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Sample records for factor mechanistic implications

  1. Mechanistic and Therapeutic Implications of Angiogenesis in Endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Robert N.; Yu, Jie; Torres, Paulo B.; Schickedanz, Aimee C.; Park, John K.; Mueller, Michael D.; Sidell, Neil

    2010-01-01

    Like tumor metastases, endometriotic implants require neovascularization to proliferate and invade into ectopic sites within the host. Endometrial tissue, with its robust stem cell populations and remarkable regenerative capabilities, is a rich source of proangiogenic factors. Among the most potent and extensively studied of these proteins, vascular endothelial growth factor has emerged as a critical vasculogenic regulator in endometriosis. Accordingly, angiogenesis of the nascent endometriotic lesion has become an attractive target for novel medical therapeutics and strategies to inhibit vascular endothelial growth factor action. Vascular endothelial growth factor gene regulation in endometrial and endometriosis cells by nuclear receptors, other transcription factors, and also by infiltrating immune cells is emphasized. New data showing that oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stress increase vascular endothelial growth factor expression are provided. Finally, we review the clinical implications of angiogenesis in this condition and propose potential antiangiogenic therapies that may become useful in the control or eradication of endometriotic lesions. PMID:19001553

  2. Ferritin Diversity: Mechanistic Studies, Disease Implications, and Materials Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, Robert J.

    2011-07-01

    The study of ferritin includes a rich history of discoveries and scientific progress. Initially, the composition of ferritin was determined. Soon, it was shown that ferritin is a spherical, hollow protein. Eventually, over several decades of research, the structure and some function of this interesting protein was elucidated. However, the ferritin field was not completely satisfied. Today, for example, researchers are interested in refining the details of ferritin function, in discovering the role of ferritin in a variety of diseases, and in using ferritin for materials chemistry applications. The work presented in this dissertation highlights the progress that we have made in each of these three areas: (1) Mechanistic studies: The buffer used during horse spleen ferritin iron loading significantly influences the mineralization process and the quantity of iron deposited in ferritin. The ferrihydrite core of ferritin is crystalline and ordered when iron is loaded into ferritin in the presence of imidazole buffer. On the other hand, when iron is loaded into ferritin in the presence of MOPS buffer, the ferrihydrite core is less crystalline and less ordered, and a smaller amount of total iron is loaded in ferritin. We also show that iron can be released from the ferritin core in a non-reductive manner. The rate of Fe3+ release from horse spleen ferritin was measured using the Fe3+-specific chelator desferoxamine. We show that iron release occurs by three kinetic events. (2) Disease studies: In order to better understand iron disruption during disease states, we performed in vitro assays that mimicked chronic kidney disease. We tested the hypothesis that elevated levels of serum phosphate interrupted normal iron binding by transferrin and ferritin. Results show that phosphate competes for iron, forming an iron(III)-phosphate complex that is inaccessible to either transferrin or ferritin. Ferritin samples separated from the iron(III)-phosphate complex shows that as the

  3. Cellular alterations of mucosal integrity by ribotoxins: mechanistic implications of environmentally-linked epithelial inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Moon, Yuseok

    2012-01-01

    Specific ribosome-directed stressors have the capacity to damage 28S ribosomal RNA by interfering with its functioning during gene translation. This can lead to what has been called ribotoxic stress responses that are closely associated with various disease processes including epithelial inflammation in humans and domestic animals. Since the primary toxic actions of most ribotoxic stress agents are generally recognized to be the functional inhibition of global protein synthesis, highly dividing tissues including epithelia are the most susceptible targets of toxic insult. In the present study, responses in the mucosal barrier by acute and chronic exposure to ribosome-inactivating agents were reviewed in various experimental models. Specifically, the focus of this review will be on the regulation of mucosa-associated microbiota, epithelial pro-inflammatory insult, and epithelial integrity. The review aims at characterizing the mechanistic evidence of the ribotoxic stress-induced cellular responses and their implication as critical etiological factors of mucosa-associated diseases, in particular epithelial inflammatory disease. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Ultrasound and Microbubble Guided Drug Delivery: Mechanistic Understanding and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tzu-Yin; Wilson, Katheryne E.; Machtaler, Steven; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound mediated drug delivery using microbubbles is a safe and noninvasive approach for spatially localized drug administration. This approach can create temporary and reversible openings on cellular membranes and vessel walls (a process called “sonoporation”), allowing for enhanced transport of therapeutic agents across these natural barriers. It is generally believed that the sonoporation process is highly associated with the energetic cavitation activities (volumetric expansion, contraction, fragmentation, and collapse) of the microbubble. However, a thorough understanding of the process was unavailable until recently. Important progress on the mechanistic understanding of sonoporation and the corresponding physiological responses in vitro and in vivo has been made. Specifically, recent research shed light on the cavitation process of microbubbles and fluid motion during insonation of ultrasound, on the spatio-temporal interactions between microbubbles and cells or vessel walls, as well as on the temporal course of the subsequent biological effects. These findings have significant clinical implications on the development of optimal treatment strategies for effective drug delivery. In this article, current progress in the mechanistic understanding of ultrasound and microbubble mediated drug delivery and its implications for clinical translation is discussed. PMID:24372231

  5. A mechanistic hypothesis of the factors that enhance vulnerability to nicotine use in females

    PubMed Central

    O'Dell, Laura E.; Torres, Oscar V.

    2013-01-01

    Women are particularly more vulnerable to tobacco use than men. This review proposes a unifying hypothesis that females experience greater rewarding effects of nicotine and more intense stress produced by withdrawal than males. We also provide a neural framework whereby estrogen promotes greater rewarding effects of nicotine in females via enhanced dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc). During withdrawal, we suggest that corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) stress systems are sensitized and promote a greater suppression of dopamine release in the NAcc of females versus males. Taken together, females display enhanced nicotine reward via estrogen and amplified effects of withdrawal via stress systems. Although this framework focuses on sex differences in adult rats, it is also applied to adolescent females who display enhanced rewarding effects of nicotine, but reduced effects of withdrawal from this drug. Since females experience strong rewarding effects of nicotine, a clinical implication of our hypothesis is that specific strategies to prevent smoking initiation among females are critical. Also, anxiolytic medications may be more effective in females that experience intense stress during withdrawal. Furthermore, medications that target withdrawal should not be applied in a unilateral manner across age and sex, given that nicotine withdrawal is lower during adolescence. This review highlights key factors that promote nicotine use in females, and future studies on sex-dependent interactions of stress and reward systems are needed to test our mechanistic hypotheses. Future studies in this area will have important translational value toward reducing health disparities produced by nicotine use in females. PMID:23684991

  6. Mechanistic duality of transcription factor function in phytochrome signaling

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The phytochrome (phy) family of sensory photoreceptors (phyA–E in Arabidopsis) elicit changes in gene expression after light-induced migration to the nucleus, where they interact with basic helix–loop–helix transcription factors, such as phytochrome-interacting factor 3 (PIF3). The mechanism by whic...

  7. Stoichiometry of proton translocation by respiratory complex I and its mechanistic implications

    PubMed Central

    Wikström, Mårten; Hummer, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    Complex I (NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase) in the respiratory chain of mitochondria and several bacteria functions as a redox-driven proton pump that contributes to the generation of the protonmotive force across the inner mitochondrial or bacterial membrane and thus to the aerobic synthesis of ATP. The stoichiometry of proton translocation is thought to be 4 H+ per NADH oxidized (2 e-). Here we show that a H+/2 e- ratio of 3 appears more likely on the basis of the recently determined H+/ATP ratio of the mitochondrial F1Fo-ATP synthase of animal mitochondria and of a set of carefully determined ATP/2 e- ratios for different segments of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. This lower H+/2 e- ratio of 3 is independently supported by thermodynamic analyses of experiments with both mitochondria and submitochondrial particles. A reduced H+/2 e- stoichiometry of 3 has important mechanistic implications for this proton pump. In a rough mechanistic model, we suggest a concerted proton translocation mechanism in the three homologous and tightly packed antiporter-like subunits L, M, and N of the proton-translocating membrane domain of complex I. PMID:22392981

  8. Pollution and skin: from epidemiological and mechanistic studies to clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Krutmann, Jean; Liu, Wei; Li, Li; Pan, Xiaochuan; Crawford, Martha; Sore, Gabrielle; Seite, Sophie

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, the health effects associated with air pollution have been intensively studied. Most studies focus on air pollution effects on the lung and the cardiovascular system. More recently, however, epidemiological and mechanistic studies suggest that air pollution is also affecting skin integrity. This state-of-the-art review focuses on this latter aspect; it was developed with the collaboration of European and Chinese board of experts with specific interests in environmental health, clinical and basic research in dermatology and cosmetic dermatology. A literature review limited to pollution and health effects and (sensitive) skin was performed using PubMed. Review and original articles were chosen. We summarize the existing scientific evidence that air pollution exerts detrimental effects on human skin, discuss potential clinical implications and suggest specific and unspecific cosmetic protective measures.

  9. A mechanistic hypothesis of the factors that enhance vulnerability to nicotine use in females.

    PubMed

    O'Dell, Laura E; Torres, Oscar V

    2014-01-01

    Women are particularly more vulnerable to tobacco use than men. This review proposes a unifying hypothesis that females experience greater rewarding effects of nicotine and more intense stress produced by withdrawal than males. We also provide a neural framework whereby estrogen promotes greater rewarding effects of nicotine in females via enhanced dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc). During withdrawal, we suggest that corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) stress systems are sensitized and promote a greater suppression of dopamine release in the NAcc of females versus males. Taken together, females display enhanced nicotine reward via estrogen and amplified effects of withdrawal via stress systems. Although this framework focuses on sex differences in adult rats, it is also applied to adolescent females who display enhanced rewarding effects of nicotine, but reduced effects of withdrawal from this drug. Since females experience strong rewarding effects of nicotine, a clinical implication of our hypothesis is that specific strategies to prevent smoking initiation among females are critical. Also, anxiolytic medications may be more effective in females that experience intense stress during withdrawal. Furthermore, medications that target withdrawal should not be applied in a unilateral manner across age and sex, given that nicotine withdrawal is lower during adolescence. This review highlights key factors that promote nicotine use in females, and future studies on sex-dependent interactions of stress and reward systems are needed to test our mechanistic hypotheses. Future studies in this area will have important translational value toward reducing health disparities produced by nicotine use in females. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'NIDA 40th Anniversary Issue'.

  10. Mechanistic-enriched models: integrating transcription factor networks and metabolic deregulation in cancer.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Lemus, Enrique; Siqueiros-García, J Mario

    2015-09-09

    In the present paper we will examine methodological frameworks to study complex genetic diseases (e.g. cancer) from the stand point of theoretical-computational biology combining both data-driven and hypothesis driven approaches. Our work focuses in the apparent counterpoint between two formal approaches to research in natural science: data- and hypothesis-driven inquiries. For a long time philosophers have recognized the mechanistic character of molecular biology explanations. On these grounds we suggest that hypothesis and data-driven approaches are not opposed to each other but that they may be integrated by the development of what we call enriched mechanistic models. We will elaborate around a case study from our laboratory that analyzed the relationship between transcriptional de-regulation of sets of genes that present both transcription factor and metabolic activity while at the same time have been associated with the presence of cancer. The way we do this is by analyzing structural, mechanistic and functional approaches to molecular level research in cancer biology. Emphasis will be given to data integration strategies to construct new explanations. Such analysis has led us to present a mechanistic-enriched model of the phenomenon. Such model pointed out to the way in which regulatory and thermodynamical behavior of gene regulation networks may be analyzed by means of gene expression data obtained from genome-wide analysis experiments in RNA from biopsy-captured tissue. The foundations of the model are given by the laws of thermodynamics and chemical physics and the approach is an enriched version of a mechanistic explanation. After analyzing the way we studied the coupling of metabolic and transcriptional deregulation in breast cancer, we have concluded that one plausible strategy to integrate data driven and hypothesis driven approaches is by means of resorting to fundamental and well established laws of physics and chemistry since these provide a solid

  11. Epigenetic regulation of human DCLK-1 gene during colon-carcinogenesis: clinical and mechanistic implications

    PubMed Central

    O’Connell, Malaney; Shubhashish, Sarkar

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal carcinogenesis is a multi-step process. While ~25% of colorectal cancers (CRCs) arise in patients with a family history (genetic predisposition), ~75% of CRCs are due to age-associated accumulation of epigenetic alterations which can result in the suppression of key tumor suppressor genes leading to mutations and activation of oncogenic pathways. Sporadic colon-carcinogenesis is facilitated by many molecular pathways of genomic instability which include chromosomal instability (CIN), micro-satellite instability (MSI) and CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP), leading towards loss of homeostasis and onset of neoplastic transformation. The unopposed activation of Wnt/β-catenin pathways, either due to loss of APC function or up-regulation of related stimulatory pathways, results in unopposed hyperproliferation of colonic crypts, considered the single most important risk factor for colon carcinogenesis. Hypermethylation of CpG islands within the promoters of specific genes can potentially inactivate DNA repair genes and/or critical tumor suppressor genes. Recently, CpG methylation of the 5’ promoter of human (h) DCLK1 gene was reported in many human epithelial cancers, including colorectal cancers (CRCs), resulting in the loss of expression of the canonical long isoform of DCLK1 (DCLK1-L) in hCRCs. Instead, a shorter isoform of DCLK1 (DCLK1-S) was discovered to be expressed in hCRCs, from an alternate β promoter of DCLKL1-gene; the clinical and biological implications of these novel findings, in relation to recent publications is discussed. PMID:27777940

  12. Epigenetic regulation of human DCLK-1 gene during colon-carcinogenesis: clinical and mechanistic implications.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pomila; O'Connell, Malaney; Shubhashish, Sarkar

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal carcinogenesis is a multi-step process. While ~25% of colorectal cancers (CRCs) arise in patients with a family history (genetic predisposition), ~75% of CRCs are due to age-associated accumulation of epigenetic alterations which can result in the suppression of key tumor suppressor genes leading to mutations and activation of oncogenic pathways. Sporadic colon-carcinogenesis is facilitated by many molecular pathways of genomic instability which include chromosomal instability (CIN), micro-satellite instability (MSI) and CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP), leading towards loss of homeostasis and onset of neoplastic transformation. The unopposed activation of Wnt/β-catenin pathways, either due to loss of APC function or up-regulation of related stimulatory pathways, results in unopposed hyperproliferation of colonic crypts, considered the single most important risk factor for colon carcinogenesis. Hypermethylation of CpG islands within the promoters of specific genes can potentially inactivate DNA repair genes and/or critical tumor suppressor genes. Recently, CpG methylation of the 5' promoter of human (h) DCLK1 gene was reported in many human epithelial cancers, including colorectal cancers (CRCs), resulting in the loss of expression of the canonical long isoform of DCLK1 (DCLK1-L) in hCRCs. Instead, a shorter isoform of DCLK1 (DCLK1-S) was discovered to be expressed in hCRCs, from an alternate β promoter of DCLKL1-gene; the clinical and biological implications of these novel findings, in relation to recent publications is discussed.

  13. DISC1, astrocytes and neuronal maturation: a possible mechanistic link with implications for mental disorders.

    PubMed

    Xia, Meng; Zhu, Shanshan; Shevelkin, Alexey; Ross, Christopher A; Pletnikov, Mikhail

    2016-08-01

    Disrupted-In-Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) is a genetic risk factor implicated in major mental disorders that involve disrupted neurodevelopment and synaptic signaling. Glial cells such as astrocytes can regulate neuronal and synaptic maturation. Although astrocytes express DISC1, the role of astrocyte DISC1 in synaptic regulation remains unknown. We expressed a pathogenic, dominant-negative form of DISC1, mutant DISC1, in astrocytes to elucidate the roles of astrocytic DISC1 in maturation of dendrites and excitatory and inhibitory synapses using a co-culture model. We found that wild-type primary neurons exhibited less elaborated dendritic arborization when co-cultured with astrocytes that express mutant DISC1, compared to control astrocytes. We observed significantly decreased density of excitatory but not inhibitory synapses on wild-type primary neurons that were co-cultured with astrocytes that express mutant DISC1, compared to control astrocytes. Treatment of co-cultures with D-serine restored dendritic development and density of excitatory synapses. Our findings show for the first time that mutant DISC1 diminished the capacity of astrocytes to support dendritic and synaptic maturation in co-cultured neurons, and that D-serine can restore the dendritic and synaptic abnormalities. The results provide a new insight into the mechanisms whereby genetic risk factors within astrocytes could contribute the pathogenesis of psychiatric disorders. Expression of mutant DISC1 (mDISC1) in astrocytes (A) decreases binding of endogenous DISC1 to serine racemase (SR) and production of D-serine (blue triangles) from L-serine (red triangles). As a result, neurons co-cultured with mutant DISC1 astrocytes exhibit diminished dendritic arborization (DIV10) and decreased linear density of VGLUT+(red)/PSD95 +  (green) excitatory synapses (DIV14). Filled circles with arrows denote membrane transporters for D-serine. Read the Editorial Highlight for this article on doi: 10.1111/jnc.13699

  14. Methane production, oxidation and mitigation: A mechanistic understanding and comprehensive evaluation of influencing factors.

    PubMed

    Malyan, Sandeep K; Bhatia, Arti; Kumar, Amit; Gupta, Dipak Kumar; Singh, Renu; Kumar, Smita S; Tomer, Ritu; Kumar, Om; Jain, Niveta

    2016-12-01

    Methane is one of the critical greenhouse gases, which absorb long wavelength radiation, affects the chemistry of atmosphere and contributes to global climate change. Rice ecosystem is one of the major anthropogenic sources of methane. The anaerobic waterlogged soil in rice field provides an ideal environment to methanogens for methanogenesis. However, the rate of methanogenesis differs according to rice cultivation regions due to a number of biological, environmental and physical factors like carbon sources, pH, Eh, temperature etc. The interplay between the different conditions and factors may also convert the rice fields into sink from source temporarily. Mechanistic understanding and comprehensive evaluation of these variations and responsible factors are urgently required for designing new mitigation options and evaluation of reported option in different climatic conditions. The objective of this review paper is to develop conclusive understanding on the methane production, oxidation, and emission and methane measurement techniques from rice field along with its mitigation/abatement mechanism to explore the possible reduction techniques from rice ecosystem. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A holistic approach to anesthesia-induced neurotoxicity and its implications for future mechanistic studies.

    PubMed

    Zanghi, Christine N; Jevtovic-Todorovic, Vesna

    The year 2016 marked the 15th anniversary since anesthesia-induced developmental neurotoxicity and its resulting cognitive dysfunction were first described. Since that time, multiple scientific studies have supported these original findings and investigated possible mechanisms behind anesthesia-induced neurotoxicity. This paper reviews the existing mechanistic literature on anesthesia-induced neurotoxicity in the context of a holistic approach that emphasizes the importance of both neuronal and non-neuronal cells during early postnatal development. Sections are divided into key stages in early neural development; apoptosis, neurogenesis, migration, differentiation, synaptogenesis, gliogenesis, myelination and blood brain barrier/cerebrovasculature. In addition, the authors combine the established literature in the field of anesthesia-induced neurotoxicity with literature from other related scientific fields to speculate on the potential role of non-neuronal cells and to generate new future hypotheses for understanding anesthetic toxicity and its application to the practice of pediatric anesthesia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Mechanistic analysis of interspecific competition using foraging trade-offs: implications for duck assemblages.

    PubMed

    Gurd, D Brent

    2008-02-01

    The role of interspecific competition and resource partitioning in determining the composition of species assemblages is often controversial. In many cases data on species co-occurrence or resource use (prey or habitat) have been interpreted without a clear understanding of how, or even whether, phenotypic differences constrain performance to allow resource partitioning or how these constraints and the density of resources and competitors should shape resource selection by each species. Instead, predictions have been based on assumed constraints, possibly leading to conflicting results. One such controversy involves the role of bill morphology in mediating resource partitioning among dabbling ducks (Anas spp.). To determine whether incorrect assumptions may have contributed to this controversy, I constructed mechanistic models that predict filter-feeding performance for seven species of ducks directly from bill morphology and kinetics and compared these predictions to those of earlier studies that tested the bill morphology hypothesis. The models predicted that species should share a preference for their most profitable (primary) prey while partitioning their less profitable (secondary) prey by size. Consequently, ducks should forage in the same habitats and exhibit high overlap in prey size when competitor/resource ratios are either high or low. In contrast, earlier studies expected that resource partitioning should always be evident, which implicitly assumes that species partition their primary resources. The models also predicted that the ecological similarity of species in assemblages should increase as prey abundance and size variability declines, contrary to the expectations of an earlier study. A more consistent understanding of the mechanisms regulating assemblages of dabbling ducks, and other species, might emerge if patterns of resource use and species co-occurrence were predicted directly from a mechanistic understanding of how performance trade

  17. Structural analysis of urate oxidase in complex with its natural substrate inhibited by cyanide: Mechanistic implications

    PubMed Central

    Gabison, Laure; Prangé, Thierry; Colloc'h, Nathalie; El Hajji, Mohamed; Castro, Bertrand; Chiadmi, Mohamed

    2008-01-01

    Background Urate oxidase (EC 1.7.3.3 or UOX) catalyzes the conversion of uric acid and gaseous molecular oxygen to 5-hydroxyisourate and hydrogen peroxide, in the absence of cofactor or particular metal cation. The functional enzyme is a homo-tetramer with four active sites located at dimeric interfaces. Results The catalytic mechanism was investigated through a ternary complex formed between the enzyme, uric acid, and cyanide that stabilizes an intermediate state of the reaction. When uric acid is replaced by a competitive inhibitor, no complex with cyanide is formed. Conclusion The X-ray structure of this compulsory ternary complex led to a number of mechanistic evidences that support a sequential mechanism in which the two reagents, dioxygen and a water molecule, process through a common site located 3.3 Å above the mean plane of the ligand. This site is built by the side chains of Asn 254, and Thr 57, two conserved residues belonging to two different subunits of the homo-tetramer. The absence of a ternary complex between the enzyme, a competitive inhibitor, and cyanide suggests that cyanide inhibits the hydroxylation step of the reaction, after the initial formation of a hydroperoxyde type intermediate. PMID:18638417

  18. Meta-analysis of postruminal microbial nitrogen flows in dairy cattle. II. Approaches to and implications of more mechanistic prediction.

    PubMed

    White, Robin R; Roman-Garcia, Yairanex; Firkins, Jeffrey L

    2016-10-01

    Several attempts have been made to quantify microbial protein flow from the rumen; however, few studies have evaluated tradeoffs between empirical equations (microbial N as a function of diet composition) and more mechanistic equations (microbial N as a function of ruminal carbohydrate digestibility). Although more mechanistic approaches have been touted because they represent more of the biology and thus might behave more appropriately in extreme scenarios, their precision is difficult to evaluate. The objective of this study was to derive equations describing starch, neutral detergent fiber (NDF), and organic matter total-tract and ruminal digestibilities; use these equations as inputs to equations predicting microbial N (MicN) production; and evaluate the implications of the different calculation methods in terms of their precision and accuracy. Models were evaluated based on root estimated variance σˆe and concordance correlation coefficients (CCC). Ruminal digestibility of NDF was positively associated with DMI and concentrations of NDF and CP and was negatively associated with concentration of starch and the ratio of acid detergent fiber to NDF (CCC=0.946). Apparent ruminal starch digestibility was increased by omasal sampling (compared with duodenal sampling), was positively associated with forage NDF and starch concentrations, and was negatively associated with wet forage DMI and total dietary DMI (CCC=0.908). Models were further evaluated by calculating fit statistics from a common data set, using stochastic simulation, and extreme scenario testing. In the stochastic simulation, variance in input variables were drawn from a multi-variate random normal distribution reflective of input measurement errors and predicting MicN while accounting for the measurement errors. Extreme scenario testing evaluated each MicN model against a data subset. When compared against an identical data set, predicting MicN empirically had the lowest prediction error, though

  19. Implications of mechanistic modeling of drought effects on growth and competition in forest landscape models

    Treesearch

    Eric J. Gustafson; Arjan M. G. De Bruijn; Brian R. Miranda; Brian R. Sturtevant; J. Thompson

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of drought is expected to increase worldwide as a factor structuring forested landscapes. Ecophysiological mechanisms are being added to Forest Landscape Models (FLMs) to increase their robustness to the novel environmental conditions of the future (including drought), but their behavior has not been evaluated for mixed temperate forests. We evaluated...

  20. Calcium Regulation of Hemorrhagic Fever Virus Budding: Mechanistic Implications for Host-Oriented Therapeutic Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ziying; Madara, Jonathan J.; Herbert, Andrew; Prugar, Laura I.; Ruthel, Gordon; Lu, Jianhong; Liu, Yuliang; Liu, Wenbo; Liu, Xiaohong; Wrobel, Jay E.; Reitz, Allen B.; Dye, John M.; Harty, Ronald N.; Freedman, Bruce D.

    2015-01-01

    Hemorrhagic fever viruses, including the filoviruses (Ebola and Marburg) and arenaviruses (Lassa and Junín viruses), are serious human pathogens for which there are currently no FDA approved therapeutics or vaccines. Importantly, transmission of these viruses, and specifically late steps of budding, critically depend upon host cell machinery. Consequently, strategies which target these mechanisms represent potential targets for broad spectrum host oriented therapeutics. An important cellular signal implicated previously in EBOV budding is calcium. Indeed, host cell calcium signals are increasingly being recognized to play a role in steps of entry, replication, and transmission for a range of viruses, but if and how filoviruses and arenaviruses mobilize calcium and the precise stage of virus transmission regulated by calcium have not been defined. Here we demonstrate that expression of matrix proteins from both filoviruses and arenaviruses triggers an increase in host cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration by a mechanism that requires host Orai1 channels. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Orai1 regulates both VLP and infectious filovirus and arenavirus production and spread. Notably, suppression of the protein that triggers Orai activation (Stromal Interaction Molecule 1, STIM1) and genetic inactivation or pharmacological blockade of Orai1 channels inhibits VLP and infectious virus egress. These findings are highly significant as they expand our understanding of host mechanisms that may broadly control enveloped RNA virus budding, and they establish Orai and STIM1 as novel targets for broad-spectrum host-oriented therapeutics to combat these emerging BSL-4 pathogens and potentially other enveloped RNA viruses that bud via similar mechanisms. PMID:26513362

  1. Genetic Dissection of Acute Ethanol Responsive Gene Networks in Prefrontal Cortex: Functional and Mechanistic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Wolen, Aaron R.; Phillips, Charles A.; Langston, Michael A.; Putman, Alex H.; Vorster, Paul J.; Bruce, Nathan A.; York, Timothy P.; Williams, Robert W.; Miles, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    over the ethanol response of gene networks could have important implications for future studies regarding the mechanisms and treatment of alcohol use disorders. PMID:22511924

  2. Probiotics, prebiotics, energy balance, and obesity: mechanistic insights and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Molinaro, Federica; Paschetta, Elena; Cassader, Maurizio; Gambino, Roberto; Musso, Giovanni

    2012-12-01

    Obesity-related disorders derive from a combination of genetic susceptibility and environmental factors. Recent evidence supports the role of gut microbiota in the pathogenesis of obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and insulin resistance by increasing energy harvest from diet and by inducing chronic, low-grade inflammation. Several studies describe characteristic differences between composition and activity of gut microbiota of lean individuals and those with obesity. Despite this evidence, some pathophysiological mechanisms remain to be clarified. This article discusses mechanisms connecting gut microbiota to obesity and fat storage and the potential therapeutic role of probiotics and prebiotics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Cloning, mechanistic and functional analysis of a fungal sterol C24-methyltransferase implicated in brassicasterol biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Maristela; Song, Zhihong; Santos-Silva, Ludier Kesser; Richards, Mathew H; Nguyen, Thi Thuy Minh; Liu, JiaLin; de Almeida Soares, Celia Maria; da Silva Cruz, Aline Helena; Ganapathy, Kulothungan; Nes, W David

    2010-10-01

    The first committed step in the formation of 24-alkylsterols in the ascomycetous fungus Paracoccidiodes brasiliensis (Pb) has been shown to involve C24-methylation of lanosterol to eburicol (24(28)-methylene-24,25-dihydro-lanosterol) on the basis of metabolite co-occurrence. A similarity-based cloning strategy was employed to obtain the cDNA clone corresponding to the sterol C24-methyltransferase (SMT) implicated in the C24-methylation reaction. The resulting catalyst, prepared as a recombinant fusion protein (His/Trx/S), was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(C43) and shown to possess a substrate specificity for lanosterol and to generate a single exocyclic methylene product. The full-length cDNA has an open reading frame of 1131 base pairs and encodes a protein of 377 residues with a calculated molecular mass of 42,502Da. The enzymatic C24-methylation gave a K(mapp) of 38microM and k(catapp) of 0.14min(-1). Quite unexpectedly, "plant" cycloartenol was catalyzed in high yield to 24(28)-methylene cycloartanol consistent with conformational arguments that favor that both cycloartenol and lanosterol are bound pseudoplanar in the ternary complex. Incubation of [27-(13)C]- or [24-(2)H]cycloartenol with PbSMT and analysis of the enzyme-generated product by a combination of (1)H and (13)CNMR and mass spectroscopy established the regiospecific conversion of the pro-Z methyl group of the Delta(24(25))-substrate to the pro-R isopropyl methyl group of the product and the migration of H24 to C25 on the Re-face of the original substrate double bond undergoing C24-methylation. Inhibition kinetics and products formed from the substrate analogs 25-azalanosterol (K(i) 14nM) and 26,27-dehydrolanosterol (K(i) 54muM and k(inact) of 0.24min(-1)) provide direct evidence for distinct reaction channeling capitalized by structural differences in the C24- and C26-sterol acceptors. 25-Azalanosterol was a potent inhibitor of cell growth (IC(50), 30nM) promoting lanosterol accumulation and 24

  4. Solvent isotope effects on alkane formation by cyanobacterial aldehyde deformylating oxygenase and their mechanistic implications.

    PubMed

    Waugh, Matthew W; Marsh, E Neil G

    2014-09-02

    The reaction catalyzed by cyanobacterial aldehyde deformylating oxygenase is of interest both because of its potential application to the production of biofuels and because of the highly unusual nature of the deformylation reaction it catalyzes. Whereas the proton in the product alkane derives ultimately from the solvent, the identity of the proton donor in the active site remains unclear. To investigate the proton transfer step, solvent isotope effect (SIE) studies were undertaken. The rate of alkane formation was found to be maximal at pH 6.8 and to be the same in D2O or H2O within experimental error, implying that proton transfer is not a kinetically significant step. However, when the ratio of protium to deuterium in the product alkane was measured as a function of the mole fraction of D2O, a (D2O)SIEobs of 2.19 ± 0.02 was observed. The SIE was invariant with the mole fraction of D2O, indicating the involvement of a single protic site in the reaction. We interpret this SIE as most likely arising from a reactant state equilibrium isotope effect on a proton donor with an inverse fractionation factor, for which Φ = 0.45. These observations are consistent with an iron-bound water molecule being the proton donor to the alkane in the reaction.

  5. A substantial oxygen isotope effect at O2 in the OMP decarboxylase reaction: mechanistic implications.

    PubMed

    Wepukhulu, Wickliffe O; Smiley, Vanessa L; Vemulapalli, Bhargavi; Smiley, Jeffrey A; Phillips, Linda M; Lee, Jeehiun K

    2008-12-21

    Orotidine-5'-monophosphate decarboxylase (OMP decarboxylase, ODCase) catalyzes the decarboxylation of orotidine-5'-monophosphate (OMP) to uridine-5'-monophosphate (UMP). Despite extensive enzymological, structural, and computational studies, the mechanism of ODCase remains incompletely characterized. Herein, carbon kinetic isotope effects were measured for both the natural abundance substrate and a substrate mixture synthesized for the purpose of carrying out the remote double label isotope effect procedure, with O2 of the substrate as the remote position. The carbon kinetic isotope effect on enzymatic decarboxylation of this substrate mix was measured to be 1.0199 +/- 0.0007, compared to the value of 1.0289 +/- 0.0009 for natural abundance OMP, revealing an (18)O2 isotope effect of 0.991 +/- 0.001. This value equates to an intrinsic isotope effect of approximately 0.983, using a calculated commitment factor derived from previous isotope effect data. The measured (18)O2 isotope effect requires a mechanism with one or more enzymatic processes, including binding and/or chemistry, that contribute to this substantial inverse isotope effect. (18)O2 kinetic isotope effects were calculated for four proposed mechanisms: decarboxylation preceded by proton transfer to 1) O2; 2) O4; and 3) C5; and 4) decarboxylation without a preceding protonation step. A mechanism involving no pre-decarboxylation step does not appear to have any steps with the necessary substantial inverse (18)O2 effect, thus calling into question any mechanism involving simple direct decarboxylation. Protonation at O2, O4, or C5 are all calculated to proceed with inverse (18)O2 effects, and could contribute to the experimentally measured value. Recent crystal structures indicate that O2 of the substrate appears to be involved in an intricate bonding arrangement involving the substrate phosphoryl group, an enzyme Gln side chain, and a bound water molecule; this interaction likely contributes to the observed

  6. Structural and mechanistic implications of metal binding in the small heat-shock protein αB-crystallin.

    PubMed

    Mainz, Andi; Bardiaux, Benjamin; Kuppler, Frank; Multhaup, Gerd; Felli, Isabella C; Pierattelli, Roberta; Reif, Bernd

    2012-01-06

    The human small heat-shock protein αB-crystallin (αB) rescues misfolded proteins from irreversible aggregation during cellular stress. Binding of Cu(II) was shown to modulate the oligomeric architecture and the chaperone activity of αB. However, the mechanistic basis of this stimulation is so far not understood. We provide here first structural insights into this Cu(II)-mediated modulation of chaperone function using NMR spectroscopy and other biophysical approaches. We show that the α-crystallin domain is the elementary Cu(II)-binding unit specifically coordinating one Cu(II) ion with picomolar binding affinity. Putative Cu(II) ligands are His(83), His(104), His(111), and Asp(109) at the dimer interface. These loop residues are conserved among different metazoans, but also for human αA-crystallin, HSP20, and HSP27. The involvement of Asp(109) has direct implications for dimer stability, because this residue forms a salt bridge with the disease-related Arg(120) of the neighboring monomer. Furthermore, we observe structural reorganization of strands β2-β3 triggered by Cu(II) binding. This N-terminal region is known to mediate both the intermolecular arrangement in αB oligomers and the binding of client proteins. In the presence of Cu(II), the size and the heterogeneity of αB multimers are increased. At the same time, Cu(II) increases the chaperone activity of αB toward the lens-specific protein β(L)-crystallin. We therefore suggest that Cu(II) binding unblocks potential client binding sites and alters quaternary dynamics of both the dimeric building block as well as the higher order assemblies of αB.

  7. Mechanistic Heterogeneity in Site Recognition by the Structurally Homologous DNA-binding Domains of the ETS Family Transcription Factors Ets-1 and PU.1*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuo; Linde, Miles H.; Munde, Manoj; Carvalho, Victor D.; Wilson, W. David; Poon, Gregory M. K.

    2014-01-01

    ETS family transcription factors regulate diverse genes through binding at cognate DNA sites that overlap substantially in sequence. The DNA-binding domains of ETS proteins (ETS domains) are highly conserved structurally yet share limited amino acid homology. To define the mechanistic implications of sequence diversity within the ETS family, we characterized the thermodynamics and kinetics of DNA site recognition by the ETS domains of Ets-1 and PU.1, which represent the extremes in amino acid divergence among ETS proteins. Even though the two ETS domains bind their optimal sites with similar affinities under physiologic conditions, their nature of site recognition differs strikingly in terms of the role of hydration and counter ion release. The data suggest two distinct mechanisms wherein Ets-1 follows a “dry” mechanism that rapidly parses sites through electrostatic interactions and direct protein-DNA contacts, whereas PU.1 utilizes hydration to interrogate sequence-specific sites and form a long-lived complex relative to the Ets-1 counterpart. The kinetic persistence of the high affinity PU.1·DNA complex may be relevant to an emerging role of PU.1, but not Ets-1, as a pioneer transcription factor in vivo. In addition, PU.1 activity is critical to the development and function of macrophages and lymphocytes, which present osmotically variable environments, and hydration-dependent specificity may represent an important regulatory mechanism in vivo, a hypothesis that finds support in gene expression profiles of primary murine macrophages. PMID:24952944

  8. The New Unified Theory of ATP Synthesis/Hydrolysis and Muscle Contraction, Its Manifold Fundamental Consequences and Mechanistic Implications and Its Applications in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Sunil

    2008-01-01

    Complete details of the thermodynamics and molecular mechanisms of ATP synthesis/hydrolysis and muscle contraction are offered from the standpoint of the torsional mechanism of energy transduction and ATP synthesis and the rotation-uncoiling-tilt (RUT) energy storage mechanism of muscle contraction. The manifold fundamental consequences and mechanistic implications of the unified theory for oxidative phosphorylation and muscle contraction are explained. The consistency of current mechanisms of ATP synthesis and muscle contraction with experiment is assessed, and the novel insights of the unified theory are shown to take us beyond the binding change mechanism, the chemiosmotic theory and the lever arm model. It is shown from first principles how previous theories of ATP synthesis and muscle contraction violate both the first and second laws of thermodynamics, necessitating their revision. It is concluded that the new paradigm, ten years after making its first appearance, is now perfectly poised to replace the older theories. Finally, applications of the unified theory in cell life and cell death are outlined and prospects for future research are explored. While it is impossible to cover each and every specific aspect of the above, an attempt has been made here to address all the pertinent details and what is presented should be sufficient to convince the reader of the novelty, originality, breakthrough nature and power of the unified theory, its manifold fundamental consequences and mechanistic implications, and its applications in health and disease. PMID:19325832

  9. Computational Identification of Mechanistic Factors That Determine the Timing and Intensity of the Inflammatory Response

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-09

    association (kon) and dissociation (koff) rate constants (Eq 2, defined in the Materials and Methods Section) for each mediator inhibitor from literature...at later time points (Fig 6b and 6e, dotted black lines). A nearly identical effect on the neutrophil Ri and macrophageCmax was observed when the CXCL8... dissociation (koff) rate constants for the inhibitors of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), transforming growth factor β (TGF-β), and the chemokine CXCL8

  10. An AIMD study of the CPD dimer repair mechanism in water: reaction free energy surface and mechanistic implications

    PubMed Central

    Hassanali, Ali A.; Zhong, Dongping; Singer, Sherwin J.

    2011-01-01

    In a series of two papers we report the detailed mechanism of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer repair in aqueous solvent using ab initio simulations. Umbrella sampling is used to determine the free energy surface for dimer splitting. The two dimensional free energy surface for splitting of the C5-C5′ and C6-C6′ bonds on the anion surface is reported. The splitting of the C5-C5′ and C6-C6′ bonds occurs on a picosecond timescale. The transition state along the splitting coordinate in the anion state coincides with a maximum in the free energy along the same coordinate on the neutral surface. The implication is that back electron transfer occurring before the anion reaches the transition state leads to re-formation of the cyclobutane dimer, while back electron transfer after transit through the transition state, leads to successful repair. Based on our calculations for CPD splitting in water, we propose a framework for understanding how various factors, such as solvent polarity, can control repair efficiency. This framework explains why back electron transfer leads predominantly to unsuccessful repair in some situations, and successful repair in others. A key observation is that the same free energy surfaces that control dimer splitting also govern how the back electron transfer rate changes during the splitting process. Configurational changes of the dimer along the splitting coordinate are also documented. PMID:21417374

  11. Childhood Obesity as a Risk Factor for Bone Fracture: A Mechanistic Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong-Eun; Hsieh, Min-Heng; Soni, Bharat K.; Zayzafoon, Majd; Allison, David B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the risk of bone fracture sustained by obese children exposed to falls. We hypothesized that the bone fracture risk of obese children would be greater than that of their nonobese counterparts. Design and Methods We developed finite element-based computational models for children that reflected various levels of obesity by varying body mass and the thickness of the subcutaneous adipose tissue layer. The models took account of both the momentum effect of variation of body mass and the cushion effect of variation of soft tissue thickness and examined these two contradictory effects on pelvic bone fracture risk through a set of sideways fall simulations with a range of impact speeds. Results The critical impact speed that yielded pelvic bone fracture decreased as the levels of obesity increased, which meant that the momentum effect of a greater body mass took precedence over the cushion effect of the soft tissue layer. Conclusions The result suggests that obese children have a greater risk of pelvic bone fracture than do their nonobese counterparts in sideways falls. A further implication is that current child safety devices, systems, and regulations will need to be revisited as the prevalence of child obesity increases. PMID:23512354

  12. Concurrent esterification and N-acetylation of amino acids with orthoesters: A useful reaction with interesting mechanistic implications

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Sarah; Romero, Dickie; Jacobs, Hollie K.; Gopalan, Aravamudan S.

    2010-01-01

    The concurrent esterification and N-acetylation of amino acids has been studied with triethyl orthoacetate (TEOA) and triethyl orthoformate (TEOF). In a surprising finding, only one equivalent of TEOA in refluxing toluene was necessary to convert L-proline and L-phenylalanine to the corresponding N-acetyl ethyl esters in good yield. The same transformation using TEOF was not effective. Stereochemical outcome and stoichiometric studies as well as structural variation of the amino acids in this reaction provided unexpected mechanistic insight. PMID:21286246

  13. Network-based discovery through mechanistic systems biology. Implications for applications--SMEs and drug discovery: where the action is.

    PubMed

    Benson, Neil

    2015-08-01

    Phase II attrition remains the most important challenge for drug discovery. Tackling the problem requires improved understanding of the complexity of disease biology. Systems biology approaches to this problem can, in principle, deliver this. This article reviews the reports of the application of mechanistic systems models to drug discovery questions and discusses the added value. Although we are on the journey to the virtual human, the length, path and rate of learning from this remain an open question. Success will be dependent on the will to invest and make the most of the insight generated along the way.

  14. Pesticides exposure as etiological factors of Parkinson's disease and other neurodegenerative diseases--a mechanistic approach.

    PubMed

    Baltazar, Maria Teresa; Dinis-Oliveira, Ricardo Jorge; de Lourdes Bastos, Maria; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M; Duarte, José Alberto; Carvalho, Félix

    2014-10-15

    The etiology of most neurodegenerative disorders is multifactorial and consists of an interaction between environmental factors and genetic predisposition. The role of pesticide exposure in neurodegenerative disease has long been suspected, but the specific causative agents and the mechanisms underlying are not fully understood. For the main neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis there are evidences linking their etiology with long-term/low-dose exposure to pesticides such as paraquat, maneb, dieldrin, pyrethroids and organophosphates. Most of these pesticides share common features, namely the ability to induce oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, α-synuclein fibrillization and neuronal cell loss. This review aims to clarify the role of pesticides as environmental risk factors in genesis of idiopathic PD and other neurological syndromes. For this purpose, the most relevant epidemiological and experimental data is highlighted in order to discuss the molecular mechanisms involved in neurodegeneration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Physiological constraints on organismal response to global warming: Mechanistic insights from clinally varying populations and implications for assessing endangerment.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Joseph; Spotila, James R

    2006-03-22

    Recent syntheses indicate that global warming affects diverse biological processes, but also highlight the potential for some species to adapt behaviourally or evolutionarily to rapid climate change. Far less attention has addressed the alternative, that organisms lacking this ability may face extinction, a fate projected to befall one-quarter of global biodiversity. This conclusion is controversial, in part because there exist few mechanistic studies that show how climate change could precipitate extinction. We provide a concrete, mechanistic example of warming as a stressor of organisms that are closely adapted to cool climates from a comparative analysis of organismal tolerance among clinally varying populations along a natural thermal gradient. We found that two montane salamanders exhibit significant metabolic depression at temperatures within the natural thermal range experienced by low and middle elevation populations. Moreover, the magnitude of depression was inversely related to native elevation, suggesting that low elevation populations are already living near the limit of their physiological tolerances. If this finding generally applies to other montane specialists, the prognosis for biodiversity loss in typically diverse montane systems is sobering. We propose that indices of warming-induced stress tolerance may provide a critical new tool for quantitative assessments of endangerment due to anthropogenic climate change across diverse species.

  16. Computational Identification of Mechanistic Factors That Determine the Timing and Intensity of the Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraja, Sridevi; Reifman, Jaques; Mitrophanov, Alexander Y.

    2015-01-01

    Timely resolution of inflammation is critical for the restoration of homeostasis in injured or infected tissue. Chronic inflammation is often characterized by a persistent increase in the concentrations of inflammatory cells and molecular mediators, whose distinct amount and timing characteristics offer an opportunity to identify effective therapeutic regulatory targets. Here, we used our recently developed computational model of local inflammation to identify potential targets for molecular interventions and to investigate the effects of individual and combined inhibition of such targets. This was accomplished via the development and application of computational strategies involving the simulation and analysis of thousands of inflammatory scenarios. We found that modulation of macrophage influx and efflux is an effective potential strategy to regulate the amount of inflammatory cells and molecular mediators in both normal and chronic inflammatory scenarios. We identified three molecular mediators − tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), and the chemokine CXCL8 − as potential molecular targets whose individual or combined inhibition may robustly regulate both the amount and timing properties of the kinetic trajectories for neutrophils and macrophages in chronic inflammation. Modulation of macrophage flux, as well as of the abundance of TNF-α, TGF-β, and CXCL8, may improve the resolution of chronic inflammation. PMID:26633296

  17. Computational Modelling Approaches on Epigenetic Factors in Neurodegenerative and Autoimmune Diseases and Their Mechanistic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Khanam Irin, Afroza; Tom Kodamullil, Alpha; Gündel, Michaela; Hofmann-Apitius, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative as well as autoimmune diseases have unclear aetiologies, but an increasing number of evidences report for a combination of genetic and epigenetic alterations that predispose for the development of disease. This review examines the major milestones in epigenetics research in the context of diseases and various computational approaches developed in the last decades to unravel new epigenetic modifications. However, there are limited studies that systematically link genetic and epigenetic alterations of DNA to the aetiology of diseases. In this work, we demonstrate how disease-related epigenetic knowledge can be systematically captured and integrated with heterogeneous information into a functional context using Biological Expression Language (BEL). This novel methodology, based on BEL, enables us to integrate epigenetic modifications such as DNA methylation or acetylation of histones into a specific disease network. As an example, we depict the integration of epigenetic and genetic factors in a functional context specific to Parkinson's disease (PD) and Multiple Sclerosis (MS). PMID:26636108

  18. Mechanistic insights into protonation state as a critical factor in hFPPS enzyme inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, David; Ortega-Castro, Joaquin; Mariño, Laura; Perelló, Joan; Frau, Juan

    2015-07-01

    Zoledronate and risedronate are the most powerful available nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates used in the treatment of bone-resorption disorders. Knowledge about inhibition mechanisms of these molecules is based on available crystallographic structures of human farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase (hFPPS). However, there is a lack of information explaining the inhibition potency of these two molecules compared to the natural substrate, dimethylallyl pyrophosphate. We carried out a molecular dynamics study that shown: (1) that NBPs potency is related to higher electrostatic interactions with the metallic cluster of the active site than to the natural substrate, and (2) the protonation of the R2 side chain is a critical factor to stabilize the NBPs into a closely irreversible ternary complex with the hFPPS.

  19. Mechanistic peptidomics: factors that dictate specificity in the formation of endogenous peptides in human milk.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Andres; Dallas, David C; Contreras, Stephanie; Chee, Sabrina; Parker, Evan A; Sun, Xin; Dimapasoc, Lauren; Barile, Daniela; German, J Bruce; Lebrilla, Carlito B

    2014-12-01

    An extensive mass spectrometry analysis of the human milk peptidome has revealed almost 700 endogenous peptides from 30 different proteins. Two in-house computational tools were created and used to visualize and interpret the data through both alignment of the peptide quasi-molecular ion intensities and estimation of the differential enzyme participation. These results reveal that the endogenous proteolytic activity in the mammary gland is remarkably specific and well conserved. Certain proteins-not necessarily the most abundant ones-are digested by the proteases present in milk, yielding endogenous peptides from selected regions. Our results strongly suggest that factors such as the presence of specific proteases, the position and concentration of cleavage sites, and, more important, the intrinsic disorder of segments of the protein drive this proteolytic specificity in the mammary gland. As a consequence of this selective hydrolysis, proteins that typically need to be cleaved at specific positions in order to exert their activity are properly digested, and bioactive peptides encoded in certain protein sequences are released. Proteins that must remain intact in order to maintain their activity in the mammary gland or in the neonatal gastrointestinal tract are unaffected by the hydrolytic environment present in milk. These results provide insight into the intrinsic structural mechanisms that facilitate the selectivity of the endogenous milk protease activity and might be useful to those studying the peptidomes of other biofluids.

  20. Mechanistic Peptidomics: Factors That Dictate Specificity in the Formation of Endogenous Peptides in Human Milk*

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Andres; Dallas, David C.; Contreras, Stephanie; Chee, Sabrina; Parker, Evan A.; Sun, Xin; Dimapasoc, Lauren; Barile, Daniela; German, J. Bruce; Lebrilla, Carlito B.

    2014-01-01

    An extensive mass spectrometry analysis of the human milk peptidome has revealed almost 700 endogenous peptides from 30 different proteins. Two in-house computational tools were created and used to visualize and interpret the data through both alignment of the peptide quasi-molecular ion intensities and estimation of the differential enzyme participation. These results reveal that the endogenous proteolytic activity in the mammary gland is remarkably specific and well conserved. Certain proteins—not necessarily the most abundant ones—are digested by the proteases present in milk, yielding endogenous peptides from selected regions. Our results strongly suggest that factors such as the presence of specific proteases, the position and concentration of cleavage sites, and, more important, the intrinsic disorder of segments of the protein drive this proteolytic specificity in the mammary gland. As a consequence of this selective hydrolysis, proteins that typically need to be cleaved at specific positions in order to exert their activity are properly digested, and bioactive peptides encoded in certain protein sequences are released. Proteins that must remain intact in order to maintain their activity in the mammary gland or in the neonatal gastrointestinal tract are unaffected by the hydrolytic environment present in milk. These results provide insight into the intrinsic structural mechanisms that facilitate the selectivity of the endogenous milk protease activity and might be useful to those studying the peptidomes of other biofluids. PMID:25172956

  1. Mechanistic heterogeneity in site recognition by the structurally homologous DNA-binding domains of the ETS family transcription factors Ets-1 and PU.1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuo; Linde, Miles H; Munde, Manoj; Carvalho, Victor D; Wilson, W David; Poon, Gregory M K

    2014-08-01

    ETS family transcription factors regulate diverse genes through binding at cognate DNA sites that overlap substantially in sequence. The DNA-binding domains of ETS proteins (ETS domains) are highly conserved structurally yet share limited amino acid homology. To define the mechanistic implications of sequence diversity within the ETS family, we characterized the thermodynamics and kinetics of DNA site recognition by the ETS domains of Ets-1 and PU.1, which represent the extremes in amino acid divergence among ETS proteins. Even though the two ETS domains bind their optimal sites with similar affinities under physiologic conditions, their nature of site recognition differs strikingly in terms of the role of hydration and counter ion release. The data suggest two distinct mechanisms wherein Ets-1 follows a "dry" mechanism that rapidly parses sites through electrostatic interactions and direct protein-DNA contacts, whereas PU.1 utilizes hydration to interrogate sequence-specific sites and form a long-lived complex relative to the Ets-1 counterpart. The kinetic persistence of the high affinity PU.1 · DNA complex may be relevant to an emerging role of PU.1, but not Ets-1, as a pioneer transcription factor in vivo. In addition, PU.1 activity is critical to the development and function of macrophages and lymphocytes, which present osmotically variable environments, and hydration-dependent specificity may represent an important regulatory mechanism in vivo, a hypothesis that finds support in gene expression profiles of primary murine macrophages. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Optimal targeting of HER2-PI3K signaling in breast cancer: mechanistic insights and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Rexer, Brent N; Arteaga, Carlos L

    2013-07-01

    The combination of a PI3K inhibitor with trastuzumab has been shown to be effective at overcoming trastuzumab resistance in models of HER2(+) breast cancer by inhibiting HER2-PI3K-FOXO-survivin signaling. In this review the potential clinical implications of these findings are discussed.

  3. Distinct properties of semiquinone species detected at the ubiquinol oxidation Qo site of cytochrome bc1 and their mechanistic implications

    PubMed Central

    Sarewicz, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    The two-electron ubiquinol oxidation or ubiquinone reduction typically involves semiquinone (SQ) intermediates. Natural engineering of ubiquinone binding sites of bioenergetic enzymes secures that SQ is sufficiently stabilized, so that it does not leave the site to membranous environment before full oxidation/reduction is completed. The ubiquinol oxidation Qo site of cytochrome bc1 (mitochondrial complex III, cytochrome b6f in plants) has been considered an exception with catalytic reactions assumed to involve highly unstable SQ or not to involve any SQ intermediate. This view seemed consistent with long-standing difficulty in detecting any reaction intermediates at the Qo site. New perspective on this issue is now offered by recent, independent reports on detection of SQ in this site. Each of the described SQs seems to have different spectroscopic properties leaving space for various interpretations and mechanistic considerations. Here, we comparatively reflect on those properties and their consequences on the SQ stabilization, the involvement of SQ in catalytic reactions, including proton transfers, and the reactivity of SQ with oxygen associated with superoxide generation activity of the Qo site. PMID:27194483

  4. A mechanistic model to study the thermal ecology of a southeastern pacific dominant intertidal mussel and implications for climate change.

    PubMed

    Finke, G R; Bozinovic, F; Navarrete, S A

    2009-01-01

    Developing mechanistic models to predict an organism's body temperature facilitates the study of physiological stresses caused by extreme climatic conditions the species might have faced in the past or making predictions about changes to come in the near future. Because the models combine empirical observation of different climatic variables with essential morphological attributes of the species, it is possible to examine specific aspects of predicted climatic changes. Here, we develop a model for the competitively dominant intertidal mussel Perumytilus purpuratus that estimates body temperature on the basis of meteorological and tidal data with an average difference (+/-SE) of 0.410 degrees +/- 0.0315 degrees C in comparison with a field-deployed temperature logger. Modeled body temperatures of P. purpuratus in central Chile regularly exceeded 30 degrees C in summer months, and values as high as 38 degrees C were found. These results suggest that the temperatures reached by mussels in the intertidal zone in central Chile are not sufficiently high to induce significant mortality on adults of this species; however, because body temperatures >40 degrees C can be lethal for this species, sublethal effects on physiological performance warrant further investigation. Body temperatures of mussels increased sigmoidally with increasing tidal height. Body temperatures of individuals from approximately 70% of the tidal range leveled off and did not increase any further with increasing tidal height. Finally, body size played an important role in determining body temperature. A hypothetical 5-cm-long mussel (only 1 cm longer than mussels found in nature) did reach potentially lethal body temperatures, suggesting that the biophysical environment may play a role in limiting the size of this small species.

  5. Minnesota logging utilization factors, 1975-1976--development, use, implications.

    Treesearch

    James E. Blyth; W. Brad Smith

    1979-01-01

    Discusses Minnesota saw log and pulpwood logging utilization factors developed during 1975-1976 and their implications. Compares factors for several species groups and shows their use in estimating growing stock cut for pulpwood and saw logs.

  6. The Role of {Ca2+ / CO32-} Ratio in Calcite Dissolution and Growth: Implications for Mechanistic Control of Biomineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arvidson, R. S.; Davis, K. J.; Luttge, A.

    2003-12-01

    The hypothesis that secular variations in the Mg/Ca ratio of seawater have exerted a fundamental control over the mineralogy and abundance of both skeletal and nonskeletal carbonates has received substantial support from both experimental and field data. In this context, ongoing efforts directed at understanding the mechanistic basis for interaction of Mg and Sr with carbonate mineral surfaces during growth (e.g., Davis et al. 2000) are of obvious importance. However, a growing body of experimental dissolution data records additional site-specific interactions between the surface and dissolved free carbon species and carbonate complexes. We suggest these data may provide additional insight into mechanisms by which organisms maintain skeletal integrity under variable conditions, including the possible development of surface precursors of mixed carbonate phases. For example, recent data have shown that kink dynamics along the fast, obtuse (+) step directions are highly sensitive to the ratio of magnesium to carbonate ion. We have used these observations as the basis for exploration of the relationship between the simple ratio of dissolved calcium to carbonate ion and surface dynamics. In sets of carefully designed experiments, we sought to maintain (1) a constant distance from equilibrium by varying {Ca2+ / CO32-} ratio at constant IAP, (2) constant {Ca2+ / CO32-} at variable IAP, (3) all under conditions of both over- and undersaturation ranging from far to close to equilibrium. Using an integrated approach, observations were made over a wide range of space and time scales using both AFM and VSI (vertical scanning interferometry). These coupled observations provide resolution of the relationship between the overall rate of reaction (total change in surface topography) and detailed observations of characteristic step dynamics developed during both dissolution and growth. Our preliminary results confirm a strong sensitivity of the conventional fast step direction to

  7. Changes in dissociation efficiency and kinetics of peptide ions induced by basic residues and their mechanistic implication.

    PubMed

    Yoon, So Hee; Moon, Jeong Hee; Kim, Myung Soo

    2011-02-01

    With matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry, total abundance of product ions formed by dissociation inside (in-source decay, ISD) and outside (post-source decay, PSD) the source was measured for peptide ions [Y(5)X + H](+), [XY(5) + H](+), [Y 2)XY(3) + H](+), and [XY(4)X + H](+) (X = tyrosine (Y), histidine (H), lysine (K), and arginine (R) with H for the ionizing proton). α-Cyano-4-hydroxycinammic acid was used as matrix. Product abundance became smaller in the presence of basic residues (H, K, and R), in the order Y > H ≈ K > R. In particular, product abundances in ISD of peptide ions with R were smaller than those with H or K by an order of magnitude, which, in turn, were smaller than that for [Y(6) + H](+) by an order of magnitude. Product abundance was affected by the most basic residue when more than one basic residue was present. A kinetic explanation for the data was attempted under the assumption of quasi-thermal equilibrium for peptide ions in MALDI plume which undergoes expansion cooling. Dramatic disparity in product abundance was found to arise from small difference in critical energy and entropy. Results indicate similar transition structures regardless of basic residues present, where the ionizing proton keeps interacting with a basic site. Further implication of the results on the dissociation mechanism along b-y channels is discussed.

  8. Mechanistic implications for LDL receptor degradation from the PCSK9/LDLR structure at neutral pH.

    PubMed

    Lo Surdo, Paola; Bottomley, Matthew J; Calzetta, Alessandra; Settembre, Ethan C; Cirillo, Agostino; Pandit, Shilpa; Ni, Yan G; Hubbard, Brian; Sitlani, Ayesha; Carfí, Andrea

    2011-12-01

    The protein PCSK9 (proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9) is a key regulator of low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) levels and cardiovascular health. We have determined the crystal structure of LDLR bound to PCSK9 at neutral pH. The structure shows LDLR in a new extended conformation. The PCSK9 C-terminal domain is solvent exposed, enabling cofactor binding, whereas the catalytic domain and prodomain interact with LDLR epidermal growth factor(A) and β-propeller domains, respectively. Thus, PCSK9 seems to hold LDLR in an extended conformation and to interfere with conformational rearrangements required for LDLR recycling.

  9. Mechanistic implications of methylglyoxal synthase complexed with phosphoglycolohydroxamic acid as observed by X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Marks, G T; Harris, T K; Massiah, M A; Mildvan, A S; Harrison, D H

    2001-06-12

    Methylglyoxal synthase (MGS) and triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) share neither sequence nor structural similarities, yet the reactions catalyzed by both enzymes are similar, in that both initially convert dihydroxyacetone phosphate to a cis-enediolic intermediate. This enediolic intermediate is formed from the abstraction of the pro-S C3 proton of DHAP by Asp-71 of MGS or the pro-R C3 proton of DHAP by Glu-165 of TIM. MGS then catalyzes the elimination of phosphate from this enediolic intermediate to form the enol of methylglyoxal, while TIM catalyzes proton donation to C2 to form D-glyceraldehyde phosphate. A competitive inhibitor of TIM, phosphoglycolohydroxamic acid (PGH) is found to be a tight binding competitive inhibitor of MGS with a K(i) of 39 nM. PGH's high affinity for MGS may be due in part to a short, strong hydrogen bond (SSHB) from the NOH of PGH to the carboxylate of Asp-71. Evidence for this SSHB is found in X-ray, 1H NMR, and fractionation factor data. The X-ray structure of the MGS homohexamer complexed with PGH at 2.0 A resolution shows this distance to be 2.30-2.37 +/- 0.24 A. 1H NMR shows a PGH-dependent 18.1 ppm signal that is consistent with a hydrogen bond length of 2.49 +/- 0.02 A. The D/H fractionation factor (phi = 0.43 +/- 0.02) is consistent with a hydrogen bond length of 2.53 +/- 0.01 A. Further, 15N NMR suggests a significant partial positive charge on the nitrogen atom of bound PGH, which could strengthen hydrogen bond donation to Asp-71. Both His-98 and His-19 are uncharged in the MGS-PGH complex on the basis of the chemical shifts of their Cdelta and C(epsilon) protons. The crystal structure reveals that Asp-71, on the re face of PGH, and His-19, on the si face of PGH, both approach the NO group of the analogue, while His-98, in the plane of PGH, approaches the carbonyl oxygen of the analogue. The phosphate group of PGH accepts nine hydrogen bonds from seven residues and is tilted out of the imidate plane of PGH toward the re face

  10. Involvement in Denitrification is Beneficial to the Biofilm Lifestyle of Comamonas testosteroni: A Mechanistic Study and Its Environmental Implications.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yichao; Shukal, Sudha; Mukherjee, Manisha; Cao, Bin

    2015-10-06

    Comamonas is one of the most abundant microorganisms in biofilm communities driving wastewater treatment. Little has been known about the role of this group of organisms and their biofilm mode of life. In this study, using Comamonas testosteroni as a model organism, we demonstrated the involvement of Comamonas biofilms in denitrification under bulk aerobic conditions and elucidated the influence of nitrate respiration on its biofilm lifestyle. Our results showed that C. testosteroni could use nitrate as the sole electron acceptor for anaerobic growth. Under bulk aerobic condition, biofilms of C. testosteroni were capable of reducing nitrate, and intriguingly, nitrate reduction significantly enhanced viability of the biofilm-cells and reduced cell detachment from the biofilms. Nitrate respiration was further shown to play an essential role in maintaining high cell viability in the biofilms. RNA-seq analysis, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed a higher level of bis(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) in cells respiring on nitrate than those grown aerobically (1.3 × 10(-4) fmol/cell vs 7.9 × 10(-6) fmol/cell; P < 0.01). C-di-GMP is one universal signaling molecule that regulates the biofilm mode of life, and a higher c-di-GMP concentration reduces cell detachment from biofilms. Taking these factors together, this study reveals that nitrate reduction occurs in mature biofilms of C. testosteroni under bulk aerobic conditions, and the respiratory reduction of nitrate is beneficial to the biofilm lifestyle by providing more metabolic energy to maintain high viability and a higher level of c-di-GMP to reduce cell detachment.

  11. Mechanistic, Mathematical Model to Predict the Dynamics of Tissue Genesis in Bone Defects via Mechanical Feedback and Mediation of Biochemical Factors

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Shannon R.; Saidel, Gerald M.; Knothe, Ulf; Knothe Tate, Melissa L.

    2014-01-01

    The link between mechanics and biology in the generation and the adaptation of bone has been well studied in context of skeletal development and fracture healing. Yet, the prediction of tissue genesis within - and the spatiotemporal healing of - postnatal defects, necessitates a quantitative evaluation of mechano-biological interactions using experimental and clinical parameters. To address this current gap in knowledge, this study aims to develop a mechanistic mathematical model of tissue genesis using bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) to represent of a class of factors that may coordinate bone healing. Specifically, we developed a mechanistic, mathematical model to predict the dynamics of tissue genesis by periosteal progenitor cells within a long bone defect surrounded by periosteum and stabilized via an intramedullary nail. The emergent material properties and mechanical environment associated with nascent tissue genesis influence the strain stimulus sensed by progenitor cells within the periosteum. Using a mechanical finite element model, periosteal surface strains are predicted as a function of emergent, nascent tissue properties. Strains are then input to a mechanistic mathematical model, where mechanical regulation of BMP-2 production mediates rates of cellular proliferation, differentiation and tissue production, to predict healing outcomes. A parametric approach enables the spatial and temporal prediction of endochondral tissue regeneration, assessed as areas of cartilage and mineralized bone, as functions of radial distance from the periosteum and time. Comparing model results to histological outcomes from two previous studies of periosteum-mediated bone regeneration in a common ovine model, it was shown that mechanistic models incorporating mechanical feedback successfully predict patterns (spatial) and trends (temporal) of bone tissue regeneration. The novel model framework presented here integrates a mechanistic feedback system based on the

  12. Mechanistic, mathematical model to predict the dynamics of tissue genesis in bone defects via mechanical feedback and mediation of biochemical factors.

    PubMed

    Moore, Shannon R; Saidel, Gerald M; Knothe, Ulf; Knothe Tate, Melissa L

    2014-06-01

    The link between mechanics and biology in the generation and the adaptation of bone has been well studied in context of skeletal development and fracture healing. Yet, the prediction of tissue genesis within - and the spatiotemporal healing of - postnatal defects, necessitates a quantitative evaluation of mechano-biological interactions using experimental and clinical parameters. To address this current gap in knowledge, this study aims to develop a mechanistic mathematical model of tissue genesis using bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) to represent of a class of factors that may coordinate bone healing. Specifically, we developed a mechanistic, mathematical model to predict the dynamics of tissue genesis by periosteal progenitor cells within a long bone defect surrounded by periosteum and stabilized via an intramedullary nail. The emergent material properties and mechanical environment associated with nascent tissue genesis influence the strain stimulus sensed by progenitor cells within the periosteum. Using a mechanical finite element model, periosteal surface strains are predicted as a function of emergent, nascent tissue properties. Strains are then input to a mechanistic mathematical model, where mechanical regulation of BMP-2 production mediates rates of cellular proliferation, differentiation and tissue production, to predict healing outcomes. A parametric approach enables the spatial and temporal prediction of endochondral tissue regeneration, assessed as areas of cartilage and mineralized bone, as functions of radial distance from the periosteum and time. Comparing model results to histological outcomes from two previous studies of periosteum-mediated bone regeneration in a common ovine model, it was shown that mechanistic models incorporating mechanical feedback successfully predict patterns (spatial) and trends (temporal) of bone tissue regeneration. The novel model framework presented here integrates a mechanistic feedback system based on the

  13. Mechanistic Approach to Understanding the Toxicity of the Azole Fungicide Triadimefon to a Nontarget Aquatic Insect and Implications for Exposure Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    We utilized mechanistic and stereoselective based in vitro metabolism assays and sublethal exposures of triadimefon to gain insight into the extent of carbonyl reduction and the toxic mode of action of triadimefon with black fly (Diptera: Simuliidae) larvae.

  14. Prediction of warfarin maintenance dose in Han Chinese patients using a mechanistic model based on genetic and non-genetic factors.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuan; Yang, Jinbo; Zhang, Haiyan; Yang, Jin

    2013-07-01

    Many attempts have been made to predict the warfarin maintenance dose in patients beginning warfarin therapy using a descriptive model based on multiple linear regression. Here we report the first attempt to develop a comprehensive mechanistic model integrating in vitro-in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE) with a pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model to predict the warfarin maintenance dose in Han Chinese patients. The model incorporates demographic factors [sex, age, body weight (BW)] and the genetic polymorphisms of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2C9 (CYP2C9) and vitamin K epoxide reductase complex subunit 1 (VKORC1). Information on the various factors, mean warfarin daily dose and International Normalized Ratio (INR) was available for a cohort of 197 Han Chinese patients. Based on in vitro enzyme kinetic parameters for S-warfarin metabolism, demographic data for Han Chinese and some scaling factors, the S-warfarin clearance (CL) was predicted for patients in the cohort with different CYP2C9 genotypes using IVIVE. The plasma concentration of S-warfarin after a single oral dose was simulated using a one-compartment pharmacokinetic model with first-order absorption and a lag time and was combined with a mechanistic coagulation model to simulate the INR response. The warfarin maintenance dose was then predicted based on the demographic data and genotypes of CYP2C9 and VKORC1 for each patient and using the observed steady-state INR (INRss) as a target value. Finally, sensitivity analysis was carried out to determine which factor(s) affect the warfarin maintenance dose most strongly. The predictive performance of this mechanistic model is not inferior to that of our previous descriptive model. There were significant differences in the mean warfarin daily dose in patients with different CYP2C9 and VKORC1 genotypes. Using IVIVE, the predicted mean CL of S-warfarin for patients with CYP2C9*1/*3 (0.092 l/h, n = 11) was 57 % less than for those with wild-type *1/*1 (0.215 l/h, n

  15. FACTORS IMPLICATED IN AMPHIBIAN POPULATION DECLINES IN THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Factors adversely affecting amphibian populations in the US were evaluated using information from species accounts written in a standardized format by multiple authors (Volume 2 of this book). For each species, factors implicated by the authors (i.e., known or suspected) as affec...

  16. Hard Tick Factors Implicated in Pathogen Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiang Ye; Bonnet, Sarah I.

    2014-01-01

    Ticks are the most common arthropod vector, after mosquitoes, and are capable of transmitting the greatest variety of pathogens. For both humans and animals, the worldwide emergence or re-emergence of tick-borne disease is becoming increasingly problematic. Despite being such an important issue, our knowledge of pathogen transmission by ticks is incomplete. Several recent studies, reviewed here, have reported that the expression of some tick factors can be modulated in response to pathogen infection, and that some of these factors can impact on the pathogenic life cycle. Delineating the specific tick factors required for tick-borne pathogen transmission should lead to new strategies in the disruption of pathogen life cycles to combat emerging tick-borne disease. PMID:24498444

  17. Antimalarial bicyclic peroxides belonging to the G-factor family: mechanistic aspects of their formation and iron (II) induced reduction.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Jeremy; Azema, Joelle; Payrastre, Corinne; Baltas, Michel; Tuccio, Beatrice; Vial, Henri; Andre-Barres, Christiane

    2014-01-01

    Artemisinin and its derivatives are peroxide-containing compounds targeting P. falciparum. We review here structural analogues of bicyclic peroxides belonging to the G factors family presenting antimalarial properties. They were synthesised under Mannich type conditions, followed by an autoxidation step resulting exclusively in the peroxide. As the electron transfer from haem or free iron to the peroxide is the first step in the mode of action of artemisinin-like compounds, the redox properties of some endoperoxides were studied by electrochemistry allowing the evaluation of the reduction standard potentials. The Fe(II) induced reduction was also investigated and the reactivity of the C-centered radical intermediate formed was linked to the antimalarial activity. These bicyclic peroxides both with various hybrid molecules containing the endoperoxide framework were evaluated in vitro against Plasmodium falciparum. They exhibited moderate to good activities.

  18. Structural and mechanistic insights into nuclear transport and delivery of the critical pluripotency factor Oct4 to DNA.

    PubMed

    Okuyama, Takahide; Yamagishi, Ryosuke; Shimada, Jiro; Ikeda, Masaaki; Maruoka, Yayoi; Kaneko, Hiroki

    2017-02-17

    Oct4 is a master regulator of the induction and maintenance of cellular pluripotency, and has crucial roles in early stages of differentiation. It is the only factor that cannot be substituted by other members of the same protein family to induce pluripotency. However, although Oct4 nuclear transport and delivery to target DNA are critical events for reprogramming to pluripotency, little is known about the molecular mechanism. Oct4 is imported to the nucleus by the classical nuclear transport mechanism, which requires importin α as an adaptor to bind the nuclear localization signal (NLS). Although there are structures of complexes of the NLS of transcription factors (TFs) in complex with importin α, there are no structures available for complexes involving intact TFs. We have therefore modeled the structure of the complex of the whole Oct4 POU domain and importin α2 using protein-protein docking and molecular dynamics. The model explains how the Ebola virus VP24 protein has a negative effect on the nuclear import of STAT1 by importin α but not on Oct4, and how Nup 50 facilitates cargo release from importin α. The model demonstrates the structural differences between the Oct4 importin α bound and DNA bound crystal states. We propose that the 'expanded linker' between the two DNA-binding domains of Oct4 is an intrinsically disordered region and that its conformational changes have a key role in the recognition/binding to both DNA and importin α. Moreover, we propose that this structural change enables efficient delivery to DNA after release from importin α.

  19. Minimum-noise production of translation factor eIF4G maps to a mechanistically determined optimal rate control window for protein synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xiang; Firczuk, Helena; Pietroni, Paola; Westbrook, Richard; Dacheux, Estelle; Mendes, Pedro; McCarthy, John E.G.

    2017-01-01

    Gene expression noise influences organism evolution and fitness. The mechanisms determining the relationship between stochasticity and the functional role of translation machinery components are critical to viability. eIF4G is an essential translation factor that exerts strong control over protein synthesis. We observe an asymmetric, approximately bell-shaped, relationship between the average intracellular abundance of eIF4G and rates of cell population growth and global mRNA translation, with peak rates occurring at normal physiological abundance. This relationship fits a computational model in which eIF4G is at the core of a multi-component–complex assembly pathway. This model also correctly predicts a plateau-like response of translation to super-physiological increases in abundance of the other cap-complex factors, eIF4E and eIF4A. Engineered changes in eIF4G abundance amplify noise, demonstrating that minimum stochasticity coincides with physiological abundance of this factor. Noise is not increased when eIF4E is overproduced. Plasmid-mediated synthesis of eIF4G imposes increased global gene expression stochasticity and reduced viability because the intrinsic noise for this factor influences total cellular gene noise. The naturally evolved eIF4G gene expression noise minimum maps within the optimal activity zone dictated by eIF4G's mechanistic role. Rate control and noise are therefore interdependent and have co-evolved to share an optimal physiological abundance point. PMID:27928055

  20. Mechanistic insights into elastin degradation by pseudolysin, the major virulence factor of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Zhao, Hui-Lin; Ran, Li-Yuan; Li, Chun-Yang; Zhang, Xi-Ying; Su, Hai-Nan; Shi, Mei; Zhou, Bai-Cheng; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2015-04-23

    Pseudolysin is the most abundant protease secreted by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and is the major extracellular virulence factor of this opportunistic human pathogen. Pseudolysin destroys human tissues by solubilizing elastin. However, the mechanisms by which pseudolysin binds to and degrades elastin remain elusive. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of action of pseudolysin on elastin binding and degradation by biochemical assay, microscopy and site-directed mutagenesis. Pseudolysin bound to bovine elastin fibers and preferred to attack peptide bonds with hydrophobic residues at the P1 and P1' positions in the hydrophobic domains of elastin. The time-course degradation processes of both bovine elastin fibers and cross-linked human tropoelastin by pseudolysin were further investigated by microscopy. Altogether, the results indicate that elastin degradation by pseudolysin began with the hydrophobic domains on the fiber surface, followed by the progressive disassembly of macroscopic elastin fibers into primary structural elements. Moreover, our site-directed mutational results indicate that five hydrophobic residues in the S1-S1' sub-sites played key roles in the binding of pseudolysin to elastin. This study sheds lights on the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa infection.

  1. A role for cathepsin Z in neuroinflammation provides mechanistic support for an epigenetic risk factor in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Allan, Euan R O; Campden, Rhiannon I; Ewanchuk, Benjamin W; Tailor, Pankaj; Balce, Dale R; McKenna, Neil T; Greene, Catherine J; Warren, Amy L; Reinheckel, Thomas; Yates, Robin M

    2017-05-10

    Hypomethylation of the cathepsin Z locus has been proposed as an epigenetic risk factor for multiple sclerosis (MS). Cathepsin Z is a unique lysosomal cysteine cathepsin expressed primarily by antigen presenting cells. While cathepsin Z expression has been associated with neuroinflammatory disorders, a role for cathepsin Z in mediating neuroinflammation has not been previously established. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) was induced in both wildtype mice and mice deficient in cathepsin Z. The effects of cathepsin Z-deficiency on the processing and presentation of the autoantigen myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein, and on the production of IL-1β and IL-18 were determined in vitro from cells derived from wildtype and cathepsin Z-deficient mice. The effects of cathepsin Z-deficiency on CD4+ T cell activation, migration, and infiltration to the CNS were determined in vivo. Statistical analyses of parametric data were performed by one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey post-hoc tests, or by an unpaired Student's t test. EAE clinical scoring was analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U test. We showed that mice deficient in cathepsin Z have reduced neuroinflammation and dramatically lowered circulating levels of IL-1β during EAE. Deficiency in cathepsin Z did not impact either the processing or the presentation of MOG, or MOG- specific CD4+ T cell activation and trafficking. Consistently, we found that cathepsin Z-deficiency reduced the efficiency of antigen presenting cells to secrete IL-1β, which in turn reduced the ability of mice to generate Th17 responses-critical steps in the pathogenesis of EAE and MS. Together, these data support a novel role for cathepsin Z in the propagation of IL-1β-driven neuroinflammation.

  2. The Role of Parathyroid Hormone-Related Protein (PTHrP) in Osteoblast Response to Microgravity: Mechanistic Implications for Osteoporosis Development

    PubMed Central

    Camirand, Anne; Goltzman, David; Gupta, Ajay; Kaouass, Mohammadi; Panda, Dibyendu; Karaplis, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged skeletal unloading through bedrest results in bone loss similar to that observed in elderly osteoporotic patients, but with an accelerated timeframe. This rapid effect on weight-bearing bones is also observed in astronauts who can lose up to 2% of their bone mass per month spent in Space. Despite the important implications for Spaceflight travelers and bedridden patients, the exact mechanisms involved in disuse osteoporosis have not been elucidated. Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) regulates many physiological processes including skeletal development, and has been proposed as a mechanosensor. To investigate the role of PTHrP in microgravity-induced bone loss, trabecular and calvarial osteoblasts (TOs and COs) from Pthrp +/+ and -/- mice were subjected to actual Spaceflight for 6 days (Foton M3 satellite). Pthrp +/+, +/- and -/- osteoblasts were also exposed to simulated microgravity for periods varying from 6 days to 6 weeks. While COs displayed little change in viability in 0g, viability of all TOs rapidly decreased in inverse proportion to PTHrP expression levels. Furthermore, Pthrp+/+ TOs displayed a sharp viability decline after 2 weeks at 0g. Microarray analysis of Pthrp+/+ TOs after 6 days in simulated 0g revealed expression changes in genes encoding prolactins, apoptosis/survival molecules, bone metabolism and extra-cellular matrix composition proteins, chemokines, insulin-like growth factor family members and Wnt-related signalling molecules. 88% of 0g-induced expression changes in Pthrp+/+ cells overlapped those caused by Pthrp ablation in normal gravity, and pulsatile treatment with PTHrP1-36 not only reversed a large proportion of 0g-induced effects in Pthrp+/+ TOs but maintained viability over 6-week exposure to microgravity. Our results confirm PTHrP efficacy as an anabolic agent to prevent microgravity-induced cell death in TOs. PMID:27463808

  3. The Role of Parathyroid Hormone-Related Protein (PTHrP) in Osteoblast Response to Microgravity: Mechanistic Implications for Osteoporosis Development.

    PubMed

    Camirand, Anne; Goltzman, David; Gupta, Ajay; Kaouass, Mohammadi; Panda, Dibyendu; Karaplis, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged skeletal unloading through bedrest results in bone loss similar to that observed in elderly osteoporotic patients, but with an accelerated timeframe. This rapid effect on weight-bearing bones is also observed in astronauts who can lose up to 2% of their bone mass per month spent in Space. Despite the important implications for Spaceflight travelers and bedridden patients, the exact mechanisms involved in disuse osteoporosis have not been elucidated. Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) regulates many physiological processes including skeletal development, and has been proposed as a mechanosensor. To investigate the role of PTHrP in microgravity-induced bone loss, trabecular and calvarial osteoblasts (TOs and COs) from Pthrp +/+ and -/- mice were subjected to actual Spaceflight for 6 days (Foton M3 satellite). Pthrp +/+, +/- and -/- osteoblasts were also exposed to simulated microgravity for periods varying from 6 days to 6 weeks. While COs displayed little change in viability in 0g, viability of all TOs rapidly decreased in inverse proportion to PTHrP expression levels. Furthermore, Pthrp+/+ TOs displayed a sharp viability decline after 2 weeks at 0g. Microarray analysis of Pthrp+/+ TOs after 6 days in simulated 0g revealed expression changes in genes encoding prolactins, apoptosis/survival molecules, bone metabolism and extra-cellular matrix composition proteins, chemokines, insulin-like growth factor family members and Wnt-related signalling molecules. 88% of 0g-induced expression changes in Pthrp+/+ cells overlapped those caused by Pthrp ablation in normal gravity, and pulsatile treatment with PTHrP1-36 not only reversed a large proportion of 0g-induced effects in Pthrp+/+ TOs but maintained viability over 6-week exposure to microgravity. Our results confirm PTHrP efficacy as an anabolic agent to prevent microgravity-induced cell death in TOs.

  4. Overlapping 16p13.11 Deletion and Gain of Copies Variations Associated with Childhood Onset Psychosis Include Genes with Mechanistic Implications for Autism Associated Pathways: Two Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Brownstein, Catherine A.; Kleiman, Robin J.; Engle, Elizabeth C.; Towne, Meghan C.; D’Angelo, Eugene J.; Yu, Timothy W.; Beggs, Alan H.; Picker, Jonathan; Fogler, Jason M.; Carroll, Devon; Schmitt, Rachel C. O.; Wolff, Robert R.; Shen, Yiping; Lip, Va; Bilguvar, Kaya; Kim, April; Tembulkar, Sahil; O’Donnell, Kyle; Gonzalez-Heydrich, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Copy number variability at 16p13.11 has been associated with intellectual disability, autism, schizophrenia, epilepsy and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. Adolescent/adult- onset psychosis has been reported in a subset of these cases. Here, we report on two children with CNVs in 16p13.11 that developed psychosis before the age of 7. The genotype and neuropsychiatric abnormalities of these patients highlight several overlapping genes that have possible mechanistic relevance to pathways previously implicated in Autism Spectrum Disorders, including the mTOR signaling and the ubiquitin-proteasome cascades. A careful screening of the 16p13.11 region is warranted in patients with childhood onset psychosis. PMID:26887912

  5. Overlapping 16p13.11 deletion and gain of copies variations associated with childhood onset psychosis include genes with mechanistic implications for autism associated pathways: Two case reports.

    PubMed

    Brownstein, Catherine A; Kleiman, Robin J; Engle, Elizabeth C; Towne, Meghan C; D'Angelo, Eugene J; Yu, Timothy W; Beggs, Alan H; Picker, Jonathan; Fogler, Jason M; Carroll, Devon; Schmitt, Rachel C O; Wolff, Robert R; Shen, Yiping; Lip, Va; Bilguvar, Kaya; Kim, April; Tembulkar, Sahil; O'Donnell, Kyle; Gonzalez-Heydrich, Joseph

    2016-05-01

    Copy number variability at 16p13.11 has been associated with intellectual disability, autism, schizophrenia, epilepsy, and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. Adolescent/adult- onset psychosis has been reported in a subset of these cases. Here, we report on two children with CNVs in 16p13.11 that developed psychosis before the age of 7. The genotype and neuropsychiatric abnormalities of these patients highlight several overlapping genes that have possible mechanistic relevance to pathways previously implicated in Autism Spectrum Disorders, including the mTOR signaling and the ubiquitin-proteasome cascades. A careful screening of the 16p13.11 region is warranted in patients with childhood onset psychosis.

  6. Hydration Effects on Skin Microstructure as Probed by High-Resolution Cryo-Scanning Electron Microscopy and Mechanistic Implications to Enhanced Transcutaneous Delivery of Biomacromolecules

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Grace; Xu, Peng; Lawson, Louise B.; He, Jibao; Freytag, Lucia C.; Clements, John D.; John, Vijay T.

    2010-01-01

    Although hydration is long known to improve the permeability of skin, penetration of macromolecules such as proteins is limited and the understanding of enhanced transport is based on empirical observations. This study uses high-resolution cryo-scanning electron microscopy to visualize microstructural changes in the stratum corneum (SC) and enable a mechanistic interpretation of biomacromolecule penetration through highly hydrated porcine skin. Swollen corneocytes, separation of lipid bilayers in the SC intercellular space to form cisternae, and networks of spherical particulates are observed in porcine skin tissue hydrated for a period of 4–10 h. This is explained through compaction of skin lipids when hydrated, a reversal in the conformational transition from unilamellar liposomes in lamellar granules to lamellae between keratinocytes when the SC skin barrier is initially established. Confocal microscopy studies show distinct enhancement in penetration of fluorescein isothiocyanate-bovine serum albumin (FITC-BSA) through skin hydrated for 4–10 h, and limited penetration of FITC-BSA once skin is restored to its natively hydrated structure when exposed to the environment for 2–3 h. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of a 4–10 h hydration period to enhance transcutaneous penetration of large biomacromolecules without permanently damaging the skin. PMID:19582754

  7. Hydration effects on skin microstructure as probed by high-resolution cryo-scanning electron microscopy and mechanistic implications to enhanced transcutaneous delivery of biomacromolecules.

    PubMed

    Tan, Grace; Xu, Peng; Lawson, Louise B; He, Jibao; Freytag, Lucia C; Clements, John D; John, Vijay T

    2010-02-01

    Although hydration is long known to improve the permeability of skin, penetration of macromolecules such as proteins is limited and the understanding of enhanced transport is based on empirical observations. This study uses high-resolution cryo-scanning electron microscopy to visualize microstructural changes in the stratum corneum (SC) and enable a mechanistic interpretation of biomacromolecule penetration through highly hydrated porcine skin. Swollen corneocytes, separation of lipid bilayers in the SC intercellular space to form cisternae, and networks of spherical particulates are observed in porcine skin tissue hydrated for a period of 4-10 h. This is explained through compaction of skin lipids when hydrated, a reversal in the conformational transition from unilamellar liposomes in lamellar granules to lamellae between keratinocytes when the SC skin barrier is initially established. Confocal microscopy studies show distinct enhancement in penetration of fluorescein isothiocyanate-bovine serum albumin (FITC-BSA) through skin hydrated for 4-10 h, and limited penetration of FITC-BSA once skin is restored to its natively hydrated structure when exposed to the environment for 2-3 h. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of a 4-10 h hydration period to enhance transcutaneous penetration of large biomacromolecules without permanently damaging the skin.

  8. ATP-binding site of adenylate kinase: mechanistic implications of its homology with ras-encoded p21, F1-ATPase, and other nucleotide-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Fry, D C; Kuby, S A; Mildvan, A S

    1986-02-01

    The MgATP binding site of adenylate kinase, located by a combination of NMR and x-ray diffraction, is near three protein segments, five to seven amino acids in length, that are homologous in sequence to segments found in other nucleotide-binding phosphotransferases, such as myosin and F1-ATPase, ras p21 and transducin GTPases, and cAMP-dependent and src protein kinases, suggesting equivalent mechanistic roles of these segments in all of these proteins. Segment 1 is a glycine-rich flexible loop that, on adenylate kinase, may control access to the ATP-binding site by changing its conformation. Segment 2 is an alpha-helix containing two hydrophobic residues that interact with the adenine-ribose moiety of ATP, and a lysine that may bind to the beta- and gamma-phosphates of ATP. Segment 3 is a hydrophobic strand of parallel beta-pleated sheet, terminated by a carboxylate, that flanks the triphosphate binding site. The various reported mutations of ras p21 that convert it to a transforming agent all appear to involve segment 1, and such substitutions may alter the properties of p21 by hindering a conformational change at this segment. In F1-ATPase, the flexible loop may, by its position, control both the accessibility and the ATP/ADP equilibrium constant on the enzyme.

  9. ATP-binding site of adenylate kinase: mechanistic implications of its homology with ras-encoded p21, F1-ATPase, and other nucleotide-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Fry, D C; Kuby, S A; Mildvan, A S

    1986-01-01

    The MgATP binding site of adenylate kinase, located by a combination of NMR and x-ray diffraction, is near three protein segments, five to seven amino acids in length, that are homologous in sequence to segments found in other nucleotide-binding phosphotransferases, such as myosin and F1-ATPase, ras p21 and transducin GTPases, and cAMP-dependent and src protein kinases, suggesting equivalent mechanistic roles of these segments in all of these proteins. Segment 1 is a glycine-rich flexible loop that, on adenylate kinase, may control access to the ATP-binding site by changing its conformation. Segment 2 is an alpha-helix containing two hydrophobic residues that interact with the adenine-ribose moiety of ATP, and a lysine that may bind to the beta- and gamma-phosphates of ATP. Segment 3 is a hydrophobic strand of parallel beta-pleated sheet, terminated by a carboxylate, that flanks the triphosphate binding site. The various reported mutations of ras p21 that convert it to a transforming agent all appear to involve segment 1, and such substitutions may alter the properties of p21 by hindering a conformational change at this segment. In F1-ATPase, the flexible loop may, by its position, control both the accessibility and the ATP/ADP equilibrium constant on the enzyme. Images PMID:2869483

  10. Wild-Type and Mutant Hemagglutinin Fusion Peptides Alter Bilayer Structure as Well as Kinetics and Activation Thermodynamics of Stalk and Pore Formation Differently: Mechanistic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Hirak; Tarafdar, Pradip K.; Klapper, David G.; Lentz, Barry R.

    2013-01-01

    Viral fusion peptides are short N-terminal regions of type-1 viral fusion proteins that are critical for virus entry. Although the importance of viral fusion peptides in virus-cell membrane fusion is established, little is known about how they function. We report the effects of wild-type (WT) hemagglutinin (HA) fusion peptide and its G1S, G1V, and W14A mutants on the kinetics of poly(ethylene glycol)(PEG)-mediated fusion of small unilamellar vesicles composed of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine, dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine, sphingomyelin, and cholesterol (molar ratio of 35:30:15:20). Time courses of lipid mixing, content mixing, and content leakage were obtained using fluorescence assays at multiple temperatures and analyzed globally using either a two-step or three-step sequential ensemble model of the fusion process to obtain the rate constant and activation thermodynamics of each step. We also monitored the influence of peptides on bilayer interfacial order, acyl chain order, bilayer free volume, and water penetration. All these data were considered in terms of a recently published mechanistic model for the thermodynamic transition states for each step of the fusion process. We propose that WT peptide catalyzes Step 1 by occupying bilayer regions vacated by acyl chains that protrude into interbilayer space to form the Step 1 transition state. It also uniquely contributes a positive intrinsic curvature to hemi-fused leaflets to eliminate Step 2 and catalyzes Step 3 by destabilizing the highly stressed edges of the hemi-fused microstructures that dominate the ensemble of the intermediate state directly preceding fusion pore formation. Similar arguments explain the catalytic and inhibitory properties of the mutant peptides and support the hypothesis that the membrane-contacting fusion peptide of HA fusion protein is key to its catalytic activity. PMID:24314080

  11. [Associated factors and clinical implications of post transplant renal anemia].

    PubMed

    Freiberg, Mónica; Chiurchiu, Carlos; Capra, Raúl; Eckhardt, Andrea; De La Fuente, Jorge; Douthat, Walter; De Arteaga, Javier; Massari, Pablo U

    2013-01-01

    A considerable percentage of patients exhibit anemia post kidney transplant. Its origin is multifactorial and the main causes involved depend on the post transplant period considered. We studied in a group of 134 consecutive patients the associated factors and the clinical implications of "late anemia" (6 months post transplant). Multiple regression analysis showed that post transplant oliguria and acute rejection episodes were significantly associated with anemia. Graft survival at 36 months was significantly reduced in the anemic group (83 % versus 96%, p < 0.01). No differences in patients survival or rate of cardiovascular events were observed. We concluded that anemia at 6 months post transplant is independently and significantly associated with events that reduced functioning renal mass and kidney survival.

  12. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and hemodialysis: physiopathology and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Libetta, Carmelo; Esposito, Pasquale; Martinelli, Claudia; Grosjean, Fabrizio; Gregorini, Marilena; Rampino, Teresa; Dal Canton, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a pleiotropic cytokine which exerts a variety of effects on several cells, being involved in the regulation of many biological processes, such as inflammation, tissue repair, morphogenesis, angiogenesis, tumour propagation, immunomodulation of viral infections and cardio-metabolic activities. Patients undergoing regular hemodialysis (HD) present elevated levels of HGF, mainly due to the leukocyte activation associated with HD treatment. High HGF levels might account for specific clinical features of HD patients, i.e. mild liver damage in course of HCV-infection and high cardiovascular risk profile. Moreover, in patients with acute kidney injury, the induction of HGF may represent a crucial step to promote renal recovery, which can have important prognostic consequences in the short and long-term. In this review we discuss the mechanisms underlying HGF production in HD patients, the role of HGF in this particular patient population and the potential clinical implications derived from the study of HGF in HD patients.

  13. Low-dose naltrexone targets the opioid growth factor-opioid growth factor receptor pathway to inhibit cell proliferation: mechanistic evidence from a tissue culture model.

    PubMed

    Donahue, Renee N; McLaughlin, Patricia J; Zagon, Ian S

    2011-09-01

    Naltrexone (NTX) is an opioid antagonist that inhibits or accelerates cell proliferation in vivo when utilized in a low (LDN) or high (HDN) dose, respectively. The mechanism of opioid antagonist action on growth is not well understood. We established a tissue culture model of LDN and HDN using short-term and continuous opioid receptor blockade, respectively, in human ovarian cancer cells, and found that the duration of opioid receptor blockade determines cell proliferative response. The alteration of growth by NTX also was detected in cells representative of pancreatic, colorectal and squamous cell carcinomas. The opioid growth factor (OGF; [Met(5)]-enkephalin) and its receptor (OGFr) were responsible for mediating the action of NTX on cell proliferation. NTX upregulated OGF and OGFr at the translational but not at the transcriptional level. The mechanism of inhibition by short-term NTX required p16 and/or p21 cyclin-dependent inhibitory kinases, but was not dependent on cell survival (necrosis, apoptosis). Sequential administration of short-term NTX and OGF had a greater inhibitory effect on cell proliferation than either agent alone. Given the parallels between short-term NTX in vitro and LDN in vivo, we now demonstrate at the molecular level that the OGF-OGFr axis is a common pathway that is essential for the regulation of cell proliferation by NTX.

  14. Mechanistic Studies of Wacker-Type Amidocyclization of Alkenes Catalyzed by (IMes)Pd(TFA)2(H2O): Kinetic and Stereochemical Implications of Proton Transfer†

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xuan; White, Paul B.

    2012-01-01

    The stereochemical course of the amidopalladation of alkenes has important implications for the development of enantioselective Pd-catalyzed “Wacker-type” oxidative amination of alkenes. We have recently shown that the addition of base (Na2CO3) can alter the stereochemical course of amidopalladation in the (IMes)Pd(TFA)2(H2O)-catalyzed aerobic oxidative amidation of alkene. In this study, the mechanism of (IMes)Pd(TFA)2(H2O)-catalyzed oxidative heterocyclization of (Z)-4-hexenyltosylamide was investigated in the presence and absence of exogenous base Na2CO3. The results reveal two parallel pathways in the absence of base: a cis-amidopalladation pathway with turnover-limiting deprotonation of the sulfonamide nucleophile, and a trans-amidopalladation pathway with turnover-limiting nucleophilic attack of sulfonamide on the coordinated alkene. The addition of base (Na2CO3) lowers the energy barrier associated with the proton transfer, leading to an overall faster turnover rate and exclusive cis-amidopalladation of alkene. PMID:23157332

  15. Mechanistic studies of Wacker-type amidocyclization of alkenes catalyzed by (IMes)Pd(TFA)2(H2O): kinetic and stereochemical implications of proton transfer.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xuan; White, Paul B; Stahl, Shannon S

    2013-03-01

    The stereochemical course of the amidopalladation of alkenes has important implications for the development of enantioselective Pd-catalyzed "Wacker-type" oxidative amidation of alkenes. We have recently shown that the addition of base (Na2CO3) can alter the stereochemical course of amidopalladation in the (IMes)Pd(TFA)2(H2O)-catalyzed aerobic oxidative amidation of alkene. In this study, the mechanism of (IMes)Pd(TFA)2(H2O)-catalyzed oxidative heterocyclization of (Z)-4-hexenyltosylamide was investigated in the presence and absence of exogenous base Na2CO3. The results reveal two parallel pathways in the absence of base: a cis-amidopalladation pathway with turnover-limiting deprotonation of the sulfonamide nucleophile and a trans-amidopalladation pathway with turnover-limiting nucleophilic attack of sulfonamide on the coordinated alkene. The addition of base (Na2CO3) lowers the energy barrier associated with the proton transfer, leading to an overall faster turnover rate and exclusive cis-amidopalladation of alkene.

  16. Genetic factors in toxicology: implications for toxicological screening

    SciTech Connect

    Festing, M.F.

    1987-01-01

    Methods of assessing the toxicity of xenobiotics have improved substantially during the last decade. However, as compounds become generally safer, the problem of individual variation in response assumes increasing relative importance. Environmental factors such as age, health and nutritional status, and interactions with other xenobiotics account for some of this variation, but genetic differences between individuals and races have important implications. In a few cases, Mendelian loci which control drug susceptibility (e.g., to isoniazid) have been described. However, in most cases the exact mode of inheritance has not yet been determined due to the problems of carrying out genetic studies in man. It is well established that many loci that are polymorphic in man are also so in laboratory animals, so much of this genetic variation should be picked up in preclinical screening, and could be used to more accurately predict potential variation in toxicity in man. Unfortunately, most toxicologists use only a single stock of laboratory animals, which does not show whether the response to a given xenobiotic is under genetic control. The design of animal tests would be improved by using more than one strain of genetically defined animals, and by paying more attention to genetic variation in responses to xenobiotics, both in animals and man. 97 references.

  17. The mare reproductive loss syndrome and the eastern tent caterpillar: a toxicokinetic/statistical analysis with clinical, epidemiologic, and mechanistic implications.

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Manu; Gantz, Marie G; Tobin, Thomas; Harkins, J Daniel; Bosken, Jeffrey M; Hughes, Charlie; Harrison, Lenn R; Bernard, William V; Richter, Dana L; Fitzgerald, Terrence D

    2003-01-01

    During 2001, central Kentucky experienced acute transient epidemics of early and late fetal losses, pericarditis, and unilateral endophthalmitis, collectively referred to as mare reproductive loss syndrome (MRLS). A toxicokinetic/statistical analysis of experimental and field MRLS data was conducted using accelerated failure time (AFT) analysis of abortions following administration of Eastern tent caterpillars (ETCs; 100 or 50 g/day or 100 g of irradiated caterpillars/day) to late-term pregnant mares. In addition, 2001 late-term fetal loss field data were used in the analysis. Experimental data were fitted by AFT analysis at a high (P <.0001) significance. Times to first abortion ("lag time") and abortion rates were dose dependent. Lag times decreased and abortion rates increased exponentially with dose. Calculated dose x response data curves allow interpretation of abortion data in terms of "intubated ETC equivalents." Analysis suggested that field exposure to ETCs in 2001 in central Kentucky commenced on approximately April 27, was initially equivalent to approximately 5 g of intubated ETCs/day, and increased to approximately 30 g/day at the outbreak peak. This analysis accounts for many aspects of the epidemiology, clinical presentations, and manifestations of MRLS. It allows quantitative interpretation of experimental and field MRLS data and has implications for the basic mechanisms underlying MRLS. The results support suggestions that MRLS is caused by exposure to or ingestion of ETCs. The results also show that high levels of ETC exposure produce intense, focused outbreaks of MRLS, closely linked in time and place to dispersing ETCs, as occurred in central Kentucky in 2001. With less intense exposure, lag time is longer and abortions tend to spread out over time and may occur out of phase with ETC exposure, obscuring both diagnosis of this syndrome and the role of the caterpillars.

  18. Mechanistic Implications of the Unique Structural Features and Dimerization of the Cytoplasmic Domain of the Pseudomonas Sigma Regulator, PupR

    DOE PAGES

    Jensen, Jaime L.; Balbo, Andrea; Neau, David B.; ...

    2015-09-29

    Gram-negative bacteria tightly regulate intracellular levels of iron, an essential nutrient. To ensure this tight regulation, some outer membrane TonB-dependent transporters (TBDTs) that are responsible for iron import stimulate their own transcription in response to extracellular binding by an iron-laden siderophore. This process is mediated by an inner membrane sigma regulator protein (an anti-sigma factor) that transduces an unknown periplasmic signal from the TBDT to release an intracellular sigma factor from the inner membrane, which ultimately upregulates TBDT transcription. Here we use the Pseudomonas putida ferric-pseudobactin BN7/BN8 sigma regulator, PupR, as a model system to understand the molecular mechanism ofmore » this conserved class of sigma regulators. We have determined the X-ray crystal structure of the cytoplasmic anti-sigma domain (ASD) of PupR to 2.0 Å. Size exclusion chromatography, small angle X-ray scattering, and sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation, all indicate that in contrast to other ASDs, the PupR-ASD exists as a dimer in solution. Mutagenesis of residues at the dimer interface identified from the crystal structure disrupts dimerization and protein stability, as determined by sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation and thermal denaturation circular dichroism spectroscopy. Lastly, these combined results suggest that this type of inner membrane sigma regulator may utilize an unusual mechanism to sequester their cognate sigma factors and prevent transcription activation.« less

  19. Mechanistic Implications of the Unique Structural Features and Dimerization of the Cytoplasmic Domain of the Pseudomonas Sigma Regulator, PupR

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Jaime L.; Balbo, Andrea; Neau, David B.; Chakravarthy, Srinivas; Zhao, Huaying; Sinha, Sangita C.; Colbert, Christopher L.

    2015-09-29

    Gram-negative bacteria tightly regulate intracellular levels of iron, an essential nutrient. To ensure this tight regulation, some outer membrane TonB-dependent transporters (TBDTs) that are responsible for iron import stimulate their own transcription in response to extracellular binding by an iron-laden siderophore. This process is mediated by an inner membrane sigma regulator protein (an anti-sigma factor) that transduces an unknown periplasmic signal from the TBDT to release an intracellular sigma factor from the inner membrane, which ultimately upregulates TBDT transcription. Here we use the Pseudomonas putida ferric-pseudobactin BN7/BN8 sigma regulator, PupR, as a model system to understand the molecular mechanism of this conserved class of sigma regulators. We have determined the X-ray crystal structure of the cytoplasmic anti-sigma domain (ASD) of PupR to 2.0 Å. Size exclusion chromatography, small angle X-ray scattering, and sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation, all indicate that in contrast to other ASDs, the PupR-ASD exists as a dimer in solution. Mutagenesis of residues at the dimer interface identified from the crystal structure disrupts dimerization and protein stability, as determined by sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation and thermal denaturation circular dichroism spectroscopy. Lastly, these combined results suggest that this type of inner membrane sigma regulator may utilize an unusual mechanism to sequester their cognate sigma factors and prevent transcription activation.

  20. Mechanistic Implications of the Unique Structural Features and Dimerization of the Cytoplasmic Domain of the Pseudomonas Sigma Regulator, PupR.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jaime L; Balbo, Andrea; Neau, David B; Chakravarthy, Srinivas; Zhao, Huaying; Sinha, Sangita C; Colbert, Christopher L

    2015-09-29

    Gram-negative bacteria tightly regulate intracellular levels of iron, an essential nutrient. To ensure this strict control, some outer membrane TonB-dependent transporters (TBDTs) that are responsible for iron import stimulate their own transcription in response to extracellular binding by an iron-laden siderophore. This process is mediated by an inner membrane sigma regulator protein (an anti-sigma factor) that transduces an unknown periplasmic signal from the TBDT to release an intracellular sigma factor from the inner membrane, which ultimately upregulates TBDT transcription. Here, we use the Pseudomonas putida ferric-pseudobactin BN7/BN8 sigma regulator, PupR, as a model system to understand the molecular mechanism of this conserved class of sigma regulators. We have determined the X-ray crystal structure of the cytoplasmic anti-sigma domain (ASD) of PupR to 2.0 Å. Size exclusion chromatography, small-angle X-ray scattering, and sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation all indicate that, in contrast to other ASDs, the PupR-ASD exists as a dimer in solution. Mutagenesis of residues at the dimer interface identified from the crystal structure disrupts dimerization and protein stability, as determined by sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation and thermal denaturation circular dichroism spectroscopy. These combined results suggest that this type of inner membrane sigma regulator may utilize an unusual mechanism to sequester their cognate sigma factors and prevent transcription activation.

  1. Targeted Regulation of PI3K/Akt/mTOR/NF-κB Signaling by Indole Compounds and their Derivatives: Mechanistic Details and Biological Implications for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Aamir; Biersack, Bernhard; Li, Yiwei; Kong, Dejuan; Bao, Bin; Schobert, Rainer; Padhye, Subhash B.; Sarkar, Fazlul H.

    2014-01-01

    Indole compounds, found in cruciferous vegetables, are potent anti-cancer agents. Studies with indole-3-carbinol (I3C) and its dimeric product, 3,3’-diindolylmethane (DIM) suggest that these compounds have the ability to deregulate multiple cellular signaling pathways, including PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. These natural compounds are also effective modulators of downstream transcription factor NF-κB signaling which might help explain their ability to inhibit invasion and angiogenesis, and the reversal of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotype and drug resistance. Signaling through PI3K/Akt/mTOR and NF-κB pathway is increasingly being realized to play important role in EMT through the regulation of novel miRNAs which further validates the importance of this signaling network and its regulations by indole compounds. Here we will review the available literature on the modulation of PI3K/Akt/mTOR/NF-κB signaling by both parental I3C and DIM, as well as their analogs/derivatives, in an attempt to catalog their anticancer activity. PMID:23272910

  2. Mechanistic studies on the synergistic cytotoxicity of the nucleoside analogs gemcitabine and clofarabine in multiple myeloma: relevance of p53 and its clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Valdez, Benigno C; Wang, Guiyun; Murray, David; Nieto, Yago; Li, Yang; Shah, Jatin; Turturro, Francesco; Wang, Michael; Weber, Donna M; Champlin, Richard E; Qazilbash, Muzaffar H; Andersson, Borje S

    2013-08-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is an established treatment for multiple myeloma (MM), a plasma cell malignancy. To identify an improved pretransplant conditioning regimen, we investigated the cytotoxicity of gemcitabine (Gem) and clofarabine (Clo) combinations toward MM cell lines and patient cell samples. A strong synergism of the two nucleoside analogs, when combined at their approximate IC10 concentrations, was observed. This synergism could be partly due to the observed Gem-mediated phosphorylation and activation of deoxycytidine kinase, resulting in enhanced phosphorylation of Gem and Clo. Their cytotoxicity correlated with a robust activation of the DNA damage response pathway. [Gem+Clo] decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential with a concomitant release of proapoptotic factors into the cytoplasm and nucleus and the activation of apoptosis. Exposure of MM cells to [Gem+Clo] also decreased the level of ribosomal RNA (rRNA), which might have resulted in nucleolar stress, as reported previously, and caused a p53-dependent cell death. A reduction by approximately 50% in the cytotoxicity of Gem and Clo was observed in the presence of pifithrin α, a p53 inhibitor. Furthermore, MM cell lines with mutant p53 exhibited greater resistance to Gem and Clo, supporting a role for the p53 protein in these cytotoxic responses. Our results provide a rationale for clinical trials incorporating [Gem+Clo] combinations as part of conditioning therapy for high-risk patients with MM undergoing HSCT.

  3. Targeted regulation of PI3K/Akt/mTOR/NF-κB signaling by indole compounds and their derivatives: mechanistic details and biological implications for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Aamir; Biersack, Bernhard; Li, Yiwei; Kong, Dejuan; Bao, Bin; Schobert, Rainer; Padhye, Subhash B; Sarkar, Fazlul H

    2013-09-01

    Indole compounds, found in cruciferous vegetables, are potent anti-cancer agents. Studies with indole-3-carbinol (I3C) and its dimeric product, 3,3'-diindolylmethane (DIM) suggest that these compounds have the ability to deregulate multiple cellular signaling pathways, including PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. These natural compounds are also effective modulators of downstream transcription factor NF-κB signaling which might help explain their ability to inhibit invasion and angiogenesis, and the reversal of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotype and drug resistance. Signaling through PI3K/Akt/mTOR and NF-κB pathway is increasingly being realized to play important role in EMT through the regulation of novel miRNAs which further validates the importance of this signaling network and its regulations by indole compounds. Here we will review the available literature on the modulation of PI3K/Akt/mTOR/NF-κB signaling by both parental I3C and DIM, as well as their analogs/derivatives, in an attempt to catalog their anticancer activity.

  4. Mechanistic Indicators of Childhood Asthma (MICA) Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Mechanistic Indicators of Childhood Asthma (MICA) Study has been designed to incorporate state-of-the-art technologies to examine the physiological and environmental factors that interact to increase the risk of asthmatic responses. MICA is primarily a clinically-bases obser...

  5. Mechanistic Indicators of Childhood Asthma (MICA) Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Mechanistic Indicators of Childhood Asthma (MICA) Study has been designed to incorporate state-of-the-art technologies to examine the physiological and environmental factors that interact to increase the risk of asthmatic responses. MICA is primarily a clinically-bases obser...

  6. Development of the Reasonable Accommodation Factor Survey: Results and Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dong, Shengli; MacDonald-Wilson, Kim L.; Fabian, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was (a) to explore the latent factors in the "Reasonable Accommodation Factor Survey" (RAFS) instrument and (b) to compare scores on the latent factors of the RAFS by participant's role. Eight latent factors were identified through an exploratory factor analysis with orthogonal rotation. The reliability tests…

  7. Development of the Reasonable Accommodation Factor Survey: Results and Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dong, Shengli; MacDonald-Wilson, Kim L.; Fabian, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was (a) to explore the latent factors in the "Reasonable Accommodation Factor Survey" (RAFS) instrument and (b) to compare scores on the latent factors of the RAFS by participant's role. Eight latent factors were identified through an exploratory factor analysis with orthogonal rotation. The reliability tests…

  8. The Factors Underlying Sex Role Perception and Their Implications for Educators and Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Linda; Rossett, Allison

    Six hundred seventy one inner city high school women were administered an attitude scale designed to measure their sex role perception. The data was subjected to principal factor analysis with a varimax rotation. Four underlying factors comprising sex role perception were determined. The factors and their implications for educators are discussed.…

  9. Problems with Single Interest Scales: Implications of the General Factor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tracey, Terence J. G.

    2012-01-01

    The presence of the general factor in interest and self-efficacy assessment and its meaning are reviewed. The general factor is found in all interest and self-efficacy assessment and has been viewed as (a) a nuisance factor with little effect on assessment, (b) a variable having substantive meaning and thus worthy of including in interpretation,…

  10. Biosynthesis, processing and secretion of von Willebrand factor: biological implications.

    PubMed

    de Wit, T R; van Mourik, J A

    2001-06-01

    von Willebrand factor is a multimeric plasma glycoprotein that is required for normal haemostasis. von Willebrand factor is synthesized by endothelial cells and megakaryocytes, and originates from its precursor pro-von Willebrand factor. The endoproteolytic processing of pro-von Willebrand factor results in mature von Willebrand factor and von Willebrand factor propeptide (also known as von Willebrand Ag II). In endothelial cells, the propeptide controls the polymerization and subsequent targeting of von Willebrand factor to the storage vesicles, the so-called Weibel-Palade bodies. Upon stimulation of the endothelial cells, the Weibel-Palade bodies are translocated to the plasma membrane of the cell, and mature von Willebrand factor and its propeptide are co-secreted. After release, these polypeptides have divergent fates and serve different biological functions. Mature von Willebrand factor both controls platelet adhesion and aggregation at sites of vascular injury and acts as a chaperone protein for coagulation factor VIII. The von Willebrand factor propeptide may serve a role in modulating inflammatory processes. This still growing body of information indicates that the biological function of the von Willebrand factor gene product is more diverse than was previously thought.

  11. Problems with Single Interest Scales: Implications of the General Factor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tracey, Terence J. G.

    2012-01-01

    The presence of the general factor in interest and self-efficacy assessment and its meaning are reviewed. The general factor is found in all interest and self-efficacy assessment and has been viewed as (a) a nuisance factor with little effect on assessment, (b) a variable having substantive meaning and thus worthy of including in interpretation,…

  12. Assessing uncertainty in mechanistic models

    Treesearch

    Edwin J. Green; David W. MacFarlane; Harry T. Valentine

    2000-01-01

    Concern over potential global change has led to increased interest in the use of mechanistic models for predicting forest growth. The rationale for this interest is that empirical models may be of limited usefulness if environmental conditions change. Intuitively, we expect that mechanistic models, grounded as far as possible in an understanding of the biology of tree...

  13. Exogenous factors in panic disorder: clinical and research implications.

    PubMed

    Roy-Byrne, P P; Uhde, T W

    1988-02-01

    Because panic disorder has an underlying biologic and probably genetic basis, the role of factors outside the organism in initiating and sustaining panic is often overlooked. The authors review certain exogenous factors that seem capable of triggering attacks and/or increasing their frequency and intensity: self-administered pharmacologic agents (caffeine, alcohol, nicotine, over-the-counter cold preparations, cannabis, cocaine); habits (sleep deprivation, diet, exercise, relaxation, hyperventilation); and aspects of the environment (fluorescent lighting, life stressors). There may be a specificity to the action of some of these factors, because certain factors previously thought to trigger panic attacks (e.g., pain, hypoglycemia) have been proved not to have this effect. Although the clinical significance of many of the exogenous factors discussed still awaits empirical confirmation, attention to such factors during the initial evaluation of a patient with panic disorder may be helpful in formulating a successful treatment plan.

  14. FACTORS IMPLICATED IN AMPHIBIAN POPULATION DECLINES IN THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study identified the factors responsible for the decline of native amphibians in the U.S. The type of land use, the introduction of exotic animal species, and chemical contamination were identified as the most likely causes of decline.

  15. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and its clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Bathina, Siresha; Das, Undurti N

    2015-12-10

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays an important role in neuronal survival and growth, serves as a neurotransmitter modulator, and participates in neuronal plasticity, which is essential for learning and memory. It is widely expressed in the CNS, gut and other tissues. BDNF binds to its high affinity receptor TrkB (tyrosine kinase B) and activates signal transduction cascades (IRS1/2, PI3K, Akt), crucial for CREB and CBP production, that encode proteins involved in β cell survival. BDNF and insulin-like growth factor-1 have similar downstream signaling mechanisms incorporating both p-CAMK and MAPK that increase the expression of pro-survival genes. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor regulates glucose and energy metabolism and prevents exhaustion of β cells. Decreased levels of BDNF are associated with neurodegenerative diseases with neuronal loss, such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis and Huntington's disease. Thus, BDNF may be useful in the prevention and management of several diseases including diabetes mellitus.

  16. From mechanistic to functional behaviorism.

    PubMed

    Moxley, R A

    1992-11-01

    A shift from mechanistic behaviorism to functional behaviorism is presented against the background of two historical traditions, one with an emphasis on form, the other with an emphasis on function. Skinner's work, which made more contributions to a functional behaviorism than to a mechanistic behaviorism, exemplifies this shift. The two traditions and an account of Skinner's development of functional relations are presented in order to show Skinner's contributions to aligning modern behavior analysis with the functional tradition.

  17. [Compliance in schizophrenia: predictive factors, therapeutical considerations and research implications].

    PubMed

    Misdrahi, D; Llorca, P M; Lançon, C; Bayle, F J

    2002-01-01

    Compliance has been defined as the extent to which a person's behavior coincides with the medical advice given. Medication compliance is one of the foremost problems affecting neuroleptic efficacy in psychiatric patients. Since chlorpromazine introduction in 1952, antipsychotics are the principal element of schizophrenia treatment. Actually progress links to the use of new antipsychotics are conditioned by quality of compliance. The problem of nonadherence to medication could concern 50% of prescription. The reported incidence of non-compliance with antipsychotic medication ranges from 11 to 80%. In a two thirds of case rehospitalization is the result of complete or partial noncompliance. After one year of first hospitalisation, 40% of relapse results from non adherence to medication. Medication adherence problems increase hospitalisation, morbidity and mortality. Social consequences, professional problems and family troubles linked to hospitalisations lead to low quality of life for patients and high cost for society. There are three main methods of measuring compliance. These include patient and clinical self-report, pill counts, and biological measures. Self-report methods are generally the most cost-effective and time-efficient way of obtaining an indication of compliance. In psychiatric research, the most commonly used self-report measure of compliance is the Drug Attitude Inventory (DAI) originally devised by Hogan et al. On the basis of criticism concerning DAI reliability, a new questionnaire of medication compliance was proposed: the Medication Adherence Rating scale (MARS). The main goal of compliance evaluation is to quantify this phenomenon with accuracy and to find predictive factors of medication nonadherence. Three types of factors influencing compliance are identified: factors due to medications, factors linked to patients and factors depending on the therapeutic relation with the clinician. Tolerance is considered as the principal reason explaining

  18. Factors associated with IADL independence: implications for OT practice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Szu-Wei; Chippendale, Tracy

    2017-03-01

    Globally, the population is aging. Instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) are an important component of independent function and impact the ability of older adults to age in place. Therefore, factors associated with IADL independence warrant further study. To explore the association of age, depressive symptoms and leisure participation with IADL independence, and the relative importance of these three factors in predicting IADL independence. A cross-sectional design using an existing data set was employed. Older adults age 60 and older (n = 98) who resided in senior housing or their own home/apartment were included in the study. A hierarchical multiple regression analysis was employed. The second model predicting IADL independence using age, depressive symptoms and level of leisure participation was significant (F(3,96) = 15.57, p < 0.001) and explained 31.00% of the variance in IADL independence compared to the first regression model, which included age alone (R(2) adjusted = 18.00%). Age was the strongest of the three predictors, accounting for 11.40% of the variance in IADL independence. Depressive symptoms and participation in leisure activities were also significant predictors, their unique contributions being 7.30 and 4.30%, respectively. Age, depressive symptoms and leisure participation are all significant predictors of IADL independence among older adults. Therefore, according to our preliminary findings, leisure participation and non-pharmacological interventions for depressive symptoms warrant attention in practice in relation to IADL independence.

  19. Factors associated with self-reported health: implications for ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    BACKGROUND: Advocates for environmental justice, local, state, and national public health officials, exposure scientists, need broad-based heath indices to identify vulnerable communities. Longitudinal studies show that perception of current health status predicts subsequent mortality, suggesting that self-reported health (SRH) may be useful in screening-level community assessments. This paper evaluates whether SRH is an appropriate surrogate indicator of health status by evaluating relationships between SRH and sociodemographic, lifestyle, and health care factors as well as serological indicators of nutrition, health risk, and environmental exposures.METHODS: Data were combined from the 2003-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys for 1372 nonsmoking 20-50 year olds. Ordinal and binary logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios and 95 % confidence intervals of reporting poorer health based on measures of nutrition, health condition, environmental contaminants, and sociodemographic, health care, and lifestyle factors.RESULTS: Poorer SRH was associated with several serological measures of nutrition, health condition, and biomarkers of toluene, cadmium, lead, and mercury exposure. Race/ethnicity, income, education, access to health care, food security, exercise, poor mental and physical health, prescription drug use, and multiple health outcome measures (e.g., diabetes, thyroid problems, asthma) were also associated with poorer SRH.CONCLUS

  20. AIR POLLUTION, INFLAMMATION AND PRETERM BIRTH: A POTENTIAL MECHANISTIC LINK

    PubMed Central

    Vadillo-Ortega, Felipe; Osornio-Vargas, Alvaro; Buxton, Miatta A.; Sánchez, Brisa N.; Rojas-Bracho, Leonora; Viveros-Alcaráz, Martin; Castillo-Castrejón, Marisol; Beltrán-Montoya, Jorge; Brown, Daniel G.; O´Neill, Marie S.

    2014-01-01

    Preterm birth is a public health issue of global significance, which may result in mortality during the perinatal period or may lead to major health and financial consequences due to lifelong impacts. Even though several risk factors for preterm birth have been identified, prevention efforts have failed to halt the increasing rates of preterm birth. Epidemiological studies have identified air pollution as an emerging potential risk factor for preterm birth. However, many studies were limited by study design and inadequate exposure assessment. Due to the ubiquitous nature of ambient air pollution and the potential public health significance of any role in causing preterm birth, a novel focus investigating possible causal mechanisms influenced by air pollution is therefore a global health priority. We hypothesize that air pollution may act together with other biological factors to induce systemic inflammation and influence the duration of pregnancy. Evaluation and testing of this hypothesis is currently being conducted in a prospective cohort study in Mexico City and will provide an understanding of the pathways that mediate the effects of air pollution on preterm birth. The important public health implication is that crucial steps in this mechanistic pathway can potentially be acted on early in pregnancy to reduce the risk of preterm birth. PMID:24382337

  1. Air pollution, inflammation and preterm birth: a potential mechanistic link.

    PubMed

    Vadillo-Ortega, Felipe; Osornio-Vargas, Alvaro; Buxton, Miatta A; Sánchez, Brisa N; Rojas-Bracho, Leonora; Viveros-Alcaráz, Martin; Castillo-Castrejón, Marisol; Beltrán-Montoya, Jorge; Brown, Daniel G; O'Neill, Marie S

    2014-02-01

    Preterm birth is a public health issue of global significance, which may result in mortality during the perinatal period or may lead to major health and financial consequences due to lifelong impacts. Even though several risk factors for preterm birth have been identified, prevention efforts have failed to halt the increasing rates of preterm birth. Epidemiological studies have identified air pollution as an emerging potential risk factor for preterm birth. However, many studies were limited by study design and inadequate exposure assessment. Due to the ubiquitous nature of ambient air pollution and the potential public health significance of any role in causing preterm birth, a novel focus investigating possible causal mechanisms influenced by air pollution is therefore a global health priority. We hypothesize that air pollution may act together with other biological factors to induce systemic inflammation and influence the duration of pregnancy. Evaluation and testing of this hypothesis is currently being conducted in a prospective cohort study in Mexico City and will provide an understanding of the pathways that mediate the effects of air pollution on preterm birth. The important public health implication is that crucial steps in this mechanistic pathway can potentially be acted on early in pregnancy to reduce the risk of preterm birth.

  2. Prognostic factors in early glottic carcinoma implications for treatment.

    PubMed

    Nur, Demiral Ayse; Oguz, Cetinayak; Kemal, Erdag Taner; Ferhat, Eyiler; Sülen, Sarioglu; Emel, Ada; Münir, Kinay; Ann, Cooper Sen Rachel; Mehmet, Sen

    2005-01-01

    In this study we aimed to determine the prognostic factors affecting local control (LC) in limited glottic carcinoma treated with definitive radiotherapy (RT). Between June 1991 and December 2001, 114 patients with early squamous-cell carcinoma of the glottis were treated with definitive RT at our institution. Only four (3.5%) patients were women. The median age was 60 (27-79). Fifteen percent, 72% and 13% of the patients had Tis, T1 and T2 tumors, respectively. Forty-three (37.7%) patients had anterior commissure invasion. Prior to RT 35 (31%) patients had undergone vocal cord stripping and two (2%) cordectomy. A median dose of 66 Gy (50-70.2) was given over a median period of 46 days (20-60). Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed for LC. The prognostic parameters analyzed for LC were T classification, anterior commissure involvement, total RT dose, and overall treatment time. Five-year local and regional control rates were 84.2% and 97.7%. RTOG grade 3-4 late side effects were observed only in one (0.9%) patient. In 15 patients with local failure, salvage treatment consisted of partial laryngectomy in eight patients and total laryngectomy in five. One of the remaining two patients was medically inoperable, and the other refused salvage surgery. In one of the three patients with regional failure, salvage surgery was applied and the other two were given palliative chemotherapy because of unresectable disease. Following salvage treatments, the ultimate five-year LC rate was 96.9% and the five-year larynx preservation rate was 91.1%. Second primary cancer was diagnosed in 17 (14.9%) patients. Only one patient developed distant metastases and two patients died of laryngeal cancer. While T2 disease and anterior commissure involvement were found to be unfavorable prognostic factors significantly influencing LC in univariate analyses, only T2 disease remained independent in multivariate analysis. In patients with early glottic carcinoma, T classification

  3. Psychiatric factors in asthma: implications for diagnosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Rietveld, Simon; Creer, Thomas L

    2003-01-01

    Emotional factors are an obstacle in the diagnosis and management of asthma. This review discusses three problem patterns: negative emotions in relatively normal patients with asthma; patients presenting possible functional symptoms and; patients presenting asthma in conjunction with psychiatric deviations. Negative emotions influence the symptoms and management of asthma, even in relatively normal patients. Psychogenic symptoms appear normal, but culminate in functional symptoms in a minority of patients. Diagnosing and treating asthma in patients with comorbid asthma and psychiatric symptoms is very difficult. On the one hand, treating asthma may often be just treating the emotions. On the other hand, negative emotions make the treatment of asthma guesswork. Physicians should estimate emotional influences in their patients' symptoms for an optimal evaluation of medication efficacy. Assessment and analysis of emotional factors surrounding exacerbations seems essential, e.g. emotional precipitants of asthma and asthma-evoked negative emotions. Moreover, patients should be informed about stress-induced breathlessness and the consequences of overuse of bronchodilators. When patients present with atypical symptoms, or do not properly respond to asthma medication, functional symptoms should be suspected. Psychiatric analysis may often lead to the conclusion that symptoms have a functional basis. In patients with comorbid asthma and anxiety disorders, asthma should be the focus for treatment since difficult-to-control asthma often causes anxiety problems in the first place. Moreover, panic-like symptoms in asthma are often related to sudden onset asthma exacerbations. However, in patients with comorbid asthma and depression, depression should become the focus of treatment. The reason is that optimal treatment of depressive asthmatics is probably impossible. Special issues include specific problems with children, compliance problems, and physicians' dilemmas regarding

  4. Otomycosis; clinical features, predisposing factors and treatment implications

    PubMed Central

    Anwar, Khurshid; Gohar, Muhammad Shahid

    2014-01-01

    Objectives : The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of otomycosis, the clinical presentation, predisposing factors and treatment outcomes. Methods: This observational study was conducted at ENT department of Combined Military Hospital Attock, from October, 2010 to September, 2012. Convenient sample comprising 180 patients of both sexes and all age groups were selected from ENT OPD. The frequency, predisposing factors and most common symptoms of otomycosis were recorded. The response to different antifungal agents was also observed. Results were recorded in percentages. Results: There were 180 patients with documented diagnosis of otomycosis. There were 107 (59%) males and 73 (41%) females. The age of patients ranged from 1½ years to 75 years with a mean age of 38.5 years. Mean follow up time was 2 years. Most common presenting symptom was hearing loss (77.7%) followed by pruritis (68.8%) and otalgia (40%). We prescribed 1% clotrimazole drops or lotion in 58% patients and 2% salicylic acid in 31% cases. Both of these agents are effective. Topical 1% clotrimazole drops yielded highest resolution rate with lowest recurrent rate. Overall 149 (83%) patients were improved with initial treatment and 31 (17%) did not respond to initial treatment. Eight (4.4%) patients had a history of otological procedures. Four (2.2%) patients had canal wall down procedures that resulted in mastoid cavity. To analyse the efficacy of 1% clotrimazole and 2% salicylic acid we applied Z-Test to calculate the difference between 2 proportions of patients before treatment with those patients who remained uncured after treatment. Conclusion: Otomycosisis commonly presented with decreased hearing, pruritis, otalgia & otorrhoea. It usually resolves with local toilet of ear and instillation of antifungal agents. Eradication of disease is difficult in presence of a mastoid cavity and metabolic diseases like diabetes mellitus. PMID:24948980

  5. Head and neck sarcomas: prognostic factors and implications for treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Eeles, R. A.; Fisher, C.; A'Hern, R. P.; Robinson, M.; Rhys-Evans, P.; Henk, J. M.; Archer, D.; Harmer, C. L.

    1993-01-01

    One hundred and thirty patients with soft tissue sarcoma of the head and neck were treated at the Royal Marsden Hospital between 1944 and 1988. Pathological review was possible in 103 of these cases; only pathologically reviewed cases have been analysed. The median age at presentation was 36 years, and 53% were male. Four had neurofibromatosis type I, and one previous bilateral retinoblastoma. Six had undergone previous radiotherapy, 12 to 45 years prior to developing sarcoma. The tumours were < or = 5 cm in 78% of cases and high grade in 48%. Only one patient presented with lymph node metastases and only one with distant metastases (to lung). Malignant fibrous histiocytoma was the commonest histological type, occurring in 30 cases. The overall 5 year survival was 50% (95% CI 39-60). Local tumour was the cause of death in 63% of cases and 5 year local control was only 47% (95% CI 36-58) with local recurrence occurring as late as 15 years after treatment. The only favourable independent prognostic factor for survival was the ability to perform surgery (other than biopsy), with or without radiotherapy, as opposed to radiotherapy alone (hazard ratio 0.39; P = 0.003). Only one patient had a biopsy with no further treatment. Favourable independent prognostic factors for local control at 5 years were site (tumours of the head as opposed to the neck, hazard ratio 0.42; P = 0.02) and modality of treatment (combined surgery and radiotherapy compared to either alone, hazard ratio 0.31; P = 0.002). Patients in the combined modality and single treatment modality groups were well balanced for T stage, grade and tumour site. The patients in the combined treatment group had less extensive surgery, yet their local recurrence-free survival was longer. Unlike soft tissue sarcomas at other sites, those in the head and neck region more often cause death by local recurrence. The addition of radiotherapy to surgery may result in longer local recurrence-free survival. PMID:8318414

  6. Snail Family Transcription Factors Are Implicated in Thyroid Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Robert G.; Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; González-Herrero, Ines; Anderson, Catriona; Flores, Teresa; Hughes, Sharon; Tselepis, Chris; Ross, James A.; Sánchez-García, Isidro

    2007-01-01

    E-Cadherin (CDH1) expression is reduced in thyroid carcinomas by primarily unknown mechanisms. In several tissues, SNAIL (SNAI1) and SLUG (SNAI2) induce epithelial-mesenchymal transition by altering target gene transcription, including CDH1 repression, but these transcription factors have not been studied in thyroid carcinoma. Recently, our group has provided direct evidence that ectopic SNAI1 expression induces epithelial and mesenchymal mouse tumors. SNAI1, SNAI2, and CDH1 expression were analyzed in thyroid-derived cell lines and samples of human follicular and papillary thyroid carcinoma by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and immunohistochemistry. The effect of SNAI1 expression on CDH1 transcription was analyzed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting in ori-3 cells. Thyroid carcinoma development was analyzed in CombitTA-Snail mice, in which SNAI1 levels are up-regulated. SNAI1 and SNAI2 were not expressed in cells derived from normal thyroid tissue, or in normal human thyroid samples, but were highly expressed in cell lines derived from thyroid carcinomas, in human thyroid carcinoma samples, and their metastases. SNAI1 expression in ori-3 cells repressed CDH1 transcription. Combi-TA mice developed papillary thyroid carcinomas, the incidence of which was increased by concomitant radiotherapy. In conclusion, SNAI1 and SNAI2 are ectopically expressed in thyroid carcinomas, and aberrant expression in mice is associated with papillary carcinoma development. PMID:17724139

  7. Cerebral microbleeds: their associated factors, radiologic findings, and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Beom Joon; Lee, Seung-Hoon

    2013-09-01

    Cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) are tiny, round dark-signal lesions that are most often detected on gradient-echo MR images. CMBs consist of extravasations of blood components through fragile microvascular walls characterized by lipohyalinosis and surrounding macrophages. The prevalence of CMBs in elderly subjects with no history of cerebrovascular disease is around 5%, but is much higher in patients with ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke. Development of CMBs is closely related to various vascular risk factors; in particular, lobar CMBs are thought to be associated with cerebral amyloid angiopathy. The presence of CMBs has been hypothesized to reflect cerebral-hemorrhage-prone status in patients with hypertension or amyloid microangiopathy. Stroke survivors with CMBs have been consistently found to have an elevated risk of subsequent hemorrhagic stroke or an antithrombotic-related hemorrhagic complication, although studies have failed to establish a link between CMBs and hemorrhagic transformation after thrombolytic treatment. A large prospective study is required to clarify the clinical significance of CMBs and their utility in a decision-making index.

  8. Cerebral Microbleeds: Their Associated Factors, Radiologic Findings, and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Beom Joon

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) are tiny, round dark-signal lesions that are most often detected on gradient-echo MR images. CMBs consist of extravasations of blood components through fragile microvascular walls characterized by lipohyalinosis and surrounding macrophages. The prevalence of CMBs in elderly subjects with no history of cerebrovascular disease is around 5%, but is much higher in patients with ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke. Development of CMBs is closely related to various vascular risk factors; in particular, lobar CMBs are thought to be associated with cerebral amyloid angiopathy. The presence of CMBs has been hypothesized to reflect cerebral-hemorrhage-prone status in patients with hypertension or amyloid microangiopathy. Stroke survivors with CMBs have been consistently found to have an elevated risk of subsequent hemorrhagic stroke or an antithrombotic-related hemorrhagic complication, although studies have failed to establish a link between CMBs and hemorrhagic transformation after thrombolytic treatment. A large prospective study is required to clarify the clinical significance of CMBs and their utility in a decision-making index. PMID:24396809

  9. Generation Y Student-Teachers' Motivational Factors: Retention Implications for K-12 Educational Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bontempo, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Generation Y represents a growing number of student-teachers who will impact the future of educational practice, yet little research has been conducted for this demographic group. The purpose of this mixed-method study was to identify motivational factors of neophyte teachers and the retention implications these findings had on Kindergarten…

  10. Evidence of Second-Order Factor Structure in a Diagnostic Problem Space: Implications for Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papa, Frank J.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Chest pain was identified as a specific medical problem space, and disease classes were modeled to define it. Results from a test taken by 628 medical residents indicate a second-order factor structure that suggests that chest pain is a multidimensional problem space. Implications for medical education are discussed. (SLD)

  11. Application of a Mechanistic Model to Evaluate Putative Mechanisms of Tolvaptan Drug-Induced Liver Injury and Identify Patient Susceptibility Factors

    PubMed Central

    Woodhead, Jeffrey L.; Brock, William J.; Roth, Sharin E.; Shoaf, Susan E.; Brouwer, Kim L.R.; Church, Rachel; Grammatopoulos, Tom N.; Stiles, Linsey; Siler, Scott Q.; Howell, Brett A.; Mosedale, Merrie; Watkins, Paul B.; Shoda, Lisl K.M.

    2017-01-01

    Tolvaptan is a selective vasopressin V2 receptor antagonist, approved in several countries for the treatment of hyponatremia and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). No liver injury has been observed with tolvaptan treatment in healthy subjects and in non-ADPKD indications, but ADPKD clinical trials showed evidence of drug-induced liver injury (DILI). Although all DILI events resolved, additional monitoring in tolvaptan-treated ADPKD patients is required. In vitro assays identified alterations in bile acid disposition and inhibition of mitochondrial respiration as potential mechanisms underlying tolvaptan hepatotoxicity. This report details the application of DILIsym software to determine whether these mechanisms could account for the liver safety profile of tolvaptan observed in ADPKD clinical trials. DILIsym simulations included physiologically based pharmacokinetic estimates of hepatic exposure for tolvaptan and2 metabolites, and their effects on hepatocyte bile acid transporters and mitochondrial respiration. The frequency of predicted alanine aminotransferase (ALT) elevations, following simulated 90/30  mg split daily dosing, was 7.9% compared with clinical observations of 4.4% in ADPKD trials. Toxicity was multifactorial as inhibition of bile acid transporters and mitochondrial respiration contributed to the simulated DILI. Furthermore, simulation analysis identified both pre-treatment risk factors and on-treatment biomarkers predictive of simulated DILI. The simulations demonstrated that in vivo hepatic exposure to tolvaptan and the DM-4103 metabolite, combined with these 2 mechanisms of toxicity, were sufficient to account for the initiation of tolvaptan-mediated DILI. Identification of putative risk-factors and potential novel biomarkers provided insight for the development of mechanism-based tolvaptan risk-mitigation strategies. PMID:27655350

  12. Enhanced/Synthetic Vision Systems - Human factors research and implications for future systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foyle, David C.; Ahumada, Albert J.; Larimer, James; Sweet, Barbara T.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reviews recent human factors research studies conducted in the Aerospace Human Factors Research Division at NASA Ames Research Center related to the development and usage of Enhanced or Synthetic Vision Systems. Research discussed includes studies of field of view (FOV), representational differences of infrared (IR) imagery, head-up display (HUD) symbology, HUD advanced concept designs, sensor fusion, and sensor/database fusion and evaluation. Implications for the design and usage of Enhanced or Synthetic Vision Systems are discussed.

  13. Molecular Motions as a Drug Target: Mechanistic Simulations of Anthrax Toxin Edema Factor Function Led to the Discovery of Novel Allosteric Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Laine, Élodie; Martínez, Leandro; Ladant, Daniel; Malliavin, Thérèse; Blondel, Arnaud

    2012-01-01

    Edema Factor (EF) is a component of Bacillus anthracis toxin essential for virulence. Its adenylyl cyclase activity is induced by complexation with the ubiquitous eukaryotic cellular protein, calmodulin (CaM). EF and its complexes with CaM, nucleotides and/or ions, have been extensively characterized by X-ray crystallography. Those structural data allowed molecular simulations analysis of various aspects of EF action mechanism, including the delineation of EF and CaM domains through their association energetics, the impact of calcium binding on CaM, and the role of catalytic site ions. Furthermore, a transition path connecting the free inactive form to the CaM-complexed active form of EF was built to model the activation mechanism in an attempt to define an inhibition strategy. The cavities at the surface of EF were determined for each path intermediate to identify potential sites where the binding of a ligand could block activation. A non-catalytic cavity (allosteric) was found to shrink rapidly at early stages of the path and was chosen to perform virtual screening. Amongst 18 compounds selected in silico and tested in an enzymatic assay, 6 thiophen ureidoacid derivatives formed a new family of EF allosteric inhibitors with IC50 as low as 2 micromolars. PMID:23012649

  14. The clinical implications of integrating additional prognostic factors into the TNM.

    PubMed

    Henson, Donald Earl; Schwartz, Arnold M; Chen, Dechang; Wu, Dengyuan

    2014-04-01

    The management of solid tumors is governed by host and tumor factors that traditionally have incorporated TNM staging with additional pathologic, biologic, and clinical host factors. Beyond the anatomic-based TNM, increasingly new prognostic and predictive factors are being discovered that have important survival and treatment implications. However, because the TNM is based on a "bin" model, additional prognostic factors would rapidly overwhelm the current system. This communication demonstrates the clinical implications and improved patient prognosis derived from a new algorithmic model based on clustering analysis. A new algorithm is described that integrates additional factors into the TNM and calculates survival. The results indicate that additional factors can be integrated into the TNM staging system providing additional patient stratification without changing the TNM definitions. Adding prognostic factors to traditional TNM staging increases substratification of given stages and identifies and separates favorable and unfavorable clinical outcomes for specific TNM stages. Integration of additional prognostic factors into the TNM by a clustering algorithm can change the stratification of patient outcome. This may guide the clinician to select a more rational management program based on the additional factors and improve cohort selection for clinical trials. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. A mechanistic pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model of factor D inhibition in cynomolgus monkeys by lampalizumab for the treatment of geographic atrophy.

    PubMed

    Le, Kha N; Gibiansky, Leonid; Good, Jeremy; Davancaze, Teresa; van Lookeren Campagne, Menno; Loyet, Kelly M; Morimoto, Alyssa; Jin, Jin; Damico-Beyer, Lisa A; Hanley, William D

    2015-11-01

    Lampalizumab is an antigen-binding fragment of a humanized monoclonal antibody against complement factor D (CFD), a rate-limiting enzyme in the activation and amplification of the alternative complement pathway (ACP), which is in phase III clinical trials for the treatment of geographic atrophy. Understanding of the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and biodistribution of lampalizumab following intravitreal administration in the ocular compartments and systemic circulation is limited but crucial for selecting doses that provide optimal efficacy and safety. Here, we sought to construct a semimechanistic and integrated ocular-systemic pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model of lampalizumab in the cynomolgus monkey to provide a quantitative understanding of the ocular and systemic disposition of lampalizumab and CFD inhibition. The model takes into account target-mediated drug disposition, target turnover, and drug distribution across ocular tissues and systemic circulation. Following intravitreal administration, lampalizumab achieves rapid equilibration across ocular tissues. Lampalizumab ocular elimination is relatively slow, with a τ1/2 of approximately 3 days, whereas systemic elimination is rapid, with a τ1/2 of 0.8 hours. Target-independent linear clearance is predominant in the eye, whereas target-mediated clearance is predominant in the systemic circulation. Systemic CFD synthesis was estimated to be high (7.8 mg/day); however, the amount of CFD entering the eye due to influx from the systemic circulation was small (<10%) compared with the lampalizumab dose and is thus expected to have an insignificant impact on the clinical dose-regimen decision. Our findings support the clinical use of intravitreal lampalizumab to achieve significant ocular ACP inhibition while maintaining low systemic exposure and minimal systemic ACP inhibition.

  16. A Mechanistic Model of the Intravitreal Pharmacokinetics of Large Molecules and the Pharmacodynamic Suppression of Ocular Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Levels by Ranibizumab in Patients with Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Hutton-Smith, Laurence A; Gaffney, Eamonn A; Byrne, Helen M; Maini, Philip K; Schwab, Dietmar; Mazer, Norman A

    2016-09-06

    Intravitreal injection of anti-VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) antibodies or antibody fragments has been shown to be a highly effective treatment for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (wet AMD). The ocular half-life (t1/2) of these large molecules, determined in ocular fluids or derived from serum levels, varies with molecular size and is larger in humans than in preclinical animal species. The high affinity binding of VEGF to these molecules lowers the free concentration of VEGF and reduces its occupancy on VEGF receptors in ocular tissues. To understand the biophysical determinants of t1/2 for anti-VEGF antibodies and the time-course of VEGF in ocular fluids, we developed a mechanistic model of intravitreal pharmacokinetics (IVT PK) for anti-VEGF antibodies and combined it with a mechanistic model of the pharmacodynamics (RVR PD) of VEGF suppression by ranibizumab, an anti-VEGF recombinant, humanized monoclonal antibody fragment (Fab). Our IVT PK model predicts that the ocular t1/2 of a large molecule will be approximately four-times the calculated value of its vitreous diffusion time (Tdiff), defined as rvit(2)/6D, where rvit is the radius of the vitreous chamber in that species (modeled as a sphere), and D is the diffusion coefficient of the molecule in physiological saline at 37 °C obtained from the Stokes-Einstein relation. This prediction is verified from a compilation of data and calculations on various large molecules in the human, monkey, rabbit, and rat and is consistent with the reported t1/2 values of ranibizumab in humans (mean value 7.9 days) and the calculated Tdiff of 1.59 days. Our RVR PD model is based on the publication of Saunders et al. (Br. J. Ophthalmol. 2015, 99, 1554-1559) who reported data on the time-course of VEGF levels in aqueous humor samples obtained from 31 patients receiving ranibizumab treatment for wet AMD and developed a compartmental mathematical model to describe the VEGF suppression profiles. We

  17. Affinity proteomics reveals human host factors implicated in discrete stages of LINE-1 retrotransposition.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Martin S; LaCava, John; Mita, Paolo; Molloy, Kelly R; Huang, Cheng Ran Lisa; Li, Donghui; Adney, Emily M; Jiang, Hua; Burns, Kathleen H; Chait, Brian T; Rout, Michael P; Boeke, Jef D; Dai, Lixin

    2013-11-21

    LINE-1s are active human DNA parasites that are agents of genome dynamics in evolution and disease. These streamlined elements require host factors to complete their life cycles, whereas hosts have developed mechanisms to combat retrotransposition's mutagenic effects. As such, endogenous L1 expression levels are extremely low, creating a roadblock for detailed interactomic analyses. Here, we describe a system to express and purify highly active L1 RNP complexes from human suspension cell culture and characterize the copurified proteome, identifying 37 high-confidence candidate interactors. These data sets include known interactors PABPC1 and MOV10 and, with in-cell imaging studies, suggest existence of at least three types of compositionally and functionally distinct L1 RNPs. Among the findings, UPF1, a key nonsense-mediated decay factor, and PCNA, the polymerase-delta-associated sliding DNA clamp, were identified and validated. PCNA interacts with ORF2p via a PIP box motif; mechanistic studies suggest that this occurs during or immediately after target-primed reverse transcription.

  18. The association of panic/agoraphobia and asthma. Contributing factors and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Shavitt, R G; Gentil, V; Mandetta, R

    1992-11-01

    The point prevalence of phobic anxiety disorders was determined in 107 asthmatic outpatients through a standardized psychiatric interview and DSM-III-R diagnostic criteria. Agoraphobia and panic disorder were more prevalent (13.1% and 6.5%, respectively) than in the general population. Contributing factors and the clinical implications of this association are discussed. The recognition of specific anxiety syndromes enhances the efficacy of the treatment of anxious asthmatic patients.

  19. Implications of Our Developing Understanding of Risk and Protective Factors in the Treatment of Adult Male Sexual Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, David

    2013-01-01

    This paper summarizes our developing knowledge of factors that contribute added risk of sexual recidivism (risk factors) and factors that are associated with a reduced risk of sexual recidivism (protective factors). Specific implications for the design of future treatment programs are drawn. This information is contrasted with the common foci of…

  20. Managing mechanistic and organic structure in health care organizations.

    PubMed

    Olden, Peter C

    2012-01-01

    Managers at all levels in a health care organization must organize work to achieve the organization's mission and goals. This requires managers to decide the organization structure, which involves dividing the work among jobs and departments and then coordinating them all toward the common purpose. Organization structure, which is reflected in an organization chart, may range on a continuum from very mechanistic to very organic. Managers must decide how mechanistic versus how organic to make the entire organization and each of its departments. To do this, managers should carefully consider 5 factors for the organization and for each individual department: external environment, goals, work production, size, and culture. Some factors may push toward more mechanistic structure, whereas others may push in the opposite direction toward more organic structure. Practical advice can help managers at all levels design appropriate structure for their departments and organization.

  1. Crystal Structure of Human Factor VIII: Implications for the Formation of the Factor IXa-Factor VIIIa Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Ngo, J.C.; Huang, M.; Roth, D.A.; Furie, B.C.; Furie, B.

    2008-06-03

    Factor VIII is a procofactor that plays a critical role in blood coagulation, and is missing or defective in hemophilia A. We determined the X-ray crystal structure of B domain-deleted human factor VIII. This protein is composed of five globular domains and contains one Ca{sup 2+} and two Cu{sup 2+} ions. The three homologous A domains form a triangular heterotrimer where the A1 and A3 domains serve as the base and interact with the C2 and C1 domains, respectively. The structurally homologous C1 and C2 domains reveal membrane binding features. Based on biochemical studies, a model of the factor IXa-factor VIIIa complex was constructed by in silico docking. Factor IXa wraps across the side of factor VIII, and an extended interface spans the factor VIII heavy and light chains. This model provides insight into the activation of factor VIII and the interaction of factor VIIIa with factor IXa on the membrane surface.

  2. Crystal Structure of Human Factor VIII: Implications for the Formation of the Factor IXa-Factor VIIIa Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Chi Ki Ngo,J.; Huang, M.; Roth, D.; Furie, B.; Furie, B.

    2008-01-01

    Factor VIII is a procofactor that plays a critical role in blood coagulation, and is missing or defective in hemophilia A. We determined the X-ray crystal structure of B domain-deleted human factor VIII. This protein is composed of five globular domains and contains one Ca(2+) and two Cu(2+) ions. The three homologous A domains form a triangular heterotrimer where the A1 and A3 domains serve as the base and interact with the C2 and C1 domains, respectively. The structurally homologous C1 and C2 domains reveal membrane binding features. Based on biochemical studies, a model of the factor IXa-factor VIIIa complex was constructed by in silico docking. Factor IXa wraps across the side of factor VIII, and an extended interface spans the factor VIII heavy and light chains. This model provides insight into the activation of factor VIII and the interaction of factor VIIIa with factor IXa on the membrane surface.

  3. Obesity, Diabetes and Cancer: A Mechanistic Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Cifarelli, V; Hursting, SD

    2016-01-01

    Nearly 35% of adults and 20% of children in the United States are obese, defined as having a body mass index (BMI) ≥ 30 kg/m2. Obesity is an established risk factor for many cancers, and obesity-associated metabolic perturbations often manifest in Type 2 diabetes mellitus and/or the metabolic syndrome. As part of the growth-promoting, proinflammatory microenvironment of the obese and/or diabetic state, crosstalk between macrophages, adipocytes, and epithelial cells occurs via metabolically-regulated hormones, cytokines, and other mediators to enhance cancer risk and/or progression. This review synthesizes the evidence on key biological mechanisms underlying the associations between obesity, diabetes and cancer, with particular emphasis on enhancements in growth factor signaling, inflammation, and vascular integrity processes. These interrelated pathways represent mechanistic targets for disrupting the obesity-diabetes-cancer link, and several diabetes drugs, such as metformin and rosiglitazone, are being intensely studied for repurposing as cancer chemopreventive agents.

  4. Evolutionary game theory of growth factor production: implications for tumour heterogeneity and resistance to therapies.

    PubMed

    Archetti, M

    2013-08-20

    Tumour heterogeneity is documented for many characters, including the production of growth factors, one of the hallmarks of cancer. What maintains heterogeneity remains an open question that has implications for diagnosis and treatment, as drugs that target growth factors are susceptible to the evolution of resistance. I use evolutionary game theory to model collective interactions between cancer cells, to analyse the dynamics of the production of growth factors and the effect of therapies that reduce their amount. Five types of dynamics are possible, including the coexistence of producer and non-producer cells, depending on the production cost of the growth factor, on its diffusion range and on the degree of synergy of the benefit it confers to the cells. Perturbations of the equilibrium mimicking therapies that target growth factors are effective in reducing the amount of growth factor in the long term only if the reduction is extremely efficient and immediate. Collective interactions within the tumour can maintain heterogeneity for the production of growth factors and explain why therapies like anti-angiogenic drugs and RNA interference that reduce the amount of available growth factors are effective in the short term but often lead to relapse. Alternative strategies for evolutionarily stable treatments are discussed.

  5. Role of diffusible and transcription factors in inner ear development: implications in regeneration.

    PubMed

    Frago, L M; Camerero, G; Cañón, S; Pañeda, C; Sanz, C; Leon, Y; Giraldez, F; Varela-Nieto, I

    2000-04-01

    Organogenesis involves a dynamic balance of the mechanisms regulating cell division, differentiation and death. The development of the chicken embryo inner ear offers a well-characterised model at the morphological level to study which signals are implicated in the modulation of cellular activation and commitment. The early developmental decisions that control the origin of the inner ear elements are just beginning to be identified by complementary in vivo and in vitro studies. Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and nerve growth factor (NGF) are among the best characterised diffusible factors acting during inner ear development. Although the cellular actions of these factors are beginning to be understood, the signalling pathways triggered by them still remain largely unknown. In this context, viral vehicles can be used to deliver genes and then analyse their functional roles during inner ear development. A model is proposed where the actions of IGF-I and NGF contribute to the combinatorial expression of Jun and Fos family members in particular domains of the otic vesicle. Some of these mechanisms may be also implicated in otic regeneration.

  6. Human factors in space station architecture 1: Space station program implications for human factors research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, M. M.

    1985-01-01

    The space station program is based on a set of premises on mission requirements and the operational capabilities of the space shuttle. These premises will influence the human behavioral factors and conditions on board the space station. These include: launch in the STS Orbiter payload bay, orbital characteristics, power supply, microgravity environment, autonomy from the ground, crew make-up and organization, distributed command control, safety, and logistics resupply. The most immediate design impacts of these premises will be upon the architectural organization and internal environment of the space station.

  7. Physiological functions and underlying mechanisms of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family members: recent findings and implications for their pharmacological application.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Toru

    2014-01-01

    Despite their name, fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) are multifunctional regulators affecting a wide variety of physiological events. This review summarizes our recent studies on FGFs from mechanistic, physiological and application-oriented viewpoints. These include studies on the importance of βKlotho and glycosaminoglycans for the signaling of hormonal FGFs (FGF21 and FGF19); the physiological role of a paracrine FGF (FGF18) in hair cycle regulation; and the development of a stable, chimeric FGF protein composed of FGF1 and FGF2 domains suitable for radioprotection.

  8. Mechanistically Consistent Reduced Models of Synthetic Gene Networks

    PubMed Central

    Mier-y-Terán-Romero, Luis; Silber, Mary; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily

    2013-01-01

    Designing genetic networks with desired functionalities requires an accurate mathematical framework that accounts for the essential mechanistic details of the system. Here, we formulate a time-delay model of protein translation and mRNA degradation by systematically reducing a detailed mechanistic model that explicitly accounts for the ribosomal dynamics and the cleaving of mRNA by endonucleases. We exploit various technical and conceptual advantages that our time-delay model offers over the mechanistic model to probe the behavior of a self-repressing gene over wide regions of parameter space. We show that a heuristic time-delay model of protein synthesis of a commonly used form yields a notably different prediction for the parameter region where sustained oscillations occur. This suggests that such heuristics can lead to erroneous results. The functional forms that arise from our systematic reduction can be used for every system that involves transcription and translation and they could replace the commonly used heuristic time-delay models for these processes. The results from our analysis have important implications for the design of synthetic gene networks and stress that such design must be guided by a combination of heuristic models and mechanistic models that include all relevant details of the process. PMID:23663853

  9. The role of angiogenic factors in fibroid pathogenesis: potential implications for future therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tal, Reshef; Segars, James H.

    2014-01-01

    Background It is well established that tumors are dependent on angiogenesis for their growth and survival. Although uterine fibroids are known to be benign tumors with reduced vascularization, recent work demonstrates that the vasculature of fibroids is grossly and microscopically abnormal. Accumulating evidence suggests that angiogenic growth factor dysregulation may be implicated in these vascular and other features of fibroid pathophysiology. Methods Literature searches were performed in PubMed and Google Scholar for articles with content related to angiogenic growth factors and myometrium/leiomyoma. The findings are hereby reviewed and discussed. Results Multiple growth factors involved in angiogenesis are differentially expressed in leiomyoma compared with myometrium. These include epidermal growth factor (EGF), heparin-binding-EGF, vascular endothelial growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, transforming growth factor-β and adrenomedullin. An important paradox is that although leiomyoma tissues are hypoxic, leiomyoma feature down-regulation of key molecular regulators of the hypoxia response. Furthermore, the hypoxic milieu of leiomyoma may contribute to fibroid development and growth. Notably, common treatments for fibroids such as GnRH agonists and uterine artery embolization (UAE) are shown to work at least partly via anti-angiogenic mechanisms. Conclusions Angiogenic growth factors play an important role in mechanisms of fibroid pathophysiology, including abnormal vasculature and fibroid growth and survival. Moreover, the fibroid's abnormal vasculature together with its aberrant hypoxic and angiogenic response may make it especially vulnerable to disruption of its vascular supply, a feature which could be exploited for treatment. Further experimental studies are required in order to gain a better understanding of the growth factors that are involved in normal and pathological myometrial angiogenesis, and to assess

  10. Sociocultural factors and breast cancer in sub-Saharan Africa: implications for diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Tetteh, Dinah A; Faulkner, Sandra L

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of breast cancer is on the rise in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) and efforts at early diagnosis have not been very successful because the public has scant knowledge about the disease, a large percentage of breast cancer cases are diagnosed late and mainly rural SSA women's practice of breast self-examination is poor. In this paper, we argue that an examination of the social and cultural contexts of SSA that influence breast cancer diagnosis and management in the region is needed. We discuss the implications of sociocultural factors, such as gender roles and spirituality, on breast cancer diagnosis and management in SSA.

  11. The ecological impacts of nighttime light pollution: a mechanistic appraisal.

    PubMed

    Gaston, Kevin J; Bennie, Jonathan; Davies, Thomas W; Hopkins, John

    2013-11-01

    The ecological impacts of nighttime light pollution have been a longstanding source of concern, accentuated by realized and projected growth in electrical lighting. As human communities and lighting technologies develop, artificial light increasingly modifies natural light regimes by encroaching on dark refuges in space, in time, and across wavelengths. A wide variety of ecological implications of artificial light have been identified. However, the primary research to date is largely focused on the disruptive influence of nighttime light on higher vertebrates, and while comprehensive reviews have been compiled along taxonomic lines and within specific research domains, the subject is in need of synthesis within a common mechanistic framework. Here we propose such a framework that focuses on the cross-factoring of the ways in which artificial lighting alters natural light regimes (spatially, temporally, and spectrally), and the ways in which light influences biological systems, particularly the distinction between light as a resource and light as an information source. We review the evidence for each of the combinations of this cross-factoring. As artificial lighting alters natural patterns of light in space, time and across wavelengths, natural patterns of resource use and information flows may be disrupted, with downstream effects to the structure and function of ecosystems. This review highlights: (i) the potential influence of nighttime lighting at all levels of biological organisation (from cell to ecosystem); (ii) the significant impact that even low levels of nighttime light pollution can have; and (iii) the existence of major research gaps, particularly in terms of the impacts of light at population and ecosystem levels, identification of intensity thresholds, and the spatial extent of impacts in the vicinity of artificial lights.

  12. Simulations of Enhancer Evolution Provide Mechanistic Insights into Gene Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Duque, Thyago; Samee, Md. Abul Hassan; Kazemian, Majid; Pham, Hannah N.; Brodsky, Michael H.; Sinha, Saurabh

    2014-01-01

    There is growing interest in models of regulatory sequence evolution. However, existing models specifically designed for regulatory sequences consider the independent evolution of individual transcription factor (TF)–binding sites, ignoring that the function and evolution of a binding site depends on its context, typically the cis-regulatory module (CRM) in which the site is located. Moreover, existing models do not account for the gene-specific roles of TF-binding sites, primarily because their roles often are not well understood. We introduce two models of regulatory sequence evolution that address some of the shortcomings of existing models and implement simulation frameworks based on them. One model simulates the evolution of an individual binding site in the context of a CRM, while the other evolves an entire CRM. Both models use a state-of-the art sequence-to-expression model to predict the effects of mutations on the regulatory output of the CRM and determine the strength of selection. We use the new framework to simulate the evolution of TF-binding sites in 37 well-studied CRMs belonging to the anterior–posterior patterning system in Drosophila embryos. We show that these simulations provide accurate fits to evolutionary data from 12 Drosophila genomes, which includes statistics of binding site conservation on relatively short evolutionary scales and site loss across larger divergence times. The new framework allows us, for the first time, to test hypotheses regarding the underlying cis-regulatory code by directly comparing the evolutionary implications of the hypothesis with the observed evolutionary dynamics of binding sites. Using this capability, we find that explicitly modeling self-cooperative DNA binding by the TF Caudal (CAD) provides significantly better fits than an otherwise identical evolutionary simulation that lacks this mechanistic aspect. This hypothesis is further supported by a statistical analysis of the distribution of intersite

  13. Modeling Bird Migration under Climate Change: A Mechanistic Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, James A.

    2009-01-01

    How will migrating birds respond to changes in the environment under climate change? What are the implications for migratory success under the various accelerated climate change scenarios as forecast by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change? How will reductions or increased variability in the number or quality of wetland stop-over sites affect migratory bird species? The answers to these questions have important ramifications for conservation biology and wildlife management. Here, we describe the use of continental scale simulation modeling to explore how spatio-temporal changes along migratory flyways affect en-route migration success. We use an individually based, biophysical, mechanistic, bird migration model to simulate the movement of shorebirds in North America as a tool to study how such factors as drought and wetland loss may impact migratory success and modify migration patterns. Our model is driven by remote sensing and climate data and incorporates important landscape variables. The energy budget components of the model include resting, foraging, and flight, but presently predation is ignored. Results/Conclusions We illustrate our model by studying the spring migration of sandpipers through the Great Plains to their Arctic breeding grounds. Why many species of shorebirds have shown significant declines remains a puzzle. Shorebirds are sensitive to stop-over quality and spacing because of their need for frequent refueling stops and their opportunistic feeding patterns. We predict bird "hydrographs that is, stop-over frequency with latitude, that are in agreement with the literature. Mean stop-over durations predicted from our model for nominal cases also are consistent with the limited, but available data. For the shorebird species simulated, our model predicts that shorebirds exhibit significant plasticity and are able to shift their migration patterns in response to changing drought conditions. However, the question remains as to whether this

  14. Modeling Bird Migration under Climate Change: A Mechanistic Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, James A.

    2009-01-01

    How will migrating birds respond to changes in the environment under climate change? What are the implications for migratory success under the various accelerated climate change scenarios as forecast by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change? How will reductions or increased variability in the number or quality of wetland stop-over sites affect migratory bird species? The answers to these questions have important ramifications for conservation biology and wildlife management. Here, we describe the use of continental scale simulation modeling to explore how spatio-temporal changes along migratory flyways affect en-route migration success. We use an individually based, biophysical, mechanistic, bird migration model to simulate the movement of shorebirds in North America as a tool to study how such factors as drought and wetland loss may impact migratory success and modify migration patterns. Our model is driven by remote sensing and climate data and incorporates important landscape variables. The energy budget components of the model include resting, foraging, and flight, but presently predation is ignored. Results/Conclusions We illustrate our model by studying the spring migration of sandpipers through the Great Plains to their Arctic breeding grounds. Why many species of shorebirds have shown significant declines remains a puzzle. Shorebirds are sensitive to stop-over quality and spacing because of their need for frequent refueling stops and their opportunistic feeding patterns. We predict bird "hydrographs that is, stop-over frequency with latitude, that are in agreement with the literature. Mean stop-over durations predicted from our model for nominal cases also are consistent with the limited, but available data. For the shorebird species simulated, our model predicts that shorebirds exhibit significant plasticity and are able to shift their migration patterns in response to changing drought conditions. However, the question remains as to whether this

  15. Food for Thought ... Mechanistic Validation

    PubMed Central

    Hartung, Thomas; Hoffmann, Sebastian; Stephens, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Summary Validation of new approaches in regulatory toxicology is commonly defined as the independent assessment of the reproducibility and relevance (the scientific basis and predictive capacity) of a test for a particular purpose. In large ring trials, the emphasis to date has been mainly on reproducibility and predictive capacity (comparison to the traditional test) with less attention given to the scientific or mechanistic basis. Assessing predictive capacity is difficult for novel approaches (which are based on mechanism), such as pathways of toxicity or the complex networks within the organism (systems toxicology). This is highly relevant for implementing Toxicology for the 21st Century, either by high-throughput testing in the ToxCast/ Tox21 project or omics-based testing in the Human Toxome Project. This article explores the mostly neglected assessment of a test's scientific basis, which moves mechanism and causality to the foreground when validating/qualifying tests. Such mechanistic validation faces the problem of establishing causality in complex systems. However, pragmatic adaptations of the Bradford Hill criteria, as well as bioinformatic tools, are emerging. As critical infrastructures of the organism are perturbed by a toxic mechanism we argue that by focusing on the target of toxicity and its vulnerability, in addition to the way it is perturbed, we can anchor the identification of the mechanism and its verification. PMID:23665802

  16. The Transcription Factor XBP1 in Memory and Cognition: Implications in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cissé, Moustapha; Duplan, Eric; Checler, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1) is a unique basic region leucine zipper transcription factor that was isolated two decades ago in a search for regulators of major histocompatibility complex class II gene expression. XBP1 is a very complex protein that regulates many physiological functions, including the immune system, inflammatory responses and lipid metabolism. Evidence over the past few years suggests that XBP1 also plays an important role in pathological settings, since its activity as a transcription factor has profound effects on the prognosis and progression of diseases such as cancer, neurodegeneration and diabetes. Here we provide an overview of recent advances in our understanding of this multifaceted molecule, particularly in regulating synaptic plasticity and memory function, and the implications in neurodegenerative diseases, with an emphasis on Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:28079229

  17. Spatialised fate factors for nitrate in catchments: modelling approach and implication for LCA results.

    PubMed

    Basset-Mens, Claudine; Anibar, Lamiaa; Durand, Patrick; van der Werf, Hayo M G

    2006-08-15

    The challenge for environmental assessment tools, such as Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is to provide a holistic picture of the environmental impacts of a given system, while being relevant both at a global scale, i.e., for global impact categories such as climate change, and at a smaller scale, i.e., for regional impact categories such as aquatic eutrophication. To this end, the environmental mechanisms between emission and impact should be taken into account. For eutrophication in particular, which is one of the main impacts of farming systems, the fate factor of eutrophying pollutants in catchments, and particularly of nitrate, reflects one of these important and complex environmental mechanisms. We define this fate factor as: the ratio of the amount of nitrate at the outlet of the catchment over the nitrate emitted from the catchment's soils. In LCA, this fate factor is most often assumed equal to 1, while the observed fate factor is generally less than 1. A generic approach for estimating the range of variation of nitrate fate factors in a region of intensive agriculture was proposed. This approach was based on the analysis of different catchment scenarios combining different catchment types and different effective rainfalls. The evolution over time of the nitrate fate factor as well as the steady state fate factor for each catchment scenario was obtained using the INCA simulation model. In line with the general LCA model, the implications of the steady state fate factors for nitrate were investigated for the eutrophication impact result in the framework of an LCA of pig production. A sensitivity analysis to the fraction of nitrate lost as N(2)O was presented for the climate change impact category. This study highlighted the difference between the observed fate factor at a given time, which aggregates both storage and transformation processes and a "steady state fate factor", specific to the system considered. The range of steady state fate factors obtained for

  18. Modeling the epidermal growth factor -- epidermal growth factor receptor l2 domain interaction: implications for the ligand binding process.

    PubMed

    Jorissen, Robert N; Treutlein, Herbert R; Epa, V Chandana; Burgess, Antony W

    2002-06-01

    Signaling from the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor is triggered by the binding of ligands such as EGF or transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha) and subsequent receptor dimerization. An understanding of these processes has been hindered by the lack of structural information about the ligand-bound, dimerized EGF receptor. Using an NMR-derived structure of EGF and a homology model of the major ligand binding domain of the EGF receptor and experimental data, we modeled the binding of EGF to this EGF receptor fragment. In this low resolution model of the complex, EGF sits across the second face of the EGF receptor L2 domain and EGF residues 10-16, 36-37, 40-47 bind to this face. The structural model is largely consistent with previously published NMR data describing the residues of TGF-alpha which interact strongly with the EGF receptor. Other EGF residues implicated in receptor binding are accounted by our proposal that the ligand binding is a two-step process with the EGF binding to at least one other site of the receptor. This three-dimensional model is expected to be useful in the design of ligand-based antagonists of the receptor.

  19. HTGR Mechanistic Source Terms White Paper

    SciTech Connect

    Wayne Moe

    2010-07-01

    The primary purposes of this white paper are: (1) to describe the proposed approach for developing event specific mechanistic source terms for HTGR design and licensing, (2) to describe the technology development programs required to validate the design methods used to predict these mechanistic source terms and (3) to obtain agreement from the NRC that, subject to appropriate validation through the technology development program, the approach for developing event specific mechanistic source terms is acceptable

  20. Somatodendritic dopamine release: recent mechanistic insights

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Margaret E.; Patel, Jyoti C.

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) is a key transmitter in motor, reward and cogitative pathways, with DA dysfunction implicated in disorders including Parkinson's disease and addiction. Located in midbrain, DA neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta project via the medial forebrain bundle to the dorsal striatum (caudate putamen), and DA neurons in the adjacent ventral tegmental area project to the ventral striatum (nucleus accumbens) and prefrontal cortex. In addition to classical vesicular release from axons, midbrain DA neurons exhibit DA release from their cell bodies and dendrites. Somatodendritic DA release leads to activation of D2 DA autoreceptors on DA neurons that inhibit their firing via G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying K+ channels. This helps determine patterns of DA signalling at distant axonal release sites. Somatodendritically released DA also acts via volume transmission to extrasynaptic receptors that modulate local transmitter release and neuronal activity in the midbrain. Thus, somatodendritic release is a pivotal intrinsic feature of DA neurons that must be well defined in order to fully understand the physiology and pathophysiology of DA pathways. Here, we review recent mechanistic aspects of somatodendritic DA release, with particular emphasis on the Ca2+ dependence of release and the potential role of exocytotic proteins. PMID:26009764

  1. Educational achievement, personality, and behavior: assessment, factor structure and implications for theory and practice.

    PubMed

    Gaffney, Tim W; Perryman, Cassandra

    2012-01-01

    The purposes of this research were to first examine the evidence regarding the factor structure of educational achievement tests in the context of two theoretical models of cognitive ability (psychometric g and mutualism) that have been proposed to explain this structure as well as the underlying processes that may be responsible for its emergence in dimensionality studies. Then, the factor structure underlying a sample of the standardized educational achievement tests used by California in its statewide school accountability program was compared to those emerging from a selection of behavioral and personality assessments. As expected, the educational achievement tests exhibited a strong and uniformly positive manifold resulting in greater unidimensionality as evidenced by a dominant general factor in bi-factor analysis then either the personality or behavioral assessments. The implications of these structural differences are discussed with respect to the two theoretical perspective as well as in the context of formative and summative educational inferences in particular, and the school accountability and reform movement in general.

  2. Early Health Risk Factors for Violence: Conceptualization, Review of the Evidence, and Implications

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianghong

    2010-01-01

    Violence and aggression are public health problems that can benefit from ongoing research into risk reduction and prevention. Current developmental theories of violence and aggression emphasize biological and psychosocial factors, particularly during adolescence. However, there has been less focus on understanding the interactive, multiplicative effects of these processes. Furthermore, little attention has been given to the pre-, peri-, and postnatal periods, where prevention and intervention may yield effective results. Early health risk factors that influence negative behavioral outcomes include prenatal and postnatal nutrition, tobacco use during pregnancy, maternal depression, birth complications, traumatic brain injury, lead exposure, and child abuse. There is an ample literature to suggest that these early health risk factors may increase the likelihood of childhood externalizing behaviors, aggression, juvenile delinquency, adult criminal behavior, and/or violence. This paper proposes an early health risk factors framework for violence prediction, built on existing developmental theories of criminal behavior and supported by empirical findings. This framework addresses gaps in the adolescent psychopathology literature and presents a novel conceptualization of behavioral disturbance that emphasizes the pre-, peri-, and post-natal periods, when a child’s development is critical and the opportunity for behavioral and environmental modification is high. Implications for such a framework on violence prevention programs are discussed. PMID:21399727

  3. A zinc finger transcription factor ART1 regulates multiple genes implicated in aluminum tolerance in rice.

    PubMed

    Yamaji, Naoki; Huang, Chao Feng; Nagao, Sakiko; Yano, Masahiro; Sato, Yutaka; Nagamura, Yoshiaki; Ma, Jian Feng

    2009-10-01

    Aluminum (Al) toxicity is the major limiting factor of crop production on acid soils, but some plant species have evolved ways of detoxifying Al. Here, we report a C2H2-type zinc finger transcription factor ART1 (for Al resistance transcription factor 1), which specifically regulates the expression of genes related to Al tolerance in rice (Oryza sativa). ART1 is constitutively expressed in the root, and the expression level is not affected by Al treatment. ART1 is localized in the nucleus of all root cells. A yeast one-hybrid assay showed that ART1 has a transcriptional activation potential and interacts with the promoter region of STAR1, an important factor in rice Al tolerance. Microarray analysis revealed 31 downstream transcripts regulated by ART1, including STAR1 and 2 and a couple of homologs of Al tolerance genes in other plants. Some of these genes were implicated in both internal and external detoxification of Al at different cellular levels. Our findings shed light on comprehensively understanding how plants detoxify aluminum to survive in an acidic environment.

  4. Metabolic Risk Factors of Sporadic Alzheimer’s Disease: Implications in the Pathology, Pathogenesis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Sasanka; Khemka, Vineet Kumar; Banerjee, Anindita; Chatterjee, Gargi; Ganguly, Anirban; Biswas, Atanu

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the major cause of dementia among the elderly world-wide, manifests in familial and sporadic forms, and the latter variety accounts for the majority of the patients affected by this disease. The etiopathogenesis of sporadic AD is complex and uncertain. The autopsy studies of AD brain have provided limited understanding of the antemortem pathogenesis of the disease. Experimental AD research with transgenic animal or various cell based models has so far failed to explain the complex and varied spectrum of AD dementia. The review, therefore, emphasizes the importance of AD related risk factors, especially those with metabolic implications, identified from various epidemiological studies, in providing clues to the pathogenesis of this complex disorder. Several metabolic risk factors of AD like hypercholesterolemia, hyperhomocysteinemia and type 2 diabetes have been studied extensively both in epidemiology and experimental research, while much less is known about the role of adipokines, pro-inflammatory cytokines and vitamin D in this context. Moreover, the results from many of these studies have shown a degree of variability which has hindered our understanding of the role of AD related risk factors in the disease progression. The review also encompasses the recent recommendations regarding clinical and neuropathological diagnosis of AD and brings out the inherent uncertainty and ambiguity in this area which may have a distinct impact on the outcome of various population-based studies on AD-related risk factors. PMID:26236550

  5. Early Health Risk Factors for Violence: Conceptualization, Review of the Evidence, and Implications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianghong

    2011-01-01

    Violence and aggression are public health problems that can benefit from ongoing research into risk reduction and prevention. Current developmental theories of violence and aggression emphasize biological and psychosocial factors, particularly during adolescence. However, there has been less focus on understanding the interactive, multiplicative effects of these processes. Furthermore, little attention has been given to the pre-, peri-, and postnatal periods, where prevention and intervention may yield effective results. Early health risk factors that influence negative behavioral outcomes include prenatal and postnatal nutrition, tobacco use during pregnancy, maternal depression, birth complications, traumatic brain injury, lead exposure, and child abuse. There is an ample literature to suggest that these early health risk factors may increase the likelihood of childhood externalizing behaviors, aggression, juvenile delinquency, adult criminal behavior, and/or violence. This paper proposes an early health risk factors framework for violence prediction, built on existing developmental theories of criminal behavior and supported by empirical findings. This framework addresses gaps in the adolescent psychopathology literature and presents a novel conceptualization of behavioral disturbance that emphasizes the pre-, peri-, and post-natal periods, when a child's development is critical and the opportunity for behavioral and environmental modification is high. Implications for such a framework on violence prevention programs are discussed.

  6. Lack of recombinant factor VIII B-domain induces phospholipid vesicle aggregation: implications for the immunogenicity of factor VIII

    PubMed Central

    Grushin, K; Miller, J; Dalm, D; Parker, E T; Healey, J F; Lollar, P; Stoilova-McPhie, S

    2014-01-01

    Factor VIII (FVIII) is a multidomain blood plasma glycoprotein. Activated FVIII acts as a cofactor to the serine protease factor IXa within the membrane-bound tenase complex assembled on the activated platelet surface. Defect or deficiency in FVIII causes haemophilia A, a severe hereditary bleeding disorder. Intravenous administration of plasma-derived FVIII or recombinant FVIII concentrates restores normal coagulation in haemophilia A patients and is used as an effective therapy. In this work, we studied the biophysical properties of clinically potent recombinant FVIII forms: human FVIII full-length (FVIII-FL), human FVIII B-domain deleted (FVIII-BDD) and porcine FVIII-BDD bound to negatively charged phospholipid vesicles at near-physiological conditions. We used cryo-electron microscopy (Cryo-EM) as a direct method to evaluate the homogeneity and micro-organization of the protein-vesicle suspensions, which are important for FVIII therapeutic properties. Applying concurrent Cryo-EM, circular dichroism and dynamic light scattering studies to the three recombinant FVIII forms when bound to phospholipid vesicles revealed novel properties for their functional, membrane-bound state. The three FVIII constructs have similar activity, secondary structure distribution and bind specifically to negatively charged phospholipid membranes. Human and porcine FVIII-BDD induce strong aggregation of the vesicles, but the human FVIII-FL form does not. The proposed methodology is effective in characterizing and identifying differences in therapeutic recombinant FVIII membrane-bound forms near physiological conditions, because protein-containing aggregates are considered to be a factor in increasing the immunogenicity of protein therapeutics. This will provide better characterization and development of safer and more effective FVIII products with implications for haemophilia A treatment. PMID:24750465

  7. Factors affecting the job stress and job satisfaction of Australian nurses: implications for recruitment and retention.

    PubMed

    Bartram, Timothy; Joiner, Therese A; Stanton, Pauline

    2004-10-01

    Against a background of nurse shortages in Australian hospitals, a significant challenge facing the healthcare sector is the recruitment and retention of nurses. The job stress and job satisfaction of nurses have been associated with recruitment and retention. The aim of this study is to consider two factors that may contribute to the job satisfaction and job stress of nurses: social support and empowerment. Using a sample of 157 registered nurses in a private hospital in Melbourne, Australia, we found that social support derived from the nurse's supervisor and work colleagues lowered job stress and at the same time increased job satisfaction. The presence of nurse empowerment, meaning, impact, competence and self-determination, also lowered job stress and increased job satisfaction. Finally, we discuss contributions of this study and implications for recruitment and retention of nurses in the health sector.

  8. Factors That Influence HIV Risk among Hispanic Female Immigrants and Their Implications for HIV Prevention Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Amy M.; Zule, William A.; Karg, Rhonda S.; Browne, Felicia A.; Wechsberg, Wendee M.

    2012-01-01

    Hispanics are the fastest growing minority group in North Carolina with increasing incidence of HIV infection. Gender roles, cultural expectations, and acculturation of women may explain some of Hispanic women's risks. The perspectives of Hispanic female immigrants and community-based providers were sought to identify services they offer, understand HIV risk factors, and support the adaptation of a best-evidence HIV behavioural intervention for Hispanic women. Two sets of focus groups were conducted to explicate risks and the opportunities to reach women or couples and the feasibility to conduct HIV prevention in an acceptable manner. Salient findings were that Hispanic female immigrants lacked accurate HIV/AIDS and STI knowledge and that traditional gender roles shaped issues surrounding sexual behaviour and HIV risks, as well as condom use, partner communication, and multiple sexual partnerships. Intervention implications are discussed such as developing and adapting culturally appropriate HIV prevention interventions for Hispanics that address gender roles and partner communication. PMID:22518308

  9. A critical examination of the U.S. nursing shortage: contributing factors, public policy implications.

    PubMed

    Fox, Rebekah L; Abrahamson, Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Despite short-lived periods of adequacy in nurse availability, the nursing shortage has endured. In order to better understand the myriad factors that influence the current shortage of nurses, as well as possible solutions, this project addresses the influence of social factors and government policy on nurse staffing inadequacy. When the government intervenes in a philosophically free-market economy, the assumption is that a problem, such as the current nursing shortage, could not be solved without such intervention. PURPOSE. Nursing care arguably falls into the realm of protecting the common good, and therefore requires government oversight. We provide a critical analysis of policy intervention efforts into the nursing shortage debate by examining the passage of legislation, the provision of educational assistance, and the establishment of minimum staffing requirements and minimum quality standards for reimbursement, which all impact nursing supply and demand. RESULTS. Arguments supporting and opposing policy intervention in general, and its impact on the overall provision of nursing care in the United States, were examined. Without policy incentive to place financial value on the quality of care provided by nurses, a simple increase in the number of available nurses is unlikely to solve the current problem. IMPLICATIONS. Important considerations that should be factored into policy creation include measurement and compensation for quality care, the nature of recruitment efforts of new nurses, and the complex nature of a nursing work.

  10. Implications of diesel emissions control failures to emission factors and road transport NOx evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ntziachristos, Leonidas; Papadimitriou, Giannis; Ligterink, Norbert; Hausberger, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    Diesel NOx emissions have been at the forefront of research and regulation scrutiny as a result of failures of late vehicle technologies to deliver on-road emissions reductions. The current study aims at identifying the actual emissions levels of late light duty vehicle technologies, including Euro 5 and Euro 6 ones. Mean NOx emission factor levels used in the most popular EU vehicle emission models (COPERT, HBEFA and VERSIT+) are compared with latest emission information collected in the laboratory over real-world driving cycles and on the road using portable emissions measurement systems (PEMS). The comparison shows that Euro 5 passenger car (PC) emission factors well reflect on road levels and that recently revealed emissions control failures do not call for any significant corrections. However Euro 5 light commercial vehicles (LCVs) and Euro 6 PCs in the 2014-2016 period exhibit on road emission levels twice as high as used in current models. Moreover, measured levels vary a lot for Euro 6 vehicles. Scenarios for future evolution of Euro 6 emission factors, reflecting different degree of effectiveness of emissions control regulations, show that total NOx emissions from diesel Euro 6 PC and LCV may correspond from 49% up to 83% of total road transport emissions in 2050. Unless upcoming and long term regulations make sure that light duty diesel NOx emissions are effectively addressed, this will have significant implications in meeting future air quality and national emissions ceilings targets.

  11. Rational and Mechanistic Perspectives on Reinforcement Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chater, Nick

    2009-01-01

    This special issue describes important recent developments in applying reinforcement learning models to capture neural and cognitive function. But reinforcement learning, as a theoretical framework, can apply at two very different levels of description: "mechanistic" and "rational." Reinforcement learning is often viewed in mechanistic terms--as…

  12. Transitioning from AOP to IATA - Exploiting mechanistic ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Slide presentation at satellite meeting of the QSAR2016 Meeting on How to Transition from AOP to IATA-Exploiting mechanistic insight for practical decision making. . Slide presentation at satellite meeting of the QSAR2016 Meeting on How to Transition from AOP to IATA-Exploiting mechanistic insight for practical decision making. .

  13. Genetic Variation of Goat Interferon Regulatory Factor 3 Gene and Its Implication in Goat Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Liping; Zhang, Yesheng; Wang, Yangzi; Sanni, Timothy M.; Imumorin, Ikhide G.; Peters, Sunday O.; Zhang, Jiajin; Dong, Yang; Wang, Wen

    2016-01-01

    The immune systems are fundamentally vital for evolution and survival of species; as such, selection patterns in innate immune loci are of special interest in molecular evolutionary research. The interferon regulatory factor (IRF) gene family control many different aspects of the innate and adaptive immune responses in vertebrates. Among these, IRF3 is known to take active part in very many biological processes. We assembled and evaluated 1356 base pairs of the IRF3 gene coding region in domesticated goats from Africa (Nigeria, Ethiopia and South Africa) and Asia (Iran and China) and the wild goat (Capra aegagrus). Five segregating sites with θ value of 0.0009 for this gene demonstrated a low diversity across the goats’ populations. Fu and Li tests were significantly positive but Tajima’s D test was significantly negative, suggesting its deviation from neutrality. Neighbor joining tree of IRF3 gene in domesticated goats, wild goat and sheep showed that all domesticated goats have a closer relationship than with the wild goat and sheep. Maximum likelihood tree of the gene showed that different domesticated goats share a common ancestor and suggest single origin. Four unique haplotypes were observed across all the sequences, of which, one was particularly common to African goats (MOCH-K14-0425, Poitou and WAD). In assessing the evolution mode of the gene, we found that the codon model dN/dS ratio for all goats was greater than one. Phylogenetic Analysis by Maximum Likelihood (PAML) gave a ω0 (dN/dS) value of 0.067 with LnL value of -6900.3 for the first Model (M1) while ω2 = 1.667 in model M2 with LnL value of -6900.3 with positive selection inferred in 3 codon sites. Mechanistic empirical combination (MEC) model for evaluating adaptive selection pressure on particular codons also confirmed adaptive selection pressure in three codons (207, 358 and 408) in IRF3 gene. Positive diversifying selection inferred with recent evolutionary changes in domesticated goat

  14. Genetic Variation of Goat Interferon Regulatory Factor 3 Gene and Its Implication in Goat Evolution.

    PubMed

    Okpeku, Moses; Esmailizadeh, Ali; Adeola, Adeniyi C; Shu, Liping; Zhang, Yesheng; Wang, Yangzi; Sanni, Timothy M; Imumorin, Ikhide G; Peters, Sunday O; Zhang, Jiajin; Dong, Yang; Wang, Wen

    2016-01-01

    The immune systems are fundamentally vital for evolution and survival of species; as such, selection patterns in innate immune loci are of special interest in molecular evolutionary research. The interferon regulatory factor (IRF) gene family control many different aspects of the innate and adaptive immune responses in vertebrates. Among these, IRF3 is known to take active part in very many biological processes. We assembled and evaluated 1356 base pairs of the IRF3 gene coding region in domesticated goats from Africa (Nigeria, Ethiopia and South Africa) and Asia (Iran and China) and the wild goat (Capra aegagrus). Five segregating sites with θ value of 0.0009 for this gene demonstrated a low diversity across the goats' populations. Fu and Li tests were significantly positive but Tajima's D test was significantly negative, suggesting its deviation from neutrality. Neighbor joining tree of IRF3 gene in domesticated goats, wild goat and sheep showed that all domesticated goats have a closer relationship than with the wild goat and sheep. Maximum likelihood tree of the gene showed that different domesticated goats share a common ancestor and suggest single origin. Four unique haplotypes were observed across all the sequences, of which, one was particularly common to African goats (MOCH-K14-0425, Poitou and WAD). In assessing the evolution mode of the gene, we found that the codon model dN/dS ratio for all goats was greater than one. Phylogenetic Analysis by Maximum Likelihood (PAML) gave a ω0 (dN/dS) value of 0.067 with LnL value of -6900.3 for the first Model (M1) while ω2 = 1.667 in model M2 with LnL value of -6900.3 with positive selection inferred in 3 codon sites. Mechanistic empirical combination (MEC) model for evaluating adaptive selection pressure on particular codons also confirmed adaptive selection pressure in three codons (207, 358 and 408) in IRF3 gene. Positive diversifying selection inferred with recent evolutionary changes in domesticated goat IRF3

  15. Implication of fibroblast growth factors in epileptogenesis-associated circuit rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Paradiso, Beatrice; Zucchini, Silvia; Simonato, Michele

    2013-01-01

    The transformation of a normal brain in epileptic (epileptogenesis) is associated with extensive morpho-functional alterations, including cell death, axonal and dendritic plasticity, neurogenesis, and others. Neurotrophic factors (NTFs) appear to be very strongly implicated in these phenomena. In this review, we focus on the involvement of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family members. Available data demonstrate that the FGFs are highly involved in the generation of the morpho-functional alterations in brain circuitries associated with epileptogenesis. For example, data on FGF2, the most studied member, suggest that it may be implicated both in seizure susceptibility and in seizure-induced plasticity, exerting different, and apparently contrasting effects: favoring acute seizures but reducing seizure-induced cell death. Even if many FGF members are still unexplored and very limited information is available on the FGF receptors, a complex and fascinating picture is emerging: multiple FGFs producing synergic or antagonistic effects one with another (and/or with other NTFs) on biological parameters that, in turn, facilitate or oppose transformation of the normal tissue in epileptic. In principle, identifying key elements in these phenomena may lead to effective therapies, but reaching this goal will require confronting a huge complexity. One first step could be to generate a “neurotrophicome” listing the FGFs (and all other NTFs) that are active during epileptogenesis. This should include identification of the extent to which each NTF is active (concentrations at the site of action); how it is active (local representation of receptor subtypes); when in the natural history of disease this occurs; how the NTF at hand will possibly interact with other NTFs. This is extraordinarily challenging, but holds the promise of a better understanding of epileptogenesis and, at large, of brain function. PMID:24062643

  16. A review of factors that affect contact angle and implications for flotation practice.

    PubMed

    Chau, T T; Bruckard, W J; Koh, P T L; Nguyen, A V

    2009-09-30

    Contact angle and the wetting behaviour of solid particles are influenced by many physical and chemical factors such as surface roughness and heterogeneity as well as particle shape and size. A significant amount of effort has been invested in order to probe the correlation between these factors and surface wettability. Some of the key investigations reported in the literature are reviewed here. It is clear from the papers reviewed that, depending on many experimental conditions such as the size of the surface heterogeneities and asperities, surface cleanliness, and the resolution of measuring equipment and data interpretation, obtaining meaningful contact angle values is extremely difficult and such values are reliant on careful experimental control. Surface wetting behaviour depends on not only surface texture (roughness and particle shape), and surface chemistry (heterogeneity) but also on hydrodynamic conditions in the preparation route. The inability to distinguish the effects of each factor may be due to the interplay and/or overlap of two or more factors in each system. From this review, it was concluded that: Surface geometry (and surface roughness of different scales) can be used to tune the contact angle; with increasing surface roughness the apparent contact angle decreases for hydrophilic materials and increases for hydrophobic materials. For non-ideal surfaces, such as mineral surfaces in the flotation process, kinetics plays a more important role than thermodynamics in dictating wettability. Particle size encountered in flotation (10-200 microm) showed no significant effect on contact angle but has a strong effect on flotation rate constant. There is a lack of a rigid quantitative correlation between factors affecting wetting, wetting behaviour and contact angle on minerals; and hence their implication for flotation process. Specifically, universal correlation of contact angle to flotation recovery is still difficult to predict from first principles

  17. In Silico Model-driven Assessment of the Effects of Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor Deficiency on Glutamate and Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid: Implications for Understanding Schizophrenia Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Rimjhim; Kalmady, Sunil Vasu; Venkatasubramanian, Ganesan

    2017-01-01

    Objective Deficient brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is one of the important mechanisms underlying the neuroplasticity abnormalities in schizophrenia. Aberration in BDNF signaling pathways directly or circuitously influences neurotransmitters like glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). For the first time, this study attempts to construct and simulate the BDNF-neurotransmitter network in order to assess the effects of BDNF deficiency on glutamate and GABA. Methods Using CellDesigner, we modeled BDNF interactions with calcium influx via N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-Calmodulin activation; synthesis of GABA via cell cycle regulators protein kinase B, glycogen synthase kinase and β-catenin; transportation of glutamate and GABA. Steady state stability, perturbation time-course simulation and sensitivity analysis were performed in COPASI after assigning the kinetic functions, optimizing the unknown parameters using random search and genetic algorithm. Results Study observations suggest that increased glutamate in hippocampus, similar to that seen in schizophrenia, could potentially be contributed by indirect pathway originated from BDNF. Deficient BDNF could suppress Glutamate decarboxylase 67-mediated GABA synthesis. Further, deficient BDNF corresponded to impaired transport via vesicular glutamate transporter, thereby further increasing the intracellular glutamate in GABAergic and glutamatergic cells. BDNF also altered calcium dependent neuroplasticity via NMDAR modulation. Sensitivity analysis showed that Calmodulin, cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and CREB regulated transcription coactivator-1 played significant role in this network. Conclusion The study presents in silico quantitative model of biochemical network constituting the key signaling molecules implicated in schizophrenia pathogenesis. It provides mechanistic insights into putative contribution of deficient BNDF towards alterations in neurotransmitters and

  18. In SilicoModel-driven Assessment of the Effects of Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor Deficiency on Glutamate and Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid: Implications for Understanding Schizophrenia Pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Rimjhim; Kalmady, Sunil Vasu; Venkatasubramanian, Ganesan

    2017-05-31

    Deficient brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is one of the important mechanisms underlying the neuroplasticity abnormalities in schizophrenia. Aberration in BDNF signaling pathways directly or circuitously influences neurotransmitters like glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). For the first time, this study attempts to construct and simulate the BDNF-neurotransmitter network in order to assess the effects of BDNF deficiency on glutamate and GABA. Using CellDesigner, we modeled BDNF interactions with calcium influx via N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)- Calmodulin activation; synthesis of GABA via cell cycle regulators protein kinase B, glycogen synthase kinase and β-catenin; transportation of glutamate and GABA. Steady state stability, perturbation time-course simulation and sensitivity analysis were performed in COPASI after assigning the kinetic functions, optimizing the unknown parameters using random search and genetic algorithm. Study observations suggest that increased glutamate in hippocampus, similar to that seen in schizophrenia, could potentially be contributed by indirect pathway originated from BDNF. Deficient BDNF could suppress Glutamate decarboxylase 67-mediated GABA synthesis. Further, deficient BDNF corresponded to impaired transport via vesicular glutamate transporter, thereby further increasing the intracellular glutamate in GABAergic and glutamatergic cells. BDNF also altered calcium dependent neuroplasticity via NMDAR modulation. Sensitivity analysis showed that Calmodulin, cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and CREB regulated transcription coactivator-1 played significant role in this network. The study presents in silicoquantitative model of biochemical network constituting the key signaling molecules implicated in schizophrenia pathogenesis. It provides mechanistic insights into putative contribution of deficient BNDF towards alterations in neurotransmitters and neuroplasticity that are consistent with current

  19. A generalized mechanistic codon model.

    PubMed

    Zaheri, Maryam; Dib, Linda; Salamin, Nicolas

    2014-09-01

    Models of codon evolution have attracted particular interest because of their unique capabilities to detect selection forces and their high fit when applied to sequence evolution. We described here a novel approach for modeling codon evolution, which is based on Kronecker product of matrices. The 61 × 61 codon substitution rate matrix is created using Kronecker product of three 4 × 4 nucleotide substitution matrices, the equilibrium frequency of codons, and the selection rate parameter. The entities of the nucleotide substitution matrices and selection rate are considered as parameters of the model, which are optimized by maximum likelihood. Our fully mechanistic model allows the instantaneous substitution matrix between codons to be fully estimated with only 19 parameters instead of 3,721, by using the biological interdependence existing between positions within codons. We illustrate the properties of our models using computer simulations and assessed its relevance by comparing the AICc measures of our model and other models of codon evolution on simulations and a large range of empirical data sets. We show that our model fits most biological data better compared with the current codon models. Furthermore, the parameters in our model can be interpreted in a similar way as the exchangeability rates found in empirical codon models. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  20. Mechanistic insights into nicotine withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Paolini, Michael; De Biasi, Mariella

    2012-01-01

    Smoking is responsible for over 400,000 premature deaths in the United States every year, making it the leading cause of preventable death. In addition, smoking-related illness leads to billions of dollars in healthcare expenditures and lost productivity annually. The public is increasingly aware that successfully abstaining from smoking at any age can add years to one’s life and reduce many of the harmful effects of smoking. Although the majority of smokers desire to quit, only a small fraction of attempts to quit are actually successful. The symptoms associated with nicotine withdrawal are a primary deterrent to cessation and they need to be quelled to avoid early relapse. This review will focus on the neuroadaptations caused by chronic nicotine exposure and discuss how those changes lead to a withdrawal syndrome upon smoking cessation. Besides examining how nicotine usurps the endogenous reward system, we will discuss how the habenula is part of a circuit that plays a critical role in the aversive effects of high nicotine doses and nicotine withdrawal. We will also provide an updated summary of the role of various nicotinic receptor subtypes in the mechanisms of withdrawal. This growing knowledge provides mechanistic insights into current and future smoking cessation therapies. PMID:21782803

  1. Individual, employment and psychosocial factors influencing walking to work: Implications for intervention design.

    PubMed

    Adams, Emma J; Esliger, Dale W; Taylor, Ian M; Sherar, Lauren B

    2017-01-01

    Promoting walking for the journey to and from work (commuter walking) is a potential strategy for increasing physical activity. Understanding the factors influencing commuter walking is important for identifying target groups and designing effective interventions. This study aimed to examine individual, employment-related and psychosocial factors associated with commuter walking and to discuss the implications for targeting and future design of interventions. 1,544 employees completed a baseline survey as part of the 'Walking Works' intervention project (33.4% male; 36.3% aged <30 years). Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine the associations of individual (age, ethnic group, educational qualifications, number of children <16 and car ownership), employment-related (distance lived from work, free car parking at work, working hours, working pattern and occupation) and psychosocial factors (perceived behavioural control, intention, social norms and social support from work colleagues) with commuter walking. Almost half of respondents (n = 587, 49%) were classified as commuter walkers. Those who were aged <30 years, did not have a car, had no free car parking at work, were confident of including some walking or intended to walk to or from work on a regular basis, and had support from colleagues for walking were more likely to be commuter walkers. Those who perceived they lived too far away from work to walk, thought walking was less convenient than using a car for commuting, did not have time to walk, needed a car for work or had always travelled the same way were less likely to be commuter walkers. A number of individual, employment-related and psychosocial factors were associated with commuter walking. Target groups for interventions to promote walking to and from work may include those in older age groups and those who own or have access to a car. Multi-level interventions targeting individual level behaviour change, social support within the

  2. Mechanistic Indicators of Childhood Asthma (MICA): piloting ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Background: Modem methods in molecular biology and advanced computational tools show promise in elucidating complex interactions that occur between genes and environmental factors in diseases such as asthma; however appropriately designed studies are critical for these methods to reach their full potential. Objective: We used a case-control study to investigate whether genomic data (blood gene expression), viewed together with a spectrum of exposure effects and susceptibility markers (blood, urine and nail), can provide a mechanistic explanation for the increased susceptibility of asthmatics to ambient air pollutants. Methods: We studied 205 non-asthmatic and asthmatic children, (9-12 years of age) who participated in a clinical study in Detroit, Michigan. The study combines a traditional epidemiological design with an integrative approach to investigate the environmental exposure of children to indoor-outdoor air. The study includes measurements of internal dose (metals, allergen specific IgE, PAH and VOC metabolites) and clinical measures of health outcome (immunological, cardiovascular and respiratory). Results: Expected immunological indications of asthma have been obtained. In addition, initial results from our analyses point to the complex nature of childhood health and risk factors linked to metabolic syndrome (obesity, blood pressure and dyslipidemia). For example, 31% and 34% of the asthmatic MICA subjects were either overweight (BMI > 25) o

  3. Role of cytokines and platelet-activating factor in inflammatory bowel disease. Implications for therapy.

    PubMed

    Nassif, A; Longo, W E; Mazuski, J E; Vernava, A M; Kaminski, D L

    1996-02-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) and cytokines, such as interleukins, tumor necrosis factor, and others, are thought to play a role in the inflammatory process involving gastrointestinal disorders such as Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, ischemic colitis, or antibiotic-associated colitis. This study was undertaken to review the latest literature on the role of PAF and cytokines in the genesis of inflammatory bowel disease and implications for therapy and management. PAF is an endogenous phospholipid involved in hypersensitivity and inflammatory reactions such as platelet and neutrophil aggregation, vasodilation, increased vascular permeability, and leukocyte adhesion, which have been associated with inflammatory processes. Cytokines are peptides that regulate and coordinate inflammatory and immunologic responses. Increased production of cytokines has been reported during Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis and is correlated with disease activity. Because PAF and cytokines may have an important role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease, their inhibition by specific antagonists, mediators, or other agents such as steroids may have a potential therapeutic benefit in treatment and management of these inflammatory diseases in the near future.

  4. Factors implicated in the initiation of human parturition in term and preterm labor: a review.

    PubMed

    Ravanos, Konstantinos; Dagklis, Themistoklis; Petousis, Stamatios; Margioula-Siarkou, Chrysoula; Prapas, Yannis; Prapas, Nikolaos

    2015-01-01

    After accommodating the pregnancy for an average of 40 weeks, the uterus expels the fetus, the placenta and the membranes through the birth canal in a process named parturition. The absolute sequence of events that trigger and sustain human parturition are not yet fully clarified. Evidence suggests that spontaneous preterm and term labor seem to share a common inflammatory pathway. However, there are several other factors being involved in the initiation of human parturition. Placental corticotropin releasing hormone production seems to serve as a placental clock that might be set to ring earlier or later determining the duration of pregnancy and timing of labor. Estrogens do not cause contractions but their properties seem to capacitate uterus to coordinate and enhance contractions. Cytokines, prostaglandins, nitric oxide and steroids seem also to induce ripening by mediating remodeling of the extracellular matrix and collagen. Infection and microbe invasion resulting in chorioamnionitis also represents a common cause of early preterm labour. This review provides an overview of all these factors considered to be implicated in the initiation of human parturition.

  5. Negative mechanistic reasoning in medical intervention assessment.

    PubMed

    Jerkert, Jesper

    2015-12-01

    Traditionally, mechanistic reasoning has been assigned a negligible role in standard EBM (evidence-based medicine) literature, although some recent authors have argued for an upgrade. Even so, the mechanistic reasoning that has received attention has almost exclusively been positive--both in an epistemic sense of claiming that there is a mechanistic chain and in a health-related sense of there being claimed benefits for the patient. Negative mechanistic reasoning has been neglected, both in the epistemic and in the health-related sense. I distinguish three main types of negative mechanistic reasoning and subsume them under a new definition of mechanistic reasoning in the context of assessing medical interventions. This definition is wider than a previous suggestion in the literature. Each negative type corresponds to a range of evidential strengths, and it is argued that there are differences with respect to typical evidential strengths. The variety of negative mechanistic reasoning should be acknowledged in EBM, and it presents a serious challenge to proponents of so-called medical hierarchies of evidence.

  6. Insulin-like growth factor 1, glycation and bone fragility: implications for fracture resistance of bone.

    PubMed

    Sroga, Grażyna E; Wu, Ping-Cheng; Vashishth, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Despite our extensive knowledge of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) action on the growing skeleton, its role in skeletal homeostasis during aging and age-related development of certain diseases is still unclear. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) derived from glucose are implicated in osteoporosis and a number of diabetic complications. We hypothesized that because in humans and rodents IGF1 stimulates uptake of glucose (a glycation substrate) from the bloodstream in a dose-dependent manner, the decline of IGF1 could be associated with the accumulation of glycation products and the decreasing resistance of bone to fracture. To test the aforementioned hypotheses, we used human tibial posterior cortex bone samples to perform biochemical (measurement of IGF1, fluorescent AGEs and pentosidine (PEN) contents) and mechanical tests (crack initiation and propagation using compact tension specimens). Our results for the first time show a significant, age-independent association between the levels of IGF1 and AGEs. Furthermore, AGEs (fAGEs, PEN) predict propensity of bone to fracture (initiation and propagation) independently of age in human cortical bone. Based on these results we propose a model of IGF1-based regulation of bone fracture. Because IGF1 level increases postnatally up to the juvenile developmental phase and decreases thereafter with aging, we propose that IGF1 may play a protective role in young skeleton and its age-related decline leads to bone fragility and an increased fracture risk. Our results may also have important implications for current understanding of osteoporosis- and diabetes-related bone fragility as well as in the development of new diagnostic tools to screen for fragile bones.

  7. Transcription initiation factor IID-interactive histone chaperone CIA-II implicated in mammalian spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Umehara, Takashi; Horikoshi, Masami

    2003-09-12

    Histones are thought to have specific roles in mammalian spermatogenesis, because several subtypes of histones emerge that are post-translationally modified during spermatogenesis. Though regular assembly of nucleosome is guaranteed by histone chaperones, their involvement in spermatogenesis is yet to be characterized. Here we identified a histone chaperone-related factor, which we designated as CCG1-interacting factor A-II (CIA-II), through interaction with bromodomains of TAFII250/CCG1, which is the largest subunit of human transcription initiation factor IID (TFIID). We found that human CIA-II (hCIA-II) localizes in HeLa nuclei and is highly expressed in testis and other proliferating cell-containing tissues. Expression of mouse CIA-II (mCIA-II) does not occur in the germ cell-lacking testes of adult WBB6F1-W/Wv mutant mice, indicating its expression in testis to be specific to germ cells. Fractionation of testicular germ cells revealed that mCIA-II transcripts accumulate in pachytene spermatocytes but not in spermatids. In addition, the mCIA-II transcripts in testis were present as early as 4 days after birth and decreased at 56 days after birth. These findings indicate that mCIA-II expression in testis is restricted to premeiotic to meiotic stages during spermatogenesis. Also, we found that hCIA-II interacts with histone H3 in vivo and with histones H3/H4 in vitro and that it facilitates supercoiling of circular DNA when it is incubated with core histones and topoisomerase I in vitro. These data suggest that CIA-II is a histone chaperone and is implicated in the regulation of mammalian spermatogenesis.

  8. Risk factors for victimization in romantic relationships of young women: a review of empirical studies and implications for prevention.

    PubMed

    Vézina, Johanne; Hébert, Martine

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews the literature on risk factors for victimization in romantic relationships of adolescent girls and young adult women. The review includes 61 empirical studies published between 1986 and 2006 that have investigated risk factors for sustained psychological, sexual, and physical violence in romantic relationships of young women ages 12 to 24. An ecological approach is used as a conceptual model to review risk factors into four categories: sociodemographic factors, individual factors (personal and interpersonal), environmental factors (family, community, and peers), and contextual factors (linked to the romantic relationship). Methodological limitations of the studies in terms of measurement issues, samples studied, research designs, and underlying conceptual models are discussed. Finally, implications for prevention programming are considered. Recommendations are presented about which clientele should be targeted, which risk factors should be considered, and when programs should be implemented.

  9. Kinetic Model Facilitates Analysis of Fibrin Generation and Its Modulation by Clotting Factors: Implications for Hemostasis-Enhancing Therapies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    investigating its potential as a hemostatic agent in trauma and surgery.6,7 These applications necessitate a detailed understanding of fibrin ...facilitates analysis of fibrin generation and its modulation by clotting factors: implications for hemostasis-enhancing therapies† Alexander Y...ability of the suggested molecular mechanisms to account for fibrin generation and degradation kinetics in diverse, physiologically relevant in vitro

  10. FACTORS IMPLICATED IN AMPHIBIAN POPULATION DECLINES IN THE US, AND AN EVALUATION OF THE CASE FOR INVASIVE SPECIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Factors known or suspected to be adversely affecting native amphibian populations in the US were identified using information from 267 species accounts written in a standardized format by multiple authors in a forthcoming book. Land use was the most frequently implicated adverse ...

  11. FACTORS IMPLICATED IN AMPHIBIAN POPULATION DECLINES IN THE US, AND AN EVALUATION OF THE CASE FOR INVASIVE SPECIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Factors known or suspected to be adversely affecting native amphibian populations in the US were identified using information from 267 species accounts written in a standardized format by multiple authors in a forthcoming book. Land use was the most frequently implicated adverse ...

  12. Alkylation of phenol: a mechanistic view.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qisheng; Chakraborty, Deb; Faglioni, Francesco; Muller, Rick P; Goddard, William A; Harris, Thomas; Campbell, Curt; Tang, Yongchun

    2006-02-16

    The current work utilizes the ab initio density functional theory (DFT) to develop a molecular level of the mechanistic understanding on the phenol alkylation in the presence of a cation-exchange resin catalyst, Amberlyst-15. The catalyst is modeled with the benzene sulfonic acid, and the effect of this acid on olefins such as isopropene (i-Pr) and tributene (t-Bu) in a phenol solution mimics the experimental condition. A neutral-pathway mechanism is established to account for early-stage high concentration of the phenolic ether observed in experiments. The mechanism involves an exothermic reaction between olefin and the benzene sulfonic acid to form ester followed by three reaction pathways leading to direct O-alkylation, o-C-alkylation, and p-C-alkylation. Our calculations conclude that O-alkylation to form the phenolic ether is the most energetically favorable in the neutral condition. An ionic rearrangement mechanism describes intramolecular migrations of the alkyl group from the phenolic ether to form C-alkylphenols, while the positively charged protonation significantly lowers transition barriers for these migrations. The ionic rearrangement mechanism accounts for high yields of o-C-alkylphenol and p-C-alkylphenol. Competition between the H atom and the alkyl R group at the substitutive site of the protonated ortho configuration is found to be the determining factor to the ortho/para ratio of C-alkylation products.

  13. Individual, employment and psychosocial factors influencing walking to work: Implications for intervention design

    PubMed Central

    Esliger, Dale W.; Taylor, Ian M.; Sherar, Lauren B.

    2017-01-01

    Background Promoting walking for the journey to and from work (commuter walking) is a potential strategy for increasing physical activity. Understanding the factors influencing commuter walking is important for identifying target groups and designing effective interventions. This study aimed to examine individual, employment-related and psychosocial factors associated with commuter walking and to discuss the implications for targeting and future design of interventions. Methods 1,544 employees completed a baseline survey as part of the ‘Walking Works’ intervention project (33.4% male; 36.3% aged <30 years). Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine the associations of individual (age, ethnic group, educational qualifications, number of children <16 and car ownership), employment-related (distance lived from work, free car parking at work, working hours, working pattern and occupation) and psychosocial factors (perceived behavioural control, intention, social norms and social support from work colleagues) with commuter walking. Results Almost half of respondents (n = 587, 49%) were classified as commuter walkers. Those who were aged <30 years, did not have a car, had no free car parking at work, were confident of including some walking or intended to walk to or from work on a regular basis, and had support from colleagues for walking were more likely to be commuter walkers. Those who perceived they lived too far away from work to walk, thought walking was less convenient than using a car for commuting, did not have time to walk, needed a car for work or had always travelled the same way were less likely to be commuter walkers. Conclusions A number of individual, employment-related and psychosocial factors were associated with commuter walking. Target groups for interventions to promote walking to and from work may include those in older age groups and those who own or have access to a car. Multi-level interventions targeting individual level behaviour

  14. Local control after radiosurgery for brain metastases: predictive factors and implications for clinical decision.

    PubMed

    de Azevedo Santos, Tâmara Ribeiro; Tundisi, Carmen Freire; Ramos, Henderson; Maia, Maria Aparecida Conte; Pellizzon, Antônio Cássio Assis; Silva, Maria Letícia Gobo; Fogaroli, Ricardo César; Chen, Michael Jenwei; Suzuki, Sérgio Hideki; Dias, José Eduardo Souza; Sanematsu, Paulo Issamu; de Castro, Douglas Guedes

    2015-03-08

    To evaluate the local control of brain metastases (BM) in patients treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), correlate the outcome with treatment parameters and lesion characteristics, and define its implications for clinical decisions. Between 2007 and 2012, 305 BM in 141 consecutive patients were treated with SRS. After exclusions, 216 BM in 100 patients were analyzed. Doses were grouped as follows: ≤15 Gy, 16-20 Gy, and ≥21 Gy. Sizes were classified as ≤10 mm and >10 mm. Local control (LC) and overall survival (OS) were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Log-rank statistics were used to identify the prognostic factors affecting LC and OS. For multivariate analyses, a Cox proportional model was applied including all potentially significant variables reached on univariate analyses. Median age was 54 years (18-80). Median radiological follow-up of the lesions was 7 months (1-66). Median LC and the LC at 1 year were 22.3 months and 69.7%, respectively. On univariate analysis, tumor size, SRS dose, and previous whole brain irradiation (WBRT) were significant factors for LC. Patients with lesions >10 and ≤10 mm had an LC at 1 year of 58.6% and 79.1%, respectively (p = 0.008). In lesions receiving ≤15 Gy, 16-20 Gy, and ≥21 Gy, the 1-year LC rates were 39.6%, 71.7%, and 92.3%, respectively (p < 0.001). When WBRT was done previously, LC at 1 year was 57.9% compared with 78.4% for those who did not undergo WBRT (p = 0.004). On multivariate analysis, dose remained the single most powerful prognostic factor for LC. Median OS for all patients was 17 months, with no difference among the groups. Dose is the most important predictive factor for LC of BM. Doses below 16 Gy correlated with poor LC. The SRS dose as salvage treatment after previous WBRT should not be reduced unless there is a pressing reason to do so.

  15. Factors affecting post-stroke motor recovery: Implications on neurotherapy after brain injury.

    PubMed

    Alawieh, Ali; Zhao, Jing; Feng, Wuwei

    2016-08-13

    Neurological disorders are a major cause of chronic disability globally among which stroke is a leading cause of chronic disability. The advances in the medical management of stroke patients over the past decade have significantly reduced mortality, but at the same time increased numbers of disabled survivors. Unfortunately, this reduction in mortality was not paralleled by satisfactory therapeutics and rehabilitation strategies that can improve functional recovery of patients. Motor recovery after brain injury is a complex, dynamic, and multifactorial process in which an interplay among genetic, pathophysiologic, sociodemographic and therapeutic factors determines the overall recovery trajectory. Although stroke recovery is the most well-studied form of post-injury neuronal recovery, a thorough understanding of the pathophysiology and determinants affecting stroke recovery is still lacking. Understanding the different variables affecting brain recovery after stroke will not only provide an opportunity to develop therapeutic interventions but also allow for developing personalized platforms for patient stratification and prognosis. We aim to provide a narrative review of major determinants for post-stroke recovery and their implications in other forms of brain injury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Cadmium in edible mushrooms from NW Spain: Bioconcentration factors and consumer health implications.

    PubMed

    Melgar, M Julia; Alonso, Julián; García, M Angeles

    2016-02-01

    Mushrooms do not constitute a significant portion of the human diet, but the consumption of wild and cultivated mushrooms has become increasingly in recent years. Some species accumulate high levels of toxic metals, both in unpolluted and polluted areas. In this study, we examined the accumulation capacity of cadmium in edible mushrooms in relation to certain factors and their possible toxicological implications. Cadmium concentrations were determined by an ICP-MS spectrometer in 238 samples of the fruiting bodies of 28 wild and cultivated growing edible mushrooms species and the underlying soil. The hymenophore (H) and the rest of the fruiting body (RFB) were analysed separately. The highest mean cadmium concentration (mg/kg dry weight) was found in Agaricus macrosporus (52.9 in H and 28.3 in RFB). All mushroom species accumulated cadmium in relation to the underlying soils. There were statistically significant differences between the hymenophore and the rest of the fruiting body (p < 0.001). Cadmium concentrations were compared to data in the literature and to levels set by legislation. It was concluded that consumption of our studied mushrooms is not a toxicological risk as far as cadmium content is concerned, although the species A. macrosporus should not be consumed.

  17. The risk factors and prognostic implication of acute pulmonary edema in resuscitated cardiac arrest patients

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Dae-hyun; Kim, Joonghee; Rhee, Joong Eui; Kim, Taeyun; Kim, Kyuseok; Jo, You Hwan; Lee, Jin Hee; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Kim, Yu Jin; Hwang, Seung Sik

    2015-01-01

    Objective Pulmonary edema is frequently observed after a successful resuscitation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients. Currently, its risk factors and prognostic implications are mostly unknown. Methods Adult OHCA patients with a presumed cardiac etiology who achieved sustained return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) in emergency department were retrospectively analyzed. The patients were grouped according to the severity of consolidation on their initial chest X-ray (group I, no consolidation; group II, patchy consolidations; group III, consolidation involving an entire lobe; group IV, total white-out of any lung). The primary objective was to identify the risk factors of developing severe pulmonary edema (group III or IV). The secondary objective was to evaluate the association between long-term prognosis and the severity of pulmonary edema. Results One hundred and seven patients were included. Total duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and initial pCO2 level were both independent predictors of developing severe pulmonary edema with their odds ratio (OR) being 1.02 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.00 to 1.04; per 1 minute) and 1.04 (95% CI, 1.01 to 1.07; per 1 mmHg), respectively. The long term prognosis was significantly poor in patients with severe pulmonary edema with a OR for good outcome (6-month cerebral performance category 1 or 2) being 0.22 (95% CI, 0.06 to 0.79) in group III and 0.16 (95% CI, 0.04 to 0.63) in group IV compared to group I. Conclusion The duration of CPR and initial pCO2 level were both independent predictors for the development of severe pulmonary edema after resuscitation in emergency department. The severity of the pulmonary edema was significantly associated with long-term outcome. PMID:27752581

  18. Induction of proinflammatory cytokines by a soluble factor of Propionibacterium acnes: implications for chronic inflammatory acne.

    PubMed Central

    Vowels, B R; Yang, S; Leyden, J J

    1995-01-01

    Although many cytokines have been implicated in the development and persistence of inflammatory immune responses, it is unknown if any of these are important in inflammatory acne. This study investigated the production of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-8 (IL-8), IL-1 beta, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) by human monocytic cell lines, ThP-1 and U937, and by freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells from acne patients. Both Propionibacterium acnes and supernatants obtained from 72-h P. acnes cultures could induce significant concentrations of IL-1 beta, TNF-alpha, and IL-8 by both cell lines and by peripheral blood mononuclear cells as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. There was no significant difference between acne and non-acne subjects. Endotoxin quantification and addition of polymyxin B to assays indicated no lipopolysaccharide (LPS) contamination. P. acnes supernatant was fractionated into components with molecular weights of < 3,000, < 10,000, and < 30,000 and assayed for the ability to induce IL-8 and TNF production in ThP-1 cells. Nearly 90% of the original activity was found in the < 30,000-molecular-weight fraction, 50% was in the < 10,000-molecular-weight fraction, and only 15% remained in the < 3,000-molecular-weight fraction. The effluent from the < 3,000-molecular-weight fraction contained about 70% activity, indicating that the inducing factor was not retained in the membrane. Incubation of P. acnes supernatant with various concentrations of mutanolysin or lysozyme resulted in a loss of 60% of the original activity. The addition of jimson lectin, which binds peptidoglycan, resulted in a loss of 70% of the activity in a dose-response manner, whereas peanut lectin had little or no effect on the activity. Heating of the P. acnes supernatant to 65 degrees C also had no effect on the activity. Blocking of CD14, a receptor for both LPS and peptidoglycan, reduced cytokine production by > 50%, suggesting that

  19. Perceptual discrimination in fear generalization: Mechanistic and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Struyf, Dieter; Zaman, Jonas; Vervliet, Bram; Van Diest, Ilse

    2015-12-01

    For almost a century, Pavlovian conditioning is the imperative experimental paradigm to investigate the development and generalization of fear. However, despite the rich research tradition, the conceptualization of fear generalization has remained somewhat ambiguous. In this selective review, we focus explicitly on some challenges with the current operationalization of fear generalization and their impact on the ability to make inferences on its clinical potential and underlying processes. The main conclusion is that, despite the strong evidence that learning influences perception, current research has largely neglected the role of perceptual discriminability and its plasticity in fear generalization. We propose an alternative operationalization of generalization, where the essence is that Pavlovian conditioning itself influences the breadth of fear generalization via learning-related changes in perceptual discriminability. Hence a conceptualization of fear generalization is incomplete without an in-depth analysis of processes of perceptual discriminability. Furthermore, this highlights perceptual learning and discriminability as important future targets for pre-clinical and clinical research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Retinal Structure in Cobalamin C Disease: Mechanistic and Therapeutic Implications.

    PubMed

    Aleman, Tomas S; Brodie, Frank; Garvin, Christopher; Gewaily, Dina Y; Ficicioglu, Can H; Mills, Monte D; Forbes, Brian J; Maguire, Albert M; Davidson, Stefanie L

    2015-01-01

    To describe the retinal structure in a patient with cobalamin C (cblC) disease. A 13-year-old male patient diagnosed with cblC disease during a perinatal metabolic screening prompted by jaundice and hypotony underwent ophthalmic examinations, electroretinography (ERG) and spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). The patient carried a homozygous (c.271dupA) mutation in the methylmalonic aciduria and homocystinuria type C (MMACHC) gene. At age 3 months he had a normal eye exam. A pigmentary maculopathy progressed to chorioretinal atrophy from 5-10 months. ERG at 7 months was normal. A nystagmus remained stable since the age of 2 years. At age 13, visual acuity was 20/250 (right eye) and 20/400 (left eye), with a +5.00 D correction, a level of vision maintained since first measurable at age 5 years. SD-OCT showed bilateral macular coloboma-like lesions; there was also a thickened surface layer with ganglion cell layer thinning. Photoreceptor outer segment loss and thinning of the outer nuclear layer (ONL) transitioned to regions with no discernible ONL with a delaminated, thickened, inner retina. A thick surface layer near the optic nerve resembling an immature retina and an initially normal macula that rapidly developed coloboma-like lesions suggest there may be an interference with retinal/foveal development in cblC, a mechanism of maculopathy that may be shared by other early onset retinal degenerations. Photoreceptor loss and inner retinal remodeling confirm associated photoreceptor degeneration.

  1. PCDD/F TEQ INDICATORS AND THEIR MECHANISTIC IMPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stack gas samples from two incinerator facilities with different operating conditions were investigated to find polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin/furan (PCDD/F) toxic equivalent quantity (TEQ) indicators from amongst the 210 PCDD/F isomers. Similarities in isomer patterns were als...

  2. PCDD/F TEQ INDICATORS AND THEIR MECHANISTIC IMPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stack gas samples from two incinerator facilities with different operating conditions were investigated to find polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin/furan (PCDD/F) toxic equivalent quantity (TEQ) indicators from amongst the 210 PCDD/F isomers. Similarities in isomer patterns were als...

  3. Clinical implications of APEX1 and Jagged1 as chemoresistance factors in biliary tract cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hong-Beum; Cho, Won Jin; Choi, Nam Gyu; Kim, Sung-Soo; Park, Jun Hee; Lee, Hee-Jeong

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Biliary cancer is a highly malignant neoplasm with poor prognosis and most patients need to undergo palliative chemotherapy, however major clinical problem associated with the use of chemotherapy is chemoresistance. So far, we aimed at investigating clinical implications of apurinic/apyrimidinic endodeoxyribonuclease 1 (APEX1) and Jagged1 as chemoresistance factors in biliary tract cancer. Methods We used 5 human biliary tract cancer cell lines (SNU-245, SNU-308, SNU-478, SNU-1079, and SNU-1196), and investigated the chemosensitivity of APEX1 and Jagged1 through 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and Western blot. Alternately, the 10 patients of advanced biliary cancer consist of 2 group according to the chemotherapy response examined by immunohistochemistry using APEX1 and Jagged1 antibody, and protein expression level was scored for staining intensity and percent positive cell. Results The result of MTT assay after APEX1 knockdown showed that strong coexpression of APEX1 and Jagged1 cell line (SNU-245, SNU-1079, and SNU-1196) showed a greater decrease in IC50 of chemotherapeutic agent (5-fluorouracil, gemcitabine and cisplatin). The Western blot analysis of APEX1 and Jagged1 expression in biliary cancer cell lines after APEX1 knockdown definitively demonstrated decreased Jagged1 expression. The APEX1 and Jagged1expression level of immunohistochemistry represented that chemorefractory patients had higher than chemoresponsive patients. Conclusion These results demonstrate that simultaneous high expression of APEX1 and Jagged1 is associated with chemoresistance in biliary cancer and suggest that is a potential therapeutic target for chemoresistance in advanced biliary cancer. PMID:28090501

  4. Targeting N-cadherin through fibroblast growth factor receptor-4: distinct pathogenetic and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Ezzat, Shereen; Zheng, Lei; Winer, Daniel; Asa, Sylvia L

    2006-11-01

    Several molecular aberrations have been implicated in the pathogenesis of pituitary tumors, but few have proven thus far to be of therapeutic value. Pituitary tumor-derived fibroblast growth factor receptor-4 (ptd-FGFR4) is an alternatively transcribed cytoplasmic isoform lacking most of the extracellular domain. This oncogene recapitulates the morphological features of human pituitary tumors in transgenic mice. To investigate the therapeutic potential of targeting ptd-FGFR4, we examined the impact of FGFR4 tyrosine kinase inhibition in xenografted mice. GH4 pituitary cells expressing ptd-FGFR4 develop into invasive tumors. Systemic treatment of mice bearing ptd-FGFR4 tumors with the FGFR-selective inhibitor PD173074 resulted in recovery of membranous N-cadherin staining and a significant reduction in tumor volume with less invasive growth behavior. Mutation of tyrosine Y754F in ptd-FGFR4 abrogated the effect of PD173074-mediated inhibition. The pivotal role of N-cadherin as a mediator of this pituitary cell growth was demonstrated by small interfering RNA mediated down-regulation, which promoted invasive growth in xenografted mice. To validate this model in primary human pituitary tumors, we examined the expression of ptd-FGFR4, N-cadherin, and clinical behavior. Loss of membranous N-cadherin correlated with cytoplasmic FGFR4 expression and with tumor invasiveness in surgically resected human pituitary tumors. Primary human pituitary tumor cells treated with PD173074 showed restoration of N-cadherin to the membrane with dephosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein. These data highlight the pathogenetic significance of N-cadherin misexpression and emphasize the importance of FGFR partnership in mediating its functions.

  5. Factors affecting computer mouse use for young children: implications for AAC.

    PubMed

    Costigan, F Aileen; Light, Janice C; Newell, Karl M

    2012-06-01

    More than 12% of preschoolers receiving special education services have complex communication needs, including increasing numbers of children who do not have significant motor impairments (e.g., children with autism spectrum disorders, Down syndrome, etc.). In order to meet their diverse communication needs (e.g., face-to-face, written, Internet, telecommunication), these children may use mainstream technologies accessed via the mouse, yet little is known about factors that affect the mouse performance of young children. This study used a mixed factorial design to investigate the effects of age, target size, and angle of approach on accuracy and time required for accurate target selection with a mouse for 20 3-year-old and 20 4-year-old children. The 4-year-olds were generally more accurate and faster than the 3-year-olds. Target size and angle mediated differences in performance within age groups. The 3-year-olds were more accurate and faster in selecting the medium and large targets relative to the small target, were faster in selecting the large relative to the medium target, and were faster in selecting targets along the vertical relative to the diagonal angle. The 4-year-olds were faster in selecting the medium and large targets relative to the small target. Implications for improving access to AAC include the preliminary suggestion of age-related threshold target sizes that support sufficient accuracy, the possibility of efficiency benefits when target size is increased up to an age-related threshold, and identification of the potential utility of the vertical angle as a context for training navigational input device use.

  6. Admixture in Mexico City: implications for admixture mapping of type 2 diabetes genetic risk factors.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Marignac, Veronica L; Valladares, Adan; Cameron, Emily; Chan, Andrea; Perera, Arjuna; Globus-Goldberg, Rachel; Wacher, Niels; Kumate, Jesús; McKeigue, Paul; O'Donnell, David; Shriver, Mark D; Cruz, Miguel; Parra, Esteban J

    2007-02-01

    Admixture mapping is a recently developed method for identifying genetic risk factors involved in complex traits or diseases showing prevalence differences between major continental groups. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is at least twice as prevalent in Native American populations as in populations of European ancestry, so admixture mapping is well suited to study the genetic basis of this complex disease. We have characterized the admixture proportions in a sample of 286 unrelated T2D patients and 275 controls from Mexico City and we discuss the implications of the results for admixture mapping studies. Admixture proportions were estimated using 69 autosomal ancestry-informative markers (AIMs). Maternal and paternal contributions were estimated from geographically informative mtDNA and Y-specific polymorphisms. The average proportions of Native American, European and, West African admixture were estimated as 65, 30, and 5%, respectively. The contributions of Native American ancestors to maternal and paternal lineages were estimated as 90 and 40%, respectively. In a logistic model with higher educational status as dependent variable, the odds ratio for higher educational status associated with an increase from 0 to 1 in European admixture proportions was 9.4 (95%, credible interval 3.8-22.6). This association of socioeconomic status with individual admixture proportion shows that genetic stratification in this population is paralleled, and possibly maintained, by socioeconomic stratification. The effective number of generations back to unadmixed ancestors was 6.7 (95% CI 5.7-8.0), from which we can estimate that genome-wide admixture mapping will require typing about 1,400 evenly distributed AIMs to localize genes underlying disease risk between populations of European and Native American ancestry. Sample sizes of about 2,000 cases will be required to detect any locus that contributes an ancestry risk ratio of at least 1.5.

  7. Relationship between category size and journals' impact factor: implications for emergency medicine journals and researchers.

    PubMed

    Miró, Òscar; Brown, Anthony F T; Graham, Colin A; Ducharme, James; Martin-Sanchez, Francisco J; Cone, David C

    2015-10-01

    We assessed the relationship between the size of the 39 Journal Citation Reports (JCR) medical categories and impact factor (IF) of journals in these categories, and the implications that it might have for emergency medicine (EM) journals. Using the 2010 JCR database, we calculated the mean IF, 5-year IF (5y-IF), Eigenfactor (EF), and Article Influence (AI) scores including all journals for each category. We also calculated a 'weighted IF' for all journals by dividing each journal IF by the mean IF of its category. We ranked EM journals according to IF and 'weighted IF' into all the journals included in the 39 categories. We assessed the relationship between category size and bibliometric scores by linear regression. Category size varied from 252 journals (Pharmacology and Pharmacy) to 14 (Primary Healthcare), EM category occupying the 36th position (23 journals). The mean IF of EM category ranked in 34th position, 5-yIF in 32nd, EF in 34th, and AI in 34th position. Category size had a direct and significant association with mean IF, 5y-IF, and AI but not with mean EF. When the EM journals were ranked among all the journals according to their IF, only two (9%) were placed into the first quartile and raised up to eight (35%) when 'weighted IF' was considered. There is a negative relationship between JCR size category and IF achieved by the journals. This places EM journals at a clear disadvantage because they represent one of the smallest clinical medical research disciplines.

  8. Factors promoting larch dominance in Eastern Siberia: fire versus growth performance and implications for carbon dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, E.-D.; Wirth, C.; Mollicone, D.; von Lüpke, N.; Ziegler, W.; Achard, F.; Mund, M.; Prokushkin, A.; Scherbina, S.

    2012-01-01

    The relative roles of fire and climate in determining canopy species composition and aboveground carbon stocks were investigated. Measurements were made along a transect extending from the dark taiga zone of Central Siberia, where Picea and Abies dominate the canopy, into the Larix zone of Eastern Siberia. We test the hypotheses that the change in canopy species composition is based (1) on climate-driven performance only, (2) on fire only, or (3) on fire-performance interactions. We show that the evergreen conifers Picea obovata and Abies sibirica are the natural late-successional species both in Central and Eastern Siberia, provided there has been no fire for an extended period of time. There are no changes in the climate-driven performance of the observed species. Fire appears to be the main factor explaining the dominance of Larix. Of lesser influence were longitude, hydrology and active-layer thickness. Stand-replacing fires decreased from 300 to 50 yr between the Yenisei Ridge and the upper Tunguska. Repeated non-stand-replacing surface fires eliminated the regeneration of Abies and Picea. With every 100 yr since the last fire, the percentage of Larix decreased by 20 %. Biomass of stems of single trees did not show signs of age-related decline. Relative diameter increment was 0.41 ± 0.20 % at breast height and stem volume increased linearly over time with a rate of about 0.36 t C ha-1 yr-1 independent of age class and species. Stand volumes reached about 130 t C ha-1 (equivalent to about 520 m3 ha-1). Individual trees of Larix were older than 600 yr. The maximum age and biomass seemed to be limited by fungal rot of heart wood. 60 % of old Larix and Picea and 30 % of Pinus sibirica trees were affected by stem rot. Implications for the future role of fire and of plant diseases are discussed.

  9. Factors Influencing Lava-Substrate Heat Transfer and Implications for Thermomechanical Erosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fagents, S. A.; Greeley, R.; Lenat, J. F. (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    We develop numerical simulations of basaltic lava flowing laminarly over a basalt substrate in order to examine the details of the lava dynamics and thermal boundary layers and to understand the implications for substrate heating. As the initial stage of a larger study of thermomechanical erosion in different planetary environments, we aim to understand why erosion occurs on Earth, why erosion features are not ubiquitous given the high temperatures involved, and whether it is a plausible mechanism for the formation of planetary channels such as lunar sinuous rilles and Venusian canali. Here we confine our attention to terrestrial lavas with well-known properties and eruption parameters. With relatively simple computational fluid dynamic simulations, most closely representing tube-fed hawaiian basalts (for which erosion has been documented), we demonstrate the importance of incorporating several key factors in models of lava flow/ substrate heat transfer, which have commonly been neglected in previous treatments. By addressing the interaction of the flow dynamics and heat transfer in the lava, our work suggests that the development of a temperature gradient in the base of the lava, even for undeveloped flow, has a significant influence on substrate temperature. The sensitivity of the lava-substrate interface temperature to the thermophysical properties of the lava and substrate suggests that a delicate balance is required for partial melting to occur. Thus, it might take weeks of continuous flow to initiate partial melting of the substrate at distances of several kilometers from the vent. These durations exceed the periods of stability typical of lava flowing in tubes; pauses, blockages, surges, and break-outs frequently disrupt the flow. However, natural irregularities in the flow dynamics or substrate topography might help to initiate and maintain substrate melting on shorter timescales by disturbing the intimately coupled dynamic and thermal boundary layers

  10. Biomechanical factors associated with shoe/pedal interfaces. Implications for injury.

    PubMed

    Gregor, R J; Wheeler, J B

    1994-02-01

    The principal demand on the body during cycling is on the lower extremities as they are responsible for producing a majority of the energy imparted to the bike. As a result the legs, due to high reactive forces between the foot and pedal, experience high loads on the joints. These loads may adversely affect joint tissues and contribute to overuse injuries, e.g. knee pain. The mechanical link between the leg and the bike is the shoe/pedal interface. This transmission site, by design, can either create smooth transfer of energy or abnormally high repetitive loads which are potentially injurious to the body. Incidence of lower extremity injury in cycling is high, and historically biomechanical analyses of this activity have focused their attention on either the rider or the bike, but not the link between the two. Recently, pedal designs have changed in response to complaints of sore knees with the development of pedals allowing varying degrees of float. This form of transmission is intended to enhance power transfer from rider to bike as well as minimise trauma to the legs by permitting the foot to rotate during the pedalling cycle in a toe-in/heel-out or heel-in/toe-out movement pattern. Recent evidence suggests this type of pedal design does reduce trauma and maintains power output. This article reviews common lower extremity overuse injuries and biomechanical factors during the pedalling cycle with the primary focus on the shoe/pedal interface. We will summarise information available on lower extremity kinematics and kinetics as well as recent data specifically related to shoe/pedal interface kinetics, evaluation of different pedal types-specifically comparison between clipless 'fixed' and clipless 'float' systems-and discuss their resultant effect on lower extremity dynamics and their implications for injury.

  11. Ionizing radiation induced cataracts: Recent biological and mechanistic developments and perspectives for future research.

    PubMed

    Ainsbury, Elizabeth A; Barnard, Stephen; Bright, Scott; Dalke, Claudia; Jarrin, Miguel; Kunze, Sarah; Tanner, Rick; Dynlacht, Joseph R; Quinlan, Roy A; Graw, Jochen; Kadhim, Munira; Hamada, Nobuyuki

    The lens of the eye has long been considered as a radiosensitive tissue, but recent research has suggested that the radiosensitivity is even greater than previously thought. The 2012 recommendation of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) to substantially reduce the annual occupational equivalent dose limit for the ocular lens has now been adopted in the European Union and is under consideration around the rest of the world. However, ICRP clearly states that the recommendations are chiefly based on epidemiological evidence because there are a very small number of studies that provide explicit biological, mechanistic evidence at doses <2Gy. This paper aims to present a review of recently published information on the biological and mechanistic aspects of cataracts induced by exposure to ionizing radiation (IR). The data were compiled by assessing the pertinent literature in several distinct areas which contribute to the understanding of IR induced cataracts, information regarding lens biology and general processes of cataractogenesis. Results from cellular and tissue level studies and animal models, and relevant human studies, were examined. The main focus was the biological effects of low linear energy transfer IR, but dosimetry issues and a number of other confounding factors were also considered. The results of this review clearly highlight a number of gaps in current knowledge. Overall, while there have been a number of recent advances in understanding, it remains unknown exactly how IR exposure contributes to opacification. A fuller understanding of how exposure to relatively low doses of IR promotes induction and/or progression of IR-induced cataracts will have important implications for prevention and treatment of this disease, as well as for the field of radiation protection.

  12. From the exposome to mechanistic understanding of chemical ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    BACKGROUND: Current definitions of the exposome expand beyond the initial idea to consider the totality of exposure and aim to relate to biological effects. While the exposome has been established for human health, its principles can be extended to include broader ecological issues. The assessment of exposure is tightly interlinked with hazard assessment. OBJECTIVES: We explore if mechanistic understanding of the causal links between exposure and adverse effects on human health and the environment can be improved by integrating the exposome approach with the adverse outcome pathway (AOP) concept - a framework to structure and organize the sequence of toxicological events from an initial molecular interaction of a chemical to an adverse outcome.METHODS: This review was informed by a Workshop organized by the Integrated Project EXPOSOME at the UFZ Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research in Leipzig, Germany. DISCUSSION: The exposome encompasses all chemicals, including exogenous chemicals and endogenous compounds that are produced in response to external factors. By complementing the exposome research with the AOP concept, we can achieve a better mechanistic understanding, weigh the importance of various components of the exposome, and determine primary risk drivers. The ability to interpret multiple exposures and mixture effects at the mechanistic level requires a more holistic approach facilitated by the exposome concept.CONCLUSION: Incorporating the AOP conc

  13. Assessment of risk factors for oro-facial pain and recent developments in classification: implications for management.

    PubMed

    Svensson, P; Kumar, A

    2016-12-01

    Oro-facial pain research has during the last decades provided important novel insights into the basic underlying mechanisms, the need for standardised diagnostic procedures and classification systems, and multiple treatment options for successful rehabilitation of the patient in pain. Notwithstanding the significant progress in our knowledge spanning from molecules to chair, there may also be limitations in our ability to integrate and interpret the tremendous amount of new data and information, in particular in terms of the clinical implications and overriding conceptual models for oro-facial pain. The aim of the present narrative review is to briefly summarise some of the current thoughts on oro-facial pain mechanisms and recent attempts to identify biomarkers and risk factors leading to the proposal of a new risk assessment diagram for oro-facial pain (RADOP) and a provocative new concept based on stochastic variation between multiple risk factors. Finally, the implications for novel management strategies will briefly be discussed.

  14. Computer-assisted mechanistic structure-activity studies: application to diverse classes of chemical carcinogens.

    PubMed Central

    Loew, G H; Poulsen, M; Kirkjian, E; Ferrell, J; Sudhindra, B S; Rebagliati, M

    1985-01-01

    In the first part of this paper we have indicated how the techniques and capabilities of theoretical chemistry, together with experimental results, can be used in a mechanistic approach to structure-activity studies of toxicity. In the second part, we have illustrated how this computer-assisted approach has been used to identify and calculate causally related molecular indicators of relative carcinogenic activity in five classes of chemical carcinogens: polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and their methyl derivatives, aromatic amines, chloroethanes, chloroalkenes and dialkyl nitrosamines. In each class of chemicals studied, candidate molecular indicators have been identified that could be useful in predictive screening of unknown compounds. In addition, further insights into some mechanistic aspects of chemical carcinogenesis have been obtained. Finally, experiments have been suggested to both verify the usefulness of the indicators and test their mechanistic implications. PMID:3905382

  15. Implications of the new Food and Drug Administration draft guidance on human factors engineering for diabetes device manufacturers.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Stephen B; Drucker, Daniel

    2012-03-01

    This article discusses the implications of the new Food and Drug Administration's draft guidance on human factors and usability engineering for the development of diabetes-related devices. Important considerations include the challenge of identifying users, when the user population is so dramatically broad, and the challenge of identifying use environments when the same can be said for use environments. Another important consideration is that diabetes-related devices, unlike many other medical devices, are used constantly as part of the user's lifestyle--adding complexity to the focus on human factors and ease of use emphasized by the draft guidance. © 2012 Diabetes Technology Society.

  16. Mechanistic models in computational social science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holme, Petter; Liljeros, Fredrik

    2015-09-01

    Quantitative social science is not only about regression analysis or, in general, data inference. Computer simulations of social mechanisms have an over 60 years long history. They have been used for many different purposes—to test scenarios, to test the consistency of descriptive theories (proof-of-concept models), to explore emergent phenomena, for forecasting, etc. In this essay, we sketch these historical developments, the role of mechanistic models in the social sciences and the influences from the natural and formal sciences. We argue that mechanistic computational models form a natural common ground for social and natural sciences, and look forward to possible future information flow across the social-natural divide.

  17. Obesity and atherosclerosis: mechanistic insights.

    PubMed

    Lovren, Fina; Teoh, Hwee; Verma, Subodh

    2015-02-01

    Obesity is a multifactorial chronic disease characterized by an accumulation of visceral and subcutaneous fat, which leads to a predisposition toward cardiometabolic diseases. A plethora of mechanisms, including abnormalities in lipid metabolism, insulin resistance, inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, adipokine imbalance, and inflammasome activation have been suggested to underlie the relationship between obesity and atherosclerosis. More recent data point toward an emerging role of impaired autophagy and altered gut microbiome homeostasis as potentially contributing factors. This review provides an overview of this area. Copyright © 2015 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Southern Ocean coccolithophore biogeography - controlling factors and implications for global biogeochemical cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissen, Cara; Vogt, Meike; Münnich, Matthias; Gruber, Nicolas

    2017-04-01

    Southern Ocean phytoplankton biogeography is important for the biogeochemical cycling of carbon, silicate, and the transport of macronutrients to lower latitudes. With the discovery of the "Great Calcite Belt" (GBC), revealing an unexpectedly high prevalence of calcifying phytoplankton in the subtropical frontal region between 40-55°S, the relative importance of Southern Ocean coccolithophores for phytoplankton biomass, net primary productivity and the carbon cycle need to be revisited. Using a regional high-resolution model with an embedded ecosystem module (ROMS-BEC) for the Southern Ocean (24-78°S) that has been extended to include an explicit representation of coccolithophores, we assess the environmental drivers of Southern Ocean coccolithophore biogeography over the course of the growing season. We thereby focus on biotic interactions and the relative importance of top-down (grazing) versus bottom-up factors (light, nutrient, temperature) controlling growth and abundance. In our simulation, coccolithophores are an important member of the Southern Ocean phytoplankton community, contributing 13% to annually integrated net primary productivity south of 30°S. We estimate the integrated annual calcification rate to account for 40% of the satellite derived global estimate. Modeled coccolithophore biomass is highest in February and March in a latitudinal band between 40-55°S, when diatoms become heavily silicate limited. This region is characterized by a number of divergent fronts with a low Si:Fe ratio of waters supplied to the mixed layer, supporting an increased growth of coccolithophores at the expense of diatoms. We find top down controls to be the major control on the relative abundance of diatoms and coccolithophores in the Southern Ocean. We perform iron and silicate fertilization experiments to assess the effects of changed nutrient availability on coccolithophore abundance in the GCB. We find that changes in nutrient stoichiometry significantly alter

  19. Integrating insulin-like growth factor 1 and sex hormones into neuroprotection: Implications for diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Huffman, Jacob; Hoffmann, Christina; Taylor, George T

    2017-01-01

    Brain integrity and cognitive aptitude are often impaired in patients with diabetes mellitus, presumably a result of the metabolic complications inherent to the disease. However, an increasing body of evidence has demonstrated the central role of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) and its relation to sex hormones in many neuroprotective processes. Both male and female patients with diabetes display abnormal IGF1 and sex-hormone levels but the comparison of these fluctuations is seldom a topic of interest. It is interesting to note that both IGF1 and sex hormones have the ability to regulate phosphoinositide 3-kinase-Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinases-extracellular signal-related kinase signaling cascades in animal and cell culture models of neuroprotection. Additionally, there is considerable evidence demonstrating the neuroprotective coupling of IGF1 and estrogen. Androgens have also been implicated in many neuroprotective processes that operate on similar signaling cascades as the estrogen-IGF1 relation. Yet, androgens have not been directly linked to the brain IGF1 system and neuroprotection. Despite the sex-specific variations in brain integrity and hormone levels observed in diabetic patients, the IGF1-sex hormone relation in neuroprotection has yet to be fully substantiated in experimental models of diabetes. Taken together, there is a clear need for the comprehensive analysis of sex differences on brain integrity of diabetic patients and the relationship between IGF1 and sex hormones that may influence brain-health outcomes. As such, this review will briefly outline the basic relation of diabetes and IGF1 and its role in neuroprotection. We will also consider the findings on sex hormones and diabetes as a basis for separately analyzing males and females to identify possible hormone-induced brain abnormalities. Finally, we will introduce the neuroprotective interplay of IGF1 and estrogen and how androgen-derived neuroprotection operates through

  20. [Food addiction: Definition, measurement and limits of the concept, associated factors, therapeutic and clinical implications].

    PubMed

    Cathelain, Sarah; Brunault, Paul; Ballon, Nicolas; Réveillère, Christian; Courtois, Robert

    2016-12-01

    Addictions, which are characterized by the inability to control a behavior despite existence of physical or psychological consequences, have biological, psychological and social determinants. Although the possibility of developing an addiction to some psychoactive substances (e.g. alcohol, tobacco, cannabis) and to gambling (i.e., gambling disorder) is now well demonstrated, the possibility to develop a non-drug addiction (i.e., behavioral addiction) to certain behaviors which provide pleasure (e.g. eating, having sex, buying things) is still in debate. The concept of food addiction, which refers to people who exhibit substance dependence criteria in relation to some high-fat and high-sugar foods, was recently proposed by applying substance dependence DSM criteria to eating behavior. To assess food addiction, the Yale Food Addiction Scale is now the only self-administered questionnaire (diagnosis and estimate of the number of symptoms of food addiction). Prevalence for food addiction is higher in overweight and obese patients, and in patients with certain psychopathological characteristics (i.e., depression, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, high impulsivity), in patients who are single and in patients with neurobiological alterations in the reward system. However, it is still unclear whether food addiction is necessary associated with subsequent increase in body weight and/or obesity. An increasing number of studies demonstrated that drug addiction and food addiction shares some similar clinical, neurobiological and psychopathological and sociocultural risk factors. To test the pertinence to include food addiction as an addiction, it would be interesting to conduct future studies in patients who may experience harms related to their food addiction, including not only patients with obesity, but also patients with metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, atherosclerosis, stroke, or coronary heart disease. Food addiction is a clinical

  1. Advanced Reach Tool (ART): development of the mechanistic model.

    PubMed

    Fransman, Wouter; Van Tongeren, Martie; Cherrie, John W; Tischer, Martin; Schneider, Thomas; Schinkel, Jody; Kromhout, Hans; Warren, Nick; Goede, Henk; Tielemans, Erik

    2011-11-01

    This paper describes the development of the mechanistic model within a collaborative project, referred to as the Advanced REACH Tool (ART) project, to develop a tool to model inhalation exposure for workers sharing similar operational conditions across different industries and locations in Europe. The ART mechanistic model is based on a conceptual framework that adopts a source receptor approach, which describes the transport of a contaminant from the source to the receptor and defines seven independent principal modifying factors: substance emission potential, activity emission potential, localized controls, segregation, personal enclosure, surface contamination, and dispersion. ART currently differentiates between three different exposure types: vapours, mists, and dust (fumes, fibres, and gases are presently excluded). Various sources were used to assign numerical values to the multipliers to each modifying factor. The evidence used to underpin this assessment procedure was based on chemical and physical laws. In addition, empirical data obtained from literature were used. Where this was not possible, expert elicitation was applied for the assessment procedure. Multipliers for all modifying factors were peer reviewed by leading experts from industry, research institutes, and public authorities across the globe. In addition, several workshops with experts were organized to discuss the proposed exposure multipliers. The mechanistic model is a central part of the ART tool and with advancing knowledge on exposure, determinants will require updates and refinements on a continuous basis, such as the effect of worker behaviour on personal exposure, 'best practice' values that describe the maximum achievable effectiveness of control measures, the intrinsic emission potential of various solid objects (e.g. metal, glass, plastics, etc.), and extending the applicability domain to certain types of exposures (e.g. gas, fume, and fibre exposure).

  2. Reductive photocarboxylation of phenanthrene: A mechanistic investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolaitchik, A.V.; Rodgers, M.A.J.; Neckers, D.C.

    1996-02-09

    Mechanistic aspects of photochemicl reactions between phenathrene and carbon dioxide while in the presence of N,N-dimethylaniline was studied. Five products were produced as characterized by NMR and GC-MS. The authors related changes in product yields to changes in reaction conditions. 31 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Testing mechanistic models of growth in insects.

    PubMed

    Maino, James L; Kearney, Michael R

    2015-11-22

    Insects are typified by their small size, large numbers, impressive reproductive output and rapid growth. However, insect growth is not simply rapid; rather, insects follow a qualitatively distinct trajectory to many other animals. Here we present a mechanistic growth model for insects and show that increasing specific assimilation during the growth phase can explain the near-exponential growth trajectory of insects. The presented model is tested against growth data on 50 insects, and compared against other mechanistic growth models. Unlike the other mechanistic models, our growth model predicts energy reserves per biomass to increase with age, which implies a higher production efficiency and energy density of biomass in later instars. These predictions are tested against data compiled from the literature whereby it is confirmed that insects increase their production efficiency (by 24 percentage points) and energy density (by 4 J mg(-1)) between hatching and the attainment of full size. The model suggests that insects achieve greater production efficiencies and enhanced growth rates by increasing specific assimilation and increasing energy reserves per biomass, which are less costly to maintain than structural biomass. Our findings illustrate how the explanatory and predictive power of mechanistic growth models comes from their grounding in underlying biological processes.

  4. Applying mechanistic models in bioprocess development.

    PubMed

    Lencastre Fernandes, Rita; Bodla, Vijaya Krishna; Carlquist, Magnus; Heins, Anna-Lena; Eliasson Lantz, Anna; Sin, Gürkan; Gernaey, Krist V

    2013-01-01

    The available knowledge on the mechanisms of a bioprocess system is central to process analytical technology. In this respect, mechanistic modeling has gained renewed attention, since a mechanistic model can provide an excellent summary of available process knowledge. Such a model therefore incorporates process-relevant input (critical process variables)-output (product concentration and product quality attributes) relations. The model therefore has great value in planning experiments, or in determining which critical process variables need to be monitored and controlled tightly. Mechanistic models should be combined with proper model analysis tools, such as uncertainty and sensitivity analysis. When assuming distributed inputs, the resulting uncertainty in the model outputs can be decomposed using sensitivity analysis to determine which input parameters are responsible for the major part of the output uncertainty. Such information can be used as guidance for experimental work; i.e., only parameters with a significant influence on model outputs need to be determined experimentally. The use of mechanistic models and model analysis tools is demonstrated in this chapter. As a practical case study, experimental data from Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentations are used. The data are described with the well-known model of Sonnleitner and Käppeli (Biotechnol Bioeng 28:927-937, 1986) and the model is analyzed further. The methods used are generic, and can be transferred easily to other, more complex case studies as well.

  5. Exploring Organic Mechanistic Puzzles with Molecular Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horowitz, Gail; Schwartz, Gary

    2004-01-01

    The molecular modeling was used to reinforce more general skills such as deducing and drawing reaction mechanisms, analyzing reaction kinetics and thermodynamics and drawing reaction coordinate energy diagrams. This modeling was done through the design of mechanistic puzzles, involving reactions not familiar to the students.

  6. Exploring Organic Mechanistic Puzzles with Molecular Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horowitz, Gail; Schwartz, Gary

    2004-01-01

    The molecular modeling was used to reinforce more general skills such as deducing and drawing reaction mechanisms, analyzing reaction kinetics and thermodynamics and drawing reaction coordinate energy diagrams. This modeling was done through the design of mechanistic puzzles, involving reactions not familiar to the students.

  7. Testing mechanistic models of growth in insects

    PubMed Central

    Maino, James L.; Kearney, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Insects are typified by their small size, large numbers, impressive reproductive output and rapid growth. However, insect growth is not simply rapid; rather, insects follow a qualitatively distinct trajectory to many other animals. Here we present a mechanistic growth model for insects and show that increasing specific assimilation during the growth phase can explain the near-exponential growth trajectory of insects. The presented model is tested against growth data on 50 insects, and compared against other mechanistic growth models. Unlike the other mechanistic models, our growth model predicts energy reserves per biomass to increase with age, which implies a higher production efficiency and energy density of biomass in later instars. These predictions are tested against data compiled from the literature whereby it is confirmed that insects increase their production efficiency (by 24 percentage points) and energy density (by 4 J mg−1) between hatching and the attainment of full size. The model suggests that insects achieve greater production efficiencies and enhanced growth rates by increasing specific assimilation and increasing energy reserves per biomass, which are less costly to maintain than structural biomass. Our findings illustrate how the explanatory and predictive power of mechanistic growth models comes from their grounding in underlying biological processes. PMID:26609084

  8. Mechanistic determinants of MBNL activity

    PubMed Central

    Sznajder, Łukasz J.; Michalak, Michał; Taylor, Katarzyna; Cywoniuk, Piotr; Kabza, Michał; Wojtkowiak-Szlachcic, Agnieszka; Matłoka, Magdalena; Konieczny, Patryk; Sobczak, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Muscleblind-like (MBNL) proteins are critical RNA processing factors in development. MBNL activity is disrupted in the neuromuscular disease myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), due to the instability of a non-coding microsatellite in the DMPK gene and the expression of CUG expansion (CUGexp) RNAs. Pathogenic interactions between MBNL and CUGexp RNA lead to the formation of nuclear complexes termed foci and prevent MBNL function in pre-mRNA processing. The existence of multiple MBNL genes, as well as multiple protein isoforms, raises the question of whether different MBNL proteins possess unique or redundant functions. To address this question, we coexpressed three MBNL paralogs in cells at equivalent levels and characterized both specific and redundant roles of these proteins in alternative splicing and RNA foci dynamics. When coexpressed in the same cells, MBNL1, MBNL2 and MBNL3 bind the same RNA motifs with different affinities. While MBNL1 demonstrated the highest splicing activity, MBNL3 showed the lowest. When forming RNA foci, MBNL1 is the most mobile paralog, while MBNL3 is rather static and the most densely packed on CUGexp RNA. Therefore, our results demonstrate that MBNL paralogs and gene-specific isoforms possess inherent functional differences, an outcome that could be enlisted to improve therapeutic strategies for DM1. PMID:27733504

  9. The Anthropological Implications of Sex Role Differences: Class and Ethnic Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Jerome W.

    The implications of physical and biological sex differences on sex role behavior cannot be understood without analyzing the complementary role of the sociocultural meaning of sex roles. The normative aspect of gender role behavior is fluid and can be affected by culture, class, and ethnicity. All societies recognize differences between the sexes.…

  10. The Anthropological Implications of Sex Role Differences: Class and Ethnic Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Jerome W.

    The implications of physical and biological sex differences on sex role behavior cannot be understood without analyzing the complementary role of the sociocultural meaning of sex roles. The normative aspect of gender role behavior is fluid and can be affected by culture, class, and ethnicity. All societies recognize differences between the sexes.…

  11. Combustion aerosols: factors governing their size and composition and implications to human health.

    PubMed

    Lighty, J S; Veranth, J M; Sarofim, A F

    2000-09-01

    Particulate matter (PM) emissions from stationary combustion sources burning coal, fuel oil, biomass, and waste, and PM from internal combustion (IC) engines burning gasoline and diesel, are a significant source of primary particles smaller than 2.5 microns (PM2.5) in urban areas. Combustion-generated particles are generally smaller than geologically produced dust and have unique chemical composition and morphology. The fundamental processes affecting formation of combustion PM and the emission characteristics of important applications are reviewed. Particles containing transition metals, ultrafine particles, and soot are emphasized because these types of particles have been studied extensively, and their emissions are controlled by the fuel composition and the oxidant-temperature-mixing history from the flame to the stack. There is a need for better integration of the combustion, air pollution control, atmospheric chemistry, and inhalation health research communities. Epidemiology has demonstrated that susceptible individuals are being harmed by ambient PM. Particle surface area, number of ultrafine particles, bioavailable transition metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and other particle-bound organic compounds are suspected to be more important than particle mass in determining the effects of air pollution. Time- and size-resolved PM measurements are needed for testing mechanistic toxicological hypotheses, for characterizing the relationship between combustion operating conditions and transient emissions, and for source apportionment studies to develop air quality plans. Citations are provided to more specialized reviews, and the concluding comments make suggestions for further research.

  12. Mechanistic species distribution modelling as a link between physiology and conservation

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Tyler G.; Diamond, Sarah E.; Kelly, Morgan W.

    2015-01-01

    Climate change conservation planning relies heavily on correlative species distribution models that estimate future areas of occupancy based on environmental conditions encountered in present-day ranges. The approach benefits from rapid assessment of vulnerability over a large number of organisms, but can have poor predictive power when transposed to novel environments and reveals little in the way of causal mechanisms that define changes in species distribution or abundance. Having conservation planning rely largely on this single approach also increases the risk of policy failure. Mechanistic models that are parameterized with physiological information are expected to be more robust when extrapolating distributions to future environmental conditions and can identify physiological processes that set range boundaries. Implementation of mechanistic species distribution models requires knowledge of how environmental change influences physiological performance, and because this information is currently restricted to a comparatively small number of well-studied organisms, use of mechanistic modelling in the context of climate change conservation is limited. In this review, we propose that the need to develop mechanistic models that incorporate physiological data presents an opportunity for physiologists to contribute more directly to climate change conservation and advance the field of conservation physiology. We begin by describing the prevalence of species distribution modelling in climate change conservation, highlighting the benefits and drawbacks of both mechanistic and correlative approaches. Next, we emphasize the need to expand mechanistic models and discuss potential metrics of physiological performance suitable for integration into mechanistic models. We conclude by summarizing other factors, such as the need to consider demography, limiting broader application of mechanistic models in climate change conservation. Ideally, modellers, physiologists and

  13. Mechanistic species distribution modelling as a link between physiology and conservation.

    PubMed

    Evans, Tyler G; Diamond, Sarah E; Kelly, Morgan W

    2015-01-01

    Climate change conservation planning relies heavily on correlative species distribution models that estimate future areas of occupancy based on environmental conditions encountered in present-day ranges. The approach benefits from rapid assessment of vulnerability over a large number of organisms, but can have poor predictive power when transposed to novel environments and reveals little in the way of causal mechanisms that define changes in species distribution or abundance. Having conservation planning rely largely on this single approach also increases the risk of policy failure. Mechanistic models that are parameterized with physiological information are expected to be more robust when extrapolating distributions to future environmental conditions and can identify physiological processes that set range boundaries. Implementation of mechanistic species distribution models requires knowledge of how environmental change influences physiological performance, and because this information is currently restricted to a comparatively small number of well-studied organisms, use of mechanistic modelling in the context of climate change conservation is limited. In this review, we propose that the need to develop mechanistic models that incorporate physiological data presents an opportunity for physiologists to contribute more directly to climate change conservation and advance the field of conservation physiology. We begin by describing the prevalence of species distribution modelling in climate change conservation, highlighting the benefits and drawbacks of both mechanistic and correlative approaches. Next, we emphasize the need to expand mechanistic models and discuss potential metrics of physiological performance suitable for integration into mechanistic models. We conclude by summarizing other factors, such as the need to consider demography, limiting broader application of mechanistic models in climate change conservation. Ideally, modellers, physiologists and

  14. The CUGBP2 Splicing Factor Regulates an Ensemble of Branchpoints from Perimeter Binding Sites with Implications for Autoregulation

    PubMed Central

    Dembowski, Jill A.; Grabowski, Paula J.

    2009-01-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing adjusts the transcriptional output of the genome by generating related mRNAs from a single primary transcript, thereby expanding protein diversity. A fundamental unanswered question is how splicing factors achieve specificity in the selection of target substrates despite the recognition of information-poor sequence motifs. The CUGBP2 splicing regulator plays a key role in the brain region-specific silencing of the NI exon of the NMDA R1 receptor. However, the sequence motifs utilized by this factor for specific target exon selection and its role in splicing silencing are not understood. Here, we use chemical modification footprinting to map the contact sites of CUGBP2 to GU-rich motifs closely positioned at the boundaries of the branch sites of the NI exon, and we demonstrate a mechanistic role for this specific arrangement of motifs for the regulation of branchpoint formation. General support for a branch site-perimeter–binding model is indicated by the identification of a group of novel target exons with a similar configuration of motifs that are silenced by CUGBP2. These results reveal an autoregulatory role for CUGBP2 as indicated by its direct interaction with functionally significant RNA motifs surrounding the branch sites upstream of exon 6 of the CUGBP2 transcript itself. The perimeter-binding model explains how CUGBP2 can effectively embrace the branch site region to achieve the specificity needed for the selection of exon targets and the fine-tuning of alternative splicing patterns. PMID:19680430

  15. Atrial Fibrillation and Hypertension: Mechanistic, Epidemiologic, and Treatment Parallels.

    PubMed

    Ogunsua, Adedotun A; Shaikh, Amir Y; Ahmed, Mohamed; McManus, David D

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an increasingly prevalent condition and the most common sustained arrhythmia encountered in ambulatory and hospital practice. Several clinical risk factors for AF include age, sex, valvular heart disease, obesity, sleep apnea, heart failure, and hypertension (HTN). Of all the risk factors, HTN is the most commonly encountered condition in patients with incident AF. Hypertension is associated with a 1.8-fold increase in the risk of developing new-onset AF and a 1.5-fold increase in the risk of progression to permanent AF. Hypertension predisposes to cardiac structural changes that influence the development of AF such as atrial remodeling. The renin angiotensin aldosterone system has been demonstrated to be a common mechanistic link in the pathogenesis of HTN and AF. Importantly, HTN is one of the few modifiable AF risk factors, and guideline-directed management of HTN may reduce the incidence of AF.

  16. Growth factors and myometrium: biological effects in uterine fibroid and possible clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Ciarmela, Pasquapina; Islam, Md. Soriful; Reis, Fernando M.; Gray, Peter C.; Bloise, Enrrico; Petraglia, Felice; Vale, Wylie; Castellucci, Mario

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Growth factors are proteins secreted by a number of cell types that are capable of modulating cellular growth, proliferation and cellular differentiation. It is well accepted that uterine cellular events such as proliferation and differentiation are regulated by sex steroids and their actions in target tissues are mediated by local production of growth factors acting through paracrine and/or autocrine mechanisms. Myometrial mass is ultimately modified in pregnancy as well as in tumour conditions such as leiomyoma and leiomyosarcoma. Leiomyomas, also known as fibroids, are benign tumours of the uterus, considered to be one of the most frequent causes of infertility in reproductive years in women. METHODS For this review, we searched the database MEDLINE and Google Scholar for articles with content related to growth factors acting on myometrium; the findings are hereby reviewed and discussed. RESULTS Different growth factors such as epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor-α (TGF-α), heparin-binding EGF (HB-EGF), acidic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), insulin-like growth factor (IGF), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and TGF-β perform actions in myometrium and in leiomyomas. In addition to these growth factors, activin and myostatin have been recently identified in myometrium and leiomyoma. CONCLUSIONS Growth factors play an important role in the mechanisms involved in myometrial patho-physiology. PMID:21788281

  17. BioAge: Toward A Multi-Determined, Mechanistic Account of Cognitive Aging

    PubMed Central

    DeCarlo, Correne A.; Tuokko, Holly A.; Williams, Dorothy; Dixon, Roger A.; MacDonald, Stuart W.S.

    2014-01-01

    The search for reliable early indicators of age-related cognitive decline represents a critical avenue for progress in aging research. Chronological age is a commonly used developmental index; however, it offers little insight into the mechanisms underlying cognitive decline. In contrast, biological age (BioAge), reflecting the vitality of essential biological systems, represents a promising operationalization of developmental time. Current BioAge models have successfully predicted age-related cognitive deficits. Research on aging-related cognitive function indicates that the interaction of multiple risk and protective factors across the human lifespan confers individual risk for late-life cognitive decline, implicating a multi-causal explanation. In this review, we explore current BioAge models, describe three broad yet pathologically relevant biological processes linked to cognitive decline, and propose a novel operationalization of BioAge accounting for both moderating and causal mechanisms of cognitive decline and dementia. We argue that a multivariate and mechanistic BioAge approach will lead to a greater understanding of disease pathology as well as more accurate prediction and early identification of late-life cognitive decline. PMID:25278166

  18. Development of animal models underlining mechanistic connections between prostate inflammation and cancer.

    PubMed

    Mimeault, Murielle; Batra, Surinder K

    2013-02-10

    The characterization of animal models has indicated that the genetic, dietary and environmental factors and hormonal imbalance may influence the risk to develop prostate inflammatory lesions and prostate cancer (PC) confirming human epidemiologic data. It is now established that the prostate inflammatory response typically results in major changes in the local microenvironment of epithelial cells of the prostate gland, including an intense stromal remodeling, activation of fibroblasts, infiltration of immune cells such as mast cells, macrophages and B and T lymphocytes and collagen deposition. The immune cells recruited at prostate inflammatory lesions and myofibroblasts may contribute to the release of numerous pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines that in turn can promote the oxidative stress, genomic instability and proliferation of epithelial cells. The accumulation of additional genetic and/or epigenetic alterations in prostatic stem/progenitor cells may subsequently culminate to their malignant transformation and PC initiation and progression and more particularly with advancing age. The potential mechanistic relationships between the molecular events associated with the persistent inflammatory response and prostate carcinogenesis have important implications for optimizing the current therapies against different prostatic disorders and PCs.

  19. Brief Symptom Inventory Factor Structure in Antisocial Adolescents: Implications for Juvenile Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitt, Ahmed; Howard, Matthew O.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI) is widely used in juvenile justice settings; however, little is known regarding its factor structure in antisocial youth. The authors evaluated the BSI factor structure in a state residential treatment population. Methods: 707 adolescents completed the BSI. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses…

  20. Transforming growth factor-(beta)s and mammary gland involution; functional roles and implications for cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Flanders, Kathleen C; Wakefield, Lalage M

    2009-06-01

    During rodent mammary gland involution there is a dramatic increase in the expression of the transforming growth factor-beta isoform, TGF-beta3. The TGF-betas are multifunctional cytokines which play important roles in wound healing and in carcinogenesis. The responses that are activated in the remodeling of the gland during involution have many similarities with the wound healing process and have been postulated to generate a mammary stroma that provides a microenvironment favoring tumor progression. In this review we will discuss the putative role of TGF-beta during involution, as well as its effects on the mammary microenvironment and possible implications for pregnancy-associated tumorigenesis.

  1. Mechanistic fracture criteria for the failure of human cortical bone

    SciTech Connect

    Nalla, Ravi K.; Kinney, John H.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2002-12-13

    A mechanistic understanding of fracture in human bone is critical to predicting fracture risk associated with age and disease. Despite extensive work, a mechanistic framework for describing how the underlying microstructure affects the failure mode in bone is lacking.

  2. Vascular endothelial growth factor is upregulated by l-dopa in the parkinsonian brain: implications for the development of dyskinesia

    PubMed Central

    Francardo, Veronica; Lindgren, Hanna S.; Sillivan, Stephanie E.; O’Sullivan, Sean S.; Luksik, Andrew S.; Vassoler, Fair M.; Lees, Andrew J.; Konradi, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Angiogenesis and increased permeability of the blood–brain barrier have been reported to occur in animal models of Parkinson’s disease and l-dopa-induced dyskinesia, but the significance of these phenomena has remained unclear. Using a validated rat model of l-dopa-induced dyskinesia, this study demonstrates that chronic treatment with l-dopa dose dependently induces the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in the basal ganglia nuclei. Vascular endothelial growth factor was abundantly expressed in astrocytes and astrocytic processes in the proximity of blood vessels. When co-administered with l-dopa, a small molecule inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor signalling significantly attenuated the development of dyskinesia and completely blocked the angiogenic response and associated increase in blood–brain barrier permeability induced by the treatment. The occurrence of angiogenesis and vascular endothelial growth factor upregulation was verified in post-mortem basal ganglia tissue from patients with Parkinson’s disease with a history of dyskinesia, who exhibited increased microvascular density, microvascular nestin expression and an upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor messenger ribonucleic acid. These congruent findings in the rat model and human patients indicate that vascular endothelial growth factor is implicated in the pathophysiology of l-dopa-induced dyskinesia and emphasize an involvement of the microvascular compartment in the adverse effects of l-dopa pharmacotherapy in Parkinson’s disease. PMID:21771855

  3. Toward mechanistic classification of enzyme functions.

    PubMed

    Almonacid, Daniel E; Babbitt, Patricia C

    2011-06-01

    Classification of enzyme function should be quantitative, computationally accessible, and informed by sequences and structures to enable use of genomic information for functional inference and other applications. Large-scale studies have established that divergently evolved enzymes share conserved elements of structure and common mechanistic steps and that convergently evolved enzymes often converge to similar mechanisms too, suggesting that reaction mechanisms could be used to develop finer-grained functional descriptions than provided by the Enzyme Commission (EC) system currently in use. Here we describe how evolution informs these structure-function mappings and review the databases that store mechanisms of enzyme reactions along with recent developments to measure ligand and mechanistic similarities. Together, these provide a foundation for new classifications of enzyme function.

  4. Hierarchical Exploratory Factor Analyses of the Woodcock-Johnson IV Full Test Battery: Implications for CHC Application in School Psychology.

    PubMed

    Dombrowski, Stefan C; McGill, Ryan J; Canivez, Gary L

    2017-07-27

    The Woodcock-Johnson (fourth edition; WJ IV; Schrank, McGrew, & Mather, 2014a) was recently redeveloped and retains its linkage to Cattell-Horn-Carroll theory (CHC). Independent reviews (e.g., Canivez, 2017) and investigations (Dombrowski, McGill, & Canivez, 2017) of the structure of the WJ IV full test battery and WJ IV Cognitive have suggested the need for additional factor analytic exploration. Accordingly, the present study used principal axis factoring (PAF) followed by the Schmid and Leiman (SL; Schmid & Leiman, 1957) procedure with the 2 school-aged correlation matrices from the normative sample to determine the degree to which the WJ IV total battery structure could be replicated. Although 7 factors emerged across the 9 to 19 age range, the pattern of subtests loadings did not fully cohere with the structure presented in the Technical Manual, most notably for the academic fluency subtests. Also, the Fluid Reasoning (Gf) and Quantitative Reasoning (Gq) subtests coalesced to form a combined factor rather than 2 separate factors and the Long Term Retrieval (Gltr) subtests aligned with a variety of different factors. The results of this study indicated that the general intelligence factor variance far exceeded the variance attributed to the lower-order CHC factors. The combination of subtest migration and nominal total/common variance of the CHC lower-order factors suggests caution when interpreting the myriad CHC-related indices when making high stakes decisions. Implications for clinical practice are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. New mechanistic interpretations for nitrone reactivity.

    PubMed

    Merino, Pedro; Tejero, Tomás; Delso, Ignacio; Matute, Rosa

    2017-03-22

    The reactivity of nitrones in cycloadditions and related reactions is revisited by introducing a topological perspective. In particular, the study of electron localization function (ELF) along a reaction pathway allows evaluating bond reorganization showing that in several cases the bonds are formed in a sequential way, the second one being formed once the first one is already formed. Both classical 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions and Mannich-type reactions revealed unexpected features often underestimated in classical mechanistic studies.

  6. Trophic factors as modulators of motor neuron physiology and survival: implications for ALS therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tovar-y-Romo, Luis B.; Ramírez-Jarquín, Uri Nimrod; Lazo-Gómez, Rafael; Tapia, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Motor neuron physiology and development depend on a continuous and tightly regulated trophic support from a variety of cellular sources. Trophic factors guide the generation and positioning of motor neurons during every stage of the developmental process. As well, they are involved in axon guidance and synapse formation. Even in the adult spinal cord an uninterrupted trophic input is required to maintain neuronal functioning and protection from noxious stimuli. Among the trophic factors that have been demonstrated to participate in motor neuron physiology are vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1). Upon binding to membrane receptors expressed in motor neurons or neighboring glia, these trophic factors activate intracellular signaling pathways that promote cell survival and have protective action on motor neurons, in both in vivo and in vitro models of neuronal degeneration. For these reasons these factors have been considered a promising therapeutic method for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and other neurodegenerative diseases, although their efficacy in human clinical trials have not yet shown the expected protection. In this minireview we summarize experimental data on the role of these trophic factors in motor neuron function and survival, as well as their mechanisms of action. We also briefly discuss the potential therapeutic use of the trophic factors and why these therapies may have not been yet successful in the clinical use. PMID:24616665

  7. Mechanistic materials modeling for nuclear fuel performance

    DOE PAGES

    Tonks, Michael R.; Andersson, David; Phillpot, Simon R.; ...

    2017-03-15

    Fuel performance codes are critical tools for the design, certification, and safety analysis of nuclear reactors. However, their ability to predict fuel behavior under abnormal conditions is severely limited by their considerable reliance on empirical materials models correlated to burn-up (a measure of the number of fission events that have occurred, but not a unique measure of the history of the material). In this paper, we propose a different paradigm for fuel performance codes to employ mechanistic materials models that are based on the current state of the evolving microstructure rather than burn-up. In this approach, a series of statemore » variables are stored at material points and define the current state of the microstructure. The evolution of these state variables is defined by mechanistic models that are functions of fuel conditions and other state variables. The material properties of the fuel and cladding are determined from microstructure/property relationships that are functions of the state variables and the current fuel conditions. Multiscale modeling and simulation is being used in conjunction with experimental data to inform the development of these models. Finally, this mechanistic, microstructure-based approach has the potential to provide a more predictive fuel performance capability, but will require a team of researchers to complete the required development and to validate the approach.« less

  8. Contextual approach to technology assessment: Implications for one-factor fix solutions to complex social problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayo, L. H.

    1975-01-01

    The contextual approach is discussed which undertakes to demonstrate that technology assessment assists in the identification of the full range of implications of taking a particular action and facilitates the consideration of alternative means by which the total affected social problem context might be changed by available project options. It is found that the social impacts of an application on participants, institutions, processes, and social interests, and the accompanying interactions may not only induce modifications in the problem contest delineated for examination with respect to the design, operations, regulation, and use of the posited application, but also affect related social problem contexts.

  9. Contextual approach to technology assessment: Implications for one-factor fix solutions to complex social problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayo, L. H.

    1975-01-01

    The contextual approach is discussed which undertakes to demonstrate that technology assessment assists in the identification of the full range of implications of taking a particular action and facilitates the consideration of alternative means by which the total affected social problem context might be changed by available project options. It is found that the social impacts of an application on participants, institutions, processes, and social interests, and the accompanying interactions may not only induce modifications in the problem contest delineated for examination with respect to the design, operations, regulation, and use of the posited application, but also affect related social problem contexts.

  10. Differential Rac1 signalling by guanine nucleotide exchange factors implicates FLII in regulating Rac1-driven cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Marei, Hadir; Carpy, Alejandro; Woroniuk, Anna; Vennin, Claire; White, Gavin; Timpson, Paul; Macek, Boris; Malliri, Angeliki

    2016-01-01

    The small GTPase Rac1 has been implicated in the formation and dissemination of tumours. Upon activation by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), Rac1 associates with a variety of proteins in the cell thereby regulating various functions, including cell migration. However, activation of Rac1 can lead to opposing migratory phenotypes raising the possibility of exacerbating tumour progression when targeting Rac1 in a clinical setting. This calls for the identification of factors that influence Rac1-driven cell motility. Here we show that Tiam1 and P-Rex1, two Rac GEFs, promote Rac1 anti- and pro-migratory signalling cascades, respectively, through regulating the Rac1 interactome. In particular, we demonstrate that P-Rex1 stimulates migration through enhancing the interaction between Rac1 and the actin-remodelling protein flightless-1 homologue, to modulate cell contraction in a RhoA-ROCK-independent manner. PMID:26887924

  11. The T-box transcription factor Tbx2: its role in development and possible implication in cancer.

    PubMed

    Abrahams, Amaal; Parker, M Iqbal; Prince, Sharon

    2010-02-01

    Tbx2 is a member of the T-box family of transcription factors that are crucial in embryonic development. Recent studies suggest that T-box factors may also play a role in controlling cell cycle progression and in the genesis of cancer. Tbx2 has been implicated in several developmental processes such as coordinating cell fate, patterning and morphogenesis of a wide range of tissues and organs including limbs, kidneys, lungs, mammary glands, heart, and craniofacial structures. Importantly, Tbx2 is overexpressed in several cancers including melanoma, small cell lung carcinoma, breast, pancreatic, liver, and bladder cancers and can suppress senescence, a cellular process, which serves as a barrier to cancer development. This review presents a state of the art overview of the role and regulation of Tbx2 in early embryonic development and in cancer.

  12. Identifying personality subtypes based on the five-factor model dimensions in male prisoners: implications for psychopathy and criminal offending.

    PubMed

    Claes, Laurence; Tavernier, Geert; Roose, Annelore; Bijttebier, Patricia; Smith, Sarah Francis; Lilienfeld, Scott O

    2014-01-01

    The current study was designed to identify personality subtypes on the basis of the five-factor model dimensions in male prisoners. Participants included 110 Flemish male prisoners assessed by means of the Neuroticism, Extraversion, Openness Five Factor Inventory and different symptom, personality, and coping measures. We found two clusters: an emotionally stable/resilient cluster and an aggressive/undercontrolled cluster. Prisoners within the aggressive/undercontrolled cluster scored significantly higher on almost all Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 basic scales, (in)direct aggression measures, and depressive coping scales compared with resilients. They also scored higher on drug abuse and committed more sexual offenses than resilient prisoners. These two personality subtypes bear theoretically and practically important implications for psychopathy subtypes and different pathways to criminal offenses.

  13. A Meta-Analysis of Factors Influencing the Development of Trust in Automation: Implications for Understanding Autonomy in Future Systems.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Kristin E; Chen, Jessie Y C; Szalma, James L; Hancock, P A

    2016-05-01

    We used meta-analysis to assess research concerning human trust in automation to understand the foundation upon which future autonomous systems can be built. Trust is increasingly important in the growing need for synergistic human-machine teaming. Thus, we expand on our previous meta-analytic foundation in the field of human-robot interaction to include all of automation interaction. We used meta-analysis to assess trust in automation. Thirty studies provided 164 pairwise effect sizes, and 16 studies provided 63 correlational effect sizes. The overall effect size of all factors on trust development was ḡ = +0.48, and the correlational effect was [Formula: see text]  = +0.34, each of which represented medium effects. Moderator effects were observed for the human-related (ḡ  = +0.49; [Formula: see text] = +0.16) and automation-related (ḡ = +0.53; [Formula: see text] = +0.41) factors. Moderator effects specific to environmental factors proved insufficient in number to calculate at this time. Findings provide a quantitative representation of factors influencing the development of trust in automation as well as identify additional areas of needed empirical research. This work has important implications to the enhancement of current and future human-automation interaction, especially in high-risk or extreme performance environments. © 2016, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

  14. A mechanistic analysis of the Birch Reduction.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Howard E

    2012-02-21

    The Birch Reduction is one of the main reactions of organic chemistry. The reaction involves the reaction of dissolving metals in ammonia with aromatic compounds to produce 1,4-cyclohexadienes. Discovered by Arthur Birch in 1944, the reaction occupies 300 pages in Organic Reactions to describe its synthetic versatility. Thus, it is remarkable that the reaction mechanism has been so very controversial and only relatively recently has been firmly established. Perhaps this is not that surprising, since the reaction also has many unusual and esoteric mechanistic facets. Here, I provide a description of how I have applied ever-evolving levels of quantum mechanics and a novel experimental test to understand details of the mechanism and the origins of the selectivities observed in the Birch reduction. The reaction involves an initial radical anion resulting from introduction of an electron from the blue liquid ammonia solution of free electrons formed by the dissolution of Li or related metals. This radical anion is protonated by an alcohol and then further reduced to a carbanion. Finally, the carbanion is protonated using a second proton to afford a nonconjugated cyclohexadiene. The regiochemistry depends on substituents present. With 18 resonance structures in the case of anisole radical anion, prediction of the initial protonation site would seem difficult. Nevertheless, computational methods from Hückel theory through modern density functional calculations do correctly predict the site of protonation. An esoteric test established this mechanism experimentally. The nature of the carbanion also is of mechanistic interest, and the preponderance of the resonance structure shown was revealed from Hückel calculations involving variable bond orders. For the trianion from benzoic acid, parallel questions about structure are apparent, and have been answered. Some mechanistic questions are answered experimentally and some by modern computations. Recently, our mechanistic

  15. Obesity, energy balance, and cancer: a mechanistic perspective.

    PubMed

    Hursting, Stephen D

    2014-01-01

    Nearly 36 % of adults and 20 % of children in the USA are obese, defined as a body mass index (BMI) ≥30 kg/m(2). Obesity, which is accompanied by metabolic dysregulation often manifesting in the metabolic syndrome, is an established risk factor for many cancers. Within the growth-promoting, proinflammatory environment of the obese state, cross talk between macrophages, adipocytes, and epithelial cells occurs via obesity-associated hormones, cytokines, and other mediators that may enhance cancer risk and/or progression. This chapter synthesizes the evidence on key biological mechanisms underlying the obesity-cancer link, with particular emphasis on obesity-associated enhancements in growth factor signaling, inflammation, and vascular integrity processes, as well as obesity-dependent microenvironmental perturbations, including the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. These interrelated pathways represent possible mechanistic targets for disrupting the obesity-cancer link.

  16. Wellness Factors as Predictors of Alcohol Use among Undergraduates: Implications for Prevention and Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Todd F.; Myers, Jane E.

    2010-01-01

    A pilot study examining holistic wellness factors and drinking behaviors among undergraduate students revealed several significant relationships. Two second-order wellness factors of the Indivisible Self model of wellness--Coping Self and Essential Self--were negatively associated with both alcohol use intensity and drinking consequences.…

  17. Higher-order factor structures for the WISC-IV: implications for neuropsychological test interpretation.

    PubMed

    Decker, Scott L; Englund, Julia A; Roberts, Alycia M

    2014-01-01

    Factor-analytic studies support a hierarchical four-factor model for the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fourth Edition (WISC-IV) with a prominent general, third-order factor. However, there is substantial disagreement on which type of higher-order model best fits the data and how different models should guide test interpretation in clinical practice, with many studies concluding interpretation should primarily be focused on general indicators of intelligence. We performed a series of confirmatory factor analyses with the WISC-IV standardization sample (N = 2,200, ages 6-16 years) to examine model fit and reexamined models used to support test interpretation at the general level. Consistent with previous research, bifactor models were difficult to identify; however, compared with bifactor and hierarchical models, the correlated factors model with no general higher-order factor provided the best fit to the data. Results from this study support the basic four-factor model specified in the WISC-IV technical manual, with test interpretation primarily focused at the factor level, rather than the general level suggested in previous studies.

  18. Impact of Health-Related Family Factors on School Enrollment in Bolivia: Implications for Health Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madanat, Hala; Dearden, Kirk; Heaton, Tim; Forste, Renata

    2005-01-01

    This study identified the extent to which family factors increase school enrollment in Bolivia, after adjusting for human and financial capital. The sample was drawn from the 1998 Demographic and Health Survey. Logistic regression models were used to determine the effect of human capital, financial capital and family factors on school enrollment.…

  19. Analysis of Factors and Implications Influencing Leadership Ascension of Female Athletic Directors in Intercollegiate Athletics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burney, Rolanda C.

    2010-01-01

    This narrative analysis/life story study was designed to understand the factors influencing the career trajectory of female athletic directors in National Collegiate Athletic Association affiliated institutions and to discover how those factors functioned as a road map for future female administrators. Both social role and role congruity theories…

  20. Dipole-field sums and Lorentz factors for orthorhombic lattices, and implications for polarizable molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purvis, C. K.; Taylor, P. L.

    1982-01-01

    A method for computing the Lorentz tensor components in single crystals via rapidly convergent sums of Bessels functions is developed using the relationship between dipole-field sums and the tensor components. The Lorentz factors for simple, body-centered, and base-centered orthorhombic lattices are computed using this method, and the derivative Lorentz factors for simple orthorhombic lattices are also determined. Both the Lorentz factors and their derivatives are shown to be very sensitive to a lattice structure. The equivalent of the Clausius-Mossotti relation for general orthorhombic lattices is derived using the Lorentz-factor formalism, and the permanent molecular dipole moment is related to crystal polarization for the case of a ferroelectric of polarizable point dipoles. It is concluded that the polarization enhancement due to self-polarization familiar from classical theory may actually be a reduction in consequences of negative Lorentz factors in one or two lattice directions for noncubic crystals.

  1. Factors influencing quality of life of elderly people with dementia and care implications: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Jing, Wenbo; Willis, Rosalind; Feng, Zhixin

    2016-01-01

    Identifying factors associated with Quality of Life (QoL) of elderly people with dementia could contribute to finding pathways to improve QoL for elderly people in dementia. This paper systematically reviews all possible factors that influence QoL of elderly people with dementia, identifies how these factors are different by different stages of dementia and living settings, and explores how the influencing factors could be perceive differently by elderly people with dementia, family members, and caregivers. PubMed, PsycINFO, Web of Science and DelphiS searches from 2000 to 2015 and hand searches of publication lists, reference lists and citations were used to identify primary studies on 'quality of life' and 'dementia' elderly people. The results suggest that there are a complex variety of factors influencing QoL of elderly people with dementia, and the factors cover demographic, physical, psychological, social, and religious aspects. And the factors influencing QoL of elderly people with dementia are different in different living settings (care institutions and communities) as well as different people's perspectives (elderly people with dementia, family members and care staff). Environmental factors and quality of care are important for elderly people in care institutions; while religious seem to only affect QoL of those living in communities. However, this review fails to comprehensively identify unique or common factors associated QoL in dementia across three stages. Further study should pay more attention to comparing factors associated with QoL in dementia across three stages of dementia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Mechanistic Analysis of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Kinesin Kar3*S

    PubMed Central

    Mackey, Andrew T.; Sproul, Lisa R.; Sontag, Christopher A.; Satterwhite, Lisa L.; Correia, John J.; Gilbert, Susan P.

    2005-01-01

    Kar3 is a minus-end-directed microtubule motor that is implicated in meiotic and mitotic spindle function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To date, the only truncated protein of Kar3 that has been reported to promote unidirectional movement in vitro is GSTKar3. This motor contains an NH2-terminal glutathione S-transferase (GST) tag followed by the Kar3 sequence that is predicted to form an extended α-helical coiled-coil. The α-helical domain leads into the neck linker and COOH-terminal motor domain. Kar3 does not homodimerize with itself but forms a heterodimer with either Cik1 or Vik1, both of which are non-motor polypeptides. We evaluated the microtubule-GSTKar3 complex in comparison to the microtubule-Kar3 motor domain complex to determine the distinctive mechanistic features required for GSTKar3 motility. Our results indicate that ATP binding was significantly faster for GSTKar3 than that observed previously for the Kar3 motor domain. In addition, microtubule-activated ADP release resulted in an intermediate that bound ADP weakly in contrast to the Kar3 motor domain, suggesting that after ADP release, the microtubule-GSTKar3 motor binds ATP in preference to ADP. The kinetics also showed that GST-Kar3 readily detached from the microtubule rather than remaining bound for multiple ATP turnovers. These results indicate that the extended α-helical domain NH2-terminal to the catalytic core provides the structural transitions in response to the ATPase cycle that are critical for motility and that dimerization is not specifically required. This study provides the foundation to define the mechanistic contributions of Cik1 and Vik1 for Kar3 force generation and function in vivo. PMID:15385545

  3. Human factors/ergonomics implications of big data analytics: Chartered Institute of Ergonomics and Human Factors annual lecture.

    PubMed

    Drury, Colin G

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, advances in sensor technology, connectedness and computational power have come together to produce huge data-sets. The treatment and analysis of these data-sets is known as big data analytics (BDA), and the somewhat related term data mining. Fields allied to human factors/ergonomics (HFE), e.g. statistics, have developed computational methods to derive meaningful, actionable conclusions from these data bases. This paper examines BDA, often characterised by volume, velocity and variety, giving examples of successful BDA use. This examination provides context by considering examples of using BDA on human data, using BDA in HFE studies, and studies of how people perform BDA. Significant issues for HFE are the reliance of BDA on correlation rather than hypotheses and theory, the ethics of BDA and the use of HFE in data visualisation.

  4. Functional Genomic Screen Identifies Klebsiella pneumoniae Factors Implicated in Blocking Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) Signaling.

    PubMed

    Tomás, Anna; Lery, Leticia; Regueiro, Verónica; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Camino; Martínez, Verónica; Moranta, David; Llobet, Enrique; González-Nicolau, Mar; Insua, Jose L; Tomas, Juan M; Sansonetti, Philippe J; Tournebize, Régis; Bengoechea, José A

    2015-07-03

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an etiologic agent of community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia. It has been shown that K. pneumoniae infections are characterized by reduced early inflammatory response. Recently our group has shown that K. pneumoniae dampens the activation of inflammatory responses by antagonizing the activation of the NF-κB canonical pathway. Our results revealed that K. pneumoniae capsule polysaccharide (CPS) was necessary but not sufficient to attenuate inflammation. To identify additional Klebsiella factors required to dampen inflammation, we standardized and applied a high-throughput gain-of-function screen to examine a Klebsiella transposon mutant library. We identified 114 mutants that triggered the activation of NF-κB. Two gene ontology categories accounted for half of the loci identified in the screening: metabolism and transport genes (32% of the mutants) and envelope-related genes (17%). Characterization of the mutants revealed that the lack of the enterobactin siderophore was linked to a reduced CPS expression, which in turn underlined the NF-κB activation induced by the mutant. The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O-polysaccharide and the pullulanase (PulA) type 2 secretion system (T2SS) are required for full effectiveness of the immune evasion. Importantly, these factors do not play a redundant role. The fact that LPS O-polysaccharide and T2SS mutant-induced responses were dependent on TLR2-TLR4-MyD88 activation suggested that LPS O-polysaccharide and PulA perturbed Toll-like receptor (TLR)-dependent recognition of K. pneumoniae. Finally, we demonstrate that LPS O-polysaccharide and pulA mutants are attenuated in the pneumonia mouse model. We propose that LPS O-polysaccharide and PulA T2SS could be new targets for the design of new antimicrobials. Increasing TLR-governed defense responses might provide also selective alternatives for the management of K. pneumoniae pneumonia.

  5. Functional Genomic Screen Identifies Klebsiella pneumoniae Factors Implicated in Blocking Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Tomás, Anna; Lery, Leticia; Regueiro, Verónica; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Camino; Martínez, Verónica; Moranta, David; Llobet, Enrique; González-Nicolau, Mar; Insua, Jose L.; Tomas, Juan M.; Sansonetti, Philippe J.; Tournebize, Régis; Bengoechea, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an etiologic agent of community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia. It has been shown that K. pneumoniae infections are characterized by reduced early inflammatory response. Recently our group has shown that K. pneumoniae dampens the activation of inflammatory responses by antagonizing the activation of the NF-κB canonical pathway. Our results revealed that K. pneumoniae capsule polysaccharide (CPS) was necessary but not sufficient to attenuate inflammation. To identify additional Klebsiella factors required to dampen inflammation, we standardized and applied a high-throughput gain-of-function screen to examine a Klebsiella transposon mutant library. We identified 114 mutants that triggered the activation of NF-κB. Two gene ontology categories accounted for half of the loci identified in the screening: metabolism and transport genes (32% of the mutants) and envelope-related genes (17%). Characterization of the mutants revealed that the lack of the enterobactin siderophore was linked to a reduced CPS expression, which in turn underlined the NF-κB activation induced by the mutant. The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O-polysaccharide and the pullulanase (PulA) type 2 secretion system (T2SS) are required for full effectiveness of the immune evasion. Importantly, these factors do not play a redundant role. The fact that LPS O-polysaccharide and T2SS mutant-induced responses were dependent on TLR2-TLR4-MyD88 activation suggested that LPS O-polysaccharide and PulA perturbed Toll-like receptor (TLR)-dependent recognition of K. pneumoniae. Finally, we demonstrate that LPS O-polysaccharide and pulA mutants are attenuated in the pneumonia mouse model. We propose that LPS O-polysaccharide and PulA T2SS could be new targets for the design of new antimicrobials. Increasing TLR-governed defense responses might provide also selective alternatives for the management of K. pneumoniae pneumonia. PMID:25971969

  6. Implications of Risk Factors for Alzheimer’s Disease in Canada’s Indigenous Population

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Julia Petrasek; Barnes, Deborah E.; Middleton, Laura E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Indigenous peoples in Canada have higher prevalence of modifiable risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The relative importance of these risk factors on AD risk management is poorly understood. Methods Relative risks from literature and prevalence of risk factors from Statistics Canada or the First Nations Regional Health Survey were used to determine projected population attributable risk (PAR) associated with modifiable risk factors for AD (low education and vascular risk factors) among on- and off-reserve Indigenous and non-Indigenous people in Canada using the Levin formula. Results Physical inactivity had the highest PAR for AD among Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples in Canada (32.5% [10.1%–51.1%] and 30.5% [9.2%–48.8%] respectively). The PAR for most modifiable risk factors was higher among Indigenous peoples in Canada, particularly among on-reserve groups. The greatest differences in PAR were for low educational attainment and smoking, which were approximately 10% higher among Indigenous peoples in Canada. The combined PAR for AD for all six modifiable risk factors was 79.6% among on-reserve Indigenous, 74.9% among off-reserve Indigenous, and 67.1% among non-Indigenous peoples in Canada. (All differences significant to p < .001.) Conclusions Modifiable risk factors are responsible for the most AD cases among Indigenous peoples in Canada. Further research is necessary to determine the prevalence of AD and the impact of risk factor modification among Indigenous peoples in Canada. PMID:26495049

  7. New web-based applications for mechanistic case diagramming.

    PubMed

    Dee, Fred R; Haugen, Thomas H; Kreiter, Clarence D

    2014-01-01

    The goal of mechanistic case diagraming (MCD) is to provide students with more in-depth understanding of cause and effect relationships and basic mechanistic pathways in medicine. This will enable them to better explain how observed clinical findings develop from preceding pathogenic and pathophysiological events. The pedagogic function of MCD is in relating risk factors, disease entities and morphology, signs and symptoms, and test and procedure findings in a specific case scenario with etiologic pathogenic and pathophysiological sequences within a flow diagram. In this paper, we describe the addition of automation and predetermined lists to further develop the original concept of MCD as described by Engelberg in 1992 and Guerrero in 2001. We demonstrate that with these modifications, MCD is effective and efficient in small group case-based teaching for second-year medical students (ratings of ~3.4 on a 4.0 scale). There was also a significant correlation with other measures of competency, with a 'true' score correlation of 0.54. A traditional calculation of reliability showed promising results (α =0.47) within a low stakes, ungraded environment. Further, we have demonstrated MCD's potential for use in independent learning and TBL. Future studies are needed to evaluate MCD's potential for use in medium stakes assessment or self-paced independent learning and assessment. MCD may be especially relevant in returning students to the application of basic medical science mechanisms in the clinical years.

  8. Gut-derived endotoxin stimulates factor VIII secretion from endothelial cells. Implications for hypercoagulability in cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Carnevale, Roberto; Raparelli, Valeria; Nocella, Cristina; Bartimoccia, Simona; Novo, Marta; Severino, Anna; De Falco, Elena; Cammisotto, Vittoria; Pasquale, Chiara; Crescioli, Clara; Scavalli, Antonio Sili; Riggio, Oliviero; Basili, Stefania; Violi, Francesco

    2017-07-14

    Patients with cirrhosis display enhanced blood levels of factor VIII, which may result in harmful activation of the clotting system; however, the underlying mechanism is unknown. We performed a cross-sectional study in patients with cirrhosis (n=61) and matched controls (n=61) comparing blood levels of factor VIII, von Willebrand factor (vWf), lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and positivity for Escherichia coli DNA. Furthermore, we performed an in vitro study to investigate if LPS, in a concentration range similar to that found in the peripheral circulation of cirrhotic patients, was able to elicit factor VIII secretion from human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Patients with cirrhosis displayed higher serum levels of LPS (55.8 [42.2-79.9] vs. 23.0 [7.0-34.0]pg/ml, p<0.001), factor VIII (172.0 [130.0-278.0] vs. 39.0 [26.0-47.0]U/dl, p<0.0001), vWf (265.0 [185.0-366.0] vs. 57.0 [48.0-65.0]U/dl, p<0.001) and positivity for Escherichia coli DNA (88% vs. 3%, p<0.001, n=34) compared to controls. Serum LPS correlated significantly with factor VIII (r=0.80, p<0.001) and vWf (r=0.63, p<0.001). Only LPS (beta-coefficient=0.70, p<0.0001) independently predicted factor VIII levels. The in vitro study showed that LPS provoked factor VIII and vWf release from HUVEC via formation and secretion of Weibel-Palade bodies, a phenomenon blunted by pre-treating HUVEC with an inhibitor of Toll-like receptor 4. The study provides the first evidence that LPS derived from gut microbiota increases the systemic levels of factor VIII via stimulating its release by endothelial cells. Lay summary: Cirrhosis is associated with thrombosis in portal and systemic circulation. Enhanced levels of factor VIII have been suggested to play a role but the underlying mechanism is still unclear. Here we show that patients with cirrhosis display a concomitant increase of factor VIII and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Escherichia coli and suggest that LPS contributes to the release of factor VIII from

  9. Factor structure of the psychopathic personality inventory: validity and implications for clinical assessment.

    PubMed

    Benning, Stephen D; Patrick, Christopher J; Hicks, Brian M; Blonigen, Daniel M; Krueger, Robert F

    2003-09-01

    Psychopathy is a personality disorder characterized by impulsive antisocial deviance in the context of emotional and interpersonal detachment. A factor analysis of the subscales of the Psychopathic Personality Inventory (PPI) yielded evidence for 2 factors. One factor showed relations with external criteria mirroring those of the emotional-interpersonal facet of psychopathy, including high dominance, low anxiety, and venturesomeness. The other factor showed relations paralleling those of the social deviance facet of psychopathy, including positive correlations with antisocial behavior and substance abuse, negative correlations with socioeconomic status and verbal ability, and personality characteristics including high negative emotionally and low behavioral constraint. Findings support using the PPI to assess these facets of psychopathy in community samples and to explore their behavioral correlates and genetic-neurobiological underpinnings.

  10. Factors predicting recall of mathematics terms by deaf students: implications for teaching.

    PubMed

    Lang, Harry; Pagliaro, Claudia

    2007-01-01

    In this study of deaf high school students, imagery and familiarity were found to be the best predictors of geometry word recall, whereas neither concreteness nor signability of the terms was a significant predictor variable. Recall of high imagery terms was significantly better than for low imagery terms, and the same result was found for high- over low-familiarity and signability. Concrete terms were recalled significantly better than abstract terms. Geometry terms that could be represented with single signs were recalled significantly better than those that are usually fingerspelled or those represented by compound signs. Teachers with degrees and/or certification in mathematics had significantly higher self-ratings for the strongest predictor variables, imagery (visualization), and familiarity, as compared with those without such formal training. Based on these findings, implications for mathematics instruction, teacher education, and research are provided.

  11. Risk for anxiety and implications for treatment: developmental, environmental, and genetic factors governing fear regulation

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Catherine A.; Casey, BJ

    2013-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are the most common of the psychiatric disorders affecting as many as 10% of youth, with a peak during adolescence. A core component of these disorders is an unremitting fear in the absence of present threat. One of the most commonly used therapies to treat these disorders is exposure-based cognitive behavioral therapy that identifies the source of the fear and anxiety and then desensitizes the individual to it. This treatment builds on basic principles of fear extinction learning. A number of patients improve with this therapy, but 40–50% do not. This paper provides an overview of recent empirical studies employing both human imaging and cross-species behavioral genetics to examine how fear regulation varies across individuals and across development, especially during adolescence. These studies have important implications for understanding who may be at risk for anxiety disorders and for whom and when during development exposure-based therapies may be most effective. PMID:24147742

  12. Analytic model for academic research productivity having factors, interactions and implications

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Financial support is dear in academia and will tighten further. How can the research mission be accomplished within new restraints? A model is presented for evaluating source components of academic research productivity. It comprises six factors: funding; investigator quality; efficiency of the research institution; the research mix of novelty, incremental advancement, and confirmatory studies; analytic accuracy; and passion. Their interactions produce output and patterned influences between factors. Strategies for optimizing output are enabled. PMID:22130145

  13. Epigenetics and the environment: emerging patterns and implications.

    PubMed

    Feil, Robert; Fraga, Mario F

    2012-01-04

    Epigenetic phenomena in animals and plants are mediated by DNA methylation and stable chromatin modifications. There has been considerable interest in whether environmental factors modulate the establishment and maintenance of epigenetic modifications, and could thereby influence gene expression and phenotype. Chemical pollutants, dietary components, temperature changes and other external stresses can indeed have long-lasting effects on development, metabolism and health, sometimes even in subsequent generations. Although the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown, particularly in humans, mechanistic insights are emerging from experimental model systems. These have implications for structuring future research and understanding disease and development.

  14. Hepatic leukemia factor promotes resistance to cell death: Implications for therapeutics and chronotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, Katrina M.; Sontag, Ryan L.; Weber, Thomas J.

    2013-04-15

    Physiological variation related to circadian rhythms and aberrant gene expression patterns are believed to modulate therapeutic efficacy, but the precise molecular determinants remain unclear. Here we examine the regulation of cell death by hepatic leukemia factor (HLF), which is an output regulator of circadian rhythms and is aberrantly expressed in human cancers, using an ectopic expression strategy in JB6 mouse epidermal cells and human keratinocytes. Ectopic HLF expression inhibited cell death in both JB6 cells and human keratinocytes, as induced by serum-starvation, tumor necrosis factor alpha and ionizing radiation. Microarray analysis indicates that HLF regulates a complex multi-gene transcriptional program encompassing upregulation of anti-apoptotic genes, downregulation of pro-apoptotic genes, and many additional changes that are consistent with an anti-death program. Collectively, our results demonstrate that ectopic expression of HLF, an established transcription factor that cycles with circadian rhythms, can recapitulate many features associated with circadian-dependent physiological variation. - Highlights: ► Circadian-dependent physiological variation impacts therapeutic efficacy. ► Hepatic leukemia factor inhibits cell death and is a candidate circadian factor. ► Hepatic leukemia factor anti-death program is conserved in murine and human cells. ► Transcriptomics indicates the anti-death program results from a systems response.

  15. Development and Predictive Effects of Eating Disorder Risk Factors during Adolescence: Implications for Prevention Efforts

    PubMed Central

    Rohde, Paul; Stice, Eric; Marti, C. Nathan

    2014-01-01

    Objective Although several prospective studies have identified factors that increase risk for eating disorders, little is known about when these risk factors emerge and escalate, or when they begin to predict future eating disorder onset. The objective of this report was to address these key research gaps. Method Data were examined from a prospective study of 496 community female adolescents (M = 13.5, SD = 0.7 at baseline) who completed eight annual assessments of potential risk factors and eating disorders from preadolescence to young adulthood. Results Three variables exhibited positive linear increases: Perceived pressure to be thin, thin-ideal internalization and body dissatisfaction; three were best characterized as quadratic effects: dieting (essentially little change); negative affectivity (overall decrease), and BMI (overall increase). Elevated body dissatisfaction at ages 13, 14, 15, and 16 predicted DSM-5 eating disorders onset in the 4 year period after each assessment, but the predictive effects of other risk factors were largely confined to age 14; BMI did not predict eating disorders at any age. Discussion The results imply that these risk factors are present by early adolescence, though eating disorders tend to emerge in late adolescence and early adulthood. These findings emphasize the need for efficacious eating disorder prevention programs for early adolescent girls, perhaps targeting 14 year olds, when risk factors appear to be most predictive. In early adolescence, it might be fruitful to target girls with body dissatisfaction, as this was the most consistent predictor of early eating disorder onset in this study. PMID:24599841

  16. Plasmonic Purcell factor and coupling efficiency to surface plasmons. Implications for addressing and controlling optical nanosources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colas des Francs, G.; Barthes, J.; Bouhelier, A.; Weeber, J. C.; Dereux, A.; Cuche, A.; Girard, C.

    2016-09-01

    The Purcell factor F p is a key quantity in cavity quantum electrodynamics (cQED) that quantifies the coupling rate between a dipolar emitter and a cavity mode. Its simple form {F}{{p}}\\propto Q/V unravels the possible strategies to enhance and control light-matter interaction. Practically, efficient light-matter interaction is achieved thanks to either (i) high quality factor Q at the basis of cQED or (ii) low modal volume V at the basis of nanophotonics and plasmonics. In the last decade, strong efforts have been done to derive a plasmonic Purcell factor in order to transpose cQED concepts to the nanocale, in a scale-law approach. In this work, we discuss the plasmonic Purcell factor for both delocalized (SPP) and localized (LSP) surface-plasmon-polaritons and briefly summarize the expected applications for nanophotonics. On the basis of the SPP resonance shape (Lorentzian or Fano profile), we derive closed form expression for the coupling rate to delocalized plasmons. The quality factor factor and modal confinement of both SPP and LSP are quantified, demonstrating their strongly subwavelength behavior.

  17. Consensus achievement of leadership, organisational and individual factors that influence safety climate: Implications for nursing management.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Shelly A; Jones, Jacqueline; Verran, Joyce A

    2017-09-21

    To validate a framework of factors that influence the relationship of transformational leadership and safety climate, and to enable testing of safety chain factors by generating hypotheses regarding their mediating and moderating effects. Understanding the patient safety chain and mechanisms by which leaders affect a strong climate of safety is essential to transformational leadership practice, education, and research. A systematic review of leadership and safety literature was used to develop an organising framework of factors proposed to influence the climate of safety. A panel of 25 international experts in leadership and safety engaged a three-round modified Delphi study with Likert-scored surveys. Eighty per cent of participating experts from six countries were retained to the final survey round. Consensus (>66% agreement) was achieved on 40 factors believed to influence safety climate in the acute care setting. Consensus regarding specific factors that play important roles in an organisation's climate of safety can be reached. Generally, the demonstration of leadership commitment to safety is key to cultivating a culture of patient safety. Transformational nurse leaders should consider and employ all three categories of factors in daily leadership activities and decision-making to drive a strong climate of patient safety. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. An Integrative Review of Factors Associated with Telomere Length and Implications for Biobehavioral Research

    PubMed Central

    Starkweather, Angela R.; Alhaeeri, Areej A.; Montpetit, Alison; Brumelle, Jenni; Filler, Kristin; Montpetit, Marty; Mohanraj, Lathika; Lyon, Debra E.; Jackson-Cook, Colleen K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although telomere shortening occurs as a natural part of aging, there is now a robust body of research that suggests that there is a relationship between psychosocial, environmental, and behavioral factors and changes in telomere length. These factors need to be considered when integrating telomere measurement in biobehavioral research studies. Objectives This article provides a brief summary of the known facts about telomere biology and an integrative review of current human research studies that assessed relationships between psychosocial, environmental, or behavioral factors and telomere length. Methods An integrative review was conducted to examine human research studies that focused on psychosocial, environmental, and behavioral factors affecting telomere length and telomerase activity using the electronic databases PubMed/Medline and CINAHL from 2003 to the present. In addition to the known individual factors that are associated with telomere length, the results of the integrative review suggest that perceived stress, childhood adversities, major depressive disorder, educational attainment, physical activity, and sleep duration should also be measured. Discussion Multiple factors have been shown to affect telomere length. To advance understanding of the role of telomere length in health and disease risk, it will be important to further elucidate the mechanisms that contribute to telomere shortening. PMID:24335912

  19. Factors that influence medical student selection of an emergency medicine residency program: implications for training programs.

    PubMed

    Love, Jeffrey N; Howell, John M; Hegarty, Cullen B; McLaughlin, Steven A; Coates, Wendy C; Hopson, Laura R; Hern, Gene H; Rosen, Carlo L; Fisher, Jonathan; Santen, Sally A

    2012-04-01

    An understanding of student decision-making when selecting an emergency medicine (EM) training program is essential for program directors as they enter interview season. To build upon preexisting knowledge, a survey was created to identify and prioritize the factors influencing candidate decision-making of U.S. medical graduates. This was a cross-sectional, multi-institutional study that anonymously surveyed U.S. allopathic applicants to EM training programs. It took place in the 3-week period between the 2011 National Residency Matching Program (NRMP) rank list submission deadline and the announcement of match results. Of 1,525 invitations to participate, 870 candidates (57%) completed the survey. Overall, 96% of respondents stated that both geographic location and individual program characteristics were important to decision-making, with approximately equal numbers favoring location when compared to those who favored program characteristics. The most important factors in this regard were preference for a particular geographic location (74.9%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 72% to 78%) and to be close to spouse, significant other, or family (59.7%, 95% CI = 56% to 63%). Factors pertaining to geographic location tend to be out of the control of the program leadership. The most important program factors include the interview experience (48.9%, 95% CI = 46% to 52%), personal experience with the residents (48.5%, 95% CI = 45% to 52%), and academic reputation (44.9%, 95% CI = 42% to 48%). Unlike location, individual program factors are often either directly or somewhat under the control of the program leadership. Several other factors were ranked as the most important factor a disproportionate number of times, including a rotation in that emergency department (ED), orientation (academic vs. community), and duration of training (3-year vs. 4-year programs). For a subset of applicants, these factors had particular importance in overall decision-making. The vast majority

  20. Risk Factors for Lung Cancer in Iowa Women: Implications for Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Neuberger, John S.; Mahnken, Jonathan D.; Mayo, Matthew S.; Field, R. William

    2007-01-01

    Background Multiple risk factors possibly associated with lung cancer were examined as part of a large-scale residential radon case-control study conducted in Iowa between 1994 and 1997. We were particularly interested in stratifying risk factors by smoking status. Relatively little risk factor information is available for Midwestern rural women. Methods Four hundred thirteen female lung cancer cases and 614 controls aged 40-84, who were residents of their current home for at least 20 years, were included. Risk factors examined included cigarette smoking, passive smoking, occupation, chemical exposure, previous lung disease, family history of cancer, and urban residence. Multiple logistic regression analysis was conducted after adjusting for age, education, and cumulative radon exposure. Results As expected, active cigarette smoking was the major risk factor for lung cancer. While cessation of smoking was significantly associated with a reduced risk for lung cancer, the risk remained significantly elevated for 25 years. Among all cases, asbestos exposure was a significant risk. Among ex-smokers, pack-year history predominated as the major risk. Among never smokers, a family history of kidney or bladder cancer were significant risk factors (OR= 7.34, 95% CI = 1.91 - 28.18; and 5.02, 95% CI = 1.64-15.39, respectively), as was a history of previous lung disease (OR=2.28, 95% CI=1.24-4.18) and asbestos exposure. No statistically significant increase in lung cancer risk was found for occupation or urban residence. Conclusions Smoking prevention activities are urgently needed in rural areas of the United States. Relatives of individuals with smoking-related cancers are potentially at increased risk. Genetic risk factors should be more fully investigated in never smokers. PMID:16581199

  1. Mechanistic considerations in small fish carcinogenicity testing.

    PubMed

    Law, J M

    2001-01-01

    Historically, small fish species have proven useful both as environmental sentinels and as versatile test animals in toxicity and carcinogenicity bioassays. They can be bred in large numbers, have low maintenance and bioassay costs, and have a low background incidence of tumors. However, more mechanistic information is needed to help validate the information garnered from these models and to keep pace with other more fully developed animal models. This paper focuses on mechanistic considerations when using small fish models for carcinogenicity testing. Several small aquarium fish species have proven useful. The Japanese medaka is perhaps the best characterized small fish model for carcinogenicity testing; however, the zebrafish is emerging as an important model because it is well characterized genetically. Both route and methodology of exposure may affect the outcome of the study. Most studies have been conducted by introducing the test compound into the ambient water, but dietary exposures and embryo microinjection have also been used. Other considerations in study design include use of an initiating carcinogen, such as diethlynitrosamine, and differences in xenobiotic metabolism, such as the fact that fish CYP2B is refractory to phenobarbital induction. The small size of these models has perhaps limited some types of mechanistic studies, such as formation and repair of DNA adducts in response to carcinogen exposure. However, improved analytical methods are allowing greater resolution and should be applied to small fish species. Slide-based methods such as immunohistochemistry are an important adjunct to routine histopathology and should be included in study design. However, there is a need for development of more species-specific antibodies for fish research. There is also a need for more fish-specific data on cytokines, serum biochemistry, and oncogenes to strengthen the use of these important test models.

  2. Platelet activation using electric pulse stimulation: growth factor profile and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Torres, Andrew S; Caiafa, Antonio; Garner, Allen L; Klopman, Steve; LaPlante, Nicole; Morton, Christine; Conway, Kenneth; Michelson, Alan D; Frelinger, Andrew L; Neculaes, V Bogdan

    2014-09-01

    Autologous platelet gel therapy using platelet-rich plasma has emerged as a promising alternative for chronic wound healing, hemostasis, and wound infection control. A critical step for this therapeutic approach is platelet activation, typically performed using bovine thrombin (BT) and calcium chloride. However, exposure of humans to BT can stimulate antibody formation, potentially resulting in severe hemorrhagic or thrombotic complications. Electric pulse stimulation using nanosecond PEFs (pulse electric fields) is an alternative, nonbiochemical platelet activation method, thereby avoiding exposure to xenogeneic thrombin and associated risks. In this study, we identified specific requirements for a clinically relevant activator instrument by dynamically measuring current, voltage, and electric impedance for platelet-rich plasma samples. From these samples, we investigated the profile of growth factors released from human platelets with electric pulse stimulation versus BT, specifically platelet-derived growth factor, transforming growth factor β, and epidermal growth factor, using commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. Electric pulse stimulation triggers growth factor release from platelet α-granules at the same or higher level compared with BT. Electric pulse stimulation is a fast, inexpensive, easy-to-use platelet activation method for autologous platelet gel therapy.

  3. Triggering neurotrophic factor actions through adenosine A2A receptor activation: implications for neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Sebastião, Ana M; Ribeiro, Joaquim A

    2009-01-01

    G protein coupled receptors and tropomyosin-related kinase (Trk) receptors have distinct structure and transducing mechanisms; therefore, cross-talk among them was unexpected. Evidence has, however, accumulated showing that tonic adenosine A2A receptor activity is a required step to allow synaptic actions of neurotrophic factors, namely upon synaptic transmission at both pre- and post-synaptic level as well as upon synaptic plasticity. An enhancement of A2A receptor tonus upon ageing may partially compensate the loss of TrkB receptors, rescuing to certain degree the facilitatory action of brain derived neurotrophic factor in aged animals, which might prove particularly relevant in the prevention of neurodegeneration upon ageing. A2A receptors also trigger synaptic actions of other neurotrophic factors, such as glial derived neurotrophic factor at dopaminergic striatal nerve endings. The growing evidence that tonic adenosine A2A receptor activity is a crucial step to allow actions of neurotrophic factors in neurones will be reviewed and discussed in the light of therapeutic strategies for neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:19508402

  4. Memory factors in Rey AVLT: Implications for early staging of cognitive decline.

    PubMed

    Fernaeus, Sven-Erik; Ostberg, Per; Wahlund, Lars-Olof; Hellström, Ake

    2014-12-01

    Supraspan verbal list learning is widely used to assess dementia and related cognitive disorders where declarative memory deficits are a major clinical sign. While the overall learning rate is important for diagnosis, serial position patterns may give insight into more specific memory processes in patients with cognitive impairment. This study explored these patterns in a memory clinic clientele. One hundred eighty three participants took the Rey Auditory-Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT). The major groups were patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), Vascular Dementia (VD), Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), and Subjective Cognitive Impairment (SCI) as well as healthy controls (HC). Raw scores for the five trials and five serial partitions were factor analysed. Three memory factors were found and interpreted as Primacy, Recency, and Resistance to Interference. AD and MCI patients had impaired scores in all factors. SCI patients were significantly impaired in the Resistance to Interference factor, and in the Recency factor at the first trial. The main conclusion is that serial position data from word list testing reflect specific memory capacities which vary with levels of cognitive impairment.

  5. Mechanistic studies of carbon monoxide reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Geoffroy, G.L.

    1990-06-12

    The progress made during the current grant period (1 January 1988--1 April 1990) in three different areas of research is summarized. The research areas are: (1) oxidatively-induced double carbonylation reactions to form {alpha}-ketoacyl complexes and studies of the reactivity of the resulting compounds, (2) mechanistic studies of the carbonylation of nitroaromatics to form isocyanates, carbamates, and ureas, and (3) studies of the formation and reactivity of unusual metallacycles and alkylidene ligands supported on binuclear iron carbonyl fragments. 18 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Mechanistic facility safety and source term analysis

    SciTech Connect

    PLYS, M.G.

    1999-06-09

    A PC-based computer program was created for facility safety and source term analysis at Hanford The program has been successfully applied to mechanistic prediction of source terms from chemical reactions in underground storage tanks, hydrogen combustion in double contained receiver tanks, and proccss evaluation including the potential for runaway reactions in spent nuclear fuel processing. Model features include user-defined facility room, flow path geometry, and heat conductors, user-defined non-ideal vapor and aerosol species, pressure- and density-driven gas flows, aerosol transport and deposition, and structure to accommodate facility-specific source terms. Example applications are presented here.

  7. Composite Nanomechanics: A Mechanistic Properties Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Handler, Louis M.; Manderscheid, Jane M.

    2007-01-01

    A unique mechanistic theory is described to predict the properties of nanocomposites. The theory is based on composite micromechanics with progressive substructuring down to a nanoscale slice of a nanofiber where all the governing equations are formulated. These equations have been programmed in a computer code. That computer code is used to predict 25 properties of a mononanofiber laminate. The results are presented graphically and discussed with respect to their practical significance. Most of the results show smooth distributions. Results for matrix-dependent properties show bimodal through-the-thickness distribution with discontinuous changes from mode to mode.

  8. Composite Nanomechanics: A Mechanistic Properties Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Handler, Louis M.; Manderscheid, Jane M.

    2007-01-01

    A unique mechanistic theory is described to predict the properties of nanocomposites. The theory is based on composite micromechanics with progressive substructuring down to a nanoscale slice of a nanofiber where all the governing equations are formulated. These equations hav e been programmed in a computer code. That computer code is used to predict 25 properties of a mononanofiber laminate. The results are pr esented graphically and discussed with respect to their practical sig nificance. Most of the results show smooth distributions. Results for matrix-dependent properties show bimodal through-the-thickness distr ibution with discontinuous changes from mode to mode.

  9. Hepatic Leukemia Factor Promotes Resistance To Cell Death: Implications For Therapeutics and Chronotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, Katrina M.; Sontag, Ryan L.; Weber, Thomas J.

    2013-04-15

    Physiological variation related to circadian rhythms and aberrant gene expression patterns are believed to modulate therapeutic efficacy, but the precise molecular determinants remain unclear. Here we examine the regulation of cell death by hepatic leukemia factor (HLF), which is an output regulator of circadian rhythms and is aberrantly expressed in human cancers, using an ectopic expression strategy in JB6 mouse epidermal cells and human keratinocytes. Ectopic HLF expression inhibited cell death in both JB6 cells and human keratinocytes, as induced by serum-starvation, tumor necrosis factor alpha and ionizing radiation. Microarray analysis indicates that HLF regulates a complex multi-gene transcriptional program encompassing upregulation of anti-apoptotic genes, downregulation of pro-apoptotic genes, and many additional changes that are consistent with an anti-death program. Collectively, our results demonstrate that ectopic expression of HLF, an established transcription factor that cycles with circadian rhythms, can recapitulate many features associated with circadian-dependent physiological variation.

  10. Global factors shaping the future of food aid: the implications for WFP.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Daniel

    2007-03-01

    Food aid is a key component of a humanitarian response but its use in other programming contexts is subject to numerous criticisms. Even in humanitarian emergencies food aid is often late, unreliable and out of proportion to other elements of the response. Three major factors will shape the future of food aid. First, mechanisms of food aid governance are being reviewed and may undergo major changes--particularly the Food Aid Convention now that hopes have diminished for an Agreement on Agriculture at the World Trade Organisation. The second significant factor is donor agency trends. Overall levels of food aid have dropped fairly steadily in recent decades and there are several discernible trends in resource allocation, procurement and the use of food aid. The third factor is an emerging body of best practice that will define acceptable standards of food aid programming in the future.

  11. Consequences of brain-derived neurotrophic factor withdrawal in CNS neurons and implications in disease

    PubMed Central

    Mariga, Abigail; Mitre, Mariela; Chao, Moses V.

    2017-01-01

    Growth factor withdrawal has been studied across different species and has been shown to have dramatic consequences on cell survival. In the nervous system, withdrawal of nerve growth factor (NGF) from sympathetic and sensory neurons results in substantial neuronal cell death, signifying a requirement for NGF for the survival of neurons in the peripheral nervous system (PNS). In contrast to the PNS, withdrawal of central nervous system (CNS) enriched brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has little effect on cell survival but is indispensible for synaptic plasticity. Given that most early events in neuropsychiatric disorders are marked by a loss of synapses, lack of BDNF may thus be an important part of a cascade of events that leads to neuronal degeneration. Here we review reports on the effects of BDNF withdrawal on CNS neurons and discuss the relevance of the loss in disease. PMID:27015693

  12. Consequences of brain-derived neurotrophic factor withdrawal in CNS neurons and implications in disease.

    PubMed

    Mariga, Abigail; Mitre, Mariela; Chao, Moses V

    2017-01-01

    Growth factor withdrawal has been studied across different species and has been shown to have dramatic consequences on cell survival. In the nervous system, withdrawal of nerve growth factor (NGF) from sympathetic and sensory neurons results in substantial neuronal cell death, signifying a requirement for NGF for the survival of neurons in the peripheral nervous system (PNS). In contrast to the PNS, withdrawal of central nervous system (CNS) enriched brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has little effect on cell survival but is indispensible for synaptic plasticity. Given that most early events in neuropsychiatric disorders are marked by a loss of synapses, lack of BDNF may thus be an important part of a cascade of events that leads to neuronal degeneration. Here we review reports on the effects of BDNF withdrawal on CNS neurons and discuss the relevance of the loss in disease.

  13. Genetic and environmental factors for hyperhomocysteinaemia and its clinical implications in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Białecka, Monika; Robowski, Piotr; Honczarenko, Krystyna; Roszmann, Anna; Sławek, Jarosław

    2009-01-01

    Elevated homocysteine (Hcy) plasma levels are caused by genetic and environmental factors. Polymorphisms of Hcy metabolizing enzyme genes may result in its plasma increase. Experimental and clinical studies have shown the possible role of hyperhomocysteinaemia in pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's disease and vascular disorders. The results of clinical studies in PD generally do not support the theoretical hypotheses, and animal studies remain controversial. A major environmental factor responsible for Hcy increase in PD seems to be levodopa therapy. Its metabolism results in Hcy increase and may be reduced with folate and vitamins B6, B12 supplementation or inhibition of catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) activity. Therefore, the potential harmful role of Hcy may be diminished in PD patients with vascular comorbidities. Further studies are needed to establish the real role of Hcy for PD and other neurological disorders. The paper summarizes the current knowledge on the genetic and environmental factors responsible for Hcy increase in PD.

  14. Interactions of host APOBEC3 restriction factors with HIV-1 in vivo: implications for therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Albin, John S; Harris, Reuben S

    2010-01-22

    Restriction factors are natural cellular proteins that defend individual cells from viral infection. These factors include the APOBEC3 family of DNA cytidine deaminases, which restrict the infectivity of HIV-1 by hypermutating viral cDNA and inhibiting reverse transcription and integration. HIV-1 thwarts this restriction activity through its accessory protein virion infectivity factor (Vif), which uses multiple mechanisms to prevent APOBEC3 proteins such as APOBEC3G and APOBEC3F from entering viral particles. Here, we review the basic biology of the interactions between human APOBEC3 proteins and HIV-1 Vif. We also summarise, for the first time, current clinical data on the in vivo effects of APOBEC3 proteins, and survey strategies and progress towards developing therapeutics aimed at the APOBEC3-Vif axis.

  15. Hepatic leukemia factor promotes resistance to cell death: implications for therapeutics and chronotherapy.

    PubMed

    Waters, Katrina M; Sontag, Ryan L; Weber, Thomas J

    2013-04-15

    Physiological variation related to circadian rhythms and aberrant gene expression patterns are believed to modulate therapeutic efficacy, but the precise molecular determinants remain unclear. Here we examine the regulation of cell death by hepatic leukemia factor (HLF), which is an output regulator of circadian rhythms and is aberrantly expressed in human cancers, using an ectopic expression strategy in JB6 mouse epidermal cells and human keratinocytes. Ectopic HLF expression inhibited cell death in both JB6 cells and human keratinocytes, as induced by serum-starvation, tumor necrosis factor alpha and ionizing radiation. Microarray analysis indicates that HLF regulates a complex multi-gene transcriptional program encompassing upregulation of anti-apoptotic genes, downregulation of pro-apoptotic genes, and many additional changes that are consistent with an anti-death program. Collectively, our results demonstrate that ectopic expression of HLF, an established transcription factor that cycles with circadian rhythms, can recapitulate many features associated with circadian-dependent physiological variation.

  16. Implications of female sex on stroke risk factors, care, outcome and rehabilitation: an Asian perspective.

    PubMed

    Mehndiratta, Prachi; Wasay, Mohammad; Mehndiratta, Man Mohan

    2015-01-01

    Stroke affects 16.9 million people annually and the greatest burden of stroke is in low- and middle-income countries, where 69% of all strokes occur. Stroke risk factors, mortality and outcomes differ in developing countries as compared to the developed world. We performed a literature review of 28 articles pertaining to epidemiology of stroke in Asian women, stroke risk factors, gender-related differences, and stroke outcomes. Asian women differ from women worldwide due to differences in stroke awareness, risk factor profile, stroke subtypes, and social issues that impact stroke care. While Asian men have a higher incidence of stroke as compared to women overall, the long- and short-term outcomes in Asian women tend to be poorer. Both conventional and gender-specific risk factors contribute to stroke risk. Oral contraceptive use and addictions such as tobacco and alcohol are less prevalent among Asian women due to socio cultural differences. There is however, a much higher preponderance of pregnancy-related stroke and cardio-embolic stroke secondary to rheumatic heart disease and heavy use of chewing tobacco. The overall outcome is poor due to poor access to health care and lack of resources. Key Messages: Our review exposed the gaps in our knowledge about stroke risk factors and differences in stroke care provided to Asian women. While there are sociocultural barriers that impede the provision of immediate care to these stroke patients, much needs to be done by way of prevention of recurrent stroke and treatment of risk factors. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. A review of environmental factors implicated in human developmental dysplasia of the hip.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Amanda M L; Clarke, Nicholas M P

    2014-10-01

    Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is common, and the term encompasses a spectrum of anatomical abnormalities of the hip in which the femoral head displaces from the acetabulum. These abnormalities may be congenital or develop during infancy and/or childhood. Neither the prenatal and postnatal factors that predispose to hip instability nor the determinants of its resolution or persistence are well characterised. A multifactorial pathogenesis of DDH is commonly accepted and identified risk factors include a family history, being first born, breech presentation, female gender, high birth weight and oligohydramnios 1. Further to genetic factors, a number of nutritional, hormonal and mechanical influences on ligament laxity have been hypothesised. A comprehensive search was conducted using NICE Healthcare Databases Advanced Search and Google Scholar engines, and the terms "nutrition", "environmental", "risk factors", "CDH" and "DDH". Wherever possible, evidence from randomised controlled trials, systematic reviews and expert review articles published in the medical and veterinary literature was considered. The relationship between a number of hormones and biochemical markers of nutritional status and the development of DDH has been repeatedly hypothesised upon in the last 45 years. Of those most frequently cited are calcium, vitamins C and D, and relaxin hormone. The evidence for these potential risk factors is provided mainly by canine studies, with a paucity of consistent or strong evidence in humans. DDH is common and remains a leading cause of hip osteoarthritis in young adults. Neonatal clinical screening programmes for this condition have been in practice since the 1950s, albeit with varying levels of sensitivity. This review summarises current understanding of some of the most frequently cited nongenetic hypothesised risk factors, the significance of which remain to be determined.

  18. Factors that influence physical activity for pregnant and postpartum women and implications for primary care.

    PubMed

    Doran, Frances; Davis, Kierrynn

    2011-01-01

    Many pregnant women and women of child-bearing age do not engage in the recommended levels of physical activity despite the well known benefits. Pregnancy and the postpartum period can be a time when inactivity actually increases. Women who experience gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) during their pregnancy are often advised to become more active in order to ameliorate their increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Health professionals have an influential role in promoting physical activity, which would be enhanced with an understanding of the factors that positively and negatively influence women's participation in physical activity during pregnancy and in the postpartum period. This research sought to explore these factors with pregnant and postpartum women including those who had experienced GDM and the attention given to physical activity during pregnancy. A survey was developed after a critical review of factors identified from previous studies. Women were recruited from the antenatal clinic, community health centres and the local media. Results from 72 women are reported from a predominately well educated, Caucasian population. Overall, the results were confirmatory of factors previously identified. Lack of child care, time constraints, no time and feeling unwell during pregnancy hindered activity and factors that facilitated activity included family support, enjoyment of activity and to prevent later health problems. It was also found that non-GDM women are given minimal advice about exercise during pregnancy. A checklist has been developed for health professionals, in partnership with women, to direct attention to the factors that enable and hinder participation in physical activity during and after pregnancy.

  19. Factors Affecting Faculty Use of Learning Technologies: Implications for Models of Technology Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Tom; Sainter, Phillip; Saunders, Gunter

    2013-01-01

    This study examines factors associated with the use of learning technologies by higher education faculty. In an online survey in a UK university, 114 faculty respondents completed a measure of Internet self-efficacy, and reported on their use of learning technologies along with barriers to their adoption. Principal components analysis suggested…

  20. Psychosocial Factors Associated with Depression in Urban Adolescent Females: Implications for Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbs, Jewelle Taylor

    Despite an increased interest in adolescent depression from theoretical and clinical perspectives, there have been few attempts to investigate depression in non-clinical populations. To identify demographic, sociocultural, and behavioral factors related to adolescent depression in a non-clinical population of urban adolescent females, a racially…

  1. Genetic and environmental factors affecting early rooting of six Populus genomic groups: implications for tree improvement

    Treesearch

    Ronald S., Jr. Zalesny

    2006-01-01

    Genetic and environmental factors affect the early rooting of Populus planted as unrooted hardwood cuttings. Populus genotypes of six genomic groups were tested in numerous studies for the quantitative genetics of rooting, along with effects of preplanting treatments and soil temperature. Genetics data (e.g. heritabilities,...

  2. Rhodopseudomonas palustris CGA010 Proteome Implicates Extracytoplasmic Function Sigma Factor in Stress Response

    DOE PAGES

    Allen, Michael S.; Hurst, Gregory B.; Lu, Tse-Yuan S.; ...

    2015-04-08

    Rhodopseudomonas palustris encodes 16 extracytoplasmic function (ECF) σ factors. In this paper, to begin to investigate the regulatory network of one of these ECF σ factors, the whole proteome of R. palustris CGA010 was quantitatively analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry from cultures episomally expressing the ECF σRPA4225 (ecfT) versus a WT control. Among the proteins with the greatest increase in abundance were catalase KatE, trehalose synthase, a DPS-like protein, and several regulatory proteins. Alignment of the cognate promoter regions driving expression of several upregulated proteins suggested a conserved binding motif in the -35 and -10 regions with the consensus sequencemore » GGAAC-18N-TT. Additionally, the putative anti-σ factor RPA4224, whose gene is contained in the same predicted operon as RPA4225, was identified as interacting directly with the predicted response regulator RPA4223 by mass spectrometry of affinity-isolated protein complexes. Furthermore, another gene (RPA4226) coding for a protein that contains a cytoplasmic histidine kinase domain is located immediately upstream of RPA4225. The genomic organization of orthologs for these four genes is conserved in several other strains of R. palustris as well as in closely related α-Proteobacteria. Finally, taken together, these data suggest that ECF σRPA4225 and the three additional genes make up a sigma factor mimicry system in R. palustris.« less

  3. Mechanisms of Inhibition of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor: Implications for Novel Anti-Cancer Therapies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    activation by the secreted protein Argos. Nature 376, 699-702 11995). Koji Nagao 3, Yoh Adachi2 & Mitsuhiro Vanagida ’-’ 6. Golembo, h., Schweitzes; R...University Yoshida - 7. Freeman, M., Klantht, C., Goodstan, C. S. & Rahin, G. M. The argas geee ercodes a diifusihlc factor Honrnachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606

  4. Factor Structure of the Restricted Academic Situation Scale: Implications for ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karama, Sherif; Amor, Leila Ben; Grizenko, Natalie; Ciampi, Antonio; Mbekou, Valentin; Ter-Stepanian, Marina; Lageix, Philippe; Baron, Chantal; Schwartz, George; Joober, Ridha

    2009-01-01

    Background: To study the factor structure of the Restricted Academic Situation Scale (RASS), a psychometric tool used to assess behavior in children with ADHD, 117 boys and 21 girls meeting "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th ed.; "DSM-IV") criteria for ADHD and aged between 6 and 12 years were recruited. Assessments were…

  5. Social Factors and Language Proficiency in Postsecondary Spanish Immersion: Issues and Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Andrew; Klee, Carol A.; Tedick, Diane J,

    2001-01-01

    Attempts to stimulate research and discussion of the social and affective variables that may impact language development in the adult second language immersion experience, because they may be noticeably different from the social factors at play in primary and secondary school-age learners' experiences. (Author/VWL)

  6. Factor structure of essential social skills to be salespersons in retail market: implications for psychiatric rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Leo C C; Tsang, Hector W H

    2005-12-01

    This study continued the effort to apply social skills training to increase vocational outcomes of people with severe mental illness. We planned to identify factor structure of essential social skills necessary for mental health consumers who have a vocational preference to work as salesperson in retail market. Exploratory factor analysis of the results of a 26-item questionnaire survey suggested a five-factor solution: social skills when interacting with customers, problem-solving skills, knowledge and attitudes, flexibility, and skills for conflict prevention, which accounted for 65.1% of the total variance. With the factor solution, we developed a job-specific social skills training program (JSST) to help consumers who want to be salespersons. The structure and session design followed the basic format of a typical social skills training program. The way this JSST is to be used with the work-related social skills training model previously developed by the corresponding author to produce better vocational outcomes of consumers is suggested.

  7. Individual and Contextual Factors for Bullying and Peer Victimization: Implications for Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vivolo, Alana M.; Holt, Melissa K.; Massetti, Greta M.

    2011-01-01

    The Division of Violence Prevention (DVP) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is committed to preventing youth violence. For the past decade, DVP has supported research on risk and protective factors associated with youth interpersonal violence and the development and evaluation of prevention programs. This commentary addresses…

  8. The Common Factors Model: Implications for Transtheoretical Clinical Social Work Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, Mark; Keenan, Elizabeth King

    2010-01-01

    Direct practice social workers today are challenged to address the requirements of the complex array of professional, organizational, institutional, and regulatory demands placed on them in the broader socioeconomic context of fewer resources and diminished public support for social welfare services in the United States. The common factors model…

  9. Factors of Peak Performance in the Death Crisis: Implications for Death Counseling and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Privette, Gayle

    Peak performance in the death crisis as a critical incident of creative response to the awareness of one's own or another person's death is the concern of this report. The topology of peak performance in the death crisis was examined in an investigation of retrospective self-reports of 20 adult respondents and a factor structure of peak…

  10. Understory vegetation and site factors : implications for a managed Wisconsin landscape

    Treesearch

    K.D. Brosofske; J. Chen; Thomas R. Crow

    2001-01-01

    We investigated relationships between edaphic and environmental factors (soil, forest floor, topography, and canopy) and understory vegetation (composition, richness, and Shannon-Wiener diversity index, H')among 77 plots representing seven major patch types comprising a landscape in northern Wisconsin that has a long history of human management. Sampled patch...

  11. Adolescent Girls' Perceptions of Smoking Risk and Protective Factors: Implications for Message Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curbow, Barbara; Bowie, Janice; Binko, JoAnn; Smith, Stephanie; Dreyling, Erin; McDonnell, Karen A.

    2007-01-01

    Using a snowball technique, in-depth interviews were conducted with 108 girls emanating from seven demographically dissimilar social networks. Girls were asked to classify 58 items as either a risk or protective factor for smoking initiation and then to assign an importance weighting to each. All items except one (worries about her weight) were…

  12. Factors of Peak Performance in the Death Crisis: Implications for Death Counseling and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Privette, Gayle

    Peak performance in the death crisis as a critical incident of creative response to the awareness of one's own or another person's death is the concern of this report. The topology of peak performance in the death crisis was examined in an investigation of retrospective self-reports of 20 adult respondents and a factor structure of peak…

  13. Factors Affecting the Establishment of Young Farm Operators in Iowa and Implications for Agricultural Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Harold R.

    A stratified random sample of 307 young farm operators from the five farming areas of Iowa were interviewed to: (1) ascertain factors influencing the establishment of young farm operators, (2) estimate the number of young farm operators becoming established each year, (3) determine their agricultural education needs, (4) examine differences among…

  14. Adolescent Girls' Perceptions of Smoking Risk and Protective Factors: Implications for Message Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curbow, Barbara; Bowie, Janice; Binko, JoAnn; Smith, Stephanie; Dreyling, Erin; McDonnell, Karen A.

    2007-01-01

    Using a snowball technique, in-depth interviews were conducted with 108 girls emanating from seven demographically dissimilar social networks. Girls were asked to classify 58 items as either a risk or protective factor for smoking initiation and then to assign an importance weighting to each. All items except one (worries about her weight) were…

  15. Factors Affecting Faculty Use of Learning Technologies: Implications for Models of Technology Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Tom; Sainter, Phillip; Saunders, Gunter

    2013-01-01

    This study examines factors associated with the use of learning technologies by higher education faculty. In an online survey in a UK university, 114 faculty respondents completed a measure of Internet self-efficacy, and reported on their use of learning technologies along with barriers to their adoption. Principal components analysis suggested…

  16. Implications for risk assessment of host factors causing large pharmacokinetic variations

    SciTech Connect

    Vesell, E.S.

    1985-12-01

    Normal human subjects vary widely in their capacity to eliminate many drugs and environmental chemicals. These variations range in magnitude from fourfold to fortyfold depending on the drug and the population studied. Pharmacogenetics deals with only one of many host factors responsible for these large pharmacokinetic differences. Age, sex, diet and exposure to other drugs and chemicals, including oral contraceptives, ethanol and cigarette smoking, can alter the genetically determined rate at which a particular subject eliminates drugs and environmental chemicals. These elimination rates, therefore, are dynamic and change even in the same subject with time and condition. Regulatory legislation has only recently begun to recognize this very broad spectrum of human susceptibility and the existence of multiple special subgroups of particularly sensitive subjects. In setting standards for environmental chemicals, EPA and NIOSH have attempted to protect the most sensitive humans and should be encouraged to continue this policy. For some drugs and environmental chemicals, the commonly used safety factor of 100 may be too low; for these chemicals large, interindividual pharmacokinetic variations produced by pharmacogenetic and other host factors may make a safety factor of 400 or 500 more adequate.

  17. Contextual Factors Affecting Learning in Laos and the Implications for Information Literacy Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorner, Daniel G.; Gorman, G. E.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Laos is used as a case study of how factors such as culture and indigenous knowledge must be considered to plan for information literacy education that is culturally and contextually appropriate. Method: Data were obtained from observations during visits to four Lao schools and from interviews with fourteen teachers at these schools.…

  18. Nuclearly encoded splicing factors implicated in RNA splicing in higher plant organelles.

    PubMed

    de Longevialle, Andéol Falcon; Small, Ian D; Lurin, Claire

    2010-07-01

    Plant organelles arose from two independent endosymbiosis events. Throughout evolutionary history, tight control of chloroplasts and mitochondria has been gained by the nucleus, which regulates most steps of organelle genome expression and metabolism. In particular, RNA maturation, including RNA splicing, is highly dependent on nuclearly encoded splicing factors. Most introns in organelles are group II introns, whose catalytic mechanism closely resembles that of the nuclear spliceosome. Plant group II introns have lost the ability to self-splice in vivo and require nuclearly encoded proteins as cofactors. Since the first splicing factor was identified in chloroplasts more than 10 years ago, many other proteins have been shown to be involved in splicing of one or more introns in chloroplasts or mitochondria. These new proteins belong to a variety of different families of RNA binding proteins and provide new insights into ribonucleo-protein complexes and RNA splicing machineries in organelles. In this review, we describe how splicing factors, encoded by the nucleus and targeted to the organelles, take part in post-transcriptional steps in higher plant organelle gene expression. We go on to discuss the potential for these factors to regulate organelle gene expression.

  19. Rhodopseudomonas palustris CGA010 Proteome Implicates Extracytoplasmic Function Sigma Factor in Stress Response

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Michael S.; Hurst, Gregory B.; Lu, Tse-Yuan S.; Perry, Leslie M.; Pan, Chongle; Lankford, Patricia K.; Pelletier, Dale A.

    2015-04-08

    Rhodopseudomonas palustris encodes 16 extracytoplasmic function (ECF) σ factors. In this paper, to begin to investigate the regulatory network of one of these ECF σ factors, the whole proteome of R. palustris CGA010 was quantitatively analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry from cultures episomally expressing the ECF σRPA4225 (ecfT) versus a WT control. Among the proteins with the greatest increase in abundance were catalase KatE, trehalose synthase, a DPS-like protein, and several regulatory proteins. Alignment of the cognate promoter regions driving expression of several upregulated proteins suggested a conserved binding motif in the -35 and -10 regions with the consensus sequence GGAAC-18N-TT. Additionally, the putative anti-σ factor RPA4224, whose gene is contained in the same predicted operon as RPA4225, was identified as interacting directly with the predicted response regulator RPA4223 by mass spectrometry of affinity-isolated protein complexes. Furthermore, another gene (RPA4226) coding for a protein that contains a cytoplasmic histidine kinase domain is located immediately upstream of RPA4225. The genomic organization of orthologs for these four genes is conserved in several other strains of R. palustris as well as in closely related α-Proteobacteria. Finally, taken together, these data suggest that ECF σRPA4225 and the three additional genes make up a sigma factor mimicry system in R. palustris.

  20. A Synthesis of Studies Searching for School Factors: Implications for Theory and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyriakides, Leonidas; Creemers, Bert; Antoniou, Panayiotis; Demetriou, Demetris

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a meta-analysis in which the dynamic model of educational effectiveness is used as a framework to search for school factors associated with student achievement. The methods and results of a synthesis of 67 studies are presented. Findings reveal that effective schools are able to develop policies and take actions…

  1. Factor Structure of the Restricted Academic Situation Scale: Implications for ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karama, Sherif; Amor, Leila Ben; Grizenko, Natalie; Ciampi, Antonio; Mbekou, Valentin; Ter-Stepanian, Marina; Lageix, Philippe; Baron, Chantal; Schwartz, George; Joober, Ridha

    2009-01-01

    Background: To study the factor structure of the Restricted Academic Situation Scale (RASS), a psychometric tool used to assess behavior in children with ADHD, 117 boys and 21 girls meeting "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th ed.; "DSM-IV") criteria for ADHD and aged between 6 and 12 years were recruited. Assessments were…

  2. RENO, NV, JANUARY 15, 2004: FACTORS IMPLICATED IN AMPHIBIAN POPULATION DECLINES IN THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Factors known or suspected to be adversely affecting native amphibian populations in the US were identified using information from 267 species accounts written in a standardized format by multiple authors in the forthcoming book, 'Status and Conservation of U.S. Amphibians'. Spec...

  3. Are polymorphisms of the immunoregulatory factor CD40LG implicated in acute transfusion reactions?

    PubMed Central

    Aloui, Chaker; Sut, Caroline; Prigent, Antoine; Fagan, Jocelyne; Cognasse, Fabrice; Granados-Herbepin, Viviana; Touraine, Renaud; Pozzetto, Bruno; Aouni, Mahjoub; Fendri, Chedlia; Hassine, Mohsen; Chakroun, Tahar; Jemni-Yacoub, Saloua; Garraud, Olivier; Laradi, Sandrine

    2014-01-01

    The CD40 ligand (CD40L/CD154), a member of TNF superfamily, is notably expressed on activated CD4+ T-cells and stimulated platelets. CD40L is linked to a variety of pathologies and to acute transfusion reactions (ATR). Mutations in this gene (CD40LG) lead to X-linked hyper-IgM syndrome. Some CD40LG polymorphisms are associated with variable protein expression. The rationale behind this study is that CD40L protein has been observed to be involved in ATR. We wondered whether genetic polymorphisms are implicated. We investigated genetic diversity in the CD40LG using DHPLC and capillary electrophoresis for screening and genotyping (n = 485 French and Tunisian blood donors). We identified significant difference in the CD40LG linkage pattern between the two populations. Variant minor alleles were significantly over-represented in Tunisian donors (P<0.0001 to 0.0270). We found higher heterogeneity in the Tunisian, including three novel low frequency variants. As there was not a particular pattern of CD40LG in single apheresis donors whose platelet components induced an ATR, we discuss how this information may be useful for future disease association studies on CD40LG. PMID:25430087

  4. Autonomic nervous system factors underlying disinhibited, antisocial, and violent behavior. Biosocial perspectives and treatment implications.

    PubMed

    Raine, A

    1996-09-20

    This paper reviews the autonomic psychophysiological correlates of antisocial and aggressive behavior in children and adolescents, outlines a biosocial perspective, and draws implications for treatment and prevention. Findings of studies on resting skin conductance and heart rate indicate that antisocial individuals are characterized by underarousal; these findings suggest that aggressive children may be stimulation seekers who are relatively fearless. Autonomic underarousal also typifies infants and young children with a disinhibited temperament that is thought to be a predisposition to juvenile delinquency and adult aggressive behavior. Deficits in the orienting response, a measure of attention allocation, also predisposes to later antisocial and criminal behavior. Initial studies have shown that particularly high levels of orienting, arousal, and conditionability may protect against crime development in those predisposed to such an outcome. From a biosocial standpoint, it is hypothesized that the psychophysiological correlates of antisocial and violent behavior may be greatest in those from more benign home backgrounds where the psychosocial push forward is relatively weaker. Alternatively, early environmental stress may underlie autonomic underarousal and hyporeactivity in antisocial individuals. Finally, it is possible that biofeedback, in combination with a multimodal treatment program, may be one benign intervention technique that may increase arousal and reduce aggression in underaroused antisocial children.

  5. Mechanistic Modeling of Emergency Events: Assessing the Impact of Hypothetical Releases of Anthrax

    PubMed Central

    Isukapalli, S. S.; Lioy, P. J.; Georgopoulos, P. G.

    2011-01-01

    A modular system for source-to-dose-to-effect modeling analysis has been developed based on the modeling environment for total risk studies (MENTOR),(1) and applied to study the impacts of hypothetical atmospheric releases of anthrax spores. The system, MENTOR-2E (MENTOR for Emergency Events), provides mechanistically consistent analysis of inhalation exposures for various release scenarios, while allowing consideration of specific susceptible subpopulations (such as the elderly) at the resolution of individual census tracts. The MENTOR-2E application presented here includes atmospheric dispersion modeling, statistically representative samples of individuals along with corresponding activity patterns, and population-based dosimetry modeling that accounts for activity and physiological variability. Two hypothetical release scenarios were simulated: a 100 g release of weaponized B. anthracis over a period of (a) one hour and (b) 10 hours, and the impact of these releases on population in the State of New Jersey was studied. Results were compared with those from simplified modeling of population dynamics (location, activities, etc.), and atmospheric dispersion of anthrax spores. The comparisons showed that in the two release scenarios simulated, each major approximation resulted in an overestimation of the number of probable infections by a factor of 5 to 10; these overestimations can have significant public health implications when preparing for and responding effectively to an actual release. This is in addition to uncertainties in dose-response modeling, which result in an additional factor of 5 to 10 variation in estimated casualties. The MENTOR-2E system has been developed in a modular fashion so that improvements in individual modules can be readily made without impacting the other modules, and provides a first step toward the development of models that can be used in supporting real-time decision making. PMID:18643828

  6. Exercise and brain health--implications for multiple sclerosis: Part 1--neuronal growth factors.

    PubMed

    White, Lesley J; Castellano, Vanessa

    2008-01-01

    The benefits of regular exercise to promote general health and reduce the risk of hypokinetic diseases associated with sedentary lifestyles are well recognized. Recent studies suggest that exercise may enhance neurobiological processes that promote brain health in aging and disease. A current frontier in the neurodegenerative disorder multiple sclerosis (MS) concerns the role of physical activity for promoting brain health through protective, regenerative and adaptive neural processes. Research on neuromodulation, raises the possibility that regular physical activity may mediate favourable changes in disease factors and symptoms associated with MS, in part through changes in neuroactive proteins. Insulin-like growth factor-I appears to act as a neuroprotective agent and studies indicate that exercise could promote this factor in MS. Neurotrophins, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor likely play roles in neuronal survival and activity-dependent plasticity. Physical activity has also been shown to up-regulate hippocampal BDNF, which may play a role in mood states, learning and memory to lessen the decline in cognitive function associated with MS. In addition, exercise may promote anti-oxidant defences and neurotrophic support that could attenuate CNS vulnerability to neuronal degeneration. Exercise exposure (preconditioning) may serve as a mechanism to enhance stress resistance and thereby may support neuronal survival under heightened stress conditions. Considering that axonal loss and cerebral atrophy occur early in the disease, exercise prescription in the acute stage could promote neuroprotection, neuroregeneration and neuroplasticity and reduce long-term disability. This review concludes with a proposed conceptual model to connect these promising links between exercise and brain health.

  7. Implications of biological factors on accumulation of persistent organic pollutants in Antarctic notothenioid fish.

    PubMed

    Ríos, J M; Lana, N B; Ciocco, N F; Covaci, A; Barrera-Oro, E; Moreira, E; Altamirano, J C

    2017-11-01

    In the present study, the possible associations between selected persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and biological factors were assessed in different tissues of two Antarctic notothenioid fish: Notothenia rossii (NOR) and Trematomus newnesi (TRN) collected at Potter Cove, King George Island/Isla 25 de Mayo, South Shetland Islands. Specifically, association patterns between biological factors (body size, lipid content, body condition) and POP concentrations (polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and metabolites, polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), and hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), chlordanes (CHLs) and methoxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (MeO-PBDEs)), were explored by using two approaches: multivariate analyses (principal component analysis: PCA) and intraspecific correlations. Integrating results suggest that biological factors such as size, KI and tissue type seemed to be associated to selective accumulation of POPs for immature specimens of N. rossii, and KI and tissue type for mature specimens of T. newnesi. Each particular factor should be considered when choosing N. rossii or T. newnesi as sentinels for POPs pollution in Antarctic marine environments. Further, both nototheniids showed a selective accumulation pattern in their gonads of penta-chlorinated biphenyls (penta-CBs; 55.5 and 29ngg(-1) lw for N. rossii and T. newnesi, respectively) and organochlorine pesticides such as DDTs (199 and 13.3ngg(-1) lw, for N. rossii and T. newnesi respectively), and of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in gills (97.2 and 22.1 for ngg(-1) lw, for N. rossii and T. newnesi, respectively), highlighting the importance of these tissues in monitoring studies of pollution in fish. The current study expands the knowledge concerning the biological factors to be investigated when specific pollutants are monitored and supports the importance of tissue type for the selective accumulation of POPs in Antarctic

  8. New insight in expression, transport, and secretion of brain-derived neurotrophic factor: Implications in brain-related diseases

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, Naoki; Numakawa, Tadahiro; Richards, Misty; Nakajima, Shingo; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) attracts increasing attention from both research and clinical fields because of its important functions in the central nervous system. An adequate amount of BDNF is critical to develop and maintain normal neuronal circuits in the brain. Given that loss of BDNF function has been reported in the brains of patients with neurodegenerative or psychiatric diseases, understanding basic properties of BDNF and associated intracellular processes is imperative. In this review, we revisit the gene structure, transcription, translation, transport and secretion mechanisms of BDNF. We also introduce implications of BDNF in several brain-related diseases including Alzheimer’s disease, Huntington’s disease, depression and schizophrenia. PMID:25426265

  9. Implications of the Fukushima Nuclear Disaster: Man-Made Hazards, Vulnerability Factors, and Risk to Environmental Health.

    PubMed

    Eddy, Christopher; Sase, Eriko

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this article was to examine the environmental health implications of the 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster from an all-hazards perspective. The authors performed a literature review that included Japanese and international nuclear guidance and policy, scientific papers, and reports on the Chernobyl and Three Mile Island disasters while also considering all-hazards preparedness rubrics in the U.S. The examination of the literature resulted in the following: a) the authors' "All-Hazards Planning Reference Model" that distinguishes three planning categories-Disaster Trigger Event, Man-Made Hazards, and Vulnerability Factors; b) the generalization of their model to other countries; and c) advocacy for environmental health end fate to be considered in planning phases to minimize risk to environmental health. This article discusses inconsistencies in disaster planning and nomenclature existing in the studied materials and international guidance and proposes new opportunity for developing predisaster risk assessment, risk communication, and prevention capacity building.

  10. Transforming Growth Factor-Beta and Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator: Dangerous Partners in Tumorigenesis—Implications in Skin Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Santibanez, Juan F.

    2013-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) is a pleiotropic factor, with several different roles in health and disease. TGF-β has been postulated as a dual factor in tumor progression, since it represses epithelial tumor development in early stages, whereas it stimulates tumor progression in advanced stages. During tumorigenesis, cancer cells acquire the capacity to migrate and invade surrounding tissues and to metastasize different organs. The urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) system, comprising uPA, the uPA cell surface receptor, and plasminogen-plasmin, is involved in the proteolytic degradation of the extracellular matrix and regulates key cellular events by activating intracellular signal pathways, which together allow cancer cells to survive, thus, enhancing cell malignance during tumor progression. Due to their importance, uPA and its receptor are tightly transcriptionally regulated in normal development, but are deregulated in cancer, when their activity and expression are related to further development of cancer. TGF-β regulates uPA expression in cancer cells, while uPA, by plasminogen activation, may activate the secreted latent TGF-β, thus, producing a pernicious cycle which contributes to the enhancement of tumor progression. Here we review the specific roles and the interplay between TGF-β and uPA system in cancer cells and their implication in skin cancer. PMID:23984088

  11. Targeting hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) signaling in therapeutics: implications for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Simon A; Beck, Paul L; MacDonald, Justin A

    2009-01-01

    In response to hypoxia, adaptive hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) signaling events are activated to increase oxygen transport, anaerobic energy production and protective pathways to minimize ischemic tissue damage. Although the activation and subsequent induction of gene transcription by HIF-1 is normally associated with hypoxia, it is now established that HIF-1 signaling can be triggered under inflammatory conditions. HIF-1 has been implicated in a number of inflammatory diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, allergic asthma, psoriasis and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In the gastrointestinal tract, HIF-1-regulated gene products, such as vascular endothelial growth factor, intestinal trefoil factor and CD73, have been shown to provide protection in animal models of intestinal inflammation. Given the importance of HIF-1 signaling in the aforementioned diseases, there exists considerable interest in the development of methods to modulate HIF-1 expression as well as down-stream signaling events. This review examines HIF-1 signaling with a special focus on the gastrointestinal tract. The patents pertaining to the modulation of HIF-1 signaling are summarized, and their relevance to the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease is discussed.

  12. Factors implicated in pathogenesis of urinary tract infections in neurogenic bladders: some revered, few forgotten, others ignored.

    PubMed

    Vasudeva, Pawan; Madersbacher, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    To comprehensively review factors implicated in the pathogenesis of urinary tract infection in patients with neurogenic bladders, and to stimulate research, especially in the somewhat ignored and forgotten areas of this important clinical subject. In addition to reviewing relevant articles on pubmed, some important articles from previous times which were not available online were also procured and reviewed. Intrinsic defence mechanisms including protective flora, anti-adherence mechanisms, urothelial, and immunological responses to bacterial binding and the blood supply to the urinary bladder may be impaired in patients with neurogenic bladders. Further, bacterial washout mechanisms may be compromised as a result of inefficient voiding, reflux, and altered hydrokinetics. Finally, catheterization itself contributes to urinary tract infection in patients with neurogenic bladders. In order to address the issue of urinary tract infection in patients with neurogenic bladders, multiple factors need to be looked into and corrected. Further research is required, especially in the area of compromised host defence mechanisms. An individualized approach, which attempts to optimize each factor is recommended. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Jacquelines of all trades or masters of some? Negative implications of focusing on common factors.

    PubMed

    Smith, Douglas C

    2012-07-01

    The emphasis on common factors initially grew out of increasingly frustrating findings from randomized clinical trials that head-to-head comparison of different treatments rarely found one to be superior (Luborsky et al., 2002; Luborsky, Singer, & Luborsky, 1975). In this regard, Cameron and Keenan (2010) have done well calling attention to a fundamental problem we deal with in researching, practicing, and teaching. As an instructor, it is difficult to teach practice- minded MSW students about empirically supported treatments when, with few exceptions, most theoretically distinct treatments that have been contrasted are not so different in terms of outcomes. This beckons us to teach students to think critically and understand the limits of current research on empirically supported treatments. However, I have argued here that there are benefits to teaching students about specific ESTs. It is plausible that providing extensive training in specific ESTs could be a platform for teaching about common factors, rather than focusing on developing generalist skills and later learning specific techniques that are needed in certain practice areas. Doing so gives students some useful techniques, which are associated with clinical improvement and can be adapted to other practice settings. It is unclear if the same can be said for teaching a common factors approach, which is already the dominant training model in social work. Of course, empirical research is needed to determine whether varying degrees of training emphasis on common factors or specific ESTs affect clinical skill development or adoption of ESTs. With regard to the issue of common factors in clinical research, health services researchers are already being encouraged to propose novel techniques for how we might affect common factors. Although it is clear that such mechanisms are not always unique to particular treatments, such research is typically being done incrementally by studying in-session processes operating

  14. Tear gas: an epidemiological and mechanistic reassessment

    PubMed Central

    Rothenberg, Craig; Achanta, Satyanarayana; Svendsen, Erik R.

    2016-01-01

    Deployments of tear gas and pepper spray have rapidly increased worldwide. Large amounts of tear gas have been used in densely populated cities, including Cairo, Istanbul, Rio de Janeiro, Manama (Bahrain), and Hong Kong. In the United States, tear gas was used extensively during recent riots in Ferguson, Missouri. Whereas tear gas deployment systems have rapidly improved—with aerial drone systems tested and requested by law enforcement—epidemiological and mechanistic research have lagged behind and have received little attention. Case studies and recent epidemiological studies revealed that tear gas agents can cause lung, cutaneous, and ocular injuries, with individuals affected by chronic morbidities at high risk for complications. Mechanistic studies identified the ion channels TRPV1 and TRPA1 as targets of capsaicin in pepper spray, and of the tear gas agents chloroacetophenone, CS, and CR. TRPV1 and TRPA1 localize to pain‐sensing peripheral sensory neurons and have been linked to acute and chronic pain, cough, asthma, lung injury, dermatitis, itch, and neurodegeneration. In animal models, transient receptor potential inhibitors show promising effects as potential countermeasures against tear gas injuries. On the basis of the available data, a reassessment of the health risks of tear gas exposures in the civilian population is advised, and development of new countermeasures is proposed. PMID:27391380

  15. Tear gas: an epidemiological and mechanistic reassessment.

    PubMed

    Rothenberg, Craig; Achanta, Satyanarayana; Svendsen, Erik R; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2016-08-01

    Deployments of tear gas and pepper spray have rapidly increased worldwide. Large amounts of tear gas have been used in densely populated cities, including Cairo, Istanbul, Rio de Janeiro, Manama (Bahrain), and Hong Kong. In the United States, tear gas was used extensively during recent riots in Ferguson, Missouri. Whereas tear gas deployment systems have rapidly improved-with aerial drone systems tested and requested by law enforcement-epidemiological and mechanistic research have lagged behind and have received little attention. Case studies and recent epidemiological studies revealed that tear gas agents can cause lung, cutaneous, and ocular injuries, with individuals affected by chronic morbidities at high risk for complications. Mechanistic studies identified the ion channels TRPV1 and TRPA1 as targets of capsaicin in pepper spray, and of the tear gas agents chloroacetophenone, CS, and CR. TRPV1 and TRPA1 localize to pain-sensing peripheral sensory neurons and have been linked to acute and chronic pain, cough, asthma, lung injury, dermatitis, itch, and neurodegeneration. In animal models, transient receptor potential inhibitors show promising effects as potential countermeasures against tear gas injuries. On the basis of the available data, a reassessment of the health risks of tear gas exposures in the civilian population is advised, and development of new countermeasures is proposed.

  16. Prolonged survival after diagnosis of brain metastasis from breast cancer: contributing factors and treatment implications.

    PubMed

    Honda, Yayoi; Aruga, Tomoyuki; Yamashita, Toshinari; Miyamoto, Hiromi; Horiguchi, Kazumi; Kitagawa, Dai; Idera, Nami; Goto, Risa; Kuroi, Katsumasa

    2015-08-01

    The prognosis of breast cancer-derived brain metastasis is poor, but new drugs and recent therapeutic strategies have helped extend survival in patients. Prediction of therapeutic responses and outcomes is not yet possible, however. In a retrospective study, we examined prognostic factors in patients with breast cancer-derived brain metastasis, and we tested the prognostic utility of a breast cancer-specific Graded Prognostic Assessment in these patients. Sixty-three patients diagnosed with brain metastasis from breast cancer treated surgically and adjuvantly were included. We examined clinical variables per primary tumor subtype: ER+/HER2- (luminal), HER2+ (human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2-enriched) or ER-/PR-/HER2- (triple negative). We also categorized patients' breast cancer-specific Graded Prognostic Assessment scores and analyzed post-brain metastasis survival time in relation to these categories. The breast cancers comprised the following subtypes: luminal, n = 18; human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2-enriched, n = 27 and triple-negative, n = 18; median survival per subtype was 11, 37 and 3 months, respectively. Survival of human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2-enriched patients was longer, though not significantly (P = 0.188), than that of luminal patients. Survival of triple-negative patients was significantly short (vs. human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2-enriched patients, P < 0.001). Karnofsky performance status, HER2 status and the disease-free interval (from initial treatment to first recurrence) were shown to be significant prognostic factors (Karnofsky performance status < 70: relative risk 2.08, P = 0.028; HER2+: relative risk 2.911, P = 0.004; disease-free interval < 24 months: relative risk 1.933, P = 0.011). Breast cancer-specific Graded Prognostic Assessment scores reflected disease-free intervals and survival times. Our data indicate that breast cancer-specific Graded Prognostic Assessment

  17. The hippocampus, neurotrophic factors and depression: possible implications for the pharmacotherapy of depression.

    PubMed

    Masi, Gabriele; Brovedani, Paola

    2011-11-01

    Depression is a prevalent, highly debilitating mental disorder affecting up to 15% of the population at least once in their lifetime, with huge costs for society. Neurobiological mechanisms of depression are still not well known, although there is consensus about interplay between genetic and environmental factors. Antidepressant medications are frequently used in depression, but at least 50% of patients are poor responders, even to more recently discovered medications. Furthermore, clinical response only occurs following weeks to months of treatment and only chronic treatment is effective, suggesting that actions beyond the rapidly occurring effect of enhancing monoaminergic systems, such as adaptation of these systems, are responsible for the effects of antidepressants. Recent studies indicate that an impairment of synaptic plasticity (neurogenesis, axon branching, dendritogenesis and synaptogenesis) in specific areas of the CNS, particularly the hippocampus, may be a core factor in the pathophysiology of depression. The abnormal neural plasticity may be related to alterations in the levels of neurotrophic factors, namely brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which play a central role in plasticity. As BDNF is repressed by stress, epigenetic regulation of the BDNF gene may play an important role in depression. The hippocampus is smaller in depressed patients, although it is unclear whether smaller size is a consequence of depression or a pre-existing, vulnerability marker for depression. Environmental stressors triggering activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis cause the brain to be exposed to corticosteroids, affecting neurobehavioural functions with a strong downregulation of hippocampal neurogenesis, and are a major risk factor for depression. Antidepressant treatment increases BDNF levels, stimulates neurogenesis and reverses the inhibitory effects of stress, but this effect is evident only after 3-4 weeks of administration, the time course

  18. Calorie restriction and cancer prevention: a mechanistic perspective

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) is one of the most potent broadly acting dietary interventions for inducing weight loss and for inhibiting cancer in experimental models. Translation of the mechanistic lessons learned from research on CR to cancer prevention strategies in human beings is important given the high prevalence of excess energy intake, obesity, and metabolic syndrome in many parts of the world and the established links between obesity-associated metabolic perturbations and increased risk or progression of many types of cancer. This review synthesizes findings on the biological mechanisms underlying many of the anticancer effects of CR, with emphasis on the impact of CR on growth factor signaling pathways, inflammation, cellular and systemic energy homeostasis pathways, vascular perturbations, and the tumor microenvironment. These CR-responsive pathways and processes represent targets for translating CR research into effective cancer prevention strategies in human beings. PMID:24280167

  19. Appropriateness of mechanistic and non-mechanistic models for the application of ultrafiltration to mixed waste

    SciTech Connect

    Foust, Henry; Ghosehajra, Malay

    2007-07-01

    This study asks two questions: (1) How appropriate is the use of a basic filtration equation to the application of ultrafiltration of mixed waste, and (2) How appropriate are non-parametric models for permeate rates (volumes)? To answer these questions, mechanistic and non-mechanistic approaches are developed for permeate rates and volumes associated with an ultrafiltration/mixed waste system in dia-filtration mode. The mechanistic approach is based on a filtration equation which states that t/V vs. V is a linear relationship. The coefficients associated with this linear regression are composed of physical/chemical parameters of the system and based the mass balance equation associated with the membrane and associated developing cake layer. For several sets of data, a high correlation is shown that supports the assertion that t/V vs. V is a linear relationship. It is also shown that non-mechanistic approaches, i.e., the use of regression models to are not appropriate. One models considered is Q(p) = a*ln(Cb)+b. Regression models are inappropriate because the scale-up from a bench scale (pilot scale) study to full-scale for permeate rates (volumes) is not simply the ratio of the two membrane surface areas. (authors)

  20. Factors affecting sexual transmission of HIV-1: current evidence and implications for prevention.

    PubMed

    Chan, Derek J

    2005-07-01

    The predominant mode of HIV-1 transmission globally is from sexual practices. The risk of HIV-1 transmission by sexual means is a function of infectivity, susceptibility and mode of transmission (type of sexual practice). In addition, transmission may be significantly increased or decreased by factors relating to the HIV-1 per se, sexual behaviour, other sexually transmissible infections (STIs), antiretroviral therapy (ART), spermicidal microbicides and HIV-1 vaccines, the host immune system, genital anatomy and nutritional deficiencies. Current research into the factors affecting sexual transmission of HIV-1 appears to benefit developed nations more than developing nations because of structured public health systems and the capacity to translate research findings into prevention strategies. A redistribution of global aid funding would do much to alleviate the pandemic in developed countries.

  1. Implications of photophysical and physicochemical factors on successful application of photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Paul, Shubhajit; Heng, Paul Wan Sia; Chan, Lai Wah

    2017-03-06

    Photodynamic therapy is an evolving treatment modality for cancer owing to its non-invasive approach. This mode of therapy depends on the dynamic interaction of light, oxygen and a photoactive drug to induce oxidative damage to affected cells. This apparently simple technique could be complicated by several factors, mainly contributed by the nature of the physicochemical properties of the photoactive drug, variation in light source and exposure time, as well as tumor physiological environment. This review covers a brief history on the use of various fluorophores in photodynamic therapy, successful marketed formulations and the factors affecting the treatment modalities. The potential of nanostructures as effective delivery carriers with improved photodynamic efficacy is also elaborated. A thorough understanding of the chemistry of photoactive drugs, characteristics of the delivery carriers and light irradiation parameters will enable optimal efficacy of photodynamic therapy. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  2. Human factor implications of the Eurocopter AS332L-1 Super Puma cockpit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padfield, R. Randall

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to identify and describe some of the human factor problems which can occur in the cockpit of a modern civilian helicopter. After examining specific hardware and software problems in the cockpit design of the Eurocopter (Aerospatiale) AS332L-1 Super Puma, the author proposes several principles that can be used to avoid similar human factors problems in the design of future cockpits. These principles relate to the use and function of warning lights, the design of autopilots in two-pilot aircraft, and the labeling of switches and warning lights, specifically with respect to abbreviations and translations from languages other than English. In the final section of the paper, the author describes current trends in society which he suggests should be taken into consideration when designing future aircraft cockpits.

  3. Risk Factors for HIV Acquisition in Urban Latinos and Implications for Prevention.

    PubMed

    Angelo, Kristina Marie; Burton, Nicole; Ruiz, Marco Andres

    2015-01-01

    The risk of HIV in the Latino population in the United States is increasing. This population has a disproportionate number of new HIV cases, with the largest burden in the seventeen southern states. The purpose of this study is to assess risk factors for HIV among HIV-positive Latinos in care in New Orleans, Louisiana, through a retrospective chart review. The Chi square test of proportions, Student's t-test, and Wilcox rank sum test were used to test differences by sex and immigration status. Men were more likely to be incarcerated, use drugs, and drink alcohol. Undocumented Latinos were younger and had increased language barriers. Legally documented participants were more likely to use drugs, have a psychiatric diagnosis, and syphilis. Understanding the complex risk factors that surround HIV in the Latino population is useful for the development of effective and comprehensive prevention programs.

  4. Dioxin induces a novel nuclear factor, DIF-3, that is implicated in spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ohbayashi, T; Oikawa, K; Iwata, R; Kameta, A; Evine, K; Isobe, T; Matsuda, Y; Mimura, J; Fujii-Kuriyama, Y; Kuroda, M; Mukai, K

    2001-11-23

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD; dioxin), a member of a class of environmental pollutants represented by polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans, is one of the most toxic artificial compounds ever developed. In this study, we identified a novel TCDD target gene, DIF-3 (dioxin inducible factor-3), by cDNA representational difference analysis. DIF-3 protein is a nuclear factor and possesses a zinc-finger motif at its N-terminus. High DIF-3 mRNA expression in the testes was demonstrated by Northern blot analysis and abundant DIF-3 protein was detected during spermatogenesis. Thus, these results suggest that DIF-3 may be a target gene mediating the reproductive toxicity induced by TCDD.

  5. Role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the aetiology of depression: implications for pharmacological treatment.

    PubMed

    Castrén, Eero; Rantamäki, Tomi

    2010-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a critical mediator of activity-dependent neuronal plasticity in the cerebral cortex. Deficits in neurotrophic factors have been proposed to underlie mood disorders. However, recent evidence suggests that mood disorders may be produced by abnormalities in the adaptation of neural networks to environmental conditions. Antidepressants may act by enhancing neuronal plasticity, which allows environmental inputs to modify the neuronal networks to better fine tune the individual to the outside world. Recent observations in the visual cortex directly support this idea. According to the network hypothesis of depression, changes in the levels of neurotrophins including BDNF may not directly produce depression or an antidepressant effect, but neurotrophins may act as critical tools in the process whereby environmental conditions guide neuronal networks to better adapt to the environment. This hypothesis suggests that antidepressant drugs should not be used alone but should always be combined with rehabilitation to guide the plastic networks within the brain.

  6. Host immunity to Bacillus anthracis lethal factor and other immunogens: implications for vaccine design.

    PubMed

    Altmann, Daniel M

    2015-03-01

    Infections of humans with Bacillus anthracis are an issue with respect to the biothreat both to civilians and military personnel, infections of individuals by infected livestock in endemic regions and, recently, infections of intravenous drug users injecting anthrax-contaminated heroin. Existing vaccination regimens are reliant on protective antigen neutralization induced by repeated boosts with the AVA or AVP vaccines. However, there is ongoing interest in updated approaches in light of the intensive booster regime and extent of reactogenicity inherent in the current protocols. Several other immunogens from the B. anthracis proteome have been characterized in recent years, including lethal factor. Lethal factor induces strong CD4 T-cell immunity and encompasses immunodominant epitopes of relevance across diverse HLA polymorphisms. Taken together, recent studies emphasize the potential benefits of vaccines able to confer synergistic immunity to protective antigen and to other immunogens, targeting both B-cell and T-cell repertoires.

  7. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in head and neck cancer: its role and treatment implications

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Michel; Zouhair, Abderrahim; Azria, David; Ozsahin, Mahmut

    2006-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a member of the ErbB family of receptors. Its stimulation by endogenous ligands, EGF or transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-α) results in activation of intracellular tyrosine kinase, therefore, cell cycle progression. High levels of EGFR expression are correlated with poor prognosis and resistance to radiation therapy in a variety of cancers, mostly in squamous-cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Blocking the EGFR by a monoclonal antibody results in inhibition of the stimulation of the receptor, therefore, in inhibition of cell proliferation, enhanced apoptosis, and reduced angiogenesis, invasiveness and metastases. The EGFR is a prime target for new anticancer therapy in SCCHN, and other agents in development include small molecular tyrosine kinase inhibitors and antisense therapies. PMID:16722544

  8. Sleep disturbances in caregivers of persons with dementia: Contributing factors and treatment implications

    PubMed Central

    McCurry, Susan M.; Logsdon, Rebecca G.; Teri, Linda; Vitiello, Michael V.

    2007-01-01

    Estimates suggest that there are more than 10 million adult caregivers of persons with dementia, two-thirds of who experience some form of sleep disturbance during the course of their caregiving career. Health care professionals are in the best position to detect and address this significant public health problem. Three major contributors to caregiver sleep disturbance are discussed in this paper: 1) the presence of caregiver disrupted sleep routines; 2) caregiver burden and depression; and, 3) the caregiver’s physical health status. Successful treatment of a caregiver’s sleep disturbance requires careful consideration of each of these contributors. We review and analyze the scientific literature concerning the multiple complex factors associated with the development and maintenance of sleep disturbances in caregivers. We provide a clinical vignette that illustrates the interplay of these contributing factors, and close by providing recommendations for clinicians and researchers treating and investigating the development and maintenance of sleep problems in family caregivers. PMID:17287134

  9. Direct calibration in megavoltage photon beams using Monte Carlo conversion factor: validation and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Wright, Tracy; Lye, Jessica E; Ramanathan, Ganesan; Harty, Peter D; Oliver, Chris; Webb, David V; Butler, Duncan J

    2015-01-21

    The Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) has established a method for ionisation chamber calibrations using megavoltage photon reference beams. The new method will reduce the calibration uncertainty compared to a (60)Co calibration combined with the TRS-398 energy correction factor. The calibration method employs a graphite calorimeter and a Monte Carlo (MC) conversion factor to convert the absolute dose to graphite to absorbed dose to water. EGSnrc is used to model the linac head and doses in the calorimeter and water phantom. The linac model is validated by comparing measured and modelled PDDs and profiles. The relative standard uncertainties in the calibration factors at the ARPANSA beam qualities were found to be 0.47% at 6 MV, 0.51% at 10 MV and 0.46% for the 18 MV beam. A comparison with the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) as part of the key comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K6 gave results of 0.9965(55), 0.9924(60) and 0.9932(59) for the 6, 10 and 18 MV beams, respectively, with all beams within 1σ of the participant average. The measured kQ values for an NE2571 Farmer chamber were found to be lower than those in TRS-398 but are consistent with published measured and modelled values. Users can expect a shift in the calibration factor at user energies of an NE2571 chamber between 0.4-1.1% across the range of calibration energies compared to the current calibration method.

  10. The role of intrinsic factors in control of arm movement direction: implications from directional preferences.

    PubMed

    Dounskaia, Natalia; Goble, Jacob A; Wang, Wanyue

    2011-03-01

    The role of extrinsic and intrinsic factors in control of arm movement direction remains under debate. We addressed this question by investigating preferences in selection of movement direction and whether factors causing these preferences have extrinsic or intrinsic nature. An unconstrained free-stroke drawing task was used during which participants produced straight strokes on a horizontal table, choosing the direction and the beginning and end of each stroke arbitrarily. The variation of the initial arm postures across strokes provided a possibility to distinguish between the extrinsic and intrinsic origins of directional biases. Although participants were encouraged to produce strokes equally in all directions, each participant demonstrated preferences for some directions over the others. However, the preferred directions were not consistent across participants, suggesting no directional preferences in extrinsic space. Consistent biases toward certain directions were revealed in intrinsic space representing initial arm postures. Factors contributing to the revealed preferences were analyzed within the optimal control framework. The major bias was explained by a tendency predicted by the leading joint hypothesis (LJH) to minimize active interference with interaction torque generated by shoulder motion at the elbow. Some minor biases may represent movements of minimal inertial resistance or maximal kinematic manipulability. These results support a crucial role of intrinsic factors in control of the movement direction of the arm. Based on the LJH interpretation of the major bias, we hypothesize that the dominant tendency was to minimize neural effort for control of arm intersegmental dynamics. Possible organization of neural processes underlying optimal selection of movement direction is discussed.

  11. Different Factors Affecting Human ANP Amyloid Aggregation and Their Implications in Congestive Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Millucci, Lia; Paccagnini, Eugenio; Ghezzi, Lorenzo; Bernardini, Giulia; Braconi, Daniela; Laschi, Marcella; Consumi, Marco; Spreafico, Adriano; Tanganelli, Piero; Lupetti, Pietro; Magnani, Agnese; Santucci, Annalisa

    2011-01-01

    Aims Atrial Natriuretic Peptide (ANP)-containing amyloid is frequently found in the elderly heart. No data exist regarding ANP aggregation process and its link to pathologies. Our aims were: i) to experimentally prove the presumptive association of Congestive Heart Failure (CHF) and Isolated Atrial Amyloidosis (IAA); ii) to characterize ANP aggregation, thereby elucidating IAA implication in the CHF pathogenesis. Methods and Results A significant prevalence (85%) of IAA was immunohistochemically proven ex vivo in biopsies from CHF patients. We investigated in vitro (using Congo Red, Thioflavin T, SDS-PAGE, transmission electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy) ANP fibrillogenesis, starting from α-ANP as well as the ability of dimeric β-ANP to promote amyloid formation. Different conditions were adopted, including those reproducing β-ANP prevalence in CHF. Our results defined the uncommon rapidity of α-ANP self-assembly at acidic pH supporting the hypothesis that such aggregates constitute the onset of a fibrillization process subsequently proceeding at physiological pH. Interestingly, CHF-like conditions induced the production of the most stable and time-resistant ANP fibrils suggesting that CHF affected people may be prone to develop IAA. Conclusions We established a link between IAA and CHF by ex vivo examination and assessed that β-ANP is, in vitro, the seed of ANP fibrils. Our results indicate that β-ANP plays a crucial role in ANP amyloid deposition under physiopathological CHF conditions. Overall, our findings indicate that early IAA-related ANP deposition may occur in CHF and suggest that these latter patients should be monitored for the development of cardiac amyloidosis. PMID:21814559

  12. Factors associated with uterine endometrial hyperplasia and pyometra in wild canids: implications for fertility.

    PubMed

    Asa, Cheryl S; Bauman, Karen L; Devery, Sarah; Zordan, Martín; Camilo, Gerardo R; Boutelle, Sally; Moresco, Anneke

    2014-01-01

    The ability to safely and effectively manage reproduction is central to the success of AZA captive-breeding programs. Although the AZA Wildlife Contraception Center routinely monitors contraceptive safety, there have been no studies that compare the effects of contraceptive use to separation of males from females, the other option for preventing reproduction. We used retrospective medical records and pathology reports submitted by AZA and related facilities for the seven AZA-managed canid species to assess rates of uterine pathology relative to female reproductive life histories. Our results showed that the prevalence of both pyometra and endometrial hyperplasia (EH) was associated not only with treatment with the two most common contraceptives (Suprelorin® and MGA implants) but also with the number of years barren (i.e., not producing a litter and not contracepted). Rates of pyometra and EH were especially high in African painted dogs and red wolves, but lowest in swift and fennec foxes. The number of years producing a litter had a low association, suggesting it could be protective against uterine pathology. A more recently developed Suprelorin® protocol using Ovaban® to prevent the initial stimulation phase, followed by implant removal when reversal is desired, may be a safer contraceptive option. These results concerning the relationship between reproductive management and uterine health have important implications for AZA-managed programs, since the unsustainability of many captive populations may be due at least in part to infertility. Managing a female's reproductive lifespan to optimize or maintain fertility will require a reconsideration of how breeding recommendations are formulated.

  13. Albedo Dynamics after Fire in Southern Africa; Contributing Factors and Implications for Regional Climate.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, M.; D'Odorico, P.; Scanlon, T. M.

    2016-12-01

    Numerous studies have documented instantaneous reductions in albedo (darkening) of the land surface after fires in sub-Saharan Africa. However, at longer time scales the interplay of vegetation removal and revelation of dry underlaying soils could result in higher albedo (brightening) and a negative radiative forcing, a phenomenon that requires further investigation. In this study we consider the effect of fire on albedo weeks to months after early fires occurring southern Africa at the onset of the 2015 dry season. We make opportunistic use of the SMAP radar-based soil moisture product to account and correct for fine-scale spatiotemporal variability in soil moisture. Furthermore, this allows us to bypass issues associated with reference pixel approach. We use advanced statistical modeling and multiple satellite data sources to quantify the relative contributions of underlying soil type, fire-induced char deposition and vegetation removal, and seasonal fluctuations in soil moisture to overall albedo dynamics. In line with previous studies, we find a general decrease in albedo immediately following fire. However, within a month of burning, about half of the study pixels exhibit fire-induced brightening. Long-lived albedo increases of up to 0.04 are common in semiarid regions. These values continue to increase over the course of the dry season. There are distinct geographic trends in the occurrence of brightening which are attributable to regional gradients in soil type and vegetation cover. Given the prevalence of brightening in drier regions and the potential for persistent surface modification, we discuss the implications for regional climate. Specifically, we consider how bright burn scars following widespread fires offer a mechanism that could help explain recent evidence of fire-induced rainfall suppression in African drylands.

  14. The role of genetic factors in autoimmune disease: implications for environmental research.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, G S; Miller, F W; Pandey, J P

    1999-01-01

    Studies in both humans and in animal models of specific disorders suggest that polymorphisms of multiple genes are involved in conferring either a predisposition to or protection from autoimmune diseases. Genes encoding polymorphic proteins that regulate immune responses or the rates and extent of metabolism of certain chemical structures have been the focus of much of the research regarding genetic susceptibility. We examine the type and strength of evidence concerning genetic factors and disease etiology, drawing examples from a number of autoimmune diseases. Twin studies of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), type I diabetes, and multiple sclerosis (MS) indicate that disease concordance in monozygotic twins is 4 or more times higher than in dizygotic twins. Strong familial associations (odds ratio ranging from 5-10) are seen in studies of MS, type I diabetes, Graves disease, discoid lupus, and SLE. Familial association studies have also reported an increased risk of several systemic autoimmune diseases among relatives of patients with a systemic autoimmune disease. This association may reflect a common etiologic pathway with shared genetic or environmental influences among these diseases. Recent genomewide searches in RA, SLE, and MS provide evidence for multiple susceptibility genes involving major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and non-MHC loci; there is also evidence that many autoimmune diseases share a common set of susceptibility genes. The multifactorial nature of the genetic risk factors and the low penetrance of disease underscore the potential influence of environmental factors and gene-environment interactions on the etiology of autoimmune diseases. PMID:10502533

  15. Nodular histogenetic type -- the most significant factor for thick melanoma: implications for prevention.

    PubMed

    Bergenmar, M; Ringborg, U; Månsson Brahme, E; Brandberg, Y

    1998-10-01

    Tumour thickness is the most important prognostic factor in malignant melanoma. To reduce the melanoma-related mortality, factors related to the presentation of thick melanoma have to be identified. Three samples of melanoma patients (n=694) were studied for this purpose. Histogenetic type was the only factor which differentiated between 'thin' (< or = 0.8 mm) and 'thick' (> 2.0 mm) lesions. During a 10-year period only 3% of the nodular lesions were 'thin' at diagnosis. Differences in knowledge about melanoma or the location of the lesion (either 'easy' or 'difficult' for the patient to observe) did not explain differences in tumour thickness. The most common tumour site irrespective of histogenetic type and gender was 'back of the trunk'. 'Increase in diameter' and 'bleeding' were the symptoms most frequently reported by patients with 'thick' melanoma. 'Thick' lesions were diagnosed in older age groups and in men to a greater extent. Considering these results, melanoma prevention should also be targeted to older age groups and attention should be paid to symptoms such as 'increase in diameter' even in the absence of other characteristic symptoms of melanoma. An increased proportion of nodular melanoma diagnosed as 'thin' lesions can be interpreted as a step forward in secondary prevention.

  16. Addressing occupational factors in the management of low back pain: implications for physical therapist practice.

    PubMed

    Shaw, William S; Main, Chris J; Johnston, Venerina

    2011-05-01

    There is mounting evidence that occupational factors influence the extent of sickness absence following an episode of low back pain, but there have been limited efforts to integrate the identification and management of occupational factors into the routine practice of physical therapists. Systematic reviews suggest that a client's report of heavy physical demands, inability to modify job tasks, work stress, lack of organizational support, job dissatisfaction, poor expectations for resuming usual work, and fear of reinjury are indications of significant barriers to returning to work. Recommended strategies for evaluating and addressing occupational factors are explored with respect to the physical therapist's role in client assessment, development of activity and lifestyle recommendations, therapeutic exercise, communication with other providers, and summary reports. Primary recommendations include: (1) administration of self-report questionnaires to assess a client's perspective of physical job demands, (2) client-centered interviewing to highlight individual return-to-work concerns, (3) early discussions with clients about possible job modifications, and (4) incorporation of clients' workplace concerns in progress reports and summaries. These strategies may improve low back pain outcomes by encouraging effective communication with key stakeholders and by developing clients' ability to resolve obstacles to returning to work.

  17. Structures of mithramycin analogues bound to DNA and implications for targeting transcription factor FLI1

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Caixia; Weidenbach, Stevi; Cano, Kristin E.; Wang, Zhonghua; Mitra, Prithiba; Ivanov, Dmitri N.; Rohr, Jürgen; Tsodikov, Oleg V.

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors have been considered undruggable, but this paradigm has been recently challenged. DNA binding natural product mithramycin (MTM) is a potent antagonist of oncogenic transcription factor EWS–FLI1. Structural details of MTM recognition of DNA, including the FLI1 binding sequence GGA(A/T), are needed to understand how MTM interferes with EWS–FLI1. We report a crystal structure of an MTM analogue MTM SA–Trp bound to a DNA oligomer containing a site GGCC, and two structures of a novel analogue MTM SA–Phe in complex with DNA. MTM SA–Phe is bound to sites AGGG and GGGT on one DNA, and to AGGG and GGGA(T) (a FLI1 binding site) on the other, revealing how MTM recognizes different DNA sequences. Unexpectedly, at sub-micromolar concentrations MTMs stabilize FLI1–DNA complex on GGAA repeats, which are critical for the oncogenic function of EWS–FLI1. We also directly demonstrate by nuclear magnetic resonance formation of a ternary FLI1–DNA–MTM complex on a single GGAA FLI1/MTM binding site. These biochemical and structural data and a new FLI1–DNA structure suggest that MTM binds the minor groove and perturbs FLI1 bound nearby in the major groove. This ternary complex model may lead to development of novel MTM analogues that selectively target EWS–FLI1 or other oncogenic transcription factors, as anti-cancer therapeutics. PMID:27587584

  18. A scoping review of epidemiologic risk factors for pediatric obesity: Implications for future childhood obesity and dental caries prevention research.

    PubMed

    Chi, Donald L; Luu, Monique; Chu, Frances

    2017-06-01

    What are the non-modifiable (socioeconomic, genetic) and modifiable factors (physical activity, dietary behaviors) related to childhood (under age 12) obesity? How can this knowledge be applied to oral health professionals' efforts to prevent or manage dental caries in children? Studies have identified risk factors for childhood obesity. The purpose of this scoping review was to develop a conceptual model to identify non-modifiable and modifiable risk factors for childhood obesity and to illustrate how these findings are relevant in developing interventions aimed at preventing obesity and dental caries in children. The authors searched PubMed and Embase and limited the study to English-language publications. A total of 2,572 studies were identified. After de-duplication, 2,479 studies remained and were downloaded into a citation-management tool. Two authors screened the titles and abstracts for relevance. Two hundred and sixty studies remained and were retrieved for a full-text review, and 80 studies were excluded, resulting in 180 studies included in the scoping review. An inductive content analytic methods was used to organize all statistically significant obesity risk factors into seven domains, which were classified as non-modifiable or modifiable; then a conceptual model of common risk factors associated with childhood obesity and dental caries was developed. Non-modifiable obesity risk factors include biological and developmental (e.g., genes, developmental conditions, puberty), sociodemographic and household (e.g., race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, parent education, unemployment), cultural (e.g., degree of acculturation), and community (e.g., neighborhood composition). Modifiable risk factors included behavioral (e.g., diet, physical activity, weight), psychosocial (e.g., maternal stress, family functioning, parenting practices, child temperament), and medical (e.g., parent smoking, maternal health, child health). Identifying common risk factors has

  19. Current mechanistic insights into the roles of matrix metalloproteinases in tumour invasion and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Brown, Gordon T; Murray, Graeme I

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this review is to highlight the recent mechanistic developments elucidating the role of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in tumour invasion and metastasis. The ability of tumour cells to invade, migrate, and subsequently metastasize is a fundamental characteristic of cancer. Tumour invasion and metastasis are increasingly being characterized by the dynamic relationship between cancer cells and their microenvironment and developing a greater understanding of these basic pathological mechanisms is crucial. While MMPs have been strongly implicated in these processes as a result of extensive circumstantial evidence--for example, increased expression of individual MMPs in tumours and association of specific MMPs with prognosis--the underpinning mechanisms are only now being elucidated. Recent studies are now providing a mechanistic basis, highlighting and reinforcing the catalytic and non-catalytic roles of specific MMPs as key players in tumour invasion and metastasis. Copyright © 2015 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Effects of weather factors on dengue fever incidence and implications for interventions in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Choi, Youngjo; Tang, Choon Siang; McIver, Lachlan; Hashizume, Masahiro; Chan, Vibol; Abeyasinghe, Rabindra Romauld; Iddings, Steven; Huy, Rekol

    2016-03-08

    Dengue viruses and their mosquito vectors are sensitive to their environment. Temperature, rainfall and humidity have well-defined roles in the transmission cycle. Therefore changes in these conditions may contribute to increasing incidence. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between weather factors and dengue incidence in three provinces in Cambodia, in order to strengthen the evidence basis of dengue control strategies in this high-burden country. We developed negative binomial models using monthly average maximum, minimum, mean temperatures and monthly cumulative rainfall over the period from January 1998 to December 2012. We adopted piecewise linear functions to estimate the incidence rate ratio (IRR) between dengue incidence and weather factors for simplicity in interpreting the coefficients. We estimated the values of parameters below cut-points defined in terms of the results of sensitivity tests over a 0-3 month lagged period. Mean temperature was significantly associated with dengue incidence in all three provinces, but incidence did not correlate well with maximum temperature in Banteay Meanchey, nor with minimum temperature in Kampong Thom at a lag of three months in the negative binomial model. The monthly cumulative rainfall influence on the dengue incidence was significant in all three provinces, but not consistently over a 0-3 month lagged period. Rainfall significantly affected the dengue incidence at a lag of 0 to 3 months in Siem Reap, but it did not have an impact at a lag of 2 to 3 months in Banteay Meanchey, nor at a lag of 2 months in Kampong Thom. The association between dengue incidence and weather factors also apparently varies by locality, suggesting that a prospective dengue early warning system would likely be best implemented at a local or regional scale, rather than nation-wide in Cambodia. Such spatial down-scaling would also enable dengue control measures to be better targeted, timed and implemented.

  1. Prevalence, risk factors and clinical implications of malnutrition in French Comprehensive Cancer Centres

    PubMed Central

    Pressoir, M; Desné, S; Berchery, D; Rossignol, G; Poiree, B; Meslier, M; Traversier, S; Vittot, M; Simon, M; Gekiere, J P; Meuric, J; Serot, F; Falewee, M N; Rodrigues, I; Senesse, P; Vasson, M P; Chelle, F; Maget, B; Antoun, S; Bachmann, P

    2010-01-01

    Background: This epidemiological observational study aimed at determining the prevalence of malnutrition in non-selected adults with cancer, to identify risk factors of malnutrition and correlate the results with length of stay and 2-month mortality. Methods: This prospective multicentre 1-day study conducted in 17 French Comprehensive Cancer Centres included 1545 patients. Body mass index (BMI), weight loss (WL) in the past 6 months and age were routinely recorded according to the French national recommendations for hospitalised patients; malnutrition was rated as absent, moderate or severe according to the level of WL and BMI. Age, sex, tumour site, type of hospitalisation and treatment, disease stage, World Health Organisation performance status (PS) and antibiotic therapy were the potential malnutrition risk factors tested. Follow-up at 2 months allowed to determine the correlation with length of stay and mortality. Results: Malnutrition was reported in 30.9% of patients, and was rated as severe in 12.2%. In multivariate analysis, only pre-existing obesity (BMI⩾30), PS ⩾2 and head-and-neck or upper digestive cancers were associated with increased risk of malnutrition. Antibiotics use was significantly higher in malnourished patients (35.5 vs 22.8% P<0.001). Severe malnutrition was independently associated with mortality. The median length of stay was 19.3±19.4 days for malnourished patients vs 13.3±19.4 days for others (P<0.0001). Conclusion: In French Comprehensive Cancer Centres, one out of three cancer patients are malnourished and this was associated with a longer length of stay. Pre-existing obesity could be identified as a new risk factor for malnutrition in our cancer patient population perhaps because of a misidentification or a delay in nutrition support in this category of patients. PMID:20160725

  2. Prevalence, risk factors and clinical implications of malnutrition in French Comprehensive Cancer Centres.

    PubMed

    Pressoir, M; Desné, S; Berchery, D; Rossignol, G; Poiree, B; Meslier, M; Traversier, S; Vittot, M; Simon, M; Gekiere, J P; Meuric, J; Serot, F; Falewee, M N; Rodrigues, I; Senesse, P; Vasson, M P; Chelle, F; Maget, B; Antoun, S; Bachmann, P

    2010-03-16

    This epidemiological observational study aimed at determining the prevalence of malnutrition in non-selected adults with cancer, to identify risk factors of malnutrition and correlate the results with length of stay and 2-month mortality. This prospective multicentre 1-day study conducted in 17 French Comprehensive Cancer Centres included 1545 patients. Body mass index (BMI), weight loss (WL) in the past 6 months and age were routinely recorded according to the French national recommendations for hospitalised patients; malnutrition was rated as absent, moderate or severe according to the level of WL and BMI. Age, sex, tumour site, type of hospitalisation and treatment, disease stage, World Health Organisation performance status (PS) and antibiotic therapy were the potential malnutrition risk factors tested. Follow-up at 2 months allowed to determine the correlation with length of stay and mortality. Malnutrition was reported in 30.9% of patients, and was rated as severe in 12.2%. In multivariate analysis, only pre-existing obesity (BMI> or =30), PS > or =2 and head-and-neck or upper digestive cancers were associated with increased risk of malnutrition. Antibiotics use was significantly higher in malnourished patients (35.5 vs 22.8%; P<0.001). Severe malnutrition was independently associated with mortality. The median length of stay was 19.3+/-19.4 days for malnourished patients vs 13.3+/-19.4 days for others (P<0.0001). In French Comprehensive Cancer Centres, one out of three cancer patients are malnourished and this was associated with a longer length of stay. Pre-existing obesity could be identified as a new risk factor for malnutrition in our cancer patient population perhaps because of a misidentification or a delay in nutrition support in this category of patients.

  3. Smoking cessation in Taiwanese male smokers with coronary artery disease: influencing factors and policy implications.

    PubMed

    Chou, L-P; Chang, H-F; Kao, C; Lin, W; Huang, C-L

    2013-06-01

    To investigate factors affecting smoking cessation in male smokers with coronary artery disease. A descriptive, correlation, cross-sectional study was conducted. Data were collected using a questionnaire constructed by a literature review of research on smoking cessation in male smokers including demographics and smoking background, as well as psychological, interpersonal and environmental factors. A total of 130 male patients with coronary artery disease were recruited from the cardiac clinic at a regional hospital in Taiwan from August to December 2008. The response rate was 93% (n = 121). Descriptive statistics, chi-square, t-tests and logistic regression analysis were conducted. During the survey, 64.5% of the respondents reported that they had stopped smoking after a coronary event. Five factors were significantly associated with smoking cessation after diagnosis of coronary artery disease: age, the severity of heart diagnoses, antismoking norms (perceived that smoking was against the social norms), nicotine dependence level, and contrary views of smoking (perceived negative expectancy of smoking). Multivariate analysis revealed antismoking norms to be the most important predictor (AOR = 4.27; P < .05) after adjusting age. The study highlights the need to develop smoking cessation interventions that specifically counsel patients with coronary artery disease about these information, such as the disease risk and development, health consequences of smoking, and dependence therapy. Additionally, government support for tobacco control programmes in hospitals and elsewhere is designed to have a beneficial effect on patients' smoking behaviours primarily by increasing antismoking norms. © 2013 The Authors. International Nursing Review © 2013 International Council of Nurses.

  4. Variability in Isotope Discrimination Factors in Coral Reef Fishes: Implications for Diet and Food Web Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, Alex S. J.; Waite, Anya M.; Humphries, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    Interpretation of stable isotope ratios of carbon and nitrogen (δ13C and δ15N) is generally based on the assumption that with each trophic level there is a constant enrichment in the heavier isotope, leading to diet-tissue discrimination factors of 3.4‰ for 15N (ΔN) and ∼0.5‰ for 13C (ΔC). Diet-tissue discrimination factors determined from paired tissue and gut samples taken from 152 individuals from 26 fish species at Ningaloo Reef, Western Australia demonstrate a large amount of variability around constant values. While caution is necessary in using gut contents to represent diet due to the potential for high temporal variability, there were significant effects of trophic position and season that may also lead to variability in ΔN under natural conditions. Nitrogen enrichment increased significantly at higher trophic levels (higher tissue δ15N), with significantly higher ΔN in carnivorous species. Changes in diet led to significant changes in ΔN, but not tissue δ15N, between seasons for several species: Acanthurus triostegus, Chromis viridis, Parupeneus signatus and Pomacentrus moluccensis. These results confirm that the use of meta-analysis averages for ΔN is likely to be inappropriate for accurately determining diets and trophic relationships using tissue stable isotope ratios. Where feasible, discrimination factors should be directly quantified for each species and trophic link in question, acknowledging the potential for significant variation away from meta-analysis averages and, perhaps, controlled laboratory diets and conditions. PMID:21060681

  5. Exploring the role of nerve growth factor in multiple sclerosis: implications in myelin repair.

    PubMed

    Acosta, C M R; Cortes, C; MacPhee, H; Namaka, M P

    2013-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disease resulting from targeted destruction of central nervous system (CNS) myelin. MS is suggested to be an autoimmune disease involving the pathogenic activation of CD4(+) T cells by a foreign antigen in the peripheral blood. The activated CD4(+) T cells liberate inflammatory cytokines that facilitate the breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) promoting their passage into the CNS. Inside the CNS, CD4(+) T cells become re-activated by myelin proteins sharing a similar structure to the foreign antigen that initially triggered the immune response. The CD4(+) T cells continue to liberate inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), which activates macrophages and antibodies responsible for the phagocytosis of myelin. Acute CNS lesions can be re-myelinated, however, the repair of chronic demyelinating lesions is limited, leading to permanent neurological deficits. Although current MS treatments reduce severity and slow disease progression, they do not directly repair damaged myelin. Henceforth, recent treatment strategies have focused on neurotrophins, such as nerve growth factor (NGF) for myelin repair. NGF promotes axonal regeneration, survival, protection and differentiation of oligodendrocytes (OGs) and facilitates migration and proliferation of oligodendrocyte precursors (OPs) to the sites of myelin damage. NGF also directly regulates key structural proteins that comprise myelin. Interestingly, NGF also induces the production of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), another integral neurotrophin involved in myelination. The intricate signaling between neurotrophins and cytokines that governs myelin repair supports the role of NGF as a leading therapeutic candidate in white matter disorders, such as MS.

  6. Structures of mithramycin analogues bound to DNA and implications for targeting transcription factor FLI1.

    PubMed

    Hou, Caixia; Weidenbach, Stevi; Cano, Kristin E; Wang, Zhonghua; Mitra, Prithiba; Ivanov, Dmitri N; Rohr, Jürgen; Tsodikov, Oleg V

    2016-10-14

    Transcription factors have been considered undruggable, but this paradigm has been recently challenged. DNA binding natural product mithramycin (MTM) is a potent antagonist of oncogenic transcription factor EWS-FLI1. Structural details of MTM recognition of DNA, including the FLI1 binding sequence GGA(A/T), are needed to understand how MTM interferes with EWS-FLI1. We report a crystal structure of an MTM analogue MTM SA-Trp bound to a DNA oligomer containing a site GGCC, and two structures of a novel analogue MTM SA-Phe in complex with DNA. MTM SA-Phe is bound to sites AGGG and GGGT on one DNA, and to AGGG and GGGA(T) (a FLI1 binding site) on the other, revealing how MTM recognizes different DNA sequences. Unexpectedly, at sub-micromolar concentrations MTMs stabilize FLI1-DNA complex on GGAA repeats, which are critical for the oncogenic function of EWS-FLI1. We also directly demonstrate by nuclear magnetic resonance formation of a ternary FLI1-DNA-MTM complex on a single GGAA FLI1/MTM binding site. These biochemical and structural data and a new FLI1-DNA structure suggest that MTM binds the minor groove and perturbs FLI1 bound nearby in the major groove. This ternary complex model may lead to development of novel MTM analogues that selectively target EWS-FLI1 or other oncogenic transcription factors, as anti-cancer therapeutics. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. Growth factor-like activity of gliadin, an alimentary protein: implications for coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Barone, Maria Vittoria; Gimigliano, Anna; Castoria, Gabriella; Paolella, Giovanni; Maurano, Francesco; Paparo, Franco; Maglio, Maria; Mineo, Alba; Miele, Erasmo; Nanayakkara, Merlin; Troncone, Riccardo; Auricchio, Salvatore

    2007-04-01

    Gliadins, a family of wheat proteins, are central to the pathogenesis of celiac disease (CD). In addition to 'immunogenic' effects, gliadin directly affects cultured cells and intestine preparations, and produces damage in vivo, via a separate 'toxic' peptide, such as A-gliadin p31-43 (P31-43). Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying direct non T-cell mediated effects of gliadin peptides, and assessing their potential role in promoting CD. Gliadin effects were tested on a number of cell lines and on cultured mucosa samples by evaluating cytoskeleton rearrangements, endocytosis, proliferation and apoptosis. Standard biochemical methods were used to assess prolonged epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation. Crude gliadin peptic-tryptic peptides (PTG], or P31-43 alone, fully reproduce the effects of epidermal growth factor (EGF] on actin cytosketon, cell cycle and cell proliferation of various cell lines. Inhibitor studies demonstrate the role of EGFR in the early response to gliadin exposure, pointing to activation of the EGFR pathway. Peptide P31-43 is not similar to any EGFR ligand, but can delay inactivation of the EGFR interfering with its endocytosis. Gliadin-induced delay of EGFR endocytosis in cultured intestinal biopsies, together with S-phase entry of epithelial intestinal cells, confirm a role for EGFR activation in CD. The ability of gliadin peptides to delay EGFR inactivation through interference with the endocytic pathway suggests a model where gliadin fragments amplify the effects of trace amounts of EGF, and possibly of other growth factors, by prolonging receptor activation. The results, using cultures of coeliac intestinal biopsies, highlight the role of the EGF pathway in establishing and maintaining the typical atrophic and proliferative alterations of the small intestine in CD.

  8. Arteriovenous fistula in dialysis patients: Factors implicated in early and late AVF maturation failure.

    PubMed

    Bashar, Khalid; Conlon, Peter J; Kheirelseid, Elrasheid A H; Aherne, Thomas; Walsh, Stewart R; Leahy, Austin

    2016-10-01

    Increasing numbers of patients are being diagnosed with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), and the demand for on haemodialysis (HD) is rising. Arteriovenous fistulae (AVFs) remain the best conduit for adequate HD, with fewer complications associated with long-term use compared to bypass grafts and central venous catheters. However, it is known that many newly formed fistulae do not mature to provide useful HD access. The paper provides a narrative overview of factors influencing the process of AVF maturation failure. Copyright © 2016 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Sexually transmitted diseases in Ethiopia. Social factors contributing to their spread and implications for developing countries.

    PubMed

    Plorde, D S

    1981-12-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases in developing countries are causing concern to those responsible for their control and eradication. To gain a better understanding of the problems involved in a country struggling with development, the economic and psychosocial factors influencing the spread of STD in Ethiopia have been studied. Increased migration and urbanisation and the changing role of women have led to a rise in prostitution. Thus changes in the social structure--particularly in relation to the education and employment of women--and improved medical services are essential for the long-term control of STD.

  10. Growth factors induce monocyte binding to vascular smooth muscle cells: implications for monocyte retention in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Cai, Qiangjun; Lanting, Linda; Natarajan, Rama

    2004-09-01

    Adhesive interactions between monocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) may contribute to subendothelial monocyte-macrophage retention in atherosclerosis. We investigated the effects of angiotensin II (ANG II) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB on VSMC-monocyte interactions. Treatment of human aortic VSMC (HVSMC) with ANG II or PDGF-BB significantly increased binding to human monocytic THP-1 cells and to peripheral blood monocytes. This was inhibited by antibodies to monocyte beta(1)- and beta(2)-integrins. The binding was also attenuated by blocking VSMC arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism by inhibitors of 12/15-lipoxygenase (12/15-LO) or cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Conversely, binding was enhanced by overexpression of 12/15-LO or COX-2. Direct treatment of HVSMC with AA or its metabolites also increased binding. Furthermore, VSMC derived from 12/15-LO knockout mice displayed reduced binding to mouse monocytic cells relative to genetic control mice. Using specific signal transduction inhibitors, we demonstrated the involvement of Src, phosphoinositide 3-kinase, and MAPKs in ANG II- or PDGF-BB-induced binding. Interestingly, after coculture with HVSMC, THP-1 cell surface expression of the scavenger receptor CD36 was increased. These results show for the first time that growth factors may play additional roles in atherosclerosis by increasing monocyte binding to VSMC via AA metabolism and key signaling pathways. This can lead to monocyte subendothelial retention, CD36 expression, and foam cell formation.

  11. Factors Influencing Self-Assessment of Cognition and Functioning in Schizophrenia: Implications For Treatment Studies

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Dante; Strassnig, Martin; Sabbag, Samir; Gould, Felicia; Twamley, Elizabeth W.; Patterson, Thomas L.; Harvey, Philip D.

    2014-01-01

    Awareness of illness is a major factor in schizophrenia and extends into unawareness of cognitive and functional deficits. This unawareness of functional limitations has been shown to be influenced by several different predictive factors, including greater impairment and less severe depression. As treatment efforts are aimed at reducing cognitive deficits, discovery of the most efficient assessment strategies for detection of cognitive and functional changes is critical. In this study, we collected systematic assessments from high contact clinicians focusing on their impressions of the cognitive deficits and everyday functioning in a sample of 169 community dwelling patients with schizophrenia. The patients provided self-report on those same rating scales, as well as self-reporting their depression and performing an assessment of cognitive performance and functional skills. There was essentially no correlation between patients' self reports of their cognitive performance and functional skills and either clinician ratings of these skills or the results of the performance-based assessments. In contrast, clinician reports of cognitive impairments and everyday functioning were correlated with objective performance data. Depression on the part of patients was associated with ratings of functioning that were both more impaired and more congruent with clinician impressions, while overall patients reported less impairment than clinicians. These results underscore the limitations of self reported cognitive functioning even with structured rating scales. Concurrently, clinicians provided ratings of cognitive performance that were related to scores on objective tests, even though they were unaware of the results of those assessments. PMID:25104226

  12. Segmental distribution of some common molecular markers for colorectal cancer (CRC): influencing factors and potential implications.

    PubMed

    Papagiorgis, Petros Christakis

    2016-05-01

    Proximal and distal colorectal cancers (CRCs) are regarded as distinct disease entities, evolving through different genetic pathways and showing multiple clinicopathological and molecular differences. Segmental distribution of some common markers (e.g., KRAS, EGFR, Ki-67, Bcl-2, COX-2) is clinically important, potentially affecting their prognostic or predictive value. However, this distribution is influenced by a variety of factors such as the anatomical overlap of tumorigenic molecular events, associations of some markers with other clinicopathological features (stage and/or grade), and wide methodological variability in markers' assessment. All these factors represent principal influences followed by intratumoral heterogeneity and geographic variation in the frequency of detection of particular markers, whereas the role of other potential influences (e.g., pre-adjuvant treatment, interaction between markers) remains rather unclear. Better understanding and elucidation of the various influences may provide a more accurate picture of the segmental distribution of molecular markers in CRC, potentially allowing the application of a novel patient stratification for treatment, based on particular molecular profiles in combination with tumor location.

  13. Implications of Dna-Nanostructures by Hoogsteen-Dinucleotides on Transcription Factor Binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanke, Dierk; Brand, Luise H.; Fischer, Nina M.; Peschke, Florian; Kilian, Joachim; Berendzen, Kenneth W.

    2013-01-01

    Recent findings showed that non-harmonic DNA-nanostructures are formed by Hoogsteen (HG) dinucleotides in vivo. In contrast to Waston-Crick (WC) base pairing, the purine base component is flipped from anti- to syn-conformation. This change consequently alters the width of the DNA-helix, the sizes of minor and major groove and biophysical properties, such as the melting temperature. Three dinucleotides (CA, TG and TA) have been identified that form stable HG conformations. Functional data and structural models imply that transcription factors specifically bind DNA-motifs that consist of both HG and WC base pairs - especially at the topological transition between HG and WC dinucleotides. We could show that most know cis -regulatory elements contain at least one HG dinucleotide. In addition, we focused our work on human promoter sequences that encode gene regulatory information within double stranded DNA. We compared occurrences of HG dinucleotides to all 16 dinucleotides. These ratios differed most in sequences closer to gene transcripts, where the promoters are located. These findings imply that transcription factors might explicitly recognize their DNA-motifs in regulatory promoter sequences that exhibit HG nanostructure islands.

  14. Inflammation and cancer-related fatigue: mechanisms, contributing factors, and treatment implications.

    PubMed

    Bower, Julienne E; Lamkin, Donald M

    2013-03-01

    Fatigue is one of the most common and distressing side effects of cancer and its treatment, and may persist for years after treatment completion in otherwise healthy survivors. Guided by basic research on neuro-immune interactions, a growing body of research has examined the hypothesis that cancer-related fatigue is driven by activation of the pro-inflammatory cytokine network. In this review, we examine the current state of the evidence linking inflammation and cancer-related fatigue, drawing from recent human research and from experimental animal models probing effects of cancer and cancer treatment on inflammation and fatigue. In addition, we consider two key questions that are currently driving research in this area: what are the neural mechanisms of fatigue, and what are the biological and psychological factors that influence the onset and/or persistence of inflammation and fatigue in cancer patients and survivors? Identification of the mechanisms driving cancer-related fatigue and associated risk factors will facilitate the development of targeted interventions for vulnerable patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. MRN1 Implicates Chromatin Remodeling Complexes and Architectural Factors in mRNA Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Düring, Louis; Thorsen, Michael; Petersen, Darima Sophia Njama; Køster, Brian; Jensen, Torben Heick; Holmberg, Steen

    2012-01-01

    A functional relationship between chromatin structure and mRNA processing events has been suggested, however, so far only a few involved factors have been characterized. Here we show that rsc nhp6ΔΔ mutants, deficient for the function of the chromatin remodeling factor RSC and the chromatin architectural proteins Nhp6A/Nhp6B, accumulate intron-containing pre-mRNA at the restrictive temperature. In addition, we demonstrate that rsc8-ts16 nhp6ΔΔ cells contain low levels of U6 snRNA and U4/U6 di-snRNA that is further exacerbated after two hours growth at the restrictive temperature. This change in U6 snRNA and U4/U6 di-snRNA levels in rsc8-ts16 nhp6ΔΔ cells is indicative of splicing deficient conditions. We identify MRN1 (multi-copy suppressor of rsc nhp6ΔΔ) as a growth suppressor of rsc nhp6ΔΔ synthetic sickness. Mrn1 is an RNA binding protein that localizes both to the nucleus and cytoplasm. Genetic interactions are observed between 2 µm-MRN1 and the splicing deficient mutants snt309Δ, prp3, prp4, and prp22, and additional genetic analyses link MRN1, SNT309, NHP6A/B, SWI/SNF, and RSC supporting the notion of a role of chromatin structure in mRNA processing. PMID:23028530

  16. Factors associated with knowledge of hypertension among adolescents: implications for preventive education programs in primary care.

    PubMed

    Grad, Iga; Mastalerz-Migas, Agnieszka; Kiliś-Pstrusińska, Katarzyna

    2015-05-03

    Hypertension (HT) amongst adolescents remains a vital issue of both a medical and social nature. There is a lack of data regarding the factors influencing the awareness of the disease among the youth. The aim of this study was to evaluate the knowledge about HT among adolescents and its level corresponding to the selected demographic, environmental and medical factors. The study was carried out among 250 adolescents of secondary schools. The authors' questionnaire poll and the psychological tests Personal Values List (PVL) and Personal Competence Scale (PCS) were performed. Only 13.2% of the youth surveyed displayed the "medium" level (defined below) of HT knowledge. Most of them present satisfactory knowledge about the causes of HT. The children from urban areas generally displayed better knowledge about HT than their peers from rural regions. Only the children who had had their blood pressure previously examined displayed good knowledge about HT. The most frequently indicated source of this knowledge was school; however, its level still remains low. There was no significant association between the level of global knowledge about HT and the feeling of one's own competences and considering the category "good health" an important personal value. Knowledge about HT among adolescents remains unsatisfactory and random, which indicates the necessity for routine education in this field, especially as it applies to HT symptoms. It seems that the consideration of such elements as blood pressure measurement and family history of HT in education programs can improve their efficiency.

  17. Identifying risk factors for brain metastasis in breast cancer patients: Implication for a vigorous surveillance program.

    PubMed

    Chow, Lorraine; Suen, Dacita; Ma, Kwok Kuen; Kwong, Ava

    2015-10-01

    Brain metastasis occurs in 10-15% of metastatic breast cancer patients and is associated with poor prognosis. This study aims to identify tumor characteristics of primary breast cancer, which are related to brain metastases in Hong Kong Chinese patients. A retrospective study of patients with invasive breast cancer receiving treatment in a university hospital from January 2001 to December 2008 was performed. The clinicopathological factors of patients with brain metastases were analyzed and compared with those who had no brain metastasis. Risk factors for brain metastasis were identified by univariate analysis first and then by multivariate analysis. A total of 912 patients with invasive breast cancer were treated during the study period. Of these, 30 patients were found to have distant metastases to brain. Patients with brain metastases had more breast tumors of higher histological grade (Grade III, 78.9% vs. 30.2%; p = 0.001). Their tumors also had a significantly higher rate of negative estrogen receptors (78.9% vs. 30.2%, p = 0.001). On multivariate analysis, only high tumor grading was found to be predictive of developing brain metastasis. Chinese breast cancer patients with brain metastasis were more likely to have high-grade tumors and negative estrogen receptor status. A more vigorous surveillance program for the central nervous system should be considered for this group of patients. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  18. Factors associated with changing cognitive function in older adults: implications for nursing rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Myers, Jamie S

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews the significant effects of aging on cognitive function. As people age, brain tissue volume decreases, white matter hyperintensities increase, and associated deficits are seen in working memory, attention, and executive function. Comorbidities include hypertension, diabetes, and cardiovascular risk factors. Another factor that affects cognitive function is the presence of apolipoprotein E-4, which is negatively correlated with cognitive function. In addition, decreased serum levels of endogenous sex hormones are related to changes in cognitive function, but hormone replacement therapy may be detrimental. Improved cognition has been associated with moderate alcohol intake, regular exercise, and exposure to novel stimuli. This article also examines research evaluating brain-plasticity-based training and rehabilitation to reverse losses in sensory, cognitive, and motor processing. Rehabilitation nursing strategies for dealing with the decline of cognitive function include educating patients and developing a program about lifestyle changes that will enhance cognitive stimulation; minimizing risks for and effects of hypertension, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease; recognizing and accommodating sensory deficits; and maintaining awareness of current research outcomes to guide evidence-based practice.

  19. Factors associated with job satisfaction among commune health workers: implications for human resource policies

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Bach Xuan; Minh, Hoang Van; Hinh, Nguyen Duc

    2013-01-01

    Background Job satisfaction among health workers is an important indicator in assessing the performance and efficiency of health services. Objective This study measured job satisfaction and determined associated factors among health workers in 38 commune health stations in an urban district and a rural district of Hanoi, Vietnam. A total of 252 health workers (36 medical doctors and 216 nurses and technicians; 74% female) were interviewed. A job satisfaction measure was developed using factor analysis, from which four dimensions emerged, namely ‘benefits and prospects,’ ‘facility and equipment,’ ‘performance,’ and ‘professionals.’ Results The results demonstrate that respondents were least satisfied with the following categories: salary and incentives (24.0%), benefit packages (25.1%), equipment (35.7%), and environment (41.8%). The average satisfaction score was moderate across four domains; it was the highest for ‘performance’ (66.6/100) and lowest for ‘facility and equipment’ (50.4/100). Tobit-censored regression models, constructed using stepwise selection, determined significant predictors of job satisfaction including age, areas of work and expertise, professional education, urban versus rural setting, and sufficient number of staff. Conclusion The findings highlight the need to implement health policies that focus on incentives, working conditions, workloads, and personnel management at grassroots level. PMID:23374700

  20. Factors associated with job satisfaction among commune health workers: implications for human resource policies.

    PubMed

    Tran, Bach Xuan; Van Hoang, Minh; Nguyen, Hinh Duc

    2013-01-30

    Job satisfaction among health workers is an important indicator in assessing the performance and efficiency of health services. This study measured job satisfaction and determined associated factors among health workers in 38 commune health stations in an urban district and a rural district of Hanoi, Vietnam. A total of 252 health workers (36 medical doctors and 216 nurses and technicians; 74% female) were interviewed. A job satisfaction measure was developed using factor analysis, from which four dimensions emerged, namely 'benefits and prospects,' 'facility and equipment,' 'performance,' and 'professionals.' The results demonstrate that respondents were least satisfied with the following categories: salary and incentives (24.0%), benefit packages (25.1%), equipment (35.7%), and environment (41.8%). The average satisfaction score was moderate across four domains; it was the highest for 'performance' (66.6/100) and lowest for 'facility and equipment' (50.4/100). Tobit-censored regression models, constructed using stepwise selection, determined significant predictors of job satisfaction including age, areas of work and expertise, professional education, urban versus rural setting, and sufficient number of staff. The findings highlight the need to implement health policies that focus on incentives, working conditions, workloads, and personnel management at grassroots level.

  1. Factors associated with job satisfaction among commune health workers: implications for human resource policies.

    PubMed

    Xuan Tran, Bach; Minh, Hoang Van; Hinh, Nguyen Duc

    2013-01-01

    Job satisfaction among health workers is an important indicator in assessing the performance and efficiency of health services. This study measured job satisfaction and determined associated factors among health workers in 38 commune health stations in an urban district and a rural district of Hanoi, Vietnam. A total of 252 health workers (36 medical doctors and 216 nurses and technicians; 74% female) were interviewed. A job satisfaction measure was developed using factor analysis, from which four dimensions emerged, namely 'benefits and prospects,' 'facility and equipment,' 'performance,' and 'professionals.' The results demonstrate that respondents were least satisfied with the following categories: salary and incentives (24.0%), benefit packages (25.1%), equipment (35.7%), and environment (41.8%). The average satisfaction score was moderate across four domains; it was the highest for 'performance' (66.6/100) and lowest for 'facility and equipment' (50.4/100). Tobit-censored regression models, constructed using stepwise selection, determined significant predictors of job satisfaction including age, areas of work and expertise, professional education, urban versus rural setting, and sufficient number of staff. The findings highlight the need to implement health policies that focus on incentives, working conditions, workloads, and personnel management at grassroots level.

  2. A spectral model of Linke's turbidity factor and its experimental implications

    SciTech Connect

    Grenier, J.C.; De La Casiniere, A.; Cabot, T. )

    1994-04-01

    A model of Linke's turbidity factor, T[sub L], is developed by means of updated spectral extraterrestrial irradiances and extinction coefficients of gaseous absorbers. It is shown that the new values of T[sub L] are clearly different from those obtained by Kasten's formula which parameterizes the optical thickness of the clean dry atmosphere. The model is used to investigate the dependence of T[sub L] on the relative optical air mass and to elucidate the relationships linking T[sub L] to Angstroem's turbidity coefficient and to the water vapor content. For any T[sub L], the corresponding value related to the air mass 2.0 can be determined. Such a standardized value is independent of solar elevation and is therefore strictly representative of the atmospheric turbidity. It can be linked to Angstroem's turbidity coefficient. Practical procedures and algorithms for computing the standard Linke's turbidity factor and determining Angstroem's turbidity coefficient are described. A relationship for converting the T[sub L] values obtained by Kasten's formula into the new values is proposed.

  3. Stem CO2 efflux in six co-occurring tree species: underlying factors and ecological implications.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Calcerrada, Jesús; López, Rosana; Salomón, Roberto; Gordaliza, Guillermo G; Valbuena-Carabaña, María; Oleksyn, Jacek; Gil, Luis

    2015-06-01

    Stem respiration plays a role in species coexistence and forest dynamics. Here we examined the intra- and inter-specific variability of stem CO2 efflux (E) in dominant and suppressed trees of six deciduous species in a mixed forest stand: Fagus sylvatica L., Quercus petraea [Matt.] Liebl, Quercus pyrenaica Willd., Prunus avium L., Sorbus aucuparia L. and Crataegus monogyna Jacq. We conducted measurements in late autumn. Within species, dominants had higher E per unit stem surface area (Es ) mainly because sapwood depth was higher than in suppressed trees. Across species, however, differences in Es corresponded with differences in the proportion of living parenchyma in sapwood and concentration of non-structural carbohydrates (NSC). Across species, Es was strongly and NSC marginally positively related with an index of drought tolerance, suggesting that slow growth of drought-tolerant trees is related to higher NSC concentration and Es . We conclude that, during the leafless period, E is indicative of maintenance respiration and is related with some ecological characteristics of the species, such as drought resistance; that sapwood depth is the main factor explaining variability in Es within species; and that the proportion of NSC in the sapwood is the main factor behind variability in Es among species.

  4. TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR GLI-SIMILAR 3 (GLIS3): IMPLICATIONS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF CONGENITAL HYPOTHYROIDISM

    PubMed Central

    Lichti-Kaiser, Kristin; ZeRuth, Gary; Jetten, Anton M.

    2014-01-01

    Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) is the most frequent endocrine disorder in neonates. While several genetic mutations have been identified that result in developmental defects of the thyroid gland or thyroid hormone synthesis, genetic factors have yet to be identified in many CH patients along with the mechanisms underlying their pathophysiology. Mutations in the gene encoding the Krüppel-like transcription factor, GLI-similar 3 (GLIS3) have been associated with the development of a syndrome characterized by congenital hypothyroidism and neonatal diabetes and similar phenotypes were observed in mouse knockout models of Glis3. Patients with GLIS3-mediated CH exhibit diminished serum levels of thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) and elevated thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and thyroglobulin (TG). However, the inconsistent presentation of clinical features associated with this CH has made it difficult to ascertain a causative mechanism. Future elucidation of the biological functions of GLIS3 in the thyroid will be crucial to the discovery of new therapeutic opportunities for the treatment of CH. PMID:25133201

  5. Factors associated with arsenicosis and arsenic exposure status in Nepal: implications from community based study.

    PubMed

    Maden, Narendra; Singh, Anjana; Smith, Linda S; Maharjan, Makhan; Shrestha, Shreekrishna

    2011-02-01

    A significant public health problem due to exposure to arsenic via groundwater in communities of lowland Terai region of Nepal has issued forth need to assess the exposure status and factors associated with arsenicosis. We observed arsenical dermal manifestations and collected and assessed total arsenic content in tubewell water, urine, and hair samples of study subjects at arsenic affected communities in Nawalparasi district of Nepal. The explanatory variables associated with arsenicosis were elevated arsenic in tubewell, male gender and increased age (P < 0.05). 67% (73/109) and 66% (77/117) of subjects exceeded the normal urinary and hair arsenic levels respectively. Among them 52% (57/109) and 47% (55/117) exceeded normal urinary and hair arsenic levels having no arsenical dermal manifestations. Males and symptomatic cases had significantly higher hair arsenic levels (P < 0.05). We also observed significant positive correlation of both urine and hair arsenic levels to tubewell arsenic levels (r = 0.27, 0.37, P < 0.01) and negative correlation of urine arsenic levels with the age of the subjects (r = -0.18, P = 0.06). We conclude that elucidating factors associated with arsenicosis could be of prime importance in intervention and preventive measures. In arsenic affected communities of Nepal exposure to arsenic is still a major problem despite mitigation efforts and the potential for sub-clinical effects in exposed population is high.

  6. Factors associated with children being driven to school: implications for walk to school programs.

    PubMed

    Wen, Li Ming; Fry, Denise; Rissel, Chris; Dirkis, Helen; Balafas, Angela; Merom, Dafna

    2008-04-01

    In this study, we examined factors associated with children being driven to school. Participants were 1603 students (aged 9-11 years) and their parents from 24 public primary schools in inner western Sydney, Australia. Students recorded their modes of travel to and from school for 5 days in a student survey. Parents recorded their demographic data, their attitudes to travel, and their modes of travel to work, using a self-administered survey. An analysis of the two linked data sets found that 41% of students travelled by car to or from school for more than 5 trips per week. Almost a third (32%) of students walked all the way. Only 1% of students rode a bike and 22% used more than one mode of travel. Of those who were driven, 29% lived less than 1 km and a further 18% lived between 1 and 1.5 km from school. Factors associated with car travel (after adjusting for other potential confounders) were mode of parents' travel to work, parent attitudes, number of cars in the household, and distance from home to school. To be effective, walk to school programs need to address the link between parent journey to work and student journey to school.

  7. Young children who commit crime: epidemiology, developmental origins, risk factors, early interventions, and policy implications.

    PubMed

    Loeber, R; Farrington, D P

    2000-01-01

    An early onset of delinquency prior to age 13 years increases the risk of later serious, violent, and chronic offending by a factor of 2-3. Also child delinquents, compared to juveniles who start offending at a later age, tend to have longer delinquent careers. This article summarizes the report of the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention's Study Group on Very Young Offenders, chaired by Rolf Loeber and David P. Farrington. The Study Group, consisting of 16 scholars and 23 coauthors, worked for 2 years on preparing a report, undertaking extensive secondary data analyses, and writing chapters in different speciality areas. The report consists of a state of the art review of the developmental background of child delinquents. The report also summarizes risk and protective factors in the individual, family, peer group, school, and neighborhood that affect that development. Lastly, the report renews relevant preventive and remedial interventions in the juvenile justice system, families, peer groups, schools. and neighborhoods, and makes a case for improvement in the integration of services for child delinquents. Policy recommendations are presented to improve methods of dealing with child delinquents by juvenile justice, child welfare, and mental health agencies.

  8. A brief review of exercise, bipolar disorder, and mechanistic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Daniel; Turner, Alyna; Lauder, Sue; Gigler, Margaret E.; Berk, Lesley; Singh, Ajeet B.; Pasco, Julie A.; Berk, Michael; Sylvia, Louisa

    2015-01-01

    Despite evidence that exercise has been found to be effective in the treatment of depression, it is unclear whether these data can be extrapolated to bipolar disorder. Available evidence for bipolar disorder is scant, with no existing randomized controlled trials having tested the impact of exercise on depressive, manic or hypomanic symptomatology. Although exercise is often recommended in bipolar disorder, this is based on extrapolation from the unipolar literature, theory and clinical expertise and not empirical evidence. In addition, there are currently no available empirical data on program variables, with practical implications on frequency, intensity and type of exercise derived from unipolar depression studies. The aim of the current paper is to explore the relationship between exercise and bipolar disorder and potential mechanistic pathways. Given the high rate of medical co-morbidities experienced by people with bipolar disorder, it is possible that exercise is a potentially useful and important intervention with regard to general health benefits; however, further research is required to elucidate the impact of exercise on mood symptomology. PMID:25788889

  9. Mechanistic modeling of aberrant energy metabolism in human disease

    PubMed Central

    Sangar, Vineet; Eddy, James A.; Simeonidis, Evangelos; Price, Nathan D.

    2012-01-01

    Dysfunction in energy metabolism—including in pathways localized to the mitochondria—has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a wide array of disorders, ranging from cancer to neurodegenerative diseases to type II diabetes. The inherent complexities of energy and mitochondrial metabolism present a significant obstacle in the effort to understand the role that these molecular processes play in the development of disease. To help unravel these complexities, systems biology methods have been applied to develop an array of computational metabolic models, ranging from mitochondria-specific processes to genome-scale cellular networks. These constraint-based (CB) models can efficiently simulate aspects of normal and aberrant metabolism in various genetic and environmental conditions. Development of these models leverages—and also provides a powerful means to integrate and interpret—information from a wide range of sources including genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and enzyme kinetics. Here, we review a variety of mechanistic modeling studies that explore metabolic functions, deficiency disorders, and aberrant biochemical pathways in mitochondria and related regions in the cell. PMID:23112774

  10. Physical activity and its mechanistic effects on prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wekesa, A; Harrison, M; Watson, R W

    2015-09-01

    Beneficial effects of physical activity have been illustrated in numerous aspects of health. With the increasing incidence of prostate cancer and changes in physical activity of men, understanding the link between the two has important implications for changing this cancer burden. Both positive and negative associations between physical activity and prostate cancer have been previously demonstrated in observational epidemiological studies. Elucidating the biological mechanisms would lead to a better understanding of how physical activity influences the progression of prostate cancer. This review was undertaken to: (1) identify evidence in literature that demonstrates the effects of physical activity on skeletal muscle secretomes, (2) indicate the plausible signaling pathways these proteins might activate, and (3) identify evidence in literature that demonstrates the roles of the signaling pathways in prostate cancer progression and regression. We also discuss proposed biological mechanisms and signaling pathways by which physical activity may prevent the development and progression of prostate cancer. We discuss proteins involved in the normal and aberrant growth and development of the prostate gland that may be affected by physical activity. We further identify future directions for research, including a better understanding of the biological mechanisms, the need to standardize physical activity and identify mechanistic end points of physical activity that can then be correlated with outcomes.

  11. Risk Factor Analysis for Mastectomy Skin Flap Necrosis: Implications for Intraoperative Vascular Analysis.

    PubMed

    Reintgen, Christian; Leavitt, Adam; Pace, Elizabeth; Molas-Pierson, Justine; Mast, Bruce A

    2016-06-01

    Skin flap necrosis after mastectomy can be a devastating complication significantly affecting patient outcomes. Routine vascular analysis (fluorescein or laser angiography) of mastectomy skin flaps in all patients has been advocated but is of questionable cost-effectiveness. The purpose of this study was to identify the incidence and causative risk factors for mastectomy skin flap necrosis and thereby calculate the fiscal reality of intraoperative vascular screening. This is an institutional review board-approved retrospective study of all patients from 2007 to 2013 who underwent mastectomy related to breast cancer. Skin flap necrosis was defined as major if it necessitated return to the operating room. Data analysis was done for determination of causative factors of necrosis, including age, body mass index, smoking, previous irradiation, coronary artery disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, hypertension, gastroesophageal reflux disease, hyperlipidemia, obstructive sleep apnea, asthma, diabetes, thyroid disease, history of lumpectomy, and breast reduction or augmentation. During this time, intraoperative vascular screening was not done. Five hundred eighty-one patients underwent 616 mastectomies with a total of 34 necrotic events (5.5%)-16 major and 18 minor. Analyses via Student t tests, univariate analyses, χ testing, and logistic regression showed that history of smoking was the only patient factor associated with postoperative necrosis (P = 0.008). More frequently represented in the necrosis group, but without statistical significance, are previous lumpectomy (P = 0.069) and immediate reconstruction (P = 0.078).For the entire study period, the actual cost to the hospital for major necrotic events was $7,123.10 or $445.19 for each of the 16 major necrotic events and $209.50 for all 34 necrotic events. Per-patient cost-effective screening would need to be less than $11.54 for all patients, $100.33 for highest risk patients (smokers), and $21.65 for

  12. Apple FLOWERING LOCUS T proteins interact with transcription factors implicated in cell growth and organ development.

    PubMed

    Mimida, Naozumi; Kidou, Shin-Ichiro; Iwanami, Hiroshi; Moriya, Shigeki; Abe, Kazuyuki; Voogd, Charlotte; Varkonyi-Gasic, Erika; Kotoda, Nobuhiro

    2011-05-01

    Understanding the flowering process in apple (Malus × domestica Borkh.) is essential for developing methods to shorten the breeding period and regulate fruit yield. It is known that FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) acts as a transmissible floral inducer in the Arabidopsis flowering network system. To clarify the molecular network of two apple FT orthologues, MdFT1 and MdFT2, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen to identify proteins that interact with MdFT1. We identified several transcription factors, including two members of the TCP (TEOSINTE BRANCHED1, CYCLOIDEA and PROLIFERATING CELL FACTORs) family, designated MdTCP2 and MdTCP4, and an Arabidopsis thaliana VOZ1 (Vascular plant One Zinc finger protein1)-like protein, designated MdVOZ1. MdTCP2 and MdVOZ1 also interacted with MdFT2 in yeast. The expression domain of MdTCP2 and MdVOZ1 partially overlapped with that of MdFT1 and MdFT2, most strikingly in apple fruit tissue, further suggesting a potential interaction in vivo. Constitutive expression of MdTCP2, MdTCP4 and MdVOZ1 in Arabidopsis affected plant size, leaf morphology and the formation of leaf primordia on the adaxial side of cotyledons. On the other hand, chimeric MdTCP2, MdTCP4 and MdVOZ1 repressors that included the ethylene-responsive transcription factors (ERF)-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) domain motif influenced reproduction and inflorescence architecture in transgenic Arabidopsis. These results suggest that MdFT1 and/or MdFT2 might be involved in the regulation of cellular proliferation and the formation of new tissues and that they might affect leaf and fruit development by interacting with TCP- and VOZ-family proteins. DDBJ accession nos. AB531019 (MdTCP2a mRNA), AB531020 (MdTCP2b mRNA), AB531021 (MdTCP4a mRNA), AB531022 (MdTCP4b mRNA) and AB531023 (MdVOZ1a mRNA).

  13. Parastomal hernia: an exploration of the risk factors and the implications.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Anthony; Porrett, Theresa; Heyman, Bob

    Risk may be defined as 'the chance that something may happen to cause loss or an adverse effect' (Concise Oxford Medical Dictionary, 2003). Patients undergoing stoma formation are at risk of developing a wide range of complications following surgery. A parastomal hernia is an adverse effect that can contribute to postoperative morbidity. The risk of developing a parastomal hernia is dependent upon a number of variables, and stoma care nurses need to be aware of these to plan the appropriate care for patients undergoing stoma formation. This article discusses the issues surrounding the development of parastomal hernias and also looks at ways in which the risk factors associated with the development of a parastomal hernia may be minimized.

  14. Estimates of utility weights in hemophilia: implications for cost-utility analysis of clotting factor prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Grosse, Scott D; Chaugule, Shraddha S; Hay, Joel W

    2015-01-01

    Estimates of preference-weighted health outcomes or health state utilities are needed to assess improvements in health in terms of quality-adjusted life-years. Gains in quality-adjusted life-years are used to assess the cost–effectiveness of prophylactic use of clotting factor compared with on-demand treatment among people with hemophilia, a congenital bleeding disorder. Published estimates of health utilities for people with hemophilia vary, contributing to uncertainty in the estimates of cost–effectiveness of prophylaxis. Challenges in estimating utility weights for the purpose of evaluating hemophilia treatment include selection bias in observational data, difficulty in adjusting for predictors of health-related quality of life and lack of preference-based data comparing adults with lifetime or primary prophylaxis versus no prophylaxis living within the same country and healthcare system. PMID:25585817

  15. Effects of transforming growth factor-beta on murine astrocyte glutamine synthetase activity. Implications in neuronal injury.

    PubMed Central

    Chao, C C; Hu, S; Tsang, M; Weatherbee, J; Molitor, T W; Anderson, W R; Peterson, P K

    1992-01-01

    Cytokines have been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of brain diseases in which neurological dysfunction has been attributed to a change in amino acid neurotransmitter metabolism. In the present in vitro study, we investigated the effects of cytokines on astrocyte glutamine synthetase (GS) activity and subsequently on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated neurotoxicity. Proinflammatory cytokines IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta, and IL-6 at a concentration of 20 ng/ml did not affect GS activity; however, tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibited this activity by 20% in mixed neuronal/astrocyte cultures. Treatment for 24 h with transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta 1 or -beta 2 inhibited up to 60% GS activity. TGF-beta 2 also inhibited GS in enriched astrocyte cultures with an ED50 of 10 pg/ml. Antibodies specific to TGF-beta 2 blocked this effect. Treatment of astrocytes with TGF-beta 2 (250 pg/ml) resulted in markedly dilated rough endoplasmic reticulum. Since astrocyte GS may play a protective role in NMDA receptor-mediated neurotoxicity, we treated mixed neuronal/astrocyte cultures with TGF-beta 2 (250 pg/ml) and found a threefold potentiation of NMDA receptor-mediated neurotoxicity. These data suggest that TGF-beta impairs astrocyte GS function and enhances neurotoxicity, thus providing insight into understanding one mechanism of cytokine-mediated central nervous system disease. Images PMID:1358919

  16. An evaluation of factors influencing pore pressure in accretionary complexes: Implications for taper angle and wedge mechanics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saffer, D.M.; Bekins, B.A.

    2006-01-01

    At many subduction zones, accretionary complexes form as sediment is off-scraped from the subducting plate. Mechanical models that treat accretionary complexes as critically tapered wedges of sediment demonstrate that pore pressure controls their taper angle by modifying basal and internal shear strength. Here, we combine a numerical model of groundwater flow with critical taper theory to quantify the effects of sediment and de??collement permeability, sediment thickness, sediment partitioning between accretion and underthrusting, and plate convergence rate on steady state pore pressure. Our results show that pore pressure in accretionary wedges can be viewed as a dynamically maintained response to factors which drive pore pressure (source terms) and those that limit flow (permeability and drainage path length). We find that sediment permeability and incoming sediment thickness are the most important factors, whereas fault permeability and the partitioning of sediment have a small effect. For our base case model scenario, as sediment permeability is increased, pore pressure decreases from near-lithostatic to hydrostatic values and allows stable taper angles to increase from ??? 2.5?? to 8??-12.5??. With increased sediment thickness in our models (from 100 to 8000 m), increased pore pressure drives a decrease in stable taper angle from 8.4??-12.5?? to 15?? to <4??) with increased sediment thickness (from <1 to 7 km). One key implication is that hydrologic properties may strongly influence the strength of the crust in a wide range of geologic settings. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. T cell expansion is the limiting factor of virus control in mice with attenuated TCR signaling: implications for human immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Hillen, Kristina M; Gather, Ruth; Enders, Anselm; Pircher, Hanspeter; Aichele, Peter; Fisch, Paul; Blumenthal, Britta; Schamel, Wolfgang W; Straub, Tobias; Goodnow, Christopher C; Ehl, Stephan

    2015-03-15

    Defining the minimal thresholds for effective antiviral T cell immunity is important for clinical decisions in immunodeficient patients. TCR signaling is critical for T cell development, activation, and effector functions. In this article, we analyzed which of these TCR-mediated processes is limiting for antiviral immunity in a mouse strain with reduced expression of SLP-76 (twp mice). Despite severe T cell activation defects in vitro, twp mice generated a normal proportion of antiviral effector T cells postinfection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). Twp CD8(+) T cells showed impaired polyfunctional cytokine production, whereas cytotoxicity as the crucial antiviral effector function for LCMV control was normal. The main limiting factor in the antiviral response of twp mice was impaired T cell proliferation and survival, leading to a 5- to 10-fold reduction of antiviral T cells at the peak of the immune response. This was still sufficient to control infection with the LCMV Armstrong strain, but the more rapidly replicating LCMV-WE induced T cell exhaustion and viral persistence. Thus, under conditions of impaired TCR signaling, reduced T cell expansion was the limiting factor in antiviral immunity. These findings have implications for understanding antiviral immunity in patients with T cell deficiencies.

  18. Growth Hormone Induces Transforming Growth Factor-Beta-Induced Protein in Podocytes: Implications for Podocyte Depletion and Proteinuria.

    PubMed

    Chitra, P Swathi; Swathi, T; Sahay, Rakesh; Reddy, G Bhanuprakash; Menon, Ram K; Kumar, P Anil

    2015-09-01

    The glomerular podocytes form a major size selective barrier for the filtration of serum proteins and reduced podocyte number is a critical event in the pathogenesis of proteinuria during diabetic nephropathy (DN). An elevated level of growth hormone (GH) is implicated as a causative factor in the development of nephropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. We have previously shown that podocytes express GH receptor and are a target for GH action. To elucidate the molecular basis for the effects of GH on podocyte depletion, we conducted PCR-array analyses for extracellular matrix and adhesion molecules in podocytes. Our studies reveal that GH increases expression of a gene that encodes transforming growth factor-beta-induced protein (TGFBIp) expression. Similarly, microarray data retrieved from the Nephromine database revealed elevation of TGFBIp in patients with DN. Treatment with GH results in increased secretion of extracellular TGFBIp by podocytes. Both GH and TGFBIp induced apoptosis and epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) of podocytes. Exposure of podocytes to GH and TGFBIp resulted in increased migration of cells and altered podocyte permeability to albumin across podocyte monolayer. Administration of GH to rats induced EMT and apoptosis in the glomerular fraction of the kidney. Therefore, we conclude that the GH-dependent increase in TGFBIp in the podocyte is one of the mechanisms responsible for podocyte depletion in DN.

  19. Fine scale spatial variability of microbial pesticide degradation in soil: scales, controlling factors, and implications

    PubMed Central

    Dechesne, Arnaud; Badawi, Nora; Aamand, Jens; Smets, Barth F.

    2014-01-01

    Pesticide biodegradation is a soil microbial function of critical importance for modern agriculture and its environmental impact. While it was once assumed that this activity was homogeneously distributed at the field scale, mounting evidence indicates that this is rarely the case. Here, we critically examine the literature on spatial variability of pesticide biodegradation in agricultural soil. We discuss the motivations, methods, and main findings of the primary literature. We found significant diversity in the approaches used to describe and quantify spatial heterogeneity, which complicates inter-studies comparisons. However, it is clear that the presence and activity of pesticide degraders is often highly spatially variable with coefficients of variation often exceeding 50% and frequently displays non-random spatial patterns. A few controlling factors have tentatively been identified across pesticide classes: they include some soil characteristics (pH) and some agricultural management practices (pesticide application, tillage), while other potential controlling factors have more conflicting effects depending on the site or the pesticide. Evidence demonstrating the importance of spatial heterogeneity on the fate of pesticides in soil has been difficult to obtain but modeling and experimental systems that do not include soil's full complexity reveal that this heterogeneity must be considered to improve prediction of pesticide biodegradation rates or of leaching risks. Overall, studying the spatial heterogeneity of pesticide biodegradation is a relatively new field at the interface of agronomy, microbial ecology, and geosciences and a wealth of novel data is being collected from these different disciplinary perspectives. We make suggestions on possible avenues to take full advantage of these investigations for a better understanding and prediction of the fate of pesticides in soil. PMID:25538691

  20. Incidence and risk factors for hepatocellular carcinoma in Texas Latinos: implications for prevention research.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Amelie G; Weiss, Nancy S; Holden, Alan E C; Suarez, Lucina; Cooper, Sharon P; Munoz, Edgar; Naylor, Susan L

    2012-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is increasing in the U.S. despite a decline in cancer overall. Latinos have higher rates of HCC than the general population according to the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program. Not included in SEER, Texas Latinos make up one-fifth of the U.S. Latino population. To determine whether HCC incidence differs among U.S. and Texas Latinos, this descriptive study compares HCC incidence from 1995 through 2006 among three Latino populations: U.S. SEER, Texas overall and a South Texas subset. To identify lines of prevention research, we compare prevalence of known HCC risk factors among these Latino groups. Data were collected from the U.S. SEER Program, Texas Cancer Registry and Texas Department of State Health Services (TDSHS). Annual age-specific and age-adjusted HCC incidence rates, annual percent changes (APCs) and 95% confidence intervals were calculated as well as prevalence of obesity, diabetes, heavy alcohol use and cigarette smoking. Of the three Latino groups compared, South Texas Latinos had the highest age-adjusted HCC incidence rates and SEER Latinos had the lowest (10.6/100,000 (10.1-11.1) and 7.5/100,000 (7.2-7.7), respectively). HCC incidence significantly increased over time (APCs>0) among Latinos in all three geographic groups. Between 1995 and 2006, there was an increase in obesity among all three populations, and obesity was highest among South Texas Latinos. Diabetes increased among U.S. Latinos, and Latino women in South Texas had significantly higher diabetes prevalence than U.S. Latino women. Cigarette smoking and heavy alcohol use were similar among groups. The incidence of HCC among Latinos in South Texas is higher than elsewhere in the United States. Higher rates of HCC among Texas and South Texas Latinos may be associated with greater prevalence of obesity and diabetes, risk factors for HCC that are amenable to intervention.

  1. Lead in New York City Community Garden Chicken Eggs: Influential Factors and Health Implications

    PubMed Central

    Spliethoff, Henry M.; Mitchell, Rebecca G.; Ribaudo, Lisa N.; Taylor, Owen; Shayler, Hannah A.; Greene, Virginia; Oglesby, Debra

    2014-01-01

    Raising chickens for eggs in urban areas is becoming increasingly common. Urban chickens may be exposed to lead, a common urban soil contaminant. We measured lead concentrations in chicken eggs from New York City (NYC) community gardens and collected information on factors that might affect those concentrations. Lead was detected between 10 and 167 μg/kg in 48% of NYC eggs. Measures of lead in eggs from a henhouse were significantly associated (p<0.005) with lead concentrations in soil. The association between soil and egg lead has been evaluated only once before, by a study of a rural region in Belgium. In our study, the apparent lead soil-to-egg transfer efficiency was considerably lower than that found in Belgium, suggesting that there may be important geographic differences in this transfer. We developed models that suggested that, for sites like ours, lead concentrations in >50% of eggs from a henhouse would exceed store-bought egg concentrations (<7–13 μg/kg; 3% above detection limit) at soil lead concentrations >120 mg/kg, and that the concentration in one of six eggs from a henhouse would exceed a 100 μg/kg guidance value at soil lead concentrations >410 mg/kg. Our models also suggested that the availability of dietary calcium supplements was another influential factor that reduced egg lead concentrations. Estimates of health risk from consuming eggs with the lead concentrations we measured generally were not significant. However, soil lead concentrations in this study were <600 mg/kg, and considerably higher concentrations are not uncommon. Efforts to reduce lead transfer to chicken eggs and associated exposure are recommended for urban chicken keepers. PMID:24287691

  2. Factors associated with the failure of obstetric fistula repair in Guinea: implications for practice.

    PubMed

    Delamou, Alexandre; Delvaux, Therese; Beavogui, Abdoul Habib; Toure, Abdoulaye; Kolié, Delphin; Sidibé, Sidikiba; Camara, Mandian; Diallo, Kindy; Barry, Thierno Hamidou; Diallo, Moustapha; Leveque, Alain; Zhang, Wei-Hong; De Brouwere, Vincent

    2016-11-08

    The prevention and treatment of obstetric fistula still remains a concern and a challenge in low income countries. The objective of this study was to estimate the overall proportions of failure of fistula closure and incontinence among women undergoing repair for obstetric fistula in Guinea and identify its associated factors. This was a retrospective cohort study using data extracted from medical records of fistula repairs between 1 January 2012 and 30 September 2013. The outcome was the failure of fistula closure and incontinence at hospital discharge evaluated by a dye test. A sub-sample of women with vesicovaginal fistula was used to identify the factors associated with these outcomes. Overall, 109 women out of 754 (14.5 %; 95 % CI:11.9-17.0) unsuccessful repaired fistula at discharge and 132 (17.5 %; 95 % CI:14.8-20.2) were not continent. Failure of fistula closure was associated with vaginal delivery (AOR: 1.9; 95 % CI: 1.0-3.6), partially (AOR: 2.0; 95 % CI: 1.1-5.6) or totally damaged urethra (AOR: 5.9; 95 % CI: 2.9-12.3) and surgical repair at Jean Paul II Hospital (AOR: 2.5; 95 % CI: 1.2-4.9). Women who had a partially damaged urethra (AOR: 2.5; 95 % CI: 1.5-4.4) or a totally damaged urethra (AOR: 6.3; 95 % CI: 3.0-13.0) were more likely to experience post-repair urinary incontinence than women who had their urethra intact. At programmatic level in Guinea, caution should be paid to the repair of women who present with a damaged urethra and those who delivered vaginally as they carry greater risks of experiencing a failure of fistula closure and incontinence.

  3. Density profiles of CDM microhalos and their implications for annihilation boost factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderhalden, Donnino; Diemand, Juerg

    2013-04-01

    In a standard cold dark matter (CDM) cosmology, microhalos at the CDM cutoff scale are the first and smallest objects expected to form in the universe. Here we present results of high resolution simulations of three representative roughly Earth-mass microhalos in order to determine their inner density profile. We find that CDM microhalos in simulations without a cutoff in the power spectrum roughly follow the NFW density profile, just like the much larger CDM halos on galaxy and galaxy cluster scales. But having a cutoff in the initial power spectrum at a typical neutralino free streaming scale of 10-7Msolar makes their inner density profiles considerably steeper, i.e. ρproptor-(1.3-1.4), in good agreement with the results from Ishiyama et al. (2010). An extrapolation of the halo and subhalo mass functions down to the cutoff scale indicates that microhalos are extremely abundant throughout the present day dark matter distribution and might contribute significantly to indirect dark matter detection signals. Assuming a transition from a NFW to a steeper inner profile (ρproptor-1.4) two orders of magnitude above the cutoff scale, the total boost factor for a Milky Way sized dark matter halo increases from about 3.5 to 4. We further find that CDM microhalo concentrations are consistent with the Bullock et al. (2001) model and clearly rule out simplistic power law models for the mass dependence of concentrations and subhalo annihilation, which would erroneously lead to very large boost factors (a few hundred for galaxy halos and over 1000 for clusters).

  4. Factors Affecting Diet Variation in the Pyrenean Rock Ptarmigan (Lagopus muta pyrenaica): Conservation Implications

    PubMed Central

    García-González, Ricardo; Aldezabal, Arantza; Laskurain, Nere Amaia; Margalida, Antoni; Novoa, Claude

    2016-01-01

    The Pyrenean rock ptarmigan (Lagopus muta pyrenaica) lives at one of the southernmost limits of the ptarmigan range. Their small population sizes and the impacts of global changes are limiting factors in the conservation of this threatened subspecies. An effective conservation policy requires precise basic knowledge of a species' food and habitat requirements, information that is practically non-existent for this Pyrenean population. Here, we describe the diet of a ptarmigan population in the Eastern Pyrenees, the environmental factors influencing its variability and the relationship between diet floristic composition and quality. Diet composition was determined by microhistological analysis of faeces and diet quality was estimated from free-urate faecal N content. Our results show that grouse diet is based mainly on arctic-alpine shrubs of the Ericaceae family, as well as dwarf willows (Salix spp.) and Dryas octopetala. The most frequently consumed plant species was Rhododendron ferrugineum, but its abundance in the diet was negatively related to the diet nitrogen content. Conversely, the abundance of Salix spp., grass leaves and arthropods increased the nitrogen content of the diet. Seasonality associated with snow-melting contributed the most to variability in the Pyrenean ptarmigan diet, differentiating winter from spring/summer diets. The latter was characterised by a high consumption of dwarf willows, flowers, arthropods and tender forb leaves. Geographic area and sex-age class influenced diet variability to a lesser extent. Current temperature increases in the Pyrenees due to global warming may reduce the persistence and surface area of snow-packs where preferred plants for rock ptarmigan usually grow, thus reducing food availability. The high consumption of Rh. ferrugineum characterised the diet of the Pyrenean population. Given the toxicity of this plant for most herbivores, its potential negative effect on Pyrenean ptarmigan populations should be

  5. Vascular permeability enhancement in solid tumor: various factors, mechanisms involved and its implications.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Hiroshi; Fang, Jun; Inutsuka, Takao; Kitamoto, Yasunori

    2003-03-01

    Most solid tumors are known to exhibit highly enhanced vascular permeability, similar to or more than the inflammatory tissues. Common denominators affecting both cancer and inflammatory lesions are now well known: bradykinin (BK), nitric oxide (NO), peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)), prostaglandins (PGs), collagenases or matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and others. Incidentally, enzymes involved in these mediator syntheses are upregulated or activated. Initially described vascular permeability factor (VPF) (proteinaceous) was later identified to be the same as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which promotes angiogenesis of cancer tissues as well. These mediators cross-talk or co-upregulate each other, such as BK-NO-PGs system. Therefore, vascular permeability observed in solid tumor may reflect the other side of the coin (angiogenesis). The vascular permeability and accumulation of plasma components in the interstitium described here is applicable for predominantly macromolecules (molecular weight, Mw>45 kDa), but not for low molecular compounds as most anticancer agents are. Macromolecular compounds (e.g., albumin, transferrin) or many biocompatible water-soluble polymers show this effect. Furthermore, they are not cleared rapidly from the sites of lesion (cancer/inflammatory tissue), thus, remain for prolonged time, usually for more than a few days. This phenomenon of "enhanced permeability and retention effect" observed in cancer tissue for macromolecules and lipids is coined "EPR effect", which is now widely accepted as a gold standard for anticancer drug designing to seek more cancer-selective targeting using macromolecular drugs. Consequently, drastic reduction of the systemic side effect is observed, while the macromolecular drugs will continuously exert antitumor activity. Other advantages of macromolecular drugs are also discussed.

  6. A cross-regional assessment of the factors affecting ecoliteracy: implications for policy and practice.

    PubMed

    Pilgrim, Sarah; Smith, David; Pretty, Jules

    2007-09-01

    The value of accumulated ecological knowledge, termed ecoliteracy, is vital to both human and ecosystem health. Maintenance of this knowledge is essential for continued support of local conservation efforts and the capacity of communities to self- or co-manage their local resources sustainably. Most previous studies have been qualitative and small scale, documenting ecoliteracy in geographically isolated locations. In this study, we take a different approach, focusing on (1) the primary factors affecting individual levels of ecoliteracy, (2) whether these factors shift with economic development, and (3) if different knowledge protection strategies are required for the future. We compared non-resource-dependent communities in the United Kingdom with resource-dependent communities in India and Indonesia (n=1250 interviews). We found that UK residents with the highest levels of ecoliteracy visited the countryside frequently, lived and grew up in rural areas, and acquired their knowledge from informal word-of-mouth sources, such as parents and friends, rather than television and schooling. The ecoliteracy of resource-dependent community members, however, varied with wealth status and gender. The least wealthy families depended most on local resources for their livelihoods and had the highest levels of ecoliteracy. Gender roles affected both the level and content of an individual's ecoliteracy. The importance of reciprocal oral transfer of this knowledge in addition to direct experience to the maintenance of ecoliteracy was apparent at all sites. Lessons learned may contribute to new local resource management strategies for combined ecoliteracy conservation. Without novel policies, local community management capacity is likely to be depleted in the future.

  7. Factors associated with early growth in Egyptian infants: implications for addressing the dual burden of malnutrition.

    PubMed

    Kavle, Justine A; Flax, Valerie L; Abdelmegeid, Ali; Salah, Farouk; Hafez, Seham; Ramzy, Magda; Hamed, Doaa; Saleh, Gulsen; Galloway, Rae

    2016-01-01

    Optimal nutrition is critical to the attainment of healthy growth, human capital and sustainable development. In Egypt, infants and young children face overlapping forms of malnutrition, including micronutrient deficiencies, stunting and overweight. Yet, in this setting, little is known about the factors associated with growth during the first year of life. A rise in stunting in Lower Egypt from 2005 to 2008 prompted this implementation research study, which followed a longitudinal cohort of infants from birth to 1 year of age within the context of a USAID-funded maternal and child health integrated programme. We sought to determine if growth patterns and factors related to early growth differed in Lower and Upper Egypt, and examined the relationship between weight loss and subsequent stunting at 12 months of age. Growth patterns revealed that length-for-age z-score (LAZ) decreased and weight-for-length z-score (WLZ) increased from 6 to 12 months of age in both regions. One-quarter of infants were stunted and nearly one-third were overweight by 12 months of age in lower Egypt. Minimum dietary diversity was significantly associated with WLZ in Lower Egypt (β = 0.22, P < 0.05), but not in Upper Egypt. Diarrhoea, fever and programme exposure were not associated with any growth outcome. Weight loss during any period was associated with a twofold likelihood of stunting at 12 months in Lower Egypt, but not Upper Egypt. In countries, like Egypt, facing the nutrition transition, infant and young child nutrition programmes need to address both stunting and overweight through improving dietary quality and reducing reliance on energy-dense foods.

  8. Factors Affecting Diet Variation in the Pyrenean Rock Ptarmigan (Lagopus muta pyrenaica): Conservation Implications.

    PubMed

    García-González, Ricardo; Aldezabal, Arantza; Laskurain, Nere Amaia; Margalida, Antoni; Novoa, Claude

    2016-01-01

    The Pyrenean rock ptarmigan (Lagopus muta pyrenaica) lives at one of the southernmost limits of the ptarmigan range. Their small population sizes and the impacts of global changes are limiting factors in the conservation of this threatened subspecies. An effective conservation policy requires precise basic knowledge of a species' food and habitat requirements, information that is practically non-existent for this Pyrenean population. Here, we describe the diet of a ptarmigan population in the Eastern Pyrenees, the environmental factors influencing its variability and the relationship between diet floristic composition and quality. Diet composition was determined by microhistological analysis of faeces and diet quality was estimated from free-urate faecal N content. Our results show that grouse diet is based mainly on arctic-alpine shrubs of the Ericaceae family, as well as dwarf willows (Salix spp.) and Dryas octopetala. The most frequently consumed plant species was Rhododendron ferrugineum, but its abundance in the diet was negatively related to the diet nitrogen content. Conversely, the abundance of Salix spp., grass leaves and arthropods increased the nitrogen content of the diet. Seasonality associated with snow-melting contributed the most to variability in the Pyrenean ptarmigan diet, differentiating winter from spring/summer diets. The latter was characterised by a high consumption of dwarf willows, flowers, arthropods and tender forb leaves. Geographic area and sex-age class influenced diet variability to a lesser extent. Current temperature increases in the Pyrenees due to global warming may reduce the persistence and surface area of snow-packs where preferred plants for rock ptarmigan usually grow, thus reducing food availability. The high consumption of Rh. ferrugineum characterised the diet of the Pyrenean population. Given the toxicity of this plant for most herbivores, its potential negative effect on Pyrenean ptarmigan populations should be

  9. HPV Literacy and Associated Factors Among Hmong American Immigrants: Implications for Reducing Cervical Cancer Disparity.

    PubMed

    Beltran, Raiza; Simms, Tina; Lee, Hee Yun; Kwon, Melissa

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies show that certain minority and ethnic communities experience low human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination rates despite a higher cervical cancer burden. HPV is known to be responsible for almost all cervical cancer cases. Hmong Americans, a growing Asian American population, appear to be at increased risk. The cervical cancer incidence rate among Hmong American women is three times higher than other Asian/Pacific Islanders and more than four times higher than Non-Hispanic Whites. Despite such alarming statistics, there is limited research focusing on HPV literacy and its associated factors in the Hmong American community. This study's objectives are to investigate: (1) the level of HPV knowledge among Hmong Americans; (2) HPV vaccination initiation and completion rates of Hmong Americans; and (3) factors associated with HPV literacy in the Hmong American community. Andersen's Behavioral Model of Health Services Use was used as the study's theoretical framework. A self-administered paper and online health survey was completed by192 Hmong Americans living in a major metropolitan area in Minnesota. Results revealed a mean score of 4.76 (SD 1.67) for the 7-item questionnaire measuring HPV knowledge. The HPV vaccination initiation rate was 46.3 % (n = 56), with 32.7 % completing the recommended three doses. Multiple regression analysis found that participants' level of education, number of doctor visits, and cervical cancer screening literacy were significantly associated with HPV knowledge. This study's results indicate the important role of health providers in educating Hmong Americans patients about HPV and cervical cancer prevention to decrease the cervical cancer burden in this high-risk population.

  10. Candidaemia with uncommon Candida species: predisposing factors, outcome, antifungal susceptibility, and implications for management.

    PubMed

    Chen, S C A; Marriott, D; Playford, E G; Nguyen, Q; Ellis, D; Meyer, W; Sorrell, T C; Slavin, M

    2009-07-01

    The risk factors for and clinical features of bloodstream infection with uncommon Candida spp. (species other than C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. parapsilosis, C. tropicals and C. krusei) are incompletely defined. To identify clinical variables associated with these species that might guide management, 57 cases of candidaemia resulting from uncommon Candida spp. were analysed in comparison with 517 episodes of Candida albicans candidaemia (2001-2004). Infection with uncommon Candida spp. (5.3% of candidaemia cases), as compared with C. albicans candidaemia, was significantly more likely to be outpatient-acquired than inpatient-acquired (15 of 57 vs. 65 of 517 episodes, p 0.01). Prior exposure to fluconazole was uncommon (n=1). Candida dubliniensis was the commonest species (n=22, 39%), followed by Candida guilliermondii (n=11, 19%) and Candida lusitaniae (n=7, 12%).C. dubliniensis candidaemia was independently associated with recent intravenous drug use (p 0.01) and chronic liver disease (p 0.03), and infection with species other than C. dubliniensis was independently associated with age<65 years (p 0.02), male sex (p 0.03) and human immunodeficiency virus infection (p 0.05). Presence of sepsis at diagnosis and crude 30-day mortality rates were similar for C. dubliniensis-related, non-C. dubliniensis-related and C. albicans-related candidaemia. Haematological malignancy was the commonest predisposing factor in C. guilliermondii (n=3, 27%) and C. lusitaniae (n=3, 43%) candidaemia. The 30-day mortality rate of C. lusitaniae candidaemia was higher than the overall death rate for all uncommon Candida spp. (42.9% vs. 25%, p not significant). All isolates were susceptible to amphotericin B, voriconazole, posaconazole, and caspofungin; five strains (9%) had fluconazole MIC values of 16-32 mg/L. Candidaemia due to uncommon Candida spp. is emerging among hospital outpatients; certain clinical variables may assist in recognition of this entity.

  11. Prevalence and risk factors for viral hepatitis in the Kosovarian population: implications for health policy.

    PubMed

    Quaglio, Gianluca; Ramadani, Naser; Pattaro, Cristian; Cami, Arben; Dentico, Pietro; Volpe, Anna; Pellizzer, Giampiero; Berisha, Ali; Smacchia, Camillo; Figliomeni, Mario; Schinaia, Nicola; Rezza, Giovanni; Putoto, Giovanni

    2008-05-01

    The prevalence of hepatitis infection among the Kosovarian population is largely unknown. The aim of the study was to evaluate the prevalence and risk factors of hepatitis A, B, C, and D (HAV, HBV, HCV, HDV) infection among the general population and in a group of health care workers in the Kosovo region. Overall, 1,287 participants were recruited, 460 males (36%) and 827 females (64%). Health care workers accounted for 253 individuals (20%), 301 were blood donor candidates (23%), 334 were pregnant women (26%), and 399 (31%) were subjects who had been examined in two clinics for routine laboratory testing. The prevalence of total anti-HAV was 88.6% (95% CI: 86.69-90.25). Prevalence of anti-HAV among children up to 10 years was 40.5% (95% CI: 29.6-53.15), reaching 70% (95% CI: 62.25-77.10) in the 11-20 age group. Age, living in rural areas and unemployment were factors associated with higher risk of HAV infection. HBsAg was detected in 2.4% (95% CI: 1.57-3.38%) of the study sample, with a significant age trend (P-value:0.0110). Positivity for total anti-HBc was detected in 18.4% (95% CI = 16.27-20.59) of the subjects. Ninety-three subjects (7.2%) were positive for anti-HBs alone. An association between age, HSV-2 positivity, working nurses and HBV infection has been observed. One patient was HDV positive. The prevalence for HCV was 0.5% (95% CI: 0.22-1.12%). HAV infection seems to be high-intermediate, while HBV shows an intermediate endemicity. It is necessary to highlight the importance of an immunization strategy against HAV and HBV in reducing the incidence of the infection. The prevalence for HCV was very low.

  12. Factors associated with early growth in Egyptian infants: implications for addressing the dual burden of malnutrition

    PubMed Central

    Flax, Valerie L.; Abdelmegeid, Ali; Salah, Farouk; Hafez, Seham; Ramzy, Magda; Hamed, Doaa; Saleh, Gulsen; Galloway, Rae

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Optimal nutrition is critical to the attainment of healthy growth, human capital and sustainable development. In Egypt, infants and young children face overlapping forms of malnutrition, including micronutrient deficiencies, stunting and overweight. Yet, in this setting, little is known about the factors associated with growth during the first year of life. A rise in stunting in Lower Egypt from 2005 to 2008 prompted this implementation research study, which followed a longitudinal cohort of infants from birth to 1 year of age within the context of a USAID‐funded maternal and child health integrated programme. We sought to determine if growth patterns and factors related to early growth differed in Lower and Upper Egypt, and examined the relationship between weight loss and subsequent stunting at 12 months of age. Growth patterns revealed that length‐for‐age z‐score (LAZ) decreased and weight‐for‐length z‐score (WLZ) increased from 6 to 12 months of age in both regions. One‐quarter of infants were stunted and nearly one‐third were overweight by 12 months of age in lower Egypt. Minimum dietary diversity was significantly associated with WLZ in Lower Egypt (β = 0.22, P < 0.05), but not in Upper Egypt. Diarrhoea, fever and programme exposure were not associated with any growth outcome. Weight loss during any period was associated with a twofold likelihood of stunting at 12 months in Lower Egypt, but not Upper Egypt. In countries, like Egypt, facing the nutrition transition, infant and young child nutrition programmes need to address both stunting and overweight through improving dietary quality and reducing reliance on energy‐dense foods. PMID:26373408

  13. Factors influencing performance in the Hecht vault and implications for modelling.

    PubMed

    King, Mark A; Yeadon, Maurice R

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigated the factors that influence Hecht vault performance and assessed the level of model complexity required to give an adequate representation of vaulting. A five-segment planar simulation model with a visco-elastic shoulder joint and a torque generator at the shoulder joint was used to simulate the contact phase in vaulting. The model was customized to an elite gymnast by determining subject-specific segmental inertia and joint torque parameters. The simulation model was matched to a performance of the Hecht vault by varying the visco-elastic characteristics of the shoulders and the arm-horse interface and the activation time history of the shoulder torque generator until the best match was found. Perturbing the matching simulation demonstrated that appropriate initial kinematics are necessary for a successful performance. Fixing the hip and knee angles at their initial values had a small effect with 3 degrees less rotation. Applying shoulder torque during the contact phase also had a small effect with only a 7 degrees range in landing angles. Excluding the hand segment from the model was found to have a moderate effect with 15 degrees less rotation and the time of contact reduced by 38%. Removing shoulder elasticity resulted in 50 degrees less rotation. The use of a five-segment simulation model confirmed that the use of shoulder torque plays a minor role in vaulting performance and that having appropriate initial kinematics at touchdown is essential. However, factors such as shoulder elasticity and the hands which have previously been ignored also have a substantial influence on performance.

  14. Prevalence and associated factors of Schistosomiasis among children in Yemen: implications for an effective control programme.

    PubMed

    Sady, Hany; Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M; Mahdy, Mohammed A K; Lim, Yvonne A L; Mahmud, Rohela; Surin, Johari

    2013-01-01

    Schistosomiasis, one of the most prevalent neglected tropical diseases, is a life-threatening public health problem in Yemen especially in rural communities. This cross-sectional study aims to determine the prevalence and associated risk factors of schistosomiasis among children in rural Yemen. Urine and faecal samples were collected from 400 children. Urine samples were examined using filtration technique for the presence of Schistosoma haematobium eggs while faecal samples were examined using formalin-ether concentration and Kato Katz techniques for the presence of S. mansoni. Demographic, socioeconomic and environmental information were collected via a validated questionnaire. Overall, 31.8% of the participants were found to be positive for schistosomiasis; 23.8% were infected with S. haematobium and 9.3% were infected with S. mansoni. Moreover, 39.5% of the participants were anaemic whereas 9.5% had hepatosplenomegaly. The prevalence of schistosomiasis was significantly higher among children aged >10 years compared to those aged ≤ 10 years (P<0.05). Multivariate analysis confirmed that presence of other infected family member (P<0.001), low household monthly income (P = 0.003), using unsafe sources for drinking water (P = 0.003), living nearby stream/spring (P = 0.006) and living nearby pool/pond (P = 0.002) were the key factors significantly associated with schistosomiasis among these children. This study reveals that schistosomiasis is still highly prevalent in Yemen. These findings support an urgent need to start an integrated, targeted and effective schistosomiasis control programme with a mission to move towards the elimination phase. Besides periodic drug distribution, health education and community mobilisation, provision of clean and safe drinking water, introduction of proper sanitation are imperative among these communities in order to curtail the transmission and morbidity caused by schistosomiasis. Screening and treating other infected family

  15. Lead in New York City community garden chicken eggs: influential factors and health implications.

    PubMed

    Spliethoff, Henry M; Mitchell, Rebecca G; Ribaudo, Lisa N; Taylor, Owen; Shayler, Hannah A; Greene, Virginia; Oglesby, Debra

    2014-08-01

    Raising chickens for eggs in urban areas is becoming increasingly common. Urban chickens may be exposed to lead, a common urban soil contaminant. We measured lead concentrations in chicken eggs from New York City (NYC) community gardens and collected information on factors that might affect those concentrations. Lead was detected between 10 and 167 μg/kg in 48 % of NYC eggs. Measures of lead in eggs from a henhouse were significantly associated (p < 0.005) with lead concentrations in soil. The association between soil and egg lead has been evaluated only once before, by a study of a rural region in Belgium. In our study, the apparent lead soil-to-egg transfer efficiency was considerably lower than that found in Belgium, suggesting that there may be important geographic differences in this transfer. We developed models that suggested that, for sites like ours, lead concentrations in >50 % of eggs from a henhouse would exceed store-bought egg concentrations (<7-13 μg/kg; 3 % above detection limit) at soil lead concentrations >120 mg/kg and that the concentration in one of six eggs from a henhouse would exceed a 100 μg/kg guidance value at soil lead concentrations >410 mg/kg. Our models also suggested that the availability of dietary calcium supplements was another influential factor that reduced egg lead concentrations. Estimates of health risk from consuming eggs with the lead concentrations we measured generally were not significant. However, soil lead concentrations in this study were <600 mg/kg, and considerably higher concentrations are not uncommon. Efforts to reduce lead transfer to chicken eggs and associated exposure are recommended for urban chicken keepers.

  16. Reaction Coordinates and Mechanistic Hypothesis Tests.

    PubMed

    Peters, Baron

    2016-05-27

    Reaction coordinates are integral to several classic rate theories that can (a) predict kinetic trends across conditions and homologous reactions, (b) extract activation parameters with a clear physical interpretation from experimental rates, and (c) enable efficient calculations of free energy barriers and rates. New trajectory-based rare events methods can provide rates directly from dynamical trajectories without a reaction coordinate. Trajectory-based frameworks can also generate ideal (but abstract) reaction coordinates such as committors and eigenfunctions of the master equation. However, rates and mechanistic insights obtained from trajectory-based methods and abstract coordinates are not readily generalized across simulation conditions or reaction families. We discuss methods for identifying physically meaningful reaction coordinates, including committor analysis, variational transition state theory, Kramers-Langer-Berezhkovskii-Szabo theory, and statistical inference methods that can use path sampling data to screen, mix, and optimize thousands of trial coordinates. Special focus is given to likelihood maximization and inertial likelihood maximization approaches.

  17. Mechanistic issues in asparagine synthetase catalysis.

    PubMed

    Richards, N G; Schuster, S M

    1998-01-01

    The enzymatic synthesis of asparagine is an ATP-dependent process that utilizes the nitrogen atom derived from either glutamine or ammonia. Despite a long history of kinetic and mechanistic investigation, there is no universally accepted catalytic mechanism for this seemingly straightforward carboxyl group activating enzyme, especially as regards those steps immediately preceding amide bond formation. This chapter considers four issues dealing with the mechanism: (a) the structural organization of the active site(s) partaking in glutamine utilization and aspartate activation; (b) the relationship of asparagine synthetase to other amidotransferases; (c) the way in which ATP is used to activate the beta-carboxyl group; and (d) the detailed mechanism by which nitrogen is transferred.

  18. Reaction Coordinates and Mechanistic Hypothesis Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Baron

    2016-05-01

    Reaction coordinates are integral to several classic rate theories that can (a) predict kinetic trends across conditions and homologous reactions, (b) extract activation parameters with a clear physical interpretation from experimental rates, and (c) enable efficient calculations of free energy barriers and rates. New trajectory-based rare events methods can provide rates directly from dynamical trajectories without a reaction coordinate. Trajectory-based frameworks can also generate ideal (but abstract) reaction coordinates such as committors and eigenfunctions of the master equation. However, rates and mechanistic insights obtained from trajectory-based methods and abstract coordinates are not readily generalized across simulation conditions or reaction families. We discuss methods for identifying physically meaningful reaction coordinates, including committor analysis, variational transition state theory, Kramers-Langer-Berezhkovskii-Szabo theory, and statistical inference methods that can use path sampling data to screen, mix, and optimize thousands of trial coordinates. Special focus is given to likelihood maximization and inertial likelihood maximization approaches.

  19. Mechanistic investigations of the ethylene tetramerisation reaction.

    PubMed

    Overett, Matthew J; Blann, Kevin; Bollmann, Annette; Dixon, John T; Haasbroek, Daleen; Killian, Esna; Maumela, Hulisani; McGuinness, David S; Morgan, David H

    2005-08-03

    The unprecedented selective tetramerisation of ethylene to 1-octene was recently reported. In the present study various mechanistic aspects of this novel transformation were investigated. The unusually high 1-octene selectivity in chromium-catalyzed ethylene tetramerisation reactions is caused by the unique extended metallacyclic mechanism in operation. Both 1-octene and higher 1-alkenes are formed by further ethylene insertion into a metallacycloheptane intermediate, whereas 1-hexene is formed by elimination from this species as in other reported trimerisation reactions. This is supported by deuterium labeling studies, analysis of the molar distribution of 1-alkene products, and identification of secondary co-oligomerization reaction products. In addition, the formation of two C6 cyclic products, methylenecyclopentane and methylcyclopentane, is discussed, and a bimetallic disproportionation mechanism to account for the available data is proposed.

  20. Mechanistic interplay between ceramide and insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Reali, Federico; Morine, Melissa J.; Kahramanoğulları, Ozan; Raichur, Suryaprakash; Schneider, Hans-Christoph; Crowther, Daniel; Priami, Corrado

    2017-01-01

    Recent research adds to a growing body of literature on the essential role of ceramides in glucose homeostasis and insulin signaling, while the mechanistic interplay between various components of ceramide metabolism remains to be quantified. We present an extended model of C16:0 ceramide production through both the de novo synthesis and the salvage pathways. We verify our model with a combination of published models and independent experimental data. In silico experiments of the behavior of ceramide and related bioactive lipids in accordance with the observed transcriptomic changes in obese/diabetic murine macrophages at 5 and 16 weeks support the observation of insulin resistance only at the later phase. Our analysis suggests the pivotal role of ceramide synthase, serine palmitoyltransferase and dihydroceramide desaturase involved in the de novo synthesis and the salvage pathways in influencing insulin resistance versus its regulation. PMID:28112248

  1. Incidence and Risk Factors for Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Texas Latinos: Implications for Prevention Research

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Amelie G.; Weiss, Nancy S.; Holden, Alan E. C.; Suarez, Lucina; Cooper, Sharon P.; Munoz, Edgar; Naylor, Susan L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is increasing in the U.S. despite a decline in cancer overall. Latinos have higher rates of HCC than the general population according to the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program. Not included in SEER, Texas Latinos make up one-fifth of the U.S. Latino population. To determine whether HCC incidence differs among U.S. and Texas Latinos, this descriptive study compares HCC incidence from 1995 through 2006 among three Latino populations: U.S. SEER, Texas overall and a South Texas subset. To identify lines of prevention research, we compare prevalence of known HCC risk factors among these Latino groups. Methods Data were collected from the U.S. SEER Program, Texas Cancer Registry and Texas Department of State Health Services (TDSHS). Annual age-specific and age-adjusted HCC incidence rates, annual percent changes (APCs) and 95% confidence intervals were calculated as well as prevalence of obesity, diabetes, heavy alcohol use and cigarette smoking. Results Of the three Latino groups compared, South Texas Latinos had the highest age-adjusted HCC incidence rates and SEER Latinos had the lowest (10.6/100,000 (10.1–11.1) and 7.5/100,000 (7.2–7.7), respectively). HCC incidence significantly increased over time (APCs>0) among Latinos in all three geographic groups. Between 1995 and 2006, there was an increase in obesity among all three populations, and obesity was highest among South Texas Latinos. Diabetes increased among U.S. Latinos, and Latino women in South Texas had significantly higher diabetes prevalence than U.S. Latino women. Cigarette smoking and heavy alcohol use were similar among groups. Conclusions The incidence of HCC among Latinos in South Texas is higher than elsewhere in the United States. Higher rates of HCC among Texas and South Texas Latinos may be associated with greater prevalence of obesity and diabetes, risk factors for HCC that are amenable to intervention. PMID:22530052

  2. Factors supporting self-management in Parkinson's disease: implications for nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Chenoweth, Lynn; Gallagher, Robyn; Sheriff, June N; Donoghue, Judith; Stein-Parbury, Jane

    2008-09-01

    Aim.  To identify the factors associated with better self-management in people with moderate to high levels of Parkinson's disease following an acute illness event. Design and methods.  A prospective, descriptive study conducted with 75 persons with Parkinson's disease over the age of 55, collected twice: within a week of an acute event and 1 month later, after resuming usual life at home. Participants completed a questionnaire on self-rated health status, self-efficacy, sense of coherence, symptom monitoring and medication and general self-management. Background.  Parkinson's disease is a chronic neurological condition that affects many dimensions of life, including threats to self-identity and confidence in self-management. Self-management has the potential to reduce costs through decreased hospital admissions, disease progression and avoidance of complications. While evidence for the relationships between self-management and self-efficacy and sense of coherence has been demonstrated in some chronic illness groups, this has not previously been demonstrated in Parkinson's disease. Results.  The independent predictors of better self-management were not being hospitalized in the last 6 months, more frequent symptom checking and better self-efficacy for self-management. The influence of other factors on self-management, such as sense of coherence, was mediated through self-efficacy. Support of family and others was associated with better self-efficacy both directly and through an improved sense of coherence. Conclusions and relevance to nursing practice.  The presence of informal support plays an important role in sustaining self-efficacy and sense of coherence and hence self-management in persons with Parkinson's disease. Since these attributes are amenable to change, nurses are in a good position to encourage participation in Parkinson's support groups, teach self-management skills through regular symptom monitoring and to assess and promote self

  3. Prevalence and Associated Factors of Schistosomiasis among Children in Yemen: Implications for an Effective Control Programme

    PubMed Central

    Sady, Hany; Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M.; Mahdy, Mohammed A. K.; Lim, Yvonne A. L.; Mahmud, Rohela; Surin, Johari

    2013-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis, one of the most prevalent neglected tropical diseases, is a life-threatening public health problem in Yemen especially in rural communities. This cross-sectional study aims to determine the prevalence and associated risk factors of schistosomiasis among children in rural Yemen. Methods/Findings Urine and faecal samples were collected from 400 children. Urine samples were examined using filtration technique for the presence of Schistosoma haematobium eggs while faecal samples were examined using formalin-ether concentration and Kato Katz techniques for the presence of S. mansoni. Demographic, socioeconomic and environmental information were collected via a validated questionnaire. Overall, 31.8% of the participants were found to be positive for schistosomiasis; 23.8% were infected with S. haematobium and 9.3% were infected with S. mansoni. Moreover, 39.5% of the participants were anaemic whereas 9.5% had hepatosplenomegaly. The prevalence of schistosomiasis was significantly higher among children aged >10 years compared to those aged ≤10 years (P<0.05). Multivariate analysis confirmed that presence of other infected family member (P<0.001), low household monthly income (P = 0.003), using unsafe sources for drinking water (P = 0.003), living nearby stream/spring (P = 0.006) and living nearby pool/pond (P = 0.002) were the key factors significantly associated with schistosomiasis among these children. Conclusions/Significance This study reveals that schistosomiasis is still highly prevalent in Yemen. These findings support an urgent need to start an integrated, targeted and effective schistosomiasis control programme with a mission to move towards the elimination phase. Besides periodic drug distribution, health education and community mobilisation, provision of clean and safe drinking water, introduction of proper sanitation are imperative among these communities in order to curtail the transmission and morbidity caused

  4. Preclinical evidence implicating corticotropin-releasing factor signaling in ethanol consumption and neuroadaptation

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, T. J.; Reed, C.; Pastor, R.

    2016-01-01

    The results of many studies support the influence of the corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) system on ethanol (EtOH) consumption and EtOH-induced neuroadaptations that are critical in the addiction process. This review summarizes the preclinical data in this area after first providing an overview of the components of the CRF system. This complex system involves hypothalamic and extra-hypothalamic mechanisms that play a role in the central and peripheral consequences of stressors, including EtOH and other drugs of abuse. In addition, several endogenous ligands and targets make up this system and show differences in their involvement in EtOH drinking and in the effects of chronic or repeated EtOH treatment. In general, genetic and pharmacological approaches paint a consistent picture of the importance of CRF signaling via type 1 CRF receptors (CRF1) in EtOH-induced neuroadaptations that result in higher levels of intake, encourage alcohol seeking during abstinence and alter EtOH sensitivity. Furthermore, genetic findings in rodents, non-human primates and humans have provided some evidence of associations of genetic polymorphisms in CRF-related genes with EtOH drinking, although additional data are needed. These results suggest that CRF1 antagonists have potential as pharmacotherapeutics for alcohol use disorders. However, given the broad and important role of these receptors in adaptation to environmental and other challenges, full antagonist effects may be too profound and consideration should be given to treatments with modulatory effects. PMID:25565358

  5. Fear of Pain as a Prognostic Factor in Chronic Pain: Conceptual Models, Assessment, and Treatment Implications

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Hilary D.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic pain is a pervasive health care issue affecting over 50 million Americans and costing more than $100 billion dollars annually in lost productivity and health care costs. As a financially and emotionally taxing condition, the families and friends of people with chronic pain, as well as society at large, are affected. Current theory supports the role of biological, psychological, and environmental factors in the etiology, exacerbation, and maintenance of chronic pain. Recently, the specific role of pain-related fear in pain experience has received increasing attention. This article summarizes current understanding of the role of pain-related fear in the onset of acute pain incidents, the transition of acute pain to chronic, and the pain severity and disability of patients with ongoing chronic pain conditions. Treatments demonstrated to reduce pain-related fear are presented, evidence demonstrating their efficacy at reducing disability and pain severity are summarized, and recent criticisms of the fear-avoidance model and future directions are considered. PMID:20425197

  6. Factors influencing the oxidation of cysteamine and other thiols: implications for hyperthermic sensitization and radiation protection

    SciTech Connect

    Biaglow, J.E.; Issels, R.W.; Gerweck, L.E.; Varnes, M.E.; Jacobson, B.; Mittchell, J.B.; Russo, A.

    1984-11-01

    Some of the factors influencing the oxygen uptake and peroxide formation for cysteamine (MEA) and other thiols in serum-supplemented modified McCoy's 5A, a well-known medium used to cultivate a variety of cells in vitro, have been studied. The oxidation of MEA and cysteine in modified McCoy's 5A has been compared with that in Ham's F-12, MEM, and phosphate-buffered saline. The ability to produce peroxide is dependent upon the temperature, the concentration of thiol, the presence of copper ions, and pH of the medium. Catalase also reduces the oxygen uptake for all thiols. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) was found to stimulate the oxygen uptake in the case of MEA and cysteine, but had little or no effect with DTT and glutathione. The combined presence of SOD and catalase resulted in less inhibition of oxygen uptake than that obtained by catalase alone. Alkaline pH was found to enhance the oxidation of cysteine and MEA. The results indicate that many problems may arise when thiols are added to various media. A major consideration is concerned with the production of peroxide, superoxide, and reduced trace metal intermediates. The presence of these intermediates may result in the production of hydroxyl radical intermediates as well as the eventual oxygen depletion from the medium.

  7. Factors influencing sorption of ciprofloxacin onto activated sludge: experimental assessment and modelling implications.

    PubMed

    Polesel, Fabio; Lehnberg, Kai; Dott, Wolfgang; Trapp, Stefan; Thomas, Kevin V; Plósz, Benedek Gy

    2015-01-01

    Many of the pharmaceuticals and personal care products occurring in municipal sewage are ionizing substances, and their partitioning behaviour is affected by ionic interactions with solid matrices. In activated sludge systems, such interactions have currently not been adequately understood and described, particularly for zwitterionic chemicals. Here we present an assessment of the effects of pH and iron salt dosing on the sorption of ciprofloxacin onto activated sludge using laboratory experiments and full-scale fate modelling. Experimental results were described with Freundlich isotherms and showed that non-linear sorption occurred under all the conditions tested. The greatest sorption potential was measured at pH=7.4, at which ciprofloxacin is speciated mostly as zwitterion. Iron salt dosing increased sorption under aerobic and, to a lesser extent, anoxic conditions, whereas no effect was registered under anaerobic conditions. The activated sludge model for xenobiotics (ASM-X) was extended with Freundlich-based sorption kinetics and used to predict the fate of ciprofloxacin in a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). Scenario simulations, using experimental Freundlich parameters, were used to identify whether the assessed factors caused a significant increase of aqueous ciprofloxacin concentration in full-scale bioreactors. Simulation results suggest that a pH increase, rather than a reduction in iron salt dosing, could be responsible for a systematic deterioration of sorption of ciprofloxacin in the WWTP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Selective induction of integrin beta1 by hypoxia-inducible factor: implications for wound healing.

    PubMed

    Keely, Simon; Glover, Louise E; MacManus, Christopher F; Campbell, Eric L; Scully, Melanie M; Furuta, Glenn T; Colgan, Sean P

    2009-05-01

    Because of localized vascular damage and increased tissue oxygen demand, wound healing occurs in a relatively hypoxic microenvironment. These features are particularly relevant to wound healing and fibrosis in chronic inflammatory conditions, such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. In these studies, we sought to identify the contribution of hypoxia to mechanisms of wound repair in a model of the intestinal submucosa. Initial studies revealed that hypoxia promotes wound healing, as modeled by an increase in intestinal fibroblast-mediated collagen gel contraction. Guided by results from transcriptional profiling, we identified the selective induction of fibroblast integrin beta1 (ITGB1) by hypoxia. Further analysis revealed that hypoxia, as well as pharmacological activators of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF), induce fibroblast beta1 integrin mRNA, protein, and function by as much as 4-fold. Cloning and analysis of the beta1 integrin gene promoter revealed a 10 +/- 0.8-fold increase in promoter activity in response to hypoxia, and subsequent studies identified a functional DNA binding region for HIF in the ITGB1 gene promoter. Mutational analysis of the HIF binding site within the ITGB1 promoter resulted in a significant loss of ITGB1 hypoxia-inducibility. As proof of principle, studies in a murine model of colitis revealed a correlation between colitic disease severity and tissue ITGB1 expression (R(2)=0.80). Taken together, these results demonstrate that hypoxia induces fibroblast ITGB1 expression and function by transcriptional mechanisms dependent on HIF.

  9. Stress-related factors in cannabis use and misuse: implications for prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Hyman, Scott M; Sinha, Rajita

    2009-06-01

    We examined the role of stress as a risk factor and motivation for cannabis use/misuse. A systematic review of studies gathered from PsychINFO and MEDLINE databases was conducted. Findings suggest that cannabis is commonly used as a stress-coping strategy. Negative life events, trauma, and maladaptive coping were all related to consumption. Cannabis use for stress-coping purposes was most evident when examining chronic as compared with experimental use. Although many individuals may be able to use cannabis without consequences, there appears to be a subset of individuals who experience greater life stress and who may be more likely to use for stress-coping purposes. These individuals may be at greatest risk for addiction. Chronic use may potentiate stress-related motivation to use/abuse cannabis and is associated with decision-making deficits and alterations in brain-stress pathways that may exacerbate compulsive drug seeking and sensitize individuals to stress-related drug use. Overall, stress-coping interventions and harm reduction focused on reducing the amount ingested may facilitate prevention and recovery efforts.

  10. Factors associated to duration of hepatitis a outbreaks: implications for control.

    PubMed

    Torner, Nuria; Broner, Sonia; Martinez, Ana; Tortajada, Cecilia; Garcia de Olalla, Patricia; Barrabeig, Irene; Sala, MariaRosa; Camps, Neus; Minguell, Sofia; Alvarez, Josep; Ferrús, Gloria; Torra, Roser; Godoy, Pere; Dominguez, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Even though hepatitis A mass vaccination effectiveness is high, outbreaks continue to occur. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between duration and characteristics of hepatitis A outbreaks. Hepatitis A (HA) outbreaks reported between 1991 and 2007 were studied. An outbreak was defined as ≥2 epidemiologically-linked cases with ≥1 case laboratory-confirmed by detection of HA immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies. Relationships between explanatory variables and outbreak duration were assessed by logistic regression. During the study period, 268 outbreaks (rate 2.45 per million persons-year) and 1396 cases (rate 1.28 per 10(5) persons-year) were reported. Factors associated with shorter duration were time to intervention (OR = 0.96; 95% CI: 0.94-0.98) and school setting (OR = 0.39; 95% CI: 0.16-0.92). In person-to-person transmission outbreaks only time to intervention was associated with shorter outbreak duration (OR = 0.96; 95% CI: 0.95-0.98). The only variables associated with shorter outbreak duration were early administration of IG or vaccine and a school setting. Timely reporting HA outbreaks was associated with outbreak duration. Making confirmed HA infections statutory reportable for clinical laboratories could diminish outbreak duration.

  11. Psychological factors influencing adoption of postural training devices: implications for practice.

    PubMed

    Fleiter, Judy; Walsh, Shari; Biggs, Herbert

    2009-01-01

    This paper details an exploratory investigation of psychological factors that may influence the adoption/rejection of postural training devices from the perspectives of two potential user groups (clients and practitioners). The aim was to elicit perceived advantages and disadvantages from potential users and to apply psychological principles to examine, and potentially counter perceived barriers to use. A small sample (50) of general public members, physiotherapists and occupational therapists were surveyed using open-ended questions designed to elicit information about current practices and attitudinal beliefs about postural training. Results suggested that members of the public fall into two categories according to whether they would use the device for prevention or treatment. This group identified issues such as lack of need, time consuming, and motivations to comply. Practitioners highlighted that lack of research, lack of ability to trial a product, and issues of cost and non-compliance by consumers and were seen as prohibitory to use. A number of theoretical principles of behaviour change were then related to the findings including: the stages of change model, behavioural learning, message framing, persuasion, attitude-behaviour relationships, motivations and impression management. Client cost objections to treatments and the need to integrate research findings into practice are also discussed.

  12. Platelet factor 4 is a negative autocrine in vivo regulator of megakaryopoiesis: clinical and therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Michele P.; Rauova, Lubica; Bailey, Matthew; Sola-Visner, Martha C.; Kowalska, M. Anna

    2007-01-01

    Platelet factor 4 (PF4) is a negative regulator of megakaryopoiesis in vitro. We have now examined whether PF4 regulates megakaryopoiesis in vivo by studying PF4 knockout mice and transgenic mice that overexpress human (h) PF4. Steady-state platelet count and thrombocrit in these animals was inversely related to platelet PF4 content. Growth of megakaryocyte colonies was also inversely related to platelet PF4 content. Function-blocking anti-PF4 antibody reversed this inhibition of megakaryocyte colony growth, indicating the importance of local PF4 released from developing megakaryocytes. The effect of megakaryocyte damage and release of PF4 on 5-fluorouracil–induced marrow failure was then examined. Severity of thrombocytopenia and time to recovery of platelet counts were inversely related to initial PF4 content. Recovery was faster and more extensive, especially in PF4-overexpressing mice, after treatment with anti-PF4 blocking antibodies, suggesting a means to limit the duration of such a chemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia, especially in individuals with high endogenous levels of PF4. We found that approximately 8% of 250 healthy adults have elevated (> 2 times average) platelet PF4 content. These individuals with high levels of platelet PF4 may be especially sensitive to developing thrombocytopenia after bone marrow injury and may benefit from approaches that block the effects of released PF4. PMID:17495129

  13. Stress-Related Factors in Cannabis Use and Misuse: Implications for Prevention and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hyman, Scott M.; Sinha, Rajita

    2009-01-01

    We examined the role of stress as a risk factor and motivation for cannabis use/misuse. A systematic review of studies gathered from PsychINFO and MEDLINE databases was conducted. Findings suggest that cannabis is commonly used as a stress-coping strategy. Negative life events, trauma, and maladaptive coping were all related to consumption. Cannabis use for stress-coping purposes was most evident when examining chronic as compared with experimental use. While many individuals may be able to use cannabis without consequences, there appears to be a subset of individuals who experience greater life stress and who may be more likely to use for stress-coping purposes. These individuals may be at greatest risk for addiction. Chronic use may potentiate stress-related motivation to use/abuse cannabis and is associated with decision making deficits and alterations in brain-stress pathways that may exacerbate compulsive drug-seeking and sensitize individuals to stress-related drug use. Overall, stress-coping interventions and harm reduction focused on reducing the amount ingested may facilitate prevention and recovery efforts. PMID:19004601

  14. Factors determining milk quality and implications for production structure under somatic cell count standard modification.

    PubMed

    Dong, F; Hennessy, D A; Jensen, H H

    2012-11-01

    Consumer and processor demand for high-quality milk has placed increasing pressure on US milk producers to achieve higher product standards. International standards for somatic cell count (SCC) are becoming more stringent, but in May 2011, the United States National Conference on Interstate Milk Shipments chose to retain the 750,000 cells/mL standard. Using ordinary least squares and quantile regressions on US Department of Agriculture Agricultural Resource Management Survey Dairy Costs and Returns Report data for 2005, we model producer and farm-level characteristics associated with SCC. Quantile regression analysis allows for a more parsed inquiry into statistical associations. Dairy Costs and Returns Report data provide cross-sectional information on the physical structure, input expenses, demographics, and outputs for farms in selected states. Location outside the Southeast, lower herd age, full-time farming status, use of biosecurity guidelines, good milking facilities and operations management, and application of related quality tests are all associated with lower SCC levels. Size of operation had little effect on SCC levels after controlling for other factors. Many of the operations that did not attain a more demanding SCC standard of 400,000 cells/mL had older operators, operators who expressed intention to exit within 10 yr, smaller size, and location in the Southeast when compared with those meeting the tighter standard. The results suggest that the stricter scheme favors larger farms that are more committed to production and are less likely to be sole or family proprietorships.

  15. [Expression of SOX11 transcription factor. Its implication in mantle cell lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Roisman, Alejandro; Slavutsky, Irma

    2014-01-01

    SOX11, belonging to the family of genes SOXC, is a transcript factor involved in the embryonic neurogenesis and tissue remodeling, also participating in the control of cell proliferation. Its role in lymphomagenesis still remains unknown. Recent studies have shown aberrant SOX11 nuclear protein expression as well as mRNA levels in patients with mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). Although the majority of these lymphomas have an aggressive clinical course, there is a subgroup of patients with an indolent clinical evolution, suggesting a greater heterogeneity of this disease. Currently, there are contradictions regarding the association of SOX11 gene expression and outcome in MCL, while some authors have related the lack of SOX11 expression with good prognosis, others find it associated with an adverse clinical course. This difference in the gene expression could be associated to epigenetic mechanisms such as modifications at the histone level and DNA methylation that would allow the aberrant expression of this gene in some lymphoid neoplasias, including LCM. More knowledge of gene SOX11 in LCM will lead to a greater understanding of those mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis and progression of this lymphoma, also the involvement of SOX11 in these processes.

  16. Smoking increases tissue factor expression in atherosclerotic plaques: implications for plaque thrombogenicity.

    PubMed

    Matetzky, S; Tani, S; Kangavari, S; Dimayuga, P; Yano, J; Xu, H; Chyu, K Y; Fishbein, M C; Shah, P K; Cercek, B

    2000-08-08

    Smoking increases the risk of atherothrombotic events. To determine whether smoking influences plaque thrombogenicity, we examined the effect of cigarette smoking and aspirin use on tissue factor (TF) expression in atherosclerotic plaques. A total of 23 apoE-/- mice were exposed to cigarette smoke with (n=9) or without (n=14) aspirin treatment. Eleven mice who were exposed to filtered room air served as controls. Aortic root plaques of mice exposed to smoke had higher immunoreactivity for TF (14+/-4% versus 6.4+/-3%; P=0.0005), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (15+/-4% versus 5+/-2%; P=0.002), and macrophages (16+/-5% versus 6+/-2%; P=0.002) compared with nonsmoking controls. Aspirin treatment attenuated smoking-induced changes in plaque composition. In human plaques obtained by carotid endarterectomy, TF immunoreactivity (8+/-5% versus 2+/-2%; P=0.0002) and activity (P=0. 03) were higher in the plaques from smokers (n=28) than those from nonsmokers (n=28). Aspirin use was associated with reduced TF expression in smokers (9+/-8% versus 3+/-4%; P=0.0017). Our results suggest increased plaque TF expression and thrombogenicity as a novel mechanism for the increased risk of atherothrombotic events in smokers. Treatment with aspirin may reduce TF expression.

  17. Transforming Growth Factor-Beta and Oxidative Stress Interplay: Implications in Tumorigenesis and Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Krstić, Jelena; Trivanović, Drenka; Mojsilović, Slavko; Santibanez, Juan F.

    2015-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) and oxidative stress/Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) both have pivotal roles in health and disease. In this review we are analyzing the interplay between TGF-β and ROS in tumorigenesis and cancer progression. They have contradictory roles in cancer progression since both can have antitumor effects, through the induction of cell death, senescence and cell cycle arrest, and protumor effects by contributing to cancer cell spreading, proliferation, survival, and metastasis. TGF-β can control ROS production directly or by downregulating antioxidative systems. Meanwhile, ROS can influence TGF-β signaling and increase its expression as well as its activation from the latent complex. This way, both are building a strong interplay which can be taken as an advantage by cancer cells in order to increment their malignancy. In addition, both TGF-β and ROS are able to induce cell senescence, which in one way protects damaged cells from neoplastic transformation but also may collaborate in cancer progression. The mutual collaboration of TGF-β and ROS in tumorigenesis is highly complex, and, due to their differential roles in tumor progression, careful consideration should be taken when thinking of combinatorial targeting in cancer therapies. PMID:26078812

  18. Factors That Influence Muscle Weakness Following Stroke and Their Clinical Implications: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Vicki; Rice, Charles L.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To provide a comprehensive review of changes that occur in the muscle after stroke and how these changes influence the force-generating capacity of the muscle. Methods: A literature search of PubMed, CINAHL, MEDLINE, and Embase was conducted using the search terms stroke, hemiparesis, muscle structure, cross sectional area, atrophy, force, velocity, and torque. There were 27 articles included in this review. Results: Three changes occur in the muscle after stroke: a decrease in muscle mass, a decrease in fibre length, and a smaller pennation angle. In addition, the tendon is stretched and becomes more compliant. All of these factors reduce the affected muscle's ability to generate forces similar to controls or to non-paretic muscles. The result is a leftward shift in the length–tension curve, a downward shift in the torque–angle curve, and a downward shift in the force–velocity curve. Conclusion: Changes in muscle architecture contributing to weakness, such as muscle-fibre length, pennation angle, muscle atrophy, and tendon compliance, should be prevented or reversed by means of an appropriate rehabilitation programme. PMID:23997398

  19. Factors that influence muscle weakness following stroke and their clinical implications: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Gray, Vicki; Rice, Charles L; Garland, S Jayne

    2012-01-01

    To provide a comprehensive review of changes that occur in the muscle after stroke and how these changes influence the force-generating capacity of the muscle. A literature search of PubMed, CINAHL, MEDLINE, and Embase was conducted using the search terms stroke, hemiparesis, muscle structure, cross sectional area, atrophy, force, velocity, and torque. There were 27 articles included in this review. Three changes occur in the muscle after stroke: a decrease in muscle mass, a decrease in fibre length, and a smaller pennation angle. In addition, the tendon is stretched and becomes more compliant. All of these factors reduce the affected muscle's ability to generate forces similar to controls or to non-paretic muscles. The result is a leftward shift in the length-tension curve, a downward shift in the torque-angle curve, and a downward shift in the force-velocity curve. Changes in muscle architecture contributing to weakness, such as muscle-fibre length, pennation angle, muscle atrophy, and tendon compliance, should be prevented or reversed by means of an appropriate rehabilitation programme.

  20. Cooking-related pediatric burns: risk factors and the role of differential cooling rates among commonly implicated substances.

    PubMed

    Dissanaike, Sharmila; Boshart, Kimberly; Coleman, Alan; Wishnew, Jenna; Hester, Cynthia

    2009-01-01

    Cooking-related injuries are a common problem worldwide, resulting in more pediatric burns than any other cause. We identified risk factors-associated mechanisms and determined cooling curves for common substances. A retrospective review of children admitted to a Level I burn center between 2001 and 2006 was performed. Variables including injury mechanism, age, sex, race, burn area, length of stay, and outcome were recorded. Commonly implicated substances were identified, and cooling curves for each were measured at room temperature. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify risk factors for cooking injury. A total of 541 pediatric burn patients were admitted, of whom 123 had cooking-related injuries. Common substances involved included soup (27%), grease (26%), coffee (18%), beans (9%), and menudo (2.3%), a traditional Mexican soup based on tripe, hominy, and chile. Children with cooking injuries were significantly younger than other groups, with a mean age of 2.7 years. The most common mechanism was the child pulling the substance down from a height, accounting for nearly half of all injuries. This resulted in a characteristic scald pattern involving a wide area across chest and shoulders narrowing to a point near the pelvis. The average burn area was 7%, associated with a hospital stay of 4 days and mortality below 1%. Analysis of cooling curves revealed surprising variation in heat retention, with semisolid or high-density liquids posing a markedly increased burn risk. Cooking injuries predominantly affect toddlers, with clearly recognized mechanisms and risk factors. Injury prevention measures should be targeted accordingly.

  1. Gender perspective on the factors predicting recycling behavior: Implications from the theory of planned behavior.

    PubMed

    Oztekin, Ceren; Teksöz, Gaye; Pamuk, Savas; Sahin, Elvan; Kilic, Dilek Sultan

    2017-02-17

    This study aimed to assess the role of some socio-psychological attributes in explaining recycling behavior of Turkish university community from a gender perspective within the context of the theory of planned behavior with an additional variable (past experience). The recycling behavior of whole sample, females and males, has been examined in 3 sessions -depending on the arguments that explain gendered pattern of private and public environmental behavior and sticking to the fact why females' stronger environmental values, beliefs, and attitudes do not translate consistently into greater engagement in public behavior. As a result of model runs, different variables shaping intention for behavior have been found, namely perceived behavior control for females and past behavior for males. Due to the low percent of the variance in explaining recycling behavior of females, they have been identified as the ones who do not carry out intentions (non-recyclers). Since intentions alone are capable of identifying recyclers accurately but not non-recyclers, there may be other factors to be considered to understand the reason for females not carrying out the intentions. The results of descriptive statistics supported the identification by attitudes toward recycling. Female attitudes were innate (recycling is good, necessary, useful and sensitive), whereas those of males were learnt (recycling is healthy, valuable and correct). Thus, it has been concluded that males' intention for recycling is shaped by their past behavior and the conclusion is supported by males having learnt attitude toward recycling whereas females' lack of intention for recycling is shaped by their perceived behavior control and is supported by their innate attitude for recycling. All in all, the results of the present study provide further support for the utility of the TPB as a model of behavioral prediction and concur with other studies examining the utility of the TPB in the context of recycling.

  2. Factors controlling seedling germination after fire in Mediterranean gorse shrublands. Implications for fire prescription.

    PubMed

    De Luis, M; Raventós, J; González-Hidalgo, J C

    2005-07-01

    In Western Mediterranean areas, fires are frequent in forests established on old croplands where woody resprouting species are scarce and post-fire regeneration is limited to obligate-seeder species, such as Mediterranean gorse (Ulex parviflorus), that accumulate a great deal of fine dry fuel, increasing the risk of other severe fires. Under these conditions, fuel control techniques are required in order to prevent fires of high intensity and severity and the subsequent economic and ecological damage. Prescribed fires present an alternative to fuel control, and recent studies demonstrate that, under optimum climatic conditions, fire-line intensity values fall within the limits of those recommended for fire prescription. However, a better understanding of the consequences of fire on the regeneration of vegetation is needed in order to evaluate the suitability of prescribed fires as a technique for fuel reduction in Mediterranean gorse ecosystems. This paper analyses the factors controlling seedling germination after fire to make an evaluation from an ecological perspective of whether fire prescription is a suitable technique for fuel control in mature Mediterranean gorse shrublands. The results show that small differences in the composition of vegetation play a decisive role in fire behaviour, and have a decisive influence on the system's capacity for regeneration. Fire severity is low in mixed Mediterranean gorse communities with a low continuity of dead fine fuel (including Cistus sp., Rosmarinus sp., etc.) and fire creates a wide range of microhabitats where seedling emergence is high. In contrast, where U. parviflorus is more dominant, fire severity is higher and the regeneration of vegetation could be hindered. Our conclusions suggest that detailed studies of the composition of plant communities are required in order to decide whether prescribed burning should be applied.

  3. Factors influencing the study of peroxidase-generated iodine species and implications for thyroglobulin synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Jack; Obinger, Christian; Eales, Geoff

    2008-07-01

    A key issue in the mechanism of thyroglobulin (Tg) iodination by thyroperoxidase (TPO) is whether a TPO-bound iodine intermediate directly iodinates Tg-incorporated tyrosines (specific iodination) or whether reactive iodine species released from TPO effectuate Tg iodination (nonspecific iodination). We addressed these alternatives by (a) determining the aqueous equilibria of the iodine species potentially involved in the kinetic studies of TPO-mediated iodination, and (b) reviewing the structure of the substrate channel in mammalian peroxidases. Redox-potentiometric analysis of aqueous iodine combined with integrated mathematical modelling demonstrates that I2 reacts with water to form several iodine species including hypoiodious acid (HOI). The HOI/I2 ratio depends on time, iodide concentration, buffering agents, and pH varying dramatically from pH 4 to 7.4. These factors may confound the use of Michaelis-Menten kinetics to determine the mechanism of TPO-catalyzed iodination since both I2 and HOI iodinate tyrosine but with different specificities and reaction rates. Consequently there is as yet no conclusive kinetic evidence that iodination occurs via formation of a TPO-bound iodinated intermediate. Furthermore, knowledge of TPO structure, gained from X-ray crystallographic studies indicates that access of Tg-bound tyrosyl groups to the active site of TPO is not possible. Thus the emerging conclusion is that the mechanism of Tg iodination is nonspecific. This is consistent with the occurrence of thyroid hormone formation in prevertebrate ascidians which exhibit TPO-like activity but lack the Tg gene.

  4. Factors influencing the length of stay after radical cystectomy: implications for cancer care and perioperative management.

    PubMed

    Pietzak, Eugene J; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Malkowicz, S Bruce; Guzzo, Thomas J

    2014-12-01

    Although radical cystectomy (RC) is the gold standard treatment for muscle invasive bladder cancer it is associated with perioperative complications, readmissions, and a prolonged length of hospital stay (PLOS). We explored the perioperative factors associated with a PLOS after RC and subsequent long-term outcomes. Consecutive patients with urothelial bladder cancer undergoing RC with curative intent at our institution were classified into two groups: LOS <12 days and PLOS ≥12 days. Clinicopathological variables were compared on univariate and multivariable analysis. Complications, re-admissions, adjuvant chemotherapy use, recurrence free survival (RFS), and overall survival (OS) were compared between the two groups. Competing risk analysis was performed for bladder cancer specific mortality (BCSM). 330 patients were included in the analysis (median LOS = 9 days [IQR = 8-11]) of which, 274 patients (83 %) had a LOS <12 days (median = 8 days [IQR = 7-10]) and 56 patients (17 %) had a PLOS ≥12 days (median = 16 days [IQR = 13-21.5]). Only female gender, older age, and perioperative complications were associated with a PLOS. 90 day readmission rates were similar (p = 0.75). No difference was seen for BCSM, RFS, or adjuvant chemotherapy usage between the two groups. However, OS was significantly worse for PLOS (median OS = 27.7 vs. 45.6 months [p = 0.046]; HR = 1.53 [95 % CI = 1.01-2.33]). Both female and elderly patients should receive preoperative counseling about their increased risk of a PLOS after RC. Patients who experience a PLOS are at greater risk for subsequent all-cause mortality. These patient groups may benefit from proactive interventions.

  5. Theoretical prediction for several important equilibrium Ge isotope fractionation factors and geological implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuefang; Zhao, Hui; Tang, Mao; Liu, Yun

    2009-09-01

    This study estimates equilibrium fractionation factors in the Ge isotope system, including the dominant aqueous Ge(OH) 4 and GeO(OH) 3- species in seawater, Ge-bearing organic complexes (e.g. Ge-catechol, Ge-oxalic acid and Ge-citric acid), and Ge in quartz- (or opal-), albite-, K-feldspar-, olivine- and sphalerite-like structures. Estimations are based on Urey model (or Bigeleisen-Mayer equation) and high level quantum chemistry calculations. All calculations are made at B3LYP/6-311 + G(d,p) theory level. Solvation effects are treated by explicit solvent model ("water-droplet" method), and mineral structures are simulated using cluster models, in which the clusters are cut from the X-ray structures of those minerals. In addition, a number of different conformers are used for aqueous complexes in order to reduce the possible errors coming from the differences of configurations in solution. The "salt effect" on GeO(OH) 3-(aq) species is also carefully evaluated. We estimate the accuracy of these fractionation calculations at about ± 0.3‰. Excitedly, very large isotope fractionations are found between many Ge isotope systems. The Ge-containing sulfides (e.g. sphalerite) can extremely enrich light Ge isotopes (more than 10‰) compared with 4-coordinated Ge-O compounds (e.g. Ge(OH) 4(aq) or quartz). The fractionations between Ge(OH) 4(aq) and 6-coordinated Ge-bearing organic complexes can be also up to 4‰ at 25 °C. These results give a good explanation for the experimental observations of Rouxel et al. (2006). It also suggests a great potential for broad application of Ge isotope method in various geological systems.

  6. Activation of mTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin) in rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Perl, Andras

    2017-01-01

    Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR, also known as mammalian target of rapamycin) is a ubiquitous serine/threonine kinase that regulates cell growth, proliferation and survival. These effects are cell-type-specific, and are elicited in response to stimulation by growth factors, hormones and cytokines, as well as to internal and external metabolic cues. Rapamycin was initially developed as an inhibitor of T-cell proliferation and allograft rejection in the organ transplant setting. Subsequently, its molecular target (mTOR) was identified as a component of two interacting complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2, that regulate T-cell lineage specification and macrophage differentiation. mTORC1 drives the proinflammatory expansion of T helper (TH) type 1, TH17, and CD4−CD8− (double-negative, DN) T cells. Both mTORC1 and mTORC2 inhibit the development of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T regulatory (TREG) cells and, indirectly, mTORC2 favours the expansion of Tfollicular helper (TFH) cells which, similarly to DN T cells, promote B-cell activation and autoantibody production. In contrast to this proinflammatory effect of mTORC2, mTORC1 favours, to some extent, an anti-inflammatory macrophage polarization that is protective against infections and tissue inflammation. Outside the immune system, mTORC1 controls fibroblast proliferation and chondrocyte survival, with implications for tissue fibrosis and osteoarthritis, respectively. Rapamycin (which primarily inhibits mTORC1), ATP-competitive, dual mTORC1/mTORC2 inhibitors and upstream regulators of the mTOR pathway are being developed to treat autoimmune, hyperproliferative and degenerative diseases. In this regard, mTOR blockade promises to increase life expectancy through treatment and prevention of rheumatic diseases. PMID:26698023

  7. Relationship between Audio-Visual Materials and Environmental Factors on Students Academic Performance in Senior Secondary Schools in Borno State: Implications for Counselling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bello, S.; Goni, Umar

    2016-01-01

    This is a survey study, designed to determine the relationship between audio-visual materials and environmental factors on students' academic performance in Senior Secondary Schools in Borno State: Implications for Counselling. The study set two research objectives, and tested two research hypotheses. The population of this study is 1,987 students…

  8. A Peacetime/Wartime Framework. Soviet and Chinese Views of Military and Non-Military Factors in the Balance of Power and Their Implications for the United States

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-31

    8217Military Factors the Balance of Power and their Implications for the United States Banning N. Garrett 0 Bennie S. Glaser LJI C ~~ Palomar Corporation 1715...fuel for diesel engines, the Soviets have stored hundreds of coal-burning locomotives . pp. 125-126. The Soviets also have huge stacks of assembled

  9. Mechanistic Differences Leading to Infectious and Sterile Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Behnia, Faranak; Sheller, Samantha; Menon, Ramkumar

    2016-05-01

    Inflammation is a physiologic component of pregnancy and parturition. Overwhelming intrauterine inflammatory load promotes quiescent feto-maternal tissues into a contractile phenotype. Like inflammation, oxidative stress is an inevitable component of both pregnancy and parturition. Pathologic activation of host innate immune response to adverse pregnancy conditions can lead to premature activation of inflammatory and oxidative stress. Inflammation and oxidative stress markers seen with both sterile and infectious inflammation are often similar; therefore, it is difficult to understand causality of conditions like spontaneous preterm birth. This review demonstrates potential mechanistic pathways of activation of sterile and infectious inflammation. We demonstrate the activation of two unique pathways of inflammation by factors that are well-documented proxies for oxidative stress (cigarette smoke extract) and infection (lipopolysaccharide). Sterile inflammation seen after exposure to an oxidative stress inducer is due to cellular elemental damage resulting in p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) induced cellular senescence. Infectious inflammation is through activation of transcription factor NF-κB and independent of oxidative stress-associated damages and p38 MAPK-induced senescence. Understanding the differences in the inflammatory pathway activation by various risk factors is important to design better screening, diagnostic and intervention strategies to reduce the risks of adverse pregnancy outcomes.

  10. Toxoplasma gondii Induces Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor and Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Secretion by Human Fibroblasts: Implications for Neutrophil Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Channon, Jacqueline Y.; Miselis, Kristin A.; Minns, Laurie A.; Dutta, Chaitali; Kasper, Lloyd H.

    2002-01-01

    Human neutrophils are rescued from apoptosis following incubation with once-washed, fibroblast-derived Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites. Both infected and uninfected neutrophils are rescued, implicating a soluble mediator. In this study we investigated the origin and identity of this soluble mediator. Neutrophils were incubated either with purified tachyzoites or with conditioned medium derived from T. gondii-infected human fibroblasts. Conditioned medium was found to be a potent stimulus that delayed neutrophil apoptosis up to 72 h, whereas purified and extensively washed tachyzoites had no effect. Delayed apoptosis correlated with up-regulation of the neutrophil antiapoptotic protein, Mcl-1, and the neutrophil interleukin 3 receptor α subunit (IL-3Rα), suggesting a role for granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). GM-CSF and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) were measurable in conditioned medium by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Neutralizing antibodies to GM-CSF and G-CSF were additive in abrogating delayed neutrophil apoptosis induced by conditioned medium. Inhibitors of Src family tyrosine kinases, Gi proteins, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, p44erk1 and p42erk2 mitogen-activated protein kinases, and Jak2 kinases partially attenuated the effect of conditioned medium, consistent with a role for G-CSF and/or GM-CSF. Hence, delayed neutrophil apoptosis is mediated by GM-CSF and G-CSF secreted by T. gondii-infected human fibroblasts. This enhanced neutrophil survival may contribute to the robust proinflammatory response elicited in the T. gondii-infected host. PMID:12379681

  11. Phytoplankton blooms during austral summer in the Ross Sea, Antarctica: Driving factors and trophic implications

    PubMed Central

    Saggiomo, Vincenzo; Bolinesi, Francesco; Margiotta, Francesca; Budillon, Giorgio; Cotroneo, Yuri; Misic, Cristina; Rivaro, Paola; Saggiomo, Maria

    2017-01-01

    During the austral summer of 2014, an oceanographic cruise was conducted in the Ross Sea in the framework of the RoME (Ross Sea Mesoscale Experiment) Project. Forty-three hydrological stations were sampled within three different areas: the northern Ross Sea (RoME 1), Terra Nova Bay (RoME 2), and the southern Ross Sea (RoME 3). The ecological and photophysiological characteristics of the phytoplankton were investigated (i.e., size structure, functional groups, PSII maximum quantum efficiency, photoprotective pigments), as related to hydrographic and chemical features. The aim was to identify the mechanisms that modulate phytoplankton blooms, and consequently, the fate of organic materials produced by the blooms. The observed biomass standing stocks were very high (e.g., integrated chlorophyll-a up to 371 mg m-2 in the top 100 m). Large differences in phytoplankton community composition, relative contribution of functional groups and photosynthetic parameters were observed among the three subsystems. The diatoms (in different physiological status) were the dominant taxa in RoME 1 and RoME 3; in RoME 1, a post-bloom phase was identified, whereas in RoME 3, an active phytoplankton bloom occurred. In RoME 2, diatoms co-occurred with Phaeocystis antarctica, but were vertically segregated by the upper mixed layer, with senescent diatoms dominating in the upper layer, and P. antarctica blooming in the deeper layer. The dominance of the phytoplankton micro-fraction over the whole area and the high Chl-a suggested the prevalence of non-grazed large cells, independent of the distribution of the two functional groups. These data emphasise the occurrence of significant temporal changes in the phytoplankton biomass in the Ross Sea during austral summer. The mechanisms that drive such changes and the fate of the carbon production are probably related to the variations in the limiting factors induced by the concurrent hydrological modifications to the Ross Sea, and they remain to

  12. Phytoplankton blooms during austral summer in the Ross Sea, Antarctica: Driving factors and trophic implications.

    PubMed

    Mangoni, Olga; Saggiomo, Vincenzo; Bolinesi, Francesco; Margiotta, Francesca; Budillon, Giorgio; Cotroneo, Yuri; Misic, Cristina; Rivaro, Paola; Saggiomo, Maria

    2017-01-01

    During the austral summer of 2014, an oceanographic cruise was conducted in the Ross Sea in the framework of the RoME (Ross Sea Mesoscale Experiment) Project. Forty-three hydrological stations were sampled within three different areas: the northern Ross Sea (RoME 1), Terra Nova Bay (RoME 2), and the southern Ross Sea (RoME 3). The ecological and photophysiological characteristics of the phytoplankton were investigated (i.e., size structure, functional groups, PSII maximum quantum efficiency, photoprotective pigments), as related to hydrographic and chemical features. The aim was to identify the mechanisms that modulate phytoplankton blooms, and consequently, the fate of organic materials produced by the blooms. The observed biomass standing stocks were very high (e.g., integrated chlorophyll-a up to 371 mg m-2 in the top 100 m). Large differences in phytoplankton community composition, relative contribution of functional groups and photosynthetic parameters were observed among the three subsystems. The diatoms (in different physiological status) were the dominant taxa in RoME 1 and RoME 3; in RoME 1, a post-bloom phase was identified, whereas in RoME 3, an active phytoplankton bloom occurred. In RoME 2, diatoms co-occurred with Phaeocystis antarctica, but were vertically segregated by the upper mixed layer, with senescent diatoms dominating in the upper layer, and P. antarctica blooming in the deeper layer. The dominance of the phytoplankton micro-fraction over the whole area and the high Chl-a suggested the prevalence of non-grazed large cells, independent of the distribution of the two functional groups. These data emphasise the occurrence of significant temporal changes in the phytoplankton biomass in the Ross Sea during austral summer. The mechanisms that drive such changes and the fate of the carbon production are probably related to the variations in the limiting factors induced by the concurrent hydrological modifications to the Ross Sea, and they remain to

  13. Rapid discharge after transfer: risk factors, incidence, and implications for trauma systems.

    PubMed

    Osen, Hayley B; Bass, Robert R; Abdullah, Fizan; Chang, David C

    2010-09-01

    The occurrence of discharge to home shortly after transfer from another hospital, also termed "secondary overtriage," needs to be analyzed in trauma patients because it helps to assess the efficiency of triage and transfer criteria. The extent of secondary overtriage and factors associated with it remain largely undescribed. A retrospective analysis of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample from 2000 to 2004. Inclusion criteria were trauma patients (as identified by ICD-9 diagnosis codes of 800-959 in the primary position, excluding codes representing late effects of injury, foreign body, burn, or early complications) who were admitted as transfers from another hospital. Rapid discharge after transfer (secondary overtriage) was defined as patients who were discharged alive within 1 day after transfer and did not receive any surgical procedure. The overall rate of secondary overtriage was 6.9% (3,291 of 51,278), with an increasing trend over the years. This rate was significantly higher among patients younger than 18 years (19.5% vs. 4.2%). Patients meeting the definition were more likely to be male (68.3% vs. 50.65%), more likely to be black or Hispanic (25.16% vs. 16.8%), more likely to come from ZIP codes with above-median household incomes (43.4% vs. 38.1%), and more likely to be treated at teaching hospitals (77.3% vs. 61.3%). The majority of these patients (98.7%) were insured, although the proportion of uninsured patients was significantly higher among secondary overtriage (1.3% vs. 0.54%). On multivariate analysis, younger age, uninsured status, and being transferred to a teaching hospital were associated with higher likelihood of rapid discharge after transfer. No association was found with gender, race, and urbanicity. Secondary overtriage is more common in pediatric patients than in adults. The underlying causes of this occurrence need to be further investigated (e.g., fear of litigation and uneven distribution of resources). There are significant direct and

  14. The Hormonal Fingerprints and BMI: Implications for Risk Factors in Dental Caries and Malocclusion

    PubMed Central

    Priyanka, Goguladinne Naga Deepthi; Radhakrishna, Ambati Naga; Ramakrishna, Juvva; Jyothi, Velagapudi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The hormonal fingerprint is the ratio between 2nd and 4th digit lengths. It was evidenced in the medical scenario that it can be used as an indirect marker in many diseases like Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) and metabolic syndromes. As far as dentistry is concerned very few studies in the literature have been done to evaluate the influence of hormonal fingerprint on oral health, thus provoking us to formulate new method for predicting dental caries and malocclusion and its association with Body Mass Index (BMI). Aim The purpose of this retrospective study was to highlight the role of new biological marker–Hormonal fingerprints in the early detection of malocclusion, caries, the influence of BMI on malocclusion and caries. We also attempted to study the correlation of BMI with hormonal fingerprints. Materials and Methods A total of 300 children were randomly selected from both sexes of age group 10-15 years. The hormonal fingerprint was made by measuring the length ratio of the index and ring finger with the help of digital Vernier caliper. Anthropometric measures (weight in kilograms and height in metres) for the calculation of BMI were recorded. Caries assessment was done using standard mouth mirrors and Community Periodontal Index probes. DMFT index was followed for assessment of caries according to the WHO assessment form, 1997. Occlusal characteristics of the children evaluated were molar relation, anterior and posterior cross bite, open bite, deep bite, lower anterior crowding. All the factors were recorded by two investigators. Results The results of the study showed that majority of the children among study population were having 2D:4D <1. The rate of occurrence of malocclusion was increasing with increase in the value of 2D:4D ratio with a statistically significant p-value of <0.001. Higher BMI values were associated with normal occlusal conditions (p= 0.041) and lower 2D:4D ratio (p= 0.037). High caries experience was noticed in children with

  15. Intriguing mechanistic labyrinths in gold(i) catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Obradors, Carla

    2014-01-01

    Many mechanistically intriguing reactions have been developed in the last decade using gold(i) as catalyst. Here we review the main mechanistic proposals in gold-catalysed activation of alkynes and allenes, in which this metal plays a central role by stabilising a variety of complex cationic intermediates. PMID:24176910

  16. Diversity Takes Shape: Understanding the Mechanistic and Adaptive Basis of Bacterial Morphology.

    PubMed

    Kysela, David T; Randich, Amelia M; Caccamo, Paul D; Brun, Yves V

    2016-10-01

    The modern age of metagenomics has delivered unprecedented volumes of data describing the genetic and metabolic diversity of bacterial communities, but it has failed to provide information about coincident cellular morphologies. Much like metabolic and biosynthetic capabilities, morphology comprises a critical component of bacterial fitness, molded by natural selection into the many elaborate shapes observed across the bacterial domain. In this essay, we discuss the diversity of bacterial morphology and its implications for understanding both the mechanistic and the adaptive basis of morphogenesis. We consider how best to leverage genomic data and recent experimental developments in order to advance our understanding of bacterial shape and its functional importance.

  17. Neuronal nicotinic receptors as novel targets for inflammation and neuroprotection: mechanistic considerations and clinical relevance

    PubMed Central

    Bencherif, Merouane

    2009-01-01

    A number of studies have confirmed the potential for neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (NNR)-mediated neuroprotection and, more recently, its anti-inflammatory effects. The mechanistic overlap between these pathways and the ubiquitous effects observed following diverse insults suggest that NNRs modulate fundamental pathways involved in cell survival. These results have wide-reaching implications for the design of experimental therapeutics that regulate inflammatory and anti-apoptotic responses through NNRs and represent an initial step toward understanding the benefits of novel therapeutic strategies for the management of central nervous system disorders that target neuronal survival and associated inflammatory processes. PMID:19498416

  18. Diversity Takes Shape: Understanding the Mechanistic and Adaptive Basis of Bacterial Morphology

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The modern age of metagenomics has delivered unprecedented volumes of data describing the genetic and metabolic diversity of bacterial communities, but it has failed to provide information about coincident cellular morphologies. Much like metabolic and biosynthetic capabilities, morphology comprises a critical component of bacterial fitness, molded by natural selection into the many elaborate shapes observed across the bacterial domain. In this essay, we discuss the diversity of bacterial morphology and its implications for understanding both the mechanistic and the adaptive basis of morphogenesis. We consider how best to leverage genomic data and recent experimental developments in order to advance our understanding of bacterial shape and its functional importance. PMID:27695035

  19. Predictive mechanistic bioenergetics to model habitat suitability of shellfish culture in coastal lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinaldi, A.; Montalto, V.; Manganaro, A.; Mazzola, A.; Mirto, S.; Sanfilippo, M.; Sarà, G.

    2014-05-01

    Quantitative tools based on mechanistic modelling of functional traits able to enhance the sustainability of aquaculture and most other human activities (i.e. reducing the likelihood of detrimental impacts optimising productions), are especially important factors in the decision to site aquaculture facilities in coastal lakes, ponds and lagoons and, in the case of detrimental impact, to adopt mitigation measures. We tested the ability of mechanistic functional trait based models to predict life history traits of cultivable shellfish in shallow coastal lakes. Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) models were run to generate spatially explicit predictions of Mytilus galloprovincialis life history (LH) traits (e.g. body size and fecundity). Using fortnightly data of food supply and hourly data of body temperatures, and exploiting the power of mechanistic rules, we estimated the amount of faeces ejected by a fixed quantity of organisms cultivated in two shallow Southern Mediterranean (Sicily) lakes. These differed in terms of temperature and food density, implying large differences in life history traits of mussels in the two study areas. This information could help facilitate the selection of sites where environmental conditions are more suitable for aquaculture and contextually compatible with sustainability. The validation exercise obtained by comparing the predicted and observed data was nearly consistent. Therefore, a mechanistic functional traits-based model seems able to capture the link between habitat characteristics and functional traits of organisms, delineating the fundamental portion of an ecological niche, the possibility of predicting LH traits and potential ecological applications in the management of natural coastal resources.

  20. Risk factors and drug interactions predisposing to statin-induced myopathy: implications for risk assessment, prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Chatzizisis, Yiannis S; Koskinas, Konstantinos C; Misirli, Gesthimani; Vaklavas, Christos; Hatzitolios, Apostolos; Giannoglou, George D

    2010-03-01

    HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors ('statins') represent the most effective and widely prescribed drugs currently available for the reduction of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, a critical therapeutic target for primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular atherosclerotic disease. In the face of the established lipid lowering and the emerging pleiotropic properties of statins, the patient population suitable for long-term statin treatment is expected to further expand. An overall positive safety and tolerability profile of statins has been established, although adverse events have been reported. Skeletal muscle-related events are the most common adverse events of statin treatment. Statin-induced myopathy can (rarely) manifest with severe and potentially fatal cases of rhabdomyolysis, thus rendering the identification of the underlying predisposing factors critical. The purpose of this review is to summarize the factors that increase the risk of statin-related myopathy. Data from published clinical trials, meta-analyses, postmarketing studies, spontaneous report systems and case reports for rare effects were reviewed. Briefly, the epidemiology, clinical spectrum and molecular mechanisms of statin-associated myopathy are discussed. We further analyse in detail the risk factors that precipitate or increase the likelihood of statin-related myopathy. Individual demographic features, genetic factors and co-morbidities that may account for the significant interindividual variability in the myopathic risk are presented. Physicochemical properties of statins have been implicated in the differential risk of currently marketed statins. Pharmacokinetic interactions with concomitant medications that interfere with statin metabolism and alter their systemic bioavailability are reviewed. Of particular clinical interest in cases of resistant dyslipidaemia is the interaction of statins with other classes of lipid-lowering agents; current data on the relative safety of available

  1. Factors influencing spatial pattern in tropical forest clearance and stand age: Implications for carbon storage and species diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmer, E. H.; Brandeis, Thomas J.; Lugo, Ariel E.; Kennaway, Todd

    2008-06-01

    Little is known about the tropical forests that undergo clearing as urban/built-up and other developed lands spread. This study uses remote sensing-based maps of Puerto Rico, multinomial logit models and forest inventory data to explain patterns of forest age and the age of forests cleared for land development and assess their implications for forest carbon storage and tree species richness. Accessibility, arability and spatial contagion emerge strongly as overriding spatial controls on tropical forest age, determining (1) the pattern of agricultural abandonment that permits forest regrowth, and (2) where humans leave old-growth forest remnants. Covariation between the factors patterning forest age and land development explains why most forest cleared for land development is younger. Forests are increasingly younger in more accessible and fertile areas where agriculture has lasted longer and land development is most common. All else equal, more species-rich older forest on less arable lands are somewhat less likely to undergo development, but they are still vulnerable to clearing for land development if close to urban centers and unprotected. Accounting for forest age leads to a 19% lower estimate of forest biomass cleared for land development than if forest age is not accounted for.

  2. Maternal methadone use in pregnancy: factors associated with the development of neonatal abstinence syndrome and implications for healthcare resources.

    PubMed

    Dryden, C; Young, D; Hepburn, M; Mactier, H

    2009-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate factors associated with the development of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) and to assess the implications for healthcare resources of infants born to drug-misusing women. Retrospective cohort study from 1 January 2004 to 31 December 2006. Inner-city maternity hospital providing dedicated multidisciplinary care to drug-misusing women. Four hundred and fifty singleton pregnancies of drug-misusing women prescribed substitute methadone in pregnancy. Case note review. Development of NAS and duration of infant hospital stay. 45.5% of infants developed NAS requiring pharmacological treatment. The odds ratio of the infant developing NAS was independently related to prescribed maternal methadone dose rather than associated polydrug misuse. Breastfeeding was associated with reduced odds of requiring treatment for NAS (OR 0.55, 95% CI 0.34-0.88). Preterm birth did not influence the odds of the infant receiving treatment for NAS. 48.4% infants were admitted to the neonatal unit (NNU) 40% of these primarily for treatment of NAS. The median total hospital stay for all infants was 10 days (interquartile range 7-17 days). Infants born to methadone-prescribed drug-misusing mothers represented 2.9% of hospital births, but used 18.2% of NNU cot days. Higher maternal methadone dose is associated with a higher incidence of NAS. Pregnant drug-misusing women should be encouraged and supported to breastfeed. Their infants are extremely vulnerable and draw heavily on healthcare resources.

  3. DNA methylation analysis of Homeobox genes implicates HOXB7 hypomethylation as risk factor for neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Rochtus, Anne; Izzi, Benedetta; Vangeel, Elise; Louwette, Sophie; Wittevrongel, Christine; Lambrechts, Diether; Moreau, Yves; Winand, Raf; Verpoorten, Carla; Jansen, Katrien; Van Geet, Chris; Freson, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are common birth defects of complex etiology. Though family- and population-based studies have confirmed a genetic component, the responsible genes for NTDs are still largely unknown. Based on the hypothesis that folic acid prevents NTDs by stimulating methylation reactions, epigenetic factors, such as DNA methylation, are predicted to be involved in NTDs. Homeobox (HOX) genes play a role in spinal cord development and are tightly regulated in a spatiotemporal and collinear manner, partly by epigenetic modifications. We have quantified DNA methylation for the different HOX genes by subtracting values from a genome-wide methylation analysis using leukocyte DNA from 10 myelomeningocele (MMC) patients and 6 healthy controls. From the 1575 CpGs profiled for the 4 HOX clusters, 26 CpGs were differentially methylated (P-value < 0.05; β-difference > 0.05) between MMC patients and controls. Seventy-seven percent of these CpGs were located in the HOXA and HOXB clusters, with the most profound difference for 3 CpGs within the HOXB7 gene body. A validation case-control study including 83 MMC patients and 30 unrelated healthy controls confirmed a significant association between MMC and HOXB7 hypomethylation (-14.4%; 95% CI: 11.9-16.9%; P-value < 0.0001) independent of the MTHFR 667C>T genotype. Significant HOXB7 hypomethylation was also present in 12 unaffected siblings, each related to a MMC patient, suggestive of an epigenetic change induced by the mother. The inclusion of a neural tube formation model using zebrafish showed that Hoxb7a overexpression but not depletion resulted in deformed body axes with dysmorphic neural tube formation. Our results implicate HOXB7 hypomethylation as risk factor for NTDs and highlight the importance for future genome-wide DNA methylation analyses without preselecting candidate pathways.

  4. Stable isotope composition in Daphnia is modulated by growth, temperature, and toxic exposure: implications for trophic magnification factor assessment.

    PubMed

    Ek, Caroline; Karlson, Agnes M L; Hansson, Sture; Garbaras, Andrius; Gorokhova, Elena

    2015-06-02

    The potential for using stable isotope analysis in risk assessment of environmental contaminants is crucially dependent on the predictability of the trophic transfer of isotopes in food webs. The relationship between contaminant levels and trophic position of consumers is widely used to assess biomagnification properties of various pollutants by establishing trophic magnification factors (TMF). However, contaminant-induced variability of the isotopic composition in biota is poorly understood. Here, we investigated effects of toxic exposure on δ(15)N and δ(13)C values in a consumer, with a main hypothesis that these effects would be largely mediated via growth rate and metabolic turnover of the test animals. The cladoceran Daphnia magna was used in two experiments that were conducted to manipulate growth and body condition (assayed as C:N ratio) by food availability and temperature (Experiment 1) and by toxic exposure to the pesticide lindane (Experiment 2). We found a significant negative effect of growth rate and a positive effect of temperature on the consumer-diet discrimination factor for δ(15)N and δ(13)C, with no effects on the C:N ratio (Experiment 1). In lindane-exposed daphnids, a significant growth inhibition was observed, with concomitant increase in metabolic costs and significantly elevated size-specific δ(15)N and δ(13)C values. Moreover, a significantly higher incorporation of carbon relative to nitrogen, yet a concomitant decrease in C:N ratio was observed in the exposed animals. Together, these results have methodological implications for determining trophic positions and TMF in polluted environments, where elevated δ(15)N values would translate into overestimated trophic positions and underestimated TMF. Furthermore, altered δ(13)C values may lead to erroneous food-chain assignment of the consumer in question.

  5. The mechanistic-holistic divide revisited: The case of the lac operon.

    PubMed

    Racine, Valérie

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, I revisit the development of the repression model of genetic regulation in the lac operon to challenge a common application of a conceptual framework in the history of biology. I take Allen's (1978) account of the changes in the life sciences during the early and mid-twentieth century as an example of a common application of a framework based on the dichotomy between a mechanistic, or reductionist, approach to science and a holistic one. From this conceptual framework, Allen infers two general claims about the process of science and its goals: (1) that "mechanistic materialism" has often presented a more practical way to begin the study of complex phenomena in the life sciences, and (2) that the approach described as "holistic materialism" provides a more complete or accurate description of the natural world. The development of the lac operon model does not fit Allen's generalizations about scientific developments, and it can be used to cast some doubt on the scope of application of that conceptual framework. I argue that a better framework to interpret particular episodes in the history of molecular biology is to consider the ways in which biologists prioritize and track different aspects of the phenomena under study, rather than to focus on whether certain scientific practices are best described as developing from mechanistic to more holistic approaches. I end with some implications for the historiography of science by considering the appropriateness of different conceptual frameworks for different grains of resolution in the history of biology.

  6. Mechanistically based mapping of human cardiac fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Junaid A. B.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The mechanisms underpinning human cardiac fibrillation remain elusive. In his 1913 paper ‘On dynamic equilibrium in the heart’, Mines proposed that an activation wave front could propagate repeatedly in a circle, initiated by a stimulus in the vulnerable period. While the dynamics of activation and recovery are central to cardiac fibrillation, these physiological data are rarely used in clinical mapping. Fibrillation is a rapid irregular rhythm with spatiotemporal disorder resulting from two fundamental mechanisms – sources in preferred cardiac regions or spatially diffuse self‐sustaining activity, i.e. with no preferred source. On close inspection, however, this debate may also reflect mapping technique. Fibrillation is initiated from triggers by regional dispersion in repolarization, slow conduction and wavebreak, then sustained by non‐uniform interactions of these mechanisms. Notably, optical mapping of action potentials in atrial fibrillation (AF) show spiral wave sources (rotors) in nearly all studies including humans, while most traditional electrogram analyses of AF do not. Techniques may diverge in fibrillation because electrograms summate non‐coherent waves within an undefined field whereas optical maps define waves with a visually defined field. Also fibrillation operates at the limits of activation and recovery, which are well represented by action potentials while fibrillatory electrograms poorly represent repolarization. We conclude by suggesting areas for study that may be used, until such time as optical mapping is clinically feasible, to improve mechanistic understanding and therapy of human cardiac fibrillation. PMID:26607671

  7. Mechanistic simulation of line-edge roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biafore, John J.; Smith, Mark D.; Robertson, Stewart A.; Graves, Trey

    2007-03-01

    Physically-based photoresist models, such as those in PROLITH, have been very successful in describing photolithography from a continuum standpoint. These models allow engineers to accurately predict the final resist CD on the wafer and to analyze process robustness. However, as the critical dimension continues to shrink, yield-limiting phenomena are observed that are related to the molecular nature and reaction kinetics of photoresist materials. An example of these phenomena is line-edge roughness (LER). In this paper, the origin of LER is hypothesized to be caused by fluctuations occurring in the initial position of the reactants, fluctuations during the exposure process (shot noise) and fluctuations occurring during thermally-induced reaction-diffusion (post-exposure bake). We have developed a lattice-based mechanistic simulator to better understand the stochastic nature of reactant initial position, the exposure step, the importance of the discrete nature of the reactants, the coupling to the deprotection kinetics and the deep complexity evident in the diffusion-limited acid-quencher reaction.

  8. Semiconductor photocatalysis--mechanistic and synthetic aspects.

    PubMed

    Kisch, Horst

    2013-01-14

    Preceding work on photoelectrochemistry at semiconductor single-crystal electrodes has formed the basis for the tremendous growth in the three last decades in the field of photocatalysis at semiconductor powders. The reason for this is the unique ability of inorganic semiconductor surfaces to photocatalyze concerted reduction and oxidation reactions of a large variety of electron-donor and -acceptor substrates. Whereas great attention was paid to water splitting and the exhaustive aerobic degradation of pollutants, only a small amount of research also explored synthetic aspects. After introducing the basic mechanistic principles, standard experiments for the preparation and characterization of visible light active photocatalysts as well as the investigation of reaction mechanisms are discussed. Novel atom-economic C-C and C-N coupling reactions illustrate the relevance of semiconductor photocatalysis for organic synthesis, and demonstrate that the multidisciplinary field combines classical photochemistry with electrochemistry, solid-state chemistry, and heterogeneous catalysis. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Mechanistic Reactive Burn Modeling of Solid Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Y.Horie; Y.Hamate; D.Greening

    2003-04-01

    This report describes a computational framework for reactive burn modeling of solid explosives and the development of a test case where physical mechanisms represent RDX or RDX-based materials. The report is a sequel to LA-13794-MS, ''A Unifying Framework for Hot Spots and the Ignition of Energetic Materials,'' where we proposed a new approach to the building of a general purpose model that captures the essential features of the three primary origins of hot-spot formation: void collapse, shear banding, friction. The purpose of the present report is to describe the continuing task of coupling the unifying hot-spot model to hydrodynamic calculations to develop a mechanistic reactive burn model. The key components of the coupling include energy localization, the growth of hot spots, overall hot-spot behavior, and a phase-averaged mixture equation of state (EOS) in a Mie-Grueneisen form. The nucleation and growth of locally heated regions is modeled by a phenomenological treatment as well as a statistical model based on an exponential size distribution. The Mie-Grueneisen form of the EOS is one of many possible choices and is not a critical selection for implementing the model. In this report, model calculations are limited to proof-of-concept illustrations for shock loading. Results include (1) shock ignition and growth-to-detonation, (2) double shock ignition, and (3) quenching and reignition. A comparative study of Pop-plots is discussed based on the statistical model.

  10. Polymyxin B hemoperfusion: a mechanistic perspective.

    PubMed

    Ronco, Claudio; Klein, David J

    2014-06-09

    Direct hemoperfusion therapy with polymyxin B immobilized fiber cartridge (PMX-DHP) is an established strategy in the treatment of septic shock in Japan and parts of Western Europe. PMX-DHP is currently the subject of a pivotal North American randomized controlled trial (EUPHRATES) in patients with septic shock and confirmed endotoxemia, as measured by the endotoxin activity assay. The major mechanism of action of this therapy is the removal of circulating endotoxin. High affinity binding of circulating endotoxin by the PMX-DHP column may decrease circulating endotoxin levels by up to 90% after two standard treatments. Basic research has shown reductions in circulating cytokine levels and in renal tubular apoptosis. Clinical research has shown that PMX-DHP therapy results in hemodynamic improvements, improvements in oxygenation, renal function, and reductions in mortality. Further research is needed to further define additional patient populations with endotoxemia that may benefit from PMX-DHP therapy as well as to further elucidate dosing, timing, and additional information on mechanisms of action. This review will present the mechanistic rationale for this targeted strategy of endotoxin removal using PMX-DHP in endotoxemic septic patients, highlighting both the specific effects of the therapy and the evidence accumulated so far of clinical improvement following this therapy in terms of recovery of organ function.

  11. Polymyxin B hemoperfusion: a mechanistic perspective

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Direct hemoperfusion therapy with polymyxin B immobilized fiber cartridge (PMX-DHP) is an established strategy in the treatment of septic shock in Japan and parts of Western Europe. PMX-DHP is currently the subject of a pivotal North American randomized controlled trial (EUPHRATES) in patients with septic shock and confirmed endotoxemia, as measured by the endotoxin activity assay. The major mechanism of action of this therapy is the removal of circulating endotoxin. High affinity binding of circulating endotoxin by the PMX-DHP column may decrease circulating endotoxin levels by up to 90% after two standard treatments. Basic research has shown reductions in circulating cytokine levels and in renal tubular apoptosis. Clinical research has shown that PMX-DHP therapy results in hemodynamic improvements, improvements in oxygenation, renal function, and reductions in mortality. Further research is needed to further define additional patient populations with endotoxemia that may benefit from PMX-DHP therapy as well as to further elucidate dosing, timing, and additional information on mechanisms of action. This review will present the mechanistic rationale for this targeted strategy of endotoxin removal using PMX-DHP in endotoxemic septic patients, highlighting both the specific effects of the therapy and the evidence accumulated so far of clinical improvement following this therapy in terms of recovery of organ function. PMID:25043934

  12. A mechanistic damage model for ligaments.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Jeff M; Callaghan, Jack P

    2017-08-16

    The accuracy of biomechanical models is predicated on the realism by which they represent their biomechanical tissues. Unfortunately, most models use phenomenological ligament models that neglect the behaviour in the failure region. Therefore, the purpose of this investigation was to test whether a mechanistic model of ligamentous tissue portrays behaviour representative of actual ligament failure tests. The model tracks the time-evolution of a population of collagen fibres in a theoretical ligament. Each collagen fibre is treated as an independent linear cables with constant stiffness. Model equations were derived by assuming these fibres act as a continuum and applying a conservation law akin to Huxley's muscle model. A breaking function models the rate of collagen fibre breakage at a given displacement, and was chosen to be a linear function for this preliminary analysis. The model was fitted to experimental average curves for the cervical anterior longitudinal ligament. In addition, the model was cyclically loaded to test whether the tissue model behaves similarly. The model agreed very well with experiment with an RMS error of 14.23 N and an R(2) of 0.995. Cyclic loading exhibited a reduction in force similar to experimental data. The proposed model showcases behaviour reminiscent of actual ligaments being strained to failure and undergoing cyclic load. Future work could incorporate viscous effects, or validate the model further by testing it in various loading conditions. Characterizing the breaking function more accurately would also lead to better results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Equation-free mechanistic ecosystem forecasting using empirical dynamic modeling

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hao; Beamish, Richard J.; Glaser, Sarah M.; Grant, Sue C. H.; Hsieh, Chih-hao; Richards, Laura J.; Schnute, Jon T.; Sugihara, George

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that current equilibrium-based models fall short as predictive descriptions of natural ecosystems, and particularly of fisheries systems that exhibit nonlinear dynamics. For example, model parameters assumed to be fixed constants may actually vary in time, models may fit well to existing data but lack out-of-sample predictive skill, and key driving variables may be misidentified due to transient (mirage) correlations that are common in nonlinear systems. With these frailties, it is somewhat surprising that static equilibrium models continue to be widely used. Here, we examine empirical dynamic modeling (EDM) as an alternative to imposed model equations and that accommodates both nonequilibrium dynamics and nonlinearity. Using time series from nine stocks of sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) from the Fraser River system in British Columbia, Canada, we perform, for the the first time to our knowledge, real-data comparison of contemporary fisheries models with equivalent EDM formulations that explicitly use spawning stock and environmental variables to forecast recruitment. We find that EDM models produce more accurate and precise forecasts, and unlike extensions of the classic Ricker spawner–recruit equation, they show significant improvements when environmental factors are included. Our analysis demonstrates the strategic utility of EDM for incorporating environmental influences into fisheries forecasts and, more generally, for providing insight into how environmental factors can operate in forecast models, thus paving the way for equation-free mechanistic forecasting to be applied in management contexts. PMID:25733874

  14. Equation-free mechanistic ecosystem forecasting using empirical dynamic modeling.

    PubMed

    Ye, Hao; Beamish, Richard J; Glaser, Sarah M; Grant, Sue C H; Hsieh, Chih-Hao; Richards, Laura J; Schnute, Jon T; Sugihara, George

    2015-03-31

    It is well known that current equilibrium-based models fall short as predictive descriptions of natural ecosystems, and particularly of fisheries systems that exhibit nonlinear dynamics. For example, model parameters assumed to be fixed constants may actually vary in time, models may fit well to existing data but lack out-of-sample predictive skill, and key driving variables may be misidentified due to transient (mirage) correlations that are common in nonlinear systems. With these frailties, it is somewhat surprising that static equilibrium models continue to be widely used. Here, we examine empirical dynamic modeling (EDM) as an alternative to imposed model equations and that accommodates both nonequilibrium dynamics and nonlinearity. Using time series from nine stocks of sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) from the Fraser River system in British Columbia, Canada, we perform, for the the first time to our knowledge, real-data comparison of contemporary fisheries models with equivalent EDM formulations that explicitly use spawning stock and environmental variables to forecast recruitment. We find that EDM models produce more accurate and precise forecasts, and unlike extensions of the classic Ricker spawner-recruit equation, they show significant improvements when environmental factors are included. Our analysis demonstrates the strategic utility of EDM for incorporating environmental influences into fisheries forecasts and, more generally, for providing insight into how environmental factors can operate in forecast models, thus paving the way for equation-free mechanistic forecasting to be applied in management contexts.

  15. Tissue factor and tissue factor pathway inhibitor in women with a past history of preeclampsia: implication for a hypercoagulable state postpregnancy.

    PubMed

    Lwaleed, Bashir A; Breish, Mohamed O; Birch, Brian R; Chowdhary, Azeem P; Saad, Rasheed A; Perigo, Oliver; Kazmi, Rashid S; Dusse, Luci M; Cooper, Alan J

    2014-10-01

    Preeclampsia (P-EC) is a multisystem disorder of pregnancy whose cause and pathogenesis remain poorly understood. However, abnormal haemostasis and endothelial dysfunction are thought to be implicated. Women with a past medical history of P-EC have a baseline hypercoagulable state postpregnancy. The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between tissue factor (TF) and TF pathway inhibitor (TFPI) in women who have had P-EC within the last 3 years (more than 6 months postpartum) and their normal counterparts. Blood specimens were collected from women known to have had P-EC within the last 3 years (n = 26) and aged-matched healthy women without past history of P-EC in previous pregnancy (n = 26). Plasma TF and TFPI levels were measured using ELISAs. Women who have had P-EC showed increased TF levels compared with their normal counterparts, whereas TFPI levels were reduced. Neither parameter differed significantly when the groups were tested against each other. Interestingly, the TF/TFPI ratio was significantly increased (P = 0.024) when the two groups were compared. In summary, there was a trend towards increased TF and reduced TFPI levels in the P-EC group. Such a tendency was not statistically significant. However, the TF/TFPI ratio was significantly increased when the groups were compared. Our findings suggest an imbalance between TF/TFPI levels in women with past history of P-EC postpregnancy. This may contribute to the development of maternal hypercoagulable states and may predispose women with a history of P-EC to cardiovascular risks later in life.

  16. Integrating mechanistic and polymorphism data to characterize human genetic susceptibility for environmental chemical risk assessment in the 21st century

    SciTech Connect

    Mortensen, Holly M.; Euling, Susan Y.

    2013-09-15

    Response to environmental chemicals can vary widely among individuals and between population groups. In human health risk assessment, data on susceptibility can be utilized by deriving risk levels based on a study of a susceptible population and/or an uncertainty factor may be applied to account for the lack of information about susceptibility. Defining genetic susceptibility in response to environmental chemicals across human populations is an area of interest in the NAS' new paradigm of toxicity pathway-based risk assessment. Data from high-throughput/high content (HT/HC), including -omics (e.g., genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics) technologies, have been integral to the identification and characterization of drug target and disease loci, and have been successfully utilized to inform the mechanism of action for numerous environmental chemicals. Large-scale population genotyping studies may help to characterize levels of variability across human populations at identified target loci implicated in response to environmental chemicals. By combining mechanistic data for a given environmental chemical with next generation sequencing data that provides human population variation information, one can begin to characterize differential susceptibility due to genetic variability to environmental chemicals within and across genetically heterogeneous human populations. The integration of such data sources will be informative to human health risk assessment.

  17. Synthetic and Mechanistic Aspects of the Regioselective Base-Mediated Reaction of Perfluoroalkyl- and Perfluoroarylsilanes with Heterocyclic N-Oxides

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, David E.; Chavez, Gabriel; Valdes, Martin; Dovalina, Monica; Arman, Hadi D.

    2014-01-01

    The scope and mechanistic implications of the direct transformation of heterocyclic N-oxides to 2-trifluoromethyl-, and related perfluoroalkyl- and perfluoroaryl-substituted N-heterocycles has been studied. The reaction is effected by perfluoroalkyl- and perfluorophenyltrimethylsilane in the presence of strong base. In situ displacement of the para-fluoro substituent in the pentafluorophenyl ring and the methoxy group in 8-methoxyquinolines with additional nucleophiles allows for further site-selective refunctionalization of the N-heterocyclic products. PMID:24993899

  18. Evaluation of the CMAQ and GMI Model-Simulated Shape Factors with DISCOVER-AQ Observations with Implications for Retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, C. M.; Pickering, K. E.; Crawford, J. H.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Diskin, G. S.; Loughner, C.; Strode, S.

    2016-12-01

    The NASA Earth Venture-1 DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) project took place over four years and was comprised of four deployments: the Baltimore-Washington metropolitan region of Maryland during July 2011: the San Joaquin Valley of California during January-February 2013; the Houston, TX, metropolitan area during September 2013; and the last in the Front Range region of Colorado during July-August 2014. The P-3B aircraft provided in situ vertical profiles of meteorological quantities, trace gases, and aerosols over surface air quality monitoring sites during flight days for each deployment. A major goal of DISCOVER-AQ is to understand the processes linking column abundances to surface concentrations for O3 and NO2, which includes understanding the typical profile shapes and the atmospheric conditions influencing these profile shapes. Additionally, these data may be used to evaluate the ability of air quality models to replicate the observed profile shapes. This has implications for the global models currently used in remote sensing retrievals of vertical column abundance as well as for the use of regional air quality models within retrievals. The regional CMAQ and global GMI atmospheric chemistry and transport models are evaluated against the observed P-3B lower tropospheric shape factors (the fraction of the column within each vertical layer) for the clusters of typical profile shapes obtained through an agglomerative hierarchical clustering technique for O3 and NO2. The CMAQ model captured the shape factors for O3, and moderately well captured the NO2 shape factors, for the conditions associated with the Maryland campaign, suggesting that a regional air quality model may adequately specify a priori profile shapes for remote sensing retrievals for the conditions associated with this deployment. Coarser vertical resolution in the GMI model affected the ability of that

  19. Evaluating National Environmental Sustainability: Performance Measures and Influential Factors for OECD-Member Countries featuring Canadian Performance and Policy Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calbick, Kenneth S.

    This research reviews five studies that evaluate national environmental sustainability with composite indices; performs uncertainty and sensitivity analyses of techniques for building a composite index; completes principal components factor analysis to help build subindices measuring waste and pollution, sustainable energy, sustainable food, nature conservation, and sustainable cities (Due to its current importance, the greenhouse gases (GHG) indicator is included individually as another policy measure.); analyses factors that seem to influence performance: climate, population growth, population density, economic output, technological development, industrial structure, energy prices, environmental governance, pollution abatement and control expenditures, and environmental pricing; and explores Canadian policy implications of the results. The techniques to build composite indices include performance indicator selection, missing data treatment, normalisation technique, scale-effect adjustments, weights, and aggregation method. Scale-effect adjustments and normalisation method are significant sources of uncertainty inducing 68% of the observed variation in a country's final rank at the 95% level of confidence. Choice of indicators also introduces substantial variation as well. To compensate for this variation, the current study recommends that a composite index should always be analysed with other policy subindices and individual indicators. Moreover, the connection between population and consumption indicates that per capita scale-effect adjustments should be used for certain indicators. Rather than ranking normalisation, studies should use a method that retains information from the raw indicator values. Multiple regression and cluster analyses indicate economic output, environmental governance, and energy prices are major influential factors, with energy prices the most important. It is statistically significant for five out of seven performance measures at the 95

  20. Mechanistic studies of ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L1.

    PubMed

    Case, April; Stein, Ross L

    2006-02-21

    Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolases (UCHs) cleave Ub-X bonds (Ub is ubiquitin and X an alcohol, an amine, or a protein) through a thioester intermediate that is produced by nucleophilic attack of the Cys residue of a Cys-SH/His-Im catalytic diad. We are studying the mechanism of UCH-L1, a UCH that is implicated in Parkinson's disease, and now wish to report our initial findings. (i) Pre-steady-state kinetic studies for UCH-L1-catalyzed hydrolysis of Ub-AMC (AMC, 7-amido-4-methylcoumarin) indicate that k(cat) is rate-limited by acyl-enzyme formation. Thus, K(m) = K(s), the dissociation constant for the Michaelis complex, and k(cat) = k(2), the rate constant for acyl-enzyme formation. (ii) For K(assoc) (=K(s)(-)(1)), DeltaC(p) = -0.8 kcal mol(-)(1) deg(-)(1) and is consistent with coupling between substrate association and a conformational change of the enzyme. For k(2), DeltaS(++) = 0 and suggests that in the E-S, substrate and active site residues are precisely aligned for reaction. (iii) Solvent isotope effects are (D)K(assoc) = 0.5 and (D)k(2) = 0.9, suggesting that the substrate binds to a form of free enzyme in which the active site Cys exists as the thiol. In the resultant Michaelis complex, the diad has tautomerized to ion pair Cys-S(-)/His-ImH(+). Subsequent attack of thiolate produces the acyl-enzyme species. In contrast, isotope effects for association of UCH-L1 with transition-state analogue ubiquitin aldehyde suggest that an alternative mechanistic pathway can sometimes be available to UCH-L1 involving general base-catalyzed attack of Cys-SH by His-Im.

  1. Labor inhibits placental mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Lager, S; Aye, I L M H; Gaccioli, F; Ramirez, V I; Jansson, T; Powell, T L

    2014-12-01

    Labor induces a myriad of changes in placental gene expression. These changes may represent a physiological adaptation inhibiting placental cellular processes associated with a high demand for oxygen and energy (e.g., protein synthesis and active transport) thereby promoting oxygen and glucose transfer to the fetus. We hypothesized that mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling, a positive regulator of trophoblast protein synthesis and amino acid transport, is inhibited by labor. Placental tissue was collected from healthy, term pregnancies (n = 15 no-labor; n = 12 labor). Activation of Caspase-1, IRS1/Akt, STAT, mTOR, and inflammatory signaling pathways was determined by Western blot. NFĸB p65 and PPARγ DNA binding activity was measured in isolated nuclei. Labor increased Caspase-1 activation and mTOR complex 2 signaling, as measured by phosphorylation of Akt (S473). However, mTORC1 signaling was inhibited in response to labor as evidenced by decreased phosphorylation of mTOR (S2448) and 4EBP1 (T37/46 and T70). Labor also decreased NFĸB and PPARγ DNA binding activity, while having no effect on IRS1 or STAT signaling pathway. Several placental signaling pathways are affected by labor, which has implications for experimental design in studies of placental signaling. Inhibition of placental mTORC1 signaling in response to labor may serve to down-regulate protein synthesis and amino acid transport, processes that account for a large share of placental oxygen and glucose consumption. We speculate that this response preserves glucose and oxygen for transfer to the fetus during the stressful events of labor. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Labor Inhibits Placental Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    LAGER, Susanne; AYE, Irving L.M.H.; GACCIOLI, Francesca; RAMIREZ, Vanessa I.; JANSSON, Thomas; POWELL, Theresa L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Labor induces a myriad of changes in placental gene expression. These changes may represent a physiological adaptation inhibiting placental cellular processes associated with a high demand for oxygen and energy (e.g., protein synthesis and active transport) thereby promoting oxygen and glucose transfer to the fetus. We hypothesized that mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling, a positive regulator of trophoblast protein synthesis and amino acid transport, is inhibited by labor. Methods Placental tissue was collected from healthy, term pregnancies (n=15 no-labor; n=12 labor). Activation of Caspase-1, IRS1/Akt, STAT, mTOR, and inflammatory signaling pathways was determined by Western blot. NFκB p65 and PPARγ DNA binding activity was measured in isolated nuclei. Results Labor increased Caspase-1 activation and mTOR complex 2 signaling, as measured by phosphorylation of Akt (S473). However, mTORC1 signaling was inhibited in response to labor as evidenced by decreased phosphorylation of mTOR (S2448) and 4EBP1 (T37/46 and T70). Labor also decreased NFκB and PPARγ DNA binding activity, while having no effect on IRS1 or STAT signaling pathway. Discussion and conclusion Several placental signaling pathways are affected by labor, which has implications for experimental design in studies of placental signaling. Inhibition of placental mTORC1 signaling in response to labor may serve to down-regulate protein synthesis and amino acid transport, processes that account for a large share of placental oxygen and glucose consumption. We speculate that this response preserves glucose and oxygen for transfer to the fetus during the stressful events of labor. PMID:25454472

  3. Framingham Risk Score underestimates cardiovascular disease risk in severe psoriatic patients: implications in cardiovascular risk factors management and primary prevention of cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Torres, Tiago; Sales, Rita; Vasconcelos, Carlos; Martins da Silva, Berta; Selores, Manuela

    2013-11-01

    Severe psoriasis has been associated with increase cardiovascular mortality, due to a higher prevalence of traditional cardiovascular risk factors and premature atherosclerosis, as a consequence of its systemic inflammation. Recently, it has been estimated that severe psoriasis may confer an increased 6.2% on long-term risk of cardiovascular disease based on Framingham Risk Score, which can have practical implications in the treatment of cardiovascular risk factors and primary prevention of cardiovascular disease, as treatment guidelines account for the risk of cardiovascular disease in treatment goals. The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of the attributable risk of severe psoriasis on long-term risk of cardiovascular disease and its implication on the correct treatment of cardiovascular risk factors and primary prevention of cardiovascular disease on a real-world cohort of patients. One hundred severe psoriasis patients without psoriatic arthritis or previous cardiovascular disease were evaluated and it was found that more than half of the patients were reclassified to a higher cardiovascular risk category with important clinical implications on the correct management of their cardiovascular risk factors and primary prevention of cardiovascular disease, as a considerable proportion of patients with hypertension, hypercholesterolemia and coronary heart disease equivalent risk were not being correctly managed.

  4. Ligand interactions with galactose oxidase: mechanistic insights.

    PubMed Central

    Whittaker, M M; Whittaker, J W

    1993-01-01

    Interactions between galactose oxidase and small molecules have been explored using a combination of optical absorption, circular dichroism, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopies to detect complex formation and characterize the products. Anions bind directly to the cupric center in both active and inactive galactose oxidase, converting to complexes with optical and EPR spectra that are distinctly different from those of the starting aquo enzyme. Azide binding is coupled to stoichiometric proton uptake by the enzyme, reflecting the generation of a strong base (pKa > 9) in the active site anion adduct. At low temperature, the aquo enzyme converts to a form that exhibits the characteristic optical and EPR spectra of an anion complex, apparently reflecting deprotonation of the coordinated water. Anion binding results in a loss of the optical transition arising from coordinated tyrosine, implying displacement of the axial tyrosine ligand on forming the adduct. Nitric oxide binds to galactose oxidase, forming a specific complex exhibiting an unusual EPR spectrum with all g values below 2. The absence of Cu splitting in this spectrum and the observation that the cupric EPR signal from the active site metal ion is not significantly decreased in the complex suggest a nonmetal interaction site for NO in galactose oxidase. These results have been interpreted in terms of a mechanistic scheme where substrate binding displaces a tyrosinate ligand from the active site cupric ion, generating a base that may serve to deprotonate the coordinated hydroxyl group of the substrate, activating it for oxidation. The protein-NO interactions may probe a nonmetal O2 binding site in this enzyme. PMID:8386015

  5. Crystal Structure of Human Plasma Platelet-activating Factor Acetylhydrolase: Structural Implication to Liporprotein Binding and Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Samanta, Uttamkumar; Bahnson, Brian J.

    2009-02-23

    Human plasma platelet-activating factor (PAF) acetylhydrolase functions by reducing PAF levels as a general anti-inflammatory scavenger and is linked to anaphylactic shock, asthma, and allergic reactions. The enzyme has also been implicated in hydrolytic activities of other pro-inflammatory agents, such as sn-2 oxidatively fragmented phospholipids. This plasma enzyme is tightly bound to low and high density lipoprotein particles and is also referred to as lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2. The crystal structure of this enzyme has been solved from x-ray diffraction data collected to a resolution of 1.5 angstroms. It has a classic lipase alpha/beta-hydrolase fold, and it contains a catalytic triad of Ser273, His351, and Asp296. Two clusters of hydrophobic residues define the probable interface-binding region, and a prediction is given of how the enzyme is bound to lipoproteins. Additionally, an acidic patch of 10 carboxylate residues and a neighboring basic patch of three residues are suggested to play a role in high density lipoprotein/low density lipoprotein partitioning. A crystal structure is also presented of PAF acetylhydrolase reacted with the organophosphate compound paraoxon via its active site Ser273. The resulting diethyl phosphoryl complex was used to model the tetrahedral intermediate of the substrate PAF to the active site. The model of interface binding begins to explain the known specificity of lipoprotein-bound substrates and how the active site can be both close to the hydrophobic-hydrophilic interface and at the same time be accessible to the aqueous phase.

  6. Epidermal vascular endothelial growth factor production is required for permeability barrier homeostasis, dermal angiogenesis, and the development of epidermal hyperplasia: implications for the pathogenesis of psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Elias, Peter M; Arbiser, Jack; Brown, Barbara E; Rossiter, Heidemarie; Man, Mao-Qiang; Cerimele, Francesca; Crumrine, Debra; Gunathilake, Roshan; Choi, Eung Ho; Uchida, Yoshikazu; Tschachler, Erwin; Feingold, Kenneth R

    2008-09-01

    Primary abnormalities in permeability barrier function appear to underlie atopic dermatitis and epidermal trauma; a concomitant barrier dysfunction could also drive other inflammatory dermatoses, including psoriasis. Central to this outside-inside view of disease pathogenesis is the epidermal generation of cytokines/growth factors, which in turn signal downstream epidermal repair mechanisms. Yet, this cascade, if sustained, signals downstream epidermal hyperplasia and inflammation. We found here that acute barrier disruption rapidly stimulates mRNA and protein expression of epidermal vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) in normal hairless mice, a specific response to permeability barrier requirements because up-regulation is blocked by application of a vapor-impermeable membrane. Moreover, epidermal vegf(-/-) mice display abnormal permeability barrier homeostasis, attributable to decreased VEGF signaling of epidermal lamellar body production; a paucity of dermal capillaries with reduced vascular permeability; and neither angiogenesis nor epidermal hyperplasia in response to repeated tape stripping (a model of psoriasiform hyperplasia). These results support a central role for epidermal VEGF in the maintenance of epidermal permeability barrier homeostasis and a link between epidermal VEGF production and both dermal angiogenesis and the development of epidermal hyperplasia. Because psoriasis is commonly induced by external trauma [isomorphic (Koebner) phenomenon] and is associated with a prominent permeability barrier abnormality, excess VEGF production, prominent angiogenesis, and epidermal hyperplasia, these results could provide a potential outside-inside mechanistic basis for the development of psoriasis.

  7. Mechanistic rationales for targeting interleukin-17A in spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    Raychaudhuri, Siba P; Raychaudhuri, Smriti K

    2017-03-08

    The term spondyloarthritis (SpA) is used to describe a group of inflammatory autoimmune diseases, including ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis, with common genetic risk factors and clinical features. SpA is clinically distinct from rheumatoid arthritis and typically affects the spine, sacroiliac joints, entheses, and, less commonly, peripheral joints. Although the pathogenesis of SpA is not fully understood, recent findings have identified the interleukin (IL)-17 pathway as a key mediator of disease pathogenesis. Clinical evidence for the efficacy of IL-17A inhibition by biologic agents was initially shown in patients with chronic plaque psoriasis, another autoimmune disease mediated by the IL-17 pathway. Subsequently, similar positive efficacy for inhibition of IL-17A was seen in patients with ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis. Inhibition of IL-17A may also improve cardiovascular and metabolic comorbidities often found in patients with SpA because studies have linked these disorders to the IL-17 pathway. In this review, we will examine key preclinical studies that demonstrated the mechanistic role of IL-17A in the development SpA and discuss how these observations were translated into clinical practice.

  8. Fine particulate matter air pollution and atherosclerosis: Mechanistic insights.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yuntao; Sun, Qinghua

    2016-12-01

    Atherosclerosis is a progressive disease characterized by the accumulation of lipids and fibrous plaque in the arteries. Its etiology is very complicated and its risk factors primarily include genetic defects, smoking, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, lack of exercise, and infection. Recent studies suggest that fine particulate matter (PM2.5) air pollution may also contribute to the development of atherosclerosis. The present review integrates current experimental evidence with mechanistic pathways whereby PM2.5 exposure can promote the development of atherosclerosis. PM2.5-mediated enhancement of atherosclerosis is likely due to its pro-oxidant and pro-inflammatory effects, involving multiple organs, different cell types, and various molecular mediators. Studies about the effects of PM2.5inhalation on atherosclerosis may yield a better understanding of the link between air pollution and major cardiovascular diseases, and provide useful information for policy makers to determine acceptable levels of PM2.5 air quality. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Air Pollution, edited by Wenjun Ding, Andrew J. Ghio and Weidong Wu. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Mechanistic Enzymology of the Radical SAM Enzyme DesII.

    PubMed

    Ruszczycky, Mark W; Liu, Hung-Wen

    2015-04-01

    DesII is a member of the radical SAM family of enzymes that catalyzes radical-mediated transformations of TDP-4-amino-4,6-didexoy-D-glucose as well as other sugar nucleotide diphosphates. Like nearly all radical SAM enzymes, the reactions begin with the reductive homolysis of SAM to produce a 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical which is followed by regiospecific hydrogen atom abstraction from the substrate. What happens next, however, depends on the nature of the substrate radical so produced. In the case of the biosynthetically relevant substrate, a radical-mediated deamination ensues; however, when this amino group is replaced with a hydroxyl, one instead observes dehydrogenation. The factors that govern the fate of the initially generated substrate radical as well as the mechanistic details underlying these transformations have been a key focus of research into the chemistry of DesII. This review will discuss recent discoveries pertaining to the enzymology of DesII, how it may relate to understanding other radical-mediated lyases and dehydrogenases and the working hypotheses currently being investigated regarding the mechanism of DesII catalysis.

  10. Sleep, immunity, and circadian clocks: a mechanistic model.

    PubMed

    Bollinger, Thomas; Bollinger, Annalena; Oster, Henrik; Solbach, Werner

    2010-01-01

    The lack of sufficient amounts of sleep is a hallmark of modern living, and it is commonly perceived that in the long run this makes us sick. An increasing amount of scientific data indicate that sleep deprivation has detrimental effects on immune function. Conversely, immune responses feedback on sleep phase and architecture. Several studies have investigated the impact of short-term sleep deprivation on different immune parameters, whereas only a few studies have addressed the influence of sleep restriction on the immune system. In many cases, sleep deprivation and restriction impair immune responses by disrupting circadian rhythms at the level of immune cells, which might be a consequence of disrupted endocrine and physiological circadian rhythms. Little is known about the mechanisms underlying the circadian regulation of immunity, but recent studies have suggested that local as well as central circadian clocks drive the rhythms of immune function. In this review, we present a mechanistic model which proposes that sleep (through soluble factors and body temperature) primes immune cells on the one hand, and, on the other hand, provides a timing signal for hematopoietic circadian clocks. We hypothesize that chronic sleep disruption desynchronizes these clocks and, through this mechanism, deregulates immune responses. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Mechanistic evaluation of virus clearance by depth filtration.

    PubMed

    Venkiteshwaran, Adith; Fogle, Jace; Patnaik, Purbasa; Kowle, Ron; Chen, Dayue

    2015-01-01

    Virus clearance by depth filtration has not been well-understood mechanistically due to lack of quantitative data on filter charge characteristics and absence of systematic studies. It is generally believed that both electrostatic interactions and sized based mechanical entrapment contribute to virus clearance by depth filtration. In order to establish whether the effectiveness of virus clearance correlates with the charge characteristics of a given depth filter, a counter-ion displacement technique was employed to determine the ionic capacity for several depth filters. Two depth filters (Millipore B1HC and X0HC) with significant differences in ionic capacities were selected and evaluated for their ability to eliminate viruses. The high ionic capacity X0HC filter showed complete porcine parvovirus (PPV) clearance (eliminating the spiked viruses to below the limit of detection) under low conductivity conditions (≤2.5 mS/cm), achieving a log10 reduction factor (LRF) of > 4.8. On the other hand, the low ionic capacity B1HC filter achieved only ∼2.1-3.0 LRF of PPV clearance under the same conditions. These results indicate that parvovirus clearance by these two depth filters are mainly achieved via electrostatic interactions between the filters and PPV. When much larger xenotropic murine leukemia virus (XMuLV) was used as the model virus, complete retrovirus clearance was obtained under all conditions evaluated for both depth filters, suggesting the involvement of mechanisms other than just electrostatic interactions in XMuLV clearance.

  12. Mechanistic perspectives on cancer chemoprevention/chemotherapeutic effects of thymoquinone.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Juthika; Chun, Kyung-Soo; Aruoma, Okezie I; Kundu, Joydeb Kumar

    2014-10-01

    The bioactive natural products (plant secondary metabolites) are widely known to possess therapeutic value for the prevention and treatment of various chronic diseases including cancer. Thymoquinone (2-methyl-5-isopropyl-1,4-benzoquinone; TQ), a monoterpene present in black cumin seeds, exhibits pleiotropic pharmacological activities including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antidiabetic and antitumor effects. TQ inhibits experimental carcinogenesis in a wide range of animal models and has been shown to arrest the growth of various cancer cells in culture as well as xenograft tumors in vivo. The mechanistic basis of anticancer effects of TQ includes the inhibition of carcinogen metabolizing enzyme activity and oxidative damage of cellular macromolecules, attenuation of inflammation, induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in tumor cells, blockade of tumor angiogenesis, and suppression of migration, invasion and metastasis of cancer cells. TQ shows synergistic and/or potentiating anticancer effects when combined with clinically used chemotherapeutic agents. At the molecular level, TQ targets various components of intracellular signaling pathways, particularly a variety of upstream kinases and transcription factors, which are aberrantly activated during the course of tumorigenesis.

  13. Bioavailability and Pharmacokinetics of Genistein: Mechanistic Studies on its ADME

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhen; Kulkarni, Kaustubh; Zhu, Wei; Hu, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Genistein, one of the most active natural flavonoids, exerts various biological effects including chemoprevention, antioxidation, antiproliferation and anticancer. More than 30 clinical trials of genistein with various disease indications have been conducted to evaluate its clinical efficacy. Based on many animals and human pharmacokinetic studies, it is well known that the most challenge issue for developing genistein as a chemoprevention agent is the low oral bioavailability, which may be the major reason relating to its ambiguous therapeutic effects and large interindividual variations in clinical trials. In order to better correlate pharmacokinetic to pharmacodynamics results in animals and clinical studies, an in-depth understanding of pharmacokinetic behavior of genistein and its ADME properties are needed. Numerous in vitro/in vivo ADME studies had been conducted to reveal the main factors contributing to the low oral bioavailability of genistein. Therefore, this review focuses on summarizing the most recent progress on mechanistic studies of genistein ADME and provides a systemic view of these processes to explain genistein pharmacokinetic behaviors in vivo. The better understanding of genistein ADME property may lead to development of proper strategy to improve genistein oral bioavailability via mechanism-based approaches. PMID:22583407

  14. Clinical and Mechanistic Drivers of Acute Traumatic Coagulopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Mitchell Jay; Kutcher, Matt; Redick, Britt; Nelson, Mary; Call, Mariah; Knudson, M Margaret; Schreiber, Martin A; Bulger, Eileen M; Muskat, Peter; Alarcon, Louis H; Myers, John G; Rahbar, Mohammad H; Brasel, Karen J; Phelan, Herb A; del Junco, Deborah J; Fox, Erin E; Wade, Charles E; Holcomb, John B; Cotton, Bryan A; Matijevic, Nena

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute Traumatic Coagulopathy (ATC) occurs after severe injury and shock and is associated with increased bleeding, morbidity and mortality. The effects of ATC and hemostatic resuscitation on outcome are not well-explored. The PRospective Observational Multicenter Major Trauma Transfusion (PROMMTT) study provided a unique opportunity to characterize coagulation and the effects of resuscitation on ATC after severe trauma. Methods Blood samples were collected upon arrival on a subset of PROMMTT patients. Plasma clotting factor levels were prospectively assayed for coagulation factors. These data were analyzed with comprehensive PROMMTT clinical data. Results There were 1198 patients with laboratory results of whom 41.6% were coagulopathic. Using International Normalized Ratio (INR)≥1.3, 41.6% (448) of patients were coagulopathic while 20.5% (214) were coagulopathic using partial thromboplastin time (PTT)≥35. Coagulopathy was primarily associated with a combination of an ISS>15 and a BD<−6 (P<.05). Regression modeling for INR-based coagulopathy shows that pre-hospital crystalloid (odds ratio (OR)=1.05), Injury Severity Score (ISS, OR=1.03), Glasgow Coma Scale (OR=0.93), heart rate (OR=1.08), systolic blood pressure (OR=0.96), base deficit (BD, OR=0.92) and temperature (OR=0.84) were significant predictors of coagulopathy (all P<.03). A subset of 165 patients had blood samples collected and coagulation factor analysis performed. Elevated ISS and BD were associated with elevation of aPC and depletion of