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Sample records for factor receptor negatively

  1. Expression of human tyrosine kinase-negative epidermal growth factor receptor amplifies signaling through endogenous murine epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Hack, N; Sue-A-Quan, A; Mills, G B; Skorecki, K L

    1993-12-15

    Recent findings have suggested that certain ligand-dependent responses to EGF may be propagated in a manner that is not dependent on the intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R, Campos-Gonzalez, R., and Glenney, J. R., Jr. (1992) J. Biol. Chem. 267, 14535-14538) or, alternatively, that these responses may occur through the interaction of the human tyrosine kinase-deficient EGF-R with an as yet unidentified kinase (Selva, E., Raden, D. L., and Davis, R. J. (1993) J. Biol. Chem. 268, 2250-2254). These conclusions represent a significant departure from our current understanding of signal transduction by receptor tyrosine kinases. Therefore we examined the effect of expression of tyrosine kinase-negative human EGF receptor in murine NIH-3T3-2.2 cells on the EGF-dependent phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP-2) kinase. In parental cells (NIH-3T3-2.2) that express low levels of endogenous murine EGF-R, there was no demonstrable EGF-dependent coupling to MAP-2 kinase. In NIH-3T3-2.2 cells transfected with tyrosine kinase-negative human EGF-R, there was unexpected EGF-dependent phosphorylation of MAP-2 kinase. Analysis of the tyrosine kinase-negative human EGF-R in these cells revealed significant tyrosine phosphorylation of the EGF-R. A low level of endogenous murine EGF-R present in these cells were also phosphorylated on tyrosine residues and displayed autokinase activity. Similar results were obtained using an unrelated cell line (B82L cells), in which EGF-dependent phosphorylation of MAP-2 kinase was previously attributed to signal propagation through a tyrosine kinase-negative human EGF-R (Campos-Gonzalez, R., and Glenney, J. R., Jr. (1992) J. Biol. Chem. 267, 14535-14538). Taken together, these results suggest that the tyrosine kinase-negative human EGF-R are able to amplify the response to activation of low levels of endogenous murine EGF-R, thus leading to EGF-dependent phosphorylation of MAP-2 kinase in cells

  2. Structural Basis for Negative Cooperativity in Growth Factor Binding to an EGF Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarado, Diego; Klein, Daryl E.; Lemmon, Mark A.

    2010-09-27

    Transmembrane signaling by the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) involves ligand-induced dimerization and allosteric regulation of the intracellular tyrosine kinase domain. Crystallographic studies have shown how ligand binding induces dimerization of the EGFR extracellular region but cannot explain the high-affinity and low-affinity classes of cell-surface EGF-binding sites inferred from curved Scatchard plots. From a series of crystal structures of the Drosophila EGFR extracellular region, we show here how Scatchard plot curvature arises from negatively cooperative ligand binding. The first ligand-binding event induces formation of an asymmetric dimer with only one bound ligand. The unoccupied site in this dimer is structurally restrained, leading to reduced affinity for binding of the second ligand, and thus negative cooperativity. Our results explain the cell-surface binding characteristics of EGF receptors and suggest how individual EGFR ligands might stabilize distinct dimeric species with different signaling properties.

  3. EphrinA5 suppresses colon cancer development by negatively regulating epidermal growth factor receptor stability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tong-Hong; Chang, Junn-Liang; Ho, Jar-Yi; Wu, Hsiao-Chun; Chen, Tse-Ching

    2012-01-01

    Colon cancer is one of the most common human cancers worldwide. Owing to its aggressiveness and lethality, it is necessary to determine the mechanisms regulating the carcinogenesis of colon cancer. EphrinA5 has been reported to act as a putative tumor suppressor in glioma; however, little is known concerning the role of this protein in the context of colon cancer. To elucidate the biological significance of ephrinA5 in colon cancer, we examined ephrinA5 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression profiles in both colon cancer and normal tissues, using immunohistochemistry on a 96-spot tissue microarray. Gain-of-function and loss-of-function experiments were performed on the human colon cancer cell lines SW480 and WiDr to determine the biological effects of ephrinA5 in relation to cell proliferation, survival, and migration. It was found that ephrinA5 mRNA and protein levels were significantly reduced in colon cancer as compared with normal colon tissue specimens. EphrinA5 expression was also negatively associated with tumor differentiation and clinical stage. In colon cancer cell line models, ephrinA5 exerted an inhibitory effect on EGFR by promoting c-Cbl-mediated EGFR ubiquitination and degradation. EphrinA5 did not affect the transcriptional regulation of EGFR mRNA expression in colon cancer cells. Expression of ephrinA5 suppressed colon cancer cell proliferation, migration, and chemotherapeutic resistance. In conclusion, ephrinA5 inhibited colon cancer progression by promoting c-Cbl-mediated EGFR degradation. Our findings identify a novel mechanism that could be utilized to improve the therapeutic efficiency of EGFR-targeting strategies.

  4. Role of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor Ost in negative regulation of receptor endocytosis by the small GTPase Rac1.

    PubMed

    Ieguchi, Katsuaki; Ueda, Shuji; Kataoka, Tohru; Satoh, Takaya

    2007-08-10

    The Rho family of GTPases has been implicated in the regulation of intracellular vesicle trafficking. Here, we investigated the mechanism underlying the negative regulation of clathrin-mediated endocytosis of cell surface receptors mediated by the Rho family protein Rac1. Contrary to previous reports, only the activated mutant of Rac1, but not other Rho family members including RhoA and Cdc42, suppressed internalization of the transferrin receptor. On the other hand, down-regulation of Rac1 expression by RNA interference resulted in enhanced receptor internalization, suggesting that endogenous Rac1 in fact functions as a negative regulator. We identified a guanine nucleotide exchange factor splice variant designated Ost-III, which contains a unique C-terminal region including an Src homology 3 domain, as a regulator of Rac1 involved in the inhibition of receptor endocytosis. In contrast, other splice variants Ost-I and Ost-II exerted virtually no effect on receptor endocytosis. We also examined subcellular localization of synaptojanin 2, a putative Rac1 effector implicated in negative regulation of receptor endocytosis. Each Ost splice variant induced distinct subcellular localization of synaptojanin 2, depending on Rac1 activation. Furthermore, we isolated gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor-associated protein (GABARAP) as a protein that binds to the C-terminal region of Ost-III. When ectopically expressed, GABARAP was co-localized with Ost-III and potently suppressed the Ost-III-dependent Rac1 activation and the inhibition of receptor endocytosis. Lipid modification of GABARAP was necessary for the suppression of Ost-III. These results are discussed in terms of subcellular region-specific regulation of the Rac1-dependent signaling pathway that negatively regulates clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

  5. Nerve growth factor receptor negates the tumor suppressor p53 as a feedback regulator

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiang; Hao, Qian; Liao, Peng; Luo, Shiwen; Zhang, Minhong; Hu, Guohui; Liu, Hongbing; Zhang, Yiwei; Cao, Bo; Baddoo, Melody; Flemington, Erik K; Zeng, Shelya X; Lu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Cancer develops and progresses often by inactivating p53. Here, we unveil nerve growth factor receptor (NGFR, p75NTR or CD271) as a novel p53 inactivator. p53 activates NGFR transcription, whereas NGFR inactivates p53 by promoting its MDM2-mediated ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis and by directly binding to its central DNA binding domain and preventing its DNA-binding activity. Inversely, NGFR ablation activates p53, consequently inducing apoptosis, attenuating survival, and reducing clonogenic capability of cancer cells, as well as sensitizing human cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents that induce p53 and suppressing mouse xenograft tumor growth. NGFR is highly expressed in human glioblastomas, and its gene is often amplified in breast cancers with wild type p53. Altogether, our results demonstrate that cancers hijack NGFR as an oncogenic inhibitor of p53. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15099.001 PMID:27282385

  6. Evidence for epidermal growth factor receptor as negative-feedback control in aldosterone-induced Na+ reabsorption.

    PubMed

    Grossmann, Claudia; Freudinger, Ruth; Mildenberger, Sigrid; Krug, Alexander W; Gekle, Michael

    2004-06-01

    Aldosterone enhances Na(+) reabsorption via epithelial Na(+) channels (ENaC). Aldosterone also stimulates the protein kinase ERK1/2- and the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR)-signaling pathway. Yet EGF and ERK1/2 are known inhibitors of ENaC-mediated Na(+) reabsorption. In the present study, using the well-established Madin-Darby canine kidney C7 cell line, we tested the hypothesis that EGFR represents a negative-feedback control for chronic aldosterone-induced Na(+) reabsorption [amiloride-inhibitable short-circuit current (I(sc))]. Mineralocorticoid receptor expression was confirmed by RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. Aldosterone enhanced ERK1/2 phosphorylation in an EGFR-dependent way. Furthermore, aldosterone stimulated EGFR expression. Aldosterone (10 nmol/l) induced a small transient increase in I(sc) under control conditions. Inhibition of ERK1/2 phosphorylation with U-0126 (10 micromol/l) stimulated I(sc), indicating constitutive ENaC inhibition. Aldosterone exerted a significantly larger effect in the presence of U-0126 than without U-0126. EGF (10 microg/l) inhibited I(sc), whereas inhibition of EGFR kinase by tyrphostin AG-1478 (100 nmol/l) enhanced I(sc). Aldosterone was more effective in the presence of AG-1478 than without AG-1478. In summary, we propose that the EGFR-signaling cascade can serve as a negative-feedback control to limit the effect of aldosterone-induced Na(+) reabsorption. PMID:14749256

  7. Treatment challenges for community oncologists treating postmenopausal women with endocrine-resistant, hormone receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative advanced breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gradishar, William J

    2016-01-01

    Community-based oncologists are faced with challenges and opportunities when delivering quality patient care, including high patient volumes and diminished resources; however, there may be the potential to deliver increased patient education and subsequently improve outcomes. This review discusses the treatment of postmenopausal women with endocrine-resistant, hormone receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2- negative advanced breast cancer in order to illustrate considerations in the provision of pertinent quality education in the treatment of these patients and the management of therapy-related adverse events. An overview of endocrine-resistant breast cancer and subsequent treatment challenges is also provided. Approved treatment options for endocrine-resistant breast cancer include hormonal therapies and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors. Compounds under clinical investigation are also discussed. PMID:27468248

  8. Treatment challenges for community oncologists treating postmenopausal women with endocrine-resistant, hormone receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Gradishar, William J

    2016-01-01

    Community-based oncologists are faced with challenges and opportunities when delivering quality patient care, including high patient volumes and diminished resources; however, there may be the potential to deliver increased patient education and subsequently improve outcomes. This review discusses the treatment of postmenopausal women with endocrine-resistant, hormone receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2- negative advanced breast cancer in order to illustrate considerations in the provision of pertinent quality education in the treatment of these patients and the management of therapy-related adverse events. An overview of endocrine-resistant breast cancer and subsequent treatment challenges is also provided. Approved treatment options for endocrine-resistant breast cancer include hormonal therapies and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors. Compounds under clinical investigation are also discussed. PMID:27468248

  9. Impact of palbociclib combinations on treatment of advanced estrogen receptor-positive/human epidermal growth factor 2-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Boér, Katalin

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease with multiple subgroups based on clinical and molecular characteristics. For the largest subgroup of breast cancers, hormone receptor-positive/human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2)-negative tumors, hormone treatment is the mainstay of therapy and is likely to result in significant improvement in disease outcomes. However, some of these cancers demonstrate de novo or acquired resistance to endocrine therapy. Despite intensive research to develop new strategies to enhance the efficacy of currently available treatment options for hormone receptor-positive breast cancer, progress has been slow, and there were few advances for a period of 10 years. In 2012, a new molecularly targeted therapeutic strategy, inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin with everolimus, was introduced into clinical practice. Everolimus, in combination with a steroidal aromatase inhibitor, exemestane, resulted in an increase in progression-free survival, but not overall survival in patients with estrogen receptor (ER)+ve advanced disease who had progressed on hormone therapy. In 2015, the first cyclin-dependent kinases 4/6 (CDK4/6) inhibitor, palbociclib, received accelerated US Food and Drug Administration approval for use in combination with letrozole for the treatment of postmenopausal ER+ve/HER2−ve advanced breast cancer as initial, endocrine-based therapy. The addition of palbociclib to endocrine therapy resulted in longer progression-free survival than letrozole alone. One year later, palbociclib received a new indication, use in combination with fulvestrant, in both premenopausal and postmenopausal females with advanced breast cancer of the same subtype with disease progression following endocrine therapy. Adding palbociclib to fulvestrant resulted in a significantly increased median progression-free survival compared to fulvestrant monotherapy. These new combination regimens of palbociclib with endocrine agents represent an important

  10. Biologic Roles of Estrogen Receptor-β and Insulin-Like Growth Factor-2 in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Elshimali, Yahya; Garbán, Hermes; Elashoff, David; Vadgama, Jaydutt; Goodglick, Lee

    2015-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) occurs in 10–15% of patients yet accounts for almost half of all breast cancer deaths. TNBCs lack expression of estrogen and progesterone receptors and HER-2 overexpression and cannot be treated with current targeted therapies. TNBCs often occur in African American and younger women. Although initially responsive to some chemotherapies, TNBCs tend to relapse and metastasize. Thus, it is critical to find new therapeutic targets. A second ER gene product, termed ERβ, in the absence of ERα may be such a target. Using human TNBC specimens with known clinical outcomes to assess ERβ expression, we find that ERβ1 associates with significantly worse 5-year overall survival. Further, a panel of TNBC cell lines exhibit significant levels of ERβ protein. To assess ERβ effects on proliferation, ERβ expression in TNBC cells was silenced using shRNA, resulting in a significant reduction in TNBC proliferation. ERβ-specific antagonists similarly suppressed TNBC growth. Growth-stimulating effects of ERβ may be due in part to downstream actions that promote VEGF, amphiregulin, and Wnt-10b secretion, other factors associated with tumor promotion. In vivo, insulin-like growth factor-2 (IGF-2), along with ERβ1, is significantly expressed in TNBC and stimulates high ERβ mRNA in TNBC cells. This work may help elucidate the interplay of metabolic and growth factors in TNBC. PMID:25874233

  11. Leukemia inhibitory factor receptor negatively regulates the metastasis of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ding; Jing, Xiaoqian; Shen, Baiyong; Liu, Xinyu; Cheng, Xi; Wang, Bingrui; Fu, Zhiping; Peng, Chenghong; Qiu, Weihua

    2016-08-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Frequent metastasis and recurrence are the main reasons for the poor prognosis of PC patients. Thus, the discovery of new biomarkers and wider insights into the mechanisms involved in pancreatic tumorigenesis and metastasis is crucial. In the present study, we report that leukemia inhibitory factor receptor (LIFR) suppresses tumorigenesis and metastasis of PC cells both in vitro and in vivo. LIFR expression was significantly lower in PC tissues and was associated with local invasion (P=0.047), lymph node metastasis (P=0.014) and tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage (P=0.002). Overexpression of LIFR significantly suppressed PC cell colony formation (P=0.005), migration (P=0.003), invasion (P=0.010) and wound healing ability (P=0.013) in vitro, while opposing results were observed after LIFR was silenced. Furthermore, animal xenograft and metastasis models confirm that the in vivo results were consistent with the outcomes in vitro. Meanwhile, LIFR inhibited the expression of β-catenin, vimentin and slug and induced the expression of E-cadherin, suggesting that the epithelial-mesenchymal transition regulation pathway may underlie the mechanism. These results indicate that LIFR negatively regulates the metastasis of PC cells. PMID:27375070

  12. The type III transforming growth factor-beta receptor negatively regulates nuclear factor kappa B signaling through its interaction with beta-arrestin2.

    PubMed

    You, Hye Jin; How, Tam; Blobe, Gerard C

    2009-08-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) increases or decreases nuclear factor kappa B (NFkappaB) signaling in a context-dependent manner through mechanisms that remain to be defined. The type III transforming growth factor-beta receptor (TbetaRIII) is a TGF-beta superfamily co-receptor with emerging roles in both mediating and regulating TGF-beta superfamily signaling. We have previously reported a novel interaction of TbetaRIII with the scaffolding protein, beta-arrestin2, which results in TbetaRIII internalization and downregulation of TGF-beta signaling. beta-arrestin2 also scaffolds interacting receptors with the mitogen-activated protein kinase and NFkappaB-signaling pathways. Here, we demonstrate that TbetaRIII, through its interaction with beta-arrestin2, negatively regulates NFkappaB signaling in MCF10A breast epithelial and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Increasing TbetaRIII expression reduced NFkappaB-mediated transcriptional activation and IkappaBalpha degradation, whereas a TbetaRIII mutant unable to interact with beta-arrestin2, TbetaRIII-T841A, had no effect. In a reciprocal manner, short hairpin RNA-mediated silencing of either TbetaRIII expression or beta-arrestin2 expression increased NFkappaB-mediated transcriptional activation and IkappaBalpha degradation. Functionally, TbetaRIII-mediated repression of NFkappaB signaling is important for TbetaRIII-mediated inhibition of breast cancer cell migration. These studies define a mechanism through which TbetaRIII regulates NFkappaB signaling and expand the roles of this TGF-beta superfamily co-receptor in regulating epithelial cell homeostasis.

  13. The type III transforming growth factorreceptor negatively regulates nuclear factor kappa B signaling through its interaction with β-arrestin2

    PubMed Central

    You, Hye Jin; How, Tam; Blobe, Gerard C.

    2009-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) increases or decreases nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) signaling in a context-dependent manner through mechanisms that remain to be defined. The type III transforming growth factorreceptor (TβRIII) is a TGF-β superfamily co-receptor with emerging roles in both mediating and regulating TGF-β superfamily signaling. We have previously reported a novel interaction of TβRIII with the scaffolding protein, β-arrestin2, which results in TβRIII internalization and downregulation of TGF-β signaling. β-arrestin2 also scaffolds interacting receptors with the mitogen-activated protein kinase and NFκB-signaling pathways. Here, we demonstrate that TβRIII, through its interaction with β-arrestin2, negatively regulates NFκB signaling in MCF10A breast epithelial and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Increasing TβRIII expression reduced NFκB-mediated transcriptional activation and IκBα degradation, whereas a TβRIII mutant unable to interact with β-arrestin2, TβRIII-T841A, had no effect. In a reciprocal manner, short hairpin RNA-mediated silencing of either TβRIII expression or β-arrestin2 expression increased NFκB-mediated transcriptional activation and IκBα degradation. Functionally, TβRIII-mediated repression of NFκB signaling is important for TβRIII-mediated inhibition of breast cancer cell migration. These studies define a mechanism through which TβRIII regulates NFκB signaling and expand the roles of this TGF-β superfamily co-receptor in regulating epithelial cell homeostasis. PMID:19325136

  14. Silencing of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta) receptor II by Kruppel-like factor 14 underscores the importance of a negative feedback mechanism in TGFbeta signaling.

    PubMed

    Truty, Mark J; Lomberk, Gwen; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E; Urrutia, Raul

    2009-03-01

    The role of non-Smad proteins in the regulation of transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta) signaling is an emerging line of active investigation. Here, we characterize the role of KLF14, as a TGFbeta-inducible, non-Smad protein that silences the TGFbeta receptor II (TGFbetaRII) promoter. Together with endocytosis, transcriptional silencing is a critical mechanism for down-regulating TGFbeta receptors at the cell surface. However, the mechanisms underlying transcriptional repression of these receptors remain poorly understood. KLF14 has been chosen from a comprehensive screen of 24 members of the Sp/KLF family due to its TGFbeta inducibility, its ability to regulate the TGFbetaRII promoter, and the fact that this protein had yet to be functionally characterized. We find that KLF14 represses the TGFbetaRII, a function that is augmented by TGFbeta treatment. Mapping of the TGFbetaRII promoter, in combination with site-directed mutagenesis, electromobility shift, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, have identified distinct GC-rich sequences used by KLF14 to regulate this promoter. Mechanistically, KLF14 represses the TGFbetaRII promoter via a co-repressor complex containing mSin3A and HDAC2. Furthermore, the TGFbeta pathway activation leads to recruitment of a KLF14-mSin3A-HDAC2 repressor complex to the TGFbetaRII promoter, as well as the remodeling of chromatin to increase histone marks that associate with transcriptional silencing. Thus, these results describe a novel negative-feedback mechanism by which TGFbetaRII activation at the cell surface induces the expression of KLF14 to ultimately silence the TGFbetaRII and further expand the network of non-Smad transcription factors that participate in the TGFbeta pathway. PMID:19088080

  15. Ultraviolet B-induced activated protein-1 activation does not require epidermal growth factor receptor but is blocked by a dominant negative PKClambda/iota.

    PubMed

    Huang, C; Ma, W y; Bowden, G T; Dong, Z

    1996-12-01

    The exposure of mammalian cells to UV irradiation leads to the activation of transcription factors such as activated protein-1 (AP-1) and NFkappaB. It is postulated that epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor, but not protein kinase C (PKC), is the major membrane mediator in UV-induced signal transduction. Since UVB is responsible for most of the carcinogenic effects of sun exposure, we investigated the role of EGF receptors and PKC in UVB-induced AP-1 activation. Our results indicated that while the down-regulation of novel PKC (nPKC) and conventional PKC (cPKC) by pretreatment of cells with 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate cannot block UVB-induced AP-1 activity, it can block 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate-induced AP-1 activity. Further, the dominant negative mutant PKClambda/iota blocked UVB-induced AP-1 activity in all doses and time courses studied. In contrast, UVB-induced AP-1 activity from cells devoid of EGF receptor (B82) was not significantly different from that of the stable transfectants with a kinase-deficient EGF receptor (B82M721) or those with a wild-type EGF receptor (B82L) at all UVB irradiation doses and time courses studied. All of this evidence indicated that aPKC, but not EGF receptor, is involved in UVB-induced AP-1 activation. PMID:8940130

  16. GDC-0941 and Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Androgen Receptor-Negative Triple Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-17

    Estrogen Receptor Negative Breast Cancer; Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 Negative Carcinoma of Breast; Triple Negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  17. Methylation at a transcription factor-binding site on the 5-HT1A receptor gene correlates with negative symptom treatment response in first episode schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hao; Dalton, Caroline F; Srisawat, Umarat; Zhang, Zhi Jun; Reynolds, Gavin P

    2014-04-01

    Individual variability and inadequate response of negative symptoms are major limitations of antipsychotic treatment in schizophrenia. A functional polymorphism, rs6295, in the 5-HT1A-receptor gene (HTR1A) contributes to this variability in negative symptom response. The DNA sequence containing rs6295 is rich in cytosine methylation (CpG) sites; CpG methylation is an epigenetic factor that, like rs6295, can modify transcriptional control. To investigate whether DNA methylation influences response to antipsychotic treatment, we determined methylation at CpG sites close to rs6295 in DNA from 82 Chinese subjects with a first psychotic episode. Methylation of one CpG site within a recognition sequence for HES transcriptional repressors was found to correlate with changes in total PANSS score (p = 0.006) and negative factor sub-score (p < 0.001) following 10 wk initial antipsychotic treatment, as well as with baseline negative factor score (p = 0.019); the effect on symptom change remained after correction for this baseline score. An effect of rs6295 on negative symptom response was not seen in this sample, which may not have provided sufficient power for the pharmacogenetic association. These preliminary results indicate that epigenetic modification of transcriptional regulation by specific cytosine methylation may modulate HTR1A expression, resulting in effects on emotional dysfunction and negative symptom response to antipsychotic treatment. PMID:24331356

  18. Purinergic P2Y2 Receptor Control of Tissue Factor Transcription in Human Coronary Artery Endothelial Cells: NEW AP-1 TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR SITE AND NEGATIVE REGULATOR.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiwei; Zhang, Lingxin; Wang, Chuan; Roy, Shama; Shen, Jianzhong

    2016-01-22

    We recently reported that the P2Y2 receptor (P2Y2R) is the predominant nucleotide receptor expressed in human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC) and that P2Y2R activation by ATP or UTP induces dramatic up-regulation of tissue factor (TF), a key initiator of the coagulation cascade. However, the molecular mechanism of this P2Y2R-TF axis remains unclear. Here, we report the role of a newly identified AP-1 consensus sequence in the TF gene promoter and its original binding components in P2Y2R regulation of TF transcription. Using bioinformatics tools, we found that a novel AP-1 site at -1363 bp of the human TF promoter region is highly conserved across multiple species. Activation of P2Y2R increased TF promoter activity and mRNA expression in HCAEC. Truncation, deletion, and mutation of this distal AP-1 site all significantly suppressed TF promoter activity in response to P2Y2R activation. EMSA and ChIP assays further confirmed that upon P2Y2R activation, c-Jun, ATF-2, and Fra-1, but not the typical c-Fos, bound to the new AP-1 site. In addition, loss-of-function studies using siRNAs confirmed a positive transactivation role of c-Jun and ATF-2 but unexpectedly revealed a strong negative role of Fra-1 in P2Y2R-induced TF up-regulation. Furthermore, we found that P2Y2R activation promoted ERK1/2 phosphorylation through Src, leading to Fra-1 activation, whereas Rho/JNK mediated P2Y2R-induced activation of c-Jun and ATF-2. These findings reveal the molecular basis for P2Y G protein-coupled receptor control of endothelial TF expression and indicate that targeting the P2Y2R-Fra-1-TF pathway may be an attractive new strategy for controlling vascular inflammation and thrombogenicity associated with endothelial dysfunction.

  19. Expression of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase ζ is a risk factor for triple negative breast cancer relapse

    PubMed Central

    FU, FENFEN; XIAO, XI; ZHANG, TAO; ZOU, QIONGYAN; CHEN, ZONGLIN; PEI, LEI; SU, JUAN; YI, WENJUN

    2016-01-01

    Patients with triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) have a higher rate of distant recurrence and a poorer prognosis than those with other breast cancer subtypes. Therefore, it is important to study the mechanism of TNBC relapse. A retrospective immunohistochemical analysis of the expression of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase ζ (PTPRZ1) and pleiotrophin (PTN) was performed for 325 cases of breast cancer. These samples included 66 cases of luminal A breast cancer, 67 cases of luminal B breast cancer, 78 cases of Her-2-enriched breast cancer, 78 cases of TNBC and 36 cases of relapsed TNBC (RTNBC). In addition, 30 control specimens and 30 cases of metastasized lymph nodes were examined. PTPRZ1 and PTN were highly expressed in the RTNBC group. Compared with the RTNBC group, significant differences in the expression of PTPRZ1 were observed between the TNBC, BC and control groups. A significant difference was observed in the expression of PTN in the BC group (P<0.05) compared to RTNBC, and there were no significant differences in the expression of PTPRZ1 and PTN among the molecular subtypes. No significant correlation was observed between the expression of PTPRZ1, PTN, ER, PR, Her-2 and ALN and the tumor size or menopause status. No significant correlation was identified between the expression of PTPRZ1 and PTN and the expression of CD24 and CD44. In summary, high expression of PTPRZ1 may be an independent risk indicator for TNBC recurrence and metastasis. PMID:26893832

  20. Dominant negative and loss of function mutations of the c-kit (mast/stem cell growth factor receptor) proto-oncogene in human piebaldism

    SciTech Connect

    Spritz, R.A.; Giebel, L.B.; Holmes, S.A. )

    1992-02-01

    Piebaldism is an autosomal dominant disorder of melanocyte development and is characterized by congenital white parches of skin and hair from which melanocytes are completely absent. A similar disorder of the mouse, 'dominant white spotting' (W), results from mutations of the c-kit proto-oncogene, which encodes the cellular tyrosine kinases receptor for the mast/stem cell growth factor. The authors have identified c-kit gene mutations in three patients with piebaldism. A missense substitution (Phe[r arrow]Leu) at codon 584, within the tyrosine kinases domain, is associated with a severe piebald phenotype, whereas two different frameshifts, within codons 561 and 642, are both associated with a variable and relatively mild piebald phenotype. This is consistent with a possible 'dominant negative' effect of missense c-kit polypeptides on the function of the dimeric receptor.

  1. Molecular and Immunohistochemical Study of Platelet Derived Growth Factor Receptor Alpha in KIT Negative Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors; the First Report from Iran

    PubMed Central

    Geramizadeh, Bita; Jowkar, Zahra; Mousavi, Seyed-Javad

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are potentially malignant tumors; however their behavior and response to treatment is dependent on the type of mutation and immunohistochemical expression of antigens. It is recommended to perform routine molecular and immunohistochemical tests in KIT and platelet derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRA) molecules for making decision regarding targeted therapy and prediction of the behavior of the tumor. Objectives: There has been no study from Iran regarding the PDGFRA mutational analysis in GISTs. In this study, for the first time from Iran, we performed immunohistochemical and molecular analysis of PDGFRA molecule on GISTs. METHODS In a cross-sectional study during 7 years (2008-2014) on 50 untreated non-recurrent non-metastatic newly diagnosed GISTs, molecular analysis and immunohistochemical staining for PDGFRA were performed and findings were compared with different clinicopathological characteristics.. RESULTS During the 7 years, 50 cases of GISTs according to the above mentioned criteria were found. 17 cases were negative for KIT mutation. Of them, 15 (30%) were positive for either exon 12 or 18 mutation of PDGFRA. These cases showed more epithelioid morphology and the number of mitotic figures were lower than PDFRA negative GISTs. Also according to the criteria for risk assessment, it seems that PDGFRA mutant GISTs are rarely in the high risk category. CONCLUSION PDGFRA mutant GISTs are common in Iranian population and it is recommended to perform mutation analysis for PDGFRA in every GIST with wild type KIT and epithelioid morphology. PMID:27698973

  2. Molecular and Immunohistochemical Study of Platelet Derived Growth Factor Receptor Alpha in KIT Negative Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors; the First Report from Iran

    PubMed Central

    Geramizadeh, Bita; Jowkar, Zahra; Mousavi, Seyed-Javad

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are potentially malignant tumors; however their behavior and response to treatment is dependent on the type of mutation and immunohistochemical expression of antigens. It is recommended to perform routine molecular and immunohistochemical tests in KIT and platelet derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRA) molecules for making decision regarding targeted therapy and prediction of the behavior of the tumor. Objectives: There has been no study from Iran regarding the PDGFRA mutational analysis in GISTs. In this study, for the first time from Iran, we performed immunohistochemical and molecular analysis of PDGFRA molecule on GISTs. METHODS In a cross-sectional study during 7 years (2008-2014) on 50 untreated non-recurrent non-metastatic newly diagnosed GISTs, molecular analysis and immunohistochemical staining for PDGFRA were performed and findings were compared with different clinicopathological characteristics.. RESULTS During the 7 years, 50 cases of GISTs according to the above mentioned criteria were found. 17 cases were negative for KIT mutation. Of them, 15 (30%) were positive for either exon 12 or 18 mutation of PDGFRA. These cases showed more epithelioid morphology and the number of mitotic figures were lower than PDFRA negative GISTs. Also according to the criteria for risk assessment, it seems that PDGFRA mutant GISTs are rarely in the high risk category. CONCLUSION PDGFRA mutant GISTs are common in Iranian population and it is recommended to perform mutation analysis for PDGFRA in every GIST with wild type KIT and epithelioid morphology.

  3. Kruppel-like Factor 9 is a Negative Regulator of Ligand-dependent Estrogen Receptor Alpha Signaling in Ishikawa Endometrial Adenocarcinoma Cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estrogen (E) and progesterone (P), acting through their respective receptors and other nuclear proteins, exhibit opposing activities in target cells. We previously reported that Krüppel-like factor 9 (KLF9) cooperates with progesterone receptor (PR) to facilitate P-dependent gene transcription in ut...

  4. Negative Regulation of Grb10 Interacting GYF Protein 2 on Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 Receptor Signaling Pathway Caused Diabetic Mice Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jing; Wei, Qianping; Deng, Huacong; Li, Gang; Ma, Lingli; Zeng, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Heterozygous Gigyf2+/− mice exhibits histopathological evidence of neurodegeneration such as motor dysfunction. Several lines of evidence have demonstrated the important role of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) signaling pathway in the neuropathogenic process of cognitive impairment, while decreased Grb10-Interacting GYF Protein 2 (GIGYF2) expression can alter IGF1R trafficking and its downstream signaling pathways. Growth factor receptor-bound protein 10 (Grb10), a suppressor of IGF1R pathway, has been shown to play a critical role in regulating diabetes-associated cognitive impairment. It remains unknown whether endogenous GIGYF2 expression contributes to the development of diabetes-associated cognitive impairment. Using streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice model, we first demonstrated that a significantly increased level of GIGYF2 expression was correlated with a significant decrease in the expression of phosphorylated IGF1R as well as the phosphorylation of AKT and ERK1/2, two signaling pathways downstream of IGF1R, in the hippocampus of diabetic mice. On the contrary, in situ knockdown of GIGYF2 expression in hippocampus resulted in increased expression of phosphorylated IGF1R expression and correspondingly reversed the down-regulation of ERK1/2 phsophorylation but had no obvious effect on Grb10 expression. Functionally, knockdown of GIGYF2 expression markedly ameliorated diabetes-associated cognitive dysfunction as well as the ultrastructural pathology and abnormal neurobehavioral changes. These results suggest that increased expression of GIGYF2 might contribute to the development of diabetes-associated cognitive disorder via negatively regulating IGF1R signaling pathway. Therefore, down-regulation of GIGYF2 expression may provide a potential novel approach to treat diabetes-associated cognitive impairment caused by aberrant IGF1R signaling pathway. PMID:25268761

  5. PM2.5 source apportionment in a French urban coastal site under steelworks emission influences using constrained non-negative matrix factorization receptor model.

    PubMed

    Kfoury, Adib; Ledoux, Frédéric; Roche, Cloé; Delmaire, Gilles; Roussel, Gilles; Courcot, Dominique

    2016-02-01

    The constrained weighted-non-negative matrix factorization (CW-NMF) hybrid receptor model was applied to study the influence of steelmaking activities on PM2.5 (particulate matter with equivalent aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm) composition in Dunkerque, Northern France. Semi-diurnal PM2.5 samples were collected using a high volume sampler in winter 2010 and spring 2011 and were analyzed for trace metals, water-soluble ions, and total carbon using inductively coupled plasma--atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), ICP--mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), ionic chromatography and micro elemental carbon analyzer. The elemental composition shows that NO3(-), SO4(2-), NH4(+) and total carbon are the main PM2.5 constituents. Trace metals data were interpreted using concentration roses and both influences of integrated steelworks and electric steel plant were evidenced. The distinction between the two sources is made possible by the use Zn/Fe and Zn/Mn diagnostic ratios. Moreover Rb/Cr, Pb/Cr and Cu/Cd combination ratio are proposed to distinguish the ISW-sintering stack from the ISW-fugitive emissions. The a priori knowledge on the influencing source was introduced in the CW-NMF to guide the calculation. Eleven source profiles with various contributions were identified: 8 are characteristics of coastal urban background site profiles and 3 are related to the steelmaking activities. Between them, secondary nitrates, secondary sulfates and combustion profiles give the highest contributions and account for 93% of the PM2.5 concentration. The steelwork facilities contribute in about 2% of the total PM2.5 concentration and appear to be the main source of Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Zn. PMID:26969551

  6. PM2.5 source apportionment in a French urban coastal site under steelworks emission influences using constrained non-negative matrix factorization receptor model.

    PubMed

    Kfoury, Adib; Ledoux, Frédéric; Roche, Cloé; Delmaire, Gilles; Roussel, Gilles; Courcot, Dominique

    2016-02-01

    The constrained weighted-non-negative matrix factorization (CW-NMF) hybrid receptor model was applied to study the influence of steelmaking activities on PM2.5 (particulate matter with equivalent aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm) composition in Dunkerque, Northern France. Semi-diurnal PM2.5 samples were collected using a high volume sampler in winter 2010 and spring 2011 and were analyzed for trace metals, water-soluble ions, and total carbon using inductively coupled plasma--atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), ICP--mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), ionic chromatography and micro elemental carbon analyzer. The elemental composition shows that NO3(-), SO4(2-), NH4(+) and total carbon are the main PM2.5 constituents. Trace metals data were interpreted using concentration roses and both influences of integrated steelworks and electric steel plant were evidenced. The distinction between the two sources is made possible by the use Zn/Fe and Zn/Mn diagnostic ratios. Moreover Rb/Cr, Pb/Cr and Cu/Cd combination ratio are proposed to distinguish the ISW-sintering stack from the ISW-fugitive emissions. The a priori knowledge on the influencing source was introduced in the CW-NMF to guide the calculation. Eleven source profiles with various contributions were identified: 8 are characteristics of coastal urban background site profiles and 3 are related to the steelmaking activities. Between them, secondary nitrates, secondary sulfates and combustion profiles give the highest contributions and account for 93% of the PM2.5 concentration. The steelwork facilities contribute in about 2% of the total PM2.5 concentration and appear to be the main source of Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Zn.

  7. Osteoblastic γ-aminobutyric acid, type B receptors negatively regulate osteoblastogenesis toward disturbance of osteoclastogenesis mediated by receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand in mouse bone.

    PubMed

    Takahata, Yoshifumi; Takarada, Takeshi; Hinoi, Eiichi; Nakamura, Yukari; Fujita, Hiroyuki; Yoneda, Yukio

    2011-09-23

    The prevailing view is that signaling machineries for the neurotransmitter GABA are also expressed by cells outside the CNS. In cultured murine calvarial osteoblasts, mRNA was constitutively expressed for both subunits 1 and 2 of metabotropic GABA(B) receptor (GABA(B)R), along with inhibition by the GABA(B)R agonist baclofen of cAMP formation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and Ca(2+) accumulation. Moreover, baclofen significantly inhibited the transactivation of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) gene in a manner sensitive to a GABA(B)R antagonist, in addition to decreasing mRNA expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2), osteocalcin, and osterix. In osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells stably transfected with GABA(B)R1 subunit, significant reductions were seen in ALP activity and Ca(2+) accumulation, as well as mRNA expression of osteocalcin, osteopontin, and osterix. In cultured calvarial osteoblasts from GABA(B)R1-null mice exhibiting low bone mineral density in tibia and femur, by contrast, both ALP activity and Ca(2+) accumulation were significantly increased together with promoted expression of both mRNA and proteins for BMP2 and osterix. No significant change was seen in the number of multinucleated cells stained for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase during the culture of osteoclasts prepared from GABA(B)R1-null mice, whereas a significant increase was seen in the number of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive multinucleated cells in co-culture of osteoclasts with osteoblasts isolated from GABA(B)R1-null mice. These results suggest that GABA(B)R is predominantly expressed by osteoblasts to negatively regulate osteoblastogenesis through down-regulation of BMP2 expression toward disturbance of osteoclastogenesis after down-regulation of RANKL expression in mouse bone.

  8. Canadian Cancer Trials Group IND197: a phase II study of foretinib in patients with estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative recurrent or metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Rayson, Daniel; Lupichuk, Sasha; Potvin, Kylea; Dent, Susan; Shenkier, Tamara; Dhesy-Thind, Sukhbinder; Ellard, Susan L; Prady, Catherine; Salim, Muhammad; Farmer, Patricia; Allo, Ghasson; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Allan, Alison; Ludkovski, Olga; Bonomi, Maria; Tu, Dongsheng; Hagerman, Linda; Goodwin, Rachel; Eisenhauer, Elizabeth; Bradbury, Penelope

    2016-05-01

    In murine models, overexpression of the MET receptor transgene induces tumors with human basal gene expression characteristics supporting MET inhibition as a treatment strategy for triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). Foretinib is an oral multi-kinase inhibitor of MET, RON, AXL, TIE-2, and VEGF receptors with anti-tumor activity in advanced HCC and papillary renal cell cancer. Patients with centrally reviewed primary TNBC and 0-1 prior regimens for metastatic disease received daily foretinib 60 mg po in a 2-stage single-arm trial. Primary endpoints were objective response and early progression rates per RECIST 1.1. In stage 2, correlative studies of MET, PTEN, EGFR, and p53 on archival and fresh tumor specimens were performed along with enumeration of CTCs. 45 patients were enrolled with 37 patients having response evaluable and centrally confirmed primary TNBC (cTNBC). There were 2 partial responses (ITT 4.7 % response evaluable cTNBC 5.4 %) with a median duration of 4.4 months (range 3.7-5 m) and 15 patients had stable disease (ITT 33 %, response evaluable cTNBC 40.5 %) with a median duration of 5.4 months (range 2.3-9.7 m). The most common toxicities (all grades/grade 3) were nausea (64/4 %), fatigue (60/4 %), hypertension (58/49 %), and diarrhea (40/7 %). Six serious adverse events were considered possibly related to foretinib and 4 patients went off study due to adverse events. There was no correlation between MET positivity and response nor between response and PTEN, EGFR, p53, or MET expression in CTCs. Although CCTG IND 197 did not meet its primary endpoint, the observation of a clinical benefit rate of 46 % in this cTNBC population suggests that foretinib may have clinical activity as a single, non-cytotoxic agent in TNBC (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01147484). PMID:27116183

  9. Correlative Analysis of Genetic Alterations and Everolimus Benefit in Hormone Receptor–Positive, Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2–Negative Advanced Breast Cancer: Results From BOLERO-2

    PubMed Central

    Chen, David; Piccart, Martine; Rugo, Hope S.; Burris, Howard A.; Pritchard, Kathleen I.; Campone, Mario; Noguchi, Shinzaburo; Perez, Alejandra T.; Deleu, Ines; Shtivelband, Mikhail; Masuda, Norikazu; Dakhil, Shaker; Anderson, Ian; Robinson, Douglas M.; He, Wei; Garg, Abhishek; McDonald, E. Robert; Bitter, Hans; Huang, Alan; Taran, Tetiana; Bachelot, Thomas; Lebrun, Fabienne; Lebwohl, David; Baselga, José

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To explore the genetic landscape of tumors from patients enrolled on the BOLERO-2 trial to identify potential correlations between genetic alterations and efficacy of everolimus treatment. The BOLERO-2 trial has previously demonstrated that the addition of everolimus to exemestane prolonged progression-free survival by more than twofold in patients with hormone receptor–positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2–negative, advanced breast cancer previously treated with nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitors. Patients and Methods Next-generation sequencing was used to analyze genetic status of cancer-related genes in 302 archival tumor specimens from patients representative of the BOLERO-2 study population. Correlations between the most common somatic alterations and degree of chromosomal instability, and treatment effect of everolimus were investigated. Results Progression-free survival benefit with everolimus was maintained regardless of alteration status of PIK3CA, FGFR1, and CCND1 or the pathways of which they are components. However, quantitative differences in everolimus benefit were observed between patient subgroups defined by the exon-specific mutations in PIK3CA (exon 20 v 9) or by different degrees of chromosomal instability in the tumor tissues. Conclusion The data from this exploratory analysis suggest that the efficacy of everolimus was largely independent of the most commonly altered genes or pathways in hormone receptor–positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2–negative breast cancer. The potential impact of chromosomal instabilities and low-frequency genetic alterations on everolimus efficacy warrants further investigation. PMID:26503204

  10. Prognostic value of Ki67 and p53 in patients with estrogen receptor-positive and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative breast cancer: Validation of the cut-off value of the Ki67 labeling index as a predictive factor

    PubMed Central

    OHARA, MASAHIRO; MATSUURA, KAZUO; AKIMOTO, ETSUSHI; NOMA, MIDORI; DOI, MIHOKO; NISHIZAKA, TAKASHI; KAGAWA, NAOKI; ITAMOTO, TOSHIYUKI

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the significance of the Ki67 labeling index and p53 status as prognostic and predictive indicators of operable estrogen receptor (ER)-positive and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative breast cancer. Among 697 consecutive patients with primary breast cancer who underwent curative surgery between 2002 and 2013, 308 patients with ER-positive and HER2-negative breast cancer were assessed. The results of the multivariate Cox analysis demonstrated that a high Ki67 labeling index was significantly associated with a short recurrence-free interval (RFI) (p=0.004) and was marginally associated with a worse overall survival (p=0.074). A positive p53 status was not associated with worse outcomes. To validate the cut-off values of the Ki67 labeling index for identifying patients who may benefit from additional chemotherapy, prognostic factors were investigated in breast cancer patients treated postoperatively with endocrine therapy alone. Analysis of receiver operating characteristic curves demonstrated that a Ki67 labeling index cut-off of 20.0% was optimal for predicting recurrence among patients who did not receive adjuvant chemotherapy. The 5-year RFIs for patients with Ki67 <20 and ≥20% were 97.2 and 86.6%, respectively (p=0.0244). A high Ki67 labeling index (≥20%) was significantly associated with large tumors (p<0.01), lymph node metastasis (p=0.0236) and positive p53 status (p<0.001). The univariate analysis demonstrated that Ki67 labeling index ≥20%, lymph node metastasis and progesterone receptor negativity were significant worse prognostic factors for RFI (p=0.0333, 0.0116 and 0.0573, respectively). The Ki67 labeling index was found to be a useful prognostic factor in patients with ER-positive and HER2-negative breast cancer and the cut-off values of the Ki67 labeling index for making a decision regarding adjuvant treatment were validated. PMID:27073684

  11. Receptor-interacting protein kinase 2 promotes triple-negative breast cancer cell migration and invasion via activation of nuclear factor-kappaB and c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathways

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Metastasis is the main cause of breast cancer morbidity and mortality. Processes that allow for tumor cell migration and invasion are important therapeutic targets. Here we demonstrate that receptor-interacting protein kinase 2 (RIP2), a kinase known to be involved in inflammatory processes, also has novel roles in cancer cell migration and invasion. Methods A total of six breast cancer expression databases, including The Cancer Genome Atlas, were assessed for RIP2 expression among various clinical subtypes and its role as a prognostic biomarker. mRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for RIP2 was performed on 17 stage III breast cancers to determine if there was a correlation between RIP2 expression and lymph node involvement. RNA-interference was used to knock-down RIP2 expression in MDA-MB-231, Htb126, SUM149PT, MCF7, T47D, and HCC1428 cells. Cell migration and invasion were measured in vitro by scratch/wound healing and transwell migration assays. A xenograft mouse model was used to assess tumor growth and chemosensitivity to docetaxel in vivo in MDA-MB-231 cells with and without RIP2 small hairpin RNA knockdown. Western blot and immunofluorescence imaging were used to evaluate protein expressions. Results Interrogation of expression databases showed that RIP2 expression is significantly over-expressed in triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC: estrogen-receptor (ER) negative, progesterone-receptor (PR) negative, Her2/neu- (Her2) negative), compared to other clinical subtypes. High RIP2 expression correlates with worse progression-free survival using a combined breast cancer expression array dataset consisting of 946 patients. Multivariate analysis shows RIP2 as an independent prognostic biomarker. Knock-down of RIP2 significantly decreases migration in both scratch/wound healing and transwell migration assays in MDA-MB-231, Htb126, SUM149PT, MCF7, and T47D cells and is correlated with decreased Nuclear Factor-kappaB and c-Jun N

  12. Effects of a green tea extract, Polyphenon E, on systemic biomarkers of growth factor signalling in women with hormone receptor-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Crew, K. D.; Ho, K. A.; Brown, P.; Greenlee, H.; Bevers, T. B.; Arun, B.; Sneige, N.; Hudis, C.; McArthur, H. L.; Chang, J.; Rimawi, M.; Cornelison, T. L.; Cardelli, J.; Santella, R. M.; Wang, A.; Lippman, S. M.; Hershman, D. L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Observational and experimental data support a potential breast cancer chemopreventive effect of green tea. Methods We conducted an ancillary study using archived blood/urine from a phase IB randomised, placebo-controlled dose escalation trial of an oral green tea extract, Polyphenon E (Poly E), in breast cancer patients. Using an adaptive trial design, women with stage I–III breast cancer who completed adjuvant treatment were randomised to Poly E 400 mg (n = 16), 600 mg (n = 11) and 800 mg (n = 3) twice daily or matching placebo (n = 10) for 6 months. Blood and urine collection occurred at baseline, and at 2, 4 and 6 months. Biological endpoints included growth factor [serum hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)], lipid (serum cholesterol, triglycerides), oxidative damage and inflammatory biomarkers. Results From July 2007-August 2009, 40 women were enrolled and 34 (26 Poly E, eight placebo) were evaluable for biomarker endpoints. At 2 months, the Poly E group (all dose levels combined) compared to placebo had a significant decrease in mean serum HGF levels (−12.7% versus +6.3%, P = 0.04). This trend persisted at 4 and 6 months but was no longer statistically significant. For the Poly E group, serum VEGF decreased by 11.5% at 2 months (P = 0.02) and 13.9% at 4 months (P = 0.05) but did not differ compared to placebo. At 2 months, there was a trend toward a decrease in serum cholesterol with Poly E (P = 0.08). No significant differences were observed for other biomarkers. Conclusions Our findings suggest potential mechanistic actions of tea polyphenols in growth factor signalling, angiogenesis and lipid metabolism. PMID:24646362

  13. Targeting Thyroid Hormone Receptor Beta in Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Guowei; Gelsomino, Luca; Covington, Kyle R.; Beyer, Amanda R.; Wang, John; Rechoum, Yassine; Huffman, Kenneth; Carstens, Ryan; Ando, Sebastiano; Fuqua, Suzanne A.W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Discover novel nuclear receptor targets in triple negative breast cancer Methods Expression microarray, western blot, qRT-PCR, MTT growth assay, soft agar anchorage-independent growth assay, TRE reporter transactivation assay, statistical analysis. Results We performed microarray analysis using 227 triple negative breast tumors, and clustered the tumors into five groups according to their nuclear receptor expression. Thyroid hormone receptor beta (TRβ) was one of the most differentially expressed nuclear receptors in group 5 compared to other groups. TRβ low expressing patients were associated with poor outcome. We evaluated the role of TRβ in triple negative breast cancer cell lines representing group 5 tumors. Knockdown of TRβ increased soft agar colony and reduced sensitivity to docetaxel and doxorubicin treatment. Docetaxel or doxorubicin long-term cultured cell lines also expressed decreased TRβ protein. Microarray analysis revealed cAMP/PKA signaling was the only KEGG pathways upregulated in TRβ knockdown cells. Inhibitors of cAMP or PKA, in combination with doxorubicin further enhanced cell apoptosis and restored sensitivity to chemotherapy. TRβ-specific agonists enhanced TRβ expression, and further sensitized cells to both docetaxel and doxorubicin. Sensitization was mediated by increased apoptosis with elevated cleaved PARP and caspase 3. Conclusions TRβ represents a novel nuclear receptor target in triple negative breast cancer; low TRβ levels were associated with enhanced resistance to both docetaxel and doxorubicin treatment. TRβ-specific agonists enhance chemosensitivity to these two agents. Mechanistically enhanced cAMP/PKA signaling was associated with TRβ’s effects on response to chemotherapy. PMID:25820519

  14. TBCRC 008: Early Change in 18F-FDG Uptake on PET Predicts Response to Preoperative Systemic Therapy in Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2–Negative Primary Operable Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Roisin M.; Leal, Jeffrey P.; Goetz, Matthew P.; Zhang, Zhe; Zhou, Xian C.; Jacobs, Lisa K.; Mhlanga, Joyce; Joo, H O; Carpenter, John; Storniolo, Anna Maria; Watkins, Stanley; Fetting, John H.; Miller, Robert S.; Sideras, Kostandinos; Jeter, Stacie C.; Walsh, Bridget; Powers, Penny; Zorzi, Jane; Boughey, Judy C.; Davidson, Nancy E.; Carey, Lisa A.; Wolff, Antonio C.; Khouri, Nagi; Gabrielson, Edward; Wahl, Richard L.; Stearns, Vered

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic modifiers, including the histone deacetylase inhibitor vorinostat, may sensitize tumors to chemotherapy and enhance outcomes. We conducted a multicenter randomized phase II neo-adjuvant trial of carboplatin and nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel (CP) with vorinostat or placebo in women with stage II/III, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)–negative breast cancer, in which we also examined whether change in maximum standardized uptake values corrected for lean body mass (SULmax) on 18F-FDG PET predicted pathologic complete response (pCR) in breast and axillary lymph nodes. Methods Participants were randomly assigned to 12 wk of preoperative carboplatin (area under the curve of 2, weekly) and nab-paclitaxel (100 mg/m2 weekly) with vorinostat (400 mg orally daily, days 1–3 of every 7-d period) or placebo. All patients underwent 18F-FDG PET and research biopsy at baseline and on cycle 1 day 15. The primary endpoint was the pCR rate. Secondary objectives included correlation of change in tumor SULmax on 18F-FDG PET by cycle 1 day 15 with pCR and correlation of baseline and change in Ki-67 with pCR. Results In an intent-to-treat analysis (n = 62), overall pCR was 27.4% (vorinostat, 25.8%; placebo, 29.0%). In a pooled analysis (n = 59), we observed a significant difference in median change in SULmax 15 d after initiating preoperative therapy between those achieving pCR versus not (percentage reduction, 63.0% vs. 32.9%; P = 0.003). Patients with 50% or greater reduction in SULmax were more likely to achieve pCR, which remained statistically significant in multivariable analysis including estrogen receptor status (odds ratio, 5.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.3–22.7; P = 0.023). Differences in baseline and change in Ki-67 were not significantly different between those achieving pCR versus not. Conclusion Preoperative CP with vorinostat or placebo is associated with similar pCR rates. Early change in SULmax on 18F-FDG PET 15 d after the

  15. Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators (SARMs) Negatively Regulate Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Growth and Epithelial:Mesenchymal Stem Cell Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Ramesh; Ahn, Sunjoo; Cheney, Misty D.; Yepuru, Muralimohan; Miller, Duane D.; Steiner, Mitchell S.; Dalton, James T.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Introduction The androgen receptor (AR) is the most highly expressed steroid receptor in breast cancer with 75–95% of estrogen receptor (ER)-positive and 40–70% of ER-negative breast cancers expressing AR. Though historically breast cancers were treated with steroidal androgens, their use fell from favor because of their virilizing side effects and the emergence of tamoxifen. Nonsteroidal, tissue selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) may provide a novel targeted approach to exploit the therapeutic benefits of androgen therapy in breast cancer. Materials and Methods Since MDA-MB-453 triple-negative breast cancer cells express mutated AR, PTEN, and p53, MDA-MB-231 triple-negative breast cancer cells stably expressing wildtype AR (MDA-MB-231-AR) were used to evaluate the in vitro and in vivo anti-proliferative effects of SARMs. Microarray analysis and epithelial:mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) co-culture signaling studies were performed to understand the mechanisms of action. Results Dihydrotestosterone and SARMs, but not bicalutamide, inhibited the proliferation of MDA-MB-231-AR. The SARMs reduced the MDA-MB-231-AR tumor growth and tumor weight by greater than 90%, compared to vehicle-treated tumors. SARM treatment inhibited the intratumoral expression of genes and pathways that promote breast cancer development through its actions on the AR. SARM treatment also inhibited the metastasis-promoting paracrine factors, IL6 and MMP13, and subsequent migration and invasion of epithelial:MSC co-cultures. Conclusion 1. AR stimulation inhibits paracrine factors that are important for MSC interactions and breast cancer invasion and metastasis. 2. SARMs may provide promise as novel targeted therapies to treat AR-positive triple-negative breast cancer. PMID:25072326

  16. Elevated Resistin Gene Expression in African American Estrogen and Progesterone Receptor Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vallega, Karin A.; Liu, NingNing; Myers, Jennifer S.; Yu, Kaixian; Sang, Qing-Xiang Amy

    2016-01-01

    Introduction African American (AA) women diagnosed with breast cancer are more likely to have aggressive subtypes. Investigating differentially expressed genes between patient populations may help explain racial health disparities. Resistin, one such gene, is linked to inflammation, obesity, and breast cancer risk. Previous studies indicated that resistin expression is higher in serum and tissue of AA breast cancer patients compared to Caucasian American (CA) patients. However, resistin expression levels have not been compared between AA and CA patients in a stage- and subtype-specific context. Breast cancer prognosis and treatments vary by subtype. This work investigates differential resistin gene expression in human breast cancer tissues of specific stages, receptor subtypes, and menopause statuses in AA and CA women. Methods Differential gene expression analysis was performed using human breast cancer gene expression data from The Cancer Genome Atlas. We performed inter-race resistin gene expression level comparisons looking at receptor status and stage-specific data between AA and CA samples. DESeq was run to test for differentially expressed resistin values. Results Resistin RNA was higher in AA women overall, with highest values in receptor negative subtypes. Estrogen-, progesterone-, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2- negative groups showed statistically significant elevated resistin levels in Stage I and II AA women compared to CA women. In inter-racial comparisons, AA women had significantly higher levels of resistin regardless of menopause status. In whole population comparisons, resistin expression was higher among Stage I and III estrogen receptor negative cases. In comparisons of molecular subtypes, resistin levels were significant higher in triple negative than in luminal A breast cancer. Conclusion Resistin gene expression levels were significantly higher in receptor negative subtypes, especially estrogen receptor negative cases in AA

  17. Constitutive negative regulation in the processing of the anti-Müllerian hormone receptor II.

    PubMed

    Hirschhorn, Tal; di Clemente, Nathalie; Amsalem, Ayelet R; Pepinsky, R Blake; Picard, Jean-Yves; Smorodinsky, Nechama I; Cate, Richard L; Ehrlich, Marcelo

    2015-04-01

    The levels and intracellular localization of wild-type transforming growth factor β superfamily (TGFβ-SF) receptors are tightly regulated by endocytic trafficking, shedding and degradation. In contrast, a main regulatory mechanism of mutation-bearing receptors involves their intracellular retention. Anti-Müllerian hormone receptor II (AMHRII, also known as AMHR2) is the type-II receptor for anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH), a TGFβ-SF ligand that mediates Müllerian duct regression in males. Here, we studied AMHRII processing and identified novel mechanisms of its constitutive negative regulation. Immunoblot analysis revealed that a significant portion of AMHRII was missing most of its extracellular domain (ECD) and, although glycosylated, was unfolded and retained in the endoplasmic reticulum. Exogenous expression of AMHRII, but not of type-II TGF-β receptor (TβRII, also known as TGFR2), resulted in its disulfide-bond-mediated homo-oligomerization and intracellular retention, and in a decrease in its AMH-binding capacity. At the plasma membrane, AMHRII differed from TβRII, forming high levels of non-covalent homomeric complexes, which exhibited a clustered distribution and restricted lateral mobility. This study identifies novel mechanisms of negative regulation of a type-II TGFβ-SF receptor through cleavage, intracellular retention and/or promiscuous disulfide-bond mediated homo-oligomerization.

  18. RAGE, receptor of advanced glycation endoproducts, negatively regulates chondrocytes differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Tatsuya; Fukui, Rino; Matsui, Mio; Kurosaka, Yuko; Nishimura, Haruka; Tanabe, Motoki; Takakura, Yuuki; Iwai, Keisuke; Waki, Takuya; Fujita, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    RAGE, receptor for advanced glycation endoproducts (AGE), has been characterized as an activator of osteoclastgenesis. However, whether RAGE directly regulates chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation is unclear. Here, we show that RAGE has an inhibitory role in chondrocyte differentiation. RAGE expression was observed in chondrocytes from the prehypertrophic to hypertrophic regions. In cultured cells, overexpression of RAGE or dominant-negative-RAGE (DN-RAGE) demonstrated that RAGE inhibited cartilaginous matrix production, while DN-RAGE promoted production. Additionally, RAGE regulated Ihh and Col10a1 negatively but upregulated PTHrP receptor. Ihh promoter analysis and real-time PCR analysis suggested that downregulation of Cdxs was the key for RAGE-induced inhibition of chondrocyte differentiation. Overexpression of the NF-κB inhibitor I-κB-SR inhibited RAGE-induced NF-κB activation, but did not influence inhibition of cartilaginous matrix production by RAGE. The inhibitory action of RAGE was restored by the Rho family GTPases inhibitor Toxin B. Furthermore, inhibitory action on Ihh, Col10a1 and Cdxs was reproduced by constitutively active forms, L63RhoA, L61Rac, and L61Cdc42, but not by I-κB-SR. Cdx1 induced Ihh and Col10a1 expressions and directly interacted with Ihh promoter. Retinoic acid (RA) partially rescued the inhibitory action of RAGE. These data combined suggests that RAGE negatively regulates chondrocyte differentiation at the prehypertrophic stage by modulating NF-κB-independent and Rho family GTPases-dependent mechanisms.

  19. RAGE, Receptor of Advanced Glycation Endoproducts, Negatively Regulates Chondrocytes Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Kurosaka, Yuko; Nishimura, Haruka; Tanabe, Motoki; Takakura, Yuuki; Iwai, Keisuke; Waki, Takuya; Fujita, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    RAGE, receptor for advanced glycation endoproducts (AGE), has been characterized as an activator of osteoclastgenesis. However, whether RAGE directly regulates chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation is unclear. Here, we show that RAGE has an inhibitory role in chondrocyte differentiation. RAGE expression was observed in chondrocytes from the prehypertrophic to hypertrophic regions. In cultured cells, overexpression of RAGE or dominant-negative-RAGE (DN-RAGE) demonstrated that RAGE inhibited cartilaginous matrix production, while DN-RAGE promoted production. Additionally, RAGE regulated Ihh and Col10a1 negatively but upregulated PTHrP receptor. Ihh promoter analysis and real-time PCR analysis suggested that downregulation of Cdxs was the key for RAGE-induced inhibition of chondrocyte differentiation. Overexpression of the NF-κB inhibitor I-κB-SR inhibited RAGE-induced NF-κB activation, but did not influence inhibition of cartilaginous matrix production by RAGE. The inhibitory action of RAGE was restored by the Rho family GTPases inhibitor Toxin B. Furthermore, inhibitory action on Ihh, Col10a1 and Cdxs was reproduced by constitutively active forms, L63RhoA, L61Rac, and L61Cdc42, but not by I-κB-SR. Cdx1 induced Ihh and Col10a1 expressions and directly interacted with Ihh promoter. Retinoic acid (RA) partially rescued the inhibitory action of RAGE. These data combined suggests that RAGE negatively regulates chondrocyte differentiation at the prehypertrophic stage by modulating NF-κB-independent and Rho family GTPases-dependent mechanisms. PMID:25275461

  20. Negative Modulation of Androgen Receptor Transcriptional Activity by Daxx

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ding-Yen; Fang, Hsin-I; Ma, Ai-Hong; Huang, Yen-Sung; Pu, Yeong-Shiau; Jenster, Guido; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Shih, Hsiu-Ming

    2004-01-01

    The transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor (AR) modulated by positive or negative regulators plays a critical role in controlling the growth and survival of prostate cancer cells. Although numerous positive regulators have been identified, negative regulators of AR are less well understood. We report here that Daxx functions as a negative AR coregulator through direct protein-protein interactions. Overexpression of Daxx suppressed AR-mediated promoter activity in COS-1 and LNCaP cells and AR-mediated prostate-specific antigen expression in LNCaP cells. Conversely, downregulation of endogenous Daxx expression by RNA interference enhances androgen-induced prostate-specific antigen expression in LNCaP cells. In vitro and in vivo interaction studies revealed that Daxx binds to both the amino-terminal and the DNA-binding domain of the AR. Daxx proteins interfere with the AR DNA-binding activity both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, sumoylation of AR at its amino-terminal domain is involved in Daxx interaction and trans-repression. Together, these findings not only provide a novel role of Daxx in controlling AR transactivation activity but also uncover the mechanism underlying sumoylation-dependent transcriptional repression of the AR. PMID:15572661

  1. Activation of Estrogen Receptor Transfected into a Receptor-Negative Brest Cancer Cell Line Decreases the Metastatic and Invasive Potential of the Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Marcel; Derocq, Danielle; Freiss, Gilles; Rochefort, Henri

    1992-12-01

    Breast cancers containing estrogen receptors are responsive to antiestrogen treatment and have a better prognosis than estrogen receptor-negative tumors. The loss of estrogen and progesterone receptors appears to be associated with a progression to less-differentiated tumors. We transfected the human estrogen receptor into the estrogen receptor-negative metastatic breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 in an attempt to restore their sensitivity to antiestrogens. Two stable sublines of MDA-MB-231 cells (HC1 and HE5) expressing functional estrogen receptors were studied for their ability to grow and invade in vitro and to metastasize in athymic nude mice. The number and size of lung metastases developed by these two sublines in ovariectomized nude mice was not markedly altered by tamoxifen but was inhibited 3-fold by estradiol. Estradiol also significantly inhibited in vitro cell proliferation of these sublines and their invasiveness in Matrigel, a reconstituted basement membrane, whereas the antiestrogens 4-hydroxytamoxifen and ICI 164,384 reversed these effects. These results show that estradiol inhibits the metastatic ability of estrogen receptornegative breast cancer cells following transfection with the estrogen receptor, whereas estrogen receptor-positive breast cancers are stimulated by estrogen, indicating that factors other than the estrogen receptor are involved in progression toward hormone independence. Reactivation or transfer of the estrogen receptor gene can therefore be considered as therapeutic approaches to hormone-independent cancers

  2. Dominant negative retinoic acid receptor initiates tumor formation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kupumbati, Tara S; Cattoretti, Giorgio; Marzan, Christine; Farias, Eduardo F; Taneja, Reshma; Mira-y-Lopez, Rafael

    2006-01-01

    Background Retinoic acid suppresses cell growth and promotes cell differentiation, and pharmacological retinoic acid receptor (RAR) activation is anti-tumorigenic. This begs the question of whether chronic physiological RAR activation by endogenous retinoids is likewise anti-tumorigenic. Results To address this question, we generated transgenic mice in which expression of a ligand binding defective dominant negative RARα (RARαG303E) was under the control of the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoter. The transgene was expressed in the lymphoid compartment and in the mammary epithelium. Observation of aging mice revealed that transgenic mice, unlike their wild type littermates, developed B cell lymphomas at high penetrance, with a median latency of 40 weeks. MMTV-RARαG303E lymphomas were high grade Pax-5+, surface H+L Ig negative, CD69+ and BCL6- and cytologically and phenotypically resembled human adult high grade (Burkitt's or lymphoblastic) lymphomas. We postulated that mammary tumors might arise after a long latency period as seen in other transgenic models of breast cancer. We tested this idea by transplanting transgenic epithelium into the cleared fat pads of wild type hosts, thus bypassing lymphomagenesis. At 17 months post-transplantation, a metastatic mammary adenocarcinoma developed in one of four transplanted glands whereas no tumors developed in sixteen of sixteen endogenous glands with wild type epithelium. Conclusion These findings suggest that physiological RAR activity may normally suppress B lymphocyte and mammary epithelial cell growth and that global RAR inactivation is sufficient to initiate a stochastic process of tumor development requiring multiple transforming events. Our work makes available to the research community a new animal resource that should prove useful as an experimental model of aggressive sporadic lymphoma in immunologically uncompromised hosts. We anticipate that it may also prove useful as a model of breast cancer. PMID

  3. A Study Evaluating INIPARIB in Combination With Chemotherapy to Treat Triple Negative Breast Cancer Brain Metastasis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-17

    Estrogen Receptor Negative (ER-Negative) Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor Negative (PR-Negative) Breast Cancer; Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 Negative (HER2-Negative) Breast Cancer; Brain Metastases

  4. Transcriptional down-regulation of epidermal growth factor receptors by nerve growth factor treatment of PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Shibutani, M; Lazarovici, P; Johnson, A C; Katagiri, Y; Guroff, G

    1998-03-20

    Treatment of PC12 cells with nerve growth factor leads to a decrease in the number of epidermal growth factor receptors on the cell membrane. The mRNA for the epidermal growth factor receptor decreases in a comparable fashion. This decrease appears due to a decrease in the transcription of the epidermal growth factor receptor gene because first, there is no difference in the stability of the epidermal growth factor receptor mRNA, second, newly transcribed epidermal growth factor receptor mRNA is decreased in nerve growth factor-differentiated cells, and third, constructs containing the promoter region of the epidermal growth factor receptor gene are transcribed much less readily in nerve growth factor-differentiated cells than in untreated cells. The decreases in mRNA are not seen in the p140(trk)-deficient variant PC12nnr5 cells nor in cells containing either dominant-negative Ras or dominant-negative Src. Treatment with nerve growth factor also increases the cellular content of GCF2, a putative transcription factor inhibitory for the transcription of the epidermal growth factor receptor gene. The increase in GCF2, like the decrease in the epidermal growth factor receptor mRNA, is not seen in PC12nnr5 cells nor in cells expressing either dominant-negative Ras or dominant-negative Src. The results suggest that nerve growth factor-induced down-regulation of the epidermal growth factor receptor is under transcriptional control, is p140(trk)-, Ras-, and Src-dependent, and may involve transcriptional repression by GCF2.

  5. Adrenocortical LDL receptor function negatively influences glucocorticoid output.

    PubMed

    van der Sluis, Ronald J; Van Eck, Miranda; Hoekstra, Menno

    2015-09-01

    Over 50% of the cholesterol needed by adrenocortical cells for the production of glucocorticoids is derived from lipoproteins. However, the overall contribution of the different lipoproteins and associated uptake pathways to steroidogenesis remains to be determined. Here we aimed to show the importance of LDL receptor (LDLR)-mediated cholesterol acquisition for adrenal steroidogenesis in vivo. Female total body LDLR knockout mice with a human-like lipoprotein profile were bilaterally adrenalectomized and subsequently provided with one adrenal either expressing or genetically lacking the LDLR under their renal capsule to solely modulate adrenocortical LDLR function. Plasma total cholesterol levels and basal plasma corticosterone levels were identical in the two types of adrenal transplanted mice. Strikingly, restoration of adrenal LDLR function significantly reduced the ACTH-mediated stimulation of adrenal steroidogenesis (P<0.001), with plasma corticosterone levels that were respectively 44-59% lower (P<0.01) as compared to adrenal LDLR negative controls. In addition, LDLR positive adrenal transplanted mice exhibited a significant decrease (-39%; P<0.001) in their plasma corticosterone level under fasting stress conditions. Biochemical analysis did not show changes in the expression of genes involved in cholesterol mobilization. However, LDLR expressing adrenal transplants displayed a marked 62% reduction (P<0.05) in the transcript level of the key steroidogenic enzyme HSD3B2. In conclusion, our studies in a mouse model with a human-like lipoprotein profile provide the first in vivo evidence for a novel inhibitory role of the LDLR in the control of adrenal glucocorticoid production. PMID:26136384

  6. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor mediates raloxifene-induced apoptosis in estrogen receptor-negative hepatoma and breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, E F; Koch, D C; Bisson, W H; Jang, H S; Kolluri, S K

    2014-01-01

    Identification of new molecular targets for the treatment of breast cancer is an important clinical goal, especially for triple-negative breast cancer, which is refractory to existing targeted treatments. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor known primarily as the mediator of dioxin toxicity. However, the AhR can also inhibit cellular proliferation in a ligand-dependent manner and act as a tumor suppressor in mice, and thus may be a potential anticancer target. To investigate the AhR as an anticancer target, we conducted a small molecule screen to discover novel AhR ligands with anticancer properties. We identified raloxifene, a selective estrogen receptor (ER) modulator currently used in the clinic for prevention of ER-positive breast cancer and osteoporosis in post-menopausal women, as an AhR activator. Raloxifene directly bound the AhR and induced apoptosis in ER-negative mouse and human hepatoma cells in an AhR-dependent manner, indicating that the AhR is a molecular target of raloxifene and mediates raloxifene-induced apoptosis in the absence of ER. Raloxifene selectively induced apoptosis of triple-negative MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells compared with non-transformed mammary epithelial cells via the AhR. Combined with recent data showing that raloxifene inhibits triple-negative breast cancer xenografts in vivo (Int J Oncol. 43(3):785-92, 2013), our results support the possibility of repurposing of raloxifene as an AhR-targeted therapeutic for triple-negative breast cancer patients. To this end, we also evaluated the role of AhR expression on survival of patients diagnosed with breast cancer. We found that higher expression of the AhR is significantly associated with increased overall survival and distant metastasis-free survival in both hormone-dependent (ER-positive) and hormone-independent (ER and progesterone receptor (PR)-negative) breast cancers. Together, our data strongly support the possibility of using the Ah

  7. Negative elongation factor controls energy homeostasis in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Pan, Haihui; Qin, Kunhua; Guo, Zhanyong; Ma, Yonggang; April, Craig; Gao, Xiaoli; Andrews, Thomas G; Bokov, Alex; Zhang, Jianhua; Chen, Yidong; Weintraub, Susan T; Fan, Jian-Bing; Wang, Degeng; Hu, Yanfen; Aune, Gregory J; Lindsey, Merry L; Li, Rong

    2014-04-10

    Negative elongation factor (NELF) is known to enforce promoter-proximal pausing of RNA polymerase II (Pol II), a pervasive phenomenon observed across multicellular genomes. However, the physiological impact of NELF on tissue homeostasis remains unclear. Here, we show that whole-body conditional deletion of the B subunit of NELF (NELF-B) in adult mice results in cardiomyopathy and impaired response to cardiac stress. Tissue-specific knockout of NELF-B confirms its cell-autonomous function in cardiomyocytes. NELF directly supports transcription of those genes encoding rate-limiting enzymes in fatty acid oxidation (FAO) and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. NELF also shares extensively transcriptional target genes with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), a master regulator of energy metabolism in the myocardium. Mechanistically, NELF helps stabilize the transcription initiation complex at the metabolism-related genes. Our findings strongly indicate that NELF is part of the PPARα-mediated transcription regulatory network that maintains metabolic homeostasis in cardiomyocytes. PMID:24656816

  8. Outcomes of Estrogen Receptor Negative and Progesterone Receptor Positive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Melissa; Chang, Martin C.; González, Rosa; Lategan, Belinda; del Barco, Elvira; Vera-Badillo, Francisco; Quesada, Paula; Goldstein, Robyn; Cruz, Ignacio; Ocana, Alberto; Cruz, Juan J.; Amir, Eitan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe the clinical features and outcomes of estrogen receptor negative (ER-) and progesterone receptor positive (PgR+) breast cancer. Methods We retrospectively reviewed a well-characterized database of sequential patients diagnosed with early stage invasive breast carcinoma. Outcomes of interest were time to relapse (TTR) and overall survival (OS). Multivariable Cox proportional hazards analysis was conducted to assess the association of ER-/PgR+ with TTR and OS in comparison to ER+ and to ER- and PgR negative (ER-/PgR-) tumors irrespective of HER2 status. ER and PgR expression was conservatively defined as 10% or greater staining of cancer cells. Results 815 patients were followed for a median of 40.5 months; 56 patients (7%) had ER-/PgR+, 624 (77%) had ER+ and 136 (17%) had ER-/PgR- phenotypes. Compared with ER+ tumors, ER-/PgR+ tumors were associated with younger age (50 versus 59 years, p=0.03), high grade (50% versus 24%, p<0.001) and more frequent HER2 overexpression/amplification (43% versus 14%, p<0.001). TTR for ER-/PgR+ was intermediate between ER+ and ER-/PgR- tumors, but was not significantly different from ER+ tumors. Recurrences in the ER-/PgR+ and ER-/PgR- groups occurred early in follow-up while in ER+ tumors recurrences continued to occur over the duration of follow-up. OS of ER-/PgR+ was similar to ER+ tumors and better than that of ER-/PgR- tumors. Conclusions The ER-/PgR+ phenotype is associated with higher grade with HER2 overexpression/amplification and occurs more commonly in younger women. Risk of relapse and death more closely resembles ER+ than ER-/PgR- tumors suggesting this phenotype represents a group of more aggressive hormone receptor positive tumors. PMID:26161666

  9. A model of spontaneous mouse mammary tumor for human estrogen receptor- and progesterone receptor-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    ZHENG, LIXIANG; ZHOU, BUGAO; MENG, XIANMING; ZHU, WEIFENG; ZUO, AIREN; WANG, XIAOMIN; JIANG, RUNDE; YU, SHIPING

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the most frequently malignancy in women. Therefore, establishment of an animal model for the development of preventative measures and effective treatment for tumors is required. A novel heterogeneous spontaneous mammary tumor animal model of Kunming mice was generated. The purpose of this study was to characterize the spontaneous mammary tumor model. Histopathologically, invasive nodular masses of pleomorphic tubular neoplastic epithelial cells invaded fibro-vascular stroma, adjacent dermis and muscle tissue. Metastatic spread through blood vessel into liver and lungs was observed by hematoxylin eosin staining. No estrogen receptor (ER) or progesterone receptor (PR) immunoreactivity was detected in their associated malignant tumors, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2) protein weak expression was found by immunohistochemistry. High expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), moderate or high expression of c-Myc and cyclin D1 were observed in tumor sections at different stages (2, 4, 6 and 8 weeks after cancer being found) when compared with that of the normal mammary glands. The result showed that the model is of an invasive ductal carcinoma. Remarkably in the mouse model, ER and PR-negative and HER2 weak positivity are observed. The high or moderate expressions of breast cancer markers (VEGF, c-Myc and cyclin D1) in mammary cancer tissue change at different stages. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a spontaneous mammary model displaying colony-strain, outbred mice. This model will be an attractive tool to understand the biology of anti-hormonal breast cancer in women. PMID:25230850

  10. Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor-1 Contributes to Progression in Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Banda, Malathi; Speyer, Cecilia L.; Semma, Sara N.; Osuala, Kingsley O.; Kounalakis, Nicole; Torres Torres, Keila E.; Barnard, Nicola J.; Kim, Hyunjin J.; Sloane, Bonnie F.; Miller, Fred R.; Goydos, James S.; Gorski, David H.

    2014-01-01

    TNBC is an aggressive breast cancer subtype that does not express hormone receptors (estrogen and progesterone receptors, ER and PR) or amplified human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2), and there currently exist no targeted therapies effective against it. Consequently, finding new molecular targets in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is critical to improving patient outcomes. Previously, we have detected the expression of metabotropic glutamate receptor-1 (gene: GRM1; protein: mGluR1) in TNBC and observed that targeting glutamatergic signaling inhibits TNBC growth both in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we explored how mGluR1 contributes to TNBC progression, using the isogenic MCF10 progression series, which models breast carcinogenesis from nontransformed epithelium to malignant basal-like breast cancer. We observed that mGluR1 is expressed in human breast cancer and that in MCF10A cells, which model nontransformed mammary epithelium, but not in MCF10AT1 cells, which model atypical ductal hyperplasia, mGluR1 overexpression results in increased proliferation, anchorage-independent growth, and invasiveness. In contrast, mGluR1 knockdown results in a decrease in these activities in malignant MCF10CA1d cells. Similarly, pharmacologic inhibition of glutamatergic signaling in MCF10CA1d cells results in a decrease in proliferation and anchorage-independent growth. Finally, transduction of MCF10AT1 cells, which express c-Ha-ras, using a lentiviral construct expressing GRM1 results in transformation to carcinoma in 90% of resultant xenografts. We conclude that mGluR1 cooperates with other factors in hyperplastic mammary epithelium to contribute to TNBC progression and therefore propose that glutamatergic signaling represents a promising new molecular target for TNBC therapy. PMID:24404125

  11. CD45 negatively regulates tumour necrosis factor and interleukin-6 production in dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Piercy, Jenny; Petrova, Svetla; Tchilian, Elma Z; Beverley, Peter C L

    2006-06-01

    CD45 is known to regulate signalling through many different surface receptors in diverse haemopoietic cell types. Here we report for the first time that CD45-/- bone marrow dendritic cells (BMDC) are more activated than CD45+/+ cells and that tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) production by BMDC and splenic dendritic cells (sDC), is increased following stimulation via Toll-like receptor (TLR)3 and TLR9. Nuclear factor-kappaB activation, an important downstream consequence of TLR3 and TLR9 signalling, is also increased in CD45-/- BMDC. BMDC of CD45-/- mice also produce more TNF and IL-6 following stimulation with the cytokines TNF and interferon-alpha. These results show that TLR signalling is increased in CD45-/- dendritic cells and imply that CD45 is a negative regulator of TLR and cytokine receptor signalling in dendritic cells. PMID:16771860

  12. Epidermal growth factor receptor signaling in tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Shvartsman, Stanislav; Wiley, H. S.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2004-08-01

    Abstract: A peptide purified from the salivary gland of a mouse was shown few years ago to accelerate incisor eruption and eyelid opening in newborn mice, and was named epidermal growth factor (EGF). The members of this family of peptide growth factors had been identified in numerous physiological and pathological contexts. EGF binds to a cell surface EGF receptor, which induces a biochemical modification (phosphorylation) of the receptor's cytoplasmic tail. There is a growing consensus in the research community that, in addition to cellular and molecular studies, the dynamics of the EGFR network and its operation must be examined in tissues. A key challenge is to integrate the existing molecular and cellular information into a system-level description of the EGFR network at the tissue and organism level. In this paper, the two examples of EGFR signaling in tissues are described, and the recent efforts to model EGFR autocrine loops, which is a predominant mode of EGFR activation in vivo, are summarized.

  13. Clinical and laboratory factors associated with negative oral food challenges.

    PubMed

    Beigelman, Avraham; Strunk, Robert C; Garbutt, Jane M; Schechtman, Kenneth B; Jaenicke, Matthew W; Stein, Joshua S; Bacharier, Leonard B

    2012-01-01

    Children with food-specific IgE (FSIgE) ≤2 kUa/L to milk, egg, or peanut (or ≤5kUa/L to peanut without history of previous reaction) are appropriate candidates for oral food challenge (OFC) to investigate resolution of food allergy, because these FSIgE cutoffs are associated with ∼50% likelihood of negative OFC. This study was designed to identify characteristics of children undergoing OFC, based on these FSIgE levels, who are most likely to show negative OFC. We collected demographics, severity of previous reaction, history of atopic diseases, total IgE and FSIgE values, and skin tests results on children who underwent OFCs to milk, egg, or peanut, based on the recommended FSIgE cutoffs. We identified independent factors associated with negative OFCs. Four hundred forty-four OFCs met our inclusion criteria. The proportions of negative OFCs performed based on FSIgE cutoffs alone were 58, 42, and 63% to milk, egg, and peanuts, respectively. Regression models identified independent factors associated with negative OFCs: lower FSIgE levels (all three foods), higher total IgE (milk), consumption of baked egg products (egg), and non-Caucasian race (eggs and peanuts). Combinations of these factors identified subgroups of children with proportions of negative OFCs of 83, 75, and 75% for milk, eggs, and peanuts, respectively. Combinations of clinical and laboratory elements, together with FSIgE values, might identify more children who are likely to have negative OFCs compared with current recommendations using FSIgE values alone. Once validated in a different population, these factors might be used for selection of patients who are most likely to show negative OFCs.

  14. Type-3 metabotropic glutamate receptors negatively modulate bone morphogenetic protein receptor signaling and support the tumourigenic potential of glioma-initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Ciceroni, C; Arcella, A; Mosillo, P; Battaglia, G; Mastrantoni, E; Oliva, M A; Carpinelli, G; Santoro, F; Sale, P; Ricci-Vitiani, L; De Maria, R; Pallini, R; Giangaspero, F; Nicoletti, F; Melchiorri, D

    2008-09-01

    Targeted-therapies enhancing differentiation of glioma-initiating cells (GICs) are potential innovative approaches to the treatment of malignant gliomas. These cells support tumour growth and recurrence and are resistant to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. We have found that GICs express mGlu3 metabotropic glutamate receptors. Activation of these receptors sustained the undifferentiated state of GICs in culture by negatively modulating the action of bone morphogenetic proteins, which physiologically signal through the phosphorylation of the transcription factors, Smads. The cross-talk between mGlu3 receptors and BMP receptors was mediated by the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Remarkably, pharmacological blockade of mGlu3 receptors stimulated the differentiation of cultured GICs into astrocytes, an effect that appeared to be long lasting, independent of the growth conditions, and irreversible. In in vivo experiments, a 3-month treatment with the brain-permeant mGlu receptor antagonist, LY341495 limited the growth of infiltrating brain tumours originating from GICs implanted into the brain parenchyma of nude mice. While clusters of tumour cells were consistently found in the brain of control mice, they were virtually absent in a large proportion of mice treated with LY341495. These findings pave the way to a new non-cytotoxic treatment of malignant gliomas based on the use of mGlu3 receptor antagonists. PMID:18621067

  15. Mammary Adipose Tissue-Derived Lysophospholipids Promote Estrogen Receptor-Negative Mammary Epithelial Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Volden, Paul A; Skor, Maxwell N; Johnson, Marianna B; Singh, Puneet; Patel, Feenalie N; McClintock, Martha K; Brady, Matthew J; Conzen, Suzanne D

    2016-05-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), acting in an autocrine or paracrine fashion through G protein-coupled receptors, has been implicated in many physiologic and pathologic processes, including cancer. LPA is converted from lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) by the secreted phospholipase autotaxin (ATX). Although various cell types can produce ATX, adipocyte-derived ATX is believed to be the major source of circulating ATX and also to be the major regulator of plasma LPA levels. In addition to ATX, adipocytes secrete numerous other factors (adipokines); although several adipokines have been implicated in breast cancer biology, the contribution of mammary adipose tissue-derived LPC/ATX/LPA (LPA axis) signaling to breast cancer is poorly understood. Using murine mammary fat-conditioned medium, we investigated the contribution of LPA signaling to mammary epithelial cancer cell biology and identified LPA signaling as a significant contributor to the oncogenic effects of the mammary adipose tissue secretome. To interrogate the role of mammary fat in the LPA axis during breast cancer progression, we exposed mammary adipose tissue to secreted factors from estrogen receptor-negative mammary epithelial cell lines and monitored changes in the mammary fat pad LPA axis. Our data indicate that bidirectional interactions between mammary cancer cells and mammary adipocytes alter the local LPA axis and increase ATX expression in the mammary fat pad during breast cancer progression. Thus, the LPC/ATX/LPA axis may be a useful target for prevention in patients at risk of ER-negative breast cancer. Cancer Prev Res; 9(5); 367-78. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26862086

  16. Galanin negatively modulates opiate withdrawal via galanin receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Fiona E.; Armenaki, Athena; Iismaa, Tiina P.; Einstein, Emily B.; Shine, John; Picciotto, Marina R.; Wynick, David; Zachariou, Venetia

    2012-01-01

    Rationale The neuropeptide galanin has been shown to modulate opiate dependence and withdrawal. These effects could be mediated via activation of one or more of three distinct G-protein coupled receptors, namely GalR1, GalR2 and GalR3. Objectives In this study, we used several transgenic mouse lines to further define the mechanisms underlying the role played by galanin and its receptors in the modulation of morphine dependence. Firstly, transgenic mice expressing β-galactosidase under the control of the galanin promoter were used to assess the regulation of galanin expression in response to chronic morphine administration and withdrawal. Next, the behavioural responses to chronic morphine administration and withdrawal were tested in mice that over-express galanin, lack the GalR1 gene or lack the GalR2 gene. Methods Transgenic and matched wild-type mice were given increasing doses of morphine followed by precipitation of withdrawal by naloxone and behavioral responses to withdrawal assessed. Results Both morphine administration and withdrawal increases galanin gene transcription in the locus coerulus (LC). Increasing galanin levels in the brain reduced signs of opiate withdrawal. Mice lacking GalR1 undergo more severe opiate withdrawal, whereas mice lacking GalR2 show no significant difference in withdrawal signs, compare to matched wild type controls. Conclusions Opiate administration and withdrawal increase galanin expression in the LC. Galanin opposes the actions of morphine which lead to opiate dependence and withdrawal, an effect that is mediated via GalR1. PMID:21969124

  17. Modern reproductive patterns associated with estrogen receptor positive but not negative breast cancer susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Aktipis, C. Athena; Ellis, Bruce J.; Nishimura, Katherine K.; Hiatt, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    It has long been accepted that modern reproductive patterns are likely contributors to breast cancer susceptibility because of their influence on hormones such as estrogen and the importance of these hormones in breast cancer. We conducted a meta-analysis to assess whether this ‘evolutionary mismatch hypothesis’ can explain susceptibility to both estrogen receptor positive (ER-positive) and estrogen receptor negative (ER-negative) cancer. Our meta-analysis includes a total of 33 studies and examines parity, age of first birth and age of menarche broken down by estrogen receptor status. We found that modern reproductive patterns are more closely linked to ER-positive than ER-negative breast cancer. Thus, the evolutionary mismatch hypothesis for breast cancer can account for ER-positive breast cancer susceptibility but not ER-negative breast cancer. PMID:25389105

  18. Beclin 1 regulates growth factor receptor signaling in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Rohatgi, R A; Janusis, J; Leonard, D; Bellvé, K D; Fogarty, K E; Baehrecke, E H; Corvera, S; Shaw, L M

    2015-10-16

    Beclin 1 is a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor that is decreased in many human tumors. The function of beclin 1 in cancer has been attributed primarily to its role in the degradative process of macroautophagy. However, beclin 1 is a core component of the vacuolar protein sorting 34 (Vps34)/class III phosphatidylinositoI-3 kinase (PI3KC3) and Vps15/p150 complex that regulates multiple membrane-trafficking events. In the current study, we describe an alternative mechanism of action for beclin 1 in breast cancer involving its control of growth factor receptor signaling. We identify a specific stage of early endosome maturation that is regulated by beclin 1, the transition of APPL1-containing phosphatidyIinositol 3-phosphate-negative (PI3P(-)) endosomes to PI3P(+) endosomes. Beclin 1 regulates PI3P production in response to growth factor stimulation to control the residency time of growth factor receptors in the PI3P(-)/APPL(+)-signaling-competent compartment. As a result, suppression of BECN1 sustains growth factor-stimulated AKT and ERK activation resulting in increased breast carcinoma cell invasion. In human breast tumors, beclin 1 expression is inversely correlated with AKT and ERK phosphorylation. Our data identify a novel role for beclin 1 in regulating growth factor signaling and reveal a mechanism by which loss of beclin 1 expression would enhance breast cancer progression.

  19. PREX1 Protein Function Is Negatively Regulated Downstream of Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Activation by p21-activated Kinases (PAKs).

    PubMed

    Barrows, Douglas; He, John Z; Parsons, Ramon

    2016-09-16

    Downstream of receptor tyrosine kinase and G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) stimulation, the phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3)-dependent Rac exchange factor (PREX) family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) activates Rho GTPases, leading to important roles for PREX proteins in numerous cellular processes and diseases, including cancer. PREX1 and PREX2 GEF activity is activated by the second messengers PIP3 and Gβγ, and further regulation of PREX GEF activity occurs by phosphorylation. Stimulation of receptor tyrosine kinases by neuregulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) leads to the phosphorylation of PREX1; however, the kinases that phosphorylate PREX1 downstream of these ligands are not known. We recently reported that the p21-activated kinases (PAKs), which are activated by GTP-bound Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1), mediate the phosphorylation of PREX2 after insulin receptor activation. Here we show that certain phosphorylation events on PREX1 after insulin, neuregulin, and IGF1 treatment are PAK-dependent and lead to a reduction in PREX1 binding to PIP3 Like PREX2, PAK-mediated phosphorylation also negatively regulates PREX1 GEF activity. Furthermore, the onset of PREX1 phosphorylation was delayed compared with the phosphorylation of AKT, supporting a model of negative feedback downstream of PREX1 activation. We also found that the phosphorylation of PREX1 after isoproterenol and prostaglandin E2-mediated GPCR activation is partially PAK-dependent and likely also involves protein kinase A, which is known to reduce PREX1 function. Our data point to multiple mechanisms of PREX1 negative regulation by PAKs within receptor tyrosine kinase and GPCR-stimulated signaling pathways that have important roles in diseases such as diabetes and cancer. PMID:27481946

  20. Selective Negative Allosteric Modulation Of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors – A Structural Perspective of Ligands and Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Harpsøe, Kasper; Isberg, Vignir; Tehan, Benjamin G.; Weiss, Dahlia; Arsova, Angela; Marshall, Fiona H.; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Gloriam, David E.

    2015-01-01

    The metabotropic glutamate receptors have a wide range of modulatory functions in the central nervous system. They are among the most highly pursued drug targets, with relevance for several neurological diseases, and a number of allosteric modulators have entered clinical trials. However, so far this has not led to a marketed drug, largely because of the difficulties in achieving subtype-selective compounds with desired properties. Very recently the first crystal structures were published for the transmembrane domain of two metabotropic glutamate receptors in complex with negative allosteric modulators. In this analysis, we make the first comprehensive structural comparison of all metabotropic glutamate receptors, placing selective negative allosteric modulators and critical mutants into the detailed context of the receptor binding sites. A better understanding of how the different mGlu allosteric modulator binding modes relates to selective pharmacological actions will be very valuable for rational design of safer drugs. PMID:26359761

  1. Chlamydophila psittaci-negative ocular adnexal marginal zone lymphomas express self polyreactive B-cell receptors.

    PubMed

    Zhu, D; Bhatt, S; Lu, X; Guo, F; Veelken, H; Hsu, D K; Liu, F-T; Alvarez Cubela, S; Kunkalla, K; Vega, F; Chapman-Fredricks, J R; Lossos, I S

    2015-07-01

    The pathogenesis of Chlamydophila psittaci-negative ocular adnexal extranodal marginal zone lymphomas (OAEMZLs) is poorly understood. OAEMZLs are monoclonal tumors expressing a biased repertoire of mutated surface immunoglobulins. Antigenic activation of the B-cell receptor (BCR) may have a role in the pathogenesis of these lymphomas. We have analyzed the reactivity of recombinant OAEMZL immunoglobulins. OAEMZL antibodies reacted with self-human antigens, as demonstrated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, HEp-2 immunofluorescence and human protein microarrays. All the analyzed recombinant antibodies (rAbs) exhibited polyreactivity by comprehensive protein array antibody reactivity and some rAbs also demonstrated rheumatoid factor activity. The identity of several reactive antigens was confirmed by microcapillary reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography nano-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. The tested rAbs frequently reacted with shared intracellular and extracellular self-antigens (for example, galectin-3). Furthermore, these self-antigens induced BCR signaling in B cells expressing cognate surface immunoglobulins derived from OAEMZLs. These findings indicate that interactions between self-antigens and cognate OAEMZL tumor-derived BCRs are functional, inducing intracellular signaling. Overall, our findings suggest that self-antigen-induced BCR stimulation may be implicated in the pathogenesis of C. psittaci-negative OAEMZLs. PMID:25676418

  2. Insulin Receptor Substrate 2 Is a Negative Regulator of Memory Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irvine, Elaine E.; Drinkwater, Laura; Radwanska, Kasia; Al-Qassab, Hind; Smith, Mark A.; O'Brien, Melissa; Kielar, Catherine; Choudhury, Agharul I.; Krauss, Stefan; Cooper, Jonathan D.; Withers, Dominic J.; Giese, Karl Peter

    2011-01-01

    Insulin has been shown to impact on learning and memory in both humans and animals, but the downstream signaling mechanisms involved are poorly characterized. Insulin receptor substrate-2 (Irs2) is an adaptor protein that couples activation of insulin- and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptors to downstream signaling pathways. Here, we have…

  3. Altered promoter recycling rates contribute to dominant-negative activity of human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma mutations associated with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Leff, Todd

    2007-04-01

    The transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARgamma) plays an important role in regulating lipid and glucose metabolism and improves insulin sensitivity in diabetic patients when activated by thiazolidinedione drugs. Several loss-of-function mutations in PPARgamma have been identified that cause lipodystrophy and diabetes in humans. Because affected individuals are heterozygotes and have one normal PPARgamma allele, it is of interest to know whether these mutations act in a dominant-negative fashion to inhibit the activity of the wild-type (WT) receptor. Here we compare the molecular phenotypes of two previously identified PPARgamma mutations: P467L, reported to be dominant negative; and F388L, reported to be devoid of dominant-negative activity. We developed a competitive chromatin immunoprecipitation assay to measure the relative ability of mutant PPARgamma to compete with WT receptor for binding to a PPAR regulatory element (PPRE)-containing promoter. By determining the ratio of mutant and WT receptors bound to a PPRE over time, we estimated the relative promoter turnover rate of each receptor. This assay demonstrated that PPARgamma bearing the P467L had a reduced promoter turnover rate compared with the F388L receptor, and over time out-competed the WT receptor for promoter binding sites. We propose that the P467L receptor is dominant negative because in a cell containing both WT and mutant receptors, the majority of the PPAR-regulated promoters will be occupied by the transcriptionally defective mutant receptor. In contrast, the F388L mutation lacks dominant-negative activity because its more rapid promoter turnover rate prevented it from out-competing the WT receptor for promoter binding sites.

  4. Manifold regularized non-negative matrix factorization with label information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huirong; Zhang, Jiangshe; Wang, Changpeng; Liu, Junmin

    2016-03-01

    Non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) as a popular technique for finding parts-based, linear representations of non-negative data has been successfully applied in a wide range of applications, such as feature learning, dictionary learning, and dimensionality reduction. However, both the local manifold regularization of data and the discriminative information of the available label have not been taken into account together in NMF. We propose a new semisupervised matrix decomposition method, called manifold regularized non-negative matrix factorization (MRNMF) with label information, which incorporates the manifold regularization and the label information into the NMF to improve the performance of NMF in clustering tasks. We encode the local geometrical structure of the data space by constructing a nearest neighbor graph and enhance the discriminative ability of different classes by effectively using the label information. Experimental comparisons with the state-of-the-art methods on theCOIL20, PIE, Extended Yale B, and MNIST databases demonstrate the effectiveness of MRNMF.

  5. Value of post-operative reassessment of estrogen receptor α expression following neoadjuvant chemotherapy with or without gefitinib for estrogen receptor negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bernsdorf, Mogens; Balslev, Eva; Lykkesfeldt, Anne E; Kroman, Niels; Harder, Eva; von der Maase, Hans; Jakobsen, Erik H; Grabau, Dorthe; Ejlertsen, Bent

    2011-07-01

    The NICE trial was designed to evaluate the possible benefits of adding epidermal growth factor receptor targeted therapy to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with estrogen receptor α (ER) negative and operable breast cancer. Preclinical data have suggested that signalling through the ErbB receptors or downstream effectors may repress ER expression. Here the authors investigated whether gefitinib, given neoadjuvant in combination with epirubicin and cyclophosphamide (EC), could restore ER expression. Eligible patients in the NICE trial were women with unilateral, primary operable, ER negative invasive breast cancer ≥ 2 cm. Material from patients randomized and completing treatment (four cycles of neoadjuvant EC plus 12 weeks of either gefitinib or placebo) in the NICE trial having available ER status both at baseline and after neoadjuvant treatment were eligible for this study. Tumors with indication of changed ER phenotype (based on collected pathology reports) were immunohistochemically reassessed centrally. 115 patients were eligible for this study; 59 patients in the gefitinib group and 56 patients in the placebo group. Five (4.3%) of 115 tumors changed ER phenotype from negative to positive. A change was seen in three patients in the gefitinib (5.1%) and in two patients in the placebo (3.6%) group with a difference of 1.51% (95% CI, -6.1-9.1). Results of the NICE trial have been reported previously. Post-operative reassessment of ER expression changed the assessment of ER status in a small but significant fraction of patients and should, whenever possible, be performed following neoadjuvant chemotherapy for ER negative breast cancer. Gefitinib did not affect the reversion rate of ER negative tumors.

  6. Effective Targeting of Estrogen Receptor Negative Breast Cancers with the Protein Kinase D inhibitor CRT0066101

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Sahra; Perez, Edith A.; Thompson, E. Aubrey; Radisky, Derek C.; Geiger, Xochiquetzal J.; Storz, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Invasive ductal carcinomas (IDCs) of the breast are associated with altered expression of hormone receptors (HR), amplification or overexpression of HER2, or a triple-negative phenotype. The most aggressive cases of IDC are characterized by a high proliferation rate, a great propensity to metastasize and their ability to resist to standard chemotherapy, hormone therapy or HER2 targeted therapy. Using progression tissue microarrays we here demonstrate that the serine/threonine kinase Protein Kinase D3 (PKD3) is highly up-regulated in estrogen receptor (ER)-negative tumors. We identify direct binding of the estrogen receptor to the PRKD3 gene promoter as a mechanism of inhibition of PKD3 expression. Loss of ER results in upregulation of PKD3 leading to all hallmarks of aggressive IDC, including increased cell proliferation, migration and invasion. This identifies ER-negative breast cancers as ideal for treatment with the PKD inhibitor CRT0066101. We show that similar to a knockdown of PKD3, treatment with this inhibitor targets all tumorigenic processes in vitro and decreases growth of primary tumors and metastasis in vivo. Our data strongly support the development of PKD inhibitors for clinical use for ER-negative breast cancers, including the triple-negative phenotype. PMID:25852060

  7. Identification of four novel susceptibility loci for oestrogen receptor negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Couch, Fergus J.; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Mendoza-Fandino, Gustavo A.; Nord, Silje; Lilyquist, Janna; Olswold, Curtis; Hallberg, Emily; Agata, Simona; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Ambrosone, Christine; Andrulis, Irene L.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Arun, Banu K.; Arver, Brita; Barile, Monica; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Barrowdale, Daniel; Beckmann, Lars; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Benitez, Javier; Blank, Stephanie V.; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Burwinkel, Barbara; Buys, Saundra S.; Caldes, Trinidad; Caligo, Maria A.; Canzian, Federico; Carpenter, Jane; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J.; Chung, Wendy K.; Claes, Kathleen B. M.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Czene, Kamila; Daly, Mary B.; Damiola, Francesca; Darabi, Hatef; de la Hoya, Miguel; Devilee, Peter; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan C.; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Domchek, Susan M.; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dumont, Martine; Dunning, Alison M.; Eccles, Diana M.; Ehrencrona, Hans; Ekici, Arif B.; Eliassen, Heather; Ellis, Steve; Fasching, Peter A.; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Försti, Asta; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D.; Friebel, Tara; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Gabrielson, Marike; Gammon, Marilie D.; Ganz, Patricia A.; Gapstur, Susan M.; Garber, Judy; Gaudet, Mia M.; Gayther, Simon A.; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ghoussaini, Maya; Giles, Graham G.; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K.; Goldberg, Mark S.; Goldgar, David E.; González-Neira, Anna; Greene, Mark H.; Gronwald, Jacek; Guénel, Pascal; Gunter, Marc; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Hart, Steven; Healey, Sue; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Henderson, Brian E.; Herzog, Josef; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hoover, Robert N.; Hopper, John L.; Humphreys, Keith; Hunter, David J.; Huzarski, Tomasz; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Isaacs, Claudine; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M.; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kar, Siddhartha; Karlan, Beth Y.; Khan, Sofia; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kibriya, Muhammad G.; Knight, Julia A.; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela; Kwong, Ava; Laitman, Yael; Lambrechts, Diether; Lazaro, Conxi; Lee, Eunjung; Le Marchand, Loic; Lester, Jenny; Lindblom, Annika; Lindor, Noralane; Lindstrom, Sara; Liu, Jianjun; Long, Jirong; Lubinski, Jan; Mai, Phuong L.; Makalic, Enes; Malone, Kathleen E.; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Martens, John W. M.; McGuffog, Lesley; Meindl, Alfons; Miller, Austin; Milne, Roger L.; Miron, Penelope; Montagna, Marco; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Mulligan, Anna M.; Muranen, Taru A.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Offit, Kenneth; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Olson, Janet E.; Osorio, Ana; Park, Sue K.; Peeters, Petra H.; Peissel, Bernard; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Phelan, Catherine M.; Pilarski, Robert; Poppe, Bruce; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rahman, Nazneen; Rantala, Johanna; Rappaport, Christine; Rennert, Gad; Richardson, Andrea; Robson, Mark; Romieu, Isabelle; Rudolph, Anja; Rutgers, Emiel J.; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Santella, Regina M.; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Scott, Rodney; Senter, Leigha; Sharma, Priyanka; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F.; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa; Steinemann, Doris; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Swerdlow, Anthony; Szabo, Csilla I.; Tamimi, Rulla; Tapper, William; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary B.; Thomassen, Mads; Thompson, Deborah; Tihomirova, Laima; Toland, Amanda E.; Tollenaar, Robert A. E. M.; Tomlinson, Ian; Truong, Thérèse; Tsimiklis, Helen; Teulé, Alex; Tumino, Rosario; Tung, Nadine; Turnbull, Clare; Ursin, Giski; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wang, Zhaoming; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Whittemore, Alice; Wildiers, Hans; Winqvist, Robert; Yang, Xiaohong R.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Yao, Song; Zamora, M Pilar; Zheng, Wei; Hall, Per; Kraft, Peter; Vachon, Celine; Slager, Susan; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Monteiro, Alvaro A. N.; García-Closas, Montserrat; Easton, Douglas F.; Antoniou, Antonis C.

    2016-01-01

    Common variants in 94 loci have been associated with breast cancer including 15 loci with genome-wide significant associations (P<5 × 10−8) with oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer and BRCA1-associated breast cancer risk. In this study, to identify new ER-negative susceptibility loci, we performed a meta-analysis of 11 genome-wide association studies (GWAS) consisting of 4,939 ER-negative cases and 14,352 controls, combined with 7,333 ER-negative cases and 42,468 controls and 15,252 BRCA1 mutation carriers genotyped on the iCOGS array. We identify four previously unidentified loci including two loci at 13q22 near KLF5, a 2p23.2 locus near WDR43 and a 2q33 locus near PPIL3 that display genome-wide significant associations with ER-negative breast cancer. In addition, 19 known breast cancer risk loci have genome-wide significant associations and 40 had moderate associations (P<0.05) with ER-negative disease. Using functional and eQTL studies we implicate TRMT61B and WDR43 at 2p23.2 and PPIL3 at 2q33 in ER-negative breast cancer aetiology. All ER-negative loci combined account for ∼11% of familial relative risk for ER-negative disease and may contribute to improved ER-negative and BRCA1 breast cancer risk prediction. PMID:27117709

  8. Identification of four novel susceptibility loci for oestrogen receptor negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Couch, Fergus J; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Mendoza-Fandino, Gustavo A; Nord, Silje; Lilyquist, Janna; Olswold, Curtis; Hallberg, Emily; Agata, Simona; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Ambrosone, Christine; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Arun, Banu K; Arver, Brita; Barile, Monica; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Barrowdale, Daniel; Beckmann, Lars; Beckmann, Matthias W; Benitez, Javier; Blank, Stephanie V; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Burwinkel, Barbara; Buys, Saundra S; Caldes, Trinidad; Caligo, Maria A; Canzian, Federico; Carpenter, Jane; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J; Chung, Wendy K; Claes, Kathleen B M; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Cunningham, Julie M; Czene, Kamila; Daly, Mary B; Damiola, Francesca; Darabi, Hatef; de la Hoya, Miguel; Devilee, Peter; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan C; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Domchek, Susan M; Dorfling, Cecilia M; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dumont, Martine; Dunning, Alison M; Eccles, Diana M; Ehrencrona, Hans; Ekici, Arif B; Eliassen, Heather; Ellis, Steve; Fasching, Peter A; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Försti, Asta; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D; Friebel, Tara; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Gabrielson, Marike; Gammon, Marilie D; Ganz, Patricia A; Gapstur, Susan M; Garber, Judy; Gaudet, Mia M; Gayther, Simon A; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ghoussaini, Maya; Giles, Graham G; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K; Goldberg, Mark S; Goldgar, David E; González-Neira, Anna; Greene, Mark H; Gronwald, Jacek; Guénel, Pascal; Gunter, Marc; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V O; Hart, Steven; Healey, Sue; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Henderson, Brian E; Herzog, Josef; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hooning, Maartje J; Hoover, Robert N; Hopper, John L; Humphreys, Keith; Hunter, David J; Huzarski, Tomasz; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kar, Siddhartha; Karlan, Beth Y; Khan, Sofia; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Knight, Julia A; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela; Kwong, Ava; Laitman, Yael; Lambrechts, Diether; Lazaro, Conxi; Lee, Eunjung; Le Marchand, Loic; Lester, Jenny; Lindblom, Annika; Lindor, Noralane; Lindstrom, Sara; Liu, Jianjun; Long, Jirong; Lubinski, Jan; Mai, Phuong L; Makalic, Enes; Malone, Kathleen E; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Martens, John W M; McGuffog, Lesley; Meindl, Alfons; Miller, Austin; Milne, Roger L; Miron, Penelope; Montagna, Marco; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Mulligan, Anna M; Muranen, Taru A; Nathanson, Katherine L; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nussbaum, Robert L; Offit, Kenneth; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Olson, Janet E; Osorio, Ana; Park, Sue K; Peeters, Petra H; Peissel, Bernard; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Phelan, Catherine M; Pilarski, Robert; Poppe, Bruce; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rahman, Nazneen; Rantala, Johanna; Rappaport, Christine; Rennert, Gad; Richardson, Andrea; Robson, Mark; Romieu, Isabelle; Rudolph, Anja; Rutgers, Emiel J; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Santella, Regina M; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmidt, Daniel F; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schmutzler, Rita K; Schumacher, Fredrick; Scott, Rodney; Senter, Leigha; Sharma, Priyanka; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa; Steinemann, Doris; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Swerdlow, Anthony; Szabo, Csilla I; Tamimi, Rulla; Tapper, William; Teixeira, Manuel R; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary B; Thomassen, Mads; Thompson, Deborah; Tihomirova, Laima; Toland, Amanda E; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Tomlinson, Ian; Truong, Thérèse; Tsimiklis, Helen; Teulé, Alex; Tumino, Rosario; Tung, Nadine; Turnbull, Clare; Ursin, Giski; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wang, Zhaoming; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Whittemore, Alice; Wildiers, Hans; Winqvist, Robert; Yang, Xiaohong R; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Yao, Song; Zamora, M Pilar; Zheng, Wei; Hall, Per; Kraft, Peter; Vachon, Celine; Slager, Susan; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D P; Monteiro, Alvaro A N; García-Closas, Montserrat; Easton, Douglas F; Antoniou, Antonis C

    2016-04-27

    Common variants in 94 loci have been associated with breast cancer including 15 loci with genome-wide significant associations (P<5 × 10(-8)) with oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer and BRCA1-associated breast cancer risk. In this study, to identify new ER-negative susceptibility loci, we performed a meta-analysis of 11 genome-wide association studies (GWAS) consisting of 4,939 ER-negative cases and 14,352 controls, combined with 7,333 ER-negative cases and 42,468 controls and 15,252 BRCA1 mutation carriers genotyped on the iCOGS array. We identify four previously unidentified loci including two loci at 13q22 near KLF5, a 2p23.2 locus near WDR43 and a 2q33 locus near PPIL3 that display genome-wide significant associations with ER-negative breast cancer. In addition, 19 known breast cancer risk loci have genome-wide significant associations and 40 had moderate associations (P<0.05) with ER-negative disease. Using functional and eQTL studies we implicate TRMT61B and WDR43 at 2p23.2 and PPIL3 at 2q33 in ER-negative breast cancer aetiology. All ER-negative loci combined account for ∼11% of familial relative risk for ER-negative disease and may contribute to improved ER-negative and BRCA1 breast cancer risk prediction.

  9. Identification of four novel susceptibility loci for oestrogen receptor negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Couch, Fergus J; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Mendoza-Fandino, Gustavo A; Nord, Silje; Lilyquist, Janna; Olswold, Curtis; Hallberg, Emily; Agata, Simona; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Ambrosone, Christine; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Arun, Banu K; Arver, Brita; Barile, Monica; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Barrowdale, Daniel; Beckmann, Lars; Beckmann, Matthias W; Benitez, Javier; Blank, Stephanie V; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Burwinkel, Barbara; Buys, Saundra S; Caldes, Trinidad; Caligo, Maria A; Canzian, Federico; Carpenter, Jane; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J; Chung, Wendy K; Claes, Kathleen B M; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Cunningham, Julie M; Czene, Kamila; Daly, Mary B; Damiola, Francesca; Darabi, Hatef; de la Hoya, Miguel; Devilee, Peter; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan C; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Domchek, Susan M; Dorfling, Cecilia M; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dumont, Martine; Dunning, Alison M; Eccles, Diana M; Ehrencrona, Hans; Ekici, Arif B; Eliassen, Heather; Ellis, Steve; Fasching, Peter A; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Försti, Asta; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D; Friebel, Tara; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Gabrielson, Marike; Gammon, Marilie D; Ganz, Patricia A; Gapstur, Susan M; Garber, Judy; Gaudet, Mia M; Gayther, Simon A; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ghoussaini, Maya; Giles, Graham G; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K; Goldberg, Mark S; Goldgar, David E; González-Neira, Anna; Greene, Mark H; Gronwald, Jacek; Guénel, Pascal; Gunter, Marc; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V O; Hart, Steven; Healey, Sue; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Henderson, Brian E; Herzog, Josef; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hooning, Maartje J; Hoover, Robert N; Hopper, John L; Humphreys, Keith; Hunter, David J; Huzarski, Tomasz; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kar, Siddhartha; Karlan, Beth Y; Khan, Sofia; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Knight, Julia A; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela; Kwong, Ava; Laitman, Yael; Lambrechts, Diether; Lazaro, Conxi; Lee, Eunjung; Le Marchand, Loic; Lester, Jenny; Lindblom, Annika; Lindor, Noralane; Lindstrom, Sara; Liu, Jianjun; Long, Jirong; Lubinski, Jan; Mai, Phuong L; Makalic, Enes; Malone, Kathleen E; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Martens, John W M; McGuffog, Lesley; Meindl, Alfons; Miller, Austin; Milne, Roger L; Miron, Penelope; Montagna, Marco; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Mulligan, Anna M; Muranen, Taru A; Nathanson, Katherine L; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nussbaum, Robert L; Offit, Kenneth; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Olson, Janet E; Osorio, Ana; Park, Sue K; Peeters, Petra H; Peissel, Bernard; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Phelan, Catherine M; Pilarski, Robert; Poppe, Bruce; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rahman, Nazneen; Rantala, Johanna; Rappaport, Christine; Rennert, Gad; Richardson, Andrea; Robson, Mark; Romieu, Isabelle; Rudolph, Anja; Rutgers, Emiel J; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Santella, Regina M; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmidt, Daniel F; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schmutzler, Rita K; Schumacher, Fredrick; Scott, Rodney; Senter, Leigha; Sharma, Priyanka; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa; Steinemann, Doris; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Swerdlow, Anthony; Szabo, Csilla I; Tamimi, Rulla; Tapper, William; Teixeira, Manuel R; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary B; Thomassen, Mads; Thompson, Deborah; Tihomirova, Laima; Toland, Amanda E; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Tomlinson, Ian; Truong, Thérèse; Tsimiklis, Helen; Teulé, Alex; Tumino, Rosario; Tung, Nadine; Turnbull, Clare; Ursin, Giski; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wang, Zhaoming; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Whittemore, Alice; Wildiers, Hans; Winqvist, Robert; Yang, Xiaohong R; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Yao, Song; Zamora, M Pilar; Zheng, Wei; Hall, Per; Kraft, Peter; Vachon, Celine; Slager, Susan; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D P; Monteiro, Alvaro A N; García-Closas, Montserrat; Easton, Douglas F; Antoniou, Antonis C

    2016-01-01

    Common variants in 94 loci have been associated with breast cancer including 15 loci with genome-wide significant associations (P<5 × 10(-8)) with oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer and BRCA1-associated breast cancer risk. In this study, to identify new ER-negative susceptibility loci, we performed a meta-analysis of 11 genome-wide association studies (GWAS) consisting of 4,939 ER-negative cases and 14,352 controls, combined with 7,333 ER-negative cases and 42,468 controls and 15,252 BRCA1 mutation carriers genotyped on the iCOGS array. We identify four previously unidentified loci including two loci at 13q22 near KLF5, a 2p23.2 locus near WDR43 and a 2q33 locus near PPIL3 that display genome-wide significant associations with ER-negative breast cancer. In addition, 19 known breast cancer risk loci have genome-wide significant associations and 40 had moderate associations (P<0.05) with ER-negative disease. Using functional and eQTL studies we implicate TRMT61B and WDR43 at 2p23.2 and PPIL3 at 2q33 in ER-negative breast cancer aetiology. All ER-negative loci combined account for ∼11% of familial relative risk for ER-negative disease and may contribute to improved ER-negative and BRCA1 breast cancer risk prediction. PMID:27117709

  10. Claudin 4 expression in triple-negative breast cancer: correlation with androgen receptors and Ki-67 expression.

    PubMed

    Abd-Elazeem, Mona A; Abd-Elazeem, Marwa A

    2015-02-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women and the leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide. Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is an important phenotype of breast cancer that accounts for a relatively small number of breast cancer cases but still represent a focus of increasing interest at the clinical, biological, and epidemiological level. Claudins are the major component of the tight junction, and only a few studies have addressed the role of claudins in breast cancer, especially TNBC. Androgen receptors (ARs), as members of the nuclear receptor superfamily, are known to be involved in a complex network of signaling pathways that collectively regulate cell proliferation. However, roles of AR in breast cancer development and progression have not been very clearly understood. The proliferation marker Ki-67 has been confirmed as an independent predictive and prognostic factor in early breast cancer. The aims of this study are to identify the clinicopathologic associations and prognostic value of claudin 4 expression in TNBC and to correlate claudin 4 expression with AR status and Ki-67 expression. Paraffin blocks obtained from 56 female patients with triple-negative primary invasive ductal breast carcinomas were analyzed for claudin 4, AR, and Ki-67 immunohistochemical expression. High levels of claudin 4 expression were detected in 66.1% of TNBC cases. There was a significant positive correlation with age, tumor size, grade, nodal status, metastasis, and Ki-67 expression (all P < .05) and negative correlation with AR status (P < .001). Androgen receptor showed positivity in 29 cases (51.78%). There was a statistical negative correlation with the all the studied clinicopathologic parameters, claudin 4 and Ki-67 expression. High claudin 4 expression, negative AR expression, and high Ki-67 index would provide a strong prognostic power to differentiate the patients with worse outcome among TNBC patients. Moreover, target treatment for TNBC cells

  11. Vitamin D receptor negatively regulates bacterial-stimulated NF-kappaB activity in intestine.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shaoping; Liao, Anne P; Xia, Yinglin; Li, Yan Chun; Li, Jian-Dong; Sartor, R Balfour; Sun, Jun

    2010-08-01

    Vitamin D receptor (VDR) plays an essential role in gastrointestinal inflammation. Most investigations have focused on the immune response; however, how bacteria regulate VDR and how VDR modulates the nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB pathway in intestinal epithelial cells remain unexplored. This study investigated the effects of VDR ablation on NF-kappaB activation in intestinal epithelia and the role of enteric bacteria on VDR expression. We found that VDR(-/-) mice exhibited a pro-inflammatory bias. After Salmonella infection, VDR(-/-) mice had increased bacterial burden and mortality. Serum interleukin-6 in noninfected VDR(+/+) mice was undetectable, but was easily detectable in VDR(-/-) mice. NF-kappaB p65 formed a complex with VDR in noninfected wild-type mouse intestine. In contrast, deletion of VDR abolished VDR/P65 binding. P65 nuclear translocation occurred in colonic epithelial cells of untreated VDR(-/-) mice. VDR deletion also elevated NF-kappaB activity in intestinal epithelia. VDR was localized to the surface epithelia of germ-free mice, but to crypt epithelial cells in conventionalized mice. VDR expression, distribution, transcriptional activity, and target genes were regulated by Salmonella stimulation, independent of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. Our study demonstrates that commensal and pathogenic bacteria directly regulate colonic epithelial VDR expression and location in vivo. VDR negatively regulates bacterial-induced intestinal NF-kappaB activation and attenuates response to infection. Therefore, VDR is an important contributor to intestinal homeostasis and host protection from bacterial invasion and infection.

  12. Tamoxifen induces oxidative stress and apoptosis in oestrogen receptor-negative human cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Ferlini, C; Scambia, G; Marone, M; Distefano, M; Gaggini, C; Ferrandina, G; Fattorossi, A; Isola, G; Panici, P Benedetti; Mancuso, S

    1999-01-01

    Recent data have demonstrated that the anti-oestrogen tamoxifen (TAM) is able to facilitate apoptosis in cancer cells not expressing oestrogen receptor (ER). In an attempt to identify the biochemical pathway for this phenomenon, we investigated the role of TAM as an oxidative stress agent. In two ER-negative human cancer cell lines, namely T-leukaemic Jurkat and ovarian A2780 cancer cells, we have demonstrated that TAM is able to generate oxidative stress, thereby causing thiol depletion and activation of the transcriptional factor NF-κB. As described for other oxidative agents, TAM was able to induce either cell proliferation or apoptosis depending on the dose. When used at the lowest dose tested (0.1 μM), a slight proliferative effect of TAM was noticed in terms of cell counts and DNA synthesis rate, whereas at higher doses (10 μM) a consistent occurrence of apoptosis was detected. Importantly, the induction of apoptosis by TAM is not linked to down-regulation or functional inactivation by phosphorylation of the antiapoptotic bcl-2 protein. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:9888466

  13. Src-like Adaptor Protein (Slap) Is a Negative Regulator of T Cell Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sosinowski, Tomasz; Pandey, Akhilesh; Dixit, Vishva M.; Weiss, Arthur

    2000-01-01

    Initiation of T cell antigen receptor (TCR) signaling is dependent on Lck, a Src family kinase. The Src-like adaptor protein (SLAP) contains Src homology (SH)3 and SH2 domains, which are highly homologous to those of Lck and other Src family members. Because of the structural similarity between Lck and SLAP, we studied its potential role in TCR signaling. Here, we show that SLAP is expressed in T cells, and that when expressed in Jurkat T cells it can specifically inhibit TCR signaling leading to nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT)-, activator protein 1 (AP-1)–, and interleukin 2–dependent transcription. The SH3 and SH2 domains of SLAP are required for maximal attenuation of TCR signaling. This inhibitory activity can be bypassed by the combination of phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and ionomycin, suggesting that SLAP acts proximally in the TCR signaling pathway. SLAP colocalizes with endosomes in Jurkat and in HeLa cells, and is insoluble in mild detergents. In stimulated Jurkat cells, SLAP associates with a molecular signaling complex containing CD3ζ, ZAP-70, SH2 domain–containing leukocyte protein of 76 kD (SLP-76), Vav, and possibly linker for activation of T cells (LAT). These results suggest that SLAP is a negative regulator of TCR signaling. PMID:10662792

  14. Src-like adaptor protein (SLAP) is a negative regulator of T cell receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Sosinowski, T; Pandey, A; Dixit, V M; Weiss, A

    2000-02-01

    Initiation of T cell antigen receptor (TCR) signaling is dependent on Lck, a Src family kinase. The Src-like adaptor protein (SLAP) contains Src homology (SH)3 and SH2 domains, which are highly homologous to those of Lck and other Src family members. Because of the structural similarity between Lck and SLAP, we studied its potential role in TCR signaling. Here, we show that SLAP is expressed in T cells, and that when expressed in Jurkat T cells it can specifically inhibit TCR signaling leading to nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT)-, activator protein 1 (AP-1)-, and interleukin 2-dependent transcription. The SH3 and SH2 domains of SLAP are required for maximal attenuation of TCR signaling. This inhibitory activity can be bypassed by the combination of phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and ionomycin, suggesting that SLAP acts proximally in the TCR signaling pathway. SLAP colocalizes with endosomes in Jurkat and in HeLa cells, and is insoluble in mild detergents. In stimulated Jurkat cells, SLAP associates with a molecular signaling complex containing CD3zeta, ZAP-70, SH2 domain-containing leukocyte protein of 76 kD (SLP-76), Vav, and possibly linker for activation of T cells (LAT). These results suggest that SLAP is a negative regulator of TCR signaling.

  15. Epidermal growth factor receptors in the oesophagus.

    PubMed Central

    Jankowski, J; Murphy, S; Coghill, G; Grant, A; Wormsley, K G; Sanders, D S; Kerr, M; Hopwood, D

    1992-01-01

    The quantity and distribution of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGF-R) in oesophageal mucosa was studied in the oesophagus in order to determine its role in oesophageal disease. Fifty five biopsies were taken from different levels of the oesophagus in 25 consecutive patients undergoing endoscopy. Another group of eight patients with histologically proven Barrett's oesophagitis had a biopsy taken from the area of columnar lined oesophagus. A peripheral, membranous pattern was seen predominantly confined to the basal and immediately suprabasal cells in all of the first group of patients. In the superficial cells a few granular cytoplasmic structures were positive. All patients with Barrett's oesophagitis showed EGF-R staining of the surface epithelium. A computerised planimeter was used to determine the proportion of stained areas of squamous cells which were expressed as a percentage of the total area of squamous cells. The difference in the area of cells stained for EGF-R between normal and inflamed oesophageal mucosa (29.5% and 43.1% respectively) was significant (p less than 0.001). Images Figure 1 PMID:1582583

  16. A Two-Factor Model Better Explains Heterogeneity in Negative Symptoms: Evidence from the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Seon-Kyeong; Choi, Hye-Im; Park, Soohyun; Jaekal, Eunju; Lee, Ga-Young; Cho, Young Il; Choi, Kee-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Acknowledging separable factors underlying negative symptoms may lead to better understanding and treatment of negative symptoms in individuals with schizophrenia. The current study aimed to test whether the negative symptoms factor (NSF) of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) would be better represented by expressive and experiential deficit factors, rather than by a single factor model, using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Two hundred and twenty individuals with schizophrenia spectrum disorders completed the PANSS; subsamples additionally completed the Brief Negative Symptom Scale (BNSS) and the Motivation and Pleasure Scale—Self-Report (MAP-SR). CFA results indicated that the two-factor model fit the data better than the one-factor model; however, latent variables were closely correlated. The two-factor model’s fit was significantly improved by accounting for correlated residuals between N2 (emotional withdrawal) and N6 (lack of spontaneity and flow of conversation), and between N4 (passive social withdrawal) and G16 (active social avoidance), possibly reflecting common method variance. The two NSF factors exhibited differential patterns of correlation with subdomains of the BNSS and MAP-SR. These results suggest that the PANSS NSF would be better represented by a two-factor model than by a single-factor one, and support the two-factor model’s adequate criterion-related validity. Common method variance among several items may be a potential source of measurement error under a two-factor model of the PANSS NSF. PMID:27242619

  17. Animal models of cognitive dysfunction and negative symptoms of schizophrenia: focus on NMDA receptor antagonism.

    PubMed

    Neill, Joanna C; Barnes, Samuel; Cook, Samantha; Grayson, Ben; Idris, Nagi F; McLean, Samantha L; Snigdha, Shikha; Rajagopal, Lakshmi; Harte, Michael K

    2010-12-01

    Cognitive deficits in schizophrenia remain an unmet clinical need. Improved understanding of the neuro- and psychopathology of these deficits depends on the availability of carefully validated animal models which will assist the development of novel therapies. There is much evidence that at least some of the pathology and symptomatology (particularly cognitive and negative symptoms) of schizophrenia results from a dysfunction of the glutamatergic system which may be modelled in animals through the use of NMDA receptor antagonists. The current review examines the validity of this model in rodents. We review the ability of acute and sub-chronic treatment with three non-competitive NMDA antagonists; phencyclidine (PCP), ketamine and MK801 (dizocilpine) to produce cognitive deficits of relevance to schizophrenia in rodents and their subsequent reversal by first- and second-generation antipsychotic drugs. Effects of NMDA receptor antagonists on the performance of rodents in behavioural tests assessing the various domains of cognition and negative symptoms are examined: novel object recognition for visual memory, reversal learning and attentional set shifting for problem solving and reasoning, 5-Choice Serial Reaction Time for attention and speed of processing; in addition to effects on social behaviour and neuropathology. The evidence strongly supports the use of NMDA receptor antagonists to model cognitive deficit and negative symptoms of schizophrenia as well as certain pathological disturbances seen in the illness. This will facilitate the evaluation of much-needed novel pharmacological agents for improved therapy of cognitive deficits and negative symptoms in schizophrenia.

  18. Vandetanib as a potential new treatment for estrogen receptor-negative breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Hatem, Rana; Labiod, Dalila; Château-Joubert, Sophie; de Plater, Ludmilla; El Botty, Rania; Vacher, Sophie; Bonin, Florian; Servely, Jean-Luc; Dieras, Véronique; Bièche, Ivan; Marangoni, Elisabetta

    2016-05-15

    The receptor tyrosine kinase RET is implicated in the progression of luminal breast cancers (BC) but its role in estrogen receptor (ER) negative tumors is unknown. Here we investigated the expression of RET in breast cancer patients tumors and patient-derived xenografts (PDX) and evaluated the therapeutic potential of Vandetanib, a tyrosin kinase inhibitor with strong activity against RET, EGFR and VEGFR2, in ER negative breast cancer PDX. The RT-PCR analysis of RET expression in breast tumors of 446 patients and 57 PDX, showed elevated levels of RET in ER+ and HER2+ subtypes and in a small subgroup of triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC). The activity of Vandetanib was tested in vivo in three PDX models of TNBC and one model of HER2+ BC with different expression levels of RET and EGFR. Vandetanib induced tumor regression in PDX models with high expression of RET or EGFR. The effect was associated with inhibition of RET/EGFR phosphorylation and MAP kinase pathway and increased necrosis. In a PDX model with no expression of RET nor EGFR, Vandetanib slowed tumor growth without inducing tumor regression. In addition, treatment by Vandetanib decreased expression of murine Vegf receptors and the endothelial marker Cd31 in the four PDX models tested, suggesting inhibition of tumor vascularization. In summary, these preclinical results suggest that Vandetanib treatment could be useful for patients with ER negative breast cancers overexpressing Vandetanib's main targets.

  19. Novel metabotropic glutamate receptor negatively coupled to adenylyl cyclase in cultured rat cerebellar astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Kanumilli, Srinivasan; Toms, Nick J; Roberts, Peter J

    2004-04-01

    Several excitatory amino acid ligands were found potently to inhibit forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation in rat cultured cerebellar astrocytes: L-cysteine sulfinic acid (L-CSA) = L-aspartate > L-glutamate >/= the glutamate uptake inhibitor, L-PDC. This property did not reflect activation of conventional glutamate receptors, since the selective ionotropic glutamate receptor agonists NMDA, AMPA, and kainate, as well as several mGlu receptor agonists [(1S,3R)-ACPD, (S)-DHPG, DCG-IV, L-AP4, L-quisqualate, and L-CCG-I], were without activity. In addition, the mGlu receptor antagonists, L-AP3, (S)-4CPG, Eglu, LY341495, (RS)-CPPG, and (S)-MCPG failed to reverse 30 microM glutamate-mediated inhibitory responses. L-PDC-mediated inhibition was abolished by the addition of the enzyme glutamate-pyruvate transaminase. This finding suggests that the effect of L-PDC is indirect and that it is mediated through endogenously released L-glutamate. Interestingly, L-glutamate-mediated inhibitory responses were resistant to pertussis toxin, suggesting that G(i)/G(o) type G proteins were not involved. However, inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC, either via the selective PKC inhibitor GF109203X or chronic PMA treatment) augmented glutamate-mediated inhibitory responses. Although mGlu3 receptors (which are negatively coupled to adenylyl cyclase) are expressed in astrocyte populations, in our study Western blot analysis indicated that this receptor type was not expressed in cerebellar astrocytes. We therefore suggest that cerebellar astrocytes express a novel mGlu receptor, which is negatively coupled to adenylyl cyclase, and possesses an atypical pharmacological profile. PMID:14999808

  20. MicroRNA 25, microRNA 145, and microRNA 210 as biomarkers for predicting the efficacy of maintenance treatment with pemetrexed in lung adenocarcinoma patients who are negative for epidermal growth factor receptor mutations or anaplastic lymphoma kinase translocations.

    PubMed

    Shi, Sheng-Bin; Wang, Meng; Tian, Jing; Li, Rui; Chang, Chun-Xiao; Qi, Jie-Lin

    2016-04-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate microRNAs (miRNAs) as biomarkers for use in predicting the efficacy of maintenance therapy with pemetrexed in patients with stage IIIb or IV lung adenocarcinoma and who had already received first-line treatment with pemetrexed plus platinum. Patients who were negative for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations or anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) translocations were assigned to a pemetrexed group and an observation group. Patients in the pemetrexed group (n = 76) received maintenance treatment with pemetrexed (500 mg/m(2), once every 21 days) plus best supportive care. Patients in the observation group (n = 72) agreed to receive only best supportive care until disease progression. Blood samples were collected from all patients in both groups before treatment and were used to detect expression levels of various miRNAs in serum by the Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) method. The expression levels of miR-25, miR-145, and miR-210 were significantly different in the 2 groups of patients. Furthermore, the median progression-free survival (PFS) times for patients in the pemetrexed and observation groups were 4.5 and 2.9 months, respectively. The PFS times among patients in the pemetrexed group varied significantly and were related to patient expression levels of miR-25, miR-145, and miR-210, whereas patients in the observation group showed no differences in PFS time. Our data suggest miR-25, miR-145, and miR-210 as predictors for the efficacy of maintenance treatment with pemetrexed in lung adenocarcinoma patients who were negative for EGFR mutations or ALK translocations.

  1. PLZF is a negative regulator of retinoic acid receptor transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Martin, Perrine J; Delmotte, Marie-Hélène; Formstecher, Pierre; Lefebvre, Philippe

    2003-09-01

    BACKGROUND: Retinoic acid receptors (RARs) are ligand-regulated transcription factors controlling cellular proliferation and differentiation. Receptor-interacting proteins such as corepressors and coactivators play a crucial role in specifying the overall transcriptional activity of the receptor in response to ligand treatment. Little is known however on how receptor activity is controlled by intermediary factors which interact with RARs in a ligand-independent manner. RESULTS: We have identified the promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger protein (PLZF), a transcriptional corepressor, to be a RAR-interacting protein using the yeast two-hybrid assay. We confirmed this interaction by GST-pull down assays and show that the PLZF N-terminal zinc finger domain is necessary and sufficient for PLZF to bind RAR. The RAR ligand binding domain displayed the highest affinity for PLZF, but corepressor and coactivator binding interfaces did not contribute to PLZF recruitment. The interaction was ligand-independent and correlated to a decreased transcriptional activity of the RXR-RAR heterodimer upon overexpression of PLZF. A similar transcriptional interference could be observed with the estrogen receptor alpha and the glucocorticoid receptor. We further show that PLZF is likely to act by preventing RXR-RAR heterodimerization, both in-vitro and in intact cells. CONCLUSION: Thus RAR and PLZF interact physically and functionally. Intriguingly, these two transcription factors play a determining role in hematopoiesis and regionalization of the hindbrain and may, upon chromosomal translocation, form fusion proteins. Our observations therefore define a novel mechanism by which RARs activity may be controlled.

  2. Hydrophobic Proteome Analysis of Triple Negative and Hormone-Receptor-Positive-Her2-Negative Breast Cancer by Mass Spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ming; Whelan, Stephen A; He, Jianbo; Saxton, Romaine E; Faull, Kym F; Whitelegge, Julian P; Chang, Helena R

    2010-09-01

    INTRODUCTION: It is widely believed that discovery of specific, sensitive, and reliable tumor biomarkers can improve the treatment of cancer. Currently, there are no obvious targets that can be used in treating triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). METHODS: To better understand TNBC and find potential biomarkers for targeted treatment, we combined a novel hydrophobic fractionation protocol with mass spectrometry LTQ-orbitrap to explore and compare the hydrophobic sub-proteome of TNBC with another subtype of breast cancer, hormone-receptor-positive-Her2-negative breast cancer (non-TNBC). RESULTS: Hydrophobic sub-proteome of breast cancer is rich in membrane proteins. Hundreds of proteins with various defined key cellular functions were identified from TNBC and non-TNBC tumors. In this study, protein profiles of TNBC and non-TNBC were systematically examined, compared, and validated. We have found that nine keratins are down-regulated and several heat shock proteins are up-regulated in TNBC tissues. Our study may provide insights of molecules that are responsible for the aggressiveness of TNBC. CONCLUSION: The initial results obtained using a combination of hydrophobic fractionation and nano-LC mass spectrometry analysis of these proteins appear promising in the discovery of potential cancer biomarkers and bio-signatures. When sufficiently refined, this approach may prove useful in improving breast cancer treatment.

  3. Analysis of murine cellular receptors for tumor-killing factor

    SciTech Connect

    Ohsawa, F.; Natori, S.

    1987-01-01

    Receptors for tumor-killing factor (TKF) on the surface of murine cells were analyzed using radioiodinated TKF. Not only sensitive cells but also insensitive cells were found to have specific receptors. Among the sensitive cells, no clear relation was observed between the number of receptors on the cell surface and sensitivity to TKF. Compounds affecting microfilaments (cytochalasin B and D) and microtubules (colchicine and Colcemid) significantly inhibited cytolysis of sensitive cells induced by receptor-bound TKF. It is concluded that internalization of receptor-bound TKF is a prerequisite for triggering cytolysis.

  4. Identification and Quantification of a New Family of Peptide Endocannabinoids (Pepcans) Showing Negative Allosteric Modulation at CB1 Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Mark; Chicca, Andrea; Tamborrini, Marco; Eisen, David; Lerner, Raissa; Lutz, Beat; Poetz, Oliver; Pluschke, Gerd; Gertsch, Jürg

    2012-01-01

    The α-hemoglobin-derived dodecapeptide RVD-hemopressin (RVDPVNFKLLSH) has been proposed to be an endogenous agonist for the cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1). To study this peptide, we have raised mAbs against its C-terminal part. Using an immunoaffinity mass spectrometry approach, a whole family of N-terminally extended peptides in addition to RVD-Hpα were identified in rodent brain extracts and human and mouse plasma. We designated these peptides Pepcan-12 (RVDPVNFKLLSH) to Pepcan-23 (SALSDLHAHKLRVDPVNFKLLSH), referring to peptide length. The most abundant Pepcans found in the brain were tested for CB1 receptor binding. In the classical radioligand displacement assay, Pepcan-12 was the most efficacious ligand but only partially displaced both [3H]CP55,940 and [3H]WIN55,212-2. The data were fitted with the allosteric ternary complex model, revealing a cooperativity factor value α < 1, thus indicating a negative allosteric modulation. Dissociation kinetic studies of [3H]CP55,940 in the absence and presence of Pepcan-12 confirmed these results by showing increased dissociation rate constants induced by Pepcan-12. A fluorescently labeled Pepcan-12 analog was synthesized to investigate the binding to CB1 receptors. Competition binding studies revealed Ki values of several Pepcans in the nanomolar range. Accordingly, using competitive ELISA, we found low nanomolar concentrations of Pepcans in human plasma and ∼100 pmol/g in mouse brain. Surprisingly, Pepcan-12 exhibited potent negative allosteric modulation of the orthosteric agonist-induced cAMP accumulation, [35S]GTPγS binding, and CB1 receptor internalization. Pepcans are the first endogenous allosteric modulators identified for CB1 receptors. Given their abundance in the brain, Pepcans could play an important physiological role in modulating endocannabinoid signaling. PMID:22952224

  5. Medical image fusion based on non-negative matrix factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Daoming; Zhang, Xianda

    2009-10-01

    Medical image fusion is a process of obtaining a new composite image from two or more source images which are from different modalities. In this paper, we proposed a novel medical image fusion scheme based on the non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) algorithm, the only resulted basis image is just the fused image. Since the CT and MRI images have a lot of pixels which are zeros, the NMF algorithm can not be employed directly. To overcome this difficulty, we first add a positive bias to the original data matrix and remove the bias from the resulted fusion image after the NMF procedure. The experiment results show that the proposed approach outperforms the existing wavelet-based methods and Laplacian pyramid-based methods.

  6. The protein kinase LKB1 negatively regulates bone morphogenetic protein receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Raja, Erna; Edlund, Karolina; Kahata, Kaoru; Zieba, Agata; Morén, Anita; Watanabe, Yukihide; Voytyuk, Iryna; Botling, Johan; Söderberg, Ola; Micke, Patrick; Pyrowolakis, George; Heldin, Carl-Henrik; Moustakas, Aristidis

    2016-01-01

    The protein kinase LKB1 regulates cell metabolism and growth and is implicated in intestinal and lung cancer. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling regulates cell differentiation during development and tissue homeostasis. We demonstrate that LKB1 physically interacts with BMP type I receptors and requires Smad7 to promote downregulation of the receptor. Accordingly, LKB1 suppresses BMP-induced osteoblast differentiation and affects BMP signaling in Drosophila wing longitudinal vein morphogenesis. LKB1 protein expression and Smad1 phosphorylation analysis in a cohort of non-small cell lung cancer patients demonstrated a negative correlation predominantly in a subset enriched in adenocarcinomas. Lung cancer patient data analysis indicated strong correlation between LKB1 loss-of-function mutations and high BMP2 expression, and these two events further correlated with expression of a gene subset functionally linked to apoptosis and migration. This new mechanism of BMP receptor regulation by LKB1 has ramifications in physiological organogenesis and disease. PMID:26701726

  7. Mice lacking the PACAP type I receptor have impaired photic entrainment and negative masking.

    PubMed

    Hannibal, Jens; Brabet, Philippe; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    2008-12-01

    The retinohypothalamic tract (RHT) is a retinofugal neuronal pathway which, in mammals, mediates nonimage-forming vision to various areas in the brain involved in circadian timing, masking behavior, and regulation of the pupillary light reflex. The RHT costores the two neurotransmitters glutamate and pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide (PACAP), which in a rather complex interplay are mediators of photic adjustment of the circadian system. To further characterize the role of PACAP/PACAP receptor type 1 (PAC1) receptor signaling in light entrainment of the clock and in negative masking behavior, we extended previous studies in mice lacking the PAC1 receptor (PAC1 KO) by examining their phase response to single light pulses using Aschoff type II regime, their ability to entrain to non-24-h light-dark (LD) cycles and large phase shifts of the LD cycle (jet lag), as well as their negative masking response during different light intensities. A prominent finding in PAC1 KO mice was a significantly decreased phase delay of the endogenous rhythm at early night. In accordance, PAC1 KO mice had a reduced ability to entrain to T cycles longer than 26 h and needed more time to reentrain to large phase delays, which was prominent at low light intensities. The data obtained at late night indicated that PACAP/PAC1 receptor signaling is less important during the phase-advancing part of the phase-response curve. Finally, the PAC1 KO mice showed impaired negative masking behavior at low light intensities. Our findings substantiate a role for PACAP/PAC1 receptor signaling in nonimage-forming vision and indicate that the system is particularly important at lower light intensities.

  8. Cellular dynamics of the negative transcription elongation factor NELF

    SciTech Connect

    Yung, Tetsu M.C.; Narita, Takashi; Komori, Toshiharu; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Handa, Hiroshi

    2009-06-10

    Negative Elongation Factor (NELF) is a transcription factor discovered based on its biochemical activity to suppress transcription elongation, and has since been implicated in various diseases ranging from neurological disorders to cancer. Besides its role in promoter-proximal pausing of RNA polymerase II during early stages of transcription, recently we found that it also plays important roles in the 3'-end processing of histone mRNA. Furthermore, NELF has been found to form a distinct subnuclear structure, which we named NELF bodies. These recent developments point to a wide range of potential functions for NELF, and, as most studies on NELF thus far had been carried out in vitro, here, we prepared a complete set of fusion protein constructs of NELF subunits and carried out a general cell biological study of the intracellular dynamics of NELF. Our data show that NELF subunits exhibit highly specific subcellular localizations, such as in NELF bodies or in midbodies, and some shuttle actively between the nucleus and cytoplasm. We further show that loss of NELF from cells can lead to enlarged and/or multiple nuclei. This work serves as a foundation and starting point for further cell biological investigations of NELF in the future.

  9. Glucocorticoids induce CCN5/WISP-2 expression and attenuate invasion in oestrogen receptor-negative human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ferrand, Nathalie; Stragier, Emilien; Redeuilh, Gérard; Sabbah, Michèle

    2012-10-01

    CCN5 (cysteine-rich 61/connective tissue growth factor/nephroblastoma overexpressed 5)/WISP-2 [WNT1 (wingless-type MMTV integration site family, member 1)-inducible signalling pathway protein 2] is an oestrogen-regulated member of the CCN family. CCN5 is a transcriptional repressor of genes associated with the EMT (epithelial-mesenchymal transition) and plays an important role in maintenance of the differentiated phenotype in ER (oestrogen receptor)-positive breast cancer cells. In contrast, CCN5 is undetectable in more aggressive ER-negative breast cancer cells. We now report that CCN5 is induced in ER-negative breast cancer cells such as MDA-MB-231 following glucocorticoid exposure, due to interaction of the endogenous glucocorticoid receptor with a functional glucocorticoid-response element in the CCN5 gene promoter. Glucocorticoid treatment of MDA-MB-231 cells is accompanied by morphological alterations, decreased invasiveness and attenuated expression of mesenchymal markers, including vimentin, cadherin 11 and ZEB1 (zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 1). Interestingly, glucocorticoid exposure did not increase CCN5 expression in ER-positive breast cancer cells, but rather down-regulated ER expression, thereby attenuating oestrogen pathway signalling. Taken together, our results indicate that glucocorticoid treatment of ER-negative breast cancer cells induces high levels of CCN5 expression and is accompanied by the appearance of a more differentiated and less invasive epithelial phenotype. These findings propose a novel therapeutic strategy for high-risk breast cancer patients.

  10. The transcription factor GFI1 negatively regulates NLRP3 inflammasome activation in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liuluan; Meng, Qingcai; Liang, Shuntao; Ma, Yaluan; Li, Rui; Li, Guoli; Zeng, Hui

    2014-11-28

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) secretion downstream of Toll-like receptor (TLR) activation is tightly controlled at the transcriptional and post-translational levels. NLRP3 inflammasome is involved in the maturation of pro-IL-1β, with NLRP3 expression identified as the limiting factor for inflammasome activation. Previously, we had demonstrated that the zinc-finger protein GFI1 inhibits pro-IL-1β transcription. Here, we show that GFI1 inhibits NLRP3 inflammasome activation and IL-1β secretion in macrophages. GFI1 suppressed Nlrp3 transcription via two mechanisms: (1) by binding to the Gli-responsive element 1 (GRE1) in the Nlrp3 promoter; and (2) by antagonizing the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) transcriptional activity. Thus, GFI1 negatively regulates TLR-mediated IL-1β production at both transcriptional and post-translational levels.

  11. Calcitriol restores antiestrogen responsiveness in estrogen receptor negative breast cancer cells: A potential new therapeutic approach

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Approximately 30% of breast tumors do not express the estrogen receptor (ER) α, which is necessary for endocrine therapy approaches. Studies are ongoing in order to restore ERα expression in ERα-negative breast cancer. The aim of the present study was to determine if calcitriol induces ERα expression in ER-negative breast cancer cells, thus restoring antiestrogen responses. Methods Cultured cells derived from ERα-negative breast tumors and an ERα-negative breast cancer cell line (SUM-229PE) were treated with calcitriol and ERα expression was assessed by real time PCR and western blots. The ERα functionality was evaluated by prolactin gene expression analysis. In addition, the effects of antiestrogens were assessed by growth assay using the XTT method. Gene expression of cyclin D1 (CCND1), and Ether-à-go-go 1 (EAG1) was also evaluated in cells treated with calcitriol alone or in combination with estradiol or ICI-182,780. Statistical analyses were determined by one-way ANOVA. Results Calcitriol was able to induce the expression of a functional ERα in ER-negative breast cancer cells. This effect was mediated through the vitamin D receptor (VDR), since it was abrogated by a VDR antagonist. Interestingly, the calcitriol-induced ERα restored the response to antiestrogens by inhibiting cell proliferation. In addition, calcitriol-treated cells in the presence of ICI-182,780 resulted in a significant reduction of two important cell proliferation regulators CCND1 and EAG1. Conclusions Calcitriol induced the expression of ERα and restored the response to antiestrogens in ERα-negative breast cancer cells. The combined treatment with calcitriol and antiestrogens could represent a new therapeutic strategy in ERα-negative breast cancer patients. PMID:24678876

  12. Lrig2 Negatively Regulates Ectodomain Shedding of Axon Guidance Receptors by ADAM Proteases.

    PubMed

    van Erp, Susan; van den Heuvel, Dianne M A; Fujita, Yuki; Robinson, Ross A; Hellemons, Anita J C G M; Adolfs, Youri; Van Battum, Eljo Y; Blokhuis, Anna M; Kuijpers, Marijn; Demmers, Jeroen A A; Hedman, Håkan; Hoogenraad, Casper C; Siebold, Christian; Yamashita, Toshihide; Pasterkamp, R Jeroen

    2015-12-01

    Many guidance receptors are proteolytically cleaved by membrane-associated metalloproteases of the ADAM family, leading to the shedding of their ectodomains. Ectodomain shedding is crucial for receptor signaling and function, but how this process is controlled in neurons remains poorly understood. Here, we show that the transmembrane protein Lrig2 negatively regulates ADAM-mediated guidance receptor proteolysis in neurons. Lrig2 binds Neogenin, a receptor for repulsive guidance molecules (RGMs), and prevents premature Neogenin shedding by ADAM17 (TACE). RGMa reduces Lrig2-Neogenin interactions, providing ADAM17 access to Neogenin and allowing this protease to induce ectodomain shedding. Regulation of ADAM17-mediated Neogenin cleavage by Lrig2 is required for neurite growth inhibition by RGMa in vitro and for cortical neuron migration in vivo. Furthermore, knockdown of Lrig2 significantly improves CNS axon regeneration. Together, our data identify a unique ligand-gated mechanism to control receptor shedding by ADAMs and reveal functions for Lrigs in neuron migration and regenerative failure. PMID:26651291

  13. Structural Basis for Negative Allosteric Modulation of GluN2A-Containing NMDA Receptors.

    PubMed

    Yi, Feng; Mou, Tung-Chung; Dorsett, Katherine N; Volkmann, Robert A; Menniti, Frank S; Sprang, Stephen R; Hansen, Kasper B

    2016-09-21

    NMDA receptors mediate excitatory synaptic transmission and regulate synaptic plasticity in the central nervous system, but their dysregulation is also implicated in numerous brain disorders. Here, we describe GluN2A-selective negative allosteric modulators (NAMs) that inhibit NMDA receptors by stabilizing the apo state of the GluN1 ligand-binding domain (LBD), which is incapable of triggering channel gating. We describe structural determinants of NAM binding in crystal structures of the GluN1/2A LBD heterodimer, and analyses of NAM-bound LBD structures corresponding to active and inhibited receptor states reveal a molecular switch in the modulatory binding site that mediate the allosteric inhibition. NAM binding causes displacement of a valine in GluN2A and the resulting steric effects can be mitigated by the transition from glycine bound to apo state of the GluN1 LBD. This work provides mechanistic insight to allosteric NMDA receptor inhibition, thereby facilitating the development of novel classes NMDA receptor modulators as therapeutic agents. PMID:27618671

  14. Induction of nerve growth factor receptors on cultured human melanocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Peacocke, M.; Yaar, M.; Mansur, C.P.; Chao, M.V.; Gilchrest, B.A. )

    1988-07-01

    Normal differentiation and malignant transformation of human melanocytes involve a complex series of interactions during which both genetic and environmental factors play roles. At present, the regulation of these processes is poorly understood. The authors have induced the expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) receptors on cultured human melanocytes with phorbol 12-tetradecanoate 13-acetate and have correlated this event with the appearance of a more differentiated, dendritic morphology. Criteria for NGF receptor expression included protein accumulation and cell-surface immunofluorescent staining with a monoclonal antibody directed against the human receptor and induction of the messenger RNA species as determined by blot-hybridization studies. The presence of the receptor could also be induced by UV irradiation or growth factor deprivation. The NGF receptor is inducible in cultured human melanocytes, and they suggest that NGF may modulate the behavior of this neural crest-derived cell in the skin.

  15. A Phase II Study Evaluating the Role of Androgen Receptors as Targets for Therapy of Pre-treated Post-menopausal Patients With ER/PgR-negative/AR-positive or ER and/or PgRpositive/ AR-positive Metastatic Breast Cancer (ARTT)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-28

    Metastatic Breastcancer; Estrogen Receptor Positive Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor Negative Neoplasm; Progesterone Receptor Positive Tumor; Progesterone Receptor Negative Neoplasm; Androgen Receptor Gene Overexpression

  16. Assaying binding of nerve growth factor to cell surface receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Vale, R.D.; Shooter, E.M.

    1985-01-01

    The paper describes methods both for the radioiodination of nerve growth factor (NGF) and for assaying NFG receptors by reversible binding techniques. Preparation of (/sup 125/I)NGF along with a rapid method for determining the amount of cell-bound ligand have allowed the detection of NGF receptors on a number of cell types.

  17. Architecture and RNA binding of the human negative elongation factor

    PubMed Central

    Vos, Seychelle M; Pöllmann, David; Caizzi, Livia; Hofmann, Katharina B; Rombaut, Pascaline; Zimniak, Tomasz; Herzog, Franz; Cramer, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Transcription regulation in metazoans often involves promoter-proximal pausing of RNA polymerase (Pol) II, which requires the 4-subunit negative elongation factor (NELF). Here we discern the functional architecture of human NELF through X-ray crystallography, protein crosslinking, biochemical assays, and RNA crosslinking in cells. We identify a NELF core subcomplex formed by conserved regions in subunits NELF-A and NELF-C, and resolve its crystal structure. The NELF-AC subcomplex binds single-stranded nucleic acids in vitro, and NELF-C associates with RNA in vivo. A positively charged face of NELF-AC is involved in RNA binding, whereas the opposite face of the NELF-AC subcomplex binds NELF-B. NELF-B is predicted to form a HEAT repeat fold, also binds RNA in vivo, and anchors the subunit NELF-E, which is confirmed to bind RNA in vivo. These results reveal the three-dimensional architecture and three RNA-binding faces of NELF. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14981.001 PMID:27282391

  18. Negative regulation of the oncogenic transcription factor FoxM1 by thiazolidinediones and mithramycin

    PubMed Central

    Petrovic, Vladimir; Costa, Robert H.; Lau, Lester F.; Raychaudhuri, Pradip; Tyner, Angela L.

    2010-01-01

    The Forkhead Box transcription factor FoxM1 regulates expression of genes that promote cell cycle progression, and it plays essential roles in the development of liver, lung, prostate and colorectal tumors. Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) activate the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), a ligand-activated nuclear receptor transcription factor. We found that treatment of the human hepatoma cell lines HepG2 and PLC/PRF/5 cells with TZDs leads to inhibition of FoxM1 gene expression. No PPARγ/retinoid X receptor (RXR) consensus DNA binding sites were detected in the FoxM1 promoter extending to −10 kb upstream, and knockdown of PPARγ had no impact on TZD mediated downregulation of FoxM1 expression. Previously, others showed that PPARγ agonists inhibit the expression and DNA-binding activity of the Sp1 transcription factor. Here we show that Sp1 binds to the FoxM1 promoter region and positively regulates FoxM1 transcription, while mithramycin, a chemotherapy drug that specifically binds GC rich sequences in the DNA and inhibits activities of Sp1, inhibits expression of FoxM1. Our data suggest that TZD mediated suppression of Sp1 is responsible for downregulation of FoxM1 gene expression. Inhibition of FoxM1 expression by TZDs provides a new mechanism for TZD mediated negative regulation of cancer cell growth. FoxM1 expression and activity in cancer cells can be targeted using PPARγ agonists or the anti-neoplastic antibiotic mithramycin. PMID:20372080

  19. PLZF is a negative regulator of retinoic acid receptor transcriptional activity

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Perrine J; Delmotte, Marie-Hélène; Formstecher, Pierre; Lefebvre, Philippe

    2003-01-01

    Background Retinoic acid receptors (RARs) are ligand-regulated transcription factors controlling cellular proliferation and differentiation. Receptor-interacting proteins such as corepressors and coactivators play a crucial role in specifying the overall transcriptional activity of the receptor in response to ligand treatment. Little is known however on how receptor activity is controlled by intermediary factors which interact with RARs in a ligand-independent manner. Results We have identified the promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger protein (PLZF), a transcriptional corepressor, to be a RAR-interacting protein using the yeast two-hybrid assay. We confirmed this interaction by GST-pull down assays and show that the PLZF N-terminal zinc finger domain is necessary and sufficient for PLZF to bind RAR. The RAR ligand binding domain displayed the highest affinity for PLZF, but corepressor and coactivator binding interfaces did not contribute to PLZF recruitment. The interaction was ligand-independent and correlated to a decreased transcriptional activity of the RXR-RAR heterodimer upon overexpression of PLZF. A similar transcriptional interference could be observed with the estrogen receptor alpha and the glucocorticoid receptor. We further show that PLZF is likely to act by preventing RXR-RAR heterodimerization, both in-vitro and in intact cells. Conclusion Thus RAR and PLZF interact physically and functionally. Intriguingly, these two transcription factors play a determining role in hematopoiesis and regionalization of the hindbrain and may, upon chromosomal translocation, form fusion proteins. Our observations therefore define a novel mechanism by which RARs activity may be controlled. PMID:14521715

  20. Stem cell growth factor receptor in canine vs. feline osteosarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Wolfesberger, Birgitt; Fuchs-Baumgartinger, Andrea; Hlavaty, Juraj; Meyer, Florian R.; Hofer, Martin; Steinborn, Ralf; Gebhard, Christiane; Walter, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is considered the most common bone cancer in cats and dogs, with cats having a much better prognosis than dogs, since the great majority of dogs with osteosarcoma develop distant metastases. In search of a factor possibly contributing to this disparity, the stem cell growth factor receptor KIT was targeted, and the messenger (m)RNA and protein expression levels of KIT were compared in canine vs. feline osteosarcomas, as well as in normal bone. The mRNA expression of KIT was quantified by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and was observed to be significantly higher in canine (n=14) than in feline (n=5) osteosarcoma samples (P<0.001). KIT protein expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry, which revealed that 21% of canine osteosarcoma samples did not exhibit KIT staining in their neoplastic cells, while in 14% of samples, a score of 1 (<10% positive tumour cells) was observed, and in 50% and 14% of samples, a score of 2 (10–50% positivity) and 3 (>50% positivity), respectively, was observed. By contrast, the cancer cells of all the feline bone tumour samples analysed were entirely negative for KIT. Notably, canine and feline osteocytes of healthy bone tissue lacked any KIT expression. These results could be the first evidence that KIT may be involved in the higher aggressiveness of canine osteosarcoma compared with feline osteosarcoma.

  1. Stem cell growth factor receptor in canine vs. feline osteosarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Wolfesberger, Birgitt; Fuchs-Baumgartinger, Andrea; Hlavaty, Juraj; Meyer, Florian R.; Hofer, Martin; Steinborn, Ralf; Gebhard, Christiane; Walter, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is considered the most common bone cancer in cats and dogs, with cats having a much better prognosis than dogs, since the great majority of dogs with osteosarcoma develop distant metastases. In search of a factor possibly contributing to this disparity, the stem cell growth factor receptor KIT was targeted, and the messenger (m)RNA and protein expression levels of KIT were compared in canine vs. feline osteosarcomas, as well as in normal bone. The mRNA expression of KIT was quantified by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and was observed to be significantly higher in canine (n=14) than in feline (n=5) osteosarcoma samples (P<0.001). KIT protein expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry, which revealed that 21% of canine osteosarcoma samples did not exhibit KIT staining in their neoplastic cells, while in 14% of samples, a score of 1 (<10% positive tumour cells) was observed, and in 50% and 14% of samples, a score of 2 (10–50% positivity) and 3 (>50% positivity), respectively, was observed. By contrast, the cancer cells of all the feline bone tumour samples analysed were entirely negative for KIT. Notably, canine and feline osteocytes of healthy bone tissue lacked any KIT expression. These results could be the first evidence that KIT may be involved in the higher aggressiveness of canine osteosarcoma compared with feline osteosarcoma. PMID:27698817

  2. Progesterone receptor subunits are high-affinity substrates for phosphorylation by epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh-Dastidar, P; Coty, W A; Griest, R E; Woo, D D; Fox, C F

    1984-01-01

    Purified preparations of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor were used to test hen oviduct progesterone receptor subunits as substrates for phosphorylation catalyzed by EGF receptor. Both the 80-kilodalton (kDa) (A) and the 105-kDa (B) progesterone receptor subunits were phosphorylated in a reaction that required EGF and EGF receptor. No phosphorylation of progesterone receptor subunits was observed in the absence of EGF receptor, even when Ca2+ was substituted for Mg2+ and Mn2+. Phospho amino acid analysis revealed phosphorylation at tyrosine residues, with no phosphorylation detectable at serine or threonine residues. Two-dimensional maps of phosphopeptides generated from phosphorylated 80- or 105-kDa subunits by tryptic digestion revealed similar patterns, with resolution of two major, several minor, and a number of very minor phosphopeptides. The Km of progesterone receptor for phosphorylation by EGF-activated EGF receptor was 100 nM and the Vmax was 2.5 nmol/min per mg of EGF receptor protein at 0 degrees C. The stoichiometry of phosphorylation/hormone binding for progesterone receptor subunits was 0.31 at ice-bath temperature and approximately 1.0 at 22 degrees C. Images PMID:6200881

  3. CLAVATA1 dominant-negative alleles reveal functional overlap between multiple receptor kinases that regulate meristem and organ development.

    PubMed

    Diévart, Anne; Dalal, Monica; Tax, Frans E; Lacey, Alexzandria D; Huttly, Alison; Li, Jianming; Clark, Steven E

    2003-05-01

    The CLAVATA1 (CLV1) receptor kinase controls stem cell number and differentiation at the Arabidopsis shoot and flower meristems. Other components of the CLV1 signaling pathway include the secreted putative ligand CLV3 and the receptor-like protein CLV2. We report evidence indicating that all intermediate and strong clv1 alleles are dominant negative and likely interfere with the activity of unknown receptor kinase(s) that have functional overlap with CLV1. clv1 dominant-negative alleles show major differences from dominant-negative alleles characterized to date in animal receptor kinase signaling systems, including the lack of a dominant-negative effect of kinase domain truncation and the ability of missense mutations in the extracellular domain to act in a dominant-negative manner. We analyzed chimeric receptor kinases by fusing CLV1 and BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE1 (BRI1) coding sequences and expressing these in clv1 null backgrounds. Constructs containing the CLV1 extracellular domain and the BRI1 kinase domain were strongly dominant negative in the regulation of meristem development. Furthermore, we show that CLV1 expressed within the pedicel can partially replace the function of the ERECTA receptor kinase. We propose the presence of multiple receptors that regulate meristem development in a functionally related manner whose interactions are driven by the extracellular domains and whose activation requires the kinase domain.

  4. CLAVATA1 Dominant-Negative Alleles Reveal Functional Overlap between Multiple Receptor Kinases That Regulate Meristem and Organ Development

    PubMed Central

    Diévart, Anne; Dalal, Monica; Tax, Frans E.; Lacey, Alexzandria D.; Huttly, Alison; Li, Jianming; Clark, Steven E.

    2003-01-01

    The CLAVATA1 (CLV1) receptor kinase controls stem cell number and differentiation at the Arabidopsis shoot and flower meristems. Other components of the CLV1 signaling pathway include the secreted putative ligand CLV3 and the receptor-like protein CLV2. We report evidence indicating that all intermediate and strong clv1 alleles are dominant negative and likely interfere with the activity of unknown receptor kinase(s) that have functional overlap with CLV1. clv1 dominant-negative alleles show major differences from dominant-negative alleles characterized to date in animal receptor kinase signaling systems, including the lack of a dominant-negative effect of kinase domain truncation and the ability of missense mutations in the extracellular domain to act in a dominant-negative manner. We analyzed chimeric receptor kinases by fusing CLV1 and BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE1 (BRI1) coding sequences and expressing these in clv1 null backgrounds. Constructs containing the CLV1 extracellular domain and the BRI1 kinase domain were strongly dominant negative in the regulation of meristem development. Furthermore, we show that CLV1 expressed within the pedicel can partially replace the function of the ERECTA receptor kinase. We propose the presence of multiple receptors that regulate meristem development in a functionally related manner whose interactions are driven by the extracellular domains and whose activation requires the kinase domain. PMID:12724544

  5. Increased serum levels of circulating exosomal microRNA-373 in receptor-negative breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Eichelser, Corinna; Stückrath, Isabel; Müller, Volkmar; Milde-Langosch, Karin; Wikman, Harriet; Pantel, Klaus; Schwarzenbach, Heidi

    2014-10-30

    In this study, we compared the blood serum levels of circulating cell-free and exosomal microRNAs, and their involvement in the molecular subtypes of breast cancer patients. Our analyses on cell-free miR-101, miR-372 and miR-373 were performed in preoperative blood serum of 168 patients with invasive breast cancer, 19 patients with benign breast diseases and 28 healthy women. MicroRNAs were additionally quantified in exosomes of 50 cancer patients and 12 healthy women from the same cohort. Relative concentrations were measured by quantitative TaqMan MicroRNA assays and correlated to clinicopathological risk factors. The concentrations of cell-free miR-101 (p=0.013) and miR-373 (p=0.024) were significantly different between patients with breast cancer and benign tumors. A prevalence of miR-101, miR-372 and miR-373 were found in exosomes. The levels of circulating exosomal (but not cell-free) miR-373 were higher in triple negative than luminal carcinomas (p=0.027). Also, estrogen-negative (p=0.021) and progesterone-negative (p=0.01) tumors displayed higher concentrations of exosomal miR-373 than patients with hormone-receptor positive tumors. Overexpression of miR-373 by transfection of MCF-7 cells showed downregulated protein expression of the estrogen receptor, and inhibition of apoptosis induced by camptothecin. Our data indicate that serum levels of exosomal miR-373 are linked to triple negative and more aggressive breast carcinomas.

  6. Crossreactive αβ T Cell Receptors Are the Predominant Targets of Thymocyte Negative Selection.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Benjamin D; Bunker, Jeffrey J; Erickson, Steven A; Oh-Hora, Masatsugu; Bendelac, Albert

    2015-11-17

    The precise impact of thymic positive and negative selection on the T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire remains controversial. Here, we used unbiased, high-throughput cloning and retroviral expression of individual pre-selection TCRs to provide a direct assessment of these processes at the clonal level in vivo. We found that 15% of random TCRs induced signaling and directed positive (7.5%) or negative (7.5%) selection, depending on strength of signal, whereas the remaining 85% failed to induce signaling or selection. Most negatively selected TCRs exhibited promiscuous crossreactivity toward multiple other major histocompatibility complex (MHC) haplotypes. In contrast, TCRs that were positively selected or non-selected were minimally crossreactive. Negative selection of crossreactive TCRs led to clonal deletion but also recycling into intestinal CD4(-)CD8β(-) intraepithelial lymphocytes (iIELs). Thus, broadly crossreactive TCRs arise at low frequency in the pre-selection repertoire but constitute the primary drivers of thymic negative selection and iIEL lineage differentiation. PMID:26522985

  7. Usefulness of neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio and platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio in hormone-receptor-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chao; Huang, Zhou; Wang, Qiusheng; Sun, Bing; Ding, Lijuan; Meng, Xiangying; Wu, Shikai

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to investigate the relationship between pretreatment neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR)/platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) and the estimation of hormone-receptor-negative (HR−) breast cancer patients’ survival in a Chinese cohort. Patients and methods Of 434 consecutive HR− nonmetastatic breast cancer patients treated between 2004 and 2010 in the Affiliated Hospital of Academy of Military Medical Sciences, 318 eligible cases with complete data were included in the present study. Kaplan–Meier analysis was performed to determine the overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS). Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used to test the usefulness of NLR and PLR. Results Univariate analysis indicated that both elevated NLR and PLR (both P<0.001) were associated with poor OS. The utility of NLR remained in the multivariate analysis (P<0.001), but not PLR (P=0.104). The analysis results for DFS were almost the same as OS. Subgroup analysis revealed a significant association between increased NLR and PLR (P<0.001 and P=0.011) and poor survival in triple-negative breast cancer. However, for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive breast cancer, only NLR was significantly associated with OS in the multivariate analysis (P=0.001). Conclusion The present study indicates that both increased NLR and PLR are associated with poor survival in HR−breast cancer patients. Meanwhile, NLR is independently correlated with OS and DFS, but PLR is not. PMID:27536129

  8. Placental Kisspeptins Differentially Modulate Vital Parameters of Estrogen Receptor-Positive and -Negative Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rasoulzadeh, Zahra; Ghods, Roya; Kazemi, Tohid; Mirzadegan, Ebrahim; Ghaffari-Tabrizi-Wizsy, Nassim; Rezania, Simin; Kazemnejad, Somaieh; Arefi, Soheila; Ghasemi, Jamileh; Vafaei, Sedigheh; Mahmoudi, Ahmad-Reza; Zarnani, Amir-Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Kisspeptins (KPs) are major regulators of trophoblast and cancer invasion. Thus far, limited and conflicting data are available on KP-mediated modulation of breast cancer (BC) metastasis; mostly based on synthetic KP-10, the most active fragment of KP. Here, we report for the first time comprehensive functional effects of term placental KPs on proliferation, adhesion, Matrigel invasion, motility, MMP activity and pro-inflammatory cytokine production in MDA-MB-231 (estrogen receptor-negative) and MCF-7 (estrogen receptor-positive). KPs were expressed at high level by term placental syncytiotrophoblasts and released in soluble form. Placental explant conditioned medium containing KPs (CM) significantly reduced proliferation of both cell types compared to CM without (w/o) KP (CM-w/o KP) in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In MDA-MB-231 cells, placental KPs significantly reduced adhesive properties, while increased MMP9 and MMP2 activity and stimulated invasion. Increased invasiveness of MDA-MB-231 cells after CM treatment was inhibited by KP receptor antagonist, P-234. CM significantly reduced motility of MCF-7 cells at all time points (2–30 hr), while it stimulated motility of MDA-MB-231 cells. These effects were reversed by P-234. Co-treatment with selective ER modulators, Tamoxifen and Raloxifene, inhibited the effect of CM on motility of MCF-7 cells. The level of IL-6 in supernatant of MCF-7 cells treated with CM was higher compared to those treated with CM-w/o KP. Both cell types produced more IL-8 after treatment with CM compared to those treated with CM-w/o KP. Taken together, our observations suggest that placental KPs differentially modulate vital parameters of estrogen receptor-positive and -negative BC cells possibly through modulation of pro-inflammatory cytokine production. PMID:27101408

  9. FOXP3 Transcription Factor: A Candidate Marker for Susceptibility and Prognosis in Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fiori Lopes, Leandra; Losi Guembarovski, Roberta; Guembarovski, Alda Losi; Okuyama Kishima, Marina; Campos, Clodoaldo Zago; Oda, Julie Massayo Maeda; Ariza, Carolina Batista; de Oliveira, Karen Brajão; Borelli, Sueli Donizete; Watanabe, Maria Angelica Ehara

    2014-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a relevant subgroup of neoplasia which presents negative phenotype of estrogen and progesterone receptors and has no overexpression of the human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2). FOXP3 (forkhead transcription factor 3) is a marker of regulatory T cells (Tregs), whose expression may be increased in tumor cells. This study aimed to investigate a polymorphism (rs3761548) and the protein expression of FOXP3 for a possible involvement in TNBC susceptibility and prognosis. Genetic polymorphism was evaluated in 50 patients and in 115 controls by allele-specific PCR (polymerase chain reaction). Protein expression was evaluated in 38 patients by immunohistochemistry. It was observed a positive association for homozygous AA (OR = 3.78; 95% CI = 1.02–14.06) in relation to TNBC susceptibility. Most of the patients (83%) showed a strong staining for FOXP3 protein in the tumor cells. In relation to FOXP3-positive infiltrate, 47% and 58% of patients had a moderate or intense intratumoral and peritumoral mononuclear infiltrate cells, respectively. Tumor size was positively correlated to intratumoral FOXP3-positive infiltrate (P = 0.026). In conclusion, since FOXP3 was positively associated with TNBC susceptibility and prognosis, it seems to be a promising candidate for further investigation in larger TNBC samples. PMID:24877082

  10. Corticotropin-releasing factor CRF1, but not CRF2, receptors mediate anxiogenic-like behavior.

    PubMed

    Heinrichs, S C; Lapsansky, J; Lovenberg, T W; De Souza, E B; Chalmers, D T

    1997-07-23

    The recent identification and differential localization in brain of three binding sites for corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-like peptides (CRF1 and CRF2 receptors as well as CRF-binding protein) suggest the existence of functionally distinct neurobiological systems which mediate CRF activation. For instance, evidence from receptor knockdown and pharmacological studies suggest involvement of the CRF1 receptor in anxiogenic-like behavior and the CRF-binding protein in learning and memory processes. The present studies examined the potential functional significance of the CRF2 receptor in relation to the CRF1 receptor using two animal models of anxiety and endocrine reactivity to a stressor. CRF1 and CRF2 receptor knockdown was achieved and confirmed autoradiographically within brain regions relevant to behavioral reactivity to stressors by chronic, central administration of antisense oligonucleotides. CRF1 but not CRF2, know down produced a significant anxiolytic-like effect in the Defensive Withdrawal relative to vehicle-treated and two missense oligonucleotide negative control groups. In contrast, neither antisense treatment altered endocrine or behavioral reactivity to a swim stressor. Thus, the present data support the reported role of CRF1 receptors in the mediation of anxiogenic-like behavior and suggest a functionally distinct for role for CRF2 receptors in brain.

  11. Expression of neu protein, epidermal growth factor receptor, and transforming growth factor alpha in breast cancer. Correlation with clinicopathologic parameters.

    PubMed Central

    Lundy, J.; Schuss, A.; Stanick, D.; McCormack, E. S.; Kramer, S.; Sorvillo, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    The major objectives of this study were twofold: to determine 1) if growth factors or growth factor receptors were expressed similarly or differently in a clinically well-characterized group of breast cancer patients and 2) if these phenotypic characteristics were associated with any of the commonly used prognostic parameters. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor tissue from 51 node-positive breast cancer patients were analyzed for the expression of neu, epidermal growth factor-receptor (EGF-R), and transforming growth factor alpha (TGF alpha) using immunoperoxidase staining. Positive membranous staining for neu was observed in 15 (29%) tumors. Over-expression of neu was observed in high-grade, estrogen-receptor-negative tumors (P less than 0.05). Epidermal growth factor receptor was expressed in 22 (43%) of the tumors analyzed and found to a greater degree in estrogen-receptor-negative and high-grade tumors (P less than 0.025). A significant correlation between neu and EGF-R expression was also noted. Tumors expressing membranous staining of neu had a greater than 70% chance of expressing EGF-R (P less than 0.01). Expression of TGF alpha was found in 68% of tumors and TGF alpha was detected in grade 1 and 2 tumor to a greater degree than EGF-R. The authors conclude that assaying tumors for these antigens may give additional phenotypic characteristics that can give further insight into the biology of breast cancer. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1711294

  12. Novel Drosophila receptor that binds multiple growth factors

    SciTech Connect

    Rosner, M.R.; Thompson, K.L.; Garcia, V.; Decker, S.J.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have recently reported the identification of a novel growth factor receptor from Drosophila cell cultures that has dual binding specificity for both insulin and epidermal growth factor (EGF). This 100 kDa protein is also antigenically related to the cytoplasmic region of the mammalian EGF receptor-tyrosine kinase. They now report that this protein binds to mammalian nerve growth factor and human transforming growth factor alpha as well as insulin and EGF with apparent dissociation constants ranging from 10/sup -6/ to 10/sup -8/ M. The 100 kDa protein can be affinity-labeled with these /sup 125/I-labeled growth factors after immunoprecipitation with anti-EGF receptor antiserum. These four growth factors appear to share a common binding site, as evidenced by their ability to block affinity labelling by /sup 125/I-insulin. No significant binding to the 100 kDa protein was observed with platelet-derived growth factor, transforming growth factor beta, or glucagon. The 100 kDa Drosophila protein has a unique ligand-binding spectrum with no direct counterpart in mammalian cells and may represent an evolutionary precursor of the mammalian receptors for these growth factors.

  13. Dissociation of peripheral T cell responses from thymocyte negative selection by weak agonists supports a spare receptor model of T cell activation

    PubMed Central

    McNeil, Lisa K.; Evavold, Brian D.

    2002-01-01

    We have focused on stability of the peptide-MHC complex as a determining factor of ligand potency for thymocytes and peripheral CD4+ T cell responses. MHC variant peptides that have low affinities and fast dissociation rates are different in that they stimulate proliferation and cytolysis of mature T cells (classifying the variant peptides as weak agonists) but do not induce thymocyte negative selection. The MHC variant weak agonists require significant receptor reserve, because decreasing the level of T cell receptor on mature T cells blocks the proliferative response. These results demonstrate that peripheral T cells are more sensitive to MHC variant ligands by virtue of increased T cell receptor expression; in addition, the data support a T cell model of the spare receptor theory. PMID:11904393

  14. Topical administration of adrenergic receptor pharmaceutics and nerve growth factor

    PubMed Central

    Steinle, Jena J

    2010-01-01

    Topical application of nerve growth factor (NGF) and adrenergic receptor pharmaceutics are currently in use for corneal ulcers and glaucoma. A recent interest in the neuroprotective abilities of NGF has led to a renewed interest in NGF as a therapeutic for retinal and choroidal diseases. NGF can promote cell proliferation through actions of the TrkA receptor or promote apoptosis through receptor p75NTR. This understanding has led to novel interest in the role of NGF for diseases of the posterior eye. The role of β-adrenergic receptor agonists and antagonists for treatments of glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, and their potential mechanisms of action, are still under investigation. This review discusses the current knowledge and applications of topical NGF and adrenergic receptor drugs for ocular disease. PMID:20668722

  15. Cutaneous adverse reactions specific to epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Lupu, I; Voiculescu, VM; Bacalbasa, N; Prie, BE; Cojocaru, I; Giurcaneanu, C

    2015-01-01

    Classical antineoplastic therapy is encumbered by extensively studied adverse reactions, most often of systemic nature. The emergence of new generations of anticancer treatments, including epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors, besides improving the response to treatment and the survival rate, is accompanied by the occurrence of new specific side effects, incompletely studied. These side effects are most often cutaneous (hand foot syndrome, acneiform reactions), and in some cases are extremely severe, requiring dose reduction or drug discontinuation. The prevention of the cutaneous adverse effects and their treatment require a close collaboration between the oncologist and the dermatologist. The occurrence of some of these skin adverse effects may be a favorable prognostic factor for the response to the cancer treatment and the overall survival. Abbreviations: EGFR = epidermal growth factor receptors; EGFRI = epidermal growth factor receptors inhibitors PMID:26361513

  16. Dicer expression in estrogen receptor-positive versus triple-negative breast cancer: an antibody comparison.

    PubMed

    Spoelstra, Nicole S; Cittelly, Diana M; Christenson, Jessica L; Gordon, Michael A; Elias, Anthony; Jedlicka, Paul; Richer, Jennifer K

    2016-10-01

    Dicer is an RNase III enzyme responsible for cleaving double-stranded RNAs into small interfering RNAs and microRNAs, which either target messenger RNA transcripts for degradation or inhibit translation. Dicer protein levels have been examined in breast cancer with contradictory results. Our goal was to resolve whether Dicer levels differ in breast cancer versus normal breast epithelium and between estrogen receptor-α-positive (ER+) or estrogen receptor-α-negative (ER-) primary breast cancers. We compared 3 different Dicer antibodies: Abcam 4A6, Abcam ab5818, and Sigma HPA000694, using immunohistochemistry and Western blot analyses. All 3 Dicer antibodies detected higher levels of Dicer in ER+ breast cancer cell lines versus ER-, and all 3 recognized exogenous overexpressed Dicer. In clinical specimens, all 3 antibodies detected higher Dicer in ER+ breast cancers versus triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) but had very different staining patterns by immunohistochemistry on the same tumor samples. Using the optimal antibody, ab5818, selected for its sensitivity and specificity, Dicer protein expression was significantly higher in ER+ versus TNBC clinical specimens of primary tumor (P<.0001, unpaired t test). Dicer was also significantly higher in adjacent normal breast epithelium versus TNBC (P<.0001, paired t test; n=18 pairs). Differences in antibody performance may explain contrasting results observed in the literature regarding Dicer protein in breast cancer. If Dicer becomes more clinically relevant as a prognostic indicator, further antibody optimization and standardization will be critical. PMID:27260947

  17. Enriched transcription factor signatures in triple negative breast cancer indicates possible targeted therapies with existing drugs

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Scooter; De, Pradip; Dey, Nandini; Long, Bradley; Young, Brandon; Sparano, Joseph A.; Wang, Victoria; Davidson, Nancy E.; Leyland-Jones, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Triple negative (TN) breast cancers which lack expression of the estrogen (ER), progesterone (PR), and human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2) receptors convey a poor prognosis due in part to a lack of targeted therapies. Methods To identify viable targets for the treatment of TN disease, we have conducted a gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) on seven different breast cancer whole genome gene expression cohorts comparing TN vs. ER + HER2 − to identify consistently enriched genes that share a common promoter motif. The seven cohorts were profiled on three different genome expression platforms (Affymetrix, Illumina and RNAseq) consisting in total of 2088 samples with IHC metadata. Results GSEA identified enriched gene expression patterns in TN samples that share common promoter motifs associated with SOX9, E2F1, HIF1A, HMGA1, MYC BACH2, CEBPB, and GCNF/NR6A1. Unexpectedly, NR6A1 an orphan nuclear receptor normally expressed in germ cells of gonads is highly expressed in TN and ER + HER2 − samples making it an ideal drug target. Conclusion With the increasing number of large sample size breast cancer cohorts, an exploratory analysis of genes that are consistently enriched in TN sharing common promoter motifs allows for the identification of possible therapeutic targets with extensive validation in patient derived data sets. PMID:26005638

  18. Clickable Photoaffinity Ligands for Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 5 Based on Select Acetylenic Negative Allosteric Modulators.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Karen J; Velagaleti, Ranganadh; Thal, David M; Brady, Ryan M; Christopoulos, Arthur; Conn, P Jeffrey; Lapinsky, David J

    2016-07-15

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent the largest class of current drug targets. In particular, small-molecule allosteric modulators offer substantial potential for selectively "tuning" GPCR activity. However, there remains a critical need for experimental strategies that unambiguously determine direct allosteric ligand-GPCR interactions, to facilitate both chemical biology studies and rational structure-based drug design. We now report the development and use of first-in-class clickable allosteric photoprobes for a GPCR based on metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu5) negative allosteric modulator (NAM) chemotypes. Select acetylenic mGlu5 NAM lead compounds were rationally modified to contain either a benzophenone or an aryl azide as a photoreactive functional group, enabling irreversible covalent attachment to mGlu5 via photoactivation. Additionally, a terminal alkyne or an aliphatic azide was incorporated as a click chemistry handle, allowing chemoselective attachment of fluorescent moieties to the irreversibly mGlu5-bound probe via tandem photoaffinity labeling-bioorthogonal conjugation. These clickable photoprobes retained submicromolar affinity for mGlu5 and negative cooperativity with glutamate, interacted with the "common allosteric-binding site," displayed slow binding kinetics, and could irreversibly label mGlu5 following UV exposure. We depleted the number of functional mGlu5 receptors using an irreversibly bound NAM to elucidate and delineate orthosteric agonist affinity and efficacy. Finally, successful conjugation of fluorescent dyes via click chemistry was demonstrated for each photoprobe. In the future, these clickable photoprobes are expected to aid our understanding of the structural basis of mGlu5 allosteric modulation. Furthermore, tandem photoaffinity labeling-bioorthogonal conjugation is expected to be a broadly applicable experimental strategy across the entire GPCR superfamily. PMID:27115427

  19. Phospho-kinase profile of triple negative breast cancer and androgen receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The androgen receptor (AR) plays a central role in the oncogenesis of different tumors, as is the case in prostate cancer. In triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) a gene expression classification has described different subgroups including a luminal androgen subtype. The AR can be controlled by several mechanisms like the activation of membrane tyrosine kinases and downstream signaling pathways. However little is known in TNBC about how the AR is modulated by these mechanisms and the potential therapeutic strategists to inhibit its expression. Methods We used human samples to evaluate the expression of AR by western-blot and phospho-proteomic kinase arrays that recognize membrane tyrosine kinase receptors and downstream mediators. Western-blots in human cell lines were carried out to analyze the expression and activation of individual proteins. Drugs against these kinases in different conditions were used to measure the expression of the androgen receptor. PCR experiments were performed to assess changes in the AR gene after therapeutic modulation of these pathways. Results AR is present in a subset of TNBC and its expression correlates with activated membrane receptor kinases-EGFR and PDGFRβ in human samples and cell lines. Inhibition of the PI3K/mTOR pathway in TNBC cell lines decreased notably the expression of the AR. Concomitant administration of the anti-androgen bicalutamide with the EGFR, PDGFRβ and Erk1/2 inhibitors, decreased the amount of AR compared to each agent given alone, and had an additive anti-proliferative effect. Administration of dihydrotestosterone augmented the expression of AR that was not modified by the inhibition of the PI3K/mTOR or Erk1/2 pathways. AR expression was posttranscriptionally regulated by PI3K or Erk1/2 inhibition. Conclusion Our results describe the expression of the AR in TNBC as a druggable target and further suggest the combination of bicalutamide with inhibitors of EGFR, PDGFRβ or Erk1/2 for future

  20. Modulation of the NMDA Receptor Through Secreted Soluble Factors.

    PubMed

    Cerpa, Waldo; Ramos-Fernández, Eva; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic activity is a critical determinant in the formation and development of excitatory synapses in the central nervous system (CNS). The excitatory current is produced and regulated by several ionotropic receptors, including those that respond to glutamate. These channels are in turn regulated through several secreted factors that function as synaptic organizers. Specifically, Wnt, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), and transforming growth factor (TGF) particularly regulate the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) glutamatergic channel. These factors likely regulate early embryonic development and directly control key proteins in the function of important glutamatergic channels. Here, we review the secreted molecules that participate in synaptic organization and discuss the cell signaling behind of this fine regulation. Additionally, we discuss how these factors are dysregulated in some neuropathologies associated with glutamatergic synaptic transmission in the CNS. PMID:25429903

  1. Glucocorticoid receptor co-factors as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Simons, S. Stoney

    2010-01-01

    Summary Numerous transcriptional cofactors (e.g., coactivators, corepressors, and comodulators) are known to alter the maximal transcriptional activity (Amax) in gene induction and repression by steroid receptors in general and glucocorticoids in particular. However, recent data advance the earlier reports that these same factors also modify other parameters of glucocorticoid receptor transcriptional activity: the potency of agonists (or EC50) and the partial agonist activity of antisteroids (or PAA). In several instances, factors modulate the EC50 and/or PAA without changing Amax. Thus, studies of all three parameters reveal new factors acting at various stages of receptor action, thereby increasing the potential therapeutic targets for adjusting GR actions in pathological situations. PMID:20801081

  2. Palbociclib in Combination With Tamoxifen as First Line Therapy for Metastatic Hormone Receptor Positive Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-04

    Hormone Receptor Positive Malignant Neoplasm of Breast; Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 Negative Carcinoma of Breast; Estrogen Receptor Positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor Positive Tumor; Metastatic Breast Cancer

  3. Epidermal growth factor receptor not equal to nerve growth factor.

    PubMed

    Williams, L R

    1989-01-01

    I am perplexed by the authors' complete lack of definition of neurotrophic factors. The agents Butcher and Woolf want to blame are neurite promoting factors, not neurotrophic factors. Treatment of Alzheimer's disease with NGF antagonists might instead exacerbate the death of both basal forebrain neurons and their cortical target neurons, accelerating the progress of dementia.

  4. Pathological complete response rate in hormone receptor-negative breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant FEC, followed by weekly paclitaxel administration: A retrospective study and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    KIBA, TAKAYOSHI; MORII, NAO; TAKAHASHI, HIROTOSHI; OZAKI, SHINJI; ATSUMI, MISAO; MASUMOTO, FUMI; YAMASHIRO, HIROYASU

    2016-01-01

    While tumor size, the presence of inflammatory carcinoma and lymph node involvement are the main prognostic factors of women with locally advanced breast cancer, the prognostic value of the estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status has not been fully clarified. The present study examined the therapeutic efficacy of a neoadjuvant fluorouracil, epirubicin and cyclophosphamide regimen (FEC), followed by weekly paclitaxel and/or trastuzumab administration, in the treatment of hormone receptor-negative breast cancer patients. Between April 2012 and February 2014, 14 patients with hormone receptor-negative local breast cancer (triple-negative type, 9 patients; HER2 type, 5 patients) were included in the study. In all cases, the histological type of the primary cancer was invasive ductal carcinoma. Among the 14 women who received the regimen, 5 presented with stage I cancer (35.7%), 3 with stage IIA (21.4%), 3 with stage IIB (21.4%), 1 with stage IIIB (7.1%) and 2 with stage IIIC (14.3%), according to the American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system. With regard to the tumor-node-metastasis classification, 5 patients were T1N0M0 (35.7%), 3 were T2N0M0 (21.4%), 3 were T2N1M0 (21.4%), 2 were T3N3M0 (14.3%) and 1 was T4N1M0 (7.1%). The pathological response was evaluated using resected tissue following neoadjuvant chemotherapy, according to the criteria established by the Japanese Breast Cancer Society. Patients were classified into pathological responders (grades 2 and 3, 71.4% of all patients) and non-responders (grade 1, 28.6% of all patients). A pathological complete response (pCR) was achieved in 50.0% of all cases (7/14); 44.4% of triple-negative-type cases (4/9) and 60.0% of HER2-type cases (3/5). Hematological and non-hematological toxicity was reversible and manageable. No patients withdrew from treatment, and favorable compliance was achieved. The present study demonstrated that neoadjuvant FEC followed

  5. Cell Surface Epidermal Growth Factor Receptors Increase Src and c-Cbl Activity and Receptor Ubiquitylation*

    PubMed Central

    Parks, Eileen E.; Ceresa, Brian P.

    2014-01-01

    There is an established role for the endocytic pathway in regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling to downstream effectors. However, because ligand-mediated EGFR endocytosis utilizes multiple “moving parts,” dissecting the spatial versus temporal contributions has been challenging. Blocking all endocytic trafficking can have unintended effects on other receptors as well as give rise to compensatory mechanisms, both of which impact interpretation of EGFR signaling. To overcome these limitations, we used epidermal growth factor (EGF) conjugated to polystyrene beads (EGF beads). EGF beads simultaneously activate the EGFR while blocking its endocytosis and allow analysis of EGFR signaling from the plasma membrane. Human telomerase immortalized corneal epithelial (hTCEpi) cells were used to model normal epithelial cell biology. In hTCEpi cells, both cell surface and intracellular EGFRs exhibited dose-dependent increases in effector activity after 15 min of ligand stimulation, but only the serine phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) was statistically significant when accounting for receptor phosphorylation. However, over time with physiological levels of receptor phosphorylation, cell surface receptors produced either enhanced or sustained mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK), Casitas B-lineage lymphoma (c-Cbl), and the pro-oncogene Src activity. These increases in effector communication by cell surface receptors resulted in an increase in EGFR ubiquitylation with sustained ligand incubation. Together, these data indicate that spatial regulation of EGFR signaling may be an important regulatory mechanism in receptor down-regulation. PMID:25074934

  6. Bayesian non-negative factor analysis for reconstructing transcription factor mediated regulatory networks

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Transcriptional regulation by transcription factor (TF) controls the time and abundance of mRNA transcription. Due to the limitation of current proteomics technologies, large scale measurements of protein level activities of TFs is usually infeasible, making computational reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory network a difficult task. Results We proposed here a novel Bayesian non-negative factor model for TF mediated regulatory networks. Particularly, the non-negative TF activities and sample clustering effect are modeled as the factors from a Dirichlet process mixture of rectified Gaussian distributions, and the sparse regulatory coefficients are modeled as the loadings from a sparse distribution that constrains its sparsity using knowledge from database; meantime, a Gibbs sampling solution was developed to infer the underlying network structure and the unknown TF activities simultaneously. The developed approach has been applied to simulated system and breast cancer gene expression data. Result shows that, the proposed method was able to systematically uncover TF mediated transcriptional regulatory network structure, the regulatory coefficients, the TF protein level activities and the sample clustering effect. The regulation target prediction result is highly coordinated with the prior knowledge, and sample clustering result shows superior performance over previous molecular based clustering method. Conclusions The results demonstrated the validity and effectiveness of the proposed approach in reconstructing transcriptional networks mediated by TFs through simulated systems and real data. PMID:22166063

  7. Differential phosphorylation of the progesterone receptor by insulin, epidermal growth factor, and platelet-derived growth factor receptor tyrosine protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Woo, D D; Fay, S P; Griest, R; Coty, W; Goldfine, I; Fox, C F

    1986-01-01

    Purified preparations of insulin, epidermal growth factor (EGF), and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptors were compared for their abilities to phosphorylate purified hen oviduct progesterone receptors. The specific activities of all three peptide hormone-induced receptor kinases were first defined using a synthetic tridecapeptide tyrosine protein kinase substrate. Next, equivalent ligand-activated activities of the three receptor kinases were tested for their abilities to phosphorylate hen oviduct progesterone receptor. Both the insulin and EGF receptors phosphorylated progesterone receptor at high affinity, exclusively at tyrosine residues and with maximal stoichiometries that were near unity. In contrast, the PDGF receptor did not recognize progesterone receptor as a substrate. Insulin decreased the Km of the insulin receptor for progesterone receptor subunits as substrates, but had no significant effect on Vmax values. On the other hand, EGF increased the Vmax of the EGF receptor for progesterone receptor subunits as substrates. Phosphorylation of progesterone receptor by the insulin and EGF receptor kinases differed in two additional ways. 1) EGF-activated receptor phosphorylated the 80- and 105-kDa progesterone receptor subunits to an equal extent, whereas insulin-activated receptor preferentially phosphorylated the 80-kDa subunit. 2) Phosphopeptide fingerprinting analyses revealed that while insulin and EGF receptors phosphorylated one identical major site on both progesterone receptor subunits, they differed in their specificities for other sites. PMID:3001059

  8. Development of neural crest cells expressing nerve growth factor receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Greiner, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    The present study examines the ontogeny of the nerve growth factor receptor of neural crest cells in vitro and the phenotypic nature of the neural crest cells expressing this receptor. /sup 125/I-NGF binding assays and autoradiographic and immunofluorescence techniques have demonstrated the presence of a subpopulation of quail neural crest cells that express specific NGF receptors after 3-4 days in vitro. This subpopulations represents approximately 28% of the cells in 5-day primary cultures and 30-35% of the cells in secondary cultures; these cells generally exhibited a flattened, phase-dark morphology. Approximately one-third of these cells also labeled with a 2 hr pulse of /sup 3/H thymidine. Catecholamine-containing neural crest cells generally lacked NGF receptors. NGF receptor-positive cells also failed to demonstrate somatostatin-, neuron-specific enolase-, or S-100-like immunoreactivity. Melanocytes do not appear to express NGF receptors. Exogenous nerve growth factor did not influence the morphology or mitotic status of the cells in culture.

  9. Receptor Specificity of the Fibroblast Growth Factor Family

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiuqin; Ibrahimi, Omar A.; Olsen, Shaun K.; Umemori, Hisashi; Mohammadi, Moosa; Ornitz, David M.

    2007-01-01

    In mammals, fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) are encoded by 22 genes. FGFs bind and activate alternatively spliced forms of four tyrosine kinase FGF receptors (FGFRs 1–4). The spatial and temporal expression patterns of FGFs and FGFRs and the ability of specific ligand-receptor pairs to actively signal are important factors regulating FGF activity in a variety of biological processes. FGF signaling activity is regulated by the binding specificity of ligands and receptors and is modulated by extrinsic cofactors such as heparan sulfate proteoglycans. In previous studies, we have engineered BaF3 cell lines to express the seven principal FGFRs and used these cell lines to determine the receptor binding specificity of FGFs 1–9 by using relative mitogenic activity as the readout. Here we have extended these semiquantitative studies to assess the receptor binding specificity of the remaining FGFs 10–23. This study completes the mitogenesis-based comparison of receptor specificity of the entire FGF family under standard conditions and should help in interpreting and predicting in vivo biological activity. PMID:16597617

  10. Androgen Receptor, EGFR, and BRCA1 as Biomarkers in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Fang, Cheng; Xu, Xianqun; Li, Anling; Cai, Qing; Long, Xinghua

    2015-01-01

    Objective. More and more evidences demonstrate that androgen receptor (AR), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1) have unique clinical implications for targeted therapy or prognosis in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis to summarize the possible associations. Methods. We retrieved published articles about AR, EGFR, and BRCA1 in TNBC from PubMed and EMBASE. The analysis was performed with Rev-Man 5.2 software. Results. A total of 38 articles were eligible for the meta-analysis. Our study showed that the expression level of EGFR (OR = 6.88, P < 0.00001) and the prevalence of BRCA1 mutation (RR = 5.26, P < 0.00001) were higher in TNBC than non-TNBC. In contrast, the expression level of AR was lower in TNBC than non-TNBC (OR = 0.07, P < 0.00001). In the subgroup related to EGFR expression, the level of EGFR expression was significantly increased in Asians (OR = 9.60) compared with Caucasians (OR = 5.53) for TNBC patients. Additionally, the prevalence of BRCA1 mutation in Asians (RR = 5.43, P < 0.00001) was higher than that in Caucasians (RR = 5.16, P < 0.00001). Conclusions. The distinct expression of AR and EGFR and the prevalence of BRCA1 mutation indicated that AR, EGFR, and BRCA1 might be unique biomarkers for targeted therapy and prognosis in TNBC. PMID:25695063

  11. Vascular growth factors and receptors in capillary hemangioblastomas and hemangiopericytomas.

    PubMed Central

    Hatva, E.; Böhling, T.; Jääskeläinen, J.; Persico, M. G.; Haltia, M.; Alitalo, K.

    1996-01-01

    Capillary hemangioblastomas and hemangiopericytomas are highly vascular central nervous system tumors of controversial origin. Of interest in their pathogenesis are mechanisms regulating endothelial cell growth. The endothelial cell mitogen vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) stimulates angiogenesis, and together with its two receptor tyrosine kinases VEGFR-1(FLT1) and VEGFR-2(KDR), is up-regulated during the malignant progression of gliomas. We have analyzed the expression of VEGF and its receptors, the related placental growth factor (PlGF) and the endothelial receptors FLT4 and Tie by in situ hybridization in capillary hemangioblastomas and hemangiopericytomas. VEGF mRNA was up-regulated in all of the hemangiopericytomas studied and highly expressed in the stromal cells of hemangioblastomas. In addition, some hemangioblastoma tumor cells expressed high levels of PlGF. Significantly elevated levels of Tie mRNA, Tie protein, VEGFR-1, and VEGFR-2 but not FLT4 mRNAs were observed in the endothelia of both tumor types. In hemangioblastomas, however, the receptors were also highly expressed by a subpopulation of stromal cells. Consistent results were obtained for a human hemangioblastoma cell line in culture. Up-regulation of the endothelial growth factors and receptors may result in autocrine or paracrine stimulation of endothelial cells and their precursors involved in the genesis of these two vascular tumors. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8774132

  12. Downregulation of androgen receptor is strongly associated with diabetes in triple negative breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Collina, Francesca; Cerrone, Margherita; Peluso, Valentina; Laurentiis, Michelino De; Caputo, Roberta; Cecio, Rossella De; Liguori, Giuseppina; Botti, Gerardo; Cantile, Monica; Bonito, Maurizio Di

    2016-01-01

    Developing of personalized therapies for Triple Negative Breast Cancer (TNBC) requires a more detailed knowledge of its biology and a correct stratification of molecular subtypes. Androgen Receptor (AR) is expressed in a large part of TNBCs but its prognostic role in this Breast Cancer (BC) subtype is highly debated. In this study, we analyzed AR expression in a series of 238 TNBCs and correlated its expression with clinical-pathological features, survival, and metabolic profile. We showed a consistent association between AR expression and a better prognosis of TNBC patients, while its downregulation appeared strongly associated with diabetic disease. Since a recent prospective study reported a lower BC risk in diabetic women treated with drugs able to reduce circulating levels of glucose compared with non-diabetic woman, and in vitro studies showed that AR level are regulated directly by hyperglycemia, we speculate on the perspective of new integrated therapies for TNBC.

  13. Downregulation of androgen receptor is strongly associated with diabetes in triple negative breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Collina, Francesca; Cerrone, Margherita; Peluso, Valentina; Laurentiis, Michelino De; Caputo, Roberta; Cecio, Rossella De; Liguori, Giuseppina; Botti, Gerardo; Cantile, Monica; Bonito, Maurizio Di

    2016-01-01

    Developing of personalized therapies for Triple Negative Breast Cancer (TNBC) requires a more detailed knowledge of its biology and a correct stratification of molecular subtypes. Androgen Receptor (AR) is expressed in a large part of TNBCs but its prognostic role in this Breast Cancer (BC) subtype is highly debated. In this study, we analyzed AR expression in a series of 238 TNBCs and correlated its expression with clinical-pathological features, survival, and metabolic profile. We showed a consistent association between AR expression and a better prognosis of TNBC patients, while its downregulation appeared strongly associated with diabetic disease. Since a recent prospective study reported a lower BC risk in diabetic women treated with drugs able to reduce circulating levels of glucose compared with non-diabetic woman, and in vitro studies showed that AR level are regulated directly by hyperglycemia, we speculate on the perspective of new integrated therapies for TNBC. PMID:27648143

  14. Downregulation of androgen receptor is strongly associated with diabetes in triple negative breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Collina, Francesca; Cerrone, Margherita; Peluso, Valentina; Laurentiis, Michelino De; Caputo, Roberta; Cecio, Rossella De; Liguori, Giuseppina; Botti, Gerardo; Cantile, Monica; Bonito, Maurizio Di

    2016-01-01

    Developing of personalized therapies for Triple Negative Breast Cancer (TNBC) requires a more detailed knowledge of its biology and a correct stratification of molecular subtypes. Androgen Receptor (AR) is expressed in a large part of TNBCs but its prognostic role in this Breast Cancer (BC) subtype is highly debated. In this study, we analyzed AR expression in a series of 238 TNBCs and correlated its expression with clinical-pathological features, survival, and metabolic profile. We showed a consistent association between AR expression and a better prognosis of TNBC patients, while its downregulation appeared strongly associated with diabetic disease. Since a recent prospective study reported a lower BC risk in diabetic women treated with drugs able to reduce circulating levels of glucose compared with non-diabetic woman, and in vitro studies showed that AR level are regulated directly by hyperglycemia, we speculate on the perspective of new integrated therapies for TNBC. PMID:27648143

  15. Nerve growth factor receptor molecules in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Taniuchi, M.; Schweitzer, J.B.; Johnson, E.M. Jr.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have developed a method to immunoprecipitate rat nerve growth factor (NGF) receptor proteins and have applied the method to detect NGF receptor molecules in the rat brain. Crosslinking /sup 125/I-labeled NGF to either PC12 cells or cultured rat sympathetic neurons yielded two radiolabeled molecules (90 kDa and 220 kDa) that were immunoprecipitated by monoclonal antibody 192-IgG. Further, 192-IgG precipitated two radiolabeled proteins, with the expected sizes (80 kDa and 210 kDa) of noncrosslinked NGF receptor components, from among numerous surface-iodinated PC12 cell proteins. These results demonstrate the specific immunoprecipitation of NGF receptor molecules by 192-IgG. They applied the /sup 125/I-NGF crosslinking and 192-IgG-mediated immunoprecipitation procedures to plasma membrane preparations of rat brain: NGF receptor molecules of the same molecular masses as the peripheral receptor components were consistently detected in all regions and in preparations from whole brains. Removal of the peripheral sympathetic innervation of the brain did not eliminate these NGF receptor proteins, indicating that the receptor is endogenous to central nervous system tissues. They also observed retrograde transport of /sup 125/I-labeled 192-IgG from the parietal cortex to the nucleus basalis and from the hippocampus to the nucleus of the diagonal band of Broca and the medial septal nucleus. These findings demonstrate the presence in brain of NGF receptor molecules indistinguishable from those of the peripheral nervous system.

  16. Expression profiling of nuclear receptors in breast cancer identifies TLX as a mediator of growth and invasion in triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Remenyi, Judit; Banerji, Christopher R.S.; Lai, Chun-Fui; Periyasamy, Manikandan; Lombardo, Ylenia; Busonero, Claudia; Ottaviani, Silvia; Passey, Alun; Quinlan, Philip R.; Purdie, Colin A.; Jordan, Lee B.; Thompson, Alastair M.; Finn, Richard S.; Rueda, Oscar M.; Caldas, Carlos; Gil, Jesus; Coombes, R. Charles; Fuller-Pace, Frances V.; Teschendorff, Andrew E.; Buluwela, Laki; Ali, Simak

    2015-01-01

    The Nuclear Receptor (NR) superfamily of transcription factors comprises 48 members, several of which have been implicated in breast cancer. Most important is estrogen receptor-α (ERα), which is a key therapeutic target. ERα action is facilitated by co-operativity with other NR and there is evidence that ERα function may be recapitulated by other NRs in ERα-negative breast cancer. In order to examine the inter-relationships between nuclear receptors, and to obtain evidence for previously unsuspected roles for any NRs, we undertook quantitative RT-PCR and bioinformatics analysis to examine their expression in breast cancer. While most NRs were expressed, bioinformatic analyses differentiated tumours into distinct prognostic groups that were validated by analyzing public microarray data sets. Although ERα and progesterone receptor were dominant in distinguishing prognostic groups, other NR strengthened these groups. Clustering analysis identified several family members with potential importance in breast cancer. Specifically, RORγ is identified as being co-expressed with ERα, whilst several NRs are preferentially expressed in ERα-negative disease, with TLX expression being prognostic in this subtype. Functional studies demonstrated the importance of TLX in regulating growth and invasion in ERα-negative breast cancer cells. PMID:26280373

  17. Liver X Receptor (LXR) activation negatively regulates visfatin expression in macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Mayi, Therese Hervee; Rigamonti, Elena; Pattou, Francois; Staels, Bart; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Synthetic LXR ligands decreased visfatin expression in human macrophages. {yields} LXR activation leads to a modest and transient decrease of NAD{sup +} concentration. {yields} LXR activation decreased PPAR{gamma}-induced visfatin in human macrophages. -- Abstract: Adipose tissue macrophages (ATM) are the major source of visfatin, a visceral fat adipokine upregulated during obesity. Also known to play a role in B cell differentiation (pre-B cell colony-enhancing factor (PBEF)) and NAD biosynthesis (nicotinamide phosphoribosyl transferase (NAMPT)), visfatin has been suggested to play a role in inflammation. Liver X Receptor (LXR) and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor (PPAR){gamma} are nuclear receptors expressed in macrophages controlling the inflammatory response. Recently, we reported visfatin as a PPAR{gamma} target gene in human macrophages. In this study, we examined whether LXR regulates macrophage visfatin expression. Synthetic LXR ligands decreased visfatin gene expression in a LXR-dependent manner in human and murine macrophages. The decrease of visfatin mRNA was paralleled by a decrease of protein secretion. Consequently, a modest and transient decrease of NAD{sup +} concentration was observed. Interestingly, LXR activation decreased the PPAR{gamma}-induced visfatin gene and protein secretion in human macrophages. Our results identify visfatin as a gene oppositely regulated by the LXR and PPAR{gamma} pathways in human macrophages.

  18. Thyroid hormone exerts negative feedback on hypothalamic type 4 melanocortin receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Decherf, Stéphanie; Seugnet, Isabelle; Kouidhi, Soumaya; Lopez-Juarez, Alejandra; Clerget-Froidevaux, Marie-Stéphanie; Demeneix, Barbara A

    2010-03-01

    The type 4 melanocortin receptor MC4R, a key relay in leptin signaling, links central energy control to peripheral reserve status. MC4R activation in different brain areas reduces food intake and increases energy expenditure. Mice lacking Mc4r are obese. Mc4r is expressed by hypothalamic paraventricular Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) neurons and increases energy usage through activation of Trh and production of the thyroid hormone tri-iodothyronine (T(3)). These facts led us to test the hypothesis that energy homeostasis should require negative feedback by T(3) on Mc4r expression. Quantitative PCR and in situ hybridization showed hyperthyroidism reduces Mc4r mRNA levels in the paraventricular nucleus. Comparative in silico analysis of Mc4r regulatory regions revealed two evolutionarily conserved potential negative thyroid hormone-response elements (nTREs). In vivo ChIP assays on mouse hypothalamus demonstrated association of thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) with a region spanning one nTRE. Further, in vivo gene reporter assays revealed dose-dependent T(3) repression of transcription from the Mc4r promoter in mouse hypothalamus, in parallel with T(3)-dependent Trh repression. Mutagenesis of the nTREs in the Mc4r promoter demonstrated direct regulation by T(3), consolidating the ChIP results. In vivo shRNA knockdown, TR over-expression approaches and use of mutant mice lacking specific TRs showed that both TRalpha and TRbeta contribute to Mc4r regulation. T(3) repression of Mc4r transcription ensures that the energy-saving effects of T(3) feedback on Trh are not overridden by MC4R activation of Trh. Thus parallel repression by T(3) on hypothalamic Mc4r and Trh contributes to energy homeostasis.

  19. Thyroid hormone exerts negative feedback on hypothalamic type 4 melanocortin receptor expression

    PubMed Central

    Decherf, Stéphanie; Seugnet, Isabelle; Kouidhi, Soumaya; Lopez-Juarez, Alejandra; Clerget-Froidevaux, Marie-Stéphanie; Demeneix, Barbara A.

    2010-01-01

    The type 4 melanocortin receptor MC4R, a key relay in leptin signaling, links central energy control to peripheral reserve status. MC4R activation in different brain areas reduces food intake and increases energy expenditure. Mice lacking Mc4r are obese. Mc4r is expressed by hypothalamic paraventricular Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) neurons and increases energy usage through activation of Trh and production of the thyroid hormone tri-iodothyronine (T3). These facts led us to test the hypothesis that energy homeostasis should require negative feedback by T3 on Mc4r expression. Quantitative PCR and in situ hybridization showed hyperthyroidism reduces Mc4r mRNA levels in the paraventricular nucleus. Comparative in silico analysis of Mc4r regulatory regions revealed two evolutionarily conserved potential negative thyroid hormone-response elements (nTREs). In vivo ChIP assays on mouse hypothalamus demonstrated association of thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) with a region spanning one nTRE. Further, in vivo gene reporter assays revealed dose-dependent T3 repression of transcription from the Mc4r promoter in mouse hypothalamus, in parallel with T3-dependent Trh repression. Mutagenesis of the nTREs in the Mc4r promoter demonstrated direct regulation by T3, consolidating the ChIP results. In vivo shRNA knockdown, TR over-expression approaches and use of mutant mice lacking specific TRs showed that both TRα and TRβ contribute to Mc4r regulation. T3 repression of Mc4r transcription ensures that the energy-saving effects of T3 feedback on Trh are not overridden by MC4R activation of Trh. Thus parallel repression by T3 on hypothalamic Mc4r and Trh contributes to energy homeostasis. PMID:20160073

  20. Androgen Receptor Expression in Early Triple-Negative Breast Cancer: Clinical Significance and Prognostic Associations

    PubMed Central

    Pistelli, Mirco; Caramanti, Miriam; Biscotti, Tommasina; Santinelli, Alfredo; Pagliacci, Alessandra; De Lisa, Mariagrazia; Ballatore, Zelmira; Ridolfi, Francesca; Maccaroni, Elena; Bracci, Raffaella; Berardi, Rossana; Battelli, Nicola; Cascinu, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Background: Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC) are characterized by aggressive tumour biology resulting in a poor prognosis. Androgen receptor (AR) is one of newly emerging biomarker in TNBC. In recent years, ARs have been demonstrated to play an important role in the genesis and in the development of breast cancer, although their prognostic role is still debated. In the present study, we explored the correlation of AR expression with clinical, pathological and molecular features and its impact on prognosis in early TNBC. Patients and Methods: ARs were considered positive in case of tumors with >10% nuclear-stained. Survival distribution was estimated by the Kaplan Meier method. The univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. The difference among variables were calculated by chi-square test. Results: 81 TNBC patients diagnosed between January 2006 and December 2011 were included in the analysis. Slides were stained immunohistochemically for estrogen and progesterone receptors, HER-2, Ki-67, ALDH1, e-cadherin and AR. Of the 81 TNBC samples, 18.8% showed positive immunostaining for AR, 23.5% and 44.4% of patients were negative for e-cadherin and ALDH1, respectively. Positive AR immunostaining was inversely correlated with a higher Ki-67 (p < 0.0001) and a lympho-vascular invasion (p = 0.01), but no other variables. Univariate survival analysis revealed that AR expression was not associated with disease-free survival (p = 0.72) or overall survival (p = 0.93). Conclusions: The expression of AR is associated with some biological features of TNBC, such as Ki-67 and lympho-vascular invasion; nevertheless the prognostic significance of AR was not documented in our analysis. However, since ARs are expressed in a significant number of TNBC, prospective studies in order to determine the biological mechanisms and their potential role as novel treatment target. PMID:24978437

  1. Motivational factors and negative affectivity as predictors of alcohol craving.

    PubMed

    Pombo, Samuel; Luísa Figueira, M; Walter, Henriette; Lesch, Otto

    2016-09-30

    Craving is thought to play an important role in alcohol use disorders. The recent inclusion of "craving" as a formal diagnostic symptom calls for further investigation of this subjective phenomenon with multiple dimensions. Considering that alcohol-dependent patients compensate negative physical/emotional states with alcohol, the aim of this study is to investigate alcohol craving and its correlation with drinking measures and affective personality dimensions. A sample of 135 alcohol-dependent patients (104 males and 31 females) was collected from a clinical setting. Subjects self-rated their cravings (Penn Alcohol Craving Scale) and the stage of change. Several personality scales were also administered. Craving was related to drinking status, abstinence time, age, and taking steps. After controlling for these conditions, psychological characteristics related to low self-concept, neuroticism, cyclothymic affective temperament, depression, and hostility were found to be predictors of craving in sober alcohol-dependent patients. Our results support craving as a component of the phenomenology of alcohol dependence and highlight the presence of unpleasant feelings as predictors of craving in sober alcohol-dependent patients without co-occurring psychiatric conditions. The predisposition to experience negative emotions may induce a stronger craving response and increase the likelihood of a first drink and a subsequent loss of control. PMID:27367491

  2. Characterization of macrophage - cancer cell crosstalk in estrogen receptor positive and triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hollmén, Maija; Roudnicky, Filip; Karaman, Sinem; Detmar, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Tumor heterogeneity may broadly influence the activation of tumor-associated macrophages. We aimed to dissect how breast cancer cells of different molecular characteristics contribute to macrophage phenotype and function. Therefore, we performed whole transcriptome sequencing of human monocytes that were co-cultured with estrogen receptor positive (ER+) or triple-negative (TNBC) breast cancer cell lines and studied the biological responses related to the differential gene activation in both monocytes and cancer cells by pathway analysis. ER+ and TNBC cancer cell lines induced distinctly different macrophage phenotypes with different biological functions, cytokine and chemokine secretion, and morphology. Conversely, ER+ and TNBC breast cancer cell lines were distinctly influenced by the presence of macrophages. ER+ cells demonstrated up-regulation of an acute phase inflammatory response, IL-17 signaling and antigen presentation pathway, whereas thioredoxin and vitamin D3 receptor pathways were down-regulated in the respective macrophages. The TNBC educated macrophages down-regulated citrulline metabolism and differentiated into M2-like macrophages with increased MMR protein expression and CCL2 secretion. These data demonstrate how different cancer cells educate the host cells to support tumor growth and might explain why high infiltration of macrophages in TNBC tumors associates with poor prognosis. PMID:25776849

  3. N-glycans of growth factor receptors: their role in receptor function and disease implications.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Motoko; Hasegawa, Yoshihiro; Gao, Congxiao; Kuroki, Yoshio; Taniguchi, Naoyuki

    2016-10-01

    Numerous signal-transduction-related molecules are secreted proteins or membrane proteins, and the mechanism by which these molecules are regulated by glycan chains is a very important issue for developing an understanding of the cellular events that transpire. This review covers the functional regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), ErbB3 and the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) receptor by N-glycans. This review shows that the N-glycans play important roles in regulating protein conformation and interactions with carbohydrate recognition molecules. These results point to the possibility of a novel strategy for controlling cell signalling and developing novel glycan-based therapeutics. PMID:27612953

  4. Estrogen receptor beta participate in the regulation of metabolizm of extracellular matrix in estrogen alpha negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Leśniewska, Monika; Miltyk, Wojciech; Swiatecka, Jolanta; Tomaszewska, Małgorzata; Kuźmicki, Mariusz; Pałka, Jerzy; Wołczyński, Sławomir

    2009-01-01

    The biology of breast cancer is closely releted to sex steroid hormones. Estrogen receptor beta is overexpressed in around 70% breast cancer cases, referrd to as "ER positive". Estrogens bind to estrogen receptor and stimulate the transcription of genes involved in control of cell proliferation. Moreover, estrogens may induce growth factors and components of extracellular matrix and interact with them in a complex manner. Extracellular matrix and integrins play an important role in cell functions and their aberrant expressions are implicated in breast cancer development, invasion and metastasis. ER beta is certainly associated with more differentiated tumors, while evidence of role of ER beta is controversial. The highly invasive breast cancer ER beta negative cell line MDA-MB 231 can be the model of exam the role of ER beta in breast cancer. The aim of this study was to examine the role of activation of ER beta on the metabolism of the extracellular matrix and the expression of beta-1 integrin in the breast cancer cell line MDA-MB 231. The cells were exposed on the estradiol, tamoxifen, raloxifen and genisteina in dose dependent concentrations. To determine the relative rate of collagen syntesis we measured the time-dependent reduction of collagen-bound radioactivity after pulse-chase labeling with [3 H] prolina by Peterkofsky methods. The expression of beta-1 integrin was determine by Western blot analysis. The activity of MMP2 and 9 were measured using gelatin zymography with an image analysis system. Our data suggest on the role of estrogen receptor beta on the metabolism of extracellular matrix in the breast cancer line MDA - MB 231. Estradiol and SERMs regulate the expression of ECM proteins: collagen, integrins and enhance activity of metaloproteinases 2 and 9. PMID:20067880

  5. Quantitative in vivo immunohistochemistry of epidermal growth factor receptor using a receptor concentration imaging approach

    PubMed Central

    Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Gunn, Jason R.; Wells, Wendy A.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2014-01-01

    As receptor-targeted therapeutics become increasingly used in clinical oncology, the ability to quantify protein expression and pharmacokinetics in vivo is imperative to ensure successful individualized treatment plans. Current standards for receptor analysis are performed on extracted tissues. These measurements are static and often physiologically irrelevant, therefore, only a partial picture of available receptors for drug targeting in vivo is provided. Until recently, in vivo measurements were limited by the inability to separate delivery, binding, and retention effects but this can be circumvented by a dual-tracer approach for referencing the detected signal. We hypothesized that in vivo receptor concentration imaging (RCI) would be superior to ex vivo immunohistochemistry. Using multiple xenograft tumor models with varying epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression, we determined the EGFR concentration in each model using a novel targeted agent (anti-EGFR affibody-IRDye800CW conjugate) along with a simultaneously delivered reference agent (control affibody-IRDye680RD conjugate). The RCI-calculated in vivo receptor concentration was strongly correlated with ex vivo pathologist-scored immunohistochemistry and computer-quantified ex vivo immunofluorescence. In contrast, no correlation was observed with ex vivo Western blot or in vitro flow cytometry assays. Overall, our results argue that in vivo RCI provides a robust measure of receptor expression equivalent to ex vivo immuno-staining, with implications for use in non-invasive monitoring of therapy or therapeutic guidance during surgery. PMID:25344226

  6. The prognostic value of epidermal growth factor receptor mRNA expression in primary ovarian cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, J. M.; Langdon, S. P.; Simpson, B. J.; Stewart, M.; Katsaros, D.; Sismondi, P.; Love, S.; Scott, W. N.; Williams, A. R.; Lessells, A. M.; Macleod, K. G.; Smyth, J. F.; Miller, W. R.

    1996-01-01

    The expression of mRNA for the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor, EGF and transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha) was determined in 76 malignant, six borderline and 15 benign primary ovarian tumours using the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and related to clinical and pathological parameters. Of the malignant tumours, 70% (53/76) expressed EGF receptor mRNA, 31% (23/75) expressed EGF mRNA and 35% (26/75) expressed TGF-alpha mRNA. For the borderline tumours, four of six (67%) expressed EGF receptor mRNA, 1/6 (17%) expressed TGF-alpha mRNA and none expressed EGF mRNA. Finally, 33% (5/15) of the benign tumours expressed EGF receptor mRNA, whereas 40% (6/15) expressed EGF mRNA and 7% (1/15) expressed TGF-alpha mRNA. The presence of the EGF receptor in malignant tumours was associated with that of TGF-alpha (P = 0.0015) but not with EGF (P = 1.00), whereas there was no relationship between the presence of EGF and TGF-alpha (P = 1.00). EGF receptor mRNA expression was significantly and positively associated with serous histology (P = 0.006) but not with stage or grade. Neither EGF nor TGF-alpha showed any link with histological subtype or stage. The survival of patients with malignant tumours possessing EGF receptor mRNA was significantly reduced compared with that of patients whose tumours were negative (P = 0.030 for all malignant tumours; P = 0.007 for malignant epithelial tumours only). In contrast, neither the expression of TGF-alpha nor EGF was related to survival. These data suggest that the presence of EGF receptor mRNA is associated with poor prognosis in primary ovarian cancer. Images Figure 1 PMID:8562334

  7. Visualization of growth factor receptor sites in rat forebrain

    SciTech Connect

    Quirion, R.; Araujo, D.; Nair, N.P.; Chabot, J.G.

    1988-01-01

    It is now known that various growth factors may also act in the central nervous system. Among them, it has recently been shown that epidermal growth factor (EGF) and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) may possess trophic effects in the mammalian brain. We report here on the respective autoradiographic distribution of (/sup 125/I)EGF and (/sup 125/I)IGF-I receptor binding sites in the rat brain, both during ontogeny and in adulthood. It appears that (/sup 125/I)EGF sites are mostly found in the rat forebrain during brain development. On the other hand, (/sup 125/I)IGF-I sites are more widely distributed both during ontogeny and in adulthood. These results reveal the plasticity of the expression of EGF and IGF-I receptor sites in the mammalian brain. This could be relevant for the respective role of these two growth factors in the development and maintenance of neuronal function.

  8. Factors associated with prognosis in human breast cancer. III. Estradiol receptors and short term relapse.

    PubMed

    Pascual, M R; Macías, A; Moreno, L; Lage, A

    1983-01-01

    Prognosis in breast cancer is one of the most important subjects currently studied because of the heterogeneity of the disease even inside the same clinical stage. Estrogen receptor determination in human breast cancer has been recognized as a prognostic factor since it is related to the long-term survival and disease-free interval. In a series of papers concerning prognosis in breast cancer this the third one which includes estrogen receptor determination in the multivariate analysis, because of the limitations of the clinical factor to conform stratification groups. We have analyzed the short term probability of relapse in a group of 136 patients treated for breast cancer. Multivariate stratification analysis was performed with the aid of Bintree computer program, which produces binary splits of the population according to the criterion of maximal reduction of variance and generates a binary stratification tree. Lymph node involvement is the most important prognostic factor in the probability of relapse. Patients without nodal involvement lacking estradiol receptor had 25% of relapse. It is therefore evident that estradiol receptor is a factor of prognostic value even inside node negative patients. PMID:6656962

  9. Differential Effect of Phosphorylation-Defective Survivin on Radiation Response in Estrogen Receptor-Positive and -Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Larson, Richard; Xu, Wei; Woodward, Wendy A.

    2015-01-01

    Survivin is a key member of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein family, and is considered a promising therapeutic target due to its universal overexpression in cancers. Survivin is implicated in cellular radiation response through its role in apoptosis, cell division, and DNA damage response. In the present study, analysis of publically available data sets showed that survivin gene expression increased with breast cancer stage (p < 0.00001) and was significantly higher in estrogen receptor-negative cancers as compared to estrogen receptor-positive cancers (p = 9e-46). However, survivin was prognostic in estrogen receptor-positive tumors (p = 0.03) but not in estrogen receptor-negative tumors (p = 0.28). We assessed the effect of a survivin dominant-negative mutant on colony-formation (2D) and mammosphere-formation (3D) efficiency, and radiation response in the estrogen receptor-positive MCF7 and estrogen receptor-negative SUM149 breast cancer cell lines. The colony-formation efficiency was significantly lower in the dominant-negative survivin-transduced cells versus control MCF7 cells (0.42 vs. 0.58, p < 0.01), but it was significantly higher in dominant-negative population versus control-transduced SUM149 cells (0.29 vs. 0.20, p < 0.01). A similar, non-significant, trend in mammosphere-formation efficiency was observed. We compared the radiosensitivity of cells stably expressing dominant-negative survivin with their controls in both cell lines under 2D and 3D culture conditions following exposure to increasing doses of radiation. We found that the dominant-negative populations were radioprotective in MCF7 cells but radiosensitive in SUM149 cells compared to the control-transduced population; further, Taxol was synergistic with the survivin mutant in SUM149 but not MCF7. Our data suggests that survivin modulation influences radiation response differently in estrogen receptor-positive and estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer subtypes, warranting further

  10. Disabled-2 is a negative immune regulator of lipopolysaccharide-stimulated Toll-like receptor 4 internalization and signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Wei-Shan; Ling, Pin; Cheng, Ju-Chien; Chang, Shy-Shin; Tseng, Ching-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) plays a pivotal role in the host response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a major cell wall component of Gram-negative bacteria. Here, we elucidated whether the endocytic adaptor protein Disabled-2 (Dab2), which is abundantly expressed in macrophages, plays a role in LPS-stimulated TLR4 signaling and trafficking. Molecular analysis and transcriptome profiling of RAW264.7 macrophage-like cells expressing short-hairpin RNA of Dab2 revealed that Dab2 regulated the TLR4/TRIF pathway upon LPS stimulation. Knockdown of Dab2 augmented TRIF-dependent interferon regulatory factor 3 activation and the expression of subsets of inflammatory cytokines and interferon-inducible genes. Dab2 acted as a clathrin sponge and sequestered clathrin from TLR4 in the resting stage of macrophages. Upon LPS stimulation, clathrin was released from Dab2 to facilitate endocytosis of TLR4 for triggering the TRIF-mediated pathway. Dab2 functions as a negative immune regulator of TLR4 endocytosis and signaling, supporting a novel role for a Dab2-associated regulatory circuit in controlling the inflammatory response of macrophages to endotoxin. PMID:27748405

  11. Nonclassical estrogen receptor alpha signaling mediates negative feedback in the female mouse reproductive axis.

    PubMed

    Glidewell-Kenney, C; Hurley, L A; Pfaff, L; Weiss, J; Levine, J E; Jameson, J L

    2007-05-01

    Ovarian estrogen exerts both positive and negative feedback control over luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion during the ovulatory cycle. Estrogen receptor (ER) alpha but not ERbeta knockout mice lack estrogen feedback. Thus, estrogen feedback appears to be primarily mediated by ERalpha. However, it is now recognized that, in addition to binding to estrogen response elements (EREs) in DNA to alter target gene transcription, ERalpha signals through ERE-independent or nonclassical pathways, and the relative contributions of these pathways in conveying estrogen feedback remain unknown. Previously we created a knockin mouse model expressing a mutant form of ERalpha (AA) with ablated ERE-dependent but intact ERE-independent activity. Breeding this allele onto the ERalpha-null (-/-) background, we examine the ability of ERE-independent ERalpha signaling pathways to convey estrogen feedback regulation of the female hypothalamic-pituitary axis in vivo. ERalpha-/AA exhibited 69.9% lower serum LH levels compared with ERalpha-/- mice. Additionally, like wild type, ERalpha-/AA mice exhibited elevated LH after ovariectomy (OVX). Furthermore, the post-OVX rise in serum LH was significantly suppressed by estrogen treatment in OVX ERalpha-/AA mice. However, unlike wild type, both ERalpha-/AA and ERalpha-/- mice failed to exhibit estrous cyclicity, spontaneous ovulation, or an afternoon LH surge response to estrogen. These results indicate that ERE-independent ERalpha signaling is sufficient to convey a major portion of estrogen's negative feedback actions, whereas positive feedback and spontaneous ovulatory cyclicity require ERE-dependent ERalpha signaling.

  12. Biochemical and biological properties of the nerve growth factor receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Taniuchi, M.

    1988-01-01

    We have utilized a monoclonal antibody (192-IgG) to study the rat nerve growth factor receptor. After intraocular injection, {sup 125}I-192-IgG was retrogradely transported in sympathetic neuronal axons to the superior cervical ganglion. When the sciatic nerve was ligated to induce the accumulation of axonally transported materials, 192-IgG immunostaining was observed on both sides of the ligature, indicating that NGF receptors are transported in both orthograde and retrograde directions. By using {sup 125}I-NGF crosslinking and 192-IgG immunoprecipitation, we detected receptor molecules throughout the rat brain, thereby supporting the hypothesis that NGF is active in the central nervous system. We also discovered that sciatic nerve transection leads to a dramatic increase in the amount of NGF receptor found in the distal portion of the nerve. Immunostaining revealed that all Schwann cells in the distal axotomized nerve were expressing NGF receptors. We examined phosphorylation of NGF receptor in cultured sympathetic neurons and PC12 cells. We also examined pharmacological effects of 192-IgG. Systemic injection of 192-IgG into neonatal rats caused a permanent partial sympathectomy in a dose-dependent manner; a maximum of 50% of the cells were killed.

  13. A role for interferon regulatory factor 4 in receptor editing.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Simanta; Ma, Shibin; Trinh, Long; Lu, Runqing

    2008-04-01

    Receptor editing is the primary means through which B cells revise antigen receptors and maintain central tolerance. Previous studies have demonstrated that interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF-4) and IRF-8 promote immunoglobulin light-chain rearrangement and transcription at the pre-B stage. Here, the roles of IRF-4 and -8 in receptor editing were analyzed. Our results show that secondary rearrangement was impaired in IRF-4 but not IRF-8 mutant mice, suggesting that receptor editing is defective in the absence of IRF-4. The role of IRF-4 in receptor editing was further examined in B-cell-receptor (BCR) transgenic mice. Our results show that secondary rearrangement triggered by membrane-bound antigen was defective in the IRF-4-deficient mice. Our results further reveal that the defect in secondary rearrangement is more severe at the immunoglobulin lambda locus than at the kappa locus, indicating that IRF-4 is more critical for the lambda rearrangement. We provide evidence demonstrating that the expression of IRF-4 in immature B cells is rapidly induced by self-antigen and that the reconstitution of IRF-4 expression in the IRF-4 mutant immature B cells promotes secondary rearrangement. Thus, our studies identify IRF-4 as a nuclear effector of a BCR signaling pathway that promotes secondary rearrangement at the immature B-cell stage.

  14. The ontogeny of epidermal growth factor receptors during mouse development

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, E.D.; Meek, J.

    1984-05-01

    In an attempt to understand the role(s) of epidermal growth factor (EGF) in vivo during murine development, we have examined the /sup 125/I-EGF binding characteristics of EGF-receptors in membrane preparations of tissues from the 12th day of gestation to parturition. Using autoradiography, the earliest time that we could detect EGF-receptors was on trophoblast cells cultured for 3 days as blastocyst outgrowths. Trophoblast eventually forms a large portion of the placenta, where EGF-receptors have long been recognized. We measured the number and affinity of EGF-receptors on tissues dissected from conceptuses from the 12th day of gestation in order to identify a stage when tissues may be most sensitive to EGF. Whereas the number of EGF receptors increases during gestation for all tissues examined, the affinity of the receptors declines for carcass and placenta and remains relatively unchanged for brain and liver. This suggests that EGF may function differently throughout development. Our hypothesis is that EGF (or its embryonic equivalent) initially stimulates proliferation in embryonic cells and then stimulates differentiation as the tissues mature. In the adult, its main role could be to stimulate tissue repair after damage.

  15. Fibroblast growth factor receptors, developmental corruption and malignant disease.

    PubMed

    Kelleher, Fergal C; O'Sullivan, Hazel; Smyth, Elizabeth; McDermott, Ray; Viterbo, Antonella

    2013-10-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGF) are a family of ligands that bind to four different types of cell surface receptor entitled, FGFR1, FGFR2, FGFR3 and FGFR4. These receptors differ in their ligand binding affinity and tissue distribution. The prototypical receptor structure is that of an extracellular region comprising three immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains, a hydrophobic transmembrane segment and a split intracellular tyrosine kinase domain. Alternative gene splicing affecting the extracellular third Ig loop also creates different receptor isoforms entitled FGFRIIIb and FGFRIIIc. Somatic fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) mutations are implicated in different types of cancer and germline FGFR mutations occur in developmental syndromes particularly those in which craniosynostosis is a feature. The mutations found in both conditions are often identical. Many somatic FGFR mutations in cancer are gain-of-function mutations of established preclinical oncogenic potential. Gene amplification can also occur with 19-22% of squamous cell lung cancers for example having amplification of FGFR1. Ontologic comparators can be informative such as aberrant spermatogenesis being implicated in both spermatocytic seminomas and Apert syndrome. The former arises from somatic FGFR3 mutations and Apert syndrome arises from germline FGFR2 mutations. Finally, therapeutics directed at inhibiting the FGF/FGFR interaction are a promising subject for clinical trials.

  16. Normal phenotype in conditional androgen receptor (AR) exon 3-floxed neomycin-negative male mice.

    PubMed

    Rana, Kesha; Clarke, Michele V; Zajac, Jeffrey D; Davey, Rachel A; MacLean, Helen E

    2014-01-01

    Androgens (testosterone and dihydrotestosterone) acting via the androgen receptor (AR) are required for male sexual differentiation, and also regulate the development of many other tissues including muscle, fat and bone. We previously generated an AR(lox) mouse line with exon 3 of the AR gene targeted by loxP sites. The deletion of exon 3 is in-frame, so only the DNA binding-dependent actions of the AR are deleted, but non-DNA binding-dependent actions are retained. This line also contained an antibiotic resistance selection cassette, neomycin (neo) in intron 3, which was also flanked by loxP sites. Hemizygous AR(lox) male mice demonstrated a phenotype of hyperandrogenization, with increased mass of androgen-dependent tissues. We hypothesized that this hyperandrogenization was likely to be due to the presence of the neo cassette. In this study, we have generated an AR(lox) neo-negative mouse line, using the EIIa-cre deleter mouse line to remove the neo cassette. Hemizygous AR(lox) neo-negative male mice have a normal phenotype, with normal body mass and normal mass of androgen-dependent tissues including the testis, seminal vesicles, kidney, spleen, heart and retroperitoneal fat. This neo-negative exon 3-targeted mouse line is the only floxed AR mouse line available to study the DNA binding-dependent actions of the AR in a tissue-specific manner, and is suitable for investigation in all tissues. This study demonstrates the importance of removing the selection cassette, which can potentially alter the phenotype of floxed mouse lines even in the absence of detectable effects on target gene expression.

  17. Cardioselective Dominant-negative Thyroid Hormone Receptor (Δ337T) Modulates Myocardial Metabolism and Contractile Dfficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Hyyti, Outi M.; Olson, Aaron; Ge, Ming; Ning, Xue-Han; Buroker, Norman E.; Chung, Youngran; Jue, Thomas; Portman, Michael A.

    2008-06-03

    Dominant- negative thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) show elevated expression relative to ligand-binding TRs during cardiac hypertrophy. We tested the hypothesis that overexpression of a dominant-negative TR alters cardiac metabolism and contractile efficiency (CE). We used mice expressing the cardioselective dominant-negative TRβ1 mutation Δ337T. Isolated working Δ337T hearts and nontransgenic control (Con) hearts were perfused with 13C-labeled free fatty acids (FFA), acetoacetate (ACAC), lactate, and glucose at physiological concentrations for 30 min. 13C NMR spectroscopy and isotopomer analyses were used to determine substrate flux and fractional contributions (Fc) of acetyl-CoA to the citric acid cycle (CAC). Δ337T hearts exhibited rate depression but higher developed pressure and CE, defined as work per oxygen consumption (MV˙ O2). Unlabeled substrate Fc from endogenous sources was higher in Δ337T, but ACAC Fc was lower. Fluxes through CAC, lactate, ACAC, and FFA were reduced in Δ337T. CE and Fc differences were reversed by pacing Δ337T to Con rates, accompanied by an increase in FFA Fc. Δ337T hearts lacked the ability to increase MV˙ O2. Decreases in protein expression for glucose transporter-4 and hexokinase-2 and increases in pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-2 and -4 suggest that these hearts are unable to increase carbohydrate oxidation in response to stress. These data show that Δ337T alters the metabolic phenotype in murine heart by reducing substrate flux for multiple pathways. Some of these changes are heart rate dependent, indicating that the substrate shift may represent an accommodation to altered contractile protein kinetics, which can be disrupted by pacing stress.

  18. P2y receptor-mediated angiogenesis via vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 signaling.

    PubMed

    Rumjahn, Sharif M; Baldwin, Karla A; Buxton, Iain L O

    2007-01-01

    Pathological as well as physiological angiogenesis is known to be regulated by such factors as nucleotides and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF). Activated P2Y nucleotide receptors have been observed to associate and transactivate VEGF Receptor 2 (VEGFR2), suggesting a cooperation between nucleotide and VEGF signaling in angiogenesis. P2YR mediated VEGFR2 signaling therefore may be important in describing the angiogenic signaling of nucleotides such as ATP. Here, we provide evidence that supports the notion of P2YR-VEGFR2 signaling. The significant angiogenic effect of P2Y1/2 receptor agonists (100 microM ATP and 10 microM 2MS-ATP) on endothelial cell tubulogenesis was suppressed back to near control levels upon addition of 1 microM SU1498 (specific VEGFR2 tyrosine kinase inhibitor). We believe that this P2YR-VEFGR2 signaling is an important component of pathological, as well as physiological angiogenesis.

  19. Therapeutic Targeting of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptors in Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fujimori, Yoshitaka; Otsuki, Sho; Sato, Yuya; Nakagawa, Masatoshi

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy has become the global standard treatment for patients with metastatic or unresectable gastric cancer (GC), although outcomes remain unfavorable. Many molecular-targeted therapies inhibiting signaling pathways of various tyrosine kinase receptors have been developed, and monoclonal antibodies targeting human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) have become standard therapy for HER2-positive GC. An inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 or MET has also produced promising results in patients with GC. Fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFR) play key roles in tumor growth via activated signaling pathways in GC. Genomic amplification of FGFR2 leads to the aberrant activation found in GC tumors and is related to survival in patients with GC. This review discusses the clinical relevance of FGFR in GC and examines FGFR as a potential therapeutic target in patients with GC. Preclinical studies in animal models suggest that multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), including FGFR inhibitor, suppress tumor cell proliferation and delay tumor progression. Several TKIs are now being evaluated in clinical trials as treatment for metastatic or unresectable GC harboring FGFR2 amplification. PMID:26000013

  20. [Resistant gram-negative bacteria. Therapeutic approach and risk factors].

    PubMed

    Salgado, P; Gilsanz, F; Maseda, E

    2016-09-01

    The rapid spread of multidrug-resistant bacteria has become a serious threat, especially in critical care units, thereby prolonging the hospital stay. Enterobacteriaceae have a high capacity to adapt to any environment. Plasmids are the reason behind their expansion. The choice of empiric therapy for intra-abdominal or urinary infections requires knowledge of the intrinsic microbiological variability of each hospital or critical care unit, as well as the source of infection, safety or antibiotic toxicity, interaction with other drugs, the dosage regimen and the presence of risk factors. Carbapenems are the drug of choice in the case of suspected infection by ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae. The new ceftazidime/avibactam and ceftolozane/tazobactam drugs are opening up promising new horizons in the treatment of multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae. PMID:27608309

  1. Overexpression and activation of epidermal growth factor receptor in hemangioblastomas

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gregory J.; Karajannis, Matthias A.; Newcomb, Elizabeth W.

    2010-01-01

    Hemangioblastomas frequently develop in patients with von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease, an autosomal dominant genetic disorder. The tumors are characterized by a dense network of blood capillaries, often in association with cysts. Although activation of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling, including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been implicated in the development of malignant brain tumors such as high-grade gliomas, little is known about the role of RTK signaling in hemangioblastomas. To address this issue, we examined hemangioblastoma tumor specimens using receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) activation profiling and immunohistochemistry. Six human hemangioblastomas were analyzed with a phospho-RTK antibody array, revealing EGFR phosphorylation in all tumors. EGFR expression was confirmed by immunohistochemistry in all tumors analyzed and downstream effector pathway activation was demonstrated by positive staining for phospho-AKT. Our findings suggest that, in primary hemangioblastomas, RTK upregulation and signaling predominantly involves EGFR, providing an attractive molecular target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:20730556

  2. Pharmacological Modulation of NMDA Receptor Activity and the Advent of Negative and Positive Allosteric Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Monaghan, Daniel T.; Irvine, Mark W.; Costa, Blaise Mathias; Fang, Guangyu; Jane, David E.

    2012-01-01

    The NMDA receptor (NMDAR) family of L-glutamate receptors are well known to have diverse roles in CNS function as well as in various neuropathological and psychiatric conditions. Until recently, the types of agents available to pharmacologically regulate NMDAR function have been quite limited in terms of mechanism of action and subtype selectivity. This has changed significantly in the past two years. The purpose of this review is to summarize the many drug classes now available for modulating NMDAR activity. Previously, this included competitive antagonists at the L-glutamate and glycine binding sites, high and low affinity channel blockers, and GluN2B-selective N-terminal domain binding site antagonists. More recently, we and others have identifed new classes of NMDAR agents that are either positive or negative allosteric modulators (PAMs and NAMs, respectively). These compounds include the pan potentiator UBP646, the GluN2A-selective potentiator/GluN2C & GluN2D inhibitor UBP512, the GluN2D-selective potentiator UBP551, the GluN2C/GluN2D-selective potentiator CIQ as well as the new NMDAR-NAMs such as the pan-inhibitor UBP618, the GluN2C/GluN2D-selective inhibitor QZN46 and the GluN2A inhibitors UBP608 and TCN201. These new agents do not bind within the L-glutamate or glycine binding sites, the ion channel pore or the N-terminal regulatory domain. Collectively, these new allosteric modulators appear to be acting at multiple novel sites on the NMDAR complex. Importantly, these agents display improved subtype-selectivity and as NMDAR PAMs and NAMs, they represent a new generation of potential NMDAR therapeutics. PMID:22269804

  3. Non-negative matrix factorization and term structure of interest rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takada, Hellinton H.; Stern, Julio M.

    2015-01-01

    Non-Negative Matrix Factorization (NNMF) is a technique for dimensionality reduction with a wide variety of applications from text mining to identification of concentrations in chemistry. NNMF deals with non-negative data and results in non-negative factors and factor loadings. Consequently, it is a natural choice when studying the term structure of interest rates. In this paper, NNMF is applied to obtain factors from the term structure of interest rates and the procedure is compared with other very popular techniques: principal component analysis and Nelson-Siegel model. The NNMF approximation for the term structure of interest rates is better in terms of fitting. From a practitioner point of view, the NNMF factors and factor loadings obtained possess straightforward financial interpretations due to their non-negativeness.

  4. [Advanced luminal breast cancer (hormone receptor-positive, HER2 negative): New therapeutic options in 2015].

    PubMed

    Vanacker, Hélène; Bally, Olivia; Kassem, Loay; Tredan, Olivier; Heudel, Pierre; Bachelot, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Despite improvements in early detection, surgery and systemic therapy, metastatic breast cancer remains a major cause of death. Luminal type breast cancers expressing hormone estrogen receptor (ER) or progesterone (PR) and without HER2 overexpression are generally sensitive to endocrine therapy, but raise the issue of the occurrence of resistance to treatment, particularly at metastatic stage. A better understanding of hormone resistance may guide the development of new therapeutics. New strategies aim at enhancing and prolonging of endocrine sensitivity, by optimizing existing schemes, or by combining an endocrine therapy with a targeted therapies specific to hormone resistance pathways: ER signaling, PI3K/AKT/mTOR and Cyclin Dependent Kinase (CDK). Key corners of 2014 include confirmation of benefit of high dose fulvestrant, and commercialization of everolimus as the first mTOR inhibitor in this indication. Other strategies are being tested dealing with new endocrine therapies or new molecular targets such as PI3K inhibitors, insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-R) and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors. Coming years may be fruitful and might radically change our way to treat these patients.

  5. [Advanced luminal breast cancer (hormone receptor-positive, HER2 negative): New therapeutic options in 2015].

    PubMed

    Vanacker, Hélène; Bally, Olivia; Kassem, Loay; Tredan, Olivier; Heudel, Pierre; Bachelot, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Despite improvements in early detection, surgery and systemic therapy, metastatic breast cancer remains a major cause of death. Luminal type breast cancers expressing hormone estrogen receptor (ER) or progesterone (PR) and without HER2 overexpression are generally sensitive to endocrine therapy, but raise the issue of the occurrence of resistance to treatment, particularly at metastatic stage. A better understanding of hormone resistance may guide the development of new therapeutics. New strategies aim at enhancing and prolonging of endocrine sensitivity, by optimizing existing schemes, or by combining an endocrine therapy with a targeted therapies specific to hormone resistance pathways: ER signaling, PI3K/AKT/mTOR and Cyclin Dependent Kinase (CDK). Key corners of 2014 include confirmation of benefit of high dose fulvestrant, and commercialization of everolimus as the first mTOR inhibitor in this indication. Other strategies are being tested dealing with new endocrine therapies or new molecular targets such as PI3K inhibitors, insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-R) and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors. Coming years may be fruitful and might radically change our way to treat these patients. PMID:26118876

  6. Anti-epidermal growth factor receptor skin toxicity: a matter of topical hydration.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Daris; Codecà, Carla; Bocci, Barbara; Crepaldi, Francesca; Violati, Martina; Viale, Giulia; Careri, Carmela; Caldiera, Sarah; Bordin, Veronica; Luciani, Andrea; Zonato, Sabrina; Cassinelli, Gabriela; Foa, Paolo

    2016-02-01

    Skin toxicity is a frequent complication of anti-epidermal growth factor receptor therapy, which can be an obstacle in maintaining the dose intensity and may negatively impact on the clinical outcome of cancer patients. Skin lesions depend on the disruption of the keratinocyte development pathways and no treatment is clearly effective in resolving the cutaneous alterations frequently found during anti-epidermal growth factor receptor therapy. Among systemic treatments, oral tetracycline proved to be useful in preventing skin manifestations. We describe the case of a patient affected by metastatic colorectal cancer, for whom a combination of chemotherapy and cetuximab was used as second-line treatment. The patient developed a symptomatic papulopustular skin rash that disappeared completely after a twice-daily application of a hydrating and moisturizing cream, mainly consisting of a mixture of paraffin, silicone compounds, and macrogol. The marked cutaneous amelioration allowed the patient to continue cetuximab without any further symptoms and was associated with a partial radiological response.

  7. Estrogen/Progesterone Receptor Negativity and HER2 Positivity Predict Locoregional Recurrence in Patients With T1a,bN0 Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, Jeffrey M.; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana M.; Guray, Merih; Sahin, Aysegul

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: Data have suggested that the molecular features of breast cancer are important determinants of outcome; however, few studies have correlated these features with locoregional recurrence (LRR). In the present study, we evaluated estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) as predictors of LRR in patients with lymph node-negative disease and tumors {<=}1 cm, because these patients often do not receive adjuvant chemotherapy or trastuzumab. Methods and Materials: The data from 911 patients with stage T1a,bN0 breast cancer who had received definitive treatment at our institution between 1997 and 2002 were retrospectively reviewed. We prospectively analyzed ER/PR/HER2 expression from the archival tissue blocks of 756 patients. These 756 patients represented the cohort for the present study. Results: With a median follow-up of 6.0 years, the 5- and 8-year Kaplan-Meier LRR rate was 1.6% and 5.9%, respectively, with no difference noted in those who underwent breast conservation therapy vs. mastectomy (p = .347). The 8-year LRR rates were greater in the patients with ER-negative (10.6% vs. 4.2%, p = .016), PR-negative (9.0% vs. 4.2%, p = .009), or HER2-positive (17.5% vs. 3.9%, p = 0.009) tumors. On multivariate analysis, ER-negative and PR-negative disease (hazard ratio, 2.37; p = .046) and HER2-positive disease (hazard ratio, 3.13, p = .016) independently predicted for LRR. Conclusion: Patients with ER/PR-negative or HER2-positive T1a,bN0 breast cancer had a greater risk of LRR. Therapeutic strategies, such as the use of chemotherapy and/or anti-HER2 therapies, should be considered for future clinical trials for these patients.

  8. Growth factor receptor interplay and resistance in cancer.

    PubMed

    Jones, Helen E; Gee, Julia M W; Hutcheson, Iain R; Knowlden, Janice M; Barrow, Denise; Nicholson, Robert I

    2006-12-01

    Aberrant signalling through the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays a major role in the progression and maintenance of the malignant phenotype and the receptor is therefore a rational anti-cancer target. A variety of approaches have been developed to specifically target the EGFR which include monoclonal antibodies and small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors, such as gefitinib (Iressa). However, the recent clinical experience across a range of cancer types is revealing that despite the anti-EGFR agents demonstrating some anti-tumour activity, there is a high level of de novo and acquired resistance to such treatments and moreover, overexpression of the EGFR is clearly not the sole determinant of response to such therapies. Such adverse phenomena, which serve to limit the overall therapeutic impact of these new agents, implies the existence of a greater complexity involved in the regulation of EGFR signalling than was previously assumed. Indeed, evidence is accumulating which demonstrates that signalling interplay occurs between the EGFR, and the IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) and the review will focus on the emerging concept of growth factor pathway switching between these two receptors as a means of influencing the effectiveness of anti-EGFR agents such as gefitinib.

  9. A candidate targeting molecule of insulin-like growth factor-I receptor for gastrointestinal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, Yasushi; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Ohashi, Hirokazu; Endo, Takao; Carbone, David P; Imai, Kohzoh; Shinomura, Yasuhisa

    2010-01-01

    Advances in molecular research in cancer have brought new therapeutic strategies into clinical usage. One new group of targets is tyrosine kinase receptors, which can be treated by several strategies, including small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Aberrant activation of growth factors/receptors and their signal pathways are required for malignant transformation and progression in gastrointestinal (GI) carcinomas. The concept of targeting specific carcinogenic receptors has been validated by successful clinical application of many new drugs. Type I insulin-like growth factor (IGF) receptor (IGF-IR) signaling potently stimulates tumor progression and cellular differentiation, and is a promising new molecular target in human malignancies. In this review, we focus on this promising therapeutic target, IGF-IR. The IGF/IGF-IR axis is an important modifier of tumor cell proliferation, survival, growth, and treatment sensitivity in many malignant diseases, including human GI cancers. Preclinical studies demonstrated that downregulation of IGF-IR signals reversed the neoplastic phenotype and sensitized cells to anticancer treatments. These results were mainly obtained through our strategy of adenoviruses expressing dominant negative IGF-IR (IGF-IR/dn) against gastrointestinal cancers, including esophagus, stomach, colon, and pancreas. We also summarize a variety of strategies to interrupt the IGFs/IGF-IR axis and their preclinical experiences. Several mAbs and TKIs targeting IGF-IR have entered clinical trials, and early results have suggested that these agents have generally acceptable safety profiles as single agents. We summarize the advantages and disadvantages of each strategy and discuss the merits/demerits of dual targeting of IGF-IR and other growth factor receptors, including Her2 and the insulin receptor, as well as other alternatives and possible drug combinations. Thus, IGF-IR might be a candidate for a molecular

  10. Rab GTPases regulate endothelial cell protein C receptor-mediated endocytosis and trafficking of factor VIIa.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Ramesh C; Keshava, Shiva; Esmon, Charles T; Pendurthi, Usha R; Rao, L Vijaya Mohan

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have established that factor VIIa (FVIIa) binds to the endothelial cell protein C receptor (EPCR). FVIIa binding to EPCR may promote the endocytosis of this receptor/ligand complex. Rab GTPases are known to play a crucial role in the endocytic and exocytic pathways of receptors or receptor/ligand complexes. The present study was undertaken to investigate the role of Rab GTPases in the intracellular trafficking of EPCR and FVIIa. CHO-EPCR cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were transduced with recombinant adenoviral vectors to express wild-type, constitutively active, or dominant negative mutant of various Rab GTPases. Cells were exposed to FVIIa conjugated with AF488 fluorescent probe (AF488-FVIIa), and intracellular trafficking of FVIIa, EPCR, and Rab proteins was evaluated by immunofluorescence confocal microscopy. In cells expressing wild-type or constitutively active Rab4A, internalized AF488-FVIIa accumulated in early/sorting endosomes and its entry into the recycling endosomal compartment (REC) was inhibited. Expression of constitutively active Rab5A induced large endosomal structures beneath the plasma membrane where EPCR and FVIIa accumulated. Dominant negative Rab5A inhibited the endocytosis of EPCR-FVIIa. Expression of constitutively active Rab11 resulted in retention of accumulated AF488-FVIIa in the REC, whereas expression of a dominant negative form of Rab11 led to accumulation of internalized FVIIa in the cytoplasm and prevented entry of internalized FVIIa into the REC. Expression of dominant negative Rab11 also inhibited the transport of FVIIa across the endothelium. Overall our data show that Rab GTPases regulate the internalization and intracellular trafficking of EPCR-FVIIa.

  11. ICON 2013: practical consensus recommendations for hormone receptor-positive Her2-negative advanced or metastatic breastcancer.

    PubMed

    Parikh, P M; Gupta, S; Dawood, S; Rugo, H; Bhattacharyya, G S; Agarwal, A; Chacko, R; Sahoo, T P; Babu, G; Agarwal, S; Munshi, A; Goswami, C; Smruti, B K; Bondarde, S; Desai, C; Rajappa, S; Somani, N; Singh, M; Nimmagadda, R; Pavitran, K; Mehta, A; Parmar, V; Desai, S; Nair, R; Doval, D

    2014-01-01

    The management of hormone receptor-positive Her2-negative breast cancer patients with advanced or metastatic disease is a common problem in India and other countries in this region. This expert group used data from published literature, practical experience, and opinion of a large group of academic oncologists, to arrive at practical consensus recommendations for use by the community oncologists.

  12. Both clathrin-positive and -negative coats are involved in endosomal sorting of the EGF receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Myromslien, Froydis D.; Grovdal, Lene Melsaether; Raiborg, Camilla; Stenmark, Harald; Madshus, Inger Helene; Stang, Espen . E-mail: espen.stang@medisin.uio.no

    2006-10-01

    Sorting of endocytosed EGF receptor (EGFR) to internal vesicles of multivesicular bodies (MVBs) depends on sustained activation and ubiquitination of the EGFR. Ubiquitination of EGFR is mediated by the ubiquitin ligase Cbl, being recruited to the EGFR both directly and indirectly through association with Grb2. Endosomal sorting of ubiquitinated proteins further depends on interaction with ubiquitin binding adaptors like Hrs. Hrs localizes to flat, clathrin-coated domains on the limiting membrane of endosomes. In the present study, we have investigated the localization of EGFR, Cbl and Grb2 with respect to coated and non-coated domains of the endosomal membrane and to vesicles within MVBs. Both EGFR, Grb2, and Cbl were concentrated in coated domains of the limiting membrane before translocation to inner vesicles of MVBs. While almost all Hrs was in clathrin-positive coats, EGFR and Grb2 in coated domains only partially colocalized with Hrs and clathrin. The extent of colocalization of EGFR and Grb2 with Hrs and clathrin varied with time of incubation with EGF. These results demonstrate that both clathrin-positive and clathrin-negative electron dense coats exist on endosomes and are involved in endosomal sorting of the EGFR.

  13. Calcium-dependent regulation of tumour necrosis factor-alpha receptor signalling by copine.

    PubMed Central

    Tomsig, Jose Luis; Sohma, Hitoshi; Creutz, Carl E

    2004-01-01

    The role of copines in regulating signalling from the TNF-alpha (tumour necrosis factor-alpha) receptor was probed by the expression of a copine dominant-negative construct in HEK293 (human embryonic kidney 293) cells. The construct was found to reduce activation of the transcription factor NF-kappaB (nuclear factor-kappaB) by TNF-alpha. The introduction of calcium into HEK293 cells either through the activation of muscarinic cholinergic receptors or through the application of the ionophore A23187 was found to enhance TNF-alpha-dependent activation of NF-kappaB. This effect of calcium was completely blocked by the copine dominant-negative construct. TNF-alpha was found to greatly enhance the expression of endogenous copine I, and the responsiveness of the TNF-alpha signalling pathway to muscarinic stimulation increased in parallel with the increased copine I expression. The copine dominant-negative construct also inhibited the TNF-alpha-dependent degradation of IkappaB, a regulator of NF-kappaB. All of the effects of the dominant-negative construct could be reversed by overexpression of full-length copine I, suggesting that the construct acts specifically through competitive inhibition of copine. One of the identified targets of copine I is the NEDD8-conjugating enzyme UBC12 (ubiquitin C12), that promotes the degradation of IkappaB through the ubiquitin ligase enzyme complex SCF(betaTrCP). Therefore the copine dominant-negative construct might inhibit TNF-alpha signalling by dysregulation or mislocalization of UBC12. Based on these results, a hypothesis is presented for possible roles of copines in regulating other signalling pathways in animals, plants and protozoa. PMID:14674885

  14. Upregulation of retinoic acid receptor-beta by the epidermal growth factor-receptor inhibitor PD153035 is not mediated by blockade of ErbB pathways.

    PubMed

    Grunt, Thomas W; Tomek, Katharina; Wagner, Renate; Puckmair, Klaudia; Kainz, Birgit; Rünzler, Dominik; Gaiger, Alexander; Köhler, Gottfried; Zielinski, Christoph C

    2007-06-01

    Inhibiting epidermal growth factor-receptor (ErbB-1) represents a powerful anticancer strategy. Activation of retinoid pathways is also in development for cancer treatment. Retinoic acid receptor-beta-the tumor suppressor and main retinoid mediator--is silenced in many tumors. The ErbB-1 inhibitor PD153035 cooperates with retinoic acid during growth inhibition and induces retinoic acid receptor-beta suggesting that ErbB-1 controls retinoic acid receptor-beta. However, here we demonstrate that ErbB pathways are not involved in PD153035-mediated retinoic acid receptor-beta-upregulation. PD153035 inhibits ErbB-1-phosphorylation, whereas its derivative EBE-A22 is inactive. Yet both inhibit cell growth and upregulate retinoic acid receptor-beta in ErbB-1-overexpressing (MDA-MB-468), moderately expressing (OVCAR-3), ErbB-1-negative (MDA-MB-453) or ErbB-negative cells (CEM, Jurkat). Both bind DNA, whereas the closely related ErbB-1 inhibitors AG1478 and ZD1839, which are inactive on retinoic acid receptor-beta, do not significantly bind DNA. None of the other ErbB-1/ErbB-2 inhibitors tested (RG-14620, LFM-A12, AG879, AG825) affect retinoic acid receptor-beta. PD153035 decreases methylation of the retinoic acid receptor-beta2 promoter. In OVCAR-3, it stimulates dislodgement of histone deacetylase 1 from the promoter and acetylation of histones H3 and H4. Consequently, PD153035 facilitates recruitment of RNA polymerase II to the promoter and stimulates transcriptional activity. Moreover, PD153035 increases the retinoic acid receptor-beta mRNA half-life. No other retinoid receptor, nor estrogen receptor-alpha, nor RASSF1A is upregulated by PD153035. Thus PD153035 induces retinoic acid receptor-beta by ErbB-independent transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms. This report highlights a triple action for an ErbB-1 inhibitor (ErbB-1 inhibition, DNA intercalation, retinoic acid receptor-beta-induction). Such multitargeting drugs bear great potential for cancer

  15. Nerve growth factor binding domain of the nerve growth factor receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Welcher, A.A.; Bitler, C.M.; Radeke, M.J.; Shooter, E.M. )

    1991-01-01

    A structural analysis of the rat low-affinity nerve growth factor (NGF) receptor was undertaken to define the NGF binding domain. Mutant NGF receptor DNA constructs were expressed in mouse fibroblasts or COS cells, and the ability of the mutant receptors to bind NGF was assayed. In the first mutant, all but 16 amino acid residues of the intracellular domain of the receptor were removed. This receptor bound NGF with a K{sub d} comparable to that of the wild-type receptor. A second mutant contained only the four cysteine-rich sequences from the extracellular portion of the protein. This mutant was expressed in COS cells and the resultant protein was a secreted soluble form of the receptor that was able to bind NGF. Two N-terminal deletions, in which either the first cystein-rich sequence or the first and part of the second cystein-rich sequences were removed, bound NGF. However, a mutant lacking all four cysteine-rich sequences was unable to bind NGF. These results show that the four cysteine-rich sequences of the NGF receptor contain the NGF binding domain.

  16. Trophoblastic cell lines generated from tumour necrosis factor receptor-deficient mice reveal specific functions for the two tumour necrosis factor receptors.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, C A; Pace, J L; Banerjee, S; Phillips, T A; Hunt, J S

    1999-01-01

    In mice and humans, expression of the tumour necrosis factor receptor-1 (TNF-R1) gene in placental trophoblast cells is constitutive whereas expression of the TNF-R2 gene is developmentally programmed. In order to study the individual functions of TNF-R1 and -R2 in this lineage, cell lines were generated from placental explants of homozygous matings of gestation day 10 outbred mice (Swiss-Webster), TNF-R1-deficient (TNF-R1-/-) and TNF-R2-/- transgenic mice as well as the background strain for the TNF-R2-/- mice (WT, C57BL/6x129). All of the cells exhibited trophoblast markers; they contained cytokeratin intermediate filaments, expressed alkaline phosphatase activity and displayed transferrin receptors, but were negative for vimentin filaments and the macrophage marker, F4/80. Analysis of DNA by polymerase chain reaction demonstrated the expected TNF-R genotype in each line. In experiments testing the effects of recombinant mouse TNF-alpha (rmTNF-alpha) on viability and proliferation of the cell lines, rmTNF-alpha modestly but dose-dependently inhibited the growth of WT and TNF-R2-/- cells while having no effect on TNF-R1-/- cells. Actinomycin D-treated WT and, to a lesser extent, TNF-R2-/- cells, were more sensitive to growth inhibition than untreated cells whereas TNF-R1-/- cell responses remained unchanged. These data indicated that rmTNF-alpha inhibits growth of trophoblastic cells through TNF-R1 and that newly synthesized protein(s) provide partial protection against toxicity. In contrast to the receptor species-specific effects on cell growth exerted by rmTNF-alpha, both TNF-R mediated inhibition of alkaline phosphatase activity. Collectively, the observations support the postulate that receptor expression is the key factor which determines the nature and extent of TNF-alpha effects on trophoblast cell growth and function.

  17. Multilevel factor analysis of smokers' real-time negative affect ratings while quitting.

    PubMed

    Bold, Krysten W; Witkiewitz, Katie; McCarthy, Danielle E

    2016-09-01

    Smoking is a serious public health problem, and accurate real-time assessment of risk factors associated with smoking is critical to understanding smoking relapse. Negative affect is often described as a critical risk factor related to smoking relapse, and ecological momentary assessment (EMA) methods have been widely used to study real-time relations between negative affect and smoking. However, the factor structure of momentary negative affect ratings is unknown. The current investigation examined the multilevel factor structure and internal consistency of an EMA measure of negative affect. Daily assessments were collected for 1 week prequit and 3 weeks postquit from 113 adult daily smokers receiving nicotine replacement therapy and counseling to quit smoking. Results supported a 2-factor model with correlated but distinct agitation and distress factors, rather than a single-factor model of negative affect. The agitation factor was indicated by these items: impatient, tense/anxious, restless. The distress factor was indicated by these items: sad/depressed, upset, distressed. The 2-factor model had acceptable model fit and consistent factor loadings across 3 separate cessation phases: prequit, postquit with recent smoking, and postquit without recent smoking. The 2 factors were highly correlated, showed good internal consistency, and showed strong associations with theoretically relevant smoking and affect variables. Agitation was more strongly related to urge to smoke, and distress was more strongly related to recent stress. This study provides support for a 2-factor model of an EMA measure of negative affect and highlights distinct facets that may be useful for future investigations of affect and smoking. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27536999

  18. A negative feedback loop controls NMDA receptor function in cortical interneurons via neuregulin 2/ErbB4 signalling

    PubMed Central

    Vullhorst, Detlef; Mitchell, Robert M.; Keating, Carolyn; Roychowdhury, Swagata; Karavanova, Irina; Tao-Cheng, Jung-Hwa; Buonanno, Andres

    2015-01-01

    The neuregulin receptor ErbB4 is an important modulator of GABAergic interneurons and neural network synchronization. However, little is known about the endogenous ligands that engage ErbB4, the neural processes that activate them or their direct downstream targets. Here we demonstrate, in cultured neurons and in acute slices, that the NMDA receptor is both effector and target of neuregulin 2 (NRG2)/ErbB4 signalling in cortical interneurons. Interneurons co-express ErbB4 and NRG2, and pro-NRG2 accumulates on cell bodies atop subsurface cisternae. NMDA receptor activation rapidly triggers shedding of the signalling-competent NRG2 extracellular domain. In turn, NRG2 promotes ErbB4 association with GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors, followed by rapid internalization of surface receptors and potent downregulation of NMDA but not AMPA receptor currents. These effects occur selectively in ErbB4-positive interneurons and not in ErbB4-negative pyramidal neurons. Our findings reveal an intimate reciprocal relationship between ErbB4 and NMDA receptors with possible implications for the modulation of cortical microcircuits associated with cognitive deficits in psychiatric disorders. PMID:26027736

  19. pH sensitivity of epidermal growth factor receptor complexes.

    PubMed

    Nunez, M; Mayo, K H; Starbuck, C; Lauffenburger, D

    1993-03-01

    The association/dissociation binding kinetics of 125I-labeled mouse epidermal growth factor (EGF) to receptors on human fibroblast cells in monolayer culture have been measured at 4 degrees C as a function of extracellular pH from pH 5-9. At pH 8, steady-state total binding is maximal. As pH is lowered to 6.5, total binding monotonically decreases dramatically. It changes further only slightly between pH 6.5 and 5 to about 20% of the maximum binding value. Scatchard binding plots at pH 7.5 and above show the commonly observed concave-upward, non-linear curve; as pH is lowered, this plot becomes much more linear, indicating that the "high affinity" bound receptor population is greatly diminished. Application of our ternary complex binding model [Mayo et al., J Biol Chem 264:17838-17844, 1989], which hypothesizes complexation of the EGF-bound receptor with a cell surface interaction molecule, indicates that pH may have some direct effects on ternary complex formation, but the major effect is on EGF-receptor dissociation. PMID:8501133

  20. Conformational thermostabilisation of corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Kean, James; Bortolato, Andrea; Hollenstein, Kaspar; Marshall, Fiona H; Jazayeri, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Recent technical advances have greatly facilitated G-protein coupled receptors crystallography as evidenced by the number of successful x-ray structures that have been reported recently. These technical advances include novel detergents, specialised crystallography techniques as well as protein engineering solutions such as fusions and conformational thermostabilisation. Using conformational thermostabilisation, it is possible to generate variants of GPCRs that exhibit significantly increased stability in detergent micelles whilst preferentially occupying a single conformation. In this paper we describe for the first time the application of this technique to a member of a class B GPCR, the corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1 (CRF1R). Mutational screening in the presence of the inverse agonist, CP-376395, resulted in the identification of a construct with twelve point mutations that exhibited significantly increased thermal stability in a range of detergents. We further describe the subsequent construct engineering steps that eventually yielded a crystallisation-ready construct which recently led to the solution of the first x-ray structure of a class B receptor. Finally, we have used molecular dynamic simulation to provide structural insight into CRF1R instability as well as the stabilising effects of the mutants, which may be extended to other class B receptors considering the high degree of structural conservation. PMID:26159865

  1. Nanoscale Imaging of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Clustering

    PubMed Central

    Abulrob, Abedelnasser; Lu, Zhengfang; Baumann, Ewa; Vobornik, Dusan; Taylor, Rod; Stanimirovic, Danica; Johnston, Linda J.

    2010-01-01

    The development of some solid tumors is associated with overexpression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and often correlates with poor prognosis. Near field scanning optical microscopy, a technique with subdiffraction-limited optical resolution, was used to examine the influence of two inhibitors (the chimeric 225 antibody and tyrosine phosphorylation inhibitor AG1478) on the nanoscale clustering of EGFR in HeLa cells. The EGFR is organized in small clusters, average diameter of 150 nm, on the plasma membrane for both control and EGF-treated cells. The numbers of receptors in individual clusters vary from as few as one or two proteins to greater than 100. Both inhibitors yield an increased cluster density and an increase in the fraction of clusters with smaller diameters and fewer receptors. Exposure to AG1478 also decreases the fraction of EGFR that colocalizes with both rafts and caveolae. EGF stimulation results in a significant loss of the full-length EGFR from the plasma membrane with the concomitant appearance of low molecular mass proteolytic products. By contrast, AG1478 reduces the level of EGFR degradation. Changes in receptor clustering provide one mechanism for regulating EGFR signaling and are relevant to the design of strategies for therapeutic interventions based on modulating EGFR signaling. PMID:19959837

  2. Factor Structure and Construct Validity of the Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sayers, Steven L.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to examine the underlying structure of negative symptoms of schizophrenia as measured by the Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS). CFA results from the assessment of 401 patients were largely supported by CFA results from a second assessment of 345 patients. (SLD)

  3. S6K1 Negatively Regulates TAK1 Activity in the Toll-Like Receptor Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kim, So Yong; Baik, Kyung-Hwa; Baek, Kwan-Hyuck; Chah, Kyong-Hwa; Kim, Kyung Ah; Moon, Gyuyoung; Jung, Eunyu; Kim, Seong-Tae; Shim, Jae-Hyuck; Greenblatt, Matthew B.; Chun, Eunyoung

    2014-01-01

    Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β)-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) is a key regulator in the signals transduced by proinflammatory cytokines and Toll-like receptors (TLRs). The regulatory mechanism of TAK1 in response to various tissue types and stimuli remains incompletely understood. Here, we show that ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) negatively regulates TLR-mediated signals by inhibiting TAK1 activity. S6K1 overexpression causes a marked reduction in NF-κB and AP-1 activity induced by stimulation of TLR2 or TLR4. In contrast, S6K1−/− and S6K1 knockdown cells display enhanced production of inflammatory cytokines. Moreover, S6K1−/− mice exhibit decreased survival in response to challenge with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We found that S6K1 inhibits TAK1 kinase activity by interfering with the interaction between TAK1 and TAB1, which is a key regulator protein for TAK1 catalytic function. Upon stimulation with TLR ligands, S6K1 deficiency causes a marked increase in TAK1 kinase activity that in turn induces a substantial enhancement of NF-κB-dependent gene expression, indicating that S6K1 is negatively involved in the TLR signaling pathway by the inhibition of TAK1 activity. Our findings contribute to understanding the molecular pathogenesis of the impaired immune responses seen in type 2 diabetes, where S6K1 plays a key role both in driving insulin resistance and modulating TLR signaling. PMID:24277938

  4. The Circadian Rhythm Gene Arntl2 Is a Metastasis Susceptibility Gene for Estrogen Receptor-Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Ngoc-Han; Long, Jirong; Cai, Qiuyin; Shu, Xiao Ou

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer mortality is primarily due to metastasis rather than primary tumors, yet relatively little is understood regarding the etiology of metastatic breast cancer. Previously, using a mouse genetics approach, we demonstrated that inherited germline polymorphisms contribute to metastatic disease, and that these single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) could be used to predict outcome in breast cancer patients. In this study, a backcross between a highly metastatic (FVB/NJ) and low metastatic (MOLF/EiJ) mouse strain identified Arntl2, a gene encoding a circadian rhythm transcription factor, as a metastasis susceptibility gene associated with progression, specifically in estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer patients. Integrated whole genome sequence analysis with DNase hypersensitivity sites reveals SNPs in the predicted promoter of Arntl2. Using CRISPR/Cas9-mediated substitution of the MOLF promoter, we demonstrate that the SNPs regulate Arntl2 transcription and affect metastatic burden. Finally, analysis of SNPs associated with ARNTL2 expression in human breast cancer patients revealed reproducible associations of ARNTL2 expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) SNPs with disease-free survival, consistent with the mouse studies. PMID:27656887

  5. Inverse regulation of human ERBB2 and epidermal growth factor receptors by tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed

    Kalthoff, H; Roeder, C; Gieseking, J; Humburg, I; Schmiegel, W

    1993-10-01

    Recombinant human tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha decreased the expression of ERBB2 mRNA by stimulating p55 TNF receptors of pancreatic tumor cells. This decrease contrasts with an increase in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mRNA. Both effects were selectively achieved by TNF-alpha or -beta, whereas interferon alpha or gamma or transforming growth factor beta showed no such effects. The inverse regulatory effects of TNF on ERBB2 and EGFR mRNA levels were evoked by different signaling pathways of p55 TNF receptors. The TNF-mediated ERBB2 mRNA decrease was followed by a reduction in protein. Four of five pancreatic tumor cell lines exhibited this down-regulation. This decrease of ERBB2 is a singular example of a modulation of this growth factor receptor by TNF. Overexpression of ERBB2 has been reported to cause resistance to TNF and other cytotoxic cytokines. In our study we show that the TNF-mediated down-regulation of ERBB2 in pancreatic tumor cells is accompanied by an increase in growth inhibition at low doses of TNF. The simultaneous alteration of the ERBB2/EGFR balance by TNF represents a striking model of cytokine receptor transregulation in the growth control of malignant pancreatic epithelial cells.

  6. Inverse regulation of human ERBB2 and epidermal growth factor receptors by tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Kalthoff, H; Roeder, C; Gieseking, J; Humburg, I; Schmiegel, W

    1993-01-01

    Recombinant human tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha decreased the expression of ERBB2 mRNA by stimulating p55 TNF receptors of pancreatic tumor cells. This decrease contrasts with an increase in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mRNA. Both effects were selectively achieved by TNF-alpha or -beta, whereas interferon alpha or gamma or transforming growth factor beta showed no such effects. The inverse regulatory effects of TNF on ERBB2 and EGFR mRNA levels were evoked by different signaling pathways of p55 TNF receptors. The TNF-mediated ERBB2 mRNA decrease was followed by a reduction in protein. Four of five pancreatic tumor cell lines exhibited this down-regulation. This decrease of ERBB2 is a singular example of a modulation of this growth factor receptor by TNF. Overexpression of ERBB2 has been reported to cause resistance to TNF and other cytotoxic cytokines. In our study we show that the TNF-mediated down-regulation of ERBB2 in pancreatic tumor cells is accompanied by an increase in growth inhibition at low doses of TNF. The simultaneous alteration of the ERBB2/EGFR balance by TNF represents a striking model of cytokine receptor transregulation in the growth control of malignant pancreatic epithelial cells. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8105469

  7. A negative elongation factor for human RNA polymerase II inhibits the anti-arrest transcript-cleavage factor TFIIS

    PubMed Central

    Palangat, Murali; Renner, Dan B.; Price, David H.; Landick, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Formation of productive transcription complexes after promoter escape by RNA polymerase II is a major event in eukaryotic gene regulation. Both negative and positive factors control this step. The principal negative elongation factor (NELF) contains four polypeptides and requires for activity the two-polypeptide 5,6-dichloro-1-β-d-ribobenzimidazole-sensitivity inducing factor (DSIF). DSIF/NELF inhibits early transcript elongation until it is counteracted by the positive elongation factor P-TEFb. We report a previously undescribed activity of DSIF/NELF, namely inhibition of the transcript cleavage factor TFIIS. These two activities of DSIF/NELF appear to be mechanistically distinct. Inhibition of nucleotide addition requires ≥18 nt of nascent RNA, whereas inhibition of TFIIS occurs at all transcript lengths. Because TFIIS promotes escape from promoter-proximal pauses by stimulating cleavage of back-tracked nascent RNA, TFIIS inhibition may help DSIF/NELF negatively regulate productive transcription. PMID:16214896

  8. Upregulation of epidermal growth factor receptor 4 in oral leukoplakia

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Kumagai, Kenichi; Gotoh, Akito; Eguchi, Takanori; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Hamada, Yoshiki; Suzuki, Satsuki; Suzuki, Ryuji

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, we investigate the expression profile of the epidermal growth factor receptor family, which comprises EGFR/ErbB1, HER2/ErbB2, HER3/ErbB3 and HER4/ErbB4 in oral leukoplakia (LP). The expression of four epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family genes and their ligands were measured in LP tissues from 14 patients and compared with levels in 10 patients with oral lichen planus (OLP) and normal oral mucosa (NOM) from 14 healthy donors by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and immunohistochemistry. Synchronous mRNA coexpression of ErbB1, ErbB2, ErbB3 and ErbB4 was detected in LP lesions. Out of the receptors, only ErbB4 mRNA and protein was more highly expressed in LP compared with NOM tissues. These were strongly expressed by epithelial keratinocytes in LP lesions, as shown by immunohistochemistry. Regarding the ligands, the mRNA of Neuregulin2 and 4 were more highly expressed in OLP compared with NOM tissues. Therefore, enhanced ErbB4 on the keratinocytes and synchronous modulation of EGFR family genes may contribute to the pathogenesis and carcinogenesis of LP. PMID:23492901

  9. Early signaling dynamics of the epidermal growth factor receptor

    PubMed Central

    Gajadhar, Aaron S.; Swenson, Eric J.; Rothenberg, Daniel A.; Curran, Timothy G.; White, Forest M.

    2016-01-01

    Despite extensive study of the EGF receptor (EGFR) signaling network, the immediate posttranslational changes that occur in response to growth factor stimulation remain poorly characterized; as a result, the biological mechanisms underlying signaling initiation remain obscured. To address this deficiency, we have used a mass spectrometry-based approach to measure system-wide phosphorylation changes throughout the network with 10-s resolution in the 80 s after stimulation in response to a range of eight growth factor concentrations. Significant changes were observed on proteins far downstream in the network as early as 10 s after stimulation, indicating a system capable of transmitting information quickly. Meanwhile, canonical members of the EGFR signaling network fall into clusters with distinct activation patterns. Src homology 2 domain containing transforming protein (Shc) and phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) phosphorylation levels increase rapidly, but equilibrate within 20 s, whereas proteins such as Grb2-associated binder-1 (Gab1) and SH2-containing tyrosine phosphatase (SHP2) show slower, sustained increases. Proximity ligation assays reveal that Shc and Gab1 phosphorylation patterns are representative of separate timescales for physical association with the receptor. Inhibition of phosphatases with vanadate reveals site-specific regulatory mechanisms and also uncovers primed activating components in the network, including Src family kinases, whose inhibition affects only a subset of proteins within the network. The results presented highlight the complexity of signaling initiation and provide a window into exploring mechanistic hypotheses about receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) biology. PMID:26929352

  10. Early signaling dynamics of the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Raven J; Gajadhar, Aaron S; Swenson, Eric J; Rothenberg, Daniel A; Curran, Timothy G; White, Forest M

    2016-03-15

    Despite extensive study of the EGF receptor (EGFR) signaling network, the immediate posttranslational changes that occur in response to growth factor stimulation remain poorly characterized; as a result, the biological mechanisms underlying signaling initiation remain obscured. To address this deficiency, we have used a mass spectrometry-based approach to measure system-wide phosphorylation changes throughout the network with 10-s resolution in the 80 s after stimulation in response to a range of eight growth factor concentrations. Significant changes were observed on proteins far downstream in the network as early as 10 s after stimulation, indicating a system capable of transmitting information quickly. Meanwhile, canonical members of the EGFR signaling network fall into clusters with distinct activation patterns. Src homology 2 domain containing transforming protein (Shc) and phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) phosphorylation levels increase rapidly, but equilibrate within 20 s, whereas proteins such as Grb2-associated binder-1 (Gab1) and SH2-containing tyrosine phosphatase (SHP2) show slower, sustained increases. Proximity ligation assays reveal that Shc and Gab1 phosphorylation patterns are representative of separate timescales for physical association with the receptor. Inhibition of phosphatases with vanadate reveals site-specific regulatory mechanisms and also uncovers primed activating components in the network, including Src family kinases, whose inhibition affects only a subset of proteins within the network. The results presented highlight the complexity of signaling initiation and provide a window into exploring mechanistic hypotheses about receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) biology. PMID:26929352

  11. Early signaling dynamics of the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Raven J; Gajadhar, Aaron S; Swenson, Eric J; Rothenberg, Daniel A; Curran, Timothy G; White, Forest M

    2016-03-15

    Despite extensive study of the EGF receptor (EGFR) signaling network, the immediate posttranslational changes that occur in response to growth factor stimulation remain poorly characterized; as a result, the biological mechanisms underlying signaling initiation remain obscured. To address this deficiency, we have used a mass spectrometry-based approach to measure system-wide phosphorylation changes throughout the network with 10-s resolution in the 80 s after stimulation in response to a range of eight growth factor concentrations. Significant changes were observed on proteins far downstream in the network as early as 10 s after stimulation, indicating a system capable of transmitting information quickly. Meanwhile, canonical members of the EGFR signaling network fall into clusters with distinct activation patterns. Src homology 2 domain containing transforming protein (Shc) and phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) phosphorylation levels increase rapidly, but equilibrate within 20 s, whereas proteins such as Grb2-associated binder-1 (Gab1) and SH2-containing tyrosine phosphatase (SHP2) show slower, sustained increases. Proximity ligation assays reveal that Shc and Gab1 phosphorylation patterns are representative of separate timescales for physical association with the receptor. Inhibition of phosphatases with vanadate reveals site-specific regulatory mechanisms and also uncovers primed activating components in the network, including Src family kinases, whose inhibition affects only a subset of proteins within the network. The results presented highlight the complexity of signaling initiation and provide a window into exploring mechanistic hypotheses about receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) biology.

  12. Lysophosphatidic acid receptor-5 negatively regulates cellular responses in mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Yan; Hirane, Miku; Araki, Mutsumi; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • LPA{sub 5} inhibits the cell growth and motile activities of 3T3 cells. • LPA{sub 5} suppresses the cell motile activities stimulated by hydrogen peroxide in 3T3 cells. • Enhancement of LPA{sub 5} on the cell motile activities inhibited by LPA{sub 1} in 3T3 cells. • The expression and activation of Mmp-9 were inhibited by LPA{sub 5} in 3T3 cells. • LPA signaling via LPA{sub 5} acts as a negative regulator of cellular responses in 3T3 cells. - Abstract: Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling via G protein-coupled LPA receptors (LPA{sub 1}–LPA{sub 6}) mediates a variety of biological functions, including cell migration. Recently, we have reported that LPA{sub 1} inhibited the cell motile activities of mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells. In the present study, to evaluate a role of LPA{sub 5} in cellular responses, Lpar5 knockdown (3T3-L5) cells were generated from 3T3 cells. In cell proliferation assays, LPA markedly stimulated the cell proliferation activities of 3T3-L5 cells, compared with control cells. In cell motility assays with Cell Culture Inserts, the cell motile activities of 3T3-L5 cells were significantly higher than those of control cells. The activity levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were measured by gelatin zymography. 3T3-L5 cells stimulated the activation of Mmp-2, correlating with the expression levels of Mmp-2 gene. Moreover, to assess the co-effects of LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 5} on cell motile activities, Lpar5 knockdown (3T3a1-L5) cells were also established from Lpar1 over-expressing (3T3a1) cells. 3T3a1-L5 cells increased the cell motile activities of 3T3a1 cells, while the cell motile activities of 3T3a1 cells were significantly lower than those of control cells. These results suggest that LPA{sub 5} may act as a negative regulator of cellular responses in mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells, similar to the case for LPA{sub 1}.

  13. Toll-Like Receptor 9 Alternatively Spliced Isoform Negatively Regulates TLR9 Signaling in Teleost Fish

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Nai-Yu; Nagarajan, Govindarajulu; Chiou, Pinwen Peter

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) recognizes and binds unmethylated CpG motifs in DNA, which are found in the genomes of bacteria and DNA viruses. In fish, Tlr9 is highly diverse, with the number of introns ranging from 0 to 4. A fish Tlr9 gene containing two introns has been reported to express two alternatively spliced isoforms, namely gTLR9A (full-length) and gTLR9B (with a truncated Cʹ-terminal signal transducing domain), whose regulation and function remain unclear. Here, we report a unique regulatory mechanism of gTLR9 signaling in orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides), whose gTlr9 sequence also contains two introns. We demonstrated that the grouper gTlr9 gene indeed has the capacity to produce two gTLR9 isoforms via alternative RNA splicing. We found that gTLR9B could function as a negative regulator to suppress gTLR9 signaling as demonstrated by the suppression of downstream gene expression. Following stimulation with CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN), gTLR9A and gTLR9B were observed to translocate into endosomes and co-localize with ODN and the adaptor protein gMyD88. Both gTLR9A and gTLR9B could interact with gMyD88; however, gTLR9B could not interact with downstream IRAK4 and TRAF6. Further analysis of the expression profile of gTlr9A and gTlr9B upon immune-stimulation revealed that the two isoforms were differentially regulated in a time-dependent manner. Overall, these data suggest that fish TLR9B functions as a negative regulator, and that its temporal expression is mediated by alternative RNA splicing. This has not been observed in mammalian TLR9s and might have been acquired relatively recently in the evolution of fish. PMID:25955250

  14. Migraine and possible etiologic heterogeneity for hormone-receptor-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Shi, Min; DeRoo, Lisa A; Sandler, Dale P; Weinberg, Clarice R

    2015-01-01

    Migraine headache is often timed with the menstrual cycle. Some studies have reported reduced risk of breast cancer in migraineurs but most of those did not distinguish menstrually-related from non-menstrually-related migraine. To examine the possible associations between breast cancer and migraine overall and between cancer subcategories and the two migraine subtypes, we used a cohort study of 50,884 women whose sister had breast cancer and a sister-matched case-control study including 1,418 young-onset (<50 years) breast cancer cases. We analyzed the two studies individually and also in tandem via a hybrid Cox model, examining subcategories of breast cancer in relation to menstrually-related and non-menstrually-related migraine. History of migraine was not associated with breast cancer overall. Migraine showed an inverse association with ductal carcinoma in situ (HR = 0.77; 95% CI (0.62,0.96)). Also, women with non-menstrually-related migraine had increased risk (HR = 1.30, 95% CI (0.93,1.81)) while women with menstrually-related migraine had decreased risk (HR = 0.63, 95% CI (0.42,0.96)) of hormone-receptor-negative (ER-/PR-) cancer, with a significant contrast in estimated effects (P = 0.005). While replication of these subset-based findings will be needed, effect specificity could suggest that while migraine has little overall association with breast cancer, menstrual migraine may be associated with reduced risk of ER-/PR- breast cancer.

  15. Ventral tegmental area orexin 1 receptors promote palatable food intake and oppose postingestive negative feedback.

    PubMed

    Terrill, Sarah J; Hyde, Kellie M; Kay, Kristen E; Greene, Hayden E; Maske, Calyn B; Knierim, Amanda E; Davis, Jon F; Williams, Diana L

    2016-09-01

    Hypothalamic orexin neurons project to numerous brain areas, including the ventral tegmental area (VTA), which is involved in motivation and food-seeking behavior. Here we address how exogenously administered orexin-A and endogenous orexin 1 receptor (OX1R) activation in the VTA affects feeding behavior. We hypothesized that orexin-A and OX1R antagonist SB334867 delivered to the VTA, at doses that were subthreshold for effect when injected into the ventricle, would affect intake of palatable foods in multiple test situations. We first used a hedonic feeding model in which satiated rats selectively consume a high-fat diet (HFD). Intra-VTA orexin-A stimulated additional consumption of chow and increased HFD intake in this model. In ad libitum-fed rats given daily 30-min test sessions, intra-VTA orexin-A also increased intake of HFD and 0.1 M sucrose. Further analysis of licking patterns revealed that that VTA orexin-A increased meal size and licking burst size only toward the end of the meal. Consistent with this finding, a subthreshold dose of VTA orexin-A prevented intake suppression induced by gastrointestinal nutrient infusion. Surprisingly, intra-VTA orexin-A had no effect on operant responding for sucrose pellets on a progressive ratio schedule of reinforcement. A role for endogenous VTA OX1R stimulation is supported by our finding that bilateral VTA injection of the selective OX1R antagonist SB334867 suppressed 0.1 M sucrose intake. Together, our data suggest that OX1R activity in the VTA facilitates food intake, potentially by counteracting postingestive negative feedback that would normally suppress feeding later in a meal. PMID:27385732

  16. Negative Allosteric Modulators of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors Subtype 5 in Addiction: a Therapeutic Window

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background: Abundant evidence at the anatomical, electrophysiological, and molecular levels implicates metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGluR5) in addiction. Consistently, the effects of a wide range of doses of different mGluR5 negative allosteric modulators (NAMs) have been tested in various animal models of addiction. Here, these studies were subjected to a systematic review to find out if mGluR5 NAMs have a therapeutic potential that can be translated to the clinic. Methods: Literature on consumption/self-administration and reinstatement of drug seeking as outcomes of interest published up to April 2015 was retrieved via PubMed. The review focused on the effects of systemic (i.p., i.v., s.c.) administration of the mGluR5 NAMs 3-((2-Methyl-4-thiazolyl)ethynyl)pyridine (MTEP) and 2-Methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine (MPEP) on paradigms with cocaine, ethanol, nicotine, and food in rats. Results: MTEP and MPEP were found to reduce self-administration of cocaine, ethanol, and nicotine at doses ≥1mg/kg and 2.5mg/kg, respectively. Dose-response relationship resembled a sigmoidal curve, with low doses not reaching statistical significance and high doses reliably inhibiting self-administration of drugs of abuse. Importantly, self-administration of cocaine, ethanol, and nicotine, but not food, was reduced by MTEP and MPEP in the dose range of 1 to 2mg/kg and 2.5 to 3.2mg/kg, respectively. This dose range corresponds to approximately 50% to 80% mGluR5 occupancy. Interestingly, the limited data found in mice and monkeys showed a similar therapeutic window. Conclusion: Altogether, this review suggests a therapeutic window for mGluR5 NAMs that can be translated to the treatment of substance-related and addictive disorders. PMID:26802568

  17. 5-HT(1A) receptors transactivate the platelet-derived growth factor receptor type beta in neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Kruk, Jeff S; Vasefi, Maryam S; Liu, Hui; Heikkila, John J; Beazely, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    In the absence of ligand, certain growth factor receptors can be activated via G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) activation in a process termed transactivation. Serotonin (5-HT) receptors can transactivate platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) β receptors in smooth muscle cells, but it is not known if similar pathways occur in neuronal cells. Here we show that 5-HT can transiently increase the phosphorylation of PDGFβ receptors through 5-HT(1A) receptors in a time- and dose-dependent manner in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. 5-HT also transactivates PDGFβ receptors in primary cortical neurons. This transactivation pathway is pertussis-toxin sensitive and Src tyrosine kinase-dependent. This pathway is also dependent on phospholipase C activity and intracellular calcium signaling. Several studies involving PDGFβ receptor transactivation by GPCRs have also demonstrated a PDGFβ receptor-dependent increase in the phosphorylation of ERK1/2. Yet in SH-SY5Y cells, 5-HT treatment causes a PDGFβ receptor-independent increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation. This crosstalk between 5-HT and PDGFβ receptors identifies a potentially important signaling link between the serotonergic system and growth factor signaling in neurons. PMID:23006663

  18. Fascin, an actin-bundling protein associated with cell motility, is upregulated in hormone receptor negative breastancer

    PubMed Central

    Grothey, A; Hashizume, R; Sahin, A A; McCrea, P D

    2000-01-01

    Loss of hormone receptor (HR) status in breast carcinomas is associated with increased tumour cell motility and invasiveness. In an immunohistological study of 58 primary breast cancers, oestrogen (ER) and progesterone (PR) receptor levels were inversely correlated with the expression of fascin, an actin-bundling protein associated with cell motility (P< 0.0001 and P = 0.0019, respectively). In addition, fascin was preferentially expressed in non-diploid tumours (P = 0.03). In summary, the upregulation of fascin in HR-negative breast cancers may contribute to their more aggressive behaviour. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10970687

  19. Endogenous interleukin-12: relationship with angiogenic factors, hormone receptors and nodal status in human breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Toi, M; Gion, M; Saji, H; Asano, M; Dittadi, R; Gilberti, S; Locopo, N; Gasparini, G

    1999-12-01

    Interleukin-12 (IL-12) is known to be a key cytokine for regulating immune response, but it is also known to provide some other biological function including inhibition of angiogenesis. We have determined using an enzymatic immunoassay the endogenous levels of IL-12 in 390 cytosols of primary breast cancers previously tested also for the angiogenic peptides, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and thymidine phosphorylase (TP). The concentration of IL-12 ranged from 0 to 7.6 ng/mg protein, and 124 (31.8%) out of 390 cancers showed a detectable dose (>0.1 ng/ml). There was no statistical association of IL-12 levels with tumor size and menopausal status. IL-12 levels tended to be higher in the tumors of node-positive patients as compared to those of node-negative ones (t-test, p=0.082). In addition, IL-12 levels were inversely associated with hormone receptor status, particularly progesterone receptor expression (p=0.0013). There was a significant inverse association between IL-12 and TP concentration (p=0.0007). The proportion of tumors with detectable levels of IL-12 and low levels of either VEGF or TP was higher among the patients with node-negative as compared to those with node-positive disease. On the contrary, the proportion of tumors with no detectable IL-12 and high levels of either VEGF or TP was higher in node-positive versus node-negative cancers. In conclusion, our study evaluated the balance between pro-angiogenic factors (TP and VEGF) and IL-12, as a detectable naturally occurring inhibitor of angiogenesis, in the same series of node-negative and node-positive breast cancers. Further studies are warranted to investigate the biological and clinical significance of the co-determination of pro and contra angiogenic factors in human breast carcinoma.

  20. Orexin–Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Receptor Heteromers in the Ventral Tegmental Area as Targets for Cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Gemma; Quiroz, César; Moreno-Delgado, David; Sierakowiak, Adam; McDowell, Kimberly; Moreno, Estefanía; Rea, William; Cai, Ning-Sheng; Aguinaga, David; Howell, Lesley A.; Hausch, Felix; Cortés, Antonio; Mallol, Josefa; Casadó, Vicent; Lluís, Carme; Canela, Enric I.

    2015-01-01

    Release of the neuropeptides corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and orexin-A in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) play an important role in stress-induced cocaine-seeking behavior. We provide evidence for pharmacologically significant interactions between CRF and orexin-A that depend on oligomerization of CRF1 receptor (CRF1R) and orexin OX1 receptors (OX1R). CRF1R–OX1R heteromers are the conduits of a negative crosstalk between orexin-A and CRF as demonstrated in transfected cells and rat VTA, in which they significantly modulate dendritic dopamine release. The cocaine target σ1 receptor (σ1R) also associates with the CRF1R–OX1R heteromer. Cocaine binding to the σ1R–CRF1R–OX1R complex promotes a long-term disruption of the orexin-A–CRF negative crosstalk. Through this mechanism, cocaine sensitizes VTA cells to the excitatory effects of both CRF and orexin-A, thus providing a mechanism by which stress induces cocaine seeking. PMID:25926444

  1. Trastuzumab Emtansine in Treating Older Patients With Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-Positive Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-04

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2 Positive Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  2. Dominant negative mutant of retinoic acid receptor alpha inhibits retinoic acid-induced P19 cell differentiation by binding to DNA.

    PubMed

    Costa, S L; McBurney, M W

    1996-05-25

    Retinoic acid (RA) is a potent inducer of P19 cell differentiation. RA activity is thought to be mediated by nuclear RA receptors (RARs), transcription factors whose activity is dependent on RA. There are three RARs called alpha, beta, and gamma. We created truncated versions of the three RARs and compared their activities as inhibitors of RA-mediated gene transcription and of P19 cell differentiation. Only mutants of the RAR alpha were inhibitory in these assays. A mutant of RAR alpha carrying a 10-amino-acid insert was able to heterodimerize with RXRbeta or with the normal RAR alpha and the inhibitory activity of this mutant was dependent on an intact DNA binding domain. We conclude that dominant negative mutants of RAR alpha act by heterodimerizing with RXRs or RARs and binding to RA response elements on DNA, thereby preventing binding of the normal receptors to those sites. PMID:8635515

  3. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase is an endogenous negative regulator of glucocorticoid receptor in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Meng-ying; Zhu, Li-Juan; Zhou, Qi-Gang

    2013-07-01

    The hippocampus is rich in both glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). But the relationship between the two molecules under physiological states remains unrevealed. Here, we report that nNOS knockout mice display increased GR expression in the hippocampus. Both systemic administration of 7-Nitroindazole (7-NI), a selective nNOS activity inhibitor, and selective infusion of 7-NI into the hippocampus resulted in an increase in GR expression in the hippocampus. Moreover, KCl exposure, which can induce overexpression of nNOS, resulted in a decrease in GR protein level in cultured hippocampal neurons. Moreover, blockade of nNOS activity in the hippocampus leads to decreased corticosterone (CORT, glucocorticoids in rodents) concentration in the plasma and reduced corticotrophin-releasing factor expression in the hypothalamus. The results indicate that nNOS is an endogenous inhibitor of GR in the hippocampus and that nNOS in the hippocampus may participate in the modulation of Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal axis activity via GR.

  4. Latent transforming growth factor binding protein 4 regulates transforming growth factor beta receptor stability.

    PubMed

    Su, Chi-Ting; Huang, Jenq-Wen; Chiang, Chih-Kang; Lawrence, Elizabeth C; Levine, Kara L; Dabovic, Branka; Jung, Christine; Davis, Elaine C; Madan-Khetarpal, Suneeta; Urban, Zsolt

    2015-07-15

    Mutations in the gene for the latent transforming growth factor beta binding protein 4 (LTBP4) cause autosomal recessive cutis laxa type 1C. To understand the molecular disease mechanisms of this disease, we investigated the impact of LTBP4 loss on transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) signaling. Despite elevated extracellular TGFβ activity, downstream signaling molecules of the TGFβ pathway, including pSMAD2 and pERK, were down-regulated in LTBP4 mutant human dermal fibroblasts. In addition, TGFβ receptors 1 and 2 (TGFBR1 and TGFBR2) were reduced at the protein but not at the ribonucleic acid level. Treatment with exogenous TGFβ1 led to an initially rapid increase in SMAD2 phosphorylation followed by a sustained depression of phosphorylation and receptor abundance. In mutant cells TGFBR1 was co-localized with lysosomes. Treatment with a TGFBR1 kinase inhibitor, endocytosis inhibitors or a lysosome inhibitor, normalized the levels of TGFBR1 and TGFBR2. Co-immunoprecipitation demonstrated a molecular interaction between LTBP4 and TGFBR2. Knockdown of LTBP4 reduced TGFβ receptor abundance and signaling in normal cells and supplementation of recombinant LTBP4 enhanced these measures in mutant cells. In a mouse model of Ltbp4 deficiency, reduced TGFβ signaling and receptor levels were normalized upon TGFBR1 kinase inhibitor treatment. Our results show that LTBP4 interacts with TGFBR2 and stabilizes TGFβ receptors by preventing their endocytosis and lysosomal degradation in a ligand-dependent and receptor kinase activity-dependent manner. These findings identify LTBP4 as a key molecule required for the stability of the TGFβ receptor complex, and a new mechanism by which the extracellular matrix regulates cytokine receptor signaling.

  5. Latent transforming growth factor binding protein 4 regulates transforming growth factor beta receptor stability

    PubMed Central

    Su, Chi-Ting; Huang, Jenq-Wen; Chiang, Chih-Kang; Lawrence, Elizabeth C.; Levine, Kara L.; Dabovic, Branka; Jung, Christine; Davis, Elaine C.; Madan-Khetarpal, Suneeta; Urban, Zsolt

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the gene for the latent transforming growth factor beta binding protein 4 (LTBP4) cause autosomal recessive cutis laxa type 1C. To understand the molecular disease mechanisms of this disease, we investigated the impact of LTBP4 loss on transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) signaling. Despite elevated extracellular TGFβ activity, downstream signaling molecules of the TGFβ pathway, including pSMAD2 and pERK, were down-regulated in LTBP4 mutant human dermal fibroblasts. In addition, TGFβ receptors 1 and 2 (TGFBR1 and TGFBR2) were reduced at the protein but not at the ribonucleic acid level. Treatment with exogenous TGFβ1 led to an initially rapid increase in SMAD2 phosphorylation followed by a sustained depression of phosphorylation and receptor abundance. In mutant cells TGFBR1 was co-localized with lysosomes. Treatment with a TGFBR1 kinase inhibitor, endocytosis inhibitors or a lysosome inhibitor, normalized the levels of TGFBR1 and TGFBR2. Co-immunoprecipitation demonstrated a molecular interaction between LTBP4 and TGFBR2. Knockdown of LTBP4 reduced TGFβ receptor abundance and signaling in normal cells and supplementation of recombinant LTBP4 enhanced these measures in mutant cells. In a mouse model of Ltbp4 deficiency, reduced TGFβ signaling and receptor levels were normalized upon TGFBR1 kinase inhibitor treatment. Our results show that LTBP4 interacts with TGFBR2 and stabilizes TGFβ receptors by preventing their endocytosis and lysosomal degradation in a ligand-dependent and receptor kinase activity-dependent manner. These findings identify LTBP4 as a key molecule required for the stability of the TGFβ receptor complex, and a new mechanism by which the extracellular matrix regulates cytokine receptor signaling. PMID:25882708

  6. α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors Occur at Postsynaptic Densities of AMPA Receptor-Positive and -Negative Excitatory Synapses in Rat Sensory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Robert B.; Aoki, Chiye

    2010-01-01

    NMDA receptor (NMDAR) activation requires concurrent membrane depolarization, and glutamatergic synapses lacking AMPA receptors (AMPARs) are often considered “silent” in the absence of another source of membrane depolarization. During the second postnatal week, NMDA currents can be enhanced in rat auditory cortex through activation of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR). Electrophysiological results support a mainly presynaptic role for α7nAChR at these synapses. However, immunocytochemical evidence that α7nAChR is prevalent at postsynaptic sites of glutamatergic synapses in hippocampus and neocortex, along with emerging electrophysiological evidence for postsynaptic nicotinic currents in neocortex and hippocampus, has prompted speculation that α7nAChR allows for activation of NMDAR postsynaptically at synapses lacking AMPAR. Here we used dual immunolabeling and electron microscopy to examine the distribution of α7nAChR relative to AMPAR (GluR1, GluR2, and GluR3 subunits combined) at excitatory synapses in somatosensory cortex of adult and 1-week-old rats. α7nAChR occurred discretely over most of the thick postsynaptic densities in all cortical layers of both age groups. AMPAR immunoreactivity was also detectable at most synapses; its distribution was independent of that of α7nAChR. In both age groups, approximately one-quarter of asymmetrical synapses were α7nAChR positive and AMPAR negative. The variability of postsynaptic α7nAChR labeling density was greater at postnatal day (PD) 7 than in adulthood, and PD 7 neuropil contained a subset of small AMPA receptor-negative synapses with a high density of α7nAChR immunoreactivity. These observations support the idea that acetylcholine receptors can aid in activating glutamatergic synapses and work together with AMPA receptors to mediate postsynaptic excitation throughout life. PMID:12077196

  7. Cannabinoid receptors activation and glucocorticoid receptors deactivation in the amygdala prevent the stress-induced enhancement of a negative learning experience.

    PubMed

    Ramot, Assaf; Akirav, Irit

    2012-05-01

    The enhancement of emotional memory is clearly important as emotional stimuli are generally more significant than neutral stimuli for surviving and reproduction purposes. Yet, the enhancement of a negative emotional memory following exposure to stress may result in dysfunctional or intrusive memory that underlies several psychiatric disorders. Here we examined the effects of stress exposure on a negative emotional learning experience as measured by a decrease in the magnitude of the expected quantity of reinforcements in an alley maze. In contrast to other fear-related negative experiences, reward reduction is more associated with frustration and is assessed by measuring the latency to run the length of the alley to consume the reduced quantity of reward. We also examined whether the cannabinoid receptors agonist WIN55,212-2 (5 μg/side) and the glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) antagonist RU-486 (10 ng/side) administered into the rat basolateral amygdala (BLA) could prevent the stress-induced enhancement. We found that intra-BLA RU-486 or WIN55,212 before stress exposure prevented the stress-induced enhancement of memory consolidation for reduction in reward magnitude. These findings suggest that cannabinoid receptors and GRs in the BLA are important modulators of stress-induced enhancement of emotional memory.

  8. P2y Receptor-Mediated Angiogenesis via Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 2 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Rumjahn, Sharif M.; Baldwin, Karla A; Buxton, Iain L. O.

    2011-01-01

    Pathological as well as physiological angiogenesis is known to be regulated by such factors as nucleotides and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF). Activated P2Y nucleotide receptors have been observed to associate and transactivate VEGF Receptor 2 (VEGFR2), suggesting a cooperation between nucleotide and VEGF signaling in angiogenesis. P2YR mediated VEGFR2 signaling therefore may be important in describing the angiogenic signaling of nucleotides such as ATP. Here, we provide evidence that supports the notion of P2YR-VEGFR2 signaling. The significant angiogenic effect of P2Y1/2 receptor agonists (100 μM ATP and 10 μM 2MS-ATP) on endothelial cell tubulogenesis was suppressed back to near control levels upon addition of 1 μM SU1498 (specific VEGFR2 tyrosine kinase inhibitor). We believe that this P2YR-VEFGR2 signaling is an important component of pathological, as well as physiological angiogenesis. PMID:18605230

  9. Epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor therapy for recurrent respiratory papillomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Sidman, James D.

    2013-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor pathway has been implicated in various tumors, including human papillomavirus (HPV) lesions such as recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP). Due to the presence of epidermal growth factor receptors in RRP, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors have been utilized as adjuvant therapy. This case series examines the response to EGFR inhibitors in RRP. Four patients with life-threatening RRP were treated with EGFR inhibitors. Operative frequency and anatomical Derkay scores were calculated prior to, and following EGFR inhibitor treatment via retrospective chart review. The anatomical Derkay score decreased for all four patients after initiation of EGFR inhibitor therapy. In one patient, the operative frequency increased after switching to an intravenous inhibitor after loss of control with an oral inhibitor. In the other patients there was a greater than 20% decrease in operative frequency in one and a more than doubling in the time between procedures in two.  This study suggests that EGFR inhibitors are a potential adjuvant therapy in RRP and deserve further study in a larger number of patients. PMID:24795806

  10. Tumor necrosis factor: receptor binding and expression of receptors in cultured mouse hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Adamson, G M; Billings, R E

    1994-04-01

    Recombinant murine tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha) was labeled with 125I and used to determine the binding characteristics, internalization and intracellular degradation in cultured mouse hepatocytes. [125I]TNF-alpha bound specifically to hepatocytes and Scatchard analysis of the data indicated binding to both a low-affinity (Kd = 20 nM) high capacity (51225 sites/cell) component and high-affinity component (Kd = 4 pM), with low capacity (290 sites/cell). The extent of TNF-alpha binding to hepatocytes correlated closely with its biological activity in hepatocytes, as indexed by depletion of intracellular ATP. At concentrations lower than 0.06 nM there was minimal binding and no effect on cellular ATP, whereas maximal binding at concentrations greater than 45 nM caused 80% depletion (in comparison to controls) of hepatocyte ATP. Incubation at 37 degrees C resulted in rapid uptake, internalization and degradation of [125I]TNF-alpha. This was followed by release of degraded material from hepatocytes. Examination, by reverse transcriptase/polymerase chain reaction technology, of hepatocyte RNA extracted after the 4-hr adherence period revealed that mouse hepatocytes expressed mRNA for both TNF-alpha receptor 1 and TNF-alpha receptor 2, and that the relative abundance of TNF-alpha receptor 1 was approximately 7-fold greater than that for TNF-alpha receptor 2. Because it has been shown that these receptors have different affinities for TNF-alpha, this may explain the high- and low-affinity binding sites present on cultured mouse hepatocytes.

  11. Inhibitory leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptors: Immune checkpoint proteins and tumor sustaining factors.

    PubMed

    Kang, Xunlei; Kim, Jaehyup; Deng, Mi; John, Samuel; Chen, Heyu; Wu, Guojin; Phan, Hiep; Zhang, Cheng Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptors (LILRBs 1-5) transduce signals via intracellular immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs) that recruit protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 6 (PTPN6 or SHP-1), protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 11 (PTPN11 or SHP-2), or Src homology 2 domain-containing inositol phosphatase (SHIP), leading to negative regulation of immune cell activation. Certain of these receptors also play regulatory roles in neuronal activity and osteoclast development. The activation of LILRBs on immune cells by their ligands may contribute to immune evasion by tumors. Recent studies found that several members of LILRB family are expressed by tumor cells, notably hematopoietic cancer cells, and may directly regulate cancer development and relapse as well as the activity of cancer stem cells. LILRBs thus have dual concordant roles in tumor biology - as immune checkpoint molecules and as tumor-sustaining factors. Importantly, the study of knockout mice indicated that LILRBs do not affect hematopoiesis and normal development. Therefore LILRBs may represent ideal targets for tumor treatment. This review aims to summarize current knowledge on expression patterns, ligands, signaling, and functions of LILRB family members in the context of cancer development. PMID:26636629

  12. The Internal Structure of Positive and Negative Affect: A Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the PANAS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuccitto, Daniel E.; Giacobbi, Peter R., Jr.; Leite, Walter L.

    2010-01-01

    This study tested five confirmatory factor analytic (CFA) models of the Positive Affect Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS) to provide validity evidence based on its internal structure. A sample of 223 club sport athletes indicated their emotions during the past week. Results revealed that an orthogonal two-factor CFA model, specifying error…

  13. Epidermal growth factor receptors in the canine antrum

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, R.P.; Gates, T.S.; Boehmer, C.G.; Mantyh, P.W.

    1988-11-01

    In this study we localized receptor binding sites for /sup 125/I-human epidermal growth factor (hEGF) in the antrum of the adult canine stomach. High levels of specific /sup 125/I-hEGF binding sites were observed over the mucosa and muscularis mucosa, whereas specific binding sites were not detectable over the submucosa, external circular and longitudinal muscle or myenteric neurons. These results are in agreement with previous studies which indicated that EGF stimulates the proliferation of cultured epithelial cells and inhibits gastric acid secretion. This suggests that EGF may be a useful therapeutic agent in the healing of gastric ulcers.

  14. Epidermal growth factor and its receptors in human pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.F.; Pan, G.Z.; Hou, X.; Liu, T.H.; Chen, J.; Yanaihara, C.; Yanaihara, N. )

    1990-05-01

    The role of epidermal growth factor (EGF) in oncogenesis and progression of malignant tumors is a subject of vast interest. In this study, radioimmunoassay and radioreceptor assay of EGF were established. EGF contents in malignant and benign pancreatic tumors, in normal pancreas tissue, and in culture media of a human pancreatic carcinoma cell line were determined. EGF receptor binding studies were performed. It was shown that EGF contents in pancreatic carcinomas were significantly higher than those in normal pancreas or benign pancreatic tumors. EGF was also detected in the culture medium of a pancreatic carcinoma cell line. The binding of 125I-EGF to the pancreatic carcinoma cells was time and temperature dependent, reversible, competitive, and specific. Scatchard analysis showed that the dissociation constant of EGF receptor was 2.1 X 10(-9) M, number of binding sites was 1.3 X 10(5) cell. These results indicate that there is an over-expression of EGF/EGF receptors in pancreatic carcinomas, and that an autocrine regulatory mechanism may exist in the growth-promoting effect of EGF on tumor cells.

  15. Reliability and factor validity of a Farsi version of The Positive and Negative Perfectionism Scale.

    PubMed

    Besharat, Mohammad Ali

    2009-08-01

    This study investigated reliability and factor validity of a Farsi version of the Positive and Negative Perfectionism Scale in 606 undergraduate students (257 men, 349 women) from the University of Tehran. All participants were asked to complete the scale, along with the General Health Questionnaire (Goldberg, 1972) and the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory (Coopersmith, 1967). Findings indicated good internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and construct validity of the two-factor structure of the Farsi version of the Positive and Negative Perfectionism Scale. These factors were similar to the factors found in previous studies and were accordingly labeled Positive Perfectionism and Negative Perfectionism. The results provide evidence for applicability of the scale and its cross-cultural validity.

  16. Functional and structural stability of the epidermal growth factor receptor in detergent micelles and phospholipid nanodiscs.

    PubMed

    Mi, Li-Zhi; Grey, Michael J; Nishida, Noritaka; Walz, Thomas; Lu, Chafen; Springer, Timothy A

    2008-09-30

    Cellular signaling mediated by the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR or ErbB) family of receptor tyrosine kinases plays an important role in regulating normal and oncogenic cellular physiology. While structures of isolated EGFR extracellular domains and intracellular protein tyrosine kinase domains have suggested mechanisms for growth factor-mediated receptor dimerization and allosteric kinase domain activation, understanding how the transmembrane and juxtamembrane domains contribute to transmembrane signaling requires structural studies on intact receptor molecules. In this report, recombinant EGFR constructs containing the extracellular, transmembrane, juxtamembrane, and kinase domains are overexpressed and purified from human embryonic kidney 293 cell cultures. The oligomerization state, overall structure, and functional stability of the purified EGF-bound receptor are characterized in detergent micelles and phospholipid bilayers. In the presence of EGF, catalytically active EGFR dimers can be isolated by gel filtration in dodecyl maltoside. Visualization of the dimeric species by negative stain electron microscopy and single particle averaging reveals an overall structure of the extracellular domain that is similar to previously published crystal structures and is consistent with the C-termini of domain IV being juxtaposed against one another as they enter the transmembrane domain. Although detergent-soluble preparations of EGFR are stable as dimers in the presence of EGF, they exhibit differential functional stability in Triton X-100 versus dodecyl maltoside. Furthermore, the kinase activity can be significantly stabilized by reconstituting purified EGF-bound EGFR dimers in phospholipid nanodiscs or vesicles, suggesting that the environment around the hydrophobic transmembrane and amphipathic juxtamembrane domains is important for stabilizing the tyrosine kinase activity in vitro.

  17. Linking γ-aminobutyric acid A receptor to epidermal growth factor receptor pathways activation in human prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Weijuan; Yang, Qing; Fung, Kar-Ming; Humphreys, Mitchell R; Brame, Lacy S; Cao, Amy; Fang, Yu-Ting; Shih, Pin-Tsen; Kropp, Bradley P; Lin, Hsueh-Kung

    2014-03-01

    Neuroendocrine (NE) differentiation has been attributed to the progression of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Growth factor pathways including the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling have been implicated in the development of NE features and progression to a castration-resistant phenotype. However, upstream molecules that regulate the growth factor pathway remain largely unknown. Using androgen-insensitive bone metastasis PC-3 cells and androgen-sensitive lymph node metastasis LNCaP cells derived from human prostate cancer (PCa) patients, we demonstrated that γ-aminobutyric acid A receptor (GABA(A)R) ligand (GABA) and agonist (isoguvacine) stimulate cell proliferation, enhance EGF family members expression, and activate EGFR and a downstream signaling molecule, Src, in both PC-3 and LNCaP cells. Inclusion of a GABA(A)R antagonist, picrotoxin, or an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Gefitinib (ZD1839 or Iressa), blocked isoguvacine and GABA-stimulated cell growth, trans-phospohorylation of EGFR, and tyrosyl phosphorylation of Src in both PCa cell lines. Spatial distributions of GABAAR α₁ and phosphorylated Src (Tyr416) were studied in human prostate tissues by immunohistochemistry. In contrast to extremely low or absence of GABA(A)R α₁-positive immunoreactivity in normal prostate epithelium, elevated GABA(A)R α₁ immunoreactivity was detected in prostate carcinomatous glands. Similarly, immunoreactivity of phospho-Src (Tyr416) was specifically localized and limited to the nucleoli of all invasive prostate carcinoma cells, but negative in normal tissues. Strong GABAAR α₁ immunoreactivity was spatially adjacent to the neoplastic glands where strong phospho-Src (Tyr416)-positive immunoreactivity was demonstrated, but not in adjacent to normal glands. These results suggest that the GABA signaling is linked to the EGFR pathway and may work through autocrine or paracine mechanism to promote CRPC progression.

  18. Vandetanib (ZD6474), a dual inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinases: current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Morabito, Alessandro; Piccirillo, Maria Carmela; Falasconi, Fabiano; De Feo, Gianfranco; Del Giudice, Antonia; Bryce, Jane; Di Maio, Massimo; De Maio, Ermelinda; Normanno, Nicola; Perrone, Francesco

    2009-04-01

    Vandetanib is a novel, orally available inhibitor of different intracellular signaling pathways involved in tumor growth, progression, and angiogenesis: vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, epidermal growth factor receptor, and REarranged during Transfection tyrosine kinase activity. Phase I clinical trials have shown that vandetanib is well tolerated as a single agent at daily doses < or =300 mg. In the phase II setting, negative results were observed with vandetanib in small cell lung cancer, metastatic breast cancer, and multiple myeloma. In contrast, three randomized phase II studies showed that vandetanib prolonged the progression-free survival (PFS) time of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as a single agent when compared with gefitinib or when added to chemotherapy. Rash, diarrhea, hypertension, fatigue, and asymptomatic QTc prolongation were the most common adverse events. Antitumor activity was also observed in medullary thyroid cancer. Four randomized phase III clinical trials in NSCLC are exploring the efficacy of vandetanib in combination with docetaxel, the Zactima in cOmbination with Docetaxel In non-small cell lung Cancer (ZODIAC) trial, or with pemetrexed, the Zactima Efficacy with Alimta in Lung cancer (ZEAL) trial, or as a single agent, the Zactima Efficacy when Studied versus Tarceva (ZEST) and the Zactima Efficacy trial for NSCLC Patients with History of EGFR-TKI chemo-Resistance (ZEPHYR) trials. Based on a press release by the sponsor of these trials, the PFS time was longer with vandetanib in the ZODIAC and ZEAL trials; the ZEST trial was negative for its primary superiority analysis, but was successful according to a preplanned noninferiority analysis of PFS. Ongoing phase II and III clinical trials will better define the appropriate schedule, the optimal setting of evaluation, and the safety of long-term use of vandetanib.

  19. Vandetanib (ZD6474), a dual inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinases: current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Morabito, Alessandro; Piccirillo, Maria Carmela; Falasconi, Fabiano; De Feo, Gianfranco; Del Giudice, Antonia; Bryce, Jane; Di Maio, Massimo; De Maio, Ermelinda; Normanno, Nicola; Perrone, Francesco

    2009-04-01

    Vandetanib is a novel, orally available inhibitor of different intracellular signaling pathways involved in tumor growth, progression, and angiogenesis: vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, epidermal growth factor receptor, and REarranged during Transfection tyrosine kinase activity. Phase I clinical trials have shown that vandetanib is well tolerated as a single agent at daily doses < or =300 mg. In the phase II setting, negative results were observed with vandetanib in small cell lung cancer, metastatic breast cancer, and multiple myeloma. In contrast, three randomized phase II studies showed that vandetanib prolonged the progression-free survival (PFS) time of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as a single agent when compared with gefitinib or when added to chemotherapy. Rash, diarrhea, hypertension, fatigue, and asymptomatic QTc prolongation were the most common adverse events. Antitumor activity was also observed in medullary thyroid cancer. Four randomized phase III clinical trials in NSCLC are exploring the efficacy of vandetanib in combination with docetaxel, the Zactima in cOmbination with Docetaxel In non-small cell lung Cancer (ZODIAC) trial, or with pemetrexed, the Zactima Efficacy with Alimta in Lung cancer (ZEAL) trial, or as a single agent, the Zactima Efficacy when Studied versus Tarceva (ZEST) and the Zactima Efficacy trial for NSCLC Patients with History of EGFR-TKI chemo-Resistance (ZEPHYR) trials. Based on a press release by the sponsor of these trials, the PFS time was longer with vandetanib in the ZODIAC and ZEAL trials; the ZEST trial was negative for its primary superiority analysis, but was successful according to a preplanned noninferiority analysis of PFS. Ongoing phase II and III clinical trials will better define the appropriate schedule, the optimal setting of evaluation, and the safety of long-term use of vandetanib. PMID:19349511

  20. The coexpression and prognostic significance of c-MET, fibroblast growth factor receptor 2, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 in resected gastric cancer: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yong-Xu; Li, Teng-Fei; Zhang, Dan-Dan; Fan, Zong-Min; Fan, Hui-Jie; Yan, Jie; Chen, Li-Juan; Tang, Hong; Qin, Yan-Ru; Li, Xing-Ya

    2016-01-01

    Molecular-targeted therapy against tyrosine kinase receptors (RTKs) plays an important role in gastric cancer (GC) treatment. Understanding the correlation between RTK coexpression could better guide clinical drug use. In the present study, the coexpression status of c-MET, fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) in human GC and their clinical significance in clinical therapy were explored. Immunohistochemical (IHC) staining, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and fluorescent in situ hybridization were performed in 143 cases of GC who had undergone gastrectomy without preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Their association with clinicopathological features and clinical prognosis was analyzed. The frequencies of c-MET, FGFR2, and HER2 overexpression were 47.6% (68/143), 34.3% (49/143), and 10.5% (15/143), respectively. In the RTK coexpression study, 30.1% of patients (43/143) were positive for only one RTK, 25.8% (37/143) were positive for two RTKs, 3.5% (5/143) had triple-positive status, and 40.6% (58/143) had triple-negative status. In survival analysis, the overexpression of c-MET, FGFR2, and HER2 were significantly associated with overall survival (OS) (P=0.018, 0.004, and 0.049, respectively). In coexpression analysis, patients with triple-positive GC had the poorest OS (P=0.013). In conclusion, RTK coexpression is significantly associated with poor clinical outcome in GC. PMID:27729801

  1. Coregulation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor/Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2) Levels and Locations: Quantitative Analysis of HER2 Overexpression Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Hendriks, Bart S.; Opresko, Lee; Wiley, H. S.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2003-03-01

    Elevated expression of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is know to alter cell signalilng and behavioral responses implicated in tumor progression. However, multiple diverse mechanisms may be involved in these overall effects, including signaling by HER2 itself, modulation of signalilng by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and modification of trafficking dynamics for both EGFR and HER2. Continued....

  2. Angiogenesis in Breast Cancer and its Correlation with Estrogen, Progesterone Receptors and other Prognostic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Rani, Poonam; Kamal, Vinay; Agarwal, Prem Narayan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of study is to evaluate angiogenesis using CD34, in estrogen, progesterone positive and negative breastcancer and to correlate the microvessel density with known histological prognostic factors, morphological type of breast carcinoma and lymph node metastasis. Materials and Methods: Twenty eight untreated cases of breast cancer were included in the study and paraffin embedded sections were obtained from representative mastectomy specimen of breast cancer patient. The sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin stain and immunohistochemistry was performed using CD34, estrogen, progesterone, cytokeratin and epithelial membrane antigen antibody. Angiogenesis was analysed using CD 34 antibody. For statistical analysis, cases were grouped into estrogen, progesterone positive and negative receptors. Results: Mean microvessel density in ER-/PR-, ER-/ PR+, ER+/PR-, ER+/PR+ was 15.45, 14.83, 11, 10.89 respectively. A significant correlation was found between ER receptors and mean vascular density with p-value (< 0.05). A significant difference was observed in mean vascular density between the four groups comprising (p-value < 0.05). Infiltrating duct carcinoma (NOS) grade III has got the highest mean microvessel density (14.17) followed by grade II (12.93) and grade I (12.33). Conclusion: Information about prognostic factors in breast cancer patients may lead to better ways to identify those patients at high risk who might benefit from adjuvant therapies. PMID:25737993

  3. Arsenite and insulin exhibit opposing effects on epidermal growth factor receptor and keratinocyte proliferative potential

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, Timothy J.; Rice, Robert H. . E-mail: rhrice@ucdavis.edu

    2007-05-15

    Previous work has suggested that arsenic exposure contributes to skin carcinogenesis by preserving the proliferative potential of human epidermal keratinocytes, thereby slowing the exit of putative target stem cells into the differentiation pathway. To find a molecular basis for this action, present work has explored the influence of arsenite on keratinocyte responses to epidermal growth factor (EGF). The ability of cultured keratinocytes to found colonies upon passaging several days after confluence was preserved by arsenite and EGF in an additive fashion, but neither was effective when the receptor tyrosine kinase activity was inhibited. Arsenite prevented the loss of EGF receptor protein and phosphorylation of tyrosine 1173, preserving its capability to signal. The level of nuclear {beta}-catenin was higher in cells treated with arsenite and EGF in parallel to elevated colony forming ability, and expression of a dominant negative {beta}-catenin suppressed the increase in both colony forming ability and yield of putative stem cells induced by arsenite and EGF. As judged by expression of three genes regulated by {beta}-catenin, this transcription factor had substantially higher activity in the arsenite/EGF-treated cells. Trivalent antimony exhibited the same effects as arsenite. A novel finding is that insulin in the medium induced the loss of EGF receptor protein, which was largely prevented by arsenite exposure.

  4. Pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor and hepatocyte nuclear factors as emerging players in cancer precision medicine.

    PubMed

    De Mattia, Elena; Cecchin, Erika; Roncato, Rossana; Toffoli, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    Great research effort has been focused on elucidating the contribution of host genetic variability on pharmacological outcomes in cancer. Nuclear receptors have emerged as mediators between environmental stimuli and drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. The pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor and hepatocyte nuclear factors have been reported to regulate transcription of genes that encode drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters. Altered nuclear receptor expression has been shown to affect the metabolism and pharmacological profile of traditional chemotherapeutics and targeted agents. Accordingly, polymorphic variants in these genes have been studied as pharmacogenetic markers of outcome variability. This review summarizes the state of knowledge about the roles played by pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor and hepatocyte nuclear factor expression and genetics as predictive markers of anticancer drug toxicity and efficacy, which can improve cancer precision medicine. PMID:27561454

  5. Pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor and hepatocyte nuclear factors as emerging players in cancer precision medicine.

    PubMed

    De Mattia, Elena; Cecchin, Erika; Roncato, Rossana; Toffoli, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    Great research effort has been focused on elucidating the contribution of host genetic variability on pharmacological outcomes in cancer. Nuclear receptors have emerged as mediators between environmental stimuli and drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. The pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor and hepatocyte nuclear factors have been reported to regulate transcription of genes that encode drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters. Altered nuclear receptor expression has been shown to affect the metabolism and pharmacological profile of traditional chemotherapeutics and targeted agents. Accordingly, polymorphic variants in these genes have been studied as pharmacogenetic markers of outcome variability. This review summarizes the state of knowledge about the roles played by pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor and hepatocyte nuclear factor expression and genetics as predictive markers of anticancer drug toxicity and efficacy, which can improve cancer precision medicine.

  6. Negative thinking: a key factor in depressive symptoms in Thai adolescents.

    PubMed

    Charoensuk, Sukjai

    2007-01-01

    Negative thinking, self-esteem, parental bonding, and everyday stressors are factors related to depressive symptoms in studies conducted in the United States, but they have been rarely explored in Thailand. An understanding of factors influencing depressive symptoms in Thai youth will lead to the development of interventions to decrease depressive symptoms among this age group. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of parental bonding, everyday stressors, self-esteem, and negative thinking on depressive symptoms among Thai adolescents. A random sample of 812 high school students in Chon Buri, Thailand, participated in the study. The prevalence of depressive symptoms varied from 20-21% depending on the measures used. Negative thinking was the best predictor of depressive symptoms in Thai adolescents. Negative thinking also mediated the effects of parental bonding, everyday stressors, and self-esteem on depressive symptoms. PMID:17130007

  7. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 3 directly regulates murine neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Calvo, Charles-Félix; Fontaine, Romain H.; Soueid, Jihane; Tammela, Tuomas; Makinen, Taija; Alfaro-Cervello, Clara; Bonnaud, Fabien; Miguez, Andres; Benhaim, Lucile; Xu, Yunling; Barallobre, Maria-José; Moutkine, Imane; Lyytikkä, Johannes; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Pytowski, Bronislaw; Zalc, Bernard; Richardson, William; Kessaris, Nicoletta; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Alitalo, Kari; Eichmann, Anne; Thomas, Jean-Léon

    2011-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are slowly dividing astrocytes that are intimately associated with capillary endothelial cells in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the brain. Functionally, members of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family can stimulate neurogenesis as well as angiogenesis, but it has been unclear whether they act directly via VEGF receptors (VEGFRs) expressed by neural cells, or indirectly via the release of growth factors from angiogenic capillaries. Here, we show that VEGFR-3, a receptor required for lymphangiogenesis, is expressed by NSCs and is directly required for neurogenesis. Vegfr3:YFP reporter mice show VEGFR-3 expression in multipotent NSCs, which are capable of self-renewal and are activated by the VEGFR-3 ligand VEGF-C in vitro. Overexpression of VEGF-C stimulates VEGFR-3-expressing NSCs and neurogenesis in the SVZ without affecting angiogenesis. Conversely, conditional deletion of Vegfr3 in neural cells, inducible deletion in subventricular astrocytes, and blocking of VEGFR-3 signaling with antibodies reduce SVZ neurogenesis. Therefore, VEGF-C/VEGFR-3 signaling acts directly on NSCs and regulates adult neurogenesis, opening potential approaches for treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:21498572

  8. Role of fibroblast growth factor receptors in astrocytic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Galvez-Contreras, Alma Y.; Gonzalez-Castaneda, Rocio E; Luquin, Sonia; Gonzalez-Perez, Oscar

    2012-01-01

    There are two well-defined neurogenic regions in the adult brain, the subventricular zone (SVZ) lining the lateral wall of the lateral ventricles and, the subgranular zone (SGZ) in the dentate gyrus at the hippocampus. Within these neurogenic regions, there are neural stem cells with astrocytic characteristics, which actively respond to the basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF, FGF2 or FGF-β) by increasing their proliferation, survival and differentiation, both in vivo and in vitro. FGF2 binds to fibroblast growth factor receptors 1 to 4 (FGFR1, FGFR2, FGFR3, FGFR4). Interestingly, these receptors are differentially expressed in neurogenic progenitors. During development, FGFR-1 and FGFR-2 drive oligodendrocytes and motor neuron specification. In particular, FGFR-1 determines oligodendroglial and neuronal cell fate, whereas FGFR-2 is related to oligodendrocyte specification. In the adult SVZ, FGF-2 promotes oligodendrogliogenesis and myelination. FGF-2 deficient mice show a reduction in the number of new neurons in the SGZ, which suggests that FGFR-1 is important for neuronal cell fate in the adult hippocampus. In human brain, FGF-2 appears to be an important component in the anti-depressive effect of drugs. In summary, FGF2 is an important modulator of the cell fate of neural precursor and, promotes oligodendrogenesis. In this review, we describe the expression pattern of FGFR2 and its role in neural precursors derived from the SVZ and the SGZ. PMID:22347841

  9. HSCARG Negatively Regulates the Cellular Antiviral RIG-I Like Receptor Signaling Pathway by Inhibiting TRAF3 Ubiquitination via Recruiting OTUB1

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yanyan; Xu, Ruidan; Zheng, Xiaofeng

    2014-01-01

    RIG-I like receptors (RLRs) recognize cytosolic viral RNA and initiate innate immunity; they increase the production of type I interferon (IFN) and the transcription of a series of antiviral genes to protect the host organism. Accurate regulation of the RLR pathway is important for avoiding tissue injury induced by excessive immune response. HSCARG is a newly reported negative regulator of NF-κB. Here we demonstrated that HSCARG participates in innate immunity. HSCARG inhibited the cellular antiviral response in an NF-κB independent manner, whereas deficiency of HSCARG had an opposite effect. After viral infection, HSCARG interacted with tumor necrosis receptor-associated factor 3 (TRAF3) and inhibited its ubiquitination by promoting the recruitment of OTUB1 to TRAF3. Knockout of HSCARG attenuated the de-ubiquitination of TRAF3 by OTUB1, and knockdown of OTUB1 abolished the effect of HSCARG. HSCARG also interacted with Ikappa-B kinase epsilon (IKKε) after viral infection and impaired the association between TRAF3 and IKKε, which further decreased the phosphorylation of IKKε and interferon response factor 3 (IRF3), thus suppressed the dimerization and nuclear translocation of IRF3. Moreover, knockdown of TRAF3 dampened the inhibitory effect of IFN-β transcription by HSCARG, suggesting that TRAF3 is necessary for HSCARG to down-regulate RLR pathway. This study demonstrated that HSCARG is a negative regulator that enables balanced antiviral innate immunity. PMID:24763515

  10. ABD1 is an Arabidopsis DCAF substrate receptor for CUL4-DDB1-based E3 ligases that acts as a negative regulator of abscisic acid signaling.

    PubMed

    Seo, Kyoung-In; Lee, Jae-Hoon; Nezames, Cynthia D; Zhong, Shangwei; Song, Eunyoung; Byun, Myung-Ok; Deng, Xing Wang

    2014-02-01

    Members of the DDB1-CUL4-associated factors (DCAFs) family directly bind to DAMAGED DNA BINDING PROTEIN1 (DDB1) and function as the substrate receptors in CULLIN4-based E3 (CUL4) ubiquitin ligases, which regulate the selective ubiquitination of proteins. Here, we describe a DCAF protein, ABD1 (for ABA-hypersensitive DCAF1), that negatively regulates abscisic acid (ABA) signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana. ABD1 interacts with DDB1 in vitro and in vivo, indicating that it likely functions as a CUL4 E3 ligase substrate receptor. ABD1 expression is induced by ABA, and mutations in ABD1 result in ABA- and NaCl-hypersensitive phenotypes. Loss of ABD1 leads to hyperinduction of ABA-responsive genes and higher accumulation of the ABA-responsive transcription factor ABA INSENSITIVE5 (ABI5), hypersensitivity to ABA during seed germination and seedling growth, enhanced stomatal closure, reduced water loss, and, ultimately, increased drought tolerance. ABD1 directly interacts with ABI5 in yeast two-hybrid assays and associates with ABI5 in vivo by coimmunoprecipitation, and the interaction was found in the nucleus by bimolecular fluorescence complementation. Furthermore, loss of ABD1 results in a retardation of ABI5 degradation by the 26S proteasome. Taken together, these data suggest that the DCAF-CUL4 E3 ubiquitin ligase assembled with ABD1 is a negative regulator of ABA responses by directly binding to and affecting the stability of ABI5 in the nucleus. PMID:24563203

  11. Dynamic Arginine Methylation of Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) Receptor-associated Factor 6 Regulates Toll-like Receptor Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Tikhanovich, Irina; Kuravi, Sudhakiranmayi; Artigues, Antonio; Villar, Maria T.; Dorko, Kenneth; Nawabi, Atta; Roberts, Benjamin; Weinman, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    Arginine methylation is a common post-translational modification, but its role in regulating protein function is poorly understood. This study demonstrates that, TNF receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6), an E3 ubiquitin ligase involved in innate immune signaling, is regulated by reversible arginine methylation in a range of primary and cultured cells. Under basal conditions, TRAF6 is methylated by the methyltransferase PRMT1, and this inhibits its ubiquitin ligase activity, reducing activation of toll-like receptor signaling. In response to toll-like receptor ligands, TRAF6 is demethylated by the Jumonji domain protein JMJD6. Demethylation is required for maximal activation of NF-κB. Loss of JMJD6 leads to reduced response, and loss of PRMT1 leads to basal pathway activation with subsequent desensitization to ligands. In human primary cells, variations in the PRMT1/JMJD6 ratio significantly correlate with TRAF6 methylation, basal activation of NF-κB, and magnitude of response to LPS. Reversible arginine methylation of TRAF6 by the opposing effects of PRMT1 and JMJD6 is, therefore, a novel mechanism for regulation of innate immune pathways. PMID:26221041

  12. Insulin-like growth factor receptor-1 (IGF-1R) expression in normal breast, proliferative breast lesions, and breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, Rohit; Beriwal, Sushil; McManus, Kim; Dabbs, David J

    2011-05-01

    Insulin-like growth factor receptor 1 (IGF-1R) is a receptor protein tyrosine kinase that is activated by ligand (IGF-1) binding and promotes mitogenic, metastatic, and antiapoptotic phenotypes of breast cancer. There is a dearth of studies analyzing IGF-1R expression by immunohistochemistry in breast carcinoma. This biomarker analysis will be important for pharmacologic interventions that target the IGF system. IGF-1R expression pattern was first analyzed in normal breast tissue and a variety of breast lesions (71 diagnoses from 35 patients), followed by analysis in 191 consecutive invasive breast carcinomas. Furthermore, 86 carcinomas treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy were also analyzed. The carcinomas were classified using immunohistochemical surrogate (to molecular classes) markers-estrogen receptors (ER), progesterone receptors, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2. IGF-1R is expressed at moderate level in normal breast tissue which was considered as normal expression. Overexpression and lower expression were defined as higher than normal or lower than normal expression, respectively. Among the benign and noninvasive breast lesions, IGF-1R expression was slightly increased in lesions that are hormonally driven (such as atypical ductal hyperplasia and columnar cells changes) whereas it was significantly reduced in ER-negative lesions (such as apocrine metaplasia). Similarly, in 191 consecutive breast carcinomas, IGF-1R overexpression was predominantly seen in ER-positive+ tumors. The tumor group that consistently showed reduced expression was the ERBB2 group (ER negative/progesterone receptors negative/human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positive). The expression was somewhat heterogeneous in the triple-negative group. IGF-1R expression was not predictive of pathologic complete response or tumor volume reduction in ER-negative tumors, but reduced IGF-1R was associated with pathologic complete response and significant tumor volume reduction in

  13. The σ1 Receptor Engages the Redox-Regulated HINT1 Protein to Bring Opioid Analgesia Under NMDA Receptor Negative Control

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Muñoz, María; Sánchez-Blázquez, Pilar; Herrero-Labrador, Raquel; Martínez-Murillo, Ricardo; Merlos, Manuel; Vela, José Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The in vivo pharmacology of the sigma 1 receptor (σ1R) is certainly complex; however, σ1R antagonists are of therapeutic interest, because they enhance mu-opioid receptor (MOR)-mediated antinociception and reduce neuropathic pain. Thus, we investigated whether the σ1R is involved in the negative control that glutamate N-methyl-d-aspartate acid receptors (NMDARs) exert on opioid antinociception. Results: The MOR C terminus carries the histidine triad nucleotide-binding protein 1 (HINT1) coupled to the regulator of G-protein signaling RGSZ2-neural nitric oxide synthase assembly. Activated MORs stimulate the production of nitric oxide (NO), and the redox zinc switch RGSZ2 converts this signal into free zinc ions that are required to recruit the redox sensor PKCγ to HINT1 proteins. Then, PKCγ impairs HINT1-RGSZ2 association and enables σ1R-NR1 interaction with MOR-HINT1 complexes to restrain opioid signaling. The inhibition of NOS or the absence of σ1Rs prevents HINT1-PKCγ interaction, and MOR-NMDAR cross-regulation fails. The σ1R antagonists transitorily remove the binding of σ1Rs to NR1 subunits, facilitate the entrance of negative regulators of NMDARs, likely Ca2+-CaM, and prevent NR1 interaction with HINT1, thereby impairing the negative feedback of glutamate on opioid analgesia. Innovation: A redox-regulated process situates MOR signaling under NMDAR control, and in this context, the σ1R binds to the cytosolic C terminal region of the NMDAR NR1 subunit. Conclusion: The σ1R antagonists enhance opioid analgesia in naïve mice by releasing MORs from the negative influence of NMDARs, and they also reset antinociception in morphine tolerant animals. Moreover, σ1R antagonists alleviate neuropathic pain, probably by driving the inhibition of up-regulated NMDARs. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 799–818. PMID:25557043

  14. Attribution to Heterogeneous Risk Factors for Breast Cancer Subtypes Based on Hormone Receptor and Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 Receptor Expression in Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Boyoung; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Sung, Ho Kyung; Ahn, Choonghyun; Hwang, Yunji; Jang, Jieun; Lee, Juyeon; Kim, Heewon; Shin, Hai-Rim; Park, Sohee; Han, Wonshik; Noh, Dong-Young; Yoo, Keun-Young; Kang, Daehee; Park, Sue K

    2016-04-01

    We conducted a heterogeneous risk assessment of breast cancer based on the hormone receptor (HR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) calculating the risks and population-based attributable fractions (PAFs) for modifiable and nonmodifiable factors.Using matched case-control study design from the Seoul Breast Cancer Study and the national prevalence of exposure, the risks and PAFs for modifiable and nonmodifiable factors were estimated for total breast cancers and subtypes.The attribution to modifiable factors was different for each subtype (luminal A, PAF = 61.4% [95% confidence interval, CI = 54.3%-69.8%]; luminal B, 21.4% [95% CI = 18.6-24.9%]; HER2-overexpression, 59.4% [95% CI = 47.8%-74.3%], and triple negative tumors [TNs], 27.1% [95% CI = 22.9%-32.4%)], and the attribution to the modifiable factors for the luminal A and HER2-overexpression subtypes was higher than that of the luminal B and TN subtypes (P heterogeneity  ≤  0.001). The contribution of modifiable reproductive factors to luminal A type in premenopausal women was higher than that of the other subtypes (18.2% for luminal A; 3.1%, 8.1%, and -3.1% for luminal B, HER2-overexpression, and TN subtypes, respectively; P heterogeneity  ≤  0.001). Physical activity had the highest impact preventing 32.6% of luminal A, 14.5% of luminal B, 38.0% of HER2-overexpression, and 26.9% of TN subtypes (P heterogeneity = 0.014). Total reproductive factors were also heterogeneously attributed to each breast cancer subtype (luminal A, 65.4%; luminal B, 24.1%; HER2-overexpression, 57.9%, and TN subtypes, -3.1%; P heterogeneity  ≤  0.001).Each pathological subtype of breast cancer by HRs and HER2 status may be associated with heterogeneous risk factors and their attributable risk, suggesting a different etiology. The luminal B and TN subtypes seemed to be less preventable despite intervention for alleged risk factors, even though physical activity had a high

  15. Attribution to Heterogeneous Risk Factors for Breast Cancer Subtypes Based on Hormone Receptor and Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 Receptor Expression in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Park, Boyoung; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Sung, Ho Kyung; Ahn, Choonghyun; Hwang, Yunji; Jang, Jieun; Lee, Juyeon; Kim, Heewon; Shin, Hai-Rim; Park, Sohee; Han, Wonshik; Noh, Dong-Young; Yoo, Keun-Young; Kang, Daehee; Park, Sue K.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We conducted a heterogeneous risk assessment of breast cancer based on the hormone receptor (HR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) calculating the risks and population-based attributable fractions (PAFs) for modifiable and nonmodifiable factors. Using matched case–control study design from the Seoul Breast Cancer Study and the national prevalence of exposure, the risks and PAFs for modifiable and nonmodifiable factors were estimated for total breast cancers and subtypes. The attribution to modifiable factors was different for each subtype (luminal A, PAF = 61.4% [95% confidence interval, CI = 54.3%–69.8%]; luminal B, 21.4% [95% CI = 18.6–24.9%]; HER2-overexpression, 59.4% [95% CI = 47.8%–74.3%], and triple negative tumors [TNs], 27.1% [95% CI = 22.9%–32.4%)], and the attribution to the modifiable factors for the luminal A and HER2-overexpression subtypes was higher than that of the luminal B and TN subtypes (P heterogeneity ≤ 0.001). The contribution of modifiable reproductive factors to luminal A type in premenopausal women was higher than that of the other subtypes (18.2% for luminal A; 3.1%, 8.1%, and −3.1% for luminal B, HER2-overexpression, and TN subtypes, respectively; P heterogeneity ≤ 0.001). Physical activity had the highest impact preventing 32.6% of luminal A, 14.5% of luminal B, 38.0% of HER2-overexpression, and 26.9% of TN subtypes (P heterogeneity = 0.014). Total reproductive factors were also heterogeneously attributed to each breast cancer subtype (luminal A, 65.4%; luminal B, 24.1%; HER2-overexpression, 57.9%, and TN subtypes, −3.1%; P heterogeneity ≤ 0.001). Each pathological subtype of breast cancer by HRs and HER2 status may be associated with heterogeneous risk factors and their attributable risk, suggesting a different etiology. The luminal B and TN subtypes seemed to be less preventable despite intervention for alleged risk factors, even though physical

  16. Epidermal growth factor receptor in breast cancer: storage conditions affecting measurement, and relationship to steroid receptors.

    PubMed

    McLeay, W R; Horsfall, D J; Seshadri, R; Morrison, D A; Saccone, G T

    1992-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of freezing and storage of tissue and subcellular fractions on the measurement of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGF-r); compares competition binding and single saturating dose assays (SSD) for quantitating EGF-r levels; investigates several tissues as potential quality control; and examines the relationship between EGF-r and hormone receptor expression in human breast cancers. Mouse and calf uterine cell membranes were preferred sources of quality control tissue with similar levels of high affinity EGF-r to human breast cancer tissue (less than 150-200 fmol/mg membrane protein). Studies using pooled mouse uterine tissues indicated a loss of 40% in EGF-r activity following a single-20 degrees C freeze/thaw cycle, while a breast cancer tissue showed a 75% loss, independent of storage temperature (liquid nitrogen, -70 degrees C, -20 degrees C). A single freeze/thaw cycle of mouse uterine broken cell pellets (nuclei plus membrane fraction) again indicated a loss of EGF-r irrespective of storage temperature (43% loss at -70 degrees C, 52% loss at -20 degrees C). In most cases irrespective of the tissue type or tissue fraction being stored, the length of storage had little impact on the extent of the loss in activity. A second freeze/thaw cycle of intact tissue, or freezing of broken cell pellets from a previously-frozen tissue, led to a further major or total loss of the remaining EGF-r. Overall these results are commensurate with the published effects of freezing and storage on estrogen receptor measurement. In addition, our studies suggest that the most suitable procedure for assaying frozen breast cancer specimens for EGF-r levels in conjunction with steroid receptor quantitation is to prepare and assay both cytosol and membrane fractions for their respective receptor content without further storage. A concordance of 86% was found in 44 breast cancers assayed for EGF-4 by saturation analysis and SSD. Statistically significant

  17. Sertoli cell-initiated testicular innate immune response through toll-like receptor-3 activation is negatively regulated by Tyro3, Axl, and mer receptors.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bing; Qi, Nan; Shang, Tao; Wu, Hui; Deng, Tingting; Han, Daishu

    2010-06-01

    Several Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are expressed in Sertoli cells and can trigger testicular innate responses after activation by ligands. TLR signaling pathway must be tightly controlled because unrestrained TLR activation generates a chronic inflammatory milieu that often leads to pathogenesis of the host. However, the regulation of TLR signaling in Sertoli cells remains to be clarified. Here we demonstrate that Tyro3 subfamily of receptor tyrosine kinases, Tyro3, Axl, and Mer (TAM), negatively regulate TLR3 signaling in Sertoli cells. Sertoli cells from TAM triple mutant (TAM(-/-)) mice exhibit an excessive activation of TLR3 in response to its ligand polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid, resulting in the up-regulation of inflammatory cytokines including IL-1beta, IL-6, TNFalpha, and type I interferons (alpha and beta). Growth arrest-specific gene 6 (Gas6), a common ligand of TAM receptors, inhibits the TLR3-driven expression of cytokines in Sertoli cells. This TAM-mediated inhibition of TLR3 signaling in Sertoli cells is transduced through the up-regulation of TLR signaling suppressors suppressor of cytokine signaling-1/3 by Gas6. Moreover, we provide evidence that TAM inhibition of inflammatory cytokine production by Sertoli cells may have physiological significance in vivo. These results illuminate a negative regulatory mechanism of TLR3 signaling in Sertoli cells, which may participate in controlling the testicular innate immune responses to pathogens.

  18. Negative feedback regulation and desensitization of insulin- and epidermal growth factor-stimulated p21ras activation.

    PubMed

    Langlois, W J; Sasaoka, T; Saltiel, A R; Olefsky, J M

    1995-10-27

    Insulin and epidermal growth factor receptors transmit signals for cell proliferation and gene regulation through formation of active GTP-bound p21ras mediated by the guanine nucleotide exchange factor Sos. Sos is constitutively bound to the adaptor protein Grb2 and growth factor stimulation induces association of the Grb2/Sos complex with Shc and movement of Sos to the plasma membrane location of p21ras. Insulin or epidermal growth factor stimulation induces a rapid increase in p21ras levels, but after several minutes levels decline toward basal despite ongoing hormone stimulation. Here we show that deactivation of p21ras correlates closely with phosphorylation of Sos and dissociation of Sos from Grb2, and that inhibition of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase kinase (also known as extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) kinase, or MEK) blocks both events, resulting in prolonged p21ras activation. These data suggest that a negative feedback loop exists whereby activation of the Raf/MEK/MAP kinase cascade by p21ras causes Sos phosphorylation and, therefore, Sos/Grb2 dissociation, limiting the duration of p21ras activation by growth factors. A serine/threonine kinase downstream of MEK (probably MAP kinase) mediates this desensitization feedback pathway.

  19. Transcription-dependent epidermal growth factor receptor activation by hepatocyte growth factor.

    PubMed

    Reznik, Thomas E; Sang, Yingying; Ma, Yongxian; Abounader, Roger; Rosen, Eliot M; Xia, Shuli; Laterra, John

    2008-01-01

    The mechanisms and biological implications of coordinated receptor tyrosine kinase coactivation remain poorly appreciated. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and c-Met are frequently coexpressed in cancers, including those associated with hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) overexpression, such as malignant astrocytoma. In a previous analysis of the HGF-induced transcriptome, we found that two EGFR agonists, transforming growth factor-alpha and heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF), are prominently up-regulated by HGF in human glioma cells. We now report that stimulating human glioblastoma cells with recombinant HGF induces biologically relevant EGFR activation. EGFR phosphorylation at Tyr(845) and Tyr(1068) increased 6 to 24 h after cell stimulation with HGF and temporally coincided with the induction of transforming growth factor-alpha (~5-fold) and HB-EGF (~23-fold) expression. Tyr(845) and Tyr(1068) phosphorylation, in response to HGF, was inhibited by cycloheximide and actinomycin D, consistent with a requirement for DNA transcription and RNA translation. Specifically, blocking HB-EGF binding to EGFR with the antagonist CRM197 inhibited HGF-induced EGFR phosphorylation by 60% to 80% and inhibited HGF-induced S-G(2)-M transition. CRM197 also inhibited HGF-induced anchorage-dependent cell proliferation but had no effect on HGF-mediated cytoprotection. These findings establish that EGFR can be activated with functional consequences by HGF as a result of EGFR ligand expression. This transcription-dependent cross-talk between the HGF receptor c-Met and EGFR expands our understanding of receptor tyrosine kinase signaling networks and may have considerable consequences for oncogenic mechanisms and cancer therapeutics.

  20. Sparse factors for the positive and negative syndrome scale: Which symptoms and stage of illness?

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Ariana; Wilcox, Marsha; Savitz, Adam; Chung, Hearee; Li, Qingqin; Salvadore, Giacomo; Wang, Dai; Nuamah, Isaac; Riese, Steven P.; Bilder, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    The Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) is frequently described with five latent factors, yet published factor models consistently fail to replicate across samples and related disorders. We hypothesize that (1) a subset of the PANSS, instead of the entire PANSS scale, would produce the most replicable five-factor models across samples, and that (2) the PANSS factor structure may be different depending on the treatment phase, influenced by the responsiveness of the positive symptoms to treatment. Using exploratory factor analysis, confirmatory factor analysis and cross validation on baseline and post-treatment observations from 3647 schizophrenia patients, we show that five-factor models fit best across samples when substantial subsets of the PANSS items are removed. The optimal model at baseline (five factors) omits 12 items: Motor Retardation, Grandiosity, Somatic Concern, Lack of Judgment and Insight, Difficulty in Abstract Thinking, Mannerisms and Posturing, Disturbance of Volition, Preoccupation, Disorientation, Excitement, Guilt Feelings and Depression. The PANSS factor models fit differently before and after patients have been treated. Patients with larger treatment response in positive symptoms have larger variations in factor structure across treatment stage than the less responsive patients. Negative symptom scores better predict the positive symptoms scores after treatment than before treatment. We conclude that sparse factor models replicate better on new samples, and the underlying disease structure of Schizophrenia changes upon treatment. PMID:25613662

  1. Progestin-mediated activation of MAPK and AKT in nuclear progesterone receptor negative breast epithelial cells: The role of membrane progesterone receptors.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Monica; Lerma-Ortiz, Alejandra; Hooks, Grace M; Ashley, Amanda K; Ashley, Ryan L

    2016-10-10

    Progesterone (P4), a steroid produced during estrous cycles and gestation for maintenance of pregnancy, also plays key roles in breast development to allow lactation post-parturition. Progestins (P4 and related steroids) are also implicated in breast cancer etiology. Hormone replacement therapy containing both estrogen and progestins increases breast cancer incidence while estrogen hormone therapy lowers breast cancer risk. P4 signaling via nuclear P4 receptors (PRs) has been extensively studied in breast cancer, however, progestin signaling via non-classical membrane bound progestin receptors (MPRs and PGRMC1) remains unclear. Moreover, P4 metabolites and synthetic progestins may bind membrane progestin receptors. We hypothesized that PR-negative breast epithelial cells express non-classical progestin receptors, which activate intracellular signaling pathways differently depending on nature of progestin. Therefore, our objectives for the current study were to determine expression of MPRs and PGRMC1 in two PR-negative non-tumorigenic breast epithelial cell lines, assess progestin-mediated signaling and biological functions. We determined five MPR isoforms and PGRMC1 were present in MCF10A cells and all progestin receptors but MPRβ in MCF12A cells. MCF10A and MCF12A cells were treated with P4, select P4 metabolites (5αP and 3αHP), medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA), or a specific MPR-Agonist (MPR-Ag) and phosphorylation of ERK, p38, JNK, and AKT was characterized following treatment. To our knowledge this is the first report of ERK and JNK activation in MCF10A and MCF12A cells with P4, P4 metabolites, MPA, and MPR-Ag. Activation of ERK and JNK in cells treated with MPR-Ag implicates MPRs may serve as the receptors responsible for their activation. In contrast, p38 activation varied with cell type and with progestin treatment. P4 and MPA promoted AKT phosphorylation in the MCF12A cell line only whereas no activation was observed in MCF10A cells. Interestingly

  2. An immune response gene expression module identifies a good prognosis subtype in estrogen receptor negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Teschendorff, Andrew E; Miremadi, Ahmad; Pinder, Sarah E; Ellis, Ian O; Caldas, Carlos

    2007-01-01

    Background Estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer specimens are predominantly of high grade, have frequent p53 mutations, and are broadly divided into HER2-positive and basal subtypes. Although ER-negative disease has overall worse prognosis than does ER-positive breast cancer, not all ER-negative breast cancer patients have poor clinical outcome. Reliable identification of ER-negative tumors that have a good prognosis is not yet possible. Results We apply a recently proposed feature selection method in an integrative analysis of three major microarray expression datasets to identify molecular subclasses and prognostic markers in ER-negative breast cancer. We find a subclass of basal tumors, characterized by over-expression of immune response genes, which has a better prognosis than the rest of ER-negative breast cancers. Moreover, we show that, in contrast to ER-positive tumours, the majority of prognostic markers in ER-negative breast cancer are over-expressed in the good prognosis group and are associated with activation of complement and immune response pathways. Specifically, we identify an immune response related seven-gene module and show that downregulation of this module confers greater risk for distant metastasis (hazard ratio 2.02, 95% confidence interval 1.2-3.4; P = 0.009), independent of lymph node status and lymphocytic infiltration. Furthermore, we validate the immune response module using two additional independent datasets. Conclusion We show that ER-negative basal breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease with at least four main subtypes. Furthermore, we show that the heterogeneity in clinical outcome of ER-negative breast cancer is related to the variability in expression levels of complement and immune response pathway genes, independent of lymphocytic infiltration. PMID:17683518

  3. TAM receptors affect adult brain neurogenesis by negative regulation of microglial cell activation.

    PubMed

    Ji, Rui; Tian, Shifu; Lu, Helen J; Lu, Qingjun; Zheng, Yan; Wang, Xiaomin; Ding, Jixiang; Li, Qiutang; Lu, Qingxian

    2013-12-15

    TAM tyrosine kinases play multiple functional roles, including regulation of the target genes important in homeostatic regulation of cytokine receptors or TLR-mediated signal transduction pathways. In this study, we show that TAM receptors affect adult hippocampal neurogenesis and loss of TAM receptors impairs hippocampal neurogenesis, largely attributed to exaggerated inflammatory responses by microglia characterized by increased MAPK and NF-κB activation and elevated production of proinflammatory cytokines that are detrimental to neuron stem cell proliferation and neuronal differentiation. Injection of LPS causes even more severe inhibition of BrdU incorporation in the Tyro3(-/-)Axl(-/-)Mertk(-/-) triple-knockout (TKO) brains, consistent with the LPS-elicited enhanced expression of proinflammatory mediators, for example, IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, and inducible NO synthase, and this effect is antagonized by coinjection of the anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin in wild-type but not TKO brains. Conditioned medium from TKO microglia cultures inhibits neuron stem cell proliferation and neuronal differentiation. IL-6 knockout in Axl(-/-)Mertk(-/-) double-knockout mice overcomes the inflammatory inhibition of neurogenesis, suggesting that IL-6 is a major downstream neurotoxic mediator under homeostatic regulation by TAM receptors in microglia. Additionally, autonomous trophic function of the TAM receptors on the proliferating neuronal progenitors may also promote progenitor differentiation into immature neurons.

  4. From bench to bedside: what do we know about Hormone Receptor-positive and Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-positive breast cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Victoria Shang; Kanaya, Noriko; Lo, Chiao; Mortimer, Joanne; Chen, Shiuan

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease. Thanks to extensive efforts from research scientists and clinicians, treatment for breast cancer has advanced into the era of targeted medicine. With the use of several well-established biomarkers, such as hormone receptors (HRs) (i.e. estrogen receptor [ER] and progesterone receptor [PgR]) and Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-2 (HER2), breast cancer patients can be categorized into multiple subgroups with specific targeted treatment strategies. Although therapeutic strategies for HR-positive (HR+) HER2-negative (HER2−) breast cancer and HR-negative (HR−) HER2-positive (HER2+) breast cancer are well-defined, HR+ HER2+ breast cancer is still an overlooked subgroup without tailored therapeutic options. In this review, we have summarized the molecular characteristics, etiology, preclinical tools and therapeutic options for HR+ HER2+ breast cancer. We hope to raise the attention of both the research and the medical community on HR+ HER2+ breast cancer, and to advance patient care for this subtype of disease. PMID:25998416

  5. From bench to bedside: What do we know about hormone receptor-positive and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive breast cancer?

    PubMed

    Wu, Victoria Shang; Kanaya, Noriko; Lo, Chiao; Mortimer, Joanne; Chen, Shiuan

    2015-09-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease. Thanks to extensive efforts from research scientists and clinicians, treatment for breast cancer has advanced into the era of targeted medicine. With the use of several well-established biomarkers, such as hormone receptors (HRs) (i.e., estrogen receptor [ER] and progesterone receptor [PgR]) and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2), breast cancer patients can be categorized into multiple subgroups with specific targeted treatment strategies. Although therapeutic strategies for HR-positive (HR+) HER2-negative (HER2-) breast cancer and HR-negative (HR-) HER2-positive (HER2+) breast cancer are well-defined, HR+ HER2+ breast cancer is still an overlooked subgroup without tailored therapeutic options. In this review, we have summarized the molecular characteristics, etiology, preclinical tools and therapeutic options for HR+ HER2+ breast cancer. We hope to raise the attention of both the research and the medical community on HR+ HER2+ breast cancer, and to advance patient care for this subtype of disease.

  6. Identification of a new fibroblast growth factor receptor, FGFR5.

    PubMed

    Sleeman, M; Fraser, J; McDonald, M; Yuan, S; White, D; Grandison, P; Kumble, K; Watson, J D; Murison, J G

    2001-06-27

    A novel fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR), designated FGFR5, was identified from an EST database of a murine lymph node stromal cell cDNA library. The EST has approximately 32% identity to the extracellular domain of FGFR1-4. Library screening with this EST identified two full-length alternative transcripts which we designated as FGFR5 beta and FGFR5 gamma. The main difference between these transcripts is that FGFR5 beta contains three extracellular Ig domains whereas FGFR5 gamma contains only two. A unique feature of FGFR5 is that it does not contain an intracellular tyrosine kinase domain. Predictive structural modelling of the extracellular domain of FGFR5 gamma suggested that it was a member of the I-set subgroup of the Ig-superfamily, consistent with the known FGFRs. Northern analysis of mouse and human FGFR5 showed detectable mRNA in a broad range of tissues, including kidney, brain and lung. Genomic sequencing identified four introns but identified no alternative transcripts containing a tyrosine kinase domain. Extracellular regions of FGFR5 beta and 5 gamma were cloned in-frame with the Fc fragment of human IgG(1) to generate recombinant non-membrane bound protein. Recombinant FGFR5 beta Fc and R5 gamma Fc demonstrated specific binding to the ligand FGF-2, but not FGF-7 or EGF. However, biological data suggest that FGF-2 binding to these proteins is with lower affinity than its cognate receptor FGFR2C. The above data indicate that this receptor should be considered as the fifth member of the FGFR family. PMID:11418238

  7. A divergent role for estrogen receptor-beta in node-positive and node-negative breast cancer classified according to molecular subtypes: an observational prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Novelli, Flavia; Milella, Michele; Melucci, Elisa; Di Benedetto, Anna; Sperduti, Isabella; Perrone-Donnorso, Raffaele; Perracchio, Letizia; Venturo, Irene; Nisticò, Cecilia; Fabi, Alessandra; Buglioni, Simonetta; Natali, Pier Giorgio; Mottolese, Marcella

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Estrogen receptor-alpha (ER-α) and progesterone receptor (PgR) are consolidated predictors of response to hormonal therapy (HT). In contrast, little information regarding the role of estrogen receptor-beta (ER-β) in various breast cancer risk groups treated with different therapeutic regimens is available. In particular, there are no data concerning ER-β distribution within the novel molecular breast cancer subtypes luminal A (LA) and luminal B (LB), HER2 (HS), and triple-negative (TN). Methods We conducted an observational prospective study using immunohistochemistry to evaluate ER-β expression in 936 breast carcinomas. Associations with conventional biopathological factors and with molecular subtypes were analyzed by multiple correspondence analysis (MCA), while univariate and multivariate Cox regression analysis and classification and regression tree analysis were applied to determine the impact of ER-β on disease-free survival in the 728 patients with complete follow-up data. Results ER-β evenly distributes (55.5%) across the four molecular breast cancer subtypes, confirming the lack of correlation between ER-β and classical prognosticators. However, the relationships among the biopathological factors, analyzed by MCA, showed that ER-β positivity is located in the quadrant containing more aggressive phenotypes such as HER2 and TN or ER-α/PgR/Bcl2- tumors. Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox regression analysis identified ER-β as a significant discriminating factor for disease-free survival both in the node-negative LA (P = 0.02) subgroup, where it is predictive of response to HT, and in the node-positive LB (P = 0.04) group, where, in association with PgR negativity, it conveys a higher risk of relapse. Conclusion Our data indicated that, in contrast to node-negative patients, in node-positive breast cancer patients, ER-β positivity appears to be a biomarker related to a more aggressive clinical course. In this context, further investigations

  8. Orphan Nuclear Receptor ERRα Controls Macrophage Metabolic Signaling and A20 Expression to Negatively Regulate TLR-Induced Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Yuk, Jae-Min; Kim, Tae Sung; Kim, Soo Yeon; Lee, Hye-Mi; Han, Jeongsu; Dufour, Catherine Rosa; Kim, Jin Kyung; Jin, Hyo Sun; Yang, Chul-Su; Park, Ki-Sun; Lee, Chul-Ho; Kim, Jin-Man; Kweon, Gi Ryang; Choi, Hueng-Sik; Vanacker, Jean-Marc; Moore, David D; Giguère, Vincent; Jo, Eun-Kyeong

    2015-07-21

    The orphan nuclear receptor estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα; NR3B1) is a key metabolic regulator, but its function in regulating inflammation remains largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that ERRα negatively regulates Toll-like receptor (TLR)-induced inflammation by promoting Tnfaip3 transcription and fine-tuning of metabolic reprogramming in macrophages. ERRα-deficient (Esrra(-/-)) mice showed increased susceptibility to endotoxin-induced septic shock, leading to more severe pro-inflammatory responses than control mice. ERRα regulated macrophage inflammatory responses by directly binding the promoter region of Tnfaip3, a deubiquitinating enzyme in TLR signaling. In addition, Esrra(-/-) macrophages showed an increased glycolysis, but impaired mitochondrial respiratory function and biogenesis. Further, ERRα was required for the regulation of NF-κB signaling by controlling p65 acetylation via maintenance of NAD(+) levels and sirtuin 1 activation. These findings unravel a previously unappreciated role for ERRα as a negative regulator of TLR-induced inflammatory responses through inducing Tnfaip3 transcription and controlling the metabolic reprogramming.

  9. Bile acid-activated nuclear receptor FXR suppresses apolipoprotein A-I transcription via a negative FXR response element

    PubMed Central

    Claudel, Thierry; Sturm, Ekkehard; Duez, Hélène; Torra, Inés Pineda; Sirvent, Audrey; Kosykh, Vladimir; Fruchart, Jean-Charles; Dallongeville, Jean; Hum, Dean W.; Kuipers, Folkert; Staels, Bart

    2002-01-01

    Serum levels of HDL are inversely correlated with the risk of coronary heart disease. The anti-atherogenic effect of HDL is partially mediated by its major protein constituent apoA-I. In this study, we identify bile acids that are activators of the nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) as negative regulators of human apoA-I expression. Intrahepatocellular accumulation of bile acids, as seen in patients with progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis and biliary atresia, was associated with diminished apoA-I serum levels. In human apoA-I transgenic mice, treatment with the FXR agonist taurocholic acid strongly decreased serum concentrations and liver mRNA levels of human apoA-I, which was associated with reduced serum HDL levels. Incubation of human primary hepatocytes and hepatoblastoma HepG2 cells with bile acids resulted in a dose-dependent downregulation of apoA-I expression. Promoter mutation analysis and gel-shift experiments in HepG2 cells demonstrated that bile acid–activated FXR decreases human apoA-I promoter activity by a negative FXR response element mapped to the C site. FXR bound this site and repressed transcription in a manner independent of retinoid X receptor. The nonsteroidal synthetic FXR agonist GW4064 likewise decreased apoA-I mRNA levels and promoter activity in HepG2 cells. PMID:11927623

  10. The epidermal growth factor receptor pathway in chronic kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Harskamp, Laura R; Gansevoort, Ron T; van Goor, Harry; Meijer, Esther

    2016-08-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway has a critical role in renal development, tissue repair and electrolyte handling. Numerous studies have reported an association between dysregulation of this pathway and the initiation and progression of various chronic kidney diseases such as diabetic nephropathy, chronic allograft nephropathy and polycystic kidney disease through the promotion of renal cell proliferation, fibrosis and inflammation. In the oncological setting, compounds that target the EGFR pathway are already in clinical use or have been evaluated in clinical trials; in the renal setting, therapeutic interventions targeting this pathway by decreasing ligand availability with disintegrin and metalloproteinase inhibitors or with ligand-neutralizing antibodies, or by inhibiting receptor activation with tyrosine kinase inhibitors or monoclonal antibodies are only just starting to be explored in animal models of chronic kidney disease and in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. In this Review we focus on the role of the EGFR signalling pathway in the kidney under physiological conditions and during the pathophysiology of chronic kidney diseases and explore the clinical potential of interventions in this pathway to treat chronic renal diseases. PMID:27374915

  11. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor in Prostate Cancer Derived Exosomes

    PubMed Central

    Kharmate, Geetanjali; Hosseini-Beheshti, Elham; Caradec, Josselin; Chin, Mei Yieng; Tomlinson Guns, Emma S.

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes proteins and microRNAs have gained much attention as diagnostic tools and biomarker potential in various malignancies including prostate cancer (PCa). However, the role of exosomes and membrane-associated receptors, particularly epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) as mediators of cell proliferation and invasion in PCa progression remains unexplored. EGFR is frequently overexpressed and has been associated with aggressive forms of PCa. While PCa cells and tissues express EGFR, it is unknown whether exosomes derived from PCa cells or PCa patient serum contains EGFR. The aim of this study was to detect and characterize EGFR in exosomes derived from PCa cells, LNCaP xenograft and PCa patient serum. Exosomes were isolated from conditioned media of different PCa cell lines; LNCaP xenograft serum as well as patient plasma/serum by differential centrifugation and ultracentrifugation on a sucrose density gradient. Exosomes were confirmed by electron microscopy, expression of exosomal markers and NanoSight™ analysis. EGFR expression was determined by western blot analysis and ELISA. This study demonstrates that exosomes may easily be derived from PCa cell lines, serum obtained from PCa xenograft bearing mice and clinical samples derived from PCa patients. Presence of exosomal EGFR in PCa patient exosomes may present a novel approach for measuring of the disease state. Our work will allow to build on this finding for future understanding of PCa exosomes and their potential role in PCa progression and as minimal invasive biomarkers for PCa. PMID:27152724

  12. Development of a Quantitative PCR Assay for Detection of Human Insulin-Like Growth Factor Receptor and Insulin Receptor Isoforms.

    PubMed

    Flannery, Clare A; Rowzee, Anne M; Choe, Gina H; Saleh, Farrah L; Radford, Caitlin C; Taylor, Hugh S; Wood, Teresa L

    2016-04-01

    The biological activity of insulin and the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) ligands, IGF-I and IGF-II, is based in part on the relative abundance and distribution of their target receptors: the insulin receptor (IR) splice variants A (IR-A) and B (IR-B) and IGF 1 receptor (IGF-1R). However, the relative quantity of all three receptors in human tissues has never been measured together on the same scale. Due to the high homology between insulin receptor (IR)-A and IR-B proteins and lack of antibodies that discern the two IR splice variants, their mRNA sequence is the most reliable means of distinguishing between the receptors. Hence, highly specific primers for IR-A, IR-B, and IGF-1R mRNA were designed to accurately detect all three receptors by quantitative RT-PCR and enable direct quantification of relative receptor expression levels. A standard concentration curve of cDNA from each receptor was performed. Assay specificity was tested using competition assays and postamplification analysis by gel electrophoresis and cloning. Forward and reverse primer concentrations were optimized to ensure equal efficiencies across primer pairs. This assay enables a specific molecular signature of IGF/insulin signaling receptors to be assayed in different tissues, cell types, or cancers. PMID:26862994

  13. Clinical experience with monoclonal antibodies to epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Emiliano; Rowinsky, Eric K

    2005-03-01

    Recent knowledge about the intermediate steps and final consequences of ligand-dependent epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation has clearly supported the notion that EGFR plays a fundamental role in regulating the proliferation and survival of malignant neoplasms. Among the rationally designed target-based therapeutics that are being assessed, those targeting EGFR appear to be some of the most clinically relevant. The strategy of using monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to block ligand binding to the extracellular domain of the EGFR has led to the development of therapeutics that robustly arrest malignant cell proliferation and, in some cases, induce profound tumor regression. The chimeric mAb against EGFR, cetuximab, has already been approved by regulatory agencies worldwide to treat patients with advanced colorectal cancer. Other mAbs against EGFR, particularly panitumumab (ABX-EGF), h-R3, and EMD72000, are in advanced stages of clinical development. PMID:15717942

  14. Targeting tumor-necrosis factor receptor pathways for tumor immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Schaer, David A; Hirschhorn-Cymerman, Daniel; Wolchok, Jedd D

    2014-01-01

    With the success of ipilimumab and promise of programmed death-1 pathway-targeted agents, the field of tumor immunotherapy is expanding rapidly. Newer targets for clinical development include select members of the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) family. Agonist antibodies to these co-stimulatory molecules target both T and B cells, modulating T-cell activation and enhancing immune responses. In vitro and in vivo preclinical data have provided the basis for continued development of 4-1BB, OX40, glucocorticoid-induced TNFR-related gene, herpes virus entry mediator, and CD27 as potential therapies for patients with cancer. In this review, we summarize the immune response to tumors, consider preclinical and early clinical data on select TNFR family members, discuss potential translational challenges and suggest possible combination therapies with the aim of inducing durable antitumor responses. PMID:24855562

  15. MET Receptor Tyrosine Kinase as an Autism Genetic Risk Factor

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yun; Huentelman, Matthew; Smith, Christopher; Qiu, Shenfeng

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter, we will briefly discuss recent literature on the role of MET receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) in brain development and how perturbation of MET signaling may alter normal neurodevelopmental outcomes. Recent human genetic studies have established MET as a risk factor for autism, and the molecular and cellular underpinnings of this genetic risk are only beginning to emerge from obscurity. Unlike many autism risk genes that encode synaptic proteins, the spatial and temporal expression pattern of MET RTK indicates this signaling system is ideally situated to regulate neuronal growth, functional maturation, and establishment of functional brain circuits, particularly in those brain structures involved in higher levels of cognition, social skills, and executive functions. PMID:24290385

  16. Patterns of epidermal growth factor receptor amplification in malignant gliomas.

    PubMed Central

    Sauter, G.; Maeda, T.; Waldman, F. M.; Davis, R. L.; Feuerstein, B. G.

    1996-01-01

    Amplification of the gene for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a common finding in malignant gliomas. We found that 18 of 29 grade 3 and grade 4 gliomas had EGFR amplification when assayed using fluorescence in situ hybridization. The amplification pattern suggests that the amplicon is contained within double minute chromosomes in most cases. EGFR copy number can differ by 20-fold in amplified cells within a single case. Polysomy 7 occurs frequently in both EGFR-amplified and -unamplified cells. More than one-third of the cases had < or = 10 percent of cells with amplified EGFR, and it is likely that these cases would not have been identified by methods that do not examine DNA on a cell by cell basis. Images Figure 1 PMID:8644846

  17. Factors Negatively Affect Speaking Skills at Saudi Colleges for Girls in the South

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamad, Mona M.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated factors negatively affect English language speaking skills in Saudi colleges for girls in the South in terms of: a) Instructors. b) Students. c) Curriculum and textbook. d) English Language teaching methods and exercises. e) Teaching and learning environment. To collect data for the study, a questionnaire papers were…

  18. [Negative effects of anti-nutritional factors from soybeans in Salmonidae].

    PubMed

    van den Ingh, T S; Krogdahl, A

    1990-10-15

    Soya bean products are used with increasing frequency in diets for salmonids. Soya beans however contain antinutritional factors (ANF), like protease inhibitors and lectins, which may decrease growth performance and even cause disease. The paper reviews the literature and adds some recent developments to the knowledge on the negative effects of ANF from soya beans in salmonids. PMID:2281471

  19. Negative School Factors and Their Influence on Math and Science Achievement in TIMSS 2003

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perse, Tina Vrsnik; Kozina, Ana; Leban, Tina Rutar

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to conduct an analysis of TIMSS (Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study) 2003 database and to determine how negative school factors, such as aggression, are associated to the mathematical and science achievement of students. The analyses were conducted separately for national and international data.…

  20. Analysis of Factors Influencing Negative Attitude toward Teacher Education in Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogiegbaen, S. E. Aduwa; Uwameiye, Raymond

    2005-01-01

    This study critically examined the factors influencing public attitudes toward teacher education in Nigeria. It analysed a series of nationwide surveys of negative public attitude toward the teaching profession using parents and prospective university students as respondents. A questionnaire made up of 12 items was used to gather data on public…

  1. Negative Intrusive Thoughts and Dissociation as Risk Factors for Self-Harm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batey, Helen; May, Jon; Andrade, Jackie

    2010-01-01

    Relationships between self-harm and vulnerability factors were studied in a general population of 432 participants, of whom 30% reported some experience of self-harm. This group scored higher on dissociation and childhood trauma, had lower self-worth, and reported more negative intrusive thoughts. Among the non-harming group, 10% scored similarly…

  2. A Prospective Study Investigating the Impact of School Belonging Factors on Negative Affect in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shochet, Ian M.; Smith, Coral L.; Furlong, Michael J.; Homel, Ross

    2011-01-01

    School belonging, measured as a unidimensional construct, is an important predictor of negative affective problems in adolescents, including depression and anxiety symptoms. A recent study found that one such measure, the Psychological Sense of School Membership scale, actually comprises three factors: Caring Relations, Acceptance, and Rejection.…

  3. Factors Influencing Pronunciation Accuracy: L1 Negative Transfer, Task Variables and Individual Aptitude

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Qian

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the influence of three factors on pronunciation accuracy of Chinese adult foreign language learners. Ten target sounds including phonemes and syllables are included in the pre-test, an analysis of which shows that the mispronunciation of the randomly chosen target sounds mainly results from L1 negative transfer. It is…

  4. Hepatic Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Attenuates Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 Expression.

    PubMed

    Girer, Nathaniel G; Murray, Iain A; Omiecinski, Curtis J; Perdew, Gary H

    2016-07-15

    The Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor involved in many physiological processes. Several studies indicate that AHR is also involved in energy homeostasis. Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is an important regulator of the fasting and feeding responses. When administered to various genetic and diet-induced mouse models of obesity, FGF21 can attenuate obesity-associated morbidities. Here, we explore the role of AHR in hepatic Fgf21 expression through the use of a conditional, hepatocyte-targeted AHR knock-out mouse model (Cre(Alb)Ahr(Fx/Fx)). Compared with the congenic parental strain (Ahr(Fx/Fx)), non-fasted Cre(Alb)Ahr(Fx/Fx) mice exhibit a 4-fold increase in hepatic Fgf21 expression, as well as elevated expression of the FGF21-target gene Igfbp1 Furthermore, in vivo agonist activation of AHR reduces hepatic Fgf21 expression during a fast. The Fgf21 promoter contains several putative dioxin response elements (DREs). Using EMSA, we demonstrate that the AHR-ARNT heterodimer binds to a specific DRE that overlaps binding sequences for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), carbohydrate response element-binding protein (ChREBP), and cAMP response element-binding protein, hepatocyte specific (CREBH). In addition, we reveal that agonist-activated AHR impairs PPARα-, ChREBP-, and CREBH-mediated promoter activity in Hepa-1 cells. Accordingly, agonist treatment in Hepa-1 cells ablates potent ER stress-driven Fgf21 expression, and pre-treatment with AHR antagonist blocks this effect. Finally, we show that pre-treatment of primary human hepatocytes with AHR agonist diminishes PPARα-, glucose-, and ER stress-driven induction of FGF21 expression, indicating the effect is not mouse-specific. Together, our data show that AHR contributes to hepatic energy homeostasis, partly through the regulation of FGF21 expression and signaling. PMID:27226639

  5. Transforming growth factor receptor type II (ec-TβR II) behaves as a halophile.

    PubMed

    Saini, Komal; Khan, M Ashhar I; Chakrapani, Sumit; Deep, Shashank

    2015-01-01

    The members of transforming growth factor β family (TGF-β) are multifunctional proteins but their main role is to control cell proliferation and differentiation. Polypeptides of TGF-β family function by binding to two related, functionally distinct transmembrane receptor kinases, first to the type II (TβR II) followed by type I receptor (TβR I). The paper describes, in details, the stability of wt-ec-TβR II under different conditions. The stability of wt-ec-TβR II was observed at different pH and salt concentration using fluorescence spectroscopy. Stability of ec-TβR II decreases with decrease in pH. Interestingly, the addition of salt increases the stability of the TβRII at pH 5.0 as observed for halophiles. Computational analysis using DELPHI suggests that this is probably due to the decrease in repulsion between negatively charged residues at surface on the addition of salt. This is further confirmed by the change in the stability of receptor on mutation of some of the residues (D32A) at surface.

  6. Epidermal growth factor receptor distribution in burn wounds. Implications for growth factor-mediated repair.

    PubMed Central

    Wenczak, B A; Lynch, J B; Nanney, L B

    1992-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) along with several related peptide growth factors has been shown both in vivo and in vitro to accelerate events associated with epidermal wound repair. EGF and transforming growth factor alpha act by binding to a common EGF receptor tyrosine kinase thereby initiating a series of events which ultimately regulate cell proliferation. This study examined the immunohistochemical localization of EGF receptor (EGF-R) in burn wound margins, adjacent proliferating epithelium, and closely associated sweat ducts, sebaceous glands, and hair follicles. Tissue specimens removed during surgical debridement were obtained from full and partial thickness burn wounds in 32 patients with total body surface area burns ranging from 2 to 88%. In the early postburn period (days 2-4), prominent staining for EGF-R was found in undifferentiated, marginal keratinocytes, adjacent proliferating, hypertrophic epithelium, and both marginal and nonmarginal hair follicles, sweat ducts, and sebaceous glands. During the late postburn period (days 5-16), EGF-R was depleted along leading epithelial margins; however, immunoreactive EGF-R remained intensely positive in the hypertrophic epithelium and all skin appendages. Increased detection of immunoreactive EGF-R and the presence of [125I]EGF binding in the hypertrophic epithelium correlated positively with proliferating cell nuclear antigen distributions. Thus, the presence of EGF-R in the appropriate keratinocyte populations suggests a functional role for this receptor during wound repair. Dynamic modulation in EGF receptor distribution during the temporal sequence of repair provides further evidence that an EGF/transforming growth factor alpha/EGF-R-mediated pathway is activated during human wound repair. Images PMID:1361495

  7. Cross-linking of epidermal growth factor receptors in intact cells: detection of initial stages of receptor clustering and determination of molecular weight of high-affinity receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Fanger, B.O.; Austin, K.S.; Earp, H.S.; Cidlowski, J.A.

    1986-10-21

    A method was developed to label epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptors with /sup 125/I-EGF in whole cells using chemical cross-linking reagents. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis resolved an M/sub r/ approx. 180,000 EGF-receptor complex and larger M/sub r/ greater than or equal to 360,000 aggregates. The formation of the larger complexes was timed and temperature dependent and appeared to represent the initial events of EGF receptor clustering. Alteration of the ratio of /sup 125/I-EGF-labeled high- and low- affinity complexes by competition with unlabeled EGF or by induction of additional high-affinity sites with dexamethasone suggested that both sites were represented by the M/sub r/ approx. 180,000 /sup 125/I-EGF-receptor complexes. Digestion of cells before cross-linking detected a small population of trypsin-resistant M/sub r/ approx. 180,000 receptors, which could represent previously described cryptic and/or high-affinity receptors. Few of the M/sub r/ approx. 360,000 receptors were trypsin resistant. Glucocorticoid induction of high-affinity EGF receptors failed to induce detectable changes in the microclustering of EGF receptors but did result in a 50% increase in EGF-induced receptor phosphorylation in HeLa S/sub 3/ cell membranes at 4/sup 0/C. Thus, glucocorticoids increase high-affinity EGF binding sites, EGF-induced receptor phosphorylation, and cell growth.

  8. [Impact of psychological factors on development and course of coronary artery disease [corrected]: should negative psychological factors be altered?].

    PubMed

    Vural, Mutlu; Başar, Emrullah

    2006-03-01

    Psychological factors effect the development and course of coronary heart disease (CHD). Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal dysregulation, reduced heart rate variability, diminished baroreflex sensitivity, impaired immune function and altered platelet function are proposed as significant psychophysiologic mechanisms to explain this association. Because psychological factors may influence several different stages of long atherosclerosis period, interventional studies aiming to alter negative psychological factors by behavioral and medical ways, expecting to prevent or improve CHD, have been discussed. Complementary to the traditional treatment, this new treatment strategy could be a different perspective and a nice promise for CHD patients.

  9. Platelet Derived Growth Factor-B and Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-2 Polymorphisms in Gall Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Kumudesh; Behari, Anu; Kapoor, Vinay Kumar; Khan, M Salman; Prakash, Swayam; Agrawal, Suraksha

    2015-01-01

    Gall bladder cancer (GBC) is a gastro-intestinal cancer with high prevalence among north Indian women. Platelet derived growth factor-B (PDGFB) and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) may play roles in the etiology of GBC through the inflammation-hyperplasia-dysplasia-carcinoma pathway. To study the association of PDGFB and HER2 polymorphisms with risk of GBC, 200 cases and 300 controls were considered. PDGFB +286A>G and +1135A>C polymorphisms were investigated with an amplification refractory mutation system and the HER2 Ile655Val polymorphism by restriction fragment length polymorphism. Significant risk associations for PDGFB +286 GG (OR=5.25) and PDGFB +1135 CC (OR=3.19) genotypes were observed for GBC. Gender wise stratification revealed susceptibility for recessive models of PDGFB +1135A>C (OR=3.00) and HER2 Ile655Val (OR=2.52) polymorphisms among female GBC cases. GBC cases with gall stones were predisposed to homozygous +286 GG and +1135 CC genotypes. Significant risk associations were found for ACIle (OR=1.48), GAVal (OR=1.70), GAIle (OR=2.00) haplotypes with GBC cases and GCIle haplotype with female GBC cases (OR=10.37, P=<0.0001). Pair-wise linkage disequilibrium revealed negative associations among variant alleles. On multi-dimensional reduction analysis, a three factor model revealed significant gene-gene interaction for PDGFB +286A>G, PDGFB +1135A>C and HER2 Ile165Val SNPs with GBC. Protein-protein interaction showed significant association of PDGFB and HER2 with the epidermal growth factor receptor signaling pathway. PMID:26320430

  10. Selectivity of phospholipase C phosphorylation by the epidermal growth factor receptor, the insulin receptor, and their cytoplasmic domains.

    PubMed Central

    Nishibe, S; Wahl, M I; Wedegaertner, P B; Kim, J W; Rhee, S G; Carpenter, G; Kim, J J

    1990-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C isozyme gamma (PLC-gamma, Mr 145,000) is an excellent substrate for the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor both in vivo and in vitro. PLC-beta-1, another PLC isozyme, is a poor substrate for the EGF receptor. We examined the relative phosphorylation of PLC-gamma and PLC-beta-1 by the 170-kDa native EGF receptor molecule, the 66-kDa cytoplasmic kinase domain of the EGF receptor (Arg647-Ala1186), the alpha 2 beta 2 native insulin receptor, and the 48-kDa cytoplasmic kinase domain of the insulin receptor beta subunit (Gly947-Ser1343). Similar to the intact EGF receptor, the cytoplasmic kinase domain of the EGF receptor preferentially phosphorylated PLC-gamma. High-performance liquid chromatographic comparison of tryptic phosphopeptides from PLC-gamma phosphorylated by both forms of the EGF receptor kinase indicated similar patterns of multiple tyrosine phosphorylations. These results imply that substrate selectivity, at least in terms of PLC isozymes, is independent of the extracellular ligand-binding and membrane anchor domains of the EGF receptor. In comparison, neither the intact insulin receptor nor the beta-chain kinase domain was able to phosphorylate PLC-gamma to a significant extent. Also, insulin failed to stimulate the phosphorylation of PLC-gamma in NIH 3T3/HIR cells, which overexpress the human insulin receptor. Thus PLC-gamma is not a phosphorylation substrate for the insulin receptor in vitro or in the intact cell. Images PMID:2153302

  11. Life history theory and breast cancer risk: methodological and theoretical challenges: Response to "Is estrogen receptor negative breast cancer risk associated with a fast life history strategy?".

    PubMed

    Aktipis, Athena

    2016-01-01

    In a meta-analysis published by myself and co-authors, we report differences in the life history risk factors for estrogen receptor negative (ER-) and estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancers. Our meta-analysis did not find the association of ER- breast cancer risk with fast life history characteristics that Hidaka and Boddy suggest in their response to our article. There are a number of possible explanations for the differences between their conclusions and the conclusions we drew from our meta-analysis, including limitations of our meta-analysis and methodological challenges in measuring and categorizing estrogen receptor status. These challenges, along with the association of ER+ breast cancer with slow life history characteristics, may make it challenging to find a clear signal of ER- breast cancer with fast life history characteristics, even if that relationship does exist. The contradictory results regarding breast cancer risk and life history characteristics illustrate a more general challenge in evolutionary medicine: often different sub-theories in evolutionary biology make contradictory predictions about disease risk. In this case, life history models predict that breast cancer risk should increase with faster life history characteristics, while the evolutionary mismatch hypothesis predicts that breast cancer risk should increase with delayed reproduction. Whether life history tradeoffs contribute to ER- breast cancer is still an open question, but current models and several lines of evidence suggest that it is a possibility. PMID:26874356

  12. Androgen deprivation therapy sensitizes triple negative breast cancer cells to immune-mediated lysis through androgen receptor independent modulation of osteoprotegerin

    PubMed Central

    Gameiro, Sofia R.; Richards, Jacob; Hall, Ashley B.; Hodge, James W.

    2016-01-01

    Among breast cancer types, triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) has the fewest treatment options and the lowest 5-year survival rate. Androgen receptor (AR) inhibition has displayed efficacy against breast cancer preclinically and is currently being examined clinically in AR positive TNBC patients. Androgen deprivation has been shown to induce immunogenic modulation; the alteration of tumor cell phenotype resulting in increased sensitivity to immune-mediated killing. We evaluated the ability of AR inhibition to reduce the growth and improve the immune-mediated killing of breast cancer cells with differing expression of the estrogen receptor and AR. While AR expression was required for the growth inhibitory effects of enzalutamide on breast cancer cells, both enzalutamide and abiraterone improved the sensitivity of breast cancer cells to immune-mediated lysis independent of detectable AR expression. This increase in sensitivity was linked to an increase in cell surface tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) receptor expression as well as a significant reduction in the expression of osteoprotegerin (OPG). The reduction in OPG was further examined and found to be critical for the increase in sensitivity of AR- TNBC cells to immune-mediated killing. The data presented herein further support the use of AR inhibition therapy in the AR+ TNBC setting. These data, however, also support the consideration of AR inhibition therapy for the treatment of AR- TNBC, especially in combination with cancer immunotherapy, providing a potential novel therapeutic option for select patients. PMID:27015557

  13. Characterization of the expression and clinical features of epidermal growth factor receptor and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 in esophageal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    NIYAZ, MADINIYAT; ANWER, JURAT; LIU, HUI; ZHANG, LIWEI; SHAYHEDIN, ILYAR; AWUT, IDIRIS

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to understand the expression characteristics of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) in individuals of Uygur, Han and Kazak ethnicity with esophageal carcinoma in Xinjiang (China) and their interrelation analysis, and to investigate the expression differences in these genes between esophageal carcinoma and pericarcinoma tissue samples, and between the three ethnic groups. The expression levels of EGFR and VEGFR-2 from 119 pairs of esophageal carcinoma tissue and corresponding pericarcinoma tissue from Uygur, Han and Kazak patients with esophageal carcinoma were detected by immunohistochemistry following surgical resection, and an additional five carcinoma in situ specimens were also tested. The relative expression was analyzed among the ethnic groups and clinicopathological parameters. The positive rate of EGFR in esophageal carcinoma tissue from patients of Uygur, Han and Kazak heritage was 70.73, 68.42 and 67.5%, respectively. For VEGFR-2 the positive rate was 73.17, 68.42 and 67.5%, respectively. No significant difference was detected in their expression between the three ethnic groups (P>0.05); however, EGFR and VEGFR-2 overexpression were correlated with lymph node metastasis (P<0.05). VEGF expression was also correlated with the expression of VEGFR-2 in esophageal carcinoma tissues. EGFR was positive in carcinoma in situ samples, while VEGFR-2 was negative. The overexpression of EGFR is therefore an early event and may have a significant role in the progression of esophageal carcinoma pathogenesis. EGFR overexpression may correlate with the expression of VEGFR-2 in esophageal cancer. These results may aid the early diagnosis of esophageal cancer, and the development of individual target treatment in the future. PMID:26788193

  14. FLT PET in Measuring Treatment Response in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Estrogen Receptor-Positive, HER2-Negative Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-02

    Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Male Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  15. Epidermal growth factor receptor in adult human dorsal root ganglia.

    PubMed

    Huerta, J J; Diaz-Trelles, R; Naves, F J; Llamosas, M M; Del Valle, M E; Vega, J A

    1996-09-01

    Transforming growth factor-alpha (TGFalpha) enhances neuronal survival and neurite outgrowth in cultured dorsal root ganglia (DRG) sensory neurons. It binds a membrane protein, denominated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFr). EGFr has been localized in developing and adult human DRG. However, it remains to be elucidated whether all DRG neurons express EGFr or whether differences exist among neuronal subtypes. This study was undertaken to investigate these topics in adult human DRG using immunoblotting, and combined immunohistochemistry and image analysis techniques. A mouse monoclonal antibody (clone F4) mapping within the intracytoplasmic domain of EGFr was used. Immunoblotting revealed two main proteins with estimated molecular masses of approximately/equal to 65 kDa and 170 kDa, and thus consistent with the full-length EGFr. Additional protein bands were also encountered. Light immunohistochemistry revealed specific immunoreactivity (IR) for EGFr-like proteins in most (86%) primary sensory neurons, the intensity of immunostaining being stronger in the small- and intermediate-sized ones. Furthermore, EGFr-like IR was also observed in the satellite glial cells of the ganglia as well as in the intraganglionic and dorsal root Schwann cells. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that EGFr, and other related proteins containing the epitope labeled with the antibody F4, are responsible for the EGFr IR reported in DRG. Furthermore, we demonstrated heterogeneity in the expression of EGFr-like IR in adult human primary sensory neurons, which suggests different responsiveness to their ligands.

  16. Enhanced cytotoxicity in triple-negative and estrogen receptor-positive breast adenocarcinoma cells due to inhibition of the transient receptor potential melastatin-2 channel

    PubMed Central

    KOH, DAVID W.; POWELL, DANIEL P.; BLAKE, STEVEN D.; HOFFMAN, JOY L.; HOPKINS, MANDI M.; FENG, XIAOXING

    2015-01-01

    We previously demonstrated a unique protective role for the transient receptor potential, melastatin-2 (TRPM2) cation channel in breast cancer cells. In the present study, we investigated the chemotherapeutic effects elicited by inhibiting this protective role in metastatic breast adenocarcinoma cells. TRPM2 inhibition led to dose-dependent increases in MDA-MB-231 breast adenocarcinoma cell death after treatment with doxorubicin or the DNA-methylating agent, N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. Similar results were observed after RNAi silencing of TRPM2 in these cells after doxorubicin treatment. However, TRPM2 RNAi silencing also led to increased MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma cell death after tamoxifen treatment, yet not in non-cancerous human mammary epithelial cells. These results thus revealed that TRPM2 inhibition selectively increased cytotoxicity in a triple-negative and an estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cell line, with minimal deleterious effects in non-cancerous breast cells. Analysis of DNA damage revealed enhanced DNA damage levels in MCF-7 cells treated with doxorubicin due to TRPM2 inhibition. Analysis of cell death demonstrated that inhibition of apoptosis, caspase-independent cell death or autophagy failed to significantly reduce cell death induced by TRPM2 inhibition and chemotherapy. These results indicate that TRPM2 inhibition activates alternative pathways of cell death in breast cancer cells. Taken together, our results provide significant evidence that TRPM2 inhibition is a potential strategy to induce triple-negative and estrogen receptor-positive breast adenocarcinoma cell death via alternative cell death pathways. This is expected to provide a basis for inhibiting TRPM2 for the improved treatment of breast cancer, which potentially includes treating breast tumors that are resistant to chemotherapy due to their evasion of apoptosis. PMID:26178079

  17. Developmental regulation of human truncated nerve growth factor receptor

    SciTech Connect

    DiStefano, P.S.; Clagett-Dame, M.; Chelsea, D.M.; Loy, R. )

    1991-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (designated XIF1 and IIIG5) recognizing distinct epitopes of the human truncated nerve growth factor receptor (NGF-Rt) were used in a two-site radiometric immunosorbent assay to monitor levels of NGF-Rt in human urine as a function of age. Urine samples were collected from 70 neurologically normal subjects ranging in age from 1 month to 68 years. By using this sensitive two-site radiometric immunosorbent assay, NGF-Rt levels were found to be highest in urine from 1-month old subjects. By 2.5 months, NGF-Rt values were half of those seen at 1 month and decreased more gradually between 0.5 and 15 years. Between 15 and 68 years, urine NGF-Rt levels were relatively constant at 5% of 1-month values. No evidence for diurnal variation of adult NGF-Rt was apparent. Pregnant women in their third trimester showed significantly elevated urine NGF-Rt values compared with age-matched normals. Affinity labeling of NGF-Rt with 125I-NGF followed by immunoprecipitation with ME20.4-IgG and gel autoradiography indicated that neonatal urine contained high amounts of truncated receptor (Mr = 50 kd); decreasingly lower amounts of NGF-Rt were observed on gel autoradiograms with development, indicating that the two-site radiometric immunosorbent assay correlated well with the affinity labeling technique for measuring NGF-Rt. NGF-Rt in urines from 1-month-old and 36-year-old subjects showed no differences in affinities for NGF or for the monoclonal antibody IIIG5. These data show that NGF-Rt is developmentally regulated in human urine, and are discussed in relation to the development and maturation of the peripheral nervous system.

  18. Anti-epidermal growth factor receptor skin toxicity: a matter of topical hydration.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Daris; Codecà, Carla; Bocci, Barbara; Crepaldi, Francesca; Violati, Martina; Viale, Giulia; Careri, Carmela; Caldiera, Sarah; Bordin, Veronica; Luciani, Andrea; Zonato, Sabrina; Cassinelli, Gabriela; Foa, Paolo

    2016-02-01

    Skin toxicity is a frequent complication of anti-epidermal growth factor receptor therapy, which can be an obstacle in maintaining the dose intensity and may negatively impact on the clinical outcome of cancer patients. Skin lesions depend on the disruption of the keratinocyte development pathways and no treatment is clearly effective in resolving the cutaneous alterations frequently found during anti-epidermal growth factor receptor therapy. Among systemic treatments, oral tetracycline proved to be useful in preventing skin manifestations. We describe the case of a patient affected by metastatic colorectal cancer, for whom a combination of chemotherapy and cetuximab was used as second-line treatment. The patient developed a symptomatic papulopustular skin rash that disappeared completely after a twice-daily application of a hydrating and moisturizing cream, mainly consisting of a mixture of paraffin, silicone compounds, and macrogol. The marked cutaneous amelioration allowed the patient to continue cetuximab without any further symptoms and was associated with a partial radiological response. PMID:26469836

  19. Models for the activation pathway of epidermal growth factor receptor protein-tyrosine kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Campion, S.R.; Niyogi, S.K. )

    1991-03-15

    Activation of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor's intrinsic protein-tyrosine kinase activity, which occurs upon formation of the receptor-ligand complex, is the critical regulatory event affecting the subsequent EGF-dependent cellular responses leading to DNA synthesis and cell proliferation. The molecular mechanism by which EGF-dependent activation of receptor kinase activity takes place is not clearly understood. In this study, the growth factor-dependent activation of the EGF receptor tyrosine kinase was examined in vitro using detergent-solubilized, partially purified GEF receptors from A5431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells. Evaluation of the cooperativity observed in the EGF-dependent activation of soluble receptor tyrosine kinase would suggest a mechanism requiring the binding of the EGF peptide to both ligand binding sites on a receptor dimer to induce full receptor kinase activity. Equations describing potential cooperative kinase activation pathways have been examined. The theoretical system which best simulates the allosteric regulation observed in the experimental kinase activation data is that describing multiple essential activation. In addition, studies using mutant analogs of the EGF peptide ligand appear to confirm the requirement for an essential conformational change in the receptor-ligand complex to activate the receptor kinase activity. Several mutant growth factor analogues are able to occupy the ligand binding sites on the receptor without inducing the fully active receptor conformation.

  20. Insulin receptor substrate-1 involvement in epidermal growth factor receptor and insulin-like growth factor receptor signalling: implication for Gefitinib ('Iressa') response and resistance.

    PubMed

    Knowlden, Janice M; Jones, Helen E; Barrow, Denise; Gee, Julia M W; Nicholson, Robert I; Hutcheson, Iain R

    2008-09-01

    Classically the insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) is an essential component of insulin-like growth factor type 1 receptor (IGF-IR) signalling, providing an interface between the receptor and key downstream signalling cascades. Here, however, we show that in tamoxifen-resistant MCF-7 (Tam-R) breast cancer cells, that are highly dependent on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) for growth, IRS-1 can interact with EGFR and be preferentially phosphorylated on tyrosine (Y) 896, a Grb2 binding site. Indeed, phosphorylation of this site is greatly enhanced by exposure of these cells, and other EGFR-positive cell lines, to EGF. Importantly, while IGF-II promotes phosphorylation of IRS-1 on Y612, a PI3-K recruitment site, it has limited effect on Y896 phosphorylation in Tam-R cells. Furthermore, EGF and IGF-II co-treatment, reduces the ability of IGF-II to phosphorylate Y612, whilst maintaining Y896 phosphorylation, suggesting that the EGFR is the dominant recruiter of IRS-1 in this cell line. Significantly, challenge of Tam-R cells with the EGFR-selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor gefitinib, for 7 days, reduces IRS-1/EGFR association and IRS-1 Y896 phosphorylation, while promoting IRS-1/IGF-IR association and IRS-1 Y612 phosphorylation. Furthermore, gefitinib significantly enhances IGF-II-mediated phosphorylation of IRS-1 Y612 and AKT in Tam-R cells. Importantly, induction of this pathway by gefitinib can be abrogated by inhibition/downregulation of the IGF-IR. Our data would therefore suggest a novel association exists between the EGFR and IRS-1 in several EGFR-positive cancer cell lines. This association acts to promote phosphorylation of IRS-1 at Y896 and drive MAPK signalling whilst preventing recruitment of IRS-1 by the IGF-IR and inhibiting signalling via this receptor. Treatment with gefitinib alters the dynamics of this system, promoting IGF-IR signalling, the dominant gefitinib-resistant growth regulatory pathway in Tam-R cells, thus, potentially limiting

  1. The Prognostic and Predictive Role of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor in Surgical Resected Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Meng; Luo, Guopei; Liu, Chen; Cheng, He; Lu, Yu; Jin, Kaizhou; Liu, Zuqiang; Long, Jiang; Liu, Liang; Xu, Jin; Huang, Dan; Ni, Quanxing; Yu, Xianjun

    2016-01-01

    The data regarding the prognostic significance of EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) expression and adjuvant therapy in patients with resected pancreatic cancer are insufficient. We retrospectively investigated EGFR status in 357 resected PDAC (pancreatic duct adenocarcinoma) patients using tissue immunohistochemistry and validated the possible role of EGFR expression in predicting prognosis. The analysis was based on excluding the multiple confounding parameters. A negative association was found between overall EGFR status and postoperative survival (p = 0.986). Remarkably, adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy were significantly associated with favorable postoperative survival, which prolonged median overall survival (OS) for 5.8 and 10.2 months (p = 0.009 and p = 0.006, respectively). Kaplan–Meier analysis showed that adjuvant chemotherapy correlated with an obvious survival benefit in the EGFR-positive subgroup rather than in the EGFR-negative subgroup. In the subgroup analyses, chemotherapy was highly associated with increased postoperative survival in the EGFR-positive subgroup (p = 0.002), and radiotherapy had a significant survival benefit in the EGFR-negative subgroup (p = 0.029). This study demonstrated that EGFR expression is not correlated with outcome in resected pancreatic cancer patients. Adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy were significantly associated with improved survival in contrary EGFR expressing subgroup. Further studies of EGFR as a potential target for pancreatic cancer treatment are warranted. PMID:27399694

  2. Generalized approach for using unbiased symmetric metrics with negative values: normalized mean bias factor and normalized mean absolute error factor

    SciTech Connect

    Gustafson, William I.; Yu, Shaocai

    2012-10-23

    Unbiased symmetric metrics provide a useful measure to quickly compare two datasets, with similar interpretations for both under and overestimations. Two examples include the normalized mean bias factor and normalized mean absolute error factor. However, the original formulations of these metrics are only valid for datasets with positive means. This paper presents a methodology to use and interpret the metrics with datasets that have negative means. The updated formulations give identical results compared to the original formulations for the case of positive means, so researchers are encouraged to use the updated formulations going forward without introducing ambiguity.

  3. The rice immune receptor XA21 recognizes a tyrosine-sulfated protein from a Gram-negative bacterium.

    PubMed

    Pruitt, Rory N; Schwessinger, Benjamin; Joe, Anna; Thomas, Nicholas; Liu, Furong; Albert, Markus; Robinson, Michelle R; Chan, Leanne Jade G; Luu, Dee Dee; Chen, Huamin; Bahar, Ofir; Daudi, Arsalan; De Vleesschauwer, David; Caddell, Daniel; Zhang, Weiguo; Zhao, Xiuxiang; Li, Xiang; Heazlewood, Joshua L; Ruan, Deling; Majumder, Dipali; Chern, Mawsheng; Kalbacher, Hubert; Midha, Samriti; Patil, Prabhu B; Sonti, Ramesh V; Petzold, Christopher J; Liu, Chang C; Brodbelt, Jennifer S; Felix, Georg; Ronald, Pamela C

    2015-07-01

    Surveillance of the extracellular environment by immune receptors is of central importance to eukaryotic survival. The rice receptor kinase XA21, which confers robust resistance to most strains of the Gram-negative bacterium Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), is representative of a large class of cell surface immune receptors in plants and animals. We report the identification of a previously undescribed Xoo protein, called RaxX, which is required for activation of XA21-mediated immunity. Xoo strains that lack RaxX, or carry mutations in the single RaxX tyrosine residue (Y41), are able to evade XA21-mediated immunity. Y41 of RaxX is sulfated by the prokaryotic tyrosine sulfotransferase RaxST. Sulfated, but not nonsulfated, RaxX triggers hallmarks of the plant immune response in an XA21-dependent manner. A sulfated, 21-amino acid synthetic RaxX peptide (RaxX21-sY) is sufficient for this activity. Xoo field isolates that overcome XA21-mediated immunity encode an alternate raxX allele, suggesting that coevolutionary interactions between host and pathogen contribute to RaxX diversification. RaxX is highly conserved in many plant pathogenic Xanthomonas species. The new insights gained from the discovery and characterization of the sulfated protein, RaxX, can be applied to the development of resistant crop varieties and therapeutic reagents that have the potential to block microbial infection of both plants and animals.

  4. The rice immune receptor XA21 recognizes a tyrosine-sulfated protein from a Gram-negative bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Pruitt, Rory N.; Schwessinger, Benjamin; Joe, Anna; Thomas, Nicholas; Liu, Furong; Albert, Markus; Robinson, Michelle R.; Chan, Leanne Jade G.; Luu, Dee Dee; Chen, Huamin; Bahar, Ofir; Daudi, Arsalan; De Vleesschauwer, David; Caddell, Daniel; Zhang, Weiguo; Zhao, Xiuxiang; Li, Xiang; Heazlewood, Joshua L.; Ruan, Deling; Majumder, Dipali; Chern, Mawsheng; Kalbacher, Hubert; Midha, Samriti; Patil, Prabhu B.; Sonti, Ramesh V.; Petzold, Christopher J.; Liu, Chang C.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.; Felix, Georg; Ronald, Pamela C.

    2015-01-01

    Surveillance of the extracellular environment by immune receptors is of central importance to eukaryotic survival. The rice receptor kinase XA21, which confers robust resistance to most strains of the Gram-negative bacterium Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), is representative of a large class of cell surface immune receptors in plants and animals. We report the identification of a previously undescribed Xoo protein, called RaxX, which is required for activation of XA21-mediated immunity. Xoo strains that lack RaxX, or carry mutations in the single RaxX tyrosine residue (Y41), are able to evade XA21-mediated immunity. Y41 of RaxX is sulfated by the prokaryotic tyrosine sulfotransferase RaxST. Sulfated, but not nonsulfated, RaxX triggers hallmarks of the plant immune response in an XA21-dependent manner. A sulfated, 21–amino acid synthetic RaxX peptide (RaxX21-sY) is sufficient for this activity. Xoo field isolates that overcome XA21-mediated immunity encode an alternate raxX allele, suggesting that coevolutionary interactions between host and pathogen contribute to RaxX diversification. RaxX is highly conserved in many plant pathogenic Xanthomonas species. The new insights gained from the discovery and characterization of the sulfated protein, RaxX, can be applied to the development of resistant crop varieties and therapeutic reagents that have the potential to block microbial infection of both plants and animals. PMID:26601222

  5. Development of real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays to quantify insulin-like growth factor receptor and insulin receptor expression in equine tissue.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Stephen B; Quan, Melvyn; Guthrie, Alan; Schulman, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factor system (insulin-like growth factor 1, insulin-like growth factor 2, insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor, insulin-like growth factor 2 receptor and six insulin-like growth factor-binding proteins) and insulin are essential to muscle metabolism and most aspects of male and female reproduction. Insulin-like growth factor and insulin play important roles in the regulation of cell growth, differentiation and the maintenance of cell differentiation in mammals. In order to better understand the local factors that regulate equine physiology, such as muscle metabolism and reproduction (e.g., germ cell development and fertilisation), real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays for quantification of equine insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor and insulin receptor messenger ribonucleic acid were developed. The assays were sensitive: 192 copies/μL and 891 copies/μL for insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor, messenger ribonucleic acid and insulin receptor respectively (95% limit of detection), and efficient: 1.01 for the insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor assay and 0.95 for the insulin receptor assay. The assays had a broad linear range of detection (seven logs for insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor and six logs for insulin receptor). This allowed for analysis of very small amounts of messenger ribonucleic acid. Low concentrations of both insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor and insulin receptor messenger ribonucleic acid were detected in endometrium, lung and spleen samples, whilst high concentrations were detected in heart, muscle and kidney samples, this was most likely due to the high level of glucose metabolism and glucose utilisation by these tissues. The assays developed for insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor and insulin receptor messenger ribonucleic acid expression have been shown to work on equine tissue and will contribute to the understanding of insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor

  6. The F-BAR Protein PACSIN2 Regulates Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Internalization

    PubMed Central

    de Kreuk, Bart-Jan; Anthony, Eloise C.; Geerts, Dirk; Hordijk, Peter L.

    2012-01-01

    Signaling via growth factor receptors, including the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor, is key to various cellular processes, such as proliferation, cell survival, and cell migration. In a variety of human diseases such as cancer, aberrant expression and activation of growth factor receptors can lead to disturbed signaling. Intracellular trafficking is crucial for proper signaling of growth factor receptors. As a result, the level of cell surface expression of growth factor receptors is an important determinant for the outcome of downstream signaling. BAR domain-containing proteins represent an important family of proteins that regulate membrane dynamics. In this study, we identify a novel role for the F-BAR protein PACSIN2 in the regulation of EGF receptor signaling. We show that internalized EGF as well as the (activated) EGF receptor translocated to PACSIN2-positive endosomes. Furthermore, loss of PACSIN2 increased plasma membrane expression of the EGF receptor in resting cells and increased EGF-induced phosphorylation of the EGF receptor. As a consequence, EGF-induced activation of Erk and Akt as well as cell proliferation were enhanced in PACSIN2-depleted cells. In conclusion, this study identifies a novel role for the F-BAR-domain protein PACSIN2 in regulating EGF receptor surface levels and EGF-induced downstream signaling. PMID:23129763

  7. Negative Regulation of Leptin-induced Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) Formation by Cannabinoid CB1 Receptor Activation in Hypothalamic Neurons.

    PubMed

    Palomba, Letizia; Silvestri, Cristoforo; Imperatore, Roberta; Morello, Giovanna; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Martella, Andrea; Cristino, Luigia; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2015-05-29

    The adipocyte-derived, anorectic hormone leptin was recently shown to owe part of its regulatory effects on appetite-regulating hypothalamic neuropeptides to the elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in arcuate nucleus (ARC) neurons. Leptin is also known to exert a negative regulation on hypothalamic endocannabinoid levels and hence on cannabinoid CB1 receptor activity. Here we investigated the possibility of a negative regulation by CB1 receptors of leptin-mediated ROS formation in the ARC. Through pharmacological and molecular biology experiments we report data showing that leptin-induced ROS accumulation is 1) blunted by arachidonyl-2'-chloroethylamide (ACEA) in a CB1-dependent manner in both the mouse hypothalamic cell line mHypoE-N41 and ARC neuron primary cultures, 2) likewise blocked by a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) agonist, troglitazone, in a manner inhibited by T0070907, a PPAR-γ antagonist that also inhibited the ACEA effect on leptin, 3) blunted under conditions of increased endocannabinoid tone due to either pharmacological or genetic inhibition of endocannabinoid degradation in mHypoE-N41 and primary ARC neuronal cultures from MAGL(-/-) mice, respectively, and 4) associated with reduction of both PPAR-γ and catalase activity, which are reversed by both ACEA and troglitazone. We conclude that CB1 activation reverses leptin-induced ROS formation and hence possibly some of the ROS-mediated effects of the hormone by preventing PPAR-γ inhibition by leptin, with subsequent increase of catalase activity. This mechanism might underlie in part CB1 orexigenic actions under physiopathological conditions accompanied by elevated hypothalamic endocannabinoid levels.

  8. NK cell function triggered by multiple activating receptors is negatively regulated by glycogen synthase kinase-3β.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyung-Joon; Kwon, Soon Jae; Lee, Heejae; Park, Hye-Ran; Choi, Go-Eun; Kang, Sang-Wook; Kwon, Seog Woon; Kim, Nacksung; Lee, Soo Young; Ryu, Sangryeol; Kim, Sun Chang; Kim, Hun Sik

    2015-09-01

    Activation of NK cells is triggered by combined signals from multiple activating receptors that belong to different families. Several NK cell activating receptors have been identified, but their role in the regulation of effector functions is primarily understood in the context of their individual engagement. Therefore, little is known about the signaling pathways broadly implicated by the multiple NK cell activation cues. Here we provide evidence pointing to glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β as a negative regulator of multiple NK cell activating signals. Using an activation model that combines NKG2D and 2B4 and tests different signaling molecules, we found that GSK-3 undergoes inhibitory phosphorylation at regulatory serine residues by the engagement of NKG2D and 2B4, either individually or in combination. The extent of such phosphorylation was closely correlated with the degree of NK cell activation. NK cell functions, such as cytokine production and cytotoxicity, were consistently enhanced by the knockdown of GSK-3β or its inhibition with different pharmacological inhibitors, whereas inhibition of the GSK-3α isoform had no effect. In addition, NK cell function was augmented by the overexpression of a catalytically inactive form of GSK-3β. Importantly, the regulation of NK cell function by GSK-3β was common to diverse activating receptors that signal through both ITAM and non-ITAM pathways. Thus, our results suggest that GSK-3β negatively regulates NK cell activation and that modulation of GSK-3β function could be used to enhance NK cell activation.

  9. Heregulin negatively regulates transcription of ErbB2/3 receptors via an AKT-mediated pathway

    PubMed Central

    Awasthi, Smita; Hamburger, Anne W.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the importance of the ErbB2/3 heterodimer in breast cancer progression, the negative regulation of these receptors is still poorly understood. We demonstrate here for the first time that the ErbB3/4 ligand Heregulin (HRG) reduced both ErbB2 and ErbB3 mRNA and protein levels in human breast cancer cell lines. In contrast, EGFR levels were unaffected by HRG treatment. The effect was rapid with a decline in steady state mRNA levels first noted two hours after HRG treatment. HRG reduced the rate of transcription of ErbB2 and ErbB3 mRNA, but did not affect ErbB2 or ErbB3 mRNA stability. To test if ErbB2 kinase activity was required for the HRG-induced downregulation, we treated cells with the ErbB2/EGFR inhibitor lapatinib. Lapatinib diminished the HRG- induced decrease in ErbB2 and ErbB3 mRNA and protein, suggesting that the kinase activity of EGFR/ErbB2 is involved in the HRG-induced receptor down-regulation. Further, HRG-mediated decreases in ErbB2/3 mRNA transcription are reversed by inhibiting the AKT but not MAPK pathway. To examine the functional consequences of HRG-mediated decreases in ErbB receptor levels, we performed cell cycle analysis. HRG blocked cell cycle progression and lapatinib reversed this block. Our findings support a role for HRG in the negative regulation of ErbB expression and suggest that inhibition of ErbB2/3 signaling by ErbB2 directed therapies may interfere with this process. PMID:24692179

  10. Soluble interleukin-1 receptor, a potential negative regulator of orange-spotted grouper Epinephelus coioides interleukin-1 system.

    PubMed

    Lu, D Q; Yao, M; Yi, S B; Li, Y W; Liu, X C; Zhang, Y; Lin, H R

    2013-09-01

    In this study, the cDNA sequence encoding interleukin-1 (Il-1) receptor-like protein of orange-spotted grouper Epinephelus coioides was obtained. The newly identified sequence was named soluble type I Il-1 receptor (sIl-1rI) owing to its structural composition, which had two Ig-like domains, lack of transmembrane region and the Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain, similar to the brown rat Rattus norvegicus soluble Il-1rI. In addition, sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis indicated that E. coioides sequence had a closer relationship with Il-1rI than Il-1rII. Real-time PCR revealed that sil-1rI mRNA expression presented a process of decrease, restoration and increase in Cryptocaryon irritans-infected E. coioides. The negative correlation between Il-1β and sil-1rI mRNA in C. irritans-infected head-kidney implied the potential negative regulatory role of sil-1rI in E. coioides Il-1 system. The leucocytes incubated with lipopolysaccharide or polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid exhibited different expression profiles of sil-1rI. Recombinant Il-1β (rIl-1β) protein was capable of inducing sil-1rI mRNA under the concentration of 100 ng ml(-1) , suggesting that high dosage or excess Il-1β would stimulate the expression of sil-1rI to maintain the homoeostasis of E. coioides Il-1 system. For the first time, the role of teleost Il-1rI in parasite infection has been identified, and soluble Il-1r was found in fish.

  11. Negative and positive urgency may both be risk factors for compulsive buying

    PubMed Central

    ROSE, PAUL; SEGRIST, DANIEL J.

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims: Descriptions of compulsive buying often emphasize the roles of negative moods and trait impulsivity in the development of problematic buying habits. Trait impulsivity is sometimes treated as a unidimensional trait in compulsive buying research, but recent factor analyses suggest that impulsivity consists of multiple components that are probably best treated as independent predictors of problem behavior. In order to draw greater attention to the role of positive moods in compulsive buying, in this study we tested whether negative urgency (the tendency to act rashly while in negative moods) and positive urgency (the tendency to act rashly while in positive moods) account for similar amounts of variance in compulsive buying. Methods: North American adults (N = 514) completed an online survey containing the Richmond Compulsive Buying Scale (Ridgway, Kukar-Kinney & Monroe, 2008), established measures of positive and negative urgency (Cyders et al., 2007), ad hoc measures of buying-specific positive and negative urgency, measures of extraversion and neuroticism obtained from the International Personality Item Pool (http://ipip.ori.org/), and demographic questions. Results: In several multiple regression analyses, when demographic variables, neuroticism, and extraversion were controlled, positive urgency and negative urgency both emerged as significant predictors of compulsive buying. Whether the two urgency variables were domain-general or buying-specific, they accounted for similar amounts of variance in compulsive buying. Conclusions: Preventing and reducing compulsive buying may require attention not only to the purchasing decisions people make while in negative states, but also to the purchasing decisions they make while in positive states. PMID:25215224

  12. Krüppel-like factor 4 negatively regulates cellular antiviral immune response

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wei-Wei; Lian, Huan; Zhong, Bo; Shu, Hong-Bing; Li, Shu

    2016-01-01

    Viral infection triggers activation of the transcription factors NF-κB and IRF3, which collaborate to induce the expression of type I interferons (IFNs) and elicit innate antiviral response. In this report, we identified Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) as a negative regulator of virus-triggered signaling. Overexpression of KLF4 inhibited virus-induced activation of ISRE and IFN-β promoter in various types of cells, while knockdown of KLF4 potentiated viral infection-triggered induction of IFNB1 and downstream genes and attenuated viral replication. In addition, KLF4 was found to be localized in the cytosol and nucleus, and viral infection promoted the translocation of KLF4 from cytosol to nucleus. Upon virus infection, KLF4 was bound to the promoter of IFNB gene and inhibited the recruitment of IRF3 to the IFNB promoter. Our study thus suggests that KLF4 negatively regulates cellular antiviral response. PMID:25531393

  13. Liver receptor homolog 1 is a negative regulator of the hepatic acute-phase response.

    PubMed

    Venteclef, Nicolas; Smith, Jason C; Goodwin, Bryan; Delerive, Philippe

    2006-09-01

    The orphan nuclear receptor liver receptor homolog 1 (LRH-1) has been reported to play an important role in bile acid biosynthesis and reverse cholesterol transport. Here, we show that LRH-1 is a key player in the control of the hepatic acute-phase response. Ectopic expression of LRH-1 with adenovirus resulted in strong inhibition of both interleukin-6 (IL-6)- and IL-1beta-stimulated haptoglobin, serum amyloid A, and fibrinogen beta gene expression in hepatocytes. Furthermore, induction of the hepatic inflammatory response was significantly exacerbated in HepG2 cells expressing short hairpin RNA targeting LRH-1 expression. Moreover, transient-transfection experiments and electrophoretic mobility shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that LRH-1 regulates this cytokine-elicited inflammatory response by, at least in part, antagonizing the CCAAT/enhancer binding protein beta signaling pathway. Finally, we show, by using LRH-1 heterozygous mice, that LRH-1 is involved in the control of the inflammatory response at the hepatic level in vivo. Taken together, our results outline an unexpected role for LRH-1 in the modulation of the hepatic acute-phase response.

  14. Regulators of G-protein-signaling proteins: negative modulators of G-protein-coupled receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Woodard, Geoffrey E; Jardín, Isaac; Berna-Erro, A; Salido, Gines M; Rosado, Juan A

    2015-01-01

    Regulators of G-protein-signaling (RGS) proteins are a category of intracellular proteins that have an inhibitory effect on the intracellular signaling produced by G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). RGS along with RGS-like proteins switch on through direct contact G-alpha subunits providing a variety of intracellular functions through intracellular signaling. RGS proteins have a common RGS domain that binds to G alpha. RGS proteins accelerate GTPase and thus enhance guanosine triphosphate hydrolysis through the alpha subunit of heterotrimeric G proteins. As a result, they inactivate the G protein and quickly turn off GPCR signaling thus terminating the resulting downstream signals. Activity and subcellular localization of RGS proteins can be changed through covalent molecular changes to the enzyme, differential gene splicing, and processing of the protein. Other roles of RGS proteins have shown them to not be solely committed to being inhibitors but behave more as modulators and integrators of signaling. RGS proteins modulate the duration and kinetics of slow calcium oscillations and rapid phototransduction and ion signaling events. In other cases, RGS proteins integrate G proteins with signaling pathways linked to such diverse cellular responses as cell growth and differentiation, cell motility, and intracellular trafficking. Human and animal studies have revealed that RGS proteins play a vital role in physiology and can be ideal targets for diseases such as those related to addiction where receptor signaling seems continuously switched on.

  15. Affibody-functionalized gold-silica nanoparticles for Raman molecular imaging of the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Jokerst, Jesse V; Miao, Zheng; Zavaleta, Cristina; Cheng, Zhen; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2011-03-01

    The affibody functionalization of fluorescent surface-enhanced Raman scattering gold-silica nanoparticles as multimodal contrast agents for molecular imaging specific to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is reported. This nanoparticle bioconjugate reports EGFR-positive A431 tumors with a signal nearly 35-fold higher than EGFR-negative MDA-435S tumors. The low-level EGFR expression in adjacent healthy tissue is 7-fold lower than in the positive tumors. Validation via competitive inhibition reduces the signal by a factor of six, and independent measurement of EGFR via flow cytometry correlates at R(2) = 0.92. PMID:21302357

  16. Affibody-Functionalized Gold–Silica Nanoparticles for Raman Molecular Imaging of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Jokerst, Jesse V.; Miao, Zheng; Zavaleta, Cristina; Cheng, Zhen; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2012-01-01

    The affibody functionalization of fluorescent surface-enhanced Raman scattering gold–silica nanoparticles as multimodal contrast agents for molecular imaging specific to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is reported. This nanoparticle bioconjugate reports EGFR-positive A431 tumors with a signal nearly 35-fold higher than EGFR-negative MDA-435S tumors. The low-level EGFR expression in adjacent healthy tissue is 7-fold lower than in the positive tumors. Validation via competitive inhibition reduces the signal by a factor of six, and independent measurement of EGFR via flow cytometry correlates at R2 = 0.92. PMID:21302357

  17. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor gene CHRNA4 is associated with negative emotionality.

    PubMed

    Markett, Sebastian; Montag, Christian; Reuter, Martin

    2011-04-01

    Knock-out studies in mice suggest a role of the CHRNA4 gene in anxiety. In the present study we extend this finding to humans by means of a genetic association study. In a sample of N = 574 healthy White participants, the CHRNA4 rs1044396 polymorphism is related to the common variance of several conceptualizations of negative emotionality. Compared to carriers of at least one T-allele, carriers of the homozygous C/C genotype described themselves as more anxious and emotionally unstable on various psychometric personality questionnaires. The scope of the genetic effect is remarkable because other prominent genetic markers for anxiety show specificity for the diagnostic tool used. The present study is the first study that demonstrates the relevance of the CHRNA4 gene for negative emotionality in humans and sets a starting point for further investigations that could inform on the treatment of various affective psychiatric disorders.

  18. Sparse Non-negative Matrix Factorization (SNMF) based color unmixing for breast histopathological image analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jun; Xiang, Lei; Wang, Guanhao; Ganesan, Shridar; Feldman, Michael; Shih, Natalie N C; Gilmore, Hannah; Madabhushi, Anant

    2015-12-01

    Color deconvolution has emerged as a popular method for color unmixing as a pre-processing step for image analysis of digital pathology images. One deficiency of this approach is that the stain matrix is pre-defined which requires specific knowledge of the data. This paper presents an unsupervised Sparse Non-negative Matrix Factorization (SNMF) based approach for color unmixing. We evaluate this approach for color unmixing of breast pathology images. Compared to Non-negative Matrix Factorization (NMF), the sparseness constraint imposed on coefficient matrix aims to use more meaningful representation of color components for separating stained colors. In this work SNMF is leveraged for decomposing pure stained color in both Immunohistochemistry (IHC) and Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) images. SNMF is compared with Principle Component Analysis (PCA), Independent Component Analysis (ICA), Color Deconvolution (CD), and Non-negative Matrix Factorization (NMF) based approaches. SNMF demonstrated improved performance in decomposing brown diaminobenzidine (DAB) component from 36 IHC images as well as accurately segmenting about 1400 nuclei and 500 lymphocytes from H & E images.

  19. Sparse Non-negative Matrix Factorization (SNMF) based color unmixing for breast histopathological image analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jun; Xiang, Lei; Wang, Guanhao; Ganesan, Shridar; Feldman, Michael; Shih, Natalie N C; Gilmore, Hannah; Madabhushi, Anant

    2015-12-01

    Color deconvolution has emerged as a popular method for color unmixing as a pre-processing step for image analysis of digital pathology images. One deficiency of this approach is that the stain matrix is pre-defined which requires specific knowledge of the data. This paper presents an unsupervised Sparse Non-negative Matrix Factorization (SNMF) based approach for color unmixing. We evaluate this approach for color unmixing of breast pathology images. Compared to Non-negative Matrix Factorization (NMF), the sparseness constraint imposed on coefficient matrix aims to use more meaningful representation of color components for separating stained colors. In this work SNMF is leveraged for decomposing pure stained color in both Immunohistochemistry (IHC) and Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) images. SNMF is compared with Principle Component Analysis (PCA), Independent Component Analysis (ICA), Color Deconvolution (CD), and Non-negative Matrix Factorization (NMF) based approaches. SNMF demonstrated improved performance in decomposing brown diaminobenzidine (DAB) component from 36 IHC images as well as accurately segmenting about 1400 nuclei and 500 lymphocytes from H & E images. PMID:25958195

  20. The Ascaris suum nicotinic receptor, ACR-16, as a drug target: Four novel negative allosteric modulators from virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Fudan; Robertson, Alan P; Abongwa, Melanie; Yu, Edward W; Martin, Richard J

    2016-04-01

    Soil-transmitted helminth infections in humans and livestock cause significant debility, reduced productivity and economic losses globally. There are a limited number of effective anthelmintic drugs available for treating helminths infections, and their frequent use has led to the development of resistance in many parasite species. There is an urgent need for novel therapeutic drugs for treating these parasites. We have chosen the ACR-16 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor of Ascaris suum (Asu-ACR-16), as a drug target and have developed three-dimensional models of this transmembrane protein receptor to facilitate the search for new bioactive compounds. Using the human α7 nAChR chimeras and Torpedo marmorata nAChR for homology modeling, we defined orthosteric and allosteric binding sites on the Asu-ACR-16 receptor for virtual screening. We identified four ligands that bind to sites on Asu-ACR-16 and tested their activity using electrophysiological recording from Asu-ACR-16 receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes. The four ligands were acetylcholine inhibitors (SB-277011-A, IC50, 3.12 ± 1.29 μM; (+)-butaclamol Cl, IC50, 9.85 ± 2.37 μM; fmoc-1, IC50, 10.00 ± 1.38 μM; fmoc-2, IC50, 16.67 ± 1.95 μM) that behaved like negative allosteric modulators. Our work illustrates a structure-based in silico screening method for seeking anthelmintic hits, which can then be tested electrophysiologically for further characterization. PMID:27054065

  1. The Ascaris suum nicotinic receptor, ACR-16, as a drug target: Four novel negative allosteric modulators from virtual screening

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Fudan; Robertson, Alan P.; Abongwa, Melanie; Yu, Edward W.; Martin, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Soil-transmitted helminth infections in humans and livestock cause significant debility, reduced productivity and economic losses globally. There are a limited number of effective anthelmintic drugs available for treating helminths infections, and their frequent use has led to the development of resistance in many parasite species. There is an urgent need for novel therapeutic drugs for treating these parasites. We have chosen the ACR-16 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor of Ascaris suum (Asu-ACR-16), as a drug target and have developed three-dimensional models of this transmembrane protein receptor to facilitate the search for new bioactive compounds. Using the human α7 nAChR chimeras and Torpedo marmorata nAChR for homology modeling, we defined orthosteric and allosteric binding sites on the Asu-ACR-16 receptor for virtual screening. We identified four ligands that bind to sites on Asu-ACR-16 and tested their activity using electrophysiological recording from Asu-ACR-16 receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes. The four ligands were acetylcholine inhibitors (SB-277011-A, IC50, 3.12 ± 1.29 μM; (+)-butaclamol Cl, IC50, 9.85 ± 2.37 μM; fmoc-1, IC50, 10.00 ± 1.38 μM; fmoc-2, IC50, 16.67 ± 1.95 μM) that behaved like negative allosteric modulators. Our work illustrates a structure-based in silico screening method for seeking anthelmintic hits, which can then be tested electrophysiologically for further characterization. PMID:27054065

  2. Molecular Docking and Interactions of Pueraria Tuberosa with Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptors.

    PubMed

    Asthana, S; Agarwal, T; Singothu, S; Samal, A; Banerjee, I; Pal, K; Pramanik, K; Ray, S S

    2015-01-01

    Pueraria tuberosa is known for its therapeutic potentials in cardiovascular disorders, but its effect in angiogenesis has not been studied so far. In this study, a computational approach has been applied to elucidate the role of the phytochemicals in inhibition of angiogenesis through modulation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors: Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, major factors responsible for angiogenesis. Metabolite structures retrieved from PubChem and KNApSAcK - 3D databases, were docked using AutoDock4.2 tool. Hydrogen bond and molecular docking, absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion and toxicity predictions were carried out using UCSF Chimera, LigPlot(+) and PreADMET server, respectively. From the docking analysis, it was observed that puerarone and tuberostan had significant binding affinity for the intracellular kinase domain of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 respectively. It is important to mention that both the phytochemicals shared similar interaction profile as that of standard inhibitors of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors. Also, both puerarone and tuberostan interacted with Lys861/Lys868 (adenosine 5'-triphosphate binding site of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors-1/vascular endothelial growth factor receptors-2), thus providing a clue that they may enforce their inhibitory effect by blocking the adenosine 5'-triphosphate binding domain of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors. Moreover, these molecules exhibited good drug-likeness, absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion properties without any carcinogenic and toxic effects. The interaction pattern of the puerarone and tuberostan may provide a hint for a novel drug design for vascular endothelial growth factor tyrosine kinase receptors with better specificity to treat angiogenic disorders. PMID:26664060

  3. Molecular Docking and Interactions of Pueraria Tuberosa with Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Asthana, S.; Agarwal, T.; Singothu, S.; Samal, A.; Banerjee, I.; Pal, K.; Pramanik, K.; Ray, S. S.

    2015-01-01

    Pueraria tuberosa is known for its therapeutic potentials in cardiovascular disorders, but its effect in angiogenesis has not been studied so far. In this study, a computational approach has been applied to elucidate the role of the phytochemicals in inhibition of angiogenesis through modulation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors: Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, major factors responsible for angiogenesis. Metabolite structures retrieved from PubChem and KNApSAcK – 3D databases, were docked using AutoDock4.2 tool. Hydrogen bond and molecular docking, absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion and toxicity predictions were carried out using UCSF Chimera, LigPlot+ and PreADMET server, respectively. From the docking analysis, it was observed that puerarone and tuberostan had significant binding affinity for the intracellular kinase domain of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 respectively. It is important to mention that both the phytochemicals shared similar interaction profile as that of standard inhibitors of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors. Also, both puerarone and tuberostan interacted with Lys861/Lys868 (adenosine 5’-triphosphate binding site of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors-1/vascular endothelial growth factor receptors-2), thus providing a clue that they may enforce their inhibitory effect by blocking the adenosine 5’-triphosphate binding domain of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors. Moreover, these molecules exhibited good drug-likeness, absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion properties without any carcinogenic and toxic effects. The interaction pattern of the puerarone and tuberostan may provide a hint for a novel drug design for vascular endothelial growth factor tyrosine kinase receptors with better specificity to treat angiogenic disorders. PMID:26664060

  4. Expression of metabolic sensing receptors in adipose tissues of periparturient dairy cows with differing extent of negative energy balance.

    PubMed

    Friedrichs, P; Sauerwein, H; Huber, K; Locher, L F; Rehage, J; Meyer, U; Dänicke, S; Kuhla, B; Mielenz, M

    2016-04-01

    inverse mRNA abundance as induced by different portions of concentrate. Thus, indicating divergent nutrient sensing of both receptors in AT during the transition period. We propose that the different manifestation of negative EB in both groups at day 21 after parturition affect at least FFAR2 expression in RPAT.

  5. Phylogenetic Investigation of Peptide Hormone and Growth Factor Receptors in Five Dipteran Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Kevin J.; Brown, Mark R.; Strand, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Peptide hormones and growth factors bind to membrane receptors and regulate a myriad of processes in insects and other metazoans. The evolutionary relationships among characterized and uncharacterized (“orphan”) receptors can provide insights into receptor-ligand biology and narrow target choices in deorphanization studies. However, the large number and low sequence conservation of these receptors make evolutionary analysis difficult. Here, we characterized the G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), receptor guanylyl cyclases (RGCs), and protein kinase receptors (PKRs) of mosquitoes and select other flies by interrogating the genomes of Aedes aegypti, Anopheles gambiae, Culex quinquefasciatus, Drosophila melanogaster, and D. mojavensis. Sequences were grouped by receptor type, clustered using the program CLANS, aligned using HMMR, and phylogenetic trees built using PhyML. Our results indicated that PKRs had relatively few orphan clades whereas GPCRs and RGCs had several. In addition, more than half of the Class B secretin-like GPCRs and RGCs remained uncharacterized. Additional studies revealed that Class B GPCRs exhibited more gain and loss events than other receptor types. Finally, using the neuropeptide F family of insect receptors and the neuropeptide Y family of vertebrate receptors, we also show that functional sites considered critical for ligand binding are conserved among distinct family members and between distantly related taxa. Overall, our results provide the first comprehensive analysis of peptide hormone and growth factor receptors for a major insect group. PMID:24379806

  6. RanBPM Protein Acts as a Negative Regulator of BLT2 Receptor to Attenuate BLT2-mediated Cell Motility*

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jun-Dong; Kim, Joo-Young; Kim, Ae-Kyoung; Jang, Sung Key; Kim, Jae-Hong

    2013-01-01

    BLT2, a low affinity receptor for leukotriene B4 (LTB4), is a member of the G protein-coupled receptor family and is involved in many signal transduction pathways associated with various cellular phenotypes, including chemotactic motility. However, the regulatory mechanism for BLT2 has not yet been demonstrated. To understand the regulatory mechanism of BLT2, we screened and identified the proteins that bind to BLT2. Using a yeast two-hybrid assay with the BLT2 C-terminal domain as bait, we found that RanBPM, a previously proposed scaffold protein, interacts with BLT2. We demonstrated the specific interaction between BLT2 and RanBPM by GST pulldown assay and co-immunoprecipitation assay. To elucidate the biological function of the RanBPM-BLT2 interaction, we evaluated the effects of RanBPM overexpression or knockdown. We found that BLT2-mediated motility was severely attenuated by RanBPM overexpression and that knockdown of endogenous RanBPM by shRNA strongly promoted BLT2-mediated motility, suggesting a negative regulatory function of RanBPM toward BLT2. Furthermore, we observed that the addition of BLT2 ligands caused the dissociation of BLT2 and RanBPM, thus releasing the negative regulatory effect of RanBPM. Finally, we propose that Akt-induced BLT2 phosphorylation at residue Thr355, which occurs after the addition of BLT2 ligands, is a potential mechanism by which BLT2 dissociates from RanBPM, resulting in stimulation of BLT2 signaling. Taken together, our results suggest that RanBPM acts as a negative regulator of BLT2 signaling to attenuate BLT2-mediated cell motility. PMID:23928309

  7. Ovarian hormones influence corticotropin releasing factor receptor colocalization with delta opioid receptors in CA1 pyramidal cell dendrites

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Tanya J.; Akama, Keith T.; Knudsen, Margarete G.; McEwen, Bruce S.; Milner, Teresa A.

    2011-01-01

    Stress interacts with addictive processes to increase drug use, drug seeking, and relapse. The hippocampal formation (HF) is an important site at which stress circuits and endogenous opioid systems intersect and likely plays a critical role in the interaction between stress and drug addiction. Our prior studies demonstrate that the stress-related neuropeptide corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and the delta-opioid receptor (DOR) colocalize in interneuron populations in the hilus of the dentate gyrus and stratum oriens of CA1 and CA3. While independent ultrastructural studies of DORs and CRF receptors suggest that each receptor is found in CA1 pyramidal cell dendrites and dendritic spines, whether DORs and CRF receptors colocalize in CA1 neuronal profiles has not been investigated. Here, hippocampal sections of adult male and proestrus female Sprague-Dawley rats were processed for dual label pre-embedding immunoelectron microscopy using well-characterized antisera directed against the DOR for immunoperoxidase and against the CRF receptor for immunogold. DOR-immunoreactivity (-ir) was found presynaptically in axons and axon terminals as well as postsynaptically in somata, dendrites and dendritic spines in stratum radiatum of CA1. In contrast, CRF receptor-ir was predominantly found postsynaptically in CA1 somata, dendrites, and dendritic spines. CRF receptor-ir frequently was observed in DOR-labeled dendritic profiles and primarily was found in the cytoplasm rather than at or near the plasma membrane. Quantitative analysis of CRF receptor-ir colocalization with DOR-ir in pyramidal cell dendrites revealed that proestrus females and males show comparable levels of CRF receptor-ir per dendrite and similar cytoplasmic density of CRF receptor-ir. In contrast, proestrus females display an increased number of dual-labeled dendritic profiles and increased membrane density of CRF receptor-ir in comparison to males. We further examined the functional consequences of CRF

  8. Pancreatitis with vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ghatalia, Pooja; Morgan, Charity J; Choueiri, Toni K; Rocha, Pedro; Naik, Gurudatta; Sonpavde, Guru

    2015-04-01

    A trial-level meta-analysis was conducted to determine the relative risk (RR) of pancreatitis associated with multi-targeted vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI). Eligible studies included randomized phase 2 and 3 trials comparing arms with and without an FDA-approved VEGFR TKI (sunitinib, sorafenib, pazopanib, axitinib, vandetanib, cabozantinib, ponatinib, regorafenib). Statistical analyses calculated the RR and 95% confidence intervals (CI). A total of 10,578 patients from 16 phase III trials and 6 phase II trials were selected. The RR for all grade and high-grade pancreatitis for the TKI vs. no TKI- arms was 1.95 (p=0.042, 95% CI: 1.02 to 3.70) and 1.89 (p=0.069, 95% CI: 0.95 to 373), respectively. No differential impact of malignancy type or specific TKI agent was seen on RR of all grade of high grade pancreatitis. Better patient selection and monitoring may mitigate the risk of severe pancreatitis.

  9. Anti-Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Gene Therapy for Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Martin J.; Chiuchiolo, Maria J.; Ballon, Douglas; Dyke, Jonathan P.; Aronowitz, Eric; Funato, Kosuke; Tabar, Viviane; Havlicek, David; Fan, Fan; Sondhi, Dolan; Kaminsky, Stephen M.; Crystal, Ronald G.

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and aggressive primary intracranial brain tumor in adults with a mean survival of 14 to 15 months. Aberrant activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays a significant role in GBM progression, with amplification or overexpression of EGFR in 60% of GBM tumors. To target EGFR expressed by GBM, we have developed a strategy to deliver the coding sequence for cetuximab, an anti-EGFR antibody, directly to the CNS using an adeno-associated virus serotype rh.10 gene transfer vector. The data demonstrates that single, local delivery of an anti-EGFR antibody by an AAVrh.10 vector coding for cetuximab (AAVrh.10Cetmab) reduces GBM tumor growth and increases survival in xenograft mouse models of a human GBM EGFR-expressing cell line and patient-derived GBM. AAVrh10.CetMab-treated mice displayed a reduction in cachexia, a significant decrease in tumor volume and a prolonged survival following therapy. Adeno-associated-directed delivery of a gene encoding a therapeutic anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody may be an effective strategy to treat GBM. PMID:27711187

  10. A diverse family of proteins containing tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor domains.

    PubMed

    Zapata, J M; Pawlowski, K; Haas, E; Ware, C F; Godzik, A; Reed, J C

    2001-06-29

    We have identified three new tumor necrosis factor-receptor associated factor (TRAF) domain-containing proteins in humans using bioinformatics approaches, including: MUL, the product of the causative gene in Mulibrey Nanism syndrome; USP7 (HAUSP), an ubiquitin protease; and SPOP, a POZ domain-containing protein. Unlike classical TRAF family proteins involved in TNF family receptor (TNFR) signaling, the TRAF domains (TDs) of MUL, USP7, and SPOP are located near the NH(2) termini or central region of these proteins, rather than carboxyl end. MUL and USP7 are capable of binding in vitro via their TDs to all of the previously identified TRAF family proteins (TRAF1, TRAF2, TRAF3, TRAF4, TRAF5, and TRAF6), whereas the TD of SPOP interacts weakly with TRAF1 and TRAF6 only. The TD of MUL also interacted with itself, whereas the TDs of USP7 and SPOP did not self-associate. Analysis of various MUL and USP7 mutants by transient transfection assays indicated that the TDs of these proteins are necessary and sufficient for suppressing NF-kappaB induction by TRAF2 and TRAF6 as well as certain TRAF-binding TNF family receptors. In contrast, the TD of SPOP did not inhibit NF-kappaB induction. Immunofluorescence confocal microscopy indicated that MUL localizes to cytosolic bodies, with targeting to these structures mediated by a RBCC tripartite domain within the MUL protein. USP7 localized predominantly to the nucleus, in a TD-dependent manner. Data base searches revealed multiple proteins containing TDs homologous to those found in MUL, USP7, and SPOP throughout eukaryotes, including yeast, protists, plants, invertebrates, and mammals, suggesting that this branch of the TD family arose from an ancient gene. We propose the moniker TEFs (TD-encompassing factors) for this large family of proteins.

  11. Impact of suppression of tumorigenicity 14 (ST14)/serine protease 14 (Prss14) expression analysis on the prognosis and management of estrogen receptor negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sauryang; Yang, Jae Woong; Kim, Chungho; Kim, Moon Gyo

    2016-01-01

    To elucidate the role of a type II transmembrane serine protease, ST14/Prss14, during breast cancer progression, we utilized publically accessible databases including TCGA, GEO, NCI-60, and CCLE. Survival of breast cancer patients with high ST14/Prss14 expression is significantly poor in estrogen receptor (ER) negative populations regardless of the ratios of ST14/Prss14 to its inhibitors, SPINT1 or SPINT2. In a clustering of 1085 selected EMT signature genes, ST14/Prss14 is located in the same cluster with CDH3, and closer to post-EMT markers, CDH2, VIM, and FN1 than to the pre-EMT marker, CDH1. Coexpression analyses of known ST14/Prss14 substrates and transcription factors revealed context dependent action. In cell lines, paradoxically, ST14/Prss14 expression is higher in the ER positive group and located closer to CDH1 in clustering. This apparent contradiction is not likely due to ST14/Prss14 expression in a cancer microenvironment, nor due to negative regulation by ER. Genes consistently coexpressed with ST14/Prss14 include transcription factors, ELF5, GRHL1, VGLL1, suggesting currently unknown mechanisms for regulation. Here, we report that ST14/Prss14 is an emerging therapeutic target for breast cancer where HER2 is not applicable. In addition we suggest that careful conclusions should be drawn not exclusively from the cell line studies for target development. PMID:27167193

  12. Impact of suppression of tumorigenicity 14 (ST14)/serine protease 14 (Prss14) expression analysis on the prognosis and management of estrogen receptor negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sauryang; Yang, Jae Woong; Kim, Chungho; Kim, Moon Gyo

    2016-06-01

    To elucidate the role of a type II transmembrane serine protease, ST14/Prss14, during breast cancer progression, we utilized publically accessible databases including TCGA, GEO, NCI-60, and CCLE. Survival of breast cancer patients with high ST14/Prss14 expression is significantly poor in estrogen receptor (ER) negative populations regardless of the ratios of ST14/Prss14 to its inhibitors, SPINT1 or SPINT2. In a clustering of 1085 selected EMT signature genes, ST14/Prss14 is located in the same cluster with CDH3, and closer to post-EMT markers, CDH2, VIM, and FN1 than to the pre-EMT marker, CDH1. Coexpression analyses of known ST14/Prss14 substrates and transcription factors revealed context dependent action. In cell lines, paradoxically, ST14/Prss14 expression is higher in the ER positive group and located closer to CDH1 in clustering. This apparent contradiction is not likely due to ST14/Prss14 expression in a cancer microenvironment, nor due to negative regulation by ER. Genes consistently coexpressed with ST14/Prss14 include transcription factors, ELF5, GRHL1, VGLL1, suggesting currently unknown mechanisms for regulation. Here, we report that ST14/Prss14 is an emerging therapeutic target for breast cancer where HER2 is not applicable. In addition we suggest that careful conclusions should be drawn not exclusively from the cell line studies for target development.

  13. The TAM family receptor tyrosine kinase TYRO3 is a negative regulator of type 2 immunity.

    PubMed

    Chan, Pamela Y; Carrera Silva, Eugenio A; De Kouchkovsky, Dimitri; Joannas, Leonel D; Hao, Liming; Hu, Donglei; Huntsman, Scott; Eng, Celeste; Licona-Limón, Paula; Weinstein, Jason S; Herbert, De'Broski R; Craft, Joseph E; Flavell, Richard A; Repetto, Silvia; Correale, Jorge; Burchard, Esteban G; Torgerson, Dara G; Ghosh, Sourav; Rothlin, Carla V

    2016-04-01

    Host responses against metazoan parasites or an array of environmental substances elicit type 2 immunity. Despite its protective function, type 2 immunity also drives allergic diseases. The mechanisms that regulate the magnitude of the type 2 response remain largely unknown. Here, we show that genetic ablation of a receptor tyrosine kinase encoded byTyro3in mice or the functional neutralization of its ortholog in human dendritic cells resulted in enhanced type 2 immunity. Furthermore, the TYRO3 agonist PROS1 was induced in T cells by the quintessential type 2 cytokine, interleukin-4. T cell-specificPros1knockouts phenocopied the loss ofTyro3 Thus, a PROS1-mediated feedback from adaptive immunity engages a rheostat, TYRO3, on innate immune cells to limit the intensity of type 2 responses.

  14. The TAM family receptor tyrosine kinase TYRO3 is a negative regulator of type 2 immunity

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Pamela Y.; Carrera Silva, Eugenio A.; De Kouchkovsky, Dimitri; Joannas, Leonel D.; Hao, Liming; Hu, Donglei; Huntsman, Scott; Eng, Celeste; Licona-Limón, Paula; Weinstein, Jason S.; Herbert, De’Broski R.; Craft, Joseph E.; Flavell, Richard A.; Repetto, Silvia; Correale, Jorge; Burchard, Esteban G.; Torgerson, Dara G.; Ghosh, Sourav; Rothlin, Carla V.

    2016-01-01

    Host responses against metazoan parasites or an array of environmental substances elicit type 2 immunity. Despite its protective function, type 2 immunity also drives allergic diseases. The mechanisms that regulate the magnitude of the type 2 response remain largely unknown. Here, we show that genetic ablation of a receptor tyrosine kinase encoded by Tyro3 in mice or the functional neutralization of its ortholog in human dendritic cells resulted in enhanced type 2 immunity. Furthermore, the TYRO3 agonist PROS1 was induced in T cells by the quintessential type 2 cytokine, interleukin-4. T cell–specific Pros1 knockouts phenocopied the loss of Tyro3. Thus, a PROS1-mediated feedback from adaptive immunity engages a rheostat, TYRO3, on innate immune cells to limit the intensity of type 2 responses. PMID:27034374

  15. G protein-coupled receptor 37 is a negative regulator of oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hyun-Jeong; Vainshtein, Anna; Maik-Rachline, Galia; Peles, Elior

    2016-01-01

    While the formation of myelin by oligodendrocytes is critical for the function of the central nervous system, the molecular mechanism controlling oligodendrocyte differentiation remains largely unknown. Here we identify G protein-coupled receptor 37 (GPR37) as an inhibitor of late-stage oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination. GPR37 is enriched in oligodendrocytes and its expression increases during their differentiation into myelin forming cells. Genetic deletion of Gpr37 does not affect the number of oligodendrocyte precursor cells, but results in precocious oligodendrocyte differentiation and hypermyelination. The inhibition of oligodendrocyte differentiation by GPR37 is mediated by suppression of an exchange protein activated by cAMP (EPAC)-dependent activation of Raf-MAPK-ERK1/2 module and nuclear translocation of ERK1/2. Our data suggest that GPR37 regulates central nervous system myelination by controlling the transition from early-differentiated to mature oligodendrocytes. PMID:26961174

  16. G protein-coupled receptor 37 is a negative regulator of oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hyun-Jeong; Vainshtein, Anna; Maik-Rachline, Galia; Peles, Elior

    2016-01-01

    While the formation of myelin by oligodendrocytes is critical for the function of the central nervous system, the molecular mechanism controlling oligodendrocyte differentiation remains largely unknown. Here we identify G protein-coupled receptor 37 (GPR37) as an inhibitor of late-stage oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination. GPR37 is enriched in oligodendrocytes and its expression increases during their differentiation into myelin forming cells. Genetic deletion of Gpr37 does not affect the number of oligodendrocyte precursor cells, but results in precocious oligodendrocyte differentiation and hypermyelination. The inhibition of oligodendrocyte differentiation by GPR37 is mediated by suppression of an exchange protein activated by cAMP (EPAC)-dependent activation of Raf-MAPK-ERK1/2 module and nuclear translocation of ERK1/2. Our data suggest that GPR37 regulates central nervous system myelination by controlling the transition from early-differentiated to mature oligodendrocytes.

  17. The TAM family receptor tyrosine kinase TYRO3 is a negative regulator of type 2 immunity.

    PubMed

    Chan, Pamela Y; Carrera Silva, Eugenio A; De Kouchkovsky, Dimitri; Joannas, Leonel D; Hao, Liming; Hu, Donglei; Huntsman, Scott; Eng, Celeste; Licona-Limón, Paula; Weinstein, Jason S; Herbert, De'Broski R; Craft, Joseph E; Flavell, Richard A; Repetto, Silvia; Correale, Jorge; Burchard, Esteban G; Torgerson, Dara G; Ghosh, Sourav; Rothlin, Carla V

    2016-04-01

    Host responses against metazoan parasites or an array of environmental substances elicit type 2 immunity. Despite its protective function, type 2 immunity also drives allergic diseases. The mechanisms that regulate the magnitude of the type 2 response remain largely unknown. Here, we show that genetic ablation of a receptor tyrosine kinase encoded byTyro3in mice or the functional neutralization of its ortholog in human dendritic cells resulted in enhanced type 2 immunity. Furthermore, the TYRO3 agonist PROS1 was induced in T cells by the quintessential type 2 cytokine, interleukin-4. T cell-specificPros1knockouts phenocopied the loss ofTyro3 Thus, a PROS1-mediated feedback from adaptive immunity engages a rheostat, TYRO3, on innate immune cells to limit the intensity of type 2 responses. PMID:27034374

  18. CACUL1 functions as a negative regulator of androgen receptor in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hanbyeul; Lee, Sang Hyup; Um, Soo-Jong; Kim, Eun-Joo

    2016-07-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) plays a critical role in the initiation and progression of prostate cancer (PCa), and thus its regulation is an important tool in PCa therapy. Here, we report that CDK2-associated cullin 1 (CACUL1) directly associates with AR and suppresses AR transcriptional activity. In addition, CACUL1 represses histone demethylase LSD1-mediated AR transactivation by competing with LSD1 for AR binding. Depletion of CACUL1 enhances the LSD1 occupancy of the AR-target promoter, accompanied by decreased accumulation of H3K9me2, a repressive transcriptional marker. CACUL1 and LSD1 oppositely regulate CDX-induced cell death in AR-positive LNCaP and metastatic castrate-resistant LNCaP-LN3 cells. These data suggest that CACUL1 impairs LSD1-mediated activation of AR, thereby implicating it as a potential antitumor target in PCa. PMID:27085459

  19. CD84 negatively regulates IgE high affinity receptor signaling in human mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-Errico, Damiana; Oliver-Vila, Irene; Aínsua-Enrich, Erola; Gilfillan, Alasdair M.; Picado, César; Sayós, Joan; Martín, Margarita

    2011-01-01

    CD84 is a self-binding receptor from the CD150 family that is broadly expressed in hematopoietic cells. It has been described that the adaptors SAP and EAT-2 are critical for CD150 family members signaling and function. We observed that human mast cells express CD84 but lack SAP or EAT-2, that CD84 is tyrosine phosphorylated upon FcεRI engagement, and that the release of granule contents is reduced when FcεRI is co-engaged with CD84 in LAD2 and human CD34+-derived mast cells (huMCs). In addition, we observed that the release of IL-8 and GM-CSF was also reduced in FcεRI/CD84 costimulated cells as compared to FcεRI/Ig control. In order to understand how CD84 down-regulates FcεRI-mediated function, we analyzed signaling pathways affected by CD84 in human mast cells. Our results showed that CD84 dampens FcεRI-mediated calcium mobilization after its co-crosslinking with the receptor. Furthermore, FcεRI-mediated Syk-LAT-PLCγ1 axis activity is down-regulated after CD84 stimulation, compared to FcεRI/Ig control. The inhibitory kinase Fes phosphorylates mainly the inhibitory motif for CD84. Moreover Fes, which has been described to become phosphorylated after substrate binding, also gets phosphorylated when co-expressed with CD84. Consistently, Fes was observed to be more phosphorylated after CD84 and FcεRI co-crosslinking. The phosphorylation of the protein phosphatase SHP-1 also increases after CD84 and FcεRI coengagement. Taken together, our results show that CD84 is highly expressed in mast cells and that it contributes to the regulation of FcεRI signaling in a SAP and EAT-2 independent and Fes and SHP-1 dependent mechanisms. PMID:22068234

  20. Simultaneous Non-Negative Matrix Factorization for Multiple Large Scale Gene Expression Datasets in Toxicology

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Clare M.; Mudaliar, Manikhandan A. V.; Haggart, D. R.; Wolf, C. Roland; Miele, Gino; Vass, J. Keith; Higham, Desmond J.; Crowther, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Non-negative matrix factorization is a useful tool for reducing the dimension of large datasets. This work considers simultaneous non-negative matrix factorization of multiple sources of data. In particular, we perform the first study that involves more than two datasets. We discuss the algorithmic issues required to convert the approach into a practical computational tool and apply the technique to new gene expression data quantifying the molecular changes in four tissue types due to different dosages of an experimental panPPAR agonist in mouse. This study is of interest in toxicology because, whilst PPARs form potential therapeutic targets for diabetes, it is known that they can induce serious side-effects. Our results show that the practical simultaneous non-negative matrix factorization developed here can add value to the data analysis. In particular, we find that factorizing the data as a single object allows us to distinguish between the four tissue types, but does not correctly reproduce the known dosage level groups. Applying our new approach, which treats the four tissue types as providing distinct, but related, datasets, we find that the dosage level groups are respected. The new algorithm then provides separate gene list orderings that can be studied for each tissue type, and compared with the ordering arising from the single factorization. We find that many of our conclusions can be corroborated with known biological behaviour, and others offer new insights into the toxicological effects. Overall, the algorithm shows promise for early detection of toxicity in the drug discovery process. PMID:23272042

  1. Euphol from Euphorbia tirucalli Negatively Modulates TGF-β Responsiveness via TGF-β Receptor Segregation inside Membrane Rafts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-Lin; Chen, Ying-Pin; Lin, Ming-Wei; Huang, Yaw-Bin; Chang, Fang-Rong; Duh, Tsai-Hui; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Wu, Wei-Chiang; Kao, Yu-Chen; Yang, Pei-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) responsiveness in cultured cells can be modulated by TGF-β partitioning between lipid raft/caveolae- and clathrin-mediated endocytosis pathways. Lipid rafts are plasma membrane microdomains with an important role in cell survival signaling, and cholesterol is necessary for the lipid rafts’ structure and function. Euphol is a euphane-type triterpene alcohol that is structurally similar to cholesterol and has a wide range of pharmacological properties, including anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects. In the present study, euphol suppressed TGF-β signaling by inducing TGF-β receptor movement into lipid-raft microdomains and degrading TGF-β receptors. PMID:26448474

  2. Engineered epidermal growth factor mutants with faster binding on-rates correlate with enhanced receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Lahti, Jennifer L.; Lui, Bertrand H.; Beck, Stayce E.; Lee, Stephen S.; Ly, Daphne P.; Longaker, Michael T.; Yang, George P.; Cochran, Jennifer R.

    2011-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) regulate critical cell signaling pathways, yet the properties of their cognate ligands that influence receptor activation are not fully understood. There is great interest in parsing these complex ligand-receptor relationships using engineered proteins with altered binding properties. Here we focus on the interaction between two engineered epidermal growth factor (EGF) mutants and the EGF receptor (EGFR), a model member of the RTK superfamily. We found that EGF mutants with faster kinetic on-rates stimulate increased EGFR activation compared to wild-type EGF. These findings support previous predictions that faster association rates correlate with enhanced receptor activity. PMID:21439278

  3. Corticotropin-releasing factor receptors induce calcium mobilization through cross-talk with Gq-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Gutknecht, Eric; Vauquelin, Georges; Dautzenberg, Frank M

    2010-09-10

    The cross-talk between corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and muscarinic receptors was investigated by measuring evoked transient increases in cytosolic calcium concentration. HEK293 cells stably expressing human CRF type 1 (hCRF(1)) and type 2(a) (hCRF(2(a))) receptors were stimulated with the muscarinic receptor agonist carbachol and shortly after by a CRF agonist. Unexpectedly, this second response was enhanced when compared to stimulating naive cells either with carbachol or CRF agonist only. Priming with 100 microM carbachol increased the maximal CRF agonist response and shifted its concentration-response curve to the left to attain almost the same potency as for stimulating the production of the natural second messenger cyclic AMP. Yet, priming did not affect CRF agonist-stimulated cyclic AMP production itself. Carbachol priming was not restricted to recombinant CRF receptors only since endogenously expressed beta(2)-adrenoceptors also started to produce a robust calcium signal. Without priming no such signal was observed. Similar findings were made in the human retinoblastoma cell line Y79 for endogenously expressed CRF(1) receptors and the type 1 pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide receptors but not for the CRF(2(a)) receptors. This differentiation between CRF(1) and CRF(2) receptors was further supported by use of selective agonists and antagonists. The results suggest that stimulating a Gq-coupled receptor shortly before stimulating a Gs-coupled receptor may result in a parallel signaling event on top of the classical cyclic AMP pathway. PMID:20594969

  4. Defining distinct negative beliefs about uncertainty: validating the factor structure of the Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale.

    PubMed

    Sexton, Kathryn A; Dugas, Michel J

    2009-06-01

    This study examined the factor structure of the English version of the Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale (IUS; French version: M. H. Freeston, J. Rhéaume, H. Letarte, M. J. Dugas, & R. Ladouceur, 1994; English version: K. Buhr & M. J. Dugas, 2002) using a substantially larger sample than has been used in previous studies. Nonclinical undergraduate students and adults from the community (M age = 23.74 years, SD = 6.36; 73.0% female and 27.0% male) who participated in 16 studies in the Anxiety Disorders Laboratory at Concordia University in Montreal, Canada were randomly assigned to 2 datasets. Exploratory factor analysis with the 1st sample (n = 1,230) identified 2 factors: the beliefs that "uncertainty has negative behavioral and self-referent implications" and that "uncertainty is unfair and spoils everything." This 2-factor structure provided a good fit to the data (Bentler-Bonett normed fit index = .96, comparative fit index = .97, standardized root-mean residual = .05, root-mean-square error of approximation = .07) upon confirmatory factor analysis with the 2nd sample (n = 1,221). Both factors showed similarly high correlations with pathological worry, and Factor 1 showed stronger correlations with generalized anxiety disorder analogue status, trait anxiety, somatic anxiety, and depressive symptomatology. PMID:19485672

  5. UNC-51-like kinase regulation of fibroblast growth factor receptor substrate 2/3.

    PubMed

    Avery, Adam W; Figueroa, Claudia; Vojtek, Anne B

    2007-01-01

    UNC-51-like kinases (ULK) are members of an evolutionarily conserved sub-family of ubiquitously expressed serine/threonine-specific protein kinases. Here we report that fibroblast growth factor receptor substrate (FRS) 2/3 are novel ULK2 carboxy-terminal domain interacting proteins. FRS2/3 are homologs that function as adaptor proteins to mediate signaling of multiple receptor tyrosine kinases. ULK2 interacts with the phospho-tyrosine binding (PTB) domain of FRS2/3. We demonstrate that siRNA targeting ULK2 in mouse P19 cells results in elevated FGFR1 mediated FRS3 and SHP2 tyrosyl phosphorylation. In addition, RNAi-mediated decrease in ULK2 causes increased interaction between FGFR1 and FRS3. ULK2 phosphorylates FRS2/3 in vitro, suggesting that ULK2 mediated phosphorylation may be a mechanism of FRS2/3 regulation. The data presented support a model in which ULK2, by interaction with FRS2/3 and inhibition of SynGAP, functions to negatively regulate tyrosyl phosphorylation of signaling proteins downstream of FGFR1.

  6. Epidermal Platelet-activating Factor Receptor Activation and Ultraviolet B Radiation Result in Synergistic Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha Production

    PubMed Central

    Wolverton, Jay E.; Al-Hassani, Mohammed; Yao, Yongxue; Zhang, Qiwei; Travers, Jeffrey B.

    2010-01-01

    Ultraviolet B radiation (UVB) is a potent stimulator of epidermal cytokine production which has been implicated in photoaggravated dermatoses. In addition to cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), UVB generates bioactive lipids including platelet-activating factor (PAF). Our previous studies have demonstrated that UVB-mediated production of keratinocyte TNF-α is in part due to PAF. The current studies use a human PAF-receptor (PAF-R) negative epithelial cell line transduced with PAF-Rs and PAF–R-deficient mice to demonstrate that activation of the epidermal PAF-R along with UVB irradiation results in a synergistic production of TNF-α. It should be noted that PAF-R effects are mimicked by the protein kinase C (PKC) agonist phorbol myristic acetate, and are inhibited by pharmacological antagonists of the PKC gamma isoenzyme. These studies suggest that concomitant PAF-R activation and UVB irradiation results in a synergistic production of the cytokine TNF-α which is mediated in part via PKC. These studies provide a novel potential mechanism for photosensitivity responses. PMID:19769579

  7. Automatic analysis of composite physical signals using non-negative factorization and information criterion.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kenji; Hidaka, Akinori; Otsu, Nobuyuki; Kurita, Takio

    2012-01-01

    In time-resolved spectroscopy, composite signal sequences representing energy transfer in fluorescence materials are measured, and the physical characteristics of the materials are analyzed. Each signal sequence is represented by a sum of non-negative signal components, which are expressed by model functions. For analyzing the physical characteristics of a measured signal sequence, the parameters of the model functions are estimated. Furthermore, in order to quantitatively analyze real measurement data and to reduce the risk of improper decisions, it is necessary to obtain the statistical characteristics from several sequences rather than just a single sequence. In the present paper, we propose an automatic method by which to analyze composite signals using non-negative factorization and an information criterion. The proposed method decomposes the composite signal sequences using non-negative factorization subjected to parametric base functions. The number of components (i.e., rank) is also estimated using Akaike's information criterion. Experiments using simulated and real data reveal that the proposed method automatically estimates the acceptable ranks and parameters.

  8. Automatic Analysis of Composite Physical Signals Using Non-Negative Factorization and Information Criterion

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Kenji; Hidaka, Akinori; Otsu, Nobuyuki; Kurita, Takio

    2012-01-01

    In time-resolved spectroscopy, composite signal sequences representing energy transfer in fluorescence materials are measured, and the physical characteristics of the materials are analyzed. Each signal sequence is represented by a sum of non-negative signal components, which are expressed by model functions. For analyzing the physical characteristics of a measured signal sequence, the parameters of the model functions are estimated. Furthermore, in order to quantitatively analyze real measurement data and to reduce the risk of improper decisions, it is necessary to obtain the statistical characteristics from several sequences rather than just a single sequence. In the present paper, we propose an automatic method by which to analyze composite signals using non-negative factorization and an information criterion. The proposed method decomposes the composite signal sequences using non-negative factorization subjected to parametric base functions. The number of components (i.e., rank) is also estimated using Akaike's information criterion. Experiments using simulated and real data reveal that the proposed method automatically estimates the acceptable ranks and parameters. PMID:22396759

  9. Oncogenic fingerprint of epidermal growth factor receptor pathway and emerging epidermal growth factor receptor blockade resistance in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sobani, Zain A; Sawant, Ashwin; Jafri, Mikram; Correa, Amit Keith; Sahin, Ibrahim Halil

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been an attractive target for treatment of epithelial cancers, including colorectal cancer (CRC). Evidence from clinical trials indicates that cetuximab and panitumumab (anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies) have clinical activity in patients with metastatic CRC. The discovery of intrinsic EGFR blockade resistance in Kirsten RAS (KRAS)-mutant patients led to the restriction of anti-EGFR antibodies to KRAS wild-type patients by Food and Drug Administration and European Medicine Agency. Studies have since focused on the evaluation of biomarkers to identify appropriate patient populations that may benefit from EGFR blockade. Accumulating evidence suggests that patients with mutations in EGFR downstream signaling pathways including KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA and PTEN could be intrinsically resistant to EGFR blockade. Recent whole genome studies also suggest that dynamic alterations in signaling pathways downstream of EGFR leads to distinct oncogenic signatures and subclones which might have some impact on emerging resistance in KRAS wild-type patients. While anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies have a clear potential in the management of a subset of patients with metastatic CRC, further studies are warranted to uncover exact mechanisms related to acquired resistance to EGFR blockade. PMID:27777877

  10. The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein/alpha2-macroglobulin receptor is a receptor for connective tissue growth factor.

    PubMed

    Segarini, P R; Nesbitt, J E; Li, D; Hays, L G; Yates, J R; Carmichael, D F

    2001-11-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) expression is regulated by transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) and strong up-regulation occurs during wound healing; in situ hybridization data indicate that there are high levels of CTGF expression in fibrotic lesions. Recently the binding parameters of CTGF to both high and lower affinity cell surface binding components have been characterized. Affinity cross-linking and SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis demonstrated the binding of CTGF to a cell surface protein with a mass of approximately 620 kDa. We report here the purification of this protein by affinity chromatography on CTGF coupled to Sepharose and sequence information obtained by mass spectroscopy. The binding protein was identified as the multiligand receptor, low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein/alpha2-macroglobulin receptor (LRP). The identification of LRP as a receptor for CTGF was validated by several studies: 1) binding competition with many ligands that bind to LRP, including receptor-associated protein; 2) immunoprecipitation of CTGF-receptor complex with LRP antibodies; and 3) cells that are genetically deficient for LRP were unable to bind CTGF. Last, CTGF is rapidly internalized and degraded and this process is LRP-dependent. In summary, our data indicate that LRP is a receptor for CTGF, and may play an important role in mediating CTGF biology.

  11. The type 2 vascular endothelial growth factor receptor recruits insulin receptor substrate-1 in its signalling pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Senthil, Duraisamy; Ghosh Choudhury, Goutam; Bhandari, Basant K; Kasinath, Balakuntalam S

    2002-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) isoforms exert their biological effects through receptors that possess intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity. Whether VEGF binding to its receptors recruits insulin receptor substrate (IRS) family of docking proteins to the receptor is not known. Following incubation of mouse kidney proximal tubular epithelial cells with VEGF, we observed an increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins, including one of approximately 200 kDa, suggesting possible regulation of phosphorylation of IRS proteins. VEGF augmented tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS-1 in kidney epithelial cells and rat heart endothelial cells in a time-dependent manner. In the epithelial cells, association of IRS-1 with type 2 VEGF receptor was promoted by VEGF. VEGF also increased association of IRS-1 with the p85 regulatory subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase), and PI 3-kinase activity in IRS-1 immunoprecipitates was increased in VEGF-treated cells. Incubation of epithelial cells with antisense IRS-1 oligonucleotide, but not sense oligonucleotide, reduced expression of the protein and VEGF-induced PI 3-kinase activity in IRS-1 immunoprecipitates. Additionally, VEGF-induced protein synthesis was also impaired by antisense but not sense IRS-1 oligonucleotide. These data provide the first evidence that binding of VEGF to its type 2 receptor promotes association of IRS-1 with the receptor complex. This association may account for some of the increase in VEGF-induced PI 3-kinase activity, and the increase in de novo protein synthesis seen in renal epithelial cells. PMID:12153400

  12. Isolation of an additional member of the fibroblast growth factor receptor family, FGFR-3.

    PubMed Central

    Keegan, K; Johnson, D E; Williams, L T; Hayman, M J

    1991-01-01

    The fibroblast growth factors are a family of polypeptide growth factors involved in a variety of activities including mitogenesis, angiogenesis, and wound healing. Fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) have previously been identified in chicken, mouse, and human and have been shown to contain an extracellular domain with either two or three immunoglobulin-like domains, a transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase domain. We have isolated a human cDNA for another tyrosine kinase receptor that is highly homologous to the previously described FGFR. Expression of this receptor cDNA in COS cells directs the expression of a 125-kDa glycoprotein. We demonstrate that this cDNA encodes a biologically active receptor by showing that human acidic and basic fibroblast growth factors activate this receptor as measured by 45Ca2+ efflux assays. These data establish the existence of an additional member of the FGFR family that we have named FGFR-3. Images PMID:1847508

  13. The CaM Kinase CMK-1 Mediates a Negative Feedback Mechanism Coupling the C. elegans Glutamate Receptor GLR-1 with Its Own Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Benjamin J.; Park, Lidia; Dahlberg, Caroline L.; Juo, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of synaptic AMPA receptor levels is a major mechanism underlying homeostatic synaptic scaling. While in vitro studies have implicated several molecules in synaptic scaling, the in vivo mechanisms linking chronic changes in synaptic activity to alterations in AMPA receptor expression are not well understood. Here we use a genetic approach in C. elegans to dissect a negative feedback pathway coupling levels of the AMPA receptor GLR-1 with its own transcription. GLR-1 trafficking mutants with decreased synaptic receptors in the ventral nerve cord (VNC) exhibit compensatory increases in glr-1 mRNA, which can be attributed to increased glr-1 transcription. Glutamatergic transmission mutants lacking presynaptic eat-4/VGLUT or postsynaptic glr-1, exhibit compensatory increases in glr-1 transcription, suggesting that loss of GLR-1 activity is sufficient to trigger the feedback pathway. Direct and specific inhibition of GLR-1-expressing neurons using a chemical genetic silencing approach also results in increased glr-1 transcription. Conversely, expression of a constitutively active version of GLR-1 results in decreased glr-1 transcription, suggesting that bidirectional changes in GLR-1 signaling results in reciprocal alterations in glr-1 transcription. We identify the CMK-1/CaMK signaling axis as a mediator of the glr-1 transcriptional feedback mechanism. Loss-of-function mutations in the upstream kinase ckk-1/CaMKK, the CaM kinase cmk-1/CaMK, or a downstream transcription factor crh-1/CREB, result in increased glr-1 transcription, suggesting that the CMK-1 signaling pathway functions to repress glr-1 transcription. Genetic double mutant analyses suggest that CMK-1 signaling is required for the glr-1 transcriptional feedback pathway. Furthermore, alterations in GLR-1 signaling that trigger the feedback mechanism also regulate the nucleocytoplasmic distribution of CMK-1, and activated, nuclear-localized CMK-1 blocks the feedback pathway. We propose a model in

  14. Human corpus luteum: presence of epidermal growth factor receptors and binding characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Ayyagari, R.R.; Khan-Dawood, F.S.

    1987-04-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptors are present in many reproductive tissues but have not been demonstrated in the human corpus luteum. To determine the presence of epidermal growth factor receptors and its binding characteristics, we carried out studies on the plasma cell membrane fraction of seven human corpora lutea (days 16 to 25) of the menstrual cycle. Specific epidermal growth factor receptors were present in human corpus luteum. Insulin, nerve growth factor, and human chorionic gonadotropin did not competitively displace epidermal growth factor binding. The optimal conditions for corpus luteum-epidermal growth factor receptor binding were found to be incubation for 2 hours at 4 degrees C with 500 micrograms plasma membrane protein and 140 femtomol /sup 125/I-epidermal growth factor per incubate. The number (mean +/- SEM) of epidermal growth factor binding sites was 12.34 +/- 2.99 X 10(-19) mol/micrograms protein; the dissociation constant was 2.26 +/- 0.56 X 10(-9) mol/L; the association constant was 0.59 +/- 0.12 X 10(9) L/mol. In two regressing corpora lutea obtained on days 2 and 3 of the menstrual cycle, there was no detectable specific epidermal growth factor receptor binding activity. Similarly no epidermal growth factor receptor binding activity could be detected in ovarian stromal tissue. Our findings demonstrate that specific receptors for epidermal growth factor are present in the human corpus luteum. The physiologic significance of epidermal growth factor receptors in human corpus luteum is unknown, but epidermal growth factor may be involved in intragonadal regulation of luteal function.

  15. Value of epidermal growth factor receptor status compared with growth fraction and other factors for prognosis in early breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Gasparini, G.; Bevilacqua, P.; Pozza, F.; Meli, S.; Boracchi, P.; Marubini, E.; Sainsbury, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a transmembrane glycoprotein whose expression is important in the regulation of breast cancer cell growth. The relationship between EGFR status (determined by an immunocytochemical assay) and various prognostic factors was investigated in 164 primary breast cancers. Overall 56% of tumours were EGFR-positive and the expression of EGFR was unrelated to axillary node status, tumour size and histological grade; and it was poorly associated with the tumour proliferative activity measured by Ki-67 immuno-cytochemistry. The relapse-free survival (RFS) probability at 3-years was significantly worse for patients with EGFR positive tumours (P = 0.003) and for those whose Ki-67 score was > 7.5% (P = 0.0027), as well as in patients with axillary node involvement (P = 0.01) and with poorly differentiated tumours (P = 0.04). Immunocytochemical determination of EGFR and cell kinetics gave superimposable prognostic information for predicting RFS with odds ratios of 3.51, when evaluated singly. In our series of patients EGFR, Ki-67 and node status retain their prognostic value concerning RFS in multivariate analysis. The 3-year probability of overall survival (OS) was significantly better in node-negative patients (P = 0.04) and was similar in EGFR-positive and negative patients. In conclusion, EGFR status appears to be a significant and independent indicator of recurrence in human breast cancer and the concomitant measurement of the tumour proliferative activity seems to improve the selection of patients with different risks of recurrence. PMID:1419645

  16. Reduced striatal dopamine DA D2 receptor function in dominant-negative GSK-3 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Sintes, Raquel; Bortolozzi, Analia; Artigas, Francesc; Lucas, José J

    2014-09-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) is a serine/threonine kinase with constitutive activity involved in cellular architecture, gene expression, cell proliferation, fate decision and apoptosis, among others. GSK-3 expression is particularly high in brain where it may be involved in neurological and psychiatric disorders such as Alzheimer׳s disease, bipolar disorder and major depression. A link with schizophrenia is suggested by the antipsychotic drug-induced GSK-3 regulation and by the involvement of the Akt/GSK-3 pathway in dopaminergic neurotransmission. Taking advantage of the previous development of dominant negative GSK-3 transgenic mice (Tg) showing a selective reduction of GSK-3 activity in forebrain neurons but not in dopaminergic neurons, we explored the relationship between GSK-3 and dopaminergic neurotransmission in vivo. In microdialysis experiments, local quinpirole (DA D2-R agonist) in dorsal striatum reduced dopamine (DA) release significantly less in Tg mice than in wild-type (WT) mice. However, local SKF-81297 (selective DA D1-R agonist) in dorsal striatum reduced DA release equally in both control and Tg mice indicating a comparable function of DA D1-R in the direct striato-nigral pathway. Likewise, systemic quinpirole administration - acting preferentially on presynaptic DA D2- autoreceptors to modulate DA release-reduced striatal DA release similarly in both control and Tg mice. Quinpirole reduced locomotor activity and induced c-fos expression in globus pallidus (both striatal DA D2-R-mediated effects) significantly more in WT than in Tg mice. Taking together, the present results show that dominant negative GSK-3 transgenic mice show reduced DA D2-R-mediated function in striatum and further support a link between dopaminergic neurotransmission and GSK-3 activity.

  17. Receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand and osteoprotegerin levels in gingival crevicular fluid

    PubMed Central

    Sarlati, Fatemeh; Sattari, Mandana; Razzaghi, Shilan; Nasiri, Malihe

    2012-01-01

    Background: Osteoclastogenesis is coordinated by the interaction of three members of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily: Osteoprotegerin (OPG)/receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL)/receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B (RANK). The aim of this study was to investigate RANKL and OPG levels, and their relative ratio in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) of patients with chronic and aggressive periodontitis, as well as healthy controls. Materials and Methods: In this analytical study, GCF was obtained from healthy (n = 10), mild chronic periodontitis (n = 18), moderate chronic periodontitis (n = 18), severe chronic periodontitis (n = 20), and generalized aggressive periodontitis (n = 20) subjects. RANKL and OPG concentrations were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Statistical tests used were Kruskal–Wallis test, Mann–Whitney U rank sum test, and Spearman's rank correlation analysis. The level of statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. Results: Mean RANKL concentration showed no statistically significant differences between groups (P = 0.58). There were also no significant differences between mean OPG concentration in the five groups (P = 0.0.56). Moreover, relative RANKL/OPG ratio did not reveal a significant difference between the three study group subjects: healthy, chronic periodontitis (mild, moderate, severe), and aggressive periodontitis (P = 0.41). There was statistically significant correlation between the concentration of sRANKL and Clinical Attachment Level (CAL) in moderate chronic periodontitis patients (R = 0.48, P = 0.04). There was also negative correlation between OPG concentration and CAL in moderate chronic periodontitis patients, although not significant (R = −0.13). Conclusion: RANKL was prominent in periodontitis sites, especially in moderate periodontitis patients, whereas OPG was not detectable in some diseased sites with bleeding on probing, supporting the role of these two molecules in

  18. The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 10 is a negative regulator of the canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Young-Hee; Sekiya, Manami; Hirata, Michiko; Ye, Mingjuan; Yamagishi, Azumi; Lee, Sang-Mi; Kang, Man-Jong; Hosoda, Akemi; Fukumura, Tomoe; Kim, Dong-Ho; Saeki, Shigeru

    2010-02-19

    Wnt signaling pathways play fundamental roles in the differentiation, proliferation and functions of many cells as well as developmental, growth, and homeostatic processes in animals. Low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR)-related protein (LRP) 5 and LRP6 serve as coreceptors of Wnt proteins together with Frizzled receptors, triggering activation of canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling. Here, we found that LRP10, a new member of the LDLR gene family, inhibits the canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway. The {beta}-catenin/T cell factor (TCF) transcriptional activity in HEK293 cells was activated by transfection with Wnt3a or LRP6, which was then inhibited by co-transfection with LRP10. Deletion of the extracellular domain of LRP10 negated its inhibitory effect. The inhibitory effect of LRP10 was consistently conserved in HEK293 cells even when GSK3{beta} phosphorylation was inhibited by incubation with lithium chloride and co-transfection with constitutively active S33Y-mutated {beta}-catenin. Nuclear {beta}-catenin accumulation was unaffected by LRP10. The present studies suggest that LRP10 may interfere with the formation of the {beta}-catenin/TCF complex and/or its binding to target DNA in the nucleus, and that the extracellular domain of LRP10 is critical for inhibition of the canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway.

  19. Lotus japonicus E3 Ligase SEVEN IN ABSENTIA4 Destabilizes the Symbiosis Receptor-Like Kinase SYMRK and Negatively Regulates Rhizobial Infection[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Den Herder, Griet; Yoshida, Satoko; Antolín-Llovera, Meritxell; Ried, Martina K.; Parniske, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The Lotus japonicus SYMBIOSIS RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE (SYMRK) is required for symbiotic signal transduction upon stimulation of root cells by microbial signaling molecules. Here, we identified members of the SEVEN IN ABSENTIA (SINA) E3 ubiquitin-ligase family as SYMRK interactors and confirmed their predicted ubiquitin-ligase activity. In Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, SYMRK–yellow fluorescent protein was localized at the plasma membrane, and interaction with SINAs, as determined by bimolecular fluorescence complementation, was observed in small punctae at the cytosolic interface of the plasma membrane. Moreover, fluorescence-tagged SINA4 partially colocalized with SYMRK and caused SYMRK relocalization as well as disappearance of SYMRK from the plasma membrane. Neither the localization nor the abundance of Nod-factor receptor1 was altered by the presence of SINA4. SINA4 was transcriptionally upregulated during root symbiosis, and rhizobia inoculated roots ectopically expressing SINA4 showed reduced SYMRK protein levels. In accordance with a negative regulatory role in symbiosis, infection thread development was impaired upon ectopic expression of SINA4. Our results implicate SINA4 E3 ubiquitin ligase in the turnover of SYMRK and provide a conceptual mechanism for its symbiosis-appropriate spatio-temporal containment. PMID:22534128

  20. DEPENDENCE OF PPAR LIGAND-INDUCED MAPK SIGNALING ON EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR TRANSACTIVATION HEPARIN-BINDING EGF CLEAVAGE MEDIATES ZINC-INDUCED EGF RECEPTOR PHOSPHORYLATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are nuclear hormone receptors that function as ligand-activated transcription factors regulating lipid metabolism and homeostasis. In addition to their ability to regulate PPAR-mediated gene transcription, PPARalpha and gamma li...

  1. Endosomal receptor kinetics determine the stability of intracellular growth factor signalling complexes

    PubMed Central

    Tzafriri, A. Rami; Edelman, Elazer R.

    2006-01-01

    There is an emerging paradigm that growth factor signalling continues in the endosome and that cell response to a growth factor is defined by the integration of cell surface and endosomal events. As activated receptors in the endosome are exposed to a different set of binding partners, they probably elicit differential signals compared with when they are at the cell surface. As such, complete appreciation of growth factor signalling requires understanding of growth factor–receptor binding and trafficking kinetics both at the cell surface and in endosomes. Growth factor binding to surface receptors is well characterized, and endosomal binding is assumed to follow surface kinetics if one accounts for changes in pH. Yet, specific binding kinetics within the endosome has not been examined in detail. To parse the factors governing the binding state of endosomal receptors we analysed a whole-cell mathematical model of epidermal growth factor receptor trafficking and binding. We discovered that the stability of growth factor–receptor complexes within endosomes is governed by three primary independent factors: the endosomal dissociation constant, total endosomal volume and the number of endosomal receptors. These factors were combined into a single dimensionless parameter that determines the endosomal binding state of the growth factor–receptor complex and can distinguish different growth factors from each other and different cell states. Our findings indicate that growth factor binding within endosomal compartments cannot be appreciated solely on the basis of the pH-dependence of the dissociation constant and that the concentration of receptors in the endosomal compartment must also be considered. PMID:17117924

  2. Estrogen-related receptor alpha induces the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Rebecca A.; Gaillard, Stéphanie; McDonnell, Donald P.

    2009-01-01

    Estrogen-related receptor alpha (ERRα) is an orphan member of the nuclear receptor family of transcription factors. In addition to its function as a metabolic regulator, ERRα has been implicated in the growth and progression of several malignancies. In the setting of breast cancer, not only is ERRα a putative negative prognostic factor, but we have recently found that knockdown of its expression retards tumor growth in a xenograft model of this disease. The specific aspects of ERRα function that are responsible for its actions in breast cancer, however, remain unclear. Using the coactivator PGC-1α as a protein ligand to regulate ERRα activity, we analyzed the effects of this receptor on gene expression in the ERα-positive MCF-7 cell line. This analysis led to the identification of a large number of potential ERRα target genes, many of which were subsequently validated in other breast cancer cell lines. Importantly, we demonstrate in this study that activation of ERRα in several different breast cancer cell lines leads to a significant increase in VEGF mRNA expression, an activity that translates into an increase in VEGF protein secretion. The induction of VEGF results from the interaction of ERRα with specific ERR-responsive elements within the VEGF promoter. These findings suggest that ERRα-dependent induction of VEGF may contribute to the overall negative phenotype observed in tumors in which ERRα is expressed and provide validation for its use as a therapeutic target in cancer. PMID:19429439

  3. Tyrosine Kinase Discoidin Domain Receptors DDR1 and DDR2 are Coordinately Deregulated in Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Toy, Kathy A.; Valiathan, Rajeshwari R.; Núñez, Fernando; Kidwell, Kelley M.; Gonzalez, Maria E.; Fridman, Rafael; Kleer, Celina G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Receptor kinases Discoidin Domain Receptors (DDRs) 1 and 2 are emerging as new therapeutic targets in breast cancer (BC). However, the expression of DDR proteins during BC progression and their association with BC subtypes remain poorly defined. Herein we report the first comprehensive immunohistochemical analyses of DDR protein expression in a wide range of breast tissues. Methods DDR1 and DDR2 expression was investigated by immunohistochemistry in 218 samples of normal breast (n=10), ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS, n=10), and invasive carcinomas (n=198), arrayed in tissue microarrays with comprehensive clinical and follow-up information. Staining was evaluated for cell type, subcellular localization, and percentage and intensity (scores 1–4) and association with disease subtype and outcome. Results In normal epithelium and DCIS, DDR1 was highly expressed, while DDR2 was negative in normal epithelium and in DCIS it localized to cells at the epithelial-stromal interface. Of the 198 invasive carcinomas, DDR1 was high in 87 (44%) and low in 103 (52%), and DDR2 was high in 110 (56%) and low in 87 (44%). High DDR2 was associated with high tumor grade (p=0.002), triple negative subtype (TNBC) (p<0.0001), and worse survival (p=0.037). We discovered a novel concordant deregulation of DDR expression, with a DDR1Low/DDR2High profile significantly associated with TNBC, compared to luminal tumors (p=0.012), and with worse overall survival. Conclusions DDR2 upregulation occurs in DCIS, before stromal invasion, and may reflect epithelial-stromal cross talk. A DDR1Low/DDR2High protein profile is associated with TNBC, and may identify invasive carcinomas with worse prognosis. PMID:25667101

  4. Tyrosine kinase discoidin domain receptors DDR1 and DDR2 are coordinately deregulated in triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Toy, Kathy A; Valiathan, Rajeshwari R; Núñez, Fernando; Kidwell, Kelley M; Gonzalez, Maria E; Fridman, Rafael; Kleer, Celina G

    2015-02-01

    Receptor kinases Discoidin Domain Receptors (DDRs) 1 and 2 are emerging as new therapeutic targets in breast cancer (BC). However, the expression of DDR proteins during BC progression and their association with BC subtypes remain poorly defined. Herein we report the first comprehensive immunohistochemical analyses of DDR protein expression in a wide range of breast tissues. DDR1 and DDR2 expression was investigated by immunohistochemistry in 218 samples of normal breast (n = 10), ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS, n = 10), and invasive carcinomas (n = 198), arrayed in tissue microarrays with comprehensive clinical and follow-up information. Staining was evaluated for cell type, subcellular localization, percentage and intensity (scores 1-4), and association with disease subtype and outcome. In normal epithelium and DCIS, DDR1 was highly expressed, while DDR2 was negative in normal epithelium, and in DCIS it localized to cells at the epithelial-stromal interface. Of the 198 invasive carcinomas, DDR1 was high in 87 (44 %) and low in 103 (52 %), and DDR2 was high in 110 (56 %) and low in 87 (44 %). High DDR2 was associated with high tumor grade (P = 0.002), triple-negative subtype (TNBC) (P < 0.0001), and worse survival (P = 0.037). We discovered a novel concordant deregulation of DDR expression, with a DDR1(Low)/DDR2(High) profile significantly associated with TNBC, compared to luminal tumors (P = 0.012), and with worse overall survival. In conclusion, DDR2 upregulation occurs in DCIS, before stromal invasion, and may reflect epithelial-stromal cross-talk. A DDR1(Low)/DDR2(High) protein profile is associated with TNBC and may identify invasive carcinomas with worse prognosis. PMID:25667101

  5. The type 1 cannabinoid receptor is highly expressed in embryonic cortical projection neurons and negatively regulates neurite growth in vitro.

    PubMed

    Vitalis, Tania; Lainé, Jeanne; Simon, Anne; Roland, Alexandre; Leterrier, Christophe; Lenkei, Zsolt

    2008-11-01

    In the rodent and human embryonic brains, the cerebral cortex and hippocampus transiently express high levels of type 1 cannabinoid receptors (CB(1)Rs), at a developmental stage when these areas are composed mainly of glutamatergic neurons. However, the precise cellular and subcellular localization of CB(1)R expression as well as effects of CB(1)R modulation in this cell population remain largely unknown. We report that, starting from embryonic day 12.5, CB(1)Rs are strongly expressed in both reelin-expressing Cajal-Retzius cells and newly differentiated postmitotic glutamatergic neurons of the mouse telencephalon. CB(1)R protein is localized first to somato-dendritic endosomes and at later developmental stages it localizes mostly to developing axons. In young axons, CB(1)Rs are localized both to the axolemma and to large, often multivesicular endosomes. Acute maternal injection of agonist CP-55940 results in the relocation of receptors from axons to somato-dendritic endosomes, indicating the functional competence of embryonic CB(1)Rs. The adult phenotype of CB(1)R expression is established around postnatal day 5. By using pharmacological and mutational modulation of CB(1)R activity in isolated cultured rat hippocampal neurons, we also show that basal activation of CB(1)R acts as a negative regulatory signal for dendritogenesis, dendritic and axonal outgrowth, and branching. Together, the overall negative regulatory role in neurite development suggests that embryonic CB(1)R signaling may participate in the correct establishment of neuronal connectivity and suggests a possible mechanism for the development of reported glutamatergic dysfunction in the offspring following maternal cannabis consumption.

  6. L1CAM stimulates glioma cell motility and proliferation through the fibroblast growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Mohanan, Vishnu; Temburni, Murali K; Kappes, John C; Galileo, Deni S

    2013-04-01

    The L1CAM cell adhesion/recognition molecule (L1, CD171) and fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) both are expressed by human high-grade glioma cells, but their potential actions in controlling cell behavior have not been linked. L1 actions in cancer cells have been attributed mainly to integrin receptors, and we demonstrated previously that L1-stimulated glioma cell migration correlates with integrin expression, increased focal adhesion kinase activation and focal complex turnover. Our analyses of datasets revealed FGFR is overexpressed in glioma regardless of grade, while ADAM10 metalloprotease expression increases with glioma grade. Here, we used dominant-negative and short hairpin RNA approaches to inhibit the activation of FGFR1 and expression of L1, respectively. An L1 peptide that inhibits L1-FGFR interaction and PD173074, a chemical inhibitor of FGFR1 activity, also were used to elucidate the involvement of L1-FGFR interactions on glioma cell behavior. Time-lapse cell motility studies and flow cytometry cell cycle analyses showed that L1 operates to increase glioma cell motility and proliferation through FGFR activation. Shutdown of both L1 expression and FGFR activity in glioma cells resulted in a complete termination of cell migration in vitro. These studies show for the first time that soluble L1 ectodomain (L1LE) acts on glioma cells through FGFRs, and that FGFRs are used by glioma cells for increasing motility as well as proliferation in response to activation by L1LE ligand. Thus, effective treatment of high-grade glioma may require simultaneous targeting of L1, FGFRs, and integrin receptors, which would reduce glioma cell motility as well as proliferation.

  7. NDRG2 phosphorylation provides negative feedback for SGK1-dependent regulation of a kainate receptor in astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Matschke, Veronika; Theiss, Carsten; Hollmann, Michael; Schulze-Bahr, Eric; Lang, Florian; Seebohm, Guiscard; Strutz-Seebohm, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Glutamate receptors play an important role in the function of astrocytes. Among their tasks is the regulation of gliotransmission, gene expression and exocytosis of the tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA), which has an enhancing effect on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors and thus prevent over-excitation of neighboring neurons. The kainate receptor GluK2, which is expressed in neurons and astrocytes, is under tight regulation of the PI3-kinase SGK pathway as shown in neurons. SGK1 targets include N-myc downstream-regulated genes (NDRGs) 1 and 2 (NDRG1, NDRG2), proteins with elusive function. In the present study, we analyzed the effects of SGK1, NDRG1, and NDRG2 on GluK2 current amplitude and plasma membrane localization in astrocytes and heterologous expression. We demonstrate that NDRG1 and NDRG2 themselves have no effect on GluK2 current amplitudes in heterologous expressed ion channels. However, when NDRG2 is coexpressed with GluK2 and SGK1, the stimulating effect of SGK1 on GluK2 is suppressed both in heterologous expression and in astrocytes. Here, we reveal a new negative feedback mechanism, whereby GluK2 stimulation by SGK1 is regulated by parallel phosphorylation of NDRG2. This regulation of GluK2 by SGK1 and NDRG2 in astrocytes may play an important role in gliotransmission, modulation of gene expression and regulation of exocytosis of tPA. PMID:26500492

  8. Androgen receptor-negative human prostate cancer cells induce osteogenesis in mice through FGF9-mediated mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi Gang; Mathew, Paul; Yang, Jun; Starbuck, Michael W; Zurita, Amado J; Liu, Jie; Sikes, Charles; Multani, Asha S; Efstathiou, Eleni; Lopez, Adriana; Wang, Jing; Fanning, Tina V; Prieto, Victor G; Kundra, Vikas; Vazquez, Elba S; Troncoso, Patricia; Raymond, Austin K; Logothetis, Christopher J; Lin, Sue-Hwa; Maity, Sankar; Navone, Nora M

    2008-08-01

    In prostate cancer, androgen blockade strategies are commonly used to treat osteoblastic bone metastases. However, responses to these therapies are typically brief, and the mechanism underlying androgen-independent progression is not clear. Here, we established what we believe to be the first human androgen receptor-negative prostate cancer xenografts whose cells induced an osteoblastic reaction in bone and in the subcutis of immunodeficient mice. Accordingly, these cells grew in castrated as well as intact male mice. We identified FGF9 as being overexpressed in the xenografts relative to other bone-derived prostate cancer cells and discovered that FGF9 induced osteoblast proliferation and new bone formation in a bone organ assay. Mice treated with FGF9-neutralizing antibody developed smaller bone tumors and reduced bone formation. Finally, we found positive FGF9 immunostaining in prostate cancer cells in 24 of 56 primary tumors derived from human organ-confined prostate cancer and in 25 of 25 bone metastasis cases studied. Collectively, these results suggest that FGF9 contributes to prostate cancer-induced new bone formation and may participate in the osteoblastic progression of prostate cancer in bone. Androgen receptor-null cells may contribute to the castration-resistant osteoblastic progression of prostate cancer cells in bone and provide a preclinical model for studying therapies that target these cells. PMID:18618013

  9. Targeting c-kit receptor in neuroblastomas and colorectal cancers using stem cell factor (SCF)-based recombinant bacterial toxins.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Swati; Pardo, Alessa; Rosinke, Reinhard; Batra, Janendra K; Barth, Stefan; Verma, Rama S

    2016-01-01

    Autocrine activation of c-kit (KIT receptor tyrosine kinase) has been postulated to be a potent oncogenic driver in small cell lung cancer, neuroblastoma (NB), and poorly differentiated colorectal carcinoma (CRC). Although targeted therapy involving tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) such as imatinib mesylate is highly effective for gastrointestinal stromal tumor carrying V560G c-kit mutation, it does not show much potential for targeting wild-type KIT (WT-KIT). Our study demonstrates the role of stem cell factor (SCF)-based toxin conjugates for targeting WT-KIT-overexpressing malignancies such as NBs and CRCs. We constructed SCF-based recombinant bacterial toxins by genetically fusing mutated form of natural ligand SCF to receptor binding deficient forms of Diphtheria toxin (DT) or Pseudomonas exotoxin A (ETA') and evaluated their efficacy in vitro. Efficient targeting was achieved in all receptor-positive neuroblastoma (IMR-32 and SHSY5Y) and colon cancer cell lines (COLO 320DM, HCT 116, and DLD-1) but not in receptor-negative breast carcinoma cell line (MCF-7) thereby proving specificity. While dose- and time-dependent cytotoxicity was observed in both neuroblastoma cell lines, COLO 320DM and HCT 116 cells, only an anti-proliferative effect was observed in DLD-1 cells. We prove that these novel targeting agents have promising potential as KIT receptor tyrosine kinase targeting system.

  10. Targeting c-kit receptor in neuroblastomas and colorectal cancers using stem cell factor (SCF)-based recombinant bacterial toxins.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Swati; Pardo, Alessa; Rosinke, Reinhard; Batra, Janendra K; Barth, Stefan; Verma, Rama S

    2016-01-01

    Autocrine activation of c-kit (KIT receptor tyrosine kinase) has been postulated to be a potent oncogenic driver in small cell lung cancer, neuroblastoma (NB), and poorly differentiated colorectal carcinoma (CRC). Although targeted therapy involving tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) such as imatinib mesylate is highly effective for gastrointestinal stromal tumor carrying V560G c-kit mutation, it does not show much potential for targeting wild-type KIT (WT-KIT). Our study demonstrates the role of stem cell factor (SCF)-based toxin conjugates for targeting WT-KIT-overexpressing malignancies such as NBs and CRCs. We constructed SCF-based recombinant bacterial toxins by genetically fusing mutated form of natural ligand SCF to receptor binding deficient forms of Diphtheria toxin (DT) or Pseudomonas exotoxin A (ETA') and evaluated their efficacy in vitro. Efficient targeting was achieved in all receptor-positive neuroblastoma (IMR-32 and SHSY5Y) and colon cancer cell lines (COLO 320DM, HCT 116, and DLD-1) but not in receptor-negative breast carcinoma cell line (MCF-7) thereby proving specificity. While dose- and time-dependent cytotoxicity was observed in both neuroblastoma cell lines, COLO 320DM and HCT 116 cells, only an anti-proliferative effect was observed in DLD-1 cells. We prove that these novel targeting agents have promising potential as KIT receptor tyrosine kinase targeting system. PMID:26428235

  11. DNA Aptamer Assembly as a Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor Agonist

    PubMed Central

    Ramaswamy, Vidhya; Monsalve, Adam; Sautina, Larysa; Segal, Mark S.; Dobson, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Controlling receptor-mediated processes in cells is paramount in many research areas. The activity of small molecules and growth factors is difficult to control and can lead to off-target effects through the activation of nonspecific receptors as well as binding affinity to nonspecific cell types. In this study, we report the development of a molecular trigger in the form of a divalent nucleic acid aptamer assembly toward vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR2). The assembly binds to VEGFR2 and functions as a receptor agonist with targeted receptor binding, promoting receptor phosphorylation, activation of the downstream Akt pathway, upregulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase, and endothelial cell capillary tube formation. The agonist action we report makes this aptamer construct a promising strategy to control VEGFR2-mediated cell signaling. PMID:26125598

  12. DNA Aptamer Assembly as a Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor Agonist.

    PubMed

    Ramaswamy, Vidhya; Monsalve, Adam; Sautina, Larysa; Segal, Mark S; Dobson, Jon; Allen, Josephine B

    2015-10-01

    Controlling receptor-mediated processes in cells is paramount in many research areas. The activity of small molecules and growth factors is difficult to control and can lead to off-target effects through the activation of nonspecific receptors as well as binding affinity to nonspecific cell types. In this study, we report the development of a molecular trigger in the form of a divalent nucleic acid aptamer assembly toward vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR2). The assembly binds to VEGFR2 and functions as a receptor agonist with targeted receptor binding, promoting receptor phosphorylation, activation of the downstream Akt pathway, upregulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase, and endothelial cell capillary tube formation. The agonist action we report makes this aptamer construct a promising strategy to control VEGFR2-mediated cell signaling.

  13. Leukemia inhibitory factor receptor is structurally related to the IL-6 signal transducer, gp130.

    PubMed Central

    Gearing, D P; Thut, C J; VandeBos, T; Gimpel, S D; Delaney, P B; King, J; Price, V; Cosman, D; Beckmann, M P

    1991-01-01

    Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) is a cytokine with a broad range of activities that in many cases parallel those of interleukin-6 (IL-6) although LIF and IL-6 appear to be structurally unrelated. A cDNA clone encoding the human LIF receptor was isolated by expression screening of a human placental cDNA library. The LIF receptor is related to the gp130 'signal-transducing' component of the IL-6 receptor and to the G-CSF receptor, with the transmembrane and cytoplasmic regions of the LIF receptor and gp130 being most closely related. This relationship suggests a common signal transduction pathway for the two receptors and may help to explain similar biological effects of the two ligands. Murine cDNAs encoding soluble LIF receptors were isolated by cross-hybridization and share 70% amino acid sequence identity to the human sequence. Images PMID:1915266

  14. Downregulation of GLUT4 contributes to effective intervention of estrogen receptor-negative/HER2-overexpressing early stage breast disease progression by lapatinib.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Sunil; Xu, Jia; Wang, Xiao; Jain, Shalini; Wang, Hai; Zhang, Qingling; Chang, Chia-Chi; Bower, Joseph; Arun, Banu; Seewaldt, Victoria; Yu, Dihua

    2016-01-01

    Tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors (AIs) have shown efficacy in prevention of estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer; however, there exists no proven prevention strategy for estrogen receptor-negative (ER-) breast cancer. Up to 40% of ER- breast cancers have human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 overexpression (HER2+), suggesting HER2 signaling might be a good target for chemoprevention for certain ER- breast cancers. Here, we tested the feasibility of the HER2-targeting agent lapatinib in prevention and/or early intervention of an ER-/HER2+ early-stage breast disease model. We found that lapatinib treatment forestalled the progression of atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH)-like acini to ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS)-like acini in ER-/HER2+ human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs) in 3D culture. Mechanistically, we found that inhibition of HER2/Akt signaling by lapatinib led to downregulation of GLUT4 and a reduced glucose uptake in HER2-overexpressing cells, resulting in decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis of these cells in 3D culture. Additionally, our data suggest that HER2-driven glycolytic metabolic dysregulation in ER-/HER2+ HMECs might promote early-stage breast disease progression, which can be reversed by lapatinib treatment. Furthermore, low-dose lapatinib treatment, starting at the early stages of mammary grand transformation in the MMTV-neu* mouse model, significantly delayed mammary tumor initiation and progression, extended tumor-free survival, which corresponded to effective inhibition of HER2/Akt signaling and downregulation of GLUT4 in vivo. Taken together, our results indicate that lapatinib, through its inhibition of key signaling pathways and tumor-promoting metabolic events, is a promising agent for the prevention/early intervention of ER-/HER2+ breast cancer progression. PMID:27293993

  15. Downregulation of GLUT4 contributes to effective intervention of estrogen receptor-negative/HER2-overexpressing early stage breast disease progression by lapatinib

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Sunil; Xu, Jia; Wang, Xiao; Jain, Shalini; Wang, Hai; Zhang, Qingling; Chang, Chia-Chi; Bower, Joseph; Arun, Banu; Seewaldt, Victoria; Yu, Dihua

    2016-01-01

    Tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors (AIs) have shown efficacy in prevention of estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer; however, there exists no proven prevention strategy for estrogen receptor-negative (ER-) breast cancer. Up to 40% of ER- breast cancers have human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 overexpression (HER2+), suggesting HER2 signaling might be a good target for chemoprevention for certain ER- breast cancers. Here, we tested the feasibility of the HER2-targeting agent lapatinib in prevention and/or early intervention of an ER-/HER2+ early-stage breast disease model. We found that lapatinib treatment forestalled the progression of atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH)-like acini to ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS)-like acini in ER-/HER2+ human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs) in 3D culture. Mechanistically, we found that inhibition of HER2/Akt signaling by lapatinib led to downregulation of GLUT4 and a reduced glucose uptake in HER2-overexpressing cells, resulting in decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis of these cells in 3D culture. Additionally, our data suggest that HER2-driven glycolytic metabolic dysregulation in ER-/HER2+ HMECs might promote early-stage breast disease progression, which can be reversed by lapatinib treatment. Furthermore, low-dose lapatinib treatment, starting at the early stages of mammary grand transformation in the MMTV-neu* mouse model, significantly delayed mammary tumor initiation and progression, extended tumor-free survival, which corresponded to effective inhibition of HER2/Akt signaling and downregulation of GLUT4 in vivo. Taken together, our results indicate that lapatinib, through its inhibition of key signaling pathways and tumor-promoting metabolic events, is a promising agent for the prevention/early intervention of ER-/HER2+ breast cancer progression. PMID:27293993

  16. A limited spectrum of mutations causes constitutive activation of the yeast alpha-factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Sommers, C M; Martin, N P; Akal-Strader, A; Becker, J M; Naider, F; Dumont, M E

    2000-06-13

    Activation of G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) by binding of ligand is the initial event in diverse cellular signaling pathways. To examine the frequency and diversity of mutations that cause constitutive activation of one particular GPCR, the yeast alpha-factor receptor, we screened libraries of random mutations for constitutive alleles. In initial screens for mutant receptor alleles that exhibit signaling in the absence of added ligand, 14 different point mutations were isolated. All of these 14 mutants could be further activated by alpha-factor. Ten of the mutants also acquired the ability to signal in response to binding of desTrp(1)¿Ala(3)ălpha-factor, a peptide that acts as an antagonist toward normal alpha-factor receptors. Of these 10 mutants, at least eight alleles residing in the third, fifth, sixth, and seventh transmembrane segments exhibit bona fide constitutive signaling. The remaining alleles are hypersensitive to alpha-factor rather than constitutive. They can be activated by low concentrations of endogenous alpha-factor present in MATa cells. The strongest constitutively active receptor alleles were recovered multiple times from the mutational libraries, and extensive mutagenesis of certain regions of the alpha-factor receptor did not lead to recovery of any additional constitutive alleles. Thus, only a limited number of mutations is capable of causing constitutive activation of this receptor. Constitutive and hypersensitive signaling by the mutant receptors is partially suppressed by coexpression of normal receptors, consistent with preferential association of the G protein with unactivated receptors. PMID:10841771

  17. Examining the Factor Structure of the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS) in a Multiethnic Sample of Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villodas, Feion; Villodas, Miguel T.; Roesch, Scott

    2011-01-01

    The psychometric properties of the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule were examined in a multiethnic sample of adolescents. Results from confirmatory factor analyses indicated that the original two-factor model did not adequately fit the data. Exploratory factor analyses revealed that four items were not pure markers of the factors. (Contains 1…

  18. Factor Structure and Psychometric Properties of the Children's Negative Cognitive Error Questionnaire with a Clinically Depressed Adolescent Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingery, Julie Newman; Kepley, Hayden O.; Ginsburg, Golda S.; Walkup, John T.; Silva, Susan G.; Hoyle, Rick H.; Reinecke, Mark A.; March, John S.

    2009-01-01

    The factor structure and psychometric properties of the Children's Negative Cognitive Error Questionnaire (CNCEQ) were examined with 427 adolescents ages 12 to 18 (193 boys) with current major depressive disorder. Results of confirmatory factor analysis supported a four-factor model comprised of three content area factors (i.e., social, academic,…

  19. Risk factors for completed suicide in veterans of peacekeeping: repatriation, negative life events, and marital status.

    PubMed

    Thoresen, Siri; Mehlum, Lars; Røysamb, Espen; Tønnessen, Arnfinn

    2006-01-01

    This psychological autopsy study focused on suicide risk factors in veterans of peacekeeping, specifically, a representative sample of Norwegian peacekeepers. A multivariate analysis yielded three dimensions with a unique impact on suicide risk: Involuntary repatriation from peacekeeping service, negative life-events before peacekeeping and marital status. In accordance with previous research into suicidal processes, repatriation probably reflects an event causing severe damage to peacekeepers' self-esteem, which combined with vulnerability and lack of protection could increase suicide risk. Preventive measures should focus on careful personnel selection and follow-up of repatriated individuals. PMID:16920686

  20. A constitutive promoter directs expression of the nerve growth factor receptor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Sehgal, A.; Patil, N.; Chao, M.

    1988-08-01

    Expression of nerve growth factor receptor is normally restricted to cells derived from the neural crest in a developmentally regulated manner. The authors analyzed promoter sequences for the human nerve growth factor receptor gene and found that the receptor promoter resembles others which are associated with constitutively expressed genes that have housekeeping and growth-related functions. Unlike these other genes, the initiation of transcription occurred at one major site rather than at multiple sites. The constitutive nature of the nerve growth factor receptor promoter may account for the ability of this gene to be transcribed in a diverse number of heterologous cells after gene transfer. The intron-exon structure of the receptor gene indicated that structural features are precisely divided into discrete domains.

  1. [Psychosocial risk factors in adolescent tobacco use: negative mood-states, peer group and parenting styles].

    PubMed

    Julià Cano, Albert; Escapa Solanas, Sandra; Marí-Klose, Marga; Marí-Klose, Pau

    2012-01-01

    There are multiple factors that can affect the risk of tobacco use in adolescence. By analyzing these factors together we can disentangle the specific relevance of each of them in shaping teenagers' individual behavior. The goal of this research study is to deepen our understanding of the relationship between tobacco use in adolescence and socio-demographic and socio-emotional variables. We worked with a representative sample of 2,289 Catalan teenagers (aged 15-18) who responded to a questionnaire drawn up by the Families and Children Panel. Regression models were developed to assess the statistical associations of different mood states (sadness, nervousness and loneliness), peer-group characteristics and parenting styles, with tobacco use. The results indicate that addictive behavior is more likely when teenagers show negative mood states, controlling for socio-demographic variables and other risk factors. Among these additional factors, authoritative parenting styles reduce the risk of tobacco use, compared to authoritarian, permissive and neglectful parenting. Extensive tobacco use within the peer group is the risk factor most strongly associated with teenagers' individual behavior.

  2. Functional Whole-genome Analysis Identifies Polo-like Kinase 2 and Poliovirus Receptor as Essential for Neuronal Differentiation Upstream of the Negative Regulator αB-crystallin

    PubMed Central

    Draghetti, Cristina; Salvat, Catherine; Zanoguera, Francisca; Curchod, Marie-Laure; Vignaud, Chloé; Peixoto, Helene; Di Cara, Alessandro; Fischer, David; Dhanabal, Mohanraj; Andreas, Goutopoulos; Abderrahim, Hadi; Rommel, Christian; Camps, Montserrat

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed at identifying transcriptional changes associated to neuronal differentiation induced by six distinct stimuli using whole-genome microarray hybridization analysis. Bioinformatics analyses revealed the clustering of these six stimuli into two categories, suggesting separate gene/pathway dependence. Treatment with specific inhibitors demonstrated the requirement of both Janus kinase and microtubule-associated protein kinase activation to trigger differentiation with nerve growth factor (NGF) and dibutyryl cAMP. Conversely, activation of protein kinase A, phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase α, and mammalian target of rapamycin, although required for dibutyryl cAMP-induced differentiation, exerted a negative feedback on NGF-induced differentiation. We identified Polo-like kinase 2 (Plk2) and poliovirus receptor (PVR) as indispensable for NGF-driven neuronal differentiation and αB-crystallin (Cryab) as an inhibitor of this process. Silencing of Plk2 or PVR blocked NGF-triggered differentiation and Cryab down-regulation, while silencing of Cryab enhanced NGF-induced differentiation. Our results position both Plk2 and PVR upstream of the negative regulator Cryab in the pathway(s) leading to neuronal differentiation triggered by NGF. PMID:19700763

  3. Functional whole-genome analysis identifies Polo-like kinase 2 and poliovirus receptor as essential for neuronal differentiation upstream of the negative regulator alphaB-crystallin.

    PubMed

    Draghetti, Cristina; Salvat, Catherine; Zanoguera, Francisca; Curchod, Marie-Laure; Vignaud, Chloé; Peixoto, Helene; Di Cara, Alessandro; Fischer, David; Dhanabal, Mohanraj; Andreas, Goutopoulos; Abderrahim, Hadi; Rommel, Christian; Camps, Montserrat

    2009-11-13

    This study aimed at identifying transcriptional changes associated to neuronal differentiation induced by six distinct stimuli using whole-genome microarray hybridization analysis. Bioinformatics analyses revealed the clustering of these six stimuli into two categories, suggesting separate gene/pathway dependence. Treatment with specific inhibitors demonstrated the requirement of both Janus kinase and microtubule-associated protein kinase activation to trigger differentiation with nerve growth factor (NGF) and dibutyryl cAMP. Conversely, activation of protein kinase A, phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase alpha, and mammalian target of rapamycin, although required for dibutyryl cAMP-induced differentiation, exerted a negative feedback on NGF-induced differentiation. We identified Polo-like kinase 2 (Plk2) and poliovirus receptor (PVR) as indispensable for NGF-driven neuronal differentiation and alphaB-crystallin (Cryab) as an inhibitor of this process. Silencing of Plk2 or PVR blocked NGF-triggered differentiation and Cryab down-regulation, while silencing of Cryab enhanced NGF-induced differentiation. Our results position both Plk2 and PVR upstream of the negative regulator Cryab in the pathway(s) leading to neuronal differentiation triggered by NGF.

  4. Bisphenol A affects early bovine embryo development and metabolism that is negated by an oestrogen receptor inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Bom-Ie; Harvey, Alexandra J.; Green, Mark P.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence supports an association between exposure to endocrine disruptors, such as the xenoestrogen bisphenol A (BPA), a commonly used plasticiser, and the developmental programming of offspring health. To date however animal studies to investigate a direct causal have mainly focussed on supra-environmental BPA concentrations, without investigating the effect on the early embryo. In this study we investigated the effect of acute BPA exposure (days 3.5 to 7.5 post-fertilisation) at environmentally relevant concentrations (1 and 10 ng/mL) on in vitro bovine embryo development, quality and metabolism. We then examined whether culturing embryos in the presence of the oestrogen receptor inhibitor fulvestrant could negate effects of BPA and 17β-oestradiol (E2). Exposure to BPA or E2 (10 ng/mL) decreased blastocyst rate and the percentage of transferrable quality embryos, without affecting cell number, lineage allocation or metabolic gene expression compared to untreated embryos. Notably, blastocysts exposed to BPA and E2 (10 ng/mL) displayed an increase in glucose consumption. The presence of fulvestrant however negated the adverse developmental and metabolic effects, suggesting BPA elicits its effects via oestrogen-mediated pathways. This study demonstrates that even acute exposure to an environmentally relevant BPA concentration can affect early embryo development and metabolism. These may have long-term health consequences on an individual. PMID:27384909

  5. Bisphenol A affects early bovine embryo development and metabolism that is negated by an oestrogen receptor inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Choi, Bom-Ie; Harvey, Alexandra J; Green, Mark P

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence supports an association between exposure to endocrine disruptors, such as the xenoestrogen bisphenol A (BPA), a commonly used plasticiser, and the developmental programming of offspring health. To date however animal studies to investigate a direct causal have mainly focussed on supra-environmental BPA concentrations, without investigating the effect on the early embryo. In this study we investigated the effect of acute BPA exposure (days 3.5 to 7.5 post-fertilisation) at environmentally relevant concentrations (1 and 10 ng/mL) on in vitro bovine embryo development, quality and metabolism. We then examined whether culturing embryos in the presence of the oestrogen receptor inhibitor fulvestrant could negate effects of BPA and 17β-oestradiol (E2). Exposure to BPA or E2 (10 ng/mL) decreased blastocyst rate and the percentage of transferrable quality embryos, without affecting cell number, lineage allocation or metabolic gene expression compared to untreated embryos. Notably, blastocysts exposed to BPA and E2 (10 ng/mL) displayed an increase in glucose consumption. The presence of fulvestrant however negated the adverse developmental and metabolic effects, suggesting BPA elicits its effects via oestrogen-mediated pathways. This study demonstrates that even acute exposure to an environmentally relevant BPA concentration can affect early embryo development and metabolism. These may have long-term health consequences on an individual. PMID:27384909

  6. Acetylcholine receptor-inducing factor from chicken brain increases the level of mRNA encoding the receptor. alpha. subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, D.A.; Falls, D.L.; Dill-Devor, R.M.; Fischbach, G.D. )

    1988-03-01

    A 42-kDa glycoprotein isolated from chicken brain, referred to as acetylcholine receptor-inducing activity (ARIA), that stimulates the rate of incorporation of acetylcholine receptors into the surface of chicken myotubes may play a role in the nerve-induced accumulation of receptors at developing neuromuscular synapses. Using nuclease-protection assays, the authors have found that ARIA causes a 2- to 16-fold increase in the level of mRNA encoding the {alpha} subunit of the receptor, with little or no change in the levels of {gamma}- and {delta}-subunit messengers. ARIA also increases the amount of a putative nuclear precursor of {alpha}-subunit mRNA, consistent with an activation of gene transcription. These results suggest that the concentration of {alpha} subunit may limit the rate of biosynthesis of the acetylcholine receptors in chicken myotubes. They also indicate that neuronal factors can regulate the expression of receptor subunit genes in a selective manner. Tetrodotoxin, 8-bromo-cAMP, and forskolin also increase the amount of {alpha}-subunit mRNA, with little change in the amount of {gamma}- and {delta}-subunit mRNAs. Unlike ARIA, however, these agents have little effect on the concentration of the {alpha}-subunit nuclear precursor.

  7. The Orphan Nuclear Receptor ERRγ Regulates Hepatic CB1 Receptor-Mediated Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yoon Seok; Lee, Ji-Min; Kim, Don-Kyu; Lee, Yong-Soo; Kim, Ki-Sun; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Kim, Jina; Lee, Myung-Shik; Lee, In-Kyu; Kim, Seong Heon; Cho, Sung Jin; Jeong, Won-Il; Lee, Chul-Ho; Harris, Robert A.; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Background Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21), a stress inducible hepatokine, is synthesized in the liver and plays important roles in glucose and lipid metabolism. However, the mechanism of hepatic cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor-mediated induction of FGF21 gene expression is largely unknown. Results Activation of the hepatic CB1 receptor by arachidonyl-2’-chloroethylamide (ACEA), a CB1 receptor selective agonist, significantly increased FGF21 gene expression. Overexpression of estrogen-related receptor (ERR) γ increased FGF21 gene expression and secretion both in hepatocytes and mice, whereas knockdown of ERRγ decreased ACEA-mediated FGF21 gene expression and secretion. Moreover, ERRγ, but not ERRα and ERRβ, induced FGF21 gene promoter activity. In addition, deletion and mutation analysis of the FGF21 promoter identified a putative ERRγ-binding motif (AGGTGC, a near-consensus response element). A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed direct binding of ERRγ to the FGF21 gene promoter. Finally, GSK5182, an ERRγ inverse agonist, significantly inhibited hepatic CB1 receptor-mediated FGF21 gene expression and secretion. Conclusion Based on our data, we conclude that ERRγ plays a key role in hepatic CB1 receptor-mediated induction of FGF21 gene expression and secretion. PMID:27455076

  8. Computer-aided design of negative allosteric modulators of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5): Comparative molecular field analysis of aryl ether derivatives.

    PubMed

    Selvam, Chelliah; Thilagavathi, Ramasamy; Narasimhan, Balasubramanian; Kumar, Pradeep; Jordan, Brian C; Ranganna, Kasturi

    2016-02-15

    The metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGlu receptors) have emerged as attractive targets for number of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Recently, mGluR5 negative allosteric modulators (NAMs) have gained considerable attention in pharmacological research. Comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) was performed on 73 analogs of aryl ether which were reported as mGluR5 NAMs. The study produced a statistically significant model with high correlation coefficient and good predictive abilities.

  9. Sprouty Is a Negative Regulator of Transforming Growth Factor β–Induced Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition and Cataract

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Eun Hye H; Basson, M Albert; Robinson, Michael L; McAvoy, John W; Lovicu, Frank J

    2012-01-01

    Fibrosis affects an extensive range of organs and is increasingly acknowledged as a major component of many chronic disorders. It is now well accepted that the elevated expression of certain inflammatory cell–derived cytokines, especially transforming growth factor β (TGFβ), is involved in the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) leading to the pathogenesis of a diverse range of fibrotic diseases. In lens, aberrant TGFβ signaling has been shown to induce EMT leading to cataract formation. Sproutys (Sprys) are negative feedback regulators of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK)-signaling pathways in many vertebrate systems, and in this study we showed that they are important in the murine lens for promoting the lens epithelial cell phenotype. Conditional deletion of Spry1 and Spry2 specifically from the lens leads to an aberrant increase in RTK-mediated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 phosphorylation and, surprisingly, elevated TGFβ-related signaling in lens epithelial cells, leading to an EMT and subsequent cataract formation. Conversely, increased Spry overexpression in lens cells can suppress not only TGFβ-induced signaling, but also the accompanying EMT and cataract formation. On the basis of these findings, we propose that a better understanding of the relationship between Spry and TGFβ signaling will not only elucidate the etiology of lens pathology, but will also lead to the development of treatments for other fibrotic-related diseases associated with TGFβ-induced EMT. PMID:22517312

  10. Mechanisms for the activity of heterocyclic cyclohexanone curcumin derivatives in estrogen receptor negative human breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Somers-Edgar, Tiffany J; Taurin, Sebastien; Larsen, Lesley; Chandramouli, Anupama; Nelson, Mark A; Rosengren, Rhonda J

    2011-02-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer is an aggressive form that currently requires more drug treatment options. Thus, we have further modified cyclohexanone derivatives of curcumin and examined them for cytotoxicity towards ER-negative human breast cancer cells. Two of the analogs screened elicited increased cytotoxic potency compared to curcumin and other previously studied derivatives. Specifically, 2,6-bis(pyridin-3-ylmethylene)-cyclohexanone (RL90) and 2,6-bis(pyridin-4-ylmethylene)-cyclohexanone (RL91) elicited EC(50) values of 1.54 and 1.10 µM, respectively, in MDA-MB-231 cells and EC(50) values of 0.51 and 0.23 in SKBr3 cells. All other new compounds examined were less potent than curcumin, which elicited EC(50) values of 7.6 and 2.4 µM in MDA-MB-231 and SKBr3 cells, respectively. Mechanistic analyses demonstrated that RL90 and RL91 significantly induced G(2)/M-phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. RL90 and RL91 also modulated the expression of key cell signaling proteins, specifically, in SKBr3 cells, protein levels of Her-2, Akt, and NFκB were decreased in a time-dependent manner, while activity of stress kinases JNK1/2 and P38 MAPK were increased. Signaling events in MDA-MB-231 cells were differently implicated, as EGFR protein levels were decreased and activity of GSK-3β transiently decreased, while β-catenin protein level and activity of P38 MAPK, Akt, and JNK1/2 were transiently increased. In conclusion replacement of the phenyl group of cyclohexanone derived curcumin derivatives with heterocyclic rings forms a class of second-generation analogs that are more potent than both curcumin and other derivatives. These new derivatives provide a platform for the further development of drugs for the treatment of ER-negative breast cancer.

  11. The role of 5-HT1A receptors in mediating acute negative effects of antidepressants: implications in pediatric depression

    PubMed Central

    Rahn, K A; Cao, Y-J; Hendrix, C W; Kaplin, A I

    2015-01-01

    Acute antidepressant exposure elevates the frequency of impulsive behavior and suicidal thoughts in children and adolescents with major depressive disorder (MDD). Long-term antidepressant treatment, however, is beneficial for pediatric MDD, so it is necessary to explore novel treatments that prevent the potentially dangerous consequences of acute antidepressant initiation. In the present study, a treatment strategy designed to reverse the acute negative behavioral effects of antidepressants was tested in rodents. Co-administration of the 5-HT1A receptor (5-HT1AR) antagonist WAY-100635 reversed the negative effects of acute fluoxetine, a serotonin reuptake inhibitor, but not reboxetine, a norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, supporting the involvement of 5-HT1AR in mediating the negative consequences of acute selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment. No 5-HT1AR antagonists are currently approved for use in pediatric populations, so alternative strategies should be explored. One such strategy was suggested based on the hypothesis that the rate of 5-HT1AR activation and the subsequent inhibition of serotonergic neuron activity caused by acute SSRI administration is proportional to the loading rate of an antidepressant. Existing pharmacological data were examined, and significant correlations were observed between the half-life of antidepressants and the rate of suicide-related events (SREs). Specifically, antidepressants with longer half-lives have lower rates of SREs. On the basis of these data, novel dosing strategies were developed for five antidepressants to mimic the pharmacological profile of the antidepressant with the longest half-life, fluoxetine. These dosing strategies could be used to decrease the rate of SREs associated with acute antidepressant treatment in pediatric MDD until an improved pharmacological treatment is developed. PMID:25942044

  12. A Genome-Wide “Pleiotropy Scan” Does Not Identify New Susceptibility Loci for Estrogen Receptor Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Campa, Daniele; Barrdahl, Myrto; Tsilidis, Konstantinos K.; Severi, Gianluca; Diver, W. Ryan; Siddiq, Afshan; Chanock, Stephen; Hoover, Robert N.; Ziegler, Regina G.; Berg, Christine D.; Buys, Saundra S.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Le Marchand, Loïc; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Lindström, Sara; Hunter, David J.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Willett, Walter C.; Kraft, Peter; Cox, David G.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Tjønneland, Anne; Dossus, Laure; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Panico, Salvatore; van Gils, Carla H.; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Barricarte, Aurelio; Sund, Malin; Gaudet, Mia M.; Giles, Graham; Southey, Melissa; Baglietto, Laura; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Kaaks, Rudolf; Canzian, Federico

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 15–30% of all breast cancer tumors are estrogen receptor negative (ER−). Compared with ER-positive (ER+) disease they have an earlier age at onset and worse prognosis. Despite the vast number of risk variants identified for numerous cancer types, only seven loci have been unambiguously identified for ER-negative breast cancer. With the aim of identifying new susceptibility SNPs for this disease we performed a pleiotropic genome-wide association study (GWAS). We selected 3079 SNPs associated with a human complex trait or disease at genome-wide significance level (P<5×10−8) to perform a secondary analysis of an ER-negative GWAS from the National Cancer Institute's Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3), including 1998 cases and 2305 controls from prospective studies. We then tested the top ten associations (i.e. with the lowest P-values) using three additional populations with a total sample size of 3509 ER+ cases, 2543 ER− cases and 7031 healthy controls. None of the 3079 selected variants in the BPC3 ER-GWAS were significant at the adjusted threshold. 186 variants were associated with ER− breast cancer risk at a conventional threshold of P<0.05, with P-values ranging from 0.049 to 2.3×10−4. None of the variants reached statistical significance in the replication phase. In conclusion, this study did not identify any novel susceptibility loci for ER-breast cancer using a “pleiotropic approach”. PMID:24523857

  13. Structures of a platelet-derived growth factor/propeptide complex and a platelet-derived growth factor/receptor complex

    SciTech Connect

    Shim, Ann Hye-Ryong; Liu, Heli; Focia, Pamela J.; Chen, Xiaoyan; Lin, P. Charles; He, Xiaolin

    2010-07-13

    Platelet-derived growth factors (PDGFs) and their receptors (PDGFRs) are prototypic growth factors and receptor tyrosine kinases which have critical functions in development. We show that PDGFs share a conserved region in their prodomain sequences which can remain noncovalently associated with the mature cystine-knot growth factor domain after processing. The structure of the PDGF-A/propeptide complex reveals this conserved, hydrophobic association mode. We also present the structure of the complex between PDGF-B and the first three Ig domains of PDGFR{beta}, showing that two PDGF-B protomers clamp PDGFR{beta} at their dimerization seam. The PDGF-B:PDGFR{beta} interface is predominantly hydrophobic, and PDGFRs and the PDGF propeptides occupy overlapping positions on mature PDGFs, rationalizing the need of propeptides by PDGFs to cover functionally important hydrophobic surfaces during secretion. A large-scale structural organization and rearrangement is observed for PDGF-B upon receptor binding, in which the PDGF-B L1 loop, disordered in the structure of the free form, adopts a highly specific conformation to form hydrophobic interactions with the third Ig domain of PDGFR{beta}. Calorimetric data also shows that the membrane-proximal homotypic PDGFR{alpha} interaction, albeit required for activation, contributes negatively to ligand binding. The structural and biochemical data together offer insights into PDGF-PDGFR signaling, as well as strategies for PDGF-antagonism.

  14. Ewing's sarcoma family tumors are sensitive to tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand and express death receptor 4 and death receptor 5.

    PubMed

    Mitsiades, N; Poulaki, V; Mitsiades, C; Tsokos, M

    2001-03-15

    In this study, we investigated the sensitivity of Ewing's sarcoma family tumors (ESFTs) of children and adolescents to the tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing Ligand (TRAIL). TRAIL binds to death receptors (DRs) DR4, DR5, DcR1, and DcR2. Either DR4 or DR5 can induce apoptosis, whereas DcR1 and DcR2 are considered inhibitory receptors. Nine of 10 ESFT cell lines, including several that were Fas resistant, underwent apoptosis with TRAIL through activation of caspase-10, capase-8 (FLICE), caspase-3, and caspase-9. In contrast to the Fas signaling pathway, caspase-10, but not caspase-8 or the Fas-associated death domain-containing molecule, was recruited to the TRAIL receptor-associated signaling complex. We found that 9 of 10 ESFT cell lines expressed both DR4 and DR5 by Western blotting, whereas the TRAIL-resistant line expressed only DR4. However, DR4 was absent from the cell surface in the resistant and two additional lines (three of five tested lines), suggesting that it may have been nonfunctional. On the contrary, DR5 was located on the cell surface in all four sensitive lines tested, being absent only from the cell surface of the resistant line that was also DR5-negative by Western blotting. In agreement with these findings, the resistance of the line was overcome by restoration of DR5 levels by transfection. Levels of DcR1 and DcR2 or levels of the FLICE-inhibitory protein (FLIP) did not correlate with TRAIL resistance, and protein synthesis inhibition did not sensitize the TRAIL-resistant line to TRAIL. Because these data suggested that sensitivity of ESFTs to TRAIL was mainly based on the presence of DR4/DR5, we investigated the presence of these receptors in 32 ESFT tissue sections by immunohistochemistry. We found that 23 of 32 tumor tissues (72%) expressed both receptors, 8 of 32 (25%) expressed one receptor only, and 1 was negative for both. Our finding of wide expression of DR4/DR5 in ESFT in vivo, in combination with their high sensitivity

  15. Vascular expression of E-selectin is increased in estrogen-receptor-negative breast cancer: a role for tumor-cell-secreted interleukin-1 alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, M.; Corless, C. L.; Kräling, B. M.; Tran, C.; Atha, T.; Bischoff, J.; Barsky, S. H.

    1997-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays an important role in breast cancer growth and metastasis. Multiple adhesion molecules have been shown to perform critical functions in the process of angiogenesis. In this study, we analyzed 15 benign and 22 malignant estrogen-receptor-negative and estrogen-receptor-positive breast specimens for the presence of the endothelial cell adhesion molecules E-selectin and P-selectin. We found that E-selectin's expression was increased in the malignant breast tumors compared with their benign counterparts (23.86% of blood vessels versus 2.47%; P = 0.0005). Furthermore, E-selectin staining was found to be significantly increased in the estrogen-receptor-negative carcinomas compared with the estrogen-receptor-positive ones (P = 0.005). In vitro findings strongly correlated with the in vivo findings and showed a higher degree of E-selectin induction in endothelial cells exposed to conditioned media from estrogen-receptor-negative breast cancer cell lines than from estrogen-receptor-positive ones. The degree of E-selectin induction correlated with the amount of interleukin-1 alpha in the tumor-conditioned media. Neutralizing antibodies to interleukin-1 alpha significantly inhibited the E-selectin expression in endothelial cells exposed to tumor-conditioned media. The results indicate that the endothelial E-selectin expression during angiogenesis is related to breast carcinoma progression in vivo and that this component of angiogenesis may be due directly to tumor-cell-secreted interleukin-1 alpha. Images Figure 1 PMID:9094987

  16. Loss of striatal type 1 cannabinoid receptors is a key pathogenic factor in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Blázquez, Cristina; Chiarlone, Anna; Sagredo, Onintza; Aguado, Tania; Pazos, M Ruth; Resel, Eva; Palazuelos, Javier; Julien, Boris; Salazar, María; Börner, Christine; Benito, Cristina; Carrasco, Carolina; Diez-Zaera, María; Paoletti, Paola; Díaz-Hernández, Miguel; Ruiz, Carolina; Sendtner, Michael; Lucas, José J; de Yébenes, Justo G; Marsicano, Giovanni; Monory, Krisztina; Lutz, Beat; Romero, Julián; Alberch, Jordi; Ginés, Silvia; Kraus, Jürgen; Fernández-Ruiz, Javier; Galve-Roperh, Ismael; Guzmán, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    Endocannabinoids act as neuromodulatory and neuroprotective cues by engaging type 1 cannabinoid receptors. These receptors are highly abundant in the basal ganglia and play a pivotal role in the control of motor behaviour. An early downregulation of type 1 cannabinoid receptors has been documented in the basal ganglia of patients with Huntington's disease and animal models. However, the pathophysiological impact of this loss of receptors in Huntington's disease is as yet unknown. Here, we generated a double-mutant mouse model that expresses human mutant huntingtin exon 1 in a type 1 cannabinoid receptor-null background, and found that receptor deletion aggravates the symptoms, neuropathology and molecular pathology of the disease. Moreover, pharmacological administration of the cannabinoid Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol to mice expressing human mutant huntingtin exon 1 exerted a therapeutic effect and ameliorated those parameters. Experiments conducted in striatal cells show that the mutant huntingtin-dependent downregulation of the receptors involves the control of the type 1 cannabinoid receptor gene promoter by repressor element 1 silencing transcription factor and sensitizes cells to excitotoxic damage. We also provide in vitro and in vivo evidence that supports type 1 cannabinoid receptor control of striatal brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression and the decrease in brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels concomitant with type 1 cannabinoid receptor loss, which may contribute significantly to striatal damage in Huntington's disease. Altogether, these results support the notion that downregulation of type 1 cannabinoid receptors is a key pathogenic event in Huntington's disease, and suggest that activation of these receptors in patients with Huntington's disease may attenuate disease progression.

  17. Platelet-activating factor induces ovine fetal pulmonary venous smooth muscle cell proliferation: role of epidermal growth factor receptor transactivation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Weilin; Ibe, Basil O; Raj, J Usha

    2007-06-01

    We have previously reported that platelet-activating factor (PAF) is present in very high levels in the ovine fetal lung and circulation and that PAF serves as an important physiological vasoconstrictor of the pulmonary circulation in utero. However, it is not known whether PAF stimulates pulmonary vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation. In this study, we used ovine fetal pulmonary venous SMCs as our model system to study the effects and mechanisms of action of PAF on SMC proliferation. We found that PAF induced SMC proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. PAF also stimulated activation of both ERK and p38 but not c-Jun NH(2) terminal kinase (JNK) mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathways. PAF (10 nM) induced phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Specific inhibition of EGFR by AG-1478 and by the expression of a dominant-negative EGFR mutant in SMCs attenuated PAF-stimulated cell proliferation. Inhibition of heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) release by CRM-197 and inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) by GM-6001 abolished PAF-induced MAP kinase activation and cell proliferation. Increased alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity after PAF treatment in AP-HB-EGF fusion construct-transfected SMCs indicated that PAF induced the release of HB-EGF within 1 min. Gelatin zymography data showed that PAF stimulated MMP-2 activity and MMP-9 activity within 1 min. These results suggest that PAF promotes pulmonary vascular SMC proliferation via transactivation of EGFR through MMP activation and HB-EGF, resulting in p38 and ERK activation and that EGFR transactivation is essential for the mitogenic effect of PAF in pulmonary venous SMC. PMID:17322418

  18. Quantitative in vivo immunohistochemistry of epidermal growth factor receptor using a receptor concentration imaging approach.

    PubMed

    Samkoe, Kimberley S; Tichauer, Kenneth M; Gunn, Jason R; Wells, Wendy A; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W

    2014-12-15

    As receptor-targeted therapeutics become increasingly used in clinical oncology, the ability to quantify protein expression and pharmacokinetics in vivo is imperative to ensure successful individualized treatment plans. Current standards for receptor analysis are performed on extracted tissues. These measurements are static and often physiologically irrelevant; therefore, only a partial picture of available receptors for drug targeting in vivo is provided. Until recently, in vivo measurements were limited by the inability to separate delivery, binding, and retention effects, but this can be circumvented by a dual-tracer approach for referencing the detected signal. We hypothesized that in vivo receptor concentration imaging (RCI) would be superior to ex vivo immunohistochemistry (IHC). Using multiple xenograft tumor models with varying EGFR expression, we determined the EGFR concentration in each model using a novel targeted agent (anti-EGFR affibody-IRDye800CW conjugate) along with a simultaneously delivered reference agent (control affibody-IRDye680RD conjugate). The RCI-calculated in vivo receptor concentration was strongly correlated with ex vivo pathologist-scored IHC and computer-quantified ex vivo immunofluorescence. In contrast, no correlation was observed with ex vivo Western blot analysis or in vitro flow-cytometry assays. Overall, our results argue that in vivo RCI provides a robust measure of receptor expression equivalent to ex vivo immunostaining, with implications for use in noninvasive monitoring of therapy or therapeutic guidance during surgery. PMID:25344226

  19. Negative elongation factor NELF controls transcription of immediate early genes in a stimulus-specific manner

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Toshitsugu; Piuz, Isabelle; Schlegel, Werner

    2009-01-15

    The transcription rate of immediate early genes (IEGs) is controlled directly by transcription elongation factors at the transcription elongation step. Negative elongation factor (NELF) and 5,6-dichloro-1-{beta}-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB) sensitivity-inducing factor (DSIF) stall RNA polymerase II (pol II) soon after transcription initiation. Upon induction of IEG transcription, DSIF is converted into an accelerator for pol II elongation. To address whether and how NELF as well as DSIF controls overall IEG transcription, its expression was reduced using stable RNA interference in GH4C1 cells. NELF knock-down reduced thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH)-induced transcription of the IEGs c-fos, MKP-1, and junB. In contrast, epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced transcription of these IEGs was unaltered or even slightly increased by NELF knock-down. Thus, stable knock-down of NELF affects IEG transcription stimulation-specifically. Conversely, DSIF knock-down reduced both TRH- and EGF-induced transcription of the three IEGs. Interestingly, TRH-induced activation of the MAP kinase pathway, a pathway essential for transcription of the three IEGs, was down-regulated by NELF knock-down. Thus, stable knock-down of NELF, by modulating intracellular signaling pathways, caused stimulation-specific loss of IEG transcription. These observations indicate that NELF controls overall IEG transcription via multiple mechanisms both directly and indirectly.

  20. Negative Effects of Psychological Treatments: An Exploratory Factor Analysis of the Negative Effects Questionnaire for Monitoring and Reporting Adverse and Unwanted Events

    PubMed Central

    Kottorp, Anders; Boettcher, Johanna; Andersson, Gerhard; Carlbring, Per

    2016-01-01

    Research conducted during the last decades has provided increasing evidence for the use of psychological treatments for a number of psychiatric disorders and somatic complaints. However, by focusing only on the positive outcomes, less attention has been given to the potential of negative effects. Despite indications of deterioration and other adverse and unwanted events during treatment, little is known about their occurrence and characteristics. Hence, in order to facilitate research of negative effects, a new instrument for monitoring and reporting their incidence and impact was developed using a consensus among researchers, self-reports by patients, and a literature review: the Negative Effects Questionnaire. Participants were recruited via a smartphone-delivered self-help treatment for social anxiety disorder and through the media (N = 653). An exploratory factor analysis was performed, resulting in a six-factor solution with 32 items, accounting for 57.64% of the variance. The derived factors were: symptoms, quality, dependency, stigma, hopelessness, and failure. Items related to unpleasant memories, stress, and anxiety were experienced by more than one-third of the participants. Further, increased or novel symptoms, as well as lack of quality in the treatment and therapeutic relationship rendered the highest self-reported negative impact. In addition, the findings were discussed in relation to prior research and other similar instruments of adverse and unwanted events, giving credence to the items that are included. The instrument is presently available in eleven different languages and can be freely downloaded and used from www.neqscale.com. PMID:27331907

  1. Negative Effects of Psychological Treatments: An Exploratory Factor Analysis of the Negative Effects Questionnaire for Monitoring and Reporting Adverse and Unwanted Events.

    PubMed

    Rozental, Alexander; Kottorp, Anders; Boettcher, Johanna; Andersson, Gerhard; Carlbring, Per

    2016-01-01

    Research conducted during the last decades has provided increasing evidence for the use of psychological treatments for a number of psychiatric disorders and somatic complaints. However, by focusing only on the positive outcomes, less attention has been given to the potential of negative effects. Despite indications of deterioration and other adverse and unwanted events during treatment, little is known about their occurrence and characteristics. Hence, in order to facilitate research of negative effects, a new instrument for monitoring and reporting their incidence and impact was developed using a consensus among researchers, self-reports by patients, and a literature review: the Negative Effects Questionnaire. Participants were recruited via a smartphone-delivered self-help treatment for social anxiety disorder and through the media (N = 653). An exploratory factor analysis was performed, resulting in a six-factor solution with 32 items, accounting for 57.64% of the variance. The derived factors were: symptoms, quality, dependency, stigma, hopelessness, and failure. Items related to unpleasant memories, stress, and anxiety were experienced by more than one-third of the participants. Further, increased or novel symptoms, as well as lack of quality in the treatment and therapeutic relationship rendered the highest self-reported negative impact. In addition, the findings were discussed in relation to prior research and other similar instruments of adverse and unwanted events, giving credence to the items that are included. The instrument is presently available in eleven different languages and can be freely downloaded and used from www.neqscale.com.

  2. Negative Effects of Psychological Treatments: An Exploratory Factor Analysis of the Negative Effects Questionnaire for Monitoring and Reporting Adverse and Unwanted Events.

    PubMed

    Rozental, Alexander; Kottorp, Anders; Boettcher, Johanna; Andersson, Gerhard; Carlbring, Per

    2016-01-01

    Research conducted during the last decades has provided increasing evidence for the use of psychological treatments for a number of psychiatric disorders and somatic complaints. However, by focusing only on the positive outcomes, less attention has been given to the potential of negative effects. Despite indications of deterioration and other adverse and unwanted events during treatment, little is known about their occurrence and characteristics. Hence, in order to facilitate research of negative effects, a new instrument for monitoring and reporting their incidence and impact was developed using a consensus among researchers, self-reports by patients, and a literature review: the Negative Effects Questionnaire. Participants were recruited via a smartphone-delivered self-help treatment for social anxiety disorder and through the media (N = 653). An exploratory factor analysis was performed, resulting in a six-factor solution with 32 items, accounting for 57.64% of the variance. The derived factors were: symptoms, quality, dependency, stigma, hopelessness, and failure. Items related to unpleasant memories, stress, and anxiety were experienced by more than one-third of the participants. Further, increased or novel symptoms, as well as lack of quality in the treatment and therapeutic relationship rendered the highest self-reported negative impact. In addition, the findings were discussed in relation to prior research and other similar instruments of adverse and unwanted events, giving credence to the items that are included. The instrument is presently available in eleven different languages and can be freely downloaded and used from www.neqscale.com. PMID:27331907

  3. Adverse Reaction to Cetuximab, an Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Štulhofer Buzina, Daška; Martinac, Ivana; Ledić Drvar, Daniela; Čeović, Romana; Bilić, Ivan; Marinović, Branka

    2016-04-01

    Dear Editor, Inhibition of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a new strategy in treatment of a variety of solid tumors, such as colorectal carcinoma, non-small cell lung cancer, squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, and pancreatic cancer (1). Cetuximab is a chimeric human-murine monoclonal antibody against EGFR. Cutaneous side effects are the most common adverse reactions occurring during epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors (EGFRI) therapy. Papulopustular rash (acne like rash) develop with 80-86% patients receiving cetuximab, while xerosis, eczema, fissures, teleangiectasiae, hyperpigmentations, and nail and hair changes occur less frequently (2). The mechanism underlying these skin changes has not been established and understood. It seems EGFRI alter cell growth and differentiation, leading to impaired stratum corneum and cell apoptosis (3-5). An abdominoperineal resection of the rectal adenocarcinoma (Dukes C) was performed on a 43-year-old female patient. Following surgery, adjuvant chemo-radiotherapy was applied. After two years, the patient suffered a metastatic relapse. Abdominal lymphadenopathy was detected on multi-slice computer tomography (MSCT) images, with an increased value of the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) tumor marker (maximal value 57 ng/mL). Hematological and biochemical tests were within normal limits, so first-line chemotherapy with oxaliplatin and a 5-fluorouracil (FOLFOX4) protocol was introduced. A wild type of the KRAS gene was confirmed in tumor tissue (diagnostic prerequisite for the introduction of EGFRI) and cetuximab (250 mg per m2 of body surface) was added to the treatment protocol. The patient responded well to the treatment with confirmed partial regression of the tumor formations. Three months after the patient started using cetuximab, an anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody, the patient presented with a papulopustular eruption in the seborrhoeic areas (Figure 1) and eczematoid reactions on the extremities

  4. A functionally significant cross-talk between androgen receptor and ErbB2 pathways in estrogen receptor negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Naderi, Ali; Hughes-Davies, Luke

    2008-06-01

    Recent studies have identified novel subgroups in ER-negative breast cancer based on the expression pattern of androgen receptor (AR). One subtype (molecular apocrine) has an over-expression of steroid-response genes and ErbB2. Using breast cancer cell lines with molecular apocrine features, we demonstrate a functional cross-talk between AR and ErbB2 pathways. We show that stimulation of AR and ErbB2 pathways leads to the cross-regulation of gene expression for AR, ErbB2, FOXA1, XBP1, TFF3, and KLK3. As opposed to the physiologic transient phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) observed with the testosterone treatment, we demonstrate that the addition of ErbB2 inhibition leads to a persistent phosphorylation of ERK1/2, which negatively regulates the downstream signaling and cell growth. This suggests a mechanism for the cross-talk involving the ERK pathway. Moreover, testosterone stimulates the proliferation of molecular apocrine breast cell lines, and this effect can be reversed using antiandrogen flutamide and anti-ErbB2 AG825. Conversely, the growth stimulatory effect of heregulin can also be inhibited with flutamide, suggesting a cross-talk between the AR and ErbB2 pathways affecting cell proliferation. Importantly, there is a synergy with the combined use of flutamide and AG825 on cell proliferation and apoptosis, which indicates a therapeutic advantage in the combined blockage of AR and ErbB2 pathways.

  5. Implications of Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 Receptor Activation in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nurwidya, Fariz; Andarini, Sita; Takahashi, Fumiyuki; Syahruddin, Elisna; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) has been intensively investigated in many preclinical studies using cell lines and animal models, and the results have provided important knowledge to help improve the understanding of cancer biology. IGF1R is highly expressed in patients with lung cancer, and high levels of circulating insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1), the main ligand for IGF1R, increases the risk of developing lung malignancy in the future. Several phase I clinical trials have supported the potential use of an IGF1R-targeted strategy for cancer, including lung cancer. However, the negative results from phase III studies need further attention, especially in selecting patients with specific molecular signatures, who will gain benefits from IGF1R inhibitors with minimal side effects. This review will discuss the basic concept of IGF1R in lung cancer biology, such as epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) induction and cancer stem cell (CSC) maintenance, and also the clinical implications of IGF1R for lung cancer patients, such as prognostic value and cancer therapy resistance. PMID:27418865

  6. Fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling in kidney and lower urinary tract development.

    PubMed

    Walker, Kenneth A; Sims-Lucas, Sunder; Bates, Carlton M

    2016-06-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) and FGF ligands are highly expressed in the developing kidney and lower urinary tract. Several classic studies showed many effects of exogenous FGF ligands on embryonic renal tissues in vitro and in vivo. Another older landmark publication showed that mice with a dominant negative Fgfr fragment had severe renal dysplasia. Together, these studies revealed the importance of FGFR signaling in kidney and lower urinary tract development. With the advent of modern gene targeting techniques, including conditional knockout approaches, several publications have revealed critical roles for FGFR signaling in many lineages of the kidney and lower urinary tract at different stages of development. FGFR signaling has been shown to be critical for early metanephric mesenchymal patterning, Wolffian duct patterning including induction of the ureteric bud, ureteric bud branching morphogenesis, nephron progenitor survival and nephrogenesis, and bladder mesenchyme patterning. FGFRs pattern these tissues by interacting with many other growth factor signaling pathways. Moreover, the many genetic Fgfr and Fgf animal models have structural defects mimicking numerous congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract seen in humans. Finally, many studies have shown how FGFR signaling is critical for kidney and lower urinary tract patterning in humans. PMID:26293980

  7. Gene Expression of Growth Factors and Growth Factor Receptors for Potential Targeted Therapy of Canine Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    IIDA, Gentoku; ASANO, Kazushi; SEKI, Mamiko; SAKAI, Manabu; KUTARA, Kenji; ISHIGAKI, Kumiko; KAGAWA, Yumiko; YOSHIDA, Orie; TESHIMA, Kenji; EDAMURA, Kazuya; WATARI, Toshihiro

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was to evaluate the gene expression of growth factors and growth factor receptors of primary hepatic masses, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and nodular hyperplasia (NH), in dogs. Quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction was performed to measure the expression of 18 genes in 18 HCCs, 10 NHs, 11 surrounding non-cancerous liver tissues and 4 healthy control liver tissues. Platelet-derived growth factor-B (PDGF-B), transforming growth factor-α, epidermal growth factor receptor, epidermal growth factor and hepatocyte growth factor were found to be differentially expressed in HCC compared with NH and the surrounding non-cancerous and healthy control liver tissues. PDGF-B is suggested to have the potential to become a valuable ancillary target for the treatment of canine HCC. PMID:24189579

  8. DSR-98776, a novel selective mGlu5 receptor negative allosteric modulator with potent antidepressant and antimanic activity.

    PubMed

    Kato, Taro; Takata, Makoto; Kitaichi, Maiko; Kassai, Momoe; Inoue, Mitsuhiro; Ishikawa, Chihiro; Hirose, Wataru; Yoshida, Kozo; Shimizu, Isao

    2015-06-15

    Modulation of monoaminergic systems has been the main stream of treatment for patients with mood disorders. However, recent evidence suggests that the glutamatergic system plays an important role in the pathophysiology of these disorders. This study pharmacologically characterized a structurally novel metabotropic glutamate 5 (mGlu5) receptor negative allosteric modulator, DSR-98776, and evaluated its effect on rodent models of depression and mania. First, DSR-98776 in vitro profile was assessed using intracellular calcium and radioligand binding assays. This compound showed dose-dependent inhibitory activity for mGlu5 receptors by binding to the same allosteric site as 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)-pyridine (MPEP), a known mGlu5 inhibitor. The in vivo therapeutic benefits of DSR-98776 were evaluated in common rodent models of depression and mania. In the rat forced swimming test, DSR-98776 (1-3mg/kg) significantly reduced rats immobility time after treatment for 7 consecutive days, while paroxetine (3 and 10mg/kg) required administration for 2 consecutive weeks to reduce rats immobility time. In the mouse forced swimming test, acute administration of DSR-98776 (10-30 mg/kg) significantly reduced immobility time. This effect was not influenced by 4-chloro-DL-phenylalanine methyl ester hydrochloride-induced 5-HT depletion. Finally, DSR-98776 (30 mg/kg) significantly decreased methamphetamine/chlordiazepoxide-induced hyperactivity in mice, which reflects this compound antimanic-like effect. These results indicate that DSR-98776 acts as an orally potent antidepressant and antimanic in rodent models and can be a promising therapeutic option for the treatment of a broad range of mood disorders with depressive and manic states. PMID:25823809

  9. Bisphenol A Increases the Migration and Invasion of Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Cells via Oestrogen-related Receptor Gamma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Lin; Liu, Na; Weng, Shan-Fan; Wang, Hong-Sheng

    2016-10-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is characterized by great metastasis and invasion capability. Our study revealed that nanomolar bisphenol A (BPA), one of the most ubiquitous endocrine disruptors, can increase wound closure and invasion of both MDA-MB-231 and BT-549 cells. BPA treatment can increase protein and mRNA expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9, while had no effect on the expression of vimentin (Vim) and fibronectin (FN) in TNBC cells. The expression of G-protein-coupled receptor (GPER), which has been suggested to mediate rapid oestrogenic signals, was not varied in BPA-treated MDA-MB-231 and BT-549 cells. Its inhibitor G15 also had no effect on BPA-induced MMPs expression and cell invasion. Interestingly, BPA treatment can significantly increase the mRNA and protein expressions of oestrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ), but not ERRα or ERRβ, in both MDA-MB-231 and BT-549 cells. The knock-down of ERRγ can markedly attenuate BPA-induced expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in TNBC cells. BPA treatment can activate both ERK1/2 and Akt in TNBC cells. Both inhibitors of ERK1/2 (PD98059) and Akt (LY294002) can attenuate BPA-induced ERRγ expression and cell invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells. Collectively, our data revealed that BPA can increase the expression of MMPs and in vitro motility of TNBC cells via ERRγ. Both activation of ERK1/2 and Akt participated in this process. Our study suggests that more attention should be paid to the roles of xenoestrogens such as BPA in the development and progression of TNBC. PMID:27038254

  10. Role of cortical N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors in auditory sensory memory and mismatch negativity generation: implications for schizophrenia.

    PubMed Central

    Javitt, D C; Steinschneider, M; Schroeder, C E; Arezzo, J C

    1996-01-01

    Working memory refers to the ability of the brain to store and manipulate information over brief time periods, ranging from seconds to minutes. As opposed to long-term memory, which is critically dependent upon hippocampal processing, critical substrates for working memory are distributed in a modality-specific fashion throughout cortex. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors play a crucial role in the initiation of long-term memory. Neurochemical mechanisms underlying the transient memory storage required for working memory, however, remain obscure. Auditory sensory memory, which refers to the ability of the brain to retain transient representations of the physical features (e.g., pitch) of simple auditory stimuli for periods of up to approximately 30 sec, represents one of the simplest components of the brain working memory system. Functioning of the auditory sensory memory system is indexed by the generation of a well-defined event-related potential, termed mismatch negativity (MMN). MMN can thus be used as an objective index of auditory sensory memory functioning and a probe for investigating underlying neurochemical mechanisms. Monkeys generate cortical activity in response to deviant stimuli that closely resembles human MMN. This study uses a combination of intracortical recording and pharmacological micromanipulations in awake monkeys to demonstrate that both competitive and noncompetitive NMDA antagonists block the generation of MMN without affecting prior obligatory activity in primary auditory cortex. These findings suggest that, on a neurophysiological level, MMN represents selective current flow through open, unblocked NMDA channels. Furthermore, they suggest a crucial role of cortical NMDA receptors in the assessment of stimulus familiarity/unfamiliarity, which is a key process underlying working memory performance. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 PMID:8876245

  11. Transactivation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor by G Protein-Coupled Receptors: Recent Progress, Challenges and Future Research

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhixiang

    2016-01-01

    Both G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and receptor-tyrosine kinases (RTKs) regulate large signaling networks, control multiple cell functions and are implicated in many diseases including various cancers. Both of them are also the top therapeutic targets for disease treatment. The discovery of the cross-talk between GPCRs and RTKs connects these two vast signaling networks and complicates the already complicated signaling networks that regulate cell signaling and function. In this review, we focus on the transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a subfamily of RTKs, by GPCRs. Since the first report of EGFR transactivation by GPCR, significant progress has been made including the elucidation of the mechanisms underlying the transactivation. Here, we first provide a basic picture for GPCR, EGFR and EGFR transactivation by GPCR. We then discuss the progress made in the last five years and finally provided our view of the future challenge and future researches needed to overcome these challenges. PMID:26771606

  12. Extended Synaptotagmin Interaction with the Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor Depends on Receptor Conformation, Not Catalytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Michel G; Herdman, Chelsea; Guillou, François; Mishra, Prakash K; Baril, Joëlle; Bellenfant, Sabrina; Moss, Tom

    2015-06-26

    We previously demonstrated that ESyt2 interacts specifically with the activated FGF receptor and is required for a rapid phase of receptor internalization and for functional signaling via the ERK pathway in early Xenopus embryos. ESyt2 is one of the three-member family of Extended Synaptotagmins that were recently shown to be implicated in the formation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-plasma membrane (PM) junctions and in the Ca(2+) dependent regulation of these junctions. Here we show that ESyt2 is directed to the ER by its putative transmembrane domain, that the ESyts hetero- and homodimerize, and that ESyt2 homodimerization in vivo requires a TM adjacent sequence but not the SMP domain. ESyt2 and ESyt3, but not ESyt1, selectively interact in vivo with activated FGFR1. In the case of ESyt2, this interaction requires a short TM adjacent sequence and is independent of receptor autophosphorylation, but dependent on receptor conformation. The data show that ESyt2 recognizes a site in the upper kinase lobe of FGFR1 that is revealed by displacement of the kinase domain activation loop during receptor activation.

  13. Effects of negative allosteric modulators of gamma-aminobutyric acidA receptors on complex behavioral processes in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Auta, J; Winsauer, P J; Faust, W B; Lambert, P; Moerschbaecher, J M

    1997-01-01

    A multiple schedule of repeated acquisition and performance of conditional discriminations was used to characterize the effects of two negative allosteric modulators of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) receptor (ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate [beta-CCE] and N-methyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxamide [FG-7142]), a hallucinogenic beta-carboline derivative (harmine), a benzodiazepine receptor antagonist (flumazenil) and a positive allosteric modulator (alprazolam). In the acquisition component, subjects acquired a different discrimination each session. Acquisition of a discrimination was defined by a decrease in errors as the session progressed. In the performance component, the discrimination was the same each session. Responding in both components was maintained by food presentation under a variable-ratio schedule. Incorrect responses in both components produced a 5-sec timeout. Alprazolam (0.1-18 mg/kg), beta-CCE (0.01-0.32 mg/kg), FG-7142 (0.1-18 mg/kg) and harmine (0.1-1.8 mg/kg) all dose-dependently decreased response rate in both components. However, accuracy of responding-was differentially affected by the drugs. Alprazolam selectively and dose-dependently increased percent errors in acquisition, whereas beta-CCE increased acquisition errors only at the highest doses tested in each subject. In contrast, FG-7142 and harmine had no effects on percent errors at doses that virtually eliminated responding. In all cases, performance accuracy was generally not affected. Flumazenil, at doses that had little or no effect (0.1 and 0.32 mg/kg) or occasionally decreased response rates (1 mg/kg) when administered alone, dose-dependently antagonized the rate-decreasing and error-increasing effects of beta-CCE, FG-7142 and alprazolam. In contrast, flumazenil failed to antagonize the effects of harmine. Thus, the negative allosteric modulators only moderately disrupted acquisition in comparison with the positive allosteric modulator, but the effects of both types of

  14. Asymmetric Receptor Contact is Required for Tyrosine Autophosphorylation of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor in Living Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, J.; Boggon, T; Tomé, F; Mandiyan, V; Lax, I; Schlessinge, J

    2010-01-01

    Tyrosine autophosphorylation of receptor tyrosine kinases plays a critical role in regulation of kinase activity and in recruitment and activation of intracellular signaling pathways. Autophosphorylation is mediated by a sequential and precisely ordered intermolecular (trans) reaction. In this report we present structural and biochemical experiments demonstrating that formation of an asymmetric dimer between activated FGFR1 kinase domains is required for transphosphorylation of FGFR1 in FGF-stimulated cells. Transphosphorylation is mediated by specific asymmetric contacts between the N-lobe of one kinase molecule, which serves as an active enzyme, and specific docking sites on the C-lobe of a second kinase molecule, which serves a substrate. Pathological loss-of-function mutations or oncogenic activating mutations in this interface may hinder or facilitate asymmetric dimer formation and transphosphorylation, respectively. The experiments presented in this report provide the molecular basis underlying the control of transphosphorylation of FGF receptors and other receptor tyrosine kinases.

  15. Prognostic Factors for Node-Negative Advanced Gastric Cancer after Curative Gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Woo; Koo, Ho-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Lymph node (LN) metastasis is the best prognostic indicator in non-distant metastatic advanced gastric cancer. This study aimed to assess the prognostic value of various clinicopathologic factors in node-negative advanced gastric cancer. Materials and Methods We retrospectively analyzed the clinical records of 254 patients with primary node-negative stage T2~4 gastric cancer. These patients were selected from a pool of 1,890 patients who underwent radical resection at Memorial Jin-Pok Kim Korea Gastric Cancer Center, Inje University Seoul Paik Hospital between 1998 and 2008. Results Of the 254 patients, 128 patients (50.4%), 88 patients (34.6%), 37 patients (14.6%), and 1 patient (0.4%) had T2, T3, T4a, and T4b tumors, respectively. In a univariate analysis, operation type, T-stage, venous invasion, tumor size, and less than 15 LNs significantly correlated with tumor recurrence and cumulative overall survival. In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, tumor size, venous invasion, and less than 15 LNs significantly and independently correlated with recurrence. In a multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis, tumor size (hazard ratio [HR]: 2.926; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.173~7.300; P=0.021), venous invasion (HR: 3.985; 95% CI: 1.401~11.338; P=0.010), and less than 15 LNs (HR: 0.092; 95% CI: 0.029~0.290; P<0.001) significantly correlated with overall survival. Conclusions Node-negative gastric cancers recurred in 8.3% of the patients in our study. Tumor size, venous invasion, and less than 15 LNs reliably predicted recurrence as well as survival. Aggressive postoperative treatments and timely follow-ups should be considered in cases with these characteristics. PMID:27752393

  16. Accounting for negative automaintenance in pigeons: a dual learning systems approach and factored representations.

    PubMed

    Lesaint, Florian; Sigaud, Olivier; Khamassi, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Animals, including Humans, are prone to develop persistent maladaptive and suboptimal behaviours. Some of these behaviours have been suggested to arise from interactions between brain systems of Pavlovian conditioning, the acquisition of responses to initially neutral stimuli previously paired with rewards, and instrumental conditioning, the acquisition of active behaviours leading to rewards. However the mechanics of these systems and their interactions are still unclear. While extensively studied independently, few models have been developed to account for these interactions. On some experiment, pigeons have been observed to display a maladaptive behaviour that some suggest to involve conflicts between Pavlovian and instrumental conditioning. In a procedure referred as negative automaintenance, a key light is paired with the subsequent delivery of food, however any peck towards the key light results in the omission of the reward. Studies showed that in such procedure some pigeons persisted in pecking to a substantial level despite its negative consequence, while others learned to refrain from pecking and maximized their cumulative rewards. Furthermore, the pigeons that were unable to refrain from pecking could nevertheless shift their pecks towards a harmless alternative key light. We confronted a computational model that combines dual-learning systems and factored representations, recently developed to account for sign-tracking and goal-tracking behaviours in rats, to these negative automaintenance experimental data. We show that it can explain the variability of the observed behaviours and the capacity of alternative key lights to distract pigeons from their detrimental behaviours. These results confirm the proposed model as an interesting tool to reproduce experiments that could involve interactions between Pavlovian and instrumental conditioning. The model allows us to draw predictions that may be experimentally verified, which could help further investigate

  17. Accounting for Negative Automaintenance in Pigeons: A Dual Learning Systems Approach and Factored Representations

    PubMed Central

    Lesaint, Florian; Sigaud, Olivier; Khamassi, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Animals, including Humans, are prone to develop persistent maladaptive and suboptimal behaviours. Some of these behaviours have been suggested to arise from interactions between brain systems of Pavlovian conditioning, the acquisition of responses to initially neutral stimuli previously paired with rewards, and instrumental conditioning, the acquisition of active behaviours leading to rewards. However the mechanics of these systems and their interactions are still unclear. While extensively studied independently, few models have been developed to account for these interactions. On some experiment, pigeons have been observed to display a maladaptive behaviour that some suggest to involve conflicts between Pavlovian and instrumental conditioning. In a procedure referred as negative automaintenance, a key light is paired with the subsequent delivery of food, however any peck towards the key light results in the omission of the reward. Studies showed that in such procedure some pigeons persisted in pecking to a substantial level despite its negative consequence, while others learned to refrain from pecking and maximized their cumulative rewards. Furthermore, the pigeons that were unable to refrain from pecking could nevertheless shift their pecks towards a harmless alternative key light. We confronted a computational model that combines dual-learning systems and factored representations, recently developed to account for sign-tracking and goal-tracking behaviours in rats, to these negative automaintenance experimental data. We show that it can explain the variability of the observed behaviours and the capacity of alternative key lights to distract pigeons from their detrimental behaviours. These results confirm the proposed model as an interesting tool to reproduce experiments that could involve interactions between Pavlovian and instrumental conditioning. The model allows us to draw predictions that may be experimentally verified, which could help further investigate

  18. Accounting for negative automaintenance in pigeons: a dual learning systems approach and factored representations.

    PubMed

    Lesaint, Florian; Sigaud, Olivier; Khamassi, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Animals, including Humans, are prone to develop persistent maladaptive and suboptimal behaviours. Some of these behaviours have been suggested to arise from interactions between brain systems of Pavlovian conditioning, the acquisition of responses to initially neutral stimuli previously paired with rewards, and instrumental conditioning, the acquisition of active behaviours leading to rewards. However the mechanics of these systems and their interactions are still unclear. While extensively studied independently, few models have been developed to account for these interactions. On some experiment, pigeons have been observed to display a maladaptive behaviour that some suggest to involve conflicts between Pavlovian and instrumental conditioning. In a procedure referred as negative automaintenance, a key light is paired with the subsequent delivery of food, however any peck towards the key light results in the omission of the reward. Studies showed that in such procedure some pigeons persisted in pecking to a substantial level despite its negative consequence, while others learned to refrain from pecking and maximized their cumulative rewards. Furthermore, the pigeons that were unable to refrain from pecking could nevertheless shift their pecks towards a harmless alternative key light. We confronted a computational model that combines dual-learning systems and factored representations, recently developed to account for sign-tracking and goal-tracking behaviours in rats, to these negative automaintenance experimental data. We show that it can explain the variability of the observed behaviours and the capacity of alternative key lights to distract pigeons from their detrimental behaviours. These results confirm the proposed model as an interesting tool to reproduce experiments that could involve interactions between Pavlovian and instrumental conditioning. The model allows us to draw predictions that may be experimentally verified, which could help further investigate

  19. Expression of Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-2 in Resected Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xiangjiao; Huang, Zhaoqin; Di, Jian; Mu, Dianbin; Wang, Yawei; Zhao, Xianguang; Zhao, Hanxi; Zhu, Wanqi; Li, Xiaolin; Kong, Lingling; Xing, Ligang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The addition of trastuzumab to chemotherapy was demonstrated to be beneficial for advanced human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2) positive gastric cancer. However, the HER-2 status of rectal cancer remains uncertain. This study aimed to determine the HER-2 expression in a large multicenter cohort of rectal cancer patients. The clinical and pathological features of 717 patients were retrospectively reviewed. All the patients were diagnosed with primary rectal adenocarcinoma without distant metastasis and took surgery directly without any preoperative anticancer treatment. HER-2 status was assessed on resected samples. A total of 99 cases with IHC3+ and 16 cases with IHC 2+ plus gene amplification were determined as HER-2 positive. 22.6% of HER-2 positive patients had local recurrence, whereas 16.9% of HER-2 negative patients did (P = 0.146). HER-2 positive tumors were more likely to have distant metastasis (P = 0.007). Univariate analysis revealed that pathological tumor stage, pathological node stage, positive margin, and lymphovascular invasion were significantly correlated with 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) and 5-year overall survival (OS). The patients with >10 dissected lymph nodes showed significantly longer OS (P = 0.045) but not DFS (P = 0.054). HER-2 negative patients had significantly better 5-year DFS (P < 0.001) and 5-year OS (P = 0.013) than those of the HER-2 positive patients. In the subgroup analysis for the early rectal cancer and locally advanced rectal cancer, HER-2 was also a poor predictor for survival. Multivariate analysis revealed that HER-2 was an independent prognostic factor for 5-year DFS (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.919, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.415–2.605, P < 0.001) and for 5-year OS (HR = 1.549, 95% CI 1.097–2.186, P = 0.013). When the treatment was included in the analysis for locally advanced patients, HER-2 was a prognostic factor for 5-year DFS (P = 0.001) but not for

  20. Dominant-Negative Androgen Receptor Inhibition of Intracrine Androgen-Dependent Growth of Castration-Recurrent Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kantor, Boris; Li, Xiangping; Haack, Karin; Moore, Dominic T.; Wilson, Elizabeth M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer (CaP) is the second leading cause of cancer death in American men. Androgen deprivation therapy is initially effective in CaP treatment, but CaP recurs despite castrate levels of circulating androgen. Continued expression of the androgen receptor (AR) and its ligands has been linked to castration-recurrent CaP growth. Principal Finding In this report, the ligand-dependent dominant-negative ARΔ142–337 (ARΔTR) was expressed in castration-recurrent CWR-R1 cell and tumor models to elucidate the role of AR signaling. Expression of ARΔTR decreased CWR-R1 tumor growth in the presence and absence of exogenous testosterone (T) and improved survival in the presence of exogenous T. There was evidence for negative selection of ARΔTR transgene in T-treated mice. Mass spectrometry revealed castration-recurrent CaP dihydrotestosterone (DHT) levels sufficient to activate AR and ARΔTR. In the absence of exogenous testosterone, CWR-R1-ARΔTR and control cells exhibited altered androgen profiles that implicated epithelial CaP cells as a source of intratumoral AR ligands. Conclusion The study provides in vivo evidence that activation of AR signaling by intratumoral AR ligands is required for castration-recurrent CaP growth and that epithelial CaP cells produce sufficient active androgens for CaP recurrence during androgen deprivation therapy. Targeting intracrine T and DHT synthesis should provide a mechanism to inhibit AR and growth of castration-recurrent CaP. PMID:22272301

  1. Elevated Appraisals of the Negative Impact of Naturally Occurring Life Events: A Risk Factor for Depressive and Anxiety Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espejo, Emmanuel Peter; Hammen, Constance; Brennan, Patricia A.

    2012-01-01

    The tendency to appraise naturally occurring life events (LEs) as having high negative impact may be a predisposing factor for the development of depression and anxiety disorders. In the current study, appraisals of the negative impact of recent LEs were examined in relationship to depressive and anxiety disorders in a sample of 653 adolescents…

  2. Non-negative matrix factorization by maximizing correntropy for cancer clustering

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) has been shown to be a powerful tool for clustering gene expression data, which are widely used to classify cancers. NMF aims to find two non-negative matrices whose product closely approximates the original matrix. Traditional NMF methods minimize either the l2 norm or the Kullback-Leibler distance between the product of the two matrices and the original matrix. Correntropy was recently shown to be an effective similarity measurement due to its stability to outliers or noise. Results We propose a maximum correntropy criterion (MCC)-based NMF method (NMF-MCC) for gene expression data-based cancer clustering. Instead of minimizing the l2 norm or the Kullback-Leibler distance, NMF-MCC maximizes the correntropy between the product of the two matrices and the original matrix. The optimization problem can be solved by an expectation conditional maximization algorithm. Conclusions Extensive experiments on six cancer benchmark sets demonstrate that the proposed method is significantly more accurate than the state-of-the-art methods in cancer clustering. PMID:23522344

  3. Akt negatively regulates translation of the ternary complex factor Elk-1.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Claudia; Vojtek, Anne B

    2003-08-28

    Cross-talk between signaling pathways plays an important role in regulation of cell growth, differentiation, survival, and death. Here, we show that Akt regulates the Elk-1 transcription factor, independent of its negative regulation of Raf kinases. Using a constitutively active Mek1 to bypass the regulation of Raf by Akt, we find that the Elk-1 and Sap1a proteins are dramatically decreased in the presence of activated Akt. Akt catalytic activity is required. Also, Mek-dependent activation of a TCF (Elk-1/Sap-1a)-dependent c-fos reporter is decreased by activated Akt. Neither the level of Elk-1 mRNA nor the stability of the Elk-1 protein is altered by activated Akt. Instead, the rate of incorporation of labeled methionine into Elk-1 protein is decreased in the presence of Akt. In addition, the level of the Elk-1 protein but not GFP is significantly decreased in the presence of activated Akt, when GFP is expressed from an IRES element in a bicistronic message with Elk-1. We conclude that Akt negatively regulates translation of the Elk-1 mRNA. A coding region determinant that maps within the first 279 nts of the Elk-1 message is necessary and sufficient for Akt-mediated regulation of Elk-1.

  4. Repetitive negative thinking as a transdiagnostic factor in depression and anxiety: A conceptual replication.

    PubMed

    Drost, Jolijn; van der Does, Willem; van Hemert, Albert M; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Spinhoven, Philip

    2014-12-01

    Comorbidity among affective disorders is high. Rumination has been found to mediate cross-sectional and prospective relations between anxiety and depressive symptoms in adolescents and adults. We examined whether rumination and worry, both forms of repetitive negative thinking, also explain the associations between affective disorders. This was studied using a prospective cohort study. In a mixed sample of 2981 adults (persons with a prior history of or a current affective disorder and healthy individuals) we assessed DSM-IV affective disorders (CIDI), rumination (LEIDS-R) and worry (PSWQ). All measures were repeated 2 years and 4 years later. Using structural equation models, we found that baseline rumination and worry partly mediated the association of baseline fear disorders (social anxiety disorder, panic disorder, agoraphobia) with distress disorders (dysthymia, major depressive disorder, generalized anxiety disorder). Moreover, baseline fear disorders predicted changes in distress disorders and changes in worry and rumination mediated these associations. The association between baseline distress disorders and changes in fear disorders was mediated by changes in rumination but not by changes in worry. From these results it can be concluded that repetitive negative thinking is an important transdiagnostic factor. Rumination and worry are partly responsible for the cross-sectional and prospective co-occurrence of affective disorders and may be suitable targets for treatment. PMID:25461794

  5. Transcriptional activation by Myc is under negative control by the transcription factor AP-2.

    PubMed Central

    Gaubatz, S; Imhof, A; Dosch, R; Werner, O; Mitchell, P; Buettner, R; Eilers, M

    1995-01-01

    The Myc protein binds to and transactivates the expression of genes via E-box elements containing a central CAC(G/A)TG sequence. The transcriptional activation function of Myc is required for its ability to induce cell cycle progression, cellular transformation and apoptosis. Here we show that transactivation by Myc is under negative control by the transcription factor AP-2. AP-2 inhibits transactivation by Myc via two distinct mechanisms. First, high affinity binding sites for AP-2 overlap Myc-response elements in two bona fide target genes of Myc, prothymosin-alpha and ornithine decarboxylase. On these sites, AP-2 competes for binding of either Myc/Max heterodimers or Max/Max homodimers. The second mechanism involves a specific interaction between C-terminal domains of AP-2 and the BR/HLH/LZ domain of Myc, but not Max or Mad. Binding of AP-2 to Myc does not preclude association of Myc with Max, but impairs DNA binding of the Myc/Max complex and inhibits transactivation by Myc even in the absence of an overlapping AP-2 binding site. Taken together, our data suggest that AP-2 acts as a negative regulator of transactivation by Myc. Images PMID:7729426

  6. Clustering Algorithm for Unsupervised Monaural Musical Sound Separation Based on Non-negative Matrix Factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang Ha; Lee, Seokjin; Sung, Koeng-Mo

    Non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) is widely used for monaural musical sound source separation because of its efficiency and good performance. However, an additional clustering process is required because the musical sound mixture is separated into more signals than the number of musical tracks during NMF separation. In the conventional method, manual clustering or training-based clustering is performed with an additional learning process. Recently, a clustering algorithm based on the mel-frequency cepstrum coefficient (MFCC) was proposed for unsupervised clustering. However, MFCC clustering supplies limited information for clustering. In this paper, we propose various timbre features for unsupervised clustering and a clustering algorithm with these features. Simulation experiments are carried out using various musical sound mixtures. The results indicate that the proposed method improves clustering performance, as compared to conventional MFCC-based clustering.

  7. Categorical Dimensions of Human Odor Descriptor Space Revealed by Non-Negative Matrix Factorization

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Jason B.; Ramanathan, Arvind; Chennubhotla, Chakra S.

    2013-01-01

    In contrast to most other sensory modalities, the basic perceptual dimensions of olfaction remain unclear. Here, we use non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) – a dimensionality reduction technique – to uncover structure in a panel of odor profiles, with each odor defined as a point in multi-dimensional descriptor space. The properties of NMF are favorable for the analysis of such lexical and perceptual data, and lead to a high-dimensional account of odor space. We further provide evidence that odor dimensions apply categorically. That is, odor space is not occupied homogenously, but rather in a discrete and intrinsically clustered manner. We discuss the potential implications of these results for the neural coding of odors, as well as for developing classifiers on larger datasets that may be useful for predicting perceptual qualities from chemical structures. PMID:24058466

  8. Categorical dimensions of human odor descriptor space revealed by non-negative matrix factorization

    SciTech Connect

    Chennubhotla, Chakra; Castro, Jason

    2013-01-01

    In contrast to most other sensory modalities, the basic perceptual dimensions of olfaction remain un- clear. Here, we use non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) - a dimensionality reduction technique - to uncover structure in a panel of odor profiles, with each odor defined as a point in multi-dimensional descriptor space. The properties of NMF are favorable for the analysis of such lexical and perceptual data, and lead to a high-dimensional account of odor space. We further provide evidence that odor di- mensions apply categorically. That is, odor space is not occupied homogenously, but rather in a discrete and intrinsically clustered manner. We discuss the potential implications of these results for the neural coding of odors, as well as for developing classifiers on larger datasets that may be useful for predicting perceptual qualities from chemical structures.

  9. Finding Imaging Patterns of Structural Covariance via Non-Negative Matrix Factorization

    PubMed Central

    Sotiras, Aristeidis; Resnick, Susan M.; Davatzikos, Christos

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the use of Non-Negative Matrix Factorization (NNMF) for the analysis of structural neuroimaging data. The goal is to identify the brain regions that co-vary across individuals in a consistent way, hence potentially being part of underlying brain networks or otherwise influenced by underlying common mechanisms such as genetics and pathologies. NNMF offers a directly data-driven way of extracting relatively localized co-varying structural regions, thereby transcending limitations of Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Independent Component Analysis (ICA) and other related methods that tend to produce dispersed components of positive and negative loadings. In particular, leveraging upon the well known ability of NNMF to produce parts-based representations of image data, we derive decompositions that partition the brain into regions that vary in consistent ways across individuals. Importantly, these decompositions achieve dimensionality reduction via highly interpretable ways and generalize well to new data as shown via split-sample experiments. We empirically validate NNMF in two data sets: i) a Diffusion Tensor (DT) mouse brain development study, and ii) a structural Magnetic Resonance (sMR) study of human brain aging. We demonstrate the ability of NNMF to produce sparse parts-based representations of the data at various resolutions. These representations seem to follow what we know about the underlying functional organization of the brain and also capture some pathological processes. Moreover, we show that these low dimensional representations favorably compare to descriptions obtained with more commonly used matrix factorization methods like PCA and ICA. PMID:25497684

  10. Finding imaging patterns of structural covariance via Non-Negative Matrix Factorization.

    PubMed

    Sotiras, Aristeidis; Resnick, Susan M; Davatzikos, Christos

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the use of Non-Negative Matrix Factorization (NNMF) for the analysis of structural neuroimaging data. The goal is to identify the brain regions that co-vary across individuals in a consistent way, hence potentially being part of underlying brain networks or otherwise influenced by underlying common mechanisms such as genetics and pathologies. NNMF offers a directly data-driven way of extracting relatively localized co-varying structural regions, thereby transcending limitations of Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Independent Component Analysis (ICA) and other related methods that tend to produce dispersed components of positive and negative loadings. In particular, leveraging upon the well known ability of NNMF to produce parts-based representations of image data, we derive decompositions that partition the brain into regions that vary in consistent ways across individuals. Importantly, these decompositions achieve dimensionality reduction via highly interpretable ways and generalize well to new data as shown via split-sample experiments. We empirically validate NNMF in two data sets: i) a Diffusion Tensor (DT) mouse brain development study, and ii) a structural Magnetic Resonance (sMR) study of human brain aging. We demonstrate the ability of NNMF to produce sparse parts-based representations of the data at various resolutions. These representations seem to follow what we know about the underlying functional organization of the brain and also capture some pathological processes. Moreover, we show that these low dimensional representations favorably compare to descriptions obtained with more commonly used matrix factorization methods like PCA and ICA.

  11. Farnesoid X receptor, through the binding with steroidogenic factor 1-responsive element, inhibits aromatase expression in tumor Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Stefania; Malivindi, Rocco; Giordano, Cinzia; Gu, Guowei; Panza, Salvatore; Bonofiglio, Daniela; Lanzino, Marilena; Sisci, Diego; Panno, Maria Luisa; Andò, Sebastiano

    2010-02-19

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily that regulates bile acid homeostasis. It is expressed in the liver and the gastrointestinal tract, but also in several non-enterohepatic tissues including testis. Recently, FXR was identified as a negative modulator of the androgen-estrogen-converting aromatase enzyme in human breast cancer cells. In the present study we detected the expression of FXR in Leydig normal and tumor cell lines and in rat testes tissue. We found, in rat Leydig tumor cells, R2C, that FXR activation by the primary bile acid chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) or a synthetic agonist GW4064, through a SHP-independent mechanism, down-regulates aromatase expression in terms of mRNA, protein levels, and its enzymatic activity. Transient transfection experiments, using vector containing rat aromatase promoter PII, evidenced that CDCA reduces basal aromatase promoter activity. Mutagenesis studies, electrophoretic mobility shift, and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis reveal that FXR is able to compete with steroidogenic factor 1 in binding to a common sequence present in the aromatase promoter region interfering negatively with its activity. Finally, the FXR-mediated anti-proliferative effects exerted by CDCA on tumor Leydig cells are at least in part due to an inhibition of estrogen-dependent cell growth. In conclusion our findings identify for the first time the activators of FXR as negative modulators of the aromatase enzyme in Leydig tumor cell lines.

  12. Phosphorylation of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (p55) protects macrophages from silica-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Gambelli, Federica; Di, Peter; Niu, Xiaomei; Friedman, Mitchell; Hammond, Timothy; Riches, David W H; Ortiz, Luis A

    2004-01-16

    Macrophages play a fundamental role in silicosis in part by removing silica particles and producing inflammatory mediators in response to silica. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) is a prominent mediator in silicosis. Silica induction of apoptosis in macrophages might be mediated by TNFalpha. However, TNFalpha also activates signal transduction pathways (NF-kappaB and AP-1) that rescue cells from apoptosis. Therefore, we studied the TNFalpha-mediated mechanisms that confer macrophage protection against the pro-apoptotic effects of silica. We will show that exposure to silica induced TNFalpha production by RAW 264.7 cells, but not by IC-21. Silica-induced activation of NF-kappaB and AP-1 was only observed in RAW 264.7 macrophages. ERK activation in response to silica exposure was only observed in RAW 264.7 macrophages, whereas activation of p38 phosphorylation was predominantly observed in IC-21 macrophages. No changes in JNK activity were observed in either cell line in response to silica exposure. Silica induced apoptosis in both macrophage cell lines, but the induction of apoptosis was significantly larger in IC-21 cells. Protection against apoptosis in RAW 264.7 cells in response to silica was mediated by enhanced NF-kappaB activation and ERK-mediated phosphorylation of the p55 TNFalpha receptor. Inhibition of these two protective mechanisms by specific pharmacological inhibitors or transfection of dominant negative mutants that inhibit IkappaBalpha or ERK phosphorylation significantly increased silica-induced apoptosis in RAW 264.7 macrophages. These data suggest that NF-kappaB activation and ERK-mediated phosphorylation of the p55 TNF receptor are important cell survival mechanisms in the macrophage response to silica exposure. PMID:14570868

  13. Altered (/sup 125/I)epidermal growth factor binding and receptor distribution in psoriasis

    SciTech Connect

    Nanney, L.B.; Stoscheck, C.M.; Magid, M.; King, L.E. Jr.

    1986-03-01

    Stimulation of growth and differentiation of human epidermis by epidermal growth factor (EGF) is mediated by its binding to specific receptors. Whether EGF receptors primarily mediate cell division or differentiation in hyperproliferative disease such as psoriasis vulgaris is unclear. To study the pathogenesis of psoriasis, 4-mm2 punch biopsy specimens of normal, uninvolved, and involved psoriatic skin were assayed for EGF receptors by autoradiographic, immunohistochemical, and biochemical methods. Using autoradiographic and immunohistochemical methods, basal keratinocytes were found to contain the greatest number of EGF binding sites and immunoreactive receptors as compared to the upper layers of the epidermis in both normal epidermis and psoriatic skin. No EGF receptor differences between normal and psoriatic epidermis were observed in this layer. In the upper layers of the epidermis, a 2-fold increase in EGF binding capacity was observed in psoriatic skin as compared with normal thin or thick skin. Biochemical methods indicated that (/sup 125/I)EGF binding was increased in psoriatic epidermis as compared with similar thickness normal epidermis when measured on a protein basis. Epidermal growth factor was shown to increase phosphorylation of the EGF receptor in skin. EGF receptors retained in the nonmitotic stratum spinosum and parakeratotic stratum corneum may reflect the incomplete, abnormal differentiation that occurs in active psoriatic lesions. Alternatively, retained EGF receptors may play a direct role in inhibiting cellular differentiation in the suprabasal layers.

  14. Negative Allosteric Modulators Selective for The NR2B Subtype of The NMDA Receptor Impair Cognition in Multiple Domains.

    PubMed

    Weed, Michael R; Bookbinder, Mark; Polino, Joseph; Keavy, Deborah; Cardinal, Rudolf N; Simmermacher-Mayer, Jean; Cometa, Fu-ni L; King, Dalton; Thangathirupathy, Srinivasan; Macor, John E; Bristow, Linda J

    2016-01-01

    Antidepressant activity of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists and negative allosteric modulators (NAMs) has led to increased investigation of their behavioral pharmacology. NMDA antagonists, such as ketamine, impair cognition in multiple species and in multiple cognitive domains. However, studies with NR2B subtype-selective NAMs have reported mixed results in rodents including increased impulsivity, no effect on cognition, impairment or even improvement of some cognitive tasks. To date, the effects of NR2B-selective NAMs on cognitive tests have not been reported in nonhuman primates. The current study evaluated two selective NR2B NAMs, CP101,606 and BMT-108908, along with the nonselective NMDA antagonists, ketamine and AZD6765, in the nonhuman primate Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB) list-based delayed match to sample (list-DMS) task. Ketamine and the two NMDA NR2B NAMs produced selective impairments in memory in the list-DMS task. AZD6765 impaired performance in a non-specific manner. In a separate cohort, CP101,606 impaired performance of the nonhuman primate CANTAB visuo-spatial Paired Associates Learning (vsPAL) task with a selective impairment at more difficult conditions. The results of these studies clearly show that systemic administration of a selective NR2B NAM can cause transient cognitive impairment in multiple cognitive domains.

  15. Novel Scaffold Identification of mGlu1 Receptor Negative Allosteric Modulators Using a Hierarchical Virtual Screening Approach.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jae Wan; Cho, Nam-Chul; Min, Sun-Joon; Cho, Yong Seo; Park, Ki Duk; Seo, Seon Hee; No, Kyoung Tai; Pae, Ae Nim

    2016-02-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1) is considered as an attractive drug target for neuropathic pain treatments. The hierarchical virtual screening approach for identifying novel scaffolds of mGluR1 allosteric modulators was performed using a homology model built with the dopamine D3 crystal structure as template. The mGluR1 mutagenesis data, conserved amino acid sequences across class A and class C GPCRs, and previously reported multiple sequence alignments of class C GPCRs to the rhodopsin template, were employed for the sequence alignment to overcome difficulties of model generation with low sequence identity of mGluR1 and dopamine D3. The structures refined by molecular dynamics simulations were employed for docking of Asinex commercial libraries after hierarchical virtual screening with pharmacophore and naïve Bayesian models. Five of 35 compounds experimentally evaluated using a calcium mobilization assay exhibited micromolar activities (IC50) with chemotype novelty that demonstrated the validity of our methods. A hierarchical structure and ligand-based virtual screening approach with homology model of class C GPCR based on dopamine D3 class A GPCR structure was successfully performed and applied to discover novel negative mGluR1 allosteric modulators.

  16. Novel Scaffold Identification of mGlu1 Receptor Negative Allosteric Modulators Using a Hierarchical Virtual Screening Approach.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jae Wan; Cho, Nam-Chul; Min, Sun-Joon; Cho, Yong Seo; Park, Ki Duk; Seo, Seon Hee; No, Kyoung Tai; Pae, Ae Nim

    2016-02-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1) is considered as an attractive drug target for neuropathic pain treatments. The hierarchical virtual screening approach for identifying novel scaffolds of mGluR1 allosteric modulators was performed using a homology model built with the dopamine D3 crystal structure as template. The mGluR1 mutagenesis data, conserved amino acid sequences across class A and class C GPCRs, and previously reported multiple sequence alignments of class C GPCRs to the rhodopsin template, were employed for the sequence alignment to overcome difficulties of model generation with low sequence identity of mGluR1 and dopamine D3. The structures refined by molecular dynamics simulations were employed for docking of Asinex commercial libraries after hierarchical virtual screening with pharmacophore and naïve Bayesian models. Five of 35 compounds experimentally evaluated using a calcium mobilization assay exhibited micromolar activities (IC50) with chemotype novelty that demonstrated the validity of our methods. A hierarchical structure and ligand-based virtual screening approach with homology model of class C GPCR based on dopamine D3 class A GPCR structure was successfully performed and applied to discover novel negative mGluR1 allosteric modulators. PMID:26343933

  17. Mapping the Binding of GluN2B-Selective N-Methyl-d-aspartate Receptor Negative Allosteric Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hongjie; Karakas, Erkan; Geballe, Matthew; Furukawa, Hiro; Liotta, Dennis C.; Snyder, James P.; Traynelis, Stephen F.

    2012-01-01

    We have used recent structural advances in our understanding of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor amino terminal domain to explore the binding mode of multiple diaryl GluN2B-selective negative allosteric modulators at the interface between the GluN1 and GluN2B amino-terminal domains. We found that interaction of the A ring within the binding pocket seems largely invariant for a variety of structurally distinct ligands. In addition, a range of structurally diverse linkers between the two aryl rings can be accommodated by the binding site, providing a potential opportunity to tune interactions with the ligand binding pocket via changes in hydrogen bond donors, acceptors, as well as stereochemistry. The most diversity in atomic interactions between protein and ligand occur in the B ring, with functional groups that contain electron donors and acceptors providing additional atomic contacts within the pocket. A cluster of residues distant to the binding site also control ligand potency, the degree of inhibition, and show ligand-induced increases in motion during molecular dynamics simulations. Mutations at some of these residues seem to distinguish between structurally distinct ligands and raise the possibility that GluN2B-selective ligands can be divided into multiple classes. These results should help facilitate the development of well tolerated GluN2B subunit-selective antagonists. PMID:22596351

  18. 2q36.3 is associated with prognosis for oestrogen receptor-negative breast cancer patients treated with chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jingmei; Lindström, Linda S.; Foo, Jia N.; Rafiq, Sajjad; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Dennis, Joe; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Van ‘t Veer, Laura J.; Cornelissen, Sten; Rutgers, Emiel; Southey, Melissa C.; Apicella, Carmel; Dite, Gillian S.; Hopper, John L.; Fasching, Peter A.; Haeberle, Lothar; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Blomqvist, Carl; Muranen, Taru A.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Kataja, Vesa; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Investigators, kConFab; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; McLachlan, Sue-Anne; Lambrechts, Diether; Thienpont, Bernard; Smeets, Ann; Wildiers, Hans; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Seibold, Petra; Rudolph, Anja; Giles, Graham G.; Baglietto, Laura; Severi, Gianluca; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Kristensen, Vessela; Alnæs, Grethe I. Grenaker; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Nord, Silje; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert; Seynaeve, Caroline; Hooning, Maartje; Kriege, Mieke; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van den Ouweland, Ans; Li, Yi; Hamann, Ute; Torres, Diana; Ulmer, Hans U.; Rüdiger, Thomas; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Chen, Shou-Tung; Teo, Soo Hwang; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Har Yip, Cheng; Fuang Ho, Gwo; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Tajima, Kazuo; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Park, Sue K.; Yoo, Keun-Young; Maishman, Tom; Tapper, William J.; Dunning, Alison; Shah, Mitul; Luben, Robert; Brown, Judith; Chuen Khor, Chiea; Eccles, Diana M.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Easton, Douglas; Humphreys, Keith; Liu, Jianjun; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila

    2014-01-01

    Large population-based registry studies have shown that breast cancer prognosis is inherited. Here we analyse single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of genes implicated in human immunology and inflammation as candidates for prognostic markers of breast cancer survival involving 1,804 oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative patients treated with chemotherapy (279 events) from 14 European studies in a prior large-scale genotyping experiment, which is part of the Collaborative Oncological Gene-environment Study (COGS) initiative. We carry out replication using Asian COGS samples (n=522, 53 events) and the Prospective Study of Outcomes in Sporadic versus Hereditary breast cancer (POSH) study (n=315, 108 events). Rs4458204_A near CCL20 (2q36.3) is found to be associated with breast cancer-specific death at a genome-wide significant level (n=2,641, 440 events, combined allelic hazard ratio (HR)=1.81 (1.49–2.19); P for trend=1.90 × 10−9). Such survival-associated variants can represent ideal targets for tailored therapeutics, and may also enhance our current prognostic prediction capabilities. PMID:24937182

  19. 2q36.3 is associated with prognosis for oestrogen receptor-negative breast cancer patients treated with chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingmei; Lindström, Linda S; Foo, Jia N; Rafiq, Sajjad; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Pharoah, Paul D P; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Dennis, Joe; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Van 't Veer, Laura J; Cornelissen, Sten; Rutgers, Emiel; Southey, Melissa C; Apicella, Carmel; Dite, Gillian S; Hopper, John L; Fasching, Peter A; Haeberle, Lothar; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Blomqvist, Carl; Muranen, Taru A; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Kataja, Vesa; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; McLachlan, Sue-Anne; Lambrechts, Diether; Thienpont, Bernard; Smeets, Ann; Wildiers, Hans; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Seibold, Petra; Rudolph, Anja; Giles, Graham G; Baglietto, Laura; Severi, Gianluca; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Kristensen, Vessela; Alnæs, Grethe I Grenaker; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Nord, Silje; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert; Seynaeve, Caroline; Hooning, Maartje; Kriege, Mieke; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van den Ouweland, Ans; Li, Yi; Hamann, Ute; Torres, Diana; Ulmer, Hans U; Rüdiger, Thomas; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Chen, Shou-Tung; Teo, Soo Hwang; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Har Yip, Cheng; Fuang Ho, Gwo; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Tajima, Kazuo; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Park, Sue K; Yoo, Keun-Young; Maishman, Tom; Tapper, William J; Dunning, Alison; Shah, Mitul; Luben, Robert; Brown, Judith; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Eccles, Diana M; Nevanlinna, Heli; Easton, Douglas; Humphreys, Keith; Liu, Jianjun; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila

    2014-01-01

    Large population-based registry studies have shown that breast cancer prognosis is inherited. Here we analyse single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of genes implicated in human immunology and inflammation as candidates for prognostic markers of breast cancer survival involving 1,804 oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative patients treated with chemotherapy (279 events) from 14 European studies in a prior large-scale genotyping experiment, which is part of the Collaborative Oncological Gene-environment Study (COGS) initiative. We carry out replication using Asian COGS samples (n=522, 53 events) and the Prospective Study of Outcomes in Sporadic versus Hereditary breast cancer (POSH) study (n=315, 108 events). Rs4458204_A near CCL20 (2q36.3) is found to be associated with breast cancer-specific death at a genome-wide significant level (n=2,641, 440 events, combined allelic hazard ratio (HR)=1.81 (1.49-2.19); P for trend=1.90 × 10(-9)). Such survival-associated variants can represent ideal targets for tailored therapeutics, and may also enhance our current prognostic prediction capabilities.

  20. 2q36.3 is associated with prognosis for oestrogen receptor-negative breast cancer patients treated with chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingmei; Lindström, Linda S; Foo, Jia N; Rafiq, Sajjad; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Pharoah, Paul D P; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Dennis, Joe; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Van 't Veer, Laura J; Cornelissen, Sten; Rutgers, Emiel; Southey, Melissa C; Apicella, Carmel; Dite, Gillian S; Hopper, John L; Fasching, Peter A; Haeberle, Lothar; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Blomqvist, Carl; Muranen, Taru A; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Kataja, Vesa; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; McLachlan, Sue-Anne; Lambrechts, Diether; Thienpont, Bernard; Smeets, Ann; Wildiers, Hans; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Seibold, Petra; Rudolph, Anja; Giles, Graham G; Baglietto, Laura; Severi, Gianluca; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Kristensen, Vessela; Alnæs, Grethe I Grenaker; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Nord, Silje; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert; Seynaeve, Caroline; Hooning, Maartje; Kriege, Mieke; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van den Ouweland, Ans; Li, Yi; Hamann, Ute; Torres, Diana; Ulmer, Hans U; Rüdiger, Thomas; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Chen, Shou-Tung; Teo, Soo Hwang; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Har Yip, Cheng; Fuang Ho, Gwo; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Tajima, Kazuo; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Park, Sue K; Yoo, Keun-Young; Maishman, Tom; Tapper, William J; Dunning, Alison; Shah, Mitul; Luben, Robert; Brown, Judith; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Eccles, Diana M; Nevanlinna, Heli; Easton, Douglas; Humphreys, Keith; Liu, Jianjun; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila

    2014-01-01

    Large population-based registry studies have shown that breast cancer prognosis is inherited. Here we analyse single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of genes implicated in human immunology and inflammation as candidates for prognostic markers of breast cancer survival involving 1,804 oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative patients treated with chemotherapy (279 events) from 14 European studies in a prior large-scale genotyping experiment, which is part of the Collaborative Oncological Gene-environment Study (COGS) initiative. We carry out replication using Asian COGS samples (n=522, 53 events) and the Prospective Study of Outcomes in Sporadic versus Hereditary breast cancer (POSH) study (n=315, 108 events). Rs4458204_A near CCL20 (2q36.3) is found to be associated with breast cancer-specific death at a genome-wide significant level (n=2,641, 440 events, combined allelic hazard ratio (HR)=1.81 (1.49-2.19); P for trend=1.90 × 10(-9)). Such survival-associated variants can represent ideal targets for tailored therapeutics, and may also enhance our current prognostic prediction capabilities. PMID:24937182

  1. Salivary Protein Profiles among HER2/neu-Receptor-Positive and -Negative Breast Cancer Patients: Support for Using Salivary Protein Profiles for Modeling Breast Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Streckfus, Charles F.; Arreola, Daniel; Edwards, Cynthia; Bigler, Lenora

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. The objective of this study was to compare the salivary protein profiles from individuals diagnosed with breast cancer that were either HER2/neu receptor positive or negative. Methods. Two pooled saliva specimens underwent proteomic analysis. One pooled specimen was from women diagnosed with stage IIa HER2/neu-receptor-positive breast cancer patients (n = 10) and the other was from women diagnosed with stage IIa HER2/neu-receptor-negative cancer patients (n = 10). The pooled samples were trypsinized and the peptides labeled with iTRAQ reagent. Specimens were analyzed using an LC-MS/MS mass spectrometer. Results. The results yielded approximately 71 differentially expressed proteins in the saliva specimens. There were 34 upregulated proteins and 37 downregulated proteins. PMID:22570650

  2. Corticotropin-releasing factor within the central nucleus of the amygdala and the nucleus accumbens shell mediates the negative affective state of nicotine withdrawal in rats

    PubMed Central

    Marcinkiewcz, Catherine A.; Prado, Melissa M.; Isaac, Shani K.; Marshall, Alex; Rylkova, Daria; Bruijnzeel, Adrie W.

    2008-01-01

    Tobacco addiction is a chronic disorder that is characterized by a negative affective state upon smoking cessation and relapse after periods of abstinence. Previous research has shown that an increased central release of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) at least partly mediates the deficit in brain reward function associated with nicotine withdrawal in rats. The aim of these studies was to investigate the role of CRF in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), the lateral bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST), and the nucleus accumbens shell (Nacc shell) in the deficit in brain reward function associated with precipitated nicotine withdrawal. The intracranial self-stimulation procedure was used to assess the negative affective aspects of nicotine withdrawal. Elevations in brain reward thresholds are indicative of a deficit in brain reward function. In all experiments, the nicotinic receptor antagonist mecamylamine (3 mg/kg) elevated the brain reward thresholds of the nicotine dependent rats (9 mg/kg/day of nicotine salt) and did not affect the brain reward thresholds of the saline-treated control rats. The administration of the nonspecific CRF1/2 receptor antagonist D-Phe CRF(12–41) into the CeA and the Nacc shell prevented the mecamylamine-induced elevations in brain reward thresholds in the nicotine dependent rats. Blockade of CRF1/2 receptors in the lateral BNST did not prevent the mecamylamine-induced elevations in brain reward thresholds in the nicotine dependent rats. These studies indicate that the negative emotional state associated with precipitated nicotine withdrawal is at least partly mediated by an increased release of CRF in the CeA and Nacc shell. PMID:19145226

  3. The types II and III transforming growth factor-beta receptors form homo-oligomers

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Affinity-labeling experiments have detected hetero-oligomers of the types I, II, and III transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) receptors which mediate intracellular signaling by TGF-beta, but the oligomeric state of the individual receptor types remains unknown. Here we use two types of experiments to show that a major portion of the receptor types II and III forms homo-oligomers both in the absence and presence of TGF-beta. Both experiments used COS-7 cells co-transfected with combinations of these receptors carrying different epitope tags at their extracellular termini. In immunoprecipitation experiments, radiolabeled TGF-beta was bound and cross-linked to cells co-expressing two differently tagged type II receptors. Sequential immunoprecipitations using anti-epitope monoclonal antibodies showed that type II TGF-beta receptors form homo-oligomers. In cells co- expressing epitope-tagged types II and III receptors, a low level of co- precipitation of the ligand-labeled receptors was observed, indicating that some hetero-oligomers of the types II and III receptors exist in the presence of ligand. Antibody-mediated cross-linking studies based on double-labeling immunofluorescence explored co-patching of the receptors at the cell surface on live cells. In cells co-expressing two differently tagged type II receptors or two differently tagged type III receptors, forcing one receptor into micropatches by IgG induced co- patching of the receptor carrying the other tag, labeled by noncross- linking monovalent Fab'. These studies showed that homo-oligomers of the types II and III receptors exist on the cell surface in the absence or presence of TGF-beta 1 or -beta 2. In cells co-expressing types II and III receptors, the amount of heterocomplexes at the cell surface was too low to be detected in the immunofluorescence co-patching experiments, confirming that hetero-oligomers of the types II and III receptors are minor and probably transient species. PMID:8027173

  4. Paracrine expression of a native soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor inhibits tumor growth, metastasis, and mortality rate

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Corey K.; Kendall, Richard L.; Cabrera, Gustavo; Soroceanu, Liliana; Heike, Yuji; Gillespie, G. Yancey; Siegal, Gene P.; Mao, Xianzhi; Bett, Andrew J.; Huckle, William R.; Thomas, Kenneth A.; Curiel, David T.

    1998-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent and selective vascular endothelial cell mitogen and angiogenic factor. VEGF expression is elevated in a wide variety of solid tumors and is thought to support their growth by enhancing tumor neovascularization. To block VEGF-dependent angiogenesis, tumor cells were transfected with cDNA encoding the native soluble FLT-1 (sFLT-1) truncated VEGF receptor which can function both by sequestering VEGF and, in a dominant negative fashion, by forming inactive heterodimers with membrane-spanning VEGF receptors. Transient transfection of HT-1080 human fibrosarcoma cells with a gene encoding sFLT-1 significantly inhibited their implantation and growth in the lungs of nude mice following i.v. injection and their growth as nodules from cells injected s.c. High sFLT-1 expressing stably transfected HT-1080 clones grew even slower as s.c. tumors. Finally, survival was significantly prolonged in mice injected intracranially with human glioblastoma cells stably transfected with the sflt-1 gene. The ability of sFLT-1 protein to inhibit tumor growth is presumably attributable to its paracrine inhibition of tumor angiogenesis in vivo, since it did not affect tumor cell mitogenesis in vitro. These results not only support VEGF receptors as antiangiogenic targets but also demonstrate that sflt-1 gene therapy might be a feasible approach for inhibiting tumor angiogenesis and growth. PMID:9671758

  5. Negative transcriptional regulation of mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) by nuclear TFAM

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eun Jin; Kang, Young Cheol; Park, Wook-Ha; Jeong, Jae Hoon; Pak, Youngmi Kim

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • TFAM localizes in nuclei and mitochondria of neuronal cells. • Nuclear TFAM does not bind the Tfam promoter. • Nuclear TFAM reduced the Tfam promoter activity via suppressing NRF-1 activity. • A novel self-negative feedback regulation of Tfam gene expression is explored. • FAM may play different roles depending on its subcellular localizations. - Abstract: The nuclear DNA-encoded mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) is synthesized in cytoplasm and transported into mitochondria. TFAM enhances both transcription and replication of mitochondrial DNA. It is unclear, however, whether TFAM plays a role in regulating nuclear gene expression. Here, we demonstrated that TFAM was localized to the nucleus and mitochondria by immunostaining, subcellular fractionation, and TFAM-green fluorescent protein hybrid protein studies. In HT22 hippocampal neuronal cells, human TFAM (hTFAM) overexpression suppressed human Tfam promoter-mediated luciferase activity in a dose-dependent manner. The mitochondria targeting sequence-deficient hTFAM also repressed Tfam promoter activity to the same degree as hTFAM. It indicated that nuclear hTFAM suppressed Tfam expression without modulating mitochondrial activity. The repression required for nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1), but hTFAM did not bind to the NRF-1 binding site of its promoter. TFAM was co-immunoprecipitated with NRF-1. Taken together, we suggest that nuclear TFAM down-regulate its own gene expression as a NRF-1 repressor, showing that TFAM may play different roles depending on its subcellular localizations.

  6. The Arabidopsis thaliana NGATHA transcription factors negatively regulate cell proliferation of lateral organs.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung Ha; Kwon, So Hyun; Lee, Sang-Joo; Park, Soon Ki; Song, Jong Tae; Lee, Sangman; Lee, Myeong Min; Hwang, Yong-sic; Kim, Jeong Hoe

    2015-11-01

    The cell proliferation process of aerial lateral organs, such as leaves and flowers, is coordinated by complex genetic networks that, in general, converge on the cell cycle. The Arabidopsis thaliana NGATHA (AtNGA) family comprises four members that belong to the B3-type transcription factor superfamily, and has been suggested to be involved in growth and development of aerial lateral organs, although its role in the cell proliferation and expansion processes remains to be resolved in more detail. In order to clarify the role of AtNGAs in lateral organ growth, we took a systematic approach using both the loss- and gain-of-functional mutants of all four members. Our results showed that overexpressors of AtNGA1 to AtNGA4 developed small, narrow lateral organs, whereas the nga1 nga2 nga3 nga4 quadruple mutant produced large, wide lateral organs. We found that cell numbers of the lateral organs were significantly affected: a decrease in overexpressors and, inversely, an increase in the quadruple mutant. Kinematic analyses on leaf growth revealed that, compared with the wild type, the overexpressors displayed a lower activity of cell proliferation and yet the mutant a higher activity. Changes in expression of cell cycle-regulating genes were well in accordance with the cell proliferation activities, establishing that the AtNGA transcription factors act as bona fide negative regulators of the cell proliferation of aerial lateral organs.

  7. Negative regulation of TLR-signaling pathways by activating transcription factor-3.

    PubMed

    Whitmore, Mark M; Iparraguirre, Amaya; Kubelka, Lindsey; Weninger, Wolfgang; Hai, Tsonwin; Williams, Bryan R G

    2007-09-15

    Activating transcription factor-3 (ATF3) is rapidly induced by LPS in mouse macrophages and regulates TLR4 responses. We show that ATF3 is rapidly induced by various TLRs in mouse macrophages and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (DCs), as well as plasmacytoid and myeloid subsets of human DCs. In primary macrophages from mice with a targeted deletion of the atf3 gene (ATF3-knockout (KO)), TLR-stimulated levels of IL-12 and IL-6 were elevated relative to responses in wild-type macrophages. Similarly, targeted deletion of atf3 correlated with enhanced responsiveness of myeloid DCs to TLR activation as measured by IL-12 secretion. Ectopic expression of ATF3 antagonized TLR-stimulated IL-12p40 activation in a reporter assay. In vivo, CpG-oligodeoxynucleotide, a TLR9 agonist, given i.p. to ATF3-KO mice resulted in enhanced cytokine production from splenocytes. Furthermore, while ATF3-KO mice challenged with a sublethal dose of PR8 influenza virus were delayed in body weight recovery in comparison to wild type, the ATF3-KO mice showed higher titers of serum neutralizing Ab against PR8 5 mo postinfection. Thus, ATF3 behaves as a negative regulatory transcription factor in TLR pathways and, accordingly, deficiency in atf3 alters responses to immunological challenges in vivo. ATF3 dysregulation merits further exploration in diseases such as type I diabetes and cancer, where altered innate immunity has been implicated in their pathogenesis.

  8. Identification of osteoblast stimulating factor 5 as a negative regulator in the B-lymphopoietic niche.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Natsuko; Ichii, Michiko; Maeda, Tetsuo; Saitoh, Norimitsu; Yokota, Takafumi; Yamawaki, Kengo; Kakitani, Makoto; Tomizuka, Kazuma; Oritani, Kenji; Kanakura, Yuzuru

    2015-11-01

    Recent studies have revealed the crucial role of the niche which supports B-lymphocyte differentiation from hematopoietic stem cells. In this study, we aimed to identify a novel regulator of B lymphopoiesis secreted in the specific niche using the signal sequence trap method. Among the identified proteins from MS5 stromal cells, expression of pleiotrophin, placental proliferin 2, and osteoblast stimulating factor 5 (OSF-5) was dominantly high in several stromal cell lines. We found that OSF-5 suppressed early B lymphopoiesis in transgenic mice producing the target protein. The number of pre-B and immature B cells was reduced by more than half compared with control in the transgenic mice. In vitro studies showed that a secreted variant of OSF-5 inhibited the proliferation and colony formation of pre-B cells, whereas cell-intrinsic form had no influence on B lymphopoiesis. The main components of the B-lymphopoietic niche, osteoblasts in mice and mesenchymal cells in humans, are primary producers of OSF-5. These results define a novel mechanism of B lymphopoiesis in bone marrow. In the specific niche, B-lymphocyte differentiation is fine-tuned by negative regulators as well as supportive factors. PMID:26213229

  9. Nonlinear hyperspectral unmixing based on sparse non-negative matrix factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Li, Xiaorun; Zhao, Liaoying

    2016-01-01

    Hyperspectral unmixing aims at extracting pure material spectra, accompanied by their corresponding proportions, from a mixed pixel. Owing to modeling more accurate distribution of real material, nonlinear mixing models (non-LMM) are usually considered to hold better performance than LMMs in complicated scenarios. In the past years, numerous nonlinear models have been successfully applied to hyperspectral unmixing. However, most non-LMMs only think of sum-to-one constraint or positivity constraint while the widespread sparsity among real materials mixing is the very factor that cannot be ignored. That is, for non-LMMs, a pixel is usually composed of a few spectral signatures of different materials from all the pure pixel set. Thus, in this paper, a smooth sparsity constraint is incorporated into the state-of-the-art Fan nonlinear model to exploit the sparsity feature in nonlinear model and use it to enhance the unmixing performance. This sparsity-constrained Fan model is solved with the non-negative matrix factorization. The algorithm was implemented on synthetic and real hyperspectral data and presented its advantage over those competing algorithms in the experiments.

  10. Robust and Non-Negative Collective Matrix Factorization for Text-to-Image Transfer Learning.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liu; Jing, Liping; Ng, Michael K

    2015-12-01

    Heterogeneous transfer learning has recently gained much attention as a new machine learning paradigm in which the knowledge can be transferred from source domains to target domains in different feature spaces. Existing works usually assume that source domains can provide accurate and useful knowledge to be transferred to target domains for learning. In practice, there may be noise appearing in given source (text) and target (image) domains data, and thus, the performance of transfer learning can be seriously degraded. In this paper, we propose a robust and non-negative collective matrix factorization model to handle noise in text-to-image transfer learning, and make a reliable bridge to transfer accurate and useful knowledge from the text domain to the image domain. The proposed matrix factorization model can be solved by an efficient iterative method, and the convergence of the iterative method can be shown. Extensive experiments on real data sets suggest that the proposed model is able to effectively perform transfer learning in noisy text and image domains, and it is superior to the popular existing methods for text-to-image transfer learning.

  11. Negative and Positive Factors Associated With the Well-Being of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, and Questioning (LGBTQ) Youth

    PubMed Central

    Higa, Darrel; Hoppe, Marilyn J.; Lindhorst, Taryn; Mincer, Shawn; Beadnell, Blair; Morrison, Diane M.; Wells, Elizabeth A.; Todd, Avry; Mountz, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Factors associated with the well-being of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and questioning (LGBTQ) youth were qualitatively examined to better understand how these factors are experienced from the youths’ perspectives. Largely recruited from LGBTQ youth groups, 68 youth participated in focus groups (n = 63) or individual interviews (n = 5). The sample included 50% male, 47% female, and 3% transgender participants. Researchers used a consensual methods approach to identify negative and positive factors across 8 domains. Negative factors were associated with families, schools, religious institutions, and community or neighborhood; positive factors were associated with the youth's own identity development, peer networks, and involvement in the LGBTQ community. These findings suggest a pervasiveness of negative experiences in multiple contexts, and the importance of fostering a positive LGBTQ identity and supportive peer/community networks. Efforts should work towards reducing and eliminating the prejudicial sentiments often present in the institutions and situations that LGBTQ youth encounter. PMID:25722502

  12. Expression of platelet derived growth factor B chain and beta receptor in human coronary arteries after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty: an immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed Central

    Tanizawa, S.; Ueda, M.; van der Loos, C. M.; van der Wal, A. C.; Becker, A. E.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether expression of platelet derived growth factor B (PDGF-B) protein is associated with expression of its receptor protein in human coronary arteries after angioplasty and to identify cells involved. BACKGROUND: PDGF is considered an important growth factor in the repair process of the vessel wall after angioplasty. In situ hybridisation has revealed expression of PDGF-A and -B chain messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) in human coronary arteries at sites of postangioplasty injury. METHODS: Target and non-target sites of eight coronary arteries were studied immunohistochemically for PDGF-B and PDGF-beta receptor proteins in relation to macrophages, T lymphocytes, smooth muscle cells, and HLA-DR positive cells. RESULTS: The PDGF-B and PDGF-beta receptor proteins were expressed in areas with distinct repair, containing alpha actin negative spindle cells, macrophages and, at later stages, alpha actin positive smooth muscle cells as well. When the neointima was composed mainly of alpha actin smooth muscle cells, PDGF-B expression was rare and PDGF-beta receptor expression was negative. CONCLUSIONS: There is expression of PDGF-B and PDGF-beta receptor proteins at sites of postangioplasty repair in human coronary arteries. The associated cells are mainly macrophages and alpha actin negative spindle cells; the latter may be dedifferentiated smooth muscle cells. A link between PDGF expression and the postangioplasty time interval suggests a relation with cell differentiation as part of the maturation of the repair tissue. Mutual expression of both the growth factor and its receptor protein strongly suggests that in humans a PDGF mediated repair process occurs, with involvement of smooth muscle cells and macrophages. Images PMID:8697155

  13. Does vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) predict local relapse and survival in radiotherapy-treated node-negative breast cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Linderholm, B; Tavelin, B; Grankvist, K; Henriksson, R

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the association of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) content in 302 consecutive node-negative breast cancer (NNBC) patients treated with only locoregional radiotherapy to relapse free- (RFS) and overall survival (OS). VEGF content in tumour cytosols was measured by an enzymatic immunoassay for the major isoform VEGF165. The median age was 56 years, the median follow-up time 56 months. A wide range (0.01–144.79 pg μg−1 DNA) of VEGF content was found (median 1.92). Significant associations were found between VEGF and oestrogen receptor (ER) content, progesterone receptor (PR) and tumour size (P = 0.005). Univariate analysis displayed significant reduced RFS and OS for patients with higher VEGF content (P = 0.0113 and P = 0.0075 respectively). A total of 43 recurrences have been found (ten local relapses within the breast, five in the axillary or supraclavicular lymph nodes and 28 distant metastasis). There was no significant correlation between the localization of the relapse and the VEGF content. Multivariate analysis suggested VEGF as the only predictor of OS (relative risk (RR) = 3.6, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.97–13.37), and in patients with T1 tumours (n = 236) the multivariate analysis clearly displayed VEGF as the only independent predictor of both RFS and OS (RR = 5.1, CI = 1.07–24.59). In the sub-group with ER-positive tumours (n = 229), multivariate analysis showed VEGF as the only significant predictor of RFS and OS (RR = 10.44, CI = 1.26–86.38). The results suggest VEGF165 as a predictor of RFS and OS in NNBC patients treated with locoregional radiotherapy, comprising especially patients with favourable prognosis of T1 tumours, or ER-positive tumours. The high VEGF expression might define a radioresistant phenotype, or indicate an early distant spread which might require adjuvant systemic treatment. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10574263

  14. Possible mechanisms and function of nuclear trafficking of the colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Rovida, Elisabetta; Dello Sbarba, Persio

    2014-10-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) have long being studied with respect to the "canonical" signaling. This includes ligand-induced activation of a receptor tyrosine kinase at the cell surface that leads to receptor dimerization, followed by its phosphorylation in the intracellular domain and activation. The activated receptor then recruits cytoplasmic signaling molecules including other kinases. Activation of the downstream signaling cascade frequently leads to changes in gene expression following nuclear translocation of downstream targets. However, RTK themselves may localize within the nucleus, as either full-length molecules or cleaved fragments, with or without their ligands. Significant differences in this mechanism have been reported depending on the individual RTK, cellular context or disease. Accumulating evidences indicate that the colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF-1R) may localize within the nucleus. To date, however, little is known about the mechanism of CSF-1R nuclear shuttling, as well as the functional role of nuclear CSF-1R.

  15. Evidence that the epidermal growth factor receptor on host cells confers reovirus infection efficiency.

    PubMed

    Strong, J E; Tang, D; Lee, P W

    1993-11-01

    Reovirus binds to multiple sialoglycoproteins on the host cell surface. In an attempt to probe additional specific determinants that dictate host cell susceptibility to reovirus infection, we found that two mouse cell lines (NR6 and B82) previously shown to express no endogenous epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptors were relatively resistant to reovirus infection, whereas the same cell lines transfected with the gene encoding the EGF receptor manifested significantly higher susceptibility as determined by induction of cytopathic effects, viral protein synthesis, and plaque titration. This enhancement of infection efficiency requires a functional EGF receptor since it was not observed in cells expressing a mutated (kinase-inactive) EGF receptor. The observed difference in infection efficiency is not due to differences in virus binding or internalization. These studies suggest that the reovirus infection process is closely coupled to the EGF receptor-mediated cell signal transduction pathway.

  16. Recommendations for Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 Testing in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Antonio C.; Hammond, M. Elizabeth H.; Hicks, David G.; Dowsett, Mitch; McShane, Lisa M.; Allison, Kimberly H.; Allred, Donald C.; Bartlett, John M.S.; Bilous, Michael; Fitzgibbons, Patrick; Hanna, Wedad; Jenkins, Robert B.; Mangu, Pamela B.; Paik, Soonmyung; Perez, Edith A.; Press, Michael F.; Spears, Patricia A.; Vance, Gail H.; Viale, Giuseppe; Hayes, Daniel F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To update the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO)/College of American Pathologists (CAP) guideline recommendations for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) testing in breast cancer to improve the accuracy of HER2 testing and its utility as a predictive marker in invasive breast cancer. Methods ASCO/CAP convened an Update Committee that included coauthors of the 2007 guideline to conduct a systematic literature review and update recommendations for optimal HER2 testing. Results The Update Committee identified criteria and areas requiring clarification to improve the accuracy of HER2 testing by immunohistochemistry (IHC) or in situ hybridization (ISH). The guideline was reviewed and approved by both organizations. Recommendations The Update Committee recommends that HER2 status (HER2 negative or positive) be determined in all patients with invasive (early stage or recurrence) breast cancer on the basis of one or more HER2 test results (negative, equivocal, or positive). Testing criteria define HER2-positive status when (on observing within an area of tumor that amounts to >10% of contiguous and homogeneous tumor cells) there is evidence of protein overexpression (IHC) or gene amplification (HER2 copy number or HER2/CEP17 ratio by ISH based on counting at least 20 cells within the area). If results are equivocal (revised criteria), reflex testing should be performed using an alternative assay (IHC or ISH). Repeat testing should be considered if results seem discordant with other histopathologic findings. Laboratories should demonstrate high concordance with a validated HER2 test on a sufficiently large and representative set of specimens. Testing must be performed in a laboratory accredited by CAP or another accrediting entity. The Update Committee urges providers and health systems to cooperate to ensure the highest quality testing. PMID:24099077

  17. Pertuzumab in human epidermal growth-factor receptor 2-positive breast cancer: clinical and economic considerations

    PubMed Central

    Lamond, Nathan WD; Younis, Tallal

    2014-01-01

    In the absence of specific therapy, the 15%–20% of breast cancers demonstrating human epidermal growth-factor receptor 2 (HER2) protein overexpression and/or gene amplification are characterized by a more aggressive phenotype and poorer prognosis compared to their HER2-negative counterparts. Trastuzumab (Herceptin), the first anti-HER2-targeted therapy, has been associated with improved survival outcomes in HER2-positive breast cancer. However, many patients with early stage disease continue to relapse, and metastatic disease remains incurable. In order to further improve these outcomes, several novel HER2-targeted agents have recently been developed. Pertuzumab (Perjeta), a monoclonal antibody against the HER2 dimerization domain, has also been associated with improved patient outcomes in clinical trials, and has recently been approved in combination with chemotherapy and trastuzumab for neoadjuvant therapy of early stage, HER2-positive breast cancer and first-line treatment of metastatic disease. This review briefly summarizes pertuzumab’s clinical development as well as the published evidence supporting its use, and highlights some of the currently unanswered questions that will influence pertuzumab’s incorporation into clinical practice. PMID:24876795

  18. Selection of DNA aptamers against epidermal growth factor receptor with high affinity and specificity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Deng-Liang; Song, Yan-Ling; Zhu, Zhi; Li, Xi-Lan; Zou, Yuan; Yang, Hai-Tao; Wang, Jiang-Jie; Yao, Pei-Sen; Pan, Ru-Jun; Yang, Chaoyong James; Kang, De-Zhi

    2014-10-31

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/HER1/c-ErbB1), is overexpressed in many solid cancers, such as epidermoid carcinomas, malignant gliomas, etc. EGFR plays roles in proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis and metastasis of malignant cancer cells and is the ideal antigen for clinical applications in cancer detection, imaging and therapy. Aptamers, the output of the systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), are DNA/RNA oligonucleotides which can bind protein and other substances with specificity. RNA aptamers are undesirable due to their instability and high cost of production. Conversely, DNA aptamers have aroused researcher's attention because they are easily synthesized, stable, selective, have high binding affinity and are cost-effective to produce. In this study, we have successfully identified DNA aptamers with high binding affinity and selectivity to EGFR. The aptamer named TuTu22 with Kd 56±7.3nM was chosen from the identified DNA aptamers for further study. Flow cytometry analysis results indicated that the TuTu22 aptamer was able to specifically recognize a variety of cancer cells expressing EGFR but did not bind to the EGFR-negative cells. With all of the aforementioned advantages, the DNA aptamers reported here against cancer biomarker EGFR will facilitate the development of novel targeted cancer detection, imaging and therapy.

  19. Platelet-derived growth factor receptor (beta-subunit) immunoreactivity in soft tissue tumors.

    PubMed

    Palman, C; Bowen-Pope, D F; Brooks, J J

    1992-01-01

    Using a well characterized monoclonal antibody (PR7212) to the beta-subunit of the platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGF-R(beta) and the avidin-biotin peroxidase method on frozen sections, we analyzed PDGF-R(beta) expression in 71 nonepithelial lesions as well as normal mesenchymal tissues. PDGF-R(beta) reactivity was observed in normal salivary gland, normal cutaneous and visceral fibroblasts, muscularis mucosa of bowel, and endothelial cells; squamous carcinoma was negative. Interestingly, hepatocytes and lymph node histiocytes were also positive. Positive tumors included malignant fibrous histiocytoma (6/6), benign and malignant smooth muscle tumors (5/6 leiomyoma, 8/9 leiomyosarcoma), liposarcoma (4/4), synovial sarcoma (6/7), angiosarcoma (2/2), and sarcoma NOS (2/2). Fibromatosis cases were also positive (2/2). In many tumors, the reactive fibroblasts and vascular components were also reactive. The characteristic pattern of reactivity in fibroblastic lesions highlighted thin cytoplasmic extensions or strands not visible in normal hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections. Expression of PDGF-R(beta) was not necessarily correlated with the presence of PDGF. We conclude that PDGF-R(beta) expression can be identified in a wide variety of mesenchymal lesions and postulate that its presence may be important in the mechanism of growth of these tumors.

  20. Loss of p53 induces epidermal growth factor receptor promoter activity in normal human keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bheda, A; Creek, KE; Pirisi, L

    2008-01-01

    Overexpression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in human papillomavirus type 16-immortalized human keratinocytes (HKc) is caused by the viral oncoprotein E6, which targets p53 for degradation. We have previously observed that expression of p53 RNAi in normal HKc is associated with an increase in EGFR mRNA and protein. We now report that p53 RNAi induces EGFR promoter activity up to approximately 10-fold in normal HKc, and this effect does not require intact p53 binding sites on the EGFR promoter. Exogenous wild-type p53 inhibits the EGFR promoter at low levels, and activates it at higher concentrations. Yin Yang 1 (YY1), which negatively regulates p53, induces EGFR promoter activity, and this effect is augmented by p53 RNAi. Intact p53 binding sites on the EGFR promoter are not required for activation by YY1. In addition, Sp1 and YY1 synergistically induce the EGFR promoter in normal HKc, indicating that Sp1 may recruit YY1 as a co-activator. Wild-type p53 suppressed Sp1- and YY1-mediated induction of the EGFR promoter. We conclude that acute loss of p53 in normal HKc induces EGFR expression bya mechanism that involves YY1 and Sp1 and does not require p53 binding to the EGFR promoter. PMID:18391986

  1. Phosphorylation of the human leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) receptor by mitogen-activated protein kinase and the regulation of LIF receptor function by heterologous receptor activation.

    PubMed Central

    Schiemann, W P; Graves, L M; Baumann, H; Morella, K K; Gearing, D P; Nielsen, M D; Krebs, E G; Nathanson, N M

    1995-01-01

    We used a bacterially expressed fusion protein containing the entire cytoplasmic domain of the human leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) receptor to study its phosphorylation in response to LIF stimulation. The dose- and time-dependent relationships for phosphorylation of this construct in extracts of LIF-stimulated 3T3-L1 cells were superimposable with those for the stimulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Indeed, phosphorylation of the cytoplasmic domain of the low-affinity LIF receptor alpha-subunit (LIFR) in Mono Q-fractionated, LIF-stimulated 3T3-L1 extracts occurred only in those fractions containing activated MAPK; Ser-1044 served as the major phosphorylation site in the human LIFR for MAPK both in agonist-stimulated 3T3-L1 lysates and by recombinant extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 in vitro. Expression in rat H-35 hepatoma cells of LIFR or chimeric granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor receptor (G-CSFR)-LIFR mutants lacking Ser-1044 failed to affect cytokine-stimulated expression of a reporter gene under the control of the beta-fibrinogen gene promoter but eliminated the insulin-induced attenuation of cytokine-stimulated gene expression. Thus, our results identify the human LIFR as a substrate for MAPK and suggest a mechanism of heterologous receptor regulation of LIFR signaling occurring at Ser-1044. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:7777512

  2. beta-Arrestin mediates beta1-adrenergic receptor-epidermal growth factor receptor interaction and downstream signaling.

    PubMed

    Tilley, Douglas G; Kim, Il-Man; Patel, Priyesh A; Violin, Jonathan D; Rockman, Howard A

    2009-07-24

    beta1-Adrenergic receptor (beta1AR) stimulation confers cardioprotection via beta-arrestin-de pend ent transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs), however, the precise mechanism for this salutary process is un