Science.gov

Sample records for factor rbp-j-mediated signaling

  1. Growth factor signalling.

    PubMed

    de Laat, S W; Boonstra, J; Defize, L H; Kruijer, W; van der Saag, P T; Tertoolen, L G; van Zoelen, E J; den Hertog, J

    1999-01-01

    Signalling between cells in the developing vertebrate embryo is essential for normal embryonic development. In the mid 1970's, signal transduction research started at the Hubrecht Laboratory with special emphasis on analysis of the signalling mechanisms that direct cell proliferation and differentiation. The introduction of in vitro model systems contributed tremendously to the success of the signal transduction research at the Hubrecht Laboratory. Initially neuroblastoma cell lines, and later embryonal carcinoma and embryonal stem cells played an important role in identification of the molecular key players in developmental signalling. For instance, embryonal carcinoma cells were used to identify and characterise polypeptide growth factors. Growth factor signalling research was extended to analysis of growth factor receptor activation. Moreover, the second messenger systems that are linked to growth factor receptors were studied, as well as the nuclear responses to growth factor receptor activation. Finally, the role of growth factor signalling in differentiation was established using embryonal carcinoma cells. Here, we will review work that was characteristic for the growth factor receptor signalling research that was done at the Hubrecht Laboratory between 1980 and the early 1990's.

  2. Evolutionary origin of rhizobium Nod factor signaling.

    PubMed

    Streng, Arend; op den Camp, Rik; Bisseling, Ton; Geurts, René

    2011-10-01

    For over two decades now, it is known that the nodule symbiosis between legume plants and nitrogen fixing rhizobium bacteria is set in motion by the bacterial signal molecule named nodulation (Nod) factor. Upon Nod factor perception a signaling cascade is activated that is also essential for endomycorrhizal symbiosis (Fig. 1). This suggests that rhizobium co-opted the evolutionary far more ancient mycorrhizal signaling pathway in order to establish an endosymbiotic interaction with legumes. As arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi of the Glomeromycota phylum can establish a symbiosis with the fast majority of land plants, it is most probable that this signaling cascade is wide spread in plant kingdom. However, Nod factor perception generally is considered to be unique to legumes. Two recent breakthroughs on the evolutionary origin of Rhizobium Nod factor signaling demonstrate that this is not the case. The purification of Nod factor-like molecules excreted by the mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices and the role of the LysM-type Nod factor receptor PaNFP in the non-legume Parasponia andersonii provide novel understanding on the evolution of rhizobial Nod factor signaling.

  3. Deletion of RBP-J in adult mice leads to the onset of aortic valve degenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi; Feng, Lei; Wang, Chun-Mei; Zheng, Qi-Jun; Zhao, Bi-Jun; Yi, Wei; Zhang, Jin-Zhou; Wang, Yue-Min; Guo, Hai-Tao; Yi, Ding-Hua; Han, Hua

    2012-04-01

    Transcription factor RBP-J-mediated Notch signaling has been implicated in several inherited cardiovascular diseases including aortic valve diseases (AVD). But whether Notch signal plays a role in AVD in adults has been unclear. This study aims to test whether the deletion of RBP-J in adult mice would lead to AVD and to investigate the underlying mechanisms. Cre-LoxP-mediated gene deletion was employed to disrupt Notch signal in adult mice. Immunofluorescence and electron microscope observations showed that deletion of RBP-J in adult mice led to early morphological changes of AVD. The size of aortic valve was enlarged. The endothelial homeostasis was perturbed, probably due to the up-regulation of VEGFR2. The endothelial cells exhibited increased proliferation and loose endothelial junctions. The valvular mesenchyme displayed significant fibrosis, consistent with the up-regulation of TGF-β1 and activation of endothelial-mesenchymal transition. We observed melanin-producing cells in aortic valves. The number of melanin-producing cells increased significantly, and their location changed from the mesenchyme to subendothelial layer of valve cusps in RBP-J deficient mice. These results suggest that RBP-J-mediated Notch signaling in aortic valves may be critically involved in valve homeostasis and valve diseases as well. These findings will be helpful for the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of AVD in adults.

  4. Some Factors Affecting Time Reversal Signal Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prevorovsky, Z.; Kober, J.

    Time reversal (TR) ultrasonic signal processing is now broadly used in a variety of applications, and also in NDE/NDT field. TR processing is used e.g. for S/N ratio enhancement, reciprocal transducer calibration, location, identification, and reconstruction of unknown sources, etc. TR procedure in con-junction with nonlinear elastic wave spectroscopy NEWS is also useful for sensitive detection of defects (nonlinearity presence). To enlarge possibilities of acoustic emission (AE) method, we proposed the use of TR signal reconstruction ability for detected AE signals transfer from a structure with AE source onto a similar remote model of the structure (real or numerical), which allows easier source analysis under laboratory conditions. Though the TR signal reconstruction is robust regarding the system variations, some small differences and changes influence space-time TR focus and reconstruction quality. Experiments were performed on metallic parts of both simple and complicated geometry to examine effects of small changes of temperature or configuration (body shape, dimensions, transducers placement, etc.) on TR reconstruction quality. Results of experiments are discussed in this paper. Considering mathematical similarity between TR and Coda Wave Interferometry (CWI), prediction of signal reconstruction quality was possible using only the direct propagation. The results show how some factors like temperature or stress changes may deteriorate the TR reconstruction quality. It is also shown that sometimes the reconstruction quality is not enhanced using longer TR signal (S/N ratio may decrease).

  5. The Fibroblast Growth Factor signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ornitz, David M; Itoh, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    The signaling component of the mammalian Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF) family is comprised of eighteen secreted proteins that interact with four signaling tyrosine kinase FGF receptors (FGFRs). Interaction of FGF ligands with their signaling receptors is regulated by protein or proteoglycan cofactors and by extracellular binding proteins. Activated FGFRs phosphorylate specific tyrosine residues that mediate interaction with cytosolic adaptor proteins and the RAS-MAPK, PI3K-AKT, PLCγ, and STAT intracellular signaling pathways. Four structurally related intracellular non-signaling FGFs interact with and regulate the family of voltage gated sodium channels. Members of the FGF family function in the earliest stages of embryonic development and during organogenesis to maintain progenitor cells and mediate their growth, differentiation, survival, and patterning. FGFs also have roles in adult tissues where they mediate metabolic functions, tissue repair, and regeneration, often by reactivating developmental signaling pathways. Consistent with the presence of FGFs in almost all tissues and organs, aberrant activity of the pathway is associated with developmental defects that disrupt organogenesis, impair the response to injury, and result in metabolic disorders, and cancer. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25772309

  6. Epidermal growth factor receptor signaling in tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Shvartsman, Stanislav; Wiley, H. S.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2004-08-01

    Abstract: A peptide purified from the salivary gland of a mouse was shown few years ago to accelerate incisor eruption and eyelid opening in newborn mice, and was named epidermal growth factor (EGF). The members of this family of peptide growth factors had been identified in numerous physiological and pathological contexts. EGF binds to a cell surface EGF receptor, which induces a biochemical modification (phosphorylation) of the receptor's cytoplasmic tail. There is a growing consensus in the research community that, in addition to cellular and molecular studies, the dynamics of the EGFR network and its operation must be examined in tissues. A key challenge is to integrate the existing molecular and cellular information into a system-level description of the EGFR network at the tissue and organism level. In this paper, the two examples of EGFR signaling in tissues are described, and the recent efforts to model EGFR autocrine loops, which is a predominant mode of EGFR activation in vivo, are summarized.

  7. Fibroblast Growth Factor Signaling in Metabolic Regulation.

    PubMed

    Nies, Vera J M; Sancar, Gencer; Liu, Weilin; van Zutphen, Tim; Struik, Dicky; Yu, Ruth T; Atkins, Annette R; Evans, Ronald M; Jonker, Johan W; Downes, Michael Robert

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity is a growing health problem. Obesity is strongly associated with several comorbidities, such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, certain cancers, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes, which all reduce life expectancy and life quality. Several drugs have been put forward in order to treat these diseases, but many of them have detrimental side effects. The unexpected role of the family of fibroblast growth factors in the regulation of energy metabolism provides new approaches to the treatment of metabolic diseases and offers a valuable tool to gain more insight into metabolic regulation. The known beneficial effects of FGF19 and FGF21 on metabolism, together with recently discovered similar effects of FGF1 suggest that FGFs and their derivatives carry great potential as novel therapeutics to treat metabolic conditions. To facilitate the development of new therapies with improved targeting and minimal side effects, a better understanding of the molecular mechanism of action of FGFs is needed. In this review, we will discuss what is currently known about the physiological roles of FGF signaling in tissues important for metabolic homeostasis. In addition, we will discuss current concepts regarding their pharmacological properties and effector tissues in the context of metabolic disease. Also, the recent progress in the development of FGF variants will be reviewed. Our goal is to provide a comprehensive overview of the current concepts and consensuses regarding FGF signaling in metabolic health and disease and to provide starting points for the development of FGF-based therapies against metabolic conditions.

  8. Fibroblast Growth Factor Signaling in Metabolic Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Nies, Vera J. M.; Sancar, Gencer; Liu, Weilin; van Zutphen, Tim; Struik, Dicky; Yu, Ruth T.; Atkins, Annette R.; Evans, Ronald M.; Jonker, Johan W.; Downes, Michael Robert

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity is a growing health problem. Obesity is strongly associated with several comorbidities, such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, certain cancers, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes, which all reduce life expectancy and life quality. Several drugs have been put forward in order to treat these diseases, but many of them have detrimental side effects. The unexpected role of the family of fibroblast growth factors in the regulation of energy metabolism provides new approaches to the treatment of metabolic diseases and offers a valuable tool to gain more insight into metabolic regulation. The known beneficial effects of FGF19 and FGF21 on metabolism, together with recently discovered similar effects of FGF1 suggest that FGFs and their derivatives carry great potential as novel therapeutics to treat metabolic conditions. To facilitate the development of new therapies with improved targeting and minimal side effects, a better understanding of the molecular mechanism of action of FGFs is needed. In this review, we will discuss what is currently known about the physiological roles of FGF signaling in tissues important for metabolic homeostasis. In addition, we will discuss current concepts regarding their pharmacological properties and effector tissues in the context of metabolic disease. Also, the recent progress in the development of FGF variants will be reviewed. Our goal is to provide a comprehensive overview of the current concepts and consensuses regarding FGF signaling in metabolic health and disease and to provide starting points for the development of FGF-based therapies against metabolic conditions. PMID:26834701

  9. Tunable signal processing through modular control of transcription factor translocation.

    PubMed

    Hao, Nan; Budnik, Bogdan A; Gunawardena, Jeremy; O'Shea, Erin K

    2013-01-25

    Signaling pathways can induce different dynamics of transcription factor (TF) activation. We explored how TFs process signaling inputs to generate diverse dynamic responses. The budding yeast general stress-responsive TF Msn2 acted as a tunable signal processor that could track, filter, or integrate signals in an input-dependent manner. This tunable signal processing appears to originate from dual regulation of both nuclear import and export by phosphorylation, as mutants with one form of regulation sustained only one signal-processing function. Versatile signal processing by Msn2 is crucial for generating distinct dynamic responses to different natural stresses. Our findings reveal how complex signal-processing functions are integrated into a single molecule and provide a guide for the design of TFs with "programmable" signal-processing functions.

  10. Tunable signal processing through modular control of transcription factor translocation

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Nan; Budnik, Bogdan A.; Gunawardena, Jeremy; O’Shea, Erin K.

    2013-01-01

    Signaling pathways can induce different dynamics of transcription factor (TF) activation. We explored how TFs process signaling inputs to generate diverse dynamic responses. The budding yeast general stress responsive TF Msn2 acted as a tunable signal processor that could track, filter, or integrate signals in an input dependent manner. This tunable signal processing appears to originate from dual regulation of both nuclear import and export by phosphorylation, as mutants with one form of regulation sustained only one signal processing function. Versatile signal processing by Msn2 is crucial for generating distinct dynamic responses to different natural stresses. Our findings reveal how complex signal processing functions are integrated into a single molecule and provide a guide for the design of TFs with “programmable” signal processing functions. PMID:23349292

  11. An integrated signal transduction network of macrophage migration inhibitory factor.

    PubMed

    Subbannayya, Tejaswini; Variar, Prathyaksha; Advani, Jayshree; Nair, Bipin; Shankar, Subramanian; Gowda, Harsha; Saussez, Sven; Chatterjee, Aditi; Prasad, T S Keshava

    2016-06-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a glycosylated multi-functional protein that acts as an enzyme as well as a cytokine. MIF mediates its actions through a cell surface class II major histocompatibility chaperone, CD74 and co-receptors such as CD44, CXCR2, CXCR4 or CXCR7. MIF has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. Although MIF is a molecule of biomedical importance, a public resource of MIF signaling pathway is currently lacking. In view of this, we carried out detailed data mining and documentation of the signaling events pertaining to MIF from published literature and developed an integrated reaction map of MIF signaling. This resulted in the cataloguing of 68 molecules belonging to MIF signaling pathway, which includes 24 protein-protein interactions, 44 post-translational modifications, 11 protein translocation events and 8 activation/inhibition events. In addition, 65 gene regulation events at the mRNA levels induced by MIF signaling have also been catalogued. This signaling pathway has been integrated into NetPath ( http://www.netpath.org ), a freely available human signaling pathway resource developed previously by our group. The MIF pathway data is freely available online in various community standard data exchange formats. We expect that data on signaling events and a detailed signaling map of MIF will provide the scientific community with an improved platform to facilitate further molecular as well as biomedical investigations on MIF. PMID:27139435

  12. Fibroblast growth factor signaling in skeletal development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Ornitz, David M.; Marie, Pierre J.

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling pathways are essential regulators of vertebrate skeletal development. FGF signaling regulates development of the limb bud and formation of the mesenchymal condensation and has key roles in regulating chondrogenesis, osteogenesis, and bone and mineral homeostasis. This review updates our review on FGFs in skeletal development published in Genes & Development in 2002, examines progress made on understanding the functions of the FGF signaling pathway during critical stages of skeletogenesis, and explores the mechanisms by which mutations in FGF signaling molecules cause skeletal malformations in humans. Links between FGF signaling pathways and other interacting pathways that are critical for skeletal development and could be exploited to treat genetic diseases and repair bone are also explored. PMID:26220993

  13. Burkholderia Diffusible Signal Factor Signals to Francisella novicida To Disperse Biofilm and Increase Siderophore Production

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Scott N.; Chung, Myung-Chul

    2015-01-01

    In many bacteria, the ability to modulate biofilm production relies on specific signaling molecules that are either self-produced or made by neighboring microbes within the ecological niche. We analyzed the potential interspecies signaling effect of the Burkholderia diffusible signal factor (BDSF) on Francisella novicida, a model organism for Francisella tularensis, and demonstrated that BDSF both inhibits the formation and causes the dispersion of Francisella biofilm. Specificity was demonstrated for the cis versus the trans form of BDSF. Using transcriptome sequencing, quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, and activity assays, we found that BDSF altered the expression of many F. novicida genes, including genes involved in biofilm formation, such as chitinases. Using a chitinase inhibitor, the antibiofilm activity of BDSF was also shown to be chitinase dependent. In addition, BDSF caused an increase in RelA expression and increased levels of (p)ppGpp, leading to decreased biofilm production. These results support our observation that exposure of F. novicida to BDSF causes biofilm dispersal. Furthermore, BDSF upregulated the genes involved in iron acquisition (figABCD), increasing siderophore production. Thus, this study provides evidence for a potential role and mechanism of diffusible signal factor (DSF) signaling in the genus Francisella and suggests the possibility of interspecies signaling between Francisella and other bacteria. Overall, this study suggests that in response to the interspecies DSF signal, F. novicida can alter its gene expression and regulate its biofilm formation. PMID:26231649

  14. Burkholderia Diffusible Signal Factor Signals to Francisella novicida To Disperse Biofilm and Increase Siderophore Production.

    PubMed

    Dean, Scott N; Chung, Myung-Chul; van Hoek, Monique L

    2015-10-01

    In many bacteria, the ability to modulate biofilm production relies on specific signaling molecules that are either self-produced or made by neighboring microbes within the ecological niche. We analyzed the potential interspecies signaling effect of the Burkholderia diffusible signal factor (BDSF) on Francisella novicida, a model organism for Francisella tularensis, and demonstrated that BDSF both inhibits the formation and causes the dispersion of Francisella biofilm. Specificity was demonstrated for the cis versus the trans form of BDSF. Using transcriptome sequencing, quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, and activity assays, we found that BDSF altered the expression of many F. novicida genes, including genes involved in biofilm formation, such as chitinases. Using a chitinase inhibitor, the antibiofilm activity of BDSF was also shown to be chitinase dependent. In addition, BDSF caused an increase in RelA expression and increased levels of (p)ppGpp, leading to decreased biofilm production. These results support our observation that exposure of F. novicida to BDSF causes biofilm dispersal. Furthermore, BDSF upregulated the genes involved in iron acquisition (figABCD), increasing siderophore production. Thus, this study provides evidence for a potential role and mechanism of diffusible signal factor (DSF) signaling in the genus Francisella and suggests the possibility of interspecies signaling between Francisella and other bacteria. Overall, this study suggests that in response to the interspecies DSF signal, F. novicida can alter its gene expression and regulate its biofilm formation. PMID:26231649

  15. The statistical mechanics of complex signaling networks: nerve growth factor signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, K. S.; Hill, C. C.; Calero, G. A.; Myers, C. R.; Lee, K. H.; Sethna, J. P.; Cerione, R. A.

    2004-10-01

    The inherent complexity of cellular signaling networks and their importance to a wide range of cellular functions necessitates the development of modeling methods that can be applied toward making predictions and highlighting the appropriate experiments to test our understanding of how these systems are designed and function. We use methods of statistical mechanics to extract useful predictions for complex cellular signaling networks. A key difficulty with signaling models is that, while significant effort is being made to experimentally measure the rate constants for individual steps in these networks, many of the parameters required to describe their behavior remain unknown or at best represent estimates. To establish the usefulness of our approach, we have applied our methods toward modeling the nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced differentiation of neuronal cells. In particular, we study the actions of NGF and mitogenic epidermal growth factor (EGF) in rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. Through a network of intermediate signaling proteins, each of these growth factors stimulates extracellular regulated kinase (Erk) phosphorylation with distinct dynamical profiles. Using our modeling approach, we are able to predict the influence of specific signaling modules in determining the integrated cellular response to the two growth factors. Our methods also raise some interesting insights into the design and possible evolution of cellular systems, highlighting an inherent property of these systems that we call 'sloppiness.'

  16. Fibroblast growth factor signaling in mammalian tooth development.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun-Ying; Prochazka, Jan; Goodwin, Alice F; Klein, Ophir D

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we discuss the central role of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling in mammalian tooth development. The FGF family consists of 22 members, most of which bind to four different receptor tyrosine kinases, which in turn signal through a cascade of intracellular proteins. This signaling regulates a number of cellular processes, including proliferation, differentiation, cell adhesion and cell mobility. FGF signaling first becomes important in the presumptive dental epithelium at the initiation stage of tooth development, and subsequently, it controls the invagination of the dental epithelium into the underlying mesenchyme. Later, FGFs are critical in tooth shape formation and differentiation of ameloblasts and odontoblasts, as well as in the development and homeostasis of the stem cell niche that fuels the continuously growing mouse incisor. In addition, FGF signaling is critical in human teeth, as mutations in genes encoding FGF ligands or receptors result in several congenital syndromes characterized by alterations in tooth number, morphology or enamel structure. The parallel roles of FGF signaling in mouse and human tooth development demonstrate the conserved importance of FGF signaling in mammalian odontogenesis.

  17. Application of homomorphic signal processing to stress wave factor analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. H., Jr.; Lee, S. S.; Karaguelle, H.

    1985-01-01

    The stress wave factor (SWF) signal, which is the output of an ultrasonic testing system where the transmitting and receiving transducers are coupled to the same face of the test structure, is analyzed in the frequency domain. The SWF signal generated in an isotropic elastic plate is modelled as the superposition of successive reflections. The reflection which is generated by the stress waves which travel P times as a longitudinal (P) wave and s times as a shear (S) wave through the plate while reflecting back and forth between the bottom and top faces of the plate is designated as the reflection with P, s. Short-time portions of the SWF signal are considered for obtaining spectral information on individual reflections. If the significant reflections are not overlapped, the short-time Fourier analysis is used. A summary of the elevant points of homomorphic signal processing, which is also called cepstrum analysis, is given. Homomorphic signal processing is applied to short-time SWF signals to obtain estimates of the log spectra of individual reflections for cases in which the reflections are overlapped. Two typical SWF signals generated in aluminum plates (overlapping and non-overlapping reflections) are analyzed.

  18. Beclin 1 regulates growth factor receptor signaling in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Rohatgi, R A; Janusis, J; Leonard, D; Bellvé, K D; Fogarty, K E; Baehrecke, E H; Corvera, S; Shaw, L M

    2015-10-16

    Beclin 1 is a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor that is decreased in many human tumors. The function of beclin 1 in cancer has been attributed primarily to its role in the degradative process of macroautophagy. However, beclin 1 is a core component of the vacuolar protein sorting 34 (Vps34)/class III phosphatidylinositoI-3 kinase (PI3KC3) and Vps15/p150 complex that regulates multiple membrane-trafficking events. In the current study, we describe an alternative mechanism of action for beclin 1 in breast cancer involving its control of growth factor receptor signaling. We identify a specific stage of early endosome maturation that is regulated by beclin 1, the transition of APPL1-containing phosphatidyIinositol 3-phosphate-negative (PI3P(-)) endosomes to PI3P(+) endosomes. Beclin 1 regulates PI3P production in response to growth factor stimulation to control the residency time of growth factor receptors in the PI3P(-)/APPL(+)-signaling-competent compartment. As a result, suppression of BECN1 sustains growth factor-stimulated AKT and ERK activation resulting in increased breast carcinoma cell invasion. In human breast tumors, beclin 1 expression is inversely correlated with AKT and ERK phosphorylation. Our data identify a novel role for beclin 1 in regulating growth factor signaling and reveal a mechanism by which loss of beclin 1 expression would enhance breast cancer progression.

  19. The transcription factor Zeb2 regulates signaling in mast cells.

    PubMed

    Barbu, Emilia Alina; Zhang, Juan; Berenstein, Elsa H; Groves, Jacqueline R; Parks, Lauren M; Siraganian, Reuben P

    2012-06-15

    Mast cell activation results in the release of stored and newly synthesized inflammatory mediators. We found that Zeb2 (also named Sip1, Zfhx1b), a zinc finger transcription factor, regulates both early and late mast cell responses. Transfection with small interfering RNA (siRNA) reduced Zeb2 expression and resulted in decreased FcεRI-mediated degranulation, with a parallel reduction in receptor-induced activation of NFAT and NF-κB transcription factors, but an enhanced response to the LPS-mediated activation of NF-κB. There was variable and less of a decrease in the Ag-mediated release of the cytokines TNF-α, IL-13, and CCL-4. This suggests that low Zeb2 expression differentially regulates signaling pathways in mast cells. Multiple phosphorylation events were impaired that affected molecules both at early and late events in the signaling pathway. The Zeb2 siRNA-treated mast cells had altered cell cycle progression, as well as decreased expression of several molecules including cell surface FcεRI and its β subunit, Gab2, phospholipase-Cγ1, and phospholipase-Cγ2, all of which are required for receptor-induced signal transduction. The results indicate that the transcription factor Zeb2 controls the expression of molecules thereby regulating signaling in mast cells.

  20. DELLA-mediated gibberellin signalling regulates Nod factor signalling and rhizobial infection

    PubMed Central

    Fonouni-Farde, Camille; Tan, Sovanna; Baudin, Maël; Brault, Mathias; Wen, Jiangqi; Mysore, Kirankumar S.; Niebel, Andreas; Frugier, Florian; Diet, Anouck

    2016-01-01

    Legumes develop symbiotic interactions with rhizobial bacteria to form nitrogen-fixing nodules. Bacterial Nod factors (NFs) and plant regulatory pathways modulating NF signalling control rhizobial infections and nodulation efficiency. Here we show that gibberellin (GA) signalling mediated by DELLA proteins inhibits rhizobial infections and controls the NF induction of the infection marker ENOD11 in Medicago truncatula. Ectopic expression of a constitutively active DELLA protein in the epidermis is sufficient to promote ENOD11 expression in the absence of symbiotic signals. We show using heterologous systems that DELLA proteins can interact with the nodulation signalling pathway 2 (NSP2) and nuclear factor-YA1 (NF-YA1) transcription factors that are essential for the activation of NF responses. Furthermore, MtDELLA1 can bind the ERN1 (ERF required for nodulation 1) promoter and positively transactivate its expression. Overall, we propose that GA-dependent action of DELLA proteins may directly regulate the NSP1/NSP2 and NF-YA1 activation of ERN1 transcription to regulate rhizobial infections. PMID:27586842

  1. DELLA-mediated gibberellin signalling regulates Nod factor signalling and rhizobial infection.

    PubMed

    Fonouni-Farde, Camille; Tan, Sovanna; Baudin, Maël; Brault, Mathias; Wen, Jiangqi; Mysore, Kirankumar S; Niebel, Andreas; Frugier, Florian; Diet, Anouck

    2016-01-01

    Legumes develop symbiotic interactions with rhizobial bacteria to form nitrogen-fixing nodules. Bacterial Nod factors (NFs) and plant regulatory pathways modulating NF signalling control rhizobial infections and nodulation efficiency. Here we show that gibberellin (GA) signalling mediated by DELLA proteins inhibits rhizobial infections and controls the NF induction of the infection marker ENOD11 in Medicago truncatula. Ectopic expression of a constitutively active DELLA protein in the epidermis is sufficient to promote ENOD11 expression in the absence of symbiotic signals. We show using heterologous systems that DELLA proteins can interact with the nodulation signalling pathway 2 (NSP2) and nuclear factor-YA1 (NF-YA1) transcription factors that are essential for the activation of NF responses. Furthermore, MtDELLA1 can bind the ERN1 (ERF required for nodulation 1) promoter and positively transactivate its expression. Overall, we propose that GA-dependent action of DELLA proteins may directly regulate the NSP1/NSP2 and NF-YA1 activation of ERN1 transcription to regulate rhizobial infections. PMID:27586842

  2. Early signaling dynamics of the epidermal growth factor receptor

    PubMed Central

    Gajadhar, Aaron S.; Swenson, Eric J.; Rothenberg, Daniel A.; Curran, Timothy G.; White, Forest M.

    2016-01-01

    Despite extensive study of the EGF receptor (EGFR) signaling network, the immediate posttranslational changes that occur in response to growth factor stimulation remain poorly characterized; as a result, the biological mechanisms underlying signaling initiation remain obscured. To address this deficiency, we have used a mass spectrometry-based approach to measure system-wide phosphorylation changes throughout the network with 10-s resolution in the 80 s after stimulation in response to a range of eight growth factor concentrations. Significant changes were observed on proteins far downstream in the network as early as 10 s after stimulation, indicating a system capable of transmitting information quickly. Meanwhile, canonical members of the EGFR signaling network fall into clusters with distinct activation patterns. Src homology 2 domain containing transforming protein (Shc) and phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) phosphorylation levels increase rapidly, but equilibrate within 20 s, whereas proteins such as Grb2-associated binder-1 (Gab1) and SH2-containing tyrosine phosphatase (SHP2) show slower, sustained increases. Proximity ligation assays reveal that Shc and Gab1 phosphorylation patterns are representative of separate timescales for physical association with the receptor. Inhibition of phosphatases with vanadate reveals site-specific regulatory mechanisms and also uncovers primed activating components in the network, including Src family kinases, whose inhibition affects only a subset of proteins within the network. The results presented highlight the complexity of signaling initiation and provide a window into exploring mechanistic hypotheses about receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) biology. PMID:26929352

  3. Early signaling dynamics of the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Raven J; Gajadhar, Aaron S; Swenson, Eric J; Rothenberg, Daniel A; Curran, Timothy G; White, Forest M

    2016-03-15

    Despite extensive study of the EGF receptor (EGFR) signaling network, the immediate posttranslational changes that occur in response to growth factor stimulation remain poorly characterized; as a result, the biological mechanisms underlying signaling initiation remain obscured. To address this deficiency, we have used a mass spectrometry-based approach to measure system-wide phosphorylation changes throughout the network with 10-s resolution in the 80 s after stimulation in response to a range of eight growth factor concentrations. Significant changes were observed on proteins far downstream in the network as early as 10 s after stimulation, indicating a system capable of transmitting information quickly. Meanwhile, canonical members of the EGFR signaling network fall into clusters with distinct activation patterns. Src homology 2 domain containing transforming protein (Shc) and phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) phosphorylation levels increase rapidly, but equilibrate within 20 s, whereas proteins such as Grb2-associated binder-1 (Gab1) and SH2-containing tyrosine phosphatase (SHP2) show slower, sustained increases. Proximity ligation assays reveal that Shc and Gab1 phosphorylation patterns are representative of separate timescales for physical association with the receptor. Inhibition of phosphatases with vanadate reveals site-specific regulatory mechanisms and also uncovers primed activating components in the network, including Src family kinases, whose inhibition affects only a subset of proteins within the network. The results presented highlight the complexity of signaling initiation and provide a window into exploring mechanistic hypotheses about receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) biology. PMID:26929352

  4. Early signaling dynamics of the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Raven J; Gajadhar, Aaron S; Swenson, Eric J; Rothenberg, Daniel A; Curran, Timothy G; White, Forest M

    2016-03-15

    Despite extensive study of the EGF receptor (EGFR) signaling network, the immediate posttranslational changes that occur in response to growth factor stimulation remain poorly characterized; as a result, the biological mechanisms underlying signaling initiation remain obscured. To address this deficiency, we have used a mass spectrometry-based approach to measure system-wide phosphorylation changes throughout the network with 10-s resolution in the 80 s after stimulation in response to a range of eight growth factor concentrations. Significant changes were observed on proteins far downstream in the network as early as 10 s after stimulation, indicating a system capable of transmitting information quickly. Meanwhile, canonical members of the EGFR signaling network fall into clusters with distinct activation patterns. Src homology 2 domain containing transforming protein (Shc) and phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) phosphorylation levels increase rapidly, but equilibrate within 20 s, whereas proteins such as Grb2-associated binder-1 (Gab1) and SH2-containing tyrosine phosphatase (SHP2) show slower, sustained increases. Proximity ligation assays reveal that Shc and Gab1 phosphorylation patterns are representative of separate timescales for physical association with the receptor. Inhibition of phosphatases with vanadate reveals site-specific regulatory mechanisms and also uncovers primed activating components in the network, including Src family kinases, whose inhibition affects only a subset of proteins within the network. The results presented highlight the complexity of signaling initiation and provide a window into exploring mechanistic hypotheses about receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) biology.

  5. Mammalian tolloid proteinases: role in growth factor signalling.

    PubMed

    Troilo, Helen; Bayley, Christopher P; Barrett, Anne L; Lockhart-Cairns, Michael P; Jowitt, Thomas A; Baldock, Clair

    2016-08-01

    Tolloid proteinases are essential for tissue patterning and extracellular matrix assembly. The members of the family differ in their substrate specificity and activity, despite sharing similar domain organization. The mechanisms underlying substrate specificity and activity are complex, with variation between family members, and depend on both multimerization and substrate interaction. In addition, enhancers, such as Twisted gastrulation (Tsg), promote cleavage of tolloid substrate, chordin, to regulate growth factor signalling. Although Tsg and mammalian tolloid (mTLD) are involved in chordin cleavage, no interaction has been detected between them, suggesting Tsg induces a change in chordin to increase susceptibility to cleavage. All members of the tolloid family bind the N terminus of latent TGFβ-binding protein-1, providing support for their role in TGFβ signalling. PMID:27391803

  6. Program-specific distribution of a transcription factor dependent on partner transcription factor and MAPK signaling.

    PubMed

    Zeitlinger, Julia; Simon, Itamar; Harbison, Christopher T; Hannett, Nancy M; Volkert, Thomas L; Fink, Gerald R; Young, Richard A

    2003-05-01

    Specialized gene expression programs are induced by signaling pathways that act on transcription factors. Whether these transcription factors can function in multiple developmental programs through a global switch in promoter selection is not known. We have used genome-wide location analysis to show that the yeast Ste12 transcription factor, which regulates mating and filamentous growth, is bound to distinct program-specific target genes dependent on the developmental condition. This condition-dependent distribution of Ste12 requires concurrent binding of the transcription factor Tec1 during filamentation and is differentially regulated by the MAP kinases Fus3 and Kss1. Program-specific distribution across the genome may be a general mechanism by which transcription factors regulate distinct gene expression programs in response to signaling. PMID:12732146

  7. Hydrogen peroxide sensing, signaling and regulation of transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Marinho, H. Susana; Real, Carla; Cyrne, Luísa; Soares, Helena; Antunes, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The regulatory mechanisms by which hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) modulates the activity of transcription factors in bacteria (OxyR and PerR), lower eukaryotes (Yap1, Maf1, Hsf1 and Msn2/4) and mammalian cells (AP-1, NRF2, CREB, HSF1, HIF-1, TP53, NF-κB, NOTCH, SP1 and SCREB-1) are reviewed. The complexity of regulatory networks increases throughout the phylogenetic tree, reaching a high level of complexity in mammalians. Multiple H2O2 sensors and pathways are triggered converging in the regulation of transcription factors at several levels: (1) synthesis of the transcription factor by upregulating transcription or increasing both mRNA stability and translation; (ii) stability of the transcription factor by decreasing its association with the ubiquitin E3 ligase complex or by inhibiting this complex; (iii) cytoplasm–nuclear traffic by exposing/masking nuclear localization signals, or by releasing the transcription factor from partners or from membrane anchors; and (iv) DNA binding and nuclear transactivation by modulating transcription factor affinity towards DNA, co-activators or repressors, and by targeting specific regions of chromatin to activate individual genes. We also discuss how H2O2 biological specificity results from diverse thiol protein sensors, with different reactivity of their sulfhydryl groups towards H2O2, being activated by different concentrations and times of exposure to H2O2. The specific regulation of local H2O2 concentrations is also crucial and results from H2O2 localized production and removal controlled by signals. Finally, we formulate equations to extract from typical experiments quantitative data concerning H2O2 reactivity with sensor molecules. Rate constants of 140 M−1 s−1 and ≥1.3 × 103 M−1 s−1 were estimated, respectively, for the reaction of H2O2 with KEAP1 and with an unknown target that mediates NRF2 protein synthesis. In conclusion, the multitude of H2O2 targets and mechanisms provides an opportunity for highly

  8. Rho Family Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor Brx Couples Extracellular Signals to the Glucocorticoid Signaling System*

    PubMed Central

    Kino, Tomoshige; Souvatzoglou, Emanuel; Charmandari, Evangelia; Ichijo, Takamasa; Driggers, Paul; Mayers, Chantal; Alatsatianos, Anton; Manoli, Irini; Westphal, Heiner; Chrousos, George P.; Segars, James H.

    2014-01-01

    Glucocorticoids regulate many crucial biologic functions through their cytoplasmic/nuclear glucocorticoid receptors (GR). Excess, deficiency, or alteration in tissue sensitivity to glucocorticoids has been associated with major causes of human morbidity and mortality. Brx, a cytoplasmic Rho family guanine nucleotide exchange factor, binds to and influences the activity of several nuclear hormone receptors. We examined the functional and molecular interactions between GR and Brx. The glucocorticoid sensitivity of lymphocytes obtained from mice haplo-insufficient for Brx was significantly decreased. Conversely, GR-mediated transcriptional activity of a glucocorticoid response element (GRE)-mediated glucocorticoid-responsive promoter was enhanced by Brx in a guanine nucleotide exchange factor domain-dependent fashion. Brx interacted with GR, forming a ternary complex with RhoA. In a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, Brx and RhoA were co-precipitated with GREs only in the presence of ligand-activated GR. Extracellularly administered lyso-phosphatidic acid, which activates its signaling cascade through a specific membrane GTP-binding protein (G-protein)-coupled receptor in a G-protein α13-, Brx-, and RhoA-dependent fashion, enhanced GR transcriptional activity, whereas depletion of endogenous Brx attenuated this effect. These findings suggest that glucocorticoid signaling and, hence, the tissue sensitivity to glucocorticoids, may be coupled to extracellular signals via Brx and small G-proteins. Nuclear Brx might act as a local GRE-GR-transcripto-some activator by mediating the effect of small G-proteins on glucocorticoid-regulated genes. PMID:16469733

  9. Purinergic regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor signaling in angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rumjahn, S M; Yokdang, N; Baldwin, K A; Thai, J; Buxton, I L O

    2009-01-01

    P2Y purine nucleotide receptors (P2YRs) promote endothelial cell tubulogenesis through breast cancer cell-secreted nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDPK). We tested the hypothesis that activated P2Y1 receptors transactivate vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR-2) in angiogenic signaling. P2Y1R stimulation (10 μM 2-methyl-thio-ATP (2MS-ATP)) of angiogenesis is suppressed by the VEGFR-2 tyrosine kinase inhibitor, SU1498 (1 μM). Phosphorylation of VEGFR-2 by 0.0262 or 2.62 nM VEGF was comparable with 0.01 or 10 μM 2MS-ATP stimulation of the P2Y1R. 2MS-ATP, and VEGF stimulation increased tyrosine phosphorylation at tyr1175. 2MS-ATP (0.1–10 μM) also stimulated EC tubulogenesis in a dose-dependent manner. The addition of sub-maximal VEGF (70 pM) in the presence of increasing concentrations of 2MS-ATP yielded additive effects at 2MS-ATP concentrations <3 μM, whereas producing saturated and less than additive effects at ⩾3 μM. We propose that the VEGF receptor can be activated in the absence of VEGF, and that the P2YR–VEGFR2 interaction and resulting signal transduction is a critical determinant of vascular homoeostasis and tumour-mediated angiogenesis. PMID:19367276

  10. Osteosarcoma cell-calcium signaling through tissue factor-factor VIIa complex and factor Xa.

    PubMed

    Daubie, Valéry; De Decker, Robert; Nicaise, Charles; Pochet, Roland

    2007-06-12

    The cells responsible for bone formation express protease-activated receptors. Although serine protease thrombin has been shown to elicit functional responses in bone cells that impact on cell survival and alkaline phosphatase activity, nothing is known about tissue factor, factor VIIa, and factor Xa, the serine proteases that act upstream of thrombin in the coagulation cascade. This paper demonstrates that tissue factor is expressed in the osteoblast-like cell line SaOS-2 and, that tissue factor in a factor VIIa-bound complex induces a transient intracellular Ca(2+) increase through protease-activated receptor-2. In SaOS-2 cells, factor Xa induced a sustained intracellular Ca(2+) response, as does SLIGRL, a PAR2-activating peptide, and PAR-1-dependent cell viability. PMID:17509570

  11. Coagulation factor V mediates inhibition of tissue factor signaling by activated protein C in mice.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hai Po H; Kerschen, Edward J; Basu, Sreemanti; Hernandez, Irene; Zogg, Mark; Jia, Shuang; Hessner, Martin J; Toso, Raffaella; Rezaie, Alireza R; Fernández, José A; Camire, Rodney M; Ruf, Wolfram; Griffin, John H; Weiler, Hartmut

    2015-11-19

    The key effector molecule of the natural protein C pathway, activated protein C (aPC), exerts pleiotropic effects on coagulation, fibrinolysis, and inflammation. Coagulation-independent cell signaling by aPC appears to be the predominant mechanism underlying its highly reproducible therapeutic efficacy in most animal models of injury and infection. In this study, using a mouse model of Staphylococcus aureus sepsis, we demonstrate marked disease stage-specific effects of the anticoagulant and cell signaling functions of aPC. aPC resistance of factor (f)V due to the R506Q Leiden mutation protected against detrimental anticoagulant effects of aPC therapy but also abrogated the anti-inflammatory and mortality-reducing effects of the signaling-selective 5A-aPC variant that has minimal anticoagulant function. We found that procofactor V (cleaved by aPC at R506) and protein S were necessary cofactors for the aPC-mediated inhibition of inflammatory tissue-factor signaling. The anti-inflammatory cofactor function of fV involved the same structural features that govern its cofactor function for the anticoagulant effects of aPC, yet its anti-inflammatory activities did not involve proteolysis of activated coagulation factors Va and VIIIa. These findings reveal a novel biological function and mechanism of the protein C pathway in which protein S and the aPC-cleaved form of fV are cofactors for anti-inflammatory cell signaling by aPC in the context of endotoxemia and infection.

  12. Nuclear factor-kappa B signaling in skeletal muscle atrophy.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Malhotra, Shweta; Kumar, Ashok

    2008-10-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy/wasting is a serious complication of a wide range of diseases and conditions such as aging, disuse, AIDS, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, space travel, muscular dystrophy, chronic heart failure, sepsis, and cancer. Emerging evidence suggests that nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) is one of the most important signaling pathways linked to the loss of skeletal muscle mass in various physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Activation of NF-kappaB in skeletal muscle leads to degradation of specific muscle proteins, induces inflammation and fibrosis, and blocks the regeneration of myofibers after injury/atrophy. Recent studies employing genetic mouse models have provided strong evidence that NF-kappaB can serve as an important molecular target for the prevention of skeletal muscle loss. In this article, we have outlined the current understanding regarding the role of NF-kappaB in skeletal muscle with particular reference to different models of muscle wasting and the development of novel therapy.

  13. From tyrosine to melanin: Signaling pathways and factors regulating melanogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rzepka, Zuzanna; Buszman, Ewa; Beberok, Artur; Wrześniok, Dorota

    2016-01-01

    Melanins are natural pigments of skin, hair and eyes and can be classified into two main types: brown to black eumelanin and yellow to reddish-brown pheomelanin. Biosynthesis of melanins takes place in melanosomes, which are specialized cytoplasmic organelles of melanocytes - dendritic cells located in the basal layer of the epidermis, uveal tract of the eye, hair follicles, as well as in the inner ear, central nervous system and heart. Melanogenesis is a multistep process and begins with the conversion of amino acid L-tyrosine to DOPAquinone. The addition of cysteine or glutathione to DOPAquinone leads to the intermediates formation, followed by subsequent transformations and polymerization to the final product, pheomelanin. In the absence of thiol compounds DOPAquinone undergoes an intramolecular cyclization and oxidation to form DOPAchrome, which is then converted to 5,6-dihydroksyindole (DHI) or 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid (DHICA). Eumelanin is formed by polymerization of DHI and DHICA and their quinones. Regulation of melanogenesis is achieved by physical and biochemical factors. The article presents the intracellular signaling pathways: cAMP/PKA/CREB/MITF cascade, MAP kinases cascade, PLC/DAG/PKCβ cascade and NO/cGMP/PKG cascade, which are involved in the regulation of expression and activity of the melanogenesis-related proteins by ultraviolet radiation and endogenous agents (cytokines, hormones). Activity of the key melanogenic enzyme, tyrosinase, is also affected by pH and temperature. Many pharmacologically active substances are able to inhibit or stimulate melanin biosynthesis, as evidenced by in vitro studies on cultured pigment cells. PMID:27356601

  14. Hematopoietic Growth Factors, Signaling and the Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kaushansky, Kenneth

    2006-01-01

    The chronic myeloproliferative diseases (CMDs) are a group of conditions characterized by unregulated blood cell production, that due either to excessive numbers of erythrocytes, leukocytes or platelets, or their defective function cause symptoms and signs of fatigue, headache, ruddy cyanosis, hemorrhage, abdominal distension, and the complications of vascular thrombosis. In the late 19th century Vaquez provided the first description of polycythemia vera (PV) and Hueck defined idiopathic myelofibrosis (IMF). In 1920, di Guglielmo established criteria for patients with essential thrombocythemia (ET). In 1951 Dameshek argued that these disorders, along with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) display many similar clinical and laboratory features (1), and grouped them. In 2002 the World Health Organization expanded the definition of CMDs to also include chronic neutrophilic leukemia (CNL), chronic eosinophilic leukemia/hypereosinophilic syndrome (CEL/HES) and systemic mast cell disorder (SMCD; 2). While the molecular pathogenesis of CML is well known (3), and the causes of CEL/HES and SMCD have been identified in about half of all cases (4,5), until very recently the etiologies of the three classically defined CMDs, PV, IMF and ET, were poorly understood. Each of these disorders is characterized by excessive hematopoiesis, a process usually dependent on one or more hematopoietic growth factors (HGFs). This review will focus on how our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms by which HGFs are produced, bind cell surface receptors and transduce survival and proliferative signals have provided the platform on which the multiple origins of CMDs can be understood and novel therapeutic interventions designed. PMID:17055768

  15. The host plant metabolite glucose is the precursor of diffusible signal factor (DSF) family signals in Xanthomonas campestris.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yinyue; Liu, Xiaoling; Wu, Ji'en; Lee, Jasmine; Chen, Shaohua; Cheng, Yingying; Zhang, Chunyan; Zhang, Lian-Hui

    2015-04-01

    Plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris produces cis-11-methyl-2-dodecenoic acid (diffusible signal factor [DSF]) as a cell-cell communication signal to regulate biofilm dispersal and virulence factor production. Previous studies have demonstrated that DSF biosynthesis is dependent on the presence of RpfF, an enoyl-coenzyme A (CoA) hydratase, but the DSF synthetic mechanism and the influence of the host plant on DSF biosynthesis are still not clear. We show here that exogenous addition of host plant juice or ethanol extract to the growth medium of X. campestris pv. campestris could significantly boost DSF family signal production. It was subsequently revealed that X. campestris pv. campestris produces not only DSF but also BDSF (cis-2-dodecenoic acid) and another novel DSF family signal, which was designated DSF-II. BDSF was originally identified in Burkholderia cenocepacia to be involved in regulation of motility, biofilm formation, and virulence in B. cenocepacia. Functional analysis suggested that DSF-II plays a role equal to that of DSF in regulation of biofilm dispersion and virulence factor production in X. campestris pv. campestris. Furthermore, chromatographic separation led to identification of glucose as a specific molecule stimulating DSF family signal biosynthesis in X. campestris pv. campestris. (13)C-labeling experiments demonstrated that glucose acts as a substrate to provide a carbon element for DSF biosynthesis. The results of this study indicate that X. campestris pv. campestris could utilize a common metabolite of the host plant to enhance DSF family signal synthesis and therefore promote virulence.

  16. The host plant metabolite glucose is the precursor of diffusible signal factor (DSF) family signals in Xanthomonas campestris.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yinyue; Liu, Xiaoling; Wu, Ji'en; Lee, Jasmine; Chen, Shaohua; Cheng, Yingying; Zhang, Chunyan; Zhang, Lian-Hui

    2015-04-01

    Plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris produces cis-11-methyl-2-dodecenoic acid (diffusible signal factor [DSF]) as a cell-cell communication signal to regulate biofilm dispersal and virulence factor production. Previous studies have demonstrated that DSF biosynthesis is dependent on the presence of RpfF, an enoyl-coenzyme A (CoA) hydratase, but the DSF synthetic mechanism and the influence of the host plant on DSF biosynthesis are still not clear. We show here that exogenous addition of host plant juice or ethanol extract to the growth medium of X. campestris pv. campestris could significantly boost DSF family signal production. It was subsequently revealed that X. campestris pv. campestris produces not only DSF but also BDSF (cis-2-dodecenoic acid) and another novel DSF family signal, which was designated DSF-II. BDSF was originally identified in Burkholderia cenocepacia to be involved in regulation of motility, biofilm formation, and virulence in B. cenocepacia. Functional analysis suggested that DSF-II plays a role equal to that of DSF in regulation of biofilm dispersion and virulence factor production in X. campestris pv. campestris. Furthermore, chromatographic separation led to identification of glucose as a specific molecule stimulating DSF family signal biosynthesis in X. campestris pv. campestris. (13)C-labeling experiments demonstrated that glucose acts as a substrate to provide a carbon element for DSF biosynthesis. The results of this study indicate that X. campestris pv. campestris could utilize a common metabolite of the host plant to enhance DSF family signal synthesis and therefore promote virulence. PMID:25681189

  17. The Host Plant Metabolite Glucose Is the Precursor of Diffusible Signal Factor (DSF) Family Signals in Xanthomonas campestris

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoling; Wu, Ji'en; Lee, Jasmine; Chen, Shaohua; Cheng, Yingying; Zhang, Chunyan

    2015-01-01

    Plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris produces cis-11-methyl-2-dodecenoic acid (diffusible signal factor [DSF]) as a cell-cell communication signal to regulate biofilm dispersal and virulence factor production. Previous studies have demonstrated that DSF biosynthesis is dependent on the presence of RpfF, an enoyl-coenzyme A (CoA) hydratase, but the DSF synthetic mechanism and the influence of the host plant on DSF biosynthesis are still not clear. We show here that exogenous addition of host plant juice or ethanol extract to the growth medium of X. campestris pv. campestris could significantly boost DSF family signal production. It was subsequently revealed that X. campestris pv. campestris produces not only DSF but also BDSF (cis-2-dodecenoic acid) and another novel DSF family signal, which was designated DSF-II. BDSF was originally identified in Burkholderia cenocepacia to be involved in regulation of motility, biofilm formation, and virulence in B. cenocepacia. Functional analysis suggested that DSF-II plays a role equal to that of DSF in regulation of biofilm dispersion and virulence factor production in X. campestris pv. campestris. Furthermore, chromatographic separation led to identification of glucose as a specific molecule stimulating DSF family signal biosynthesis in X. campestris pv. campestris. 13C-labeling experiments demonstrated that glucose acts as a substrate to provide a carbon element for DSF biosynthesis. The results of this study indicate that X. campestris pv. campestris could utilize a common metabolite of the host plant to enhance DSF family signal synthesis and therefore promote virulence. PMID:25681189

  18. Diffusible signal factor family signals provide a fitness advantage to Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris in interspecies competition.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yinyue; Wu, Jien; Yin, Wenfang; Li, Peng; Zhou, Jianuan; Chen, Shaohua; He, Fei; Cai, Jun; Zhang, Lian-Hui

    2016-05-01

    Diffusible signal factor (DSF) represents a new class of widely conserved quorum sensing signals, which regulates various biological functions through intra- or interspecies signaling. The previous studies identified that there is an antagonistic interaction between Xanthomonas and Bacillus species bacteria in natural ecosystem, but the detailed molecular mechanism of interspecies competition is not clear. This study showed that Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc) interfered with morphological transition and sporulation of Bacillus thuringiensis in mixed cultures, whereas abrogation of the DSF synthase RpfF reduced the interference. DSF inhibited B. thuringiensis cell division and sporulation through modulation of ftsZ, which encodes an important cell division protein in bacterial cells. In addition, RpfF is essential for production of six DSF-family signals in Xcc, which employ the same signaling pathways to regulate biological functions in Xcc and play similar effects on reduction of cell division, sporulation and antibiotic resistance of B. thuringiensis. Furthermore, abrogation of RpfF decreased the competitive capability of Xcc against B. thuringiensis on the surface of Chinese cabbage leaves. Our findings provide new insights into the role of DSF-family signals in interspecies competition and depict molecular mechanisms with which Xcc competes with B. thuringiensis. PMID:26913592

  19. High-power optical millimeter-wave signal generation with tunable frequency multiplication factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yi-shi; Zheng, Zhenyu; Luo, Zhixiao; Min, Zhixuan; Xu, Ou; Liu, Jie

    2015-01-01

    This work demonstrates a simple and novel scheme for millimeter-wave (MMW) signal generation using optical multi-sidebands (OMSB) modulation. In the proposed methods, several pairs of optical sidebands can be generated by employing parallel phase modulators driven by a low frequency radio frequency (RF) signal. The optical sidebands will beat at a photodetector (PD) to generate high frequency MMW signal with tunable frequency multiplication factor, such as frequency octupling, 12-tupling, 16-tupling and 18-tupling. Since no optical filters or DC bias are used, the MMW signal has the evident character of high-power output. A generalized analytic expression and simulation verification for generating the frequency multi-tupling MMW signal are developed. The influences caused by non-ideal factors are discussed in detail, and undesired power ratios versus non-ideal factors are plotted and analyzed.

  20. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling regulates transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ)-dependent smooth muscle cell phenotype modulation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pei-Yu; Qin, Lingfeng; Li, Guangxin; Tellides, George; Simons, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in normal blood vessels exist in a highly differentiate state characterized by expression of SMC-specific contractile proteins ("contractile phenotype"). Following blood vessel injury in vivo or when cultured in vitro in the presence of multiple growth factors, SMC undergo a phenotype switch characterized by the loss of contractile markers and appearance of expression of non-muscle proteins ("proliferative phenotype"). While a number of factors have been reported to modulate this process, its regulation remains uncertain. Here we show that induction of SMC FGF signaling inhibits TGFβ signaling and converts contractile SMCs to the proliferative phenotype. Conversely, inhibition of SMC FGF signaling induces TGFβ signaling converting proliferating SMCs to the contractile phenotype, even in the presence of various growth factors in vitro or vascular injury in vivo. The importance of this signaling cross-talk is supported by in vivo data that show that an SMC deletion of a pan-FGF receptor adaptor Frs2α (fibroblast growth factor receptor substrate 2 alpha) in mice profoundly reduces neointima formation and vascular remodelling following carotid artery ligation. These results demonstrate that FGF-TGFβ signaling antagonism is the primary regulator of the SMC phenotype switch. Manipulation of this cross-talk may be an effective strategy for treatment of SMC-proliferation related diseases. PMID:27634335

  1. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling regulates transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ)-dependent smooth muscle cell phenotype modulation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pei-Yu; Qin, Lingfeng; Li, Guangxin; Tellides, George; Simons, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in normal blood vessels exist in a highly differentiate state characterized by expression of SMC-specific contractile proteins (“contractile phenotype”). Following blood vessel injury in vivo or when cultured in vitro in the presence of multiple growth factors, SMC undergo a phenotype switch characterized by the loss of contractile markers and appearance of expression of non-muscle proteins (“proliferative phenotype”). While a number of factors have been reported to modulate this process, its regulation remains uncertain. Here we show that induction of SMC FGF signaling inhibits TGFβ signaling and converts contractile SMCs to the proliferative phenotype. Conversely, inhibition of SMC FGF signaling induces TGFβ signaling converting proliferating SMCs to the contractile phenotype, even in the presence of various growth factors in vitro or vascular injury in vivo. The importance of this signaling cross-talk is supported by in vivo data that show that an SMC deletion of a pan-FGF receptor adaptor Frs2α (fibroblast growth factor receptor substrate 2 alpha) in mice profoundly reduces neointima formation and vascular remodelling following carotid artery ligation. These results demonstrate that FGF-TGFβ signaling antagonism is the primary regulator of the SMC phenotype switch. Manipulation of this cross-talk may be an effective strategy for treatment of SMC-proliferation related diseases. PMID:27634335

  2. Growth Factor Signaling and Memory Formation: Temporal and Spatial Integration of a Molecular Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopec, Ashley M.; Carew, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Growth factor (GF) signaling is critically important for developmental plasticity. It also plays a crucial role in adult plasticity, such as that required for memory formation. Although different GFs interact with receptors containing distinct types of kinase domains, they typically signal through converging intracellular cascades (e.g.,…

  3. Supramolecular Nanofibers Enhance Growth Factor Signaling by Increasing Lipid Raft Mobility.

    PubMed

    Newcomb, Christina J; Sur, Shantanu; Lee, Sungsoo S; Yu, Jeong Min; Zhou, Yan; Snead, Malcolm L; Stupp, Samuel I

    2016-05-11

    The nanostructures of self-assembling biomaterials have been previously designed to tune the release of growth factors in order to optimize biological repair and regeneration. We report here on the discovery that weakly cohesive peptide nanostructures in terms of intermolecular hydrogen bonding, when combined with low concentrations of osteogenic growth factor, enhance both BMP-2 and Wnt mediated signaling in myoblasts and bone marrow stromal cells, respectively. Conversely, analogous nanostructures with enhanced levels of internal hydrogen bonding and cohesion lead to an overall reduction in BMP-2 signaling. We propose that the mechanism for enhanced growth factor signaling by the nanostructures is related to their ability to increase diffusion within membrane lipid rafts. The phenomenon reported here could lead to new nanomedicine strategies to mediate growth factor signaling for translational targets. PMID:27070195

  4. Sgk3 links growth factor signaling to maintenance of progenitor cells in the hair follicle.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Laura; Okada, Hitoshi; Pasolli, Hilda Amalia; Wakeham, Andrew; You-Ten, Annick Itie; Mak, Tak W; Fuchs, Elaine

    2005-08-15

    Tyrosine kinase growth factor receptor signaling influences proliferation, survival, and apoptosis. Hair follicles undergo cycles of proliferation and apoptotic regression, offering an excellent paradigm to study how this transition is governed. Several factors are known to affect the hair cycle, but it remains a mystery whether Akt kinases that are downstream of growth factor signaling impact this equilibrium. We now show that an Akt relative, Sgk (serum and glucocorticoid responsive kinase) 3, plays a critical role in this process. Hair follicles of mice lacking Sgk3 fail to mature normally. Proliferation is reduced, apoptosis is increased, and follicles prematurely regress. Maintenance of the pool of transiently amplifying matrix cells is impaired. Intriguingly, loss of Sgk3 resembles the gain of function of epidermal growth factor signaling. Using cultured primary keratinocytes, we find that Sgk3 functions by negatively regulating phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase signaling. Our results reveal a novel and important function for Sgk3 in controlling life and death in the hair follicle.

  5. Supramolecular Nanofibers Enhance Growth Factor Signaling by Increasing Lipid Raft Mobility.

    PubMed

    Newcomb, Christina J; Sur, Shantanu; Lee, Sungsoo S; Yu, Jeong Min; Zhou, Yan; Snead, Malcolm L; Stupp, Samuel I

    2016-05-11

    The nanostructures of self-assembling biomaterials have been previously designed to tune the release of growth factors in order to optimize biological repair and regeneration. We report here on the discovery that weakly cohesive peptide nanostructures in terms of intermolecular hydrogen bonding, when combined with low concentrations of osteogenic growth factor, enhance both BMP-2 and Wnt mediated signaling in myoblasts and bone marrow stromal cells, respectively. Conversely, analogous nanostructures with enhanced levels of internal hydrogen bonding and cohesion lead to an overall reduction in BMP-2 signaling. We propose that the mechanism for enhanced growth factor signaling by the nanostructures is related to their ability to increase diffusion within membrane lipid rafts. The phenomenon reported here could lead to new nanomedicine strategies to mediate growth factor signaling for translational targets.

  6. Connective tissue growth factor induces cardiac hypertrophy through Akt signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Hayata, Nozomi; Fujio, Yasushi; Yamamoto, Yasuhiro; Iwakura, Tomohiko; Obana, Masanori; Takai, Mika; Mohri, Tomomi; Nonen, Shinpei; Maeda, Makiko; Azuma, Junichi

    2008-05-30

    In the process of cardiac remodeling, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) is secreted from cardiac myocytes. Though CTGF is well known to promote fibroblast proliferation, its pathophysiological effects in cardiac myocytes remain to be elucidated. In this study, we examined the biological effects of CTGF in rat neonatal cardiomyocytes. Cardiac myocytes stimulated with full length CTGF and its C-terminal region peptide showed the increase in cell surface area. Similar to hypertrophic ligands for G-protein coupled receptors, such as endothelin-1, CTGF activated amino acid uptake; however, CTGF-induced hypertrophy is not associated with the increased expression of skeletal actin or BNP, analyzed by Northern-blotting. CTGF treatment activated ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, JNK and Akt. The inhibition of Akt by transducing dominant-negative Akt abrogated CTGF-mediated increase in cell size, while the inhibition of MAP kinases did not affect the cardiac hypertrophy. These findings indicate that CTGF is a novel hypertrophic factor in cardiac myocytes.

  7. Transcription factor-mediated cell-to-cell signalling in plants.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiao; Kumar, Dhinesh; Chen, Huan; Wu, Shuwei; Kim, Jae-Yean

    2014-04-01

    Plant cells utilize mobile transcription factors to transmit intercellular signals when they perceive environmental stimuli or initiate developmental programmes. Studies on these novel cell-to-cell signals have accumulated multiple pieces of evidence showing that non-cell-autonomous transcription factors play pivotal roles in most processes related to the formation and development of plant organs. Recent studies have explored the evolution of mobile transcription factors and proposed mechanisms for their trafficking through plasmodesmata, where a selective system exists to facilitate this process. Mobile transcription factors contribute to the diversity of the intercellular signalling network, which is also established by peptides, hormones, and RNAs. Crosstalk between mobile transcription factors and other intercellular molecules leads to the development of complex biological signalling networks in plants. The regulation of plasmodesmata appears to have been another major step in controlling the intercellular trafficking of transcription factors based on studies of many plasmodesmal components. Furthermore, diverse omics approaches are being successfully applied to explore a large number of candidate transcription factors as mobile signals in plants. Here, we review these fascinating discoveries to integrate current knowledge of non-cell-autonomous transcription factors.

  8. A pathway to bone: signaling molecules and transcription factors involved in chondrocyte development and maturation

    PubMed Central

    Kozhemyakina, Elena; Lassar, Andrew B.; Zelzer, Elazar

    2015-01-01

    Decades of work have identified the signaling pathways that regulate the differentiation of chondrocytes during bone formation, from their initial induction from mesenchymal progenitor cells to their terminal maturation into hypertrophic chondrocytes. Here, we review how multiple signaling molecules, mechanical signals and morphological cell features are integrated to activate a set of key transcription factors that determine and regulate the genetic program that induces chondrogenesis and chondrocyte differentiation. Moreover, we describe recent findings regarding the roles of several signaling pathways in modulating the proliferation and maturation of chondrocytes in the growth plate, which is the ‘engine’ of bone elongation. PMID:25715393

  9. Angiogenic factor signaling regulates centrosome duplication in endothelial cells of developing blood vessels

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Sarah M.; Nevis, Kathleen R.; Park, Hannah L.; Rogers, Gregory C.; Rogers, Stephen L.; Cook, Jeanette G.

    2010-01-01

    Regulated vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling is required for proper angiogenesis, and excess VEGF signaling results in aberrantly formed vessels that do not function properly. Tumor endothelial cells have excess centrosomes and are aneuploid, properties that probably contribute to the morphologic and functional abnormalities of tumor vessels. We hypothesized that endothelial cell centrosome number is regulated by signaling via angiogenic factors, such as VEGF. We found that endothelial cells in developing vessels exposed to elevated VEGF signaling display centrosome overduplication. Signaling from VEGF, through either MEK/ERK or AKT to cyclin E/Cdk2, is amplified in association with centrosome overduplication, and blockade of relevant pathway components rescued the centrosome overduplication defect. Endothelial cells exposed to elevated FGF also had excess centrosomes, suggesting that multiple angiogenic factors regulate centrosome number. Endothelial cells with excess centrosomes survived and formed aberrant spindles at mitosis. Developing vessels exposed to elevated VEGF signaling also exhibited increased aneuploidy of endothelial cells, which is associated with cellular dysfunction. These results provide the first link between VEGF signaling and regulation of the centrosome duplication cycle, and suggest that endothelial cell centrosome overduplication contributes to aberrant angiogenesis in developing vessel networks exposed to excess angiogenic factors. PMID:20664058

  10. P2y receptor-mediated angiogenesis via vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 signaling.

    PubMed

    Rumjahn, Sharif M; Baldwin, Karla A; Buxton, Iain L O

    2007-01-01

    Pathological as well as physiological angiogenesis is known to be regulated by such factors as nucleotides and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF). Activated P2Y nucleotide receptors have been observed to associate and transactivate VEGF Receptor 2 (VEGFR2), suggesting a cooperation between nucleotide and VEGF signaling in angiogenesis. P2YR mediated VEGFR2 signaling therefore may be important in describing the angiogenic signaling of nucleotides such as ATP. Here, we provide evidence that supports the notion of P2YR-VEGFR2 signaling. The significant angiogenic effect of P2Y1/2 receptor agonists (100 microM ATP and 10 microM 2MS-ATP) on endothelial cell tubulogenesis was suppressed back to near control levels upon addition of 1 microM SU1498 (specific VEGFR2 tyrosine kinase inhibitor). We believe that this P2YR-VEFGR2 signaling is an important component of pathological, as well as physiological angiogenesis.

  11. [Signaling molecules in the brain and epigenetic factors in neurodegenerative and mental disorders].

    PubMed

    Gomazkov, O A

    2015-01-01

    The literature on a role of signaling molecules in the organization of memory and cognitive functions is analyzed basing on mechanisms of memory physiology determined by a complex of biochemical processes initiated by the transmission of the signal to the synapse and completed by the synthesis of functionally significant molecules in the neuronal genetic apparatus. The center of these processes is a coordinated system of signal transduction, transcription, epigenetic and neurotrophic molecules. The dissonance of signal mechanisms is a prime cause of memory impairment and cognitive dysfunction as social maladaptation factors. The results of experimental and clinical studies of a role of the multilevel signaling system in age-related, neurodegenerative (Alzheimer’s disease) and mental (depression) disorders are discussed. At the same time, signaling molecules may be considered as particular targets for new therapeutic approaches. PMID:26649375

  12. Signal transduction pathways and transcription factors triggered by arsenic trioxide in leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sumi, Daigo; Shinkai, Yasuhiro; Kumagai, Yoshito

    2010-05-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As{sub 2}O{sub 3}) is widely used to treat acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Several lines of evidence have indicated that As{sub 2}O{sub 3} affects signal transduction and transactivation of transcription factors, resulting in the stimulation of apoptosis in leukemia cells, because some transcription factors are reported to associate with the redox condition of the cells, and arsenicals cause oxidative stress. Thus, the disturbance and activation of the cellular signaling pathway and transcription factors due to reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation during arsenic exposure may explain the ability of As{sub 2}O{sub 3} to induce a complete remission in relapsed APL patients. In this report, we review recent findings on ROS generation and alterations in signal transduction and in transactivation of transcription factors during As{sub 2}O{sub 3} exposure in leukemia cells.

  13. Targeting signaling factors for degradation, an emerging mechanism for TRAF functions

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiao-Dong; Sun, Shao-Cong

    2015-01-01

    Summary Tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR)-associated factors (TRAFs) form a family of proteins that are best known as signaling adapters of TNFRs. However, emerging evidence suggests that TRAF proteins, particularly TRAF2 and TRAF3, also regulate signal transduction by controlling the fate of intracellular signaling factors. A well-recognized function of TRAF2 and TRAF3 in this aspect is to mediate ubiquitin-dependent degradation of NF-κB-inducing kinase (NIK), an action required for the control of NIK-regulated noncanonical NF-κB signaling pathway. TRAF2 and TRAF3 form a complex with the E3 ubiquitin ligase cIAP (cIAP1 or cIAP2), in which TRAF3 serves as the NIK-binding adapter. Recent evidence suggests that the cIAP-TRAF2-TRAF3 E3 complex also targets additional signaling factors for ubiquitin-dependent degradation, thereby regulating important aspects of immune and inflammatory responses. This review provides both historical aspects and new insights into the signaling functions of this ubiquitination system. PMID:26085207

  14. Ethylene Response Factors: A Key Regulatory Hub in Hormone and Stress Signaling.

    PubMed

    Müller, Maren; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2015-09-01

    Ethylene is essential for many developmental processes and a key mediator of biotic and abiotic stress responses in plants. The ethylene signaling and response pathway includes Ethylene Response Factors (ERFs), which belong to the transcription factor family APETALA2/ERF. It is well known that ERFs regulate molecular response to pathogen attack by binding to sequences containing AGCCGCC motifs (the GCC box), a cis-acting element. However, recent studies suggest that several ERFs also bind to dehydration-responsive elements and act as a key regulatory hub in plant responses to abiotic stresses. Here, we review some of the recent advances in our understanding of the ethylene signaling and response pathway, with emphasis on ERFs and their role in hormone cross talk and redox signaling under abiotic stresses. We conclude that ERFs act as a key regulatory hub, integrating ethylene, abscisic acid, jasmonate, and redox signaling in the plant response to a number of abiotic stresses.

  15. Shifted factor analysis for the separation of evoked dependent MEG signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohl, F.; Wübbeler, G.; Kolossa, D.; Bär, M.; Orglmeister, R.; Elster, C.

    2010-08-01

    Decomposition of evoked magnetoencephalography (MEG) data into their underlying neuronal signals is an important step in the interpretation of these measurements. Often, independent component analysis (ICA) is employed for this purpose. However, ICA can fail as for evoked MEG data the neuronal signals may not be statistically independent. We therefore consider an alternative approach based on the recently proposed shifted factor analysis model, which does not assume statistical independence of the neuronal signals. We suggest the application of this model in the time domain and present an estimation procedure based on a Taylor series expansion. We show in terms of synthetic evoked MEG data that the proposed procedure can successfully separate evoked dependent neuronal signals while standard ICA fails. Latency estimation of neuronal signals is an inherent part of the proposed procedure and we demonstrate that resulting latency estimates are superior to those obtained by a maximum likelihood method.

  16. Multiple Signaling Pathways Converge on the Cbfa1/Runx2 Transcription Factor to Regulate Osteoblast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Franceschi, Renny T.; Xiao, Guozhi; Jiang, Di; Gopalakrishnan, Rajaram; Yang, Shuying; Reith, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    The Cbfa1/Runx2 transcription factor is essential for osteoblast differentiation. However, levels of Runx2 are often not well correlated with its transcriptional activity suggesting that this factor must be activated either by covalent modification or through interactions with other nuclear components. Runx2 is phosphorylated and activated by the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. This pathway is stimulated in at least two ways: by binding of type I collagen to β2β1 integrins on the osteoblast surface and by treatment of cells with the osteogenic growth factor, FGF2. Protein kinase A (PKA) also may phosphorylate/activate Runx2 under certain conditions. Runx2 activity also is enhanced by factors known to stimulate specific signal transduction pathways such as PTH/PTHrP (signals through PKA and PKC pathways) and BMPs (Signal through Smad proteins). Interactions with Runx2 are complex involving both binding of distinct components such as AP-1 factors and Smads to separate sites on DNA, direct interactions between Runx2 and AP-1/Smad factors and MAPK or PKA-dependent Runx2 phosphorylation. These findings suggest that Runx2 plays a central role in coordinating multiple signals involved in osteoblast differentiation. PMID:12952183

  17. Hormones, neurosecretions, and growth factors as signal molecules for intercellular communication.

    PubMed

    Sicard, R E

    1986-01-01

    Chemical signals, whether in the form of hormones, neurosecretions (neurotransmitters and neuropeptides), or growth factors and chalones are used to communicate information to cells at all stages of their life cycle. These signals inform the cells when it is time to progress through developmental change, when to change the rates of various activities (e.g. metabolism or contraction), and, in some cases, even when it is time to die. Throughout all of these interactive exchanges, the signal molecule itself carries no intrinsic message of a universal nature. The chemical identity of the signal molecule has meaning only for those cells competent to receive the signal (i.e. does it possess an appropriate receptor?). Moreover, it is the nature of the cell receiving the signal (itself the product of innumerable previous encounters with signals from other cells) that dictates the specific response that a particular signal will evoke. The signal emitted by the communicating cell only informs the target cell that it is time to act in a manner consistent with that signal. The majority of the discussion has been from the perspective of vertebrate organisms. Moreover, of necessity, the discussion has been general and superficial. The primary objective of the preceding discussion has been to underscore major similarities and differences existing among hormones, neurosecretions (neurotransmitters and neuropeptides), and growth factors as information-bearing substances used in communication among vertebrate cells. It should be realized that similar means of communication are employed by multicellular invertebrates, by plants, and even by single-celled organisms such as the protists and bacteria.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Epidermal Wnt/β-catenin signaling regulates adipocyte differentiation via secretion of adipogenic factors

    PubMed Central

    Donati, Giacomo; Proserpio, Valentina; Lichtenberger, Beate Maria; Natsuga, Ken; Sinclair, Rodney; Fujiwara, Hironobu; Watt, Fiona M.

    2014-01-01

    It has long been recognized that the hair follicle growth cycle and oscillation in the thickness of the underlying adipocyte layer are synchronized. Although factors secreted by adipocytes are known to regulate the hair growth cycle, it is unclear whether the epidermis can regulate adipogenesis. We show that inhibition of epidermal Wnt/β-catenin signaling reduced adipocyte differentiation in developing and adult mouse dermis. Conversely, ectopic activation of epidermal Wnt signaling promoted adipocyte differentiation and hair growth. When the Wnt pathway was activated in the embryonic epidermis, there was a dramatic and premature increase in adipocytes in the absence of hair follicle formation, demonstrating that Wnt activation, rather than mature hair follicles, is required for adipocyte generation. Epidermal and dermal gene expression profiling identified keratinocyte-derived adipogenic factors that are induced by β-catenin activation. Wnt/β-catenin signaling-dependent secreted factors from keratinocytes promoted adipocyte differentiation in vitro, and we identified ligands for the bone morphogenetic protein and insulin pathways as proadipogenic factors. Our results indicate epidermal Wnt/β-catenin as a critical initiator of a signaling cascade that induces adipogenesis and highlight the role of epidermal Wnt signaling in synchronizing adipocyte differentiation with the hair growth cycle. PMID:24706781

  19. Membrane-associated transcription factor peptidase, site-2 protease, antagonizes ABA signaling in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shun-Fan; Sun, Le; Valdés, Ana Elisa; Engström, Peter; Song, Ze-Ting; Lu, Sun-Jie; Liu, Jian-Xiang

    2015-10-01

    Abscisic acid plays important roles in maintaining seed dormancy while gibberellins (GA) and other phytohormones antagonize ABA to promote germination. However, how ABA signaling is desensitized during the transition from dormancy to germination is still poorly understood. We functionally characterized the role of membrane-associated transcription factor peptidase, site-2 protease (S2P), in ABA signaling during seed germination in Arabidopsis. Genetic analysis showed that loss-of-function of S2P conferred high ABA sensitivity during seed germination, and expression of the activated form of membrane-associated transcription factor bZIP17, in which the transmembrane domain and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen-facing C-terminus were deleted, in the S2P mutant rescued its ABA-sensitive phenotype. MYC and green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged bZIP17 were processed and translocated from the ER to the nucleus in response to ABA treatment. Furthermore, genes encoding negative regulators of ABA signaling, such as the transcription factor ATHB7 and its target genes HAB1, HAB2, HAI1 and AHG3, were up-regulated in seeds of the wild-type upon ABA treatment; this up-regulation was impaired in seeds of S2P mutants. Our results suggest that S2P desensitizes ABA signaling during seed germination through regulating the activation of the membrane-associated transcription factor bZIP17 and therefore controlling the expression level of genes encoding negative regulators of ABA signaling. PMID:25919792

  20. Genetic factors influencing bystander signaling in murine bladder epithelium after low-dose irradiation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mothersill, Carmel; Lyng, Fiona; Seymour, Colin; Maguire, Paula; Lorimore, Sally; Wright, Eric

    2005-04-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects occur in cells that are not directly hit by radiation tracks but that receive signals from hit cells. They are well-documented in vitro consequences of low-dose exposure, but their relevance to in vivo radiobiology is not established. To investigate the in vivo production of bystander signals, bladder explants were established from two strains of mice known to differ significantly in both short-term and long-term radiation responses. These were investigated for the ability of 0.5 Gy total-body irradiation in vivo to induce production of bystander signals in bladder epithelium. The studies demonstrate that irradiated C57BL/6 mice, but not CBA/Ca mice, produce bystander signals that induce apoptosis and reduce clonogenic survival in reporter HPV-G-transfected keratinocytes. Transfer of medium from explants established from irradiated animals to explants established from unirradiated animals confirmed these differences in bladder epithelium. The responses to the in vivo-generated bystander signal exhibit genotypic differences in calcium signaling and also in signaling pathways indicative of a major role for the balance of pro-apoptosis and anti-apoptosis proteins in determining the overall response. The results clearly demonstrate the in vivo induction of bystander signals that are strongly influenced by genetic factors and have implications for radiation protection, medical imaging, and radiotherapy. PMID:15799694

  1. An integrated model of epidermal growth factor receptor trafficking and signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Resat, Haluk; Ewald, Jonathan A; Dixon, David A; Wiley, H Steven

    2003-08-01

    Endocytic trafficking of many types of receptors can have profound effects on subsequent signaling events. Quantitative models of these processes, however, have usually considered trafficking and signaling independently. Here, we present an integrated model of both the trafficking and signaling pathway of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) using a probability weighted-dynamic Monte Carlo simulation. Our model consists of hundreds of distinct endocytic compartments and approximately 13,000 reactions/events that occur over a broad spatio-temporal range. By using a realistic multicompartment model, we can investigate the distribution of the receptors among cellular compartments as well as their potential signal transduction characteristics. Our new model also allows the incorporation of physiochemical aspects of ligand-receptor interactions, such as pH-dependent binding in different endosomal compartments. To determine the utility of this approach, we simulated the differential activation of the EGFR by two of its ligands, epidermal growth factor (EGF) and transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha). Our simulations predict that when EGFR is activated with TGF-alpha, receptor activation is biased toward the cell surface whereas EGF produces a signaling bias toward the endosomal compartment. Experiments confirm these predictions from our model and simulations. Our model accurately predicts the kinetics and extent of receptor downregulation induced by either EGF or TGF-alpha. Our results suggest that receptor trafficking controls the compartmental bias of signal transduction, rather than simply modulating signal magnitude. Our model provides a new approach to evaluating the complex effect of receptor trafficking on signal transduction. Importantly, the stochastic and compartmental nature of the simulation allows these models to be directly tested by high-throughput approaches, such as quantitative image analysis. PMID:12885624

  2. An Integrated Model of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Trafficking and Signal Transduction

    SciTech Connect

    Resat, Haluk; Ewald, Jonathan A.; Dixon, David A.; Wiley, H. S.

    2003-08-01

    Endocytic trafficking of many types of receptors can have profound effects on subsequent signaling events. Quantitative models of these processes, however, have usually considered trafficking and signaling independently. Here, we present an integrated model of both the trafficking and signaling pathway of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) using a probability weighted-dynamic Monte Carlo simulation. Our model consists of hundreds of distinct endocytic compartments and about 13,000 reactions/events that occur over a broad spatio-temporal range. By using a realistic multi-compartment model, we can investigate the distribution of the receptors among cellular compartments as well as their potential signal transduction characteristics. Our new model also allows the incorporation of physio-chemical aspects of ligand-receptor interactions, such as pH-dependent binding in different endosomal compartments. To determine the utility of this approach, we simulated the differential activation of the EGFR by two of its ligands, epidermal growth factor (EGF) and transforming growth factor- alpha (TGF-a). Our simulations predict that when EGFR is activated with TGF-a, receptor activation is biased toward the cell surface whereas EGF produces a signaling bias towards the endosomal compartment. Experiments confirm these predictions from our model and simulations. Our model accurately predicts the kinetics and extent of receptor down-regulation induced by either EGF or TGF-a. Our results suggest that receptor trafficking controls the compartmental bias of signal transduction, rather than simply modulating signal magnitude. Our model provides a new approach to evaluating the complex effect of receptor trafficking on signal transduction. Importantly, the stochastic and compartmental nature of the simulation allows these models to be directly tested by high-throughput approaches, such as quantitative image analysis.

  3. Insulin-like growth factor-1 suppresses the Myostatin signaling pathway during myogenic differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Retamales, A.; Zuloaga, R.; Valenzuela, C.A.; Gallardo-Escarate, C.; Molina, A.; Valdés, J.A.

    2015-08-21

    Myogenic differentiation is a complex and well-coordinated process for generating mature skeletal muscle fibers. This event is autocrine/paracrine regulated by growth factors, principally Myostatin (MSTN) and Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1). Myostatin, a member of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily, is a negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth in vertebrates that exerts its inhibitory function by activating Smad transcription factors. In contrast, IGF-1 promotes the differentiation of skeletal myoblasts by activating the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. This study reports on a novel functional crosstalk between the IGF-1 and MSTN signaling pathways, as mediated through interaction between PI3K/Akt and Smad3. Stimulation of skeletal myoblasts with MSTN resulted in a transient increase in the pSmad3:Smad3 ratio and Smad-dependent transcription. Moreover, MSTN inhibited myod gene expression and myoblast fusion in an Activin receptor-like kinase/Smad3-dependent manner. Preincubation of skeletal myoblasts with IGF-1 blocked MSTN-induced Smad3 activation, promoting myod expression and myoblast differentiation. This inhibitory effect of IGF-1 on the MSTN signaling pathway was dependent on IGF-1 receptor, PI3K, and Akt activities. Finally, immunoprecipitation assay analysis determined that IGF-1 pretreatment increased Akt and Smad3 interaction. These results demonstrate that the IGF-1/PI3K/Akt pathway may inhibit MSTN signaling during myoblast differentiation, providing new insight to existing knowledge on the complex crosstalk between both growth factors. - Highlights: • IGF-1 inhibits Myostatin canonical signaling pathway through IGF-1R/PI3K/Akt pathway. • IGF-1 promotes myoblast differentiation through a direct blocking of Myostatin signaling pathway. • IGF-1 induces the interaction of Akt with Smad3 in skeletal myoblast.

  4. Growth factor signalling networks in breast cancer and resistance to endocrine agents: new therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, R I; Hutcheson, I R; Britton, D; Knowlden, J M; Jones, H E; Harper, M E; Hiscox, S E; Barrow, D; Gee, J M W

    2005-02-01

    Recent evidence demonstrates that growth factor networks are highly interactive with the estrogen receptor (ER) in the control of breast cancer growth and development. As such, tumor responses to anti-hormones are likely to be a composite of the ER and growth factor inhibitory activity of these agents, with alterations/aberrations in growth factor signalling providing a mechanism for the development of anti-hormone resistance. In this light, the current article focuses on illustrating the relationship between growth factor signalling and anti-hormone failure in our in-house tumor models of breast cancer and describes how we are now beginning to successfully target their actions to improve the effects of anti-hormonal drugs and to block aggressive disease progression.

  5. Signaling Proteins and Transcription Factors in Normal and Malignant Early B Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Vera, Patricia; Reyes-León, Adriana; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M.

    2011-01-01

    B cell development starts in bone marrow with the commitment of hematopoietic progenitors to the B cell lineage. In murine models, the IL-7 and preBCR receptors, and the signaling pathways and transcription factors that they regulate, control commitment and maintenance along the B cell pathway. E2A, EBF1, PAX5, and Ikaros are among the most important transcription factors controlling early development and thereby conditioning mice homeostatic B cell lymphopoiesis. Importantly, their gain or loss of function often results in malignant development in humans, supporting conserved roles for these transcription factors. B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the most common cause of pediatric cancer, and it is characterized by unpaired early B cell development resulting from genetic lesions in these critical signaling pathways and transcription factors. Fine mapping of these genetic abnormalities is allowing more specific treatments, more accurately predicting risk profiles for this disease, and improving survival rates. PMID:22046564

  6. Signaling proteins and transcription factors in normal and malignant early B cell development.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Vera, Patricia; Reyes-León, Adriana; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M

    2011-01-01

    B cell development starts in bone marrow with the commitment of hematopoietic progenitors to the B cell lineage. In murine models, the IL-7 and preBCR receptors, and the signaling pathways and transcription factors that they regulate, control commitment and maintenance along the B cell pathway. E2A, EBF1, PAX5, and Ikaros are among the most important transcription factors controlling early development and thereby conditioning mice homeostatic B cell lymphopoiesis. Importantly, their gain or loss of function often results in malignant development in humans, supporting conserved roles for these transcription factors. B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the most common cause of pediatric cancer, and it is characterized by unpaired early B cell development resulting from genetic lesions in these critical signaling pathways and transcription factors. Fine mapping of these genetic abnormalities is allowing more specific treatments, more accurately predicting risk profiles for this disease, and improving survival rates.

  7. [The source and influential factors in signals of trans-esophageal oxygen saturation].

    PubMed

    Yu, Siyuan; Mu, Ling; Wei, Wei

    2012-04-01

    This paper is aimed to investigate the signal source and influential factors in signals of trans-esophageal pulse oxygen saturation (SeO2). The red light of the SeO2 probe was faced directly to the descending aorta (DA) of the mongrel dogs. The readings and waveform of SeO2 signals were recorded under following conditions: before and after DA was shield; before and after the blood supply of esophagus was cut off; under the different touch pressures between the SeO2 probe and the esophageal wall. The readings and waveform of SeO2 signals were also recorded respectively at both different esophageal depth and directions when mechanical ventilation was on and off. The tongue oxygen saturation (StO2) was recorded simultaneously as control. The waveform of SeO2 signals disappeared after DA was shield (P < 0.001). No significant difference was found in the SeO2 signals before and after the blood supply of esophagus was cut off (P > 0.05). Compared with the StO2 readings when the SeO2 probe was placed at different esophageal depth, the waldeyer ring, cervical area and thoracic inlet,the readings of SeOz significantly decreased (P < 0.05) while mechanical ventilation was on and off. However, there was no significant difference in the readings between SeO2 signals from DA, aortic arch (AA) and left subclavian artery and the StO2 signals recorded simultaneously. Mechanical ventilation had a remarkable effect on the SeO2 signals at different esophageal depth (P < 0.05), but the StO2 signals lay in its insensitivity to its influence. The readings of StO2 signals were significantly different from that of StO2 signals when the touch pressure between the SeO2 probe and the esophageal wall below 40 mmHg (P < 0.01). The directions of the optimum SeO2 signals acquired at different esophageal depth were not the same. The SeO2 signals were primarily derived from deeper arteries around the esophagus. All of Mechanical ventilation, location of the SeO2 probe in the esophagus and the

  8. Antagonism or Synergism: Role of Tyrosine Phosphatases SHP-1 and SHP-2 in Growth Factor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ning; Li, Zhe; Ding, Ronghua; Frank, Gerald D.; Senbonmatsu, Takaaki; Landon, Erwin J.; Inagami, Tadashi; Zhao, Zhizhuang Joe

    2008-01-01

    SHP-1 and SHP-2 are two SH2 domain-containing tyrosine phosphatases with major pathological implications in cell growth regulating signaling. They share significant overall sequence identity, but their biological functions are often opposite. SHP-1 is generally considered as a negative signal transducer while SHP-2 as a positive one. However, the precise role of each enzyme in shared signaling pathways is not well defined. In this study, we investigated the interaction of these two enzymes in a single cell system by knocking down their expressions with siRNAs and analyzing the effects on epidermal growth factor signaling. Interestingly, knockdown of either SHP-1 or SHP-2 caused significant reduction in the activation of ERK1/2 but not Akt. Furthermore, SHP-1, SHP-2, and Gab1 formed a signaling complex, and SHP-1 and SHP-2 interact with each other. The interaction of SHP-1 with Gab1 is mediated by SHP-2 since it was abrogated by knockdown of SHP-2 and SHP-2, but not SHP-1, binds directly to tyrosine phosphorylated Gab1. Together, the data revealed that both SHP-1 and SHP-2 have a positive role in epidermal growth factor-induced ERK1/2 activation and that they act cooperatively rather than antagonistically. The interaction of SHP-1 and SHP-2 may be responsible for hitherto unexpected novel regulatory mechanism of cell signaling by tyrosine phosphatases. PMID:16762922

  9. Dexras1 links glucocorticoids to insulin-like growth factor-1 signaling in adipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyo Jung; Cha, Jiyoung Y.; Seok, Jo Woon; Choi, Yoonjeong; Yoon, Bo Kyung; Choi, Hyeonjin; Yu, Jung Hwan; Song, Su Jin; Kim, Ara; Lee, Hyemin; Kim, Daeun; Han, Ji Yoon; Kim, Jae-woo

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are associated with obesity, but the underlying mechanism by which they function remains poorly understood. Previously, we showed that small G protein Dexras1 is expressed by glucocorticoids and leads to adipocyte differentiation. In this study, we explored the mechanism by which Dexras1 mediates adipogenesis and show a link to the insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) signaling pathway. Without Dexras1, the activation of MAPK and subsequent phosphorylation of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β (C/EBPβ) is abolished, thereby inhibiting mitotic clonal expansion and further adipocyte differentiation. Dexras1 translocates to the plasma membrane upon insulin or IGF-1 treatment, for which the unique C-terminal domain (amino acids 223–276) is essential. Dexras1-dependent MAPK activation is selectively involved in the IGF-1 signaling, because another Ras protein, H-ras localized to the plasma membrane independently of insulin treatment. Moreover, neither epidermal growth factor nor other cell types shows Dexras1-dependent MAPK activation, indicating the importance of Dexras1 in IGF-1 signaling in adipogenesis. Dexras1 interacts with Shc and Raf, indicating that Dexras1-induced activation of MAPK is largely dependent on the Shc-Grb2-Raf complex. These results suggest that Dexras1 is a critical mediator of the IGF-1 signal to activate MAPK, linking glucocorticoid signaling to IGF-1 signaling in adipogenesis. PMID:27345868

  10. Automatic analysis of composite physical signals using non-negative factorization and information criterion.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kenji; Hidaka, Akinori; Otsu, Nobuyuki; Kurita, Takio

    2012-01-01

    In time-resolved spectroscopy, composite signal sequences representing energy transfer in fluorescence materials are measured, and the physical characteristics of the materials are analyzed. Each signal sequence is represented by a sum of non-negative signal components, which are expressed by model functions. For analyzing the physical characteristics of a measured signal sequence, the parameters of the model functions are estimated. Furthermore, in order to quantitatively analyze real measurement data and to reduce the risk of improper decisions, it is necessary to obtain the statistical characteristics from several sequences rather than just a single sequence. In the present paper, we propose an automatic method by which to analyze composite signals using non-negative factorization and an information criterion. The proposed method decomposes the composite signal sequences using non-negative factorization subjected to parametric base functions. The number of components (i.e., rank) is also estimated using Akaike's information criterion. Experiments using simulated and real data reveal that the proposed method automatically estimates the acceptable ranks and parameters.

  11. Helicobacter pylori virulence factor CagA promotes tumorigenesis of gastric cancer via multiple signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Yong, Xin; Tang, Bo; Li, Bo-Sheng; Xie, Rui; Hu, Chang-Jiang; Luo, Gang; Qin, Yong; Dong, Hui; Yang, Shi-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is strongly associated with the development of gastric diseases but also with several extragastric diseases. The clinical outcomes caused by H. pylori infection are considered to be associated with a complex combination of host susceptibility, environmental factors and bacterial isolates. Infections involving H. pylori strains that possess the virulence factor CagA have a worse clinical outcome than those involving CagA-negative strains. It is remarkable that CagA-positive H. pylori increase the risk for gastric cancer over the risk associated with H. pylori infection alone. CagA behaves as a bacterial oncoprotein playing a key role in H. pylori-induced gastric cancer. Activation of oncogenic signaling pathways and inactivation of tumor suppressor pathways are two crucial events in the development of gastric cancer. CagA shows the ability to affect the expression or function of vital protein in oncogenic or tumor suppressor signaling pathways via several molecular mechanisms, such as direct binding or interaction, phosphorylation of vital signaling proteins and methylation of tumor suppressor genes. As a result, CagA continuously dysregulates of these signaling pathways and promotes tumorigenesis. Recent research has enriched our understanding of how CagA effects on these signaling pathways. This review summarizes the results of the most relevant studies, discusses the complex molecular mechanism involved and attempts to delineate the entire signaling pathway.

  12. Automatic Analysis of Composite Physical Signals Using Non-Negative Factorization and Information Criterion

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Kenji; Hidaka, Akinori; Otsu, Nobuyuki; Kurita, Takio

    2012-01-01

    In time-resolved spectroscopy, composite signal sequences representing energy transfer in fluorescence materials are measured, and the physical characteristics of the materials are analyzed. Each signal sequence is represented by a sum of non-negative signal components, which are expressed by model functions. For analyzing the physical characteristics of a measured signal sequence, the parameters of the model functions are estimated. Furthermore, in order to quantitatively analyze real measurement data and to reduce the risk of improper decisions, it is necessary to obtain the statistical characteristics from several sequences rather than just a single sequence. In the present paper, we propose an automatic method by which to analyze composite signals using non-negative factorization and an information criterion. The proposed method decomposes the composite signal sequences using non-negative factorization subjected to parametric base functions. The number of components (i.e., rank) is also estimated using Akaike's information criterion. Experiments using simulated and real data reveal that the proposed method automatically estimates the acceptable ranks and parameters. PMID:22396759

  13. Regulation of pancreatic islet beta-cell mass by growth factor and hormone signaling.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yao; Chang, Yongchang

    2014-01-01

    Dysfunction and destruction of pancreatic islet beta cells is a hallmark of diabetes. Better understanding of cellular signals in beta cells will allow development of therapeutic strategies for diabetes, such as preservation and expansion of beta-cell mass and improvement of beta-cell function. During the past several decades, the number of studies analyzing the molecular mechanisms, including growth factor/hormone signaling pathways that impact islet beta-cell mass and function, has increased exponentially. Notably, somatolactogenic hormones including growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and their receptors (GHR, PRLR, and IGF-1R) are critically involved in beta-cell growth, survival, differentiation, and insulin secretion. In this chapter, we focus more narrowly on GH, PRL, and IGF-1 signaling, and GH-IGF-1 cross talk. We also discuss how these signaling aspects contribute to the regulation of beta-cell proliferation and apoptosis. In particular, our novel findings of GH-induced formation of GHR-JAK2-IGF-1R protein complex and synergistic effects of GH and IGF-1 on beta-cell signaling, proliferation, and antiapoptosis lead to a new concept that IGF-1R may serve as a proximal component of GH/GHR signaling.

  14. Krüppel-like factors are effectors of nuclear receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Knoedler, Joseph R; Denver, Robert J

    2014-07-01

    Binding of steroid and thyroid hormones to their cognate nuclear receptors (NRs) impacts virtually every aspect of postembryonic development, physiology and behavior, and inappropriate signaling by NRs may contribute to disease. While NRs regulate genes by direct binding to hormone response elements in the genome, their actions may depend on the activity of other transcription factors (TFs) that may or may not bind DNA. The Krüppel-like family of transcription factors (KLF) is an evolutionarily conserved class of DNA-binding proteins that influence many aspects of development and physiology. Several members of this family have been shown to play diverse roles in NR signaling. For example, KLFs (1) act as accessory transcription factors for NR actions, (2) regulate expression of NR genes, and (3) as gene products of primary NR response genes function as key players in NR-dependent transcriptional networks. In mouse models, deletion of different KLFs leads to aberrant transcriptional and physiological responses to hormones, underscoring the importance of these proteins in the regulation of hormonal signaling. Understanding the functional relationships between NRs and KLFs will yield important insights into mechanisms of NR signaling. In this review we present a conceptual framework for understanding how KLFs participate in NR signaling, and we provide examples of how these proteins function to effect hormone action.

  15. Wnt signaling induces gene expression of factors associated with bone destruction in lung and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Rachelle W; Merkel, Alyssa R; Page, Jonathan M; Ruppender, Nazanin S; Guelcher, Scott A; Sterling, Julie A

    2014-12-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) is an important regulator of bone destruction in bone metastatic tumors. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) stimulates PTHrP production in part through the transcription factor Gli2, which is regulated independent of the Hedgehog signaling pathway in osteolytic cancer cells. However, inhibition of TGF-β in vivo does not fully inhibit tumor growth in bone or tumor-induced bone destruction, suggesting other pathways are involved. While Wnt signaling regulates Gli2 in development, the role of Wnt signaling in bone metastasis is unknown. Therefore, we investigated whether Wnt signaling regulates Gli2 expression in tumor cells that induce bone destruction. We report here that Wnt activation by β-catenin/T cell factor 4 (TCF4) over-expression or lithium chloride (LiCl) treatment increased Gli2 and PTHrP expression in osteolytic cancer cells. This was mediated through the TCF and Smad binding sites within the Gli2 promoter as determined by promoter mutation studies, suggesting cross-talk between TGF-β and Wnt signaling. Culture of tumor cells on substrates with bone-like rigidity increased Gli2 and PTHrP production, enhanced autocrine Wnt activity and led to an increase in the TCF/Wnt signaling reporter (TOPFlash), enriched β-catenin nuclear accumulation, and elevated Wnt-related genes by PCR-array. Stromal cells serve as an additional paracrine source of Wnt ligands and enhanced Gli2 and PTHrP mRNA levels in MDA-MB-231 and RWGT2 cells in vitro and promoted tumor-induced bone destruction in vivo in a β-catenin/Wnt3a-dependent mechanism. These data indicate that a combination of matrix rigidity and stromal-secreted factors stimulate Gli2 and PTHrP through Wnt signaling in osteolytic breast cancer cells, and there is significant cross-talk between the Wnt and TGF-β signaling pathways. This suggests that the Wnt signaling pathway may be a potential therapeutic target for inhibiting tumor cell response to the bone

  16. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor in Glioma: Signal Transduction, Neuropathology, Imaging, and Radioresistance1

    PubMed Central

    Hatanpaa, Kimmo J; Burma, Sandeep; Zhao, Dawen; Habib, Amyn A

    2010-01-01

    Aberrant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling is common in cancer. Increased expression of wild type and mutant EGFR is a widespread feature of diverse types of cancer. EGFR signaling in cancer has been the focus of intense investigation for decades primarily for two reasons. First, aberrant EGFR signaling is likely to play an important role in the pathogenesis of cancer, and therefore, the mechanisms of EGFR-mediated oncogenic signaling are of interest. Second, the EGFR signaling system is an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. EGFR gene amplification and overexpression are a particularly striking feature of glioblastoma (GBM), observed in approximately 40% of tumors. GBM is the most common primary malignant tumor of the central nervous system in adults. In approximately 50% of tumors with EGFR amplification, a specific EGFR mutant (EGFRvIII, also known as EGFR type III, de2-7, ΔEGFR) can be detected. This mutant is highly oncogenic and is generated from a deletion of exons 2 to 7 of the EGFR gene, which results in an in-frame deletion of 267 amino acids from the extracellular domain of the receptor. EGFRvIII is unable to bind ligand, and it signals constitutively. Although EGFRvIII has the same signaling domain as the wild type receptor, it seems to generate a distinct set of downstream signals that may contribute to an increased tumorigenicity. In this review, we discuss recent progress in key aspects of EGFR signaling in GBM, focusing on neuropathology, signal transduction, imaging of the EGFR, and the role of the EGFR in mediating resistance to radiation therapy in GBM. PMID:20824044

  17. Endosomal receptor kinetics determine the stability of intracellular growth factor signalling complexes

    PubMed Central

    Tzafriri, A. Rami; Edelman, Elazer R.

    2006-01-01

    There is an emerging paradigm that growth factor signalling continues in the endosome and that cell response to a growth factor is defined by the integration of cell surface and endosomal events. As activated receptors in the endosome are exposed to a different set of binding partners, they probably elicit differential signals compared with when they are at the cell surface. As such, complete appreciation of growth factor signalling requires understanding of growth factor–receptor binding and trafficking kinetics both at the cell surface and in endosomes. Growth factor binding to surface receptors is well characterized, and endosomal binding is assumed to follow surface kinetics if one accounts for changes in pH. Yet, specific binding kinetics within the endosome has not been examined in detail. To parse the factors governing the binding state of endosomal receptors we analysed a whole-cell mathematical model of epidermal growth factor receptor trafficking and binding. We discovered that the stability of growth factor–receptor complexes within endosomes is governed by three primary independent factors: the endosomal dissociation constant, total endosomal volume and the number of endosomal receptors. These factors were combined into a single dimensionless parameter that determines the endosomal binding state of the growth factor–receptor complex and can distinguish different growth factors from each other and different cell states. Our findings indicate that growth factor binding within endosomal compartments cannot be appreciated solely on the basis of the pH-dependence of the dissociation constant and that the concentration of receptors in the endosomal compartment must also be considered. PMID:17117924

  18. Fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling as therapeutic targets in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yashiro, Masakazu; Matsuoka, Tasuku

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) regulate a variety of cellular functions, from embryogenesis to adult tissue homeostasis. FGFR signaling also plays significant roles in the proliferation, invasion, and survival of several types of tumor cells. FGFR-induced alterations, including gene amplification, chromosomal translocation, and mutations, have been shown to be associated with the tumor initiation and progression of gastric cancer, especially in diffuse-type cancers. Therefore, the FGFR signaling pathway might be one of the therapeutic targets in gastric cancer. This review aims to provide an overview of the role of FGFR signaling in tumorigenesis, tumor progression, proliferation, and chemoresistance. We also discuss the accumulating evidence that demonstrates the effectiveness of using clinical therapeutic agents to inhibit FGFR signaling for the treatment of gastric cancer. PMID:26937130

  19. Signal Detection Analysis of Factors Associated with Diabetes among Semirural Mexican American Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanni, K. D.; Ahn, D. A.; Winkleby, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    Signal detection analysis was used to evaluate a combination of sociodemographic, acculturation, mental health, health care, and chronic disease risk factors potentially associated with diabetes in a sample of 4,505 semirural Mexican American adults. Overall, 8.9% of adults had been diagnosed with diabetes. The analysis resulted in 12 mutually…

  20. MECHANISMS OF ZN-INDUCED SIGNAL INITIATION THROUGH THE EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR (EGFR)

    EPA Science Inventory

    MECHANISMS OF Zn-INDUCED SIGNAL INITIATION THROUGH THE EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR (EGFR)
    James M. Samet*, Lee M. Graves? and Weidong Wu?. *Human Studies Division, NHEERL, ORD, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711, and ?Center for Environmental Medicine, University of North C...

  1. Danger signal-dependent activation of human dendritic cells by plasma-derived factor VIII products.

    PubMed

    Miller, L; Weissmüller, S; Ringler, E; Crauwels, P; van Zandbergen, G; Seitz, R; Waibler, Z

    2015-08-01

    Treatment of haemophilia A by infusions of the clotting factor VIII (FVIII) results in the development of inhibitors/anti-drug antibodies in up to 25 % of patients. Mechanisms leading to immunogenicity of FVIII products are not yet fully understood. Amongst other factors, danger signals as elicited upon infection or surgery have been proposed to play a role. In the present study, we focused on effects of danger signals on maturation and activation of dendritic cells (DC) in the context of FVIII application. Human monocyte-derived DC were treated with FVIII alone, with a danger signal alone or a combination of both. By testing more than 60 different healthy donors, we show that FVIII and the bacterial danger signal lipopolysaccharide synergise in increasing DC activation, as characterised by increased expression of co-stimulatory molecules and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. The degree and frequency of this synergistic activation correlate with CD86 expression levels on immature DC prior to stimulation. In our assay system, plasma-derived but not recombinant FVIII products activate human DC in a danger signal-dependent manner. Further tested danger signals, such as R848 also induced DC activation in combination with FVIII, albeit not in every tested donor. In our hands, human DC but not human B cells or macrophages could be activated by FVIII in a danger signal-dependent manner. Our results suggest that immunogenicity of FVIII is a result of multiple factors including the presence of danger, predisposition of the patient, and the choice of a FVIII product for treatment.

  2. Potential attenuation of p38 signaling by DDB2 as a factor in acquired TNF resistance.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chun-Ling; Chao, Chuck C-K

    2005-06-20

    Our previous study demonstrated that DDB2, a DNA repair protein, attenuates cell surface membrane-associated death signal induced by UV or FasAb; DDB2 is overexpressed in cisplatin-selected cells. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the protective role of DDB2 along the apoptotic pathway remains unknown. Our study identified the cross-resistance of the cisplatin-selected cells to tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Since knock-down of the DDB2 level rendered cells (HR18) sensitive to the treatment, the cell sensitivity to TNF-alpha appears inversely proportional to the cellular level of DDB2. Treatment of HeLa cells with TNF-alpha transiently induced activation of p38MAPK signal, but this induction was significantly reduced in the resistant cells. Overexpression of DDB2 attenuated the activation of p38 in cells. TNF-alpha-induced apoptotic signals, represented by caspase-8 and downstream substrate cleavage, were reduced in resistant cells compared to their sensitive counterparts. Inhibition of p38 signal by SB202190 clearly attenuated TNF-alpha-induced apoptotic signals. Moreover, overexpression of DDB2 in HR18 cells also attenuated TNF-alpha induced caspase activation. These results suggest that p38MAPK activation may be a key upstream signal of TNF-alpha-induced apoptosis and that attenuation of p38 signal by DDB2 overexpression may be responsible for acquired TNF-alpha resistance. PMID:15700318

  3. Factors Affecting the Timing of Signal Detection of Adverse Drug Reactions.

    PubMed

    Hashiguchi, Masayuki; Imai, Shungo; Uehara, Keiko; Maruyama, Junya; Shimizu, Mikiko; Mochizuki, Mayumi

    2015-01-01

    We investigated factors affecting the timing of signal detection by comparing variations in reporting time of known and unknown ADRs after initial drug release in the USA. Data on adverse event reactions (AERs) submitted to U.S. FDA was used. Six ADRs associated with 6 drugs (rosuvastatin, aripiprazole, teriparatide, telithromycin, exenatide, varenicline) were investigated: Changes in the proportional reporting ratio, reporting odds ratio, and information component as indexes of signal detection were followed every 3 months after each drugs release, and the time for detection of signals was investigated. The time for the detection of signal to be detected after drug release in the USA was 2-10 months for known ADRs and 19-44 months for unknown ones. The median lag time for known and unknown ADRs was 99.0-122.5 days and 185.5-306.0 days, respectively. When the FDA released advisory information on rare but potentially serious health risks of an unknown ADR, the time lag to report from the onset of ADRs to the FDA was shorter. This study suggested that one factor affecting signal detection time is whether an ADR was known or unknown at release. PMID:26641634

  4. P2y Receptor-Mediated Angiogenesis via Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 2 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Rumjahn, Sharif M.; Baldwin, Karla A; Buxton, Iain L. O.

    2011-01-01

    Pathological as well as physiological angiogenesis is known to be regulated by such factors as nucleotides and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF). Activated P2Y nucleotide receptors have been observed to associate and transactivate VEGF Receptor 2 (VEGFR2), suggesting a cooperation between nucleotide and VEGF signaling in angiogenesis. P2YR mediated VEGFR2 signaling therefore may be important in describing the angiogenic signaling of nucleotides such as ATP. Here, we provide evidence that supports the notion of P2YR-VEGFR2 signaling. The significant angiogenic effect of P2Y1/2 receptor agonists (100 μM ATP and 10 μM 2MS-ATP) on endothelial cell tubulogenesis was suppressed back to near control levels upon addition of 1 μM SU1498 (specific VEGFR2 tyrosine kinase inhibitor). We believe that this P2YR-VEFGR2 signaling is an important component of pathological, as well as physiological angiogenesis. PMID:18605230

  5. Transforming Growth Factor-β and Endoglin Signaling Orchestrate Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Valluru, Manoj; Staton, Carolyn A.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Brown, Nicola J.

    2011-01-01

    Physiological wound healing is a complex process requiring the temporal and spatial co-ordination of various signaling networks, biomechanical forces, and biochemical signaling pathways in both hypoxic and non-hypoxic conditions. Although a plethora of factors are required for successful physiological tissue repair, transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) expression has been demonstrated throughout wound healing and shown to regulate many processes involved in tissue repair, including production of ECM, proteases, protease inhibitors, migration, chemotaxis, and proliferation of macrophages, fibroblasts of the granulation tissue, epithelial and capillary endothelial cells. TGF-β mediates these effects by stimulating signaling pathways through a receptor complex which contains Endoglin. Endoglin is expressed in a broad spectrum of proliferating and stem cells with elevated expression during hypoxia, and regulates important cellular functions such as proliferation and adhesion via Smad signaling. This review focuses on how the TGF-β family and Endoglin, regulate stem cell availability, and modulate cellular behavior within the wound microenvironment, includes current knowledge of the signaling pathways involved, and explores how this information may be applicable to inflammatory and/or angiogenic diseases such as fibrosis, rheumatoid arthritis and metastatic cancer. PMID:22164144

  6. Fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling in kidney and lower urinary tract development.

    PubMed

    Walker, Kenneth A; Sims-Lucas, Sunder; Bates, Carlton M

    2016-06-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) and FGF ligands are highly expressed in the developing kidney and lower urinary tract. Several classic studies showed many effects of exogenous FGF ligands on embryonic renal tissues in vitro and in vivo. Another older landmark publication showed that mice with a dominant negative Fgfr fragment had severe renal dysplasia. Together, these studies revealed the importance of FGFR signaling in kidney and lower urinary tract development. With the advent of modern gene targeting techniques, including conditional knockout approaches, several publications have revealed critical roles for FGFR signaling in many lineages of the kidney and lower urinary tract at different stages of development. FGFR signaling has been shown to be critical for early metanephric mesenchymal patterning, Wolffian duct patterning including induction of the ureteric bud, ureteric bud branching morphogenesis, nephron progenitor survival and nephrogenesis, and bladder mesenchyme patterning. FGFRs pattern these tissues by interacting with many other growth factor signaling pathways. Moreover, the many genetic Fgfr and Fgf animal models have structural defects mimicking numerous congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract seen in humans. Finally, many studies have shown how FGFR signaling is critical for kidney and lower urinary tract patterning in humans. PMID:26293980

  7. Inhibition of transforming growth factor β signaling promotes epiblast formation in mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Ghimire, Sabitri; Heindryckx, Björn; Van der Jeught, Margot; Neupane, Jitesh; O'Leary, Thomas; Lierman, Sylvie; De Vos, Winnok H; Chuva de Sousa Lopes, Susana; Deroo, Tom; De Sutter, Petra

    2015-02-15

    Early lineage segregation in preimplantation embryos and maintenance of pluripotency in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are both regulated by specific signaling pathways. Small molecules have been shown to modulate these signaling pathways. We examined the influence of several small molecules and growth factors on second-lineage segregation of the inner cell mass toward hypoblast and epiblast lineage during mouse embryonic preimplantation development. We found that the second-lineage segregation is influenced by activation or inhibition of the transforming growth factor (TGF)β pathway. Inhibition of the TGFβ pathway from the two-cell, four-cell, and morula stages onward up to the blastocyst stage significantly increased the epiblast cell proliferation. The epiblast formed in the embryos in which TGFβ signaling was inhibited was fully functional as demonstrated by the potential of these epiblast cells to give rise to pluripotent ESCs. Conversely, activating the TGFβ pathway reduced epiblast formation. Inhibition of the glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)3 pathway and activation of bone morphogenetic protein 4 signaling reduced the formation of both epiblast and hypoblast cells. Activation of the protein kinase A pathway and of the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 pathway did not influence the second-lineage segregation in mouse embryos. The simultaneous inhibition of three pathways--TGFβ, GSK3β, and the fibroblast growth factor (FGF)/extracellular signal-regulated kinases (Erk)--significantly enhanced the proliferation of epiblast cells than that caused by inhibition of either TGFβ pathway alone or by combined inhibition of the GSK3β and FGF/Erk pathways only.

  8. Inhibition of Transforming Growth Factor β Signaling Promotes Epiblast Formation in Mouse Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Ghimire, Sabitri; Heindryckx, Björn; Van der Jeught, Margot; Neupane, Jitesh; O'Leary, Thomas; Lierman, Sylvie; De Vos, Winnok H.; Chuva de Sousa Lopes, Susana; Deroo, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Early lineage segregation in preimplantation embryos and maintenance of pluripotency in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are both regulated by specific signaling pathways. Small molecules have been shown to modulate these signaling pathways. We examined the influence of several small molecules and growth factors on second-lineage segregation of the inner cell mass toward hypoblast and epiblast lineage during mouse embryonic preimplantation development. We found that the second-lineage segregation is influenced by activation or inhibition of the transforming growth factor (TGF)β pathway. Inhibition of the TGFβ pathway from the two-cell, four-cell, and morula stages onward up to the blastocyst stage significantly increased the epiblast cell proliferation. The epiblast formed in the embryos in which TGFβ signaling was inhibited was fully functional as demonstrated by the potential of these epiblast cells to give rise to pluripotent ESCs. Conversely, activating the TGFβ pathway reduced epiblast formation. Inhibition of the glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)3 pathway and activation of bone morphogenetic protein 4 signaling reduced the formation of both epiblast and hypoblast cells. Activation of the protein kinase A pathway and of the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 pathway did not influence the second-lineage segregation in mouse embryos. The simultaneous inhibition of three pathways—TGFβ, GSK3β, and the fibroblast growth factor (FGF)/extracellular signal-regulated kinases (Erk)—significantly enhanced the proliferation of epiblast cells than that caused by inhibition of either TGFβ pathway alone or by combined inhibition of the GSK3β and FGF/Erk pathways only. PMID:25245024

  9. Dynamics of Transforming Growth Factor Beta Signaling in Wound Healing and Scarring

    PubMed Central

    Finnson, Kenneth W.; McLean, Sarah; Di Guglielmo, Gianni M.; Philip, Anie

    2013-01-01

    Significance Wound healing is an intricate biological process in which the skin, or any other tissue, repairs itself after injury. Normal wound healing relies on the appropriate levels of cytokines and growth factors to ensure that cellular responses are mediated in a coordinated manner. Among the many growth factors studied in the context of wound healing, transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) is thought to have the broadest spectrum of effects. Recent Advances Many of the molecular mechanisms underlying the TGF-β/Smad signaling pathway have been elucidated, and the role of TGF-β in wound healing has been well characterized. Targeting the TGF-β signaling pathway using therapeutic agents to improve wound healing and/or reduce scarring has been successful in pre-clinical studies. Critical Issues Although TGF-β isoforms (β1, β2, β3) signal through the same cell surface receptors, they display distinct functions during wound healing in vivo through mechanisms that have not been fully elucidated. The challenge of translating preclinical studies targeting the TGF-β signaling pathway to a clinical setting may require more extensive preclinical research using animal models that more closely mimic wound healing and scarring in humans, and taking into account the spatial, temporal, and cell-type–specific aspects of TGF-β isoform expression and function. Future Directions Understanding the differences in TGF-β isoform signaling at the molecular level and identification of novel components of the TGF-β signaling pathway that critically regulate wound healing may lead to the discovery of potential therapeutic targets for treatment of impaired wound healing and pathological scarring. PMID:24527343

  10. Fibroblast growth factor signaling is essential for self-renewal of dental epithelial stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Julia Yu Fong; Wang, Cong; Liu, Junchen; Huang, Yanqing; Jin, Chengliu; Yang, Chaofeng; Hai, Bo; Liu, Fei; D'Souza, Rena N; McKeehan, Wallace L; Wang, Fen

    2013-10-01

    A constant supply of epithelial cells from dental epithelial stem cell (DESC) niches in the cervical loop (CL) enables mouse incisors to grow continuously throughout life. Elucidation of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this unlimited growth potential is of broad interest for tooth regenerative therapies. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling is essential for the development of mouse incisors and for maintenance of the CL during prenatal development. However, how FGF signaling in DESCs controls the self-renewal and differentiation of the cells is not well understood. Herein, we report that FGF signaling is essential for self-renewal and the prevention of cell differentiation of DESCs in the CL as well as in DESC spheres. Inhibiting the FGF signaling pathway decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis of the cells in DESC spheres. Suppressing FGFR or its downstream signal transduction pathways diminished Lgr5-expressing cells in the CL and promoted cell differentiation both in DESC spheres and the CL. Furthermore, disruption of the FGF pathway abrogated Wnt signaling to promote Lgr5 expression in DESCs both in vitro and in vivo. This study sheds new light on understanding the mechanism by which the homeostasis, expansion, and differentiation of DESCs are regulated.

  11. Transforming growth factor-beta signaling in thoracic aortic aneurysm development: a paradox in pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jeffrey A.; Spinale, Francis G.; Ikonomidis, John S.

    2008-01-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) are potentially devastating, and due to their asymptomatic behavior, pose a serious health risk characterized by the lack of medical treatment options and high rates of surgical morbidity and mortality. Independent of the inciting stimuli (biochemical/mechanical), TAA development proceeds by a multifactorial process influenced by both cellular and extracellular mechanisms, resulting in alterations of the structure and composition of the vascular extracellular matrix (ECM). While the role of enhanced ECM proteolysis in TAA formation remains undisputed, little attention has been focused on the upstream signaling events that drive the remodeling process. Recent evidence highlighting the dysregulation of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signaling in ascending TAAs from Marfan syndrome patients has stimulated an interest in this intracellular signaling pathway. However, paradoxical discoveries have implicated both enhanced TGF-β signaling and loss of function TGF-β receptor mutations, in aneurysm formation; obfuscating a clear functional role for TGF-β in aneurysm development. In an effort to elucidate this subject, TGF-β signaling and its role in vascular remodeling and pathology will be reviewed, with the aim of identifying potential mechanisms of how TGF-β signaling may contribute to the formation and progression of TAA. PMID:18765947

  12. Pleiotropic functions of fibroblast growth factor signaling in embryonic mammary gland development.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Jung; Jung, Han-Sung; Lu, Pengfei

    2013-06-01

    The mammary gland is an ectodermal appendage and a defining feature of mammals. Consistent with it being a recent evolutionary novelty, many of the molecules essential for the ontogeny and morphogenesis of various vertebrate organs, including those in the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling pathway, are co-opted for induction, maintenance and morphogenesis of the mammary glands. Understanding the mechanism whereby FGF signaling regulates the fundamental cell behavior during normal mammary gland develop may facilitate determination of the consequences of its deregulation during breast cancer progression.

  13. Neuroendocrine control of the gut during stress: corticotropin-releasing factor signaling pathways in the spotlight.

    PubMed

    Stengel, Andreas; Taché, Yvette

    2009-01-01

    Stress affects the gastrointestinal tract as part of the visceral response. Various stressors induce similar profiles of gut motor function alterations, including inhibition of gastric emptying, stimulation of colonic propulsive motility, and hypersensitivity to colorectal distension. In recent years, substantial progress has been made in our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of stress's impact on gut function. Activation of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) signaling pathways mediates both the inhibition of upper gastrointestinal (GI) and the stimulation of lower GI motor function through interaction with different CRF receptor subtypes. Here, we review how various stressors affect the gut, with special emphasis on the central and peripheral CRF signaling systems. PMID:18928406

  14. Nanoconjugation prolongs endosomal signaling of the epidermal growth factor receptor and enhances apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, L.; Xu, F.; Reinhard, B. M.

    2016-07-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that intracellular signaling can be subject to strict spatial control. As the covalent attachment of a signaling ligand to a nanoparticle (NP) impacts ligand-receptor binding, uptake, and trafficking, nanoconjugation provides new opportunities for manipulating intracellular signaling in a controlled fashion. To establish the effect of nanoconjugation on epidermal growth factor (EGF) mediated signaling, we investigate here the intracellular fate of nanoconjugated EGF (NP-EGF) and its bound receptor (EGFR) by quantitative correlated darkfield/fluorescence microscopy and density-based endosomal fractionation. We demonstrate that nanoconjugation prolongs the dwell time of phosphorylated receptors in the early endosomes and that the retention of activated EGFR in the early endosomes is accompanied by an EGF mediated apoptosis at effective concentrations that do not induce apoptosis in the case of free EGF. Overall, these findings indicate nanoconjugation as a rational strategy for modifying signaling that acts by modulating the temporo-spatial distribution of the activated EGF-EGFR ligand-receptor complex.It is becoming increasingly clear that intracellular signaling can be subject to strict spatial control. As the covalent attachment of a signaling ligand to a nanoparticle (NP) impacts ligand-receptor binding, uptake, and trafficking, nanoconjugation provides new opportunities for manipulating intracellular signaling in a controlled fashion. To establish the effect of nanoconjugation on epidermal growth factor (EGF) mediated signaling, we investigate here the intracellular fate of nanoconjugated EGF (NP-EGF) and its bound receptor (EGFR) by quantitative correlated darkfield/fluorescence microscopy and density-based endosomal fractionation. We demonstrate that nanoconjugation prolongs the dwell time of phosphorylated receptors in the early endosomes and that the retention of activated EGFR in the early endosomes is accompanied by an EGF

  15. Factor Xa stimulates fibroblast procollagen production, proliferation, and calcium signaling via PAR{sub 1} activation

    SciTech Connect

    Blanc-Brude, Olivier P. . E-mail: olivier.blanc-brude@larib.inserm.fr; Archer, Fabienne; Leoni, Patricia; Derian, Claudia; Bolsover, Steven; Laurent, Geoffrey J.; Chambers, Rachel C.

    2005-03-10

    Fibroblast proliferation and procollagen production are central features of tissue repair and fibrosis. In addition to its role in blood clotting, the coagulation cascade proteinase thrombin can contribute to tissue repair by stimulating fibroblasts via proteolytic activation of proteinase-activated receptor-1 (PAR{sub 1}). During hemostasis, the coagulation cascade proteinase factor X is converted into factor Xa. We have previously shown that factor Xa upregulates fibroblast proliferation via production of autocrine PDGF. In this study, we further examined the effects of factor Xa on fibroblast function and aimed to identify its signaling receptor. We showed that factor Xa stimulates procollagen promoter activity and protein production by human and mouse fibroblasts. This effect was independent of PDGF and thrombin production, but dependent on factor Xa proteolytic activity. We also showed that PAR{sub 1}-deficient mouse fibroblasts did not upregulate procollagen production, mobilize cytosolic calcium, or proliferate in response to factor Xa. Desensitization techniques and PAR{sub 1}-specific agonists and inhibitors were used to demonstrate that PAR{sub 1} mediates factor Xa signaling in human fibroblasts. This is the first report that factor Xa stimulates extracellular matrix production. In contrast with endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells, fibroblasts appear to be the only cell type in which the effects of factor Xa are mediated mainly via PAR{sub 1} and not PAR{sub 2}. These findings are critical for our understanding of tissue repair and fibrotic mechanisms, and for the design of novel approaches to inhibit the profibrotic effects of the coagulation cascade without compromising blood hemostasis.

  16. The glucose-sensing transcription factor MLX promotes myogenesis via myokine signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Liam C.; Xu, Beisi; Finkelstein, David; Fan, Yiping; Carroll, Patrick A.; Cheng, Pei-Feng; Eisenman, Robert N.; Demontis, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic stress and changes in nutrient levels modulate many aspects of skeletal muscle function during aging and disease. Growth factors and cytokines secreted by skeletal muscle, known as myokines, are important signaling factors, but it is largely unknown whether they modulate muscle growth and differentiation in response to nutrients. Here, we found that changes in glucose levels increase the activity of the glucose-responsive transcription factor MLX (Max-like protein X), which promotes and is necessary for myoblast fusion. MLX promotes myogenesis not via an adjustment of glucose metabolism but rather by inducing the expression of several myokines, including insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2), whereas RNAi and dominant-negative MLX reduce IGF2 expression and block myogenesis. This phenotype is rescued by conditioned medium from control muscle cells and by recombinant IGF2, which activates the myogenic kinase Akt. Importantly, MLX-null mice display decreased IGF2 induction and diminished muscle regeneration in response to injury, indicating that the myogenic function of MLX is manifested in vivo. Thus, glucose is a signaling molecule that regulates myogenesis and muscle regeneration via MLX/IGF2/Akt signaling. PMID:26584623

  17. Extrinsic and intrinsic signals converge on the Runx1/CBFβ transcription factor for nonpeptidergic nociceptor maturation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Siyi; O'Donovan, Kevin J; Turner, Eric E; Zhong, Jian; Ginty, David D

    2015-01-01

    The generation of diverse neuronal subtypes involves specification of neural progenitors and, subsequently, postmitotic neuronal differentiation, a relatively poorly understood process. Here, we describe a mechanism whereby the neurotrophic factor NGF and the transcription factor Runx1 coordinate postmitotic differentiation of nonpeptidergic nociceptors, a major nociceptor subtype. We show that the integrity of a Runx1/CBFβ holocomplex is crucial for NGF-dependent nonpeptidergic nociceptor maturation. NGF signals through the ERK/MAPK pathway to promote expression of Cbfb but not Runx1 prior to maturation of nonpeptidergic nociceptors. In contrast, transcriptional initiation of Runx1 in nonpeptidergic nociceptor precursors is dependent on the homeodomain transcription factor Islet1, which is largely dispensable for Cbfb expression. Thus, an NGF/TrkA-MAPK-CBFβ pathway converges with Islet1-Runx1 signaling to promote Runx1/CBFβ holocomplex formation and nonpeptidergic nociceptor maturation. Convergence of extrinsic and intrinsic signals to control heterodimeric transcription factor complex formation provides a robust mechanism for postmitotic neuronal subtype specification. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10874.001 PMID:26418744

  18. Synchronization of developmental processes and defense signaling by growth regulating transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinyi; Rice, J Hollis; Chen, Nana; Baum, Thomas J; Hewezi, Tarek

    2014-01-01

    Growth regulating factors (GRFs) are a conserved class of transcription factor in seed plants. GRFs are involved in various aspects of tissue differentiation and organ development. The implication of GRFs in biotic stress response has also been recently reported, suggesting a role of these transcription factors in coordinating the interaction between developmental processes and defense dynamics. However, the molecular mechanisms by which GRFs mediate the overlaps between defense signaling and developmental pathways are elusive. Here, we report large scale identification of putative target candidates of Arabidopsis GRF1 and GRF3 by comparing mRNA profiles of the grf1/grf2/grf3 triple mutant and those of the transgenic plants overexpressing miR396-resistant version of GRF1 or GRF3. We identified 1,098 and 600 genes as putative targets of GRF1 and GRF3, respectively. Functional classification of the potential target candidates revealed that GRF1 and GRF3 contribute to the regulation of various biological processes associated with defense response and disease resistance. GRF1 and GRF3 participate specifically in the regulation of defense-related transcription factors, cell-wall modifications, cytokinin biosynthesis and signaling, and secondary metabolites accumulation. GRF1 and GRF3 seem to fine-tune the crosstalk between miRNA signaling networks by regulating the expression of several miRNA target genes. In addition, our data suggest that GRF1 and GRF3 may function as negative regulators of gene expression through their association with other transcription factors. Collectively, our data provide new insights into how GRF1 and GRF3 might coordinate the interactions between defense signaling and plant growth and developmental pathways. PMID:24875638

  19. Blocking Nerve Growth Factor Signaling Reduces the Neural Invasion Potential of Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bapat, Aditi A.; Munoz, Ruben M.; Von Hoff, Daniel D.

    2016-01-01

    Perineural invasion (PNI) is thought to be one of the factors responsible for the high rate of tumor recurrence after surgery and the pain generation associated with pancreatic cancer. Signaling via the nerve growth factor (NGF) pathway between pancreatic cancer cells and the surrounding nerves has been implicated in PNI, and increased levels of these proteins have been correlated to poor prognosis. In this study, we examine the molecular mechanism of the NGF signaling pathway in PNI in pancreatic cancer. We show that knocking down NGF or its receptors, TRKA and p75NTR, or treatment with GW441756, a TRKA kinase inhibitor, reduces the proliferation and migration of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. Furthermore, pancreatic cancer cells migrate towards dorsal root ganglia (DRG) in a co-culture assay, indicating a paracrine NGF signaling between the DRGs and pancreatic cancer cells. Knocking down the expression of NGF pathway proteins or inhibiting the activity of TRKA by GW441756 reduced the migratory ability of Mia PaCa2 towards the DRGs. Finally, blocking NGF signaling by NGF neutralizing antibodies or GW441756 inhibited the neurite formation in PC-12 cells in response to conditioned media from pancreatic cancer cells, indicating a reciprocal signaling pathway between the pancreatic cancer cells and nerves. Our results indicate that NGF signaling pathway provides a potential target for developing molecularly targeted therapies to decrease PNI and reduce pain generation. Since there are several TRKA antagonists currently in early clinical trials they could now be tested in the clinical situation of pancreatic cancer induced pain. PMID:27792755

  20. The role of vascular-derived perlecan in modulating cell adhesion, proliferation and growth factor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lord, Megan S.; Chuang, Christine Y.; Melrose, James; Davies, Michael J.; Iozzo, Renato V.; Whitelock, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Smooth muscle cell proliferation can be inhibited by heparan sulfate proteoglycans whereas the removal or digestion of heparan sulfate from perlecan promotes their proliferation. In this study we characterized the glycosaminoglycan side chains of perlecan isolated from either primary human coronary artery smooth muscle or endothelial cells and determined their roles in mediating cell adhesion and proliferation, and in fibroblast growth factor (FGF) binding and signaling. Smooth muscle cell perlecan was decorated with both heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate, whereas endothelial perlecan contained exclusively heparan sulfate chains. Smooth muscle cells bound to the protein core of perlecan only when the glycosaminoglycans were removed, and this binding involved a novel site in domain III as well as domain V/endorepellin and the α2β1 integrin. In contrast, endothelial cells adhered to the protein core of perlecan in the presence of glycosaminoglycans. Smooth muscle cell perlecan bound both FGF1 and FGF2 via its heparan sulfate chains and promoted the signaling of FGF2 but not FGF1. Also endothelial cell perlecan bound both FGF1 and FGF2 via its heparan sulfate chains, but in contrast, promoted the signaling of both growth factors. Based on this differential bioactivity, we propose that perlecan synthesized by smooth muscle cells differs from that synthesized by endothelial cells by possessing different signaling capabilities, primarily, but not exclusively, due to a differential glycanation. The end result is a differential modulation of cell adhesion, proliferation and growth factor signaling in these two key cellular constituents of blood vessels. PMID:24509440

  1. Reduction of Nup107 attenuates the growth factor signaling in the senescent cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sung Young; Kang, Hyun Tae; Choi, Hae Ri; Park, Sang Chul

    2010-10-08

    Research highlights: {yields} Decreased expression of Nup107 in aged cells and organs. {yields} Depletion of Nup107 results in impaired nuclear translocation of p-ERK. {yields} Depletion of Nup107 affects downstream effectors of ERK signaling. {yields} Depletion of Nup107 inhibits cell proliferation of oligodendroglioma cells. -- Abstract: Hypo-responsiveness to growth factors is a fundamental feature of cellular senescence. In this study, we found markedly decreased level of Nup107, a key scaffold protein in nuclear pore complex assembly, in senescent human diploid fibroblasts as well as in organs of aged mice. Depletion of Nup107 by specific siRNA in young human diploid fibroblasts prevented the effective nuclear translocation of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) following epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulation, and decreased the expression of c-Fos in consequence. The disturbances in ERK signaling in Nup107 depleted cells closely mirror the similar changes in senescent cells. Knockdown of Nup107 in anaplastic oligodendroglioma cells caused cell death, rather than growth retardation, indicating a greater sensitivity to Nup107 depletion in cancer cells than in normal cells. These findings support the notion that Nup107 may contribute significantly to the regulation of cell fate in aged and transformed cells by modulating nuclear trafficking of signal molecules.

  2. A predictive model of bifunctional transcription factor signaling during embryonic tissue patterning.

    PubMed

    Junker, Jan Philipp; Peterson, Kevin A; Nishi, Yuichi; Mao, Junhao; McMahon, Andrew P; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2014-11-24

    Hedgehog signaling controls pattern formation in many vertebrate tissues. The downstream effectors of the pathway are the bifunctional Gli transcription factors, which, depending on hedgehog concentration, act as either transcriptional activators or repressors. Quantitatively understanding the interplay between Gli activator and repressor forms for patterning complex tissues is an open challenge. Here, we describe a reductionist mathematical model for how Gli activators and repressors are integrated in space and time to regulate transcriptional outputs of hedgehog signaling, using the pathway readouts Gli1 and Ptch1 as a model system. Spatially resolved measurements of absolute transcript numbers for these genes allow us to infer spatiotemporal variations of Gli activator and repressor levels. We validate our model by successfully predicting expression changes of Gli1 and Ptch1 in mutants at different developmental stages and in different tissues. Our results provide a starting point for understanding gene regulation by bifunctional transcription factors during mammalian development. PMID:25458012

  3. Phytochrome Interacting Factors: central players in phytochrome-mediated light signaling networks.

    PubMed

    Castillon, Alicia; Shen, Hui; Huq, Enamul

    2007-11-01

    To adapt to the surrounding environment, plants constantly monitor and respond to changes in the red and far-red regions of the light spectrum through the phytochrome family of photoreceptors. Extensive efforts using genetic, molecular and photobiological techniques have led to the identification of a group of basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors called the Phytochrome Interacting Factors, PIFs, which directly bind to the photoactivated phytochromes. Members of the PIF family have been shown to control light-regulated gene expression directly and indirectly. PIF1, PIF3, PIF4 and PIF5 are degraded in response to light signals, and physical interaction of PIF3 with phytochromes is necessary for the light-induced phosphorylation and degradation of PIF3. PIFs constitute an excellent model for the investigation of the biochemical mechanisms of signal transfer from photoactivated phytochromes and the light-regulation of gene expression that controls photomorphogenesis in plants.

  4. Attenuation of fibroblast growth factor signaling by poly-N-acatyllactosamine type glycans

    PubMed Central

    Sugihara, Kazuhiro; Shibata, Toshiaki K.; Takata, Kayoko; Kimura, Takako; Kanayama, Naohiro; Williams, Roy; Hatakeyama, Shingo; Akama, Tomoya O.; Kuo, Chu-Wei; Khoo, Kay-Hooi; Fukuda, Michiko N.

    2014-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) and their receptors are expressed in a variety of mammalian tissues, playing a role in development and cell proliferation. While analyzing human sperm motility, we found that sperm treated with endo-β-galactosidase (EBG), which specifically hydrolyzes poly-N-acetyllactosamine type glycans (polyLacs), enhanced motility. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed that sperm-associated polyLacs are heavily fucosylated, consistent with Lewis Y antigen. Immunohistochemistry of epididymis using an anti-Lewis Y antibody before and after EBG treatment suggested that polyLacs carrying the Lewis Y epitope are synthesized in epididymal epithelia and secreted to seminal fluid. EBG-treated sperm elevated cAMP levels and calcium influx, indicating activation of fibroblast growth factor signaling. Seminal fluid polyLacs bound to FGFs in vitro, and impaired FGF-mediated signaling in HEK293T cells. PMID:23968720

  5. Genetic Analysis of Fibroblast Growth Factor Signaling in the Drosophila Eye

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, T.; Choi, I.; Banerjee, Utpal

    2012-01-01

    The development of eyes in Drosophila involves intricate epithelial reorganization events for accurate positioning of cells and proper formation and organization of ommatidial clusters. We demonstrate that Branchless (Bnl), the fibroblast growth factor ligand, regulates restructuring events in the eye disc primordium from as early as the emergence of clusters from a morphogenetic front to the cellular movements during pupal eye development. Breathless (Btl) functions as the fibroblast growth factor receptor to mediate Bnl signal, and together they regulate expression of DE-cadherin, Crumbs, and Actin. In addition, in the eye Bnl regulates the temporal onset and extent of retinal basal glial cell migration by activating Btl in the glia. We hypothesized that the Bnl functions in the eye are Hedgehog dependent and represent novel aspects of Bnl signaling not explored previously. PMID:22384378

  6. Unraveling Growth Factor Signaling and Cell Cycle Progression in Individual Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Gross, Sean M; Rotwein, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Cultured cells require the actions of growth factors to enter the cell cycle, but how individual members of a population respond to the same stimulus remains unknown. Here we have employed continuous monitoring by live cell imaging in a dual-reporter cell model to investigate the regulation of short-term growth factor signaling (protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) activity) and longer-term progression through the cell cycle (cyclin-dependent kinase 2 activity). In the total population, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I)-enhanced cell cycle entry by >5-fold compared with serum-free medium (from 13.5 to 78%), but at the single cell level we observed a broad distribution in the timing of G1 exit (4-24 h, mean ∼12 h) that did not vary with either the amount or duration of IGF-I treatment. Cells that failed to re-enter the cell cycle exhibited similar responses to IGF-I in terms of integrated Akt activity and migration distance compared with those that did. We made similar observations with EGF, PDGF-AA, and PDGF-BB. As potential thresholds of growth factor-mediated cell cycle progression appeared to be heterogeneous within the population, the longer-term proliferative outcomes of individual cells to growth factor stimulation could not be predicted based solely on acute Akt signaling responses, no matter how robust these might be. Thus, although we could define a relationship at the population level between growth factor-induced Akt signaling dynamics and cell cycle progression, we could not predict the fate of individual cells. PMID:27226630

  7. Targeting the Transforming Growth FactorSignaling Pathway in Human Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraj, Nagathihalli S

    2009-01-01

    The transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling pathway plays a pivotal role in diverse cellular processes. TGF-β switches its role from tumor suppressor in normal or dysplastic cells to a tumor promoter in advanced cancers. It is widely believed that Smad-dependent pathway is involved in TGF-β tumor suppressive functions, whereas activation of Smad-independent pathways coupled with the loss of tumor suppressor functions of TGF-β is important for its pro-oncogenic functions. TGF-β signaling has been considered as a very suitable therapeutic target. The discovery of oncogenic actions of TGF-β has generated a great deal of enthusiasm for developing TGF-β signaling inhibitors for the treatment of cancer. The challenge is to identify the group of patients where targeted tumors are not only refractory to TGF-β-induced tumor suppressor functions but also responsive to tumor promoting effects of TGF-β. TGF-β pathway inhibitors including small and large molecules have now entered clinical trials. Preclinical studies with these inhibitors have shown promise in a variety of different tumor models. Here we emphasize on the mechanisms of signaling and specific targets of the TGF-β pathway that are critical effectors of tumor progression and invasion. This report also focuses on the therapeutic intervention of TGF-β signaling in human cancers. PMID:20001556

  8. Noise and fidelity of information transmission through the Tumor Necrosis Factor signaling circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levchenko, Andre

    2013-03-01

    Molecular noise restricts the ability of an individual cell to resolve input signals of different strengths and gather information about the external environment. We developed an integrative theoretical and experimental framework, based on the formalism of information theory, to quantitatively predict and measure the amount of information transduced by molecular and cellular networks. Analyzing tumor necrosis factor (TNF) signaling revealed that individual TNF signaling pathways transduce information sufficient for accurate binary decisions, and an upstream bottleneck limits the information gained via multiple integrated pathways. Negative feedback to this bottleneck could both alleviate and enhance its limiting effect, despite decreasing noise. Bottlenecks likewise constrain information attained by networks signaling through multiple genes or cells. We further use this new analysis formalism to ``map'' the noise amplitude across different parts of the network. Finally, we show that the redundancy in signaling due to the existence of parallel pathways is not absolute, and that parallel pathways can transmit different types of information about the input, i.e., the duration vs. amplitude.

  9. Fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling in oligodendrocytes regulates myelin sheath thickness.

    PubMed

    Furusho, Miki; Dupree, Jeffrey L; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Bansal, Rashmi

    2012-05-01

    Formation of the CNS white matter is developmentally tightly regulated, but the molecules and mechanisms of myelination control in the postnatal CNS are poorly understood. Here, we show that myelin growth is controlled by fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling, originally identified as a proliferative signal for oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) in vitro. We created two lines of mice lacking both FGF receptor 1 (Fgfr1) and Fgfr2 in oligodendrocyte-lineage cells but found that in these mice OPC proliferation and differentiation were unaffected. In addition, axonal ensheathment and the initiation of myelination were on time. However, the rapid growth of CNS myelin, normally occurring in the second postnatal week, was strongly inhibited. Throughout adulthood, the myelin sheath remained disproportionately thin relative to the axon caliber. In adult mice, mutant oligodendrocytes were normal in number, whereas the transcription of major myelin genes was reduced. This FGF receptor-mediated stimulation of mature oligodendrocytes could also be modeled in vitro, demonstrating that enhanced expansion of oligodendroglial processes requires signaling by extracellular signal regulated kinase-1 and -2 (Erk1/2), downstream mediators of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). In vivo, Erk1/2-MAPK activity was reduced in the hypomyelinated CNS of Fgfr1/Fgfr2 mutant mice. These studies reveal a previously unrecognized function of FGF receptor signaling in oligodendrocytes that contributes to the regulation of myelin sheath thickness and that uncouples the initiation of ensheathment from the later phase of continued myelin growth.

  10. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor Signaling in Pheochromocytoma: Turning the Rudder in the Right Direction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Many solid tumors, including pheochromocytoma (PHEO) and paraganglioma (PGL), are characterized by a (pseudo)hypoxic signature. (Pseudo)hypoxia has been shown to promote both tumor progression and resistance to therapy. The major mediators of the transcriptional hypoxic response are hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). High levels of HIFs lead to transcription of hypoxia-responsive genes, which are involved in tumorigenesis. PHEOs and PGLs are catecholamine-producing tumors arising from sympathetic- or parasympathetic-derived chromaffin tissue. In recent years, substantial progress has been made in understanding the metabolic disturbances present in PHEO and PGL, especially because of the identification of some disease-susceptibility genes. To date, fifteen PHEO and PGL susceptibility genes have been identified. Based on the main transcription signatures of the mutated genes, PHEOs and PGLs have been divided into two clusters, pseudohypoxic cluster 1 and cluster 2, rich in kinase receptor signaling and protein translation pathways. Although these two clusters seem to show distinct signaling pathways, recent data suggest that both clusters are interconnected by HIF signaling as the important driver in their tumorigenesis, and mutations in most PHEO and PGL susceptibility genes seem to affect HIF-α regulation and its downstream signaling pathways. HIF signaling appears to play an important role in the development and growth of PHEOs and PGLs, which could suggest new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of these tumors. PMID:23940289

  11. Imbalanced signal transduction in regulatory T cells expressing the transcription factor FoxP3

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Dapeng; Farache, Julia; Mingueneau, Michael; Mathis, Diane; Benoist, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    FoxP3+ T regulatory (Treg) cells have a fundamental role in immunological tolerance, with transcriptional and functional phenotypes that demarcate them from conventional CD4+ T cells (Tconv). Differences between these two lineages in the signaling downstream of T-cell receptor-triggered activation have been reported, and there are different requirements for some signaling factors. Seeking a comprehensive view, we found that Treg cells have a broadly dampened activation of several pathways and signaling nodes upon TCR-mediated activation, with low phosphorylation of CD3ζ, SLP76, Erk1/2, AKT, or S6 and lower calcium flux. In contrast, STAT phosphorylation triggered by interferons, IL2 or IL6, showed variations between Treg and Tconv in magnitude or choice of preferential STAT activation but no general Treg signaling defect. Much, but not all, of the Treg/Tconv difference in TCR-triggered responses could be attributed to lower responsiveness of antigen-experienced cells with CD44hi or CD62Llo phenotypes, which form a greater proportion of the Treg pool. Candidate regulators were tested, but the Treg/Tconv differential could not be explained by overexpression in Treg cells of the signaling modulator CD5, the coinhibitors PD-1 and CTLA4, or the regulatory phosphatase DUSP4. However, transcriptome profiling in Dusp4-deficient mice showed that DUSP4 enhances the expression of a segment of the canonical Treg transcriptional signature, which partially overlaps with the TCR-dependent Treg gene set. Thus, Treg cells, likely because of their intrinsically higher reactivity to self, tune down TCR signals but seem comparatively more attuned to cytokines or other intercellular signals. PMID:26627244

  12. Factors shaping the ontogeny of vocal signals in a wild parrot.

    PubMed

    Berg, Karl S; Beissinger, Steven R; Bradbury, Jack W

    2013-01-15

    Parrots rely heavily on vocal signals to maintain their social and mobile lifestyles. We studied vocal ontogeny in nests of wild green-rumped parrotlets (Forpus passerinus) in Venezuela. We identified three successive phases of vocal signaling that corresponded closely to three independently derived phases of physiological development. For each ontogenetic phase, we characterized the relative importance of anatomical constraints, motor skills necessary for responding to specific contexts of the immediate environment, and the learning of signals that are necessary for adult forms of communication. We observed shifts in the relative importance of these three factors as individuals progressed from one stage to the next; there was no single fixed ratio of factors that applied across the entire ontogenetic sequence. The earliest vocalizations were short in duration, as predicted from physical constraints and under-developed motor control. Calls became longer and frequency modulated during intermediate nestling ages in line with motor skills required for competitive begging. In the week before fledging, calls drastically shortened in accordance with the flight-constrained short durations of adult contact calls. The latter constraints were made evident by the demonstrated links between wing-assisted incline running, a widespread prelude to avian flight, just before the shift from long-duration begging calls to short-duration contact calls. At least in this species, the shifting emphases of factors at different ontogenetic stages precluded the morphing of intermediate-stage begging calls into adult contact calls; as shown previously, the latter are influenced by sample templates provided by parents.

  13. Three WRKY transcription factors additively repress abscisic acid and gibberellin signaling in aleurone cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liyuan; Gu, Lingkun; Ringler, Patricia; Smith, Stanley; Rushton, Paul J; Shen, Qingxi J

    2015-07-01

    Members of the WRKY transcription factor superfamily are essential for the regulation of many plant pathways. Functional redundancy due to duplications of WRKY transcription factors, however, complicates genetic analysis by allowing single-mutant plants to maintain wild-type phenotypes. Our analyses indicate that three group I WRKY genes, OsWRKY24, -53, and -70, act in a partially redundant manner. All three showed characteristics of typical WRKY transcription factors: each localized to nuclei and yeast one-hybrid assays indicated that they all bind to W-boxes, including those present in their own promoters. Quantitative real time-PCR (qRT-PCR) analyses indicated that the expression levels of the three WRKY genes varied in the different tissues tested. Particle bombardment-mediated transient expression analyses indicated that all three genes repress the GA and ABA signaling in a dosage-dependent manner. Combination of all three WRKY genes showed additive antagonism of ABA and GA signaling. These results suggest that these WRKY proteins function as negative transcriptional regulators of GA and ABA signaling. However, different combinations of these WRKY genes can lead to varied strengths in suppression of their targets.

  14. Organotypic Cultures of Intervertebral Disc Cells: Responses to Growth Factors and Signaling Pathways Involved.

    PubMed

    Pratsinis, Harris; Kletsas, Dimitris

    2015-01-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is strongly associated with low back pain, a major cause of disability worldwide. An in-depth understanding of IVD cell physiology is required for the design of novel regenerative therapies. Accordingly, aim of this work was the study of IVD cell responses to mitogenic growth factors in a three-dimensional (3D) organotypic milieu, comprising characteristic molecules of IVD's extracellular matrix. In particular, annulus fibrosus (AF) cells were cultured inside collagen type-I gels, while nucleus pulposus (NP) cells in chondroitin sulfate A (CSA) supplemented collagen gels, and the effects of Platelet-Derived Growth Factor (PDGF), basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (bFGF), and Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I (IGF-I) were assessed. All three growth factors stimulated DNA synthesis in both AF and NP 3D cell cultures, with potencies similar to those observed previously in monolayers. CSA supplementation inhibited basal DNA synthesis rates, without affecting the response to growth factors. ERK and Akt were found to be phosphorylated following growth factor stimulation. Blockade of these two signaling pathways using pharmacologic inhibitors significantly, though not completely, inhibited growth factor-induced DNA synthesis. The proposed culture systems may prove useful for further in vitro studies aiming at future interventions for IVD regeneration. PMID:26583105

  15. Organotypic Cultures of Intervertebral Disc Cells: Responses to Growth Factors and Signaling Pathways Involved

    PubMed Central

    Pratsinis, Harris; Kletsas, Dimitris

    2015-01-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is strongly associated with low back pain, a major cause of disability worldwide. An in-depth understanding of IVD cell physiology is required for the design of novel regenerative therapies. Accordingly, aim of this work was the study of IVD cell responses to mitogenic growth factors in a three-dimensional (3D) organotypic milieu, comprising characteristic molecules of IVD's extracellular matrix. In particular, annulus fibrosus (AF) cells were cultured inside collagen type-I gels, while nucleus pulposus (NP) cells in chondroitin sulfate A (CSA) supplemented collagen gels, and the effects of Platelet-Derived Growth Factor (PDGF), basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (bFGF), and Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I (IGF-I) were assessed. All three growth factors stimulated DNA synthesis in both AF and NP 3D cell cultures, with potencies similar to those observed previously in monolayers. CSA supplementation inhibited basal DNA synthesis rates, without affecting the response to growth factors. ERK and Akt were found to be phosphorylated following growth factor stimulation. Blockade of these two signaling pathways using pharmacologic inhibitors significantly, though not completely, inhibited growth factor-induced DNA synthesis. The proposed culture systems may prove useful for further in vitro studies aiming at future interventions for IVD regeneration. PMID:26583105

  16. Membrane-to-nucleus signaling links insulin-like growth factor-1- and stem cell factor-activated pathways.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yujiro; Asuzu, David T; Gibbons, Simon J; Aarsvold, Kirsten H; Bardsley, Michael R; Lomberk, Gwen A; Mathison, Angela J; Kendrick, Michael L; Shen, K Robert; Taguchi, Takahiro; Gupta, Anu; Rubin, Brian P; Fletcher, Jonathan A; Farrugia, Gianrico; Urrutia, Raul A; Ordog, Tamas

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell factor (mouse: Kitl, human: KITLG) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1), acting via KIT and IGF1 receptor (IGF1R), respectively, are critical for the development and integrity of several tissues. Autocrine/paracrine KITLG-KIT and IGF1-IGF1R signaling are also activated in several cancers including gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), the most common sarcoma. In murine gastric muscles, IGF1 promotes Kitl-dependent development of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC), the non-neoplastic counterpart of GIST, suggesting cooperation between these pathways. Here, we report a novel mechanism linking IGF1-IGF1R and KITLG-KIT signaling in both normal and neoplastic cells. In murine gastric muscles, the microenvironment for ICC and GIST, human hepatic stellate cells (LX-2), a model for cancer niches, and GIST cells, IGF1 stimulated Kitl/KITLG protein and mRNA expression and promoter activity by activating several signaling pathways including AKT-mediated glycogen synthase kinase-3β inhibition (GSK3i). GSK3i alone also stimulated Kitl/KITLG expression without activating mitogenic pathways. Both IGF1 and GSK3i induced chromatin-level changes favoring transcriptional activation at the Kitl promoter including increased histone H3/H4 acetylation and H3 lysine (K) 4 methylation, reduced H3K9 and H3K27 methylation and reduced occupancy by the H3K27 methyltransferase EZH2. By pharmacological or RNA interference-mediated inhibition of chromatin modifiers we demonstrated that these changes have the predicted impact on KITLG expression. KITLG knock-down and immunoneutralization inhibited the proliferation of GIST cells expressing wild-type KIT, signifying oncogenic autocrine/paracrine KITLG-KIT signaling. We conclude that membrane-to-nucleus signaling involving GSK3i establishes a previously unrecognized link between the IGF1-IGF1R and KITLG-KIT pathways, which is active in both physiologic and oncogenic contexts and can be exploited for therapeutic purposes. PMID:24116170

  17. The ERF11 Transcription Factor Promotes Internode Elongation by Activating Gibberellin Biosynthesis and Signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xin; Zhang, Zhong-Lin; Park, Jeongmoo; Tyler, Ludmila; Yusuke, Jikumaru; Qiu, Kai; Nam, Edward A; Lumba, Shelley; Desveaux, Darrell; McCourt, Peter; Kamiya, Yuji; Sun, Tai-Ping

    2016-08-01

    The phytohormone gibberellin (GA) plays a key role in promoting stem elongation in plants. Previous studies show that GA activates its signaling pathway by inducing rapid degradation of DELLA proteins, GA signaling repressors. Using an activation-tagging screen in a reduced-GA mutant ga1-6 background, we identified AtERF11 to be a novel positive regulator of both GA biosynthesis and GA signaling for internode elongation. Overexpression of AtERF11 partially rescued the dwarf phenotype of ga1-6 AtERF11 is a member of the ERF (ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR) subfamily VIII-B-1a of ERF/AP2 transcription factors in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Overexpression of AtERF11 resulted in elevated bioactive GA levels by up-regulating expression of GA3ox1 and GA20ox genes. Hypocotyl elongation assays further showed that overexpression of AtERF11 conferred elevated GA response, whereas loss-of-function erf11 and erf11 erf4 mutants displayed reduced GA response. In addition, yeast two-hybrid, coimmunoprecipitation, and transient expression assays showed that AtERF11 enhances GA signaling by antagonizing the function of DELLA proteins via direct protein-protein interaction. Interestingly, AtERF11 overexpression also caused a reduction in the levels of another phytohormone ethylene in the growing stem, consistent with recent finding showing that AtERF11 represses transcription of ethylene biosynthesis ACS genes. The effect of AtERF11 on promoting GA biosynthesis gene expression is likely via its repressive function on ethylene biosynthesis. These results suggest that AtERF11 plays a dual role in promoting internode elongation by inhibiting ethylene biosynthesis and activating GA biosynthesis and signaling pathways. PMID:27255484

  18. The ERF11 Transcription Factor Promotes Internode Elongation by Activating Gibberellin Biosynthesis and Signaling1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xin; Zhang, Zhong-Lin; Tyler, Ludmila; Yusuke, Jikumaru; Qiu, Kai; Lumba, Shelley; Desveaux, Darrell; McCourt, Peter; Sun, Tai-ping

    2016-01-01

    The phytohormone gibberellin (GA) plays a key role in promoting stem elongation in plants. Previous studies show that GA activates its signaling pathway by inducing rapid degradation of DELLA proteins, GA signaling repressors. Using an activation-tagging screen in a reduced-GA mutant ga1-6 background, we identified AtERF11 to be a novel positive regulator of both GA biosynthesis and GA signaling for internode elongation. Overexpression of AtERF11 partially rescued the dwarf phenotype of ga1-6. AtERF11 is a member of the ERF (ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR) subfamily VIII-B-1a of ERF/AP2 transcription factors in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Overexpression of AtERF11 resulted in elevated bioactive GA levels by up-regulating expression of GA3ox1 and GA20ox genes. Hypocotyl elongation assays further showed that overexpression of AtERF11 conferred elevated GA response, whereas loss-of-function erf11 and erf11 erf4 mutants displayed reduced GA response. In addition, yeast two-hybrid, coimmunoprecipitation, and transient expression assays showed that AtERF11 enhances GA signaling by antagonizing the function of DELLA proteins via direct protein-protein interaction. Interestingly, AtERF11 overexpression also caused a reduction in the levels of another phytohormone ethylene in the growing stem, consistent with recent finding showing that AtERF11 represses transcription of ethylene biosynthesis ACS genes. The effect of AtERF11 on promoting GA biosynthesis gene expression is likely via its repressive function on ethylene biosynthesis. These results suggest that AtERF11 plays a dual role in promoting internode elongation by inhibiting ethylene biosynthesis and activating GA biosynthesis and signaling pathways. PMID:27255484

  19. Calcium-dependent regulation of tumour necrosis factor-alpha receptor signalling by copine.

    PubMed Central

    Tomsig, Jose Luis; Sohma, Hitoshi; Creutz, Carl E

    2004-01-01

    The role of copines in regulating signalling from the TNF-alpha (tumour necrosis factor-alpha) receptor was probed by the expression of a copine dominant-negative construct in HEK293 (human embryonic kidney 293) cells. The construct was found to reduce activation of the transcription factor NF-kappaB (nuclear factor-kappaB) by TNF-alpha. The introduction of calcium into HEK293 cells either through the activation of muscarinic cholinergic receptors or through the application of the ionophore A23187 was found to enhance TNF-alpha-dependent activation of NF-kappaB. This effect of calcium was completely blocked by the copine dominant-negative construct. TNF-alpha was found to greatly enhance the expression of endogenous copine I, and the responsiveness of the TNF-alpha signalling pathway to muscarinic stimulation increased in parallel with the increased copine I expression. The copine dominant-negative construct also inhibited the TNF-alpha-dependent degradation of IkappaB, a regulator of NF-kappaB. All of the effects of the dominant-negative construct could be reversed by overexpression of full-length copine I, suggesting that the construct acts specifically through competitive inhibition of copine. One of the identified targets of copine I is the NEDD8-conjugating enzyme UBC12 (ubiquitin C12), that promotes the degradation of IkappaB through the ubiquitin ligase enzyme complex SCF(betaTrCP). Therefore the copine dominant-negative construct might inhibit TNF-alpha signalling by dysregulation or mislocalization of UBC12. Based on these results, a hypothesis is presented for possible roles of copines in regulating other signalling pathways in animals, plants and protozoa. PMID:14674885

  20. Molecular mechanisms of corticotropin-releasing factor receptor-induced calcium signaling.

    PubMed

    Gutknecht, Eric; Van der Linden, Ilse; Van Kolen, Kristof; Verhoeven, Kim F C; Vauquelin, Georges; Dautzenberg, Frank M

    2009-03-01

    The molecular mechanisms governing calcium signal transduction of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptors CRF(1) and CRF(2(a)) stably expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells were investigated. Calcium signaling strictly depended on intracellular calcium sources, and this is the first study to establish a prominent contribution of the three major G-protein families to CRF receptor-mediated calcium signaling. Overexpression of Galpha(q/11) and Galpha(16) led to leftward shifts of the agonist concentration-response curves. Blockade of Galpha(q/11) proteins by the small interfering RNA (siRNA) technology partially reduced agonist-mediated calcium responses in CRF(1)- and CRF(2(a))-expressing HEK293 cells, thereby proving a contribution of the G(q) protein family. A small but significant inhibition of calcium signaling was recorded by pharmacological inhibition of G(i/o) proteins with pertussis toxin treatment. This effect was mediated by direct binding of Gbetagamma subunits to phospholipase C. G(i/o) inhibition also elevated cAMP responses in CRF receptor-overexpressing HEK293 cells and in Y79 retinoblastoma cells endogenously expressing human CRF(1) and CRF(2(a)) receptors, thereby demonstrating natural coupling of G(i) proteins to both CRF receptors. The strongest reduction of CRF receptor-mediated calcium mobilization was noted when blocking the G(s) signaling protein either by cholera toxin or by siRNA. It is noteworthy that simultaneous inhibition of two G-proteins shed light on the additive effects of G(s) and G(q) on the calcium signaling and, hence, that they act in parallel. On the other hand, G(i) coupling required prior G(s) activation. PMID:19098121

  1. Alkaline-stress response in Glycine soja leaf identifies specific transcription factors and ABA-mediated signaling factors.

    PubMed

    Ge, Ying; Li, Yong; Lv, De-Kang; Bai, Xi; Ji, Wei; Cai, Hua; Wang, Ao-Xue; Zhu, Yan-Ming

    2011-06-01

    Transcriptome of Glycine soja leaf tissue during a detailed time course formed a foundation for examining transcriptional processes during NaHCO(3) stress treatment. Of a total of 2,310 detected differentially expressed genes, 1,664 genes were upregulated and 1,704 genes were downregulated at various time points. The number of stress-regulated genes increased dramatically after a 6-h stress treatment. GO category gene enrichment analysis revealed that most of the differentially expressed genes were involved in cell structure, protein synthesis, energy, and secondary metabolism. Another enrichment test revealed that the response of G. soja to NaHCO(3) highlights specific transcription factors, such as the C2C2-CO-like, MYB-related, WRKY, GARP-G2-like, and ZIM families. Co-expressed genes were clustered into ten classes (P < 0.001). Intriguingly, one cluster of 188 genes displayed a unique expression pattern that increases at an early stage (0.5 and 3 h), followed by a decrease from 6 to 12 h. This group was enriched in regulation of transcription components, including AP2-EREBP, bHLH, MYB/MYB-related, C2C2-CO-like, C2C2-DOF, C2C2, C3H, and GARP-G2-like transcription factors. Analysis of the 1-kb upstream regions of transcripts displaying similar changes in abundance identified 19 conserved motifs, potential binding sites for transcription factors. The appearance of ABA-responsive elements in the upstream of co-expression genes reveals that ABA-mediated signaling participates in the signal transduction in alkaline response.

  2. Transient anabolic effects accompany epidermal growth factor receptor signal activation in articular cartilage in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Signals from the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) have typically been considered to provide catabolic activities in articular cartilage, and accordingly have been suggested to have a causal role in osteoarthritis progression. The aim of this study was to determine in vivo roles for endogenous EGFR signal activation in articular cartilage. Methods Transgenic mice with conditional, limb-targeted deletion of the endogenous intracellular EGFR inhibitor Mig-6 were generated using CreLoxP (Mig-6-flox; Prx1Cre) recombination. Histology, histochemical staining and immunohistochemistry were used to confirm activation of EGFR signaling in the articular cartilage and joints, and to analyze phenotypic consequences of Mig-6 loss on articular cartilage morphology, proliferation, expression of progenitor cell markers, presence of chondrocyte hypertrophy and degradation of articular cartilage matrix. Results The articular cartilage of Mig-6-conditional knockout (Mig-6-cko) mice was dramatically and significantly thicker than normal articular cartilage at 6 and 12 weeks of age. Mig-6-cko articular cartilage contained a population of chondrocytes in which EGFR signaling was activated, and which were three to four times more proliferative than normal Mig-6-flox articular chondrocytes. These cells expressed high levels of the master chondrogenic regulatory factor Sox9, as well as high levels of putative progenitor cell markers including superficial zone protein (SZP), growth and differentiation factor-5 (GDF-5) and Notch1. Expression levels were also high for activated β-catenin and the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) mediators phospho-Smad2/3 (pSmad2/3). Anabolic effects of EGFR activation in articular cartilage were followed by catabolic events, including matrix degradation, as determined by accumulation of aggrecan cleavage fragments, and onset of hypertrophy as determined by type × collagen expression. By 16 weeks of age, the articular cartilage of

  3. SOX9: a stem cell transcriptional regulator of secreted niche signaling factors.

    PubMed

    Kadaja, Meelis; Keyes, Brice E; Lin, Mingyan; Pasolli, H Amalia; Genander, Maria; Polak, Lisa; Stokes, Nicole; Zheng, Deyou; Fuchs, Elaine

    2014-02-15

    Hair follicles (HFs) undergo cyclical periods of growth, which are fueled by stem cells (SCs) at the base of the resting follicle. HF-SC formation occurs during HF development and requires transcription factor SOX9. Whether and how SOX9 functions in HF-SC maintenance remain unknown. By conditionally targeting Sox9 in adult HF-SCs, we show that SOX9 is essential for maintaining them. SOX9-deficient HF-SCs still transition from quiescence to proliferation and launch the subsequent hair cycle. However, once activated, bulge HF-SCs begin to differentiate into epidermal cells, which naturally lack SOX9. In addition, as HF-SC numbers dwindle, outer root sheath production is not sustained, and HF downgrowth arrests prematurely. Probing the mechanism, we used RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) to identify SOX9-dependent transcriptional changes and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and deep sequencing (ChIP-seq) to identify SOX9-bound genes in HF-SCs. Intriguingly, a large cohort of SOX9-sensitive targets encode extracellular factors, most notably enhancers of Activin/pSMAD2 signaling. Moreover, compromising Activin signaling recapitulates SOX9-dependent defects, and Activin partially rescues them. Overall, our findings reveal roles for SOX9 in regulating adult HF-SC maintenance and suppressing epidermal differentiation in the niche. In addition, our studies expose a role for SCs in coordinating their own behavior in part through non-cell-autonomous signaling within the niche. PMID:24532713

  4. Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 Signaling Axis Meets p53 Genome Protection Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Haim; Sarfstein, Rive; LeRoith, Derek; Bruchim, Ilan

    2016-01-01

    Clinical, epidemiological, and experimental evidence indicate that the insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) are important mediators in the biochemical chain of events that lead from a phenotypically normal to a neoplastic cell. The IGF1 receptor (IGF1R), which mediates the biological actions of IGF1 and IGF2, exhibits potent pro-survival and antiapoptotic activities. The IGF1R is highly expressed in most types of cancer and is regarded as a promising therapeutic target in oncology. p53 is a transcription factor with tumor suppressor activity that is usually activated in response to DNA damage and other forms of cellular stress. On the basis of its protective activities, p53 is commonly regarded as the guardian of the genome. We provide evidence that the IGF signaling axis and p53 genome protection pathways are tightly interconnected. Wild-type, but not mutant, p53 suppresses IGF1R gene transcription, leading to abrogation of the IGF signaling network, with ensuing cell cycle arrest. Gain-of-function, or loss-of-function, mutations of p53 in tumor cells may disrupt its inhibitory activity, thus generating oncogenic molecules capable of transactivating the IGF1R gene. The interplay between the IGF1 and p53 pathways is also of major relevance in terms of metabolic regulation, including glucose transport and glycolysis. A better understanding of the complex physical and functional interactions between these important signaling pathways will have major basic and translational relevance. PMID:27446805

  5. PTEN modulates vascular endothelial growth factor-mediated signaling and angiogenic effects.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianhua; Kontos, Christopher D

    2002-03-29

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase is activated by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and many of the angiogenic cellular responses of VEGF are regulated by the lipid products of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. The tumor suppressor PTEN has been shown to down-regulate phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling, yet the effects of PTEN on VEGF-mediated signaling and angiogenesis are unknown. Inhibition of endogenous PTEN in cultured endothelial cells by adenovirus-mediated overexpression of a dominant negative PTEN mutant (PTEN-C/S) enhanced VEGF-mediated Akt phosphorylation, and this effect correlated with decreases in caspase-3 cleavage, caspase-3 activity, and DNA degradation after induction of apoptosis with tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Overexpression of PTEN-C/S also enhanced VEGF-mediated endothelial cell proliferation and migration. In contrast, overexpression of wild-type PTEN inhibited the anti-apoptotic, proliferative, and chemotactic effects of VEGF. Moreover, PTEN-C/S increased the length of vascular sprouts in the rat aortic ring assay and modulated VEGF-mediated tube formation in an in vitro angiogenesis assay, whereas PTEN-wild type inhibited these effects. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that PTEN potently modulates VEGF-mediated signaling and function and that PTEN is a viable target in therapeutic approaches to promote or inhibit angiogenesis.

  6. SOX9: a stem cell transcriptional regulator of secreted niche signaling factors.

    PubMed

    Kadaja, Meelis; Keyes, Brice E; Lin, Mingyan; Pasolli, H Amalia; Genander, Maria; Polak, Lisa; Stokes, Nicole; Zheng, Deyou; Fuchs, Elaine

    2014-02-15

    Hair follicles (HFs) undergo cyclical periods of growth, which are fueled by stem cells (SCs) at the base of the resting follicle. HF-SC formation occurs during HF development and requires transcription factor SOX9. Whether and how SOX9 functions in HF-SC maintenance remain unknown. By conditionally targeting Sox9 in adult HF-SCs, we show that SOX9 is essential for maintaining them. SOX9-deficient HF-SCs still transition from quiescence to proliferation and launch the subsequent hair cycle. However, once activated, bulge HF-SCs begin to differentiate into epidermal cells, which naturally lack SOX9. In addition, as HF-SC numbers dwindle, outer root sheath production is not sustained, and HF downgrowth arrests prematurely. Probing the mechanism, we used RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) to identify SOX9-dependent transcriptional changes and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and deep sequencing (ChIP-seq) to identify SOX9-bound genes in HF-SCs. Intriguingly, a large cohort of SOX9-sensitive targets encode extracellular factors, most notably enhancers of Activin/pSMAD2 signaling. Moreover, compromising Activin signaling recapitulates SOX9-dependent defects, and Activin partially rescues them. Overall, our findings reveal roles for SOX9 in regulating adult HF-SC maintenance and suppressing epidermal differentiation in the niche. In addition, our studies expose a role for SCs in coordinating their own behavior in part through non-cell-autonomous signaling within the niche.

  7. Adequate hypoxia inducible factorsignaling is indispensable for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Stegen, Steve; Deprez, Sanne; Eelen, Guy; Torrekens, Sophie; Van Looveren, Riet; Goveia, Jermaine; Ghesquière, Bart; Carmeliet, Peter; Carmeliet, Geert

    2016-06-01

    Engineered cell-based constructs are an appealing strategy to treat large skeletal defects. However, transplanted cells are often confronted with an environment that is deprived of oxygen and nutrients. Upon hypoxia, most cell types activate hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) signaling, but its importance for implanted osteoprogenitor cells during bone regeneration is not elucidated. To this end, we specifically deleted the HIF--1α isoform in periosteal progenitor cells and show that activation of HIF-1α signaling in these cells is critical for bone repair by modulating angiogenic and metabolic processes. Activation of HIF-1α is not only crucial for blood vessel invasion, by enhancing angiogenic growth factor production, but also for periosteal cell survival early after implantation, when blood vessels have not yet invaded the construct. HIF-1α signaling limits oxygen consumption to avoid accumulation of harmful ROS and preserve redox balance, and additionally induces a switch to glycolysis to prevent energetic distress. Altogether, our results indicate that the proangiogenic capacity of implanted periosteal cells is HIF-1α regulated and that metabolic adaptations mediate post-implantation cell survival. PMID:27058876

  8. Multipronged attenuation of macrophage-colony stimulating factor signaling by Epstein-Barr virus BARF1

    SciTech Connect

    Shim, Ann Hye-Ryong; Chang, Rhoda Ahn; Chen, Xiaoyan; Longnecker, Richard; He, Xiaolin

    2014-10-02

    The ubiquitous EBV causes infectious mononucleosis and is associated with several types of cancers. The EBV genome encodes an early gene product, BARF1, which contributes to pathogenesis, potentially through growth-altering and immune-modulating activities, but the mechanisms for such activities are poorly understood. We have determined the crystal structure of BARF1 in complex with human macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF), a hematopoietic cytokine with pleiotropic functions in development and immune response. BARF1 and M-CSF form a high-affinity, stable, ring-like complex in both solution and the crystal, with a BARF1 hexameric ring surrounded by three M-CSF dimers in triangular array. The binding of BARF1 to M-CSF dramatically reduces but does not completely abolish M-CSF binding and signaling through its cognate receptor FMS. A three-pronged down-regulation mechanism is proposed to explain the biological effect of BARF1 on M-CSF:FMS signaling. These prongs entail control of the circulating and effective local M-CSF concentration, perturbation of the receptor-binding surface of M-CSF, and imposition of an unfavorable global orientation of the M-CSF dimer. Each prong may reduce M-CSF:FMS signaling to a limited extent but in combination may alter M-CSF:FMS signaling dramatically. The downregulating mechanism of BARF1 underlines a viral modulation strategy, and provides a basis for understanding EBV pathogenesis.

  9. AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 2 Intersects Hormonal Signals in the Regulation of Tomato Fruit Ripening

    PubMed Central

    Meir, Sagit; Panizel, Irina; Puig, Clara Pons; Hao, Yanwei; Yifhar, Tamar; Yasuor, Hagai; Zouine, Mohamed; Bouzayen, Mondher; Granell Richart, Antonio; Rogachev, Ilana; Aharoni, Asaph

    2016-01-01

    The involvement of ethylene in fruit ripening is well documented, though knowledge regarding the crosstalk between ethylene and other hormones in ripening is lacking. We discovered that AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 2A (ARF2A), a recognized auxin signaling component, functions in the control of ripening. ARF2A expression is ripening regulated and reduced in the rin, nor and nr ripening mutants. It is also responsive to exogenous application of ethylene, auxin and abscisic acid (ABA). Over-expressing ARF2A in tomato resulted in blotchy ripening in which certain fruit regions turn red and possess accelerated ripening. ARF2A over-expressing fruit displayed early ethylene emission and ethylene signaling inhibition delayed their ripening phenotype, suggesting ethylene dependency. Both green and red fruit regions showed the induction of ethylene signaling components and master regulators of ripening. Comprehensive hormone profiling revealed that altered ARF2A expression in fruit significantly modified abscisates, cytokinins and salicylic acid while gibberellic acid and auxin metabolites were unaffected. Silencing of ARF2A further validated these observations as reducing ARF2A expression let to retarded fruit ripening, parthenocarpy and a disturbed hormonal profile. Finally, we show that ARF2A both homodimerizes and interacts with the ABA STRESS RIPENING (ASR1) protein, suggesting that ASR1 might be linking ABA and ethylene-dependent ripening. These results revealed that ARF2A interconnects signals of ethylene and additional hormones to co-ordinate the capacity of fruit tissue to initiate the complex ripening process. PMID:26959229

  10. AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 2 Intersects Hormonal Signals in the Regulation of Tomato Fruit Ripening.

    PubMed

    Breitel, Dario A; Chappell-Maor, Louise; Meir, Sagit; Panizel, Irina; Puig, Clara Pons; Hao, Yanwei; Yifhar, Tamar; Yasuor, Hagai; Zouine, Mohamed; Bouzayen, Mondher; Granell Richart, Antonio; Rogachev, Ilana; Aharoni, Asaph

    2016-03-01

    The involvement of ethylene in fruit ripening is well documented, though knowledge regarding the crosstalk between ethylene and other hormones in ripening is lacking. We discovered that AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 2A (ARF2A), a recognized auxin signaling component, functions in the control of ripening. ARF2A expression is ripening regulated and reduced in the rin, nor and nr ripening mutants. It is also responsive to exogenous application of ethylene, auxin and abscisic acid (ABA). Over-expressing ARF2A in tomato resulted in blotchy ripening in which certain fruit regions turn red and possess accelerated ripening. ARF2A over-expressing fruit displayed early ethylene emission and ethylene signaling inhibition delayed their ripening phenotype, suggesting ethylene dependency. Both green and red fruit regions showed the induction of ethylene signaling components and master regulators of ripening. Comprehensive hormone profiling revealed that altered ARF2A expression in fruit significantly modified abscisates, cytokinins and salicylic acid while gibberellic acid and auxin metabolites were unaffected. Silencing of ARF2A further validated these observations as reducing ARF2A expression let to retarded fruit ripening, parthenocarpy and a disturbed hormonal profile. Finally, we show that ARF2A both homodimerizes and interacts with the ABA STRESS RIPENING (ASR1) protein, suggesting that ASR1 might be linking ABA and ethylene-dependent ripening. These results revealed that ARF2A interconnects signals of ethylene and additional hormones to co-ordinate the capacity of fruit tissue to initiate the complex ripening process. PMID:26959229

  11. KRIT1 Protein Depletion Modifies Endothelial Cell Behavior via Increased Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    DiStefano, Peter V.; Kuebel, Julia M.; Sarelius, Ingrid H.; Glading, Angela J.

    2014-01-01

    Disruption of endothelial cell-cell contact is a key event in many cardiovascular diseases and a characteristic of pathologically activated vascular endothelium. The CCM (cerebral cavernous malformation) family of proteins (KRIT1 (Krev-interaction trapped 1), PDCD10, and CCM2) are critical regulators of endothelial cell-cell contact and vascular homeostasis. Here we show novel regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling in KRIT1-depleted endothelial cells. Loss of KRIT1 and PDCD10, but not CCM2, increases nuclear β-catenin signaling and up-regulates VEGF-A protein expression. In KRIT1-depleted cells, increased VEGF-A levels led to increased VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2) activation and subsequent alteration of cytoskeletal organization, migration, and barrier function and to in vivo endothelial permeability in KRIT1-deficient animals. VEGFR2 activation also increases β-catenin phosphorylation but is only partially responsible for KRIT1 depletion-dependent disruption of cell-cell contacts. Thus, VEGF signaling contributes to modifying endothelial function in KRIT1-deficient cells and microvessel permeability in Krit1+/− mice; however, VEGF signaling is likely not the only contributor to disrupted endothelial cell-cell contacts in the absence of KRIT1. PMID:25320085

  12. Regulation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Signaling by Endocytosis and Intracellular Trafficking

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, Patrick; Schooler, Kevin; Wiley, H S.

    2001-06-01

    Ligand activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) leads to its rapid internalization and eventual delivery to lysosomes. This process is thought to be a mechanism to attenuate signaling, but signals could potentially be generated following endocytosis. To directly evaluate EGFR signaling during receptor trafficking, we developed a technique to rapidly and selectively isolate internalized EGFR and associated molecules using reversibly-biotinylated anti-EGFR antibodies. In addition, we developed antibodies specific to tyrosine-phosphorylated EGFR. Using a combination of fluorescence imaging and affinity precipitation approaches, we evaluated the state of EGFR activation and substrate association during trafficking in epithelial cells. We found that following internalization, EGFR remained active in the early endosomes. However, receptors were inactivated prior to degradation, apparently due to ligand removal from endosomes. Adapter molecules, such as Shc, were associated with EGFR both at the cell surface and within endosomes. Some molecules, such as Grb2, were primarily found associated with surface EGFR, while others, such as Eps8, were only found with intracellular receptors. During the inactivation phase, c-Cbl became EGFR-associated, consistent with its postulated role in receptor attenuation. We conclude that the association of the EGFR with different proteins is compartment-specific . In addition, ligand loss is the proximal cause of EGFR inactivation. Thus, regulated trafficking could potentially influence the pattern as well as the duration of signal transduction.

  13. Nerve growth factor induces survival and differentiation through two distinct signaling cascades in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Klesse, L J; Meyers, K A; Marshall, C J; Parada, L F

    1999-03-25

    Nerve growth factor induces differentiation and survival of rat PC12 pheochromocytoma cells. The activation of the erk cascade has been implicated in transducing the multitude of signals induced by NGF. In order to explore the role of this signaling cascade in NGF mediated survival, differentiation and proliferation, we generated recombinant adenoviruses which express the intermediates of the erk cascade in their wild type, dominant negative and constitutively activated forms. We show that differentiation of PC12 cells requires activity of the ras/erk pathway, whereas inhibition of this pathway had no effect on survival or proliferation. Constitutively active forms of ras, raf and mek induced PC12 cell differentiation, while dominant interfering forms inhibited differentiation. Survival of PC12 cells in serum-free medium did not require activity of the ras/erk pathway. Instead, PI3 Kinase signaling was necessary for PC12 cell survival. Interestingly, constitutively activated versions of raf and mek were able to promote survival, but again this was dependent on activation of PI3 Kinase. Therefore, at least two distinct signaling pathways are required in PC12 cells for mediation of NGF functions.

  14. The endothelial transcription factor ERG promotes vascular stability and growth through Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Birdsey, Graeme M; Shah, Aarti V; Dufton, Neil; Reynolds, Louise E; Osuna Almagro, Lourdes; Yang, Youwen; Aspalter, Irene M; Khan, Samia T; Mason, Justin C; Dejana, Elisabetta; Göttgens, Berthold; Hodivala-Dilke, Kairbaan; Gerhardt, Holger; Adams, Ralf H; Randi, Anna M

    2015-01-12

    Blood vessel stability is essential for embryonic development; in the adult, many diseases are associated with loss of vascular integrity. The ETS transcription factor ERG drives expression of VE-cadherin and controls junctional integrity. We show that constitutive endothelial deletion of ERG (Erg(cEC-KO)) in mice causes embryonic lethality with vascular defects. Inducible endothelial deletion of ERG (Erg(iEC-KO)) results in defective physiological and pathological angiogenesis in the postnatal retina and tumors, with decreased vascular stability. ERG controls the Wnt/β-catenin pathway by promoting β-catenin stability, through signals mediated by VE-cadherin and the Wnt receptor Frizzled-4. Wnt signaling is decreased in ERG-deficient endothelial cells; activation of Wnt signaling with lithium chloride, which stabilizes β-catenin levels, corrects vascular defects in Erg(cEC-KO) embryos. Finally, overexpression of ERG in vivo reduces permeability and increases stability of VEGF-induced blood vessels. These data demonstrate that ERG is an essential regulator of angiogenesis and vascular stability through Wnt signaling. PMID:25584796

  15. AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 2 Intersects Hormonal Signals in the Regulation of Tomato Fruit Ripening.

    PubMed

    Breitel, Dario A; Chappell-Maor, Louise; Meir, Sagit; Panizel, Irina; Puig, Clara Pons; Hao, Yanwei; Yifhar, Tamar; Yasuor, Hagai; Zouine, Mohamed; Bouzayen, Mondher; Granell Richart, Antonio; Rogachev, Ilana; Aharoni, Asaph

    2016-03-01

    The involvement of ethylene in fruit ripening is well documented, though knowledge regarding the crosstalk between ethylene and other hormones in ripening is lacking. We discovered that AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 2A (ARF2A), a recognized auxin signaling component, functions in the control of ripening. ARF2A expression is ripening regulated and reduced in the rin, nor and nr ripening mutants. It is also responsive to exogenous application of ethylene, auxin and abscisic acid (ABA). Over-expressing ARF2A in tomato resulted in blotchy ripening in which certain fruit regions turn red and possess accelerated ripening. ARF2A over-expressing fruit displayed early ethylene emission and ethylene signaling inhibition delayed their ripening phenotype, suggesting ethylene dependency. Both green and red fruit regions showed the induction of ethylene signaling components and master regulators of ripening. Comprehensive hormone profiling revealed that altered ARF2A expression in fruit significantly modified abscisates, cytokinins and salicylic acid while gibberellic acid and auxin metabolites were unaffected. Silencing of ARF2A further validated these observations as reducing ARF2A expression let to retarded fruit ripening, parthenocarpy and a disturbed hormonal profile. Finally, we show that ARF2A both homodimerizes and interacts with the ABA STRESS RIPENING (ASR1) protein, suggesting that ASR1 might be linking ABA and ethylene-dependent ripening. These results revealed that ARF2A interconnects signals of ethylene and additional hormones to co-ordinate the capacity of fruit tissue to initiate the complex ripening process.

  16. Journal Impact Factor Shapes Scientists’ Reward Signal in the Prospect of Publication

    PubMed Central

    Paulus, Frieder Michel; Rademacher, Lena; Schäfer, Theo Alexander Jose; Müller-Pinzler, Laura; Krach, Sören

    2015-01-01

    The incentive structure of a scientist’s life is increasingly mimicking economic principles. While intensely criticized, the journal impact factor (JIF) has taken a role as the new currency for scientists. Successful goal-directed behavior in academia thus requires knowledge about the JIF. Using functional neuroimaging we examined how the JIF, as a powerful incentive in academia, has shaped the behavior of scientists and the reward signal in the striatum. We demonstrate that the reward signal in the nucleus accumbens increases with higher JIF during the anticipation of a publication and found a positive correlation with the personal publication record (pJIF) supporting the notion that scientists have incorporated the predominant reward principle of the scientific community in their reward system. The implications of this behavioral adaptation within the ecological niche of the scientist’s habitat remain unknown, but may also have effects which were not intended by the community. PMID:26555725

  17. Leukemia inhibitory factor receptor is structurally related to the IL-6 signal transducer, gp130.

    PubMed Central

    Gearing, D P; Thut, C J; VandeBos, T; Gimpel, S D; Delaney, P B; King, J; Price, V; Cosman, D; Beckmann, M P

    1991-01-01

    Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) is a cytokine with a broad range of activities that in many cases parallel those of interleukin-6 (IL-6) although LIF and IL-6 appear to be structurally unrelated. A cDNA clone encoding the human LIF receptor was isolated by expression screening of a human placental cDNA library. The LIF receptor is related to the gp130 'signal-transducing' component of the IL-6 receptor and to the G-CSF receptor, with the transmembrane and cytoplasmic regions of the LIF receptor and gp130 being most closely related. This relationship suggests a common signal transduction pathway for the two receptors and may help to explain similar biological effects of the two ligands. Murine cDNAs encoding soluble LIF receptors were isolated by cross-hybridization and share 70% amino acid sequence identity to the human sequence. Images PMID:1915266

  18. Redox regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor signaling through cysteine oxidation.

    PubMed

    Truong, Thu H; Carroll, Kate S

    2012-12-18

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) exemplifies the family of receptor tyrosine kinases that mediate numerous cellular processes, including growth, proliferation, and differentiation. Moreover, gene amplification and EGFR mutations have been identified in a number of human malignancies, making this receptor an important target for the development of anticancer drugs. In addition to ligand-dependent activation and concomitant tyrosine phosphorylation, EGFR stimulation results in the localized generation of H(2)O(2) by NADPH-dependent oxidases. In turn, H(2)O(2) functions as a secondary messenger to regulate intracellular signaling cascades, largely through the modification of specific cysteine residues within redox-sensitive protein targets, including Cys797 in the EGFR active site. In this review, we highlight recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms that underlie redox regulation of EGFR signaling and how these discoveries may form the basis for the development of new therapeutic strategies for targeting this and other H(2)O(2)-modulated pathways.

  19. Autocrine epidermal growth factor signaling stimulates directionally persistent mammary epithelial cell migration

    SciTech Connect

    Maheshwari, Gargi; Wiley, H Steven ); Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2001-12-24

    Autocrine receptor/ligand signaling loops were first identified in tumor cells, where it was found that transformation of cells resulted in overexpression of certain growth factors leading to unregulated proliferation of the tumor cells (Sporn and Todaro, 1980). However, in the ensuing decades autocrine signaling has been found to operate in numerous physiological situations (Sporn and Roberts, 1992), including wound healing (Tokumaru et al., 2000), angiogenesis (Seghezzi et al., 1998), and tissue organization during development (Wasserman and Freeman, 1998) and reproductive cycles (Xie et al., 1997). Although it is becoming evident that autocrine loops play crucial roles in regulation of cell function within tissue contexts, it is unclear whether their effects on cell responses are different from the effects of the same ligand presented in exogenous or paracrine manner.

  20. Journal Impact Factor Shapes Scientists' Reward Signal in the Prospect of Publication.

    PubMed

    Paulus, Frieder Michel; Rademacher, Lena; Schäfer, Theo Alexander Jose; Müller-Pinzler, Laura; Krach, Sören

    2015-01-01

    The incentive structure of a scientist's life is increasingly mimicking economic principles. While intensely criticized, the journal impact factor (JIF) has taken a role as the new currency for scientists. Successful goal-directed behavior in academia thus requires knowledge about the JIF. Using functional neuroimaging we examined how the JIF, as a powerful incentive in academia, has shaped the behavior of scientists and the reward signal in the striatum. We demonstrate that the reward signal in the nucleus accumbens increases with higher JIF during the anticipation of a publication and found a positive correlation with the personal publication record (pJIF) supporting the notion that scientists have incorporated the predominant reward principle of the scientific community in their reward system. The implications of this behavioral adaptation within the ecological niche of the scientist's habitat remain unknown, but may also have effects which were not intended by the community.

  1. Directed random walks and constraint programming reveal active pathways in hepatocyte growth factor signaling.

    PubMed

    Kittas, Aristotelis; Delobelle, Aurélien; Schmitt, Sabrina; Breuhahn, Kai; Guziolowski, Carito; Grabe, Niels

    2016-01-01

    An effective means to analyze mRNA expression data is to take advantage of established knowledge from pathway databases, using methods such as pathway-enrichment analyses. However, pathway databases are not case-specific and expression data could be used to infer gene-regulation patterns in the context of specific pathways. In addition, canonical pathways may not always describe the signaling mechanisms properly, because interactions can frequently occur between genes in different pathways. Relatively few methods have been proposed to date for generating and analyzing such networks, preserving the causality between gene interactions and reasoning over the qualitative logic of regulatory effects. We present an algorithm (MCWalk) integrated with a logic programming approach, to discover subgraphs in large-scale signaling networks by random walks in a fully automated pipeline. As an exemplary application, we uncover the signal transduction mechanisms in a gene interaction network describing hepatocyte growth factor-stimulated cell migration and proliferation from gene-expression measured with microarray and RT-qPCR using in-house perturbation experiments in a keratinocyte-fibroblast co-culture. The resulting subgraphs illustrate possible associations of hepatocyte growth factor receptor c-Met nodes, differentially expressed genes and cellular states. Using perturbation experiments and Answer Set programming, we are able to select those which are more consistent with the experimental data. We discover key regulator nodes by measuring the frequency with which they are traversed when connecting signaling between receptors and significantly regulated genes and predict their expression-shift consistently with the measured data. The Java implementation of MCWalk is publicly available under the MIT license at: https://bitbucket.org/akittas/biosubg.

  2. Colony-stimulating Factor-1 Receptor Utilizes Multiple Signaling Pathways to Induce Cyclin D2 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Arunangsu; She, Hongyun; Kim, Leopold; Boruch, Allan; Guris, Deborah L.; Carlberg, Kristen; Sebti, Saïd M.; Woodley, David T.; Imamoto, Akira; Li, Wei

    2000-01-01

    Colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) induces expression of immediate early gene, such as c-myc and c-fos and delayed early genes such as D-type cyclins (D1 and D2), whose products play essential roles in the G1 to S phase transition of the cell cycle. Little is known, however, about the cytoplasmic signal transduction pathways that connect the surface CSF-1 receptor to these genes in the nucleus. We have investigated the signaling mechanism of CSF-1-induced D2 expression. Analyses of CSF-1 receptor autophosphorylation mutants show that, although certain individual mutation has a partial inhibitory effect, only multiple combined mutations completely block induction of D2 in response to CSF-1. We report that at least three parallel pathways, the Src pathway, the MAPK/ERK kinase (MEK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway, and the c-myc pathway, are involved. Induction of D2 is partially inhibited in Src−/− bone marrow-derived macrophages and by Src inhibitor PP1 and is enhanced in v-Src-overexpressing cells. Activation of myc's transactivating activity selectively induces D2 but not D1. Blockade of c-myc expression partially blocks CSF-1-induced D2 expression. Complete inhibition of the MEK/ERK pathway causes 50% decrease of D2 expression. Finally, simultaneous inhibition of Src, MEK activation, and c-myc expression additively blocks CSF-1-induced D2 expression. This study indicates that multiple signaling pathways are involved in full induction of a single gene, and this finding may also apply broadly to other growth factor-inducible genes. PMID:11071910

  3. Transforming growth factor: beta signaling is essential for limb regeneration in axolotls.

    PubMed

    Lévesque, Mathieu; Gatien, Samuel; Finnson, Kenneth; Desmeules, Sophie; Villiard, Eric; Pilote, Mireille; Philip, Anie; Roy, Stéphane

    2007-01-01

    Axolotls (urodele amphibians) have the unique ability, among vertebrates, to perfectly regenerate many parts of their body including limbs, tail, jaw and spinal cord following injury or amputation. The axolotl limb is the most widely used structure as an experimental model to study tissue regeneration. The process is well characterized, requiring multiple cellular and molecular mechanisms. The preparation phase represents the first part of the regeneration process which includes wound healing, cellular migration, dedifferentiation and proliferation. The redevelopment phase represents the second part when dedifferentiated cells stop proliferating and redifferentiate to give rise to all missing structures. In the axolotl, when a limb is amputated, the missing or wounded part is regenerated perfectly without scar formation between the stump and the regenerated structure. Multiple authors have recently highlighted the similarities between the early phases of mammalian wound healing and urodele limb regeneration. In mammals, one very important family of growth factors implicated in the control of almost all aspects of wound healing is the transforming growth factor-beta family (TGF-beta). In the present study, the full length sequence of the axolotl TGF-beta1 cDNA was isolated. The spatio-temporal expression pattern of TGF-beta1 in regenerating limbs shows that this gene is up-regulated during the preparation phase of regeneration. Our results also demonstrate the presence of multiple components of the TGF-beta signaling machinery in axolotl cells. By using a specific pharmacological inhibitor of TGF-beta type I receptor, SB-431542, we show that TGF-beta signaling is required for axolotl limb regeneration. Treatment of regenerating limbs with SB-431542 reveals that cellular proliferation during limb regeneration as well as the expression of genes directly dependent on TGF-beta signaling are down-regulated. These data directly implicate TGF-beta signaling in the

  4. Gliotoxin potentiates osteoblast differentiation by inhibiting nuclear factor-κB signaling

    PubMed Central

    WANG, GUANGYE; ZHANG, XIAOHAI; YU, BAOQING; REN, KE

    2015-01-01

    The differentiation of pluripotent mesenchymal stem cells to mature osteoblasts is crucial for the maintenance of the adult skeleton. In rheumatic arthritis, osteoblast differentiation is impaired by the overproduction of cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. It has been demonstrated that TNF-α is able to inhibit osteoblast differentiation through the activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling. As a result of the critical role of TNF-α and NF-κB in the pathogenesis of bone-loss associated diseases, these factors are regarded as key targets for the development of therapeutic agents. In the current study, the role of the NF-κB inhibitor gliotoxin (GTX) in the regulation of osteoblast differentiation was evaluated. The non-toxic GTX doses were determined to be ≤3 μg/ml. It was revealed that GTX was able to block TNF-α-induced inhibition of osteoblast differentiation, as indicated by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and ALP staining assays, as well as the expression levels of osteoblast-associated genes Col I, Ocn, Bsp, Runx2, Osx and ATF4. Additionally, it was identified that gliotoxin directly promoted bone morphoge-netic protein-2-induced osteoblast differentiation. GTX was found to inhibit the accumulation of NF-κB protein p65 in the nucleus and reduce NF-κB transcriptional activity, suggesting that GTX potentiated osteoblast differentiation via the suppression of NF-κB signaling. PMID:25816130

  5. Profiling of anti-fibrotic signaling by hepatocyte growth factor in renal fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Schievenbusch, Stephanie; Strack, Ingo; Scheffler, Melanie; Wennhold, Kerstin; Maurer, Julia; Nischt, Roswitha; Dienes, Hans Peter; Odenthal, Margarete

    2009-07-17

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a multifunctional growth factor affecting cell proliferation and differentiation. Due to its mitogenic potential, HGF plays an important role in tubular repair and regeneration after acute renal injury. However, recent reports have shown that HGF also acts as an anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic factor, affecting various cell types such as renal fibroblasts and triggering tubulointerstitial fibrosis of the kidney. The present study provides evidence that HGF stimulation of renal fibroblasts results in the activation of both the Erk1/2 and the Akt pathways. As previously shown, Erk1/2 phosphorylation results in Smad-linker phosphorylation, thereby antagonizing cellular signals induced by TGF{beta}. By siRNA mediated silencing of the Erk1/2-Smad linkage, however, we now demonstrate that Akt signaling acts as an auxiliary pathway responsible for the anti-fibrotic effects of HGF. In order to define the anti-fibrotic function of HGF we performed comprehensive expression profiling of HGF-stimulated renal fibroblasts by microarray hybridization. Functional cluster analyses and quantitative PCR assays indicate that the HGF-stimulated pathways transfer the anti-fibrotic effects in renal interstitial fibroblasts by reducing expression of extracellular matrix proteins, various chemokines, and members of the CCN family.

  6. Bacterial factors exploit eukaryotic Rho GTPase signaling cascades to promote invasion and proliferation within their host

    PubMed Central

    Popoff, Michel R

    2014-01-01

    Actin cytoskeleton is a main target of many bacterial pathogens. Among the multiple regulation steps of the actin cytoskeleton, bacterial factors interact preferentially with RhoGTPases. Pathogens secrete either toxins which diffuse in the surrounding environment, or directly inject virulence factors into target cells. Bacterial toxins, which interfere with RhoGTPases, and to some extent with RasGTPases, catalyze a covalent modification (ADPribosylation, glucosylation, deamidation, adenylation, proteolysis) blocking these molecules in their active or inactive state, resulting in alteration of epithelial and/or endothelial barriers, which contributes to dissemination of bacteria in the host. Injected bacterial virulence factors preferentially manipulate the RhoGTPase signaling cascade by mimicry of eukaryotic regulatory proteins leading to local actin cytoskeleton rearrangement, which mediates bacterial entry into host cells or in contrast escape to phagocytosis and immune defense. Invasive bacteria can also manipulate RhoGTPase signaling through recognition and stimulation of cell surface receptor(s). Changes in RhoGTPase activation state is sensed by the innate immunity pathways and allows the host cell to adapt an appropriate defense response. PMID:25203748

  7. The Growth Factor Receptor ERBB2 Regulates Mitochondrial Activity on a Signaling Time Scale*

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Nirav; Barrientos, Antoni; Landgraf, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Overexpression of the ERBB2 receptor tyrosine kinase and the mitochondrial inner membrane protein UCP2 occurs frequently in aggressive cancers with dysfunctional mitochondria. Overexpressed ERBB2 signals constitutively and elevated UCP2 can uncouple mitochondria and alleviate oxidative stress. However, the physiological contributions of UCP2 and ERBB2 at the low expression levels that are typical of most tissues, as well as the path to oncogenic deregulation, are poorly understood. We now show that ERBB2 directly controls UCP2 levels, both at low physiological levels and oncogenic overexpression. At low levels of receptor and UCP2, ligand stimulation creates a distinct temporal response pattern driven by the opposing forces of translational suppression of the exceptionally short lived UCP2 protein and a time delayed transcriptional up-regulation. The latter becomes dominant through constitutive signaling by overexpressed ERBB2, resulting in high levels of UCP2 that contribute mitochondrial uncoupling. By contrast, ligand stimulation of non-overexpressed ERBB2 transiently removes UCP2 and paradoxically reduces the mitochondrial membrane potential, oxygen consumption, and OXPHOS on a signaling time scale. However, neither the transporter activity nor down-regulation of already low UCP2 levels drive this reduction in mitochondrial activity. Instead, UCP2 is required to establish mitochondria that are capable of responding to ligand. UCP2 knockdown impairs proliferation at high glucose but its absence specifically impairs ligand-induced growth when glucose levels fluctuate. These findings demonstrate the ability of growth factor signaling to control oxidative phosphorylation on a signaling time scale and point toward a non-transporter role for low levels of UCP2 in establishing dynamic response capability. PMID:24142693

  8. Involvement of nuclear factor {kappa}B in platelet CD40 signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Hachem, Ahmed; Yacoub, Daniel; Zaid, Younes; Mourad, Walid; Merhi, Yahye

    2012-08-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer sCD40L induces TRAF2 association to CD40 and NF-{kappa}B activation in platelets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation downstream of CD40L/CD40 signaling is independent of p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer I{kappa}B{alpha} is required for sCD40L-induced platelet activation and potentiation of aggregation. -- Abstract: CD40 ligand (CD40L) is a thrombo-inflammatory molecule that predicts cardiovascular events. Platelets constitute the major source of soluble CD40L (sCD40L), which has been shown to potentiate platelet activation and aggregation, in a CD40-dependent manner, via p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Rac1 signaling. In many cells, the CD40L/CD40 dyad also induces activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B). Given that platelets contain NF-{kappa}B, we hypothesized that it may be involved in platelet CD40 signaling and function. In human platelets, sCD40L induces association of CD40 with its adaptor protein the tumor necrosis factor receptor associated factor 2 and triggers phosphorylation of I{kappa}B{alpha}, which are abolished by CD40L blockade. Inhibition of I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation reverses sCD40L-induced I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation without affecting p38 MAPK phosphorylation. On the other hand, inhibition of p38 MAPK phosphorylation has no effect on I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation, indicating a divergence in the signaling pathway originating from CD40 upon its ligation. In functional studies, inhibition of I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation reverses sCD40L-induced platelet activation and potentiation of platelet aggregation in response to a sub-threshold concentration of collagen. This study demonstrates that the sCD40L/CD40 axis triggers NF-{kappa}B activation in platelets. This signaling pathway plays a critical role in platelet activation and aggregation upon sCD40L stimulation and may represent an important target against thrombo

  9. Dynamic Arginine Methylation of Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) Receptor-associated Factor 6 Regulates Toll-like Receptor Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Tikhanovich, Irina; Kuravi, Sudhakiranmayi; Artigues, Antonio; Villar, Maria T.; Dorko, Kenneth; Nawabi, Atta; Roberts, Benjamin; Weinman, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    Arginine methylation is a common post-translational modification, but its role in regulating protein function is poorly understood. This study demonstrates that, TNF receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6), an E3 ubiquitin ligase involved in innate immune signaling, is regulated by reversible arginine methylation in a range of primary and cultured cells. Under basal conditions, TRAF6 is methylated by the methyltransferase PRMT1, and this inhibits its ubiquitin ligase activity, reducing activation of toll-like receptor signaling. In response to toll-like receptor ligands, TRAF6 is demethylated by the Jumonji domain protein JMJD6. Demethylation is required for maximal activation of NF-κB. Loss of JMJD6 leads to reduced response, and loss of PRMT1 leads to basal pathway activation with subsequent desensitization to ligands. In human primary cells, variations in the PRMT1/JMJD6 ratio significantly correlate with TRAF6 methylation, basal activation of NF-κB, and magnitude of response to LPS. Reversible arginine methylation of TRAF6 by the opposing effects of PRMT1 and JMJD6 is, therefore, a novel mechanism for regulation of innate immune pathways. PMID:26221041

  10. Integration of Developmental and Environmental Signals via a Polyadenylation Factor in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Man; Xu, Ruqiang; Merrill, Carrie; Hong, Liwei; Von Lanken, Carol; Hunt, Arthur G.; Li, Qingshun Q.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to integrate environmental and developmental signals with physiological responses is critical for plant survival. How this integration is done, particularly through posttranscriptional control of gene expression, is poorly understood. Previously, it was found that the 30 kD subunit of Arabidopsis cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (AtCPSF30) is a calmodulin-regulated RNA-binding protein. Here we demonstrated that mutant plants (oxt6) deficient in AtCPSF30 possess a novel range of phenotypes – reduced fertility, reduced lateral root formation, and altered sensitivities to oxidative stress and a number of plant hormones (auxin, cytokinin, gibberellic acid, and ACC). While the wild-type AtCPSF30 (C30G) was able to restore normal growth and responses, a mutant AtCPSF30 protein incapable of interacting with calmodulin (C30GM) could only restore wild-type fertility and responses to oxidative stress and ACC. Thus, the interaction with calmodulin is important for part of AtCPSF30 functions in the plant. Global poly(A) site analysis showed that the C30G and C30GM proteins can restore wild-type poly(A) site choice to the oxt6 mutant. Genes associated with hormone metabolism and auxin responses are also affected by the oxt6 mutation. Moreover, 19 genes that are linked with calmodulin-dependent CPSF30 functions, were identified through genome-wide expression analysis. These data, in conjunction with previous results from the analysis of the oxt6 mutant, indicate that the polyadenylation factor AtCPSF30 is a regulatory hub where different signaling cues are transduced, presumably via differential mRNA 3′ end formation or alternative polyadenylation, into specified phenotypic outcomes. Our results suggest a novel function of a polyadenylation factor in environmental and developmental signal integration. PMID:25546057

  11. Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor Associated Factor 2 Signaling Provokes Adverse Cardiac Remodeling in the Adult Mammalian Heart

    PubMed Central

    Divakaran, Vijay G.; Evans, Sarah; Topkara, Veli K.; Diwan, Abhinav; Burchfield, Jana; Gao, Feng; Dong, Jianwen; Tzeng, Huei-Ping; Sivasubramanian, Natarajan; Barger, Philip M.; Mann, Douglas L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily ligands that provoke a dilated cardiac phenotype signal through a common scaffolding protein termed TNF receptor associated factor 2 (TRAF2); however, virtually nothing is known with regard to TRAF2 signaling in the adult mammalian heart. Methods and Results We generated multiple founder lines of mice with cardiac restricted overexpression of TRAF2 and characterized the phenotype of mice with higher expression levels of TRAF2 (MHC-TRAF2HC). MHC-TRAF2HC transgenic mice developed a time-dependent increase in cardiac hypertrophy, LV dilation and adverse LV remodeling, and a significant decrease in LV +dP/dt and −dP/dt when compared to littermate (LM) controls (p < 0.05 compared to LM). During the early phases of LV remodeling there was a significant increase in total matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity that corresponded with a decrease in total myocardial fibrillar collagen content. As the MHC-TRAF2HC mice aged, there was a significant decrease in total MMP activity accompanied by an increase in total fibrillar collagen content and an increase in myocardial tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 levels. There was a significant increase in NF-κB activation at 4 – 12 weeks and JNK activation at 4 weeks in the MHCs TRAF2HC mice. Transciptional profiling revealed that > 95% of the hypertrophic/dilated cardiomyopathy-related genes that were significantly upregulated genes in the MHC-TRAF2HC hearts contained κB elements in their promoters. Conclusions These results show for the first time that targeted overexpression of TRAF2 is sufficient to mediate adverse cardiac remodeling in the heart. PMID:23493088

  12. Modulation of Mitochondrial Antiviral Signaling by Human Herpesvirus 8 Interferon Regulatory Factor 1

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Keun Young

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mitochondrial lipid raft-like microdomains, experimentally also termed mitochondrial detergent-resistant membrane fractions (mDRM), play a role as platforms for recruiting signaling molecules involved in antiviral responses such as apoptosis and innate immunity. Viruses can modulate mitochondrial functions for their own survival and replication. However, viral regulation of the antiviral responses via mDRM remains incompletely understood. Here, we report that human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) gene product viral interferon regulatory factor 1 (vIRF-1) is targeted to mDRM during virus replication and negatively regulates the mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS)-mediated antiviral responses. The N-terminal region of vIRF-1 interacts directly with membrane lipids, including cardiolipin. In addition, a GxRP motif within the N terminus of vIRF-1, conserved in the mDRM-targeting region of mitochondrial proteins, including PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) and MAVS, was found to be important for vIRF-1 association with mitochondria. Furthermore, MAVS, which has the potential to promote vIRF-1 targeting to mDRM possibly by inducing cardiolipin exposure on the outer membrane of mitochondria, interacts with vIRF-1, which, in turn, inhibits MAVS-mediated antiviral signaling. Consistent with these results, vIRF-1 targeting to mDRM contributes to promotion of HHV-8 productive replication and inhibition of associated apoptosis. Combined, our results suggest novel molecular mechanisms for negative-feedback regulation of MAVS by vIRF-1 during virus replication. IMPORTANCE Successful virus replication is in large part achieved by the ability of viruses to counteract apoptosis and innate immune responses elicited by infection of host cells. Recently, mitochondria have emerged to play a central role in antiviral signaling. In particular, mitochondrial lipid raft-like microdomains appear to function as platforms in cell apoptosis signaling. However, viral regulation

  13. Binding Mode Analysis of Zerumbone to Key Signal Proteins in the Tumor Necrosis Factor Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Fatima, Ayesha; Abdul, Ahmad Bustamam Hj.; Abdullah, Rasedee; Karjiban, Roghayeh Abedi; Lee, Vannajan Sanghiran

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common cancer among women worldwide. Several signaling pathways have been implicated as causative and progression agents. The tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α protein plays a dual role in promoting and inhibiting cancer depending largely on the pathway initiated by the binding of the protein to its receptor. Zerumbone, an active constituent of Zingiber zerumbet, Smith, is known to act on the tumor necrosis factor pathway upregulating tumour necrosis factor related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) death receptors and inducing apoptosis in cancer cells. Zerumbone is a sesquiterpene that is able to penetrate into the hydrophobic pockets of proteins to exert its inhibiting activity with several proteins. We found a good binding with the tumor necrosis factor, kinase κB (IKKβ) and the Nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) component proteins along the TNF pathway. Our results suggest that zerumbone can exert its apoptotic activities by inhibiting the cytoplasmic proteins. It inhibits the IKKβ kinase that activates the NF-κB and also binds to the NF-κB complex in the TNF pathway. Blocking both proteins can lead to inhibition of cell proliferating proteins to be downregulated and possibly ultimate induction of apoptosis. PMID:25629232

  14. CLAUSA Is a MYB Transcription Factor That Promotes Leaf Differentiation by Attenuating Cytokinin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Bar, Maya; Israeli, Alon; Levy, Matan; Ben Gera, Hadas; Jiménez-Gómez, José M; Kouril, Stepan; Tarkowski, Petr; Ori, Naomi

    2016-07-01

    Leaf morphogenesis and differentiation are highly flexible processes, resulting in a large diversity of leaf forms. The development of compound leaves involves an extended morphogenesis stage compared with that of simple leaves, and the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) mutant clausa (clau) exposes a potential for extended morphogenesis in tomato leaves. Here, we report that the CLAU gene encodes a MYB transcription factor that has evolved a unique role in compound-leaf species to promote an exit from the morphogenetic phase of tomato leaf development. We show that CLAU attenuates cytokinin signaling, and that clau plants have increased cytokinin sensitivity. The results suggest that flexible leaf patterning involves a coordinated interplay between transcription factors and hormones.

  15. CLAUSA Is a MYB Transcription Factor That Promotes Leaf Differentiation by Attenuating Cytokinin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Bar, Maya; Israeli, Alon; Levy, Matan; Ben Gera, Hadas; Jiménez-Gómez, José M; Kouril, Stepan; Tarkowski, Petr; Ori, Naomi

    2016-07-01

    Leaf morphogenesis and differentiation are highly flexible processes, resulting in a large diversity of leaf forms. The development of compound leaves involves an extended morphogenesis stage compared with that of simple leaves, and the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) mutant clausa (clau) exposes a potential for extended morphogenesis in tomato leaves. Here, we report that the CLAU gene encodes a MYB transcription factor that has evolved a unique role in compound-leaf species to promote an exit from the morphogenetic phase of tomato leaf development. We show that CLAU attenuates cytokinin signaling, and that clau plants have increased cytokinin sensitivity. The results suggest that flexible leaf patterning involves a coordinated interplay between transcription factors and hormones. PMID:27385816

  16. Interacting inflammatory and growth factor signals underlie the obesity-cancer link.

    PubMed

    Lashinger, Laura M; Ford, Nikki A; Hursting, Stephen D

    2014-02-01

    The prevalence of obesity, an established risk factor for many chronic diseases (including diabetes, cardiovascular disease, stroke, and several types of cancer), has risen steadily for the past several decades in the United States and many parts of the world. Today, ∼70% of U.S. adults and 30% of children are at an unhealthy weight. The evidence on key biologic mechanisms underlying the obesity-cancer link, with an emphasis on local and systemic inflammatory processes and their crosstalk with energy-sensing growth factor signaling pathways, will be discussed. Understanding the influence and underlying mechanisms of obesity on chronic inflammation and cancer will identify promising mechanistic targets and strategies for disrupting the obesity-cancer link and provide important lessons regarding the associations between obesity, inflammation, and other chronic diseases.

  17. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) and Platelet (PF-4) Factor 4 Inputs Modulate Human Microvascular Endothelial Signaling in a Three-Dimensional Matrix Migration Context*

    PubMed Central

    Hang, Ta-Chun; Tedford, Nathan C.; Reddy, Raven J.; Rimchala, Tharathorn; Wells, Alan; White, Forest M.; Kamm, Roger D.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2013-01-01

    The process of angiogenesis is under complex regulation in adult organisms, particularly as it often occurs in an inflammatory post-wound environment. As such, there are many impacting factors that will regulate the generation of new blood vessels which include not only pro-angiogenic growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor, but also angiostatic factors. During initial postwound hemostasis, a large initial bolus of platelet factor 4 is released into localized areas of damage before progression of wound healing toward tissue homeostasis. Because of its early presence and high concentration, the angiostatic chemokine platelet factor 4, which can induce endothelial anoikis, can strongly affect angiogenesis. In our work, we explored signaling crosstalk interactions between vascular endothelial growth factor and platelet factor 4 using phosphotyrosine-enriched mass spectrometry methods on human dermal microvascular endothelial cells cultured under conditions facilitating migratory sprouting into collagen gel matrices. We developed new methods to enable mass spectrometry-based phosphorylation analysis of primary cells cultured on collagen gels, and quantified signaling pathways over the first 48 h of treatment with vascular endothelial growth factor in the presence or absence of platelet factor 4. By observing early and late signaling dynamics in tandem with correlation network modeling, we found that platelet factor 4 has significant crosstalk with vascular endothelial growth factor by modulating cell migration and polarization pathways, centered around P38α MAPK, Src family kinases Fyn and Lyn, along with FAK. Interestingly, we found EphA2 correlational topology to strongly involve key migration-related signaling nodes after introduction of platelet factor 4, indicating an influence of the angiostatic factor on this ambiguous but generally angiogenic signal in this complex environment. PMID:24023389

  18. Sprouty2 controls proliferation of palate mesenchymal cells via fibroblast growth factor signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumura, Kaori; Taketomi, Takaharu; Yoshizaki, Keigo; Arai, Shinsaku; Sanui, Terukazu; Yoshiga, Daigo; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Nakamura, Seiji

    2011-01-28

    Research highlights: {yields} Sprouty2-deficient mice exhibit cleft palate as a result of failure of palatal shelf elevation. {yields} We examined palate cell proliferation in Sprouty2-deficient mice. {yields} Palate mesenchymal cell proliferation was increased in Sprouty2 KO mice. {yields} Sprouty2 plays roles in murine palatogenesis by regulating cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Cleft palate is one of the most common craniofacial deformities. The fibroblast growth factor (FGF) plays a central role in reciprocal interactions between adjacent tissues during palatal development, and the FGF signaling pathway has been shown to be inhibited by members of the Sprouty protein family. In this study, we report the incidence of cleft palate, possibly caused by failure of palatal shelf elevation, in Sprouty2-deficient (KO) mice. Sprouty2-deficient palates fused completely in palatal organ culture. However, palate mesenchymal cell proliferation estimated by Ki-67 staining was increased in Sprouty2 KO mice compared with WT mice. Sprouty2-null palates expressed higher levels of FGF target genes, such as Msx1, Etv5, and Ptx1 than WT controls. Furthermore, proliferation and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) activation in response to FGF was enhanced in palate mesenchymal cells transfected with Sprouty2 small interfering RNA. These results suggest that Sprouty2 regulates palate mesenchymal cell proliferation via FGF signaling and is involved in palatal shelf elevation.

  19. Differential Phosphoproteomics of Fibroblast Growth Factor Signaling: Identification of Src Family Kinase-Mediated Phosphorylation Events

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Activation of signal transduction by the receptor tyrosine kinase, fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR), results in a cascade of protein−protein interactions that rely on the occurrence of specific tyrosine phosphorylation events. One such protein recruited to the activated receptor complex is the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase, Src, which is involved in both initiation and termination of further signaling events. To gain a further understanding of the tyrosine phosphorylation events that occur during FGF signaling, with a specific focus on those that are dependent on Src family kinase (SFK) activity, we have applied SILAC combined with chemical inhibition of SFK activity to search for phosphorylation events that are dependent on SFK activity in FGF stimulated cells. In addition, we used a more targeted approach to carry out high coverage phosphopeptide mapping of one Src substrate protein, the multifunctional adaptor Dok1, and to identify SFK-dependent Dok1 binding partners. From these analyses we identify 80 SFK-dependent phosphorylation events on 40 proteins. We further identify 18 SFK-dependent Dok1 interactions and 9 SFK-dependent Dok1 phosphorylation sites, 6 of which had not previously been known to be SFK-dependent. PMID:20225815

  20. Transcription factors as potential participants in the signal transduction pathway of boron deficiency.

    PubMed

    González-Fontes, Agustín; Rexach, Jesús; Quiles-Pando, Carlos; Herrera-Rodríguez, M Begoña; Camacho-Cristóbal, Juan J; Navarro-Gochicoa, M Teresa

    2013-11-01

    Boron (B) plays a well-known structural role in the cell wall, however the way of perceiving B deficiency by roots and transmitting this environmental signal to the nucleus to elicit a response is not well established. It is known that the direct interaction between Ca2+ sensors and transcription factors (TFs) is a necessary step to regulate the expression of downstream target genes in some signaling pathways. Interestingly, B deprivation affected gene expressions of several TFs belonging to MYB, WRKY, and bZIP families, as well as expressions of Ca2+ -related genes such as several CML (calmodulin-like protein) and CPK (Ca2+ -dependent protein kinase) genes. Taken together, these results suggest that B deficiency could affect the expression of downstream target genes by alteration of a calcium signaling pathway in which the interaction between CMLs and/or CPKs with TFs (activator or repressor) would be a crucial step, which would explain why some genes are upregulated whereas others are repressed upon B deprivation.

  1. Transcription factors as potential participants in the signal transduction pathway of boron deficiency

    PubMed Central

    González-Fontes, Agustín; Rexach, Jesús; Quiles-Pando, Carlos; Herrera-Rodríguez, M Begoña; Camacho-Cristóbal, Juan J; Navarro-Gochicoa, M Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Boron (B) plays a well-known structural role in the cell wall, however the way of perceiving B deficiency by roots and transmitting this environmental signal to the nucleus to elicit a response is not well established. It is known that the direct interaction between Ca2+ sensors and transcription factors (TFs) is a necessary step to regulate the expression of downstream target genes in some signaling pathways. Interestingly, B deprivation affected gene expressions of several TFs belonging to MYB, WRKY, and bZIP families, as well as expressions of Ca2+-related genes such as several CML (calmodulin-like protein) and CPK (Ca2+-dependent protein kinase) genes. Taken together, these results suggest that B deficiency could affect the expression of downstream target genes by alteration of a calcium signaling pathway in which the interaction between CMLs and/or CPKs with TFs (activator or repressor) would be a crucial step, which would explain why some genes are upregulated whereas others are repressed upon B deprivation. PMID:23989264

  2. The transcription factor FOXL2 mobilizes estrogen signaling to maintain the identity of ovarian granulosa cells

    PubMed Central

    Georges, Adrien; L'Hôte, David; Todeschini, Anne Laure; Auguste, Aurélie; Legois, Bérangère; Zider, Alain; Veitia, Reiner A

    2014-01-01

    FOXL2 is a lineage determining transcription factor in the ovary, but its direct targets and modes of action are not fully characterized. In this study, we explore the targets of FOXL2 and five nuclear receptors in murine primary follicular cells. We found that FOXL2 is required for normal gene regulation by steroid receptors, and we show that estrogen receptor beta (ESR2) is the main vector of estradiol signaling in these cells. Moreover, we found that FOXL2 directly modulates Esr2 expression through a newly identified intronic element. Interestingly, we found that FOXL2 repressed the testis-determining gene Sox9 both independently of estrogen signaling and through the activation of ESR2 expression. Altogether, we show that FOXL2 mobilizes estrogen signaling to establish a coherent feed-forward loop repressing Sox9. This sheds a new light on the role of FOXL2 in ovarian maintenance and function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04207.001 PMID:25369636

  3. A Salmonella virulence factor activates the NOD1/NOD2 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Keestra, A Marijke; Winter, Maria G; Klein-Douwel, Daisy; Xavier, Mariana N; Winter, Sebastian E; Kim, Anita; Tsolis, Renée M; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2011-01-01

    The invasion-associated type III secretion system (T3SS-1) of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) activates the transcription factor NF-κB in tissue culture cells and induces inflammatory responses in animal models through unknown mechanisms. Here we show that bacterial delivery or ectopic expression of SipA, a T3SS-1-translocated protein, led to the activation of the NOD1/NOD2 signaling pathway and consequent RIP2-mediated induction of NF-κB-dependent inflammatory responses. SipA-mediated activation of NOD1/NOD2 signaling was independent of bacterial invasion in vitro but required an intact T3SS-1. In the mouse colitis model, SipA triggered mucosal inflammation in wild-type mice but not in NOD1/NOD2-deficient mice. These findings implicate SipA-driven activation of the NOD1/NOD2 signaling pathway as a mechanism by which the T3SS-1 induces inflammatory responses in vitro and in vivo. PMID:22186610

  4. Acetylbritannilactone Modulates Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Signaling and Regulates Angiogenesis in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jingshan; Niu, Honglin; Li, Aiying; Nie, Lei

    2016-01-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the effects of 1-O-acetylbritannilactone (ABL), a compound extracted from Inula britannica L., on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling and angiogenesis in endothelial cells (ECs). We showed that ABL promotes VEGF-induced cell proliferation, growth, migration, and tube formation in cultured human ECs. Furthermore, the modulatory effect of ABL on VEGF-induced Akt, MAPK p42/44, and p38 phosphorylation, as well as on upstream VEGFR-2 phosphorylation, were associated with VEGF-dependent Matrigel angiogenesis in vivo. In addition, animals treated with ABL (26 mg/kg/day) recovered blood flow significantly earlier than control animals, suggesting that ABL affects ischemia-mediated angiogenesis and arteriogenesis in vivo. Finally, we demonstrated that ABL strongly reduced the levels of VEGFR-2 on the cell surface, enhanced VEGFR-2 endocytosis, which consistent with inhibited VE-cadherin, a negative regulator of VEGF signaling associated with VEGFR-2 complex formation, but did not alter VE-cadherin or VEGFR-2 expression in ECs. Our results suggest that ABL may serve as a novel therapeutic intervention for various cardiovascular diseases, including chronic ischemia, by regulating VEGF signaling and modulating angiogenesis. PMID:26863518

  5. A Salmonella Virulence Factor Activates the NOD1/NOD2 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Marijke Keestra, A.; Winter, Maria G.; Klein-Douwel, Daisy; Xavier, Mariana N.; Winter, Sebastian E.; Kim, Anita; Tsolis, Renée M.; Bäumler, Andreas J.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT The invasion-associated type III secretion system (T3SS-1) of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) activates the transcription factor NF-κB in tissue culture cells and induces inflammatory responses in animal models through unknown mechanisms. Here we show that bacterial delivery or ectopic expression of SipA, a T3SS-1-translocated protein, led to the activation of the NOD1/NOD2 signaling pathway and consequent RIP2-mediated induction of NF-κB-dependent inflammatory responses. SipA-mediated activation of NOD1/NOD2 signaling was independent of bacterial invasion in vitro but required an intact T3SS-1. In the mouse colitis model, SipA triggered mucosal inflammation in wild-type mice but not in NOD1/NOD2-deficient mice. These findings implicate SipA-driven activation of the NOD1/NOD2 signaling pathway as a mechanism by which the T3SS-1 induces inflammatory responses in vitro and in vivo. PMID:22186610

  6. Analytical expressions for the gate utilization factors of passive multiplicity counters including signal build-up

    SciTech Connect

    Croft, Stephen; Evans, Louise G; Schear, Melissa A

    2010-01-01

    In the realm of nuclear safeguards, passive neutron multiplicity counting using shift register pulse train analysis to nondestructively quantify Pu in product materials is a familiar and widely applied technique. The approach most commonly taken is to construct a neutron detector consisting of {sup 3}He filled cylindrical proportional counters embedded in a high density polyethylene moderator. Fast neutrons from the item enter the moderator and are quickly slowed down, on timescales of the order of 1-2 {micro}s, creating a thermal population which then persists typically for several 10's {micro}s and is sampled by the {sup 3}He detectors. Because the initial transient is of comparatively short duration it has been traditional to treat it as instantaneous and furthermore to approximate the subsequent capture time distribution as exponential in shape. With these approximations simple expressions for the various Gate Utilization Factors (GUFs) can be obtained. These factors represent the proportion of time correlated events i.e. Doubles and Triples signal present in the pulse train that is detected by the coincidence gate structure chosen (predelay and gate width settings of the multiplicity shift register). More complicated expressions can be derived by generalizing the capture time distribution to multiple time components or harmonics typically present in real systems. When it comes to applying passive neutron multiplicity methods to extremely intense (i.e. high emission rate and highly multiplying) neutron sources there is a drive to use detector types with very fast response characteristics in order to cope with the high rates. In addition to short pulse width, detectors with a short capture time profile are also desirable so that a short coincidence gate width can be set in order to reduce the chance or Accidental coincidence signal. In extreme cases, such as might be realized using boron loaded scintillators, the dieaway time may be so short that the build

  7. Mitochondria mediate tumor necrosis factor-alpha/NF-kappaB signaling in skeletal muscle myotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Y. P.; Atkins, C. M.; Sweatt, J. D.; Reid, M. B.; Hamilton, S. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is implicated in muscle atrophy and weakness associated with a variety of chronic diseases. Recently, we reported that TNF-alpha directly induces muscle protein degradation in differentiated skeletal muscle myotubes, where it rapidly activates nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB). We also have found that protein loss induced by TNF-alpha is NF-kappaB dependent. In the present study, we analyzed the signaling pathway by which TNF-alpha activates NF-kappaB in myotubes differentiated from C2C12 and rat primary myoblasts. We found that activation of NF-kappaB by TNF-alpha was blocked by rotenone or amytal, inhibitors of complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. On the other hand, antimycin A, an inhibitor of complex III, enhanced TNF-alpha activation of NK-kappaB. These results suggest a key role of mitochondria-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mediating NF-kappaB activation in muscle. In addition, we found that TNF-alpha stimulated protein kinase C (PKC) activity. However, other signal transduction mediators including ceramide, Ca2+, phospholipase A2 (PLA2), and nitric oxide (NO) do not appear to be involved in the activation of NF-kappaB.

  8. Interactions between SOX factors and Wnt/beta-catenin signaling in development and disease.

    PubMed

    Kormish, Jay D; Sinner, Débora; Zorn, Aaron M

    2010-01-01

    The SOX family of transcription factors have emerged as modulators of canonical Wnt/beta-catenin signaling in diverse development and disease contexts. There are over 20 SOX proteins encoded in the vertebrate genome and recent evidence suggests that many of these can physically interact with beta-catenin and modulate the transcription of Wnt-target genes. The precise mechanisms by which SOX proteins regulate beta-catenin/TCF activity are still being resolved and there is evidence to support a number of models including: protein-protein interactions, the binding of SOX factors to Wnt-target gene promoters, the recruitment of co-repressors or co-activators, modulation of protein stability, and nuclear translocation. In some contexts, Wnt signaling also regulates SOX expression resulting in feedback regulatory loops that fine-tune cellular responses to beta-catenin/TCF activity. In this review, we summarize the examples of Sox-Wnt interactions and examine the underlying mechanisms of this potentially widespread and underappreciated mode of Wnt-regulation. PMID:19655378

  9. Transcription factor TLX1 controls retinoic acid signaling to ensure spleen development

    PubMed Central

    Lenti, Elisa; Farinello, Diego; Penkov, Dmitry; Castagnaro, Laura; Lavorgna, Giovanni; Wuputra, Kenly; Tjaden, Naomi E. Butler; Bernassola, Francesca; Caridi, Nicoletta; Wagner, Michael; Kozinc, Katja; Niederreither, Karen; Blasi, Francesco; Pasini, Diego; Trainor, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms that underlie spleen development and congenital asplenia, a condition linked to increased risk of overwhelming infections, remain largely unknown. The transcription factor TLX1 controls cell fate specification and organ expansion during spleen development, and Tlx1 deletion causes asplenia in mice. Deregulation of TLX1 expression has recently been proposed in the pathogenesis of congenital asplenia in patients carrying mutations of the gene-encoding transcription factor SF-1. Herein, we have shown that TLX1-dependent regulation of retinoic acid (RA) metabolism is critical for spleen organogenesis. In a murine model, loss of Tlx1 during formation of the splenic anlage increased RA signaling by regulating several genes involved in RA metabolism. Uncontrolled RA activity resulted in premature differentiation of mesenchymal cells and reduced vasculogenesis of the splenic primordium. Pharmacological inhibition of RA signaling in Tlx1-deficient animals partially rescued the spleen defect. Finally, spleen growth was impaired in mice lacking either cytochrome P450 26B1 (Cyp26b1), which results in excess RA, or retinol dehydrogenase 10 (Rdh10), which results in RA deficiency. Together, these findings establish TLX1 as a critical regulator of RA metabolism and provide mechanistic insights into the molecular determinants of human congenital asplenia. PMID:27214556

  10. Epidermal growth factor promotes proliferation of dermal papilla cells via Notch signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haihua; Nan, Weixiao; Wang, Shiyong; Zhang, Tietao; Si, Huazhe; Wang, Datao; Yang, Fuhe; Li, Guangyu

    2016-08-01

    The effect of epidermal growth factor (EGF) on the development and growth of hair follicle is controversial. In the present study, 2-20 ng/ml EGF promoted the growth of mink hair follicles in vitro, whereas 200 ng/ml EGF inhibited follicle growth. Further, dermal papilla (DP) cells, a group of mesenchymal cells that govern hair follicle development and growth, were isolated and cultured in vitro. Treatment with or forced expression of EGF accelerated proliferation and induced G1/S transition in DP cells. Moreover, EGF upregulated the expression of DP mesenchymal genes, such as alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1), as well as the Notch pathway molecules including Notch1, Jagged1, Hes1 and Hes5. In addition, inhibition of Notch signaling pathway by DAPT significantly reduced the basal and EGF-enhanced proliferation rate, and also suppressed cell cycle progression. We also show that the expression of several follicle-regulatory genes, such as Survivin and Msx2, were upregulated by EGF, and was inhibited by DAPT. In summary, our study demonstrates that the concentration of EGF is critical for the switch between hair follicle growth and inhibition, and EGF promotes DP cell proliferation via Notch signaling pathway.

  11. The role of Zic transcription factors in regulating hindbrain retinoic acid signaling

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The reiterated architecture of cranial motor neurons aligns with the segmented structure of the embryonic vertebrate hindbrain. Anterior-posterior identity of cranial motor neurons depends, in part, on retinoic acid signaling levels. The early vertebrate embryo maintains a balance between retinoic acid synthetic and degradative zones on the basis of reciprocal expression domains of the retinoic acid synthesis gene aldhehyde dehydrogenase 1a2 (aldh1a2) posteriorly and the oxidative gene cytochrome p450 type 26a1 (cyp26a1) in the forebrain, midbrain, and anterior hindbrain. Results This manuscript investigates the role of zinc finger of the cerebellum (zic) transcription factors in regulating levels of retinoic acid and differentiation of cranial motor neurons. Depletion of zebrafish Zic2a and Zic2b results in a strong downregulation of aldh1a2 expression and a concomitant reduction in activity of a retinoid-dependent transgene. The vagal motor neuron phenotype caused by loss of Zic2a/2b mimics a depletion of Aldh1a2 and is rescued by exogenously supplied retinoic acid. Conclusion Zic transcription factors function in patterning hindbrain motor neurons through their regulation of embryonic retinoic acid signaling. PMID:23937294

  12. Chromatin-Remodeling-Factor ARID1B Represses Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Vasileiou, Georgia; Ekici, Arif B.; Uebe, Steffen; Zweier, Christiane; Hoyer, Juliane; Engels, Hartmut; Behrens, Jürgen; Reis, André; Hadjihannas, Michel V.

    2015-01-01

    The link of chromatin remodeling to both neurodevelopment and cancer has recently been highlighted by the identification of mutations affecting BAF chromatin-remodeling components, such as ARID1B, in individuals with intellectual disability and cancer. However, the underlying molecular mechanism(s) remains unknown. Here, we show that ARID1B is a repressor of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Through whole-transcriptome analysis, we find that in individuals with intellectual disability and ARID1B loss-of-function mutations, Wnt/β-catenin target genes are upregulated. Using cellular models of low and high Wnt/β-catenin activity, we demonstrate that knockdown of ARID1B activates Wnt/β-catenin target genes and Wnt/β-catenin-dependent transcriptional reporters in a β-catenin-dependent manner. Reciprocally, forced expression of ARID1B inhibits Wnt/β-catenin signaling downstream of the β-catenin destruction complex. Both endogenous and exogenous ARID1B associate with β-catenin and repress Wnt/β-catenin-mediated transcription through the BAF core subunit BRG1. Accordingly, mutations in ARID1B leading to partial or complete deletion of its BRG1-binding domain, as is often observed in intellectual disability and cancers, compromise association with β-catenin, and the resultant ARID1B mutant proteins fail to suppress Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Finally, knockdown of ARID1B in mouse neuroblastoma cells leads to neurite outgrowth through β-catenin. The data suggest that aberrations in chromatin-remodeling factors, such as ARID1B, might contribute to neurodevelopmental abnormalities and cancer through deregulation of developmental and oncogenic pathways, such as the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. PMID:26340334

  13. Sex-biased stress signaling: the corticotropin-releasing factor receptor as a model.

    PubMed

    Valentino, Rita J; Bangasser, Debra; Van Bockstaele, Elisabeth J

    2013-04-01

    Sex differences in the prevalence or severity of many diseases and in the response to pharmacological agents are well recognized. Elucidating the biologic bases of these differences can advance our understanding of the pathophysiology of disease and facilitate the development of treatments. Despite the importance to medicine, this has been an area of limited research. Here, we review physiologic, cellular, and molecular findings supporting the idea that there are sex differences in receptor signaling and trafficking that can be determinants of pathology. The focus is on the receptor for corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), the orchestrator of the stress response, which has been implicated in diverse stress-related diseases that show a female prevalence. Data are reviewed that show sex differences in the association of the CRF receptor (CRF1) with the Gs protein and β-arrestin 2 that would render females more responsive to acute stress and less able to adapt to chronic stress as a result of compromised CRF1 internalization. Because β-arrestin 2 serves to link CRF1 to Gs-independent signaling pathways, this sex-biased signaling is proposed to result in distinct cellular responses to stress that are translated to different physiologic and behavioral coping mechanisms and that can have different pathologic consequences. Because stress has been implicated in diverse medical and psychiatric diseases, these sex differences in CRF1 signaling could explain sex differences in a multitude of disorders. The possibility that analogous sex differences may occur with other G-protein-coupled receptors underscores the impact of this effect and is discussed. PMID:23239826

  14. Neuroprotective effects of physical activity on the brain: a closer look at trophic factor signaling.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Cristy; Baktir, Mehmet Akif; Srivatsan, Malathi; Salehi, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    While the relationship between increased physical activity and cognitive ability has been conjectured for centuries, only recently have the mechanisms underlying this relationship began to emerge. Convergent evidence suggests that physical activity offers an affordable and effective method to improve cognitive function in all ages, particularly the elderly who are most vulnerable to neurodegenerative disorders. In addition to improving cardiac and immune function, physical activity alters trophic factor signaling and, in turn, neuronal function and structure in areas critical for cognition. Sustained exercise plays a role in modulating anti-inflammatory effects and may play a role in preserving cognitive function in aging and neuropathological conditions. Moreover, recent evidence suggests that myokines released by exercising muscles affect the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor synthesis in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, a finding that could lead to the identification of new and therapeutically important mediating factors. Given the growing number of individuals with cognitive impairments worldwide, a better understanding of how these factors contribute to cognition is imperative, and constitutes an important first step toward developing non-pharmacological therapeutic strategies to improve cognition in vulnerable populations. PMID:24999318

  15. Neuroprotective effects of physical activity on the brain: a closer look at trophic factor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Cristy; Baktir, Mehmet Akif; Srivatsan, Malathi; Salehi, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    While the relationship between increased physical activity and cognitive ability has been conjectured for centuries, only recently have the mechanisms underlying this relationship began to emerge. Convergent evidence suggests that physical activity offers an affordable and effective method to improve cognitive function in all ages, particularly the elderly who are most vulnerable to neurodegenerative disorders. In addition to improving cardiac and immune function, physical activity alters trophic factor signaling and, in turn, neuronal function and structure in areas critical for cognition. Sustained exercise plays a role in modulating anti-inflammatory effects and may play a role in preserving cognitive function in aging and neuropathological conditions. Moreover, recent evidence suggests that myokines released by exercising muscles affect the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor synthesis in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, a finding that could lead to the identification of new and therapeutically important mediating factors. Given the growing number of individuals with cognitive impairments worldwide, a better understanding of how these factors contribute to cognition is imperative, and constitutes an important first step toward developing non-pharmacological therapeutic strategies to improve cognition in vulnerable populations. PMID:24999318

  16. The transcription factor MEF2C mediates cardiomyocyte hypertrophy induced by IGF-1 signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Munoz, Juan Pablo; Collao, Andres; Chiong, Mario; Maldonado, Carola; Adasme, Tatiana; Carrasco, Loreto; Ocaranza, Paula; Bravo, Roberto; Gonzalez, Leticia; Diaz-Araya, Guillermo; Hidalgo, Cecilia; Lavandero, Sergio

    2009-10-09

    Myocyte enhancer factor 2C (MEF2C) plays an important role in cardiovascular development and is a key transcription factor for cardiac hypertrophy. Here, we describe MEF2C regulation by insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and its role in IGF-1-induced cardiac hypertrophy. We found that IGF-1 addition to cultured rat cardiomyocytes activated MEF2C, as evidenced by its increased nuclear localization and DNA binding activity. IGF-1 stimulated MEF2 dependent-gene transcription in a time-dependent manner, as indicated by increased MEF2 promoter-driven reporter gene activity; IGF-1 also induced p38-MAPK phosphorylation, while an inhibitor of p38-MAPK decreased both effects. Additionally, inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and calcineurin prevented IGF-1-induced MEF2 transcriptional activity. Via MEF2C-dependent signaling, IGF-1 also stimulated transcription of atrial natriuretic factor and skeletal {alpha}-actin but not of fos-lux reporter genes. These novel data suggest that MEF2C activation by IGF-1 mediates the pro-hypertrophic effects of IGF-1 on cardiac gene expression.

  17. Basic Aspects of Tumor Cell Fatty Acid-Regulated Signaling and Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Comba, Andrea; Lin, Yi-Hui; Eynard, Aldo Renato; Valentich, Mirta Ana; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin Ernesto; Pasqualini, Marìa Eugenia

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews the current knowledge and experimental research about the mechanisms by which fatty acids and their derivatives control specific gene expression involved during carcinogenesis. Changes in dietary fatty acids, specifically the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) of the ω-3 and ω-6 families and some derived eicosanoids from lipoxygenases (LOXs), cyclooxygenases (COXs), and cytochrome P-450 (CYP-450), seem to control the activity of transcription factor families involved in cancer cell proliferation or cell death. Their regulation may be carried out either through direct binding to DNA as peroxisome proliferator–activated receptors (PPARs) or via modulation in an indirect manner of signaling pathway molecules (e.g., protein kinase C [PKC]) and other transcription factors (nuclear factor kappa B [NFκB] and sterol regulatory element binding protein [SREBP]). Knowledge of the mechanisms by which fatty acids control specific gene expression may identify important risk factors for cancer, and provide insight into the development of new therapeutic strategies for a better management of whole-body lipid metabolism. PMID:22048864

  18. The transcription factor MEF2C mediates cardiomyocyte hypertrophy induced by IGF-1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Juan Pablo; Collao, Andres; Chiong, Mario; Maldonado, Carola; Adasme, Tatiana; Carrasco, Loreto; Ocaranza, Paula; Bravo, Roberto; Gonzalez, Leticia; Díaz-Araya, Guillermo; Hidalgo, Cecilia; Lavandero, Sergio

    2009-10-01

    Myocyte enhancer factor 2C (MEF2C) plays an important role in cardiovascular development and is a key transcription factor for cardiac hypertrophy. Here, we describe MEF2C regulation by insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and its role in IGF-1-induced cardiac hypertrophy. We found that IGF-1 addition to cultured rat cardiomyocytes activated MEF2C, as evidenced by its increased nuclear localization and DNA binding activity. IGF-1 stimulated MEF2 dependent-gene transcription in a time-dependent manner, as indicated by increased MEF2 promoter-driven reporter gene activity; IGF-1 also induced p38-MAPK phosphorylation, while an inhibitor of p38-MAPK decreased both effects. Additionally, inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and calcineurin prevented IGF-1-induced MEF2 transcriptional activity. Via MEF2C-dependent signaling, IGF-1 also stimulated transcription of atrial natriuretic factor and skeletal alpha-actin but not of fos-lux reporter genes. These novel data suggest that MEF2C activation by IGF-1 mediates the pro-hypertrophic effects of IGF-1 on cardiac gene expression. PMID:19654000

  19. Lhx2 Is an Essential Factor for Retinal Gliogenesis and Notch Signaling

    PubMed Central

    de Melo, Jimmy; Zibetti, Cristina; Clark, Brian S.; Hwang, Woochang; Miranda-Angulo, Ana L.; Qian, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Müller glia (MG) are the only glial cell type produced by the neuroepithelial progenitor cells that generate the vertebrate retina. MG are required to maintain retinal homeostasis and support the survival of retinal neurons. Furthermore, in certain vertebrate classes, MG function as adult stem cells, mediating retinal regeneration in response to injury. However, the mechanisms that regulate MG development are poorly understood because there is considerable overlap in gene expression between retinal progenitor cells and differentiated MG. We show that the LIM homeodomain transcription factor Lhx2 is required for the development of MG in the mouse retina. Temporally controlled knock-out studies reveal a requirement for Lhx2 during all stages of MG development, ranging from the proliferation of gliocompetent retinal progenitors, activation of Müller-specific gene expression, and terminal differentiation of MG morphological features. We show that Lhx2 regulates gliogenesis in part by regulating directly the expression of Notch pathway genes including Notch1, Dll1, and Dll3 and gliogenic transcription factors such as Hes1, Hes5, Sox8, and Rax. Conditional knock-out of Lhx2 resulted in a rapid downregulation of Notch pathway genes and loss of Notch signaling. We further demonstrate that Müller gliogenesis induced by misexpression of the potently gliogenic Notch pathway transcriptional effector Hes5 requires Lhx2 expression. These results indicate that Lhx2 not only directly regulates expression of Notch signaling pathway components, but also acts together with the gliogenic Notch pathway to drive MG specification and differentiation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Müller glia (MG) are radial glial cells located in the vertebrate retina that are essential for the function and survival of retinal neurons. We found the LIM homeodomain transcription factor Lhx2 to be expressed in both retinal progenitor cells and MG. Using conditional knock-outs, we show that Lhx2 is required

  20. Convergence of auxin and gibberellin signaling on the regulation of the GATA transcription factors GNC and GNL in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Richter, René; Behringer, Carina; Zourelidou, Melina; Schwechheimer, Claus

    2013-08-01

    Plant growth is regulated by a complex network of signaling events. Points of convergence for the signaling cross-talk between the phytohormones auxin and gibberellin (GA), which partly control overlapping processes during plant development, are largely unknown. At the cellular level, auxin responses are controlled by members of the AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR (ARF) family of transcription factors as well as AUXIN/INDOLE-3-ACETIC ACID INDUCIBLE (AUX/IAA) proteins that repress the activity of at least a subset of ARFs. Here, we show that the two paralogous GATA transcription factors GATA, NITRATE-INDUCIBLE, CARBON-METABOLISM INVOLVED (GNC) and GNC-LIKE (GNL)/CYTOKININ-RESPONSIVE GATA FACTOR1 (CGA1) are direct and critical transcription targets downstream from ARF2 in the control of greening, flowering time, and senescence. Mutants deficient in the synthesis or signaling of the phytohormone GA are also impaired in greening, flowering, and senescence, and interestingly, GNC and GNL were previously identified as important transcription targets of the GA signaling pathway. In line with a critical regulatory role for GNC and GNL downstream from both auxin and GA signaling, we show here that the constitutive activation of GA signaling is sufficient to suppress arf2 mutant phenotypes through repression of GNC and GNL. In addition, we show that GA promotes ARF2 protein abundance through a translation-dependent mechanism that could serve to override the autoinhibitory negative feedback regulation of ARF2 on its own transcription and thereby further promote GA signaling. PMID:23878229

  1. Sustained activation of fibroblast transforming growth factor-beta/Smad signaling in a murine model of scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Takagawa, Shinsuke; Lakos, Gabriella; Mori, Yasuji; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Nishioka, Kiyoshi; Varga, John

    2003-07-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta is responsible for triggering a cascade of events leading to fibrosis in scleroderma. The Smads are intracellular signal transducers recently shown to mediate fibroblast activation and other profibrotic responses elicited by transforming growth factor-betain vitro. To understand better the involvement of Smads in the pathogenesis of fibrosis, we examined Smad expression and activation in situ in a murine model of scleroderma. Bleomycin injections induced striking dermal infiltration with macrophages by 3 d, and progressive fibrosis by 2 wk. Infiltrating macrophages and resident fibroblasts expressed Smad3, the positive mediator for transforming growth factor-beta responses. Importantly, in bleomycin-injected skin, fibroblasts showed predominantly nuclear localization of Smad3 and intense staining for phospho-Smad2/3. Furthermore, phosphorylated Smad2/3 in fibroblasts was detected even after the resolution of inflammation. Expression of Smad7, the endogenous inhibitor of transforming growth factor-beta/Smad signaling, was strongly induced in dermal cells by transforming growth factor-beta, but not by bleomycin injections. Collectively, these results indicate that bleomycin-induced murine scleroderma is associated with rapid and sustained induction of transforming growth factor-beta/Smad signaling in resident dermal fibroblasts. Despite apparent activation of the intracellular transforming growth factor-beta signaling pathway in the lesional dermis, the expression of transforming growth factor-beta-inducible Smad7 was not upregulated. In light of the critical function of Smad7 as an endogenous inhibitor of Smad signaling that restricts the duration and magnitude of transforming growth factor-beta responses, and as a mediator of apoptosis, relative Smad7 deficiency observed in the present studies may account for sustained activation of transforming growth factor-beta/Smad signaling in lesional tissues. These findings raise the

  2. Arabidopsis NAC transcription factor JUB1 regulates GA/BR metabolism and signalling.

    PubMed

    Shahnejat-Bushehri, Sara; Tarkowska, Danuse; Sakuraba, Yasuhito; Balazadeh, Salma

    2016-01-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) and brassinosteroids (BRs) are important phytohormones that control plant development and responses to environmental cues by involving DELLA proteins and BRASSINAZOLE-RESISTANT1 (BZR1) respectively as key transcription factors. Here, we reveal a new role for JUNGBRUNNEN1 (JUB1) as a transcriptional regulator of GA/BR signalling in Arabidopsis thaliana. JUB1 directly represses the hormone biosynthesis genes GA3ox1 and DWARF4 (DWF4), leading to reduced levels of GAs and BRs and typical GA/BR deficiency phenotypes exhibiting short hypocotyls, dwarfism, late flowering and male sterility. JUB1 also directly represses PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR4 (PIF4), a transcription factor connecting hormonal and environmental stimuli. On the other hand, JUB1 activates the DELLA genes GA INSENSITIVE (GAI) and RGA-LIKE 1 (RGL1). In addition, BZR1 and PIF4 act as direct transcriptional repressors upstream of JUB1, establishing a negative feedback loop. Thus, JUB1 forms the core of a robust regulatory module that triggers DELLA accumulation, thereby restricting cell elongation while concomitantly enhancing stress tolerance. PMID:27249348

  3. Phosphorylation of the transcription factor Sp4 is reduced by NMDA receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Saia, Gregory; Lalonde, Jasmin; Sun, Xinxin; Ramos, Belén; Gill, Grace

    2014-05-01

    The regulation of transcription factor function in response to neuronal activity is important for development and function of the nervous system. The transcription factor Sp4 regulates the developmental patterning of dendrites, contributes to complex processes including learning and memory, and has been linked to psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Despite its many roles in the nervous system, the molecular mechanisms regulating Sp4 activity are poorly understood. Here, we report a site of phosphorylation on Sp4 at serine 770 that is decreased in response to membrane depolarization. Inhibition of the voltage-dependent NMDA receptor increased Sp4 phosphorylation. Conversely, stimulation with NMDA reduced the levels of Sp4 phosphorylation, and this was dependent on the protein phosphatase 1/2A. A phosphomimetic substitution at S770 impaired the Sp4-dependent maturation of cerebellar granule neuron primary dendrites, whereas a non-phosphorylatable Sp4 mutant behaved like wild type. These data reveal that transcription factor Sp4 is regulated by NMDA receptor-dependent activation of a protein phosphatase 1/2A signaling pathway. Our findings also suggest that the regulated control of Sp4 activity is an important mechanism governing the developmental patterning of dendrites.

  4. Beyond receptors and signaling: epigenetic factors in the regulation of innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Stuti; Jeffrey, Kate L

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of innate immune cells with pathogens leads to changes in gene expression that elicit our body’s first line of defense against infection. Although signaling pathways and transcription factors have a central role, it is becoming increasingly clear that epigenetic factors, in the form of DNA or histone modifications, as well as noncoding RNAs, are critical for generating the necessary cell lineage as well as context-specific gene expression in diverse innate immune cell types. Much of the epigenetic landscape is set during cellular differentiation; however, pathogens and other environmental triggers also induce changes in histone modifications that can either promote tolerance or ‘train’ innate immune cells for a more robust antigen-independent secondary response. Here we review the important contribution of epigenetic factors to the initiation, maintenance and training of innate immune responses. In addition, we explore how pathogens have hijacked these mechanisms for their benefit and the potential of small molecules targeting chromatin machinery as a way to boost or subdue the innate immune response in disease. PMID:25559622

  5. Sparsity-enabled signal decomposition using tunable Q-factor wavelet transform for fault feature extraction of gearbox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Gaigai; Chen, Xuefeng; He, Zhengjia

    2013-12-01

    Localized faults in gearboxes tend to result in periodic shocks and thus arouse periodic responses in vibration signals. Feature extraction has always been a key problem for localized fault diagnosis. This paper proposes a new fault feature extraction technique for gearboxes by using sparsity-enabled signal decomposition method. The sparsity-enabled signal decomposition method separates signals based on the oscillatory behavior of the signal rather than the frequency or scale. Thus, the fault feature can be nonlinearly extracted from vibration signals. During the implementation of the proposed method, tunable Q-factor wavelet transform, for which the Q-factor can be easily specified, is adopted to represent vibration signals in a sparse way, and then morphological component analysis (MCA) is employed to estimate and separate the distinct components. The corresponding optimization problem of MCA is solved by the split augmented Lagrangian shrinkage algorithm (SALSA). With the proposed method, vibration signals of the faulty gearbox can be nonlinearly decomposed into high-oscillatory component and low-oscillatory component which is the fault feature of gearboxes. To evaluate the performance of the proposed method, this paper investigates the effect of two parameters pertinent to MCA and SALSA: the Lagrange multiplier and the penalty parameter. The effectiveness of the proposed method is verified by both the simulated and practical gearbox vibration signals. Results show the proposed method outperforms empirical mode decomposition and spectral kurtosis in extracting fault features of gearboxes.

  6. Differences and Similarities in TRAIL- and Tumor Necrosis Factor-Mediated Necroptotic Signaling in Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Sosna, Justyna; Philipp, Stephan; Fuchslocher Chico, Johaiber; Saggau, Carina; Fritsch, Jürgen; Föll, Alexandra; Plenge, Johannes; Arenz, Christoph; Pinkert, Thomas; Kalthoff, Holger; Trauzold, Anna; Schmitz, Ingo; Schütze, Stefan; Adam, Dieter

    2016-10-15

    Recently, a type of regulated necrosis (RN) called necroptosis was identified to be involved in many pathophysiological processes and emerged as an alternative method to eliminate cancer cells. However, only a few studies have elucidated components of TRAIL-mediated necroptosis useful for anticancer therapy. Therefore, we have compared this type of cell death to tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-mediated necroptosis and found similar signaling through acid and neutral sphingomyelinases, the mitochondrial serine protease HtrA2/Omi, Atg5, and vacuolar H(+)-ATPase. Notably, executive mechanisms of both TRAIL- and TNF-mediated necroptosis are independent of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1), and depletion of p38α increases the levels of both types of cell death. Moreover, we found differences in signaling between TNF- and TRAIL-mediated necroptosis, e.g., a lack of involvement of ubiquitin carboxyl hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1) and Atg16L1 in executive mechanisms of TRAIL-mediated necroptosis. Furthermore, we discovered indications of an altered involvement of mitochondrial components, since overexpression of the mitochondrial protein Bcl-2 protected Jurkat cells from TRAIL- and TNF-mediated necroptosis, and overexpression of Bcl-XL diminished only TRAIL-induced necroptosis in Colo357 cells. Furthermore, TRAIL does not require receptor internalization and endosome-lysosome acidification to mediate necroptosis. Taken together, pathways described for TRAIL-mediated necroptosis and differences from those for TNF-mediated necroptosis might be unique targets to increase or modify necroptotic signaling and eliminate tumor cells more specifically in future anticancer approaches. PMID:27528614

  7. Mitochondrial function and nuclear factor-kappaB-mediated signaling in radiation-induced bystander effects.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hongning; Ivanov, Vladimir N; Lien, Yu-Chin; Davidson, Mercy; Hei, Tom K

    2008-04-01

    Although radiation-induced bystander effects have been well described over the past decade, the mechanisms of the signaling processes involved in the bystander phenomenon remain unclear. In the present study, using the Columbia University charged particle microbeam, we found that mitochondrial DNA-depleted human skin fibroblasts (rho(o)) showed a higher bystander mutagenic response in confluent monolayers when a fraction of the same population were irradiated with lethal doses compared with their parental mitochondrial-functional cells (rho(+)). However, using mixed cultures of rho(o) and rho(+) cells and targeting only one population of cells with a lethal dose of alpha-particles, a decreased bystander mutagenesis was uniformly found in nonirradiated bystander cells of both cell types, indicating that signals from one cell type can modulate expression of bystander response in another cell type. In addition, we found that Bay 11-7082, a pharmacologic inhibitor of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation, and 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide, a scavenger of nitric oxide (NO), significantly decreased the mutation frequency in both bystander rho(o) and rho(+) cells. Furthermore, we found that NF-kappaB activity and its dependent proteins, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and inducible NO synthase (iNOS), were lower in bystander rho(o) cells when compared with their rho(+) counterparts. Our results indicated that mitochondria play an important role in the regulation of radiation-induced bystander effects and that mitochondria-dependent NF-kappaB/iNOS/NO and NF-kappaB/COX-2/prostaglandin E2 signaling pathways are important to the process.

  8. Eukaryotic Elongation Factor 2 Kinase Activity Is Controlled by Multiple Inputs from Oncogenic Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuemin; Regufe da Mota, Sergio; Liu, Rui; Moore, Claire E.; Xie, Jianling; Lanucara, Francesco; Agarwala, Usha; Pyr dit Ruys, Sébastien; Vertommen, Didier; Rider, Mark H.; Eyers, Claire E.

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic elongation factor 2 kinase (eEF2K), an atypical calmodulin-dependent protein kinase, phosphorylates and inhibits eEF2, slowing down translation elongation. eEF2K contains an N-terminal catalytic domain, a C-terminal α-helical region and a linker containing several regulatory phosphorylation sites. eEF2K is expressed at high levels in certain cancers, where it may act to help cell survival, e.g., during nutrient starvation. However, it is a negative regulator of protein synthesis and thus cell growth, suggesting that cancer cells may possess mechanisms to inhibit eEF2K under good growth conditions, to allow protein synthesis to proceed. We show here that the mTORC1 pathway and the oncogenic Ras/Raf/MEK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway cooperate to restrict eEF2K activity. We identify multiple sites in eEF2K whose phosphorylation is regulated by mTORC1 and/or ERK, including new ones in the linker region. We demonstrate that certain sites are phosphorylated directly by mTOR or ERK. Our data reveal that glycogen synthase kinase 3 signaling also regulates eEF2 phosphorylation. In addition, we show that phosphorylation sites remote from the N-terminal calmodulin-binding motif regulate the phosphorylation of N-terminal sites that control CaM binding. Mutations in the former sites, which occur in cancer cells, cause the activation of eEF2K. eEF2K is thus regulated by a network of oncogenic signaling pathways. PMID:25182533

  9. Tumor Necrosis Factor/Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Signaling Augments Resistance Artery Myogenic Tone in Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sauvé, Meghan; Hui, Sonya K; Dinh, Danny D; Foltz, Warren D; Momen, Abdul; Nedospasov, Sergei A; Offermanns, Stefan; Husain, Mansoor; Kroetsch, Jeffrey T; Lidington, Darcy; Bolz, Steffen-Sebastian

    2016-07-01

    Diabetes strongly associates with microvascular complications that ultimately promote multiorgan failure. Altered myogenic responsiveness compromises tissue perfusion, aggravates hypertension, and sets the stage for later permanent structural changes to the microcirculation. We demonstrate that skeletal muscle resistance arteries isolated from patients with diabetes have augmented myogenic tone, despite reasonable blood glucose control. To understand the mechanisms, we titrated a standard diabetes mouse model (high-fat diet plus streptozotocin [HFD/STZ]) to induce a mild increase in blood glucose levels. HFD/STZ treatment induced a progressive myogenic tone augmentation in mesenteric and olfactory cerebral arteries; neither HFD nor STZ alone had an effect on blood glucose or resistance artery myogenic tone. Using gene deletion models that eliminate tumor necrosis factor (TNF) or sphingosine kinase 1, we demonstrate that vascular smooth muscle cell TNF drives the elevation of myogenic tone via enhanced sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) signaling. Therapeutically antagonizing TNF (etanercept) or S1P (JTE013) signaling corrects this defect. Our investigation concludes that vascular smooth muscle cell TNF augments resistance artery myogenic vasoconstriction in a diabetes model that induces a small elevation of blood glucose. Our data demonstrate that microvascular reactivity is an early disease marker and advocate establishing therapies that strategically target the microcirculation. PMID:27207546

  10. Characterization of Differential Protein Tethering at the Plasma Membrane in Response to Epidermal Growth Factor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Looyenga, Brendan D.; MacKeigan, Jeffrey P.

    2013-01-01

    Physical tethering of membrane proteins to the cortical actin cytoskeleton provides functional organization to the plasma membrane and contributes to diverse cellular processes including cell signaling, vesicular trafficking, endocytosis, and migration. For these processes to occur, membrane protein tethering must be dynamically regulated in response to environmental cues. In this study, we describe a novel biochemical scheme for isolating the complement of plasma membrane proteins that are physically tethered to the actin cytoskeleton. We utilized this method in combination with tandem liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS) to demonstrate that cytoskeletal tethering of membrane proteins is acutely regulated by epidermal growth factor (EGF) in normal human kidney (HK2) cells. Our results indicate that several proteins known to be involved in EGF signaling, as well as other proteins not traditionally associated with this pathway, are tethered to the cytoskeleton in dynamic fashion. Further analysis of one hit from our proteomic survey, the receptor phosphotyrosine phosphatase PTPRS, revealed a correlation between cytoskeletal tethering and endosomal trafficking in response to EGF. This finding parallels previous indications that PTPRS is involved in the desensitization of EGFR and provides a potential mechanism to coordinate localization of these two membrane proteins in the same compartment upon EGFR activation. PMID:22559174

  11. Band-pass processing in a GPCR signaling pathway selects for NFAT transcription factor activation.

    PubMed

    Sumit, M; Neubig, R R; Takayama, S; Linderman, J J

    2015-11-01

    Many biological processes are rhythmic and proper timing is increasingly appreciated as being critical for development and maintenance of physiological functions. To understand how temporal modulation of an input signal influences downstream responses, we employ microfluidic pulsatile stimulation of a G-protein coupled receptor, the muscarinic M3 receptor, in single cells with simultaneous real-time imaging of both intracellular calcium and NFAT nuclear localization. Interestingly, we find that reduced stimulation with pulses of ligand can give more efficient transcription factor activation, if stimuli are timed appropriately. Our experiments and computational analyses show that M3 receptor-induced calcium oscillations form a low pass filter while calcium-induced NFAT translocation forms a high pass filter. The combination acts as a band-pass filter optimized for intermediate frequencies of stimulation. We demonstrate that receptor desensitization and NFAT translocation rates determine critical features of the band-pass filter and that the band-pass may be shifted for different receptors or NFAT dynamics. As an example, we show that the two NFAT isoforms (NFAT4 and NFAT1) have shifted band-pass windows for the same receptor. While we focus specifically on the M3 muscarinic receptor and NFAT translocation, band-pass processing is expected to be a general theme that applies to multiple signaling pathways.

  12. Geraniol Suppresses Angiogenesis by Downregulating Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF)/VEGFR-2 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wittig, Christine; Scheuer, Claudia; Parakenings, Julia; Menger, Michael D.; Laschke, Matthias W.

    2015-01-01

    Geraniol exerts several direct pharmacological effects on tumor cells and, thus, has been suggested as a promising anti-cancer compound. Because vascularization is a major precondition for tumor growth, we analyzed in this study the anti-angiogenic action of geraniol. In vitro, geraniol reduced the migratory activity of endothelial-like eEND2 cells. Western blot analyses further revealed that geraniol downregulates proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and upregulates cleaved caspase-3 (Casp-3) expression in eEND2 cells. Moreover, geraniol blocked vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)/VEGFR-2 signal transduction, resulting in a suppression of downstream AKT and ERK signaling pathways. In addition, geraniol significantly reduced vascular sprout formation in a rat aortic ring assay. In vivo, geraniol inhibited the vascularization of CT26 tumors in dorsal skinfold chambers of BALB/c mice, which was associated with a smaller tumor size when compared to vehicle-treated controls. Immunohistochemical analyses confirmed a decreased number of Ki67-positive cells and CD31-positive microvessels with reduced VEGFR-2 expression within geraniol-treated tumors. Taken together, these findings indicate that geraniol targets multiple angiogenic mechanisms and, therefore, is an attractive candidate for the anti-angiogenic treatment of tumors. PMID:26154255

  13. Thiazolidinediones block tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced inhibition of insulin signaling.

    PubMed Central

    Peraldi, P; Xu, M; Spiegelman, B M

    1997-01-01

    TNF-alpha has been shown to be an important mediator of insulin resistance linked to obesity. This cytokine induces insulin resistance, at least in part, through inhibition of the tyrosine kinase activity of the insulin receptor. Recently, a new class of compounds, the antidiabetic thiazolidinediones (TZDs), has been shown to improve insulin resistance in obesity and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in both rodents and man. Here we show that TZDs have powerful effects on the ability of TNF-alpha to alter the most proximal steps of insulin signaling, including tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor and its major substrate, IRS-1, and activation of PI3-kinase. Troglitazone or pioglitazone essentially eliminate the reduction in tyrosine phosphorylation of IR and IRS-1 caused by TNF-alpha in fat cells, even at relatively high doses (25 ng/ml). That this effect of TZDs operates through activation of the nuclear receptor PPARgamma/ RXR complex is shown by the fact that similar effects are observed with other PPARgamma/RXR ligands such as 15 deoxy Delta12,14PGJ2 and LG268. The TZDs do not inhibit all TNF-alpha signaling in that the transcription factor NF-kB is still induced well. These data indicate that TZDs can specifically block certain actions of TNF-alpha related to insulin resistance, suggesting that this block may contribute to their antidiabetic actions. PMID:9312188

  14. Band-pass processing in a GPCR signaling pathway selects for NFAT transcription factor activation†

    PubMed Central

    Sumit, M.; Neubig, R. R.; Takayama, S.; Linderman, J. J.

    2015-01-01

    Many biological processes are rhythmic and proper timing is increasingly appreciated as being critical for development and maintenance of physiological functions. To understand how temporal modulation of an input signal influences downstream responses, we employ microfluidic pulsatile stimulation of a G-Protein coupled receptor, the muscarinic M3 receptor, in single cells with simultaneous real-time imaging of both intracellular calcium and NFAT nuclear localization. Interestingly, we find that reduced stimulation with pulses of ligand can give more efficient transcription factor activation, if stimuli are timed appropriately. Our experiments and computational analyses show that M3 receptor-induced calcium oscillations form a low pass filter while calcium-induced NFAT translocation forms a high pass filter. The combination acts as a band-pass filter optimized for intermediate frequencies of stimulation. We demonstrate that receptor desensitization and NFAT translocation rates determine critical features of the band-pass filter and that the band-pass may be shifted for different receptors or NFAT dynamics. As an example, we show that the two NFAT isoforms (NFAT4 and NFAT1) have shifted band-pass windows for the same receptor. While we focus specifically on the M3 muscarinic receptor and NFAT translocation, band-pass processing is expected to be a general theme that applies to multiple signaling pathways. PMID:26374065

  15. Noisy transcription factor NF-κB oscillations stabilize and sensitize cytokine signaling in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangstad, Sirin W.; Feldager, Cilie W.; Juul, Jeppe; Trusina, Ala

    2013-02-01

    NF-κB is a major transcription factor mediating inflammatory response. In response to a pro-inflammatory stimulus, it exhibits a characteristic response—a pulse followed by noisy oscillations in concentrations of considerably smaller amplitude. NF-κB is an important mediator of cellular communication, as it is both activated by and upregulates production of cytokines, signals used by white blood cells to find the source of inflammation. While the oscillatory dynamics of NF-κB has been extensively investigated both experimentally and theoretically, the role of the noise and the lower secondary amplitude has not been addressed. We use a cellular automaton model to address these issues in the context of spatially distributed communicating cells. We find that noisy secondary oscillations stabilize concentric wave patterns, thus improving signal quality. Furthermore, both lower secondary amplitude as well as noise in the oscillation period might be working against chronic inflammation, the state of self-sustained and stimulus-independent excitations. Our findings suggest that the characteristic irregular secondary oscillations of lower amplitude are not accidental. On the contrary, they might have evolved to increase robustness of the inflammatory response and the system's ability to return to a pre-stimulated state.

  16. Nordihydroguaiaretic Acid Inhibits Insulin-Like Growth Factor Signaling, Growth, and Survival in Human Neuroblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Gary E.; Chesler, Louis; Liu, Dandan; Gable, Karissa; Maddux, Betty A.; Goldenberg, David D.; Youngren, Jack F.; Goldfine, Ira D.; Weiss, William A.; Matthay, Katherine K.; Rosenthal, Stephen M.

    2010-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is a common pediatric malignancy that metastasizes to the liver, bone, and other organs. Children with metastatic disease have a less than 50% chance of survival with current treatments. Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) stimulate neuroblastoma growth, survival, and motility, and are expressed by neuroblastoma cells and the tissues they invade. Thus, therapies that disrupt the effects of IGFs on neuroblastoma tumorigenesis may slow disease progression. We show that NVP-AEW541, a specific inhibitor of the IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR), potently inhibits neuroblastoma growth in vitro. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), a phenolic compound isolated from the creosote bush (Larrea divaricata), has anti-tumor properties against a number of malignancies, has been shown to inhibit the phosphorylation and activation of the IGF-IR in breast cancer cells, and is currently in Phase I trials for prostate cancer. In the present study in neuroblastoma, NDGA inhibits IGF-I-mediated activation of the IGF-IR and disrupts activation of ERK and Akt signaling pathways induced by IGF-I. NDGA inhibits growth of neuroblastoma cells and induces apoptosis at higher doses, causing IGF-I-resistant activation of caspase-3 and a large increase in the fraction of sub-G0 cells. In addition, NDGA inhibits the growth of xenografted human neuroblastoma tumors in nude mice. These results indicate that NDGA may be useful in the treatment of neuroblastoma and may function in part via disruption of IGF-IR signaling. PMID:17486636

  17. Multiple signaling pathways leading to the activation of interferon regulatory factor 3.

    PubMed

    Servant, Marc J; Grandvaux, Nathalie; Hiscott, John

    2002-09-01

    Virus infection of susceptible cells activates multiple signaling pathways that orchestrate the activation of genes, such as cytokines, involved in the antiviral and innate immune response. Among the kinases induced are the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases, Jun-amino terminal kinases (JNK) and p38, the IkappaB kinase (IKK) and DNA-PK. In addition, virus infection also activates an uncharacterized VAK responsible for the C-terminal phosphorylation and subsequent activation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3). Virus-mediated activation of IRF-3 through VAK is dependent on viral entry and transcription, since replication deficient virus failed to induce IRF-3 activity. The pathways leading to VAK activation are not well characterized, but IRF-3 appears to represent a novel cellular detection pathway that recognizes viral nucleocapsid (N) structure. Recently, the range of inducers responsible for IRF-3 activation has increased. In addition to virus infection, recognition of bacterial infection mediated through lipopolysaccharide by Toll-like receptor 4 has also been reported. Furthermore, MAP kinase kinase kinase (MAP KKK)-related pathways and DNA-PK induce N-terminal phosphorylation of IRF-3. This review summarizes recent observations in the identification of novel signaling pathways leading to IRF-3 activation.

  18. ICOS Coreceptor Signaling Inactivates the Transcription Factor FOXO1 to Promote Tfh Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Erica L.; Pepper, Marion; Katayama, Carol D.; Kerdiles, Yann M.; Lai, Chen-Yen; Emslie, Elizabeth; Lin, Yin C.; Yang, Edward; Goldrath, Ananda W.; Li, Ming O.; Cantrell, Doreen A.; Hedrick, Stephen M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary T follicular helper (Tfh) cells are essential in the induction of high-affinity, class-switched antibodies. The differentiation of Tfh cells is a multi-step process that depends upon the co-receptor ICOS and the activation of phosphoinositide-3 kinase leading to the expression of key Tfh cell genes. We report that ICOS signaling inactivates the transcription factor FOXO1, and a Foxo1 genetic deletion allowed for generation of Tfh cells with reduced dependence on ICOS ligand. Conversely, enforced nuclear localization of FOXO1 inhibited Tfh cell development even though ICOS was overexpressed. FOXO1 regulated Tfh cell differentiation through a broad program of gene expression exemplified by its negative regulation of Bcl6. Final differentiation to germinal center Tfh cells (GC-Tfh) was instead FOXO1 dependent as the Foxo1−/− GC-Tfh cell population was substantially reduced. We propose that ICOS signaling transiently inactivates FOXO1 to initiate a Tfh cell contingency that is completed in a FOXO1-dependent manner. PMID:25692700

  19. Diverse ETS transcription factors mediate FGF signaling in the Ciona anterior neural plate.

    PubMed

    Gainous, T Blair; Wagner, Eileen; Levine, Michael

    2015-03-15

    The ascidian Ciona intestinalis is a marine invertebrate belonging to the sister group of the vertebrates, the tunicates. Its compact genome and simple, experimentally tractable embryos make Ciona well-suited for the study of cell-fate specification in chordates. Tunicate larvae possess a characteristic chordate body plan, and many developmental pathways are conserved between tunicates and vertebrates. Previous studies have shown that FGF signals are essential for neural induction and patterning at sequential steps of Ciona embryogenesis. Here we show that two different ETS family transcription factors, Ets1/2 and Elk1/3/4, have partially redundant activities in the anterior neural plate of gastrulating embryos. Whereas Ets1/2 promotes pigment cell formation in lateral lineages, both Ets1/2 and Elk1/3/4 are involved in the activation of Myt1L in medial lineages and the restriction of Six3/6 expression to the anterior-most regions of the neural tube. We also provide evidence that photoreceptor cells arise from posterior regions of the presumptive sensory vesicle, and do not depend on FGF signaling. Cells previously identified as photoreceptor progenitors instead form ependymal cells and neurons of the larval brain. Our results extend recent findings on FGF-dependent patterning of anterior-posterior compartments in the Ciona central nervous system.

  20. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid inhibits insulin-like growth factor signaling, growth, and survival in human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Gary E; Chesler, Louis; Liu, Dandan; Gable, Karissa; Maddux, Betty A; Goldenberg, David D; Youngren, Jack F; Goldfine, Ira D; Weiss, William A; Matthay, Katherine K; Rosenthal, Stephen M

    2007-12-15

    Neuroblastoma is a common pediatric malignancy that metastasizes to the liver, bone, and other organs. Children with metastatic disease have a less than 50% chance of survival with current treatments. Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) stimulate neuroblastoma growth, survival, and motility, and are expressed by neuroblastoma cells and the tissues they invade. Thus, therapies that disrupt the effects of IGFs on neuroblastoma tumorigenesis may slow disease progression. We show that NVP-AEW541, a specific inhibitor of the IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR), potently inhibits neuroblastoma growth in vitro. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), a phenolic compound isolated from the creosote bush (Larrea divaricata), has anti-tumor properties against a number of malignancies, has been shown to inhibit the phosphorylation and activation of the IGF-IR in breast cancer cells, and is currently in Phase I trials for prostate cancer. In the present study in neuroblastoma, NDGA inhibits IGF-I-mediated activation of the IGF-IR and disrupts activation of ERK and Akt signaling pathways induced by IGF-I. NDGA inhibits growth of neuroblastoma cells and induces apoptosis at higher doses, causing IGF-I-resistant activation of caspase-3 and a large increase in the fraction of sub-G0 cells. In addition, NDGA inhibits the growth of xenografted human neuroblastoma tumors in nude mice. These results indicate that NDGA may be useful in the treatment of neuroblastoma and may function in part via disruption of IGF-IR signaling.

  1. Traumatic Brain Injury as a Risk Factor for Alzheimer's Disease: Is Inflammatory Signaling a Key Player?

    PubMed

    Djordjevic, Jelena; Sabbir, Mohammad Golam; Albensi, Benedict C

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has become a significant medical and social concern within the last 30 years. TBI has acute devastating effects, and in many cases, seems to initiate long-term neurodegeneration. With advances in medical technology, many people are now surviving severe brain injuries and their long term consequences. Post trauma effects include communication problems, sensory deficits, emotional and behavioral problems, physical complications and pain, increased suicide risk, dementia, and an increased risk for chronic CNS diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this review, we provide an introduction to TBI and hypothesize how it may lead to neurodegenerative disease in general and AD in particular. In addition, we discuss the evidence that supports the hypothesis that TBI may lead to AD. In particular, we focus on inflammatory responses as key processes in TBI-induced secondary injury, with emphasis on nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) signaling. PMID:26899581

  2. CYLD negatively regulates transforming growth factor-β-signalling via deubiquitinating Akt

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jae Hyang; Jono, Hirofumi; Komatsu, Kensei; Woo, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Jiyun; Miyata, Masanori; Matsuno, Takashi; Xu, Xiangbin; Huang, Yuxian; Zhang, Wenhong; Park, Soo Hyun; Kim, Yu-Il; Choi, Yoo-Duk; Shen, Huahao; Heo, Kyung-Sun; Xu, Haodong; Bourne, Patricia; Koga, Tomoaki; Xu, Haidong; Yan, Chen; Wang, Binghe; Chen, Lin-Feng; Feng, Xin-Hua; Li, Jian-Dong

    2012-01-01

    Lung injury, whether induced by infection or caustic chemicals, initiates a series of complex wound-healing responses. If uncontrolled, these responses may lead to fibrotic lung diseases and loss of function. Thus, resolution of lung injury must be tightly regulated. The key regulatory proteins required for tightly controlling the resolution of lung injury have yet to be identified. Here we show that loss of deubiquitinase CYLD led to the development of lung fibrosis in mice after infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae. CYLD inhibited transforming growth factor-β-signalling and prevented lung fibrosis by decreasing the stability of Smad3 in an E3 ligase carboxy terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein-dependent manner. Moreover, CYLD decreases Smad3 stability by deubiquitinating K63-polyubiquitinated Akt. Together, our results unveil a role for CYLD in tightly regulating the resolution of lung injury and preventing fibrosis by deubiquitinating Akt. These studies may help develop new therapeutic strategies for preventing lung fibrosis. PMID:22491319

  3. Classification of ECG signals using LDA with factor analysis method as feature reduction technique.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Manpreet; Arora, A S

    2012-11-01

    The analysis of ECG signal, especially the QRS complex as the most characteristic wave in ECG, is a widely accepted approach to study and to classify cardiac dysfunctions. In this paper, first wavelet coefficients calculated for QRS complex are taken as features. Next, factor analysis procedures without rotation and with orthogonal rotation (varimax, equimax and quartimax) are used for feature reduction. The procedure uses the 'Principal Component Method' to estimate component loadings. Further, classification has been done with a LDA classifier. The MIT-BIH arrhythmia database is used and five types of beats (normal, PVC, paced, LBBB and RBBB) are considered for analysis. Accuracy, sensitivity and positive predictivity are performance parameters used for comparing performance of feature reduction techniques. Results demonstrate that the equimax rotation method yields maximum average accuracy of 99.056% for unknown data sets among other used methods.

  4. New horizons at the caudal embryos; coordinated urogenital/reproductive organ formation by growth factor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Kentaro; Economides, Aris; Yanagita, Motoko; Graf, Daniel; Yamada, Gen

    2009-01-01

    Summary The cloaca/urogenital sinus and its adjacent region differentiate into the urogenital/reproductive organs. Caudal regression syndrome (CRS; including Mermaid syndrome), a type of severe cloacal malformation displays hindlimb fusion and urogenital organ defects, thus suggesting that such defects are caused by several morphogenetic alterations during early development. The attenuation of Bone Morphogenetic Protein (Bmp) signaling at the posterior primitive streak of embryos leads to the caudal dysmorphogenesis including the cloaca and fusion of both hindlimbs. Genetic tissue lineage studies indicate the presence of coordinated organogenesis. Hedgehog (HH)-responding cells derived from peri-cloacal mesenchyme (PCM) contribute to the urogenital/reproductive organs. These findings indicate the existence o f developmental programs for the coordinated organogenesis of urogenital/reproductive tissues based on growth factor function and crosstalk. PMID:19765973

  5. Regulation of insulin-like growth factor signaling by metformin in endometrial cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    XIE, YA; WANG, JING-LU; JI, MEI; YUAN, ZHONG-FU; PENG, ZHENG; ZHANG, YI; WEN, JIAN-GUO; SHI, HUI-RONG

    2014-01-01

    Obesity, diabetes and insulin resistance are marked risk factors that promote the development of type I endometrial cancer. Previous studies have demonstrated that insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and IGF-2 promote cell proliferation in endometrial cancer cells, while metformin reverses this effect and inhibits cell proliferation. However, the effects of metformin on the regulation of the IGF signaling pathway are unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the regulation of IGF signaling by metformin in endometrial cancer cells, and to determine the effects of metformin combined with IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) inhibitor on cell proliferation and apoptosis. Cell proliferation was assessed following exposure of Ishikawa and HEC-1B endometrial cancer cell lines to metformin and/or the IGF-1R inhibitor, PPP. Apoptosis was assessed by TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay. Metformin was observed to downregulate IGF-1R and upregulate IGF binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) mRNA and protein expression, while compound C, an adenosine monophosphate protein kinase inhibitor, reversed this effect. Metformin administered with PPP inhibited endometrial cancer cell proliferation to a greater degree than treatment with either agent alone. At high concentrations (1 or 2 mM), metformin induced apoptosis in endometrial cancer cells. Metformin combined with IGF-1R axis inhibitors may act synergistically to kill tumor cells, as metformin was shown to delay and prevent IGF-1R feedback. In conclusion, this study supported the results of animal studies and subclinical studies, demonstrating the feasibility of metformin combined with IGF-1R axis inhibitors in the treatment of endometrial cancer. PMID:25289085

  6. Matriptase activation connects tissue factor-dependent coagulation initiation to epithelial proteolysis and signaling.

    PubMed

    Le Gall, Sylvain M; Szabo, Roman; Lee, Melody; Kirchhofer, Daniel; Craik, Charles S; Bugge, Thomas H; Camerer, Eric

    2016-06-23

    The coagulation cascade is designed to sense tissue injury by physical separation of the membrane-anchored cofactor tissue factor (TF) from inactive precursors of coagulation proteases circulating in plasma. Once TF on epithelial and other extravascular cells is exposed to plasma, sequential activation of coagulation proteases coordinates hemostasis and contributes to host defense and tissue repair. Membrane-anchored serine proteases (MASPs) play critical roles in the development and homeostasis of epithelial barrier tissues; how MASPs are activated in mature epithelia is unknown. We here report that proteases of the extrinsic pathway of blood coagulation transactivate the MASP matriptase, thus connecting coagulation initiation to epithelial proteolysis and signaling. Exposure of TF-expressing cells to factors (F) VIIa and Xa triggered the conversion of latent pro-matriptase to an active protease, which in turn cleaved the pericellular substrates protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) and pro-urokinase. An activation pathway-selective PAR2 mutant resistant to direct cleavage by TF:FVIIa and FXa was activated by these proteases when cells co-expressed pro-matriptase, and matriptase transactivation was necessary for efficient cleavage and activation of wild-type PAR2 by physiological concentrations of TF:FVIIa and FXa. The coagulation initiation complex induced rapid and prolonged enhancement of the barrier function of epithelial monolayers that was dependent on matriptase transactivation and PAR2 signaling. These observations suggest that the coagulation cascade engages matriptase to help coordinate epithelial defense and repair programs after injury or infection, and that matriptase may contribute to TF-driven pathogenesis in cancer and inflammation. PMID:27114461

  7. Expression and clinical significance of the transforming growth factorsignalling pathway in endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mhawech-Fauceglia, Paulette; Akers, Stacey; DuPont, Nefertiti Chianti; Clark, Kimberly; Lele, Shashikant; Liu, Song

    2016-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the components of the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β–Smad signalling pathway in human endometrial cancer (EC). Methods and results TGF-β1, TGF-β receptor type I, TGF-β receptor type II, Smad2, Smad3, Smad4, Skil and Disabled-2 (DAB2) mRNA levels were determined by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction on EC cell lines and in 70 EC tissues. Immunohistochemistry for Skil and DAB2 antibodies was performed on 362 EC cases. Decreased mRNA levels of all eight components of the TGF-β pathway tested were found in the majority of 70 cases. For DAB2, the mRNA level was correlated with protein expression level (P = 0.04). The Skil mRNA level was associated with tumour stage (P = 0.03), and the Smad2/3/4 mRNA level with tumour grade (P = 0.03, P = 0.02, and P = 0.00, respectively). The Smad4 mRNA level was also associated with tumour size (P = 0.05), subtype (P = 0.04), and disease-free survival (DFS) (P = 0.05). The TGF-β1 mRNA level was associated with DFS (P = 0.04). Finally, tumours with positive Skil protein expression had a shorter recurrence time, whereas, those with positive DAB2 protein expression had a longer recurrence time. Conclusions Down-regulation of the TGF-β–Smad signalling pathway might be responsible for the pathogenesis of human EC, and some of its components appeared to be prognostic factors. Exploration of future therapy targeting the TGF-β–Smad pathway is warranted in EC. PMID:21771027

  8. Divergent fibroblast growth factor signaling pathways in lung fibroblast subsets: where do we go from here?

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Camp, Jordi; Morty, Rory E

    2015-10-15

    Lung fibroblasts play a key role in postnatal lung development, namely, the formation of the alveolar gas exchange units, through the process of secondary septation. Although evidence initially highlighted roles for fibroblasts in the production and remodeling of the lung extracellular matrix, more recent studies have described the presence of different fibroblast subsets in the developing lung. These subsets include myofibroblasts and lipofibroblasts and their precursors. These cells are believed to play different roles in alveologenesis and are localized to different regions of the developing septa. The precise roles played by these different fibroblast subsets remain unclear. Understanding the signaling pathways that control the discrete functions of these fibroblast subsets would help to clarify the roles and the regulation of lung fibroblasts during lung development. Here, we critically evaluate a recent report that described divergent fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling pathways in two different subsets of lung fibroblasts that express different levels of green fluorescent protein (GFP) driven by the platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α promoter. The GFP expression was used as a surrogate for lipofibroblasts (GFP(low)) and myofibroblasts (GFP(high)). It was suggested that Fgf10/Fgf1 and Fgf18/Fgfr3 autocrine pathways may be operative in GFP(low) and GFP(high) cells, respectively, and that these pathways might regulate the proliferation and migration of different fibroblast subsets during alveologenesis. These observations lay important groundwork for the further exploration of FGF function during normal lung development, as well as in aberrant lung development associated with bronchopulmonary dysplasia.

  9. Cooperative signaling through the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 and nuclear factor-κB pathways in subtypes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Lloyd T.; Wright, George; Davis, R. Eric; Lenz, Georg; Farinha, Pedro; Dang, Lenny; Chan, John W.; Rosenwald, Andreas; Gascoyne, Randy D.

    2008-01-01

    The activated B cell–like (ABC) subgroup of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is characterized by constitutive activation of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway. In this study, we showed that the NF-κB pathway induced the expression of the cytokines interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-10 in ABC DLBCL cell lines, which also have high levels of total and phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 protein, suggesting autocrine signaling. Using RNA interference for STAT3, we defined a gene expression signature of IL-6 and IL-10 signaling through STAT3. Based on this signature, we constructed a molecular predictor of STAT3 signaling that defined a subset of ABC DLBCL tumors with high expression of STAT3, IL-6, and/or IL-10 and their downstream targets. Although the STAT3-high and STAT3-low subsets had equivalent expression of genes that distinguish ABC DLBCL from germinal center B cell–like DLBCL, STAT3-high ABC DLBCLs had higher expression of signatures that reflected NF-κB activity, proliferation, and glycolysis. A small-molecule inhibitor of Janus kinase signaling, which blocked STAT3 signature expression, was toxic only for ABC DLBCL lines and synergized with an inhibitor of NF-κB signaling. These findings suggest that the biological interplay between the STAT3 and NF-κB pathways may be exploited for the treatments of a subset of ABC DLBCLs. PMID:18160665

  10. Expression of human tyrosine kinase-negative epidermal growth factor receptor amplifies signaling through endogenous murine epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Hack, N; Sue-A-Quan, A; Mills, G B; Skorecki, K L

    1993-12-15

    Recent findings have suggested that certain ligand-dependent responses to EGF may be propagated in a manner that is not dependent on the intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R, Campos-Gonzalez, R., and Glenney, J. R., Jr. (1992) J. Biol. Chem. 267, 14535-14538) or, alternatively, that these responses may occur through the interaction of the human tyrosine kinase-deficient EGF-R with an as yet unidentified kinase (Selva, E., Raden, D. L., and Davis, R. J. (1993) J. Biol. Chem. 268, 2250-2254). These conclusions represent a significant departure from our current understanding of signal transduction by receptor tyrosine kinases. Therefore we examined the effect of expression of tyrosine kinase-negative human EGF receptor in murine NIH-3T3-2.2 cells on the EGF-dependent phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP-2) kinase. In parental cells (NIH-3T3-2.2) that express low levels of endogenous murine EGF-R, there was no demonstrable EGF-dependent coupling to MAP-2 kinase. In NIH-3T3-2.2 cells transfected with tyrosine kinase-negative human EGF-R, there was unexpected EGF-dependent phosphorylation of MAP-2 kinase. Analysis of the tyrosine kinase-negative human EGF-R in these cells revealed significant tyrosine phosphorylation of the EGF-R. A low level of endogenous murine EGF-R present in these cells were also phosphorylated on tyrosine residues and displayed autokinase activity. Similar results were obtained using an unrelated cell line (B82L cells), in which EGF-dependent phosphorylation of MAP-2 kinase was previously attributed to signal propagation through a tyrosine kinase-negative human EGF-R (Campos-Gonzalez, R., and Glenney, J. R., Jr. (1992) J. Biol. Chem. 267, 14535-14538). Taken together, these results suggest that the tyrosine kinase-negative human EGF-R are able to amplify the response to activation of low levels of endogenous murine EGF-R, thus leading to EGF-dependent phosphorylation of MAP-2 kinase in cells

  11. Transforming growth factor β signaling upregulates the expression of human GDP-fucose transporter by activating transcription factor Sp1.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yu-Xin; Ma, Anna; Liu, Li

    2013-01-01

    GDP-fucose transporter plays a crucial role in fucosylation of glycoproteins by providing activated fucose donor, GDP-fucose, for fucosyltransferases in the lumen of the Golgi apparatus. Fucose-containing glycans are involved in many biological processes, which are essential for growth and development. Mutations in the GDP-fucose transporter gene cause leukocyte adhesion deficiency syndrome II, a disease characterized by slow growth, mental retardation and immunodeficiency. However, no information is available regarding its transcriptional regulation. Here, by using human cells, we show that TGF-β1 specifically induces the GDP-fucose transporter expression, but not other transporters tested such as CMP-sialic acid transporter, suggesting a diversity of regulatory pathways for the expression of these transporters. The regulatory elements that are responsive to the TGF-β1 stimulation are present in the region between bp -330 and -268 in the GDP-fucose transporter promoter. We found that this region contains two identical octamer GC-rich motifs (GGGGCGTG) that were demonstrated to be essential for the transporter expression. We also show that the transcription factor Sp1 specifically binds to the GC-rich motifs in vitro and Sp1 coupled with phospho-Smad2 is associated with the promoter region covering the Sp1-binding motifs in vivo using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. In addition, we further confirmed that Sp1 is essential for the GDP-fucose transporter expression stimulated by TGF-β1 using a luciferase reporter system. These results highlight the role of TGF-β signaling in regulation of the GDP-fucose transporter expression via activating Sp1. This is the first transcriptional study for any nucleotide sugar transporters that have been identified so far. Notably, TGF-β1 receptor itself is known to be modified by fucosylation. Given the essential role of GDP-fucose transporter in fucosylation, the finding that TGF-β1 stimulates the expression of

  12. Fibroblast growth factor receptor–Frs2α signaling is critical for nephron progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Di Giovanni, Valeria; Walker, Kenneth A.; Bushnell, Daniel; Schaefer, Caitlin; Sims-Lucas, Sunder; Puri, Pawan; Bates, Carlton M.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies using transgenic Pax3cre mice have revealed roles for fibroblast growth factor receptors (Fgfrs) and Fgfr substrate 2α (Frs2α) signaling in early metanephric mesenchyme patterning and in ureteric morphogenesis. The role of Fgfr/Frs2α signaling in nephron progenitors is unknown. Thus, we generated mouse models using BAC transgenic Six2EGFPcre (Six2cre) mediated deletion of Fgfrs and/or Frs2α in nephron progenitors. Six2cre mediated deletion of Fgfr1 or Fgfr2 alone led to no obvious kidney defects. Six2creFgfr1flox/floxFgfr2flox/flox (Fgfr1/2NP−/−) mice generate a discernable kidney; however, they develop nephron progenitor depletion starting at embryonic day 12.5 (E12.5) and later demonstrate severe cystic dysplasia. To determine the role of Frs2α signaling downstream of Fgfr2 in Fgfr1/2NP−/− mice, we generated Six2cre,Fgfr1flox/floxFgfr2LR/LR (Fgfr1NP−/−Fgfr2LR/LR) mice that have point mutations in the Frs2α binding site of Fgfr2. Like Fgfr1/2NP−/− mice, Fgfr1NP−/−Fgfr2LR/LR develop nephron progenitor depletion, but it does not start until E14.5 and older mice have less severe cystic dysplasia than Fgfr1/2NP−/− To determine the role of Frs2α alone in nephron progenitors, we generated Six2creFrs2′Aflox/flox (Frs2aNP−/−) mice. Frs2aNP−/− mice also develop nephron progenitor depletion and renal cysts, although these occurred later and were less severe than in the other Six2cre mutant mice. The nephron progenitor loss in all Six2cre mutant lines was associated with decreased Cited1 expression and increased apoptosis versus controls. FAC-sorted nephron progenitors in Six2cre Frs2′Aflox/flox mice demonstrated evidence of increased Notch activity versus controls, which likely drives the progenitor defects. Thus, Fgfr1 and Fgfr2 have synergistic roles in maintaining nephron progenitors; furthermore, Fgfr signaling in nephron progenitors appears to be mediated predominantly by Frs2α. PMID:25641696

  13. Fibroblast growth factor receptor-Frs2α signaling is critical for nephron progenitors.

    PubMed

    Di Giovanni, Valeria; Walker, Kenneth A; Bushnell, Daniel; Schaefer, Caitlin; Sims-Lucas, Sunder; Puri, Pawan; Bates, Carlton M

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies using transgenic Pax3cre mice have revealed roles for fibroblast growth factor receptors (Fgfrs) and Fgfr substrate 2α (Frs2α) signaling in early metanephric mesenchyme patterning and in ureteric morphogenesis. The role of Fgfr/Frs2α signaling in nephron progenitors is unknown. Thus, we generated mouse models using BAC transgenic Six2EGFPcre (Six2cre) mediated deletion of Fgfrs and/or Frs2α in nephron progenitors. Six2cre mediated deletion of Fgfr1 or Fgfr2 alone led to no obvious kidney defects. Six2creFgfr1(flox/flox)Fgfr2(flox/flox) (Fgfr1/2(NP-/-)) mice generate a discernable kidney; however, they develop nephron progenitor depletion starting at embryonic day 12.5 (E12.5) and later demonstrate severe cystic dysplasia. To determine the role of Frs2α signaling downstream of Fgfr2 in Fgfr1/2(NP-/-) mice, we generated Six2cre(,)Fgfr1(flox/flox)Fgfr2(LR/LR) (Fgfr1(NP-/-)Fgfr2(LR/LR)) mice that have point mutations in the Frs2α binding site of Fgfr2. Like Fgfr1/2(NP-/-) mice, Fgfr1(NP-/-)Fgfr2(LR/LR) develop nephron progenitor depletion, but it does not start until E14.5 and older mice have less severe cystic dysplasia than Fgfr1/2(NP-/-) To determine the role of Frs2α alone in nephron progenitors, we generated Six2creFrs2'A(flox/flox) (Frs2a(NP-/-)) mice. Frs2a(NP-/-)mice also develop nephron progenitor depletion and renal cysts, although these occurred later and were less severe than in the other Six2cre mutant mice. The nephron progenitor loss in all Six2cre mutant lines was associated with decreased Cited1 expression and increased apoptosis versus controls. FAC-sorted nephron progenitors in Six2cre Frs2'A(flox/flox) mice demonstrated evidence of increased Notch activity versus controls, which likely drives the progenitor defects. Thus, Fgfr1 and Fgfr2 have synergistic roles in maintaining nephron progenitors; furthermore, Fgfr signaling in nephron progenitors appears to be mediated predominantly by Frs2α.

  14. Involvement of epidermal growth factor receptor-linked signaling responses in Pseudomonas fluorescens-infected alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hye Jin; Seo, Chan Hee; Park, Seong Hwan; Yang, Hyun; Do, Kee Hun; Kim, Juil; Kim, Hyung-Kab; Chung, Duk-Hwa; Ahn, Jung Hoon; Moon, Yuseok

    2011-05-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is an opportunistic indoor pathogen that can cause severe airway proinflammatory responses. Pulmonary epithelium, like other mucosal epithelial linings of the body, constitutes the first line of defense against airway microbial pathogens. Mucosal epithelial cells can be a sentinel of pathogenic bacteria via stimulation of specific cell surface receptors, including the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and Toll-like receptor (TLR). This study addressed the involvement of EGFR in airway epithelial pathogenesis by P. fluorescens. Human A549 pneumocytes showed prolonged production of proinflammatory interleukin-8 (IL-8) in response to infection with P. fluorescens, which was via the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signaling pathway. Production of proinflammatory cytokine IL-8 was not mediated by P. fluorescens lipopolysaccharide, a representative TLR4 agonist, but was mediated through EGFR-linked signals activated by the opportunistic bacteria. Moreover, EGFR signals were involved in NF-κB signal-mediated production of proinflammatory cytokines. Along with persistent NF-κB activation, P. fluorescens enhanced the EGFR phosphorylation and subsequent activation of downstream mediators, including protein kinase B or extracellular-signal-regulated kinases 1/2. Blocking of EGFR-linked signals increased epithelial susceptibility to pathogen-induced epithelial cell death, suggesting protective roles of EGFR signals. Thus, airway epithelial exposure to P. fluorescens can trigger antiapoptotic responses via EGFR and proinflammatory responses via TLR4-independent NF-κB signaling pathway in human pneumocytes.

  15. Transforming growth factor-beta regulates stearoyl coenzyme A desaturase expression through a Smad signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Samuel, William; Nagineni, Chandrasekharam N; Kutty, R Krishnan; Parks, W Tony; Gordon, Joel S; Prouty, Stephen M; Hooks, John J; Wiggert, Barbara

    2002-01-01

    The regulation of stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD), a rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of unsaturated fatty acids, is physiologically important because the ratio of saturated to unsaturated fatty acids is thought to control cellular functions by modulating the structural integrity and fluidity of cell membranes. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), a multifunctional cytokine, increased SCD mRNA expression in cultured human retinal pigment epithelial cells. This response was elicited by all three TGF-beta isoforms, beta1, beta2, and beta3. However, SCD mRNA expression was not increased either by other members of the TGF-beta family or by other growth factors or cytokines. TGF-beta also increased SCD mRNA expression in several other cell lines tested. The increase in SCD mRNA expression was preceded by a marked increase in Smad2 phosphorylation in TGF-beta-treated human retinal pigment epithelial cells. TGF-beta did not induce SCD mRNA expression in a Smad4-deficient cell line. However, Smad4 overexpression restored the TGF-beta effect in this cell line. Moreover, TGF-beta-induced SCD mRNA expression was effectively blocked by the overexpression of Smad7, an inhibitory Smad. Thus, a TGF-beta signal transduction pathway involving Smad proteins appears to regulate the cellular expression of the SCD gene, and this regulation may play an important role in lipid metabolism.

  16. Diosgenin attenuates hepatic stellate cell activation through transforming growth factor-β/Smad signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wei-Lin; Jiang, Rong; Shen, Xiao-Lu; Chen, Zhi-Yu; Deng, Xiao-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSC) plays a pivotal role in the development of hepatic fibrosis. Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) is considered to be the main stimuli factor responsible for the activation of HSC. Diosgenin is a steroidal saponin found in several plants including Solanum and Dioscorea species, and it inhibited high glucose-induced renal tubular fibrosis. However, the effects of diosgenin against hepatic fibrosis remain elusive. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the effects of diosgenin on TGF-β1-induced HSCs and elucidate the possible mechanism of its anti-fibrotic effect. Our results demonstrated that diosgenin inhibited TGF-β1-induced HSC proliferation, reduced the expression of collagen I and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), as well as the expression of TGF-β receptor I (TGF-β RI) and II. Moreover, diosgenin suppressed TGF-β1-induced phosphorylation of Smad3 in HSCs. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that diosgenin inhibited HSC-T6 cell proliferation and activation, at least in part, via the TGF-β1/Smad signaling pathway. These results provide that diosgenin may have potential to treat liver fibrosis. PMID:26884947

  17. Diosgenin attenuates hepatic stellate cell activation through transforming growth factor-β/Smad signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wei-Lin; Jiang, Rong; Shen, Xiao-Lu; Chen, Zhi-Yu; Deng, Xiao-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSC) plays a pivotal role in the development of hepatic fibrosis. Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) is considered to be the main stimuli factor responsible for the activation of HSC. Diosgenin is a steroidal saponin found in several plants including Solanum and Dioscorea species, and it inhibited high glucose-induced renal tubular fibrosis. However, the effects of diosgenin against hepatic fibrosis remain elusive. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the effects of diosgenin on TGF-β1-induced HSCs and elucidate the possible mechanism of its anti-fibrotic effect. Our results demonstrated that diosgenin inhibited TGF-β1-induced HSC proliferation, reduced the expression of collagen I and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), as well as the expression of TGF-β receptor I (TGF-β RI) and II. Moreover, diosgenin suppressed TGF-β1-induced phosphorylation of Smad3 in HSCs. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that diosgenin inhibited HSC-T6 cell proliferation and activation, at least in part, via the TGF-β1/Smad signaling pathway. These results provide that diosgenin may have potential to treat liver fibrosis. PMID:26884947

  18. Non-canonical signaling mode of the epidermal growth factor receptor family

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Heng-Huan; Wang, Ying-Nai; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2015-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and its family members are key players in both physiological and pathological settings for which they are well recognized as models for investigating the functions and regulations of other membrane receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and serve as therapeutic targets critical to clinical need and fundamental research. The canonical view of the pivotal functions in the EGFR family has been well documented as being an initiator of signaling amplification cascades from the plasma membrane to different subcellular compartments via receptor endocytic trafficking, intermolecular interaction, and kinase-substrate reaction in a temporalspatial manner. However, several lines of evidence have identified non-canonical roles of the EGFR family, acting as a transcriptional factor and a chromatin regulator in the nucleus to regulate gene expression, DNA replication, and DNA damage repair. Moreover, the EGFR family can even exert its impact outside the host cell through exosomal vesicle secretion. The emerging concept of the non-canonical roles of the EGFR family reveals an astonishing and elaborate scheme on the molecular functions of membrane RTKs, offering new insights into the receptor biology as well as the development of comprehensive therapeutic strategies in the future. PMID:26693051

  19. Niacin inhibits vascular inflammation via downregulating nuclear transcription factor-κB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Si, Yanhong; Zhang, Ying; Zhao, Jilong; Guo, Shoudong; Zhai, Lei; Yao, Shutong; Sang, Hui; Yang, Nana; Song, Guohua; Gu, Jue; Qin, Shucun

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed to investigate the effect of niacin on vascular inflammatory lesions in vivo and in vitro as well as its lipid-regulating mechanism. In vivo study revealed that niacin downregulated the levels of inflammatory factors (IL-6 and TNF-α) in plasma, suppressed protein expression of CD68 and NF-κB p65 in arterial wall, and attenuated oxidative stress in guinea pigs that have been fed high fat diet. In vitro study further confirmed that niacin decreased the secretion of IL-6 and TNF-α and inhibited NF-κB p65 and notch1 protein expression in oxLDL-stimulated HUVECs and THP-1 macrophages. Moreover, niacin attenuated oxLDL-induced apoptosis of HUVECs as well. In addition, niacin significantly lessened lipid deposition in arterial wall, increased HDL-C and apoA levels and decreased TG and non-HDL-C levels in plasma, and upregulated the mRNA amount of cholesterol 7 α-hydroxylase A1 in liver of guinea pigs. These data suggest for the first time that niacin inhibits vascular inflammation in vivo and in vitro via downregulating NF-κB signaling pathway. Furthermore, niacin also modulates plasma lipid by upregulating the expression of factors involved in the process of reverse cholesterol transport.

  20. Loss of the proteostasis factor AIRAPL causes myeloid transformation by deregulating IGF-1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Fernando G; Soria-Valles, Clara; Santiago-Fernández, Olaya; Bernal, Teresa; Mittelbrunn, María; Colado, Enrique; Rodríguez, Francisco; Bonzon-Kulichenko, Elena; Vázquez, Jesús; Porta-de-la-Riva, Montserrat; Cerón, Julián; Fueyo, Antonio; Li, Juan; Green, Anthony R; Freije, José M P; López-Otín, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    AIRAPL (arsenite-inducible RNA-associated protein-like) is an evolutionarily conserved regulator of cellular proteostasis linked to longevity in nematodes, but its biological function in mammals is unknown. We show herein that AIRAPL-deficient mice develop a fully-penetrant myeloproliferative neoplastic process. Proteomic analysis of AIRAPL-deficient mice revealed that this protein exerts its antineoplastic function through the regulation of the insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) signaling pathway. We demonstrate that AIRAPL interacts with newly synthesized insulin-related growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) polypeptides, promoting their ubiquitination and proteasome-mediated degradation. Accordingly, genetic and pharmacological IGF1R inhibitory strategies prevent the hematological disease found in AIRAPL-deficient mice as well as that in mice carrying the Jak2(V617F) mutation, thereby demonstrating the causal involvement of this pathway in the pathogenesis of myeloproliferative neoplasms. Consistent with its proposed role as a tumor suppressor of myeloid transformation, AIRAPL expression is widely abrogated in human myeloproliferative disorders. Collectively, these findings support the oncogenic relevance of proteostasis deregulation in hematopoietic cells, and they unveil novel therapeutic targets for these frequent hematological neoplasias.

  1. Tissue factor trafficking in fibroblasts: involvement of protease-activated receptor–mediated cell signaling

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Samir K.; Pendurthi, Usha R.

    2007-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is the cellular receptor for clotting factor VIIa (FVIIa), and the formation of TF-FVIIa complexes on cell surfaces triggers the activation of the coagulation cascade and the cell signaling. Our recent studies have shown that a majority of TF resides in various intracellular compartments, predominantly in the Golgi, and that FVIIa binding to cell surface TF induces TF endocytosis and mobilizes the Golgi TF pool to translocate it to the cell surface. This present study is aimed to elucidate the mechanisms involved in TF endocytosis and its mobilization from the Golgi. Activation of protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) and PAR2 by specific peptide agonists and proteases, independent of FVIIa, mobilized TF from the Golgi store and increased the cell surface expression of TF. Blocking PAR2 activation, but not PAR1, with neutralizing antibodies fully attenuated the FVIIa-induced TF mobilization. Consistent with these data, silencing the PAR2 receptor, and not PAR1, abrogated the FVIIa-mediated TF mobilization. In contrast to their effect on TF mobilization, PAR1 and PAR2 activation, in the absence of FVIIa, had no effect on TF endocytosis. However, PAR2 activation is found to be critical for the FVIIa-induced TF endocytosis. Overall the data herein provide novel insights into the role of PARs in regulating cell surface TF expression. PMID:17384202

  2. Niacin Inhibits Vascular Inflammation via Downregulating Nuclear Transcription Factor-κB Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Si, Yanhong; Zhang, Ying; Zhao, Jilong; Guo, Shoudong; Zhai, Lei; Yao, Shutong; Sang, Hui; Yang, Nana; Song, Guohua; Gu, Jue; Qin, Shucun

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed to investigate the effect of niacin on vascular inflammatory lesions in vivo and in vitro as well as its lipid-regulating mechanism. In vivo study revealed that niacin downregulated the levels of inflammatory factors (IL-6 and TNF-α) in plasma, suppressed protein expression of CD68 and NF-κB p65 in arterial wall, and attenuated oxidative stress in guinea pigs that have been fed high fat diet. In vitro study further confirmed that niacin decreased the secretion of IL-6 and TNF-α and inhibited NF-κB p65 and notch1 protein expression in oxLDL-stimulated HUVECs and THP-1 macrophages. Moreover, niacin attenuated oxLDL-induced apoptosis of HUVECs as well. In addition, niacin significantly lessened lipid deposition in arterial wall, increased HDL-C and apoA levels and decreased TG and non-HDL-C levels in plasma, and upregulated the mRNA amount of cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase A1 in liver of guinea pigs. These data suggest for the first time that niacin inhibits vascular inflammation in vivo and in vitro via downregulating NF-κB signaling pathway. Furthermore, niacin also modulates plasma lipid by upregulating the expression of factors involved in the process of reverse cholesterol transport. PMID:24991087

  3. Interactions of signaling proteins, growth factors and other proteins with heparan sulfate: mechanisms and mysteries.

    PubMed

    Billings, Paul C; Pacifici, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Heparan sulfate (HS) is a component of cell surface and matrix-associated proteoglycans (HSPGs) that, collectively, play crucial roles in many physiologic processes including cell differentiation, organ morphogenesis and cancer. A key function of HS is to bind and interact with signaling proteins, growth factors, plasma proteins, immune-modulators and other factors. In doing so, the HS chains and HSPGs are able to regulate protein distribution, bio-availability and action on target cells and can also serve as cell surface co-receptors, facilitating ligand-receptor interactions. These proteins contain an HS/heparin-binding domain (HBD) that mediates their association and contacts with HS. HBDs are highly diverse in sequence and predicted structure, contain clusters of basic amino acids (Lys and Arg) and possess an overall net positive charge, most often within a consensus Cardin-Weintraub (CW) motif. Interestingly, other domains and residues are now known to influence protein-HS interactions, as well as interactions with other glycosaminoglycans, such as chondroitin sulfate. In this review, we provide a description and analysis of HBDs in proteins including amphiregulin, fibroblast growth factor family members, heparanase, sclerostin and hedgehog protein family members. We discuss HBD structural and functional features and important roles carried out by other protein domains, and also provide novel conformational insights into the diversity of CW motifs present in Sonic, Indian and Desert hedgehogs. Finally, we review progress in understanding the pathogenesis of a rare pediatric skeletal disorder, Hereditary Multiple Exostoses (HME), characterized by HS deficiency and cartilage tumor formation. Advances in understanding protein-HS interactions will have broad implications for basic biology and translational medicine as well as for the development of HS-based therapeutics.

  4. Common elements in interleukin 4 and insulin signaling pathways in factor-dependent hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, L M; Keegan, A D; Li, W; Lienhard, G E; Pacini, S; Gutkind, J S; Myers, M G; Sun, X J; White, M F; Aaronson, S A

    1993-05-01

    Interleukin 4 (IL-4), insulin, and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) efficiently induced DNA synthesis in the IL-3-dependent murine myeloid cell lines FDC-P1 and FDC-P2. Although these factors could not individually sustain long-term growth of these lines, a combination of IL-4 with either insulin or IGF-I did support continuous growth. The principal tyrosine-phosphorylated substrate observed in FDC cells stimulated with IL-4, previously designated 4PS, was of the same size (170 kDa) as the major substrate phosphorylated in response to insulin or IGF-I. These substrates had phosphopeptides of the same size when analyzed by digestion with Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease, and each tightly associated with the 85-kDa component of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase after factor stimulation. IRS-1, the principal substrate phosphorylated in response to insulin or IGF-I stimulation in nonhematopoietic cells, is similar in size to 4PS. However, anti-IRS-1 antibodies failed to efficiently precipitate 4PS, and some phosphopeptides generated by V8 protease digestion of IRS-1 were distinct in size from the phosphopeptides of 4PS. Nevertheless, IL-4, insulin, and IGF-I were capable of stimulating tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS-1 in FDC cells that expressed this substrate as a result of transfection. These findings indicate that (i) IL-4, insulin, and IGF-I use signal transduction pathways in FDC lines that have at least one major feature in common, the rapid tyrosine phosphorylation of 4PS, and (ii) insulin and IGF-I stimulation of hematopoietic cell lines leads to the phosphorylation of a substrate that may be related to but is not identical to IRS-1.

  5. 2-Methoxystypandrone inhibits signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 and nuclear factor-κB signaling by inhibiting Janus kinase 2 and IκB kinase.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Shan; Qi, Chunting; Liu, Jiawei; Sun, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Qing; Sima, Zhenhua; Liu, Jingli; Li, Wuguo; Yu, Qiang

    2014-04-01

    Constitutive activation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) or the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway occurs frequently in cancer cells and contributes to oncogenesis. The activation of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) and IκB kinase (IKK) are key events in STAT3 and NF-κB signaling, respectively. We have identified 2-methoxystypandrone (2-MS) from a traditional Chinese medicinal herb Polygonum cuspidatum as a novel dual inhibitor of JAK2 and IKK. 2-MS inhibits both interleukin-6-induced and constitutively-activated STAT3, as well as tumor necrosis factor-α-induced NF-κB activation. 2-MS specifically inhibits JAK and IKKβ kinase activities but has little effect on activities of other kinases tested. The inhibitory effects of 2-MS on STAT3 and NF-κB signaling can be eliminated by DTT or glutathione and can last for 4 h after a pulse treatment. Furthermore, 2-MS inhibits growth and induces death of tumor cells, particularly those with constitutively-activated STAT3 or NF-κB signaling. We propose that the natural compound 2-MS, as a potent dual inhibitor of STAT3 and NF-κB pathways, is a promising anticancer drug candidate. PMID:24450414

  6. Nerve Growth Factor Regulates Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 2 via Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Signaling To Enhance Neurite Outgrowth in Developing Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Matthew R.; Johnson, William M.; Pilat, Jennifer M.; Kiselar, Janna; DeFrancesco-Lisowitz, Alicia; Zigmond, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    Neurite outgrowth is key to the formation of functional circuits during neuronal development. Neurotrophins, including nerve growth factor (NGF), increase neurite outgrowth in part by altering the function and expression of Ca2+-permeable cation channels. Here we report that transient receptor potential vanilloid 2 (TRPV2) is an intracellular Ca2+-permeable TRPV channel upregulated by NGF via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway to augment neurite outgrowth. TRPV2 colocalized with Rab7, a late endosome protein, in addition to TrkA and activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in neurites, indicating that the channel is closely associated with signaling endosomes. In line with these results, we showed that TRPV2 acts as an ERK substrate and identified the motifs necessary for phosphorylation of TRPV2 by ERK. Furthermore, neurite length, TRPV2 expression, and TRPV2-mediated Ca2+ signals were reduced by mutagenesis of these key ERK phosphorylation sites. Based on these findings, we identified a previously uncharacterized mechanism by which ERK controls TRPV2-mediated Ca2+ signals in developing neurons and further establish TRPV2 as a critical intracellular ion channel in neuronal function. PMID:26416880

  7. Fas- and tumor necrosis factor-mediated apoptosis uses the same binding surface of FADD to trigger signal transduction. A typical model for convergent signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Bang, S; Jeong, E J; Kim, I K; Jung, Y K; Kim, K S

    2000-11-17

    FADD is known to function as a common signaling conduit in Fas- and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-mediated apoptosis. The convergent death signals from the Fas receptor and TNF receptor 1 are transferred to FADD by death domain interactions triggering the same cellular event, caspase-8 activation. In this work, we investigated whether the same binding surface of FADD is used for both signaling pathways by using FADD death domain mutants. Mutations in helices alpha2 and alpha3 of the FADD death domain, the interacting surface with the Fas death domain, affected TNF-mediated apoptosis to various extents. This indicated that TNF-mediated apoptosis uses the same binding surface of the FADD death domain as Fas-mediated apoptosis. The binding specificity is not the same, however. Some mutations affected the binding affinity of the Fas death domain for the FADD death domain, but did not influence TNF-mediated apoptosis and vice versa. Interestingly, all mutants tested that affected TNF-mediated apoptosis have structural perturbations, implying that the structural integrity, involving helices alpha2 and alpha3 in particular, is critical in TNF-mediated apoptosis. Our results suggest that different signaling molecules use a similar structural interaction to trigger the same cellular event, such as caspase-8 recruitment, which could be typical in convergent signal transduction.

  8. Epidermal growth factor receptor in the prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii: function and putative signaling cascade.

    PubMed

    Sharabi, Omri; Ventura, Tomer; Manor, Rivka; Aflalo, Eliahu D; Sagi, Amir

    2013-09-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs) are highly conserved members of the tyrosine kinase receptor superfamily found in metazoans and plants. In arthropods, EGFRs are vital for the proper development of embryos and of adult limbs, gonads, and eyes as well as affecting body size. In searching for genes involved in the growth and development of our model organism, the decapod crustacean (Macrobrachium rosenbergii), a comprehensive transcript library was established using next-generation sequencing. Using this library, the expression of several genes assigned to the signal transduction pathways mediated by EGFRs was observed, including a transcript encoding M. rosenbergii EGFR (Mr-EGFR), several potential ligands upstream to the receptor, and most of the putative downstream signal transducer genes. The deduced protein encoded by Mr-EGFR, representing the first such receptor reported thus far in crustaceans, shows sequence similarity to other arthropod EGFRs. The M. rosenbergii gene is expressed in most tested tissues. The role of Mr-EGFR was revealed by temporarily silencing the transcript through weekly injections of double-stranded Mr-EGFR RNA. Such treatment resulted in a significant reduction in growth and a delay in the appearance of a male secondary sexual characteristic, namely the appendix masculina. An additional function of Mr-EGFR was revealed with respect to eye development. Although the optic ganglion appeared to have retained its normal morphology, Mr-EGFR-silenced individuals developed abnormal eyes that presented irregular organization of the ommatidia, reflected by unorganized receptor cells occupying large areas of the dioptric portion and by a shortened crystalline tract layer.

  9. Tumor necrosis factor alpha signaling in the development of experimental murine pre-hepatic portal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Theodorakis, Nicholas G; Wang, Yining N; Wu, Jianmin; Maluccio, Mary A; Skill, Nicholas J

    2010-01-01

    The cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFa) has previously been identified in the development of portal hypertension (PHT) by facilitating portal venous and systemic hyperemia. TNFa is reported to contribute to hyperemia via endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) induction and nitric oxide (NO) production. This study examines this hypothesis by utilizing TNFa receptor knockout mice and a murine model of pre-hepatic PHT. Plasma TNFa and NOx and tissue TNFa mRNA levels were determined in wild-type mice 0-7d post induction of pre-hepatic PHT by partial portal vein ligation (PVL). TNFa receptor knockout mice also received PVL or sham surgery and splenic pulp pressure, abdominal aortic flow and portal-systemic shunting were recorded 7d following. Portal pressure and systemic hyperemia developed rapidly following PVL. Plasma NOx was increased temporarily 2-3 days following PVL and returned to baseline by day 7. Circulating TNFa was below detectable limits of the ELISA used, as such no increase was observed. Hepatic and vascular TNFa mRNA levels were transiently changed after PVL otherwise there was no significant change. TNFa receptor targeted gene deletion did not ameliorate plasma NOx following PVL and had no effect on the development of PHT. TNFa receptor signaling plays no detectable role in the development of systemic hyperemia in the murine model of pre-hepatic PHT. Consequently, increased TNFa observed in intra-hepatic inflammatory models (CCl4) and in patients is probably related to inflammation associated with intra-hepatic pathology. Alternatively, TNFa may be signaling via a TNFa receptor independent mechanism. PMID:21383890

  10. Fibroblast growth factor signaling in myofibroblasts differs from lipofibroblasts during alveolar septation in mice

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Diann M.

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar fibroblasts produce extracellular matrix in a temporally and spatially regulated pattern to yield a durable yet pliable gas-exchange surface. Proliferation ensures a sufficient complement of cells, but they must differentiate into functionally distinct subtypes: contractile myofibroblasts (MF), which generate elastin and regulate air-flow at the alveolar ducts, and, in mice and rats, lipofibroblasts (LF), which store neutral lipids. PDGF-A is required but acts in conjunction with other differentiation factors arising from adjacent epithelia or within fibroblasts. We hypothesized that FGF receptor (FGFR) expression and function vary for MF and LF and contributes to their divergent differentiation. Whereas approximately half of the FGFR3 was extracellular in MF, FGFR2 and FGFR4 were primarily intracellular. Intracellular FGFR3 localized to the multivesicular body, and its abundance may be modified by Sprouty and interaction with heat shock protein-90. FGF18 mRNA is more abundant in MF, whereas FGF10 mRNA predominated in LF, which also express FGFR1 IIIb, a receptor for FGF10. FGF18 diminished fibroblast proliferation and was chemotactic for cultured fibroblasts. Although PDGF receptor-α (PDGFR-α) primarily signals through phosphoinositide 3-kinase and Akt, p42/p44 MAP kinase (Erk1/2), a major signaling pathway for FGFRs, influenced the abundance of cell-surface PDGFR-α. Observing different FGFR and ligand profiles in MF and LF is consistent with their divergent differentiation although both subpopulations express PDGFR-α. These studies also emphasize the importance of particular cellular locations of FGFR3 and PDGFR-α, which may modify their effects during alveolar development or repair. PMID:26138642

  11. Rhodococcus erythropolis BG43 Genes Mediating Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quinolone Signal Degradation and Virulence Factor Attenuation

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Christine; Birmes, Franziska S.; Rückert, Christian; Kalinowski, Jörn

    2015-01-01

    Rhodococcus erythropolis BG43 is able to degrade the Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing signal molecules PQS (Pseudomonas quinolone signal) [2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone] and HHQ [2-heptyl-4(1H)-quinolone] to anthranilic acid. Based on the hypothesis that degradation of HHQ might involve hydroxylation to PQS followed by dioxygenolytic cleavage of the heterocyclic ring and hydrolysis of the resulting N-octanoylanthranilate, the genome was searched for corresponding candidate genes. Two gene clusters, aqdA1B1C1 and aqdA2B2C2, each predicted to code for a hydrolase, a flavin monooxygenase, and a dioxygenase related to 1H-3-hydroxy-4-oxoquinaldine 2,4-dioxygenase, were identified on circular plasmid pRLCBG43 of strain BG43. Transcription of all genes was upregulated by PQS, suggesting that both gene clusters code for alkylquinolone-specific catabolic enzymes. An aqdR gene encoding a putative transcriptional regulator, which was also inducible by PQS, is located adjacent to the aqdA2B2C2 cluster. Expression of aqdA2B2C2 in Escherichia coli conferred the ability to degrade HHQ and PQS to anthranilic acid; however, for E. coli transformed with aqdA1B1C1, only PQS degradation was observed. Purification of the recombinant AqdC1 protein verified that it catalyzes the cleavage of PQS to form N-octanoylanthranilic acid and carbon monoxide and revealed apparent Km and kcat values for PQS of ∼27 μM and 21 s−1, respectively. Heterologous expression of the PQS dioxygenase gene aqdC1 or aqdC2 in P. aeruginosa PAO1 quenched the production of the virulence factors pyocyanin and rhamnolipid and reduced the synthesis of the siderophore pyoverdine. Thus, the toolbox of quorum-quenching enzymes is expanded by new PQS dioxygenases. PMID:26319870

  12. Rhodococcus erythropolis BG43 Genes Mediating Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quinolone Signal Degradation and Virulence Factor Attenuation.

    PubMed

    Müller, Christine; Birmes, Franziska S; Rückert, Christian; Kalinowski, Jörn; Fetzner, Susanne

    2015-11-01

    Rhodococcus erythropolis BG43 is able to degrade the Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing signal molecules PQS (Pseudomonas quinolone signal) [2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone] and HHQ [2-heptyl-4(1H)-quinolone] to anthranilic acid. Based on the hypothesis that degradation of HHQ might involve hydroxylation to PQS followed by dioxygenolytic cleavage of the heterocyclic ring and hydrolysis of the resulting N-octanoylanthranilate, the genome was searched for corresponding candidate genes. Two gene clusters, aqdA1B1C1 and aqdA2B2C2, each predicted to code for a hydrolase, a flavin monooxygenase, and a dioxygenase related to 1H-3-hydroxy-4-oxoquinaldine 2,4-dioxygenase, were identified on circular plasmid pRLCBG43 of strain BG43. Transcription of all genes was upregulated by PQS, suggesting that both gene clusters code for alkylquinolone-specific catabolic enzymes. An aqdR gene encoding a putative transcriptional regulator, which was also inducible by PQS, is located adjacent to the aqdA2B2C2 cluster. Expression of aqdA2B2C2 in Escherichia coli conferred the ability to degrade HHQ and PQS to anthranilic acid; however, for E. coli transformed with aqdA1B1C1, only PQS degradation was observed. Purification of the recombinant AqdC1 protein verified that it catalyzes the cleavage of PQS to form N-octanoylanthranilic acid and carbon monoxide and revealed apparent Km and kcat values for PQS of ∼27 μM and 21 s(-1), respectively. Heterologous expression of the PQS dioxygenase gene aqdC1 or aqdC2 in P. aeruginosa PAO1 quenched the production of the virulence factors pyocyanin and rhamnolipid and reduced the synthesis of the siderophore pyoverdine. Thus, the toolbox of quorum-quenching enzymes is expanded by new PQS dioxygenases. PMID:26319870

  13. Piperlongumine inhibits lung tumor growth via inhibition of nuclear factor kappa B signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jie; Son, Dong Ju; Gu, Sun Mi; Woo, Ju Rang; Ham, Young Wan; Lee, Hee Pom; Kim, Wun Jae; Jung, Jae Kyung; Hong, Jin Tae

    2016-01-01

    Piperlongumine has anti-cancer activity in numerous cancer cell lines via various signaling pathways. But there has been no study regarding the mechanisms of PL on the lung cancer yet. Thus, we evaluated the anti-cancer effects and possible mechanisms of PL on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells in vivo and in vitro. Our findings showed that PL induced apoptotic cell death and suppressed the DNA binding activity of NF-κB in a concentration dependent manner (0–15 μM) in NSCLC cells. Docking model and pull down assay showed that PL directly binds to the DNA binding site of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p50 subunit, and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis showed that PL binds to p50 concentration-dependently. Moreover, co-treatment of PL with NF-κB inhibitor phenylarsine oxide (0.1 μM) or p50 siRNA (100 nM) augmented PL-induced inhibitory effect on cell growth and activation of Fas and DR4. Notably, co-treatment of PL with p50 mutant plasmid (C62S) partially abolished PL-induced cell growth inhibition and decreased the enhanced expression of Fas and DR4. In xenograft mice model, PL (2.5–5 mg/kg) suppressed tumor growth of NSCLC dose-dependently. Therefore, these results indicated that PL could inhibit lung cancer cell growth via inhibition of NF-κB signaling pathway in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27198178

  14. The Effect of α-Mating Factor Secretion Signal Mutations on Recombinant Protein Expression in Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Lin-Cereghino, Geoff P.; Stark, Carolyn M.; Kim, Daniel; Chang, Jennifer; Shaheen, Nadia; Poerwanto, Hansel; Agari, Kimiko; Moua, Pachai; Low, Lauren K.; Tran, Namphuong; Huang, Amy D.; Nattestad, Maria; Oshiro, Kristin T.; Chang, John William; Chavan, Archana; Tsai, Jerry W.; Lin-Cereghino, Joan

    2013-01-01

    The methylotrophic yeast, Pichia pastoris, has been genetically engineered to produce many heterologous proteins for industrial and research purposes. In order to secrete proteins for easier purification from the extracellular medium, the coding sequence of recombinant proteins are initially fused to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae α-mating factor secretion signal leader. Extensive site-directed mutagenesis of the prepro region of the α-mating factor secretion signal sequence was performed in order to determine the effects of various deletions and substitutions on expression. Though some mutations clearly dampened protein expression, deletion of amino acids 57-70, corresponding to the predicted 3rd alpha helix of α-mating factor secretion signal, increased secretion of reporter proteins horseradish peroxidase and lipase at least 50% in small-scale cultures. These findings raise the possibility that the secretory efficiency of the leader can be further enhanced in the future. PMID:23454485

  15. Coupling signalling pathways to transcriptional control: nuclear factors responsive to cAMP.

    PubMed

    Tamai, K T; Monaco, L; Nantel, F; Zazopoulos, E; Sassone-Corsi, P

    1997-01-01

    Several endocrine and neuronal functions are governed by the cAMP-dependent signalling pathway. In eukaryotes, transcriptional regulation upon stimulation of the adenylyl cyclase signalling pathway is mediated by a family of cAMP-responsive nuclear factors. This family consists of a large number of members that may act as activators or repressors. These factors contain the basic domain/ leucine zipper motifs and bind as dimers to cAMP-response elements (CRE). The function of CRE-binding proteins (CREBs) is modulated by phosphorylation by several kinases. Direct activation of gene expression by CREB requires phosphorylation by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A to the serine-133 residue. Among the repressors, ICER (Inducible cAMP Early Repressor) deserves special mention. ICER is generated from an alternative CREM promoter and constitutes the only inducible cAMP-responsive element binding protein. Furthermore, ICER negatively autoregulates the alternative promoter, thus generating a feedback loop. In contrast to the other members of the CRE-binding protein family, ICER expression is tissue specific and developmentally regulated. The kinetics of ICER expression are characteristic of an early response gene. Our results indicate that CREM plays a key physiological and developmental role within the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. We have previously shown that the transcriptional activator CREM is highly expressed in postmeiotic cells. Spermiogenesis is a complex process by which postmeiotic male germ cells differentiate into mature spermatozoa. This process involves remarkable structural and biochemical changes that are under the hormonal control of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. We have addressed the specific role of CREM in spermiogenesis using CREM-mutant mice generated by homologous recombination. Analysis of the seminiferous epithelium from mutant male mice reveals that spermatogenesis stops at the first step of spermiogenesis. Late spermatids are

  16. Interferon-Regulatory Factor 5-Dependent Signaling Restricts Orthobunyavirus Dissemination to the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Proenca-Modena, Jose Luiz; Hyde, Jennifer L.; Sesti-Costa, Renata; Lucas, Tiffany; Pinto, Amelia K.; Richner, Justin M.; Gorman, Matthew J.; Lazear, Helen M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Interferon (IFN)-regulatory factor 5 (IRF-5) is a transcription factor that induces inflammatory responses after engagement and signaling by pattern recognition receptors. To define the role of IRF-5 during bunyavirus infection, we evaluated Oropouche virus (OROV) and La Crosse virus (LACV) pathogenesis and immune responses in primary cells and in mice with gene deletions in Irf3, Irf5, and Irf7 or in Irf5 alone. Deletion of Irf3, Irf5, and Irf7 together resulted in uncontrolled viral replication in the liver and spleen, hypercytokinemia, extensive liver injury, and an early-death phenotype. Remarkably, deletion of Irf5 alone resulted in meningoencephalitis and death on a more protracted timeline, 1 to 2 weeks after initial OROV or LACV infection. The clinical signs in OROV-infected Irf5−/− mice were associated with abundant viral antigen and terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells in several regions of the brain. Circulating dendritic cell (DC) subsets in Irf5−/− mice had higher levels of OROV RNA in vivo yet produced lower levels of type I IFN than wild-type (WT) cells. This result was supported by data obtained in vitro, since a deficiency of IRF-5 resulted in enhanced OROV infection and diminished type I IFN production in bone marrow-derived DCs. Collectively, these results indicate a key role for IRF-5 in modulating the host antiviral response in peripheral organs that controls bunyavirus neuroinvasion in mice. IMPORTANCE Oropouche virus (OROV) and La Crosse virus (LACV) are orthobunyaviruses that are transmitted by insects and cause meningitis and encephalitis in subsets of individuals in the Americas. Recently, we demonstrated that components of the type I interferon (IFN) induction pathway, particularly the regulatory transcription factors IRF-3 and IRF-7, have key protective roles during OROV infection. However, the lethality in Irf3−/− Irf7−/− (DKO) mice infected with OROV

  17. Paracrine regulation of growth factor signaling by shed leucine-rich repeats and immunoglobulin-like domains 1

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Wei; Holmlund, Camilla; Nilsson, Jonas; Inui, Shigeki; Lei, Ting; Itami, Satoshi; Henriksson, Roger; Hedman, Hakan

    2011-02-15

    Leucine-rich repeats and immunoglobulin-like domains 1 (LRIG1) is a recently discovered negative regulator of growth factor signaling. The LRIG1 integral membrane protein has been demonstrated to regulate various oncogenic receptor tyrosine kinases, including epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR), by cell-autonomous mechanisms. Here, we investigated whether LRIG1 ectodomains were shed, and if LRIG1 could regulate cell proliferation and EGF signaling in a paracrine manner. Cells constitutively shed LRIG1 ectodomains in vitro, and shedding was modulated by known regulators of metalloproteases, including the ADAM17 specific inhibitor TAPI-2. Furthermore, shedding was enhanced by ectopic expression of Adam17. LRIG1 ectodomains appeared to be shed in vivo, as well, as demonstrated by immunoblotting of mouse and human tissue lysates. Ectopic expression of LRIG1 in lymphocytes suppressed EGF signaling in co-cultured fibroblastoid cells, demonstrating that shed LRIG1 ectodomains can function in a paracrine fashion. Purified LRIG1 ectodomains suppressed EGF signaling without any apparent downregulation of EGFR levels. Taken together, the results show that the LRIG1 ectodomain can be proteolytically shed and can function as a non-cell-autonomous regulator of growth factor signaling. Thus, LRIG1 or its ectodomain could have therapeutic potential in the treatment of growth factor receptor-dependent cancers.

  18. A Novel Transcriptional Factor Nkapl Is a Germ Cell-Specific Suppressor of Notch Signaling and Is Indispensable for Spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Okuda, Hidenobu; Kiuchi, Hiroshi; Takao, Tetsuya; Miyagawa, Yasushi; Tsujimura, Akira; Nonomura, Norio; Miyata, Haruhiko; Okabe, Masaru; Ikawa, Masahito; Kawakami, Yoshitaka; Goshima, Naoki; Wada, Morimasa; Tanaka, Hiromitsu

    2015-01-01

    Spermatogenesis is an elaborately regulated system dedicated to the continuous production of spermatozoa via the genesis of spermatogonia. In this process, a variety of genes are expressed that are relevant to the differentiation of germ cells at each stage. Although Notch signaling plays a critical role in germ cell development in Drosophila and Caenorhabditis elegans, its function and importance for spermatogenesis in mammals is controversial. We report that Nkapl is a novel germ cell-specific transcriptional suppressor in Notch signaling. It is also associated with several molecules of the Notch corepressor complex such as CIR, HDAC3, and CSL. It was expressed robustly in spermatogonia and early spermatocytes after the age of 3 weeks. Nkapl-deleted mice showed complete arrest at the level of pachytene spermatocytes. In addition, apoptosis was observed in this cell type. Overexpression of NKAPL in germline stem cells demonstrated that Nkapl induced changes in spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) markers and the reduction of differentiation factors through the Notch signaling pathway, whereas testes with Nkapl deleted showed inverse changes in those markers and factors. Therefore, Nkapl is indispensable because aberrantly elevated Notch signaling has negative effects on spermatogenesis, affecting SSC maintenance and differentiation factors. Notch signaling should be properly regulated through the transcriptional factor Nkapl. PMID:25875095

  19. Structural basis of JAZ repression of MYC transcription factors in jasmonate signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feng; Yao, Jian; Ke, Jiyuan; Zhang, Li; Lam, Vinh Q.; Xin, Xiu-Fang; Zhou, X. Edward; Chen, Jian; Brunzelle, Joseph; Griffin, Patrick R.; Zhou, Mingguo; Xu, H. Eric; Melcher, Karsten; He, Sheng Yang

    2015-01-01

    The plant hormone jasmonate (JA) plays crucial roles in regulating plant responses to herbivorous insects and microbial pathogens and is an important regulator of plant growth and development1–7. Key mediators of JA signaling include MYC transcription factors, which are repressed by JAZ transcriptional repressors at the resting state. In the presence of active JA, JAZ proteins function as JA co-receptors by forming a hormone-dependent complex with COI1, the F-box subunit of an SCF-type ubiquitin E3 ligase8–11. The hormone-dependent formation of the COI1–JAZ co-receptor complex leads to ubiquitination and proteasome-dependent degradation of JAZ repressors and release of MYC proteins from transcriptional repression3,10,12. The mechanism by which JAZ proteins repress MYC transcription factors and how JAZ proteins switch between the repressor function in the absence of hormone and the co-receptor function in the presence of hormone remain enigmatic. Here we show that Arabidopsis MYC3 undergoes pronounced conformational changes when bound to the conserved Jas motif of the JAZ9 repressor. The Jas motif, previously shown to bind to hormone as a partially unwound helix, forms a complete α-helix that displaces the N-terminal helix of MYC3 and becomes an integral part of the MYC N-terminal fold. In this position, the Jas helix competitively inhibits MYC3 interaction with the MED25 subunit of the transcriptional Mediator complex. Our study elucidates a novel molecular switch mechanism that governs the repression and activation of a major plant hormone pathway. PMID:26258305

  20. Disturbance of Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha-Mediated Beta Interferon Signaling in Cervical Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bachmann, Anastasia; Hanke, Brigitte; Zawatzky, Rainer; Soto, Ubaldo; van Riggelen, Jan; zur Hausen, Harald; Rösl, Frank

    2002-01-01

    In the present study we show that malignant human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive cells lost their ability to synthesize endogenous beta interferon (IFN-β) upon tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) treatment. IFN-β transcription, however, was reinducible in nonmalignant HPV-positive cells, which was confirmed in functional protection assays against encephalomyocarditis virus or vesicular stomatitis virus infections. Addition of neutralizing antibodies against IFN-β blocked the antiviral effect, excluding the possibility that other IFN types were involved. Conversely, both malignant and immortalized cells could be protected against viral cytolysis when either IFN-β, IFN-α, or IFN-γ was added exogenously. This indicates that only the cross talk between TNF-α and the IFN-β pathways, and not IFN-α/β and IFN-γ signaling in general, is perturbed in cervical carcinoma cells. Notably, full virus protection was restricted exclusively to nonmalignant cells, indicating that the antiviral effect correlates with the growth-inhibitory and virus-suppressive properties of TNF-α. The IFN-regulatory factors IRF-1 and p48 (ISGF3γ) emerged as key regulatory molecules in the differential IFN-β response, since their transcription was either absent or only inefficiently enhanced in tumorigenic cells upon treatment with TNF-α. Inducibility of both genes, however, became reestablished in cervical carcinoma cells, which were complemented to nontumorigenicity after somatic cell hybridization. Complementation was paralleled by the entire reconstitution of cytokine-mediated IFN-β expression and the ability of TNF-α to exert an antiviral state. In contrast, under conditions where tumor suppression was not accomplished upon somatic cell hybridization, neither expression of IRF-1, p48, and IFN-β nor antiviral activity could be restored. PMID:11739693

  1. Characterization of Amphioxus IFN Regulatory Factor Family Reveals an Archaic Signaling Framework for Innate Immune Response.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shaochun; Zheng, Tingting; Li, Peiyi; Yang, Rirong; Ruan, Jie; Huang, Shengfeng; Wu, Zhenxin; Xu, Anlong

    2015-12-15

    The IFN regulatory factor (IRF) family encodes transcription factors that play important roles in immune defense, stress response, reproduction, development, and carcinogenesis. Although the origin of the IRF family has been dated back to multicellular organisms, invertebrate IRFs differ from vertebrate IRFs in genomic structure and gene synteny, and little is known about their functions. Through comparison of multiple amphioxus genomes, in this study we suggested that amphioxus contains nine IRF members, whose orthologs are supposed to be shared among three amphioxus species. As the orthologs to the vertebrate IRF1 and IRF4 subgroups, Branchiostoma belcheri tsingtauense (bbt)IRF1 and bbtIRF8 bind the IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE) and were upregulated when amphioxus intestinal cells were stimulated with poly(I:C). As amphioxus-specific IRFs, both bbtIRF3 and bbtIRF7 bind ISRE. When activated, they can be phosphorylated by bbtTBK1 and then translocate into nucleus for target gene transcription. As transcriptional repressors, bbtIRF2 and bbtIRF4 can inhibit the transcriptional activities of bbtIRF1, 3, 7, and 8 by competing for the binding of ISRE. Interestingly, amphioxus IRF2, IRF8, and Rel were identified as target genes of bbtIRF1, bbtIRF7, and bbtIRF3, respectively, suggesting a dynamic feedback regulation among amphioxus IRF and NF-κB. Collectively, to our knowledge we present for the first time an archaic IRF signaling framework in a basal chordate, shedding new insights into the origin and evolution of vertebrate IFN-based antiviral networks.

  2. Characterization of Amphioxus IFN Regulatory Factor Family Reveals an Archaic Signaling Framework for Innate Immune Response.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shaochun; Zheng, Tingting; Li, Peiyi; Yang, Rirong; Ruan, Jie; Huang, Shengfeng; Wu, Zhenxin; Xu, Anlong

    2015-12-15

    The IFN regulatory factor (IRF) family encodes transcription factors that play important roles in immune defense, stress response, reproduction, development, and carcinogenesis. Although the origin of the IRF family has been dated back to multicellular organisms, invertebrate IRFs differ from vertebrate IRFs in genomic structure and gene synteny, and little is known about their functions. Through comparison of multiple amphioxus genomes, in this study we suggested that amphioxus contains nine IRF members, whose orthologs are supposed to be shared among three amphioxus species. As the orthologs to the vertebrate IRF1 and IRF4 subgroups, Branchiostoma belcheri tsingtauense (bbt)IRF1 and bbtIRF8 bind the IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE) and were upregulated when amphioxus intestinal cells were stimulated with poly(I:C). As amphioxus-specific IRFs, both bbtIRF3 and bbtIRF7 bind ISRE. When activated, they can be phosphorylated by bbtTBK1 and then translocate into nucleus for target gene transcription. As transcriptional repressors, bbtIRF2 and bbtIRF4 can inhibit the transcriptional activities of bbtIRF1, 3, 7, and 8 by competing for the binding of ISRE. Interestingly, amphioxus IRF2, IRF8, and Rel were identified as target genes of bbtIRF1, bbtIRF7, and bbtIRF3, respectively, suggesting a dynamic feedback regulation among amphioxus IRF and NF-κB. Collectively, to our knowledge we present for the first time an archaic IRF signaling framework in a basal chordate, shedding new insights into the origin and evolution of vertebrate IFN-based antiviral networks. PMID:26573836

  3. Bid Promotes K63-Linked Polyubiquitination of Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor Associated Factor 6 (TRAF6) and Sensitizes to Mutant SOD1-Induced Proinflammatory Signaling in Microglia123

    PubMed Central

    Kinsella, Sinéad

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) gene contribute to motoneuron degeneration and are evident in 20% of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis cases. Mutant SOD1 induces microglial activation through a stimulation of Toll-like receptors 2 and 4 (TLR2 and TLR4). In the present study, we identified the proapoptotic Bcl-2 family protein Bid as a positive regulator of mutant SOD1-induced TLR-nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling in microglia. bid-deficient primary mouse microglia showed reduced NF-κB signaling in response to TLR4 activation or exposure to conditioned medium derived from SOD1 G93A expressing NSC-34 cells. Attenuation of NF-κB signaling in bid-deficient microglia was associated with lower levels of phosphorylated IKKα/β and p65, with a delayed degradation of IκBα and enhanced degradation of Peli1. Upstream of IKK, we found that Bid interacted with, and promoted, the K63-linked polyubiquitination of the E3 ubiquitin ligase tumor necrosis factor receptor associated factor 6 (TRAF6) in microglia. Our study suggests a key role for Bid in the regulation of TLR4-NF-κB proinflammatory signaling during mutant SOD1-induced disease pathology. Bid promotes TLR4-NF-κB signaling by interacting with TRAF6 and promoting TRAF6 K63-linked polyubiquitination in microglia. PMID:27257617

  4. Discovery of an ergosterol-signaling factor that regulates Trypanosoma brucei growth[S

    PubMed Central

    Haubrich, Brad A.; Singha, Ujjal K.; Miller, Matthew B.; Nes, Craigen R.; Anyatonwu, Hosanna; Lecordier, Laurence; Patkar, Presheet; Leaver, David J.; Villalta, Fernando; Vanhollebeke, Benoit; Chaudhuri, Minu; Nes, W. David

    2015-01-01

    Ergosterol biosynthesis and homeostasis in the parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma brucei was analyzed by RNAi silencing and inhibition of sterol C24β-methyltransferase (TbSMT) and sterol 14α-demethylase [TbSDM (TbCYP51)] to explore the functions of sterols in T. brucei growth. Inhibition of the amount or activity of these enzymes depletes ergosterol from cells at <6 fg/cell for procyclic form (PCF) cells or <0.01 fg/cell for bloodstream form (BSF) cells and reduces infectivity in a mouse model of infection. Silencing of TbSMT expression by RNAi in PCF or BSF in combination with 25-azalanosterol (AZA) inhibited parasite growth and this inhibition was restored completely by adding synergistic cholesterol (7.8 μM from lipid-depleted media) with small amounts of ergosterol (1.2 μM) to the medium. These observations are consistent with the proposed requirement for ergosterol as a signaling factor to spark cell proliferation while imported cholesterol or the endogenously formed cholesta-5,7,24-trienol act as bulk membrane components. To test the potential chemotherapeutic importance of disrupting ergosterol biosynthesis using pairs of mechanism-based inhibitors that block two enzymes in the post-squalene segment, parasites were treated with AZA and itraconazole at 1 μM each (ED50 values) resulting in parasite death. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the ergosterol pathway is a prime drug target for intervention in T. brucei infection. PMID:25424002

  5. Foxi transcription factors promote pharyngeal arch development by regulating formation of FGF signaling centers.

    PubMed

    Edlund, Renée K; Ohyama, Takahiro; Kantarci, Husniye; Riley, Bruce B; Groves, Andrew K

    2014-06-01

    The bones of the vertebrate face develop from transient embryonic branchial arches that are populated by cranial neural crest cells. We have characterized a mouse mutant for the Forkhead family transcription factor Foxi3, which is expressed in branchial ectoderm and endoderm. Foxi3 mutant mice are not viable and display severe branchial arch-derived facial skeleton defects, including absence of all but the most distal tip of the mandible and complete absence of the inner, middle and external ear structures. Although cranial neural crest cells of Foxi3 mutants are able to migrate, populate the branchial arches, and display some elements of correct proximo-distal patterning, they succumb to apoptosis from embryonic day 9.75 onwards. We show this cell death correlates with a delay in expression of Fgf8 in branchial arch ectoderm and a failure of neural crest cells in the arches to express FGF-responsive genes. Zebrafish foxi1 is also expressed in branchial arch ectoderm and endoderm, and morpholino knock-down of foxi1 also causes apoptosis of neural crest in the branchial arches. We show that heat shock induction of fgf3 in zebrafish arch tissue can rescue cell death in foxi1 morphants. Our results suggest that Foxi3 may play a role in the establishment of signaling centers in the branchial arches that are required for neural crest survival, patterning and the subsequent development of branchial arch derivatives.

  6. Reduced insulin/insulin-like growth factor signaling decreases translation in Drosophila and mice.

    PubMed

    Essers, Paul; Tain, Luke S; Nespital, Tobias; Goncalves, Joana; Froehlich, Jenny; Partridge, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Down-regulation of insulin/insulin-like growth factor signaling (IIS) can increase lifespan in C. elegans, Drosophila and mice. In C. elegans, reduced IIS results in down-regulation of translation, which itself can extend lifespan. However, the effect of reduced IIS on translation has yet to be determined in other multicellular organisms. Using two long-lived IIS models, namely Drosophila lacking three insulin-like peptides (dilp2-3,5(-/-)) and mice lacking insulin receptor substrate 1 (Irs1(-/-)), and two independent translation assays, polysome profiling and radiolabeled amino acid incorporation, we show that reduced IIS lowers translation in these organisms. In Drosophila, reduced IIS decreased polysome levels in fat body and gut, but reduced the rate of protein synthesis only in the fat body. Reduced IIS in mice decreased protein synthesis rate only in skeletal muscle, without reducing polysomes in any tissue. This lowered translation in muscle was independent of Irs1 loss in the muscle itself, but a secondary effect of Irs1 loss in the liver. In conclusion, down-regulation of translation is an evolutionarily conserved response to reduced IIS, but the tissues in which it occurs can vary between organisms. Furthermore, the mechanisms underlying lowered translation may differ in mice, possibly associated with the complexity of the regulatory processes. PMID:27452396

  7. Identification and prediction of abiotic stress responsive transcription factors involved in abiotic stress signaling in soybean.

    PubMed

    Tran, Lam-Son Phan; Mochida, Keiichi

    2010-03-01

    Abiotic stresses such as extreme temperature, drought, high salinity, cold and waterlogging often result in significant losses to the yields of economically important crops such as soybean (Glycine max L.). Transcription factors (TFs) which bind to DNA through specific cis-regulatory sequences either activate or repress gene transcription have been reported to act as control switches in stress signaling. Recent completion of the soybean genomic sequence has open wide opportunities for large-scale identification and annotations of regulatory TFs in soybean for functional studies. Within the soybean genome, we identified 5,035 TF models which grouped into 61 families. Detailed annotations of soybean TF genes can be accessed at SoybeanTFDB (soybeantfdb.psc.riken.jp). Moreover, we have reported a new idea of high throughput prediction and selection of abiotic stress responsive TFs based on the existence of known stress responsive cis-element(s) located in the promoter regions of respective TFs and GO annotations. We, therefore, have provided a basic platform for the genome-wide analysis of regulatory mechanisms underlying abiotic stress responses and a reliable tool for prediction and selection of stress responsive TFs for further functional studies and genetic engineering.

  8. Fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling is essential for lens fiber cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Haotian; Yang, Tianyu; Madakashira, Bhavani P.; Thiels, Cornelius A.; Bechtle, Chad A.; Garcia, Claudia M.; Zhang, Huiming; Yu, Kai; Ornitz, David M.; Beebe, David C.; Robinson, Michael L.

    2008-01-01

    The vertebrate lens provides an excellent model to study the mechanisms that regulate terminal differentiation. Although fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) are thought to be important for lens cell differentiation, it is unclear which FGF receptors mediate these processes during different stages of lens development. Deletion of three FGF receptors (Fgfr1-3) early in lens development demonstrated that expression of only a single allele of Fgfr2 or Fgfr3 was sufficient for grossly normal lens development, while mice possessing only a single Fgfr1 allele developed cataracts and microphthalmia. Profound defects were observed in lenses lacking all three Fgfrs. These included lack of fiber cell elongation, abnormal proliferation in prospective lens fiber cells, reduced expression of the cell cycle inhibitors p27kip1 and p57kip2, increased apoptosis and aberrant or reduced expression of Prox1, Pax6, c-Maf, E-cadherin and α-, β- and γ-crystallins. Therefore, while signaling by FGF receptors is essential for lens fiber differentiation, different FGF receptors function redundantly. PMID:18455718

  9. System theoretical investigation of human epidermal growth factor receptor-mediated signalling

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yi; Shankaran, Harish; Opresko, Lee; Resat, Haluk

    2008-09-01

    The partitioning of biological networks into coupled functional modules is gaining increasing attention in the biological sciences. This approach has the advantage that predicting a system level response does not require a mechanistic description of the internal dynamics of each module. Identification of the input-output characteristics of the network modules and the connectivity between the modules provide the necessary quantitative representation of system dynamics. However, determination of the input-output relationships of the modules is not trivial; it requires the controlled perturbation of module inputs and systematic analysis of experimental data. In this report, we apply a system theoretical analysis approach to derive the causal input-output relationships of the functional module for the human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) mediated Erk and Akt signaling pathways. Using a library of cell lines expressing varying levels of EGFR and HER2, we show that a transfer function-based representation can be successfully applied to quantitatively characterize information transfer in this system.

  10. Autocrine motility factor promotes HER2 cleavage and signaling in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kho, Dhong Hyo; Nangia-Makker, Pratima; Balan, Vitaly; Hogan, Victor; Tait, Larry; Wang, Yi; Raz, Avraham

    2013-01-01

    Trastuzumab (Herceptin®) is an effective targeted therapy in HER2 overexpressing human breast carcinoma. However, many HER2-positive patients initially or eventually become resistant to this treatment, so elucidating mechanisms of trastuzumab resistance that emerge in breast carcinoma cells is clinically important. Here we show that autocrine motility factor (AMF) binds to HER2 and induces cleavage to the ectodomain-deleted and constitutively active form p95HER2. Mechanistic investigations indicated that interaction of AMF with HER2 triggers HER2 phosphorylation and metalloprotease-mediated ectodomain shedding, activating PI3K and MAPK signaling and ablating the ability of trastuzumab to inhibit breast carcinoma cell growth. Further, we found that HER2 expression and AMF secretion were inversely related in breast carcinoma cells. Based on this evidence that AMF may contribute to HER2-mediated breast cancer progression, our findings suggest that AMF-HER2 interaction might be a novel target for therapeutic management of breast cancer patients whose disease is resistant to trastuzumab. PMID:23248119

  11. Tumor necrosis factor receptor 2-signaling in CD133-expressing cells in renal clear cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Al-Lamki, Rafia S; Wang, Jun; Yang, Jun; Burrows, Natalie; Maxwell, Patrick H; Eisen, Timothy; Warren, Anne Y; Vanharanta, Sakari; Pacey, Simon; Vandenabeele, Peter; Pober, Jordan S; Bradley, John R

    2016-01-01

    Compared to normal kidney, renal clear cell carcinomas (ccRCC) contain increased numbers of interstitial, non-hematopoietic CD133+cells that express stem cell markers and exhibit low rates of proliferation. These cells fail to form tumors upon transplantation but support tumor formation by differentiated malignant cells. We hypothesized that killing of ccRCC CD133+ (RCCCD133+) cells by cytotoxic agents might be enhanced by inducing them to divide. Since tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF), signalling through TNFR2, induces proliferation of malignant renal tubular epithelial cells, we investigated whether TNFR2 might similarly affect RCCCD133+cells. We compared treating organ cultures of ccRCC vs adjacent nontumour kidney (NK) and RCCCD133+ vs NK CD133+ (NKCD133+) cell cultures with wild-type TNF (wtTNF) or TNF muteins selective for TNFR1 (R1TNF) or TNFR2 (R2TNF). In organ cultures, R2TNF increased expression of TNFR2 and promoted cell cycle entry of both RCCCD133+ and NKCD133+ but effects were greater in RCCCD133+. In contrast, R1TNF increased TNFR1 expression and promoted cell death. Importantly, cyclophosphamide triggered much more cell death in RCCCD133+ and NKCD133+cells pre-treated with R2TNF as compared to untreated controls. We conclude that selective engagement of TNFR2 by TNF can drives RCCCD133+ proliferation and thereby increase sensitivity to cell cycle-dependent cytotoxicity. PMID:26992212

  12. Matricellular Protein Periostin Mediates Intestinal Inflammation through the Activation of Nuclear Factor κB Signaling.

    PubMed

    Koh, Seong-Joon; Choi, Younjeong; Kim, Byeong Gwan; Lee, Kook Lae; Kim, Dae Woo; Kim, Jung Ho; Kim, Ji Won; Kim, Joo Sung

    2016-01-01

    Periostin is a matricellular protein that interacts with various integrin molecules on the cell surface. Although periostin is expressed in inflamed colonic mucosa, its role in the regulation of intestinal inflammation remains unclear. We investigated the role of periostin in intestinal inflammation using Postn-deficient (Postn-/-) mice. Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) were transfected by Postn small interfering RNAs. Periostin expression was determined in colon tissue samples from ulcerative colitis (UC) patients. Oral administration of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) or rectal administration of trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid, induced severe colitis in wild-type mice, but not in Postn-/- mice. Administration of recombinant periostin induced colitis in Postn-/- mice. The periostin neutralizing-antibody ameliorated the severity of colitis in DSS-treated wild-type mice. Silencing of Postn inhibited inteleukin (IL)-8 mRNA expression and NF-κB DNA-binding activity in IECs. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α upregulated mRNA expression of Postn in IECs, and recombinant periostin strongly enhanced IL-8 expression in combination with TNF-α, which was suppressed by an antibody against integrin αv (CD51). Periostin and CD51 were expressed at significantly higher levels in UC patients than in controls. Periostin mediates intestinal inflammation through the activation of NF-κB signaling, which suggests that periostin is a potential therapeutic target for inflammatory bowel disease.

  13. Reduced insulin/insulin-like growth factor signaling decreases translation in Drosophila and mice

    PubMed Central

    Essers, Paul; Tain, Luke S.; Nespital, Tobias; Goncalves, Joana; Froehlich, Jenny; Partridge, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Down-regulation of insulin/insulin-like growth factor signaling (IIS) can increase lifespan in C. elegans, Drosophila and mice. In C. elegans, reduced IIS results in down-regulation of translation, which itself can extend lifespan. However, the effect of reduced IIS on translation has yet to be determined in other multicellular organisms. Using two long-lived IIS models, namely Drosophila lacking three insulin-like peptides (dilp2-3,5−/−) and mice lacking insulin receptor substrate 1 (Irs1−/−), and two independent translation assays, polysome profiling and radiolabeled amino acid incorporation, we show that reduced IIS lowers translation in these organisms. In Drosophila, reduced IIS decreased polysome levels in fat body and gut, but reduced the rate of protein synthesis only in the fat body. Reduced IIS in mice decreased protein synthesis rate only in skeletal muscle, without reducing polysomes in any tissue. This lowered translation in muscle was independent of Irs1 loss in the muscle itself, but a secondary effect of Irs1 loss in the liver. In conclusion, down-regulation of translation is an evolutionarily conserved response to reduced IIS, but the tissues in which it occurs can vary between organisms. Furthermore, the mechanisms underlying lowered translation may differ in mice, possibly associated with the complexity of the regulatory processes. PMID:27452396

  14. Preclinical evidence implicating corticotropin-releasing factor signaling in ethanol consumption and neuroadaptation

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, T. J.; Reed, C.; Pastor, R.

    2016-01-01

    The results of many studies support the influence of the corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) system on ethanol (EtOH) consumption and EtOH-induced neuroadaptations that are critical in the addiction process. This review summarizes the preclinical data in this area after first providing an overview of the components of the CRF system. This complex system involves hypothalamic and extra-hypothalamic mechanisms that play a role in the central and peripheral consequences of stressors, including EtOH and other drugs of abuse. In addition, several endogenous ligands and targets make up this system and show differences in their involvement in EtOH drinking and in the effects of chronic or repeated EtOH treatment. In general, genetic and pharmacological approaches paint a consistent picture of the importance of CRF signaling via type 1 CRF receptors (CRF1) in EtOH-induced neuroadaptations that result in higher levels of intake, encourage alcohol seeking during abstinence and alter EtOH sensitivity. Furthermore, genetic findings in rodents, non-human primates and humans have provided some evidence of associations of genetic polymorphisms in CRF-related genes with EtOH drinking, although additional data are needed. These results suggest that CRF1 antagonists have potential as pharmacotherapeutics for alcohol use disorders. However, given the broad and important role of these receptors in adaptation to environmental and other challenges, full antagonist effects may be too profound and consideration should be given to treatments with modulatory effects. PMID:25565358

  15. Cartilage signal intensity on T1-weighted MRI: association with risk factors and measures of knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Stannus, Oliver Patrick; Jiang, Danchi; Cicuttini, Flavia; Cao, Yuelong; Ding, Changhai

    2014-03-01

    This study aims to assess mean signal intensity of cartilage on T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images, and then examine whether mean signal intensity is associated with risk factors and measures of osteoarthritis in younger and older adults. A total of 50 younger adult subjects (mean age 41, range 29-57; 64% female; baseline only) and 168 older adult subjects (mean age 63, range 52-78; 46% female; baseline and 2.9 year followup) were randomly selected from the community. T1-weighted fat-supressed gradient recall echo MRI scans of right knees were performed. Image segmentation was performed semi-automatically, and measures of mean signal intensity and cartilage thickness for regions of cartilage were obtained. Urinary levels of C-terminal crosslinking telopeptide of type II collagen (U-CTX-II) were measured in younger adults. Cartilage defects were scored using a 5-point scale in both groups. In multivariable analyses, higher cartilage defects and BMI were significantly associated with lower same-region mean signal intensity in younger and older adults. CTX-II was negatively and significantly associated with mean signal intensity of cartilage in the lateral femoral and patellar sites. Joint space narrowing and osteophytes analysed in older adults were significantly associated with reduced mean signal intensity at various sites. Over 2.9 years, lower mean signal intensity at femoral and patellar sites and in whole knee was associated with decreases in cartilage thickness. Reduced mean signal intensity of cartilage on T1-weighted gradient recall echo MRI is associated with osteoarthritis risk factors and predicts cartilage loss suggesting low cartilage signal intensity may reflect early osteoarthritic changes. PMID:24322833

  16. The type III transforming growth factor-beta receptor negatively regulates nuclear factor kappa B signaling through its interaction with beta-arrestin2.

    PubMed

    You, Hye Jin; How, Tam; Blobe, Gerard C

    2009-08-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) increases or decreases nuclear factor kappa B (NFkappaB) signaling in a context-dependent manner through mechanisms that remain to be defined. The type III transforming growth factor-beta receptor (TbetaRIII) is a TGF-beta superfamily co-receptor with emerging roles in both mediating and regulating TGF-beta superfamily signaling. We have previously reported a novel interaction of TbetaRIII with the scaffolding protein, beta-arrestin2, which results in TbetaRIII internalization and downregulation of TGF-beta signaling. beta-arrestin2 also scaffolds interacting receptors with the mitogen-activated protein kinase and NFkappaB-signaling pathways. Here, we demonstrate that TbetaRIII, through its interaction with beta-arrestin2, negatively regulates NFkappaB signaling in MCF10A breast epithelial and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Increasing TbetaRIII expression reduced NFkappaB-mediated transcriptional activation and IkappaBalpha degradation, whereas a TbetaRIII mutant unable to interact with beta-arrestin2, TbetaRIII-T841A, had no effect. In a reciprocal manner, short hairpin RNA-mediated silencing of either TbetaRIII expression or beta-arrestin2 expression increased NFkappaB-mediated transcriptional activation and IkappaBalpha degradation. Functionally, TbetaRIII-mediated repression of NFkappaB signaling is important for TbetaRIII-mediated inhibition of breast cancer cell migration. These studies define a mechanism through which TbetaRIII regulates NFkappaB signaling and expand the roles of this TGF-beta superfamily co-receptor in regulating epithelial cell homeostasis.

  17. The type III transforming growth factor-β receptor negatively regulates nuclear factor kappa B signaling through its interaction with β-arrestin2

    PubMed Central

    You, Hye Jin; How, Tam; Blobe, Gerard C.

    2009-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) increases or decreases nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) signaling in a context-dependent manner through mechanisms that remain to be defined. The type III transforming growth factor-β receptor (TβRIII) is a TGF-β superfamily co-receptor with emerging roles in both mediating and regulating TGF-β superfamily signaling. We have previously reported a novel interaction of TβRIII with the scaffolding protein, β-arrestin2, which results in TβRIII internalization and downregulation of TGF-β signaling. β-arrestin2 also scaffolds interacting receptors with the mitogen-activated protein kinase and NFκB-signaling pathways. Here, we demonstrate that TβRIII, through its interaction with β-arrestin2, negatively regulates NFκB signaling in MCF10A breast epithelial and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Increasing TβRIII expression reduced NFκB-mediated transcriptional activation and IκBα degradation, whereas a TβRIII mutant unable to interact with β-arrestin2, TβRIII-T841A, had no effect. In a reciprocal manner, short hairpin RNA-mediated silencing of either TβRIII expression or β-arrestin2 expression increased NFκB-mediated transcriptional activation and IκBα degradation. Functionally, TβRIII-mediated repression of NFκB signaling is important for TβRIII-mediated inhibition of breast cancer cell migration. These studies define a mechanism through which TβRIII regulates NFκB signaling and expand the roles of this TGF-β superfamily co-receptor in regulating epithelial cell homeostasis. PMID:19325136

  18. The cellular response to vascular endothelial growth factors requires co-ordinated signal transduction, trafficking and proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Gina A.; Fearnley, Gareth W.; Tomlinson, Darren C.; Harrison, Michael A.; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2015-01-01

    VEGFs (vascular endothelial growth factors) are a family of conserved disulfide-linked soluble secretory glycoproteins found in higher eukaryotes. VEGFs mediate a wide range of responses in different tissues including metabolic homoeostasis, cell proliferation, migration and tubulogenesis. Such responses are initiated by VEGF binding to soluble and membrane-bound VEGFRs (VEGF receptor tyrosine kinases) and co-receptors. VEGF and receptor splice isoform diversity further enhances complexity of membrane protein assembly and function in signal transduction pathways that control multiple cellular responses. Different signal transduction pathways are simultaneously activated by VEGFR–VEGF complexes with membrane trafficking along the endosome–lysosome network further modulating signal output from multiple enzymatic events associated with such pathways. Balancing VEGFR–VEGF signal transduction with trafficking and proteolysis is essential in controlling the intensity and duration of different intracellular signalling events. Dysfunction in VEGF-regulated signal transduction is important in chronic disease states including cancer, atherosclerosis and blindness. This family of growth factors and receptors is an important model system for understanding human disease pathology and developing new therapeutics for treating such ailments. PMID:26285805

  19. Local Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Signaling Mediates the Systemic Pathogenic Effects of Staphylococcus aureus Toxic Shock Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gillman, Aaron N.; Stach, Christopher S.; Schlievert, Patrick M.; Peterson, Marnie L.

    2016-01-01

    Secreted factors of Staphylococcus aureus can activate host signaling from the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). The superantigen toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1) contributes to mucosal cytokine production through a disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM)-mediated shedding of EGFR ligands and subsequent EGFR activation. The secreted hemolysin, α-toxin, can also induce EGFR signaling and directly interacts with ADAM10, a sheddase of EGFR ligands. The current work explores the role of EGFR signaling in menstrual toxic shock syndrome (mTSS), a disease mediated by TSST-1. The data presented show that TSST-1 and α-toxin induce ADAM- and EGFR-dependent cytokine production from human vaginal epithelial cells. TSST-1 and α-toxin also induce cytokine production from an ex vivo porcine vaginal mucosa (PVM) model. EGFR signaling is responsible for the majority of IL-8 production from PVM in response to secreted toxins and live S. aureus. Finally, data are presented demonstrating that inhibition of EGFR signaling with the EGFR-specific tyrosine kinase inhibitor AG1478 significantly increases survival in a rabbit model of mTSS. These data indicate that EGFR signaling is critical for progression of an S. aureus exotoxin-mediated disease and may represent an attractive host target for therapeutics. PMID:27414801

  20. Ankyrin-rich Membrane Spanning Protein Plays a Critical Role in Nuclear Factor-κB Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sniderhan, Lynn F.; Stout, Angela; Lu, Yuanan; Chao, Moses V.; Maggirwar, Sanjay B.

    2008-01-01

    Activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), a key feature of the neurotrophin signaling, has been shown to be critical for neuronal survival under pathologic settings. However, the precise mechanism by which neurotrophins activate NF-κB is not well understood. Here we report that the Ankyrin-rich Membrane Spanning (ARMS/Kidins220) protein, a novel transmembrane substrate of tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB), plays an important role in NF-κB signaling elicited by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Accordingly, depletion of ARMS by specific RNA interference, or disruption of ARMS-TrkB interaction with expression of dominant-negative ARMS mutant, abolished BDNF-induced signaling to NF-κB. Our data further suggests that ARMS may promote NF-κB signaling via activation of mitogen-activated kinase (MAPK) and IκB kinase (IKK), thereby facilitating phosphorylation of RelA (major NF-κB subunit) at an IKK-sensitive site. The results shown here identify ARMS as a major factor that links neurotrophin signaling to NF-κB. PMID:18501627

  1. Regulation of Transcription Factors and Repression of Sp1 by Prolactin Signaling Through the Short Isoform of Its Cognate Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Devi, Y. Sangeeta; Shehu, Aurora; Stocco, Carlos; Halperin, Julia; Le, Jamie; Seibold, Anita M.; Lahav, Michal; Binart, Nadine; Gibori, Geula

    2009-01-01

    Prolactin (PRL) affects the development and function of the reproductive system by binding to two types of receptors, which differ by the size of their intracellular domain in rodents. Whereas the signaling pathway through the long form of the receptor (PRL-RL) is well characterized, signaling through the short form (PRL-RS) remains obscure. In this investigation, we examined transcription factors regulated by PRL in the ovary and decidua of mice expressing only PRL-RS in a PRL receptor null background. These mice provide a powerful in vivo model to study the selective signaling mechanism of PRL through PRL-RS independent of PRL-RL. We also examined the regulation of transcription factors in ovarian and uterine cell lines stably transfected with PRL-RS or PRL-RL. We focused our investigation on transcription factors similarly regulated in both these tissues and clearly established that signaling through PRL-RS does not activate the JaK/Stat in vivo but leads to severe down-regulation of Sp1 expression, DNA binding activity, and nuclear localization, events that appear to involve the calmodulin-dependent protein kinase pathway. Our in vivo and in culture data demonstrate that the PRL-RS activates a signaling pathway distinct from that of the PRL-RL. PMID:19342455

  2. X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein functions as a cofactor in transforming growth factor-beta signaling.

    PubMed

    Birkey Reffey, S; Wurthner, J U; Parks, W T; Roberts, A B; Duckett, C S

    2001-07-13

    X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) is a potent suppressor of apoptotic cell death, which functions by directly inhibiting caspases, the principal effectors of apoptosis. Here we report that XIAP can also function as a cofactor in the regulation of gene expression by transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta). XIAP, but not the related proteins c-IAP1 or c-IAP2, associated with several members of the type I class of the TGF-beta receptor superfamily and potentiated TGF-beta-induced signaling. Although XIAP-mediated activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase and nuclear factor kappa B was found to require the TGF-beta signaling intermediate Smad4, the ability of XIAP to suppress apoptosis was found to be Smad4-independent. These data implicate a role for XIAP in TGF-beta-mediated signaling that is distinct from its anti-apoptotic functions.

  3. Experimental Determination of Dual-Wavelength Mie Lidar Geometric form Factor Combining Side-Scatter and Back-Scatter Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenzhu; Tao, Zongming; Liu, Dong; Xie, Chenbo; Wang, Yingjian

    2016-06-01

    In theory, lidar overlap factor can be derived from the difference between the particle backscatter coefficient retrieved from lidar elastic signal without overlap correction and the actual particle backscatter coefficient, which can be obtained by other measured techniques. The side-scatter signal using a CCD camera is testified to be a powerful tool to detect the particle backscatter coefficient in near ground layer during night time. In experiment, by combining side-scatter and backscatter signals the geometric form factor for vertically-pointing Mie lidar in 532 nm channel is determined successfully, which is corrected by an iteration algorithm combining the retrieved particle backscatter coefficient using CCD sidescatter method and Fernald method. In this study, the method will be expanded to 1064 nm channel in dual-wavelength Mie lidar during routine campaigns. The experimental results in different atmosphere conditions demonstrated that the method present in this study is available in practice.

  4. Group VII Ethylene Response Factors Coordinate Oxygen and Nitric Oxide Signal Transduction and Stress Responses in Plants.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Daniel J; Conde, Jorge Vicente; Berckhan, Sophie; Prasad, Geeta; Mendiondo, Guillermina M; Holdsworth, Michael J

    2015-09-01

    The group VII ethylene response factors (ERFVIIs) are plant-specific transcription factors that have emerged as important regulators of abiotic and biotic stress responses, in particular, low-oxygen stress. A defining feature of ERFVIIs is their conserved N-terminal domain, which renders them oxygen- and nitric oxide (NO)-dependent substrates of the N-end rule pathway of targeted proteolysis. In the presence of these gases, ERFVIIs are destabilized, whereas an absence of either permits their accumulation; ERFVIIs therefore coordinate plant homeostatic responses to oxygen availability and control a wide range of NO-mediated processes. ERFVIIs have a variety of context-specific protein and gene interaction partners, and also modulate gibberellin and abscisic acid signaling to regulate diverse developmental processes and stress responses. This update discusses recent advances in our understanding of ERFVII regulation and function, highlighting their role as central regulators of gaseous signal transduction at the interface of ethylene, oxygen, and NO signaling.

  5. Some Interactions of Speech Rate, Signal Distortion, and Certain Linguistic Factors in Listening Comprehension. Professional Paper No. 39-68.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sticht, Thomas G.

    This experiment was designed to determine the relative effects of speech rate and signal distortion due to the time-compression process on listening comprehension. In addition, linguistic factors--including sequencing of random words into story form, and inflection and phraseology--were qualitatively considered for their effects on listening…

  6. Transforming Growth Factor ß Recruits Persistent MAPK Signaling to Regulate Long-Term Memory Consolidation in "Aplysia Californica"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shobe, Justin; Philips, Gary T.; Carew, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we explore the mechanistic relationship between growth factor signaling and kinase activity that supports the protein synthesis-dependent phase of long-term memory (LTM) consolidation for sensitization of "Aplysia." Specifically, we examine LTM for tail shock-induced sensitization of the tail-elicited siphon withdrawal…

  7. Transcription factor AP-2γ induces early Cdx2 expression and represses HIPPO signaling to specify the trophectoderm lineage

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zubing; Carey, Timothy S.; Ganguly, Avishek; Wilson, Catherine A.; Paul, Soumen; Knott, Jason G.

    2015-01-01

    Cell fate decisions are fundamental to the development of multicellular organisms. In mammals the first cell fate decision involves segregation of the pluripotent inner cell mass and the trophectoderm, a process regulated by cell polarity proteins, HIPPO signaling and lineage-specific transcription factors such as CDX2. However, the regulatory mechanisms that operate upstream to specify the trophectoderm lineage have not been established. Here we report that transcription factor AP-2γ (TFAP2C) functions as a novel upstream regulator of Cdx2 expression and position-dependent HIPPO signaling in mice. Loss- and gain-of-function studies and promoter analysis revealed that TFAP2C binding to an intronic enhancer is required for activation of Cdx2 expression during early development. During the 8-cell to morula transition TFAP2C potentiates cell polarity to suppress HIPPO signaling in the outside blastomeres. TFAP2C depletion triggered downregulation of PARD6B, loss of apical cell polarity, disorganization of F-actin, and activation of HIPPO signaling in the outside blastomeres. Rescue experiments using Pard6b mRNA restored cell polarity but only partially corrected position-dependent HIPPO signaling, suggesting that TFAP2C negatively regulates HIPPO signaling via multiple pathways. Several genes involved in regulation of the actin cytoskeleton (including Rock1, Rock2) were downregulated in TFAP2C-depleted embryos. Inhibition of ROCK1 and ROCK2 activity during the 8-cell to morula transition phenocopied TFAP2C knockdown, triggering a loss of position-dependent HIPPO signaling and decrease in Cdx2 expression. Altogether, these results demonstrate that TFAP2C facilitates trophectoderm lineage specification by functioning as a key regulator of Cdx2 transcription, cell polarity and position-dependent HIPPO signaling. PMID:25858457

  8. Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 Contributes to Mucosal Repair by β-Arrestin2-Mediated Extracellular Signal-Related Kinase Signaling in Experimental Colitis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tingting; Zheng, Fengping; Tao, Jin; Tan, Siwei; Zeng, Lixian; Peng, Xiaojie; Wu, Bin

    2015-09-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) possesses the ability to attenuate intestinal damage and promote mucosal repair of colitis. β-Arrestins, as the scaffolding proteins of G protein-coupled receptors or non-G protein-coupled receptors signaling, can be involved in IGF-1-mediated signaling pathways. However, the interaction of IGF-1 and β-arrestin2 in the mucosal repair of experimental colitis remains unexplored. Ulcerative colitis was induced in β-arrestin2 wild-type mice and β-arrestin2 knockout littermates by using 3% dextran sulfate sodium for 5 days, followed by regular water consumption for 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks to analyze the mucosal repair from experimental colitis. Disease activity index and histologic score analyses were performed. Apoptosis and proliferation were assessed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling and Ki-67 staining, respectively. The expressions of β-arrestin2, phospho (p)-IGF-1R, and p-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 were examined. Furthermore, β-arrestin2 was overexpressed or altered in HCT116 cells by transfection before IGF-1 treatment in vitro. IGF-1 and β-arrestin2 expression was up-regulated in the repairing phase of experimental colitis. Targeted deletion of β-arrestin2 delayed the repair of colitis by inhibiting cell proliferation without affecting the levels of IGF-1 and p-IGF-1R. The β-arrestin2/ERK signaling pathway was involved in IGF-1-mediated mucosal repair through promoting epithelial cell and goblet cell regeneration from experimental colitis. These results indicate that IGF-1 contributes to the mucosal repair by β-arrestin2-mediated ERK signaling in experimental colitis.

  9. Xanthomonas campestris cell–cell signalling molecule DSF (diffusible signal factor) elicits innate immunity in plants and is suppressed by the exopolysaccharide xanthan

    PubMed Central

    Kakkar, Akanksha; Nizampatnam, Narasimha Rao; Kondreddy, Anil; Pradhan, Binod Bihari; Chatterjee, Subhadeep

    2015-01-01

    Several secreted and surface-associated conserved microbial molecules are recognized by the host to mount the defence response. One such evolutionarily well-conserved bacterial process is the production of cell–cell signalling molecules which regulate production of multiple virulence functions by a process known as quorum sensing. Here it is shown that a bacterial fatty acid cell–cell signalling molecule, DSF (diffusible signal factor), elicits innate immunity in plants. The DSF family of signalling molecules are highly conserved among many phytopathogenic bacteria belonging to the genus Xanthomonas as well as in opportunistic animal pathogens. Using Arabidopsis, Nicotiana benthamiana, and rice as model systems, it is shown that DSF induces a hypersensitivity reaction (HR)-like response, programmed cell death, the accumulation of autofluorescent compounds, hydrogen peroxide production, and the expression of the PATHOGENESIS-RELATED1 (PR-1) gene. Furthermore, production of the DSF signalling molecule in Pseudomonas syringae, a non-DSF-producing plant pathogen, induces the innate immune response in the N. benthamiana host plant and also affects pathogen growth. By pre- and co-inoculation of DSF, it was demonstrated that the DSF-induced plant defence reduces disease severity and pathogen growth in the host plant. In this study, it was further demonstrated that wild-type Xanthomonas campestris suppresses the DSF-induced innate immunity by secreting xanthan, the main component of extracellular polysaccharide. The results indicate that plants have evolved to recognize a widely conserved bacterial communication system and may have played a role in the co-evolution of host recognition of the pathogen and the communication machinery. PMID:26248667

  10. Xanthomonas campestris cell-cell signalling molecule DSF (diffusible signal factor) elicits innate immunity in plants and is suppressed by the exopolysaccharide xanthan.

    PubMed

    Kakkar, Akanksha; Nizampatnam, Narasimha Rao; Kondreddy, Anil; Pradhan, Binod Bihari; Chatterjee, Subhadeep

    2015-11-01

    Several secreted and surface-associated conserved microbial molecules are recognized by the host to mount the defence response. One such evolutionarily well-conserved bacterial process is the production of cell-cell signalling molecules which regulate production of multiple virulence functions by a process known as quorum sensing. Here it is shown that a bacterial fatty acid cell-cell signalling molecule, DSF (diffusible signal factor), elicits innate immunity in plants. The DSF family of signalling molecules are highly conserved among many phytopathogenic bacteria belonging to the genus Xanthomonas as well as in opportunistic animal pathogens. Using Arabidopsis, Nicotiana benthamiana, and rice as model systems, it is shown that DSF induces a hypersensitivity reaction (HR)-like response, programmed cell death, the accumulation of autofluorescent compounds, hydrogen peroxide production, and the expression of the PATHOGENESIS-RELATED1 (PR-1) gene. Furthermore, production of the DSF signalling molecule in Pseudomonas syringae, a non-DSF-producing plant pathogen, induces the innate immune response in the N. benthamiana host plant and also affects pathogen growth. By pre- and co-inoculation of DSF, it was demonstrated that the DSF-induced plant defence reduces disease severity and pathogen growth in the host plant. In this study, it was further demonstrated that wild-type Xanthomonas campestris suppresses the DSF-induced innate immunity by secreting xanthan, the main component of extracellular polysaccharide. The results indicate that plants have evolved to recognize a widely conserved bacterial communication system and may have played a role in the co-evolution of host recognition of the pathogen and the communication machinery.

  11. Insulin-like growth factor factor binding protein-2 is a novel mediator of p53 inhibition of insulin-like growth factor signaling.

    PubMed

    Grimberg, Adda; Coleman, Carrie M; Shi, Zonggao; Burns, Timothy F; MacLachlan, Timothy K; Wang, Wenge; El-Deiry, Wafik S

    2006-10-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor induces cellular growth arrest and apoptosis in response to DNA damage by transcriptionally activating or repressing target genes and also through protein-protein interactions and direct mitochondrial activities. In 1995, insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP)-3 was identified as one of the genes transcriptionally activated by p53. IGFBP-3 is one of six closely related IGFBP's, with additional IGFBP-related proteins belonging to the IGFBP superfamily. Here we show that IGFBP-2 is also a p53 target. Like IGFBP-3, IGFBP-2 secretion is reduced when p53+/+ lung cancer cells are transfected with human papillomavirus E6, which targets p53 for degradation. IGFBP-2 mRNA is induced by irradiation in vivo in a p53-dependent manner. p53 protein binds IGFBP-2 intronic sequences in an electrophoretic mobility shift assay, and activates transcription in a luciferase assay. Loss of IGFBP-2 inhibits the ability of p53 to inhibit the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1 by IGF-I. Thus, p53 effects on the IGF axis are more complex than previously appreciated, and overall transform the axis from IGF-mediated mitogenesis to growth inhibition and apoptosis. This has significant implications for how growth hormone and IGF-I can induce growth without also inducing cancer.

  12. A novel epidermal growth factor receptor-signaling platform and its targeted translation in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Gilmour, Alanna M; Abdulkhalek, Samar; Cheng, Timothy S W; Alghamdi, Farah; Jayanth, Preethi; O'Shea, Leah K; Geen, Olivia; Arvizu, Luis A; Szewczuk, Myron R

    2013-12-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced EGFR tyrosine kinase receptor activation in cancer cell survival responses has become a strategic molecular-targeting clinical therapeutic intent, but the failures of these targeted approaches in the clinical setting demand alternate strategies. Here, we uncover a novel neuraminidase-1 (Neu1) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) cross-talk in alliance with GPCR neuromedin B, which is essential for EGF-induced receptor activation and cellular signaling. Neu1 and MMP-9 form a complex with EGFR on the cell surface. Tamiflu (oseltamivir phosphate), anti-Neu1 antibodies, broad range MMP inhibitor galardin (GM6001), neuromedin B GPCR specific antagonist BIM-23127, the selective inhibitor of whole heterotrimeric G-protein complex BIM-46174 and MMP-9 specific inhibitor dose-dependently inhibited Neu1 activity associated with EGF stimulated 3T3-hEGFR cells. Tamiflu, anti-Neu1 antibodies and MMP9i attenuated EGFR phosphorylation associated with EGF-stimulated cells. Preclinical data provide the proof-of-evidence for a therapeutic targeting of Neu1 with Tamiflu in impeding human pancreatic cancer growth and metastatic spread in heterotopic xenografts of eGFP-MiaPaCa-2 tumors growing in RAGxCγ double mutant mice. Tamiflu-treated cohort exhibited a reduction of phosphorylation of EGFR-Tyr1173, Stat1-Tyr701, Akt-Thr308, PDGFRα-Tyr754 and NFκBp65-Ser311 but an increase in phospho-Smad2-Ser465/467 and -VEGFR2-Tyr1175 in the tumor lysates from the xenografts of human eGFP-MiaPaCa-2 tumor-bearing mice. The findings identify a novel promising alternate therapeutic treatment of human pancreatic cancer. PMID:23993964

  13. Patterns of Deregulation of Insulin Growth Factor Signaling Pathway in Pediatric and Adult Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Italiano, Antoine; Chen, Junwei; Zhang, Lei; Hajdu, Mihai; Singer, Samuel; DeMatteo, Ronald P; Antonescu, Cristina R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Data regarding the patterns and the mechanisms of deregulation of the insulin growth factor (IGF) pathway in adult and pediatric gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are limited. Methods We investigated the expression profiling of the genes encoding the main components of the IGF signaling pathway in 131 GISTs (106 adult, 21 pediatric and 4 young adult) and 25 other soft-tissue sarcomas (STS) using an Affymetrix U133A platform. IGF2 was investigated for loss of imprinting (LOI) whereas IGF1R was analyzed for copy number aberration and mutation. Results IGF2 was the most highly overexpressed gene of the IGF pathway in GIST. IGF2 expression was also significantly higher than in other STS. IGF2 expression was correlated to the age onset and mutational status of GIST. Indeed, IGF2 expression was significantly higher in the “adult” group than in the “pediatric” and “young adult” groups. Among adult GIST, IGF2 expression was higher in tumors lacking KIT or PDGFRA mutations in comparison with mutated cases. A trend for a higher expression of IGF2 in resistant GIST in comparison to responsive GIST was also found. Overexpression of IGF2 was not related to LOI. Conversely, the expression of the IGF1R gene was significantly higher in the pediatric group than in the adult group. No copy number gains or mutations of IGF1R were observed. Conclusion The IGF pathway is deregulated in GIST with distinct patterns according to age onset and mutational status. The IGF pathway may represent a therapeutic target in patients with primary or secondary resistance to imatinib. PMID:22770876

  14. Disruption of the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus in Fibroblast Growth Factor Signaling-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Ann V.; Kavanaugh, Scott I.; Tsai, Pei-San

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) 8 is essential for the development of multiple brain regions. Previous studies from our laboratory showed that reduced Fgf8 signaling led to the developmental alterations of neuroendocrine nuclei that originated within the diencephalon, including the paraventricular (PVN) and supraoptic (SON) nuclei. To further understand the role of Fgf8 in the development of other hypothalamic nuclei, we examined if Fgf8 and its cognate receptor, Fgfr1, also impact the integrity of the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN). The SCN control an organism’s circadian rhythm and contain vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-producing neurons as the main input neurons. Mice hypomorphic for Fgf8, Fgfr1, or both were examined for their SCN volume and the number of VIP neurons on postnatal day (PN) 0; adult hypomorphic mice were further examined for SCN function by quantifying SCN neuronal activation using cFos as a marker. On PN0, mice homozygous for Fgf8 hypomorphy displayed the most severe reduction of the SCN volume and VIP neurons. Those heterozygous for Fgf8 hypomorphy alone or Fgf8 combined with Fgfr1 hypomorphy, called double heterozygotes (DH), showed normal SCN volume but significantly reduced VIP neurons, albeit less severely than the homozygotes. Adult wild type, heterozygous Fgf8 hypomorphs (F8 Het), and DH mice were also examined for SCN cFos activation at three time points: 1 h (morning), 6 h (afternoon), and 11 h (evening) after light onset. In F8 Het mice, a significant change in the pattern of cFos immunostaining that may reflect delayed morning SCN activation was observed. Overall, our studies provide evidence supporting that deficiencies in Fgf8 not only impact the structural integrity of the SCN but also the pattern of SCN activation in response to light. PMID:26903947

  15. Identification and validation of genetic variants that influence transcription factor and cell signaling protein levels.

    PubMed

    Hause, Ronald J; Stark, Amy L; Antao, Nirav N; Gorsic, Lidija K; Chung, Sophie H; Brown, Christopher D; Wong, Shan S; Gill, Daniel F; Myers, Jamie L; To, Lida Anita; White, Kevin P; Dolan, M Eileen; Jones, Richard Baker

    2014-08-01

    Many genetic variants associated with human disease have been found to be associated with alterations in mRNA expression. Although it is commonly assumed that mRNA expression changes will lead to consequent changes in protein levels, methodological challenges have limited our ability to test the degree to which this assumption holds true. Here, we further developed the micro-western array approach and globally examined relationships between human genetic variation and cellular protein levels. We collected more than 250,000 protein level measurements comprising 441 transcription factor and signaling protein isoforms across 68 Yoruba (YRI) HapMap lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) and identified 12 cis and 160 trans protein level QTLs (pQTLs) at a false discovery rate (FDR) of 20%. Whereas up to two thirds of cis mRNA expression QTLs (eQTLs) were also pQTLs, many pQTLs were not associated with mRNA expression. Notably, we replicated and functionally validated a trans pQTL relationship between the KARS lysyl-tRNA synthetase locus and levels of the DIDO1 protein. This study demonstrates proof of concept in applying an antibody-based microarray approach to iteratively measure the levels of human proteins and relate these levels to human genome variation and other genomic data sets. Our results suggest that protein-based mechanisms might functionally buffer genetic alterations that influence mRNA expression levels and that pQTLs might contribute phenotypic diversity to a human population independently of influences on mRNA expression.

  16. Promiscuous Diffusible Signal Factor Production and Responsiveness of the Xylella fastidiosa Rpf System

    PubMed Central

    Ionescu, Michael; Yokota, Kenji; Antonova, Elena; Garcia, Angelica; Beaulieu, Ellen; Hayes, Terry; Iavarone, Anthony T.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cell density-dependent regulation of gene expression in Xylella fastidiosa that is crucial to its switching between plant hosts and insect vectors is dependent on RpfF and its production of 2-enoic acids known as diffusible signal factor (DSF). We show that X. fastidiosa produces a particularly large variety of similar, relatively long-chain-length 2-enoic acids that are active in modulating gene expression. Both X. fastidiosa itself and a Pantoea agglomerans surrogate host harboring X. fastidiosa RpfF (XfRpfF) is capable of producing a variety of both saturated and unsaturated free fatty acids. However, only 2-cis unsaturated acids were found to be biologically active in X. fastidiosa. X. fastidiosa produces, and is particularly responsive to, a novel DSF species, 2-cis-hexadecanoic acid that we term XfDSF2. It is also responsive to other, even longer 2-enoic acids to which other taxa such as Xanthomonas campestris are unresponsive. The 2-enoic acids that are produced by X. fastidiosa are strongly affected by the cellular growth environment, with XfDSF2 not detected in culture media in which 2-tetradecenoic acid (XfDSF1) had previously been found. X. fastidiosa is responsive to much lower concentrations of XfDSF2 than XfDSF1. Apparently competitive interactions can occur between various saturated and unsaturated fatty acids that block the function of those agonistic 2-enoic fatty acids. By altering the particular 2-enoic acids produced and the relative balance of free enoic and saturated fatty acids, X. fastidiosa might modulate the extent of DSF-mediated quorum sensing. PMID:27435463

  17. Characterization of a putative Xylella fastidiosa diffusible signal factor by HRGC-EI-MS.

    PubMed

    Colnaghi Simionato, Ana Valéria; da Silva, Denise Santos; Lambais, Marcio Rodrigues; Carrilho, Emanuel

    2007-10-01

    Xylella fastidiosa (X.f.) is a plant pathogen with high levels of genomic similarity to Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (X.c.c.). It has been shown that X. fastidiosa synthesizes a putative diffusible signal factor (X.f.-DSF) that activates regulation of pathogenicity factor (rpf) genes in a X.c.c. reporter system, which might be involved in the regulation of pathogenesis associated genes as in X.c.c., as well as in quorum-sensing. The nature of the X.f.-DSF is not known, whereas the X.c.c.-DSF has been identified as cis-11-methyl-2-dodecenoic acid. In this work, the chemical nature of a putative X.f.-DSF molecule, able to restore endoglucanase activity in a X.c.c. rpfF mutant, was investigated as if it was a fatty acid derivative. Bioassays with X.c.c. reporter bacterium and X.f. culture extracts, based on endoglucanase restoration activity, were also carried out in order to confirm the DSFs molecules similarities. For this reason, a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method was developed with standard fatty acids methyl esters mixtures. The retention time, as well as the fragmentation patterns, of each standard was used to identify the DSF molecule synthesized by X.f. in the culture medium. Typical ester fragmentation patterns (the derivatized analyte) were observed, such as: McLafferty rearrangement and migration of the Hdelta followed by 1,4-hydrogen shift and cleavage of the bond Cbeta--Cgamma, confirming the nature of this molecule. This confirmation was corroborated by the common peaks in both spectra. Besides, the observed retention time reinforces our conclusion since it corresponds to a methyl ester with 15 carbons. Since the X.f.-DSF molecule was tentatively identified as 12-methyl-tetradecanoic acid (by mass spectra library comparison), this standard compound was also analyzed, strongly suggesting that this is the identification of such a molecule. To our knowledge, this is the first time a DSF produced by X.f. has been characterized.

  18. Characterization of a putative Xylella fastidiosa diffusible signal factor by HRGC-EI-MS.

    PubMed

    Colnaghi Simionato, Ana Valéria; da Silva, Denise Santos; Lambais, Marcio Rodrigues; Carrilho, Emanuel

    2007-04-01

    Xylella fastidiosa (X.f.) is a plant pathogen with high levels of genomic similarity to Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (X.c.c.). It has been shown that X. fastidiosa synthesizes a putative diffusible signal factor (X.f.-DSF) that activates regulation of pathogenicity factor (rpf) genes in a X.c.c. reporter system, which might be involved in the regulation of pathogenesis associated genes as in X.c.c., as well as in quorum-sensing. The nature of the X.f.-DSF is not known, whereas the X.c.c.-DSF has been identified as cis-11-methyl-2-dodecenoic acid. In this work, the chemical nature of a putative X.f.-DSF molecule, able to restore endoglucanase activity in a X.c.c. rpfF mutant, was investigated as if it was a fatty acid derivative. Bioassays with X.c.c. reporter bacterium and X.f. culture extracts, based on endoglucanase restoration activity, were also carried out in order to confirm the DSFs molecules similarities. For this reason, a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method was developed with standard fatty acids methyl esters mixtures. The retention time, as well as the fragmentation patterns, of each standard was used to identify the DSF molecule synthesized by X.f. in the culture medium. Typical ester fragmentation patterns (the derivatized analyte) were observed, such as: McLafferty rearrangement and migration of the Hdelta followed by 1,4-hydrogen shift and cleavage of the bond Cbeta-Cgamma, confirming the nature of this molecule. This confirmation was corroborated by the common peaks in both spectra. Besides, the observed retention time reinforces our conclusion since it corresponds to a methyl ester with 15 carbons. Since the X.f.-DSF molecule was tentatively identified as 12-methyl-tetradecanoic acid (by mass spectra library comparison), this standard compound was also analyzed, strongly suggesting that this is the identification of such a molecule. To our knowledge, this is the first time a DSF produced by X.f. has been characterized.

  19. Mouse mammary tumors display Stat3 activation dependent on leukemia inhibitory factor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Quaglino, Ana; Schere-Levy, Carolina; Romorini, Leonardo; Meiss, Roberto P; Kordon, Edith C

    2007-01-01

    Introduction It has been demonstrated that leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) induces epithelium apoptosis through Stat3 activation during mouse mammary gland involution. In contrast, it has been shown that this transcription factor is commonly activated in breast cancer cells, although what causes this effect remains unknown. Here we have tested the hypothesis that locally produced LIF can be responsible for Stat3 activation in mouse mammary tumors. Methods The studies were performed in different tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic mammary cells. The expression of LIF and LIF receptor was tested by RT-PCR analysis. In tumors, LIF and Stat3 proteins were analyzed by immunohistochemistry, whereas Stat3 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 expression and phosphorylation were studied by Western blot analysis. A LIF-specific blocking antibody was used to determine whether this cytokine was responsible for Stat3 phosphorylation induced by conditioned medium. Specific pharmacological inhibitors (PD98059 and Stat3ip) that affect ERK1/2 and Stat3 activation were used to study their involvement in LIF-induced effects. To analyze cell survival, assays with crystal violet were performed. Results High levels of LIF expression and activated Stat3 were found in mammary tumors growing in vivo and in their primary cultures. We found a single mouse mammary tumor cell line, LM3, that showed low levels of activated Stat3. Incidentally, these cells also showed very little expression of LIF receptor. This suggested that autocrine/paracrine LIF would be responsible for Stat3 activation in mouse mammary tumors. This hypothesis was confirmed by the ability of conditioned medium of mammary tumor primary cultures to induce Stat3 phosphorylation, activity that was prevented by pretreatment with LIF-blocking antibody. Besides, we found that LIF increased tumor cell viability. Interestingly, blocking Stat3 activation enhanced this effect in mammary tumor cells. Conclusion LIF is

  20. Fibroblast Growth Factor 8 Signaling through Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 1 Is Required for the Emergence of Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Wilson C. J.; Moyle, Sarah S.; Tsai, Pei-San

    2008-01-01

    GnRH neurons are essential for the onset and maintenance of reproduction. Mutations in both fibroblast growth factor receptor (Fgfr1) and Fgf8 have been shown to cause Kallmann syndrome, a disease characterized by hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and anosmia, indicating that FGF signaling is indispensable for the formation of a functional GnRH system. Presently it is unclear which stage of GnRH neuronal development is most impacted by FGF signaling deficiency. GnRH neurons express both FGFR1 and -3; thus, it is also unclear whether FGFR1 or FGFR3 contributes directly to GnRH system development. In this study, we examined the developing GnRH system in mice deficient in FGF8, FGFR1, or FGFR3 to elucidate the individual contribution of these FGF signaling components. Our results show that the early emergence of GnRH neurons from the embryonic olfactory placode requires FGF8 signaling, which is mediated through FGFR1, not FGFR3. These data provide compelling evidence that the developing GnRH system is exquisitely sensitive to reduced levels of FGF signaling. Furthermore, Kallmann syndrome stemming from FGF signaling deficiency may be due primarily to defects in early GnRH neuronal development prior to their migration into the forebrain. PMID:18566132

  1. Probabilistic Inference on Multiple Normalized Signal Profiles from Next Generation Sequencing: Transcription Factor Binding Sites.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ka-Chun; Peng, Chengbin; Li, Yue

    2015-01-01

    With the prevalence of chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) with sequencing (ChIP-Seq) technology, massive ChIP-Seq data has been accumulated. The ChIP-Seq technology measures the genome-wide occupancy of DNA-binding proteins in vivo. It is well-known that different DNA-binding protein occupancies may result in a gene being regulated in different conditions (e.g. different cell types). To fully understand a gene's function, it is essential to develop probabilistic models on multiple ChIP-Seq profiles for deciphering the gene transcription causalities. In this work, we propose and describe two probabilistic models. Assuming the conditional independence of different DNA-binding proteins' occupancies, the first method (SignalRanker) is developed as an intuitive method for ChIP-Seq genome-wide signal profile inference. Unfortunately, such an assumption may not always hold in some gene regulation cases. Thus, we propose and describe another method (FullSignalRanker) which does not make the conditional independence assumption. The proposed methods are compared with other existing methods on ENCODE ChIP-Seq datasets, demonstrating its regression and classification ability. The results suggest that FullSignalRanker is the best-performing method for recovering the signal ranks on the promoter and enhancer regions. In addition, FullSignalRanker is also the best-performing method for peak sequence classification. We envision that SignalRanker and FullSignalRanker will become important in the era of next generation sequencing. FullSignalRanker program is available on the following website: http://www.cs.toronto.edu/~wkc/FullSignalRanker/.

  2. Probabilistic Inference on Multiple Normalized Signal Profiles from Next Generation Sequencing: Transcription Factor Binding Sites.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ka-Chun; Peng, Chengbin; Li, Yue

    2015-01-01

    With the prevalence of chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) with sequencing (ChIP-Seq) technology, massive ChIP-Seq data has been accumulated. The ChIP-Seq technology measures the genome-wide occupancy of DNA-binding proteins in vivo. It is well-known that different DNA-binding protein occupancies may result in a gene being regulated in different conditions (e.g. different cell types). To fully understand a gene's function, it is essential to develop probabilistic models on multiple ChIP-Seq profiles for deciphering the gene transcription causalities. In this work, we propose and describe two probabilistic models. Assuming the conditional independence of different DNA-binding proteins' occupancies, the first method (SignalRanker) is developed as an intuitive method for ChIP-Seq genome-wide signal profile inference. Unfortunately, such an assumption may not always hold in some gene regulation cases. Thus, we propose and describe another method (FullSignalRanker) which does not make the conditional independence assumption. The proposed methods are compared with other existing methods on ENCODE ChIP-Seq datasets, demonstrating its regression and classification ability. The results suggest that FullSignalRanker is the best-performing method for recovering the signal ranks on the promoter and enhancer regions. In addition, FullSignalRanker is also the best-performing method for peak sequence classification. We envision that SignalRanker and FullSignalRanker will become important in the era of next generation sequencing. FullSignalRanker program is available on the following website: http://www.cs.toronto.edu/~wkc/FullSignalRanker/. PMID:26671811

  3. Cardiac Aging and Insulin Resistance: Could Insulin/Insulin-Like Growth Factor (IGF) Signaling be used as a Therapeutic Target?

    PubMed Central

    Boudina, Sihem

    2013-01-01

    Intrinsic cardiac aging is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease and is associated with structural and functional changes that impede cardiac responses to stress and to cardio-protective mechanisms. Although systemic insulin resistance and the associated risk factors exacerbate cardiac aging, cardiac-specific insulin resistance without confounding systemic alterations, could prevent cardiac aging. Thus, strategies aimed to reduce insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling in the heart prevent cardiac aging in lower organisms and in mammals but the mechanisms underlying this protection are not fully understood. In this review, we describe the impact of aging on the cardiovascular system and discuss the mounting evidence that reduced insulin/IGF signaling in the heart could alleviate age-associated alterations and preserve cardiac performance. PMID:23448491

  4. Targeted Disruption of Heparan Sulfate Interaction with Hepatocyte and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factors Blocks Normal and Oncogenic Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Cecchi, Fabiola; Pajalunga, Deborah; Fowler, C. Andrew; Uren, Aykut; Rabe, Daniel C.; Peruzzi, Benedetta; MacDonald, Nicholas J.; Blackman, Davida K.; Stahl, Stephen J.; Byrd, R. Andrew; Bottaro, Donald P.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF) regulate normal development and homeostasis, and drive disease progression in many forms of cancer. Both proteins signal by binding to receptor tyrosine kinases and heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycans on target cell surfaces. Basic residues comprising the primary HS binding sites on HGF and VEGF provide similar surface charge distributions without underlying structural similarity. Combining three acidic amino acid substitutions in these sites in the HGF isoform NK1 or the VEGF isoform VEGF165 transformed each into potent, selective competitive antagonists of their respective normal and oncogenic signaling pathways. Our findings illustrate the importance of HS in growth factor driven cancer progression and reveal an efficient strategy for therapeutic antagonist development. PMID:22897854

  5. Ceramide inhibitor myriocin restores insulin/insulin growth factor signaling for liver remodeling in experimental alcohol-related steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lizarazo, Diana; Zabala, Valerie; Tong, Ming; Longato, Lisa; de la Monte, Suzanne M.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim Alcohol-related liver disease (ALD) is mediated in part by insulin resistance. Attendant dysregulation of lipid metabolism increases accumulation of hepatic ceramides that worsen insulin resistance and compromise the structural and functional integrity of the liver. Insulin and insulin growth factor (IGF) stimulate aspartyl-asparaginyl-β-hydroxylase (AAH), which promotes cell motility needed for structural maintenance and remodeling of the liver. AAH mediates its effects by activating Notch, and in ALD, insulin/IGF signaling, AAH, and Notch are inhibited. Method To test the hypothesis that in ALD, hepatic ceramide load contributes to impairments in insulin, AAH, and Notch signaling, control and chronic ethanol-fed adult Long–Evans rats were treated with myriocin, an inhibitor of serine palmitoyl transferase. Livers were used to assess steatohepatitis, insulin/IGF pathway activation, and expression of AAH–Notch signaling molecules. Results Chronic ethanol-fed rats had steatohepatitis with increased ceramide levels; impairments in signaling through the insulin receptor, insulin receptor substrate, and Akt; and decreased expression of AAH, Notch, Jagged, Hairy–Enhancer of Split-1, hypoxiainducible factor 1α, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen. Myriocin abrogated many of these adverse effects of ethanol, particularly hepatic ceramide accumulation, steatohepatitis, and impairments of insulin signaling through Akt, AAH, and Notch. Conclusions In ALD, the histopathology and impairments in insulin/IGF responsiveness can be substantially resolved by ceramide inhibitor treatments, even in the context of continued chronic ethanol exposure. PMID:23802886

  6. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 stabilizes transcription factor Gli2 and enhances the activity of Hedgehog signaling in hepatocellular cancer.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhengwei; Xu, Liyao; Zhang, Junyan; Lu, Quqin; Luo, Shiwen; Xu, Linlin

    2016-03-18

    The Gli transcription factors are primary transcriptional regulators that mediate the activation of Hedgehog (Hh) signaling. Recent studies have revealed that Gli proteins are also regulated transcriptionally and post-translationally through noncanonical mechanisms, independent of Hh signaling. However, the precise mechanisms involved in the regulation of Gli proteins remain unclear. Using a differential mass-spectrometry approach, we found that aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 (ALDH1A1) is associated with transcription factor Gli2. Overexpression of ALDH1A1 increased Gli2 protein levels; in contrast, ALDH1A1 depletion facilitated Gli2 degradation. In addition, Gli2 mRNA expression was not affected by ectopic expression of ALDH1A1, indicating the role of ALDH1A1 in the stabilization of Gli2. Further investigation showed that ALDH1A1 prolonged the stability of Gli2 protein in a catalytic-independent manner. Finally, we showed that overexpression of ALDH1A1 activated the Hh signaling pathway and promoted cell growth, migration and invasion in hepatocellular cancer cells. Together, these results illustrate regulatory roles of ALDH1A1 in the activation of the Hh signaling pathway and highlight a novel mechanism for the aberrant activation of the Hh signaling pathway in hepatocellular cancer cells. PMID:26896768

  7. Colony stimulating factor-1 receptor signaling networks inhibit mouse macrophage inflammatory responses by induction of microRNA-21.

    PubMed

    Caescu, Cristina I; Guo, Xingyi; Tesfa, Lydia; Bhagat, Tushar D; Verma, Amit; Zheng, Deyou; Stanley, E Richard

    2015-02-19

    Macrophage polarization between the M2 (repair, protumorigenic) and M1 (inflammatory) phenotypes is seen as a continuum of states. The detailed transcriptional events and signals downstream of colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF-1R) that contributes to amplification of the M2 phenotype and suppression of the M1 phenotype are largely unknown. Macrophage CSF-1R pTyr-721 signaling promotes cell motility and enhancement of tumor cell invasion in vitro. Combining analysis of cellular systems for CSF-1R gain of function and loss of function with bioinformatic analysis of the macrophage CSF-1R pTyr-721-regulated transcriptome, we uncovered microRNA-21 (miR-21) as a downstream molecular switch controlling macrophage activation and identified extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 and nuclear factor-κB as CSF-1R pTyr-721-regulated signaling nodes. We show that CSF-1R pTyr-721 signaling suppresses the inflammatory phenotype, predominantly by induction of miR-21. Profiling of the miR-21-regulated messenger RNAs revealed that 80% of the CSF-1-regulated canonical miR-21 targets are proinflammatory molecules. Additionally, miR-21 positively regulates M2 marker expression. Moreover, miR-21 feeds back to positively regulate its own expression and to limit CSF-1R-mediated activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 and nuclear factor-κB. Consistent with an anti-inflammatory role of miRNA-21, intraperitoneal injection of mice with a miRNA-21 inhibitor increases the recruitment of inflammatory monocytes and enhances the peritoneal monocyte/macrophage response to lipopolysaccharide. These results identify the CSF-1R-regulated miR-21 network that modulates macrophage polarization.

  8. Ultrasound Targeted Microbubble Destruction-Mediated Delivery of a Transcription Factor Decoy Inhibits STAT3 Signaling and Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Kopechek, Jonathan A.; Carson, Andrew R.; McTiernan, Charles F.; Chen, Xucai; Hasjim, Bima; Lavery, Linda; Sen, Malabika; Grandis, Jennifer R.; Villanueva, Flordeliza S.

    2015-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is constitutively activated in many cancers where it acts to promote tumor progression. A STAT3-specific transcription factor decoy has been developed to suppress STAT3 downstream signaling, but a delivery strategy is needed to improve clinical translation. Ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) has been shown to enhance image-guided local delivery of molecular therapeutics to a target site. The objective of this study was to deliver STAT3 decoy to squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) tumors using UTMD to disrupt STAT3 signaling and inhibit tumor growth. Studies performed demonstrated that UTMD treatment with STAT3 decoy-loaded microbubbles inhibited STAT3 signaling in SCC cells in vitro. Studies performed in vivo demonstrated that UTMD treatment with STAT3 decoy-loaded microbubbles induced significant tumor growth inhibition (31-51% reduced tumor volume vs. controls, p < 0.05) in mice bearing SCC tumors. Furthermore, expression of STAT3 downstream target genes (Bcl-xL and cyclin D1) was significantly reduced (34-39%, p < 0.05) in tumors receiving UTMD treatment with STAT3 decoy-loaded microbubbles compared to controls. In addition, the quantity of radiolabeled STAT3 decoy detected in tumors eight hours after treatment was significantly higher with UTMD treatment compared to controls (70-150%, p < 0.05). This study demonstrates that UTMD can increase delivery of a transcription factor decoy to tumors in vivo and that the decoy can inhibit STAT3 signaling and tumor growth. These results suggest that UTMD treatment holds potential for clinical use to increase the concentration of a transcription factor signaling inhibitor in the tumor. PMID:26681983

  9. Colony stimulating factor-1 receptor signaling networks inhibit mouse macrophage inflammatory responses by induction of microRNA-21

    PubMed Central

    Caescu, Cristina I.; Guo, Xingyi; Tesfa, Lydia; Bhagat, Tushar D.; Verma, Amit; Zheng, Deyou

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage polarization between the M2 (repair, protumorigenic) and M1 (inflammatory) phenotypes is seen as a continuum of states. The detailed transcriptional events and signals downstream of colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF-1R) that contributes to amplification of the M2 phenotype and suppression of the M1 phenotype are largely unknown. Macrophage CSF-1R pTyr-721 signaling promotes cell motility and enhancement of tumor cell invasion in vitro. Combining analysis of cellular systems for CSF-1R gain of function and loss of function with bioinformatic analysis of the macrophage CSF-1R pTyr-721–regulated transcriptome, we uncovered microRNA-21 (miR-21) as a downstream molecular switch controlling macrophage activation and identified extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 and nuclear factor-κB as CSF-1R pTyr-721–regulated signaling nodes. We show that CSF-1R pTyr-721 signaling suppresses the inflammatory phenotype, predominantly by induction of miR-21. Profiling of the miR-21–regulated messenger RNAs revealed that 80% of the CSF-1–regulated canonical miR-21 targets are proinflammatory molecules. Additionally, miR-21 positively regulates M2 marker expression. Moreover, miR-21 feeds back to positively regulate its own expression and to limit CSF-1R–mediated activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 and nuclear factor-κB. Consistent with an anti-inflammatory role of miRNA-21, intraperitoneal injection of mice with a miRNA-21 inhibitor increases the recruitment of inflammatory monocytes and enhances the peritoneal monocyte/macrophage response to lipopolysaccharide. These results identify the CSF-1R–regulated miR-21 network that modulates macrophage polarization. PMID:25573988

  10. CTCF-dependent co-localization of canonical Smad signaling factors at architectural protein binding sites in D. melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Van Bortle, Kevin; Peterson, Aidan J; Takenaka, Naomi; O'Connor, Michael B; Corces, Victor G

    2015-01-01

    The transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathways transduce extracellular signals into tissue-specific transcriptional responses. During this process, signaling effector Smad proteins translocate into the nucleus to direct changes in transcription, but how and where they localize to DNA remain important questions. We have mapped Drosophila TGF-β signaling factors Mad, dSmad2, Medea, and Schnurri genome-wide in Kc cells and find that numerous sites for these factors overlap with the architectural protein CTCF. Depletion of CTCF by RNAi results in the disappearance of a subset of Smad sites, suggesting Smad proteins localize to CTCF binding sites in a CTCF-dependent manner. Sensitive Smad binding sites are enriched at low occupancy CTCF peaks within topological domains, rather than at the physical domain boundaries where CTCF may function as an insulator. In response to Decapentaplegic, CTCF binding is not significantly altered, whereas Mad, Medea, and Schnurri are redirected from CTCF to non-CTCF binding sites. These results suggest that CTCF participates in the recruitment of Smad proteins to a subset of genomic sites and in the redistribution of these proteins in response to BMP signaling.

  11. Notch signaling represses hypoxia-inducible factor-1α-induced activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in osteoblasts under cobalt-mimicked hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    LI, CHEN-TIAN; LIU, JIAN-XIU; YU, BO; LIU, RUI; DONG, CHAO; LI, SONG-JIAN

    2016-01-01

    The modification of Wnt and Notch signaling pathways by hypoxia, and its association with osteoblast proliferation and apoptosis remain to be fully elucidated. To investigate Wnt-Notch crosstalk, and its role in hypoxia-induced osteoblast proliferation and apoptosis regulation, the present study investigated the effects of cobalt-mimicked hypoxia on the mouse pre-osteoblast-like cell line, MC3T3-E1, when the Notch signals were repressed using a γ-secretase inhibitor DAPT. The data showed that the cobalt-mimicked hypoxia suppressed cell proliferation under normal conditions, but increased cell proliferation under conditions of Notch repression, in a concentration-dependent manner. The results of western blot and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses showed that the cobalt treatment increased the levels of activated β-catenin protein and the expression levels of the target genes, axis inhibition protein 2 and myelocytomatosis oncogene, under DAPT-induced Notch repression. However, no significant changes were found in the expression levels of the Notch intracellular domain protein or the Notch target gene, hes1. In a β-catenin gene-knockdown experiment, the proliferation of the MC3T3-E1 cells under hypoxia were decreased by DAPT treatment, and knockdown of the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) suppressed the cobalt-induced increase in Wnt target gene levels. No significant difference in cell proliferation rate was found following DAPT treatment when the expression of HIF-1α was knocked down. The results of the present study showed the opposing effects of Wnt and Notch signaling under cobalt-mimicked hypoxia, which were partially regulated by HIF-1α, The results also showed that osteoblast proliferation was dependent on Wnt-Notch signal crosstalk. PMID:27220406

  12. Factors influencing the detectability of early warning signals of population collapse.

    PubMed

    Clements, Christopher F; Drake, John M; Griffiths, Jason I; Ozgul, Arpat

    2015-07-01

    The recent description of potentially generic early warning signals is a promising development that may help conservationists to anticipate a population's collapse prior to its occurrence. So far, the majority of such warning signals documented have been in highly controlled laboratory systems or in theoretical models. Data from wild populations, however, are typically restricted both temporally and spatially due to limited monitoring resources and intrinsic ecological heterogeneity-limitations that may affect the detectability of generic early warning signals, as they add additional stochasticity to population abundance estimates. Consequently, spatial and temporal subsampling may serve to either muffle or magnify early warning signals. Using a combination of theoretical models and analysis of experimental data, we evaluate the extent to which statistical warning signs are robust to data corruption.

  13. Fuz Regulates Craniofacial Development through Tissue Specific Responses to Signaling Factors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zichao; Wlodarczyk, Bogdan J.; Niederreither, Karen; Venugopalan, Shankar; Florez, Sergio; Finnell, Richard H.; Amendt, Brad A.

    2011-01-01

    The planar cell polarity effector gene Fuz regulates ciliogenesis and Fuz loss of function studies reveal an array of embryonic phenotypes. However, cilia defects can affect many signaling pathways and, in humans, cilia defects underlie several craniofacial anomalies. To address this, we analyzed the craniofacial phenotype and signaling responses of the Fuz−/− mice. We demonstrate a unique role for Fuz in regulating both Hedgehog (Hh) and Wnt/β-catenin signaling during craniofacial development. Fuz expression first appears in the dorsal tissues and later in ventral tissues and craniofacial regions during embryonic development coincident with cilia development. The Fuz−/− mice exhibit severe craniofacial deformities including anophthalmia, agenesis of the tongue and incisors, a hypoplastic mandible, cleft palate, ossification/skeletal defects and hyperplastic malformed Meckel's cartilage. Hh signaling is down-regulated in the Fuz null mice, while canonical Wnt signaling is up-regulated revealing the antagonistic relationship of these two pathways. Meckel's cartilage is expanded in the Fuz−/− mice due to increased cell proliferation associated with the up-regulation of Wnt canonical target genes and decreased non-canonical pathway genes. Interestingly, cilia development was decreased in the mandible mesenchyme of Fuz null mice, suggesting that cilia may antagonize Wnt signaling in this tissue. Furthermore, expression of Fuz decreased expression of Wnt pathway genes as well as a Wnt-dependent reporter. Finally, chromatin IP experiments demonstrate that β-catenin/TCF-binding directly regulates Fuz expression. These data demonstrate a new model for coordination of Hh and Wnt signaling and reveal a Fuz-dependent negative feedback loop controlling Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PMID:21935430

  14. Combinatorial signal integration by APETALA2/Ethylene Response Factor (ERF)-transcription factors and the involvement of AP2-2 in starvation response.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Marc Oliver; Gomez-Perez, Deborah; Probst, Nina; Dietz, Karl-Josef

    2012-01-01

    Transcription factors of the APETALA 2/Ethylene Response Factor (AP2/ERF)- family have been implicated in diverse processes during development, stress acclimation and retrograde signaling. Fifty-three leaf-expressed AP2/ERFs were screened for their transcriptional response to abscisic acid (ABA), 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), methylviologen (MV), sucrose and high or low light, respectively, and revealed high reactivity to these effectors. Six of them (AP2-2, ARF14, CEJ1, ERF8, ERF11, RAP2.5) were selected for combinatorial response analysis to ABA, DCMU and high light. Additive, synergistic and antagonistic effects demonstrated that these transcription factors are components of multiple signaling pathways. AP2-2 (At1g79700) was subjected to an in depth study. AP2-2 transcripts were high under conditions linked to limited carbohydrate availability and stress and down-regulated in extended light phase, high light or in the presence of sugar. ap2-2 knock out plants had unchanged metabolite profiles and transcript levels of co-expressed genes in extended darkness. However, ap2-2 revealed more efficient germination and faster early growth under high sugar, osmotic or salinity stress, but the difference was abolished in the absence of sugar or during subsequent growth. It is suggested that AP2-2 is involved in mediating starvation-related and hormonal signals.

  15. Transforming growth factor (TGF)beta, fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and retinoid signalling pathways promote pancreatic exocrine gene expression in mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed Central

    Skoudy, Anouchka; Rovira, Meritxell; Savatier, Pierre; Martin, Franz; León-Quinto, Trinidad; Soria, Bernat; Real, Francisco X

    2004-01-01

    Extracellular signalling cues play a major role in the activation of differentiation programmes. Mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells are pluripotent and can differentiate into a wide variety of specialized cells. Recently, protocols designed to induce endocrine pancreatic differentiation in vitro have been designed but little information is currently available concerning the potential of ES cells to differentiate into acinar pancreatic cells. By using conditioned media of cultured foetal pancreatic rudiments, we demonstrate that ES cells can respond in vitro to signalling pathways involved in exocrine development and differentiation. In particular, modulation of the hedgehog, transforming growth factor beta, retinoid, and fibroblast growth factor pathways in ES cell-derived embryoid bodies (EB) resulted in increased levels of transcripts encoding pancreatic transcription factors and cytodifferentiation markers, as demonstrated by RT-PCR. In EB undergoing spontaneous differentiation, expression of the majority of the acinar genes (i.e. amylase, carboxypeptidase A and elastase) was induced after the expression of endocrine genes, as occurs in vivo during development. These data indicate that ES cells can undergo exocrine pancreatic differentiation with a kinetic pattern of expression reminiscent of pancreas development in vivo and that ES cells can be coaxed to express an acinar phenotype by activation of signalling pathways known to play a role in pancreatic development and differentiation. PMID:14733613

  16. Activity-sensitive signaling by muscle-derived insulin-like growth factors in the developing and regenerating neuromuscular system.

    PubMed

    Caroni, P

    1993-08-27

    In the nervous system, activity-sensitive retrograde signaling pathways couple the status of postsynaptic activation to elimination of collaterals during development and collateral sprouting in the adult. This article presents evidence supporting the hypothesis that in the neuromuscular system, skeletal muscle fiber derived insulin-like growth factors play a central role in such signaling. This evidence includes (1) timing and activity-sensitive expression of IGFs in skeletal muscle fibers, (2) identification of an IGF- and activity-sensitive retrograde signaling pathway from developing muscle to motoneurons in the spinal cord, (3) demonstration that IGFs in the muscle are both sufficient and necessary to induce interstitial cell proliferation and intramuscular nerve sprouting in adult muscle.

  17. A novel transcriptional factor with Ser/Thr kinase activity involved in the transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta signalling pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, S; Takeuchi, M; Deguchi, M; Tsuji, T; Gahara, Y; Nagata, K

    2000-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) shows a variety of biological activities in various organs or cells. Recently some factors such as Smads (Sma and Mad proteins) and TGF-beta activating kinase 1 ('TAK1') have been characterized as signalling molecules downstream of TGF-beta. Several TGF-beta response elements have been identified such as cAMP response element, Smad binding element, and recognition sites for activating protein-1 and stimulating protein-1 in various gene promoters. We also reported a TGF-beta response element in the human C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) gene promoter. In this paper, we report on a novel factor which regulates the TGF-beta response promoter. This factor, named TSF1 (TGF-beta stimulated factor 1), possessed DNA-binding ability and activated the TGF-beta responsive CNP promoter or vascular endothelial growth factor gene promoter which possesses a sequence element analogous to the TGF-beta responsive GC-rich element of the CNP promoter. TSF1 did not directly activate a Smads-dependent promoter from plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 gene, but it showed enhancement in co-operation with Smad3 and Smad4. Interestingly, this factor had the structural features of a Ser/Thr kinase and actually exhibited protein kinase activity. TSF1 mRNA as well as its protein level were stimulated by TGF-beta treatment. Thus, TSF1 is an unique factor with two biological functions, transcriptional regulation and protein phosphorylation, that may be involved in TGF-beta signals. PMID:10947953

  18. Ebola Virus Modulates Transforming Growth Factor β Signaling and Cellular Markers of Mesenchyme-Like Transition in Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wahl-Jensen, Victoria; Safronetz, David; Trost, Brett; Hoenen, Thomas; Arsenault, Ryan; Feldmann, Friederike; Traynor, Dawn; Postnikova, Elena; Kusalik, Anthony; Napper, Scott; Blaney, Joseph E.; Feldmann, Heinz; Jahrling, Peter B.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ebola virus (EBOV) causes a severe hemorrhagic disease in humans and nonhuman primates, with a median case fatality rate of 78.4%. Although EBOV is considered a public health concern, there is a relative paucity of information regarding the modulation of the functional host response during infection. We employed temporal kinome analysis to investigate the relative early, intermediate, and late host kinome responses to EBOV infection in human hepatocytes. Pathway overrepresentation analysis and functional network analysis of kinome data revealed that transforming growth factor (TGF-β)-mediated signaling responses were temporally modulated in response to EBOV infection. Upregulation of TGF-β signaling in the kinome data sets correlated with the upregulation of TGF-β secretion from EBOV-infected cells. Kinase inhibitors targeting TGF-β signaling, or additional cell receptors and downstream signaling pathway intermediates identified from our kinome analysis, also inhibited EBOV replication. Further, the inhibition of select cell signaling intermediates identified from our kinome analysis provided partial protection in a lethal model of EBOV infection. To gain perspective on the cellular consequence of TGF-β signaling modulation during EBOV infection, we assessed cellular markers associated with upregulation of TGF-β signaling. We observed upregulation of matrix metalloproteinase 9, N-cadherin, and fibronectin expression with concomitant reductions in the expression of E-cadherin and claudin-1, responses that are standard characteristics of an epithelium-to-mesenchyme-like transition. Additionally, we identified phosphorylation events downstream of TGF-β that may contribute to this process. From these observations, we propose a model for a broader role of TGF-β-mediated signaling responses in the pathogenesis of Ebola virus disease. IMPORTANCE Ebola virus (EBOV), formerly Zaire ebolavirus, causes a severe hemorrhagic disease in humans and nonhuman

  19. The Drosophila Forkhead transcription factor FOXO mediates the reduction in cell number associated with reduced insulin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Jünger, Martin A; Rintelen, Felix; Stocker, Hugo; Wasserman, Jonathan D; Végh, Mátyás; Radimerski, Thomas; Greenberg, Michael E; Hafen, Ernst

    2003-01-01

    Background Forkhead transcription factors belonging to the FOXO subfamily are negatively regulated by protein kinase B (PKB) in response to signaling by insulin and insulin-like growth factor in Caenorhabditis elegans and mammals. In Drosophila, the insulin-signaling pathway regulates the size of cells, organs, and the entire body in response to nutrient availability, by controlling both cell size and cell number. In this study, we present a genetic characterization of dFOXO, the only Drosophila FOXO ortholog. Results Ectopic expression of dFOXO and human FOXO3a induced organ-size reduction and cell death in a manner dependent on phosphoinositide (PI) 3-kinase and nutrient levels. Surprisingly, flies homozygous for dFOXO null alleles are viable and of normal size. They are, however, more sensitive to oxidative stress. Furthermore, dFOXO function is required for growth inhibition associated with reduced insulin signaling. Loss of dFOXO suppresses the reduction in cell number but not the cell-size reduction elicited by mutations in the insulin-signaling pathway. By microarray analysis and subsequent genetic validation, we have identified d4E-BP, which encodes a translation inhibitor, as a relevant dFOXO target gene. Conclusion Our results show that dFOXO is a crucial mediator of insulin signaling in Drosophila, mediating the reduction in cell number in insulin-signaling mutants. We propose that in response to cellular stresses, such as nutrient deprivation or increased levels of reactive oxygen species, dFOXO is activated and inhibits growth through the action of target genes such as d4E-BP. PMID:12908874

  20. Osmotic Stress, not Aldose Reductase Activity, Directly induces Growth Factors and MAPK Signaling changes during Sugar Cataract Formation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Xing, Kuiyi; Randazzo, James; Blessing, Karen; Lou, Marjorie F.; Kador, Peter F.

    2012-01-01

    In sugar cataract formation in rats, aldose reductase (AR) actitvity is not only linked to lenticular sorbitol (diabetic) or galactitol (galactosemic) formation but also to signal transduction changes, cytotoxic signals and activation of apoptosis. Using both in vitro and in vivo techniques, the interrelationship between AR activity, polyol (sorbitol and galactitol) formation, osmotic stress, growth factor induction, and cell signaling changes have been investigated. For in vitro studies, lenses from Sprague Dawley rats were cultured for up to 48 hrs in TC-199-bicarbonate media containing either 30 mM fructose (control), or 30 mM glucose or galctose with/without the aldose reductase inhibitors AL1576 or tolrestat, the sorbitol dehydrogenase inhibitor (SDI) CP-470,711, or 15 mM mannitol (osmotic-compensated media). For in vivo studies, lenses were obtained from streptozotocin-induced diabetic Sprague Dawley rats fed diet with/without the ARIs AL1576 or tolrestat for 10 weeks. As expected, lenses cultured in high glucose / galactose media or from untreated diabetic rats all showed a decrease in the GSH pool that was lessened by ARI treatment. Lenses either from diabetic rats or from glucose/galactose culture conditions showed increased expression of basic-FGF, TGF-β, and increased signaling through P-Akt, P-ERK1/2 and P-SAPK/JNK which were also normalized by ARIs to the expression levels observed in non-diabetic controls. Culturing rat lenses in osomotically compensated media containing 30 mM glucose or galactose did not lead to increased growth factor expression or altered signaling. These studies indicate that it is the biophysical response of the lens to osmotic stress that results in an increased intralenticular production of basic-FGF and TGF-β and the altered cytotoxic signaling that is observed during sugar cataract formation. PMID:22710095

  1. The Mediator Kinase Module Restrains Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Signaling and Represses Vulval Cell Fate Specification in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Grants, Jennifer M; Ying, Lisa T L; Yoda, Akinori; You, Charlotte C; Okano, Hideyuki; Sawa, Hitoshi; Taubert, Stefan

    2016-02-01

    Cell signaling pathways that control proliferation and determine cell fates are tightly regulated to prevent developmental anomalies and cancer. Transcription factors and coregulators are important effectors of signaling pathway output, as they regulate downstream gene programs. In Caenorhabditis elegans, several subunits of the Mediator transcriptional coregulator complex promote or inhibit vulva development, but pertinent mechanisms are poorly defined. Here, we show that Mediator's dissociable cyclin dependent kinase 8 (CDK8) module (CKM), consisting of cdk-8, cic-1/Cyclin C, mdt-12/dpy-22, and mdt-13/let-19, is required to inhibit ectopic vulval cell fates downstream of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-Ras-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway. cdk-8 inhibits ectopic vulva formation by acting downstream of mpk-1/ERK, cell autonomously in vulval cells, and in a kinase-dependent manner. We also provide evidence that the CKM acts as a corepressor for the Ets-family transcription factor LIN-1, as cdk-8 promotes transcriptional repression by LIN-1. In addition, we find that CKM mutation alters Mediator subunit requirements in vulva development: the mdt-23/sur-2 subunit, which is required for vulva development in wild-type worms, is dispensable for ectopic vulva formation in CKM mutants, which instead display hallmarks of unrestrained Mediator tail module activity. We propose a model whereby the CKM controls EGFR-Ras-ERK transcriptional output by corepressing LIN-1 and by fine tuning Mediator specificity, thus balancing transcriptional repression vs. activation in a critical developmental signaling pathway. Collectively, these data offer an explanation for CKM repression of EGFR signaling output and ectopic vulva formation and provide the first evidence of Mediator CKM-tail module subunit crosstalk in animals. PMID:26715664

  2. Loss of transforming growth factor β signalling in the intestine contributes to tissue injury in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Hahm, K; Im, Y; Parks, T; Park, S; Markowitz, S; Jung, H; Green, J; Kim, S

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract caused by an abnormal and uncontrolled immune response to one or more normally occurring gut constituents.
AIM—Given the effects of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) on both the immune system and extracellular matrix, we postulated that alterations in TGF-β signalling in intestinal epithelial cells may play an important role in the development of IBD.
METHODS—TGF-β signalling was inactivated in mouse intestine by expressing a dominant negative mutant form of the TGF-β type II receptor under the control of the mouse intestinal trefoil peptide (ITF)/TFF3 promoter. Transgenic mice (ITF-dnRII) developed spontaneous colitis presenting with diarrhoea, haematochezia, and anal prolapse when not maintained under specific pathogen free (SPF) conditions. Under SPF conditions we induced colitis by mixing dextran sodium sulphate (DSS) in drinking water to examine the significance of loss of TGF-β signalling in the pathogenesis of IBD.
RESULTS—Transgenic mice showed increased susceptibility to DSS induced IBD, and elicited increased expression of major histocompatibility complex class II, generation of autoantibodies against intestinal goblet cells, and increased activity of matrix metalloproteinase in intestinal epithelial cells compared with wild-type littermates challenged with DSS.
CONCLUSIONS—Deficiency of TGF-β signalling specifically in the intestine contributes to the development of IBD. Maintenance of TGF-β signalling may be important in regulating immune homeostasis in the intestine


Keywords: inflammatory bowel disease; transforming growth factor β; matrix metalloproteinases; intestinal trefoil factor; mouse PMID:11454793

  3. Transforming Growth Factor β/activin signalling induces epithelial cell flattening during Drosophila oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Brigaud, Isabelle; Duteyrat, Jean-Luc; Chlasta, Julien; Le Bail, Sandrine; Couderc, Jean-Louis; Grammont, Muriel

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although the regulation of epithelial morphogenesis is essential for the formation of tissues and organs in multicellular organisms, little is known about how signalling pathways control cell shape changes in space and time. In the Drosophila ovarian epithelium, the transition from a cuboidal to a squamous shape is accompanied by a wave of cell flattening and by the ordered remodelling of E-cadherin-based adherens junctions. We show that activation of the TGFβ pathway is crucial to determine the timing, the degree and the dynamic of cell flattening. Within these cells, TGFβ signalling controls cell-autonomously the formation of Actin filament and the localisation of activated Myosin II, indicating that internal forces are generated and used to remodel AJ and to promote cytoskeleton rearrangement. Our results also reveal that TGFβ signalling controls Notch activity and that its functions are partly executed through Notch. Thus, we demonstrate that the cells that undergo the cuboidal-to-squamous transition produce active cell-shaping mechanisms, rather than passively flattening in response to a global force generated by the growth of the underlying cells. Thus, our work on TGFβ signalling provides new insights into the mechanisms through which signal transduction cascades orchestrate cell shape changes to generate proper organ structure. PMID:25681395

  4. Mannose Phosphate Isomerase Regulates Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor Family Signaling and Glioma Radiosensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Cazet, Aurélie; Charest, Jonathan; Bennett, Daniel C.; Sambrooks, Cecilia Lopez; Contessa, Joseph N.

    2014-01-01

    Asparagine-linked glycosylation is an endoplasmic reticulum co- and post- translational modification that enables the transit and function of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) glycoproteins. To gain insight into the regulatory role of glycosylation enzymes on RTK function, we investigated shRNA and siRNA knockdown of mannose phosphate isomerase (MPI), an enzyme required for mature glycan precursor biosynthesis. Loss of MPI activity reduced phosphorylation of FGFR family receptors in U-251 and SKMG-3 malignant glioma cell lines and also resulted in significant decreases in FRS2, Akt, and MAPK signaling. However, MPI knockdown did not affect ligand-induced activation or signaling of EGFR or MET RTKs, suggesting that FGFRs are more susceptible to MPI inhibition. The reductions in FGFR signaling were not caused by loss of FGF ligands or receptors, but instead were caused by interference with receptor dimerization. Investigations into the cellular consequences of MPI knockdown showed that cellular programs driven by FGFR signaling, and integral to the clinical progression of malignant glioma, were impaired. In addition to a blockade of cellular migration, MPI knockdown also significantly reduced glioma cell clonogenic survival following ionizing radiation. Therefore our results suggest that targeted inhibition of enzymes required for cell surface receptor glycosylation can be manipulated to produce discrete and limited consequences for critical client glycoproteins expressed by tumor cells. Furthermore, this work identifies MPI as a potential enzymatic target for disrupting cell surface receptor-dependent survival signaling and as a novel approach for therapeutic radiosensitization. PMID:25314669

  5. Regulation of NF-E2-Related Factor 2 Signaling for Cancer Chemoprevention: Antioxidant Coupled with Antiinflammatory

    PubMed Central

    Saw, Constance Lay-Lay

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Cancer chemoprevention is a process of using either natural or synthetic compounds to reduce the risk of developing cancer. Observations that NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-deficient mice lack response to some chemopreventive agents point to the important role of Nrf2 in chemoprevention. Nrf2 is a member of basic-leucine zipper transcription factor family and has been shown to regulate gene expression by binding to a response element, antioxidant responsive element. It is generally believed that activation of Nrf2 signaling is an adaptive response to the environmental and endogenous stresses. Under homeostatic conditions, Nrf2 is suppressed by association with Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1), but is stimulated upon exposure to oxidative or electrophilic stress. Once activated, Nrf2 translocates into nuclei and upregulates a group of genes that act in concert to combat oxidative stress. Nrf2 is also shown to have protective function against inflammation, a pathological process that could contribute to carcinogenesis. In this review, we will discuss the current progress in the study of Nrf2 signaling, in particular, the mechanisms of Nrf2 activation by chemopreventive agents. We will also discuss some of the potential caveats of Nrf2 in cancer treatment and future opportunity and challenges on regulation of Nrf2-mediated antioxidant and antiinflammatory signaling in the context of cancer prevention. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 13, 1679–1698. PMID:20486765

  6. Definition of a novel growth factor-dependent signal cascade for the suppression of bile acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Holt, Jason A; Luo, Guizhen; Billin, Andrew N; Bisi, John; McNeill, Y Yvette; Kozarsky, Karen F; Donahee, Mary; Wang, Da Yuan; Mansfield, Traci A; Kliewer, Steven A; Goodwin, Bryan; Jones, Stacey A

    2003-07-01

    The nuclear bile acid receptor FXR has been proposed to play a central role in the feedback repression of the gene encoding cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), the first and rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of bile acids. We demonstrate that FXR directly regulates expression of fibroblast growth factor-19 (FGF-19), a secreted growth factor that signals through the FGFR4 cell-surface receptor tyrosine kinase. In turn, FGF-19 strongly suppresses expression of CYP7A1 in primary cultures of human hepatocytes and mouse liver through a c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)-dependent pathway. This signaling cascade defines a novel mechanism for feedback repression of bile acid biosynthesis and underscores the vital role of FXR in the regulation of multiple pathways of cholesterol catabolism in the liver.

  7. FRS2 proteins recruit intracellular signaling pathways by binding to diverse targets on fibroblast growth factor and nerve growth factor receptors.

    PubMed

    Ong, S H; Guy, G R; Hadari, Y R; Laks, S; Gotoh, N; Schlessinger, J; Lax, I

    2000-02-01

    The docking protein FRS2 was implicated in the transmission of extracellular signals from the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) or nerve growth factor (NGF) receptors to the Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling cascade. The two members of the FRS2 family, FRS2alpha and FRS2beta, are structurally very similar. Each is composed of an N-terminal myristylation signal, a phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) domain, and a C-terminal tail containing multiple binding sites for the SH2 domains of the adapter protein Grb2 and the protein tyrosine phosphatase Shp2. Here we show that the PTB domains of both the alpha and beta isoforms of FRS2 bind directly to the FGF or NGF receptors. The PTB domains of the FRS2 proteins bind to a highly conserved sequence in the juxtamembrane region of FGFR1. While FGFR1 interacts with FRS2 constitutively, independent of ligand stimulation and tyrosine phosphorylation, NGF receptor (TrkA) binding to FRS2 is strongly dependent on receptor activation. Complex formation with TrkA is dependent on phosphorylation of Y490, a canonical PTB domain binding site that also functions as a binding site for Shc (NPXpY). Using deletion and alanine scanning mutagenesis as well as peptide competition assays, we demonstrate that the PTB domains of the FRS2 proteins specifically recognize two different primary structures in two different receptors in a phosphorylation-dependent or -independent manner. In addition, NGF-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of FRS2alpha is diminished in cells that overexpress a kinase-inactive mutant of FGFR1. This experiment suggests that FGFR1 may regulate signaling via NGF receptors by sequestering a common key element which both receptors utilize for transmitting their signals. The multiple interactions mediated by FRS2 appear to play an important role in target selection and in defining the specificity of several families of receptor tyrosine kinases. PMID:10629055

  8. Vascular endothelial growth factor signaling regulates the segregation of artery and vein via ERK activity during vascular development

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Se-Hee; Schmitt, Christopher E.; Woolls, Melissa J.; Holland, Melinda B.; Kim, Jun-Dae; Jin, Suk-Won

    2013-01-25

    Highlights: ► VEGF-A signaling regulates the segregation of axial vessels. ► VEGF-A signaling is mediated by PKC and ERK in this process. ► Ectopic activation of ERK is sufficient to rescue defects in vessel segregation. -- Abstract: Segregation of two axial vessels, the dorsal aorta and caudal vein, is one of the earliest patterning events occur during development of vasculature. Despite the importance of this process and recent advances in our understanding on vascular patterning during development, molecular mechanisms that coordinate the segregation of axial vessels remain largely elusive. In this report, we find that vascular endothelial growth factor-A (Vegf-A) signaling regulates the segregation of dorsal aorta and axial vein during development. Inhibition of Vegf-A pathway components including ligand Vegf-A and its cognate receptor Kdrl, caused failure in segregation of axial vessels in zebrafish embryos. Similarly, chemical inhibition of Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (Map2k1)/Extracellular-signal-regulated kinases (Erk) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3 K), which are downstream effectors of Vegf-A signaling pathway, led to the fusion of two axial vessels. Moreover, we find that restoring Erk activity by over-expression of constitutively active MEK in embryos with a reduced level of Vegf-A signaling can rescue the defects in axial vessel segregation. Taken together, our data show that segregation of axial vessels requires the function of Vegf-A signaling, and Erk may function as the major downstream effector in this process.

  9. Downstream signaling pathways in mouse adipose tissues following acute in vivo administration of fibroblast growth factor 21.

    PubMed

    Muise, Eric S; Souza, Sandra; Chi, An; Tan, Yejun; Zhao, Xuemei; Liu, Franklin; Dallas-Yang, Qing; Wu, Margaret; Sarr, Tim; Zhu, Lan; Guo, Hongbo; Li, Zhihua; Li, Wenyu; Hu, Weiwen; Jiang, Guoqiang; Paweletz, Cloud P; Hendrickson, Ronald C; Thompson, John R; Mu, James; Berger, Joel P; Mehmet, Huseyin

    2013-01-01

    FGF21 is a novel secreted protein with robust anti-diabetic, anti-obesity, and anti-atherogenic activities in preclinical species. In the current study, we investigated the signal transduction pathways downstream of FGF21 following acute administration of the growth factor to mice. Focusing on adipose tissues, we identified FGF21-mediated downstream signaling events and target engagement biomarkers. Specifically, RNA profiling of adipose tissues and phosphoproteomic profiling of adipocytes, following FGF21 treatment revealed several specific changes in gene expression and post-translational modifications, specifically phosphorylation, in several relevant proteins. Affymetrix microarray analysis of white adipose tissues isolated from both C57BL/6 (fed either regular chow or HFD) and db/db mice identified over 150 robust potential RNA transcripts and over 50 potential secreted proteins that were changed greater than 1.5 fold by FGF21 acutely. Phosphoprofiling analysis identified over 130 phosphoproteins that were modulated greater than 1.5 fold by FGF21 in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Bioinformatic analysis of the combined gene and phosphoprotein profiling data identified a number of known metabolic pathways such as glucose uptake, insulin receptor signaling, Erk/Mapk signaling cascades, and lipid metabolism. Moreover, a number of novel events with hitherto unknown links to FGF21 signaling were observed at both the transcription and protein phosphorylation levels following treatment. We conclude that such a combined "omics" approach can be used not only to identify robust biomarkers for novel therapeutics but can also enhance our understanding of downstream signaling pathways; in the example presented here, novel FGF21-mediated signaling events in adipose tissue have been revealed that warrant further investigation.

  10. Downstream Signaling Pathways in Mouse Adipose Tissues Following Acute In Vivo Administration of Fibroblast Growth Factor 21

    PubMed Central

    Chi, An; Tan, Yejun; Zhao, Xuemei; Liu, Franklin; Dallas-yang, Qing; Wu, Margaret; Sarr, Tim; Zhu, Lan; Guo, Hongbo; Li, Zhihua; Li, Wenyu; Hu, Weiwen; Jiang, Guoqiang; Paweletz, Cloud P.; Hendrickson, Ronald C.; Thompson, John R.; Mu, James; Berger, Joel P.; Mehmet, Huseyin

    2013-01-01

    FGF21 is a novel secreted protein with robust anti-diabetic, anti-obesity, and anti-atherogenic activities in preclinical species. In the current study, we investigated the signal transduction pathways downstream of FGF21 following acute administration of the growth factor to mice. Focusing on adipose tissues, we identified FGF21-mediated downstream signaling events and target engagement biomarkers. Specifically, RNA profiling of adipose tissues and phosphoproteomic profiling of adipocytes, following FGF21 treatment revealed several specific changes in gene expression and post-translational modifications, specifically phosphorylation, in several relevant proteins. Affymetrix microarray analysis of white adipose tissues isolated from both C57BL/6 (fed either regular chow or HFD) and db/db mice identified over 150 robust potential RNA transcripts and over 50 potential secreted proteins that were changed greater than 1.5 fold by FGF21 acutely. Phosphoprofiling analysis identified over 130 phosphoproteins that were modulated greater than 1.5 fold by FGF21 in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Bioinformatic analysis of the combined gene and phosphoprotein profiling data identified a number of known metabolic pathways such as glucose uptake, insulin receptor signaling, Erk/Mapk signaling cascades, and lipid metabolism. Moreover, a number of novel events with hitherto unknown links to FGF21 signaling were observed at both the transcription and protein phosphorylation levels following treatment. We conclude that such a combined "omics" approach can be used not only to identify robust biomarkers for novel therapeutics but can also enhance our understanding of downstream signaling pathways; in the example presented here, novel FGF21-mediated signaling events in adipose tissue have been revealed that warrant further investigation. PMID:24039848

  11. Transforming growth factor-beta/Smad3 signaling regulates insulin gene transcription and pancreatic islet beta-cell function.

    PubMed

    Lin, Huei-Min; Lee, Ji-Hyeon; Yadav, Hariom; Kamaraju, Anil K; Liu, Eric; Zhigang, Duan; Vieira, Anthony; Kim, Seong-Jin; Collins, Heather; Matschinsky, Franz; Harlan, David M; Roberts, Anita B; Rane, Sushil G

    2009-05-01

    Pancreatic islet beta-cell dysfunction is a signature feature of Type 2 diabetes pathogenesis. Consequently, knowledge of signals that regulate beta-cell function is of immense clinical relevance. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta signaling plays a critical role in pancreatic development although the role of this pathway in the adult pancreas is obscure. Here, we define an important role of the TGF-beta pathway in regulation of insulin gene transcription and beta-cell function. We identify insulin as a TGF-beta target gene and show that the TGF-beta signaling effector Smad3 occupies the insulin gene promoter and represses insulin gene transcription. In contrast, Smad3 small interfering RNAs relieve insulin transcriptional repression and enhance insulin levels. Transduction of adenoviral Smad3 into primary human and non-human primate islets suppresses insulin content, whereas, dominant-negative Smad3 enhances insulin levels. Consistent with this, Smad3-deficient mice exhibit moderate hyperinsulinemia and mild hypoglycemia. Moreover, Smad3 deficiency results in improved glucose tolerance and enhanced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in vivo. In ex vivo perifusion assays, Smad3-deficient islets exhibit improved glucose-stimulated insulin release. Interestingly, Smad3-deficient islets harbor an activated insulin-receptor signaling pathway and TGF-beta signaling regulates expression of genes involved in beta-cell function. Together, these studies emphasize TGF-beta/Smad3 signaling as an important regulator of insulin gene transcription and beta-cell function and suggest that components of the TGF-beta signaling pathway may be dysregulated in diabetes.

  12. Single-channel blind separation using L₁-sparse complex non-negative matrix factorization for acoustic signals.

    PubMed

    Parathai, P; Woo, W L; Dlay, S S; Gao, Bin

    2015-01-01

    An innovative method of single-channel blind source separation is proposed. The proposed method is a complex-valued non-negative matrix factorization with probabilistically optimal L1-norm sparsity. This preserves the phase information of the source signals and enforces the inherent structures of the temporal codes to be optimally sparse, thus resulting in more meaningful parts factorization. An efficient algorithm with closed-form expression to compute the parameters of the model including the sparsity has been developed. Real-time acoustic mixtures recorded from a single-channel are used to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:25618092

  13. Glucocorticoid signaling drives epigenetic and transcription factors to induce key regulators of human parturition.

    PubMed

    Zannas, Anthony S; Chrousos, George P

    2015-10-27

    Glucocorticoids are thought to play an important role in parturition. Two recent articles by Di Stefano et al. in the Archives and Wang et al. in this issue of Science Signaling reveal novel mechanisms by which glucocorticoid signaling can drive the epigenetic and transcriptional machinery to induce molecules involved in parturition, including the neuropeptide corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), the enzyme cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and the autacoid hormone prostaglandin E2. These findings contribute to our understanding of how glucocorticoids may regulate human parturition.

  14. Growth factors mediated cell signalling in prostate cancer progression: Implications in discovery of anti-prostate cancer agents.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Gaurav; Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Negi, Arvind; Rana, Anil; Singh, Sandeep; Kumar, Raj

    2015-10-01

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of mortality amongst world's population, in which prostate cancer is one of the most encountered malignancies among men. Globally, it is the sixth leading cause of cancer-related death in men. Prostate cancer is more prevalent in the developed world and is increasing at alarming rates in the developing countries. Prostate cancer is mostly a very sluggish progressing disease, caused by the overproduction of steroidal hormones like dihydrotestosterone or due to over-expression of enzymes such as 5-α-reductase. Various studies have revealed that growth factors play a crucial role in the progression of prostate cancer as they act either by directly elevating the level of steroidal hormones or upregulating enzyme efficacy by the active feedback mechanism. Presently, treatment options for prostate cancer include radiotherapy, surgery and chemotherapy. If treatment is done with prevailing traditional chemotherapy; it leads to resistance and development of androgen-independent prostate cancer that further complicates the situation with no cure option left. The current review article is an attempt to cover and establish an understanding of some major signalling pathways intervened through survival factors (IGF-1R), growth factors (TGF-α, EGF), Wnt, Hedgehog, interleukin, cytokinins and death factor receptor which are frequently dysregulated in prostate cancer. This will enable the researchers to design and develop better therapeutic strategies targeting growth factors and their cross talks mediated prostate cancer cell signalling. PMID:26297992

  15. Growth factors mediated cell signalling in prostate cancer progression: Implications in discovery of anti-prostate cancer agents.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Gaurav; Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Negi, Arvind; Rana, Anil; Singh, Sandeep; Kumar, Raj

    2015-10-01

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of mortality amongst world's population, in which prostate cancer is one of the most encountered malignancies among men. Globally, it is the sixth leading cause of cancer-related death in men. Prostate cancer is more prevalent in the developed world and is increasing at alarming rates in the developing countries. Prostate cancer is mostly a very sluggish progressing disease, caused by the overproduction of steroidal hormones like dihydrotestosterone or due to over-expression of enzymes such as 5-α-reductase. Various studies have revealed that growth factors play a crucial role in the progression of prostate cancer as they act either by directly elevating the level of steroidal hormones or upregulating enzyme efficacy by the active feedback mechanism. Presently, treatment options for prostate cancer include radiotherapy, surgery and chemotherapy. If treatment is done with prevailing traditional chemotherapy; it leads to resistance and development of androgen-independent prostate cancer that further complicates the situation with no cure option left. The current review article is an attempt to cover and establish an understanding of some major signalling pathways intervened through survival factors (IGF-1R), growth factors (TGF-α, EGF), Wnt, Hedgehog, interleukin, cytokinins and death factor receptor which are frequently dysregulated in prostate cancer. This will enable the researchers to design and develop better therapeutic strategies targeting growth factors and their cross talks mediated prostate cancer cell signalling.

  16. Transforming growth factor-β1 induces EMT by the transactivation of epidermal growth factor signaling through HA/CD44 in lung and breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Lingmei; Qi, Lisha; Liang, Zhijie; Song, Wangzhao; Liu, Yanxue; Wang, Yalei; Sun, Baocun; Zhang, Bin; Cao, Wenfeng

    2015-07-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a process closely related to tumor development, is regulated by a variety of signaling pathways and growth factors, such as transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and epidermal growth factor (EGF). Hyaluronan (HA) has been shown to induce EMT through either TGF-β1 or EGF signaling and to be a regulator of the crosstalk between these two pathways in fibroblasts. In this study, in order to clarify whether HA has the same effect in tumor cells, we utilized the lung cancer cell line, A549, and the breast cancer cell line, MCF-7, and found that the effects of stimulation with TGF-β1 were more potent than those of EGF in regulating the expression of EMT-associated proteins and in enhancing cell migration and invasion. In addition, we observed that TGF-β1 activated EGF receptor (EGFR) and its downstream AKT and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathways. Furthermore, we found that TGF-β1 upregulated the expression of hyaluronan synthases (HAS1, HAS2 and HAS3) and promoted the expression of CD44, a cell surface receptor for HA, which interacts with EGFR, resulting in the activation of the downstream AKT and ERK pathways. Conversely, treatment with 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU; an inhibitor of HAS) prior to stimulation with TGF-β1, inhibited the expression of CD44 and EGFR, abolished the interaction between CD44 and EGFR. Furthermore, the use of shRNA targeting CD44 impaired the expression of EGFR, deactivated the AKT and ERK pathways, reversed EMT and decreased the migration and invasion ability of cells. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that TGF-β1 induces EMT by the transactivation of EGF signaling through HA/CD44 in lung and breast cancer cells.

  17. Physical and perceptual factors shape the neural mechanisms that integrate audiovisual signals in speech comprehension.

    PubMed

    Lee, HweeLing; Noppeney, Uta

    2011-08-01

    Face-to-face communication challenges the human brain to integrate information from auditory and visual senses with linguistic representations. Yet the role of bottom-up physical (spectrotemporal structure) input and top-down linguistic constraints in shaping the neural mechanisms specialized for integrating audiovisual speech signals are currently unknown. Participants were presented with speech and sinewave speech analogs in visual, auditory, and audiovisual modalities. Before the fMRI study, they were trained to perceive physically identical sinewave speech analogs as speech (SWS-S) or nonspeech (SWS-N). Comparing audiovisual integration (interactions) of speech, SWS-S, and SWS-N revealed a posterior-anterior processing gradient within the left superior temporal sulcus/gyrus (STS/STG): Bilateral posterior STS/STG integrated audiovisual inputs regardless of spectrotemporal structure or speech percept; in left mid-STS, the integration profile was primarily determined by the spectrotemporal structure of the signals; more anterior STS regions discarded spectrotemporal structure and integrated audiovisual signals constrained by stimulus intelligibility and the availability of linguistic representations. In addition to this "ventral" processing stream, a "dorsal" circuitry encompassing posterior STS/STG and left inferior frontal gyrus differentially integrated audiovisual speech and SWS signals. Indeed, dynamic causal modeling and Bayesian model comparison provided strong evidence for a parallel processing structure encompassing a ventral and a dorsal stream with speech intelligibility training enhancing the connectivity between posterior and anterior STS/STG. In conclusion, audiovisual speech comprehension emerges in an interactive process with the integration of auditory and visual signals being progressively constrained by stimulus intelligibility along the STS and spectrotemporal structure in a dorsal fronto-temporal circuitry.

  18. RNA editing of the GLI1 transcription factor modulates the output of Hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Shimokawa, Takashi; Rahman, Mohammed Ferdous-Ur; Tostar, Ulrica; Sonkoly, Enikö; Ståhle, Mona; Pivarcsi, Andor; Palaniswamy, Ramesh; Zaphiropoulos, Peter G

    2013-02-01

    The Hedgehog (HH) signaling pathway has important roles in tumorigenesis and in embryonal patterning. The Glioma-associated oncogene 1 (GLI1) is a key molecule in HH signaling, acting as a transcriptional effector and, moreover, is considered to be a potential therapeutic target for several types of cancer. To extend our previous focus on the implications of alternative splicing for HH signal transduction, we now report on an additional post-transcriptional mechanism with an impact on GLI1 activity, namely RNA editing. The GLI1 mRNA is highly edited at nucleotide 2179 by adenosine deamination in normal cerebellum, but the extent of this modification is reduced in cell lines from the cerebellar tumor medulloblastoma. Additionally, basal cell carcinoma tumor samples exhibit decreased GLI1 editing compared with normal skin. Interestingly, knocking down of either ADAR1 or ADAR2 reduces RNA editing of GLI1. This adenosine to inosine substitution leads to a change from Arginine to Glycine at position 701 that influences not only GLI1 transcriptional activity, but also GLI1-dependent cellular proliferation. Specifically, the edited GLI1, GLI1-701G, has a higher capacity to activate most of the transcriptional targets tested and is less susceptible to inhibition by the negative regulator of HH signaling suppressor of fused. However, the Dyrk1a kinase, implicated in cellular proliferation, is more effective in increasing the transcriptional activity of the non-edited GLI1. Finally, introduction of GLI1-701G into medulloblastoma cells confers a smaller increase in cellular growth relative to GLI1. In conclusion, our findings indicate that RNA editing of GLI1 is a regulatory mechanism that modulates the output of the HH signaling pathway. PMID:23324600

  19. Signalling pathways involved in the synergistic effects of human growth differentiation factor 9 and bone morphogenetic protein 15.

    PubMed

    Reader, Karen L; Mottershead, David G; Martin, Georgia A; Gilchrist, Robert B; Heath, Derek A; McNatty, Kenneth P; Juengel, Jennifer L

    2016-03-01

    Growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF9) and bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15) act synergistically to regulate granulosa cell proliferation and steroid production in several species. Several non-Sma and mothers against decapentaplegic (SMAD) signalling pathways are involved in the action of murine and ovine GDF9 and BMP15 in combination, with the pathways utilised differing between the two species. The aims of this research were to determine if human GDF9 and BMP15 also act in a synergistic manner to stimulate granulosa cell proliferation and to identify which non-SMAD signalling pathways are activated. Human GDF9 with BMP15 (GDF9+BMP15) stimulated an increase in (3)H-thymidine incorporation (P<0.001), which was greater than the increase with BMP15 alone, while GDF9 alone had no effect. The stimulation of (3)H-thymidine incorporation by GDF9+BMP15 was reduced by the addition of inhibitors to the SMAD2/3, nuclear factor-KB (NF-KB) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signalling pathways. Inhibitors to the SMAD1/5/8, extracellular signal-regulated kinase mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK-MAPK) or p38-MAPK pathways had no effect. The addition of the BMP receptor 2 (BMPR2) extracellular domain also inhibited stimulation of (3)H-thymidine incorporation by GDF9+BMP15. In conclusion, human GDF9 and BMP15 act synergistically to stimulate granulosa cell proliferation, a response that also involves species-specific non-SMAD signalling pathways.

  20. Inhibition of myocardin-related transcription factor/serum response factor signaling decreases lung fibrosis and promotes mesenchymal cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Sisson, Thomas H; Ajayi, Iyabode O; Subbotina, Natalya; Dodi, Amos E; Rodansky, Eva S; Chibucos, Lauren N; Kim, Kevin K; Keshamouni, Venkateshwar G; White, Eric S; Zhou, Yong; Higgins, Peter D R; Larsen, Scott D; Neubig, Richard R; Horowitz, Jeffrey C

    2015-04-01

    Myofibroblasts are crucial to the pathogenesis of tissue fibrosis. Their formation of stress fibers results in the release of myocardin-related transcription factor (MRTF), a transcriptional coactivator of serum response factor (SRF). MRTF-A (Mkl1)-deficient mice are protected from lung fibrosis. We hypothesized that the SRF/MRTF pathway inhibitor CCG-203971 would modulate myofibroblast function in vitro and limit lung fibrosis in vivo. Normal and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis lung fibroblasts were treated with/without CCG-203971 (N-[4-chlorophenyl]-1-[3-(2-furanyl)benzoyl]-3-piperidine carboxamide) and/or Fas-activating antibody in the presence/absence of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, and apoptosis was assessed. In vivo studies examined the effect of therapeutically administered CCG-203971 on lung fibrosis in two distinct murine models of fibrosis induced by bleomycin or targeted type II alveolar epithelial injury. In vitro, CCG-203971 prevented nuclear localization of MRTF-A; increased the apoptotic susceptibility of normal and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis fibroblasts; blocked TGF-β1-induced myofibroblast differentiation; and inhibited TGF-β1-induced expression of fibronectin, X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. TGF-β1 did not protect fibroblasts or myofibroblasts from apoptosis in the presence of CCG-203971. In vivo, CCG-203971 significantly reduced lung collagen content in both murine models while decreasing alveolar plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and promoting myofibroblast apoptosis. These data support a central role of the SRF/MRTF pathway in the pathobiology of lung fibrosis and suggest that its inhibition can help resolve lung fibrosis by promoting fibroblast apoptosis.

  1. Inhibition of Myocardin-Related Transcription Factor/Serum Response Factor Signaling Decreases Lung Fibrosis and Promotes Mesenchymal Cell Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Sisson, Thomas H.; Ajayi, Iyabode O.; Subbotina, Natalya; Dodi, Amos E.; Rodansky, Eva S.; Chibucos, Lauren N.; Kim, Kevin K.; Keshamouni, Venkateshwar G.; White, Eric S.; Zhou, Yong; Higgins, Peter D.R.; Larsen, Scott D.; Neubig, Richard R.; Horowitz, Jeffrey C.

    2016-01-01

    Myofibroblasts are crucial to the pathogenesis of tissue fibrosis. Their formation of stress fibers results in the release of myocardin-related transcription factor (MRTF), a transcriptional coactivator of serum response factor (SRF). MRTF-A (Mkl1)-deficient mice are protected from lung fibrosis. We hypothesized that the SRF/MRTF pathway inhibitor CCG-203971 would modulate myofibroblast function in vitro and limit lung fibrosis in vivo. Normal and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis lung fibroblasts were treated with/without CCG-203971 (N-[4-chlorophenyl]-1-[3-(2-furanyl)benzoyl]-3-piperidine carboxamide) and/or Fas-activating antibody in the presence/absence of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, and apoptosis was assessed. In vivo studies examined the effect of therapeutically administered CCG-203971 on lung fibrosis in two distinct murine models of fibrosis induced by bleomycin or targeted type II alveolar epithelial injury. In vitro, CCG-203971 prevented nuclear localization of MRTF-A; increased the apoptotic susceptibility of normal and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis fibroblasts; blocked TGF-β1–induced myofibroblast differentiation; and inhibited TGF-β1–induced expression of fibronectin, X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. TGF-β1 did not protect fibroblasts or myofibroblasts from apoptosis in the presence of CCG-203971. In vivo, CCG-203971 significantly reduced lung collagen content in both murine models while decreasing alveolar plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and promoting myofibroblast apoptosis. These data support a central role of the SRF/MRTF pathway in the pathobiology of lung fibrosis and suggest that its inhibition can help resolve lung fibrosis by promoting fibroblast apoptosis. PMID:25681733

  2. Intracrine prostaglandin E(2) signalling regulates hypoxia-inducible factor-1α expression through retinoic acid receptor-β.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Martínez, Ana B; Jiménez, María I Arenas; Manzano, Victoria Moreno; Lucio-Cazaña, Francisco J

    2012-12-01

    We have previously found in human renal proximal tubular HK-2 cells that hypoxia- and all-trans retinoic acid-induced hypoxia-inducible factor-1α up-regulation is accompanied by retinoic acid receptor-β up-regulation. Here we first investigated whether hypoxia-inducible factor-1α expression is dependent on retinoic acid receptor-β and our results confirmed it since (i) hypoxia-inducible factor-1α-inducing agents hypoxia, hypoxia-mimetic agent desferrioxamine, all-trans retinoic acid and interleukin-1β increased retinoic acid receptor-β expression, (ii) hypoxia-inducible factor-1α up-regulation was prevented by retinoic acid receptor-β antagonist LE-135 or siRNA retinoic acid receptor-β and (iii) there was direct binding of retinoic acid receptor-β to the retinoic acid response element in hypoxia-inducible factor-1α promoter upon treatment with all-trans retinoic acid and 16,16-dimethyl-prostaglandin E(2). Since intracellular prostaglandin E(2) mediates hypoxia-inducible factor-1α up-regulation in normoxia in HK-2 cells, we next investigated and confirmed, its role in the up-regulation of retinoic acid receptor-β in normoxia by hypoxia-inducible factor-1α-inducing agents all-trans retinoic acid, interleukin-1β and 16,16-dimethyl-prostaglandin E(2) by inhibiting cyclooxygenases, prostaglandin influx transporter or EP receptors. Interestingly, the hypoxia-induced increase in retinoic acid receptor-β expression and accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α was also blocked by the inhibitors tested. This is the first time, to our knowledge, that retinoic acid receptor-β signalling is involved in the control of the expression of transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1α in both normoxia and hypoxia and that retinoic acid receptor-β expression is found to be strictly regulated by intracellular prostaglandin E(2). Given the relevance of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α in the kidney in terms of tumorigenesis, progressive renal failure, production

  3. Neuroprotection, Growth Factors and BDNF-TrkB Signalling in Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Atsuko; Namekata, Kazuhiko; Guo, Xiaoli; Harada, Chikako; Harada, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    Neurotrophic factors play key roles in the development and survival of neurons. The potent neuroprotective effects of neurotrophic factors, including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF), suggest that they are good therapeutic candidates for neurodegenerative diseases. Glaucoma is a neurodegenerative disease of the eye that causes irreversible blindness. It is characterized by damage to the optic nerve, usually due to high intraocular pressure (IOP), and progressive degeneration of retinal neurons called retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Current therapy for glaucoma focuses on reduction of IOP, but neuroprotection may also be beneficial. BDNF is a powerful neuroprotective agent especially for RGCs. Exogenous application of BDNF to the retina and increased BDNF expression in retinal neurons using viral vector systems are both effective in protecting RGCs from damage. Furthermore, induction of BDNF expression by agents such as valproic acid has also been beneficial in promoting RGC survival. In this review, we discuss the therapeutic potential of neurotrophic factors in retinal diseases and focus on the differential roles of glial and neuronal TrkB in neuroprotection. We also discuss the role of neurotrophic factors in neuroregeneration. PMID:27657046

  4. Noncanonical transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) signaling in cranial neural crest cells causes tongue muscle developmental defects.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Jun-ichi; Suzuki, Akiko; Pelikan, Richard C; Ho, Thach-Vu; Chai, Yang

    2013-10-11

    Microglossia is a congenital birth defect in humans and adversely impacts quality of life. In vertebrates, tongue muscle derives from the cranial mesoderm, whereas tendons and connective tissues in the craniofacial region originate from cranial neural crest (CNC) cells. Loss of transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) type II receptor in CNC cells in mice (Tgfbr2(fl/fl);Wnt1-Cre) causes microglossia due to a failure of cell-cell communication between cranial mesoderm and CNC cells during tongue development. However, it is still unclear how TGFβ signaling in CNC cells regulates the fate of mesoderm-derived myoblasts during tongue development. Here we show that activation of the cytoplasmic and nuclear tyrosine kinase 1 (ABL1) cascade in Tgfbr2(fl/fl);Wnt1-Cre mice results in a failure of CNC-derived cell differentiation followed by a disruption of TGFβ-mediated induction of growth factors and reduction of myogenic cell proliferation and differentiation activities. Among the affected growth factors, the addition of fibroblast growth factor 4 (FGF4) and neutralizing antibody for follistatin (FST; an antagonist of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)) could most efficiently restore cell proliferation, differentiation, and organization of muscle cells in the tongue of Tgfbr2(fl/fl);Wnt1-Cre mice. Thus, our data indicate that CNC-derived fibroblasts regulate the fate of mesoderm-derived myoblasts through TGFβ-mediated regulation of FGF and BMP signaling during tongue development.

  5. Factors Influencing Continuous Breath Signal in Intubated and Mechanically-Ventilated Intensive Care Unit Patients Measured by an Electronic Nose

    PubMed Central

    Leopold, Jan Hendrik; Abu-Hanna, Ameen; Colombo, Camilla; Sterk, Peter J.; Schultz, Marcus J.; Bos, Lieuwe D. J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Continuous breath analysis by electronic nose (eNose) technology in the intensive care unit (ICU) may be useful in monitoring (patho) physiological changes. However, the application of breath monitoring in a non-controlled clinical setting introduces noise into the data. We hypothesized that the sensor signal is influenced by: (1) humidity in the side-stream; (2) patient-ventilator disconnections and the nebulization of medication; and (3) changes in ventilator settings and the amount of exhaled CO2. We aimed to explore whether the aforementioned factors introduce noise into the signal, and discuss several approaches to reduce this noise. Methods: Study in mechanically-ventilated ICU patients. Exhaled breath was monitored using a continuous eNose with metal oxide sensors. Linear (mixed) models were used to study hypothesized associations. Results: In total, 1251 h of eNose data were collected. First, the initial 15 min of the signal was discarded. There was a negative association between humidity and Sensor 1 (Fixed-effect β: −0.05 ± 0.002) and a positive association with Sensors 2–4 (Fixed-effect β: 0.12 ± 0.001); the signal was corrected for this noise. Outliers were most likely due to noise and therefore removed. Sensor values were positively associated with end-tidal CO2, tidal volume and the pressure variables. The signal was corrected for changes in these ventilator variables after which the associations disappeared. Conclusion: Variations in humidity, ventilator disconnections, nebulization of medication and changes of ventilator settings indeed influenced exhaled breath signals measured in ventilated patients by continuous eNose analysis. We discussed several approaches to reduce the effects of these noise inducing variables. PMID:27556467

  6. Weighted calibration with reduced number of signals by weighing factor modelling: application to the identification of explosives by ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Brasil, Beatriz; Bettencourt da Silva, Ricardo J N; Camões, M Filomena G F C; Salgueiro, Pedro A S

    2013-12-01

    The linear weighted regression model (LW) can be used to calibrate analytical instrumentation in a range of quantities (e.g. concentration or mass) wider than possible by the linear unweighted regression model, LuW (i.e. the least squares regression model), since this model can be applied when signals are not equally precise through the calibration range. If precision of signals varies within the calibration range, the regression line should be defined taking into account that more precise signals are more reliable and should count more to define regression parameters. Nevertheless, the LW requires the determination of the variation of signals precision through the calibration range. Typically, this information is collected experimentally for each calibration, requiring a large number of replicate collection of signals of calibrators. This work proposes reducing the number of signals needed to perform LW calibrations by developing models of weighing factors robust to daily variations of instrument sensibility. These models were applied to the determination of the ionic composition of the water soluble fraction of explosives. The adequacy of the developed models was tested through the analysis of control standards, certified reference materials and the ion balance of anions and cations in aqueous extracts of explosives, considering the measurement uncertainty estimated by detailed metrological models. The high success rate of the comparisons between estimated and known quantity values of reference solutions, considering results uncertainty, proves the validity of developed metrological models. The relative expanded measurement uncertainty of single determinations ranged from 1.93% to 35.7% for calibrations performed along 4 months. PMID:24267095

  7. Modulation of B-cell receptor and microenvironment signaling by a guanine exchange factor in B-cell malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Wei; Sharma, Sanjai

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) cells over-express a guanine exchange factor (GEF), Rasgrf-1. This GEF increases active Ras as it catalyzes the removal of GDP from Ras so that GTP can bind and activate Ras. This study aims to study the mechanism of action of Rasgrf-1 in B-cell malignancies. Methods: N-terminus truncated Rasgrf-1 variants have a higher GEF activity as compared to the full-length transcript therefore a MCL cell line with stable over-expression of truncated Rasgrf-1 was established. The B-cell receptor (BCR) and chemokine signaling pathways were compared in the Rasgrf-1 over-expressing and a control transfected cell line. Results: Cells over-expressing truncated form of Rasgrf-1 have a higher proliferative rate as compared to control transfected cells. BCR was activated by lower concentrations of anti-IgM antibody in Rasgrf-1 over-expressing cells as compared to control cells indicating that these cells are more sensitive to BCR signaling. BCR signaling also phosphorylates Rasgrf-1 that further increases its GEF function and amplifies BCR signaling. This activation of Rasgrf-1 in over-expressing cells resulted in a higher expression of phospho-ERK, AKT, BTK and PKC-alpha as compared to control cells. Besides BCR, Rasgrf-1 over-expressing cells were also more sensitive to microenvironment stimuli as determined by resistance to apoptosis, chemotaxis and ERK pathway activation. Conclusions: This GEF protein sensitizes B-cells to BCR and chemokine mediated signaling and also upregulates a number of other signaling pathways which promotes growth and survival of these cells. PMID:27458535

  8. Weighted calibration with reduced number of signals by weighing factor modelling: application to the identification of explosives by ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Brasil, Beatriz; Bettencourt da Silva, Ricardo J N; Camões, M Filomena G F C; Salgueiro, Pedro A S

    2013-12-01

    The linear weighted regression model (LW) can be used to calibrate analytical instrumentation in a range of quantities (e.g. concentration or mass) wider than possible by the linear unweighted regression model, LuW (i.e. the least squares regression model), since this model can be applied when signals are not equally precise through the calibration range. If precision of signals varies within the calibration range, the regression line should be defined taking into account that more precise signals are more reliable and should count more to define regression parameters. Nevertheless, the LW requires the determination of the variation of signals precision through the calibration range. Typically, this information is collected experimentally for each calibration, requiring a large number of replicate collection of signals of calibrators. This work proposes reducing the number of signals needed to perform LW calibrations by developing models of weighing factors robust to daily variations of instrument sensibility. These models were applied to the determination of the ionic composition of the water soluble fraction of explosives. The adequacy of the developed models was tested through the analysis of control standards, certified reference materials and the ion balance of anions and cations in aqueous extracts of explosives, considering the measurement uncertainty estimated by detailed metrological models. The high success rate of the comparisons between estimated and known quantity values of reference solutions, considering results uncertainty, proves the validity of developed metrological models. The relative expanded measurement uncertainty of single determinations ranged from 1.93% to 35.7% for calibrations performed along 4 months.

  9. Working With LGBT Baby Boomers and Older Adults: Factors That Signal a Welcoming Service Environment.

    PubMed

    Croghan, Catherine F; Moone, Rajean P; Olson, Andrea M

    2015-01-01

    Many providers recognize the importance of creating culturally competent services for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) older adults. Although multiple resources list steps to make professional practices more LGBT-welcoming, these resources provide no empirical data to support their recommendations. LGBT older adults (N = 327) were asked to describe what signals that a provider is LGBT-welcoming. Six of the top 10 signals related to provider behavior and suggest the importance of staff training; the balance included display of signage and rainbow flags, use of inclusive language on forms and the presence of LGBT-identified staff. Results provide evidence-based recommendations for working with LGBT older adults.

  10. Working With LGBT Baby Boomers and Older Adults: Factors That Signal a Welcoming Service Environment.

    PubMed

    Croghan, Catherine F; Moone, Rajean P; Olson, Andrea M

    2015-01-01

    Many providers recognize the importance of creating culturally competent services for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) older adults. Although multiple resources list steps to make professional practices more LGBT-welcoming, these resources provide no empirical data to support their recommendations. LGBT older adults (N = 327) were asked to describe what signals that a provider is LGBT-welcoming. Six of the top 10 signals related to provider behavior and suggest the importance of staff training; the balance included display of signage and rainbow flags, use of inclusive language on forms and the presence of LGBT-identified staff. Results provide evidence-based recommendations for working with LGBT older adults. PMID:26193473

  11. Impact of targeting insulin-like growth factor signaling in head and neck cancers.

    PubMed

    Limesand, Kirsten H; Chibly, Alejandro Martinez; Fribley, Andrew

    2013-10-01

    The IGF system has been shown to have either negative or negligible impact on clinical outcomes of tumor development depending on specific tumor sites or stages. This review focuses on the clinical impact of IGF signaling in head and neck cancer, the effects of IGF targeted therapies, and the multi-dimensional role of IRS 1/2 signaling as a potential mechanism in resistance to targeted therapies. Similar to other tumor sites, both negative and positive correlations between levels of IGF-1/IGF-1-R and clinical outcomes in head and neck cancer have been reported. In addition, utilization of IGF targeted therapies has not demonstrated significant clinical benefit; therefore the prognostic impact of the IGF system on head and neck cancer remains uncertain.

  12. Noise and signal scaling factors in digital holography in weak illumination: relationship with shot noise.

    PubMed

    Lesaffre, M; Verrier, N; Gross, M

    2013-01-01

    We have performed off-axis heterodyne holography with very weak illumination by recording holograms of the object with and without object illumination in the same acquisition run. We have experimentally studied how the reconstructed image signal (with illumination) and noise background (without) scale with the holographic acquisition and reconstruction parameters that are the number of frames and the number of pixels of the reconstruction spatial filter. The first parameter is related to the frequency bandwidth of detection in time, the second one to the bandwidth in space. The signal to background ratio varies roughly like the inverse of the bandwidth in time and space. We have also compared the noise background with the theoretical shot-noise background calculated by Monte Carlo simulation. The experimental and Monte Carlo noise background agree very well with each other.

  13. Tissue factor induces VEGF expression via activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in ARPE-19 cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Sang, Aimin; Zhu, Manhui; Zhang, Guowei; Guan, Huaijin; Ji, Min

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of the present study was to investigate the potential signal mechanism of tissue factor (TF) in the regulation of the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in human retinal pigment epithelial (ARPE-19) cells. Methods An in vitro RPE cell chemical hypoxia model was established by adding cobalt chloride (CoCl2) in the culture medium. The irritative concentration of CoCl2 was determined with a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay kit. VEGF production in ARPE-19 cells was measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and western blotting. The Wnt signaling pathway–associated molecules, including phospho-glycogen synthase kinase 3β (p-GSK3β), GSK3β, p-β-catenin and β-catenin, were detected with western blotting. pEGFP-N3-hTF was constructed and verified with digestion of the restriction enzyme and sequencing analysis. Human TF overexpression and silencing plasmids were transfected into the ARPE-19 cells to clarify the causal relationship between TF and VEGF expression. The Transwell coculture system of ARPE-19 cells and RF/6A rhesus macaque choroid–retinal endothelial cells was performed to evaluate cell invasion and tube formation ability. Results Our anoxic model of ARPE-19 cells showed that TF expression was upregulated in accordance with variations in hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF-1α) and VEGF levels. Silencing and overexpression of TF decreased and increased VEGF expression, respectively. The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway played an important role in this effect. Results from the ARPE-19 cell and RF/6A cell coculture system showed that the enhancement of TF expression in the ARPE-19 cells led to significantly faster invasion and stronger tube-forming ability of the RF/6A cells, while siRNA-mediated TF silencing caused the opposite effects. Pharmacological disruption of Wnt signaling IWR-1-endo inhibited the effects compared to the TF-overexpressing group

  14. Insulin-Like Growth Factor Receptor Signaling is Necessary for Epidermal Growth Factor Mediated Proliferation of SVZ Neural Precursors in vitro Following Neonatal Hypoxia–Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Alagappan, Dhivyaa; Ziegler, Amber N.; Chidambaram, Shravanthi; Min, Jungsoo; Wood, Teresa L.; Levison, Steven W.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we assessed the importance of insulin-like growth factor (IGF) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor co-signaling for rat neural precursor (NP) cell proliferation and self-renewal in the context of a developmental brain injury that is associated with cerebral palsy. Consistent with previous studies, we found that there is an increase in the in vitro growth of subventricular zone NPs isolated acutely after cerebral hypoxia–ischemia; however, when cultured in medium that is insufficient to stimulate the IGF type 1 receptor, neurosphere formation and the proliferative capacity of those NPs was severely curtailed. This reduced growth capacity could not be attributed simply to failure to survive. The growth and self-renewal of the NPs could be restored by addition of both IGF-I and IGF-II. Since the size of the neurosphere is predominantly due to cell proliferation we hypothesized that the IGFs were regulating progression through the cell cycle. Analyses of cell cycle progression revealed that IGF-1R activation together with EGFR co-signaling decreased the percentage of cells in G1 and enhanced cell progression into S and G2. This was accompanied by increases in expression of cyclin D1, phosphorylated histone 3, and phosphorylated Rb. Based on these data, we conclude that coordinate signaling between the EGF receptor and the IGF type 1 receptor is necessary for the normal proliferation of NPs as well as for their reactive expansion after injury. These data indicate that manipulations that maintain or amplify IGF signaling in the brain during recovery from developmental brain injuries will enhance the production of new brain cells to improve neurological function in children who are at risk for developing cerebral palsy. PMID:24904523

  15. Notch signalling pathway as an oncogenic factor involved in cancer development

    PubMed Central

    Piecuch, Adam; Dittfeld, Anna; Mielańczyk, Łukasz; Michalski, Marek; Wyrobiec, Grzegorz; Harabin-Słowińska, Marzena; Kurek, Józef; Wojnicz, Romuald

    2016-01-01

    Notch signalling is an evolutionarily conserved signalling pathway, which plays a significant role in a wide array of cellular processes including proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Nevertheless, it must be noted that Notch is a binary cell fate determinant, and its overexpression has been described as oncogenic in a broad range of human malignancies. This finding led to interest in therapeutically targeting this pathway especially by the use of GSIs, which block the cleavage of Notch at the cell membrane and inhibit release of the transcriptionally active NotchIC subunit. Preclinical cancer models have clearly demonstrated that GSIs suppress the growth of such malignancies as pancreatic, breast, and lung cancer; however, GSI treatment in vivo is associated with side effects, especially those within the gastrointestinal tract. Although intensive studies are associated with the role of γ-secretase in pathological states, it should be pointed out that this complex impacts on proteolytic cleavages of around 55 membrane proteins. Therefore, it is clear that GSIs are highly non-specific and additional drugs must be designed, which will more specifically target components of the Notch signalling.

  16. Notch signalling pathway as an oncogenic factor involved in cancer development.

    PubMed

    Brzozowa-Zasada, Marlena; Piecuch, Adam; Dittfeld, Anna; Mielańczyk, Łukasz; Michalski, Marek; Wyrobiec, Grzegorz; Harabin-Słowińska, Marzena; Kurek, Józef; Wojnicz, Romuald

    2016-01-01

    Notch signalling is an evolutionarily conserved signalling pathway, which plays a significant role in a wide array of cellular processes including proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Nevertheless, it must be noted that Notch is a binary cell fate determinant, and its overexpression has been described as oncogenic in a broad range of human malignancies. This finding led to interest in therapeutically targeting this pathway especially by the use of GSIs, which block the cleavage of Notch at the cell membrane and inhibit release of the transcriptionally active NotchIC subunit. Preclinical cancer models have clearly demonstrated that GSIs suppress the growth of such malignancies as pancreatic, breast, and lung cancer; however, GSI treatment in vivo is associated with side effects, especially those within the gastrointestinal tract. Although intensive studies are associated with the role of γ-secretase in pathological states, it should be pointed out that this complex impacts on proteolytic cleavages of around 55 membrane proteins. Therefore, it is clear that GSIs are highly non-specific and additional drugs must be designed, which will more specifically target components of the Notch signalling. PMID:27688721

  17. The scaffolding and signaling functions of a localization factor impact polar development

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Patrick D.; Quardokus, Ellen M.; Lawler, Melanie L.; Guo, Xiaoyun; Klein, David; Chen, Joseph C.; Arnold, Randy J.; Brun, Yves V.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY In the differentiating alphaproteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus, organelle synthesis at cell poles is critical to forming different progeny after cell division. Coordination of polar organelle synthesis, including pili and holdfast, and flagellum ejection, is mediated in part by the scaffolding protein PodJ. At the time of cell division, PodJ undergoes regulated processing to a short form that persists at the flagellar pole of swarmer cells. This study analyzes how PodJ’s role in structural and signaling protein localization impacts organelle synthesis. A PodJ mutant with an internal deletion exhibits reduced sensitivity to pili-tropic phage ΦCbK, resulting from reduced pilA gene expression, which can be linked to altered signaling protein localization. The phage sensitivity defect of a ΔpodJ mutant can be partially suppressed by ectopic pilA expression. Induction of PodJ processing, by manipulation of podJ itself or controlled perP expression, resulted in decreased pilus biogenesis and, when coupled with a podJ mutation that reduced pilA expression, led to complete loss of phage sensitivity. As a whole, the results show that PodJ’s scaffolding role for structural and signaling proteins both contribute to flagellar pole organelle development. PMID:22512778

  18. Notch signalling pathway as an oncogenic factor involved in cancer development

    PubMed Central

    Piecuch, Adam; Dittfeld, Anna; Mielańczyk, Łukasz; Michalski, Marek; Wyrobiec, Grzegorz; Harabin-Słowińska, Marzena; Kurek, Józef; Wojnicz, Romuald

    2016-01-01

    Notch signalling is an evolutionarily conserved signalling pathway, which plays a significant role in a wide array of cellular processes including proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Nevertheless, it must be noted that Notch is a binary cell fate determinant, and its overexpression has been described as oncogenic in a broad range of human malignancies. This finding led to interest in therapeutically targeting this pathway especially by the use of GSIs, which block the cleavage of Notch at the cell membrane and inhibit release of the transcriptionally active NotchIC subunit. Preclinical cancer models have clearly demonstrated that GSIs suppress the growth of such malignancies as pancreatic, breast, and lung cancer; however, GSI treatment in vivo is associated with side effects, especially those within the gastrointestinal tract. Although intensive studies are associated with the role of γ-secretase in pathological states, it should be pointed out that this complex impacts on proteolytic cleavages of around 55 membrane proteins. Therefore, it is clear that GSIs are highly non-specific and additional drugs must be designed, which will more specifically target components of the Notch signalling. PMID:27688721

  19. Ectopic Expression of JcWRKY Transcription Factor Confers Salinity Tolerance via Salicylic Acid Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Parinita; Dabi, Mitali; Sapara, Komal K.; Joshi, Priyanka S.; Agarwal, Pradeep K.

    2016-01-01

    Plants, being sessile, have developed intricate signaling network to specifically respond to the diverse environmental stress. The plant-specific WRKY TFs form one of the largest TF family and are involved in diverse plant processes, involving growth, development and stress signaling through auto and cross regulation with different genes and TFs. Here, we report the functional characterization of a salicylic acid -inducible JcWRKY TF. The JcWRKY overexpression confers salinity tolerance in transgenic tobacco, as was evident by increased chlorophyll content and seed germination potential. The transgenic plants showed increased soluble sugar, membrane stability, reduced electrolyte leakage and generation of reactive oxygen species (H2O2 and O2•-) as compared to the wild type. Furthermore, the low SA treatment along with salinity improved the tolerance potential of the transgenics by maintaining ROS homeostasis and high K+/Na+ ratio. The transcript expression of SA biosynthetic gene ICS1 and antioxidative enzymes (CAT and SOD) showed upregulation during stress. Thus, the present study reflects that JcWRKY is working in co-ordination with SA signaling to orchestrate the different biochemical and molecular pathways to maneuvre salt stress tolerance of the transgenic plants. PMID:27799936

  20. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) signals through SHP2 to regulate primary mouse myoblast proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ju; Reed, Sarah A.; Johnson, Sally E.

    2009-08-01

    Niche localized HGF plays an integral role in G{sub 0} exit and the return to mitotic activity of adult skeletal muscle satellite cells. HGF actions are regulated by MET initiated intracellular signaling events that include recruitment of SHP2, a protein tyrosine phosphatase. The importance of SHP2 in HGF-mediated signaling was examined in myoblasts and primary cultures of satellite cells. Myoblasts stably expressing SHP2 (23A2-SHP2) demonstrate increased proliferation rates by comparison to controls or myoblasts expressing a phosphatase-deficient SHP2 (23A2-SHP2DN). By comparison to 23A2 myoblasts, treatment of 23A2-SHP2 cells with HGF does not further increase proliferation rates and 23A2-SHP2DN myoblasts are unresponsive to HGF. Importantly, the effects of SHP2 are independent of downstream ERK1/2 activity as inclusion of PD98059 does not blunt the HGF-induced proliferative response. SHP2 function was further evaluated in primary satellite cell cultures. Ectopic expression of SHP2 in satellite cells tends to decrease proliferation rates and siSHP2 causes an increase the percentage of dividing myogenic cells. Interestingly, treatment of satellite cells with high concentrations of HGF (50 ng/ml) inhibits proliferation, which can be overcome by knockdown of SHP2. From these results, we conclude that HGF signals through SHP2 in myoblasts and satellite cells to directly alter proliferation rates.

  1. Wolbachia as an “Infectious” Extrinsic Factor Manipulating Host Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Negri, Ilaria

    2011-01-01

    Wolbachia pipientis is a widespread endosymbiont of filarial nematodes and arthropods. While in worms the symbiosis is obligate, in arthropods Wolbachia induces several reproductive manipulations (i.e., cytoplasmic incompatibility, parthenogenesis, feminization of genetic males, and male-killing) in order to increase the number of infected females. These various phenotypic effects may be linked to differences in host physiology, and in particular to endocrine-related processes governing growth, development, and reproduction. Indeed, a number of evidences links Wolbachia symbiosis to insulin and ecdysteroid signaling, two multilayered pathways known to work antagonistically, jointly or even independently for the regulation of different molecular networks. At present it is not clear whether Wolbachia manipulates one pathway, thus affecting other related metabolic networks, or if it targets both pathways, even interacting at several points in each of them. Interestingly, in view of the interplay between hormone signaling and epigenetic machinery, a direct influence of the “infection” on hormonal signaling involving ecdysteroids might be achievable through the manipulation of the host’s epigenetic pathways. PMID:22654845

  2. Cross-talk between Smad and p38 MAPK signalling in transforming growth factor {beta} signal transduction in human glioblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dziembowska, Magdalena; Danilkiewicz, Malgorzata; Wesolowska, Aleksandra; Zupanska, Agata; Chouaib, Salem; Kaminska, Bozena . E-mail: bozenakk@nencki.gov.pl

    2007-03-23

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-{beta}) is a multifunctional cytokine involved in the regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival. Malignant tumour cells often do not respond to TGF-{beta} by growth inhibition, but retain responsiveness to cytokine in regulating extracellular matrix deposition, cell adhesion, and migration. We demonstrated that TGF-{beta}1 does not affect viability or proliferation of human glioblastoma T98G, but increases transcriptional responses exemplified by induction of MMP-9 expression. TGF-{beta} receptors were functional in T98G glioblastoma cells leading to SMAD3/SMAD4 nuclear translocation and activation of SMAD-dependent promoter. In parallel, a selective activation of p38 MAPK, and phosphorylation of its substrates: ATF2 and c-Jun proteins were followed by a transient activation of AP-1 transcription factor. Surprisingly, an inhibition of p38 MAPK with a specific inhibitor, SB202190, abolished TGF-inducible activation of Smad-dependent promoter and decreased Smad2 phosphorylation. It suggests an unexpected interaction between Smad and p38 MAPK pathways in TGF-{beta}1-induced signalling.

  3. Regulation of Hypoxia-inducible Factor-1α and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Signaling by Plant Flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Wasundara; Rupasinghe, H P Vasantha; Hoskin, David W

    2015-01-01

    Discovery of novel drugs that are able to prevent angiogenesis is a fast growing branch of cancer research. Current approaches to cancer chemotherapy include the use of alkylating agents, antimetabolites, antitumor antibiotics, platinum analogs and drugs derived from natural compounds. However, most of the currently used chemotherapeutic drugs have adverse side effects on normal healthy cells. In addition to the classical targets of cancer chemotherapy, prevention of angiogenesis through the regulation of indigenous angiogenic factors is a leading approach of developing selective novel anticancer drugs. Because of their low toxicity, there is increasing interest in exploring specific dietary phytochemicals as possible antiangiogenic agents. In this mini-review, selected flavonoids (e.g., apigenin, luteolin, quercetin and epigallocatechin-3-gallate, which are a group of plant polyphenols) that are able to regulate angiogenesis in in vitro and in vivo systems are discussed in the light of their potential to be exploited as novel anticancer drugs.

  4. Functional Genomic Screen Identifies Klebsiella pneumoniae Factors Implicated in Blocking Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) Signaling.

    PubMed

    Tomás, Anna; Lery, Leticia; Regueiro, Verónica; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Camino; Martínez, Verónica; Moranta, David; Llobet, Enrique; González-Nicolau, Mar; Insua, Jose L; Tomas, Juan M; Sansonetti, Philippe J; Tournebize, Régis; Bengoechea, José A

    2015-07-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an etiologic agent of community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia. It has been shown that K. pneumoniae infections are characterized by reduced early inflammatory response. Recently our group has shown that K. pneumoniae dampens the activation of inflammatory responses by antagonizing the activation of the NF-κB canonical pathway. Our results revealed that K. pneumoniae capsule polysaccharide (CPS) was necessary but not sufficient to attenuate inflammation. To identify additional Klebsiella factors required to dampen inflammation, we standardized and applied a high-throughput gain-of-function screen to examine a Klebsiella transposon mutant library. We identified 114 mutants that triggered the activation of NF-κB. Two gene ontology categories accounted for half of the loci identified in the screening: metabolism and transport genes (32% of the mutants) and envelope-related genes (17%). Characterization of the mutants revealed that the lack of the enterobactin siderophore was linked to a reduced CPS expression, which in turn underlined the NF-κB activation induced by the mutant. The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O-polysaccharide and the pullulanase (PulA) type 2 secretion system (T2SS) are required for full effectiveness of the immune evasion. Importantly, these factors do not play a redundant role. The fact that LPS O-polysaccharide and T2SS mutant-induced responses were dependent on TLR2-TLR4-MyD88 activation suggested that LPS O-polysaccharide and PulA perturbed Toll-like receptor (TLR)-dependent recognition of K. pneumoniae. Finally, we demonstrate that LPS O-polysaccharide and pulA mutants are attenuated in the pneumonia mouse model. We propose that LPS O-polysaccharide and PulA T2SS could be new targets for the design of new antimicrobials. Increasing TLR-governed defense responses might provide also selective alternatives for the management of K. pneumoniae pneumonia.

  5. Functional Genomic Screen Identifies Klebsiella pneumoniae Factors Implicated in Blocking Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Tomás, Anna; Lery, Leticia; Regueiro, Verónica; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Camino; Martínez, Verónica; Moranta, David; Llobet, Enrique; González-Nicolau, Mar; Insua, Jose L.; Tomas, Juan M.; Sansonetti, Philippe J.; Tournebize, Régis; Bengoechea, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an etiologic agent of community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia. It has been shown that K. pneumoniae infections are characterized by reduced early inflammatory response. Recently our group has shown that K. pneumoniae dampens the activation of inflammatory responses by antagonizing the activation of the NF-κB canonical pathway. Our results revealed that K. pneumoniae capsule polysaccharide (CPS) was necessary but not sufficient to attenuate inflammation. To identify additional Klebsiella factors required to dampen inflammation, we standardized and applied a high-throughput gain-of-function screen to examine a Klebsiella transposon mutant library. We identified 114 mutants that triggered the activation of NF-κB. Two gene ontology categories accounted for half of the loci identified in the screening: metabolism and transport genes (32% of the mutants) and envelope-related genes (17%). Characterization of the mutants revealed that the lack of the enterobactin siderophore was linked to a reduced CPS expression, which in turn underlined the NF-κB activation induced by the mutant. The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O-polysaccharide and the pullulanase (PulA) type 2 secretion system (T2SS) are required for full effectiveness of the immune evasion. Importantly, these factors do not play a redundant role. The fact that LPS O-polysaccharide and T2SS mutant-induced responses were dependent on TLR2-TLR4-MyD88 activation suggested that LPS O-polysaccharide and PulA perturbed Toll-like receptor (TLR)-dependent recognition of K. pneumoniae. Finally, we demonstrate that LPS O-polysaccharide and pulA mutants are attenuated in the pneumonia mouse model. We propose that LPS O-polysaccharide and PulA T2SS could be new targets for the design of new antimicrobials. Increasing TLR-governed defense responses might provide also selective alternatives for the management of K. pneumoniae pneumonia. PMID:25971969

  6. Development of a Multicolor Bioluminescence Imaging Platform to Simultaneously Investigate Transcription Factor NF-κB Signaling and Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Knol-Blankevoort, Vicky T; Mezzanotte, Laura; Rabelink, Martijn J W E; Löwik, Clemens W G M; Kaijzel, Eric L

    2016-01-01

    Here we describe a novel multicolor bioluminescent imaging platform that enables us to simultaneously investigate transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signalling and apoptosis. We genetically modified the human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 to express green, red, and blue light-emitting luciferases to monitor cell number and viability, NF-κB promoter activity, and to enable specific cell sorting and detection, respectively. Z-DEVD-animoluciferin, the pro-luciferin substrate, was used to determine apoptotic caspase 3/7 activity. We used this multicolored cell line for the in vitro evaluation of natural compounds and in vivo optical imaging of tumor necrosis factor (TNFα)-induced NF-κB activation (Mezzanotte et al., PLoS One 9:e85550, 2014). PMID:27424911

  7. Association of atypical protein kinase C isotypes with the docker protein FRS2 in fibroblast growth factor signaling.

    PubMed

    Lim, Y P; Low, B C; Lim, J; Wong, E S; Guy, G R

    1999-07-01

    FRS2 is a docker protein that recruits signaling proteins to the plasma membrane in fibroblast growth factor signal transduction. We report here that FRS2 was associated with PKC lambda when Swiss 3T3 cells were stimulated with basic fibroblast growth factor. PKC zeta, the other member of the atypical PKC subfamily, could also bind FRS2. The association between FRS2 and PKC lambda is likely to be direct as shown by yeast two-hybrid analysis. The C-terminal fragments of FRS2 (amino acid residues 300-508) and SNT2 (amino acids 281-492), an isoform bearing 50% identity to FRS2, interacted with PKC lambda at a region (amino acids 240-562) that encompasses the catalytic domain. In vitro kinase assays revealed neither FRS2 nor SNT2 was a substrate of PKC lambda or zeta. Mutation of the alanine residue (Ala-120) to glutamate in the pseudo-substrate region of PKC lambda results in a constitutively active kinase that exhibited more than 2-fold greater binding to FRS2 in vitro than its "closed" wild-type counterpart. Tyrosine phosphorylation of FRS2 did not affect its binding to the constitutively active PKC lambda mutant, suggesting that the activation of PKC lambda is necessary and sufficient for its association with FRS2. It is likely that FRS2 serves as an anchoring protein for targeting activated atypical PKCs to the cell plasma membrane in signaling pathways.

  8. SCAFFOLDING PROTEIN GAB1 SUSTAINS EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR-INDUCED MITOGENIC AND SURVIVAL SIGNALING BY MULTIPLE POSITIVE FEEDBACK LOOPS

    PubMed Central

    Kiyatkin, Anatoly; Aksamitiene, Edita; Markevich, Nick I.; Borisov, Nikolay M.; Hoek, Jan B.; Kholodenko, Boris N.

    2008-01-01

    Grb2-associated binder 1 (GAB1) is a scaffold protein involved in numerous interactions that propagate signaling by growth factor and cytokine receptors. Here we explore in silico and validate in vivo the role of GAB1 in the control of mitogenic (Ras/MAPK) and survival (PI3K/Akt) signaling stimulated by epidermal growth factor (EGF). We built a comprehensive mechanistic model that allows for reliable predictions of temporal patterns of cellular responses to EGF under diverse perturbations, including different EGF doses, GAB1 suppression, expression of mutant proteins and pharmacological inhibitors. We show that the temporal dynamics of GAB1 tyrosine phosphorylation is significantly controlled by positive GAB1-PI3K feedback and negative MAPK-GAB1 feedback. Our experimental and computational results demonstrate that the essential function of GAB1 is to enhance PI3K/Akt activation and extend the duration of Ras/MAPK signaling. By amplifying positive interactions between survival and mitogenic pathways, GAB1 plays the critical role in cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. PMID:16687399

  9. RNA helicase HEL-1 promotes longevity by specifically activating DAF-16/FOXO transcription factor signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Seo, Mihwa; Seo, Keunhee; Hwang, Wooseon; Koo, Hee Jung; Hahm, Jeong-Hoon; Yang, Jae-Seong; Han, Seong Kyu; Hwang, Daehee; Kim, Sanguk; Jang, Sung Key; Lee, Yoontae; Nam, Hong Gil; Lee, Seung-Jae V

    2015-08-01

    The homeostatic maintenance of the genomic DNA is crucial for regulating aging processes. However, the role of RNA homeostasis in aging processes remains unknown. RNA helicases are a large family of enzymes that regulate the biogenesis and homeostasis of RNA. However, the functional significance of RNA helicases in aging has not been explored. Here, we report that a large fraction of RNA helicases regulate the lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans. In particular, we show that a DEAD-box RNA helicase, helicase 1 (HEL-1), promotes longevity by specifically activating the DAF-16/forkhead box O (FOXO) transcription factor signaling pathway. We find that HEL-1 is required for the longevity conferred by reduced insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) signaling (IIS) and is sufficient for extending lifespan. We further show that the expression of HEL-1 in the intestine and neurons contributes to longevity. HEL-1 enhances the induction of a large fraction of DAF-16 target genes. Thus, the RNA helicase HEL-1 appears to promote longevity in response to decreased IIS as a transcription coregulator of DAF-16. Because HEL-1 and IIS are evolutionarily well conserved, a similar mechanism for longevity regulation via an RNA helicase-dependent regulation of FOXO signaling may operate in mammals, including humans. PMID:26195740

  10. RNA helicase HEL-1 promotes longevity by specifically activating DAF-16/FOXO transcription factor signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Seo, Mihwa; Seo, Keunhee; Hwang, Wooseon; Koo, Hee Jung; Hahm, Jeong-Hoon; Yang, Jae-Seong; Han, Seong Kyu; Hwang, Daehee; Kim, Sanguk; Jang, Sung Key; Lee, Yoontae; Nam, Hong Gil; Lee, Seung-Jae V

    2015-08-01

    The homeostatic maintenance of the genomic DNA is crucial for regulating aging processes. However, the role of RNA homeostasis in aging processes remains unknown. RNA helicases are a large family of enzymes that regulate the biogenesis and homeostasis of RNA. However, the functional significance of RNA helicases in aging has not been explored. Here, we report that a large fraction of RNA helicases regulate the lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans. In particular, we show that a DEAD-box RNA helicase, helicase 1 (HEL-1), promotes longevity by specifically activating the DAF-16/forkhead box O (FOXO) transcription factor signaling pathway. We find that HEL-1 is required for the longevity conferred by reduced insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) signaling (IIS) and is sufficient for extending lifespan. We further show that the expression of HEL-1 in the intestine and neurons contributes to longevity. HEL-1 enhances the induction of a large fraction of DAF-16 target genes. Thus, the RNA helicase HEL-1 appears to promote longevity in response to decreased IIS as a transcription coregulator of DAF-16. Because HEL-1 and IIS are evolutionarily well conserved, a similar mechanism for longevity regulation via an RNA helicase-dependent regulation of FOXO signaling may operate in mammals, including humans.

  11. Control of phenotypic plasticity of smooth muscle cells by bone morphogenetic protein signaling through the myocardin-related transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Lagna, Giorgio; Ku, Manching M; Nguyen, Peter H; Neuman, Nicole A; Davis, Brandi N; Hata, Akiko

    2007-12-21

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), unlike other muscle cells, do not terminally differentiate. In response to injury, VSMCs change phenotype, proliferate, and migrate as part of the repair process. Dysregulation of this plasticity program contributes to the pathogenesis of several vascular disorders, such as atherosclerosis, restenosis, and hypertension. The discovery of mutations in the gene encoding BMPRII, the type II subunit of the receptor for bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) provided an indication that BMP signaling may affect the homeostasis of VSMCs and their phenotype modulation. Here we report that BMP signaling potently induces SMC-specific genes in pluripotent cells and prevents dedifferentiation of arterial SMCs. The BMP-induced phenotype switch requires intact RhoA/ROCK signaling but is not blocked by inhibitors of the TGFbeta and PI3K/Akt pathways. Furthermore, nuclear localization and recruitment of the myocardin-related transcription factors (MRTF-A and MRTF-B) to a smooth muscle alpha-actin promoter is observed in response to BMP treatment. Thus, BMP signaling modulates VSMC phenotype via cross-talk with the RhoA/MRTFs pathway, and may contribute to the development of the pathological characteristics observed in patients with PAH and other obliterative vascular diseases. PMID:17947237

  12. Atypical regulation of virulence-associated functions by a diffusible signal factor in Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae.

    PubMed

    Rai, Rikky; Ranjan, Manish; Pradhan, Binod B; Chatterjee, Subhadeep

    2012-06-01

    In Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, the bacterial blight pathogen of rice, a secreted fatty acid signaling molecule known as diffusible signal factor (DSF) is required for virulence and growth on low-iron medium. To identify other virulence-associated traits that are regulated by DSF in this pathogen, we have performed microarray analysis of transcriptional changes between the wild type and DSF-deficient mutants of X. oryzae pv. oryzae. Expression of genes that encode secreted hydrolytic enzymes, motility, and chemotaxis functions are negatively regulated by DSF while functions involved in adhesion and biofilm formation are positively regulated. Enzymatic assays for hydrolytic enzymes as well as assays for chemotaxis, motility, attachment, and biofilm formation corroborate these findings. These results demonstrate that, in X. oryzae pv. oryzae, DSF-mediated cell-to-cell signaling coordinates transition from solitary to biofilm lifestyle by promoting expression of attachment functions and negatively regulating expression of motility functions. This is in contrast to X. campestris pv. campestris, a pathogen of crucifers, wherein the DSF system positively regulates motility functions and negatively regulates biofilm formation. These results indicate that virulence-associated functions can be regulated in a completely contrasting fashion by the same signaling system in very closely related bacteria.

  13. Ordering of neuronal apoptosis signaling: a superoxide burst precedes mitochondrial cytochrome c release in a growth factor deprivation model

    PubMed Central

    Lieven, Christopher J.; Thurber, Katherine A.; Levin, Emily J.

    2012-01-01

    Axonal injury to retinal ganglion cells, a defined central neuron, induces a burst of intracellular superoxide anion that precedes externalization of membrane phosphatidylserine and subsequent apoptotic cell death. Dismutation of superoxide prevents the signal and delays loss of these cells, consistent with superoxide being necessary for transduction of the axotomy signal. However, phosphatidylserine externalization is a relatively late step in apoptosis, and it is possible that the superoxide burst is not an early axotomy signal but rather a result of cytochrome c release from the mitochondrial inner membrane with consequent accumulation of reduced intermediates. Other possibilities are that both superoxide generation and cytochrome c release are induced in parallel by axotomy, or that cytochrome c release potentiates the effect of the superoxide burst. To distinguish these various possibilities, serum-deprived neuronal retinal cells were assayed in vitro for superoxide elevation and release of cytochrome c from mitochondria, and the distribution of these two markers across a large number of cells used to model the temporal ordering of events. Based on this model of factor-dependent cell death, superoxide precedes, and possibly potentiates, cytochrome c release, and thus the former is likely an early signal for certain types of neuronal apoptosis in the central nervous system. PMID:22411528

  14. Ordering of neuronal apoptosis signaling: a superoxide burst precedes mitochondrial cytochrome c release in a growth factor deprivation model.

    PubMed

    Lieven, Christopher J; Thurber, Katherine A; Levin, Emily J; Levin, Leonard A

    2012-06-01

    Axonal injury to retinal ganglion cells, a defined central neuron, induces a burst of intracellular superoxide anion that precedes externalization of membrane phosphatidylserine and subsequent apoptotic cell death. Dismutation of superoxide prevents the signal and delays loss of these cells, consistent with superoxide being necessary for transduction of the axotomy signal. However, phosphatidylserine externalization is a relatively late step in apoptosis, and it is possible that the superoxide burst is not an early axotomy signal but rather a result of cytochrome c release from the mitochondrial inner membrane with consequent accumulation of reduced intermediates. Other possibilities are that both superoxide generation and cytochrome c release are induced in parallel by axotomy, or that cytochrome c release potentiates the effect of the superoxide burst. To distinguish these various possibilities, serum-deprived neuronal retinal cells were assayed in vitro for superoxide elevation and release of cytochrome c from mitochondria, and the distribution of these two markers across a large number of cells used to model the temporal ordering of events. Based on this model of factor-dependent cell death, superoxide precedes, and possibly potentiates, cytochrome c release, and thus the former is likely an early signal for certain types of neuronal apoptosis in the central nervous system. PMID:22411528

  15. Structural insights of homotypic interaction domains in the ligand-receptor signal transduction of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young-Hoon; Jeong, Mi Suk; Jang, Se Bok

    2016-01-01

    Several members of tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) superfamily that these members activate caspase-8 from death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) in TNF ligand-receptor signal transduction have been identified. In the extrinsic pathway, apoptotic signal transduction is induced in death domain (DD) superfamily; it consists of a hexahelical bundle that contains 80 amino acids. The DD superfamily includes about 100 members that belong to four subfamilies: death domain (DD), caspase recruitment domain (CARD), pyrin domain (PYD), and death effector domain (DED). This superfamily contains key building blocks: with these blocks, multimeric complexes are formed through homotypic interactions. Furthermore, each DD-binding event occurs exclusively. The DD superfamily regulates the balance between death and survival of cells. In this study, the structures, functions, and unique features of DD superfamily members are compared with their complexes. By elucidating structural insights of DD superfamily members, we investigate the interaction mechanisms of DD domains; these domains are involved in TNF ligand-receptor signaling. These DD superfamily members play a pivotal role in the development of more specific treatments of cancer. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(3): 159-166] PMID:26615973

  16. MADS-box transcription factor AGL21 regulates lateral root development and responds to multiple external and physiological signals.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lin-Hui; Miao, Zi-Qing; Qi, Guo-Feng; Wu, Jie; Cai, Xiao-Teng; Mao, Jie-Li; Xiang, Cheng-Bin

    2014-11-01

    Plant root system morphology is dramatically influenced by various environmental cues. The adaptation of root system architecture to environmental constraints, which mostly depends on the formation and growth of lateral roots, is an important agronomic trait. Lateral root development is regulated by the external signals coordinating closely with intrinsic signaling pathways. MADS-box transcription factors are known key regulators of the transition to flowering and flower development. However, their functions in root development are still poorly understood. Here we report that AGL21, an AGL17-clade MADS-box gene, plays a crucial role in lateral root development. AGL21 was highly expressed in root, particularly in the root central cylinder and lateral root primordia. AGL21 overexpression plants produced more and longer lateral roots while agl21 mutants showed impaired lateral root development, especially under nitrogen-deficient conditions. AGL21 was induced by many plant hormones and environmental stresses, suggesting a function of this gene in root system plasticity in response to various signals. Furthermore, AGL21 was found positively regulating auxin accumulation in lateral root primordia and lateral roots by enhancing local auxin biosynthesis, thus stimulating lateral root initiation and growth. We propose that AGL21 may be involved in various environmental and physiological signals-mediated lateral root development and growth.

  17. Thiamine-auxotrophic mutants of Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0 are defective in cell-cell signaling and biocontrol factor expression.

    PubMed

    Dubuis, Christophe; Rolli, Joëlle; Lutz, Matthias; Défago, Geneviève; Haas, Dieter

    2006-04-01

    In the biocontrol strain Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0, the Gac/Rsm signal transduction pathway positively controls the synthesis of antifungal secondary metabolites and exoenzymes. In this way, the GacS/GacA two-component system determines the expression of three small regulatory RNAs (RsmX, RsmY, and RsmZ) in a process activated by the strain's own signal molecules, which are not related to N-acyl-homoserine lactones. Transposon Tn5 was used to isolate P. fluorescens CHA0 insertion mutants that expressed an rsmZ-gfp fusion at reduced levels. Five of these mutants were gacS negative, and in them the gacS mutation could be complemented for exoproduct and signal synthesis by the gacS wild-type allele. Furthermore, two thiamine-auxotrophic (thiC) mutants that exhibited decreased signal synthesis in the presence of 5 x 10(-8) M thiamine were found. Under these conditions, a thiC mutant grew normally but showed reduced expression of the three small RNAs, the exoprotease AprA, and the antibiotic 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol. In a gnotobiotic system, a thiC mutant was impaired for biological control of Pythium ultimum on cress. Addition of excess exogenous thiamine restored all deficiencies of the mutant. Thus, thiamine appears to be an important factor in the expression of biological control by P. fluorescens.

  18. Vascular endothelial growth factor stimulates endothelial differentiation from mesenchymal stem cells via Rho/myocardin-related transcription factor--a signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Nan; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Shui-Jing; Zhang, Chun-Ling; Mao, Li-Bin; Zhuang, Chun-Yu; Tang, Yan-Yang; Luo, Xue-Gang; Zhou, Hao; Zhang, Tong-Cun

    2013-07-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are pluripotent progenitors that can differentiate into a variety of cell types. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is one of the major factors of initiating and regulating angiogenesis. It has been reported that VEGF can induce MSCs differentiated into endothelial cells (ECs). However, the mechanism that VEGF-induced MSC differentiation is not completely understood. Here, we showed that VEGF induced human and rat bone marrow-derived MSCs differentiation to ECs. Rho family plays an important role in VEGF-induced endothelial cell migration and angiogenesis. Our results indicated that in MSCs, VEGF activated Rho/ROCK signaling pathway and promoted nuclear translocation of myocardin-related transcription factor-A (MRTF-A), which is controlled by Rho/ROCK signaling. In addition, Rho inhibitor C3 transferase, ROCK inhibitor Y27632 or depletion of endogenous MRTF-A abolished the VEGF-induced differentiation of MSCs into ECs. Furthermore, VEGF also enhanced the expression levels of CYR61/CCN1, as a regulator of vascular development and angiogenesis, and knockdown of endogenous MRTF-A reduced VEGF-induced the upregulation of CYR61/CCN1. Report assays with site-direct mutation analysis of CYR61/CCN1 promoter demonstrated that MRTF-A transactivated CYR61/CCN1 promoter mainly depending on CArG box. In this study, we identify the Rho/MRTF-A signaling pathway as a main actor in controlling VEGF-induced differentiation of human and rat bone marrow-derived MSCs into endothelial cells.

  19. Purification of a factor which provides a costimulatory signal for gamma interferon production.

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, K; Okamura, H; Nagata, K; Komatsu, T; Tamura, T

    1993-01-01

    A protein factor which induces high levels of gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) in resting splenic nonadherent cells was isolated from the sera of mice with generalized inflammation caused by endotoxic shock. The factor was highly purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation followed by ion-exchange column chromatography on DEAE-Sepharose, molecular sieving on Ultrogel AcA 44, and hydrophobic column chromatography with phenyl-Sepharose. It was further purified to apparent homogeneity by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. It induced IFN-gamma production in a dose-dependent manner in the presence of interleukin-2, monoclonal anti-CD3 antibody (anti-CD3 MAb), or concanavalin A (ConA) in spleen cells deprived of plastic plate- and nylon wool-adherent cells. Anti-CD3 MAb induced the highest level of production of the three. The factor, interleukin-2, anti-CD3 MAb, or ConA alone induced a trace of or no detectable IFN-gamma in these cells. The factor also exhibited an accessory function during proliferation in these cells in the presence of a suboptimal dose of ConA. However, the factor failed to stimulate IFN-gamma production when staphylococcal enterotoxin A, a superantigenic T-cell mitogen, was employed. Treatment with pronase or heat abolished these activities. These studies confirm the existence of a soluble protein factor which is able to exhibit a novel accessory function in IFN-gamma production in resting T or natural killer cells. It will be of interest to compare this factor with the recently cloned human natural killer stimulatory factor (NKSF/IL-12). Images PMID:8093360

  20. Oligodendrocytes exhibit selective expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling genes and signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 independent inhibition of interferon-gamma-induced toxicity in response to leukemia inhibitory factor.

    PubMed

    Emery, B; Butzkueven, H; Snell, C; Binder, M; Kilpatrick, T J

    2006-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune disease of the CNS that results in the death of oligodendrocytes, the myelinating cells of the CNS. Previous studies have indicated that the cytokine leukemia inhibitory factor prevents the cytotoxic effects of interferon-gamma on oligodendrocytes in vitro, and the death of oligodendrocytes in an animal model of multiple sclerosis. Members of a recently characterized family of proteins, the suppressors of cytokine signaling, have been demonstrated to mediate negative cross-talk between cytokines, with induction of suppressors of cytokine signaling proteins by one cytokine inhibiting the activity of a second. Here, we assess whether induction of members of the suppressors of cytokine signaling family could explain the antagonistic biological effects of leukemia inhibitory factor and interferon-gamma upon oligodendrocytes. It is found that leukemia inhibitory factor rapidly and strongly induces the expression of suppressors of cytokine signaling-3 in cultured rat oligodendrocytes, whereas interferon-gamma weakly induces the expression of both suppressor of cytokine signaling-1 and 3. Pre-treatment of oligodendrocytes with leukemia inhibitory factor does not prevent the subsequent phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 by interferon-gamma indicating that the leukemia inhibitory factor inhibition of interferon-gamma toxicity in oligodendrocytes is mediated by a suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 independent mechanism.

  1. Lipopolysaccharide signals activation of tumor necrosis factor biosynthesis through the ras/raf-1/MEK/MAPK pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Geppert, T. D.; Whitehurst, C. E.; Thompson, P.; Beutler, B.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is known to activate macrophages, causing the release of toxic cytokines that may provoke inflammation and shock. One of the most important and best studied of these cytokines is tumor necrosis factor (TNF). Details of the signaling pathway leading to TNF biosynthesis remain unclear. The pathway is branched in the sense that TNF gene transcription and TNF mRNA translation are both strongly stimulated by LPS. Recent evidence has indicated that MAP kinase homologs become phosphorylated in LPS-stimulated cells, suggesting their possible involvement in signal transduction. We sought to test this hypothesis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Measurements of LPS-induced MEK and ERK2 activity were undertaken in LPS-sensitive and LPS-insensitive cells. Transfection studies, in which dominant inhibitors of ras and raf-1 were used to block signaling to the level of MAP kinase, were carried out in order to judge whether the TNF gene transcription and TNF mRNA translation are modulated through this pathway. RESULTS: In RAW 264.7 mouse macrophages, both ERK2 and MEK1 activity are induced by LPS treatment. In the same cell line, dominant negative inhibitors of ras and raf-1 block LPS-induced activation of the TNF promoter, as well as derepression of the translational blockade normally imposed by the TNF 3'-untranslated region. A constitutively active form of raf-1 (raf-BXB) was found to augment, but not replace, the LPS signal. In LPS-insensitive cells (RAW 264.7 x NIH 3T3 fusion hybrid cells and primary macrophages derived from C3H/HeJ mice), ERK2 activity was found to be refractory to induction by LPS. CONCLUSIONS: The ras/raf-1/MEK/MAPK pathway is chiefly responsible for transduction of the LPS signal to the level of the TNF gene and mRNA. raf and raf-1 lie upstream from (or actually represent) the physical branchpoints of the transcriptional and translation activation signals generated by LPS. The lesions that prevent LPS signaling in macrophages

  2. Pleiotrophin promotes microglia proliferation and secretion of neurotrophic factors by activating extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 pathway.

    PubMed

    Miao, Jiayin; Ding, Minghui; Zhang, Aiwu; Xiao, Zijian; Qi, Weiwei; Luo, Ning; Di, Wei; Tao, Yuqian; Fang, Yannan

    2012-12-01

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) is an effective neuroprotective factor and its expression is strikingly increased in microglia after ischemia/reperfusion injury. However, whether PTN could provide neurotrophic support to neurons by regulating microglia function is not clear. In this study, we demonstrated that the expression of PTN was induced in microglia after oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion. PTN promoted the proliferation of microglia by enhancing the G1 to S phase transition. PTN also stimulated the secretion of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) in microglia, but did not upregulate the expression of proinflammatory factors such as TNF-α, IL-1β and iNOS. Mechanistically, we found that PTN increased the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 in microglia in both concentration-dependent and time-dependent manners. In addition, ERK1/2 inhibitor U0126 abolished the proliferation and G1 to S phase transition of microglia stimulated by PTN, and inhibited the production of BDNF, CNTF and NGF induced by PTN. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that PTN-ERK1/2 pathway plays important role in regulating microglia growth and secretion of neurotrophic factors. These findings provide new insight into the neuroprotective role of PTN and suggest that PTN is a new target for therapeutic intervention of stroke.

  3. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and Transforming Growth FactorSignaling Contributes to Variation for Wing Shape in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Dworkin, Ian; Gibson, Greg

    2006-01-01

    Wing development in Drosophila is a common model system for the dissection of genetic networks and their roles during development. In particular, the RTK and TGF-β regulatory networks appear to be involved with numerous aspects of wing development, including patterning, cell determination, growth, proliferation, and survival in the developing imaginal wing disc. However, little is known as to how subtle changes in the function of these genes may contribute to quantitative variation for wing shape, per se. In this study 50 insertional mutations, representing 43 loci in the RTK, Hedgehog, TGF-β pathways, and their genetically interacting factors were used to study the role of these networks on wing shape. To concurrently examine how genetic background modulates the effects of the mutation, each insertion was introgressed into two wild-type genetic backgrounds. Using geometric morphometric methods, it is shown that the majority of these mutations have profound effects on shape but not size of the wing when measured as heterozygotes. To examine the relationships between how each mutation affects wing shape hierarchical clustering was used. Unlike previous observations of environmental canalization, these mutations did not generally increase within-line variation relative to their wild-type counterparts. These results provide an entry point into the genetics of wing shape and are discussed within the framework of the dissection of complex phenotypes. PMID:16648592

  4. Transforming Growth Factor-β1 Signaling Represses Testicular Steroidogenesis through Cross-Talk with Orphan Nuclear Receptor Nur77

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eunsook; Song, Chin-Hee; Park, Jae-Il; Ahn, Ryun-Sup; Choi, Hueng-Sik; Ko, CheMyong; Lee, Keesook

    2014-01-01

    Transforming growth factor- β1 (TGF-β1) has been reported to inhibit luteinizing hormone (LH) mediated-steroidogenesis in testicular Leydig cells. However, the mechanism by which TGF-β1 controls the steroidogenesis in Leydig cells is not well understood. Here, we investigated the possibility that TGF-β1 represses steroidogenesis through cross-talk with the orphan nuclear receptor Nur77. Nur77, which is induced by LH/cAMP signaling, is one of major transcription factors that regulate the expression of steroidogenic genes in Leydig cells. TGF-β1 signaling inhibited cAMP-induced testosterone production and the expression of steroidogenic genes such as P450c17, StAR and 3β-HSD in mouse Leydig cells. Further, TGF-β1/ALK5 signaling repressed cAMP-induced and Nur77-activated promoter activity of steroidogenic genes. In addition, TGF-β1/ALK5-activated Smad3 repressed Nur77 transactivation of steroidogenic gene promoters by interfering with Nur77 binding to DNA. In primary Leydig cells isolated from Tgfbr2flox/flox Cyp17iCre mice, TGF-β1-mediated repression of cAMP-induced steroidogenic gene expression was significantly less than that in primary Leydig cells from Tgfbr2flox/flox mice. Taken together, these results suggest that TGF-β1/ALK5/Smad3 signaling represses the expression of steroidogenic genes via the suppression of Nur77 transactivation in testicular Leydig cells. These findings may provide a molecular mechanism involved in the TGF-β1-mediated repression of testicular steroidogenesis. PMID:25140527

  5. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) induces antiapoptotic and proapoptotic signals in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Faderl, Stefan; Harris, David; Van, Quin; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Talpaz, Moshe; Estrov, Zeev

    2003-07-15

    High levels of cytokines are associated with a poor prognosis in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, cytokines may induce, on one hand, survival factor expression and cell proliferation and, on the other hand, expression of inhibitory signals such as up-regulation of suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS) and induce apoptotic cell death. Because blasts from patients with AML express high procaspase protein levels, we asked whether granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) enhances procaspase protein production in AML cells. In the GM-CSF-responsive OCIM2 AML cell line, GM-CSF induced signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (Stat 5) phosphorylation, up-regulated cyclin D2, and stimulated cell cycle progression. Concurrently, GM-CSF stimulated expression of SOCS-2 and -3 and of procaspases 2 and 3 and induced caspase 3 activation, poly(ADP[adenosine 5'-diphosphate]-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage, and apoptotic cell death. The Janus kinase (Jak)-Stat inhibitor AG490 abrogated GM-CSF-induced expression of procaspase 3 and activation of caspase 3. Under the same conditions GM-CSF up-regulated production of BAX as well as Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, survivin, and XIAP. GM-CSF also increased procaspase 3 protein levels in OCI/AML3 and Mo7e cells, suggesting that this phenomenon is not restricted to a single leukemia cell line. Our data suggest that GM-CSF exerts a dual effect: it stimulates cell division but contemporaneously up-regulates Jak-Stat-dependent proapoptotic proteins. Up-regulation of procaspase levels in AML is thus a beacon for an ongoing growth-stimulatory signal.

  6. Signals and myogenic regulatory factors restrict pax3 and pax7 expression to dermomyotome-like tissue in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Christina L.; Hinits, Yaniv; Osborn, Daniel P.S.; Minchin, James E.N.; Tettamanti, Gianluca; Hughes, Simon M.

    2014-01-01

    Pax3/7 paired homeodomain transcription factors are important markers of muscle stem cells. Pax3 is required upstream of myod for lateral dermomyotomal cells in the amniote somite to form particular muscle cells. Later Pax3/7-dependent cells generate satellite cells and most body muscle. Here we analyse early myogenesis from, and regulation of, a population of Pax3-expressing dermomyotome-like cells in the zebrafish. Zebrafish pax3 is widely expressed in the lateral somite and, along with pax7, becomes restricted anteriorly and then to the external cells on the lateral somite surface. Midline-derived Hedgehog signals appear to act directly on lateral somite cells to repress Pax3/7. Both Hedgehog and Fgf8, signals that induce muscle formation within the somite, suppress Pax3/7 and promote expression of myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) myf5 and myod in specific muscle precursor cell populations. Loss of MRF function leads to loss of myogenesis by specific populations of muscle fibres, with parallel up-regulation of Pax3/7. Myod is required for lateral fast muscle differentiation from pax3-expressing cells. In contrast, either Myf5 or Myod is sufficient to promote slow muscle formation from adaxial cells. Thus, myogenic signals act to drive somite cells to a myogenic fate through up-regulation of distinct combinations of MRFs. Our data show that the relationship between Pax3/7 genes and myogenesis is evolutionarily ancient, but that changes in the MRF targets for particular signals contribute to myogenic differences between species. PMID:17094960

  7. Plumbagin Ameliorates CCl4-Induced Hepatic Fibrosis in Rats via the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Si; Chen, Yi; Chen, Bi; Cai, Yi-jing; Zou, Zhuo-lin; Wang, Jin-guo; Lin, Zhuo; Wang, Xiao-dong; Fu, Li-yun; Hu, Yao-ren; Chen, Yong-ping; Chen, Da-zhi

    2015-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) and its signaling molecules, EGFreceptor (EGFR) and signal transducer and activator of transcription factor 3 (STAT3), have been considered to play a role in liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. Plumbagin (PL) is an extracted component from the plant and has been used to treat different kinds of cancer. However, its role in regulation of EGFR and STAT3 during liver fibrosis has not been investigated. In this study, the effects of PL on the regulation of EGFR and STAT3 were investigated in carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) induced liver fibrosis and hepatic stellate cells (HSC-T6). PL significantly attenuated liver injury and fibrosis in CCl4 treated rats. At concentrations of 2 to 6 μM, PL did not induce significant cytotoxicity of HSC-T6 cells. Moreover, PL reduced phosphorylation of EGFR and STAT3 in both fibrotic liver and heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) treated HSC-T6 cells. Furthermore, PL reduced the expression of α-SMA, EGFR, and STAT3 in both fibrotic liver and HB-EGF treated HSC-T6 cells. In conclusion, plumbagin could ameliorate the development of hepatic fibrosis through its downregulation of EGFR and STAT3 in the liver, especially in hepatic stellate cells. PMID:26550019

  8. Hypoxia converts the myogenic action of insulin-like growth factors into mitogenic action by differentially regulating multiple signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Hongxia; Accili, Domenico; Duan, Cunming

    2010-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) stimulate myoblast proliferation and differentiation. It remains elusive how these mutually exclusive cellular responses are elicited by the same growth factor. Here we report that whereas IGF promotes myoblast differentiation under normoxia, it stimulates proliferation under hypoxia. Hypoxia activates the HIF-1 transcriptional program and knockdown of HIF-1α changes the mitogenic action of IGF into myogenic action under hypoxia. Conversely, overexpression of HIF-1α abolishes the myogenic effect of IGF under normoxia. Under normoxia, IGF activates the Akt-mTOR, p38, and Erk1/2 MAPK pathways. Hypoxia suppresses basal and IGF-induced Akt-mTOR and p38 activity, whereas it enhances and prolongs IGF-induced Erk1/2 activation in a HIF-1–dependent fashion. Activation of Akt-mTOR and p38 promotes myogenesis, and p38 also inhibits proliferation. Activation of Erk stimulates myoblast proliferation but inhibits differentiation. These results suggest that hypoxia converts the myogenic action of IGFs into mitogenic action by differentially regulating multiple signaling pathways via HIF-1-dependent mechanisms. Our findings provide a mechanistic explanation for the paradoxical actions of IGFs during myogenesis and reveal a novel mechanism by which cells sense and integrate growth factor signals and oxygen availability in their microenvironments. PMID:20231451

  9. Cucurbitacin I Attenuates Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy via Inhibition of Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CCN2) and TGF- β/Smads Signalings.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Moon Hee; Kim, Shang-Jin; Kang, Hara; Park, Kye Won; Park, Woo Jin; Yang, Seung Yul; Yang, Dong Kwon

    2015-01-01

    Cucurbitacin I is a naturally occurring triterpenoid derived from Cucurbitaceae family plants that exhibits a number of potentially useful pharmacological and biological activities. However, the therapeutic impact of cucurbitacin I on the heart has not heretofore been reported. To evaluate the functional role of cucurbitacin I in an in vitro model of cardiac hypertrophy, phenylephrine (PE)-stimulated cardiomyocytes were treated with a sub-cytotoxic concentration of the compound, and the effects on cell size and mRNA expression levels of ANF and β-MHC were investigated. Consequently, PE-induced cell enlargement and upregulation of ANF and β-MHC were significantly suppressed by pretreatment of the cardiomyocytes with cucurbitacin I. Notably, cucurbitacin I also impaired connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and MAPK signaling, pro-hypertrophic factors, as well as TGF-β/Smad signaling, the important contributing factors to fibrosis. The protective impact of cucurbitacin I was significantly blunted in CTGF-silenced or TGF-β1-silenced hypertrophic cardiomyocytes, indicating that the compound exerts its beneficial actions through CTGF. Taken together, these findings signify that cucurbitacin I protects the heart against cardiac hypertrophy via inhibition of CTGF/MAPK, and TGF- β/Smad-facilitated events. Accordingly, the present study provides new insights into the defensive capacity of cucurbitacin I against cardiac hypertrophy, and further suggesting cucurbitacin I's utility as a novel therapeutic agent for the management of heart diseases. PMID:26296085

  10. Quorum sensing signals are produced by Aeromonas salmonicida and quorum sensing inhibitors can reduce production of a potential virulence factor.

    PubMed

    Rasch, Maria; Kastbjerg, Vicky Gaedt; Bruhn, Jesper Bartholin; Dalsgaard, Inger; Givskov, Michael; Gram, Lone

    2007-12-13

    Many pathogens control production of virulence factors by self-produced signals in a process called quorum sensing (QS). We demonstrate that acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) signals, which enable bacteria to express certain phenotypes in relation to cell density, are produced by a wide spectrum of Aeromonas salmonicida strains. All 31 typical strains were AHL producers as were 21 of 26 atypical strains, but on a strain population basis, production of virulence factors such as protease, lipase, A-layer or pigment did not correlate with the production and accumulation of AHLs in the growth medium. Pigment production was only observed in broth under highly aerated conditions. Quorum sensing inhibitors (QSIs) are compounds that specifically block QS systems without affecting bacterial growth and 2 such compounds, sulphur-containing AHL-analogues, reduced production of protease in a typical strain of Aeromonas salmonicida. The most efficient compound N-(heptylsulfanylacetyl)-L-homoserine lactone (HepS-AHL), reduced protease production by a factor of 10. Five extracellular proteases were detected on gelatin-containing sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) gels and 3 of these were completely down regulated by HepS-AHL. Hence, QSIs can curb virulence in some strains and could potentially be pursued as bacterial disease control measures in aquaculture.

  11. The effects of milking frequency on insulin-like growth factor I signaling within the mammary gland of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Murney, R; Stelwagen, K; Wheeler, T T; Margerison, J K; Singh, K

    2015-08-01

    In dairy cows, short-term changes in milking frequency (MF) in early lactation have been shown to produce both an immediate and a long-term effect on milk yield. The effect of MF on milk yield is controlled locally within mammary glands and could be a function of changes in either number or activity of secretory mammary epithelial cells (MEC). Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) signaling is one candidate factor that could mediate these effects, as it can be controlled locally within mammary glands. Both MEC number and activity can be affected by IGF-I signaling by activating the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 pathways. To investigate the relationship between MF and IGF-I signaling, udder halves of 17 dairy cows were milked either 4 times a day (4×) or once a day (1×) for 14 d in early lactation. On d 14, between 3 and 5 h following milking, mammary biopsies were obtained from 10 cows from both udder halves, and changes in the expression of genes associated with IGF-I signaling and the activation of the PI3K/Akt and ERK1/2 pathways were measured. The mRNA abundance of IGF type I receptor, IGF binding protein (IGFBP)-3, and IGFBP-5 were lower following 4× milking relative to 1× milking. However, the mRNA abundance of IGF-I was not affected by MF. Both IGFBP3 and IGFBP5 are thought to inhibit IGF-I; therefore, decreases in their mRNA abundance may serve to stimulate the IGF-I signal in the 4×-milked mammary gland. The activation of PI3K/Akt pathway was lower in response to 4× milking relative to 1×, and the activation of the ERK1/2 was unaffected by MF, suggesting that they do not mediate the effects of MF. PMID:26074231

  12. Excessive Reversal of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and Ephrin Signaling Following Tracheal Occlusion in Rabbit Model of Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Varisco, Brian M; Sbragia, Lourenco; Chen, Jing; Scorletti, Federico; Joshi, Rashika; Wong, Hector R; Lopes-Figueira, Rebeca; Oria, Marc; Peiro, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) causes severe pulmonary hypoplasia from herniation of abdominal contents into the thorax. Tracheal occlusion (TO) for human CDH improves survival, but morbidity and mortality remain high, and we do not fully understand the cellular pathways and processes most severely impacted by CDH and TO. We created a left diaphragmatic hernia (DH) in rabbit fetuses with subsequent TO and collected left lung sections for NextGen mRNA sequencing. DH, TO and DHTO fetuses had comparable body and organ growth to control except for lower lung weights in DH (p < 0.05). Of 13,687 expressed genes, DHTO had 687 differentially expressed genes compared with DH, but no other group-group comparison had more than 10. Considering genes in combination, many of the genes reduced in DH were more highly expressed in DHTO than in control. Benchmarking fetal rabbit lung gene expression to published lung development data, both DH and DHTO lungs were more highly correlated with the gene expression of immature lung. DNA synthesis was upregulated in DHTO compared with DH and ribosome and protein synthesis pathways were downregulated. DH reduced total and epithelial cell proliferation by half and two-thirds respectively, and DHTO increased proliferation by 2.5 and 3.4-fold respectively. Signaling pathways downregulated by DH and upregulated in DHTO were epidermal growth factor receptor signaling, ephrin signaling and cell migration; however, levels of ephrin and EGFR signaling in DHTO exceeded that of control. Identification and inhibition of the ligands responsible for this dysregulated signaling could improve lung development in CDH. PMID:27452320

  13. MDA-9/Syntenin Is Essential for Factor VIIa-induced Signaling, Migration, and Metastasis in Melanoma Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Aissaoui, Hanaa; Prévost, Célia; Boucharaba, Ahmed; Sanhadji, Kamel; Bordet, Jean-Claude; Négrier, Claude; Boukerche, Habib

    2015-01-01

    Melanoma differentiation associated gene-9 (MDA-9), also known as syntenin, is a novel gene that positively regulates cancer cell motility, invasion, and metastasis through distinct biochemical and signaling pathways, but how MDA-9/syntenin is regulated in response to signals with the extracellular environment and promotes tumor progression is unclear. We now demonstrate that MDA-9/syntenin is dramatically up-regulated by a combination of rFVIIa and factor F(X) in malignant melanoma. Induction of MDA-9/syntenin in melanoma was found to occur in a thrombin-independent signaling pathway and involves the PAR-1/c-Src/Rho GTPases Rac1 and Cdc42/c-Jun N-terminal kinase axis resulting in the activation of paxillin, NF-κB, and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2). MDA-9/syntenin physically interacts with c-Src through its PDZ binding motif following stimulation of melanoma cells with rFVIIa and FX. We also document that induction of this signaling pathway is required for TF·FVIIa·Xa-induced cell migration, invasion, and metastasis by melanoma cells. The present finding uncovers a novel role of MDA-9/syntenin as an important TF·FVIIa·Xa/PAR-1-regulated gene that initiates a signaling circuit essential for cell motility and invasion of metastatic melanoma. In these contexts, targeting TF·FVIIa·Xa and its relevant downstream targets such as MDA-9/syntenin, may represent a novel therapeutic strategy to control the evolution of neoplastic cells. PMID:25505176

  14. MicroRNA regulation of central glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) signalling in depression.

    PubMed

    Maheu, M; Lopez, J P; Crapper, L; Davoli, M A; Turecki, G; Mechawar, N

    2015-02-17

    Although multiple studies have reported that peripheral glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is reduced in depression, cerebral GDNF signalling has yet to be examined in this condition. Here, we report an isoform-specific decrease in GDNF family receptor alpha 1 (GFRA1) mRNA expression, resulting in lowered GFRα1a protein levels in basolateral amygdala (BLA) samples from depressed subjects. Downregulation of GFRα1a was associated with increased expression of microRNAs, including miR-511, predicted to bind to long 3' untranslated region (3'-UTR)-containing transcripts (GFRA1-L) coding for GFRα1a. Transfection of human neural progenitor cells (NPCs) with a miR-511 mimic was sufficient to repress GFRA1-L/GFRα1a without altering GFRα1b, and resulted in pathway-specific changes in immediate early gene activity. Unexpectedly, GFRα1a knockdown did not reduce NPC responses to GDNF. Rather, it greatly enhanced mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling. This effect appeared to be mediated by GDNF/soluble GFRα1/neural cell adhesion molecule binding, and substituting the soluble GFRα1a/GFRα1b content of miR-511-transfected NPCs with that of controls rescued signalling. In light of previous reports suggesting that GFRα1b can inhibit GFRα1a-induced neuroplasticity, we also assessed the association between GFRα1 and doublecortin (DCX; a hyperplastic marker) in human BLA. Although controls displayed coordinated expression of GFRα1a and b isoforms and these correlated positively with DCX, the only significant association observed among depressed subjects was a strongly negative correlation between GFRα1b and DCX. Taken together, these results suggest that microRNA-mediated reductions of GFRα1a in depression change the quality, rather than the quantity, of GDNF signalling. They also suggest that central GDNF signalling may represent a novel target for antidepressant treatment.

  15. Kruppel-like factor 4 signals through microRNA-206 to promote tumor initiation and cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Lin, C-C; Sharma, S B; Farrugia, M K; McLaughlin, S L; Ice, R J; Loskutov, Y V; Pugacheva, E N; Brundage, K M; Chen, D; Ruppert, J M

    2015-01-01

    Tumor cell heterogeneity poses a major hurdle in the treatment of cancer. Mammary cancer stem-like cells (MaCSCs), or tumor-initiating cells, are highly tumorigenic sub-populations that have the potential to self-renew and to differentiate. These cells are clinically important, as they display therapeutic resistance and may contribute to treatment failure and recurrence, but the signaling axes relevant to the tumorigenic phenotype are poorly defined. The zinc-finger transcription factor Kruppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) is a pluripotency mediator that is enriched in MaCSCs. KLF4 promotes RAS-extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway activity and tumor cell survival in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells. In this study, we found that both KLF4 and a downstream effector, microRNA-206 (miR-206), are selectively enriched in the MaCSC fractions of cultured human TNBC cell lines, as well as in the aldehyde dehydrogenase-high MaCSC sub-population of cells derived from xenografted human mammary carcinomas. The suppression of endogenous KLF4 or miR-206 activities abrogated cell survival and in vivo tumor initiation, despite having only subtle effects on MaCSC abundance. Using a combinatorial approach that included in silico as well as loss- and gain-of-function in vitro assays, we identified miR-206-mediated repression of the pro-apoptotic molecules programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4) and connexin 43 (CX43/GJA1). Depletion of either of these two miR-206-regulated transcripts promoted resistance to anoikis, a prominent feature of CSCs, but did not consistently alter MaCSC abundance. Consistent with increased levels of miR-206 in MaCSCs, the expression of both PDCD4 and CX43 was suppressed in these cells relative to control cells. These results identify miR-206 as an effector of KLF4-mediated prosurvival signaling in MaCSCs through repression of PDCD4 and CX43. Consequently, our study suggests that a pluripotency factor exerts prosurvival signaling in MaCSCs, and that

  16. Final Scientific/Technical report for "ABI8: Prototype of a novel signaling factor"

    SciTech Connect

    Finkelstein, Ruth R.

    2013-02-21

    The Arabidopsis thaliana ABSCISIC ACID-INSENSITIVE8 locus encodes a highly conserved plant-specific protein that mediates abscisic acid (ABA) and sugar responses essential for growth. Although initial database comparisons revealed no domains of predictable function, it has recently been re-annotated as a member of the Glycosyltransferase family A. However, this function has not been demonstrated experimentally and no specific substrates have been identified. Mutations affecting ABI8 are near-lethal due to pleiotropic yet specific effects including altered ABA signaling, sugar transport, cell wall synthesis, root meristem maintenance, vascular patterning, and male sterility. Because the predicted sequence initially provided no clues, we used a guilt by association strategy to address function of this protein by determining its subcellular localization and identifying interacting proteins. Our studies showed that ABI8 is localized to the endomembrane system and may interact with proteins implicated in Golgi trafficking, lignification, and stress signaling. We found that the root meristem arrest reflects decreased auxin accumulation and resulting decreases in regulators required for meristem identity, all of which can be rescued by added glucose. Further studies showed that this glucose-dependence reflects reduced glucose uptake as well as the decreased expression of sugar-mobilizing enzymes. This work suggests that ABI8 may regulate trafficking of membrane proteins such as auxin transporters and cellulose synthase, but this hypothesis has not yet been tested. The altered gene expression is likely to be a secondary or later effect of this pleiotropic mutation.

  17. Resveratrol upregulates Egr-1 expression and activity involving extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase and ternary complex factors

    SciTech Connect

    Rössler, Oliver G.; Glatzel, Daniel; Thiel, Gerald

    2015-03-01

    Many intracellular functions have been attributed to resveratrol, a polyphenolic phytoalexin found in grapes and in other plants. Here, we show that resveratrol induces the expression of the transcription factor Egr-1 in human embryonic kidney cells. Using a chromosomally embedded Egr-1-responsive reporter gene, we show that the Egr-1 activity was significantly elevated in resveratrol-treated cells, indicating that the newly synthesized Egr-1 protein was biologically active. Stimulus-transcription coupling leading to the resveratrol-induced upregulation of Egr-1 expression and activity requires the protein kinases Raf and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase ERK, while MAP kinase phosphatase-1 functions as a nuclear shut-off device that interrupts the signaling cascade connecting resveratrol stimulation with enhanced Egr-1 expression. On the transcriptional level, Elk-1, a key transcriptional regulator of serum response element-driven gene transcription, connects the intracellular signaling cascade elicited by resveratrol with transcription of the Egr-1 gene. These data were corroborated by the observation that stimulation of the cells with resveratrol increased the transcriptional activation potential of Elk-1. The SRE as well as the GC-rich DNA binding site of Egr-1 function as resveratrol-responsive elements. Thus, resveratrol regulates gene transcription via activation of the stimulus-regulated protein kinases Raf and ERK and the stimulus-responsive transcription factors TCF and Egr-1. - Highlights: • The plant polyphenol resveratrol upregulates Egr-1 expression and activity. • The stimulation of Egr-1 requires the protein kinases ERK and Raf. • Resveratrol treatment upregulates the transcriptional activation potential of Elk-1. • Resveratrol-induced stimulation of Egr-1 requires ternary complex factors. • Two distinct resveratrol-responsive elements were identified.

  18. Xanthomonas campestris overcomes Arabidopsis stomatal innate immunity through a DSF cell-to-cell signal-regulated virulence factor.

    PubMed

    Gudesblat, Gustavo E; Torres, Pablo S; Vojnov, Adrián A

    2009-02-01

    Pathogen-induced stomatal closure is part of the plant innate immune response. Phytopathogens using stomata as a way of entry into the leaf must avoid the stomatal response of the host. In this article, we describe a factor secreted by the bacterial phytopathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv campestris (Xcc) capable of interfering with stomatal closure induced by bacteria or abscisic acid (ABA). We found that living Xcc, as well as ethyl acetate extracts from Xcc culture supernatants, are capable of reverting stomatal closure induced by bacteria, lipopolysaccharide, or ABA. Xcc ethyl acetate extracts also complemented the infectivity of Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (Pst) mutants deficient in the production of the coronatine toxin, which is required to overcome stomatal defense. By contrast, the rpfF and rpfC mutant strains of Xcc, which are unable to respectively synthesize or perceive a diffusible molecule involved in bacterial cell-to-cell signaling, were incapable of reverting stomatal closure, indicating that suppression of stomatal response by Xcc requires an intact rpf/diffusible signal factor system. In addition, we found that guard cell-specific Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase3 (MPK3) antisense mutants were unresponsive to bacteria or lipopolysaccharide in promotion of stomatal closure, and also more sensitive to Pst coronatine-deficient mutants, showing that MPK3 is required for stomatal immune response. Additionally, we found that, unlike in wild-type Arabidopsis, ABA-induced stomatal closure in MPK3 antisense mutants is not affected by Xcc or by extracts from Xcc culture supernatants, suggesting that the Xcc factor might target some signaling component in the same pathway as MPK3. PMID:19091877

  19. Insulin receptor substrate-1 involvement in epidermal growth factor receptor and insulin-like growth factor receptor signalling: implication for Gefitinib ('Iressa') response and resistance.

    PubMed

    Knowlden, Janice M; Jones, Helen E; Barrow, Denise; Gee, Julia M W; Nicholson, Robert I; Hutcheson, Iain R

    2008-09-01

    Classically the insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) is an essential component of insulin-like growth factor type 1 receptor (IGF-IR) signalling, providing an interface between the receptor and key downstream signalling cascades. Here, however, we show that in tamoxifen-resistant MCF-7 (Tam-R) breast cancer cells, that are highly dependent on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) for growth, IRS-1 can interact with EGFR and be preferentially phosphorylated on tyrosine (Y) 896, a Grb2 binding site. Indeed, phosphorylation of this site is greatly enhanced by exposure of these cells, and other EGFR-positive cell lines, to EGF. Importantly, while IGF-II promotes phosphorylation of IRS-1 on Y612, a PI3-K recruitment site, it has limited effect on Y896 phosphorylation in Tam-R cells. Furthermore, EGF and IGF-II co-treatment, reduces the ability of IGF-II to phosphorylate Y612, whilst maintaining Y896 phosphorylation, suggesting that the EGFR is the dominant recruiter of IRS-1 in this cell line. Significantly, challenge of Tam-R cells with the EGFR-selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor gefitinib, for 7 days, reduces IRS-1/EGFR association and IRS-1 Y896 phosphorylation, while promoting IRS-1/IGF-IR association and IRS-1 Y612 phosphorylation. Furthermore, gefitinib significantly enhances IGF-II-mediated phosphorylation of IRS-1 Y612 and AKT in Tam-R cells. Importantly, induction of this pathway by gefitinib can be abrogated by inhibition/downregulation of the IGF-IR. Our data would therefore suggest a novel association exists between the EGFR and IRS-1 in several EGFR-positive cancer cell lines. This association acts to promote phosphorylation of IRS-1 at Y896 and drive MAPK signalling whilst preventing recruitment of IRS-1 by the IGF-IR and inhibiting signalling via this receptor. Treatment with gefitinib alters the dynamics of this system, promoting IGF-IR signalling, the dominant gefitinib-resistant growth regulatory pathway in Tam-R cells, thus, potentially limiting

  20. The Arabidopsis Transcription Factor MYB77 Modulates Auxin Signal Transduction[W

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Ryoung; Burch, Adrien Y.; Huppert, Kari A.; Tiwari, Shiv B.; Murphy, Angus S.; Guilfoyle, Tom J.; Schachtman, Daniel P.

    2007-01-01

    Auxin is a key plant hormone that regulates plant development, apical dominance, and growth-related tropisms, such as phototropism and gravitropism. In this study, we report a new Arabidopsis thaliana transcription factor, MYB77, that is involved in auxin response. In MYB77 knockout plants, we found that auxin-responsive gene expression was greatly attenuated. Lateral root density in the MYB77 knockout was lower than the wild type at low concentrations of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and also under low nutrient conditions. MYB77 interacts with auxin response factors (ARFs) in vitro through the C terminus (domains III and IV) of ARFs and the activation domain of MYB77. A synergistic genetic interaction was demonstrated between MYB77 and ARF7 that resulted in a strong reduction in lateral root numbers. Experiments with protoplasts confirmed that the coexpression of MYB77 and an ARF C terminus enhance reporter gene expression. R2R3 MYB transcription factors have not been previously implicated in regulating the expression of auxin-inducible genes. Also it was previously unknown that ARFs interact with proteins other than those in the Aux/IAA family via conserved domains. The interaction between MYB77 and ARFs defines a new type of combinatorial transcriptional control in plants. This newly defined transcription factor interaction is part of the plant cells' repertoire for modulating response to auxin, thereby controlling lateral root growth and development under changing environmental conditions. PMID:17675404

  1. Insulin, insulin-like growth factor-I, and platelet-derived growth factor activate extracellular signal-regulated kinase by distinct pathways in muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Tsakiridis, T; Tsiani, E; Lekas, P; Bergman, A; Cherepanov, V; Whiteside, C; Downey, G P

    2001-10-19

    We have investigated the signaling pathways initiated by insulin, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-I), and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) leading to activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in L6 myotubes. Insulin but not IGF-I or PDGF-induced ERK activation was abrogated by Ras inhibition, either by treatment with the farnesyl transferase inhibitor FTP III, or by actin disassembly by cytochalasin D, previously shown to inhibit Ras activation. The protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide abolished PDGF but not IGF-I or insulin-induced ERK activation. ERK activation by insulin, IGF-I, or PDGF was unaffected by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor wortmannin but was abolished by the MEK inhibitor PD98059. In contrast, activation of the pathway involving phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3k), protein kinase B, and glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) was mediated similarly by all three receptors, through a PI 3-kinase-dependent but Ras- and actin-independent pathway. We conclude that ERK activation is mediated by distinct pathways including: (i) a cytoskeleton- and Ras-dependent, PKC-independent, pathway utilized by insulin, (ii) a PKC-dependent, cytoskeleton- and Ras-independent pathway used by PDGF, and (iii) a cytoskeleton-, Ras-, and PKC-independent pathway utilized by IGF-I.

  2. Restoring apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells by targeting the nuclear factor-kappaB signaling pathway with the anti-epidermal growth factor antibody IMC-C225.

    PubMed

    Sclabas, Guido M; Fujioka, Shuichi; Schmidt, Christian; Fan, Zhen; Evans, Douglas B; Chiao, Paul J

    2003-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that RelA is constitutively activated in the majority of human pancreatic cancers and plays an important role in tumorigenesis and metastasis. The antiapoptotic gene bcl-xl is a downstream target of RelA, and regulation of bcl-xl transcription is mediated directly by the nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) binding sites present in the upstream promoter element of the bcl-xl gene. In this study we investigated the effects of inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway with the anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody IMC-C225 on constitutive NF-kappaB activation and regulation of apoptosis-related genes in human pancreatic cancer cells. We found that activation of EGFR can be blocked with the anti-EGFR antibody IMC-C225 in the human pancreatic cancer cell line MDA Panc-28, leading to a marked decrease in constitutive NF-kappaB DNA binding activity. Our data also suggest that downregulation of NF-kappaB DNA binding activity by IMC-C225 leads to a decrease in bcl-xl and bfl-1 expression. Therefore, targeting the NF-kappaB signaling pathway with an anti-EGFR antibody may be one strategy to restore apoptosis in human pancreatic cancer cells, thereby enhancing the effect of chemotherapy and radiation therapy.

  3. Trefoil peptides as proangiogenic factors in vivo and in vitro: implication of cyclooxygenase-2 and EGF receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Sylvie; Van Aken, Elisabeth; Van Bocxlaer, Saskia; Attoub, Samir; Nguyen, Quang-Dé; Bruyneel, Erik; Westley, Bruce R; May, Felicity E B; Thim, Lars; Mareel, Marc; Gespach, Christian; Emami, Shahin

    2003-01-01

    We previously established that the trefoil peptides (TFFs) pS2, spasmolytic polypeptide, and intestinal trefoil factor are involved in cellular scattering and invasion in kidney and colonic cancer cells. Using the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay and the formation of tube-like structures by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) plated on the Matrigel matrix substratum, we report here that TFFs are proangiogenic factors. Angiogenic activity of TFFs is comparable to that induced by vascular endothelial growth factor, leptin, and transforming growth factor-alpha. Stimulation of angiogenesis by pS2 in the CAM assay is blocked by pharmacological inhibitors of cyclooxygenase COX-2 (NS-398) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) tyrosine kinase (ZD1839), but is independent of KDR/Flk-1 and thromboxane A2 receptors. In contrast, the morphogenic switch induced by pS2 in HUVEC cells could be inhibited by the specific KDR heptapeptide antagonist ATWLPPR and by inhibitors of COX-2 and EGF-R signaling. These results implicate TFFs in the formation of new blood vessels during normal and pathophysiological processes linked to wound healing, inflammation, and cancer progression in the digestive mucosa and other human solid tumors associated with aberrant expression of TFFs.

  4. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase is autonomous from the dominant extrasynaptic NMDA receptor extracellular signal-regulated kinase shutoff pathway.

    PubMed

    Mulholland, P J; Luong, N T; Woodward, J J; Chandler, L J

    2008-01-24

    NMDA receptors bidirectionally modulate extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) through the coupling of synaptic NMDA receptors to an ERK activation pathway that is opposed by a dominant ERK shutoff pathway thought to be coupled to extrasynaptic NMDA receptors. In the present study, synaptic NMDA receptor activation of ERK in rat cortical cultures was partially inhibited by the highly selective NR2B antagonist Ro25-6981 (Ro) and the less selective NR2A antagonist NVP-AAM077 (NVP). When Ro and NVP were added together, inhibition appeared additive and equal to that observed with the NMDA open-channel blocker MK-801. Consistent with a selective coupling of extrasynaptic NMDA receptors to the dominant ERK shutoff pathway, pre-block of synaptic NMDA receptors with MK-801 did not alter the inhibitory effect of bath-applied NMDA on ERK activity. Lastly, in contrast to a complete block of synaptic NMDA receptor activation of ERK by extrasynaptic NMDA receptors, activation of extrasynaptic NMDA receptors had no effect upon ERK activation by brain-derived neurotrophic factor. These results suggest that the synaptic NMDA receptor ERK activation pathway is coupled to both NR2A and NR2B containing receptors, and that the extrasynaptic NMDA receptor ERK inhibitory pathway is not a non-selective global ERK shutoff.

  5. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor signalling via Janus kinase 2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, J; Fraser, F W; Riley, C; Ahmed, N; McCulloch, D R; Ward, A C

    2014-01-01

    Background: Ovarian cancer remains a major cause of cancer mortality in women, with only limited understanding of disease aetiology at the molecular level. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a key regulator of both normal and emergency haematopoiesis, and is used clinically to aid haematopoietic recovery following ablative therapies for a variety of solid tumours including ovarian cancer. Methods: The expression of G-CSF and its receptor, G-CSFR, was examined in primary ovarian cancer samples and a panel of ovarian cancer cell lines, and the effects of G-CSF treatment on proliferation, migration and survival were determined. Results: G-CSFR was predominantly expressed in high-grade serous ovarian epithelial tumour samples and a subset of ovarian cancer cell lines. Stimulation of G-CSFR-expressing ovarian epithelial cancer cells with G-CSF led to increased migration and survival, including against chemotherapy-induced apoptosis. The effects of G-CSF were mediated by signalling via the downstream JAK2/STAT3 pathway. Conclusion: This study suggests that G-CSF has the potential to impact on ovarian cancer pathogenesis, and that G-CSFR expression status should be considered in determining appropriate therapy. PMID:24220695

  6. Brittlestars contain highly sulfated chondroitin sulfates/dermatan sulfates that promote fibroblast growth factor 2-induced cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Ramachandra, Rashmi; Namburi, Ramesh B; Ortega-Martinez, Olga; Shi, Xiaofeng; Zaia, Joseph; Dupont, Sam T; Thorndyke, Michael C; Lindahl, Ulf; Spillmann, Dorothe

    2014-02-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) isolated from brittlestars, Echinodermata class Ophiuroidea, were characterized, as part of attempts to understand the evolutionary development of these polysaccharides. A population of chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate (CS/DS) chains with a high overall degree of sulfation and hexuronate epimerization was the major GAG found, whereas heparan sulfate (HS) was below detection level. Enzymatic digestion with different chondroitin lyases revealed exceptionally high proportions of di- and trisulfated CS/DS disaccharides. The latter unit appears much more abundant in one of four individual species of brittlestars, Amphiura filiformis, than reported earlier in other marine invertebrates. The brittlestar CS/DS was further shown to bind to growth factors such as fibroblast growth factor 2 and to promote FGF-stimulated cell signaling in GAG-deficient cell lines in a manner similar to that of heparin. These findings point to a potential biological role for the highly sulfated invertebrate GAGs, similar to those ascribed to HS in vertebrates.

  7. Differential Rac1 signalling by guanine nucleotide exchange factors implicates FLII in regulating Rac1-driven cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Marei, Hadir; Carpy, Alejandro; Woroniuk, Anna; Vennin, Claire; White, Gavin; Timpson, Paul; Macek, Boris; Malliri, Angeliki

    2016-01-01

    The small GTPase Rac1 has been implicated in the formation and dissemination of tumours. Upon activation by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), Rac1 associates with a variety of proteins in the cell thereby regulating various functions, including cell migration. However, activation of Rac1 can lead to opposing migratory phenotypes raising the possibility of exacerbating tumour progression when targeting Rac1 in a clinical setting. This calls for the identification of factors that influence Rac1-driven cell motility. Here we show that Tiam1 and P-Rex1, two Rac GEFs, promote Rac1 anti- and pro-migratory signalling cascades, respectively, through regulating the Rac1 interactome. In particular, we demonstrate that P-Rex1 stimulates migration through enhancing the interaction between Rac1 and the actin-remodelling protein flightless-1 homologue, to modulate cell contraction in a RhoA-ROCK-independent manner. PMID:26887924

  8. Proneural transcription factors regulate different steps of cortical neuron migration through Rnd-mediated inhibition of RhoA signaling.

    PubMed

    Pacary, Emilie; Heng, Julian; Azzarelli, Roberta; Riou, Philippe; Castro, Diogo; Lebel-Potter, Mélanie; Parras, Carlos; Bell, Donald M; Ridley, Anne J; Parsons, Maddy; Guillemot, François

    2011-03-24

    Little is known of the intracellular machinery that controls the motility of newborn neurons. We have previously shown that the proneural protein Neurog2 promotes the migration of nascent cortical neurons by inducing the expression of the atypical Rho GTPase Rnd2. Here, we show that another proneural factor, Ascl1, promotes neuronal migration in the cortex through direct regulation of a second Rnd family member, Rnd3. Both Rnd2 and Rnd3 promote neuronal migration by inhibiting RhoA signaling, but they control distinct steps of the migratory process, multipolar to bipolar transition in the intermediate zone and locomotion in the cortical plate, respectively. Interestingly, these divergent functions directly result from the distinct subcellular distributions of the two Rnd proteins. Because Rnd proteins also regulate progenitor divisions and neurite outgrowth, we propose that proneural factors, through spatiotemporal regulation of Rnd proteins, integrate the process of neuronal migration with other events in the neurogenic program. PMID:21435554

  9. Proneural transcription factors regulate different steps of cortical neuron migration through Rnd-mediated inhibition of RhoA signaling.

    PubMed

    Pacary, Emilie; Heng, Julian; Azzarelli, Roberta; Riou, Philippe; Castro, Diogo; Lebel-Potter, Mélanie; Parras, Carlos; Bell, Donald M; Ridley, Anne J; Parsons, Maddy; Guillemot, François

    2011-03-24

    Little is known of the intracellular machinery that controls the motility of newborn neurons. We have previously shown that the proneural protein Neurog2 promotes the migration of nascent cortical neurons by inducing the expression of the atypical Rho GTPase Rnd2. Here, we show that another proneural factor, Ascl1, promotes neuronal migration in the cortex through direct regulation of a second Rnd family member, Rnd3. Both Rnd2 and Rnd3 promote neuronal migration by inhibiting RhoA signaling, but they control distinct steps of the migratory process, multipolar to bipolar transition in the intermediate zone and locomotion in the cortical plate, respectively. Interestingly, these divergent functions directly result from the distinct subcellular distributions of the two Rnd proteins. Because Rnd proteins also regulate progenitor divisions and neurite outgrowth, we propose that proneural factors, through spatiotemporal regulation of Rnd proteins, integrate the process of neuronal migration with other events in the neurogenic program.

  10. Vascular endothelial growth factor signalling in endothelial cell survival: A role for NF{kappa}B

    SciTech Connect

    Grosjean, Jennifer . E-mail: Jennifer.grosjean@imperial.ac.uk; Kiriakidis, Serafim; Reilly, Kerri; Feldmann, Marc; Paleolog, Ewa

    2006-02-17

    Angiogenesis is the development of blood capillaries from pre-existing vessels. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a key regulator of vessel growth and regression, and acts as an endothelial survival factor by protecting endothelial cells from apoptosis. Many genes involved in cell proliferation and apoptosis are regulated by the nuclear factor kappa B (NF{kappa}B) transcription factor family. This study aimed to address the hypothesis that VEGF-mediated survival effects on endothelium involve NF{kappa}B. Using an NF{kappa}B-luciferase reporter adenovirus, we observed activation of NF{kappa}B following VEGF treatment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. This was confirmed using electrophoretic mobility shift assay and found to involve nuclear translocation of NF{kappa}B sub-unit p65. However, NF{kappa}B activation occurred without degradation of inhibitory I{kappa}B proteins (I{kappa}B{alpha}, I{kappa}B{beta}, and I{kappa}B{epsilon}). Instead, tyrosine phosphorylation of I{kappa}B{alpha} was observed following VEGF treatment, suggesting NF{kappa}B activation was mediated by degradation-independent dissociation of I{kappa}B{alpha} from NF{kappa}B. Adenovirus-mediated over-expression of either native I{kappa}B{alpha}, or of I{kappa}B{alpha} in which tyrosine residue 42 was mutated to phenylalanine, inhibited induction of NF{kappa}B-dependent luciferase activity in response to VEGF. Furthermore, VEGF-induced upregulation of mRNA for the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and cell survival following serum withdrawal was reduced following I{kappa}B{alpha} over-expression. This study highlights that different molecular mechanisms of NF{kappa}B activation may be involved downstream of stimuli which activate the endothelial lining of blood vessels.

  11. Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor OSG-1 Confers Functional Aging via Dysregulated Rho Signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Zhibing; Sesti, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Rho signaling regulates a variety of biological processes, but whether it is implicated in aging remains an open question. Here we show that a guanine nucleotide exchange factor of the Dbl family, OSG-1, confers functional aging by dysregulating Rho GTPases activities in C. elegans. Thus, gene reporter analysis revealed widespread OSG-1 expression in muscle and neurons. Loss of OSG-1 gene function was not associated with developmental defects. In contrast, suppression of OSG-1 lessened loss of function (chemotaxis) in ASE sensory neurons subjected to conditions of oxidative stress generated during natural aging, by oxidative challenges, or by genetic mutations. RNAi analysis showed that OSG-1 was specific toward activation of RHO-1 GTPase signaling. RNAi further implicated actin-binding proteins ARX-3 and ARX-5, thus the actin cytoskeleton, as one of the targets of OSG-1/RHO-1 signaling. Taken together these data suggest that OSG-1 is recruited under conditions of oxidative stress, a hallmark of aging, and contributes to promote loss of neuronal function by affecting the actin cytoskeleton via altered RHO-1 activity. PMID:25527286

  12. Dynamic regulation of the translation initiation helicase complex by mitogenic signal transduction to eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4G.

    PubMed

    Dobrikov, Mikhail I; Dobrikova, Elena Y; Gromeier, Matthias

    2013-03-01

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4F (eIF4F), comprising the cap-binding protein eIF4E, the helicase eIF4A, and the central scaffold eIF4G, is a convergence node for a complex signaling network that controls protein synthesis. Together with eIF3 and eIF4A/4B, eIF4G recruits ribosomal subunits to mRNAs and facilitates 5' untranslated region unwinding. Mammalian eIF4G contains three HEAT domains and unstructured regions involved in protein-protein interactions. Despite detailed eIF4G structure data, the mechanisms controlling initiation scaffold formation remain obscure. We found a new, highly regulated eIF4B/-3 binding site within the HEAT-1/-2 interdomain linker, harboring two phosphorylation sites that we identified as substrates for Erk1/2 and casein kinase 2. Phorbol ester-induced sequential phosphorylation of both sites detached HEAT-2 from the complex with eIF4A/-4B/-3 and stimulated the association of HEAT-3 with the mitogen-activated protein kinase signal integrating kinase Mnk1. Our results provide a mechanistic link between intracellular signal transduction and dynamic initiation complex formation coordinated by flexible eIF4G structure.

  13. Antagonism of Stem Cell Factor/c-kit Signaling Attenuates Neonatal Chronic Hypoxia-Induced Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Young, Karen C; Torres, Eneida; Hehre, Dorothy; Wu, Shu; Suguihara, Cleide; Hare, Joshua M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence suggests that c-kit positive cells are present in the remodeled pulmonary vasculature bed of patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH). Whether stem cell factor (SCF)/ c-kit regulated pathways potentiate pulmonary vascular remodeling is unknown. Here, we tested the hypothesis that attenuated c-kit signaling would decrease chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling by decreasing pulmonary vascular cell mitogenesis. Methods Neonatal FVB/NJ mice treated with non-immune IgG (PL), or c-kit neutralizing antibody (ACK2) as well as c-kit mutant mice (WBB6F1- Kit W− v/ +) and their congenic controls, were exposed to normoxia (FiO2=0.21) or hypoxia (FiO2=0.12) for two weeks. Following this exposure, right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP), right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH), pulmonary vascular cell proliferation and remodeling were evaluated. Results As compared to chronically hypoxic controls, c-kit mutant mice had decreased RVSP, RVH, pulmonary vascular remodeling and proliferation. Consistent with these findings, administration of ACK2 to neonatal mice with chronic hypoxia-induced PH decreased RVSP, RVH, pulmonary vascular cell proliferation and remodeling. This attenuation in PH was accompanied by decreased extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) 1/2 activation. Conclusion SCF/c-kit signaling may potentiate chronic hypoxia-induced vascular remodeling by modulating ERK activation. Inhibition of c-kit activity may be a potential strategy to alleviate PH. PMID:26705118

  14. A pair of light signaling factors FHY3 and FAR1 regulates plant immunity by modulating chlorophyll biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wanqing; Tang, Weijiang; Ma, Tingting; Niu, De; Jin, Jing Bo; Wang, Haiyang; Lin, Rongcheng

    2016-01-01

    Light and chloroplast function is known to affect the plant immune response; however, the underlying mechanism remains elusive. We previously demonstrated that two light signaling factors, FAR-RED ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL 3 (FHY3) and FAR-RED IMPAIRED RESPONSE 1 (FAR1), regulate chlorophyll biosynthesis and seedling growth via controlling HEMB1 expression in Arabidopsis thaliana. In this study, we reveal that FHY3 and FAR1 are involved in modulating plant immunity. We showed that the fhy3 far1 double null mutant displayed high levels of reactive oxygen species and salicylic acid (SA) and increased resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pathogen infection. Microarray analysis revealed that a large proportion of pathogen-related genes, particularly genes encoding nucleotide-binding and leucine-rich repeat domain resistant proteins, are highly induced in fhy3 far1. Genetic studies indicated that the defects of fhy3 far1 can be largely rescued by reducing SA signaling or blocking SA accumulation, and by overexpression of HEMB1, which encodes a 5-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase in the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. Furthermore, we found that transgenic plants with reduced expression of HEMB1 exhibit a phenotype similar to fhy3 far1. Taken together, this study demonstrates an important role of FHY3 and FAR1 in regulating plant immunity, through integrating chlorophyll biosynthesis and the SA signaling pathway.

  15. Linewidth Enhancement Factor and Amplification of Angle-Modulated Optical Signals in Injection-Locked Quantum Cascade Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, Taraprasad; Bhattacharyya, Prosenjit

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a nonlinear analysis of the effect of linewidth enhancement factor (LEF) on the amplification of angle-modulated optical signals in injection-locked mid-infrared (IR) quantum cascade lasers (QCLs). A higher value of LEF tends to conserve the output angle modulation index of the amplified mid-IR signal particularly in the low-modulation frequency region. Further, a higher value of signal injection ratio produces a wider bandwidth of the locked QCL amplifier. The LEF introduces asymmetry in the lockband (LB) of the injection-locked QCL and this asymmetry increases with the increase in the value of LEF. Typically ratio of calculated lower-side LB to upper-side LB for an injection power level of - 20 dB and a LEF of unity is 1.67. The electron relaxation time in the uppermost subband lasing level in a three-level system has a profound effect on the LB asymmetry in a QCL.

  16. Accumulation of transcription factors and cell signaling-related proteins in the nucleus during citrus-Xanthomonas interaction.

    PubMed

    Rani, T Swaroopa; Durgeshwar, P; Podile, Appa Rao

    2015-07-20

    The nucleus is the maestro of the cell and is involved in the modulation of cell signaling during stress. We performed a comprehensive nuclear proteome analysis of Citrus sinensis during interaction with host (Xanthomonas citri pv. citri-Xcc) and non-host (Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae-Xoo) pathogens. The nuclear proteome was obtained using a sequential method of organelle enrichment and determined by nano-LC-MS/MS analysis. A total of 243 proteins accumulated differentially during citrus-Xanthomonas interaction, belonging to 11 functional groups, with signaling and transcription-related proteins dominating. MADS-box transcription factors, DEAD-box RNA helicase and leucine aminopeptidase, mainly involved in jasmonic acid (JA) responses, were in high abundance during non-host interaction (Xoo). Signaling-related proteins like serine/threonine kinase, histones (H3.2, H2A), phosphoglycerate kinase, dynamin, actin and aldolase showed increased accumulation early during Xoo interaction. Our results suggest that there is a possible involvement of JA-triggered defense responses during non-host resistance, with early recognition of the non-host pathogen.

  17. Involvement of aquaporin-3 in epidermal growth factor receptor signaling via hydrogen peroxide transport in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hara-Chikuma, Mariko; Watanabe, Sachiko; Satooka, Hiroki

    2016-03-18

    Aquaporin 3 (AQP3), a water/glycerol channel protein, is capable of transporting hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Here, we show that AQP3-mediated intracellular H2O2 is involved in epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced cell signaling and its dependent cell function in the EGF receptor (EGFR)-positive cancer cell lines A431 and H1666. AQP3 knockdown suppressed the transport into the cells of extracellular H2O2 produced in response to EGF in A431 and H1666 cells. EGF-induced Erk and Akt activation, which occurred through SHP2 and/or PTEN modulation, was impaired by AQP3 knockdown. Cell growth and migration induced by EGF stimulation were attenuated in AQP3 knockdown cells compared with those in control cells. Coincidentally, tumor growth of A431 cell xenografts in immunodeficient mice was decreased by AQP3 knockdown. Accordingly, a xenograft with AQP3 knockdown A431 cells significantly enhanced the survival of recipient mice compared with the transplantation with control cells. In addition, AQP3 associated with EGFR and NADPH oxidase 2, which we propose is linked to AQP3 producing a localized increase in intracellular H2O2 to function as a second messenger during EGFR cell signaling. Therefore, our findings suggest that AQP3 is required for EGF-EGFR cell signaling in cancer cells and is a therapeutic target for cancer progression.

  18. Informed Source Separation of Atmospheric and Surface Signal Contributions in Shortwave Hyperspectral Imagery using Non-negative Matrix Factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, L.; Coddington, O.; Pilewskie, P.

    2015-12-01

    Current challenges in Earth remote sensing require improved instrument spectral resolution, spectral coverage, and radiometric accuracy. Hyperspectral instruments, deployed on both aircraft and spacecraft, are a growing class of Earth observing sensors designed to meet these challenges. They collect large amounts of spectral data, allowing thorough characterization of both atmospheric and surface properties. The higher accuracy and increased spectral and spatial resolutions of new imagers require new numerical approaches for processing imagery and separating surface and atmospheric signals. One potential approach is source separation, which allows us to determine the underlying physical causes of observed changes. Improved signal separation will allow hyperspectral instruments to better address key science questions relevant to climate change, including land-use changes, trends in clouds and atmospheric water vapor, and aerosol characteristics. In this work, we investigate a Non-negative Matrix Factorization (NMF) method for the separation of atmospheric and land surface signal sources. NMF offers marked benefits over other commonly employed techniques, including non-negativity, which avoids physically impossible results, and adaptability, which allows the method to be tailored to hyperspectral source separation. We adapt our NMF algorithm to distinguish between contributions from different physically distinct sources by introducing constraints on spectral and spatial variability and by using library spectra to inform separation. We evaluate our NMF algorithm with simulated hyperspectral images as well as hyperspectral imagery from several instruments including, the NASA Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS), NASA Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean (HICO) and National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) Imaging Spectrometer.

  19. Proteomic Screening and Lasso Regression Reveal Differential Signaling in Insulin and Insulin-like Growth Factor I (IGF1) Pathways.

    PubMed

    Erdem, Cemal; Nagle, Alison M; Casa, Angelo J; Litzenburger, Beate C; Wang, Yu-Fen; Taylor, D Lansing; Lee, Adrian V; Lezon, Timothy R

    2016-09-01

    Insulin and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF1) influence cancer risk and progression through poorly understood mechanisms. To better understand the roles of insulin and IGF1 signaling in breast cancer, we combined proteomic screening with computational network inference to uncover differences in IGF1 and insulin induced signaling. Using reverse phase protein array, we measured the levels of 134 proteins in 21 breast cancer cell lines stimulated with IGF1 or insulin for up to 48 h. We then constructed directed protein expression networks using three separate methods: (i) lasso regression, (ii) conventional matrix inversion, and (iii) entropy maximization. These networks, named here as the time translation models, were analyzed and the inferred interactions were ranked by differential magnitude to identify pathway differences. The two top candidates, chosen for experimental validation, were shown to regulate IGF1/insulin induced phosphorylation events. First, acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) knock-down was shown to increase the level of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation. Second, stable knock-down of E-Cadherin increased the phospho-Akt protein levels. Both of the knock-down perturbations incurred phosphorylation responses stronger in IGF1 stimulated cells compared with insulin. Overall, the time-translation modeling coupled to wet-lab experiments has proven to be powerful in inferring differential interactions downstream of IGF1 and insulin signaling, in vitro.

  20. Proteomic Screening and Lasso Regression Reveal Differential Signaling in Insulin and Insulin-like Growth Factor I (IGF1) Pathways.

    PubMed

    Erdem, Cemal; Nagle, Alison M; Casa, Angelo J; Litzenburger, Beate C; Wang, Yu-Fen; Taylor, D Lansing; Lee, Adrian V; Lezon, Timothy R

    2016-09-01

    Insulin and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF1) influence cancer risk and progression through poorly understood mechanisms. To better understand the roles of insulin and IGF1 signaling in breast cancer, we combined proteomic screening with computational network inference to uncover differences in IGF1 and insulin induced signaling. Using reverse phase protein array, we measured the levels of 134 proteins in 21 breast cancer cell lines stimulated with IGF1 or insulin for up to 48 h. We then constructed directed protein expression networks using three separate methods: (i) lasso regression, (ii) conventional matrix inversion, and (iii) entropy maximization. These networks, named here as the time translation models, were analyzed and the inferred interactions were ranked by differential magnitude to identify pathway differences. The two top candidates, chosen for experimental validation, were shown to regulate IGF1/insulin induced phosphorylation events. First, acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) knock-down was shown to increase the level of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation. Second, stable knock-down of E-Cadherin increased the phospho-Akt protein levels. Both of the knock-down perturbations incurred phosphorylation responses stronger in IGF1 stimulated cells compared with insulin. Overall, the time-translation modeling coupled to wet-lab experiments has proven to be powerful in inferring differential interactions downstream of IGF1 and insulin signaling, in vitro. PMID:27364358

  1. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor signalling mediates the antidepressant-like effect of piperine in chronically stressed mice.

    PubMed

    Mao, Qing-Qiu; Huang, Zhen; Zhong, Xiao-Ming; Xian, Yan-Fang; Ip, Siu-Po

    2014-03-15

    Previous studies in our laboratory have demonstrated that piperine produced antidepressant-like action in various mouse models of behavioral despair. This study aimed to investigate the role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signalling in the antidepressant-like effect of piperine in mice exposed to chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS). The results showed that CUMS caused depression-like behavior in mice, as indicated by the significant decrease in sucrose consumption and increase in immobility time in the forced swim test. It was also found that BDNF protein expression in the hippocampus and frontal cortex were significantly decreased in CUMS-treated mice. Chronic treatment of piperine at the dose of 10mg/kg significantly ameliorated behavioural deficits of CUMS-treated mice in the sucrose preference test and forced swim test. Piperine treatment also significantly decreased immobility time in the forced swim test in naive mice. In parallel, chronic piperine treatment significantly increased BDNF protein expression in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of both naive and CUMS-treated mice. In addition, inhibition of BDNF signalling by injection of K252a, an inhibitor of the BDNF receptor TrkB, significantly blocked the antidepressant-like effect of piperine in the sucrose preference test and forced swim test of CUMS-treated mice. Taken together, this study suggests that BDNF signalling is an essential mediator for the antidepressant-like effect of piperine.

  2. Redox Signaling by the RNA Polymerase III TFIIB-Related Factor Brf2.

    PubMed

    Gouge, Jerome; Satia, Karishma; Guthertz, Nicolas; Widya, Marcella; Thompson, Andrew James; Cousin, Pascal; Dergai, Oleksandr; Hernandez, Nouria; Vannini, Alessandro

    2015-12-01

    TFIIB-related factor 2 (Brf2) is a member of the family of TFIIB-like core transcription factors. Brf2 recruits RNA polymerase (Pol) III to type III gene-external promoters, including the U6 spliceosomal RNA and selenocysteine tRNA genes. Found only in vertebrates, Brf2 has been linked to tumorigenesis but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. We have solved crystal structures of a human Brf2-TBP complex bound to natural promoters, obtaining a detailed view of the molecular interactions occurring at Brf2-dependent Pol III promoters and highlighting the general structural and functional conservation of human Pol II and Pol III pre-initiation complexes. Surprisingly, our structural and functional studies unravel a Brf2 redox-sensing module capable of specifically regulating Pol III transcriptional output in living cells. Furthermore, we establish Brf2 as a central redox-sensing transcription factor involved in the oxidative stress pathway and provide a mechanistic model for Brf2 genetic activation in lung and breast cancer. PMID:26638071

  3. Transforming Growth Factor Beta Signaling Is Essential for the Autonomous Formation of Cartilage-Like Tissue by Expanded Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tekari, Adel; Luginbuehl, Reto; Hofstetter, Willy; Egli, Rainer J.

    2015-01-01

    Cartilage is a tissue with limited self-healing potential. Hence, cartilage defects require surgical attention to prevent or postpone the development of osteoarthritis. For cell-based cartilage repair strategies, in particular autologous chondrocyte implantation, articular chondrocytes are isolated from cartilage and expanded in vitro to increase the number of cells required for therapy. During expansion, the cells lose the competence to autonomously form a cartilage-like tissue, that is in the absence of exogenously added chondrogenic growth factors, such as TGF-βs. We hypothesized that signaling elicited by autocrine and/or paracrine TGF-β is essential for the formation of cartilage-like tissue and that alterations within the TGF-β signaling pathway during expansion interfere with this process. Primary bovine articular chondrocytes were harvested and expanded in monolayer culture up to passage six and the formation of cartilage tissue was investigated in high density pellet cultures grown for three weeks. Chondrocytes expanded for up to three passages maintained the potential for autonomous cartilage-like tissue formation. After three passages, however, exogenous TGF-β1 was required to induce the formation of cartilage-like tissue. When TGF-β signaling was blocked by inhibiting the TGF-β receptor 1 kinase, the autonomous formation of cartilage-like tissue was abrogated. At the initiation of pellet culture, chondrocytes from passage three and later showed levels of transcripts coding for TGF-β receptors 1 and 2 and TGF-β2 to be three-, five- and five-fold decreased, respectively, as compared to primary chondrocytes. In conclusion, the autonomous formation of cartilage-like tissue by expanded chondrocytes is dependent on signaling induced by autocrine and/or paracrine TGF-β. We propose that a decrease in the expression of the chondrogenic growth factor TGF-β2 and of the TGF-β receptors in expanded chondrocytes accounts for a decrease in the activity of

  4. Connective tissue growth factor differentially binds to members of the cystine knot superfamily and potentiates platelet-derived growth factor-B signaling in rabbit corneal fibroblast cells

    PubMed Central

    Pi, Liya; Chung, Pei-Yu; Sriram, Sriniwas; Rahman, Masmudur M; Song, Wen-Yuan; Scott, Edward W; Petersen, Bryon E; Schultz, Gregory S

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study the binding of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) to cystine knot-containing ligands and how this impacts platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-B signaling. METHODS: The binding strengths of CTGF to cystine knot-containing growth factors including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A, PDGF-B, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-4, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 were compared using the LexA-based yeast two-hybrid system. EYG48 reporter strain that carried a wild-type LEU2 gene under the control of LexA operators and a lacZ reporter plasmid (p80p-lacZ) containing eight high affinity LexA binding sites were used in the yeast two-hybrid analysis. Interactions between CTGF and the tested growth factors were evaluated based on growth of transformed yeast cells on selective media and colorimetric detection in a liquid β-galactosidase activity assay. Dissociation constants of CTGF to VEGF-A isoform 165 or PDGF-BB homo-dimer were measured in surface plasma resonance (SPR) analysis. CTGF regulation in PDGF-B presentation to the PDGF receptor β (PDGFRβ) was also quantitatively assessed by the SPR analysis. Combinational effects of CTGF protein and PDGF-BB on activation of PDGFRβ and downstream signaling molecules ERK1/2 and AKT were assessed in rabbit corneal fibroblast cells by Western analysis. RESULTS: In the LexA-based yeast two-hybrid system, cystine knot motifs of tested growth factors were fused to the activation domain of the transcriptional factor GAL4 while CTGF was fused to the DNA binding domain of the bacterial repressor protein LexA. Yeast co-transformants containing corresponding fusion proteins for CTGF and all four tested cystine knot motifs survived on selective medium containing galactose and raffinose but lacking histidine, tryptophan, and uracil. In liquid β-galactosidase assays, CTGF expressing cells that were co-transformed with the cystine knot of VEGF-A had the highest activity, at 29.88 ± 0.91 fold above controls

  5. Potentiation of growth factor signaling by insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 in breast epithelial cells requires sphingosine kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Martin, Janet L; Lin, Mike Z; McGowan, Eileen M; Baxter, Robert C

    2009-09-18

    We have investigated the mechanism underlying potentiation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGFR1) signaling by IGF-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) in MCF-10A breast epithelial cells, focusing on a possible involvement of the sphingosine kinase (SphK) system. IGFBP-3 potentiated EGF-stimulated EGF receptor activation and DNA synthesis, and this was blocked by inhibitors of SphK activity or small interference RNA-mediated silencing of SphK1, but not SphK2, expression. Similarly, IGFR1 phosphorylation and DNA synthesis stimulated by LR3-IGF-I (an IGF-I analog not bound by IGFBP-3), were enhanced by IGFBP-3, and this was blocked by SphK1 silencing. SphK1 expression and activity were stimulated by IGFBP-3 approximately 2-fold over 24 h. Silencing of sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P1) or S1P3, but not S1P2, abolished the effect of IGFBP-3 on EGF-stimulated EGFR activation. The effects of IGFBP-3 could be reproduced with exogenous S1P or medium conditioned by cells treated with IGFBP-3, and this was also blocked by inhibition of S1P1 and S1P3. These data indicate that potentiation of growth factor signaling by IGFBP-3 in MCF-10A cells requires SphK1 activity and S1P1/S1P3, suggesting that S1P, the product of SphK activity and ligand for S1P1 and S1P3, is the "missing link" mediating IGF and EGFR transactivation and cell growth stimulation by IGFBP-3.

  6. TRAF6 inhibits proangiogenic signals in endothelial cells and regulates the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Bruneau, Sarah; Datta, Dipak; Flaxenburg, Jesse A.; Pal, Soumitro; Briscoe, David M.

    2012-03-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TNF-receptor associated factors (TRAFs) function in the angiogenesis response. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TRAF6 regulates basal and inducible expression of VEGF in endothelial cells (EC). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TRAF6 is an endogenous inhibitor of EC proliferation and migration in EC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TRAF6 inhibits VEGF expression in part via its ability to regulate Src signaling. -- Abstract: TNF-family molecules induce the expression Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) in endothelial cells (EC) and elicit signaling responses that result in angiogenesis. However, the role of TNF-receptor associated factors (TRAFs) as upstream regulators of VEGF expression or as mediators of angiogenesis is not known. In this study, HUVEC were cotransfected with a full-length VEGF promoter-luciferase construct and siRNAs to TRAF 1, -2, -3, -5, -6, and promoter activity was measured. Paradoxically, rather than inhibiting VEGF expression, we found that knockdown of TRAF6 resulted in a 4-6-fold increase in basal VEGF promoter activity compared to control siRNA-transfected EC (P < 0.0001). In addition, knockdown of TRAF 1, -2, -3 or -5 resulted in a slight increase or no change in VEGF promoter activation. Using [{sup 3}H]thymidine incorporation assays as well as the in vitro wound healing assay, we also found that basal rates of EC proliferation and migration were increased following TRAF6 knockdown; and this response was inhibited by the addition of a blocking anti-VEGF antibody into cell cultures. Using a limited protein array to gain insight into TRAF6-dependent intermediary signaling responses, we observed that TRAF6 knockdown resulted in an increase in the activity of Src family kinases. In addition, we found that treatment with AZD-0530, a pharmacological Src inhibitor, reduced the regulatory effect of TRAF6 knockdown on VEGF promoter activity. Collectively, these findings define a novel pro-angiogenic signaling

  7. Radiation induced nuclear factor kappa-B signaling cascade study in mammalian cells by improved detection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chishti, Arif Ali; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Hellweg, Christine; Reitz, Guenther

    To enable long-term human space flight cellular radiation response to densely ionizing radiation needs to be better understood for developing appropriate countermeasures to mitigate acute effects and late radiation risks for the astronaut. The biological effectiveness of accelerated heavy ions with high linear energy transfer (LET) for effecting DNA damage response pathways as a gateway to cell death or survival is of major concern, not only for tumor radiotherapy but also for new regimes of space missions. Ionizing radiation modulates several signaling pathways resulting in transcription factor activation. NF-kappaB is one of the important transcription factors that respond to changes in the environment of a mammalian cell and plays a key role in many biological processes relevant to radiation response, such as apoptosis, inflammation and carcinogenesis. From medical and biological point of view it is important to understand radiation induced NF-kappaB signaling cascade. For studying NF-kappaB signaling, green fluorescent proteins EGFP and d2EGFP were used previously (Advances in Space Research, 36: 1673-1679, 2005). The current study aims to improve reporter assays by the use of a destabilized variant of red fluorescent protein tdTomato (DD-tdTomato) which gives high fluorescence signals and a better signal/noise ratio for NF-kappaB activation. The reporter system HEK-pNFkappaB-DD-tdTomato-C8 is a dual reporter system which can provide both discrete and cumulative signals after exposure to ionizing radiation (X-rays, heavy ions). In the presence of Shield-1, the fluorescent protein DD-tdTomato is not degraded but accumulated inside the cell which helps to quantify the fold induction of NF-kappaB-dependent gene expression. The minimum dose required to activate NF-kappaB is 6 Gy but accumulated signals data shows that NF-kappaB is activated after 3 Gy in the presence of Shield-1. Average dose and number of heavy ions’ hits per nucleus necessary to double the NF

  8. Unbiased identification of signal-activated transcription factors by barcoded synthetic tandem repeat promoter screening (BC-STAR-PROM)

    PubMed Central

    Gosselin, Pauline; Rando, Gianpaolo; Fleury-Olela, Fabienne; Schibler, Ueli

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of transcription factors (TFs) controlling pathways in health and disease is of paramount interest. We designed a widely applicable method, dubbed barcorded synthetic tandem repeat promoter screening (BC-STAR-PROM), to identify signal-activated TFs without any a priori knowledge about their properties. The BC-STAR-PROM library consists of ∼3000 luciferase expression vectors, each harboring a promoter (composed of six tandem repeats of synthetic random DNA) and an associated barcode of 20 base pairs (bp) within the 3′ untranslated mRNA region. Together, the promoter sequences encompass >400,000 bp of random DNA, a sequence complexity sufficient to capture most TFs. Cells transfected with the library are exposed to a signal, and the mRNAs that it encodes are counted by next-generation sequencing of the barcodes. This allows the simultaneous activity tracking of each of the ∼3000 synthetic promoters in a single experiment. Here we establish proof of concept for BC-STAR-PROM by applying it to the identification of TFs induced by drugs affecting actin and tubulin cytoskeleton dynamics. BC-STAR-PROM revealed that serum response factor (SRF) is the only immediate early TF induced by both actin polymerization and microtubule depolymerization. Such changes in cytoskeleton dynamics are known to occur during the cell division cycle, and real-time bioluminescence microscopy indeed revealed cell-autonomous SRF–myocardin-related TF (MRTF) activity bouts in proliferating cells. PMID:27601530

  9. Fibroblast growth factor inhibits interferon γ-STAT1 and interleukin 6-STAT3 signaling in chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Krejci, Pavel; Prochazkova, Jirina; Bryja, Vitezslav; Jelinkova, Petra; Pejchalova, Katerina; Kozubik, Alois; Thompson, Leslie Michels; Wilcox, William R.

    2008-01-01

    Activation of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) leads to attenuation of cartilage growth. The members of the STAT family of transcription factors are believed to participate in FGFR3 signaling in cartilage, however the molecular mechanism of this action is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that a chronic FGF stimulus leads to accumulation of STAT1, 3, 5 and 6, evident in both in vitro chondrocyte model and murine limb explant cultures. Despite the accumulation, both endogenous and cytokine-induced activation of STAT1 and STAT3 is impaired by FGF, as demonstrated by imaging of active STAT nuclear translocation and analyses of STAT activatory phosphorylation and transcriptional activation. Further, we demonstrate that FGF induces expression of CIS, SOCS1 and SOCS3 inhibitors of gp130, a common receptor for the IL6-family of cytokines. Since cytokine-gp130 signaling represents an important positive regulator of cartilage, its inhibition may contribute to the growth-inhibitory effect of FGFR3 in cartilage. PMID:18950705

  10. Unbiased identification of signal-activated transcription factors by barcoded synthetic tandem repeat promoter screening (BC-STAR-PROM).

    PubMed

    Gosselin, Pauline; Rando, Gianpaolo; Fleury-Olela, Fabienne; Schibler, Ueli

    2016-08-15

    The discovery of transcription factors (TFs) controlling pathways in health and disease is of paramount interest. We designed a widely applicable method, dubbed barcorded synthetic tandem repeat promoter screening (BC-STAR-PROM), to identify signal-activated TFs without any a priori knowledge about their properties. The BC-STAR-PROM library consists of ∼3000 luciferase expression vectors, each harboring a promoter (composed of six tandem repeats of synthetic random DNA) and an associated barcode of 20 base pairs (bp) within the 3' untranslated mRNA region. Together, the promoter sequences encompass >400,000 bp of random DNA, a sequence complexity sufficient to capture most TFs. Cells transfected with the library are exposed to a signal, and the mRNAs that it encodes are counted by next-generation sequencing of the barcodes. This allows the simultaneous activity tracking of each of the ∼3000 synthetic promoters in a single experiment. Here we establish proof of concept for BC-STAR-PROM by applying it to the identification of TFs induced by drugs affecting actin and tubulin cytoskeleton dynamics. BC-STAR-PROM revealed that serum response factor (SRF) is the only immediate early TF induced by both actin polymerization and microtubule depolymerization. Such changes in cytoskeleton dynamics are known to occur during the cell division cycle, and real-time bioluminescence microscopy indeed revealed cell-autonomous SRF-myocardin-related TF (MRTF) activity bouts in proliferating cells. PMID:27601530

  11. Role of Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 Signaling Pathway in Cisplatin-Resistant Lung Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Yunguang; Zheng Siyuan; Torossian, Artour; Speirs, Christina K.; Schleicher, Stephen; Giacalone, Nicholas J.; Carbone, David P.; Zhao Zhongming; Lu Bo

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: The development of drug-resistant phenotypes has been a major obstacle to cisplatin use in non-small-cell lung cancer. We aimed to identify some of the molecular mechanisms that underlie cisplatin resistance using microarray expression analysis. Methods and Materials: H460 cells were treated with cisplatin. The differences between cisplatin-resistant lung cancer cells and parental H460 cells were studied using Western blot, MTS, and clonogenic assays, in vivo tumor implantation, and microarray analysis. The cisplatin-R cells were treated with human recombinant insulin-like growth factor (IGF) binding protein-3 and siRNA targeting IGF-1 receptor. Results: Cisplatin-R cells illustrated greater expression of the markers CD133 and aldehyde dehydrogenase, more rapid in vivo tumor growth, more resistance to cisplatin- and etoposide-induced apoptosis, and greater survival after treatment with cisplatin or radiation than the parental H460 cells. Also, cisplatin-R demonstrated decreased expression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 and increased activation of IGF-1 receptor signaling compared with parental H460 cells in the presence of IGF-1. Human recombinant IGF binding protein-3 reversed cisplatin resistance in cisplatin-R cells and targeting of IGF-1 receptor using siRNA resulted in sensitization of cisplatin-R-cells to cisplatin and radiation. Conclusions: The IGF-1 signaling pathway contributes to cisplatin-R to cisplatin and radiation. Thus, this pathway represents a potential target for improved lung cancer response to treatment.

  12. CHMP6 and VPS4A mediate recycling of Ras to the plasma membrane to promote growth factor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Ze-Yi; Cheng, Chiang-Min; Fu, Xin-Rong; Chen, Liuh-Yow; Xu, Lizhong; Terrillon, Sonia; Wong, Stephen T.; Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Songyang, Zhou; Chang, Eric C.

    2011-01-01

    While Ras is well-known to function on the plasma membrane (PM) to mediate growth factor signaling, increasing evidence suggests that Ras has complex roles in the cytoplasm. To uncover these roles, we screened a cDNA library and isolated H-Ras-binding proteins that also influence Ras functions. Many isolated proteins regulate trafficking involving endosomes; CHMP6/VPS20 and VPS4A, which interact with ESCRT-III, were chosen for further study. We showed that the binding is direct and occurs in endosomes. Furthermore, the binding is most efficient when H-Ras has a functional effector-binding-loop and is GTP-bound and ubiquitylated. CHMP6 and VPS4A also bound N-Ras, but not K-Ras. Repressing CHMP6 and VPS4A blocked Ras-induced transformation, which correlated with inefficient Ras localization to the PM as measured by cell fractionation and photobleaching. Moreover, silencing CHMP6 and VPS4A also blocked EGFR recycling. These data suggest that Ras interacts with key ESCRT-III components to promote recycling of itself and EGFR back to the PM to create a positive feedback loop to enhance growth factor signaling. PMID:22231449

  13. Heat shock protein 90 acts in brassinosteroid signaling through interaction with BES1/BZR1 transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Shigeta, Tomoaki; Zaizen, Yuichi; Sugimoto, Yasushi; Nakamura, Yasushi; Matsuo, Tomoaki; Okamoto, Shigehisa

    2015-04-15

    Brassinosteroids (BRs), a class of phytohormones, control various physiological and developmental processes in plants. Two highly homologous transcription factors, brassinosteroid insensitive 1-EMS-SUPRESSOR 1 (BES1) and brassinazole resistant 1 (BZR1), act downstream of BR signaling to control several thousands of putative target genes. We reported previously that BES1 forms a complex with a molecular chaperone: heat shock protein 90 (HSP90). This study demonstrates that the amino-terminal and central parts of BES1 are responsible for its physical interaction with HSP90.3 in vitro. Additionally, we present evidence that BZR1 is a novel HSP90 partner aside from two BR signaling components previously identified as its clients: BES1 and brassinosteroid insensitive 2 (BIN2). Furthermore, geldanamycin, an inhibitor of ATPase activity in HSP90, caused BES1 hyperphosphorylation and disrupted the expression of BR-responsive genes. Considered together, our results imply that HSP90 takes a part in BR-mediated gene expression through complex formation with two major transcription factors. PMID:25778412

  14. Unbiased identification of signal-activated transcription factors by barcoded synthetic tandem repeat promoter screening (BC-STAR-PROM).

    PubMed

    Gosselin, Pauline; Rando, Gianpaolo; Fleury-Olela, Fabienne; Schibler, Ueli

    2016-08-15

    The discovery of transcription factors (TFs) controlling pathways in health and disease is of paramount interest. We designed a widely applicable method, dubbed barcorded synthetic tandem repeat promoter screening (BC-STAR-PROM), to identify signal-activated TFs without any a priori knowledge about their properties. The BC-STAR-PROM library consists of ∼3000 luciferase expression vectors, each harboring a promoter (composed of six tandem repeats of synthetic random DNA) and an associated barcode of 20 base pairs (bp) within the 3' untranslated mRNA region. Together, the promoter sequences encompass >400,000 bp of random DNA, a sequence complexity sufficient to capture most TFs. Cells transfected with the library are exposed to a signal, and the mRNAs that it encodes are counted by next-generation sequencing of the barcodes. This allows the simultaneous activity tracking of each of the ∼3000 synthetic promoters in a single experiment. Here we establish proof of concept for BC-STAR-PROM by applying it to the identification of TFs induced by drugs affecting actin and tubulin cytoskeleton dynamics. BC-STAR-PROM revealed that serum response factor (SRF) is the only immediate early TF induced by both actin polymerization and microtubule depolymerization. Such changes in cytoskeleton dynamics are known to occur during the cell division cycle, and real-time bioluminescence microscopy indeed revealed cell-autonomous SRF-myocardin-related TF (MRTF) activity bouts in proliferating cells.

  15. Illumination Effects on the Capacitance Spectra and Signal Quality Factor of Al/InSe/C Microwave Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qasrawi, A. F.

    2013-06-01

    Amorphous indium selenide thin films have been used in the design of a microwave-sensitive Schottky barrier. The illumination effects on the capacitance spectra, on the signal quality factor, and on the capacitance ( C)-voltage ( V) characteristics of the Al/InSe/C device are investigated. Particular shifts in the amplitude and in the resonance peaks of the capacitance spectra which were studied in the frequency range of 10.0 kHz to 3.0 GHz are observed. While the photoexcitation of these devices increased the capacity level by ˜1.6 times the original magnitude, the dark quality factor, which was 2.2 × 106 at 3.0 GHz, fell to 1.2 × 106 when subjected to luminance of 14.7 klux. Analysis of the C- V curves recorded at signal power ranging from wireless local area network (LAN) levels to the maximum output power of third generation (3G) mobiles reflected high tunability of capacitance upon increasing the voltage or power. The tunability of the biased capacitance was much more pronounced in the light than in the dark. The obtained characteristics of the Al/InSe/C sensors indicate their usability in radio and microwave technology.

  16. Kaiso depletion attenuates transforming growth factorsignaling and metastatic activity of triple-negative breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Bassey-Archibong, B I; Kwiecien, J M; Milosavljevic, S B; Hallett, R M; Rayner, L G A; Erb, M J; Crawford-Brown, C J; Stephenson, K B; Bédard, P-A; Hassell, J A; Daniel, J M

    2016-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) represent a subset of breast tumors that are highly aggressive and metastatic, and are responsible for a disproportionate number of breast cancer-related deaths. Several studies have postulated a role for the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) program in the increased aggressiveness and metastatic propensity of TNBCs. Although EMT is essential for early vertebrate development and wound healing, it is frequently co-opted by cancer cells during tumorigenesis. One prominent signaling pathway involved in EMT is the transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) pathway. In this study, we report that the novel POZ-ZF transcription factor Kaiso is highly expressed in TNBCs and correlates with a shorter metastasis-free survival. Notably, Kaiso expression is induced by the TGFβ pathway and silencing Kaiso expression in the highly invasive breast cancer cell lines, MDA-MB-231 (hereafter MDA-231) and Hs578T, attenuated the expression of several EMT-associated proteins (Vimentin, Slug and ZEB1), abrogated TGFβ signaling and TGFβ-dependent EMT. Moreover, Kaiso depletion attenuated the metastasis of TNBC cells (MDA-231 and Hs578T) in a mouse model. Although high Kaiso and high TGFβR1 expression is associated with poor overall survival in breast cancer patients, overexpression of a kinase-active TGFβR1 in the Kaiso-depleted cells was insufficient to restore the metastatic potential of these cells, suggesting that Kaiso is a key downstream component of TGFβ-mediated pro-metastatic responses. Collectively, these findings suggest a critical role for Kaiso in TGFβ signaling and the metastasis of TNBCs. PMID:26999717

  17. Kaiso depletion attenuates transforming growth factorsignaling and metastatic activity of triple-negative breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bassey-Archibong, B I; Kwiecien, J M; Milosavljevic, S B; Hallett, R M; Rayner, L G A; Erb, M J; Crawford-Brown, C J; Stephenson, K B; Bédard, P-A; Hassell, J A; Daniel, J M

    2016-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) represent a subset of breast tumors that are highly aggressive and metastatic, and are responsible for a disproportionate number of breast cancer-related deaths. Several studies have postulated a role for the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) program in the increased aggressiveness and metastatic propensity of TNBCs. Although EMT is essential for early vertebrate development and wound healing, it is frequently co-opted by cancer cells during tumorigenesis. One prominent signaling pathway involved in EMT is the transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) pathway. In this study, we report that the novel POZ-ZF transcription factor Kaiso is highly expressed in TNBCs and correlates with a shorter metastasis-free survival. Notably, Kaiso expression is induced by the TGFβ pathway and silencing Kaiso expression in the highly invasive breast cancer cell lines, MDA-MB-231 (hereafter MDA-231) and Hs578T, attenuated the expression of several EMT-associated proteins (Vimentin, Slug and ZEB1), abrogated TGFβ signaling and TGFβ-dependent EMT. Moreover, Kaiso depletion attenuated the metastasis of TNBC cells (MDA-231 and Hs578T) in a mouse model. Although high Kaiso and high TGFβR1 expression is associated with poor overall survival in breast cancer patients, overexpression of a kinase-active TGFβR1 in the Kaiso-depleted cells was insufficient to restore the metastatic potential of these cells, suggesting that Kaiso is a key downstream component of TGFβ-mediated pro-metastatic responses. Collectively, these findings suggest a critical role for Kaiso in TGFβ signaling and the metastasis of TNBCs.

  18. Intestinal trefoil factor activates the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway to protect gastric mucosal epithelium from damage.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhaorui; Liu, Hongmei; Yang, Zhizhou; Shao, Danbing; Zhang, Wei; Ren, Yi; Sun, Baodi; Lin, Jinfeng; Xu, Min; Nie, Shinan

    2014-09-01

    Intestinal trefoil factor (ITF, also named as trefoil factor 3, TFF3) is a member of the TFF-domain peptide family, which plays an essential role in the regulation of cell survival, cell migration and maintains mucosal epithelial integrity in the gastrointestinal tract. However, the underlying mechanisms and associated molecules remain unclear. The aim of this study was to explore the protective effects of ITF on gastric mucosal epithelium injury and its possible molecular mechanisms of action. In the present study, we show that ITF was able to promote the proliferation and migration of GES-1 cells via a mechanism that involves the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Western blot results indicated that ITF induced a dose- and time-dependent increase in the Akt signaling pathway. ITF also plays an essential role in the restitution of GES-1 cell damage induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS induced the apoptosis of GES-1 cells, decreased cell viability significantly (P<0.01) and led to epithelial tight junction damage, which is attenuated via ITF treatment. The protective effect of ITF on the integrity of GES-1 was abrogated by inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway. Taken together, our results demonstrate that ITF promotes the proliferation and migration of gastric mucosal epithelial cells and preserves gastric mucosal epithelial integrity after damage is mediated by activation of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. This study suggested that the PI3K/Akt pathway could act as a key intracellular pathway in the gastric mucosal epithelium that may serve as a therapeutic target to preserve epithelial integrity during injury.

  19. Omega-3 fatty acids and other FFA4 agonists inhibit growth factor signaling in human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ze; Hopkins, Mandi M; Zhang, Zhihong; Quisenberry, Chrystal B; Fix, Louise C; Galvan, Brianna M; Meier, Kathryn E

    2015-02-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids (n-3 FAs) are proposed to have many beneficial effects on human health. However, the mechanisms underlying their potential cancer preventative effects are unclear. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) of the free fatty acid receptor (FFAR) family, FFA1/GPR40 and FFA4/GPR120, specifically bind n-3 FAs as agonist ligands. In this study, we examined the effects of n-3 FAs in human prostate cancer cell lines. Initial studies established that the long-chain n-3 FAs, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid, inhibit proliferation of DU145 cells in response to lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a mitogenic lipid mediator. When added alone to serum-starved DU145 cells, EPA transiently activates signaling events, including p70S6K phosphorylation. However, when added 15 minutes prior to LPA, EPA suppresses LPA-induced activating phosphorylations of ERK, FAK, and p70S6K, and expression of the matricellular protein CCN1. The rapid onset of the inhibitory action of EPA suggested involvement of a GPCR. Further studies showed that DU145 and PC-3 cells express mRNA and protein for both FFA4 and FFA1. TUG-891 (4-[(4-fluoro-4'-methyl[1,1'-biphenyl]-2-yl)methoxy]-benzenepropanoic acid), a selective agonist for FFA4, exerts inhibitory effects on LPA- and epidermal growth factor-induced proliferation and migration, similar to EPA, in DU145 and PC-3 cells. The effects of TUG-891 and EPA are readily reversible. The FFA1/FFA4 agonist GW9508 (4-[[(3-phenoxyphenyl)methyl]amino]-benzenepropranoic acid) likewise inhibits proliferation at doses that block FFA4. Knockdown of FFA4 expression prevents EPA- and TUG-891-induced inhibition of growth and migration. Together, these results indicate that activation of FFA4 initiates signaling events that can inhibit growth factor-induced signaling, providing a novel mechanism for suppression of cancer cell proliferation.

  20. LCAT-null mice develop improved hepatic insulin sensitivity through altered regulation of transcription factors and suppressors of cytokine signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Lixin; Naples, Mark; Song, Hui; Yuan, Ronghua; Ye, Feilu; Shafi, Sharmi; Adeli, Khosrow; Ng, Dominic S

    2007-08-01

    We previously reported that LCAT-deficient mice develop not only low HDL-cholesterol but also hypertriglyceridemia, hepatic triglyceride (TG) overproduction, and, unexpectedly, improved hepatic insulin sensitivity and reduced hepatic TG content. Here, we examined the mechanistic links underlying this apparent paradox. The LDL receptor-deficient (Ldlr)(-/-)xLcat(-/-) mouse model and age- and sex-matched Ldlr(-/-)xLcat(+/+) littermates, both in C57Bl/6 background, were employed. Studies of hepatic insulin signal transduction showed an upregulation of hepatic Irs2 mRNA level (5.3-fold, P = 0.02), IRS-2 protein mass level (1.5-fold, P = 0.009) and pIRS-2 (1.8-fold. P = 0.02) in the Ldlr(-/-)xLcat(-/-) mice. There was a 1.2-fold increase in pAkt (P = 0.03) with a nonsignificant change in total Akt. We observed a significant shift in its downstream transcription factor FoxO-1 to the cytosolic compartment (2.3-fold increase in cytosolic/nuclear ratio, P = 0.04). We also observed a significant 3.1-fold increase in nuclear abundance of FoxA-2 mass (P = 0.017) and a 1.5-fold upregulation of its coactivator PGC-1beta (P = 0.002), the coordinated actions of which promotes hepatic TG production and beta-oxidation. Increased hepatic insulin signaling in the Ldlr(-/-)xLcat(-/-) mice was associated with an upregulation of the Tcfe3 gene (1.7-fold, P = 0.024), a selective downregulation of the Socs-1 gene by 60% (P = 0.01), and no change in PTP-1B protein mass. These data suggest that LCAT deficiency induces complex alterations in hepatic signal transduction cascades, which explain, at least in part, the observed enhanced insulin signaling in association with hepatic TG overproduction and reduced hepatic TG content.

  1. Hemodynamic scaling of fMRI-BOLD signal: validation of low-frequency spectral amplitude as a scalability factor.

    PubMed

    Biswal, Bharat B; Kannurpatti, Sridhar S; Rypma, Bart

    2007-12-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (fMRI-BOLD) signal representing neural activity may be optimized by discriminating MR signal components related to neural activity and those related to intrinsic properties of the cortical vasculature. The objective of this study was to reduce the hemodynamic change independent of neural activity to obtain a scaled fMRI-BOLD response using two factors, namely, low-frequency spectral amplitude (LFSA) and breath-hold amplitude (BHA). Ten subjects (age range, 22-38 years) were scanned during four task conditions: (a) rest while breathing room air, (b) bilateral finger tapping while breathing room air, (c) rest during a partial inspirational breath-hold, and (d) rest during moderate hypercapnia (breathing 5% CO2, 20% O2 and 75% N2). In all subjects who breathed 5% CO2, regions with significant BOLD response during breath-hold correlated significantly with the percent signal increase during 5% CO2 inhalation. Finger-tapping-induced responses in the motor cortex were diminished to a similar extent after scaling using either LFSA or BHA. Inter- and intrasubject variation in the amplitude of the BOLD signal response reduced after hemodynamic scaling using LFSA or BHA. The results validated the hemodynamic amplitude scaling using LFSA with the earlier established BHA. LFSA free from motor-task contamination can be used to calibrate the fMRI-BOLD response in lieu of BHA or hypercapnia to minimize intra- and intersubject variation arising from vascular anatomy and vasodilative capacity. PMID:17482411

  2. Global analysis of WRKY transcription factor superfamily in Setaria identifies potential candidates involved in abiotic stress signaling

    PubMed Central

    Muthamilarasan, Mehanathan; Bonthala, Venkata S.; Khandelwal, Rohit; Jaishankar, Jananee; Shweta, Shweta; Nawaz, Kashif; Prasad, Manoj

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are major players in stress signaling and constitute an integral part of signaling networks. Among the major TFs, WRKY proteins play pivotal roles in regulation of transcriptional reprogramming associated with stress responses. In view of this, genome- and transcriptome-wide identification of WRKY TF family was performed in the C4model plants, Setaria italica (SiWRKY) and S. viridis (SvWRKY), respectively. The study identified 105 SiWRKY and 44 SvWRKY proteins that were computationally analyzed for their physicochemical properties. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis classified these proteins into three major groups, namely I, II, and III with majority of WRKY proteins belonging to group II (53 SiWRKY and 23 SvWRKY), followed by group III (39 SiWRKY and 11 SvWRKY) and group I (10 SiWRKY and 6 SvWRKY). Group II proteins were further classified into 5 subgroups (IIa to IIe) based on their phylogeny. Domain analysis showed the presence of WRKY motif and zinc finger-like structures in these proteins along with additional domains in a few proteins. All SiWRKY genes were physically mapped on the S. italica genome and their duplication analysis revealed that 10 and 8 gene pairs underwent tandem and segmental duplications, respectively. Comparative mapping of SiWRKY and SvWRKY genes in related C4 panicoid genomes demonstrated the orthologous relationships between these genomes. In silico expression analysis of SiWRKY and SvWRKY genes showed their differential expression patterns in different tissues and stress conditions. Expression profiling of candidate SiWRKY genes in response to stress (dehydration and salinity) and hormone treatments (abscisic acid, salicylic acid, and methyl jasmonate) suggested the putative involvement of SiWRKY066 and SiWRKY082 in stress and hormone signaling. These genes could be potential candidates for further characterization to delineate their functional roles in abiotic stress signaling. PMID:26635818

  3. The Heat Stress Factor HSFA6b Connects ABA Signaling and ABA-Mediated Heat Responses1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chen-Ru

    2016-01-01

    Heat stress response (HSR) is a conserved mechanism developed to increase the expression of heat shock proteins (HSPs) via a heat shock factor (HSF)-dependent mechanism. Signaling by the stress phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) is involved in acquired thermotolerance as well. Analysis of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) microarray databases revealed that the expression of HSFA6b, a class A HSF, extensively increased with salinity, osmotic, and cold stresses, but not heat. Here, we show that HSFA6b plays a pivotal role in the response to ABA and in thermotolerance. Salt-inducible HSFA6b expression was down-regulated in ABA-insensitive and -deficient mutants; however, exogenous ABA application restored expression in ABA-deficient, but not -insensitive plants. Thus, ABA signaling is required for proper HSFA6b expression. A transcriptional activation assay of protoplasts revealed that ABA treatment and coexpression of an ABA signaling master effector, ABA-RESPONSIVE ELEMENT-BINDING PROTEIN1, could activate the HSFA6b promoter. In addition, HSFA6b directly bound to the promoter of DEHYDRATION-RESPONSIVE ELEMENT-BINDING PROTEIN2A and enhanced its expression. Analysis of ABA responses in seed germination, cotyledon greening, and root growth as well as salt and drought tolerance in HSFA6b-null, overexpression, and dominant negative mutants revealed that HSFA6b is a positive regulator participating in ABA-mediated salt and drought resistance. Thermoprotection tests showed that HSFA6b was required for thermotolerance acquisition. Our study reveals a network in which HSFA6b operates as a downstream regulator of the ABA-mediated stress response and is required for heat stress resistance. This new ABA-signaling pathway is integrated into the complex HSR network in planta. PMID:27493213

  4. Thermoperiodic control of hypocotyl elongation depends on auxin-induced ethylene signaling that controls downstream PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR3 activity.

    PubMed

    Bours, Ralph; Kohlen, Wouter; Bouwmeester, Harro J; van der Krol, Alexander

    2015-02-01

    We show that antiphase light-temperature cycles (negative day-night temperature difference [-DIF]) inhibit hypocotyl growth in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). This is caused by reduced cell elongation during the cold photoperiod. Cell elongation in the basal part of the hypocotyl under -DIF was restored by both 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC; ethylene precursor) and auxin, indicating limited auxin and ethylene signaling under -DIF. Both auxin biosynthesis and auxin signaling were reduced during -DIF. In addition, expression of several ACC Synthase was reduced under -DIF but could be restored by auxin application. In contrast, the reduced hypocotyl elongation of ethylene biosynthesis and signaling mutants could not be complemented by auxin, indicating that auxin functions upstream of ethylene. The PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTORS (PIFs) PIF3, PIF4, and PIF5 were previously shown to be important regulators of hypocotyl elongation. We now show that, in contrast to pif4 and pif5 mutants, the reduced hypocotyl length in pif3 cannot be rescued by either ACC or auxin. In line with this, treatment with ethylene or auxin inhibitors reduced hypocotyl elongation in PIF4 overexpressor (PIF4ox) and PIF5ox but not PIF3ox plants. PIF3 promoter activity was strongly reduced under -DIF but could be restored by auxin application in an ACC Synthase-dependent manner. Combined, these results show that PIF3 regulates hypocotyl length downstream, whereas PIF4 and PIF5 regulate hypocotyl length upstream of an auxin and ethylene cascade. We show that, under -DIF, lower auxin biosynthesis activity limits the signaling in this pathway, resulting in low activity of PIF3 and short hypocotyls.

  5. New role for Kruppel-like factor 14 as a transcriptional activator involved in the generation of signaling lipids.

    PubMed

    de Assuncao, Thiago M; Lomberk, Gwen; Cao, Sheng; Yaqoob, Usman; Mathison, Angela; Simonetto, Douglas A; Huebert, Robert C; Urrutia, Raul A; Shah, Vijay H

    2014-05-30

    Sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1) is an FGF-inducible gene responsible for generation of sphingosine-1-phosphate, a critical lipid signaling molecule implicated in diverse endothelial cell functions. In this study, we identified SK1 as a target of the canonical FGF2/FGF receptor 1 activation pathway in endothelial cells and sought to identify novel transcriptional pathways that mediate lipid signaling. Studies using the 1.9-kb SK1 promoter and deletion mutants revealed that basal and FGF2-stimulated promoter activity occurred through two GC-rich regions located within 633 bp of the transcription start site. Screening for GC-rich binding transcription factors that could activate this site demonstrated that KLF14, a gene implicated in obesity and the metabolic syndrome, binds to this region. Congruently, overexpression of KLF14 increased basal and FGF2-stimulated SK1 promoter activity by 3-fold, and this effect was abrogated after mutation of the GC-rich sites. In addition, KLF14 siRNA transfection decreased SK1 mRNA and protein levels by 3-fold. Congruently, SK1 mRNA and protein levels were decreased in livers from KLF14 knock-out mice. Combined, luciferase, gel shift, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that KLF14 couples to p300 to increase the levels of histone marks associated with transcriptional activation (H4K8ac and H3K14ac), while decreasing repressive marks (H3K9me3 and H3K27me3). Collectively, the results demonstrate a novel mechanism whereby SK1 lipid signaling is regulated by epigenetic modifications conferred by KLF14 and p300. Thus, this is the first description of the activity and mechanisms underlying the function of KLF14 as an activator protein and novel regulator of lipid signaling. PMID:24759103

  6. New Role for Kruppel-like Factor 14 as a Transcriptional Activator Involved in the Generation of Signaling Lipids*

    PubMed Central

    de Assuncao, Thiago M.; Lomberk, Gwen; Cao, Sheng; Yaqoob, Usman; Mathison, Angela; Simonetto, Douglas A.; Huebert, Robert C.; Urrutia, Raul A.; Shah, Vijay H.

    2014-01-01

    Sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1) is an FGF-inducible gene responsible for generation of sphingosine-1-phosphate, a critical lipid signaling molecule implicated in diverse endothelial cell functions. In this study, we identified SK1 as a target of the canonical FGF2/FGF receptor 1 activation pathway in endothelial cells and sought to identify novel transcriptional pathways that mediate lipid signaling. Studies using the 1.9-kb SK1 promoter and deletion mutants revealed that basal and FGF2-stimulated promoter activity occurred through two GC-rich regions located within 633 bp of the transcription start site. Screening for GC-rich binding transcription factors that could activate this site demonstrated that KLF14, a gene implicated in obesity and the metabolic syndrome, binds to this region. Congruently, overexpression of KLF14 increased basal and FGF2-stimulated SK1 promoter activity by 3-fold, and this effect was abrogated after mutation of the GC-rich sites. In addition, KLF14 siRNA transfection decreased SK1 mRNA and protein levels by 3-fold. Congruently, SK1 mRNA and protein levels were decreased in livers from KLF14 knock-out mice. Combined, luciferase, gel shift, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that KLF14 couples to p300 to increase the levels of histone marks associated with transcriptional activation (H4K8ac and H3K14ac), while decreasing repressive marks (H3K9me3 and H3K27me3). Collectively, the results demonstrate a novel mechanism whereby SK1 lipid signaling is regulated by epigenetic modifications conferred by KLF14 and p300. Thus, this is the first description of the activity and mechanisms underlying the function of KLF14 as an activator protein and novel regulator of lipid signaling. PMID:24759103

  7. The Bacterial Transcription Termination Factor Rho Coordinates Mg(2+) Homeostasis with Translational Signals.

    PubMed

    Kriner, Michelle A; Groisman, Eduardo A

    2015-12-01

    The bacterial protein Rho triggers transcription termination at the ends of many operons and when transcription and translation become uncoupled. In addition to these genome wide activities, Rho implements regulation of specific genes by dictating whether RNA polymerase terminates transcription within the 5' leader region or continues into the downstream coding region. Here, we report that the Mg(2+) channel gene corA in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, which was previously thought to be constitutively expressed, is regulated by a Rho-dependent terminator located within its 5' leader region. We demonstrate that the unusually long and highly conserved corA leader mRNA can adopt two mutually exclusive conformations that determine whether or not Rho interacts with a Rho utilization site on the nascent RNA and thereby prevents transcription of the corA coding region. The RNA conformation that promotes Rho-dependent termination is favored by efficient translation of corL, a short open reading frame located within the corA leader. Thus, corA transcription is inversely coupled to corL translation. This mechanism resembles those governing expression of Salmonella's other two Mg(2+) transport genes, suggesting that Rho links Mg(2+) uptake to translational signals. PMID:26523680

  8. Characterization of a baculovirus nuclear localization signal domain in the late expression factor 3 protein

    SciTech Connect

    Au, Victoria; Yu Mei; Carstens, Eric B.

    2009-03-01

    The baculovirus Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) single-stranded DNA binding protein LEF-3 is a multi-functional protein that is required to transport the helicase protein P143 into the nucleus of infected cells where they function to replicate viral DNA. The N-terminal 56 amino acid region of LEF-3 is required for nuclear transport. In this report, we analyzed the effect of site-specific mutagenesis of LEF-3 on its intracellular distribution. Fluorescence microscopy of expression plasmid-transfected cells demonstrated that the residues 28 to 32 formed the core nuclear localization signal, but other adjacent positively-charged residues augmented these sequences. Comparison with other group I Alphabaculoviruses suggested that this core region functionally duplicated residues including 18 and 19. This was demonstrated by the loss of nuclear localization when the equivalent residues (18 to 20) in Choristoneura fumiferana nucleopolyhedrovirus (CfMNPV) LEF-3 were mutated. The AcMNPV LEF-3 nuclear localization domain was also shown to drive nuclear transport in mammalian cells indicating that the protein nuclear import systems in insect and mammalian cells are conserved. We also demonstrated by mutagenesis that two conserved cysteine residues located at 82 and 106 were not essential for nuclear localization or for interaction with P143. However, by using a modified construct of P143 that localized on its own to the nucleus, we demonstrated that a functional nuclear localization domain on LEF-3 was required for interaction between LEF-3 and P143.

  9. Fibroblast growth factor-10 signals development of von Brunn's nests in the exstrophic bladder.

    PubMed

    Eastman, Rocky; Leaf, Elizabeth M; Zhang, Dianzhong; True, Lawrence D; Sweet, Robert M; Seidel, Kristy; Siebert, Joseph R; Grady, Richard; Mitchell, Michael E; Bassuk, James A

    2010-11-01

    von Brunn's nests have long been recognized as precursors of benign lesions of the urinary bladder mucosa. We report here that von Brunn's nests are especially prevalent in the exstrophic bladder, a birth defect that predisposes the patient to formation of bladder cancer. Cells of von Brunn's nest were found to coalesce into a stratified, polarized epithelium which surrounds itself with a capsule-like structure rich in types I, III, and IV collagen. Histocytochemical analysis and keratin profiling demonstrated that nested cells exhibited a phenotype similar, but not identical, to that of urothelial cells of transitional epithelium. Immunostaining and in situ hybridization analysis of exstrophic tissue demonstrated that the FGF-10 receptor is synthesized and retained by cells of von Brunn's nest. In contrast, FGF-10 is synthesized and secreted by mesenchymal fibroblasts via a paracrine pathway that targets basal epithelial cells of von Brunn's nests. Small clusters of 10pRp cells, positive for both FGF-10 and its receptor, were observed both proximal to and inside blood vessels in the lamina propria. The collective evidence points to a mechanism where von Brunn's nests develop under the control of the FGF-10 signal transduction system and suggests that 10pRp cells may be the original source of nested cells.

  10. Loss of ADAM17-Mediated Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Signaling in Intestinal Cells Attenuates Mucosal Atrophy in a Mouse Model of Parenteral Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yongjia; Tsai, Yu-Hwai; Xiao, Weidong; Ralls, Matthew W; Stoeck, Alex; Wilson, Carole L; Raines, Elaine W; Teitelbaum, Daniel H; Dempsey, Peter J

    2015-11-01

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is commonly used clinically to sustain patients; however, TPN is associated with profound mucosal atrophy, which may adversely affect clinical outcomes. Using a mouse TPN model, removing enteral nutrition leads to decreased crypt proliferation, increased intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) apoptosis and increased mucosal tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) expression that ultimately produces mucosal atrophy. Upregulation of TNF-α signaling plays a central role in mediating TPN-induced mucosal atrophy without intact epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling. Currently, the mechanism and the tissue-specific contributions of TNF-α signaling to TPN-induced mucosal atrophy remain unclear. ADAM17 is an ectodomain sheddase that can modulate the signaling activity of several cytokine/growth factor receptor families, including the TNF-α/TNF receptor and ErbB ligand/EGFR pathways. Using TPN-treated IEC-specific ADAM17-deficient mice, the present study demonstrates that a loss of soluble TNF-α signaling from IECs attenuates TPN-induced mucosal atrophy. Importantly, this response remains dependent on the maintenance of functional EGFR signaling in IECs. TNF-α blockade in wild-type mice receiving TPN confirmed that soluble TNF-α signaling is responsible for downregulation of EGFR signaling in IECs. These results demonstrate that ADAM17-mediated TNF-α signaling from IECs has a significant role in the development of the proinflammatory state and mucosal atrophy observed in TPN-treated mice.

  11. Loss of ADAM17-Mediated Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Signaling in Intestinal Cells Attenuates Mucosal Atrophy in a Mouse Model of Parenteral Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yongjia; Tsai, Yu-Hwai; Xiao, Weidong; Ralls, Matthew W.; Stoeck, Alex; Wilson, Carole L.; Raines, Elaine W.

    2015-01-01

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is commonly used clinically to sustain patients; however, TPN is associated with profound mucosal atrophy, which may adversely affect clinical outcomes. Using a mouse TPN model, removing enteral nutrition leads to decreased crypt proliferation, increased intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) apoptosis and increased mucosal tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) expression that ultimately produces mucosal atrophy. Upregulation of TNF-α signaling plays a central role in mediating TPN-induced mucosal atrophy without intact epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling. Currently, the mechanism and the tissue-specific contributions of TNF-α signaling to TPN-induced mucosal atrophy remain unclear. ADAM17 is an ectodomain sheddase that can modulate the signaling activity of several cytokine/growth factor receptor families, including the TNF-α/TNF receptor and ErbB ligand/EGFR pathways. Using TPN-treated IEC-specific ADAM17-deficient mice, the present study demonstrates that a loss of soluble TNF-α signaling from IECs attenuates TPN-induced mucosal atrophy. Importantly, this response remains dependent on the maintenance of functional EGFR signaling in IECs. TNF-α blockade in wild-type mice receiving TPN confirmed that soluble TNF-α signaling is responsible for downregulation of EGFR signaling in IECs. These results demonstrate that ADAM17-mediated TNF-α signaling from IECs has a significant role in the development of the proinflammatory state and mucosal atrophy observed in TPN-treated mice. PMID:26283731

  12. Fish TRIM8 exerts antiviral roles through regulation of the proinflammatory factors and interferon signaling.

    PubMed

    Huang, Youhua; Yu, Yepin; Yang, Ying; Yang, Min; Zhou, Linli; Huang, Xiaohong; Qin, Qiwei

    2016-07-01

    The tripartite motif (TRIM)-containing proteins usually exert important regulatory roles during multiple biological processes. TRIM8 has been demonstrated to be a RING domain-containing E3 ubiquitin ligase which plays critical roles in inflammation and cancer. In this study, a TRIM8 homolog from grouper, Epinephelus coioides (EcTRIM8) was cloned, and its effects on fish virus replication were investigated. The full-length EcTRIM8 cDNA encoded a polypeptide of 568 amino acids with 92% identity to TRIM8 homolog from large yellow croaker (Larimichthys crocea). Sequence alignment analysis indicated that EcTRIM8 contained conserved RING finger, B-box and coiled-coil domain. Expression patterns analysis showed that EcTRIM8 was predominant in kidney, gill, fin, liver, spleen and brain. After challenging with Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV) or polyinosin-polycytidylic acid (poly I:C), the EcTRIM8 transcript was significantly increased at the early stage of injection. Under fluorescence microscopy, we observed different distribution patterns of EcTRIM8 in grouper spleen (GS) cells, including punctate fluorescence evenly situated throughout the cytoplasm and bright aggregates. The ectopic expression of EcTRIM8 in vitro significantly inhibited the replication of SGIV and red spotted grouper nervous necrosis virus (RGNNV), evidenced by the obvious reduction in the severity of cytopathic effect (CPE) and the significant decrease in viral gene transcription and protein synthesis. Moreover, the transcription of the proinflammatory factors and interferon related immune factors were differently regulated by EcTRIM8 during SGIV or RGNNV infection. In addition, overexpression of EcTRIM8 significantly increased the transcription of interferon regulator factor 3 (IRF3) and IRF7, and enhanced IRF3 or IRF7 induced interferon-stimulated response element (ISRE) promoter activity. Together, our results firstly demonstrated that fish TRIM8 could exert antiviral function through the

  13. Negative regulation of TLR-signaling pathways by activating transcription factor-3.

    PubMed

    Whitmore, Mark M; Iparraguirre, Amaya; Kubelka, Lindsey; Weninger, Wolfgang; Hai, Tsonwin; Williams, Bryan R G

    2007-09-15

    Activating transcription factor-3 (ATF3) is rapidly induced by LPS in mouse macrophages and regulates TLR4 responses. We show that ATF3 is rapidly induced by various TLRs in mouse macrophages and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (DCs), as well as plasmacytoid and myeloid subsets of human DCs. In primary macrophages from mice with a targeted deletion of the atf3 gene (ATF3-knockout (KO)), TLR-stimulated levels of IL-12 and IL-6 were elevated relative to responses in wild-type macrophages. Similarly, targeted deletion of atf3 correlated with enhanced responsiveness of myeloid DCs to TLR activation as measured by IL-12 secretion. Ectopic expression of ATF3 antagonized TLR-stimulated IL-12p40 activation in a reporter assay. In vivo, CpG-oligodeoxynucleotide, a TLR9 agonist, given i.p. to ATF3-KO mice resulted in enhanced cytokine production from splenocytes. Furthermore, while ATF3-KO mice challenged with a sublethal dose of PR8 influenza virus were delayed in body weight recovery in comparison to wild type, the ATF3-KO mice showed higher titers of serum neutralizing Ab against PR8 5 mo postinfection. Thus, ATF3 behaves as a negative regulatory transcription factor in TLR pathways and, accordingly, deficiency in atf3 alters responses to immunological challenges in vivo. ATF3 dysregulation merits further exploration in diseases such as type I diabetes and cancer, where altered innate immunity has been implicated in their pathogenesis.

  14. Mechanism of programmed cell death factor 4/nuclear factor-κB signaling pathway in porcine coronary micro-embolization-induced cardiac dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Su, Qiang; Wang, Jiangyou; Zhou, You; Liu, Yangchun

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of the programmed cell death factor 4 (PDCD4)/nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway in coronary micro-embolism (CME)-induced inflammatory responses and cardiac dysfunction in a porcine model. Bama miniature pigs were randomly divided into four groups (n = 5 per group). Micro-embolization balls or saline were infused through a microcatheter in the left anterior descending (LAD) artery in the CME and Sham groups, respectively. PDCD4 siRNA or control siRNA mixed with transfection reagent was infused via the LAD artery 72 h before CME induction in the CME + siRNA-PDCD4 and siRNA-control groups, respectively. Cardiac function was evaluated with ultrasound. Tissue biopsy was stained with hematoxylin–eosin (HE) and hematoxylin basic fuchsin picric acid (HBFP) to measure infarction area. Myocardial PDCD4 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) mRNA and protein expression were analyzed by quantitative PCR and Western blotting. NF-κB activity was evaluated in gel electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Echocardiographic parameters showed that compared with the sham group, the CME group had impaired heart function, manifested as systolic dysfunction and left ventricular dilatation (reduced left ventricular ejection fraction [LVEF], left ventricular fractional shortening [FS], and cardiac output [CO] [P < 0.05] and increased left ventricular end-diastolic diameter [LVEDd] [P < 0.05]). Compared with the CME group, the CME + siRNA-PDCD4 group had attenuated CME-induced cardiac function damage (increased LVEF, FS and CO [P < 0.05] and reduced LVEDd [P < 0.05]). Compared with the sham group, the CME group had significantly increased PDCD4 and TNF-α mRNA and protein expression and increased NF-κB activity (P < 0.05). These effects were significantly inhibited in the CME + siRNA-PDCD4 group (P < 0.05). In conclusion, PDCD4/NF-κB signaling pathway activation is an important mechanism for CME

  15. Defects in subventricular zone pigmented epithelium-derived factor niche signaling in the senescence-accelerated mouse prone-8.

    PubMed

    Castro-Garcia, Paola; Díaz-Moreno, María; Gil-Gas, Carmen; Fernández-Gómez, Francisco J; Honrubia-Gómez, Paloma; Álvarez-Simón, Carmen Belén; Sánchez-Sánchez, Francisco; Cano, Juan Carlos Castillo; Almeida, Francisco; Blanco, Vicente; Jordán, Joaquín; Mira, Helena; Ramírez-Castillejo, Carmen

    2015-04-01

    We studied potential changes in the subventricular zone (SVZ) stem cell niche of the senescence-accelerated mouse prone-8 (SAM-P8) aging model. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) assays with longtime survival revealed a lower number of label-retaining stem cells in the SAM-P8 SVZ compared with the SAM-Resistant 1 (SAM-R1) control strain. We also found that in SAM-P8 niche signaling is attenuated and the stem cell pool is less responsive to the self-renewal niche factor pigmented epithelium-derived factor (PEDF). Protein analysis demonstrated stable amounts of the PEDF ligand in the SAM-P8 SVZ niche; however, SAM-P8 stem cells present a significant expression decrease of patatin-like phospholipase domain containing 2, a receptor for PEDF (PNPLA2-PEDF) receptor, but not of laminin receptor (LR), a receptor for PEDF (LR-PEDF) receptor. We observed changes in self-renewal related genes (hairy and enhancer of split 1 (Hes1), hairy and enhancer of split 1 (Hes5), Sox2] and report that although these genes are down-regulated in SAM-P8, differentiation genes (Pax6) are up-regulated and neurogenesis is increased. Finally, sheltering mammalian telomere complexes might be also involved given a down-regulation of telomeric repeat binding factor 1 (Terf1) expression was observed in SAM-P8 at young age periods. Differences between these 2 models, SAM-P8 and SAM-R1 controls, have been previously detected at more advanced ages. We now describe alterations in the PEDF signaling pathway and stem cell self-renewal at a very young age, which could be involved in the premature senescence observed in the SAM-P8 model. PMID:25636741

  16. Influential factors of red-light running at signalized intersection and prediction using a rare events logistic regression model.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yilong; Wang, Yunpeng; Wu, Xinkai; Yu, Guizhen; Ding, Chuan

    2016-10-01

    Red light running (RLR) has become a major safety concern at signalized intersection. To prevent RLR related crashes, it is critical to identify the factors that significantly impact the drivers' behaviors of RLR, and to predict potential RLR in real time. In this research, 9-month's RLR events extracted from high-resolution traffic data collected by loop detectors from three signalized intersections were applied to identify the factors that significantly affect RLR behaviors. The data analysis indicated that occupancy time, time gap, used yellow time, time left to yellow start, whether the preceding vehicle runs through the intersection during yellow, and whether there is a vehicle passing through the intersection on the adjacent lane were significantly factors for RLR behaviors. Furthermore, due to the rare events nature of RLR, a modified rare events logistic regression model was developed for RLR prediction. The rare events logistic regression method has been applied in many fields for rare events studies and shows impressive performance, but so far none of previous research has applied this method to study RLR. The results showed that the rare events logistic regression model performed significantly better than the standard logistic regression model. More importantly, the proposed RLR prediction method is purely based on loop detector data collected from a single advance loop detector located 400 feet away from stop-bar. This brings great potential for future field applications of the proposed method since loops have been widely implemented in many intersections and can collect data in real time. This research is expected to contribute to the improvement of intersection safety significantly.

  17. Defects in subventricular zone pigmented epithelium-derived factor niche signaling in the senescence-accelerated mouse prone-8.

    PubMed

    Castro-Garcia, Paola; Díaz-Moreno, María; Gil-Gas, Carmen; Fernández-Gómez, Francisco J; Honrubia-Gómez, Paloma; Álvarez-Simón, Carmen Belén; Sánchez-Sánchez, Francisco; Cano, Juan Carlos Castillo; Almeida, Francisco; Blanco, Vicente; Jordán, Joaquín; Mira, Helena; Ramírez-Castillejo, Carmen

    2015-04-01

    We studied potential changes in the subventricular zone (SVZ) stem cell niche of the senescence-accelerated mouse prone-8 (SAM-P8) aging model. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) assays with longtime survival revealed a lower number of label-retaining stem cells in the SAM-P8 SVZ compared with the SAM-Resistant 1 (SAM-R1) control strain. We also found that in SAM-P8 niche signaling is attenuated and the stem cell pool is less responsive to the self-renewal niche factor pigmented epithelium-derived factor (PEDF). Protein analysis demonstrated stable amounts of the PEDF ligand in the SAM-P8 SVZ niche; however, SAM-P8 stem cells present a significant expression decrease of patatin-like phospholipase domain containing 2, a receptor for PEDF (PNPLA2-PEDF) receptor, but not of laminin receptor (LR), a receptor for PEDF (LR-PEDF) receptor. We observed changes in self-renewal related genes (hairy and enhancer of split 1 (Hes1), hairy and enhancer of split 1 (Hes5), Sox2] and report that although these genes are down-regulated in SAM-P8, differentiation genes (Pax6) are up-regulated and neurogenesis is increased. Finally, sheltering mammalian telomere complexes might be also involved given a down-regulation of telomeric repeat binding factor 1 (Terf1) expression was observed in SAM-P8 at young age periods. Differences between these 2 models, SAM-P8 and SAM-R1 controls, have been previously detected at more advanced ages. We now describe alterations in the PEDF signaling pathway and stem cell self-renewal at a very young age, which could be involved in the premature senescence observed in the SAM-P8 model.

  18. The Actin Depolymerizing Factor (ADF)/Cofilin Signaling Pathway and DNA Damage Responses in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chun-Yuan; Leu, Jyh-Der; Lee, Yi-Jang

    2015-01-01

    The actin depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin protein family is essential for actin dynamics, cell division, chemotaxis and tumor metastasis. Cofilin-1 (CFL-1) is a primary non-muscle isoform of the ADF/cofilin protein family accelerating the actin filamental turnover in vitro and in vivo. In response to environmental stimulation, CFL-1 enters the nucleus to regulate the actin dynamics. Although the purpose of this cytoplasm-nucleus transition remains unclear, it is speculated that the interaction between CFL-1 and DNA may influence various biological responses, including DNA damage repair. In this review, we will discuss the possible involvement of CFL-1 in DNA damage responses (DDR) induced by ionizing radiation (IR), and the implications for cancer radiotherapy. PMID:25689427

  19. Transforming Growth Factor-β1 Downregulates Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-D Expression in Human Lung Fibroblasts via the Jun NH2-Terminal Kinase Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Ye; Osorio, Juan C; Risquez, Cristobal; Wang, Hao; Shi, Ying; Gochuico, Bernadette R; Morse, Danielle; Rosas, Ivan O; El-Chemaly, Souheil

    2014-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-D, a member of the VEGF family, induces both angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis by activating VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) and VEGFR-3 on the surface of endothelial cells. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 has been shown to stimulate VEGF-A expression in human lung fibroblast via the Smad3 signaling pathway and to induce VEGF-C in human proximal tubular epithelial cells. However, the effects of TGF-β1 on VEGF-D regulation are unknown. To investigate the regulation of VEGF-D, human lung fibroblasts were studied under pro-fibrotic conditions in vitro and in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) lung tissue. We demonstrate that TGF-β1 downregulates VEGF-D expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner in human lung fibroblasts. This TGF-β1 effect can be abolished by inhibitors of TGF-β type I receptor kinase and Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK), but not by Smad3 knockdown. In addition, VEGF-D knockdown in human lung fibroblasts induces G1/S transition and promotes cell proliferation. Importantly, VEGF-D protein expression is decreased in lung homogenates from IPF patients compared with control lung. In IPF lung sections, fibroblastic foci show very weak VEGF-D immunoreactivity, whereas VEGF-D is abundantly expressed within alveolar interstitial cells in control lung. Taken together, our data identify a novel mechanism for downstream signal transduction induced by TGF-β1 in lung fibroblasts, through which they may mediate tissue remodeling in IPF. PMID:24515257

  20. The Mobile bypass Signal Arrests Shoot Growth by Disrupting Shoot Apical Meristem Maintenance, Cytokinin Signaling, and WUS Transcription Factor Expression1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Parrott, David L.; Adhikari, Emma; Fraser, Nisa

    2016-01-01

    The bypass1 (bps1) mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) produces a root-sourced compound (the bps signal) that moves to the shoot and is sufficient to arrest growth of a wild-type shoot; however, the mechanism of growth arrest is not understood. Here, we show that the earliest shoot defect arises during germination and is a failure of bps1 mutants to maintain their shoot apical meristem (SAM). This finding suggested that the bps signal might affect expression or function of SAM regulatory genes, and we found WUSCHEL (WUS) expression to be repressed in bps1 mutants. Repression appears to arise from the mobile bps signal, as the bps1 root was sufficient to rapidly down-regulate WUS expression in wild-type shoots. Normally, WUS is regulated by a balance between positive regulation by cytokinin (CK) and negative regulation by CLAVATA (CLV). In bps1, repression of WUS was independent of CLV, and, instead, the bps signal down-regulates CK responses. Cytokinin treatment of bps1 mutants restored both WUS expression and activity, but only in the rib meristem. How the bps signal down-regulates CK remains unknown, though the bps signal was sufficient to repress expression of one CK receptor (AHK4) and one response regulator (AHP6). Together, these data suggest that the bps signal pathway has the potential for long-distance regulation through modification of CK signaling and altering gene expression. PMID:27208247

  1. Bone mineralization is regulated by signaling cross talk between molecular factors of local and systemic origin: the role of fibroblast growth factor 23.

    PubMed

    Sapir-Koren, Rony; Livshits, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Body phosphate homeostasis is regulated by a hormonal counter-balanced intestine-bone-kidney axis. The major systemic hormones involved in this axis are parathyroid hormone (PTH), 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin-D, and fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23). FGF23, produced almost exclusively by the osteocytes, is a phosphaturic hormone that plays a major role in regulation of the bone remodeling process. Remodeling composite components, bone mineralization and resorption cycles create a continuous influx-efflux loop of the inorganic phosphate (Pi) through the skeleton. This "bone Pi loop," which is formed, is controlled by local and systemic factors according to phosphate homeostasis demands. Although FGF23 systemic actions in the kidney, and for the production of PTH and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin-D are well established, its direct involvement in bone metabolism is currently poorly understood. This review presents the latest available evidence suggesting two aspects of FGF23 bone local activity: (a) Regulation of FGF23 production by both local and systemic factors. The suggested local factors include extracellular levels of Pi and pyrophosphate (PPi), (the Pi/PPi ratio), and another osteocyte-derived protein, sclerostin. In addition, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin-D, synthesized locally by bone cells, may contribute to regulation of FGF23 production. The systemic control is achieved via PTH and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin-D endocrine functions. (b) FGF23 acts as a local agent, directly affecting bone mineralization. We support the assumption that under balanced physiological conditions, sclerostin, by para- autocrine signaling, upregulates FGF23 production by the osteocyte. FGF23, in turn, acts as a mineralization inhibitor, by stimulating the generation of the major mineralization antagonist-PPi.

  2. The Arabidopsis transcription factor ABIG1 relays ABA signaled growth inhibition and drought induced senescence

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tie; Longhurst, Adam D; Talavera-Rauh, Franklin; Hokin, Samuel A; Barton, M Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    Drought inhibits plant growth and can also induce premature senescence. Here we identify a transcription factor, ABA INSENSITIVE GROWTH 1 (ABIG1) required for abscisic acid (ABA) mediated grow