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Sample records for factor multimer distribution

  1. [Determination of von Willebrand factor multimers in Mexican population].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Zamora, Edgar; Zavala-Hernández, Cesar; Viveros-Sandoval, Martha Eva; Ochoa-Rico, Angeles; Martínez-Murillo, Carlos; Reyes-Maldonado, Elba

    2014-01-01

    Antecedentes: la enfermedad de von Willebrand es un padecimiento hereditario en el que la estructura, función y concentración del factor de von Willebrand están alteradas y, en consecuencia, también la interacción plaqueta-factor de von Willebrand-endotelio. En México no hay registros epidemiológicos de la enfermedad, sólo se han efectuado algunos estudios aislados desde el punto de vista clínico y hematológico. Material y métodos: estudio retrospectivo efectuado en 155 mexicanos mestizos, 75 de ellos con diagnóstico presuntivo de enfermedad de von Willebrand, 15 con sospecha de hemofilia A y 65 donadores sanos (testigos). Se realizaron pruebas: básicas de coagulación, especiales y de clasificación: análisis de la composición multimérica. Resultados: 15 pacientes se diagnosticaron con hemofilia A; de los 75 sujetos con sospecha de enfermedad de von Willebrand se diagnosticaron 50 de la manera siguiente: tipo 1 (62%), tipo 2 (22%) [subtipos: 2A (14%), 2B (2%) y 2N (6%)] y tipo 3 (16%). Conclusión: el análisis de los multímeros del factor de von Willebrand es un método que cumple con las características adecuadas para el diagnóstico de la enfermedad de von Willebrand, por lo que es necesario implementar esta metodología para su estudio y mejorar su diagnóstico específico.

  2. Analysis of von Willebrand factor multimers using a commercially available enhanced chemiluminescence kit.

    PubMed Central

    Cumming, A M; Wensley, R T

    1993-01-01

    AIMS--To develop a rapid, sensitive, and safe method for the analysis of von Willebrand factor (vWf) multimers in plasma or platelet lysates. METHOD--Analysis of vWf multimers was carried out by sodium dodecyl sulphate-agarose discontinuous gel electrophoresis followed by protein transfer to nitrocellulose membranes by western blotting. Blots were probed using horseradish peroxidase (HRP) conjugated rabbit anti-vWf; visualisation of vWf multimers was achieved using a commercially available enhanced chemi-Luminescence (ECL) kit for detecting HRP labelled antibodies on western blots. RESULTS--Electrophoretic transfer of vWf multimers to nitrocellulose membranes, including the higher molecular weight forms, was achieved satisfactorily and there was good resolution of individual multimer bands and of the triplet sub-band structure. Type II vWD variants were readily identifiable. The use of ECL conferred a high degree of sensitivity to the method and the end result on autoradiography film provided a permanent record which did not fade and which was suitable for scanning densitometry. CONCLUSION--The method for vWf multimer analysis described here is sensitive, simple to carry out, uses minimal amounts of reagents, produces results within 48 hours, and does not require the use of potentially hazardous radioactive materials or carcinogenic enzyme substrates. Images PMID:8320330

  3. Two Cys residues essential for von Willebrand factor multimer assembly in the Golgi.

    PubMed

    Purvis, Angie R; Gross, Julia; Dang, Luke T; Huang, Ren-Huai; Kapadia, Milan; Townsend, R Reid; Sadler, J Evan

    2007-10-02

    Von Willebrand factor (VWF) dimerizes through C-terminal CK domains, and VWF dimers assemble into multimers in the Golgi by forming intersubunit disulfide bonds between D3 domains. This unusual oxidoreductase reaction requires the VWF propeptide (domains D1D2), which acts as an endogenous pH-dependent chaperone. The cysteines involved in multimer assembly were characterized by using a VWF construct that encodes the N-terminal D1D2D'D3 domains. Modification with thiol-specific reagents demonstrated that secreted D'D3 monomer contained reduced Cys, whereas D'D3 dimer and propeptide did not. Reduced Cys in the D'D3 monomer were alkylated with N-ethylmaleimide and analyzed by mass spectrometry. All 52 Cys within the D'D3 region were observed, and only Cys(1099) and Cys(1142) were modified by N-ethylmaleimide. When introduced into the D1D2D'D3 construct, the mutation C1099A or C1142A markedly impaired the formation of D'D3 dimers, and the double mutation prevented dimerization. In full-length VWF, the mutations C1099A and C1099A/C1142A prevented multimer assembly; the mutation C1142A allowed the formation of almost exclusively dimers, with few tetramers and no multimers larger than hexamers. Therefore, Cys(1099) and Cys(1142) are essential for the oxidoreductase mechanism of VWF multimerization. Cys(1142) is reported to form a Cys(1142)-Cys(1142) intersubunit bond, suggesting that Cys(1099) also participates in a Cys(1099)-Cys(1099) disulfide bond between D3 domains. This arrangement of intersubunit disulfide bonds implies that the dimeric N-terminal D'D3 domains of VWF subunits align in a parallel orientation within VWF multimers.

  4. An explanation for minor multimer species in endothelial cell-synthesized von Willebrand factor.

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, D C; Zimmerman, T S; Ling, E H; Browning, P J

    1986-01-01

    Initial synthesis of von Willebrand factor (vWf) by cultured human endothelial cells proceeds by formation of a dimer of pro-vWf subunits. These subunits are found only within the cell and have an apparent molecular weight of 240,000-260,000, as measured by electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. Posttranslational modifications, including proteolytic cleavage, glycosylation, and sulfation, result in the appearance of two additional vWf subunits. The major one migrates with the subunit of plasma vWf at an apparent molecular weight of 220,000-225,000 and the other migrates more slowly than pro-vWf at an apparent molecular weight of 260,000-275,000. These subunits oligomerize to form a set of vWf multimers, which are subsequently secreted into the culture medium. We isolated individual vWf oligomer species from the agarose gel bands and show that vWf minor, or satellite, species differ from major species in subunit composition. Images PMID:3486890

  5. The function of ultra-large von Willebrand factor multimers in high shear flow controlled by ADAMTS13.

    PubMed

    Reininger, A J

    2015-01-01

    The paradigm that platelet aggregation, which contributes to bleeding arrest and also to thrombovascular disorders, initiates after signaling-induced platelet activation has been refuted in past recent years. Platelets can form aggregates independently of activation when soluble von Willebrand factor (VWF) is present and the shear rate exceeds a certain threshold where active A1 domains become exposed in soluble VWF multimers and can bind to platelet glycoprotein Ib. Subsequently - fostering each other - VWF can self-assemble into large nets combining with platelets into large conglomerates, which are entirely reversible when they enter a flow region with shear rates below the threshold. In addition the threshold changes from approximately 20 000 s⁻¹ in wall parallel flow to approximately 10 000 s⁻¹ in stagnation point flow. VWF containing ultra-large multimers - as when just released from endothelial storage sites - has been shown to have the highest binding potential to platelets and to each other, thus facilitating rapid platelet accrual to sites of vessel injury and exposed subendothelial structures, i.e. collagen. The VWF nets as well as the platelet-VWF conglomerates are controlled by the cleaving protease ADAMTS13 within minutes under high shear flow. Therewith the hemostatic potential is delivered where needed and the thrombogenic potential is highly controlled twofold: by flow and enzymatic proteolytic cleavage.

  6. Diagnostic Differentiation of von Willebrand Disease Types 1 and 2 by von Willebrand Factor Multimer Analysis and DDAVP Challenge Test.

    PubMed

    Michiels, Jan Jacques; Smejkal, Petr; Penka, Miroslav; Batorova, Angelika; Pricangova, Tatiana; Budde, Ulrich; Vangenechten, Inge; Gadisseur, Alain

    2016-01-01

    The European Clinical Laboratory and Molecular (ECLM) classification of von Willebrand disease (vWD) is based on the splitting approach which uses sensitive and specific von Willebrand factor (vWF) assays with regard to the updated molecular data on structure and function of vWF gene and protein defects. A complete set of FVIII:C and vWF ristocetine cofactor, collagen binding, and antigen, vWF multimeric analysis in low- and medium-resolution gels, and responses to desmopressin (DDAVP) of FVIII:C and vWF parameters are mandatory. The ECLM classification distinguishes recessive types 1 and 3 vWD from recessive vWD 2C due to mutations in the D1 and D2 domains and vWD 2N due to mutations in the D'-FVIII-binding domain of vWF. The ECLM classification differentiates between mild vWD type 1 with variable penetrance of bleedings from symptomatic dominant type 1 vWD secretion defect and/or clearance defect with normal vWF multimers versus vWD 1M and 2M with normal or smeary vWF multimers in low- and medium-resolution gels. High-quality multimeric analysis of vWF in medium-resolution gels based on a DDAVP challenge test clearly delineates and distinguishes each of the dominant type 2 vWDs 1/2E, 2M, 2B, 2A, and 2D caused by vWF gene mutations in the D3 multimerization domain, loss or gain-of-function mutations in the glycoprotein Ib receptor A1 domain, gene mutations in the A2 proteolytic domain, and the C-terminal dimerization domain, respectively.

  7. Characterization of α-Synuclein Multimer Stoichiometry in Complex Biological Samples by Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Killinger, Bryan A; Moszczynska, Anna

    2016-04-05

    The aberrant aggregation of α-synuclein in the brain is a hallmark of Parkinson's disease (PD). In vivo soluble α-synuclein occurs as a monomer and several multimers, the latter of which may be important for the biological function of α-synuclein. Currently, there is a lack of reproducible methods to compare α-synuclein multimer abundance between complex biological samples. Here we developed a method, termed "multimer-PAGE," that combines in-gel chemical cross-linking with several common electrophoretic techniques to measure the stoichiometry of soluble α-synuclein multimers in brain tissue lysates. Results show that soluble α-synuclein from the rat brain exists as several high molecular weight species of approximately 56 kDa (αS56), 80 kDa (αS80), and 100 kDa (αS100) that comigrate with endogenous lipids, detergents, and/or micelles during blue native gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE). Co-extraction of endogenous lipids with α-synuclein was essential for the detection of soluble α-synuclein multimers. Homogenization of brain tissue in small buffer volumes (>50 mg tissue per 1 mL buffer) increased relative lipid extraction and subsequently resulted in abundant soluble multimer detection via multimer-PAGE. α-Synuclein multimers captured by directly cross-linking soluble lysates resembled those observed following multimer-PAGE. The ratio of multimer (αS80) to monomer (αS17) increased linearly with protein input into multimer-PAGE, suggesting to some extent, multimers were also formed during electrophoresis. Overall, soluble α-synuclein maintains lipid interactions following tissue disruption and readily forms multimers when this lipid-protein complex is preserved. Once the multimer-PAGE technique was validated, relative stoichiometric comparisons could be conducted simultaneously between 14 biological samples. Multimer-PAGE provides a simple inexpensive biochemical technique to study the molecular factors influencing α-synuclein multimerization.

  8. Rapid Restoration of Thrombus Formation and High-Molecular-Weight von Willebrand Factor Multimers in Patients with Severe Aortic Stenosis After Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Keigo; Yagi, Hideo; Hayakawa, Masaki; Abe, Takehisa; Hayata, Yoshihiro; Yamaguchi, Naoko; Sugimoto, Mitsuhiko; Fujimura, Yoshihiro; Taniguchi, Shigeki

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS) may have bleeding episodes due to the loss of high-molecular-weight (HMW) von Willebrand factor multimers (VWFMs). The absence of HMW-VWFMs and bleeding tendency are usually corrected after aortic valve replacement (AVR). To investigate the process of VWFM recovery and symptoms in patients with severe AS, we analyzed changes in VWF antigen (VWF:Ag), ADAMTS13 activity (ADAMTS13:AC), and platelet thrombus formation under high shear stress conditions. Methods: Nine patients with severe AS undergoing AVR were analyzed. Results: Evident deficiency of HMW-VWFMs was observed in six patients before surgery, which was rapidly restored within 8 days after AVR. Median levels of VWF:Ag before surgery, on postoperative days (PODs) 1, 8, 15, and 22, and one year after AVR were 78.1%, 130%, 224%, 155%, 134%, and 142%, respectively. In contrast, ADAMTS13:AC was 50.5%, 35.5%, 25.5%, 25.1%, 30.3%, and 84.6%, respectively. Preoperative thrombus formation but not surface coverage was significantly lower than that on POD 22, which was considered as normal level in each patient. Compared with preoperative levels, thrombus volume was significantly lower on POD 1, but rapidly increased by POD 8. Conclusion: Bleeding tendency and loss of HMW-VWFMs observed in patients with severe AS before surgery was rapidly corrected after AVR. Instead, patients were in a VWF-predominant state between POD 8 and 22. PMID:27052664

  9. Characterization of α-Synuclein Multimer Stoichiometry in Complex Biological Samples by Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The aberrant aggregation of α-synuclein in the brain is a hallmark of Parkinson’s disease (PD). In vivo soluble α-synuclein occurs as a monomer and several multimers, the latter of which may be important for the biological function of α-synuclein. Currently, there is a lack of reproducible methods to compare α-synuclein multimer abundance between complex biological samples. Here we developed a method, termed “multimer-PAGE,” that combines in-gel chemical cross-linking with several common electrophoretic techniques to measure the stoichiometry of soluble α-synuclein multimers in brain tissue lysates. Results show that soluble α-synuclein from the rat brain exists as several high molecular weight species of approximately 56 kDa (αS56), 80 kDa (αS80), and 100 kDa (αS100) that comigrate with endogenous lipids, detergents, and/or micelles during blue native gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE). Co-extraction of endogenous lipids with α-synuclein was essential for the detection of soluble α-synuclein multimers. Homogenization of brain tissue in small buffer volumes (>50 mg tissue per 1 mL buffer) increased relative lipid extraction and subsequently resulted in abundant soluble multimer detection via multimer-PAGE. α-Synuclein multimers captured by directly cross-linking soluble lysates resembled those observed following multimer-PAGE. The ratio of multimer (αS80) to monomer (αS17) increased linearly with protein input into multimer-PAGE, suggesting to some extent, multimers were also formed during electrophoresis. Overall, soluble α-synuclein maintains lipid interactions following tissue disruption and readily forms multimers when this lipid–protein complex is preserved. Once the multimer-PAGE technique was validated, relative stoichiometric comparisons could be conducted simultaneously between 14 biological samples. Multimer-PAGE provides a simple inexpensive biochemical technique to study the molecular factors influencing α-synuclein multimerization

  10. Binding of factor VIII to von willebrand factor is enabled by cleavage of the von Willebrand factor propeptide and enhanced by formation of disulfide-linked multimers.

    PubMed

    Bendetowicz, A V; Morris, J A; Wise, R J; Gilbert, G E; Kaufman, R J

    1998-07-15

    von Willebrand factor (vWF) is a multimeric adhesive glycoprotein with one factor VIII binding site/subunit. Prior reports suggest that posttranslational modifications of vWF, including formation of N-terminal intersubunit disulfide bonds and subsequent cleavage of the propeptide, influence availability and/or affinity of factor VIII binding sites. We found that deletion of the vWF propeptide produced a dimeric vWF molecule lacking N-terminal intersubunit disulfide bonds. This molecule bound fluorescein-labeled factor VIII with sixfold lower affinity than multimeric vWF in an equilibrium flow cytometry assay (approximate KDs, 5 nmol/L v 0.9 nmol/L). Coexpression of propeptide-deleted vWF with the vWF propeptide in trans yielded multimeric vWF that displayed increased affinity for factor VIII. Insertion of an alanine residue at the N-terminus of the mature vWF subunit destroyed binding to factor VIII, indicating that the native mature N-terminus is required for factor VIII binding. The requirement for vWF propeptide cleavage was shown by (1) a point mutation of the vWF propeptide cleavage site yielding pro-vWF that was defective in factor VIII binding and (2) correlation between efficiency of intracellular propeptide cleavage and factor VIII binding. Furthermore, in a cell-free system, addition of the propeptide-cleaving enzyme PACE/furin enabled factor VIII binding in parallel with propeptide cleavage. Our results indicate that high-affinity factor VIII binding sites are located on N-terminal disulfide-linked vWF subunits from which the propeptide has been cleaved.

  11. ADAMTS13 content and VWF multimer and triplet structure in commercially available VWF/FVIII concentrates.

    PubMed

    Kannicht, Christoph; Fisseau, Claudine; Hofmann, Werner; Kröning, Mario; Fuchs, Birte

    2015-03-01

    ADAMTS13 is a metalloproteinase that cleaves von Willebrand factor (VWF) into smaller multimers in vivo. This cleavage creates both the typical multimeric size distribution and the characteristic triplet band distribution of VWF. Here we analysed ADAMTS13 content, VWF multimeric size distribution and VWF triplet structure in five commercial VWF/factor VIII (FVIII) concentrates. The relative distribution of ADAMTS13 activity values corresponded well to the ADAMTS13 antigen values for all examined concentrates except Haemate HS®, which had markedly higher ADAMTS13 antigen/activity ratio, with Fanhdi® and Haemate HS® displaying the most intense ADAMTS13 signal. Interestingly, ADAMTS13 levels did not correlate with the high molecular weight multimer content of the concentrates, but did correlate with VWF triplet distribution. Densitometric quantification showed that Wilate®, Immunate® and Willfact® displayed human plasma-like VWF triplet distribution, whereas Fanhdi® and Haemate HS® showed enhanced content of the faster migrating triplet band, which corresponded well to their higher ADAMTS13 content. In summary, Immunate®, Willfact® and Wilate® had lower levels of ADAMTS13 antigen and activity and exhibited a plasma-like VWF triplet structure. Fanhdi® and Haemate HS® had higher ADAMTS13 content and an altered triplet structure. The possible impact of these observations on function and clinical efficacy of VWF/FVIII concentrates is discussed.

  12. Exponential Size Distribution of von Willebrand Factor

    PubMed Central

    Lippok, Svenja; Obser, Tobias; Müller, Jochen P.; Stierle, Valentin K.; Benoit, Martin; Budde, Ulrich; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Rädler, Joachim O.

    2013-01-01

    Von Willebrand Factor (VWF) is a multimeric protein crucial for hemostasis. Under shear flow, it acts as a mechanosensor responding with a size-dependent globule-stretch transition to increasing shear rates. Here, we quantify for the first time, to our knowledge, the size distribution of recombinant VWF and VWF-eGFP using a multilateral approach that involves quantitative gel analysis, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. We find an exponentially decaying size distribution of multimers for recombinant VWF as well as for VWF derived from blood samples in accordance with the notion of a step-growth polymerization process during VWF biosynthesis. The distribution is solely described by the extent of polymerization, which was found to be reduced in the case of the pathologically relevant mutant VWF-IIC. The VWF-specific protease ADAMTS13 systematically shifts the VWF size distribution toward smaller sizes. This dynamic evolution is monitored using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and compared to a computer simulation of a random cleavage process relating ADAMTS13 concentration to the degree of VWF breakdown. Quantitative assessment of VWF size distribution in terms of an exponential might prove to be useful both as a valuable biophysical characterization and as a possible disease indicator for clinical applications. PMID:24010664

  13. Association of adiponectin multimers with Barrett’s oesophagus

    PubMed Central

    Rubenstein, J H; Kao, J Y; Madanick, R D; Zhang, M; Wang, M; Spacek, M B; Donovan, J L; Bright, S D; Shaheen, N J

    2012-01-01

    Objective Barrett’s oesophagus is associated with abdominal obesity. Adiponectin is a peptide that is secreted from adipocytes and circulates in three multimeric forms: low molecular weight (LMW), middle molecular weight (MMW), and high molecular weight (HMW). The anti-inflammatory effects of adiponectin are specific to individual multimers, with LMW being most anti-inflammatory. We postulated that circulating levels of adiponectin and its multimers would be associated with the risk of Barrett’s oesophagus. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Outpatient clinic in North Carolina, USA. Patients Cases of Barrett’s oesophagus and controls undergoing upper endoscopy for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD). Main outcome measures Adjusted odds ratios of plasma adiponectin levels and its multimers for Barrett’s oesophagus. Results There were 112 cases of Barrett’s oesophagus and 199 GORD controls. Total adiponectin was not associated with Barrett’s oesophagus (3rd tertile vs 1st tertile adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 0.88; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.44 to 1.78). High levels of LMW adiponectin were associated with a decreased risk of Barrett’s oesophagus (3rd tertile vs 1st tertile aOR = 0.33; 95% CI, 0.16 to 0.69), and a high LMW/total ratio appeared particularly inversely associated with Barrett’s oesophagus (3rd tertile vs 1st tertile aOR = 0.27; 95% CI, 0.13 to 0.58). Conclusions High levels of LMW adiponectin are associated with a decreased risk of Barrett’s oesophagus among patients with GORD. Further human studies are required to confirm these findings, and in vitro studies are needed to understand if there is a mechanism whereby adiponectin may affect Barrett’s metaplasia. PMID:19570765

  14. Tuberculosis: distribution, risk factors, mortality.

    PubMed

    Kochi, A

    1994-10-01

    About a century after Koch's discovery of the TB bacilli the tuberculosis epidemic which had appeared to be under control was again recognized as a major global health threat. The decline in the epidemic in this century had been largely through the improved living standards and, eventually, the availability and use of effective antibiotics. While tuberculosis gradually disappeared from the health agenda in the western world it remained a big killer throughout the century and in 1992 an estimated 2.7 million TB deaths occurred; 30 million will die from TB during the 1990s if current trends are not reversed. The annual number of new cases will increase from 7.5 million estimated in 1990 to more than 10 million in the year 2000. The main factors for this increase are demographic forces, population movements, the HIV epidemic and increasing drug resistance. The impact of the HIV epidemic is already felt in many sub-Saharan African countries and now threatens Asia where almost two-thirds of the world's TB infected population live and where HIV is spreading. Tuberculosis has also reemerged as a major public health problem in industrialized countries due to international migration, the breakdown of health services, including TB services etc. The control of the epidemic can only be through a concerted action to reinstate TB as priority among health concerns, reflected in national and international resources. A coalition of public and private supporters must be mobilized to support the effort to fight the disease. Governments, non-governmental organizations, the business community, refugee organizations, medical institutions, and other UN agencies are invited to join with WHO in this effort.

  15. Involvement of surface cysteines in activity and multimer formation of thimet oligopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Sigman, J A; Sharky, M L; Walsh, S T; Pabon, A; Glucksman, M J; Wolfson, A J

    2003-08-01

    Thimet oligopeptidase is a metalloenzyme involved in regulating neuropeptide processing. Three cysteine residues (246, 248, 253) are known to be involved in thiol activation of the enzyme. In contrast to the wild-type enzyme, the triple mutant (C246S/C248S/C253S) displays increased activity in the absence of dithiothreitol. Dimers, purportedly formed through cysteines 246, 248 and 253, have been thought to be inactive. However, analysis of the triple mutant by native gel electrophoresis reveals the existence of dimers and multimers, implying that oligomer formation is mediated by other cysteines, probably on the surface, and that some of these forms are enzymatically active. Isolation and characterization of iodoacetate-modified monomers and dimers of the triple mutant revealed that, indeed, certain dimeric forms of the enzyme are still fully active, whereas others show reduced activity. Cysteine residues potentially involved in dimerization were identified by modeling of thimet oliogopeptidase to its homolog, neurolysin. Five mutants were constructed; all contained the triple mutation C246S/C248S/C253S and additional substitutions. Substitutions at C46 or C682 and C687 prevented multimer formation and inhibited dimer formation. The C46S mutant had enzymatic activity comparable to the parent triple mutant, whereas that of C682S/C687S was reduced. Thus, the location of intermolecular disulfide bonds, rather than their existence per se, is relevant to activity. Dimerization close to the N-terminus is detrimental to activity, whereas dimerization near the C-terminus has little effect. Altering disulfide bond formation is a potential regulatory factor in the cell owing to the varying oxidation states in subcellular compartments and the different compartmental locations and functions of the enzyme.

  16. Drosophila BTB/POZ domains of "ttk group" can form multimers and selectively interact with each other.

    PubMed

    Bonchuk, Artem; Denisov, Stepan; Georgiev, Pavel; Maksimenko, Oksana

    2011-09-23

    The BTB (bric-a-brac, tramtrack and broad complex)/POZ (poxvirus and zinc finger) domain is a conserved protein-protein interaction motif contained in a variety of transcription factors involved in development, chromatin remodeling, insulator activity, and carcinogenesis. All well-studied mammalian BTB domains form obligate homodimers and, rarely, tetramers. Only the BTB domain of the Drosophila GAGA factor (GAF) has been shown to exist as higher-order multimers. The BTB domain of GAF belongs to the "ttk group" that contains several highly conserved sequences not found in other BTB domains. Here, we have shown by size-exclusion chromatography, chemical cross-linking, and nondenaturing PAGE that four additional BTB domains of the ttk group-Batman, Mod(mdg4), Pipsqueak, and Tramtrack-can form multimers, like GAF. Interestingly, the BTB domains of GAF and Batman have formed a wide range of complexes and interacted in the yeast two-hybrid assay with other BTB domains tested. In contrast, the BTB domains of Mod(mdg4), Pipsqueak, and Tramtrack have formed stable high-order multimer complexes and failed to interact with each other. The BTB domain of Drosophila CP190 protein does not belong to the ttk group. This BTB domain has formed stable dimers and has not interacted with domains of the ttk group. Previously, it was suggested that GAF oligomerization into higher-order complexes facilitates long-range activation by providing a protein bridge between an enhancer and a promoter. Unexpectedly, experiments in the Drosophila model system have not supported the role of GAF in organization of long-distance interaction between the yeast GAL4 activator and the white promoter.

  17. Factors determining antibody distribution in tumors.

    PubMed

    Thurber, Greg M; Schmidt, Michael M; Wittrup, K Dane

    2008-02-01

    The development of antibody therapies for cancer is increasing rapidly, primarily owing to their specificity. Antibody distribution in tumors is often extremely uneven, however, leading to some malignant cells being exposed to saturating concentrations of antibody, whereas others are completely untargeted. This is detrimental because large regions of cells escape therapy, whereas other regions might be exposed to suboptimal concentrations that promote a selection of resistant mutants. The distribution of antibody depends on a variety of factors, including dose, affinity, antigens per cell and molecular size. Because these parameters are often known or easily estimated, a quick calculation based on simple modeling considerations can predict the uniformity of targeting within a tumor. Such analyses should enable experimental researchers to identify in a straightforward way the limitations in achieving evenly distributed antibody, and design and test improved antibody therapeutics more rationally.

  18. Arachidonic acid mediates the formation of abundant alpha-helical multimers of alpha-synuclein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iljina, Marija; Tosatto, Laura; Choi, Minee L.; Sang, Jason C.; Ye, Yu; Hughes, Craig D.; Bryant, Clare E.; Gandhi, Sonia; Klenerman, David

    2016-09-01

    The protein alpha-synuclein (αS) self-assembles into toxic beta-sheet aggregates in Parkinson’s disease, while it is proposed that αS forms soluble alpha-helical multimers in healthy neurons. Here, we have made αS multimers in vitro using arachidonic acid (ARA), one of the most abundant fatty acids in the brain, and characterized them by a combination of bulk experiments and single-molecule Fӧrster resonance energy transfer (sm-FRET) measurements. The data suggest that ARA-induced oligomers are alpha-helical, resistant to fibril formation, more prone to disaggregation, enzymatic digestion and degradation by the 26S proteasome, and lead to lower neuronal damage and reduced activation of microglia compared to the oligomers formed in the absence of ARA. These multimers can be formed at physiologically-relevant concentrations, and pathological mutants of αS form less multimers than wild-type αS. Our work provides strong biophysical evidence for the formation of alpha-helical multimers of αS in the presence of a biologically relevant fatty acid, which may have a protective role with respect to the generation of beta-sheet toxic structures during αS fibrillation.

  19. Shear-Induced Unfolding and Enzymatic Cleavage of Full-Length VWF Multimers

    PubMed Central

    Lippok, Svenja; Radtke, Matthias; Obser, Tobias; Kleemeier, Lars; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Budde, Ulrich; Netz, Roland R.; Rädler, Joachim O.

    2016-01-01

    Proteolysis of the multimeric blood coagulation protein von Willebrand Factor (VWF) by ADAMTS13 is crucial for prevention of microvascular thrombosis. ADAMTS13 cleaves VWF within the mechanosensitive A2 domain, which is believed to open under shear flow. In this study, we combine fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and a microfluidic shear cell to monitor real-time kinetics of full-length VWF proteolysis as a function of shear stress. For comparison, we also measure the Michaelis-Menten kinetics of ADAMTS13 cleavage of wild-type VWF in the absence of shear but partially denaturing conditions. Under shear, ADAMTS13 activity on full-length VWF arises without denaturing agent as evidenced by FCS and gel-based multimer analysis. In agreement with Brownian hydrodynamics simulations, we find a sigmoidal increase of the enzymatic rate as a function of shear at a threshold shear rate γ˙1/2 = 5522/s. The same flow-rate dependence of ADAMTS13 activity we also observe in blood plasma, which is relevant to predict hemostatic dysfunction. PMID:26840720

  20. Filamentous phage pIV multimer visualized by scanning transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Linderoth, N.A.; Russel, M.; Simon, M.N.

    1997-11-28

    A family of homomultimeric outer-membrane proteins termed secretins mediates the secretion of large macromolecules such as enzymes and filamentous bacteriophages across bacterial outer membranes to the extracellular millieu. The secretin encoded by filamentous phage f1 was purified. Mass determination of individual molecules by scanning transmission electron microscopy revealed two forms, a unit multimer composed of about 14 subunits and a multimer dimer. The secretin is roughly cylindrical and has an internal diameter of about 80 angstroms, which is large enough to accommodate filamentous phage (diameter of 65 angstroms). 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Structure of the filamentous phage pIV multimer by cryo-electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Opalka, Natacha; Beckmann, Roland; Boisset, Nicolas; Simon, Martha N; Russel, Marjorie; Darst, Seth A

    2003-01-17

    The homo-multimeric pIV protein constitutes a channel required for the assembly and export of filamentous phage across the outer membrane of Escherichia coli. We present a 22 A-resolution three-dimensional reconstruction of detergent-solubilized pIV by cryo-electron microscopy associated with image analysis. The structure reveals a barrel-like complex, 13.5 nm in diameter and 24 nm in length, with D14 point-group symmetry, consisting of a dimer of unit multimers. Side views of each unit multimer exhibit three cylindrical domains named the N-ring, the M-ring and the C-ring. Gold labeling of pIV engineered to contain a single cysteine residue near the N or C terminus unambiguously identified the N-terminal region as the N-ring, and the C-terminal region was inferred to make up the C-ring. A large pore, ranging in inner diameter from 6.0 nm to 8.8 nm, runs through the middle of the multimer, but a central domain, the pore gate, blocks it. Moreover, the pore diameter at the N-ring is smaller than the phage particle. We therefore propose that the pIV multimer undergoes a large conformational change during phage transport, with reorganization of the central domain to open the pore, and widening at the N-ring in order to accommodate the 6.5 nm diameter phage particle.

  2. Distributed PV Adoption - Sensitivity to Market Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Gagnon, Pieter; Sigrin, Ben

    2016-02-01

    NREL staff used the dSolar (distributed solar) model to forecast the adoption of distributed, behind-the-meter PV through the year 2050 for 9 different scenarios. The scenarios varied in their assumptions about a carbon tax, the cost of PV systems in the future, and what credit would be given for excess generation once current net metering policies expire.

  3. Tracking antigen-specific CD8⁺ T cells using MHC class I multimers.

    PubMed

    Alanio, Cécile; Bouvier, Isabelle; Jusforgues-Saklani, Hélène; Albert, Matthew L

    2013-01-01

    The tracking of epitope-specific T cells is a useful approach for the study of adaptive immune responses. This protocol describes how Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I (MHC-I) multimers can be used to stain, enrich, and enumerate (rare) populations of CD8(+) T cells specific for a given antigen. It provides the detailed steps for multimer labeling, magnetic enrichment, and cytometric analysis. Additionally, it provides informations for multiplexing experiments in order to achieve simultaneous detection of multiple antigenic specificities, and strategies for coupling the protocol with functional assays (e.g., intracellular cytokine staining). Future developments in cytometric systems (e.g., mass spectroscopy-based cytometry) and gene expression studies (e.g., single cell PCR) will extend these approaches and provide an unprecedented assessment of the immune repertoire.

  4. A Comparison of Distribution Free and Non-Distribution Free Factor Analysis Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritter, Nicola L.

    2012-01-01

    Many researchers recognize that factor analysis can be conducted on both correlation matrices and variance-covariance matrices. Although most researchers extract factors from non-distribution free or parametric methods, researchers can also extract factors from distribution free or non-parametric methods. The nature of the data dictates the method…

  5. Geological factors affecting CO2 plume distribution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frailey, S.M.; Leetaru, H.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the lateral extent of a CO2 plume has important implications with regards to buying/leasing pore volume rights, defining the area of review for an injection permit, determining the extent of an MMV plan, and managing basin-scale sequestration from multiple injection sites. The vertical and lateral distribution of CO2 has implications with regards to estimating CO2 storage volume at a specific site and the pore pressure below the caprock. Geologic and flow characteristics such as effective permeability and porosity, capillary pressure, lateral and vertical permeability anisotropy, geologic structure, and thickness all influence and affect the plume distribution to varying degrees. Depending on the variations in these parameters one may dominate the shape and size of the plume. Additionally, these parameters do not necessarily act independently. A comparison of viscous and gravity forces will determine the degree of vertical and lateral flow. However, this is dependent on formation thickness. For example in a thick zone with injection near the base, the CO2 moves radially from the well but will slow at greater radii and vertical movement will dominate. Generally the CO2 plume will not appreciably move laterally until the caprock or a relatively low permeability interval is contacted by the CO2. Conversely, in a relatively thin zone with the injection interval over nearly the entire zone, near the wellbore the CO2 will be distributed over the entire vertical component and will move laterally much further with minimal vertical movement. Assuming no geologic structure, injecting into a thin zone or into a thick zone immediately under a caprock will result in a larger plume size. With a geologic structure such as an anticline, CO2 plume size may be restricted and injection immediately below the caprock may have less lateral plume growth because the structure will induce downward vertical movement of the CO2 until the outer edge of the plume reaches a spill

  6. Standardized approach for developing probabilistic exposure factor distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Maddalena, Randy L.; McKone, Thomas E.; Sohn, Michael D.

    2003-03-01

    The effectiveness of a probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) depends critically on the quality of input information that is available to the risk assessor and specifically on the probabilistic exposure factor distributions that are developed and used in the exposure and risk models. Deriving probabilistic distributions for model inputs can be time consuming and subjective. The absence of a standard approach for developing these distributions can result in PRAs that are inconsistent and difficult to review by regulatory agencies. We present an approach that reduces subjectivity in the distribution development process without limiting the flexibility needed to prepare relevant PRAs. The approach requires two steps. First, we analyze data pooled at a population scale to (1) identify the most robust demographic variables within the population for a given exposure factor, (2) partition the population data into subsets based on these variables, and (3) construct archetypal distributions for each subpopulation. Second, we sample from these archetypal distributions according to site- or scenario-specific conditions to simulate exposure factor values and use these values to construct the scenario-specific input distribution. It is envisaged that the archetypal distributions from step 1 will be generally applicable so risk assessors will not have to repeatedly collect and analyze raw data for each new assessment. We demonstrate the approach for two commonly used exposure factors--body weight (BW) and exposure duration (ED)--using data for the U.S. population. For these factors we provide a first set of subpopulation based archetypal distributions along with methodology for using these distributions to construct relevant scenario-specific probabilistic exposure factor distributions.

  7. Unique profile of chicken adiponectin, a predominantly heavy molecular weight multimer, and relationship to visceral adiposity.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, Gilbert L; Hadley, Jill A; Krzysik-Walker, Susan M; Prabhu, K Sandeep; Vasilatos-Younken, Regina; Ramachandran, Ramesh

    2009-07-01

    Adiponectin, a 30-kDa adipokine hormone, circulates as heavy, medium, and light molecular weight isoforms in mammals. Plasma heavy molecular weight (HMW) adiponectin isoform levels are inversely correlated with the incidence of type 2 diabetes in humans. The objectives of the present study were to characterize adiponectin protein and quantify plasma adiponectin levels in chickens, which are naturally hyperglycemic relative to mammals. Using gel filtration column chromatography and Western blot analysis under nonreducing and non-heat-denaturing native conditions, adiponectin in chicken plasma, and adipose tissue is predominantly a multimeric HMW isoform that is larger than 669 kDa mass. Under reducing conditions and heating to 70-100 C, however, a majority of the multimeric adiponectin in chicken plasma and adipose tissue was reduced to oligomeric and/or monomeric forms. Immunoprecipitation and elution under neutral pH preserved the HMW adiponectin multimer, whereas brief exposure to acidic pH led to dissociation of HMW multimer into multiple oligomers. Mass spectrometric analysis of chicken adiponectin revealed the presence of hydroxyproline and differential glycosylation of hydroxylysine residues in the collagenous domain. An enzyme immunoassay was developed and validated for quantifying plasma adiponectin in chickens. Plasma adiponectin levels were found to be significantly lower in 8- compared with 4-wk-old male chickens and inversely related to abdominal fat pad mass. Collectively, our results provide novel evidence that adiponectin in chicken plasma and tissues is predominantly a HMW multimer, suggesting the presence of unique multimerization and stabilization mechanisms in the chicken that favors preponderance of HMW adiponectin over other oligomers.

  8. Rearrangement of MICU1 multimers for activation of MCU is solely controlled by cytosolic Ca2+

    PubMed Central

    Waldeck-Weiermair, Markus; Malli, Roland; Parichatikanond, Warisara; Gottschalk, Benjamin; Madreiter-Sokolowski, Corina T.; Klec, Christiane; Rost, Rene; Graier, Wolfgang F.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake is a vital process that controls distinct cell and organelle functions. Mitochondrial calcium uptake 1 (MICU1) was identified as key regulator of the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter (MCU) that together with the essential MCU regulator (EMRE) forms the mitochondrial Ca2+ channel. However, mechanisms by which MICU1 controls MCU/EMRE activity to tune mitochondrial Ca2+ signals remain ambiguous. Here we established a live-cell FRET approach and demonstrate that elevations of cytosolic Ca2+ rearranges MICU1 multimers with an EC50 of 4.4 μM, resulting in activation of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake. MICU1 rearrangement essentially requires the EF-hand motifs and strictly correlates with the shape of cytosolic Ca2+ rises. We further show that rearrangements of MICU1 multimers were independent of matrix Ca2+ concentration, mitochondrial membrane potential, and expression levels of MCU and EMRE. Our experiments provide novel details about how MCU/EMRE is regulated by MICU1 and an original approach to investigate MCU/EMRE activation in intact cells. PMID:26489515

  9. Pion Electromagnetic Form Factor in Virtuality Distribution Formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Radyushkin, Anatoly V.

    2016-01-01

    We discuss two applications of the {\\it Virtuality Distribution Amplitudes} (VDA) formalism developed in our recent papers. We start with an overview of the main properties of the pion distribution amplitude emphasizing the quantitative measures of its width, and possibility to access them through the pion transition form factor studies. We formulate the basic concepts of the VDA approach and introduce the pion {\\it transverse momentum distribution amplitude} (TMDA) which plays, in a covariant Lagrangian formulation, a role similar to that of the pion wave function in the 3-dimensional Hamiltonian light-front approach. We propose simple factorized models for soft TMDAs, and use them to describe existing data on the pion transition form factor, thus fixing the scale determining the size of the transverse-momentum effects. Finally, we apply the VDA approach to the one-gluon exchange contribution for the pion electromagnetic form factor. We observe a very late $Q^2 \\gtrsim 20$ GeV$^2$ onset of transition to the asymptotic pQCD predictions and show that in the $Q^2 \\lesssim 10$ GeV$^2$ region there is essentially no sensitivity to the shape of the pion distribution amplitude. Furthermore, the magnitude of the one-gluon exchange contribution in this region is estimated to be an order of magnitude below the Jefferson Lab data, thus leaving the Feynman mechanism as the only one relevant to the pion electromagnetic form factor behavior for accessible $Q^2$.

  10. Magnetic microparticle-based multimer detection system for the detection of prion oligomers in sheep

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Kuntaek; Kim, Su Yeon; Lee, Byoungsub; Segarra, Christiane; Kang, Sungmin; Ju, Youngran; Schmerr, Mary Jo; Coste, Joliette; Kim, Sang Yun; Yokoyama, Takashi; An, Seong Soo A

    2015-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are zoonotic fatal neurodegenerative diseases in animals and humans. TSEs are commonly known as bovine spongiform encephalopathy in cattle, scrapie in sheep and goats, chronic wasting disease in cervids, and Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease in humans. The putative transmissible agents are infectious prion proteins (PrPSc), which are formed by the conversion of the normal prion protein on the glycoprotein cell surface in the presence of other PrPSc. Reports of the transmission of TSEs through blood raised considerable concern about the safety of blood and blood products. To address this issue, many laboratories attempted to develop a sensitive and accurate blood diagnostic test to detect PrPSc. Previously, we reported that, compared to normal controls, the multimer detection system (MDS) was more efficient in detecting PrPSc in infected hamster brain homogenate, mouse plasma spiked with purified PrPSc from scrapie mouse brain, and scrapie-infected hamster plasmas. MDS differentiates prion multimers from the cellular monomer through the multimeric expression of epitopes on prion multimers, in contrast to the monomeric form. In this study, MDS detected PrPSc in plasma samples from scrapie-infected sheep expressing clinical symptoms, demonstrating 100% sensitivity and specificity in these samples. Plasma samples from asymptomatic lambs at the preclinical stage (8-month-old naturally infected offspring of scrapie-infected parents expressing a highly susceptible genotype) tested positive with 50% sensitivity and 100% specificity. In the first of two coded analyses using clinical scrapie-infected sheep and normal healthy samples, MDS successfully identified all but one of the clinical samples with 92% sensitivity and 100% specificity. Similar results were obtained in the second coded analysis using preclinical samples. MDS again successfully identified all but one of the samples with 87% sensitivity and 100% specificity. The

  11. Covalently linked multimers of gold nanoclusters Au102(p-MBA)44 and Au∼250(p-MBA)n.

    PubMed

    Lahtinen, Tanja; Hulkko, Eero; Sokołowska, Karolina; Tero, Tiia-Riikka; Saarnio, Ville; Lindgren, Johan; Pettersson, Mika; Häkkinen, Hannu; Lehtovaara, Lauri

    2016-11-10

    We present the synthesis, separation, and characterization of covalently-bound multimers of para-mercaptobenzoic acid (p-MBA) protected gold nanoclusters. The multimers were synthesized by performing a ligand-exchange reaction of a pre-characterized Au102(p-MBA)44 nanocluster with biphenyl-4,4'-dithiol (BPDT). The reaction products were separated using gel electrophoresis yielding several distinct bands. The bands were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealing monomer, dimer, and trimer fractions of the nanocluster. TEM analysis of dimers in combination with molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the nanoclusters are covalently bound via a disulfide bridge between BPDT molecules. The linking chemistry is not specific to Au102(p-MBA)44. The same approach yields multimers also for a larger monodisperse p-MBA-protected cluster of approximately 250 gold atoms, Au∼250(p-MBA)n. While the Au102(p-MBA)44 is not plasmonic, the Au∼250(p-MBA)n nanocluster supports localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) at 530 nm. Multimers of the Au∼250(p-MBA)n exhibit additional transitions in their UV-vis spectrum at 630 nm and 810 nm, indicating the presence of hybridized LSPR modes. Well-defined structures and relatively small sizes make these systems excellent candidates for connecting ab initio theoretical studies and experimental quantum plasmonics. Moreover, our work opens new possibilities in the controlled synthesis of advanced monodisperse nanocluster superstructures.

  12. Directional reflectance factor distributions of a cotton row crop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimes, D. S.; Newcomb, W. W.; Schutt, J. B.; Pinter, P. J., Jr.; Jackson, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    The directional reflectance factor distribution spanning the entire exitance hemisphere was measured for a cotton row crop (Gossypium barbadense L.) with 39 percent ground cover. Spectral directional radiances were taken in NOAA satellite 7 AVHRR bands 1 and 2 using a three-band radiometer with restricted 12 deg full angle field of view at half peak power points. Polar co-ordinate system plots of directional reflectance factor distributions and three-dimensional computer graphic plots of scattered flux were used to study the dynamics of the directional reflectance factor distribution as a function of spectral band, geometric structure of the scene, solar zenith and azimuth angles, and optical properties of the leaves and soil. The factor distribution of the incomplete row crops was highly polymodal relative to that for complete vegetation canopies. Besides the enhanced reflectance for the antisolar point, a reflectance minimum was observed towards the forwardscatter direction in the principle plane of the sun. Knowledge of the mechanics of the observed dynamics of the data may be used to provide rigorous validation for two- or three-dimensional radiative transfer models, and is important in interpreting aircraft and satellite data where the solar angle varies widely.

  13. Fibulin-3, -4, and -5 Are Highly Susceptible to Proteolysis, Interact with Cells and Heparin, and Form Multimers*

    PubMed Central

    Djokic, Jelena; Fagotto-Kaufmann, Christine; Bartels, Rainer; Nelea, Valentin; Reinhardt, Dieter P.

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular short fibulins, fibulin-3, -4, and -5, are components of the elastic fiber/microfibril system and are implicated in the formation and homeostasis of elastic tissues. In this study, we report new structural and functional properties of the short fibulins. Full-length human short fibulins were recombinantly expressed in human embryonic kidney cells and purified by immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography. All three fibulins showed various levels of degradation after the purification procedure. N-terminal sequencing revealed that all three fibulins are highly susceptible to proteolysis within the N-terminal linker region of the first calcium-binding epidermal growth factor domain. Proteolytic susceptibility of the linker correlated with its length. Exposure of these fibulins to matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, -2, -3, -7, -9, and -12 resulted in similar proteolytic fragments with MMP-7 and -12 being the most potent proteases. Fibulin-3 proteolysis was almost completely inhibited in cell culture by the addition of 25 μm doxycycline (a broad spectrum MMP inhibitor). Reducible fibulin-4 dimerization and multimerization were consistently observed by SDS-PAGE, Western blotting, and mass spectrometry. Atomic force microscopy identified monomers, dimers, and multimers in purified fibulin-4 preparations with sizes of ∼10–15, ∼20–25, and ∼30–50 nm, respectively. All short fibulins strongly adhered to human fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells. Although only fibulin-5 has an RGD integrin binding site, all short fibulins adhere at a similar level to the respective cells. Solid phase binding assays detected strong calcium-dependent binding of the short fibulins to immobilized heparin, suggesting that these fibulins may bind cell surface-located heparan sulfate. PMID:23782690

  14. Theranostic Value of Multimers: Lessons Learned from Trimerization of Neurotensin Receptor Ligands and Other Targeting Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Maschauer, Simone; Einsiedel, Jürgen; Reich, Dominik; Hübner, Harald; Gmeiner, Peter; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Prante, Olaf; Notni, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    Neurotensin receptor 1 (NTS1) is overexpressed on a variety of cancer entities; for example, prostate cancer, ductal pancreatic adenocarcinoma, and breast cancer. Therefore, it represents an interesting target for the diagnosis of these cancers types by positron emission tomography (PET). The metabolically-stabilized neurotensin (NT) derivative peptide Nlys8-Lys9-Pro10-Tyr11-Tle12-Leu13-OH was elongated at the N-terminus with 6-azido norleucine and coupled with the 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4,7-tris[(2-carboxyethyl)methylenephosphinic acid] (TRAP) chelator TRAP(alkyne)3 in order to synthesize a NT trimer with subnanomolar affinity and high stability. The 68Ga-labeled peptide [68Ga]Ga-TRAP(NT4)3 was characterized in vitro using the NTS1-expressing human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line HT29. It displayed fast and high internalization rates of >90%, but also fast efflux rates of 50% over 15 min. In vivo, [68Ga]Ga-TRAP(NT4)3 showed moderate HT29 tumor uptake values of 1.7 %ID/g at 60 min post-injection (p.i.), but also high uptake and retention in the kidneys and liver. A comparison of data for trimer/monomer pairs of NT ligands and other targeting vectors (peptides and peptoids targeting integrins αvβ3, α5β1, and αvβ6, the PSMA-ligand DUPA (2-[3-(1,3-dicarboxypropyl)-ureido]pentanedioic acid), and nitroimidazoles targeting hypoxia) revealed that multimers always exhibit higher target affinities and tumor uptake, but not necessarily improved tumor-to-tissue ratios. Thus, although in vitro data are not suitable for prediction of in vivo performance, multimers are potentially superior to monomers, particularly for applications where high tumor accumulation is crucial. PMID:28287433

  15. Enhanced expression of tandem multimers of the antimicrobial peptide buforin II in Escherichia coli by the DEAD-box protein and trxB mutant.

    PubMed

    Lee, J H; Kim, M S; Cho, J H; Kim, S C

    2002-05-01

    The tandem multimeric expression of various peptides has been explored by many researchers. However, expression levels have usually not been proportional to the degree of multimerization. To increase the expression level in Escherichia coli of tandem multimers of a cationic antimicrobial peptide, buforin II, fused to an anionic peptide, we studied the effect of the DEAD-box protein and the trxB mutant on the expression of tandem multimers. An expression vector with a tac promoter was more effective in directing multimeric expression than one with a T7 promoter. The expression level of large multimers was substantially increased with the tac promoter, possibly through stabilization of long transcripts by synchronization of transcription and translation. Coexpression of the DEAD-box protein, an RNA-binding protein, with the T7 expression system increased the expression level of multimers, especially large multimers, due to protection of the long RNA transcripts. In addition, the use of the trxB mutant also enhanced the expression level of tandem multimers, which contain two cysteine residues at both ends of the monomeric unit. It seems that disulfide bonds formed in the multimers in the trxB mutant might help efficient charge neutralization for inclusion body formation of the multimers, resulting in enhancement of expression. Our results show that the expression of multimers can be improved through the stabilization of the long transcripts by the DEAD-box protein or the expression, under an oxidizing environment, of the trxB mutant in which covalent cross-links through disulfide bonds facilitate inclusion body formation of the multimeric fusion peptide.

  16. Factors influencing the effect size distribution of adaptive substitutions

    PubMed Central

    Oakley, Christopher G.; Gould, Billie A.; Schemske, Douglas W.

    2016-01-01

    The distribution of effect sizes of adaptive substitutions has been central to evolutionary biology since the modern synthesis. Early theory proposed that because large-effect mutations have negative pleiotropic consequences, only small-effect mutations contribute to adaptation. More recent theory suggested instead that large-effect mutations could be favoured when populations are far from their adaptive peak. Here we suggest that the distributions of effect sizes are expected to differ among study systems, reflecting the wide variation in evolutionary forces and ecological conditions experienced in nature. These include selection, mutation, genetic drift, gene flow, and other factors such as the degree of pleiotropy, the distance to the phenotypic optimum, whether the optimum is stable or moving, and whether new mutation or standing genetic variation provides the source of adaptive alleles. Our goal is to review how these factors might affect the distribution of effect sizes and to identify new research directions. Until more theory and empirical work is available, we feel that it is premature to make broad generalizations about the effect size distribution of adaptive substitutions important in nature. PMID:27053750

  17. 25 CFR Appendix C to Subpart C - Relative Need Distribution Factor

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Relative Need Distribution Factor C Appendix C to Subpart...—Relative Need Distribution Factor The Relative Need Distribution Factor (RNDF) is a mathematical formula...? The Relative Need Distribution Factor is as follows: ER19JY04.004 Where: A = percent Relative Need...

  18. [Ordination analysis on relationship between bryophyte distribution and climatic factors].

    PubMed

    Cao, T; Guo, S; Gao, C

    2000-10-01

    Based on the data of climate and bryoflora in 21 mountainous regions of China, 61 moss families, 23 genera of Dicranaceae, 17 species of genus Campylopus and 35 species of genus Dicranum were analyzed by Canonical Correspond Analysis(CCA) and Detrended Canonical Correspond Analysis (DDCA) to reveal their distribution relationships with nine climatic factors, including annual average temperature, January average temperature, July average temperature, annual average rainfall, annual average fog days, annual average frost days and annual average light hours. The similarity of geographical elements among nine mountains in China and their relationships with climatic factors were also analyzed. The methods of applying DDCA and CCA to analyze the relationships between bryophyte and climatic factors were thus introduced. The studies indicate that CCA and DCCA are applicable in florology and phytogeography.

  19. QCD Factorization, Wilson Loop Space and Unintegrated Gluon Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherednikov, Igor O.

    2017-03-01

    Currently available operator definitions of gauge-invariant unintegrated (transverse momentum dependent) gluon density function available are briefly overviewed, with emphasis on the structure of the associated Wilson lines. A gauge-invariant generating function with maximal path-dependence is proposed, which, as distinct from the common methodology, is based on arbitrary Wilson loops with no reference to any factorization scheme. After the local area differentiation defined in the Wilson loop space, this object can be used to define fully unintegrated gluon distribution functions in a way potentially suitable for the lattice simulations.

  20. Learning factorizations in estimation of distribution algorithms using affinity propagation.

    PubMed

    Santana, Roberto; Larrañaga, Pedro; Lozano, José A

    2010-01-01

    Estimation of distribution algorithms (EDAs) that use marginal product model factorizations have been widely applied to a broad range of mainly binary optimization problems. In this paper, we introduce the affinity propagation EDA (AffEDA) which learns a marginal product model by clustering a matrix of mutual information learned from the data using a very efficient message-passing algorithm known as affinity propagation. The introduced algorithm is tested on a set of binary and nonbinary decomposable functions and using a hard combinatorial class of problem known as the HP protein model. The results show that the algorithm is a very efficient alternative to other EDAs that use marginal product model factorizations such as the extended compact genetic algorithm (ECGA) and improves the quality of the results achieved by ECGA when the cardinality of the variables is increased.

  1. Design and expression of recombinant antihypertensive peptide multimer gene in Escherichia coli BL21.

    PubMed

    Rao, Shengqi; Su, Yujie; Li, Junhua; Xu, Zhenzhen; Yang, Yanjun

    2009-12-01

    The design and expression of an antihypertensive peptide multimer (AHPM), a common precursor of 11 kinds of antihypertensive peptides (AHPs) tandemly linked up according to the restriction sites of gastrointestinal proteases, were explored. The DNA fragment encoding the AHPM was chemically synthesized and cloned into expression vector pGEX-3X. After an optimum induction with IPTG, the recombinant AHPM fused with glutathione S-transferase (GST-AHPM) was expressed mostly as inclusion body in Escherichia coli BL21 and reached the maximal production, 35% of total intracellular protein. The inclusion body was washed, dissolved, and purified by cation exchange chromatography under denaturing conditions, followed by refolding together with size exclusion chromatography and gradual dialysis. The resulting yield of the soluble GST-AHPM (34 kDa) with a purity of 95% reached 399 mg/l culture. The release of high active fragments from the AHPM was confirmed by the simulated gastrointestinal digestion. The results suggest that the design strategy and production method of the AHPM will be useful to obtain a large quantity of recombinant AHPs at a low cost.

  2. Seed-Specific Expression of Spider Silk Protein Multimers Causes Long-Term Stability

    PubMed Central

    Weichert, Nicola; Hauptmann, Valeska; Helmold, Christine; Conrad, Udo

    2016-01-01

    Seeds enable plants to germinate and to grow in situations of limited availability of nutrients. The stable storage of different seed proteins is a remarkable presumption for successful germination and growth. These strategies have been adapted and used in several molecular farming projects. In this study, we explore the benefits of seed-based expression to produce the high molecular weight spider silk protein FLAG using intein-based trans-splicing. Multimers larger than 460 kDa in size are routinely produced, which is above the native size of the FLAG protein. The storage of seeds for 8 weeks and 1 year at an ambient temperature of 15°C does not influence the accumulation level. Even the extended storage time does not influence the typical pattern of multimerized bands. These results show that seeds are the method of choice for stable accumulation of products of complex transgenes and have the capability for long-term storage at moderate conditions, an important feature for the development of suitable downstream processes. PMID:26858734

  3. Multimer recognition and secretion by the non-classical secretion pathway in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Liuqun; Chen, Jingqi; Sun, Jibin; Zhang, Dawei

    2017-01-01

    Non-classical protein secretion in bacteria is a common phenomenon. However, the selection principle for non-classical secretion pathways remains unclear. Here, our experimental data, to our knowledge, are the first to show that folded multimeric proteins can be recognized and excreted by a non-classical secretion pathway in Bacillus subtilis. We explored the secretion pattern of a typical cytoplasmic protein D-psicose 3-epimerase from Ruminococcus sp. 5_1_39BFAA (RDPE), and showed that its non-classical secretion is not simply due to cell lysis. Analysis of truncation variants revealed that the C- and N-terminus, and two hydrophobic domains, are required for structural stability and non-classical secretion of RDPE. Alanine scanning mutagenesis of the hydrophobic segments of RDPE revealed that hydrophobic residues mediated the equilibrium between its folded and unfolded forms. Reporter mCherry and GFP fusions with RDPE regions show that its secretion requires an intact tetrameric protein complex. Using cross-linked tetramers, we show that folded tetrameric RDPE can be secreted as a single unit. Finally, we provide evidence that the non-classical secretion pathway has a strong preference for multimeric substrates, which accumulate at the poles and septum region. Altogether, these data show that a multimer recognition mechanism is likely applicable across the non-classical secretion pathway. PMID:28276482

  4. Dynamics of directional reflectance factor distributions for vegetation canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimes, D. S.

    1983-01-01

    Directional reflectance factors that span the entire exitance hemisphere are collected on the ground for a variety of homogeneous vegetation canopies and bare soils. NOAA 6/7 AVHRR bands 1 (0.58-0.68 micron) and 2 (0.73-1.1 microns) are used. When possible, geometric measurements of leaf orientation distributions are taken simultaneously with each spectral measurement. Other supporting structural and optical measurements are made. These data sets are taken at various times of the day for each cover type. These unique sets, together with pertinent data in the literature, are used to investigate the dynamics of the directional reflectance factor distribution as a function of the geometric structure of the scene, solar zenith angle, and optical properties of the scene components (leaves and soil). For complete homogeneous vegetation canopies, the principal trend observed at all sun angles and spectral bands is a minimum reflectance near nadir and increasing reflectance with increasing off-nadir view angle for all azimuth directions.

  5. The distribution of hospital nurses and associated factors.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Yayoi; Morioka, Noriko; Nakamura, Fumiaki; Toyokawa, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Yasuki

    2016-01-01

    Objectives With the increasing aging population in Japan, the demand for medical and long-term care is expected to grow. Consequently, it is important to secure sufficient nursing personnel for medical care facilities. Careful monitoring of the allocation of nurses is crucial for providing services that match the needs of the population. However, few studies have examined the distribution of nurses by the type of facility in which they work or identified any associated factors. The objectives of this study are to examine trends in the distribution of nurses working in hospitals and to identify any associated factors such as policy changes, local socioeconomic characteristics, and nurse supply-and-demand-related factors.Methods We conducted an ecological study using public survey data from 2002 to 2011. We focused on 274 secondary medical areas (SMAs) in 38 prefectures from which we could obtain continuous data over the study period. We calculated the number of hospital nurses per 100,000 of the population in each SMA as well as the Gini coefficient. The explained variable was the number of hospital nurses per 100,000 of the population. We employed the following explanatory variables: SMA population, aging population ratio, population density category, per capita income, region, number of nursing school graduates, and nurse wages offered during the previous year. We then examined the association by applying multilevel analysis.Results The number of hospital nurses per 100,000 of the population in the SMAs increased during the period. The Gini coefficient decreased as a general trend but increased in 2007 and 2008. After adjusting for the SMA population and its increase, depending on the year, the number of hospital nurses was positively correlated with higher income per capita, higher aging population ratio, regions other than Kanto, higher number of nursing school graduates, and higher previous-year wages.Conclusion Although the differences in the numbers

  6. A Benchmarking Analysis for Five Radionuclide Vadose Zone Models (Chain, Multimed{_}DP, Fectuz, Hydrus, and Chain 2D) in Soil Screening Level Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J-S.; Drake, R.; Lin, Z.; Jewett, D. G.

    2002-02-26

    Five vadose zone models with different degrees of complexity (CHAIN, MULTIMED{_}DP, FECTUZ, HYDRUS, and CHAIN 2D) were selected for use in radionuclide soil screening level (SSL) calculations. A benchmarking analysis between the models was conducted for a radionuclide ({sup 99}Tc) release scenario at the Las Cruces Trench Site in New Mexico. Sensitivity of three model outputs to the input parameters were evaluated and compared among the models. The three outputs were peak contaminant concentrations, time to peak concentrations at the water table, and time to exceed the contaminants maximum critical level at a representative receptor well. Model parameters investigated include soil properties such as bulk density, water content, soil water retention parameters and hydraulic conductivity. Chemical properties examined include distribution coefficient, radionuclide half-life, dispersion coefficient, and molecular diffusion. Other soil characteristics, such as recharge rate, also were examined. Model sensitivity was quantified in the form of sensitivity and relative sensitivity coefficients. Relative sensitivities were used to compare the sensitivities of different parameters. The analysis indicates that soil water content, recharge rate, saturated soil water content, and soil retention parameter, {beta}, have a great influence on model outputs. In general, the results of sensitivities and relative sensitivities using five models are similar for a specific scenario. Slight differences were observed in predicted peak contaminant concentrations due to different mathematical treatment among models. The results of benchmarking and sensitivity analysis would facilitate the model selection and application of the model in SSL calculations.

  7. Increased Length of Long Terminal Repeats Inhibits Ty1 Transposition and Leads to the Formation of Tandem Multimers

    PubMed Central

    Lauermann, V.; Hermankova, M.; Boeke, J. D.

    1997-01-01

    The Ty1 retrotransposon of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is bounded by long-terminal repeats (LTRs). We have constructed a variety of Ty1 elements in which the LTR length has been increased from the normal length of 334 bp to >2 kb. Although small insertions in the LTR have minimal effects on transposition frequency, larger insertions dramatically reduce it. Nevertheless, elements with long LTRs are incorporated into the genome at a low frequency. Most of these rare insertion events represent Ty1 tandem (head to tail) multimers. PMID:9093846

  8. Proximate and landscape factors influence grassland bird distributions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cunningham, M.A.; Johnson, D.H.

    2006-01-01

    Ecologists increasingly recognize that birds can respond to features well beyond their normal areas of activity, but little is known about the relative importance of landscapes and proximate factors or about the scales of landscapes that influence bird distributions. We examined the influences of tree cover at both proximate and landscape scales on grassland birds, a group of birds of high conservation concern, in the Sheyenne National Grassland in North Dakota, USA. The Grassland contains a diverse array of grassland and woodland habitats. We surveyed breeding birds on 2015 100 m long transect segments during 2002 and 2003. We modeled the occurrence of 19 species in relation to habitat features (percentages of grassland, woodland, shrubland, and wetland) within each 100-m segment and to tree cover within 200-1600 m of the segment. We used information-theoretic statistical methods to compare models and variables. At the proximate scales, tree cover was the most important variable, having negative influences on 13 species and positive influences on two species. In a comparison of multiple scales, models with only proximate variables were adequate for some species, but models combining proximate with landscape information were best for 17 of 19 species. Landscape-only models were rarely competitive. Combined models at the largest scales (800-1600 m) were best for 12 of 19 species. Seven species had best models including 1600-m landscapes plus proximate factors in at least one year. These were Wilson's Phalarope (Phalaropus tricolor), Sedge Wren (Cistothorus platensis), Field Sparrow (Spizella pusilla), Grasshopper Sparrow (Ammodramus savannarum), Bobolink (Dolychonix oryzivorus), Red-winged Blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus), and Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater). These seven are small-bodied species; thus larger-bodied species do not necessarily respond most to the largest landscapes. Our findings suggest that birds respond to habitat features at a variety of

  9. Proximate and landscape factors influence grassland bird distributions.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Mary Ann; Johnson, Douglas H

    2006-06-01

    Ecologists increasingly recognize that birds can respond to features well beyond their normal areas of activity, but little is known about the relative importance of landscapes and proximate factors or about the scales of landscapes that influence bird distributions. We examined the influences of tree cover at both proximate and landscape scales on grassland birds, a group of birds of high conservation concern, in the Sheyenne National Grassland in North Dakota, USA. The Grassland contains a diverse array of grassland and woodland habitats. We surveyed breeding birds on 2015 100 m long transect segments during 2002 and 2003. We modeled the occurrence of 19 species in relation to habitat features (percentages of grassland, woodland, shrubland, and wetland) within each 100-m segment and to tree cover within 200-1600 m of the segment. We used information-theoretic statistical methods to compare models and variables. At the proximate scales, tree cover was the most important variable, having negative influences on 13 species and positive influences on two species. In a comparison of multiple scales, models with only proximate variables were adequate for some species, but models combining proximate with landscape information were best for 17 of 19 species. Landscape-only models were rarely competitive. Combined models at the largest scales (800-1600 m) were best for 12 of 19 species. Seven species had best models including 1600-m landscapes plus proximate factors in at least one year. These were Wilson's Phalarope (Phalaropus tricolor), Sedge Wren (Cistothorus platensis), Field Sparrow (Spizella pusilla), Grasshopper Sparrow (Ammodramus savannarum), Bobolink (Dolychonix oryzivorus), Red-winged Blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus), and Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater). These seven are small-bodied species; thus larger-bodied species do not necessarily respond most to the largest landscapes. Our findings suggest that birds respond to habitat features at a variety of

  10. Von Willebrand factor processing.

    PubMed

    Brehm, Maria A

    2017-01-31

    Von Willebrand factor (VWF) is a multimeric glycoprotein essential for primary haemostasis that is produced only in endothelial cells and megakaryocytes. Key to VWF's function in recruitment of platelets to the site of vascular injury is its multimeric structure. The individual steps of VWF multimer biosynthesis rely on distinct posttranslational modifications at specific pH conditions, which are realized by spatial separation of the involved processes to different cell organelles. Production of multimers starts with translocation and modification of the VWF prepropolypeptide in the endoplasmic reticulum to produce dimers primed for glycosylation. In the Golgi apparatus they are further processed to multimers that carry more than 300 complex glycan structures functionalized by sialylation, sulfation and blood group determinants. Of special importance is the sequential formation of disulfide bonds with different functions in structural support of VWF multimers, which are packaged, stored and further processed after secretion. Here, all these processes are being reviewed in detail including background information on the occurring biochemical reactions.

  11. Distribution and release of epidermal growth factor in man.

    PubMed Central

    Konturek, J W; Bielanski, W; Konturek, S J; Bogdal, J; Oleksy, J

    1989-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is localised in man to salivary and Brunner's glands. It is present in large concentrations in saliva and duodenal contents but the mechanisms of its release have been little studied. This study carried out on four groups of healthy subjects was designed to determine the distribution and the release of immunoreactive EGF (IR-EGF) in salivary, gastric, duodenal, and pancreatic secretions. Under basal conditions, the concentrations of IR-EGF in salivary, gastric, duodenal and pancreatic secretions were; 2.7 (0.4), 0.42 (0.12), 21 (5) and 8.5 (1.2) ng/ml, respectively. Chewing of Parafilm* significantly increased salivary but not gastric or duodenal EGF output while atropinisation led to the reduction in basal salivary and duodenal EGF output without affecting the increment in EGF release induced by chewing. Cigarette smoking caused a marked reduction in basal salivary and duodenal EGF output. Infusion of pentagastrin increased salivary and duodenal EGF output and this was blocked by the addition of somatostatin. Injection of secretin lead to an increase in pancreatic output of EGF. We conclude that in man the major sources of EGF are salivary glands, duodenum, and pancreas and that the release of EGF remains under neurohormonal control. PMID:2806986

  12. Mixture Factor Analysis for Approximating a Nonnormally Distributed Continuous Latent Factor with Continuous and Dichotomous Observed Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wall, Melanie M.; Guo, Jia; Amemiya, Yasuo

    2012-01-01

    Mixture factor analysis is examined as a means of flexibly estimating nonnormally distributed continuous latent factors in the presence of both continuous and dichotomous observed variables. A simulation study compares mixture factor analysis with normal maximum likelihood (ML) latent factor modeling. Different results emerge for continuous versus…

  13. Pesticides in ground water: distribution, trends, and governing factors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barbash, Jack; Resek, Elizabeth A.

    1997-01-01

    A comprehensive review of published information on the distribution and behavior of pesticides and their transformation products in ground water indicates that pesticides from every chemical class have been detected in ground waters of the United States. Many of these compounds are commonly present at low concentrations in ground water beneath agricultural land. Little information is available on their occurrence beneath non-agricultural land, although the intensity of their use in such areas (on lawns, golf courses, rights of way, timberlands, etc.) is often comparable to, or greater than agricultural use. Information on pesticides in ground water is not sufficient to provide either a statistically representative view of pesticide occurrence in ground water across the United States, or an indication of long-term trends or changes in the severity or extent of this contamination over the past three decades. This is largely due to wide variations in analytical detection limits, well selection procedures, and other design features among studies conducted in different areas or at different times. Past approaches have not been well suited for distinguishing "point source" from "nonpoint source" pesticide contamination. Among the variety of natural and anthropogenic factors examined, those that appear to be most strongly associated with the intensity of pesticide contamination of ground water are the depth, construction and age of the sampled wells, the amount of recharge (by precipitation or irrigation), and the depth of tillage. Approaches commonly employed for predicting pesticide distributions in the subsurface--including computer simulations, indicator solutes (e.g., nitrate or tritium), and ground-water vulnerability assessments--generally provide unreliable predictions of pesticide occurrence in ground water. Such difficulties may arise largely from a general failure to account for the preferential transport of pesticides in the subsurface. Significant

  14. CENTDIST: discovery of co-associated factors by motif distribution

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhizhuo; Chang, Cheng Wei; Goh, Wan Ling; Sung, Wing-Kin; Cheung, Edwin

    2011-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) do not function alone but work together with other TFs (called co-TFs) in a combinatorial fashion to precisely control the transcription of target genes. Mining co-TFs is thus important to understand the mechanism of transcriptional regulation. Although existing methods can identify co-TFs, their accuracy depends heavily on the chosen background model and other parameters such as the enrichment window size and the PWM score cut-off. In this study, we have developed a novel web-based co-motif scanning program called CENTDIST (http://compbio.ddns.comp.nus.edu.sg/~chipseq/centdist/). In comparison to current co-motif scanning programs, CENTDIST does not require the input of any user-specific parameters and background information. Instead, CENTDIST automatically determines the best set of parameters and ranks co-TF motifs based on their distribution around ChIP-seq peaks. We tested CENTDIST on 14 ChIP-seq data sets and found CENTDIST is more accurate than existing methods. In particular, we applied CENTDIST on an Androgen Receptor (AR) ChIP-seq data set from a prostate cancer cell line and correctly predicted all known co-TFs (eight TFs) of AR in the top 20 hits as well as discovering AP4 as a novel co-TF of AR (which was missed by existing methods). Taken together, CENTDIST, which exploits the imbalanced nature of co-TF binding, is a user-friendly, parameter-less and powerful predictive web-based program for understanding the mechanism of transcriptional co-regulation. PMID:21602269

  15. Factors controlling black carbon distribution in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Ling; Li, Qinbin; Li, Yinrui; He, Cenlin

    2017-01-01

    ), and the WBF effect increases BCair by 25-70 % during winter and early spring. The resulting model simulation of BCsnow is substantially improved (within 10 % of the observations) and the discrepancies of BCair are much smaller during the snow season at Barrow, Alert, and Summit (from -67-47 % to -46-3 %). Our results point toward an urgent need for better characterization of flaring emissions of BC (e.g., the emission factors, temporal, and spatial distribution), extensive measurements of both the dry deposition of BC over snow and ice, and the scavenging efficiency of BC in mixed-phase clouds. In addition, we find that the poorly constrained precipitation in the Arctic may introduce large uncertainties in estimating BCsnow. Doubling precipitation introduces a positive bias approximately as large as the overall effects of flaring emissions and the WBF effect; halving precipitation produces a similarly large negative bias.

  16. A BENCHMARKING ANALYSIS FOR FIVE RADIONUCLIDE VADOSE ZONE MODELS (CHAIN, MULTIMED_DP, FECTUZ, HYDRUS, AND CHAIN 2D) IN SOIL SCREENING LEVEL CALCULATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Five radionuclide vadose zone models with different degrees of complexity (CHAIN, MULTIMED_DP, FECTUZ, HYDRUS, and CHAIN 2D) were selected for use in soil screening level (SSL) calculations. A benchmarking analysis between the models was conducted for a radionuclide (99Tc) rele...

  17. Determining the factors affecting the distribution of Muscari latifolium, an endemic plant of Turkey, and a mapping species distribution model.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Hatice; Yilmaz, Osman Yalçın; Akyüz, Yaşar Feyza

    2017-02-01

    Species distribution modeling was used to determine factors among the large predictor candidate data set that affect the distribution of Muscari latifolium, an endemic bulbous plant species of Turkey, to quantify the relative importance of each factor and make a potential spatial distribution map of M. latifolium. Models were built using the Boosted Regression Trees method based on 35 presence and 70 absence records obtained through field sampling in the Gönen Dam watershed area of the Kazdağı Mountains in West Anatolia. Large candidate variables of monthly and seasonal climate, fine-scale land surface, and geologic and biotic variables were simplified using a BRT simplifying procedure. Analyses performed on these resources, direct and indirect variables showed that there were 14 main factors that influence the species' distribution. Five of the 14 most important variables influencing the distribution of the species are bedrock type, Quercus cerris density, precipitation during the wettest month, Pinus nigra density, and northness. These variables account for approximately 60% of the relative importance for determining the distribution of the species. Prediction performance was assessed by 10 random subsample data sets and gave a maximum the area under a receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) value of 0.93 and an average AUC value of 0.8. This study provides a significant contribution to the knowledge of the habitat requirements and ecological characteristics of this species. The distribution of this species is explained by a combination of biotic and abiotic factors. Hence, using biotic interaction and fine-scale land surface variables in species distribution models improved the accuracy and precision of the model. The knowledge of the relationships between distribution patterns and environmental factors and biotic interaction of M. latifolium can help develop a management and conservation strategy for this species.

  18. Knife mill operating factors effect on switchgrass particle size distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Bitra, V.S.P.; Womac, A.R.; Yang, Y.T.; Igathinathane, C.; Miu, P.I; Chevanan, Nehru; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine

    2009-06-01

    Biomass particle size impacts handling, storage, conversion, and dust control systems. Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) particle size distributions created by a knife mill were determined for integral classifying screen sizes from 12.7 to 50.8 mm, operating speeds from 250 to 500 rpm, and mass input rates from 2 to 11 kg/min. Particle distributions were classified with standardized sieves for forage analysis that included horizontal sieving motion with machined-aluminum sieves of thickness proportional to sieve opening dimensions. Then, a wide range of analytical descriptors were examined to mathematically represent the range of particle sizes in the distributions. Correlation coefficient of geometric mean length with knife mill screen size, feed rate, and speed were 0.872, 0.349, and 0.037, respectively. Hence, knife mill screen size largely determined particle size of switchgrass chop. Feed rate had an unexpected influence on particle size, though to a lesser degree than screen size. The Rosin Rammler function fit the chopped switchgrass size distribution data with an R2 > 0.982. Mass relative span was greater than 1, which indicated a wide distribution of particle sizes. Uniformity coefficient was more than 4.0, which indicated a large assortment of particles and also represented a well-graded particle size distribution. Knife mill chopping of switchgrass produced strongly fine skewed mesokurtic particles with 12.7 25.4 mm screens and fine skewed mesokurtic particles with 50.8 mm screen. Results of this extensive analysis of particle sizes can be applied to selection of knife mill operating parameters to produce a particular size of switchgrass chop, and will serve as a guide for relations among the various analytic descriptors of biomass particle distributions.

  19. Knife mill operating factors effect on switchgrass particle size distributions.

    PubMed

    Bitra, Venkata S P; Womac, Alvin R; Yang, Yuechuan T; Igathinathane, C; Miu, Petre I; Chevanan, Nehru; Sokhansanj, Shahab

    2009-11-01

    Biomass particle size impacts handling, storage, conversion, and dust control systems. Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) particle size distributions created by a knife mill were determined for integral classifying screen sizes from 12.7 to 50.8 mm, operating speeds from 250 to 500 rpm, and mass input rates from 2 to 11 kg/min. Particle distributions were classified with standardized sieves for forage analysis that included horizontal sieving motion with machined-aluminum sieves of thickness proportional to sieve opening dimensions. Then, a wide range of analytical descriptors were examined to mathematically represent the range of particle sizes in the distributions. Correlation coefficient of geometric mean length with knife mill screen size, feed rate, and speed were 0.872, 0.349, and 0.037, respectively. Hence, knife mill screen size largely determined particle size of switchgrass chop. Feed rate had an unexpected influence on particle size, though to a lesser degree than screen size. The Rosin-Rammler function fit the chopped switchgrass size distribution data with an R(2)>0.982. Mass relative span was greater than 1, which indicated a wide distribution of particle sizes. Uniformity coefficient was more than 4.0, which indicated a large assortment of particles and also represented a well-graded particle size distribution. Knife mill chopping of switchgrass produced 'strongly fine skewed mesokurtic' particles with 12.7-25.4 mm screens and 'fine skewed mesokurtic' particles with 50.8 mm screen. Results of this extensive analysis of particle sizes can be applied to selection of knife mill operating parameters to produce a particular size of switchgrass chop, and will serve as a guide for relations among the various analytic descriptors of biomass particle distributions.

  20. LMI Based Robust Blood Glucose Regulation in Type-1 Diabetes Patient with Daily Multi-meal Ingestion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, S.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Sutradhar, A.

    2014-04-01

    This paper illustrates the design of a robust output feedback H ∞ controller for the nonlinear glucose-insulin (GI) process in a type-1 diabetes patient to deliver insulin through intravenous infusion device. The H ∞ design specification have been realized using the concept of linear matrix inequality (LMI) and the LMI approach has been used to quadratically stabilize the GI process via output feedback H ∞ controller. The controller has been designed on the basis of full 19th order linearized state-space model generated from the modified Sorensen's nonlinear model of GI process. The resulting controller has been tested with the nonlinear patient model (the modified Sorensen's model) in presence of patient parameter variations and other uncertainty conditions. The performance of the controller was assessed in terms of its ability to track the normoglycemic set point of 81 mg/dl with a typical multi-meal disturbance throughout a day that yields robust performance and noise rejection.

  1. Ion Mobility Measurements of Nondenatured 12-150 kDa Proteins and Protein Multimers by Tandem Differential Mobility Analysis-Mass Spectrometry (DMA-MS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, Christopher J.; de la Mora, Juan Fernández

    2011-01-01

    The mobilities of electrosprayed proteins and protein multimers with molecular weights ranging from 12.4 kDa (cytochrome C monomers) to 154 kDa (nonspecific concanavalin A hexamers) were measured in dry air by a planar differential mobility analyzer (DMA) coupled to a time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS). The DMA determines true mobility at atmospheric pressure, without perturbing ion structure from that delivered by the electrospray. A nondenaturing aqueous 20 mM triethylammonium formate buffer yields compact ions with low charge states, moderating polarization effects on ion mobility. Conversion of mobilities into cross-sections involves a reduction factor ξ for the actual mobility relative to that associated with elastic specular collisions with smooth surfaces. ξ is known to be 1.36 in air from Millikan's oil drop experiments. A similar enhancement effect ascribed to atomic-scale surface roughness has been found in numerical simulations. Adopting Millikan's value ξ = 1.36 and assuming a spherical geometry yields a gas-phase protein density ρ p = 0.949 ± 0.053 g cm-3 for all our protein data. This is substantially higher than the 0.67 g cm-3 found in recent low-resolution DMA measurements of singly charged proteins. DMA-MS can distinguish nonspecific protein aggregates formed during the electrospray process from those formed preferentially in solution. The observed charge versus diameter relation is compatible with a protein charge reduction mechanism based on the evaporation of triethylammonium ions from electrosprayed drops.

  2. The biologically active form of the sea urchin egg receptor for sperm is a disulfide-bonded homo-multimer

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Since many cell surface receptors exist in their active form as oligomeric complexes, we have investigated the subunit composition of the biologically active sperm receptor in egg plasma membranes from Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. Electrophoretic analysis of the receptor without prior reduction of disulfide bonds revealed that the surface receptor exists in the form of a disulfide-bonded multimer, estimated to be a tetramer. These findings are in excellent agreement with the fact that the NH2-terminus of the extracellular domain of the sperm receptor is rich in cysteine residues. Studies with cross-linking agents of various length and hydrophobicity suggest that no other major protein is tightly associated with the receptor. Given the multimeric structure of the receptor, we investigated the effect of disulfide bond reduction on its biological activity. Because in quantitative bioassays fertilization was found to be inhibited by treatment of eggs with 5 mM dithiothreitol, we undertook more direct studies of the effect of reduction on properties of the receptor. First, we studied the effect of addition of isolated, pure receptor on fertilization. Whereas the non-reduced, native receptor complex inhibited fertilization in a dose- dependent manner, the reduced and alkylated receptor was inactive. Second, we tested the ability of the isolated receptor to mediate binding of acrosome-reacted sperm to polystyrene beads. Whereas beads coated with native receptor bound sperm, those containing reduced and alkylated receptor did not. Thus, these results demonstrate that the biologically active form of the sea urchin sperm receptor consists only of 350 kD subunits and that these must be linked as a multimer via disulfide bonds to produce a complex that is functional in sperm recognition and binding. PMID:8188748

  3. Evidence that TSH Receptor A-Subunit Multimers, Not Monomers, Drive Antibody Affinity Maturation in Graves' Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aliesky, Holly A.; Chen, Chun-Rong; McLachlan, Sandra M.

    2015-01-01

    Context: The TSH receptor (TSHR) A-subunit shed from the cell surface contributes to the induction and/or affinity maturation of pathogenic TSHR autoantibodies in Graves' disease. Objective: This study aimed to determine whether the quaternary structure (multimerization) of shed A-subunits influences pathogenic TSHR autoantibody generation. Design: The isolated TSHR A-subunit generated by transfected mammalian cells exists in two forms; one (active) is recognized only by Graves' TSHR autoantibodies, the second (inactive) is recognized only by mouse monoclonal antibody (mAb) 3BD10. Recent evidence suggests that both Graves' TSHR autoantibodies and mAb 3BD10 recognize the A-subunit monomer. Therefore, if the A-subunit monomer is an immunogen, Graves' sera should have antibodies to both active and inactive A-subunits. Conversely, restriction of TSHR autoantibodies to active A-subunits would be evidence of a role for shed A-subunit multimers, not monomers, in the pathogenesis of Graves' disease. Therefore, we tested a panel of Graves' sera for their relative recognition of active and inactive A-subunits. Results: Of 34 sera from unselected Graves' patients, 28 were unequivocally positive in a clinical TSH binding inhibition assay. None of the latter sera, as well as 8/9 sera from control individuals, recognized inactive A-subunits on ELISA. In contrast to Graves' sera, antibodies induced in mice, not by shedding from the TSHR holoreceptor, but by immunization with adenovirus expressing the free human A-subunit, were directed to both the active and inactive A-subunit forms. Conclusions: The present study supports the concept that pathogenic TSHR autoantibody affinity maturation in Graves' disease is driven by A-subunit multimers, not monomers. PMID:25856215

  4. Factors affecting distribution of airflow in a human tracheobronchial cast.

    PubMed

    Cohen, B S; Sussman, R G; Lippmann, M

    1993-09-01

    Air velocity was measured at end airways of hollow replicate casts of the human tracheobronchial tree in order to determine the flow distribution within casts extending to 3 mm diameter airways. Measurements were made by hot-wire anemometry for constant inspiratory flow rates of 7.5, 15, 30 and 60 L.min-1. Average flow distribution among the lung lobes was as follows: right upper, 18.5%; right middle, 9.2%; right lower, 32.3%; left upper, 15.7%; and left lower, 24.3%. An empirical model derived from the experimental flow distribution data demonstrated the effect of various morphometric parameters of the hollow cast on the distribution of airflow. Airway cross-sectional area, branching angle and total path-length were found to have the greatest influence. As the tracheal flow rate decreased from 60 to 7.5 L.min-1, the influence of branching angle was reduced, while total path-length became more influential. These results provide evidence for the transition of flow regimes within the TB tree within normal physiological flow ranges.

  5. Factors Influencing the Interstate Distribution of Human Capital.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mu'min, Ridgely A.

    The interstate distribution of defense contract awards may both influence and be influenced by regional differences in educational attainment levels. Data from the 1980 census indicate that the level of educational attainment of adult workers was lowest in Kentucky and highest in Alaska. Statistical analysis of the relationships between this…

  6. 25 CFR 170.223 - What is the Relative Need Distribution Factor (RNDF)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What is the Relative Need Distribution Factor (RNDF)? 170.223 Section 170.223 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Indian Reservation Roads Program Funding Relative Need Distribution Factor §...

  7. 25 CFR 170.223 - What is the Relative Need Distribution Factor (RNDF)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What is the Relative Need Distribution Factor (RNDF)? 170.223 Section 170.223 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Indian Reservation Roads Program Funding Relative Need Distribution Factor §...

  8. 25 CFR 170.223 - What is the Relative Need Distribution Factor (RNDF)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What is the Relative Need Distribution Factor (RNDF)? 170.223 Section 170.223 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Indian Reservation Roads Program Funding Relative Need Distribution Factor §...

  9. 25 CFR 170.223 - What is the Relative Need Distribution Factor (RNDF)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What is the Relative Need Distribution Factor (RNDF)? 170.223 Section 170.223 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Indian Reservation Roads Program Funding Relative Need Distribution Factor §...

  10. 25 CFR 170.223 - What is the Relative Need Distribution Factor (RNDF)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true What is the Relative Need Distribution Factor (RNDF)? 170.223 Section 170.223 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Indian Reservation Roads Program Funding Relative Need Distribution Factor §...

  11. 25 CFR 170.202 - Does the Relative Need Distribution Factor allocate funding among tribes?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Does the Relative Need Distribution Factor allocate... LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Indian Reservation Roads Program Funding Tribal Transportation Allocation Methodology (ttam) § 170.202 Does the Relative Need Distribution Factor...

  12. [Biology of von Willebrand factor].

    PubMed

    Girma, Jean-Pierre

    2006-01-01

    Von Willebrand factor (VWF) is a multimeric glycoprotein synthesized by megakaryocytes and endothelial cells. It is stored in platelets and endothelial cells and secreted towards subendothelium and plasma. VWF multimers consist of linear arrangements of identical subunits with a molecular weight of 270 kDa. The longest multimers reach more than 20 x 10(6) Da in storage granules. In the circulation, the multimer size is limited by the specific protease ADAMTS13. In primary hemostasis, VWF plays a key role as a molecular bridge in adhesion between platelets and subendothelium and between platelets during their aggregation. These functions, which involve the interaction with platelet glycoprotein lb, are mainly enhanced by VWF immobilization onto hydrophobic surfaces (collagen, cell membrane) and by high shear rates found in microcirculation and stenosed arteries. In these functions, the higher molecular weight forms are the most efficient. Under such hemodynamic conditions, proteolytic activity of ADAMTS13 is also optimal and limits the multimer size to about 15 x 10(6) Da as soon as their secretion. Thus ADAMTS13 appears as a key physiologic regulator of the VWF platelet functions. In the microcirculation, the lack of ADAMTS13 activity can result in the formation of VWF-rich platelet aggregates responsible for thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura.

  13. 40 CFR Table W - 7 of Subpart W-Default Methane Emission Factors for Natural Gas Distribution

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Emission Factors for Natural Gas Distribution W Table W Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Petroleum and Natural Gas... for Natural Gas Distribution Natural gas distribution Emission factor (scf/hour/component)...

  14. Factors controlling the regional distribution of vanadium in groundwater.

    PubMed

    Wright, Michael T; Belitz, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Although the ingestion of vanadium (V) in drinking water may have possible adverse health effects, there have been relatively few studies of V in groundwater. Given the importance of groundwater as a source of drinking water in many areas of the world, this study examines the potential sources and geochemical processes that control the distribution of V in groundwater on a regional scale. Potential sources of V to groundwater include dissolution of V rich rocks, and waste streams from industrial processes. Geochemical processes such as adsorption/desorption, precipitation/dissolution, and chemical transformations control V concentrations in groundwater. Based on thermodynamic data and laboratory studies, V concentrations are expected to be highest in samples collected from oxic and alkaline groundwater. However, the extent to which thermodynamic data and laboratory results apply to the actual distribution of V in groundwater is not well understood. More than 8400 groundwater samples collected in California were used in this study. Of these samples, high (> or =50 microg/L) and moderate (25 to 49 microg/L) V concentrations were most frequently detected in regions where both source rock and favorable geochemical conditions occurred. The distribution of V concentrations in groundwater samples suggests that significant sources of V are mafic and andesitic rock. Anthropogenic activities do not appear to be a significant contributor of V to groundwater in this study. High V concentrations in groundwater samples analyzed in this study were almost always associated with oxic and alkaline groundwater conditions, which is consistent with predictions based on thermodynamic data.

  15. The global distribution of risk factors by poverty level.

    PubMed Central

    Blakely, Tony; Hales, Simon; Kieft, Charlotte; Wilson, Nick; Woodward, Alistair

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the individual-level association of income poverty with being underweight, using tobacco, drinking alcohol, having access only to unsafe water and sanitation, being exposed to indoor air pollution and being obese. METHODS: Using survey data for as many countries as possible, we estimated the relative risk association between income or assets and risk factors at the individual level within 11 medium- and low-income subregions of WHO. WHO and The World Bank data on the prevalence of risk factors and income poverty (defined as living on < US$ 1.00 per day, US$ 1-2.00 per day and > US$ 2.00 per day) were analysed to impute the association between poverty and risk factors for each subregion. The possible effect of poverty reduction on the prevalence of risk factors was estimated using population-attributable risk percentages. FINDINGS: There were strong associations between poverty and malnutrition among children, having access only to unsafe water and sanitation, and being exposed to indoor air pollution within each subregion (relative risks were twofold to threefold greater for those living on < US$ 1.00 per day compared with those living on > US$ 2.00 per day). Associations between poverty and obesity, tobacco use and alcohol use varied across subregions. If everyone living on < US$ 2.00 per day had the risk factor profile of those living on > US$ 2.00 per day, 51% of exposures to unimproved water and sanitation could be avoided as could 37% of malnutrition among children and 38% of exposure to indoor air pollution. The more realistic, but still challenging, Millennium Development Goal of halving the number of people living on < US$ 1.00 per day would achieve much smaller reductions. CONCLUSION: To achieve large gains in global health requires both poverty eradication and public health action. The methods used in this study may be useful for monitoring pro-equity progress towards Millennium Development Goals. PMID:15744404

  16. Factors controlling the regional distribution of vanadium in ground water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Michael T.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Although the ingestion of vanadium (V) in drinking water may have possible adverse health effects, there have been relatively few studies of V in groundwater. Given the importance of groundwater as a source of drinking water in many areas of the world, this study examines the potential sources and geochemical processes that control the distribution of V in groundwater on a regional scale. Potential sources of V to groundwater include dissolution of V rich rocks, and waste streams from industrial processes. Geochemical processes such as adsorption/desorption, precipitation/dissolution, and chemical transformations control V concentrations in groundwater. Based on thermodynamic data and laboratory studies, V concentrations are expected to be highest in samples collected from oxic and alkaline groundwater. However, the extent to which thermodynamic data and laboratory results apply to the actual distribution of V in groundwater is not well understood. More than 8400 groundwater samples collected in California were used in this study. Of these samples, high (> or = 50 μg/L) and moderate (25 to 49 μg/L) V concentrations were most frequently detected in regions where both source rock and favorable geochemical conditions occurred. The distribution of V concentrations in groundwater samples suggests that significant sources of V are mafic and andesitic rock. Anthropogenic activities do not appear to be a significant contributor of V to groundwater in this study. High V concentrations in groundwater samples analyzed in this study were almost always associated with oxic and alkaline groundwater conditions, which is consistent with predictions based on thermodynamic data.

  17. Influencing factors in the Earthquake Distribution in Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yepes, H. A.; Beauval, C.; Alvarado, A.; Audin, L.

    2013-05-01

    The seismicity distribution in Ecuador reflects the two major tectonic features in the country: the subduction of the Nazca Plate that generates great interface events and distributed intraslab seismicity, and the active crustal deformation occurring in the Andean Cordillera related to the expulsion of the North Andean Block (NAB) and the Andean growth. Along the subduction zone, the largest interface earthquakes are concentrated North of ~1S. Two Mw>8 earthquakes are related to this segment. North of 1S also, almost no earthquakes deeper than 120 km are found further East of the Western Cordillera (Lat. ~79W). To the contrary, South of 2S there is a lack of interface seismicity in the Guayaquil Gulf area and no major earthquakes with the exception of a conspicuous cluster in Talara, Perú, around 4S. South of 1S also, the distribution of earthquakes in the depth range of 40-120 km is almost uniform regardless the distance from the trench and deeper intraslab earthquakes (depth>120km) are concentrated around a cluster at ~1.5S - 78W. The crustal seismicity also shows different behavior North and South of ~2S. To the South, besides the Macas Mw7.1 earthquake sequence in the sub-Andean zone, there is very little shallow seismicity (<35 km) that could be related to the crustal deformation. It is clearly noticeable that the Andean Range is depleted of epicenters. North of 2S large earthquakes are the rule and mostly occur in the Cordillera, noticeably along the Interandean Valley. The largest historical crustal earthquakes seem to be related to the limit of the NAB with stable South America, while smaller events spread along a N-S alignment related to the eastern slopes of the Western Cordillera, facing the Interandean Valley. The analysis suggests that the Carnegie Ridge has no clear influence in the deep seismicity distribution, while Grijalva, Alvarado and Sarmiento ridges and the subduction of the older crust South of Sarmiento could be playing an important role.

  18. Biotic and abiotic factors predicting the global distribution and population density of an invasive large mammal

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Jesse S.; Farnsworth, Matthew L.; Burdett, Chris L.; Theobald, David M.; Gray, Miranda; Miller, Ryan S.

    2017-01-01

    Biotic and abiotic factors are increasingly acknowledged to synergistically shape broad-scale species distributions. However, the relative importance of biotic and abiotic factors in predicting species distributions is unclear. In particular, biotic factors, such as predation and vegetation, including those resulting from anthropogenic land-use change, are underrepresented in species distribution modeling, but could improve model predictions. Using generalized linear models and model selection techniques, we used 129 estimates of population density of wild pigs (Sus scrofa) from 5 continents to evaluate the relative importance, magnitude, and direction of biotic and abiotic factors in predicting population density of an invasive large mammal with a global distribution. Incorporating diverse biotic factors, including agriculture, vegetation cover, and large carnivore richness, into species distribution modeling substantially improved model fit and predictions. Abiotic factors, including precipitation and potential evapotranspiration, were also important predictors. The predictive map of population density revealed wide-ranging potential for an invasive large mammal to expand its distribution globally. This information can be used to proactively create conservation/management plans to control future invasions. Our study demonstrates that the ongoing paradigm shift, which recognizes that both biotic and abiotic factors shape species distributions across broad scales, can be advanced by incorporating diverse biotic factors. PMID:28276519

  19. Pesticides in the atmosphere; distribution, trends, and governing factors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Majewski, Michael S.; Capel, Paul D.

    1995-01-01

    A comprehensive review of existing literature on the occurrence and distribution of pesticides in the atmosphere of the United States and adjoining Canadian provinces showed that the atmosphere is an important part of the hydrologic cycle that acts to distribute and deposit pesticides in areas far removed from their application sites. A compilation of existing data shows that pesticides have been detected in the atmosphere throughout the nation. Most of the available information on pesticides in the atmosphere is from small-scale, short-term studies that seldom lasted more than one year. Only two national-scale, multi-year studies were done since the late 1960's that analyzed for a wide variety of pesticides in air that were in current use at the time. Another large-scale study was done during 1990-91, but was limited to the midwestern and northeastern United States and only analyzed for two classes of herbicides in wet deposition. Most of the pesticides analyzed for were detected in either air or rain, and represent about 25 percent of the total number of insecticides, herbicides, and fungicides in current use. The geographical distribution of studies, and the type of sampling and analysis were highly variable with most of the historical study efforts concentrated in the Great Lakes area and California. Air and rain were the main atmospheric matrices sampled, but pesticides were also detected in fog and snow. Reported pesticide concentrations in air and rain were frequently positively correlated to their regional agricultural use. Deviations from this relation could usually be explained by non-agricultural use of pesticides, sampling and analytical difficulties, and environmental persistence. High concentrations of locally used pesticides were found to occur seasonally, usually in conjunction with spring planting of row crops and warm temperatures, but high concentrations also occurred during winter months in those areas where dormant orchards were sprayed. The

  20. Thinning factor distributions viewed through numerical models of continental extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svartman Dias, Anna Eliza; Hayman, Nicholas W.; Lavier, Luc L.

    2016-12-01

    A long-standing question surrounding rifted margins concerns how the observed fault-restored extension in the upper crust is usually less than that calculated from subsidence models or from crustal thickness estimates, the so-called "extension discrepancy." Here we revisit this issue drawing on recently completed numerical results. We extract thinning profiles from four end-member geodynamic model rifts with varying width and asymmetry and propose tectonic models that best explain those results. We then relate the spatial and temporal evolution of upper to lower crustal thinning, or crustal depth-dependent thinning (DDT), and crustal thinning to mantle thinning, or lithospheric DDT, which are difficult to achieve in natural systems due to the lack of observations that constrain thinning at different stages between prerift extension and lithospheric breakup. Our results support the hypothesis that crustal DDT cannot be the main cause of the extension discrepancy, which may be overestimated because of the difficulty in recognizing distributed deformation, and polyphase and detachment faulting in seismic data. More importantly, the results support that lithospheric DDT is likely to dominate at specific stages of rift evolution because crustal and mantle thinning distributions are not always spatially coincident and at times are not even balanced by an equal magnitude of thinning in two dimensions. Moreover, either pure or simple shear models can apply at various points of time and space depending on the type of rift. Both DDT and pure/simple shear variations across space and time can result in observed complex fault geometries, uplift/subsidence, and thermal histories.

  1. Analysis of temperature factor distribution in high-resolution protein structures.

    PubMed Central

    Parthasarathy, S.; Murthy, M. R.

    1997-01-01

    The temperature factors obtained from X-ray refinement of proteins at high resolution show large variations from one structure to another. However, the B-values expressed in units of standard deviation about their mean value (B'-factor) at the C alpha atoms show remarkably characteristic frequency distribution. In all of the 110 proteins examined in this study, the frequency distribution exhibited a bimodal distribution. The peaks in the B'-factor frequency distribution occur at -1.1 and 0.4 for a bin size of 0.5. The peak at lower temperature factor corresponds largely to buried residues, whereas the peak at larger value corresponds to exposed residues. The distribution could be accurately described as a superposition of two Gaussian functions. The parameters describing the distribution are therefore characteristic of protein structures. The frequency distribution for a given amino acid over all the proteins also shows a similar bimodal distribution, although the areas under the two Gaussians differ from one amino acid to another. The area under the frequency distribution curve for any interval in B'-factor represents the propensity of the amino acid to occur in that interval. This propensity is related both to the hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity of the residue and the tendency of the residue to impose a different degree of rigidity on the polypeptide chain. The frequency distribution of stretches of high B'-factors departs appreciably from that expected for a random distribution. The correlation in the B-values of sequentially proximal residues is probably responsible for the bimodal distribution. PMID:9416605

  2. Bacterial Sigma Factors and Anti-Sigma Factors: Structure, Function and Distribution.

    PubMed

    Paget, Mark S

    2015-06-26

    Sigma factors are multi-domain subunits of bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) that play critical roles in transcription initiation, including the recognition and opening of promoters as well as the initial steps in RNA synthesis. This review focuses on the structure and function of the major sigma-70 class that includes the housekeeping sigma factor (Group 1) that directs the bulk of transcription during active growth, and structurally-related alternative sigma factors (Groups 2-4) that control a wide variety of adaptive responses such as morphological development and the management of stress. A recurring theme in sigma factor control is their sequestration by anti-sigma factors that occlude their RNAP-binding determinants. Sigma factors are then released through a wide variety of mechanisms, often involving branched signal transduction pathways that allow the integration of distinct signals. Three major strategies for sigma release are discussed: regulated proteolysis, partner-switching, and direct sensing by the anti-sigma factor.

  3. ZOSTERA MARINA IN A PACIFIC NORTHWEST ESTUARY: WHAT FACTORS CONTROL INTERTIDAL DISTRIBUTION?

    EPA Science Inventory

    The impact of four factors (desiccation, macroalgae, erosion, light) on the distribution of Zostera marina was examined across tidal and bathymetric slope gradients. Data detailing seagrass characteristics, including 1 production, macroalgae biomass and sediment characteristics ...

  4. Peroxisome-targeted and tandem repeat multimer expressions of human antimicrobial peptide LL37 in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Siwei; Gao, Yanyun; Wang, Xiaolong; Shen, Wei; Wang, Jinjia; Zhou, Xiangshan; Cai, Menghao; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2017-03-16

    Although the human antimicrobial peptide LL37 has a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activities, it easily damages host cells following heterologous expressions. This study attempted two strategies to alleviate its damage to host cells when expressed in Pichia pastoris using the AOX1 promoter. Tandem repeat multimers of LL37 were first designed, and secretion expression strains GS115-9K-(DPLL37DP)n (n = 2, 4, 6 and 8) containing different copies of the LL37 gene were constructed. However, LL37 tandems still killed the cells after 96 hr of induction. Subsequently, peroxisome-targeted expression was performed by adding a peroxisomal targeting signal 1 (SKL) at the C-terminus of LL37. The LL37 expression strain GS115-3.5K-LL37-SKL showed no significant inhibition in the cells after induction. Antibacterial activity assays showed that the recombinant LL37 expressed in peroxisomes had good antimicrobial activities. Then, a strain GS115-3.5K-LL37-GFP-SKL producing LL37, green fluorescent protein, and SKL fusion proteins was constructed, and the fusion protein was confirmed to be targeting the peroxisomes. However, protein extraction analysis indicated that most of the fusion proteins were still located in the cell debris after cell disruption, and further studies are required to extract more proteins from the peroxisome membrane.

  5. α-Synuclein assembles into higher-order multimers upon membrane binding to promote SNARE complex formation

    PubMed Central

    Burré, Jacqueline; Sharma, Manu; Südhof, Thomas C.

    2014-01-01

    Physiologically, α-synuclein chaperones soluble NSF attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complex assembly and may also perform other functions; pathologically, in contrast, α-synuclein misfolds into neurotoxic aggregates that mediate neurodegeneration and propagate between neurons. In neurons, α-synuclein exists in an equilibrium between cytosolic and membrane-bound states. Cytosolic α-synuclein appears to be natively unfolded, whereas membrane-bound α-synuclein adopts an α-helical conformation. Although the majority of studies showed that cytosolic α-synuclein is monomeric, it is unknown whether membrane-bound α-synuclein is also monomeric, and whether chaperoning of SNARE complex assembly by α-synuclein involves its cytosolic or membrane-bound state. Here, we show using chemical cross-linking and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) that α-synuclein multimerizes into large homomeric complexes upon membrane binding. The FRET experiments indicated that the multimers of membrane-bound α-synuclein exhibit defined intermolecular contacts, suggesting an ordered array. Moreover, we demonstrate that α-synuclein promotes SNARE complex assembly at the presynaptic plasma membrane in its multimeric membrane-bound state, but not in its monomeric cytosolic state. Our data delineate a folding pathway for α-synuclein that ranges from a monomeric, natively unfolded form in cytosol to a physiologically functional, multimeric form upon membrane binding, and show that only the latter but not the former acts as a SNARE complex chaperone at the presynaptic terminal, and may protect against neurodegeneration. PMID:25246573

  6. Factors determining the distribution and abundance of Dreissena polymorpha in lakes, dam reserviors and channels

    SciTech Connect

    Karatayev, A.

    1995-06-01

    This article addresses the several factors affecting the distribution and abundance of Dreissena polymorphia in bodies of water. Factors covered include: (1) salinity, (2) oxygen level, (3) temperature, (4) substrate, (5) depth, and (6) water chemistry. The analysis of the data allowed the specification of limiting or optimal concentrations of the principle abiotic parameters.

  7. Bacterial Sigma Factors and Anti-Sigma Factors: Structure, Function and Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Paget, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Sigma factors are multi-domain subunits of bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) that play critical roles in transcription initiation, including the recognition and opening of promoters as well as the initial steps in RNA synthesis. This review focuses on the structure and function of the major sigma-70 class that includes the housekeeping sigma factor (Group 1) that directs the bulk of transcription during active growth, and structurally-related alternative sigma factors (Groups 2–4) that control a wide variety of adaptive responses such as morphological development and the management of stress. A recurring theme in sigma factor control is their sequestration by anti-sigma factors that occlude their RNAP-binding determinants. Sigma factors are then released through a wide variety of mechanisms, often involving branched signal transduction pathways that allow the integration of distinct signals. Three major strategies for sigma release are discussed: regulated proteolysis, partner-switching, and direct sensing by the anti-sigma factor. PMID:26131973

  8. Life on the boundary: Environmental factors as drivers of habitat distribution in the littoral zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cefalì, Maria Elena; Cebrian, Emma; Chappuis, Eglantine; Pinedo, Susana; Terradas, Marc; Mariani, Simone; Ballesteros, Enric

    2016-04-01

    The boundary between land and sea, i.e. the littoral zone, is home to a large number of habitats whose distribution is primarily driven by the distance to the sea level but also by other environmental factors such as littoral's geomorphological features, wave exposure, water temperature or orientation. Here we explore the relative importance of those major environmental factors that drive the presence of littoral rocky habitats along 1100 Km of Catalonia's shoreline (Spain, NW Mediterranean) by using Geographic Information Systems and Generalized Linear Models. The distribution of mediolittoral and upper infralittoral habitats responded to different environmental factors. Mediolittoral habitats showed regional differences drawn by sea-water temperature and substrate type. Wave exposure (hydrodynamism), slope and geological features were only relevant to those mediolittoral habitats with specific environmental needs. We did not find any regional pattern of distribution in upper infralittoral habitats, and selected factors only played a moderate role in habitat distribution at the local scale. This study shows for the first time that environmental factors determining habitat distribution differ within the mediolittoral and the upper infralittoral zones and provides the basis for further development of models oriented at predicting the distribution of littoral marine habitats.

  9. Distribution of Balsamorhiza rosea in Rattlesnake Hills with respect to various environmental factors

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhurst, M.A.

    1980-01-01

    Balsamorhiza rosea (Compositae), a suffrutescent perennial, is found on several rocky hilltops with sparse canopy cover in Eastern Washington. This study investigated B. rosea's abundance and its associated species along several physical gradients. Important elements of microclimate selected for this analysis were elevation, slope aspect, slope angle, and soil depth. Results show that the occurrence of B. rosea is associated more strongly with soil depth than with other factors examined. The distribution of B. rosea was not fully explained by the factors in this study. Other potential factors determining its distribution are discussed.

  10. Interactions of von Willebrand factor and ADAMTS13 in von Willebrand disease and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Budde, U; Schneppenheim, R

    2014-01-01

    The function of von Willebrand factor (VWF), a huge multimeric protein and a key factor in platelet dependent primary haemostasis, is regulated by its specific protease ADAMTS13. The ADAMTS13 dependent degradation of VWF to its proteolytic fragments can be visualized as a characteristic so-called triplet structure of individual VWF oligomers by multimer analysis. Lack of VWF high molecular weight multimers (VWF-HMWM) or their pathologically enhanced degradation underlies a particular type of von Willebrand disease, VWD type 2A with a significant bleeding tendency, and may also be observed in acquired von Willebrand syndrome due to cardiovascular disease. In these conditions multimer analysis is an obligatory and powerful tool for diagnosis of VWD. The opposite condition, the persistence of ultralarge VWF (UL-VWF) multimers may cause the microangiopathic life-threatening disorder thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). During the course of active TTP, UL-VWF is consumed in the hyaline thrombi formed in the microvasculature which will ultimately result in the loss of UL-VWF and VWF-HMWM. Therefore, VWF multimer analysis is not a valid tool to diagnose TTP in the active phase of disease but may be helpful for the diagnosis of TTP patients in remission.

  11. 40 CFR Table W - 7 of Subpart W of Part 98-Default Methane Emission Factors for Natural Gas Distribution

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Methane Emission Factors for Natural Gas Distribution W Table W Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Natural Gas Systems Definitions. Pt. 98, Subpt. W, Table W-7 Table W-7 of Subpart W of Part 98—Default Methane Emission Factors for Natural Gas Distribution Natural gas distribution Emission factor...

  12. 40 CFR Table W - 7 of Subpart W of Part 98-Default Methane Emission Factors for Natural Gas Distribution

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Methane Emission Factors for Natural Gas Distribution W Table W Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Natural Gas Systems Definitions. Pt. 98, Subpt. W, Table W-7 Table W-7 of Subpart W of Part 98—Default Methane Emission Factors for Natural Gas Distribution Natural gas distribution Emission factor...

  13. Factors affecting RFID adoption in the agricultural product distribution industry: empirical evidence from China.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ping; Yan, Bo

    2016-01-01

    We conducted an exploratory investigation of factors influencing the adoption of radio frequency identification (RFID) methods in the agricultural product distribution industry. Through a literature review and field research, and based on the technology-organization-environment (TOE) theoretical framework, this paper analyzes factors influencing RFID adoption in the agricultural product distribution industry in reference to three contexts: technological, organizational, and environmental contexts. An empirical analysis of the TOE framework was conducted by applying structural equation modeling based on actual data from a questionnaire survey on the agricultural product distribution industry in China. The results show that employee resistance and uncertainty are not supported by the model. Technological compatibility, perceived effectiveness, organizational size, upper management support, trust between enterprises, technical knowledge, competitive pressure and support from the Chinese government, which are supported by the model, have significantly positive effects on RFID adoption. Meanwhile, organizational size has the strongest positive effect, while competitive pressure levels have the smallest effect. Technological complexities and costs have significantly negative effects on RFID adoption, with cost being the most significantly negative influencing factor. These research findings will afford enterprises in the agricultural products supply chain with a stronger understanding of the factors that influence RFID adoption in the agricultural product distribution industry. In addition, these findings will help enterprises remain aware of how these factors affect RFID adoption and will thus help enterprises make more accurate and rational decisions by promoting RFID application in the agricultural product distribution industry.

  14. Health care expenditure disparities in the European Union and underlying factors: a distribution dynamics approach.

    PubMed

    Villaverde, José; Maza, Adolfo; Hierro, María

    2014-09-01

    This paper examines health care expenditure (HCE) disparities between the European Union countries over the period 1995-2010. By means of using a continuous version of the distribution dynamics approach, the key conclusions are that the reduction in disparities is very weak and, therefore, persistence is the main characteristic of the HCE distribution. In view of these findings, a preliminary attempt is made to add some insights into potentially main factors behind the HCE distribution. The results indicate that whereas per capita income is by far the main determinant, the dependency ratio and female labour participation do not play any role in explaining the HCE distribution; as for the rest of the factors studied (life expectancy, infant mortality, R&D expenditure and public HCE expenditure share), we find that their role falls somewhat in between.

  15. A Distributed Simulation Facility to Support Human Factors Research in Advanced Air Transportation Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amonlirdviman, Keith; Farley, Todd C.; Hansman, R. John, Jr.; Ladik, John F.; Sherer, Dana Z.

    1998-01-01

    A distributed real-time simulation of the civil air traffic environment developed to support human factors research in advanced air transportation technology is presented. The distributed environment is based on a custom simulation architecture designed for simplicity and flexibility in human experiments. Standard Internet protocols are used to create the distributed environment, linking all advanced cockpit simulator, all Air Traffic Control simulator, and a pseudo-aircraft control and simulation management station. The pseudo-aircraft control station also functions as a scenario design tool for coordinating human factors experiments. This station incorporates a pseudo-pilot interface designed to reduce workload for human operators piloting multiple aircraft simultaneously in real time. The application of this distributed simulation facility to support a study of the effect of shared information (via air-ground datalink) on pilot/controller shared situation awareness and re-route negotiation is also presented.

  16. Single-molecule force measurements of the polymerizing dimeric subunit of von Willebrand factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijeratne, Sithara S.; Li, Jingqiang; Yeh, Hui-Chun; Nolasco, Leticia; Zhou, Zhou; Bergeron, Angela; Frey, Eric W.; Moake, Joel L.; Dong, Jing-fei; Kiang, Ching-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Von Willebrand factor (VWF) multimers are large adhesive proteins that are essential to the initiation of hemostatic plugs at sites of vascular injury. The binding of VWF multimers to platelets, as well as VWF proteolysis, is regulated by shear stresses that alter VWF multimeric conformation. We used single molecule manipulation with atomic force microscopy (AFM) to investigate the effect of high fluid shear stress on soluble dimeric and multimeric forms of VWF. VWF dimers are the smallest unit that polymerizes to construct large VWF multimers. The resistance to mechanical unfolding with or without exposure to shear stress was used to evaluate VWF conformational forms. Our data indicate that, unlike recombinant VWF multimers (RVWF), recombinant dimeric VWF (RDVWF) unfolding force is not altered by high shear stress (100 dynes/cm2 for 3 min at 37°C ). We conclude that under the shear conditions used (100 dynes/cm2 for 3 min at 37°C ) , VWF dimers do not self-associate into a conformation analogous to that attained by sheared large VWF multimers.

  17. [CCA of water beetles' distribution and environmental factors in lentic samples of north Changbai Mountain].

    PubMed

    We, Yulian; Ji, Lanzhu; Wang, Miao; Zhao, Min

    2002-01-01

    The relationship between 28 species water beetles in 12 lentic samples and environmental factors of North Chang-bai Mountain was studied by Cononical Correspondence Analysis (CCA). The results showed that degree of underwater humus and altitude are the major factors correlated with beetles distribution, and the correlation coefficients of environmental factors and axes of CCA were 0.8371 and 0.7206 respectively, while water temperature and plant density also had certain effects. Under the influence of environmental factors, the water beetles' populations were different in different habitat. Coelambus impressopunctatus, Colymbetes magnus, Helophorus browni, Haliplus spp. distributed in deep water pool. Water temperature was not important for those beetles. Ilybius sp. and Limnebius glabriventris correlated with altitude and humus.

  18. Interpreting the neutron's electric form factor: Rest frame charge distribution or foldy term?

    SciTech Connect

    Nathan Isgur

    1998-12-01

    The neutron's electric form factor contains vital information on nucleon structure, but its interpretation within many models has been obscured by relativistic effects. The author demonstrates that, to leading order in the relativistic expansion of a constituent quark model, the Foldy term cancels exactly against a contribution to the Dirac form factor F{sub 1} to leave intact the naive interpretation of G{sup n}{sub E} as arising from the neutron's rest frame charge distribution.

  19. Thrombospondin-1 in von Willebrand factor function.

    PubMed

    Bonnefoy, Arnaud; Hoylaerts, Marc F

    2008-10-01

    Thrombospondin-1 (TSP1), expressed in many cells and tissues is abundantly present in platelet alpha-granules, from where it is released upon platelet activation. Murine Tsp1(-/-) platelet studies have revealed that TSP1 is redundant for platelet aggregation, but that it reinforces platelet aggregate stabilization, especially in a shear field. von Willebrand factor (VWF), synthesized by megakaryocytes and endothelial cells is stored both in platelet alpha-granules and in endothelial Weibel-Palade bodies as ultralarge multimers. When released from endothelial cells, these multimers are temporarily retained on the endothelium, to be cleaved by the plasma protease ADAMTS13 into smaller and hemostatically less reactive multimers, released in plasma. This protease shows partial sequence identity with the type 1 (TSR1) and type 2 (TSR2) repeats of TSP1 and contains 1 TSR1 and 6 TSR2 repeats. TSP1, locally released by platelets, competes with ADAMTS13 during VWF proteolysis and controls the degree of VWF multimer processing. In addition, TSP1 and VWF both interact with the platelet GPIb/V/IX membrane complex, primarily in flow. These interactions control the recruitment of platelets to (sub) endothelial VWF and TSP1, exposed to the circulation, as a consequence of vascular inflammation and endothelial injury. TSP1-VWF interactions do not strictly enhance platelet recruitment and secreted TSP1 even weakly competes with the dynamic platelet rolling and adhesion onto VWF. Hence, TSP1 and VWF show partially related hemostatic functions, the most important one being the TSP1 role in the ADAMTS13 operated VWF multimer processing, in pro-inflammatory and thrombogenic conditions.

  20. Imagens do céu ontem e hoje - um multimídia interativo de astronomia e uma nova exposição no MAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caretta, C. A.; Lima, F. P.; Requeijo, F.; Vieira, G. G.; Alves, F.; Valente, M. E. A.; de Almeida, R.; de Garcia, G. C.; Quixadá, A. C.

    2003-08-01

    "Imagens do Céu Ontem e Hoje" é o título de uma nova exposição que está sendo inaugurada no Museu de Astronomia e Ciências Afins (MCT), que inclui experimentos interativos, maquetes, réplicas e 8 terminais de computador com um multimídia interativo sobre Astronomia para consulta dos visitantes. O multimídia apresenta um conteúdo bastante extenso, que engloba quase todos os temas em Astronomia, consistindo numa fonte de divulgação e pesquisa para um público que vai das crianças até estudantes universitários. O conteúdo está distribuído em mais de 500 páginas de texto divididas em 4 módulos: "O Universo", "Espectroscopia", "Telescópios" e "Observando o Céu". Cada módulo é subdividido em 5 seções, em média, cada uma iniciada por uma animação que ilustra os temas a serem abordados na seção. Ao final da animação, uma lista de temas é apresentada sob o título "Saiba Mais". Para exemplificar, o módulo "O Universo" contém as seguintes seções: "O Universo visto pelo homem", "Conhecendo o Sistema Solar", "Indo além do Sistema Solar", "Nossa Galáxia, a Via-Láctea" e "Indo mais além, a imensidão do Universo". A seção "Conhecendo o Sistema Solar", por sua vez, tem os seguintes temas: "A origem do Sistema Solar", "O Sol", "Os planetas", "Satélites, asteróides, cometas e outros bichos..." e "O Sistema Solar em números". Cada texto é repleto de imagens, quadros, desenhos, esquemas, etc, além de passatempos ao final de cada seção, incluindo jogos interativos, quadrinhos e curiosidades, que auxiliam o aprendizado de forma divertida. Apresentamos neste trabalho as idéias gerais que permearam a produção da exposição, e uma viagem pelo multimídia para exemplificar sua estrutura e conteúdo. O multimídia será posteriormente disponibilizado para o público externo pela página eletrônica do MAst e/ou por intermédio de uma publicação comercial.

  1. The Robustness of 2SLS Estimation of a Non-normally Distributed Confirmatory Factor Analysis Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, R. L.

    1990-01-01

    A Monte Carlo study was conducted to assess the robustness of the limited information two-stage least squares (2SLS) estimation procedure on a confirmatory factor analysis model with nonnormal distributions. Full information maximum likelihood methods were used for comparison. One hundred model replications were used to generate data. (TJH)

  2. Human and environmental factors affecting Aedes aegypti distribution in an arid urban environment.

    PubMed

    Walker, Kathleen R; Joy, Teresa K; Ellers-Kirk, Christa; Ramberg, Frank B

    2011-06-01

    Aedes aegypti has reappeared in urban communities in the southwestern U.S.A. in the 1990s after a 40-year absence. In 2003 and 2004, a systematic survey was conducted throughout metropolitan Tucson, AZ, to identify human and environmental factors associated with Ae. aegypti distribution within an arid urban area. Aedes aegypti presence and abundance were measured monthly using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention enhanced oviposition traps at sampling sites established in a grid at 3- to 4-km intervals across the city. Sampling occurred in the summer rainy season (July through September), the peak of mosquito activity in the region. Multiple regression analyses were conducted to determine relationships between mosquito density and factors that could influence mosquito distribution. House age was the only factor that showed a consistent significant association with Ae. aegypti abundance in both years: older houses had more mosquito eggs. This is the 1st study of Ae. aegypti distribution at a local level to identify house age as an explanatory factor independent of other human demographic factors. Further research into the reasons why mosquitoes were more abundant around older homes may help inform and refine future vector surveillance and control efforts in the event of a dengue outbreak in the region.

  3. Risk factor distribution for cardiovascular diseases among high school boys and girls of urban Dibrugarh, Assam

    PubMed Central

    Ekta, Gupta; Tulika, Mahanta Goswami

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Chronic noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) including cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are the leading cause of death in the world, and their incidence is rising rapidly due to increasing rates of risk factors such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes, obesity, physical inactivity, and tobacco use. These risk factors track from childhood to adulthood, and their distribution varies among males and females; hence, there is a need to determine risk factor prevalence among adolescent age group so as to plan preventive strategies. Objective: To determine the distribution of risk factors of CVDs amongst high school boys and girls of urban Dibrugarh, Assam. Subjects and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted from October 2012 to June 2013 in the schools of urban Dibrugarh, Assam wherein data was collected from 1000 students of Class 8–10 using multistage random sampling and risk factors were assessed using WHO steps methodology. Statistical Analysis: Statistical analysis was done using SPSS 16 software and test of differences used were Chi-square test and t-test. Results: The prevalence of ever tobacco use was 32.3% among boys and 6.6% among girls (P < 0.001) while ever alcohol use was reported by 11.9% boys and 1% girls (P < 0.001). Prevalence of overweight and hypertension was found to be higher among girls (11.7% and 24.1%) as compared to boys (6.8% and 18.1%). Prevalence of hypercholesterolemia was higher among boys while high triglycerides levels were more prevalent among girls. Conclusion: The study revealed a high prevalence of various risk factors among boys and girls. There is a need to reduce the risk factor prevalence of CVD among this group of the population to address the future epidemic of NCD. Different health promotional activities need to be implemented to target boys and girls as the risk factor distribution among these groups is different. PMID:27453853

  4. Distribution of some daily and seasonal events in relation to changes of physical factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreisig, H.; Nachman, G.

    1983-03-01

    A special case of the Weibull distribution model is used in describing the course of behavioural transformation processes in relation to some cyclic physical factor. The model assumes that the rate of the process increases, the less inhibiting the physical factor, and the faster the factor changes. However, due to some resistance or a depletion, the rate slows down, the further the process progresses. The model was tested on the daily onset of activity in nocturnal insects, daily roosting flight of blackbirds, dark and light adaptation by pigment migration in insect eyes, photoperiodic response of an insect, and daily emergence of tiger beetles. The assumptions of the model are tested and discussed. One of these is violated in unnaturally fast changes of the physical factor because the process reaches some constant minimum duration, and proportionality between rate of process and rate of factor can no longer be maintained.

  5. Source apportionment of ambient fine particle size distribution using positive matrix factorization in Erfurt, Germany

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Wei; Stölzel, Matthias; Cyrys, Josef; Pitz, Mike; Heinrich, Joachim; Kreyling, Wolfgang G.; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Peters, Annette; Wang, Sheng; Hopke, Philip K.

    2008-01-01

    Particle size distribution data collected between September 1997 and August 2001 in Erfurt, Germany were used to investigate the sources of ambient particulate matter by positive matrix factorization (PMF). A total of 29,313 hourly averaged particle size distribution measurements covering the size range of 0.01 to 3.0 μm were included in the analysis. The particle number concentrations (cm−3) for the 9 channels in the ultrafine range, and mass concentrations (ng m−3) for the 41 size bins in the accumulation mode and particle up to 3 μm in aerodynamic diameter were used in the PMF. The analysis was performed separately for each season. Additional analyses were performed including calculations of the correlations of factor contributions with gaseous pollutants (O3, NO, NO2, CO and SO2) and particle composition data (sulfate, organic carbon and elemental carbon), estimating the contributions of each factor to the total number and mass concentration, identifying the directional locations of the sources using the conditional probability function, and examining the diurnal patterns of factor scores. These results were used to assist in the interpretation of the factors. Five factors representing particles from airborne soil, ultrafine particles from local traffic, secondary aerosols from local fuel combustion, particles from remote traffic sources, and secondary aerosols from multiple sources were identified in all seasons. PMID:18433834

  6. Spatiotemporal dataset on Chinese population distribution and its driving factors from 1949 to 2013

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lizhe; Chen, Lajiao

    2016-01-01

    Spatio-temporal data on human population and its driving factors is critical to understanding and responding to population problems. Unfortunately, such spatio-temporal data on a large scale and over the long term are often difficult to obtain. Here, we present a dataset on Chinese population distribution and its driving factors over a remarkably long period, from 1949 to 2013. Driving factors of population distribution were selected according to the push-pull migration laws, which were summarized into four categories: natural environment, natural resources, economic factors and social factors. Natural environment and natural resources indicators were calculated using Geographic Information System (GIS) and Remote Sensing (RS) techniques, whereas economic and social factors from 1949 to 2013 were collected from the China Statistical Yearbook and China Compendium of Statistics from 1949 to 2008. All of the data were quality controlled and unified into an identical dataset with the same spatial scope and time period. The dataset is expected to be useful for understanding how population responds to and impacts environmental change. PMID:27377410

  7. Spatiotemporal dataset on Chinese population distribution and its driving factors from 1949 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lizhe; Chen, Lajiao

    2016-07-05

    Spatio-temporal data on human population and its driving factors is critical to understanding and responding to population problems. Unfortunately, such spatio-temporal data on a large scale and over the long term are often difficult to obtain. Here, we present a dataset on Chinese population distribution and its driving factors over a remarkably long period, from 1949 to 2013. Driving factors of population distribution were selected according to the push-pull migration laws, which were summarized into four categories: natural environment, natural resources, economic factors and social factors. Natural environment and natural resources indicators were calculated using Geographic Information System (GIS) and Remote Sensing (RS) techniques, whereas economic and social factors from 1949 to 2013 were collected from the China Statistical Yearbook and China Compendium of Statistics from 1949 to 2008. All of the data were quality controlled and unified into an identical dataset with the same spatial scope and time period. The dataset is expected to be useful for understanding how population responds to and impacts environmental change.

  8. Spatiotemporal dataset on Chinese population distribution and its driving factors from 1949 to 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lizhe; Chen, Lajiao

    2016-07-01

    Spatio-temporal data on human population and its driving factors is critical to understanding and responding to population problems. Unfortunately, such spatio-temporal data on a large scale and over the long term are often difficult to obtain. Here, we present a dataset on Chinese population distribution and its driving factors over a remarkably long period, from 1949 to 2013. Driving factors of population distribution were selected according to the push-pull migration laws, which were summarized into four categories: natural environment, natural resources, economic factors and social factors. Natural environment and natural resources indicators were calculated using Geographic Information System (GIS) and Remote Sensing (RS) techniques, whereas economic and social factors from 1949 to 2013 were collected from the China Statistical Yearbook and China Compendium of Statistics from 1949 to 2008. All of the data were quality controlled and unified into an identical dataset with the same spatial scope and time period. The dataset is expected to be useful for understanding how population responds to and impacts environmental change.

  9. [Spatiotemporal distribution of negative air ion concentration in urban area and related affecting factors: a review].

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiang-Hua; Wang, Jian; Zeng, Hong-Da; Chen, Guang-Shui; Zhong, Xian-Fang

    2013-06-01

    Negative air ion (NAI) concentration is an important indicator comprehensively reflecting air quality, and has significance to human beings living environment. This paper summarized the spatiotemporal distribution features of urban NAI concentration, and discussed the causes of these features based on the characteristics of the environmental factors in urban area and their effects on the physical and chemical processes of NAI. The temporal distribution of NAI concentration is mainly controlled by the periodic variation of solar radiation, while the spatial distribution of NAI concentration along the urban-rural gradient is mainly affected by the urban aerosol distribution, underlying surface characters, and urban heat island effect. The high NAI concentration in urban green area is related to the vegetation life activities and soil radiation, while the higher NAI concentration near the water environment is attributed to the water molecules that participate in the generation of NAI through a variety of ways. The other environmental factors can also affect the generation, life span, component, translocation, and distribution of NAI to some extent. To increase the urban green space and atmospheric humidity and to maintain the soil natural attributes of underlying surface could be the effective ways to increase the urban NAI concentration and improve the urban air quality.

  10. Influence of nonhomogeneous distribution of topically applied UV filters on sun protection factors.

    PubMed

    Lademann, Jürgen; Rudolph, Andreas; Jacobi, Ute; Weigmann, Hans-Jürgen; Schaefer, Hans; Sterry, Wolfram; Meinke, Martina

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the present study is the development of a method to determine quantitatively in vivo the influence of homogeneity of the distribution of sunscreen containing UV filters on the sun protection factor (SPF). The SPF of a sunscreen applied either topically or inside an optical cell (pure or in a solvent) fixed above the skin is determined in vivo. In both cases, in vivo measurements using the erythema formation are carried out. Identical optical parameters of the skin are realized in both experiments. In addition, both in vitro (using tape stripping) and in vivo microscopic measurements are performed to analyze the homogeneity of distribution of the topically applied substances. An SPF of 8 is measured in the experiment applying the UV filters topically, whereas this value increases by a factor of 10 if the same amount of filter substances is distributed homogeneously in solution inside the optical cell. Tape strips removed from skin treated with the sunscreen reflect the inhomogeneous distribution of the topically applied substances on the skin. The direct correlation of homogeneity of distribution with the SPF opens up the possibility to increase the SPF by optimizing the formulation.

  11. Factorization and reduction methods for optimal control of distributed parameter systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, J. A.; Powers, R. K.

    1985-01-01

    A Chandrasekhar-type factorization method is applied to the linear-quadratic optimal control problem for distributed parameter systems. An aeroelastic control problem is used as a model example to demonstrate that if computationally efficient algorithms, such as those of Chandrasekhar-type, are combined with the special structure often available to a particular problem, then an abstract approximation theory developed for distributed parameter control theory becomes a viable method of solution. A numerical scheme based on averaging approximations is applied to hereditary control problems. Numerical examples are given.

  12. Non-negative factor analysis supporting the interpretation of elemental distribution images acquired by XRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfeld, Matthias; Wahabzada, Mirwaes; Bauckhage, Christian; Kersting, Kristian; Wellenreuther, Gerd; Falkenberg, Gerald

    2014-04-01

    Stacks of elemental distribution images acquired by XRF can be difficult to interpret, if they contain high degrees of redundancy and components differing in their quantitative but not qualitative elemental composition. Factor analysis, mainly in the form of Principal Component Analysis (PCA), has been used to reduce the level of redundancy and highlight correlations. PCA, however, does not yield physically meaningful representations as they often contain negative values. This limitation can be overcome, by employing factor analysis that is restricted to non-negativity. In this paper we present the first application of the Python Matrix Factorization Module (pymf) on XRF data. This is done in a case study on the painting Saul and David from the studio of Rembrandt van Rijn. We show how the discrimination between two different Co containing compounds with minimum user intervention and a priori knowledge is supported by Non-Negative Matrix Factorization (NMF).

  13. Sulfation of von Willebrand factor

    SciTech Connect

    Carew, J.A.; Browning, P.J.; Lynch, D.C. )

    1990-12-15

    von Willebrand factor (vWF) is a multimeric adhesive glycoprotein essential for normal hemostasis. We have discovered that cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells incorporate inorganic sulfate into vWF. Following immunoisolation and analysis by polyacrylamide or agarose gel electrophoresis, metabolically labeled vWF was found to have incorporated (35S)-sulfate into all secreted multimer species. The time course of incorporation shows that sulfation occurs late in the biosynthesis of vWF, near the point at which multimerization occurs. Quantitative analysis suggests the presence, on average, of one molecule of sulfate per mature vWF subunit. Virtually all the detectable sulfate is released from the mature vWF subunit by treatment with endoglycosidases that remove asparagine-linked carbohydrates. Sulfated carbohydrate was localized first to the N-terminal half of the mature subunit (amino acids 1 through 1,365) by partial proteolytic digestion with protease V8; and subsequently to a smaller fragment within this region (amino acids 273 through 511) by sequential digestions with protease V8 and trypsin. Thus, the carbohydrate at asparagine 384 and/or 468 appears to be the site of sulfate modification. Sodium chlorate, an inhibitor of adenosine triphosphate-sulfurylase, blocks sulfation of vWF without affecting either the ability of vWF to assemble into high molecular weight multimers or the ability of vWF multimers to enter Weible-Palade bodies. The stability of vWF multimers in the presence of an endothelial cell monolayer also was unaffected by the sulfation state. Additionally, we have found that the cleaved propeptide of vWF is sulfated on asparagine-linked carbohydrate.

  14. Factors controlling spatial distribution patterns of biocrusts in a heterogeneous and topographically complex semiarid area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamizo, Sonia; Rodríguez-Caballero, Emilio; Roncero, Beatriz; Raúl Román, José; Cantón, Yolanda

    2016-04-01

    Biocrusts are widespread soil components in drylands all over the world. They are known to play key roles in the functioning of these regions by fixing carbon and nitrogen, regulating hydrological processes, and preventing from water and wind erosion, thus reducing the loss of soil resources and increasing soil fertility. The rate and magnitude of services provided by biocrusts greatly depend on their composition and developmental stage. Late-successional biocrusts such as lichens and mosses have higher carbon and nitrogen fixation rates, and confer greater protection against erosion and the loss of sediments and nutrients than early-successional algae and cyanobacteria biocrusts. Knowledge of spatial distribution patterns of different biocrust types and the factors that control their distribution is important to assess ecosystem services provided by biocrusts at large spatial scales and to improve modelling of biogeochemical processes and water and carbon balance in drylands. Some of the factors that condition biocrust cover and composition are incoming solar radiation, terrain attributes, vegetation distribution patterns, microclimatic variables and soil properties such as soil pH, texture, soil organic matter, soil nutrients and gypsum and CaCO3 content. However, the factors that govern biocrust distribution may vary from one site to another depending on site characteristics. In this study, we examined the influence of abiotic attributes on the spatial distribution of biocrust types in a complex heterogeneous badland system (Tabernas, SE Spain) where biocrust cover up to 50% of the soil surface. From the analysis of relationships between terrain attributes and proportional abundance of biocrust types, it was found that topography exerted a main control on the spatial distribution of biocrust types in this area. SW-facing slopes were dominated by physical soil crusts and were practically devoid of vegetation and biocrusts. Biocrusts mainly occupied the pediments

  15. [Advance to the research of the climate factor effect on the distribution of plague].

    PubMed

    Zhang, A P; Wei, R J; Xiong, H M; Wang, Z Y

    2016-05-01

    Plague is an anthropozoonotic disease caused by the Yersinia pestis ,which developed by many factors including local climate factors. In recent years, more and more studies on the effects of climate on plague were conducted. According to the researches, climate factors (mainly the rainfall and temperature) affected the development and distribution of plague by influencing the abundance of plague host animals and fleas index. The climate also affected the epidemic dynamics and the scope of plague. There were significant differences existing in the influence of climate on the palgue developed in the north and south China. In the two different plague epidemic systems, the solitary Daurian ground squirrel-flea-plague and the social Mongolian gerbil-flea-plague, the obvious population differences existed among the responses of the host animal to the climate changes. Although the internal relationship between the rainfall, the flea index, the density of rodents and the plague supported the nutritional cascade hypothesis, it can not prove that there is a clear causality between the occurrence of plague and rainfall. So the influence of climate factors on plague distribution can only be used for early forecasting and warning of the plague.

  16. Assessing the Spatial Scale Effect of Anthropogenic Factors on Species Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Mangiacotti, Marco; Scali, Stefano; Sacchi, Roberto; Bassu, Lara; Nulchis, Valeria; Corti, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Patch context is a way to describe the effect that the surroundings exert on a landscape patch. Despite anthropogenic context alteration may affect species distributions by reducing the accessibility to suitable patches, species distribution modelling have rarely accounted for its effects explicitly. We propose a general framework to statistically detect the occurrence and the extent of such a factor, by combining presence-only data, spatial distribution models and information-theoretic model selection procedures. After having established the spatial resolution of the analysis on the basis of the species characteristics, a measure of anthropogenic alteration that can be quantified at increasing distance from each patch has to be defined. Then the distribution of the species is modelled under competing hypotheses: H0, assumes that the distribution is uninfluenced by the anthropogenic variables; H1, assumes the effect of alteration at the species scale (resolution); and H2, H3 … Hn add the effect of context alteration at increasing radii. Models are compared using the Akaike Information Criterion to establish the best hypothesis, and consequently the occurrence (if any) and the spatial scale of the anthropogenic effect. As a study case we analysed the distribution data of two insular lizards (one endemic and one naturalised) using four alternative hypotheses: no alteration (H0), alteration at the species scale (H1), alteration at two context scales (H2 and H3). H2 and H3 performed better than H0 and H1, highlighting the importance of context alteration. H2 performed better than H3, setting the spatial scale of the context at 1 km. The two species respond differently to context alteration, the introduced lizard being more tolerant than the endemic one. The proposed approach supplies reliably and interpretable results, uses easily available data on species distribution, and allows the assessing of the spatial scale at which human disturbance produces the heaviest

  17. Sero-prevalence, risk factors and distribution of foot and mouth disease in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Abdela, Nejash

    2017-05-01

    Foot and mouth disease (FMD), world's most important highly infectious and contagious trans-boundary animal diseases, is responsible for huge global losses of livestock production as well as severe impacts on international trade. This vesicular disease is caused by foot and mouth disease virus of the genus Aphthovirus, family Picornaviridae. Currently FMD is major global animal health problem and endemic in Africa including Ethiopia. This paper systematically reviewed the sero-prevalence reports, associated risk factors and distribution of FMD in Ethiopia with the main aim of making compressive document on prevalence, risk factor and distribution of the disease thus helping as a basis for designing effective control strategies. FMD is widely distributed in Ethiopia and its prevalence varies from place to place with seropositivity that ranges from 5.6% to 42.7% in cattle and from 4% to 11% in small ruminant and in 30% in ungulate wildlife. In Ethiopia endemic distributions of five of seven serotypes, namely serotypes O, A, C, SAT1 and SAT2 have been documented. The dominant serotype being reported recently is serotype O and serotype C has not been reported in the country since 1983. However, serotype C specific antibody was detected in cattle indicating that circulation of serotype C viruses in the country may have gone unnoticed. The most common risk factor associated with FMD infection in Ethiopia includes production system, geographic location, species, age of animals, contact with wildlife and season of the year, mixed animal species and Breed. Conclusively, this paper revealed as FMD is posing a major threat in different area of the country thereby causing substantial economic losses through morbidity, mortality and restriction of international trade. Thus, demanding for great attention as its occurrence is may affect the export earnings of the country thereby threaten the livelihood of farmers and economy of the country at large.

  18. Segmental distribution of some common molecular markers for colorectal cancer (CRC): influencing factors and potential implications.

    PubMed

    Papagiorgis, Petros Christakis

    2016-05-01

    Proximal and distal colorectal cancers (CRCs) are regarded as distinct disease entities, evolving through different genetic pathways and showing multiple clinicopathological and molecular differences. Segmental distribution of some common markers (e.g., KRAS, EGFR, Ki-67, Bcl-2, COX-2) is clinically important, potentially affecting their prognostic or predictive value. However, this distribution is influenced by a variety of factors such as the anatomical overlap of tumorigenic molecular events, associations of some markers with other clinicopathological features (stage and/or grade), and wide methodological variability in markers' assessment. All these factors represent principal influences followed by intratumoral heterogeneity and geographic variation in the frequency of detection of particular markers, whereas the role of other potential influences (e.g., pre-adjuvant treatment, interaction between markers) remains rather unclear. Better understanding and elucidation of the various influences may provide a more accurate picture of the segmental distribution of molecular markers in CRC, potentially allowing the application of a novel patient stratification for treatment, based on particular molecular profiles in combination with tumor location.

  19. Pesticides in stream sediment and aquatic biota: distribution, trends, and governing factors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nowell, Lisa H.; Capel, Peter D.

    1999-01-01

    More than 20 years after the ban of DDT and other organochlorine pesticides, pesticides continue to be detected in air, rain, soil, surface water, bed sediment, and aquatic and terrestrial biota throughout the world. Recent research suggests that low levels of some of these pesticides may have the potential to affect the development, reproduction, and behavior of fish and wildlife, and possibly humans. Pesticides in Stream Sediment and Aquatic Biota: Distribution, Trends, and Governing Factors assesses the occurrence and behavior of pesticides in bed sediment and aquatic biota-the two major compartments of the hydrologic system where organochlorine pesticides are most likely to accumulate. This book collects, for the first time, results from several hundred monitoring studies and field experiments, ranging in scope from individual sites to the entire nation. Comprehensive tables provide concise summaries of study locations, pesticides analyzed, and study outcomes. Comprehensive and extensively illustrated, Pesticides in Stream Sediment and Aquatic Biota: Distribution, Trends, and Governing Factors evaluates the sources, environmental fate, geographic distribution, and long-term trends of pesticides in bed sediment and aquatic biota. The book focuses on organochlorine pesticides, but also assesses the potential for currently used pesticides to be found in bed sediment and aquatic biota. Topics covered in depth include the effect of land use on pesticide occurrence, mechanisms of pesticide uptake and accumulation by aquatic biota, and the environmental significance of observed levels of pesticides in stream sediment and aquatic biota.

  20. Distribution of Hepatitis C Risk Factors and HCV Treatment Outcomes among Central Canadian Aboriginal

    PubMed Central

    Parmar, Parmvir; Corsi, Daniel J.; Cooper, Curtis

    2016-01-01

    Background. Aboriginal Canadians face many lifestyle risk factors for hepatitis C exposure. Methods. An analysis of Ottawa Hospital Viral Hepatitis Clinic (Ottawa, Canada) patients between January 2000 and August 2013 was performed. HCV infection risk factors and HCV treatment outcomes were assessed. Socioeconomic status markers were based on area-level indicators linked to postal codes using administrative databases. Results. 55 (2.8%) Aboriginal and 1923 (97.2%) non-Aboriginal patients were evaluated. Aboriginals were younger (45.6 versus 49.6 years, p < 0.01). The distribution of gender (63.6% versus 68.3% male), HIV coinfection (9.1% versus 8.1%), advanced fibrosis stage (29.2% versus 28.0%), and SVR (56.3% versus 58.9%) was similar between groups. Aboriginals had a higher number of HCV risk factors, (mean 4.2 versus 3.1, p < 0.001) with an odds ratio of 2.5 (95% confidence interval: 1.4–4.4) for having 4+ risk factors. This was not explained after adjustment for income, social deprivation, and poor housing. Aboriginal status was not related to SVR. Aboriginals interrupted therapy more often due to loss to follow-up, poor adherence, and substance abuse (25.0% versus 4.6%). Conclusion. Aboriginal Canadians have higher levels of HCV risk factors, even when adjusting for socioeconomic markers. Despite facing greater barriers to care, SVR rates were comparable with non-Aboriginals. PMID:27446875

  1. Spatial distribution and controlling factors of sedimentary bodies in Jiaozhou Bay and Adjacent Sea Areas, Qingdao

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Heping; Li, Guangxue; Li, Shuanglin; Li, Shaoquan; Li, Chun

    2011-06-01

    The distributions of thickness of unconsolidated Quaternary sedimentary layers in Jiaozhou Bay and Qingdao offshore area were studied by using 1079-km high-resolution shallow seismic profiles and drilling core data, and the factors controlling the Quaternary evolution were discussed. The results show that such thickness distributions resulted from the coactions of geologic structures and marine hydrodynamic conditions since the Holocene. The geologic structures controlled the slope deposit, proluvial and fluvial fillings since the late Pleistocene. Holocene marine hydrodynamics eroded away sediments at the bay mouth, and tides carried these eroded materials to the sides of the bay mouth and released them there, forming channel-ridge-alternating geomorphic features. During transgressive processes, the sea level rose rapidly, and insufficient sediment supply and tidal actions yielded the relict sediments in the east of Qingdao offshore area.

  2. Factors driving the seasonal distribution of zooplankton in a eutrophicated Mediterranean Lagoon.

    PubMed

    Ziadi, Boutheina; Dhib, Amel; Turki, Souad; Aleya, Lotfi

    2015-08-15

    The distribution of the zooplankton community was studied along with environmental factors at five sampling stations in Ghar El Melh Lagoon (GML) (Mediterranean Sea, northern Tunisia). GML is characterized by specific following properties: broad and shallow, freshwater supply (Station 1); connection to the sea (S2); stagnation (S3 especially), and eutrophic conditions with enhanced nutrient concentrations (S4 and S5). Samples were taken twice monthly from February 2011 to January 2012. Twenty-three zooplankton groups comprising 10 larval stages were identified. Zooplankton assemblages were largely dominated by copepods (37.25%), followed respectively by ciliates (21.09%), bivalve larvae (14.88%) and gastropod veligers (12.53%). Redundancy analysis indicated that while no significant difference was found in the distribution of zooplankton at any station, a strong difference was observed according to season. Both temporal and physicochemical fluctuations explain more than 50% of changes in zooplankton abundances.

  3. Clustered, regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) diversity and virulence factor distribution in avian Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiang; Su, Zhixin; Cheng, Yuqiang; Wang, Zhaofei; Li, Shiyu; Wang, Heng'an; Sun, Jianhe; Yan, Yaxian

    In order to investigate the diverse characteristics of clustered, regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) arrays and the distribution of virulence factor genes in avian Escherichia coli, 80 E. coli isolates obtained from chickens with avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC) or avian fecal commensal E. coli (AFEC) were identified. Using the multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR), five genes were subjected to phylogenetic typing and examined for CRISPR arrays to study genetic relatedness among the strains. The strains were further analyzed for CRISPR loci and virulence factor genes to determine a possible association between their CRISPR elements and their potential virulence. The strains were divided into five phylogenetic groups: A, B1, B2, D and E. It was confirmed that two types of CRISPR arrays, CRISPR1 and CRISPR2, which contain up to 246 distinct spacers, were amplified in most of the strains. Further classification of the isolates was achieved by sorting them into nine CRISPR clusters based on their spacer profiles, which indicates a candidate typing method for E. coli. Several significant differences in invasion-associated gene distribution were found between the APEC isolates and the AFEC isolates. Our results identified the distribution of 11 virulence genes and CRISPR diversity in 80 strains. It was demonstrated that, with the exception of iucD and aslA, there was no sharp demarcation in the gene distribution between the pathogenic (APEC) and commensal (AFEC) strains, while the total number of indicated CRISPR spacers may have a positive correlation with the potential pathogenicity of the E. coli isolates.

  4. Factors Associated with the Income Distribution of Full-Time Physicians: A Quantile Regression Approach

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Ya-Chen Tina; Konrad, Thomas R

    2007-01-01

    Objective Physician income is generally high, but quite variable; hence, physicians have divergent perspectives regarding health policy initiatives and market reforms that could affect their incomes. We investigated factors underlying the distribution of income within the physician population. Data Sources Full-time physicians (N=10,777) from the restricted version of the 1996–1997 Community Tracking Study Physician Survey (CTS-PS), 1996 Area Resource File, and 1996 health maintenance organization penetration data. Study Design We conducted separate analyses for primary care physicians (PCPs) and specialists. We employed least square and quantile regression models to examine factors associated with physician incomes at the mean and at various points of the income distribution, respectively. We accounted for the complex survey design for the CTS-PS data using appropriate weighted procedures and explored endogeneity using an instrumental variables method. Principal Findings We detected widespread and subtle effects of many variables on physician incomes at different points (10th, 25th, 75th, and 90th percentiles) in the distribution that were undetected when employing regression estimations focusing on only the means or medians. Our findings show that the effects of managed care penetration are demonstrable at the mean of specialist incomes, but are more pronounced at higher levels. Conversely, a gender gap in earnings occurs at all levels of income of both PCPs and specialists, but is more pronounced at lower income levels. Conclusions The quantile regression technique offers an analytical tool to evaluate policy effects beyond the means. A longitudinal application of this approach may enable health policy makers to identify winners and losers among segments of the physician workforce and assess how market dynamics and health policy initiatives affect the overall physician income distribution over various time intervals. PMID:17850525

  5. Distributions of key exposure factors controlling the uptake of xenobiotic chemicals in an estuarine food web

    SciTech Connect

    Iannuzzi, T.J.; Harrington, N.W.; Shear, N.M.; Curry, C.L.; Carlson-Lynch, H.; Henning, M.H.; Su, S.H.; Rabbe, D.E.

    1996-11-01

    A critical evaluation of literature on the behavior, physiology, and ecology of common estuarine organisms was conducted in an attempt to develop probabilistic distributions for those variables that influence the uptake of xenobiotic chemicals from sediments, water, and food sources. The ranges, central tendencies, and distributions of several key parameter values were identified for dominant organisms from various trophic levels, including the polychaete Nereis virens, mummichog (Fundulus heteroclitus), blue crab (Callinectes sapidus), and striped bass (Morone saxatilis). The exposure factors of interest included ingestion rate for various food sources, growth rate, respiration rate, excretion rate, body weight, wet/dry weight ratio, lipid content, chemical assimilation efficiency, and food assimilation efficiency. These exposure factors are critical to the execution of mechanistic food web models, which, when properly calibrated, can be used to estimate tissue concentrations of nonionic chemicals in aquatic organisms based on knowledge of the bioenergetics and feeding interactions within a food web and the sediment and water concentrations of chemicals. In this article the authors describe the use of distributions for various exposure factors in the context of a mechanistic bioaccumulation model that is amenable to probabilistic analyses for multiple organisms within a food web. A case study is provided which compares the estimated versus measured concentrations of five polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners in a representative food web from the tidal portion of the Passaic River, New Jersey, USA. The results suggest that the model is accurate within an order of magnitude or less in estimating the bioaccumulation of PCBs in this food web without calibration. The results of a model sensitivity analysis suggest that the input parameters which most influence the output of the model are both chemical and organism specific.

  6. Factors affecting the distribution of haemosporidian parasites within an oceanic island.

    PubMed

    Padilla, David P; Illera, Juan Carlos; Gonzalez-Quevedo, Catalina; Villalba, Miry; Richardson, David S

    2017-03-01

    Understanding how different ecological and evolutionary processes influence the distribution of pathogens within the environment is important from many perspectives including wildlife epidemiology, evolutionary ecology and conservation. The simultaneous use of ecological and evolutionary frameworks can enhance our conceptual understanding of host-parasite interactions, however such studies are rare in the wild. Using samples from 12 bird species caught across all habitats existing on an oceanic island, we evaluated how environmental variables, parasite host specificity and parasite phylogenetic relationships determine the distribution and prevalence of haemosporidians (Haemoproteus, Plasmodium and Leucocytozoon) in the wild living avifauna. Differences were found in the prevalence of Plasmodium, but not Leucocytozoon, strains between habitats. The warmest temperature best predicted Plasmodium prevalence in the low altitude habitats, which had the highest incidence of Plasmodium. The prevalence of Leucocytozoon lineages was associated with natural factors, i.e. rainfall, temperature and habitat, but the two most important predictors (from model averaging) for models of Leucocytozoon were anthropogenic: poultry farms and distance to a water reservoir. We found no relationship between local (Tenerife, Canary Islands) versus global host range indices (which assess the diversity of hosts that a parasite is observed to infect), thus global generalist lineages do not behave in the same way on Tenerife (i.e. they infected less avian hosts than was expected). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the most abundant haemosporidians on Tenerife grouped with lineages found in African host species. Our data indicate that climatic and anthropogenic factors, plus proximity to the African mainland, are the main factors influencing the presence and distribution of avian haemosporidians on Tenerife. Future climate projections for the archipelago foresee significant temperature

  7. Factorization and the synthesis of optimal feedback gains for distributed parameter systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milman, Mark H.; Scheid, Robert E.

    1990-01-01

    An approach based on Volterra factorization leads to a new methodology for the analysis and synthesis of the optimal feedback gain in the finite-time linear quadratic control problem for distributed parameter systems. The approach circumvents the need for solving and analyzing Riccati equations and provides a more transparent connection between the system dynamics and the optimal gain. The general results are further extended and specialized for the case where the underlying state is characterized by autonomous differential-delay dynamics. Numerical examples are given to illustrate the second-order convergence rate that is derived for an approximation scheme for the optimal feedback gain in the differential-delay problem.

  8. [Seedling regeneration and affecting factors of Quercus variabilis in different distribution regions].

    PubMed

    Wu, Min; Zhang, Wen-hui; Zhou, Jian-yun; Ma, Chuang; Ma, Li-wei

    2013-08-01

    Twenty four fixed plots in three distribution regions of Quercus variabilis (Loess Plateau, marginal distribution zone; north slope of Qinling Mountains, semi-arid core area; and south slope of Qinling Mountains, moist core area) were installed, respectively, to investigate the age structure, growth status, and dry mass accumulation and allocation of 1-8 years old Q. variabilis seedlings, and path analysis was adopted to determine the key factors affecting the regeneration of the seedlings. In the distribution regions, the density of the seedlings decreased with their increasing age, and the density of the 1-8 years old seedlings all decreased in the order of south slope of Qin-ling Mountains > north slope of Qinling Mountains > Loess Plateau. The transformation rate of the seedlings with adjacent ages differed significantly among the three distribution regions. On Loess Plateau, the transformation rate of 7 years old to 8 years old seedlings was the lowest (30.2 +/- 2.9) %; on the north and south slopes of Qinling Mountains, the transformation rate of 4 years old to 5 years old seedlings was the lowest, being (53.9 +/- 3.7) % and (50.0 +/- 2.1) %, respectively. With the increasing age of the seedlings, their height and dry mass presented an increasing trend, with the order of south slope of Qinling Mountains > north slope of Qinling Mountains > Loess Plateau, the rate of root length to plant height tended to decline, and the rates of root breadth to canopy breadth and of root dry mass to shoot dry mass decreased after an initial increase. The rates of root length to plant height, root breadth to canopy breadth, and root dry mass to shoot dry mass were all the highest on Loess Plateau, and the lowest on south slope of Qinling Mountains. Air temperature, irradiance, canopy density and shrub coverage were the direct key factors affecting Q. variabilis seedling regeneration, among which, air temperature and irradiance were the positive factors, while canopy density

  9. Data analysis as a source of variability of the HLA-peptide multimer assay: from manual gating to automated recognition of cell clusters.

    PubMed

    Gouttefangeas, Cécile; Chan, Cliburn; Attig, Sebastian; Køllgaard, Tania T; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Stevanović, Stefan; Wernet, Dorothee; thor Straten, Per; Welters, Marij J P; Ottensmeier, Christian; van der Burg, Sjoerd H; Britten, Cedrik M

    2015-05-01

    Multiparameter flow cytometry is an indispensable method for assessing antigen-specific T cells in basic research and cancer immunotherapy. Proficiency panels have shown that cell sample processing, test protocols and data analysis may all contribute to the variability of the results obtained by laboratories performing ex vivo T cell immune monitoring. In particular, analysis currently relies on a manual, step-by-step strategy employing serial gating decisions based on visual inspection of one- or two-dimensional plots. It is therefore operator dependent and subjective. In the context of continuing efforts to support inter-laboratory T cell assay harmonization, the CIMT Immunoguiding Program organized its third proficiency panel dedicated to the detection of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells by HLA-peptide multimer staining. We first assessed the contribution of manual data analysis to the variability of reported T cell frequencies within a group of laboratories staining and analyzing the same cell samples with their own reagents and protocols. The results show that data analysis is a source of variation in the multimer assay outcome. To evaluate whether an automated analysis approach can reduce variability of proficiency panel data, we used a hierarchical statistical mixture model to identify cell clusters. Challenges for automated analysis were the need to process non-standardized data sets from multiple centers, and the fact that the antigen-specific cell frequencies were very low in most samples. We show that this automated method can circumvent difficulties inherent to manual gating strategies and is broadly applicable for experiments performed with heterogeneous protocols and reagents.

  10. West Nile virus epidemiology and factors triggering change in its distribution in Europe.

    PubMed

    Pradier, S; Lecollinet, S; Leblond, A

    2012-12-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) has historically been considered among the least virulent members of the Japanese serogroup complex (family Flaviviridae, genus Flavivirus). The WNV natural cycle involves birds as the main amplifying hosts and several species of mosquito as vectors. Many outbreaks occurred during the past decade, causing severe human encephalitis in the Old World, and the virus has become established in many European countries. Emergence of WNV is difficult to predict and even more difficult to prevent. In this review, the latest information on the epidemiology, transmission dynamics and clinical aspects of WNV is presented, with particular focus on specific factors likely to trigger changes in the distribution of the disease in Europe, such as climate changes and their consequences on the potential vectors of WNV or bird migration routes. The control of some anthropogenic and environmental factors could help prevent extension and re-emergence of WNV epidemics.

  11. A high-quality factor hybrid plasmonic nanocavity based on distributed Bragg reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Linlin; Zhang, Chi; Huang, Zhong; Yau, Jason; Zhan, Peng; Wang, Zhenlin

    2016-09-01

    Herein, we propose a high-quality (Q) factor hybrid plasmonic nanocavity based on distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) with low propagation loss and extremely strong mode confinement. This hybrid plasmonic nanocavity is composed of a high-index cylindrical nanowire separated from a metal surface possessing shallow DBRs gratings by a sufficiently thin low-index dielectric layer. The hybrid plasmonic nanocavity possesses advantages such as a high Purcell factor (Fp) of up to nearly 20000 and a gain threshold approaching 266 cm-1 at 1550 nm, promising a greater potential in deep sub-wavelength lasing applications. Project supported by the National Key Basic Research Special Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 2012CB921501 and 2013CB632703) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11274160, 91221206, and 51271092).

  12. Factors limiting the intertidal distribution of the mangrove species Xylocarpus granatum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, J.A.; Krauss, K.W.; Hauff, R.D.

    2003-01-01

    The tree species Xylocarpus granatum is commonly described as occurring in the upper intertidal zone of mangrove forests, but mature trees are occasionally found at lower elevations. In the Utwe River basin, on the Pacific island of Kosrae, we investigated the relative importance of several biotic and abiotic factors that may control the intertidal distribution of X. granatum. Factors we evaluated included differential seed predation across the lower, mid, and upper intertidal zones and seedling responses to salinity, tidal flooding, and shade. Seed predation was 22.4% over the first 34 days and varied little among zones or in gaps versus under the forest canopy. By day 161, there were still no differences in seed mortality, but a significant difference was found in seedling establishment, with much greater establishment in the upper intertidal plots. X. granatum seedlings in a greenhouse experiment exhibited greater growth in freshwater than seedlings in 23 ppt salinity, which is typical of salinity levels found in the mid intertidal zone in our field study sites in Micronesia, where mature X. granatum trees are generally absent. Seedlings grown in 23 ppt salinity, however, exhibited few visible signs of stress associated with patterns in growth. Seedlings grown in a simulated tidal flooding treatment (with 23 ppt salinity) also showed few signs of stress. Growth declined dramatically under 80% shade cloths, but there were few interactions of shading with either 23 ppt salinity or simulated tidal flooding. Differential seed predation is not likely to be the primary factor responsible for the intertidal distribution of X. granatum on Kosrae. However, seedling tolerance of flooding or salinity may be more important, especially relative to a potential contribution to secondary stress mortality. Other factors may ultimately prove to be more critical, such as physiological effects of salinity on seed germination, effects of tides on seed dispersal and rooting, or

  13. Factors limiting the intertidal distribution of the mangrove species Xylocarpus granatum.

    PubMed

    Allen, James A; Krauss, Ken W; Hauff, Robert D

    2003-03-01

    The tree species Xylocarpus granatum is commonly described as occurring in the upper intertidal zone of mangrove forests, but mature trees are occasionally found at lower elevations. In the Utwe River basin, on the Pacific island of Kosrae, we investigated the relative importance of several biotic and abiotic factors that may control the intertidal distribution of X. granatum. Factors we evaluated included differential seed predation across the lower, mid, and upper intertidal zones and seedling responses to salinity, tidal flooding, and shade. Seed predation was 22.4% over the first 34 days and varied little among zones or in gaps versus under the forest canopy. By day 161, there were still no differences in seed mortality, but a significant difference was found in seedling establishment, with much greater establishment in the upper intertidal plots. X. granatum seedlings in a greenhouse experiment exhibited greater growth in freshwater than seedlings in 23 ppt salinity, which is typical of salinity levels found in the mid intertidal zone in our field study sites in Micronesia, where mature X. granatum trees are generally absent. Seedlings grown in 23 ppt salinity, however, exhibited few visible signs of stress associated with patterns in growth. Seedlings grown in a simulated tidal flooding treatment (with 23 ppt salinity) also showed few signs of stress. Growth declined dramatically under 80% shade cloths, but there were few interactions of shading with either 23 ppt salinity or simulated tidal flooding. Differential seed predation is not likely to be the primary factor responsible for the intertidal distribution of X. granatum on Kosrae. However, seedling tolerance of flooding or salinity may be more important, especially relative to a potential contribution to secondary stress mortality. Other factors may ultimately prove to be more critical, such as physiological effects of salinity on seed germination, effects of tides on seed dispersal and rooting, or

  14. Physical factors driving intertidal macroalgae distribution: physiological stress of a dominant fucoid at its southern limit.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Brezo; Arenas, F; Rubal, M; Burgués, S; Esteban, R; García-Plazaola, I; Figueroa, F L; Pereira, R; Saldaña, L; Sousa-Pinto, I; Trilla, A; Viejo, R M

    2012-10-01

    Climate change is driving species range shifts worldwide. However, physiological responses related to distributional changes are not fully understood. Oceanographers have reported an increase in ocean temperature in the northwest Iberian Peninsula that is potentially related to the decline in some cold-temperate intertidal macroalgae in the Cantabrian Sea, namely Fucus serratus. Low tide stress could also play a role in this decline. We performed one mensurative (in situ) and two manipulative (in culture) experiments designed to evaluate the interactive effects of some physical factors. The first experiment analysed field response to low tide stress in marginal (mid-Cantabrian Sea and northern Portugal) versus central (Galicia) populations of F. serratus. Then a second experiment was performed that utilized either harsh or mild summer conditions of atmospheric temperature, irradiance, humidity, and wind velocity to compare the responses of individuals from one marginal and one central population to low tide stress. Finally, the combined effect of sea temperature and the other factors was evaluated to detect interactive effects. Changes in frond growth, maximal photosynthetic quantum yield (F(v)/F(m)), temperature, and desiccation were found. Three additive factors (solar irradiation, ocean and air temperatures) were found to drive F. serratus distribution, except under mildly humid conditions that ameliorated atmospheric thermal stress (two additive factors). Mid-Cantabrian Sea temperatures have recently increased, reaching the inhibitory levels suggested in this study of F. serratus. We also expect an additive secondary contribution of low tide stress to this species decline. On the northern Portugal coast, ocean warming plus low tide stress has not reached this species' inhibition threshold. No significant differential responses attributed to the population of origin were found. Mechanistic approaches that are designed to analyse the interactive effects of

  15. Analysis of geological structure and anthropological factors affecting arsenic distribution in the Lahore aquifer, Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhammad, Akhtar Malik; Zhonghua, Tang; Sissou, Zakari; Mohamadi, Bahaa; Ehsan, Muhsan

    2016-11-01

    This study investigated the potential factors affecting arsenic concentration in the groundwater system of Lahore, Pakistan. The effects of several factors such as population density (PD), pumping rate (PR), impermeable land use (LU), surface elevation (SE), and water-table elevation (WL) on arsenic concentration were studied in 101 union councils of Lahore. Forty single and multi-factor models were established using geographic information system (GIS) techniques to develop an arsenic contamination map and to investigate the most effective combinations among factors. Additionally, statistical tests were used to evaluate arsenic concentration between classes of the same single factor. The arsenic concentration in the Lahore aquifer varied from 0.001 to 0.143 mg L-1. The highest arsenic concentrations were detected in the Walled City and the town of Shahdara. Among the 40 raster models, groundwater arsenic concentration showed the best matching frequency with single-factor models for PD (50.70 %) and SE (47 %). Thus, PD and SE were used to develop an arsenic distribution raster map, and they were also used to study the effect of aquifer depth on arsenic concentration. PD was found to have hidden latent variables such as PR and LU. The shallow aquifer depth was negatively correlated with arsenic concentration ( r = -0.23) and positively with PR ( r = 0.15). Therefore, when there was high PR in wells with smaller aquifer depth, the arsenic concentration was high. The existing water treatment and alternative water resources are good options, which should be developed to deal with Lahore wells contaminated with arsenic at high concentrations.

  16. Socioeconomic and Ecological Factors Influencing Aedes aegypti Prevalence, Abundance, and Distribution in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Dhar-Chowdhury, Parnali; Haque, C Emdad; Lindsay, Robbin; Hossain, Shakhawat

    2016-06-01

    This study examined household risk factors and prevalence, abundance, and distribution of immature Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus, and their association with socioeconomic and ecological factors at urban zonal and household levels in the city of Dhaka, Bangladesh. During the 2011 monsoon, 826 households in 12 randomly selected administrative wards were surveyed for vector mosquitoes. Results revealed that the abundance and distribution of immature Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus, and pupae-per-person indices did not vary significantly among the zones with varied socioeconomic status. Of 35 different types of identified wet containers, 30 were infested, and among the 23 pupae-positive container types, nine were defined as the "most productive" for pupae including: disposable plastic containers (12.2% of 550), sealable plastic barrels (12.0%), tires (10.4%), abandoned plastic buckets (9.6%), flower tub and trays (8.5%), refrigerator trays (6.5%), plastic bottles (6.4%), clay pots (4.9%), and water tanks (1.6%). When the function of the containers was assessed, ornamental, discarded, and household repairing and reconstruction-related container categories were found significantly associated with the number of pupae in the households. The purpose of storing water and income variables were significant predictors of possession of containers that were infested by vector mosquitoes.

  17. Soil moisture and biogeochemical factors influence the distribution of annual Bromus species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belnap, Jayne; Stark, John Thomas; Rau, Benjamin; Allen, Edith B.; Phillips, Sue

    2016-01-01

    Abiotic factors have a strong influence on where annual Bromus species are found. At the large regional scale, temperature and precipitation extremes determine the boundaries of Bromusoccurrence. At the more local scale, soil characteristics and climate influence distribution, cover, and performance. In hot, dry, summer-rainfall-dominated deserts (Sonoran, Chihuahuan), little or noBromus is found, likely due to timing or amount of soil moisture relative to Bromus phenology. In hot, winter-rainfall-dominated deserts (parts of the Mojave Desert), Bromus rubens is widespread and correlated with high phosphorus availability. It also responds positively to additions of nitrogen alone or with phosphorus. On the Colorado Plateau, with higher soil moisture availability, factors limiting Bromus tectorum populations vary with life stage: phosphorus and water limit germination, potassium and the potassium/magnesium ratio affect winter performance, and water and potassium/magnesium affect spring performance. Controlling nutrients also change with elevation. In cooler deserts with winter precipitation (Great Basin, Columbia Plateau) and thus even greater soil moisture availability, B. tectorum populations are controlled by nitrogen, phosphorus, or potassium. Experimental nitrogen additions stimulate Bromus performance. The reason for different nutrients limiting in dissimilar climatic regions is not known, but it is likely that site conditions such as soil texture (as it affects water and nutrient availability), organic matter, and/or chemistry interact in a manner that regulates nutrient availability and limitations. Under future drier, hotter conditions,Bromus distribution is likely to change due to changes in the interaction between moisture and nutrient availability.

  18. Socioeconomic and Ecological Factors Influencing Aedes aegypti Prevalence, Abundance, and Distribution in Dhaka, Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Dhar-Chowdhury, Parnali; Haque, C. Emdad; Lindsay, Robbin; Hossain, Shakhawat

    2016-01-01

    This study examined household risk factors and prevalence, abundance, and distribution of immature Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus, and their association with socioeconomic and ecological factors at urban zonal and household levels in the city of Dhaka, Bangladesh. During the 2011 monsoon, 826 households in 12 randomly selected administrative wards were surveyed for vector mosquitoes. Results revealed that the abundance and distribution of immature Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus, and pupae-per-person indices did not vary significantly among the zones with varied socioeconomic status. Of 35 different types of identified wet containers, 30 were infested, and among the 23 pupae-positive container types, nine were defined as the “most productive” for pupae including: disposable plastic containers (12.2% of 550), sealable plastic barrels (12.0%), tires (10.4%), abandoned plastic buckets (9.6%), flower tub and trays (8.5%), refrigerator trays (6.5%), plastic bottles (6.4%), clay pots (4.9%), and water tanks (1.6%). When the function of the containers was assessed, ornamental, discarded, and household repairing and reconstruction-related container categories were found significantly associated with the number of pupae in the households. The purpose of storing water and income variables were significant predictors of possession of containers that were infested by vector mosquitoes. PMID:27022149

  19. [Vertical distribution of fuels in Pinus yunnanensis forest and related affecting factors].

    PubMed

    Wang, San; Niu, Shu-Kui; Li, De; Wang, Jing-Hua; Chen, Feng; Sun, Wu

    2013-02-01

    In order to understand the effects of fuel loadings spatial distribution on forest fire kinds and behaviors, the canopy fuels and floor fuels of Pinus yunnanensis forests with different canopy density, diameter at breast height (DBH), tree height, and stand age and at different altitude, slope grade, position, and aspect in Southwest China were taken as test objects, with the fuel loadings and their spatial distribution characteristics at different vertical layers compared and the fire behaviors in different stands analyzed. The relationships between the fuel loadings and the environmental factors were also analyzed by canonical correspondence analysis (CCA). In different stands, there existed significant differences in the vertical distribution of fuels. Pinus yunnanensis-Qak-Syzygium aromaticum, Pinus yunnanensis-oak, and Pinus yunnanensis forests were likely to occur floor fire but not crown fire, while Pinus yunnanensis-Platycladus orientalis, Pinus yunnanensis-Keteleeria fortune, and Keteleeria fortune-Pinus yunnanensis were not only inclined to occur floor fire, but also, the floor fire could be easily transformed into crown fire. The crown fuels were mainly affected by the stand age, altitude, DBH, and tree height, while the floor fuels were mainly by the canopy density, slope grade, altitude, and stand age.

  20. Virtuality Distributions in application to gamma gamma* to pi^0 Transition Form Factor at Handbag Level

    SciTech Connect

    Radyushkin, Anatoly V.

    2014-07-01

    We outline basics of a new approach to transverse momentum dependence in hard processes. As an illustration, we consider hard exclusive transition process gamma*gamma -> to pi^0 at the handbag level. Our starting point is coordinate representation for matrix elements of operators (in the simplest case, bilocal O(0,z)) describing a hadron with momentum p. Treated as functions of (pz) and z^2, they are parametrized through a virtuality distribution amplitude (VDA) Phi (x, sigma), with x being Fourier-conjugate to (pz) and sigma Laplace-conjugate to z^2. For intervals with z^+=0, we introduce transverse momentum distribution amplitude (TMDA) Psi (x, k_\\perp), and write it in terms of VDA Phi (x, \\sigma). The results of covariant calculations, written in terms of Phi (x sigma) are converted into expressions involving Psi (x, k_\\perp. Starting with scalar toy models, we extend the analysis onto the case of spin-1/2 quarks and QCD. We propose simple models for soft VDAs/TMDAs, and use them for comparison of handbag results with experimental (BaBar and BELLE) data on the pion transition form factor. We also discuss how one can generate high-k_\\perp tails from primordial soft distributions.

  1. Effects of natural factors on the spatial distribution of heavy metals in soils surrounding mining regions.

    PubMed

    Ding, Qian; Cheng, Gong; Wang, Yong; Zhuang, Dafang

    2017-02-01

    Various studies have shown that soils surrounding mining areas are seriously polluted with heavy metals. Determining the effects of natural factors on spatial distribution of heavy metals is important for determining the distribution characteristics of heavy metals in soils. In this study, an 8km buffer zone surrounding a typical non-ferrous metal mine in Suxian District of Hunan Province, China, was selected as the study area, and statistical, spatial autocorrelation and spatial interpolation analyses were used to obtain descriptive statistics and spatial autocorrelation characteristics of As, Pb, Cu, and Zn in soil. Additionally, the distributions of soil heavy metals under the influences of natural factors, including terrain (elevation and slope), wind direction and distance from a river, were determined. Layout of sampling sites, spatial changes of heavy metal contents at high elevations and concentration differences between upwind and downwind directions were then evaluated. The following results were obtained: (1) At low elevations, heavy metal concentrations decreased slightly, then increased considerably with increasing elevation. At high elevations, heavy metal concentrations first decreased, then increased, then decreased with increasing elevation. As the slope increased, heavy metal contents increased then decreased. (2) Heavy metal contents changed consistently in the upwind and downwind directions. Heavy metal contents were highest in 1km buffer zone and decreased with increasing distance from the mining area. The largest decrease in heavy metal concentrations was in 2km buffer zone. Perennial wind promotes the transport of heavy metals in downwind direction. (3) The spatial extent of the influence of the river on Pb, Zn and Cu in the soil was 800m. (4) The influence of the terrain on the heavy metal concentrations was greater than that of the wind. These results provide a scientific basis for preventing and mitigating heavy metal soil pollution in

  2. Distribution Patterns of Infection with Multiple Types of Human Papillomaviruses and Their Association with Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Soto-De Leon, Sara; Camargo, Milena; Sanchez, Ricardo; Munoz, Marina; Perez-Prados, Antonio; Purroy, Antonio; Patarroyo, Manuel Elkin; Patarroyo, Manuel Alfonso

    2011-01-01

    Background Infection with multiple types of human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the main risk factors associated with the development of cervical lesions. In this study, cervical samples collected from 1,810 women with diverse sociocultural backgrounds, who attended to their cervical screening program in different geographical regions of Colombia, were examined for the presence of cervical lesions and HPV by Papanicolau testing and DNA PCR detection, respectively. Principal Findings The negative binomial distribution model used in this study showed differences between the observed and expected values within some risk factor categories analyzed. Particularly in the case of single infection and coinfection with more than 4 HPV types, observed frequencies were smaller than expected, while the number of women infected with 2 to 4 viral types were higher than expected. Data analysis according to a negative binomial regression showed an increase in the risk of acquiring more HPV types in women who were of indigenous ethnicity (+37.8%), while this risk decreased in women who had given birth more than 4 times (−31.1%), or were of mestizo (−24.6%) or black (−40.9%) ethnicity. Conclusions According to a theoretical probability distribution, the observed number of women having either a single infection or more than 4 viral types was smaller than expected, while for those infected with 2–4 HPV types it was larger than expected. Taking into account that this study showed a higher HPV coinfection rate in the indigenous ethnicity, the role of underlying factors should be assessed in detail in future studies. PMID:21379574

  3. Landslides distribution analysis and role of triggering factors in the Foglia river basin (Central Itay)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baioni, Davide; Gallerini, Giuliano; Sgavetti, Maria

    2013-04-01

    The present work is focused on the distribution of landslides in Foglia river basin area (northern Marche-Romagna), using a heuristic approach supported by GIS tools for the construction of statistical analysis and spatial data. The study area is located in the Adriatic side of the northern Apennine in the boundary that marks the transition between the Marche and Emilia-Romagna regions. The Foglia river basin extends from the Apennines to the Adriatic sea with NE-SE trend occupying an area of about 708 km2. The purpose of this study is to investigate any relationships between factors related to the territory, which were taken into account and divided into classes, and landslides, trying to identify any possible existence of relationships between them. For this aim the study of landslides distribution was performed by using a GIS approach superimposing each thematic map, previously created, with landslides surveyed. Furthermore, we tried to isolate the most recurrent classes, to detect if at the same conditions there is a parameter that affects more than others, so as to recognize every direct relationship of cause and effect. Finally, an analysis was conducted by applying the model of uncertainty CF (Certainity Factor). In the Foglia river basin were surveyed a total of 2821 landslides occupy a total area of 155 km2, corresponding to 22% areal extent of the entire basin. The results of analysis carried out highlighted the importance and role of individual factors that led to the development of landslides analyzed. Moreover, this methodology may be applied to all orders of magnitude and scale without any problem by not requiring a commitment important, both from the economic point of view, and of human resources.

  4. Soil carbon distribution in Alaska in relation to soil-forming factors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, K.D.; Harden, J.; McGuire, A.D.; Bliss, N.B.; Bockheim, James G.; Clark, M.; Nettleton-Hollingsworth, T.; Jorgenson, M.T.; Kane, E.S.; Mack, M.; O'Donnell, J.; Ping, C.-L.; Schuur, E.A.G.; Turetsky, M.R.; Valentine, D.W.

    2011-01-01

    The direction and magnitude of soil organic carbon (SOC) changes in response to climate change remain unclear and depend on the spatial distribution of SOC across landscapes. Uncertainties regarding the fate of SOC are greater in high-latitude systems where data are sparse and the soils are affected by sub-zero temperatures. To address these issues in Alaska, a first-order assessment of data gaps and spatial distributions of SOC was conducted from a recently compiled soil carbon database. Temperature and landform type were the dominant controls on SOC distribution for selected ecoregions. Mean SOC pools (to a depth of 1-m) varied by three, seven and ten-fold across ecoregion, landform, and ecosystem types, respectively. Climate interactions with landform type and SOC were greatest in the uplands. For upland SOC there was a six-fold non-linear increase in SOC with latitude (i.e., temperature) where SOC was lowest in the Intermontane Boreal compared to the Arctic Tundra and Coastal Rainforest. Additionally, in upland systems mineral SOC pools decreased as climate became more continental, suggesting that the lower productivity, higher decomposition rates and fire activity, common in continental climates, interacted to reduce mineral SOC. For lowland systems, in contrast, these interactions and their impacts on SOC were muted or absent making SOC in these environments more comparable across latitudes. Thus, the magnitudes of SOC change across temperature gradients were non-uniform and depended on landform type. Additional factors that appeared to be related to SOC distribution within ecoregions included stand age, aspect, and permafrost presence or absence in black spruce stands. Overall, these results indicate the influence of major interactions between temperature-controlled decomposition and topography on SOC in high-latitude systems. However, there remains a need for more SOC data from wetlands and boreal-region permafrost soils, especially at depths > 1 m in

  5. Structure of von Willebrand factor and its function in platelet adhesion and thrombus formation.

    PubMed

    Ruggeri, Z M

    2001-06-01

    The adhesive protein von Willebrand factor mediates the initiation and progression of thrombus formation at sites of vascular injury. von Willebrand factor is synthesized in endothelial cells and megakaryocytes as a very large polymer composed of identical subunits. In the plasma, it appears as a series of multimers of regularly decreasing molecular mass, from several thousand to 500 kDa. The size of circulating von Willebrand factor multimers is controlled by proteolytic cleavage carried out by a specific protease. The biological functions of von Willebrand factor are exerted through specific domains that interact with extracellular matrix components and cell membrane receptors to promote the initial tethering and adhesion of platelets to subendothelial surfaces, as well as platelet aggregation. Moreover, von Willebrand factor binds the procoagulant co-enzyme, factor VIII, contributing to its stability and, indirectly, to its function in the generation of fibrin. This chapter presents a review of current knowledge on the structure, biosynthesis and functions of von Willebrand factor.

  6. Environmental risk factors and hotspot analysis of dengue distribution in Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalid, Bushra; Ghaffar, Abdul

    2015-11-01

    This study is an attempt to find out the factors responsible for sudden dengue outbreak in different cities of Pakistan during 2011. For this purpose, spatio-temporal distribution of dengue in Islamabad, Rawalpindi, Lahore, and Karachi has been taken into account. According to the available data, the factors responsible for this spread includes climate covariates like rainfall, temperature, and wind speed; social covariates like population, and area of locality, and environmental risk factors like drainage pattern and geo-hydrological conditions. Reported dengue cases from localities and Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) 90 m digital elevation model (DEM) of study areas have been processed for hotspots, regression model and stream density in the localities of high dengue incidence. The relationship of daily dengue incidence with climate covariates during the months of July-October of the study year is analyzed. Results show that each dry spell of 2-4 days provides suitable conditions for the development and survival of dengue vectors during the wet months of July and August in the areas of high stream density and population. Very few cases have been reported in July while higher number of cases reported in the months of August, September, until late October. Hotspot analysis highlights the areas of high dengue incidence while regression analysis shows the relationship between the population and the areas of localities with the dengue incidence.

  7. Genotype distribution and the relative risk factors for human papillomavirus in Urumqi, China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhifang; Meng, Wei; DU, Rong; Zhu, Yuejie; Zhang, Yi; Ding, Yan

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and HPV genotype distributions in Urumqi, Xinjiang, China. The related risk factors for high-risk HPV infection was also analyzed. A stratified cluster sampling method was used for the population-based cervical cancer screening of women aged 18-69 years in the Urumqi Saybagh district. Exfoliated cervical cell samples were collected for liquid-based cytology detection and HPV genotyping DNA microarrays. Education level, number of sexual partners, condom use and occupation were used in the multivariate analysis model. The HPV infection rate of women working in service industries was significantly higher compared with those of white-collar workers, community residents and migrant workers. The 35-44-year-old migrant worker group had the highest HPV infection rates among all of the groups in the three different age ranges. The number of marriages, education level, smoking history, number of abortions, use of condoms, number of sexual partners, number of sexual partners in the past five years and occupation were all associated with female HPV infection rate (P<0.05). The 35-44-year-old women were the age group with the highest HPV infection rate. The HPV infection rate of females in service industries was the highest. Education level and condom use were protective factors of HPV infection, while the number of sexual partners and occupation were risk factors for HPV infection.

  8. Mining heart disease risk factors in clinical text with named entity recognition and distributional semantic models.

    PubMed

    Urbain, Jay

    2015-12-01

    We present the design, and analyze the performance of a multi-stage natural language processing system employing named entity recognition, Bayesian statistics, and rule logic to identify and characterize heart disease risk factor events in diabetic patients over time. The system was originally developed for the 2014 i2b2 Challenges in Natural Language in Clinical Data. The system's strengths included a high level of accuracy for identifying named entities associated with heart disease risk factor events. The system's primary weakness was due to inaccuracies when characterizing the attributes of some events. For example, determining the relative time of an event with respect to the record date, whether an event is attributable to the patient's history or the patient's family history, and differentiating between current and prior smoking status. We believe these inaccuracies were due in large part to the lack of an effective approach for integrating context into our event detection model. To address these inaccuracies, we explore the addition of a distributional semantic model for characterizing contextual evidence of heart disease risk factor events. Using this semantic model, we raise our initial 2014 i2b2 Challenges in Natural Language of Clinical data F1 score of 0.838 to 0.890 and increased precision by 10.3% without use of any lexicons that might bias our results.

  9. Evaluating the influence of canopy species and meteorological factors on throughfall drop size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanko, Kazuki; Hotta, Norifumi; Suzuki, Masakazu

    2006-10-01

    SummaryDrop size distributions (DSDs) were continuously and simultaneously measured by laser raindrop-sizing instruments (LD gauges) in an open site and in three forest stands consisting of Japanese cypress (CY: Chamaecyparis obtusa), Japanese cedar (CD: Cryptomeria japonica), and sawtooth oak (SO: Quercus acutissima), during three rainfall events in Tokyo, Japan. Drop data during the whole observation period were used in an hourly based data set and divided into three meteorological condition groups: calm, heavy rain, and strong wind. Evaluating the influence of canopy species and meteorological factors on the D50 and DSD difference revealed some throughfall DSD characteristics. First, throughfall had different DSDs among canopy species under conditions of little canopy vibration with low rainfall intensity and wind speed; D50 values were 2.00, 2.93, and 3.60 mm in CY, CD, and SO, respectively. Second, throughfall contained smaller drops under conditions of severe canopy vibration, with high rainfall intensity and/or high wind speed, than under calm meteorological conditions. Vibration of the canopy could reduce water coalescence and increase spattered rainwater from canopies. Third, the influence of meteorological factors was different between canopy species; SO was readily influenced but CY was not. Moreover, results from this study implied that throughfall consisted of three drop components - free throughfall, drips, and splash droplets - and suggested a process for generating throughfall DSD that could explain the variations in throughfall DSDs between canopy species and that influenced by meteorological factors.

  10. Factors Which Impact the Distribution of Leadership for an ICT Reform: Expertise vis-a-vis Formal Role?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Jeanne Marie; Ng, David

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the process of Information Communication Technology reform in a Singapore school. The focus was on distributed leadership actions, and the factors which enabled and constrained the distribution of leadership. This study adopted a naturalistic inquiry approach, involving the case study of a school. The study found that…

  11. Dynamic Distribution and Interaction of the Arabidopsis SRSF1 Subfamily Splicing Factors1

    PubMed Central

    Stankovic, Nancy; Schloesser, Marie; Joris, Marine; Sauvage, Eric; Hanikenne, Marc; Motte, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Ser/Arg-rich (SR) proteins are essential nucleus-localized splicing factors. Our prior studies showed that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) RSZ22, a homolog of the human SRSF7 SR factor, exits the nucleus through two pathways, either dependent or independent on the XPO1 receptor. Here, we examined the expression profiles and shuttling dynamics of the Arabidopsis SRSF1 subfamily (SR30, SR34, SR34a, and SR34b) under control of their endogenous promoter in Arabidopsis and in transient expression assay. Due to its rapid nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and high expression level in transient assay, we analyzed the multiple determinants that regulate the localization and shuttling dynamics of SR34. By site-directed mutagenesis of SR34 RNA-binding sequences and Arg/Ser-rich (RS) domain, we further show that functional RRM1 or RRM2 are dispensable for the exclusive protein nuclear localization and speckle-like distribution. However, mutations of both RRMs induced aggregation of the protein whereas mutation in the RS domain decreased the stability of the protein and suppressed its nuclear accumulation. Furthermore, the RNA-binding motif mutants are defective for their export through the XPO1 (CRM1/Exportin-1) receptor pathway, but retain nucleocytoplasmic mobility. We performed a yeast two hybrid screen with SR34 as bait and discovered SR45 as a new interactor. SR45 is an unusual SR splicing factor bearing two RS domains. These interactions were confirmed in planta by FLIM-FRET and BiFC and the roles of SR34 domains in protein-protein interactions were further studied. Altogether, our report extends our understanding of shuttling dynamics of Arabidopsis SR splicing factors. PMID:26697894

  12. Distribution and dynamics of epidemic and pandemic Vibrio parahaemolyticus virulence factors.

    PubMed

    Ceccarelli, Daniela; Hasan, Nur A; Huq, Anwar; Colwell, Rita R

    2013-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus, autochthonous to estuarine, marine, and coastal environments throughout the world, is the causative agent of food-borne gastroenteritis. More than 80 serotypes have been described worldwide, based on antigenic properties of the somatic (O) and capsular (K) antigens. Serovar O3:K6 emerged in India in 1996 and subsequently was isolated worldwide, leading to the conclusion that the first V. parahaemolyticus pandemic had taken place. Most strains of V. parahaemolyticus isolated from the environment or seafood, in contrast to clinical strains, do not produce a thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) and/or a TDH-related hemolysin (TRH). Type 3 secretion systems (T3SSs), needle-like apparatuses able to deliver bacterial effectors into host cytoplasm, were identified as triggering cytotoxicity and enterotoxicity. Type 6 secretion systems (T6SS) predicted to be involved in intracellular trafficking and vesicular transport appear to play a role in V. parahaemolyticus virulence. Recent advances in V. parahaemolyticus genomics identified several pathogenicity islands (VpaIs) located on either chromosome in both epidemic and pandemic strains and comprising additional colonization factors, such as restriction-modification complexes, chemotaxis proteins, classical bacterial surface virulence factors, and putative colicins. Furthermore, studies indicate strains lacking toxins and genomic regions associated with pathogenicity may also be pathogenic, suggesting other important virulence factors remain to be identified. The unique repertoire of virulence factors identified to date, their occurrence and distribution in both epidemic and pandemic strains worldwide are described, with the aim of highlighting the complexity of V. parahaemolyticus pathogenicity as well as its dynamic genome.

  13. On-road emission factor distributions of individual diesel vehicles in and around Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xing; Westerdahl, Dane; Wu, Ye; Pan, Xiaochuan; Zhang, K. Max

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports findings of a recent field study that characterized the on-road emissions of individual diesel vehicles in and around Beijing, China during November and December of 2009. We successfully sampled 230 individual trucks on 4 major expressways around the city as well as 57 individual buses in the city using refined mobile chasing techniques and fast response instruments. Emission factors (EF) for carbon monoxide (CO), black carbon (BC) and particulate matter with diameters less than 0.5 μm (PM 0.5) are derived from the measurements, which are consistent with the results from laboratory dynamometer tests. The PM 0.5 number emission factor distributions demonstrate consistent bimodal modes with peaks around 10 nm and 80 nm, while the mass emission factor distributions demonstrate a unimodal maximum around 110 nm for a majority of the trucks. The BC emissions are shown to be highly correlated with the mass emission of particles with 100-250 nm diameters, which are in good agreement with the results from previous studies. A number of important policy implications are discussed based on the results from this study. First, we identified "heavy emitters" in the on-road fleet we encountered, finding that 5% of diesel trucks in this sample are responsible for 50% of total BC emissions, and 20% of the trucks are responsible for 50% CO and PM 0.5 number emissions, 60% PM 0.5 mass emissions and over 70% of BC emissions. This suggests that emissions control programs should include identifying and removing heavy emitters from the road or improving their emissions. Second, the BC and PM 0.5 number emission factors of trucks registered in regions outside Beijing are significantly higher than those of Beijing-registered trucks, suggesting that improving engine and fuel standards in Beijing alone is not sufficient in reducing the traffic-related air pollution in Beijing. Third, the significantly lower emissions from Euro IV and CNG buses compared to the Euro II and

  14. Distribution of {Omega}{sub k} from the scale-factor cutoff measure

    SciTech Connect

    De Simone, Andrea; Salem, Michael P.

    2010-04-15

    Our Universe may be contained in one among a diverging number of bubbles that nucleate within an eternally inflating multiverse. A promising measure to regulate the diverging spacetime volume of such a multiverse is the scale-factor cutoff, one feature of which is bubbles are not rewarded for having a longer duration of slow-roll inflation. Thus, depending on the landscape distribution of the number of e-folds of inflation among bubbles like ours, we might hope to measure spatial curvature. We study a recently proposed cartoon model of inflation in the landscape and find a reasonable chance (about 10%) that the curvature in our Universe is well above the value expected from cosmic variance. Anthropic selection does not strongly select for curvature as small as is observed (relative somewhat larger values), meaning the observational bound on curvature can be used to rule out landscape models that typically give too little inflation.

  15. Feature enhancement of reverberant speech by distribution matching and non-negative matrix factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keronen, Sami; Kallasjoki, Heikki; Palomäki, Kalle J.; Brown, Guy J.; Gemmeke, Jort F.

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes a novel two-stage dereverberation feature enhancement method for noise-robust automatic speech recognition. In the first stage, an estimate of the dereverberated speech is generated by matching the distribution of the observed reverberant speech to that of clean speech, in a decorrelated transformation domain that has a long temporal context in order to address the effects of reverberation. The second stage uses this dereverberated signal as an initial estimate within a non-negative matrix factorization framework, which jointly estimates a sparse representation of the clean speech signal and an estimate of the convolutional distortion. The proposed feature enhancement method, when used in conjunction with automatic speech recognizer back-end processing, is shown to improve the recognition performance compared to three other state-of-the-art techniques.

  16. Using microfluidics to understand the effect of spatial distribution of tissue factor on blood coagulation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Feng; Kastrup, Christian J; Ismagilov, Rustem F

    2008-01-01

    Initiation of blood coagulation by tissue factor (TF) is a robust, highly regulated process. Both the spatial distribution of TF and the geometry of the vasculature may play important roles in regulating coagulation. As this review describes, microfluidic systems provide a unique opportunity for investigating the spatiotemporal dynamics of blood coagulation in vitro. Microfluidic systems with surfaces of phospholipid bilayers patterned with TF have been used to demonstrate experimentally the threshold responses of initiation of coagulation to the size and shape of surfaces presenting TF. These systems have also been used to demonstrate experimentally that propagation of coagulation is regulated by the shear rate of blood flow in microcapillaries and microchannels. By understanding these and other aspects of the spatial dynamics that regulate blood coagulation, many new methods for treating clotting disorders, such as venous thromboembolism (VTE) and sepsis, could arise.

  17. Cellular distribution, subcellular localization and possible functions of basic and acidic fibroblast growth factors.

    PubMed

    Eckenstein, F P; Kuzis, K; Nishi, R; Woodward, W R; Meshul, C; Sherman, L; Ciment, G

    1994-01-13

    The distribution in the rat nervous system of acidic and basic fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) was analysed by a combination of biochemical and anatomical methods. Acidic FGF (aFGF) was found to be present exclusively in specific neuronal populations, such as motor neurons and basal forebrain cholinergic neurons. Basic FGF (bFGF) was found in astrocytes and in neurons in hippocampal area CA2. Within labelled astrocytes and CA2-neurons, bFGF was detected in both the cytoplasm and the nucleus. The levels of intracellular bFGF were manipulated by antisense oligonucleotide treatment of cultures of developing neural crest cells. Results indicated that the amount of melanogenesis in the cultures is likely to be regulated by intracellular, possibly nuclear bFGF.

  18. Distributions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowers, Wayne A.

    This monograph was written for the Conference of the New Instructional Materials in Physics, held at the University of Washington in summer, 1965. It is intended for students who have had an introductory college physics course. It seeks to provide an introduction to the idea of distributions in general, and to some aspects of the subject in…

  19. Distribution of cardiovascular disease risk factors by socioeconomic status among Canadian adults

    PubMed Central

    Choinière, R; Lafontaine, P; Edwards, A C

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study was designed to describe the distribution of risk factors for cardiovascular disease by socioeconomic status in adult men and women across Canada using the Canadian Heart Health Surveys Database. METHODS: The data were derived from provincial cross-sectional surveys done between 1986 and 1992. Data were obtained through a home interview and a clinic visit using a probability sample of 29,855 men and women aged 18-74 years of whom 23,129 (77%) agreed to participate. The following risk factors for cardiovascular disease were considered: elevated total plasma cholesterol (greater than 5.2 mmol/L), regular current cigarette smoking (one or more daily), elevated diastolic or systolic blood pressure (140/90 mm Hg), overweight (body mass index and lack of leisure-time physical activity [less than once a week in the last month]). Education and income adequacy were used as measures of socioeconomic status and mother tongue as a measure of cultural affiliation. RESULTS: For most of the risk factors examined, the prevalence of the risk factors was inversely related to socioeconomic status, but the relationship was stronger and more consistent for education than for income. The inverse relationship between socioeconomic status and the prevalence of the risk factors was particularly strong for smoking and overweight, where a gradient was observed: 46% (standard error [SE] 1.4) of men and 42% (SE 4.3) of women who had not completed secondary school were regular smokers, but only 12% (SE 1.0) of men and 13% (SE 0.9) of women with a university degree were regular smokers. Thirty-nine percent (SE 1.4) of men and 19% (SE 3.8) of women who had not completed secondary school were overweight, compared with 26% (SE 2.6) of male and 19% of female university graduates. The prevalence of leisure-time physical inactivity and elevated cholesterol was highest in both men and women in the lowest socioeconomic category, particularly by level of education. INTERPRETATION

  20. Factors Affecting the Spatial Distribution of Oviposition Sites for Tandem Black Saddlebags Dragonflies (Odonata: Libellulidae)

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, Jessica L.; Switzer, Paul V.

    2015-01-01

    Oviposition site location may be affected by (1) factors influencing the costs and benefits to the offspring (e.g., resource availability, competition, predation risk) and (2) factors influencing the costs and benefits to the female (e.g., predation risk or mate harassment). In cases in which both the male and female are involved in locating a site, costs and benefits may differ for each parent and the resulting oviposition site location may represent the outcome of selection pressures on one or both of them. We studied oviposition behavior in the black saddlebags dragonfly (Tramea lacerata Hagen), a species in which the male and female typically remain together (i.e., in tandem) while traveling among potential oviposition locations. Oviposition sites tended to be away from pond shoreline at the outer edge of the vegetation on the water’s surface. We found that tandems distributed their oviposition locations widely around the pond, and interactions with other dragonflies (typically other T. lacerata, either territorial males or tandems) led to a larger distance between consecutive oviposition locations. Interestingly, for 10% of the tandems, the female became separated from the male and oviposited solitarily multiple times. These solitary females spent significantly less time and traveled significantly smaller distances between successive oviposition sites than when in tandem. Our results indicate that while some aspects of oviposition behavior and site selection may be consistent between the male and female (e.g., the characteristics that make a site suitable), other aspects, such as the distribution of sites, may be a result of a differing benefits and costs for the two sexes, perhaps as a consequence of potential sperm competition.

  1. Factors driving changes in freshwater mussel (Bivalvia, Unionida) diversity and distribution in Peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Zieritz, Alexandra; Lopes-Lima, Manuel; Bogan, Arthur E; Sousa, Ronaldo; Walton, Samuel; Rahim, Khairul Adha A; Wilson, John-James; Ng, Pei-Yin; Froufe, Elsa; McGowan, Suzanne

    2016-11-15

    Freshwater mussels (Bivalvia, Unionida) fulfil important ecosystem functions and are one of the most threatened freshwater taxa globally. Knowledge of freshwater mussel diversity, distribution and ecology in Peninsular Malaysia is extremely poor, and the conservation status of half of the species presumed to occur in the region has yet to be assessed. We conducted the first comprehensive assessment of Peninsular Malaysia's freshwater mussels based on species presence/absence and environmental data collected from 155 sites spanning all major river catchments and diverse habitat types. Through an integrative morphological-molecular approach we recognised nine native and one widespread non-native species, i.e. Sinanodonta woodiana. Two species, i.e. Pilsbryoconcha compressa and Pseudodon cambodjensis, had not been previously recorded from Malaysia, which is likely a result of morphological misidentifications of historical records. Due to their restriction to single river catchments and declining distributions, Hyriopsis bialata, possibly endemic to Peninsular Malaysia, Ensidens ingallsianus, possibly already extinct in the peninsula, and Rectidens sumatrensis, particularly require conservation attention. Equally, the Pahang, the Perak and the north-western river catchments are of particular conservation value due to the presence of a globally unique freshwater mussel fauna. Statistical relationships of 15 water quality parameters and mussel presence/absence identified acidification and nutrient pollution (eutrophication) as the most important anthropogenic factors threatening freshwater mussel diversity in Peninsular Malaysia. These factors can be linked to atmospheric pollution, deforestation, oil-palm plantations and a lack of functioning waste water treatment, and could be mitigated by establishing riparian buffers and improving waste water treatment for rivers running through agricultural and residential land.

  2. Unwinding the von Willebrand factor strings puzzle.

    PubMed

    De Ceunynck, Karen; De Meyer, Simon F; Vanhoorelbeke, Karen

    2013-01-10

    von Willebrand factor (VWF) is amongst others synthesized by endothelial cells and stored as ultra-large (UL) VWF multimers in Weibel-Palade bodies. Although UL-VWF is proteolysed by ADAMTS13 (a disintegrin-like and metalloprotease domain with thrombospondin type-1 motif, number 13) on secretion from endothelial cells, in vitro experiments in the absence of ADAMTS13 have demonstrated that a proportion of these UL-VWF multimers remain anchored to the activated endothelium. These multimers unravel, bind platelets, and wave in the direction of the flow. These so-called VWF "strings" have also been visualized in vivo, lining the lumen of activated mesenteric veins of Adamts13(-/-) mice. Various studies have demonstrated the extraordinary length of these VWF strings, the availability of their platelet binding and ADAMTS13 cleavage sites, and the possible nature of their endothelial attachment. VWF strings are also capable of tethering leukocytes and parasite-infected red blood cells. However, the majority of studies have been performed in the absence of ADAMTS13, a condition only experienced in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. A normal functional role of VWF strings in healthy persons or in other disease pathologies remains unclear. In this review, we discuss some of the puzzling characteristics of VWF strings, and we debate whether the properties of VWF strings in the absence of ADAMTS13 might be relevant for understanding (patho)physiologic mechanisms.

  3. Aroma types of flue-cured tobacco in China: spatial distribution and association with climatic factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chao; Wu, Wei; Wu, Shu-Cheng; Liu, Hong-Bin; Peng, Qing

    2014-02-01

    Aroma types of flue-cured tobacco (FCT) are classified into light, medium, and heavy in China. However, the spatial distribution of FCT aroma types and the relationships among aroma types, chemical parameters, and climatic variables were still unknown at national scale. In the current study, multi-year averaged chemical parameters (total sugars, reducing sugars, nicotine, total nitrogen, chloride, and K2O) of FCT samples with grade of C3F and climatic variables (mean, minimum and maximum temperatures, rainfall, relative humidity, and sunshine hours) during the growth periods were collected from main planting areas across China. Significant relationships were found between chemical parameters and climatic variables ( p < 0.05). A spatial distribution map of FCT aroma types were produced using support vector machine algorithms and chemical parameters. Significant differences in chemical parameters and climatic variables were observed among the three aroma types based on one-way analysis of variance ( p < 0.05). Areas with light aroma type had significantly lower values of mean, maximum, and minimum temperatures than regions with medium and heavy aroma types ( p < 0.05). Areas with heavy aroma type had significantly lower values of rainfall and relative humidity and higher values of sunshine hours than regions with light and medium aroma types ( p < 0.05). The output produced by classification and regression trees showed that sunshine hours, rainfall, and maximum temperature were the most important factors affecting FCT aroma types at national scale.

  4. Abiotic factors affecting summer distribution and movement of male paddlefish, Polyodon spathula, in a prairie reservoir

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paukert, C.P.; Fisher, W.L.

    2000-01-01

    Six male paddlefish, Polyodon spathula, were implanted with ultrasonic temperature-sensing transmitters and tracked during June through August 1997 to quantify effects of physicochemical conditions on their distribution and movement in Keystone Reservoir, Oklahoma. Paddlefish moved about twice as much during night than day. Movement rate of paddlefish was related to reservoir water level, inflow, and discharge from the reservoir at night; however, none of these variables was significant during the day. Location in the reservoir (distance from the dam) was negatively related to water level and positively related to inflow during day and night periods. Location in the reservoir was negatively related to discharge during the day. Paddlefish avoided the highest available water temperatures, but did not always avoid low dissolved oxygen concentrations. Paddlefish avoided the Cimarron River arm of the reservoir in summer, possibly because of high salinity. Our study demonstrates that distribution of paddlefish during summer and movement in Keystone Reservoir was influenced by physicochemical and hydrologic conditions in the system. However, biotic factors (e.g., food availability) not measured in this study may have been influenced by abiotic conditions in the reservoir.

  5. Expression and Distribution of Mesencephalic Astrocyte-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in the Retina and Optic Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Feng-Juan; Zhang, Sheng-Hai; Li, Ting-Ting; Wu, Ji-Hong; Wu, Qiang

    2017-01-01

    Mesencephalic astrocyte-derived neurotrophic factor (MANF), otherwise named Arginine-Rich, Mutated in Early-stage Tumors (ARMET), is a secretory endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) protein that is widely expressed in mammalian tissues. To date, little is known about the distribution and expression of MANF in the retina and optic nerve (ON). Therefore, we studied the expression and distribution of MANF in the ON and retina by real-time PCR, immunofluorescence staining and western blotting. Results from rat and mouse were highly consistent in the retina. MANF was detected in both tissues in rat, wherein it was principally localized to the ganglion cell layer (GCL), followed by the inner nuclear layer (INL). The MANF protein levels in the rat retina were 3.33-fold higher than in the rat ON. Additionally, MANF was robustly expressed by retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in the human retina. In human ON, MANF was partially co-localized with glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), suggesting that it was not restricted to astrocytes. In vitro studies confirmed that MANF could be robustly expressed in RGCs and was found principally within the cytoplasm. Hypoxia can stimulate up-regulation by of MANF expression over time, suggesting that MANF may play a vital role in the functional regulation of RGCs both in health and disease. We believe that the present study improves our understanding of the distribution and expression of MANF in the retina and ON and could help in further analysis of its interact and correlate with the relevant ophthalmic diseases. PMID:28154531

  6. Ecological factors related to the widespread distribution of sylvatic Rhodnius ecuadoriensis populations in southern Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Chagas disease transmission risk is a function of the presence of triatomines in domestic habitats. Rhodnius ecuadoriensis is one of the main vectors implicated in transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi in Ecuador. This triatomine species is present in domestic, peridomestic and sylvatic habitats in the country. To determine the distribution of sylvatic populations of R. ecuadoriensis and the factors related to this distribution, triatomine searches were conducted between 2005 and 2009 in southern Ecuador. Methods Manual triatomine searches were conducted by skilled bug collectors in 23 communities. Sylvatic searched sites were selected by a) directed sampling, where microhabitats were selected by the searchers and b) random sampling, where sampling points where randomly generated. Domiciliary triatomine searches were conducted using the one man-hour method. Natural trypanosome infection was determined by microscopic examination and PCR. Generalized linear models were used to test the effect of environmental factors on the presence of sylvatic triatomines. Results In total, 1,923 sylvatic individuals were collected representing a sampling effort of 751 man-hours. Collected sylvatic triatomines were associated with mammal and bird nests. The 1,219 sampled nests presented an infestation index of 11.9%, a crowding of 13 bugs per infested nest, and a colonization of 80% of the nests. Triatomine abundance was significantly higher in squirrel (Sciurus stramineus) nests located above five meters from ground level and close to the houses. In addition, 8.5% of the 820 examined houses in the same localities were infested with triatomines. There was a significant correlation between R. ecuadoriensis infestation rates found in sylvatic and synanthropic environments within communities (p = 0.012). Parasitological analysis revealed that 64.7% and 15.7% of the sylvatic bugs examined (n = 300) were infected with Trypanosoma cruzi and T. rangeli respectively, and 8% of the

  7. Scale-dependent factors affecting North American river otter distribution in the midwest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jeffress, Mackenzie R.; Paukert, C.P.; Whittier, Joanna B.; Sandercock, B.K.; Gipson, P.S.

    2011-01-01

    The North American river otter (Lontra canadensis) is recovering from near extirpation throughout much of its range. Although reintroductions, trapping regulations and habitat improvements have led to the reestablishment of river otters in the Midwest, little is known about how their distribution is influenced by local- and landscape-scale habitat. We conducted river otter sign surveys from Jan. to Apr. in 2008 and 2009 in eastern Kansas to assess how local- and landscape-scale habitat factors affect river otter occupancy. We surveyed three to nine 400-m stretches of stream and reservoir shorelines for 110 sites and measured local-scale variables (e.g., stream order, land cover types) within a 100 m buffer of the survey site and landscape-scale variables (e.g., road density, land cover types) for Hydrological Unit Code 14 watersheds. We then used occupancy models that account for the probability of detection to estimate occupancy as a function of these covariates using Program PRESENCE. The best-fitting model indicated river otter occupancy increased with the proportion of woodland cover and decreased with the proportion of cropland and grassland cover at the local scale. Occupancy also increased with decreased shoreline diversity, waterbody density and stream density at the landscape scale. Occupancy was not affected by land cover or human disturbance at the landscape scale. Understanding the factors and scale important to river otter occurrence will be useful in identifying areas for management and continued restoration. ?? 2011, American Midland Naturalist.

  8. Diversity and distribution of cholix toxin, a novel ADP-ribosylating factor from Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Purdy, Alexandra E; Balch, Deborah; Lizárraga-Partida, Marcial Leonardo; Islam, Mohammad Sirajul; Martinez-Urtaza, Jaime; Huq, Anwar; Colwell, Rita R; Bartlett, Douglas H

    2010-02-01

    Non-toxigenic non-O1, non-O139 Vibrio cholerae strains isolated from both environmental and clinical settings carry a suite of virulence factors aside from cholera toxin. Among V. cholerae strains isolated from coastal waters of southern California, this includes cholix toxin, an ADP-ribosylating factor that is capable of halting protein synthesis in eukaryotic cells. The prevalence of the gene encoding cholix toxin, chxA, was assessed among a collection of 155 diverse V. cholerae strains originating from both clinical and environmental settings in Bangladesh and Mexico and other countries around the globe. The chxA gene was present in 47% of 83 non-O1, non-O139 strains and 16% of 72 O1/O139 strains screened as part of this study. A total of 86 chxA gene sequences were obtained, and phylogenetic analysis revealed that they fall into two distinct clades. These two clades were also observed in the phylogenies of several housekeeping genes, suggesting that the divergence observed in chxA extends to other regions of the V. cholerae genome, and most likely has arisen from vertical descent rather than horizontal transfer. Our results clearly indicate that ChxA is a major toxin of V. cholerae with a worldwide distribution that is preferentially associated with non-pandemic strains.

  9. Distribution and dynamics of risk factors associated with highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Guo, Z W; Bridge, E S; Li, Y M; Xiao, X M

    2013-11-01

    Within China's Poyang Lake region, close interactions between wild migratory birds and domestic poultry are common and provide an opportunity for the transmission and subsequent outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus. We overlaid a series of ecological factors associated with HPAI to map the risk of HPAI in relation to natural and anthropogenic variables, and we identified two hotspots for potential HPAI outbreaks in the Poyang Lake region as well as three corridors connecting the two hotspot areas. In hotspot I, there is potential for migratory birds to bring new avian influenza (AI) strains that can reassort with existing strains to form new AI viruses. Hotspot II features high-density poultry production where outbreaks of endemic AI viruses are likely. The three communication corridors that link the two hotspots further promote HPAI H5N1 transmission and outbreaks and lead to the persistence of AI viruses in the Poyang Lake region. We speculate that the region's unevenly distributed poultry supply-and-demand system might be a key factor inducing HPAI H5N1 transmission and outbreaks in the Poyang Lake region.

  10. Edaphic factors affecting the vertical distribution of radionuclides in the different soil types of Belgrade, Serbia.

    PubMed

    Dragović, Snežana; Gajić, Boško; Dragović, Ranko; Janković-Mandić, Ljiljana; Slavković-Beškoski, Latinka; Mihailović, Nevena; Momčilović, Milan; Ćujić, Mirjana

    2012-01-01

    The specific activities of natural radionuclides ((40)K, (226)Ra and (232)Th) and Chernobyl-derived (137)Cs were measured in soil profiles representing typical soil types of Belgrade (Serbia): chernozems, fluvisols, humic gleysols, eutric cambisols, vertisols and gleyic fluvisols. The influence of soil properties and content of stable elements on radionuclide distribution down the soil profiles (at 5 cm intervals up to 50 cm depth) was analysed. Correlation analysis identified associations of (40)K, (226)Ra and (137)Cs with fine-grained soil fractions. Significant positive correlations were found between (137)Cs specific activity and both organic matter content and cation exchange capacity. Saturated hydraulic conductivity and specific electrical conductivity were also positively correlated with the specific activity of (137)Cs. The strong positive correlations between (226)Ra and (232)Th specific activities and Fe and Mn indicate an association with oxides of these elements in soil. The correlations observed between (40)K and Cr, Ni, Pb and Zn and also between (137)Cs and Cd, Cr, Pb and Zn could be attributed to their common affinity for clay minerals. These results provide insight into the main factors that affect radionuclide migration in the soil, which contributes to knowledge about radionuclide behaviour in the environment and factors governing their mobility within terrestrial ecosystems.

  11. Size distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon particulate emission factors from agricultural burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshtkar, Haleh; Ashbaugh, Lowell L.

    Burning of agricultural waste residue is a common method of disposal when preparing land following crop harvest. This practice introduces volatile organic compounds, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), into the atmosphere. This study examines the particle size distribution in the smoke emissions of two common agricultural waste residues (biofuels) in California, almond prunings and rice straw. The residues were burned in a combustion chamber designed specifically for this purpose, and the smoke emissions were collected on 10-stage MOUDI impactors for analysis of PAH and total particle mass. The results, in units of emission factors, show that combustion temperature is an important factor in determining the smoke particle PAH composition. Total PAH emissions from rice straw burns were 18.6 mg kg -1 of fuel, while the emissions from almond prunings were lower at 8.03 mg kg -1. The less volatile five- and six-ring PAH was predominately on smaller particles where it condensed in the early stages of combustion while the more volatile three- and four-ring PAH formed on larger particles as the smoke cooled.

  12. PMF Determination of Factors Affecting Organic Pollutant Distributions in the Baltimore Harbor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, R. K.; Schneider, A.; Baker, J. E.

    2002-05-01

    The E.P.A. has declared the Baltimore Harbor as an impaired waterway, due to elevated levels of persistent pollutants. This concern coupled with recent changes to TMDL permitting requirements has made it essential to understand and quantify the sources of organic contamination. To complement ongoing hydrodynamic modeling efforts, an advanced multivariate statistical method was employed to assess the major factors influencing the distribution of organic contaminants in the harbor. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) was used to interpret the seasonal and spatial patterns of 30 PAHs and 10 PCB homolog groups in Baltimore Harbor. Both the particulate and dissolved PAH and PCB homolog fractions, as well as, water quality parameters such as POC, DOC and chlorophyll a were incorporated in this three-dimensional analysis. PMF has been used successfully several times to determine sources of atmospheric pollutants, but only once in water quality analysis. PMF offers several advantages over traditional source modeling including constraints on non-negative solutions. The data used in this analysis was collected as part of the Comprehensive Harbor Assessment and Regional Modeling Study (CHARM) in which water and particulate samples were collected from 26 sites in Baltimore Harbor during the fall and winter of 1999 and spring and summer of 2000.

  13. [Influence on the spatial distribution of fish in Taizi River basin by environmental factors at multiple scales].

    PubMed

    Ding, Sen; Zhang, Yuan; Qu, Xiao-Dong; Kong, Wei-Jing; Liu, Si-Si; Meng, Wei

    2012-07-01

    The deterioration of fish is influenced by various types of environmental factors. To develop protection plans that are more suitable, non-metric multidimensional scaling analysis (NMS) was used to investigate the influence of environmental factors at multiple scales on the spatial distribution of fish. The results of cluster analysis showed that there were three types of spatial distribution of fish, i.e. upstream timber and tributary headstream area, midstream hilly area, and downstream plain area. Results of NMS analysis indicated the significant correlations between spatial distribution of fish and environmental factors at multiple scales. Altitude, stream order and land use were three important factors influencing the fish distribution at the watershed scale. Combination of velocity and depth, habitat inhomogeneity and electrical conductivity significantly affected fish distribution at the reach scale, whereas the quality of bottom material showed significant influence at the microhabitat scale. Therefore, the effect of specific environmental factors at multiple scales should be taken into consideration in the basin fish conversation management.

  14. Factors influencing elimination and distribution of fleroxacin: metaanalysis of individual data from 10 pharmacokinetic studies.

    PubMed Central

    Reigner, B G; Welker, H A

    1996-01-01

    A metaanalysis was conducted on data from 172 subjects (healthy volunteers and uninfected patients) included in 10 pharmacokinetic studies of fleroxacin after oral administration. The objectives of this analysis were (i) to estimate the typical values of two key pharmacokinetic parameters, clearance over systemic availability (CL/F) and volume of distribution over systemic availability (V/F), after the administration of therapeutic doses and (ii) to study qualitatively and quantitatively the factors which influence the elimination and distribution of fleroxacin. The main pharmacokinetic parameters, CL/F and V/F, were analyzed separately by a standard two-stage approach. The covariates investigated were predicted creatinine clearance (CLCR), age, gender, body surface area, body weight, and lean body weight (LBW). The predicted CL/F and V/F were 83.5 ml/min and 101 liters, respectively, for a typical male subject (CLCR, 70 ml/min; LBW, 54 kg; age, 54 years). Modeling of CL/F indicated that this parameter increases linearly with CLCR, decreases linearly with age, and is 10.8 ml/min lower in females than in males. The best model for V/F showed a linear increase with LBW and a linear decrease with age. V/F was found to be 20.4 liters greater in males than in females. In conclusion, this metaanalysis has shown that CLCR, age, and gender influence the elimination of fleroxacin from the body, whereas V/F is influenced by LBW, age, and gender. PMID:8851573

  15. Diversity of riceland mosquitoes and factors affecting their occurrence and distribution in Mwea, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Muturi, Ephantus J; Shililu, Josephat I; Jacob, Benjamin G; Mwangangi, Joseph M; Mbogo, Charles M; Githure, John I; Novak, Robert J

    2008-09-01

    Knowledge of mosquito species diversity, occurrence, and distribution is an essential component of vector ecology and a guiding principle to formulation and implementation of integrated vector management programs. A 12-month entomological survey was conducted to determine the diversity of riceland mosquitoes and factors affecting their occurrence and distribution at 3 sites targeted for malaria vector control in Mwea, Kenya. Adult mosquitoes were sampled indoors by pyrethrum spray catch and outdoors by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention light traps. Mosquitoes were then morphologically identified to species using taxonomic keys. The characteristics of houses sampled for indoor resting mosquitoes, including number of people sleeping in each house the night preceding collection, presence of bed nets, location of the house, size of eaves, wall type, presence of cattle and distance of the house to the cowshed, and proximity to larval habitats, were recorded. Of the 191,378 mosquitoes collected, 95% were identified morphologically to species and comprised 25 species from 5 genera. Common species included Anopheles arabiensis (53.5%), Culex quinquefasciatus (35.5%), An. pharoensis (4.7%), An. coustani (2.5%), and An. funestus (1.6%). Shannon's species diversity and evenness indices did not differ significantly among the 3 study sites. There was a marked house-to-house variation in the average number of mosquitoes captured. The number of people sleeping in the house the night preceding collection, size of eaves, distance to the cowshed, and the nearest larval habitat were significant predictors of occurrence of either or both An. arabiensis and Cx. quinquefasciatus. The peak abundance of An. arabiensis coincided with land preparation and the first few weeks after transplanting of rice seedlings, and that of Cx. quinquefasciatus coincided with land preparation, late stage of rice development, and short rains. After transplanting of rice seedlings, the

  16. Prevalence, distribution, and risk factor for sheep pox and goat pox (SPGP) in Algeria.

    PubMed

    Kardjadj, Moustafa

    2017-03-01

    A cross-sectional study using a tested questionnaire was carried out across Algeria between January and June 2014. Our investigation demonstrated that of the 150 flocks visited, 21 were positive for sheep pox and goat pox (SPGP) with an overall flock prevalence of 14% (95% CI 11.08-16.92%) suggesting that SPGP is endemic in Algeria. Our results showed also that the disease appears only in sheep and no case affecting goats has been reported. For the risk factor analysis, univariate analysis of variables followed by a multiple logistic regression identified steppe region (OR = 1.81, 95% CI 0.87-2.57; P = 0.037), large flocks (OR = 2. 19, 95% CI 1.02-3.36; P = 0.027), and transhumance (OR = 3.98, 95% CI 2.59-5.34; P = 0.021) as risk factors in the spread of the disease. Furthermore, our study revealed that the use of vaccination as preventive measures in the selected flocks decreased the odds for SPGP positivity by 5.78 (95% CI 2.22-9.34; P < 0.001) times compared to non vaccinated flocks. In conclusion, our findings documented an evidence of a widespread distribution and endemic establishment of the SPGP in Algerian sheep population despite the annual vaccination program. Consequently, the vaccination must cover all the Algerian sheep population to improve animal welfare and reduce economic losses associated with outbreak episodes.

  17. Nucleocytoplasmic distribution of opioid growth factor and its receptor in tongue epithelium.

    PubMed

    Zagon, Ian S; Ruth, Torre B; McLaughlin, Patricia J

    2005-01-01

    The subcellular distributions of the opioid growth factor (OGF), [Met(5)]-enkephalin, and opioid growth factor receptor (OGFr) in the epithelium of the rat tongue were determined in order to reveal structure-function relationships. Laser scanning confocal microscopic analysis showed that both OGF and OGFr were colocalized in the paranuclear cytoplasm and in the nuclei of keratinocytes in the stratum basale. Using immunoelectron microscopy and postembedding techniques, double labeling experiments disclosed that complexes of OGF-OGFr were colocalized on the outer nuclear envelope, in the paranuclear cytoplasm, perpendicular to the nuclear envelope in a putative nuclear pore complex, and in the nucleus adjacent to heterochromatin. Anti-OGF IgG alone was detected in the cytoplasm, and anti-OGFr IgG alone was associated with the outer nuclear envelope. Study of chronic treatment with the opioid antagonist, naltrexone (NTX), which blocks opioid-receptor binding, revealed the presence of OGFr immunoreactivity alone in the cytoplasm and the nucleus; some OGF-OGFr complexes were also observed. Colocalization of OGFr and karyopherin (importin) beta was recorded in the cytoplasm and nucleus. These results in tongue epithelium are the first to suggest that OGFr resides on the outer nuclear envelope, where OGF interacts with OGFr; that the OGF-OGFr complex translocates between cytoplasm and nucleus at the nuclear pore; and that the nuclear localization signal of OGFr interacts with karyopherin beta for nuclear transport. These novel data also indicate that signal transduction for cell proliferation appears to involve an OGF-OGFr complex that interfaces with chromatin in the nucleus. Moreover, the unique finding that OGFr was found in the cytoplasm and nucleus in NTX-treated specimens may suggest that NTX-OGFr complexes have the same pathway as OGF-OGFr.

  18. Simple Estimation of Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) Orientation Factor Distribution in Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Loura, Luís M. S.

    2012-01-01

    Because of its acute sensitivity to distance in the nanometer scale, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) has found a large variety of applications in many fields of chemistry, physics, and biology. One important issue regarding the correct usage of FRET is its dependence on the donor-acceptor relative orientation, expressed as the orientation factor κ2. Different donor/acceptor conformations can lead to κ2 values in the 0 ≤ κ2 ≤ 4 range. Because the characteristic distance for FRET, R0, is proportional to (κ2)1/6, uncertainties in the orientation factor are reflected in the quality of information that can be retrieved from a FRET experiment. In most cases, the average value of κ2 corresponding to the dynamic isotropic limit (<κ2> = 2/3) is used for computation of R0 and hence donor-acceptor distances and acceptor concentrations. However, this can lead to significant error in unfavorable cases. This issue is more critical in membrane systems, because of their intrinsically anisotropic nature and their reduced fluidity in comparison to most common solvents. Here, a simple numerical simulation method for estimation of the probability density function of κ2 for membrane-embedded donor and acceptor fluorophores in the dynamic regime is presented. In the simplest form, the proposed procedure uses as input the most probable orientations of the donor and acceptor transition dipoles, obtained by experimental (including linear dichroism) or theoretical (such as molecular dynamics simulation) techniques. Optionally, information about the widths of the donor and/or acceptor angular distributions may be incorporated. The methodology is illustrated for special limiting cases and common membrane FRET pairs. PMID:23203123

  19. What factors drive copepod community distribution in the Gulf of Gabes, Eastern Mediterranean Sea?

    PubMed

    Drira, Zaher; Bel Hassen, Malika; Ayadi, Habib; Aleya, Lotfi

    2014-02-01

    The spatial and temporal variations in copepod communities were investigated during four oceanographic cruises conducted between July 2005 and March 2007 aboard the R/V Hannibal. A close relationship was observed between the temperature, salinity, hydrographic properties and water masses characterising the Gulf of Gabes. Indeed, water thermal stratification began in May-June, and a thermocline was established at a 20-m depth, but ranged from 25 m in July to more than 30 m in September. The zooplankton community is dominated by copepods representing 69 % to 83 % of total zooplankton. Spatial and temporal variation of copepods in relation to environmental factors shows their close relationship with the hydrodynamic features of the water column. Thermal stratification in the column, established in summer, supports copepod development. In fact, copepod abundance increases gradually with rising water temperature and salinity, starting from the beginning of thermal stratification (May-June 2006) and lasting until its completion (July 2005 and September 2006). When the water column is well mixed (March 2007), copepod abundance decreased. Our finding shows that temperature and salinity seem to be the most important physical factors and thus strongly influence the taxonomic diversity and distribution of the copepod population. They are characterised by the dominance of Oithona nana, representing 75-86 % of total cyclopoid abundance. The most abundant species during the stratification period were O. nana, Acartia clausi and Stephos marsalensis in July 2005 and September 2006. However, during the mixing period, Euterpina acutifrons was more abundant, representing 21 % of the total. Unlike the copepod community, which is more abundant during the period of high stratification, phytoplankton proliferates during semi-mixed conditions.

  20. Chronic hepatitis C in Austria, 1992-2006: genotype distribution and demographic factors.

    PubMed

    Maieron, A; Metz-Gercek, S; Hackl, F; Luger, C; Ziachehabi, A; Strauss, R; Schöfl, R; Mittermayer, H

    2010-02-25

    Chronic hepatitis C is a leading cause of end-stage liver disease and, with a worldwide prevalence of up to 3%, is a pandemic infectious disease. Austria, like most western European countries can be considered as a low prevalence country. This analysis aimed to assess the distribution of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes in patients with chronic HCV infection in Upper Austria. Between September 1992 and December 2006, we identified 1,318 consecutive patients who tested positive for HCV RNA. Genotyping was routinely performed in 1,239 of the 1,318 patients, and in a subgroup of 617 patients data on the source of transmission were collected. Additionally we obtained data on liver histology and body mass index in a subsample of 273 of the 617 patients. Hepatitis C genotypes 1, 2, 3, 4, 6 and co-infections were found in 80.4%, 4.5%, 12.3%, 2.7%, 0.1% and 0.2% of the patients, respectively. There was a highly significant age difference in relation to gender at the time of diagnosis of chronic hepatitis C, with women being older than men (men: 45.0 years; women: 49.3 years; p<0.0001). The number of new cases of chronic hepatitis C decreased substantially over the last decade, but although risk factors for obtaining HCV are well established, we did not find a decrease in the age of first diagnosis. Besides consistent screening in defined risk groups it is important to raise awareness for risk factors for HCV acquisition and liver disease progression.

  1. [Mercury Distribution Characteristics and Atmospheric Mercury Emission Factors of Typical Waste Incineration Plants in Chongqing].

    PubMed

    Duan, Zhen-ya; Su, Hai-tao; Wang, Feng-yang; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Shu-xiao; Yu, Bin

    2016-02-15

    Waste incineration is one of the important atmospheric mercury emission sources. The aim of this article is to explore the atmospheric mercury pollution level of waste incineration industry from Chongqing. This study investigated the mercury emissions from a municipal solid waste incineration plant and a medical waste incineration plant in Chongqing. The exhaust gas samples in these two incineration plants were obtained using USA EPA 30B method. The mercury concentrations in the fly ash and bottom ash samples were analyzed. The results indicated that the mercury concentrations of the municipal solid waste and medical waste incineration plant in Chongqing were (26.4 +/- 22.7) microg x m(-3) and (3.1 +/- 0.8) microg x m(-3) in exhaust gas respectively, (5279.2 +/- 798.0) microg x kg(-1) and (11,709.5 +/- 460.5) microg x kg(-1) in fly ash respectively. Besides, the distribution proportions of the mercury content from municipal solid waste and medical waste in exhaust gas, fly ash, and bottom ash were 34.0%, 65.3%, 0.7% and 32.3%, 67.5%, 0.2% respectively; The mercury removal efficiencies of municipal solid waste and medical waste incineration plants were 66.0% and 67.7% respectively. The atmospheric mercury emission factors of municipal solid waste and medical waste incineration plants were (126.7 +/- 109.0) microg x kg(-1) and (46.5 +/- 12.0) microg x kg(-1) respectively. Compared with domestic municipal solid waste incineration plants in the Pearl River Delta region, the atmospheric mercury emission factor of municipal solid waste incineration plant in Chongqing was lower.

  2. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering enhancement factor distribution for nanoparticles of arbitrary shapes using surface integral equation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying Huang, Shao; Wu, Bae-Ian; Foong, Shaohui

    2013-01-01

    Poggio-Miller-Chang-Harrington-Wu-Tsai (PMCHWT) surface integral equation method is applied for the first time to accurately estimate the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) enhancement factor distribution for arbitrary nanoparticles and nano-aggregates. It is the first time in literature that the distributions of SERS enhancement factors of nanoparticles of a large variety are reported. It is shown that not every SERS substrate exhibits a long-tail distribution as a dimer consisting of two spheres in close proximity. Generic methods are proposed to evaluate the performance of nanoparticles on SERS substrates. A cumulative distribution is proposed to examine the contributions of hot and warm spots around the nanoparticles. It is used to identify the importance of warm spots on a SERS substrate. A parameter q is proposed to describe the likelihood of a randomly positioned molecule that can be activated. This study provides guidance and insights for the optimization of SERS substrate fabrication techniques.

  3. Analysis of Co-Associated Transcription Factors via Ordered Adjacency Differences on Motif Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Gaofeng; Tang, Jijun; Guo, Fei

    2017-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) binding to specific DNA sequences or motifs, are elementary to the regulation of transcription. The gene is regulated by a combination of TFs in close proximity. Analysis of co-TFs is an important problem in understanding the mechanism of transcriptional regulation. Recently, ChIP-seq in mapping TF provides a large amount of experimental data to analyze co-TFs. Several studies show that if two TFs are co-associated, the relative distance between TFs exhibits a peak-like distribution. In order to analyze co-TFs, we develop a novel method to evaluate the associated situation between TFs. We design an adjacency score based on ordered differences, which can illustrate co-TF binding affinities for motif analysis. For all candidate motifs, we calculate corresponding adjacency scores, and then list descending-order motifs. From these lists, we can find co-TFs for candidate motifs. On ChIP-seq datasets, our method obtains best AUC results on five datasets, 0.9432 for NMYC, 0.9109 for KLF4, 0.9006 for ZFX, 0.8892 for ESRRB, 0.8920 for E2F1. Our method has great stability on large sample datasets. AUC results of our method on all datasets are above 0.8. PMID:28240320

  4. Factors influencing recombination frequency and distribution in a human meiotic crossover hotspot.

    PubMed

    Jeffreys, Alec J; Neumann, Rita

    2005-08-01

    Little is known about the factors that influence the frequency and distribution of meiotic recombination events within human crossover hotspots. We now describe the detailed analysis of sperm recombination in the NID1 hotspot. Like the neighbouring MS32 hotspot, the NID1 hotspot is associated with a minisatellite, suggesting that hotspots predispose DNA to tandem repetition. Unlike MS32, crossover resolution breakpoints in NID1 avoid the minisatellite, producing a cold spot within the hotspot. This avoidance may be related to the palindromic nature of the minisatellite interfering with the generation and/or processing of recombination intermediates. The NID1 hotspot also contains a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) close to the centre, which appears to directly influence the frequency of crossover initiation. Quantitative gene conversion assays show that this SNP affects the frequency of gene conversion and crossover to a very similar extent, providing evidence that conversions and crossovers are triggered by the same recombination initiating events. The recombination-suppressing allele is over-transmitted to recombinant progeny, and provides the most dramatic example to date of recombination-mediated meiotic drive, of a magnitude sufficient to virtually guarantee that the recombination suppressor will eventually replace the more active allele in human populations.

  5. Fish in shallow areas in Moreton Bay, Queensland and factors affecting their distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, H. T.

    1990-06-01

    Five shallow areas (< 4 m in depth) in Moreton Bay were selected to examine fish communities. These areas can be categorized as sand-drifting, sea grass, river mouth, mangrove fringe and sewage outlet. A total of 86 fish species were recorded. Five species (6%) were regarded as true marine fish but these were of rare occurrence (0·5%). Four species (5%) were highly abundant (51%) and 57 species (66%) were represented by low numbers of fish (5%). The sewage outlet and the river mouth sites were found to contain the highest number of fish with relatively low numbers of species. The sand-drifting and the sea grass sites were different in fish fauna, and both were different from the remaining three sites which were of high similarity in fish faunal groups. Food availability, preference for habitats, sea grass vegetation, juvenile/adult segregation, season of juvenile recruitment and hydrological characteristics were thought to be important factors affecting the distribution of these species of fish.

  6. Spatial distribution and risk factors associated with Salmonella enterica in pigs.

    PubMed

    Parada, J; Carranza, A; Alvarez, J; Pichel, M; Tamiozzo, P; Busso, J; Ambrogi, A

    2017-02-01

    The importance of pork in the transmission of Salmonella spp. to humans has led to the development of control programmes worldwide. For this, knowledge on the epidemiology of the infection in the production system is fundamental to the efficacy of the regulations. Our objective was to determine the prevalence and spatial distribution of Salmonella-infected farms in the central region of Argentina, and to identify the predominant serotypes and epidemiological factors associated with an increased risk of infection. Salmonella was isolated from 22 of 52 sampled farms, for a farm prevalence of 42·3% (95% confidence interval 28·4-56·1). The most frequent serotypes isolated were S. Typhimurium and S. Derby, which have often been considered of public health concern in the region. Limited evidences of global and local clustering in the region under study were found, and the type of feed and presence of diarrhoeic pigs were significantly associated with having Salmonella shedders in the farm. This highlights the need to evaluate microbiological controls at the farm level, and demonstrates the usefulness of the spatial tools to identify areas of greatest risk when processing pork at slaughterhouse, which could contribute to increasing the food safety of pork products.

  7. Social distribution of diabetes, hypertension and related risk factors in Barbados: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Howitt, Christina; Hambleton, Ian R; Rose, Angela M C; Hennis, Anselm; Samuels, T Alafia; George, Kenneth S; Unwin, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the distribution of diabetes, hypertension and related behavioural and biological risk factors in adults in Barbados by gender, education and occupation. Design Multistage probability sampling was used to select a representative sample of the adult population (≥25 years). Participants were interviewed using standard questionnaires, underwent anthropometric and blood pressure measurements, and provided fasting blood for glucose and cholesterol measurements. Standard WHO definitions were used. Data were weighted for sampling and non-response, and were age and sex standardised to the 2010 Barbados population. Weighted prevalence estimates were calculated, and prevalence ratios were calculated for behavioural and biological risk factors by demographic and socioeconomic group. Results Study response rate was 55.0%, with 764 women, 470 men. Prevalence of obesity was 33.8% (95% CI 30.7% to 37.1%); hypertension 40.6% (95% CI 36.5% to 44.9%); and diabetes 18.7% (95% CI 16.2% to 21.4%). Compared with women, men were less likely to be obese (prevalence ratio 0.5; 95% CI 0.4 to 0.7), or physically inactive (0.5; 0.4 to 0.6), but more likely to smoke tobacco (4.1; 2.5 to 6.7) and consume large amounts of alcohol in a single episode (4.6; 2.7 to 7.6). Both diabetes (0.83; 0.65 to 1.05) and hypertension (0.89; 0.79 to 1.02) were lower in men, but not significantly so. In women, higher educational level was related to higher fruit and vegetable intake, more physical activity, less diabetes and less hypercholesterolaemia (p 0.01–0.04). In men, higher education was related only to less smoking (p 0.04). Differences by occupation were limited to smoking in men and hypercholesterolaemia in women. Conclusions In this developing country population, sex appears to be a much stronger determinant of behavioural risk factors, as well as obesity and its related risks, than education or occupation. These findings have implications for meeting the commitments made

  8. Estimation of exposure to food packaging materials. 3: Development of consumption factors and food-type distribution factors from data collected on Irish children.

    PubMed

    Duffy, E; Hearty, A P; McCarthy, S; Gibney, M J

    2007-01-01

    There are many initiatives in Europe trying to refine the exposure assessment for food packaging migrants. In the USA, the US Food and Drug Administration (US FDA) uses food consumption and food-type distribution factors to aid the exposure assessment process and generate more realistic estimates of exposure. The present study developed food-consumption factors and food-type distribution factors for Irish children aged 5-12 years from data collected as part of a National Children's Food Survey (NCFS) completed in Ireland in 2003-04, combined with data from the 2003-05 Irish Food Packaging Database and from literature data on surface area-to-weight ratios for food packaging. Consumption factors are defined as the fraction of a person's diet likely to contact a specific food-contact material, while food-type distribution factors reflect the fraction of all food contacting each material that is aqueous, acidic, alcoholic or fatty. In this study, it was found that 'total plastics' had the highest consumption factor of 0.83, while 'total paper and board' had a factor of 0.13 and 'total metal and alloys' had a factor of 0.06. Although it is tentative to compare the US FDA factors with the factors derived in the current study, as the US FDA data are for the total US population, the consumption factor for 'total plastics' in the present study (0.83) was similar to that used by the US FDA (0.79). However, a large difference existed for the consumption factor for 'total metal and alloys' in the Irish data (0.06) and the US FDA data (0.2). In terms of the type of materials used for foods, glass was used mainly for acidic foods (0.67), while plastic was uniformly used for all food types. The food-contact area for plastic packaging for all foods consumed by children was 10.67 dm2/child day(-1), which is slightly lower than the proposed value for the average European consumer of 12.4 dm2/person day(-1). However, this should be expected, as children do not consume as much food as

  9. The distributions of one invasive and two native crayfishes in relation to coarse-scale natural and anthropogenic factors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Westhoff, Jacob T.; Rabeni, C.F.; Sowa, S.P.

    2011-01-01

    1. Native crayfishes are often extirpated from portions of their range because of interactions with invasive species, anthropogenic alterations to environmental conditions or a combination of these factors. Our goal was to identify coarse-scale natural and anthropogenic factors related to the current distributions of the invasive crayfish, Orconectes hylas, and two endemic crayfishes, Orconectes peruncus andOrconectes quadruncus in the St. Francis River drainage, Missouri, U.S.A. and to provide wider insights into the potential role of anthropogenic factors in facilitating species displacement. 2. We used classification trees to model coarse-scale natural and anthropogenic environmental factors and their relation to the presence or absence of each species. Model results were then used to predict probability of presence for each species within each stream segment throughout the entire St. Francis River drainage. 3. Factors related to geology and soils were the best predictors of species distributions. A dichotomy of these factors explained much of the discrete distributions of the two native species. Agricultural-related factors were identified as the most influential anthropogenic activity related to species distributions. All associations between the invasive species and anthropogenic factors were negative which suggested the invader was not likely to establish in heavily impacted areas. Overall, our models had high correct classification rates, and we were able to reliably predict the presence of the invader in the invaded drainage. 4. Given the negative associations of the invader with anthropogenic alterations at a coarse spatial scale, we believe other mechanisms are likely to be responsible for the widespread displacement of the two native species. These findings can be used to assist in conservation activities such as creation of refugia for native species and may direct future research to identify the mechanism(s) of species displacement.

  10. Seroprevalence, distribution and risk factor for peste des petits ruminants (PPR) in Algeria.

    PubMed

    Kardjadj, Moustafa; Kouidri, Brahim; Metref, Djamil; Luka, Pam Dachung; Ben-Mahdi, Meriem Hind

    2015-11-01

    Peste des petit ruminants (PPR) is a highly contagious and infectious viral disease of small ruminants with severe socio-economic implications. The disease was first reported in the Southern part of Algeria in 2011 and by February 2012 it has reached the central part of the country. Estimating national prevalence, distribution and identification of risk factors remains a key component in understanding the epidemiology and control of the disease. The present study was carried out between January and June 2014, to include a detailed description of flock and within-flock seroprevalence and risk association between PPR seropositivity and various flock management factors in Algeria. A total of 150 flocks randomly sampled across the country were investigated and 4552 serum samples were collected from 3336 sheep and 1216 goats, respectively. C-ELISA was used to detect the presence of antibodies in small ruminant animals as an indicator of PPRV exposure. The results showed an overall true flock seroprevalence of 30.45% [95% CI 23.76-37.14] with a mean of the true within-flock prevalence as 29.87%±2.11. The mean of the true within-flock prevalence in mixed flocks (12.93%±1.85) was however found to be significantly higher than sheep flocks (5.74%±1.06). Also the mean of the true within-flock prevalence was found to be significantly higher in adult (35.36%±3.13) compared to young animals (21.83%±2.47) and in females (33.11%±2.87) compared to males (22.14%±2.31). The univariate analysis revealed that PPR overall flock seroprevalence was significantly higher (P<0.20) in large flock (50.61%) than in small flock (33.33%), in mixed flock (56.7%) than in sheep flock (35.35%) and in the flocks that had contact with other flocks (46.5%) compared to those who had not (30.6%). However the differences among studied regions and grazing system were not statistically significant. For the risk factor analysis, univariate analysis of variables followed by a multiple logistic

  11. Platelet-independent adhesion of calcium-loaded erythrocytes to von Willebrand factor

    PubMed Central

    Bierings, Ruben; Meems, Henriet; Mul, Frederik P. J.; Geerts, Dirk; Vlaar, Alexander P. J.; Voorberg, Jan; Hordijk, Peter L.

    2017-01-01

    Adhesion of erythrocytes to endothelial cells lining the vascular wall can cause vaso-occlusive events that impair blood flow which in turn may result in ischemia and tissue damage. Adhesion of erythrocytes to vascular endothelial cells has been described in multiple hemolytic disorders, especially in sickle cell disease, but the adhesion of normal erythrocytes to endothelial cells has hardly been described. It was shown that calcium-loaded erythrocytes can adhere to endothelial cells. Because sickle erythrocyte adhesion to ECs can be enhanced by ultra-large von Willebrand factor multimers, we investigated whether calcium loading of erythrocytes could promote binding to endothelial cells via ultra-large von Willebrand factor multimers. We used (immunofluorescent) live-cell imaging of washed erythrocytes perfused over primary endothelial cells at venular flow rate. Using this approach, we show that calcium-loaded erythrocytes strongly adhere to histamine-stimulated primary human endothelial cells. This adhesion is mediated by ultra-large von Willebrand factor multimers. Von Willebrand factor knockdown or ADAMTS13 cleavage abolished the binding of erythrocytes to activated endothelial cells under flow. Platelet depletion did not interfere with erythrocyte binding to von Willebrand factor. Our results reveal platelet-independent adhesion of calcium-loaded erythrocytes to endothelium-derived von Willebrand factor. Erythrocyte adhesion to von Willebrand factor may be particularly relevant for venous thrombosis, which is characterized by the formation of erythrocyte-rich thrombi. PMID:28249049

  12. Study of distribution and factors affecting syphilis epidemic among inner-city minorities of Baltimore.

    PubMed

    Williams, P B; Ekundayo, O

    2001-11-01

    Disparities in health and medical conditions among ethnic and racial groups have been repeatedly documented. These inequalities, which have been noted in the recent past, include health outcomes such as quality of life and mortality, process, accessibility and appropriateness of care, and the prevalence of certain degenerative conditions and infectious diseases. Syphilis, a sexually transmitted disease (STD) which seemed to have disappeared or had been controlled over the years, has now re-emerged as a major public health problem in many rural, urban and suburban communities. Progression of the current rate of syphilis, which erupted in Baltimore during the later part of 1994, has continued unabated, most especially among the ethnic minorities, despite efforts of the Baltimore City Health Department and Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene to control the epidemic. With the current incidence rates of 270 per 100 000 live births for congenital syphilis and 99.3 per 100 000 population for primary, secondary and latent syphilis (96% of the cases being in the non-white population), Baltimore becomes the city with the highest number of syphilis cases in the nation, surpassing the national average of 2.6 cases per 100 000 population. This study, which utilizes a combination of retrospective and questionnaire-oriented approach, was designed to assess factors that influenced the high incidence of syphilis among Baltimore inner-city dwellers between 1994 and 1998. Data for the study included syphilis reports from private physicians, the Baltimore City Health Department, STD clinics, the Center for Disease Control (CDC), and ethnographic interviews. Factors favoring the distribution and infectivity of the disease among the inner-city dwellers include greater poverty, high level of communication gaps between providers and a cross-section of minority inner-city dwellers, exchange of sex for crack cocaine, lower educational background, and inadequate and

  13. Factors related to occurrence and distribution of selected bacterial and protozoan pathogens in Pennsylvania streams.

    PubMed

    Duris, Joseph W; Reif, Andrew G; Krouse, Donna A; Isaacs, Natasha M

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence and distribution of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) and bacterial and protozoan pathogens are controlled by diverse factors. To investigate these factors in Pennsylvania streams, 217 samples were collected quarterly from a 27-station water-quality monitoring network from July 2007 through August 2009. Samples were analyzed for concentrations of Escherichia coli (EC) and enterococci (ENT) indicator bacteria, concentrations of Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts, and the presence of four genes related to pathogenic types of EC (eaeA, stx2, stx1, rfb(O157)) plus three microbial source tracking (MST) gene markers that are also associated with pathogenic ENT and EC (esp, LTIIa, STII). Water samples were concurrently analyzed for basic water chemistry, physical measures of water quality, nutrients, metals, and a suite of 79 organic compounds that included hormones, pharmaceuticals, and antibiotics. For each sample location, stream discharge was measured by using standardized methods at the time of sample collection, and ancillary sample site information, such as land use and geological characteristics, was compiled. Samples exceeding recreational water quality criteria were more likely to contain all measured pathogen genes but not Cryptosporidium or Giardia (oo)cysts. FIB and Giardia density and frequency of eaeA gene occurrence were significantly related to season. When discharge at a sampling location was high (>75th percentile of daily mean discharge), there were greater densities of FIB and Giardia, and the stx2, rfb(O157), STII, and esp genes were found more frequently than at other discharge conditions. Giardia occurrence was likely related to nonpoint sources, which are highly influential during seasonal overland transport resulting from snowmelt and elevated precipitation in late winter and spring in Pennsylvania. When MST markers of human, swine, or bovine origin were present, samples more frequently carried the eaeA, stx2, stx1, and rfb

  14. Factors related to occurrence and distribution of selected bacterial and protozoan pathogens in Pennsylvania streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duris, Joseph W.; Reif, Andrew G.; Donna A. Crouse,; Isaacs, Natasha M.

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence and distribution of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) and bacterial and protozoan pathogens are controlled by diverse factors. To investigate these factors in Pennsylvania streams, 217 samples were collected quarterly from a 27-station water-quality monitoring network from July 2007 through August 2009. Samples were analyzed for concentrations of Escherichia coli (EC) and enterococci (ENT) indicator bacteria, concentrations of Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts, and the presence of four genes related to pathogenic types of EC (eaeA, stx2, stx1, rfbO157) plus three microbial source tracking (MST) gene markers that are also associated with pathogenic ENT and EC (esp, LTIIa, STII). Water samples were concurrently analyzed for basic water chemistry, physical measures of water quality, nutrients, metals, and a suite of 79 organic compounds that included hormones, pharmaceuticals, and antibiotics. For each sample location, stream discharge was measured by using standardized methods at the time of sample collection, and ancillary sample site information, such as land use and geological characteristics, was compiled. Samples exceeding recreational water quality criteria were more likely to contain all measured pathogen genes but notCryptosporidium or Giardia (oo)cysts. FIB and Giardia density and frequency of eaeA gene occurrence were significantly related to season. When discharge at a sampling location was high (>75th percentile of daily mean discharge), there were greater densities of FIB and Giardia, and the stx2, rfbO157, STII, and esp genes were found more frequently than at other discharge conditions. Giardia occurrence was likely related to nonpoint sources, which are highly influential during seasonal overland transport resulting from snowmelt and elevated precipitation in late winter and spring in Pennsylvania. When MST markers of human, swine, or bovine origin were present, samples more frequently carried the eaeA, stx2

  15. Microbial decomposition of wood in streams: distribution of microflora and factors affecting [C]lignocellulose mineralization.

    PubMed

    Aumen, N G; Bottomley, P J; Ward, G M; Gregory, S V

    1983-12-01

    The distribution and lignocellulolytic activity of the microbial community was determined on a large log of Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) in a Pacific Northwest stream. Scanning electron microscopy, plate counts, and degradation of [C]lignocelluloses prepared from Douglas fir and incubated with samples of wood taken from the surface and within the log revealed that most of the microbial colonization and lignocellulose-degrading activity occurred on the surface. Labeled lignocellulose and surface wood samples were incubated in vitro with nutrient supplements to determine potential limiting factors of [C]lignocellulose degradation. Incubations carried out in a nitrogenless mineral salts and trace elements solution were no more favorable to degradation than those carried out in distilled water alone. Incubations supplemented with either (NH(4))(2)SO(4) or organic nitrogen sources showed large increases in the rates of mineralization over incubations with mineral salts and trace elements alone, with the greatest effect being observed from an addition of (NH(4))(2)SO(4). Subsequent incubations with (NH(4))(2)SO(4), KNO(3), and NH(4)NO(3) revealed that KNO(3) was the most favorable for lignin degradation, whereas all three supplements were equally favorable for cellulose degradation. Supplementation with glucose repressed both lignin and cellulose mineralization. The results reported in this study indicate that nitrogen limitation of wood decomposition may exist in streams of the Pacific Northwest. The radiotracer technique was shown to be a sensitive and useful tool for assessing relative patterns of lignocellulose decay and microbial activity in wood, along with the importance of thoroughly characterizing the experimental system before its general acceptance.

  16. Determination of Stress Intensity Factor Distributions for "Interface" Cracks in Incompressible, Dissimilar Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, C. W.

    1997-01-01

    The present study was undertaken in order to develop test methods and procedures for measuring the variation of the stress intensity factor through the thickness in bimaterial specimens containing cracks within and parallel to the bond line using the frozen stress photoelastic method. Since stress freezing materials are incompressible above critical temperature, and since thick plates are to be employed which tend to produce a state of plane strain near the crack tip, the interface near tip fracture equations reduce to the classic form for homogeneous materials. Moreover, zero thickness interfaces do not exist when materials are bonded together. It was decided early on that it would be important to insure a uniform straight and accurate crack tip region through the thickness of the body to reduce scatter in the SIF distribution through the thickness. It was also observed that rubberlike materials which were desired to be modeled exhibited significant tip blunting prior to crack extension and that some blunting of the tip would provide a more realistic model. It should be noted that, in normal stress freezing photoelastic work, it is considered good practice to avoid utilizing data near bond lines in photoelastic models due to the bond line stresses which inevitably develop when two parts are bonded together. Thus, the present study involves certain exploratory aspects in deviating from standard practice in stress freezing work. With the above ideas in mind, several different test methods were investigated and are described in the following sections and appendices. The geometry selected for the program was a thick, edge cracked specimen containing a bond line.

  17. Phthalates and nonylphenols in urban runoff: Occurrence, distribution and area emission factors.

    PubMed

    Björklund, Karin; Cousins, Anna Palm; Strömvall, Ann-Margret; Malmqvist, Per-Arne

    2009-08-01

    The urban water system is believed to be an important sink for the nonpoint-source pollutants nonylphenols and phthalates. The presence of nonylphenols (NPs), nonylphenol ethoxylates (NPEOs), and eight phthalates was analyzed in urban stormwater and sediment from three catchment areas in Sweden. Emission loads for these substances were then calculated for a specific urban catchment area. In addition, substance distribution in road runoff passing through a sedimentation facility was modeled using a modified QWASI-model for chemical fate. High concentrations of DEHP, DIDP and DINP (factors from an urban highway environment revealed that as much as 2.1 kg of total phthalates and 200 g of NP and NPEOs may be emitted per hectare and year. The results indicate that all monitored phthalates, branched NPs and lower NPEOs are present in Swedish urban water systems. The long-chain phthalates DIDP and DINP are believed to occur at higher concentrations than other phthalates because of their higher environmental persistence and their increasing use in Sweden.

  18. [Spatial distribution of soil moisture and salinity and their influence factors in the farmland of Manas River catchment, Northwest China].

    PubMed

    Shen, Hao; Abuduwaili, Jilili

    2015-03-01

    Applying methods of statistics and geo-statistics, Manas River catchment was selected as the research area to study the spatial distribution of soil moisture and salinity in the soil profile as. well as their influence factors. The coupling relationship between soil moisture and salinity presented in the spatial distribution was explored as well. The result showed that the soil moisture was overall at a low level (varying from 14.2% to 20.9%), while the salinity was relatively high (about 6.00-9.15 g . kg-1). The soil profile distribution of water and salt contents both showed a trend of bottom accumulation. The variation of soil water moisture was moderate, while that of salt content was strong. Soil salinity and moisture of all layers showed strong spatial autocorrelation, which were mainly affected by structural factors. The horizontal distribution patterns of water and salt contents were irregular, and were constrained by factors like terrain and landforms, etc. Disturbed by human activities, the coupling relation of soil moisture and salinity became much more complex, but their spatial distribution variation was synchronized to some extent.

  19. Host-Specific Interactions with Environmental Factors Shape the Distribution of Symbiodinium across the Great Barrier Reef

    PubMed Central

    Tonk, Linda; Sampayo, Eugenia M.; Weeks, Scarla; Magno-Canto, Marites; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove

    2013-01-01

    Background The endosymbiotic dinoflagellates (genus Symbiodinium) within coral reef invertebrates are critical to the survival of the holobiont. The genetic variability of Symbiodinium may contribute to the tolerance of the symbiotic association to elevated sea surface temperatures (SST). To assess the importance of factors such as the local environment, host identity and biogeography in driving Symbiodinium distributions on reef-wide scales, data from studies on reef invertebrate-Symbiodinium associations from the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) were compiled. Methodology/Principal Findings The resulting database consisted of 3717 entries from 26 studies. It was used to explore ecological patterns such as host-specificity and environmental drivers structuring community complexity using a multi-scalar approach. The data was analyzed in several ways: (i) frequently sampled host species were analyzed independently to investigate the influence of the environment on symbiont distributions, thereby excluding the influence of host specificity, (ii) host species distributions across sites were added as an environmental variable to determine the contribution of host identity on symbiont distribution, and (iii) data were pooled based on clade (broad genetic groups dividing the genus Symbiodinium) to investigate factors driving Symbiodinium distributions using lower taxonomic resolution. The results indicated that host species identity plays a dominant role in determining the distribution of Symbiodinium and environmental variables shape distributions on a host species-specific level. SST derived variables (especially SSTstdev) most often contributed to the selection of the best model. Clade level comparisons decreased the power of the predictive model indicating that it fails to incorporate the main drivers behind Symbiodinium distributions. Conclusions/Significance Including the influence of different host species on Symbiodinium distributional patterns improves our understanding

  20. Spatial analysis of the distribution, risk factors and access to medical resources of patients with hepatitis B in Shenzhen, China.

    PubMed

    Xi, Yuliang; Ren, Fu; Liang, Shi; Zhang, Jinghua; Lin, De-Nan

    2014-11-07

    Considering the high morbidity of hepatitis B in China, many epidemiological studies based on classic medical statistical analysis have been started but lack spatial information. However, spatial information such as the spatial distribution, autocorrelation and risk factors of the disease is of great help in studying patients with hepatitis B. This study examined 2851 cases of hepatitis B that were hospitalized in Shenzhen in 2010 and studied the spatial distribution, risk factors and spatial access to health services using spatial interpolation, Pearson correlation analysis and the improved two-step floating catchment area method. The results showed that the spatial distribution of hepatitis B, along with risk factors as well as spatial access to the regional medical resources, was uneven and mainly concentrated in the south and southwest of Shenzhen in 2010. In addition, the distribution characteristics of hepatitis B revealed a positive correlation between four types of service establishments and risk factors for the disease. The Pearson correlation coefficients are 0.566, 0.515, 0.626, 0.538 corresponding to bath centres, beauty salons, massage parlours and pedicure parlours (p < 0.05). Additionally, the allocation of medical resources for hepatitis B is adequate, as most patients could be treated at nearby hospitals.

  1. Spatial Analysis of the Distribution, Risk Factors and Access to Medical Resources of Patients with Hepatitis B in Shenzhen, China

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Yuliang; Ren, Fu; Liang, Shi; Zhang, Jinghua; Lin, De-Nan

    2014-01-01

    Considering the high morbidity of hepatitis B in China, many epidemiological studies based on classic medical statistical analysis have been started but lack spatial information. However, spatial information such as the spatial distribution, autocorrelation and risk factors of the disease is of great help in studying patients with hepatitis B. This study examined 2851 cases of hepatitis B that were hospitalized in Shenzhen in 2010 and studied the spatial distribution, risk factors and spatial access to health services using spatial interpolation, Pearson correlation analysis and the improved two-step floating catchment area method. The results showed that the spatial distribution of hepatitis B, along with risk factors as well as spatial access to the regional medical resources, was uneven and mainly concentrated in the south and southwest of Shenzhen in 2010. In addition, the distribution characteristics of hepatitis B revealed a positive correlation between four types of service establishments and risk factors for the disease. The Pearson correlation coefficients are 0.566, 0.515, 0.626, 0.538 corresponding to bath centres, beauty salons, massage parlours and pedicure parlours (p < 0.05). Additionally, the allocation of medical resources for hepatitis B is adequate, as most patients could be treated at nearby hospitals. PMID:25386954

  2. Distribution and controlling factors of phytoplankton assemblages in a semi-enclosed bay during spring and summer.

    PubMed

    Peng, Shitao; Qin, Xuebo; Shi, Honghua; Zhou, Ran; Dai, Mingxin; Ding, Dewen

    2012-05-01

    The phytoplankton assemblages' patterns and their correlation to environmental factors were studied in Bohai Bay during spring and summer. Two zones, the northern (NWA) and southern (SWA) water area, were identified by cluster analysis based on their physical and chemical properties. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed that more phytoplankton species was found in the SWA with low nutrient concentration, while high phytoplankton abundance occurred in the NWA with high nutrient concentration. The seasonal variability in phytoplankton can be explained by water temperature, nutrient, and hydrodynamic conditions (includes mixing during spring and stratification during summer). Results of redundancy analysis (RDA) showed that silicate (SiO(4)) and soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) were the most important environmental factors influencing the phytoplankton distribution during spring and summer, respectively. Hydrodynamics condition plays a key role in controlling variation of the environmental factors, which determined phytoplankton distribution in Bohai Bay.

  3. Neutron distribution, electric dipole polarizability and weak form factor of 48Ca from chiral effective field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendt, Kyle

    2016-03-01

    How large is the 48Ca nucleus? While the electric charge distribution of this nucleus was accurately measured decades ago, both experimental and ab initio descriptions of the neutron distribution are deficient. We address this question using ab initio calculations of the electric charge, neutron, and weak distributions of 48Ca based on chiral effective field theory. Historically, chiral effective field theory calculations of systems larger than 4 nucleons have been plagued by strong systematic errors which result in theoretical descriptions that are too dense and over bound. We address these errors using a novel approach that permits us to accurately reproduce binding energy and charge radius of 48Ca, and to constrain electroweak observables such as the neutron radius, electric dipole polarizability, and the weak form factor. For a full list of contributors to this work, please see ``Neutron and weak-charge distributions of the 48Ca nucleus,'' Nature Physics (2015) doi:10.1038/nphys3529.

  4. 25 CFR 170.202 - Does the Relative Need Distribution Factor allocate funding among tribes?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... for their approved IRR projects and activities under 23 U.S.C. 202(d)(2). The IRR Program construction.... (a) The IRR Program construction funds will be distributed in accordance with the BIA procedures for self-governance tribes that negotiate IRR construction projects into their AFA, and distributed to...

  5. 25 CFR 170.202 - Does the Relative Need Distribution Factor allocate funding among tribes?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... for their approved IRR projects and activities under 23 U.S.C. 202(d)(2). The IRR Program construction.... (a) The IRR Program construction funds will be distributed in accordance with the BIA procedures for self-governance tribes that negotiate IRR construction projects into their AFA, and distributed to...

  6. Examining Factor Score Distributions to Determine the Nature of Latent Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinley, Douglas; McDonald, Roderick P.

    2007-01-01

    Similarities between latent class models with K classes and linear factor models with K-1 factors are investigated. Specifically, the mathematical equivalence between the covariance structure of the two models is discussed, and a Monte Carlo simulation is performed using generated data that represents both latent factors and latent classes with…

  7. [Distribution, seasonal variation and influence factors of dissolved inorganic arsenic in the Sanggou Bay].

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Ren, Jing-Ling; Liu, Su-Mei; Jiang, Zeng-Jie; Du, Jin-Zhou; Fang, Jian-Guang

    2014-07-01

    The biogeochemical behavior of arsenic in the aquatic environment has already captured the attentions of scientists due to its complex forms and toxicity. Four cruises were carried out in April, August, October 2011 and January 2012 in the Sanggou Bay. The concentrations of total dissolved inorganic arsenic (TDIAs, TDIAs = [ As(5+] + [As(3+)]) and arsenite (As(3+)) were measured by Hydride Generation-Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry (HG-AFS). The concentrations of TDIAs ranged from 3.4-12.4 nmol x L(-1) in April, 8.9-16.9 nmol x L(-1) in August, 14.7-21.3 nmol x L(-1) in October and 13.8-21.9 nmol x L(-1) in January. The concentrations of arsenite ranged from 0.3-2.1 nmol x L(-1), 0.4-3.8 nmol x L(-1), 1.8-4.0 nmol x L(-1) and 0.3-2.9 nmol x L(-1) during four cruises, respectively. The concentrations of TDIAs in spring and summer were lower than those in autumn and winter, and high values of TDIAs appeared in the bay-mouth and the coastal estuary. The concentrations of arsenite in spring and winter were lower than those in summer and autumn. The maximum As(3+)/TDIAs ratios appeared in summer. The mean value of TDIAs in the Sanggou Bay was (13.9 +/- 4.7) nmol x L(-1), which was lower than the national primary drinking in water Standards from USEPA and met the first grade water quality based on the environmental quality standards for surface water of China. It indicates that there is no obvious anthropogenic pollution. The concentrations of TDIAs in the Sanggou Bay were lower than those in the Ailian Bay and the Lidao Bay in spring and summer due to the different hydrological environments and terrestrial inputs. Riverine input, incursion of Yellow Sea and biological activities were the three main factors impacting the distribution of TDIAs in the Sanggou Bay, and the influence of aquaculture activities was particularly significant. The enrichment of arsenic by aquaculture may lead to potential ecological crisis and food safety problems, and need to be paid more

  8. Equal impact of diffusion and DNA binding rates on the potential spatial distribution of nuclear factor κB transcription factor inside the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Sycheva, A M; Kel, A; Nikolaev, E N; Moshkovskii, S A

    2014-06-01

    There are two physical processes that influence the spatial distribution of transcription factor molecules entering the nucleus of a eukaryotic cell, the binding to genomic DNA and the diffusion throughout the nuclear volume. Comparison of the DNA-protein association rate constant and the protein diffusion constant may determine which one is the limiting factor. If the process is diffusion-limited, transcription factor molecules are captured by DNA before their even distribution in the nuclear volume. Otherwise, if the reaction rate is limiting, these molecules diffuse evenly and then find their binding sites. Using well-studied human NF-κB dimer as an example, we calculated its diffusion constant using the Debye-Smoluchowski equation. The value of diffusion constant was about 10(-15) cm(3)/s, and it was comparable to the NF-κB association rate constant for DNA binding known from previous studies. Thus, both diffusion and DNA binding play an equally important role in NF-κB spatial distribution. The importance of genome 3D-structure in gene expression regulation and possible dependence of gene expression on the local concentration of open chromatin can be hypothesized from our theoretical estimate.

  9. Factors responsible for the patchy distribution of natural soil water repellency in Mediterranean semiarid forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano, E.; Jiménez-Pinilla, P.; Mataix-Solera, J.; González-Pérez, J. A.; García-Orenes, F.; Torres, M. P.; Arcenegui, V.; Mataix-Beneyto, J.

    2012-04-01

    Soil water repellency (WR) is commonly observed in forest areas showing wettable and water repellent patches with high spatial variability. This has important hydrological implications; in semiarid areas where water supply is limited, even slight WR may play an important role in infiltration patterns and distribution of water into the soil (Mataix-Solera et al., 2007). It has been proposed that the origin of WR is the release of organic compounds from different plants species and sources (due to waxes and other organic substances in their tissues; Doerr et al., 1998). However, the relationship between WR and plants may not always be a direct one: a group of fungi (mainly mycorrhizal fungi) and microorganisms could be also responsible for WR. The aim of this research is to study the relationships between WR in soils under different plant cover with selected soil properties and the quantity of fungi and their exudates. The study area is located in Southeast Spain, "Sierra de la Taja" near Pinoso (Alicante)), with a semiarid Mediterranean climate (Pm=260mm). Samples were taken in September 2011, when WR is normally strongest after summer drought. Soil samples were collected from the first 2.5cm of the mineral A horizon at microsites beneath each of the four most representative species (Pinus halepensis, Rosmarinus officinalis, Quercus. rotundifolia and Cistus albidus; n=15 per specie) and 5 samples from bare soil with no influence of any species. Different soil parameters were analyzed; water content, soil organic mater content (SOM), pH, WR, easily extractable glomalin (EEG), total mycelium and extractable lipids. The occurrence of WR was higher under P. halepensis (87% of samples) and Q. rotundifolia (60% of samples). Positive significant correlations were found between WR and SOM content for all species, with the best correlations for Pinus and Quercus (r=0.855**, r= 0.934** respectively). In addition, negative significant correlations were found between WR and p

  10. Programmes for advance distribution of misoprostol to prevent post-partum haemorrhage: a rapid literature review of factors affecting implementation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Helen J; Colvin, Christopher J; Richards, Esther; Roberson, Jeffrey; Sharma, Geeta; Thapa, Kusum; Gülmezoglu, A Metin

    2016-02-01

    Recent efforts to prevent post-partum haemorrhage (PPH) in low-income countries have focused on providing women with access to oral misoprostol during home birth. The WHO recommends using lay health workers (LHWs) to administer misoprostol in settings where skilled birth attendants are not available. This review synthesizes current knowledge about the barriers and facilitators affecting implementation of advance community distribution of misoprostol to prevent PPH, where misoprostol may be self-administered or administered by an LHW.We searched for and summarized available empirical evidence, and collected primary data from programme stakeholders about their experiences of programme implementation.We present key outcomes and features of advanced distribution programmes that are in operation or have been piloted globally. We categorized factors influencing implementation into those that operate at the health system level, factors related to the community and policy context and those factors more closely connected to the end user.Debates around advance distribution have centred on the potential risks and benefits of making misoprostol available to pregnant women and community members during pregnancy for administration in the home. However, the risks of advance distribution appear manageable and the benefits of self-administration, especially for women who have little chance of expert care for PPH, are considerable.

  11. Environmental and managerial factors associated with pack stock distribution in high elevation meadows: Case study from Yosemite National Park.

    PubMed

    Walden-Schreiner, Chelsey; Leung, Yu-Fai; Kuhn, Tim; Newburger, Todd; Tsai, Wei-Lun

    2017-02-09

    Parks and protected areas are integral strategies for biological diversity conservation, and their management often involves balancing visitor use with resource protection. Effectively balancing these objectives requires data about how use is distributed within areas of interest and how management strategies and environmental conditions interact to minimize negative impacts. This study examined which environmental and managerial factors most influenced the distribution of domestic pack stock animals, a common visitor use-related activity, when released to graze in high elevation meadows. Using a species distribution modelling approach, MaxEnt, managerial factors were found to be among the top contributors to models. Pack stock animals concentrated use near the locations where they were released as well as portable enclosure fencing confining the lead animal even though the remainder were allowed to roam freely. Elevation was the environmental factor contributing most, with animals remaining at similar elevations to the meadow even if moving into nearby understory. Results highlight the importance of release point and fence locations to overall pack stock animal distribution and rotational or strategic placement can be a tactic for mitigating impacts to sensitive habitats.

  12. Jamaica Bay studies VII: Factors affecting the distribution and abundance of ducks in a New York estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, Joanna; Trout, J. Richard; Wander, Wade; Ritter, Glenn S.

    1984-12-01

    The abundance and distribution of ducks (Anatini, Cairinini, Aythyini, Mergini, Oxyurini) were examined at Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge, a coastal estuary on Long Island, New York. The refuge contains a variety of tidal habitats as well two freshwater impoundments. The largest concentrations of diving ducks were present in March and April, and from October through December; while the largest concentrations of dabbling ducks were present from June through December. Thus, diving ducks used the refuge on migration whereas dabbling ducks used the refuge during and following the breeding season. Time of year was thus the most significant factor affecting distribution and abundance. Some species were present all year, including Black Duck Anas rubripes, Mallard A. platyrhynchos, Gadwall A. strepera, and Ruddy Duck Oxyura jamaicensis. Although both dabblers and divers used all areas of the bay, dabblers used both ponds while divers used only the East Pond. Dabbling ducks concentrated in the bay at low tide, and on the ponds at high tide. There were more divers on the bay on a falling tide although tide direction did not influence the abundance or distribution of dabblers. Temperature and wind variables influenced the distribution of all ducks: they used the bay at low temperatures, and rafted in large flocks on the bay in intermediate, Northwest winds. Only the numbers and distribution of dabblers were significantly influenced by cloud cover. We conclude that abiotic factors influence the abundance and distribution of ducks on Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge, and that tidal factors should be considered when managing migratory or wintering populations of ducks.

  13. Factors Affecting the Distribution of Perfluorinated Compounds in Sediments from Lake Shihwa, Korea

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) are ubiquitously distributed in various environmental media including water, soil, sediment, and biota. PFCs have also been shown to biomagnify in both aquatic and terrestrial environments. Lake Shihwa is an artificial saltwater lake, located on ...

  14. DESICCATION AND OTHER FACTORS AFFECTING THE UPPER INTERTIDAL DISTRIBUTION OF EELGRASS IN YAQUINA BAY, OR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Eelgrass (Zostera marina) in Pacific Northwest is primarily intertidal, yet little research has been done on what factors control its upper intertidal growth boundary. In July 2000 a two year study was initiated in Yaquina Bay (Newport, OR) to evaluate the effects of four factor...

  15. Environmental factors prevail over dispersal constraints in determining the distribution and assembly of Trichoptera species in mountain lakes

    PubMed Central

    de Mendoza, Guillermo; Ventura, Marc; Catalan, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Aiming to elucidate whether large-scale dispersal factors or environmental species sorting prevail in determining patterns of Trichoptera species composition in mountain lakes, we analyzed the distribution and assembly of the most common Trichoptera (Plectrocnemia laetabilis, Polycentropus flavomaculatus, Drusus rectus, Annitella pyrenaea, and Mystacides azurea) in the mountain lakes of the Pyrenees (Spain, France, Andorra) based on a survey of 82 lakes covering the geographical and environmental extremes of the lake district. Spatial autocorrelation in species composition was determined using Moran’s eigenvector maps (MEM). Redundancy analysis (RDA) was applied to explore the influence of MEM variables and in-lake, and catchment environmental variables on Trichoptera assemblages. Variance partitioning analysis (partial RDA) revealed the fraction of species composition variation that could be attributed uniquely to either environmental variability or MEM variables. Finally, the distribution of individual species was analyzed in relation to specific environmental factors using binomial generalized linear models (GLM). Trichoptera assemblages showed spatial structure. However, the most relevant environmental variables in the RDA (i.e., temperature and woody vegetation in-lake catchments) were also related with spatial variables (i.e., altitude and longitude). Partial RDA revealed that the fraction of variation in species composition that was uniquely explained by environmental variability was larger than that uniquely explained by MEM variables. GLM results showed that the distribution of species with longitudinal bias is related to specific environmental factors with geographical trend. The environmental dependence found agrees with the particular traits of each species. We conclude that Trichoptera species distribution and composition in the lakes of the Pyrenees are governed predominantly by local environmental factors, rather than by dispersal constraints. For

  16. [Factors limiting distribution of the rare lichen species Lobaria pulmonaria (in forests of the Kologriv Forest Nature Reserve)].

    PubMed

    Ivanova, N V

    2015-01-01

    The distribution patterns and coenotic confines ofthe epiphytic lichen Lobaria pulmonaria have been studied. The factors limiting the habitat of this rare lichen species in the Kologriv Forest Nature Reserve (southern taiga subzone) have been revealed. It has been shown that L. pulmonaria is attracted to forest areas, which are less affected by humans and characterized by better light conditions than other communities. It has been found that L. pulmonaria is able to colonize trees at various ontogenetic states, beginning from virginal ones.

  17. [Relationships between distribution of soil-born bryophytes in urban area of Hangzhou and related ecological factors].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Cao, Tong; Wang, Jian; Cao, Yang

    2008-04-01

    At the 21 sampling sites in urban area of Hangzhou, 47 species of soil-born bryophytes belonging to 31 genera and 22 families were recorded. Based on the ecological importance value of these species and the data of ecological factors at the sampling sites, the relationships between the distribution of the bryophytes species in urban area of Hangzhou and related ecological factors were studied by canonical correspondence analysis. The results showed that human disturbance and soil pH were the most important factors determining the distribution of the bryophytes. In urban parks and green lands where human disturbance was greater, soil pH was alkali, and the species were mainly belonging to the genera of Haplocladium and Bryum and the family of Pottiaceae. In hilly area where human disturbance was lesser, soil pH turned to acidic, and the bryophytes were more, with pleurocarpous mosses and liverworts being relatively rich. The niche width of the 47 bryophytes was calculated, which revealed that most of them had very narrow niche width (<0.1). The Pseudotaxiphyllum pohliaecarpum widely distributed in the hilly area of southwest Xihu Lake had the widest niche width (0.3510), followed by Trichostomum planifolium (0.2239) and Haplocladium microphyllum (0.2185), the commonest species in the parks and greenlands in urban area of Hangzhou.

  18. Difficulty Factors, Distribution Effects, and the Least Squares Simplex Data Matrix Solution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ten Berge, Jos M. F.

    1972-01-01

    In the present article it is argued that the Least Squares Simplex Data Matrix Solution does not deal adequately with difficulty factors inasmuch as the theoretical foundation is insufficient. (Author/CB)

  19. Importance of environmental factors on the richness and distribution of benthic macroinvertebrates in tropical headwater streams

    EPA Science Inventory

    It is essential to understand the interactions between local environmental factors (e.g., physical habitat and water quality) and aquatic assemblages to conserve biodiversity in tropical and subtropical headwater streams. Therefore, we evaluated the relative importance of multipl...

  20. Magnitude-frequency characteristics and preparatory factors for spatial debris-slide distribution in the northern Faroe Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahl, Mads-Peter J.; Mortensen, Lis E.; Jensen, Niels H.; Veihe, Anita

    2013-04-01

    The Faroe Islands in the North Atlantic Ocean are highly susceptible to debris-avalanches and debris-flows originating from debris-slide activity in shallow colluvial soils. To provide data for hazard and risk assessment of debris-avalanches and debris-flows, this study aims at quantifying the magnitude and frequency of their debris-slide origins as well as identifying which preparatory factors are responsible for the spatial debris-slide distribution in the landscape. For that purpose a debris-slide inventory was generated from aerial photo interpretation (API), fieldwork and anecdotal sources, covering a 159 km2 study area in the northern Faroe Islands. A magnitude-cumulative frequency (MCF) curve was derived to predict magnitude dependant debris-slide frequencies, while preparatory factors responsible for spatial debris-slide distribution were quantified through GIS-supported discriminant function analysis (DFA). Nine factors containing geological (lithology, dip), geomorphological (slope angle, altitude, aspect, plan and profile curvature) and land use (infield/outfield, sheep density) information were included in the multivariate analysis. Debris-slides larger than 100 m2 with magnitude expressed as topographic scar area can be predicted from the power-law function: Y = 936.26X- 1.277, r2 = 0.98 while a physical explanation is preferred for the roll-over pattern of smaller slope failures. The DFA is able to correctly classify app. 70% of the modeled terrain units into their pre-determined stable/unstable groups. Preparatory factors responsible for the spatial debris-slide distribution are aspect, slope angle, sheep density, plan curvature and altitude, while influence of the remaining factors is negligible.

  1. Spatial distribution of soil organic carbon and its influencing factors in desert grasslands of the Hexi Corridor, northwest China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Su, Yongzhong; Yang, Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the distribution patterns of soil organic carbon (SOC) and factors that influence these patterns is crucial for understanding the carbon cycle. The objectives of this study were to determine the spatial distribution pattern of soil organic carbon density (SOCD) and the controlling factors in arid desert grasslands of northwest China. The above- and belowground biomass and SOCD in 260 soil profiles from 52 sites over 2.7×10(4) km2 were investigated. Combined with a satellite-based dataset of an enhanced vegetation index during 2011-2012 and climatic factors at different sites, the relationships between SOCD and biotic and abiotic factors were identified. The results indicated that the mean SOCD was 1.20 (SD:+/- 0.85), 1.73 (SD:+/- 1.20), and 2.69 (SD:+/- 1.91) kg m(-2) at soil depths of 0-30 cm, 0-50 cm, and 0-100 cm, respectively, which was smaller than other estimates in temperate grassland, steppe, and desert-grassland ecosystems. The spatial distribution of SOCD gradually decreased from the southeast to the northwest, corresponding to the precipitation gradient. SOCD increased significantly with vegetation biomass, annual precipitation, soil moisture, clay and silt content, and decreased with mean annual temperature and sand content. The correlation between BGB and SOCD was closer than the correlation between AGB and SOCD. Variables could together explain about 69.8%, 74.4%, and 78.9% of total variation in SOCD at 0-30 cm, 0-50 cm, and 0-100 cm, respectively. In addition, we found that mean annual temperature is more important than other abiotic factors in determining SOCD in arid desert grasslands in our study area. The information obtained in this study provides a basis for accurately estimating SOC stocks and assessing carbon (C) sequestration potential in the desert grasslands of northwest China.

  2. A Model Based on Environmental Factors for Diameter Distribution in Black Wattle in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Sanquetta, Carlos Roberto; Behling, Alexandre; Dalla Corte, Ana Paula; Péllico Netto, Sylvio; Rodrigues, Aurelio Lourenço; Simon, Augusto Arlindo

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses the dynamics of a diameter distribution in stands of black wattle throughout its growth cycle using the Weibull probability density function. Moreover, the parameters of this distribution were related to environmental variables from meteorological data and surface soil horizon with the aim of finding a model for diameter distribution which their coefficients were related to the environmental variables. We found that the diameter distribution of the stand changes only slightly over time and that the estimators of the Weibull function are correlated with various environmental variables, with accumulated rainfall foremost among them. Thus, a model was obtained in which the estimators of the Weibull function are dependent on rainfall. Such a function can have important applications, such as in simulating growth potential in regions where historical growth data is lacking, as well as the behavior of the stand under different environmental conditions. The model can also be used to project growth in diameter, based on the rainfall affecting the forest over a certain time period. PMID:24932909

  3. FACTORS INFLUENCING THE DISTRIBUTION OF LINDANE AND OTHER HEXACHLOROCYCLOHEXANES IN THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This review examines the potential for y-hexachlorocycio-hexane (HCH) to be transformed into other isomers of HCH. HCH residues are among the most widely distributed and frequently detected organochlorine contaminants in the environment. The potential environmental and human he...

  4. Tectonic factors controlling initiation and distribution of Silurian reefs in Illinois basin, southwestern Indiana

    SciTech Connect

    Furer, L.C. )

    1989-08-01

    The authors discuss the relative effects of differential compaction and tectonics on the distribution, growth, geometry, and age of Silurian reefs in the Illinois basis. Their working hypothesis is that both differential compaction and tectonics have had a significant effect on the reefs, each at a different time. Examples are given.

  5. [Temporal and spatial distribution of environmental factors and chlorophyll-a and their correlation analysis in a small enclosed lake].

    PubMed

    Li, Fei-Peng; Zhang, Hai-Ping; Chen, Ling

    2013-10-01

    About four year's field observation was conducted from July 2007 to September 2011, in a small enclosed eutrophic lake located in Qianwei Village, Chongming Island. The temporal and spatial distribution of environmental factors (including physical-chemical factors and hydrodynamic condition) and chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) were studied and their correlation was analyzed. Results indicated that there were significant differences in the spatial and temporal distribution of Chl-a in the lake. Significantly positive correlation was found between Chl-a and water temperature, turbidity, TN and TP. Water temperature and nutrients were the main limited factors of seasonal changes of phytoplankton. It could be the result of phytoplankton growth that caused the seasonal change of turbidity. It was found that hydrological changes were the primary factor affecting the spatial difference of Chl-a concentration. Lower average Chl-a concentration (35. 30 microg.L-1) was recorded in the north watercourse, in condition with higher wind driven flow velocity ranging from 0. 08 m.s- 1 to 0. 22 m.s -1. A strong negative correlation was found between Chl-a concentration and flow velocity. Higher average Chl-a concentration (53. 11 microg.L-1) was frequently found under flow conditions ranged from 0 m.s-1 to 0. 10 m.s-1. These findings indicated that increasing hydrodynamic condition would significantly inhibit the growth of phytoplankton and reduce the risk of algae blooming in summer in these eutrophic water bodies.

  6. [Distribution of Formica cunicularia mound and related affecting factors on mobile dune in Horqin sandy land].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ren-Tao; Zhao, Ha-Lin; Zhao, Xue-Yong

    2009-02-01

    Taking the typical mobile dune in Horqin sandy land as test object, the density, diameter, and coverage of Formica cunicularia mounds on different land forms were investigated by quadrate method, with the spatial distribution of F. cunicularia mounds and the effects of topography and soil property on F. cunicularia nest-building activities discussed. The results showed that the density of F. cunicularia mounds decreased in the order of ridge > leeward slope > windward slope, while the diameter and coverage of the mounds were in the order of ridge > windward slope > leeward slope and conditioned by mound density. The spatial distribution of F. cunicularia mounds was in random pattern. Topography and soil property co-affected the nest-building activities of F. cunicularia.

  7. Distributions and impact factors of antimony in topsoils and moss in Ny-Ålesund, Arctic.

    PubMed

    Jia, Nan; Sun, Liguang; He, Xin; You, Kehua; Zhou, Xin; Long, Nanye

    2012-12-01

    The distribution of antimony (Sb) in topsoil and moss (Dicranum angustum) in disturbed and undisturbed areas, as well as coal and gangue, in Ny-Ålesund, Arctic was examined. Results show that the weathering of coal bed could not contribute to the increase of Sb concentrations in topsoil and moss in the study area. The distribution of Sb is partially associated with traffic and historical mining activities. The occurrence of the maximum Sb concentration is due to the contribution of human activities. In addition, the decrease of Sb content in topsoil near the coastline may be caused by the washing of seawater. Compared with topsoils, moss could be a useful tool for monitoring Sb in both highly and lightly polluted areas.

  8. [Analysis of influence factors and control methods on iron release phenomenon in drinking water distribution system].

    PubMed

    Niu, Zhang-bin; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Xiao-jian; He, Wen-Jie; Han, Hong-da; Yin, Pei-jun

    2006-02-01

    Variation rule of iron in drinking water distribution systems was studied, and it was found that the iron released from the scale to the bulk water was the primary reason for iron overstep. The main chemical composition of the scale in cast iron pipe and galvanized steel pipe was iron in a northern city in China. In the drinking water distribution systems, when the value of dissolved oxygen or chlorine residual was low, the iron release phenomenon was severe. The reason for that was the passivation layer of the corrosion scale was destroyed in reductive condition and the result was a great amount of iron in ferrous form was released. According to the research results, the control methods for iron release and 'red water' phenomenon were indicated.

  9. Factors affecting the distribution of natural and anthropogenic radionuclides in the coastal Burullus Lake.

    PubMed

    El-Reefy, H I; Badran, H M; Sharshar, T; Hilal, M A; Elnimr, T

    2014-08-01

    In the present study, measurements of naturally occurring radioactive materials and (137)Cs activity in sediment were conducted for locations covering the entire Burullus Lake in order to gather information about radionuclides mobility and distribution. Low-background γ-spectrometry was employed to determine the activity concentrations of water and sediment samples. The activity concentrations of (226)Ra and (232)Th are close to uniform distribution in the lake environment. Among the different physical and chemical characteristics measured for water and sediment, only salinity and total organic matter content have the potential to affect the mobility of (137)Cs and (40)K. The results suggest that these two radionuclides are attached to different mobile particulates. Increasing salinity tends to strengthen the adsorption of (137)Cs and solubilization of (40)K in sediment. On the other hand, sediment with high organic matter content traps (137)Cs and (40)K associated particulates to bottom sediment.

  10. Factors determining the most efficient spray distribution for marine cloud brightening

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, P. J.; McFiggans, G. B.; Wood, R.; Tsiamis, A.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the sensitivity of marine cloud brightening to the properties of the added salt particle distribution using a cloud parcel model, with an aim to address the question of, ‘what is the most efficient particle size distribution that will produce a desired cooling effect?’ We examine the effect that altering the aerosol particle size distribution has on the activation and growth of drops, i.e. the Twomey effect alone, and do not consider macrophysical cloud responses that may enhance or mitigate the Twomey effect. For all four spray generation methods considered, Rayleigh jet; Taylor cone jet; supercritical fluid; and effervescent spray, salt particles within the median dry diameter range Dm=30–100 nm are the most effective range of sizes. The Rayleigh jet method is also the most energy efficient overall. We also find that care needs to be taken when using droplet activation parametrizations: for the concentrations considered, Aitken particles do not result in a decrease in the total albedo, as was found in a recent study, and such findings are likely to be a result of the parametrizations' inability to simulate the effect of swollen aerosol particles. Our findings suggest that interstitial aerosol particles play a role in controlling the albedo rather than just the activated cloud drops, which is an effect that the parametrization methods do not consider. PMID:25404674

  11. Saproxylic Beetle Assemblage Selection as Determining Factor of Species Distributional Patterns: Implications for Conservation.

    PubMed

    García-López, A; Galante, E; Micó, E

    2016-01-01

    The knowledge of the distributional patterns of saproxylic beetles is essential for conservation biology due to the relevance of this fauna in the maintenance of ecological processes and the endangerment of species. The complex community of saproxylic beetles is shaped by different assemblages that are composed of species linked by the microhabitats they use. We evaluate how different the species distribution patterns that are obtained can be, depending on the analyzed assemblage and to what extent these can affect conservation decisions. Beetles were sampled using hollow emergence and window traps in three protected areas of the Iberian Peninsula. Species richness, composition, and diversity turnover were analyzed for each sampling method and showed high variation depending on the analyzed assemblage. Beta diversity was clearly higher among forests for the assemblage captured using window traps. This method collects flying insects from different tree microhabitats and its captures are influenced by the forest structuring. Within forests, the assemblages captured by hollow emergence traps, which collect the fauna linked to tree hollows, showed the largest turnover of species, as they are influenced by the characteristics of each cavity. Moreover, the selection of the forest showing the highest species richness strongly depended on the studied assemblage. This study demonstrates that differences in the studied assemblages (group of species co-occurring in the same habitat) can also lead to significant differences in the identified patterns of species distribution and diversity turnover. This fact will be necessary to take into consideration when making decisions about conservation and management.

  12. Complex interactions between dietary and genetic factors impact lycopene metabolism and distribution

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Nancy E.; Erdman, John W.; Clinton, Steven K.

    2013-01-01

    Intake of lycopene, a red, tetraterpene carotenoid found in tomatoes is epidemiologically associated with a decreased risk of chronic disease processes, and lycopene has demonstrated bioactivity in numerous in vitro and animal models. However, our understanding of absorption, tissue distribution, and biological impact in humans remains very limited. Lycopene absorption is strongly impacted by dietary composition, especially the amount of fat. Concentrations of circulating lycopene in lipoproteins may be further influenced by a number of variations in genes related to lipid absorption and metabolism. Lycopene is not uniformly distributed among tissues, with adipose, liver, and blood being the major body pools, while the testes, adrenals, and liver have the greatest concentrations compared to other organs. Tissue concentrations of lycopene are likely dictated by expression of and genetic variation in lipoprotein receptors, cholesterol transporters, and carotenoid metabolizing enzymes, thus impacting lycopene accumulation at target sites of action. The novel application of genetic evaluation in concert with lycopene tracers will allow determination of which genes and polymorphisms define individual lycopene metabolic phenotypes, response to dietary variables, and ultimately determine biological and clinical outcomes. A better understanding of the relationship between diet, genetics, and lycopene distribution will provide necessary information to interpret epidemiological findings more accurately and to design effective, personalized clinical nutritional interventions addressing hypotheses regarding health outcomes. PMID:23845854

  13. Saproxylic Beetle Assemblage Selection as Determining Factor of Species Distributional Patterns: Implications for Conservation

    PubMed Central

    Galante, E.; Micó, E.

    2016-01-01

    The knowledge of the distributional patterns of saproxylic beetles is essential for conservation biology due to the relevance of this fauna in the maintenance of ecological processes and the endangerment of species. The complex community of saproxylic beetles is shaped by different assemblages that are composed of species linked by the microhabitats they use. We evaluate how different the species distribution patterns that are obtained can be, depending on the analyzed assemblage and to what extent these can affect conservation decisions. Beetles were sampled using hollow emergence and window traps in three protected areas of the Iberian Peninsula. Species richness, composition, and diversity turnover were analyzed for each sampling method and showed high variation depending on the analyzed assemblage. Beta diversity was clearly higher among forests for the assemblage captured using window traps. This method collects flying insects from different tree microhabitats and its captures are influenced by the forest structuring. Within forests, the assemblages captured by hollow emergence traps, which collect the fauna linked to tree hollows, showed the largest turnover of species, as they are influenced by the characteristics of each cavity. Moreover, the selection of the forest showing the highest species richness strongly depended on the studied assemblage. This study demonstrates that differences in the studied assemblages (group of species co-occurring in the same habitat) can also lead to significant differences in the identified patterns of species distribution and diversity turnover. This fact will be necessary to take into consideration when making decisions about conservation and management. PMID:27252483

  14. Factors determining the most efficient spray distribution for marine cloud brightening.

    PubMed

    Connolly, P J; McFiggans, G B; Wood, R; Tsiamis, A

    2014-12-28

    We investigate the sensitivity of marine cloud brightening to the properties of the added salt particle distribution using a cloud parcel model, with an aim to address the question of, 'what is the most efficient particle size distribution that will produce a desired cooling effect?' We examine the effect that altering the aerosol particle size distribution has on the activation and growth of drops, i.e. the Twomey effect alone, and do not consider macrophysical cloud responses that may enhance or mitigate the Twomey effect. For all four spray generation methods considered, Rayleigh jet; Taylor cone jet; supercritical fluid; and effervescent spray, salt particles within the median dry diameter range Dm=30-100 nm are the most effective range of sizes. The Rayleigh jet method is also the most energy efficient overall. We also find that care needs to be taken when using droplet activation parametrizations: for the concentrations considered, Aitken particles do not result in a decrease in the total albedo, as was found in a recent study, and such findings are likely to be a result of the parametrizations' inability to simulate the effect of swollen aerosol particles. Our findings suggest that interstitial aerosol particles play a role in controlling the albedo rather than just the activated cloud drops, which is an effect that the parametrization methods do not consider.

  15. Span-Load Distribution as a Factor in Stability in Roll

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Montgomery; Noyes, Richard W

    1932-01-01

    This report gives the results of pressure-distribution tests made to study the effects on lateral stability of changing the span-load distribution on a rectangular monoplane wing model of fairly thick section. Three methods of changing the distribution were employed: variation in profile along the span to a thin symmetrical section at the tip, twist from +5 degrees to -15 degrees at the tip, and sweepback from +20 degrees to -20 degrees. The tests were conducted in a 5-foot closed-throat atmospheric wind tunnel. The investigation shows the following results: (1) change in profile along the span from the NACA-84 at the root to the NACA-M2 at the tip considerably reduces lateral instability, but also reduces the general effectiveness of the wing. (2) washout up to 11 degrees progressively reduces maximum lateral instability. (3) transition from sweepforward to sweepback gradually reduces the useful angle-of-attack range, but has no clearly defined effect on maximum lateral instability.

  16. Statistical analysis of factors affecting landslide distribution in the new Madrid seismic zone, Tennessee and Kentucky

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jibson, R.W.; Keefer, D.K.

    1989-01-01

    More than 220 large landslides along the bluffs bordering the Mississippi alluvial plain between Cairo, Ill., and Memphis, Tenn., are analyzed by discriminant analysis and multiple linear regression to determine the relative effects of slope height and steepness, stratigraphic variation, slope aspect, and proximity to the hypocenters of the 1811-12 New Madrid, Mo., earthquakes on the distribution of these landslides. Three types of landslides are analyzed: (1) old, coherent slumps and block slides, which have eroded and revegetated features and no active analogs in the area; (2) old earth flows, which are also eroded and revegetated; and (3) young rotational slumps, which are present only along near-river bluffs, and which are the only young, active landslides in the area. Discriminant analysis shows that only one characteristic differs significantly between bluffs with and without young rotational slumps: failed bluffs tend to have sand and clay at their base, which may render them more susceptible to fluvial erosion. Bluffs having old coherent slides are significantly higher, steeper, and closer to the hypocenters of the 1811-12 earthquakes than bluffs without these slides. Bluffs having old earth flows are likewise higher and closer to the earthquake hypocenters. Multiple regression analysis indicates that the distribution of young rotational slumps is affected most strongly by slope steepness: about one-third of the variation in the distribution is explained by variations in slope steepness. The distribution of old coherent slides and earth flows is affected most strongly by slope height, but the proximity to the hypocenters of the 1811-12 earthquakes also significantly affects the distribution. The results of the statistical analyses indicate that the only recently active landsliding in the area is along actively eroding river banks, where rotational slumps formed as bluffs are undercut by the river. The analyses further indicate that the old coherent slides

  17. Immunohistochemical distribution of early pregnancy factor in ovary, oviduct and placenta of pregnant gilts.

    PubMed

    Grosso, M C; Bellingeri, R V; Motta, C E; Alustiza, F E; Picco, N Y; Vivas, A B

    2015-01-01

    Early pregnancy factor (EPF) is an immunosuppressant that promotes maternal immune system tolerance of the allogenic fetus. Little is known about localization of this factor in different tissues and nothing has been reported about localization in swine reproductive and placental tissues. We determined the concentration of EPF in serum of gilts and porcine placenta conditioned medium (PPCM). We also analyzed the expression of EPF in different reproductive tissues of pregnant gilts at 10, 30, 60 and 90 days of pregnancy. EPF concentration in serum and PPCM was determined by western blot and densitometry. EPF expression in reproductive tissue was assessed by immunohistochemistry. The highest concentration of EPF was observed at 30 days in serum and PPCM; the concentration was higher in PPCM than in serum at the stages we evaluated. All reproductive tissues from the gestational stages analyzed showed specific labeling of EPF, but this labeling did not appear in non-pregnant gilts. At 30 days pregnancy, the EPF expression in the ovary was predominantly in follicular lutein cells, probably owing to its function as a luteotrophic factor. In the oviduct, EPF was expressed in unciliated secretory epithelial cells and in the cilia of ciliated cells. In the placenta, EPF was expressed in the fetal portion (mesoderm chorioallantois and epithelium of endoderm). EPF acts as an autocrine and paracrine growth factor for the trophoblast during the peri-implantation period.

  18. Distribution of fiber development genes and transcription factors between At and Dt subgenomes in tetraploid cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As the worlds leading natural material used in the manufacture of textiles, cotton fibers are important seed trichomes derived from individual cells of the epidermal layer of the seed coat. Cotton fiber development is determined by large numbers of genes and transcription factors. However, little ...

  19. 25 CFR Appendix C to Subpart C - Relative Need Distribution Factor

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... available sources. (c) BIADOT will collect the national IRR Program bid tabulation data and enter it into... relative weight given to each formula factor Example: Tribe X has the following data: CTC = $51,583,000... the IRR Program Coordinating Committee, may consider revisions to the data elements used...

  20. Emotional stress induced by parachute jumping enhances blood nerve growth factor levels and the distribution of nerve growth factor receptors in lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Aloe, L; Bracci-Laudiero, L; Alleva, E; Lambiase, A; Micera, A; Tirassa, P

    1994-10-25

    We examined the plasma nerve growth factor (NGF) level and the distribution of NGF receptors in peripheral lymphocytes of young soldiers (mean age, 20-24 yr) experiencing the thrill of a novice about to make their first parachute jumps. Blood was collected from soldiers who knew they were selected to jump (n = 26), as well as from soldiers who knew they were not selected (n = 17, controls). The former group was sampled the evening before the jump and 20 min after landing. Compared with controls, NGF levels increased 84% in prejump and 107% in postjump sampling. Our studies also showed that the increase of NGF levels preceded the increase of plasma cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone. No changes in the baseline levels of circulating interleukin 1 beta or tumor necrosis factor were found, suggesting that the increased levels of NGF were not correlated with change in these cytokines. Moreover, immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated that parachuting stress enhances the distribution of low-affinity p75LNGFR and high-affinity p140trkA NGF receptors in circulating peripheral blood mononuclear cells. These observations suggest that the release of NGF might be involved in the activation of cells of the immune system and is most probably associated with homeostatic adaptive mechanisms, as previously shown for stressed rodents.

  1. Emotional stress induced by parachute jumping enhances blood nerve growth factor levels and the distribution of nerve growth factor receptors in lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Aloe, L; Bracci-Laudiero, L; Alleva, E; Lambiase, A; Micera, A; Tirassa, P

    1994-01-01

    We examined the plasma nerve growth factor (NGF) level and the distribution of NGF receptors in peripheral lymphocytes of young soldiers (mean age, 20-24 yr) experiencing the thrill of a novice about to make their first parachute jumps. Blood was collected from soldiers who knew they were selected to jump (n = 26), as well as from soldiers who knew they were not selected (n = 17, controls). The former group was sampled the evening before the jump and 20 min after landing. Compared with controls, NGF levels increased 84% in prejump and 107% in postjump sampling. Our studies also showed that the increase of NGF levels preceded the increase of plasma cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone. No changes in the baseline levels of circulating interleukin 1 beta or tumor necrosis factor were found, suggesting that the increased levels of NGF were not correlated with change in these cytokines. Moreover, immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated that parachuting stress enhances the distribution of low-affinity p75LNGFR and high-affinity p140trkA NGF receptors in circulating peripheral blood mononuclear cells. These observations suggest that the release of NGF might be involved in the activation of cells of the immune system and is most probably associated with homeostatic adaptive mechanisms, as previously shown for stressed rodents. Images PMID:7937971

  2. Escherichia coli strains from pregnant women and neonates: intraspecies genetic distribution and prevalence of virulence factors.

    PubMed

    Watt, Stéphane; Lanotte, Philippe; Mereghetti, Laurent; Moulin-Schouleur, Maryvonne; Picard, Bertrand; Quentin, Roland

    2003-05-01

    To determine the extent to which the vagina, endocervix, and amniotic fluid screen the Escherichia coli strains responsible for neonatal infections, we studied the genetic relationships among 105 E. coli strains isolated from all of the ecosystems involved in this infectious process. Twenty-four strains were isolated from the intestinal flora, and 25 strains were isolated from the vaginas of pregnant women. Twenty-seven strains were isolated from the amniotic fluid, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of infected neonates. The intraspecies genetic characteristics of all of the isolates were determined by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis, PCR ECOR (E. coli reference) grouping, and PCR virulence genotyping. A correlation was found between the intraspecies distributions of the strains in the A, B1, B2, and D ECOR groups and in the two major RAPD groups (I and II). Nevertheless, the distribution of the E. coli strains in the RAPD groups according to their anatomical origins was more significant than their distribution in the ECOR groups. This may be explained by the existence of an E. coli subpopulation, defined by the RAPD I group, within the ECOR B2 group. This RAPD I group presents a major risk for neonates: 75% of the strains isolated from patients with meningitis and 100% of the strains isolated from patients with bacteremia were in this group. The vagina and the amniotic fluid are two barriers that favor colonization by highly infectious strains. Indeed, only 17% of fecal strains belonged to the RAPD I group, whereas 52% of vaginal strains and 67% of amniotic fluid strains belonged to this subpopulation. The ibeA and iucC genes were significantly associated with CSF strains, whereas the hly and sfa/foc genes were more frequent in blood strains. These findings could serve as a basis for developing tools to recognize vaginal strains, which present a high risk for neonates, for use in prophylaxis programs.

  3. Updated greenhouse gas and criteria air pollutant emission factors and their probability distribution functions for electricity generating units

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, H.; Wang, M.; Elgowainy, A.; Han, J.

    2012-07-06

    Greenhouse gas (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O, hereinafter GHG) and criteria air pollutant (CO, NO{sub x}, VOC, PM{sub 10}, PM{sub 2.5} and SO{sub x}, hereinafter CAP) emission factors for various types of power plants burning various fuels with different technologies are important upstream parameters for estimating life-cycle emissions associated with alternative vehicle/fuel systems in the transportation sector, especially electric vehicles. The emission factors are typically expressed in grams of GHG or CAP per kWh of electricity generated by a specific power generation technology. This document describes our approach for updating and expanding GHG and CAP emission factors in the GREET (Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation) model developed at Argonne National Laboratory (see Wang 1999 and the GREET website at http://greet.es.anl.gov/main) for various power generation technologies. These GHG and CAP emissions are used to estimate the impact of electricity use by stationary and transportation applications on their fuel-cycle emissions. The electricity generation mixes and the fuel shares attributable to various combustion technologies at the national, regional and state levels are also updated in this document. The energy conversion efficiencies of electric generating units (EGUs) by fuel type and combustion technology are calculated on the basis of the lower heating values of each fuel, to be consistent with the basis used in GREET for transportation fuels. On the basis of the updated GHG and CAP emission factors and energy efficiencies of EGUs, the probability distribution functions (PDFs), which are functions that describe the relative likelihood for the emission factors and energy efficiencies as random variables to take on a given value by the integral of their own probability distributions, are updated using best-fit statistical curves to characterize the uncertainties associated with GHG and CAP emissions in life

  4. Involvement of in situ conformation of ribosomal genes and selective distribution of upstream binding factor in rRNA transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Junéra, H R; Masson, C; Géraud, G; Suja, J; Hernandez-Verdun, D

    1997-01-01

    The distribution of the ribosomal genes (rDNA) and the upstream binding factor (UBF), correlatively with their RNA transcripts, was investigated in G1, S-phase, and G2. rDNA was distributed in nucleoli, with alternate sites of clustered and dispersed genes. UBF was found associated with some but not all clustered genes and proportionally more with dispersed genes. It was distributed in several foci that were more numerous and heterogeneous in size during G2 than G1. We suggest that UBF associated with rDNA during S-phase because its nucleolar amount increased during that time and remained stable in G2. 5,6-Dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole treatment indicated a similar amount of UBF per transcription unit, and consequently heterogeneous size of the UBF foci can represent a variable number of transcription units per foci. Direct visualization of the transcripts demonstrated that only part of UBF is associated with active transcription and that rDNA distribution varied with transcription. We propose that in the same rDNA locus three types of configuration coexist that are correlated with gene activity: 1) clustered genes without UBF; 2) clustered genes with UBF, of which some are associated with transcription; and 3) dispersed genes with UBF and transcription. These results support the hypothesis that rDNA transcription involved several steps of regulation acting successively and locally in the same locus to promote the repressed clustered genes to become actively transcribed dispersed genes. Images PMID:9017602

  5. Distribution of the Euryhaline Squid Lolliguncula brevis in Chesapeake Bay: Effects of Selected Abiotic Factors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-31

    significant aquatic habitats where cephalopods are poorly represented. One notable squid, the brief squid Lolliguncula brevis, is the only species of... cephalopod frequently found in low-salinity estuaries (Vecchione 1991a), where it tolerates salinities as low as 8.5‰ for brief periods (Laughlin...effects of selected abiotic factors I. K. Bartol1,*, R. Mann2, M. Vecchione3 1Department of Organismic Biology, Ecology, and Evolution , University of

  6. Benthic invertebrate distributions in the San Joaquin River, California, in relation to physical and chemical factors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leland, H.V.; Fend, S.V.

    1998-01-01

    The invertebrate fauna of nontidal portions of the lower San Joaquin River and its major tributaries is described in relation to water quality and habitat using canonical correspondence analysis, autecological metrics, and indicator species analysis. A large-scale (basin-wide) pattern in community response to salinity (sulfate-bicarbonate type) was detected when standardized, stable substratum was sampled. Community structure, taxa richness, and EPT (ephemeropterans, plecopterans, and trichopterans) richness varied with dissolved solids concentration (55-1700 mg total dissolved solids. L-1), and distributions of many taxa indicated salinity optima. Distinct assemblages associated with either high or low salinity were evident over this range. Large-scale patterns in community structure were unrelated to pesticide distributions. Structure and taxa richness of invertebrate assemblages in sand substratum varied both with salinity and with microhabitat heterogeneity. The benthic fauna generally was dominated by a taxa-poor assemblage of specialized psammophilous species, contributing to a weaker relationship between community structure and water quality than was observed using standardized substratum. Habitat types and associated dominant species were characterized using indicator species analysis. Species assemblages did not vary substantially with irrigation regime or fiver discharge, indicating that structure of invertebrate communities was a conservative measure of water quality.

  7. Arcane epipelagic fishes of the subtropical North Pacific and factors associated with their distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinnell, Skip; Seki, Michael P.

    2017-01-01

    In 1992, a moratorium was declared by the United Nations General Assembly to end the practice of large-scale pelagic driftnet fishing. During two years leading up to the moratorium, three scientific research and fishery observer programs involving Canada, Japan, Korea, China-Taipei and the United States had collected significant amounts of information about the distribution and abundance of the epipelagic fauna in the subtropical North Pacific Ocean. The pan-regional distributions of the fishes in 1990 and 1991, most of which were taken as bycatch in 9910 fishing operations (357,150 km of driftnet) are described. More species were observed per fishing operation in 1991 than in 1990. Principal coordinate analysis of the incidence of the commonly caught fish species was used to show that, except for an anomaly in the region of the Shatsky Rise (165°E), the composition of the catch changed from the coast of Japan across more than 6000 km to the eastern boundary of the fishery (145°W). The analysis suggested that the fish species composition changed rather little with increasing latitude within the southern part of the domain (25-35°N), before changing more rapidly north of the Kuroshio Extension region to a more subarctic, transition zone fauna.

  8. An examination of factors potentially influencing birth distributions in golden snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus roxellana).

    PubMed

    Xiang, Zuofu; Yang, Wanji; Qi, Xiaoguang; Yao, Hui; Grueter, Cyril C; Garber, Paul A; Li, Baoguo; Li, Ming

    2017-01-01

    Many species of primates are considered seasonal breeders, but the set of factors, such as food availability, day length and temperature, that influence the timing of reproductive events for both wild and captive individuals remains unclear. Here, we examine the role of factors in shaping breeding patterns in Rhinopithecus roxellana, a temperate colobine primate. We used circular statistics to describe and compare the patterns of reproductive seasonality among individuals in 13 captive groups and two free ranging but provisioned groups at various locations throughout China. Almost 90% of births occurred in March, April and May in adult females residing in both free ranging (n = 131) and captive groups (n = 407). Births occurred principally in 2-4 months prior to the peak of food availability, while conceptions occurred in 1-2 months after the peak of food availability in free ranging but provisioned groups. Day length (latitude) had a significant effect on the timing of reproduction. However, females that experienced a wide variation of temperature between the lowest and highest monthly average temperature had a later conception date. These results support that day length and temperature might be factor influencing the timing of reproductive activity.

  9. Hamilton study: distribution of factors confounding the relationship between air quality and respiratory health

    SciTech Connect

    Pengelly, L.D.; Kerigan, A.T.; Goldsmith, C.H.; Inman, E.M.

    1984-10-01

    Hamilton, Ontario is an industrial city with a population of 300,000 which is situated at the western end of Lake Ontario. Canada's two largest iron and steel mills are located here; the city historically has had relatively poor air quality, which has improved markedly in the last 25 years. Concern about the health effects of current air quality recently led us to carry out an epidemiological study of the effects of air pollution on the respiratory health of over 3500 school children. Respiratory health was measured by pulmonary function testing of each child, and by an assessment of each child's respiratory symptoms via a questionnaire administered to the parents. Previous studies had shown that other environmental factors (e.g. parental smoking, parental cough, socioeconomic level, housing, and gas cooking) might also affect respiratory health, and thus confound any potential relationships between health and air pollution. The questionnaire also collected information on many of these confounding factors. For the purposes of initial analysis, the city was divided into five areas in which differences in air quality were expected. In general, factors which have been associated with poor respiratory health were observed to be more prevalent in areas of poorer air quality.

  10. [The distribution of intestinal parasites and their causative factors in children].

    PubMed

    Yapici, Ferda; Sönmez Tamer, Gülden; Arisoy, Emin Sami

    2008-01-01

    Intestinal parasitic infection prevalence in children who had been brought to our hospital together with related factors. The study was carried out in 400 children who were chosen at random among those brought to our hospital. All stool samples were examined with nativelugol, formol-ether, Kinyon acid-fast, methods. The cellophane tape preparations and hemoglobin concentration measurement were used. Intestinal parasites found in 156 of 400 (39%) children were Giardia intestinalis (19.8%) Enterobius vermicularis (15%), Blastocystis hominis (5.8%). Socio-economic and educational level of patient's family, living in urban area, having abdominal pain, anal itching, salivation during sleep, and nasal itching had been found related with the prevalence of parasitic infection. No relationship were found in the other factors. Because WHO guidelines favor routine screening and treatment of parasitic infections of school-age children when the prevalence of parasitic infections in community exceeds 50%, all children should be evaluated for parasitic infections if they have one or more risk factors.

  11. An examination of factors potentially influencing birth distributions in golden snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus roxellana)

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wanji; Qi, Xiaoguang; Yao, Hui; Grueter, Cyril C.; Garber, Paul A.; Li, Baoguo; Li, Ming

    2017-01-01

    Many species of primates are considered seasonal breeders, but the set of factors, such as food availability, day length and temperature, that influence the timing of reproductive events for both wild and captive individuals remains unclear. Here, we examine the role of factors in shaping breeding patterns in Rhinopithecus roxellana, a temperate colobine primate. We used circular statistics to describe and compare the patterns of reproductive seasonality among individuals in 13 captive groups and two free ranging but provisioned groups at various locations throughout China. Almost 90% of births occurred in March, April and May in adult females residing in both free ranging (n = 131) and captive groups (n = 407). Births occurred principally in 2–4 months prior to the peak of food availability, while conceptions occurred in 1–2 months after the peak of food availability in free ranging but provisioned groups. Day length (latitude) had a significant effect on the timing of reproduction. However, females that experienced a wide variation of temperature between the lowest and highest monthly average temperature had a later conception date. These results support that day length and temperature might be factor influencing the timing of reproductive activity. PMID:28149681

  12. Distribution and Risk Factors of Disability Attributed to Personality Disorders: A National Cross-sectional Survey in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ting-Ting; Huang, Yue-Qin; Liu, Zhao-Rui; Chen, Hong-Guang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Personality disorders can lead to some disability. However, little is known about the disability prevalence and function impairments. This study aimed to describe the disability prevalence attributed to personality disorders, its distribution, impairments of daily activities and social functions, and risk factors in China. Methods: Using a descriptive and analytic epidemiological method, data from the Second China National Sample Survey on Disability in 2006 were analyzed. The disability prevalence attributed to personality disorders, its distribution in different people and regions, and risk factors were statistically calculated. Results: Respondents included 1,909,205 adults. The disability prevalence rate attributed to personality disorders in China was 5.9/100,000. The disability rate attributed to personality disorders of males was higher than that of females (P = 0.012), while the rate of the unemployed was higher than that of the employed (P < 0.001). Furthermore, the rates of unmarried/divorced/widowed people and the illiterate population were higher than those of married and educated people (P < 0.001). Regarding the severity of disability attributable to personality disorders, mild disability accounted for a majority or 60% of the respondents. The data showed that disability mainly impaired respondents’ ability to engage in daily activities, get along with people, and participate in social situations. According to the case-control study, marriage, employment, and higher education were protective factors of disability. Conclusions: The prevalence of disability attributed to personality disorders is low in China and always leads to mild disability. The distribution of disability attributed to personality disorders also varies in the Chinese population. PMID:27453222

  13. Snow Dunes: A Controlling Factor of Melt Pond Distribution on Arctic Sea Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrich, Chris; Eicken, Hajo; Polashenski, Christopher M.; Sturm, Matthew; Harbeck, Jeremy P.; Perovich, Donald K.; Finnegan, David C.

    2012-01-01

    The location of snow dunes over the course of the ice-growth season 2007/08 was mapped on level landfast first-year sea ice near Barrow, Alaska. Landfast ice formed in mid-December and exhibited essentially homogeneous snow depths of 4-6 cm in mid-January; by early February distinct snow dunes were observed. Despite additional snowfall and wind redistribution throughout the season, the location of the dunes was fixed by March, and these locations were highly correlated with the distribution of meltwater ponds at the beginning of June. Our observations, including ground-based light detection and ranging system (lidar) measurements, show that melt ponds initially form in the interstices between snow dunes, and that the outline of the melt ponds is controlled by snow depth contours. The resulting preferential surface ablation of ponded ice creates the surface topography that later determines the melt pond evolution.

  14. Distributed Factorization Computation on Multiple Volunteered Mobile Resource to Break RSA Key

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaya, I.; Hardi, S. M.; Tarigan, J. T.; Zamzami, E. M.; Sihombing, P.

    2017-01-01

    Similar to common asymmeric encryption, RSA can be cracked by usmg a series mathematical calculation. The private key used to decrypt the massage can be computed using the public key. However, finding the private key may require a massive amount of calculation. In this paper, we propose a method to perform a distributed computing to calculate RSA’s private key. The proposed method uses multiple volunteered mobile devices to contribute during the calculation process. Our objective is to demonstrate how the use of volunteered computing on mobile devices may be a feasible option to reduce the time required to break a weak RSA encryption and observe the behavior and running time of the application on mobile devices.

  15. Factors Affecting the Evolution of Hurricane Erin and the Distributions of Hydrometeors: Role of Microphysical Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFarquhar, Greg M.; Zhang, Henian; Dudhia, Jimy; Halverson, Jeffrey B.; Heymsfield, Gerald; Hood, Robbie; Marks, Frank, Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Fine-resolution simulations of Hurricane Erin 2001 are conducted using the Penn State University/National Center for Atmospheric Research mesoscale model version 3.5 to investigate the role of thermodynamic, boundary layer and microphysical processes in Erin's growth and maintenance, and their effects on the horizontal and vertical distributions of hydrometeors. Through comparison against radar, radiometer, and dropsonde data collected during the Convection and Moisture Experiment 4, it is seen that realistic simulations of Erin are obtained provided that fine resolution simulations with detailed representations of physical processes are conducted. The principle findings of the study are as follows: 1) a new iterative condensation scheme, which limits the unphysical increase of equivalent potential temperature associated with most condensation schemes, increases the horizontal size of the hurricane, decreases its maximum rainfall rate, reduces its intensity, and makes its eye more moist; 2) in general, microphysical parameterization schemes with more categories of hydrometeors produce more intense hurricanes, larger hydrometeor mixing ratios, and more intense updrafts and downdrafts; 3) the choice of coefficients describing hydrometeor fall velocities has as big of an impact on the hurricane simulations as does choice of microphysical parameterization scheme with no clear relationship between fall velocity and hurricane intensity; and 4) in order for a tropical cyclone to adequately intensify, an advanced boundary layer scheme (e.g., Burk-Thompson scheme) must be used to represent boundary layer processes. The impacts of varying simulations on the horizontal and vertical distributions of different categories of hydrometeor species, on equivalent potential temperature, and on storm updrafts and downdrafts are examined to determine how the release of latent heat feedbacks upon the structure of Erin. In general, all simulations tend to overpredict precipitation rate

  16. Spatial distribution of forest fires and controlling factors in Andhra Pradesh, India using SPOT satellite datasets.

    PubMed

    Vadrevu, Krishna P; Eaturu, Anuradha; Badarinath, K V S

    2006-12-01

    Fires are one of the major causes of forest disturbance and destruction in several dry deciduous forests of southern India. In this study, we use remote sensing data sets in conjunction with topographic, vegetation, climate and socioeconomic factors for determining the potential causes of forest fires in Andhra Pradesh, India. Spatial patterns in fire characteristics were analyzed using SPOT satellite remote sensing datasets. We then used nineteen different metrics in concurrence with fire count datasets in a robust statistical framework to arrive at a predictive model that best explained the variation in fire counts across diverse geographical and climatic gradients. Results suggested that, of all the states in India, fires in Andhra Pradesh constituted nearly 13.53% of total fires. District wise estimates of fire counts for Andhra Pradesh suggested that, Adilabad, Cuddapah, Kurnool, Prakasham and Mehbubnagar had relatively highest number of fires compared to others. Results from statistical analysis suggested that of the nineteen parameters, population density, demand of metabolic energy (DME), compound topographic index, slope, aspect, average temperature of the warmest quarter (ATWQ) along with literacy rate explained 61.1% of total variation in fire datasets. Among these, DME and literacy rate were found to be negative predictors of forest fires. In overall, this study represents the first statewide effort that evaluated the causative factors of fire at district level using biophysical and socioeconomic datasets. Results from this study identify important biophysical and socioeconomic factors for assessing 'forest fire danger' in the study area. Our results also identify potential 'hotspots' of fire risk, where fire protection measures can be taken in advance. Further this study also demonstrate the usefulness of best-subset regression approach integrated with GIS, as an effective method to assess 'where and when' forest fires will most likely occur.

  17. Altered (/sup 125/I)epidermal growth factor binding and receptor distribution in psoriasis

    SciTech Connect

    Nanney, L.B.; Stoscheck, C.M.; Magid, M.; King, L.E. Jr.

    1986-03-01

    Stimulation of growth and differentiation of human epidermis by epidermal growth factor (EGF) is mediated by its binding to specific receptors. Whether EGF receptors primarily mediate cell division or differentiation in hyperproliferative disease such as psoriasis vulgaris is unclear. To study the pathogenesis of psoriasis, 4-mm2 punch biopsy specimens of normal, uninvolved, and involved psoriatic skin were assayed for EGF receptors by autoradiographic, immunohistochemical, and biochemical methods. Using autoradiographic and immunohistochemical methods, basal keratinocytes were found to contain the greatest number of EGF binding sites and immunoreactive receptors as compared to the upper layers of the epidermis in both normal epidermis and psoriatic skin. No EGF receptor differences between normal and psoriatic epidermis were observed in this layer. In the upper layers of the epidermis, a 2-fold increase in EGF binding capacity was observed in psoriatic skin as compared with normal thin or thick skin. Biochemical methods indicated that (/sup 125/I)EGF binding was increased in psoriatic epidermis as compared with similar thickness normal epidermis when measured on a protein basis. Epidermal growth factor was shown to increase phosphorylation of the EGF receptor in skin. EGF receptors retained in the nonmitotic stratum spinosum and parakeratotic stratum corneum may reflect the incomplete, abnormal differentiation that occurs in active psoriatic lesions. Alternatively, retained EGF receptors may play a direct role in inhibiting cellular differentiation in the suprabasal layers.

  18. SU-E-T-463: Impact to Total Scatter Factors On the Calculated Dose Distribution in Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, O; Larraga-Gutierrez, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To assess the impact of relative measurements: off axis ratios (OAR), tissue phantom ratios (TPR) and especially total scatter factor (TSF) on the calculated dose distribution in stereotactic radiosurgery with circular cones. Methods: Six detectors were employed to characterize circular collimated photon beams of 6 MV: three diodes (SFD, E, SRS), one ionization chamber (CC01) and two radiochromic films (EBT, EBT2). The relative measurements were incorporated in the treatment planning system (TPS) in order to compare and analyze the calculated dose distributions (DD). Each dose distribution was re-scaled by the TSF to observe its effect in the final dose distribution. The comparison was performed by using the gamma index. A Monte Carlo generated dosimetry was used as reference. Results: The results showed that in terms of relative dosimetry all the detectors have a good agreement within 2%, with the exception of the CC01 and EBT2 film. However, the analysis performed with the dose distributions re-scaled relative to the TSF for each detector showed that the impact it was not only to the isocenter dose. The dose to the PTV and normal tissue showed differences up to 13% depending of the dosimeter used for TSF measurements. Conclusion: With the exception of the CC01 ionization chamber and EBT2 radiochromic film, all the studied dosimeters were adequate for the measurement of OAR and TPR. However, attention must be put in the measurement of TSF. The use of the wrong detector does not only affect the isocenter dose, it may have an impact in the PTV and normal tissue dose.

  19. Assessment of factors related to heavy metals distribution in abandoned mining soils in Madrid, central Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Manuel; Carral, Pilar; Alvarez, Ana M.; Hernández, Zulimar; Lorena, Recio-Vázquez; Marques, Maria J.; Almendros, Gonzalo

    2013-04-01

    Exploitation of metallic mineral deposits and its subsequent abandonment in last decades has lead to significant environmental hazard for natural systems. The present study concerns the distribution and mobility of heavy metals and trace elements mainly As, Cu, Cd, Co, Mn and V, in sulphide-rich soils. The site studied (Sierra de Guadarrama, Garganta de los Montes, Madrid) is at 1200 m asl. Soils are Humic and Dystric Cambisols (WRB) developed on gneisses; the main minerals consist of sulphides and include chalcopyrite, pyrite, marcasite, galena and arsenopyrite. Concentration data of the different species of heavy metals as dependent variables in addition to a series of independent variables mainly soil organic matter were subjected to multivariate chemometric treatments including multidimensional scaling (MDS), principal component analysis (PCA) and support vector machine (SVM) for a preliminary survey on the possible role of soil organic matter in the distribution and speciation of heavy metals in soils. The soil heavy metals speciation was determined using the BCR (Community Bureau of Reference, European Commission) sequential extraction procedure and analysed by ICP-MS. The total contents of these elements were calculated as the sum of the four BCR fractions. The results showed element concentrations decreasing with the distance from the source of pollution. The highest amounts of As and Mn, and Cu, Cd, Co and V were found at 10 and 100 m respectively. These values exceed the allowed limits of the environmental regulation. The percentages of extractable elements (step one of BCR) in relation to total elements show that Cu and Cd were significantly more easily extractable than the other elements. Metal availability in soils was generally controlled by total metal concentration. Data processing techniques coincided in pointing out the association of high levels of organic matter with the concentrations of elements extracted just in the most available forms: i

  20. A new factor in the blood of patients with peptic ulcer. Distribution in blood fractions.

    PubMed

    Necheles, H; Geisel, A; Berg, M; Jefferson, N C

    1975-08-01

    Previous work on a factor in the blood of patients with peptic ulcer which contracts smooth muscle was confirmed and the work extended to investigation of the activity of blood fractions. Whole heparinized blood and its fractions were tested on a strip of guinea pig ileum and height of contraction and latent period were used as criteria of activity. Whole heparinized blood of ulcer patients had significantly higher activity than that of normal controls. Differences between the fractions of ulcer patients and controls were less significant. With the lysed buffy coat, however, while the differences between the height of contraction between the groups did not differ statistically, the speed of the reaction (shorter latent period) was significantly greater in the ulcer patients. The cellular alterations causing this response are unknown.

  1. Novel aspects of blood coagulation factor XIII. I. Structure, distribution, activation, and function

    SciTech Connect

    Muszbek, L.; Adany, R.; Mikkola, H.

    1996-10-01

    Blood coagulation factor XIII (FXIII) is a protransglutaminase that becomes activated by the concerted action of thrombin and Ca{sup 2+} in the final stage of the clotting cascade. In addition to plasma, FXIII also occurs in platelets, monocytes, and monocyte-derived macrophages. While the plasma factor is a heterotetramer consisting of paired A and B subunits (A{sub 2}B{sub 2}), its cellular counterpart lacks the B subunits and is a homodimer of potentially active A subunits (A{sub 2}). The gene coding for the A and B subunits has been localized to chromosomes 6p24-25 and 1q31-32.1, respectively. The genomic as well as the primary protein structure of both subunits has been established. Plasma FXIII circulates in association with its substrate precursor, fibrinogen. Fibrin(ogen) has an important regulatory role in the activation of plasma FXIII, for instance the proteolytic removal of activation peptide by thrombin, the dissociation of subunits A and B, and the exposure of the originally buried active site on the free A subunits. The end result of this process is the formation of an active transglutaminase, which crosslinks peptide chains through {epsilon}({gamma}-glutamyl)lysyl isopeptide bonds. The protein substrates of activated FXIII include components of the clotting-fibrinolytic system, adhesive and contractile proteins. The main physiological function of plasma FXIII is to cross-link fibrin and protect it from the fibrinolytic enzyme plasmin. The latter effect is achieved mainly by covalently linking {alpha}{sub 2} antiplasmin, the most potent physiological inhibitor of plasmin, to fibrin. Plasma FXIII seems to be involved in wound healing and tissue repair, and it is essential to maintaining pregnancy. Cellular FXIII, if exposed to the surface of the cells, might support or perhaps take over the hemostatic functions of plasma FXIII; however, its intracellular role has remained mostly unexplored. 328 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Factors Affecting the Distribution of the Amphipod Corophium volutatorin Two Estuaries in South-east England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, R. G.; Gerdol, V.

    1997-05-01

    The distribution of Corophium volutator(Pallas) in the estuaries of the Rivers Blackwater and Crouch in South-east England was examined by taking samples of mud from 137 sites at approximately 0·5 m below mean high water of neap tidal level. Corophium volutatorwere approximately twice as abundant in creeks and semi-enclosed bays than on the open mud flats, a difference that was significant statistically. There was no correlation between the abundance of C. volutatorand the median particle size of the sediment nor the mud content. There was a significant but weak negative correlation between the abundance of C. volutatorand the polychaete Nereis diversicolor. The aggregation of C. volutatorin the creeks and bays was attributed to their dispersal behaviour of swimming on the flood tide, which would sweep the amphipods into such areas where the tide rises but does not flow laterally. On the open mud flats, displacement of swimming amphipods by the flood tide further upstream and into semi-enclosed areas would occur. Their dispersal behaviour places C. volutatorin the creeks and bays within the saltmarsh vegetation, where their bioturbatory feeding habits may be responsible, in part, for the significant loss of pioneer zone vegetation that occurs there.

  3. Distribution of epidermal growth factor binding sites in the adult rat anterior pituitary gland

    SciTech Connect

    Chabot, J.G.; Walker, P.; Pelletier, G.

    1986-01-01

    The distribution of epidermal growth (EGF) binding sites was studied in the pituitary gland using light and electron microscope autoradiography which was performed at different time intervals (2 to 60 min) after intravenous (IV) injection of (/sup 125/I)EGF into adult rats. At the light microscopic level, the labeling was found over cells of the anterior pituitary gland. The time-course study performed by light microscope autoradiography showed that the maximal values were reached at the 2 min time interval. At this time interval, most silver grains were found at the periphery of the target cells. After, the number of silver grains decreased progressively and the localization of silver grains in the cytoplasm indicated the internalization of (/sup 125/I)EGF. Electron microscope autoradiography showed that labeling was mostly restricted to mammotrophs and somatotrophs. Control experiments indicated that the autoradiographic labeling was due specific interaction of (/sup 125/I)EGF with its binding site. These results indicate that EGF binding sites are present in at least two anterior pituitary cell types and suggest that EGF can exert a physiological role in the pituitary gland.

  4. Distribution of ophthalmologists and optometrists in Islamic Republic of Iran and their associated factors.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, S-F; Lashay, M-R; Ashrafi, E; Haghdoust, A-A; Alinia, C; Lashay, A-R; Asadi-Lari, M; Mohammadi, S-M; Hatef, E

    2017-02-01

    We aimed to determine the distribution of ophthalmic care providers and its correlation with health and socioeconomic status and health system indicators. Data were gathered from the Iran Medical Council and the Iranian Societies of Ophthalmology and Optometry. Concurrent indicators were collected from the Statistical Center of Iran and national studies. A population-adjusted number of combined ophthalmologists and optometrists was used as the main dependent variable. Optometrist/ophthalmologist ratio was 0.9. We had 1 ophthalmologist and 1 optometrist for every 40 000 and 45 000 individuals, respectively. We observed a direct correlation between the number of ophthalmologists, optometrists and life expectancy at the provincial level. Gross provincial income and expenditure and provincial literacy were correlated as well. Provincial unemployment had a negative correlation. Provincial hospital statistics and population density were also significantly correlated. The Islamic Republic of Iran has met the World Health Organization's desired per capita number of ophthalmologists and optometrists, but there is wide variation in their density.

  5. Factors influencing the occurrence and distribution of neonicotinoid insecticides in surface waters of southern Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Struger, John; Grabuski, Josey; Cagampan, Steve; Sverko, Ed; McGoldrick, Daryl; Marvin, Christopher H

    2017-02-01

    The widespread use of neonicotinoid insecticides and recent increased regulatory scrutiny requires the generation of monitoring data with sufficient scope and resolution to provide decision makers with a better understanding of occurrence and distribution in the environment. This study presents a wide-scale investigation of neonicotinoid insecticides used across the range of agricultural activities from fifteen surface water sites in southern Ontario. Using statistical analysis, the correlation of individual compounds with land use was investigated, and the relationship between neonicotinoid occurrence and hydrologic parameters in calibrated water courses was also assessed. Of the five neonicotinoids studied, imidacloprid, clothianidin and thiamethoxam exhibited detection rates above 90% at over half the sites sampled over a three year period (2012-2014). At two sites in southwestern Ontario, the Canadian Federal freshwater guideline value for imidacloprid (230 ng/L) was exceeded in roughly 75% of the samples collected. For some watersheds, there were correlations between the occurrence of neonicotinoids and precipitation and/or stream discharge. Some watersheds exhibited seasonal maxima in concentrations of neonicotinoids in spring and fall, particularly for those areas where row crop agriculture is predominant; these seasonal patterns were absent in some areas characterized by a broad range of agricultural activities.

  6. Environmental factors shaping the abundance and distribution of laccase-encoding bacterial community with potential phenolic oxidase capacity during composting.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lunhui; Zeng, Guangming; Fan, Changzheng; Guo, Jinsong; Zhang, Jiachao; Chen, Ming; Wu, Haipeng; Yuan, Yujie; He, Xiaoxiao; He, Yan

    2015-11-01

    Increasing molecular evidence points to a wide occurrence of laccase-like multicopper oxidase (LMCO)-encoding genes in bacteria. Most researches mainly focused on the bacterial LMCO diversity, whereas the processes and the environmental factors responsible for structuring bacterial LMCO communities remain relatively unknown in a composting system. Six gene libraries were constructed from samples in representative stages during composting. A total of 185 sequences obtained from sample DNA extracts were classified to 59 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) based on 10 % cutoff. The distribution profile of bacterial LMCO genes showed that proteobacterial- and actinobacterial-associated species were the dominant communities during composting. Pearson correlation analysis indicated that the pile temperature and water-soluble carbon (WSC) content were significantly positively correlated with bacterial LMCO gene OTU numbers, Chao1 and Shannon index, whereas the humic acid (HA)-like carbon content had the most significant effect on the distribution of the bacterial LMCO genes during composting by redundancy analysis. These findings will improve the understanding of the mutual relationship between environmental factors and bacterial LMCO community compositions in composting.

  7. SpSoxB1, a maternally encoded transcription factor asymmetrically distributed among early sea urchin blastomeres.

    PubMed

    Kenny, A P; Kozlowski, D; Oleksyn, D W; Angerer, L M; Angerer, R C

    1999-12-01

    We have identified a Sox family transcription factor, SpSoxB1, that is asymmetrically distributed among blastomeres of the sea urchin embryo during cleavage, beginning at 4th cleavage. SpSoxB1 interacts with a cis element that is essential for transcription of SpAN, a gene that is activated cell autonomously and expressed asymmetrically along the animal-vegetal axis. In vitro translated SpSoxB1 forms a specific complex with this cis element whose mobility is identical to that formed by a protein in nuclear extracts. An anti-SpSoxB1 rabbit polyclonal antiserum specifically supershifts this DNA-protein complex and recognizes a single protein on immunoblots of nuclear proteins that comigrates with in vitro translated SpSoxB1. Developmental immunoblots of total proteins at selected early developmental stages, as well as EMSA of egg and 16-cell stage proteins, show that SpSoxB1 is present at low levels in unfertilized eggs and progressively accumulates during cleavage. SpSoxB1 maternal transcripts are uniformly distributed in the unfertilized egg and the protein accumulates to similar, high concentrations in all nuclei of 4- and 8-cell embryos. However, at fourth cleavage, the micromeres, which are partitioned by asymmetric division of the vegetal 4 blastomeres, have reduced nuclear levels of the protein, while high levels persist in their sister macromeres and in the mesomeres. During cleavage, the uniform maternal SpSoxB1 transcript distribution is replaced by a zygotic nonvegetal pattern that reinforces the asymmetric SpSoxB1 protein distribution and reflects the corresponding domain of SpAN mRNA accumulation at early blastula stage ( approximately 150 cells). The vegetal region lacking nuclear SpSoxB1 gradually expands so that, after blastula stage, only cells in differentiating ectoderm accumulate this protein in their nuclei. The results reported here support a model in which SpSoxB1 is a major regulator of the initial phase of asymmetric transcription of SpAN in

  8. Environmental factors affecting methane distribution and bacterial methane oxidation in the German Bight (North Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osudar, Roman; Matoušů, Anna; Alawi, Mashal; Wagner, Dirk; Bussmann, Ingeborg

    2015-07-01

    River estuaries are responsible for high rates of methane emissions to the atmosphere. The complexity and diversity of estuaries require detailed investigation of methane sources and sinks, as well as of their spatial and seasonal variations. The Elbe river estuary and the adjacent North Sea were chosen as the study site for this survey, which was conducted from October 2010 to June 2012. Using gas chromatography and radiotracer techniques, we measured methane concentrations and methane oxidation (MOX) rates along a 60 km long transect from Cuxhaven to Helgoland. Methane distribution was influenced by input from the methane-rich mouth of the Elbe and gradual dilution by methane-depleted sea water. Methane concentrations near the coast were on average 30 ± 13 nmol L-1, while in the open sea, they were 14 ± 6 nmol L-1. Interestingly, the highest methane concentrations were repeatedly detected near Cuxhaven, not in the Elbe River freshwater end-member as previously reported. Though, we did not find clear seasonality we observed temporal methane variations, which depended on temperature and presumably on water discharge from the Elbe River. The highest MOX rates generally coincided with the highest methane concentrations, and varied from 2.6 ± 2.7 near the coast to 0.417 ± 0.529 nmol L-1 d-1 in the open sea. Turnover times varied from 3 to >1000 days. MOX rates were strongly affected by methane concentration, temperature and salinity. We ruled out the supposition that MOX is not an important methane sink in most of the Elbe estuary and adjacent German Bight.

  9. Factors affecting phytoplankton distribution and production in the Elephant Island area, Antarctica

    SciTech Connect

    Helbling, E.W.

    1993-01-01

    During the austral summer of four years, 1990 to 1993, studies on phytoplankton were performed in the Elephant Island area as one component of the US Antarctica Marine Living Resources program. In addition to continuous measurements (temperature, salinity, chlorophyll-a, beam attenuation) made on ship's intake water, a profiling CTD-rosette unit was used to obtain water column characteristics (temperature, salinity, chlorophyll-a, attenuation of solar radiation, beam attenuation) from the surface to 750m depth and also water samples from at least 10 depths for chemical and biological analyses. The sampling grid consisted of an average of 70 stations, all of which were occupied two times each year. The Elephant Island area is a transition zone between the rich coastal areas, where phytoplankton can develop dense blooms, and pelagic waters where the phytoplankton biomass is in general very low. A frontal zone was usually found to the north of Elephant Island and over the continental slope, and high phytoplankton biomass was in general associated with this frontal region. Although the location of this frontal system showed seasonal movement in a north-south direction, it seems to be a consistent feature from year to year. There seems to be considerable year-to-year variability in physical (water temperatures and salinity) and phytoplankton characteristics within the study area, in regard to both distributional patterns in surface waters and to profile characteristics in the upper 100m of the water column. With shallow upper mixed layer depths of less than 50 m, phytoplankton can attain relatively high concentrations. Optimum light conditions for growth occurred when the mixed layer was less than 55% of the euphotic zone. As the area around Elephant Island is characterized by relatively strong and frequent winds, the depth of the upper mixed layer at many stations approached the depth of the euphotic zone, with the result that growth of phytoplankton was light limited.

  10. Distribution and risk factors associated with intestinal parasite infections among children with gastrointestinal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kiani, Hamed; Haghighi, Ali; Salehi, Roya; Azargashb, Eznollah

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Prevalence and risk factors associated with intestinal parasites among children ≤ 12 years old in Nahavand county western Iran, was the objective of this search. Background: Intestinal parasites (IPs) are important health problems among most societies. Methods: This cross sectional study was carried out during 6 months from April to September 2014 in Nahavand County western Iran. Fecal samples were collected from 500 children suffering from gastrointestinal disorders (GIDs) and examined by macroscopy and microscopic (using saline and iodine wet mount, formalin-ether sedimentation, Trichrome and modified Ziehl Neelsen staining) methods. Finally, data was analyzed using Chi-square (Chi2) test and Fisher’s exact test as well as logistic regression. Results: 21.8% (109/500) of the samples were infected by one or more IPs. The most common parasites were Blastocystis sp. (16.2%), followed by Cryptosporidium spp. (2.6%), Giardia lamblia (1.6%), and Entamoeba coli (1.6%). Prevalence of intestinal parasite infections were significantly associated with age (OR= 2.280; CI 95% = 1.375-3.830; P<0.002), gender (OR= 0551; CI 95% = 0.348-0.875; P<0.011), contact with domestic animal or soil (OR= 0.492; CI 95% = 0.282-0.860; P<0.013) and seasons (OR= 2.012; CI 95% = 1.254-3.227; P<0.004). There was a significant correlation between IPs with diarrhea (OR= 3.027; CI 95% = 1.712-5.345; P<0.001) and nausea or vomiting (OR= 3.261; CI 95% = 1.281-8.175; P<0.013). Conclusion: Blastocystis sp. was the most prevalent parasites among children in Nahavand County and Helminthes infection have been dramatically decreased. Our finding shown that gender, age, season and contact with domestic animals or soil polluted are main predictive factors for intestinal parasite infections among children in this region. Moreover, IPs infection among children with gastrointestinal disorders were significantly associated with diarrhea and vomiting or nausea signs. PMID:28224033

  11. Global distribution patterns of highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza: environmental vs. socioeconomic factors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Youhua; Chen, You-Fang

    2014-01-01

    In this report, we quantitatively analyzed the essential ecological factors that were strongly correlated with the global outbreak of highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza. The ecological niche modeling (ENM) was used to reveal the potential outbreak hotspots of H5N1. A two-step modeling procedure has been proposed: we first used BioClim model to obtain the coarse suitable areas of H5N1, and then those suitable areas with very high probabilities were retained as the inputs of multiple-variable autologistic regression analysis (MAR) for model refinement. MAR was implemented taking spatial autocorrelation into account. The final performance of ENM was evaluated using the areas under the curve (AUC) of receiver-operating characteristic. In addition, principal component analysis (PCA) was employed to reveal the most important variables and relevant ecological gradients of H5N1 outbreak. Niche visualization was used to identify potential spreading trend of H5N1 along important ecological gradients. For the first time, we combined socioeconomic and environmental variables as joint predictors in developing ecological niche modeling. Environmental variables represented the natural element related to H5N1 outbreak, whereas socioeconomic ones represented the anthropogenic element. Our results indicated that: (1) the high-risk hotspots are mainly located in temperate zones (indicated by ENM)-correspondingly, we argued that the "ecoregions hypothesis" was reasonable to some extent; (2) evaporation, humidity, human population density, livestock population density were the first four important factors (in descending order) that were associated with the H5N1 global outbreak (indicated by PCA); (3) influenza had a tendency to expand into areas with low evaporation (indicated by niche visualization). In conclusion, our study substantiates that both the environmental and socioeconomic variables jointly determined the global spreading trend of H5N1, but environmental variables

  12. Factors influencing the distribution of native bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout in western Glacier National Park, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    D'Angelo, Vincent S.; Muhlfeld, Clint C.

    2013-01-01

    The widespread declines of native bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii lewisi) populations prompted researchers to investigate factors influencing their distribution and status in western Glacier National Park, Montana. We evaluated the association of a suite of abiotic factors (stream width, elevation, gradient, large woody debris density, pool density, August mean stream temperature, reach surface area) with the occurrence (presence or absence) of bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout in 79 stream reaches in five sub-drainages containing glacial lakes. We modeled the occurrence of each species using logistic regression and evaluated competing models using an information theoretic approach. Westslope cutthroat trout were widely distributed (47 of 79 reaches), and there appeared to be no restrictions on their distribution other than physical barriers. Westslope cutthroat trout were most commonly found in relatively warm reaches downstream of lakes and in headwater reaches with large amounts of large woody debris and abundant pools. By contrast, bull trout were infrequently detected (10 of 79 reaches), with 7 of the 10 (70%) detections in sub-drainages that have not been compromised by non-native lake trout (S. namaycush). Bull trout were most often found in cold, low-gradient reaches upstream of glacial lakes. Our results indicate that complex stream habitats in sub-drainages free of non-native species are important to the persistence of native salmonids in western Glacier National Park. Results from this study may help managers monitor and protect important habitats and populations, inform conservation and recovery programs, and guide non-native species suppression efforts in Glacier National Park and elsewhere.

  13. Effects of retorting factors on combustion properties of shale char. 3. Distribution of residual organic matters.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiangxin; Jiang, Xiumin; Cui, Zhigang; Liu, Jianguo; Yan, Junwei

    2010-03-15

    Shale char, formed in retort furnaces of oil shale, is classified as a dangerous waste containing several toxic compounds. In order to retort oil shale to produce shale oil as well as treat shale char efficiently and in an environmentally friendly way, a novel kind of comprehensive utilization system was developed to use oil shale for shale oil production, electricity generation (shale char fired) and the extensive application of oil shale ash. For exploring the combustion properties of shale char further, in this paper organic matters within shale chars obtained under different retorting conditions were extracted and identified using a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method. Subsequently, the effects of retorting factors, including retorting temperature, residence time, particle size and heating rate, were analyzed in detail. As a result, a retorting condition with a retorting temperature of 460-490 degrees C, residence time of <40 min and a middle particle size was recommended for both keeping nitrogenous organic matters and aromatic hydrocarbons in shale char and improving the yield and quality of shale oil. In addition, shale char obtained under such retorting condition can also be treated efficiently using a circulating fluidized bed technology with fractional combustion.

  14. Matrix factorization to time-frequency distribution for structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chia-Ming; Huang, Shieh-Kung

    2016-04-01

    Structural health monitoring enables structural information to be acquired through sensing technology, and is of need to early detect problems and damages in structures. Health monitoring strategies are often realized through a combination of qualitative sensing systems and high-performance structural integrity assessment methods. Structural deviations can be then effectively identified by interpreting the raw sensor measurements using signal processing techniques. The objective of this study is to develop a new structural health monitoring method that applies a matrix factorization algorithm to a time-frequency representation of multi-channel signals measured from a structure. This method processes vibrational input and/or output responses of structures to improve raw data quality, to estimate structural responses, to derive signal features, and to detect structural variations. For example, the proposed method can reduce the signal noise by utilizing first few principle vectors to reconstruct the measured signals. For frequency-domain responses, this method can smooth the phase to obtain a better input-output relationship of a structure. Additionally, the method removes abnormal signals in time series, allowing better understanding of structural behavior. Due to communication loss, this method is able to recover lost data from other channel measurements in a structure. Moreover, the proposed method transforms the signal components into a specific domain and then yield meaningful characteristics. All these features are numerically verified using experimental data, and the proposed method permits more detailed investigation of structural behavior.

  15. Distribution of Selected Plant Parasitic Nematodes Relative to Vegetation and Edaphic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Norton, D. C.; Hoffmann, J. K.

    1974-01-01

    The occurrence of selected plant-parasitic nematodes in the hemlock-hardwood-white pine, boreal forest, tundra, and oak-hickory associations in some northern states was compared. Helicotylenchus platyurus and Xiphinema americanum were not found in the boreal forest and tundra, and occurred infrequently in the hemlock-hardwood-white pine areas. They were found frequently, however, in the oak-hickory forest of Iowa. It is questioned that vegetational differences among the areas account directly for the major differences in nematode occurrence. Presence and absence of nematodes and their numbers in the oak-hickory association were clustered by similarity coefficients by sites and correlated with soil pH, percentage organic matter, percentage sand-silt-clay, and field capacity. Of the soil factors measured, pH gave the strongest correlations with nematode numbers. Xiphinema chambersi was found only in soils with a pH between 4.5 and 6.4 while the largest numbers of H. platyurus, H. pseudorobustus, and X. americanum occurred in soil above pH 6.0. PMID:19319372

  16. Epidermal growth factor binding and receptor distribution in the mouse reproductive tract during development

    SciTech Connect

    Bossert, N.L.; Nelson, K.G.; Ross, K.A.; Takahashi, T.; McLachlan, J.A. )

    1990-11-01

    The ontogeny of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor in the different cell types in the neonatal and immature mouse uterus and vagina was examined. Immunohistochemical examination of prenatal and neonatal reproductive tracts with a polyclonal antibody to the EGF receptor shows immunoreactive EGF receptors as early as Day 13 of gestation. Autoradiographic analysis of tissue sections at 3 to 17 days of age (the day of birth is Day 1) demonstrates that both uterine and vaginal epithelial and stromal cells are capable of binding 125I-labeled EGF. Both the 125I-labeled EGF autoradiography and immunohistochemistry in whole tissue show higher EGF receptor levels in the uterine epithelium than the uterine stroma. The presence of EGF receptors was also confirmed by affinity labeling and Scatchard analysis of isolated uterine cell types at 7 and/or 17 days of age. However, in contrast to the autoradiography and immunohistochemistry data of intact tissue, the affinity labeling and Scatchard data of isolated cells indicate that the uterine stroma contains higher levels of EGF receptor than that of the uterine epithelium. The reason for this discrepancy between the different techniques is, as yet, unknown. Regardless of the differences in the actual numbers of EGF receptors obtained, our data demonstrate that the developing mouse reproductive tract contains immunoreactive EGF receptors that are capable of binding 125I-labeled EGF.

  17. Utility of Red Cell Distribution Width as a Prognostic Factor in Young Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Du-Ping; Ma, Rui-Min; Xiang, You-Qun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The prognosis of breast cancer occurs in young women is usually poor. Red cell distribution width (RDW), 1 of many routinely examined parameters, has recently been proposed as a prognostic marker in solid tumors. The aim of our study was to assess the predictive value of RDW for survival in young women with breast cancer. We reviewed 203 consecutive young female patients (under 40) with invasive breast cancer diagnosed at the First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University between January 2008 and December 2012. Preoperational RDW, clinicopathological information, and prognostic data were collected. RDW levels were divided into 2 groups: 161 patients with low RDW (≤13.75%) and 42 patients with high RDW (>13.75%). Clinicopathological differences between the 2 groups were calculated by chi-squared test and Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Kaplan–Meier survival analysis and Cox proportional hazard regression analyses were used to examine the effect of RDW on survival. We found that high RDW was significantly associated with larger tumor size (P = 0.002), positive lymph node metastases (P = 0.011), and advanced stages (P = 0.004). Patients with high RDW showed significantly lower disease-free survival (DFS; P < 0.001) and lower overall survival (OS) rate (P < 0.001) than patients with low RDW. Moreover, the Cox regression multivariate analysis revealed that high pretreatment DRW was independently correlated with poor DFS and OS, with hazard ratio 4.819 (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.291–10.138, P < 0.001) and 5.887 (95% CI 1.666–20.802, P = 0.006), respectively. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that pretreatment RDW may be associated with DFS and OS in young women with breast cancer. Further validation and feasibility studies are required before the result of our study can be considered for clinical practice. PMID:27124030

  18. Factors affecting nitrate distribution in shallow groundwater under a beef farm in south eastern Ireland.

    PubMed

    Fenton, O; Richards, K G; Kirwan, L; Khalil, M I; Healy, M G

    2009-07-01

    Groundwater contamination was characterised using a methodology which combines shallow groundwater geochemistry data from 17 piezometers over a 2 yr period in a statistical framework and hydrogeological techniques. Nitrate-N (NO3-N) contaminant mass flux was calculated across three control planes (rows of piezometers) in six isolated plots. Results showed natural attenuation occurs on site although the method does not directly differentiate between dilution and denitrification. It was further investigated whether NO3-N concentration in shallow groundwater (<5 m below ground level) generated from an agricultural point source on a 4.2 ha site on a beef farm in SE Ireland could be predicted from saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat) measurements, ground elevation (m Above Ordnance Datum), elevation of groundwater sampling (screen opening interval) (m AOD) and distance from a dirty water point pollution source. Tobit regression, using a background concentration threshold of 2.6 mg NO3-N L(-1) showed, when assessed individually in a step wise procedure, Ksat was significantly related to groundwater NO3-N concentration. Distance of the point dirty water pollution source becomes significant when included with Ksat in the model. The model relationships show areas with higher Ksat values have less time for denitrification to occur, whereas lower Ksat values allow denitrification to occur. Areas with higher permeability transport greater NO3-N fluxes to ground and surface waters. When the distribution of Cl- was examined by the model, Ksat and ground elevation had the most explanatory power but Ksat was not significant pointing to dilution having an effect. Areas with low NO3 concentration and unaffected Cl- concentration points to denitrification, low NO3 concentration and low Cl- chloride concentration points to dilution and combining these findings allows areas of denitrification and dilution to be inferred. The effect of denitrification is further supported as mean

  19. The Ciliogenic Transcription Factor RFX3 Regulates Early Midline Distribution of Guidepost Neurons Required for Corpus Callosum Development

    PubMed Central

    Benadiba, Carine; Magnani, Dario; Niquille, Mathieu; Morlé, Laurette; Valloton, Delphine; Nawabi, Homaira; Ait-Lounis, Aouatef; Otsmane, Belkacem; Reith, Walter; Theil, Thomas; Hornung, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    The corpus callosum (CC) is the major commissure that bridges the cerebral hemispheres. Agenesis of the CC is associated with human ciliopathies, but the origin of this default is unclear. Regulatory Factor X3 (RFX3) is a transcription factor involved in the control of ciliogenesis, and Rfx3–deficient mice show several hallmarks of ciliopathies including left–right asymmetry defects and hydrocephalus. Here we show that Rfx3–deficient mice suffer from CC agenesis associated with a marked disorganisation of guidepost neurons required for axon pathfinding across the midline. Using transplantation assays, we demonstrate that abnormalities of the mutant midline region are primarily responsible for the CC malformation. Conditional genetic inactivation shows that RFX3 is not required in guidepost cells for proper CC formation, but is required before E12.5 for proper patterning of the cortical septal boundary and hence accurate distribution of guidepost neurons at later stages. We observe focused but consistent ectopic expression of Fibroblast growth factor 8 (Fgf8) at the rostro commissural plate associated with a reduced ratio of GLIoma-associated oncogene family zinc finger 3 (GLI3) repressor to activator forms. We demonstrate on brain explant cultures that ectopic FGF8 reproduces the guidepost neuronal defects observed in Rfx3 mutants. This study unravels a crucial role of RFX3 during early brain development by indirectly regulating GLI3 activity, which leads to FGF8 upregulation and ultimately to disturbed distribution of guidepost neurons required for CC morphogenesis. Hence, the RFX3 mutant mouse model brings novel understandings of the mechanisms that underlie CC agenesis in ciliopathies. PMID:22479201

  20. Correlation of Spatio-Temporal Contaminant Distribution, Land Use, and Hydrogeological Factors in the Karst Aquifers of Northern Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres Torres, N. I.; Padilla, I. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Karst aquifers are characterized by caves, springs, and sinkholes, and typified by interconnected fissures, fractures and conduits. These characteristics make these aquifers highly productive, and vulnerable to contamination. Previous studies in the northern karst aquifers of Puerto Rico have shown significant distribution of contaminants, including volatile organic compounds, phthalates and other contaminants of emerging concern, beyond demarked sources of contamination. This study develops spatial-temporal distributions of phthalate contaminants in the karst system of northern Puerto Rico and assesses statistical correlations between hydrogeologic factors and groundwater contamination with phthalates. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) tools and technologies, and statistical models are applied to attain these objectives. Results show that there is an extensive contamination with phthalates that varies with time. Contamination is present in the confined and shallow aquifers. Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is the most detected contaminant (20.6% of the sites). Diethyl phthalate and and dibutyl phthalate are also detected in 6.7% and 8.24% of the sites, respectively. Phthalates detected as mixtures components are significantly detected in areas of high urban and industrial development. They are also detected in areas within 5 miles of superfund sites and landfills. The results indicate that phthalate contamination is highly related to land use. Statistical models show that the hydraulic conductivity of the aquifers, sinkholes density, and time are significantly related to the presence of phthalates in groundwater. The extensive spatio-temporal contamination suggests that contaminants can persist in the environment for long periods of time, and that land use and hydrogeological factors are important factors contributing to the presence of emerging contaminants in karst systems.

  1. Vertical distribution of soil saturated hydraulic conductivity and its influencing factors in a small karst catchment in Southwest China.

    PubMed

    Fu, Tonggang; Chen, Hongsong; Zhang, Wei; Nie, Yunpeng; Wang, Kelin

    2015-03-01

    Saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) is one of the most important soil hydraulic parameters influencing hydrological processes. This paper aims to investigate the vertical distribution of Ks and to analyze its influencing factors in a small karst catchment in Southwest China. Ks was measured in 23 soil profiles for six soil horizons using a constant head method. These profiles were chosen in different topographical locations (upslope, downslope, and depression) and different land-use types (forestland, shrubland, shrub-grassland, and farmland). The influencing factors of Ks, including rock fragment content (RC), bulk density (BD), capillary porosity (CP), non-capillary porosity (NCP), and soil organic carbon (SOC), were analyzed by partial correlation analysis. The mean Ks value was higher in the entire profile in the upslope and downslope, but lower value, acting as a water-resisting layer, was found in the 10-20 cm soil depth in the depression. Higher mean Ks values were found in the soil profiles in the forestland, shrubland, and shrub-grassland, but lower in the farmland. These results indicated that saturation-excess runoff could occur primarily in the hillslopes but infiltration-excess runoff in the depression. Compared with other land-use types, surface runoff is more likely to occur in the farmlands. RC had higher correlation coefficients with Ks in all categories concerned except in the forestland and farmland with little or no rock fragments, indicating that RC was the dominant influencing factor of Ks. These results suggested that the vertical distributions of Ks and RC should be considered for hydrological modeling in karst areas.

  2. Factors determining the distribution of the sea pansy, Renilla kollikeri, in a subtidal sand-bottom habitat.

    PubMed

    Kastendiek, Jon

    1982-01-01

    The biological and physical factors that affect the distribution of the subtidal, epibenthic, sand-dwelling cnidarian Renilla kollikeri along a depth gradient from 2 to 13 m were determined by manipulative field and laboratory experiments. The sea pansy's nearshore distributional limit (2.5 m in depth) was set by the animal's inability to remain anchored on the bottom in the face of increasing wave surge associated with shallow water. Renilla was outcompeted for space by the sand dollar Dendraster excentricus in an area between 6 and 9 m in depth and was largely excluded from the substrate when sand dollar densities exceeded 350/m(2). Predator-prey interactions also influence the Renilla distribution. The asteroid Astropecten brasiliensis feeds on and removes Renilla 40 mm and less in diameter from areas seaward of the sand dollar bed (9 m in depth). Astropecten did not forage in the shallow area where Renilla was most abundant because of its intolerance to wave surge and because of its difficulty in crossing the sand dollar bed. The nudibranch Armina californica fed on Renilla throughout the depth gradient but did not remove colonies greater than 20 mm in diameter because of the Armina- specific escape behavior of Renilla. The foraging behavior of Armina was also curtailed by strong surge conditions. The nearshore area (3-6 m in depth) of high Renilla density was a refuge in which animals that had settled from the plankton could escape predation. As the animals grow they lose their ability to anchor in the substrate in shallow water and thus move into deeper water. The results of multiway interactions among sets of three species, particularly the beneficial results of the competitive interaction with Dendraster in light of the activities of the predators are discussed with reference to the abundance and distribution of Renilla.

  3. Distribution of asthma by occupation: Washington State Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Data, 2006–2009

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Zihong Joyce; Reeb-Whitaker, Carolyn; Bonauto, David K.; Rauser, Edmund

    2014-01-01

    Objective Objective: To estimate the prevalence of asthma in workers by occupation in Washington State. Methods: Data from the 2006–2009 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) and the BRFSS Asthma Call-Back Survey (ACBS) in Washington State (WA) were analyzed. Using state-added and coded Industry and Occupation questions, we calculated prevalence ratios (PRs) for 19 occupational groups. Results: Of the 41 935 respondents who were currently employed during 2006–2009, the prevalence of current asthma was 8.1% [95% confidence interval (CI) 7.8–8.5%] When compared with the reference group of executive, administration and managerial occupations, three occupational groups had significantly (p < 0.05) higher PRs of current asthma: “Teachers, all levels, and Counselors’ (PR 1.3, 95% CI 1.1–1. 6%); ‘Administrative Support, including Clerical” (PR 1. 5, 95% CI 1.2–1.9%); and “Other Health Services” (PR 1.5, 95% CI 1.2–1.9). Half of the 2511 ACBS respondent workers (55.1%) indicated that they believed exposure at work had caused or worsened their asthma, but only 10.7% had ever spoken with a health care professional about their asthma being work related. Conclusions: Some occupations have a higher prevalence of current asthma than other occupations. The systematic collection of industry and occupation data can help identify worker populations with a high burden of asthma and can be used to target disease prevention efforts as well as to aid clinician recognition and treatment. Workers indicated that work-related asthma exposures are not discussed with their health care provider and this communication gap has implications for asthma management. PMID:24995660

  4. Species Distribution Models and Impact Factor Growth in Environmental Journals: Methodological Fashion or the Attraction of Global Change Science

    PubMed Central

    Brotons, Lluís

    2014-01-01

    In this work, I evaluate the impact of species distribution models (SDMs) on the current status of environmental and ecological journals by asking the question to which degree development of SDMs in the literature is related to recent changes in the impact factors of ecological journals. The hypothesis evaluated states that research fronts are likely to attract research attention and potentially drive citation patterns, with journals concentrating papers related to the research front receiving more attention and benefiting from faster increases in their impact on the ecological literature. My results indicate a positive relationship between the number of SDM related articles published in a journal and its impact factor (IF) growth during the period 2000–09. However, the percentage of SDM related papers in a journal was strongly and positively associated with the percentage of papers on climate change and statistical issues. The results support the hypothesis that global change science has been critical in the development of SDMs and that interest in climate change research in particular, rather than the usage of SDM per se, appears as an important factor behind journal IF increases in ecology and environmental sciences. Finally, our results on SDM application in global change science support the view that scientific interest rather than methodological fashion appears to be the major driver of research attraction in the scientific literature. PMID:25386926

  5. Species distribution models and impact factor growth in environmental journals: methodological fashion or the attraction of global change science.

    PubMed

    Brotons, Lluís

    2014-01-01

    In this work, I evaluate the impact of species distribution models (SDMs) on the current status of environmental and ecological journals by asking the question to which degree development of SDMs in the literature is related to recent changes in the impact factors of ecological journals. The hypothesis evaluated states that research fronts are likely to attract research attention and potentially drive citation patterns, with journals concentrating papers related to the research front receiving more attention and benefiting from faster increases in their impact on the ecological literature. My results indicate a positive relationship between the number of SDM related articles published in a journal and its impact factor (IF) growth during the period 2000-09. However, the percentage of SDM related papers in a journal was strongly and positively associated with the percentage of papers on climate change and statistical issues. The results support the hypothesis that global change science has been critical in the development of SDMs and that interest in climate change research in particular, rather than the usage of SDM per se, appears as an important factor behind journal IF increases in ecology and environmental sciences. Finally, our results on SDM application in global change science support the view that scientific interest rather than methodological fashion appears to be the major driver of research attraction in the scientific literature.

  6. Controlling factors analysis of pCO2 distribution in the Western Arctic Ocean in summertime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xuelian; Bai, Yan; Hao, Zengzhou; Zhun, Qiankun; Chen, Jianyu; Gong, Fang

    2015-10-01

    The uptake of carbon dioxide (CO2) by the Arctic Ocean has been changing because of the rapid sea-ice retreat with global warming. The Chukchi Sea is the only gateway of the warm and nutrient-rich Pacific Ocean water flowing into the North Pole, and the high productivity-water had great impact on the CO2 uptake by the Arctic Ocean. We used the in situ underway data of aquatic partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2), temperature and salinity, as well as the remote sensing data of sea ice concentration, chlorophyll concentration, sea surface temperature in August in 2008, 2011 and 2012 to analyze the major controlling factors of aquatic pCO2 in the Western Arctic Ocean. We analyzed the pCO2 variation under the effects of thermodynamic process (temperature), mixing of water mass (salinity), biological drawdown (chlorophyll), and sea ice concentration. The aquatic pCO2 was generally unsaturation relative to the atmospheric CO2 in most of the Western Arctic Ocean. According to different controlling mechanisms, the study area was divided into three parts: the area affected by the Pacific Ocean water (mainly in the Chukchi Sea), the area where sea ice mostly melted with weak biological production (the southern Canada Basin and the Western Beaufort Sea), and the area mostly covered by sea ice (the Northern Canada Basin). The aquatic pCO2 was low in the Chukchi Sea with the influence of the Pacific Ocean water. While, pCO2 in the area where sea ice melted was up to 360-380 μatm because of warming, CO2 invasion from the atmosphere, and a low biological production. For the Canada Basin, it was controlled by temperature change and sea ice cover. The remote sensing data in large spatial-temporal scale can help to understand the pCO2 variation and its response to global change; and it needs to develop satellite algorithm of pCO2 based on the quantification of controlling processes.

  7. The distribution of forensic journals, reflections on authorship practices, peer-review and role of the impact factor.

    PubMed

    Jones, Alan Wayne

    2007-01-17

    This article presents information about journals specializing in the forensic sciences and legal medicine, their development and distribution and their current status as reflected in the journal impact factor. The first scientific journal devoted to spreading information and reporting new developments in social and legal medicine seemingly originated in Germany about 150 years ago. The official journal of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences (Journal of Forensic Sciences, JFS) was founded in 1956 and has enjoyed 50 years of scholarly publishing. The two leading European journals specializing in forensics are Forensic Science International (FSI) and International Journal of Legal Medicine (IJLM). Besides the size of the circulation, the readership numbers, the quality of the editorial staff and the peer-reviewers, the number of submitted and accepted manuscripts, considerable interest has focused on the journal's impact factor as a measure of prestige. The 2006 impact factor of a certain journal is derived by counting the number of citations in 2006 to all material published in the journal in the previous 2 years (2004 and 2005) and dividing this total by the number of citable items (articles and reviews) published in the same 2 years. Impact factors for several thousand scientific journals are compiled and published by a company called Thomson Institute for Scientific Information (Thomson ISI) and are available on-line via the database Journal Citation Reports. Forensic journals are grouped within the subject category Medicine, Legal, which currently comprises nine journals a few of which are seemingly unrelated to mainstream forensics. The top-ranked forensic journal in terms of its impact factor was IJLM with a score of just over 2.0 in 2004. This means that the average article published in 2003 and 2002 was cited twice per year in the 2-year window after publication. Impact factors of forensic journals are fairly low in comparison with many other

  8. Analysis of Impact of Geographical Environment and Socio-economic Factors on the Spatial Distribution of Kaohsiung Dengue Fever Epidemic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Wei-Yin; Wen, Tzai-Hung; Yu, Hwa-Lung

    2013-04-01

    Taiwan is located in subtropical and tropical regions with high temperature and high humidity in the summer. This kind of climatic condition is the hotbed for the propagation and spread of the dengue vector mosquito. Kaohsiung City has been the worst dengue fever epidemic city in Taiwan. During the study period, from January 1998 to December 2011, Taiwan CDC recorded 7071 locally dengue epidemic cases in Kaohsiung City, and the number of imported case is 118. Our research uses Quantile Regression, a spatial infection disease distribution, to analyze the correlation between dengue epidemic and geographic environmental factors and human society factors in Kaohsiung. According to our experiment statistics, agriculture and natural forest have a positive relation to dengue fever(5.5~34.39 and 3.91~15.52). The epidemic will rise when the ratio for agriculture and natural forest increases. Residential ratio has a negative relation for quantile 0.1 to 0.4(-0.005~-0.78), and a positive relation for quantile 0.5 to0.9(0.01~18.0) . The mean income is also a significant factor in social economy field, and it has a negative relation to dengue fever(-0.01~-0.04). Conclusion from our research is that the main factor affecting the degree of dengue fever in predilection area is the residential proportion and the ratio of agriculture and natural forest plays an important role affecting the degree of dengue fever in non predilection area. Moreover, the serious epidemic area located by regression model is the same as the actual condition in Kaohsiung. This model can be used to predict the serious epidemic area of dengue fever and provide some references for the Health Agencies

  9. An examination of factors influencing the spatial distribution of foraging bats in pine stands in the southeastern United States.

    SciTech Connect

    Menzel, Michael, A., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Menzel, M.A. 2003. An examination of factors influencing the spatial distribution of foraging bats in pine stands in the Southeastern United States. Ph.D Dissertation. Davis College of Agriculture, Forestry and Consumer Sciences at West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia. 336 pp. The general objective of this dissertation was to determine the effect of changes in forest structure on bat activity patterns in southern pine stands. Four sub studies are included in the dissertation: (1) An examination of the homerange size, habitat use and diet of four reproductively active male Rafinesque's big eared bats (Corynorhimus rafinesquii); (2) An examination of the diet of 5 reproductively active male Rafinesque's big eared bats; (3) A comparison of bat activity levels in the Coastal Plain of South Carolina among 5 vegetational community types: forested riparian areas, clearcuts, young pine plantations, mature plantations, and pine savannahs; (4) A summarization of information concerning the natural history of all bat species common in the SPR.

  10. Prevalence and organ distribution of leukocyte chemotactic factor 2 amyloidosis (ALECT2) among decedents in New Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Christopher P.; Beggs, Marjorie L.; Wilson, Jon D.; Lathrop, Sarah L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Leukocyte chemotactic factor 2 (LECT2) amyloidosis is one of the most recently described types of amyloidosis. Since its description, it has been found to be one the most common types of amyloidosis in large series of amyloid cases involving the kidney and liver in the United States, where it primarily affects patients of Hispanic ethnicity. We sought to investigate the prevalence of this disease among Hispanic adult decedents who had an autopsy performed at the New Mexico Office of the Medical Investigator and determine the organ distribution of amyloid deposition. LECT2 amyloid deposits were identified within the kidney in 3.1% of Hispanic decedents. It was consistently deposited in the liver, spleen, adrenals, and lungs but did not involve the myocardium or brain. LECT2 amyloidosis is likely not rare among Hispanics in the Southwest United States and could represent an important but under-recognized etiology of chronic kidney disease in this population. PMID:26912093

  11. Prevalence and organ distribution of leukocyte chemotactic factor 2 amyloidosis (ALECT2) among decedents in New Mexico.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Christopher P; Beggs, Marjorie L; Wilson, Jon D; Lathrop, Sarah L

    2016-06-01

    Leukocyte chemotactic factor 2 (LECT2) amyloidosis is one of the most recently described types of amyloidosis. Since its description, it has been found to be one the most common types of amyloidosis in large series of amyloid cases involving the kidney and liver in the United States, where it primarily affects patients of Hispanic ethnicity. We sought to investigate the prevalence of this disease among Hispanic adult decedents who had an autopsy performed at the New Mexico Office of the Medical Investigator and determine the organ distribution of amyloid deposition. LECT2 amyloid deposits were identified within the kidney in 3.1% of Hispanic decedents. It was consistently deposited in the liver, spleen, adrenals, and lungs but did not involve the myocardium or brain. LECT2 amyloidosis is likely not rare among Hispanics in the Southwest United States and could represent an important but under-recognized etiology of chronic kidney disease in this population.

  12. Distribution and Diversity of Soil Microfauna from East Antarctica: Assessing the Link between Biotic and Abiotic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Velasco-Castrillón, Alejandro; Schultz, Mark B.; Colombo, Federica; Gibson, John A. E.; Davies, Kerrie A.; Austin, Andrew D.; Stevens, Mark I.

    2014-01-01

    Terrestrial life in Antarctica has been described as some of the simplest on the planet, and mainly confined to soil microfaunal communities. Studies have suggested that the lack of diversity is due to extreme environmental conditions and thought to be driven by abiotic factors. In this study we investigated soil microfauna composition, abundance, and distribution in East Antarctica, and assessed correlations with soil geochemistry and environmental variables. We examined 109 soil samples from a wide range of ice-free habitats, spanning 2000 km from Framnes Mountains to Bailey Peninsula. Microfauna across all samples were patchily distributed, from complete absence of invertebrates to over 1600 specimens/gram of dry weight of soil (gdw), with highest microfauna abundance observed in samples with visible vegetation. Bdelloid rotifers were on average the most widespread found in 87% of sampled sites and the most abundant (44 specimens/gdw). Tardigrades occurred in 57% of the sampled sites with an abundance of 12 specimens/gdw. Nematodes occurred in 71% of samples with a total abundance of 3 specimens/gdw. Ciliates and mites were rarely found in soil samples, with an average abundance of 1.3 and 0.04 specimens/gdw, respectively. We found that microfaunal composition and abundance were mostly correlated with the soil geochemical parameters; phosphorus, NO3− and salinity, and likely to be the result of soil properties and historic landscape formation and alteration, rather than the geographic region they were sampled from. Studies focusing on Antarctic biodiversity must take into account soil geochemical and environmental factors that influence population and species heterogeneity. PMID:24498126

  13. Distribution and diversity of soil microfauna from East Antarctica: assessing the link between biotic and abiotic factors.

    PubMed

    Velasco-Castrillón, Alejandro; Schultz, Mark B; Colombo, Federica; Gibson, John A E; Davies, Kerrie A; Austin, Andrew D; Stevens, Mark I

    2014-01-01

    Terrestrial life in Antarctica has been described as some of the simplest on the planet, and mainly confined to soil microfaunal communities. Studies have suggested that the lack of diversity is due to extreme environmental conditions and thought to be driven by abiotic factors. In this study we investigated soil microfauna composition, abundance, and distribution in East Antarctica, and assessed correlations with soil geochemistry and environmental variables. We examined 109 soil samples from a wide range of ice-free habitats, spanning 2000 km from Framnes Mountains to Bailey Peninsula. Microfauna across all samples were patchily distributed, from complete absence of invertebrates to over 1600 specimens/gram of dry weight of soil (gdw), with highest microfauna abundance observed in samples with visible vegetation. Bdelloid rotifers were on average the most widespread found in 87% of sampled sites and the most abundant (44 specimens/gdw). Tardigrades occurred in 57% of the sampled sites with an abundance of 12 specimens/gdw. Nematodes occurred in 71% of samples with a total abundance of 3 specimens/gdw. Ciliates and mites were rarely found in soil samples, with an average abundance of 1.3 and 0.04 specimens/gdw, respectively. We found that microfaunal composition and abundance were mostly correlated with the soil geochemical parameters; phosphorus, NO3 (-) and salinity, and likely to be the result of soil properties and historic landscape formation and alteration, rather than the geographic region they were sampled from. Studies focusing on Antarctic biodiversity must take into account soil geochemical and environmental factors that influence population and species heterogeneity.

  14. Distribution of genes encoding virulence factors and molecular analysis of Shigella spp. isolated from patients with diarrhea in Kerman, Iran.

    PubMed

    Hosseini Nave, Hossein; Mansouri, Shahla; Emaneini, Mohammad; Moradi, Mohammad

    2016-03-01

    Shigella is one of the important causes of diarrhea worldwide. Shigella has several virulence factors contributing in colonization and invasion of epithelial cells and eventually death of host cells. The present study was performed in order to investigate the distribution of virulence factors genes in Shigella spp. isolated from patients with acute diarrhea in Kerman, Iran as well as the genetic relationship of these isolates. A total of 56 isolates including 31 S. flexneri, 18 S. sonnei and 7 S. boydii were evaluated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the presence of 11 virulence genes (ipaH, ial, set1A, set1B, sen, virF, invE, sat, sigA, pic and sepA). Then, the clonal relationship of these strains was analyzed by multilocus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) method. All isolates were positive for ipaH gene. The other genes include ial, invE and virF were found in 80.4%, 60.7% and 67.9% of the isolates, respectively. Both set1A and set1B were detected in 32.3% of S. flexneri isolates, whereas 66.1% of the isolates belonging to different serogroup carried sen gene. The sat gene was present in all S. flexneri isolates, but not in the S. sonnei and S. boydii isolates. The result showed, 30.4% of isolates were simultaneously positive and the rest of the isolates were negative for sepA and pic genes. The Shigella isolates were divided into 29 MLVA types. This study, for the first time, investigated distribution of 11 virulence genes in Shigella spp. Our results revealed heterogeneity of virulence genes in different Shigella serogroups. Furthermore, the strains belonging to the same species had little diversity.

  15. Determination of key environmental factors responsible for distribution patterns of fiddler crabs in a tropical mangrove ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Mokhtari, Mohammad; Ghaffar, Mazlan Abd; Usup, Gires; Cob, Zaidi Che

    2015-01-01

    In tropical regions, different species of fiddler crabs coexist on the mangrove floor, which sometimes makes it difficult to define species-specific habitat by visual inspection. The aim of this study is to find key environmental parameters which affect the distribution of fiddler crabs and to determine the habitats in which each species was most abundant. Crabs were collected from 19 sites within the mudflats of Sepang-Lukut mangrove forest. Temperature, porewater salinity, organic matter, water content, carbon and nitrogen content, porosity, chlorophyll content, pH, redox potential, sediment texture and heavy metals were determined in each 1 m2 quadrate. Pearson correlation indicated that all sediment properties except pH and redox potential were correlated with sediment grain size. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) indicated that Uca paradussumieri was negatively correlated with salinity and redox potential. Sand dwelling species, Uca perplexa and Uca annulipes, were highly dependent on the abundance of 250 μm and 150 μm grain size particles in the sediment. Canonical Discriminative Analysis (CDA) indicated that variation in sediment grain size best explained where each crab species was most abundant. Moreover, U. paradussumieri commonly occupies muddy substrates of low shore, while U. forcipata lives under the shade of mangrove trees. U. annulipes and U. perplexa with the high number of spoon tipped setae on their second maxiliped are specialized to feed on the sandy sediments. U. rosea and U. triangularis are more common on muddy sediment with high sediment density. In conclusion, sediment grain size that influences most sediment properties acts as a main factor responsible for sediment heterogeneity. In this paper, the correlation between fiddler crab species and environmental parameters, as well as the interaction between sediment characteristics, was explained in order to define the important environmental factors in fiddler crab distributions.

  16. [Distribution of phytoplankton and water dynamical environmental factors in high red tide occurrence area of Changjiang River estuary].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Genhai; Xu, Weiyi; Zhu, Dedi; Shi, Qingsong; Zhang, Jian

    2003-07-01

    Species composition and cell abundance of phytoplankton, and its relations with environmental factors were investigated in the Changjiang River estuary of east China sea (30 degrees 50'-31 degrees 50'N, 121 degrees 50'-123 degrees 00'E). A total of 110 taxa belonging to 45 genera of phytoplankton in the investigation area were identified. The main species of phytoplankton resulted in red tide were Skeletonema costatum and Prorocentrum dentatum, etc. Phytoplankton abundance in the day was higher than that at night. The vertical distribution of phytoplankton in different water bodies was not obvious. The ecological groups of phytoplankton were freshwater group, estuarine and brackish water and low salinity group in the coast, high salinity and warm water group in off-sea, and widely ranging group. The abundance of phytoplankton in the Changjiang River estuary was 1.6 x 10(3)-75.2 x 10(3) ind.dm-3. The species composition and cell abundance of phytoplankton were related to the freshwater pouring into the Changjiang River estuary. The three waters in the area affecting the distribution of phytoplankton were the Changjiang River estuary water, freshwater, and warm water from outsea.

  17. Comparison of bacterial regrowth in distribution systems using free chlorine and chloramine: a statistical study of causative factors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weidong; DiGiano, Francis A

    2002-03-01

    Bacterial regrowth was investigated over a 15-month period in distribution systems (DSs) of Durham and Raleigh in North Carolina. These two water utilities were chosen because they are adjacent to one another, have similar service area characteristics, and treat surface waters of similar characteristics with conventional processes (coagulation-sedimentation and dual-media filtration). The finished waters have similar chemical quality and regrowth potential as measured by assimilable organic carbon (AOC). The major difference in treatment is the choice of final disinfectants (chlorine in Durham and chloramine in Raleigh). Ten sampling sites (monthly sampling) were chosen in each system to give wide geographic coverage and correspondingly, a wide range of water residence times. Significant losses were observed in both chlorine and chloramine residual in the DSs that produced bacterial regrowth as measured by heterotrophic plate count (HPC). The frequency distributions for log HPC (133 observations from Durham and 135 observations from Raleigh) were statistically the same in the chlorinated and chloraminated DSs. A correlation analysis indicated that disinfectant residual is the most important factor determining HPC level. However, the resulting R2 value for a non-linear regression model that also included AOC, temperature, and pH as independent variables was less than 0.7. Bacterial regrowth as measured by HPC, is dependent upon a complex interaction of chemical, physical, and operational parameters that may not be captured by such a simple statistical relationship.

  18. Distribution of petroleum degrading genes and factor analysis of petroleum contaminated soil from the Dagang Oilfield, China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qinglong; Tang, Jingchun; Bai, Zhihui; Hecker, Markus; Giesy, John P

    2015-06-18

    Genes that encode for enzymes that can degrade petroleum hydrocarbons (PHs) are critical for the ability of microorganisms to bioremediate soils contaminated with PHs. Distributions of two petroleum-degrading genes AlkB and Nah in soils collected from three zones of the Dagang Oilfield, Tianjin, China were investigated. Numbers of copies of AlkB ranged between 9.1 × 10(5) and 1.9 × 10(7) copies/g dry mass (dm) soil, and were positively correlated with total concentrations of PHs (TPH) (R(2) = 0.573, p = 0.032) and alkanes (C33 ~ C40) (R(2) = 0.914, p < 0.01). The Nah gene was distributed relatively evenly among sampling zones, ranging between 1.9 × 10(7) and 1.1 × 10(8) copies/g dm soil, and was negatively correlated with concentrations of total aromatic hydrocarbons (TAH) (R(2) = -0.567, p = 0.035) and ∑16 PAHs (R(2) = -0.599, p = 0.023). Results of a factor analysis showed that individual samples of soils were not ordinated as a function of the zones.

  19. Selectivity in glycosaminoglycan binding dictates the distribution and diffusion of fibroblast growth factors in the pericellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    Marcello, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The range of biological outcomes generated by many signalling proteins in development and homeostasis is increased by their interactions with glycosaminoglycans, particularly heparan sulfate (HS). This interaction controls the localization and movement of these signalling proteins, but whether such control depends on the specificity of the interactions is not known. We used five fibroblast growth factors with an N-terminal HaloTag (Halo-FGFs) for fluorescent labelling, with well-characterized and distinct HS-binding properties, and measured their binding and diffusion in pericellular matrix of fixed rat mammary 27 fibroblasts. Halo-FGF1, Halo-FGF2 and Halo-FGF6 bound to HS, whereas Halo-FGF10 also interacted with chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate, and FGF20 did not bind detectably. The distribution of bound FGFs in the pericellular matrix was not homogeneous, and for FGF10 exhibited striking clusters. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching showed that FGF2 and FGF6 diffused faster, whereas FGF1 diffused more slowly, and FGF10 was immobile. The results demonstrate that the specificity of the interactions of proteins with glycosaminoglycans controls their binding and diffusion. Moreover, cells regulate the spatial distribution of different protein-binding sites in glycosaminoglycans independently of each other, implying that the extracellular matrix has long-range structure. PMID:27009190

  20. Chronic alcohol exposure differentially affects activation of female locus coeruleus neurons and the subcellular distribution of corticotropin releasing factor receptors.

    PubMed

    Retson, T A; Reyes, B A; Van Bockstaele, E J

    2015-01-02

    Understanding the neurobiological bases for sex differences in alcohol dependence is needed to help guide the development of individualized therapies for alcohol abuse disorders. In the present study, alcohol-induced adaptations in (1) anxiety-like behavior, (2) patterns of c-Fos activation and (3) subcellular distribution of corticotropin releasing factor receptor in locus coeruleus (LC) neurons was investigated in male and female Sprague-Dawley rats that were chronically exposed to ethanol using a liquid diet. Results confirm and extend reports by others showing that chronic ethanol exposure produces an anxiogenic-like response in both male and female subjects. Ethanol-induced sex differences were observed with increased c-Fos expression in LC neurons of female ethanol-treated subjects compared to controls or male subjects. Results also reveal sex differences in the subcellular distribution of the CRFr in LC-noradrenergic neurons with female subjects exposed to ethanol exhibiting a higher frequency of plasmalemmal CRFrs. These adaptations have implications for LC neuronal activity and its neural targets across the sexes. Considering the important role of the LC in ethanol-induced activation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, the present results indicate important sex differences in feed-forward regulation of the HPA axis that may render alcohol dependent females more vulnerable to subsequent stress exposure.

  1. Effects of biotic and abiotic factors on the distribution of trout and salmon along a longitudinal stream gradient

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    De La, Hoz; Budy, P.

    2005-01-01

    We examined the influence of biotic and abiotic factors on the distribution, abundance, and condition of salmonid fishes along a stream gradient. We observed a longitudinal change in fish distribution with native cutthroat trout, Oncorhynchus clarki utah, and introduced brown trout, Salmo trutta, demonstrating a distinct pattern of allopatry. Cutthroat trout dominated high elevation reaches, while reaches at lower elevations were dominated by brown trout. A transition zone between these populations was associated with lower total trout abundance, consistent changes in temperature and discharge, and differences in dietary preference. Variation in cutthroat trout abundance was best explained by a model including the abundance of brown trout and diel temperature, whereas variation in brown trout abundance was best explained by a model including the abundance of cutthroat trout and discharge. These results suggest the potential for condition-mediated competition between the two species. The results from our study can aid biologists in prioritizing conservation activities and in developing robust management strategies for cutthroat trout. ?? Springer 2005.

  2. Distribution of petroleum degrading genes and factor analysis of petroleum contaminated soil from the Dagang Oilfield, China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qinglong; Tang, Jingchun; Bai, Zhihui; Hecker, Markus; Giesy, John P.

    2015-01-01

    Genes that encode for enzymes that can degrade petroleum hydrocarbons (PHs) are critical for the ability of microorganisms to bioremediate soils contaminated with PHs. Distributions of two petroleum-degrading genes AlkB and Nah in soils collected from three zones of the Dagang Oilfield, Tianjin, China were investigated. Numbers of copies of AlkB ranged between 9.1 × 105 and 1.9 × 107 copies/g dry mass (dm) soil, and were positively correlated with total concentrations of PHs (TPH) (R2 = 0.573, p = 0.032) and alkanes (C33 ~ C40) (R2 = 0.914, p < 0.01). The Nah gene was distributed relatively evenly among sampling zones, ranging between 1.9 × 107 and 1.1 × 108 copies/g dm soil, and was negatively correlated with concentrations of total aromatic hydrocarbons (TAH) (R2 = −0.567, p = 0.035) and ∑16 PAHs (R2 = −0.599, p = 0.023). Results of a factor analysis showed that individual samples of soils were not ordinated as a function of the zones. PMID:26086670

  3. Evaluation of factors controlling the distribution of organic matter and phosphorus in the Eastern Arabian Shelf: A geostatistical reappraisal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Shiba Shankar; Panigrahi, Mruganka K.

    2016-09-01

    The Eastern Arabian Shelf (EAS) is a region of high primary production and a part of an intense oxygen minimum zone as well. The EAS is a zone of significant accumulation of organic matter that is ascribable to either the prevalent anoxic condition or high primary productivity, There has been a considerable amount of debate on the dominant factor responsible for the enrichment of organic matter in the sediments in EAS. The present study is an attempt to resolve the issue through robust geostatistical analysis of published and unpublished data. Results of Empirical Bayesian kriging (EBK) and geographically weighted regression (GWR) of available data help to get a refined distribution of organic carbon and phosphorus in the Eastern Arabian Shelf as compared to the earlier known distribution patterns. The primary productivity, evaluated through the latest satellite dataset using Vertically Generalized Production Model, does not show any similarity with the distribution pattern of either organic carbon (Corg) or phosphorus, that was determined based on the in situ data. The negative correlations of primary production with Corg (r=-0.14) and P (r=-0.4) indicate that primary productivity is the most unlikely modulator of organic matter accumulation in the EAS. The negative correlation of bottom water oxygen concentration with Corg (r=-0.39) and Ti-normalized fraction of organic carbon (r=-0.56) indicates that anoxia plays a major role in the preservation of organic matter in the EAS. The mass accumulation rates of Corg and phosphorus show a strong dependency on sedimentation rate (r>0.88), which indicates that the accumulation rate of sediments outweighs the other depositional parameters in controlling the accumulation of organic matter in the EAS.

  4. Review of factors affecting the distribution and abundance of waterfowl in shallow-water habitats of Chesapeake Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perry, M.C.; Deller, A.S.

    1996-01-01

    Long-term trends of waterfowl populations in Chesapeake Bay demonstrate the importance of shallow-water habitats for waterfowl species. Although recent increases in field feeding by geese and swans lessened the importance of shallow-water areas for these species, most duck species depend almost exclusively on shallow-water habitats. Many factors influenced the distribution and abundance of waterfowl in shallow-water habitats. Habitat degradation resulted in the decline in numbers of most duck species and a change in distribution of some species. Increased numbers of mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) in recent decades probably resulted from release programs conducted by the Maryland Department of Natural Resources and private individuals. Studies of food habits since 1885 showed a decline in submerged-aquatic vegetation in the diet of some species, such as the canvasback (Aythya valisineria ), and an increase in the proportions of invertebrates in the diet. Diversity of food organisms for many waterfowl species has declined. Surveys of vegetation and invertebrates in the Chesapeake Bay generally reflect a degradation of shallow-water habitat. Human population increases in the Chesapeake Bay watershed directly and indirectly affected waterfowl distribution and abundance. The increase of exotic plant and invertebrate species in the bay, in most cases, benefited waterfowl populations. Increased contaminants have reduced the quality and quantity of habitat, although serious attempts to reverse this trend are underway. The use of shallow-water habitats by humans for fishing, hunting, boating, and other recreational and commercial uses reduced the use of shallow-water habitats by waterfowl. Humans can lessen the adverse influences on the valuable shallow-water habitats by restricting human population growth near these habitats and improving the water quality of the bay tributaries. Other affirmative actions that will improve these areas for waterfowl include greater

  5. Purification of human von Willebrand factor-cleaving protease and its identification as a new member of the metalloproteinase family.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, K; Suzuki, H; McMullen, B; Chung, D

    2001-09-15

    von Willebrand factor (vWF) is synthesized in megakaryocytes and endothelial cells as a very large multimer, but circulates in plasma as a group of multimers ranging from 500 to 10 000 kd. An important mechanism for depolymerization of the large multimers is the limited proteolysis by a vWF-cleaving protease present in plasma. The absence or inactivation of the vWF-cleaving protease results in the accumulation of large multimers, which may cause thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. The vWF-cleaving protease was first described as a Ca(++)-dependent proteinase with an apparent molecular weight of approximately 300 kd. Thus far, however, it has not been isolated and characterized. In this study, the purification of human vWF-cleaving protease from a commercial preparation of factor VIII/vWF concentrate by means of several column chromatographic steps, including 2 steps of heparin-Sepharose column, is reported. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of the anion exchange and gel filtration column fractions showed that the vWF-cleaving protease activity corresponded to a protein band of 150 kd. After reduction, it migrated with an apparent weight of 190 kd. The amino terminal sequence of the 150-kd band was AAGGIL(H)LE(L)L(D)AXG(P)X(V)XQ (single-letter amino acid codes), with the tentative residues shown in parentheses. A search of the human genome sequence identified the vWF-cleaving protease as a new member of the ADAMTS (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin type I motif) family of metalloproteinase. An active site sequence of HEIGHSFGLEHE (single-letter amino acid codes) was located at 150 residues from the N terminus of the protein.

  6. Elevated Red Blood Cell Distribution Width as a Simple Prognostic Factor in Patients with Symptomatic Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyewon; Kong, Sun-Young; Sohn, Ji Yeon; Shim, Hyoeun; Youn, Hye Sun; Lee, Sangeun; Kim, Hyun Ju; Eom, Hyeon-Seok

    2014-01-01

    Red blood cell distribution width (RDW) is a parameter reported in complete blood cell count tests, and has been reported as an inflammatory biomarker. Multiple myeloma (MM) is known to be associated with inflammatory microenvironments. However, the importance of RDW has been seldom studied in MM. For this study, 146 symptomatic myeloma patients with available RDW at diagnosis were retrospectively reviewed, and their characteristics were compared between two groups, those with high (>14.5%) and normal (≤14.5%) RDW. RDW was correlated to hemoglobin, MM stage, β2-microglobulin, M-protein, bone marrow plasma cells, and cellularity (P < 0.001). During induction, overall response rates of the two groups were similar (P = 0.195); however, complete response rate was higher in the normal-RDW group than it was in the high-RDW group (P = 0.005). With a median follow-up of 47 months, the normal-RDW group showed better progression-free survival (PFS) (24.2 versus 17.0 months, P = 0.029) compared to the high-RDW group. Overall survival was not different according to the RDW level (P = 0.236). In multivariate analysis, elevated RDW at diagnosis was a poor prognostic factor for PFS (HR 3.21, 95% CI 1.24–8.32) after adjustment with other myeloma-related prognostic factors. RDW would be a simple and immediately available biomarker of symptomatic MM, reflecting the systemic inflammation. PMID:24963470

  7. Play-level distributions of estimates of recovery factors for a miscible carbon dioxide enhanced oil recovery method used in oil reservoirs in the conterminous United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Attanasi, E.D.; Freeman, P.A.

    2016-03-02

    The retention factor is the percentage of injected CO2 that is naturally retained in the reservoir. Retention factors were also estimated in this study. For clastic reservoirs, 90 percent of the estimated retention factors were between 21.7 and 32.1 percent, and for carbonate reservoirs, 90 percent were between 23.7 and 38.2 percent. The respective median values were 22.9 for clastic reservoirs and 26.1 for carbonate reservoirs. Both distributions were right skewed. The recovery and retention factors that were calculated are consistent with the corresponding factors reported in the literature.

  8. Effects of local factors and climate on permafrost conditions and distribution in Beiluhe basin, Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, China.

    PubMed

    Yin, Guoan; Niu, Fujun; Lin, Zhanju; Luo, Jing; Liu, Minghao

    2017-03-01

    Beiluhe basin is underlain by warm and ice-rich permafrost, and covered by vegetation and soils characteristic of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. A field monitoring network was established to investigate permafrost conditions and to assess potential impacts of local factors and climate change. This paper describes the spatial variations in permafrost conditions from instrumented boreholes, controlling environmental factors, and recent thermal evolution of permafrost in the basin. The study area was divided into 10 ecotypes using satellite imagery based classification. The field investigations and cluster analysis of ground temperatures indicated that permafrost underlies most of the ground in swamp meadow, undisturbed alpine meadow, degrading alpine meadow, and desert alpine grassland, but is absent in other cover types. Permafrost-ecotope relations examined over a 2-year (2014-2016) period indicated that: (i) ground surface temperatures varied largely among ecotopes; (ii) annual mean ground temperatures ranged from -1.5 to 0°C in permafrost, indicating sensitive permafrost conditions; (iii) active-layer thicknesses ranged from 1.4m to 3.4m; (iv) ground ice content at the top of permafrost is high, but the active-layer soil is relatively dry. Long-term climate warming has driven thermal changes to permafrost, but ground surface characteristics and soil moisture content strongly influence the ground thermal state. These factors control local-scale spatial variations in permafrost conditions. The warm permafrost in the basin is commonly in thermal disequilibrium, and is sensitive to future climate change. Active-layer thicknesses have increased by at least 42cm and the mean annual ground temperatures have increased by up to 0.2°C in the past 10years over the basin. A permafrost distribution map was produced based on ecotypes, suggesting that permafrost underlies 64% of the study region.

  9. CT Angiographic Evaluation of Pattern and Distribution of Stenosis and its Association with Risk Factors Among Indian Ischemic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastava, Amit; Srivastava, Trilochan; Saxena, Richa

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Stroke is the major cause of disability and third major cause of death. Ischemia causes about 80% of stroke cases; stenosis and occlusion are the predominant cause of stroke. Our purpose for this study was to evaluate the pattern and distribution of stenosis and its association with risk factors in Indian ischemic stroke patients and in other countries, for comparison. Material/Methods We evaluated 60 patients after ischemic stroke with CT angiography. The degree of stenosis was measured by the North American Symptomatic Carotid Endarterectomy Trial (NASCET). The results were analyzed by descriptive statistics and chi-square test. Results Out of 60 cases, 32 cases were positive for significant stenosis and a total number of stenotic segments was 45. Out of 45 stenotic segments, 29 were single stenotic segments (16 intracranial and 13 extracranial) and 16 were multiple stenotic segments (8 intracranial and 8 extracranial). In the total number of stenotic segments (single and multiple), there were 24 (53.33%) intracranial and 21 (46.67%) extracranial. The most commonly involved intracranial stenosis segment was MCA, present in 10 (41.6%) out of 24 intracranial segments. Most commonly involved extracranial stenosis segment was ICA, present in 14 (66.6%) out of 21 extracranial segments. Diabetes is found to be the most common risk factor of intracranial stenosis while hypertension and hypercholesterolemia are the major risk factors of extracranial stenosis. Conclusions In the Indian population, intracranial stenosis is more common than extracranial one, anterior circulation stenosis is more common than posterior circulation stenosis; single stenosis is more common than multiple stenosis. PMID:27994695

  10. Distribution and factors affecting adsorption of sterols in the surface sediments of Bosten Lake and Manas Lake, Xinjiang.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiang; Yao, Xiaorui; Lu, Jianjiang; Qiao, Xiuwen; Liu, Zilong; Li, Shanman

    2016-03-01

    This study investigated the concentrations and distribution of eight sterol compounds in the surface sediments of Bosten Lake and Manas Lake, Xinjiang, China. The ratios of sterols as diagnostic indices were used to identify pollution sources. The sediment of the two lakes was selected as an adsorbent to investigate the adsorption behaviour of sterols. Results showed that the sterols were widely distributed in the sediments of the lakes in the study areas. The total concentrations of the detected sterols in Bosten Lake and in Manas Lake were 1.584-27.897 and 2.048-18.373 μg g(-1)∙dw, respectively. In all of the sampling sites, the amount of faecal sterols was less than that of plant sterols. β-sitosterol was the dominant plant sterol with a mean concentration of 2.378 ± 2.234 μg g(-1)∙dw; cholesterol was the most abundant faecal sterol with a mean concentration of 1.060 ± 1.402 μg g(-1)∙dw. The pollution level was higher in Bosten Lake than in Manas Lake. Majority of the ratios clearly demonstrated that the contamination by human faecal sources was occurring at stations which are adjacent to residential areas and water inlets. The adsorption behaviour of sterols to sediment suggested that the sterol adsorption coefficients were reduced as temperature increased. As salinity increased, the adsorption quantity also increased. As pH increased, the sediment adsorption of sterol slightly increased because the strong alkaline solution is not conducive to the adsorption of sterols. The ratios between sterols did not change largely with the change in external factors.

  11. Emission factors, size distributions, and emission inventories of carbonaceous particulate matter from residential wood combustion in rural China.

    PubMed

    Guofeng, Shen; Siye, Wei; Wen, Wei; Yanyan, Zhang; Yujia, Min; Bin, Wang; Rong, Wang; Wei, Li; Huizhong, Shen; Ye, Huang; Yifeng, Yang; Wei, Wang; Xilong, Wang; Xuejun, Wang; Shu, Tao

    2012-04-03

    Published emission factors (EFs) often vary significantly, leading to high uncertainties in emission estimations. There are few reliable EFs from field measurements of residential wood combustion in China. In this study, 17 wood fuels and one bamboo were combusted in a typical residential stove in rural China to measure realistic EFs of particulate matter (PM), organic carbon (OC), and elemental carbon (EC), as well as to investigate the influence of fuel properties and combustion conditions on the EFs. Measured EFs of PM, OC, and EC (EF(PM), EF(OC), and EF(EC), respectively) were in the range of 0.38-6.4, 0.024-3.0, and 0.039-3.9 g/kg (dry basis), with means and standard derivation of 2.2 ± 1.2, 0.62 ± 0.64, and 0.83 ± 0.69 g/kg, respectively. Shrubby biomass combustion produced higher EFs than tree woods, and both species had lower EFs than those of indoor crop residue burning (p < 0.05). Significant correlations between EF(PM), EF(OC), and EF(EC) were expected. By using a nine-stage cascade impactor, it was shown that size distributions of PM emitted from tree biomass combustions were unimodal with peaks at a diameter less than 0.4 μm (PM(0.4)), much finer than the PM from indoor crop residue burning. Approximately 79.4% of the total PM from tree wood combustion was PM with a diameter less than 2.1 μm (PM(2.1)). PM size distributions for shrubby biomasses were slightly different from those for tree fuels. On the basis of the measured EFs, total emissions of PM, OC, and EC from residential wood combustion in rural China in 2007 were estimated at about 303, 75.7, and 92.0 Gg.

  12. Distribution and risk factors for spread of amphibian chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area, Australia.

    PubMed

    Pauza, Matthew D; Driessen, Michael M; Skerratt, Lee F

    2010-11-01

    Chytridiomycosis is an emerging infectious disease caused by the pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) and is the cause of the decline and extinction of amphibian species throughout the world. We surveyed the distribution of Bd within and around the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area (TWWHA), a 1.38 million ha area of significant fauna conservation value, which provides the majority of habitat for Tasmania's 3 endemic frog species (Litoria burrowsae, Bryobatrachus nimbus and Crinia tasmaniensis). Bd was detected at only 1 (3%) of the 33 sites surveyed within the TWWHA and at 15 (52%) of the 29 sites surveyed surrounding the TWWHA. The relatively low incidence of the disease within the TWWHA suggests that the majority of the TWWHA is currently free of the pathogen despite the fact that the region provides what appears to be optimal conditions for the persistence of Bd. For all survey sites within and around the TWWHA, the presence of Bd was strongly associated with the presence of gravel roads, forest and < 1000 m altitude--factors that in this study were associated with human-disturbed landscapes around the TWWHA. Conversely, the presence of walking tracks was strongly associated with the absence of Bd, suggesting an association of absence with relatively remote locations. The wide distribution of Bd in areas of Tasmania with high levels of human disturbance and its very limited occurrence in remote wilderness areas suggests that anthropogenic activities may facilitate the dissemination of the pathogen on a landscape scale in Tasmania. Because the majority of the TWWHA is not readily accessible and appears to be largely free of Bd, and because Tasmanian frogs reproduce in ponds rather than streams, it may be feasible to control the spread of the disease in the TWWHA.

  13. Emission Factors, Size Distributions and Emission Inventories of Carbonaceous Particulate Matter from Residential Wood Combustion in Rural China

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Guofeng; Wei, Siye; Wei, Wen; Zhang, Yanyan; Min, Yujia; Wang, Bin; Wang, Rong; Li, Wei; Shen, Huizhong; Huang, Ye; Huang, Ye; Yang, Yifeng; Wang, Wei; Wang, Xilong; Wang, Xuejun; Tao, Shu

    2012-01-01

    Published emission factors (EFs) often vary significantly, leading to high uncertainties in emission estimations. There are few reliable EFs from field measurements of residential wood combustion in China. In this study, 17 wood fuels and one bamboo were combusted in a typical residential stove in rural China to measure realistic EFs of particulate matter (PM), organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC), as well as to investigate the influence of fuel properties and combustion conditions on the EFs. Measured EFs of PM, OC, and EC (EFPM, EFOC, and EFEC, respectively) were in the range of 0.38~6.4, 0.024~3.0 and 0.039~3.9 g/kg (dry basis), with means and standard derivation of 2.2±1.2, 0.62±0.64 and 0.83±0.69 g/kg, respectively. Shrubby biomass combustion produced higher EFs than tree woods, and both species had lower EFs than those of indoor crop residue burning (p<0.05). Significant correlations between EFPM, EFOC and EFEC were expected. By using a nine-stage cascade impactor, it was shown that size distributions of PM emitted from tree biomass combustions were unimodal with peaks at a diameter less than 0.4 µm (PM0.4), much finer than the PM from indoor crop residue burning. Approximately 79.4% of the total PM from tree wood combustion was PM with a diameter less than 2.1µm (PM2.1). PM size distributions for shrubby biomasses were slightly different from those for tree fuels. Based on the measured EFs, total emissions of PM, OC, and EC from residential wood combustion in rural China in 2007 were estimated at about 303, 75.7, and 92.0 Gg. PMID:22380753

  14. First Principles Calculation on Equilibrium Si Isotope Fractionation Factors and its Implementation on Si Isotope Distributions in Earth Surface Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; He, H. T.; Zhu, C.

    2014-12-01

    Several important equilibrium Si isotope fractionation factors are calculated here. We use a so-called volume-variable-cluster-model (VVCM) method for solids and the "water-droplet" method for aqueous species for isotope fractionation calculation at the same quantum chemistry level. The calculation results show that several silicate minerals, such as quartz, feldspar, kaolinite, etc., all enrich heavy Si isotopes relative to aqueous H4SiO4 and can be up to 3.3‰ at 25°C, different from most field observations. Meanwhile stable organosilicon complexes can enrich even lighter Si isotopes than aqueous H4SiO4. For explaining the difference between the calculation results and field observations, we calculate the kinetic isotope effect (KIE) associated with the formation of amorphous silica, and find that amorphous silica will enrich extremely light Si isotopes. From amorphous silica to crystalline quartz, the structural adjustment & transition needs getting rid of small amount of Si to re-organize the structure. Light Si isotopes will be preferentially lost and let the final crystalline quartz with a little bit more heavy Si isotopes. However, such late-stage Si heavy isotope enrichment cannot erase the total isotopic signal, crystalline quartz still inherit much light Si isotopic composition from amorphous quartz. That is the reason for the discrepancy between the calculation results and the field observations, because the formation of amorphous quartz is under a non-equilibrium process but theoretical calculations are for equilibrium isotope fractionations. With accurate equilibrium fractionation factors provided here, Si isotope distributions in earth surface environments including soil, groundwater and plants can be further interpreted. We find that δ30Si variations in soil are mainly driven by secondary minerals precipitation and adsorption. Also, bulk soil δ30Si maybe have a parabolic distribution with soil age, with a minimum value at where allophane is

  15. Growth factor controls on the distribution and carbon isotope composition of n-alkanes in leaf wax

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, C.; Xie, S.; Huang, X.

    2012-12-01

    Cuticular wax plays pivotal physiological and ecological roles in the interactions between plants and the environments in which they grow. Plant-derived long-chain alkanes are more resistant to decay than other biochemical polymers. n-Alkane distributions (Carbon Preference Index (CPI) values and Average Chain Length (ACL) values) and carbon isotopic values are used widely in palaeoenvironmental reconstruction. However, there is little information available on how growth stages of the plant might influence the abundance of n-alkanes in the natural environment. In this study, we analyzed n-alkane distributions and carbon isotope data from two tree species (Cinnamomum camphora (L.) Presl. and Liquidambar formosana Hance) collected monthly from 2009 to 2011 in Nanwang Shan, Wuhan, Hubei Province. CPI values for n-alkanes from C. camphora remained stable in autumn and winter but fluctuated dramatically during spring and autumn each year. Positive correlations between CPI values and the relative content of (C27+C29) were observed in both sun and shade leaves of C. camphora from April to July. In L. formosana, CPI values decreased gradually from April to December. A similar trend was observed in all three years suggesting that growth stages rather than temperature or relative humidity affected the CPI values on a seasonal timescale. In the samples of L. formosana ACL values were negatively correlated with CPI values in the growing season (from April to July) and positively correlated with CPI values in the other seasons. The δ13C values of C29 and C31 n-alkanes displayed more negative carbon isotopic values in autumn and winter compared with leaves sampled at the start of the growing season from both trees. The δ13C values of C29 and C31 n-alkanes of L. formosana decreased from April to December. These results demonstrate the importance of elucidating the growing factors that influence the distribution and δ13C values of alkanes in modern leaves prior to using CPI

  16. Factors affecting vertical distribution of Fukushima accident-derived radiocesium in soil under different land-use conditions.

    PubMed

    Koarashi, Jun; Atarashi-Andoh, Mariko; Matsunaga, Takeshi; Sato, Tsutomu; Nagao, Seiya; Nagai, Haruyasu

    2012-08-01

    The Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident in Japan, triggered by a big earthquake and the resulting tsunami on 11 March 2011, caused a substantial release of radiocesium ((137)Cs and (134)Cs) and a subsequent contamination of soils in a range of terrestrial ecosystems. Identifying factors and processes affecting radiocesium retention in these soils is essential to predict how the deposited radiocesium will migrate through the soil profile and to other biological components. We investigated vertical distributions of radiocesium and physicochemical properties in soils (to 20 cm depth) at 15 locations under different land-use types (croplands, grasslands, and forests) within a 2 km × 2 km mesh area in Fukushima city. The total (137)Cs inventory deposited onto and into soil was similar (58.4±9.6 kBq m(-2)) between the three different land-use types. However, aboveground litter layer at the forest sites and herbaceous vegetation at the non-forested sites contributed differently to the total (137)Cs inventory. At the forest sites, 50-91% of the total inventory was observed in the litter layer. The aboveground vegetation contribution was in contrast smaller (<35%) at the other sites. Another remarkable difference was found in vertical distribution of (137)Cs in mineral soil layers; (137)Cs penetrated deeper in the forest soil profiles than in the non-forested soil profiles. We quantified (137)Cs retention at surface soil layers, and showed that higher (137)Cs retention can be explained in part by larger amounts of silt- and clay-sized particles in the layers. More importantly, the (137)Cs retention highly and negatively correlated with soil organic carbon content divided by clay content across all land-use types. The results suggest that organic matter inhibits strong adsorption of (137)Cs on clay minerals in surface soil layers, and as a result affects the vertical distribution and thus the mobility of (137)Cs in soil, particularly in the forest ecosystems.

  17. Wet and dry deposition of mineral dust particles in Japan: factors related to temporal variation and spatial distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osada, K.; Ura, S.; Kagawa, M.; Mikami, M.; Tanaka, T. Y.; Matoba, S.; Aoki, K.; Shinoda, M.; Kurosaki, Y.; Hayashi, M.; Shimizu, A.; Uematsu, M.

    2014-01-01

    of the sum of > 20 μm and 10-20 μm (giant fraction) were higher than 50% for most of the event samples. Irrespective of the deposition type, the giant dust fractions generally decreased with increasing distance from the source area, suggesting the selective depletion of larger giant particles during atmospheric transport. Based on temporal variations of PMc (2.5 < D < 10 μm), ground-based lidar, backward air trajectories, and vertical profiles of potential temperatures, transport processes of dust particles are discussed for events with high-deposition and low-deposition flux with high PMc. Low dry dust depositions with high PMc concentrations were observed under stronger (5 K km-1) stratification of potential temperature with thinner and lower (< 2 km) dust distributions because the PMc fraction of dust particles only survived after depletion of giant dust particles by rapid gravitational settling at the time they reach Japan. In contrast, transport through a thicker (> 2 km) dust layer with weak vertical gradient of potential temperature carry more giant dust particles to Japan. Because giant dust particles are an important mass fraction of dust accumulation, especially in the North Pacific, which is known as a high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll (HNLC) region, the transport height and fraction of giant dust particles are important factors for studying dust budgets in the atmosphere and their role in biogeochemical cycles.

  18. Expression of abnormal von Willebrand factor by endothelial cells from a patient with type IIA von Willebrand disease.

    PubMed Central

    Levene, R B; Booyse, F M; Chediak, J; Zimmerman, T S; Livingston, D M; Lynch, D C

    1987-01-01

    Studies were conducted to characterize the biosynthesis of von Willebrand factor (vWf) by cultured endothelial cells (EC) derived from the umbilical vein of a patient with type IIA von Willebrand disease. The patient's EC, compared with those from normal individuals, produced vWf that had decreased amounts of large multimers and an increase in rapidly migrating satellite species, features characteristic of plasma vWf from patients with type IIA von Willebrand disease. The type IIA EC did produce a full spectrum of vWf multimers in both cell lysates and postculture medium, although the relative amounts of the largest species were decreased. The large multimers were degraded in conjunction with the appearance of rapidly migrating satellites that contained approximately equal to 170-kDa proteolytic fragments, suggesting that this patient's functional defect is due to abnormal proteolysis and not to a primary failure of vWf subunit oligomerization. Moreover, the observed degradation appears to result from an abnormal vWf molecule and not elevated protease levels. These results suggest that this patient's von Willebrand disease phenotype is caused by increased proteolytic sensitivity of his vWf protein. Images PMID:3306682

  19. PHD and TFIIS-Like Domains of the Bye1 Transcription Factor Determine Its Multivalent Genomic Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Pinskaya, Marina; Ghavi-Helm, Yad; Mariotte-Labarre, Sylvie; Morillon, Antonin; Soutourina, Julie; Werner, Michel

    2014-01-01

    The BYpass of Ess1 (Bye1) protein is a putative S. cerevisiae transcription factor homologous to the human cancer-associated PHF3/DIDO family of proteins. Bye1 contains a Plant Homeodomain (PHD) and a TFIIS-like domain. The Bye1 PHD finger interacts with tri-methylated lysine 4 of histone H3 (H3K4me3) while the TFIIS-like domain binds to RNA polymerase (Pol) II. Here, we investigated the contribution of these structural features to Bye1 recruitment to chromatin as well as its function in transcriptional regulation. Genome-wide analysis of Bye1 distribution revealed at least two distinct modes of association with actively transcribed genes: within the core of Pol II- and Pol III-transcribed genes concomitant with the presence of the TFIIS transcription factor and, additionally, with promoters of a subset of Pol II-transcribed genes. Specific loss of H3K4me3 abolishes Bye1 association to gene promoters, but doesn’t affect its binding within gene bodies. Genetic interactions suggested an essential role of Bye1 in cell fitness under stress conditions compensating the absence of TFIIS. Furthermore, BYE1 deletion resulted in the attenuation of GAL genes expression upon galactose-mediated induction indicating its positive role in transcription regulation. Together, these findings point to a bimodal role of Bye1 in regulation of Pol II transcription. It is recruited via its PHD domain to H3K4 tri-methylated promoters at early steps of transcription. Once Pol II is engaged into elongation, Bye1 binds directly to the transcriptional machinery, modulating its progression along the gene. PMID:25029256

  20. Occurrence, distribution and potential affecting factors of antibiotics in sewage sludge of wastewater treatment plants in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenhui; Shi, Yali; Gao, Lihong; Liu, Jiemin; Cai, Yaqi

    2013-02-15

    The occurrence and distribution of eight quinolones, nine sulfonamides, and five macrolides were investigated in sewage sludge from 45 wastewater treatment plants in 23 cities in China. Among all the antibiotics considered, quinolones were the dominant antibiotics detected in all samples [total concentrations up to 8905 μg/kg, dry weight (dw)], followed by macrolides (85.1 μg/kg, dw), and sulfonamides (22.7 μg/kg, dw). High concentrations of quinolones in sewage sludge indicated that antibiotics are widely used and extensive pollutants in China. Significant differences were observed for the total concentrations of antibiotics in sludge samples among the 45 WWTPs. To evaluate the potential factors affecting the antibiotic levels in sewage sludge, wastewater and sludge characteristics, as well as the operational conditions and treatment techniques in WWTPs were investigated. The results indicated that the antibiotic levels in sewage sludge depend to a great extent on wastewater characteristics. Significant correlation between total organic carbon (TOC) and total concentrations of antibiotics was also found in studied WWTPs, indicating that TOC could affect the sludge adsorption capability to the antibiotics to some extent. Moreover, the relation between treatment techniques and the total concentrations of antibiotics in sludge showed that antibiotic levels in sludge increased with longer solid retention time.

  1. Bathyal meiobenthos of the western Coral Sea: distribution and abundance in relation to microbial standing stocks and environmental factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alongi, Daniel M.; Pichon, Michel

    1988-04-01

    The distribution and abundance of meiobenthos in relation to microbial densities and environmental factors were examined at 24 stations in a bathyal (298-1610 m) region of the western Coral Sea. Densities of metazoan meiofauna were low ( overlinex = 57 ; range: 19-170 individuals 10 cm -2) compared with other bathyal communtiesm but when densities of living Foraminifera ( overlinex = 560 ; range: 0-3410 individuals 10 cm -2) were included, total faunal densities were high ( overlinex = 610 10 cm-2) and ranged from 73 to 3465 individuals 10 cm -2. Soft-bodied (non-chitinous) taxa (e.g. turbellarians) were not detected beyond the continental slope. Densities of all metazoan taxa, excluding nematodes, decreased significantly with bathymetric depth. When the effect of ocean depth was held constant, only a few significant correlations of meiobenthos with microbes and sediment characteristics were found. Our data, coupled with earlier findings of low bacterial densities and organic conditions, suggest that low densities of metazoan meiobenthos in the western Coral Sea are due to low rates of detrital input. However, densities of Foraminifera and other protozoans increased with bathymetric depth ( ALONGI, 1987, Deep-Sea Research, 34, 1245-1254), indicating their ability to exploit oligotrophic conditions and to gain numerical dominance in benthic food webs of the deep sea.

  2. Phylogeographic concordance factors quantify phylogeographic congruence among co-distributed species in the Sarracenia alata pitcher plant system.

    PubMed

    Satler, Jordan D; Carstens, Bryan C

    2016-05-01

    Comparative phylogeographic investigations have identified congruent phylogeographic breaks in co-distributed species in nearly every region of the world. The qualitative assessments of phylogeographic patterns traditionally used to identify such breaks, however, are limited because they rely on identifying monophyletic groups across species and do not account for coalescent stochasticity. Only long-standing phylogeographic breaks are likely to be obvious; many species could have had a concerted response to more recent landscape events, yet possess subtle signs of phylogeographic congruence because ancestral polymorphism has not completely sorted. Here, we introduce Phylogeographic Concordance Factors (PCFs), a novel method for quantifying phylogeographic congruence across species. We apply this method to the Sarracenia alata pitcher plant system, a carnivorous plant with a diverse array of commensal organisms. We explore whether a group of ecologically associated arthropods have co-diversified with the host pitcher plant, and identify if there is a positive correlation between ecological interaction and PCFs. Results demonstrate that multiple arthropods share congruent phylogeographic breaks with S. alata, and provide evidence that the level of ecological association can be used to predict the degree of similarity in the phylogeographic pattern. This study outlines an approach for quantifying phylogeographic congruence, a central concept in biogeographic research.

  3. Environmental factors controlling the seasonal variability in particle size distribution of modern Saharan dust deposited off Cape Blanc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friese, Carmen A.; van der Does, Michèlle; Merkel, Ute; Iversen, Morten H.; Fischer, Gerhard; Stuut, Jan-Berend W.

    2016-09-01

    The particle sizes of Saharan dust in marine sediment core records have been used frequently as a proxy for trade-wind speed. However, there are still large uncertainties with respect to the seasonality of the particle sizes of deposited Saharan dust off northwestern Africa and the factors influencing this seasonality. We investigated a three-year time-series of grain-size data from two sediment-trap moorings off Cape Blanc, Mauritania and compared them to observed wind-speed and precipitation as well as satellite images. Our results indicate a clear seasonality in the grain-size distributions: during summer the modal grain sizes were generally larger and the sorting was generally less pronounced compared to the winter season. Gravitational settling was the major deposition process during winter. We conclude that the following two mechanisms control the modal grain size of the collected dust during summer: (1) wet deposition causes increased deposition fluxes resulting in coarser modal grain sizes and (2) the development of cold fronts favors the emission and transport of coarse particles off Cape Blanc. Individual dust-storm events throughout the year could be recognized in the traps as anomalously coarse-grained samples. During winter and spring, intense cyclonic dust-storm events in the dust-source region explained the enhanced emission and transport of a larger component of coarse particles off Cape Blanc. The outcome of our study provides important implications for climate modellers and paleo-climatologists.

  4. Emission factors and particulate matter size distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from residential coal combustions in rural Northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Guofeng; Wang, Wei; Yang, Yifeng; Zhu, Chen; Min, Yujia; Xue, Miao; Ding, Junnan; Li, Wei; Wang, Bin; Shen, Huizhong; Wang, Rong; Wang, Xilong; Tao, Shu

    2010-12-01

    Coal consumption is one important contributor to energy production, and is regarded as one of the most important sources of air pollutants that have considerable impacts on human health and climate change. Emissions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from coal combustion were studied in a typical stove. Emission factors (EFs) of 16 EPA priority PAHs from tested coals ranged from 6.25 ± 1.16 mg kg -1 (anthracite) to 253 ± 170 mg kg -1 (bituminous), with NAP and PHE dominated in gaseous and particulate phases, respectively. Size distributions of particulate phase PAHs from tested coals showed that they were mostly associated with particulate matter (PM) with size either between 0.7 and 2.1 μm or less than 0.4 μm (PM 0.4). In the latter category, not only were more PAHs present in PM 0.4, but also contained higher fractions of high molecular weight PAHs. Generally, there were more than 89% of total particulate phase PAHs associated with PM 2.5. Gas-particle partitioning of freshly emitted PAHs from residential coal combustions were thought to be mainly controlled by absorption rather than adsorption, which is similar to those from other sources. Besides, the influence of fuel properties and combustion conditions was further investigated by using stepwise regression analysis, which indicated that almost 57 ± 10% of total variations in PAH EFs can be accounted for by moisture and volatile matter content of coal in residential combustion.

  5. Emission factors and particulate matter size distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from residential coal combustions in rural Northern China

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Guofeng; Wang, Wei; Yang, Yifeng; Zhu, Chen; Min, Yujia; Xue, Miao; Ding, Junnan; Li, Wei; Wang, Bin; Shen, Huizhong; Wang, Rong; Wang, Xilong; Tao, Shu

    2013-01-01

    Coal consumption is one important contributor to energy production, and is regarded as one of the most important sources of air pollutants that have considerable impacts on human health and climate change. Emissions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from coal combustion were studied in a typical stove. Emission factors (EFs) of 16 EPA priority PAHs from tested coals ranged from 6.25 ± 1.16 mg kg−1 (anthracite) to 253 ± 170 mg kg−1 (bituminous), with NAP and PHE dominated in gaseous and particulate phases, respectively. Size distributions of particulate phase PAHs from tested coals showed that they were mostly associated with particulate matter (PM) with size either between 0.7 and 2.1 μm or less than 0.4 μm (PM0.4). In the latter category, not only were more PAHs present in PM0.4, but also contained higher fractions of high molecular weight PAHs. Generally, there were more than 89% of total particulate phase PAHs associated with PM2.5. Gas-particle partitioning of freshly emitted PAHs from residential coal combustions were thought to be mainly controlled by absorption rather than adsorption, which is similar to those from other sources. Besides, the influence of fuel properties and combustion conditions was further investigated by using stepwise regression analysis, which indicated that almost 57 ± 10% of total variations in PAH EFs can be accounted for by moisture and volatile matter content of coal in residential combustion. PMID:24179437

  6. Prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV), distribution of HPV types, and risk factors for infection in HPV-positive women.

    PubMed

    Santos Filho, M V C; Gurgel, A P A D; Lobo, C D P; Freitas, A C F; Silva-Neto, J C; Silva, L A F

    2016-07-14

    The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV), the distribution of different HPV types, and the putative risk factors for infection among HPV-positive women from the State of Alagoas, Northeast Brazil. We analyzed data from 515 patients attending public and private health centers. HPV DNA from cervical samples was extracted and HPV genotyping was performed by polymerase chain reaction using MY09/11 consensus primers followed by direct sequencing. The chi-squared test for independence was used to assess statistical differences between the HPV groups. HPV DNA was found in 111 (21.55%) cervical samples. Twenty genotypes were detected: HPV6, 11, 16, 31, 33, 35, 39, 52, 53, 54, 58, 61, 62, 66, 70, 72, 81, 82, 83, and 84. In addition, multiple sexual partners (P = 0.002) and the use of oral contraceptives (P = 0.015) were associated with the presence of HPV. These findings may be relevant to the design of screening and vaccination strategies targeting specific groups of women in Northeast Brazil.

  7. Microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) in Purkinje cell dendrites: Evidence that factors other than binding to microtubules are involved in determining its cytoplasmic distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Matus, A.; Delhaye-Bouchaud, N.; Mariani, J. )

    1990-07-15

    We have studied the distribution of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) in the Purkinje cell dendrites of rats whose cerebella were exposed to X-irradiation during the second postnatal week. The Purkinje cells of such animals have abnormally elongated apical primary processes that branch in the other molecular layer rather than close to the cell body as in normal tissue. The results show that in these distorted dendrites the MAP2 distribution is shifted distally relative to the normal pattern, in which MAP2 is distributed evenly throughout the dendritic tree. Tubulin and other microtubule-associated proteins, such as MAP1, are not affected and remain evenly distributed throughout the dendritic tree despite the anatomical distortion. We conclude that the distribution of MAP2 in Purkinje cells is not determined solely by its binding to tubulin. Other factors must be involved and these appear to be related to dendritic morphology and possibly to branching.

  8. von Willebrand factor storage requires intact prosequence cleavage site.

    PubMed

    Journet, A M; Saffaripour, S; Cramer, E M; Tenza, D; Wagner, D D

    1993-02-01

    Large multimers of the adhesive glycoprotein von Willebrand factor (vWf) are stored in endothelial cells in rod-shaped granules called Weibel-Palade bodies, while small multimers are secreted constitutively. Expression of pro-vWf in other cells with a regulated pathway of secretion, results in formation of vWf-containing storage granules that have a morphology similar to Weibel-Palade bodies. vWf expressed without its prosequence is not stored. To evaluate the importance of prosequence cleavage in vWf storage, the Arg at position -1, known to be necessary for cleavage, was mutated to Gly. Transfection of this cleavage mutant into two cell lines with a regulated pathway of secretion (RIN 5F and AtT-20 cells) led to the formation of large multimers. However, treatment of the cell lysates by the enzyme endoglycosidase H (Endo-H) did not reveal significant amounts of intracellular Endo-H-resistant vWf, which indicates the absence of a pool of stored processed vWf. In addition, no Weibel-Palade body-like structure was detected in these cells by immunofluorescence labeling with anti-vWf antiserum. Electron microscopy and immunocytochemistry of RIN 5F cells expressing the pro-vWf mutant confirmed the absence of Weibel-Palade body-like structures. In addition, anti-vWf-linked gold particles were found in the ER, occasionally in rounded granules and particularly in lysosomal structures which were abundant. We conclude that the formation of large aggregates is not sufficient to induce efficient vWf storage, and that the lack of cleavage of the prosequence may direct the mutant pro-vWf molecule to a degradative pathway. Therefore, the prosequence cleavage is a requirement for vWf storage.

  9. Characterization of concentration, particle size distribution, and contributing factors to ambient hexavalent chromium in an area with multiple emission sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chang Ho; Huang, Lihui; Shin, Jin Young; Artigas, Francisco; Fan, Zhi-hua (Tina)

    2014-09-01

    Airborne hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is a known pulmonary carcinogen and can be emitted from both natural and anthropogenic sources, including diesel emissions. However, there is limited knowledge about ambient Cr(VI) concentration levels and its particle size distribution. This pilot study characterized ambient Cr(VI) concentrations in the New Jersey Meadowlands (NJ ML) district, which is close to the heavily trafficked New Jersey Turnpike (NJTPK) as well as Chromium Ore Processing Residue (COPR) waste sites. Monitoring was simultaneously conducted at two sites, William site (∼50 m from NJTPK) and MERI site (∼700 m from NJTPK). The distance between the two sites is approximately 6.2 km. Ambient Cr(VI) concentrations and PM2.5 mass concentrations were concurrently measured at both sites during summer and winter. The summer concentrations (mean ± S.D. [median]), 0.13 ± 0.06 [0.12] ng/m3 at the MERI site and 0.08 ± 0.05 [0.07] ng/m3 at the William site, were all significantly higher than the winter concentrations, 0.02 ± 0.01 [0.02] ng/m3 and 0.03 ± 0.01 [0.03] ng/m3 at the MERI and William sites, respectively. The site difference (i.e., MERI > William) was observed for summer Cr(VI) concentrations; however, no differences for winter and pooled datasets. These results suggest higher Cr(VI) concentrations may be attributed from stronger atmospheric reactions such as photo-oxidation of Cr(III) to Cr(VI) in the summer. The Cr(VI) distribution as a function of particle size, ranging from 0.18 to 18 μm, was determined at the William site. It was found that Cr(VI) was enriched in the particles less than 2.5 μm in diameter (PM2.5). This finding suggested potential health concerns, because PM2.5 are easily inhaled and deposited in the alveoli. A multiple linear regression analysis confirmed ambient Cr(VI) concentrations were significantly affected by meteorological factors (i.e., temperature and humidity) and reactive gases/particles (i.e., O3, Fe and Mn).

  10. Characterization of concentration, particle size distribution, and contributing factors to ambient hexavalent chromium in an area with multiple emission sources

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chang Ho; Huang, Lihui; Shin, Jin Young; Artigas, Francisco; Fan, Zhi-hua (Tina)

    2015-01-01

    Airborne hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is a known pulmonary carcinogen and can be emitted from both natural and anthropogenic sources, including diesel emissions. However, there is limited knowledge about ambient Cr(VI) concentration levels and its particle size distribution. This pilot study characterized ambient Cr(VI) concentrations in the New Jersey Meadowlands (NJ ML) district, which is close to the heavily trafficked New Jersey Turnpike (NJTPK) as well as Chromium Ore Processing Residue (COPR) waste sites. Monitoring was simultaneously conducted at two sites, William site (~50 m from NJTPK) and MERI site (~700 m from NJTPK). The distance between the two sites is approximately 6.2 km. Ambient Cr(VI) concentrations and PM2.5 mass concentrations were concurrently measured at both sites during summer and winter. The summer concentrations (mean ± S.D. [median]), 0.13 ± 0.06 [0.12] ng/m3 at the MERI site and 0.08 ± 0.05 [0.07] ng/m3 at the William site, were all significantly higher than the winter concentrations, 0.02 ± 0.01 [0.02] ng/m3 and 0.03 ± 0.01 [0.03] ng/m3 at the MERI and William sites, respectively. The site difference (i.e., MERI > William) was observed for summer Cr(VI) concentrations; however, no differences for winter and pooled datasets. These results suggest higher Cr(VI) concentrations may be attributed from stronger atmospheric reactions such as photo-oxidation of Cr(III) to Cr(VI) in the summer. The Cr(VI) distribution as a function of particle size, ranging from 0.18 to 18 μm, was determined at the William site. It was found that Cr(VI) was enriched in the particles less than 2.5 μm in diameter (PM2.5). This finding suggested potential health concerns, because PM2.5 are easily inhaled and deposited in the alveoli. A multiple linear regression analysis confirmed ambient Cr(VI) concentrations were significantly affected by meteorological factors (i.e., temperature and humidity) and reactive gases/particles (i.e., O3, Fe and Mn). PMID

  11. B → ρ transition form factors and the ρ-meson transverse leading-twist distribution amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Hai-Bing; Wu, Xing-Gang; Han, Hua-Yong; Ma, Yang

    2015-05-01

    The QCD light-cone sum rules (LCSR) provide an effective way for dealing with heavy-to-light transition form factors (TFFs), in which the non-perturbative dynamics are parameterized into the light-meson’s light-cone distribution amplitudes (LCDAs). By taking the chiral correlator as the starting point, we derive new LCSRs for B\\to ρ TFFs up to twist-4 accuracy. In those LCSRs, the twist-2 transverse LCDA φ 2;ρ \\bot provides dominant contribution, while the twist-3 and twist-4 contributions are δ2-suppressed (δ ≃ {{m}ρ }/{{m}b}). Thus, they provide good platforms for testing φ 2;ρ \\bot behavior. For the purpose, we suggest a WH-model for φ 2;ρ \\bot , in which a single parameter B2;ρ \\bot ˜ a2\\bot dominantly controls its longitudinal distribution. When setting B2;ρ \\bot \\in [-0.20,+0.20], φ 2;ρ \\bot varies from the single-peak behavior to the double-humped behavior. We present a detailed comparison of the LCSR estimation for B\\to ρ TFFs with those predicted by pQCD and lattice QCD calculations. The TFFs become smaller with the increment of B2;ρ \\bot and a larger B2;ρ \\bot is not allowed by lattice QCD predictions. By using the extrapolated TFFs, we further predict the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM)-matrix element \\mid {{V}ub}\\mid with the help of two B\\to ρ semi-leptonic decays. The predicted \\mid {{V}ub}\\mid increases with the increment of B2;ρ \\bot , i.e. we have \\mid {{V}ub}\\mid =(2.91+/- 0.19)× {{10}-3} for B2;ρ \\bot =-0.20 and \\mid {{V}ub}\\mid =(3.11+/- 0.19)× {{10}-3} for B2;ρ \\bot =0.00. If treating the BABAR prediction on \\mid {{V}ub}\\mid as a criteria, we observe that B2;ρ \\bot should be within the region of [-0.20, +0.10], which indicates that the ρ-meson LCDA prefers a single-peak behavior rather than a double-humped behavior.

  12. Cross-sectional study of brucellosis in Jordan: Prevalence, risk factors and spatial distribution in small ruminants and cattle.

    PubMed

    Musallam, I I; Abo-Shehada, M; Omar, M; Guitian, J

    2015-03-01

    Brucellosis is considered endemic in many Middle Eastern countries including Jordan. To determine the frequency, risk factors and spatial distribution of ruminant brucellosis in Jordan, a nationwide cross-sectional study was conducted. Small ruminant flocks (n=333) and cattle herds (n=204) were randomly selected, and their disease status was ascertained by testing individual serum samples using the Rose Bengal Test and a competitive ELISA (sheep and goats) and milk samples using an indirect ELISA (cattle). Information on putative risk factors was collected using standardized questionnaires. A logistic model with a binomial outcome was built to identify risk factors for being seropositive. The estimated true seroprevalence values were 18.1% (95% CI: 11-25.3) (cattle-only herds), 22.2% (95% CI: 16.5-28.8) (sheep flocks), 45.4% (95% CI: 30.3-61.6) (goat herds), 70.4% (95% CI: 55.5-84.9) (mixed sheep-goat flocks), 34.3% (95% CI: 28.4, 40.4) (all small ruminant flocks) and 38.5% (95% CI: 24.3-51.8) (mixed herds of cattle and small ruminants). Only 1.5% of small ruminant flocks were vaccinated. The seroprevalence was higher in northern areas, where livestock density is also higher. The logistic model fitted the data well and had a very high predictive ability. In the small ruminant model, five variables were significantly associated with a higher odds of seropositivity: lending/borrowing rams (OR=8.9, 95% CI: 3.0-26.1), feeding aborted material to dogs (OR=8.0, 95% CI: 3.5-18.1) the presence of goats (OR=6.9, 95% CI: 3.1-15.4), introducing new animals to the flock (OR=5.8, 95% CI: 2.5-13.6), and a large flock size (OR=2.2, 95% CI: 1.0-4.6). Conversely, separating newly introduced animals (OR=0.16, 95% CI: 0.05-0.47), separating animals that had aborted (OR=0.19, 95% CI: 0.08-0.46) and using disinfectants to clean pens (OR=0.37, 95% CI: 0.16-0.83) were significantly associated with a lower odds of being seropositive. The main risk factor for cattle herds being

  13. Acquired von Willebrand syndrome: von Willebrand factor propeptide to von Willebrand factor antigen ratio predicts remission status

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Adrienne; Sinclair, Gary; Valentine, Karen; James, Paula

    2014-01-01

    We investigated a case of acquired von Willebrand syndrome (AVWS) secondary to a nonneutralizing anti-von Willebrand factor (VWF) antibody associated with an autoimmune disorder. At diagnosis, VWF activity (VWF:Act), antigen (VWF:Ag), multimers, and factor VIII coagulant activity were virtually absent. VWF propeptide (VWFpp) was elevated with an infinitely high VWFpp to VWF:Ag ratio (VWFpp:Ag) consistent with rapid VWF clearance. Immunosuppressive treatment resulted in phenotypic remission 1 with normalization of VWF/factor VIII levels and multimer pattern. However, VWFpp:Ag remained elevated (∼2× normal), consistent with ongoing VWF clearance by the remaining anti-VWF antibody still present by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. This suggests that increased VWF secretion was compensating for the incomplete remission state. Relapse occurred when VWFpp:Ag was again infinitely high, with associated decreased VWFpp but unchanged anti-VWF titers; switching the balance to favor VWF clearance over secretion. Complete remission with undetectable anti-VWF occurred only when VWFpp:Ag was normal. This case of relapsing-remitting AVWS demonstrates the use of VWFpp:Ag for predicting remission status. PMID:24951428

  14. Feline hyperthyroidism reported in primary-care veterinary practices in England: prevalence, associated factors and spatial distribution.

    PubMed

    Stephens, M J; O'Neill, D G; Church, D B; McGreevy, P D; Thomson, P C; Brodbelt, D C

    2014-11-08

    Feline hyperthyroidism is a commonly diagnosed endocrinopathy that can have a substantial deleterious impact on the welfare of affected cats. This study aimed to estimate the prevalence, associated factors and geographical distribution for feline hyperthyroidism in England, using primary-care veterinary practice clinical data from the VetCompass Animal Surveillance Project. Prevalence was estimated from the overall cat cohort. Associated factor analysis used an age-matched, nested, case-control design with multivariable logistic regression. There were 2,276 cases of feline hyperthyroidism identified from 95,629 cats attending 84 practices from September 2009 to December 2011. Cases were aged 6-25 years. 3.7 per cent of cases and 9.9 per cent of controls were purebred, 56.4 per cent of cases and 56.5 per cent of controls were female, and 88.1 per cent of cases and 86.0 per cent of controls were neutered. The apparent prevalence was 2.4 per cent (95% CI 2.3 to 2.5 per cent) overall, and 8.7 per cent (95% CI 8.3 to 9.0 per cent) in cats aged 10 years or above. Burmese (OR 0.15, 95% CI 0.07 to 0.32, P<0.0001), Persian (OR 0.17, 95% CI 0.08 to 0.33, P<0.0001), Siamese (OR 0.4, 95% CI 0.21 to 0.75, P=0.004) and purebred cats overall (OR 0.33, 95% CI 0.25 to 0.42, P< 0.0001) had lower odds of feline hyperthyroidism than non-purebred cats. Insured cats had increased odds (OR 1.78, 95% CI 1.56 to 2.03, P< 0.001). There was little evidence of spatial variation. This study highlights feline hyperthyroidism as a high-prevalence disease in England, and reports reduced odds of diagnosis in certain breeds and purebred cats overall.

  15. Contrasting Spatial Distribution and Risk Factors for Past Infection with Scrub Typhus and Murine Typhus in Vientiane City, Lao PDR

    PubMed Central

    Vallée, Julie; Thaojaikong, Thaksinaporn; Moore, Catrin E.; Phetsouvanh, Rattanaphone; Richards, Allen L.; Souris, Marc; Fournet, Florence; Salem, Gérard; Gonzalez, Jean-Paul J.; Newton, Paul N.

    2010-01-01

    . Conclusions This study underscores the intense circulation of both scrub and murine typhus in Vientiane city and underlines difference in spatial distribution and risk factors involved in the transmission of these diseases. PMID:21151880

  16. Appetite regulating factors in pacu (Piaractus mesopotamicus): Tissue distribution and effects of food quantity and quality on gene expression.

    PubMed

    Volkoff, Hélène; Estevan Sabioni, Rafael; Coutinho, Luiz Lehmann; Cyrino, José Eurico Possebon

    2017-01-01

    The pacu Piaractus mesopotamicus is an omnivorous fish considered a promising species for aquaculture. Little is known about the endocrine regulation of feeding in this species. In this study, transcripts for orexin, cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript (CART), cholecystokinin (CCK) and leptin were isolated in pacu. Orexin, CCK and leptin have widespread mRNA distributions in brain and periphery, CART is limited to the brain. To examine the role of these peptides in the regulation of feeding and energy status, mRNA expression levels were compared between fed and fasted fish and around feeding time. Both orexin and CART brain expressions were affected by fasting and displayed periprandial changes, suggesting a role in both short- and long-term regulation of feeding. CCK intestinal expression decreased in fasted fish and displayed periprandial changes, suggesting CCK acts as a peripheral satiety factor. Leptin was not affected by fasting but displayed periprandial changes, suggesting a role as a short-term regulator. To examine if these peptides are affected by diet, brain and gut expressions were assessed in fish fed with different diets containing soy protein concentrate. Food intake, weight gain and expressions of orexin, CART, CCK and leptin were little affected by replacement of fish protein with soy protein, suggesting that pacu is able to tolerate and grow well with a diet rich in plant material. Overall, our results suggest that orexin, CART, CCK and leptin are involved in the physiology of feeding of pacu and that their expressions are little affected by plant-based diets.

  17. Beyond thriftiness: Independent and interactive effects of genetic and dietary factors on variations in fat deposition and distribution across populations

    PubMed Central

    Casazza, Krista; Beasley, T. Mark; Fernandez, Jose R.

    2011-01-01

    The thrifty genotype hypothesis initiated speculation that feast and famine cycling throughout history may have led to group-specific alterations of the human genome, thereby augmenting the capacity for excessive fat mass accrual when immersed in the modern-day obesogenic environment. Contemporary work, however, suggests alternative mechanisms influencing fuel utilization and subsequent tissue partitioning to be more relevant in the etiology of population-based variation in adipose storage. The objective of this study was to evaluate the independent and interactive contribution of ancestral admixture as a proxy for population-based genetic variation and diet on adipose tissue deposition and distribution in peripubertal children and to identify differences in racial/ethnic and sex groups. Two-hundred seventy-eight children (53% male) aged 7–12y, categorized by parental self-report as African- (n=91), European- (n=110), or Hispanic American (n=77), participated. Ancestral genetic admixture was estimated using 140 ancestry informative markers. Body composition was evaluated by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry; energy expenditure by indirect calorimetry and accelerometry; and diet by 24h–recall. Admixture independently contributed to all adiposity parameters; i.e., estimates of European and Amerindian ancestries were positively associated with all adiposity parameters, whereas African genetic admixture was inversely associated with adiposity. In boys, energy intake was associated with adiposity, irrespective of macronutrient profile, whereas in girls, the relationship was mediated by carbohydrate. We also observed moderating effects of energy balance/fuel utilization of the interaction between ancestral genetic admixture and diet. Interactive effects of genetic and non-genetic factors alter metabolic pathways and underlie some of the present population-based differences in fat storage. PMID:21365611

  18. The Distribution of and Factors Associated with Intimate Terrorism and Situational Couple Violence among a Population-Based Sample of Urban Women in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frye, Victoria; Manganello, Jennifer; Campbell, Jacquelyn C.; Walton-Moss, Benita; Wilt, Susan

    2006-01-01

    It has been proposed that two distinct forms of intimate partner violence exist: intimate terrorism and situational couple violence. This article describes the distribution of factors that characterize intimate terrorism and situational couple violence, including controlling behaviors, violence escalation, and injury, among a representative sample…

  19. Factors determining growth and vertical distribution of planktonic algae in extremely acidic mining lakes (pH 2.7)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bissinger, Vera

    2003-04-01

    In this thesis, I investigated the factors influencing the growth and vertical distribution of planktonic algae in extremely acidic mining lakes (pH 2-3). In the focal study site, Lake 111 (pH 2.7; Lusatia, Germany), the chrysophyte, Ochromonas sp., dominates in the upper water strata and the chlorophyte, Chlamydomonas sp., in the deeper strata, forming a pronounced deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM). Inorganic carbon (IC) limitation influenced the phototrophic growth of Chlamydomonas sp. in the upper water strata. Conversely, in deeper strata, light limited its phototrophic growth. When compared with published data for algae from neutral lakes, Chlamydomonas sp. from Lake 111 exhibited a lower maximum growth rate, an enhanced compensation point and higher dark respiration rates, suggesting higher metabolic costs due to the extreme physico-chemical conditions. The photosynthetic performance of Chlamydomonas sp. decreased in high-light-adapted cells when IC limited. In addition, the minimal phosphorus (P) cell quota was suggestive of a higher P requirement under IC limitation. Subsequently, it was shown that Chlamydomonas sp. was a mixotroph, able to enhance its growth rate by taking up dissolved organic carbon (DOC) via osmotrophy. Therefore, it could survive in deeper water strata where DOC concentrations were higher and light limited. However, neither IC limitation, P availability nor in situ DOC concentrations (bottom-up control) could fully explain the vertical distribution of Chlamydomonas sp. in Lake 111. Conversely, when a novel approach was adopted, the grazing influence of the phagotrophic phototroph, Ochromonas sp., was found to exert top-down control on its prey (Chlamydomonas sp.) reducing prey abundance in the upper water strata. This, coupled with the fact that Chlamydomonas sp. uses DOC for growth, leads to a pronounced accumulation of Chlamydomonas sp. cells at depth; an apparent DCM. Therefore, grazing appears to be the main factor influencing the

  20. Predicting probability of occurrence and factors affecting distribution and abundance of three Ozark endemic crayfish species at multiple spatial scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nolen, Matthew S.; Magoulick, Daniel D.; DiStefano, Robert J.; Imhoff, Emily M.; Wagner, Brian K.

    2014-01-01

    We found that a range of environmental variables were important in predicting crayfish distribution and abundance at multiple spatial scales and their importance was species-, response variable- and scale dependent. We would encourage others to examine the influence of spatial scale on species distribution and abundance patterns.

  1. Observed effects of “distributional learning” may not relate to the number of peaks. A test of “dispersion” as a confounding factor

    PubMed Central

    Wanrooij, Karin; Boersma, Paul; Benders, Titia

    2015-01-01

    Distributional learning of speech sounds is learning from simply being exposed to frequency distributions of speech sounds in one’s surroundings. In laboratory settings, the mechanism has been reported to be discernible already after a few minutes of exposure, in both infants and adults. These “effects of distributional training” have traditionally been attributed to the difference in the number of peaks between the experimental distribution (two peaks) and the control distribution (one or zero peaks). However, none of the earlier studies fully excluded a possibly confounding effect of the dispersion in the distributions. Additionally, some studies with a non-speech control condition did not control for a possible difference between processing speech and non-speech. The current study presents an experiment that corrects both imperfections. Spanish listeners were exposed to either a bimodal distribution encompassing the Dutch contrast /ɑ/∼/a/ or a unimodal distribution with the same dispersion. Before and after training, their accuracy of categorization of [ɑ]- and [a]-tokens was measured. A traditionally calculated p-value showed no significant difference in categorization improvement between bimodally and unimodally trained participants. Because of this null result, a Bayesian method was used to assess the odds in favor of the null hypothesis. Four different Bayes factors, each calculated on a different belief in the truth value of previously found effect sizes, indicated the absence of a difference between bimodally and unimodally trained participants. The implication is that “effects of distributional training” observed in the lab are not induced by the number of peaks in the distributions. PMID:26441719

  2. Factor VIII alters tubular organization and functional properties of von Willebrand factor stored in Weibel-Palade bodies.

    PubMed

    Bouwens, Eveline A M; Mourik, Marjon J; van den Biggelaar, Maartje; Eikenboom, Jeroen C J; Voorberg, Jan; Valentijn, Karine M; Mertens, Koen

    2011-11-24

    In endothelial cells, von Willebrand factor (VWF) multimers are packaged into tubules that direct biogenesis of elongated Weibel-Palade bodies (WPBs). WPB release results in unfurling of VWF tubules and assembly into strings that serve to recruit platelets. By confocal microscopy, we have previously observed a rounded morphology of WPBs in blood outgrowth endothelial cells transduced to express factor VIII (FVIII). Using correlative light-electron microscopy and tomography, we now demonstrate that FVIII-containing WPBs have disorganized, short VWF tubules. Whereas normal FVIII and FVIII Y1680F interfered with formation of ultra-large VWF multimers, release of the WPBs resulted in VWF strings of equal length as those from nontransduced blood outgrowth endothelial cells. After release, both WPB-derived FVIII and FVIII Y1680F remained bound to VWF strings, which however had largely lost their ability to recruit platelets. Strings from nontransduced cells, however, were capable of simultaneously recruiting exogenous FVIII and platelets. These findings suggest that the interaction of FVIII with VWF during WPB formation is independent of Y1680, is maintained after WPB release in FVIII-covered VWF strings, and impairs recruitment of platelets. Apparently, intra-cellular and extracellular assembly of FVIII-VWF complex involves distinct mechanisms, which differ with regard to their implications for platelet binding to released VWF strings.

  3. Variation in stability of elk and red deer populations with abiotic and biotic factors at the species-distribution scale.

    PubMed

    Ahrestani, Farshid S; Smith, William K; Hebblewhite, Mark; Running, Steven; Post, Eric

    2016-11-01

    abiotic conditions, both reduce stability, but in opposing fashion: one through weakened direct density dependence and the other through strengthened delayed density dependence. Importantly, however, no single abiotic or biotic environmental factor emerged as generally predictive of the strengths of direct or delayed density dependence, nor of the stability properties emerging from their interaction. Our results emphasize the challenges inherent to ascribing primacy to drivers of such parameters at the species level and distribution scale.

  4. [Distribution of PGEs contents and its factors in snowfall and snow cover over the arid region in Changji City].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Yan; Liu, Hao-Feng; Zhang, Lan

    2013-02-01

    This paper was to select a small-medium sized City, Changji city, over the arid region, study the distribution of platinum group metals(PGEs) contents and influencing factors in snowfall and snow cover. Samples were analysed by ICP-MS. The results revealed that the annual contents of Rh, Pd and Pt in snowfall were on the average value of 0.43 ng.L-1 ranging from not detected to 2.24 ng.L-1 , 60.07 ng.L-1 ranging from 46.66 to 84.25 ng.L-1 and 4.54 ng.L-1 ranging from 3.02 ng.L-1 to 6.38 ng.L-1 respectively. The difference of PGEs levels was found in different occurrences of snowfall, tended to increase before snowfall due to the longer arid days. PGEs contents maybe influenced by the amount of snowfall, the less snowfall, the higher PGEs contents reflected. The annual levels of Rh, Pd and Pt in snow cover were in the range of 2.50-18.80 ng.L-1 (av. 6.65 ng.L-1), 46.83-199.20 ng.L-1 (av. 83.45 ng.L-1) ,4. 27-13.78 ng.L-1 (av. 8.17 ng.L-1) respectively. PGEs content in snow cover were far higher than that of snowfall, PGEs in snowfall were only obtained from atmospheric PGEs rinsed by single time of snowfall, while PGEs were not only from the accumulation of PGEs in frequent times of snowfall and the snow cover under the long time exposure, but also continuously accepted the PGEs from atmospheric dry deposition. PGEs content of snow cover in all sampling sites were demonstrated as follows: traffic area > residential-culture-education district > square of park > suburban farmland. the input way of PGEs in snow cover was found a remarkable difference with the amount of input within different function areas, which was the main reason caused that PGEs content of snow cover in each function area varied and had a certain regularity.

  5. Nucleon distribution amplitudes and their application to nucleon form factors and the N{yields}{delta} transition at intermediate values of Q{sup 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Lenz, Alexander; Goeckeler, Meinulf; Kaltenbrunner, Thomas; Warkentin, Nikolaus

    2009-05-01

    We compare a recent lattice determination of the nucleon distribution amplitudes with other approaches and models. We study the nucleon distribution amplitudes up to twist 6 in next-to-leading conformal spin and we also investigate conformal d-wave contributions to the leading-twist distribution amplitude. With the help of light-cone sum rules one can relate the distribution amplitudes to the form factors of the nucleon or the N{yields}{delta} transition at intermediate values of the momentum transfer. We compare our results with experimental data in the range 1 GeV{sup 2}{<=}Q{sup 2}{<=}10 GeV{sup 2}. Keeping in mind that we are working only in leading order QCD and next-to-leading order QCD corrections might be sizeable, we already obtain a surprisingly good agreement for the nucleon form factors G{sub M}{sup n}, G{sub M}{sup p}, G{sub A}{sup p}, and G{sub T}{sup p} and for the N{yields}{delta} transition form factor ratios R{sub EM} and R{sub SM}.

  6. Multilevel Analysis of Trachomatous Trichiasis and Corneal Opacity in Nigeria: The Role of Environmental and Climatic Risk Factors on the Distribution of Disease

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jennifer L.; Sivasubramaniam, Selvaraj; Rabiu, Mansur M.; Kyari, Fatima; Solomon, Anthony W.; Gilbert, Clare

    2015-01-01

    The distribution of trachoma in Nigeria is spatially heterogeneous, with large-scale trends observed across the country and more local variation within areas. Relative contributions of individual and cluster-level risk factors to the geographic distribution of disease remain largely unknown. The primary aim of this analysis is to assess the relationship between climatic factors and trachomatous trichiasis (TT) and/or corneal opacity (CO) due to trachoma in Nigeria, while accounting for the effects of individual risk factors and spatial correlation. In addition, we explore the relative importance of variation in the risk of trichiasis and/or corneal opacity (TT/CO) at different levels. Data from the 2007 National Blindness and Visual Impairment Survey were used for this analysis, which included a nationally representative sample of adults aged 40 years and above. Complete data were available from 304 clusters selected using a multi-stage stratified cluster-random sampling strategy. All participants (13,543 individuals) were interviewed and examined by an ophthalmologist for the presence or absence of TT and CO. In addition to field-collected data, remotely sensed climatic data were extracted for each cluster and used to fit Bayesian hierarchical logistic models to disease outcome. The risk of TT/CO was associated with factors at both the individual and cluster levels, with approximately 14% of the total variation attributed to the cluster level. Beyond established individual risk factors (age, gender and occupation), there was strong evidence that environmental/climatic factors at the cluster-level (lower precipitation, higher land surface temperature, higher mean annual temperature and rural classification) were also associated with a greater risk of TT/CO. This study establishes the importance of large-scale risk factors in the geographical distribution of TT/CO in Nigeria, supporting anecdotal evidence that environmental conditions are associated with increased

  7. Multilevel Analysis of Trachomatous Trichiasis and Corneal Opacity in Nigeria: The Role of Environmental and Climatic Risk Factors on the Distribution of Disease.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jennifer L; Sivasubramaniam, Selvaraj; Rabiu, Mansur M; Kyari, Fatima; Solomon, Anthony W; Gilbert, Clare

    2015-01-01

    The distribution of trachoma in Nigeria is spatially heterogeneous, with large-scale trends observed across the country and more local variation within areas. Relative contributions of individual and cluster-level risk factors to the geographic distribution of disease remain largely unknown. The primary aim of this analysis is to assess the relationship between climatic factors and trachomatous trichiasis (TT) and/or corneal opacity (CO) due to trachoma in Nigeria, while accounting for the effects of individual risk factors and spatial correlation. In addition, we explore the relative importance of variation in the risk of trichiasis and/or corneal opacity (TT/CO) at different levels. Data from the 2007 National Blindness and Visual Impairment Survey were used for this analysis, which included a nationally representative sample of adults aged 40 years and above. Complete data were available from 304 clusters selected using a multi-stage stratified cluster-random sampling strategy. All participants (13,543 individuals) were interviewed and examined by an ophthalmologist for the presence or absence of TT and CO. In addition to field-collected data, remotely sensed climatic data were extracted for each cluster and used to fit Bayesian hierarchical logistic models to disease outcome. The risk of TT/CO was associated with factors at both the individual and cluster levels, with approximately 14% of the total variation attributed to the cluster level. Beyond established individual risk factors (age, gender and occupation), there was strong evidence that environmental/climatic factors at the cluster-level (lower precipitation, higher land surface temperature, higher mean annual temperature and rural classification) were also associated with a greater risk of TT/CO. This study establishes the importance of large-scale risk factors in the geographical distribution of TT/CO in Nigeria, supporting anecdotal evidence that environmental conditions are associated with increased

  8. Calculation of the sun protection factor of sunscreens with different vehicles using measured film thickness distribution - Comparison with the SPF in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Myriam; Herzog, Bernd; Osterwalder, Uli; Imanidis, Georgios

    2016-06-01

    The sun protection factor (SPF) depends on UV filter composition, and amount and type of vehicle of the applied sunscreen. In an earlier work, we showed that the vehicle affected the average thickness of sunscreen film that is formed upon application to a skin substrate and that film thickness correlated significantly with SPF in vitro. In the present study, we quantitatively assess the role for sunscreen efficacy of the complete film thickness frequency distribution of sunscreen measured with an oil-in-water cream, an oil-in-water spray, a gel, a water-in-oil, and an alcoholic spray formulation. A computational method is employed to determine SPF in silico from calculated UV transmittance based on experimental film thickness and thickness distribution, and concentration and spectral properties of the UV filters. The investigated formulations exhibited different SPFs in vitro and different film thickness distributions especially in the small thickness range. We found a very good agreement between SPF in silico and SPF in vitro for all sunscreens. This result establishes the relationship between sun protection and the film thickness distribution actually formed by the applied sunscreen and demonstrates that variation in SPF between formulations is primarily due to their film forming properties. It also opens the possibility to integrate the influence of vehicle into tools for in silico prediction of the performance of sunscreen formulations. For this, the use of the Gamma distribution was found to be appropriate for describing film thickness distribution.

  9. Multi-factors influencing the spatial distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soils surrounding drinking water protection zone.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Wentao; Wang, Tieyu; Lu, Yonglong; Chang, Andrew; Chen, Weiping

    2013-08-01

    We selected the Guanting Reservoir in Beijing, China as a case where an industrial area locates on the upwind corner to study the influence of human activities and natural processes on the distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soils. Soil PAH concentrations in the study area follow a log-normal probability distribution function, suggesting that distribution of PAH in soils was affected by human activities. Distribution of PAHs in soils was significantly affected by the point source that high PAH concentrations were observed in near industrial area with an obvious declining trend from the northwest to the southeast which was the prevailing wind direction in this area. Away from the influence of point source, distribution of PAHs in soils was found to significantly correlate with total organic carbon content, while the influences of agricultural land uses and type of soil texture on the total soil PAHs contents and ring compositions were quite limited. The results can provide some evidences and data on the pollutant accumulation in drink water protection area influenced by natural processes and human activities.

  10. Projecting Distribution of the Overwintering Population of Sogatella furcifera (Hemiptera: Delphacidae), in Yunnan, China With Analysis on Key Influencing Climatic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shao-Ji; Liu, Xiao-Fei; Fu, Da-Ying; Huang, Wei; Wang, Xue-Ying; Liu, Xiao-Jun; Lü, Jian-Ping; Ye, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Sogatella furcifera (Horváth) is the most threatening migratory rice pest in Yunnan, China. S. furcifera overwinters in low- altitude basins and valleys in southern Yunnan and migrates northward in spring and summer of the following year, causing serious damage during migration. The overwintering distribution, areas, and spatial pattern of S. furcifera are relevant to the migration and outbreak of this pest. Based on a 4-yr field survey (2010–2013), this study projected areas suitable for S. furcifera to overwinter using a species distribution model, and analyzed the key influencing climatic factors using principal component analysis (PCA) and ecological niche factor analysis (ENFA). Our field survey showed that the northern latitudinal- and upper elevation limits of overwintering S. furcifera was 25.4° N and 1,608 m in western Yunnan and 24.2° N and 1,563 m in eastern Yunnan. The species distribution model produced a fragmented distribution pattern, with most of which in western Yunnan and only a few in eastern Yunnan. The PCA and ENFA analyses showed that the mean temperature of the driest quarter and the precipitation of the coldest quarter significantly influenced the distribution of S. furcifera in winter. The results suggested that the complex topography, spatial differences in winter temperatures, and host availability altogether determined the distribution of overwintering S. furcifera. Compared with previous surveys, the northern latitudinal- and upper elevation limits of overwintering S. furcifera were higher, while the population became rarer in some suitable areas due to change of farmland utilization in winter and possibly climate change. PMID:26494777

  11. Relative importance of meteorological and geographical factors in the distribution of Fasciola hepatica infestation in farmed sheep in Qinghai province, China

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Hongyu; Gao, Xiang; Wang, Hongbin; Xiao, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    Fasciola hepatica is an important trematode parasite of economic importance that infests sheep and cattle worldwide. We conducted a detailed investigation into the spatial distribution of F. hepatica infestation in farmed sheep in Qinghai (Wutumeiren) province, Mainland China. Mathematical modelling was used to assess the inter-relationships between meteorological and geographical factors and the risk of F. hepatica infestation across the province. A capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test (MM3-SERO) was used to detect F. hepatica infestation. A niche model based on the maximum entropy method (MaxEnt) was used to estimate the influence of meteorological and geographical factors on the observed spatial distribution of F. hepatica infestation. Results of jackknife analysis indicated that temperature, precipitation, solar radiation, digital elevation and slope were associated with the occurrence of F. hepatica infestation, and that infestation rates were significantly higher among animals from districts with a high percentage of grassland habitat. The findings indicate that meteorological and geographical factors may be important variables affecting the distribution of F. hepatica infestation and should be taken into account in the development of future surveillance and control programmes for fascioliasis. PMID:28000591

  12. The influence of particle size distribution on dose conversion factors for radon progeny in the underground excavations of hard coal mine.

    PubMed

    Skubacz, Krystian; Wojtecki, Łukasz; Urban, Paweł

    2016-10-01

    In Polish underground mines, hazards caused by enhanced natural radioactivity occur. The sources of radiation exposure are short-lived radon decay products, mine waters containing radium (226)Ra and (228)Ra and the radioactive sediments that can precipitate out of these waters. For miners, the greatest exposure is usually due to short-lived radon decay products. The risk assessment is based on the measurement of the total potential alpha energy concentration (PAEC) and the evaluation of the related dose by using the dose conversion factor as recommended by relevant legal requirements. This paper presents the results of measurements of particle size distributions of ambient aerosols in an underground hard coal mine, the assessment of the radioactive particle size distribution of the short-lived radon decay products and the corresponding values of dose conversion factors. The measurements of the ambient airborne particle size distribution were performed in the range from a few nanometers to about 20 μm. The study therefore included practically the whole class of respirable particles. The results showed that the high concentration of ultrafine and fine aerosols measured can significantly affect the value of the dose conversion factors, and consequently the corresponding committed effective dose, to which the miners can be exposed.

  13. Presentation of the Multimédia Game "Geolover" Concept, to Educational Enchancement of the Geolocical Heritage of the Following Regions: "Ilha do Fogo" (Cabo-Verde), Seridó (Brasil), Sabugal (Portugal) and Açores (Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabral, João; Gomes, Ana; Alfama, Vera; Oliveira, Sirlene; Pinharandas, Carlos; Fonseca, Pedro; Campos, José; Nobre, José

    2013-04-01

    "Geolover" - Presentation of the multimédia game concept, to educational enchancement of the geolocical heritage of the following regions: : "Ilha do Fogo" (Cabo-Verde), Seridó (Brasil), Sabugal and Açores (Portugal). "Geolover" is a multitouch game, played by four players simultaneously, identified by 4 mascots and using as sceneries, the four regions landscapes, aimed to the young people with ages between 8 and 12 years old. The main objective is value the geological heritage of the Ilha do Fogo (Cabo Verde), Seridó in State of Rio Grande do Norte (Brasil) , Sabugal in Beira Alta province (Portugal) and Arquipélago dos Açores (Portuguese autonomous region). These regions have a great geological heritage like volcanology, plutonic rocks, sedimentar formations, metamorphic, paleontologic, mineralogic, geomorphologic, hydric and mining resources. Such heritage is being used in the different regions has base of studies to senior scientists and were used to great scientific researches. The diversified and distinguished cultural heritage of these four regions is referenced and it's a value to the union of the students from these three continents, with the Portuguese language as communication tool. The variety of the geological wealth and cultural of these regions, results in the common objective of their valuing like Geoparks. His creation on these three regions is a strategy with a great relevance to the socio-economic development. With the creation of this game, we promote the union of these 3 countries from these three continents, the universal values of the heritage richness that are offered by our planet.

  14. Spatial distribution and risk factors of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 in China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, Vincent; Pfeiffer, Dirk U.; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Xiao, Xiangming; Prosser, Diann J.; Guo, Fusheng; Gilbert, Marius

    2011-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 was first encountered in 1996 in Guangdong province (China) and started spreading throughout Asia and the western Palearctic in 2004–2006. Compared to several other countries where the HPAI H5N1 distribution has been studied in some detail, little is known about the environmental correlates of the HPAI H5N1 distribution in China. HPAI H5N1 clinical disease outbreaks, and HPAI virus (HPAIV) H5N1 isolated from active risk-based surveillance sampling of domestic poultry (referred to as HPAIV H5N1 surveillance positives in this manuscript) were modeled separately using seven risk variables: chicken, domestic waterfowl population density, proportion of land covered by rice or surface water, cropping intensity, elevation, and human population density. We used bootstrapped logistic regression and boosted regression trees (BRT) with cross-validation to identify the weight of each variable, to assess the predictive power of the models, and to map the distribution of HPAI H5N1 risk. HPAI H5N1 clinical disease outbreak occurrence in domestic poultry was mainly associated with chicken density, human population density, and elevation. In contrast, HPAIV H5N1 infection identified by risk-based surveillance was associated with domestic waterfowl density, human population density, and the proportion of land covered by surface water. Both models had a high explanatory power (mean AUC ranging from 0.864 to 0.967). The map of HPAIV H5N1 risk distribution based on active surveillance data emphasized areas south of the Yangtze River, while the distribution of reported outbreak risk extended further North, where the density of poultry and humans is higher. We quantified the statistical association between HPAI H5N1 outbreak, HPAIV distribution and post-vaccination levels of seropositivity (percentage of effective post-vaccination seroconversion in vaccinated birds) and found that provinces with either outbreaks or HPAIV H5N1 surveillance

  15. Spatial distribution and risk factors of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 in China.

    PubMed

    Martin, Vincent; Pfeiffer, Dirk U; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Xiao, Xiangming; Prosser, Diann J; Guo, Fusheng; Gilbert, Marius

    2011-03-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 was first encountered in 1996 in Guangdong province (China) and started spreading throughout Asia and the western Palearctic in 2004-2006. Compared to several other countries where the HPAI H5N1 distribution has been studied in some detail, little is known about the environmental correlates of the HPAI H5N1 distribution in China. HPAI H5N1 clinical disease outbreaks, and HPAI virus (HPAIV) H5N1 isolated from active risk-based surveillance sampling of domestic poultry (referred to as HPAIV H5N1 surveillance positives in this manuscript) were modeled separately using seven risk variables: chicken, domestic waterfowl population density, proportion of land covered by rice or surface water, cropping intensity, elevation, and human population density. We used bootstrapped logistic regression and boosted regression trees (BRT) with cross-validation to identify the weight of each variable, to assess the predictive power of the models, and to map the distribution of HPAI H5N1 risk. HPAI H5N1 clinical disease outbreak occurrence in domestic poultry was mainly associated with chicken density, human population density, and elevation. In contrast, HPAIV H5N1 infection identified by risk-based surveillance was associated with domestic waterfowl density, human population density, and the proportion of land covered by surface water. Both models had a high explanatory power (mean AUC ranging from 0.864 to 0.967). The map of HPAIV H5N1 risk distribution based on active surveillance data emphasized areas south of the Yangtze River, while the distribution of reported outbreak risk extended further North, where the density of poultry and humans is higher. We quantified the statistical association between HPAI H5N1 outbreak, HPAIV distribution and post-vaccination levels of seropositivity (percentage of effective post-vaccination seroconversion in vaccinated birds) and found that provinces with either outbreaks or HPAIV H5N1 surveillance

  16. Environmental Factors Controlling the Distribution of Symbiodinium Harboured by the Coral Acropora millepora on the Great Barrier Reef

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Timothy F.; Berkelmans, Ray; Ulstrup, Karin E.; Weeks, Scarla; Radford, Ben; Jones, Alison M.; Doyle, Jason; Canto, Marites; O'Leary, Rebecca A.; van Oppen, Madeleine J. H.

    2011-01-01

    Background The Symbiodinium community associated with scleractinian corals is widely considered to be shaped by seawater temperature, as the coral's upper temperature tolerance is largely contingent on the Symbiodinium types harboured. Few studies have challenged this paradigm as knowledge of other environmental drivers on the distribution of Symbiodinium is limited. Here, we examine the influence of a range of environmental variables on the distribution of Symbiodinium associated with Acropora millepora collected from 47 coral reefs spanning 1,400 km on the Great Barrier Reef (GBR), Australia. Methodology/Principal Findings The environmental data included Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite data at 1 km spatial resolution from which a number of sea surface temperature (SST) and water quality metrics were derived. In addition, the carbonate and mud composition of sediments were incorporated into the analysis along with in situ water quality samples for a subset of locations. Analyses were conducted at three spatio-temporal scales [GBR (regional-scale), Whitsunday Islands (local-scale) and Keppel Islands/Trunk Reef (temporal)] to examine the effects of scale on the distribution patterns. While SST metrics were important drivers of the distribution of Symbiodinium types at regional and temporal scales, our results demonstrate that spatial variability in water quality correlates significantly with Symbiodinium distribution at local scales. Background levels of Symbiodinium types were greatest at turbid inshore locations of the Whitsunday Islands where SST predictors were not as important. This was not the case at regional scales where combinations of mud and carbonate sediment content coupled with SST anomalies and mean summer SST explained 51.3% of the variation in dominant Symbiodinium communities. Conclusions/Significance Reef corals may respond to global-scale stressors such as climate change through changes in their resident symbiont

  17. Spatial and non-spatial risk factors associated with cage-level distribution of infectious salmon anaemia at three Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L., farms in Maine, USA.

    PubMed

    Gustafson, L; Ellis, S; Robinson, T; Marenghi, F; Merrill, P; Hawkins, L; Giray, C; Wagner, B

    2007-02-01

    The distribution of infectious salmon anaemia (ISA) was examined among 80 cages from three Atlantic salmon grow-out farms in Maine, USA that were stocked with smolts from a single hatchery. Cage-level disease was broadly defined as one or more moribund fish testing positive for infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV) by RT-PCR and a second confirmatory test (IFAT, culture or genotype sequence). Spatio-temporal and cage-level risks were explored using logistic regression and survival analysis. Non-spatial risk factors associated with ISA, or shortened survival time to disease, included increased predation, trucking company choice for smolt transfers, a finely-sedimented benthic substrate, and smaller average size of smolts at stocking. Univariable analysis identified the time-dependent spatial factor 'adjacency to newly infected cages' to be predictive of new infection in neighbouring cages 11-12 weeks later. However, none of the spatial factors, or their lags retained relevance in multiple-variable models. The results suggest a diffuse distribution of virus exposure throughout infected sites, with host-susceptibility factors probably influencing disease manifestation in individual cages. The narrow focus of the current study may limit application of the findings to other sites and year-classes. However, these data support the relevance of husbandry efforts to optimize fish health in regions affected by ISAV.

  18. Spatial distribution of putative growth factors in the guinea pig placenta and the effects of these factors, plasma, and bile on the growth and chemotaxis of Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Burrough, E R; Wu, Z; Sahin, O; Zhang, Q; Yaeger, M J

    2012-05-01

    The pregnant guinea pig is an effective model for studying abortifacient Campylobacter spp, and previous experiments have demonstrated that C. jejuni IA3902 has a marked predilection for the subplacenta while sparing the placental disc in this species. In the study described here, the growth and chemotaxis of IA3902 and a reference strain (NCTC 11168) are compared in the presence of subplacental and placental factors, as well as bile and plasma, from pregnant and nonpregnant guinea pigs. Both strains grew better in subplacental versus placental disc tissue extracts at 24 hours; however, only IA3902 maintained this enhancement at 48 hours. Histochemistry and lectin histochemistry were used to localize mucin, iron, and l-fucose within the placental unit. Mucin was most abundant in subplacental lacunae, the junctional zone, and visceral yolk sac placenta, while iron was most abundant in the placental disc, and L-fucose-containing surface glycans were limited to the visceral yolk sac placenta. These 3 individual factors, along with progesterone and estradiol, were evaluated for effects on growth and chemotaxis of C. jejuni. Mucin, iron, and L-fucose were growth promoting, while l-fucose was also chemoattractive for both strains. Progesterone, estradiol, and pregnant guinea pig plasma did not affect growth or chemotaxis, and no difference was observed when bile from pregnant and nonpregnant animals was compared. These findings demonstrate the presence of specific factors within the guinea pig placental unit that drive chemotaxis and enhance growth of C. jejuni, shedding light on potential mechanisms underlying the fetoplacental tropism observed with this strain.

  19. Factors Influencing the CNS Distribution of a Novel MEK-1/2 Inhibitor: Implications for Combination Therapy for Melanoma Brain Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Vaidhyanathan, Shruthi; Mittapalli, Rajendar K.; Sarkaria, Jann N.

    2014-01-01

    Brain metastases are a major cause of mortality in patients with advanced melanoma. Adequate brain distribution of targeted agents for melanoma will be critical for treatment success. Recently, improvement in overall survival led to US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of the v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B (BRAF) inhibitors, vemurafenib and dabrafenib, and the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase-1 (MEK)-1/2 inhibitor, trametinib. However, brain metastases and emergence of resistance remain a significant problem. MEK-1/2 is downstream of BRAF in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway, making it an attractive target to combat resistance. The recently approved combination of dabrafenib and trametinib has shown improvement in progression-free survival; however, adequate brain distribution of both compounds is required to effectively treat brain metastases. In previous studies, we found limited brain distribution of dabrafenib. The purpose of the current study was to investigate factors influencing the brain distribution of trametinib. In vitro studies indicated that trametinib is a substrate for both P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and Bcrp, efflux transporters found at the blood-brain barrier. In vivo studies in transgenic mouse models confirmed that P-gp plays an important role in restricting brain distribution of trametinib. The brain-to-plasma partition coefficient (AUCbrain/AUCplasma) was approximately 5-fold higher in Mdr1a/b(−/−) (P-gp knockout) and Mdr1a/b(−/−)Bcrp1(−/−) (triple knockout) mice when compared with wild-type and Bcrp1(−/−) (Bcrp knockout) mice. The brain distribution of trametinib was similar between the wild-type and Bcrp knockout mice. These results show that P-gp plays an important role in limiting brain distribution of trametinib and may have important implications for use of trametinib as single agent or in combination therapy for treatment of melanoma brain metastases. PMID:24875464

  20. Applying of Factor Analyses for Determination of Trace Elements Distribution in Water from River Vardar and Its Tributaries, Macedonia/Greece

    PubMed Central

    Popov, Stanko Ilić; Stafilov, Trajče; Šajn, Robert; Tănăselia, Claudiu; Bačeva, Katerina

    2014-01-01

    A systematic study was carried out to investigate the distribution of fifty-six elements in the water samples from river Vardar (Republic of Macedonia and Greece) and its major tributaries. The samples were collected from 27 sampling sites. Analyses were performed by mass spectrometry with inductively coupled plasma (ICP-MS) and atomic emission spectrometry with inductively coupled plasma (ICP-AES). Cluster and R mode factor analysis (FA) was used to identify and characterise element associations and four associations of elements were determined by the method of multivariate statistics. Three factors represent the associations of elements that occur in the river water naturally while Factor 3 represents an anthropogenic association of the elements (Cd, Ga, In, Pb, Re, Tl, Cu, and Zn) introduced in the river waters from the waste waters from the mining and metallurgical activities in the country. PMID:24587756

  1. von Willebrand Factor-Rich Platelet Thrombi in the Liver Cause Sinusoidal Obstruction Syndrome following Oxaliplatin-Based Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Nishigori, Naoto; Matsumoto, Masanori; Koyama, Fumikazu; Hayakawa, Masaki; Hatakeyayama, Kinta; Ko, Saiho; Fujimura, Yoshihiro; Nakajima, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy is widely used to treat advanced colorectal cancer (CRC). Sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS) due to oxaliplatin is a serious type of chemotherapy-associated liver injury (CALI) in CRC patients. SOS is thought to be caused by the sinusoidal endothelial cell damage, which results in the release of unusually-large von Willebrand factor multimers (UL-VWFMs) from endothelial cells. To investigate the pathophysiology of CALI after oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy, we analyzed plasma concentration of von Willebrand factor (VWF) and the distribution of VWFMs in CRC patients. Twenty-three patients with advanced CRC who received oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy with (n = 6) and without (n = 17) bevacizumab were analyzed. CALI (n = 6) and splenomegaly (n = 9) were found only in patients who did not treated with bevacizumab. Plasma VWF antigen (VWF:Ag) and serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels increased after chemotherapy only in patients without bevacizumab. VWFM analysis in patients who did not receive bevacizumab showed the presence of UL-VWFMs and absence of high molecular weight VWFMs during chemotherapy, especially in those with CALI. In addition, plasma VWF:Ag and AST levels increased after chemotherapy in patients with splenomegaly (n = 9), but not in patients without splenomegaly (n = 14). Histological findings in the liver tissue of patients who did not receive bevacizumab included sinusoidal dilatation and microthrombi in the sinusoids. Many microthrombi were positive for both anti-IIb/IIIa and anti-VWF antibodies. Plasma UL-VWFM levels might be increased by damage to endothelial cells as a result of oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy. Bevacizumab could prevent CALI and splenomegaly through inhibition of VWF-rich platelet thrombus formation. PMID:26580395

  2. Kinetic and thermodynamic factors controlling the distribution of SO 32- and Na + in calcites and selected aragonites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busenberg, Eurybiades; Niel Plummer, L.

    1985-03-01

    Significant amounts of SO 42-, Na +, and OH - are incorporated in marine biogenic calcites. Biogenic high Mg-calcites average about 1 mole percent SO 42-. Aragonites and most biogenic low Mg-calcites contain significant amounts of Na +, but very low concentrations of SO 42-. The SO 42- content of non-biogenic calcites and aragonites investigated was below 100 ppm. The presence of Na + and SO 42- increases the unit cell size of calcites. The solid-solutions show a solubility minimum at about 0.5 mole percent SO 42- beyond which the solubility rapidly increases. The solubility product of calcites containing 3 mole percent SO 42- is the same as that of aragonite. Na + appears to have very little effect on the solubility product of calcites. The amounts of Na + and SO 42- incorporated in calcites vary as a function of the rate of crystal growth. The variation of the distribution coefficient ( D) of SO 42- in calcite at 25.0°C and 0.50 molal NaCl is described by the equation D = k 0 + k 1R where k 0 and k 1 are constants equal to 6.16 × 10 -6 and 3.941 × 10 -6, respectively, and R is the rate of crystal growth of calcite in mg·min -1·g -1 of seed. The data on Na + are consistent with the hypothesis that a significant amount of Na + occupies interstitial positions in the calcite structure. The distribution of Na + follows a Freundlich isotherm and not the Berthelot-Nernst distribution law. The numerical value of the Na + distribution coefficient in calcite is probably dependent on the number of defects in the calcite structure. The Na + contents of calcites are not very accurate indicators of environmental salinities.

  3. Kinetic and thermodynamic factors controlling the distribution of SO32- and Na+ in calcites and selected aragonites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Busenberg, E.; Niel, Plummer L.

    1985-01-01

    Significant amounts of SO42-, Na+, and OH- are incorporated in marine biogenic calcites. Biogenic high Mg-calcites average about 1 mole percent SO42-. Aragonites and most biogenic low Mg-calcites contain significant amounts of Na+, but very low concentrations of SO42-. The SO42- content of non-biogenic calcites and aragonites investigated was below 100 ppm. The presence of Na+ and SO42- increases the unit cell size of calcites. The solid-solutions show a solubility minimum at about 0.5 mole percent SO42- beyond which the solubility rapidly increases. The solubility product of calcites containing 3 mole percent SO42- is the same as that of aragonite. Na+ appears to have very little effect on the solubility product of calcites. The amounts of Na+ and SO42- incorporated in calcites vary as a function of the rate of crystal growth. The variation of the distribution coefficient (D) of SO42- in calcite at 25.0??C and 0.50 molal NaCl is described by the equation D = k0 + k1R where k0 and k1 are constants equal to 6.16 ?? 10-6 and 3.941 ?? 10-6, respectively, and R is the rate of crystal growth of calcite in mg??min-1??g-1 of seed. The data on Na+ are consistent with the hypothesis that a significant amount of Na+ occupies interstitial positions in the calcite structure. The distribution of Na+ follows a Freundlich isotherm and not the Berthelot-Nernst distribution law. The numerical value of the Na+ distribution coefficient in calcite is probably dependent on the number of defects in the calcite structure. The Na+ contents of calcites are not very accurate indicators of environmental salinities. ?? 1985.

  4. Distribution of short chain chlorinated paraffins in marine sediments of the East China Sea: influencing factors, transport and implications.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Lixi; Zhao, Zongshan; Li, Huijuan; Wang, Thanh; Liu, Qian; Xiao, Ke; Du, Yuguo; Wang, Yawei; Jiang, Guibin

    2012-09-18

    Short chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs) are high production volume chemicals in China and found to be widely present in the environment. In this study, fifty-one surface sediments and two sediment cores were collected from the East China Sea to study their occurrence, distribution patterns and potential transport in the marginal sea. SCCPs were found in all surface sediments and ranged from 5.8 to 64.8 ng/g (dry weight, d.w.) with an average value of 25.9 ng/g d.w. A general decreasing trend with distance from the coast was observed, but the highest value was found in a distal mud area far away from the land. The C10 homologue was the most predominant carbon chain group, followed by C11, C12, and C13 homologue groups. Significant linear relationship was found between total organic carbon (TOC) and total SCCP concentrations (R(2) = 0.51, p < 0.05). Spatial distributions and correlation analysis indicated that TOC, riverine input, ocean current, and atmospheric deposition played an important role in controlling SCCP accumulation in marine sediments. Vertical profiles of sediment cores showed that SCCP concentrations decreased from surface to the depth of 36 cm, and then slightly increased again with depth, which showed a significant positive correlation with TOC and chlorine contents (Cl%). The results suggest that SCCPs are being regionally or globally distributed by long-range atmospheric or ocean current transport.

  5. Characteristics of trace metals in traffic-derived particles in Hsuehshan Tunnel, Taiwan: size distribution, fingerprinting metal ratio, and emission factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y.-C.; Tsai, C.-J.; Wu, Y.-C.; Zhang, R.; Chi, K.-H.; Huang, Y.-T.; Lin, S.-H.; Hsu, S.-C.

    2014-05-01

    Traffic emissions are a significant source of airborne particulate matter (PM) in ambient environments. These emissions contain high abundance of toxic metals and thus pose adverse effects on human health. Size-fractionated aerosol samples were collected from May to September 2013 by using micro-orifice uniform deposited impactor (MOUDI). Sample collection was conducted simultaneously at the inlet and outlet sites of Hsuehshan Tunnel in northern Taiwan, which is the second longest freeway tunnel (12.9 km) in Asia. Such endeavor aims to characterize the chemical constituents, size distributions, and fingerprinting ratios, as well as the emission factors of particulate metals emitted by vehicle fleets. A total of 36 metals in size-resolved aerosols were determined through inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Three major groups, namely, tailpipe emissions (Zn, Pb, and V), wear debris (Cu, Cd, Fe, Ga, Mn, Mo, Sb, and Sn), and resuspended dust (Ca, Mg, K, and Rb), of airborne PM metals were categorized on the basis of the results of enrichment factor, correlation matrix, and principal component analysis. Size distributions of wear-originated metals resembled the pattern of crustal elements, which were predominated by super-micron particulates (PM1-10). By contrast, tailpipe exhaust elements such as Zn, Pb, and V were distributed mainly in submicron particles. By employing Cu as a tracer of wear abrasion, several inter-metal ratios, including Fe/Cu (14), Ba/Cu (1.05), Sb/Cu (0.16), Sn/Cu (0.10), and Ga/Cu (0.03), served as fingerprints for wear debris. Emission factor of PM10 mass was estimated to be 7.7 mg vkm-1. The metal emissions were mostly predominated in super-micron particles (PM1-10). Finally, factors that possibly affect particulate metal emissions inside Hsuehshan Tunnel are discussed.

  6. The large-scale distribution of ammonia oxidizers in paddy soils is driven by soil pH, geographic distance, and climatic factors

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hang-Wei; Zhang, Li-Mei; Yuan, Chao-Lei; Zheng, Yong; Wang, Jun-Tao; Chen, Deli; He, Ji-Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Paddy soils distribute widely from temperate to tropical regions, and are characterized by intensive nitrogen fertilization practices in China. Mounting evidence has confirmed the functional importance of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB) in soil nitrification, but little is known about their biogeographic distribution patterns in paddy ecosystems. Here, we used barcoded pyrosequencing to characterize the effects of climatic, geochemical and spatial factors on the distribution of ammonia oxidizers from 11 representative rice-growing regions (75–1945 km apart) of China. Potential nitrification rates varied greatly by more than three orders of magnitude, and were significantly correlated with the abundances of AOA and AOB. The community composition of ammonia oxidizer was affected by multiple factors, but changes in relative abundances of the major lineages could be best predicted by soil pH. The alpha diversity of AOA and AOB displayed contrasting trends over the gradients of latitude and atmospheric temperature, indicating a possible niche separation between AOA and AOB along the latitude. The Bray–Curtis dissimilarities in ammonia-oxidizing community structure significantly increased with increasing geographical distance, indicating that more geographically distant paddy fields tend to harbor more dissimilar ammonia oxidizers. Variation partitioning analysis revealed that spatial, geochemical and climatic factors could jointly explain majority of the data variation, and were important drivers defining the ecological niches of AOA and AOB. Our findings suggest that both AOA and AOB are of functional importance in paddy soil nitrification, and ammonia oxidizers in paddy ecosystems exhibit large-scale biogeographic patterns shaped by soil pH, geographic distance, and climatic factors. PMID:26388866

  7. Weed species composition and distribution pattern in the maize crop under the influence of edaphic factors and farming practices: A case study from Mardan, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Zeeshan; Khan, Shujaul Mulk; Abd Allah, Elsayed Fathi; Alqarawi, Abdulaziz Abdullah; Hashem, Abeer

    2016-11-01

    Weeds are unwanted plant species growing in ordinary environment. In nature there are a total of 8000 weed species out of which 250 are important for agriculture world. The present study was carried out on weed species composition and distribution pattern with special reference to edaphic factor and farming practices in maize crop of District Mardan during the months of August and September, 2014. Quadrates methods were used to assess weed species distribution in relation to edaphic factor and farming practices. Phytosociological attributes such as frequency, relative frequency, density, relative density and Importance Values were measured by placing 9 quadrates (1 × 1 m(2)) randomly in each field. Initial results showed that the study area has 29 diverse weed species belonging to 27 genera and 15 families distributed in 585 quadrats. Presence and absence data sheet of 29 weed species and 65 fields were analyzed through PC-ORD version 5. Cluster and Two Way Cluster Analyses initiated four different weed communities with significant indicator species and with respect to underlying environmental variables using data attribute plots. Canonical Correspondence Analyses (CCA) of CANOCO software version 4.5 was used to assess the environmental gradients of weed species. It is concluded that among all the edaphic factors the strongest variables were higher concentration of potassium, organic matter and sandy nature of soil. CCA plots of both weed species and sampled fields based on questionnaire data concluded the farming practices such as application of fertilizers, irrigation and chemical spray were the main factors in determination of weed communities.

  8. The effects of collapsing factors on F-actin content and microtubule distribution of Helisoma growth cones.

    PubMed

    Torreano, Paul J; Waterman-Storer, Clare M; Cohan, Christopher S

    2005-03-01

    Growth cone collapsing factors induce growth cone collapse or repulsive growth cone turning by interacting with membrane receptors that induce alterations in the growth cone cytoskeleton. A common change induced by collapsing factors in the cytoskeleton of the peripheral domain, the thin lamellopodial area of growth cones, is a decline in the number of radially aligned F-actin bundles that form the core of filopodia. The present study examined whether ML-7, a myosin light chain kinase inhibitor, serotonin, a neurotransmitter and TPA, an activator of protein kinase C, which induce growth cone collapse of Helisoma growth cones, depolymerized or debundled F-actin. We report that these collapsing factors had different effects. ML-7 induced F-actin reorganization consistent with debundling whereas serotonin and TPA predominately depolymerized and possibly debundled F-actin. Additionally, these collapsing factors induced the formation of a dense actin-ring around the central domain, the thicker proximal area of growth cones [Zhou and Cohan, 2001: J. Cell Biol. 153:1071-1083]. The formation of the actin-ring occurred subsequent to the loss of actin bundles. The ML-7-induced actin-ring was found to inhibit microtubule extension into the P-domain. Thus, ML-7, serotonin, and TPA induce growth cone collapse associated with a decline in radially aligned F-actin bundles through at least two mechanisms involving debundling of actin filaments and/or actin depolymerization.

  9. Sequence correction of random coil chemical shifts: correlation between neighbor correction factors and changes in the Ramachandran distribution.

    PubMed

    Kjaergaard, Magnus; Poulsen, Flemming M

    2011-06-01

    Random coil chemical shifts are necessary for secondary chemical shift analysis, which is the main NMR method for identification of secondary structure in proteins. One of the largest challenges in the determination of random coil chemical shifts is accounting for the effect of neighboring residues. The contributions from the neighboring residues are typically removed by using neighbor correction factors determined based on each residue's effect on glycine chemical shifts. Due to its unusual conformational freedom, glycine may be particularly unrepresentative for the remaining residue types. In this study, we use random coil peptides containing glutamine instead of glycine to determine the random coil chemical shifts and the neighbor correction factors. The resulting correction factors correlate to changes in the populations of the major wells in the Ramachandran plot, which demonstrates that changes in the conformational ensemble are an important source of neighbor effects in disordered proteins. Glutamine derived random coil chemical shifts and correction factors modestly improve our ability to predict (13)C chemical shifts of intrinsically disordered proteins compared to existing datasets, and may thus improve the identification of small populations of transient structure in disordered proteins.

  10. Factors involved in the distribution pattern of ciliates in the water column of a transparent alpine lake

    PubMed Central

    SONNTAG, BETTINA; SUMMERER, MONIKA; SOMMARUGA, RUBEN

    2011-01-01

    The recurrent depth preference of three ciliate species (two prostomatids and one haptorid) in a transparent alpine lake indicates the existence of niche partitioning among them involving potential factors such as avoidance of high ultraviolet radiation levels and zooplankton predation, as well as competition for food resources. PMID:21984852

  11. Neighborhood History as a Factor Shaping Syringe Distribution Networks Among Drug Users at a U.S. Syringe Exchange1

    PubMed Central

    Braine, Naomi; Acker, Caroline; Goldblatt, Cullen; Yi, Huso; Friedman, Samuel; DesJarlais, Don C.

    2008-01-01

    Throughout the US, high-visibility drug markets are concentrated in neighborhoods with few economic opportunities, while drug buyers/users are widely dispersed. A study of Pittsburgh Syringe Exchange participants provides data on travel between and network linkages across neighborhoods with different levels of drug activity. There are distinct racial patterns to syringe distribution activity within networks and across neighborhoods. Pittsburgh’s history suggests these patterns emerge from historical patterns of social and economic development. Study data demonstrate the ability of IDUs to form long term social ties across racial and geographic boundaries and use them to reduce the risk of HIV transmission. PMID:19578475

  12. The oxidative modification of von Willebrand factor is associated with thrombotic angiopathies in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Oggianu, Laura; Lancellotti, Stefano; Pitocco, Dario; Zaccardi, Francesco; Rizzo, Paola; Martini, Francesca; Ghirlanda, Giovanni; De Cristofaro, Raimondo

    2013-01-01

    The thrombogenic activity of Von Willebrand factor (VWF) is proportional to its molecular size and inversely related to its proteolysis by ADAMTS-13. Oxidation of VWF severely impairs its proteolysis by the metalloprotease. This study was aimed at assessing in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes whether protein carbonyls, marker of oxidative stress, are associated with both the level and oxidation status of VWF as well as with micro- and macroangiopathic complications. Eighty-three diabetic patients (41 type 1 and 42 type 2 diabetic subjects) and their respective eighty-three healthy controls were studied after verifying the availability, through institutional databases, of clinical biochemistry records spanning at least 3 years. VWF and protein carbonyls were measured by immunoassays, whereas VWF multimers were studied by SDS-agarose gel electrophoresis. Type 2 diabetic subjects had higher levels of VWF antigen (VWF:ag), VWF activity (VWF:act) and plasma proteins' carbonyls compared to both their controls and type 1 diabetic subjects. Moreover, high molecular weight VWF multimers and specific VWF-bound carbonyls were significantly increased in subjects with micro- and macro-angiopathic complications. In both type 1 and type 2 diabetic subjects, ADAMTS-13 activity was in the normal range. In a multivariable analysis, only VWF-bound carbonyls were significantly associated with any form of thrombotic angiopathy in the entire group of T1- and T2 diabetic patients. These data provide first evidence that not only high VWF levels but also its oxidation status and the presence of high molecular weight VWF multimers that are not observed in SDS-agarose gel electrophoresis of normal subjects are associated with thrombotic angiopathies in diabetes mellitus. These findings may help identify diabetic patients particularly at risk for these complications and elucidate a new pathophysiological mechanism of thrombotic angiopathies in this clinical setting.

  13. The Oxidative Modification of Von Willebrand Factor Is Associated with Thrombotic Angiopathies in Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Pitocco, Dario; Zaccardi, Francesco; Rizzo, Paola; Martini, Francesca; Ghirlanda, Giovanni; De Cristofaro, Raimondo

    2013-01-01

    The thrombogenic activity of Von Willebrand factor (VWF) is proportional to its molecular size and inversely related to its proteolysis by ADAMTS-13. Oxidation of VWF severely impairs its proteolysis by the metalloprotease. This study was aimed at assessing in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes whether protein carbonyls, marker of oxidative stress, are associated with both the level and oxidation status of VWF as well as with micro- and macroangiopathic complications. Eighty-three diabetic patients (41 type 1 and 42 type 2 diabetic subjects) and their respective eighty-three healthy controls were studied after verifying the availability, through institutional databases, of clinical biochemistry records spanning at least 3 years. VWF and protein carbonyls were measured by immunoassays, whereas VWF multimers were studied by SDS-agarose gel electrophoresis. Type 2 diabetic subjects had higher levels of VWF antigen (VWF:ag), VWF activity (VWF:act) and plasma proteins’ carbonyls compared to both their controls and type 1 diabetic subjects. Moreover, high molecular weight VWF multimers and specific VWF-bound carbonyls were significantly increased in subjects with micro- and macro-angiopathic complications. In both type 1 and type 2 diabetic subjects, ADAMTS-13 activity was in the normal range. In a multivariable analysis, only VWF-bound carbonyls were significantly associated with any form of thrombotic angiopathy in the entire group of T1- and T2 diabetic patients. These data provide first evidence that not only high VWF levels but also its oxidation status and the presence of high molecular weight VWF multimers that are not observed in SDS-agarose gel electrophoresis of normal subjects are associated with thrombotic angiopathies in diabetes mellitus. These findings may help identify diabetic patients particularly at risk for these complications and elucidate a new pathophysiological mechanism of thrombotic angiopathies in this clinical setting. PMID:23383177

  14. Plasmatic ADAMTS-13 metalloprotease and von Willebrand factor in children with cyanotic congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Soares, R.P.S.; Bydlowski, S.P.; Nascimento, N.M.; Thomaz, A.M.; Bastos, E.N.M.; Lopes, A.A.

    2013-01-01

    Changes in plasma von Willebrand factor concentration (VWF:Ag) and ADAMTS-13 activity (the metalloprotease that cleaves VWF physiologically) have been reported in several cardiovascular disorders with prognostic implications. We therefore determined the level of these proteins in the plasma of children with cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD) undergoing surgical treatment. Forty-eight children were enrolled (age 0.83 to 7.58 years). Measurements were performed at baseline and 48 h after surgery. ELISA, collagen-binding assays and Western blotting were used to estimate antigenic and biological activities, and proteolysis of VWF multimers. Preoperatively, VWF:Ag and ADAMTS-13 activity were decreased (65 and 71% of normal levels considered as 113 (105-129) U/dL and 91 ± 24% respectively, P < 0.003) and correlated (r = 0.39, P = 0.0064). High molecular weight VWF multimers were not related, suggesting an interaction of VWF with cell membranes, followed by proteolytic cleavage. A low preoperative ADAMTS-13 activity, a longer activated partial thromboplastin time and the need for cardiopulmonary bypass correlated with postoperative bleeding (P < 0.05). Postoperatively, ADAMTS-13 activity increased but less extensively than VWF:Ag (respectively, 2.23 and 2.83 times baseline, P < 0.0001), resulting in an increased VWF:Ag/ADAMTS-13 activity ratio (1.20 to 1.54, respectively, pre- and postoperative median values, P = 0.0029). ADAMTS-13 consumption was further confirmed by decreased ADAMTS-13 antigenic concentration (0.91 ± 0.30 to 0.70 ± 0.25 µg/mL, P < 0.0001) and persistent proteolysis of VWF multimers. We conclude that, in pediatric CCHD, changes in circulating ADAMTS-13 suggest enzyme consumption, associated with abnormal structure and function of VWF. PMID:23558858

  15. Distribution and structure of the upper sublittoral macrobenthic communities of Tróia sand beaches (Setúbal, Portugal) and their relationship with environmental factors.

    PubMed

    Vale, Maria; Cabral, Henrique; Andrade, Francisco

    2010-04-01

    The present study dealt with the spatial and temporal variability of the distribution of the upper sublittoral benthic macrofauna of the Tróia peninsula sand beaches and its relationship with abiotic environmental factors. The existence of a relationship between the data set of macrobenthic species distribution and community structure in the Sado estuary (432 individual samples) and the environmental factors in analysis was investigated. Morpho-sedimentary data analysis revealed an environmental gradient, from the marine margin (exposed marine environment) to the estuarine margin (sheltered estuarine environment). Benthic macrofauna analysis showed a gradient of increasing number of individuals, species richness and diversity from the marine margin (Exposed) to the estuarine margin (Sheltered). Canonical Correspondence Analysis showed the dominant patterns in the community structure to be explained by the environmental factors considered, the most important, of which in influencing the spatial and temporal pattern, being beach slope, organic matter and calcium carbonate contents. The structure of the sandy beach communities studied showed a clear dominance of the spatial patterns over the seasonal ones. Four assemblages were defined-(1) an assemblage dominated by Angulus tenuis, on the marine margin of the peninsula; (2) an assemblage dominated by Euclymene sp. and Apseudes latreillei, on the sea-estuary transition area and related to the presence of a Zostera spp. meadow; (3) an assemblage dominated by Glycera sp. and Scoloplos armiger, on the sea-estuary transition area; (4) an assemblage dominated by Notomastus latericeus, Nassarius reticulatus and Cyathura carinata, on the estuarine margin.

  16. Influence of land use and meteorological factors on the spatial distribution of Toxocara canis and Toxocara cati eggs in soil in urban areas.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang; Wang, Hongbin; Li, Jianxin; Qin, Hongyu; Xiao, Jianhua

    2017-01-15

    Soil which has been contaminated by Toxocara spp. eggs is considered as one of the main infection sources of Toxocariasis in animals and humans. The present study conducted a detailed investigation into the spatial patterns of Toxocara canis (T. canis) and Toxocara cati (T. cati) eggs in soil in urban area of northeastern Mainland China, and assessed the inter-relationships between meteorological factors, land use and the distribution of the Toxocara spp. eggs. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used for the determination of T. canis and T. cati eggs contamination in soil samples. Between April 2014 and May 2015, 9420 soil samples were subjected to PCR examination and 7027 sheep (74.6%) were determined to be positive for T. canis and T. cati eggs. Subsequently, we evaluated the effect of land use, and meteorological factors on the spatial distribution of T. canis and T. cati eggs based on a maximum entropy model. Jackknife analysis revealed that the area of residential land, wood and grass land and precipitation may influence the occurrence of T. canis and T. cati eggs in soil. Our findings indicate that land use and meteorological factors may be important variables affecting transmission of Toxocariasis and should be taken into account in the development of future surveillance programmes for Toxocariasis.

  17. Evaluation of processing factors for selected organic contaminants during virgin olive oil production: Distribution of BTEXS during olives processing.

    PubMed

    López-Blanco, Rafael; Gilbert-López, Bienvenida; Rojas-Jiménez, Rubén; Robles-Molina, José; Ramos-Martos, Natividad; García-Reyes, Juan F; Molina-Díaz, Antonio

    2016-05-15

    The presence of BTEXS (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes and styrene) in virgin olive oils can be attributed to environmental contamination, but also to biological processes during oil lipogenesis (styrene). In this work, the processing factor of BTEXS from olives to olive oil during its production was evaluated at lab-scale with an Abencor system. Benzene showed the lowest processing factor (15%), whereas toluene and xylenes showed an intermediate behavior (with 40-60% efficiency), and ethylbenzene and styrene were completely transferred (100%). In addition, an attempt to examine the contribution of potential sources to olives contamination with BTEXS was carried out for the first time. Two types of olives samples were classified according to their proximity to the contamination source (road). Although higher levels of BTEXS were found in samples close to roads, the concentrations were relatively low and do not constitute a major contribution to BTEXS usually detected in olive oil.

  18. The longitudinal and transverse distributions of the pion wave function from the present experimental data on the pion-photon transition form factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Tao; Wu, Xing-Gang; Huang, Tao

    2016-07-01

    The low-energy and high-energy behavior of the pion-photon transition form factor F_{π γ }(Q^2) are sensitive to the transverse and longitudinal distributions of the pion wave function, respectively. A careful study of F_{π γ }(Q^2) shall thus provide helpful constraints on the properties of the pion wave function. In this paper, we present a combined analysis of the data on F_{π γ }(Q^2) reported by the CELLO, the CLEO, the BABAR, and the BELLE Collaborations. It is performed by using the method of least squares. By using the combined measurements of the BELLE and CLEO Collaborations, the pion wave function longitudinal and transverse behavior can be fixed to a certain degree, i.e. we obtain β in [0.691,0.757] GeV and B in [0.00,0.235] for P_{χ ^2} ≥ 90 %, where β and B are two parameters of a convenient pion wave function model. It is noted that the distribution amplitude of such a pion wave function can mimic various longitudinal behaviors, as suggested in the literature under a proper choice of parameters. We observe that the CELLO, CLEO, and BELLE data are consistent with each other, all of which prefer the asymptotic-like distribution amplitude; while the BABAR data prefers a more broad distribution amplitude, such as the CZ-like one.

  19. Topographical Distribution of Morphological Changes in a Partial Model of Parkinson's Disease--Effects of Nanoencapsulated Neurotrophic Factors Administration.

    PubMed

    Requejo, C; Ruiz-Ortega, J A; Bengoetxea, H; Garcia-Blanco, A; Herrán, E; Aristieta, A; Igartua, M; Ugedo, L; Pedraz, J L; Hernández, R M; Lafuente, J V

    2015-10-01

    Administration of various neurotrophic factors is a promising strategy against Parkinson's disease (PD). An intrastriatal infusion of 6-hydroxidopamine (6-OHDA) in rats is a suitable model to study PD. This work aims to describe stereological parameters regarding rostro-caudal gradient, in order to characterize the model and verify its suitability for elucidating the benefits of therapeutic strategies. Administration of 6-OHDA induced a reduction in tyrosine hidroxylase (TH) reactivity in the dorsolateral part of the striatum, being higher in the caudal section than in the rostral one. Loss of TH-positive neurons and axodendritic network was highly significant in the external third of substantia nigra (e-SN) in the 6-OHDA group versus the saline one. After the administration of nanospheres loaded with neurotrophic factors (NTF: vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) + glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF)), parkinsonized rats showed more TH-positive fibers than those of control groups; this recovery taking place chiefly in the rostral sections. Neuronal density and axodendritic network in e-SN was more significant than in the entire SN; the topographical analysis showed that the highest difference between NTF versus control group was attained in the middle section. A high number of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-positive cells were found in sub- and periventricular areas in the group receiving NTF, where most of them co-expressed doublecortin. Measurements on the e-SN achieved more specific and significant results than in the entire SN. This difference in rostro-caudal gradients underpins the usefulness of a topological approach to the assessment of the lesion and therapeutic strategies. Findings confirmed the neurorestorative, neurogenic, and synergistic effects of VEGF+GDNF administration.

  20. The effect of signal variability on the histograms of anthropomorphic channel outputs: factors resulting in non-normally distributed data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elshahaby, Fatma E. A.; Ghaly, Michael; Jha, Abhinav K.; Frey, Eric C.

    2015-03-01

    Model Observers are widely used in medical imaging for the optimization and evaluation of instrumentation, acquisition parameters and image reconstruction and processing methods. The channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) is a commonly used model observer in nuclear medicine and has seen increasing use in other modalities. An anthropmorphic CHO consists of a set of channels that model some aspects of the human visual system and the Hotelling Observer, which is the optimal linear discriminant. The optimality of the CHO is based on the assumption that the channel outputs for data with and without the signal present have a multivariate normal distribution with equal class covariance matrices. The channel outputs result from the dot product of channel templates with input images and are thus the sum of a large number of random variables. The central limit theorem is thus often used to justify the assumption that the channel outputs are normally distributed. In this work, we aim to examine this assumption for realistically simulated nuclear medicine images when various types of signal variability are present.

  1. Factors associated with distribution of Anopheles aquasalis and Anopheles oswaldoi (Diptera: Culicidae) in a malarious area, northeastern Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Grillet, M E

    2000-03-01

    Spatial and temporal abundance patterns of anopheline larvae and their relationships with wetland conditions were studied in an endemic malaria area in northeastern Venezuela, where Anopheles aquasalis Curry is the main vector. Larvae were sampled over a 2-yr period in 7 wetland types (brackish and freshwater herbaceous swamps, mangrove swamps, freshwater ponds, clear-cut marsh forests, small irrigation canals, and swamp forests), covering 3 environmental gradients (salinity, aquatic vegetation, and habitat permanence). Twelve variable were quantified to describe each habitat. Two species of anophelines were collected. An. aquasalis was the species with the widest distribution, and its highest abundance was in the seasonal brackish mangrove habitat during the rainy season. An. oswaldoi Peryassu was rarely encountered, but was mainly associated with the dry season and with the permanent fresh water wetlands (such as ponds). Principal components and correlation analyses revealed that the physicochemical (salinity, dissolved oxygen) variables of the wetland were associated most strongly with the spatial distribution of both species. Variations in salinity were strongly associated with the abundance of An. aquasalis. Both the occurrence and abundance of An. oswaldoi were most closely correlated with dissolved oxygen. Changes in seasonal abundance of both species were associated with rainfall. The relevance of these results to vector control in northern Venezuela is discussed.

  2. Driving factors behind the distribution of dinocyst composition and abundance in surface sediments in a western Mediterranean coastal lagoon: report from a high resolution mapping study.

    PubMed

    Fertouna-Bellakhal, Mouna; Dhib, Amel; Béjaoui, Béchir; Turki, Souad; Aleya, Lotfi

    2014-07-15

    Species composition and abundance of dinocysts in relation to environmental factors were studied at 123 stations of surface sediment in Bizerte Lagoon. Forty-eight dinocyst types were identified, mainly dominated by Brigantidinium simplex, Votadinum spinosum, Alexandrium pseudogonyaulax, Alexandrium catenella, and Lingulodinum machaerophorum along with many round brown cysts and spiny round brown cysts. Cysts ranged from 1276 to 20126 cysts g(-1)dry weight sediment. Significant differences in cyst distribution pattern were recorded among the zones, with a higher cyst abundance occurring in the lagoon's inner areas. Redundancy analyses showed two distinct associations of dinocysts according to location and environmental variables. Ballast water discharges are potential introducers of non-indigenous species, especially harmful ones such as A. catenella and Polysphaeridium zoharyi, with currents playing a pivotal role in cyst distribution. Findings concerning harmful cyst species indicate potential seedbeds for initiation of future blooms and outbreaks of potentially toxic species in the lagoon.

  3. Comparison of interatomic potentials of water via structure factors reconstructed from simulated partial radial distribution functions: a reverse Monte Carlo based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinczinger, Zsuzsanna; Jóvári, Pál; Pusztai, László

    2017-01-01

    Neutron- and x-ray weighted total structure factors of liquid water have been calculated on the basis of the intermolecular parts of partial radial distribution functions resulting from various computer simulations. The approach includes reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) modelling of these partials, using realistic flexible molecules, and the calculation of experimental diffraction data, including the intramolecular contributions, from the RMC particle configurations. The procedure has been applied to ten sets of intermolecular partial radial distribution functions obtained from various computer simulations, including one set from an ab initio molecular dynamics, of water. It is found that modern polarizable water potentials, such as SWM4-DP and BK3 are the most successful in reproducing measured diffraction data.

  4. Bioaccumulation of short chain chlorinated paraffins in a typical freshwater food web contaminated by e-waste in south china: Bioaccumulation factors, tissue distribution, and trophic transfer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Runxia; Luo, Xiaojun; Tang, Bin; Chen, Laiguo; Liu, Yu; Mai, Bixian

    2017-03-01

    Short chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs) are under review for inclusion into the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants. However, limited information is available on their bioaccumulation and biomagnification in ecosystems, which is hindering evaluation of their ecological and health risks. In the present study, wild aquatic organisms (fish and invertebrates), water, and sediment collected from an enclosed freshwater pond contaminated by electronic waste (e-waste) were analyzed to investigate the bioaccumulation, distribution, and trophic transfer of SCCPs in the aquatic ecosystem. SCCPs were detected in all of the investigated aquatic species at concentrations of 1700-95,000 ng/g lipid weight. The calculated bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) varied from 2.46 to 3.49. The relationship between log BAF and the octanol/water partition coefficient (log KOW) for benthopelagic omnivorous fish species followed the empirical model of bioconcentration, indicating that bioconcentration plays an important role in accumulation of SCCPs. In contrast, the relationship for the benthic carnivorous fish and invertebrates was not consistent with the empirical model of bioconcentration, implying that the bioaccumulation of SCCPs in these species could be more influenced by other complex factors (e.g., habitat and feeding habit). Preferential distribution in the liver rather than in other tissues (e.g., muscle, gills, skin, and kidneys) was noted for the SCCP congeners with higher log KOW, and bioaccumulation pathway (i.e. water or sediment) can affect the tissue distribution of SCCP congeners. SCCPs underwent trophic dilution in the aquatic food web, and the trophic magnification factor (TMF) values of SCCP congener groups significantly correlated with their corresponding log KOW values (p < 0.0001). The present study results improved our understanding on the environmental behavior and fate of SCCPs in aquatic ecosystem.

  5. Analysis of the factors that affect the distribution and abundance of three Neobuxbaumia species (Cactaceae) that differ in their degree of rarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruedas, Marcela; Valverde, Teresa; Zavala-Hurtado, José Alejandro

    2006-03-01

    We studied three species of columnar cacti in the genus Neobuxbaumia which differ in their degree of rarity: Neobuxbaumia macrocephala (the rarest), Neobuxbaumia tetetzo (intermediate), and Neobuxbaumia mezcalaensis (the most common). To investigate the ecological factors that limit their distribution and abundance, we surveyed 80 localities within the region of Tehuacan-Cuicatlán, in Central Mexico. At each locality we measured several environmental variables, and the density of the Neobuxbaumia populations present. We used a principal component analysis (PCA) to identify the factors that are associated to the presence/absence of each species. Additionally, we carried out multiple regressions between environmental variables and population density to test whether the variation in these variables was related to changes in abundance. The results show that factors significantly affecting the distribution of these species are mean annual temperature, altitude, rainfall, and soil properties such as texture and organic matter content. N. mezcalaensis reaches maximum population densities of 14,740 plants per ha (average density = 3943 plants per ha) and is associated with localities with relatively abundant rainfall. N. tetetzo shows maximum population densities of 14,060 plants per ha (average = 3070 plants per ha), and is associated with sites located at high latitudes and with high phosphorous content in the soil. The rarest species, N. macrocephala, shows maximum densities of 1180 plants per ha (average = 607 plants per ha) and is associated with localities with high soil calcium content. The distribution of this species is limited to sites with specific values of the environmental variables recorded, conferring it a high habitat specificity which accounts for its rarity.

  6. Prevalence of factor V Leiden and prothrombin G20210A mutation in a large French population selected for nonthrombotic history: geographical and age distribution.

    PubMed

    Mazoyer, Elisabeth; Ripoll, Laurent; Gueguen, René; Tiret, Laurence; Collet, Jean-Philippe; dit Sollier, Claire Bal; Roussi, Jacqueline; Drouet, Ludovic

    2009-10-01

    Among inherited risk factors for venous thrombosis, the most common are the FV-G1691A and FII-G20210A polymorphisms. The FV-G1691A polymorphism is preferentially observed in Europe, with differences between European countries. The FII-G20210A polymorphism is observed all over the world. The study was designed to compare the prevalence of the FV-G1691A and FII-G20210A polymorphisms in a large French population of unrelated individuals with no thrombotic disease history and to determine the age and geographical distributions. Over a period of 18 months, 6154 individuals were included throughout France and FV-G1691A and FII-G20210A polymorphisms were determined. The FV-G1691A prevalence was 3.84% (95% confidence interval 3.35-4.33) and the FII-G20210A prevalence was 3.07% (95% CI 2.63-3.51). A north-east/south-west gradient was observed in the FV-G1691A geographical distribution. No difference was observed in the geographical distribution of FII-G20210A polymorphism nor in the age distribution of the two polymorphisms. The prevalence of the two polymorphisms was similar whatever the blood group (O or non-O). Plasma D-dimers were significantly higher in healthy individuals with FV-G1691A but not in individuals with FII-G20210A. Thirty percent of variation in plasma prothrombin level was explained by environmental factors (serum cholesterol, age, oral contraception, hormonal replacement therapy, body mass index, sex) and genetic factors (FII-G20210A). As expected, individuals with FII-G20210A displayed higher plasma prothrombin level compared with individuals with wild type. However, this was not associated with a modification of the fibrin clot elastic modulus. This study shows a differential distribution of the two polymorphisms among the French territory. These polymorphisms confer a very mild hypercoagulable state as shown by the limited increased in basal D-dimers in mutated FV-G1691A populations and only a trend that does not reach statistical significance for FII

  7. A Framework for Federated Two-Factor Authentication Enabling Cost-Effective Secure Access to Distributed Cyberinfrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Ezell, Matthew A; Rogers, Gary L; Peterson, Gregory D.

    2012-01-01

    As cyber attacks become increasingly sophisticated, the security measures used to mitigate the risks must also increase in sophistication. One time password (OTP) systems provide strong authentication because security credentials are not reusable, thus thwarting credential replay attacks. The credential changes regularly, making brute-force attacks significantly more difficult. In high performance computing, end users may require access to resources housed at several different service provider locations. The ability to share a strong token between multiple computing resources reduces cost and complexity. The National Science Foundation (NSF) Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE) provides access to digital resources, including supercomputers, data resources, and software tools. XSEDE will offer centralized strong authentication for services amongst service providers that leverage their own user databases and security profiles. This work implements a scalable framework built on standards to provide federated secure access to distributed cyberinfrastructure.

  8. Environmental factors associated with spatial and temporal distribution of Anopheles (Diptera: Culicidae) larvae in Sukabumi, West Java, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Stoops, Craig A; Gionar, Yoyo R; Shinta; Sismadi, Priyanto; Elyazar, Iqbal R F; Bangs, Michael J; Sukowati, Supratman

    2007-07-01

    A 12-mo ecological study of the spatial-temporal distribution of immature stages of Anopheles species was conducted in Sukabumi District, West Java, Indonesia. The study characterized 1,600 sites from a contiguous coastal and hill zone (0-800-m elevation) of which 64% contained Anopheles larvae. Principal component and multiple logistic regression analyses identified ecological parameters associated with presence of nine [Anopheles aconitus Doenitz, Anopheles annularis Van de Wulp, Anopheles barbirostris Van der Wulp, Anopheles flavirostris (Ludlow), Anopheles insulaeflorum (Swellengrebel and Swellengrebel de Graaf), Anopheles kochi Doenitz, Anopheles maculatus Theobald, Anopheles sundaicus (Rodenwaldt), and Anopheles vagus Doenitz] of 15 Anopheles species collected. Combined data for all nine species showed increased Anopheles presence associated with wet season periods and higher elevation habitats exhibiting reduced tree canopy coverage, higher water temperatures, and shallower water depths. Habitat variables measured included topography (elevation), water conditions (temperature, pH, salinity depth, and velocity), habitat characteristics (substrate and canopy cover), density and type of aquatic vegetation coverage (riparian, floating, and emergent), and distance from nearest human habitation. Significant relationships were found for nine species when using all habitats in the analysis. Habitat characteristics for three species were refined. An. aconitus and An. barbirostris were associated with higher elevation rice, Oryza savita L., paddies with relatively shallow water depths, higher water temperatures, higher acidity and salinity concentrations, and a greater average distance from human habitation. An. vagus presence in rice paddies was associated with lower elevation fields, deeper and cooler water, less acidic and saline conditions, and habitats closer to human dwellings. Overall, the distribution of Anopheles species in Sukabumi was found to be nonrandom

  9. Calcareous Bio-Concretions in the Northern Adriatic Sea: Habitat Types, Environmental Factors that Influence Habitat Distributions, and Predictive Modeling.

    PubMed

    Falace, Annalisa; Kaleb, Sara; Curiel, Daniele; Miotti, Chiara; Galli, Giovanni; Querin, Stefano; Ballesteros, Enric; Solidoro, Cosimo; Bandelj, Vinko

    2015-01-01

    Habitat classifications provide guidelines for mapping and comparing marine resources across geographic regions. Calcareous bio-concretions and their associated biota have not been exhaustively categorized. Furthermore, for management and conservation purposes, species and habitat mapping is critical. Recently, several developments have occurred in the field of predictive habitat modeling, and multiple methods are available. In this study, we defined the habitats constituting northern Adriatic biogenic reefs and created a predictive habitat distribution model. We used an updated dataset of the epibenthic assemblages to define the habitats, which we verified using the fuzzy k-means (FKM) clustering method. Redundancy analysis was employed to model the relationships between the environmental descriptors and the FKM membership grades. Predictive modelling was carried out to map habitats across the basin. Habitat A (opportunistic macroalgae, encrusting Porifera, bioeroders) characterizes reefs closest to the coastline, which are affected by coastal currents and river inputs. Habitat B is distinguished by massive Porifera, erect Tunicata, and non-calcareous encrusting algae (Peyssonnelia spp.). Habitat C (non-articulated coralline, Polycitor adriaticus) is predicted in deeper areas. The onshore-offshore gradient explains the variability of the assemblages because of the influence of coastal freshwater, which is the main driver of nutrient dynamics. This model supports the interpretation of Habitat A and C as the extremes of a gradient that characterizes the epibenthic assemblages, while Habitat B demonstrates intermediate characteristics. Areas of transition are a natural feature of the marine environment and may include a mixture of habitats and species. The habitats proposed are easy to identify in the field, are related to different environmental features, and may be suitable for application in studies focused on other geographic areas. The habitat model outputs

  10. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) distribution and effect factors in the water and sediment of the Yellow River Estuary, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shiliang; Wang, Hui; Deng, Wenjing

    2013-10-01

    The distribution of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) was investigated in a total of 15 water and sediment samples from the Yellow River Estuary, China in April 2011. The results indicated that the concentrations of PFOS in the water and sediment samples averaged 157.5 ng/L and 198.8 ng/g and ranged from 82.30 to 261.8 ng/L and 75.48 to 457.0 ng/g, respectively. The concentrations of PFOS in the sediment column increased from 45.32 to 379.98 ng/g with the decrease of the sampling depth, which showed that the increased PFOS pollution in the sediment appeared in this region in over recent years. The distribution coefficient (K d) of PFOS between water and sediment linearly increased from 0.37 to 4.80 L/g as the salinity (S‰) increased from 0.18 to 4.47. Correlation analysis revealed that K d was significantly and positively correlated to the contents of total organic carbon and clay of the sediment, and salinity. Therefore, salinity was an important parameter in controlling the sediment-water interactions and the fate or transport of PFOS in the aquatic environment. The results of this study showed that the estuary was an important sink for PFOS and suggested that PFOS might be carried with the river water and transported for long distances before it reached to the sea and largely scavenged to the sediment in the estuaries due to the change in salinity.

  11. Calcareous Bio-Concretions in the Northern Adriatic Sea: Habitat Types, Environmental Factors that Influence Habitat Distributions, and Predictive Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Falace, Annalisa; Kaleb, Sara; Curiel, Daniele; Miotti, Chiara; Galli, Giovanni; Querin, Stefano; Ballesteros, Enric; Solidoro, Cosimo; Bandelj, Vinko

    2015-01-01

    Habitat classifications provide guidelines for mapping and comparing marine resources across geographic regions. Calcareous bio-concretions and their associated biota have not been exhaustively categorized. Furthermore, for management and conservation purposes, species and habitat mapping is critical. Recently, several developments have occurred in the field of predictive habitat modeling, and multiple methods are available. In this study, we defined the habitats constituting northern Adriatic biogenic reefs and created a predictive habitat distribution model. We used an updated dataset of the epibenthic assemblages to define the habitats, which we verified using the fuzzy k-means (FKM) clustering method. Redundancy analysis was employed to model the relationships between the environmental descriptors and the FKM membership grades. Predictive modelling was carried out to map habitats across the basin. Habitat A (opportunistic macroalgae, encrusting Porifera, bioeroders) characterizes reefs closest to the coastline, which are affected by coastal currents and river inputs. Habitat B is distinguished by massive Porifera, erect Tunicata, and non-calcareous encrusting algae (Peyssonnelia spp.). Habitat C (non-articulated coralline, Polycitor adriaticus) is predicted in deeper areas. The onshore-offshore gradient explains the variability of the assemblages because of the influence of coastal freshwater, which is the main driver of nutrient dynamics. This model supports the interpretation of Habitat A and C as the extremes of a gradient that characterizes the epibenthic assemblages, while Habitat B demonstrates intermediate characteristics. Areas of transition are a natural feature of the marine environment and may include a mixture of habitats and species. The habitats proposed are easy to identify in the field, are related to different environmental features, and may be suitable for application in studies focused on other geographic areas. The habitat model outputs

  12. Distribution of four polymorphisms in the tumour necrosis factor (TNF) genes in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)

    PubMed Central

    BOUMA, G.; XIA, B.; CRUSIUS, J. B. A.; BIOQUE, G.; KOUTROUBAKIS, I.; BLOMBERG, B. M. E. VON; MEUWISSEN, S. G. M.; PEÑA, A. S.

    1996-01-01

    In 153 patients with IBD, 64 with Crohn's disease (CD), and 89 with ulcerative colitis (UC), as well as in 54 healthy controls (HC), the frequencies of four known di-allelic polymorphisms in the genes for TNF-α and lymphotoxin alpha (LTα) were investigated. In the Dutch population, the alleles of these four polymorphisms are present in only five combinations, called TNF haplotypes: TNF-C, -E, -H, -I, -P. Furthermore, the relation with the presence of perinuclear anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (P-ANCA) was studied. A small, but statistically significant, association between the polymorphism at position -308 in the promoter region of the TNF-α gene and UC was found. The frequency of the uncommon TNF-α -308 allele 2 was found to be decreased in patients with UC compared with HC (allele frequency of allele 2 in UC patients 0·15 versus 0·25 in HC, P = 0·044). No significant differences in distribution of the TNF haplotypes were found between IBD patients and HC, although there was a tendency towards a higher frequency of the TNF-C haplotype in UC patients compared with controls (haplotype frequency 22% versus 13%; P = 0·19). No statistically significant differences in distribution of the TNF haplotypes were observed between P-ANCA-positive and P-ANCA-negative UC patients. The strength of the associations indicates that TNF genes are not markers for the predisposition to suffer from IBD. They may, however, be markers of subsets of patients with UC and CD. PMID:8608636

  13. Biological and chemical factors driving the temporal distribution of cyanobacteria and heterotrophic bacteria in a eutrophic lake (West Lake, China).

    PubMed

    Song, Hao; Xu, Jiahui; Lavoie, Michel; Fan, Xiaoji; Liu, Guangfu; Sun, Liwei; Fu, Zhengwei; Qian, Haifeng

    2017-02-01

    Physico-chemical parameters, hydrological conditions, and microbial interactions can affect the growth and persistence of cyanobacteria, but the interacting effects among these bloom-forming factors are still poorly known. This hampers our capacity to predict the occurrence of cyanobacterial bloom accurately. Here, we studied the relationship between temperature, N and P cycles, and the microbial community abundance and diversity at 0.5 m under the surface of West Lake (China) from January 21 to November 20, 2015, in order to better understand the key factors regulating temporal changes in the cyanobacterial community. Using high throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene V3-V4 region, we studied the diversity and abundance of bacteria. In parallel, we measured physico-chemical parameters and followed the abundance of key genes involved in N fixation, denitrification, and nutrient uptake. Multivariate analyses suggest that P concentration and water temperature are the key factors controlling the outbreak of summer cyanobacterial bloom. RT-qPCR analyses of the bacterial community and measurements of the copy number of denitrification-related gene (nirK, nosZ, nirS) show that denitrification potential and denitrifying bacteria relative abundance (Pseudomonas and Bacillus) increased in concert with diazotrophic cyanobacterial genera (Anabaena, Nostoc, Aphanizomenon flos-aquae) and the common bloom-forming non-diazotrophic cyanobacterium genus Microcystis. The present study brings new insights on the complex interplay between physico-chemical parameters, heterotrophic bacterial community composition, nitrogen cycle, and cyanobacteria dominance in a eutrophic lake.

  14. Transcription factor WRKY23 assists auxin distribution patterns during Arabidopsis root development through local control on flavonol biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Grunewald, Wim; De Smet, Ive; Lewis, Daniel R; Löfke, Christian; Jansen, Leentje; Goeminne, Geert; Vanden Bossche, Robin; Karimi, Mansour; De Rybel, Bert; Vanholme, Bartel; Teichmann, Thomas; Boerjan, Wout; Van Montagu, Marc C E; Gheysen, Godelieve; Muday, Gloria K; Friml, Jirí; Beeckman, Tom

    2012-01-31

    Gradients of the plant hormone auxin, which depend on its active intercellular transport, are crucial for the maintenance of root meristematic activity. This directional transport is largely orchestrated by a complex interaction of specific influx and efflux carriers that mediate the auxin flow into and out of cells, respectively. Besides these transport proteins, plant-specific polyphenolic compounds known as flavonols have been shown to act as endogenous regulators of auxin transport. However, only limited information is available on how flavonol synthesis is developmentally regulated. Using reduction-of-function and overexpression approaches in parallel, we demonstrate that the WRKY23 transcription factor is needed for proper root growth and development by stimulating the local biosynthesis of flavonols. The expression of WRKY23 itself is controlled by auxin through the Auxin Response Factor 7 (ARF7) and ARF19 transcriptional response pathway. Our results suggest a model in which WRKY23 is part of a transcriptional feedback loop of auxin on its own transport through local regulation of flavonol biosynthesis.

  15. Species distribution and virulence factors of Candida spp. isolated from the oral cavity of kidney transplant recipients in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Guilherme Maranhão; Diniz, Mariana Guimarães; da Silva-Rocha, Walicyranison Plinio; de Souza, Luanda Bárbara Ferreira Canário; Gondim, Libia Augusta Maciel; Ferreira, Maria Angela Fernandes; Svidzinski, Terezinha Inez Estivalet; Milan, Eveline Pipolo

    2013-04-01

    Although yeasts belonging to the genus Candida are frequently seen as commensals in the oral cavity, they possess virulence attributes that contribute for pathogenicity. The aims of the present study were to study the prevalence of Candida spp. isolated from the oral cavity of renal transplant recipients and to analyze strains virulence factors. We isolated a total of 70 Candida strains from 111 transplant recipients, and Candida albicans was the most prevalent species (82.86 %). Oral candidiasis was diagnosed in 14.4 % kidney transplant patients, while 11 isolates (15.7 %) corresponded to non-Candida albicans Candida (NCAC) species. C. albicans adhered to a higher extension than NCAC strains. Some isolates of Candida tropicalis were markedly adherent to human buccal epithelial cells and highly biofilm-forming strains. Regarding proteinase activity, Candida orthopsilosis was more proteolytic than Candida metapsilosis. Candida glabrata and Candida dubliniensis showed very low ability to form biofilm on polystyrene microtiter plates. We have demonstrated here diverse peculiarities of different Candida species regarding the ability to express virulence factors. This study will contribute for the understanding of the natural history and pathogenesis of yeasts belonging to the genus Candida in the oral cavity of patients who were submitted to kidney transplant and are under immunosuppressive therapies.

  16. cDNA cloning, tissue distribution, and chromosomal localization of myelodysplasia/Myeloid Leukemia Factor 2 (MLF2)

    SciTech Connect

    Kuefer, M.U.; Valentine, V.; Behm, F.G.

    1996-07-15

    A fusion gene between nucleophosmin (NPM) and myelodysplasia/myeloid leukemia factor 1 (MLF1) and myelodysplasia/myeloid leukemia factor 1 (MLF1) is formed by a recurrent t(3;5)(q25.1;q34) in myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia. Here we report the identification of a novel gene, MLF2, which contains an open reading frame of 744 bp encoding a 248-amino-acid protein highly related to the previously identified MLF1 protein (63% similarity, 40% identity). In contrast to the tissue-restricted expression pattern of MLF1, and MLF2 messenger RNA is expressed ubiquitously. The MLF2 gene locus was mapped by fluorescence in situ hybridization to human chromosome 12p13, a chromosomal region frequently involved in translocations and deletions in acute leukemias of lymphoid or myeloid lineage. In a physical map of chromosome 12, MLF2 was found to reside on the yeast artificial chromosome clone 765b9. Southern blotting analysis of malignant cell DNAs prepared from a series of acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases with translocations involving chromosome arm 12p, as well as a group of acute myeloid leukemias with various cytogenetic abnormalities, failed to reveal MLF2 gene rearrangements. 19 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Dune-scale distribution pattern of herbaceous plants and their relationship with environmental factors in a saline-alkali desert in Central Asia.

    PubMed

    Tao, Ye; Wu, Gan-Lin; Zhang, Yuan-Ming

    2017-01-15

    Sand dunes are the main landforms in modern deserts worldwide. As an important type of desert vegetation, herbaceous plants have long been acknowledged for their important ecological functions. We focus on the dune-scale distribution pattern of herbaceous plants and their relationship with the environment. During the early summer of 2010, the herbaceous plant density, coverage, aboveground biomass and eighteen environmental factors were surveyed from 214 plots (5m×5m) across two linear sand dunes (220m×110m) located in the Gurbantunggut Desert, China, a typical saline-alkali desert in Central Asia. Data were analyzed using univariate, ordination, and geostatistical techniques. Three vegetation variables represent a significant clumped distribution (P<0.01) across the entire study site. Obvious differences were observed among different slope positions/transects, with the lowest values observed at the summit. Geostatistics indicated that all of the variables showed a moderate spatial dependence and obvious zonal distribution along the sand dunes. The ranges (lag distance) of density (32.2m) and coverage (33.5m) were close to the average width (31.4m) of the transects. The biomass range (74.1m) was almost equal to the average width (75m) of the sand dunes. Pearson's correlation analysis and nonmetric multidimensional scaling analysis consistently demonstrated that the distributions of herbs on sand dunes were dominantly influenced by sand dune topography (slope position, convexity, and relative height), soil nutrients (total nitrogen and phosphorus) and deep-rooted shrubbery (Ephedra distachya). Compared to large, mobile and steep sand dunes, low, fixed and gentle sand dunes contribute to herbaceous plant abundance and distribution as well as the stability maintenance of the whole desert ecosystem.

  18. Spatial distribution of soil cadmium and its influencing factors in peri-urban farmland: a case study in the Jingyang District, Sichuan, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing; Xiao, Rui; Wang, Changquan; Cao, Linhai; Zhang, Yi; Zheng, Shunqiang; Yang, Lan; Guo, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Semi-agricultural ecosystems in peri-urban areas are susceptible to contamination. The spatial distribution and influencing factors of such pollution are unclear and poorly constrained in many areas worldwide. Therefore, studying the problems of soil pollution in peri-urban areas is critical for environmental management and agricultural production. In this paper, with cadmium (Cd) as the target pollutant, the spatiotemporal variations of soil cadmium pollution and the relative importance of the affecting factors were analyzed at a peri-urban area from the Jingyang District, Sichuan, China. Statistical results showed that the farmland in the study area could be considered moderately soil Cd-polluted, under the dual influence of natural factors and human activity. In particular, the soil Cd concentration in Tianyuan and Bajiaojing exceeded 0.5 mg kg(-1), for intensive industrial enterprises are distributed in these areas. Correspondingly, the geoaccumulation index also showed that the contamination of Cd in this area was moderately polluted. Moreover, the ecological risk index was 80% in the study area, indicating that the soil Cd pollution potential risk was moderate to high. High geological background values (soil Cd = 0.29 mg kg(-1)), river migration, industrial enterprises, and traffic significantly influenced soil Cd pollution, with natural geological factors playing greater roles. The significant horizontal-spatial effective distances away from Shiting River, Deyang-Aba Highway, and chemical plants were 200, 400, and 100 m, respectively. These results will be useful in guiding farmland cultivation and pollution remediation effectively in the peri-urban areas.

  19. Multiple environmental factors influence the spatial distribution and structure of reef communities in the northeastern Arabian Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Bauman, Andrew G; Feary, David A; Heron, Scott F; Pratchett, Morgan S; Burt, John A

    2013-07-30

    Multivariate analysis revealed distinct sub-regional coral communities among the southern Persian Gulf, Strait of Hormuz, and Gulf of Oman. Differences in community structure among locations were associated with considerable spatial heterogeneity in oceanic conditions, and strong directional environmental gradients. Despite clear community differences, considerable changes to coral community structure have occurred throughout the northeastern Arabian Peninsula as compared with previous studies. The most dramatic of these are the apparent changes from Acropora dominated to poritid and faviid dominated communities, particularly in the southern Persian Gulf and Strait of Hormuz. Although temperature and salinity have previously been cited as the major environmental factors structuring coral communities around the region, additional environmental parameters, including chlorophyll-a, surface currents and winds are shown to be important in structuring reef communities throughout the northeastern Arabian Peninsula.

  20. Energy factors and temperature distribution in insulated built-up roofs. Technical note July 1977-January 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Keeton, J.R.; Alumbaugh, R.L.

    1981-02-01

    Surface temperatures of 4-ply built-up roofs insulated with (1) 1 inch of perlite (R = 2.8) and 2-1/2 inches of urethane (R = 19.2) and (2) 1 inch of urethane (R = 7.1) and 1-7/8 inches of glass fiber (R = 7.7) are presented. Energy factors are shown in terms of temperature-time areas defined as solar heat response, cooling (heating) required, radiative cooling, and insulation efficiency. Results indicate that for a black surface, solar heat response is significantly higher in the roof portion with the higher R-value. Solar heat response is directly affected by color of surfacing; lowest to highest values were found with white, white gravel, gray gravel, aluminum-gray, and black. Recommendations are given for reducing surface temperatures of insulated built-up roofs.

  1. Teat apex colonization with coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species before parturition: Distribution and species-specific risk factors.

    PubMed

    De Visscher, A; Piepers, S; Haesebrouck, F; De Vliegher, S

    2016-02-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) are the main cause of bovine intramammary infections and are also abundantly present in extramammary habitats such as teat apices. Teat apex colonization (TAC) with CNS has already been explored in lactating dairy cows at the species level, whereas this is not true for dry cows and end-term heifers. Therefore, the aim of this observational study was to describe CNS TAC in nonlactating dairy cows and end-term heifers in Flemish dairy herds and to identify associated risk factors at the herd, cow, and quarter level. All CNS were molecularly identified to the species level using transfer RNA intergenic spacer PCR (tDNA-PCR) and sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, allowing for species-specific statistical analyses using multivariable, multilevel logistic regression. Staphylococcus devriesei, Staphylococcus chromogenes, Staphylococcus haemolyticus, and Staphylococcus equorum were the most frequently isolated species. Staphylococcus chromogenes was the sole species colonizing teat apices of cows and heifers in all herds, whereas large between-herd differences were observed for the other species. Teat apices of red and white Holstein Friesians, of quarters dried off without an internal teat sealer, and swabbed in months with lower precipitation and higher ambient temperature were significantly more likely to be colonized by S. devriesei. Slightly dirty teat apices and teat apices swabbed in months with lower precipitation had higher odds of being colonized by S. chromogenes, whereas teat apices sampled in months with lower precipitation and higher ambient temperature were more likely to be colonized by S. haemolyticus. Dirty teat apices and teat apices swabbed in months with lower ambient temperature in combination with low precipitation had higher odds of being colonized by S. equorum. Diverse factors explaining CNS TAC, yet mostly related to humidity, ambient temperature, and hygiene, substantiate differences in epidemiological

  2. Phosphorus characteristics, distribution, and relationship with environmental factors in surface sediments of river systems in Eastern China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenqiang; Jin, Xin; Zhu, Xiaolei; Shan, Baoqing; Zhao, Yu

    2016-10-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential nutrient for aquatic organisms. However, too much P discharged into limnetic ecosystems can induce eutrophication. The concentration of P in freshwater ecosystems has escalated in Eastern China due to overuse of fertilizer and excess emission of sewage, which is the result of the development of industry and agriculture in this area. However, little is known about the P characteristics and its environmental factors in river systems. Here, we present the results of P characterization and its relationships with environmental factors in Eastern China by applying SMT and (31)P-NMR methods. The results showed that the concentrations of P in surface sediments varied with the river system, and more than 50 % of the samples had P concentrations exceeding 500 mg kg(-1). HCl-Pi was the dominant Pi in surface sediments, with the highest percentage (96.5 %) in the Yellow River System. Mono-P was the dominant Po in river sediments, followed by DNA-P. The PCA approach indicated that NaOH-Pi and ortho-P clustered in one group, with a second group including mono-P, diesters-P, and HCl-Pi. Phon-P and pyro-P belonged to different groups. On a regional scale, NaOH-Pi and Po showed a negative relationship with pH in sediments. Continuous eutrophication was induced by the presence of dams, and oxygen-consuming pollutants, such as NH3-N and CODcr, even when external P input was cut in heavily polluted rivers. The research revealed the characteristics of P in different river systems and proposed a conceptual model of P biogeochemical cycles in heavily polluted rivers. Results from this study may provide insight into P characteristics in Eastern China and would set a scientific basis for effective P management in developing countries.

  3. Spatial distribution of human asymptomatic Leishmania infantum infection in southeast Spain: a study of environmental, demographic and social risk factors.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Cutillas, P; Goyena, E; Chitimia, L; De la Rúa, P; Bernal, L J; Fisa, R; Riera, C; Iborra, A; Murcia, L; Segovia, M; Berriatua, E

    2015-06-01

    Recent PCR studies indicate that asymptomatic L. infantum infection is common in people in southern Europe. Understanding its spatial distribution is a requisite to evaluate the public health implications and to design disease control schemes. We investigated infection in blood samples from 657 donors in southeast Spain using PCR and antibody ELISA. They came from 19 blood centers and were interviewed about their residence, occupation, dog ownership and Leishmaniosis awareness. The percentage of PCR and ELISA positives were 8% (49/618) and 2% (13/657). Donor's residences were spatially clustered around blood donning centers and PCR prevalence was 18% in rural municipalities with 20-1330 inhabitants, 12% in those with 1467-5088 inhabitants and 3% in larger communities, and was associated with dog ownership (p<0.05). Further analysis of data from rural donors indicated that PCR status was strongly related to the climate, altitude and soil type in the donor's residence area and not to other demographic or sociologic variables. Mixed logistic regression analysis predicted PCR prevalence to be greatest in the 200-300m altitude range with a mean spring-summer (time of highest vector activity) temperature of 18.4-19.0°C. A temperature and altitude risk map was generated that will provide the basis for elaborating evidence-based vector surveillance studies.

  4. Factors that affect molecular weight distribution of Suwannee river fulvic acid as determined by electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rostad, C.E.; Leenheer, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Effects of methylation, molar response, multiple charging, solvents, and positive and negative ionization on molecular weight distributions of aquatic fulvic acid were investigated by electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry. After preliminary analysis by positive and negative modes, samples and mixtures of standards were derivatized by methylation to minimize ionization sites and reanalyzed.Positive ionization was less effective and produced more complex spectra than negative ionization. Ionization in methanol/water produced greater response than in acetonitrile/water. Molar response varied widely for the selected free acid standards when analyzed individually and in a mixture, but after methylation this range decreased. After methylation, the number average molecular weight of the Suwannee River fulvic acid remained the same while the weight average molecular weight decreased. These differences are probably indicative of disaggregation of large aggregated ions during methylation. Since the weight average molecular weight decreased, it is likely that aggregate formation in the fulvic acid was present prior to derivatization, rather than multiple charging in the mass spectra. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Spatially governed climate factors dominate management in determining the quantity and distribution of soil organic carbon in dryland agricultural systems

    PubMed Central

    Hoyle, Frances C.; O’Leary, Rebecca A.; Murphy, Daniel V.

    2016-01-01

    Few studies describe the primary drivers influencing soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks and the distribution of carbon (C) fractions in agricultural systems from semi-arid regions; yet these soils comprise one fifth of the global land area. Here we identified the primary drivers for changes in total SOC and associated particulate (POC), humus (HOC) and resistant (ROC) organic C fractions for 1347 sample points in the semi-arid agricultural region of Western Australia. Total SOC stock (0–0.3 m) varied from 4 to 209 t C ha−1 with 79% of variation explained by measured variables. The proportion of C in POC, HOC and ROC fractions averaged 28%, 45% and 27% respectively. Climate (43%) and land management practices (32%) had the largest relative influence on variation in total SOC. Carbon accumulation was constrained where average daily temperature was above 17.2 °C and annual rainfall below 450 mm, representing approximately 42% of the 197,300 km2 agricultural region. As such large proportions of this region are not suited to C sequestration strategies. For the remainder of the region a strong influence of management practices on SOC indicate opportunities for C sequestration strategies associated with incorporation of longer pasture phases and adequate fertilisation. PMID:27530805

  6. Distribution of phytobenthos in the Yakima River basin, Washington, in relation to geology, land use and other environmental factors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leland, Harry V.

    1995-01-01

    Benthic-algal distributions in the Yakima River, Washington, basin were, examined in relation to geology, land use, water chemistry, and stream habitat using indicator-species classification (TWINSPAN) and canonical correspondence analysis (CCA). Algal assemblages identified byTWINSPAN were each associated with a narrow range of water-quality conditions. In the Cascade geologic province, where timber harvest and grazing are the dominant land uses, differences in community structure (CCA site scores) and concentrations of major ions (Ca and Mg) and nutrients (solute P, SiO2 and inorganic N) varied with dominant rock type of the basin. In agricultural areas of the Columbia Plateau province, differences in phytobenthos structure were based primarily on the degree of enrichment of dissolved solids, inorganic N, and solute P from irrigation-return flows and subsurface drainage. Habitat characteristics strongly correlated with community structure included reach altitude, turbidity, substratum embeddedness (Columbia Plateau), large woody-debris density (Cascade Range), and composition and density of the riparian vegetation. Algal biomass (AFDM) correlated with composition and density of the riparian vegetation but not with measured chemical-constituent concentrations. Nitrogen limitation in streams of the Cascade Range favored nitrogen-fixing blue-green algae and diatoms with endosymbiotic blue-greens, whereas nitrogen heterotrophs were abundant in agricultural areas of the Columbia Plateau.

  7. Distribution of phytobenthos in the Yakima River basin, Washington, in relation to geology, land use, and other environmental factors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leland, Harry V.

    1995-01-01

    Benthic-algal distributions in the Yakima River, Washington, basin were, examined in relation to geology, land use, water chemistry, and stream habitat using indicator-species classification (TWINSPAN) and canonical correspondence analysis (CCA). Algal assemblages identified byTWINSPAN were each associated with a narrow range of water-quality conditions. In the Cascade geologic province, where timber harvest and grazing are the dominant land uses, differences in community structure (CCA site scores) and concentrations of major ions (Ca and Mg) and nutrients (solute P, SiO2 and inorganic N) varied with dominant rock type of the basin. In agricultural areas of the Columbia Plateau province, differences in phytobenthos structure were based primarily on the degree of enrichment of dissolved solids, inorganic N, and solute P from irrigation-return flows and subsurface drainage. Habitat characteristics strongly correlated with community structure included reach altitude, turbidity, substratum embeddedness (Columbia Plateau), large woody-debris density (Cascade Range), and composition and density of the riparian vegetation. Algal biomass (AFDM) correlated with composition and density of the riparian vegetation but not with measured chemical-constituent concentrations. Nitrogen limitation in streams of the Cascade Range favored nitrogen-fixing blue-green algae and diatoms with endosymbiotic blue-greens, whereas nitrogen heterotrophs were abundant in agricultural areas of the Columbia Plateau.

  8. Spatially governed climate factors dominate management in determining the quantity and distribution of soil organic carbon in dryland agricultural systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyle, Frances C.; O’Leary, Rebecca A.; Murphy, Daniel V.

    2016-08-01

    Few studies describe the primary drivers influencing soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks and the distribution of carbon (C) fractions in agricultural systems from semi-arid regions; yet these soils comprise one fifth of the global land area. Here we identified the primary drivers for changes in total SOC and associated particulate (POC), humus (HOC) and resistant (ROC) organic C fractions for 1347 sample points in the semi-arid agricultural region of Western Australia. Total SOC stock (0–0.3 m) varied from 4 to 209 t C ha‑1 with 79% of variation explained by measured variables. The proportion of C in POC, HOC and ROC fractions averaged 28%, 45% and 27% respectively. Climate (43%) and land management practices (32%) had the largest relative influence on variation in total SOC. Carbon accumulation was constrained where average daily temperature was above 17.2 °C and annual rainfall below 450 mm, representing approximately 42% of the 197,300 km2 agricultural region. As such large proportions of this region are not suited to C sequestration strategies. For the remainder of the region a strong influence of management practices on SOC indicate opportunities for C sequestration strategies associated with incorporation of longer pasture phases and adequate fertilisation.

  9. Distribution of plaque and gingivitis and associated factors in 3- to 5-year-old Brazilian children.

    PubMed

    Feldens, Eliane Gerson; Kramer, Paulo Floriani; Feldens, Carlos Alberto; Ferreira, Simone Helena

    2006-01-01

    This cross-sectional study investigated the distribution of plaque and gingivitis and its association with demographic, socioeconomic, and orthodontic variables (spacing in anterior teeth, anterior open bite, and crossbite), and visible plaque level (low, medium, high) in Brazilian preschoolers. The sample comprised 490 3- to 5-year-old children from nursery schools in Canoas, a city in southern Brazil. One single, trained observer examined children's oral cavities and determined visible plaque index (VPI) and gingival bleeding index (GBI). Results showed that 99% of the children had visible plaque and 77% had gingivitis (GBI>0). A positive (r(s)=0.32) and significant correlation was found between VPI and GBI. VPI and GBI were significantly higher in posterior teeth and buccal and lingual surfaces. VPI was significantly higher in boys, children of low-income families, and without spacing in maxillary anterior teeth. Gingivitis was associated with absence of spacing in maxillary anterior teeth and plaque level. The most prevalent areas of plaque and gingivitis identified in this study should be taken in consideration during oral hygiene instructions, which should be given to children and mothers-particularly those with a low socioeconomic status--to motivate self-care and prevent gingivitis.

  10. Distribution of geoacoustic properties and related influencing factors of surface sediments in the southern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingqiang; Guo, Changsheng; Liu, Baohua; Hou, Zhengyu; Han, Guozhong

    2016-12-01

    In order to characterize and map the seafloor sediments in the southern South China Sea, the physical and geoacoustic properties of the sediments were measured and analyzed at 21 stations. Sound speeds were measured using the coaxial differential distance measurement method on deck, and were corrected to in situ sound speeds using the correction-to-laboratory-velocity method. The results show that the distributions of sound speed ratio and acoustic impedance are closely related to the sediments physical properties. The study area can be divided into 3 geoacoustic provinces: the highest speed zone on the Sunda Shelf, and the intermediate and lowest speed zones on the continental slope and Nansha Trough. The correlations between the sound speed ratio and physical parameters fit linear relationships similarly or even better than the quadratic relationships derived in previous studies. This good fit may however be due to the limited range of data samples used in this study. Compared with the predicted sound speeds from Hamilton and Bachman's or Anderson's empirical equations, the measured values are smaller, which is probably due to different sedimentary environments and measurement methods.

  11. Factors affecting distribution of the mound-building ant Lasius neoniger (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) and implications for management on golf course putting greens.

    PubMed

    Maier, Reid M; Potter, Daniel A

    2005-06-01

    Lasius neoniger (Emery), a cosmopolitan ant species, can be a serious pest when its mound-building activities occur on golf course putting greens and other closely mowed turfgrass sites. We mapped the distribution of 735 ant mounds on 30 sand-based putting greens of three golf courses. We then examined factors that might explain why >90% of the mounds on such greens were concentrated in a 2-m wide band just inside the perimeter. Root aphids (Homoptera: Aphididae) from which L. neoniger obtains honeydew were largely absent from high-sand root zone mix of greens but present in surrounding turfgrass on natural soil. Main ant nests, with brood, also were absent from sand-based greens but abundant in adjacent roughs. Although more root aphids were found within ant nests than away from nests, their numbers seem too low to be the main factor restricting the ants' distribution to edges of putting greens. In manipulative experiments, ants responded to low cut (scalped) turf and to sand-filled holes by increased mound building. We suggest that most ant mounds on sand-based greens are associated with subnests, used by foraging workers, which are connected to main nests located just outside the collar in natural soil. Encroachment of mounds into greens occurs when the polydomous colonies seasonally expand their foraging territories, accounting for mounds being concentrated around the perimeter. Control actions for L. neoniger on golf courses should focus on the perimeter of sand-based greens.

  12. Spatial distribution of bacterial communities driven by multiple environmental factors in a beach wetland of the largest freshwater lake in China

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xia; Peng, Xiao-Jue; Jin, Bin-Song; Xiao, Ming; Chen, Jia-Kuan; Li, Bo; Fang, Chang-Ming; Nie, Ming

    2015-01-01

    The spatial distributions of bacterial communities may be driven by multiple environmental factors. Thus, understanding the relationships between bacterial distribution and environmental factors is critical for understanding wetland stability and the functioning of freshwater lakes. However, little research on the bacterial communities in deep sediment layers exists. In this study, thirty clone libraries of 16S rRNA were constructed from a beach wetland of the Poyang Lake along both horizontal (distance to the water-land junction) and vertical (sediment depth) gradients to assess the effects of sediment properties on bacterial community structure and diversity. Our results showed that bacterial diversity increased along the horizontal gradient and decreased along the vertical gradient. The heterogeneous sediment properties along gradients substantially affected the dominant bacterial groups at the phylum and species levels. For example, the NH+4 concentration decreased with increasing depth, which was positively correlated with the relative abundance of Alphaproteobacteria. The changes in bacterial diversity and dominant bacterial groups showed that the top layer had a different bacterial community structure than the deeper layers. Principal component analysis revealed that both gradients, not each gradient independently, contributed to the shift in the bacterial community structure. A multiple linear regression model explained the changes in bacterial diversity and richness along the depth and distance gradients. Overall, our results suggest that spatial gradients associated with sediment properties shaped the bacterial communities in the Poyang Lake beach wetland. PMID:25767466

  13. Influence of Topographic and Hydrographic Factors on the Spatial Distribution of Leptospirosis Disease in São Paulo County, Brazil: An Approach Using Geospatial Techniques and GIS Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, M. C.; Ferreira, M. F. M.

    2016-06-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonosis caused by Leptospira genus bacteria. Rodents, especially Rattus norvegicus, are the most frequent hosts of this microorganism in the cities. The human transmission occurs by contact with urine, blood or tissues of the rodent and contacting water or mud contaminated by rodent urine. Spatial patterns of concentration of leptospirosis are related to the multiple environmental and socioeconomic factors, like housing near flooding areas, domestic garbage disposal sites and high-density of peoples living in slums located near river channels. We used geospatial techniques and geographical information system (GIS) to analysing spatial relationship between the distribution of leptospirosis cases and distance from rivers, river density in the census sector and terrain slope factors, in Sao Paulo County, Brazil. To test this methodology we used a sample of 183 geocoded leptospirosis cases confirmed in 2007, ASTER GDEM2 data, hydrography and census sectors shapefiles. Our results showed that GIS and geospatial analysis techniques improved the mapping of the disease and permitted identify the spatial pattern of association between location of cases and spatial distribution of the environmental variables analyzed. This study showed also that leptospirosis cases might be more related to the census sectors located on higher river density areas and households situated at shorter distances from rivers. In the other hand, it was not possible to assert that slope terrain contributes significantly to the location of leptospirosis cases.

  14. Dissociation of glucocerebrosidase dimer in solution by its co-factor, saposin C

    SciTech Connect

    Gruschus, James M.; Jiang, Zhiping; Yap, Thai Leong; Hill, Stephanie A.; Grishaev, Alexander; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Sidransky, Ellen; Lee, Jennifer C.

    2015-01-16

    Mutations in the gene for the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase (GCase) cause Gaucher disease and are the most common risk factor for Parkinson disease (PD). Analytical ultracentrifugation of 8 μM GCase shows equilibrium between monomer and dimer forms. However, in the presence of its co-factor saposin C (Sap C), only monomer GCase is seen. Isothermal calorimetry confirms that Sap C associates with GCase in solution in a 1:1 complex (Kd = 2.1 ± 1.1 μM). Saturation cross-transfer NMR determined that the region of Sap C contacting GCase includes residues 63–66 and 74–76, which is distinct from the region known to enhance GCase activity. Because α-synuclein (α-syn), a protein closely associated with PD etiology, competes with Sap C for GCase binding, its interaction with GCase was also measured by ultracentrifugation and saturation cross-transfer. Unlike Sap C, binding of α-syn to GCase does not affect multimerization. However, adding α-syn reduces saturation cross-transfer from Sap C to GCase, confirming displacement. To explore where Sap C might disrupt multimeric GCase, GCase x-ray structures were analyzed using the program PISA, which predicted stable dimer and tetramer forms. In conclusion, for the most frequently predicted multimer interface, the GCase active sites are partially buried, suggesting that Sap C might disrupt the multimer by binding near the active site.

  15. Dissociation of glucocerebrosidase dimer in solution by its co-factor, saposin C

    PubMed Central

    Gruschus, James M.; Jiang, Zhiping; Yap, Thai Leong; Hill, Stephanie A.; Grishaev, Alexander; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Sidransky, Ellen; Lee, Jennifer C.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the gene for the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase (GCase) cause Gaucher disease and are the most common risk factor for Parkinson disease (PD). Analytical ultracentrifugation of 8 μM GCase shows equilibrium between monomer and dimer forms. However, in the presence of its co-factor saposin C (Sap C), only monomer GCase is seen. Isothermal calorimetry confirms that Sap C associates with GCase in solution in a 1:1 complex (Kd = 2.1 ± 1.1 μM). Saturation cross-transfer NMR determined that the region of Sap C contacting GCase includes residues 63–66 and 74–76, which is distinct from the region known to enhance GCase activity. Because α-synuclein (α-syn), a protein closely associated with PD etiology, competes with Sap C for GCase binding, its interaction with GCase was also measured by ultracentrifugation and saturation cross-transfer. Unlike Sap C, binding of α-syn to GCase does not affect multimerization. However, adding α-syn reduces saturation cross-transfer from Sap C to GCase, confirming displacement. To explore where Sap C might disrupt multimeric GCase, GCase x-ray structures were analyzed using the program PISA, which predicted stable dimer and tetramer forms. For the most frequently predicted multimer interface, the GCase active sites are partially buried, suggesting that Sap C might disrupt the multimer by binding near the active site. PMID:25600808

  16. Dissociation of glucocerebrosidase dimer in solution by its co-factor, saposin C

    DOE PAGES

    Gruschus, James M.; Jiang, Zhiping; Yap, Thai Leong; ...

    2015-01-16

    Mutations in the gene for the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase (GCase) cause Gaucher disease and are the most common risk factor for Parkinson disease (PD). Analytical ultracentrifugation of 8 μM GCase shows equilibrium between monomer and dimer forms. However, in the presence of its co-factor saposin C (Sap C), only monomer GCase is seen. Isothermal calorimetry confirms that Sap C associates with GCase in solution in a 1:1 complex (Kd = 2.1 ± 1.1 μM). Saturation cross-transfer NMR determined that the region of Sap C contacting GCase includes residues 63–66 and 74–76, which is distinct from the region known to enhancemore » GCase activity. Because α-synuclein (α-syn), a protein closely associated with PD etiology, competes with Sap C for GCase binding, its interaction with GCase was also measured by ultracentrifugation and saturation cross-transfer. Unlike Sap C, binding of α-syn to GCase does not affect multimerization. However, adding α-syn reduces saturation cross-transfer from Sap C to GCase, confirming displacement. To explore where Sap C might disrupt multimeric GCase, GCase x-ray structures were analyzed using the program PISA, which predicted stable dimer and tetramer forms. In conclusion, for the most frequently predicted multimer interface, the GCase active sites are partially buried, suggesting that Sap C might disrupt the multimer by binding near the active site.« less

  17. Diagnostic Value of Measuring Platelet Von Willebrand Factor in Von Willebrand Disease

    PubMed Central

    Casonato, Alessandra; Cattini, Maria Grazia; Daidone, Viviana; Pontara, Elena; Bertomoro, Antonella; Prandoni, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Von Willebrand disease (VWD) may be caused by an impaired von Willebrand factor (VWF) synthesis, its increased clearance or abnormal function, or combinations of these factors. It may be difficult to recognize the different contributions of these anomalies. Here we demonstrate that VWD diagnostics gains from measuring platelet VWF, which can reveal a defective VWF synthesis. Measuring platelet VWF revealed that: severe type 1 VWD always coincided with significantly lower platelet and plasma VWF levels, whereas mild forms revealed low plasma VWF levels associated with low or normal platelet VWF levels, and the latter were associated with a slightly shorter VWF survival; type Vicenza (the archetype VWD caused by a reduced VWF survival) featured normal platelet VWF levels despite significantly reduced plasma VWF levels; type 2B patients could have either normal platelet VWF levels associated with abnormal multimer patterns, or reduced platelet VWF levels associated with normal multimer patterns; type 2A patients could have reduced or normal platelet VWF levels, the former associated mainly with type 2A-I, the latter with type 2A-II; plasma and platelet VWF levels were normal in type 2N, except when the defect was associated with a quantitative VWF mutation. Our findings show that measuring platelet VWF helps to characterize VWD, especially the ambiguous phenotypes, shedding light on the mechanisms underlying the disorder. PMID:27532107

  18. Human and canine visceral leishmaniasis in an emerging focus in Araçuaí, Minas Gerais: spatial distribution and socio-environmental factors

    PubMed Central

    Ursine, Renata Luiz; Dias, João Victor Leite; Morais, Harriman Aley; Pires, Herton Helder Rocha

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to analyse the spatial distribution of human (2007-2013) and canine (2013) visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in the city of Araçuaí, Minas Gerais, Brazil, and identify the socio-environmental factors related to their occurrence. The spatial distribution of human and canine cases was analysed by kernel density estimation (KDE) and the K function. The KDE values were analysed for correlation between human and canine LV and for normalised difference vegetation index (NDVI). Socio-environmental aspects of household structures and surroundings were evaluated. The spatial distribution of human and canine VL cases exhibited a significant aggregated pattern in distances greater than 350 and 75 m, respectively. The higher occurrence of human and canine infection occurred in the central area of the city. A positive correlation between the densities of human and canine cases was observed, as well as a negative correlation between NDVI and densities of human and canine cases. Socio-environmental analysis revealed that the large amount of animals, organic material from trees and deficiencies in environmental sanitation are possibly contributing to the continuation of the transmission cycle of Leishmania infantum in Araçuaí. These results can contribute to the planning by competent agencies to reduce the incidence of infection in the city. PMID:27384080

  19. Satellite-derived NDVI, LST, and climatic factors driving the distribution and abundance of Anopheles mosquitoes in a former malarious area in northwest Argentina.

    PubMed

    Dantur Juri, María Julia; Estallo, Elizabet; Almirón, Walter; Santana, Mirta; Sartor, Paolo; Lamfri, Mario; Zaidenberg, Mario

    2015-06-01

    Distribution and abundance of disease vectors are directly related to climatic conditions and environmental changes. Remote sensing data have been used for monitoring environmental conditions influencing spatial patterns of vector-borne diseases. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Land Surface Temperature (LST) obtained from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), and climatic factors (temperature, humidity, wind velocity, and accumulated rainfall) on the distribution and abundance of Anopheles species in northwestern Argentina using Poisson regression analyses. Samples were collected from December, 2001 to December, 2005 at three localities, Aguas Blancas, El Oculto and San Ramón de la Nueva Orán. We collected 11,206 adult Anopheles species, with the major abundance observed at El Oculto (59.11%), followed by Aguas Blancas (22.10%) and San Ramón de la Nueva Orán (18.79%). Anopheles pseudopunctipennis was the most abundant species at El Oculto, Anopheles argyritarsis predominated in Aguas Blancas, and Anopheles strodei in San Ramón de la Nueva Orán. Samples were collected throughout the sampling period, with the highest peaks during the spring seasons. LST and mean temperature appear to be the most important variables determining the distribution patterns and major abundance of An. pseudopunctipennis and An. argyritarsis within malarious areas.

  20. Investigation of factors affecting the accumulation of vinyl chloride in polyvinyl chloride piping used in drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Walter, Ryan K; Lin, Po-Hsun; Edwards, Marc; Richardson, Ruth E

    2011-04-01

    Plastic piping made of polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and chlorinated PVC (CPVC), is being increasingly used for drinking water distribution lines. Given the formulation of the material from vinyl chloride (VC), there has been concern that the VC (a confirmed human carcinogen) can leach from the plastic piping into drinking water. PVC/CPVC pipe reactors in the laboratory and tap samples collected from consumers homes (n = 15) revealed vinyl chloride accumulation in the tens of ng/L range after a few days and hundreds of ng/L after two years. While these levels did not exceed the EPA's maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 2 μg/L, many readings that simulated stagnation times in homes (overnight) exceeded the MCL-Goal of 0 μg/L. Considerable differences in VC levels were seen across different manufacturers, while aging and biofilm effects were generally small. Preliminary evidence suggests that VC may accumulate not only via chemical leaching from the plastic piping, but also as a disinfection byproduct (DBP) via a chlorine-dependent reaction. This is supported from studies with CPVC pipe reactors where chlorinated reactors accumulated more VC than dechlorinated reactors, copper pipe reactors that accumulated VC in chlorinated reactors and not in dechlorinated reactors, and field samples where VC levels were the same before and after flushing the lines where PVC/CPVC fittings were contributing. Free chlorine residual tests suggest that VC may be formed as a secondary, rather than primary, DBP. Further research and additional studies need to be conducted in order to elucidate reaction mechanisms and tease apart relative contributions of VC accumulation from PVC/CPVC piping and chlorine-dependent reactions.

  1. Ecological factors responsible for the geographic distribution of Rhabdias joaquinensis: where do lungworms infect anurans in nature?

    PubMed

    Langford, Gabriel J; Janovy, John

    2016-03-01

    The lungworm Rhabdias joaquinensis (Nematoda: Rhabdiasidae) is a common parasite of anurans in eastern Nebraska, yet absent from the same hosts in western Nebraska. This study investigated the ecology of the lungworm's free-living stages that reside in host feces and surrounding soils to establish the worm's free-living niche in eastern Nebraska. Using a comparative method, this study also investigated the absence of lungworms in western Nebraska's Sandhills. Soil composition, moisture, and temperature were experimentally varied in the laboratory to assess their effects on juvenile development and survival. Field mesocosm and host defecation experiments were used to determine where in nature lungworms survive and eventually infect frogs and toads and to discover if vegetation facilitates lungworm transmission to hosts. The results found loam soils were amenable to lungworm development, whereas soils with high clay or sand content produced few infective lungworms. Soil moisture <50 % did not support lungworm development. Infective juveniles successfully developed between 5 and 35 °C, albeit at different rates, whereas only a limited number of non-infective worms developed at 40 °C. Field studies found that shoreline environments supported lungworm development, and the majority of lungworm infections appear to occur within a zone of infection adjacent to shorelines in eastern Nebraska. The prevalence in vegetation mesocosms was 100 %, and a significantly higher mean abundance was found in toads from containers with vegetation than without. Overall, these experiments suggest that the spatial distribution of R. joaquinensis in Nebraska is constrained by the worm's ability to survive and reproduce in a soil matrix.

  2. Factors influencing the distribution of Myxobolus cerebralis, the causative agent of whirling disease, in the Cache la Poudre River, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, M. Brady; Bergersen, Eric P.

    2002-01-01

    Oligochaetes, triactinomyxons (TAMs), and age-0 trout were sampled in the upper Cache la Poudre River, Colorado, to determine the distribution of Myxobolus cerebralis during 1997 and 1998. Densities of the intermediate host, the oligochaete Tubifex tubifex, were 3.5 orders of magnitude higher in the M. cerebralis-infected Poudre Rearing Unit (PRU) trout rearing ponds than at any of the river sampling reaches. Oligochaetes, including T. tubifex, were rare in the river (1 oligochaete m-2), except in a few stream side alcoves and eddies (50 oligochaete m-2). Species composition of oligochaetes in the river reaches was more diverse than in the PRU. Tubifex tubifex constituted 50% or less of the oligochaete community in the river and 98% in the PRU. Infection rates of T. tubifex were 1% in the area above the PRU, 2% in the PRU, and 6% below the PRU. An increased M. cerebralis intensity of infection in age-0 trout below the PRU could not be attributed entirely to the high numbers of TAMs in its effluent (3.7 TAMs l-1). Low densities of TAMs ranging from 0 to 0.2 TAMs l-1 were found in the river reaches, yet nearly all of the age-0 trout were infected soon after emergence. This suggests that very few TAMs, as measured by filtration, need be present in the water column to bring about infection in the majority of trout present. This also indicates that the parasite can persist and potentially cause reduced juvenile trout recruitment in cold, oligotrophic, sediment poor, high-gradient streams.

  3. Amount, determining factors and spatial distribution of soil organic carbon storage in the Dano catchment (Southwest Burkina-Faso)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hounkpatin, O.; Op de Hipt, F.; Bossa, A. Y.; Welp, G.; Amelung, W.

    2015-12-01

    The ability to project and to mitigate the impacts of climate change is closely related to the evaluation of soil organic carbon (SOC) content and stock across different types of land use and soil groups. Therefore, this study aimed at estimating the surface and subsoil organic carbon stocks in different land use systems and across various soil groups. A further aim was to assess the spatial variability of SOC content and stocks and how this is controlled by climate and site properties. The Random Forest (RF) modelling was used and compared to Ordinary Kriging interpolation (OK) for the topsoil SOC and stock. About 70 soil profiles were described along 16 transects with 197 samples collected from different horizons up to 1 m depth where possible. In addition, 1205 samples were collected within an intensive auger grid mapping. Mid-infrared spectroscopy and partial least-squares analysis were used as a fast and low-cost technique to handle the large amount of samples for the SOC estimation. The natural/semi natural vegetation recorded the highest SOC stock in the topsoil (28.6 t C ha-1) as compared to the cropland (25.5 t C ha-1). Over 1 m depth, Gleysols (87.4 t C ha-1) stored the highest amount of SOC stock followed by the Cambisols (76. t C ha-1) and the Plinthosols (73.1 t C ha-1) while the lowest were found in the Lixisols (57.8 t C ha-1). For the topsoil, the RF model revealed soil properties such as cation exchange capacity (CEC) and stone content as main factors affecting SOC content variability while CEC and bulk density were the major drivers for the subsoil. The carbon stock variability was mainly affected by the CEC and the reference soil group in the topsoil while horizon thickness and bulk density constituted the main factors for the subsoil. The geostatistical evaluation proved that the SOC content in the Dano catchment has a moderate spatial autocorrelation while the carbon stock was strongly spatially dependent. The RF gave a better prediction for

  4. Source apportionment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in urban air using positive matrix factorization and spatial distribution analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Eunhwa; Alam, Mohammed S.; Harrison, Roy M.

    2013-11-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are currently generating a great deal of interest because of their recognised toxicity, including carcinogenicity. In this study, source apportionment (SA) has been carried out using Positive Matrix Factorisation (PMF) with a dataset of 29 individual PAH (sum of vapour and particulate forms) collected by the UK National Network between 2002 and 2006. Analysis of data from 14 urban sites revealed four major source categories corresponding to unburned petroleum, diesel combustion, wood combustion and coal combustion. When a separate set of sites known to be influenced by local industrial sources was analysed, three source categories were identified corresponding to the unburned petroleum, diesel combustion and coal combustion seen in the full data analysis. When SA data were applied to the individual sites, the estimated apportionment could be explained in terms of local emission characteristics. Unburned petroleum showed the highest contribution to the sum of PAH, averaging 51.9% across the network, but benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) was more influenced by the coal combustion source which contributed 59.5% across the entire network. At the subset of sites with local industrial influence, industry was both the main contributor to the sum of PAH (accounting for 48.4% of PAH mass) and of BaP (67.9% of mass). A spatial analysis was also conducted in which the traffic source was evaluated by the difference between a roadside and a nearby urban background site, the urban source by difference between urban background and a rural site, and the industrial source by difference between a site close to a major steelworks subtracting data from a local urban background site. This showed considerable similarity between the net urban contribution and the road traffic factor, and between the net industrial contribution and the PMF coal factor profile. In both cases the congener profiles corresponded fairly well to UK national emissions inventory data

  5. Spatial patterns of distribution and the influence of seasonal and abiotic factors on demersal ichthyofauna in an estuarine tropical bay.

    PubMed

    da Silva, D R; Paranhos, R; Vianna, M

    2016-07-01

    This study focused on the influence of local-scale environmental factors on key metrics of fish community structure and function at Guanabara Bay, an estuarine system that differs from all other south-western Atlantic estuaries due to the influence of an annual low-intensity upwelling event during late spring and summer, between November and March, when a warm rainy climate prevails. The spatial patterns of the bottom temperature and salinity were more heterogeneous during the rainy season than the dry season, being linked to total precipitation and seasonal oceanographic events. The study identified 130 species and 45 families, placing Guanabara Bay as one of the most species-rich tropical estuarine ecosystems, far exceeding 22 other Brazilian estuaries. These results, in addition to characteristics such as a relatively well-preserved mangrove forest, high productivity and favourable conditions for the growth and reproduction of estuarine species, indicate that Guanabara Bay plays a central role in supporting large populations of fishes, including commercially important species.

  6. Evaluate the frequency distribution of nonadhesive virulence factors in carbapenemase-producing Acinetobacter baumannii isolated from clinical samples in Kermanshah

    PubMed Central

    Mohajeri, Parviz; Sharbati, Saba; Farahani, Abbas; Rezaei, Zhaleh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acinetobacter baumannii which is a Gram-negative bacterium can cause several different infections. The appearance of carbapenemase-producing A. baumannii in recent years has made the treatment process more difficult. The identification of virulence factors (VFs), such as nonadhesives in A. baumannii, helps to fight against related infections. Materials and Methods: A total of 104 samples from teaching hospitals in Kermanshah, Iran, were collected during a 24 months period (2011-2013). Sample identification was first carried out by biochemical tests, and then their susceptibility to carbapenems was determined using the Kirby–Bauer method. For confirmation of carbapenemase-producing A. baumannii, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was done for carbapenemase-encoding genes. In addition, the frequency of nonadhesive VFs in carbapenemase-producing isolates was determined by PCR. Results: There were 50 isolates that were identified as carbapenemase-producing A. baumannii. The PCR results showed; 40 isolates (80%) for traT, 17 isolates (34%) for cvaC, and 8 isolates (16%) for iutA, and these encode serum resistance, colicin V and aerobactin, respectively. No significant correlation was observed between these three genes. Conclusions: The mechanism of A. baumannii virulence has always been in question. The role of VFs has also been recognized in other Gram-negative bacteria. According to the prevalence of traT, cvaC and iutA, as nonadhesive VFs, we can suggest that they could be the main mechanism of carbapenemase-producing A. baumannii pathogenesis. PMID:27003971

  7. Lg wave propagation in a laterally varying crust and the distribution of the apparent quality factor in central France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campillo, Michel

    1987-11-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the sensitivity of Lg waves to lateral changes of the earth's structure. Considering a simple model of uplift of the Moho, numerical simulations show that the geometrical attenuation of Lg is not much affected by a smooth anomaly of the Moho depth. On the other hand, the passing of the Lg wave through the region of the Moho uplift results in a clear deterioration of the wave shapes, which confirms the occurrence of mode conversions. The presence of an overlying sedimentary basin causes a local amplification of Lg above the basin itself and the appearance, behind the basin, of a secondary surface wave guided in the sediments. The effect of the basin on the Lg wave is found to be reasonably taken into account by applying a local amplification function to the data. We use a data set consisting of records of Lg phases in France to test the conclusions of our numerical study. The mapping of the apparent quality factor, computed from Lg at different frequencies, confirms the interpretation of the strong attenuation of S waves around 1 Hz in terms of scattering and shows the weak sensitivity of the amplitude of Lg to smooth changes in the depth of the Moho.

  8. Deep-sea macroplankton distribution (at 400 to 2300 m) in the northwestern Mediterranean in relation to environmental factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartes, J. E.; Fanelli, E.; López-Pérez, C.; Lebrato, M.

    2013-03-01

    Changes in the composition and biomass distribution of deep-living zooplankton over wide gradients of depth (400-2300 m) and longitude (~ 180 km) have been analyzed in the Balearic Basin (western Mediterranean), seeking the environmental variables responsible for these changes. Zooplankton tends to aggregate at different levels of the water column (forming Deep Scattering Layers, DSL) and in the Benthic Boundary Layer (BBL). Macrozooplankton biomass and composition were analyzed along a transect performed in July 2010 in midwater (between ~ 350 and 450 m) and near the bottom (at ~ 5-200 mab), over soundings of 450-2263 m, including the top of Valencia Seamount (at ~ 40° 25' N-02° 42' E, 1076 m). Zooplankton changed significantly in composition at the mesoscale (~ 180 km) in both the DSL and the BBL. Siphonophores and calanoid copepods were the most dominant deep zooplankton taxa, calanoids reaching higher abundance in the BBL (1761-5177 individuals/1000 m3) than in the DSL (1568-1743 individuals/1000 m3). There was a significant increase in near-bottom zooplankton biomass over the middle slope, at 1000-1300 m, linked to an increase in scyphozoans and siphonophores (Lensia spp. and Abylopsis tetragona) with peaks of 1.5-2.0 gWW/1000 m3. The peak of near-bottom zooplankton at 1000-1300 m coincided with the lowest temperatures (13.08 °C) and maximum O2 concentration (4.40 ml/l) near the bottom and below 1000 m with higher records in near-bottom turbidity. Gelatinous zooplankton are the main prey in the diet of the demersal fish Alepocephalus rostratus in the western Mediterranean, fish responsible for the peak of megafauna biomass reported at around 1200-1400 m in the deep Mediterranean and at similar depths in other oceanic areas (e.g. the NW Atlantic). We suggest that deep-sea environmental conditions can govern peaks of near-bottom zooplankton, as well as influence the structure of the demersal fish community.

  9. The influence of fuel mass load, oxygen supply and burning rate on emission factor and size distribution of carbonaceous particulate matter from indoor corn straw burning

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Guofeng; Xue, Miao; Wei, Siye; Chen, Yuanchen; Wang, Bing; Wang, Rong; Shen, Huizhong; Li, Wei; Zhang, Yanyan; Huang, Ye; Chen, Han; Wei, Wen; Zhao, Qiuyue; Li, Bin; Wu, Haisuo; Tao, Shu

    2014-01-01

    The uncertainty in emission estimation is strongly associated with the variation in emission factor which could be influenced by a variety of factors, like fuel property, stove type, fire management and even methods used in measurements. The impacts of these factors were usually complicated and often interacted with each other. In the present study, controlled burning experiments were conducted to investigate the influence of fuel mass load, air supply and burning rate on the emission of carbonaceous particulate matter (PM) from indoor corn straw burning. Their impacts on PM size distribution were also studied. The results showed that EFs of PM (EFPM), organic carbon (EFOC) and element carbon (EFEC) was independent of the fuel mass load. The differences among them under different burning rates or air supply amounts were also found to be insignificant (p > 0.05) in the tested circumstances. PM from the indoor corn straw burning was dominated by fine PM, and PM with diameter less than 2.1 μm contributed about 86.4±3.9% of the total. The size distribution of PM was also influenced by the burning rate and changed air supply conditions. On average, EFPM, EFOC and EFEC for corn straw burned in a residential cooking stove were 3.84±1.02, 0.846±0.895 and 0.391±0.350 g/kg, respectively. EFPM, EFOC and EFEC were found to be positively correlated with each other, but they were not significantly correlated with EF of co-emitted CO, suggesting a special attention should be paid to the use of CO acting as a surrogate for other incomplete pollutants. PMID:23923424

  10. Sensitivity analysis of some critical factors affecting simulated intrusion volumes during a low pressure transient event in a full-scale water distribution system.

    PubMed

    Ebacher, G; Besner, M C; Clément, B; Prévost, M

    2012-09-01

    Intrusion events caused by transient low pressures may result in the contamination of a water distribution system (DS). This work aims at estimating the range of potential intrusion volumes that could result from a real downsurge event caused by a momentary pump shutdown. A model calibrated with transient low pressure recordings was used to simulate total intrusion volumes through leakage orifices and submerged air vacuum valves (AVVs). Four critical factors influencing intrusion volumes were varied: the external head of (untreated) water on leakage orifices, the external head of (untreated) water on submerged air vacuum valves, the leakage rate, and the diameter of AVVs' outlet orifice (represented by a multiplicative factor). Leakage orifices' head and AVVs' orifice head levels were assessed through fieldwork. Two sets of runs were generated as part of two statistically designed experiments. A first set of 81 runs was based on a complete factorial design in which each factor was varied over 3 levels. A second set of 40 runs was based on a latin hypercube design, better suited for experimental runs on a computer model. The simulations were conducted using commercially available transient analysis software. Responses, measured by total intrusion volumes, ranged from 10 to 366 L. A second degree polynomial was used to analyze the total intrusion volumes. Sensitivity analyses of both designs revealed that the relationship between the total intrusion volume and the four contributing factors is not monotonic, with the AVVs' orifice head being the most influential factor. When intrusion through both pathways occurs concurrently, interactions between the intrusion flows through leakage orifices and submerged AVVs influence intrusion volumes. When only intrusion through leakage orifices is considered, the total intrusion volume is more largely influenced by the leakage rate than by the leakage orifices' head. The latter mainly impacts the extent of the area affected by

  11. Distribution of ABO blood groups in the patients with intracranial aneurysm and association of different risk factors with particular blood type

    PubMed Central

    Bir, Shyamal Chandra; Bollam, Papireddy; Nanda, Anil

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The association between ABO blood groups and intracranial aneurysms is not well-known. Many co-morbid factors are associated with intracranial aneurysms. Our objective was to assess the prevalence of different blood group in patients with intracranial aneurysm and to look for associations between risk factors and these groups. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study includes 1,491 cases who underwent surgical operations for intracranial aneurysms from 1993-2014. We have evaluated the information related to clinical history, ABO blood groups and associated risk factors in the patients both ruptured and unruptured intracranial aneurysms by chart review of the cases. Results: In our study, out of 1,491 cases, the most common ABO blood groups were group O (668 cases, 44.80%) and Group A (603 cases, 40.44%), and Rh(+) in 1,319 (88.4%) and Rh(-) in 147 (11.6%). Blood Group A (43% vs. 36%) and Group B (16.2% vs. 8.6%) were significantly higher in Caucasian and African Americans respectively. However, in general population, there was no significant difference in blood groups between Caucasians and African Americans. Rh(-) factor was significantly higher in Caucasians compared to African Americans. Incidence of smoking was significantly higher in aneurysm patients with O group compared to others. In addition, incidence of hypercholesterolemia was significantly higher in aneurysm patients with A group compared to others. Conclusion: The racial disparity in the distribution of blood groups, and risk factor association with blood groups in the development of intracranial aneurysm needs to be considered. The findings from our study may be useful in identifying patients at increased risk. Further study may be required to establish the risks from multiple centers studies around the world. PMID:26396600

  12. The number and distribution of eosinophils in the adult human gastrointestinal tract: a study and comparison of racial and environmental factors.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Takashi; Maruyama, Riruke; Ishikawa, Nahoko; Harada, Yuji; Araki, Asuka; Chen, Diane; Tauchi-Nishi, Pamela; Yuki, Takafumi; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2015-04-01

    There are surprisingly limited data regarding normal counts or distribution of eosinophils in the gastrointestinal tract, despite the increasing incidence of eosinophilic gastrointestinal tract diseases. Moreover, there are no published reports on the eosinophil number throughout the gastrointestinal tract of adults or Asian populations, or those investigating the effect of race on eosinophil count. First, in our study, the number of eosinophils from each portion of the gastrointestinal mucosa was quantified on biopsy slides from a Japanese adult population (132 samples). Next, the surgical resections from Japanese (110 samples), Japanese Americans (64), and Caucasians (57) were used to investigate the racial and environmental effects. Our results with the Japanese biopsy samples showed a significant increase in the number of eosinophils from the esophagus to the right colon (mean±SD/mm: 0.07±0.43 for the esophagus, 12.18±11.39 for the stomach, and 36.59±15.50 for the right colon), compared with a decrease in the left colon (8.53±7.83). Investigation using surgical samples showed that the distribution patterns in the gastrointestinal tract were very similar among the 3 ethnic groups, and there were no significant differences in the number of eosinophils among these groups, except in the esophageal epithelium. This study is the first report on the normal numbers and distribution of eosinophils throughout the gastrointestinal tract not only of an Asian population but also of adults. Our data suggest that a cutoff value for eosinophil counts, when rendering a diagnosis of eosinophilic gastrointestinal tract disease, should be individualized to the different biopsy sites. Interestingly, race and environmental factors did not seem to have a significant effect on eosinophil densities and distributions.

  13. High-Resolution Global Analysis of the Influences of Bas1 and Ino4 Transcription Factors on Meiotic DNA Break Distributions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xuan; Keeney, Scott

    2015-10-01

    Meiotic recombination initiates with DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) made by Spo11. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, many DSBs occur in "hotspots" coinciding with nucleosome-depleted gene promoters. Transcription factors (TFs) stimulate DSB formation in some hotspots, but TF roles are complex and variable between locations. Until now, available data for TF effects on global DSB patterns were of low spatial resolution and confined to a single TF. Here, we examine at high resolution the contributions of two TFs to genome-wide DSB distributions: Bas1, which was known to regulate DSB activity at some loci, and Ino4, for which some binding sites were known to be within strong DSB hotspots. We examined fine-scale DSB distributions in TF mutant strains by deep sequencing oligonucleotides that remain covalently bound to Spo11 as a byproduct of DSB formation, mapped Bas1 and Ino4 binding sites in meiotic cells, evaluated chromatin structure around DSB hotspots, and measured changes in global messenger RNA levels. Our findings show that binding of these TFs has essentially no predictive power for DSB hotspot activity and definitively support the hypothesis that TF control of DSB numbers is context dependent and frequently indirect. TFs often affected the fine-scale distributions of DSBs within hotspots, and when seen, these effects paralleled effects on local chromatin structure. In contrast, changes in DSB frequencies in hotspots did not correlate with quantitative measures of chromatin accessibility, histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation, or transcript levels. We also ruled out hotspot competition as a major source of indirect TF effects on DSB distributions. Thus, counter to prevailing models, roles of these TFs on DSB hotspot strength cannot be simply explained via chromatin "openness," histone modification, or compensatory interactions between adjacent hotspots.

  14. Impact of Real-world Factors Influencing Investment Decisions on the Costs and Distribution of Climate Change Mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmonds, J.; Iyer, G.; McJeon, H. C.; Leon, C.; Hultman, N.

    2015-12-01

    Strategies to mitigate dangerous anthropogenic climate change require a dramatic transformation of the energy system to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, that in turn requires large-scale investments. Investment decisions depend not only on investment capital availability but also on investment risks. A number of factors such as national policy environments, quality of public and private institutions, sector, firm and technology specific characteristics can affect investors' assessments of risks, leading to a wide variation in the business climate for investment. Such heterogeneity in investment risks can have important implications, as investors usually respond to risks by requiring higher returns for riskier projects; delaying or forgoing the investments; or preferring to invest in existing, familiar projects. We study the impact of variation in investment risks on regional patterns of emissions mitigation, the cost of emissions mitigation and patterns of technology deployment. We modify an integrated assessment model, widely used in global climate policy analyses (the Global Change Assessment Model) and incorporate decisions on investments based on risks along two dimensions. Along the first dimension, we vary perceived risks associated with particular technologies. To do so, we assign a higher cost of capital for investment in low-carbon technologies as these involve intrinsically higher levels of regulatory and market risk. The second dimension uses a proxy to vary investment risks across regions, based on an institutional quality metric published by the World Economic Forum. Explicit representation of investment risks has two major effects. First, it raises the cost of emissions mitigation relative to a world with uniform investment risks. Second, it shifts the pattern of emissions mitigation, with industrialized countries mitigating more, and developing countries mitigating less. Our results suggest that institutional reforms aimed at lowering investment

  15. Distribution and chemical coding of corticotropin-releasing factor-immunoreactive neurons in the guinea pig enteric nervous system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sumei; Gao, Na; Hu, Hong-Zhen; Wang, Xiyu; Wang, Guo-Du; Fang, Xiucai; Gao, Xiang; Xia, Yun; Wood, Jackie D

    2006-01-01

    Immunofluorescence was used to study immunoreactivity (IR) for corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) in the guinea pig enteric nervous system. CRF-IR was expressed in both the myenteric and the submucosal plexuses of all regions of the large and small intestine and the myenteric plexus of the stomach. CRF-IR nerve fibers were present in the myenteric and submucosal plexuses, in the circular muscle coat, and surrounding submucosal arterioles. Most of the CRF-IR fibers persisted in the myenteric and submucosal plexuses after 7 days in organotypic culture. CRF-IR was not coexpressed with tyrosine hydroxylase-IR or calcitonin gene-related peptide-IR fibers. The proportions of CRF-IR cell bodies in the myenteric plexus increased progressively from the stomach (0.6%) to the distal colon (2.8%). Most of the CRF-IR myenteric neurons (95%) had uniaxonal morphology; the remainder had Dogiel type II multipolar morphology. CRF-IR cell bodies in the myenteric plexus of the ileum expressed IR for choline acetyltransferase (56.9%), substance P (55.0%), and nitric oxide synthase (37.9%). CRF-IR never colocalized with IR for calbindin, calretinin, neuropeptide Y, serotonin, or somatostatin in the myenteric plexus. CRF-IR cell bodies were more abundant in the submucosal plexus (29.9-38.0%) than in the myenteric plexus. All CRF-IR neurons in submucosal ganglia expressed vasoactive intestinal peptide-IR and were likely to be secretomotor/vasodilator neurons. CRF-IR neurons did not express IR for the CRF(1) receptor. CRF(1)-IR was expressed in neuronal neighbors of those with CRF-IR. Collective evidence suggests that VIPergic secretomotor neurons might provide synaptic input to neighboring cholinergic neurons.

  16. Model-driven experimental approach reveals the complex regulatory distribution of p53 by the circadian factor Period 2

    PubMed Central

    Gotoh, Tetsuya; Liu, Jingjing; Vila-Caballer, Marian; Stauffer, Philip E.; Tyson, John J.; Finkielstein, Carla V.

    2016-01-01

    The circadian clock and cell cycle networks are interlocked on the molecular level, with the core clock loop exerting a multilevel regulatory role over cell cycle components. This is particularly relevant to the circadian factor Period 2 (Per2), which modulates the stability of the tumor suppressor p53 in unstressed cells and transcriptional activity in response to genotoxic stress. Per2 binding prevents Mdm2-mediated ubiquitination of p53 and, therefore, its degradation, and oscillations in the peaks of Per2 and p53 were expected to correspond. However, our findings showed that Per2 and p53 rhythms were significantly out-of-phase relative to each other in cell lysates and in purified cytoplasmic fractions. These seemingly conflicting experimental data motivated the use of a combined theoretical and experimental approach focusing on the role played by Per2 in dictating the phase of p53 oscillations. Systematic modeling of all possible regulatory scenarios predicted that the observed phase relationship between Per2 and p53 could be simulated if (i) p53 was more stable in the nucleus than in the cytoplasm, (ii) Per2 associates to various ubiquitinated forms of p53, and (iii) Per2 mediated p53 nuclear import. These predictions were supported by a sevenfold increase in p53’s half-life in the nucleus and by in vitro binding of Per2 to the various ubiquitinated forms of p53. Last, p53’s nuclear shuttling was significantly favored by ectopic expression of Per2 and reduced because of Per2 down-regulation. Our combined theoretical/mathematical approach reveals how clock regulatory nodes can be inferred from oscillating time course data. PMID:27834218

  17. Radar Interferometric Applications for a Better Understanding of the Distribution, Controlling Factors, and Precursors of Large Earthquakes in Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emil, M.; Sultan, M.; Fawzy, D. E.; Ahmed, M. E.; Chouinard, K.

    2012-12-01

    We are analyzing ERS-1 and ERS-2 and ENVISAT data to measure the spatial and temporal variations in three tectonically active areas near Izmit, Duzce and Van provinces in Turkey. We are using ERS-1 and ERS-2 data sets, which provide a longer time period of coverage (1992 to 2001). In addition, we will extend this forward to the present with ENVISAT radar data. The proposed activities can potentially provide predictive tools that can identify precursors to earthquakes and hence develop procedures to identify areas at risk. We are using radar interferometric techniques that have the ability of detecting deformation on the order of millimeters in scale over relatively large areas. We are applying the persistent scatterer and the small baseline subset (SBAS) techniques. A four fold exercise is being conducted: (1) extraction of land deformation rates and patterns from radar interferometry, (2) comparison and calibration of extracted rates to those extracted from existing geodetic ground stations, (3) identification of the natural factors (e.g., displacement along one or more faults) that are largely responsible for the observed deformation patterns, (4) utilizing the extracted deformation rates and/or patterns to identify areas prone to earthquake development in the near future, and (5) utilizing the extracted deformation rates or patterns to identify the areal extent of the domains affected by the earthquakes and the magnitude of the deformation following the earthquakes. The conditions in Turkey are typical of many of the world's areas that are witnessing continent to continent collisions. To date, applications similar to those advocated here for the assessment of ongoing land deformation in such areas and for identifying and characterizing land deformation as potential precursors to earthquakes have not been fully explored. Thus, the broader impact of this work lies in a successful demonstration of the advocated procedures in the study area which will invite similar

  18. Spatially distributed influence of agro-environmental factors governing nitrate fate and transport in an irrigated stream-aquifer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, R. T.; Ahmadi, M.; Gates, T. K.; Arabi, M.

    2015-12-01

    Elevated levels of nitrate (NO3) in groundwater systems pose a serious risk to human populations and natural ecosystems. As part of an effort to remediate NO3 contamination in irrigated stream-aquifer systems, this study elucidates agricultural and environmental parameters and processes that govern NO3 fate and transport at the regional (500 km2), local (50 km2), and field scales (< 1 km2). Specifically, the revised Morris sensitivity analysis method was applied to a finite-difference nitrogen cycling and reactive transport model of a regional-scale study site in the lower Arkansas River valley in southeastern Colorado. The method was used to rank the influence of anthropogenic activities and natural chemical processes on NO3 groundwater concentration, NO3 mass leaching, and NO3 mass loading to the Arkansas River from the aquifer. Sensitivity indices were computed for the entire study area in aggregate as well as each canal command area, crop type, and individual grid cells. Results suggest that fertilizer loading, crop uptake, and heterotrophic denitrification govern NO3 fate and transport for the majority of the study area, although their order of influence on NO3 groundwater concentration and mass leaching varies according to crop type and command area. Canal NO3 concentration and rates of autotrophic denitrification, nitrification, and humus decomposition also dominate or partially dominate in other locations. Each factor, with the exception of O2 reduction rate, is the dominating influence on NO3 groundwater concentration at one or more locations within the study area. Results can be used to determine critical processes and key management actions for future data collection and remediation strategies, with efforts able to be focused on localized areas.

  19. Molecular characterization, tissue distribution and functional analysis of macrophage migration inhibitory factor protein (MIF) in Chinese giant salamanders Andrias davidianus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lixin; Yang, Hui; Li, Fenggang; Zhang, Yingying; Yang, Zhaoxia; Li, Yang; Liu, Xiaolin

    2013-03-01

    The macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) produced in numerous cell types is a multi-functional cytokine mediating both innate and adaptive immune responses. To obtain a better understanding of the innate immune ability of Andrias davidianus and their defensive mechanisms, we identify the A. davidianus MIF (AdMIF) cDNA sequence from a skin cDNA library. The full-length cDNA of AdMIF was of 661bp, consisting of 134bp 5'-terminal UTR, 348bp open reading frame and 179bp 3'-terminal UTR. The deduced protein was composed of 115 amino acids, with an estimated molecular mass of 12.53kDa and a predicted pI of 6.07. AdMIF primary structure is as conserved as the other known sequences. Real time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis indicated that AdMIF gene was ubiquitously expressed in selected tissues, with the highest level in liver, moderate level in spleen, intestine, stomach, and the lowest level in heart and skin. The cDNA fragment encoding mature peptide of AdMIF was recombined and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). By means of Ni(2+)-chelating chromatography, the recombinant protein of AdMIF (rAdMIF) was purified successfully. The rAdMIF protein was proved to have enzymatic redox and tautomerase activity in vitro. This study represents the first report for characterization of A. davidianus MIF, demonstrating the successful isolation of MIF from Chinese giant salamanders, and the purified rAdMIF protein is important to produce the monoclonal antibodies and provides a foundation for further investigation of the physiological function of AdMIF.

  20. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α contributes to brain edema after stroke by regulating aquaporins and glycerol distribution in brain.

    PubMed

    Higashida, Tetsuhiro; Peng, Changya; Li, Jie; Dornbos, David; Teng, Kailing; Li, Xiaohua; Kinni, Harish; Guthikonda, Murali; Ding, Yuchuan

    2011-02-01

    Brain edema following stroke is a critical clinical problem due to its association with increased morbidity and mortality. Despite its significance, present treatment for brain edema simply provides symptomatic relief due to the fact that molecular mechanisms underlying brain edema remain poorly understood. The present study investigated the role of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and aquaporins (AQP-4 and -9) in regulating cerebral glycerol accumulation and inducing brain edema in a rodent model of stroke. Two-hours of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) followed by reperfusion was performed in male Sprague-Dawley rats (250-280 g). Anti-AQP-4 antibody, anti-AQP-9 antibody, or 2-Methoxyestradiol (2ME2, an inhibitor of HIF-1α) was given at the time of MCAO. The rats were sacrificed at 1 and 24 hours after reperfusion and their brains were examined. Extracellular and intracellular glycerol concentration of brain tissue was calculated with an enzymatic glycerol assay. The protein expressions of HIF-1α, AQP-4 and AQP-9 were determined by Western blotting. Brain edema was measured by brain water content. Compared to control, edema (p < 0.01), increased glycerol (p < 0.05), and enhanced expressions of HIF-1α, AQP-4, and AQP-9 (p < 0.05) were observed after stroke. With inhibition of AQP-4, AQP-9 or HIF-1α, edema and extracellular glycerol were significantly (p < 0.01) decreased while intracellular glycerol was increased (p < 0.01) 1 hour after stroke. Inhibition of HIF-1α with 2ME2 suppressed (p < 0.01) the expression of AQP-4 and AQP-9. These findings suggest that HIF-1α serves as an upstream regulator of cerebral glycerol concentrations and brain edema via a molecular pathway involving AQP-4 and AQP-9. Pharmacological blockade of this pathway in stroke patients may provide novel therapeutic strategies.

  1. Distribution of algae in the San Joaquin River, California, in relation to nutrient supply, salinity and other environmental factors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leland, H.V.; Brown, L.R.; Mueller, D.K.

    2001-01-01

    1. The taxonomic composition and biomass of the phytoplankton and the taxonomic composition of the phytobenthos of the San Joaquin River and its major tributaries were examined in relation to water chemistry, habitat and flow regime. Agricultural drainage and subsurface flow contribute to a complex gradient of salinity and nutrients in this eutrophic, 'lowland type' river.2. Because of light-limiting conditions for growth, maintenance demands of the algae exceed production during summer and autumn in the San Joaquin River where there is no inflow from tributaries. In contrast to substantial gains in concentration of inorganic nitrogen and soluble reactive phosphorus during the summer of normal-flow years, net losses of algal biomass (2-4 ??g L-1 day-1 chlorophyll a) occurred in a mid-river segment with no significant tributary inflow. However, downstream of a large tributary draining the Sierra Nevada, a substantial net gain in algal biomass (6-11 μg L-1 day-1) occurred in the summer, but not in the spring (loss of 1-6 μg L-1 day-1) or autumn (loss of 2-5 ??g L-1 day-1).3. The phytoplankton was dominated in summer by 'r-selected' centric diatoms (Thalassiosirales), species both tolerant of variable salinity and widely distributed in the San Joaquin River. Pennate diatoms were proportionally more abundant (in biomass) in the winter, spring and autumn. Abundant taxa included the diatoms Cyclotella meneghiniana, Skeletonema cf. potamos, Cyclostephanos invisitatus, Thalassiosira weissflogii, Nitzschia acicularis, N. palea and N. reversa, and the chlorophytes Chlamydomonas sp. and Scenesdesmus quadricauda. Patterns in the abundance of species indicated that assembly of the phytoplankton is limited more by light and flow regime than by nutrient supply.4. The phytobenthos was dominated by larger, more slowly reproducing pennate diatoms. Few of the abundant species are euryhaline. The diatoms Navicula recens and Nitzschia inconspicua and cyanophytes, Oscillatoria spp

  2. Associations Between Macrolevel Economic Factors and Weight Distributions in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A Multilevel Analysis of 200 000 Adults in 40 Countries

    PubMed Central

    Sweet, Elizabeth; Kawachi, Ichiro; Heymann, Jody; Galea, Sandro

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We examined associations between macrolevel economic factors hypothesized to drive changes in distributions of weight and body mass index (BMI) in a representative sample of 200 796 men and women from 40 low- and middle-income countries.