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Sample records for factor mechanistic implications

  1. Structure and Mechanistic Implications of a Tryptophan Synthase Quinonoid Intermediate

    SciTech Connect

    Barends,T.; Domratcheva, T.; Kulik, V.; Blumenstein, L.; Niks, D.; Dunn, M.; Schlichting, I.

    2008-01-01

    Quinonoid intermediates play a key role in the catalytic mechanism of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzymes. Whereas structures of other PLP-bound reaction intermediates have been determined, a high-quality structure of a quinonoid species has not been reported. We present the crystal structure of the indoline quinonoid intermediate of tryptophan synthase (see figure) and discuss its implications for the enzymatic mechanism and allosteric regulation.

  2. Ferritin Diversity: Mechanistic Studies, Disease Implications, and Materials Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, Robert J.

    2011-07-01

    The study of ferritin includes a rich history of discoveries and scientific progress. Initially, the composition of ferritin was determined. Soon, it was shown that ferritin is a spherical, hollow protein. Eventually, over several decades of research, the structure and some function of this interesting protein was elucidated. However, the ferritin field was not completely satisfied. Today, for example, researchers are interested in refining the details of ferritin function, in discovering the role of ferritin in a variety of diseases, and in using ferritin for materials chemistry applications. The work presented in this dissertation highlights the progress that we have made in each of these three areas: (1) Mechanistic studies: The buffer used during horse spleen ferritin iron loading significantly influences the mineralization process and the quantity of iron deposited in ferritin. The ferrihydrite core of ferritin is crystalline and ordered when iron is loaded into ferritin in the presence of imidazole buffer. On the other hand, when iron is loaded into ferritin in the presence of MOPS buffer, the ferrihydrite core is less crystalline and less ordered, and a smaller amount of total iron is loaded in ferritin. We also show that iron can be released from the ferritin core in a non-reductive manner. The rate of Fe3+ release from horse spleen ferritin was measured using the Fe3+-specific chelator desferoxamine. We show that iron release occurs by three kinetic events. (2) Disease studies: In order to better understand iron disruption during disease states, we performed in vitro assays that mimicked chronic kidney disease. We tested the hypothesis that elevated levels of serum phosphate interrupted normal iron binding by transferrin and ferritin. Results show that phosphate competes for iron, forming an iron(III)-phosphate complex that is inaccessible to either transferrin or ferritin. Ferritin samples separated from the iron(III)-phosphate complex shows that as the

  3. Ultrasound and Microbubble Guided Drug Delivery: Mechanistic Understanding and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tzu-Yin; Wilson, Katheryne E.; Machtaler, Steven; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound mediated drug delivery using microbubbles is a safe and noninvasive approach for spatially localized drug administration. This approach can create temporary and reversible openings on cellular membranes and vessel walls (a process called “sonoporation”), allowing for enhanced transport of therapeutic agents across these natural barriers. It is generally believed that the sonoporation process is highly associated with the energetic cavitation activities (volumetric expansion, contraction, fragmentation, and collapse) of the microbubble. However, a thorough understanding of the process was unavailable until recently. Important progress on the mechanistic understanding of sonoporation and the corresponding physiological responses in vitro and in vivo has been made. Specifically, recent research shed light on the cavitation process of microbubbles and fluid motion during insonation of ultrasound, on the spatio-temporal interactions between microbubbles and cells or vessel walls, as well as on the temporal course of the subsequent biological effects. These findings have significant clinical implications on the development of optimal treatment strategies for effective drug delivery. In this article, current progress in the mechanistic understanding of ultrasound and microbubble mediated drug delivery and its implications for clinical translation is discussed. PMID:24372231

  4. A mechanistic hypothesis of the factors that enhance vulnerability to nicotine use in females

    PubMed Central

    O'Dell, Laura E.; Torres, Oscar V.

    2013-01-01

    Women are particularly more vulnerable to tobacco use than men. This review proposes a unifying hypothesis that females experience greater rewarding effects of nicotine and more intense stress produced by withdrawal than males. We also provide a neural framework whereby estrogen promotes greater rewarding effects of nicotine in females via enhanced dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc). During withdrawal, we suggest that corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) stress systems are sensitized and promote a greater suppression of dopamine release in the NAcc of females versus males. Taken together, females display enhanced nicotine reward via estrogen and amplified effects of withdrawal via stress systems. Although this framework focuses on sex differences in adult rats, it is also applied to adolescent females who display enhanced rewarding effects of nicotine, but reduced effects of withdrawal from this drug. Since females experience strong rewarding effects of nicotine, a clinical implication of our hypothesis is that specific strategies to prevent smoking initiation among females are critical. Also, anxiolytic medications may be more effective in females that experience intense stress during withdrawal. Furthermore, medications that target withdrawal should not be applied in a unilateral manner across age and sex, given that nicotine withdrawal is lower during adolescence. This review highlights key factors that promote nicotine use in females, and future studies on sex-dependent interactions of stress and reward systems are needed to test our mechanistic hypotheses. Future studies in this area will have important translational value toward reducing health disparities produced by nicotine use in females. PMID:23684991

  5. Stoichiometry of proton translocation by respiratory complex I and its mechanistic implications

    PubMed Central

    Wikström, Mårten; Hummer, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    Complex I (NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase) in the respiratory chain of mitochondria and several bacteria functions as a redox-driven proton pump that contributes to the generation of the protonmotive force across the inner mitochondrial or bacterial membrane and thus to the aerobic synthesis of ATP. The stoichiometry of proton translocation is thought to be 4 H+ per NADH oxidized (2 e-). Here we show that a H+/2 e- ratio of 3 appears more likely on the basis of the recently determined H+/ATP ratio of the mitochondrial F1Fo-ATP synthase of animal mitochondria and of a set of carefully determined ATP/2 e- ratios for different segments of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. This lower H+/2 e- ratio of 3 is independently supported by thermodynamic analyses of experiments with both mitochondria and submitochondrial particles. A reduced H+/2 e- stoichiometry of 3 has important mechanistic implications for this proton pump. In a rough mechanistic model, we suggest a concerted proton translocation mechanism in the three homologous and tightly packed antiporter-like subunits L, M, and N of the proton-translocating membrane domain of complex I. PMID:22392981

  6. Physiologically induced color-pattern changes in butterfly wings: mechanistic and evolutionary implications.

    PubMed

    Otaki, Joji M

    2008-07-01

    A mechanistic understanding of the butterfly wing color-pattern determination can be facilitated by experimental pattern changes. Here I review physiologically induced color-pattern changes in nymphalid butterflies and their mechanistic and evolutionary implications. A type of color-pattern change can be elicited by elemental changes in size and position throughout the wing, as suggested by the nymphalid groundplan. These changes of pattern elements are bi-directional and bi-sided dislocation toward or away from eyespot foci and in both proximal and distal sides of the foci. The peripheral elements are dislocated even in the eyespot-less compartments. Anterior spots are more severely modified, suggesting the existence of an anterior-posterior gradient. In one species, eyespots are transformed into white spots with remnant-like orange scales, and such patterns emerge even at the eyespot-less "imaginary" foci. A series of these color-pattern modifications probably reveal "snap-shots" of a dynamic morphogenic signal due to heterochronic uncoupling between the signaling and reception steps. The conventional gradient model can be revised to account for these observed color-pattern changes. PMID:18638480

  7. Physiologically induced color-pattern changes in butterfly wings: mechanistic and evolutionary implications.

    PubMed

    Otaki, Joji M

    2008-07-01

    A mechanistic understanding of the butterfly wing color-pattern determination can be facilitated by experimental pattern changes. Here I review physiologically induced color-pattern changes in nymphalid butterflies and their mechanistic and evolutionary implications. A type of color-pattern change can be elicited by elemental changes in size and position throughout the wing, as suggested by the nymphalid groundplan. These changes of pattern elements are bi-directional and bi-sided dislocation toward or away from eyespot foci and in both proximal and distal sides of the foci. The peripheral elements are dislocated even in the eyespot-less compartments. Anterior spots are more severely modified, suggesting the existence of an anterior-posterior gradient. In one species, eyespots are transformed into white spots with remnant-like orange scales, and such patterns emerge even at the eyespot-less "imaginary" foci. A series of these color-pattern modifications probably reveal "snap-shots" of a dynamic morphogenic signal due to heterochronic uncoupling between the signaling and reception steps. The conventional gradient model can be revised to account for these observed color-pattern changes.

  8. Pollution and skin: from epidemiological and mechanistic studies to clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Krutmann, Jean; Liu, Wei; Li, Li; Pan, Xiaochuan; Crawford, Martha; Sore, Gabrielle; Seite, Sophie

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, the health effects associated with air pollution have been intensively studied. Most studies focus on air pollution effects on the lung and the cardiovascular system. More recently, however, epidemiological and mechanistic studies suggest that air pollution is also affecting skin integrity. This state-of-the-art review focuses on this latter aspect; it was developed with the collaboration of European and Chinese board of experts with specific interests in environmental health, clinical and basic research in dermatology and cosmetic dermatology. A literature review limited to pollution and health effects and (sensitive) skin was performed using PubMed. Review and original articles were chosen. We summarize the existing scientific evidence that air pollution exerts detrimental effects on human skin, discuss potential clinical implications and suggest specific and unspecific cosmetic protective measures. PMID:25278222

  9. Molecular Targeting of Proteins by l-Homocysteine: Mechanistic Implications for Vascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Glushchenko, Alla V.; Jacobsen, Donald W.

    2010-01-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease, complications of pregnancy, cognitive impairment, and osteoporosis. That elevated homocysteine leads to vascular dysfunction may be the linking factor between these apparently unrelated pathologies. Although a growing body of evidence suggests that homocysteine plays a causal role in atherogenesis, specific mechanisms to explain the underlying pathogenesis have remained elusive. This review focuses on chemistry unique to the homocysteine molecule to explain its inherent cytotoxicity. Thus, the high pKa of the sulfhydryl group (pKa, 10.0) of homocysteine underlies its ability to form stable disulfide bonds with protein cysteine residues, and in the process, alters or impairs the function of the protein. Studies in this laboratory have identified albumin, fibronectin, transthyretin, and metallothionein as targets for homocysteinylation. In the case of albumin, the mechanism of targeting has been elucidated. Homocysteinylation of the cysteine residues of fibronectin impairs its ability to bind to fibrin. Homocysteinylation of the cysteine residues of metallothionein disrupts zinc binding by the protein and abrogates inherent superoxide dismutase activity. Thus, S-homocysteinylation of protein cysteine residues may explain mechanistically the cytotoxicity of elevated l-homocysteine. PMID:17760510

  10. Epigenetic regulation of human DCLK-1 gene during colon-carcinogenesis: clinical and mechanistic implications

    PubMed Central

    O’Connell, Malaney; Shubhashish, Sarkar

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal carcinogenesis is a multi-step process. While ~25% of colorectal cancers (CRCs) arise in patients with a family history (genetic predisposition), ~75% of CRCs are due to age-associated accumulation of epigenetic alterations which can result in the suppression of key tumor suppressor genes leading to mutations and activation of oncogenic pathways. Sporadic colon-carcinogenesis is facilitated by many molecular pathways of genomic instability which include chromosomal instability (CIN), micro-satellite instability (MSI) and CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP), leading towards loss of homeostasis and onset of neoplastic transformation. The unopposed activation of Wnt/β-catenin pathways, either due to loss of APC function or up-regulation of related stimulatory pathways, results in unopposed hyperproliferation of colonic crypts, considered the single most important risk factor for colon carcinogenesis. Hypermethylation of CpG islands within the promoters of specific genes can potentially inactivate DNA repair genes and/or critical tumor suppressor genes. Recently, CpG methylation of the 5’ promoter of human (h) DCLK1 gene was reported in many human epithelial cancers, including colorectal cancers (CRCs), resulting in the loss of expression of the canonical long isoform of DCLK1 (DCLK1-L) in hCRCs. Instead, a shorter isoform of DCLK1 (DCLK1-S) was discovered to be expressed in hCRCs, from an alternate β promoter of DCLKL1-gene; the clinical and biological implications of these novel findings, in relation to recent publications is discussed. PMID:27777940

  11. DISC1, astrocytes and neuronal maturation: a possible mechanistic link with implications for mental disorders.

    PubMed

    Xia, Meng; Zhu, Shanshan; Shevelkin, Alexey; Ross, Christopher A; Pletnikov, Mikhail

    2016-08-01

    Disrupted-In-Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) is a genetic risk factor implicated in major mental disorders that involve disrupted neurodevelopment and synaptic signaling. Glial cells such as astrocytes can regulate neuronal and synaptic maturation. Although astrocytes express DISC1, the role of astrocyte DISC1 in synaptic regulation remains unknown. We expressed a pathogenic, dominant-negative form of DISC1, mutant DISC1, in astrocytes to elucidate the roles of astrocytic DISC1 in maturation of dendrites and excitatory and inhibitory synapses using a co-culture model. We found that wild-type primary neurons exhibited less elaborated dendritic arborization when co-cultured with astrocytes that express mutant DISC1, compared to control astrocytes. We observed significantly decreased density of excitatory but not inhibitory synapses on wild-type primary neurons that were co-cultured with astrocytes that express mutant DISC1, compared to control astrocytes. Treatment of co-cultures with D-serine restored dendritic development and density of excitatory synapses. Our findings show for the first time that mutant DISC1 diminished the capacity of astrocytes to support dendritic and synaptic maturation in co-cultured neurons, and that D-serine can restore the dendritic and synaptic abnormalities. The results provide a new insight into the mechanisms whereby genetic risk factors within astrocytes could contribute the pathogenesis of psychiatric disorders. Expression of mutant DISC1 (mDISC1) in astrocytes (A) decreases binding of endogenous DISC1 to serine racemase (SR) and production of D-serine (blue triangles) from L-serine (red triangles). As a result, neurons co-cultured with mutant DISC1 astrocytes exhibit diminished dendritic arborization (DIV10) and decreased linear density of VGLUT+(red)/PSD95 +  (green) excitatory synapses (DIV14). Filled circles with arrows denote membrane transporters for D-serine. Read the Editorial Highlight for this article on doi: 10.1111/jnc.13699

  12. The therapeutic potential of tumor necrosis factor for autoimmune disease: a mechanistically based hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Kodama, S; Davis, M; Faustman, D L

    2005-08-01

    Excess levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) have been associated with certain autoimmune diseases. Under the rationale that elevated TNF-alpha levels are deleterious, several anti-TNF-alpha therapies are now available to block the action of TNF-alpha in patients with autoimmune diseases with a chronic inflammatory component to the destructive process. TNF-alpha antagonists have provided clinical benefit to many patients, but their use also is accompanied by new or aggravated forms of autoimmunity. Here we propose a mechanistically based hypothesis for the adverse events observed with TNF-alpha antagonists, and argue for the opposite therapeutic strategy: to boost or restore TNF-alpha activity as a treatment for some forms of autoimmunity. Activation defects in the transcription factor nuclear factor kappaB leave autoreactive T cells sensitive to TNF-alpha-induced apoptosis. Treatment with TNF-alpha, by destroying autoreactive T cells, appears to be a highly targeted strategy to interrupt the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes, lupus and certain forms of autoimmunity.

  13. Structures of multidrug and toxic compound extrusion transporters and their mechanistic implications.

    PubMed

    Lu, Min

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance poses grand challenges to the effective treatment of infectious diseases and cancers. Integral membrane proteins from the multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) family contribute to multidrug resistance by exporting a wide variety of therapeutic drugs across cell membranes. MATE proteins are conserved from bacteria to humans and can be categorized into the NorM, DinF and eukaryotic subfamilies. MATE transporters hold great appeal as potential therapeutic targets for curbing multidrug resistance, yet their transport mechanism remains elusive. During the past 5 years, X-ray structures of 4 NorM and DinF transporters have been reported and guided biochemical studies to reveal how MATE transporters extrude different drugs. Such advances, although substantial, have yet to be discussed collectively. Herein I review these structures and the unprecedented mechanistic insights that have been garnered from those structure-inspired studies, as well as lay out the outstanding questions that present exciting opportunities for future work. PMID:26488689

  14. Meta-analysis of postruminal microbial nitrogen flows in dairy cattle. II. Approaches to and implications of more mechanistic prediction.

    PubMed

    White, Robin R; Roman-Garcia, Yairanex; Firkins, Jeffrey L

    2016-10-01

    Several attempts have been made to quantify microbial protein flow from the rumen; however, few studies have evaluated tradeoffs between empirical equations (microbial N as a function of diet composition) and more mechanistic equations (microbial N as a function of ruminal carbohydrate digestibility). Although more mechanistic approaches have been touted because they represent more of the biology and thus might behave more appropriately in extreme scenarios, their precision is difficult to evaluate. The objective of this study was to derive equations describing starch, neutral detergent fiber (NDF), and organic matter total-tract and ruminal digestibilities; use these equations as inputs to equations predicting microbial N (MicN) production; and evaluate the implications of the different calculation methods in terms of their precision and accuracy. Models were evaluated based on root estimated variance σˆe and concordance correlation coefficients (CCC). Ruminal digestibility of NDF was positively associated with DMI and concentrations of NDF and CP and was negatively associated with concentration of starch and the ratio of acid detergent fiber to NDF (CCC=0.946). Apparent ruminal starch digestibility was increased by omasal sampling (compared with duodenal sampling), was positively associated with forage NDF and starch concentrations, and was negatively associated with wet forage DMI and total dietary DMI (CCC=0.908). Models were further evaluated by calculating fit statistics from a common data set, using stochastic simulation, and extreme scenario testing. In the stochastic simulation, variance in input variables were drawn from a multi-variate random normal distribution reflective of input measurement errors and predicting MicN while accounting for the measurement errors. Extreme scenario testing evaluated each MicN model against a data subset. When compared against an identical data set, predicting MicN empirically had the lowest prediction error, though

  15. The hydratase activity of malonate semialdehyde decarboxylase: mechanistic and evolutionary implications.

    PubMed

    Poelarends, Gerrit J; Serrano, Hector; Johnson, William H; Hoffman, David W; Whitman, Christian P

    2004-12-01

    Malonate semialdehyde decarboxylase (MSAD) is a member of the tautomerase superfamily, a group of structurally homologous proteins that have a characteristic beta-alpha-beta-fold and a catalytic amino-terminal proline. In addition to its physiological decarboxylase activity, the conversion of malonate semialdehyde to acetaldehyde and carbon dioxide, the enzyme has now been found to display a promiscuous hydratase activity, converting 2-oxo-3-pentynoate to acetopyruvate, with a kcat/Km value of 6.0 x 102 M-1 s-1. Pro-1 and Arg-75 are critical for both activities, and the pKa of Pro-1 was determined to be approximately 9.2 by a direct 15N NMR titration. These observations implicate a decarboxylation mechanism in which Pro-1 polarizes the carbonyl oxygen of substrate by hydrogen bonding and/or an electrostatic interaction. Arg-75 may position the carboxylate group into a favorable orientation for decarboxylation. Both the hydratase activity and the pKa value of Pro-1 are shared with trans-3-chloroacrylic acid dehalogenase, another tautomerase superfamily member that precedes MSAD in a bacterial degradation pathway for trans-1,3-dichloropropene. Hence, MSAD and CaaD could have evolved by divergent evolution from a common ancestral protein, retaining the necessary catalytic components for the conjugate addition of water.

  16. Treponema denticola cystalysin exhibits significant alanine racemase activity accompanied by transamination: mechanistic implications.

    PubMed Central

    Bertoldi, Mariarita; Cellini, Barbara; Paiardini, Alessandro; Di Salvo, Martino; Borri Voltattorni, Carla

    2003-01-01

    To obtain information on the reaction specificity of cystalysin from the spirochaete bacterium Treponema denticola, the interaction with L- and D-alanine has been investigated. Binding of both alanine enantiomers leads to the appearance of an external aldimine absorbing at 429 nm and of a band absorbing at 498 nm, indicative of a quinonoid species. Racemization and transamination reactions were observed to occur with both alanine isomers as substrates. The steady-state kinetic parameters for racemization, k (cat) and K (m), for L-alanine are 1.05+/-0.03 s(-1) and 10+/-1 mM respectively, whereas those for D-alanine are 1.4+/-0.1 s(-1) and 10+/-1 mM. During the reaction of cystalysin with L- or D-alanine, a time-dependent loss of beta-elimination activity occurs concomitantly with the conversion of the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) coenzyme into pyridoxamine 5'-phosphate (PMP). The catalytic efficiency of the half-transamination of L-alanine is found to be 5.3x10(-5) mM(-1) x s(-1), 5-fold higher when compared with that of D-alanine. The partition ratio between racemization and half-transamination reactions is 2.3x10(3) for L-alanine and 1.4x10(4) for D-alanine. The pH dependence of the kinetic parameters for both the reactions shows that the enzyme possesses a single ionizing residue with p K values of 6.5-6.6, which must be unprotonated for catalysis. Addition of pyruvate converts the PMP form of the enzyme back into the PLP form and causes the concomitant recovery of beta-elimination activity. In contrast with other PLP enzymes studied so far, but similar to alanine racemases, the apoform of the enzyme abstracted tritium from C4' of both (4' S)- and (4' R)-[4'-(3)H]PMP in the presence of pyruvate. Together with molecular modelling of the putative binding sites of L- and D-alanine at the active site of the enzyme, the implications of these studies for the mechanisms of the side reactions catalysed by cystalysin are discussed. PMID:12519070

  17. Rosette-shaped calcite structures at surfaces: mechanistic implications for CaCO3 crystallization.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sung Ho; Choi, Insung S

    2010-07-01

    Biomineralization is believed to be achieved by the intimate cooperation of soluble macromolecules and an insoluble matrix at the specific inorganic-organic interface. It has been reported that positively charged matrices play an important role in controlling the structure of CaCO(3) at surfaces, although detailed mechanisms remain unclear. In this work, we studied the transformation from amorphous CaCO(3) to calcite crystals on surfaces by using thin films of poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) and its quaternized form. The positively charged PDMAEMA film was found to possess unique properties for CaCO(3) crystallization: individually separated, single calcite crystals were formed on the PDMAEMA film in the absence of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA), while circularly fused calcite crystals were formed in the presence of PAA. The circularly fused (rosette-shaped) calcite crystals could be changed from a completely packed rosette to a ring-shaped, hollow structure by tuning the crystallization conditions. A number of factors, such as reaction time, amount of (NH(4))(2)CO(3), concentration of PAA, and charge of matrix-films, were varied systematically, and we now propose a mechanism based on these observations.

  18. Mechanistic heterogeneity in site recognition by the structurally homologous DNA-binding domains of the ETS family transcription factors Ets-1 and PU.1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuo; Linde, Miles H; Munde, Manoj; Carvalho, Victor D; Wilson, W David; Poon, Gregory M K

    2014-08-01

    ETS family transcription factors regulate diverse genes through binding at cognate DNA sites that overlap substantially in sequence. The DNA-binding domains of ETS proteins (ETS domains) are highly conserved structurally yet share limited amino acid homology. To define the mechanistic implications of sequence diversity within the ETS family, we characterized the thermodynamics and kinetics of DNA site recognition by the ETS domains of Ets-1 and PU.1, which represent the extremes in amino acid divergence among ETS proteins. Even though the two ETS domains bind their optimal sites with similar affinities under physiologic conditions, their nature of site recognition differs strikingly in terms of the role of hydration and counter ion release. The data suggest two distinct mechanisms wherein Ets-1 follows a "dry" mechanism that rapidly parses sites through electrostatic interactions and direct protein-DNA contacts, whereas PU.1 utilizes hydration to interrogate sequence-specific sites and form a long-lived complex relative to the Ets-1 counterpart. The kinetic persistence of the high affinity PU.1 · DNA complex may be relevant to an emerging role of PU.1, but not Ets-1, as a pioneer transcription factor in vivo. In addition, PU.1 activity is critical to the development and function of macrophages and lymphocytes, which present osmotically variable environments, and hydration-dependent specificity may represent an important regulatory mechanism in vivo, a hypothesis that finds support in gene expression profiles of primary murine macrophages.

  19. Mechanistic and biological significance of DNA methyltransferase 1 upregulated by growth factors in human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Fang, Qin-Liang; Yin, Yi-Rui; Xie, Cheng-Rong; Zhang, Sheng; Zhao, Wen-Xiu; Pan, Chao; Wang, Xiao-Min; Yin, Zhen-Yu

    2015-02-01

    Dysregulation of growth factor signaling plays a pivotal role in controlling the malignancy phenotype and progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the precise oncogenic mechanisms underlying transcription regulation of certain tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) by growth factors are poorly understood. In the present study, we report a novel insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) pathway that mediates de novo DNA methylation and TSG (such as DLC1 and CHD5) silencing by upregulation of the DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) via an AKT/β-transducin repeat-containing protein (βTrCP)-mediated ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in HCC. Analysis of DNA methylation in CpG islands of target genes revealed high co-localization of DNMT1 and DNMT3B on the promoters of TSGs associated with enhanced CpG hypermethylation. Our results point to a novel epigenetic mechanism for growth factor-mediated repression of TSG transcription that involves DNA methylation. PMID:25420499

  20. Network-based discovery through mechanistic systems biology. Implications for applications--SMEs and drug discovery: where the action is.

    PubMed

    Benson, Neil

    2015-08-01

    Phase II attrition remains the most important challenge for drug discovery. Tackling the problem requires improved understanding of the complexity of disease biology. Systems biology approaches to this problem can, in principle, deliver this. This article reviews the reports of the application of mechanistic systems models to drug discovery questions and discusses the added value. Although we are on the journey to the virtual human, the length, path and rate of learning from this remain an open question. Success will be dependent on the will to invest and make the most of the insight generated along the way.

  1. Network-based discovery through mechanistic systems biology. Implications for applications--SMEs and drug discovery: where the action is.

    PubMed

    Benson, Neil

    2015-08-01

    Phase II attrition remains the most important challenge for drug discovery. Tackling the problem requires improved understanding of the complexity of disease biology. Systems biology approaches to this problem can, in principle, deliver this. This article reviews the reports of the application of mechanistic systems models to drug discovery questions and discusses the added value. Although we are on the journey to the virtual human, the length, path and rate of learning from this remain an open question. Success will be dependent on the will to invest and make the most of the insight generated along the way. PMID:26464089

  2. Computational Identification of Mechanistic Factors That Determine the Timing and Intensity of the Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraja, Sridevi; Reifman, Jaques; Mitrophanov, Alexander Y.

    2015-01-01

    Timely resolution of inflammation is critical for the restoration of homeostasis in injured or infected tissue. Chronic inflammation is often characterized by a persistent increase in the concentrations of inflammatory cells and molecular mediators, whose distinct amount and timing characteristics offer an opportunity to identify effective therapeutic regulatory targets. Here, we used our recently developed computational model of local inflammation to identify potential targets for molecular interventions and to investigate the effects of individual and combined inhibition of such targets. This was accomplished via the development and application of computational strategies involving the simulation and analysis of thousands of inflammatory scenarios. We found that modulation of macrophage influx and efflux is an effective potential strategy to regulate the amount of inflammatory cells and molecular mediators in both normal and chronic inflammatory scenarios. We identified three molecular mediators − tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), and the chemokine CXCL8 − as potential molecular targets whose individual or combined inhibition may robustly regulate both the amount and timing properties of the kinetic trajectories for neutrophils and macrophages in chronic inflammation. Modulation of macrophage flux, as well as of the abundance of TNF-α, TGF-β, and CXCL8, may improve the resolution of chronic inflammation. PMID:26633296

  3. Computational Modelling Approaches on Epigenetic Factors in Neurodegenerative and Autoimmune Diseases and Their Mechanistic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Khanam Irin, Afroza; Tom Kodamullil, Alpha; Gündel, Michaela; Hofmann-Apitius, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative as well as autoimmune diseases have unclear aetiologies, but an increasing number of evidences report for a combination of genetic and epigenetic alterations that predispose for the development of disease. This review examines the major milestones in epigenetics research in the context of diseases and various computational approaches developed in the last decades to unravel new epigenetic modifications. However, there are limited studies that systematically link genetic and epigenetic alterations of DNA to the aetiology of diseases. In this work, we demonstrate how disease-related epigenetic knowledge can be systematically captured and integrated with heterogeneous information into a functional context using Biological Expression Language (BEL). This novel methodology, based on BEL, enables us to integrate epigenetic modifications such as DNA methylation or acetylation of histones into a specific disease network. As an example, we depict the integration of epigenetic and genetic factors in a functional context specific to Parkinson's disease (PD) and Multiple Sclerosis (MS). PMID:26636108

  4. Tumor Necrosis Factor: A Mechanistic Link between Angiotensin-II-Induced Cardiac Inflammation and Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Duerrschmid, Clemens; Trial, JoAnn; Wang, Yanlin; Entman, Mark L.; Haudek, Sandra B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Continuous angiotensin-II (Ang-II) infusion induced the uptake of monocytic fibroblast precursors that initiated the development of cardiac fibrosis; these cells and concurrent fibrosis were absent in mice lacking tumor necrosis factor-alpha receptor 1 (TNFR1). We now investigated their cellular origin and temporal uptake, and the involvement of TNFR1 in monocyte-to-fibroblast differentiation. Methods and Results Within a day, Ang-II induced a pro-inflammatory environment characterized by production of inflammatory chemokines, cytokines, and TH1-interleukins and uptake of bone marrow-derived M1-cells. After a week, the cardiac environment changed to profibrotic with growth-factor and TH2-interleukin synthesis, uptake of bone marrow-derived M2-cells, and presence of M2-related fibroblasts. TNFR1 signaling was not necessary for early M1 uptake, but its absence diminished the amount of M2-cells. TNFR1-KO hearts also showed reduced levels of cytokine expression, but not of TH-related lymphokines. Reconstitution of wild-type bone marrow into TNFR1-KO mice was sufficient to restore M2 uptake, upregulation of pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic genes, and development of fibrosis in response to Ang-II. We also developed an in vitro mouse monocyte-to-fibroblast-maturation assay that confirmed the essential role of TNFR1 in the sequential progression of monocyte activation and fibroblast formation. Conclusions Development of cardiac fibrosis in response to Ang-II was mediated by myeloid precursors and consisted of two stages. A primary M1 inflammatory response was followed by a subsequent M2 fibrotic response. While the first phase appeared to be independent of TNFR1 signaling, the later phase (and development of fibrosis) was abrogated by deletion of TNFR1. PMID:25550440

  5. Structural And Mechanistic Insights Into Nerve Growth Factor Interactions With the Trka And P75 Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Wehrman, T.; He, X.; Raab, B.; Dukipatti, A.; Blau, H.; Garcia, K.C.; /Howard Hughes Med. Inst. /Stanford U., Med. School

    2007-07-13

    Nerve growth factor engages two structurally distinct transmembrane receptors, TrkA and p75, which have been proposed to create a ''high-affinity'' NGF binding site through formation of a ternary TrkA/NGF/p75 complex. To define a structural basis for the high-affinity site, we have determined the three-dimensional structure of a complete extracellular domain of TrkA complexed with NGF. The complex reveals a crab-shaped homodimeric TrkA structure, but a mechanism for p75 coordination is not obvious. We investigated the heterodimerization of membrane-bound TrkA and p75, on intact mammalian cells, using a beta-gal protein-protein interaction system. We find that NGF dimerizes TrkA and that p75 exists on the cell surface as a preformed oligomer that is not dissociated by NGF. We find no evidence for a direct TrkA/p75 interaction. We propose that TrkA and p75 likely communicate through convergence of downstream signaling pathways and/or shared adaptor molecules, rather than through direct extracellular interactions.

  6. Optimal targeting of HER2-PI3K signaling in breast cancer: mechanistic insights and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Rexer, Brent N; Arteaga, Carlos L

    2013-07-01

    The combination of a PI3K inhibitor with trastuzumab has been shown to be effective at overcoming trastuzumab resistance in models of HER2(+) breast cancer by inhibiting HER2-PI3K-FOXO-survivin signaling. In this review the potential clinical implications of these findings are discussed.

  7. Distinct properties of semiquinone species detected at the ubiquinol oxidation Qo site of cytochrome bc1 and their mechanistic implications.

    PubMed

    Pietras, Rafał; Sarewicz, Marcin; Osyczka, Artur

    2016-05-01

    The two-electron ubiquinol oxidation or ubiquinone reduction typically involves semiquinone (SQ) intermediates. Natural engineering of ubiquinone binding sites of bioenergetic enzymes secures that SQ is sufficiently stabilized, so that it does not leave the site to membranous environment before full oxidation/reduction is completed. The ubiquinol oxidation Qo site of cytochrome bc1 (mitochondrial complex III, cytochrome b6f in plants) has been considered an exception with catalytic reactions assumed to involve highly unstable SQ or not to involve any SQ intermediate. This view seemed consistent with long-standing difficulty in detecting any reaction intermediates at the Qo site. New perspective on this issue is now offered by recent, independent reports on detection of SQ in this site. Each of the described SQs seems to have different spectroscopic properties leaving space for various interpretations and mechanistic considerations. Here, we comparatively reflect on those properties and their consequences on the SQ stabilization, the involvement of SQ in catalytic reactions, including proton transfers, and the reactivity of SQ with oxygen associated with superoxide generation activity of the Qo site.

  8. Distinct properties of semiquinone species detected at the ubiquinol oxidation Qo site of cytochrome bc1 and their mechanistic implications

    PubMed Central

    Sarewicz, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    The two-electron ubiquinol oxidation or ubiquinone reduction typically involves semiquinone (SQ) intermediates. Natural engineering of ubiquinone binding sites of bioenergetic enzymes secures that SQ is sufficiently stabilized, so that it does not leave the site to membranous environment before full oxidation/reduction is completed. The ubiquinol oxidation Qo site of cytochrome bc1 (mitochondrial complex III, cytochrome b6f in plants) has been considered an exception with catalytic reactions assumed to involve highly unstable SQ or not to involve any SQ intermediate. This view seemed consistent with long-standing difficulty in detecting any reaction intermediates at the Qo site. New perspective on this issue is now offered by recent, independent reports on detection of SQ in this site. Each of the described SQs seems to have different spectroscopic properties leaving space for various interpretations and mechanistic considerations. Here, we comparatively reflect on those properties and their consequences on the SQ stabilization, the involvement of SQ in catalytic reactions, including proton transfers, and the reactivity of SQ with oxygen associated with superoxide generation activity of the Qo site. PMID:27194483

  9. Distinct properties of semiquinone species detected at the ubiquinol oxidation Qo site of cytochrome bc1 and their mechanistic implications.

    PubMed

    Pietras, Rafał; Sarewicz, Marcin; Osyczka, Artur

    2016-05-01

    The two-electron ubiquinol oxidation or ubiquinone reduction typically involves semiquinone (SQ) intermediates. Natural engineering of ubiquinone binding sites of bioenergetic enzymes secures that SQ is sufficiently stabilized, so that it does not leave the site to membranous environment before full oxidation/reduction is completed. The ubiquinol oxidation Qo site of cytochrome bc1 (mitochondrial complex III, cytochrome b6f in plants) has been considered an exception with catalytic reactions assumed to involve highly unstable SQ or not to involve any SQ intermediate. This view seemed consistent with long-standing difficulty in detecting any reaction intermediates at the Qo site. New perspective on this issue is now offered by recent, independent reports on detection of SQ in this site. Each of the described SQs seems to have different spectroscopic properties leaving space for various interpretations and mechanistic considerations. Here, we comparatively reflect on those properties and their consequences on the SQ stabilization, the involvement of SQ in catalytic reactions, including proton transfers, and the reactivity of SQ with oxygen associated with superoxide generation activity of the Qo site. PMID:27194483

  10. The Role of {Ca2+ / CO32-} Ratio in Calcite Dissolution and Growth: Implications for Mechanistic Control of Biomineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arvidson, R. S.; Davis, K. J.; Luttge, A.

    2003-12-01

    The hypothesis that secular variations in the Mg/Ca ratio of seawater have exerted a fundamental control over the mineralogy and abundance of both skeletal and nonskeletal carbonates has received substantial support from both experimental and field data. In this context, ongoing efforts directed at understanding the mechanistic basis for interaction of Mg and Sr with carbonate mineral surfaces during growth (e.g., Davis et al. 2000) are of obvious importance. However, a growing body of experimental dissolution data records additional site-specific interactions between the surface and dissolved free carbon species and carbonate complexes. We suggest these data may provide additional insight into mechanisms by which organisms maintain skeletal integrity under variable conditions, including the possible development of surface precursors of mixed carbonate phases. For example, recent data have shown that kink dynamics along the fast, obtuse (+) step directions are highly sensitive to the ratio of magnesium to carbonate ion. We have used these observations as the basis for exploration of the relationship between the simple ratio of dissolved calcium to carbonate ion and surface dynamics. In sets of carefully designed experiments, we sought to maintain (1) a constant distance from equilibrium by varying {Ca2+ / CO32-} ratio at constant IAP, (2) constant {Ca2+ / CO32-} at variable IAP, (3) all under conditions of both over- and undersaturation ranging from far to close to equilibrium. Using an integrated approach, observations were made over a wide range of space and time scales using both AFM and VSI (vertical scanning interferometry). These coupled observations provide resolution of the relationship between the overall rate of reaction (total change in surface topography) and detailed observations of characteristic step dynamics developed during both dissolution and growth. Our preliminary results confirm a strong sensitivity of the conventional fast step direction to

  11. Mutagenic scan of the H-N-H motif of colicin E9: implications for the mechanistic enzymology of colicins, homing enzymes and apoptotic endonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Walker, David C.; Georgiou, Theonie; Pommer, Ansgar J.; Walker, Daniel; Moore, Geoffrey R.; Kleanthous, Colin; James, Richard

    2002-01-01

    Colicin E9 is a microbial toxin that kills bacteria through random degradation of chromosomal DNA. Within the active site of the cytotoxic endonuclease domain of colicin E9 (the E9 DNase) is a 32 amino acid motif found in the H-N-H group of homing endonucleases. Crystal structures of the E9 DNase have implicated several conserved residues of the H-N-H motif in the mechanism of DNA hydrolysis. We have used mutagenesis to test the involvement of these key residues in colicin toxicity, metal ion binding and catalysis. Our data show, for the first time, that the H-N-H motif is the site of DNA binding and that Mg2+-dependent cleavage of double-stranded DNA is responsible for bacterial cell death. We demonstrate that more active site residues are required for catalysis in the presence of Mg2+ ions than transition metals, consistent with the recent hypothesis that the E9 DNase hydrolyses DNA by two distinct, cation-dependent catalytic mechanisms. The roles of individual amino acids within the H-N-H motif are discussed in the context of the available structural information on this and related DNases and we address the possible mechanistic similarities between caspase-activated DNases, responsible for the degradation of chromatin in eukaryotic apoptosis, and H-N-H DNases. PMID:12136104

  12. Parent Involvement: Influencing Factors and Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pena, Delores C.

    2000-01-01

    Investigated the involvement of Mexican American parents in their children's elementary schools. Interviews with teachers, parents, and administrators and observations of parent activities indicated that parent involvement was influenced by factors like language, parent cliques, parent education, school staff attitudes, cultural factors, and…

  13. FACTORS IMPLICATED IN AMPHIBIAN POPULATION DECLINES IN THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Factors adversely affecting amphibian populations in the US were evaluated using information from species accounts written in a standardized format by multiple authors (Volume 2 of this book). For each species, factors implicated by the authors (i.e., known or suspected) as affec...

  14. Involvement in Denitrification is Beneficial to the Biofilm Lifestyle of Comamonas testosteroni: A Mechanistic Study and Its Environmental Implications.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yichao; Shukal, Sudha; Mukherjee, Manisha; Cao, Bin

    2015-10-01

    Comamonas is one of the most abundant microorganisms in biofilm communities driving wastewater treatment. Little has been known about the role of this group of organisms and their biofilm mode of life. In this study, using Comamonas testosteroni as a model organism, we demonstrated the involvement of Comamonas biofilms in denitrification under bulk aerobic conditions and elucidated the influence of nitrate respiration on its biofilm lifestyle. Our results showed that C. testosteroni could use nitrate as the sole electron acceptor for anaerobic growth. Under bulk aerobic condition, biofilms of C. testosteroni were capable of reducing nitrate, and intriguingly, nitrate reduction significantly enhanced viability of the biofilm-cells and reduced cell detachment from the biofilms. Nitrate respiration was further shown to play an essential role in maintaining high cell viability in the biofilms. RNA-seq analysis, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed a higher level of bis(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) in cells respiring on nitrate than those grown aerobically (1.3 × 10(-4) fmol/cell vs 7.9 × 10(-6) fmol/cell; P < 0.01). C-di-GMP is one universal signaling molecule that regulates the biofilm mode of life, and a higher c-di-GMP concentration reduces cell detachment from biofilms. Taking these factors together, this study reveals that nitrate reduction occurs in mature biofilms of C. testosteroni under bulk aerobic conditions, and the respiratory reduction of nitrate is beneficial to the biofilm lifestyle by providing more metabolic energy to maintain high viability and a higher level of c-di-GMP to reduce cell detachment. PMID:26327221

  15. Mechanistic, mathematical model to predict the dynamics of tissue genesis in bone defects via mechanical feedback and mediation of biochemical factors.

    PubMed

    Moore, Shannon R; Saidel, Gerald M; Knothe, Ulf; Knothe Tate, Melissa L

    2014-06-01

    The link between mechanics and biology in the generation and the adaptation of bone has been well studied in context of skeletal development and fracture healing. Yet, the prediction of tissue genesis within - and the spatiotemporal healing of - postnatal defects, necessitates a quantitative evaluation of mechano-biological interactions using experimental and clinical parameters. To address this current gap in knowledge, this study aims to develop a mechanistic mathematical model of tissue genesis using bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) to represent of a class of factors that may coordinate bone healing. Specifically, we developed a mechanistic, mathematical model to predict the dynamics of tissue genesis by periosteal progenitor cells within a long bone defect surrounded by periosteum and stabilized via an intramedullary nail. The emergent material properties and mechanical environment associated with nascent tissue genesis influence the strain stimulus sensed by progenitor cells within the periosteum. Using a mechanical finite element model, periosteal surface strains are predicted as a function of emergent, nascent tissue properties. Strains are then input to a mechanistic mathematical model, where mechanical regulation of BMP-2 production mediates rates of cellular proliferation, differentiation and tissue production, to predict healing outcomes. A parametric approach enables the spatial and temporal prediction of endochondral tissue regeneration, assessed as areas of cartilage and mineralized bone, as functions of radial distance from the periosteum and time. Comparing model results to histological outcomes from two previous studies of periosteum-mediated bone regeneration in a common ovine model, it was shown that mechanistic models incorporating mechanical feedback successfully predict patterns (spatial) and trends (temporal) of bone tissue regeneration. The novel model framework presented here integrates a mechanistic feedback system based on the

  16. [Function and expression of transcription factors implicated in gonadal differentiation].

    PubMed

    Morohashi, K

    1998-07-01

    Several transcription factors such as SRY, DAX-1, Ad4BP/SF-1, WT-1 and SOX -9, have been revealed to be implicated in gonadal development by analyzing the genetic disorders of human and the gene disrupted mice. All of these transcription factors are expressed in the early stage of the gonadal development and the expression profiles during the gonadal development are clearly different between the two sexes. Functions of the transcription factors are discussed by referring genes under the control of these factors. Effects of endocrine disruptants on the expression of Ad4BP/SF-1 in the fetal gonads was also discussed. PMID:9702047

  17. Human Factors and Computer Interfaces--Implications for Artificial Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris, Cathleen A.

    1987-01-01

    This second in a series of articles on artificial intelligence emphasizes human factors. The design of video display units and keyboards is discussed, the organizational structure of human memory is described, humans are examined as information processors using inductive and deductive reasoning, and educational implications are explored. (LRW)

  18. The FIRO model of family therapy: implications of factor analysis.

    PubMed

    Hafner, R J; Ross, M W

    1989-11-01

    Schutz's FIRO model contains three main elements: inclusion, control, and affection. It is used widely in mental health research and practice, but has received little empirical validation. The present study is based on factor analysis of the resources to FIRO questionnaire of 120 normal couples and 191 couples who were attending a clinic for marital/psychiatric problems. Results confirmed the validity of the FIRO model for women only. The differences between the sexes reflected a considerable degree of sex-role stereotyping, the clinical implications of which are discussed.

  19. Submandibular gland tumors. Adverse histologic factors and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Weber, R S; Byers, R M; Petit, B; Wolf, P; Ang, K; Luna, M

    1990-09-01

    We reviewed our 41-year experience with tumors of the submandibular gland to determine what factors influence outcome and their implications for treatment. The most common benign neoplasm was pleomorphic adenoma (21), while among malignant tumors the adenoid cystic variety (37) predominated. For the 86 patients who had malignant tumors, the 2- and 5-year survivals by the life table method were 82% and 69%, respectively. For patients with malignant tumors, histology, size, perineural invasion, and prior treatment did not affect overall survival. Factors adversely affecting outcome were extraglandular soft-tissue extension and lymph node metastasis. Local-regional control was enhanced in patients with soft-tissue extension if they were treated by surgery followed by radiotherapy rather than by surgery alone.

  20. The Role of Parathyroid Hormone-Related Protein (PTHrP) in Osteoblast Response to Microgravity: Mechanistic Implications for Osteoporosis Development.

    PubMed

    Camirand, Anne; Goltzman, David; Gupta, Ajay; Kaouass, Mohammadi; Panda, Dibyendu; Karaplis, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged skeletal unloading through bedrest results in bone loss similar to that observed in elderly osteoporotic patients, but with an accelerated timeframe. This rapid effect on weight-bearing bones is also observed in astronauts who can lose up to 2% of their bone mass per month spent in Space. Despite the important implications for Spaceflight travelers and bedridden patients, the exact mechanisms involved in disuse osteoporosis have not been elucidated. Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) regulates many physiological processes including skeletal development, and has been proposed as a mechanosensor. To investigate the role of PTHrP in microgravity-induced bone loss, trabecular and calvarial osteoblasts (TOs and COs) from Pthrp +/+ and -/- mice were subjected to actual Spaceflight for 6 days (Foton M3 satellite). Pthrp +/+, +/- and -/- osteoblasts were also exposed to simulated microgravity for periods varying from 6 days to 6 weeks. While COs displayed little change in viability in 0g, viability of all TOs rapidly decreased in inverse proportion to PTHrP expression levels. Furthermore, Pthrp+/+ TOs displayed a sharp viability decline after 2 weeks at 0g. Microarray analysis of Pthrp+/+ TOs after 6 days in simulated 0g revealed expression changes in genes encoding prolactins, apoptosis/survival molecules, bone metabolism and extra-cellular matrix composition proteins, chemokines, insulin-like growth factor family members and Wnt-related signalling molecules. 88% of 0g-induced expression changes in Pthrp+/+ cells overlapped those caused by Pthrp ablation in normal gravity, and pulsatile treatment with PTHrP1-36 not only reversed a large proportion of 0g-induced effects in Pthrp+/+ TOs but maintained viability over 6-week exposure to microgravity. Our results confirm PTHrP efficacy as an anabolic agent to prevent microgravity-induced cell death in TOs. PMID:27463808

  1. The Role of Parathyroid Hormone-Related Protein (PTHrP) in Osteoblast Response to Microgravity: Mechanistic Implications for Osteoporosis Development

    PubMed Central

    Camirand, Anne; Goltzman, David; Gupta, Ajay; Kaouass, Mohammadi; Panda, Dibyendu; Karaplis, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged skeletal unloading through bedrest results in bone loss similar to that observed in elderly osteoporotic patients, but with an accelerated timeframe. This rapid effect on weight-bearing bones is also observed in astronauts who can lose up to 2% of their bone mass per month spent in Space. Despite the important implications for Spaceflight travelers and bedridden patients, the exact mechanisms involved in disuse osteoporosis have not been elucidated. Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) regulates many physiological processes including skeletal development, and has been proposed as a mechanosensor. To investigate the role of PTHrP in microgravity-induced bone loss, trabecular and calvarial osteoblasts (TOs and COs) from Pthrp +/+ and -/- mice were subjected to actual Spaceflight for 6 days (Foton M3 satellite). Pthrp +/+, +/- and -/- osteoblasts were also exposed to simulated microgravity for periods varying from 6 days to 6 weeks. While COs displayed little change in viability in 0g, viability of all TOs rapidly decreased in inverse proportion to PTHrP expression levels. Furthermore, Pthrp+/+ TOs displayed a sharp viability decline after 2 weeks at 0g. Microarray analysis of Pthrp+/+ TOs after 6 days in simulated 0g revealed expression changes in genes encoding prolactins, apoptosis/survival molecules, bone metabolism and extra-cellular matrix composition proteins, chemokines, insulin-like growth factor family members and Wnt-related signalling molecules. 88% of 0g-induced expression changes in Pthrp+/+ cells overlapped those caused by Pthrp ablation in normal gravity, and pulsatile treatment with PTHrP1-36 not only reversed a large proportion of 0g-induced effects in Pthrp+/+ TOs but maintained viability over 6-week exposure to microgravity. Our results confirm PTHrP efficacy as an anabolic agent to prevent microgravity-induced cell death in TOs. PMID:27463808

  2. Overlapping 16p13.11 deletion and gain of copies variations associated with childhood onset psychosis include genes with mechanistic implications for autism associated pathways: Two case reports.

    PubMed

    Brownstein, Catherine A; Kleiman, Robin J; Engle, Elizabeth C; Towne, Meghan C; D'Angelo, Eugene J; Yu, Timothy W; Beggs, Alan H; Picker, Jonathan; Fogler, Jason M; Carroll, Devon; Schmitt, Rachel C O; Wolff, Robert R; Shen, Yiping; Lip, Va; Bilguvar, Kaya; Kim, April; Tembulkar, Sahil; O'Donnell, Kyle; Gonzalez-Heydrich, Joseph

    2016-05-01

    Copy number variability at 16p13.11 has been associated with intellectual disability, autism, schizophrenia, epilepsy, and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. Adolescent/adult- onset psychosis has been reported in a subset of these cases. Here, we report on two children with CNVs in 16p13.11 that developed psychosis before the age of 7. The genotype and neuropsychiatric abnormalities of these patients highlight several overlapping genes that have possible mechanistic relevance to pathways previously implicated in Autism Spectrum Disorders, including the mTOR signaling and the ubiquitin-proteasome cascades. A careful screening of the 16p13.11 region is warranted in patients with childhood onset psychosis. PMID:26887912

  3. ATP-binding site of adenylate kinase: mechanistic implications of its homology with ras-encoded p21, F1-ATPase, and other nucleotide-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Fry, D C; Kuby, S A; Mildvan, A S

    1986-02-01

    The MgATP binding site of adenylate kinase, located by a combination of NMR and x-ray diffraction, is near three protein segments, five to seven amino acids in length, that are homologous in sequence to segments found in other nucleotide-binding phosphotransferases, such as myosin and F1-ATPase, ras p21 and transducin GTPases, and cAMP-dependent and src protein kinases, suggesting equivalent mechanistic roles of these segments in all of these proteins. Segment 1 is a glycine-rich flexible loop that, on adenylate kinase, may control access to the ATP-binding site by changing its conformation. Segment 2 is an alpha-helix containing two hydrophobic residues that interact with the adenine-ribose moiety of ATP, and a lysine that may bind to the beta- and gamma-phosphates of ATP. Segment 3 is a hydrophobic strand of parallel beta-pleated sheet, terminated by a carboxylate, that flanks the triphosphate binding site. The various reported mutations of ras p21 that convert it to a transforming agent all appear to involve segment 1, and such substitutions may alter the properties of p21 by hindering a conformational change at this segment. In F1-ATPase, the flexible loop may, by its position, control both the accessibility and the ATP/ADP equilibrium constant on the enzyme.

  4. The S0 state of the water oxidizing complex in photosystem II: pH dependence of the EPR split signal induction and mechanistic implications.

    PubMed

    Sjöholm, Johannes; Havelius, Kajsa G V; Mamedov, Fikret; Styring, Stenbjörn

    2009-10-13

    5 K and the S(0) --> S(1) and S(1) --> S(2) transitions at room temperature. The result allows mechanistic conclusions concerning differences between the hydrogen bond pattern around Y(Z) in the S(0) and S(1) states. PMID:19736946

  5. Hierarchical Structure and General Factor Saturation of the Anxiety Sensitivity Index: Evidence and Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zinbarg, Richard E.; Barlow, David H.; Brown, Timothy A.

    1997-01-01

    A hierarchical factor model of the Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI) (S. Reiss and others, 1986) was evaluated with 432 psychiatric outpatients and 32 people with no mental disorder. Results support a hierarchical factor structure of three lower order factors and one higher order factor. Implications for the assessment of anxiety sensitivity are…

  6. Mechanistic Implications of the Unique Structural Features and Dimerization of the Cytoplasmic Domain of the Pseudomonas Sigma Regulator, PupR

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Jaime L.; Balbo, Andrea; Neau, David B.; Chakravarthy, Srinivas; Zhao, Huaying; Sinha, Sangita C.; Colbert, Christopher L.

    2015-09-29

    Gram-negative bacteria tightly regulate intracellular levels of iron, an essential nutrient. To ensure this tight regulation, some outer membrane TonB-dependent transporters (TBDTs) that are responsible for iron import stimulate their own transcription in response to extracellular binding by an iron-laden siderophore. This process is mediated by an inner membrane sigma regulator protein (an anti-sigma factor) that transduces an unknown periplasmic signal from the TBDT to release an intracellular sigma factor from the inner membrane, which ultimately upregulates TBDT transcription. Here we use the Pseudomonas putida ferric-pseudobactin BN7/BN8 sigma regulator, PupR, as a model system to understand the molecular mechanism of this conserved class of sigma regulators. We have determined the X-ray crystal structure of the cytoplasmic anti-sigma domain (ASD) of PupR to 2.0 Å. Size exclusion chromatography, small angle X-ray scattering, and sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation, all indicate that in contrast to other ASDs, the PupR-ASD exists as a dimer in solution. Mutagenesis of residues at the dimer interface identified from the crystal structure disrupts dimerization and protein stability, as determined by sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation and thermal denaturation circular dichroism spectroscopy. Lastly, these combined results suggest that this type of inner membrane sigma regulator may utilize an unusual mechanism to sequester their cognate sigma factors and prevent transcription activation.

  7. Mechanistic Implications of the Unique Structural Features and Dimerization of the Cytoplasmic Domain of the Pseudomonas Sigma Regulator, PupR

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jensen, Jaime L.; Balbo, Andrea; Neau, David B.; Chakravarthy, Srinivas; Zhao, Huaying; Sinha, Sangita C.; Colbert, Christopher L.

    2015-09-29

    Gram-negative bacteria tightly regulate intracellular levels of iron, an essential nutrient. To ensure this tight regulation, some outer membrane TonB-dependent transporters (TBDTs) that are responsible for iron import stimulate their own transcription in response to extracellular binding by an iron-laden siderophore. This process is mediated by an inner membrane sigma regulator protein (an anti-sigma factor) that transduces an unknown periplasmic signal from the TBDT to release an intracellular sigma factor from the inner membrane, which ultimately upregulates TBDT transcription. Here we use the Pseudomonas putida ferric-pseudobactin BN7/BN8 sigma regulator, PupR, as a model system to understand the molecular mechanism ofmore » this conserved class of sigma regulators. We have determined the X-ray crystal structure of the cytoplasmic anti-sigma domain (ASD) of PupR to 2.0 Å. Size exclusion chromatography, small angle X-ray scattering, and sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation, all indicate that in contrast to other ASDs, the PupR-ASD exists as a dimer in solution. Mutagenesis of residues at the dimer interface identified from the crystal structure disrupts dimerization and protein stability, as determined by sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation and thermal denaturation circular dichroism spectroscopy. Lastly, these combined results suggest that this type of inner membrane sigma regulator may utilize an unusual mechanism to sequester their cognate sigma factors and prevent transcription activation.« less

  8. The mare reproductive loss syndrome and the eastern tent caterpillar: a toxicokinetic/statistical analysis with clinical, epidemiologic, and mechanistic implications.

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Manu; Gantz, Marie G; Tobin, Thomas; Harkins, J Daniel; Bosken, Jeffrey M; Hughes, Charlie; Harrison, Lenn R; Bernard, William V; Richter, Dana L; Fitzgerald, Terrence D

    2003-01-01

    During 2001, central Kentucky experienced acute transient epidemics of early and late fetal losses, pericarditis, and unilateral endophthalmitis, collectively referred to as mare reproductive loss syndrome (MRLS). A toxicokinetic/statistical analysis of experimental and field MRLS data was conducted using accelerated failure time (AFT) analysis of abortions following administration of Eastern tent caterpillars (ETCs; 100 or 50 g/day or 100 g of irradiated caterpillars/day) to late-term pregnant mares. In addition, 2001 late-term fetal loss field data were used in the analysis. Experimental data were fitted by AFT analysis at a high (P <.0001) significance. Times to first abortion ("lag time") and abortion rates were dose dependent. Lag times decreased and abortion rates increased exponentially with dose. Calculated dose x response data curves allow interpretation of abortion data in terms of "intubated ETC equivalents." Analysis suggested that field exposure to ETCs in 2001 in central Kentucky commenced on approximately April 27, was initially equivalent to approximately 5 g of intubated ETCs/day, and increased to approximately 30 g/day at the outbreak peak. This analysis accounts for many aspects of the epidemiology, clinical presentations, and manifestations of MRLS. It allows quantitative interpretation of experimental and field MRLS data and has implications for the basic mechanisms underlying MRLS. The results support suggestions that MRLS is caused by exposure to or ingestion of ETCs. The results also show that high levels of ETC exposure produce intense, focused outbreaks of MRLS, closely linked in time and place to dispersing ETCs, as occurred in central Kentucky in 2001. With less intense exposure, lag time is longer and abortions tend to spread out over time and may occur out of phase with ETC exposure, obscuring both diagnosis of this syndrome and the role of the caterpillars.

  9. The Factors Underlying Sex Role Perception and Their Implications for Educators and Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Linda; Rossett, Allison

    Six hundred seventy one inner city high school women were administered an attitude scale designed to measure their sex role perception. The data was subjected to principal factor analysis with a varimax rotation. Four underlying factors comprising sex role perception were determined. The factors and their implications for educators are discussed.…

  10. Targeted Regulation of PI3K/Akt/mTOR/NF-κB Signaling by Indole Compounds and their Derivatives: Mechanistic Details and Biological Implications for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Aamir; Biersack, Bernhard; Li, Yiwei; Kong, Dejuan; Bao, Bin; Schobert, Rainer; Padhye, Subhash B.; Sarkar, Fazlul H.

    2014-01-01

    Indole compounds, found in cruciferous vegetables, are potent anti-cancer agents. Studies with indole-3-carbinol (I3C) and its dimeric product, 3,3’-diindolylmethane (DIM) suggest that these compounds have the ability to deregulate multiple cellular signaling pathways, including PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. These natural compounds are also effective modulators of downstream transcription factor NF-κB signaling which might help explain their ability to inhibit invasion and angiogenesis, and the reversal of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotype and drug resistance. Signaling through PI3K/Akt/mTOR and NF-κB pathway is increasingly being realized to play important role in EMT through the regulation of novel miRNAs which further validates the importance of this signaling network and its regulations by indole compounds. Here we will review the available literature on the modulation of PI3K/Akt/mTOR/NF-κB signaling by both parental I3C and DIM, as well as their analogs/derivatives, in an attempt to catalog their anticancer activity. PMID:23272910

  11. Mechanistic analysis of the immunomodulatory effects of a catalytic antioxidant on antigen-presenting cells: implication for their use in targeting oxidation-reduction reactions in innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Tse, Hubert M; Milton, Martha J; Piganelli, Jon D

    2004-01-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have an indispensable role in controlling the growth of pathogens. Recent evidence also suggests that they can function as second messengers and modulators of the immune system. The identification of many redox-sensitive signal transduction pathways that are necessary for initiating the innate proinflammatory immune response suggests that modulation of these oxidation-reduction reactions may provide a means of therapeutic benefit for controlling inflammatory-mediated diseases. In order to test this hypothesis we employed two catalytic antioxidants (AEOL 10113 and 10150) for the determination of the role of oxidation-reduction reactions in innate immune system activation. Catalytic antioxidants prevented the initiation of the innate immune response in LPS-stimulated macrophages as evidenced by the suppression of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-alpha, IL-1beta) and ROS (NO2- and O2-). The suppression of proinflammatory cytokine and ROS production correlated with the inhibition of NF-kappaB DNA binding, without any effects on the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway. Catalytic antioxidants prevented NF-kappaB from binding DNA by an oxidation mechanism that was reversible with the addition of DTT. Although the primary use of these agents was to reduce and scavenge ROS, surprisingly, we also observed the ability of these compounds to exhibit oxidoreductase activity and oxidize redox-sensitive transcription factors such as NF-kappaB. Catalytic antioxidants exhibit antioxidant and pro-oxidant activities and our data further demonstrate the importance of redox balance for the initiation of proinflammation. The coupling of the innate with the adaptive immune response is dependent on TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, NO2-, and O2- generation; therefore, agents like catalytic antioxidants that decrease proinflammatory cytokines and ROS may provide protective effects in diseases in which chronic inflammation plays a pathogenic role.

  12. Mechanistic Indicators of Childhood Asthma (MICA) Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Mechanistic Indicators of Childhood Asthma (MICA) Study has been designed to incorporate state-of-the-art technologies to examine the physiological and environmental factors that interact to increase the risk of asthmatic responses. MICA is primarily a clinically-bases obser...

  13. Problems with Single Interest Scales: Implications of the General Factor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tracey, Terence J. G.

    2012-01-01

    The presence of the general factor in interest and self-efficacy assessment and its meaning are reviewed. The general factor is found in all interest and self-efficacy assessment and has been viewed as (a) a nuisance factor with little effect on assessment, (b) a variable having substantive meaning and thus worthy of including in interpretation,…

  14. Bleeding in renal failure: is von Willebrand factor implicated?

    PubMed Central

    Remuzzi, G; Livio, M; Roncaglioni, M C; Mecca, G; Donati, M B; de Gaetano, G

    1977-01-01

    Normal or increased concentrations of factor VIII procoagulant activity (VIIIC), factor VIII-related antigen (VIIIRA), and factor VIII-von Willebrand activity (VIIIVWF) were found in the predialysis plasma of 10 out of 11 patients with chronic renal failure (CRF). All patients had a bleeding time longer than 15 minutes and platelet retention to glass beads lower than 40%. The only patient who had reduced concentrations of all three factor VIII complex components was subsequently shown to have von Willebrand's disease. In four patients with CRF, very low platelet retention, and slightly prolonged bleeding time none of the three factor VIII COMPLEX COMPONENTS WERE SELECTIVely modified in predialysis samples. These findings suggest that the bleeding tendency common in CRF is not necessarily linked to defective plasma factor VIII-related activities. PMID:302134

  15. Relationship factors and sexual dysfunction. Implications for assessment and treatment.

    PubMed

    Hartman, L M

    1980-11-01

    Conceptual issues pertaining to behavioural treatment of sexual dysfunctions are examined. A study is described in which twenty couples referred to an outpatient family therapy unit were assigned one of four group classifications based on their combined scores for specific measures of marital happiness and sexual functioning. The groups included asymptomatic-control, sexual dysfunction, marital conflict, and combined classifications. Results clearly indicate that sexual dysfunction and marital distress may operate independent of one another. Implications for assessment, treatment, and future research are discussed.

  16. Growth factors and cardiovascular structure. Implications for calcium antagonist therapy.

    PubMed

    Re, R N; Chen, L

    1991-07-01

    Abnormalities of cellular growth regulation are integral to the development of cardiovascular disorders such as atherogenesis, ventricular hypertrophy, and diabetic glomerulopathy. Moreover, cellular growth is in large measure controlled by peptide and nonpeptide growth factors that mediate their actions, in part, through the transcriptional regulation of normal cellular genes called protooncogenes. Because angiotensin II is one such growth regulatory factor and because changes in intracellular calcium are intimately involved in the action of angiotensin and other growth factors, it is likely that inhibitors of angiotensin action and calcium-channel-blocking agents will be found to have useful growth regulatory properties. PMID:1910639

  17. FACTORS IMPLICATED IN AMPHIBIAN POPULATION DECLINES IN THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study identified the factors responsible for the decline of native amphibians in the U.S. The type of land use, the introduction of exotic animal species, and chemical contamination were identified as the most likely causes of decline.

  18. Common factors affecting psychotherapy outcomes: some implications for teaching psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Feinstein, Robert; Heiman, Noa; Yager, Joel

    2015-05-01

    The number of psychotherapies classified as "empirically supported treatments" has increased significantly. As the number and scope of empirically supported treatments multiply, it has become impossible to train therapists in all of these specific modalities. Although the current Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requirements for psychiatric residents follow an approach based on specific schools of psychotherapy (emphasizing competency in cognitive-behavioral therapy, psychodynamic therapy, and supportive treatments), evidence suggests that we are failing even in these efforts. In developing a specialized Psychotherapy Scholars Track in the residency program at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, we opted to focus initially on teaching the common factors in psychotherapy that positively affect psychotherapy outcomes. This article reviews 6 such broad common factors.

  19. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and its clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Bathina, Siresha

    2015-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays an important role in neuronal survival and growth, serves as a neurotransmitter modulator, and participates in neuronal plasticity, which is essential for learning and memory. It is widely expressed in the CNS, gut and other tissues. BDNF binds to its high affinity receptor TrkB (tyrosine kinase B) and activates signal transduction cascades (IRS1/2, PI3K, Akt), crucial for CREB and CBP production, that encode proteins involved in β cell survival. BDNF and insulin-like growth factor-1 have similar downstream signaling mechanisms incorporating both p-CAMK and MAPK that increase the expression of pro-survival genes. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor regulates glucose and energy metabolism and prevents exhaustion of β cells. Decreased levels of BDNF are associated with neurodegenerative diseases with neuronal loss, such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis and Huntington's disease. Thus, BDNF may be useful in the prevention and management of several diseases including diabetes mellitus. PMID:26788077

  20. [Compliance in schizophrenia: predictive factors, therapeutical considerations and research implications].

    PubMed

    Misdrahi, D; Llorca, P M; Lançon, C; Bayle, F J

    2002-01-01

    Compliance has been defined as the extent to which a person's behavior coincides with the medical advice given. Medication compliance is one of the foremost problems affecting neuroleptic efficacy in psychiatric patients. Since chlorpromazine introduction in 1952, antipsychotics are the principal element of schizophrenia treatment. Actually progress links to the use of new antipsychotics are conditioned by quality of compliance. The problem of nonadherence to medication could concern 50% of prescription. The reported incidence of non-compliance with antipsychotic medication ranges from 11 to 80%. In a two thirds of case rehospitalization is the result of complete or partial noncompliance. After one year of first hospitalisation, 40% of relapse results from non adherence to medication. Medication adherence problems increase hospitalisation, morbidity and mortality. Social consequences, professional problems and family troubles linked to hospitalisations lead to low quality of life for patients and high cost for society. There are three main methods of measuring compliance. These include patient and clinical self-report, pill counts, and biological measures. Self-report methods are generally the most cost-effective and time-efficient way of obtaining an indication of compliance. In psychiatric research, the most commonly used self-report measure of compliance is the Drug Attitude Inventory (DAI) originally devised by Hogan et al. On the basis of criticism concerning DAI reliability, a new questionnaire of medication compliance was proposed: the Medication Adherence Rating scale (MARS). The main goal of compliance evaluation is to quantify this phenomenon with accuracy and to find predictive factors of medication nonadherence. Three types of factors influencing compliance are identified: factors due to medications, factors linked to patients and factors depending on the therapeutic relation with the clinician. Tolerance is considered as the principal reason explaining

  1. Implications of Indeterminate Factor-Error Covariances for Factor Construction, Prediction, and Determinacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krijnen, Wim P.

    2006-01-01

    The assumptions of the model for factor analysis do not exclude a class of indeterminate covariances between factors and error variables (Grayson, 2003). The construction of all factors of the model for factor analysis is generalized to incorporate indeterminate factor-error covariances. A necessary and sufficient condition is given for…

  2. Sudden Infant Death Syndrome: review of implicated genetic factors.

    PubMed

    Weese-Mayer, Debra E; Ackerman, Michael J; Marazita, Mary L; Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth M

    2007-04-15

    Genetic studies in Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) have been motivated by clinical, epidemiological, and/or neuropathological observations in SIDS victims, with subsequent pursuit of candidate genes in five categories: (1) genes for ion channel proteins based on electrocardiographic evidence of prolonged QT intervals in SIDS victims, (2) gene for serotonin transporter based on decreased serotonergic receptor binding in brainstems of SIDS victims, (3) genes pertinent to the early embryology of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) (and with a link to the 5-HT system) based on reports of ANS dysregulation in SIDS victims, (4) genes for nicotine metabolizing enzymes based on evidence of cigarette smoking as a modifiable risk factor for SIDS, and (5) genes regulating inflammation, energy production, hypoglycemia, and thermal regulation based on reports of postnatal infection, low birth weight, and/or overheating in SIDS victims. Evidence for each of these classes of candidate genes is reviewed in detail. As this review indicates, a number of genetically controlled pathways appear to be involved in at least some cases of SIDS. Given the diversity of results to date, genetic studies support the clinical impression that SIDS is heterogeneous with more than one entity and with more than one possible genetic etiology. Future studies should consider expanded phenotypic features that might help clarify the heterogeneity and improve the predictive value of the identified genetic factors. Such features should be evaluated to the extent possible in both SIDS victims and their family members. With 2,162 infants dying from SIDS in 2003 in the U.S. alone, and improved but still imperfect parent and caretaker compliance with known modifiable risk factors for SIDS, it behooves clinicians, researchers, and parents to combine efforts to reach a common goal. The message of the "Back to Sleep" campaign needs to be re-introduced/re-engineered to reach families and caretakers of all

  3. Snail Family Transcription Factors Are Implicated in Thyroid Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Robert G.; Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; González-Herrero, Ines; Anderson, Catriona; Flores, Teresa; Hughes, Sharon; Tselepis, Chris; Ross, James A.; Sánchez-García, Isidro

    2007-01-01

    E-Cadherin (CDH1) expression is reduced in thyroid carcinomas by primarily unknown mechanisms. In several tissues, SNAIL (SNAI1) and SLUG (SNAI2) induce epithelial-mesenchymal transition by altering target gene transcription, including CDH1 repression, but these transcription factors have not been studied in thyroid carcinoma. Recently, our group has provided direct evidence that ectopic SNAI1 expression induces epithelial and mesenchymal mouse tumors. SNAI1, SNAI2, and CDH1 expression were analyzed in thyroid-derived cell lines and samples of human follicular and papillary thyroid carcinoma by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and immunohistochemistry. The effect of SNAI1 expression on CDH1 transcription was analyzed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting in ori-3 cells. Thyroid carcinoma development was analyzed in CombitTA-Snail mice, in which SNAI1 levels are up-regulated. SNAI1 and SNAI2 were not expressed in cells derived from normal thyroid tissue, or in normal human thyroid samples, but were highly expressed in cell lines derived from thyroid carcinomas, in human thyroid carcinoma samples, and their metastases. SNAI1 expression in ori-3 cells repressed CDH1 transcription. Combi-TA mice developed papillary thyroid carcinomas, the incidence of which was increased by concomitant radiotherapy. In conclusion, SNAI1 and SNAI2 are ectopically expressed in thyroid carcinomas, and aberrant expression in mice is associated with papillary carcinoma development. PMID:17724139

  4. Evidence of Second-Order Factor Structure in a Diagnostic Problem Space: Implications for Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papa, Frank J.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Chest pain was identified as a specific medical problem space, and disease classes were modeled to define it. Results from a test taken by 628 medical residents indicate a second-order factor structure that suggests that chest pain is a multidimensional problem space. Implications for medical education are discussed. (SLD)

  5. Generation Y Student-Teachers' Motivational Factors: Retention Implications for K-12 Educational Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bontempo, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Generation Y represents a growing number of student-teachers who will impact the future of educational practice, yet little research has been conducted for this demographic group. The purpose of this mixed-method study was to identify motivational factors of neophyte teachers and the retention implications these findings had on Kindergarten…

  6. Enhanced/Synthetic Vision Systems - Human factors research and implications for future systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foyle, David C.; Ahumada, Albert J.; Larimer, James; Sweet, Barbara T.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reviews recent human factors research studies conducted in the Aerospace Human Factors Research Division at NASA Ames Research Center related to the development and usage of Enhanced or Synthetic Vision Systems. Research discussed includes studies of field of view (FOV), representational differences of infrared (IR) imagery, head-up display (HUD) symbology, HUD advanced concept designs, sensor fusion, and sensor/database fusion and evaluation. Implications for the design and usage of Enhanced or Synthetic Vision Systems are discussed.

  7. Mechanistic study on growth suppression and apoptosis induction by targeting hepatoma-derived growth factor in human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Tsun Yee; Tang, Wan Yee; Tsang, Wing Pui; Co, Ngai Na; Kong, Siu Kai; Kwok, Tim Tak

    2009-01-01

    Hepatoma-derived growth factor (HDGF) is frequently overexpressed in human cancer. The growth factor was previously demonstrated to be a survival factor as knock-down of HDGF suppresses the growth and induces apoptosis in human cancer cells through the Bad-mediated intrinsic apoptotic pathway. However, inactivation of Bad cannot completely repress the apoptosis induced upon HDGF knock-down, indicating the presence of other unidentified pathways. In the present study, HDGF knock-down was shown to trigger the Fas-mediated extrinsic apoptotic pathway in human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells through NF-kappaB signaling pathway. Increases in Fas expression and fas promoter activity were detected upon HDGF knock-down by Western blot analysis and luciferase reporter assay. Knock-down of fas inhibited HDGF knock-down effect on apoptosis induction and growth suppression as revealed by annexin V binding assay and soft agar assay. Down-regulation of IkappaBalpha was also observed upon HDGF knock-down. Overexpression of IkappaBalpha by transient transfection or inhibition of NF-kappaB by BAY11-7082 suppressed HDGF knock-down effect on fas promoter activation, Fas up-regulation, apoptosis induction and growth suppression. Furthermore, the interaction of Fas-mediated extrinsic and Bad-mediated intrinsic apoptotic pathways was demonstrated as a stronger inhibition on apoptosis induction and growth suppression upon HDGF knock-down was observed when both pathways were inactivated. The results therefore suggested that, through both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways, HDGF may function as a survival factor and be a potential target for cancer therapy.

  8. Air pollution, inflammation and preterm birth: a potential mechanistic link.

    PubMed

    Vadillo-Ortega, Felipe; Osornio-Vargas, Alvaro; Buxton, Miatta A; Sánchez, Brisa N; Rojas-Bracho, Leonora; Viveros-Alcaráz, Martin; Castillo-Castrejón, Marisol; Beltrán-Montoya, Jorge; Brown, Daniel G; O'Neill, Marie S

    2014-02-01

    Preterm birth is a public health issue of global significance, which may result in mortality during the perinatal period or may lead to major health and financial consequences due to lifelong impacts. Even though several risk factors for preterm birth have been identified, prevention efforts have failed to halt the increasing rates of preterm birth. Epidemiological studies have identified air pollution as an emerging potential risk factor for preterm birth. However, many studies were limited by study design and inadequate exposure assessment. Due to the ubiquitous nature of ambient air pollution and the potential public health significance of any role in causing preterm birth, a novel focus investigating possible causal mechanisms influenced by air pollution is therefore a global health priority. We hypothesize that air pollution may act together with other biological factors to induce systemic inflammation and influence the duration of pregnancy. Evaluation and testing of this hypothesis is currently being conducted in a prospective cohort study in Mexico City and will provide an understanding of the pathways that mediate the effects of air pollution on preterm birth. The important public health implication is that crucial steps in this mechanistic pathway can potentially be acted on early in pregnancy to reduce the risk of preterm birth. PMID:24382337

  9. AIR POLLUTION, INFLAMMATION AND PRETERM BIRTH: A POTENTIAL MECHANISTIC LINK

    PubMed Central

    Vadillo-Ortega, Felipe; Osornio-Vargas, Alvaro; Buxton, Miatta A.; Sánchez, Brisa N.; Rojas-Bracho, Leonora; Viveros-Alcaráz, Martin; Castillo-Castrejón, Marisol; Beltrán-Montoya, Jorge; Brown, Daniel G.; O´Neill, Marie S.

    2014-01-01

    Preterm birth is a public health issue of global significance, which may result in mortality during the perinatal period or may lead to major health and financial consequences due to lifelong impacts. Even though several risk factors for preterm birth have been identified, prevention efforts have failed to halt the increasing rates of preterm birth. Epidemiological studies have identified air pollution as an emerging potential risk factor for preterm birth. However, many studies were limited by study design and inadequate exposure assessment. Due to the ubiquitous nature of ambient air pollution and the potential public health significance of any role in causing preterm birth, a novel focus investigating possible causal mechanisms influenced by air pollution is therefore a global health priority. We hypothesize that air pollution may act together with other biological factors to induce systemic inflammation and influence the duration of pregnancy. Evaluation and testing of this hypothesis is currently being conducted in a prospective cohort study in Mexico City and will provide an understanding of the pathways that mediate the effects of air pollution on preterm birth. The important public health implication is that crucial steps in this mechanistic pathway can potentially be acted on early in pregnancy to reduce the risk of preterm birth. PMID:24382337

  10. Air pollution, inflammation and preterm birth: a potential mechanistic link.

    PubMed

    Vadillo-Ortega, Felipe; Osornio-Vargas, Alvaro; Buxton, Miatta A; Sánchez, Brisa N; Rojas-Bracho, Leonora; Viveros-Alcaráz, Martin; Castillo-Castrejón, Marisol; Beltrán-Montoya, Jorge; Brown, Daniel G; O'Neill, Marie S

    2014-02-01

    Preterm birth is a public health issue of global significance, which may result in mortality during the perinatal period or may lead to major health and financial consequences due to lifelong impacts. Even though several risk factors for preterm birth have been identified, prevention efforts have failed to halt the increasing rates of preterm birth. Epidemiological studies have identified air pollution as an emerging potential risk factor for preterm birth. However, many studies were limited by study design and inadequate exposure assessment. Due to the ubiquitous nature of ambient air pollution and the potential public health significance of any role in causing preterm birth, a novel focus investigating possible causal mechanisms influenced by air pollution is therefore a global health priority. We hypothesize that air pollution may act together with other biological factors to induce systemic inflammation and influence the duration of pregnancy. Evaluation and testing of this hypothesis is currently being conducted in a prospective cohort study in Mexico City and will provide an understanding of the pathways that mediate the effects of air pollution on preterm birth. The important public health implication is that crucial steps in this mechanistic pathway can potentially be acted on early in pregnancy to reduce the risk of preterm birth.

  11. Antiproliferative naphthopyrans: biological activity, mechanistic studies and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Dell, C P

    1998-06-01

    This article will firstly briefly review the newer generation of immunosuppressant drugs, focusing mainly on tacrolimus (FK-506), sirolimus (rapamycin), mycophenolate mofetil (RS-61443) and leflunomide (HWA 486) and then describe work carried out at the Lilly Research Centre on analogues of leflunomide and subsequent diversion into a structurally distinct series of compounds, the naphthopyrans. A clear structure activity relationship exists within this series and selected data from a Concanavalin A stimulated T-cell proliferation assay are presented to illustrate this. Although the compounds proved to possess little in vivo activity in our rheumatoid arthritis program, examination of the compounds in in vitro and in vivo models within the diabetic complications group showed the compounds behaved as would be anticipated for inhibitors of protein kinase C, although this direct mode of action was clearly not correct. Mechanistic investigations revealed that the favoured compound 290181 blocks phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate-induced binding of transcription factor proteins to the PEA3/TRE sequence of the promoter region of the urokinase plasminogen activator gene. The compounds also showed antiproliferative effects on vascular smooth muscle cells, an in vitro activity that translated into in vivo efficacy in a rat model of restenosis. Mechanistic studies here demonstrated that 290181 blocks proliferation in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle by binding directly to a novel site on tubulin. Finally the compounds were shown to inhibit the release of neutral proteases from interleukin-1 stimulated articular chondrocytes, this activity having implications in the degenerative aspects of osteoarthritis. PMID:9562601

  12. Molecular Motions as a Drug Target: Mechanistic Simulations of Anthrax Toxin Edema Factor Function Led to the Discovery of Novel Allosteric Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Laine, Élodie; Martínez, Leandro; Ladant, Daniel; Malliavin, Thérèse; Blondel, Arnaud

    2012-01-01

    Edema Factor (EF) is a component of Bacillus anthracis toxin essential for virulence. Its adenylyl cyclase activity is induced by complexation with the ubiquitous eukaryotic cellular protein, calmodulin (CaM). EF and its complexes with CaM, nucleotides and/or ions, have been extensively characterized by X-ray crystallography. Those structural data allowed molecular simulations analysis of various aspects of EF action mechanism, including the delineation of EF and CaM domains through their association energetics, the impact of calcium binding on CaM, and the role of catalytic site ions. Furthermore, a transition path connecting the free inactive form to the CaM-complexed active form of EF was built to model the activation mechanism in an attempt to define an inhibition strategy. The cavities at the surface of EF were determined for each path intermediate to identify potential sites where the binding of a ligand could block activation. A non-catalytic cavity (allosteric) was found to shrink rapidly at early stages of the path and was chosen to perform virtual screening. Amongst 18 compounds selected in silico and tested in an enzymatic assay, 6 thiophen ureidoacid derivatives formed a new family of EF allosteric inhibitors with IC50 as low as 2 micromolars. PMID:23012649

  13. Affinity proteomics reveals human host factors implicated in discrete stages of LINE-1 retrotransposition

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Martin S.; LaCava, John; Mita, Paolo; Molloy, Kelly R.; Huang, Cheng Ran Lisa; Li, Donghui; Adney, Emily M.; Jiang, Hua; Burns, Kathleen H.; Chait, Brian T.; Rout, Michael P.; Boeke, Jef D.; Dai, Lixin

    2014-01-01

    LINE-1s are active human DNA parasites that are agents of genome dynamics in evolution and disease. These streamlined elements require host factors to complete their lifecycles, whereas hosts have developed mechanisms to combat retrotransposition’s mutagenic effects. As such, endogenous L1 expression levels are extremely low, creating a roadblock for detailed interactomic analyses. Here we describe a system to express and purify highly active L1 RNP complexes from human suspension cell culture and characterize the co-purified proteome, identifying 37 high-confidence candidate interactors. These datasets include known interactors PABPC1 and MOV10 and, with in-cell imaging studies, suggest existence of at least three types of compositionally and functionally distinct L1 RNPs. Among the novel findings, UPF1, a key nonsense-mediated decay factor, and PCNA, the polymerase-delta-associated sliding DNA clamp, were identified and validated. PCNA interacts with ORF2p via a PIP box motif; mechanistic studies suggest this occurs during or immediately after target-primed reverse transcription. PMID:24267889

  14. Implications of Our Developing Understanding of Risk and Protective Factors in the Treatment of Adult Male Sexual Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, David

    2013-01-01

    This paper summarizes our developing knowledge of factors that contribute added risk of sexual recidivism (risk factors) and factors that are associated with a reduced risk of sexual recidivism (protective factors). Specific implications for the design of future treatment programs are drawn. This information is contrasted with the common foci of…

  15. Crystal Structure of Human Factor VIII: Implications for the Formation of the Factor IXa-Factor VIIIa Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Chi Ki Ngo,J.; Huang, M.; Roth, D.; Furie, B.; Furie, B.

    2008-01-01

    Factor VIII is a procofactor that plays a critical role in blood coagulation, and is missing or defective in hemophilia A. We determined the X-ray crystal structure of B domain-deleted human factor VIII. This protein is composed of five globular domains and contains one Ca(2+) and two Cu(2+) ions. The three homologous A domains form a triangular heterotrimer where the A1 and A3 domains serve as the base and interact with the C2 and C1 domains, respectively. The structurally homologous C1 and C2 domains reveal membrane binding features. Based on biochemical studies, a model of the factor IXa-factor VIIIa complex was constructed by in silico docking. Factor IXa wraps across the side of factor VIII, and an extended interface spans the factor VIII heavy and light chains. This model provides insight into the activation of factor VIII and the interaction of factor VIIIa with factor IXa on the membrane surface.

  16. Crystal Structure of Human Factor VIII: Implications for the Formation of the Factor IXa-Factor VIIIa Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Ngo, J.C.; Huang, M.; Roth, D.A.; Furie, B.C.; Furie, B.

    2008-06-03

    Factor VIII is a procofactor that plays a critical role in blood coagulation, and is missing or defective in hemophilia A. We determined the X-ray crystal structure of B domain-deleted human factor VIII. This protein is composed of five globular domains and contains one Ca{sup 2+} and two Cu{sup 2+} ions. The three homologous A domains form a triangular heterotrimer where the A1 and A3 domains serve as the base and interact with the C2 and C1 domains, respectively. The structurally homologous C1 and C2 domains reveal membrane binding features. Based on biochemical studies, a model of the factor IXa-factor VIIIa complex was constructed by in silico docking. Factor IXa wraps across the side of factor VIII, and an extended interface spans the factor VIII heavy and light chains. This model provides insight into the activation of factor VIII and the interaction of factor VIIIa with factor IXa on the membrane surface.

  17. Epidermal growth factor receptor distribution in burn wounds. Implications for growth factor-mediated repair.

    PubMed Central

    Wenczak, B A; Lynch, J B; Nanney, L B

    1992-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) along with several related peptide growth factors has been shown both in vivo and in vitro to accelerate events associated with epidermal wound repair. EGF and transforming growth factor alpha act by binding to a common EGF receptor tyrosine kinase thereby initiating a series of events which ultimately regulate cell proliferation. This study examined the immunohistochemical localization of EGF receptor (EGF-R) in burn wound margins, adjacent proliferating epithelium, and closely associated sweat ducts, sebaceous glands, and hair follicles. Tissue specimens removed during surgical debridement were obtained from full and partial thickness burn wounds in 32 patients with total body surface area burns ranging from 2 to 88%. In the early postburn period (days 2-4), prominent staining for EGF-R was found in undifferentiated, marginal keratinocytes, adjacent proliferating, hypertrophic epithelium, and both marginal and nonmarginal hair follicles, sweat ducts, and sebaceous glands. During the late postburn period (days 5-16), EGF-R was depleted along leading epithelial margins; however, immunoreactive EGF-R remained intensely positive in the hypertrophic epithelium and all skin appendages. Increased detection of immunoreactive EGF-R and the presence of [125I]EGF binding in the hypertrophic epithelium correlated positively with proliferating cell nuclear antigen distributions. Thus, the presence of EGF-R in the appropriate keratinocyte populations suggests a functional role for this receptor during wound repair. Dynamic modulation in EGF receptor distribution during the temporal sequence of repair provides further evidence that an EGF/transforming growth factor alpha/EGF-R-mediated pathway is activated during human wound repair. Images PMID:1361495

  18. Human factors in space station architecture 1: Space station program implications for human factors research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, M. M.

    1985-01-01

    The space station program is based on a set of premises on mission requirements and the operational capabilities of the space shuttle. These premises will influence the human behavioral factors and conditions on board the space station. These include: launch in the STS Orbiter payload bay, orbital characteristics, power supply, microgravity environment, autonomy from the ground, crew make-up and organization, distributed command control, safety, and logistics resupply. The most immediate design impacts of these premises will be upon the architectural organization and internal environment of the space station.

  19. Sociocultural factors and breast cancer in sub-Saharan Africa: implications for diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Tetteh, Dinah A; Faulkner, Sandra L

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of breast cancer is on the rise in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) and efforts at early diagnosis have not been very successful because the public has scant knowledge about the disease, a large percentage of breast cancer cases are diagnosed late and mainly rural SSA women's practice of breast self-examination is poor. In this paper, we argue that an examination of the social and cultural contexts of SSA that influence breast cancer diagnosis and management in the region is needed. We discuss the implications of sociocultural factors, such as gender roles and spirituality, on breast cancer diagnosis and management in SSA. PMID:26757491

  20. Sociocultural factors and breast cancer in sub-Saharan Africa: implications for diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Tetteh, Dinah A; Faulkner, Sandra L

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of breast cancer is on the rise in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) and efforts at early diagnosis have not been very successful because the public has scant knowledge about the disease, a large percentage of breast cancer cases are diagnosed late and mainly rural SSA women's practice of breast self-examination is poor. In this paper, we argue that an examination of the social and cultural contexts of SSA that influence breast cancer diagnosis and management in the region is needed. We discuss the implications of sociocultural factors, such as gender roles and spirituality, on breast cancer diagnosis and management in SSA.

  1. Managing mechanistic and organic structure in health care organizations.

    PubMed

    Olden, Peter C

    2012-01-01

    Managers at all levels in a health care organization must organize work to achieve the organization's mission and goals. This requires managers to decide the organization structure, which involves dividing the work among jobs and departments and then coordinating them all toward the common purpose. Organization structure, which is reflected in an organization chart, may range on a continuum from very mechanistic to very organic. Managers must decide how mechanistic versus how organic to make the entire organization and each of its departments. To do this, managers should carefully consider 5 factors for the organization and for each individual department: external environment, goals, work production, size, and culture. Some factors may push toward more mechanistic structure, whereas others may push in the opposite direction toward more organic structure. Practical advice can help managers at all levels design appropriate structure for their departments and organization.

  2. Suicidal behavior inLatinas: explanatory cultural factors and implications for intervention.

    PubMed

    Zayas, Luis H; Pilat, Allyson M

    2008-06-01

    We posit that the high rates of suicidal behavior by teenage Hispanic females reported in large-scale surveys can be understood as a cultural phenomenon, a product of specific elements of the history, tradition, ideology, or social norms of a particular society, and that treatment interventions must take family and cultural factors into consideration. For over a decade, surveys have reported that among ethnic and racial minority youth in the United States, Latinas have the highest rates of suicidal behavior compared to African American and non-Hispanic White adolescent females. However, other research shows that the psychological profiles of suicidal Latina adolescent girls and the risk factors for Latina suicidal behavior may not be that different from non-Hispanic suicidal adolescent females. The unique situation of adolescent Latinas involves the convergence of cultural and familial factors (i.e., familism, acculturation, relatedness, autonomy, etc.) with the developmental, social, and individual factors frequently associated with suicidal behaviors. Based on this background, family-oriented interventions appear to be the most appropriate approach to the prevention and treatment of Hispanic suicidal girls. Factors implicated in Latina suicidal behavior and community-based interventions that include the adolescent and her family are suggested. PMID:18611132

  3. Metabolic Risk Factors of Sporadic Alzheimer’s Disease: Implications in the Pathology, Pathogenesis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Sasanka; Khemka, Vineet Kumar; Banerjee, Anindita; Chatterjee, Gargi; Ganguly, Anirban; Biswas, Atanu

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the major cause of dementia among the elderly world-wide, manifests in familial and sporadic forms, and the latter variety accounts for the majority of the patients affected by this disease. The etiopathogenesis of sporadic AD is complex and uncertain. The autopsy studies of AD brain have provided limited understanding of the antemortem pathogenesis of the disease. Experimental AD research with transgenic animal or various cell based models has so far failed to explain the complex and varied spectrum of AD dementia. The review, therefore, emphasizes the importance of AD related risk factors, especially those with metabolic implications, identified from various epidemiological studies, in providing clues to the pathogenesis of this complex disorder. Several metabolic risk factors of AD like hypercholesterolemia, hyperhomocysteinemia and type 2 diabetes have been studied extensively both in epidemiology and experimental research, while much less is known about the role of adipokines, pro-inflammatory cytokines and vitamin D in this context. Moreover, the results from many of these studies have shown a degree of variability which has hindered our understanding of the role of AD related risk factors in the disease progression. The review also encompasses the recent recommendations regarding clinical and neuropathological diagnosis of AD and brings out the inherent uncertainty and ambiguity in this area which may have a distinct impact on the outcome of various population-based studies on AD-related risk factors. PMID:26236550

  4. The Role of Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Complexes Signaling in the Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Ghada A.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanistic Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) is an evolutionarily conserved serine/threonine kinase which is a member of the PI3K related kinase (PIKK) family. mTOR emerged as a central node in cellular metabolism, cell growth, and differentiation, as well as cancer metabolism. mTOR senses the nutrients, energy, insulin, growth factors, and environmental cues and transmits signals to downstream targets to effectuate the cellular and metabolic response. Recently, mTOR was also implicated in the regulation of both the innate and adaptive immune responses. This paper will summarize the current knowledge of mTOR, as related to the immune microenvironment and immune responses. PMID:23783557

  5. The ecological impacts of nighttime light pollution: a mechanistic appraisal.

    PubMed

    Gaston, Kevin J; Bennie, Jonathan; Davies, Thomas W; Hopkins, John

    2013-11-01

    The ecological impacts of nighttime light pollution have been a longstanding source of concern, accentuated by realized and projected growth in electrical lighting. As human communities and lighting technologies develop, artificial light increasingly modifies natural light regimes by encroaching on dark refuges in space, in time, and across wavelengths. A wide variety of ecological implications of artificial light have been identified. However, the primary research to date is largely focused on the disruptive influence of nighttime light on higher vertebrates, and while comprehensive reviews have been compiled along taxonomic lines and within specific research domains, the subject is in need of synthesis within a common mechanistic framework. Here we propose such a framework that focuses on the cross-factoring of the ways in which artificial lighting alters natural light regimes (spatially, temporally, and spectrally), and the ways in which light influences biological systems, particularly the distinction between light as a resource and light as an information source. We review the evidence for each of the combinations of this cross-factoring. As artificial lighting alters natural patterns of light in space, time and across wavelengths, natural patterns of resource use and information flows may be disrupted, with downstream effects to the structure and function of ecosystems. This review highlights: (i) the potential influence of nighttime lighting at all levels of biological organisation (from cell to ecosystem); (ii) the significant impact that even low levels of nighttime light pollution can have; and (iii) the existence of major research gaps, particularly in terms of the impacts of light at population and ecosystem levels, identification of intensity thresholds, and the spatial extent of impacts in the vicinity of artificial lights.

  6. Modeling Bird Migration under Climate Change: A Mechanistic Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, James A.

    2009-01-01

    How will migrating birds respond to changes in the environment under climate change? What are the implications for migratory success under the various accelerated climate change scenarios as forecast by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change? How will reductions or increased variability in the number or quality of wetland stop-over sites affect migratory bird species? The answers to these questions have important ramifications for conservation biology and wildlife management. Here, we describe the use of continental scale simulation modeling to explore how spatio-temporal changes along migratory flyways affect en-route migration success. We use an individually based, biophysical, mechanistic, bird migration model to simulate the movement of shorebirds in North America as a tool to study how such factors as drought and wetland loss may impact migratory success and modify migration patterns. Our model is driven by remote sensing and climate data and incorporates important landscape variables. The energy budget components of the model include resting, foraging, and flight, but presently predation is ignored. Results/Conclusions We illustrate our model by studying the spring migration of sandpipers through the Great Plains to their Arctic breeding grounds. Why many species of shorebirds have shown significant declines remains a puzzle. Shorebirds are sensitive to stop-over quality and spacing because of their need for frequent refueling stops and their opportunistic feeding patterns. We predict bird "hydrographs that is, stop-over frequency with latitude, that are in agreement with the literature. Mean stop-over durations predicted from our model for nominal cases also are consistent with the limited, but available data. For the shorebird species simulated, our model predicts that shorebirds exhibit significant plasticity and are able to shift their migration patterns in response to changing drought conditions. However, the question remains as to whether this

  7. A critical examination of the U.S. nursing shortage: contributing factors, public policy implications.

    PubMed

    Fox, Rebekah L; Abrahamson, Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Despite short-lived periods of adequacy in nurse availability, the nursing shortage has endured. In order to better understand the myriad factors that influence the current shortage of nurses, as well as possible solutions, this project addresses the influence of social factors and government policy on nurse staffing inadequacy. When the government intervenes in a philosophically free-market economy, the assumption is that a problem, such as the current nursing shortage, could not be solved without such intervention. PURPOSE. Nursing care arguably falls into the realm of protecting the common good, and therefore requires government oversight. We provide a critical analysis of policy intervention efforts into the nursing shortage debate by examining the passage of legislation, the provision of educational assistance, and the establishment of minimum staffing requirements and minimum quality standards for reimbursement, which all impact nursing supply and demand. RESULTS. Arguments supporting and opposing policy intervention in general, and its impact on the overall provision of nursing care in the United States, were examined. Without policy incentive to place financial value on the quality of care provided by nurses, a simple increase in the number of available nurses is unlikely to solve the current problem. IMPLICATIONS. Important considerations that should be factored into policy creation include measurement and compensation for quality care, the nature of recruitment efforts of new nurses, and the complex nature of a nursing work.

  8. A critical examination of the U.S. nursing shortage: contributing factors, public policy implications.

    PubMed

    Fox, Rebekah L; Abrahamson, Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Despite short-lived periods of adequacy in nurse availability, the nursing shortage has endured. In order to better understand the myriad factors that influence the current shortage of nurses, as well as possible solutions, this project addresses the influence of social factors and government policy on nurse staffing inadequacy. When the government intervenes in a philosophically free-market economy, the assumption is that a problem, such as the current nursing shortage, could not be solved without such intervention. PURPOSE. Nursing care arguably falls into the realm of protecting the common good, and therefore requires government oversight. We provide a critical analysis of policy intervention efforts into the nursing shortage debate by examining the passage of legislation, the provision of educational assistance, and the establishment of minimum staffing requirements and minimum quality standards for reimbursement, which all impact nursing supply and demand. RESULTS. Arguments supporting and opposing policy intervention in general, and its impact on the overall provision of nursing care in the United States, were examined. Without policy incentive to place financial value on the quality of care provided by nurses, a simple increase in the number of available nurses is unlikely to solve the current problem. IMPLICATIONS. Important considerations that should be factored into policy creation include measurement and compensation for quality care, the nature of recruitment efforts of new nurses, and the complex nature of a nursing work. PMID:19954463

  9. Transforming growth factor-beta and its implication in the malignancy of gliomas.

    PubMed

    Roy, Laurent-Olivier; Poirier, Marie-Belle; Fortin, David

    2015-03-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common type of primary malignant brain tumors. They are characterized by enhanced growing capabilities, neoangiogenic proliferation, and extensive infiltration of the brain parenchyma, which make their complete surgical resection impossible. Together with transient and refractory responses to standard therapy, these aggressive neoplasms are incurable and present a median survival of 12 to 14 months. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) is a pleiotropic cytokine of which two of the three isoforms expressed in humans have been shown to be overexpressed proportionally to the histologic grade of glioma malignancy. The increase of chromosomal aberrations and genetic mutations observed in glioma cells turns TGF-β into an oncogene. For that reason, it plays critical roles in glioma progression through induction of several genes implicated in many carcinogenic processes such as proliferation, angiogenesis, and invasion. Consequently, investigators have begun developing innovative therapeutics targeting this growth factor or its signaling pathway in an attempt to hinder TGF-β's appalling effects in order to refine the treatment of malignant gliomas and improve their prognosis. In this paper, we extensively review the TGF-β-induced oncogenic pathways and discuss the diverse new molecules targeting this growth factor. PMID:24590691

  10. Implications of diesel emissions control failures to emission factors and road transport NOx evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ntziachristos, Leonidas; Papadimitriou, Giannis; Ligterink, Norbert; Hausberger, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    Diesel NOx emissions have been at the forefront of research and regulation scrutiny as a result of failures of late vehicle technologies to deliver on-road emissions reductions. The current study aims at identifying the actual emissions levels of late light duty vehicle technologies, including Euro 5 and Euro 6 ones. Mean NOx emission factor levels used in the most popular EU vehicle emission models (COPERT, HBEFA and VERSIT+) are compared with latest emission information collected in the laboratory over real-world driving cycles and on the road using portable emissions measurement systems (PEMS). The comparison shows that Euro 5 passenger car (PC) emission factors well reflect on road levels and that recently revealed emissions control failures do not call for any significant corrections. However Euro 5 light commercial vehicles (LCVs) and Euro 6 PCs in the 2014-2016 period exhibit on road emission levels twice as high as used in current models. Moreover, measured levels vary a lot for Euro 6 vehicles. Scenarios for future evolution of Euro 6 emission factors, reflecting different degree of effectiveness of emissions control regulations, show that total NOx emissions from diesel Euro 6 PC and LCV may correspond from 49% up to 83% of total road transport emissions in 2050. Unless upcoming and long term regulations make sure that light duty diesel NOx emissions are effectively addressed, this will have significant implications in meeting future air quality and national emissions ceilings targets.

  11. Genetic Variation of Goat Interferon Regulatory Factor 3 Gene and Its Implication in Goat Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Liping; Zhang, Yesheng; Wang, Yangzi; Sanni, Timothy M.; Imumorin, Ikhide G.; Peters, Sunday O.; Zhang, Jiajin; Dong, Yang; Wang, Wen

    2016-01-01

    The immune systems are fundamentally vital for evolution and survival of species; as such, selection patterns in innate immune loci are of special interest in molecular evolutionary research. The interferon regulatory factor (IRF) gene family control many different aspects of the innate and adaptive immune responses in vertebrates. Among these, IRF3 is known to take active part in very many biological processes. We assembled and evaluated 1356 base pairs of the IRF3 gene coding region in domesticated goats from Africa (Nigeria, Ethiopia and South Africa) and Asia (Iran and China) and the wild goat (Capra aegagrus). Five segregating sites with θ value of 0.0009 for this gene demonstrated a low diversity across the goats’ populations. Fu and Li tests were significantly positive but Tajima’s D test was significantly negative, suggesting its deviation from neutrality. Neighbor joining tree of IRF3 gene in domesticated goats, wild goat and sheep showed that all domesticated goats have a closer relationship than with the wild goat and sheep. Maximum likelihood tree of the gene showed that different domesticated goats share a common ancestor and suggest single origin. Four unique haplotypes were observed across all the sequences, of which, one was particularly common to African goats (MOCH-K14-0425, Poitou and WAD). In assessing the evolution mode of the gene, we found that the codon model dN/dS ratio for all goats was greater than one. Phylogenetic Analysis by Maximum Likelihood (PAML) gave a ω0 (dN/dS) value of 0.067 with LnL value of -6900.3 for the first Model (M1) while ω2 = 1.667 in model M2 with LnL value of -6900.3 with positive selection inferred in 3 codon sites. Mechanistic empirical combination (MEC) model for evaluating adaptive selection pressure on particular codons also confirmed adaptive selection pressure in three codons (207, 358 and 408) in IRF3 gene. Positive diversifying selection inferred with recent evolutionary changes in domesticated goat

  12. Genetic Variation of Goat Interferon Regulatory Factor 3 Gene and Its Implication in Goat Evolution.

    PubMed

    Okpeku, Moses; Esmailizadeh, Ali; Adeola, Adeniyi C; Shu, Liping; Zhang, Yesheng; Wang, Yangzi; Sanni, Timothy M; Imumorin, Ikhide G; Peters, Sunday O; Zhang, Jiajin; Dong, Yang; Wang, Wen

    2016-01-01

    The immune systems are fundamentally vital for evolution and survival of species; as such, selection patterns in innate immune loci are of special interest in molecular evolutionary research. The interferon regulatory factor (IRF) gene family control many different aspects of the innate and adaptive immune responses in vertebrates. Among these, IRF3 is known to take active part in very many biological processes. We assembled and evaluated 1356 base pairs of the IRF3 gene coding region in domesticated goats from Africa (Nigeria, Ethiopia and South Africa) and Asia (Iran and China) and the wild goat (Capra aegagrus). Five segregating sites with θ value of 0.0009 for this gene demonstrated a low diversity across the goats' populations. Fu and Li tests were significantly positive but Tajima's D test was significantly negative, suggesting its deviation from neutrality. Neighbor joining tree of IRF3 gene in domesticated goats, wild goat and sheep showed that all domesticated goats have a closer relationship than with the wild goat and sheep. Maximum likelihood tree of the gene showed that different domesticated goats share a common ancestor and suggest single origin. Four unique haplotypes were observed across all the sequences, of which, one was particularly common to African goats (MOCH-K14-0425, Poitou and WAD). In assessing the evolution mode of the gene, we found that the codon model dN/dS ratio for all goats was greater than one. Phylogenetic Analysis by Maximum Likelihood (PAML) gave a ω0 (dN/dS) value of 0.067 with LnL value of -6900.3 for the first Model (M1) while ω2 = 1.667 in model M2 with LnL value of -6900.3 with positive selection inferred in 3 codon sites. Mechanistic empirical combination (MEC) model for evaluating adaptive selection pressure on particular codons also confirmed adaptive selection pressure in three codons (207, 358 and 408) in IRF3 gene. Positive diversifying selection inferred with recent evolutionary changes in domesticated goat IRF3

  13. Food for Thought ... Mechanistic Validation

    PubMed Central

    Hartung, Thomas; Hoffmann, Sebastian; Stephens, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Summary Validation of new approaches in regulatory toxicology is commonly defined as the independent assessment of the reproducibility and relevance (the scientific basis and predictive capacity) of a test for a particular purpose. In large ring trials, the emphasis to date has been mainly on reproducibility and predictive capacity (comparison to the traditional test) with less attention given to the scientific or mechanistic basis. Assessing predictive capacity is difficult for novel approaches (which are based on mechanism), such as pathways of toxicity or the complex networks within the organism (systems toxicology). This is highly relevant for implementing Toxicology for the 21st Century, either by high-throughput testing in the ToxCast/ Tox21 project or omics-based testing in the Human Toxome Project. This article explores the mostly neglected assessment of a test's scientific basis, which moves mechanism and causality to the foreground when validating/qualifying tests. Such mechanistic validation faces the problem of establishing causality in complex systems. However, pragmatic adaptations of the Bradford Hill criteria, as well as bioinformatic tools, are emerging. As critical infrastructures of the organism are perturbed by a toxic mechanism we argue that by focusing on the target of toxicity and its vulnerability, in addition to the way it is perturbed, we can anchor the identification of the mechanism and its verification. PMID:23665802

  14. Conceptualization and analysis of mechanistic studies.

    PubMed

    Aickin, Mikel

    2007-01-01

    Much recent attention has been given to the priority for doing "mechanistic studies" of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) modalities. A preference for such studes has been clearly indicated by the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine program of funding for CAM research. It is, however, difficult to find canons by which "mechanistic" studies should be analyzed, and even harder to find a good definition of "mechanism." Social scientists have well-developed ways of approaching these issues, but their methods suffer from a fatal flaw, the ecologic mechanistic fallacy. Basic scientists fare even worse, often conducting mechanistic studies that may have no plausible mechanistic content, and that also commit the ecologic mechanistic fallacy. More methodological work on the concept of mechanism is needed at a fundamental level.

  15. HTGR Mechanistic Source Terms White Paper

    SciTech Connect

    Wayne Moe

    2010-07-01

    The primary purposes of this white paper are: (1) to describe the proposed approach for developing event specific mechanistic source terms for HTGR design and licensing, (2) to describe the technology development programs required to validate the design methods used to predict these mechanistic source terms and (3) to obtain agreement from the NRC that, subject to appropriate validation through the technology development program, the approach for developing event specific mechanistic source terms is acceptable

  16. Structural and mechanistic insights on nitrate reductases.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Catarina; Romão, Maria João

    2015-12-01

    Nitrate reductases (NR) belong to the DMSO reductase family of Mo-containing enzymes and perform key roles in the metabolism of the nitrogen cycle, reducing nitrate to nitrite. Due to variable cell location, structure and function, they have been divided into periplasmic (Nap), cytoplasmic, and membrane-bound (Nar) nitrate reductases. The first crystal structure obtained for a NR was that of the monomeric NapA from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans in 1999. Since then several new crystal structures were solved providing novel insights that led to the revision of the commonly accepted reaction mechanism for periplasmic nitrate reductases. The two crystal structures available for the NarGHI protein are from the same organism (Escherichia coli) and the combination with electrochemical and spectroscopic studies also lead to the proposal of a reaction mechanism for this group of enzymes. Here we present an overview on the current advances in structural and functional aspects of bacterial nitrate reductases, focusing on the mechanistic implications drawn from the crystallographic data. PMID:26362109

  17. Somatodendritic dopamine release: recent mechanistic insights

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Margaret E.; Patel, Jyoti C.

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) is a key transmitter in motor, reward and cogitative pathways, with DA dysfunction implicated in disorders including Parkinson's disease and addiction. Located in midbrain, DA neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta project via the medial forebrain bundle to the dorsal striatum (caudate putamen), and DA neurons in the adjacent ventral tegmental area project to the ventral striatum (nucleus accumbens) and prefrontal cortex. In addition to classical vesicular release from axons, midbrain DA neurons exhibit DA release from their cell bodies and dendrites. Somatodendritic DA release leads to activation of D2 DA autoreceptors on DA neurons that inhibit their firing via G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying K+ channels. This helps determine patterns of DA signalling at distant axonal release sites. Somatodendritically released DA also acts via volume transmission to extrasynaptic receptors that modulate local transmitter release and neuronal activity in the midbrain. Thus, somatodendritic release is a pivotal intrinsic feature of DA neurons that must be well defined in order to fully understand the physiology and pathophysiology of DA pathways. Here, we review recent mechanistic aspects of somatodendritic DA release, with particular emphasis on the Ca2+ dependence of release and the potential role of exocytotic proteins. PMID:26009764

  18. Factors implicated in the initiation of human parturition in term and preterm labor: a review.

    PubMed

    Ravanos, Konstantinos; Dagklis, Themistoklis; Petousis, Stamatios; Margioula-Siarkou, Chrysoula; Prapas, Yannis; Prapas, Nikolaos

    2015-01-01

    After accommodating the pregnancy for an average of 40 weeks, the uterus expels the fetus, the placenta and the membranes through the birth canal in a process named parturition. The absolute sequence of events that trigger and sustain human parturition are not yet fully clarified. Evidence suggests that spontaneous preterm and term labor seem to share a common inflammatory pathway. However, there are several other factors being involved in the initiation of human parturition. Placental corticotropin releasing hormone production seems to serve as a placental clock that might be set to ring earlier or later determining the duration of pregnancy and timing of labor. Estrogens do not cause contractions but their properties seem to capacitate uterus to coordinate and enhance contractions. Cytokines, prostaglandins, nitric oxide and steroids seem also to induce ripening by mediating remodeling of the extracellular matrix and collagen. Infection and microbe invasion resulting in chorioamnionitis also represents a common cause of early preterm labour. This review provides an overview of all these factors considered to be implicated in the initiation of human parturition.

  19. Vascular endothelial growth factor and the eye: biochemical mechanisms of action and implications for novel therapies.

    PubMed

    Aiello, L P

    1997-01-01

    Ophthalmic complications arising from pathologic intraocular neovascularization are responsible for the majority of visual loss in most developed countries. Among the many disorders associated with intraocular neovascularization are retinopathy of prematurity, diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration. These conditions are the leading causes of blindness among infants, those of working age and the elderly, respectively. For nearly half a century the clinical findings associated with these conditions have suggested that the action of growth factors may play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of these diseases. However, the exact molecules involved and their mechanisms of action have remained incompletely understood. Recently, studies have begun to elucidate the major molecules and intracellular pathways involved in regulating neovascular eye disorders. Vascular endothelial growth factor has been implicated as a major mediator of intraocular neovascularization and permeability. The recent insights into the mechanisms of intraocular angiogenesis have provided new targets for novel nondestructive therapeutic agents directed toward preventing the visual loss associated with ophthalmic neovascular disorders. PMID:9323726

  20. Implications of Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 Receptor Activation in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nurwidya, Fariz; Andarini, Sita; Takahashi, Fumiyuki; Syahruddin, Elisna; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) has been intensively investigated in many preclinical studies using cell lines and animal models, and the results have provided important knowledge to help improve the understanding of cancer biology. IGF1R is highly expressed in patients with lung cancer, and high levels of circulating insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1), the main ligand for IGF1R, increases the risk of developing lung malignancy in the future. Several phase I clinical trials have supported the potential use of an IGF1R-targeted strategy for cancer, including lung cancer. However, the negative results from phase III studies need further attention, especially in selecting patients with specific molecular signatures, who will gain benefits from IGF1R inhibitors with minimal side effects. This review will discuss the basic concept of IGF1R in lung cancer biology, such as epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) induction and cancer stem cell (CSC) maintenance, and also the clinical implications of IGF1R for lung cancer patients, such as prognostic value and cancer therapy resistance. PMID:27418865

  1. Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1, Glycation and Bone Fragility: Implications for Fracture Resistance of Bone

    PubMed Central

    Sroga, Grażyna E.; Wu, Ping-Cheng; Vashishth, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Despite our extensive knowledge of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) action on the growing skeleton, its role in skeletal homeostasis during aging and age-related development of certain diseases is still unclear. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) derived from glucose are implicated in osteoporosis and a number of diabetic complications. We hypothesized that because in humans and rodents IGF1 stimulates uptake of glucose (a glycation substrate) from the bloodstream in a dose-dependent manner, the decline of IGF1 could be associated with the accumulation of glycation products and the decreasing resistance of bone to fracture. To test the aforementioned hypotheses, we used human tibial posterior cortex bone samples to perform biochemical (measurement of IGF1, fluorescent AGEs and pentosidine (PEN) contents) and mechanical tests (crack initiation and propagation using compact tension specimens). Our results for the first time show a significant, age-independent association between the levels of IGF1 and AGEs. Furthermore, AGEs (fAGEs, PEN) predict propensity of bone to fracture (initiation and propagation) independently of age in human cortical bone. Based on these results we propose a model of IGF1-based regulation of bone fracture. Because IGF1 level increases postnatally up to the juvenile developmental phase and decreases thereafter with aging, we propose that IGF1 may play a protective role in young skeleton and its age-related decline leads to bone fragility and an increased fracture risk. Our results may also have important implications for current understanding of osteoporosis- and diabetes-related bone fragility as well as in the development of new diagnostic tools to screen for fragile bones. PMID:25629402

  2. Clinical implications for vascular endothelial growth factor in the lung: friend or foe?

    PubMed

    Papaioannou, Andriana I; Kostikas, Konstantinos; Kollia, Panagoula; Gourgoulianis, Konstantinos I

    2006-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent mediator of angiogenesis which has multiple effects in lung development and physiology. VEGF is expressed in several parts of the lung and the pleura while it has been shown that changes in its expression play a significant role in the pathophysiology of some of the most common respiratory disorders, such as acute lung injury, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, obstructive sleep apnea, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, pulmonary hypertension, pleural disease, and lung cancer. However, the exact role of VEGF in the lung is not clear yet, as there is contradictory evidence that suggests either a protective or a harmful role. VEGF seems to interfere in a different manner, depending on its amount, the location, and the underlying pathologic process in lung tissue. The lack of VEGF in some disease entities may provide implications for its substitution, whereas its overexpression in other lung disorders has led to interventions for the attenuation of its action. Many efforts have been made in order to regulate the expression of VEGF and anti-VEGF antibodies are already in use for the management of lung cancer. Further research is still needed for the complete understanding of the exact role of VEGF in health and disease, in order to take advantage of its benefits and avoid its adverse effects. The scope of the present review is to summarize from a clinical point of view the changes in VEGF expression in several disorders of the respiratory system and focus on its diagnostic and therapeutic implications. PMID:17044926

  3. Biochemical characterization of penicillin-resistant and -sensitive penicillin-binding protein 2x transpeptidase activities of Streptococcus pneumoniae and mechanistic implications in bacterial resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics.

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, G; Yeh, W K; Carnahan, R H; Flokowitsch, J; Meier, T I; Alborn, W E; Becker, G W; Jaskunas, S R

    1997-01-01

    To understand the biochemical basis of resistance of bacteria to beta-lactam antibiotics, we purified a penicillin-resistant penicillin-binding protein 2x (R-PBP2x) and a penicillin-sensitive PBP2x (S-PBP2x) enzyme of Streptococcus pneumoniae and characterized their transpeptidase activities, using a thioester analog of stem peptides as a substrate. A comparison of the k(cat)/Km values for the two purified enzymes (3,400 M(-1) s(-1) for S-PBP2x and 11.2 M(-1) s(-1) for R-PBP2x) suggests that they are significantly different kinetically. Implications of this finding are discussed. We also found that the two purified enzymes did not possess a detectable level of beta-lactam hydrolytic activity. Finally, we show that the expression levels of both PBP2x enzymes were similar during different growth phases. PMID:9244281

  4. Transcription initiation factor IID-interactive histone chaperone CIA-II implicated in mammalian spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Umehara, Takashi; Horikoshi, Masami

    2003-09-12

    Histones are thought to have specific roles in mammalian spermatogenesis, because several subtypes of histones emerge that are post-translationally modified during spermatogenesis. Though regular assembly of nucleosome is guaranteed by histone chaperones, their involvement in spermatogenesis is yet to be characterized. Here we identified a histone chaperone-related factor, which we designated as CCG1-interacting factor A-II (CIA-II), through interaction with bromodomains of TAFII250/CCG1, which is the largest subunit of human transcription initiation factor IID (TFIID). We found that human CIA-II (hCIA-II) localizes in HeLa nuclei and is highly expressed in testis and other proliferating cell-containing tissues. Expression of mouse CIA-II (mCIA-II) does not occur in the germ cell-lacking testes of adult WBB6F1-W/Wv mutant mice, indicating its expression in testis to be specific to germ cells. Fractionation of testicular germ cells revealed that mCIA-II transcripts accumulate in pachytene spermatocytes but not in spermatids. In addition, the mCIA-II transcripts in testis were present as early as 4 days after birth and decreased at 56 days after birth. These findings indicate that mCIA-II expression in testis is restricted to premeiotic to meiotic stages during spermatogenesis. Also, we found that hCIA-II interacts with histone H3 in vivo and with histones H3/H4 in vitro and that it facilitates supercoiling of circular DNA when it is incubated with core histones and topoisomerase I in vitro. These data suggest that CIA-II is a histone chaperone and is implicated in the regulation of mammalian spermatogenesis.

  5. FACTORS IMPLICATED IN AMPHIBIAN POPULATION DECLINES IN THE US, AND AN EVALUATION OF THE CASE FOR INVASIVE SPECIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Factors known or suspected to be adversely affecting native amphibian populations in the US were identified using information from 267 species accounts written in a standardized format by multiple authors in a forthcoming book. Land use was the most frequently implicated adverse ...

  6. Rational and Mechanistic Perspectives on Reinforcement Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chater, Nick

    2009-01-01

    This special issue describes important recent developments in applying reinforcement learning models to capture neural and cognitive function. But reinforcement learning, as a theoretical framework, can apply at two very different levels of description: "mechanistic" and "rational." Reinforcement learning is often viewed in mechanistic terms--as…

  7. Factors that affect the hydraulic performance of raingardens: implications for design and maintenance.

    PubMed

    Virahsawmy, Harry K; Stewardson, Michael J; Vietz, Geoff; Fletcher, Tim D

    2014-01-01

    Raingardens are becoming an increasingly popular technology for urban stormwater treatment. However, their hydraulic performance is known to reduce due to clogging from deposition of fine-grained sediments on the surface. This impacts on their capacity to treat urban runoff. It has been recently hypothesised that plants can help to mitigate the effect of surface clogging on infiltration. A conceptual model is therefore presented to better understand key processes, including those associated with plant cover, which influences surface infiltration mechanisms. Based on this understanding, a field evaluation was carried out to test the hypothesis that plants increase the infiltration rate, and to investigate factors that influence the deposition of fine-grained sediments within raingardens. The results show that infiltration rates around plants are statistically higher than bare areas, irrespective of the degree of surface clogging. This suggests that preferential flow pathways exist around plants. Sediment deposition processes are also influenced by design elements of raingardens such as the inlet configuration. These findings have implications for the design and maintenance of raingardens, in particular the design of the inlet configuration, as well as maintenance of the filter media surface layer and vegetation.

  8. Cadmium in edible mushrooms from NW Spain: Bioconcentration factors and consumer health implications.

    PubMed

    Melgar, M Julia; Alonso, Julián; García, M Angeles

    2016-02-01

    Mushrooms do not constitute a significant portion of the human diet, but the consumption of wild and cultivated mushrooms has become increasingly in recent years. Some species accumulate high levels of toxic metals, both in unpolluted and polluted areas. In this study, we examined the accumulation capacity of cadmium in edible mushrooms in relation to certain factors and their possible toxicological implications. Cadmium concentrations were determined by an ICP-MS spectrometer in 238 samples of the fruiting bodies of 28 wild and cultivated growing edible mushrooms species and the underlying soil. The hymenophore (H) and the rest of the fruiting body (RFB) were analysed separately. The highest mean cadmium concentration (mg/kg dry weight) was found in Agaricus macrosporus (52.9 in H and 28.3 in RFB). All mushroom species accumulated cadmium in relation to the underlying soils. There were statistically significant differences between the hymenophore and the rest of the fruiting body (p < 0.001). Cadmium concentrations were compared to data in the literature and to levels set by legislation. It was concluded that consumption of our studied mushrooms is not a toxicological risk as far as cadmium content is concerned, although the species A. macrosporus should not be consumed. PMID:26702984

  9. Explaining the Rapid Increase in Nigeria's Sex Ratio at Birth: Factors and Implications.

    PubMed

    Kaba, Amadu J

    2015-06-01

    This paper examines the rapid increase in Nigeria's sex ratio at birth from 1.03 boys born for every 1 girl born in each year from 1996-2008 to 1.06 in each year from 2009-2014, second only to Tunisia in Africa at 1.07. The average sex ratio at birth in the world in 2014 was 1.07. In most Black African nations or Black majority nations, it is 1.03 or less. Among the factors presented for this development are: historical fluctuations of sex ratio at birth; geography and ethnicity; male preference/chasing a son; Age of parents; high death rates of male infants and males in general; and wealth/socioeconomic status. Among the potential implications are: young and poor men in Nigeria may not be able to find brides and form families due to a potential shortage of females; emigration of young and poor Nigerian men to West (Africa) and elsewhere to seek brides and form families; immigration of marriage age women from West (Africa) and around the world to Nigeria to seek husbands; and low contraceptive use and high fertility rates in Nigeria.

  10. A review of cognitive factors in the etiology of rape: theories, empirical studies, and implications.

    PubMed

    Drieschner, K; Lange, A

    1999-01-01

    In the past decade, research into the etiology of rape has increasingly focused on cognitive variables. The studies reviewed in the present article provide evidence that men with a high proclivity to rape have more rape supportive attitudes, are more likely to consider victims to be responsible for rape, and are less knowledgeable about the negative impact of rape on the victims. These men tend to misperceive cues emitted by women in heterosocial interactions; fail to generate inhibitory self-verbalizations to suppress association of sex and aggression; and have more coercive, sexual fantasies. Furthermore, a high proclivity to rape is associated with a semantic network in which concepts of sex and power are closely linked in such a way that power cues are necessary precursors of sexual feelings. Multivariate studies suggest that rape-supportive attitudes interact with noncognitive factors in the etiology of rape. Implications for rape prevention and treatment of rapists are considered. Finally, methodological issues are discussed, and recommendations for future research are given. PMID:9987584

  11. Factors that affect the hydraulic performance of raingardens: implications for design and maintenance.

    PubMed

    Virahsawmy, Harry K; Stewardson, Michael J; Vietz, Geoff; Fletcher, Tim D

    2014-01-01

    Raingardens are becoming an increasingly popular technology for urban stormwater treatment. However, their hydraulic performance is known to reduce due to clogging from deposition of fine-grained sediments on the surface. This impacts on their capacity to treat urban runoff. It has been recently hypothesised that plants can help to mitigate the effect of surface clogging on infiltration. A conceptual model is therefore presented to better understand key processes, including those associated with plant cover, which influences surface infiltration mechanisms. Based on this understanding, a field evaluation was carried out to test the hypothesis that plants increase the infiltration rate, and to investigate factors that influence the deposition of fine-grained sediments within raingardens. The results show that infiltration rates around plants are statistically higher than bare areas, irrespective of the degree of surface clogging. This suggests that preferential flow pathways exist around plants. Sediment deposition processes are also influenced by design elements of raingardens such as the inlet configuration. These findings have implications for the design and maintenance of raingardens, in particular the design of the inlet configuration, as well as maintenance of the filter media surface layer and vegetation. PMID:24622546

  12. Atypical Antipsychotics and Metabolic Syndrome in Patients with Schizophrenia: Risk Factors, Monitoring, and Healthcare Implications

    PubMed Central

    Riordan, Henry J.; Antonini, Paola; Murphy, Michael F.

    2011-01-01

    Background Metabolic syndrome is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with schizophrenia, with a prevalence rate double that of nonpsychiatric populations. Given the amount of evidence suggesting a link between atypical antipsychotic medications and metabolic syndrome, several agencies have recommended regular clinical monitoring of weight, symptoms of hyperglycemia, and glucose in chronically medicated patients with schizophrenia. Objectives To summarize the current literature on atypical antipsychotic-induced metabolic syndrome in patients with schizophrenia, outline some of the molecular mechanisms behind this syndrome, identify demographic and disease-related risk factors, and describe cost-effective methods for surveillance. Discussion The differential prevalence of metabolic syndrome associated with various atypical antipsychotic medications has been evidenced across numerous studies, with higher effects seen for certain antipsychotic medications on weight gain, waist circumference, fasting triglyceride level, and glucose levels. Given the association of these symptoms, all atypical antipsychotic medications currently include a warning about the risk of hyperglycemia and diabetes, as well as suggestions for regular monitoring. Despite this, very little data are available to support adherence to these monitoring recommendations. Lack of awareness and resources, diffusion of responsibility, policy implementation, and organizational structure have all been implicated. Conclusion The treatment of schizophrenia involves a balance in terms of risks and benefits. Failing to treat because of risk for complications from metabolic syndrome may place the patient at a higher risk for more serious health outcomes. Supporting programs aimed at increasing monitoring of simple laboratory and clinical measures associated with metabolic syndrome may decrease important risk factors, improve patients' quality of life, and reduce healthcare costs. PMID:25126357

  13. The risk factors and prognostic implication of acute pulmonary edema in resuscitated cardiac arrest patients

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Dae-hyun; Kim, Joonghee; Rhee, Joong Eui; Kim, Taeyun; Kim, Kyuseok; Jo, You Hwan; Lee, Jin Hee; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Kim, Yu Jin; Hwang, Seung Sik

    2015-01-01

    Objective Pulmonary edema is frequently observed after a successful resuscitation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients. Currently, its risk factors and prognostic implications are mostly unknown. Methods Adult OHCA patients with a presumed cardiac etiology who achieved sustained return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) in emergency department were retrospectively analyzed. The patients were grouped according to the severity of consolidation on their initial chest X-ray (group I, no consolidation; group II, patchy consolidations; group III, consolidation involving an entire lobe; group IV, total white-out of any lung). The primary objective was to identify the risk factors of developing severe pulmonary edema (group III or IV). The secondary objective was to evaluate the association between long-term prognosis and the severity of pulmonary edema. Results One hundred and seven patients were included. Total duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and initial pCO2 level were both independent predictors of developing severe pulmonary edema with their odds ratio (OR) being 1.02 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.00 to 1.04; per 1 minute) and 1.04 (95% CI, 1.01 to 1.07; per 1 mmHg), respectively. The long term prognosis was significantly poor in patients with severe pulmonary edema with a OR for good outcome (6-month cerebral performance category 1 or 2) being 0.22 (95% CI, 0.06 to 0.79) in group III and 0.16 (95% CI, 0.04 to 0.63) in group IV compared to group I. Conclusion The duration of CPR and initial pCO2 level were both independent predictors for the development of severe pulmonary edema after resuscitation in emergency department. The severity of the pulmonary edema was significantly associated with long-term outcome.

  14. Kinetic and Stereochemical Analysis of YwhB, a 4-Oxalocrotonate Tautomerase Homologue in Bacillus subtilis: Mechanistic Implications for the YwhB- and 4-Oxalocrotonate Tautomerase-catalyzed Reactions†

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Susan C; Johnson, William H.; Czerwinski, Robert M.; Stamps, Stacy L.; Whitman, Christian P.

    2008-01-01

    YwhB, a 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase (4-OT) homologue in Bacillus subtilis, has no known biological role and the gene has no apparent genomic context. The kinetic and stereochemical properties of YwhB have been examined using available enol and dienol compounds. The kinetic analysis shows that YwhB has a relatively non-specific 1,3- and 1,5-keto-enol tautomerase activity, with the former activity prevailing. Replacement of Pro-1 or Arg-11 with an alanine significantly reduces or abolishes these activities, implicating both residues as critical ones for the activities. In D2O, ketonization of two monoacid substrates (2-hydroxy-2,4-pentadienoate and phenylenolpyruvate) produces a mixture of stereoisomers {2-keto-3-[2H]-4-pentenoate and 3-[2H]-phenylpyruvate}, where the (3R)-isomers predominate. Ketonization of 2-hydroxy-2,4-hexadienedioate, a diacid, in D2O affords mostly the opposite enantiomer, (3S)-2-oxo-[3-2H]-4-hexenedioate. The mono- and diacids apparently bind in different orientations in the active site of YwhB, but the highly stereoselective nature of the YwhB reaction using a diacid suggests that the biological substrate for YwhB may be a diacid. Moreover, of the three dienols examined, 1,3- and 1,5-keto-enol tautomerization reactions are only observed for 2-hydroxy-2,4-hexadienedioate, indicating that the C-3 and C-5 positions are accessible for protonation in this compound. Incubation of 4-OT with 2-hydroxy-2,4-hexadienedioate in D2O results in a racemic mixture of 2-oxo-[3-2H]-4-hexenedioate, suggesting that 4-OT may not catalyze a 1,3-keto-enol tautomerization reaction using this dienol. It has previously been shown that 4-OT catalyzes the near stereospecific conversion of 2-hydroxy-2,4-hexadienedioate to (5S)-[5-2H]-2-oxo-3-hexenedioate in D2O. Taken together, these observations suggest that 4-OT might function as a 1,5-keto-enol tautomerase using 2-hydroxy-2,4-hexadienedioate. PMID:17902707

  15. Negative mechanistic reasoning in medical intervention assessment.

    PubMed

    Jerkert, Jesper

    2015-12-01

    Traditionally, mechanistic reasoning has been assigned a negligible role in standard EBM (evidence-based medicine) literature, although some recent authors have argued for an upgrade. Even so, the mechanistic reasoning that has received attention has almost exclusively been positive--both in an epistemic sense of claiming that there is a mechanistic chain and in a health-related sense of there being claimed benefits for the patient. Negative mechanistic reasoning has been neglected, both in the epistemic and in the health-related sense. I distinguish three main types of negative mechanistic reasoning and subsume them under a new definition of mechanistic reasoning in the context of assessing medical interventions. This definition is wider than a previous suggestion in the literature. Each negative type corresponds to a range of evidential strengths, and it is argued that there are differences with respect to typical evidential strengths. The variety of negative mechanistic reasoning should be acknowledged in EBM, and it presents a serious challenge to proponents of so-called medical hierarchies of evidence. PMID:26597869

  16. Factors promoting larch dominance in Eastern Siberia: fire versus growth performance and implications for carbon dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, E.-D.; Wirth, C.; Mollicone, D.; von Lüpke, N.; Ziegler, W.; Achard, F.; Mund, M.; Prokushkin, A.; Scherbina, S.

    2012-01-01

    The relative roles of fire and climate in determining canopy species composition and aboveground carbon stocks were investigated. Measurements were made along a transect extending from the dark taiga zone of Central Siberia, where Picea and Abies dominate the canopy, into the Larix zone of Eastern Siberia. We test the hypotheses that the change in canopy species composition is based (1) on climate-driven performance only, (2) on fire only, or (3) on fire-performance interactions. We show that the evergreen conifers Picea obovata and Abies sibirica are the natural late-successional species both in Central and Eastern Siberia, provided there has been no fire for an extended period of time. There are no changes in the climate-driven performance of the observed species. Fire appears to be the main factor explaining the dominance of Larix. Of lesser influence were longitude, hydrology and active-layer thickness. Stand-replacing fires decreased from 300 to 50 yr between the Yenisei Ridge and the upper Tunguska. Repeated non-stand-replacing surface fires eliminated the regeneration of Abies and Picea. With every 100 yr since the last fire, the percentage of Larix decreased by 20 %. Biomass of stems of single trees did not show signs of age-related decline. Relative diameter increment was 0.41 ± 0.20 % at breast height and stem volume increased linearly over time with a rate of about 0.36 t C ha-1 yr-1 independent of age class and species. Stand volumes reached about 130 t C ha-1 (equivalent to about 520 m3 ha-1). Individual trees of Larix were older than 600 yr. The maximum age and biomass seemed to be limited by fungal rot of heart wood. 60 % of old Larix and Picea and 30 % of Pinus sibirica trees were affected by stem rot. Implications for the future role of fire and of plant diseases are discussed.

  17. Black tea polyphenols: a mechanistic treatise.

    PubMed

    Butt, M S; Imran, A; Sharif, M K; Ahmad, Rabia Shabir; Xiao, Hang; Imran, M; Rsool, H A

    2014-01-01

    Dietary interventions are among the emerging trends to curtail physiological malfunctioning like cancer, diabetes, cardiac complications, etc. The essence of phytonutrients has developed the concept of nutraceuticals at the junction of diet health linkages. In this context, theaflavin & thearubigins are the oxidized derivatives of black tea catechins during fermentation having nutraceutical potential owing to esterification of hydroxyl ring with digallate esters. Theaflavin may influence activation of transcription factors such as NFnB or AP-1 that ultimately hinder the formation of nitric oxide expression gene. Likewise, black tea contains a unique amino acid theanine acts as neurotransmitter owing to its ability to cross the blood-brain barrier. Moreover, it boasts immunity by enhancing the disease-fighting ability of gamma delta T cells. Theaflavin & thearubigins act as safeguard against oxidative stress thereby effective in the cardiac functioning. The mechanistic approach of these antioxidants is likely to be associated with inhibition of redox sensitive transcription factors & pro-oxidant enzymes such as xanthine oxidase or nitric oxide synthase. However, their involvement in antioxidative enzyme induction as in glutathione-S-transferases is also well documented. They act as curative agent against numerous pathological disorders by disrupting the electron chain thus inhibiting the progression of certain ailments. Black tea polyphenols established themselves as strong antioxidants due to their standard one-electron potential, and their vitality is dependent on the concentration of polyphenols and pH for their inclusive execution. Present review is an attempt to enrich the readers regarding the health promoting aspects of black tea polyphenols. Concomitantly, it needs core attention of researchers for the exploitations of black tea flavanols as an important dietary constituent for the vulnerable segment.

  18. PCDD/F TEQ INDICATORS AND THEIR MECHANISTIC IMPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stack gas samples from two incinerator facilities with different operating conditions were investigated to find polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin/furan (PCDD/F) toxic equivalent quantity (TEQ) indicators from amongst the 210 PCDD/F isomers. Similarities in isomer patterns were als...

  19. Carbanions from Decarboxylation of Orotate Analogues: Stability and Mechanistic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Yeoh, Fong Ying; Cuasito, Roxanne R.; Capule, Christina C.; Wong, Freeman M.; Wu, Weiming

    2009-01-01

    The pKa’s of the 6–CH groups of 1,3-dimethyluracil, N-methyl-2-pyridone, and N-methyl-4-pyridone were determined through their reactions with bases derived from carbon acids with known pKa and the reactions of their corresponding carbanions with the carbon acids. No correlation between the stability of the carbanions and the rate of decarboxylation of corresponding carboxylic acids was found. PMID:17400276

  20. Cancer Tills the Premetastatic Field: Mechanistic Basis and Clinical Implications.

    PubMed

    Chin, Andrew R; Wang, Shizhen Emily

    2016-08-01

    A growing body of work has shown that cancer metastasis is not a random spontaneous event; rather, it is the culmination of a cascade of priming steps through which a subpopulation of the tumor cells acquires invasive traits while readying a permissive environment, termed the "premetastatic niche," in which distant metastases can occur. Signals from the primary tumor mobilize and adapt immune cells as well as directly communicating with distant niche cells to induce a broad spectrum of adaptations in target organs, including the induction of angiogenesis, inflammation, extracellular matrix remodeling, and metabolic reprogramming. Together, these interactions facilitate the formation of a premetastatic niche composed of a variable mix of resident and recruited immune cells, endothelial cells, and stromal cells connected through a complex signaling network that we are only beginning to understand. Here, we summarize the latest findings on how cancer induces and guides the formation of this premetastatic niche as well as potential prognostic markers and therapeutic targets that may lead to a better understanding and effective treatment of metastatic disease. Clin Cancer Res; 22(15); 3725-33. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27252414

  1. Perceptual discrimination in fear generalization: Mechanistic and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Struyf, Dieter; Zaman, Jonas; Vervliet, Bram; Van Diest, Ilse

    2015-12-01

    For almost a century, Pavlovian conditioning is the imperative experimental paradigm to investigate the development and generalization of fear. However, despite the rich research tradition, the conceptualization of fear generalization has remained somewhat ambiguous. In this selective review, we focus explicitly on some challenges with the current operationalization of fear generalization and their impact on the ability to make inferences on its clinical potential and underlying processes. The main conclusion is that, despite the strong evidence that learning influences perception, current research has largely neglected the role of perceptual discriminability and its plasticity in fear generalization. We propose an alternative operationalization of generalization, where the essence is that Pavlovian conditioning itself influences the breadth of fear generalization via learning-related changes in perceptual discriminability. Hence a conceptualization of fear generalization is incomplete without an in-depth analysis of processes of perceptual discriminability. Furthermore, this highlights perceptual learning and discriminability as important future targets for pre-clinical and clinical research.

  2. Sexual Abuse and Subsequent Suicidal Behaviour: Exacerbating Factors and Implications for Recovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Cate

    2006-01-01

    Suicidal behaviour is a cause for concern among many western countries; in general, it is most common among young women. This research used qualitative methods to explore the narratives of 24 women, to contextualise their insights, and to examine the meanings of events leading to and implicated in the recovery from suicidal behaviour. The research…

  3. Combustion aerosols: factors governing their size and composition and implications to human health.

    PubMed

    Lighty, J S; Veranth, J M; Sarofim, A F

    2000-09-01

    Particulate matter (PM) emissions from stationary combustion sources burning coal, fuel oil, biomass, and waste, and PM from internal combustion (IC) engines burning gasoline and diesel, are a significant source of primary particles smaller than 2.5 microns (PM2.5) in urban areas. Combustion-generated particles are generally smaller than geologically produced dust and have unique chemical composition and morphology. The fundamental processes affecting formation of combustion PM and the emission characteristics of important applications are reviewed. Particles containing transition metals, ultrafine particles, and soot are emphasized because these types of particles have been studied extensively, and their emissions are controlled by the fuel composition and the oxidant-temperature-mixing history from the flame to the stack. There is a need for better integration of the combustion, air pollution control, atmospheric chemistry, and inhalation health research communities. Epidemiology has demonstrated that susceptible individuals are being harmed by ambient PM. Particle surface area, number of ultrafine particles, bioavailable transition metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and other particle-bound organic compounds are suspected to be more important than particle mass in determining the effects of air pollution. Time- and size-resolved PM measurements are needed for testing mechanistic toxicological hypotheses, for characterizing the relationship between combustion operating conditions and transient emissions, and for source apportionment studies to develop air quality plans. Citations are provided to more specialized reviews, and the concluding comments make suggestions for further research.

  4. Risk factors for acquisition of hepatitis C virus infection: a case series and potential implications for disease surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Leland J; Weiss, Heidi L; Langner, Rebecca G; Herrera, Jorge; Kaslow, Richard A; van Leeuwen, Dirk J

    2001-01-01

    Background Transmission of hepatitis C vims (HCV) is strongly associated with use of contaminated blood products and injection drugs. Other "non-parental" modes of transmission including sexual activity have been increasingly recognized. We examined risk factors for acquiring HCV in patients who were referred to two tertiary care centers and enrolled in an antiviral therapy protocol. Methods Interviews of 148 patients were conducted apart from their physician evaluation using a structured questionnaire covering demographics and risk factors for HCV acquisition. Results Risk factors (blood products, injection/intranasal drugs, razor blades/ toothbrushes, body/ear piercing, occupational exposure, sexual activity) were identified in 141 (95.3%) of participants; 23 (15.5%) had one (most frequently blood or drug exposure), 41 (27.7%) had two, and 84 (53.4%) had more than two risk factors. No patient reported sexual activity as a sole risk factor. Body piercing accounted for a high number of exposures in women. Men were more likely to have exposure to street drugs but less exposure to blood products than women. Blood product exposure was less common in younger than older HCV patients. Conclusion One and often multiple risk factors could be identified in nearly all HCV-infected patients seen in a referral practice. None named sexual transmission as the sole risk factor. The development of a more complete profile of factors contributing to transmission of HCV infection may assist in clinical and preventive efforts. The recognition of the potential presence of multiple risk factors may have important implications in the approach to HCV surveillance, and particularly the use of hierarchical algorithms in the study of risk factors. PMID:11518542

  5. Rotation Criteria and Hypothesis Testing for Exploratory Factor Analysis: Implications for Factor Pattern Loadings and Interfactor Correlations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitt, Thomas A.; Sass, Daniel A.

    2011-01-01

    Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) has long been used in the social sciences to depict the relationships between variables/items and latent traits. Researchers face many choices when using EFA, including the choice of rotation criterion, which can be difficult given that few research articles have discussed and/or demonstrated their differences.…

  6. Advanced Reach Tool (ART): development of the mechanistic model.

    PubMed

    Fransman, Wouter; Van Tongeren, Martie; Cherrie, John W; Tischer, Martin; Schneider, Thomas; Schinkel, Jody; Kromhout, Hans; Warren, Nick; Goede, Henk; Tielemans, Erik

    2011-11-01

    This paper describes the development of the mechanistic model within a collaborative project, referred to as the Advanced REACH Tool (ART) project, to develop a tool to model inhalation exposure for workers sharing similar operational conditions across different industries and locations in Europe. The ART mechanistic model is based on a conceptual framework that adopts a source receptor approach, which describes the transport of a contaminant from the source to the receptor and defines seven independent principal modifying factors: substance emission potential, activity emission potential, localized controls, segregation, personal enclosure, surface contamination, and dispersion. ART currently differentiates between three different exposure types: vapours, mists, and dust (fumes, fibres, and gases are presently excluded). Various sources were used to assign numerical values to the multipliers to each modifying factor. The evidence used to underpin this assessment procedure was based on chemical and physical laws. In addition, empirical data obtained from literature were used. Where this was not possible, expert elicitation was applied for the assessment procedure. Multipliers for all modifying factors were peer reviewed by leading experts from industry, research institutes, and public authorities across the globe. In addition, several workshops with experts were organized to discuss the proposed exposure multipliers. The mechanistic model is a central part of the ART tool and with advancing knowledge on exposure, determinants will require updates and refinements on a continuous basis, such as the effect of worker behaviour on personal exposure, 'best practice' values that describe the maximum achievable effectiveness of control measures, the intrinsic emission potential of various solid objects (e.g. metal, glass, plastics, etc.), and extending the applicability domain to certain types of exposures (e.g. gas, fume, and fibre exposure).

  7. Identifying personality subtypes based on the five-factor model dimensions in male prisoners: implications for psychopathy and criminal offending.

    PubMed

    Claes, Laurence; Tavernier, Geert; Roose, Annelore; Bijttebier, Patricia; Smith, Sarah Francis; Lilienfeld, Scott O

    2014-01-01

    The current study was designed to identify personality subtypes on the basis of the five-factor model dimensions in male prisoners. Participants included 110 Flemish male prisoners assessed by means of the Neuroticism, Extraversion, Openness Five Factor Inventory and different symptom, personality, and coping measures. We found two clusters: an emotionally stable/resilient cluster and an aggressive/undercontrolled cluster. Prisoners within the aggressive/undercontrolled cluster scored significantly higher on almost all Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 basic scales, (in)direct aggression measures, and depressive coping scales compared with resilients. They also scored higher on drug abuse and committed more sexual offenses than resilient prisoners. These two personality subtypes bear theoretically and practically important implications for psychopathy subtypes and different pathways to criminal offenses.

  8. Differential Rac1 signalling by guanine nucleotide exchange factors implicates FLII in regulating Rac1-driven cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Marei, Hadir; Carpy, Alejandro; Woroniuk, Anna; Vennin, Claire; White, Gavin; Timpson, Paul; Macek, Boris; Malliri, Angeliki

    2016-01-01

    The small GTPase Rac1 has been implicated in the formation and dissemination of tumours. Upon activation by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), Rac1 associates with a variety of proteins in the cell thereby regulating various functions, including cell migration. However, activation of Rac1 can lead to opposing migratory phenotypes raising the possibility of exacerbating tumour progression when targeting Rac1 in a clinical setting. This calls for the identification of factors that influence Rac1-driven cell motility. Here we show that Tiam1 and P-Rex1, two Rac GEFs, promote Rac1 anti- and pro-migratory signalling cascades, respectively, through regulating the Rac1 interactome. In particular, we demonstrate that P-Rex1 stimulates migration through enhancing the interaction between Rac1 and the actin-remodelling protein flightless-1 homologue, to modulate cell contraction in a RhoA-ROCK-independent manner. PMID:26887924

  9. Contextual approach to technology assessment: Implications for one-factor fix solutions to complex social problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayo, L. H.

    1975-01-01

    The contextual approach is discussed which undertakes to demonstrate that technology assessment assists in the identification of the full range of implications of taking a particular action and facilitates the consideration of alternative means by which the total affected social problem context might be changed by available project options. It is found that the social impacts of an application on participants, institutions, processes, and social interests, and the accompanying interactions may not only induce modifications in the problem contest delineated for examination with respect to the design, operations, regulation, and use of the posited application, but also affect related social problem contexts.

  10. Trefoil peptides as proangiogenic factors in vivo and in vitro: implication of cyclooxygenase-2 and EGF receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Sylvie; Van Aken, Elisabeth; Van Bocxlaer, Saskia; Attoub, Samir; Nguyen, Quang-Dé; Bruyneel, Erik; Westley, Bruce R; May, Felicity E B; Thim, Lars; Mareel, Marc; Gespach, Christian; Emami, Shahin

    2003-01-01

    We previously established that the trefoil peptides (TFFs) pS2, spasmolytic polypeptide, and intestinal trefoil factor are involved in cellular scattering and invasion in kidney and colonic cancer cells. Using the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay and the formation of tube-like structures by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) plated on the Matrigel matrix substratum, we report here that TFFs are proangiogenic factors. Angiogenic activity of TFFs is comparable to that induced by vascular endothelial growth factor, leptin, and transforming growth factor-alpha. Stimulation of angiogenesis by pS2 in the CAM assay is blocked by pharmacological inhibitors of cyclooxygenase COX-2 (NS-398) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) tyrosine kinase (ZD1839), but is independent of KDR/Flk-1 and thromboxane A2 receptors. In contrast, the morphogenic switch induced by pS2 in HUVEC cells could be inhibited by the specific KDR heptapeptide antagonist ATWLPPR and by inhibitors of COX-2 and EGF-R signaling. These results implicate TFFs in the formation of new blood vessels during normal and pathophysiological processes linked to wound healing, inflammation, and cancer progression in the digestive mucosa and other human solid tumors associated with aberrant expression of TFFs.

  11. Mechanistic species distribution modelling as a link between physiology and conservation

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Tyler G.; Diamond, Sarah E.; Kelly, Morgan W.

    2015-01-01

    Climate change conservation planning relies heavily on correlative species distribution models that estimate future areas of occupancy based on environmental conditions encountered in present-day ranges. The approach benefits from rapid assessment of vulnerability over a large number of organisms, but can have poor predictive power when transposed to novel environments and reveals little in the way of causal mechanisms that define changes in species distribution or abundance. Having conservation planning rely largely on this single approach also increases the risk of policy failure. Mechanistic models that are parameterized with physiological information are expected to be more robust when extrapolating distributions to future environmental conditions and can identify physiological processes that set range boundaries. Implementation of mechanistic species distribution models requires knowledge of how environmental change influences physiological performance, and because this information is currently restricted to a comparatively small number of well-studied organisms, use of mechanistic modelling in the context of climate change conservation is limited. In this review, we propose that the need to develop mechanistic models that incorporate physiological data presents an opportunity for physiologists to contribute more directly to climate change conservation and advance the field of conservation physiology. We begin by describing the prevalence of species distribution modelling in climate change conservation, highlighting the benefits and drawbacks of both mechanistic and correlative approaches. Next, we emphasize the need to expand mechanistic models and discuss potential metrics of physiological performance suitable for integration into mechanistic models. We conclude by summarizing other factors, such as the need to consider demography, limiting broader application of mechanistic models in climate change conservation. Ideally, modellers, physiologists and

  12. Mechanistic species distribution modelling as a link between physiology and conservation.

    PubMed

    Evans, Tyler G; Diamond, Sarah E; Kelly, Morgan W

    2015-01-01

    Climate change conservation planning relies heavily on correlative species distribution models that estimate future areas of occupancy based on environmental conditions encountered in present-day ranges. The approach benefits from rapid assessment of vulnerability over a large number of organisms, but can have poor predictive power when transposed to novel environments and reveals little in the way of causal mechanisms that define changes in species distribution or abundance. Having conservation planning rely largely on this single approach also increases the risk of policy failure. Mechanistic models that are parameterized with physiological information are expected to be more robust when extrapolating distributions to future environmental conditions and can identify physiological processes that set range boundaries. Implementation of mechanistic species distribution models requires knowledge of how environmental change influences physiological performance, and because this information is currently restricted to a comparatively small number of well-studied organisms, use of mechanistic modelling in the context of climate change conservation is limited. In this review, we propose that the need to develop mechanistic models that incorporate physiological data presents an opportunity for physiologists to contribute more directly to climate change conservation and advance the field of conservation physiology. We begin by describing the prevalence of species distribution modelling in climate change conservation, highlighting the benefits and drawbacks of both mechanistic and correlative approaches. Next, we emphasize the need to expand mechanistic models and discuss potential metrics of physiological performance suitable for integration into mechanistic models. We conclude by summarizing other factors, such as the need to consider demography, limiting broader application of mechanistic models in climate change conservation. Ideally, modellers, physiologists and

  13. Exploring Organic Mechanistic Puzzles with Molecular Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horowitz, Gail; Schwartz, Gary

    2004-01-01

    The molecular modeling was used to reinforce more general skills such as deducing and drawing reaction mechanisms, analyzing reaction kinetics and thermodynamics and drawing reaction coordinate energy diagrams. This modeling was done through the design of mechanistic puzzles, involving reactions not familiar to the students.

  14. The Substitution-Elimination Mechanistic Disc Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buonora, Paul T.; Yu Jin Lim

    2004-01-01

    A method designed to facilitate prediction of mechanism and products by developing critical thinking skills and reducing memorization is presented. The mechanistic disc method requiring students to utilize their understanding of charge stabilization, structural organic chemistry, and the fundamental mechanisms of aliphatic substitution and…

  15. Testing mechanistic models of growth in insects.

    PubMed

    Maino, James L; Kearney, Michael R

    2015-11-22

    Insects are typified by their small size, large numbers, impressive reproductive output and rapid growth. However, insect growth is not simply rapid; rather, insects follow a qualitatively distinct trajectory to many other animals. Here we present a mechanistic growth model for insects and show that increasing specific assimilation during the growth phase can explain the near-exponential growth trajectory of insects. The presented model is tested against growth data on 50 insects, and compared against other mechanistic growth models. Unlike the other mechanistic models, our growth model predicts energy reserves per biomass to increase with age, which implies a higher production efficiency and energy density of biomass in later instars. These predictions are tested against data compiled from the literature whereby it is confirmed that insects increase their production efficiency (by 24 percentage points) and energy density (by 4 J mg(-1)) between hatching and the attainment of full size. The model suggests that insects achieve greater production efficiencies and enhanced growth rates by increasing specific assimilation and increasing energy reserves per biomass, which are less costly to maintain than structural biomass. Our findings illustrate how the explanatory and predictive power of mechanistic growth models comes from their grounding in underlying biological processes.

  16. Evolving biosynthetic tangos negotiate mechanistic landscapes.

    PubMed

    Austin, Michael B; O'Maille, Paul E; Noel, Joseph P

    2008-04-01

    The dependence of polyketide synthase and terpene cyclase mechanistic adaptation on the chemistry of their oligomeric substrates illuminates a convergent evolutionary strategy for shaping cyclization in these otherwise disparate reactions. Evolution of these enzyme families relies on rhythmic tangos, in which the enzymes and substrates together determine product outcome by negotiating decision networks governing intrinsic and induced chemical reactivities. PMID:18347585

  17. Impact of Health-Related Family Factors on School Enrollment in Bolivia: Implications for Health Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madanat, Hala; Dearden, Kirk; Heaton, Tim; Forste, Renata

    2005-01-01

    This study identified the extent to which family factors increase school enrollment in Bolivia, after adjusting for human and financial capital. The sample was drawn from the 1998 Demographic and Health Survey. Logistic regression models were used to determine the effect of human capital, financial capital and family factors on school enrollment.…

  18. Analysis of Factors and Implications Influencing Leadership Ascension of Female Athletic Directors in Intercollegiate Athletics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burney, Rolanda C.

    2010-01-01

    This narrative analysis/life story study was designed to understand the factors influencing the career trajectory of female athletic directors in National Collegiate Athletic Association affiliated institutions and to discover how those factors functioned as a road map for future female administrators. Both social role and role congruity theories…

  19. Hand factors as regulators of cardiac morphogenesis and implications for congenital heart defects.

    PubMed

    Vincentz, Joshua W; Barnes, Ralston M; Firulli, Anthony B

    2011-06-01

    Almost 15 years of careful study have established the related basic Helix-Loop-Helix (bHLH) transcription factors Hand1 and Hand2 as critical for heart development across evolution. Hand factors make broad contributions, revealed through animal models, to the development of multiple cellular lineages that ultimately contribute to the heart. They perform critical roles in ventricular cardiomyocyte growth, differentiation, morphogenesis, and conduction. They are also important for the proper development of the cardiac outflow tract, epicardium, and endocardium. Molecularly, they function both through DNA binding and through protein-protein interactions, which are regulated transcriptionally, posttranscriptionally by microRNAs, and posttranslationally through phosphoregulation. Although direct Hand factor transcriptional targets are progressively being identified, confirmed direct targets of Hand factor transcriptional activity in the heart are limited. Identification of these targets will be critical to model the mechanisms by which Hand factor bHLH interactions affect developmental pathways. Improved understanding of Hand factor-mediated transcriptional cascades will be necessary to determine how Hand factor dysregulation translates to human disease phenotypes. This review summarizes the insight that animal models have provided into the regulation and function of these factors during heart development, in addition to the recent findings that suggest roles for HAND1 and HAND2 in human congenital heart disease.

  20. Dipole-field sums and Lorentz factors for orthorhombic lattices, and implications for polarizable molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purvis, C. K.; Taylor, P. L.

    1982-01-01

    A method for computing the Lorentz tensor components in single crystals via rapidly convergent sums of Bessels functions is developed using the relationship between dipole-field sums and the tensor components. The Lorentz factors for simple, body-centered, and base-centered orthorhombic lattices are computed using this method, and the derivative Lorentz factors for simple orthorhombic lattices are also determined. Both the Lorentz factors and their derivatives are shown to be very sensitive to a lattice structure. The equivalent of the Clausius-Mossotti relation for general orthorhombic lattices is derived using the Lorentz-factor formalism, and the permanent molecular dipole moment is related to crystal polarization for the case of a ferroelectric of polarizable point dipoles. It is concluded that the polarization enhancement due to self-polarization familiar from classical theory may actually be a reduction in consequences of negative Lorentz factors in one or two lattice directions for noncubic crystals.

  1. Growth factor modulation of fibroblast proliferation, differentiation, and invasion: implications for tissue valve engineering.

    PubMed

    Narine, Kishan; De Wever, Olivier; Van Valckenborgh, Dillis; Francois, Katrien; Bracke, Marc; DeSmet, Stefaan; Mareel, Marc; Van Nooten, Guido

    2006-10-01

    We have previously shown that transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) stimulates transdifferentiation of fibroblasts into smooth muscle alpha-actin (alpha-SMA) positive myofibroblasts. However, TGF-beta, as such, is unsuitable for effective population of a heart valve matrix, because it dose-dependently inhibits growth of fibroblasts. The aim of this study was to investigate combinations of other growth factors with TGF-beta to stimulate the proliferation of suitably differentiated cells and to enhance their invasion into aortic valve matrices. Human dermal mesenchymal cells (hDMC1.1) were treated with combinations of growth factors to stimulate these cells to trans-differentiate into myofibroblasts, to proliferate, and to invade. Growth factors were chosen after expression of their respective receptors was confirmed in hDMC1.1 using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. We combined TGF-beta with several growth factors such as insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1, IGF-2), epidermal growth factor (EGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-AA, PDGF-BB, and PDGFAB). Nuclear Ki67 staining, MTT assay, and cell counting revealed that only EGF and bFGF were capable of overcoming TGF-beta-induced growth inhibition. However, bFGF but not EGF inhibited TGF-beta-induced alpha-SMA expression, as evidenced by immuno-cytochemistry and Western blotting. A growth factor cocktail (TGF-beta, EGF, bFGF) has been established that maintains TGF-beta-induced trans-differentiation but overcomes TGF-beta-induced growth inhibition while stimulating fibroblast proliferation and invasion. PMID:17518640

  2. Human factors/ergonomics implications of big data analytics: Chartered Institute of Ergonomics and Human Factors annual lecture.

    PubMed

    Drury, Colin G

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, advances in sensor technology, connectedness and computational power have come together to produce huge data-sets. The treatment and analysis of these data-sets is known as big data analytics (BDA), and the somewhat related term data mining. Fields allied to human factors/ergonomics (HFE), e.g. statistics, have developed computational methods to derive meaningful, actionable conclusions from these data bases. This paper examines BDA, often characterised by volume, velocity and variety, giving examples of successful BDA use. This examination provides context by considering examples of using BDA on human data, using BDA in HFE studies, and studies of how people perform BDA. Significant issues for HFE are the reliance of BDA on correlation rather than hypotheses and theory, the ethics of BDA and the use of HFE in data visualisation.

  3. Functional Genomic Screen Identifies Klebsiella pneumoniae Factors Implicated in Blocking Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) Signaling.

    PubMed

    Tomás, Anna; Lery, Leticia; Regueiro, Verónica; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Camino; Martínez, Verónica; Moranta, David; Llobet, Enrique; González-Nicolau, Mar; Insua, Jose L; Tomas, Juan M; Sansonetti, Philippe J; Tournebize, Régis; Bengoechea, José A

    2015-07-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an etiologic agent of community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia. It has been shown that K. pneumoniae infections are characterized by reduced early inflammatory response. Recently our group has shown that K. pneumoniae dampens the activation of inflammatory responses by antagonizing the activation of the NF-κB canonical pathway. Our results revealed that K. pneumoniae capsule polysaccharide (CPS) was necessary but not sufficient to attenuate inflammation. To identify additional Klebsiella factors required to dampen inflammation, we standardized and applied a high-throughput gain-of-function screen to examine a Klebsiella transposon mutant library. We identified 114 mutants that triggered the activation of NF-κB. Two gene ontology categories accounted for half of the loci identified in the screening: metabolism and transport genes (32% of the mutants) and envelope-related genes (17%). Characterization of the mutants revealed that the lack of the enterobactin siderophore was linked to a reduced CPS expression, which in turn underlined the NF-κB activation induced by the mutant. The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O-polysaccharide and the pullulanase (PulA) type 2 secretion system (T2SS) are required for full effectiveness of the immune evasion. Importantly, these factors do not play a redundant role. The fact that LPS O-polysaccharide and T2SS mutant-induced responses were dependent on TLR2-TLR4-MyD88 activation suggested that LPS O-polysaccharide and PulA perturbed Toll-like receptor (TLR)-dependent recognition of K. pneumoniae. Finally, we demonstrate that LPS O-polysaccharide and pulA mutants are attenuated in the pneumonia mouse model. We propose that LPS O-polysaccharide and PulA T2SS could be new targets for the design of new antimicrobials. Increasing TLR-governed defense responses might provide also selective alternatives for the management of K. pneumoniae pneumonia.

  4. Functional Genomic Screen Identifies Klebsiella pneumoniae Factors Implicated in Blocking Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Tomás, Anna; Lery, Leticia; Regueiro, Verónica; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Camino; Martínez, Verónica; Moranta, David; Llobet, Enrique; González-Nicolau, Mar; Insua, Jose L.; Tomas, Juan M.; Sansonetti, Philippe J.; Tournebize, Régis; Bengoechea, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an etiologic agent of community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia. It has been shown that K. pneumoniae infections are characterized by reduced early inflammatory response. Recently our group has shown that K. pneumoniae dampens the activation of inflammatory responses by antagonizing the activation of the NF-κB canonical pathway. Our results revealed that K. pneumoniae capsule polysaccharide (CPS) was necessary but not sufficient to attenuate inflammation. To identify additional Klebsiella factors required to dampen inflammation, we standardized and applied a high-throughput gain-of-function screen to examine a Klebsiella transposon mutant library. We identified 114 mutants that triggered the activation of NF-κB. Two gene ontology categories accounted for half of the loci identified in the screening: metabolism and transport genes (32% of the mutants) and envelope-related genes (17%). Characterization of the mutants revealed that the lack of the enterobactin siderophore was linked to a reduced CPS expression, which in turn underlined the NF-κB activation induced by the mutant. The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O-polysaccharide and the pullulanase (PulA) type 2 secretion system (T2SS) are required for full effectiveness of the immune evasion. Importantly, these factors do not play a redundant role. The fact that LPS O-polysaccharide and T2SS mutant-induced responses were dependent on TLR2-TLR4-MyD88 activation suggested that LPS O-polysaccharide and PulA perturbed Toll-like receptor (TLR)-dependent recognition of K. pneumoniae. Finally, we demonstrate that LPS O-polysaccharide and pulA mutants are attenuated in the pneumonia mouse model. We propose that LPS O-polysaccharide and PulA T2SS could be new targets for the design of new antimicrobials. Increasing TLR-governed defense responses might provide also selective alternatives for the management of K. pneumoniae pneumonia. PMID:25971969

  5. Implications of Risk Factors for Alzheimer’s Disease in Canada’s Indigenous Population

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Julia Petrasek; Barnes, Deborah E.; Middleton, Laura E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Indigenous peoples in Canada have higher prevalence of modifiable risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The relative importance of these risk factors on AD risk management is poorly understood. Methods Relative risks from literature and prevalence of risk factors from Statistics Canada or the First Nations Regional Health Survey were used to determine projected population attributable risk (PAR) associated with modifiable risk factors for AD (low education and vascular risk factors) among on- and off-reserve Indigenous and non-Indigenous people in Canada using the Levin formula. Results Physical inactivity had the highest PAR for AD among Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples in Canada (32.5% [10.1%–51.1%] and 30.5% [9.2%–48.8%] respectively). The PAR for most modifiable risk factors was higher among Indigenous peoples in Canada, particularly among on-reserve groups. The greatest differences in PAR were for low educational attainment and smoking, which were approximately 10% higher among Indigenous peoples in Canada. The combined PAR for AD for all six modifiable risk factors was 79.6% among on-reserve Indigenous, 74.9% among off-reserve Indigenous, and 67.1% among non-Indigenous peoples in Canada. (All differences significant to p < .001.) Conclusions Modifiable risk factors are responsible for the most AD cases among Indigenous peoples in Canada. Further research is necessary to determine the prevalence of AD and the impact of risk factor modification among Indigenous peoples in Canada. PMID:26495049

  6. Atrial Fibrillation and Hypertension: Mechanistic, Epidemiologic, and Treatment Parallels

    PubMed Central

    Ogunsua, Adedotun A.; Shaikh, Amir Y.; Ahmed, Mohamed; McManus, David D.

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an increasingly prevalent condition and the most common sustained arrhythmia encountered in ambulatory and hospital practice. Several clinical risk factors for AF include age, sex, valvular heart disease, obesity, sleep apnea, heart failure, and hypertension (HTN). Of all the risk factors, HTN is the most commonly encountered condition in patients with incident AF. Hypertension is associated with a 1.8-fold increase in the risk of developing new-onset AF and a 1.5-fold increase in the risk of progression to permanent AF. Hypertension predisposes to cardiac structural changes that influence the development of AF such as atrial remodeling. The renin angiotensin aldosterone system has been demonstrated to be a common mechanistic link in the pathogenesis of HTN and AF. Importantly, HTN is one of the few modifiable AF risk factors, and guideline-directed management of HTN may reduce the incidence of AF. PMID:27057292

  7. Atrial Fibrillation and Hypertension: Mechanistic, Epidemiologic, and Treatment Parallels.

    PubMed

    Ogunsua, Adedotun A; Shaikh, Amir Y; Ahmed, Mohamed; McManus, David D

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an increasingly prevalent condition and the most common sustained arrhythmia encountered in ambulatory and hospital practice. Several clinical risk factors for AF include age, sex, valvular heart disease, obesity, sleep apnea, heart failure, and hypertension (HTN). Of all the risk factors, HTN is the most commonly encountered condition in patients with incident AF. Hypertension is associated with a 1.8-fold increase in the risk of developing new-onset AF and a 1.5-fold increase in the risk of progression to permanent AF. Hypertension predisposes to cardiac structural changes that influence the development of AF such as atrial remodeling. The renin angiotensin aldosterone system has been demonstrated to be a common mechanistic link in the pathogenesis of HTN and AF. Importantly, HTN is one of the few modifiable AF risk factors, and guideline-directed management of HTN may reduce the incidence of AF. PMID:27057292

  8. BioAge: Toward A Multi-Determined, Mechanistic Account of Cognitive Aging

    PubMed Central

    DeCarlo, Correne A.; Tuokko, Holly A.; Williams, Dorothy; Dixon, Roger A.; MacDonald, Stuart W.S.

    2014-01-01

    The search for reliable early indicators of age-related cognitive decline represents a critical avenue for progress in aging research. Chronological age is a commonly used developmental index; however, it offers little insight into the mechanisms underlying cognitive decline. In contrast, biological age (BioAge), reflecting the vitality of essential biological systems, represents a promising operationalization of developmental time. Current BioAge models have successfully predicted age-related cognitive deficits. Research on aging-related cognitive function indicates that the interaction of multiple risk and protective factors across the human lifespan confers individual risk for late-life cognitive decline, implicating a multi-causal explanation. In this review, we explore current BioAge models, describe three broad yet pathologically relevant biological processes linked to cognitive decline, and propose a novel operationalization of BioAge accounting for both moderating and causal mechanisms of cognitive decline and dementia. We argue that a multivariate and mechanistic BioAge approach will lead to a greater understanding of disease pathology as well as more accurate prediction and early identification of late-life cognitive decline. PMID:25278166

  9. Factor Analysis Demonstrates a Common Schizoidal Phenotype within Autistic and Schizotypal Tendency: Implications for Neuroscientific Studies.

    PubMed

    Ford, Talitha C; Crewther, David P

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral and cognitive dysfunction, particularly social and communication impairments, are shared between autism and schizophrenia spectrum disorders, while evidence for a diametric autism-positive schizophrenia symptom profile is inconsistent. We investigated the shared phenotype at a personality trait level, particularly its resemblance to schizoid personality disorder, as well as differential aspects of the autism-schizophrenia model. Items of the autism spectrum quotient (AQ) and schizotypal personality questionnaire (SPQ) were pseudo-randomly combined, and were completed by 449 (162 male, 287 female) non-clinical participants aged 18-40. A factor analysis revealed three factors; the first represented a shared social disorganization phenotype, the second reflected perceptual oddities specific to schizotypy while the third reflected social rigidity specific to autism. The AQ and SPQ were strongly correlated with Factor 1 (AQ: r = 0.75, p < 0.001; SPQ: r = 0.96, p < 0.001), SPQ score was correlated with Factor 2 (r = 0.51, p < 0.001), particularly in cognitive-perceptual features (r = 0.66, p < 0.001), and AQ score was strongly correlated with Factor 3 (r = 0.76, p < 0.001). Furthermore, there was no relationship between Factor 1 and Factor 2. Thus, there is robust evidence for a shared social disorganization phenotype in autistic and schizotypal tendency, which reflects the schizoid phenotype. Discriminating and independent dimensions of schizotypal and autistic tendency exist in Factors 2 and 3, respectively. Current diagnostic protocols could result in different diagnoses depending on the instrument used, suggesting the need for neuromarkers that objectively differentiate autistic and schizotypal traits and resolve the question of commonality versus co-morbidity.

  10. Analytic model for academic research productivity having factors, interactions and implications

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Financial support is dear in academia and will tighten further. How can the research mission be accomplished within new restraints? A model is presented for evaluating source components of academic research productivity. It comprises six factors: funding; investigator quality; efficiency of the research institution; the research mix of novelty, incremental advancement, and confirmatory studies; analytic accuracy; and passion. Their interactions produce output and patterned influences between factors. Strategies for optimizing output are enabled. PMID:22130145

  11. Hepatic leukemia factor promotes resistance to cell death: Implications for therapeutics and chronotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, Katrina M.; Sontag, Ryan L.; Weber, Thomas J.

    2013-04-15

    Physiological variation related to circadian rhythms and aberrant gene expression patterns are believed to modulate therapeutic efficacy, but the precise molecular determinants remain unclear. Here we examine the regulation of cell death by hepatic leukemia factor (HLF), which is an output regulator of circadian rhythms and is aberrantly expressed in human cancers, using an ectopic expression strategy in JB6 mouse epidermal cells and human keratinocytes. Ectopic HLF expression inhibited cell death in both JB6 cells and human keratinocytes, as induced by serum-starvation, tumor necrosis factor alpha and ionizing radiation. Microarray analysis indicates that HLF regulates a complex multi-gene transcriptional program encompassing upregulation of anti-apoptotic genes, downregulation of pro-apoptotic genes, and many additional changes that are consistent with an anti-death program. Collectively, our results demonstrate that ectopic expression of HLF, an established transcription factor that cycles with circadian rhythms, can recapitulate many features associated with circadian-dependent physiological variation. - Highlights: ► Circadian-dependent physiological variation impacts therapeutic efficacy. ► Hepatic leukemia factor inhibits cell death and is a candidate circadian factor. ► Hepatic leukemia factor anti-death program is conserved in murine and human cells. ► Transcriptomics indicates the anti-death program results from a systems response.

  12. Plasmonic Purcell factor and coupling efficiency to surface plasmons. Implications for addressing and controlling optical nanosources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colas des Francs, G.; Barthes, J.; Bouhelier, A.; Weeber, J. C.; Dereux, A.; Cuche, A.; Girard, C.

    2016-09-01

    The Purcell factor F p is a key quantity in cavity quantum electrodynamics (cQED) that quantifies the coupling rate between a dipolar emitter and a cavity mode. Its simple form {F}{{p}}\\propto Q/V unravels the possible strategies to enhance and control light–matter interaction. Practically, efficient light–matter interaction is achieved thanks to either (i) high quality factor Q at the basis of cQED or (ii) low modal volume V at the basis of nanophotonics and plasmonics. In the last decade, strong efforts have been done to derive a plasmonic Purcell factor in order to transpose cQED concepts to the nanocale, in a scale-law approach. In this work, we discuss the plasmonic Purcell factor for both delocalized (SPP) and localized (LSP) surface-plasmon-polaritons and briefly summarize the expected applications for nanophotonics. On the basis of the SPP resonance shape (Lorentzian or Fano profile), we derive closed form expression for the coupling rate to delocalized plasmons. The quality factor factor and modal confinement of both SPP and LSP are quantified, demonstrating their strongly subwavelength behavior.

  13. CREB in the Pathophysiology of Cancer: Implications for Targeting Transcription Factors for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Kathleen M.; Frank, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Transcription factors are key regulators of the pattern of gene expression in a cell and directly control central processes such as proliferation, survival, self-renewal, and invasion. Given this critical role, the function of transcription factors is normally regulated closely, often through transient phosphorylation. Although transcription factors are not often directly modified by mutations in cancer cells, they frequently become activated constitutively through mutations affecting “upstream” pathways. By continually driving the expression of key target genes, these oncogenic transcription factors play a central role in tumor pathogenesis. One such transcription factor is the cAMP-regulatory element-binding protein (CREB), which can be activated through phosphorylation by a number of kinases, including Akt, p90Rsk, protein kinase A, and calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases and regulates genes whose deregulated expression promotes oncogenesis, including cyclins, Bcl-2 family members, and Egr-1. CREB is overexpressed and constitutively phosphorylated in a number of forms of human cancer, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and non – small cell lung cancer, and appears to play a direct role in disease pathogenesis and prognosis. Although transcription factors have not been a central focus of drug development, recent advances suggest that CREB and other such proteins may be worthwhile targets for cancer therapy. PMID:19351775

  14. Plasmonic Purcell factor and coupling efficiency to surface plasmons. Implications for addressing and controlling optical nanosources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colas des Francs, G.; Barthes, J.; Bouhelier, A.; Weeber, J. C.; Dereux, A.; Cuche, A.; Girard, C.

    2016-09-01

    The Purcell factor F p is a key quantity in cavity quantum electrodynamics (cQED) that quantifies the coupling rate between a dipolar emitter and a cavity mode. Its simple form {F}{{p}}\\propto Q/V unravels the possible strategies to enhance and control light-matter interaction. Practically, efficient light-matter interaction is achieved thanks to either (i) high quality factor Q at the basis of cQED or (ii) low modal volume V at the basis of nanophotonics and plasmonics. In the last decade, strong efforts have been done to derive a plasmonic Purcell factor in order to transpose cQED concepts to the nanocale, in a scale-law approach. In this work, we discuss the plasmonic Purcell factor for both delocalized (SPP) and localized (LSP) surface-plasmon-polaritons and briefly summarize the expected applications for nanophotonics. On the basis of the SPP resonance shape (Lorentzian or Fano profile), we derive closed form expression for the coupling rate to delocalized plasmons. The quality factor factor and modal confinement of both SPP and LSP are quantified, demonstrating their strongly subwavelength behavior.

  15. Risk Factors for Lung Cancer in Iowa Women: Implications for Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Neuberger, John S.; Mahnken, Jonathan D.; Mayo, Matthew S.; Field, R. William

    2007-01-01

    Background Multiple risk factors possibly associated with lung cancer were examined as part of a large-scale residential radon case-control study conducted in Iowa between 1994 and 1997. We were particularly interested in stratifying risk factors by smoking status. Relatively little risk factor information is available for Midwestern rural women. Methods Four hundred thirteen female lung cancer cases and 614 controls aged 40-84, who were residents of their current home for at least 20 years, were included. Risk factors examined included cigarette smoking, passive smoking, occupation, chemical exposure, previous lung disease, family history of cancer, and urban residence. Multiple logistic regression analysis was conducted after adjusting for age, education, and cumulative radon exposure. Results As expected, active cigarette smoking was the major risk factor for lung cancer. While cessation of smoking was significantly associated with a reduced risk for lung cancer, the risk remained significantly elevated for 25 years. Among all cases, asbestos exposure was a significant risk. Among ex-smokers, pack-year history predominated as the major risk. Among never smokers, a family history of kidney or bladder cancer were significant risk factors (OR= 7.34, 95% CI = 1.91 - 28.18; and 5.02, 95% CI = 1.64-15.39, respectively), as was a history of previous lung disease (OR=2.28, 95% CI=1.24-4.18) and asbestos exposure. No statistically significant increase in lung cancer risk was found for occupation or urban residence. Conclusions Smoking prevention activities are urgently needed in rural areas of the United States. Relatives of individuals with smoking-related cancers are potentially at increased risk. Genetic risk factors should be more fully investigated in never smokers. PMID:16581199

  16. Mechanistic fracture criteria for the failure of human cortical bone

    SciTech Connect

    Nalla, Ravi K.; Kinney, John H.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2002-12-13

    A mechanistic understanding of fracture in human bone is critical to predicting fracture risk associated with age and disease. Despite extensive work, a mechanistic framework for describing how the underlying microstructure affects the failure mode in bone is lacking.

  17. Hepatic Leukemia Factor Promotes Resistance To Cell Death: Implications For Therapeutics and Chronotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, Katrina M.; Sontag, Ryan L.; Weber, Thomas J.

    2013-04-15

    Physiological variation related to circadian rhythms and aberrant gene expression patterns are believed to modulate therapeutic efficacy, but the precise molecular determinants remain unclear. Here we examine the regulation of cell death by hepatic leukemia factor (HLF), which is an output regulator of circadian rhythms and is aberrantly expressed in human cancers, using an ectopic expression strategy in JB6 mouse epidermal cells and human keratinocytes. Ectopic HLF expression inhibited cell death in both JB6 cells and human keratinocytes, as induced by serum-starvation, tumor necrosis factor alpha and ionizing radiation. Microarray analysis indicates that HLF regulates a complex multi-gene transcriptional program encompassing upregulation of anti-apoptotic genes, downregulation of pro-apoptotic genes, and many additional changes that are consistent with an anti-death program. Collectively, our results demonstrate that ectopic expression of HLF, an established transcription factor that cycles with circadian rhythms, can recapitulate many features associated with circadian-dependent physiological variation.

  18. Critical Review: Immunomodulation by Seminal Factors and Implications for Male-to-Female HIV-1 Transmission.

    PubMed

    Keogan, Shawn; Siegert, Karl; Wigdahl, Brian; Krebs, Fred C

    2015-06-01

    The role of semen in heterosexual transmission of the HIV-1 has been marginally viewed as an inert vehicle for the delivery of virus. However, studies from the field of reproductive biology have made it clear that seminal fluid is a complex and dynamic medium containing high concentrations of factors that play key roles in modulating the local immune response in the female reproductive tract during fertilization and embryogenesis. It is therefore strongly implied that the same seminal factors responsible for guiding the immune response in reproduction also play a role in male-to-female transmission of HIV-1. To begin to understand how these factors affect male-to-female HIV-1 transmission, multiple studies have comparatively profiled the contents of seminal fluid collected from uninfected and HIV-1-infected men. This review provides an overview of these studies, as well as a discussion of the potential impact of semen on HIV-1 transmission.

  19. N-glycans of growth factor receptors: their role in receptor function and disease implications.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Motoko; Hasegawa, Yoshihiro; Gao, Congxiao; Kuroki, Yoshio; Taniguchi, Naoyuki

    2016-10-01

    Numerous signal-transduction-related molecules are secreted proteins or membrane proteins, and the mechanism by which these molecules are regulated by glycan chains is a very important issue for developing an understanding of the cellular events that transpire. This review covers the functional regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), ErbB3 and the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) receptor by N-glycans. This review shows that the N-glycans play important roles in regulating protein conformation and interactions with carbohydrate recognition molecules. These results point to the possibility of a novel strategy for controlling cell signalling and developing novel glycan-based therapeutics. PMID:27612953

  20. Music: a milieu factor with implications for the nurse-therapist.

    PubMed

    Hinds, P S

    1980-06-01

    The effects of one type of music upon the social interactions observed in a group play therapy with ten male children, ages 8 to 10, were studied. A behavioral check list was developed to measure five target behaviors: the children's verbalizations, proximity with group members, proximity with the group co-therapists, involvement in toy exchanges and involvement in acts of physical aggression. The resulting statistical analysis of tabulated data suggests music to be a factor in an increased number of social interactions. Consideration of such a milieu factor as music may prove valuable in many varying situations. PMID:6249919

  1. Epigenetics and the environment: emerging patterns and implications.

    PubMed

    Feil, Robert; Fraga, Mario F

    2012-01-04

    Epigenetic phenomena in animals and plants are mediated by DNA methylation and stable chromatin modifications. There has been considerable interest in whether environmental factors modulate the establishment and maintenance of epigenetic modifications, and could thereby influence gene expression and phenotype. Chemical pollutants, dietary components, temperature changes and other external stresses can indeed have long-lasting effects on development, metabolism and health, sometimes even in subsequent generations. Although the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown, particularly in humans, mechanistic insights are emerging from experimental model systems. These have implications for structuring future research and understanding disease and development.

  2. Rhodopseudomonas palustris CGA010 Proteome Implicates Extracytoplasmic Function Sigma Factor in Stress Response

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Michael S.; Hurst, Gregory B.; Lu, Tse-Yuan S.; Perry, Leslie M.; Pan, Chongle; Lankford, Patricia K.; Pelletier, Dale A.

    2015-04-08

    Rhodopseudomonas palustris encodes 16 extracytoplasmic function (ECF) σ factors. In this paper, to begin to investigate the regulatory network of one of these ECF σ factors, the whole proteome of R. palustris CGA010 was quantitatively analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry from cultures episomally expressing the ECF σRPA4225 (ecfT) versus a WT control. Among the proteins with the greatest increase in abundance were catalase KatE, trehalose synthase, a DPS-like protein, and several regulatory proteins. Alignment of the cognate promoter regions driving expression of several upregulated proteins suggested a conserved binding motif in the -35 and -10 regions with the consensus sequence GGAAC-18N-TT. Additionally, the putative anti-σ factor RPA4224, whose gene is contained in the same predicted operon as RPA4225, was identified as interacting directly with the predicted response regulator RPA4223 by mass spectrometry of affinity-isolated protein complexes. Furthermore, another gene (RPA4226) coding for a protein that contains a cytoplasmic histidine kinase domain is located immediately upstream of RPA4225. The genomic organization of orthologs for these four genes is conserved in several other strains of R. palustris as well as in closely related α-Proteobacteria. Finally, taken together, these data suggest that ECF σRPA4225 and the three additional genes make up a sigma factor mimicry system in R. palustris.

  3. Rhodopseudomonas palustris CGA010 Proteome Implicates Extracytoplasmic Function Sigma Factor in Stress Response

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Allen, Michael S.; Hurst, Gregory B.; Lu, Tse-Yuan S.; Perry, Leslie M.; Pan, Chongle; Lankford, Patricia K.; Pelletier, Dale A.

    2015-04-08

    Rhodopseudomonas palustris encodes 16 extracytoplasmic function (ECF) σ factors. In this paper, to begin to investigate the regulatory network of one of these ECF σ factors, the whole proteome of R. palustris CGA010 was quantitatively analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry from cultures episomally expressing the ECF σRPA4225 (ecfT) versus a WT control. Among the proteins with the greatest increase in abundance were catalase KatE, trehalose synthase, a DPS-like protein, and several regulatory proteins. Alignment of the cognate promoter regions driving expression of several upregulated proteins suggested a conserved binding motif in the -35 and -10 regions with the consensus sequencemore » GGAAC-18N-TT. Additionally, the putative anti-σ factor RPA4224, whose gene is contained in the same predicted operon as RPA4225, was identified as interacting directly with the predicted response regulator RPA4223 by mass spectrometry of affinity-isolated protein complexes. Furthermore, another gene (RPA4226) coding for a protein that contains a cytoplasmic histidine kinase domain is located immediately upstream of RPA4225. The genomic organization of orthologs for these four genes is conserved in several other strains of R. palustris as well as in closely related α-Proteobacteria. Finally, taken together, these data suggest that ECF σRPA4225 and the three additional genes make up a sigma factor mimicry system in R. palustris.« less

  4. Nuclearly encoded splicing factors implicated in RNA splicing in higher plant organelles.

    PubMed

    de Longevialle, Andéol Falcon; Small, Ian D; Lurin, Claire

    2010-07-01

    Plant organelles arose from two independent endosymbiosis events. Throughout evolutionary history, tight control of chloroplasts and mitochondria has been gained by the nucleus, which regulates most steps of organelle genome expression and metabolism. In particular, RNA maturation, including RNA splicing, is highly dependent on nuclearly encoded splicing factors. Most introns in organelles are group II introns, whose catalytic mechanism closely resembles that of the nuclear spliceosome. Plant group II introns have lost the ability to self-splice in vivo and require nuclearly encoded proteins as cofactors. Since the first splicing factor was identified in chloroplasts more than 10 years ago, many other proteins have been shown to be involved in splicing of one or more introns in chloroplasts or mitochondria. These new proteins belong to a variety of different families of RNA binding proteins and provide new insights into ribonucleo-protein complexes and RNA splicing machineries in organelles. In this review, we describe how splicing factors, encoded by the nucleus and targeted to the organelles, take part in post-transcriptional steps in higher plant organelle gene expression. We go on to discuss the potential for these factors to regulate organelle gene expression.

  5. Individual and Contextual Factors for Bullying and Peer Victimization: Implications for Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vivolo, Alana M.; Holt, Melissa K.; Massetti, Greta M.

    2011-01-01

    The Division of Violence Prevention (DVP) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is committed to preventing youth violence. For the past decade, DVP has supported research on risk and protective factors associated with youth interpersonal violence and the development and evaluation of prevention programs. This commentary addresses…

  6. Factor Structure of the Restricted Academic Situation Scale: Implications for ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karama, Sherif; Amor, Leila Ben; Grizenko, Natalie; Ciampi, Antonio; Mbekou, Valentin; Ter-Stepanian, Marina; Lageix, Philippe; Baron, Chantal; Schwartz, George; Joober, Ridha

    2009-01-01

    Background: To study the factor structure of the Restricted Academic Situation Scale (RASS), a psychometric tool used to assess behavior in children with ADHD, 117 boys and 21 girls meeting "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th ed.; "DSM-IV") criteria for ADHD and aged between 6 and 12 years were recruited. Assessments were…

  7. Factors Affecting Students' Choice to Enroll at HCC: Implications for Marketing, Recruitment, and Advising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinley, John W.

    A study was conducted to analyze the factors which affect students' decisions to enroll at Harford Community College (HCC), Harford County, Maryland. An entrant follow-up survey was sent in spring 1984 to all students who were enrolled in a Maryland community college for the first time in fall 1982. The survey sought to evaluate the extent to…

  8. Factors of Peak Performance in the Death Crisis: Implications for Death Counseling and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Privette, Gayle

    Peak performance in the death crisis as a critical incident of creative response to the awareness of one's own or another person's death is the concern of this report. The topology of peak performance in the death crisis was examined in an investigation of retrospective self-reports of 20 adult respondents and a factor structure of peak…

  9. Survey of piloting factors in V/STOL aircraft with implications for flight control system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ringland, R. F.; Craig, S. J.

    1977-01-01

    Flight control system design factors involved for pilot workload relief are identified. Major contributors to pilot workload include configuration management and control and aircraft stability and response qualities. A digital fly by wire stability augmentation, configuration management, and configuration control system is suggested for reduction of pilot workload during takeoff, hovering, and approach.

  10. RENO, NV, JANUARY 15, 2004: FACTORS IMPLICATED IN AMPHIBIAN POPULATION DECLINES IN THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Factors known or suspected to be adversely affecting native amphibian populations in the US were identified using information from 267 species accounts written in a standardized format by multiple authors in the forthcoming book, 'Status and Conservation of U.S. Amphibians'. Spec...

  11. Factors Affecting Use of Computers in Elementary Classrooms: Implications for Preservice and Inservice Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foliart, Hillary H.; Lemlech, Johanna K.

    Designed to isolate curriculum needs for computer education courses for preservice and inservice elementary school teachers, this study identified patterns of microcomputer use as they have been planned and implemented in elementary classrooms together with factors that affect those patterns. The cluster analysis procedure was used to analyze…

  12. A Study of Societal Factors Influencing the Growth of Castleton State College: Implications for Future Trends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forest, Robert F.

    Analyzed are certain societal factors--political, demographic, financial, public relations, student profiles, and mission statements as they have influenced the growth of Castleton State College since becoming a member of the Vermont State College system in 1961. Data for the study were gathered from a literature review of one of the daily…

  13. Constraints on the form factors for K ---> pi l nu and implications for |V(us)|

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Richard J.; /Fermilab

    2006-07-01

    Rigorous bounds are established for the expansion coefficients governing the shape of semileptonic K {yields} {pi} form factors. The constraints enforced by experimental data from {tau} {yields} K{pi}{nu} eliminate uncertainties associated with model parameterizations in the determination of |V{sub us}|. The results support the validity of a powerful expansion that can be applied to other semileptonic transitions.

  14. A Synthesis of Studies Searching for School Factors: Implications for Theory and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyriakides, Leonidas; Creemers, Bert; Antoniou, Panayiotis; Demetriou, Demetris

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a meta-analysis in which the dynamic model of educational effectiveness is used as a framework to search for school factors associated with student achievement. The methods and results of a synthesis of 67 studies are presented. Findings reveal that effective schools are able to develop policies and take actions…

  15. Prognostic clinical factors in pretreated colorectal cancer patients receiving regorafenib: Implications for clinical management

    PubMed Central

    Del Prete, Michela; Giampieri, Riccardo; Loupakis, Fotios; Prochilo, Tiziana; Salvatore, Lisa; Faloppi, Luca; Bianconi, Maristella; Bittoni, Alessandro; Aprile, Giuseppe; Zaniboni, Alberto; Falcone, Alfredo; Scartozzi, Mario; Cascinu, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Background We assessed the impact on survival of angiogenesis and inflammation-related factors, particularly LDH serum levels, platelet, neutrophil and lymphocyte counts, and neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), in metastatic colorectal cancer patients receiving regorafenib monotherapy. Methods LDH serum levels, neutrophil, lymphocyte and platelet counts were collected at the start of regorafenib monotherapy. Cut-off values were calculated by ROC curve analysis. Survival analyses were performed by Kaplan-Meier method, and multivariate analysis by Cox method. Results A total of 208 patients were eligible for analysis. Among factors who were related with worse overall survival and who maintained their role at the multivariate analysis, high platelet count (Exp(b):1.4963, 95% CI:1.0130–2.2103, p = 0.0439) and high neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (Exp(b):1.6963, 95% CI:1.0757–2.6751, p = 0.0237) were those who more deeply were related to worse overall survival. High lymphocyte count (Exp(b):0.4527, 95% CI:0.2801–0.7316, p = 0.0013) was correlated with improved overall survival. Conclusions High neutrophil, high platelet, low lymphocyte count and/or high NLR may represent negative prognostic factors in patients receiving regorafenib monotherapy. It is advisable that these factors are taken into account in the design of subsequent trials in colorectal cancer patients receiving this drug. PMID:26334693

  16. The Common Factors Model: Implications for Transtheoretical Clinical Social Work Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, Mark; Keenan, Elizabeth King

    2010-01-01

    Direct practice social workers today are challenged to address the requirements of the complex array of professional, organizational, institutional, and regulatory demands placed on them in the broader socioeconomic context of fewer resources and diminished public support for social welfare services in the United States. The common factors model…

  17. Contextual Factors Affecting Learning in Laos and the Implications for Information Literacy Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorner, Daniel G.; Gorman, G. E.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Laos is used as a case study of how factors such as culture and indigenous knowledge must be considered to plan for information literacy education that is culturally and contextually appropriate. Method: Data were obtained from observations during visits to four Lao schools and from interviews with fourteen teachers at these schools.…

  18. A mechanistic insight into a proteasome-independent constitutive inhibitor kappaBalpha (IkappaBalpha) degradation and nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation pathway in WEHI-231 B-cells.

    PubMed Central

    Shumway, Stuart D; Miyamoto, Shigeki

    2004-01-01

    Inducible activation of the transcription factor NF-kappaB (nuclear factor kappaB) is classically mediated by proteasomal degradation of its associated inhibitors, IkappaBalpha (inhibitory kappaBalpha) and IkappaBbeta. However, certain B-lymphocytes maintain constitutively nuclear NF-kappaB activity (a p50-c-Rel heterodimer) which is resistant to inhibition by proteasome inhibitors. This activity in the WEHI-231 B-cell line is associated with continual and preferential degradation of IkappaBalpha, which is also unaffected by proteasome inhibitors. Pharmacological studies indicated that there was a correlation between inhibition of IkappaBalpha degradation and constitutive p50-c-Rel activity. Domain analysis of IkappaBalpha by deletion mutagenesis demonstrated that an N-terminal 36-amino-acid sequence of IkappaBalpha represented an instability determinant for constitutive degradation. Moreover, domain grafting studies indicated that this sequence was sufficient to cause IkappaBbeta, but not chloramphenicol acetyltransferase, to be rapidly degraded in WEHI-231 B-cells. However, this sequence was insufficient to target IkappaBbeta to the non-proteasome degradation pathway, suggesting that there was an additional cis-element(s) in IkappaBalpha that was required for complete targeting. Nevertheless, the NF-kappaB pool associated with IkappaBbeta now became constitutively active by virtue of IkappaBbeta instability in these cells. These findings further support the notion that IkappaB instability governs the maintenance of constitutive p50-c-Rel activity in certain B-cells via a unique degradation pathway. PMID:14763901

  19. Biofilm formation by Streptococcus agalactiae: influence of environmental conditions and implicated virulence factors

    PubMed Central

    Rosini, Roberto; Margarit, Immaculada

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus, GBS) is an important human pathogen that colonizes the urogenital and/or the lower gastro-intestinal tract of up to 40% of healthy women of reproductive age and is a leading cause of sepsis and meningitis in the neonates. GBS can also infect the elderly and immuno-compromised adults, and is responsible for mastitis in bovines. Like other Gram-positive bacteria, GBS can form biofilm-like three-dimensional structures that could enhance its ability to colonize and persist in the host. Biofilm formation by GBS has been investigated in vitro and appears tightly controlled by environmental conditions. Several adhesins have been shown to play a role in the formation of GBS biofilm-like structures, among which are the protein components of pili protruding outside the bacterial surface. Remarkably, antibodies directed against pilus proteins can prevent the formation of biofilms. The implications of biofilm formation in the context of GBS asymptomatic colonization and dissemination to cause invasive disease remain to be investigated in detail. PMID:25699242

  20. Chemical studies on tobacco smoke. XXXIII. N' -nitrosonornicotine in tobacco: analysis of possible contributing factors and biologic implications.

    PubMed

    Hecht, S S; Ornaf, R M; Hoffmann, D

    1975-05-01

    A chemical analytic method to determine N'-nitrosonornicotine (NNN) and N' -nitrosoanabasine (NAB) in tobacco was developed. NNN was found in the unburned tobacco of commercial products at concentrations betweeen 0.3 and 88.6 mug/g. The highest levels were observed in highly fermented snuff (29.1 mug/g) and fine-cut chewing tobacco (88.6 mug/g). NAB was not detected (smaller than 0.5 ng/g) in any tobacco examined. Two new tobacco components, N' -carbomethoxynornicotine and N' -carbomethoxyanabasine,were found. Possible origins of NNN in tobacco were discussed, especially in relation to concentrations of nitrite, nitate, and alkaloids, and in relation to pH and curing. Biologic implications, including the possible function of NNN (the first organic carcinogen isolated from unburned tobacco) as a causative factor in cancer of the oral cavity in tobacco chewers and betel quid chewers, were also discussed.

  1. Implications of the Fukushima Nuclear Disaster: Man-Made Hazards, Vulnerability Factors, and Risk to Environmental Health.

    PubMed

    Eddy, Christopher; Sase, Eriko

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this article was to examine the environmental health implications of the 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster from an all-hazards perspective. The authors performed a literature review that included Japanese and international nuclear guidance and policy, scientific papers, and reports on the Chernobyl and Three Mile Island disasters while also considering all-hazards preparedness rubrics in the U.S. The examination of the literature resulted in the following: a) the authors' "All-Hazards Planning Reference Model" that distinguishes three planning categories-Disaster Trigger Event, Man-Made Hazards, and Vulnerability Factors; b) the generalization of their model to other countries; and c) advocacy for environmental health end fate to be considered in planning phases to minimize risk to environmental health. This article discusses inconsistencies in disaster planning and nomenclature existing in the studied materials and international guidance and proposes new opportunity for developing predisaster risk assessment, risk communication, and prevention capacity building. PMID:26427265

  2. New insight in expression, transport, and secretion of brain-derived neurotrophic factor: Implications in brain-related diseases

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, Naoki; Numakawa, Tadahiro; Richards, Misty; Nakajima, Shingo; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) attracts increasing attention from both research and clinical fields because of its important functions in the central nervous system. An adequate amount of BDNF is critical to develop and maintain normal neuronal circuits in the brain. Given that loss of BDNF function has been reported in the brains of patients with neurodegenerative or psychiatric diseases, understanding basic properties of BDNF and associated intracellular processes is imperative. In this review, we revisit the gene structure, transcription, translation, transport and secretion mechanisms of BDNF. We also introduce implications of BDNF in several brain-related diseases including Alzheimer’s disease, Huntington’s disease, depression and schizophrenia. PMID:25426265

  3. Mechanistic analysis of challenge-response experiments.

    PubMed

    Shotwell, M S; Drake, K J; Sidorov, V Y; Wikswo, J P

    2013-09-01

    We present an application of mechanistic modeling and nonlinear longitudinal regression in the context of biomedical response-to-challenge experiments, a field where these methods are underutilized. In this type of experiment, a system is studied by imposing an experimental challenge, and then observing its response. The combination of mechanistic modeling and nonlinear longitudinal regression has brought new insight, and revealed an unexpected opportunity for optimal design. Specifically, the mechanistic aspect of our approach enables the optimal design of experimental challenge characteristics (e.g., intensity, duration). This article lays some groundwork for this approach. We consider a series of experiments wherein an isolated rabbit heart is challenged with intermittent anoxia. The heart responds to the challenge onset, and recovers when the challenge ends. The mean response is modeled by a system of differential equations that describe a candidate mechanism for cardiac response to anoxia challenge. The cardiac system behaves more variably when challenged than when at rest. Hence, observations arising from this experiment exhibit complex heteroscedasticity and sharp changes in central tendency. We present evidence that an asymptotic statistical inference strategy may fail to adequately account for statistical uncertainty. Two alternative methods are critiqued qualitatively (i.e., for utility in the current context), and quantitatively using an innovative Monte-Carlo method. We conclude with a discussion of the exciting opportunities in optimal design of response-to-challenge experiments. PMID:23859366

  4. Obesity, energy balance, and cancer: a mechanistic perspective.

    PubMed

    Hursting, Stephen D

    2014-01-01

    Nearly 36 % of adults and 20 % of children in the USA are obese, defined as a body mass index (BMI) ≥30 kg/m(2). Obesity, which is accompanied by metabolic dysregulation often manifesting in the metabolic syndrome, is an established risk factor for many cancers. Within the growth-promoting, proinflammatory environment of the obese state, cross talk between macrophages, adipocytes, and epithelial cells occurs via obesity-associated hormones, cytokines, and other mediators that may enhance cancer risk and/or progression. This chapter synthesizes the evidence on key biological mechanisms underlying the obesity-cancer link, with particular emphasis on obesity-associated enhancements in growth factor signaling, inflammation, and vascular integrity processes, as well as obesity-dependent microenvironmental perturbations, including the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. These interrelated pathways represent possible mechanistic targets for disrupting the obesity-cancer link.

  5. Human factor implications of the Eurocopter AS332L-1 Super Puma cockpit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padfield, R. Randall

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to identify and describe some of the human factor problems which can occur in the cockpit of a modern civilian helicopter. After examining specific hardware and software problems in the cockpit design of the Eurocopter (Aerospatiale) AS332L-1 Super Puma, the author proposes several principles that can be used to avoid similar human factors problems in the design of future cockpits. These principles relate to the use and function of warning lights, the design of autopilots in two-pilot aircraft, and the labeling of switches and warning lights, specifically with respect to abbreviations and translations from languages other than English. In the final section of the paper, the author describes current trends in society which he suggests should be taken into consideration when designing future aircraft cockpits.

  6. Nuclear factor kappaB inhibitors induce adhesion-dependent colon cancer apoptosis: implications for metastasis.

    PubMed

    Scaife, Courtney L; Kuang, Jinqiu; Wills, Jason C; Trowbridge, D Brad; Gray, Phil; Manning, Bernadette M; Eichwald, Ernst J; Daynes, Raymond A; Kuwada, Scott K

    2002-12-01

    The transcription factor nuclear factor kappaB (NFkappaB) is constitutively active in many types of cancercells and regulates the expression of several antiapoptotic genes. Previous studies demonstrated a role for the inhibition of NFkappaB in cancer therapyusing a transgenic approach in mice. We found that NFkappaB was transiently activated much greater than background constitutive levels during colon cancer cell readhesion, which rendered the readhering colon cancer cells exquisitely susceptible to apoptosis in the presence of soluble NFkappaB inhibitors. These compounds greatly reduced colon cancer cell implantation in an in vivo seeding model of metastasis. The ability of soluble NFkappaB inhibitors to significantly induce apoptosis of readherent colon cancer cells makes them prospective candidates for preventing colon cancer metastasis.

  7. The role of genetic factors in autoimmune disease: implications for environmental research.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, G S; Miller, F W; Pandey, J P

    1999-01-01

    Studies in both humans and in animal models of specific disorders suggest that polymorphisms of multiple genes are involved in conferring either a predisposition to or protection from autoimmune diseases. Genes encoding polymorphic proteins that regulate immune responses or the rates and extent of metabolism of certain chemical structures have been the focus of much of the research regarding genetic susceptibility. We examine the type and strength of evidence concerning genetic factors and disease etiology, drawing examples from a number of autoimmune diseases. Twin studies of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), type I diabetes, and multiple sclerosis (MS) indicate that disease concordance in monozygotic twins is 4 or more times higher than in dizygotic twins. Strong familial associations (odds ratio ranging from 5-10) are seen in studies of MS, type I diabetes, Graves disease, discoid lupus, and SLE. Familial association studies have also reported an increased risk of several systemic autoimmune diseases among relatives of patients with a systemic autoimmune disease. This association may reflect a common etiologic pathway with shared genetic or environmental influences among these diseases. Recent genomewide searches in RA, SLE, and MS provide evidence for multiple susceptibility genes involving major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and non-MHC loci; there is also evidence that many autoimmune diseases share a common set of susceptibility genes. The multifactorial nature of the genetic risk factors and the low penetrance of disease underscore the potential influence of environmental factors and gene-environment interactions on the etiology of autoimmune diseases. PMID:10502533

  8. Structures of mithramycin analogues bound to DNA and implications for targeting transcription factor FLI1

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Caixia; Weidenbach, Stevi; Cano, Kristin E.; Wang, Zhonghua; Mitra, Prithiba; Ivanov, Dmitri N.; Rohr, Jürgen; Tsodikov, Oleg V.

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors have been considered undruggable, but this paradigm has been recently challenged. DNA binding natural product mithramycin (MTM) is a potent antagonist of oncogenic transcription factor EWS–FLI1. Structural details of MTM recognition of DNA, including the FLI1 binding sequence GGA(A/T), are needed to understand how MTM interferes with EWS–FLI1. We report a crystal structure of an MTM analogue MTM SA–Trp bound to a DNA oligomer containing a site GGCC, and two structures of a novel analogue MTM SA–Phe in complex with DNA. MTM SA–Phe is bound to sites AGGG and GGGT on one DNA, and to AGGG and GGGA(T) (a FLI1 binding site) on the other, revealing how MTM recognizes different DNA sequences. Unexpectedly, at sub-micromolar concentrations MTMs stabilize FLI1–DNA complex on GGAA repeats, which are critical for the oncogenic function of EWS–FLI1. We also directly demonstrate by nuclear magnetic resonance formation of a ternary FLI1–DNA–MTM complex on a single GGAA FLI1/MTM binding site. These biochemical and structural data and a new FLI1–DNA structure suggest that MTM binds the minor groove and perturbs FLI1 bound nearby in the major groove. This ternary complex model may lead to development of novel MTM analogues that selectively target EWS–FLI1 or other oncogenic transcription factors, as anti-cancer therapeutics. PMID:27587584

  9. Addressing occupational factors in the management of low back pain: implications for physical therapist practice.

    PubMed

    Shaw, William S; Main, Chris J; Johnston, Venerina

    2011-05-01

    There is mounting evidence that occupational factors influence the extent of sickness absence following an episode of low back pain, but there have been limited efforts to integrate the identification and management of occupational factors into the routine practice of physical therapists. Systematic reviews suggest that a client's report of heavy physical demands, inability to modify job tasks, work stress, lack of organizational support, job dissatisfaction, poor expectations for resuming usual work, and fear of reinjury are indications of significant barriers to returning to work. Recommended strategies for evaluating and addressing occupational factors are explored with respect to the physical therapist's role in client assessment, development of activity and lifestyle recommendations, therapeutic exercise, communication with other providers, and summary reports. Primary recommendations include: (1) administration of self-report questionnaires to assess a client's perspective of physical job demands, (2) client-centered interviewing to highlight individual return-to-work concerns, (3) early discussions with clients about possible job modifications, and (4) incorporation of clients' workplace concerns in progress reports and summaries. These strategies may improve low back pain outcomes by encouraging effective communication with key stakeholders and by developing clients' ability to resolve obstacles to returning to work. PMID:21451096

  10. Factors associated with uterine endometrial hyperplasia and pyometra in wild canids: implications for fertility.

    PubMed

    Asa, Cheryl S; Bauman, Karen L; Devery, Sarah; Zordan, Martín; Camilo, Gerardo R; Boutelle, Sally; Moresco, Anneke

    2014-01-01

    The ability to safely and effectively manage reproduction is central to the success of AZA captive-breeding programs. Although the AZA Wildlife Contraception Center routinely monitors contraceptive safety, there have been no studies that compare the effects of contraceptive use to separation of males from females, the other option for preventing reproduction. We used retrospective medical records and pathology reports submitted by AZA and related facilities for the seven AZA-managed canid species to assess rates of uterine pathology relative to female reproductive life histories. Our results showed that the prevalence of both pyometra and endometrial hyperplasia (EH) was associated not only with treatment with the two most common contraceptives (Suprelorin® and MGA implants) but also with the number of years barren (i.e., not producing a litter and not contracepted). Rates of pyometra and EH were especially high in African painted dogs and red wolves, but lowest in swift and fennec foxes. The number of years producing a litter had a low association, suggesting it could be protective against uterine pathology. A more recently developed Suprelorin® protocol using Ovaban® to prevent the initial stimulation phase, followed by implant removal when reversal is desired, may be a safer contraceptive option. These results concerning the relationship between reproductive management and uterine health have important implications for AZA-managed programs, since the unsustainability of many captive populations may be due at least in part to infertility. Managing a female's reproductive lifespan to optimize or maintain fertility will require a reconsideration of how breeding recommendations are formulated. PMID:23553688

  11. Factors associated with uterine endometrial hyperplasia and pyometra in wild canids: implications for fertility.

    PubMed

    Asa, Cheryl S; Bauman, Karen L; Devery, Sarah; Zordan, Martín; Camilo, Gerardo R; Boutelle, Sally; Moresco, Anneke

    2014-01-01

    The ability to safely and effectively manage reproduction is central to the success of AZA captive-breeding programs. Although the AZA Wildlife Contraception Center routinely monitors contraceptive safety, there have been no studies that compare the effects of contraceptive use to separation of males from females, the other option for preventing reproduction. We used retrospective medical records and pathology reports submitted by AZA and related facilities for the seven AZA-managed canid species to assess rates of uterine pathology relative to female reproductive life histories. Our results showed that the prevalence of both pyometra and endometrial hyperplasia (EH) was associated not only with treatment with the two most common contraceptives (Suprelorin® and MGA implants) but also with the number of years barren (i.e., not producing a litter and not contracepted). Rates of pyometra and EH were especially high in African painted dogs and red wolves, but lowest in swift and fennec foxes. The number of years producing a litter had a low association, suggesting it could be protective against uterine pathology. A more recently developed Suprelorin® protocol using Ovaban® to prevent the initial stimulation phase, followed by implant removal when reversal is desired, may be a safer contraceptive option. These results concerning the relationship between reproductive management and uterine health have important implications for AZA-managed programs, since the unsustainability of many captive populations may be due at least in part to infertility. Managing a female's reproductive lifespan to optimize or maintain fertility will require a reconsideration of how breeding recommendations are formulated.

  12. Prognostic factors influencing survival in gastrointestinal leiomyosarcomas. Implications for surgical management and staging.

    PubMed Central

    Ng, E H; Pollock, R E; Munsell, M F; Atkinson, E N; Romsdahl, M M

    1992-01-01

    The appropriate surgical therapeutic options for either localized or more advanced disease in patients with gastrointestinal leiomyosarcomas remain unclear. A staging classification for this disease has not been adopted nor risk factors identifying patients at risk for recurrence defined. To address these issues, this study evaluated the influence of various clinicopathologic variables on overall and disease-free survival. In an univariate analysis of overall survival involving 191 patients, the Cox proportional hazards model identified four factors that were associated with a significantly better outcome: complete resection without tumor rupture (p less than 0.001), localized lesions (p less than 0.001), low grade of tumor (p = 0.02), and tumors smaller than 5 cm (p = 0.03). When interactive effects of these factors were taken into account, however, type of resection of the tumor was selected as the only significant prognostic factor in a multivariate analysis. Complete resection without tumor rupture improved overall survival of patients with localized disease (median, 46 months) as well as those with contiguous organ invasion (median, 36 months) or peritoneal implants (median, 36 months). In contrast, patients with incomplete resections survived for a median of 21 months. Patients with tumor rupture, despite removal of all gross disease, behaved similarly to those with incomplete resections; median survival was only 17 months. For disease-free survival, important determinants selected from a multivariate analysis were tumor rupture (p = 0.002), contiguous organ invasion (p = 0.02) and high tumor grade (p = 0.02). A staging classification incorporating these prognostic factors of significance was evaluated using a TGM system: T1 (less than 5 cm), T2 (greater than or equal to 5 cm), T3 (contiguous organ invasion or peritoneal implants), T4 (tumor rupture); G: G1 (low grade), G2 (high grade); M: M0 (no metastases), M1 (metastases present). The corresponding 5-year

  13. A mechanistic analysis of the Birch Reduction.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Howard E

    2012-02-21

    The Birch Reduction is one of the main reactions of organic chemistry. The reaction involves the reaction of dissolving metals in ammonia with aromatic compounds to produce 1,4-cyclohexadienes. Discovered by Arthur Birch in 1944, the reaction occupies 300 pages in Organic Reactions to describe its synthetic versatility. Thus, it is remarkable that the reaction mechanism has been so very controversial and only relatively recently has been firmly established. Perhaps this is not that surprising, since the reaction also has many unusual and esoteric mechanistic facets. Here, I provide a description of how I have applied ever-evolving levels of quantum mechanics and a novel experimental test to understand details of the mechanism and the origins of the selectivities observed in the Birch reduction. The reaction involves an initial radical anion resulting from introduction of an electron from the blue liquid ammonia solution of free electrons formed by the dissolution of Li or related metals. This radical anion is protonated by an alcohol and then further reduced to a carbanion. Finally, the carbanion is protonated using a second proton to afford a nonconjugated cyclohexadiene. The regiochemistry depends on substituents present. With 18 resonance structures in the case of anisole radical anion, prediction of the initial protonation site would seem difficult. Nevertheless, computational methods from Hückel theory through modern density functional calculations do correctly predict the site of protonation. An esoteric test established this mechanism experimentally. The nature of the carbanion also is of mechanistic interest, and the preponderance of the resonance structure shown was revealed from Hückel calculations involving variable bond orders. For the trianion from benzoic acid, parallel questions about structure are apparent, and have been answered. Some mechanistic questions are answered experimentally and some by modern computations. Recently, our mechanistic

  14. New web-based applications for mechanistic case diagramming

    PubMed Central

    Dee, Fred R.; Haugen, Thomas H.; Kreiter, Clarence D.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of mechanistic case diagraming (MCD) is to provide students with more in-depth understanding of cause and effect relationships and basic mechanistic pathways in medicine. This will enable them to better explain how observed clinical findings develop from preceding pathogenic and pathophysiological events. The pedagogic function of MCD is in relating risk factors, disease entities and morphology, signs and symptoms, and test and procedure findings in a specific case scenario with etiologic pathogenic and pathophysiological sequences within a flow diagram. In this paper, we describe the addition of automation and predetermined lists to further develop the original concept of MCD as described by Engelberg in 1992 and Guerrero in 2001. We demonstrate that with these modifications, MCD is effective and efficient in small group case-based teaching for second-year medical students (ratings of ~3.4 on a 4.0 scale). There was also a significant correlation with other measures of competency, with a ‘true’ score correlation of 0.54. A traditional calculation of reliability showed promising results (α =0.47) within a low stakes, ungraded environment. Further, we have demonstrated MCD's potential for use in independent learning and TBL. Future studies are needed to evaluate MCD's potential for use in medium stakes assessment or self-paced independent learning and assessment. MCD may be especially relevant in returning students to the application of basic medical science mechanisms in the clinical years. PMID:25059836

  15. Variability in Isotope Discrimination Factors in Coral Reef Fishes: Implications for Diet and Food Web Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, Alex S. J.; Waite, Anya M.; Humphries, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    Interpretation of stable isotope ratios of carbon and nitrogen (δ13C and δ15N) is generally based on the assumption that with each trophic level there is a constant enrichment in the heavier isotope, leading to diet-tissue discrimination factors of 3.4‰ for 15N (ΔN) and ∼0.5‰ for 13C (ΔC). Diet-tissue discrimination factors determined from paired tissue and gut samples taken from 152 individuals from 26 fish species at Ningaloo Reef, Western Australia demonstrate a large amount of variability around constant values. While caution is necessary in using gut contents to represent diet due to the potential for high temporal variability, there were significant effects of trophic position and season that may also lead to variability in ΔN under natural conditions. Nitrogen enrichment increased significantly at higher trophic levels (higher tissue δ15N), with significantly higher ΔN in carnivorous species. Changes in diet led to significant changes in ΔN, but not tissue δ15N, between seasons for several species: Acanthurus triostegus, Chromis viridis, Parupeneus signatus and Pomacentrus moluccensis. These results confirm that the use of meta-analysis averages for ΔN is likely to be inappropriate for accurately determining diets and trophic relationships using tissue stable isotope ratios. Where feasible, discrimination factors should be directly quantified for each species and trophic link in question, acknowledging the potential for significant variation away from meta-analysis averages and, perhaps, controlled laboratory diets and conditions. PMID:21060681

  16. NDUFA12L mitochondrial complex-I assembly factor: Implications for taupathies

    PubMed Central

    Salama, Mohamed; Mohamed, Wael M.Y.

    2015-01-01

    There is a strong correlation between taupathies and the development and progression of neurodegenerative disorders. Abnormal tau becomes hyperphosphorylated and dissociated from microtubules with the aggregation of intracellular tau aggregates within the patient's brain. The current review is divided into two broad sections. In the first section we discuss the molecular biology and the clinicopathologic features of taupathies. While in the second section we discuss the relationship between mitochondrial complex-I and taupathies. Polymorphism in NDUFA12L may be a crucial factor for development of neurodegenerative taupathies. Thus NDUFA12L screening may be an early biomarker for identifying risk groups for such disorders. PMID:26937358

  17. Induction of trefoil factor (TFF)1, TFF2 and TFF3 by hypoxia is mediated by hypoxia inducible factor-1: implications for gastric mucosal healing

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, C; Santamatilde, E; McCreath, KJ; Cervera, AM; Díez, I; Ortiz-Masiá, D; Martínez, N; Calatayud, S; Esplugues, JV; Barrachina, MD

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Mucosal microcirculation is compromised during gastric damage induced by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as aspirin. Consequently, oxygen supply to epithelial cells is decreased. The trefoil factor (TFF) peptides are involved in mechanisms of defence and repair in the gastrointestinal tract but their regulation at sites of gastric injury is unknown. Experimental approach: Hypoxia and expression of TFF genes and peptides were measured in the damaged stomach of aspirin-treated rats. In a human gastric cell line (AGS cells), the effects of hypoxia and of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1 (through transient transfection of HIF-1α siRNA or over-expression of HIF-1α) on TFF gene expression were evaluated. Key results: Hypoxyprobe immunostaining, up-regulation of TFF2 (1.9-fold) and TFF3 (1.8-fold) and a non-significant increase of TFF1 (1.5-fold) mRNA were observed in the damaged stomach of aspirin-treated rats, compared with control animals. Hypoxia (3% O2, 16 h) induced mRNA for TFF1 (5.8-fold), TTF2 (9.1-fold) and TFF3 (9.3-fold) in AGS cells, an effect mediated by HIF-1, as transient transfection of HIF-1α siRNA reduced the effects of hypoxia. Over-expression of HIF-1α by transfection in non-hypoxic epithelial cells produced a similar pattern of TFF induction to that observed with hypoxia and transactivated a TFF1 reporter construct. Conclusions and implications: Hypoxia inducible factor-1 mediated the induction of TFF gene expression by hypoxia in gastric epithelial cells. Low oxygen levels and up-regulation of TFF gene expression in the damaged stomach of aspirin-treated rats suggest that hypoxia induced expression of TFF genes at sites of gastric injury. PMID:19076725

  18. Factors associated with arsenicosis and arsenic exposure status in Nepal: implications from community based study.

    PubMed

    Maden, Narendra; Singh, Anjana; Smith, Linda S; Maharjan, Makhan; Shrestha, Shreekrishna

    2011-02-01

    A significant public health problem due to exposure to arsenic via groundwater in communities of lowland Terai region of Nepal has issued forth need to assess the exposure status and factors associated with arsenicosis. We observed arsenical dermal manifestations and collected and assessed total arsenic content in tubewell water, urine, and hair samples of study subjects at arsenic affected communities in Nawalparasi district of Nepal. The explanatory variables associated with arsenicosis were elevated arsenic in tubewell, male gender and increased age (P < 0.05). 67% (73/109) and 66% (77/117) of subjects exceeded the normal urinary and hair arsenic levels respectively. Among them 52% (57/109) and 47% (55/117) exceeded normal urinary and hair arsenic levels having no arsenical dermal manifestations. Males and symptomatic cases had significantly higher hair arsenic levels (P < 0.05). We also observed significant positive correlation of both urine and hair arsenic levels to tubewell arsenic levels (r = 0.27, 0.37, P < 0.01) and negative correlation of urine arsenic levels with the age of the subjects (r = -0.18, P = 0.06). We conclude that elucidating factors associated with arsenicosis could be of prime importance in intervention and preventive measures. In arsenic affected communities of Nepal exposure to arsenic is still a major problem despite mitigation efforts and the potential for sub-clinical effects in exposed population is high.

  19. A spectral model of Linke's turbidity factor and its experimental implications

    SciTech Connect

    Grenier, J.C.; De La Casiniere, A.; Cabot, T. )

    1994-04-01

    A model of Linke's turbidity factor, T[sub L], is developed by means of updated spectral extraterrestrial irradiances and extinction coefficients of gaseous absorbers. It is shown that the new values of T[sub L] are clearly different from those obtained by Kasten's formula which parameterizes the optical thickness of the clean dry atmosphere. The model is used to investigate the dependence of T[sub L] on the relative optical air mass and to elucidate the relationships linking T[sub L] to Angstroem's turbidity coefficient and to the water vapor content. For any T[sub L], the corresponding value related to the air mass 2.0 can be determined. Such a standardized value is independent of solar elevation and is therefore strictly representative of the atmospheric turbidity. It can be linked to Angstroem's turbidity coefficient. Practical procedures and algorithms for computing the standard Linke's turbidity factor and determining Angstroem's turbidity coefficient are described. A relationship for converting the T[sub L] values obtained by Kasten's formula into the new values is proposed.

  20. Young children who commit crime: epidemiology, developmental origins, risk factors, early interventions, and policy implications.

    PubMed

    Loeber, R; Farrington, D P

    2000-01-01

    An early onset of delinquency prior to age 13 years increases the risk of later serious, violent, and chronic offending by a factor of 2-3. Also child delinquents, compared to juveniles who start offending at a later age, tend to have longer delinquent careers. This article summarizes the report of the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention's Study Group on Very Young Offenders, chaired by Rolf Loeber and David P. Farrington. The Study Group, consisting of 16 scholars and 23 coauthors, worked for 2 years on preparing a report, undertaking extensive secondary data analyses, and writing chapters in different speciality areas. The report consists of a state of the art review of the developmental background of child delinquents. The report also summarizes risk and protective factors in the individual, family, peer group, school, and neighborhood that affect that development. Lastly, the report renews relevant preventive and remedial interventions in the juvenile justice system, families, peer groups, schools. and neighborhoods, and makes a case for improvement in the integration of services for child delinquents. Policy recommendations are presented to improve methods of dealing with child delinquents by juvenile justice, child welfare, and mental health agencies.

  1. Stem CO2 efflux in six co-occurring tree species: underlying factors and ecological implications.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Calcerrada, Jesús; López, Rosana; Salomón, Roberto; Gordaliza, Guillermo G; Valbuena-Carabaña, María; Oleksyn, Jacek; Gil, Luis

    2015-06-01

    Stem respiration plays a role in species coexistence and forest dynamics. Here we examined the intra- and inter-specific variability of stem CO2 efflux (E) in dominant and suppressed trees of six deciduous species in a mixed forest stand: Fagus sylvatica L., Quercus petraea [Matt.] Liebl, Quercus pyrenaica Willd., Prunus avium L., Sorbus aucuparia L. and Crataegus monogyna Jacq. We conducted measurements in late autumn. Within species, dominants had higher E per unit stem surface area (Es ) mainly because sapwood depth was higher than in suppressed trees. Across species, however, differences in Es corresponded with differences in the proportion of living parenchyma in sapwood and concentration of non-structural carbohydrates (NSC). Across species, Es was strongly and NSC marginally positively related with an index of drought tolerance, suggesting that slow growth of drought-tolerant trees is related to higher NSC concentration and Es . We conclude that, during the leafless period, E is indicative of maintenance respiration and is related with some ecological characteristics of the species, such as drought resistance; that sapwood depth is the main factor explaining variability in Es within species; and that the proportion of NSC in the sapwood is the main factor behind variability in Es among species.

  2. Factors affecting stress experienced by surrogate decision-makers for critically ill patients: implications for nursing practice

    PubMed Central

    Iverson, Ellen; Celious, Aaron; Kennedy, Carie R.; Shehane, Erica; Eastman, Alexander; Warren, Victoria; Freeman, Bradley D.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study explores surrogate decision-makers’ (SDMs) challenges making decisions related to the care of patients in critical care, to 1) characterize the SDM stress 2) identify personal, social, care-related factors influencing stress and 3) consider implications of findings to improving critical care practice. Methodology Semi-structured interviews were conducted with SDMs of critically ill patients receiving care in two tertiary care institutions. Transcripts were analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Domains explored were: stress characteristics, stress mitigators, coping strategies, social networks, SDM decision-making role, decision-making concordance, knowledge of patient's preferences, experience with provider team, SDM-provider communication, patient outcome certainty. Main Outcomes We interviewed 34 SDMs. Most were female and described long-term relationships with patients. SDMs described the strain of uncertain outcomes and decision-making without clear, consistent information from providers. Decision-making anxiety was buffered by SDMs’ active engagement of social networks, faith and access to clear communication from providers. Conclusion Stress is a very real factor influencing SDMs confidence and comfort making decisions. These findings suggest that stress can be minimized by improving communication between SDMs and medical providers. Nurses central role in ICU make them uniquely poised to spearhead interventions to improve provider-SDM communication and reduce SDM decision-making anxiety. PMID:24211047

  3. An evaluation of factors influencing pore pressure in accretionary complexes: Implications for taper angle and wedge mechanics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saffer, D.M.; Bekins, B.A.

    2006-01-01

    At many subduction zones, accretionary complexes form as sediment is off-scraped from the subducting plate. Mechanical models that treat accretionary complexes as critically tapered wedges of sediment demonstrate that pore pressure controls their taper angle by modifying basal and internal shear strength. Here, we combine a numerical model of groundwater flow with critical taper theory to quantify the effects of sediment and de??collement permeability, sediment thickness, sediment partitioning between accretion and underthrusting, and plate convergence rate on steady state pore pressure. Our results show that pore pressure in accretionary wedges can be viewed as a dynamically maintained response to factors which drive pore pressure (source terms) and those that limit flow (permeability and drainage path length). We find that sediment permeability and incoming sediment thickness are the most important factors, whereas fault permeability and the partitioning of sediment have a small effect. For our base case model scenario, as sediment permeability is increased, pore pressure decreases from near-lithostatic to hydrostatic values and allows stable taper angles to increase from ??? 2.5?? to 8??-12.5??. With increased sediment thickness in our models (from 100 to 8000 m), increased pore pressure drives a decrease in stable taper angle from 8.4??-12.5?? to 15?? to <4??) with increased sediment thickness (from <1 to 7 km). One key implication is that hydrologic properties may strongly influence the strength of the crust in a wide range of geologic settings. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. Clinical implications of transforming growth factor-beta–induced gene-h3 protein expression in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    He, Changjun; Sun, Dawei; Bai, Xue; Li, Yingbin; Xu, Hai; Xu, Shidong

    2016-01-01

    Aim The clinical implications of transforming growth factor-beta–induced gene-h3 (beta-IGH3) protein expression in lung cancer remain unclear. This study investigated beta-IGH3 protein expression levels and biological function, as well as lung cancer prognosis. Methods Beta-IGH3 protein expression levels were measured in 236 lung cancers and were matched with adjacent noncancerous tissues by immunohistochemical staining. Subsequently, the relationship between beta-IGH3 protein expression, clinical–pathological parameters, and lung cancer prognosis was evaluated. Results Beta-IGH3 protein expression was significantly higher in lung cancer tissues compared with adjacent noncancerous tissues (61.86% vs 22.88%; P=0.01). Of the 236 enrolled cases, 146 (61.86%) showed high beta-IGH3 levels. Tumor size, clinical stage, and lymph node metastasis were significantly related to beta-IGH3 protein expression in univariate analysis (P=0.001, 0.044, and 0.029, respectively), whereas age, sex, and histological type were not (P=0.038, 0.756, and 0.889, respectively). Finally, a Cox regression model also identified beta-IGH3 as an independent prognostic factor (P=0.01). Conclusion Beta-IGH3 is highly expressed in lung cancers and may be a potential target for lung cancer treatments. PMID:27563252

  5. Growth Hormone Induces Transforming Growth Factor-Beta-Induced Protein in Podocytes: Implications for Podocyte Depletion and Proteinuria.

    PubMed

    Chitra, P Swathi; Swathi, T; Sahay, Rakesh; Reddy, G Bhanuprakash; Menon, Ram K; Kumar, P Anil

    2015-09-01

    The glomerular podocytes form a major size selective barrier for the filtration of serum proteins and reduced podocyte number is a critical event in the pathogenesis of proteinuria during diabetic nephropathy (DN). An elevated level of growth hormone (GH) is implicated as a causative factor in the development of nephropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. We have previously shown that podocytes express GH receptor and are a target for GH action. To elucidate the molecular basis for the effects of GH on podocyte depletion, we conducted PCR-array analyses for extracellular matrix and adhesion molecules in podocytes. Our studies reveal that GH increases expression of a gene that encodes transforming growth factor-beta-induced protein (TGFBIp) expression. Similarly, microarray data retrieved from the Nephromine database revealed elevation of TGFBIp in patients with DN. Treatment with GH results in increased secretion of extracellular TGFBIp by podocytes. Both GH and TGFBIp induced apoptosis and epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) of podocytes. Exposure of podocytes to GH and TGFBIp resulted in increased migration of cells and altered podocyte permeability to albumin across podocyte monolayer. Administration of GH to rats induced EMT and apoptosis in the glomerular fraction of the kidney. Therefore, we conclude that the GH-dependent increase in TGFBIp in the podocyte is one of the mechanisms responsible for podocyte depletion in DN. PMID:25740786

  6. Implication of tubby proteins as transcription factors by structure-based functional analysis.

    PubMed

    Boggon, T J; Shan, W S; Santagata, S; Myers, S C; Shapiro, L

    1999-12-10

    Tubby-like proteins (TULPs) are found in a broad range of multicellular organisms. In mammals, genetic mutation of tubby or other TULPs can result in one or more of three disease phenotypes: obesity (from which the name "tubby" is derived), retinal degeneration, and hearing loss. These disease phenotypes indicate a vital role for tubby proteins; however, no biochemical function has yet been ascribed to any member of this protein family. A structure-directed approach was employed to investigate the biological function of these proteins. The crystal structure of the core domain from mouse tubby was determined at a resolution of 1.9 angstroms. From primarily structural clues, experiments were devised, the results of which suggest that TULPs are a unique family of bipartite transcription factors. PMID:10591637

  7. Parastomal hernia: an exploration of the risk factors and the implications.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Anthony; Porrett, Theresa; Heyman, Bob

    Risk may be defined as 'the chance that something may happen to cause loss or an adverse effect' (Concise Oxford Medical Dictionary, 2003). Patients undergoing stoma formation are at risk of developing a wide range of complications following surgery. A parastomal hernia is an adverse effect that can contribute to postoperative morbidity. The risk of developing a parastomal hernia is dependent upon a number of variables, and stoma care nurses need to be aware of these to plan the appropriate care for patients undergoing stoma formation. This article discusses the issues surrounding the development of parastomal hernias and also looks at ways in which the risk factors associated with the development of a parastomal hernia may be minimized. PMID:16628167

  8. Parastomal hernia: an exploration of the risk factors and the implications.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Anthony; Porrett, Theresa; Heyman, Bob

    Risk may be defined as 'the chance that something may happen to cause loss or an adverse effect' (Concise Oxford Medical Dictionary, 2003). Patients undergoing stoma formation are at risk of developing a wide range of complications following surgery. A parastomal hernia is an adverse effect that can contribute to postoperative morbidity. The risk of developing a parastomal hernia is dependent upon a number of variables, and stoma care nurses need to be aware of these to plan the appropriate care for patients undergoing stoma formation. This article discusses the issues surrounding the development of parastomal hernias and also looks at ways in which the risk factors associated with the development of a parastomal hernia may be minimized.

  9. Factors associated with early growth in Egyptian infants: implications for addressing the dual burden of malnutrition

    PubMed Central

    Flax, Valerie L.; Abdelmegeid, Ali; Salah, Farouk; Hafez, Seham; Ramzy, Magda; Hamed, Doaa; Saleh, Gulsen; Galloway, Rae

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Optimal nutrition is critical to the attainment of healthy growth, human capital and sustainable development. In Egypt, infants and young children face overlapping forms of malnutrition, including micronutrient deficiencies, stunting and overweight. Yet, in this setting, little is known about the factors associated with growth during the first year of life. A rise in stunting in Lower Egypt from 2005 to 2008 prompted this implementation research study, which followed a longitudinal cohort of infants from birth to 1 year of age within the context of a USAID‐funded maternal and child health integrated programme. We sought to determine if growth patterns and factors related to early growth differed in Lower and Upper Egypt, and examined the relationship between weight loss and subsequent stunting at 12 months of age. Growth patterns revealed that length‐for‐age z‐score (LAZ) decreased and weight‐for‐length z‐score (WLZ) increased from 6 to 12 months of age in both regions. One‐quarter of infants were stunted and nearly one‐third were overweight by 12 months of age in lower Egypt. Minimum dietary diversity was significantly associated with WLZ in Lower Egypt (β = 0.22, P < 0.05), but not in Upper Egypt. Diarrhoea, fever and programme exposure were not associated with any growth outcome. Weight loss during any period was associated with a twofold likelihood of stunting at 12 months in Lower Egypt, but not Upper Egypt. In countries, like Egypt, facing the nutrition transition, infant and young child nutrition programmes need to address both stunting and overweight through improving dietary quality and reducing reliance on energy‐dense foods. PMID:26373408

  10. Fine scale spatial variability of microbial pesticide degradation in soil: scales, controlling factors, and implications

    PubMed Central

    Dechesne, Arnaud; Badawi, Nora; Aamand, Jens; Smets, Barth F.

    2014-01-01

    Pesticide biodegradation is a soil microbial function of critical importance for modern agriculture and its environmental impact. While it was once assumed that this activity was homogeneously distributed at the field scale, mounting evidence indicates that this is rarely the case. Here, we critically examine the literature on spatial variability of pesticide biodegradation in agricultural soil. We discuss the motivations, methods, and main findings of the primary literature. We found significant diversity in the approaches used to describe and quantify spatial heterogeneity, which complicates inter-studies comparisons. However, it is clear that the presence and activity of pesticide degraders is often highly spatially variable with coefficients of variation often exceeding 50% and frequently displays non-random spatial patterns. A few controlling factors have tentatively been identified across pesticide classes: they include some soil characteristics (pH) and some agricultural management practices (pesticide application, tillage), while other potential controlling factors have more conflicting effects depending on the site or the pesticide. Evidence demonstrating the importance of spatial heterogeneity on the fate of pesticides in soil has been difficult to obtain but modeling and experimental systems that do not include soil's full complexity reveal that this heterogeneity must be considered to improve prediction of pesticide biodegradation rates or of leaching risks. Overall, studying the spatial heterogeneity of pesticide biodegradation is a relatively new field at the interface of agronomy, microbial ecology, and geosciences and a wealth of novel data is being collected from these different disciplinary perspectives. We make suggestions on possible avenues to take full advantage of these investigations for a better understanding and prediction of the fate of pesticides in soil. PMID:25538691

  11. Lead in New York City Community Garden Chicken Eggs: Influential Factors and Health Implications

    PubMed Central

    Spliethoff, Henry M.; Mitchell, Rebecca G.; Ribaudo, Lisa N.; Taylor, Owen; Shayler, Hannah A.; Greene, Virginia; Oglesby, Debra

    2014-01-01

    Raising chickens for eggs in urban areas is becoming increasingly common. Urban chickens may be exposed to lead, a common urban soil contaminant. We measured lead concentrations in chicken eggs from New York City (NYC) community gardens and collected information on factors that might affect those concentrations. Lead was detected between 10 and 167 μg/kg in 48% of NYC eggs. Measures of lead in eggs from a henhouse were significantly associated (p<0.005) with lead concentrations in soil. The association between soil and egg lead has been evaluated only once before, by a study of a rural region in Belgium. In our study, the apparent lead soil-to-egg transfer efficiency was considerably lower than that found in Belgium, suggesting that there may be important geographic differences in this transfer. We developed models that suggested that, for sites like ours, lead concentrations in >50% of eggs from a henhouse would exceed store-bought egg concentrations (<7–13 μg/kg; 3% above detection limit) at soil lead concentrations >120 mg/kg, and that the concentration in one of six eggs from a henhouse would exceed a 100 μg/kg guidance value at soil lead concentrations >410 mg/kg. Our models also suggested that the availability of dietary calcium supplements was another influential factor that reduced egg lead concentrations. Estimates of health risk from consuming eggs with the lead concentrations we measured generally were not significant. However, soil lead concentrations in this study were <600 mg/kg, and considerably higher concentrations are not uncommon. Efforts to reduce lead transfer to chicken eggs and associated exposure are recommended for urban chicken keepers. PMID:24287691

  12. Factors Affecting Diet Variation in the Pyrenean Rock Ptarmigan (Lagopus muta pyrenaica): Conservation Implications

    PubMed Central

    García-González, Ricardo; Aldezabal, Arantza; Laskurain, Nere Amaia; Margalida, Antoni; Novoa, Claude

    2016-01-01

    The Pyrenean rock ptarmigan (Lagopus muta pyrenaica) lives at one of the southernmost limits of the ptarmigan range. Their small population sizes and the impacts of global changes are limiting factors in the conservation of this threatened subspecies. An effective conservation policy requires precise basic knowledge of a species' food and habitat requirements, information that is practically non-existent for this Pyrenean population. Here, we describe the diet of a ptarmigan population in the Eastern Pyrenees, the environmental factors influencing its variability and the relationship between diet floristic composition and quality. Diet composition was determined by microhistological analysis of faeces and diet quality was estimated from free-urate faecal N content. Our results show that grouse diet is based mainly on arctic-alpine shrubs of the Ericaceae family, as well as dwarf willows (Salix spp.) and Dryas octopetala. The most frequently consumed plant species was Rhododendron ferrugineum, but its abundance in the diet was negatively related to the diet nitrogen content. Conversely, the abundance of Salix spp., grass leaves and arthropods increased the nitrogen content of the diet. Seasonality associated with snow-melting contributed the most to variability in the Pyrenean ptarmigan diet, differentiating winter from spring/summer diets. The latter was characterised by a high consumption of dwarf willows, flowers, arthropods and tender forb leaves. Geographic area and sex-age class influenced diet variability to a lesser extent. Current temperature increases in the Pyrenees due to global warming may reduce the persistence and surface area of snow-packs where preferred plants for rock ptarmigan usually grow, thus reducing food availability. The high consumption of Rh. ferrugineum characterised the diet of the Pyrenean population. Given the toxicity of this plant for most herbivores, its potential negative effect on Pyrenean ptarmigan populations should be

  13. Dissecting variation in biomass conversion factors across China's forests: implications for biomass and carbon accounting.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yunjian; Zhang, Xiaoquan; Wang, Xiaoke; Ren, Yin

    2014-01-01

    Biomass conversion factors (BCFs, defined as the ratios of tree components (i.e. stem, branch, foliage and root), as well as aboveground and whole biomass of trees to growing stock volume, Mg m-3) are considered as important parameters in large-scale forest biomass carbon estimation. To date, knowledge of possible sources of the variation in BCFs is still limited at large scales. Using our compiled forest biomass dataset of China, we presented forest type-specific values of BCFs, and examined the variation in BCFs in relation to forest type, stand development and environmental factors (climate and soil fertility). BCFs exhibited remarkable variation across forest types, and also were significantly related to stand development (especially growing stock volume). BCFs (except Stem BCF) had significant relationships with mean annual temperature (MAT) and mean annual precipitation (MAP) (P<0.001). Climatic data (MAT and MAP) collectively explained 10.0-25.0% of the variation in BCFs (except Stem BCFs). Moreover, stronger climatic effects were found on BCFs for functional components (i.e. branch, foliage and root) than BCFs for combined components (i.e. aboveground section and whole trees). A general trend for BCFs was observed to decrease and then increase from low to high soil fertility. When qualitative soil fertility and climatic data (MAT and MAP) were combined, they explained 14.1-29.7% of the variation in in BCFs (except Stem BCFs), adding only 4.1-4.9% than climatic data used. Therefore, to reduce the uncertainty induced by BCFs in forest carbon estimates, we should apply values of BCFs for a specified forest type, and also consider climatic and edaphic effects, especially climatic effect, in developing predictive models of BCFs (except Stem BCF).

  14. Factors influencing performance in the Hecht vault and implications for modelling.

    PubMed

    King, Mark A; Yeadon, Maurice R

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigated the factors that influence Hecht vault performance and assessed the level of model complexity required to give an adequate representation of vaulting. A five-segment planar simulation model with a visco-elastic shoulder joint and a torque generator at the shoulder joint was used to simulate the contact phase in vaulting. The model was customized to an elite gymnast by determining subject-specific segmental inertia and joint torque parameters. The simulation model was matched to a performance of the Hecht vault by varying the visco-elastic characteristics of the shoulders and the arm-horse interface and the activation time history of the shoulder torque generator until the best match was found. Perturbing the matching simulation demonstrated that appropriate initial kinematics are necessary for a successful performance. Fixing the hip and knee angles at their initial values had a small effect with 3 degrees less rotation. Applying shoulder torque during the contact phase also had a small effect with only a 7 degrees range in landing angles. Excluding the hand segment from the model was found to have a moderate effect with 15 degrees less rotation and the time of contact reduced by 38%. Removing shoulder elasticity resulted in 50 degrees less rotation. The use of a five-segment simulation model confirmed that the use of shoulder torque plays a minor role in vaulting performance and that having appropriate initial kinematics at touchdown is essential. However, factors such as shoulder elasticity and the hands which have previously been ignored also have a substantial influence on performance. PMID:15519350

  15. Factors Affecting Diet Variation in the Pyrenean Rock Ptarmigan (Lagopus muta pyrenaica): Conservation Implications.

    PubMed

    García-González, Ricardo; Aldezabal, Arantza; Laskurain, Nere Amaia; Margalida, Antoni; Novoa, Claude

    2016-01-01

    The Pyrenean rock ptarmigan (Lagopus muta pyrenaica) lives at one of the southernmost limits of the ptarmigan range. Their small population sizes and the impacts of global changes are limiting factors in the conservation of this threatened subspecies. An effective conservation policy requires precise basic knowledge of a species' food and habitat requirements, information that is practically non-existent for this Pyrenean population. Here, we describe the diet of a ptarmigan population in the Eastern Pyrenees, the environmental factors influencing its variability and the relationship between diet floristic composition and quality. Diet composition was determined by microhistological analysis of faeces and diet quality was estimated from free-urate faecal N content. Our results show that grouse diet is based mainly on arctic-alpine shrubs of the Ericaceae family, as well as dwarf willows (Salix spp.) and Dryas octopetala. The most frequently consumed plant species was Rhododendron ferrugineum, but its abundance in the diet was negatively related to the diet nitrogen content. Conversely, the abundance of Salix spp., grass leaves and arthropods increased the nitrogen content of the diet. Seasonality associated with snow-melting contributed the most to variability in the Pyrenean ptarmigan diet, differentiating winter from spring/summer diets. The latter was characterised by a high consumption of dwarf willows, flowers, arthropods and tender forb leaves. Geographic area and sex-age class influenced diet variability to a lesser extent. Current temperature increases in the Pyrenees due to global warming may reduce the persistence and surface area of snow-packs where preferred plants for rock ptarmigan usually grow, thus reducing food availability. The high consumption of Rh. ferrugineum characterised the diet of the Pyrenean population. Given the toxicity of this plant for most herbivores, its potential negative effect on Pyrenean ptarmigan populations should be

  16. Prevalence of Vitamin D Deficiency in Singapore: Its Implications to Cardiovascular Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Xinyan; Tey, Siew Ling; Leong, Claudia; Quek, Rina; Henry, Christiani Jeyakumar

    2016-01-01

    Objective Vitamin D deficiency is a global health challenge and has been linked to type 2 diabetes and other chronic diseases. However, the relationship between vitamin D status, body composition, and cardiovascular risks has not been well characterized in Asian populations. The objectives of this study were to examine the factors associated with the low vitamin D levels in a sunny tropical region and to assess the role of vitamin D status in cardiovascular risk factors. Design and Methods This was a cross-sectional study. One hundred and fourteen healthy participants (59 males and 55 females) residing in Singapore took part in this study. Plasma 25OH-D3 concentration was measured by using LC-MS/MS. Body fat (%) was measured by using three different techniques including bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA), BOD POD, and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). Basic anthropometric measurements, fasting blood glucose (FBG), fasting serum insulin (FSI), and lipid profiles were obtained using standard protocols. Results Approximately 42% of the participants were vitamin D deficient (< 20 ng/mL). Vitamin D status was inversely associated with body fat (%), homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and total cholesterol/high density lipoprotein (TC/HDL) ratio, while positively associated with lean body mass (LBM) and hand grip strength (HGS). Conclusions The high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in a sunny tropical region reinforces the need to recognize that sunlight alone is not the precursor for optimal vitamin D status. This raises the need to investigate public health measures that will encourage exposure to sunlight without overexposure that is harmful to skin. More importantly, vitamin D deficiency is associated with increased cardiovascular risks, i.e. HOMA-IR, TC/HDL, and LDL/HDL. Future studies should attempt to elucidate the potential mechanisms. PMID:26799569

  17. Imbalance of the Nerve Growth Factor and Its Precursor: Implication in Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Riyaz; El-Remessy, Azza B

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of blindness in working age in US and worldwide. Neurotrophins including nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) and neurotrophin-4 (NT-4) are known to be essential for growth, differentiation and survival of neurons in the developing and mature retina. Nevertheless, a growing body of evidence supports an emerging role of neurotrophins in retinal diseases and in particular, diabetic retinopathy. Neurotrophins are initially synthesized in a pro-form and undergo proteolytic cleavage to produce the mature form that activates two distinctive receptors, the tyrosine kinase tropomycin receptor (Trk) and, to lesser extent, the common low affinity p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR). Despite tight glycemic and metabolic control, many diabetic patients continue to experience progressive retinal damage. Understanding the molecular events involved in diabetic retinopathy is extremely important to identify novel therapeutic strategies to halt the disease progression. Diabetes induces imbalance in neurotrophins by increasing its proform, which is associated with upregulation of the p75NTR receptor in the retina. A growing body of evidence supports a link between the imbalance of pro-neurotrophins and early retinal inflammation, neuro-and microvascular degeneration. Therefore, examining changes in the levels of neurotrophins and its receptors might provide a therapeutically beneficial target to combat disease progression in diabetic patients. This commentary aims to highlight the impact of diabetes-impaired balance of neurotrophins and in particular, the NGF and its receptors; TrkA and p75NTR in the pathology of DR. PMID:26807305

  18. Fine scale spatial variability of microbial pesticide degradation in soil: scales, controlling factors, and implications.

    PubMed

    Dechesne, Arnaud; Badawi, Nora; Aamand, Jens; Smets, Barth F

    2014-01-01

    Pesticide biodegradation is a soil microbial function of critical importance for modern agriculture and its environmental impact. While it was once assumed that this activity was homogeneously distributed at the field scale, mounting evidence indicates that this is rarely the case. Here, we critically examine the literature on spatial variability of pesticide biodegradation in agricultural soil. We discuss the motivations, methods, and main findings of the primary literature. We found significant diversity in the approaches used to describe and quantify spatial heterogeneity, which complicates inter-studies comparisons. However, it is clear that the presence and activity of pesticide degraders is often highly spatially variable with coefficients of variation often exceeding 50% and frequently displays non-random spatial patterns. A few controlling factors have tentatively been identified across pesticide classes: they include some soil characteristics (pH) and some agricultural management practices (pesticide application, tillage), while other potential controlling factors have more conflicting effects depending on the site or the pesticide. Evidence demonstrating the importance of spatial heterogeneity on the fate of pesticides in soil has been difficult to obtain but modeling and experimental systems that do not include soil's full complexity reveal that this heterogeneity must be considered to improve prediction of pesticide biodegradation rates or of leaching risks. Overall, studying the spatial heterogeneity of pesticide biodegradation is a relatively new field at the interface of agronomy, microbial ecology, and geosciences and a wealth of novel data is being collected from these different disciplinary perspectives. We make suggestions on possible avenues to take full advantage of these investigations for a better understanding and prediction of the fate of pesticides in soil.

  19. Prevalence and Associated Factors of Schistosomiasis among Children in Yemen: Implications for an Effective Control Programme

    PubMed Central

    Sady, Hany; Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M.; Mahdy, Mohammed A. K.; Lim, Yvonne A. L.; Mahmud, Rohela; Surin, Johari

    2013-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis, one of the most prevalent neglected tropical diseases, is a life-threatening public health problem in Yemen especially in rural communities. This cross-sectional study aims to determine the prevalence and associated risk factors of schistosomiasis among children in rural Yemen. Methods/Findings Urine and faecal samples were collected from 400 children. Urine samples were examined using filtration technique for the presence of Schistosoma haematobium eggs while faecal samples were examined using formalin-ether concentration and Kato Katz techniques for the presence of S. mansoni. Demographic, socioeconomic and environmental information were collected via a validated questionnaire. Overall, 31.8% of the participants were found to be positive for schistosomiasis; 23.8% were infected with S. haematobium and 9.3% were infected with S. mansoni. Moreover, 39.5% of the participants were anaemic whereas 9.5% had hepatosplenomegaly. The prevalence of schistosomiasis was significantly higher among children aged >10 years compared to those aged ≤10 years (P<0.05). Multivariate analysis confirmed that presence of other infected family member (P<0.001), low household monthly income (P = 0.003), using unsafe sources for drinking water (P = 0.003), living nearby stream/spring (P = 0.006) and living nearby pool/pond (P = 0.002) were the key factors significantly associated with schistosomiasis among these children. Conclusions/Significance This study reveals that schistosomiasis is still highly prevalent in Yemen. These findings support an urgent need to start an integrated, targeted and effective schistosomiasis control programme with a mission to move towards the elimination phase. Besides periodic drug distribution, health education and community mobilisation, provision of clean and safe drinking water, introduction of proper sanitation are imperative among these communities in order to curtail the transmission and morbidity caused

  20. Demographic factors influencing the GH system: Implications for the detection of GH doping in sport.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Anne E; Ho, Ken K Y

    2009-08-01

    Application of methods for detecting GH doping depend on being able to discriminate between abnormal levels due to doping and normal physiological levels of circulating proteins that change in response to exogenous administration. Constituents of the IGF and collagen systems have been shown to be promising markers of GH abuse. Their ultimate utility, however, depends on identification of the factors that regulate their concentrations in blood. Among these are demographic factors that are known to influence these markers in the general population. In a large cross-sectional study of the GH-responsive markers in over 1000 elite athletes from 12 countries representing 4 major ethnic groups and 10 sport types, we have shown that there is a significant negative correlation between age and all the IGF and collagen markers we studied, with a rapid decrease in early adolescence. Age was the major contribution to the variability, equivalent to >80% of the attributable variation in IGF-I and the collagen markers. The IGF axis markers were all significantly higher in women, and the collagen markers significantly higher in men, however, the contribution of gender was smaller than that of age, except for IGFBP-3 and ALS. BMI had a minor contribution to variability of the GH-responsive markers. After adjustment for the confounding influences of age, gender and BMI, the effect of ethnicity in elite athletes was trivial except for IGFBP-3 and ALS, which were both lower in Africans and higher in Caucasians. Compared to age and gender, the contribution of sport type was also modest. Our findings on the influence of age, gender, BMI and sport type have also been confirmed in a study of mostly Caucasian elite athletes in the post-competition setting. In conclusion, age and gender are the major determinants of variability for IGF-I and the collagen markers, whereas ethnicity and sport type have a minor influence. Therefore, a test based on IGF-I and the collagen markers must take age

  1. Psychological factors influencing adoption of postural training devices: implications for practice.

    PubMed

    Fleiter, Judy; Walsh, Shari; Biggs, Herbert

    2009-01-01

    This paper details an exploratory investigation of psychological factors that may influence the adoption/rejection of postural training devices from the perspectives of two potential user groups (clients and practitioners). The aim was to elicit perceived advantages and disadvantages from potential users and to apply psychological principles to examine, and potentially counter perceived barriers to use. A small sample (50) of general public members, physiotherapists and occupational therapists were surveyed using open-ended questions designed to elicit information about current practices and attitudinal beliefs about postural training. Results suggested that members of the public fall into two categories according to whether they would use the device for prevention or treatment. This group identified issues such as lack of need, time consuming, and motivations to comply. Practitioners highlighted that lack of research, lack of ability to trial a product, and issues of cost and non-compliance by consumers and were seen as prohibitory to use. A number of theoretical principles of behaviour change were then related to the findings including: the stages of change model, behavioural learning, message framing, persuasion, attitude-behaviour relationships, motivations and impression management. Client cost objections to treatments and the need to integrate research findings into practice are also discussed. PMID:19276521

  2. Factors influencing the oxidation of cysteamine and other thiols: implications for hyperthermic sensitization and radiation protection

    SciTech Connect

    Biaglow, J.E.; Issels, R.W.; Gerweck, L.E.; Varnes, M.E.; Jacobson, B.; Mittchell, J.B.; Russo, A.

    1984-11-01

    Some of the factors influencing the oxygen uptake and peroxide formation for cysteamine (MEA) and other thiols in serum-supplemented modified McCoy's 5A, a well-known medium used to cultivate a variety of cells in vitro, have been studied. The oxidation of MEA and cysteine in modified McCoy's 5A has been compared with that in Ham's F-12, MEM, and phosphate-buffered saline. The ability to produce peroxide is dependent upon the temperature, the concentration of thiol, the presence of copper ions, and pH of the medium. Catalase also reduces the oxygen uptake for all thiols. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) was found to stimulate the oxygen uptake in the case of MEA and cysteine, but had little or no effect with DTT and glutathione. The combined presence of SOD and catalase resulted in less inhibition of oxygen uptake than that obtained by catalase alone. Alkaline pH was found to enhance the oxidation of cysteine and MEA. The results indicate that many problems may arise when thiols are added to various media. A major consideration is concerned with the production of peroxide, superoxide, and reduced trace metal intermediates. The presence of these intermediates may result in the production of hydroxyl radical intermediates as well as the eventual oxygen depletion from the medium.

  3. Factors That Influence Muscle Weakness Following Stroke and Their Clinical Implications: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Vicki; Rice, Charles L.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To provide a comprehensive review of changes that occur in the muscle after stroke and how these changes influence the force-generating capacity of the muscle. Methods: A literature search of PubMed, CINAHL, MEDLINE, and Embase was conducted using the search terms stroke, hemiparesis, muscle structure, cross sectional area, atrophy, force, velocity, and torque. There were 27 articles included in this review. Results: Three changes occur in the muscle after stroke: a decrease in muscle mass, a decrease in fibre length, and a smaller pennation angle. In addition, the tendon is stretched and becomes more compliant. All of these factors reduce the affected muscle's ability to generate forces similar to controls or to non-paretic muscles. The result is a leftward shift in the length–tension curve, a downward shift in the torque–angle curve, and a downward shift in the force–velocity curve. Conclusion: Changes in muscle architecture contributing to weakness, such as muscle-fibre length, pennation angle, muscle atrophy, and tendon compliance, should be prevented or reversed by means of an appropriate rehabilitation programme. PMID:23997398

  4. Preclinical evidence implicating corticotropin-releasing factor signaling in ethanol consumption and neuroadaptation

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, T. J.; Reed, C.; Pastor, R.

    2016-01-01

    The results of many studies support the influence of the corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) system on ethanol (EtOH) consumption and EtOH-induced neuroadaptations that are critical in the addiction process. This review summarizes the preclinical data in this area after first providing an overview of the components of the CRF system. This complex system involves hypothalamic and extra-hypothalamic mechanisms that play a role in the central and peripheral consequences of stressors, including EtOH and other drugs of abuse. In addition, several endogenous ligands and targets make up this system and show differences in their involvement in EtOH drinking and in the effects of chronic or repeated EtOH treatment. In general, genetic and pharmacological approaches paint a consistent picture of the importance of CRF signaling via type 1 CRF receptors (CRF1) in EtOH-induced neuroadaptations that result in higher levels of intake, encourage alcohol seeking during abstinence and alter EtOH sensitivity. Furthermore, genetic findings in rodents, non-human primates and humans have provided some evidence of associations of genetic polymorphisms in CRF-related genes with EtOH drinking, although additional data are needed. These results suggest that CRF1 antagonists have potential as pharmacotherapeutics for alcohol use disorders. However, given the broad and important role of these receptors in adaptation to environmental and other challenges, full antagonist effects may be too profound and consideration should be given to treatments with modulatory effects. PMID:25565358

  5. Composite Nanomechanics: A Mechanistic Properties Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Handler, Louis M.; Manderscheid, Jane M.

    2007-01-01

    A unique mechanistic theory is described to predict the properties of nanocomposites. The theory is based on composite micromechanics with progressive substructuring down to a nanoscale slice of a nanofiber where all the governing equations are formulated. These equations hav e been programmed in a computer code. That computer code is used to predict 25 properties of a mononanofiber laminate. The results are pr esented graphically and discussed with respect to their practical sig nificance. Most of the results show smooth distributions. Results for matrix-dependent properties show bimodal through-the-thickness distr ibution with discontinuous changes from mode to mode.

  6. Composite Nanomechanics: A Mechanistic Properties Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Handler, Louis M.; Manderscheid, Jane M.

    2007-01-01

    A unique mechanistic theory is described to predict the properties of nanocomposites. The theory is based on composite micromechanics with progressive substructuring down to a nanoscale slice of a nanofiber where all the governing equations are formulated. These equations have been programmed in a computer code. That computer code is used to predict 25 properties of a mononanofiber laminate. The results are presented graphically and discussed with respect to their practical significance. Most of the results show smooth distributions. Results for matrix-dependent properties show bimodal through-the-thickness distribution with discontinuous changes from mode to mode.

  7. Mechanistic studies of carbon monoxide reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Geoffroy, G.L.

    1990-06-12

    The progress made during the current grant period (1 January 1988--1 April 1990) in three different areas of research is summarized. The research areas are: (1) oxidatively-induced double carbonylation reactions to form {alpha}-ketoacyl complexes and studies of the reactivity of the resulting compounds, (2) mechanistic studies of the carbonylation of nitroaromatics to form isocyanates, carbamates, and ureas, and (3) studies of the formation and reactivity of unusual metallacycles and alkylidene ligands supported on binuclear iron carbonyl fragments. 18 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Relationship between Audio-Visual Materials and Environmental Factors on Students Academic Performance in Senior Secondary Schools in Borno State: Implications for Counselling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bello, S.; Goni, Umar

    2016-01-01

    This is a survey study, designed to determine the relationship between audio-visual materials and environmental factors on students' academic performance in Senior Secondary Schools in Borno State: Implications for Counselling. The study set two research objectives, and tested two research hypotheses. The population of this study is 1,987 students…

  9. Digital telecommunications are a key development factor: Integration of satellite into overall telecommunication networks as a way to harmonize social and economic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caracciolo, Raffaele

    Viewgraphs and discussions on digital telecommunications - a key development factor: integration of satellite into overall telecommunication networks as a way to harmonize social and economic implications are presented. Topics covered include: analysis of correlation between gross national product (GNP) and telephone density; analysis of potential lines increases vs. GNP; SESNET; corporate networks; and an integrated network concept.

  10. Factors influencing the study of peroxidase-generated iodine species and implications for thyroglobulin synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Jack; Obinger, Christian; Eales, Geoff

    2008-07-01

    A key issue in the mechanism of thyroglobulin (Tg) iodination by thyroperoxidase (TPO) is whether a TPO-bound iodine intermediate directly iodinates Tg-incorporated tyrosines (specific iodination) or whether reactive iodine species released from TPO effectuate Tg iodination (nonspecific iodination). We addressed these alternatives by (a) determining the aqueous equilibria of the iodine species potentially involved in the kinetic studies of TPO-mediated iodination, and (b) reviewing the structure of the substrate channel in mammalian peroxidases. Redox-potentiometric analysis of aqueous iodine combined with integrated mathematical modelling demonstrates that I2 reacts with water to form several iodine species including hypoiodious acid (HOI). The HOI/I2 ratio depends on time, iodide concentration, buffering agents, and pH varying dramatically from pH 4 to 7.4. These factors may confound the use of Michaelis-Menten kinetics to determine the mechanism of TPO-catalyzed iodination since both I2 and HOI iodinate tyrosine but with different specificities and reaction rates. Consequently there is as yet no conclusive kinetic evidence that iodination occurs via formation of a TPO-bound iodinated intermediate. Furthermore, knowledge of TPO structure, gained from X-ray crystallographic studies indicates that access of Tg-bound tyrosyl groups to the active site of TPO is not possible. Thus the emerging conclusion is that the mechanism of Tg iodination is nonspecific. This is consistent with the occurrence of thyroid hormone formation in prevertebrate ascidians which exhibit TPO-like activity but lack the Tg gene.

  11. Calorie restriction and cancer prevention: a mechanistic perspective

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) is one of the most potent broadly acting dietary interventions for inducing weight loss and for inhibiting cancer in experimental models. Translation of the mechanistic lessons learned from research on CR to cancer prevention strategies in human beings is important given the high prevalence of excess energy intake, obesity, and metabolic syndrome in many parts of the world and the established links between obesity-associated metabolic perturbations and increased risk or progression of many types of cancer. This review synthesizes findings on the biological mechanisms underlying many of the anticancer effects of CR, with emphasis on the impact of CR on growth factor signaling pathways, inflammation, cellular and systemic energy homeostasis pathways, vascular perturbations, and the tumor microenvironment. These CR-responsive pathways and processes represent targets for translating CR research into effective cancer prevention strategies in human beings. PMID:24280167

  12. The Hormonal Fingerprints and BMI: Implications for Risk Factors in Dental Caries and Malocclusion

    PubMed Central

    Priyanka, Goguladinne Naga Deepthi; Radhakrishna, Ambati Naga; Ramakrishna, Juvva; Jyothi, Velagapudi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The hormonal fingerprint is the ratio between 2nd and 4th digit lengths. It was evidenced in the medical scenario that it can be used as an indirect marker in many diseases like Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) and metabolic syndromes. As far as dentistry is concerned very few studies in the literature have been done to evaluate the influence of hormonal fingerprint on oral health, thus provoking us to formulate new method for predicting dental caries and malocclusion and its association with Body Mass Index (BMI). Aim The purpose of this retrospective study was to highlight the role of new biological marker–Hormonal fingerprints in the early detection of malocclusion, caries, the influence of BMI on malocclusion and caries. We also attempted to study the correlation of BMI with hormonal fingerprints. Materials and Methods A total of 300 children were randomly selected from both sexes of age group 10-15 years. The hormonal fingerprint was made by measuring the length ratio of the index and ring finger with the help of digital Vernier caliper. Anthropometric measures (weight in kilograms and height in metres) for the calculation of BMI were recorded. Caries assessment was done using standard mouth mirrors and Community Periodontal Index probes. DMFT index was followed for assessment of caries according to the WHO assessment form, 1997. Occlusal characteristics of the children evaluated were molar relation, anterior and posterior cross bite, open bite, deep bite, lower anterior crowding. All the factors were recorded by two investigators. Results The results of the study showed that majority of the children among study population were having 2D:4D <1. The rate of occurrence of malocclusion was increasing with increase in the value of 2D:4D ratio with a statistically significant p-value of <0.001. Higher BMI values were associated with normal occlusal conditions (p= 0.041) and lower 2D:4D ratio (p= 0.037). High caries experience was noticed in children with

  13. Appropriateness of mechanistic and non-mechanistic models for the application of ultrafiltration to mixed waste

    SciTech Connect

    Foust, Henry; Ghosehajra, Malay

    2007-07-01

    This study asks two questions: (1) How appropriate is the use of a basic filtration equation to the application of ultrafiltration of mixed waste, and (2) How appropriate are non-parametric models for permeate rates (volumes)? To answer these questions, mechanistic and non-mechanistic approaches are developed for permeate rates and volumes associated with an ultrafiltration/mixed waste system in dia-filtration mode. The mechanistic approach is based on a filtration equation which states that t/V vs. V is a linear relationship. The coefficients associated with this linear regression are composed of physical/chemical parameters of the system and based the mass balance equation associated with the membrane and associated developing cake layer. For several sets of data, a high correlation is shown that supports the assertion that t/V vs. V is a linear relationship. It is also shown that non-mechanistic approaches, i.e., the use of regression models to are not appropriate. One models considered is Q(p) = a*ln(Cb)+b. Regression models are inappropriate because the scale-up from a bench scale (pilot scale) study to full-scale for permeate rates (volumes) is not simply the ratio of the two membrane surface areas. (authors)

  14. Current mechanistic insights into the roles of matrix metalloproteinases in tumour invasion and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Brown, Gordon T; Murray, Graeme I

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this review is to highlight the recent mechanistic developments elucidating the role of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in tumour invasion and metastasis. The ability of tumour cells to invade, migrate, and subsequently metastasize is a fundamental characteristic of cancer. Tumour invasion and metastasis are increasingly being characterized by the dynamic relationship between cancer cells and their microenvironment and developing a greater understanding of these basic pathological mechanisms is crucial. While MMPs have been strongly implicated in these processes as a result of extensive circumstantial evidence--for example, increased expression of individual MMPs in tumours and association of specific MMPs with prognosis--the underpinning mechanisms are only now being elucidated. Recent studies are now providing a mechanistic basis, highlighting and reinforcing the catalytic and non-catalytic roles of specific MMPs as key players in tumour invasion and metastasis.

  15. Presence of cytoplasmic factors functional in peroxisomal protein import implicates organelle-associated defects in several human peroxisomal disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Wendland, M; Subramani, S

    1993-01-01

    Cells from patients with peroxisome-deficient disorders contain membrane ghosts devoid of most matrix contents instead of normal peroxisomes indicating that the underlying molecular defects impair the import of matrix proteins into these peroxisome ghosts. Genetic heterogeneity for the molecular defects was inferred from the assignment of patients with peroxisome-deficient disorders into nine complementation groups. The aim of our studies was to analyze cell lines from six different complementation groups in a systematic manner for the presence of peroxisome ghosts, the ability to import Ser-Lys-Leu-containing proteins into peroxisome ghosts and for the presence of cytosolic factors required for peroxisomal protein import. We show that each of the cell lines analyzed contains peroxisome ghosts, but is unable to import matrix proteins as judged by a peroxisomal import assay using permeabilized cells. The addition of wild type cytosol did not restore the capacity to import matrix proteins but cytosol prepared from these cell lines was functional in stimulation of peroxisomal protein import in a heterologous system. These results implicate organelle-associated molecular defects in each of the six cell lines analyzed. Images PMID:7693762

  16. Factors influencing spatial pattern in tropical forest clearance and stand age: Implications for carbon storage and species diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmer, E. H.; Brandeis, Thomas J.; Lugo, Ariel E.; Kennaway, Todd

    2008-06-01

    Little is known about the tropical forests that undergo clearing as urban/built-up and other developed lands spread. This study uses remote sensing-based maps of Puerto Rico, multinomial logit models and forest inventory data to explain patterns of forest age and the age of forests cleared for land development and assess their implications for forest carbon storage and tree species richness. Accessibility, arability and spatial contagion emerge strongly as overriding spatial controls on tropical forest age, determining (1) the pattern of agricultural abandonment that permits forest regrowth, and (2) where humans leave old-growth forest remnants. Covariation between the factors patterning forest age and land development explains why most forest cleared for land development is younger. Forests are increasingly younger in more accessible and fertile areas where agriculture has lasted longer and land development is most common. All else equal, more species-rich older forest on less arable lands are somewhat less likely to undergo development, but they are still vulnerable to clearing for land development if close to urban centers and unprotected. Accounting for forest age leads to a 19% lower estimate of forest biomass cleared for land development than if forest age is not accounted for.

  17. Ecological factors influencing HIV sexual risk and resilience among young people in rural Kenya: implications for prevention.

    PubMed

    Harper, Gary W; Riplinger, Andrew J; Neubauer, Leah C; Murphy, Alexandra G; Velcoff, Jessica; Bangi, Audrey K

    2014-02-01

    Most new HIV infections in Kenya occur among young people. The purpose of this study was to understand ecological factors that influence HIV-related sexual risk and resilience among young people in rural Kenya and to elicit their ideas for HIV prevention interventions. Nine focus groups (N = 199) were conducted with both female (55%) and male (45%) participants (ages 14-24 years) living in rural communities in Kenya. Findings were organized into thematic areas related to the following systems of influence: (i) intrapersonal (substance use, HIV knowledge), (ii) interpersonal (peer pressure, lack of parent-child communication, interpersonal sexual violence), (iii) institutional/community (pornography, transactional sex, 'idleness', lack of role models) and (iv) socio-cultural/policy (Kikuyu culture, Western influence, religious beliefs, HIV-related stigma and gendered sexual scripts). Results regarding the types of HIV prevention programs that participants believed should be developed for young people in rural Kenya revealed seven primary themes, including (i) HIV prevention community/group workshops, (ii) condom distribution, (iii) job skills trainings, (iv) athletic and social clubs, (v) HIV-related stigma reduction campaigns, (vi) community-wide demonstrations and (vii) other HIV/AIDS activities led by young people. Implications for the development of culturally and developmentally appropriate HIV prevention interventions for young people in rural Kenya are discussed.

  18. Ecological factors influencing HIV sexual risk and resilience among young people in rural Kenya: implications for prevention.

    PubMed

    Harper, Gary W; Riplinger, Andrew J; Neubauer, Leah C; Murphy, Alexandra G; Velcoff, Jessica; Bangi, Audrey K

    2014-02-01

    Most new HIV infections in Kenya occur among young people. The purpose of this study was to understand ecological factors that influence HIV-related sexual risk and resilience among young people in rural Kenya and to elicit their ideas for HIV prevention interventions. Nine focus groups (N = 199) were conducted with both female (55%) and male (45%) participants (ages 14-24 years) living in rural communities in Kenya. Findings were organized into thematic areas related to the following systems of influence: (i) intrapersonal (substance use, HIV knowledge), (ii) interpersonal (peer pressure, lack of parent-child communication, interpersonal sexual violence), (iii) institutional/community (pornography, transactional sex, 'idleness', lack of role models) and (iv) socio-cultural/policy (Kikuyu culture, Western influence, religious beliefs, HIV-related stigma and gendered sexual scripts). Results regarding the types of HIV prevention programs that participants believed should be developed for young people in rural Kenya revealed seven primary themes, including (i) HIV prevention community/group workshops, (ii) condom distribution, (iii) job skills trainings, (iv) athletic and social clubs, (v) HIV-related stigma reduction campaigns, (vi) community-wide demonstrations and (vii) other HIV/AIDS activities led by young people. Implications for the development of culturally and developmentally appropriate HIV prevention interventions for young people in rural Kenya are discussed. PMID:23969629

  19. X-ray structure of active site-inhibited clotting factor Xa. Implications for drug design and substrate recognition.

    PubMed

    Brandstetter, H; Kühne, A; Bode, W; Huber, R; von der Saal, W; Wirthensohn, K; Engh, R A

    1996-11-22

    The 3.0-A resolution x-ray structure of human des-Gla-coagulation factor Xa (fXa) has been determined in complex with the synthetic inhibitor DX-9065a. The binding geometry is characterized primarily by two interaction sites: the naphthamidine group is fixed in the S1 pocket by a typical salt bridge to Asp-189, while the pyrrolidine ring binds in the unique aryl-binding site (S4) of fXa. Unlike the large majority of inhibitor complexes with serine proteinases, Gly-216 (S3) does not contribute to hydrogen bond formation. In contrast to typical thrombin binding modes, the S2 site of fXa cannot be used by DX-9065a since it is blocked by Tyr-99, and the aryl-binding site (S4) of fXa is lined by carbonyl oxygen atoms that can accommodate positive charges. This has implications for natural substrate recognition as well as for drug design. PMID:8939944

  20. Stable isotope composition in Daphnia is modulated by growth, temperature, and toxic exposure: implications for trophic magnification factor assessment.

    PubMed

    Ek, Caroline; Karlson, Agnes M L; Hansson, Sture; Garbaras, Andrius; Gorokhova, Elena

    2015-06-01

    The potential for using stable isotope analysis in risk assessment of environmental contaminants is crucially dependent on the predictability of the trophic transfer of isotopes in food webs. The relationship between contaminant levels and trophic position of consumers is widely used to assess biomagnification properties of various pollutants by establishing trophic magnification factors (TMF). However, contaminant-induced variability of the isotopic composition in biota is poorly understood. Here, we investigated effects of toxic exposure on δ(15)N and δ(13)C values in a consumer, with a main hypothesis that these effects would be largely mediated via growth rate and metabolic turnover of the test animals. The cladoceran Daphnia magna was used in two experiments that were conducted to manipulate growth and body condition (assayed as C:N ratio) by food availability and temperature (Experiment 1) and by toxic exposure to the pesticide lindane (Experiment 2). We found a significant negative effect of growth rate and a positive effect of temperature on the consumer-diet discrimination factor for δ(15)N and δ(13)C, with no effects on the C:N ratio (Experiment 1). In lindane-exposed daphnids, a significant growth inhibition was observed, with concomitant increase in metabolic costs and significantly elevated size-specific δ(15)N and δ(13)C values. Moreover, a significantly higher incorporation of carbon relative to nitrogen, yet a concomitant decrease in C:N ratio was observed in the exposed animals. Together, these results have methodological implications for determining trophic positions and TMF in polluted environments, where elevated δ(15)N values would translate into overestimated trophic positions and underestimated TMF. Furthermore, altered δ(13)C values may lead to erroneous food-chain assignment of the consumer in question.

  1. DNA methylation analysis of Homeobox genes implicates HOXB7 hypomethylation as risk factor for neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Rochtus, Anne; Izzi, Benedetta; Vangeel, Elise; Louwette, Sophie; Wittevrongel, Christine; Lambrechts, Diether; Moreau, Yves; Winand, Raf; Verpoorten, Carla; Jansen, Katrien; Van Geet, Chris; Freson, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are common birth defects of complex etiology. Though family- and population-based studies have confirmed a genetic component, the responsible genes for NTDs are still largely unknown. Based on the hypothesis that folic acid prevents NTDs by stimulating methylation reactions, epigenetic factors, such as DNA methylation, are predicted to be involved in NTDs. Homeobox (HOX) genes play a role in spinal cord development and are tightly regulated in a spatiotemporal and collinear manner, partly by epigenetic modifications. We have quantified DNA methylation for the different HOX genes by subtracting values from a genome-wide methylation analysis using leukocyte DNA from 10 myelomeningocele (MMC) patients and 6 healthy controls. From the 1575 CpGs profiled for the 4 HOX clusters, 26 CpGs were differentially methylated (P-value < 0.05; β-difference > 0.05) between MMC patients and controls. Seventy-seven percent of these CpGs were located in the HOXA and HOXB clusters, with the most profound difference for 3 CpGs within the HOXB7 gene body. A validation case-control study including 83 MMC patients and 30 unrelated healthy controls confirmed a significant association between MMC and HOXB7 hypomethylation (-14.4%; 95% CI: 11.9-16.9%; P-value < 0.0001) independent of the MTHFR 667C>T genotype. Significant HOXB7 hypomethylation was also present in 12 unaffected siblings, each related to a MMC patient, suggestive of an epigenetic change induced by the mother. The inclusion of a neural tube formation model using zebrafish showed that Hoxb7a overexpression but not depletion resulted in deformed body axes with dysmorphic neural tube formation. Our results implicate HOXB7 hypomethylation as risk factor for NTDs and highlight the importance for future genome-wide DNA methylation analyses without preselecting candidate pathways.

  2. Mechanistic modeling of aberrant energy metabolism in human disease

    PubMed Central

    Sangar, Vineet; Eddy, James A.; Simeonidis, Evangelos; Price, Nathan D.

    2012-01-01

    Dysfunction in energy metabolism—including in pathways localized to the mitochondria—has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a wide array of disorders, ranging from cancer to neurodegenerative diseases to type II diabetes. The inherent complexities of energy and mitochondrial metabolism present a significant obstacle in the effort to understand the role that these molecular processes play in the development of disease. To help unravel these complexities, systems biology methods have been applied to develop an array of computational metabolic models, ranging from mitochondria-specific processes to genome-scale cellular networks. These constraint-based (CB) models can efficiently simulate aspects of normal and aberrant metabolism in various genetic and environmental conditions. Development of these models leverages—and also provides a powerful means to integrate and interpret—information from a wide range of sources including genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and enzyme kinetics. Here, we review a variety of mechanistic modeling studies that explore metabolic functions, deficiency disorders, and aberrant biochemical pathways in mitochondria and related regions in the cell. PMID:23112774

  3. Physical activity and its mechanistic effects on prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wekesa, A; Harrison, M; Watson, R W

    2015-09-01

    Beneficial effects of physical activity have been illustrated in numerous aspects of health. With the increasing incidence of prostate cancer and changes in physical activity of men, understanding the link between the two has important implications for changing this cancer burden. Both positive and negative associations between physical activity and prostate cancer have been previously demonstrated in observational epidemiological studies. Elucidating the biological mechanisms would lead to a better understanding of how physical activity influences the progression of prostate cancer. This review was undertaken to: (1) identify evidence in literature that demonstrates the effects of physical activity on skeletal muscle secretomes, (2) indicate the plausible signaling pathways these proteins might activate, and (3) identify evidence in literature that demonstrates the roles of the signaling pathways in prostate cancer progression and regression. We also discuss proposed biological mechanisms and signaling pathways by which physical activity may prevent the development and progression of prostate cancer. We discuss proteins involved in the normal and aberrant growth and development of the prostate gland that may be affected by physical activity. We further identify future directions for research, including a better understanding of the biological mechanisms, the need to standardize physical activity and identify mechanistic end points of physical activity that can then be correlated with outcomes.

  4. A brief review of exercise, bipolar disorder, and mechanistic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Daniel; Turner, Alyna; Lauder, Sue; Gigler, Margaret E.; Berk, Lesley; Singh, Ajeet B.; Pasco, Julie A.; Berk, Michael; Sylvia, Louisa

    2015-01-01

    Despite evidence that exercise has been found to be effective in the treatment of depression, it is unclear whether these data can be extrapolated to bipolar disorder. Available evidence for bipolar disorder is scant, with no existing randomized controlled trials having tested the impact of exercise on depressive, manic or hypomanic symptomatology. Although exercise is often recommended in bipolar disorder, this is based on extrapolation from the unipolar literature, theory and clinical expertise and not empirical evidence. In addition, there are currently no available empirical data on program variables, with practical implications on frequency, intensity and type of exercise derived from unipolar depression studies. The aim of the current paper is to explore the relationship between exercise and bipolar disorder and potential mechanistic pathways. Given the high rate of medical co-morbidities experienced by people with bipolar disorder, it is possible that exercise is a potentially useful and important intervention with regard to general health benefits; however, further research is required to elucidate the impact of exercise on mood symptomology. PMID:25788889

  5. Evaluating National Environmental Sustainability: Performance Measures and Influential Factors for OECD-Member Countries featuring Canadian Performance and Policy Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calbick, Kenneth S.

    This research reviews five studies that evaluate national environmental sustainability with composite indices; performs uncertainty and sensitivity analyses of techniques for building a composite index; completes principal components factor analysis to help build subindices measuring waste and pollution, sustainable energy, sustainable food, nature conservation, and sustainable cities (Due to its current importance, the greenhouse gases (GHG) indicator is included individually as another policy measure.); analyses factors that seem to influence performance: climate, population growth, population density, economic output, technological development, industrial structure, energy prices, environmental governance, pollution abatement and control expenditures, and environmental pricing; and explores Canadian policy implications of the results. The techniques to build composite indices include performance indicator selection, missing data treatment, normalisation technique, scale-effect adjustments, weights, and aggregation method. Scale-effect adjustments and normalisation method are significant sources of uncertainty inducing 68% of the observed variation in a country's final rank at the 95% level of confidence. Choice of indicators also introduces substantial variation as well. To compensate for this variation, the current study recommends that a composite index should always be analysed with other policy subindices and individual indicators. Moreover, the connection between population and consumption indicates that per capita scale-effect adjustments should be used for certain indicators. Rather than ranking normalisation, studies should use a method that retains information from the raw indicator values. Multiple regression and cluster analyses indicate economic output, environmental governance, and energy prices are major influential factors, with energy prices the most important. It is statistically significant for five out of seven performance measures at the 95

  6. Reaction Coordinates and Mechanistic Hypothesis Tests.

    PubMed

    Peters, Baron

    2016-05-27

    Reaction coordinates are integral to several classic rate theories that can (a) predict kinetic trends across conditions and homologous reactions, (b) extract activation parameters with a clear physical interpretation from experimental rates, and (c) enable efficient calculations of free energy barriers and rates. New trajectory-based rare events methods can provide rates directly from dynamical trajectories without a reaction coordinate. Trajectory-based frameworks can also generate ideal (but abstract) reaction coordinates such as committors and eigenfunctions of the master equation. However, rates and mechanistic insights obtained from trajectory-based methods and abstract coordinates are not readily generalized across simulation conditions or reaction families. We discuss methods for identifying physically meaningful reaction coordinates, including committor analysis, variational transition state theory, Kramers-Langer-Berezhkovskii-Szabo theory, and statistical inference methods that can use path sampling data to screen, mix, and optimize thousands of trial coordinates. Special focus is given to likelihood maximization and inertial likelihood maximization approaches.

  7. Reaction Coordinates and Mechanistic Hypothesis Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Baron

    2016-05-01

    Reaction coordinates are integral to several classic rate theories that can (a) predict kinetic trends across conditions and homologous reactions, (b) extract activation parameters with a clear physical interpretation from experimental rates, and (c) enable efficient calculations of free energy barriers and rates. New trajectory-based rare events methods can provide rates directly from dynamical trajectories without a reaction coordinate. Trajectory-based frameworks can also generate ideal (but abstract) reaction coordinates such as committors and eigenfunctions of the master equation. However, rates and mechanistic insights obtained from trajectory-based methods and abstract coordinates are not readily generalized across simulation conditions or reaction families. We discuss methods for identifying physically meaningful reaction coordinates, including committor analysis, variational transition state theory, Kramers-Langer-Berezhkovskii-Szabo theory, and statistical inference methods that can use path sampling data to screen, mix, and optimize thousands of trial coordinates. Special focus is given to likelihood maximization and inertial likelihood maximization approaches.

  8. Crystal Structure of Human Plasma Platelet-activating Factor Acetylhydrolase: Structural Implication to Liporprotein Binding and Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Samanta, Uttamkumar; Bahnson, Brian J.

    2009-02-23

    Human plasma platelet-activating factor (PAF) acetylhydrolase functions by reducing PAF levels as a general anti-inflammatory scavenger and is linked to anaphylactic shock, asthma, and allergic reactions. The enzyme has also been implicated in hydrolytic activities of other pro-inflammatory agents, such as sn-2 oxidatively fragmented phospholipids. This plasma enzyme is tightly bound to low and high density lipoprotein particles and is also referred to as lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2. The crystal structure of this enzyme has been solved from x-ray diffraction data collected to a resolution of 1.5 angstroms. It has a classic lipase alpha/beta-hydrolase fold, and it contains a catalytic triad of Ser273, His351, and Asp296. Two clusters of hydrophobic residues define the probable interface-binding region, and a prediction is given of how the enzyme is bound to lipoproteins. Additionally, an acidic patch of 10 carboxylate residues and a neighboring basic patch of three residues are suggested to play a role in high density lipoprotein/low density lipoprotein partitioning. A crystal structure is also presented of PAF acetylhydrolase reacted with the organophosphate compound paraoxon via its active site Ser273. The resulting diethyl phosphoryl complex was used to model the tetrahedral intermediate of the substrate PAF to the active site. The model of interface binding begins to explain the known specificity of lipoprotein-bound substrates and how the active site can be both close to the hydrophobic-hydrophilic interface and at the same time be accessible to the aqueous phase.

  9. Diversity Takes Shape: Understanding the Mechanistic and Adaptive Basis of Bacterial Morphology

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The modern age of metagenomics has delivered unprecedented volumes of data describing the genetic and metabolic diversity of bacterial communities, but it has failed to provide information about coincident cellular morphologies. Much like metabolic and biosynthetic capabilities, morphology comprises a critical component of bacterial fitness, molded by natural selection into the many elaborate shapes observed across the bacterial domain. In this essay, we discuss the diversity of bacterial morphology and its implications for understanding both the mechanistic and the adaptive basis of morphogenesis. We consider how best to leverage genomic data and recent experimental developments in order to advance our understanding of bacterial shape and its functional importance. PMID:27695035

  10. Intriguing mechanistic labyrinths in gold(i) catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Obradors, Carla

    2014-01-01

    Many mechanistically intriguing reactions have been developed in the last decade using gold(i) as catalyst. Here we review the main mechanistic proposals in gold-catalysed activation of alkynes and allenes, in which this metal plays a central role by stabilising a variety of complex cationic intermediates. PMID:24176910

  11. Predictive mechanistic bioenergetics to model habitat suitability of shellfish culture in coastal lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinaldi, A.; Montalto, V.; Manganaro, A.; Mazzola, A.; Mirto, S.; Sanfilippo, M.; Sarà, G.

    2014-05-01

    Quantitative tools based on mechanistic modelling of functional traits able to enhance the sustainability of aquaculture and most other human activities (i.e. reducing the likelihood of detrimental impacts optimising productions), are especially important factors in the decision to site aquaculture facilities in coastal lakes, ponds and lagoons and, in the case of detrimental impact, to adopt mitigation measures. We tested the ability of mechanistic functional trait based models to predict life history traits of cultivable shellfish in shallow coastal lakes. Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) models were run to generate spatially explicit predictions of Mytilus galloprovincialis life history (LH) traits (e.g. body size and fecundity). Using fortnightly data of food supply and hourly data of body temperatures, and exploiting the power of mechanistic rules, we estimated the amount of faeces ejected by a fixed quantity of organisms cultivated in two shallow Southern Mediterranean (Sicily) lakes. These differed in terms of temperature and food density, implying large differences in life history traits of mussels in the two study areas. This information could help facilitate the selection of sites where environmental conditions are more suitable for aquaculture and contextually compatible with sustainability. The validation exercise obtained by comparing the predicted and observed data was nearly consistent. Therefore, a mechanistic functional traits-based model seems able to capture the link between habitat characteristics and functional traits of organisms, delineating the fundamental portion of an ecological niche, the possibility of predicting LH traits and potential ecological applications in the management of natural coastal resources.

  12. The mechanistic-holistic divide revisited: The case of the lac operon.

    PubMed

    Racine, Valérie

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, I revisit the development of the repression model of genetic regulation in the lac operon to challenge a common application of a conceptual framework in the history of biology. I take Allen's (1978) account of the changes in the life sciences during the early and mid-twentieth century as an example of a common application of a framework based on the dichotomy between a mechanistic, or reductionist, approach to science and a holistic one. From this conceptual framework, Allen infers two general claims about the process of science and its goals: (1) that "mechanistic materialism" has often presented a more practical way to begin the study of complex phenomena in the life sciences, and (2) that the approach described as "holistic materialism" provides a more complete or accurate description of the natural world. The development of the lac operon model does not fit Allen's generalizations about scientific developments, and it can be used to cast some doubt on the scope of application of that conceptual framework. I argue that a better framework to interpret particular episodes in the history of molecular biology is to consider the ways in which biologists prioritize and track different aspects of the phenomena under study, rather than to focus on whether certain scientific practices are best described as developing from mechanistic to more holistic approaches. I end with some implications for the historiography of science by considering the appropriateness of different conceptual frameworks for different grains of resolution in the history of biology.

  13. Integrating mechanistic and polymorphism data to characterize human genetic susceptibility for environmental chemical risk assessment in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Holly M; Euling, Susan Y

    2013-09-15

    Response to environmental chemicals can vary widely among individuals and between population groups. In human health risk assessment, data on susceptibility can be utilized by deriving risk levels based on a study of a susceptible population and/or an uncertainty factor may be applied to account for the lack of information about susceptibility. Defining genetic susceptibility in response to environmental chemicals across human populations is an area of interest in the NAS' new paradigm of toxicity pathway-based risk assessment. Data from high-throughput/high content (HT/HC), including -omics (e.g., genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics) technologies, have been integral to the identification and characterization of drug target and disease loci, and have been successfully utilized to inform the mechanism of action for numerous environmental chemicals. Large-scale population genotyping studies may help to characterize levels of variability across human populations at identified target loci implicated in response to environmental chemicals. By combining mechanistic data for a given environmental chemical with next generation sequencing data that provides human population variation information, one can begin to characterize differential susceptibility due to genetic variability to environmental chemicals within and across genetically heterogeneous human populations. The integration of such data sources will be informative to human health risk assessment.

  14. Integrating mechanistic and polymorphism data to characterize human genetic susceptibility for environmental chemical risk assessment in the 21st century

    SciTech Connect

    Mortensen, Holly M.; Euling, Susan Y.

    2013-09-15

    Response to environmental chemicals can vary widely among individuals and between population groups. In human health risk assessment, data on susceptibility can be utilized by deriving risk levels based on a study of a susceptible population and/or an uncertainty factor may be applied to account for the lack of information about susceptibility. Defining genetic susceptibility in response to environmental chemicals across human populations is an area of interest in the NAS' new paradigm of toxicity pathway-based risk assessment. Data from high-throughput/high content (HT/HC), including -omics (e.g., genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics) technologies, have been integral to the identification and characterization of drug target and disease loci, and have been successfully utilized to inform the mechanism of action for numerous environmental chemicals. Large-scale population genotyping studies may help to characterize levels of variability across human populations at identified target loci implicated in response to environmental chemicals. By combining mechanistic data for a given environmental chemical with next generation sequencing data that provides human population variation information, one can begin to characterize differential susceptibility due to genetic variability to environmental chemicals within and across genetically heterogeneous human populations. The integration of such data sources will be informative to human health risk assessment.

  15. Equation-free mechanistic ecosystem forecasting using empirical dynamic modeling.

    PubMed

    Ye, Hao; Beamish, Richard J; Glaser, Sarah M; Grant, Sue C H; Hsieh, Chih-Hao; Richards, Laura J; Schnute, Jon T; Sugihara, George

    2015-03-31

    It is well known that current equilibrium-based models fall short as predictive descriptions of natural ecosystems, and particularly of fisheries systems that exhibit nonlinear dynamics. For example, model parameters assumed to be fixed constants may actually vary in time, models may fit well to existing data but lack out-of-sample predictive skill, and key driving variables may be misidentified due to transient (mirage) correlations that are common in nonlinear systems. With these frailties, it is somewhat surprising that static equilibrium models continue to be widely used. Here, we examine empirical dynamic modeling (EDM) as an alternative to imposed model equations and that accommodates both nonequilibrium dynamics and nonlinearity. Using time series from nine stocks of sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) from the Fraser River system in British Columbia, Canada, we perform, for the the first time to our knowledge, real-data comparison of contemporary fisheries models with equivalent EDM formulations that explicitly use spawning stock and environmental variables to forecast recruitment. We find that EDM models produce more accurate and precise forecasts, and unlike extensions of the classic Ricker spawner-recruit equation, they show significant improvements when environmental factors are included. Our analysis demonstrates the strategic utility of EDM for incorporating environmental influences into fisheries forecasts and, more generally, for providing insight into how environmental factors can operate in forecast models, thus paving the way for equation-free mechanistic forecasting to be applied in management contexts.

  16. Equation-free mechanistic ecosystem forecasting using empirical dynamic modeling.

    PubMed

    Ye, Hao; Beamish, Richard J; Glaser, Sarah M; Grant, Sue C H; Hsieh, Chih-Hao; Richards, Laura J; Schnute, Jon T; Sugihara, George

    2015-03-31

    It is well known that current equilibrium-based models fall short as predictive descriptions of natural ecosystems, and particularly of fisheries systems that exhibit nonlinear dynamics. For example, model parameters assumed to be fixed constants may actually vary in time, models may fit well to existing data but lack out-of-sample predictive skill, and key driving variables may be misidentified due to transient (mirage) correlations that are common in nonlinear systems. With these frailties, it is somewhat surprising that static equilibrium models continue to be widely used. Here, we examine empirical dynamic modeling (EDM) as an alternative to imposed model equations and that accommodates both nonequilibrium dynamics and nonlinearity. Using time series from nine stocks of sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) from the Fraser River system in British Columbia, Canada, we perform, for the the first time to our knowledge, real-data comparison of contemporary fisheries models with equivalent EDM formulations that explicitly use spawning stock and environmental variables to forecast recruitment. We find that EDM models produce more accurate and precise forecasts, and unlike extensions of the classic Ricker spawner-recruit equation, they show significant improvements when environmental factors are included. Our analysis demonstrates the strategic utility of EDM for incorporating environmental influences into fisheries forecasts and, more generally, for providing insight into how environmental factors can operate in forecast models, thus paving the way for equation-free mechanistic forecasting to be applied in management contexts. PMID:25733874

  17. Equation-free mechanistic ecosystem forecasting using empirical dynamic modeling

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hao; Beamish, Richard J.; Glaser, Sarah M.; Grant, Sue C. H.; Hsieh, Chih-hao; Richards, Laura J.; Schnute, Jon T.; Sugihara, George

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that current equilibrium-based models fall short as predictive descriptions of natural ecosystems, and particularly of fisheries systems that exhibit nonlinear dynamics. For example, model parameters assumed to be fixed constants may actually vary in time, models may fit well to existing data but lack out-of-sample predictive skill, and key driving variables may be misidentified due to transient (mirage) correlations that are common in nonlinear systems. With these frailties, it is somewhat surprising that static equilibrium models continue to be widely used. Here, we examine empirical dynamic modeling (EDM) as an alternative to imposed model equations and that accommodates both nonequilibrium dynamics and nonlinearity. Using time series from nine stocks of sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) from the Fraser River system in British Columbia, Canada, we perform, for the the first time to our knowledge, real-data comparison of contemporary fisheries models with equivalent EDM formulations that explicitly use spawning stock and environmental variables to forecast recruitment. We find that EDM models produce more accurate and precise forecasts, and unlike extensions of the classic Ricker spawner–recruit equation, they show significant improvements when environmental factors are included. Our analysis demonstrates the strategic utility of EDM for incorporating environmental influences into fisheries forecasts and, more generally, for providing insight into how environmental factors can operate in forecast models, thus paving the way for equation-free mechanistic forecasting to be applied in management contexts. PMID:25733874

  18. Mechanistic insights into type III restriction enzymes.

    PubMed

    Raghavendra, Nidhanapati K; Bheemanaik, Shivakumara; Rao, Desirazu N

    2012-01-01

    Type III restriction-modification (R-M) enzymes need to interact with two separate unmethylated DNA sequences in indirectly repeated, head-to-head orientations for efficient cleavage to occur at a defined location next to only one of the two sites. However, cleavage of sites that are not in head-to-head orientation have been observed to occur under certain reaction conditions in vitro. ATP hydrolysis is required for the long-distance communication between the sites prior to cleavage. Type III R-M enzymes comprise two subunits, Res and Mod that form a homodimeric Mod2 and a heterotetrameric Res2Mod2 complex. The Mod subunit in M2 or R2M2 complex recognizes and methylates DNA while the Res subunit in R2M2 complex is responsible for ATP hydrolysis, DNA translocation and cleavage. A vast majority of biochemical studies on Type III R-M enzymes have been undertaken using two closely related enzymes, EcoP1I and EcoP15I. Divergent opinions about how the long-distance interaction between the recognition sites exist and at least three mechanistic models based on 1D- diffusion and/or 3D- DNA looping have been proposed.

  19. Mechanistically based mapping of human cardiac fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Sanjiv M; Zaman, Junaid A B

    2016-05-01

    The mechanisms underpinning human cardiac fibrillation remain elusive. In his 1913 paper 'On dynamic equilibrium in the heart', Mines proposed that an activation wave front could propagate repeatedly in a circle, initiated by a stimulus in the vulnerable period. While the dynamics of activation and recovery are central to cardiac fibrillation, these physiological data are rarely used in clinical mapping. Fibrillation is a rapid irregular rhythm with spatiotemporal disorder resulting from two fundamental mechanisms - sources in preferred cardiac regions or spatially diffuse self-sustaining activity, i.e. with no preferred source. On close inspection, however, this debate may also reflect mapping technique. Fibrillation is initiated from triggers by regional dispersion in repolarization, slow conduction and wavebreak, then sustained by non-uniform interactions of these mechanisms. Notably, optical mapping of action potentials in atrial fibrillation (AF) show spiral wave sources (rotors) in nearly all studies including humans, while most traditional electrogram analyses of AF do not. Techniques may diverge in fibrillation because electrograms summate non-coherent waves within an undefined field whereas optical maps define waves with a visually defined field. Also fibrillation operates at the limits of activation and recovery, which are well represented by action potentials while fibrillatory electrograms poorly represent repolarization. We conclude by suggesting areas for study that may be used, until such time as optical mapping is clinically feasible, to improve mechanistic understanding and therapy of human cardiac fibrillation. PMID:26607671

  20. Mechanistically based mapping of human cardiac fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Junaid A. B.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The mechanisms underpinning human cardiac fibrillation remain elusive. In his 1913 paper ‘On dynamic equilibrium in the heart’, Mines proposed that an activation wave front could propagate repeatedly in a circle, initiated by a stimulus in the vulnerable period. While the dynamics of activation and recovery are central to cardiac fibrillation, these physiological data are rarely used in clinical mapping. Fibrillation is a rapid irregular rhythm with spatiotemporal disorder resulting from two fundamental mechanisms – sources in preferred cardiac regions or spatially diffuse self‐sustaining activity, i.e. with no preferred source. On close inspection, however, this debate may also reflect mapping technique. Fibrillation is initiated from triggers by regional dispersion in repolarization, slow conduction and wavebreak, then sustained by non‐uniform interactions of these mechanisms. Notably, optical mapping of action potentials in atrial fibrillation (AF) show spiral wave sources (rotors) in nearly all studies including humans, while most traditional electrogram analyses of AF do not. Techniques may diverge in fibrillation because electrograms summate non‐coherent waves within an undefined field whereas optical maps define waves with a visually defined field. Also fibrillation operates at the limits of activation and recovery, which are well represented by action potentials while fibrillatory electrograms poorly represent repolarization. We conclude by suggesting areas for study that may be used, until such time as optical mapping is clinically feasible, to improve mechanistic understanding and therapy of human cardiac fibrillation. PMID:26607671

  1. Polymyxin B hemoperfusion: a mechanistic perspective.

    PubMed

    Ronco, Claudio; Klein, David J

    2014-06-09

    Direct hemoperfusion therapy with polymyxin B immobilized fiber cartridge (PMX-DHP) is an established strategy in the treatment of septic shock in Japan and parts of Western Europe. PMX-DHP is currently the subject of a pivotal North American randomized controlled trial (EUPHRATES) in patients with septic shock and confirmed endotoxemia, as measured by the endotoxin activity assay. The major mechanism of action of this therapy is the removal of circulating endotoxin. High affinity binding of circulating endotoxin by the PMX-DHP column may decrease circulating endotoxin levels by up to 90% after two standard treatments. Basic research has shown reductions in circulating cytokine levels and in renal tubular apoptosis. Clinical research has shown that PMX-DHP therapy results in hemodynamic improvements, improvements in oxygenation, renal function, and reductions in mortality. Further research is needed to further define additional patient populations with endotoxemia that may benefit from PMX-DHP therapy as well as to further elucidate dosing, timing, and additional information on mechanisms of action. This review will present the mechanistic rationale for this targeted strategy of endotoxin removal using PMX-DHP in endotoxemic septic patients, highlighting both the specific effects of the therapy and the evidence accumulated so far of clinical improvement following this therapy in terms of recovery of organ function.

  2. Labor Inhibits Placental Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    LAGER, Susanne; AYE, Irving L.M.H.; GACCIOLI, Francesca; RAMIREZ, Vanessa I.; JANSSON, Thomas; POWELL, Theresa L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Labor induces a myriad of changes in placental gene expression. These changes may represent a physiological adaptation inhibiting placental cellular processes associated with a high demand for oxygen and energy (e.g., protein synthesis and active transport) thereby promoting oxygen and glucose transfer to the fetus. We hypothesized that mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling, a positive regulator of trophoblast protein synthesis and amino acid transport, is inhibited by labor. Methods Placental tissue was collected from healthy, term pregnancies (n=15 no-labor; n=12 labor). Activation of Caspase-1, IRS1/Akt, STAT, mTOR, and inflammatory signaling pathways was determined by Western blot. NFκB p65 and PPARγ DNA binding activity was measured in isolated nuclei. Results Labor increased Caspase-1 activation and mTOR complex 2 signaling, as measured by phosphorylation of Akt (S473). However, mTORC1 signaling was inhibited in response to labor as evidenced by decreased phosphorylation of mTOR (S2448) and 4EBP1 (T37/46 and T70). Labor also decreased NFκB and PPARγ DNA binding activity, while having no effect on IRS1 or STAT signaling pathway. Discussion and conclusion Several placental signaling pathways are affected by labor, which has implications for experimental design in studies of placental signaling. Inhibition of placental mTORC1 signaling in response to labor may serve to down-regulate protein synthesis and amino acid transport, processes that account for a large share of placental oxygen and glucose consumption. We speculate that this response preserves glucose and oxygen for transfer to the fetus during the stressful events of labor. PMID:25454472

  3. Mechanistic Enzymology of the Radical SAM Enzyme DesII

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    DesII is a member of the radical SAM family of enzymes that catalyzes radical-mediated transformations of TDP-4-amino-4,6-didexoy-D-glucose as well as other sugar nucleotide diphosphates. Like nearly all radical SAM enzymes, the reactions begin with the reductive homolysis of SAM to produce a 5′-deoxyadenosyl radical which is followed by regiospecific hydrogen atom abstraction from the substrate. What happens next, however, depends on the nature of the substrate radical so produced. In the case of the biosynthetically relevant substrate, a radical-mediated deamination ensues; however, when this amino group is replaced with a hydroxyl, one instead observes dehydrogenation. The factors that govern the fate of the initially generated substrate radical as well as the mechanistic details underlying these transformations have been a key focus of research into the chemistry of DesII. This review will discuss recent discoveries pertaining to the enzymology of DesII, how it may relate to understanding other radical-mediated lyases and dehydrogenases and the working hypotheses currently being investigated regarding the mechanism of DesII catalysis.

  4. Functional and mechanistic diversity of distal transcription enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Bulger, Michael; Groudine, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Biological differences among metazoans, and between cell types in a given organism, arise in large part due to differences in gene expression patterns. The sequencing of multiple metazoan genomes, coupled with recent advances in genome-wide analysis of histone modifications and transcription factor binding, has revealed that among regulatory DNA sequences, gene-distal enhancers appear to exhibit the greatest diversity and cell-type specificity. Moreover, such elements are emerging as important targets for mutations that can give rise to disease and to genetic variability that underlies evolutionary change. Studies of long-range interactions between distal genomic sequences in the nucleus indicate that enhancers are often important determinants of nuclear organization, contributing to a general model for enhancer function that involves direct enhancer-promoter contact. In a number of systems, however, mechanisms for enhancer function are emerging that do not fit solely within such a model, suggesting that enhancers as a class of DNA regulatory element may be functionally and mechanistically diverse. PMID:21295696

  5. Mechanistic Perspectives of Maslinic Acid in Targeting Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Wei Hsum; Lim, Yang Mooi

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammation drives the development of various pathological diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis, multiple sclerosis, and cancer. The arachidonic acid pathway represents one of the major mechanisms for inflammation. Prostaglandins (PGs) are lipid products generated from arachidonic acid by the action of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes and their activity is blocked by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS). The use of natural compounds in regulation of COX activity/prostaglandins production is receiving increasing attention. In Mediterranean diet, olive oil and table olives contain significant dietary sources of maslinic acid. Maslinic acid is arising as a safe and novel natural pentacyclic triterpene which has protective effects against chronic inflammatory diseases in various in vivo and in vitro experimental models. Understanding the anti-inflammatory mechanism of maslinic acid is crucial for its development as a potential dietary nutraceutical. This review focuses on the mechanistic action of maslinic acid in regulating the inflammation pathways through modulation of the arachidonic acid metabolism including the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB)/COX-2 expression, upstream protein kinase signaling, and phospholipase A2 enzyme activity. Further investigations may provide insight into the mechanism of maslinic acid in regulating the molecular targets and their associated pathways in response to specific inflammatory stimuli. PMID:26491566

  6. Mechanistic perspectives on cancer chemoprevention/chemotherapeutic effects of thymoquinone.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Juthika; Chun, Kyung-Soo; Aruoma, Okezie I; Kundu, Joydeb Kumar

    2014-10-01

    The bioactive natural products (plant secondary metabolites) are widely known to possess therapeutic value for the prevention and treatment of various chronic diseases including cancer. Thymoquinone (2-methyl-5-isopropyl-1,4-benzoquinone; TQ), a monoterpene present in black cumin seeds, exhibits pleiotropic pharmacological activities including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antidiabetic and antitumor effects. TQ inhibits experimental carcinogenesis in a wide range of animal models and has been shown to arrest the growth of various cancer cells in culture as well as xenograft tumors in vivo. The mechanistic basis of anticancer effects of TQ includes the inhibition of carcinogen metabolizing enzyme activity and oxidative damage of cellular macromolecules, attenuation of inflammation, induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in tumor cells, blockade of tumor angiogenesis, and suppression of migration, invasion and metastasis of cancer cells. TQ shows synergistic and/or potentiating anticancer effects when combined with clinically used chemotherapeutic agents. At the molecular level, TQ targets various components of intracellular signaling pathways, particularly a variety of upstream kinases and transcription factors, which are aberrantly activated during the course of tumorigenesis. PMID:25847385

  7. Application of Mechanistic Toxicology Data to Ecological Risk Assessments

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ongoing evolution of knowledge and tools in the areas of molecular biology, bioinformatics, and systems biology holds significant promise for reducing uncertainties associated with ecological risk assessment. As our understanding of the mechanistic basis of responses of organ...

  8. World-View Entrapment: Moral-Ethical Implications for Gifted Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambrose, Don

    2000-01-01

    This article explores the moral-ethical implications of the mechanistic world view and related issues such as technological determinism, social Darwinism, and androcentrism. It finds that educational approaches reinforced by the mechanistic world view include positivistic approaches to curriculum, instruction, and research. Recommendations for…

  9. The Continuum of Disclosure: Exploring Factors Predicting Tentative Disclosure of Child Sexual Abuse Allegations During Forensic Interviews and the Implications for Practice, Policy, and Future Research.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Gwendolyn D

    2016-01-01

    When a child sexual abuse investigation ensues, many children do not disclose readily to professionals. Defining disclosure beyond the disclosure versus nondisclosure dichotomy is essential, yet little research exists on factors associated with a continuum of disclosure, including active and tentative disclosure. Through the coding of 196 forensic interviews using content analysis and subsequent regression analysis, findings suggest that children of color, children abused by adults, unintentional initial disclosure, and those lacking family support were more likely to tentatively disclose in this study. Implications include a need to understand tentative disclosure as part of a normal continuum of disclosure within court proceedings and investigations of abuse allegations. PMID:27266535

  10. Vitamins C and E: Beneficial effects from a mechanistic perspective

    PubMed Central

    Traber, Maret G.; Stevens, Jan F.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanistic properties of two dietary antioxidants that are required by humans, vitamins C and E, are discussed relative to their biological effects. Vitamin C (ascorbic acid) is an essential cofactor for α-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases. Examples are prolyl hydroxylases, which play a role in the biosynthesis of collagen and in down-regulation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1, a transcription factor that regulates many genes responsible for tumor growth, energy metabolism, and neutrophil function and apoptosis. Vitamin C-dependent inhibition of the HIF pathway may provide alternative or additional approaches for controlling tumor progression, infections and inflammation. Vitamin E (α-tocopherol) functions as an essential lipid soluble antioxidant, scavenging hydroperoxyl radicals in lipid milieu. Human symptoms of vitamin E deficiency suggest that its antioxidant properties play a major role in protecting erythrocyte membranes and nervous tissues. As an antioxidant, vitamin C provides protection against oxidative stress-induced cellular damage by scavenging of reactive oxygen species, vitamin E-dependent neutralization of lipid hydroperoxyl radicals, and by protecting proteins from alkylation by electrophilic lipid peroxidation products. These bioactivities bear relevance to inflammatory disorders. Vitamin C plays also a role in the function of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) by recycling the eNOS cofactor, tetrahydrobiopterin, which is relevant to arterial elasticity and blood pressure regulation. Evidence from plants supports a role for vitamin C in the formation of covalent adducts with electrophilic secondary metabolites. Mechanism-based effects of vitamin C and E supplementation on biomarkers and on clinical outcomes from randomized, placebo-controlled trials are emphasized in this review. PMID:21664268

  11. Regulation of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ Expression by Adipocyte Differentiation and Determination Factor 1/Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein 1: Implications for Adipocyte Differentiation and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Fajas, Lluis; Schoonjans, Kristina; Gelman, Laurent; Kim, Jae B.; Najib, Jamila; Martin, Genevieve; Fruchart, Jean-Charles; Briggs, Michael; Spiegelman, Bruce M.; Auwerx, Johan

    1999-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) is a nuclear receptor implicated in adipocyte differentiation and insulin sensitivity. We investigated whether PPARγ expression is dependent on the activity of adipocyte differentiation and determination factor 1/sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 (ADD-1/SREBP-1), another transcription factor associated with both adipocyte differentiation and cholesterol homeostasis. Ectopic expression of ADD-1/SREBP-1 in 3T3-L1 and HepG2 cells induced endogenous PPARγ mRNA levels. The related transcription factor SREBP-2 likewise induced PPARγ expression. In addition, cholesterol depletion, a condition known to result in proteolytic activation of transcription factors of the SREBP family, induced PPARγ expression and improved PPRE-driven transcription. The effect of the SREBPs on PPARγ expression was mediated through the PPARγ1 and -3 promoters. Both promoters contain a consensus E-box motif that mediates the regulation of the PPARγ gene by ADD-1/SREBP-1 and SREBP-2. These results suggest that PPARγ expression can be controlled by the SREBP family of transcription factors and demonstrate new interactions between transcription factors that can regulate different pathways of lipid metabolism. PMID:10409739

  12. Pathophysiology of osteoporosis: new mechanistic insights.

    PubMed

    Armas, Laura A G; Recker, Robert R

    2012-09-01

    Understanding of the pathophysiology of osteoporosis has evolved to include compromised bone strength and skeletal fragility caused by several factors: (1) defects in microarchitecture of trabeculae, (2) defective intrinsic material properties of bone tissue, (3) defective repair of microdamage from normal daily activities, and (4) excessive bone remodeling rates. These factors occur in the context of age-related bone loss. Clinical studies of estrogen deprivation, antiresorptives, mechanical loading, and disuse have helped further knowledge of the factors affecting bone quality and the mechanisms that underlie them. This progress has led to several new drug targets in the treatment of osteoporosis.

  13. Structural and Mechanistic Roles of Novel Chemical Ligands on the SdiA Quorum-Sensing Transcription Regulator

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Nguyen, Y.; Nguyen, Nam X.; Rogers, Jamie L.; Liao, Jun; MacMillan, John B.; Jiang, Youxing; Sperandio, Vanessa

    2015-05-19

    Bacteria engage in chemical signaling, termed quorum sensing (QS), to mediate intercellular communication, mimicking multicellular organisms. The LuxR family of QS transcription factors regulates gene expression, coordinating population behavior by sensing endogenous acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs). However, some bacteria (such as Escherichia coli) do not produce AHLs. These LuxR orphans sense exogenous AHLs but also regulate transcription in the absence of AHLs. Importantly, this AHL-independent regulatory mechanism is still largely unknown. Here we present several structures of one such orphan LuxR-type protein, SdiA, from enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), in the presence and absence of AHL. SdiA is actually not inmore » an apo state without AHL but is regulated by a previously unknown endogenous ligand, 1-octanoyl-rac-glycerol (OCL), which is ubiquitously found throughout the tree of life and serves as an energy source, signaling molecule, and substrate for membrane biogenesis. While exogenous AHL renders to SdiA higher stability and DNA binding affinity, OCL may function as a chemical chaperone placeholder that stabilizes SdiA, allowing for basal activity. Structural comparison between SdiA-AHL and SdiA-OCL complexes provides crucial mechanistic insights into the ligand regulation of AHL-dependent and -independent function of LuxR-type proteins. Importantly, in addition to its contribution to basic science, this work has implications for public health, inasmuch as the SdiA signaling system aids the deadly human pathogen EHEC to adapt to a commensal lifestyle in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of cattle, its main reservoir. These studies open exciting and novel avenues to control shedding of this human pathogen in the environment. IMPORTANCE Quorum sensing refers to bacterial chemical signaling. The QS acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) signals are recognized by LuxR-type receptors that regulate gene transcription. However, some bacteria have orphan Lux

  14. Structural and Mechanistic Roles of Novel Chemical Ligands on the SdiA Quorum-Sensing Transcription Regulator

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Y.; Nguyen, Nam X.; Rogers, Jamie L.; Liao, Jun; MacMillan, John B.; Jiang, Youxing; Sperandio, Vanessa

    2015-05-19

    Bacteria engage in chemical signaling, termed quorum sensing (QS), to mediate intercellular communication, mimicking multicellular organisms. The LuxR family of QS transcription factors regulates gene expression, coordinating population behavior by sensing endogenous acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs). However, some bacteria (such as Escherichia coli) do not produce AHLs. These LuxR orphans sense exogenous AHLs but also regulate transcription in the absence of AHLs. Importantly, this AHL-independent regulatory mechanism is still largely unknown. Here we present several structures of one such orphan LuxR-type protein, SdiA, from enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), in the presence and absence of AHL. SdiA is actually not in an apo state without AHL but is regulated by a previously unknown endogenous ligand, 1-octanoyl-rac-glycerol (OCL), which is ubiquitously found throughout the tree of life and serves as an energy source, signaling molecule, and substrate for membrane biogenesis. While exogenous AHL renders to SdiA higher stability and DNA binding affinity, OCL may function as a chemical chaperone placeholder that stabilizes SdiA, allowing for basal activity. Structural comparison between SdiA-AHL and SdiA-OCL complexes provides crucial mechanistic insights into the ligand regulation of AHL-dependent and -independent function of LuxR-type proteins. Importantly, in addition to its contribution to basic science, this work has implications for public health, inasmuch as the SdiA signaling system aids the deadly human pathogen EHEC to adapt to a commensal lifestyle in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of cattle, its main reservoir. These studies open exciting and novel avenues to control shedding of this human pathogen in the environment. IMPORTANCE Quorum sensing refers to bacterial chemical signaling. The QS acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) signals are recognized by LuxR-type receptors that regulate gene transcription. However, some bacteria have orphan LuxR-type receptors and

  15. Role of the Transforming-Growth-Factor-β1 Gene in Late-Onset Alzheimer’s Disease: Implications for the Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bosco, Paolo; Ferri, Raffaele; Salluzzo, Maria Grazia; Castellano, Sabrina; Signorelli, Maria; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Nuovo, Santo Di; Drago, Filippo; Caraci, Filippo

    2013-01-01

    Late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) is the most common form of dementia in the elderly. LOAD has a complex and largely unknown etiology with strong genetic determinants. Genetics of LOAD is known to involve several genetic risk factors among which the Apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene seems to be the major recognized genetic determinant. Recent efforts have been made to identify other genetic factors involved in the pathophysiology of LOAD such as genes associated with a deficit of neurotrophic factors in the AD brain. Genetic variations of neurotrophic factors, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and transforming-growth-factor-β1 (TGF-β1) are known to increase the risk to develop LOAD and have also been related to depression susceptibility in LOAD. Transforming-Growth-Factor-β1 (TGF-β1) is a neurotrophic factor that exerts neuroprotective effects against ß-amyloid-induced neurodegeneration. Recent evidence suggests that a specific impairment in the signaling of TGF-β is an early event in the pathogenesis of AD. TGF-β1 protein levels are predominantly under genetic control, and the TGF-β1 gene, located on chromosome 19q13.1–3, con-tains several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) upstream and in the transcript region, such as the SNP at codon +10 (T/C) and +25 (G/C), which is known to influence the level of expression of TGF-β1. In the present review, we summarize the current literature on genetic risk factors for LOAD, focusing on the role of the TGF-β1 gene, finally discussing the possible implications of these genetic studies for the selection of patients eligible for neuroprotective strategies in AD. PMID:24082824

  16. Stroke risk factor knowledge in Hispanic and non-Hispanic white women in New Mexico: implications for targeted prevention strategies.

    PubMed

    Kattapong, V J; Longstreth, W T; Kukull, W A; Howard, D B; Bowes, J I; Wilson, B E; Bigney, J B; Becker, T M

    1998-01-01

    Hispanic women in New Mexico have recently experienced an increase in age-adjusted mortality compared with non-Hispanic white women. Since patients' knowledge of stroke risk factors may affect risk factor control, the present study was undertaken to characterize stroke risk factor understanding in Hispanic and non-Hispanic white women in New Mexico. We administered a stroke risk factor knowledge survey to 215 women hospitalized in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Patients were classified by each of three dichotomous groupings: stroke or nonstroke diagnosis; Hispanic or non-Hispanic white ethnicity; history of cardiovascular risk factors. The frequency of specific item responses was determined for each patient grouping. Two-way analysis of variance was used to determine whether composite knowledge score differed among patient groups. Stress was the attribute most commonly thought to be a risk factor for stroke. Although no ethnic differences were found on composite knowledge score, Hispanic women were significantly less likely to report hypertension as a stroke risk factor than non-Hispanic white women. We suggest that stroke risk factor understanding in Hispanic and non-Hispanic white women in New Mexico is inadequate. Insufficient understanding of the consequences of hypertension, including stroke, may diminish the degree of hypertension control that patients achieve. Further study of the relationship between stroke risk factor understanding and health behavior could enhance prevention efforts.

  17. Thermal degradation events as health hazards: Particle vs gas phase effects, mechanistic studies with particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberdörster, G.; Ferin, J.; Finkelstein, J.; Soderholm, S.

    Exposure to thermal degradation products arising from fire or smoke could be a major concern for manned space missions. Severe acute lung damage has been reported in people after accidental exposure to fumes from plastic materials, and animal studies revealed the extremely high toxicity of freshly generated fumes whereas a decrease in toxicity of aged fumes has been found. This and the fact that toxicity of the freshly generated fumes can be prevented with filters raises the question whether the toxicity may be due to the particulate rather than the gas phase components of the thermodegradation products. Indeed, results from recent studies implicate ultrafine particles (particle diameter in the nm range) as potential severe pulmonary toxicants. We have conducted a number of in vivo (inhalation and instillation studies in rats) and in vitro studies to test the hypothesis that ultrafine particles possess an increased potential to injure the lung compared to larger-sized particles. We used as surrogate particles ultrafine TiO 2 particles (12 and 20 nm diameter). Results in exposed rats showed that the ultrafine TiO 2 particles not only induce a greater acute inflammatory reaction in the lung than larger-sized TiO 2 particles, but can also lead to persistent chronic effects, as indicated by an adverse effect on alveolar macrophage mediated clearance function of particles. Release of mediators from alveolar macrophages during phagocytosis of the ultrafine particles and an increased access of the ultrafine particles to the pulmonary interstitium are likely factors contributing to their pulmonary toxicity. In vitro studies with lung cells (alveolar macrophages) showed, in addition, that ultrafine TiO 2 particles have a greater potential to induce cytokines than larger-sized particles. We conclude from our present studies that ultrafine particles have a significant potential to injure the lung and that their occurrence in thermal degradation events can play a major role in

  18. Thermal degradation events as health hazards: particle vs gas phase effects, mechanistic studies with particles.

    PubMed

    Oberdörster, G; Ferin, J; Finkelstein, J; Soderholm, S

    1992-01-01

    Exposure to thermal degradation products arising from fire or smoke could be a major concern for manned space missions. Severe acute lung damage has been reported in people after accidental exposure to fumes from plastic materials, and animal studies revealed the extremely high toxicity of freshly generated fumes whereas a decrease in toxicity of aged fumes has been found. This and the fact that toxicity of the freshly generated fumes can be prevented with filters raises the question whether the toxicity may be due to the particulate rather than the gas phase components of the thermodegradation products. Indeed, results from recent studies implicate ultrafine particles (particle diameter in the nm range) as potential severe pulmonary toxicants. We have conducted a number of in vivo (inhalation and instillation studies in rats) and in vitro studies to test the hypothesis that ultrafine particles possess an increased potential to injure the lung compared to larger-sized particles. We used as surrogate particles ultrafine TiO2 particles (12 and 20 nm diameter). Results in exposed rats showed that the ultrafine TiO2 particles not only induce a greater acute inflammatory reaction in the lung than larger-sized TiO2 particles, but can also lead to persistent chronic effects, as indicated by an adverse effect on alveolar macrophage mediated clearance function of particles. Release of mediators from alveolar macrophages during phagocytosis of the ultrafine particles and an increased access of the ultrafine particles to the pulmonary interstitium are likely factors contributing to their pulmonary toxicity. In vitro studies with lung cells (alveolar macrophages) showed, in addition, that ultrafine TiO2 particles have a greater potential to induce cytokines than larger-sized particles. We conclude from our present studies that ultrafine particles have a significant potential to injure the lung and that their occurrence in thermal degradation events can play a major role in the

  19. Mechanistic Modelling of DNA Repair and Cellular Survival Following Radiation-Induced DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Stephen J.; Schuemann, Jan; Paganetti, Harald; Prise, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    Characterising and predicting the effects of ionising radiation on cells remains challenging, with the lack of robust models of the underlying mechanism of radiation responses providing a significant limitation to the development of personalised radiotherapy. In this paper we present a mechanistic model of cellular response to radiation that incorporates the kinetics of different DNA repair processes, the spatial distribution of double strand breaks and the resulting probability and severity of misrepair. This model enables predictions to be made of a range of key biological endpoints (DNA repair kinetics, chromosome aberration and mutation formation, survival) across a range of cell types based on a set of 11 mechanistic fitting parameters that are common across all cells. Applying this model to cellular survival showed its capacity to stratify the radiosensitivity of cells based on aspects of their phenotype and experimental conditions such as cell cycle phase and plating delay (correlation between modelled and observed Mean Inactivation Doses R2 > 0.9). By explicitly incorporating underlying mechanistic factors, this model can integrate knowledge from a wide range of biological studies to provide robust predictions and may act as a foundation for future calculations of individualised radiosensitivity. PMID:27624453

  20. Mechanistic Modelling of DNA Repair and Cellular Survival Following Radiation-Induced DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Stephen J; Schuemann, Jan; Paganetti, Harald; Prise, Kevin M

    2016-01-01

    Characterising and predicting the effects of ionising radiation on cells remains challenging, with the lack of robust models of the underlying mechanism of radiation responses providing a significant limitation to the development of personalised radiotherapy. In this paper we present a mechanistic model of cellular response to radiation that incorporates the kinetics of different DNA repair processes, the spatial distribution of double strand breaks and the resulting probability and severity of misrepair. This model enables predictions to be made of a range of key biological endpoints (DNA repair kinetics, chromosome aberration and mutation formation, survival) across a range of cell types based on a set of 11 mechanistic fitting parameters that are common across all cells. Applying this model to cellular survival showed its capacity to stratify the radiosensitivity of cells based on aspects of their phenotype and experimental conditions such as cell cycle phase and plating delay (correlation between modelled and observed Mean Inactivation Doses R(2) > 0.9). By explicitly incorporating underlying mechanistic factors, this model can integrate knowledge from a wide range of biological studies to provide robust predictions and may act as a foundation for future calculations of individualised radiosensitivity. PMID:27624453

  1. Mechanistic analytical models for long-distance seed dispersal by wind.

    PubMed

    Katul, G G; Porporato, A; Nathan, R; Siqueira, M; Soons, M B; Poggi, D; Horn, H S; Levin, S A

    2005-09-01

    We introduce an analytical model, the Wald analytical long-distance dispersal (WALD) model, for estimating dispersal kernels of wind-dispersed seeds and their escape probability from the canopy. The model is based on simplifications to well-established three-dimensional Lagrangian stochastic approaches for turbulent scalar transport resulting in a two-parameter Wald (or inverse Gaussian) distribution. Unlike commonly used phenomenological models, WALD's parameters can be estimated from the key factors affecting wind dispersal--wind statistics, seed release height, and seed terminal velocity--determined independently of dispersal data. WALD's asymptotic power-law tail has an exponent of -3/2, a limiting value verified by a meta-analysis for a wide variety of measured dispersal kernels and larger than the exponent of the bivariate Student t-test (2Dt). We tested WALD using three dispersal data sets on forest trees, heathland shrubs, and grassland forbs and compared WALD's performance with that of other analytical mechanistic models (revised versions of the tilted Gaussian Plume model and the advection-diffusion equation), revealing fairest agreement between WALD predictions and measurements. Analytical mechanistic models, such as WALD, combine the advantages of simplicity and mechanistic understanding and are valuable tools for modeling large-scale, long-term plant population dynamics. PMID:16224691

  2. Mechanistic analytical models for long-distance seed dispersal by wind.

    PubMed

    Katul, G G; Porporato, A; Nathan, R; Siqueira, M; Soons, M B; Poggi, D; Horn, H S; Levin, S A

    2005-09-01

    We introduce an analytical model, the Wald analytical long-distance dispersal (WALD) model, for estimating dispersal kernels of wind-dispersed seeds and their escape probability from the canopy. The model is based on simplifications to well-established three-dimensional Lagrangian stochastic approaches for turbulent scalar transport resulting in a two-parameter Wald (or inverse Gaussian) distribution. Unlike commonly used phenomenological models, WALD's parameters can be estimated from the key factors affecting wind dispersal--wind statistics, seed release height, and seed terminal velocity--determined independently of dispersal data. WALD's asymptotic power-law tail has an exponent of -3/2, a limiting value verified by a meta-analysis for a wide variety of measured dispersal kernels and larger than the exponent of the bivariate Student t-test (2Dt). We tested WALD using three dispersal data sets on forest trees, heathland shrubs, and grassland forbs and compared WALD's performance with that of other analytical mechanistic models (revised versions of the tilted Gaussian Plume model and the advection-diffusion equation), revealing fairest agreement between WALD predictions and measurements. Analytical mechanistic models, such as WALD, combine the advantages of simplicity and mechanistic understanding and are valuable tools for modeling large-scale, long-term plant population dynamics.

  3. Religion as a Support Factor for Women of Color Pursuing Science Degrees: Implications for Science Teacher Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ceglie, Robert

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the influence of religion as a support factor for a group of Latina and African-American women majoring in science. The current project is a part of a larger study that investigated persistence factors of underrepresented woman who were enrolled as science majors at United States colleges and universities. This paper focuses on…

  4. A NEW FACTOR ANALYSIS OF THE SVIB--SUGGESTED MODIFICATION OF EXISTING GROUPS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR COUNSELING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SMITH, STUART E.; AND OTHERS

    FACTOR ANALYSIS WAS CARRIED OUT TO ASCERTAIN THE BEST OCCUPATIONAL GROUP LOCATION FOR EACH OF FOUR STRONG VOCATIONAL INTEREST BLANK (SVIB) SCALES--VETERMINARIAN, SENIOR CPA, PHARMACIST, AND MORTICIAN. THE SVIB WAS ADMINISTERED TO 125 MALE LIBERAL ARTS FRESHMEN. MEANS, STANDARD DEVIATIONS, AND INTERCORRELATIONS WERE COMPUTED. THIS FACTOR ANALYSIS…

  5. Suicidal ideation and suicide attempts among human immunodeficiency virus-infected adults: differences in risk factors and their implications.

    PubMed

    Kang, Cho Ryok; Bang, Ji Hwan; Cho, Sung-Il; Kim, Kui Nam; Lee, Hee-Jin; Ryu, Bo Yeong; Cho, Soo Kyung; Lee, Young Hwa; Oh, Myoung-Don; Lee, Jong-Koo

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have investigated risk factors for suicidal ideation and suicide attempt; however, most have failed to show differences in risk factors between suicidal ideation and suicide attempt among the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected population. This study was designed to identify differences in risk factors between suicidal ideation and suicide attempts among HIV-infected adults in Seoul. A face-to-face survey of 457 HIV-infected adults was conducted by the Seoul Metropolitan Government in 2013. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with suicidal ideation and suicide attempt. Among 422 participants, 44% had suicidal ideation, and 11% had suicide attempts. The independent risk factors for suicidal ideation were young and middle age, living with someone, history of AIDS-defining opportunistic disease, history of treatment for depression, lower social support, and psychological status. Beneficiaries of National Medical Aid, economic barriers to treatment, history of treatment for depression, and lower psychological status were independently associated with suicide attempts. Patients with HIV in Korea were treated without cost in some centers. Thus, experiencing an economic barrier to treatment might be due in part to ignorance of HIV care policies. Our findings indicate that suicide attempts are associated with socioeconomic factors and information inequality regarding medical care. In conclusion, suicidal ideation closely associated with the psychosocial factors, whereas suicide attempt demonstrates a stronger association with socioeconomic factors. Suicide prevention measures should be implemented to provide information to help HIV-infected patients.

  6. Gender Differences in Factor Scores of Anxiety and Depression among Australian University Students: Implications for Counselling Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bitsika, Vicki; Sharpley, Chris F.; Melham, Therese C.

    2010-01-01

    Anxiety and depression inventory scores from 200 male and female university students attending a private university in Australia were examined for their factor structure. Once established, the two sets of factors were tested for gender-based differences, revealing that females were more likely than males to report symptomatology associated with…

  7. Examining the Use of a Mechanistic Model to Generate an In Vivo/In Vitro Correlation: Journey Through a Thought Process.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Bipin; Patel, Nikunjkumar; Jamei, Masoud; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin; Martinez, Marilyn N

    2016-09-01

    The attention and interest in establishing in vivo/in vitro correlations (IVIVCs) is grounded in its tremendous utility as a prognostic tool. It can be used to support formulation optimization, predict in vivo drug exposure across a potential patient population, select a biologically relevant in vitro dissolution test condition, and support the use of in vitro dissolution data as a surrogate for in vivo bioequivalence trials. The pharmacological and statistical implications of this correlation are linked to the method by which the IVIVC was determined and to the assumptions and optimization approaches integrated into the estimation procedure. Using previously published data generated in normal healthy volunteers, an IVIVC for metoprolol was established using a mechanistic modeling approach. Within that framework, we explored the consequences of (1) our method of fitting a single Weibull function to the in vivo dissolution, (2) our selection of weighting scheme and optimization approaches, (3) the impact of applying a fixed versus fitted gastric emptying time, and 4) the importance of factoring population variability into our IVIVC estimation and profile reconvolution. We identified those factors found to be critical in terms of their influence on the accuracy of our predicted systemic metoprolol concentration-time profiles. We considered the strengths and weaknesses of our approach and discussed how the results of this study may impact efforts to generate IVIVCs with compounds presenting physicochemical characteristics different from that of metoprolol. PMID:27312260

  8. Stress and food allergy: mechanistic considerations

    PubMed Central

    Schreier, Hannah M.C.; Wright, Rosalind J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent years have seen a marked increase in food allergy prevalence among children, particularly in Western countries, that cannot be explained by genetic factors alone. This has resulted in an increased effort to identify environmental risk factors underlying food allergies and to understand how these factors may be modified through interventions. Food allergy is an immune-mediated adverse reaction to food. Consequently, considerations of candidate risk factors have begun to focus on environmental influences that perturb the healthy development of the emerging immune system during critical periods of development (eg, prenatally and during early childhood), particularly in the gut. Given that psychosocial stress is known to play an important role in other allergic and inflammatory diseases, such as asthma, its potential role in food allergy is a growing area of research. However, research to date has largely focused on animal studies. This review synthesizes relevant animal research and epidemiological data, providing proof of concept for moderating influences of psychological stress on food allergy outcomes in humans. Pathways that may underlie associations between psychosocial stress and the expression of food allergy are discussed. PMID:24428964

  9. Gender and factor-level interactions in psychopathy: implications for self-directed violence risk and borderline personality disorder symptoms.

    PubMed

    Verona, Edelyn; Sprague, Jenessa; Javdani, Shabnam

    2012-07-01

    Women with antisocial and psychopathic traits have a more extensive history of self-directed violence, as well as borderline personality disorder (BPD) symptoms, than their male counterparts (Chapman, Specht, & Cellucci, 2005; Warren et al., 2003). To inform this area of research, we examined gender differences in the relationship between psychopathy factors and risk for self-directed violence, as measured by a history of suicidal ideation, self-harm, and suicide attempts, across 2 studies. In both studies, we found that the interaction of the interpersonal-affective (Factor 1) and impulsive-antisocial traits (Factor 2) of psychopathy, a combination considered to exemplify high psychopathy, was associated with ideation, self-harm, and suicide attempt histories specifically in women. In men, Factor 2 traits were associated with these risk indices for self-directed violence, regardless of Factor 1. In Study 2, we extended our analysis to examine whether BPD accounted for the relationship between psychopathy and self-directed violence differentially in women and men. Results suggested that BPD symptoms partially accounted for the effects of Factor 2 on self-directed violence (both self-harm and attempts) in both genders but fully accounted for Factor 1 protective effects only in men. These findings underscore the notion that the same psychopathic trait liabilities, at least as they are currently assessed, may confer risk for different forms of behavioral maladjustment in women versus men.

  10. A mechanistic accounting of SOM speciation and kinetics in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggi, F.; Riley, W. J.; Guerry, N.; Torn, M. S.; Kleber, M.

    2012-12-01

    The nature and dynamics of soil organic matter (SOM) are arguably far from being understood and accurately represented in current site, regional, and global land use and climate models. Whereas consolidated models make use of aggregated pools describing SOM with characteristic turnover times such as inert, passive, slow cycling, and fast cycling, or linking the turnover time to the molecular weight of the compound, recent analyses of SOM below the top soil suggest that those approaches only partially capture SOM dynamics, and that SOM stability may largely be determined by biological and chemical protection as well as other environmental factors rather than the molecular structure of the compound and its molecular weight. We introduce here a new paradigm of SOM speciation and kinetics that explicitly decouples the assumed recalcitrance and turnover time from the SOM molecular density and structure in favour of a mechanistic accounting of microbially mediated processes and chemo-physical interactions among the various SOM species and soil environment. These processes include microbial assimilation, respiration and C recycling; depolymerization of solid litter, root exudates, and dead cells into various decomposed SOM groups; and incorporation of soluble SOM species into a protected phase not available to chemical and biological agents. SOM was described by means of functional compounds including mono- and polysaccharides, lignin, amino compounds, organic acids, nucleic acids, lipids, and phenols, each being accounted for by one or more representative species in the model. Fungal and bacterial microbial functional groups were used to characterize depolymerization and respiration rates. The SOM reaction network and characteristics, its mathematical inclusion within the TOUGHREACT framework, and some preliminary results of modeling grasslands and forested ecosystems are presented here. Biogeochemical reaction network of SOC pathways. Steady state vertical contentration

  11. Chemical Specific Adjustment Factors Workshop

    EPA Science Inventory

    The World Health Organization, through the International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS), has established guidance on the use of mechanistic data to replace default uncertainty factors for interspecies extrapolation and intraspecies variability in deriving risk values such as...

  12. Discordance between Risk Factors and Coronary Artery Calcium: Implications for Guiding Treatment Strategies in Primary Prevention Settings.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Parag H; Nasir, Khurram

    2015-01-01

    Preventive efforts including smoking cessation campaigns, increased awareness of healthy lifestyle habits, risk factor modification, and the appropriate use of statins have been successful in reducing cardiovascular mortality over the last decade. The coronary artery calcium (CAC) scan has reliably been an additive predictor to traditional risk estimation methods, partly because of the heterogeneity between risk factor burden and atherosclerotic burden. The focus of this review is to highlight this heterogeneity by focusing on groups in which risk factor burden and subclinical atherosclerosis burden, as measured by CAC, are discordant. In high-risk groups with 0 CAC, the event rates are consistently low; in low-risk groups with elevated CAC (CAC>100), the event rates are consistently high. We conclude with our clinical perspective of the considerable heterogeneity between risk factors and atherosclerotic burden in the context of the 2013 ACC/AHA cholesterol treatment and risk assessment guidelines. PMID:25982215

  13. Shared Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease and Cancer: Implications for Preventive Health and Clinical Care in Oncology Patients.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Christopher B; Davis, Margot K; Law, Angeline; Sulpher, Jeffrey

    2016-07-01

    The cardiovascular toxicity of cancer therapy has raised awareness of the importance of heart disease in cancer care among oncologists and cardiologists, leading to the new interdisciplinary field of cardio-oncology. Evidence is accumulating to suggest that risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease are also related to an increased incidence of cancer and excess cancer mortality. We review the epidemiologic evidence that smoking, obesity, poor diet, and inactivity can cause both heart disease and cancer. The importance of cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular risk factors in adversely affecting oncological outcomes and leading to increased cancer mortality is discussed. Cardiotoxicity prediction tools that incorporate cardiac disease and risk factors are described. Raising awareness about shared risk factors for cancer and heart disease may result in more effective advocacy to promote healthy lifestyle changes through the combined efforts of the historically separate specialties of cardiology and oncology. PMID:27343745

  14. Discordance between Risk Factors and Coronary Artery Calcium: Implications for Guiding Treatment Strategies in Primary Prevention Settings.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Parag H; Nasir, Khurram

    2015-01-01

    Preventive efforts including smoking cessation campaigns, increased awareness of healthy lifestyle habits, risk factor modification, and the appropriate use of statins have been successful in reducing cardiovascular mortality over the last decade. The coronary artery calcium (CAC) scan has reliably been an additive predictor to traditional risk estimation methods, partly because of the heterogeneity between risk factor burden and atherosclerotic burden. The focus of this review is to highlight this heterogeneity by focusing on groups in which risk factor burden and subclinical atherosclerosis burden, as measured by CAC, are discordant. In high-risk groups with 0 CAC, the event rates are consistently low; in low-risk groups with elevated CAC (CAC>100), the event rates are consistently high. We conclude with our clinical perspective of the considerable heterogeneity between risk factors and atherosclerotic burden in the context of the 2013 ACC/AHA cholesterol treatment and risk assessment guidelines.

  15. Cognitive science as an interface between rational and mechanistic explanation.

    PubMed

    Chater, Nick

    2014-04-01

    Cognitive science views thought as computation; and computation, by its very nature, can be understood in both rational and mechanistic terms. In rational terms, a computation solves some information processing problem (e.g., mapping sensory information into a description of the external world; parsing a sentence; selecting among a set of possible actions). In mechanistic terms, a computation corresponds to causal chain of events in a physical device (in engineering context, a silicon chip; in biological context, the nervous system). The discipline is thus at the interface between two very different styles of explanation--as the papers in the current special issue well illustrate, it explores the interplay of rational and mechanistic forces.

  16. Why did Jacques Monod make the choice of mechanistic determinism?

    PubMed

    Loison, Laurent

    2015-06-01

    The development of molecular biology placed in the foreground a mechanistic and deterministic conception of the functioning of macromolecules. In this article, I show that this conception was neither obvious, nor necessary. Taking Jacques Monod as a case study, I detail the way he gradually came loose from a statistical understanding of determinism to finally support a mechanistic understanding. The reasons of the choice made by Monod at the beginning of the 1950s can be understood only in the light of the general theoretical schema supported by the concept of mechanistic determinism. This schema articulates three fundamental notions for Monod, namely that of the rigidity of the sequence of the genetic program, that of the intrinsic stability of macromolecules (DNA and proteins), and that of the specificity of molecular interactions.

  17. The Krüppel-like Factor 15 as a Molecular Link between Myogenic Factors and a Chromosome 4q Transcriptional Enhancer Implicated in Facioscapulohumeral Dystrophy*

    PubMed Central

    Dmitriev, Petr; Petrov, Andrei; Ansseau, Eugenie; Stankevicins, Luiza; Charron, Sébastien; Kim, Elena; Bos, Tomas Jan; Robert, Thomas; Turki, Ahmed; Coppée, Frédérique; Belayew, Alexandra; Lazar, Vladimir; Carnac, Gilles; Laoudj, Dalila; Lipinski, Marc; Vassetzky, Yegor S.

    2011-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), a dominant hereditary disease with a prevalence of 7 per 100,000 individuals, is associated with a partial deletion in the subtelomeric D4Z4 repeat array on chromosome 4q. The D4Z4 repeat contains a strong transcriptional enhancer that activates promoters of several FSHD-related genes. We report here that the enhancer within the D4Z4 repeat binds the Krüppel-like factor KLF15. KLF15 was found to be up-regulated during myogenic differentiation induced by serum starvation or by overexpression of the myogenic differentiation factor MYOD. When overexpressed, KLF15 activated the D4Z4 enhancer and led to overexpression of DUX4c (Double homeobox 4, centromeric) and FRG2 (FSHD region gene 2) genes, whereas its silencing caused inactivation of the D4Z4 enhancer. In immortalized human myoblasts, the D4Z4 enhancer was activated by the myogenic factor MYOD, an effect that was abolished upon KLF15 silencing or when the KLF15-binding sites within the D4Z4 enhancer were mutated, indicating that the myogenesis-related activation of the D4Z4 enhancer was mediated by KLF15. KLF15 and several myogenesis-related factors were found to be expressed at higher levels in myoblasts, myotubes, and muscle biopsies from FSHD patients than in healthy controls. We propose that KLF15 serves as a molecular link between myogenic factors and the activity of the D4Z4 enhancer, and it thus contributes to the overexpression of the DUX4c and FRG2 genes during normal myogenic differentiation and in FSHD. PMID:21937448

  18. A two-factor model of ethnic identity exploration: Implications for identity coherence and well-being.

    PubMed

    Syed, Moin; Walker, Lovey H M; Lee, Richard M; Umaña-Taylor, Adriana J; Zamboanga, Byron L; Schwartz, Seth J; Armenta, Brian E; Huynh, Que-Lam

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the multidimensional nature of ethnic identity exploration and its relevance for a broader sense of identity and well-being. Participants were 3,637 ethnic minority college students who completed survey measures of ethnic identity exploration, general identity coherence, general identity confusion, and well-being. Consistent with our 3 hypotheses, the results indicated that (a) ethnic identity exploration comprised 2 dimensions, participation and search; (b) participation was positively associated with well-being, whereas search was negatively associated with well-being; and (c) identity coherence and identity confusion mediated the associations between participation and search, respectively, and well-being. These findings have important theoretical implications for conceptualization and measurement of ethnic identity exploration and its association with well-being.

  19. Assessment of economic factors affecting the satellite power system. Volume 2: The systems implications of rectenna siting issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, P. K.; Bugos, B. J.; Csigi, K. I.; Glaser, P. E.; Schimke, G. R.; Thomas, R. G.

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility was evaluated of finding potential sites for Solar Power Satellite (SPS) receiving antennas (rectennas) in the continental United States, in sufficient numbers to permit the SPS to make a major contribution to U.S. generating facilities, and to give statistical validity to an assessment of the characteristics of such sites and their implications for the design of the SPS system. It is found that the cost-optimum power output of the SPS does not depend on the particular value assigned to the cost per unit area of a rectenna and its site, as long as it is independent of rectenna area. Many characteristics of the sites chosen affect the optimum design of the rectenna itself.

  20. Mechanistic Effects of Calcitriol in Cancer Biology

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Lorenza; Díaz-Muñoz, Mauricio; García-Gaytán, Ana Cristina; Méndez, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Besides its classical biological effects on calcium and phosphorus homeostasis, calcitriol, the active vitamin D metabolite, has a broad variety of actions including anticancer effects that are mediated either transcriptionally and/or via non-genomic pathways. In the context of cancer, calcitriol regulates the cell cycle, induces apoptosis, promotes cell differentiation and acts as anti-inflammatory factor within the tumor microenvironment. In this review, we address the different mechanisms of action involved in the antineoplastic effects of calcitriol. PMID:26102214

  1. Growth factors mediated cell signalling in prostate cancer progression: Implications in discovery of anti-prostate cancer agents.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Gaurav; Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Negi, Arvind; Rana, Anil; Singh, Sandeep; Kumar, Raj

    2015-10-01

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of mortality amongst world's population, in which prostate cancer is one of the most encountered malignancies among men. Globally, it is the sixth leading cause of cancer-related death in men. Prostate cancer is more prevalent in the developed world and is increasing at alarming rates in the developing countries. Prostate cancer is mostly a very sluggish progressing disease, caused by the overproduction of steroidal hormones like dihydrotestosterone or due to over-expression of enzymes such as 5-α-reductase. Various studies have revealed that growth factors play a crucial role in the progression of prostate cancer as they act either by directly elevating the level of steroidal hormones or upregulating enzyme efficacy by the active feedback mechanism. Presently, treatment options for prostate cancer include radiotherapy, surgery and chemotherapy. If treatment is done with prevailing traditional chemotherapy; it leads to resistance and development of androgen-independent prostate cancer that further complicates the situation with no cure option left. The current review article is an attempt to cover and establish an understanding of some major signalling pathways intervened through survival factors (IGF-1R), growth factors (TGF-α, EGF), Wnt, Hedgehog, interleukin, cytokinins and death factor receptor which are frequently dysregulated in prostate cancer. This will enable the researchers to design and develop better therapeutic strategies targeting growth factors and their cross talks mediated prostate cancer cell signalling. PMID:26297992

  2. Growth factors mediated cell signalling in prostate cancer progression: Implications in discovery of anti-prostate cancer agents.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Gaurav; Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Negi, Arvind; Rana, Anil; Singh, Sandeep; Kumar, Raj

    2015-10-01

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of mortality amongst world's population, in which prostate cancer is one of the most encountered malignancies among men. Globally, it is the sixth leading cause of cancer-related death in men. Prostate cancer is more prevalent in the developed world and is increasing at alarming rates in the developing countries. Prostate cancer is mostly a very sluggish progressing disease, caused by the overproduction of steroidal hormones like dihydrotestosterone or due to over-expression of enzymes such as 5-α-reductase. Various studies have revealed that growth factors play a crucial role in the progression of prostate cancer as they act either by directly elevating the level of steroidal hormones or upregulating enzyme efficacy by the active feedback mechanism. Presently, treatment options for prostate cancer include radiotherapy, surgery and chemotherapy. If treatment is done with prevailing traditional chemotherapy; it leads to resistance and development of androgen-independent prostate cancer that further complicates the situation with no cure option left. The current review article is an attempt to cover and establish an understanding of some major signalling pathways intervened through survival factors (IGF-1R), growth factors (TGF-α, EGF), Wnt, Hedgehog, interleukin, cytokinins and death factor receptor which are frequently dysregulated in prostate cancer. This will enable the researchers to design and develop better therapeutic strategies targeting growth factors and their cross talks mediated prostate cancer cell signalling.

  3. Genetic Factors Involved in Fumonisin Accumulation in Maize Kernels and Their Implications in Maize Agronomic Management and Breeding.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Rogelio; Cao, Ana; Butrón, Ana

    2015-08-20

    Contamination of maize with fumonisins depends on the environmental conditions; the maize resistance to contamination and the interaction between both factors. Although the effect of environmental factors is a determinant for establishing the risk of kernel contamination in a region, there is sufficient genetic variability among maize to develop resistance to fumonisin contamination and to breed varieties with contamination at safe levels. In addition, ascertaining which environmental factors are the most important in a region will allow the implementation of risk monitoring programs and suitable cultural practices to reduce the impact of such environmental variables. The current paper reviews all works done to address the influence of environmental variables on fumonisin accumulation, the genetics of maize resistance to fumonisin accumulation, and the search for the biochemical and/or structural mechanisms of the maize plant that could be involved in resistance to fumonisin contamination. We also explore the outcomes of breeding programs and risk monitoring of undertaken projects.

  4. Genetic Factors Involved in Fumonisin Accumulation in Maize Kernels and Their Implications in Maize Agronomic Management and Breeding.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Rogelio; Cao, Ana; Butrón, Ana

    2015-08-01

    Contamination of maize with fumonisins depends on the environmental conditions; the maize resistance to contamination and the interaction between both factors. Although the effect of environmental factors is a determinant for establishing the risk of kernel contamination in a region, there is sufficient genetic variability among maize to develop resistance to fumonisin contamination and to breed varieties with contamination at safe levels. In addition, ascertaining which environmental factors are the most important in a region will allow the implementation of risk monitoring programs and suitable cultural practices to reduce the impact of such environmental variables. The current paper reviews all works done to address the influence of environmental variables on fumonisin accumulation, the genetics of maize resistance to fumonisin accumulation, and the search for the biochemical and/or structural mechanisms of the maize plant that could be involved in resistance to fumonisin contamination. We also explore the outcomes of breeding programs and risk monitoring of undertaken projects. PMID:26308050

  5. Genetic Factors Involved in Fumonisin Accumulation in Maize Kernels and Their Implications in Maize Agronomic Management and Breeding

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Rogelio; Cao, Ana; Butrón, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Contamination of maize with fumonisins depends on the environmental conditions; the maize resistance to contamination and the interaction between both factors. Although the effect of environmental factors is a determinant for establishing the risk of kernel contamination in a region, there is sufficient genetic variability among maize to develop resistance to fumonisin contamination and to breed varieties with contamination at safe levels. In addition, ascertaining which environmental factors are the most important in a region will allow the implementation of risk monitoring programs and suitable cultural practices to reduce the impact of such environmental variables. The current paper reviews all works done to address the influence of environmental variables on fumonisin accumulation, the genetics of maize resistance to fumonisin accumulation, and the search for the biochemical and/or structural mechanisms of the maize plant that could be involved in resistance to fumonisin contamination. We also explore the outcomes of breeding programs and risk monitoring of undertaken projects. PMID:26308050

  6. Cognitive changes and dementia risk after traumatic brain injury: implications for aging military personnel.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Andrea S; Roebuck-Spencer, Tresa M; Cernich, Alison

    2014-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is recognized as an important risk factor for the long-term cognitive health of military personnel, particularly in light of growing evidence that TBI increases risk for Alzheimer's disease and other dementias. In this article, we review the neurocognitive and neuropathologic changes after TBI with particular focus on the potential risk for cognitive decline across the life span in military service members. Implications for monitoring and surveillance of cognition in the aging military population are discussed. Additional studies are needed to clarify the factors that increase risk for later life cognitive decline, define the mechanistic link between these factors and dementia, and provide empirically supported interventions to mitigate the impact of TBI on cognition across the life span.

  7. Up-regulation of neurotrophic factors by cinnamon and its metabolite sodium benzoate: therapeutic implications for neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Jana, Arundhati; Modi, Khushbu K; Roy, Avik; Anderson, John A; van Breemen, Richard B; Pahan, Kalipada

    2013-06-01

    This study underlines the importance of cinnamon, a widely-used food spice and flavoring material, and its metabolite sodium benzoate (NaB), a widely-used food preservative and a FDA-approved drug against urea cycle disorders in humans, in increasing the levels of neurotrophic factors [e.g., brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3)] in the CNS. NaB, but not sodium formate (NaFO), dose-dependently induced the expression of BDNF and NT-3 in primary human neurons and astrocytes. Interestingly, oral administration of ground cinnamon increased the level of NaB in serum and brain and upregulated the levels of these neurotrophic factors in vivo in mouse CNS. Accordingly, oral feeding of NaB, but not NaFO, also increased the level of these neurotrophic factors in vivo in the CNS of mice. NaB induced the activation of protein kinase A (PKA), but not protein kinase C (PKC), and H-89, an inhibitor of PKA, abrogated NaB-induced increase in neurotrophic factors. Furthermore, activation of cAMP response element binding (CREB) protein, but not NF-κB, by NaB, abrogation of NaB-induced expression of neurotrophic factors by siRNA knockdown of CREB and the recruitment of CREB and CREB-binding protein to the BDNF promoter by NaB suggest that NaB exerts its neurotrophic effect through the activation of CREB. Accordingly, cinnamon feeding also increased the activity of PKA and the level of phospho-CREB in vivo in the CNS. These results highlight a novel neutrophic property of cinnamon and its metabolite NaB via PKA - CREB pathway, which may be of benefit for various neurodegenerative disorders.

  8. [Prevalence and implicated risk factors associated with the exteriorization of cardiac pacemakers: 5 year follow-up].

    PubMed

    Argüello-Hurtado, Marco; Guevara-Valdivia, Milton Ernesto; Aranda-Ayala, Zulema Lisbeth; Hernández-Lara, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Introducción: el objetivo de este estudio es establecer la prevalencia y determinar la frecuencia de factores de riesgo de exteriorización de marcapasos definitivos (MPD), en el departamento de Electrofisiología Cardiaca de la UMAE Hospital de Especialidades "Dr. Antonio Fraga Mouret" del Centro Médico Nacional La Raza del Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social.Métodos: se llevó a cabo un estudio transversal, descriptivo del periodo: septiembre del 2005 a septiembre del 2010, para el análisis de los factores se manejó como casos y controles; se eligieron emparejándose por edad, sexo y presencia, o no, de factores de riesgo. Se realizó el cálculo de medidas de tendencia central (media, mediana y moda), así como pruebas de chi cuadrada, test de Fisher y razón de momios.Resultados: se implantaron 3192 MPD, identificando 83 casos de exteriorizaciones, seleccionando 43 casos para casos y controles, la edad promedio fue de 71 años. Ninguno de los factores de riesgo ni el tipo de técnica quirúrgica presentó significancia estadística.Conclusiones: nuestra prevalencia de exteriorizaciones es del 2.6 %, valores muy similares a los reportes publicados. Ninguno de los factores de riesgo descritos se encuentra presente como causa de exteriorización en nuestra población. El análisis de la técnica quirúrgica utilizada puede ser un factor importante, por lo que se necesitan estudios posteriores.

  9. Mechanistic studies related to the safety of Li/SOCl2 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, B. J.; Williams, R. M.; Tsay, F. D.; Rodriguez, A.; Kim, S.; Evans, M. M.; Frank, H.

    1985-01-01

    Mechanistic studies of the reactions in Li-SOCl2 cells have been undertaken to improve understanding of the safety problems of these cells. The electrochemical reduction of 1.5M LiAlCl4/SOCl2 has been investigated using gas chromatography, electron spin resonance spectroscopy, and infrared spectroscopy. Cl2 and S2Cl2 have been identified as intermediates in the reduction of SOCl2, along with a radical species (g/xx/ = 2.004, g/yy/ = 2.016, g/zz/ = 2.008) and the proposed triplet ground-state dimer of this radical. SO2 and sulfur have been identified as products. Based upon these findings, a mechanism for the electrochemical reduction of 1.5M LiAlCl4/SOCl2 has been proposed, and its implications for safety of Li-SOCl2 cells during discharge to +0.5V at 25-30 C are discussed.

  10. Factors influencing movement of two migratory fishes within the tailrace of a large neotropical dam and their implications for hydropower impacts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Suzuki, F. M.; Dunham, Jason; Silva, L. G. M.; Alves, C. B. M.; Pompeu, P.S.

    2016-01-01

    Fish attempting to move upstream through hydroelectric dams can be trapped and killed in turbines. Understanding fish movement patterns can provide useful insights for how to manage dam operations to minimize fish kill in turbines. We evaluated the movements of two migratory fish (Curimba—Prochilodus argenteus and Mandi—Pimelodus maculatus) using acoustic telemetry in the tailrace of Três Marias Dam (São Francisco River, Brazil) from 31 October 2011 to 16 February 2012. The majority of tagged fish left the tailrace in less than one week; however, some individuals returned, performing several visits to the tailrace. Mandi remained longer in the tailrace than Curimba. The number of visits was influenced by diel period, turbine and spillway discharge. Although the diel period was the only important contributor to the visits performed by Curimba, the movements of Mandi were significantly influenced by three factors. We found that whereas Curimba was predominantly diurnal, Mandi showed nocturnal habits. Additionally, visits of Mandi were significantly greater during higher turbine and spillway discharge. We discuss the implications of these results for understanding fish movements in the Três Marias Dam tailrace and their potential implications for adapting hydroelectric operations to minimize fish kills.

  11. Evaluation of the biological differences of canine and human factor VIII in gene delivery: Implications in human hemophilia treatment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The canine is the most important large animal model for testing novel hemophilia A(HA) treatment. It is often necessary to use canine factor VIII (cFIII) gene or protein for the evaluation of HA treatment in the canine model. However, the different biological properties between cFVIII and human FVII...

  12. The Role of Community, Family, Peer, and School Factors in Group Bullying: Implications for School-Based Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Michael J.; Kristjansson, Alfgeir L.; Sigfusdottir, Inga Dora; Smith, Megan L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although an ecological perspective suggests the importance of multiple levels of intervention, most bullying research has emphasized individual- and school-focused strategies. This study investigated community and family factors that influence school efforts to reduce odds of group bullying behavior and victimization. Methods: We used…

  13. An Assessment of the Predictive Validity of Impact Factor Scores: Implications for Academic Employment Decisions in Social Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Gary; Rosenberg, Gary; Barker, Kathleen; Onghena, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Bibliometrics is a method of examining scholarly communications. Concerns regarding the use of bibliometrics in general, and the impact factor score (IFS) in particular, have been discussed across disciplines including social work. Although there are frequent mentions in the literature of the IFS as an indicator of the impact or quality…

  14. Factors Associated with Participation in Work-Site Wellness Programs: Implications for Increasing Willingness among Rural Service Employees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middlestadt, Susan E.; Sheats, Jylana L.; Geshnizjani, Alireza; Sullivan, Margaret R.; Arvin, Christopher S.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors underlying decisions to participate in work-site wellness programs. A sample of 279 full-time workers from a service division of a rural Midwestern university completed a survey assessing demographic and job characteristics, health status and health behaviors, and Reasoned Action Approach (RAA)…

  15. Protection of Nonself Surfaces from Complement Attack by Factor H-Binding Peptides: Implications for Therapeutic Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Wu, You-Qiang; Qu, Hongchang; Sfyroera, Georgia; Tzekou, Apostolia; Kay, Brian K.; Nilsson, Bo; Ekdahl, Kristina Nilsson; Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D.

    2011-01-01

    Exposure of nonself surfaces such as those of biomaterials or transplanted cells and organs to host blood frequently triggers innate immune responses, thereby affecting both their functionality and tolerability. Activation of the alternative pathway of complement plays a decisive role in this unfavorable reaction. Whereas previous studies demonstrated that immobilization of physiological regulators of complement activation (RCA) can attenuate this foreign body-induced activation, simple and efficient approaches for coating artificial surfaces with intact RCA are still missing. The conjugation of small molecular entities that capture RCA with high affinity is an intriguing alternative, as this creates a surface with autoregulatory activity upon exposure to blood. We therefore screened two variable cysteine-constrained phage-displayed peptide libraries for factor H-binding peptides. We discovered three peptide classes that differed with respect to their main target binding areas. Peptides binding to the broad middle region of factor H (domains 5–18) were of particular interest, as they do not interfere with either regulatory or binding activities. One peptide in this group (5C6) was further characterized and showed high factor H-capturing activity while retaining its functional integrity. Most importantly, when 5C6 was coated to a model polystyrene surface and exposed to human lepirudin-anticoagulated plasma, the bound peptide captured factor H and substantially inhibited complement activation by the alternative pathway. Our study therefore provides a promising and novel approach to produce therapeutic materials with enhanced biocompatibility. PMID:21339361

  16. FACTORS AFFECTING PERFORMANCE OF TRANSFER STUDENTS FROM 2- TO 4-YEAR COLLEGES--WITH IMPLICATIONS FOR COORDINATION AND ARTICULATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KNOELL, DOROTHY M.; MEDSKER, LELAND L.

    AN INTENSIVE STUDY WAS MADE OF THE FACTORS AFFECTING PERSISTENCE AND ACADEMIC ACCOMPLISHMENT OF STUDENTS TRANSFERRING FROM 2-YEAR (JUNIOR COLLEGE) TO 4-YEAR COLLEGES. THE OBJECTIVE WAS TO OBTAIN NORMATIVE INFORMATION ABOUT THE CHARACTERISTICS OF THESE STUDENTS. THE MAJOR STUDY GROUP WAS COMPOSED OF APPROXIMATELY 9,000 JUNIOR COLLEGE STUDENTS WHO…

  17. Factors Impacting Job Performance and Role Attractiveness in Academic Directors and Their Implications for Policy and Practice in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vilkinas, Tricia; Ladyshewsky, Richard K.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors that impacted on the performance and attractiveness of the Academic Director's role. Academic Directors are responsible for leading and managing an academic qualification. Academic Directors (n = 101) participating in a leadership development programme were invited to respond to an online 360…

  18. Anger, Anxiety, and Depression as Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease: The Problems and Implications of Overlapping Affective Dispositions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sul, Jerry; Bunde, James

    2005-01-01

    Several recent reviews (e.g., L. C. Gallo & K. Matthews, 2003; A. Rozanski, J. A. Blumenthal, & J. Kaplan, 1999; R. Rugulies, 2002) have identified 3 affective dispositions--depression, anxiety, and anger-hostility--as putative risk factors for coronary heart disease. There are, however, mixed and negative results. Following a critical summary of…

  19. Reducing the weight of cancer: mechanistic targets for breaking the obesity-carcinogenesis link.

    PubMed

    Hursting, Stephen D; Lashinger, Laura M; Wheatley, Karrie W; Rogers, Connie J; Colbert, Lisa H; Nunez, Nomeli P; Perkins, Susan N

    2008-08-01

    The prevalence of obesity, an established epidemiologic risk factor for many cancers, has risen steadily for the past several decades in the US. The increasing rates of obesity among children are especially alarming and suggest continuing increases in the rates of obesity-related cancers for many years to come. Unfortunately, the mechanisms underlying the association between obesity and cancer are not well understood. In particular, the effects on the carcinogenesis process and mechanistic targets of interventions that modulate energy balance, such as reduced-calorie diets and physical activity, have not been well characterized. The purpose of this review is to provide a strong foundation for the translation of mechanism-based research in this area by describing key animal and human studies of energy balance modulations involving diet or physical activity and by focusing on the interrelated pathways affected by alterations in energy balance. Particular attention is placed on signaling through the insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptors, including components of the Akt and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathways downstream of these growth factor receptors. These pathways have emerged as potential targets for disrupting the obesity-cancer link. The ultimate goal of this work is to provide the missing mechanistic information necessary to identify targets for the prevention and control of cancers related to or caused by excess body weight.

  20. Factors that influence VSV-G pseudotyping and transduction efficiency of lentiviral vectors-in vitro and in vivo implications.

    PubMed

    Farley, Daniel C; Iqball, Sharifah; Smith, Joanne C; Miskin, James E; Kingsman, Susan M; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A

    2007-05-01

    Pseudotyping viral vectors with vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G) enables the transduction of an extensive range of cell types from different species. We have discovered two important parameters of the VSV-G-pseudotyping phenomenon that relate directly to the transduction potential of lentiviral vectors: (1) the glycosylation status of VSV-G, and (2) the quantity of glycoprotein associated with virions. We measured production-cell and virion-associated quantities of two isoform variants of VSV-G, which differ in their glycosylation status, VSV-G1 and VSV-G2, and assessed the impact of this difference on the efficiency of mammalian cell transduction by lentiviral vectors. The glycosylation of VSV-G at N336 allowed greater maximal expression of VSV-G in HEK293T cells, thus facilitating vector pseudotyping. The transduction of primate cell lines was substantially affected (up to 50-fold) by the degree of VSV-G1 or VSV-G2 incorporation, whereas other cell lines, such as D17 (canine), were less sensitive to virion-associated VSV-G1/2 quantities. These data indicate that the minimum required concentration of virion-associated VSV-G differs substantially between cell species/types. The implications of these data with regard to VSV-G-pseudotyped vector production, titration, and use in host-cell restriction studies, are discussed.

  1. Key to Opening Kidney for In Vitro-In Vivo Extrapolation Entrance in Health and Disease: Part II: Mechanistic Models and In Vitro-In Vivo Extrapolation.

    PubMed

    Scotcher, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Posada, Maria; Galetin, Aleksandra; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin

    2016-09-01

    It is envisaged that application of mechanistic models will improve prediction of changes in renal disposition due to drug-drug interactions, genetic polymorphism in enzymes and transporters and/or renal impairment. However, developing and validating mechanistic kidney models is challenging due to the number of processes that may occur (filtration, secretion, reabsorption and metabolism) in this complex organ. Prediction of human renal drug disposition from preclinical species may be hampered by species differences in the expression and activity of drug metabolising enzymes and transporters. A proposed solution is bottom-up prediction of pharmacokinetic parameters based on in vitro-in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE), mediated by recent advances in in vitro experimental techniques and application of relevant scaling factors. This review is a follow-up to the Part I of the report from the 2015 AAPS Annual Meeting and Exhibition (Orlando, FL; 25th-29th October 2015) which focuses on IVIVE and mechanistic prediction of renal drug disposition. It describes the various mechanistic kidney models that may be used to investigate renal drug disposition. Particular attention is given to efforts that have attempted to incorporate elements of IVIVE. In addition, the use of mechanistic models in prediction of renal drug-drug interactions and potential for application in determining suitable adjustment of dose in kidney disease are discussed. The need for suitable clinical pharmacokinetics data for the purposes of delineating mechanistic aspects of kidney models in various scenarios is highlighted. PMID:27506526

  2. [The epidemiology of central venous catheterization (CVC) in parenteral nutrition. The clinical implications and factors that determine the selection of germs].

    PubMed

    Llop Talaverón, J M; Rey Salido, M; Tubau Molas, M; Verdaguer Riu, R; Ramón Torrell, J M; Pastó Cardona, L; Manges Bafalluy, I

    1996-01-01

    The objective of the study is, on one hand, to determine the etiology and the clinical implications as a function of the isolated germ, of central venous catheterization in patients with parenteral nutrition in our hospital, and on the other hand, to determine which factors are associated with the selection of germs of central venous catheterization in parenteral nutrition. For this we included venous catheters, colonized for 5 years, and with a study of the different segments (connection, insertion point, and tip). As a function of the appearance of associated clinical symptoms, of the results of the blood culture, and of the clinical evolution of the patient, the variables which determine the level of pathogenicity of the different groups of germs in the central venous catheterization, are defined; for the study of the factors associated with the selection of the different groups of germs, 8 variables were chosen. The data obtained are statistically treated, and the results are considered to be significant if p < 0.05. The understanding of the different factors associated with the selection of germs, and the level of clinical pathogenesis of the different groups, allows a better level of the clinical action in the prevention of the infection associated with the catheter. PMID:8695707

  3. Up-regulation of pro-inflammatory factors by HP-PRRSV infection in microglia: implications for HP-PRRSV neuropathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin-Xin; Quan, Rong; Guo, Xue-Kun; Gao, Li; Shi, Jishu; Feng, Wen-Hai

    2014-05-14

    Atypical porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) caused by a highly pathogenic PRRS virus (HP-PRRSV) is characterized by high fever, high morbidity, high mortality, and associated with severe neurological symptoms. Microglia are the resident innate immune cells in central nervous system (CNS), and their activation has been implicated as an important contributor to the pathogenesis of CNS diseases. In the present study, we successfully cultured porcine microglia and demonstrated that microglia could support PRRSV infection and replication in vitro. We further showed that HP-PRRSV infection significantly up-regulated the key inflammatory factors including IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-12, IL-8, CXCL10, MCP-1, CCL3, CCL4, and CCL5 in cultured microglia as well as in the CNS of HP-PRRSV-infected pigs. The transcription factors NF-κB and AP-1, which are widely reported to regulate cytokine and chemokine productions, were activated by HP-PRRSV infection in microglia. Meanwhile, we found that HP-PRRSV induced cellular ROS formation in microglia and ROS scavenger was proved to significantly abolish the activation of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-8), suggesting that ROS are crucial for pro-inflammatory gene production. Importantly, incubation with supernatants from HP-PRRSV-infected microglia cell culture remarkably induced SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell death. Collectively, these results showed that PRRSV infection induced cytokine and ROS up-regulation in microglia, which might contribute to neurotoxicity. These data have implications for us to understand the neuropathogenesis of HP-PRRSV in pigs. PMID:24581811

  4. A simple mechanistic model to interpret the effects of narcotics.

    PubMed

    Baas, J; Spurgeon, D; Broerse, M

    2015-01-01

    In this research we will show the advantages of using a time-independent dose metric in a mechanistic model to evaluate toxic effects for different narcotic compounds on different species. We will show how different already existing QSARs can be combined within a mechanistic framework to 1) make predictions of lethal thresholds; 2) show some limitations in the use of existing QSARs; 3) show how a mechanistic framework solves some conceptual problems in current approaches and 4) show how such a framework can be used to be of aid in an experimental setup in predicting the outcome of a survival experiment. The approach we chose is based on the simplest mechanistic model available, a scaled one-compartment model to describe uptake and elimination and hazard model to link the exposure to effects on survival. Within this theoretical framework a prediction for an internal threshold for effects on survival of 3 mmol/kg bw can be made, which should be similar for different species and independent of the partitioning characteristics of the toxicant. To demonstrate this, a threshold for 51 different species was derived, which indeed appeared to lie in a relatively small range, typically between 1 and 10 mmol/kg bw.

  5. Does Mechanistic Thinking Improve Student Success in Organic Chemistry?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grove, Nathaniel P.; Cooper, Melanie M.; Cox, Elizabeth L.

    2012-01-01

    The use of the curved-arrow notation to depict electron flow during mechanistic processes is one of the most important representational conventions in the organic chemistry curriculum. Our previous research documented a disturbing trend: when asked to predict the products of a series of reactions, many students do not spontaneously engage in…

  6. Rearrangements of Allylic Sulfinates to Sulfones: A Mechanistic Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, David B.; Mollard, Paul; Voigtritter, Karl R.; Ball, Jenelle L.

    2010-01-01

    Most current organic chemistry textbooks are organized by functional groups and those of us who teach organic chemistry use functional-group organization in our courses but ask students to learn organic chemistry from a mechanistic approach. To enrich and extend the chemical understanding and knowledge of pericyclic-type reactions for chemistry…

  7. Bridging Mechanistic and Phenomenological Models of Complex Biological Systems

    PubMed Central

    Transtrum, Mark K.; Qiu, Peng

    2016-01-01

    The inherent complexity of biological systems gives rise to complicated mechanistic models with a large number of parameters. On the other hand, the collective behavior of these systems can often be characterized by a relatively small number of phenomenological parameters. We use the Manifold Boundary Approximation Method (MBAM) as a tool for deriving simple phenomenological models from complicated mechanistic models. The resulting models are not black boxes, but remain expressed in terms of the microscopic parameters. In this way, we explicitly connect the macroscopic and microscopic descriptions, characterize the equivalence class of distinct systems exhibiting the same range of collective behavior, and identify the combinations of components that function as tunable control knobs for the behavior. We demonstrate the procedure for adaptation behavior exhibited by the EGFR pathway. From a 48 parameter mechanistic model, the system can be effectively described by a single adaptation parameter τ characterizing the ratio of time scales for the initial response and recovery time of the system which can in turn be expressed as a combination of microscopic reaction rates, Michaelis-Menten constants, and biochemical concentrations. The situation is not unlike modeling in physics in which microscopically complex processes can often be renormalized into simple phenomenological models with only a few effective parameters. The proposed method additionally provides a mechanistic explanation for non-universal features of the behavior. PMID:27187545

  8. MECHANISTIC AND SOURCE UNDERSTANDING OF PCDD/F FORMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses mechanistic and source understanding of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin and dibenzofuran (PCDD/F) formation. (NOTE: Considerable research effort has been expended over the last 15-plus years to understand how combustion sources result in formation of PCDDs/F...

  9. DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION OF A MECHANISTIC GROUND SPRAYER MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the last ten years the Spray Drift Task Force (SDTF), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), USDA Agricultural Research Service, and USDA Forest Service cooperated in the refinement and evaluation of a mechanistically-based aerial spray model (contained within AGDISP and ...

  10. Protein kinases as switches for the function of upstream stimulatory factors: implications for tissue injury and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Horbach, Tina; Götz, Claudia; Kietzmann, Thomas; Dimova, Elitsa Y.

    2015-01-01

    The upstream stimulatory factors (USFs) are regulators of important cellular processes. Both USF1 and USF2 are supposed to have major roles in metabolism, tissue protection and tumor development. However, the knowledge about the mechanisms that control the function of USFs, in particular in tissue protection and cancer, is limited. Phosphorylation is a versatile tool to regulate protein functions. Thereby, phosphorylation can positively or negatively affect different aspects of transcription factor function including protein stability, protein–protein interaction, cellular localization, or DNA binding. The present review aims to summarize the current knowledge about the regulation of USFs by direct phosphorylation and the consequences for USF functions in tissue protection and cancer. PMID:25741280

  11. Factors influencing the outdoor concentration of carbonaceous aerosols at urban schools in Brisbane, Australia: Implications for children's exposure.

    PubMed

    Crilley, L R; Ayoko, G A; Mazaheri, M; Morawska, L

    2016-01-01

    This comprehensive study aimed to determine the sources and driving factors of organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) concentrations in ambient PM2.5 in urban schools. Sampling was conducted outdoors at 25 schools in the Brisbane Metropolitan Area, Australia. Concentrations of primary and secondary OC were quantified using the EC tracer method, with secondary OC accounting for an average of 60%. Principal component analysis distinguished the contributing sources above the background and identified groups of schools with differing levels of primary and secondary carbonaceous aerosols. Overall, the results showed that vehicle emissions, local weather conditions and secondary organic aerosols (SOA) were the key factors influencing concentrations of carbonaceous component of PM2.5 at these schools. These results provide insights into children's exposure to vehicle emissions and SOA at such urban schools. PMID:25953387

  12. New Measurement of Parity Violation in Elastic Electron-Proton Scattering and Implications for Strange Form Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Konrad Aniol; David Armstrong; Todd Averett; Maud Baylac; Etienne Burtin; John Calarco; Gordon Cates; Christian Cavata; Zhengwei Chai; C. Chang; Jian-Ping Chen; Eugene Chudakov; Evaristo Cisbani; Marius Coman; Daniel Dale; Alexandre Deur; Pibero Djawotho; Martin Epstein; Stephanie Escoffier; Lars Ewell; Nicolas Falletto; John Finn; A. Fleck; Bernard Frois; Salvatore Frullani; Juncai Gao; Franco Garibaldi; Ashot Gasparian; G. M. Gerstner; Ronald Gilman; Oleksandr Glamazdin; Javier Gomez; Viktor Gorbenko; Jens-ole Hansen; F. Hersman; Douglas Higinbotham; Richard Holmes; Maurik Holtrop; Thomas Humensky; Sebastien Incerti; Mauro Iodice; Cornelis De Jager; Johann Jardillier; Xiaodong Jiang; Mark Jones; J. Jorda; Christophe Jutier; W. Kahl; James Kelly; Donghee Kim; M. -J. Kim; Minsuk Kim; Ioannis Kominis; Edgar Kooijman; Kevin Kramer; Krishna Kumar; Michael Kuss; John LeRose; Raffaele De Leo; M. Leuschner; David Lhuillier; Meihua Liang; Nilanga Liyanage; R. Lourie; Richard Madey; Sergey Malov; Demetrius Margaziotis; Frederic Marie; Pete Markowitz; Jacques Martino; Peter Mastromarino; Kathy McCormick; Justin McIntyre; Zein-Eddine Meziani; Robert Michaels; Brian Milbrath; Gerald Miller; Joseph Mitchell; Ludyvine Morand; Damien Neyret; Gerassimos Petratos; Roman Pomatsalyuk; John Price; David Prout; Thierry Pussieux; Gilles Quemener; Ronald Ransome; David Relyea; Yves Roblin; Julie Roche; Gary Rutledge; Paul Rutt; Marat Rvachev; Franck Sabatie; Arunava Saha; Paul Souder; Marcus Spradlin; Steffen Strauch; Riad Suleiman; Jeffrey Templon; T. Teresawa; James Thompson; Raphael Tieulent; Luminita Todor; Baris Tonguc; Paul Ulmer; Guido Urciuoli; Branislav Vlahovic; Krishni Wijesooriya; R. Wilson; Bogdan Wojtsekhowski; Rhett Woo; Wang Xu; Imran Younus; C. Zhang

    2001-06-01

    We have measured the parity-violating electroweak asymmetry in the elastic scattering of polarized electrons from the proton. The result is A = -15.05 +- 0.98(stat) {+-} 0.56(syst) ppm at the kinematic point theta{sub lab} = 12.3 degrees and Q{sup 2} = 0.477 (GeV/c){sup 2}. The measurement implies that the value for the strange form factor (G{sub E}{sup s} + 0.392 G{sub M}{sup s})/(G{sub M}{sup p} {mu}{sub p}) = 0.069 +- 0.056 +- 0.039, where the first error is experimental and the second arises from the uncertainties in electromagnetic form factors. This measurement is the first fixed-target parity violation experiment that used either a ''strained'' GaAs photocathode to produce highly polarized electrons or a Compton polarimeter to continuously monitor the electron beam polarization.

  13. Nitrous oxide exchanges with the atmosphere of a constructed wetland treating wastewater. Parameters and implications for emission factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, A. E.; Kasimir Klemedtsson, Å.; Klemedtsson, L.; Svensson, B. H.

    2003-07-01

    Static chamber measurements of N2O fluxes were taken during the 1998 and 1999 growth seasons in a Swedish constructed wetland receiving wastewater. The dominating plant species in different parts of the wetland were Lemna minor L., Typha latifolia L., Spirogyra sp. and Glyceria maxima (Hartm.) and Phalaris arundinacea (L.), respectively. There were large temporal and spatial variations in N2O fluxes, which ranged from consumption at -350 to emissions at 1791 μg N2O m-2 h-1. The largest positive flux occurred in October 1999 and the lowest in the middle of July 1999. The average N2O flux for the two years was 130 μg N2O m-2 h-1 (SD = 220). No significant differences in N2O fluxes were found between the years, even though the two growing seasons differed considerably with respect to both air temperature and precipitation. 15% of the fluxes were negative, showing a consumption of N2O. Consumption occurred on a few occasions at most measurement sites and ranged from 1-350 μg N2O m-2 h-1. 13-43% of the variation in N2O fluxes was explained by multiple linear regression analysis including principal components. Emission factors were calculated according to IPCC methods from the N2O fluxes in the constructed wetland. The calculated emission factors were always lower (0.02-0.27%) compared to the default factor provided by the IPCC (0.75%). Thus, direct application of the IPCC default factor may lead to overestimation of N2O fluxes from constructed wastewater-treating wetlands.

  14. Consequences of nocturnal water loss: a synthesis of regulating factors and implications for capacitance, embolism and use in models.

    PubMed

    Zeppel, M J B; Lewis, J D; Phillips, N G; Tissue, D T

    2014-10-01

    Total daily water use is a key factor influencing the growth of many terrestrial plants, and reflects both day-time and nocturnal water fluxes. However, while nocturnal sap flow (En) and stomatal conductance (gs,n) have been reported across a range of species, ecosystems and microclimatic conditions, the regulation of these fluxes remains poorly understood. Here, we present a framework describing the role of abiotic and biotic factors in regulating En and gs,n highlighting recent developments in this field. Across ecosystems, En and gs,n generally increased with increasing soil water content and vapor pressure deficit, but the interactive effects of these factors and the potential roles of wind speed and other abiotic factors remain unclear. On average, gs,n and En are higher in broad-leaved compared with needle-leaved plants, in C3 compared with C4 plants, and in tropical compared with temperate species. We discuss the impacts of leaf age, elevated [CO2] and refilling of capacitance on night-time water loss, and how nocturnal gs,n may be included in vegetation models. Younger leaves may have higher gs,n than older leaves. Embolism refilling and recharge of capacitance may affect sap flow such that total plant water loss at night may be less than estimated solely from En measurements. Our estimates of gs,n for typical plant functional types, based on the published literature, suggest that nocturnal water loss may be a significant fraction (10-25%) of total daily water loss. Counter-intuitively, elevated [CO2] may increase nocturnal water loss. Assumptions in process-based ecophysiological models and dynamic global vegetation models that gs is zero when solar radiation is zero are likely to be incorrect. Consequently, failure to adequately consider nocturnal water loss may lead to substantial under-estimation of total plant water use and inaccurate estimation of ecosystem level water balance. PMID:25413023

  15. Clinical implications of the Women's Ischemia Syndrome Evaluation: inter-relationships between symptoms, psychosocial factors and cardiovascular outcomes.

    PubMed

    Handberg, Eileen M; Eastwood, Jo-Ann; Eteiba, Wafia; Johnson, B Delia; Krantz, David S; Thompson, Diane V; Vaccarino, Viola; Bittner, Vera; Sopko, George; Pepine, Carl J; Merz, Noel Bairey; Rutledge, Thomas R

    2013-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death in the USA and is associated with several modifiable (hypertension, diabetes, high cholesterol, tobacco use, physical inactivity, obesity and unhealthy diet) and nonmodifiable (age, gender and family history) risk factors. The role of psychosocial risk factors in the development of cardiovascular disease has a growing body of literature, and differences in men and women have been identified. The Women's Ischemia Syndrome Evaluation provides insight into psychosocial risk factors in a cohort of women presenting with chest pain who had a comprehensive battery of psychosocial assessments and long-term follow-up. This review focuses on symptom presentation for chest pain and its relationship to cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality, quality of life, healthcare costs and psychosocial predictor variables, including anxiety, depression, hostility and social networks. In the Women's Ischemia Syndrome Evaluation, persistent chest pain was associated with an increased rate of adverse events and relatively high rates of depression and anxiety, with reduced functional capacity and impaired quality of life, over a median of 6 years of follow-up. More research is needed to better understand the relationships between symptoms and negative emotions and to determine whether psychological (pharmacologic and/or cognitive) interventions might impact both psychological and cardiovascular outcomes. PMID:24007253

  16. Clinical implications of the Women's Ischemia Syndrome Evaluation: inter-relationships between symptoms, psychosocial factors and cardiovascular outcomes.

    PubMed

    Handberg, Eileen M; Eastwood, Jo-Ann; Eteiba, Wafia; Johnson, B Delia; Krantz, David S; Thompson, Diane V; Vaccarino, Viola; Bittner, Vera; Sopko, George; Pepine, Carl J; Merz, Noel Bairey; Rutledge, Thomas R

    2013-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death in the USA and is associated with several modifiable (hypertension, diabetes, high cholesterol, tobacco use, physical inactivity, obesity and unhealthy diet) and nonmodifiable (age, gender and family history) risk factors. The role of psychosocial risk factors in the development of cardiovascular disease has a growing body of literature, and differences in men and women have been identified. The Women's Ischemia Syndrome Evaluation provides insight into psychosocial risk factors in a cohort of women presenting with chest pain who had a comprehensive battery of psychosocial assessments and long-term follow-up. This review focuses on symptom presentation for chest pain and its relationship to cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality, quality of life, healthcare costs and psychosocial predictor variables, including anxiety, depression, hostility and social networks. In the Women's Ischemia Syndrome Evaluation, persistent chest pain was associated with an increased rate of adverse events and relatively high rates of depression and anxiety, with reduced functional capacity and impaired quality of life, over a median of 6 years of follow-up. More research is needed to better understand the relationships between symptoms and negative emotions and to determine whether psychological (pharmacologic and/or cognitive) interventions might impact both psychological and cardiovascular outcomes.

  17. The adolescent body image satisfaction scale for males: exploratory factor analysis and implications for strength and conditioning professionals.

    PubMed

    Leone, James E; Mullin, Elizabeth M; Maurer-Starks, Suanne S; Rovito, Michael J

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether there is evidence of reliability and validity for the Adolescent Body Image Satisfaction Scale (ABISS), an instrument previously developed to measure adolescent body image. A sample (N = 330) of adolescent males, aged 14-19 years, completed the ABISS to determine current body image satisfaction. Data were analyzed for measures of instrument composite reliability and initial content and construct validity. Exploratory factor analysis supported a 3-factor solution (16 total items), which explained 42.7% of variance in the model. Composite reliability for the subscales, body competence, body inadequacy, and internal conflict ranged from 0.64 to 0.82. Exploratory factor analysis of the ABISS provides initial psychometric support for a valid and reliable measure for assessing adolescent male body image, which also can be used as a needs assessment tool. Strength and conditioning professionals should be aware of their athlete and client psychological attributes, many of whom are adolescents. Understanding how adolescents view their bodies and their body image will assist professionals in designing appropriate, health-promotive strength programs, while at the same time monitoring for signs of body image dissatisfaction. Assessing body image can help heighten awareness and possibly encourage preventative programming to help avert negative health practices (e.g., performance-enhancing drug use, exercise addictions, disordered eating). The ABISS seems to have preliminary psychometric support to be a valid and reliable instrument that helps gauge at-risk populations.

  18. Religion as a Support Factor for Women of Color Pursuing Science Degrees: Implications for Science Teacher Educators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceglie, Robert

    2013-02-01

    This study explores the influence of religion as a support factor for a group of Latina and African-American women majoring in science. The current project is a part of a larger study that investigated persistence factors of underrepresented woman who were enrolled as science majors at United States colleges and universities. This paper focuses on one theme that emerged among six participants who disclosed how religion was a significant influence on their persistence in science fields. The strength and support offered by religious values is certainly not specific to science content; however, the support received from their beliefs highlights a potential area for further exploration. Given the importance of increasing participation by students from diverse backgrounds into science fields, it is critical to recognize how some of these differences may be the key factors influencing the way these students look at the world. This study offers evidence that science educators need to consider what role religious beliefs have for students who may be considering science or science education as a future career, particularly for those students from underrepresented groups.

  19. Adolescent pornographic internet site use: a multivariate regression analysis of the predictive factors of use and psychosocial implications.

    PubMed

    Tsitsika, Artemis; Critselis, Elena; Kormas, Georgios; Konstantoulaki, Eleftheria; Constantopoulos, Andreas; Kafetzis, Dimitrios

    2009-10-01

    The study objectives were to evaluate the prevalence, predictors, and implications of pornographic Internet site (PIS) use among Greek adolescents. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 529 randomly selected Greek high school students. The prevalence of overall PIS use was 19.47% (n = 96). Among PIS users, 55 (57.29%) reported infrequent and 41 (42.71%) reported frequent PIS use. The predictors of infrequent PIS use included male gender (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 8.33; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 3.52-19.61), Internet use for sexual education (AOR = 5.26; 95% CI = 1.78-15.55), chat rooms (AOR = 2.95; 95% CI = 1.48-5.91), and purchases (AOR = 3.06; 95% CI = 1.22-7.67). The predictors of frequent PIS use were male gender (AOR = 19.61; 95% CI = 4.46-83.33), Internet use for sexual education (AOR = 7.39; 95% CI = 2.37-23.00), and less than 10 hours per week Internet use (AOR = 1.32; 95% CI = 1.10-1.59). Compared to non-PIS users, infrequent PIS users were twice as likely to have abnormal conduct problems (odds ratio [OR] = 2.74; 95% CI = 1.19-6.28); frequent PIS users were significantly more likely to have abnormal conduct problems (OR = 4.05; 95% CI = 1.57-10.46) and borderline prosocial score (OR = 4.22; 95% CI = 1.64-10.85). Thus, both infrequent and frequent PIS use are prevalent and significantly associated with social maladjustment among Greek adolescents. PMID:19772438

  20. A mechanistic view of drying suspension droplets.

    PubMed

    van der Kooij, Hanne M; van de Kerkhof, Gea T; Sprakel, Joris

    2016-03-21

    When a dispersion droplet dries, a rich variety of spatial and temporal heterogeneities emerge. Controlling these phenomena is essential for many applications yet requires a thorough understanding of the underlying mechanisms. Although the process of film formation from initially dispersed polymer particles is well documented and is known to involve three main stages - evaporation, particle deformation and coalescence - it is impossible to fully disentangle the effects of particle deformation and coalescence, as these stages are closely linked. We circumvent this problem by studying suspensions of colloidal rubber particles that are incapable of coalescing. Varying the crosslink density allows us to tune the particle deformability in a controlled manner. We develop a theoretical framework of the main regimes and stresses in drying droplets of these suspensions, and validate this framework experimentally. Specifically, we show that changing the particle modulus by less than an order of magnitude can completely alter the stress development and resulting instabilities. Scanning electron microscopy reveals that particle deformability is a key factor in stress mitigation. Our model is the suspension equivalent of the widely used Routh-Russel model for film formation in drying dispersions, with additional focus on lateral nonuniformities such as cracking and wrinkling inherent to the droplet geometry, thus adding a new dimension to the conventional view of particle deformation.

  1. Mechanistic Studies of Planetary Haze Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Raea Kay

    2015-10-01

    controlling the total mass produced depends on pressure. We also report an overall increase with pressure in the N/C ratio, which supports the importance of a pressure- dependent mechanism for nitrogen incorporation. In order to understand carbon incorporation into early Earth aerosols, we devised an analysis technique that allows retrieval of the elemental analysis from unit-mass resolution (UMR) mass spectra of isotopically-labeled data. A quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer (Q-AMS) was used to obtain UMR data of 13C-labeled and unlabeled aerosol generated by FUV photochemistry of gas mixtures containing 0.1% of either CH4 or 13CH 4 in N2. In this method, the differences in the positions of ion groups in the resulting spectra are used to estimate the mass fraction of carbon in the aerosol, and estimation of the remaining elements follows. Analysis of the UMR data yields an elemental composition of 63+/-7% C, 8+/-1% H, and 29+/-7% N by mass. Unlabeled aerosols formed under the same conditions are found by the HR-ToF-AMS to have an elemental composition of 63+/-3% C, 8+/-1% H, 20+/-4% N, and 9+/-3% O by mass, in good agreement with the UMR method. This favorable comparison verifies the method, which expands the UMR mass spectrometry toolkit. Chemical mechanisms posited to explain the aerosol-forming chemistry treat CH4 as carbon source in these hazes and treat CO2 as a source of oxygen only. We have generated early Earth aerosol analogs in the laboratory by FUV irradiation of gas mixtures containing isotopically-labeled permutations of 1,000 ppmv unlabeled and 13C-labeled CH 4 and CO2 in N2. Products in the particle phase were analyzed by the Q-AMS and the HR-ToF-AMS. Results indicate that CH 4 can account for 100% of the total carbon contained in the hazes. These results have implications for the geochemical interpretations of inclusions found in Archaean rocks on Earth, and for the astrobiological potential of other planetary atmospheres.

  2. Insulin receptor substrate-1 involvement in epidermal growth factor receptor and insulin-like growth factor receptor signalling: implication for Gefitinib ('Iressa') response and resistance.

    PubMed

    Knowlden, Janice M; Jones, Helen E; Barrow, Denise; Gee, Julia M W; Nicholson, Robert I; Hutcheson, Iain R

    2008-09-01

    Classically the insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) is an essential component of insulin-like growth factor type 1 receptor (IGF-IR) signalling, providing an interface between the receptor and key downstream signalling cascades. Here, however, we show that in tamoxifen-resistant MCF-7 (Tam-R) breast cancer cells, that are highly dependent on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) for growth, IRS-1 can interact with EGFR and be preferentially phosphorylated on tyrosine (Y) 896, a Grb2 binding site. Indeed, phosphorylation of this site is greatly enhanced by exposure of these cells, and other EGFR-positive cell lines, to EGF. Importantly, while IGF-II promotes phosphorylation of IRS-1 on Y612, a PI3-K recruitment site, it has limited effect on Y896 phosphorylation in Tam-R cells. Furthermore, EGF and IGF-II co-treatment, reduces the ability of IGF-II to phosphorylate Y612, whilst maintaining Y896 phosphorylation, suggesting that the EGFR is the dominant recruiter of IRS-1 in this cell line. Significantly, challenge of Tam-R cells with the EGFR-selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor gefitinib, for 7 days, reduces IRS-1/EGFR association and IRS-1 Y896 phosphorylation, while promoting IRS-1/IGF-IR association and IRS-1 Y612 phosphorylation. Furthermore, gefitinib significantly enhances IGF-II-mediated phosphorylation of IRS-1 Y612 and AKT in Tam-R cells. Importantly, induction of this pathway by gefitinib can be abrogated by inhibition/downregulation of the IGF-IR. Our data would therefore suggest a novel association exists between the EGFR and IRS-1 in several EGFR-positive cancer cell lines. This association acts to promote phosphorylation of IRS-1 at Y896 and drive MAPK signalling whilst preventing recruitment of IRS-1 by the IGF-IR and inhibiting signalling via this receptor. Treatment with gefitinib alters the dynamics of this system, promoting IGF-IR signalling, the dominant gefitinib-resistant growth regulatory pathway in Tam-R cells, thus, potentially limiting

  3. Redox-based epigenetic status in drug addiction: a potential contributor to gene priming and a mechanistic rationale for metabolic intervention

    PubMed Central

    Trivedi, Malav S.; Deth, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol and other drugs of abuse, including psychostimulants and opioids, can induce epigenetic changes: a contributing factor for drug addiction, tolerance, and associated withdrawal symptoms. DNA methylation is a major epigenetic mechanism and it is one of more than 200 methylation reactions supported by methyl donor S-adenosylmethionine (SAM). Levels of SAM are controlled by cellular redox status via the folate and vitamin B12-dependent enzyme methionine synthase (MS). For example, under oxidative conditions MS is inhibited, diverting its substrate homocysteine (HCY) to the trans sulfuration pathway. Alcohol, dopamine, and morphine, can alter intracellular levels of glutathione (GSH)-based cellular redox status, subsequently affecting SAM levels and DNA methylation status. Here, existing evidence is presented in a coherent manner to propose a novel hypothesis implicating the involvement of redox-based epigenetic changes in drug addiction. Further, we discuss how a “gene priming” phenomenon can contribute to the maintenance of redox and methylation status homeostasis under various stimuli including drugs of abuse. Additionally, a new mechanistic rationale for the use of metabolic interventions/redox-replenishers as symptomatic treatment of alcohol and other drug addiction and associated withdrawal symptoms is also provided. Hence, the current review article strengthens the hypothesis that neuronal metabolism has a critical bidirectional coupling with epigenetic changes in drug addiction exemplified by the link between redox-based metabolic changes and resultant epigenetic consequences under the effect of drugs of abuse. PMID:25657617

  4. Risk Factors for Invasive Mold Infections and Implications for Choice of Prophylaxis after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Blennow, Ola; Remberger, Mats; Törlén, Johan; Szakos, Attila; Ljungman, Per; Mattsson, Jonas

    2016-09-01

    Invasive mold infections (IMIs) are major complications after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) with high mortality. We retrospectively investigated incidence and risk factors for IMI after 797 HSCTs in a center with high autopsy frequency, trying to identify patient groups that would potentially benefit from mold-active prophylaxis. The cumulative 1-year incidence of IMI was 2.1% in patients aged 21 to 40, 7.1% in patients aged 41 to 60, and 16.4% in patients > 60 years of age (P < .01 for patients aged 21 to 40 versus 41 to 60, P < .001 for patients aged 21 to 40 versus patients > 60). Risk factors for a new IMI in multivariate analysis were older age, grades II to IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) (risk hazard, 4.1; 95% CI, 1.9 to 8.8; P < .001), treatment with mesenchymal stromal cells (risk hazard, 4.0; 95% CI, 2.1 to 7.8; P < .001), transplantation with female donor to male recipient (risk hazard, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.1 to 4.3; P = .02), and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation-specific comorbidity index over 5 (risk hazard, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.1 to 6.8; P = .03). In patients with grade II acute GVHD, no IMI was seen after onset of acute GVHD in 109 HSCTs performed in patients < 40 years of age, as compared with 14 IMIs in 97 HSCTs (14%) performed in patients > 40 years of age (P < .001). To conclude, older age is an important risk factor for developing IMIs, and patients < 40 years of age with grade II acute GVHD do not appear to need mold-active prophylaxis unless receiving prolonged treatment with corticosteroids. PMID:27311967

  5. Soluble and pelletable factors in porcine, canine and human notochordal cell-conditioned medium: implications for IVD regeneration.

    PubMed

    Bach, F C; de Vries, S A; Riemers, F M; Boere, J; van Heel, F W; van Doeselaar, M; Goerdaya, S S; Nikkels, P G; Benz, K; Creemers, L B; Maarten Altelaar, A F; Meij, B P; Ito, K; Tryfonidou, M A

    2016-01-01

    During intervertebral disc (IVD) maturation, notochordal cells (NCs) are replaced by chondrocyte-like cells (CLCs) in the nucleus pulposus, suggesting that NCs play a role in maintaining tissue health. Affirmatively, NC-conditioned medium (NCCM) exerts regenerative effects on CLC proliferation and extracellular matrix (ECM) production. The aim of this study was to identify NC-secreted substances that stimulate IVD regeneration. By mass spectrometry of porcine, canine and human NCCM, 149, 170 and 217 proteins were identified, respectively, with 66 proteins in common. Mainly ECM-related proteins were identified, but also organelle-derived and membrane-bound vesicle proteins. To determine whether the effect of NCCM was mediated by soluble and/or pelletable factors, porcine and canine NCCM were separated into a soluble (NCCM-S; peptides and proteins) and pelletable (NCCM-P; protein aggregates and extracellular vesicles) fraction by ultracentrifugation, and tested on bovine and canine CLCs in vitro, respectively. In each model, NCCM-S exerted a more pronounced anabolic effect than NCCM-P. However, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) uptake from the medium into the carrier gel prevented more definite conclusions. While the effect of porcine NCCM-P on bovine CLCs was negligible, canine NCCM-P appeared to enhance GAG and collagen type II deposition by canine CLCs. In conclusion, porcine and canine NCCM exerted their anabolic effects mainly through soluble factors, but also the pelletable NCCM factors showed moderate regenerative potential. Although the regenerative potential of NCCM-P should not be overlooked, future studies should focus on unraveling the protein-based regenerative mechanism from NCCM produced from isolated NCs, e.g. by NCCM fractionation and pathway blocking studies. PMID:27572543

  6. Dengue Vector Dynamics (Aedes aegypti) Influenced by Climate and Social Factors in Ecuador: Implications for Targeted Control

    PubMed Central

    Stewart Ibarra, Anna M.; Ryan, Sadie J.; Beltrán, Efrain; Mejía, Raúl; Silva, Mercy; Muñoz, Ángel

    2013-01-01

    Background Dengue fever, a mosquito-borne viral disease, is now the fastest spreading tropical disease globally. Previous studies indicate that climate and human behavior interact to influence dengue virus and vector (Aedes aegypti) population dynamics; however, the relative effects of these variables depends on local ecology and social context. We investigated the roles of climate and socio-ecological factors on Ae. aegypti population dynamics in Machala, a city in southern coastal Ecuador where dengue is hyper-endemic. Methods/Principal findings We studied two proximate urban localities where we monitored weekly Ae. aegypti oviposition activity (Nov. 2010-June 2011), conducted seasonal pupal surveys, and surveyed household to identify dengue risk factors. The results of this study provide evidence that Ae. aegypti population dynamics are influenced by social risk factors that vary by season and lagged climate variables that vary by locality. Best-fit models to predict the presence of Ae. aegypti pupae included parameters for household water storage practices, access to piped water, the number of households per property, condition of the house and patio, and knowledge and perceptions of dengue. Rainfall and minimum temperature were significant predictors of oviposition activity, although the effect of rainfall varied by locality due to differences in types of water storage containers. Conclusions These results indicate the potential to reduce the burden of dengue in this region by conducting focused vector control interventions that target high-risk households and containers in each season and by developing predictive models using climate and non-climate information. These findings provide the region's public health sector with key information for conducting time and location-specific vector control campaigns, and highlight the importance of local socio-ecological studies to understand dengue dynamics. See Text S1 for an executive summary in Spanish. PMID:24324542

  7. The roles of the classical and alternative nuclear factor-kappaB pathways: potential implications for autoimmunity and rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Keith D; Claudio, Estefania; Siebenlist, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) is an inducible transcription factor controlled by two principal signaling cascades, each activated by a set of signal ligands: the classical/canonical NF-κB activation pathway and the alternative/noncanonical pathway. The former pathway proceeds via phosphorylation and degradation of inhibitor of NF-κB (IκB) and leads most commonly to activation of the heterodimer RelA/NF-κB1(p50). The latter pathway proceeds via phosphorylation and proteolytic processing of NF-κB2 (p100) and leads to activation, most commonly, of the heterodimer RelB/NF-κB2 (p52). Both pathways play critical roles at multiple levels of the immune system in both health and disease, including the autoimmune inflammatory response. These roles include cell cycle progression, cell survival, adhesion, and inhibition of apoptosis. NF-κB is constitutively activated in many autoimmune diseases, including diabetes type 1, systemic lupus erythematosus, and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In this review we survey recent developments in the involvement of the classical and alternative pathways of NF-κB activation in autoimmunity, focusing particularly on RA. We discuss the involvement of NF-κB in self-reactive T and B lymphocyte development, survival and proliferation, and the maintenance of chronic inflammation due to cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-1, IL-6, and IL-8. We discuss the roles played by IL-17 and T-helper-17 cells in the inflammatory process; in the activation, maturation, and proliferation of RA fibroblast-like synovial cells; and differentiation and activation of osteoclast bone-resorbing activity. The prospects of therapeutic intervention to block activation of the NF-κB signaling pathways in RA are also discussed. PMID:18771589

  8. Risk Factors for Invasive Mold Infections and Implications for Choice of Prophylaxis after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Blennow, Ola; Remberger, Mats; Törlén, Johan; Szakos, Attila; Ljungman, Per; Mattsson, Jonas

    2016-09-01

    Invasive mold infections (IMIs) are major complications after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) with high mortality. We retrospectively investigated incidence and risk factors for IMI after 797 HSCTs in a center with high autopsy frequency, trying to identify patient groups that would potentially benefit from mold-active prophylaxis. The cumulative 1-year incidence of IMI was 2.1% in patients aged 21 to 40, 7.1% in patients aged 41 to 60, and 16.4% in patients > 60 years of age (P < .01 for patients aged 21 to 40 versus 41 to 60, P < .001 for patients aged 21 to 40 versus patients > 60). Risk factors for a new IMI in multivariate analysis were older age, grades II to IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) (risk hazard, 4.1; 95% CI, 1.9 to 8.8; P < .001), treatment with mesenchymal stromal cells (risk hazard, 4.0; 95% CI, 2.1 to 7.8; P < .001), transplantation with female donor to male recipient (risk hazard, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.1 to 4.3; P = .02), and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation-specific comorbidity index over 5 (risk hazard, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.1 to 6.8; P = .03). In patients with grade II acute GVHD, no IMI was seen after onset of acute GVHD in 109 HSCTs performed in patients < 40 years of age, as compared with 14 IMIs in 97 HSCTs (14%) performed in patients > 40 years of age (P < .001). To conclude, older age is an important risk factor for developing IMIs, and patients < 40 years of age with grade II acute GVHD do not appear to need mold-active prophylaxis unless receiving prolonged treatment with corticosteroids.

  9. Factors Predicting Bereaved Caregiver Perception of Quality of Care in the Final Week of Life: Implications for Health Care Providers

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Philip C.; Garrido, Melissa M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Cancer caregivers are key stakeholders in the final weeks of life and in bereavement. Research has highlighted end-of-life (EOL) factors important to caregivers, as well as factors contributing to caregiver mental health and bereavement outcomes. There has been limited data on factors predicting caregiver perceptions of quality of EOL care. Objective: This study's purpose was to identify modifiable predictors of caregivers' Caregiver Evaluation of Quality of End of Life Care (CEQUEL) scores, with the broader aim of informing clinical interventions to improve caregiver impressions of care and subsequent bereavement adjustment. Methods: Study data came from Coping with Cancer I (CwC1). CwC1 investigators interviewed advanced cancer patients and caregivers prior to the patient's death (Wave 1) and reinterviewed caregivers following the death (Wave 2) (N=275 dyads). The authors identified potential Wave 1 predictors of CEQUEL scores and performed a series of linear regression analyses to identify a parsimonious predictive model using corrected Akaike's Information Criterion (AICc) values. Results: In adjusted analyses, caregivers rated quality of care as poorer when patients died in a hospital (B=−1.40, SE=0.40, p=0.001) (B, unstandardized regression coefficient; SE, standard error) or had less than one week of inpatient hospice care (B=−1.98, SE=−0.70, p=0.006). Whole-person physician care and caregiver religiosity were associated with perceived higher quality of care in unadjusted, but not adjusted, analyses. Conclusions: Findings suggest that place of death and hospice length of stay best predict bereaved caregiver evaluations of quality of EOL care. These findings equip health care providers with modifiable targets to improve caregivers' experience of EOL care and subsequent bereavement. PMID:26186021

  10. Climatic, tectonic, and biological factors affecting the oxidation state of the atmosphere and oceans: Implications for Phanerozoic O2 evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, K.; Tajika, E.

    2015-12-01

    The Earth's atmosphere and oceans have seen fundamental changes in its oxidation state in response to the climatic, tectonic and geochemical variations. Over the past decade, several geochemical proxies have led to significant progress in understanding the paleredox states of ancient oceans. However, a quantitative interpretation of these data for atmospheric O2 levels remain unclear because the relationship between atmospheric O2 levels (pO2) and oceanic redox state depends on several environmental factors, such as terrestrial weathering rate, sea-level stands, and sinking rate of particulate organic matter (POM) in the water column and so on. It is widely thought that the redox-dependent P cycling also plays a crucial role in regulating pO2 because it acts as a negative feedback on a geological timescale. It is important that strength of this feedback for a given pO2 is also modulated by environmental factors, affecting not only O2 levels at steady state but also its susceptibility to environmental changes. In this study, a quantitative role of environmental factors in the oxidation state of Earth's surface environment is evaluated with an oceanic biogeochemical cycle model (CANOPS) coupled with global C cycle model, which enables us to understand the ancient CO2 and O2 evolution. Our results demonstrate that atmospheric O2 level at steady state is affected by CO2 input flux from Earth's interior via changes in biogeochemical cycles, but its response is modulated by several internal factors such as shelf area and POM sinking rate. We also found that early Paleozoic atmospheric O2 levels before the advent of land plant would be determined so that oceans may locate at the "edge of anoxia (EoA)" where the redox-dependency of marine P cycle plays a crucial role in regulating O2 cycle, and that POM sinking rate has a great impact on the EoA. Our findings provide insights into the O2 cycle over the Phanerozoic in response to the climatic and tectonic variations and

  11. Personality factors and attitudes toward euthanasia in Iran: implications for end-of-life research and practice.

    PubMed

    Aghababaei, Naser; Wasserman, Jason Adam; Hatami, Javad

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on the relationship of personality and euthanasia attitudes. Results from a survey of 165 Iranian students showed that religiosity, honesty-humility, agreeableness, and extraversion were related to negative attitudes toward euthanasia, whereas openness was related to acceptance of euthanasia, with the unconventionality facet driving this relationship. Moreover, openness explained additional variance when added to a multivariate model containing religiosity and HEXACO factors. This study illustrates the possibility of accounting for variation beyond the traditional group level predictors of attitudes toward euthanasia and promoting future cross-cultural studies into personality and end-of-life issues and informing end-of-life conversations at the bedside.

  12. Basic fibroblast growth factor in human rhabdomyosarcoma cells: implications for the proliferation and neovascularization of myoblast-derived tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Schweigerer, L.; Neufeld, G.; Mergia, A.; Abraham, J.A.; Fiddes, J.C.; Gospodarowicz, D.

    1987-02-01

    Cultured human embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma cells express the basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) gene and they produced bFGF, which is apparently composed of two microheterogenous forms with M/sub r/s of 16,500 and 17,200, respectively. bFGF was purified by radioreceptor binding assays or cross-linking experiments. bFGF derived from the rhabdomyosarcoma cells stimulates their own proliferation and that of human or bovine vascular endothelial cells. It is conceivable that the rhabdomyosarcoma-derived bFGF stimulates the growth and neovascularization of human rhabdomyosarcomas and that it may thereby contribute to the development of these tumors.

  13. The zinc finger transcription factor Gfi1, implicated in lymphomagenesis, is required for inner ear hair cell differentiation and survival

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallis, Deeann; Hamblen, Melanie; Zhou, Yi; Venken, Koen J T.; Schumacher, Armin; Grimes, H. Leighton; Zoghbi, Huda Y.; Orkin, Stuart H.; Bellen, Hugo J.

    2003-01-01

    Gfi1 was first identified as causing interleukin 2-independent growth in T cells and lymphomagenesis in mice. Much work has shown that Gfi1 and Gfi1b, a second mouse homolog, play pivotal roles in blood cell lineage differentiation. However, neither Gfi1 nor Gfi1b has been implicated in nervous system development, even though their invertebrate homologues, senseless in Drosophila and pag-3 in C. elegans are expressed and required in the nervous system. We show that Gfi1 mRNA is expressed in many areas that give rise to neuronal cells during embryonic development in mouse, and that Gfi1 protein has a more restricted expression pattern. By E12.5 Gfi1 mRNA is expressed in both the CNS and PNS as well as in many sensory epithelia including the developing inner ear epithelia. At later developmental stages, Gfi1 expression in the ear is refined to the hair cells and neurons throughout the inner ear. Gfi1 protein is expressed in a more restricted pattern in specialized sensory cells of the PNS, including the eye, presumptive Merkel cells, the lung and hair cells of the inner ear. Gfi1 mutant mice display behavioral defects that are consistent with inner ear anomalies, as they are ataxic, circle, display head tilting behavior and do not respond to noise. They have a unique inner ear phenotype in that the vestibular and cochlear hair cells are differentially affected. Although Gfi1-deficient mice initially specify inner ear hair cells, these hair cells are disorganized in both the vestibule and cochlea. The outer hair cells of the cochlea are improperly innervated and express neuronal markers that are not normally expressed in these cells. Furthermore, Gfi1 mutant mice lose all cochlear hair cells just prior to and soon after birth through apoptosis. Finally, by five months of age there is also a dramatic reduction in the number of cochlear neurons. Hence, Gfi1 is expressed in the developing nervous system, is required for inner ear hair cell differentiation, and its loss

  14. Capsid-binding retrovirus restriction factors: discovery, restriction specificity and implications for the development of novel therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Sanz-Ramos, Marta; Stoye, Jonathan P

    2013-12-01

    The development of drugs against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection has been highly successful, and numerous combinational treatments are currently available. However, the risk of the emergence of resistance and the toxic effects associated with prolonged use of antiretroviral therapies have emphasized the need to consider alternative approaches. One possible area of investigation is provided by the properties of restriction factors, cellular proteins that protect organisms against retroviral infection. Many show potent viral inhibition. Here, we describe the discovery, properties and possible therapeutic uses of the group of restriction factors known to interact with the capsid core of incoming retroviruses. This group comprises Fv1, TRIM5α and TRIMCypA: proteins that all act shortly after virus entry into the target cell and block virus replication at different stages prior to integration of viral DNA into the host chromosome. They have different origins and specificities, but share general structural features required for restriction, with an N-terminal multimerization domain and a C-terminal capsid-binding domain. Their overall efficacy makes it reasonable to ask whether they might provide a framework for developing novel antiretroviral strategies.

  15. Comparative Genomics of NAC Transcriptional Factors in Angiosperms: Implications for the Adaptation and Diversification of Flowering Plants.

    PubMed

    Pereira-Santana, Alejandro; Alcaraz, Luis David; Castaño, Enrique; Sanchez-Calderon, Lenin; Sanchez-Teyer, Felipe; Rodriguez-Zapata, Luis

    2015-01-01

    NAC proteins constitute one of the largest groups of plant-specific transcription factors and are known to play essential roles in various developmental processes. They are also important in plant responses to stresses such as drought, soil salinity, cold, and heat, which adversely affect growth. The current knowledge regarding the distribution of NAC proteins in plant lineages comes from relatively small samplings from the available data. In the present study, we broadened the number of plant species containing the NAC family origin and evolution to shed new light on the evolutionary history of this family in angiosperms. A comparative genome analysis was performed on 24 land plant species, and NAC ortholog groups were identified by means of bidirectional BLAST hits. Large NAC gene families are found in those species that have experienced more whole-genome duplication events, pointing to an expansion of the NAC family with divergent functions in flowering plants. A total of 3,187 NAC transcription factors that clustered into six major groups were used in the phylogenetic analysis. Many orthologous groups were found in the monocot and eudicot lineages, but only five orthologous groups were found between P. patens and each representative taxa of flowering plants. These groups were called basal orthologous groups and likely expanded into more recent taxa to cope with their environmental needs. This analysis on the angiosperm NAC family represents an effort to grasp the evolutionary and functional diversity within this gene family while providing a basis for further functional research on vascular plant gene families.

  16. Reproductive Performance of a Declining Forest Passerine in Relation to Environmental and Social Factors: Implications for Species Conservation

    PubMed Central

    Grendelmeier, Alex; Arlettaz, Raphaël; Gerber, Michael; Pasinelli, Gilberto

    2015-01-01

    Identifying factors influencing a species' ecological niche and demography is a prerequisite for species conservation. However, our understanding of the interplay between demographic rates and biotic/abiotic factors is still poor for most species of conservation concern. We evaluated relevance of eight hypotheses relating to timing of breeding, temporal nest exposure, nest concealment, topography, tree structure, predation risk and disturbance, density dependence and weather for explaining variation in reproductive performance of the declining wood warbler Phylloscopus sibilatrix in northern Switzerland. Reproductive performance was monitored with cameras at 136 nests from 2010 to 2012 and was associated to temporal exposure, timing of breeding and concealment of nests. Daily nest survival was positively related to the number of grass and sedge tussocks, nest concealment and nest age. Clutch size and number of fledglings decreased, the later in the season a nest was initiated. Nest survival over an average nesting period of 31 days was 46.9 ± 0.07% (mean ± SE), daily nest survival rate was 0.976 ± 0.002. As for many ground-breeding birds, nest predation was the principal cause of nest failure, accounting for 79% of all nest losses. Conservation measures should aim at increasing the area of relatively homogenous forest stands featuring suitable habitats characterized by abundant and accessible grass and sedge tussocks. In managed forests, such conditions can be found in stands of middle age (i.e. pole wood) with little to no shrub layer. PMID:26172954

  17. A review of factors affecting productivity of bald eagles in the Great Lakes region: implications for recovery.

    PubMed Central

    Bowerman, W W; Giesy, J P; Best, D A; Kramer, V J

    1995-01-01

    The bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) population in North America declined greatly after World War II due primarily to the eggshell thinning effects of p,p'-DDE, a biodegradation product of DDT. After the banning of DDT in the United States and Canada during the early 1970s, the bald eagle population started to increase. However, this population recovery has not been uniform. Eagles nesting along the shorelines of the North American Great Lakes and rivers open to spawning runs of anadromous fishes from the Great Lakes still exhibit impaired reproduction. We have explored both ecological and toxicological factors that would limit reproduction of bald eagles in the Great Lakes region. Based on our studies, the most critical factors influencing eagle populations are concentrations of environmental toxicants. While there might be some continuing effects of DDE, total PCBs and most importantly 2,3,7,8-tetrachlordibenzo-p-dioxin equivalents (TCDD-EQ) in fishes from the Great Lakes and rivers open to spawning runs of anadromous fishes from the Great Lakes currently represent a significant hazard to bald eagles living along these shorelines or near these rivers and are most likely related to the impaired reproduction in bald eagles living there. PMID:7556024

  18. Expression of Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 5A and Hypusine Forming Enzymes in Glioblastoma Patient Samples: Implications for New Targeted Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Preukschas, Michael; Hagel, Christian; Schulte, Alexander; Weber, Kristoffer; Lamszus, Katrin; Sievert, Henning; Pällmann, Nora; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Hauber, Joachim; Braig, Melanie; Balabanov, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastomas are highly aggressive brain tumors of adults with poor clinical outcome. Despite a broad range of new and more specific treatment strategies, therapy of glioblastomas remains challenging and tumors relapse in all cases. Recent work demonstrated that the posttranslational hypusine modification of the eukaryotic initiation factor 5A (eIF-5A) is a crucial regulator of cell proliferation, differentiation and an important factor in tumor formation, progression and maintenance. Here we report that eIF-5A as well as the hypusine-forming enzymes deoxyhypusine synthase (DHS) and deoxyhypusine hydroxylase (DOHH) are highly overexpressed in glioblastoma patient samples. Importantly, targeting eIF-5A and its hypusine modification with GC7, a specific DHS-inhibitor, showed a strong antiproliferative effect in glioblastoma cell lines in vitro, while normal human astrocytes were not affected. Furthermore, we identified p53 dependent premature senescence, a permanent cell cycle arrest, as the primary outcome in U87-MG cells after treatment with GC7. Strikingly, combined treatment with clinically relevant alkylating agents and GC7 had an additive antiproliferative effect in glioblastoma cell lines. In addition, stable knockdown of eIF-5A and DHS by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) could mimic the antiproliferative effects of GC7. These findings suggest that pharmacological inhibition of eIF-5A may represent a novel concept to treat glioblastomas and may help to substantially improve the clinical course of this tumor entity. PMID:22927971

  19. A review of factors affecting productivity of bald eagles in the Great Lakes region: implications for recovery.

    PubMed

    Bowerman, W W; Giesy, J P; Best, D A; Kramer, V J

    1995-05-01

    The bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) population in North America declined greatly after World War II due primarily to the eggshell thinning effects of p,p'-DDE, a biodegradation product of DDT. After the banning of DDT in the United States and Canada during the early 1970s, the bald eagle population started to increase. However, this population recovery has not been uniform. Eagles nesting along the shorelines of the North American Great Lakes and rivers open to spawning runs of anadromous fishes from the Great Lakes still exhibit impaired reproduction. We have explored both ecological and toxicological factors that would limit reproduction of bald eagles in the Great Lakes region. Based on our studies, the most critical factors influencing eagle populations are concentrations of environmental toxicants. While there might be some continuing effects of DDE, total PCBs and most importantly 2,3,7,8-tetrachlordibenzo-p-dioxin equivalents (TCDD-EQ) in fishes from the Great Lakes and rivers open to spawning runs of anadromous fishes from the Great Lakes currently represent a significant hazard to bald eagles living along these shorelines or near these rivers and are most likely related to the impaired reproduction in bald eagles living there.

  20. Characteristic Features and Contributory Factors in Fatal Ciguatera Fish Poisoning--Implications for Prevention and Public Education.

    PubMed

    Chan, Thomas Y K

    2016-04-01

    In this review, the main objective was to describe the characteristic features of fatal ciguatera fish poisoning and identify contributory factors, with a view to promote prevention and public education. Ciguatera-related deaths, although rare, have been reported from the Pacific, Caribbean, and Indian Ocean regions. The clinical features were generally dominated by convulsions and coma, with various focal neurological signs. Several contributory factors could be identified, including consumption of ciguatoxin (CTX)-rich fish parts (viscera and head) in larger amounts, the most ciguatoxic fish species (e.g.,Gymnothorax flavimarginatus) and reef fish collected after storms and individuals' susceptibility. Mass ciguatera fish poisoning with mortalities also occurred when G. flavimarginatus and other ciguatoxic fish species were shared in gatherings and parties. The characteristic features of fatal ciguatera fish poisoning must be recognized early. The public should be repeatedly reminded to avoid eating the most ciguatoxic fish species and the CTX-rich parts of reef fish. To prevent mass poisoning in gatherings and parties, the most ciguatoxic fish species and potentially toxic fish species must be avoided. Particularly after hits by disastrous storms, it is important to monitor the toxicity of reef fish and the incidence rates of ciguatera. PMID:26787145

  1. Reproductive Performance of a Declining Forest Passerine in Relation to Environmental and Social Factors: Implications for Species Conservation.

    PubMed

    Grendelmeier, Alex; Arlettaz, Raphaël; Gerber, Michael; Pasinelli, Gilberto

    2015-01-01

    Identifying factors influencing a species' ecological niche and demography is a prerequisite for species conservation. However, our understanding of the interplay between demographic rates and biotic/abiotic factors is still poor for most species of conservation concern. We evaluated relevance of eight hypotheses relating to timing of breeding, temporal nest exposure, nest concealment, topography, tree structure, predation risk and disturbance, density dependence and weather for explaining variation in reproductive performance of the declining wood warbler Phylloscopus sibilatrix in northern Switzerland. Reproductive performance was monitored with cameras at 136 nests from 2010 to 2012 and was associated to temporal exposure, timing of breeding and concealment of nests. Daily nest survival was positively related to the number of grass and sedge tussocks, nest concealment and nest age. Clutch size and number of fledglings decreased, the later in the season a nest was initiated. Nest survival over an average nesting period of 31 days was 46.9 ± 0.07% (mean ± SE), daily nest survival rate was 0.976 ± 0.002. As for many ground-breeding birds, nest predation was the principal cause of nest failure, accounting for 79% of all nest losses. Conservation measures should aim at increasing the area of relatively homogenous forest stands featuring suitable habitats characterized by abundant and accessible grass and sedge tussocks. In managed forests, such conditions can be found in stands of middle age (i.e. pole wood) with little to no shrub layer.

  2. Pathophysiological roles of microvascular alterations in pulmonary inflammatory diseases: possible implications of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and CXC chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Orihara, Kanami; Matsuda, Akio

    2008-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and bronchial asthma are common respiratory diseases that are caused by chronic inflammation of the airways. Although these diseases are mediated by substantially distinct immunological reactions, especially in mild cases, they both show increased numbers of neutrophils, increased production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and poor responses to corticosteroids, particularly in patients with severe diseases. These immunological alterations may contribute strongly to airway structural changes, commonly referred to as airway remodeling. Microvascular alterations, a component of airway remodeling and caused by chronic inflammation, are observed and appear to be clinically involved in both diseases. It has been well established that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays important roles in the airway microvascular alterations in mild and moderate cases of both diseases, but any role that VEGF might play in severe cases of these diseases remains unclear. Here, we review recent research findings, including our own data, and discuss the possibility that TNF-α and its associated CXC chemokines play roles in microvascular alterations that are even more crucial than those of VEGF in patients with severe COPD or asthma. PMID:19281078

  3. Factors influencing the therapeutic effect of muscle afferent block for oromandibular dystonia and dyskinesia: implications for their distinct pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, K; Kaji, R; Shibasaki, H; Iizuka, T

    2002-10-01

    Oromandibular dystonia (OMD) is a focal dystonia manifested by involuntary masticatory and/or lingual muscle contractions. Muscle afferent block (MAB) by injecting anaesthetic and alcohol intramuscularly is recently used for the treatment of OMD. To study the factors affecting the efficacy of MAB, 44 patients with OMD were treated by local injection of lidocaine and ethanol. They were divided into four groups (spastic, rhythmic, dyskinetic, and task-specific) according to the pattern of incisal movement and involuntary contraction. We used a clinical scaling protocol in terms of four parameters (mastication, speech, pain, and discomfort) to evaluate the change of symptoms objectively. The relationship of improvement in clinical scores with various parameters was assessed statistically. The overall objective improvement was 60.2 +/- 29.5%. The scores decreased significantly (P<0.0001, paired t-test) after MAB. The maximal incisal velocity significantly correlated inversely with the clinical improvement, and MAB was particularly effective for spastic contraction. Dyskinetic and rhythmic groups showed variable and significantly less improvements than the spastic group. MAB is highly effective for OMD, but not for the patients with dyskinetic symptoms. The jaw movement pattern is an important factor for predicting the outcome. The difference in the response to MAB in OMD and oral and/or orofacial dyskinesia suggests the distinct pathophysiology between the two.

  4. Methanosarcina acetivorans 16S rRNA and transcription factor nucleotide fluctuation with implications in exobiology and pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, Todd; Tremberger, G., Jr.; Cheung, E.; Subramaniam, R.; Sullivan, R.; Schneider, P.; Flamholz, A.; Marchese, P.; Hiciano, O.; Yao, H.; Lieberman, D.; Cheung, T.

    2008-08-01

    Cultures of the methane-producing archaea Methanosarcina, have recently been isolated from Alaskan sediments. It has been proposed that methanogens are strong candidates for exobiological life in extreme conditions. The spatial environmental gradients, such as those associated with the polygons on Mars' surface, could have been produced by past methanogenesis activity. The 16S rRNA gene has been used routinely to classify phenotypes. Using the fractal dimension of nucleotide fluctuation, a comparative study of the 16S rRNA nucleotide fluctuation in Methanosarcina acetivorans C2A, Deinococcus radiodurans, and E. coli was conducted. The results suggest that Methanosarcina acetivorans has the lowest fractal dimension, consistent with its ancestral position in evolution. Variation in fluctuation complexity was also detected in the transcription factors. The transcription factor B (TFB) was found to have a higher fractal dimension as compared to transcription factor E (TFE), consistent with the fact that a single TFB in Methanosarcina acetivorans can code three different TATA box proteins. The average nucleotide pair-wise free energy of the DNA repair genes was found to be highest for Methanosarcina acetivorans, suggesting a relatively weak bonding, which is consistent with its low prevalence in pathology. Multitasking capacity comparison of type-I and type-II topoisomerases has been shown to correlate with fractal dimension using the methicillin-resistant strain MRSA 252. The analysis suggests that gene adaptation in a changing chemical environment can be measured in terms of bioinformatics. Given that the radiation resistant Deinococcus radiodurans is a strong candidate for an extraterrestrial origin and that the cold temperature Psychrobacter cryohalolentis K5 can function in Siberian permafrost, the fractal dimension comparison in this study suggests that a chemical resistant methanogen could exist in extremely cold conditions (such as that which existed on early

  5. MicroRNA profiling implicates the insulin-like growth factor pathway in bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a disease characterized by alveolar epithelial cell injury, inflammatory cell infiltration and deposition of extracellular matrix in lung tissue. As mouse models of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis display many of the same phenotypes observed in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, they have been used to study various aspects of the disease, including altered expression of microRNAs. Results In this work, microRNA expression profiling of the lungs from treated C57BL/6J mice, relative to that of untreated controls, was undertaken to determine which alterations in microRNAs could in part regulate the fibrosis phenotype induced by bleomycin delivered through mini-osmotic pumps. We identified 11 microRNAs, including miR-21 and miR-34a, to be significantly differentially expressed (P < 0.01) in lungs of bleomycin treated mice and confirmed these data with real time PCR measurements. In situ hybridization of both miR-21 and miR-34a indicated that they were expressed in alveolar macrophages. Using a previously reported gene expression profile, we identified 195 genes to be both predicted targets of the 11 microRNAs and of altered expression in bleomycin-induced lung disease of C57BL/6J mice. Pathway analysis with these 195 genes indicated that altered microRNA expression may be associated with hepatocyte growth factor signaling, cholecystokinin/gastrin-mediated signaling, and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) signaling, among others, in fibrotic lung disease. The relevance of the IGF-1 pathway in this model was then demonstrated by showing lung tissue of bleomycin treated C57BL/6J mice had increased expression of Igf1 and that increased numbers of Igf-1 positive cells, predominantly in macrophages, were detected in the lungs. Conclusions We conclude that altered microRNA expression in macrophages is a feature which putatively influences the insulin-like growth factor signaling component of bleomycin

  6. Environmental factors and management practices controlling oxygen dynamics in agricultural irrigation ponds in a semiarid Mediterranean region: implications for pond agricultural functions.

    PubMed

    Bonachela, Santiago; Acuña, Rodrigo A; Casas, Jesús

    2007-03-01

    A water quality study was carried out on 40 irrigation ponds located within the main greenhouse areas on the Almería coast, placing special emphasis on the factors controlling the oxygen dynamics, a relevant aspect with agricultural and environmental implications. Considering chemical, physical and biological water characteristics, agricultural irrigation ponds were satisfactorily classified by cluster analysis in four groups. These were congruently arranged by principal components analysis along four main environmental gradients: trophic status, photosynthetic activity, water mineralisation and presence of submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV). Dissolved oxygen (DO) values differed highly among and within each of the four pond groups. DO dynamics was mainly depended on photosynthetic activity, and the environmental factors and management practices controlling it: seasonal and daily climatic changes, pond management (open vs. covered ponds and presence/absence of aquatic vegetation) and trophic status. Overall, different diurnal DO patterns were found between open and covered ponds. The former usually presented DO values above saturation and increasingly higher from early morning to mid-afternoon due to the photosynthetic activity of algae and macrophytic vegetation. In contrast, covered ponds showed relatively stable DO values during the diurnal period regardless of climatic conditions, with absolute values around or below saturation level. Globally, our results suggest that open ponds, with macrophytes concentrated in the deeper layer, can be an effective and sustainable management method of water oxygen enrichment.

  7. Postpartum von Willebrand factor levels in women with and without von Willebrand disease and implications for prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    James, A H; Konkle, B A; Kouides, P; Ragni, M V; Thames, B; Gupta, S; Sood, S; Fletcher, S K; Philipp, C S

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the fall in von Willebrand factor (VWF) and factor VIII activity (FVIII) after childbirth in women with and without von Willebrand disease (VWD). VWF:RCo, VWF:Ag, and FVIII were obtained in the third trimester of pregnancy, on admission for childbirth, and 10 times postpartum. Specimens were processed within 4 h and analysed centrally. Means were calculated at each time point. Forty women (40 pregnancies) without VWD and 32 women (35 pregnancies) with VWD were enrolled. 15/32 with VWD were treated (30% of those with type 1 and all of those with type 2) in 17 pregnancies. Treatments prior to delivery consisted of desmopressin (2/17), VWF concentrate (15/17) and after delivery VWF concentrate (16/17). Duration of treatment was 0-21 days (median 6). VWF levels peaked at 250% of baseline--4 h postpartum in women with VWD and 12 h postpartum in women without VWD. Thereafter, VWF levels fell rapidly, approached baseline at 1 week and reached baseline at 3 weeks. Except immediately postpartum, when the levels among treated cases were higher, levels among women with VWD appeared to parallel, but were lower than those among women without VWD. Levels were lowest among those who received treatment. VWF levels fall rapidly after childbirth. Except immediately postpartum, current treatment strategies do not raise VWF levels to the levels of women without VWD or even to the levels of women with milder, untreated VWD. Consequently, women with VWD may be at risk of postpartum haemorrhage despite treatment.

  8. Comparative Genomics of NAC Transcriptional Factors in Angiosperms: Implications for the Adaptation and Diversification of Flowering Plants

    PubMed Central

    Pereira-Santana, Alejandro; Alcaraz, Luis David; Castaño, Enrique; Sanchez-Calderon, Lenin; Sanchez-Teyer, Felipe; Rodriguez-Zapata, Luis

    2015-01-01

    NAC proteins constitute one of the largest groups of plant-specific transcription factors and are known to play essential roles in various developmental processes. They are also important in plant responses to stresses such as drought, soil salinity, cold, and heat, which adversely affect growth. The current knowledge regarding the distribution of NAC proteins in plant lineages comes from relatively small samplings from the available data. In the present study, we broadened the number of plant species containing the NAC family origin and evolution to shed new light on the evolutionary history of this family in angiosperms. A comparative genome analysis was performed on 24 land plant species, and NAC ortholog groups were identified by means of bidirectional BLAST hits. Large NAC gene families are found in those species that have experienced more whole-genome duplication events, pointing to an expansion of the NAC family with divergent functions in flowering plants. A total of 3,187 NAC transcription factors that clustered into six major groups were used in the phylogenetic analysis. Many orthologous groups were found in the monocot and eudicot lineages, but only five orthologous groups were found between P. patens and each representative taxa of flowering plants. These groups were called basal orthologous groups and likely expanded into more recent taxa to cope with their environmental needs. This analysis on the angiosperm NAC family represents an effort to grasp the evolutionary and functional diversity within this gene family while providing a basis for further functional research on vascular plant gene families. PMID:26569117

  9. Equilibrium and kinetic Si isotope fractionation factors and their implications on Si isotope distributions in the Earth's surface environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, M.; Zhang, S.; Liu, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Several important equilibrium Si isotope fractionation factors among minerals, organic molecules and the H4SiO4 solution are complemented to facilitate explanation of distributions of Si isotope in the Earth's surface environments. The results reveal that heavy Si isotopes will be significantly enriched in the secondary silicate minerals in comparison to aqueous H4SiO4. On the contrary, quadra-coordinated organosilicon complexes are enriched in light silicon isotope relative to the solution. The extent of 28Si-enrichment in hyper-coordinated organosilicon complexes is found the largest. In addition, the large kinetic isotope effect associated with the polymerization of monosilicic acid and dimer is calculated and the result supports previous statement that highly 28Si-enrichment in the formation of amorphous quartz precursor contributes to the discrepancy between theoretical calculations and field observations. With equilibrium Si isotope fractionation factors provided here, Si isotope distributions in many surface systems of the Earth can be explained. For example, the change of bulk soil δ30Si can be predicted as a concave pattern with respect to weathering degree, with the minimum value where allophane completely dissolves and the total amount of sesqui-oxides and poorly crystalline minerals reaches its maximum. When well-crystallized clays start to precipitate from pore solutions under equilibrium conditions, the bulk soil δ30Si will increase again and reach a constant value. Similarly, the precipitation of crystalline smectite and the dissolution of poorly crystalline kaolinite may explain δ30Si variations in the ground water profile. Equilibrium Si isotope fractionations among quadra-coordinated organosilicon complexes and the H4SiO4 solution may also shed the light on the Si isotope distributions in Si-accumulating plants.

  10. Migration/mobility and risk factors for HIV among female sex workers in Andhra Pradesh, India: implications for HIV prevention.

    PubMed

    Reed, E; Gupta, J; Biradavolu, M; Blankenship, K M

    2012-04-01

    We examined the relation between high mobility/migration (sex work in three or more villages/towns within the past year) and HIV risk factors among a sample of female sex workers (FSWs) in Andhra Pradesh, India. We recruited FSWs aged ≥18 years (n = 673) through respondent-driven sampling for a survey on HIV risk. Adjusted logistic and linear regression models assessed high mobility in relation to sexual and physical victimization, sexually transmitted infection (STI) symptoms and treatment, condom use and negotiation, number and/or types of sex trades, number of clients and number of days worked. Twelve percent (n = 82) of FSWs were highly mobile; those with high mobility were more likely to report recent HIV risk factors: sexual violence (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 5.2; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.0-8.9), physical violence (AOR = 1.7; 95% CI: 1.1-2.7), unprotected sex for more money (AOR = 1.7; 95% CI: 1.1-3.0), at least one STI symptom (AOR = 1.9; 95% CI: 1.1-3.1), a greater number of vaginal sex trades (β = 3.9, P = 0.003), a greater number of clients (β = 2.5, P = 0.02) and anal sex with clients (AOR = 2.4; 95% CI: 1.4-4.1). Findings from this study underscore the violence and HIV-related vulnerability faced by mobile/migrant FSWs and highlight the need to inform and tailor related prevention strategies.

  11. Low-wind and other microclimatic factors in near-road black carbon variability: A case study and assessment implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Marissa S.; Keener, Timothy C.; Birch, M. Eileen; Baldauf, Richard; Neal, Jill; Yang, Y. Jeffrey

    2013-12-01

    Airborne black carbon from urban traffic is a climate forcing agent and has been associated with health risks to near-road populations. In this paper, we describe a case study of black carbon concentration and compositional variability at and near a traffic-laden multi-lane highway in Cincinnati, Ohio, using an onsite aethalometer and filter-based NIOSH Method 5040 measurements; the former measured 1-min average black carbon concentrations and the latter determined the levels of organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC) averaged over an approximately 2-h time interval. The results show significant wind and temperature effects on black carbon concentration and composition in a way more complex than predicted by Gaussian dispersion models. Under oblique low winds, namely ux[=u×sin(θ)]˜ (0, -0.5 m s-1), which mostly occurred during morning hours, black carbon concentrations per unit traffic flow were highest and had large variation. The variability did not always follow Gaussian dispersion but was characteristic of a uniform distribution at a near-road distance. Under all other wind conditions, the near-road black carbon variation met Gaussian dispersion characteristics. Significant differences in roadside dispersion are observed between OC and EC fractions, between PM2.5 and PM10-2.5, and between the morning period and rest of the day. In a general case, the overall black carbon variability at the multi-lane highway can be stated as bimodal consisting of Gaussian dispersion and non-Gaussian uniform distribution. Transition between the two types depends on wind velocity and wind angle to the traffic flow. In the order of decreasing importance, the microclimatic controlling factors over the black carbon variability are: 1) wind velocity and the angle with traffic; 2) diurnal temperature variations due to thermal buoyancy; and 3) downwind Gaussian dispersion. Combinations of these factors may have created various traffic-microclimate interactions that have significant

  12. Seroprevalence and risk factors of brucellosis in goats in selected states in Nigeria and the public health implications

    PubMed Central

    Ogugua, A.J.; Akinseye, V.O.; Ayoola, M.C.; Oyesola, O.O.; Shima, F.K.; Tijjani, A.O.; Musa, Aderemi N. A.; Adesokan, H.K.; Perrett, Lorraine; Taylor, Andrew; Stack, Judy A.; Moriyon, I; Cadmus, S.I.B.

    2015-01-01

    Available reports on brucellosis in Nigeria are largely confined to cattle while it is believed that other ruminants like sheep and goats are equally exposed to the disease. To have an insight into the role of goats in the epidemiology of brucellosis in Nigeria, we conducted a cross-sectional study between June 2011 and May 2013 to determine the seroprevalence of brucellosis in goats in some selected states in Nigeria. Serum samples were collected from goats at different locations and tested for antibodies to Brucella spp using the Rose Bengal Test (RBT), samples positive by RBT were further subjected to Competitive Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (cELISA). Data collected to determine risk factors were also analysed using chi-square and logistics regression statistics. Out of a total of 2827 samples tested from the different states (Benue = 331; Borno =195; Oyo = 2155; Sokoto = 146), we recorded an overall seroprevalence of 2.83% (Benue = 17.30%; Borno = 2.05%; Oyo = 0.60% and Sokoto = 0.00%) by RBT. The cELISA further supported 9.45% (7/74) of the total RBT positive samples. Logistic regression analysis showed that the location (p = 0.004) and source (p < 0.0001); are probable risk factors to be considered in the epidemiology of brucellosis with sex (p = 0.179); age (p = 0.791) and breed (p = 0.369) not playing any major role. Our findings reveal a relatively low seroprevalence of brucellosis among goats screened except for Benue State. Since most of the goats sampled in the present study were from the abattoirs, further farm level investigations are required to determine the role of goats in the epidemiology of brucellosis in Nigeria since they share common environment with sheep and cattle that are natural hosts of Brucella species which are of major public health threat. PMID:26689681

  13. Fundamental principals of tumor necrosis factor-alpha gene therapy approach and implications for patients with lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sanlioglu, Ahter D; Aydin, Cigdem; Bozcuk, Hakan; Terzioglu, Ender; Sanlioglu, Salih

    2004-05-01

    Apoptosis, known as programmed cell death, is defined as a cell's preferred form of death under hectic conditions through genetically conserved and complex pathways. There is a decisive balance between stimulatory and inhibitory signaling pathways to maintain homeostasis in cells. In order to shift the balance towards apoptosis, the modulation of both apoptotic and anti-apoptotic pathways represents an attractive target for cancer therapeutics. Currently, chemotherapy and radiotherapy are among the most commonly used treatment modalities against lung cancer. Tumor suppressor gene, p53, is required in order for both of these treatment methods to work as anti-tumor agents. As a result, tumors lacking p53 display resistance to both chemotherapy and radiotherapy. However, death ligands induce apoptosis regardless of p53 status of cells. Thus, these methods constitute a complementary therapeutic approach to currently employed conventional treatment modalities. At present, death ligands are being evaluated as potential cancer therapeutic agents. Since resistance to tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha-mediated apoptosis represented an obstacle for the treatment of patients with lung carcinoma in the earlier attempts, an extensive research was recently initiated to understand molecular mechanism of TNF-alpha signaling. NF-kappaB transcription factors have been demonstrated to modulate the apoptotic program, mostly as blockers of apoptosis in different cell types. In this review, we concentrate on the current progress in the understanding of TNF-alpha-mediated apoptosis for lung carcinoma. Representative models of NF-kappaB-inhibiting gene therapy strategies from various labs including ours are also provided as examples of up-to-date approaches to defeat TNF resistance. In order to give the reader better understanding and appreciation of such approaches, previously unpublished in vivo assays are also incorporated into this review. Current progress in clinical trials using

  14. Pigment epithelium derived factor suppresses expression of Sost/Sclerostin by osteocytes: implication for its role in bone matrix mineralization.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Song, Na; Tombran-Tink, Joyce; Niyibizi, Christopher

    2015-06-01

    Mutations in Serpinf1 gene which encodes pigment epithelium derived factor (PEDF) lead to osteogenesis imperfecta type VI whose hallmark is defective mineralization. Mechanisms by which PEDF regulates matrix mineralization remain unknown. We examined effect of exogenous PEDF on expression of osteoblastic and osteocytic related genes and proteins in mineralizing osteoblast culture. Mineralizing human osteoblasts supplemented with exogenous PEDF for 14 days deposited 47% more mineral than cells cultured without PEDF. Analysis of selected gene expression by cells in mineralizing cultures supplemented with exogenous PEDF showed reduction in expression of Sclerostin (Sost) by 70%, matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE) by 75% and dentin matrix protein (DMP-1) by 20% at day 14 of culture. Phosphate-regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases on the X chromosome (PHEX) expression was not affected. Western blotting and immunoprecipitation showed that sclerostin and MEPE synthesis by osteocytes were reduced by 50% and 60% respectively in mineralizing osteoblasts containing exogenous PEDF. Primary osteocytes exposed to PEDF also reduced synthesis of Sost/sclerostin by 50% within 24 h. For osteoblastic genes, Bone sialoprotein (BSP) was expressed at 75% higher by day 7 in cultures containing exogenous PEDF while Col1A1 expression remained high at all-time points. Total beta-catenin was increased in mineralizing osteoblastic cells suggesting increased Wnt activity. Taken together, the data indicate that PEDF suppressed expression of factors that inhibit mineralization while enhancing those that promote mineralization. The findings also suggest that PEDF may regulate Sost expression by osteocytes leading to enhanced osteoblastic differentiation and increased matrix mineralization.

  15. Hazard assessment of metals in invasive fish species of the Yamuna River, India in relation to bioaccumulation factor and exposure concentration for human health implications.

    PubMed

    Singh, Atul K; Srivastava, Sharad C; Verma, Pankaj; Ansari, Abubakar; Verma, Ambrish

    2014-06-01

    Monitoring of heavy metals was conducted in the Yamuna River considering bioaccumulation factor, exposure concentration, and human health implications which showed contamination levels of copper (Cu), lead (Pb), nickel (Ni), and chromium (Cr) and their dispersion patterns along the river. Largest concentration of Pb in river water was 392 μg L(-1); Cu was 392 μg L(-1) at the extreme downstream, Allahabad and Ni was 146 μg L(-1) at midstream, Agra. Largest concentration of Cu was 617 μg kg(-1), Ni 1,621 μg kg(-1) at midstream while Pb was 1,214 μg kg(-1) at Allahabad in surface sediment. The bioconcentration of Cu, Pb, Ni, and Cr was observed where the largest accumulation of Pb was 2.29 μg kg(-1) in Oreochromis niloticus and 1.55 μg kg(-1) in Cyprinus carpio invaded at Allahabad while largest concentration of Ni was 174 μg kg(-1) in O. niloticus and 124 μg kg(-1) in C. carpio in the midstream of the river. The calculated values of hazard index (HI) for Pb was found more than one which indicated human health concern. Carcinogenic risk value for Ni was again high i.e., 17.02 × 10(-4) which was larger than all other metals studied. The results of this study indicated bioconcentration in fish due to their exposures to heavy metals from different routes which had human health risk implications. Thus, regular environmental monitoring of heavy metal contamination in fish is advocated for assessing food safety since health risk may be associated with the consumption of fish contaminated through exposure to a degraded environment. PMID:24526612

  16. Hazard assessment of metals in invasive fish species of the Yamuna River, India in relation to bioaccumulation factor and exposure concentration for human health implications.

    PubMed

    Singh, Atul K; Srivastava, Sharad C; Verma, Pankaj; Ansari, Abubakar; Verma, Ambrish

    2014-06-01

    Monitoring of heavy metals was conducted in the Yamuna River considering bioaccumulation factor, exposure concentration, and human health implications which showed contamination levels of copper (Cu), lead (Pb), nickel (Ni), and chromium (Cr) and their dispersion patterns along the river. Largest concentration of Pb in river water was 392 μg L(-1); Cu was 392 μg L(-1) at the extreme downstream, Allahabad and Ni was 146 μg L(-1) at midstream, Agra. Largest concentration of Cu was 617 μg kg(-1), Ni 1,621 μg kg(-1) at midstream while Pb was 1,214 μg kg(-1) at Allahabad in surface sediment. The bioconcentration of Cu, Pb, Ni, and Cr was observed where the largest accumulation of Pb was 2.29 μg kg(-1) in Oreochromis niloticus and 1.55 μg kg(-1) in Cyprinus carpio invaded at Allahabad while largest concentration of Ni was 174 μg kg(-1) in O. niloticus and 124 μg kg(-1) in C. carpio in the midstream of the river. The calculated values of hazard index (HI) for Pb was found more than one which indicated human health concern. Carcinogenic risk value for Ni was again high i.e., 17.02 × 10(-4) which was larger than all other metals studied. The results of this study indicated bioconcentration in fish due to their exposures to heavy metals from different routes which had human health risk implications. Thus, regular environmental monitoring of heavy metal contamination in fish is advocated for assessing food safety since health risk may be associated with the consumption of fish contaminated through exposure to a degraded environment.

  17. Measurements of black and organic carbon emission factors for household coal combustion in China: implication for emission reduction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yingjun; Zhi, Guorui; Feng, Yanli; Liu, Dongyan; Zhang, Gan; Li, Jun; Sheng, Guoying; Fu, Jiamo

    2009-12-15

    Household coal combustion is considered as the greatest emission source for black carbon (BC) and an important source for organic carbon (OC) in China. However, measurements on BC and OC emission factors (EF(BC) and EF(OC)) are still scarce, which result in large uncertainties in emission estimates. In this study, a detailed data set of EF(BC) and EF(OC) for household coal burning was presented on the basis of 38 coal/stove combination experiments. These experiments included 13 coals with a wide coverage of geological maturity which were tested in honeycomb-coal-briquette and raw-coal-chunk forms in three typical coal stoves. Averaged values of EF(BC) are 0.004 and 0.007 g/kg for anthracite in briquette and chunk forms and 0.09 and 3.05 g/kg for bituminous coal, respectively; EF(OC) are 0.06 and 0.10 g/kg for anthracite and 3.74 and 5.50 g/kg for bituminous coal in both forms, respectively. Coal maturity was found to be the most important influencing factor relative to coal's burning forms and the stove's burning efficiency, and when medium-volatile bituminous coals (MVB) are excluded from use, averaged EF(BC) and EF(OC) for bituminous coal decrease by 50% and 30%, respectively. According to these EFs, China's BC and OC emissions from the household sector in 2000 were 94 and 244 gigagrams (Gg), respectively. Compared with previous BC emission estimates for this sector (e.g., 465 Gg by Ohara et al., Atmos. Chem. Phys. 2007, 7, 4419-4444), a dramatic decrease was observed and was mainly attributed to the update of EFs. As suggested by this study, if MVB is prohibited as household fuel together with further promotion of briquettes, BC and OC emissions in this sector will be reduced by 80% and 34%, respectively, and then carbonaceous emissions can be controlled to a large extent in China.

  18. Syringe confiscation as an HIV risk factor: the public health implications of arbitrary policing in Tijuana and Ciudad Juarez, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Beletsky, Leo; Lozada, Remedios; Gaines, Tommi; Abramovitz, Daniela; Staines, Hugo; Vera, Alicia; Rangel, Gudelia; Arredondo, Jaime; Strathdee, Steffanie A

    2013-04-01

    Female sex workers who inject drugs (FSW-IDUs) face elevated risk for HIV/STIs and constitute a key population for public health prevention. Through direct and indirect pathways including human rights violations, policing practices like syringe confiscation can compound FSW-IDU health risk and facilitate the spread of disease. We studied correlates of experiencing syringe confiscation among FSW-IDUs in northern Mexico, where formal policy allows for syringes to be available over the counter without a prescription, but police practices are often at odds with the law. FSW-IDUs reporting recent syringe sharing and unprotected sex with clients in Tijuana and Ciudad Juarez were administered surveys and HIV/STI testing. Logistic regression was used to identify correlates of syringe confiscation. Among 624 respondent FSW-IDUs, prevalence of syringe confiscation in the last 6 months was 48%. The following factors were positively associated with syringe confiscation: testing positive for HIV (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 2.54, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.11-5.80), reporting sexual abuse by police (aOR = 12.76, 95% CI = 6.58-24.72), engaging in groin injection (aOR = 1.84, 95% CI = 1.15-2.93), injecting in public (aOR = 1.64; 95% CI = 1.14-2.36), and obtaining syringes from pharmacies (aOR = 1.54; 95% CI = 1.06-2.23). Higher education level was negatively associated with syringe confiscation (aOR = 0.92, 95% CI = 0.87-0.98) as was frequent injection with clients within the last month (aOR = 0.64, 95% CI = 0.44-0.94). This analysis adds to the body of evidence linking unauthorized law enforcement actions targeting high-risk groups with HIV and other adverse health outcomes. Using a public health lens to conceptualize abuse as a structural risk factor, we advocate for multi-prong prevention, systematic monitoring, and evidence-based intervention response to deleterious police practices.

  19. Measurements of black and organic carbon emission factors for household coal combustion in China: implication for emission reduction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yingjun; Zhi, Guorui; Feng, Yanli; Liu, Dongyan; Zhang, Gan; Li, Jun; Sheng, Guoying; Fu, Jiamo

    2009-12-15

    Household coal combustion is considered as the greatest emission source for black carbon (BC) and an important source for organic carbon (OC) in China. However, measurements on BC and OC emission factors (EF(BC) and EF(OC)) are still scarce, which result in large uncertainties in emission estimates. In this study, a detailed data set of EF(BC) and EF(OC) for household coal burning was presented on the basis of 38 coal/stove combination experiments. These experiments included 13 coals with a wide coverage of geological maturity which were tested in honeycomb-coal-briquette and raw-coal-chunk forms in three typical coal stoves. Averaged values of EF(BC) are 0.004 and 0.007 g/kg for anthracite in briquette and chunk forms and 0.09 and 3.05 g/kg for bituminous coal, respectively; EF(OC) are 0.06 and 0.10 g/kg for anthracite and 3.74 and 5.50 g/kg for bituminous coal in both forms, respectively. Coal maturity was found to be the most important influencing factor relative to coal's burning forms and the stove's burning efficiency, and when medium-volatile bituminous coals (MVB) are excluded from use, averaged EF(BC) and EF(OC) for bituminous coal decrease by 50% and 30%, respectively. According to these EFs, China's BC and OC emissions from the household sector in 2000 were 94 and 244 gigagrams (Gg), respectively. Compared with previous BC emission estimates for this sector (e.g., 465 Gg by Ohara et al., Atmos. Chem. Phys. 2007, 7, 4419-4444), a dramatic decrease was observed and was mainly attributed to the update of EFs. As suggested by this study, if MVB is prohibited as household fuel together with further promotion of briquettes, BC and OC emissions in this sector will be reduced by 80% and 34%, respectively, and then carbonaceous emissions can be controlled to a large extent in China. PMID:20000546

  20. Prognostic implications of p53 protein, epidermal growth factor receptor, and Ki-67 labelling in brain tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Jaros, E.; Perry, R. H.; Adam, L.; Kelly, P. J.; Crawford, P. J.; Kalbag, R. M.; Mendelow, A. D.; Sengupta, R. P.; Pearson, A. D.

    1992-01-01

    The expression of p53 protein, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and Ki-67 nuclear antigen was examined by immunohistochemistry in biopsies of 16 types of human brain tumours, including 43 astrocytomas. P53 protein, almost certainly its mutant form, was expressed in seven of the 16, and EGFR in 11 of the 16 types of tumours. In astrocytomas both the proportion of tumours which expressed p53 or EGFR increased with grade of malignancy as did the mean Ki-67 labelling index (LI): p53-0% in grade 1, 17% in grade 2, 38% in grade 3, 65% in grade 4; EGFR-0% in grade 1, 33% in grade 2, 85% in grade 3, 95% in grade 4; mean Ki-67 L1-1.1% in grades 1 and 2, 8.3% in grade 3, and 13.4% in grade 4. Astrocytomas which expressed p53 or EGFR had a significantly higher Ki-67 LI at P less than 0.05 (11.8% and 10.7%, resp.) than those that did not (6.2% or 4.1%, resp.). Patients with astrocytomas expressing p53 or EGFR had a significantly reduced survival (P = 0.035 and P = 0.007, resp.): only 11% of the p53 + ve and 13% of the EGFR + ve patients were alive at 100 weeks following diagnosis compared to 36% of p53-ve or 60% of EGFR-ve patients. Patients with Ki-67 LI greater than 5% had a reduced survival (P less than 0.0001)--none survived beyond 86 weeks following diagnosis, whilst 63% of patients with less than 5% positive cells were still alive at 100 weeks. The univariate analysis showed that in astrocytomas expression of p53 mutants, EGFR protein, and Ki-67 greater than 5% are associated with malignant progression and poor prognosis. The multivariate analysis revealed that only tumour grade and Ki-67LI were independent prognostic factors for survival. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 9 PMID:1503912

  1. Yin Yang 1 is associated with cancer stem cell transcription factors (SOX2, OCT4, BMI1) and clinical implication.

    PubMed

    Kaufhold, Samantha; Garbán, Hermes; Bonavida, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor Yin Yang 1 (YY1) is frequently overexpressed in cancerous tissues compared to normal tissues and has regulatory roles in cell proliferation, cell viability, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, metastasis and drug/immune resistance. YY1 shares many properties with cancer stem cells (CSCs) that drive tumorigenesis, metastasis and drug resistance and are regulated by overexpression of certain transcription factors, including SOX2, OCT4 (POU5F1), BMI1 and NANOG. Based on these similarities, it was expected that YY1 expression would be associated with SOX2, OCT4, BMI1, and NANOG's expressions and activities. Data mining from the proteomic tissue-based datasets from the Human Protein Atlas were used for protein expression patterns of YY1 and the four CSC markers in 17 types of cancer, including both solid and hematological malignancies. A close association was revealed between the frequency of expressions of YY1 and SOX2 as well as SOX2 and OCT4 in all cancers analyzed. Two types of dynamics were identified based on the nature of their association, namely, inverse or direct, between YY1 and SOX2. These two dynamics define distinctive patterns of BMI1 and OCT4 expressions. The relationship between YY1 and SOX2 expressions as well as the expressions of BMI1 and OCT4 resulted in the classification of four groups of cancers with distinct molecular signatures: (1) Prostate, lung, cervical, endometrial, ovarian and glioma cancers (YY1(lo)SOX2(hi)BMI1(hi)OCT4(hi)) (2) Skin, testis and breast cancers (YY1(hi)SOX2(lo)BMI1(hi)OCT4(hi)) (3) Liver, stomach, renal, pancreatic and urothelial cancers (YY1(lo)SOX2(lo)BMI1(hi)OCT4(hi)) and (4) Colorectal cancer, lymphoma and melanoma (YY1(hi)SOX2(hi)BMI1(lo)OCT4(hi)). A regulatory loop is proposed consisting of the cross-talk between the NF-kB/PI3K/AKT pathways and the downstream inter-regulation of target gene products YY1, OCT4, SOX2 and BMI1. PMID:27225481

  2. Low-wind and other microclimatic factors in near-road black carbon variability: A case study and assessment implications

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Marissa S.; Keener, Timothy C.; Birch, M. Eileen; Baldauf, Richard; Neal, Jill; Yang, Y. Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Airborne black carbon from urban traffic is a climate forcing agent and has been associated with health risks to near-road populations. In this paper, we describe a case study of black carbon concentration and compositional variability at and near a traffic-laden multi-lane highway in Cincinnati, Ohio, using an onsite aethalometer and filter-based NIOSH Method 5040 measurements; the former measured 1-min average black carbon concentrations and the latter determined the levels of organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC) averaged over an approximately 2-h time interval. The results show significant wind and temperature effects on black carbon concentration and composition in a way more complex than predicted by Gaussian dispersion models. Under oblique low winds, namely ux[= u × sin(g=q)]~ (0,−0.5 m s−1), which mostly occurred during morning hours, black carbon concentrations per unit traffic flow were highest and had large variation. The variability did not always follow Gaussian dispersion but was characteristic of a uniform distribution at a near-road distance. Under all other wind conditions, the near-road black carbon variation met Gaussian dispersion characteristics. Significant differences in roadside dispersion are observed between OC and EC fractions, between PM2.5 and PM10–2.5, and between the morning period and rest of the day. In a general case, the overall black carbon variability at the multi-lane highway can be stated as bimodal consisting of Gaussian dispersion and non-Gaussian uniform distribution. Transition between the two types depends on wind velocity and wind angle to the traffic flow. In the order of decreasing importance, the microclimatic controlling factors over the black carbon variability are: 1) wind velocity and the angle with traffic; 2) diurnal temperature variations due to thermal buoyancy; and 3) downwind Gaussian dispersion. Combinations of these factors may have created various traffic–microclimate interactions that have

  3. A dynamic and mechanistic model of PCB bioaccumulation in the European hake ( Merluccius merluccius)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodiguel, Xavier; Maury, Olivier; Mellon-Duval, Capucine; Roupsard, François; Le Guellec, Anne-Marie; Loizeau, Véronique

    2009-08-01

    Bioaccumulation is difficult to document because responses differ among chemical compounds, with environmental conditions, and physiological processes characteristic of each species. We use a mechanistic model, based on the Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) theory, to take into account this complexity and study factors impacting accumulation of organic pollutants in fish through ontogeny. The bioaccumulation model proposed is a comprehensive approach that relates evolution of hake PCB contamination to physiological information about the fish, such as diet, metabolism, reserve and reproduction status. The species studied is the European hake ( Merluccius merluccius, L. 1758). The model is applied to study the total concentration and the lipid normalised concentration of 4 PCB congeners in male and female hakes from the Gulf of Lions (NW Mediterranean sea) and the Bay of Biscay (NE Atlantic ocean). Outputs of the model compare consistently to measurements over the life span of fish. Simulation results clearly demonstrate the relative effects of food contamination, growth and reproduction on the PCB bioaccumulation in hake. The same species living in different habitats and exposed to different PCB prey concentrations exhibit marked difference in the body accumulation of PCBs. At the adult stage, female hakes have a lower PCB concentration compared to males for a given length. We successfully simulated these sex-specific PCB concentrations by considering two mechanisms: a higher energy allocation to growth for females and a transfer of PCBs from the female to its eggs when allocating lipids from reserve to eggs. Finally, by its mechanistic description of physiological processes, the model is relevant for other species and sets the stage for a mechanistic understanding of toxicity and ecological effects of organic contaminants in marine organisms.

  4. Implications of Web of Science journal impact factor for scientific output evaluation in 16 institutions and investigators' opinion.

    PubMed

    Wáng, Yì-Xiáng J; Arora, Richa; Choi, Yongdoo; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Egorov, Vyacheslav I; Frahm, Jens; Kudo, Hiroyuki; Kuyumcu, Suleyman; Laurent, Sophie; Loffroy, Romaric; Maurea, Simone; Morcos, Sameh K; Ni, Yicheng; Oei, Edwin H G; Sabarudin, Akmal; Yu, Xin

    2014-12-01

    Journal based metrics is known not to be ideal for the measurement of the quality of individual researcher's scientific output. In the current report 16 contributors from Hong Kong SAR, India, Korea, Taiwan, Russia, Germany, Japan, Turkey, Belgium, France, Italy, UK, The Netherlands, Malaysia, and USA are invited. The following six questions were asked: (I) is Web of Sciences journal impact factor (IF) and Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) citation the main academic output performance evaluation tool in your institution? and your country? (II) How does Google citation count in your institution? and your country? (III) If paper is published in a non-SCI journal but it is included in PubMed and searchable by Google scholar, how it is valued when compared with a paper published in a journal with an IF? (IV) Do you value to publish a piece of your work in a non-SCI journal as much as a paper published in a journal with an IF? (V) What is your personal view on the metric measurement of scientific output? (VI) Overall, do you think Web of Sciences journal IF is beneficial, or actually it is doing more harm? The results show that IF and ISI citation is heavily affecting the academic life in most of the institutions. Google citation and evaluation, while is being used and convenient and speedy, has not gain wide 'official' recognition as a tool for scientific output evaluation.

  5. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor in arterial baroreceptor pathways: implications for activity-dependent plasticity at baroafferent synapses.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jessica L; Jenkins, Victoria K; Hsieh, Hui-ya; Balkowiec, Agnieszka

    2009-01-01

    Functional characteristics of the arterial baroreceptor reflex change throughout ontogenesis, including perinatal adjustments of the reflex gain and adult resetting during hypertension. However, the cellular mechanisms that underlie these functional changes are not completely understood. Here, we provide evidence that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a neurotrophin with a well-established role in activity-dependent neuronal plasticity, is abundantly expressed in vivo by a large subset of developing and adult rat baroreceptor afferents. Immunoreactivity to BDNF is present in the cell bodies of baroafferent neurons in the nodose ganglion, their central projections in the solitary tract, and terminal-like structures in the lower brainstem nucleus tractus solitarius. Using ELISA in situ combined with electrical field stimulation, we show that native BDNF is released from cultured newborn nodose ganglion neurons in response to patterns that mimic the in vivo activity of baroreceptor afferents. In particular, high-frequency bursting patterns of baroreceptor firing, which are known to evoke plastic changes at baroreceptor synapses, are significantly more effective at releasing BDNF than tonic patterns of the same average frequency. Together, our study indicates that BDNF expressed by first-order baroreceptor neurons is a likely mediator of both developmental and post-developmental modifications at first-order synapses in arterial baroreceptor pathways.

  6. Effects of nuclear factor-kappaB inhibitors and its implication on natural killer T-cell lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kihyun; Ryu, Kyoungju; Ko, Younghyeh; Park, Chaehwa

    2005-10-01

    Natural killer/T-cell lymphoma (NKTL) is a highly aggressive disease. Despite the use of various treatment regimens, the prognosis of NKTL is poor, and new treatment strategies need to be determined. Because of the significant survival potential, nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB has become one of the major targets for drug development. In this study, we explored the effect and action mechanism of NF-kappaB inhibitors, BAY 11-7082 and curcumin, on NKTL cell lines (NKL, NK-92 and HANK1). Electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed that NF-kappaB was constitutively active in HANK1, a chemoresistant cell line. BAY 11-7082 and curcumin suppressed NF-kappaB activation in a time- and dose-dependent manner, which finally resulted in cell death. BAY 11-7082- and curcumin-induced cell death was associated with downregulation of Bcl-xL, cyclin D1, XIAP and c-FLIP, followed by caspase-8, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage and activation. Given that the chemoresistant NK-92 cells respond to NF-kappaB inhibitors but not to conventional drugs, BAY 11-7082 and curcumin could be potentially useful for achieving improved outcome in chemotherapy-refractory NKTL.

  7. Implications of Web of Science journal impact factor for scientific output evaluation in 16 institutions and investigators’ opinion

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Richa; Choi, Yongdoo; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Egorov, Vyacheslav I.; Frahm, Jens; Kudo, Hiroyuki; Kuyumcu, Suleyman; Laurent, Sophie; Loffroy, Romaric; Maurea, Simone; Morcos, Sameh K.; Ni, Yicheng; Oei, Edwin H.G.; Sabarudin, Akmal; Yu, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Journal based metrics is known not to be ideal for the measurement of the quality of individual researcher’s scientific output. In the current report 16 contributors from Hong Kong SAR, India, Korea, Taiwan, Russia, Germany, Japan, Turkey, Belgium, France, Italy, UK, The Netherlands, Malaysia, and USA are invited. The following six questions were asked: (I) is Web of Sciences journal impact factor (IF) and Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) citation the main academic output performance evaluation tool in your institution? and your country? (II) How does Google citation count in your institution? and your country? (III) If paper is published in a non-SCI journal but it is included in PubMed and searchable by Google scholar, how it is valued when compared with a paper published in a journal with an IF? (IV) Do you value to publish a piece of your work in a non-SCI journal as much as a paper published in a journal with an IF? (V) What is your personal view on the metric measurement of scientific output? (VI) Overall, do you think Web of Sciences journal IF is beneficial, or actually it is doing more harm? The results show that IF and ISI citation is heavily affecting the academic life in most of the institutions. Google citation and evaluation, while is being used and convenient and speedy, has not gain wide ‘official’ recognition as a tool for scientific output evaluation. PMID:25525577

  8. Evidence for beta1-adrenergic receptor involvement in amygdalar corticotropin-releasing factor gene expression: implications for cocaine withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Rudoy, Carla A; Reyes, Arith-Ruth S; Van Bockstaele, Elisabeth J

    2009-04-01

    We previously showed that betaxolol, a selective beta(1)-adrenergic receptor antagonist, administered during early phases of cocaine abstinence, ameliorated withdrawal-induced anxiety and blocked increases in amygdalar beta(1)-adrenergic receptor expression in rats. Here, we report the efficacy of betaxolol in reducing increases in gene expression of amygdalar corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), a peptide known to be involved in mediating 'anxiety-like' behaviors during initial phases of cocaine abstinence. We also demonstrate attenuation of an amygdalar beta(1)-adrenergic receptor-mediated cell-signaling pathway following this treatment. Male rats were administered betaxolol at 24 and 44 h following chronic cocaine administration. Animals were euthanized at the 48-h time point and the amygdala was microdissected and processed for quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and/or western blot analysis. Results showed that betaxolol treatment during early cocaine withdrawal attenuated increases in amygdalar CRF gene expression and cyclic adenosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase regulatory and catalytic subunit (nuclear fraction) protein expression. Our data also reveal that beta(1)-adrenergic receptors are on amygdalar neurons, which are immunoreactive for CRF. The present findings suggest that the efficacy of betaxolol treatment on cocaine withdrawal-induced anxiety may be related, in part, to its effect on amygdalar beta(1)-adrenergic receptor, modulation of its downstream cell-signaling elements and CRF gene expression.

  9. Hind limb scaling of kangaroos and wallabies (superfamily Macropodoidea): implications for hopping performance, safety factor and elastic savings.

    PubMed

    McGowan, C P; Skinner, J; Biewener, A A

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine hind limb scaling of the musculoskeletal system in the Macropodoidea, the superfamily containing wallabies and kangaroos, to re-examine the effect of size on the locomotor mechanics and physiology of marsupial hopping. Morphometric musculoskeletal analyses were conducted of 15 species and skeletal specimens of 21 species spanning a size range from 0.8 to 80 kg that included representatives of 12 of the 16 extant genera of macropodoids. We found that unlike other groups, macropodoids are able to match force demands associated with increasing body size primarily through a combination of positive allometry in muscle area and muscle moment arms. Isometric scaling of primary hind limb bones suggests, however, that larger species experience relatively greater bone stresses. Muscle to tendon area ratios of the ankle extensors scale with strong positive allometry, indicating that peak tendon stresses also increase with increasing body size but to a lesser degree than previously reported. Consistent with previous morphological and experimental studies, large macropodoids are therefore better suited for elastic strain energy recovery but operate at lower safety factors, which likely poses an upper limit to body size. Scaling patterns for extant macropodoids suggest that extinct giant kangaroos (approximately 250 kg) were likely limited in locomotor capacity.

  10. Structures of adamalysin II with peptidic inhibitors. Implications for the design of tumor necrosis factor alpha convertase inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Gomis-Rüth, F. X.; Meyer, E. F.; Kress, L. F.; Politi, V.

    1998-01-01

    Crotalus adamanteus snake venom adamalysin II is the structural prototype of the adamalysin or ADAM family comprising proteolytic domains of snake venom metalloproteinases, multimodular mammalian reproductive tract proteins, and tumor necrosis factor alpha convertase, TACE, involved in the release of the inflammatory cytokine, TNFalpha. The structure of adamalysin II in noncovalent complex with two small-molecule right-hand side peptidomimetic inhibitors (Pol 647 and Pol 656) has been solved using X-ray diffraction data up to 2.6 and 2.8 A resolution. The inhibitors bind to the S'-side of the proteinase, inserting between two protein segments, establishing a mixed parallel-antiparallel three-stranded beta-sheet and coordinate the central zinc ion in a bidentate manner via their two C-terminal oxygen atoms. The proteinase-inhibitor complexes are described in detail and are compared with other known structures. An adamalysin-based model of the active site of TACE reveals that these small molecules would probably fit into the active site cleft of this latter metalloproteinase, providing a starting model for the rational design of TACE inhibitors. PMID:9521103

  11. Role of India's wildlife in the emergence and re-emergence of zoonotic pathogens, risk factors and public health implications.

    PubMed

    Singh, B B; Gajadhar, A A

    2014-10-01

    Evolving land use practices have led to an increase in interactions at the human/wildlife interface. The presence and poor knowledge of zoonotic pathogens in India's wildlife and the occurrence of enormous human populations interfacing with, and critically linked to, forest ecosystems warrant attention. Factors such as diverse migratory bird populations, climate change, expanding human population and shrinking wildlife habitats play a significant role in the emergence and re-emergence of zoonotic pathogens from India's wildlife. The introduction of a novel Kyasanur forest disease virus (family flaviviridae) into human populations in 1957 and subsequent occurrence of seasonal outbreaks illustrate the key role that India's wild animals play in the emergence and reemergence of zoonotic pathogens. Other high priority zoonotic diseases of wildlife origin which could affect both livestock and humans include influenza, Nipah, Japanese encephalitis, rabies, plague, leptospirosis, anthrax and leishmaniasis. Continuous monitoring of India's extensively diverse and dispersed wildlife is challenging, but their use as indicators should facilitate efficient and rapid disease-outbreak response across the region and occasionally the globe. Defining and prioritizing research on zoonotic pathogens in wildlife are essential, particularly in a multidisciplinary one-world one-health approach which includes human and veterinary medical studies at the wildlife-livestock-human interfaces. This review indicates that wild animals play an important role in the emergence and re-emergence of zoonotic pathogens and provides brief summaries of the zoonotic diseases that have occurred in wild animals in India.

  12. Ca2+ responses to interleukin 1 and tumor necrosis factor in cultured human skin fibroblasts. Possible implications for Reye syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Corkey, B E; Geschwind, J F; Deeney, J T; Hale, D E; Douglas, S D; Kilpatrick, L

    1991-01-01

    Elevated concentrations of cytokines were found in the plasma of patients acutely ill with Reye syndrome (RS) but not in control subjects or recovered RS patients. To determine whether this disorder involves a genetically determined abnormal response to cytokines, the effects of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and IL-1 on intracellular free Ca2+ were compared in cultured skin fibroblasts from control subjects and patients with RS. IL-1 and TNF caused rapid, transient, and concentration-dependent increases in cytosolic free Ca2+. The peak cytosolic free Ca2+ was greater and occurred at higher concentrations of IL-1 and TNF in patient cells than in cells from age-matched controls. In control cells, the Ca2+ transient diminished sharply with increasing amounts of IL-1 or TNF above the maximum stimulatory concentration. In contrast, in patient fibroblast this bell-shaped curve of concentration dependency was much less apparent. Bradykinin-stimulated Ca2+ transients were similar in the two groups and did not exhibit the bell-shaped concentration dependency. Thus, plasma cytokine levels are elevated in RS patients and the Ca2+ response to cytokines is increased in cells derived from these patients. We propose that the increased response reflects a genetic defect in cytokine receptor-modulated signal transduction. PMID:1847937

  13. Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in public and private wells in New Hampshire: occurrence, factors, and possible implications.

    PubMed

    Ayotte, Joseph D; Argue, Denise M; McGarry, Frederick J; Degnan, James R; Hayes, Laura; Flanagan, Sarah M; Helsel, Dennis R

    2008-02-01

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) concentrations > or = 0.2 /microg/L were found in samples of untreated water in 18% of public-supply wells (n = 284) and 9.1% of private domestic wells (n = 264) sampled in 2005 and 2006 in New Hampshire. In counties that used reformulated gasoline (RFG), MTBE occurred at or above 0.2 microg/L in 30% of public- and 17% of private-supply wells. Additionally, 52% of public-supply wells collocated with fuel storage and 71% of mobile home park wells had MTBE. MTBE occurrence in public-supply wells was predicted by factors such as proximity to sources of fuel, land use, and population density, as well as low pH and distance from mapped lineaments. RFG use, land-use variables, and pH were important predictors of private-well MTBE occurrence. Variables representing sources of MTBE, such as the distance to known fuel sources, were not significant predictors of MTBE occurrence in private-supply wells. It is hypothesized that private wells may become contaminated from the collective effects of sources in high population areas and from undocumented incidental releases from onsite or proximal gasoline use. From 2003 to 2005, MTBE occurrence decreased in 63 public-supply wells and increased in 60 private-supply wells, but neither trend was statistically significant.

  14. Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in public and private wells in New Hampshire: Occurrence, factors, and possible implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ayotte, J.D.; Argue, D.M.; McGarry, F.J.; Degnan, J.R.; Hayes, L.; Flanagan, S.M.; Helsel, D.R.

    2008-01-01

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) concentrations ???0.2 ??g/L were found in samples of untreated water in 18% of public-supply wells (n = 284) and 9.1% of private domestic wells (n = 264) sampled in 2005 and 2006 in New Hampshire. In counties that used reformulated gasoline (RFG), MTBE occurred at or above 0.2 ??g/L in 30% of public- and 17% of private-supply wells. Additionally, 52% of public-supply wells collocated with fuel storage and 71% of mobile home park wells had MTBE. MTBE occurrence in public-supply wells was predicted by factors such as proximity to sources of fuel, land use, and population density, as well as low pH and distance from mapped lineaments. RFG use, land-use variables, and pH were important predictors of private-well MTBE occurrence. Variables representing sources of MTBE, such as the distance to known fuel sources, were not significant predictors of MTBE occurrence in private-supply wells. It is hypothesized that private wells may become contaminated from the collective effects of sources in high population areas and from undocumented incidental releases from onsite or proximal gasoline use. From 2003 to 2005, MTBE occurrence decreased in 63 public-supply wells and increased in 60 private-supply wells, but neither trend was statistically significant. ?? 2008 American Chemical Society.

  15. Modulation of the Bioactive Conformation of Transforming Growth Factor β: Possible Implications of Cation Binding for Biological Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocharov, Eduard V.; Pavlov, Konstantin V.; Blommers, Marcel J. J.; Arvinte, Tudor; Arseniev, Alexander S.

    In any organism, very precisely adjusted interaction and exchange of information between cells is continuously required. These cooperative interactions involve numerous cytokines, acting through corresponding sets of cell-surface receptors. The transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) superfamily includes a variety of structurally related multifunctional cytokines that play critical roles in maintaining cellular homeostasis and controlling cell fate. Response of a cell to a specific signal it receives should depend upon the current state of the environment, including concentrations of biologically relevant ions. One of the most biologically active ions, calcium, acts upon a specific calcium signaling system that operates over a wide temporal range and regulates many cellular processes in continuous “cross-talk” with the TGF-β signaling system. In addition to that, the structural and dynamical properties of TGF-β molecules, along with detected direct interaction of them with the biologically relevant cations suggest another level of fine regulation of TGF-β activity. The fact that both mono- and divalent cations bind in the same low-affinity sites implies that some competition of cations for interaction with TGF-β can also occur in vivo, contributing to the diversity of TGF-β biological functions.

  16. Substance abuse as a risk factor for violence in mental illness: some implications for forensic psychiatric practice and clinical ethics

    PubMed Central

    Pickard, Hanna; Fazel, Seena

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review To review recent research on the relationship between substance abuse, crime, violence and mental illness, and suggest how this research could aid forensic psychiatrists, psychologists and other mental health professionals in assessing and managing risk, and balancing patient care and public protection. Recent findings Substance abuse in mentally ill forensic psychiatric patients should be considered an important risk factor for violence and re-offending. Summary Improved treatment for substance abuse in forensic psychiatric patients and other mentally disordered offenders together with the offer of monitored abstinence as a condition of leave or discharge could be usefully considered as a means of reducing and managing risk. This may improve patient care by addressing mental health needs and increasing opportunity and likelihood of successful re-integration into the community and better life prospects; protect the public by reducing risk of re-offending and offering real time monitoring and potential intervention when risk is heightened; and help forensic psychiatrists strike a balance between patient care and public protection, potentially alleviating some of the difficulty and anxiety that decisions to grant leave or discharge can create. PMID:23722099

  17. Answering evolutionary questions: A guide for mechanistic biologists.

    PubMed

    Masel, Joanna; Promislow, Daniel E L

    2016-07-01

    The questions and methods of molecular biology and evolutionary biology are clearly distinct, yet a unified approach can lead to deep insights. Unfortunately, attempts to unify these approaches are fraught with pitfalls. In this informal series of questions and answers, we offer the mechanistically oriented biologist a set of steps to come up with evolutionarily reasonable and meaningful hypotheses. We emphasize the critical power and importance of carefully constructed null hypotheses, and we illustrate our ideas with examples representing a range of topics, from the biology of aging, to protein structure, to speciation, and more. We also stress the importance of mathematics as the lingua franca for biologists of all stripes, and encourage mechanistic biologists to seek out quantitative collaborators to build explicit mathematical models, making their assumptions explicit, and their logic clear and testable. Biologists in all realms of inquiry stand to gain from strong bridges between our disciplines. PMID:27151396

  18. Mechanistic model for catalytic recombination during aerobraking maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willey, Ronald J.

    1989-01-01

    Several mechanistic models are developed to predict recombination coefficients for use in heat shield design for reusable surface insulation (RSI) on aerobraking vehicles such as space shuttles. The models are applied over a temperature range of 300 to 1800 K and a stagnation pressure range of 0 to 3,000 Pa. A four parameter model in temperature was found to work best; however, several models (including those with atom concentrations at the surface) were also investigated. Mechanistic models developed with atom concentration terms may be applicable when sufficient data becomes available. The requirement is shown for recombination experiments in the 300 to 1000 K and 1500 to 1850 K temperature range, with deliberate concentration variations.

  19. Effects of nerve growth factor antagonist K252a on peritoneal mast cell degranulation: implications for rat postoperative ileus.

    PubMed

    Berdún, Sergio; Rychter, Jakub; Vergara, Patri

    2015-11-15

    Stabilization of mast cell (MC) degranulation has been proposed to prevent postoperative ileus (POI). Nerve growth factor (NGF) mediates MC degranulation. The aim of the study was to evaluate whether NGF receptor antagonist K252a acts as a MC stabilizer in vitro and in vivo model of POI. Peritoneal mast cells (PMCs) were obtained from Sprague-Dawley rats and were incubated with K252a and exposed to NGF or Compound 48/80 (C48/80). MC degranulation was assessed by β-hexosaminidase assay. POI was induced in rats by intestinal manipulation (IM). Rats were pretreated with K252a (100 μg/kg sc) 20 min prior to POI induction. At 20 min after IM, release of rat mast cell protease 6 (RMCP-6) was evaluated in peritoneal lavage. At 24 h, intestinal transit (IT) and gastric emptying (GE) were evaluated. Ileal inflammation was assessed by myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, expression of IL-6, NGF, TrkA, RMCP-2 and 6, and MC density within the full-thickness ileum. C48/80 and NGF evoked degranulation of PMCs in a dose-dependent manner. K252a prevented NGF-evoked, but not C48/80-evoked, MC degranulation. IM evoked the release of peritoneal RMCP-6 and subsequently delayed IT and GE. IM increased MPO activity and expression of IL-6. In IM rats, K252a prevented upregulation of IL-6 expression and reduced TrkA. IT, GE, and inflammation were not affected by K252a. K252a inhibited NGF-evoked degranulation of PMCs in vitro. In vivo, K252a decreased IL-6 and PMC degranulation. This may be of relevance for the development of new therapeutic targets for POI. PMID:26405114

  20. Brown carbon aerosols from burning of boreal peatlands: microphysical properties, emission factors, and implications for direct radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarty, Rajan K.; Gyawali, Madhu; Yatavelli, Reddy L. N.; Pandey, Apoorva; Watts, Adam C.; Knue, Joseph; Chen, Lung-Wen A.; Pattison, Robert R.; Tsibart, Anna; Samburova, Vera; Moosmüller, Hans

    2016-03-01

    The surface air warming over the Arctic has been almost twice as much as the global average in recent decades. In this region, unprecedented amounts of smoldering peat fires have been identified as a major emission source of climate-warming agents. While much is known about greenhouse gas emissions from these fires, there is a knowledge gap on the nature of particulate emissions and their potential role in atmospheric warming. Here, we show that aerosols emitted from burning of Alaskan and Siberian peatlands are predominantly brown carbon (BrC) - a class of visible light-absorbing organic carbon (OC) - with a negligible amount of black carbon content. The mean fuel-based emission factors for OC aerosols ranged from 3.8 to 16.6 g kg-1. Their mass absorption efficiencies were in the range of 0.2-0.8 m2 g-1 at 405 nm (violet) and dropped sharply to 0.03-0.07 m2 g-1 at 532 nm (green), characterized by a mean Ångström exponent of ≈ 9. Electron microscopy images of the particles revealed their morphologies to be either single sphere or agglomerated "tar balls". The shortwave top-of-atmosphere aerosol radiative forcing per unit optical depth under clear-sky conditions was estimated as a function of surface albedo. Only over bright surfaces with albedo greater than 0.6, such as snow cover and low-level clouds, the emitted aerosols could result in a net warming (positive forcing) of the atmosphere.

  1. PLATELET-DERIVED GROWTH FACTOR-C (PDGF-C) ACTIVATION BY SERINE PROTEASES: IMPLICATIONS FOR BREAST CANCER PROGRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Hurst, Newton J.; Najy, Abdo J.; Ustach, Carolyn V.; Movilla, Lisa; Kim, Hyeong-Reh Choi

    2012-01-01

    The PDGF family members are potent mitogens for cells of mesenchymal origin and serve as important regulators of cell migration, survival, apoptosis, and transformation. Tumor-derived PDGF ligands are thought to function in both autocrine and paracrine manners, activating receptors on tumor and surrounding stromal cells. PDGF-C and -D are secreted as latent dimers, unlike PDGF-A and -B. Cleavage of the CUB domain from the PDGF-C and -D dimers is required for their biological activity. At present, little is known about the proteolytic processing of PDGF-C, the rate-limiting step in the regulation of PDGF-C activity. Here we show that the breast carcinoma cell line, MCF7, engineered to overexpress PDGF-C, produces proteases capable of cleaving PDGF-C to its active form. Increased PDGF-C expression enhances cell proliferation, anchorage independent cell growth, and tumor cell motility by autocrine signaling. In addition, MCF7-produced PDGF-C induces fibroblast cell migration in a paracrine manner. Interestingly, PDGF-C enhances tumor cell invasion in the presence of fibroblast, suggesting a role of tumor-derived PDGF-C in tumor-stromal interactions. In the present study, we identify tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and matriptase as major proteases for processing of PDGF-C in MCF7 cells. In in vitro studies, we also show that urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) is able to process PDGF-C. Furthermore, by site-directed mutagenesis, we identify the cleavage site for these proteases in PDGF-C. Lastly, we provide evidence suggesting a 2-step proteolytic processing of PDGF-C involving creation of a hemidimer, followed by growth factor domain dimer (GFD-D) generation. PMID:22035541

  2. Immune-Modulation by Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Inhibitors: Implication on Anti-Tumor Immunity in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Amanda C.; Bernatchez, Chantale; Haymaker, Cara; Molldrem, Jeffrey J.; Hong, Waun Ki; Perez-Soler, Roman

    2016-01-01

    Skin toxicity is the most common toxicity caused by Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) inhibitors, and has been associated with clinical efficacy. As EGFR inhibitors enhance the expression of antigen presenting molecules in affected skin keratinocytes, they may concurrently facilitate neo-antigen presentation in lung cancer tumor cells contributing to anti-tumor immunity. Here, we investigated the modulatory effect of the EGFR inhibitor, erlotinib on antigen presenting molecules and PD-L1, prominent immune checkpoint protein, of skin keratinocytes and lung cancer cell lines to delineate the link between EGFR signaling pathway inhibition and potential anti-tumor immunity. Erlotinib up-regulated MHC-I and MHC-II proteins on IFNγ treated keratinocytes but abrogated IFNγ-induced expression of PD-L1, suggesting the potential role of infiltrating autoreactive T cells in the damage of keratinocytes in affected skin. Interestingly, the surface expression of MHC-I, MHC-II, and PD-L1 was up-regulated in response to IFNγ more often in lung cancer cell lines sensitive to erlotinib, but only expression of PD-L1 was inhibited by erlotinib. Further, erlotinib significantly increased T cell mediated cytotoxicity on lung cancer cells. Lastly, the analysis of gene expression dataset of 186 lung cancer cell lines from Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia demonstrated that overexpression of PD-L1 was associated with sensitivity to erlotinib and higher expression of genes related to antigen presenting pathways and IFNγ signaling pathway. Our findings suggest that the EGFR inhibitors can facilitate anti-tumor adaptive immune responses by breaking tolerance especially in EGFR driven lung cancer that are associated with overexpression of PD-L1 and genes related to antigen presentation and inflammation. PMID:27467256

  3. Immune-Modulation by Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Inhibitors: Implication on Anti-Tumor Immunity in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Im, Jin S; Herrmann, Amanda C; Bernatchez, Chantale; Haymaker, Cara; Molldrem, Jeffrey J; Hong, Waun Ki; Perez-Soler, Roman

    2016-01-01

    Skin toxicity is the most common toxicity caused by Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) inhibitors, and has been associated with clinical efficacy. As EGFR inhibitors enhance the expression of antigen presenting molecules in affected skin keratinocytes, they may concurrently facilitate neo-antigen presentation in lung cancer tumor cells contributing to anti-tumor immunity. Here, we investigated the modulatory effect of the EGFR inhibitor, erlotinib on antigen presenting molecules and PD-L1, prominent immune checkpoint protein, of skin keratinocytes and lung cancer cell lines to delineate the link between EGFR signaling pathway inhibition and potential anti-tumor immunity. Erlotinib up-regulated MHC-I and MHC-II proteins on IFNγ treated keratinocytes but abrogated IFNγ-induced expression of PD-L1, suggesting the potential role of infiltrating autoreactive T cells in the damage of keratinocytes in affected skin. Interestingly, the surface expression of MHC-I, MHC-II, and PD-L1 was up-regulated in response to IFNγ more often in lung cancer cell lines sensitive to erlotinib, but only expression of PD-L1 was inhibited by erlotinib. Further, erlotinib significantly increased T cell mediated cytotoxicity on lung cancer cells. Lastly, the analysis of gene expression dataset of 186 lung cancer cell lines from Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia demonstrated that overexpression of PD-L1 was associated with sensitivity to erlotinib and higher expression of genes related to antigen presenting pathways and IFNγ signaling pathway. Our findings suggest that the EGFR inhibitors can facilitate anti-tumor adaptive immune responses by breaking tolerance especially in EGFR driven lung cancer that are associated with overexpression of PD-L1 and genes related to antigen presentation and inflammation. PMID:27467256

  4. Projecting Future Land Use Changes in West Africa Driven by Climate and Socioeconomic Factors: Uncertainties and Implications for Adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G.; Ahmed, K. F.; You, L.

    2015-12-01

    Land use changes constitute an important regional climate change forcing in West Africa, a region of strong land-atmosphere coupling. At the same time, climate change can be an important driver for land use, although its importance relative to the impact of socio-economic factors may vary significant from region to region. This study compares the contributions of climate change and socioeconomic development to potential future changes of agricultural land use in West Africa and examines various sources of uncertainty using a land use projection model (LandPro) that accounts for the impact of socioeconomic drivers on the demand side and the impact of climate-induced crop yield changes on the supply side. Future crop yield changes were simulated by a process-based crop model driven with future climate projections from a regional climate model, and future changes of food demand is projected using a model for policy analysis of agricultural commodities and trade. The impact of human decision-making on land use was explicitly considered through multiple "what-if" scenarios to examine the range of uncertainties in projecting future land use. Without agricultural intensification, the climate-induced decrease of crop yield together with increase of food demand are found to cause a significant increase in agricultural land use at the expense of forest and grassland by the mid-century, and the resulting land use land cover changes are found to feed back to the regional climate in a way that exacerbates the negative impact of climate on crop yield. Analysis of results from multiple decision-making scenarios suggests that human adaptation characterized by science-informed decision making to minimize land use could be very effective in many parts of the region.

  5. Posttranslational modification of mitochondrial transcription factor A in impaired mitochondria biogenesis: implications in diabetic retinopathy and metabolic memory phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Santos, Julia M; Mishra, Manish; Kowluru, Renu A

    2014-04-01

    Mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) is one of the key regulators of the transcription of mtDNA. In diabetes, despite increase in gene transcripts of TFAM, its protein levels in the mitochondria are decreased and mitochondria copy numbers become subnormal. The aim of this study is to investigate the mechanism(s) responsible for decreased mitochondrial TFAM in diabetes. Using retinal endothelial cells, we have investigated the effect of overexpression of cytosolic chaperone, Hsp70, and TFAM on glucose-induced decrease in mitochondrial TFAM levels, and the transcription of mtDNA-encoded genes, NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6 (ND6) and cytochrome b (Cytb). To investigate the role of posttranslational modifications in subnormal mitochondrial TFAM, ubiquitination of TFAM was assessed, and the results were confirmed in the retina from streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. While overexpression of Hsp70 failed to prevent glucose-induced decrease in mitochondrial TFAM and transcripts of ND6 and Cytb, overexpression of TFAM ameliorated decrease in its mitochondrial protein levels and transcriptional activity. TFAM was ubiquitinated by high glucose, and PYR-41, an inhibitor of ubiquitination, prevented TFAM ubiquitination and restored the transcriptional activity. Similarly, TFAM was ubiquitinated in the retina from diabetic rats, and it continued to be modified after reinstitution of normal glycemia. Our results clearly imply that the ubiquitination of TFAM impedes its transport to the mitochondria resulting in subnormal mtDNA transcription and mitochondria dysfunction, and inhibition of ubiquitination restores mitochondrial homeostasis. Reversal of hyperglycemia does not provide any benefit to TFAM ubiquitination. Thus, strategies targeting posttranslational modification could provide an avenue to preserve mitochondrial homeostasis, and inhibit the development/progression of diabetic retinopathy.

  6. Evaluation of the biological differences of canine and human factor VIII in gene delivery: implications in human hemophilia treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Q; Dong, B; Firrman, J; Wu, W; Roberts, S; Moore, A R; Liu, L S; Chin, M P S; Diao, Y; Kost, J; Xiao, W

    2016-07-01

    The canine is the most important large animal model for testing novel hemophilia A (HA) treatment. It is often necessary to use canine factor VIII (cFIII) gene or protein for the evaluation of HA treatment in the canine model. However, different biological properties between cFVIII and human FVIII (hFVIII) indicated that the development of novel HA treatment may require careful characterization of non-human FVIII. To investigate whether the data obtained using cFVIII can translate to HA treatment in human, we analyzed the differential biological properties of canine heavy chain (cHC) and light chain (cLC) by comparing with human heavy chain (hHC) and light chain (hLC). The secretion of cHC was 5-30-fold higher than hHC, with or without light chains (LCs). cHC+hLC group exhibited ~18-fold increase in coagulation activity compared with hHC+hLC delivery by recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors. Unlike hHC, the secretion of cHC was independent of LCs. cLC improves the specific activity of FVIII by two- to threefold compared with hLC. Moreover, the cLC, but not cHC, contributes to the higher stability of cFVIII. Our results suggested that the cFVIII expression results in the canine model should be interpreted with caution as the cHC secreted more efficiently than hHC and cLC exhibited a more active and stable phenotype than hLC. PMID:27064790

  7. Posttranslational Modification of Mitochondrial Transcription Factor A in Impaired Mitochondria Biogenesis: Implications in Diabetic Retinopathy and Metabolic Memory Phenomenon

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Julia M.; Mishra, Manish; Kowluru, Renu A.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) is one of the key regulators of the transcription of mtDNA. In diabetes, despite increase in gene transcripts of TFAM, its protein levels in the mitochondria are decreased and mitochondria copy numbers become subnormal. The aim of this study is to investigate the mechanism(s) responsible for decreased mitochondrial TFAM in diabetes. Using retinal endothelial cells, we have investigated the effect of overexpression of cytosolic chaperone, Hsp70, and TFAM on glucose-induced decrease in mitochondrial TFAM levels, and the transcription of mtDNA-encoded genes, NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6 (ND6) and cytochrome b (Cytb). To investigate the role of posttranslational modifications in subnormal mitochondrial TFAM, ubiquitination of TFAM was accessed, and the results were confirmed in the retina from streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. While overexpression of Hsp70 failed to prevent glucose-induced decrease in mitochondrial TFAM and transcripts of ND6 and Cytb, overexpression of TFAM ameliorated decrease in its mitochondrial protein levels and transcriptional activity. TFAM was ubiquitinated by high glucose, and PYR-41, an inhibitor of ubiquitination, prevented TFAM ubiquitination and restored the transcriptional activity. Similarly, TFAM was ubiquitinated in the retina from diabetic rats, and it continued to be modified after reinstitution of normal glycemia. Our results clearly imply that the ubiquitination of TFAM impedes its transport to the mitochondria resulting in subnormal mtDNA transcription and mitochondria dysfunction, and inhibition of ubiquitination restores mitochondrial homeostasis. Reversal of hyperglycemia does not provide any benefit to TFAM ubiquitination. Thus, strategies targeting posttranslational modification could provide an avenue to preserve mitochondrial homeostasis, and inhibit the development/progression of diabetic retinopathy. PMID:24607487

  8. An insulin-like growth factor found in hepatopancreas implicates carbohydrate metabolism of the blue crab Callinectes sapidus.

    PubMed

    Chung, J Sook

    2014-04-01

    Hyperglycemia that is caused by the release of crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) from the sinus gland to hemolymph is one of the hallmark physiological phenomena, occurring in decapod crustaceans experiencing stressful conditions. However, the mechanism(s) by which such elevated glucose levels return to resting levels is still unknown. Interestingly, noted is a difference in the clearance rate of hemolymph glucose between adult females and adult males of the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus: the former with more rapid clearance than the latter. The presence of an endogenous-insulin-like molecule is suggested in C. sapidus because an injection of bovine insulin, significantly reduces the levels of hemolymph glucose that were previously elevated by emersion stress or the glucose injection. Using 5' and 3' RACE, the full-length cDNA of an insulin-like molecule is isolated from the hepatopancreas of an adult female C. sapidus and shows the same putative sequence of an insulin-like androgenic gland factor (IAG) but differs in 5' and 3' UTR sequences. A knock-down study using five injections of double-stranded RNA of CasIAG-hep (dsRNA-CasIAG-hep, 10μg/injection) over a 10-day period reduces CasIAG-hep expression by ∼50%. The levels of hemolymph glucose are also kept higher in dsRNA-CasIAG-hep injected group than those treated with dsRNA-green fluorescent protein (dsRNA-IAG-hep) or saline. Most importantly, the hepatopancreas of dsRNA-CasIAG-hep injected animals contains amounts of carbohydrate (glucose, trehalose, and glycogen) significantly lower than those of control groups, indicating that the function of CasIAG-hep in carbohydrate metabolism in crustaceans is similar to carbohydrate metabolism in vertebrates.

  9. Evaluation of the biological differences of canine and human factor VIII in gene delivery: implications in human hemophilia treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qizhao; Dong, Biao; Firrman, Jenni; Wu, Wenman; Roberts, Sean; Moore, Andrea Rossi; Liu, LinShu; Chin, Mario P.S.; Diao, Yong; Kost, Joseph; Xiao, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    The canine is the most important large animal model for testing novel hemophilia A(HA) treatment. It is often necessary to use canine factor VIII (cFIII) gene or protein for the evaluation of HA treatment in the canine model. However, the different biological properties between cFVIII and human FVIII(hFVIII) indicated that the development of novel HA treatment may require careful characterization of non-human FVIII. To investigate whether the data obtained using cFVIII can translate to HA treatment in human, we analyzed the differential biological properties of canine heavy chain (cHC) and light chain (cLC) by comparing with human HC (hHC) and LC (hLC). The secretion of cHC was 5~30 fold higher than hHC, with or without LCs. cHC+hLC group exhibited ~18-fold increase in coagulation activity compared with hHC+hLC delivery by recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors. Unlike hHC, the secretion of cHC was independent of LCs. cLC improves the specific activity of FVIII by 2~3-fold compared with hLC. Moreover, the cLC but not cHC, contributes the high stability of cFVIII. Our results suggested that the cFVIII expression results in the canine model should be interpreted with caution as the cHC secreted more efficiently than hHC and cLC exhibited a more active and stable phenotype than hLC. PMID:27064790

  10. Complement Evasion Mediated by Enhancement of Captured Factor H: Implications for Protection of Self-Surfaces from Complement

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Andrew P.; Makou, Elisavet; Chen, Zhuo A.; Kerr, Heather; Richards, Anna; Rappsilber, Juri

    2015-01-01

    In an attempt to evade annihilation by the vertebrate complement system, many microbes capture factor H (FH), the key soluble complement-regulating protein in human plasma. However, FH is normally an active complement suppressor exclusively on self-surfaces and this selective action of FH is pivotal to self versus non-self discrimination by the complement system. We investigated whether the bacterially captured FH becomes functionally enhanced and, if so, how this is achieved at a structural level. We found, using site-directed and truncation mutagenesis, surface plasmon resonance, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and cross-linking and mass spectrometry, that the N-terminal domain of Streptococcus pneumoniae protein PspC (PspCN) not only binds FH extraordinarily tightly but also holds it in a previously uncharacterized conformation. Functional enhancement arises from exposure of a C-terminal cryptic second binding site in FH for C3b, the activation-specific fragment of the pivotal complement component, C3. This conformational change of FH doubles its affinity for C3b and increases 5-fold its ability to accelerate decay of the binary enzyme (C3bBb) responsible for converting C3 to C3b in an amplification loop. Despite not sharing critical FH-binding residues, PspCNs from D39 and Tigr4 S. pneumoniae exhibit similar FH-anchoring and enhancing properties. We propose that these bacterial proteins mimic molecular markers of self-surfaces, providing a compelling hypothesis for how FH prevents complement-mediated injury to host tissue while lacking efficacy on virtually all other surfaces. In hemolysis assays with 2-aminoethylisothiouronium bromide–treated erythrocytes that recapitulate paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, PspCN enhanced protection of cells by FH, suggesting a new paradigm for therapeutic complement suppression. PMID:26459349

  11. Millifluidics for Chemical Synthesis and Time-resolved Mechanistic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, Katla Sai; Biswas, Sanchita; Navin, Chelliah V.; Yamane, Dawit G.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Kumar, Challa S.S.R.

    2013-01-01

    Procedures utilizing millifluidic devices for chemical synthesis and time-resolved mechanistic studies are described by taking three examples. In the first, synthesis of ultra-small copper nanoclusters is described. The second example provides their utility for investigating time resolved kinetics of chemical reactions by analyzing gold nanoparticle formation using in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The final example demonstrates continuous flow catalysis of reactions inside millifluidic channel coated with nanostructured catalyst. PMID:24327099

  12. Underreliance on mechanistic models: Comment on Ferguson (2015).

    PubMed

    Tryon, Warren W

    2016-09-01

    Ferguson (see record ) proposed that our overreliance on mechanistic models is responsible for the public's negative view of psychology. On the contrary, I claim that our explanations do not actually explain because they lack mechanism information and that is why the public has a negative view of psychology. Some of the mechanism information required to move from interpretations to explanations can be found in parallel distributed processing connectionist neural network models of psychology and behavior. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27571530

  13. Millifluidics for chemical synthesis and time-resolved mechanistic studies.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Katla Sai; Biswas, Sanchita; Navin, Chelliah V; Yamane, Dawit G; Miller, Jeffrey T; Kumar, Challa S S R

    2013-01-01

    Procedures utilizing millifluidic devices for chemical synthesis and time-resolved mechanistic studies are described by taking three examples. In the first, synthesis of ultra-small copper nanoclusters is described. The second example provides their utility for investigating time resolved kinetics of chemical reactions by analyzing gold nanoparticle formation using in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The final example demonstrates continuous flow catalysis of reactions inside millifluidic channel coated with nanostructured catalyst. PMID:24327099

  14. Home range analysis using a mechanistic home range model

    SciTech Connect

    Moorcroft, P.R. . Dept. of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology); Lewis, M.A. . Dept. of Mathematics) Crabtree, R.L. . Dept. of Fish and Wildlife Resources)

    1999-07-01

    The traditional models used to characterize animal home ranges have no mechanistic basis underlying their descriptions of space use, and as a result, the analysis of animal home ranges has primarily been a descriptive endeavor. In this paper, the authors characterize coyote (Canis latrans) home range patterns using partial differential equations for expected space use that are formally derived from underlying descriptions of individual movement behavior. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first time that mechanistic models have been used to characterize animal home ranges. The results provide empirical support for a model formulation of movement response to scent marks, and suggest that having relocation data for individuals in adjacent groups is necessary to capture the spatial arrangement of home range boundaries. The authors then show how the model fits can be used to obtain predictions for individual movement and scent marking behavior and to predict changes in home range patterns. More generally, the findings illustrate how mechanistic models permit the development of a predictive theory for the relationship between movement behavior and animal spatial distribution.

  15. Dual effect of red wine on liver redox status: a concise and mechanistic review.

    PubMed

    Silva, Paula; Fernandes, Eduarda; Carvalho, Félix

    2015-10-01

    Chronic ethanol consumption is a strong risk factor for the development of liver disease. Multiple mechanisms are involved in ethanol-mediated liver injury; oxidative stress being pointed has an important factor. However, it should be noted that moderate consumption of red wine has been associated with hepatoprotective effects, mainly due to the antioxidant effect of resveratrol, one of its polyphenolic compounds. In this paper, the potential molecular mechanisms through which the protective effects of resveratrol counteract the oxidative effect of ethanol and the way as this dual effect impacts liver oxidative stress are reviewed. Mechanistic evaluation of modulation of oxidative signaling pathways by ethanol and resveratrol may explain the pathogenesis of various liver diseases and ultimately to disclose possible pharmacological therapies.

  16. Growth signals, inflammation, and vascular perturbations: mechanistic links between obesity, metabolic syndrome, and cancer.

    PubMed

    Hursting, Stephen D; Hursting, Marcie J

    2012-08-01

    Nearly 35% of adults and 20% of children in the United States are obese, defined as a body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m(2). Obesity, which is accompanied by metabolic dysregulation often manifesting in the metabolic syndrome, is an established risk factor for many cancers. Within the growth-promoting, proinflammatory environment of the obese state, cross talk between macrophages, adipocytes, and epithelial cells occurs via obesity-associated hormones, cytokines, and other mediators that may enhance cancer risk and progression. This review synthesizes the evidence on key biological mechanisms underlying the obesity-cancer link, with particular emphasis on obesity-associated enhancements in growth factor signaling, inflammation, and vascular integrity processes. These interrelated pathways represent possible mechanistic targets for disrupting the obesity-cancer link.

  17. The Risk Factors of Symptomatic Communicating Hydrocephalus After Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Unilateral Vestibular Schwannoma: The Implication of Brain Atrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Jung Ho; Kim, Dong Gyu; Chung, Hyun-Tai; Paek, Sun Ha; Park, Chul-Kee; Kim, Chae-Yong; Hwang, Seung-Sik; Park, Jeong-Hoon; Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Jin Wook; Kim, Yong Hwy; Song, Sang Woo; Kim, In Kyung; Jung, Hee-Won

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To identify the effect of brain atrophy on the development of symptomatic communicating hydrocephalus (SCHCP) after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for sporadic unilateral vestibular schwannomas (VS). Methods and Materials: A total of 444 patients with VS were treated with SRS as a primary treatment. One hundred eighty-one patients (40.8%) were male, and the mean age of the patients was 53 {+-} 13 years (range, 11-81 years). The mean follow-up duration was 56.8 {+-} 35.8 months (range, 12-160 months). The mean tumor volume was 2.78 {+-} 3.33 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.03-23.30 cm{sup 3}). The cross-sectional area of the lateral ventricles (CALV), defined as the combined area of the lateral ventricles at the level of the mammillary body, was measured on coronal T1-weighted magnetic resonance images as an indicator of brain atrophy. Results: At distant follow-up, a total of 25 (5.6%) patients had SCHCP. The median time to symptom development was 7 months (range, 1-48 months). The mean CALV was 334.0 {+-} 194.0 mm{sup 2} (range, 44.70-1170 mm{sup 2}). The intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.988 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.976-0.994; p < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, the CALV had a significant relationship with the development of SCHCP (p < 0.001; odds ration [OR] = 1.005; 95% CI, 1.002-1.007). Tumor volume and female sex also had a significant association (p < 0.001; OR = 1.246; 95% CI, 1.103-1.409; p < 0.009; OR = 7.256; 95% CI, 1.656-31.797, respectively). However, age failed to show any relationship with the development of SCHCP (p = 0.364). Conclusion: Brain atrophy may be related to de novo SCHCP after SRS, especially in female patients with a large VS. Follow-up surveillance should be individualized, considering the risk factors involved for each patient, for prompt diagnosis of SCHCP.

  18. Dissociable and nondissociable forms of platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase in human plasma LDL: implications for LDL oxidative susceptibility.

    PubMed

    McCall, M R; La Belle, M; Forte, T M; Krauss, R M; Takanami, Y; Tribble, D L

    1999-01-29

    Platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) is transported by lipoproteins in plasma and is thought to possess both anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative activity. It has been reported that PAF-AH is recovered primarily in small, dense LDL and HDL following ultracentrifugal separation of lipoproteins. In the present studies, we aimed to further define the distribution of PAF-AH among lipoprotein fractions and subfractions, and to determine whether these distributions are affected by the lipoprotein isolation strategy (FPLC versus sequential ultracentrifugation) and LDL particle distribution profile. When lipoproteins were isolated by FPLC, the bulk (approximately 85%) of plasma PAF-AH activity was recovered within LDL-containing fractions, whereas with ultracentrifugation, there was a redistribution to HDL (which contained approximately 18% of the activity) and the d>1.21 g/ml fraction (which contained approximately 32%). Notably, re-ultracentrifugation of isolated LDL did not result in any further movement of PAF-AH to higher densities, suggesting the presence of dissociable and nondissociable forms of the enzyme on LDL. Differences were noted in the distribution of PAF-AH activity among LDL subfractions from subjects exhibiting the pattern A (primarily large, buoyant LDL) versus pattern B (primarily small, dense LDL) phenotype. In the latter group, there was a relative depletion of PAF-AH activity in subfractions in the intermediate to dense range (d=1.039-1.047 g/ml) with a corresponding increase in enzyme activity recovered within the d>1.21 g/ml ultracentrifugal fraction. Thus, there appears to be a greater proportion of the dissociable form of PAF-AH in pattern B subjects. In both populations, most of the nondissociable activity was recovered in a minor small, dense LDL subfraction. Based on conjugated dienes as a measure of lipid peroxidation, variations in PAF-AH activity appeared to contribute to variations in oxidative behavior among

  19. MRI Predictive Factors for Tumor Response in Rectal Cancer Following Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy - Implications for Induction Chemotherapy?

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Stanley K.T.; Tait, Diana

    2013-11-01

    predictive factors could be taken into account in the pursuit of individualized neoadjuvant treatments for patients with rectal cancer.

  20. Persistence factors among engineering students at the Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico: Student perceptions and curricular implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez Juarbe, Juan M.

    Various persistence studies demonstrate that there is a direct correlation between college or university academic program completion and the amount of students' involvement in the college or university on a social, academic, and institutional level. These studies suggest that, over the course of time, the greater the level of involvement the greater the probability of increased persistence towards program completion. Student persistence among Hispanic engineering students was researched at the Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico during the period of January 2002 to April 2003. Persistence factors lead students to either one of the following behaviors: (1) to re-enroll, (2) to switch to another educational program, or (3) to depart from the institution. Increased student persistence is the result of recurring decisions to re-enroll each trimester. Decreased student persistence is the outcome associated with a decision to either depart or switch to another educational vocation. Early departure at the institution is linked to perceptions formed day-to-day as the student experiences the educational environment. These perceptions inspire behavioral outcomes to either persist or depart the education process. Desirable behavioral outcomes are closely related with educational commitments leading to increased persistence. Likewise, undesirable behavioral outcomes are those resulting in decreased persistence. Satisfactory student experiences in successfully achieving social, academic, and institutional responsibilities set the course towards increased persistence. In the research undertaken, student and faculty educational experiences were analyzed and documented. This was accomplished by the use of a combined quantitative and qualitative research methodology. The volunteer participants in this study included: six full time professors, eight part time professors, eighty-one students at a job fair, and seven individual student participants. Personal data on the participants

  1. Extensive domain shuffling in transcription regulators of DNA viruses and implications for the origin of fungal APSES transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Koonin, Eugene V; Aravind, L

    2002-01-01

    Background Viral DNA-binding proteins have served as good models to study the biochemistry of transcription regulation and chromatin dynamics. Computational analysis of viral DNA-binding regulatory proteins and identification of their previously undetected homologs encoded by cellular genomes might lead to a better understanding of their function and evolution in both viral and cellular systems. Results The phyletic range and the conserved DNA-binding domains of the viral regulatory proteins of the poxvirus D6R/N1R and baculoviral Bro protein families have not been previously defined. Using computational analysis, we show that the amino-terminal module of the D6R/N1R proteins defines a novel, conserved DNA-binding domain (the KilA-N domain) that is found in a wide range of proteins of large bacterial and eukaryotic DNA viruses. The KilA-N domain is suggested to be homologous to the fungal DNA-binding APSES domain. We provide evidence for the KilA-N and APSES domains sharing a common fold with the nucleic acid-binding modules of the LAGLIDADG nucleases and the amino-terminal domains of the tRNA endonuclease. The amino-terminal module of the Bro proteins is another, distinct DNA-binding domain (the Bro-N domain) that is present in proteins whose domain architectures parallel those of the KilA-N domain-containing proteins. A detailed analysis of the KilA-N and Bro-N domains and the associated domains points to extensive domain shuffling and lineage-specific gene family expansion within DNA virus genomes. Conclusions We define a large class of novel viral DNA-binding proteins and their cellular homologs and identify their domain architectures. On the basis of phyletic pattern analysis we present evidence for a probable viral origin of the fungus-specific cell-cycle regulatory transcription factors containing the APSES DNA-binding domain. We also demonstrate the extensive role of lineage-specific gene expansion and domain shuffling, within a limited set of approximately

  2. The rise of electric two-wheelers in China: Factors for their success and implications for the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinert, Jonathan Xavier

    This dissertation examines the rise, present use, and future growth of the electric two-wheeler (E2W, a.k.a. E2W or e-scooter) in China, the world's most successful electric-drive vehicle. The E2W market has been experiencing tremendous growth with over 30 million now in regular use on Chinese streets. The adoption of E2W technology is significant because, along with their air quality and energy (low-carbon) benefits compared to gasoline powered motorcycles, E2Ws are driving the development of improved and lower cost batteries and may lead to a shift toward larger three-and four-wheel electric vehicles (EV). This dissertation explores three questions: why the E2W market grew so rapidly in China, what factors are driving and resisting its growth, and how future growth might impact the adoption of electric vehicles. In Chapter 1, the context for this analysis is built by describing China's transportation past, present, and future challenges. E2Ws are also introduced and compared with gasoline-powered motorcycles on several metrics, such as performance, air emissions, and energy use. In Chapter 2, data from the literature was collected and analyzed to understand the history and important reasons for E2W growth in China. To supplement these data, the author and colleagues interviewed leaders of E2W and battery companies and toured several manufacturing plants. In Chapter 3, E2W and bicycles users were surveyed to understand how and why they use (or don't use) E2Ws. In Chapter 4, valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries commonly used in today's E2Ws were laboratory tested to determine their performance characteristics. Data were also compiled on their cost, and on the cost and performance of Li-ion batteries. In Chapter 5, the future of E2Ws in China was assessed by integrating data from the previous three chapters and from the literature to create a force-field analysis of the E2W market. This chapter concludes by examining the spillover effects E2W market growth may

  3. Variable δ15N Diet-Tissue Discrimination Factors among Sharks: Implications for Trophic Position, Diet and Food Web Models

    PubMed Central

    Olin, Jill A.; Hussey, Nigel E.; Grgicak-Mannion, Alice; Fritts, Mark W.; Wintner, Sabine P.; Fisk, Aaron T.

    2013-01-01

    The application of stable isotopes to characterize the complexities of a species foraging behavior and trophic relationships is dependent on assumptions of δ15N diet-tissue discrimination factors (∆15N). As ∆15N values have been experimentally shown to vary amongst consumers, tissues and diet composition, resolving appropriate species-specific ∆15N values can be complex. Given the logistical and ethical challenges of controlled feeding experiments for determining ∆15N values for large and/or endangered species, our objective was to conduct an assessment of a range of reported ∆15N values that can hypothetically serve as surrogates for describing the predator-prey relationships of four shark species that feed on prey from different trophic levels (i.e., different mean δ15N dietary values). Overall, the most suitable species-specific ∆15N values decreased with increasing dietary-δ15N values based on stable isotope Bayesian ellipse overlap estimates of shark and the principal prey functional groups contributing to the diet determined from stomach content analyses. Thus, a single ∆15N value was not supported for this speciose group of marine predatory fishes. For example, the ∆15N value of 3.7‰ provided the highest percent overlap between prey and predator isotope ellipses for the bonnethead shark (mean diet δ15N = 9‰) whereas a ∆15N value < 2.3‰ provided the highest percent overlap between prey and predator isotope ellipses for the white shark (mean diet δ15N = 15‰). These data corroborate the previously reported inverse ∆15N-dietary δ15N relationship when both isotope ellipses of principal prey functional groups and the broader identified diet of each species were considered supporting the adoption of different ∆15N values that reflect the predators’ δ15N-dietary value. These findings are critical for refining the application of stable isotope modeling approaches as inferences regarding a species’ ecological role in their

  4. Myocardial T1 and T2 mapping at 3 T: reference values, influencing factors and implications

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Myocardial T1 and T2 mapping using cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) are promising to improve tissue characterization and early disease detection. This study aimed at analyzing the feasibility of T1 and T2 mapping at 3 T and providing reference values. Methods Sixty healthy volunteers (30 males/females, each 20 from 20–39 years, 40–59 years, 60–80 years) underwent left-ventricular T1 and T2 mapping in 3 short-axis slices at 3 T. For T2 mapping, 3 single-shot steady-state free precession (SSFP) images with different T2 preparation times were acquired. For T1 mapping, modified Look-Locker inversion recovery technique with 11 single shot SSFP images was used before and after injection of gadolinium contrast. T1 and T2 relaxation times were quantified for each slice and each myocardial segment. Results Mean T2 and T1 (pre-/post-contrast) times were: 44.1 ms/1157.1 ms/427.3 ms (base), 45.1 ms/1158.7 ms/411.2 ms (middle), 46.9 ms/1180.6 ms/399.7 ms (apex). T2 and pre-contrast T1 increased from base to apex, post-contrast T1 decreased. Relevant inter-subject variability was apparent (scatter factor 1.08/1.05/1.11 for T2/pre-contrast T1/post-contrast T1). T2 and post-contrast T1 were influenced by heart rate (p < 0.0001, p = 0.0020), pre-contrast T1 by age (p < 0.0001). Inter- and intra-observer agreement of T2 (r = 0.95; r = 0.95) and T1 (r = 0.91; r = 0.93) were high. T2 maps: 97.7% of all segments were diagnostic and 2.3% were excluded (susceptibility artifact). T1 maps (pre-/post-contrast): 91.6%/93.9% were diagnostic, 8.4%/6.1% were excluded (predominantly susceptibility artifact 7.7%/3.2%). Conclusions Myocardial T2 and T1 reference values for the specific CMR setting are provided. The diagnostic impact of the high inter-subject variability of T2 and T1 relaxation times requires further investigation. PMID:23777327

  5. Bird Migration Under Climate Change - A Mechanistic Approach Using Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, James A.; Blattner, Tim; Messmer, Peter

    2010-01-01

    migratory shorebirds in the central fly ways of North America. We demonstrated the phenotypic plasticity of a migratory population of Pectoral sandpipers consisting of an ensemble of 10,000 individual birds in response to changes in stopover locations using an individual based migration model driven by remotely sensed land surface data, climate data and biological field data. With the advent of new computing capabilities enabled hy recent GPU-GP computing paradigms and commodity hardware, it now is possible to simulate both larger ensemble populations and to incorporate more realistic mechanistic factors into migration models. Here, we take our first steps use these tools to study the impact of long-term drought variability on shorebird survival.

  6. The iron isotope composition of enstatite meteorites: Implications for their origin and the metal/sulfide Fe isotopic fractionation factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kun; Savage, Paul S.; Moynier, Frédéric

    2014-10-01

    due to intensive impact-induced shearing stress, or the ultimate destruction of the Shallowater parent body. Analysis of separated enstatite meteorite mineral phases show that the magnetic phase (Fe metal) is systematically enriched in the heavier Fe isotopes when compared to non-magnetic phases (Fe hosted in troilite), which agrees with previous experimental observations and theoretical calculations. The difference between magnetic and non-magnetic phases from enstatite achondrites provides an equilibrium metal-sulfide Fe isotopic fractionation factor of Δ56Femetal-troilite = δ56Femetal - δ56Fetroilite of 0.129 ± 0.060‰ (2 SE) at 1060 ± 80 K, which confirms the predictions of previous theoretical calculations.

  7. Is nonalcoholic fatty liver disease an endogenous alcoholic fatty liver disease? - A mechanistic hypothesis.

    PubMed

    de Medeiros, Ivanildo Coutinho; de Lima, Josivan Gomes

    2015-08-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and alcoholic fatty liver disease (AFLD) are so similar that only a detailed history of alcohol intake can distinguish one from the other. Because subjects with NAFLD produce significantly more endogenous ethanol (EE) than controls, some researchers suspected that these similarities are not merely coincidental. For this reason, it was attempted to show that NAFLD is actually an endogenous alcoholic fatty liver disease (EAFLD). However, negligible blood-alcohol concentration (BAC) and the inability of gut microbiota to produce hepatotoxic concentrations of EE rejected this hypothesis. To clarify these conflicting results, we provide a mechanistic framework explaining how NAFLD may be an EAFLD. First of all, the key finding is that ethanol is a prodrug, enabling the idea that AFLD may develop with negligible/absent BAC. Second, extrahepatic acetaldehyde (ACD) alone recapitulates AFLD and is about 330-fold more hepatotoxic than that generated inside the liver. Third, gut microbiota can even produce much larger amounts of EE than those currently considered cirrhotogenic for man. Fourth, an extensive gut-liver axis first-pass metabolism of ethanol prevents the development of significant BAC in NAFLD. Fifth, all genes involved in EE metabolism are upregulated in the livers of patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Last, overexpression of the gene encoding alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) 4 implicates liver exposure to high concentrations of EE. In conclusion, this work provides mechanistic explanation supporting the assumption that NAFLD may indeed be an EAFLD. If validated by further testing, the hypothesis may help develop novel therapeutic and preventive strategies against this ubiquitous condition.

  8. Is nonalcoholic fatty liver disease an endogenous alcoholic fatty liver disease? - A mechanistic hypothesis.

    PubMed

    de Medeiros, Ivanildo Coutinho; de Lima, Josivan Gomes

    2015-08-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and alcoholic fatty liver disease (AFLD) are so similar that only a detailed history of alcohol intake can distinguish one from the other. Because subjects with NAFLD produce significantly more endogenous ethanol (EE) than controls, some researchers suspected that these similarities are not merely coincidental. For this reason, it was attempted to show that NAFLD is actually an endogenous alcoholic fatty liver disease (EAFLD). However, negligible blood-alcohol concentration (BAC) and the inability of gut microbiota to produce hepatotoxic concentrations of EE rejected this hypothesis. To clarify these conflicting results, we provide a mechanistic framework explaining how NAFLD may be an EAFLD. First of all, the key finding is that ethanol is a prodrug, enabling the idea that AFLD may develop with negligible/absent BAC. Second, extrahepatic acetaldehyde (ACD) alone recapitulates AFLD and is about 330-fold more hepatotoxic than that generated inside the liver. Third, gut microbiota can even produce much larger amounts of EE than those currently considered cirrhotogenic for man. Fourth, an extensive gut-liver axis first-pass metabolism of ethanol prevents the development of significant BAC in NAFLD. Fifth, all genes involved in EE metabolism are upregulated in the livers of patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Last, overexpression of the gene encoding alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) 4 implicates liver exposure to high concentrations of EE. In conclusion, this work provides mechanistic explanation supporting the assumption that NAFLD may indeed be an EAFLD. If validated by further testing, the hypothesis may help develop novel therapeutic and preventive strategies against this ubiquitous condition. PMID:25956735

  9. Mechanistic approach to multi-element isotope modeling of organic contaminant degradation.

    PubMed

    Jin, Biao; Rolle, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    We propose a multi-element isotope modeling approach to simultaneously predict the evolution of different isotopes during the transformation of organic contaminants. The isotopic trends of different elements are explicitly simulated by tracking position-specific isotopologues that contain the isotopes located at fractionating positions. Our approach is self-consistent and provides a mechanistic description of different degradation pathways that accounts for the influence of both primary and secondary isotope effects during contaminant degradation. The method is particularly suited to quantitatively describe the isotopic evolution of relatively large organic contaminant molecules. For such compounds, an integrated approach, simultaneously considering all possible isotopologues, would be impractical due to the large number of isotopologues. We apply the proposed modeling approach to the degradation of toluene, methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and nitrobenzene observed in previous experimental studies. Our model successfully predicts the multi-element isotope data (both 2D and 3D), and accurately captures the distinct trends observed for different reaction pathways. The proposed approach provides an improved and mechanistic methodology to interpret multi-element isotope data and to predict the extent of multi-element isotope fractionation that goes beyond commonly applied modeling descriptions and simplified methods based on the ratio between bulk enrichment factors or on linear regression in dual-isotope plots.

  10. Induced polarization dependence on pore space geometry: Empirical observations and mechanistic predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weller, A.; Slater, L. D.

    2015-12-01

    We use an extensive database to compare empirical observations and previously proposed empirical models against recently developed mechanistic formulations for the induced polarization (IP) response in porous media as a function of pore space geometry and interfacial chemistry. These comparisons support the argument that the pore-volume normalized internal surface (Spor) is the most important geometric parameter influencing the polarization. The specific polarizability derived from the empirical relationship between imaginary conductivity σ″ and Spor is independent of the porosity. By contrast, equivalent specific polarizability terms in recently proposed mechanistic models are found to be significantly correlated with porosity, and thus do not appear to represent an interfacial chemistry factor independent of the pore space geometry. Furthermore, the database shows no evidence for a significant decrease in the counterion mobility of clayey materials relative to clay-free materials, as postulated in recent studies. On the contrary, a single value of cp is consistent with no significant differences in ionic mobility given that all samples were saturated with a NaCl solution close to a common salinity of about 100 mS/m.

  11. Mechanistic modelling and mechanistic monitoring: simulation and shadowgraph imaging of particulate dissolution in the flow-through apparatus.

    PubMed

    D'arcy, Deirdre M; Persoons, Tim

    2011-03-01

    Accurate mechanistic modelling of a complex system requires insight into the process being simulated, in addition to a theoretical 'first-principles' approach. The current work uses a numerical mechanistic model to simulate dissolution of a particulate system in the flow-through dissolution apparatus. A shadowgraph imaging method is also used to monitor the dissolution process, providing real-time estimates of particle motion, number and total dissolution time. Experimental dissolution studies of ibuprofen particles are used to assess the accuracy of the model. The numerical model adequately predicts the ibuprofen particle dissolution rate at 16 mL min(-1) . Parameter sensitivity analysis identified dissolution test circumstances requiring more, or less, accuracy in the particle size and density calculations. The shadowgraph imaging method successfully determined the total dissolution time and decreasing particle numbers over time. The images confirmed the pulsing particle motion of the numerical model but revealed some more complex velocity patterns, assisting numerical model development. Further optimisation of the sampling window is required to capture all relevant particle motion and changing particle size distribution. A mechanistic model can successfully simulate particulate dissolution in the flow-through apparatus, and when used along with shadowgraph imaging, can give valuable insight into the dissolution process mechanisms and environment. PMID:20848646

  12. Circadian rhythm transcription factor CLOCK regulates the transcriptional activity of the glucocorticoid receptor by acetylating its hinge region lysine cluster: potential physiological implications

    PubMed Central

    Nader, Nancy; Chrousos, George P.; Kino, Tomoshige

    2009-01-01

    Glucocorticoids, end products of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, influence functions of virtually all organs and tissues through the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Circulating levels of glucocorticoids fluctuate naturally in a circadian fashion and regulate the transcriptional activity of GR in target tissues. The basic helix-loop-helix protein CLOCK, a histone acetyltransferase (HAT), and its heterodimer partner BMAL1 are self-oscillating transcription factors that generate circadian rhythms in both the central nervous system and periphery. We found that CLOCK/BMAL1 repressed GR-induced transcriptional activity in a HAT-activity- dependent fashion. In serum-shock-synchronized cells, transactivational activity of GR, accessed by mRNA expression of an endogenous-responsive gene, fluctuated spontaneously in a circadian fashion in reverse phase with CLOCK/BMAL1 mRNA expression. CLOCK and GR interacted with each other physically, and CLOCK suppressed binding of GR to its DNA recognition sequences by acetylating multiple lysine residues located in its hinge region. These findings indicate that CLOCK/BMAL1 functions as a reverse-phase negative regulator of glucocorticoid action in target tissues, possibly by antagonizing biological actions of diurnally fluctuating circulating glucocorticoids. Further, these results suggest that a peripheral target tissue circadian rhythm indirectly influences the functions of every organ and tissue inside the body through modulation of the ubiquitous and diverse actions of glucocorticoids.—Nader, N., Chrousos, G. P., Kino, T. Circadian rhythm transcription factor CLOCK regulates the transcriptional activity of the glucocorticoid receptor by acetylating its hinge region lysine cluster: potential physiological implications. PMID:19141540

  13. Surface energetics and protein-protein interactions: analysis and mechanistic implications

    PubMed Central

    Peri, Claudio; Morra, Giulia; Colombo, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Understanding protein-protein interactions (PPI) at the molecular level is a fundamental task in the design of new drugs, the prediction of protein function and the clarification of the mechanisms of (dis)regulation of biochemical pathways. In this study, we use a novel computational approach to investigate the energetics of aminoacid networks located on the surface of proteins, isolated and in complex with their respective partners. Interestingly, the analysis of individual proteins identifies patches of surface residues that, when mapped on the structure of their respective complexes, reveal regions of residue-pair couplings that extend across the binding interfaces, forming continuous motifs. An enhanced effect is visible across the proteins of the dataset forming larger quaternary assemblies. The method indicates the presence of energetic signatures in the isolated proteins that are retained in the bound form, which we hypothesize to determine binding orientation upon complex formation. We propose our method, BLUEPRINT, as a complement to different approaches ranging from the ab-initio characterization of PPIs, to protein-protein docking algorithms, for the physico-chemical and functional investigation of protein-protein interactions. PMID:27050828

  14. Structure and Mechanistic Implications of a Uroporphyrinogen III Synthase−Product Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert,H.; Phillips, J.; Heroux, A.; Hill, C.

    2008-01-01

    Uroporphyrinogen III synthase (U3S) catalyzes the asymmetrical cyclization of a linear tetrapyrrole to form the physiologically relevant uroporphyrinogen III (uro'gen III) isomer during heme biosynthesis. Here, we report four apoenzyme and one product complex crystal structures of the Thermus thermophilus (HB27) U3S protein. The overlay of eight crystallographically unique U3S molecules reveals a huge range of conformational flexibility, including a 'closed' product complex. The product, uro'gen III, binds between the two domains and is held in place by a network of hydrogen bonds between the product's side chain carboxylates and the protein's main chain amides. Interactions of the product A and B ring carboxylate side chains with both structural domains of U3S appear to dictate the relative orientation of the domains in the closed enzyme conformation and likely remain intact during catalysis. The product C and D rings are less constrained in the structure, consistent with the conformational changes required for the catalytic cyclization with inversion of D ring orientation. A conserved tyrosine residue is potentially positioned to facilitate loss of a hydroxyl from the substrate to initiate the catalytic reaction.

  15. Nickel Alloy Primary Water Bulk Surface and SCC Corrosion Film Analytical Characterization and SCC Mechanistic Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, D.; Lewis, N.; Hanson, M.; Rice, S.; Sanders, P.

    2007-04-18

    Alloy 600 corrosion coupon tests were performed: (1) to quantify the temperature dependency of general corrosion and (2) to characterize the composition and structure of bulk surface corrosion films for comparison with ongoing primary water SCC (PWSCC) crack tip corrosion film analyses. Results suggest that the thermal activation energy of Alloy 600 corrosion is consistent with the thermal activation energy of nickel alloy PWSCC. Analytical investigations of the structure and composition of Alloy 600 bulk surface corrosion oxides revealed a duplex (inner and outer) oxide layer structure. The outer layer is discontinuous and comprised of relatively large (1 to 3 {micro}m) nickel ferrite crystals and smaller ({approx}0.1 {micro}m) chromium containing nickel ferrite crystals. The inner layer consists of a relatively continuous chromite spinel (major phase) and chromia (Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} minor phase) which formed through non-selective oxidation. Chromia and dealloyed Alloy 600 (highly Ni enriched metal) were only observed at 337 C (640 F) and only along the boundaries of deformation induced fine grains and subcells. Specimens having deformation free surfaces exhibited continuous uniform inner chromite spinel oxide layers. Specimens with machining induced surface deformation produced non-uniform inner layer oxides (chromite spinel, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and unoxidized material). PWSCC crack tip oxides, in contrast, were fine grain (no duplex structure) and consisted of both chromium rich spinels and ''NiO'' structure oxides. Generally, nickel rich oxides were more abundant under more oxidized conditions (reduced coolant hydrogen) and spinel rich crack tip oxides were favored under more reducing conditions (increased coolant hydrogen). Bulk surface corrosion film thickness did not correlate with observed SCC growth rates. These results suggest that corrosion is not the rate controlling step of PWSCC but rather that PWSCC and corrosion have a common rate controlling sub process (e.g., cation diffusion, oxygen ingress).

  16. NMR determination of lysine pKa values in the Pol lambda lyase domain: mechanistic implications.

    PubMed

    Gao, Guanghua; DeRose, Eugene F; Kirby, Thomas W; London, Robert E

    2006-02-14

    The base excision repair (BER) process requires removal of an abasic deoxyribose-5-phosphate group, a catalytic activity that has been demonstrated for the N-terminal 8 kDa domain of DNA polymerase beta (Pol beta), and for the homologous domain of DNA polymerase lambda (Pol lambda). Previous studies have demonstrated that this activity results from formation of a Schiff base adduct of the abasic deoxyribose C-1' with a lysine residue (K312 in the case of Pol lambda), followed by a beta-elimination reaction. To better understand the underlying chemistry, we have determined pKa values for the lysine residues in the Pol lambda lyase domain labeled with [epsilon-13C]lysine. At neutral pH, the H(epsilon) protons on 3 of the 10 lysine residues in this domain, K287, K291, and K312, exhibit chemical shift inequivalence that results from immobilization of the lysyl side chains. For K287 and K291, this results from the K287-E261 and K291-E298 salt bridge interactions, while for K312, immobilization apparently results from steric and hydrogen-bonding interactions that constrain the position of the lysine side chain. The pKa value of K312 is depressed to 9.58, a value indicating that at physiological pH K312 will exist predominantly in the protonated form. Titration of the domain with hairpin DNA containing a 5'-tetrahydrofuran terminus to model the abasic site produced shifts of the labeled lysine resonances that were in fast exchange but appeared to be complete at a stoichiometry of approximately 1:1.3, consistent with a dissociation constant of approximately 1 microM. The epsilon-proton shifts of K273 were the most sensitive to the addition of the DNA, apparently due to changes in the relative orientation between K273 and W274 in the DNA complex. The average pKa values increased by 0.55, consistent with the formation of some DNA-lysine salt bridges and with the general pH increase expected to result from a reduction in the net positive charge of the complex. A general increase in the Hill coefficients observed in the complex is consistent with the screening of the interacting lysine residues by the DNA. The pKa of K312 residue increased to 10.58 in the complex, probably due to salt bridge formation with the 5'-phosphate group of the DNA. The pKa values obtained for the lyase domain of Pol lambda in the present study are consistent with recent crystallographic studies of Pol beta complexed with 5-phosphorylated abasic sugar analogues in nicked DNA which reveal an open site with no obvious interactions that would significantly depress the pK value for the active site lysine residue. It is suggested that due to the heterogeneity of the damaged DNA substrates with which Pol lambda as well as other related polymerases may be required to bind, the unexpectedly poor optimization of the lyase catalytic site may reflect a compromise of flexibility with catalytic efficiency. PMID:16460025

  17. Mechanistic simulation of normal-tissue damage in radiotherapy—implications for dose-volume analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutkowska, Eva; Baker, Colin; Nahum, Alan

    2010-04-01

    A radiobiologically based 3D model of normal tissue has been developed in which complications are generated when 'irradiated'. The aim is to provide insight into the connection between dose-distribution characteristics, different organ architectures and complication rates beyond that obtainable with simple DVH-based analytical NTCP models. In this model the organ consists of a large number of functional subunits (FSUs), populated by stem cells which are killed according to the LQ model. A complication is triggered if the density of FSUs in any 'critical functioning volume' (CFV) falls below some threshold. The (fractional) CFV determines the organ architecture and can be varied continuously from small (series-like behaviour) to large (parallel-like). A key feature of the model is its ability to account for the spatial dependence of dose distributions. Simulations were carried out to investigate correlations between dose-volume parameters and the incidence of 'complications' using different pseudo-clinical dose distributions. Correlations between dose-volume parameters and outcome depended on characteristics of the dose distributions and on organ architecture. As anticipated, the mean dose and V20 correlated most strongly with outcome for a parallel organ, and the maximum dose for a serial organ. Interestingly better correlation was obtained between the 3D computer model and the LKB model with dose distributions typical for serial organs than with those typical for parallel organs. This work links the results of dose-volume analyses to dataset characteristics typical for serial and parallel organs and it may help investigators interpret the results from clinical studies.

  18. Mechanistic Investigation of Acid-Catalyzed Cleavage of Aryl-Ether Linkages: Implications for Lignin Depolymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Sturgeon, M. R.; Kim, S.; Chmely, S. C.; Foust, T. D.; Beckham, G. T.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon-oxygen bonds are the primary inter-monomer linkages lignin polymers in plant cell walls, and as such, catalyst development to cleave these linkages is of paramount importance to deconstruct biomass to its constituent monomers for the production of renewable fuels and chemicals. For many decades, acid catalysis has been used to depolymerize lignin. Lignin is a primary component of plant cell walls, which is connected primarily by aryl-ether linkages, and the mechanism of its deconstruction by acid is not well understood, likely due to its heterogeneous and complex nature compared to cellulose. For effective biomass conversion strategies, utilization of lignin is of significant relevance and as such understanding the mechanisms of catalytic lignin deconstruction to constituent monomers and oligomers is of keen interest. Here, we present a comprehensive experimental and theoretical study of the acid catalysis of a range of dimeric species exhibiting the b-O-4 linkage, the most common inter-monomer linkage in lignin. We demonstrate that the presence of a phenolic species dramatically increases the rate of cleavage in acid at 150 degrees C. Quantum mechanical calculations on dimers with the para-hydroxyl group demonstrate that this acid-catalyzed pathway differs from the nonphenolic dimmers. Importantly, this result implies that depolymerization of native lignin in the plant cell wall will proceed via an unzipping mechanism wherein b-O-4 linkages will be cleaved from the ends of the branched, polymer chains inwards toward the center of the polymer. To test this hypothesis further, we synthesized a homopolymer of b-O-4 with a phenolic hydroxyl group, and demonstrate that it is cleaved in acid from the end containing the phenolic hydroxyl group. This result suggests that genetic modifications to lignin biosynthesis pathways in plants that will enable lower severity processes to fractionate lignin for upgrading and for easier access to the carbohydrate fraction of the plant cell wall.

  19. Mechanistic implications from structures of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase complexed with coenzyme and an alcohol.

    PubMed

    Plapp, Bryce V; Charlier, Henry A; Ramaswamy, S

    2016-02-01

    Yeast alcohol dehydrogenase I is a homotetramer of subunits with 347 amino acid residues, catalyzing the oxidation of alcohols using NAD(+) as coenzyme. A new X-ray structure was determined at 3.0 Å where both subunits of an asymmetric dimer bind coenzyme and trifluoroethanol. The tetramer is a pair of back-to-back dimers. Subunit A has a closed conformation and can represent a Michaelis complex with an appropriate geometry for hydride transfer between coenzyme and alcohol, with the oxygen of 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol ligated at 2.1 Å to the catalytic zinc in the classical tetrahedral coordination with Cys-43, Cys-153, and His-66. Subunit B has an open conformation, and the coenzyme interacts with amino acid residues from the coenzyme binding domain, but not with residues from the catalytic domain. Coenzyme appears to bind to and dissociate from the open conformation. The catalytic zinc in subunit B has an alternative, inverted coordination with Cys-43, Cys-153, His-66 and the carboxylate of Glu-67, while the oxygen of trifluoroethanol is 3.5 Å from the zinc. Subunit B may represent an intermediate in the mechanism after coenzyme and alcohol bind and before the conformation changes to the closed form and the alcohol oxygen binds to the zinc and displaces Glu-67.

  20. ON THE INTERACTION OF ADENINE WITH IONIZING RADIATION: MECHANISTICAL STUDIES AND ASTROBIOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Nicholas L.; Ullrich, Susanne; Bennett, Chris J.; Kaiser, Ralf I.

    2011-04-01

    The molecular inventory available on the prebiotic Earth was likely derived from both terrestrial and extraterrestrial sources. A complete description of which extraterrestrial molecules may have seeded early Earth is therefore necessary to fully understand the prebiotic evolution which led to life. Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) are expected to cause both the formation and destruction of important biomolecules-including nucleic acid bases such as adenine-in the interstellar medium within the ices condensed on interstellar grains. The interstellar ultraviolet (UV) component is expected to photochemically degrade gas-phase adenine on a short timescale of only several years. However, the destruction rate is expected to be significantly reduced when adenine is shielded in dense molecular clouds or even within the ices of interstellar grains. Here, biomolecule destruction by the energetic charged particle component of the GCR becomes important as it is not fully attenuated. Presented here are results on the destruction rate of the nucleobase adenine in the solid state at 10 K by energetic electrons, as generated in the track of cosmic ray particles as they penetrate ices. When both UV and energetic charged particle destructive processes are taken into account, the half-life of adenine within dense interstellar clouds is found to be {approx}6 Myr, which is on the order of a star-forming molecular cloud. We also discuss chemical reaction pathways within the ices to explain the production of observed species, including the formation of nitriles (R-C{identical_to}N), epoxides (C-O-C), and carbonyl functions (R-C=O).

  1. Mechanistic aspects of superacid mediated condensation of polyphenols with ketones. Implications for polymer synthesis.

    PubMed

    López, Gustavo; Cruz, Olivia H; Garza, Lilian I Olvera; Zolotukhin, Mikhail G; Fomine, Serguei

    2014-10-01

    A detailed computational study of possible reaction paths for methanesulfonic and triflic acid mediated polyhydroxyalkylation reaction between resorcinol and trifluoracetone accompanied by cyclodehydration to give 9H-xanthene containing polymers has been carried out at M06-2X/6-311+G level of theory. A cluster solvation model was used for the calculations. The calculations revealed that the most kinetically favorable reaction path involves the cyclodehydration occurring during the polymer forming step. In this case 9H-xanthene formation is promoted by the activated phenyl ring in Wheland intermediate assisting the aromatic nucleophilic substitution of OH group which leads to the cyclization. It has been demonstrated that the inability of methanesulfonic acid to catalyze the formation of 9H-xanthene containing polymers is due to the very high barrier of the rate limiting step of the polymer forming reaction and not the cyclodehydration process. PMID:25296891

  2. Z-selective cross metathesis with ruthenium catalysts: synthetic applications and mechanistic implications.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Myles B; Grubbs, Robert H

    2015-04-20

    Olefin cross metathesis is a particularly powerful transformation that has been exploited extensively for the formation of complex products. Until recently, however, constructing Z-olefins using this methodology was not possible. With the discovery and development of three families of ruthenium-based Z-selective catalysts, the formation of Z-olefins using metathesis is now not only possible but becoming increasingly prevalent in the literature. In particular, ruthenium complexes containing cyclometalated NHC architectures developed in our group have been shown to catalyze various cross metathesis reactions with high activity and, in most cases, near perfect selectivity for the Z-isomer. The types of cross metathesis reactions investigated thus far are presented here and explored in depth.

  3. Mass Spectrometry Based Mechanistic Insights into Formation of Tris Conjugates: Implications on Protein Biopharmaceutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabadi, Pradeep G.; Sankaran, Praveen Kallamvalliillam; Palanivelu, Dinesh V.; Adhikary, Laxmi; Khedkar, Anand; Chatterjee, Amarnath

    2016-10-01

    We present here extensive mass spectrometric studies on the formation of a Tris conjugate with a therapeutic monoclonal antibody. The results not only demonstrate the reactive nature of the Tris molecule but also the sequence and reaction conditions that trigger this reactivity. The results corroborate the fact that proteins are, in general, prone to conjugation and/or adduct formation reactions and any modification due to this essentially leads to formation of impurities in a protein sample. Further, the results demonstrate that the conjugation reaction happens via a succinimide intermediate and has sequence specificity. Additionally, the data presented in this study also shows that the Tris formation is produced in-solution and is not an in-source phenomenon. We believe that the facts given here will open further avenues on exploration of Tris as a conjugating agent as well as ensure that the use of Tris or any ionic buffer in the process of producing a biopharmaceutical drug is monitored closely for the presence of such conjugate formation.

  4. Romidepsin in peripheral and cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: mechanistic implications from clinical and correlative data.

    PubMed

    Bates, Susan E; Eisch, Robin; Ling, Alexander; Rosing, Douglas; Turner, Maria; Pittaluga, Stefania; Prince, H Miles; Kirschbaum, Mark H; Allen, Steven L; Zain, Jasmine; Geskin, Larisa J; Joske, David; Popplewell, Leslie; Cowen, Edward W; Jaffe, Elaine S; Nichols, Jean; Kennedy, Sally; Steinberg, Seth M; Liewehr, David J; Showe, Louise C; Steakley, Caryn; Wright, John; Fojo, Tito; Litman, Thomas; Piekarz, Richard L

    2015-07-01

    Romidepsin is an epigenetic agent approved for the treatment of patients with cutaneous or peripheral T-cell lymphoma (CTCL and PTCL). Here we report data in all patients treated on the National Cancer Institute 1312 trial, demonstrating long-term disease control and the ability to retreat patients relapsing off-therapy. In all, 84 patients with CTCL and 47 with PTCL were enrolled. Responses occurred early, were clinically meaningful and of very long duration in some cases. Notably, patients with PTCL receiving romidepsin as third-line therapy or later had a comparable response rate (32%) of similar duration as the total population (38%). Eight patients had treatment breaks of 3.5 months to 10 years; in four of six patients, re-initiation of treatment led to clear benefit. Safety data show slightly greater haematological and constitutional toxicity in PTCL. cDNA microarray studies show unique individual gene expression profiles, minimal overlap between patients, and both induction and repression of gene expression that reversed within 24 h. These data argue against cell death occurring as a result of an epigenetics-mediated gene induction programme. Together this work supports the safety and activity of romidepsin in T-cell lymphoma, but suggests a complex mechanism of action.

  5. Realizing serine/threonine ligation: scope and limitations and mechanistic implication thereof

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Clarence T. T.; Li, Tianlu; Lam, Hiu Yung; Zhang, Yinfeng; Li, Xuechen

    2014-01-01

    Serine/Threonine ligation (STL) has emerged as an alternative tool for protein chemical synthesis, bioconjugations as well as macrocyclization of peptides of various sizes. Owning to the high abundance of Ser/Thr residues in natural peptides and proteins, STL is expected to find a wide range of applications in chemical biology research. Herein, we have fully investigated the compatibility of the STL strategy for X-Ser/Thr ligation sites, where X is any of the 20 naturally occurring amino acids. Our studies have shown that 17 amino acids are suitable for ligation, while Asp, Glu, and Lys are not compatible. Among the working 17 C-terminal amino acids, the retarded reaction resulted from the bulky β-branched amino acid (Thr, Val, and Ile) is not seen under the current ligation condition. We have also investigated the chemoselectivity involving the amino group of the internal lysine which may compete with the N-terminal Ser/Thr for reaction with the C-terminal salicylaldehyde (SAL) ester aldehyde group. The result suggested that the free internal amino group does not adversely slow down the ligation rate. PMID:24904921

  6. Nitrite and Hydroxylamine as Nitrogenase Substrates: Mechanistic Implications for the Pathway of N2 Reduction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Investigations of reduction of nitrite (NO2–) to ammonia (NH3) by nitrogenase indicate a limiting stoichiometry, NO2– + 6e– + 12ATP + 7H+ → NH3 + 2H2O + 12ADP + 12Pi. Two intermediates freeze-trapped during NO2– turnover by nitrogenase variants and investigated by Q-band ENDOR/ESEEM are identical to states, denoted H and I, formed on the pathway of N2 reduction. The proposed NO2– reduction intermediate hydroxylamine (NH2OH) is a nitrogenase substrate for which the H and I reduction intermediates also can be trapped. Viewing N2 and NO2– reductions in light of their common reduction intermediates and of NO2– reduction by multiheme cytochrome c nitrite reductase (ccNIR) leads us to propose that NO2– reduction by nitrogenase begins with the generation of NO2H bound to a state in which the active-site FeMo-co (M) has accumulated two [e–/H+] (E2), stored as a (bridging) hydride and proton. Proton transfer to NO2H and H2O loss leaves M–[NO+]; transfer of the E2 hydride to the [NO+] directly to form HNO bound to FeMo-co is one of two alternative means for avoiding formation of a terminal M–[NO] thermodynamic “sink”. The N2 and NO2– reduction pathways converge upon reduction of NH2NH2 and NH2OH bound states to form state H with [−NH2] bound to M. Final reduction converts H to I, with NH3 bound to M. The results presented here, combined with the parallels with ccNIR, support a N2 fixation mechanism in which liberation of the first NH3 occurs upon delivery of five [e–/H+] to N2, but a total of seven [e–/H+] to FeMo-co when obligate H2 evolution is considered, and not earlier in the reduction process. PMID:25136926

  7. Mass Spectrometry Based Mechanistic Insights into Formation of Tris Conjugates: Implications on Protein Biopharmaceutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabadi, Pradeep G.; Sankaran, Praveen Kallamvalliillam; Palanivelu, Dinesh V.; Adhikary, Laxmi; Khedkar, Anand; Chatterjee, Amarnath

    2016-08-01

    We present here extensive mass spectrometric studies on the formation of a Tris conjugate with a therapeutic monoclonal antibody. The results not only demonstrate the reactive nature of the Tris molecule but also the sequence and reaction conditions that trigger this reactivity. The results corroborate the fact that proteins are, in general, prone to conjugation and/or adduct formation reactions and any modification due to this essentially leads to formation of impurities in a protein sample. Further, the results demonstrate that the conjugation reaction happens via a succinimide intermediate and has sequence specificity. Additionally, the data presented in this study also shows that the Tris formation is produced in-solution and is not an in-source phenomenon. We believe that the facts given here will open further avenues on exploration of Tris as a conjugating agent as well as ensure that the use of Tris or any ionic buffer in the process of producing a biopharmaceutical drug is monitored closely for the presence of such conjugate formation.

  8. Phosphodiesterase 10A inhibitor MP-10 effects in primates: Comparison with risperidone and mechanistic implications

    PubMed Central

    Uthayathas, Subramaniam; Masilamoni, Gunasingh J.; Shaffer, Christopher L.; Schmidt, Christopher J.; Menniti, Frank S.; Papa, Stella M.

    2013-01-01

    Phosphodiesterase 10A (PDE10A) is highly expressed in striatal medium spiny neurons of both the direct and indirect output pathways. Similar to dopamine D2 receptor antagonists acting on indirect pathway neurons, PDE10A inhibitors have shown behavioral effects in rodent models that predict antipsychotic efficacy. These findings have supported the clinical investigation of PDE10A inhibitors as a new treatment for schizophrenia. However, PDE10A inhibitors and D2 antagonists differ in effects on direct pathway and other neurons of the basal ganglia, indicating that these two drug classes may have divergent antipsychotic efficacy and side effect profile. In the present study, we compare the behavioral effects of the selective PDE10A inhibitor MP-10 to those of the clinical standard D2 antagonist risperidone in rhesus monkeys using a standardized motor disability scale for parkinsonian primates and a newly designed “Drug Effects on Nervous System” scale to assess non-motor effects. Behavioral effects of MP-10 correlated with its plasma levels and its regulation of metabolic activity in striatal and cortical regions as measured by FDG-PET imaging. While MP-10 and risperidone broadly impacted similar behavioral domains in the primate, their effects had a different underlying basis. MP-10-treated animals retained the ability to respond but did not engage tasks, whereas risperidone-treated animals retained the motivation to respond but were unable to perform the intended actions. These findings are discussed in light of what is currently known about the modulation of striatal circuitry by these two classes of compounds, and provide insight into interpreting emerging clinical data with PDE10A inhibitors for the treatment of psychotic symptoms. PMID:24490227

  9. Opioid receptors: Structural and mechanistic insights into pharmacology and signaling.

    PubMed

    Shang, Yi; Filizola, Marta

    2015-09-15

    Opioid receptors are important drug targets for pain management, addiction, and mood disorders. Although substantial research on these important subtypes of G protein-coupled receptors has been conducted over the past two decades to discover ligands with higher specificity and diminished side effects, currently used opioid therapeutics remain suboptimal. Luckily, recent advances in structural biology of opioid receptors provide unprecedented insights into opioid receptor pharmacology and signaling. We review here a few recent studies that have used the crystal structures of opioid receptors as a basis for revealing mechanistic details of signal transduction mediated by these receptors, and for the purpose of drug discovery.

  10. [Mechanistic examination of organometallic electron transfer reactions: Annual report, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-31

    Our mechanistic examination of electron transfer reactions between organometallic complexes has required data from our stopped-flow infrared spectrophotometer that was constructed in the first year. Our research on organometallic electron transfer reaction mechanisms was recognized by an invitation to the Symposium on Organometallic Reaction Mechanisms at the National ACS meeting in Miami. We have obtained a reasonable understanding of the electron transfer reactions between metal cations and anions and between metal carbonyl anions and metal carbonyl dimers. In addition we have begun to obtain data on the outer sphere electron transfer between metal carbonyl anions and coordination complexes and on reactions involving cluster anions.

  11. A mechanistic, stochastic, population model of egg production.

    PubMed

    Johnston, S A; Gous, R M

    2007-04-01

    1. A mechanistic, stochastic egg production model is presented. Mean age at first egg may be predicted from the lighting programme applied during rearing, using the Bristol-Reading model (Lewis et al., 2002). 2. Rate of ovulation is determined by an amended version of the mathematical model of the ovulatory cycle, originally proposed by Etches and Schoch (1984). 3. Oviposition times are estimated from ovulation times. 4. Yolk, albumen and shell weights are calculated using allometric functions. 5. The model predicts egg production of a theoretical flock of laying hens for a full laying year, including random occurrences of double-yolked and soft-shelled eggs and internal ovulations.

  12. Combating Pathogenic Microorganisms Using Plant-Derived Antimicrobials: A Minireview of the Mechanistic Basis

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyaya, Indu; Kollanoor-Johny, Anup

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria has led to renewed interest in exploring the potential of plant-derived antimicrobials (PDAs) as an alternative therapeutic strategy to combat microbial infections. Historically, plant extracts have been used as a safe, effective, and natural remedy for ailments and diseases in traditional medicine. Extensive research in the last two decades has identified a plethora of PDAs with a wide spectrum of activity against a variety of fungal and bacterial pathogens causing infections in humans and animals. Active components of many plant extracts have been characterized and are commercially available; however, research delineating the mechanistic basis of their antimicrobial action is scanty. This review highlights the potential of various plant-derived compounds to control pathogenic bacteria, especially the diverse effects exerted by plant compounds on various virulence factors that are critical for pathogenicity inside the host. In addition, the potential effect of PDAs on gut microbiota is discussed. PMID:25298964

  13. Mechanistic causality and counterfactual-manipulative causality: recent insights from philosophy of science.

    PubMed

    Campaner, Raffaella

    2011-12-01

    Current epidemiological and statistical theory about research methods and how to elicit causation from epidemiological studies is strongly influenced by counterfactual-manipulative thinking. However, thinking about how disease states develop is rooted in mechanistic 'webs of causes'. After a tremendous growth of research in molecular biology, biochemistry and genetics, attention has increasingly been paid to environmental and socioeconomic factors as determinants of diseases. This led to conceiving of most pathologies as caused by multilevel mechanical systems. The nature of 'mechanisms' has been the subject of extensive philosophical reflection over the past couple of decades. The present paper will first present some of today's philosophical insights in what are called biologic or other 'mechanisms' and thereafter show how these concepts can be linked to counterfactual-manipulative views.

  14. Unification and mechanistic detail as drivers of model construction: models of networks in economics and sociology.

    PubMed

    Kuorikoski, Jaakko; Marchionni, Caterina

    2014-12-01

    We examine the diversity of strategies of modelling networks in (micro) economics and (analytical) sociology. Field-specific conceptions of what explaining (with) networks amounts to or systematic preference for certain kinds of explanatory factors are not sufficient to account for differences in modelling methodologies. We argue that network models in both sociology and economics are abstract models of network mechanisms and that differences in their modelling strategies derive to a large extent from field-specific conceptions of the way in which a good model should be a general one. Whereas the economics models aim at unification, the sociological models aim at a set of mechanism schemas that are extrapolatable to the extent that the underlying psychological mechanisms are general. These conceptions of generality induce specific biases in mechanistic explanation and are related to different views of when knowledge from different fields should be seen as relevant.

  15. Mechanistic study of synthesis of gold nanoparticles using multi-functional polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Taekyung; Kim, Rayoung; Park, Hoseok; Yi, Jonghyup; Kim, Woo-Sik

    2014-01-01

    This Letter presents a mechanistic study of the large-scale synthesis of Au nanoparticles when using branched polyethyleneimine (BPEI) as a multi-functional reducing agent, capping agent, and stabilizer. During the synthesis, the molar ratio of BPEI/HAuCl4, reaction temperature, and pH of the reacting solution were all found to be important factors in the formation, size control, and stabilization of the Au nanoparticles. The proposed synthetic route provided a highly concentrated product of Au nanoparticles (above 40 g/L), at least 10- to 200-fold more than previous methods, and can be readily applied to a large-scale process due to its simple and mild reaction conditions.

  16. Allozyme diversity in endemic flowering plant species of the Juan Fernandez Archipelago, Chile: ecological and historical factors with implications for conservation.

    PubMed

    Crawford, D J; Ruiz, E; Stuessy, T F; Tepe, E; Aqeveque, P; Gonzalez, F; Jensen, R J; Anderson, G J; Bernardello, G; Baeza, C M; Swenson, U; Silva O, M

    2001-12-01

    The level and apportionment of allozyme diversity were determined for 29 endemic (and 1 native) species from the Juan Fernández Islands, Chile. Mean diversities at the species level (H(es) = 0.065) are low but comparable to those measured for other insular endemics in the Pacific. A high mean proportion (0.338) of species-level diversity resides among populations. Diversity statistics were compared for species in different ecological-life history trait categories and abundance classes. Species occurring in large populations and those present in scattered small populations have higher diversities than species occurring in one or two populations. Although not significant with the conservative statistical test employed, lower diversity was found in highly selfing species as compared to animal- or wind-pollinated species. The apportionment of genetic diversity within and among populations (G(ST) values) is not significantly different for any of the species categories. Of particular interest is the lack of difference between animal- and wind-pollinated species because previous analyses of large data sets showed higher differentiation between populations of animal- than wind-pollinated species. Historical factors, both ecological and phylogenetic in nature, can influence the level and apportionment of diversity within insular endemics, and thus ecological correlates of diversity seen in many continental species may not apply to endemics. The results have several conservation implications. The preservation of large populations or several small populations is important for conserving diversity within species because when species are reduced to one or two populations, allozyme diversity is sharply reduced. High mean G(ST) values for the species examined illustrate the need for conserving as many populations as possible, either in the wild or in the garden, to preserve maximal diversity within species. Effective conservation strategies require empirical knowledge of each

  17. Heat acclimation increases hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha and erythropoietin receptor expression: implication for neuroprotection after closed head injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Shein, Na'ama A; Horowitz, Michal; Alexandrovich, Alexander G; Tsenter, Jeanna; Shohami, Esther

    2005-11-01

    Experimental evidence indicates that long-term exposure to moderately high ambient temperature (heat acclimation, HA) mediates cross-tolerance to various types of subsequently applied stress. The transcriptional activator hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) has been implicated in playing a critical role in HA. It also regulates the expression of Erythropoietin (Epo), whose neuroprotective effects have been shown in a variety of brain injuries. The aim of the present study was to examine whether HA exerts a beneficial effect on the outcome of closed head injury (CHI) in mice and to explore the possible involvement of HIF-1 and Epo in this process. Heat acclimated mice and matched normothermic controls were subjected to CHI or sham surgery. Postinjury motor and cognitive parameters of acclimated mice were compared with those of controls. Mice were killed at various time points after injury or sham surgery and brain levels of HIF-1alpha, the inducible subunit of HIF-1, Epo, and the specific erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) were analyzed by Western immunoblotting. Motor and cognitive functions of acclimated mice were significantly better than those of controls. Heat acclimation was found to induce a significant increase in expression of nuclear HIF-1alpha and EpoR. The EpoR/Epo ratio was also significantly higher in acclimated mice as compared with controls. Nuclear HIF-1alpha and EpoR were higher in the acclimated group at 4 h after injury as well. The improved outcome of acclimated mice taken together with the basal and postinjury upregulation of the examined proteins suggests the involvement of this pathway in HA-induced neuroprotection.

  18. Stressor and glucocorticoid-dependent induction of the immediate early gene kruppel-like factor 9: implications for neural development and plasticity.

    PubMed

    Bonett, Ronald M; Hu, Fang; Bagamasbad, Pia; Denver, Robert J

    2009-04-01

    Krüppel-like factor 9 (KLF9) is a thyroid hormone-induced, immediate early gene implicated in neural development in vertebrates. We analyzed stressor and glucocorticoid (GC)-dependent regulation of KLF9 expression in the brain of the frog Xenopus laevis, and investigated a possible role for KLF9 in neuronal differentiation. Exposure to shaking/confinement stressor increased plasma corticosterone (CORT) concentration, and KLF9 immunoreactivity in several brain regions, which included the medial amygdala and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, anterior preoptic area (homologous to the mammalian paraventricular nucleus), and optic tectum (homologous to the mammalian superior colliculus). The stressor-induced KLF9 mRNA expression in the brain was blocked by pretreatment with the GC receptor antagonist RU486, or mimicked by injection of CORT. Treatment with CORT also caused a rapid and dose-dependent increase in KLF9 mRNA in X. laevis XTC-2 cells that was resistant to inhibition of protein synthesis. The action of CORT on KLF9 expression in XTC-2 cells was blocked by RU486, but not by the mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist spironolactone. To test for functional consequences of up-regulation of KLF9, we introduced a KLF9 expression plasmid into living tadpole brain by electroporation-mediated gene transfer. Forced expression of KLF9 in tadpole brain caused an increase in Golgi-stained cells, reflective of neuronal differentiation/maturation. Our results support that KLF9 is a direct, GC receptor target gene that is induced by stress, and functions as an intermediary in the actions of GCs on brain gene expression and neuronal structure.

  19. Cathepsin D: an Mϕ-derived factor mediating increased endothelial cell permeability with implications for alteration of the blood-retinal barrier in diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Monickaraj, Finny; McGuire, Paul G; Nitta, Carolina Franco; Ghosh, Kaustabh; Das, Arup

    2016-04-01

    Inflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy (DR). We have previously reported increased monocyte (Mono) trafficking into the retinas of diabetic animals. In this study, we have examined the effect of activated Monos on retinal endothelial cells (ECs). The U937 Mϕ-conditioned medium (CM) significantly decreased the transendothelial resistance of EC monolayers as measured by electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (P= 0.007). The CM was fractioned, and the effective fraction (30-100 kDa) was analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, and cathepsin D (CD) was identified as a major secreted product. Immunoprecipitated CD resulted in decreased resistance in ECs (P= 0.006). The specificity of CD in mediating alterations of the EC barrier was confirmed using small interfering RNA. The decreased resistance correlated with a significantly increased gap between ECs. CD altered the Ras homolog gene family, member A/Rho-associated kinase pathway with increased stress actin filament formation in the EC layer. Increased CD levels were found in the retinas of diabetic mice (3-fold) and serum samples of patients with diabetic macular edema (1.6-fold) measured by Western blot and ELISA. These findings suggest an important role for Mϕ-derived CD in altering the blood-retinal barrier and reveal a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of DR.-Monickaraj, F., McGuire, P. G., Nitta, C. F., Ghosh, K., Das, A. Cathepsin D: an Mϕ-derived factor mediating increased endothelial cell permeability with implications for alteration of the blood-retinal barrier in diabetic retinopathy. PMID:26718887

  20. Overexpression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha impacts FoxP3 levels in mycosis fungoides--cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Alcántara-Hernández, M; Torres-Zárate, C; Pérez-Montesinos, G; Jurado-Santacruz, F; Domínguez-Gómez, M A; Peniche-Castellanos, A; Ferat-Osorio, E; Neri, N; Nambo, M J; Alvarado-Cabrero, I; Moreno-Lafont, M; Huerta-Yepez, S; Bonifaz, L C

    2014-05-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) is the most common variant of primary cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, and decreased forkhead box P3 (FoxP3) expression has been reported in MF late stages. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α) may regulate FoxP3 expression; however, it is unknown whether HIF-1α is expressed in the CD4(+) T cells of MF patients and how it could affect the expression of FoxP3. Therefore, we evaluated the expression of HIF-1α and FoxP3 in CD4(+) T cells obtained from the skin lesions of MF patients. We found increased cell proliferation and an increase in CD4(+) T cells with an aberrant phenotype among early stage MF patients. HIF-1α was overexpressed in these CD4(+) T cells. In addition, we found a decrease in the percentage of FoxP3(+) cells both in the skin of MF patients, when compared with control skin samples, and with disease progression. In addition, a negative correlation was established between HIF-1α and FoxP3 expression. Skin HIF-1α expression in MF patients correlated with the extent of the affected area and increased with the disease progression. Finally, we showed that ex vivo inhibition of HIF-1α degradation increases the percentage of FoxP3(+) T cells in skin lesions. Our results suggest that overexpression of HIF-1α affects the levels of FoxP3 in MF patients, which could have relevant implications in terms of disease outcome.

  1. Discerning mechanistically rewired biological pathways by cumulative interaction heterogeneity statistics.

    PubMed

    Cotton, Travis B; Nguyen, Hien H; Said, Joseph I; Ouyang, Zhengyu; Zhang, Jinfa; Song, Mingzhou

    2015-01-01

    Changes in response of a biological pathway could be a consequence of either pathway rewiring, changed input, or a combination of both. Most pathway analysis methods are not designed for mechanistic rewiring such as regulatory element variations. This limits our understanding of biological pathway evolution. Here we present a Q-method to discern whether changed pathway response is caused by mechanistic rewiring of pathways due to evolution. The main innovation is a cumulative pathway interaction heterogeneity statistic accounting for rewiring-specific effects on the rate of change of each molecular variable across conditions. The Q-method remarkably outperformed differential-correlation based approaches on data from diverse biological processes. Strikingly, it also worked well in differentiating rewired chaotic systems, whose dynamics are notoriously difficult to predict. Applying the Q-method on transcriptome data of four yeasts, we show that pathway interaction heterogeneity for known metabolic and signaling pathways is indeed a predictor of interspecies genetic rewiring due to unbalanced TATA box-containing genes among the yeasts. The demonstrated effectiveness of the Q-method paves the way to understanding network evolution at the resolution of functional biological pathways. PMID:25921728

  2. Mechanistic study of a diazo dye degradation by Soybean Peroxidase

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Enzyme based remediation of wastewater is emerging as a novel, efficient and environmentally-friendlier approach. However, studies showing detailed mechanisms of enzyme mediated degradation of organic pollutants are not widely published. Results The present report describes a detailed study on the use of Soybean Peroxidase to efficiently degrade Trypan Blue, a diazo dye. In addition to examining various parameters that can affect the dye degradation ability of the enzyme, such as enzyme and H2O2 concentration, reaction pH and temperature, we carried out a detailed mechanistic study of Trypan Blue degradation. HPLC-DAD and LC-MS/MS studies were carried out to confirm dye degradation and analyze the intermediate metabolites and develop a detailed mechanistic dye degradation pathway. Conclusion We report that Soybean peroxidase causes Trypan Blue degradation via symmetrical azo bond cleavage and subsequent radical-initiated ring opening of the metabolites. Interestingly, our results also show that no high molecular weight polymers were produced during the peroxidase-H2O2 mediated degradation of the phenolic Trypan Blue. PMID:23711110

  3. Modeling of batch sorber system: kinetic, mechanistic, and thermodynamic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Vishal

    2016-09-01

    The present investigation has dealt with the biosorption of copper and zinc ions on the surface of egg-shell particles in the liquid phase. Various rate models were evaluated to elucidate the kinetics of copper and zinc biosorptions, and the results indicated that the pseudo-second-order model was more appropriate than the pseudo-first-order model. The curve of the initial sorption rate versus the initial concentration of copper and zinc ions also complemented the results of the pseudo-second-order model. Models used for the mechanistic modeling were the intra-particle model of pore diffusion and Bangham's model of film diffusion. The results of the mechanistic modeling together with the values of pore and film diffusivities indicated that the preferential mode of the biosorption of copper and zinc ions on the surface of egg-shell particles in the liquid phase was film diffusion. The results of the intra-particle model showed that the biosorption of the copper and zinc ions was not dominated by the pore diffusion, which was due to macro-pores with open-void spaces present on the surface of egg-shell particles. The thermodynamic modeling reproduced the fact that the sorption of copper and zinc was spontaneous, exothermic with the increased order of the randomness at the solid-liquid interface.

  4. Grignard Reaction of an Epoxide: A Mechanistic Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciaccio, James A.; Volpi, Sabrina; Clarke, Ransford

    1996-12-01

    Addition of PhMgBr to styrene oxide (1) affords a mixture of 2,2-diphenylethanol (3) and 1,2-diphenylethanol (6) (3:6 = 1:3); reversing the order of addition inverts the ratio of 3 to 6 formed (3:6 = 2:1). Students identify 3 and 6 by TLC comparison with authentic samples which they prepare by independent synthesis (hydride reduction of the corresponding carbonyl compounds), and establish the ratios of 3 to 6 by a combination of 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopies. This undergraduate experiment serves as an interesting alternative to more traditional Grignard experiments and is an excellent vehicle for a "discovery-based" experiment in which students are introduced to epoxide chemistry, share their laboratory data and make mechanistic conclusions from their experimental results. Unlike most undergraduate Grignard experiments which are performed merely for the sake of illustrating a textbook reaction, this Grignard synthesis is performed to probe the reactivity of styrene oxide. Students are required to analyze their products by TLC and NMR spectroscopy (instead of just submitting them for a grade) in order to obtain the data necessary for making mechanistic conclusions.

  5. Trichloroethylene: Mechanistic, epidemiologic and other supporting evidence of carcinogenic hazard.

    PubMed

    Rusyn, Ivan; Chiu, Weihsueh A; Lash, Lawrence H; Kromhout, Hans; Hansen, Johnni; Guyton, Kathryn Z

    2014-01-01

    The chlorinated solvent trichloroethylene (TCE) is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant. The carcinogenic hazard of TCE was the subject of a 2012 evaluation by a Working Group of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Information on exposures, relevant data from epidemiologic studies, bioassays in experimental animals, and toxicity and mechanism of action studies was used to conclude that TCE is carcinogenic to humans (Group 1). This article summarizes the key evidence forming the scientific bases for the IARC classification. Exposure to TCE from environmental sources (including hazardous waste sites and contaminated water) is common throughout the world. While workplace use of TCE has been declining, occupational exposures remain of concern, especially in developing countries. The strongest human evidence is from studies of occupational TCE exposure and kidney cancer. Positive, although less consistent, associations were reported for liver cancer and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. TCE is carcinogenic at multiple sites in multiple species and strains of experimental animals. The mechanistic evidence includes extensive data on the toxicokinetics and genotoxicity of TCE and its metabolites. Together, available evidence provided a cohesive database supporting the human cancer hazard of TCE, particularly in the kidney. For other target sites of carcinogenicity, mechanistic and other data were found to be more limited. Important sources of susceptibility to TCE toxicity and carcinogenicity were also reviewed by the Working Group. In all, consideration of the multiple evidence streams presented herein informed the IARC conclusions regarding the carcinogenicity of TCE.

  6. From Data Patterns to Mechanistic Models in Acute Critical Illness

    PubMed Central

    Aerts, Jean-Marie; Haddad, Wassim M.; An, Gary; Vodovotz, Yoram

    2014-01-01

    The complexity of the physiologic and inflammatory response in acute critical illness has stymied the accurate diagnosis and development of therapies. The Society for Complex Acute Illness was formed a decade ago with the goal of leveraging multiple complex systems approaches in order to address this unmet need. Two main paths of development have characterized the Society’s approach: i) data pattern analysis, either defining the diagnostic/prognostic utility of complexity metrics of physiological signals or multivariate analyses of molecular and genetic data, and ii) mechanistic mathematical and computational modeling, all being performed with an explicit translational goal. Here, we summarize the progress to date on each of these approaches, along with pitfalls inherent in the use of each approach alone. We suggest that the next decade holds the potential to merge these approaches, connecting patient diagnosis to treatment via mechanism-based dynamical system modeling and feedback control, and allowing extrapolation from physiologic signals to biomarkers to novel drug candidates. As a predicate example, we focus on the role of data-driven and mechanistic models in neuroscience, and the impact that merging these modeling approaches can have on general anesthesia. PMID:24768566

  7. Trichloroethylene: Mechanistic, Epidemiologic and Other Supporting Evidence of Carcinogenic Hazard

    PubMed Central

    Rusyn, Ivan; Chiu, Weihsueh A.; Lash, Lawrence H.; Kromhout, Hans; Hansen, Johnni; Guyton, Kathryn Z.

    2013-01-01

    The chlorinated solvent trichloroethylene (TCE) is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant. The carcinogenic hazard of TCE was the subject of a 2012 evaluation by a Working Group of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Information on exposures, relevant data from epidemiologic studies, bioassays in experimental animals, and toxicity and mechanism of action studies was used to conclude that TCE is carcinogenic to humans (Group 1). This article summarizes the key evidence forming the scientific bases for the IARC classification. Exposure to TCE from environmental sources (including from hazardous waste sites and contaminated water) is common throughout the world. While workplace use of TCE has been declining, occupational exposures remain of concern, especially in developing countries. Strongest human evidence is from studies of occupational TCE exposure and kidney cancer. Positive, although less consistent, associations were reported for liver cancer and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. TCE is carcinogenic at multiple sites in multiple species and strains of experimental animals. The mechanistic evidence includes extensive data on the toxicokinetics and genotoxicity of TCE and its metabolites. Together, available evidence provided a cohesive database supporting the human cancer hazard of TCE, particularly in the kidney. For other target sites of carcinogenicity, mechanistic and other data were found to be more limited. Important sources of susceptibility to TCE toxicity and carcinogenicity were also reviewed by the Working Group. In all, consideration of the multiple evidence streams presented herein informed the IARC conclusions regarding the carcinogenicity of TCE. PMID:23973663

  8. Water on hydrophobic surfaces: Mechanistic modeling of hydrophobic interaction chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang; Hahn, Tobias; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2016-09-23

    Mechanistic models are successfully used for protein purification process development as shown for ion-exchange column chromatography (IEX). Modeling and simulation of hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) in the column mode has been seldom reported. As a combination of these two techniques is often encountered in biopharmaceutical purification steps, accurate modeling of protein adsorption in HIC is a core issue for applying holistic model-based process development, especially in the light of the Quality by Design (QbD) approach. In this work, a new mechanistic isotherm model for HIC is derived by consideration of an equilibrium between well-ordered water molecules and bulk-like ordered water molecules on the hydrophobic surfaces of protein and ligand. The model's capability of describing column chromatography experiments is demonstrated with glucose oxidase, bovine serum albumin (BSA), and lysozyme on Capto™ Phenyl (high sub) as model system. After model calibration from chromatograms of bind-and-elute experiments, results were validated with batch isotherms and prediction of further gradient elution chromatograms. PMID:27575919

  9. Factors associated with physical and sexual violence by police among people who inject drugs in Ukraine: implications for retention on opioid agonist therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kutsa, Oksana; Marcus, Ruthanne; Bojko, Martha J; Zelenev, Alexei; Mazhnaya, Alyona; Dvoriak, Sergii; Filippovych, Sergii; Altice, Frederick L

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Ukraine's volatile HIV epidemic, one of the largest in Eastern Europe and Central Asia, remains concentrated in people who inject drugs (PWID). HIV prevalence is high (21.3% to 41.8%) among the estimated 310,000 PWID. Opioid agonist therapy (OAT) is the most cost-effective HIV prevention strategy there, yet OAT services are hampered by negative attitudes and frequent harassment of OAT clients and site personnel by law enforcement. This paper examines the various types of police violence that Ukrainian PWID experience and factors associated with the different types of violence, as well as the possible implications of police harassment on OAT retention. Methods In 2014 to 2015, we conducted a cross-sectional survey in five Ukrainian cities with 1613 PWID currently, previously and never on OAT, using a combination of respondent-driven sampling, as well as random sampling. We analysed correlates of police violence by multiple factors, including by gender, and their effects on duration of OAT retention. Self-reported physical and sexual violence by police were the two primary outcomes, while retention on OAT was used as a secondary outcome. Results Overall, 1033 (64.0%) PWID reported being physically assaulted by police, which was positively correlated with currently or previously being on OAT (69.1% vs. 60.2%; p<0.01). HIV prevalence rates were higher in those receiving OAT than those not on OAT (47.6% vs. 36.1%; p<0.01). Police violence experiences differed by sex, with men experiencing significantly more physical violence, while women experienced more sexual violence (65.9% vs. 42.6%; p<0.01). For PWID who had successfully accessed OAT, longer OAT retention was significantly correlated both with sexual assault by police and fewer non-fatal overdoses. Conclusions Police violence is a frequent experience among PWID in Ukraine, particularly for those accessing OAT, an evidence-based primary and secondary HIV prevention strategy. Police violence experiences

  10. Mechanistic insight from in silico pharmacokinetic experiments: roles of P-glycoprotein, Cyp3A4 enzymes, and microenvironments.

    PubMed

    Lam, Tai Ning; Hunt, C Anthony

    2010-02-01

    Saquinavir exhibits paradoxical transport across modified Caco-2 cell monolayers (doi: 10.1124/jpet.103.056390) expressing P-glycoprotein and Cyp3A4. The data implicate complicated intracellular transport mechanisms. Drawing on recent discrete event modeling and simulation advances, we built an in silico analog of the confluent, asymmetric cell monolayer used in the cited work. We call it in silico experimental Caco-2 (cell monolayer) culture (ISECC). Concrete, working, hypothesized spatial mechanisms were implemented. Validation was achieved when in silico experimental results met similarity measure (SM) expectations that targeted 16 wet-lab experimental conditions. Initial mechanistic hypotheses turned out to be necessary parts of a more complicated explanation. We progressed through four stages of an iterative refinement and validation protocol that enabled and facilitated discovery of plausible, new mechanistic details. The process exercised abductive reasoning, a primary means of scientific knowledge creation and creative cognition. The ISECC that survived the most stringent SM challenge produced transport data that was statistically indistinguishable from referent wet-lab observations. It required a 7:1 ratio of apical transporters to metabolizing enzymes, a 97% reduction of efflux activity by an inhibitor, a biased distribution of metabolizing enzymes, heterogeneous intracellular spaces, and restrictions on intracellular drug movement. Experimenting on synthetic analogs such as ISECC provides a former unavailable means of discovering new mechanistic details and testing their plausibility. The approach thus provides a powerful new expansion of the scientific method: an independent, scientific means to challenge, explore, better understand, and improve any inductive mechanism and, importantly, the assumptions on which it rests. PMID:19864617

  11. Environmental Factors, Toxicants and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Anselm; Tay, Sen Hee

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an immune-complex-mediated multi-systemic autoimmune condition of multifactorial etiology, which mainly affects young women. It is currently believed that the onset of SLE and lupus flares are triggered by various environmental factors in genetically susceptible individuals. Various environmental agents and toxicants, such as cigarette smoke, alcohol, occupationally- and non-occupationally-related chemicals, ultraviolet light, infections, sex hormones and certain medications and vaccines, have been implicated to induce SLE onset or flares in a number case series, case-control and population-based cohort studies and very few randomized controlled trials. Here, we will describe some of these recognized environmental lupus triggering and perpetuating factors and explain how these factors potentially bias the immune system towards autoimmunity through their interactions with genetic and epigenetic alterations. Further in-depth exploration of how potentially important environmental factors mechanistically interact with the immune system and the genome, which trigger the onset of SLE and lupus flares, will certainly be one of the plausible steps to prevent the onset and to decelerate the progress of the disease. PMID:25216337

  12. Pain, Nicotine, and Smoking: Research Findings and Mechanistic Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Ditre, Joseph W.; Brandon, Thomas H.; Zale, Emily L.; Meagher, Mary M.

    2011-01-01

    Tobacco addiction and chronic pain represent two highly prevalent and comorbid conditions that engender substantial burdens upon individuals and systems. Although interrelations between pain and smoking have been of clinical and empirical interest for decades, research on the topic of pain, nicotine, and tobacco smoking has increased dramatically over the past five years. We conceptualize the interaction of pain and smoking as a prototypical example of the biopsychosocial model. Accordingly, the current review extrapolated from behavioral, cognitive, affective, biomedical, and social perspectives to propose causal mechanisms that may contribute to the observed comorbidity between these two conditions. Research in the broad area of pain and smoking was first dichotomized into investigations of either "effects of smoking on pain" or "effects of pain on smoking." We then integrated the extant literature to present a reciprocal model of pain and smoking that is hypothesized to interact in the manner of a positive feedback loop, resulting in greater pain, increased smoking, and the maintenance of tobacco addiction. Finally, we proposed directions for future research, and discussed clinical implications for smokers with comorbid pain disorders. We observed modest evidence to support the notions that smoking may be a risk factor in the multifactorial etiology of some chronically painful conditions, and that the experience of pain may come to serve as a potent motivator of smoking. We also found that whereas animal studies yielded consistent support for direct pain-inhibitory effects of nicotine and tobacco smoke, results from human studies were much less consistent. Future research in the emerging area of pain and smoking has the potential to inform theoretical and clinical applications with respect to tobacco smoking, chronic pain, and their comorbid presentation. PMID:21967450

  13. Immunosuppressive potency of mechanistic target of rapamycin inhibitors in solid-organ transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Baroja-Mazo, Alberto; Revilla-Nuin, Beatriz; Ramírez, Pablo; Pons, José A

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin, also known as mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a protein kinase that belongs to the PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway, which is involved in several fundamental cellular functions such as cell growth, proliferation, and survival. This protein and its associated pathway have been implicated in cancer development and the regulation of immune responses, including the rejection response generated following allograft transplantation. Inhibitors of mTOR (mTORi) such as rapamycin and its derivative everolimus are potent immunosuppressive drugs that both maintain similar rates of efficacy and could optimize the renal function and diminish the side effects compared with calcineurin inhibitors. These drugs are used in solid-organ transplantationtoinduceimmunosuppression while also promoting the expansion of CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ regulatory T-cells that could favor a scenery of immunological tolerance. In this review, we describe the mechanisms by which inhibitors of mTOR induce suppression by regulation of these pathways at different levels of the immune response. In addition, we particularly emphasize about the main methods that are used to assess the potency of immunosuppressive drugs, highlighting the studies carried out about immunosuppressive potency of inhibitors of mTOR. PMID:27011916

  14. Crystal structure of the sodium–proton antiporter NhaA dimer and new mechanistic insights

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chiara; Yashiro, Shoko; Dotson, David L.; Uzdavinys, Povilas; Iwata, So; Sansom, Mark S.P.; von Ballmoos, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Sodium–proton antiporters rapidly exchange protons and sodium ions across the membrane to regulate intracellular pH, cell volume, and sodium concentration. How ion binding and release is coupled to the conformational changes associated with transport is not clear. Here, we report a crystal form of the prototypical sodium–proton antiporter NhaA from Escherichia coli in which the protein is seen as a dimer. In this new structure, we observe a salt bridge between an essential aspartic acid (Asp163) and a conserved lysine (Lys300). An equivalent salt bridge is present in the homologous transporter NapA, but not in the only other known crystal structure of NhaA, which provides the foundation of most existing structural models of electrogenic sodium–proton antiport. Molecular dynamics simulations show that the stability of the salt bridge is weakened by sodium ions binding to Asp164 and the neighboring Asp163. This suggests that the transport mechanism involves Asp163 switching between forming a salt bridge with Lys300 and interacting with the sodium ion. pKa calculations suggest that Asp163 is highly unlikely to be protonated when involved in the salt bridge. As it has been previously suggested that Asp163 is one of the two residues through which proton transport occurs, these results have clear implications to the current mechanistic models of sodium–proton antiport in NhaA. PMID:25422503

  15. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-lipid interactions: Mechanistic insight and biological function.

    PubMed

    Baenziger, John E; Hénault, Camille M; Therien, J P Daniel; Sun, Jiayin

    2015-09-01

    Membrane lipids are potent modulators of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) from Torpedo. Lipids influence nAChR function by both conformational selection and kinetic mechanisms, stabilizing varying proportions of activatable versus non-activatable conformations, as well as influencing the transitions between these conformational states. Of note, some membranes stabilize an electrically silent uncoupled conformation that binds agonist but does not undergo agonist-induced conformational transitions. The uncoupled nAChR, however, does transition to activatable conformations in relatively thick lipid bilayers, such as those found in lipid rafts. In this review, we discuss current understanding of lipid-nAChR interactions in the context of increasingly available high resolution structural and functional data. These data highlight different sites of lipid action, including the lipid-exposed M4 transmembrane α-helix. Current evidence suggests that lipids alter nAChR function by modulating interactions between M4 and the adjacent transmembrane α-helices, M1 and M3. These interactions have also been implicated in both the folding and trafficking of nAChRs to the cell surface. We review current mechanistic understanding of lipid-nAChR interactions, and highlight potential biological roles for lipid-nAChR interactions in modulating the synaptic response. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipid-protein interactions. PMID:25791350

  16. Perspectives on the Application of Mechanistic Information in Chemical Hazard and Dose-Response Assessments

    EPA Science Inventory

    This overview summarizes several EPA Assessment publications reviewing approaches for applying mechanistic information in human health risk assessment and exploring opportunities for progress in this area.

  17. A new mechanistic framework to predict OCS fluxes in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauze, Joana; Ogee, Jérôme; Launois, Thomas; Kesselmeier, Jürgen; Van Diest, Heidi; Wingate, Lisa

    2015-04-01

    A better description of the amplitude of photosynthetic and respiratory gross CO2 fluxes at large scales is needed to improve our predictions of the current and future global CO2 cycle. Carbonyl sulfide (COS) is the most abundant sulphur gas in the atmosphere and has been proposed as a new tracer of gross photosynthesis, as the uptake of COS from the atmosphere is dominated by the activity of carbonic anhydrase (CA), an enzyme abundant in leaves that also catalyses CO2 hydration during photosynthesis. However, soils also exchange COS with the atmosphere and there is growing evidence that this flux must also be accounted for in atmospheric budgets. In this context a new mechanistic description of soil-atmosphere COS exchange is clearly needed. Soils can take up COS from the atmosphere as the soil biota also contain CA, and COS emissions from soils have also been reported in agricultural fields or anoxic soils. Previous studies have also shown that soil COS fluxes present an optimum soil water content and soil temperature. Here we propose a new mechanistic framework to predict the fluxes of COS between the soils and the atmosphere. We describe the COS soil budget by a first-order reaction-diffusion-production equation, assuming that the hydrolysis of COS by CA is total and irreversible. To describe COS diffusion through the soil matrix, we use different formulations of soil air-filled pore space and temperature, depending on the turbulence level above the soil surface. Using this model we are able to explain the observed presence of an optimum temperature for soil COS uptake and show how this optimum can shift to cooler temperatures in the presence of soil COS emissions. Our model can also explain the observed optimum with soil moisture content previously described in the literature (e.g. Van Diest & Kesselmeier, 2008) as a result of diffusional constraints on COS hydrolysis. These diffusional constraints are also responsible for the response of COS uptake to soil

  18. Conservative or reactive? Mechanistic chemical perspectives on organic matter stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Boris

    2016-04-01

    Carbon fixation by terrestrial and marine primary production has a fundamental seasonal effect on the atmospheric carbon content and it profoundly contributes to long-term carbon storage in form of organic matter (OM) in soils, water, and sediments. The efficacy of this sequestration process strongly depends on the degree of OM persistence. Therefore, one of the key issues in dissolved and particulate OM research is to assess the stability of reservoirs and to quantify their contribution to global carbon fluxes. Incubation experiments are helpful to assess OM stability during the first, early diagenetic turnover induced by sunlight or microbes. However, net carbon fluxes within the global carbon cycle also act on much longer time scales, which are not amenable in experiments. It is therefore critical to improve our mechanistic understanding to be able to assess potential future changes in the organic matter cycle. This session contribution highlights some achievements and open questions in the field. An improved mechanistic understanding of OM turnover particularly depends on the molecular characterization of biogeochemical processes and their kinetics: (i) in soils and sediments, aggregation/disaggregation of OM is primarily controlled by its molecular composition. Hence, the chemical composition determines the transfer of organic carbon from the large particulate to the small dissolved organic matter reservoir - an important substrate for microbial metabolism. (ii) In estuaries, dissolved organic carbon gradients usually suggest conservative behavior, whereas molecular-level studies reveal a substantial chemical modification of terrestrial DOM along the land-ocean interface. (iii) In the ocean, previous studies have shown that the recalcitrance of OM depends on bulk concentration and energy yield. However, ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry in combination with radiocarbon analyses also emphasized that stability is tightly connected to molecular composition

  19. Mechanistic models of plant seed dispersal by wind in heterogeneous landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trakhtenbrot, A.; Katul, G. G.; Nathan, R.

    2010-12-01

    Seed dispersal, and especially long-distance dispersal (LDD), is a key process in plant population survival, colonization, and gene flow. Its importance is amplified by the man-induced habitat fragmentation, climate change and invasions of exotic species. Mechanistic seed dispersal models are central to quantitative prediction of dispersal patterns and understanding their underlying mechanisms. For wind dispersal, most current mechanistic models assume homogenous environment. Although both topography and sharp transitions in vegetation stature profoundly affect wind flow, accounting for these effects via simplified models remains a vexing research problem. Such simplified models are needed to inform ecosystem managers about consequences of landscape fragmentation. We modified the Coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian closure (CELC) mechanistic dispersal model to represent scenarios of wind flow over a sharp transition from short to tall vegetation or over forested hilly terrain, and predicted the resulting dispersal distances and direction. We parameterized the wind and vegetation factors using measurements taken on a hill with short height Mediterranean shrubland and pine forest vegetation at Mt. Pithulim, Israel. For the short-to-tall vegetation transition scenario, the main feature of the modeled wind field is an exponential decay of the mean horizontal wind velocity, assuming that the mean momentum equation simplifies to a balance between the advective acceleration and the drag force terms. As a consequence of the incompressibility condition, this exponential decay leads to strong upward mean vertical velocity component. We found that for seed release downwind of the edge, the simulated median (short) and 99-th percentile (long) distances were longer than those for the homogeneous tall vegetation scenario. For seed release upwind of the edge the effect on dispersal distance was more complex and depended on the release height and he seed terminal velocity of the seeds

  20. A reductionist mechanistic model for bioconcentration of neutral and weakly polar organic compounds in fish.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Dave T F; Di Toro, Dominic M

    2013-09-01

    The bioconcentration factor (BCF) of neutral and weakly polar organic chemicals in fish is modeled using independently calibrated models of chemical partitioning (freely dissolved fraction of chemical in the aqueous phase [φsys ] and wet-weight fish-water partition coefficient [KFW ]), respiratory exchange (respiratory update rate constant [k1 ], and respiratory elimination rate constant [k2  = k1 /KFW ]), and biotransformation (whole-body biotransformation rate constant [kM ]) as BCF = φsys KFW /(1 + kM /k2 ). Existing k1 models tend to overestimate for chemicals with log KOW  < 3.5, which constituted 30% to 50% of the examined chemicals. A revised k1 model covering a wider log KOW range (0-8.5) is presented k1  = (5.46 × 10(-6) MW + 0.261/KOW )(-1) , where MW is the molecular weight. The biotransformation rate constant kM is modeled using biota internal partitioning and Abraham parameters as reactivity descriptors. The reductionist model was tested using 3 different BCF data sets (US Environmental Protection Agency's Estimation Programs Interface [EPI], n = 548; Hertfordshire, n = 210; Arnot-Gobas, n = 1855) and compared with the following 3 state-of-the-art models: 1) the EPI Suite BCFBAF module, 2) the European Commision's Computer Assisted Evaluation of industrial chemical Substances According to Regulations (CAESAR), and 3) the EPI/Arnot mechanistic kinetic model. The reductionist model performed comparably with the alternative models (root mean square errors [RMSEs] = 0.72-0.77), with only 5 fitting parameters and no training against experimental BCFs. Respiratory elimination and biotransformation dominate the total depuration (i.e., [k2  + kM ]/kT  ≥ 0.8) for approximately 98% of the data entries, thus validating the reductionist approximation. Mechanistic models provide greater insights into bioaccumulation and are more sensitive to biological variation. All three BCF data sets and relevant

  1. Siderophilic Cyanobacteria: Implications for Early Earth.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, I. I.; Mummey, D.; Sarkisova, S.; Shen, G.; Bryant, D. A.; Lindsay, J.; Garrison, D.; McKay, D. S.

    2006-01-01

    Of all extant environs, iron-depositing hot springs (IDHS) may exhibit the greatest similarity to late Precambrian shallow warm oceans in regards to temperature, O2 gradients and dissolved iron and H2S concentrations. Despite the insights into the ecology, evolutionary biology, paleogeobiochemistry, and astrobiology examination of IDHS could potentially provide, very few studies dedicated to the physiology and diversity of cyanobacteria (CB) inhabiting IDHS have been conducted. Results. Here we describe the phylogeny, physiology, ultrastructure and biogeochemical activity of several recent CB isolates from two different greater Yellowstone area IDHS, LaDuke and Chocolate Pots. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA genes indicated that 6 of 12 new isolates examined couldn't be placed within established CB genera. Some of the isolates exhibited pronounced requirements for elevated iron concentrations, with maximum growth rates observed when 0.4-1 mM Fe(3+) was present in the media. In light of "typical" CB iron requirements, our results indicate that elevated iron likely represents a salient factor selecting for "siderophilicM CB species in IDHS. A universal feature of our new isolates is their ability to produce thick EPS layers in which iron accumulates resulting in the generation of well preserved signatures. In parallel, siderophilic CB show enhanced ability to etch the analogs of iron-rich lunar regolith minerals and impact glasses. Despite that iron deposition by CB is not well understood mechanistically, we recently obtained evidence that the PS I:PS II ratio is higher in one of our isolates than for other CB. Although still preliminary, this finding is in direct support of the Y. Cohen hypothesis that PSI can directly oxidize Fe(2+). Conclusion. Our results may have implications for factors driving CB evolutionary relationships and biogeochemical processes on early Earth and probably Mars.

  2. Factors promoting larch dominance in central Siberia: fire versus growth performance and implications for carbon dynamics at the boundary of evergreen and deciduous conifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, E.-D.; Wirth, C.; Mollicone, D.; von Lüpke, N.; Ziegler, W.; Achard, F.; Mund, M.; Prokushkin, A.; Scherbina, S.

    2012-04-01

    The relative role of fire and of climate in determining canopy species composition and aboveground carbon stocks were investigated. Measurements were made along a transect extending from the dark taiga zone of central Siberia, where Picea and Abies dominate the canopy, into the Larix zone of eastern Siberia. We test the hypotheses that the change in canopy species composition is based (1) on climate-driven performance only, (2) on fire only, or (3) on fire-performance interactions. We show that the evergreen conifers Picea obovata and Abies sibirica are the natural late-successional species both in central and eastern Siberia, provided there has been no fire for an extended period of time. There are no changes in performance of the observed species along the transect. Fire appears to be the main factor explaining the dominance of Larix and of soil carbon. Of lesser influence were longitude as a proxy for climate, local hydrology and active-layer thickness. We can only partially explain fire return frequency, which is not only related to climate and land cover, but also to human behavior. Stand-replacing fires decreased from 300 to 50 yrs between the Yenisei Ridge and the upper Tunguska. Repeated non-stand-replacing surface fires eliminated the regeneration of Abies and Picea. With every 100 yrs since the last fire, the percentage of Larix decreased by 20%. Biomass of stems of single trees did not show signs of age-related decline. Relative diameter increment was 0.41 ± 0.20% at breast height and stem volume increased linearly over time with a rate of about 0.36 t C ha-1 yr-1 independent of age class and species. Stand biomass reached about 130 t C ha-1(equivalent to about 520 m3 ha-1). Individual trees of Larix were older than 600 yrs. The maximum age and biomass seemed to be limited by fungal rot of heart wood. 60% of old Larix and Picea and 30% of Pinus sibirica trees were affected by stem rot. Implications for the future role of fire and of plant diseases are

  3. A mechanistic interpretation of the resonant wave-particle interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chim, Chi Yung; O'Neil, Thomas M.

    2016-05-01

    This paper provides a simple mechanistic interpretation of the resonant wave-particle interaction of Landau. For the simple case of a Langmuir wave in a Vlasov plasma, the non-resonant electrons satisfy an oscillator equation that is driven resonantly by the bare electric field from the resonant electrons, and in the case of wave damping, this complex driver field is of a phase to reduce the oscillation amplitude. The wave-particle resonant interaction also occurs in waves governed by 2D E × B drift dynamics, such as a diocotron wave. In this case, the bare electric field from the resonant electrons causes E × B drift motion back in the core plasma, reducing the amplitude of the wave.

  4. Mechanistic insights into selective autophagy pathways: lessons from yeast.

    PubMed

    Farré, Jean-Claude; Subramani, Suresh

    2016-09-01

    Autophagy has burgeoned rapidly as a field of study because of its evolutionary conservation, the diversity of intracellular cargoes degraded and recycled by this machinery, the mechanisms involved, as well as its physiological relevance to human health and disease. This self-eating process was initially viewed as a non-selective mechanism used by eukaryotic cells to degrade and recycle macromolecules in response to stress; we now know that various cellular constituents, as well as pathogens, can also undergo selective autophagy. In contrast to non-selective autophagy, selective autophagy pathways rely on a plethora of selective autophagy receptors (SARs) that recognize and direct intracellular protein aggregates, organelles and pathogens for specific degradation. Although SARs themselves are not highly conserved, their modes of action and the signalling cascades that activate and regulate them are. Recent yeast studies have provided novel mechanistic insights into selective autophagy pathways, revealing principles of how various cargoes can be marked and targeted for selective degradation. PMID:27381245

  5. Mechanistic characterization of chloride interferences in electrothermal atomization systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shekiro, J.M.; Skogerboe, R.K.; Taylor, H.E.

    1988-01-01

    A computer-controlled spectrometer with a photodiode array detector has been used for wavelength and temperature resolved characterization of the vapor produced by an electrothermal atomizer. The system has been used to study the chloride matrix interference on the atomic absorption spectrometric determination of manganese and copper. The suppression of manganese and copper atom populations by matrix chlorides such as those of calcium and magnesium is due to the gas-phase formation of an analyte chloride species followed by the diffusion of significant fractions of these species from the atom cell prior to completion of the atomization process. The analyte chloride species cannot be formed when matrix chlorides with metal-chloride bond dissociation energies above those of the analyte chlorides are the principal entitles present. The results indicate that multiple wavelength spectrometry used to obtain temperature-resolved spectra is a viable tool in the mechanistic characterization of interference effects observed with electrothermal atomization systems. ?? 1988 American Chemical Society.

  6. Mechanistic issues concerning cancer prevention by tea catechins.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chung S; Wang, Hong

    2011-06-01

    The cancer preventive activities of tea (Camellia sinensis, Theaceae) have been demonstrated in animal models for cancers at different organ sites and suggested by some epidemiological studies. Many mechanisms for cancer prevention have been proposed based on studies in cell lines, which demonstrated the modulation of signal transduction and metabolic pathways by (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), the most abundant and active polyphenol in green tea. These molecular events may result in cellular changes, such as enhancement of apoptosis, suppression of cell proliferation, and inhibition of angiogenesis. Nevertheless, it is not known whether these are the molecular mechanisms of inhibition of carcinogenesis in animals and humans. This article discusses the key issues involved in extrapolating results from cell line studies to mechanistic information in vivo and in translating animal studies to human cancer prevention. PMID:21538856

  7. Synthetic and mechanistic aspects of titanium-mediated carbonyl olefinations

    SciTech Connect

    Petasis, N.A.; Staszewski, J.P.; Hu, Yong-Han; Lu, Shao-Po

    1995-12-31

    A new method for the olefination of carbonyl compounds with dimethyl titanocene, and other related bishydrocarbyl titanocene derivatives has been recently developed in the author`s laboratories. This process is experimentally convenient and works with various types of carbonyl compounds, including aldehydes, ketones, esters, lactones, carbonates, anhydrides, amides, imides, lactams, thioesters, selenoesters, and acylsilanes. More recent studies have focused on the scope and utility of this reaction, including mechanistic studies and synthetic applications. In addition to varying the reaction conditions, the authors have examined several mixed titanocene derivatives and have found ways for carrying out this type of olefination at room temperature, such as the use of tris(trimethylsilyl) titanacyclobutene. The authors have also employed this reaction in the modification of carbohydrates and cyclobutenediones. This olefination was also followed-up with subsequent transformations to produce carbocycles and heterocycles, including tetrahydrofurans and tetrahydropyrans.

  8. Mechanistic model for void distribution in flashing flow

    SciTech Connect

    Riznic, J.; Ishii, M.; Afgan, N.

    1987-01-01

    A problem of discharging of an initially subcooled liquid from a high pressure condition into a low pressure environment is quite important in several industrial systems such as nuclear reactors and chemical reactors. A new model for the flashing process is proposed here based on the wall nucleation theory, bubble growth model and drift-flux bubble transport model. In order to calculate the bubble number density, the bubble number transport equation with a distributed source from the wall nucleation sites is used. The model predictions in terms of the void fraction are compared to Moby Dick and BNL experimental data. It shows that satisfactory agreements could be obtained from the present model without any floating parameter to be adjusted with data. This result indicates that, at least for the experimental conditions considered here, the mechanistic prediction of the flashing phenomenon is possible based on the present wall nucleation based model. 43 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Mechanistic model for void distribution in flashing flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riznic, J.; Ishii, M.; Afgan, N.

    A problem of discharging of an initially subcooled liquid from a high pressure condition into a low pressure environment is quite important in several industrial systems such as nuclear reactors and chemical reactors. A new model for the flashing process is proposed here based on the wall nucleation theory, bubble growth model and drift-flux bubble transport model. In order to calculate the bubble number density, the bubble number transport equation with a distributed source from the wall nucleation sites is used. The model predictions in terms of the void fraction are compared to Moby Dick and BNL experimental data. It shows that satisfactory agreements could be obtained from the present model without any floating parameter to be adjusted with data. This result indicates that, at least for the experimental conditions considered here, the mechanistic prediction of the flashing phenomenon is possible based on the present wall nucleation based model.

  10. Mechanistic modeling confronts the complexity of molecular cell biology.

    PubMed

    Phair, Robert D

    2014-11-01

    Mechanistic modeling has the potential to transform how cell biologists contend with the inescapable complexity of modern biology. I am a physiologist-electrical engineer-systems biologist who has been working at the level of cell biology for the past 24 years. This perspective aims 1) to convey why we build models, 2) to enumerate the major approaches to modeling and their philosophical differences, 3) to address some recurrent concerns raised by experimentalists, and then 4) to imagine a future in which teams of experimentalists and modelers build-and subject to exhaustive experimental tests-models covering the entire spectrum from molecular cell biology to human pathophysiology. There is, in my view, no technical obstacle to this future, but it will require some plasticity in the biological research mind-set.

  11. Mechanistic failure mode investigation and resolution of parvovirus retentive filters.

    PubMed

    LaCasse, Daniel; Lute, Scott; Fiadeiro, Marcus; Basha, Jonida; Stork, Matthew; Brorson, Kurt; Godavarti, Ranga; Gallo, Chris

    2016-07-01

    Virus retentive filters are a key product safety measure for biopharmaceuticals. A simplistic perception is that they function solely based on a size-based particle removal mechanism of mechanical sieving and retention of particles based on their hydrodynamic size. Recent observations have revealed a more nuanced picture, indicating that changes in viral particle retention can result from process pressure and/or flow interruptions. In this study, a mechanistic investigation was performed to help identify a potential mechanism leading to the reported reduced particle retention in small virus filters. Permeate flow rate or permeate driving force were varied and analyzed for their impact on particle retention in three commercially available small virus retentive filters. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:959-970, 2016.

  12. Mechanistic modeling confronts the complexity of molecular cell biology

    PubMed Central

    Phair, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanistic modeling has the potential to transform how cell biologists contend with the inescapable complexity of modern biology. I am a physiologist–electrical engineer–systems biologist who has been working at the level of cell biology for the past 24 years. This perspective aims 1) to convey why we build models, 2) to enumerate the major approaches to modeling and their philosophical differences, 3) to address some recurrent concerns raised by experimentalists, and then 4) to imagine a future in which teams of experimentalists and modelers build—and subject to exhaustive experimental tests—models covering the entire spectrum from molecular cell biology to human pathophysiology. There is, in my view, no technical obstacle to this future, but it will require some plasticity in the biological research mind-set. PMID:25368428

  13. Mechanistic models of biofilm growth in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, Priyank; Al-Hadrami, Fathiya; Atekwana, Estella A.; Atekwana, Eliot A.

    2014-07-01

    Nondestructive acoustics methods can be used to monitor in situ biofilm growth in porous media. In practice, however, acoustic methods remain underutilized due to the lack of models that can translate acoustic data into rock properties in the context of biofilm. In this paper we present mechanistic models of biofilm growth in porous media. The models are used to quantitatively interpret arrival times and amplitudes recorded in the 29 day long Davis et al. (2010) physical scale biostimulation experiment in terms of biofilm morphologies and saturation. The model pivots on addressing the sediment elastic behavior using the lower Hashin-Shtrikman bounds for grain mixing and Gassmann substitution for fluid saturation. The time-lapse P wave velocity (VP; a function of arrival times) is explained by a combination of two rock models (morphologies); "load bearing" which assumes the biofilm as an additional mineral in the rock matrix and "pore filling" which assumes the biofilm as an additional fluid phase in the pores. The time-lapse attenuation (QP-1; a function of amplitudes), on the other hand, can be explained adequately in two ways; first, through squirt flow where energy is lost from relative motion between rock matrix and pore fluid, and second, through an empirical function of porosity (φ), permeability (κ), and grain size. The squirt flow model-fitting results in higher internal φ (7% versus 5%) and more oblate pores (0.33 versus 0.67 aspect ratio) for the load-bearing morphology versus the pore-filling morphology. The empirical model-fitting results in up to 10% increase in κ at the initial stages of the load-bearing morphology. The two morphologies which exhibit distinct mechanical and hydraulic behavior could be a function of pore throat size. The biofilm mechanistic models developed in this study can be used for the interpretation of seismic data critical for the evaluation of biobarriers in bioremediation, microbial enhanced oil recovery, and CO2

  14. Assembly Line Polyketide Synthases: Mechanistic Insights and Unsolved Problems

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Two hallmarks of assembly line polyketide synthases have motivated an interest in these unusual multienzyme systems, their stereospecificity and their capacity for directional biosynthesis. In this review, we summarize the state of knowledge regarding the mechanistic origins of these two remarkable features, using the 6-deoxyerythronolide B synthase as a prototype. Of the 10 stereocenters in 6-deoxyerythronolide B, the stereochemistry of nine carbon atoms is directly set by ketoreductase domains, which catalyze epimerization and/or diastereospecific reduction reactions. The 10th stereocenter is established by the sequential action of three enzymatic domains. Thus, the problem has been reduced to a challenge in mainstream enzymology, where fundamental gaps remain in our understanding of the structural basis for this exquisite stereochemical control by relatively well-defined active sites. In contrast, testable mechanistic hypotheses for the phenomenon of vectorial biosynthesis are only just beginning to emerge. Starting from an elegant theoretical framework for understanding coupled vectorial processes in biology [Jencks, W. P. (1980) Adv. Enzymol. Relat. Areas Mol. Biol. 51, 75–106], we present a simple model that can explain assembly line polyketide biosynthesis as a coupled vectorial process. Our model, which highlights the important role of domain–domain interactions, not only is consistent with recent observations but also is amenable to further experimental verification and refinement. Ultimately, a definitive view of the coordinated motions within and between polyketide synthase modules will require a combination of structural, kinetic, spectroscopic, and computational tools and could be one of the most exciting frontiers in 21st Century enzymology. PMID:24779441

  15. Parameter and uncertainty estimation for mechanistic, spatially explicit epidemiological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finger, Flavio; Schaefli, Bettina; Bertuzzo, Enrico; Mari, Lorenzo; Rinaldo, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    Epidemiological models can be a crucially important tool for decision-making during disease outbreaks. The range of possible applications spans from real-time forecasting and allocation of health-care resources to testing alternative intervention mechanisms such as vaccines, antibiotics or the improvement of sanitary conditions. Our spatially explicit, mechanistic models for cholera epidemics have been successfully applied to several epidemics including, the one that struck Haiti in late 2010 and is still ongoing. Calibration and parameter estimation of such models represents a major challenge because of properties unusual in traditional geoscientific domains such as hydrology. Firstly, the epidemiological data available might be subject to high uncertainties due to error-prone diagnosis as well as manual (and possibly incomplete) data collection. Secondly, long-term time-series of epidemiological data are often unavailable. Finally, the spatially explicit character of the models requires the comparison of several time-series of model outputs with their real-world counterparts, which calls for an appropriate weighting scheme. It follows that the usual assumption of a homoscedastic Gaussian error distribution, used in combination with classical calibration techniques based on Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithms, is likely to be violated, whereas the construction of an appropriate formal likelihood function seems close to impossible. Alternative calibration methods, which allow for accurate estimation of total model uncertainty, particularly regarding the envisaged use of the models for decision-making, are thus needed. Here we present the most recent developments regarding methods for parameter and uncertainty estimation to be used with our mechanistic, spatially explicit models for cholera epidemics, based on informal measures of goodness of fit.

  16. Toxic neuropathies: Mechanistic insights based on a chemical perspective.

    PubMed

    LoPachin, Richard M; Gavin, Terrence

    2015-06-01

    2,5-Hexanedione (HD) and acrylamide (ACR) are considered to be prototypical among chemical toxicants that cause central-peripheral axonopathies characterized by distal axon swelling and degeneration. Because the demise of distal regions was assumed to be causally related to the onset of neurotoxicity, substantial effort was devoted to deciphering the respective mechanisms. Continued research, however, revealed that expression of the presumed hallmark morphological features was dependent upon the daily rate of toxicant exposure. Indeed, many studies reported that the corresponding axonopathic changes were late developing effects that occurred independent of behavioral and/or functional neurotoxicity. This suggested that the toxic axonopathy classification might be based on epiphenomena related to dose-rate. Therefore, the goal of this mini-review is to discuss how quantitative morphometric analyses and the establishment of dose-dependent relationships helped distinguish primary, mechanistically relevant toxicant effects from non-specific consequences. Perhaps more importantly, we will discuss how knowledge of neurotoxicant chemical nature can guide molecular-level research toward a better, more rational understanding of mechanism. Our discussion will focus on HD, the neurotoxic γ-diketone metabolite of the industrial solvents n-hexane and methyl-n-butyl ketone. Early investigations suggested that HD caused giant neurofilamentous axonal swellings and eventual degeneration in CNS and PNS. However, as our review will point out, this interpretation underwent several iterations as the understanding of γ-diketone chemistry improved and more quantitative experimental approaches were implemented. The chemical concepts and design strategies discussed in this mini-review are broadly applicable to the mechanistic studies of other chemicals (e.g., n-propyl bromine, methyl methacrylate) that cause toxic neuropathies.

  17. Mechanistic Variants in Gas-Phase Metal-Oxide Mediated Activation of Methane at Ambient Conditions.

    PubMed

    Li, Jilai; Zhou, Shaodong; Zhang, Jun; Schlangen, Maria; Usharani, Dandamudi; Shaik, Sason; Schwarz, Helmut

    2016-09-01

    The C-H bond activation of methane mediated by a prototypical heteronuclear metal-oxide cluster, [Al2Mg2O5](•+), was investigated by using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) in conjunction with high-level quantum mechanical calculations. Experimentally, hydrogen-atom abstraction from m