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Sample records for factor receptor negatively

  1. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Expression in Triple Negative and Nontriple Negative Breast Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Changavi, Arathi A; Shashikala, Arundhathi; Ramji, Ashwini S

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The panel of markers used for molecular classification include estrogen receptors (ER), progesterone receptors (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER)-2/neu, p53, Bcl-2 and basal markers like cytokeratin 5/6 or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Among these, EGFR plays an important role and is associated with bad prognosis. Aims and Objectives: To study EGFR expression in triple negative breast carcinoma (TNBC) and non-TNBCs (NTNBCs). Materials and Methods: Fifty cases of breast carcinomas were classified and graded according to World Health Organization and Nottingham modification of Scarff-Bloom-Richardson (SBR) system, respectively. The age of the patients ranged from 28 to 69 years. Histological features such as necrosis, pushing borders, lymphocytic infiltrate and periductal elastosis were noted. The panel of markers used in our study included ER, PR, HER-2/neu and EGFR. EGFR expression was assessed based on membrane staining. Chi-square test was applied for statistical analysis to compare EGFR expression with hormonal status and prognostic factors. P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: The mean age was 49.8 ± 7.2 years. There were 44 (88%) infiltrating ductal carcinoma, 3 (6%) medullary carcinoma and 3 (6%) mucinous carcinoma. EGFR expression was common in young patients and was predominant in TNBC (89.47%), was also expressed in few cases of NTNBC. There was a positive correlation of EGFR expression (P = 0.03491) with a high grade. Medullary carcinomas were triple negative and strongly expressed EGFR. EGFR expression was inversely associated with ER status and showed strong association with necrosis and lymphocytic infiltrate, but not with pushing border and periductal elastosis. Conclusion: EGFR is an important marker to stratify patients with breast cancer according to molecular classification. Its expression correlated positively with young age, higher SBR grade, necrosis, lymphocytic infiltrate and inversely with

  2. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Expression in Triple Negative and Nontriple Negative Breast Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Changavi, Arathi A; Shashikala, Arundhathi; Ramji, Ashwini S

    2015-01-01

    The panel of markers used for molecular classification include estrogen receptors (ER), progesterone receptors (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER)-2/neu, p53, Bcl-2 and basal markers like cytokeratin 5/6 or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Among these, EGFR plays an important role and is associated with bad prognosis. To study EGFR expression in triple negative breast carcinoma (TNBC) and non-TNBCs (NTNBCs). Fifty cases of breast carcinomas were classified and graded according to World Health Organization and Nottingham modification of Scarff-Bloom-Richardson (SBR) system, respectively. The age of the patients ranged from 28 to 69 years. Histological features such as necrosis, pushing borders, lymphocytic infiltrate and periductal elastosis were noted. The panel of markers used in our study included ER, PR, HER-2/neu and EGFR. EGFR expression was assessed based on membrane staining. Chi-square test was applied for statistical analysis to compare EGFR expression with hormonal status and prognostic factors. P < 0.05 was considered significant. The mean age was 49.8 ± 7.2 years. There were 44 (88%) infiltrating ductal carcinoma, 3 (6%) medullary carcinoma and 3 (6%) mucinous carcinoma. EGFR expression was common in young patients and was predominant in TNBC (89.47%), was also expressed in few cases of NTNBC. There was a positive correlation of EGFR expression (P = 0.03491) with a high grade. Medullary carcinomas were triple negative and strongly expressed EGFR. EGFR expression was inversely associated with ER status and showed strong association with necrosis and lymphocytic infiltrate, but not with pushing border and periductal elastosis. EGFR is an important marker to stratify patients with breast cancer according to molecular classification. Its expression correlated positively with young age, higher SBR grade, necrosis, lymphocytic infiltrate and inversely with hormonal receptor expression.

  3. Activity of ixabepilone in oestrogen receptor-negative and oestrogen receptor-progesterone receptor-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Pivot, Xavier B; Li, Rubi K; Thomas, Eva S; Chung, Hyun-Cheol; Fein, Luis E; Chan, Valorie F; Jassem, Jacek; de Mendoza, Fernando Hurtado; Mukhopadyay, Pralay; Roché, Henri H

    2009-11-01

    Oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer, including oestrogen receptor-, progesterone receptor- and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative (ER/PR/HER2-negative) breast cancer, is more aggressive than ER-positive disease. A major limitation in the treatment of ER-negative disease subtypes is the inherent insensitivity to hormonal agents (tamoxifen, aromatase inhibitors) that are widely used in the treatment of breast cancer. Thus, therapeutic options for poor prognosis patients with ER-negative breast cancer are limited to a handful of chemotherapeutic agents, and new agents are needed to improve the treatment of this disease. Ixabepilone, a novel epothilone B analogue with low susceptibility to cellular mechanisms that confer resistance to taxanes and other chemotherapeutic agents, has demonstrated potent preclinical antitumour activity in multiple models, including those with primary or acquired drug resistance. This review summarises the results of a prospective subset analysis from a phase III clinical trial evaluating ixabepilone for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer (MBC), in which efficacy and safety were evaluated in patients with ER-negative and ER/PR/HER2-negative disease.

  4. A dominant negative mutation suppresses the function of normal epidermal growth factor receptors by heterodimerization.

    PubMed Central

    Kashles, O; Yarden, Y; Fischer, R; Ullrich, A; Schlessinger, J

    1991-01-01

    Recent studies provide evidence that defective receptors can function as a dominant negative mutation suppressing the action of wild-type receptors. This causes various diminished responses in cell culture and developmental disorders in murine embryogenesis. Here, we describe a model system and a potential mechanism underlying the dominant suppressing response caused by defective epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptors. We used cultured 3T3 cells coexpressing human wild-type receptors and an inactive deletion mutant lacking most of the cytoplasmic domain. When expressed alone, EGF was able to stimulate the dimerization of either wild-type or mutant receptors in living cells as revealed by chemical covalent cross-linking experiments. In response to EGF, heterodimers and homodimers of wild-type and mutant receptors were observed in cells coexpressing both receptor species. However, only homodimers of wild-type EGF receptors underwent EGF-induced tyrosine autophosphorylation in living cells. These results indicate that the integrity of both receptor moieties within receptor dimers is essential for kinase activation and autophosphorylation. Moreover, the presence of mutant receptors in cells expressing wild-type receptors diminished the number of high-affinity binding sites for EGF, reduced the rate of receptor endocytosis and degradation, and diminished biological signalling via EGF receptors. We propose that heterodimerization with defective EGF receptors functions as a dominant negative mutation suppressing the activation and response of normal receptors by formation of unproductive heterodimers. Images PMID:1705006

  5. Structural Basis for Negative Cooperativity in Growth Factor Binding to an EGF Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarado, Diego; Klein, Daryl E.; Lemmon, Mark A.

    2010-09-27

    Transmembrane signaling by the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) involves ligand-induced dimerization and allosteric regulation of the intracellular tyrosine kinase domain. Crystallographic studies have shown how ligand binding induces dimerization of the EGFR extracellular region but cannot explain the high-affinity and low-affinity classes of cell-surface EGF-binding sites inferred from curved Scatchard plots. From a series of crystal structures of the Drosophila EGFR extracellular region, we show here how Scatchard plot curvature arises from negatively cooperative ligand binding. The first ligand-binding event induces formation of an asymmetric dimer with only one bound ligand. The unoccupied site in this dimer is structurally restrained, leading to reduced affinity for binding of the second ligand, and thus negative cooperativity. Our results explain the cell-surface binding characteristics of EGF receptors and suggest how individual EGFR ligands might stabilize distinct dimeric species with different signaling properties.

  6. Nuclear Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor is a Functional Molecular Target in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Toni M.; Iida, Mari; Luthar, Neha; Kostopoulos, Kellie T.; Corrigan, Kelsey L.; Wleklinski, Matthew J.; Yang, David; Wisinski, Kari B.; Salgia, Ravi; Wheeler, Deric L.

    2014-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a subclass of breast cancers (i.e. estrogen receptor negative, progesterone receptor negative, and HER2 negative) that have poor prognosis and very few identified molecular targets. Strikingly, a high percentage of TNBC’s overexpress the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), yet EGFR inhibition has yielded little clinical benefit. Over the last decade, advances in EGFR biology have established that EGFR functions in two distinct signaling pathways: 1) classical membrane-bound signaling, and 2) nuclear signaling. Previous studies have demonstrated that nuclear EGFR (nEGFR) can enhance resistance to anti-EGFR therapies and is correlated with poor overall survival in breast cancer. Based on these findings we hypothesized that nEGFR may promote intrinsic resistance to cetuximab in TNBC. To examine this question, a battery of TNBC cell lines and human tumors were screened and found to express nEGFR. Knockdown of EGFR expression demonstrated that TNBC cell lines retained dependency on EGFR for proliferation, yet all cell lines were resistant to cetuximab. Further, Src Family Kinases (SFKs) influenced nEGFR translocation in TNBC cell lines and in vivo tumor models, where inhibition of SFK activity led to potent reductions in nEGFR expression. Inhibition of nEGFR translocation led to a subsequent accumulation of EGFR on the plasma membrane, which greatly enhanced sensitivity of TNBC cells to cetuximab. Collectively, these data suggest that targeting both the nEGFR signaling pathway, through the inhibition of its nuclear transport, and the classical EGFR signaling pathway with cetuximab may be a viable approach for the treatment of TNBC patients. PMID:24634415

  7. Reproductive factors and risk of hormone receptor positive and negative breast cancer: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The association of reproductive factors with hormone receptor (HR)-negative breast tumors remains uncertain. Methods Within the EPIC cohort, Cox proportional hazards models were used to describe the relationships of reproductive factors (menarcheal age, time between menarche and first pregnancy, parity, number of children, age at first and last pregnancies, time since last full-term childbirth, breastfeeding, age at menopause, ever having an abortion and use of oral contraceptives [OC]) with risk of ER-PR- (n = 998) and ER+PR+ (n = 3,567) breast tumors. Results A later first full-term childbirth was associated with increased risk of ER+PR+ tumors but not with risk of ER-PR- tumors (≥35 vs. ≤19 years HR: 1.47 [95% CI 1.15-1.88] ptrend < 0.001 for ER+PR+ tumors; ≥35 vs. ≤19 years HR: 0.93 [95% CI 0.53-1.65] ptrend = 0.96 for ER-PR- tumors; P het = 0.03). The risk associations of menarcheal age, and time period between menarche and first full-term childbirth with ER-PR-tumors were in the similar direction with risk of ER+PR+ tumors (phet = 0.50), although weaker in magnitude and statistically only borderline significant. Other parity related factors such as ever a full-term birth, number of births, age- and time since last birth were associated only with ER+PR+ malignancies, however no statistical heterogeneity between breast cancer subtypes was observed. Breastfeeding and OC use were generally not associated with breast cancer subtype risk. Conclusion Our study provides possible evidence that age at menarche, and time between menarche and first full-term childbirth may be associated with the etiology of both HR-negative and HR-positive malignancies, although the associations with HR-negative breast cancer were only borderline significant. PMID:24321460

  8. Positive and Negative Cross-Talk between Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptor 1, Free Fatty Acid Receptor 4, and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor in Human Prostate Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Mandi M; Liu, Ze; Meier, Kathryn E

    2016-10-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a lipid mediator that mediates cellular effects via G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is a peptide that acts via a receptor tyrosine kinase. LPA and EGF both induce proliferation of prostate cancer cells and can transactivate each other's receptors. The LPA receptor LPA1 is particularly important for LPA response in human prostate cancer cells. Previous work in our laboratory has demonstrated that free fatty acid 4 (FFA4), a GPCR activated by ω-3 fatty acids, inhibits responses to both LPA and EGF in these cells. One potential mechanism for the inhibition involves negative interactions between FFA4 and LPA1, thereby suppressing responses to EGF that require LPA1 In the current study, we examined the role of LPA1 in mediating EGF and FFA4 agonist responses in two human prostate cancer cell lines, DU145 and PC-3. The results show that an LPA1-selective antagonist inhibits proliferation and migration to both LPA and EGF. Knockdown of LPA1 expression, using silencing RNA, blocks responses to LPA and significantly inhibits responses to EGF. The partial response to EGF that is observed after LPA1 knockdown is not inhibited by FFA4 agonists. Finally, the role of arrestin-3, a GPCR-binding protein that mediates many actions of activated GPCRs, was tested. Knockdown of arrestin-3 completely inhibits responses to both LPA and EGF in prostate cancer cells. Taken together, these results suggest that LPA1 plays a critical role in EGF responses and that FFA4 agonists inhibit proliferation by suppressing positive cross-talk between LPA1 and the EGF receptor. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  9. Targeting Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor in triple negative breast cancer: New discoveries and practical insights for drug development.

    PubMed

    Costa, Ricardo; Shah, Ami N; Santa-Maria, Cesar A; Cruz, Marcelo R; Mahalingam, Devalingam; Carneiro, Benedito A; Chae, Young Kwang; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Gradishar, William J; Giles, Francis J

    2017-02-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) accounts for 10-20% of cases in breast cancer. Despite recent advances in the treatment of hormonal receptor+ and HER2+ breast cancers, there are no targeted therapies available for TNBC. Evidence supports that most patients with TNBC express the transmembrane Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR). However, early phase clinical trials failed to demonstrate significant activity of EGFR-targeted monoclonal antibodies and/or tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Here, we review the recent discoveries related to the underlying biology of the EGFR pathway in TNBC, clinical progress to date and suggest rational future approaches for investigational therapies in TNBC.

  10. Nerve growth factor receptor negates the tumor suppressor p53 as a feedback regulator

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiang; Hao, Qian; Liao, Peng; Luo, Shiwen; Zhang, Minhong; Hu, Guohui; Liu, Hongbing; Zhang, Yiwei; Cao, Bo; Baddoo, Melody; Flemington, Erik K; Zeng, Shelya X; Lu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Cancer develops and progresses often by inactivating p53. Here, we unveil nerve growth factor receptor (NGFR, p75NTR or CD271) as a novel p53 inactivator. p53 activates NGFR transcription, whereas NGFR inactivates p53 by promoting its MDM2-mediated ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis and by directly binding to its central DNA binding domain and preventing its DNA-binding activity. Inversely, NGFR ablation activates p53, consequently inducing apoptosis, attenuating survival, and reducing clonogenic capability of cancer cells, as well as sensitizing human cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents that induce p53 and suppressing mouse xenograft tumor growth. NGFR is highly expressed in human glioblastomas, and its gene is often amplified in breast cancers with wild type p53. Altogether, our results demonstrate that cancers hijack NGFR as an oncogenic inhibitor of p53. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15099.001 PMID:27282385

  11. The nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB): A potential therapeutic target for estrogen receptor negative breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Debajit K.; Dai, Sun-Chun; Cruz, Antonio; Weiser, Barbara; Graner, Edgard; Pardee, Arthur B.

    2001-01-01

    The effect of a kinase inhibitor Go6796 on growth of epidermal growth factor (EGF)-stimulated estrogen receptor negative (ER−) breast cancer cells in vivo and role of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) on tumorogenesis have been investigated. This was studied in an animal model by implanting ER− mouse mammary epithelial tumor cells (CSMLO) in syngeneic A-J mice. (i) Local administration of Go6976 an inhibitor of protein kinases C alpha and beta inhibited growth of tumors and caused extensive necrotic degeneration and regression of the tumors without causing any microscopically detectable damage to the vital organs liver and lung. (ii) Stable expression of dominant-negative mutants of the beta subunit (dnIkkβ) of the inhibitory kappa B (IκB) kinase (dnIkk) that selectively blocked activation of NF-κB caused loss of tumorigenic potential of CSMLO cells. Stable expression of dnIkkβ also blocked phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced activation of NF-κB and overexpression of cyclin D1, concomitantly with the loss or reduced tumorigenic potential of these cells. Thus, results from in vivo and in vitro experiments strongly suggest the involvement of NF-κB in ER− mammary epithelial cell-mediated tumorigenesis. We propose that blocking NF-κB activation not only inhibits cell proliferation, but also antagonizes the antiapoptotic role of this transcription factor in ER− breast cancer cells. Thus, NF-κB is a potential target for therapy of EGFR family receptor-overexpressing ER− breast cancers. PMID:11517301

  12. Treatment challenges for community oncologists treating postmenopausal women with endocrine-resistant, hormone receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative advanced breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gradishar, William J

    2016-01-01

    Community-based oncologists are faced with challenges and opportunities when delivering quality patient care, including high patient volumes and diminished resources; however, there may be the potential to deliver increased patient education and subsequently improve outcomes. This review discusses the treatment of postmenopausal women with endocrine-resistant, hormone receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2- negative advanced breast cancer in order to illustrate considerations in the provision of pertinent quality education in the treatment of these patients and the management of therapy-related adverse events. An overview of endocrine-resistant breast cancer and subsequent treatment challenges is also provided. Approved treatment options for endocrine-resistant breast cancer include hormonal therapies and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors. Compounds under clinical investigation are also discussed. PMID:27468248

  13. Androgen Receptor Expression and its Correlation with Other Risk Factors in Triple Negative Breast Cancers: a Report from Western Iran.

    PubMed

    Payandeh, Mehrdad; Shazad, Babak; Madani, SeyedHamid; Ramezani, Mazaher; Sadeghi, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Androgen receptors (ARs) are expressed in more than 70% of breast cancers (BCs) and have been implicated in BC pathogenesis. Some triple negative (TN)BC tumors express AR and may benefit from ARtargeted therapies. The aim of this study was to evaluate survival and the prevalence of AR expression and its correlation with other risk factors in triple negative BCs in women from Western Iran. In a retrospective study between 20092015, 41 patients with TNBC were referred to the Private Clinic of Oncology, Kermanshah city, Iran. ER, PR and ARpositive expression was defined as ≥10% nuclear staining and also HER2 (2+), FISH was performed. Nuclear staining was considered representative for Ki67 and P53. The mean followup for the patients was 25 months. In this time, 5 patients died and 4 lost to followup were censored from survival analysis. The mean age at diagnosis was 46.9 years (range, 2471 years) and all patients were female. The OS rates for ARpositive and ARnegative patients were 90% and 85.1%, respectively, and the mean OS was 26.3 and 23.2 months. Therefore, there was no significant difference between the two groups (Hazard ratio: 0.580, 95% CI: 0.0863.893, P=0.575). In TNBC patients, evaluation of AR status may provide additional information on prognosis and treatment. The results of studies showed that the prevalence AR expression may differ in the world and probably ethnicity can be an influencing factor.

  14. Absolute Benefit of Adjuvant Endocrine Therapies for Premenopausal Women With Hormone Receptor-Positive, Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-Negative Early Breast Cancer: TEXT and SOFT Trials.

    PubMed

    Regan, Meredith M; Francis, Prudence A; Pagani, Olivia; Fleming, Gini F; Walley, Barbara A; Viale, Giuseppe; Colleoni, Marco; Láng, István; Gómez, Henry L; Tondini, Carlo; Pinotti, Graziella; Price, Karen N; Coates, Alan S; Goldhirsch, Aron; Gelber, Richard D

    2016-07-01

    Risk of recurrence is the primary consideration in breast cancer adjuvant therapy recommendations. The TEXT (Tamoxifen and Exemestane Trial) and SOFT (Suppression of Ovarian Function Trial) trials investigated adjuvant endocrine therapies for premenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer, testing exemestane plus ovarian function suppression (OFS), tamoxifen plus OFS, and tamoxifen alone. We examined absolute treatment effect across a continuum of recurrence risk to individualize endocrine therapy decision making for premenopausal women with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) -negative disease. The TEXT and SOFT hormone receptor-positive, HER2-negative analysis population included 4,891 women. The end point was breast cancer-free interval (BCFI), defined as time from random assignment to first occurrence of invasive locoregional, distant, or contralateral breast cancer. A continuous, composite measure of recurrence risk for each patient was determined from a Cox model incorporating age, nodal status, tumor size and grade, and estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and Ki-67 expression levels. Subpopulation treatment effect pattern plot methodology revealed differential treatment effects on 5-year BCFI according to composite risk. SOFT patients who remained premenopausal after chemotherapy experienced absolute improvement of 5% or more in 5-year BCFI with exemestane plus OFS versus tamoxifen plus OFS or tamoxifen alone, reaching 10% to 15% at intermediate to high composite risk; the benefit of tamoxifen plus OFS versus tamoxifen alone was apparent at the highest composite risk. The SOFT no-chemotherapy cohort-for whom composite risk was lowest on average-did well with all endocrine therapies. For TEXT patients, the benefit of exemestane plus OFS versus tamoxifen plus OFS in 5-year BCFI ranged from 5% to 15%; patients not receiving chemotherapy and with lowest composite risk did well with both treatments. Premenopausal women with

  15. Impact of palbociclib combinations on treatment of advanced estrogen receptor-positive/human epidermal growth factor 2-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Boér, Katalin

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease with multiple subgroups based on clinical and molecular characteristics. For the largest subgroup of breast cancers, hormone receptor-positive/human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2)-negative tumors, hormone treatment is the mainstay of therapy and is likely to result in significant improvement in disease outcomes. However, some of these cancers demonstrate de novo or acquired resistance to endocrine therapy. Despite intensive research to develop new strategies to enhance the efficacy of currently available treatment options for hormone receptor-positive breast cancer, progress has been slow, and there were few advances for a period of 10 years. In 2012, a new molecularly targeted therapeutic strategy, inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin with everolimus, was introduced into clinical practice. Everolimus, in combination with a steroidal aromatase inhibitor, exemestane, resulted in an increase in progression-free survival, but not overall survival in patients with estrogen receptor (ER)+ve advanced disease who had progressed on hormone therapy. In 2015, the first cyclin-dependent kinases 4/6 (CDK4/6) inhibitor, palbociclib, received accelerated US Food and Drug Administration approval for use in combination with letrozole for the treatment of postmenopausal ER+ve/HER2−ve advanced breast cancer as initial, endocrine-based therapy. The addition of palbociclib to endocrine therapy resulted in longer progression-free survival than letrozole alone. One year later, palbociclib received a new indication, use in combination with fulvestrant, in both premenopausal and postmenopausal females with advanced breast cancer of the same subtype with disease progression following endocrine therapy. Adding palbociclib to fulvestrant resulted in a significantly increased median progression-free survival compared to fulvestrant monotherapy. These new combination regimens of palbociclib with endocrine agents represent an important

  16. Impact of palbociclib combinations on treatment of advanced estrogen receptor-positive/human epidermal growth factor 2-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Boér, Katalin

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease with multiple subgroups based on clinical and molecular characteristics. For the largest subgroup of breast cancers, hormone receptor-positive/human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2)-negative tumors, hormone treatment is the mainstay of therapy and is likely to result in significant improvement in disease outcomes. However, some of these cancers demonstrate de novo or acquired resistance to endocrine therapy. Despite intensive research to develop new strategies to enhance the efficacy of currently available treatment options for hormone receptor-positive breast cancer, progress has been slow, and there were few advances for a period of 10 years. In 2012, a new molecularly targeted therapeutic strategy, inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin with everolimus, was introduced into clinical practice. Everolimus, in combination with a steroidal aromatase inhibitor, exemestane, resulted in an increase in progression-free survival, but not overall survival in patients with estrogen receptor (ER)+ve advanced disease who had progressed on hormone therapy. In 2015, the first cyclin-dependent kinases 4/6 (CDK4/6) inhibitor, palbociclib, received accelerated US Food and Drug Administration approval for use in combination with letrozole for the treatment of postmenopausal ER+ve/HER2-ve advanced breast cancer as initial, endocrine-based therapy. The addition of palbociclib to endocrine therapy resulted in longer progression-free survival than letrozole alone. One year later, palbociclib received a new indication, use in combination with fulvestrant, in both premenopausal and postmenopausal females with advanced breast cancer of the same subtype with disease progression following endocrine therapy. Adding palbociclib to fulvestrant resulted in a significantly increased median progression-free survival compared to fulvestrant monotherapy. These new combination regimens of palbociclib with endocrine agents represent an important addition

  17. Biologic Roles of Estrogen Receptor-β and Insulin-Like Growth Factor-2 in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Elshimali, Yahya; Garbán, Hermes; Elashoff, David; Vadgama, Jaydutt; Goodglick, Lee

    2015-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) occurs in 10–15% of patients yet accounts for almost half of all breast cancer deaths. TNBCs lack expression of estrogen and progesterone receptors and HER-2 overexpression and cannot be treated with current targeted therapies. TNBCs often occur in African American and younger women. Although initially responsive to some chemotherapies, TNBCs tend to relapse and metastasize. Thus, it is critical to find new therapeutic targets. A second ER gene product, termed ERβ, in the absence of ERα may be such a target. Using human TNBC specimens with known clinical outcomes to assess ERβ expression, we find that ERβ1 associates with significantly worse 5-year overall survival. Further, a panel of TNBC cell lines exhibit significant levels of ERβ protein. To assess ERβ effects on proliferation, ERβ expression in TNBC cells was silenced using shRNA, resulting in a significant reduction in TNBC proliferation. ERβ-specific antagonists similarly suppressed TNBC growth. Growth-stimulating effects of ERβ may be due in part to downstream actions that promote VEGF, amphiregulin, and Wnt-10b secretion, other factors associated with tumor promotion. In vivo, insulin-like growth factor-2 (IGF-2), along with ERβ1, is significantly expressed in TNBC and stimulates high ERβ mRNA in TNBC cells. This work may help elucidate the interplay of metabolic and growth factors in TNBC. PMID:25874233

  18. Obesity increases the incidence of distant metastases in oestrogen receptor-negative human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Mazzarella, Luca; Disalvatore, Davide; Bagnardi, Vincenzo; Rotmensz, Nicole; Galbiati, Donata; Caputo, Sara; Curigliano, Giuseppe; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe

    2013-11-01

    Obesity is a major negative determinant of breast cancer outcome. However, there are contrasting data on the differential impact of obesity on specific breast cancer subtypes. In particular, very little is known on human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive (HER2+) tumours. We assessed the prognostic role of increased body mass index (BMI) on a consecutive series of non-metastatic HER2+ patients treated at our institution before the introduction of adjuvant Trastuzumab. We separately analysed oestrogen receptor-positive (ER+) and -negative (ER-) HER2+ cases. In ER-/HER2+ tumours we observed a significantly worse overall survival (Hazard ratio (HR) 1.79, p-value 0.041) and cumulative incidence of distant metastases (HR 2.03, p-value 0.019) in obese (BMI>30) versus normal/underweight (BMI<25) patients. Local relapses appeared to be non-significantly reduced in obese patients, masking the overall effect on disease-free survival. Outcome in ER+ tumours, instead, was not significantly different between BMI groups. Obesity significantly correlates with worse overall survival and cumulative incidence of distant metastases in ER-/HER2 positive breast cancer. Differences in the biology of breast tumours may determine individual susceptibility to obesity. The biology of the underlying tumour should be taken into account in the design of dietary intervention trials in breast cancer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Clinicopathological factors predicting early and late distant recurrence in estrogen receptor-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Hiroko; Ogiya, Akiko; Shien, Tadahiko; Horimoto, Yoshiya; Masuda, Norikazu; Inao, Touko; Osako, Tomofumi; Takahashi, Masato; Endo, Yumi; Hosoda, Mitsuchika; Ishida, Naoko; Horii, Rie; Yamazaki, Kieko; Miyoshi, Yuichiro; Yasojima, Hiroyuki; Tomioka, Nobumoto

    2016-11-01

    Most studies analyzing prognostic factors for late relapse have been performed in postmenopausal women who received tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors as adjuvant endocrine therapy for estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer. A total of 223 patients (108 premenopausal and 115 postmenopausal) with early distant recurrence and 149 patients (62 premenopausal and 87 postmenopausal) with late distant recurrence of ER-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer who were given their initial treatment between 2000 and 2004 were registered from nine institutions. For each late recurrence patient, approximately two matched control patients without relapse for more than 10 years were selected. Clinicopathological factors and adjuvant therapies were compared among the three groups by menopausal status and age. Factors predicting early recurrence in premenopausal women were large tumor size, high lymph node category and high tumor grade, whereas predictors for late recurrence were large tumor size and high lymph node category. In postmenopausal women under 60 years of age, factors predicting early recurrence were bilateral breast cancer, large tumor size, high lymph node category, low PgR expression and high Ki67 labeling index (LI), while predictors for late recurrence were large tumor size and high lymph node category. On the other hand, in postmenopausal women aged 60 years or older, factors predicting early recurrence were bilateral breast cancer, large tumor size, high lymph node category, high tumor grade, low ER expression and high Ki67 LI, whereas predictors for late recurrence were high lymph node category, low ER expression and short duration of adjuvant endocrine therapy. Predictors of early and late distant recurrence might differ according to menopausal status and age.

  20. Patterns of resource utilization and cost for postmenopausal women with hormone-receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2-negative advanced breast cancer in Europe.

    PubMed

    Jerusalem, Guy; Neven, Patrick; Marinsek, Nina; Zhang, Jie; Degun, Ravi; Benelli, Giancarlo; Saletan, Stephen; Ricci, Jean-François; Andre, Fabrice

    2015-10-24

    Healthcare resource utilization in breast cancer varies by disease characteristics and treatment choices. However, lack of clarity in guidelines can result in varied interpretation and heterogeneous treatment management and costs. In Europe, the extent of this variability is unclear. Therefore, evaluation of chemotherapy use and costs versus hormone therapy across Europe is needed. This retrospective chart review (N = 355) examined primarily direct costs for chemotherapy versus hormone therapy in postmenopausal women with hormone-receptor-positive (HR+), human epidermal growth factor receptor-2-negative (HER2-) advanced breast cancer across 5 European countries (France, Germany, The Netherlands, Belgium, and Sweden). Total direct costs across the first 3 treatment lines were approximately €10,000 to €14,000 lower for an additional line of hormone therapy-based treatment versus switching to chemotherapy-based treatment. Direct cost difference between chemotherapy-based and hormone therapy-based regimens was approximately €1900 to €2500 per month. Chemotherapy-based regimens were associated with increased resource utilization (managing side effects; concomitant targeted therapy use; and increased frequencies of hospitalizations, provider visits, and monitoring tests). The proportion of patients taking sick leave doubled after switching from hormone therapy to chemotherapy. These results suggest chemotherapy is associated with increased direct costs and potentially with increased indirect costs (lower productivity of working patients) versus hormone therapy in HR+, HER2- advanced breast cancer.

  1. Loss of BRCA1 leads to an increase in epidermal growth factor receptor expression in mammary epithelial cells, and epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition prevents estrogen receptor-negative cancers in BRCA1-mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Women who carry a BRCA1 mutation typically develop "triple-negative" breast cancers (TNBC), defined by the absence of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor and Her2/neu. In contrast to ER-positive tumors, TNBCs frequently express high levels of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Previously, we found a disproportionate fraction of progenitor cells in BRCA1 mutation carriers with EGFR overexpression. Here we examine the role of EGFR in mammary epithelial cells (MECs) in the emergence of BRCA1-related tumors and as a potential target for the prevention of TNBC. Methods Cultures of MECs were used to examine EGFR protein levels and promoter activity in response to BRCA1 suppression with inhibitory RNA. EGFR was assessed by immunoblot and immunofluorescence analysis, real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assay (RT-PCR) and flow cytometry. Binding of epidermal growth factor (EGF) to subpopulations of MECs was examined by Scatchard analysis. The responsiveness of MECs to the EGFR inhibitor erlotinib was assessed in vitro in three-dimensional cultures and in vivo. Mouse mammary tumor virus-Cre recombinase (MMTV-Cre) BRCA1flox/flox p53+/- mice were treated daily with erlotinib or vehicle control, and breast cancer-free survival was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results Inhibition of BRCA1 in MECs led to upregulation of EGFR with an inverse correlation of BRCA1 with cellular EGFR protein levels (r2 = 0.87) and to an increase in cell surface-expressed EGFR. EGFR upregulation in response to BRCA1 suppression was mediated by transcriptional and posttranslational mechanisms. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1)-positive MECs expressed higher levels of EGFR than ALDH1-negative MECs and were expanded two- to threefold in the BRCA1-inhibited MEC population. All MECs were exquisitely sensitive to EGFR inhibition with erlotinib in vitro. EGFR inhibition in MMTV-Cre BRCA1flox/flox p53+/- female mice starting at age 3 months increased

  2. Economic evaluation of the 70-gene prognosis-signature (MammaPrint®) in hormone receptor-positive, lymph node-negative, human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2-negative early stage breast cancer in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Masahide; Hoshi, Shu-Ling; Ishiguro, Hiroshi; Toi, Masakazu

    2012-06-01

    The 70-gene prognosis-signature is validated as a good predictor of recurrence for hormone receptor-positive (ER+), lymph node-negative (LN-), human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2-negative (HER2-) early stage breast cancer (ESBC) in Japanese patient population. Its high cost and potential in avoiding unnecessary adjuvant chemotherapy arouse interest in its economic impact. This study evaluates the cost-effectiveness of including the assay into Japan's social health insurance benefit package. An economic decision tree and Markov model under Japan's health system from the societal perspective is constructed with clinical evidence from the pool analysis of validation studies. One-way sensitivity analyses are also performed. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratio is estimated as ¥3,873,922/quality adjusted life year (QALY) (US$43,044/QALY), which is not more than the suggested social willingness-to-pay for one QALY gain from an innovative medical intervention in Japan, ¥5,000,000/QALY (US$55,556/QALY). However, sensitivity analyses show the instability of this estimation. The introduction of the assay into Japanese practice of ER+, LN-, HER2- ESBC treatment by including it to Japan's social health insurance benefit package has a reasonable chance to be judged as cost-effective and may be justified as an efficient deployment of finite health care resources.

  3. Divergent effects of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor expression on prognosis of estrogen receptor positive versus triple negative invasive ductal breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hartog, Hermien; Horlings, Hugo M; van der Vegt, Bert; Kreike, Bas; Ajouaou, Abderrahim; van de Vijver, Marc J; Marike Boezen, H; de Bock, Geertruida H; van der Graaf, Winette T A; Wesseling, Jelle

    2011-10-01

    The insulin-like growth factor type 1 receptor (IGF1R) is involved in progression of breast cancer and resistance to systemic treatment. Targeting IGF1R signaling may, therefore, be beneficial in systemic treatment. We report the effect of IGF1R expression on prognosis in invasive ductal breast carcinoma (IDC), the most common type of breast cancer. Immunohistochemistry was performed on tumor tissue of a consecutive cohort of 429 female patients treated for operable primary IDC. Associations between IGF1R expression with clinicopathological parameters, disease free survival (DFS) and breast cancer specific survival (BCSS) were evaluated by multivariate analyses focusing on ER-positive and triple negative IDC (TN-IDC). To enlarge the TN-IDCs cohort, we analyzed a combined dataset of 51 TN-IDC tumors from our series with 64 TN-IDCs with similar clinicopathological parameters. Patients with tumors expressing cytoplasmic IGF1R have a longer DFS and BCSS (DFS: HR 0.46, 95% CI 0.27-0.49, P = 0.005, BCSS: HR 0.38, 95% CI 0.19-0.74, P = 0.005). This effect was most prominent in ER-positive tumors. However, in a combined series of 105 TN-IDCs cytoplasmic IGF1R expression was associated with a shorter DFS (HR = 2.29, 95% CI 1.08-4.84, P = 0.03), also when combined in a multivariate model, including well-known prognostic factors (HR 2.06; 95% CI 0.95-4.47; P = 0.07). IGF1R expression in ER-positive IDC is strongly related to a favorable DFS and BCSS, but to a shorter DFS in TN-IDC tumors. This divergent effect of IGF1R expression in subgroups of IDC may affect selection of patients for IGF1R targeted therapy.

  4. Budget impact analysis of everolimus for the treatment of hormone receptor positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 negative (HER2-) advanced breast cancer in the United States.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jipan; Diener, Melissa; De, Gourab; Yang, Hongbo; Wu, Eric Q; Namjoshi, Madhav

    2013-01-01

    To estimate the budget impact of everolimus as the first and second treatment option after letrozole or anastrozole (L/A) failure for post-menopausal women with hormone receptor positive (HR+), human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 negative (HER2-) advanced breast cancer (ABC). Pharmacy and medical budget impacts (2011 USD) were estimated over the first year of everolimus use in HR+, HER2- ABC from a US payer perspective. Epidemiology data were used to estimate target population size. Pre-everolimus entry treatment options included exemestane, fulvestrant, and tamoxifen. Pre- and post-everolimus entry market shares were estimated based on market research and assumptions. Drug costs were based on wholesale acquisition cost. Patients were assumed to be on treatment until progression or death. Annual medical costs were calculated as the average of pre- and post-progression medical costs weighted by the time in each period, adjusted for survival. One-way and two-way sensitivity analyses were conducted to assess the model robustness. In a hypothetical 1,000,000 member plan, 72 and 159 patients were expected to be candidates for everolimus treatment as first and second treatment option, respectively, after L/A failure. The total budget impact for the first year post-everolimus entry was $0.044 per member per month [PMPM] (pharmacy budget: $0.058 PMPM; medical budget: -$0.014 PMPM), assuming 10% of the target population would receive everolimus. The total budget impacts for the first and second treatment options after L/A failure were $0.014 PMPM (pharmacy budget: $0.018; medical budget: -$0.004) and $0.030 PMPM (pharmacy budget: $0.040; medical budget: -$0.010), respectively. Results remained robust in sensitivity analyses. Assumptions about some model input parameters were necessary and may impact results. Increased pharmacy costs for HR+, HER2- ABC following everolimus entry are expected to be partially offset by reduced medical service costs. Pharmacy and total

  5. Thromboxane A2 receptor (TBXA2R) is a potent survival factor for triple negative breast cancers (TNBCs)

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Katy; Buckley, Niamh E.; Haddock, Paula; James, Colin; Parent, Jean-Luc; McQuaid, Stephen; Mullan, Paul B.

    2016-01-01

    Triple Negative Breast Cancer (TNBC) is defined by the lack of ERα, PR expression and HER2 overexpression and is the breast cancer subtype with the poorest clinical outcomes. Our aim was to identify genes driving TNBC proliferation and/or survival which could represent novel therapeutic targets. We performed microarray profiling of primary TNBCs and generated differential genelists based on clinical outcomes following the chemotherapy regimen FEC (5-Fluorouracil/Epirubicin/Cyclophosphamide -‘good’ outcome no relapse > 3 years; ‘poor’ outcome relapse < 3 years). Elevated expression of thromboxane A2 receptor (TBXA2R) was observed in ‘good’ outcome TNBCs. TBXA2R expression was higher specifically in TNBC cell lines and TBXA2R knockdowns consistently showed dramatic cell killing in TNBC cells. TBXA2R mRNA and promoter activities were up-regulated following BRCA1 knockdown, with c-Myc being required for BRCA1-mediated transcriptional repression. We demonstrated that TBXA2R enhanced TNBC cell migration, invasion and activated Rho signalling, phenotypes which could be reversed using Rho-associated Kinase (ROCK) inhibitors. TBXA2R also protected TNBC cells from DNA damage by negatively regulating reactive oxygen species levels. In summary, TBXA2R is a novel breast cancer-associated gene required for the survival and migratory behaviour of a subset of TNBCs and could provide opportunities to develop novel, more effective treatments. PMID:27487152

  6. GDC-0941 and Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Androgen Receptor-Negative Triple Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-17

    Estrogen Receptor Negative Breast Cancer; Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 Negative Carcinoma of Breast; Triple Negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  7. Purinergic P2Y2 Receptor Control of Tissue Factor Transcription in Human Coronary Artery Endothelial Cells: NEW AP-1 TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR SITE AND NEGATIVE REGULATOR.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiwei; Zhang, Lingxin; Wang, Chuan; Roy, Shama; Shen, Jianzhong

    2016-01-22

    We recently reported that the P2Y2 receptor (P2Y2R) is the predominant nucleotide receptor expressed in human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC) and that P2Y2R activation by ATP or UTP induces dramatic up-regulation of tissue factor (TF), a key initiator of the coagulation cascade. However, the molecular mechanism of this P2Y2R-TF axis remains unclear. Here, we report the role of a newly identified AP-1 consensus sequence in the TF gene promoter and its original binding components in P2Y2R regulation of TF transcription. Using bioinformatics tools, we found that a novel AP-1 site at -1363 bp of the human TF promoter region is highly conserved across multiple species. Activation of P2Y2R increased TF promoter activity and mRNA expression in HCAEC. Truncation, deletion, and mutation of this distal AP-1 site all significantly suppressed TF promoter activity in response to P2Y2R activation. EMSA and ChIP assays further confirmed that upon P2Y2R activation, c-Jun, ATF-2, and Fra-1, but not the typical c-Fos, bound to the new AP-1 site. In addition, loss-of-function studies using siRNAs confirmed a positive transactivation role of c-Jun and ATF-2 but unexpectedly revealed a strong negative role of Fra-1 in P2Y2R-induced TF up-regulation. Furthermore, we found that P2Y2R activation promoted ERK1/2 phosphorylation through Src, leading to Fra-1 activation, whereas Rho/JNK mediated P2Y2R-induced activation of c-Jun and ATF-2. These findings reveal the molecular basis for P2Y G protein-coupled receptor control of endothelial TF expression and indicate that targeting the P2Y2R-Fra-1-TF pathway may be an attractive new strategy for controlling vascular inflammation and thrombogenicity associated with endothelial dysfunction. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Identification and characterization of the protein-associated splicing factor as a negative co-regulator of the progesterone receptor.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xuesen; Shylnova, Oksana; Challis, John R G; Lye, Stephen J

    2005-04-08

    Progesterone is essential in all species for the maintenance of pregnancy, and its withdrawal is required to activate the myometrium and to initiate labor. However, unlike most other species, progesterone levels do not fall at term in humans, raising the paradox as to how labor can occur under the continued influence of progesterone. We hypothesized that an endogenous (myometrial) repressor of the progesterone receptor (PR) could induce a functional withdrawal of progesterone and hence lead to the initiation of labor. We used the human PR as bait in a protein pull-down assay and identified polypyrimidine tract-binding protein-associated splicing factor (PSF) as a PR-interacting protein. PSF functions as a potent inhibitor of PR (but not estrogen receptor) transcriptional activity in mammalian cells. It acts through two novel mechanisms, inducing degradation of the PR through the proteasomal pathway and also interfering with binding of PR to its DNA response element. Importantly, in vivo studies in rats demonstrated a dramatic increase in myometrial PSF expression at term that was temporally associated with reduced levels of the myometrial PR. Accordingly, we propose that PSF acts as a PR corepressor and contributes to the functional withdrawal of progesterone and the initiation of human labor.

  9. The Chicken Ovalbumin Upstream Promoter-Transcription Factor II Negatively Regulates the Transactivation of Androgen Receptor in Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Song, Chin-Hee; Lee, Hyun Joo; Park, Eunsook; Lee, Keesook

    2012-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) is involved in the development and progression of prostate cancers. However, the mechanisms by which this occurs remain incompletely understood. In previous reports, chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factor II (COUP-TF II) has been suggested to play a role in the development of cancers. In the present study, we explored a putative role of COUP-TF II in prostate cancers by investigating its effect on cell proliferation and a cross-talk between COUP-TF II and AR. Overexpression of COUP-TF II results in the inhibition of androgen-dependent proliferation of prostate cancer cells. Further studies show that COUP-TF II functions as a corepressor of AR. It represses AR transactivation on target promoters containing the androgen response element (ARE) in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, COUP-TF II interacts physically with AR in vitro and in vivo. It binds to both the DNA binding domain (DBD) and the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of AR and disrupts the N/C terminal interaction of AR. Furthermore, COUP-TF II competes with coactivators such as ARA70, SRC-1, and GRIP1 to modulate AR transactivation as well as inhibiting the recruitment of AR to its ARE-containing target promoter. Taken together, our findings suggest that COUP-TF II is a novel corepressor of AR, and provide an insight into the role of COUP-TF II in prostate cancers. PMID:23145053

  10. Dominant negative and loss of function mutations of the c-kit (mast/stem cell growth factor receptor) proto-oncogene in human piebaldism

    SciTech Connect

    Spritz, R.A.; Giebel, L.B.; Holmes, S.A. )

    1992-02-01

    Piebaldism is an autosomal dominant disorder of melanocyte development and is characterized by congenital white parches of skin and hair from which melanocytes are completely absent. A similar disorder of the mouse, 'dominant white spotting' (W), results from mutations of the c-kit proto-oncogene, which encodes the cellular tyrosine kinases receptor for the mast/stem cell growth factor. The authors have identified c-kit gene mutations in three patients with piebaldism. A missense substitution (Phe[r arrow]Leu) at codon 584, within the tyrosine kinases domain, is associated with a severe piebald phenotype, whereas two different frameshifts, within codons 561 and 642, are both associated with a variable and relatively mild piebald phenotype. This is consistent with a possible 'dominant negative' effect of missense c-kit polypeptides on the function of the dimeric receptor.

  11. Immunohistochemical co-expression status of cytokeratin 5/6, androgen receptor, and p53 as prognostic factors of adjuvant chemotherapy for triple negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Tetsuyo; Nakanishi, Yoko; Hirotani, Yukari; Fuchinoue, Fumi; Enomoto, Katsuhisa; Sakurai, Kenichi; Amano, Sadao; Nemoto, Norimichi

    2016-03-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is immunohistochemically characterised by the lack of expression of the estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2). TNBC is known for its poor prognosis and high recurrence probability. There is no effective targeted treatment for TNBC, but only adjuvant chemotherapies. There are two TNBC subtypes, basal-like and non-basal-like, which are defined based on positive cytokeratin (CK) 5/6 and/or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression. In particular, CK5/6 expression is reported to correlate with TNBC recurrence. TNBC lacks ER-α expression, but some TNBCs are known to express the androgen receptor (AR). Moreover, although p53 accumulation is detected in various malignant tumors, its influence on adjuvant chemotherapy for patients with TNBC remains unclear. The aim of this study was to assess the combined immunohistochemical expression of CK 5/6, AR, and p53 as a potential prognostic marker of adjuvant chemotherapy for patients with TNBC. The expression of CK5/6, AR, and p53 in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) surgical sections from 52 patients with TNBC was analysed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and the co-expression patterns in individual cells were investigated by immunofluorescent (IF) staining. Low AR expression was correlated with high clinical stage (P < 0.05) and low nuclear grade (P < 0.05). The expression of CK5/6 and p53 did not correlate with clinicopathological features. Patients who needed adjuvant chemotherapy presented the worst prognosis. In particular, when the IHC expression pattern was CK5/6 (-), AR (-), and p53 (+), the disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were the worst. On the other hand, patients with AR (+) and p53 (-) TNBC presented a good prognosis. The analysis of the co-expression status of these three markers showed that no cells presented both AR and CK5/6 expression. Furthermore, TP53 m

  12. Essential role of TEA domain transcription factors in the negative regulation of the MYH 7 gene by thyroid hormone and its receptors.

    PubMed

    Iwaki, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Shigekazu; Matsushita, Akio; Ohba, Kenji; Matsunaga, Hideyuki; Misawa, Hiroko; Oki, Yutaka; Ishizuka, Keiko; Nakamura, Hirotoshi; Suda, Takafumi

    2014-01-01

    MYH7 (also referred to as cardiac myosin heavy chain β) gene expression is known to be repressed by thyroid hormone (T3). However, the molecular mechanism by which T3 inhibits the transcription of its target genes (negative regulation) remains to be clarified, whereas those of transcriptional activation by T3 (positive regulation) have been elucidated in detail. Two MCAT (muscle C, A, and T) sites and an A/T-rich region in the MYH7 gene have been shown to play a critical role in the expression of this gene and are known to be recognized by the TEAD/TEF family of transcription factors (TEADs). Using a reconstitution system with CV-1 cells, which has been utilized in the analysis of positive as well as negative regulation, we demonstrate that both T3 receptor (TR) β1 and α1 inhibit TEAD-dependent activation of the MYH7 promoter in a T3 dose-dependent manner. TRβ1 bound with GC-1, a TRβ-selective T3 analog, also repressed TEAD-induced activity. Although T3-dependent inhibition required the DNA-binding domain (DBD) of TRβ1, it remained after the putative negative T3-responsive elements were mutated. A co-immunoprecipitation study demonstrated the in vivo association of TRβ1 with TEAD-1, and the interaction surfaces were mapped to the DBD of the TRβ1 and TEA domains of TEAD-1, both of which are highly conserved among TRs and TEADs, respectively. The importance of TEADs in MYH7 expression was also validated with RNA interference using rat embryonic cardiomyocyte H9c2 cells. These results indicate that T3-bound TRs interfere with transactivation by TEADs via protein-protein interactions, resulting in the negative regulation of MYH7 promoter activity.

  13. Essential Role of TEA Domain Transcription Factors in the Negative Regulation of the MYH 7 Gene by Thyroid Hormone and Its Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Iwaki, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Shigekazu; Matsushita, Akio; Ohba, Kenji; Matsunaga, Hideyuki; Misawa, Hiroko; Oki, Yutaka; Ishizuka, Keiko; Nakamura, Hirotoshi; Suda, Takafumi

    2014-01-01

    MYH7 (also referred to as cardiac myosin heavy chain β) gene expression is known to be repressed by thyroid hormone (T3). However, the molecular mechanism by which T3 inhibits the transcription of its target genes (negative regulation) remains to be clarified, whereas those of transcriptional activation by T3 (positive regulation) have been elucidated in detail. Two MCAT (muscle C, A, and T) sites and an A/T-rich region in the MYH7 gene have been shown to play a critical role in the expression of this gene and are known to be recognized by the TEAD/TEF family of transcription factors (TEADs). Using a reconstitution system with CV-1 cells, which has been utilized in the analysis of positive as well as negative regulation, we demonstrate that both T3 receptor (TR) β1 and α1 inhibit TEAD-dependent activation of the MYH7 promoter in a T3 dose-dependent manner. TRβ1 bound with GC-1, a TRβ-selective T3 analog, also repressed TEAD-induced activity. Although T3-dependent inhibition required the DNA-binding domain (DBD) of TRβ1, it remained after the putative negative T3-responsive elements were mutated. A co-immunoprecipitation study demonstrated the in vivo association of TRβ1 with TEAD-1, and the interaction surfaces were mapped to the DBD of the TRβ1 and TEA domains of TEAD-1, both of which are highly conserved among TRs and TEADs, respectively. The importance of TEADs in MYH7 expression was also validated with RNA interference using rat embryonic cardiomyocyte H9c2 cells. These results indicate that T3-bound TRs interfere with transactivation by TEADs via protein-protein interactions, resulting in the negative regulation of MYH7 promoter activity. PMID:24781449

  14. Second-line single-agent chemotherapy in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative metastatic breast cancer: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Puglisi, Fabio; Rea, Daniel; Kroes, Michel A; Pronzato, Paolo

    2016-02-01

    No 'gold standard' exists for single-agent chemotherapy of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative (HER2-negative) metastatic breast cancer (MBC) in the second-line. The objective of this systematic review is to identify and appraise overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), time to progression (TTP) and Grade ≥3 adverse event evidence for single-agent chemotherapy in this setting. MEDLINE, Embase and the Cochrane Library were searched to October 2013, and PubMed October 2013 to November 2014. Electronic database searches were supplemented with hand searching of reference lists and conferences. Eligible randomised controlled trials (RCTs) employed at least one single-agent chemotherapy treatment, enrolled HER2-negative or unselected MBC patients who had progressed following first-line chemotherapy within the metastatic setting, and reported outcomes of interest for the second-line setting. Fifty-three RCTs were included in total, with most containing mixed populations by HER2 status and treatment line. Fourteen studies reported data specifically for second- and later-line treatment within the metastatic setting. Median overall survival (OS) in most trials was 8-13 months. Only one trial reported a significant difference between studied interventions in the second-line metastatic setting: nab-paclitaxel (n=131) conferred a statistically significant OS advantage vs. three-weekly paclitaxel (n=136) (median OS 13.0 vs. 10.7 months, respectively; hazard ratio 0.73, p=0.024) and improved overall safety. One RCT demonstrated significant benefit in this setting in confirmed HER2-negative MBC alongside favourable safety. Treatment line terminology was imprecise. To reliably inform patient treatment decisions, quality-of-life data are needed and precise OS estimation according to underlying patient characteristics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Epidermal growth factor receptor mediated proliferation depends on increased lipid droplet density regulated via a negative regulatory loop with FOXO3/Sirtuin6

    SciTech Connect

    Penrose, Harrison; Heller, Sandra; Cable, Chloe; Makboul, Rania; Chadalawada, Gita; Chen, Ying; Crawford, Susan E.; Savkovic, Suzana D.

    2016-01-15

    The proliferation of colon cancer cells is mediated in part by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling and requires sustained levels of cellular energy to meet its high metabolic needs. Intracellular lipid droplets (LDs) are a source of energy used for various cellular functions and they are elevated in density in human cancer, yet their regulation and function are not well understood. Here, in human colon cancer cells, EGF stimulates increases in LD density, which depends on EGFR expression and activation as well as the individual cellular capacity for lipid synthesis. Increases in LDs are blockaded by inhibition of PI3K/mTOR and PGE2 synthesis, supporting their dependency on select upstream pathways. In colon cancer cells, silencing of the FOXO3 transcription factor leads to down regulation of SIRT6, a negative regulator of lipid synthesis, and consequent increases in the LD coat protein PLIN2, revealing that increases in LDs depend on loss of FOXO3/SIRT6. Moreover, EGF stimulates loss of FOXO3/SIRT6, which is blockaded by the inhibition of upstream pathways as well as lipid synthesis, revealing existence of a negative regulatory loop between LDs and FOXO3/SIRT6. Elevated LDs are utilized by EGF treatment and their depletion through the inhibition of lipid synthesis or silencing of PLIN2 significantly attenuates proliferation. This novel mechanism of proliferative EGFR signaling leading to elevated LD density in colon cancer cells could potentially be therapeutically targeted for the treatment of tumor progression. - Highlights: • In colon cancer cells, EGFR activation leads to increases in LD density. • EGFR signaling includes PI3K/mTOR and PGE2 leading to lipid synthesis. • Increases in LDs are controlled by a negative regulatory loop with FOXO3/SIRT6. • EGFR mediated colon cancer cell proliferation depends on increased LD density.

  16. Snail-Modulated MicroRNA 493 Forms a Negative Feedback Loop with the Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Receptor Pathway and Blocks Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Arathy S; Jagadeeshan, Sankar; Pitani, Ravi Shankar; Ramshankar, Vijayalakshmi; Venkitasamy, Kesavan; Venkatraman, Ganesh; Rayala, Suresh K

    2017-03-15

    In this study, we have identified one microRNA, microRNA 493 (miR-493), which could simultaneously and directly regulate multiple genes downstream of the insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) pathway, including IGF1R, by binding with complementary sequences in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of mRNAs of IGF1R, insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1), and mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 (MAPK1), thereby potentiating their inhibitory function at multiple levels in development and progression of cancers. This binding was further confirmed by pulldown of miR with AGO-2 antibody. Further, results from head and neck samples showed that miR-493 levels were significantly downregulated in tumors, with a concomitant increase in the expression of IGF1R and key downstream effectors. Functional studies from miR-493 overexpression cells and nude-mouse models revealed the tumor suppressor functions of miR-493. Regulation studies revealed that Snail binds to the miR-493 promoter and represses it. We found the existence of a dynamic negative feedback loop in the regulation of IGF1R and miR-493 mediated via Snail. Our study showed that nicotine treatment significantly decreases the levels of miR-493-with a concomitant increase in the levels of Snail-an indication of progression of cells toward tumorigenesis, reestablishing the role of tobacco as a major risk factor for head and neck cancers and elucidating the mechanism behind nicotine-mediated tumorigenesis. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  17. Snail-Modulated MicroRNA 493 Forms a Negative Feedback Loop with the Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Receptor Pathway and Blocks Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Arathy S.; Jagadeeshan, Sankar; Pitani, Ravi Shankar; Ramshankar, Vijayalakshmi; Venkitasamy, Kesavan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In this study, we have identified one microRNA, microRNA 493 (miR-493), which could simultaneously and directly regulate multiple genes downstream of the insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) pathway, including IGF1R, by binding with complementary sequences in the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of mRNAs of IGF1R, insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1), and mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 (MAPK1), thereby potentiating their inhibitory function at multiple levels in development and progression of cancers. This binding was further confirmed by pulldown of miR with AGO-2 antibody. Further, results from head and neck samples showed that miR-493 levels were significantly downregulated in tumors, with a concomitant increase in the expression of IGF1R and key downstream effectors. Functional studies from miR-493 overexpression cells and nude-mouse models revealed the tumor suppressor functions of miR-493. Regulation studies revealed that Snail binds to the miR-493 promoter and represses it. We found the existence of a dynamic negative feedback loop in the regulation of IGF1R and miR-493 mediated via Snail. Our study showed that nicotine treatment significantly decreases the levels of miR-493—with a concomitant increase in the levels of Snail—an indication of progression of cells toward tumorigenesis, reestablishing the role of tobacco as a major risk factor for head and neck cancers and elucidating the mechanism behind nicotine-mediated tumorigenesis. PMID:27956702

  18. Negative Regulation of Grb10 Interacting GYF Protein 2 on Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 Receptor Signaling Pathway Caused Diabetic Mice Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jing; Wei, Qianping; Deng, Huacong; Li, Gang; Ma, Lingli; Zeng, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Heterozygous Gigyf2+/− mice exhibits histopathological evidence of neurodegeneration such as motor dysfunction. Several lines of evidence have demonstrated the important role of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) signaling pathway in the neuropathogenic process of cognitive impairment, while decreased Grb10-Interacting GYF Protein 2 (GIGYF2) expression can alter IGF1R trafficking and its downstream signaling pathways. Growth factor receptor-bound protein 10 (Grb10), a suppressor of IGF1R pathway, has been shown to play a critical role in regulating diabetes-associated cognitive impairment. It remains unknown whether endogenous GIGYF2 expression contributes to the development of diabetes-associated cognitive impairment. Using streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice model, we first demonstrated that a significantly increased level of GIGYF2 expression was correlated with a significant decrease in the expression of phosphorylated IGF1R as well as the phosphorylation of AKT and ERK1/2, two signaling pathways downstream of IGF1R, in the hippocampus of diabetic mice. On the contrary, in situ knockdown of GIGYF2 expression in hippocampus resulted in increased expression of phosphorylated IGF1R expression and correspondingly reversed the down-regulation of ERK1/2 phsophorylation but had no obvious effect on Grb10 expression. Functionally, knockdown of GIGYF2 expression markedly ameliorated diabetes-associated cognitive dysfunction as well as the ultrastructural pathology and abnormal neurobehavioral changes. These results suggest that increased expression of GIGYF2 might contribute to the development of diabetes-associated cognitive disorder via negatively regulating IGF1R signaling pathway. Therefore, down-regulation of GIGYF2 expression may provide a potential novel approach to treat diabetes-associated cognitive impairment caused by aberrant IGF1R signaling pathway. PMID:25268761

  19. Kruppel-like Factor 9 is a Negative Regulator of Ligand-dependent Estrogen Receptor Alpha Signaling in Ishikawa Endometrial Adenocarcinoma Cells

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Estrogen (E) and progesterone (P), acting through their respective receptors and other nuclear proteins, exhibit opposing activities in target cells. We previously reported that Krüppel-like factor 9 (KLF9) cooperates with progesterone receptor (PR) to facilitate P-dependent gene transcription in ut...

  20. Overexpression of insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor and frequent mutational inactivation of SDHA in wild-type SDHB-negative gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Belinsky, Martin G; Rink, Lori; Flieder, Douglas B; Jahromi, Mona S; Schiffman, Joshua D; Godwin, Andrew K; Mehren, Margaret von

    2013-02-01

    Approximately 15% of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) in adults and 85% in children lack mutations in KIT and PDGFRA and are known as wild-type GISTs. Wild-type GISTs from adults and children express high levels of insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) and exhibit stable genomes compared to mutant GISTs. Pediatric wild-type GISTs, GISTs from the multitumor Carney-Stratakis syndrome, and the Carney triad share other clinicopathological properties (e.g., early-onset, multifocal GISTs with epitheliod cell morphology), suggesting a common etiology. Carney-Stratakis is an inherited association of GIST and paragangliomas caused by germline mutations in succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) genes. The connection between defective cellular respiration and GIST pathology has been strengthened by the utilization of SDHB immunohistochemistry to identify SDH deficiency in pediatric GISTs, syndromic GISTs, and some adult wild-type GISTs. SDHB and IGF1R expression was examined in 12 wild-type and 12 mutant GIST cases. Wild-type GISTs were screened for coding-region alterations in SDH genes and for chromosomal aberrations using genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism and MIP arrays. SDHB-deficiency, identified in 11/12 wild-type GIST cases, was tightly associated with overexpression of IGF1R protein and transcript. Biallelic inactivation of the SDHA gene was a surprisingly frequent event, identified in 5 of 11 SDHB-negative cases, generally due to germline point mutations accompanied by somatic SDHA allelic losses. As a novel finding, inactivation of the SDHC gene from a combination of a heterozygous coding-region mutation and hypermethylation of the wild-type allele was found in one SDHB-negative case. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Integrin alpha1beta1 controls reactive oxygen species synthesis by negatively regulating epidermal growth factor receptor-mediated Rac activation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiwu; Abair, Tristin D; Ibanez, Maria R; Su, Yan; Frey, Mark R; Dise, Rebecca S; Polk, D Brent; Singh, Amar B; Harris, Raymond C; Zent, Roy; Pozzi, Ambra

    2007-05-01

    Integrins control many cell functions, including generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and regulation of collagen synthesis. Mesangial cells, found in the glomerulus of the kidney, are able to produce large amounts of ROS via the NADPH oxidase. We previously demonstrated that integrin alpha1-null mice develop worse fibrosis than wild-type mice following glomerular injury and this is due, in part, to excessive ROS production by alpha1-null mesangial cells. In the present studies, we describe the mechanism whereby integrin alpha1-null mesangial cells produce excessive ROS. Integrin alpha1-null mesangial cells have constitutively increased basal levels of activated Rac1, which result in its increased translocation to the cell membrane, excessive ROS production, and consequent collagen IV deposition. Basal Rac1 activation is a direct consequence of ligand-independent increased epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) phosphorylation in alpha1-null mesangial cells. Thus, our study demonstrates that integrin alpha1beta1-EGFR cross talk is a key step in negatively regulating Rac1 activation, ROS production, and excessive collagen synthesis, which is a hallmark of diseases characterized by irreversible fibrosis.

  2. Protective effect of 55- but not 75-kD soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor-immunoglobulin G fusion proteins in an animal model of gram- negative sepsis

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the ability of both a 55- and 75- kD soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor immunoglobulin G fusion protein (sTNFR-IgG) in protecting against death in a murine model of gram-negative sepsis. Pretreatment with 250 micrograms of the p75 construct delayed but did not avert death in this model, reducing peak bioactive TNF-alpha levels after infection from 76.4 ng ml-1 in control mice to 4.7 ng ml-1 in the treated group (p < 0.05, two-sample t test). However, these low levels of bioactive TNF-alpha persisted in the p75 fusion protein-treated animals compared with the controls and were sufficient to mediate delayed death. In contrast, pretreatment with 200 micrograms of the p55 sTNFR-IgG gave excellent protection against death with complete neutralization of circulating TNF. Studies of the binding of TNF-alpha with the soluble TNFR fusion proteins showed that the p75 fusion construct exchanges bound TNF-alpha about 50-100-fold faster than the p55 fusion protein. Thus, although both fusion proteins in equilibrium bind TNF-alpha with high affinity, the TNF-alpha p55 fusion protein complex is kinetically more stable than the p75 fusion construct, which thus acts as a TNF carrier. The persistent release of TNF-alpha from the p75 fusion construct limits its therapeutic effect in this model of sepsis. PMID:7964492

  3. Endogenous interleukin-22 protects against inflammatory bowel disease but not autoimmune cholangitis in dominant negative form of transforming growth factor beta receptor type II mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, G-X; Sun, Y; Tsuneyama, K; Zhang, W; Leung, P S C; He, X-S; Ansari, A A; Bowlus, C; Ridgway, W M; Gershwin, M E

    2016-08-01

    During chronic inflammation, interleukin (IL)-22 expression is up-regulated in both CD4 and CD8 T cells, exerting a protective role in infections. However, in autoimmunity, IL-22 appears to have either a protective or a pathogenic role in a variety of murine models of autoimmunity and, by extrapolation, in humans. It is not clear whether IL-22 itself mediates inflammation or is a by-product of inflammation. We have taken advantage of the dominant negative form of transforming growth factor beta receptor type II (dnTGF-βRII) mice that develop both inflammatory bowel disease and autoimmune cholangitis and studied the role and the biological function of IL-22 by generating IL-22(-/-) dnTGF-βRII mice. Our data suggest that the influence of IL-22 on autoimmunity is determined in part by the local microenvironment. In particular, IL-22 deficiency exacerbates tissue injury in inflammatory bowel disease, but has no influence on either the hepatocytes or cholangiocytes in the same model. These data take on particular significance in the previously defined effects of IL-17A, IL-12p40 and IL-23p19 deficiency and emphasize that, in colitis, there is a dominant role of IL-23/T helper type 17 (Th17) signalling. Furthermore, the levels of IL-22 are IL-23-dependent. The use of cytokine therapy in patients with autoimmune disease has significant potential, but must take into account the overlapping and often promiscuous effects that can theoretically exacerbate inflammation. © 2016 British Society for Immunology.

  4. Targeting the androgen receptor in triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Gucalp, Ayca; Traina, Tiffany A

    Triple-negative breast cancer represents approximately 15%-20% of all newly diagnosed breast cancers, but it accounts for a disproportionate number of breast cancer-related deaths each year. Owing to the lack of estrogen, progesterone, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 expression, patients with triple-negative breast cancer do not benefit from generally well-tolerated and effective therapies targeting the estrogen and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 signaling pathways and are faced with an increased risk of disease progression and poorer overall survival. The heterogeneity of triple-negative breast cancer has been increasingly recognized and this may lead to therapeutic opportunities because of newly defined oncogenic drivers and targets. A subset of triple-negative breast tumors expresses the androgen receptor (AR) and this may benefit from treatments that inhibit the AR-signaling pathway. The first proof-of-concept trial established activity of the AR antagonist, bicalutamide, in patients with advanced AR+ triple-negative breast cancer. Since that time, evidence further supports the activity of other next-generation AR-targeted agents such as enzalutamide. Not unlike in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer, mechanisms of resistance are being investigated and rationale exists for thoughtful, well-designed combination regimens such as AR antagonism with CDK4/6 pathway inhibitors or PI3K inhibitors. Furthermore, novel agents developed for the treatment of prostate cancer, which reduce androgen production such as abiraterone acetate and seviteronel, are being tested as well. This review summarizes the underlying biology of AR signaling in breast cancer development and the available clinical trial data for the use of anti-androgen therapy in the treatment of AR+ triple-negative breast cancer.

  5. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-associated factor (TRAF)-interacting protein (TRIP) negatively regulates the TRAF2 ubiquitin-dependent pathway by suppressing the TRAF2-sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) interaction.

    PubMed

    Park, Eui-Soon; Choi, Seunga; Shin, Bongjin; Yu, Jungeun; Yu, Jiyeon; Hwang, Jung-Me; Yun, Hyeongseok; Chung, Young-Ho; Choi, Jong-Soon; Choi, Yongwon; Rho, Jaerang

    2015-04-10

    The signaling pathway downstream of TNF receptor (TNFR) is involved in the induction of a wide range of cellular processes, including cell proliferation, activation, differentiation, and apoptosis. TNFR-associated factor 2 (TRAF2) is a key adaptor molecule in TNFR signaling complexes that promotes downstream signaling cascades, such as nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinase activation. TRAF-interacting protein (TRIP) is a known cellular binding partner of TRAF2 and inhibits TNF-induced NF-κB activation. Recent findings that TRIP plays a multifunctional role in antiviral response, cell proliferation, apoptosis, and embryonic development have increased our interest in exploring how TRIP can affect the TNFR-signaling pathway on a molecular level. In our current study, we demonstrated that TRIP is negatively involved in the TNF-induced inflammatory response through the down-regulation of proinflammatory cytokine production. Here, we demonstrated that the TRAF2-TRIP interaction inhibits Lys(63)-linked TRAF2 ubiquitination by inhibiting TRAF2 E3 ubiquitin (Ub) ligase activity. The TRAF2-TRIP interaction inhibited the binding of sphingosine 1-phosphate, which is a cofactor of TRAF2 E3 Ub ligase, to the TRAF2 RING domain. Finally, we demonstrated that TRIP functions as a negative regulator of proinflammatory cytokine production by inhibiting TNF-induced NF-κB activation. These results indicate that TRIP is an important cellular regulator of the TNF-induced inflammatory response.

  6. Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) Receptor-associated Factor (TRAF)-interacting Protein (TRIP) Negatively Regulates the TRAF2 Ubiquitin-dependent Pathway by Suppressing the TRAF2-Sphingosine 1-Phosphate (S1P) Interaction*

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eui-Soon; Choi, Seunga; Shin, Bongjin; Yu, Jungeun; Yu, Jiyeon; Hwang, Jung-Me; Yun, Hyeongseok; Chung, Young-Ho; Choi, Jong-Soon; Choi, Yongwon; Rho, Jaerang

    2015-01-01

    The signaling pathway downstream of TNF receptor (TNFR) is involved in the induction of a wide range of cellular processes, including cell proliferation, activation, differentiation, and apoptosis. TNFR-associated factor 2 (TRAF2) is a key adaptor molecule in TNFR signaling complexes that promotes downstream signaling cascades, such as nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinase activation. TRAF-interacting protein (TRIP) is a known cellular binding partner of TRAF2 and inhibits TNF-induced NF-κB activation. Recent findings that TRIP plays a multifunctional role in antiviral response, cell proliferation, apoptosis, and embryonic development have increased our interest in exploring how TRIP can affect the TNFR-signaling pathway on a molecular level. In our current study, we demonstrated that TRIP is negatively involved in the TNF-induced inflammatory response through the down-regulation of proinflammatory cytokine production. Here, we demonstrated that the TRAF2-TRIP interaction inhibits Lys63-linked TRAF2 ubiquitination by inhibiting TRAF2 E3 ubiquitin (Ub) ligase activity. The TRAF2-TRIP interaction inhibited the binding of sphingosine 1-phosphate, which is a cofactor of TRAF2 E3 Ub ligase, to the TRAF2 RING domain. Finally, we demonstrated that TRIP functions as a negative regulator of proinflammatory cytokine production by inhibiting TNF-induced NF-κB activation. These results indicate that TRIP is an important cellular regulator of the TNF-induced inflammatory response. PMID:25716317

  7. Cell surface interaction of annexin A2 and galectin-3 modulates epidermal growth factor receptor signaling in Her-2 negative breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Praveenkumar; Bargale, Anil; Patil, Basavraj R; Mohan, Rajashekar; Dinesh, U S; Vishwanatha, Jamboor K; Gai, Pramod B; Patil, Vidya S; Amsavardani, T S

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression and activation of tyrosine kinase receptors like EGFR and Src regulate the progression and metastasis of Her-2 negative breast cancer. Recently we have reported the role of cell membrane interaction of phospholipid-binding protein annexin A2 (AnxA2) and EGFR in regulating cellular signaling in the activation of angiogenesis, matrix degradation, invasion, and cancer metastasis. Beta-galactoside-specific animal lectin galectin-3 is an apoptosis inhibitor, and cell surface-associated extracellular galectin-3 also has a role in cell migration, cancer progression, and metastasis. Similar expression pattern and membrane co-localization of these two proteins made us to hypothesize in the current study that galectin-3 and AnxA2 interaction is critical for Her-2 negative breast cancer progression. By various experimental analyses, we confirm that glycosylated AnxA2 at the membrane surface interacts with galectin-3. N-linked glycosylation inhibitor tunicamycin treatment convincingly blocked AnxA2 membrane translocation and its association with galectin-3. To analyze whether this interaction has any functional relevance, we tried to dissociate this interaction with purified plant lectin from chickpea (Cicer arietinum agglutinin). This highly specific 30 kDa plant lectin could dissociate AnxA2 from endogenous lectin galectin-3 interaction at the cell surface. This dissociation could down-regulate Bcl-2 family proteins, cell proliferation, and migration simultaneously triggering cell apoptosis. Targeting this interaction of membrane surface glycoprotein and its animal lectin in Her-2 negative breast cancer may be of therapeutic value.

  8. Delaying Chemotherapy in the Treatment of Hormone Receptor–Positive, Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2–Negative Advanced Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brufsky, Adam M.

    2015-01-01

    Global guidelines for the management of locally advanced or metastatic hormone receptor–positive (HR-positive), human epidermal growth factor 2–negative (HER2-negative) breast cancer recommend endocrine therapy as first-line treatment for all patients, regardless of age or postmenopausal status. However, current practice patterns in the United States and Europe suggest that these modes of therapy are not being used as recommended, and many patients with advanced HR-positive, HER2-negative disease are being treated first-line with chemotherapy or switched to chemotherapy after a single endocrine therapy. Given that chemotherapy is associated with increased toxicity and reduced quality of life (QOL) compared with endocrine therapy, prolonging the duration of response obtained with endocrine therapy may help delay chemotherapy and its attendant toxicities. Several strategies to delay or overcome endocrine resistance and thereby postpone chemotherapy have been explored, including the use of second-line endocrine agents with different mechanisms of action, adding targeted agents that inhibit specific resistance pathways, and adding agents that act in complementary or synergistic ways to inhibit tumor cell proliferation. This review analyzes the different therapy options available to HR-positive, HER2-negative patients with advanced breast cancer that can be used to delay chemotherapy and enhance QOL. PMID:26793013

  9. SIGIRR, a negative regulator of Toll-like receptor-interleukin 1 receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Wald, David; Qin, Jinzhong; Zhao, Zhendong; Qian, Youcun; Naramura, Mayumi; Tian, Liping; Towne, Jennifer; Sims, John E; Stark, George R; Li, Xiaoxia

    2003-09-01

    The Toll-like receptor-interleukin 1 receptor signaling (TLR-IL-1R) receptor superfamily is important in differentially recognizing pathogen products and eliciting appropriate immune responses. These receptors alter gene expression, mainly through the activation of nuclear factor-kappaB and activating protein 1. SIGIRR (single immunoglobulin IL-1R-related molecule), a member of this family that does not activate these factors, instead negatively modulates immune responses. Inflammation is enhanced in SIGIRR-deficient mice, as shown by their enhanced chemokine induction after IL-1 injection and reduced threshold for lethal endotoxin challenge. Cells from SIGIRR-deficient mice showed enhanced activation in response to either IL-1 or certain Toll ligands. Finally, biochemical analysis indicated that SIGIRR binds to the TLR-IL-1R signaling components in a ligand-dependent way. Our data show that SIGIRR functions as a biologically important modulator of TLR-IL-1R signaling.

  10. Negative cross-talk between the human orphan nuclear receptor Nur77/NAK-1/TR3 and nuclear factor-kappaB.

    PubMed

    Harant, Hanna; Lindley, Ivan J D

    2004-01-01

    The effect of orphan nuclear receptor Nur77 overexpression on activation of an interleukin-2 (IL-2) promoter-luciferase construct was analyzed in the human leukemic cell line Jurkat. Cotransfection of the IL-2 promoter construct together with the Nur77 expression plasmid resulted in a significant repression of IL-2 promoter activation compared to control cells. The repression by Nur77 requires the N-terminal activation function-1 domain. The repressive effect of Nur77 on IL-2 promoter activation is mediated through inhibition of the transcription factor complex nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB), since blocking or alteration of the IL-2 NF-kappaB binding sites resulted in abrogation of the repressive effect of Nur77. Moreover, further examination of a reporter gene construct containing multiple copies of the IL-2 CD28 response element (CD28RE) showed that Nur77 can inhibit transactivation mediated by the NF-kappaB components p65 and c-Rel. However, no effect of Nur77 was seen on p65-mediated transactivation of a construct containing multiple NF-kappaB binding sites of the HIV LTR. Our data suggest that Nur77 is able to block activation through NF-kappaB when bound to low-affinity NF-kappaB binding sites, such as those located in the IL-2 promoter.

  11. Promoter methylation of BRCA1 is associated with estrogen, progesterone and human epidermal growth factor receptor-negative tumors and the prognosis of breast cancer: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Taiyan; Ren, Yongyong; Wang, Boyuan; Huang, Yingze; Jia, Shuting; Tang, Wenru; Luo, Ying

    2015-11-01

    Aberrant methylation of the breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1) promoter is a mechanism for its functional inactivation. It may potentially be used as a prognostic marker in studies for patients with breast cancer and plays an important role in tumorigenesis. Numerous studies have suggested that the methylation of the BRCA1 promoter is associated with the prognosis of breast cancer. However, the prognosis of BRCA1 promoter methylation in breast cancer patients of different ethnicities remains ambiguous. The present meta-analysis was performed to adjust and augment a previously published study, which estimated the correlations between promoter methylation of BRCA1 and the clinical outcomes of breast cancer patients. These results indicated that BRCA1 methylation was significantly correlated with a poor prognosis of breast cancer, particularly for Asian patients, but the correlation was over-estimated in the previous study. The combined hazard ratios (HRs) in the present study were 1.76 (1.15-2.68) and 1.97 (1.12-3.44) for univariate and multivariate analysis of overall survival, which were different from 2.02 (1.35-3.03) and 1.38 (1.04-1.84) in the previous study. For studies of disease-free survival, the univariate and multivariate analyses also have different pooled HRs: 2.89 (1.73-4.83) and 3.92 (1.49-10.32) in the previously published study and 1.28 (0.68-2.43) and 1.64 (0.64-4.19) in the present study. In addition, the BRCA1 promoter regions used to detect the hypermethylation were different. All the studies using the Baldwin's primer reported that breast cancer patients with BRCA1 promoter methylation had a better prognosis. There were also correlations between BRCA1 promoter methylation and receptor-negativity of the estrogen receptors, progesterone receptor, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 and a triple-negative status. Patients with the estrogen, progesterone and epidermal growth factor-related receptor-negative status were more likely to be

  12. Visualising dual downregulation of insulin-like growth factor receptor-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor-A by heat shock protein 90 inhibition effect in triple negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Terwisscha van Scheltinga, Anton G T; Berghuis, Paul; Nienhuis, Hilde H; Timmer-Bosscha, Hetty; Pot, Linda; Gaykema, Sietske B M; Lub-de Hooge, Marjolijn N; Kosterink, Jos G W; de Vries, Elisabeth G E; Schröder, Carolien P

    2014-09-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is biologically characterised by heterogeneous presence of molecular pathways underlying it. Insulin-like growth factor receptor-1 (IGF-1R) expression and vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) have been identified as key factors in these pathways in TNBC. In this study, we aimed at in vivo PET imaging the effect of heat shock protein (Hsp) 90 inhibition by means of NVP-AUY922 on these pathways, with zirconium-89 ((89)Zr) labelled antibodies targeting IGF-1R and VEGF-A. In vitro NVP-AUY922 effects on cellular IGF-1R expression and VEGF-A secretion were determined in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines. Moreover human TNBC bearing MDA-MB-231 mice received 50mg/kg NVP-AUY922 or vehicle q3d intraperitoneally for 21days. PET scans with (89)Zr-MAB391 and (89)Zr-bevacizumab for visualisation of IGF-1R and VEGF-A were performed before and during treatment. Ex vivo biodistribution and correlative tissue analyses were performed. NVP-AUY922 treatment reduced IGF-1R expression and VEGF-A excretion in both cell lines. Hsp90 inhibition lowered tumour uptake on (89)Zr-MAB391-PET by 37.3% (P<0.01) and on (89)Zr-bevacizumab-PET by 44.4% (P<0.01). This was confirmed by ex vivo biodistribution with a reduction of 41.3% injected dose (ID)/g for (89)Zr-MAB391 and 37.8% ID/g for (89)Zr-bevacizumab, while no differences were observed for other tissues. This coincided with reduced IGF-1R expression and mean vessel density in the NVP-AUY922 treated tumours. (89)Zr-MAB391 and (89)Zr-bevacizumab PET reflect effect of Hsp90 inhibitors and can therefore potentially be used to monitor therapeutic effects of Hsp90 inhibitor therapy in TNBC. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. N1-Guanyl-1,7-Diaminoheptane Sensitizes Estrogen Receptor Negative Breast Cancer Cells to Doxorubicin by Preventing Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition through Inhibition of Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Factor 5A2 Activation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Liu, Rongrong; Fu, Peifen; Du, Feiya; Hong, Yun; Yao, Minya; Zhang, Xianning; Zheng, Shusen

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 30% of breast cancer does not express the estrogen receptor (ER), which is necessary for endocrine-based therapy approaches. Many studies demonstrated that eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A2 (eIF5A2) serves as a proliferation-related oncogene in tumorigenic processes. The present study used cell viability assays, EdU incorporation assays, western blot, and immunofluorescence to explore whether N1-guanyl-1,7-diaminoheptane (GC7), which inhibits eIF5A2 activation, exerts synergistic cytotoxicity with doxorubicin in breast cancer. We found that GC7 enhanced doxorubicin cytotoxicity in ER-negative HCC1937 cells but had little effect in ER-positive MCF-7 and Bcap-37 cells. Administration of GC7 reversed the doxorubicin-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in ER-negative breast cancer cells. Knockdown of eIF5A2 by siRNA inhibited the doxorubicin-induced EMT in ER-negative HCC1937 cells. These data demonstrated that GC7 combination therapy may enhance the therapeutic efficacy of doxorubicin in estrogen negative breast cancer cells by preventing EMT through inhibition of eIF5A2 activation. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Receptor-interacting protein kinase 2 promotes triple-negative breast cancer cell migration and invasion via activation of nuclear factor-kappaB and c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathways

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Metastasis is the main cause of breast cancer morbidity and mortality. Processes that allow for tumor cell migration and invasion are important therapeutic targets. Here we demonstrate that receptor-interacting protein kinase 2 (RIP2), a kinase known to be involved in inflammatory processes, also has novel roles in cancer cell migration and invasion. Methods A total of six breast cancer expression databases, including The Cancer Genome Atlas, were assessed for RIP2 expression among various clinical subtypes and its role as a prognostic biomarker. mRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for RIP2 was performed on 17 stage III breast cancers to determine if there was a correlation between RIP2 expression and lymph node involvement. RNA-interference was used to knock-down RIP2 expression in MDA-MB-231, Htb126, SUM149PT, MCF7, T47D, and HCC1428 cells. Cell migration and invasion were measured in vitro by scratch/wound healing and transwell migration assays. A xenograft mouse model was used to assess tumor growth and chemosensitivity to docetaxel in vivo in MDA-MB-231 cells with and without RIP2 small hairpin RNA knockdown. Western blot and immunofluorescence imaging were used to evaluate protein expressions. Results Interrogation of expression databases showed that RIP2 expression is significantly over-expressed in triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC: estrogen-receptor (ER) negative, progesterone-receptor (PR) negative, Her2/neu- (Her2) negative), compared to other clinical subtypes. High RIP2 expression correlates with worse progression-free survival using a combined breast cancer expression array dataset consisting of 946 patients. Multivariate analysis shows RIP2 as an independent prognostic biomarker. Knock-down of RIP2 significantly decreases migration in both scratch/wound healing and transwell migration assays in MDA-MB-231, Htb126, SUM149PT, MCF7, and T47D cells and is correlated with decreased Nuclear Factor-kappaB and c-Jun N

  15. P53 mutations in triple negative breast cancer upregulate endosomal recycling of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) increasing its oncogenic potency.

    PubMed

    Shapira, Iuliana; Lee, Annette; Vora, Reena; Budman, Daniel R

    2013-11-01

    There is no available targeted therapy for triple-negative or its more aggressive subtype, basal-like breast cancer. Multiple therapeutic strategies based on translational knowledge have not improved the treatment options for triple negative patients. As understanding of molecular pathways that drive tumor development is rapidly increasing, it is imperative to adapt our treatment strategies to perturbations in molecular pathways driving the malignant process. Basal-like breast cancers over-express EGFR (without mutations or EGFR gene amplifications) and have p53 mutations. While EGFR drives the malignant behavior in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), anti-EGFR therapies have fallen short of the expected results in clinical trials. Here we bring evidence that the less than optimal results of the anti-EGFR therapies may be explained in part by the increased potency of the EGFR signaling due to increased endosomal recycling. The functional connection between EGFR and endosomal trafficking in TNBC is mutant p53 found in the most aggressive forms of TNBC. Mutant p53 acquires oncogenic functions and binds p63 protein, a member of p53 family with tumor suppressor activities. In the absence of functional p63 there is an upregulation of endosomal recycling EGFR and integrin to the membrane with increased proinvasive abilities of cancer cells. Blocking endosomal trafficking combined with anti-EGFR treatments may result in better clinical outcomes in TNBC.

  16. Nuclear detection of Y-box protein-1 (YB-1) closely associates with progesterone receptor negativity and is a strong adverse survival factor in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Edgar; En-Nia, Abdelaziz; Wiesmann, Frank; Krings, Renate; Djudjaj, Sonja; Breuer, Elisabeth; Fuchs, Thomas; Wild, Peter J; Hartmann, Arndt; Dunn, Sandra E; Mertens, Peter R

    2009-11-24

    Y-box binding protein-1 (YB-1) is the prototypic member of the cold shock protein family that fulfills numerous cellular functions. In the nucleus YB-1 protein orchestrates transcription of proliferation-related genes, whereas in the cytoplasm it associates with mRNA and directs translation. In human tumor entities, such as breast, lung and prostate cancer, cellular YB-1 expression indicates poor clinical outcome, suggesting that YB-1 is an attractive marker to predict patients' prognosis and, potentially, is suitable to individualize treatment protocols. Given these predictive qualities of YB-1 detection we sought to establish a highly specific monoclonal antibody (Mab) for diagnostic testing and its characterization towards outcome prediction (relapse-free and overall survival). Hybridoma cell generation was carried out with recombinant YB-1 protein as immunogen and Mab characterization was performed using immunoblotting and ELISA with recombinant and tagged YB-1 proteins, as well as immunohistochemistry of healthy and breast cancer specimens. Breast tumor tissue array staining results were analyzed for correlations with receptor expression and outcome parameters. YB-1-specific Mab F-E2G5 associates with conformational binding epitopes mapping to two domains within the N-terminal half of the protein and detects nuclear YB-1 protein by immunohistochemistry in paraffin-embedded breast cancer tissues. Prognostic evaluation of Mab F-E2G5 was performed by immunohistochemistry of a human breast cancer tissue microarray comprising 179 invasive breast cancers, 8 ductal carcinoma in situ and 37 normal breast tissue samples. Nuclear YB-1 detection in human breast cancer cells was associated with poor overall survival (p = 0.0046). We observed a close correlation between nuclear YB-1 detection and absence of progesterone receptor expression (p = 0.002), indicating that nuclear YB-1 detection marks a specific subgroup of breast cancer. Likely due to limitation of sample size

  17. Glut1 promotes cell proliferation, migration and invasion by regulating epidermal growth factor receptor and integrin signaling in triple-negative breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sunhwa; Kim, Hyungjoo; Nam, KeeSoo; Shin, Incheol

    2017-03-01

    Elevated glucose levels in cancer cells can be attributed to increased levels of glucose transporter (GLUT) proteins. Glut1 expression is increased in human malignant cells. To investigate alternative roles of Glut1 in breast cancer, we silenced Glut1 in triple-negative breast-cancer cell lines using a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) system. Glut1 silencing was verified by Western blotting and qRT-PCR. Knockdown of Glut1 resulted in decreased cell proliferation, glucose uptake, migration, and invasion through modulation of the EGFR/ MAPK signaling pathway and integrin β1/Src/FAK signaling pathways. These results suggest that Glut1 not only plays a role as a glucose transporter, but also acts as a regulator of signaling cascades in the tumorigenesis of breast cancer. [BMB Reports 2017; 50(3): 132-137].

  18. CD23 can negatively regulate B-cell receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chaohong; Richard, Katharina; Wiggins, Melvin; Zhu, Xiaoping; Conrad, Daniel H.; Song, Wenxia

    2016-01-01

    CD23 has been implicated as a negative regulator of IgE and IgG antibody responses. However, whether CD23 has any role in B-cell activation remains unclear. We examined the expression of CD23 in different subsets of peripheral B cells and the impact of CD23 expression on the early events of B-cell receptor (BCR) activation using CD23 knockout (KO) mice. We found that in addition to marginal zone B cells, mature follicular B cells significantly down regulate the surface expression level of CD23 after undergoing isotype switch and memory B-cell differentiation. Upon stimulation with membrane-associated antigen, CD23 KO causes significant increases in the area of B cells contacting the antigen-presenting membrane and the magnitude of BCR clustering. This enhanced cell spreading and BCR clustering is concurrent with increases in the levels of phosphorylation of tyrosine and Btk, as well as the levels of F-actin and phosphorylated Wiskott Aldrich syndrome protein, an actin nucleation promoting factor, in the contract zone of CD23 KO B cells. These results reveal a role of CD23 in the negative regulation of BCR signaling in the absence of IgE immune complex and suggest that CD23 down-regulates BCR signaling by influencing actin-mediated BCR clustering and B-cell morphological changes. PMID:27181049

  19. Absolute Benefit of Adjuvant Endocrine Therapies for Premenopausal Women With Hormone Receptor–Positive, Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2–Negative Early Breast Cancer: TEXT and SOFT Trials

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Prudence A.; Pagani, Olivia; Fleming, Gini F.; Walley, Barbara A.; Viale, Giuseppe; Colleoni, Marco; Láng, István; Gómez, Henry L.; Tondini, Carlo; Pinotti, Graziella; Price, Karen N.; Coates, Alan S.; Goldhirsch, Aron; Gelber, Richard D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Risk of recurrence is the primary consideration in breast cancer adjuvant therapy recommendations. The TEXT (Tamoxifen and Exemestane Trial) and SOFT (Suppression of Ovarian Function Trial) trials investigated adjuvant endocrine therapies for premenopausal women with hormone receptor–positive breast cancer, testing exemestane plus ovarian function suppression (OFS), tamoxifen plus OFS, and tamoxifen alone. We examined absolute treatment effect across a continuum of recurrence risk to individualize endocrine therapy decision making for premenopausal women with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) –negative disease. Patients and Methods The TEXT and SOFT hormone receptor–positive, HER2-negative analysis population included 4,891 women. The end point was breast cancer–free interval (BCFI), defined as time from random assignment to first occurrence of invasive locoregional, distant, or contralateral breast cancer. A continuous, composite measure of recurrence risk for each patient was determined from a Cox model incorporating age, nodal status, tumor size and grade, and estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and Ki-67 expression levels. Subpopulation treatment effect pattern plot methodology revealed differential treatment effects on 5-year BCFI according to composite risk. Results SOFT patients who remained premenopausal after chemotherapy experienced absolute improvement of 5% or more in 5-year BCFI with exemestane plus OFS versus tamoxifen plus OFS or tamoxifen alone, reaching 10% to 15% at intermediate to high composite risk; the benefit of tamoxifen plus OFS versus tamoxifen alone was apparent at the highest composite risk. The SOFT no-chemotherapy cohort—for whom composite risk was lowest on average—did well with all endocrine therapies. For TEXT patients, the benefit of exemestane plus OFS versus tamoxifen plus OFS in 5-year BCFI ranged from 5% to 15%; patients not receiving chemotherapy and with lowest composite risk did well

  20. Discovery of a Negative Allosteric Modulator of GABAB Receptors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Initialized from the scaffold of CGP7930, an allosteric agonist of GABAB receptors, a series of noncompetitive antagonists were discovered. Among these compounds, compounds 3, 6, and 14 decreased agonist GABA-induced maximal effect of IP3 production in HEK293 cells overexpressing GABAB receptors and Gqi9 proteins without changing the EC50. Compounds 3, 6, and 14 not only inhibited agonist baclofen-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation but also blocked CGP7930-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation in HEK293 cells overexpressing GABAB receptors. The results suggested that compounds 3, 6, and 14 are negative allosteric modulators of GABAB receptors. The representative compound 14 decreased GABA-induced IP3 production with IC50 of 37.9 μM and had no effect on other GPCR Class C members such as mGluR1, mGluR2, and mGluR5. Finally, we showed that compound 14 did not bind to the orthosteric binding sites of GABAB receptors, demonstrating that compound 14 negatively modulated GABAB receptors activity as a negative allosteric modulator. PMID:25050158

  1. Identification of a negative regulatory cis-element in the enhancer core region of the prostate-specific antigen promoter: implications for intersection of androgen receptor and nuclear factor-kappaB signalling in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Cinar, Bekir; Yeung, Fan; Konaka, Hiroyuki; Mayo, Marty W; Freeman, Michael R; Zhau, Haiyen E; Chung, Leland W K

    2004-01-01

    The NF-kappaB (nuclear factor-kappaB) transcription factors mediate activation of a large number of gene promoters containing diverse kappaB-site sequences. Here, PSA (prostate-specific antigen) was used as an AR (androgen receptor)-responsive gene to examine the underlying mechanism by which the NF-kappaB p65 transcription factor down-regulates the transcriptional activity of AR in cells. We observed that activation of NF-kappaB by TNFalpha (tumour necrosis factor alpha) inhibited both basal and androgen-stimulated PSA expression, and that this down-regulation occurred at the promoter level, as confirmed by the super-repressor IkappaBalpha (S32A/S36A), a dominant negative inhibitor of NF-kappaB. Using a linker-scanning mutagenesis approach, we identified a cis -element, designated XBE (X-factor-binding element), in the AREc (androgen response element enhancer core) of the PSA promoter, which negatively regulated several AR-responsive promoters, including that of PSA. When three copies of XBE in tandem were juxtaposed to GRE4 (glucocorticoid response element 4), a 4-6-fold reduction of inducible GRE4 activity was detected in three different cell lines, LNCaP, ARCaP-AR and PC3-AR. Bioinformatics and molecular biochemical studies indicated that XBE is a kappaB-like element that binds specifically to the NF-kappaB p65 subunit; consistent with these observations, only NF-kappaB p65, but not the NF-kappaB p50 subunit, was capable of inhibiting AR-mediated PSA promoter transactivation in LNCaP cells. In addition, our data also showed that AR binds to XBE, as well as to the kappaB consensus site, and that the transfection of AR inhibits the kappaB-responsive promoter in transient co-transfection assays. Collectively, these data indicate that cross-modulation between AR and NF-kappaB p65 transcription factors may occur by a novel mechanism involving binding to a common cis -DNA element. PMID:14715080

  2. Oestrogen receptor negativity in breast cancer: a cause or consequence?

    PubMed Central

    Gajulapalli, Vijaya Narasihma Reddy; Malisetty, Vijaya Lakshmi; Chitta, Suresh Kumar; Manavathi, Bramanandam

    2016-01-01

    Endocrine resistance, which occurs either by de novo or acquired route, is posing a major challenge in treating hormone-dependent breast cancers by endocrine therapies. The loss of oestrogen receptor α (ERα) expression is the vital cause of establishing endocrine resistance in this subtype. Understanding the mechanisms that determine the causes of this phenomenon are therefore essential to reduce the disease efficacy. But how we negate oestrogen receptor (ER) negativity and endocrine resistance in breast cancer is questionable. To answer that, two important approaches are considered: (1) understanding the cellular origin of heterogeneity and ER negativity in breast cancers and (2) characterization of molecular regulators of endocrine resistance. Breast tumours are heterogeneous in nature, having distinct molecular, cellular, histological and clinical behaviour. Recent advancements in perception of the heterogeneity of breast cancer revealed that the origin of a particular mammary tumour phenotype depends on the interactions between the cell of origin and driver genetic hits. On the other hand, histone deacetylases (HDACs), DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs), miRNAs and ubiquitin ligases emerged as vital molecular regulators of ER negativity in breast cancers. Restoring response to endocrine therapy through re-expression of ERα by modulating the expression of these molecular regulators is therefore considered as a relevant concept that can be implemented in treating ER-negative breast cancers. In this review, we will thoroughly discuss the underlying mechanisms for the loss of ERα expression and provide the future prospects for implementing the strategies to negate ER negativity in breast cancers. PMID:27884978

  3. Targeting Thyroid Hormone Receptor Beta in Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Guowei; Gelsomino, Luca; Covington, Kyle R.; Beyer, Amanda R.; Wang, John; Rechoum, Yassine; Huffman, Kenneth; Carstens, Ryan; Ando, Sebastiano; Fuqua, Suzanne A.W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Discover novel nuclear receptor targets in triple negative breast cancer Methods Expression microarray, western blot, qRT-PCR, MTT growth assay, soft agar anchorage-independent growth assay, TRE reporter transactivation assay, statistical analysis. Results We performed microarray analysis using 227 triple negative breast tumors, and clustered the tumors into five groups according to their nuclear receptor expression. Thyroid hormone receptor beta (TRβ) was one of the most differentially expressed nuclear receptors in group 5 compared to other groups. TRβ low expressing patients were associated with poor outcome. We evaluated the role of TRβ in triple negative breast cancer cell lines representing group 5 tumors. Knockdown of TRβ increased soft agar colony and reduced sensitivity to docetaxel and doxorubicin treatment. Docetaxel or doxorubicin long-term cultured cell lines also expressed decreased TRβ protein. Microarray analysis revealed cAMP/PKA signaling was the only KEGG pathways upregulated in TRβ knockdown cells. Inhibitors of cAMP or PKA, in combination with doxorubicin further enhanced cell apoptosis and restored sensitivity to chemotherapy. TRβ-specific agonists enhanced TRβ expression, and further sensitized cells to both docetaxel and doxorubicin. Sensitization was mediated by increased apoptosis with elevated cleaved PARP and caspase 3. Conclusions TRβ represents a novel nuclear receptor target in triple negative breast cancer; low TRβ levels were associated with enhanced resistance to both docetaxel and doxorubicin treatment. TRβ-specific agonists enhance chemosensitivity to these two agents. Mechanistically enhanced cAMP/PKA signaling was associated with TRβ’s effects on response to chemotherapy. PMID:25820519

  4. TBCRC 008: Early Change in 18F-FDG Uptake on PET Predicts Response to Preoperative Systemic Therapy in Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2–Negative Primary Operable Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Roisin M.; Leal, Jeffrey P.; Goetz, Matthew P.; Zhang, Zhe; Zhou, Xian C.; Jacobs, Lisa K.; Mhlanga, Joyce; Joo, H O; Carpenter, John; Storniolo, Anna Maria; Watkins, Stanley; Fetting, John H.; Miller, Robert S.; Sideras, Kostandinos; Jeter, Stacie C.; Walsh, Bridget; Powers, Penny; Zorzi, Jane; Boughey, Judy C.; Davidson, Nancy E.; Carey, Lisa A.; Wolff, Antonio C.; Khouri, Nagi; Gabrielson, Edward; Wahl, Richard L.; Stearns, Vered

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic modifiers, including the histone deacetylase inhibitor vorinostat, may sensitize tumors to chemotherapy and enhance outcomes. We conducted a multicenter randomized phase II neo-adjuvant trial of carboplatin and nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel (CP) with vorinostat or placebo in women with stage II/III, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)–negative breast cancer, in which we also examined whether change in maximum standardized uptake values corrected for lean body mass (SULmax) on 18F-FDG PET predicted pathologic complete response (pCR) in breast and axillary lymph nodes. Methods Participants were randomly assigned to 12 wk of preoperative carboplatin (area under the curve of 2, weekly) and nab-paclitaxel (100 mg/m2 weekly) with vorinostat (400 mg orally daily, days 1–3 of every 7-d period) or placebo. All patients underwent 18F-FDG PET and research biopsy at baseline and on cycle 1 day 15. The primary endpoint was the pCR rate. Secondary objectives included correlation of change in tumor SULmax on 18F-FDG PET by cycle 1 day 15 with pCR and correlation of baseline and change in Ki-67 with pCR. Results In an intent-to-treat analysis (n = 62), overall pCR was 27.4% (vorinostat, 25.8%; placebo, 29.0%). In a pooled analysis (n = 59), we observed a significant difference in median change in SULmax 15 d after initiating preoperative therapy between those achieving pCR versus not (percentage reduction, 63.0% vs. 32.9%; P = 0.003). Patients with 50% or greater reduction in SULmax were more likely to achieve pCR, which remained statistically significant in multivariable analysis including estrogen receptor status (odds ratio, 5.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.3–22.7; P = 0.023). Differences in baseline and change in Ki-67 were not significantly different between those achieving pCR versus not. Conclusion Preoperative CP with vorinostat or placebo is associated with similar pCR rates. Early change in SULmax on 18F-FDG PET 15 d after the

  5. Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators (SARMs) Negatively Regulate Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Growth and Epithelial:Mesenchymal Stem Cell Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Ramesh; Ahn, Sunjoo; Cheney, Misty D.; Yepuru, Muralimohan; Miller, Duane D.; Steiner, Mitchell S.; Dalton, James T.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Introduction The androgen receptor (AR) is the most highly expressed steroid receptor in breast cancer with 75–95% of estrogen receptor (ER)-positive and 40–70% of ER-negative breast cancers expressing AR. Though historically breast cancers were treated with steroidal androgens, their use fell from favor because of their virilizing side effects and the emergence of tamoxifen. Nonsteroidal, tissue selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) may provide a novel targeted approach to exploit the therapeutic benefits of androgen therapy in breast cancer. Materials and Methods Since MDA-MB-453 triple-negative breast cancer cells express mutated AR, PTEN, and p53, MDA-MB-231 triple-negative breast cancer cells stably expressing wildtype AR (MDA-MB-231-AR) were used to evaluate the in vitro and in vivo anti-proliferative effects of SARMs. Microarray analysis and epithelial:mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) co-culture signaling studies were performed to understand the mechanisms of action. Results Dihydrotestosterone and SARMs, but not bicalutamide, inhibited the proliferation of MDA-MB-231-AR. The SARMs reduced the MDA-MB-231-AR tumor growth and tumor weight by greater than 90%, compared to vehicle-treated tumors. SARM treatment inhibited the intratumoral expression of genes and pathways that promote breast cancer development through its actions on the AR. SARM treatment also inhibited the metastasis-promoting paracrine factors, IL6 and MMP13, and subsequent migration and invasion of epithelial:MSC co-cultures. Conclusion 1. AR stimulation inhibits paracrine factors that are important for MSC interactions and breast cancer invasion and metastasis. 2. SARMs may provide promise as novel targeted therapies to treat AR-positive triple-negative breast cancer. PMID:25072326

  6. Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) negatively regulate triple-negative breast cancer growth and epithelial:mesenchymal stem cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Ramesh; Ahn, Sunjoo; Cheney, Misty D; Yepuru, Muralimohan; Miller, Duane D; Steiner, Mitchell S; Dalton, James T

    2014-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is the most highly expressed steroid receptor in breast cancer with 75-95% of estrogen receptor (ER)-positive and 40-70% of ER-negative breast cancers expressing AR. Though historically breast cancers were treated with steroidal androgens, their use fell from favor because of their virilizing side effects and the emergence of tamoxifen. Nonsteroidal, tissue selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) may provide a novel targeted approach to exploit the therapeutic benefits of androgen therapy in breast cancer. Since MDA-MB-453 triple-negative breast cancer cells express mutated AR, PTEN, and p53, MDA-MB-231 triple-negative breast cancer cells stably expressing wildtype AR (MDA-MB-231-AR) were used to evaluate the in vitro and in vivo anti-proliferative effects of SARMs. Microarray analysis and epithelial:mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) co-culture signaling studies were performed to understand the mechanisms of action. Dihydrotestosterone and SARMs, but not bicalutamide, inhibited the proliferation of MDA-MB-231-AR. The SARMs reduced the MDA-MB-231-AR tumor growth and tumor weight by greater than 90%, compared to vehicle-treated tumors. SARM treatment inhibited the intratumoral expression of genes and pathways that promote breast cancer development through its actions on the AR. SARM treatment also inhibited the metastasis-promoting paracrine factors, IL6 and MMP13, and subsequent migration and invasion of epithelial:MSC co-cultures. 1. AR stimulation inhibits paracrine factors that are important for MSC interactions and breast cancer invasion and metastasis. 2. SARMs may provide promise as novel targeted therapies to treat AR-positive triple-negative breast cancer.

  7. Elevated Resistin Gene Expression in African American Estrogen and Progesterone Receptor Negative Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Vallega, Karin A; Liu, NingNing; Myers, Jennifer S; Yu, Kaixian; Sang, Qing-Xiang Amy

    2016-01-01

    African American (AA) women diagnosed with breast cancer are more likely to have aggressive subtypes. Investigating differentially expressed genes between patient populations may help explain racial health disparities. Resistin, one such gene, is linked to inflammation, obesity, and breast cancer risk. Previous studies indicated that resistin expression is higher in serum and tissue of AA breast cancer patients compared to Caucasian American (CA) patients. However, resistin expression levels have not been compared between AA and CA patients in a stage- and subtype-specific context. Breast cancer prognosis and treatments vary by subtype. This work investigates differential resistin gene expression in human breast cancer tissues of specific stages, receptor subtypes, and menopause statuses in AA and CA women. Differential gene expression analysis was performed using human breast cancer gene expression data from The Cancer Genome Atlas. We performed inter-race resistin gene expression level comparisons looking at receptor status and stage-specific data between AA and CA samples. DESeq was run to test for differentially expressed resistin values. Resistin RNA was higher in AA women overall, with highest values in receptor negative subtypes. Estrogen-, progesterone-, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2- negative groups showed statistically significant elevated resistin levels in Stage I and II AA women compared to CA women. In inter-racial comparisons, AA women had significantly higher levels of resistin regardless of menopause status. In whole population comparisons, resistin expression was higher among Stage I and III estrogen receptor negative cases. In comparisons of molecular subtypes, resistin levels were significant higher in triple negative than in luminal A breast cancer. Resistin gene expression levels were significantly higher in receptor negative subtypes, especially estrogen receptor negative cases in AA women. Resistin may serve as an early breast

  8. Pembrolizumab and Enobosarm in Treating Patients With Androgen Receptor Positive Metastatic Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-15

    Androgen Receptor Positive; Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage III Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  9. Intracellular LINGO-1 negatively regulates Trk neurotrophin receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Meabon, James S; de Laat, Rian; Ieguchi, Katsuaki; Serbzhinsky, Dmitry; Hudson, Mark P; Huber, B Russel; Wiley, Jesse C; Bothwell, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Neurotrophins, essential regulators of many aspects of neuronal differentiation and function, signal via four receptors, p75, TrkA, TrkB and TrkC. The three Trk paralogs are members of the LIG superfamily of membrane proteins, which share extracellular domains consisting of leucine-rich repeat and C2 Ig domains. Another LIG protein, LINGO-1 has been reported to bind and influence signaling of p75 as well as TrkA, TrkB and TrkC. Here we examine the manner in which LINGO-1 influences the function of TrkA, TrkB and TrkC. We report that Trk activation promotes Trk association with LINGO-1, and that this association promotes Trk degradation by a lysosomal mechanism. This mechanism resembles the mechanism by which another LIG protein, LRIG1, promotes lysosomal degradation of receptor tyrosine kinases such as the EGF receptor. We present evidence indicating that the Trk/LINGO-1 interaction occurs, in part, within recycling endosomes. We show that a mutant form of LINGO-1, with much of the extracellular domain deleted, has the capacity to enhance TrkA signaling in PC12 cells, possibly by acting as an inhibitor of Trk down-regulation by full length LINGO-1. We propose that LINGO-1 functions as a negative feedback regulator of signaling by cognate receptor tyrosine kinases including TrkA, TrkB and TrkC.

  10. Inflammation, Prostate Cancer and Negative Regulation of Androgen Receptor Expression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    activity, 2) microRNA -mediated regulation of prostate cancer cell proliferation. My data establish that the human AR level is negatively regulated by... cancer , scanning of the cancer microRNA array shows that miR-454 is up regulated in androgen-independent C4-2 cells and overexpression of miR-454...TERMS Androgen receptor, prostate cancer , TNF-α, NF-κB, microRNA 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF

  11. [Negative regulation of Toll-like receptor signalling].

    PubMed

    Antosz, Halina; Choroszyńska, Dorota

    2013-04-25

    The mechanism of innate immunity is based on the pattern recognition receptors (PRR) that recognize molecular patterns associated with pathogens (PAMPs). Among PRR receptors Toll-like receptors (TLR) are distinguished. As a result of contact with pathogens, TLRs activate specific intracellular signaling pathways. It happens through proteins such as adaptor molecules, e.g. MyD88, TIRAP, TRIF, TRAM, and IPS-1, which participate in the cascade activation of kinases (IKK, MAP, RIP-1, TBK-1) as well as transcription factors (NF-κB, AP-1) and regulatory factor (IRF3). The result of this activation is the production of active proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, interferons and enzymes. The PRR pathways are controlled by extra- and intracellular molecules to prevent overexpression of PRR. They include soluble receptors (sTLR), transmembrane proteins (ST2, SIGIRR, RP105, TRAIL-R) and intracellular inhibitors (SOCS-1, SOCS-3, sMyD88, TOLLIP, IRAK-M, SARM, A20, β-arrestin, CYLD, SHP). These molecules maintain the balance between activation and inhibition and ensure balancing of the beneficial and adverse effects of antigen recognition.

  12. Stand Up to Cancer Phase Ib Study of Pan-Phosphoinositide-3-Kinase Inhibitor Buparlisib With Letrozole in Estrogen Receptor-Positive/Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Ingrid A.; Abramson, Vandana G.; Isakoff, Steven J.; Forero, Andres; Balko, Justin M.; Kuba, María Gabriela; Sanders, Melinda E.; Yap, Jeffrey T.; Van den Abbeele, Annick D.; Li, Yisheng; Cantley, Lewis C.; Winer, Eric; Arteaga, Carlos L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Buparlisib, an oral reversible inhibitor of all class I phosphoinositide-3-kinases, has shown antitumoral activity against estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer cell lines and xenografts, alone and with endocrine therapy. This phase Ib study evaluated buparlisib plus letrozole's safety, tolerability, and preliminary activity in patients with metastatic ER-positive breast cancer refractory to endocrine therapy. Patients and Methods Patients received letrozole and buparlisib in two different administration schedules. Outcomes were assessed by standard solid-tumor phase I methods. [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose–positron emission tomography/computed tomography ([18F]FDG-PET/CT) scans were done at baseline and 2 weeks after treatment initiation. Tumor blocks were collected for phosphoinositide-3-kinase pathway mutation analysis. Results Fifty-one patients were allocated sequentially to continuous or intermittent (five on/two off days) buparlisib administration on an every-4-week schedule. Buparlisib's maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) was 100 mg/d. Common drug-related adverse events included ≤ grade 2 hyperglycemia, nausea, fatigue, transaminitis, and mood disorders. The clinical benefit rate (lack of progression ≥ 6 months) among all patients treated at the MTD was 31%, including two objective responses in the continuous dose arm. Of seven patients remaining on treatment ≥ 12 months, three had tumors with PIK3CA hot-spot mutation. Patients exhibiting metabolic disease progression by [18F]FDG-PET/CT scan at 2 weeks progressed rapidly on therapy. Conclusion The letrozole and buparlisib combination was safe, with reversible toxicities regardless of schedule administration. Clinical activity was observed independent of PIK3CA mutation status. No metabolic response by [18F]FDG-PET/CT scan at 2 weeks was associated with rapid disease progression. Phase III trials of buparlisib and endocrine therapy in patients with ER-positive breast cancer are ongoing. PMID

  13. Stand up to cancer phase Ib study of pan-phosphoinositide-3-kinase inhibitor buparlisib with letrozole in estrogen receptor-positive/human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Ingrid A; Abramson, Vandana G; Isakoff, Steven J; Forero, Andres; Balko, Justin M; Kuba, María Gabriela; Sanders, Melinda E; Yap, Jeffrey T; Van den Abbeele, Annick D; Li, Yisheng; Cantley, Lewis C; Winer, Eric; Arteaga, Carlos L

    2014-04-20

    Buparlisib, an oral reversible inhibitor of all class I phosphoinositide-3-kinases, has shown antitumoral activity against estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer cell lines and xenografts, alone and with endocrine therapy. This phase Ib study evaluated buparlisib plus letrozole's safety, tolerability, and preliminary activity in patients with metastatic ER-positive breast cancer refractory to endocrine therapy. Patients received letrozole and buparlisib in two different administration schedules. Outcomes were assessed by standard solid-tumor phase I methods. [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography ([(18)F]FDG-PET/CT) scans were done at baseline and 2 weeks after treatment initiation. Tumor blocks were collected for phosphoinositide-3-kinase pathway mutation analysis. Fifty-one patients were allocated sequentially to continuous or intermittent (five on/two off days) buparlisib administration on an every-4-week schedule. Buparlisib's maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) was 100 mg/d. Common drug-related adverse events included ≤ grade 2 hyperglycemia, nausea, fatigue, transaminitis, and mood disorders. The clinical benefit rate (lack of progression ≥ 6 months) among all patients treated at the MTD was 31%, including two objective responses in the continuous dose arm. Of seven patients remaining on treatment ≥ 12 months, three had tumors with PIK3CA hot-spot mutation. Patients exhibiting metabolic disease progression by [(18)F]FDG-PET/CT scan at 2 weeks progressed rapidly on therapy. The letrozole and buparlisib combination was safe, with reversible toxicities regardless of schedule administration. Clinical activity was observed independent of PIK3CA mutation status. No metabolic response by [(18)F]FDG-PET/CT scan at 2 weeks was associated with rapid disease progression. Phase III trials of buparlisib and endocrine therapy in patients with ER-positive breast cancer are ongoing.

  14. RAGE, Receptor of Advanced Glycation Endoproducts, Negatively Regulates Chondrocytes Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Kurosaka, Yuko; Nishimura, Haruka; Tanabe, Motoki; Takakura, Yuuki; Iwai, Keisuke; Waki, Takuya; Fujita, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    RAGE, receptor for advanced glycation endoproducts (AGE), has been characterized as an activator of osteoclastgenesis. However, whether RAGE directly regulates chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation is unclear. Here, we show that RAGE has an inhibitory role in chondrocyte differentiation. RAGE expression was observed in chondrocytes from the prehypertrophic to hypertrophic regions. In cultured cells, overexpression of RAGE or dominant-negative-RAGE (DN-RAGE) demonstrated that RAGE inhibited cartilaginous matrix production, while DN-RAGE promoted production. Additionally, RAGE regulated Ihh and Col10a1 negatively but upregulated PTHrP receptor. Ihh promoter analysis and real-time PCR analysis suggested that downregulation of Cdxs was the key for RAGE-induced inhibition of chondrocyte differentiation. Overexpression of the NF-κB inhibitor I-κB-SR inhibited RAGE-induced NF-κB activation, but did not influence inhibition of cartilaginous matrix production by RAGE. The inhibitory action of RAGE was restored by the Rho family GTPases inhibitor Toxin B. Furthermore, inhibitory action on Ihh, Col10a1 and Cdxs was reproduced by constitutively active forms, L63RhoA, L61Rac, and L61Cdc42, but not by I-κB-SR. Cdx1 induced Ihh and Col10a1 expressions and directly interacted with Ihh promoter. Retinoic acid (RA) partially rescued the inhibitory action of RAGE. These data combined suggests that RAGE negatively regulates chondrocyte differentiation at the prehypertrophic stage by modulating NF-κB-independent and Rho family GTPases-dependent mechanisms. PMID:25275461

  15. Folate Receptor-α (FOLR1) Expression and Function in Triple Negative Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Necela, Brian M.; Crozier, Jennifer A.; Andorfer, Cathy A.; Lewis-Tuffin, Laura; Kachergus, Jennifer M.; Geiger, Xochiquetzal J.; Kalari, Krishna R.; Serie, Daniel J.; Sun, Zhifu; Aspita, Alvaro Moreno; O’Shannessy, Daniel J.; Maltzman, Julia D.; McCullough, Ann E.; Pockaj, Barbara A.; Cunliffe, Heather E.; Ballman, Karla V.; Thompson, E. Aubrey; Perez, Edith A.

    2015-01-01

    Folate receptor alpha (FOLR1) has been identified as a potential prognostic and therapeutic target in a number of cancers. A correlation has been shown between intense overexpression of FOLR1 in breast tumors and poor prognosis, yet there is limited examination of the distribution of FOLR1 across clinically relevant breast cancer subtypes. To explore this further, we used RNA-seq data from multiple patient cohorts to analyze the distribution of FOLR1 mRNA across breast cancer subtypes comprised of estrogen receptor positive (ER+), human epidermal growth factor receptor positive (HER2+), and triple negative (TNBC) tumors. FOLR1 expression varied within breast tumor subtypes; triple negative/basal tumors were significantly associated with increased expression of FOLR1 mRNA, compared to ER+ and HER2+ tumors. However, subsets of high level FOLR1 expressing tumors were observed in all clinical subtypes. These observations were supported by immunohistochemical analysis of tissue microarrays, with the largest number of 3+ positive tumors and highest H-scores of any subtype represented by triple negatives, and lowest by ER+ tumors. FOLR1 expression did not correlate to common clinicopathological parameters such as tumor stage and nodal status. To delineate the importance of FOLR1 overexpression in triple negative cancers, RNA-interference was used to deplete FOLR1 in overexpressing triple negative cell breast lines. Loss of FOLR1 resulted in growth inhibition, whereas FOLR1 overexpression promoted folate uptake and growth advantage in low folate conditions. Taken together, our data suggests patients with triple negative cancers expressing high FOLR1 expression represent an important population of patients that may benefit from targeted anti-FOLR1 therapy. This may prove particularly helpful for a large number of patients who would typically be classified as triple negative and who to this point have been left without any targeted treatment options. PMID:25816016

  16. Folate receptor-α (FOLR1) expression and function in triple negative tumors.

    PubMed

    Necela, Brian M; Crozier, Jennifer A; Andorfer, Cathy A; Lewis-Tuffin, Laura; Kachergus, Jennifer M; Geiger, Xochiquetzal J; Kalari, Krishna R; Serie, Daniel J; Sun, Zhifu; Moreno-Aspitia, Alvaro; Aspita, Alvaro Moreno; O'Shannessy, Daniel J; Maltzman, Julia D; McCullough, Ann E; Pockaj, Barbara A; Cunliffe, Heather E; Ballman, Karla V; Thompson, E Aubrey; Perez, Edith A

    2015-01-01

    Folate receptor alpha (FOLR1) has been identified as a potential prognostic and therapeutic target in a number of cancers. A correlation has been shown between intense overexpression of FOLR1 in breast tumors and poor prognosis, yet there is limited examination of the distribution of FOLR1 across clinically relevant breast cancer subtypes. To explore this further, we used RNA-seq data from multiple patient cohorts to analyze the distribution of FOLR1 mRNA across breast cancer subtypes comprised of estrogen receptor positive (ER+), human epidermal growth factor receptor positive (HER2+), and triple negative (TNBC) tumors. FOLR1 expression varied within breast tumor subtypes; triple negative/basal tumors were significantly associated with increased expression of FOLR1 mRNA, compared to ER+ and HER2+ tumors. However, subsets of high level FOLR1 expressing tumors were observed in all clinical subtypes. These observations were supported by immunohistochemical analysis of tissue microarrays, with the largest number of 3+ positive tumors and highest H-scores of any subtype represented by triple negatives, and lowest by ER+ tumors. FOLR1 expression did not correlate to common clinicopathological parameters such as tumor stage and nodal status. To delineate the importance of FOLR1 overexpression in triple negative cancers, RNA-interference was used to deplete FOLR1 in overexpressing triple negative cell breast lines. Loss of FOLR1 resulted in growth inhibition, whereas FOLR1 overexpression promoted folate uptake and growth advantage in low folate conditions. Taken together, our data suggests patients with triple negative cancers expressing high FOLR1 expression represent an important population of patients that may benefit from targeted anti-FOLR1 therapy. This may prove particularly helpful for a large number of patients who would typically be classified as triple negative and who to this point have been left without any targeted treatment options.

  17. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Overexpression as a Target for Auger Electron Radiotherapy of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-08-01

    proportion of estrogen receptor-negative and hormone-resistant breast cancers. Our objective is to construct a human epidermal growth factor (hEGF...61 5 INTRODUCTION Overexpression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) occurs in a high proportion of estrogen receptor-negative and...Lac Iq promotor induced by isopropyl-b- D -thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG). The DNA sequence of the final hEGF-CH1 construct was confirmed (FUi. 2). BamHJ

  18. A common variant at the TERT-CLPTM1L locus is associated with estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Haiman, Christopher A; Chen, Gary K; Vachon, Celine M; Canzian, Federico; Dunning, Alison; Millikan, Robert C; Wang, Xianshu; Ademuyiwa, Foluso; Ahmed, Shahana; Ambrosone, Christine B; Baglietto, Laura; Balleine, Rosemary; Bandera, Elisa V; Beckmann, Matthias W; Berg, Christine D; Bernstein, Leslie; Blomqvist, Carl; Blot, William J; Brauch, Hiltrud; Buring, Julie E; Carey, Lisa A; Carpenter, Jane E; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J; Chasman, Daniel I; Clarke, Christine L; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Deming, Sandra L; Diasio, Robert B; Dimopoulos, Athanasios M; Driver, W Ryan; Dünnebier, Thomas; Durcan, Lorraine; Eccles, Diana; Edlund, Christopher K; Ekici, Arif B; Fasching, Peter A; Feigelson, Heather S; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fostira, Florentia; Försti, Asta; Fountzilas, George; Gerty, Susan M; Giles, Graham G; Godwin, Andrew K; Goodfellow, Paul; Graham, Nikki; Greco, Dario; Hamann, Ute; Hankinson, Susan E; Hartmann, Arndt; Hein, Rebecca; Heinz, Judith; Holbrook, Andrea; Hoover, Robert N; Hu, Jennifer J; Hunter, David J; Ingles, Sue A; Irwanto, Astrid; Ivanovich, Jennifer; John, Esther M; Johnson, Nicola; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kaaks, Rudolf; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Kolonel, Laurence N; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kulkarni, Swati; Lambrechts, Diether; Lee, Adam M; Marchand, Loïc Le; Lesnick, Timothy; Liu, Jianjun; Lindstrom, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Margolin, Sara; Martin, Nicholas G; Miron, Penelope; Montgomery, Grant W; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nickels, Stephan; Nyante, Sarah; Olswold, Curtis; Palmer, Julie; Pathak, Harsh; Pectasides, Dimitrios; Perou, Charles M; Peto, Julian; Pharoah, Paul D P; Pooler, Loreall C; Press, Michael F; Pylkäs, Katri; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L; Rosenberg, Lynn; Ross, Eric; Rüdiger, Thomas; Silva, Isabel dos Santos; Sawyer, Elinor; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schulz-Wendtland, Rüdiger; Schumacher, Fredrick; Severi, Gianluca; Sheng, Xin; Signorello, Lisa B; Sinn, Hans-Peter; Stevens, Kristen N; Southey, Melissa C; Tapper, William J; Tomlinson, Ian; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Wauters, Els; Weaver, JoEllen; Wildiers, Hans; Winqvist, Robert; Van Den Berg, David; Wan, Peggy; Xia, Lucy Y; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Zheng, Wei; Ziegler, Regina G; Siddiq, Afshan; Slager, Susan L; Stram, Daniel O; Easton, Douglas; Kraft, Peter; Henderson, Brian E; Couch, Fergus J

    2011-10-30

    Estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer shows a higher incidence in women of African ancestry compared to women of European ancestry. In search of common risk alleles for ER-negative breast cancer, we combined genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from women of African ancestry (1,004 ER-negative cases and 2,745 controls) and European ancestry (1,718 ER-negative cases and 3,670 controls), with replication testing conducted in an additional 2,292 ER-negative cases and 16,901 controls of European ancestry. We identified a common risk variant for ER-negative breast cancer at the TERT-CLPTM1L locus on chromosome 5p15 (rs10069690: per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.18 per allele, P = 1.0 × 10(-10)). The variant was also significantly associated with triple-negative (ER-negative, progesterone receptor (PR)-negative and human epidermal growth factor-2 (HER2)-negative) breast cancer (OR = 1.25, P = 1.1 × 10(-9)), particularly in younger women (<50 years of age) (OR = 1.48, P = 1.9 × 10(-9)). Our results identify a genetic locus associated with estrogen receptor negative breast cancer subtypes in multiple populations.

  19. Activation of Estrogen Receptor Transfected into a Receptor-Negative Brest Cancer Cell Line Decreases the Metastatic and Invasive Potential of the Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Marcel; Derocq, Danielle; Freiss, Gilles; Rochefort, Henri

    1992-12-01

    Breast cancers containing estrogen receptors are responsive to antiestrogen treatment and have a better prognosis than estrogen receptor-negative tumors. The loss of estrogen and progesterone receptors appears to be associated with a progression to less-differentiated tumors. We transfected the human estrogen receptor into the estrogen receptor-negative metastatic breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 in an attempt to restore their sensitivity to antiestrogens. Two stable sublines of MDA-MB-231 cells (HC1 and HE5) expressing functional estrogen receptors were studied for their ability to grow and invade in vitro and to metastasize in athymic nude mice. The number and size of lung metastases developed by these two sublines in ovariectomized nude mice was not markedly altered by tamoxifen but was inhibited 3-fold by estradiol. Estradiol also significantly inhibited in vitro cell proliferation of these sublines and their invasiveness in Matrigel, a reconstituted basement membrane, whereas the antiestrogens 4-hydroxytamoxifen and ICI 164,384 reversed these effects. These results show that estradiol inhibits the metastatic ability of estrogen receptornegative breast cancer cells following transfection with the estrogen receptor, whereas estrogen receptor-positive breast cancers are stimulated by estrogen, indicating that factors other than the estrogen receptor are involved in progression toward hormone independence. Reactivation or transfer of the estrogen receptor gene can therefore be considered as therapeutic approaches to hormone-independent cancers

  20. Enforced Sparse Non-Negative Matrix Factorization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-23

    intermediate and output matrices . This method enables the application of NMF to large datasets through improved memory and compute performance. Further...the NMF. Residual: Relative norm of the difference between U matrices at subsequent iterations of ALS. Error: Relative norm of the difference between...approximately factorizes the data matrix A into a product of two other matrices . A ≈ UV T (1.1) A ∈ Rn×m, U ∈ Rn×k, V ∈ Rm×k A ≥ 0, U ≥ 0, V ≥ 0 The rank

  1. Negative glucocorticoid receptor response elements and their role in glucocorticoid action.

    PubMed

    Dostert, A; Heinzel, T

    2004-01-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) belongs to the steroid hormone receptor subclass of nuclear receptors and controls physiological processes through activation and repression of specific target genes. The ligand-activated receptor dimer activates gene expression by binding to specific DNA sequences (glucocorticoid response element, GRE) in the promoter regions of glucocorticoid-regulated genes. In contrast to the regulation of these classical GREs, the repression of negatively regulated target genes is mediated by negative GREs (nGRE), composite GREs or by transrepression. Due to their broad therapeutic spectrum and superior therapeutic effects glucocorticoids (GCs) are the most effective drugs used for the treatment of acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. Unfortunately, long term systemic therapy with GCs is restricted due to their metabolic side effects. It is assumed that transrepression of transcription factors such as AP-1 and NF-kappa B is the main mechanism by which glucocorticoids mediate their anti-inflammatory activity, whereas the side effects of GCs are mainly mediated by GR-DNA-interaction either by activation or by negative regulation of gene expression. While trans-repression has been characterized in detail, the molecular mechanisms of DNA-dependent cis-repression remain unclear. In this review, we focus on current knowledge about nGRE-mediated target gene repression and the relevance and function of these genes for glucocorticoid action. Negative GREs contribute to the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis (POMC and CRH), bone (osteocalcin) and skin (keratins) function, inflammation (IL-1beta), angiogenesis (proliferin) and lactation (prolactin). The discovery of the underlying mechanisms, especially the comparison to positive GREs and trans-repression may help in the future to discover and analyze novel selective GR agonists.

  2. A Study Evaluating INIPARIB in Combination With Chemotherapy to Treat Triple Negative Breast Cancer Brain Metastasis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-17

    Estrogen Receptor Negative (ER-Negative) Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor Negative (PR-Negative) Breast Cancer; Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 Negative (HER2-Negative) Breast Cancer; Brain Metastases

  3. PALOMA-3: Phase III Trial of Fulvestrant With or Without Palbociclib in Premenopausal and Postmenopausal Women With Hormone Receptor-Positive, Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer That Progressed on Prior Endocrine Therapy-Safety and Efficacy in Asian Patients.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Hiroji; Im, Seock-Ah; Masuda, Norikazu; Im, Young-Hyuck; Inoue, Kenichi; Rai, Yoshiaki; Nakamura, Rikiya; Kim, Jee Hyun; Hoffman, Justin T; Zhang, Ke; Giorgetti, Carla; Iyer, Shrividya; Schnell, Patrick T; Bartlett, Cynthia Huang; Ro, Jungsil

    2017-08-01

    To assess efficacy and safety of palbociclib plus fulvestrant in Asians with endocrine therapy-resistant metastatic breast cancer. The Palbociclib Ongoing Trials in the Management of Breast Cancer 3 (PALOMA-3) trial, a double-blind phase III study, included 521 patients with hormone receptor-positive/human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative metastatic breast cancer with disease progression on endocrine therapy. Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) were assessed on study treatment and at the end of treatment. This preplanned subgroup analysis of the PALOMA-3 study included premenopausal and postmenopausal Asians taking palbociclib plus fulvestrant (n = 71) or placebo plus fulvestrant (n = 31). Palbociclib plus fulvestrant improved progression-free survival (PFS) compared with fulvestrant alone. Median PFS was not reached with palbociclib plus fulvestrant (95% CI, 9.2 months to not reached) but was 5.8 months with placebo plus fulvestrant (95% CI, 3.5 to 9.2 months; hazard ratio, 0.485; 95% CI, 0.270 to 0.869; P = .0065). The most common all-cause grade 3 or 4 adverse events in the palbociclib arm were neutropenia (92%) and leukopenia (29%); febrile neutropenia occurred in 4.1% of patients. Within-patient mean trough concentration comparisons across subgroups indicated similar palbociclib exposure between Asians and non-Asians. Global quality of life was maintained; no statistically significant changes from baseline were observed for patient-reported outcome scores with palbociclib plus fulvestrant. This is the first report, to our knowledge, showing that palbociclib plus fulvestrant improves PFS in asian patients. Palbociclib plus fulvestrant was well tolerated in this study.

  4. Evaluating Serum Markers for Hormone Receptor-Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schummer, Michèl; Thorpe, Jason; Giraldez, Maria; Bergan, Lindsay; Tewari, Muneesh; Urban, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer and the leading cause of cancer death in females worldwide. Death rates have been declining, largely as a result of early detection through mammography and improved treatment, but mammographic screening is controversial because of over-diagnosis of breast disease that might not require treatment, and under-diagnosis of cancer in women with dense breasts. Breast cancer screening could be improved by pairing mammography with a tumor circulating marker, of which there are currently none. Given genomic similarities between the basal breast cancer subtype and serous ovarian cancer, and given our success in identifying circulating markers for ovarian cancer, we investigated the performance in hormone receptor-negative breast cancer detection of both previously identified ovarian serum markers and circulating markers associated with transcripts that were differentially expressed in breast cancer tissue compared to healthy breast tissue from reduction mammaplasties. Methods We evaluated a total of 15 analytes (13 proteins, 1 miRNA, 1 autoantibody) in sera drawn at or before breast cancer surgery from 43 breast cancer cases (28 triple-negative—TN—and 15 hormone receptor-negative—HRN—/ HER2-positive) and 87 matched controls. Results In the analysis of our whole cohort of breast cancer cases, autoantibodies to TP53 performed significantly better than the other selected 14 analytes showing 25.6% and 34.9% sensitivity at 95% and 90% specificity respectively with AUC: 0.7 (p<0.001). The subset of 28 TN cancers showed very similar results. We observed no correlation between anti-TP53 and the 14 other markers; however, anti-TP53 expression correlated with Body-Mass-Index. It did not correlate with tumor size, positive lymph nodes, tumor stage, the presence of metastases or recurrence. Conclusion None of the 13 serum proteins nor miRNA 135b identified women with HRN or TN breast cancer. TP53 autoantibodies

  5. Small leucine zipper protein functions as a negative regulator of estrogen receptor α in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Juyeon; Park, Sodam; An, Hyoung-Tae; Kang, Minsoo; Ko, Jesang

    2017-01-01

    The nuclear transcription factor estrogen receptor α (ERα) plays a critical role in breast cancer progression. ERα acts as an important growth stimulatory protein in breast cancer and the expression level of ERα is tightly related to the prognosis and treatment of patients. Small leucine zipper protein (sLZIP) functions as a transcriptional cofactor by binding to various nuclear receptors, including glucocorticoid receptor, androgen receptor, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ. However, the role of sLZIP in the regulation of ERα and its involvement in breast cancer progression is unknown. We found that sLZIP binds to ERα and represses the transcriptional activity of ERα in ERα-positive breast cancer cells. sLZIP also suppressed the expression of ERα target genes. sLZIP disrupted the binding of ERα to the estrogen response element of the target gene promoter, resulting in suppression of cell proliferation. sLZIP is a novel co-repressor of ERα, and plays a negative role in ERα-mediated cell proliferation in breast cancer.

  6. Fulvestrant, a selective estrogen receptor down-regulator, sensitizes estrogen receptor negative breast tumors to chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Donghai; Huang, Yuan; Han, Ning; Xu, Mingjie; Xu, Liang; Zhou, Lin; Wang, Shu; Fan, Weimin

    2014-05-01

    Drug resistance frequently results in poor prognosis and high 5-year recurrence rate in estrogen receptor-negative (ER-) breast cancer patients. Herein, we examined the reversal effects of fulvestrant on multidrug resistance (MDR) in ER- breast cancer cells. Co-administration of fulvestrant significantly sensitized ER- MDR tumors to paclitaxel both in vitro and in vivo. Further analyses indicated that fulvestrant did not affect P-gp expression, but could inhibit P-gp function and subsequently reverse P-gp mediated drug resistance in ER- breast cancer cells. These results showed that combination of fulvestrant and chemotherapeutic agents might provide an effective treatment for ER- MDR breast cancers.

  7. Grb10 mediates insulin-stimulated degradation of the insulin receptor: a mechanism of negative regulation.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Fresnida J; Langlais, Paul R; Hu, Derong; Dong, Lily Q; Liu, Feng

    2006-06-01

    Growth factor receptor-bound protein 10 (Grb10) is an adapter protein that interacts with a number of tyrosine-phosphorylated growth factor receptors, including the insulin receptor (IR). To investigate the role of Grb10 in insulin signaling, we generated cell lines in which the expression levels of Grb10 are either overexpressed by stable transfection or suppressed by RNA interference. We found that suppressing endogenous Grb10 expression led to increased IR protein levels, whereas overexpression of Grb10 led to reduced IR protein levels. Altering Grb10 expression levels had no effect on the mRNA levels of IR, suggesting that the modulation occurs at the protein level. Reduced IR levels were also observed in cells with prolonged insulin treatment, and this reduction was inhibited in Grb10-deficient cells. The insulin-induced IR reduction was greatly reversed by MG-132, a proteasomal inhibitor, but not by chloroquine, a lysosomal inhibitor. IR underwent insulin-stimulated ubiquitination in cells, and this ubiquitination was inhibited in the Grb10-suppressed cell line. Together, our results suggest that, in addition to inhibiting IR kinase activity by directly binding to the IR, Grb10 also negatively regulates insulin signaling by mediating insulin-stimulated degradation of the receptor.

  8. Negative elongation factor controls energy homeostasis in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Pan, Haihui; Qin, Kunhua; Guo, Zhanyong; Ma, Yonggang; April, Craig; Gao, Xiaoli; Andrews, Thomas G; Bokov, Alex; Zhang, Jianhua; Chen, Yidong; Weintraub, Susan T; Fan, Jian-Bing; Wang, Degeng; Hu, Yanfen; Aune, Gregory J; Lindsey, Merry L; Li, Rong

    2014-04-10

    Negative elongation factor (NELF) is known to enforce promoter-proximal pausing of RNA polymerase II (Pol II), a pervasive phenomenon observed across multicellular genomes. However, the physiological impact of NELF on tissue homeostasis remains unclear. Here, we show that whole-body conditional deletion of the B subunit of NELF (NELF-B) in adult mice results in cardiomyopathy and impaired response to cardiac stress. Tissue-specific knockout of NELF-B confirms its cell-autonomous function in cardiomyocytes. NELF directly supports transcription of those genes encoding rate-limiting enzymes in fatty acid oxidation (FAO) and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. NELF also shares extensively transcriptional target genes with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), a master regulator of energy metabolism in the myocardium. Mechanistically, NELF helps stabilize the transcription initiation complex at the metabolism-related genes. Our findings strongly indicate that NELF is part of the PPARα-mediated transcription regulatory network that maintains metabolic homeostasis in cardiomyocytes.

  9. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor mediates raloxifene-induced apoptosis in estrogen receptor-negative hepatoma and breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, E F; Koch, D C; Bisson, W H; Jang, H S; Kolluri, S K

    2014-01-30

    Identification of new molecular targets for the treatment of breast cancer is an important clinical goal, especially for triple-negative breast cancer, which is refractory to existing targeted treatments. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor known primarily as the mediator of dioxin toxicity. However, the AhR can also inhibit cellular proliferation in a ligand-dependent manner and act as a tumor suppressor in mice, and thus may be a potential anticancer target. To investigate the AhR as an anticancer target, we conducted a small molecule screen to discover novel AhR ligands with anticancer properties. We identified raloxifene, a selective estrogen receptor (ER) modulator currently used in the clinic for prevention of ER-positive breast cancer and osteoporosis in post-menopausal women, as an AhR activator. Raloxifene directly bound the AhR and induced apoptosis in ER-negative mouse and human hepatoma cells in an AhR-dependent manner, indicating that the AhR is a molecular target of raloxifene and mediates raloxifene-induced apoptosis in the absence of ER. Raloxifene selectively induced apoptosis of triple-negative MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells compared with non-transformed mammary epithelial cells via the AhR. Combined with recent data showing that raloxifene inhibits triple-negative breast cancer xenografts in vivo (Int J Oncol. 43(3):785-92, 2013), our results support the possibility of repurposing of raloxifene as an AhR-targeted therapeutic for triple-negative breast cancer patients. To this end, we also evaluated the role of AhR expression on survival of patients diagnosed with breast cancer. We found that higher expression of the AhR is significantly associated with increased overall survival and distant metastasis-free survival in both hormone-dependent (ER-positive) and hormone-independent (ER and progesterone receptor (PR)-negative) breast cancers. Together, our data strongly support the possibility of using the Ah

  10. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor mediates raloxifene-induced apoptosis in estrogen receptor-negative hepatoma and breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, E F; Koch, D C; Bisson, W H; Jang, H S; Kolluri, S K

    2014-01-01

    Identification of new molecular targets for the treatment of breast cancer is an important clinical goal, especially for triple-negative breast cancer, which is refractory to existing targeted treatments. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor known primarily as the mediator of dioxin toxicity. However, the AhR can also inhibit cellular proliferation in a ligand-dependent manner and act as a tumor suppressor in mice, and thus may be a potential anticancer target. To investigate the AhR as an anticancer target, we conducted a small molecule screen to discover novel AhR ligands with anticancer properties. We identified raloxifene, a selective estrogen receptor (ER) modulator currently used in the clinic for prevention of ER-positive breast cancer and osteoporosis in post-menopausal women, as an AhR activator. Raloxifene directly bound the AhR and induced apoptosis in ER-negative mouse and human hepatoma cells in an AhR-dependent manner, indicating that the AhR is a molecular target of raloxifene and mediates raloxifene-induced apoptosis in the absence of ER. Raloxifene selectively induced apoptosis of triple-negative MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells compared with non-transformed mammary epithelial cells via the AhR. Combined with recent data showing that raloxifene inhibits triple-negative breast cancer xenografts in vivo (Int J Oncol. 43(3):785-92, 2013), our results support the possibility of repurposing of raloxifene as an AhR-targeted therapeutic for triple-negative breast cancer patients. To this end, we also evaluated the role of AhR expression on survival of patients diagnosed with breast cancer. We found that higher expression of the AhR is significantly associated with increased overall survival and distant metastasis-free survival in both hormone-dependent (ER-positive) and hormone-independent (ER and progesterone receptor (PR)-negative) breast cancers. Together, our data strongly support the possibility of using the Ah

  11. The muscle-specific laminin receptor alpha7 beta1 integrin negatively regulates alpha5 beta1 fibronectin receptor function.

    PubMed

    Tomatis, D; Echtermayer, F; Schöber, S; Balzac, F; Retta, S F; Silengo, L; Tarone, G

    1999-02-01

    alpha7 beta1 is the major integrin complex expressed in differentiated muscle cells where it functions as a laminin receptor. In this work we have expressed the alpha7 integrin subunit in CHO cells to investigate the functional properties of this receptor. After transfection with alpha7 CHO cells acquired the ability to adhere and spread on laminin 1 consistent with the laminin receptor activity of the alpha7 beta1. alpha7 transfectants, however, showed a 70% reduction in the ability to adhere to fibronectin and were unable to assemble a fibronectin matrix. The degree of reduction was inversely related to the level of alpha7 expression. To define the mechanisms underlying this adhesive defect we analyzed surface expression and functional properties of the alpha5 beta1 fibronectin receptor. Although cell surface expression of alpha5 beta1 was reduced by a factor of 20-25% in alpha7 transfectants compared to control untransfected cells, this slight reduction was not sufficient to explain the dramatic reduction in cell adhesion (70%) and matrix assembly (close to 100%). Binding studies showed that the affinity of 125I-fibronectin for its surface receptor was decreased by 50% in alpha7 transfectants, indicating that the alpha5 beta1 integrin is partially inactivated in these cells. Inactivation can be reversed by Mn2+, a cation known to increase integrin affinity for their ligands. In fact, incubation of cells with Mn2+ restored fibronectin binding affinity, adhesion to fibronectin, and assembly of fibronectin matrix in alpha7 transfectants. These data indicate that alpha7 expression leads to the functional down regulation of alpha5beta1 integrin by decreasing ligand binding affinity and surface expression. In conclusion, the data reported establish the existence of a negative cooperativity between alpha7 and alpha5 integrins that may be important in determining functional regulation of integrins during myogenic differentiation.

  12. Survival among women with triple receptor-negative breast cancer and brain metastases

    PubMed Central

    Dawood, S.; Broglio, K.; Esteva, F. J.; Yang, W.; Kau, S.-W.; Islam, R.; Albarracin, C.; Yu, T. K.; Green, M.; Hortobagyi, G. N.; Gonzalez-Angulo, A. M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of and survival following brain metastases among women with triple receptor-negative breast cancer. Patients and methods: In all, 679 patients with nonmetastatic triple receptor-negative breast cancer diagnosed from 1980 to 2006 were identified. Cumulative incidence of brain metastases was computed. Cox proportional hazards models were fitted to explore factors that predict for development of brain metastases. Survival was computed using the Kaplan–Meier product limit method. Results: Median follow-up was 26.9 months. In all, 42 (6.2%) patients developed brain metastases with a cumulative incidence at 2 and 5 years of 5.6% [95% confidence interval (CI) 3.8% to 7.9%] and 9.6% (95% CI 6.8% to 13%), respectively. A total of 24 (3.5%) patients developed brain metastases as the first site of recurrence with cumulative incidence at 2 and 5 years of 2.0% (95% CI 2.6% to 6.0%) and 4.9% (95% CI 3.2% to 7.0%), respectively. In the multivariable model, no specific factor was observed to be significantly associated with time to brain metastases. Median survival for all patients who developed brain metastases and those who developed brain metastases as the first site of recurrence was 2.9 months (95% CI 2.0–7.6 months) and 5.8 months (95% CI 1.7–11.0 months), respectively. Conclusion: In this single-institutional study, patients with nonmetastatic triple receptor-negative breast tumors have a high early incidence of brain metastases associated with poor survival and maybe an ideal cohort to target brain metastases preventive strategies. PMID:19150943

  13. The latest progress in research on triple negative breast cancer (TNBC): risk factors, possible therapeutic targets and prognostic markers.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Qingli; Wu, Aiguo; Shao, Guoli; Peng, Haoyu; Wang, Mengchuan; Ji, Shufeng; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Jian

    2014-09-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is one type of breast cancer (BC), which is defined as negative for estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (Her2). Its origins and development seem to be elusive. And for now, drugs like tamoxifen or trastuzumab which specifically apply to ER, PR or Her2 positive BC seem unforeseeable in TNBC clinical treatment. Due to its extreme malignancy, high recurrence rate and poor prognosis, a lot of work on the research of TNBC is needed. This review aims to summarize the latest findings in TNBC in risk factors, possible therapeutic targets and possible prognostic makers.

  14. Epidermal growth factor receptor degradation: an alternative view of oncogenic pathways.

    PubMed

    Kirisits, Andreas; Pils, Dietmar; Krainer, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Positive regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor signalling is related to many human malignancies. Besides overexpression and gain of function mutations, the escape from negative regulation through an increase in epidermal growth factor receptor stability has evolved as yet another key factor contributing to enhanced receptor activity. Intensive research over the past years has provided considerable evidence concerning the molecular mechanisms which provide epidermal growth factor receptor degradation. c-Cbl mediated ubiquitination, endocytosis via clathrin-coated pits, endosomal sorting and lysosomal degradation have become well-investigated cornerstones. Recent findings on the interdependency of the endosomal sorting complexes required for transport in multivesicular body sorting, stress the topicality of receptor tyrosine kinase downregulation. Here, we review the degradation pathway of the epidermal growth factor receptor, following the receptor from ligand binding to the lysosome and illustrating different modes of oncogenic deregulation.

  15. Hormonal therapy followed by chemotherapy or the reverse sequence as first-line treatment of hormone-responsive, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 negative metastatic breast cancer patients: results of an observational study.

    PubMed

    Bighin, Claudia; Dozin, Beatrice; Poggio, Francesca; Ceppi, Marcello; Bruzzi, Paolo; D'Alonzo, Alessia; Levaggi, Alessia; Giraudi, Sara; Lambertini, Matteo; Miglietta, Loredana; Vaglica, Marina; Fontana, Vincenzo; Iacono, Giuseppina; Pronzato, Paolo; Mastro, Lucia Del

    2017-01-18

    Introduction Although hormonal-therapy is the preferred first-line treatment for hormone-responsive, HER2 negative metastatic breast cancer, no data from clinical trials support the choice between hormonal-therapy and chemotherapy.Methods Patients were divided into two groups according to the treatment: chemotherapy or hormonal-therapy. Outcomes in terms of clinical benefit and median overall survival (OS) were retrospectively evaluated in the two groups. To calculate the time spent in chemotherapy with respect to OS in the two groups, the proportion of patients in chemotherapy relative to those present in either group was computed at every day from the start of therapy.Results From 1999 to 2013, 119 patients received first-line hormonal-therapy (HT-first group) and 100 first-line chemotherapy (CT-first group). Patients in the CT-first group were younger and with poorer prognostic factors as compared to those in HT-first group. Clinical benefit (77 vs 81%) and median OS (50.7 vs 51.1 months) were similar in the two groups. Time spent in chemotherapy was significantly longer during the first 3 years in CT-first group (54-34%) as compared to the HT-first group (11-18%). This difference decreased after the third year and overall was 28% in the CT-first group and 18% in the HT-first group.Conclusions The sequence first-line chemotherapy followed by hormonal-therapy, as compared with the opposite sequence, is associated with a longer time of OS spent in chemotherapy. However, despite the poorer prognostic factors, patients in the CT-first group had a superimposable OS than those in the HT-first group.

  16. Parity and lactation in relation to estrogen receptor negative breast cancer in African American women

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Julie R.; Boggs, Deborah A.; Wise, Lauren A.; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Adams-Campbell, Lucile L.; Rosenberg, Lynn

    2011-01-01

    Background Estrogen receptor (ER) negative, progesterone receptor (PR) negative breast tumors occur more commonly in women of African ancestry. Recent research indicates that the effects of reproductive factors may differ by hormone receptor status. We assessed the relation of parity and lactation to incidence of ER−/PR− and ER+/PR+ breast cancer in a cohort of African American women. Methods From 1995–2009, 457 incident cases of ER+/PR+ and 318 cases of ER−/PR− breast cancer were confirmed by review of pathology data among 59,000 African American women followed in the Black Women’s Health Study through biennial questionnaires. Hazard ratios (HR) and two-sided 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the incidence of breast cancer subtypes were derived from proportional hazards regression models that controlled for age, reproductive variables, and breast cancer risk factors. Results Higher parity was associated with an increased risk of ER−/PR− breast cancer (HR = 1.48, 95% CI 0.98–1.84 for 3+ versus 0 births, p trend = 0.009), and with a reduced risk of ER+/PR+ cancer (HR = 0.53, 95% CI 0.39–0.73 for 3+ versus 0 births, p trend = 0.0002). Among women who had breastfed, high parity was no longer associated with increased incidence of ER−/PR− breast, but the inverse association with ER+/PR+ cancer persisted. Conclusions The higher incidence of ER−/PR− breast cancer in African American women may be explained in part by their higher parity and lower prevalence of breastfeeding relative to white women. Impact Increased breastfeeding may lead to a reduction in the incidence of this breast cancer subtype. PMID:21846820

  17. A model of spontaneous mouse mammary tumor for human estrogen receptor- and progesterone receptor-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    ZHENG, LIXIANG; ZHOU, BUGAO; MENG, XIANMING; ZHU, WEIFENG; ZUO, AIREN; WANG, XIAOMIN; JIANG, RUNDE; YU, SHIPING

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the most frequently malignancy in women. Therefore, establishment of an animal model for the development of preventative measures and effective treatment for tumors is required. A novel heterogeneous spontaneous mammary tumor animal model of Kunming mice was generated. The purpose of this study was to characterize the spontaneous mammary tumor model. Histopathologically, invasive nodular masses of pleomorphic tubular neoplastic epithelial cells invaded fibro-vascular stroma, adjacent dermis and muscle tissue. Metastatic spread through blood vessel into liver and lungs was observed by hematoxylin eosin staining. No estrogen receptor (ER) or progesterone receptor (PR) immunoreactivity was detected in their associated malignant tumors, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2) protein weak expression was found by immunohistochemistry. High expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), moderate or high expression of c-Myc and cyclin D1 were observed in tumor sections at different stages (2, 4, 6 and 8 weeks after cancer being found) when compared with that of the normal mammary glands. The result showed that the model is of an invasive ductal carcinoma. Remarkably in the mouse model, ER and PR-negative and HER2 weak positivity are observed. The high or moderate expressions of breast cancer markers (VEGF, c-Myc and cyclin D1) in mammary cancer tissue change at different stages. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a spontaneous mammary model displaying colony-strain, outbred mice. This model will be an attractive tool to understand the biology of anti-hormonal breast cancer in women. PMID:25230850

  18. The negative effects of bile acids and tumor necrosis factor-alpha on the transcription of cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase gene (CYP7A1) converge to hepatic nuclear factor-4: a novel mechanism of feedback regulation of bile acid synthesis mediated by nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    De Fabiani, E; Mitro, N; Anzulovich, A C; Pinelli, A; Galli, G; Crestani, M

    2001-08-17

    Bile acids regulate the cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase gene (CYP7A1), which encodes the rate-limiting enzyme in the classical pathway of bile acid synthesis. Here we report a novel mechanism whereby bile acid feedback regulates CYP7A1 transcription through the nuclear receptor hepatocyte nuclear factor-4 (HNF-4), which binds to the bile acid response element (BARE) at nt -149/-118 relative to the transcription start site. Using transient transfection assays of HepG2 cells with Gal4-HNF-4 fusion proteins, we show that chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) dampened the transactivation potential of HNF-4. Overexpression of a constitutive active form of MEKK1, an upstream mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) module triggered by stress signals, strongly repressed the promoter activity of CYP7A1 via the consensus sequence for HNF-4 embedded in the BARE. Similarly, MEKK1 inhibited the activity of HNF-4 in the Gal4-based assay. The involvement of the MEKK1-dependent pathway in the bile acid-mediated repression of CYP7A1 was confirmed by co-transfecting a dominant negative form of the stress-activated protein kinase kinase, SEK, which abolished the effect of CDCA upon CYP7A1 transcription. Treatment of transfected HepG2 cells with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), an activator of the MEKK1 pathway, led to the repression of CYP7A1 via the HNF-4 site in the BARE. TNF-alpha also inhibited the transactivation potential of HNF-4. Collectively, our results demonstrate for the first time that HNF-4, in combination with a MAPK signaling pathway, acts as a bile acid sensor in the liver. Furthermore, the effects of CDCA and TNF-alpha converge to HNF-4, which binds to the BARE of CYP7A1, suggesting a link between the cascades elicited by bile acids and pro-inflammatory stimuli in the liver.

  19. Metabotropic glutamate receptor-1 contributes to progression in triple negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Banda, Malathi; Speyer, Cecilia L; Semma, Sara N; Osuala, Kingsley O; Kounalakis, Nicole; Torres Torres, Keila E; Barnard, Nicola J; Kim, Hyunjin J; Sloane, Bonnie F; Miller, Fred R; Goydos, James S; Gorski, David H

    2014-01-01

    TNBC is an aggressive breast cancer subtype that does not express hormone receptors (estrogen and progesterone receptors, ER and PR) or amplified human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2), and there currently exist no targeted therapies effective against it. Consequently, finding new molecular targets in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is critical to improving patient outcomes. Previously, we have detected the expression of metabotropic glutamate receptor-1 (gene: GRM1; protein: mGluR1) in TNBC and observed that targeting glutamatergic signaling inhibits TNBC growth both in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we explored how mGluR1 contributes to TNBC progression, using the isogenic MCF10 progression series, which models breast carcinogenesis from nontransformed epithelium to malignant basal-like breast cancer. We observed that mGluR1 is expressed in human breast cancer and that in MCF10A cells, which model nontransformed mammary epithelium, but not in MCF10AT1 cells, which model atypical ductal hyperplasia, mGluR1 overexpression results in increased proliferation, anchorage-independent growth, and invasiveness. In contrast, mGluR1 knockdown results in a decrease in these activities in malignant MCF10CA1d cells. Similarly, pharmacologic inhibition of glutamatergic signaling in MCF10CA1d cells results in a decrease in proliferation and anchorage-independent growth. Finally, transduction of MCF10AT1 cells, which express c-Ha-ras, using a lentiviral construct expressing GRM1 results in transformation to carcinoma in 90% of resultant xenografts. We conclude that mGluR1 cooperates with other factors in hyperplastic mammary epithelium to contribute to TNBC progression and therefore propose that glutamatergic signaling represents a promising new molecular target for TNBC therapy.

  20. Tumor necrosis factor negative bone marrow-derived dendritic cells exhibit deficient IL-10 expression.

    PubMed

    Roomberg, Alicia; Kling, Jessica; Fromm, Phillip; Körner, Heinrich

    2010-01-01

    The effective maturation of dendritic cells (DC) is complex and highly regulated and requires the presence of a variety of signals. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and its receptors or innate pattern recognition receptors such as the toll-like receptors have been shown to contribute to this process. DC derived from bone marrow cells in the presence of granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor can be used as a model to ascertain the contribution of different signals to DC maturation. Analysis of DC activated by addition of the mycobacterial vaccine strain Bacillus Calmette-Guérin showed that of the effector molecules studied only interleukin-10 expression was significantly reduced in TNF-negative (B6.TNF(-/-)) DC. Another effector molecule produced by DC, inducible nitric oxide synthase, was largely unchanged.

  1. NEDD4-2 (neural precursor cell expressed, developmentally down-regulated 4-2) negatively regulates TGF-β (transforming growth factor-β) signalling by inducing ubiquitin-mediated degradation of Smad2 and TGF-β type I receptor

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Inhibitory Smad, Smad7, is a potent inhibitor of TGF-β (transforming growth factor-β) superfamily signalling. By binding to activated type I receptors, it prevents the activation of R-Smads (receptor-regulated Smads). To identify new components of the Smad pathway, we performed yeast two-hybrid screening using Smad7 as bait, and identified NEDD4-2 (neural precursor cell expressed, developmentally down-regulated 4-2) as a direct binding partner of Smad7. NEDD4-2 is structurally similar to Smurfs (Smad ubiquitin regulatory factors) 1 and 2, which were identified previously as E3 ubiquitin ligases for R-Smads and TGF-β superfamily receptors. NEDD4-2 functions like Smurfs 1 and 2 in that it associates with TGF-β type I receptor via Smad7, and induces its ubiquitin-dependent degradation. Moreover, NEDD4-2 bound to TGF-β-specific R-Smads, Smads 2 and 3, in a ligand-dependent manner, and induced degradation of Smad2, but not Smad3. However, in contrast with Smurf2, NEDD4-2 failed to induce ubiquitination of SnoN (Ski-related novel protein N), although NEDD4-2 bound to SnoN via Smad2 more strongly than Smurf2. We showed further that overexpressed NEDD4-2 prevents transcriptional activity induced by TGF-β and BMP, whereas silencing of the NEDD4-2 gene by siRNA (small interfering RNA) resulted in enhancement of the responsiveness to TGF-β superfamily cytokines. These data suggest that NEDD4-2 is a member of the Smurf-like C2-WW-HECT (WW is Trp-Trp and HECT is homologous to the E6-accessory protein) type E3 ubiquitin ligases, which negatively regulate TGF-β superfamily signalling through similar, but not identical, mechanisms to those used by Smurfs. PMID:15496141

  2. Comparing the clinical, histopathological and myoepithelial features of estrogen receptor positive and negative mammary carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Gucin, Zuhal; Aksoy, Bilgin; Gunver, Feray; Pasaoglu, Esra; Bahadir, Fadime

    2006-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between hormone-receptor status and histological parameters, considering that some estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast carcinoma are suggested to be of myoepithelial origin or differentiation; and to examine the presence of significant difference by myoepithelial markers and define their morphologies. For this research, 30 estrogen receptor-negative and 31 estrogen receptor-positive breast carcinomas diagnosed at the Pathology Department, Istanbul Training and Education Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey, between February 2003 and October 2004 were considered and compared clinically, microscopically and immunohistochemically considering myoepithelial markers using SMA, S100, keratin14. We found a higher amount of grade 3 frequency pushing margins, solid islets, and presence of central necrosis in the estrogen receptor-negative group than in the positive group (p<0.001 and p<0.05). Six estrogen-negative and 2 estrogen-positive cases were found positive for myoepithelial markers; a difference which is non-significant (p=0.147). The presence of solid islets, fusiform, and clear cells was detected higher in myoepithelial positive tumors than in negative group (p<0.05). For daily pathologic applications, some morphological properties of a breast carcinoma can give clues about ER and myoepithelial features. In estrogen receptor-negative tumors, there is a remarkable myoepithelial marker positivity. Studies involving broader series and different myoepithelial markers could give more reliable results.

  3. Negative regulation of T cell receptor signaling by Siglec-7 (p70/AIRM) and Siglec-9.

    PubMed

    Ikehara, Yuzuru; Ikehara, Sanae Kabata; Paulson, James C

    2004-10-08

    Siglec-7 (p70/AIRM) and Siglec-9 are "CD33"-related siglecs expressed on natural killer (NK) cells and subsets of peripheral T cells. Like other inhibitory NK cell receptors, they contain immunoglobulin receptor family tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs in their cytoplasmic domains, and Siglec-7 has been demonstrated to negatively regulate NK cell activation. Based on reports of the presence of these siglecs on T cells, we sought to determine if they are capable of modulating T cell receptor (TCR) signaling using Jurkat T cells stably and transiently transfected with Siglec-7 or Siglec-9. Following either pervanadate stimulation or TCR engagement, both Siglecs exhibited increased tyrosine phosphorylation and recruitment of SHP-1. Effects of Siglec-7 and -9 were also evident in downstream events in the signaling pathway. Both siglecs reduced phosphorylation of Tyr319 on ZAP-70, known to play a pivotal role in up-regulation of gene transcription following TCR stimulation. There was also a corresponding decreased transcriptional activity of nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) as determined using a luciferase reporter gene. Like all siglecs, Siglec-7 and -9 recognize sialic acid-containing glycans of glycoproteins and glycolipids as ligands. Mutation of the conserved Arg in the ligand binding site of Siglec-7 (Arg124) or Siglec-9 (Arg120) resulted in reduced inhibitory function in the NFAT/luciferase transcription assay, suggesting that ligand binding is required for optimal inhibition of TCR signaling. The combined results demonstrate that both Siglec-7 and Siglec-9 are capable of negative regulation of TCR signaling and that ligand binding is required for optimal activity.

  4. Spontaneous feline mammary intraepithelial lesions as a model for human estrogen receptor- and progesterone receptor-negative breast lesions

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women. Intraepithelial lesions (IELs), such as usual ductal hyperplasia (UH), atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH), and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) are risk factors that predict a woman's chance of developing invasive breast cancer. Therefore, a comparative study that establishes an animal model of pre-invasive lesions is needed for the development of preventative measures and effective treatment for both mammary IELs and tumors. The purpose of this study was to characterize the histologic and molecular features of feline mammary IELs and compare them with those in women. Methods Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded specimens (n = 205) from 203 female cats with clinical mammary disease were retrieved from the archives of the Purdue University Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory and Veterinary Teaching Hospital (West Lafayette, IN), and the Department of Pathology and Veterinary Clinic, School of Veterinary Medicine (Sassari, Italy). Histologic sections, stained with hematoxylin and eosin (HE), were evaluated for the presence of IELs in tissue adjacent to excised mammary tumors. Lesions were compared to those of humans. Immunohistochemistry for estrogen receptor (ER-alpha), progesterone receptor (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2/neu) and Ki-67 was performed in IELs and adjacent tumor tissues. Results Intraepithelial lesions were found in 57 of 203 (28%) feline mammary specimens and were categorized as UH (27%), ADH (29%), and DCIS (44%). Most IELs with atypia (ADH and DCIS) were associated with mammary cancer (91%), whereas UH was associated with benign lesions in 53% of cases. Feline IELs were remarkably similar to human IELs. No ER or PR immunoreactivity was detected in intermediate-grade or high-grade DCIS or their associated malignant tumors. HER-2 protein overexpression was found in 27% of IELs. Conclusion The remarkable similarity of feline mammary IELs to those of humans

  5. Epidermal growth factor receptor signaling in tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Shvartsman, Stanislav; Wiley, H. S.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2004-08-01

    Abstract: A peptide purified from the salivary gland of a mouse was shown few years ago to accelerate incisor eruption and eyelid opening in newborn mice, and was named epidermal growth factor (EGF). The members of this family of peptide growth factors had been identified in numerous physiological and pathological contexts. EGF binds to a cell surface EGF receptor, which induces a biochemical modification (phosphorylation) of the receptor's cytoplasmic tail. There is a growing consensus in the research community that, in addition to cellular and molecular studies, the dynamics of the EGFR network and its operation must be examined in tissues. A key challenge is to integrate the existing molecular and cellular information into a system-level description of the EGFR network at the tissue and organism level. In this paper, the two examples of EGFR signaling in tissues are described, and the recent efforts to model EGFR autocrine loops, which is a predominant mode of EGFR activation in vivo, are summarized.

  6. Progesterone receptor (PR) variants exist in breast cancer cells characterised as PR negative.

    PubMed

    Cork, David M W; Lennard, Thomas W J; Tyson-Capper, Alison J

    2012-12-01

    Progesterone receptor (PR) expression is measured in breast cancer by immunohistochemistry using N-terminally targeted antibodies and serves as a biomarker for endocrine therapeutic decisions. Extensive PR alternative splicing has been reported which may generate truncated PR variant proteins which are not detected by current breast cancer screening or may alter the function of proteins detected in screening. However, the existence of such truncated PR variants remains controversial. We have characterised PR protein expression in breast cancer cell lines using commercial PR antibodies targeting different epitopes. Truncated PR proteins are detected in reportedly PR negative MDA-MB-231 cells using a C-terminally targeted antibody. Antibody specificity was confirmed by immunoblotting following siRNA knockdown of PR expression. We have further demonstrated that alternatively spliced PR mRNA is present in MDA-MB-231 cells and in reportedly PR-negative breast tumour tissue which could encode the truncated PR proteins detected by the C-terminal antibody. The potential function of PR variant proteins present in MDA-MB-231 cells was also assessed, indicating the ability of these PR variants to bind progesterone, interact with a nuclear PR co-factor and bind DNA. These findings suggest that alternative splicing may generate functional truncated PR variant proteins which are not detected by breast cancer screening using N-terminally targeted antibodies leading to misclassification as PR negative.

  7. Role of fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling in kidney development.

    PubMed

    Bates, Carlton M

    2007-03-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptors (Fgfrs) are expressed in the ureteric bud and metanephric mesenchyme of the developing kidney. Furthermore, in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that exogenous fibroblast growth factors (Fgfs) increase growth and maturation of the metanephric mesenchyme and ureteric bud. Deletion of fgf7, fgf10, and fgfr2IIIb (the receptor isoform that binds Fgf7 and Fgf10) in mice lead to smaller kidneys with fewer collecting ducts and nephrons. Overexpression of a dominant negative receptor isoform in transgenic mice has revealed more striking defects including renal aplasia or severe dysplasia. Moreover, deletion of many fgf ligands and receptors in mice results in early embryonic lethality, making it difficult to determine their roles in kidney development. Recently, conditional targeting approaches revealed that deletion of fgf8 from the metanephric mesenchyme interrupts nephron formation. Furthermore, deletion of fgfr2 from the ureteric bud resulted in both ureteric bud branching and stromal mesenchymal patterning defects. Deletion of both fgfr1 and fgfr2 in the metanephric mesenchyme resulted in renal aplasia, characterized by defects in metanephric mesenchyme formation and initial ureteric bud elongation and branching. Thus, Fgfr signaling is critical for growth and patterning of all renal lineages at early and later stages of kidney development.

  8. Multi-epitope Folate Receptor Alpha Peptide Vaccine, Sargramostim, and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-24

    Bilateral Breast Carcinoma; Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage III Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma; Unilateral Breast Carcinoma

  9. The human adaptor SARM negatively regulates adaptor protein TRIF-dependent Toll-like receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Carty, Michael; Goodbody, Rory; Schröder, Martina; Stack, Julianne; Moynagh, Paul N; Bowie, Andrew G

    2006-10-01

    Toll-like receptors discriminate between different pathogen-associated molecules and activate signaling cascades that lead to immune responses. The specificity of Toll-like receptor signaling occurs by means of adaptor proteins containing Toll-interleukin 1 receptor (TIR) domains. Activating functions have been assigned to four TIR adaptors: MyD88, Mal, TRIF and TRAM. Here we characterize a fifth TIR adaptor, SARM, as a negative regulator of TRIF-dependent Toll-like receptor signaling. Expression of SARM blocked gene induction 'downstream' of TRIF but not of MyD88. SARM associated with TRIF, and 'knockdown' of endogenous SARM expression by interfering RNA led to enhanced TRIF-dependent cytokine and chemokine induction. Thus, the fifth mammalian TIR adaptor SARM is a negative regulator of Toll-like receptor signaling.

  10. Interleukin-6 Receptor Polymorphism Is Prevalent in HIV-negative Castleman Disease and Is Associated with Increased Soluble Interleukin-6 Receptor Levels

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Katie; Woods, Emily; Szmania, Susann M.; Stephens, Owen W.; Garg, Tarun K.; Barlogie, Bart; Shaughnessy, John D.; Hall, Brett; Reddy, Manjula; Hoering, Antje; Hansen, Emily; van Rhee, Frits

    2013-01-01

    Multicentric Castleman Disease is largely driven by increased signaling in the pathway for the plasma cell growth factor interleukin-6. We hypothesized that interleukin-6/interleukin-6 receptor/gp130 polymorphisms contribute to increased interleukin-6 and/or other components of the interleukin-6 signaling pathway in HIV-negative Castleman Disease patients. The study group was composed of 58 patients and 50 healthy donors of a similar racial/ethnic profile. Of seven polymorphisms chosen for analysis, we observed an increased frequency between patients and controls of the minor allele of interleukin-6 receptor polymorphism rs4537545, which is in linkage disequilibrium with interleukin-6 receptor polymorphism rs2228145. Further, individuals possessing at least one copy of the minor allele of either polymorphism expressed higher levels of soluble interleukin-6 receptor. These elevated interleukin-6 receptor levels may contribute to increased interleukin-6 activity through the trans-signaling pathway. These data suggest that interleukin-6 receptor polymorphism may be a contributing factor in Castleman Disease, and further research is warranted. PMID:23372742

  11. Helicobacter pylori-Negative Gastritis: Prevalence and Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Nordenstedt, Helena; Graham, David Y.; Kramer, Jennifer R.; Rugge, Massimo; Verstovsek, Gordana; Fitzgerald, Stephanie; Alsarraj, Abeer; Shaib, Yasser; Velez, Maria E.; Abraham, Neena; Anand, Bhupinderjit; Cole, Rhonda; El-Serag, Hashem B.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Recent studies using histology alone in select patients have suggested that Helicobacter pylori-negative gastritis may be common. The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of H. pylori among individuals with histologic gastritis. METHODS Subjects between 40 and 80 years underwent elective esophagogastroduodenoscopy at a VA Medical Center. Gastric biopsies were mapped from seven prespecified sites (two antrum, four corpus, and one cardia) and graded by two gastrointestinal pathologists, using the Updated Sydney System. H. pylori-negative required four criteria: negative triple staining at all seven gastric sites, negative H. pylori culture, negative IgG H. pylori serology, and no previous treatment for H. pylori. Data regarding tobacco smoking, alcohol drinking, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, and proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use were obtained by questionnaire. RESULTS Of the 491 individuals enrolled, 40.7% (200) had gastritis of at least grade 2 in at least one biopsy site or grade 1 in at least two sites. Forty-one (20.5%) had H. pylori-negative gastritis; most (30 or 73.2%) had chronic gastritis, five (12.2%) had active gastritis, and six (14.6%) had both. H. pylori-negative gastritis was approximately equally distributed in the antrum, corpus, and both antrum and corpus. Past and current PPI use was more frequent in H. pylori-negative vs. H. pylori-positive gastritis (68.2% and 53.8%; P = 0.06). CONCLUSIONS We used multiple methods to define non-H. pylori gastritis and found it in 21% of patients with histologic gastritis. While PPI use is a potential risk factor, the cause or implications of this entity are not known. PMID:23147524

  12. Targeted chemotherapy for triple-negative breast cancers via LHRH receptor.

    PubMed

    Föst, Crispin; Duwe, Francesca; Hellriegel, Martin; Schweyer, Stefan; Emons, Günter; Gründker, Carsten

    2011-05-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer does not express estrogen and progesterone receptors and there is no overexpression/amplification of the HER2-neu gene. Therefore, this subtype of breast cancer lacks the benefits of specific therapies which target these receptors. About 60% of all human breast cancers express receptors for luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH, GnRH), which might be used as a target. The LHRH receptor can be used for targeted chemotherapy with cytotoxic luteinizing hormone releasing hormone agonists such as AEZS-108 (AN-152), in which doxorubicin is linked to [D-Lys6]LHRH. In the present study we have analyzed by in vitro and in vivo experiments whether the cytotoxic LHRH agonist AEZS-108 (AN-152) induces apoptosis in triple-negative human breast cancer cells that express LHRH receptors. LHRH receptor expression in tumor biopsy specimens of triple-negative breast cancers was tested using immunohistochemistry. Cell proliferation was analyzed using alamar blue proliferation assay. Induction of apoptosis was quantified by measurement of loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. In vivo experiments were performed using nude mice bearing xenografted human breast tumors.Thirty-one of 42 triple-negative breast cancers (73.8%) expressed LHRH receptors. We could show that treatment of triple-negative but LHRH-positive MDA-MB-231, HCC1806 and HCC1937 human breast cancer cells with AEZS-108 (AN-152) resulted in apoptotic cell death in vitro via activation of caspase-3. The antitumor effects were confirmed in nude mice. AEZS-108 (AN-152) inhibited the growth of xenotransplants of triple-negative human breast cancers in nude mice completely, without any apparent side effects. The cytotoxic LHRH agonist AEZS-108 (AN-152) seems to be a suitable drug for an efficacious therapy for triple-negative breast cancers with little toxicity.

  13. UV activates growth factor receptors via reactive oxygen intermediates

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Exposure of mammalian cells to UV irradiation induces rapid and transient expression of early growth response-1 gene (Egr-1) encoding a transcription factor that plays a role in cell survival. These signals from the irradiated cell surface are likely to involve more than one pathway, and we show here that an essential pathway involves activation of several growth factor receptors by reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI). UVC irradiation causes the tyrosine phosphorylation of EGF receptor (EGFR) in mouse NIH 3T3 fibroblasts and HC11 mouse mammary cells. EGFR activation by irradiation of cells is abrogated by suramin, by antioxidants, and by the presence of a dominant negative EGFR. UV induces the formation of complexes between activated EGFR and SOS, Grb2, PLC gamma, and SHC that can be precipitated with antibodies to EGFR. The activation of EGFR by UV is mimicked by H2O2, suggesting that ROI may function upstream of EGFR activation. Our observations support the hypothesis that ROI and growth factor receptors operate in the early steps of the UV signal that lead to the enhanced expression and activity of Egr-1. PMID:8601609

  14. Insulin receptor substrate 2 is a negative regulator of memory formation

    PubMed Central

    Irvine, Elaine E.; Drinkwater, Laura; Radwanska, Kasia; Al-Qassab, Hind; Smith, Mark A.; O’Brien, Melissa; Kielar, Catherine; Choudhury, Agharul I; Krauss, Stefan; Cooper, Jonathan D.; Withers, Dominic J.; Giese, K. Peter

    2015-01-01

    Insulin has been shown to impact on learning and memory in both humans and animals, but the downstream signaling mechanisms involved are poorly characterized. Insulin receptor substrate-2 (Irs2) is an adaptor protein that couples activation of insulin- and insulin-like growth factor-1- receptors to downstream signaling pathways. Here, we have deleted Irs2, either in the whole brain or selectively in the forebrain, using the nestin Cre- or D6 Cre- deleter mouse lines respectively. We show that brain- and forebrain-specific Irs2 knockout mice have enhanced hippocampal spatial reference memory. Furthermore, NesCreIrs2KO mice have enhanced spatial working memory and contextual- and cued-fear memory. Deletion of Irs2 in the brain also increases PSD-95 expression and the density of dendritic spines in hippocampal area CA1, possibly reflecting an increase in the number of excitatory synapses per neuron in the hippocampus that can become activated during memory formation. This increase in activated excitatory synapses might underlie the improved hippocampal memory formation observed in NesCreIrs2KO mice. Overall, these results suggest that Irs2 acts as a negative regulator on memory formation by restricting dendritic spine generation. PMID:21597043

  15. Negative phototropism of rice root and its influencing factors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhong; Mo, Yiwei; Qian, Shanqin; Gu, Yunjie

    2002-10-01

    Some characteristics of the rice (Oryza sativa L.) root were found in the experiment of unilaterally irradiating the roots which were planted in water: (i) All the seminal roots, adventitious roots and their branched roots bent away from light, and their curvatures ranged from 25 degrees to 60 degrees . The curvature of adventitious root of the higher node was often larger than that of the lower node, and even larger than that of the seminal root, (ii) The negative phototropic bending of the rice root was mainly due to the larger growth increment of root-tip cells of the irradiated side compared with that of the shaded side, (iii) Root cap was the site of light perception. If root cap was shaded while the root was irradiated the root showed no negative phototropism, and the root lost the characteristic of negative phototropism when root cap was divested. Rice root could resume the characteristic of negative phototropism when the new root cap grew up, if the original cells of root cap were well protected while root cap was divested, (iv) The growth increment and curvature of rice root were both influenced by light intensity. Within the range of 0-100 mumol . m(2) -s(-1), the increasing of light intensity resulted in the decreasing of the growth increment and the increasing of the curvature of rice root, (v) The growth increment and the curvature reached the maximum at 30 degrees C with the temperature treatment of 10-40 degrees C. (vi) Blue-violet light could prominently induce the negative phototropism of rice root, while red light had no such effect. (vii) The auxin (IAA) in the solution, as a very prominent influencing factor, inhibited the growth, the negative phototropism and the gravitropism of rice root when the concentration of IAA increased. The response of negative phototropism of rice root disappeared when the concentration of IAA was above 10 mg . L(-1).

  16. PREX1 Protein Function Is Negatively Regulated Downstream of Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Activation by p21-activated Kinases (PAKs).

    PubMed

    Barrows, Douglas; He, John Z; Parsons, Ramon

    2016-09-16

    Downstream of receptor tyrosine kinase and G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) stimulation, the phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3)-dependent Rac exchange factor (PREX) family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) activates Rho GTPases, leading to important roles for PREX proteins in numerous cellular processes and diseases, including cancer. PREX1 and PREX2 GEF activity is activated by the second messengers PIP3 and Gβγ, and further regulation of PREX GEF activity occurs by phosphorylation. Stimulation of receptor tyrosine kinases by neuregulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) leads to the phosphorylation of PREX1; however, the kinases that phosphorylate PREX1 downstream of these ligands are not known. We recently reported that the p21-activated kinases (PAKs), which are activated by GTP-bound Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1), mediate the phosphorylation of PREX2 after insulin receptor activation. Here we show that certain phosphorylation events on PREX1 after insulin, neuregulin, and IGF1 treatment are PAK-dependent and lead to a reduction in PREX1 binding to PIP3 Like PREX2, PAK-mediated phosphorylation also negatively regulates PREX1 GEF activity. Furthermore, the onset of PREX1 phosphorylation was delayed compared with the phosphorylation of AKT, supporting a model of negative feedback downstream of PREX1 activation. We also found that the phosphorylation of PREX1 after isoproterenol and prostaglandin E2-mediated GPCR activation is partially PAK-dependent and likely also involves protein kinase A, which is known to reduce PREX1 function. Our data point to multiple mechanisms of PREX1 negative regulation by PAKs within receptor tyrosine kinase and GPCR-stimulated signaling pathways that have important roles in diseases such as diabetes and cancer.

  17. Expression of androgen receptor in breast cancer & its correlation with other steroid receptors & growth factors

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Ashwani K.; Agrawal, Usha; Negi, Shivani; Bansal, Anju; Mohil, R.; Chintamani, Chintamani; Bhatnagar, Amar; Bhatnagar, Dinesh; Saxena, Sunita

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: Breast cancer is the second most common malignancy in Indian women. Among the members of the steroid receptor superfamily the role of estrogen and progesterone receptors (ER and PR) is well established in breast cancer in predicting the prognosis and management of therapy, however, little is known about the clinical significance of androgen receptor (AR) in breast carcinogenesis. The present study was aimed to evaluate the expression of AR in breast cancer and to elucidate its clinical significance by correlating it with clinicopathological parameters, other steroid receptors (ER and PR) and growth factors receptors (EGFR and CD105). Methods: Expression of AR, ER, PR, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and endoglin (CD105) was studied in 100 cases of breast cancer by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Risk ratio (RR) along with 95% confidence interval (CI) was estimated to assess the strength of association between the markers and clinicopathological characteristics. Categorical principal component analysis (CATPCA) was applied to obtain new sets of linearly combined expression, for their further evaluation with clinicopathological characteristics (n=100). Results: In 31 cases presenting with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC), the expression of AR, ER, PR, EGFR and CD105 was associated with response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT). The results indicated the association of AR+ (P=0.001) and AR+/EGFR- (P=0.001) with the therapeutic response to NACT in LABC patients. The AR expression exhibited maximum sensitivity, specificity and likelihood ratio of positive and negative test. The present results showed the benefit of adding AR, EGFR and CD105 to the existing panel of markers to be able to predict response to therapy. Interpretation & conclusions: More studies on the expression profiles of AR+, AR+/CD105+ and AR+/EGFR- in larger set of breast cancer patients may possibly help in confirming their predictive role for therapeutic response

  18. Extracellular nucleotide inhibits cell proliferation and negatively regulates Toll-like receptor 4 signalling in human progenitor endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhilin; Yang, Mei; Fang, Li; Lv, Qingshan; He, Qing; Deng, Minjie; Liu, Xueting; Chen, Xiaobin; Chen, Meifang; Xie, Xiumei; Hu, Jinyue

    2012-07-01

    Extracellular nucleotides mediate a wide range of physiological effects by interacting with plasma membrane P2 purinergic receptors. P2 receptors are expressed in certain kinds of stem cells, and function to induce cytokine expression and to modulate cell proliferation. We have analysed the expression and the function of P2 receptors in human umbilical cord blood-derived EPCs (endothelial progenitor cells). EPCs expressed P2X4,6,7 and P2Y2,4,11,13,14 receptors and extracellular ATP inhibited EPCs proliferation. As in a previous study, EPCs expressed functional TLR4 (Toll-like receptor 4) and activation of TLR4 by LPS (lipopolysaccharide) evoked a pro-inflammatory immune response. When human EPCs were stimulated with LPS and nucleotides, ATP or UTP inhibited the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines including MCP-1 (monocyte chemoattractant protein-1), IFNα (interferon α), TNFα (tumour necrosis factor α) and adhesion molecule VCAM-1 (vascular cell adhesion molecule 1) induced by LPS. ATP and UTP also down-regulated the gene expression of TLR4, CD14 and MyD88 (myeloid differentiation factor 88), a TLR adaptor molecule, and protein expression of CD14 and MyD88. Moreover, the phosphorylation of NF-κB (nuclear factor κB) p65 induced by TLR4 activation was inhibited partly by ATP or UTP at concentrations of 1-5 μM. These results suggest that extracellular nucleotides negatively regulate EPCs proliferation and TLR4 signalling.

  19. Vitamin D receptor in osteoblasts is a negative regulator of bone mass control.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yoko; Yoshizawa, Tatsuya; Fukuda, Toru; Shirode-Fukuda, Yuko; Yu, Taiyong; Sekine, Keisuke; Sato, Takashi; Kawano, Hirotaka; Aihara, Ken-Ichi; Nakamichi, Yuko; Watanabe, Tomoyuki; Shindo, Masayo; Inoue, Kazuki; Inoue, Erina; Tsuji, Naoya; Hoshino, Maiko; Karsenty, Gerard; Metzger, Daniel; Chambon, Pierre; Kato, Shigeaki; Imai, Yuuki

    2013-03-01

    The physiological and beneficial actions of vitamin D in bone health have been experimentally and clinically proven in mammals. The active form of vitamin D [1α,25(OH)(2)D(3)] binds and activates its specific nuclear receptor, the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Activated VDR prevents the release of calcium from its storage in bone to serum by stimulating intestinal calcium absorption and renal reabsorption. However, the direct action of VDR in bone tissue is poorly understood because serum Ca(2+) homeostasis is maintained through tightly regulated ion transport by the kidney, intestine, and bone. In addition, conventional genetic approaches using VDR knockout (VDR-KO, VDR(-/-)) mice could not identify VDR action in bone because of the animals' systemic defects in calcium metabolism. In this study, we report that systemic VDR heterozygous KO (VDR(+/L-)) mice generated with the Cre/loxP system as well as conventional VDR heterozygotes (VDR(+/-)) showed increased bone mass in radiological assessments. Because mineral metabolism parameters were unaltered in both types of mice, these bone phenotypes imply that skeletal VDR plays a role in bone mass regulation. To confirm this assumption, osteoblast-specific VDR-KO (VDR(ΔOb/ΔOb)) mice were generated with 2.3 kb α1(I)-collagen promoter-Cre transgenic mice. They showed a bone mass increase without any dysregulation of mineral metabolism. Although bone formation parameters were not affected in bone histomorphometry, bone resorption was obviously reduced in VDR(ΔOb/ΔOb) mice because of decreased expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (an essential molecule in osteoclastogenesis) in VDR(ΔOb/ΔOb) osteoblasts. These findings establish that VDR in osteoblasts is a negative regulator of bone mass control.

  20. A Structural View of Negative Regulation of the Toll-like Receptor-Mediated Inflammatory Pathway.

    PubMed

    Guven-Maiorov, Emine; Keskin, Ozlem; Gursoy, Attila; Nussinov, Ruth

    2015-09-15

    Even though the Toll-like receptor (TLR) pathway is integral to inflammatory defense mechanisms, its excessive signaling may be devastating. Cells have acquired a cascade of strategies to regulate TLR signaling by targeting protein-protein interactions, or ubiquitin chains, but the details of the inhibition mechanisms are still unclear. Here, we provide the structural basis for the regulation of TLR signaling by constructing architectures of protein-protein interactions. Structural data suggest that 1) Toll/IL-1R (TIR) domain-containing regulators (BCAP, SIGIRR, and ST2) interfere with TIR domain signalosome formation; 2) major deubiquitinases such as A20, CYLD, and DUBA prevent association of TRAF6 and TRAF3 with their partners, in addition to removing K63-linked ubiquitin chains that serve as a docking platform for downstream effectors; 3) alternative downstream pathways of TLRs also restrict signaling by competing to bind common partners through shared binding sites. We also performed in silico mutagenesis analysis to characterize the effects of oncogenic mutations on the negative regulators and to observe the cellular outcome (whether there is/is not inflammation). Missense mutations that fall on interfaces and nonsense/frameshift mutations that result in truncated negative regulators disrupt the interactions with the targets, thereby enabling constitutive activation of the nuclear factor-kappa B, and contributing to chronic inflammation, autoimmune diseases, and oncogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A Structural View of Negative Regulation of the Toll-like Receptor-Mediated Inflammatory Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Guven-Maiorov, Emine; Keskin, Ozlem; Gursoy, Attila; Nussinov, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Even though the Toll-like receptor (TLR) pathway is integral to inflammatory defense mechanisms, its excessive signaling may be devastating. Cells have acquired a cascade of strategies to regulate TLR signaling by targeting protein-protein interactions, or ubiquitin chains, but the details of the inhibition mechanisms are still unclear. Here, we provide the structural basis for the regulation of TLR signaling by constructing architectures of protein-protein interactions. Structural data suggest that 1) Toll/IL-1R (TIR) domain-containing regulators (BCAP, SIGIRR, and ST2) interfere with TIR domain signalosome formation; 2) major deubiquitinases such as A20, CYLD, and DUBA prevent association of TRAF6 and TRAF3 with their partners, in addition to removing K63-linked ubiquitin chains that serve as a docking platform for downstream effectors; 3) alternative downstream pathways of TLRs also restrict signaling by competing to bind common partners through shared binding sites. We also performed in silico mutagenesis analysis to characterize the effects of oncogenic mutations on the negative regulators and to observe the cellular outcome (whether there is/is not inflammation). Missense mutations that fall on interfaces and nonsense/frameshift mutations that result in truncated negative regulators disrupt the interactions with the targets, thereby enabling constitutive activation of the nuclear factor-kappa B, and contributing to chronic inflammation, autoimmune diseases, and oncogenesis. PMID:26276688

  2. Selection of Optimal Adjuvant Chemotherapy Regimens for Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2) -Negative and Adjuvant Targeted Therapy for HER2-Positive Breast Cancers: An American Society of Clinical Oncology Guideline Adaptation of the Cancer Care Ontario Clinical Practice Guideline.

    PubMed

    Denduluri, Neelima; Somerfield, Mark R; Eisen, Andrea; Holloway, Jamie N; Hurria, Arti; King, Tari A; Lyman, Gary H; Partridge, Ann H; Telli, Melinda L; Trudeau, Maureen E; Wolff, Antonio C

    2016-07-10

    A Cancer Care Ontario (CCO) guideline on the selection of optimal adjuvant chemotherapy regimens for early breast cancer including adjuvant targeted therapy for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive breast cancers was identified for adaptation. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has a policy and set of procedures for adapting clinical practice guidelines developed by other organizations. The CCO guideline was reviewed for developmental rigor and content applicability. On the basis of the content review of the CCO guideline, the ASCO Panel agreed that, in general, the recommendations were clear and thorough and were based on the most relevant scientific evidence, and they presented options that will be acceptable to patients. However, for some topics addressed in the CCO guideline, the ASCO Panel formulated a set of adapted recommendations on the basis of local context and practice beliefs of the Panel members. Decisions regarding adjuvant chemotherapy regimens should take into account baseline recurrence risk, toxicities, likelihood of benefit, and host factors such as comorbidities. In high-risk HER2-negative populations with excellent performance status, anthracycline- and taxane-containing regimens are the standard of care. Docetaxel and cyclophosphamide for four cycles is an acceptable non-anthracycline regimen. In high-risk HER2-positive disease, sequential anthracycline and taxanes administered concurrently with trastuzumab or docetaxel, carboplatin, and trastuzumab for six cycles are recommended. An alternative regimen in a lower-risk, node-negative, HER2-positive population is paclitaxel and trastuzumab once per week for 12 cycles. Trastuzumab should be given for 1 year. Platinum salts should not be routinely administered in the adjuvant triple-negative population until survival efficacy data become available. © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  3. Gemini Vitamin D Analogs Inhibit Estrogen Receptor Positive and Estrogen Receptor Negative Mammary Tumorigenesis without Hypercalcemic Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hong Jin; Paul, Shiby; Atalla, Nadi; Thomas, Paul E.; Lin, Jennie; Yang, Ill; Buckley, Brian; Lu, Gang; Zheng, Xi; Lou, You-Rong; Conney, Allan H.; Maehr, Hubert; Uskokovic, Milan; Suh, Nanjoo

    2009-01-01

    Numerous preclinical, epidemiological and clinical studies have suggested the benefits of vitamin D and its analogs for the prevention and treatment of cancer. However, the hypercalcemic effects have limited the use of 1α,25(OH)2D3, the hormonally active form of vitamin D. To identify vitamin D analogs with better efficacy and low toxicity, we have tested more than 60 novel Gemini vitamin D analogs with a unique structure of two side chains for growth inhibition of breast cancer cells. Our initial studies found that some Gemini analogs are many-fold more active than 1α,25(OH)2D3 in growth inhibition assay. In vivo experiments were designed to study the inhibitory effect of selected Gemini vitamin D analogs against mammary carcinogenesis by using (a) an N-methyl-N-nitrosourea-induced estrogen receptor (ER)-positive mammary tumor model and (b) an MCF10DCIS.com xenograft model of ER-negative mammary tumors. Among vitamin D analogs we tested, Gemini 0072 [1α,25-dihydroxy-20S-21(3-trideuteromethyl-3-hydroxy-4,4,4-trideuterobutyl)-23-yne-26,27-hexafluoro-19-nor-cholecalciferol] and Gemini 0097 [1α,25-dihydroxy-20R-21(3-trideuteromethyl-3-hydroxy-4,4,4-trideuterobutyl)-23-yne-26,27-hexafluoro-19-nor-cholecalciferol] administration inhibited by 60% the NMU-induced mammary tumor burden compared to the NMU-treated control group, but these compounds were devoid of hypercalcemia toxicity. In an ER-negative xenograft model, Gemini 0097 significantly suppressed tumor growth without hypercalcemia toxicity. We found that the inhibitory effect of Gemini 0097 was associated with an increased level of cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor p21 and the insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 in both ER-positive and ER-negative mammary tumors. Our results suggest that Gemini vitamin D analogs may be potent agents for the prevention and treatment of both ER-positive and ER-negative breast cancer without hypercalcemia toxicity. PMID:19138995

  4. Gemini vitamin D analogues inhibit estrogen receptor-positive and estrogen receptor-negative mammary tumorigenesis without hypercalcemic toxicity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hong Jin; Paul, Shiby; Atalla, Nadi; Thomas, Paul E; Lin, Xinjie; Yang, Ill; Buckley, Brian; Lu, Gang; Zheng, Xi; Lou, You-Rong; Conney, Allan H; Maehr, Hubert; Adorini, Luciano; Uskokovic, Milan; Suh, Nanjoo

    2008-11-01

    Numerous preclinical, epidemiologic, and clinical studies have suggested the benefits of vitamin D and its analogues for the prevention and treatment of cancer. However, the hypercalcemic effects have limited the use of 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3), the hormonally active form of vitamin D. To identify vitamin D analogues with better efficacy and low toxicity, we have tested >60 novel Gemini vitamin D analogues with a unique structure of two side chains for growth inhibition of breast cancer cells. Our initial studies found that some Gemini analogues are 5-15 times more active than 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3) in growth inhibition assay. In vivo experiments were designed to study the inhibitory effect of selected Gemini vitamin D analogues against mammary carcinogenesis by using (a) an N-methyl-N-nitrosourea-induced estrogen receptor (ER)-positive mammary tumor model and (b) an MCF10DCIS.com xenograft model of ER-negative mammary tumors. Among vitamin D analogues we tested, Gemini 0072 [1alpha,25-dihydroxy-20S-21(3-trideuteromethyl-3-hydroxy-4,4,4-trideuterobutyl)-23-yne-26,27-hexafluoro-19-nor-cholecalciferol] and Gemini 0097 [1alpha,25-dihydroxy-20R-21(3-trideuteromethyl-3-hydroxy-4,4,4-trideuterobutyl)-23-yne-26,27-hexafluoro-19-nor-cholecalciferol] administration inhibited by 60% the NMU-induced mammary tumor burden compared with the NMU-treated control group, but these compounds were devoid of hypercalcemia toxicity. In an ER-negative xenograft model, Gemini 0097 significantly suppressed tumor growth without hypercalcemia toxicity. We found that the inhibitory effect of Gemini 0097 was associated with an increased level of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 and the insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 in both ER-positive and ER-negative mammary tumors. Our results suggest that Gemini vitamin D analogues may be potent agents for the prevention and treatment of both ER-positive and ER-negative breast cancer without hypercalcemia toxicity.

  5. Phase II trial of bicalutamide in patients with androgen receptor-positive, estrogen receptor-negative metastatic Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Gucalp, Ayca; Tolaney, Sara; Isakoff, Steven J; Ingle, James N; Liu, Minetta C; Carey, Lisa A; Blackwell, Kimberly; Rugo, Hope; Nabell, Lisle; Forero, Andres; Stearns, Vered; Doane, Ashley S; Danso, Michael; Moynahan, Mary Ellen; Momen, Lamia F; Gonzalez, Joseph M; Akhtar, Arooj; Giri, Dilip D; Patil, Sujata; Feigin, Kimberly N; Hudis, Clifford A; Traina, Tiffany A

    2013-10-01

    Patients with hormone receptor-negative breast cancer generally do not benefit from endocrine-targeted therapies. However, a subset with androgen receptor (AR) expression is predicted to respond to antiandrogen therapies. This phase II study explored bicalutamide in AR-positive, estrogen receptor (ER), and progesterone receptor (PgR)-negative metastatic breast cancer. Tumors from patients with ER/PgR-negative advanced breast cancer were tested centrally for AR [immunohistochemistry (IHC) > 10% nuclear staining considered positive]. If either the primary or a metastatic site was positive, patients were eligible to receive the AR antagonist bicalutamide at a dose of 150 mg daily. Clinical benefit rate (CBR), the primary endpoint, was defined as the total number of patients who show a complete response (CR), partial response (PR), or stable disease (SD) > 6 months; secondary endpoints included progression-free survival (PFS) and toxicity. Correlative studies included measurement of circulating endocrine markers and IHC surrogates for basal-like breast cancer. Of 424 patients with ER/PgR-negative breast cancer, 12% tested AR-positive. The 6-month CBR was 19% [95% confidence interval (CI), 7%-39%] for bicalutamide. The median PFS was 12 weeks (95% CI, 11-22 weeks). Bicalutamide was well-tolerated with no grade 4/5 treatment-related adverse events observed. AR was expressed in 12% of patients with ER/PgR-negative breast cancer screened for this trial. The CBR of 19% observed with bicalutamide shows proof of principle for the efficacy of minimally toxic androgen blockade in a select group of patients with ER/PgR-negative, AR-positive breast cancer. ©2013 AACR.

  6. Manifold regularized non-negative matrix factorization with label information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huirong; Zhang, Jiangshe; Wang, Changpeng; Liu, Junmin

    2016-03-01

    Non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) as a popular technique for finding parts-based, linear representations of non-negative data has been successfully applied in a wide range of applications, such as feature learning, dictionary learning, and dimensionality reduction. However, both the local manifold regularization of data and the discriminative information of the available label have not been taken into account together in NMF. We propose a new semisupervised matrix decomposition method, called manifold regularized non-negative matrix factorization (MRNMF) with label information, which incorporates the manifold regularization and the label information into the NMF to improve the performance of NMF in clustering tasks. We encode the local geometrical structure of the data space by constructing a nearest neighbor graph and enhance the discriminative ability of different classes by effectively using the label information. Experimental comparisons with the state-of-the-art methods on theCOIL20, PIE, Extended Yale B, and MNIST databases demonstrate the effectiveness of MRNMF.

  7. Role of fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling in kidney development.

    PubMed

    Bates, Carlton M

    2011-09-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptors (Fgfrs) are expressed throughout the developing kidney. Several early studies have shown that exogenous fibroblast growth factors (Fgfs) affect growth and maturation of the metanephric mesenchyme (MM) and ureteric bud (UB). Transgenic mice that over-express a dominant negative receptor isoform develop renal aplasia/severe dysplasia, confirming the importance of Fgfrs in renal development. Furthermore, global deletion of Fgf7, Fgf10, and Fgfr2IIIb (isoform that binds Fgf7 and Fgf10) in mice leads to small kidneys with fewer collecting ducts and nephrons. Deletion of Fgfrl1, a receptor lacking intracellular signaling domains, causes severe renal dysgenesis. Conditional targeting of Fgf8 from the MM interrupts nephron formation. Deletion of Fgfr2 from the UB results in severe ureteric branching and stromal mesenchymal defects, although loss of Frs2α (major signaling adapter for Fgfrs) in the UB causes only mild renal hypoplasia. Deletion of both Fgfr1 and Fgfr2 in the MM results in renal aplasia with defects in MM formation and initial UB elongation and branching. Loss of Fgfr2 in the MM leads to many renal and urinary tract anomalies as well as vesicoureteral reflux. Thus, Fgfr signaling is critical for patterning of virtually all renal lineages at early and later stages of development.

  8. Insulin Receptor Substrate 2 Is a Negative Regulator of Memory Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irvine, Elaine E.; Drinkwater, Laura; Radwanska, Kasia; Al-Qassab, Hind; Smith, Mark A.; O'Brien, Melissa; Kielar, Catherine; Choudhury, Agharul I.; Krauss, Stefan; Cooper, Jonathan D.; Withers, Dominic J.; Giese, Karl Peter

    2011-01-01

    Insulin has been shown to impact on learning and memory in both humans and animals, but the downstream signaling mechanisms involved are poorly characterized. Insulin receptor substrate-2 (Irs2) is an adaptor protein that couples activation of insulin- and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptors to downstream signaling pathways. Here, we have…

  9. Insulin Receptor Substrate 2 Is a Negative Regulator of Memory Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irvine, Elaine E.; Drinkwater, Laura; Radwanska, Kasia; Al-Qassab, Hind; Smith, Mark A.; O'Brien, Melissa; Kielar, Catherine; Choudhury, Agharul I.; Krauss, Stefan; Cooper, Jonathan D.; Withers, Dominic J.; Giese, Karl Peter

    2011-01-01

    Insulin has been shown to impact on learning and memory in both humans and animals, but the downstream signaling mechanisms involved are poorly characterized. Insulin receptor substrate-2 (Irs2) is an adaptor protein that couples activation of insulin- and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptors to downstream signaling pathways. Here, we have…

  10. Semisynthetic preparation of amentoflavone: A negative modulator at GABA(A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Hanrahan, Jane R; Chebib, Mary; Davucheron, Neil L M; Hall, Belinda J; Johnston, Graham A R

    2003-07-21

    Amentoflavone is found in a number of plants with medicinal properties, including Ginkgo biloba and Hypericum perforatum (St. John's Wort). We have developed a rapid and economic semi-synthetic preparation of amentoflavone from biflavones isolated from autumnal Ginkgo biloba leaves. Several studies have shown that amentoflavone binds to benzodiazepine receptors. Using two electrode voltage-clamp methodology, amentoflavone has been shown to be a negative modulator of GABA at GABA(A) alpha(1)beta(2)gamma(2L) receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes This action appears to be independent of the flumazenil-sensitive benzodiazepine modulatory sites on the GABA(A) receptor.

  11. Positive and negative regulation of type II TGF-beta receptor signal transduction by autophosphorylation on multiple serine residues.

    PubMed Central

    Luo, K; Lodish, H F

    1997-01-01

    The type II transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) receptor Ser/Thr kinase (TbetaRII) is responsible for the initiation of multiple TGF-beta signaling pathways, and loss of its function is associated with many types of human cancer. Here we show that TbetaRII kinase is regulated intricately by autophosphorylation on at least three serine residues. Ser213, in the membrane-proximal segment outside the kinase domain, undergoes intra-molecular autophosphorylation which is essential for the activation of TbetaRII kinase activity, activation of TbetaRI and TGF-beta-induced growth inhibition. In contrast, phosphorylation of Ser409 and Ser416, located in a segment corresponding to the substrate recognition T-loop region in a three-dimensional structural model of protein kinases, is enhanced by receptor dimerization and can occur via an intermolecular mechanism. Phosphorylation of Ser409 is essential for TbetaRII kinase signaling, while phosphorylation of Ser416 inhibits receptor function. Mutation of Ser416 to alanine results in a hyperactive receptor that is better able than wild-type to induce TbetaRI activation and subsequent cell cycle arrest. Since on a single receptor either Ser409 or Ser416, but not both simultaneously, can become autophosphorylated, our results show that TbetaRII phosphorylation is regulated intricately and affects TGF-beta receptor signal transduction both positively and negatively. PMID:9155023

  12. Conversion of epidermal growth factor receptor 2 and hormone receptor expression in breast cancer metastases to the brain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction We investigated the status of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα), progesterone receptor (PR), and epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) in primary tumor and in the corresponding brain metastases in a consecutive series of breast cancer patients. Additionally, we studied factors potentially influencing conversion and evaluated its association with survival. Methods The study group included 120 breast cancer patients. ERα, PR, and HER2 status in primary tumors and in matched brain metastases was determined centrally by immunohistochemistry and/or fluorescence in situ hybridization. Results Using the Allred score of ≥ 3 as a threshold, conversion of ERα and PR in brain metastases occurred in 29% of cases for both receptors, mostly from positive to negative. Conversion of HER2 occurred in 14% of patients and was more balanced either way. Time to brain relapse and the use of chemotherapy or trastuzumab did not influence conversion, whereas endocrine therapy induced conversion of ERα (P = 0.021) and PR (P = 0.001), mainly towards their loss. Receptor conversion had no significant impact on survival. Conclusions Receptor conversion, particularly loss of hormone receptors, is a common event in brain metastases from breast cancer, and endocrine therapy may increase its incidence. Receptor conversion does not significantly affect survival. PMID:22898337

  13. Overlapping spectra resolution using non-negative matrix factorization.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hong-Tao; Li, Tong-Hua; Chen, Kai; Li, Wei-Guang; Bi, Xian

    2005-03-31

    Non-negative matrix factorization (NMF), with the constraints of non-negativity, has been recently proposed for multi-variate data analysis. Because it allows only additive, not subtractive, combinations of the original data, NMF is capable of producing region or parts-based representation of objects. It has been used for image analysis and text processing. Unlike PCA, the resolutions of NMF are non-negative and can be easily interpreted and understood directly. Due to multiple solutions, the original algorithm of NMF [D.D. Lee, H.S. Seung, Nature 401 (1999) 788] is not suitable for resolving chemical mixed signals. In reality, NMF has never been applied to resolving chemical mixed signals. It must be modified according to the characteristics of the chemical signals, such as smoothness of spectra, unimodality of chromatograms, sparseness of mass spectra, etc. We have used the modified NMF algorithm to narrow the feasible solution region for resolving chemical signals, and found that it could produce reasonable and acceptable results for certain experimental errors, especially for overlapping chromatograms and sparse mass spectra. Simulated two-dimensional (2-D) data and real GUJINGGONG alcohol liquor GC-MS data have been resolved soundly by NMF technique. Butyl caproate and its isomeric compound (butyric acid, hexyl ester) have been identified from the overlapping spectra. The result of NMF is preferable to that of Heuristic evolving latent projections (HELP). It shows that NMF is a promising chemometric resolution method for complex samples.

  14. Results With Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation in Terms of Estrogen Receptor, Progesterone Receptor, and Human Growth Factor Receptor 2 Status

    SciTech Connect

    Wilder, Richard B.; Curcio, Lisa D.; Khanijou, Rajesh K.; Eisner, Martin E.; Kakkis, Jane L.; Chittenden, Lucy; Agustin, Jeffrey; Lizarde, Jessica; Mesa, Albert V.; Macedo, Jorge C.; Ravera, John; Tokita, Kenneth M.

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To report our results with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in terms of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2/neu) status. Methods and Materials: Between February 2003 and June 2009, 209 women with early-stage breast carcinomas were treated with APBI using multicatheter, MammoSite, or Contura brachytherapy to 34 Gy in 10 fractions twice daily over 5-7 days. Three patient groups were defined by receptor status: Group 1: ER or PR (+) and HER-2/neu (-) (n = 180), Group 2: ER and PR (-) and HER-2/neu (+) (n = 10), and Group 3: ER, PR, and HER-2/neu (-) (triple negative breast cancer, n = 19). Median follow-up was 22 months. Results: Group 3 patients had significantly higher Scarff-Bloom-Richardson scores (p < 0.001). The 3-year ipsilateral breast tumor control rates for Groups 1, 2, and 3 were 99%, 100%, and 100%, respectively (p = 0.15). Group 3 patients tended to experience relapse in distant sites earlier than did non-Group 3 patients. The 3-year relapse-free survival rates for Groups 1, 2, and 3 were 100%, 100%, and 81%, respectively (p = 0.046). The 3-year cause-specific and overall survival rates for Groups 1, 2, and 3 were 100%, 100%, and 89%, respectively (p = 0.002). Conclusions: Triple negative breast cancer patients typically have high-grade tumors with significantly worse relapse-free, cause-specific, and overall survival. Longer follow-up will help to determine whether these patients also have a higher risk of ipsilateral breast tumor relapse.

  15. Evidence for epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced intermolecular autophosphorylation of the EGF receptors in living cells.

    PubMed Central

    Honegger, A M; Schmidt, A; Ullrich, A; Schlessinger, J

    1990-01-01

    In response to epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulation, the intrinsic protein tyrosine kinase of EGF receptor is activated, leading to tyrosine phosphorylation of several cellular substrate proteins, including the EGF receptor molecule itself. To test the mechanism of EGF receptor autophosphorylation in living cells, we established transfected cell lines coexpressing a kinase-negative point mutant of EGF receptor (K721A) with an active EGF receptor mutant lacking 63 amino acids from its carboxy terminus. The addition of EGF to these cells caused tyrosine phosphorylation of the kinase-negative mutant by the active receptor molecule, demonstrating EGF receptor cross-phosphorylation in living cells. After internalization the kinase-negative mutant and CD63 have separate trafficking pathways. This limits their association and the extent of cross-phosphorylation of K721A by CD63. The coexpression of the kinase-negative mutant together with active EGF receptors in the same cells suppressed the mitogenic response toward EGF as compared with that in cells that express active receptors alone. The presence of the kinase-negative mutant functions as a negative dominant mutation suppressing the response of active EGF receptors, probably by interfering with EGF-induced signal transduction. It appears, therefore, that crucial events of signal transduction occur before K721A and active EGF receptors are separated by their different endocytic itineraries. Images PMID:2164634

  16. The Immunophilin-Like Protein XAP2 Is a Negative Regulator of Estrogen Signaling through Interaction with Estrogen Receptor α

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Petra; Korbonits, Marta; Pongratz, Ingemar

    2011-01-01

    XAP2 (also known as aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein, AIP) is originally identified as a negative regulator of the hepatitis B virus X-associated protein. Recent studies have expanded the range of XAP2 client proteins to include the nuclear receptor family of transcription factors. In this study, we show that XAP2 is recruited to the promoter of ERα regulated genes like the breast cancer marker gene pS2 or GREB1 and negatively regulate the expression of these genes in MCF-7 cells. Interestingly, we show that XAP2 downregulates the E2-dependent transcriptional activation in an estrogen receptor (ER) isoform-specific manner: XAP2 inhibits ERα but not ERβ-mediated transcription. Thus, knockdown of intracellular XAP2 levels leads to increased ERα activity. XAP2 proteins, carrying mutations in their primary structures, loose the ability of interacting with ERα and can no longer regulate ER target gene transcription. Taken together, this study shows that XAP2 exerts a negative effect on ERα transcriptional activity and may thus prevent ERα-dependent events. PMID:21984905

  17. Identification of four novel susceptibility loci for oestrogen receptor negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Couch, Fergus J.; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Mendoza-Fandino, Gustavo A.; Nord, Silje; Lilyquist, Janna; Olswold, Curtis; Hallberg, Emily; Agata, Simona; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Ambrosone, Christine; Andrulis, Irene L.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Arun, Banu K.; Arver, Brita; Barile, Monica; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Barrowdale, Daniel; Beckmann, Lars; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Benitez, Javier; Blank, Stephanie V.; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Burwinkel, Barbara; Buys, Saundra S.; Caldes, Trinidad; Caligo, Maria A.; Canzian, Federico; Carpenter, Jane; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J.; Chung, Wendy K.; Claes, Kathleen B. M.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Czene, Kamila; Daly, Mary B.; Damiola, Francesca; Darabi, Hatef; de la Hoya, Miguel; Devilee, Peter; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan C.; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Domchek, Susan M.; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dumont, Martine; Dunning, Alison M.; Eccles, Diana M.; Ehrencrona, Hans; Ekici, Arif B.; Eliassen, Heather; Ellis, Steve; Fasching, Peter A.; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Försti, Asta; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D.; Friebel, Tara; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Gabrielson, Marike; Gammon, Marilie D.; Ganz, Patricia A.; Gapstur, Susan M.; Garber, Judy; Gaudet, Mia M.; Gayther, Simon A.; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ghoussaini, Maya; Giles, Graham G.; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K.; Goldberg, Mark S.; Goldgar, David E.; González-Neira, Anna; Greene, Mark H.; Gronwald, Jacek; Guénel, Pascal; Gunter, Marc; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Hart, Steven; Healey, Sue; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Henderson, Brian E.; Herzog, Josef; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hoover, Robert N.; Hopper, John L.; Humphreys, Keith; Hunter, David J.; Huzarski, Tomasz; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Isaacs, Claudine; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M.; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kar, Siddhartha; Karlan, Beth Y.; Khan, Sofia; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kibriya, Muhammad G.; Knight, Julia A.; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela; Kwong, Ava; Laitman, Yael; Lambrechts, Diether; Lazaro, Conxi; Lee, Eunjung; Le Marchand, Loic; Lester, Jenny; Lindblom, Annika; Lindor, Noralane; Lindstrom, Sara; Liu, Jianjun; Long, Jirong; Lubinski, Jan; Mai, Phuong L.; Makalic, Enes; Malone, Kathleen E.; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Martens, John W. M.; McGuffog, Lesley; Meindl, Alfons; Miller, Austin; Milne, Roger L.; Miron, Penelope; Montagna, Marco; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Mulligan, Anna M.; Muranen, Taru A.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Offit, Kenneth; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Olson, Janet E.; Osorio, Ana; Park, Sue K.; Peeters, Petra H.; Peissel, Bernard; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Phelan, Catherine M.; Pilarski, Robert; Poppe, Bruce; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rahman, Nazneen; Rantala, Johanna; Rappaport, Christine; Rennert, Gad; Richardson, Andrea; Robson, Mark; Romieu, Isabelle; Rudolph, Anja; Rutgers, Emiel J.; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Santella, Regina M.; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Scott, Rodney; Senter, Leigha; Sharma, Priyanka; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F.; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa; Steinemann, Doris; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Swerdlow, Anthony; Szabo, Csilla I.; Tamimi, Rulla; Tapper, William; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary B.; Thomassen, Mads; Thompson, Deborah; Tihomirova, Laima; Toland, Amanda E.; Tollenaar, Robert A. E. M.; Tomlinson, Ian; Truong, Thérèse; Tsimiklis, Helen; Teulé, Alex; Tumino, Rosario; Tung, Nadine; Turnbull, Clare; Ursin, Giski; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wang, Zhaoming; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Whittemore, Alice; Wildiers, Hans; Winqvist, Robert; Yang, Xiaohong R.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Yao, Song; Zamora, M Pilar; Zheng, Wei; Hall, Per; Kraft, Peter; Vachon, Celine; Slager, Susan; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Monteiro, Alvaro A. N.; García-Closas, Montserrat; Easton, Douglas F.; Antoniou, Antonis C.

    2016-01-01

    Common variants in 94 loci have been associated with breast cancer including 15 loci with genome-wide significant associations (P<5 × 10−8) with oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer and BRCA1-associated breast cancer risk. In this study, to identify new ER-negative susceptibility loci, we performed a meta-analysis of 11 genome-wide association studies (GWAS) consisting of 4,939 ER-negative cases and 14,352 controls, combined with 7,333 ER-negative cases and 42,468 controls and 15,252 BRCA1 mutation carriers genotyped on the iCOGS array. We identify four previously unidentified loci including two loci at 13q22 near KLF5, a 2p23.2 locus near WDR43 and a 2q33 locus near PPIL3 that display genome-wide significant associations with ER-negative breast cancer. In addition, 19 known breast cancer risk loci have genome-wide significant associations and 40 had moderate associations (P<0.05) with ER-negative disease. Using functional and eQTL studies we implicate TRMT61B and WDR43 at 2p23.2 and PPIL3 at 2q33 in ER-negative breast cancer aetiology. All ER-negative loci combined account for ∼11% of familial relative risk for ER-negative disease and may contribute to improved ER-negative and BRCA1 breast cancer risk prediction. PMID:27117709

  18. Identification of four novel susceptibility loci for oestrogen receptor negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Couch, Fergus J; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Mendoza-Fandino, Gustavo A; Nord, Silje; Lilyquist, Janna; Olswold, Curtis; Hallberg, Emily; Agata, Simona; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Ambrosone, Christine; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Arun, Banu K; Arver, Brita; Barile, Monica; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Barrowdale, Daniel; Beckmann, Lars; Beckmann, Matthias W; Benitez, Javier; Blank, Stephanie V; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Burwinkel, Barbara; Buys, Saundra S; Caldes, Trinidad; Caligo, Maria A; Canzian, Federico; Carpenter, Jane; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J; Chung, Wendy K; Claes, Kathleen B M; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Cunningham, Julie M; Czene, Kamila; Daly, Mary B; Damiola, Francesca; Darabi, Hatef; de la Hoya, Miguel; Devilee, Peter; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan C; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Domchek, Susan M; Dorfling, Cecilia M; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dumont, Martine; Dunning, Alison M; Eccles, Diana M; Ehrencrona, Hans; Ekici, Arif B; Eliassen, Heather; Ellis, Steve; Fasching, Peter A; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Försti, Asta; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D; Friebel, Tara; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Gabrielson, Marike; Gammon, Marilie D; Ganz, Patricia A; Gapstur, Susan M; Garber, Judy; Gaudet, Mia M; Gayther, Simon A; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ghoussaini, Maya; Giles, Graham G; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K; Goldberg, Mark S; Goldgar, David E; González-Neira, Anna; Greene, Mark H; Gronwald, Jacek; Guénel, Pascal; Gunter, Marc; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V O; Hart, Steven; Healey, Sue; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Henderson, Brian E; Herzog, Josef; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hooning, Maartje J; Hoover, Robert N; Hopper, John L; Humphreys, Keith; Hunter, David J; Huzarski, Tomasz; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kar, Siddhartha; Karlan, Beth Y; Khan, Sofia; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Knight, Julia A; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela; Kwong, Ava; Laitman, Yael; Lambrechts, Diether; Lazaro, Conxi; Lee, Eunjung; Le Marchand, Loic; Lester, Jenny; Lindblom, Annika; Lindor, Noralane; Lindstrom, Sara; Liu, Jianjun; Long, Jirong; Lubinski, Jan; Mai, Phuong L; Makalic, Enes; Malone, Kathleen E; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Martens, John W M; McGuffog, Lesley; Meindl, Alfons; Miller, Austin; Milne, Roger L; Miron, Penelope; Montagna, Marco; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Mulligan, Anna M; Muranen, Taru A; Nathanson, Katherine L; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nussbaum, Robert L; Offit, Kenneth; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Olson, Janet E; Osorio, Ana; Park, Sue K; Peeters, Petra H; Peissel, Bernard; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Phelan, Catherine M; Pilarski, Robert; Poppe, Bruce; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rahman, Nazneen; Rantala, Johanna; Rappaport, Christine; Rennert, Gad; Richardson, Andrea; Robson, Mark; Romieu, Isabelle; Rudolph, Anja; Rutgers, Emiel J; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Santella, Regina M; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmidt, Daniel F; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schmutzler, Rita K; Schumacher, Fredrick; Scott, Rodney; Senter, Leigha; Sharma, Priyanka; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa; Steinemann, Doris; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Swerdlow, Anthony; Szabo, Csilla I; Tamimi, Rulla; Tapper, William; Teixeira, Manuel R; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary B; Thomassen, Mads; Thompson, Deborah; Tihomirova, Laima; Toland, Amanda E; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Tomlinson, Ian; Truong, Thérèse; Tsimiklis, Helen; Teulé, Alex; Tumino, Rosario; Tung, Nadine; Turnbull, Clare; Ursin, Giski; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wang, Zhaoming; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Whittemore, Alice; Wildiers, Hans; Winqvist, Robert; Yang, Xiaohong R; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Yao, Song; Zamora, M Pilar; Zheng, Wei; Hall, Per; Kraft, Peter; Vachon, Celine; Slager, Susan; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D P; Monteiro, Alvaro A N; García-Closas, Montserrat; Easton, Douglas F; Antoniou, Antonis C

    2016-04-27

    Common variants in 94 loci have been associated with breast cancer including 15 loci with genome-wide significant associations (P<5 × 10(-8)) with oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer and BRCA1-associated breast cancer risk. In this study, to identify new ER-negative susceptibility loci, we performed a meta-analysis of 11 genome-wide association studies (GWAS) consisting of 4,939 ER-negative cases and 14,352 controls, combined with 7,333 ER-negative cases and 42,468 controls and 15,252 BRCA1 mutation carriers genotyped on the iCOGS array. We identify four previously unidentified loci including two loci at 13q22 near KLF5, a 2p23.2 locus near WDR43 and a 2q33 locus near PPIL3 that display genome-wide significant associations with ER-negative breast cancer. In addition, 19 known breast cancer risk loci have genome-wide significant associations and 40 had moderate associations (P<0.05) with ER-negative disease. Using functional and eQTL studies we implicate TRMT61B and WDR43 at 2p23.2 and PPIL3 at 2q33 in ER-negative breast cancer aetiology. All ER-negative loci combined account for ∼11% of familial relative risk for ER-negative disease and may contribute to improved ER-negative and BRCA1 breast cancer risk prediction.

  19. µ-opioid Receptor Availability in the Amygdala is Associated with Smoking for Negative Affect Relief

    PubMed Central

    Falcone, Mary; Gold, Allison B.; Wileyto, E. Paul; Ray, Riju; Ruparel, Kosha; Newberg, Andrew; Dubroff, Jacob; Logan, Jean; Zubieta, Jon-Kar; Blendy, Julie A.; Lerman, Caryn

    2013-01-01

    Rationale The perception that smoking relieves negative affect contributes to smoking persistence. Endogenous opioid neurotransmission, and the µ-opioid receptor (MOR) in particular, plays a role in affective regulation and is modulated by nicotine. Objectives We examined the relationship of µ-opioid receptor binding availability in the amygdala to the motivation to smoke for negative affect relief and to the acute effects of smoking on affective responses. Methods Twenty-two smokers were scanned on two separate occasions after overnight abstinence using [11C]carfentanil positron emission tomography imaging: after smoking a nicotine-containing cigarette and after smoking a denicotinized cigarette. Self-reports of smoking motives were collected at baseline, and measures of positive and negative affect were collected pre- and post- cigarette smoking. Results Higher MOR availability in the amygdala was associated with motivation to smoke to relieve negative affect. However, MOR availability was unrelated to changes in affect after smoking either cigarette. Conclusions Increased MOR availability in amygdala may underlie the motivation to smoke for negative affective relief. These results are consistent with previous data highlighting the role of µ-opioid receptor neurotransmission in smoking behavior. PMID:22389047

  20. Molecular apocrine breast cancers are aggressive estrogen receptor negative tumors overexpressing either HER2 or GCDFP15

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Molecular apocrine (MA) tumors are estrogen receptor (ER) negative breast cancers characterized by androgen receptor (AR) expression. We analyzed a group of 58 transcriptionally defined MA tumors and proposed a new tool to identify these tumors. Methods We performed quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) for ESR1, AR, FOXA1 and AR-related genes, and immunohistochemistry (IHC) for ER, PR, Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2), CK5/6, CK17, EGFR, Ki67, AR, FOXA1 and GCDFP15 and we analyzed clinical features. Results MA tumors were all characterized by ESR1(-) AR(+) FOXA1(+) and AR-related genes positive mRNA profile. IHC staining on these tumors showed 93% ER(-), only 58% AR(+) and 90% FOXA1(+). 67% and 57% MA tumors were HER2(3+) and GCDFP15(+), respectively. Almost all MA tumors (94%) had the IHC signature HER2(3+) or GCDFP15(+) but none of the 13 control basal-like (BL) tumors did. Clinically, MA tumors were rather aggressive, with poor prognostic factors. Conclusion MA tumors could be better defined by their qRT-PCR-AR profile than by AR IHC. In addition, we found that HER2 or GCDFP15 protein overexpression is a sensitive and specific tool to differentiate MA from BL in the context of ER negative tumors. A composite molecular and IHC signature could, therefore, help to identify MA tumors in daily practice. PMID:23663520

  1. Cognitive involvement by negative modulation of histamine H2 receptors in passive avoidance task in mice.

    PubMed

    Onodera, K; Miyazaki, S; Imaizumi, M

    1998-05-01

    In this study, the intracerebroventricular administration of 4-methylhistamine (3 and 10 micrograms/head), a histamine H2 receptor agonist, shortened the step-through latency in the retention trial using a step-through passive avoidance task in mice. This deteriorating effect of 4-methylhistamine (3 micrograms/head) was clearly antagonized by pretreatment with zolantidine (10 mg/kg, i.p.), a histamine H2 receptor antagonist, 20 min before an acquisition trial. Zolantidine alone at the dose tested had no effect. Thus, it is likely that activation of histamine H2 receptors has a deteriorating effect on avoidance learning in mice. The present results indicate the cognitive involvement by negative modulation of histamine H2 receptors in passive avoidance task in mice.

  2. An optimized five-gene multi-platform predictor of hormone receptor negative and triple negative breast cancer metastatic risk.

    PubMed

    Yau, Christina; Sninsky, John; Kwok, Shirley; Wang, Alice; Degnim, Amy; Ingle, James N; Gillett, Cheryl; Tutt, Andrew; Waldman, Fred; Moore, Dan; Esserman, Laura; Benz, Christopher C

    2013-01-01

    Outcome predictors in use today are prognostic only for hormone receptor-positive (HRpos) breast cancer. Although microarray-derived multigene predictors of hormone receptor-negative (HRneg) and/or triple negative (Tneg) breast cancer recurrence risk are emerging, to date none have been transferred to clinically suitable assay platforms (for example, RT-PCR) or validated against formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) HRneg/Tneg samples. Multiplexed RT-PCR was used to assay two microarray-derived HRneg/Tneg prognostic signatures IR-7 and Buck-4) in a pooled FFPE collection of 139 chemotherapy-naïve HRneg breast cancers. The prognostic value of the RTPCR measured gene signatures were evaluated as continuous and dichotomous variables, and in conditional risk models incorporating clinical parameters. An optimized five-gene index was derived by evaluating gene combinations from both signatures. RT-PCR measured IR-7 and Buck-4 signatures proved prognostic as continuous variables; and conditional risk modeling chose nodal status, the IR-7 signature, and tumor grade as significant predictors of distant recurrence (DR). From the Buck-4 and IR-7 signatures, an optimized five-gene (TNFRSF17, CLIC5, HLA-F, CXCL13, XCL2) predictor was generated, referred to as the Integrated Cytokine Score (ICS) based on its functional pathway linkage through interferon-γ and IL-10. Across all FFPE cases, the ICS was prognostic as either a continuous or dichotomous variable, and conditional risk modeling selected nodal status and ICS as DR predictors. Further dichotomization of node-negative/ICS-low FFPE cases identified a subset of low-grade HRneg tumors with <10% 5-year DR risk. The prognostic value of ICS was reaffirmed in two previously studied microarray assayed cohorts containing 274 node-negative and chemotherapy naive HRneg breast cancers, including 95 Tneg cases where it proved prognostically independent of Tneg molecular subtyping. In additional HRneg/Tneg microarray assayed

  3. A Two-Factor Model Better Explains Heterogeneity in Negative Symptoms: Evidence from the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale.

    PubMed

    Jang, Seon-Kyeong; Choi, Hye-Im; Park, Soohyun; Jaekal, Eunju; Lee, Ga-Young; Cho, Young Il; Choi, Kee-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Acknowledging separable factors underlying negative symptoms may lead to better understanding and treatment of negative symptoms in individuals with schizophrenia. The current study aimed to test whether the negative symptoms factor (NSF) of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) would be better represented by expressive and experiential deficit factors, rather than by a single factor model, using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Two hundred and twenty individuals with schizophrenia spectrum disorders completed the PANSS; subsamples additionally completed the Brief Negative Symptom Scale (BNSS) and the Motivation and Pleasure Scale-Self-Report (MAP-SR). CFA results indicated that the two-factor model fit the data better than the one-factor model; however, latent variables were closely correlated. The two-factor model's fit was significantly improved by accounting for correlated residuals between N2 (emotional withdrawal) and N6 (lack of spontaneity and flow of conversation), and between N4 (passive social withdrawal) and G16 (active social avoidance), possibly reflecting common method variance. The two NSF factors exhibited differential patterns of correlation with subdomains of the BNSS and MAP-SR. These results suggest that the PANSS NSF would be better represented by a two-factor model than by a single-factor one, and support the two-factor model's adequate criterion-related validity. Common method variance among several items may be a potential source of measurement error under a two-factor model of the PANSS NSF.

  4. Claudin 4 expression in triple-negative breast cancer: correlation with androgen receptors and Ki-67 expression.

    PubMed

    Abd-Elazeem, Mona A; Abd-Elazeem, Marwa A

    2015-02-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women and the leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide. Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is an important phenotype of breast cancer that accounts for a relatively small number of breast cancer cases but still represent a focus of increasing interest at the clinical, biological, and epidemiological level. Claudins are the major component of the tight junction, and only a few studies have addressed the role of claudins in breast cancer, especially TNBC. Androgen receptors (ARs), as members of the nuclear receptor superfamily, are known to be involved in a complex network of signaling pathways that collectively regulate cell proliferation. However, roles of AR in breast cancer development and progression have not been very clearly understood. The proliferation marker Ki-67 has been confirmed as an independent predictive and prognostic factor in early breast cancer. The aims of this study are to identify the clinicopathologic associations and prognostic value of claudin 4 expression in TNBC and to correlate claudin 4 expression with AR status and Ki-67 expression. Paraffin blocks obtained from 56 female patients with triple-negative primary invasive ductal breast carcinomas were analyzed for claudin 4, AR, and Ki-67 immunohistochemical expression. High levels of claudin 4 expression were detected in 66.1% of TNBC cases. There was a significant positive correlation with age, tumor size, grade, nodal status, metastasis, and Ki-67 expression (all P < .05) and negative correlation with AR status (P < .001). Androgen receptor showed positivity in 29 cases (51.78%). There was a statistical negative correlation with the all the studied clinicopathologic parameters, claudin 4 and Ki-67 expression. High claudin 4 expression, negative AR expression, and high Ki-67 index would provide a strong prognostic power to differentiate the patients with worse outcome among TNBC patients. Moreover, target treatment for TNBC cells

  5. Widespread negative response elements mediate direct repression by agonist-liganded glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Surjit, Milan; Ganti, Krishna Priya; Mukherji, Atish; Ye, Tao; Hua, Guoqiang; Metzger, Daniel; Li, Mei; Chambon, Pierre

    2011-04-15

    The glucocorticoid (GC) receptor (GR), when liganded to GC, activates transcription through direct binding to simple (+)GRE DNA binding sequences (DBS). GC-induced direct repression via GR binding to complex "negative" GREs (nGREs) has been reported. However, GR-mediated transrepression was generally ascribed to indirect "tethered" interaction with other DNA-bound factors. We report that GC-induces direct transrepression via the binding of GR to simple DBS (IR nGREs) unrelated to (+)GRE. These DBS act on agonist-liganded GR, promoting the assembly of cis-acting GR-SMRT/NCoR repressing complexes. IR nGREs are present in over 1000 mouse/human ortholog genes, which are repressed by GC in vivo. Thus variations in the levels of a single ligand can coordinately turn genes on or off depending in their response element DBS, allowing an additional level of regulation in GR signaling. This mechanism suits GR signaling remarkably well, given that adrenal secretion of GC fluctuates in a circadian and stress-related fashion.

  6. Negative Correlation between the Diffusion Coefficient and Transcriptional Activity of the Glucocorticoid Receptor.

    PubMed

    Mikuni, Shintaro; Yamamoto, Johtaro; Horio, Takashi; Kinjo, Masataka

    2017-08-25

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is a transcription factor, which interacts with DNA and other cofactors to regulate gene transcription. Binding to other partners in the cell nucleus alters the diffusion properties of GR. Raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS) was applied to quantitatively characterize the diffusion properties of EGFP labeled human GR (EGFP-hGR) and its mutants in the cell nucleus. RICS is an image correlation technique that evaluates the spatial distribution of the diffusion coefficient as a diffusion map. Interestingly, we observed that the averaged diffusion coefficient of EGFP-hGR strongly and negatively correlated with its transcriptional activities in comparison to that of EGFP-hGR wild type and mutants with various transcriptional activities. This result suggests that the decreasing of the diffusion coefficient of hGR was reflected in the high-affinity binding to DNA. Moreover, the hyper-phosphorylation of hGR can enhance the transcriptional activity by reduction of the interaction between the hGR and the nuclear corepressors.

  7. Hydrophobic Proteome Analysis of Triple Negative and Hormone-Receptor-Positive-Her2-Negative Breast Cancer by Mass Spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ming; Whelan, Stephen A.; He, Jianbo; Saxton, Romaine E.; Faull, Kym F.; Whitelegge, Julian P.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction It is widely believed that discovery of specific, sensitive, and reliable tumor biomarkers can improve the treatment of cancer. Currently, there are no obvious targets that can be used in treating triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). Methods To better understand TNBC and find potential biomarkers for targeted treatment, we combined a novel hydrophobic fractionation protocol with mass spectrometry LTQ-orbitrap to explore and compare the hydrophobic sub-proteome of TNBC with another subtype of breast cancer, hormone-receptor-positive-Her2-negative breast cancer (non-TNBC). Results Hydrophobic sub-proteome of breast cancer is rich in membrane proteins. Hundreds of proteins with various defined key cellular functions were identified from TNBC and non-TNBC tumors. In this study, protein profiles of TNBC and non-TNBC were systematically examined, compared, and validated. We have found that nine keratins are down-regulated and several heat shock proteins are up-regulated in TNBC tissues. Our study may provide insights of molecules that are responsible for the aggressiveness of TNBC. Conclusion The initial results obtained using a combination of hydrophobic fractionation and nano-LC mass spectrometry analysis of these proteins appear promising in the discovery of potential cancer biomarkers and bio-signatures. When sufficiently refined, this approach may prove useful in improving breast cancer treatment. PMID:20930921

  8. The sigma-2 receptor as a therapeutic target for drug delivery in triple negative breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Makvandi, Mehran; Tilahun, Estifanos D.; Lieberman, Brian P.; Anderson, Redmond-Craig; Zeng, Chenbo; Xu, Kuiying; Hou, Catherine; McDonald, Elizabeth S.; Pryma, Daniel A.; Mach, Robert H.

    2015-11-27

    Background: Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is associated with high relapse rates and increased mortality when compared with other breast cancer subtypes. In contrast to receptor positive breast cancers, there are no approved targeted therapies for TNBC. Identifying biomarkers for TNBC is of high importance for the advancement of patient care. The sigma-2 receptor has been shown to be overexpressed in triple negative breast cancer in vivo and has been characterized as a marker of proliferation. The aim of the present study was to define the sigma-2 receptor as a target for therapeutic drug delivery and biomarker in TNBC. Methods: Three TNBC cell lines were evaluated: MDA-MB-231, HCC1937 and HCC1806. Sigma-2 compounds were tested for pharmacological properties specific to the sigma-2 receptor through competitive inhibition assays. Sigma-2 receptor expression was measured through radioligand receptor saturation studies. Drug sensitivity for taxol was compared to a sigma-2 targeting compound conjugated to a cytotoxic payload, SW IV-134. Cell viability was assessed after treatments for 2 or 48 h. Sigma-2 blockade was assessed to define sigma-2 mediated cytotoxicity of SW IV-134. Caspase 3/7 activation induced by SW IV-134 was measured at corresponding treatment time points. Results: SW IV-134 was the most potent compound tested in two of the three cell lines and was similarly effective in all three. MDA-MB-231 displayed a statistically significant higher sigma-2 receptor expression and also was the most sensitive cell line evaluated to SW IV-134. Conclusion: Targeting the sigma-2 receptor with a cytotoxic payload was effective in all the three cell lines evaluated and provides the proof of concept for future development of a therapeutic platform for the treatment of TNBC. - Highlights: • TNBC cells are sensitive to sigma-2 receptor targeted drug conjugate SW IV-134. • MDA-MB-231 displayed the highest amount of sigma-2 receptors and corresponded well with

  9. Vandetanib as a potential new treatment for estrogen receptor-negative breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Hatem, Rana; Labiod, Dalila; Château-Joubert, Sophie; de Plater, Ludmilla; El Botty, Rania; Vacher, Sophie; Bonin, Florian; Servely, Jean-Luc; Dieras, Véronique; Bièche, Ivan; Marangoni, Elisabetta

    2016-05-15

    The receptor tyrosine kinase RET is implicated in the progression of luminal breast cancers (BC) but its role in estrogen receptor (ER) negative tumors is unknown. Here we investigated the expression of RET in breast cancer patients tumors and patient-derived xenografts (PDX) and evaluated the therapeutic potential of Vandetanib, a tyrosin kinase inhibitor with strong activity against RET, EGFR and VEGFR2, in ER negative breast cancer PDX. The RT-PCR analysis of RET expression in breast tumors of 446 patients and 57 PDX, showed elevated levels of RET in ER+ and HER2+ subtypes and in a small subgroup of triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC). The activity of Vandetanib was tested in vivo in three PDX models of TNBC and one model of HER2+ BC with different expression levels of RET and EGFR. Vandetanib induced tumor regression in PDX models with high expression of RET or EGFR. The effect was associated with inhibition of RET/EGFR phosphorylation and MAP kinase pathway and increased necrosis. In a PDX model with no expression of RET nor EGFR, Vandetanib slowed tumor growth without inducing tumor regression. In addition, treatment by Vandetanib decreased expression of murine Vegf receptors and the endothelial marker Cd31 in the four PDX models tested, suggesting inhibition of tumor vascularization. In summary, these preclinical results suggest that Vandetanib treatment could be useful for patients with ER negative breast cancers overexpressing Vandetanib's main targets. © 2015 UICC.

  10. Negative Suppressors of Oncogenic Activation of the Met Receptor Tyrosine Kinase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    that activate the Met receptor in human cancer , I have previously shown that the specific uncoupling of Met from ubiquitination results in its...INTRODUCTION The Met receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) and its ligand, Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) are deregulated in human breast cancer , through over...invasive tumour margins. We have shown that HGF stimulates the dissociation, motility and invasion of human breast cancer cell lines in culture. These

  11. Negative estrogen-receptor invasive breast carcinoma: mammographic aspects, correlations with HER2/neu oncoprotein status.

    PubMed

    Enache, Dana Elena; Georgescu, Claudia Valentina; Pătrană, Nicoleta

    2012-01-01

    This study involved 40 ER-negative female patients with invasive breast cancer, aged between 25 and 88 years, diagnosed at Emergency County Hospital of Craiova, Romania, during a two-year interval (2010-2011). All patients that took part in the study were subjected to a preoperative mammography exam, and later to HP and IHC exams, in order to detect the ER, PR and HER2 status. These exams were followed by CISH in ambiguous HER2 cases. The tumor detection method was palpation in 16 cases, whereas in 24 cases the method used was the screening mammography. Histopathologically, the analyzed tumors were infiltrative ductal carcinoma (35 cases), lobular carcinoma (one case), mucinous (two cases) and metaplastic carcinoma (two cases). Depending on the status of the oncoprotein HER2, the 40 ER-negative female patients included in the study formed two groups: the ER-negative, HER2-positive (11 cases, 27.5%) formed the first group and the ER-negative, HER2-negative (29 cases, 72.5%) formed the second group. Depending on the expression of the receptors for progesterone, 60% of cases were classified as triple negative mammary carcinomas (ER-, PR-, HER2-). The comparative study of the ER-negative, HER2-positive and the ER-negative, HER2-negative mammary carcinomas showed that the tumors of the ER-negative, HER2-positive group were mostly high degree cancers (80% vs. 56%), with negative progesterone receptors (81.81% vs. 48.27%), associated with axillary lymph node metastasis (63.63% vs. 48.27%), and were detected at a higher cancer stage (II/III) (81.81% vs. 62.06%). Regarding the mammographic features, the ER-negative HER2-positive breast cancers are more likely to be irregular masses (62.5% vs. 33.33%), with spiculated margins (45.45% vs. 6.9%), frequently associated with dense or heterogeneously dense breast (82% vs. 69%) and pleomorphic calcifications (62.5% vs. 28.57%) comparative with ER-negative HER2-negative cancers that were more frequently round/oval mass, with

  12. PLZF is a negative regulator of retinoic acid receptor transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Martin, Perrine J; Delmotte, Marie-Hélène; Formstecher, Pierre; Lefebvre, Philippe

    2003-09-06

    BACKGROUND: Retinoic acid receptors (RARs) are ligand-regulated transcription factors controlling cellular proliferation and differentiation. Receptor-interacting proteins such as corepressors and coactivators play a crucial role in specifying the overall transcriptional activity of the receptor in response to ligand treatment. Little is known however on how receptor activity is controlled by intermediary factors which interact with RARs in a ligand-independent manner. RESULTS: We have identified the promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger protein (PLZF), a transcriptional corepressor, to be a RAR-interacting protein using the yeast two-hybrid assay. We confirmed this interaction by GST-pull down assays and show that the PLZF N-terminal zinc finger domain is necessary and sufficient for PLZF to bind RAR. The RAR ligand binding domain displayed the highest affinity for PLZF, but corepressor and coactivator binding interfaces did not contribute to PLZF recruitment. The interaction was ligand-independent and correlated to a decreased transcriptional activity of the RXR-RAR heterodimer upon overexpression of PLZF. A similar transcriptional interference could be observed with the estrogen receptor alpha and the glucocorticoid receptor. We further show that PLZF is likely to act by preventing RXR-RAR heterodimerization, both in-vitro and in intact cells. CONCLUSION: Thus RAR and PLZF interact physically and functionally. Intriguingly, these two transcription factors play a determining role in hematopoiesis and regionalization of the hindbrain and may, upon chromosomal translocation, form fusion proteins. Our observations therefore define a novel mechanism by which RARs activity may be controlled.

  13. Expression and prognostic value of estrogen receptor β in patients with triple-negative and triple-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Guo, Liying; Zhu, Qianwen; Aisimutuola, Mulati; Yilamu, Dilimina; Liu, Sha; Jakulin, Adina

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression of estrogen receptor β (ERβ) in triple-negative and triple-positive breast cancer patients, and evaluate its utility as a prognostic factor. Between January 2000 and December 2010, primary tumor tissue samples were collected from 234 subjects, including 107 triple-negative and 127 triple-positive breast cancer patients. The samples were embedded in paraffin and immunohistochemical staining was conducted to determine the expression levels of ERβ. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to analyze patient survival rates. ERβ expression was observed in 38/107 patients (35.5%) with triple-negative breast cancer and 63/127 patients (49.6%) with triple-positive breast cancer. The ERβ expression rate was significantly decreased in the patients with triple-negative breast cancer, as compared with those with triple-positive breast cancer (P=0.03). Analysis of the survival rates indicated that patients with triple-negative breast cancer and positive ERβ expression exhibited poor disease progression-free survival (DFS) compared with those with negative ERβ expression (P=0.021). However, no statistically significant difference was observed in the DFS between the triple-positive breast cancer patients with positive and negative ERβ expression. Therefore, the expression of ERβ varies between triple-negative and triple-positive breast cancer patients. In addition, positive expression of ERβ indicates a poor prognosis in triple-negative breast cancer patients; however, this is not the case for triple-positive breast cancer patients.

  14. Expression and prognostic value of estrogen receptor β in patients with triple-negative and triple-positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    GUO, LIYING; ZHU, QIANWEN; AISIMUTUOLA, MULATI; YILAMU, DILIMINA; LIU, SHA; JAKULIN, ADINA

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression of estrogen receptor β (ERβ) in triple-negative and triple-positive breast cancer patients, and evaluate its utility as a prognostic factor. Between January 2000 and December 2010, primary tumor tissue samples were collected from 234 subjects, including 107 triple-negative and 127 triple-positive breast cancer patients. The samples were embedded in paraffin and immunohistochemical staining was conducted to determine the expression levels of ERβ. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to analyze patient survival rates. ERβ expression was observed in 38/107 patients (35.5%) with triple-negative breast cancer and 63/127 patients (49.6%) with triple-positive breast cancer. The ERβ expression rate was significantly decreased in the patients with triple-negative breast cancer, as compared with those with triple-positive breast cancer (P=0.03). Analysis of the survival rates indicated that patients with triple-negative breast cancer and positive ERβ expression exhibited poor disease progression-free survival (DFS) compared with those with negative ERβ expression (P=0.021). However, no statistically significant difference was observed in the DFS between the triple-positive breast cancer patients with positive and negative ERβ expression. Therefore, the expression of ERβ varies between triple-negative and triple-positive breast cancer patients. In addition, positive expression of ERβ indicates a poor prognosis in triple-negative breast cancer patients; however, this is not the case for triple-positive breast cancer patients. PMID:26136950

  15. Cellular dynamics of the negative transcription elongation factor NELF

    SciTech Connect

    Yung, Tetsu M.C.; Narita, Takashi; Komori, Toshiharu; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Handa, Hiroshi

    2009-06-10

    Negative Elongation Factor (NELF) is a transcription factor discovered based on its biochemical activity to suppress transcription elongation, and has since been implicated in various diseases ranging from neurological disorders to cancer. Besides its role in promoter-proximal pausing of RNA polymerase II during early stages of transcription, recently we found that it also plays important roles in the 3'-end processing of histone mRNA. Furthermore, NELF has been found to form a distinct subnuclear structure, which we named NELF bodies. These recent developments point to a wide range of potential functions for NELF, and, as most studies on NELF thus far had been carried out in vitro, here, we prepared a complete set of fusion protein constructs of NELF subunits and carried out a general cell biological study of the intracellular dynamics of NELF. Our data show that NELF subunits exhibit highly specific subcellular localizations, such as in NELF bodies or in midbodies, and some shuttle actively between the nucleus and cytoplasm. We further show that loss of NELF from cells can lead to enlarged and/or multiple nuclei. This work serves as a foundation and starting point for further cell biological investigations of NELF in the future.

  16. Characterization of factor XII Tenri, a rare CRM-negative factor XII deficiency.

    PubMed

    Fujihara, Noriko; Tozuka, Minoru; Yamauchi, Kazuyoshi; Ueno, Ichiro; Urasawa, Nobuyuki; Ishikawa, Shinsuke; Hirota-Kawadobora, Masako; Okumura, Nobuo; Hidaka, Hiroya; Katsuyama, Tsutomu

    2004-01-01

    Factor XII Tenri (Y34C), a rare cross-reacting material (CRM)-negative factor XII deficiency, was identified in a 71-yr-old Japanese woman with angina pectoris. In the patient's plasma, factor XII activity and antigen levels were only 1.6% and 5.0%, respectively, of those seen in a normal subject. Immunoblot analysis showed that the secreted factor XII Tenri existed not only as a monomer (76 kDa), but also in complexes with apparent molecular weights of approximately 115, 140, 190, 215, and 225 kDa. After reduction with 2-mercaptoethanol, the factor XII Tenri contained in the complexes was completely converted to monomeric form on immunoblot patterns. It appeared that some of the secreted factor XII Tenri formed several types of disulfide-linked complexes, including a factor XII-alpha1-microglobulin complex, through a newly generated Cys residue. The monomeric form of factor XII Tenri, like normal factor XII, was degraded into 2 major fragments with molecular weights of approximately 45 kDa and 30 kDa following mixing with activated partial-thromboplastin-time measuring reagent (cephalin and ellagic acid), whereas the factor XII Tenri that formed the complexes was not. This indicates that the factor XII Tenri present in disulfide-linked complexes with other proteins (and itself) is not converted to active forms, suggesting that attached proteins obstruct or delay the activation of factor XII via an inhibition of its binding to a negatively charged surface in vitro.

  17. Identification and Quantification of a New Family of Peptide Endocannabinoids (Pepcans) Showing Negative Allosteric Modulation at CB1 Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Mark; Chicca, Andrea; Tamborrini, Marco; Eisen, David; Lerner, Raissa; Lutz, Beat; Poetz, Oliver; Pluschke, Gerd; Gertsch, Jürg

    2012-01-01

    The α-hemoglobin-derived dodecapeptide RVD-hemopressin (RVDPVNFKLLSH) has been proposed to be an endogenous agonist for the cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1). To study this peptide, we have raised mAbs against its C-terminal part. Using an immunoaffinity mass spectrometry approach, a whole family of N-terminally extended peptides in addition to RVD-Hpα were identified in rodent brain extracts and human and mouse plasma. We designated these peptides Pepcan-12 (RVDPVNFKLLSH) to Pepcan-23 (SALSDLHAHKLRVDPVNFKLLSH), referring to peptide length. The most abundant Pepcans found in the brain were tested for CB1 receptor binding. In the classical radioligand displacement assay, Pepcan-12 was the most efficacious ligand but only partially displaced both [3H]CP55,940 and [3H]WIN55,212-2. The data were fitted with the allosteric ternary complex model, revealing a cooperativity factor value α < 1, thus indicating a negative allosteric modulation. Dissociation kinetic studies of [3H]CP55,940 in the absence and presence of Pepcan-12 confirmed these results by showing increased dissociation rate constants induced by Pepcan-12. A fluorescently labeled Pepcan-12 analog was synthesized to investigate the binding to CB1 receptors. Competition binding studies revealed Ki values of several Pepcans in the nanomolar range. Accordingly, using competitive ELISA, we found low nanomolar concentrations of Pepcans in human plasma and ∼100 pmol/g in mouse brain. Surprisingly, Pepcan-12 exhibited potent negative allosteric modulation of the orthosteric agonist-induced cAMP accumulation, [35S]GTPγS binding, and CB1 receptor internalization. Pepcans are the first endogenous allosteric modulators identified for CB1 receptors. Given their abundance in the brain, Pepcans could play an important physiological role in modulating endocannabinoid signaling. PMID:22952224

  18. Activation of the orphan receptor GPR55 by lysophosphatidylinositol promotes metastasis in triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Andradas, Clara; Blasco-Benito, Sandra; Castillo-Lluva, Sonia; Dillenburg-Pilla, Patricia; Diez-Alarcia, Rebeca; Juanes-García, Alba; García-Taboada, Elena; Hernando-Llorente, Rodrigo; Soriano, Joaquim; Hamann, Sigrid; Wenners, Antonia; Alkatout, Ibrahim; Klapper, Wolfram; Rocken, Christoph; Bauer, Maret; Arnold, Norbert; Quintanilla, Miguel; Megías, Diego; Vicente-Manzanares, Miguel; Urigüen, Leyre; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Guzmán, Manuel; Pérez-Gómez, Eduardo; Sánchez, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    The orphan G protein-coupled receptor GPR55 has been directly or indirectly related to basic alterations that drive malignant growth: uncontrolled cancer cell proliferation, sustained angiogenesis, and cancer cell adhesion and migration. However, little is known about the involvement of this receptor in metastasis. Here, we show that elevated GPR55 expression in human tumors is associated with the aggressive basal/triple-negative breast cancer population, higher probability to develop metastases, and therefore poor patient prognosis. Activation of GPR55 by its proposed endogenous ligand lysophosphatidylinositol confers pro-invasive features on breast cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. Specifically, this effect is elicited by coupling to Gq/11 heterotrimeric proteins and the subsequent activation, through ERK, of the transcription factor ETV4/PEA3. Together, these data show that GPR55 promotes breast cancer metastasis, and supports the notion that this orphan receptor may constitute a new therapeutic target and potential biomarker in the highly aggressive triple-negative subtype. PMID:27340777

  19. KISS1R induces invasiveness of estrogen receptor-negative human mammary epithelial and breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cvetkovic, Donna; Dragan, Magdalena; Leith, Sean J; Mir, Zuhaib M; Leong, Hon S; Pampillo, Macarena; Lewis, John D; Babwah, Andy V; Bhattacharya, Moshmi

    2013-06-01

    Kisspeptins (KPs), peptide products of the KISS1 metastasis-suppressor gene, are endogenous ligands for a G protein-coupled receptor (KISS1R). KISS1 acts as a metastasis suppressor in numerous human cancers. However, recent studies have demonstrated that an increase in KISS1 and KISS1R expression in patient breast tumors correlates with higher tumor grade and metastatic potential. We have shown that KP-10 stimulates invasion of estrogen receptor α (ERα)-negative MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells via transactivation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Here, we report that either KP-10 treatment of ERα-negative nonmalignant mammary epithelial MCF10A cells or expression of KISS1R in MCF10A cells induced a mesenchymal phenotype and stimulated invasiveness. Similarly, exogenous expression of KISS1R in ERα-negative SKBR3 breast cancer cells was sufficient to trigger invasion and induced extravasation in vivo. In contrast, KP-10 failed to transactivate EGFR or stimulate invasiveness in the ERα-positive MCF7 and T47D breast cancer cells. This suggested that ERα negatively regulates KISS1R-dependent breast cancer cell migration, invasion, and EGFR transactivation. In support of this, we found that these KP-10-induced effects were ablated upon exogenous expression of ERα in the MDA-MB-231 cells, by down-regulating KISS1R expression. Lastly, we have identified IQGAP1, an actin cytoskeletal binding protein as a novel binding partner of KISS1R, and have shown that KISS1R regulates EGFR transactivation in breast cancer cells in an IQGAP1-dependent manner. Overall, our data strongly suggest that the ERα status of mammary cells dictates whether KISS1R may be a novel clinical target for treating breast cancer metastasis.

  20. Tissue Factor, Protease Activated Receptors and Pathologic Heart Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Antoniak, Silvio; Sparkenbaugh, Erica; Pawlinski, Rafal

    2015-01-01

    Tissue factor is the primary initiator of coagulation cascade and plays an essential role in hemostasis and thrombosis. In addition, tissue factor and coagulation proteases contribute to the many cellular responses via activation of protease activated receptors. Heart is the organ demonstrating high levels of constitutive tissue factor expression. This review focuses on the role of tissue factor, coagulation proteases and protease activated receptors in heart hemostasis and the pathological heart remodeling associated with myocardial infarction, viral myocarditis and hypertension. PMID:25104210

  1. Receptor function, dominant negative activity and phenotype correlations for MC1R variant alleles.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, Kimberley A; Shekar, Sri N; Shekar, Sri L; Newton, Richard A; James, Michael R; Stow, Jennifer L; Duffy, David L; Sturm, Richard A

    2007-09-15

    The human melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R) is a G-protein coupled receptor involved in the regulation of pigmentation. Several MC1R variant alleles are associated with red hair, fair skin and increased skin cancer risk. We have performed a systematic functional analysis of nine common MC1R variants and correlated these results with the strength of the genetic association of each variant allele with pigmentation phenotypes. In vitro expression studies revealed that variant receptors with reduced cell surface expression, including V60L, D84E, R151C, I155T, R160W and R163Q, showed a corresponding impairment in cAMP coupling. The R142H and D294H variants demonstrated normal cell surface expression, but had reduced functional responses, indicating that altered G-protein coupling may be responsible for this loss of function. The V92M variant cAMP activation was equal to or higher than that for wild-type MC1R. In co-expression studies, the D84E, R151C, I155T and R160W variants showed a dominant negative effect on wild-type receptor cell surface expression, which was reflected in a decreased ability to elevate intracellular cAMP levels. The D294H variant also demonstrated a dominant negative effect on wild-type MC1R cAMP signalling, but had no effect on wild-type surface expression. Importantly, comparison of the in vitro receptor characteristics with skin and hair colour data of individuals both homozygous and heterozygous for MC1R variant alleles revealed parallels between variant MC1R cell surface expression, functional ability, dominant negative activity and their effects on human pigmentation. These findings show the first direct correlations between variant MC1R biochemical properties and pigmentation phenotype.

  2. Androgen Receptor Status Is a Prognostic Marker in Non-Basal Triple Negative Breast Cancers and Determines Novel Therapeutic Options

    PubMed Central

    Guler, Gulnur; Balci, Serdar; Irkkan, Cigdem; Paisie, Carolyn; Lovat, Francesca; Morrison, Carl; Zhang, Jianying; Scarpa, Aldo; Croce, Carlo M.; Shapiro, Charles L.; Huebner, Kay

    2014-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancers are a heterogeneous group of tumors characterized by poor patient survival and lack of targeted therapeutics. Androgen receptor has been associated with triple negative breast cancer pathogenesis, but its role in the different subtypes has not been clearly defined. We examined androgen receptor protein expression by immunohistochemical analysis in 678 breast cancers, including 396 triple negative cancers. Fifty matched lymph node metastases were also examined. Association of expression status with clinical (race, survival) and pathological (basal, non-basal subtype, stage, grade) features was also evaluated. In 160 triple negative breast cancers, mRNA microarray expression profiling was performed, and differences according to androgen receptor status were analyzed. In triple negative cancers the percentage of androgen receptor positive cases was lower (24.8% vs 81.6% of non-triple negative cases), especially in African American women (16.7% vs 25.5% of cancers of white women). No significant difference in androgen receptor expression was observed in primary tumors vs matched metastatic lesions. Positive androgen receptor immunoreactivity was inversely correlated with tumor grade (p<0.01) and associated with better overall patient survival (p = 0.032) in the non-basal triple negative cancer group. In the microarray study, expression of three genes (HER4, TNFSF10, CDK6) showed significant deregulation in association with androgen receptor status; eg CDK6, a novel therapeutic target in triple negative cancers, showed significantly higher expression level in androgen receptor negative cases (p<0.01). These findings confirm the prognostic impact of androgen receptor expression in non-basal triple negative breast cancers, and suggest targeting of new androgen receptor-related molecular pathways in patients with these cancers. PMID:24505496

  3. Androgen receptor status is a prognostic marker in non-basal triple negative breast cancers and determines novel therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Gasparini, Pierluigi; Fassan, Matteo; Cascione, Luciano; Guler, Gulnur; Balci, Serdar; Irkkan, Cigdem; Paisie, Carolyn; Lovat, Francesca; Morrison, Carl; Zhang, Jianying; Scarpa, Aldo; Croce, Carlo M; Shapiro, Charles L; Huebner, Kay

    2014-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancers are a heterogeneous group of tumors characterized by poor patient survival and lack of targeted therapeutics. Androgen receptor has been associated with triple negative breast cancer pathogenesis, but its role in the different subtypes has not been clearly defined. We examined androgen receptor protein expression by immunohistochemical analysis in 678 breast cancers, including 396 triple negative cancers. Fifty matched lymph node metastases were also examined. Association of expression status with clinical (race, survival) and pathological (basal, non-basal subtype, stage, grade) features was also evaluated. In 160 triple negative breast cancers, mRNA microarray expression profiling was performed, and differences according to androgen receptor status were analyzed. In triple negative cancers the percentage of androgen receptor positive cases was lower (24.8% vs 81.6% of non-triple negative cases), especially in African American women (16.7% vs 25.5% of cancers of white women). No significant difference in androgen receptor expression was observed in primary tumors vs matched metastatic lesions. Positive androgen receptor immunoreactivity was inversely correlated with tumor grade (p<0.01) and associated with better overall patient survival (p = 0.032) in the non-basal triple negative cancer group. In the microarray study, expression of three genes (HER4, TNFSF10, CDK6) showed significant deregulation in association with androgen receptor status; eg CDK6, a novel therapeutic target in triple negative cancers, showed significantly higher expression level in androgen receptor negative cases (p<0.01). These findings confirm the prognostic impact of androgen receptor expression in non-basal triple negative breast cancers, and suggest targeting of new androgen receptor-related molecular pathways in patients with these cancers.

  4. The protein kinase LKB1 negatively regulates bone morphogenetic protein receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Raja, Erna; Edlund, Karolina; Kahata, Kaoru; Zieba, Agata; Morén, Anita; Watanabe, Yukihide; Voytyuk, Iryna; Botling, Johan; Söderberg, Ola; Micke, Patrick; Pyrowolakis, George; Heldin, Carl-Henrik; Moustakas, Aristidis

    2016-01-01

    The protein kinase LKB1 regulates cell metabolism and growth and is implicated in intestinal and lung cancer. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling regulates cell differentiation during development and tissue homeostasis. We demonstrate that LKB1 physically interacts with BMP type I receptors and requires Smad7 to promote downregulation of the receptor. Accordingly, LKB1 suppresses BMP-induced osteoblast differentiation and affects BMP signaling in Drosophila wing longitudinal vein morphogenesis. LKB1 protein expression and Smad1 phosphorylation analysis in a cohort of non-small cell lung cancer patients demonstrated a negative correlation predominantly in a subset enriched in adenocarcinomas. Lung cancer patient data analysis indicated strong correlation between LKB1 loss-of-function mutations and high BMP2 expression, and these two events further correlated with expression of a gene subset functionally linked to apoptosis and migration. This new mechanism of BMP receptor regulation by LKB1 has ramifications in physiological organogenesis and disease. PMID:26701726

  5. Outcomes of Breast Cancer Patients With Triple Negative Receptor Status Treated With Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkinson, J. Ben; Reid, Robert E.; Shaitelman, Simona F.; Chen, Peter Y.; Mitchell, Christine K.; Wallace, Michelle F.; Marvin, Kimberly S.; Grills, Inga S.; Margolis, Jeffrey M.; Vicini, Frank A.

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: Triple negative receptor status (TNRS) of patients undergoing breast-conserving therapy treated with whole-breast irradiation has been associated with increased distant metastasis and decreased disease-free and overall survival. This paper reports the outcomes of TNRS patients treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Methods and Materials: We studied 455 patients who received APBI at our institution, using interstitial, intracavitary, and three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy. TNRS was assigned if a patient tested negative for all three (ER [estrogen receptor], PR [progesterone receptor], and HER2/neu) receptors. Of 202 patients with all receptor results available, 20 patients were designated TNRS, and 182 patients had at least one receptor positive (RP). We analyzed ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR), regional nodal failure (RNF), distant metastasis (DM), and overall survival (OS). Results: Mean follow-up was 4.1 years for the TNRS group and 5.1 years for the RP cohort (p = 0.11). TNRS patients had a higher histologic grade (59% TNRS vs. 13% RP; p < 0.001). Mean tumor size, stage N1 disease, and margin status were similar. Based on a 5-year actuarial analysis, the TNRS cohort experienced no IBTR, RNF, or DM, with an OS of 100% versus rates of 1.4% IBTR, 1.5% RNF, and 2.8% DM in the RP cohort (p > 0.52). OS for the RP cohort was 93% at 5 years (p > 0.28). Conclusions: In our patient population, TNRS conferred a clinical outcome similar to that of patients with RP disease treated with APBI. Further investigation with larger patient populations and longer follow-up periods is warranted to confirm that APBI is a safe and effective treatment for patients with localized TNRS breast cancer.

  6. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Transactivation by the Cannabinoid Receptor (CB1) and Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) Induces Differential Responses in Corneal Epithelial Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor transactivation by the cannabinoid receptor (CB1) and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 ( TRPV1 ) induces...Available online 7 July 2010 Keywords: cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 ( TRPV1 ) epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR...release of endogenous metabolites that are cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 ( TRPV1 ) agonists. We determined

  7. Estrogen receptor-α36 is involved in icaritin induced growth inhibition of triple-negative breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue; Zheng, Nan; Dong, Jing; Wang, Xuming; Liu, Lijiang; Huang, Jian

    2017-07-01

    A sub-class of ER-negative breast cancer that is negative for ER, PR and HER2 expression known as triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is highly malignant and lacks effective treatment. Recently, it has been reported that an isoform of estrogen receptor-alpha ER-α36 is expressed and plays a critical role in development of TNBC. ER-α36 forms a positive regulatory loop with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which promotes malignant growth of TNBC cells. Thus, ER-α36 has been proposed as an important target for development of novel drugs for TNBC. In this study, we evaluated the effects of icaritin, a prenylflavonoid derivant purified from Epimedium Genus, on growth of TNBC cells and examined the possible underlying mechanisms. Our study demonstrated that icartin decreased both ER-α36 and EGFR protein expression, and induced apoptosis in TNBC MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-453 cells. We also found that icaritin inhibited ER-α36-mediated MAPK/ERK pathway and cyclin D1 induction by estrogen. Our results thus indicated that icaritin has a potential to be developed into a novel therapeutic agent for human TNBC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Loss of Yes-associated protein (YAP) expression is associated with estrogen and progesterone receptors negativity in invasive breast carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Tufail, Rozina; Jorda, Mercy; Zhao, Wei; Reis, Isildinha; Nawaz, Zafar

    2011-01-01

    Yes-associated protein (YAP) is a well characterized transcriptional coactivator that interacts with various transcription factors and modulates their transcriptional activities. Phosphorylation of YAP by specific kinases regulates its cellular distribution and transcriptional activation functions. Sequestration of phosphorylated YAP in cytoplasm results in the reduction of transcription from its target genes. Since, YAP has been characterized as a coactivator of estrogen (ER) and progesterone (PR) receptors, we examined the immunohistochemical expression profile of YAP and correlation of YAP expression with that of ER and PR in normal (40 samples) and tumor breast (226 samples) from microarray tissue samples using immunohistochemistry. Here we show that YAP expression is significantly reduced in invasive carcinoma samples compared to normal breast tissues, which express high levels of YAP (YAP was positive for 45.1% of invasive carcinoma samples vs. 82.5% of normal samples p<.0001). Furthermore, our data shows that reduced expression of YAP in invasive carcinoma samples is significantly associated with ER negativity (YAP was negative for 59.9% in ER negative vs. 38.9% in ER positive invasive carcinoma samples, p=0.007) and PR negativity (YAP was negative for 60.1% in PR negative vs. 28.9% in PR positive, p=0.0004). Among invasive carcinoma samples, 42.9% were YAP, ER and PR negative, whereas only 7.5% were found to be YAP, ER and PR positive. On the contrary, 20 out of 23 (87%) normal breast tissues that were positive for ER and PR were also positive for YAP. These data suggest that YAP may act as a tumor suppressor in invasive breast carcinomas and it can also be used as a molecular marker for ER and PR negative breast tumors. PMID:21399893

  9. Calcitriol restores antiestrogen responsiveness in estrogen receptor negative breast cancer cells: A potential new therapeutic approach

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Approximately 30% of breast tumors do not express the estrogen receptor (ER) α, which is necessary for endocrine therapy approaches. Studies are ongoing in order to restore ERα expression in ERα-negative breast cancer. The aim of the present study was to determine if calcitriol induces ERα expression in ER-negative breast cancer cells, thus restoring antiestrogen responses. Methods Cultured cells derived from ERα-negative breast tumors and an ERα-negative breast cancer cell line (SUM-229PE) were treated with calcitriol and ERα expression was assessed by real time PCR and western blots. The ERα functionality was evaluated by prolactin gene expression analysis. In addition, the effects of antiestrogens were assessed by growth assay using the XTT method. Gene expression of cyclin D1 (CCND1), and Ether-à-go-go 1 (EAG1) was also evaluated in cells treated with calcitriol alone or in combination with estradiol or ICI-182,780. Statistical analyses were determined by one-way ANOVA. Results Calcitriol was able to induce the expression of a functional ERα in ER-negative breast cancer cells. This effect was mediated through the vitamin D receptor (VDR), since it was abrogated by a VDR antagonist. Interestingly, the calcitriol-induced ERα restored the response to antiestrogens by inhibiting cell proliferation. In addition, calcitriol-treated cells in the presence of ICI-182,780 resulted in a significant reduction of two important cell proliferation regulators CCND1 and EAG1. Conclusions Calcitriol induced the expression of ERα and restored the response to antiestrogens in ERα-negative breast cancer cells. The combined treatment with calcitriol and antiestrogens could represent a new therapeutic strategy in ERα-negative breast cancer patients. PMID:24678876

  10. Calcitriol restores antiestrogen responsiveness in estrogen receptor negative breast cancer cells: a potential new therapeutic approach.

    PubMed

    Santos-Martínez, Nancy; Díaz, Lorenza; Ordaz-Rosado, David; García-Quiroz, Janice; Barrera, David; Avila, Euclides; Halhali, Ali; Medina-Franco, Heriberto; Ibarra-Sánchez, María J; Esparza-López, José; Camacho, Javier; Larrea, Fernando; García-Becerra, Rocío

    2014-03-29

    Approximately 30% of breast tumors do not express the estrogen receptor (ER) α, which is necessary for endocrine therapy approaches. Studies are ongoing in order to restore ERα expression in ERα-negative breast cancer. The aim of the present study was to determine if calcitriol induces ERα expression in ER-negative breast cancer cells, thus restoring antiestrogen responses. Cultured cells derived from ERα-negative breast tumors and an ERα-negative breast cancer cell line (SUM-229PE) were treated with calcitriol and ERα expression was assessed by real time PCR and western blots. The ERα functionality was evaluated by prolactin gene expression analysis. In addition, the effects of antiestrogens were assessed by growth assay using the XTT method. Gene expression of cyclin D1 (CCND1), and Ether-à-go-go 1 (EAG1) was also evaluated in cells treated with calcitriol alone or in combination with estradiol or ICI-182,780. Statistical analyses were determined by one-way ANOVA. Calcitriol was able to induce the expression of a functional ERα in ER-negative breast cancer cells. This effect was mediated through the vitamin D receptor (VDR), since it was abrogated by a VDR antagonist. Interestingly, the calcitriol-induced ERα restored the response to antiestrogens by inhibiting cell proliferation. In addition, calcitriol-treated cells in the presence of ICI-182,780 resulted in a significant reduction of two important cell proliferation regulators CCND1 and EAG1. Calcitriol induced the expression of ERα and restored the response to antiestrogens in ERα-negative breast cancer cells. The combined treatment with calcitriol and antiestrogens could represent a new therapeutic strategy in ERα-negative breast cancer patients.

  11. Architecture and RNA binding of the human negative elongation factor

    PubMed Central

    Vos, Seychelle M; Pöllmann, David; Caizzi, Livia; Hofmann, Katharina B; Rombaut, Pascaline; Zimniak, Tomasz; Herzog, Franz; Cramer, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Transcription regulation in metazoans often involves promoter-proximal pausing of RNA polymerase (Pol) II, which requires the 4-subunit negative elongation factor (NELF). Here we discern the functional architecture of human NELF through X-ray crystallography, protein crosslinking, biochemical assays, and RNA crosslinking in cells. We identify a NELF core subcomplex formed by conserved regions in subunits NELF-A and NELF-C, and resolve its crystal structure. The NELF-AC subcomplex binds single-stranded nucleic acids in vitro, and NELF-C associates with RNA in vivo. A positively charged face of NELF-AC is involved in RNA binding, whereas the opposite face of the NELF-AC subcomplex binds NELF-B. NELF-B is predicted to form a HEAT repeat fold, also binds RNA in vivo, and anchors the subunit NELF-E, which is confirmed to bind RNA in vivo. These results reveal the three-dimensional architecture and three RNA-binding faces of NELF. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14981.001 PMID:27282391

  12. Unmixing hyperspectral skin data using non-negative matrix factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehmood, Asif; Clark, Jeffrey; Sakla, Wesam

    2013-05-01

    The ability to accurately detect a target of interest in a hyperspectral imagery (HSI) is largely dependent on the spatial and spectral resolution. While hyperspectral imaging provides high spectral resolution, the spatial resolution is mostly dependent on the optics and distance from the target. Many times the target of interest does not occupy a full pixel and thus is concealed within a pixel, i.e. the target signature is mixed with other constituent material signatures within the field of view of that pixel. Extraction of spectral signatures of constituent materials from a mixed pixel can assist in the detection of the target of interest. Hyperspectral unmixing is a process to identify the constituent materials and estimate the corresponding abundances from the mixture. In this paper, a framework based on non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) is presented, which is utilized to extract the spectral signature and fractional abundance of human skin in a scene. The NMF technique is employed in a supervised manner such that the spectral bases of each constituent are computed first, and then these bases are applied to the mixed pixel. Experiments using synthetic and real data demonstrate that the proposed algorithm provides an effective supervised technique for hyperspectral unmixing of skin signatures.

  13. Toll-like receptor 4 decoy, TOY, attenuates gram-negative bacterial sepsis.

    PubMed

    Jung, Keehoon; Lee, Jung-Eun; Kim, Hak-Zoo; Kim, Ho Min; Park, Beom Seok; Hwang, Seong-Ik; Lee, Jie-Oh; Kim, Sun Chang; Koh, Gou Young

    2009-10-09

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane glycolipid, induces sepsis through its interaction with myeloid differentiation protein-2 (MD-2) and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). To block interaction between LPS/MD-2 complex and TLR4, we designed and generated soluble fusion proteins capable of binding MD-2, dubbed TLR4 decoy receptor (TOY) using 'the Hybrid leucine-rich repeats (LRR) technique'. TOY contains the MD-2 binding ectodomain of TLR4, the LRR motif of hagfish variable lymphocyte receptor (VLR), and the Fc domain of IgG1 to make it soluble, productive, and functional. TOY exhibited strong binding to MD-2, but not to the extracellular matrix (ECM), resulting in a favorable pharmacokinetic profile in vivo. TOY significantly extended the lifespan, when administered in either preventive or therapeutic manners, in both the LPS- and cecal ligation/puncture-induced sepsis models in mice. TOY markedly attenuated LPS-triggered NF-kappaB activation, secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, and thrombus formation in multiple organs. Taken together, the targeting strategy for sequestration of LPS/MD-2 complex using the decoy receptor TOY is effective in treating LPS- and bacteria-induced sepsis; furthermore, the strategy used in TOY development can be applied to the generation of other novel decoy receptor proteins.

  14. CpG island methylation profile of estrogen receptor alpha in Iranian females with triple negative or non-triple negative breast cancer: new marker of poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Ramezani, Fatemeh; Salami, Siamak; Omrani, Mir Davood; Maleki, Davood

    2012-01-01

    One decade early onset of the breast cancer in Iranian females was reported but the basis of the observed difference has remained unclear and difference in gene silencing by epigenetic processes is suggested. Hence, this study was sought to map the methylation status of ER gene CpG islands and its impact on clinicopathological factors of triple negative and non-triple negative ductal cell carcinoma of the breast in Iranian females. Surgically resected formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded breast tissues from sixty Iranian women with confirmed invasive ductal carcinoma were assessed by methylation-specific PCR using primer sets encompassing some of the 29 CpGs across the ER gene CpG island. The estrogen and progesterone receptors, Her-2 overexpression, and nuclear accumulation of P53 were examined using immunohistochemistry (IHC). Methylated ER3, ER4, and ER5 were found in 41.7, 11.3, and 43.3% of the samples, respectively. Significantly higher methylation of ER4 was found in the tumors with nuclear accumulation of P53, and significantly higher methylation of ER5 was found in patients with lymph node involvement and tumor with bigger size or higher grades. Furthermore, significantly higher rate of ER5 methylation was found in patients with Her-2+ tumors and in postmenopausal patients with ER-, PgR-, or ER-/PgR- tumors. However, no significant difference in ERs methylation status was found between triple negative and non-triple negative tumors in pre- and postmenopausal patients. Findings revealed that aberrant hypermethylation of ER-a gene frequently occur in Iranian women with invasive ductal cell carcinoma of the breast. However, methylation of different CpG islands produced a diverse impact on the prognosis of breast cancer, and ER5 was found to be the most frequently methylated region in the Iranian women, and could serve as a marker of poor prognosis.

  15. The GTPase-activating protein GIT2 protects against colitis by negatively regulating Toll-like receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Juncheng; Wei, Chao; Wang, Min; Qiu, Xiao; Li, Yang; Yuan, Yanzhi; Jin, Chaozhi; Leng, Ling; Wang, Jian; Yang, Xiaoming; He, Fuchu

    2014-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor kinase-interactor 2 (GIT2) regulates thymocyte positive selection, neutrophil-direction sensing, and cell motility during immune responses by regulating the activity of the small GTPases ADP ribosylation factors (Arfs) and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1). Here, we show that Git2-deficient mice were more susceptible to dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis, Escherichia coli, or endotoxin-shock challenge, and a dramatic increase in proinflammatory cytokines was observed in Git2 knockout mice and macrophages. GIT2 is a previously unidentified negative regulator of Toll-like receptor (TLR)-induced NF-κB signaling. The ubiquitination of TNF receptor associated factor 6 (TRAF6) is critical for the activation of NF-κB. GIT2 terminates TLR-induced NF-κB and MAPK signaling by recruiting the deubiquitinating enzyme Cylindromatosis to inhibit the ubiquitination of TRAF6. Finally, we show that the susceptibility of Git2-deficient mice to DSS-induced colitis depends on TLR signaling. Thus, we show that GIT2 is an essential terminator of TLR signaling and that loss of GIT2 leads to uncontrolled inflammation and severe organ damage. PMID:24879442

  16. Statins May Reduce Breast Cancer Risk, Particularly Hormone Receptor-Negative Disease.

    PubMed

    Vinayak, Shaveta; Kurian, Allison W

    2009-09-01

    Estrogen and progesterone receptor-negative breast cancer disproportionately affects young women and African Americans, has a poor prognosis, and lacks an effective chemoprevention agent. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors, known as "statins," are appealing candidate agents for breast cancer chemoprevention because of their demonstrated safety after decades of widespread use. In preclinical studies, statins inhibit multiple cancer-associated pathways in both hormone receptor (HR)-negative and HR-positive cell lines. Epidemiologic studies of statins and breast cancer show inconsistent results, with some suggesting a reduction in HR-negative breast cancer incidence in lipophilic statin users. However, large meta-analyses show no association between statin use and overall risk of breast cancer, although most did not evaluate tumor HR status. Multiple phase 1 and 2 prevention studies of statins for breast cancer risk reduction are ongoing. If results are promising, they may justify a randomized trial of statins for breast cancer chemoprevention, with a focus on HR-negative disease.

  17. Training for assessment of negative symptoms of schizophrenia across languages and cultures: comparison of the NSA-16 with the PANSS Negative Subscale and Negative Symptom factor.

    PubMed

    Daniel, David G; Alphs, Larry; Cazorla, Pilar; Bartko, John J; Panagides, John

    2011-07-01

    The 16-item Negative Symptom Assessment scale (NSA-16) has been validated in English-speaking raters. We analyzed the level of agreement achieved among raters of different nationalities using the NSA-16 and the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) negative subscale and Marder negative factor. Raters participating in two international trials were trained in the use of each instrument through lectures and feedback on their ratings of at least one videotaped interview of a schizophrenic patient. Overall and regional (North America, Western Europe, Eastern Europe, South/Central America, and Australia and South Africa combined) kappa values were calculated and mean total scores were compared (1-way analysis of variance) by region for each instrument. In addition, within-scales variance was calculated by item to help identify negative symptoms that were particularly challenging to obtain agreement on across cultures. In the combined group of international raters, the kappa values for ratings of the NSA-16, PANSS negative subscale, and Marder negative factors were 0.89, 0.84, and 0.82, respectively. Kappa values calculated by geographic region ranged from 0.87 to 0.94 for the NSA-16 compared with 0.82 to 0.86 for the PANSS negative subscale and 0.79 to 0.87 for the PANSS Marder negative factor. Despite cultural and linguistic differences among raters, standardizing measurement of negative symptoms in international clinical trials is possible using available rating scales: NSA-16, PANSS negative subscale, and Marder negative subscale. Agreement among raters was at least as high using the NSA-16 as using the PANSS instruments.

  18. A Novel Family of Negative and Positive Allosteric Modulators of NMDA ReceptorsS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Blaise Mathias; Irvine, Mark W.; Fang, Guangyu; Eaves, Richard J.; Mayo-Martin, Marie Belen; Skifter, Donald A.; Jane, David E.

    2010-01-01

    The N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor family regulates various central nervous system functions, such as synaptic plasticity. However, hypo- or hyperactivation of NMDA receptors is critically involved in many neurological and psychiatric conditions, such as pain, stroke, epilepsy, neurodegeneration, schizophrenia, and depression. Consequently, subtype-selective positive and negative modulators of NMDA receptor function have many potential therapeutic applications not addressed by currently available compounds. We have identified allosteric modulators with several novel patterns of NMDA receptor subtype selectivity that have a novel mechanism of action. In a series of carboxylated naphthalene and phenanthrene derivatives, compounds were identified that selectively potentiate responses at GluN1/GluN2A [e.g., 9-iodophenanthrene-3-carboxylic acid (UBP512)]; GluN1/GluN2A and GluN1/GluN2B [9-cyclopropylphenanthrene-3-carboxylic acid (UBP710)]; GluN1/GluN2D [3,5-dihydroxynaphthalene-2-carboxylic acid (UBP551)]; or GluN1/GluN2C and GluN1/GluN2D receptors [6-, 7-, 8-, and 9-nitro isomers of naphth[1,2-c][1,2,5]oxadiazole-5-sulfonic acid (NSC339614)] and have no effect or inhibit responses at the other NMDA receptors. Selective inhibition was also observed; UBP512 inhibits only GluN1/GluN2C and GluN1/GluN2D receptors, whereas 6-bromo-2-oxo-2H-chromene-3-carboxylic acid (UBP608) inhibits GluN1/GluN2A receptors with a 23-fold selectivity compared with GluN1/GluN2D receptors. The actions of these compounds were not competitive with the agonists l-glutamate or glycine and were not voltage-dependent. Whereas the N-terminal regulatory domain was not necessary for activity of either potentiators or inhibitors, segment 2 of the agonist ligand-binding domain was important for potentiating activity, whereas subtype-specific inhibitory activity was dependent upon segment 1. In terms of chemical structure, activity profile, and mechanism of action, these modulators represent a new

  19. A genome-wide association scan on estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease and may be characterized on the basis of whether estrogen receptors (ER) are expressed in the tumour cells. ER status of breast cancer is important clinically, and is used both as a prognostic indicator and treatment predictor. In this study, we focused on identifying genetic markers associated with ER-negative breast cancer risk. Methods We conducted a genome-wide association analysis of 285,984 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyped in 617 ER-negative breast cancer cases and 4,583 controls. We also conducted a genome-wide pathway analysis on the discovery dataset using permutation-based tests on pre-defined pathways. The extent of shared polygenic variation between ER-negative and ER-positive breast cancers was assessed by relating risk scores, derived using ER-positive breast cancer samples, to disease state in independent, ER-negative breast cancer cases. Results Association with ER-negative breast cancer was not validated for any of the five most strongly associated SNPs followed up in independent studies (1,011 ER-negative breast cancer cases, 7,604 controls). However, an excess of small P-values for SNPs with known regulatory functions in cancer-related pathways was found (global P = 0.052). We found no evidence to suggest that ER-negative breast cancer shares a polygenic basis to disease with ER-positive breast cancer. Conclusions ER-negative breast cancer is a distinct breast cancer subtype that merits independent analyses. Given the clinical importance of this phenotype and the likelihood that genetic effect sizes are small, greater sample sizes and further studies are required to understand the etiology of ER-negative breast cancers. PMID:21062454

  20. Negative cooperativity in binding of muscarinic receptor agonists and GDP as a measure of agonist efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Jakubík, J; Janíčková, H; El-Fakahany, EE; Doležal, V

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Conventional determination of agonist efficacy at G-protein coupled receptors is measured by stimulation of guanosine-5′-γ−thiotriphosphate (GTPγS) binding. We analysed the role of guanosine diphosphate (GDP) in the process of activation of the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor and provide evidence that negative cooperativity between agonist and GDP binding is an alternative measure of agonist efficacy. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Filtration and scintillation proximity assays measured equilibrium binding as well as binding kinetics of [35S]GTPγS and [3H]GDP to a mixture of G-proteins as well as individual classes of G-proteins upon binding of structurally different agonists to the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor. KEY RESULTS Agonists displayed biphasic competition curves with the antagonist [3H]-N-methylscopolamine. GTPγS (1 µM) changed the competition curves to monophasic with low affinity and 50 µM GDP produced a similar effect. Depletion of membrane-bound GDP increased the proportion of agonist high-affinity sites. Carbachol accelerated the dissociation of [3H]GDP from membranes. The inverse agonist N-methylscopolamine slowed GDP dissociation and GTPγS binding without changing affinity for GDP. Carbachol affected both GDP association with and dissociation from Gi/o G-proteins but only its dissociation from Gs/olf G-proteins. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These findings suggest the existence of a low-affinity agonist-receptor conformation complexed with GDP-liganded G-protein. Also the negative cooperativity between GDP and agonist binding at the receptor/G-protein complex determines agonist efficacy. GDP binding reveals differences in action of agonists versus inverse agonists as well as differences in activation of Gi/o versus Gs/olf G-proteins that are not identified by conventional GTPγS binding. PMID:20958290

  1. Negative cooperativity in binding of muscarinic receptor agonists and GDP as a measure of agonist efficacy.

    PubMed

    Jakubík, J; Janíčková, H; El-Fakahany, E E; Doležal, V

    2011-03-01

    Conventional determination of agonist efficacy at G-protein coupled receptors is measured by stimulation of guanosine-5'-γ-thiotriphosphate (GTPγS) binding. We analysed the role of guanosine diphosphate (GDP) in the process of activation of the M₂ muscarinic acetylcholine receptor and provide evidence that negative cooperativity between agonist and GDP binding is an alternative measure of agonist efficacy. Filtration and scintillation proximity assays measured equilibrium binding as well as binding kinetics of [³⁵S]GTPγS and [³H]GDP to a mixture of G-proteins as well as individual classes of G-proteins upon binding of structurally different agonists to the M₂ muscarinic acetylcholine receptor. Agonists displayed biphasic competition curves with the antagonist [³H]-N-methylscopolamine. GTPγS (1 µM) changed the competition curves to monophasic with low affinity and 50 µM GDP produced a similar effect. Depletion of membrane-bound GDP increased the proportion of agonist high-affinity sites. Carbachol accelerated the dissociation of [³H]GDP from membranes. The inverse agonist N-methylscopolamine slowed GDP dissociation and GTPγS binding without changing affinity for GDP. Carbachol affected both GDP association with and dissociation from G(i/o) G-proteins but only its dissociation from G(s/olf) G-proteins. These findings suggest the existence of a low-affinity agonist-receptor conformation complexed with GDP-liganded G-protein. Also the negative cooperativity between GDP and agonist binding at the receptor/G-protein complex determines agonist efficacy. GDP binding reveals differences in action of agonists versus inverse agonists as well as differences in activation of G(i/o) versus G(s/olf) G-proteins that are not identified by conventional GTPγS binding. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  2. An Integrin Binding-defective Mutant of Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 (R36E/R37E IGF1) Acts as a Dominant-negative Antagonist of the IGF1 Receptor (IGF1R) and Suppresses Tumorigenesis but Still Binds to IGF1R*

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Masaaki; Ieguchi, Katsuaki; Cedano-Prieto, Dora M.; Fong, Andrew; Wilkerson, Charles; Chen, Jane Q.; Wu, Mac; Lo, Su-Hao; Cheung, Anthony T. W.; Wilson, Machelle D.; Cardiff, Robert D.; Borowsky, Alexander D.; Takada, Yoko K.; Takada, Yoshikazu

    2013-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1) is a major therapeutic target for cancer. We recently reported that IGF1 directly binds to integrins (αvβ3 and α6β4) and induces ternary complex formation (integrin-IGF1-IGF1 receptor (IGF1R)) and that the integrin binding-defective mutant of IGF1 (R36E/R37E) is defective in signaling and ternary complex formation. These findings predict that R36E/R37E competes with WT IGF1 for binding to IGF1R and inhibits IGF signaling. Here, we described that excess R36E/R37E suppressed cell viability increased by WT IGF1 in vitro in non-transformed cells. We studied the effect of R36E/R37E on viability and tumorigenesis in cancer cell lines. We did not detect an effect of WT IGF1 or R36E/R37E in cancer cells under anchorage-dependent conditions. However, under anchorage-independent conditions, WT IGF1 enhanced cell viability and induced signals, whereas R36E/R37E did not. Notably, excess R36E/R37E suppressed cell viability and signaling induced by WT IGF1 under anchorage-independent conditions. Using cancer cells stably expressing WT IGF1 or R36E/R37E, we determined that R36E/R37E suppressed tumorigenesis in vivo, whereas WT IGF1 markedly enhanced it. R36E/R37E suppressed the binding of WT IGF1 to the cell surface and the subsequent ternary complex formation induced by WT IGF1. R36E/R37E suppressed activation of IGF1R by insulin. WT IGF1, but not R36E/R37E, induced ternary complex formation with the IGF1R/insulin receptor hybrid. These findings suggest that 1) IGF1 induces signals under anchorage-independent conditions and that 2) R36E/R37E acts as a dominant-negative inhibitor of IGF1R (IGF1 decoy). Our results are consistent with a model in which ternary complex formation is critical for IGF signaling. PMID:23696648

  3. PLZF is a negative regulator of retinoic acid receptor transcriptional activity

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Perrine J; Delmotte, Marie-Hélène; Formstecher, Pierre; Lefebvre, Philippe

    2003-01-01

    Background Retinoic acid receptors (RARs) are ligand-regulated transcription factors controlling cellular proliferation and differentiation. Receptor-interacting proteins such as corepressors and coactivators play a crucial role in specifying the overall transcriptional activity of the receptor in response to ligand treatment. Little is known however on how receptor activity is controlled by intermediary factors which interact with RARs in a ligand-independent manner. Results We have identified the promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger protein (PLZF), a transcriptional corepressor, to be a RAR-interacting protein using the yeast two-hybrid assay. We confirmed this interaction by GST-pull down assays and show that the PLZF N-terminal zinc finger domain is necessary and sufficient for PLZF to bind RAR. The RAR ligand binding domain displayed the highest affinity for PLZF, but corepressor and coactivator binding interfaces did not contribute to PLZF recruitment. The interaction was ligand-independent and correlated to a decreased transcriptional activity of the RXR-RAR heterodimer upon overexpression of PLZF. A similar transcriptional interference could be observed with the estrogen receptor alpha and the glucocorticoid receptor. We further show that PLZF is likely to act by preventing RXR-RAR heterodimerization, both in-vitro and in intact cells. Conclusion Thus RAR and PLZF interact physically and functionally. Intriguingly, these two transcription factors play a determining role in hematopoiesis and regionalization of the hindbrain and may, upon chromosomal translocation, form fusion proteins. Our observations therefore define a novel mechanism by which RARs activity may be controlled. PMID:14521715

  4. Positive and negative cues for modulating neurite dynamics and receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Wrobel, Melissa R; Sundararaghavan, Harini G

    2017-03-27

    Many current peripheral nerve repair strategies focus on delivering positive, growth promoting cues (e.g. extracellular matrix, ECM) while eliminating negative, growth inhibiting cues (e.g. chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, CSPGs) at the injury site. We hypothesized that recapitulating the positive and negative cues of the peripheral nerve injury microenvironment would improve regeneration. First, we tested the effects of a characteristic CSPG, chondroitin sulfate A (CSA) on neurite dynamics of dissociated chick embryo dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons using time lapse video microscopy. DRG growth was recorded on different adhesive substrates, including a novel, porcine-derived spinal cord matrix (SCM). The SCM significantly increased frequency of neurite extension coordinated by a significant reduction in the neurites' time spent stalled. The SCM also mitigated inhibitory effects of CSA, producing longer neurites than the controls without CSA treatment. Next we aimed to elucidate receptors involved in mediating this behavior by testing the ability of CSA to upregulate cell-substrate binding receptors using flow cytometry. Our results showed a significant increase in syndecan-3 receptor expression in neurons treated with CSA. Furthermore, syndecans would most likely bind to the sulfated glycosaminoglycans measured in the SCM. Finally, we evaluated neurite growth on biomaterial scaffolds featuring CSA and SCM cues. Our results showed significantly increased neurite outgrowth on electrospun hyaluronic acid fibers with SCM and low levels of CSA. Higher incorporation of CSA maintained its inhibitory properties. Future work will evaluate coupling CSPGs with growth-permissive ECM to assess the combined effect on neurite outgrowth.

  5. A Phase II Study Evaluating the Role of Androgen Receptors as Targets for Therapy of Pre-treated Post-menopausal Patients With ER/PgR-negative/AR-positive or ER and/or PgRpositive/ AR-positive Metastatic Breast Cancer (ARTT)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-28

    Metastatic Breastcancer; Estrogen Receptor Positive Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor Negative Neoplasm; Progesterone Receptor Positive Tumor; Progesterone Receptor Negative Neoplasm; Androgen Receptor Gene Overexpression

  6. Induction of nerve growth factor receptors on cultured human melanocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Peacocke, M.; Yaar, M.; Mansur, C.P.; Chao, M.V.; Gilchrest, B.A. )

    1988-07-01

    Normal differentiation and malignant transformation of human melanocytes involve a complex series of interactions during which both genetic and environmental factors play roles. At present, the regulation of these processes is poorly understood. The authors have induced the expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) receptors on cultured human melanocytes with phorbol 12-tetradecanoate 13-acetate and have correlated this event with the appearance of a more differentiated, dendritic morphology. Criteria for NGF receptor expression included protein accumulation and cell-surface immunofluorescent staining with a monoclonal antibody directed against the human receptor and induction of the messenger RNA species as determined by blot-hybridization studies. The presence of the receptor could also be induced by UV irradiation or growth factor deprivation. The NGF receptor is inducible in cultured human melanocytes, and they suggest that NGF may modulate the behavior of this neural crest-derived cell in the skin.

  7. Crossreactive αβ T cell receptors are the predominant targets of thymocyte negative selection

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Benjamin D.; Bunker, Jeffrey J.; Erickson, Steven A.; Oh-Hora, Masatsugu; Bendelac, Albert

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The precise impact of thymic positive and negative selection on the T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire remains controversial. Here, we used unbiased, high-throughput cloning and retroviral expression of individual preselection TCRs to provide a direct assessment of these processes at the clonal level in vivo. We found that 15% of random TCRs induced signaling and directed positive (7.5%) or negative (7.5%) selection, depending on strength of signal, whereas the remaining 85% failed to induce signaling or selection. Most negatively selected TCRs exhibited promiscuous crossreactivity toward multiple other major histocompatibility complex (MHC) haplotypes. In contrast, TCRs that were positively selected or non-selected were minimally crossreactive. Negative selection of crossreactive TCRs led to clonal deletion but also recycling into intestinal CD4−CD8β− intraepithelial lymphocytes (iIELs). Thus, broadly crossreactive TCRs arise at low frequency in the pre-selection repertoire but constitute the primary drivers of thymic negative selection and iIEL lineage differentiation. PMID:26522985

  8. ABO blood type/Rh factor and the incidence and outcomes for patients with triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jennifer; Gao, Feng; Klimberg, V Suzanne; Margenthaler, Julie A

    2012-10-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) has a poorer prognosis; the factors that contribute to this remain unclear. We hypothesized that TNBC is associated with ABO blood type/Rh factors that account for differences in survival. We identified 468 patients with stage I-III TNBC [estrogen receptor (ER)-negative, progesterone receptor (PR)-negative, and HER2 nonamplified]. Patient/tumor characteristics, treatments, and outcomes were obtained. Data were examined for associations with specific ABO blood type/Rh factors. Descriptive statistics and χ (2) analysis were utilized for data summary and comparisons. Of 468 TNBC patients, 283 had known ABO blood type [122 (43 %) O, 108 (38 %) A, 39 (14 %) B, and 14 (5 %) AB] and Rh factor [253 (89 %) positive and 30 (11 %) negative]. Mean patient age was 53.7 ± 12.5 years, and median follow-up was 30.2 ± 20.5 months. The incidence of each ABO blood type/Rh factor in our TNBC cohort was not different from the general population or a cohort of ER-positive breast cancers (P > 0.05). Compared with patients with blood type O, there was no difference in breast cancer-specific mortality for type A [hazard ratio (HR) 0.906; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.554-1.481], type B (HR 1.534; 95 % CI 0.792-2.972), or type AB (HR 0.488; 95 % CI 0.113-2.106). Compared with women with negative Rh, there was no difference in breast cancer-specific mortality for women with positive Rh (HR 1.161; 95 % CI 0.568-2.374). TNBC was not associated with a specific ABO blood type or Rh factor. Our results failed to demonstrate an association between ABO blood type/Rh factor and breast cancer mortality in patients with TNBC.

  9. Aberrant methylation of imprinted genes is associated with negative hormone receptor status in invasive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Barrow, Timothy M; Barault, Ludovic; Ellsworth, Rachel E; Harris, Holly R; Binder, Alexandra M; Valente, Allyson L; Shriver, Craig D; Michels, Karin B

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation of imprinted genes enables monoallelic expression according to parental origin, and its disruption is implicated in many cancers and developmental disorders. The expression of hormone receptors is significant in breast cancer as they are indicators of cancer cell growth rate and determine response to endocrine therapies. We investigated the frequency of aberrant events and variation in DNA methylation at nine imprinted sites in invasive breast cancer and examined the association with estrogen and progesterone receptor status. Breast tissue and blood from patients with invasive breast cancer (n=38) and benign breast disease (n=30) were compared to those from healthy individuals (n=36), matched to the cancer patients by age at diagnosis, ethnicity, BMI, menopausal status, and familial history of cancer. DNA methylation and allele-specific expression were analyzed by pyrosequencing. Tumor-specific methylation changes at IGF2 DMR2 were observed in 59% of cancer patients, IGF2 DMR0 in 38%, DIRAS3 DMR in 36%, GRB10 ICR in 23%, PEG3 DMR in 21%, MEST ICR in 19%, H19 ICR in 18%, KvDMR in 8%, and SNRPN/SNURF ICR in 4%. Variation of methylation was significantly greater in breast tissue from cancer patients than healthy individuals and benign breast disease. Aberrant methylation of three or more sites was significantly associated with negative estrogen-alpha (Fisher’s Exact Test, p=0.02) and progesterone-A (p=0.02) receptor status. Aberrant events and increased variation of imprinted gene DNA methylation therefore appear to be frequent in invasive breast cancer and are associated with negative estrogen and progesterone receptor status, without loss of monoallelic expression. PMID:25560175

  10. Placental Kisspeptins Differentially Modulate Vital Parameters of Estrogen Receptor-Positive and -Negative Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rasoulzadeh, Zahra; Ghods, Roya; Kazemi, Tohid; Mirzadegan, Ebrahim; Ghaffari-Tabrizi-Wizsy, Nassim; Rezania, Simin; Kazemnejad, Somaieh; Arefi, Soheila; Ghasemi, Jamileh; Vafaei, Sedigheh; Mahmoudi, Ahmad-Reza; Zarnani, Amir-Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Kisspeptins (KPs) are major regulators of trophoblast and cancer invasion. Thus far, limited and conflicting data are available on KP-mediated modulation of breast cancer (BC) metastasis; mostly based on synthetic KP-10, the most active fragment of KP. Here, we report for the first time comprehensive functional effects of term placental KPs on proliferation, adhesion, Matrigel invasion, motility, MMP activity and pro-inflammatory cytokine production in MDA-MB-231 (estrogen receptor-negative) and MCF-7 (estrogen receptor-positive). KPs were expressed at high level by term placental syncytiotrophoblasts and released in soluble form. Placental explant conditioned medium containing KPs (CM) significantly reduced proliferation of both cell types compared to CM without (w/o) KP (CM-w/o KP) in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In MDA-MB-231 cells, placental KPs significantly reduced adhesive properties, while increased MMP9 and MMP2 activity and stimulated invasion. Increased invasiveness of MDA-MB-231 cells after CM treatment was inhibited by KP receptor antagonist, P-234. CM significantly reduced motility of MCF-7 cells at all time points (2–30 hr), while it stimulated motility of MDA-MB-231 cells. These effects were reversed by P-234. Co-treatment with selective ER modulators, Tamoxifen and Raloxifene, inhibited the effect of CM on motility of MCF-7 cells. The level of IL-6 in supernatant of MCF-7 cells treated with CM was higher compared to those treated with CM-w/o KP. Both cell types produced more IL-8 after treatment with CM compared to those treated with CM-w/o KP. Taken together, our observations suggest that placental KPs differentially modulate vital parameters of estrogen receptor-positive and -negative BC cells possibly through modulation of pro-inflammatory cytokine production. PMID:27101408

  11. Placental Kisspeptins Differentially Modulate Vital Parameters of Estrogen Receptor-Positive and -Negative Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Rasoulzadeh, Zahra; Ghods, Roya; Kazemi, Tohid; Mirzadegan, Ebrahim; Ghaffari-Tabrizi-Wizsy, Nassim; Rezania, Simin; Kazemnejad, Somaieh; Arefi, Soheila; Ghasemi, Jamileh; Vafaei, Sedigheh; Mahmoudi, Ahmad-Reza; Zarnani, Amir-Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Kisspeptins (KPs) are major regulators of trophoblast and cancer invasion. Thus far, limited and conflicting data are available on KP-mediated modulation of breast cancer (BC) metastasis; mostly based on synthetic KP-10, the most active fragment of KP. Here, we report for the first time comprehensive functional effects of term placental KPs on proliferation, adhesion, Matrigel invasion, motility, MMP activity and pro-inflammatory cytokine production in MDA-MB-231 (estrogen receptor-negative) and MCF-7 (estrogen receptor-positive). KPs were expressed at high level by term placental syncytiotrophoblasts and released in soluble form. Placental explant conditioned medium containing KPs (CM) significantly reduced proliferation of both cell types compared to CM without (w/o) KP (CM-w/o KP) in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In MDA-MB-231 cells, placental KPs significantly reduced adhesive properties, while increased MMP9 and MMP2 activity and stimulated invasion. Increased invasiveness of MDA-MB-231 cells after CM treatment was inhibited by KP receptor antagonist, P-234. CM significantly reduced motility of MCF-7 cells at all time points (2-30 hr), while it stimulated motility of MDA-MB-231 cells. These effects were reversed by P-234. Co-treatment with selective ER modulators, Tamoxifen and Raloxifene, inhibited the effect of CM on motility of MCF-7 cells. The level of IL-6 in supernatant of MCF-7 cells treated with CM was higher compared to those treated with CM-w/o KP. Both cell types produced more IL-8 after treatment with CM compared to those treated with CM-w/o KP. Taken together, our observations suggest that placental KPs differentially modulate vital parameters of estrogen receptor-positive and -negative BC cells possibly through modulation of pro-inflammatory cytokine production.

  12. Negatively Cooperative Binding of High Density Lipoprotein to the HDL Receptor SR-BI†

    PubMed Central

    Nieland, Thomas J.F.; Xu, Shangzhe; Penman, Marsha; Krieger, Monty

    2011-01-01

    Scavenger receptor class B, type I (SR-BI) is a high-density lipoprotein (HDL) receptor, which also binds low density lipoprotein (LDL), and mediates the cellular selective uptake of cholesteryl esters from lipoproteins. SR-BI also is a co-receptor for hepatitis C virus and a signaling receptor that regulates cell metabolism. Many investigators have reported that lipoproteins bind to SR-BI via a single class of independent (not interacting), high affinity binding sites (one site model). We have re-investigated the ligand concentration dependence of 125I-HDL binding to SR-BI and SR-BI-mediated specific uptake of [3H]CE from [3H]CE-HDL using an expanded range of ligand concentrations (<1 µg protein/ml, lower than previously reported). Scatchard and non-linear least squares model fitting analyses of the binding and uptake data were both inconsistent with a single class of independent binding sites binding univalent lipoprotein ligands. The data are best fit by models in which SR-BI has either two independent classes of binding sites, or one class of sites exhibiting negative cooperativity due to either classic allostery or ensemble effects (‘ lattice model’). Similar results were observed for LDL. Application of the ‘infinite dilution’ dissociation rate method established that the binding of 125I-HDL to SR-BI at 4 °C exhibits negative cooperativity. The unexpected complexity of the interactions of lipoproteins with SR-BI should be taken into account when interpreting the results of experiments that explore the mechanism(s) by which SR-BI mediates ligand binding, lipid transport and cell signaling. PMID:21254782

  13. Progesterone suppresses triple-negative breast cancer growth and metastasis to the brain via membrane progesterone receptor α.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li; Zhou, Wei; Zhang, Hongwei; Hu, Yan; Yu, Lei; Zhang, Yufei; Zhang, Yanli; Wang, Shuang; Wang, Peng; Xia, Wei

    2017-09-01

    Progesterone plays an important role in mammary epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation. Evidence from experimental and clinical studies indicates that progesterone is a risk factor for breast cancer under certain conditions through binding nuclear progesterone receptor (PR). These mechanisms, however, are not applicable to triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) due to the lack of PR in these cancers. In this study, we demonstrate that membrane progesterone receptor α (mPRα) is expressed in TNBC tissues and the expression level of mPRα is negatively associated with the TNM stage. We found that progesterone suppressed the growth, migration and invasion of mPRα+ human TNBC cells in vitro, which was neither mediated by PR nor by PR membrane component 1 (PGRMCl). Notably, these effects exerted by progesterone were significantly blocked by shRNA specific to mPRα. Moreover, the knockdown of mPRα expression impaired the inhibitory effects of progesterone on mPRα+ tumor growth and metastasis in vivo. These data collectively indicate that progesterone suppresses TNCB growth and metastasis via mPRα, which provides evidence of the anti-neoplastic effects of progesterone-mPRα pathway in the treatment of human TNBC.

  14. Usefulness of neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio and platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio in hormone-receptor-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chao; Huang, Zhou; Wang, Qiusheng; Sun, Bing; Ding, Lijuan; Meng, Xiangying; Wu, Shikai

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to investigate the relationship between pretreatment neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR)/platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) and the estimation of hormone-receptor-negative (HR−) breast cancer patients’ survival in a Chinese cohort. Patients and methods Of 434 consecutive HR− nonmetastatic breast cancer patients treated between 2004 and 2010 in the Affiliated Hospital of Academy of Military Medical Sciences, 318 eligible cases with complete data were included in the present study. Kaplan–Meier analysis was performed to determine the overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS). Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used to test the usefulness of NLR and PLR. Results Univariate analysis indicated that both elevated NLR and PLR (both P<0.001) were associated with poor OS. The utility of NLR remained in the multivariate analysis (P<0.001), but not PLR (P=0.104). The analysis results for DFS were almost the same as OS. Subgroup analysis revealed a significant association between increased NLR and PLR (P<0.001 and P=0.011) and poor survival in triple-negative breast cancer. However, for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive breast cancer, only NLR was significantly associated with OS in the multivariate analysis (P=0.001). Conclusion The present study indicates that both increased NLR and PLR are associated with poor survival in HR−breast cancer patients. Meanwhile, NLR is independently correlated with OS and DFS, but PLR is not. PMID:27536129

  15. Stem cell growth factor receptor in canine vs. feline osteosarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Wolfesberger, Birgitt; Fuchs-Baumgartinger, Andrea; Hlavaty, Juraj; Meyer, Florian R.; Hofer, Martin; Steinborn, Ralf; Gebhard, Christiane; Walter, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is considered the most common bone cancer in cats and dogs, with cats having a much better prognosis than dogs, since the great majority of dogs with osteosarcoma develop distant metastases. In search of a factor possibly contributing to this disparity, the stem cell growth factor receptor KIT was targeted, and the messenger (m)RNA and protein expression levels of KIT were compared in canine vs. feline osteosarcomas, as well as in normal bone. The mRNA expression of KIT was quantified by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and was observed to be significantly higher in canine (n=14) than in feline (n=5) osteosarcoma samples (P<0.001). KIT protein expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry, which revealed that 21% of canine osteosarcoma samples did not exhibit KIT staining in their neoplastic cells, while in 14% of samples, a score of 1 (<10% positive tumour cells) was observed, and in 50% and 14% of samples, a score of 2 (10–50% positivity) and 3 (>50% positivity), respectively, was observed. By contrast, the cancer cells of all the feline bone tumour samples analysed were entirely negative for KIT. Notably, canine and feline osteocytes of healthy bone tissue lacked any KIT expression. These results could be the first evidence that KIT may be involved in the higher aggressiveness of canine osteosarcoma compared with feline osteosarcoma. PMID:27698817

  16. CD95 death receptor and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in liver cell apoptosis and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Reinehr, Roland; Häussinger, Dieter

    2012-02-01

    Recent evidence suggests that signaling pathways towards cell proliferation and cell death are much more interconnected than previously thought. Whereas not only death receptors such as CD95 (Fas, APO-1) can couple to both, cell death and proliferation, also growth factor receptors such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are involved in these opposing kinds of cell fate. EGFR is briefly discussed as a growth factor receptor involved in liver cell proliferation during liver regeneration. Then the role of EGFR in activating CD95 death receptor in liver parenchymal cells (PC) and hepatic stellate cells (HSC), which represent a liver stem/progenitor cell compartment, is described summarizing different ways of CD95- and EGFR-dependent signaling in the liver. Here, depending on the hepatic cell type (PC vs. HSC) and the respective signaling context (sustained vs. transient JNK activation) CD95-/EGFR-mediated signaling ends up in either liver cell apoptosis or cell proliferation.

  17. Vascular Endothelial Cell Growth Factor A Acts via Platelet-Derived Growth Factor Receptor α To Promote Viability of Cells Enduring Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Pennock, Steven; Kim, Leo A.

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cell growth factor A (VEGF) is a biologically and therapeutically important growth factor because it promotes angiogenesis in response to hypoxia, which underlies a wide variety of both physiological and pathological settings. We report here that both VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2)-positive and -negative cells depended on VEGF to endure hypoxia. VEGF enhanced the viability of platelet-derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα)-positive and VEGFR2-negative cells by enabling indirect activation of PDGFRα, thereby reducing the level of p53. We conclude that the breadth of VEGF's influence extends beyond VEGFR-positive cells and propose a plausible mechanistic explanation of this phenomenon. PMID:27325673

  18. Proteomic Profiling of Triple-negative Breast Carcinomas in Combination With a Three-tier Orthogonal Technology Approach Identifies Mage-A4 as Potential Therapeutic Target in Estrogen Receptor Negative Breast Cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Cabezón, Teresa; Gromova, Irina; Gromov, Pavel; Serizawa, Reza; Timmermans Wielenga, Vera; Kroman, Niels; Celis, Julio E.; Moreira, José M. A.

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is a very heterogeneous disease, encompassing several intrinsic subtypes with various morphological and molecular features, natural history and response to therapy. Currently, molecular targeted therapies are available for estrogen receptor (ER)− and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (Her2)-positive breast tumors. However, a significant proportion of primary breast cancers are negative for ER, progesterone receptor (PgR), and Her2, comprising the triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) group. Women with TNBC have a poor prognosis because of the aggressive nature of these tumors and current lack of suitable targeted therapies. As a consequence, the identification of novel relevant protein targets for this group of patients is of great importance. Using a systematic two dimensional (2D) gel-based proteomic profiling strategy, applied to the analysis of fresh TNBC tissue biopsies, in combination with a three-tier orthogonal technology (two dimensional PAGE/silver staining coupled with MS, two dimensional Western blotting, and immunohistochemistry) approach, we aimed to identify targetable protein markers that were present in a significant fraction of samples and that could define therapy-amenable sub-groups of TNBCs. We present here our results, including a large cumulative database of proteins based on the analysis of 78 TNBCs, and the identification and validation of one specific protein, Mage-A4, which was expressed in a significant fraction of TNBC and Her2-positive/ER negative lesions. The high level expression of Mage-A4 in the tumors studied allowed the detection of the protein in the tumor interstitial fluids as well as in sera. The existence of immunotherapeutics approaches specifically targeting this protein, or Mage-A protein family members, and the fact that we were able to detect its presence in serum suggest novel management options for TNBC and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positive/estrogen receptor negative patients

  19. N-WASP Is Essential for the Negative Regulation of B Cell Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chaohong; Bai, Xiaoming; Wu, Junfeng; Sharma, Shruti; Upadhyaya, Arpita; Dahlberg, Carin I. M.; Westerberg, Lisa S.; Snapper, Scott B.; Zhao, Xiaodong; Song, Wenxia

    2013-01-01

    Negative regulation of receptor signaling is essential for controlling cell activation and differentiation. In B-lymphocytes, the down-regulation of B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) signaling is critical for suppressing the activation of self-reactive B cells; however, the mechanism underlying the negative regulation of signaling remains elusive. Using genetically manipulated mouse models and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, we demonstrate that neuronal Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP), which is coexpressed with WASP in all immune cells, is a critical negative regulator of B-cell signaling. B-cell–specific N-WASP gene deletion causes enhanced and prolonged BCR signaling and elevated levels of autoantibodies in the mouse serum. The increased signaling in N-WASP knockout B cells is concurrent with increased accumulation of F-actin at the B-cell surface, enhanced B-cell spreading on the antigen-presenting membrane, delayed B-cell contraction, inhibition in the merger of signaling active BCR microclusters into signaling inactive central clusters, and a blockage of BCR internalization. Upon BCR activation, WASP is activated first, followed by N-WASP in mouse and human primary B cells. The activation of N-WASP is suppressed by Bruton's tyrosine kinase-induced WASP activation, and is restored by the activation of SH2 domain-containing inositol 5-phosphatase that inhibits WASP activation. Our results reveal a new mechanism for the negative regulation of BCR signaling and broadly suggest an actin-mediated mechanism for signaling down-regulation. PMID:24223520

  20. Copanlisib, Letrozole, and Palbociclib in Treating Patients With Hormone Receptor Positive HER2 Negative Stage I-IV Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-08-17

    Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Multifocal Breast Carcinoma; Postmenopausal; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage III Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  1. Indispensability of chemotherapy in estrogen receptor-negative early breast cancer in elderly women with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiaoqing; Hong, Qi; Cheng, Jingyi; Li, Jianwei; Wang, Yujie; Mo, Miao; Shao, Zhimin; Shen, Zhenzhou; Liu, Guangyu

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate whether chemotherapy is indispensable in elderly patients with early estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer and diabetes mellitus (DM), the data on 112 patients, ≥70 years of age, with early, operable ER-negative breast cancer who were treated at the Cancer Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai, China, between 2000 and 2010, were analyzed. The overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), and breast cancer-specific survival (BCS) were compared. Survival analysis was performed using the Kaplan-Meier method. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to evaluate the prognostic value of DM and chemotherapy for OS, DFS, and BCS. The univariate Cox regression analysis revealed that DM at diagnosis, the number of positive lymph nodes, and radiotherapy were associated with OS, the number of positive lymph nodes, human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2/neu) status, and radiotherapy were associated with DFS, and the number of positive lymph nodes, tumor size, HER2/neu status, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy were associated with BCS. The subsequent multivariate analysis identified DM at diagnosis (hazard ratio [HR]=3.797; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.515-9.520; P=0.004) as an independent prognostic factor for OS (with the addition of chemotherapy regimen). Chemotherapy was not an independent prognostic factor for either OS (HR=1.275; 95% CI, 0.614-2.646; P=0.515) or DFS (HR=0.849; 95% CI, 0.445-1.619; P=0.619) when other possible factors that may affect the results were adjusted. In conclusion, chemotherapy was not found to be indispensable for elderly (≥70 years of age) female patients with early ER-negative breast cancer with DM because, particularly in such patients, the treatment of DM may be more important compared with chemotherapy.

  2. Tyrosine kinase activity is essential for the association of phospholipase C-gamma with the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Margolis, B; Bellot, F; Honegger, A M; Ullrich, A; Schlessinger, J; Zilberstein, A

    1990-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) treatment of NIH 3T3 cells transfected with wild-type EGF receptor induced tyrosine phosphorylation of phospholipase C-gamma (PLC-gamma). The EGF receptor and PLC-gamma were found to be physically associated such that antibodies directed against PLC-gamma or the EGF receptor coimmunoprecipitated both proteins. The association between PLC-gamma and wild-type EGF receptor was dependent on the concentration of EGF, but EGF did not enhance the association between PLC-gamma and a kinase-negative mutant of the EGF receptor. Oligomerization of the EGF receptor was not sufficient to induce association of the EGF receptor with PLC-gamma, since the kinase-negative mutant receptor underwent normal dimerization in response to EGF yet did not associate with PLC-gamma. The form of PLC-gamma associated with the EGF receptor appeared to be primarily the non-tyrosine-phosphorylated form. It is concluded that the kinase activity of the EGF receptor is essential for association of PLC-gamma with the EGF receptor, possibly by stimulating receptor autophosphorylation. Images PMID:2153914

  3. Enriched transcription factor signatures in triple negative breast cancer indicates possible targeted therapies with existing drugs

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Scooter; De, Pradip; Dey, Nandini; Long, Bradley; Young, Brandon; Sparano, Joseph A.; Wang, Victoria; Davidson, Nancy E.; Leyland-Jones, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Triple negative (TN) breast cancers which lack expression of the estrogen (ER), progesterone (PR), and human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2) receptors convey a poor prognosis due in part to a lack of targeted therapies. Methods To identify viable targets for the treatment of TN disease, we have conducted a gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) on seven different breast cancer whole genome gene expression cohorts comparing TN vs. ER + HER2 − to identify consistently enriched genes that share a common promoter motif. The seven cohorts were profiled on three different genome expression platforms (Affymetrix, Illumina and RNAseq) consisting in total of 2088 samples with IHC metadata. Results GSEA identified enriched gene expression patterns in TN samples that share common promoter motifs associated with SOX9, E2F1, HIF1A, HMGA1, MYC BACH2, CEBPB, and GCNF/NR6A1. Unexpectedly, NR6A1 an orphan nuclear receptor normally expressed in germ cells of gonads is highly expressed in TN and ER + HER2 − samples making it an ideal drug target. Conclusion With the increasing number of large sample size breast cancer cohorts, an exploratory analysis of genes that are consistently enriched in TN sharing common promoter motifs allows for the identification of possible therapeutic targets with extensive validation in patient derived data sets. PMID:26005638

  4. CBAP promotes thymocyte negative selection by facilitating T-cell receptor proximal signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ho, K-C; Chiang, Y-J; Lai, A C-Y; Liao, N-S; Chang, Y-J; Yang-Yen, H-F; Yen, J J-Y

    2014-01-01

    T-cell receptor (TCR)-transduced signaling is critical to thymocyte development at the CD4/CD8 double-positive stage, but the molecules involved in this process are not yet fully characterized. We previously demonstrated that GM-CSF/IL-3/IL-5 receptor common β-chain-associated protein (CBAP) modulates ZAP70-mediated T-cell migration and adhesion. On the basis of the high expression of CBAP during thymocyte development, we investigated the function of CBAP in thymocyte development using a CBAP knockout mouse. CBAP-deficient mice showed normal early thymocyte development and positive selection. In contrast, several negative selection models (including TCR transgene, superantigen staphylococcal enterotoxin B, and anti-CD3 antibody treatment) revealed an attenuation of TCR-induced thymocyte deletion in CBAP knockout mice. This phenotype correlated with a reduced accumulation of BIM upon TCR crosslinking in CBAP-deficient thymocytes. Loss of CBAP led to reduced TCR-induced phosphorylation of proteins involved in both proximal and distal signaling events, including ZAP70, LAT, PLCγ1, and JNK1/2. Moreover, TCR-induced association of LAT signalosome components was reduced in CBAP-deficient thymocytes. Our data demonstrate that CBAP is a novel component in the TCR signaling pathway and modulates thymocyte apoptosis during negative selection. PMID:25393474

  5. Characterization of adult ghrelin and ghrelin receptor knockout mice under positive and negative energy balance.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuxiang; Butte, Nancy F; Garcia, Jose M; Smith, Roy G

    2008-02-01

    Ghrelin and the ghrelin receptor (GH secretagogue receptor, GHS-R), are believed to have important roles in energy homeostasis. We describe results from the first studies to be conducted in congenic (N10) adult ghrelin(-/-) and Ghsr(-/-) mice under conditions of both positive (high-fat diet) and negative (caloric restriction) energy balance. In contrast to results from young N2 mutant mice, changes in body weight and energy expenditure are not clearly distinguishable across genotypes. Although respiratory quotient was lower in mice fed a high-fat diet, no differences were evident between littermate wild-type and null genotypes. With normal chow, a modest decrease trend in respiratory quotient was detected in ghrelin(-/-) mice but not in Ghsr(-/-) mice. Under caloric restriction, the weight loss of ghrelin(-/-) and Ghsr(-/-) mice was identical to wild-type littermates, but blood glucose levels were significantly lower. We conclude that adult congenic ghrelin(-/-) and Ghsr(-/-) mice are not resistant to diet-induced obesity but under conditions of negative energy balance show impairment in maintaining glucose homeostasis. These results support our hypothesis that the primary metabolic function of ghrelin in adult mice is to modulate glucose sensing and insulin sensitivity, rather than directly regulate energy intake and energy expenditure.

  6. The glucocorticoid receptor binds to a sequence overlapping the TATA box of the human osteocalcin promoter: a potential mechanism for negative regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Strömstedt, P E; Poellinger, L; Gustafsson, J A; Carlstedt-Duke, J

    1991-01-01

    Expression of the human osteocalcin promoter is negatively regulated by glucocorticoids in vivo. In vitro DNase I and exonuclease III footprinting analysis showed binding of purified glucocorticoid receptor in close proximity to and overlapping with the TATA box of the osteocalcin gene. These results imply competition or interference with binding of the TATA box-binding transcription factor IID as a mechanism of repression of this gene by glucocorticoids. In support of this notion, point mutation analysis of the receptor binding site indicated that flanking nucleotides and not the TATA box motif per se were important for receptor interaction. Moreover, DNA binding competition assays showed specific binding of the receptor only to the TATA box region of the osteocalcin gene and not to the corresponding region of an immunoglobulin heavy-chain promoter. Images PMID:2038339

  7. Activation of 5-HT7 receptors increases neuronal platelet-derived growth factor β receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Vasefi, Maryam S; Kruk, Jeff S; Liu, Hui; Heikkila, John J; Beazely, Michael A

    2012-03-09

    Several antipsychotics have a high affinity for 5-HT7 receptors yet despite intense interest in the 5-HT7 receptor as a potential drug target to treat psychosis, the function and signaling properties of 5-HT7 receptors in neurons remain largely uncharacterized. In primary mouse hippocampal and cortical neurons, as well as in the SH-SY5Y cell line, incubation with 5-HT, 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT), or 5-HT7 receptor-selective agonists increases the expression of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)β receptors. The increased PDGFβ receptor expression is cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA)-dependent, suggesting that 5-HT7 receptors couple to Gα(s) in primary neurons. Interestingly, up-regulated PDGFβ receptors display an increased basal phosphorylation state at the phospholipase Cγ-activating tyrosine 1021. This novel linkage between the 5-HT7 receptor and the PDGF system may be an important GPCR-neurotrophic factor signaling pathway in neurons.

  8. Interactions between Type III receptor tyrosine phosphatases and growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases regulate tracheal tube formation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Mili; Scott, Matthew P; Zinn, Kai

    2012-06-15

    The respiratory (tracheal) system of the Drosophila melanogaster larva is an intricate branched network of air-filled tubes. Its developmental logic is similar in some ways to that of the vertebrate vascular system. We previously described a unique embryonic tracheal tubulogenesis phenotype caused by loss of both of the Type III receptor tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs), Ptp4E and Ptp10D. In Ptp4E Ptp10D double mutants, the linear tubes in unicellular and terminal tracheal branches are converted into bubble-like cysts that incorporate apical cell surface markers. This tube geometry phenotype is modulated by changes in the activity or expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (Egfr) tyrosine kinase (TK). Ptp10D physically interacts with Egfr. Here we demonstrate that the Ptp4E Ptp10D phenotype is the consequence of the loss of negative regulation by the RPTPs of three growth factor receptor TKs: Egfr, Breathless and Pvr. Reducing the activity of any of the three kinases by tracheal expression of dominant-negative mutants suppresses cyst formation. By competing dominant-negative and constitutively active kinase mutants against each other, we show that the three RTKs have partially interchangeable activities, so that increasing the activity of one kinase can compensate for the effects of reducing the activity of another. This implies that SH2-domain downstream effectors that are required for the phenotype are likely to be able to interact with phosphotyrosine sites on all three receptor TKs. We also show that the phenotype involves increases in signaling through the MAP kinase and Rho GTPase pathways.

  9. Interactions between Type III receptor tyrosine phosphatases and growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases regulate tracheal tube formation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Mili; Scott, Matthew P.; Zinn, Kai

    2012-01-01

    Summary The respiratory (tracheal) system of the Drosophila melanogaster larva is an intricate branched network of air-filled tubes. Its developmental logic is similar in some ways to that of the vertebrate vascular system. We previously described a unique embryonic tracheal tubulogenesis phenotype caused by loss of both of the Type III receptor tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs), Ptp4E and Ptp10D. In Ptp4E Ptp10D double mutants, the linear tubes in unicellular and terminal tracheal branches are converted into bubble-like cysts that incorporate apical cell surface markers. This tube geometry phenotype is modulated by changes in the activity or expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (Egfr) tyrosine kinase (TK). Ptp10D physically interacts with Egfr. Here we demonstrate that the Ptp4E Ptp10D phenotype is the consequence of the loss of negative regulation by the RPTPs of three growth factor receptor TKs: Egfr, Breathless and Pvr. Reducing the activity of any of the three kinases by tracheal expression of dominant-negative mutants suppresses cyst formation. By competing dominant-negative and constitutively active kinase mutants against each other, we show that the three RTKs have partially interchangeable activities, so that increasing the activity of one kinase can compensate for the effects of reducing the activity of another. This implies that SH2-domain downstream effectors that are required for the phenotype are likely to be able to interact with phosphotyrosine sites on all three receptor TKs. We also show that the phenotype involves increases in signaling through the MAP kinase and Rho GTPase pathways. PMID:23213447

  10. Adenosine A2B Receptor Deficiency Promotes Host Defenses against Gram-Negative Bacterial Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Barletta, Kathryn E.; Cagnina, R. Elaine; Burdick, Marie D.; Linden, Joel

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Activation of the adenosine A2B receptor (A2BR) promotes antiinflammatory effects in diverse biological settings, but the role of this receptor in antimicrobial host defense in the lung has not been established. Gram-negative bacillary pneumonia is a common and serious illness associated with high morbidity and mortality, the treatment of which is complicated by increasing rates of antibiotic resistance. Objectives: To test the hypothesis that absence of adenosine A2B receptor signaling promotes host defense against bacterial pneumonia. Methods: We used a model of Klebsiella pneumoniae pneumonia in wild-type mice and mice with targeted deletion of the A2BR. Host responses were compared in vivo and leukocyte responses to the bacteria were examined in vitro. Measurements and Main Results: A2BR–/– mice demonstrated enhanced bacterial clearance from the lung and improved survival after infection with K. pneumoniae compared with wild-type controls, an effect that was mediated by bone marrow–derived cells. Leukocyte recruitment to the lungs and expression of inflammatory cytokines did not differ between A2BR–/– and wild-type mice, but A2BR–/– neutrophils exhibited sixfold greater bactericidal activity and enhanced production of neutrophil extracellular traps compared with wild-type neutrophils when incubated with K. pneumoniae. Consistent with this finding, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from A2BR–/– mice with Klebsiella pneumonia contained more extracellular DNA compared with wild-type mice with pneumonia. Conclusions: These data suggest that the absence of A2BR signaling enhances antimicrobial activity in gram-negative bacterial pneumonia. PMID:22997203

  11. Irradiation of juvenile, but not adult, mammary gland increases stem cell self-renewal and estrogen receptor negative tumors.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jonathan; Fernandez-Garcia, Ignacio; Vijayakumar, Sangeetha; Martinez-Ruis, Haydeliz; Illa-Bochaca, Irineu; Nguyen, David H; Mao, Jian-Hua; Costes, Sylvain V; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2014-03-01

    Children exposed to ionizing radiation have a substantially greater breast cancer risk than adults; the mechanism for this strong age dependence is not known. Here we show that pubertal murine mammary glands exposed to sparsely or densely ionizing radiation exhibit enrichment of mammary stem cell and Notch pathways, increased mammary repopulating activity indicative of more stem cells, and propensity to develop estrogen receptor (ER) negative tumors thought to arise from stem cells. We developed a mammary lineage agent-based model (ABM) to evaluate cell inactivation, self-renewal, or dedifferentiation via epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) as mechanisms by which radiation could increase stem cells. ABM rejected cell inactivation and predicted increased self-renewal would only affect juveniles while dedifferentiation could act in both juveniles and adults. To further test self-renewal versus dedifferentiation, we used the MCF10A human mammary epithelial cell line, which recapitulates ductal morphogenesis in humanized fat pads, undergoes EMT in response to radiation and transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) and contains rare stem-like cells that are Let-7c negative or express both basal and luminal cytokeratins. ABM simulation of population dynamics of double cytokeratin cells supported increased self-renewal in irradiated MCF10A treated with TGFβ. Radiation-induced Notch concomitant with TGFβ was necessary for increased self-renewal of Let-7c negative MCF10A cells but not for EMT, indicating that these are independent processes. Consistent with these data, irradiating adult mice did not increase mammary repopulating activity or ER-negative tumors. These studies suggest that irradiation during puberty transiently increases stem cell self-renewal, which increases susceptibility to developing ER-negative breast cancer.

  12. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 1b is a novel negative regulator of white adipocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Wu, Hao; Yu, Weihua; Liu, Jiangzheng; Peng, Jie; Liao, Nai; Zhang, Jieling; Zhang, Xiaodi; Hai, Chunxu

    2017-09-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 1b (HNF1b) is a transcription factor belonging to the HNF family. We aimed to investigate the role of HNF1b in white adipocyte differentiation. The expression of HNF1b was reduced in white adipose tissue (WAT) of both diet-induced and genetic obese mice and decreased during the process of 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation. Downregulation of HNF1b enhanced 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation and upregulation of HNF1b inhibited this process. Upregulation of HNF1b inhibited peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and its target gene expression, while downregulation of HNF1b increased those genes expression. Overexpression of PPARγ suppressed HNF1b upregulation-induced inhibition of adipocyte differentiation. HNF1b can directly bind with the promoter of PPARγ in 3T3-L1 cells, which was decreased after adipogenic differentiation. HNF1b promoted apoptotic and autophagic cell death in early differentiated adipocytes through regulation of cell cycle progress and cell death-related factors, and thus inhibited the process of mitotic clonal expansion (MCE). HNF1b acted as an antioxidant regulator through regulating various antioxidant enzymes via binding with antioxidant response element. Oxidant treatment suppressed HNF1b upregulation-induced inhibition of adipocyte differentiation. Overall, our results suggest that HNF1b is a novel negative regulator of adipocyte differentiation through regulation of PPARγ signaling, MCE and redox state.

  13. Novel Drosophila receptor that binds multiple growth factors

    SciTech Connect

    Rosner, M.R.; Thompson, K.L.; Garcia, V.; Decker, S.J.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have recently reported the identification of a novel growth factor receptor from Drosophila cell cultures that has dual binding specificity for both insulin and epidermal growth factor (EGF). This 100 kDa protein is also antigenically related to the cytoplasmic region of the mammalian EGF receptor-tyrosine kinase. They now report that this protein binds to mammalian nerve growth factor and human transforming growth factor alpha as well as insulin and EGF with apparent dissociation constants ranging from 10/sup -6/ to 10/sup -8/ M. The 100 kDa protein can be affinity-labeled with these /sup 125/I-labeled growth factors after immunoprecipitation with anti-EGF receptor antiserum. These four growth factors appear to share a common binding site, as evidenced by their ability to block affinity labelling by /sup 125/I-insulin. No significant binding to the 100 kDa protein was observed with platelet-derived growth factor, transforming growth factor beta, or glucagon. The 100 kDa Drosophila protein has a unique ligand-binding spectrum with no direct counterpart in mammalian cells and may represent an evolutionary precursor of the mammalian receptors for these growth factors.

  14. Phospho-kinase profile of triple negative breast cancer and androgen receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The androgen receptor (AR) plays a central role in the oncogenesis of different tumors, as is the case in prostate cancer. In triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) a gene expression classification has described different subgroups including a luminal androgen subtype. The AR can be controlled by several mechanisms like the activation of membrane tyrosine kinases and downstream signaling pathways. However little is known in TNBC about how the AR is modulated by these mechanisms and the potential therapeutic strategists to inhibit its expression. Methods We used human samples to evaluate the expression of AR by western-blot and phospho-proteomic kinase arrays that recognize membrane tyrosine kinase receptors and downstream mediators. Western-blots in human cell lines were carried out to analyze the expression and activation of individual proteins. Drugs against these kinases in different conditions were used to measure the expression of the androgen receptor. PCR experiments were performed to assess changes in the AR gene after therapeutic modulation of these pathways. Results AR is present in a subset of TNBC and its expression correlates with activated membrane receptor kinases-EGFR and PDGFRβ in human samples and cell lines. Inhibition of the PI3K/mTOR pathway in TNBC cell lines decreased notably the expression of the AR. Concomitant administration of the anti-androgen bicalutamide with the EGFR, PDGFRβ and Erk1/2 inhibitors, decreased the amount of AR compared to each agent given alone, and had an additive anti-proliferative effect. Administration of dihydrotestosterone augmented the expression of AR that was not modified by the inhibition of the PI3K/mTOR or Erk1/2 pathways. AR expression was posttranscriptionally regulated by PI3K or Erk1/2 inhibition. Conclusion Our results describe the expression of the AR in TNBC as a druggable target and further suggest the combination of bicalutamide with inhibitors of EGFR, PDGFRβ or Erk1/2 for future

  15. Characteristics Of acetylcholine-receptor-antibody-negative myasthenia gravis in a South African cohort.

    PubMed

    Huda, Saif; Woodhall, Mark R; Vincent, Angela; Heckmann, Jeannine M

    2016-12-01

    In this study we determined the frequencies of antibodies (Abs) directed against muscle-specific kinase (MuSK) and lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (LRP4) in the sera of a South African cohort with acetylcholine receptor (AChR)-antibody-negative generalized MG and determined outcomes to therapies. Sera negative by commercial AChR radioimmunoassay (RIA) were tested by MuSK RIA (n = 30; 2006-2012) and AChR, MuSK, and LRP4 RIA with or without cell-based assays (CBA) (n = 53; 2012-2015). AChR-Abs were detected in 4 of 53 and MuSK-Abs in 20 of 83 (24%) cases. Thirty-six of 53 (68%) were triple seronegative (triple-SNMG) for MuSK, AChR, and LRP4-Abs. When compared with triple-SNMG, individuals with MuSK-MG had a younger onset age (P = 0.008), a greater likelihood of African genetic ancestry (P = 0.008), and 4-fold higher odds of reaching MGFA grade IVB/V (P = 0.018), but were also 9-fold more likely to reach at least minimal manifestations status after ≥12 months of therapy (P = 0.003). Individuals with African genetic ancestry and severe bulbar/respiratory AChR-Ab-negative MG are likely to have MuSK-MG, but most respond favorably to maintenance immunotherapies. Muscle Nerve 54: 1023-1029, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Distant invasive breast cancer recurrence risk in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive T1a and T1b node-negative localized breast cancer diagnosed from 2000 to 2006: a cohort from an integrated health care delivery system.

    PubMed

    Fehrenbacher, Louis; Capra, Angela M; Quesenberry, Charles P; Fulton, Regan; Shiraz, Parveen; Habel, Laurel A

    2014-07-10

    To determine the invasive recurrence (IR) risk among patients with small, node-negative human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) -positive breast cancer. Among 16,975 consecutive patients with invasive breast cancer diagnosed from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2006, in a large, integrated health care system, we identified a cohort of 234 patients with HER2-positive T1aN0M0 or T1bN0M0 (T1abN0M0) disease with a median follow-up of 5.8 years. Kaplan-Meier methods were used to estimate the percentage of patients who were free of invasive recurrence (recurrence-free interval [RFI]) at 5 years for both distant (DRFI) and local (LRFI) recurrences. Of 15 IRs, 47% were locoregional only. Among T1ab patients not treated with adjuvant trastuzumab or chemotherapy (n = 171), the 5-year invasive DRFI was 98.2% (95% CI, 94.5% to 99.4%); it was 99.0% (95% CI, 93.0% to 99.9%) for T1a patients, and 97.0% (95% CI, 88.6% to 99.2%) for T1b patients. Locoregional plus distant 5-year invasive RFI was 97.0% (95% CI, 90.9% to 99.0%) for T1a and 91.9% (95% CI, 81.5% to 96.6%) for T1b patients; it was 89.4% (95% CI, 70.6% to 96.5%) for T1b tumors reported at 1.0 cm. T1b tumors reported at 1.0 cm accounted for 24% of the T1ab cohort, 61% of the cohort total tumor volume, and 75% of distant recurrences. Invasive RFI for T1b 1.0 cm tumors was lower than that for T1a tumors: 84.5% versus 97.4% (P = .009). The distant IR risk of T1a HER2-positive breast cancer appears quite low. The distant IR risk in T1b patients, particularly those with 1.0-cm tumors, is higher. Potential risk differences for T1a and T1b, including the 1.0-cm tumors, should be considered when making treatment decisions. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  17. Topical administration of adrenergic receptor pharmaceutics and nerve growth factor

    PubMed Central

    Steinle, Jena J

    2010-01-01

    Topical application of nerve growth factor (NGF) and adrenergic receptor pharmaceutics are currently in use for corneal ulcers and glaucoma. A recent interest in the neuroprotective abilities of NGF has led to a renewed interest in NGF as a therapeutic for retinal and choroidal diseases. NGF can promote cell proliferation through actions of the TrkA receptor or promote apoptosis through receptor p75NTR. This understanding has led to novel interest in the role of NGF for diseases of the posterior eye. The role of β-adrenergic receptor agonists and antagonists for treatments of glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, and their potential mechanisms of action, are still under investigation. This review discusses the current knowledge and applications of topical NGF and adrenergic receptor drugs for ocular disease. PMID:20668722

  18. The epidermal growth factor receptor family: Biology driving targeted therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Wieduwilt, M. J.; Moasser, M. M.

    2011-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor family of receptor tyrosine kinases (ErbBs) plays essential roles in regulating cell proliferation, survival, differentiation and migration. The ErbB receptors carry out both redundant and restricted functions in mammalian development and in the maintenance of tissues in the adult mammal. Loss of regulation of the ErbB receptors underlies many human diseases, most notably cancer. Our understanding of the function and complex regulation of these receptors has fueled the development of targeted therapeutic agents for human malignancies in the last 15 years. Here we review the biology of ErbB receptors, including their structure, signaling, regulation, and roles in development and disease, then briefly touch on their increasing roles as targets for cancer therapy. PMID:18259690

  19. Negative allosteric modulation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors blocks nicotine self-administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Ryan F; Hogenkamp, Derk J; Li, Wen Y; Tran, Minhtam B; Belluzzi, James D; Whittemore, Edward R; Leslie, Frances M; Gee, Kelvin W

    2007-12-01

    Drugs that antagonize nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) can be used to inhibit nicotine-induced behavior in both humans and animals. The aim of our experiments is to establish a proof-of-principle that antagonism of nAChRs by negative allosteric modulation can alter behavior in a relevant animal model of addiction, nicotine self-administration. We have identified a novel, negative allosteric modulator of nAChRs, UCI-30002 [N-(1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-1-naphthyl)-4-nitroaniline], with selectivity for the major neuronal nAChR subtypes over muscle-type nAChRs. After systemic administration, UCI-30002 significantly reduces nicotine self-administration in rats on both fixed ratio and progressive ratio schedules of reinforcement. The minimum effective dose that significantly alters nicotine self-administration corresponds to brain concentrations of UCI-30002 that produce at least 30% inhibition of the major neuronal nAChR subtypes measured in vitro. UCI-30002 has no effect on responding for food reinforcement in rats on either type of schedule, indicating that there is no effect on general responding or natural reward. UCI-30002 represents validation of the concept that negative allosteric modulators may have significant benefits as a strategy for treating nicotine addiction and encourages the development of subtype-selective modulators.

  20. C-myc gene chromatin of estrogen receptor positive and negative breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Miller, T L; Huzel, N J; Davie, J R; Murphy, L C

    1993-02-01

    Expression of the c-myc protooncogene is estrogen regulated in estrogen receptor (ER) positive, hormone-dependent human breast cancer cells, but it is constitutively active in ER negative, hormone-independent breast cancer cells. To determine whether these differences are reflected in c-myc chromatin, DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHS) were mapped. Six DHS were detected in all cell lines studied, with DHS 3(2) being more prominent than DHS 3(1). The accessibility of DHS 2 was markedly greater in ER negative cells than in ER positive cells, and this relative accessibility remained unchanged when cells were grown in estrogen free medium. DHS 2, 3(1) and 3(2) map near the P0, P1 and P2 promoters, respectively. An analysis of promoter usage demonstrated that P2 was the preferred promoter. Thus, the differences in the accessibility of DHS 2 in c-myc chromatin of ER positive and negative cells likely reflects alterations in DNA-protein interactions in this region.

  1. The role of tumour necrosis factor alpha and soluble tumour necrosis factor alpha receptors in the symptomatology of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Turhan, Levent; Batmaz, Sedat; Kocbiyik, Sibel; Soygur, Arif Haldun

    2016-07-01

    Background Immunological mechanisms may be responsible for the development and maintenance of schizophrenia symptoms. Aim The aim of this study is to measure tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), soluble tumour necrosis factor-alpha receptor I (sTNF-αRI), and soluble tumour necrosis factor-alpha receptor II (sTNF-αRII) levels in patients with schizophrenia and healthy individuals, and to determine their relationship with the symptoms of schizophrenia. Methods Serum TNF-α, sTNF-αRI and sTNF-αRII levels were measured. The Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) was administered for patients with schizophrenia (n = 35), and the results were compared with healthy controls (n = 30). Hierarchical regression analyses were undertaken to predict the levels of TNF-α, sTNF-αRI and sTNF-αRII. Results No significant difference was observed in TNF-α levels, but sTNF-αRI and sTNF-αRII levels were lower in patients with schizophrenia. Serum sTNF-αRI and sTNF-αRII levels were found to be negatively correlated with the negative subscale score of the PANSS, and sTNF-αRI levels were also negatively correlated with the total score of the PANSS. Smoking, gender, body mass index were not correlated with TNF-α and sTNF-α receptor levels. Conclusions These results suggest that there may be a change in anti-inflammatory response in patients with schizophrenia due to sTNF-αRI and sTNF-αRII levels. The study also supports low levels of TNF activity in schizophrenia patients with negative symptoms.

  2. Motivational factors and negative affectivity as predictors of alcohol craving.

    PubMed

    Pombo, Samuel; Luísa Figueira, M; Walter, Henriette; Lesch, Otto

    2016-09-30

    Craving is thought to play an important role in alcohol use disorders. The recent inclusion of "craving" as a formal diagnostic symptom calls for further investigation of this subjective phenomenon with multiple dimensions. Considering that alcohol-dependent patients compensate negative physical/emotional states with alcohol, the aim of this study is to investigate alcohol craving and its correlation with drinking measures and affective personality dimensions. A sample of 135 alcohol-dependent patients (104 males and 31 females) was collected from a clinical setting. Subjects self-rated their cravings (Penn Alcohol Craving Scale) and the stage of change. Several personality scales were also administered. Craving was related to drinking status, abstinence time, age, and taking steps. After controlling for these conditions, psychological characteristics related to low self-concept, neuroticism, cyclothymic affective temperament, depression, and hostility were found to be predictors of craving in sober alcohol-dependent patients. Our results support craving as a component of the phenomenology of alcohol dependence and highlight the presence of unpleasant feelings as predictors of craving in sober alcohol-dependent patients without co-occurring psychiatric conditions. The predisposition to experience negative emotions may induce a stronger craving response and increase the likelihood of a first drink and a subsequent loss of control.

  3. Understanding Cytokine and Growth Factor Receptor Activation Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Atanasova, Mariya; Whitty, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    Our understanding of the detailed mechanism of action of cytokine and growth factor receptors – and particularly our quantitative understanding of the link between structure, mechanism and function – lags significantly behind our knowledge of comparable functional protein classes such as enzymes, G protein-coupled receptors, and ion channels. In particular, it remains controversial whether such receptors are activated by a mechanism of ligand-induced oligomerization, versus a mechanism in which the ligand binds to a pre-associated receptor dimer or oligomer that becomes activated through subsequent conformational rearrangement. A major limitation to progress has been the relative paucity of methods for performing quantitative mechanistic experiments on unmodified receptors expressed at endogenous levels on live cells. In this article we review the current state of knowledge on the activation mechanisms of cytokine and growth factor receptors, critically evaluate the evidence for and against the different proposed mechanisms, and highlight other key questions that remain unanswered. New approaches and techniques have led to rapid recent progress in this area, and the field is poised for major advances in the coming years, which promises to revolutionize our understanding of this large and biologically and medically important class of receptors. PMID:23046381

  4. Astrocyte Mitogen Inhibitor Related to Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieto-Sampedro, Manuel

    1988-06-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is a well-characterized polypeptide hormone with diverse biological activities, including stimulation of astrocyte division. A soluble astrocyte mitogen inhibitor, immunologically related to the EGF receptor, is present in rat brain. Injury to the brain causes a time-dependent reduction in the levels of this inhibitor and the concomitant appearance of EGF receptor on the astrocyte surface. Intracerebral injection of antibody capable of binding the inhibitor caused the appearance of numerous reactive astrocytes. EGF receptor-related inhibitors may play a key role in the control of glial cell division in both normal and injured brain.

  5. Modulation of the NMDA Receptor Through Secreted Soluble Factors.

    PubMed

    Cerpa, Waldo; Ramos-Fernández, Eva; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic activity is a critical determinant in the formation and development of excitatory synapses in the central nervous system (CNS). The excitatory current is produced and regulated by several ionotropic receptors, including those that respond to glutamate. These channels are in turn regulated through several secreted factors that function as synaptic organizers. Specifically, Wnt, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), and transforming growth factor (TGF) particularly regulate the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) glutamatergic channel. These factors likely regulate early embryonic development and directly control key proteins in the function of important glutamatergic channels. Here, we review the secreted molecules that participate in synaptic organization and discuss the cell signaling behind of this fine regulation. Additionally, we discuss how these factors are dysregulated in some neuropathologies associated with glutamatergic synaptic transmission in the CNS.

  6. Downregulation of androgen receptor is strongly associated with diabetes in triple negative breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Collina, Francesca; Cerrone, Margherita; Peluso, Valentina; Laurentiis, Michelino De; Caputo, Roberta; Cecio, Rossella De; Liguori, Giuseppina; Botti, Gerardo; Cantile, Monica; Bonito, Maurizio Di

    2016-01-01

    Developing of personalized therapies for Triple Negative Breast Cancer (TNBC) requires a more detailed knowledge of its biology and a correct stratification of molecular subtypes. Androgen Receptor (AR) is expressed in a large part of TNBCs but its prognostic role in this Breast Cancer (BC) subtype is highly debated. In this study, we analyzed AR expression in a series of 238 TNBCs and correlated its expression with clinical-pathological features, survival, and metabolic profile. We showed a consistent association between AR expression and a better prognosis of TNBC patients, while its downregulation appeared strongly associated with diabetic disease. Since a recent prospective study reported a lower BC risk in diabetic women treated with drugs able to reduce circulating levels of glucose compared with non-diabetic woman, and in vitro studies showed that AR level are regulated directly by hyperglycemia, we speculate on the perspective of new integrated therapies for TNBC. PMID:27648143

  7. miR-29a suppresses MCF-7 cell growth by downregulating tumor necrosis factor receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yiling; Yang, Fenghua; Li, Wenyuan; Xu, Chunyan; Li, Li; Chen, Lifei; Liu, Yancui; Sun, Ping

    2017-02-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 is the main receptor mediating many tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced cellular events. Some studies have shown that tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 promotes tumorigenesis by activating nuclear factor-kappa B signaling pathway, while other studies have confirmed that tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 plays an inhibitory role in tumors growth by inducing apoptosis in breast cancer. Therefore, the function of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 in breast cancer requires clarification. In this study, we first found that tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 was significantly increased in human breast cancer tissues and cell lines, and knockdown of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 by small interfering RNA inhibited cell proliferation by arresting the cell cycle and inducing apoptosis. In addition, miR-29a was predicted as a regulator of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 by TargetScan and was shown to be inversely correlated with tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 expression in human breast cancer tissues and cell lines. Luciferase reporter assay further confirmed that miR-29a negatively regulated tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 expression by binding to the 3' untranslated region. In our functional study, miR-29a overexpression remarkably suppressed cell proliferation and colony formation, arrested the cell cycle, and induced apoptosis in MCF-7 cell. Furthermore, in combination with tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 transfection, miR-29a significantly reversed the oncogenic role caused by tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 in MCF-7 cell. In addition, we demonstrated that miR-29a suppressed MCF-7 cell growth by inactivating the nuclear factor-kappa B signaling pathway and by decreasing cyclinD1 and Bcl-2/Bax protein levels. Taken together, our results suggest that miR-29a is an important regulator of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 expression in breast cancer and functions as a tumor suppressor by targeting tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 to

  8. Breast Cancer Outcomes as Defined by the Estrogen Receptor, Progesterone Receptor, and Human Growth Factor Receptor-2 in a Multi-ethnic Asian Country.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, S; Bhoo-Pathy, N; Taib, N A; Tan, G H; See, M H; Jamaris, S; Ho, G F; Looi, L M; Yip, C H

    2015-10-01

    Breast cancer can be divided into four subtypes based on the expressions of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor-2 (HER2). Each subtype has different clinicopathological features and outcomes. To compare the clinicopathological features and survival of ER and/or PR positive HER2 negative (ER+PR+HER2-, ER+PR-HER2- or ER-PR+HER2-), ER and/or PR positive HER2 positive (ER+PR+HER2+, ER+PR-HER2+ or ER-PR+HER2+), ER negative PR negative HER2 positive (ER-PR-HER2+), and ER negative PR negative HER2 negative (ER-PR-HER2-) subtypes. 1957 patients with Stage 1-3 breast carcinoma diagnosed between Jan 2005 and Dec 2011 were categorized into the four subtypes. The clinicopathological features between the subtypes were compared using χ (2) test. Kaplan-Meier analysis was performed to estimate 5-year overall survival. Multivariate Cox regression was used to determine the association between subtypes and mortality adjusted for age, ethnicity, stage, pathological features, and treatment. ER-PR-HER2+ and ER-PR-HER2- subtypes were associated with younger age, larger tumors, and higher grade. There was no difference in the 5-year survival of the ER-PR-HER2+ and ER-PR-HER2- subtypes (75.1 and 74.4 %, respectively) and survival was poorer than in the ER and/or PR positive HER2 negative and ER and/or PR positive HER2 positive subtypes (87.1 and 83.1 %, respectively). Only 9.5 % of women with HER2 positive breast cancer had access to trastuzumab. In a low resource setting with limited access to trastuzumab, there is no difference in survival between the ER-PR-HER2+ and ER-PR-HER2- subtypes of breast cancer.

  9. Cord blood natural killer cells expressing a dominant negative TGF-β receptor: Implications for adoptive immunotherapy for glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Yvon, Eric S; Burga, Rachel; Powell, Allison; Cruz, Conrad R; Fernandes, Rohan; Barese, Cecilia; Nguyen, Tuongvan; Abdel-Baki, Mohamed S; Bollard, Catherine M

    2017-03-01

    Cord blood (CB) natural killer (NK) cells are promising effector cells for tumor immunotherapy but are currently limited by immune-suppressive cytokines in the tumor microenvironment, such as transforming growth factor (TGF-β). We observed that TGF-β inhibits expression of activating receptors such as NKG2D and DNAM1 and decreases killing activity against glioblastoma tumor cells through inhibition of perforin secretion. To overcome the detrimental effects of TGF-β, we engrafted a dominant negative TGF-β receptor II (DNRII) on CB-derived NK cells by retroviral transduction and evaluated their ability to kill glioblastoma cells in the presence of TGF-β. After manufacture using Good Manufacturing Practice-compliant methodologies and transduction with DNRII, CB-derived DNRII-transduced NK cells expanded to clinically relevant numbers and retained both their killing ability and their secretion of interferon-γ upon activation. More important, these cells maintained both perforin expression and NKG2D/DNMA1 expression in the presence of TGF-β allowing for recognition and killing of glioblastoma tumor cells. Hence, NK cells expressing a DNRII should have a functional advantage over unmodified NK cells in the presence of TGF-β-secreting tumors and may be an important therapeutic approach for patients with cancer. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Androgen Receptor Expression in Early Triple-Negative Breast Cancer: Clinical Significance and Prognostic Associations

    PubMed Central

    Pistelli, Mirco; Caramanti, Miriam; Biscotti, Tommasina; Santinelli, Alfredo; Pagliacci, Alessandra; De Lisa, Mariagrazia; Ballatore, Zelmira; Ridolfi, Francesca; Maccaroni, Elena; Bracci, Raffaella; Berardi, Rossana; Battelli, Nicola; Cascinu, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Background: Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC) are characterized by aggressive tumour biology resulting in a poor prognosis. Androgen receptor (AR) is one of newly emerging biomarker in TNBC. In recent years, ARs have been demonstrated to play an important role in the genesis and in the development of breast cancer, although their prognostic role is still debated. In the present study, we explored the correlation of AR expression with clinical, pathological and molecular features and its impact on prognosis in early TNBC. Patients and Methods: ARs were considered positive in case of tumors with >10% nuclear-stained. Survival distribution was estimated by the Kaplan Meier method. The univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. The difference among variables were calculated by chi-square test. Results: 81 TNBC patients diagnosed between January 2006 and December 2011 were included in the analysis. Slides were stained immunohistochemically for estrogen and progesterone receptors, HER-2, Ki-67, ALDH1, e-cadherin and AR. Of the 81 TNBC samples, 18.8% showed positive immunostaining for AR, 23.5% and 44.4% of patients were negative for e-cadherin and ALDH1, respectively. Positive AR immunostaining was inversely correlated with a higher Ki-67 (p < 0.0001) and a lympho-vascular invasion (p = 0.01), but no other variables. Univariate survival analysis revealed that AR expression was not associated with disease-free survival (p = 0.72) or overall survival (p = 0.93). Conclusions: The expression of AR is associated with some biological features of TNBC, such as Ki-67 and lympho-vascular invasion; nevertheless the prognostic significance of AR was not documented in our analysis. However, since ARs are expressed in a significant number of TNBC, prospective studies in order to determine the biological mechanisms and their potential role as novel treatment target. PMID:24978437

  11. Liver X Receptor (LXR) activation negatively regulates visfatin expression in macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Mayi, Therese Hervee; Rigamonti, Elena; Pattou, Francois; Staels, Bart; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Synthetic LXR ligands decreased visfatin expression in human macrophages. {yields} LXR activation leads to a modest and transient decrease of NAD{sup +} concentration. {yields} LXR activation decreased PPAR{gamma}-induced visfatin in human macrophages. -- Abstract: Adipose tissue macrophages (ATM) are the major source of visfatin, a visceral fat adipokine upregulated during obesity. Also known to play a role in B cell differentiation (pre-B cell colony-enhancing factor (PBEF)) and NAD biosynthesis (nicotinamide phosphoribosyl transferase (NAMPT)), visfatin has been suggested to play a role in inflammation. Liver X Receptor (LXR) and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor (PPAR){gamma} are nuclear receptors expressed in macrophages controlling the inflammatory response. Recently, we reported visfatin as a PPAR{gamma} target gene in human macrophages. In this study, we examined whether LXR regulates macrophage visfatin expression. Synthetic LXR ligands decreased visfatin gene expression in a LXR-dependent manner in human and murine macrophages. The decrease of visfatin mRNA was paralleled by a decrease of protein secretion. Consequently, a modest and transient decrease of NAD{sup +} concentration was observed. Interestingly, LXR activation decreased the PPAR{gamma}-induced visfatin gene and protein secretion in human macrophages. Our results identify visfatin as a gene oppositely regulated by the LXR and PPAR{gamma} pathways in human macrophages.

  12. Case Report: Hormone Receptor Positive, HER2/neu Negative Inflammatory Breast Cancer in a Male Patient.

    PubMed

    Loewen, Anthony H; Schilling, Spencer D; Milroy, Mary; Villanueva, Mary Lee

    2015-10-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer is a rare and aggressive disease found almost exclusively in women. We present a case of a 51-year-old male with inflammatory breast carcinoma. The patient presented with a mass measuring roughly 7 cm with overlying erythema, peau d'orange appearance, and prominent nipple retraction. Core biopsy analysis demonstrated estrogen and progesterone receptor positive, HER2/neu receptor negative invasive ductal carcinoma. A PET scan revealed contralateral supraclavicular lymph node metastasis. The patient refused chemotherapy and radiation and was not a surgical candidate. Ultimately he opted for therapy with strictly an aromatase inhibitor. Most recent follow-up at 12 months demonstrated improvement of metastatic lesions on PET scan. Local progression of disease was noted on physical exam and the patient decided to add everolimus and radiation therapy while continuing an aromatase inhibitor. Retrospective studies have demonstrated increased survival of inflammatory breast cancer diagnosed in women with the utilization of neoadjuvant chemotherapy, surgical excision, and radiation therapy. Unfortunately, due to the rarity of the disease, no specific optimal treatment guidelines have been established for men diagnosed with this disease.

  13. CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β negatively regulates progesterone receptor expression in human glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hansberg-Pastor, Valeria; González-Arenas, Aliesha; Camacho-Arroyo, Ignacio

    2017-01-05

    Many progesterone (P4) actions are mediated by its intracellular receptor (PR), which has two isoforms (PR-A and PR-B) differentially transcribed from separate promoters of a single gene. In glioblastomas, the most frequent and aggressive brain tumors, PR-B is the predominant isoform. In an in silico analysis we showed putative CCAAT/Enhancer Binding Protein (C/EBP) binding sites at PR-B promoter. We evaluated the role of C/EBPβ in PR-B expression regulation in glioblastoma cell lines, which expressed different ratios of PR and C/EBPβ isoforms (LAP1, LAP2, and LIP). ChIP assays showed a significant basal binding of C/EBPβ, specific protein 1 (Sp1) and estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) to PR-B promoter. C/EBPβ knockdown increased PR-B expression and treatment with estradiol (E2) reduced C/EBPβ binding to the promoter and up-regulated PR-B expression. P4 induced genes were differently regulated when CEBP/β was silenced. These data show that C/EBPβ negatively regulates PR-B expression in glioblastoma cells.

  14. Role of the Androgen Receptor in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rampurwala, Murtuza; Wisinski, Kari B.; O’Regan, Ruth

    2017-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is an aggressive disease with outcomes inferior to those of other breast cancer subtypes. No targeted therapies are currently approved for TNBC, and newer treatment approaches are critically needed. It is increasingly recognized that TNBC is a heterogeneous disease, and the role of androgen signaling in a subset of TNBC is emerging. Although the degree of androgen receptor (AR) expression in TNBC varies widely depending on the assay methodology, cutoff for positivity, and patient population, existing evidence suggests an association between a higher level of AR expression and improved outcomes. Despite lower pathologic complete response (pCR) rates with neoadjuvant therapy, patients with AR-dependent TNBCs have a better prognosis than those with TNBCs that are not AR-dependent. Furthermore, gene expression profiling has been used to identify a luminal androgen receptor subtype of TNBC that is dependent on AR signaling. Early clinical studies investigating agents targeting AR in advanced TNBC have produced promising results. We review herein the literature on the biology of AR in breast cancer and its prognostic and predictive role in TNBC, and we describe the results of early clinical trials with antiandrogens in this population. We also present our vision of the future development of newer therapeutic strategies in AR-dependent TNBC. PMID:27058032

  15. Inhibition of growth of cervical cancer cells using a dominant negative estrogen receptor gene

    PubMed Central

    Au, William W.; Abdou-Salama, Salama; Al-Hendy, Ayman

    2007-01-01

    Objective Estrogen stimulates human papilloma virus oncogene expression, promotes cervical cancer (CC) cell proliferation and prevents apoptosis. Therefore, blockage of estrogen function may have therapeutic application to CC. Methods CasKi CC cells were transfected with an adenovirus expressing a dominant negative estrogen receptor gene (Ad-ER-DN) and their responses were investigated by RT-PCR, Flow Cytometry and Western blot assays. Result Transfected cells showed disturbance of cell colony morphology, reduced HPV E6 and E7 mRNA, interruption of cell proliferation, reduced cyclin D1 protein and expression of apoptosis. Conclusion We report, for the first time, the use of Ad-ER-DN to block estrogen receptors which led to dramatic changes in CC cells that are consistent with the possible reactivation of cellular p53 and Rb function. Their reactivation most likely allowed the recognition of existing chromosome abnormalities as a serious stress signal and the initiation of a cascade of cellular events in response to the stress, including the activation of the core apoptotic machinery which led to self-destruction of the CC cells. PMID:17137618

  16. Characterization of macrophage - cancer cell crosstalk in estrogen receptor positive and triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hollmén, Maija; Roudnicky, Filip; Karaman, Sinem; Detmar, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Tumor heterogeneity may broadly influence the activation of tumor-associated macrophages. We aimed to dissect how breast cancer cells of different molecular characteristics contribute to macrophage phenotype and function. Therefore, we performed whole transcriptome sequencing of human monocytes that were co-cultured with estrogen receptor positive (ER+) or triple-negative (TNBC) breast cancer cell lines and studied the biological responses related to the differential gene activation in both monocytes and cancer cells by pathway analysis. ER+ and TNBC cancer cell lines induced distinctly different macrophage phenotypes with different biological functions, cytokine and chemokine secretion, and morphology. Conversely, ER+ and TNBC breast cancer cell lines were distinctly influenced by the presence of macrophages. ER+ cells demonstrated up-regulation of an acute phase inflammatory response, IL-17 signaling and antigen presentation pathway, whereas thioredoxin and vitamin D3 receptor pathways were down-regulated in the respective macrophages. The TNBC educated macrophages down-regulated citrulline metabolism and differentiated into M2-like macrophages with increased MMR protein expression and CCL2 secretion. These data demonstrate how different cancer cells educate the host cells to support tumor growth and might explain why high infiltration of macrophages in TNBC tumors associates with poor prognosis. PMID:25776849

  17. Contralateral prophylactic mastectomy provides no survival benefit in young women with estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Pesce, Catherine; Liederbach, Erik; Wang, Chihsiung; Lapin, Brittany; Winchester, David J; Yao, Katharine

    2014-10-01

    Several studies have shown that contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) provides a disease-free and overall survival (OS) benefit in young women with estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer. We utilized the National Cancer Data Base to evaluate CPM's survival benefit for young women with early -stage breast cancer in the years that ER status was available. We selected 14,627 women ≤45 years of age with American Joint Committee on Cancer stage I-II breast cancer who underwent unilateral mastectomy or CPM from 2004 to 2006. Five-year OS was compared between those who had unilateral mastectomy and CPM using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression analysis. A total of 10,289 (70.3 %) women underwent unilateral mastectomy and 4,338 (29.7 %) women underwent CPM. Median follow up was 6.1 years. After adjusting for patient age, race, insurance status, co-morbidities, year of diagnosis, ER status, tumor size, nodal status, grade, histology, facility type, facility location, use of adjuvant radiation and chemohormonal therapy, there was no difference in OS in women <45 years of age who underwent CPM compared towith those who underwent unilateral mastectomy (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.93; p = 0.39). In addition, Tthere was no improvement in OS in women <45 years of age with T1N0 tumors who underwent CPM versus unilateral mastectomy (HR = 0.85; p = 0.37) after adjusting for the aforementioned factors. Among women ≤45 years of age with ER-negative tumors who underwent CPM, there was no improvement in OS compared with women who underwent unilateral mastectomy (HR = 1.12; p = 0.32) after adjusting for the same aforementioned factors. CPM provides no survival benefit to young patients with early-stage breast cancer, and no benefit to ER-negative patients. Future studies with longer follow-up are required in this cohort of patients.

  18. Platelet-activating factor: receptors and signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Chao, W; Olson, M S

    1993-06-15

    During the past two decades, studies describing the chemistry and biology of PAF have been extensive. This potent phosphoacylglycerol exhibits a wide variety of physiological and pathophysiological effects in various cells and tissues. PAF acts, through specific receptors and a variety of signal transduction systems, to elicit diverse biochemical responses. Several important future directions can be enumerated for the characterization of PAF receptors and their attendant signalling mechanisms. The recent cloning and sequence analysis of the gene for the PAF receptor will allow a number of important experimental approaches for characterizing the structure and analysing the function of the various domains of the receptor. Using molecular genetic and immunological technologies, questions relating to whether there is receptor heterogeneity, the precise mechanism(s) for the regulation of the PAF receptor, and the molecular details of the signalling mechanisms in which the PAF receptor is involved can be explored. Another area of major significance is the examination of the relationship between the signalling response(s) evoked by PAF binding to its receptor and signalling mechanisms activated by a myriad of other mediators, cytokines and growth factors. A very exciting recent development in which PAF receptors undoubtedly play a role is in the regulation of the function of various cellular adhesion molecules. Finally, there remain many incompletely characterized physiological and pathophysiological situations in which PAF and its receptor play a crucial signalling role. Our laboratory has been active in the elucidation of several tissue responses in which PAF exhibits major autocoid signalling responses, e.g. hepatic injury and inflammation, acute and chronic pancreatitis, and cerebral stimulation and/or trauma. As new experimental strategies are developed for characterizing the fine structure of the molecular mechanisms involved in tissue injury and inflammation, the

  19. Expression profiling of nuclear receptors in breast cancer identifies TLX as a mediator of growth and invasion in triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Remenyi, Judit; Banerji, Christopher R.S.; Lai, Chun-Fui; Periyasamy, Manikandan; Lombardo, Ylenia; Busonero, Claudia; Ottaviani, Silvia; Passey, Alun; Quinlan, Philip R.; Purdie, Colin A.; Jordan, Lee B.; Thompson, Alastair M.; Finn, Richard S.; Rueda, Oscar M.; Caldas, Carlos; Gil, Jesus; Coombes, R. Charles; Fuller-Pace, Frances V.; Teschendorff, Andrew E.; Buluwela, Laki; Ali, Simak

    2015-01-01

    The Nuclear Receptor (NR) superfamily of transcription factors comprises 48 members, several of which have been implicated in breast cancer. Most important is estrogen receptor-α (ERα), which is a key therapeutic target. ERα action is facilitated by co-operativity with other NR and there is evidence that ERα function may be recapitulated by other NRs in ERα-negative breast cancer. In order to examine the inter-relationships between nuclear receptors, and to obtain evidence for previously unsuspected roles for any NRs, we undertook quantitative RT-PCR and bioinformatics analysis to examine their expression in breast cancer. While most NRs were expressed, bioinformatic analyses differentiated tumours into distinct prognostic groups that were validated by analyzing public microarray data sets. Although ERα and progesterone receptor were dominant in distinguishing prognostic groups, other NR strengthened these groups. Clustering analysis identified several family members with potential importance in breast cancer. Specifically, RORγ is identified as being co-expressed with ERα, whilst several NRs are preferentially expressed in ERα-negative disease, with TLX expression being prognostic in this subtype. Functional studies demonstrated the importance of TLX in regulating growth and invasion in ERα-negative breast cancer cells. PMID:26280373

  20. Decoy receptor 3 suppresses B cell functions and has a negative correlation with disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-Han; Liu, Po-Chun; Chang, Chien-Wen; Chen, Yi-Ann; Chen, Ming-Huang; Liu, Chun-Yu; Leu, Chuen-Miin; Lin, Hsiao-Yi

    2014-01-01

    The decoy receptor 3 (DcR3) is a member of the tumour necrosis factor (TNF) receptor superfamily and may regulate inflammation. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of DcR3 in B cell functions and its correlation to disease activity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The concentrations of DcR3 and TNF-α were measured by ELISA. B cell proliferation was assessed by quantification of 3H-thymidine uptake. Staphylococcus aureus Cowan (SAC) strain were used to stimulate B cell proliferation and TNF-α production. Compared to the osteoarthritis (OA) patients, the RA group had higher synovial DcR3 levels (3273.6±1623.2 vs. 1594.8±1190.0 pg/ml, p=0.003), which were negatively correlated with the serum erythrocyte sedimentation rate and Disease Activity Score using 28 joint counts (DAS28) scores (r=-0.560, p=0.002; r=-0.579, p<0.001, respectively). Although the RA B cells have more active characteristics, B cell proliferation induced by SAC was successfully suppressed by recombinant DcR3.Fc fusion protein with an average inhibition of 44.8%. Moreover, DcR3.Fc fusion protein was found to suppress SAC-induced TNF-α production by B cells in 8 RA patients (average inhibition 47.0%). The results of our study indicated that the inhibition of B cell functions by DcR3 may partially explain the negative correlation between DcR3 level and disease activity in RA patients. Our findings imply that DcR3 may be used as a biomarker for disease activity and a potential therapeutic agent in the treatment of RA.

  1. Expression of calretinin in high-grade hormone receptor-negative invasive breast carcinomas: correlation with histological and molecular subtypes.

    PubMed

    Micello, Donata; Bossi, Alberto; Marando, Alessandro; Dainese, Emanuele; Sessa, Fausto; Capella, Carlo

    2017-07-01

    Calretinin expression has been reported in neoplasms arising in various organs, including the breast. We investigated the relationship of calretinin expression with different histological and molecular subtypes of invasive breast carcinomas (IBCs) and its prognostic significance in high-grade female hormone receptor-negative IBCs. A total of 196 cases of IBCs of different histological subtypes were analyzed for immunohistochemical expression of calretinin, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), basal-like (BL), apocrine, and proliferative markers and grouped in different molecular subtypes. We found significant morphological differences in the group of formally classified invasive ductal carcinoma of no special type (IDC-NST), which we further subdivided into two types (type I IDC-NST and type II IDC-NST) according to their morphology. Calretinin expression was found in 55.1% of the IBCs and was strongly associated with carcinoma with medullary features (P = 0.014) and type II IDC-NST (P < 0.001), while type I IDC-NST correlated (P < 0.001) with a lack of calretinin expression. Among the molecular subtypes of IBC, calretinin expression was identified in a significant portion of BL breast cancers (BLBCs), while expression was poor in HER2-overexpressing and molecular-apocrine (MA) HER2-negative subtypes and even less in MA/HER2+ ones. Calretinin expression was significantly associated with high (≥50) Ki-67 (P = 0.02), but not with parameters like age, tumor size, lymph node status, overall survival (OS), and disease-free survival. Calretinin expression is most common in high-grade IBCs with histological medullary features, type II IDC-NST and BL phenotype, and is associated with high neoplastic proliferative index.

  2. PreImplantation factor (PIF*) promotes embryotrophic and neuroprotective decidual genes: effect negated by epidermal growth factor

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Intimate embryo-maternal interaction is paramount for pregnancy success post-implantation. The embryo follows a specific developmental timeline starting with neural system, dependent on endogenous and decidual factors. Beyond altered genetics/epigenetics, post-natal diseases may initiate at prenatal/neonatal, post-natal period, or through a continuum. Preimplantation factor (PIF) secreted by viable embryos promotes implantation and trophoblast invasion. Synthetic PIF reverses neuroinflammation in non-pregnant models. PIF targets embryo proteins that protect against oxidative stress and protein misfolding. We report of PIF’s embryotrophic role and potential to prevent developmental disorders by regulating uterine milieu at implantation and first trimester. Methods PIF’s effect on human implantation (human endometrial stromal cells (HESC)) and first-trimester decidua cultures (FTDC) was examined, by global gene expression (Affymetrix), disease-biomarkers ranking (GeneGo), neuro-specific genes (Ingenuity) and proteins (mass-spectrometry). PIF co-cultured epidermal growth factor (EGF) in both HESC and FTDC (Affymetrix) was evaluated. Results In HESC, PIF promotes neural differentiation and transmission genes (TLX2, EPHA10) while inhibiting retinoic acid receptor gene, which arrests growth. PIF promotes axon guidance and downregulates EGF-dependent neuroregulin signaling. In FTDC, PIF promotes bone morphogenetic protein pathway (SMAD1, 53-fold) and axonal guidance genes (EPH5) while inhibiting PPP2R2C, negative cell-growth regulator, involved in Alzheimer’s and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In HESC, PIF affects angiotensin via beta-arrestin, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β), notch, BMP, and wingless-int (WNT) signaling pathways that promote neurogenesis involved in childhood neurodevelopmental diseases—autism and also affected epithelial-mesenchymal transition involved in neuromuscular disorders. In FTDC, PIF upregulates neural development

  3. A Murine Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF) Receptor Expressed in CHO Cells is Activated by Basic FGF and Kaposi FGF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansukhani, Alka; Moscatelli, David; Talarico, Daniela; Levytska, Vera; Basilico, Claudio

    1990-06-01

    We have cloned a murine cDNA encoding a tyrosine kinase receptor with about 90% similarity to the chicken fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptor and the human fms-like gene (FLG) tyrosine kinase. This mouse receptor lacks 88 amino acids in the extracellular portion, leaving only two immunoglobulin-like domains compared to three in the chicken FGF receptor. The cDNA was cloned into an expression vector and transfected into receptor-negative CHO cells. We show that cells expressing the receptor can bind both basic FGF and Kaposi FGF. Although the receptor binds basic FGF with a 15- to 20-fold higher affinity, Kaposi FGF is able to induce down-regulation of the receptor to the same extent as basic FGF. The receptor is phosphorylated upon stimulation with both FGFs, DNA synthesis is stimulated, and a proliferative response is produced in cells expressing the receptor, whereas cells expressing the cDNA in the antisense orientation show none of these responses to basic FGF or Kaposi FGF. Thus this receptor can functionally interact with two growth factors of the FGF family.

  4. Palbociclib in Combination With Tamoxifen as First Line Therapy for Metastatic Hormone Receptor Positive Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-28

    Hormone Receptor Positive Malignant Neoplasm of Breast; Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 Negative Carcinoma of Breast; Estrogen Receptor Positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor Positive Tumor; Metastatic Breast Cancer

  5. Tumor necrosis factor receptors support murine hematopoietic progenitor function in the early stages of engraftment.

    PubMed

    Pearl-Yafe, Michal; Mizrahi, Keren; Stein, Jerry; Yolcu, Esma S; Kaplan, Ofer; Shirwan, Haval; Yaniv, Isaac; Askenasy, Nadir

    2010-07-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family receptors/ligands are important participants in hematopoietic homeostasis, in particular as essential negative expansion regulators of differentiated clones. As a prominent injury cytokine, TNF-alpha has been traditionally considered to suppress donor hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell function after transplantation. We monitored the involvement of TNF receptors (TNF-R) 1 and 2 in murine hematopoietic cell engraftment and their inter-relationship with Fas. Transplantation of lineage-negative (lin(-)) bone marrow cells (BMC) from TNF receptor-deficient mice into wild-type recipients showed defective early engraftment and loss of durable hematopoietic contribution upon recovery of host hematopoiesis. Consistently, cells deficient in TNF receptors had reduced competitive capacity as compared to wild-type progenitors. The TNF receptors were acutely upregulated in bone marrow (BM)-homed donor cells (wild-type) early after transplantation, being expressed in 60%-75% of the donor cells after 6 days. Both TNF receptors were detected in fast cycling, early differentiating progenitors, and were ubiquitously expressed in the most primitive progenitors with long-term reconstituting potential (lin(-)c-kit(+) stem cell antigen (SCA)-1(+)). BM-homed donor cells were insensitive to apoptosis induced by TNF-alpha and Fas-ligand and their combination, despite reciprocal inductive cross talk between the TNF and Fas receptors. The engraftment supporting effect of TNF-alpha is attributed to stimulation of progenitors through TNF-R1, which involves activation of the caspase cascade. This stimulatory effect was not observed for TNF-R2, and this receptor did not assume redundant stimulatory function in TNFR1-deficient cells. It is concluded that TNF-alpha plays a tropic role early after transplantation, which is essential to successful progenitor engraftment.

  6. Placental growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 in human lung development.

    PubMed

    Janér, Joakim; Andersson, Sture; Haglund, Caj; Karikoski, Riitta; Lassus, Patrik

    2008-08-01

    We examined the pulmonary expression of 2 proangiogenic factors, namely, placental growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, during lung development and acute and chronic lung injury in newborn infants. Six groups were included in an immunohistochemical study of placental growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, that is, 9 fetuses, 4 preterm and 8 term infants without lung injury who died soon after birth, 5 preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome of <2 days and 7 with respiratory distress syndrome of >10 days, and 6 with bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Placental growth factor concentrations in tracheal aspirate fluid were measured in 70 samples from 20 preterm infants during the first postnatal week. In immunohistochemical analyses, placental growth factor staining was seen in bronchial epithelium and macrophages in all groups. Distal airway epithelium positivity was observed mostly in fetuses and in preterm infants who died soon after birth. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 staining was seen in vascular endothelium in all groups and also in lymphatic endothelium in fetuses. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 staining in arterial endothelium was associated with higher and staining in venous endothelium with lower gestational age. In capillaries, less vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 staining was seen in bronchopulmonary dysplasia. The mean placental growth factor protein concentration in tracheal aspirate fluid during the first postnatal week was 0.64 +/- 0.42 pg/mL per IgA-secretory component unit. Concentrations during the first postnatal week were stable. Lower placental growth factor concentrations correlated with chorioamnionitis and lactosyl ceramide positivity. The vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 staining pattern seems to reflect ongoing differentiation and activity of different endothelia. Lower vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 expression

  7. Expression and Clinical Significance of Androgen Receptor in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Asano, Yuka; Kashiwagi, Shinichiro; Goto, Wataru; Tanaka, Sayaka; Morisaki, Tamami; Takashima, Tsutomu; Noda, Satoru; Onoda, Naoyoshi; Ohsawa, Masahiko; Hirakawa, Kosei; Ohira, Masaichi

    2017-01-01

    Background: Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) has a poor prognosis because of frequent recurrence. Androgen receptor (AR) is involved in the pathogenesis of breast cancer, but its role is not clearly defined. The aim of this study was to explore the expression of AR and its relationship with clinicopathologic features in TNBC. Methods: This study investigated 1036 cases of sporadic invasive breast carcinoma. Immunohistochemical assays were performed to determine the expression of AR in 190 TNBC samples. The relationships between AR expression and clinicopathologic data and prognosis were analyzed. Results: In 190 TNBC cases, the prognosis of AR-positive patients was significantly better (p = 0.019, log-rank) than AR-negative patients, and in multivariate analysis, AR expression was an independent indicator of good prognosis (p = 0.039, hazard ratio = 0.36). In patients with disease relapse, AR positivity was significantly correlated with better prognosis (p = 0.034, log-rank). Conclusions: AR expression may be useful as a subclassification marker for prognosis in TNBC. PMID:28067809

  8. Prevalence and predictors of androgen receptor and programmed death-ligand 1 in BRCA1-associated and sporadic triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Tung, Nadine; Garber, Judy E; Hacker, Michele R; Torous, Vanda; Freeman, Gordon J; Poles, Emily; Rodig, Scott; Alexander, Brian; Lee, Larissa; Collins, Laura C; Schnitt, Stuart J

    2016-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancers comprise 15% of breast cancers and are more common in women with BRCA1 mutations. Although most have basal gene expression signatures, others resemble luminal tumors with expression of androgen receptor-related genes and some express the immunoinhibitory protein programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1). Given the availability of androgen receptor-targeted and immune therapies for triple-negative breast cancers, determining predictors of these biomarkers is important. To determine the prevalence and predictors of androgen receptor and PD-L1 expression in BRCA1-associated and sporadic triple-negative breast cancer. We studied 197 triple-negative breast cancers: 78 (39.6%) from BRCA1 mutation carriers and 119 (60.4%) from noncarriers. Tumor pathology was reviewed and tissue microarray sections were immunostained for androgen receptor and PD-L1. Androgen receptor expression was seen in 18% of tumors and was significantly less common in tumors from BRCA1 mutation carriers than noncarriers (9.2 vs. 23.7%; P=0.01). Twenty-six percent of cancers expressed PD-L1 with no significant difference in frequency between carriers and noncarriers. Factors predicting androgen receptor expression were lower histologic grade (odds ratio (OR) 4.6; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1-19.7), older age at diagnosis (OR 1.3; 95% CI 1.03-1.7) and PD-L1 expression (OR 2.6; 95% CI 1.1-6.1). PD-L1 expression was significantly more common in cancers with lymphocytic infiltrates (OR, 3.3; 95% CI 1.1-10.4) and androgen receptor expression (OR, 3.2; 95% CI 1.4-7.5), and less common in tumors with lymphovascular invasion (OR 0.41; 95% CI 0.18-0.92). These results identify predictors for androgen receptor and PD-L1 expression among triple-negative breast cancers that may lead to better treatment selection and participation in clinical trials.

  9. Cell and molecular biology of epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Ceresa, Brian P; Peterson, Joanne L

    2014-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been one of the most intensely studied cell surface receptors due to its well-established roles in developmental biology, tissue homeostasis, and cancer biology. The EGFR has been critical for creating paradigms for numerous aspects of cell biology, such as ligand binding, signal transduction, and membrane trafficking. Despite this history of discovery, there is a continual stream of evidence that only the surface has been scratched. New ways of receptor regulation continue to be identified, each of which is a potential molecular target for manipulating EGFR signaling and the resultant changes in cell and tissue biology. This chapter is an update on EGFR-mediated signaling, and describes some recent developments in the regulation of receptor biology.

  10. Disabled-2 is a negative immune regulator of lipopolysaccharide-stimulated Toll-like receptor 4 internalization and signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Wei-Shan; Ling, Pin; Cheng, Ju-Chien; Chang, Shy-Shin; Tseng, Ching-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) plays a pivotal role in the host response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a major cell wall component of Gram-negative bacteria. Here, we elucidated whether the endocytic adaptor protein Disabled-2 (Dab2), which is abundantly expressed in macrophages, plays a role in LPS-stimulated TLR4 signaling and trafficking. Molecular analysis and transcriptome profiling of RAW264.7 macrophage-like cells expressing short-hairpin RNA of Dab2 revealed that Dab2 regulated the TLR4/TRIF pathway upon LPS stimulation. Knockdown of Dab2 augmented TRIF-dependent interferon regulatory factor 3 activation and the expression of subsets of inflammatory cytokines and interferon-inducible genes. Dab2 acted as a clathrin sponge and sequestered clathrin from TLR4 in the resting stage of macrophages. Upon LPS stimulation, clathrin was released from Dab2 to facilitate endocytosis of TLR4 for triggering the TRIF-mediated pathway. Dab2 functions as a negative immune regulator of TLR4 endocytosis and signaling, supporting a novel role for a Dab2-associated regulatory circuit in controlling the inflammatory response of macrophages to endotoxin. PMID:27748405

  11. Cardioselective Dominant-negative Thyroid Hormone Receptor (Δ337T) Modulates Myocardial Metabolism and Contractile Dfficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Hyyti, Outi M.; Olson, Aaron; Ge, Ming; Ning, Xue-Han; Buroker, Norman E.; Chung, Youngran; Jue, Thomas; Portman, Michael A.

    2008-06-03

    Dominant- negative thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) show elevated expression relative to ligand-binding TRs during cardiac hypertrophy. We tested the hypothesis that overexpression of a dominant-negative TR alters cardiac metabolism and contractile efficiency (CE). We used mice expressing the cardioselective dominant-negative TRβ1 mutation Δ337T. Isolated working Δ337T hearts and nontransgenic control (Con) hearts were perfused with 13C-labeled free fatty acids (FFA), acetoacetate (ACAC), lactate, and glucose at physiological concentrations for 30 min. 13C NMR spectroscopy and isotopomer analyses were used to determine substrate flux and fractional contributions (Fc) of acetyl-CoA to the citric acid cycle (CAC). Δ337T hearts exhibited rate depression but higher developed pressure and CE, defined as work per oxygen consumption (MV˙ O2). Unlabeled substrate Fc from endogenous sources was higher in Δ337T, but ACAC Fc was lower. Fluxes through CAC, lactate, ACAC, and FFA were reduced in Δ337T. CE and Fc differences were reversed by pacing Δ337T to Con rates, accompanied by an increase in FFA Fc. Δ337T hearts lacked the ability to increase MV˙ O2. Decreases in protein expression for glucose transporter-4 and hexokinase-2 and increases in pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-2 and -4 suggest that these hearts are unable to increase carbohydrate oxidation in response to stress. These data show that Δ337T alters the metabolic phenotype in murine heart by reducing substrate flux for multiple pathways. Some of these changes are heart rate dependent, indicating that the substrate shift may represent an accommodation to altered contractile protein kinetics, which can be disrupted by pacing stress.

  12. Vascular growth factors and receptors in capillary hemangioblastomas and hemangiopericytomas.

    PubMed Central

    Hatva, E.; Böhling, T.; Jääskeläinen, J.; Persico, M. G.; Haltia, M.; Alitalo, K.

    1996-01-01

    Capillary hemangioblastomas and hemangiopericytomas are highly vascular central nervous system tumors of controversial origin. Of interest in their pathogenesis are mechanisms regulating endothelial cell growth. The endothelial cell mitogen vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) stimulates angiogenesis, and together with its two receptor tyrosine kinases VEGFR-1(FLT1) and VEGFR-2(KDR), is up-regulated during the malignant progression of gliomas. We have analyzed the expression of VEGF and its receptors, the related placental growth factor (PlGF) and the endothelial receptors FLT4 and Tie by in situ hybridization in capillary hemangioblastomas and hemangiopericytomas. VEGF mRNA was up-regulated in all of the hemangiopericytomas studied and highly expressed in the stromal cells of hemangioblastomas. In addition, some hemangioblastoma tumor cells expressed high levels of PlGF. Significantly elevated levels of Tie mRNA, Tie protein, VEGFR-1, and VEGFR-2 but not FLT4 mRNAs were observed in the endothelia of both tumor types. In hemangioblastomas, however, the receptors were also highly expressed by a subpopulation of stromal cells. Consistent results were obtained for a human hemangioblastoma cell line in culture. Up-regulation of the endothelial growth factors and receptors may result in autocrine or paracrine stimulation of endothelial cells and their precursors involved in the genesis of these two vascular tumors. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8774132

  13. Probabilistic non-negative matrix factorization: theory and application to microarray data analysis.

    PubMed

    Bayar, Belhassen; Bouaynaya, Nidhal; Shterenberg, Roman

    2014-02-01

    Non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) has proven to be a useful decomposition technique for multivariate data, where the non-negativity constraint is necessary to have a meaningful physical interpretation. NMF reduces the dimensionality of non-negative data by decomposing it into two smaller non-negative factors with physical interpretation for class discovery. The NMF algorithm, however, assumes a deterministic framework. In particular, the effect of the data noise on the stability of the factorization and the convergence of the algorithm are unknown. Collected data, on the other hand, is stochastic in nature due to measurement noise and sometimes inherent variability in the physical process. This paper presents new theoretical and applied developments to the problem of non-negative matrix factorization (NMF). First, we generalize the deterministic NMF algorithm to include a general class of update rules that converges towards an optimal non-negative factorization. Second, we extend the NMF framework to the probabilistic case (PNMF). We show that the Maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimate of the non-negative factors is the solution to a weighted regularized non-negative matrix factorization problem. We subsequently derive update rules that converge towards an optimal solution. Third, we apply the PNMF to cluster and classify DNA microarrays data. The proposed PNMF is shown to outperform the deterministic NMF and the sparse NMF algorithms in clustering stability and classification accuracy.

  14. Growth factor control of epidermal growth factor receptor kinase activity via an intramolecular mechanism.

    PubMed

    Koland, J G; Cerione, R A

    1988-02-15

    The mechanism by which the protein kinase activity of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor is activated by binding of growth factor was investigated. Detergent-solubilized receptor in monomeric form was isolated by sucrose density gradient centrifugation and both its kinase and autophosphorylation activities monitored. In a low ionic strength medium and with MnCl2 as an activator, the activity of the monomeric receptor was EGF-independent. However, with 0.25 M ammonium sulfate present, the MnCl2-stimulated kinase activity was strikingly EGF-dependent. In contrast, the kinase activity expressed in the presence of MgCl2 showed growth factor control in the absence of added salt. Under the conditions of these experiments there was apparently little tendency for growth factor to induce aggregation of the receptor, indicating that the allosteric activation of the receptor kinase by EGF occurred via an intramolecular mechanism. Whereas detergent-solubilized receptor was the subject of these studies, the kinase activity of cell surface receptors might also be controlled by an intramolecular mechanism. These results indicate that an individual receptor molecule has the potential to function as a transmembrane signal transducer.

  15. Non-negative matrix factorization and term structure of interest rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takada, Hellinton H.; Stern, Julio M.

    2015-01-01

    Non-Negative Matrix Factorization (NNMF) is a technique for dimensionality reduction with a wide variety of applications from text mining to identification of concentrations in chemistry. NNMF deals with non-negative data and results in non-negative factors and factor loadings. Consequently, it is a natural choice when studying the term structure of interest rates. In this paper, NNMF is applied to obtain factors from the term structure of interest rates and the procedure is compared with other very popular techniques: principal component analysis and Nelson-Siegel model. The NNMF approximation for the term structure of interest rates is better in terms of fitting. From a practitioner point of view, the NNMF factors and factor loadings obtained possess straightforward financial interpretations due to their non-negativeness.

  16. Apolipoprotein A-I Limits the Negative Effect of Tumor Necrosis Factor on Lymphangiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bisoendial, Radjesh; Tabet, Fatiha; Tak, Paul P; Petrides, Francine; Cuesta Torres, Luisa F; Hou, Liming; Cook, Adam; Barter, Philip J; Weninger, Wolfgang; Rye, Kerry-Anne

    2015-11-01

    Lymphatic endothelial dysfunction underlies the pathogenesis of many chronic inflammatory disorders. The proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is known for its role in disrupting the function of the lymphatic vasculature. This study investigates the ability of apolipoprotein (apo) A-I, the principal apolipoprotein of high-density lipoproteins, to preserve the normal function of lymphatic endothelial cells treated with TNF. TNF decreased the ability of lymphatic endothelial cells to form tube-like structures. Preincubation of lymphatic endothelial cells with apoA-I attenuated the TNF-mediated inhibition of tube formation in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, apoA-I reversed the TNF-mediated suppression of lymphatic endothelial cell migration and lymphatic outgrowth in thoracic duct rings. ApoA-I also abrogated the negative effect of TNF on lymphatic neovascularization in an ATP-binding cassette transporter A1-dependent manner. At the molecular level, this involved downregulation of TNF receptor-1 and the conservation of prospero-related homeobox gene-1 expression, a master regulator of lymphangiogenesis. ApoA-I also re-established the normal phenotype of the lymphatic network in the diaphragms of human TNF transgenic mice. ApoA-I restores the neovascularization capacity of the lymphatic system during TNF-mediated inflammation. This study provides a proof-of-concept that high-density lipoprotein-based therapeutic strategies may attenuate chronic inflammation via its action on lymphatic vasculature. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. The Steroid and Xenobiotic Receptor Negatively Regulates B-1 Cell Development in the Fetal Liver

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Stephanie C.

    2012-01-01

    The steroid and xenobiotic receptor (SXR) (also known as pregnane X receptor or PXR) is a broad-specificity nuclear hormone receptor that is well known for its role in drug and xenobiotic metabolism. SXR is activated by a wide variety of endobiotics, dietary compounds, pharmaceuticals, and xenobiotic chemicals. SXR is expressed at its highest levels in the liver and intestine yet is found in lower levels in other tissues, where its roles are less understood. We previously demonstrated that SXR−/− mice demonstrate elevated nuclear factor (NF)-κB activity and overexpression of NF-κB target genes and that SXR−/− mice develop lymphoma derived from B-1 lymphocytes in an age-dependent manner. In this work, we show that fetal livers in SXR−/− mice display elevated expression of NF-κB target genes and possess a significantly larger percentage of B-1 progenitor cells in the fetal liver. Furthermore, in utero activation of SXR in wild-type mice reduces the B-1 progenitor populations in the embryonic liver and reduces the size of the B-1 cell compartment in adult animals that were treated in utero. This suggests that activation of SXR during development may permanently alter the immune system of animals exposed in utero, demonstrating a novel role for SXR in the generation of B-1 cell precursors in the fetal liver. These data support our previous findings that SXR functions as a tumor suppressor in B-1 lymphocytes and establish a unique role for SXR as a modulator of developmental hematopoiesis in the liver. PMID:22496360

  18. The ontogeny of epidermal growth factor receptors during mouse development

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, E.D.; Meek, J.

    1984-05-01

    In an attempt to understand the role(s) of epidermal growth factor (EGF) in vivo during murine development, we have examined the /sup 125/I-EGF binding characteristics of EGF-receptors in membrane preparations of tissues from the 12th day of gestation to parturition. Using autoradiography, the earliest time that we could detect EGF-receptors was on trophoblast cells cultured for 3 days as blastocyst outgrowths. Trophoblast eventually forms a large portion of the placenta, where EGF-receptors have long been recognized. We measured the number and affinity of EGF-receptors on tissues dissected from conceptuses from the 12th day of gestation in order to identify a stage when tissues may be most sensitive to EGF. Whereas the number of EGF receptors increases during gestation for all tissues examined, the affinity of the receptors declines for carcass and placenta and remains relatively unchanged for brain and liver. This suggests that EGF may function differently throughout development. Our hypothesis is that EGF (or its embryonic equivalent) initially stimulates proliferation in embryonic cells and then stimulates differentiation as the tissues mature. In the adult, its main role could be to stimulate tissue repair after damage.

  19. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor-CXCR4 Receptor Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekaran, Deepa; Gröning, Sabine; Schmitz, Corinna; Zierow, Swen; Drucker, Natalie; Bakou, Maria; Kohl, Kristian; Mertens, André; Lue, Hongqi; Weber, Christian; Xiao, Annie; Luker, Gary; Kapurniotu, Aphrodite; Lolis, Elias; Bernhagen, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    An emerging number of non-chemokine mediators are found to bind to classical chemokine receptors and to elicit critical biological responses. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is an inflammatory cytokine that exhibits chemokine-like activities through non-cognate interactions with the chemokine receptors CXCR2 and CXCR4, in addition to activating the type II receptor CD74. Activation of the MIF-CXCR2 and -CXCR4 axes promotes leukocyte recruitment, mediating the exacerbating role of MIF in atherosclerosis and contributing to the wealth of other MIF biological activities. Although the structural basis of the MIF-CXCR2 interaction has been well studied and was found to engage a pseudo-ELR and an N-like loop motif, nothing is known about the regions of CXCR4 and MIF that are involved in binding to each other. Using a genetic strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that expresses a functional CXCR4 receptor, site-specific mutagenesis, hybrid CXCR3/CXCR4 receptors, pharmacological reagents, peptide array analysis, chemotaxis, fluorescence spectroscopy, and circular dichroism, we provide novel molecular information about the structural elements that govern the interaction between MIF and CXCR4. The data identify similarities with classical chemokine-receptor interactions but also provide evidence for a partial allosteric agonist compared with CXCL12 that is possible due to the two binding sites of CXCR4. PMID:27226569

  20. Biochemical and biological properties of the nerve growth factor receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Taniuchi, M.

    1988-01-01

    We have utilized a monoclonal antibody (192-IgG) to study the rat nerve growth factor receptor. After intraocular injection, {sup 125}I-192-IgG was retrogradely transported in sympathetic neuronal axons to the superior cervical ganglion. When the sciatic nerve was ligated to induce the accumulation of axonally transported materials, 192-IgG immunostaining was observed on both sides of the ligature, indicating that NGF receptors are transported in both orthograde and retrograde directions. By using {sup 125}I-NGF crosslinking and 192-IgG immunoprecipitation, we detected receptor molecules throughout the rat brain, thereby supporting the hypothesis that NGF is active in the central nervous system. We also discovered that sciatic nerve transection leads to a dramatic increase in the amount of NGF receptor found in the distal portion of the nerve. Immunostaining revealed that all Schwann cells in the distal axotomized nerve were expressing NGF receptors. We examined phosphorylation of NGF receptor in cultured sympathetic neurons and PC12 cells. We also examined pharmacological effects of 192-IgG. Systemic injection of 192-IgG into neonatal rats caused a permanent partial sympathectomy in a dose-dependent manner; a maximum of 50% of the cells were killed.

  1. G protein-coupled receptor signaling through Gq and JNK negatively regulates neural progenitor cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Norikazu; Kokubu, Hiroshi; Sato, Maiko; Nishimura, Akiyuki; Yamauchi, Junji; Kurose, Hitoshi; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    In the early development of the central nervous system, neural progenitor cells divide in an asymmetric manner and migrate along the radial glia cells. The radial migration is an important process for the proper lamination of the cerebral cortex. Recently, a new mode of the radial migration was found at the intermediate zone where the neural progenitor cells become multipolar and reduce the migration rate. However, the regulatory signals for the radial migration are unknown. Using the migration assay in vitro, we examined how neural progenitor cell migration is regulated. Neural progenitor cells derived from embryonic mouse telencephalon migrated on laminin-coated dishes. Endothelin (ET)-1 inhibited the neural progenitor cell migration. This ET-1 effect was blocked by BQ788, a specific inhibitor of the ETB receptor, and by the expression of a carboxyl-terminal peptide of Gαq but not Gαi. The expression of constitutively active mutant of Gαq, GαqR183C, inhibited the migration of neural progenitor cells. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of ET-1 was suppressed by the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor SP600125 and the expression of the JNK-binding domain of JNK-interacting protein-1, a specific inhibitor of the JNK pathway. Using the slice culture system of embryonic brain, we demonstrated that ET-1 and the constitutively active mutant of Gαq caused the retention of the neural progenitor cells in the intermediate zone and JNK-binding domain of JNK-interacting protein-1 abrogated the effect of ET-1. These results indicated that G protein-coupled receptor signaling negatively regulates neural progenitor cell migration through Gq and JNK. PMID:16116085

  2. Age disrupts androgen receptor-modulated negative feedback in the gonadal axis in healthy men

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Paul Y.; Keenan, Daniel M.; Liu, Peter Y.; Mielke, Kristi L.; Weist, Suanne M.

    2010-01-01

    Testosterone (T) exerts negative feedback on the hypothalamo-pituitary (GnRH-LH) unit, but the relative roles of the CNS and pituitary are not established. We postulated that relatively greater LH responses to flutamide (brain-permeant antiandrogen) than bicalutamide (brain-impermeant antiandrogen) should reflect greater feedback via CNS than pituitary/peripheral androgen receptor-dependent pathways. To this end, 24 healthy men ages 20–73 yr, BMI 21–32 kg/m2, participated in a prospective, placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blind crossover study of the effects of antiandrogen control of pulsatile, basal, and entropic (pattern regularity) measurements of LH secretion. Analysis of covariance revealed that flutamide but not bicalutamide 1) increased pulsatile LH secretion (P = 0.003), 2) potentiated the age-related abbreviation of LH secretory bursts (P = 0.025), 3) suppressed incremental GnRH-induced LH release (P = 0.015), and 4) decreased the regularity of GnRH-stimulated LH release (P = 0.012). Furthermore, the effect of flutamide exceeded that of bicalutamide in 1) raising mean LH (P = 0.002) and T (P = 0.017) concentrations, 2) accelerating LH pulse frequency (P = 0.013), 3) amplifying total (basal plus pulsatile) LH (P = 0.002) and T (P < 0.001) secretion, 4) shortening LH secretory bursts (P = 0.032), and 5) reducing LH secretory regularity (P < 0.001). Both flutamide and bicalutamide elevated basal (nonpulsatile) LH secretion (P < 0.001). These data suggest the hypothesis that topographically selective androgen receptor pathways mediate brain-predominant and pituitary-dependent feedback mechanisms in healthy men. PMID:20682842

  3. Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Transmembrane Mutations Convert Ivermectin from a Positive to a Negative Allosteric Modulator

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Toby

    2010-01-01

    Ivermectin is a macrocyclic lactone that acts as a positive allosteric modulator of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) but has no modulatory activity on 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) type 3 (5-HT3) receptors. By examining the influence of ivermectin on subunit chimeras containing domains from the nAChR α7 subunit and the 5-HT3A subunit, we have concluded that the transmembrane domains play a critical role in influencing allosteric modulation by ivermectin. A series of mutations located within the α-helical transmembrane domains of the α7 subunit were examined, and seven were found to have significant effects on allosteric modulation by ivermectin. Four mutations (A225D, Q272V, T456Y, and C459Y) caused a significant reduction in the potency of ivermectin as an allosteric potentiator. Compared with wild-type α7 nAChRs, potentiation by ivermectin was reduced dramatically (by 89–97%) by these mutations. Somewhat unexpectedly, three mutations (S222M, M253L, and S276V located in TM1, TM2, and TM3) converted ivermectin from a positive allosteric modulator into an antagonist. Levels of inhibition of 56, 84, and 89% were observed on M253L, S276V, and S222M, respectively. Antagonism by ivermectin was insurmountable and had no effect on EC50 of acetylcholine, indicating that it is acting noncompetitively. The seven mutations that influence allosteric modulation by ivermectin are located near a predicted intrasubunit transmembrane cavity. Computer docking simulations provide support for the hypothesis that ivermectin binds in close proximity to this cavity. We conclude that transmembrane mutations in α7 nAChRs are able to convert ivermectin from a positive to a negative allosteric modulator. PMID:20463059

  4. Negative interference by rheumatoid factor in alpha-fetoprotein chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Bi, Xiaohui; Xu, Lei; Li, Yirong

    2017-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid factor causes positive interference in multiple immunoassays. Recently, negative interference has also been found in immunoassays in the presence of rheumatoid factor. The chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay is widely used to determine serum alpha-fetoprotein. However, it is not clear whether the presence of rheumatoid factor in the serum causes interference in the chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay of alpha-fetoprotein. Methods Serum alpha-fetoprotein was determined using the ARCHITECT alpha-fetoprotein assay. The estimation of alpha-fetoprotein recovery was carried out in samples prepared by diluting high-concentration alpha-fetoprotein serum with rheumatoid factor-positive or rheumatoid factor-negative serum. Paramagnetic microparticles coated with hepatitis B surface antigen-anti-HBs complexes were used to remove rheumatoid factor from the serum. Results The average recovery of alpha-fetoprotein was 88.4% and 93.8% in the rheumatoid factor-positive and rheumatoid factor-negative serum samples, respectively. The recovery of alpha-fetoprotein was significantly lower in the rheumatoid factor-positive serum samples than in the rheumatoid factor-negative serum samples. In two of five rheumatoid factor-positive samples, a large difference was found (9.8%) between the average alpha-fetoprotein recoveries in the serially diluted and initial recoveries. Fourteen rheumatoid factor-positive serum samples were pretreated with hepatitis B surface antigen-anti-HBs complex-coated paramagnetic microparticles. The alpha-fetoprotein concentrations measured in the pretreated samples increased significantly. Conclusions It was concluded that the alpha-fetoprotein chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay is susceptible to interference by rheumatoid factor, leading to significantly lower results. Eliminating the incidence of negative interference from rheumatoid factor should be an important goal for immunoassay providers. In the meantime

  5. MCPIP1 Negatively Regulates Toll-like Receptor 4 Signaling and Protects Mice from LPS-induced Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shengping; Miao, Ruidong; Zhou, Zhou; Wang, Tianyi; Liu, Jianguo; Liu, Gang; Chen, Y. Eugene; Xin, Hong-Bo; Zhang, Jifeng; Fu, Mingui

    2013-01-01

    Septic shock is one of leading causes of morbidity and mortality in hospital patients. However, genetic factors predisposing to septic shock are not fully understood. Our previous work showed that MCP-induced protein 1 (MCPIP1) was induced by lipopolysaccharides (LPS), which then negatively regulates LPS-induced inflammatory signaling in vitro. Here we report that although MCPIP1 was induced by various toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands in macrophages, MCPIP1-deficient mice are extremely susceptible to TLR4 ligand (LPS)-induced septic shock and death, but not to the TLR2, 3, 5 and 9 ligands-induced septic shock. Consistently, LPS induced tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) production in MCPIP1-deficient mice was 20-fold greater than that in their wild-type littermates. Further analysis revealed that MCPIP1-deficient mice developed severe acute lung injury after LPS injection and JNK signaling was highly activated in MCPIP1-deificient lungs after LPS stimulation. Finally, macrophage-specific MCPIP1 transgenic mice were partially protected from LPS-induced septic shock, suggesting that inflammatory cytokines from sources other than macrophages may significantly contribute to the pathogenesis of LPS-induced septic shock. Taken together, these results suggest that MCPIP1 selectively suppresses TLR4 signaling pathway and protects mice from LPS-induced septic shock. PMID:23422584

  6. Systems Biological Analysis of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Internalization Dynamics for Altered Receptor Levels*

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt-Glenewinkel, Hannah; Reinz, Eileen; Eils, Roland; Brady, Nathan R.

    2009-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR) overexpression is a hallmark of many cancers. EGFR endocytosis is a critical step in signal attenuation, raising the question of how receptor expression levels affect the internalization process. Here we combined quantitative experimental and mathematical modeling approaches to investigate the role of the EGFR expression level on the rate of receptor internalization. Using tetramethylrhodamine-labeled EGF, we established assays for quantifying EGF-triggered EGFR internalization by both high resolution confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. We determined that the flow cytometry approach was more sensitive for examining large populations of cells. Mathematical modeling was used to investigate the relationship between EGF internalization kinetics, EGFR expression, and internalization machinery. We predicted that the standard parameter used to assess internalization kinetics, the temporal evolution r(t) of the ratio of internalized versus surface-located ligand·receptor complexes, does not describe a straight line, as proposed previously. Instead, a convex or concave curve occurs depending on whether initial receptor numbers or internalization adaptors are limiting the uptake reaction, respectively. To test model predictions, we measured EGF-EGFR binding and internalization in cells expressing different levels of green fluorescent protein-EGFR. As expected, surface binding of rhodamine-labeled EGF increased with green fluorescent protein-EGFR expression level. Unexpectedly, internalization of ligand· receptor complexes increased linearly with increasing receptor expression level, suggesting that receptors and not internalization adaptors were limiting the uptake in our experimental model. Finally, determining the ratio of internalized versus surface-located ligand·receptor complexes for this cell line confirmed that it follows a convex curve, supporting our model predictions. PMID:19297331

  7. Receptor subtype-dependent positive and negative modulation of GABA(A) receptor function by niflumic acid, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug.

    PubMed

    Sinkkonen, Saku T; Mansikkamäki, Salla; Möykkynen, Tommi; Lüddens, Hartmut; Uusi-Oukari, Mikko; Korpi, Esa R

    2003-09-01

    In addition to blocking cyclooxygenases, members of the fenamate group of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have been proposed to affect brain GABAA receptors. Using quantitative autoradiography with GABAA receptor-associated ionophore ligand [35S]t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate (TBPS) on rat brain sections, one of the fenamates, niflumate, at micromolar concentration was found to potentiate GABA actions in most brain areas, whereas being in the cerebellar granule cell layer an efficient antagonist similar to furosemide. With recombinant GABAA receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, we found that niflumate potentiated 3 microM GABA responses up to 160% and shifted the GABA concentration-response curve to the left in alpha1beta2gamma2 receptors, the predominant GABAA receptor subtype in the brain. This effect needed the gamma2 subunit, because on alpha1beta2 receptors, niflumate exhibited solely an antagonistic effect at high concentrations. The potentiation was not abolished by the specific benzodiazepine site antagonist flumazenil. Niflumate acted as a potent antagonist of alpha6beta2 receptors (with or without gamma2 subunit) and of alphaXbeta2gamma2 receptors containing a chimeric alpha1 to alpha6 subunit, which suggests that niflumate antagonism is dependent on the same transmembrane domain 1- and 2-including fragment of the alpha6 subunit as furosemide antagonism. This antagonism was noncompetitive because the maximal GABA response, but not the potency, was reduced by niflumate. These data show receptor subtype-dependent positive and negative modulatory actions of niflumate on GABAA receptors at clinically relevant concentrations, and they suggest the existence of a novel positive modulatory site on alpha1beta2gamma2 receptors that is dependent on the gamma2 subunit but not associated with the benzodiazepine binding site.

  8. IL-8 expression and its possible relationship with estrogen-receptor-negative status of breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Freund, Ariane; Chauveau, Corine; Brouillet, Jean-Paul; Lucas, Annick; Lacroix, Matthieu; Licznar, Anne; Vignon, Françoise; Lazennec, Gwendal

    2003-01-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER) status is an important parameter in breast cancer management as ER-positive breast cancers have a better prognosis than ER-negative tumors. This difference comes essentially from the lower aggressiveness and invasiveness of ER-positive tumors. Here, we demonstrate, that IL-8 was clearly overexpressed in most ER-negative breast, ovary cell lines and breast tumor samples tested, whereas no significant IL-8 level could be detected in ER-positive breast or ovarian cell lines. We have also cloned human IL-8 from ER-negative MDA-MB-231 cells and we show that IL-8 produced by breast cancer cells is identical to monocyte-derived IL-8. Interestingly, the invasion potential of ER-negative breast cancer cells is associated at least in part with expression of interleukin-8 (IL-8), but not with IL-8 receptors levels. Moreover, IL-8 increases the invasiveness of ER-positive breast cancer cells by 2 fold, thus confirming the invasion-promoting role of IL-8. On the other hand, exogenous expression of estrogen receptors in ER-negative cells led to a decrease of IL-8 levels. In summary, our data show that IL-8 expression is negatively linked to ER-status of breast and ovarian cancer cells. We also support the idea that IL-8 expression is associated with a higher invasiveness potential of cancer cells in vitro, which suggests that IL-8 could be a novel marker of tumor aggressiveness. PMID:12527894

  9. Glucocorticoid receptor antagonism as a novel therapy for triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Skor, Maxwell N.; Wonder, Erin L.; Kocherginsky, Masha; Goyal, Anju; Hall, Ben A.; Cai, Yi; Conzen, Suzanne D.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) accounts for 10-20% of newly diagnosed invasive breast cancer. Finding effective targets for chemotherapy-resistant TNBC has proven difficult in part because of TNBC’s molecular heterogeneity. We have previously reported that, likely because of GR’s anti-apoptotic activity in ER-negative breast epithelial and cancer cells, high glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression/activity in early-stage TNBC significantly correlates with chemotherapy-resistance and increased recurrence. We hypothesized that pre-treatment with mifepristone, a (GR)-antagonist, would potentiate the efficacy of chemotherapy in GR+ TNBC by inhibiting GR’s anti-apoptotic signaling pathways and increasing the cytotoxic efficiency of chemotherapy. Experimental Design: TNBC cell apoptosis was examined in the context of physiological glucocorticoid concentrations, chemotherapy, and/or pharmacologic concentrations of mifepristone. We used high-throughput live microscopy with continuous recording to measure apoptotic cells stained with a fluorescent dye, and Western analysis to detect caspase-3 and PARP cleavage. The effect of mifepristone on GR-mediated gene expression was also measured. TNBC xenograft studies were performed in female severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice and tumors were measured following treatment with vehicle, paclitaxel or mifepristone/paclitaxel. Results: We found that although mifepristone treatment alone had no significant effect on TNBC cell viability or clonogenicity in the absence of chemotherapy, the addition of mifepristone to dexamethasone/paclitaxel treatment significantly increased cytotoxicity and caspase-3/PARP cleavage. Mifepristone also antagonized GR-induced SGK1 and MKP1/DUSP1 gene expression, while significantly augmenting paclitaxel-induced GR+ MDA-MB-231 xenograft tumor shrinkage in vivo. Conclusions: These results suggest that mifepristone pre-treatment could be a useful strategy for increasing tumor cell

  10. Estrogen/Progesterone Receptor Negativity and HER2 Positivity Predict Locoregional Recurrence in Patients With T1a,bN0 Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, Jeffrey M.; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana M.; Guray, Merih; Sahin, Aysegul

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: Data have suggested that the molecular features of breast cancer are important determinants of outcome; however, few studies have correlated these features with locoregional recurrence (LRR). In the present study, we evaluated estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) as predictors of LRR in patients with lymph node-negative disease and tumors {<=}1 cm, because these patients often do not receive adjuvant chemotherapy or trastuzumab. Methods and Materials: The data from 911 patients with stage T1a,bN0 breast cancer who had received definitive treatment at our institution between 1997 and 2002 were retrospectively reviewed. We prospectively analyzed ER/PR/HER2 expression from the archival tissue blocks of 756 patients. These 756 patients represented the cohort for the present study. Results: With a median follow-up of 6.0 years, the 5- and 8-year Kaplan-Meier LRR rate was 1.6% and 5.9%, respectively, with no difference noted in those who underwent breast conservation therapy vs. mastectomy (p = .347). The 8-year LRR rates were greater in the patients with ER-negative (10.6% vs. 4.2%, p = .016), PR-negative (9.0% vs. 4.2%, p = .009), or HER2-positive (17.5% vs. 3.9%, p = 0.009) tumors. On multivariate analysis, ER-negative and PR-negative disease (hazard ratio, 2.37; p = .046) and HER2-positive disease (hazard ratio, 3.13, p = .016) independently predicted for LRR. Conclusion: Patients with ER/PR-negative or HER2-positive T1a,bN0 breast cancer had a greater risk of LRR. Therapeutic strategies, such as the use of chemotherapy and/or anti-HER2 therapies, should be considered for future clinical trials for these patients.

  11. Therapeutic Targeting of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptors in Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fujimori, Yoshitaka; Otsuki, Sho; Sato, Yuya; Nakagawa, Masatoshi

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy has become the global standard treatment for patients with metastatic or unresectable gastric cancer (GC), although outcomes remain unfavorable. Many molecular-targeted therapies inhibiting signaling pathways of various tyrosine kinase receptors have been developed, and monoclonal antibodies targeting human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) have become standard therapy for HER2-positive GC. An inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 or MET has also produced promising results in patients with GC. Fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFR) play key roles in tumor growth via activated signaling pathways in GC. Genomic amplification of FGFR2 leads to the aberrant activation found in GC tumors and is related to survival in patients with GC. This review discusses the clinical relevance of FGFR in GC and examines FGFR as a potential therapeutic target in patients with GC. Preclinical studies in animal models suggest that multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), including FGFR inhibitor, suppress tumor cell proliferation and delay tumor progression. Several TKIs are now being evaluated in clinical trials as treatment for metastatic or unresectable GC harboring FGFR2 amplification. PMID:26000013

  12. The Arabidopsis Leucine-rich Repeat Receptor Kinase BIR3 Negatively Regulates BAK1 Receptor Complex Formation and Stabilizes BAK1.

    PubMed

    Imkampe, Julia; Halter, Thierry; Huang, Shuhua; Schulze, Sarina; Mazzotta, Sara; Schmidt, Nikola; Manstretta, Raffaele; Postel, Sandra; Wierzba, Michael; Yang, Yong; vanDongen, Walter Mam; Stahl, Mark; Zipfel, Cyril; Goshe, Michael B; Clouse, Steven; de Vries, Sacco C; Tax, Frans; Wang, Xiaofeng; Kemmerling, Birgit

    2017-08-25

    BAK1 is a co-receptor and positive regulator of multiple ligand-binding leucine-rich-repeat receptor kinases (LRR-RKs) and is involved in brassinosteroid (BR)-dependent growth and development, innate immunity and cell death control. The BAK1-interacting LRR-RKs BIR2 and BIR3 were previously identified by proteomics analyses of in vivo BAK1 complexes. Here we show that BAK1-related pathways such as innate immunity and cell death control are affected by BIR3 in Arabidopsis thaliana. BIR3 also has a strong negative impact on BR signaling. BIR3 directly interacts with the BR receptor BRI1 and other ligand-binding receptors and negatively regulates BR signaling by competitive inhibition of BRI1. BIR3 is released from BAK1 and BRI1 after ligand exposure and directly affects the formation of BAK1 complexes with BRI1 or FLAGELLIN SENSING2. Double mutants of bak1 and bir3 show spontaneous cell death and constitutive activation of defense responses. BAK1 and its closest homolog BKK1 interact with and are stabilized by BIR3, suggesting that bak1 bir3 double mutants mimic the spontaneous cell death phenotype observed in bak1 bkk1 mutants via destabilization of BIR3 target proteins. Our results provide evidence for a negative regulatory mechanism for BAK1 receptor complexes in which BIR3 interacts with BAK1 and inhibits ligand-binding receptors to prevent BAK1 receptor complex formation. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  13. Topoisomerase IIβ Negatively Modulates Retinoic Acid Receptor α Function: a Novel Mechanism of Retinoic Acid Resistance▿

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Suzan; Wang, Hongling; Hanna, Nessrine; Miller, Wilson H.

    2008-01-01

    Interactions between retinoic acid (RA) receptor α (RARα) and coregulators play a key role in coordinating gene transcription and myeloid differentiation. In patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), the RARα gene is fused with the promyelocytic leukemia (PML) gene via the t(15;17) translocation, resulting in the expression of a PML/RARα fusion protein. Here, we report that topoisomerase II beta (TopoIIβ) associates with and negatively modulates RARα transcriptional activity and that increased levels of and association with TopoIIβ cause resistance to RA in APL cell lines. Knockdown of TopoIIβ was able to overcome resistance by permitting RA-induced differentiation and increased RA gene expression. Overexpression of TopoIIβ in clones from an RA-sensitive cell line conferred resistance by a reduction in RA-induced expression of target genes and differentiation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that TopoIIβ is bound to an RA response element and that inhibition of TopoIIβ causes hyperacetylation of histone 3 at lysine 9 and activation of transcription. Our results identify a novel mechanism of resistance in APL and provide further insight to the role of TopoIIβ in gene regulation and differentiation. PMID:18212063

  14. Mismatch negativity predicts psychotic experiences induced by NMDA receptor antagonist in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Umbricht, Daniel; Koller, Rene; Vollenweider, Franz X; Schmid, Liselotte

    2002-03-01

    Previous studies indicate that mismatch negativity (MMN)-a preattentive auditory event-related potential (ERP)-depends on NMDA receptor (NMDAR) functioning. To explore if the strength of MMN generation reflects the functional condition of the NMDAR system in healthy volunteers, we analyzed correlations between MMN recorded before drug administration and subsequent responses to the NMDAR antagonist ketamine or the 5-HT2a agonist psilocybin. In two separate studies, MMN was recorded to both frequency and duration deviants prior to administration of ketamine or psilocybin. Behavioral and subjective effects of ketamine and psilocybin were assessed with the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale and the OAV Scale-a rating scale developed to measure altered states of consciousness. Correlations between ERP amplitudes (MMN, N1, and P2) and drug-induced effects were calculated in each study group and compared between them. Smaller MMN to both pitch and duration deviants was significantly correlated to stronger effects during ketamine, but not psilocybin administration. No significant correlations were observed for N1 and P2. Smaller MMN indicates a NMDAR system that is more vulnerable to disruption by the NMDAR antagonist ketamine. MMN generation appears to index the functional state of NMDAR-mediated neurotransmission even in subjects who do not demonstrate any psychopathology.

  15. Ligand-dependent genomic function of glucocorticoid receptor in triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhong; Lan, Xun; Wu, Dayong; Sunkel, Benjamin; Ye, Zhenqing; Huang, Jiaoti; Liu, Zhihua; Clinton, Steven K; Jin, Victor X; Wang, Qianben

    2015-09-16

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) have been widely used as coadjuvants in the treatment of solid tumours, but GC treatment may be associated with poor pharmacotherapeutic response or prognosis. The genomic action of GC in these tumours is largely unknown. Here we find that dexamethasone (Dex, a synthetic GC)-regulated genes in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells are associated with drug resistance. Importantly, these GC-regulated genes are aberrantly expressed in TNBC patients and are associated with unfavourable clinical outcomes. Interestingly, in TNBC cells, Compound A (CpdA, a selective GR modulator) only regulates a small number of genes not involved in carcinogenesis and therapy resistance. Mechanistic studies using a ChIP-exo approach reveal that Dex- but not CpdA-liganded glucocorticoid receptor (GR) binds to a single glucocorticoid response element (GRE), which drives the expression of pro-tumorigenic genes. Our data suggest that development of safe coadjuvant therapy should consider the distinct genomic function between Dex- and CpdA-liganded GR.

  16. A negative allosteric modulator demonstrates biased antagonism of the follicle stimulating hormone receptor

    PubMed Central

    Dias, James A.; Bonnet, Béatrice; Weaver, Barbara A.; Watts, Julie; Kluetzman, Kerri; Thomas, Richard M.; Poli, Sonia; Mutel, Vincent; Campo, Brice

    2015-01-01

    High quality gamete production in males and females requires the pituitary gonadotropin follicle stimulating hormone (FSH). In this report a novel chemical class of small molecule inhibitors of FSH receptor (FSHR) is described. ADX61623, a negative allosteric modulator (NAM), increased the affinity of interaction between 125I-hFSH and human FSHR (hFSHR) five fold. This form of FSHR occupied simultaneously by FSH and ADX61623 was inactive for cAMP and progesterone production in primary cultures of rat granulosa cells. In contrast, ADX61623 did not block estrogen production. This demonstrates for the first time, biased antagonism at the FSHR. To determine if ADX61623 blocked FSH induction of follicle development in vivo, a bioassay to measure follicular development and oocyte production in immature female rats was validated. ADX61623 was not completely effective in blocking FSH induced follicular development in vivo at doses up to 100 mg/kg as oocyte production and ovarian weight gain were only moderately reduced. These data illustrate that FSHR couples to multiple signaling pathways in vivo. Suppression of one pool of FSHR uncouples Gαs and cAMP production, and decreases progesterone production. Occupancy of another pool of FSHR sensitizes granulosa cells to FSH induced estradiol production. Therefore, ADX61623 is a useful tool to investigate further the mechanism of the FSHR signaling dichotomy. This may lead to a greater understanding of the signaling infrastructure which enables estrogen biosynthesis and may prove useful in treating estrogen dependent disease. PMID:21184806

  17. Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPRB negatively regulates FGF2-dependent branching morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Soady, Kelly J; Tornillo, Giusy; Kendrick, Howard; Meniel, Valerie; Olijnyk-Dallis, Daria; Morris, Joanna S; Stein, Torsten; Gusterson, Barry A; Isacke, Clare M; Smalley, Matthew J

    2017-09-04

    PTPRB is a transmembrane protein tyrosine phosphatase known to regulate blood vessel remodelling and angiogenesis. Here we demonstrate that PTPRB negatively regulates branching morphogenesis in the mammary epithelium. We show that Ptprb is highly expressed in adult mammary stem cells and also, although at lower levels, in estrogen receptor positive luminal cells. During mammary development Ptprb expression is down-regulated during puberty, a period of extensive of ductal outgrowth and branching. In vivo shRNA knockdown of Ptprb in the cleared mammary fat pad transplant assay resulted in smaller epithelial outgrowths with an increased branching density and also increased branching in an in vitro organoid assay. Organoid branching was dependent on stimulation by FGF2, and Ptprb knockdown in mammary epithelial cells resulted in a higher level of FGFR activation and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, both at baseline and following FGF2 stimulation. Therefore, PTPRB regulates branching morphogenesis in the mammary epithelium by modulating the response of the FGFR signalling pathway to FGF stimulation. Considering the importance of branching morphogenesis in multiple taxa, our findings have general importance outside mammary developmental biology. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  18. Both clathrin-positive and -negative coats are involved in endosomal sorting of the EGF receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Myromslien, Froydis D.; Grovdal, Lene Melsaether; Raiborg, Camilla; Stenmark, Harald; Madshus, Inger Helene; Stang, Espen . E-mail: espen.stang@medisin.uio.no

    2006-10-01

    Sorting of endocytosed EGF receptor (EGFR) to internal vesicles of multivesicular bodies (MVBs) depends on sustained activation and ubiquitination of the EGFR. Ubiquitination of EGFR is mediated by the ubiquitin ligase Cbl, being recruited to the EGFR both directly and indirectly through association with Grb2. Endosomal sorting of ubiquitinated proteins further depends on interaction with ubiquitin binding adaptors like Hrs. Hrs localizes to flat, clathrin-coated domains on the limiting membrane of endosomes. In the present study, we have investigated the localization of EGFR, Cbl and Grb2 with respect to coated and non-coated domains of the endosomal membrane and to vesicles within MVBs. Both EGFR, Grb2, and Cbl were concentrated in coated domains of the limiting membrane before translocation to inner vesicles of MVBs. While almost all Hrs was in clathrin-positive coats, EGFR and Grb2 in coated domains only partially colocalized with Hrs and clathrin. The extent of colocalization of EGFR and Grb2 with Hrs and clathrin varied with time of incubation with EGF. These results demonstrate that both clathrin-positive and clathrin-negative electron dense coats exist on endosomes and are involved in endosomal sorting of the EGFR.

  19. The DREAM protein negatively regulates the NMDA receptor through interaction with the NR1 subunit.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Su, Ping; Liang, Ping; Liu, Tao; Liu, Xu; Liu, Xin-Ying; Zhang, Bo; Han, Tao; Zhu, Yan-Bing; Yin, Dong-Min; Li, Junfa; Zhou, Zhuan; Wang, Ke-Wei; Wang, Yun

    2010-06-02

    Glutamate-induced excitotoxicity has been implicated in the etiology of stroke, epilepsy, and neurodegenerative diseases. NMDA receptors (NMDARs) play a pivotal role in excitotoxic injury; however, clinical trials testing NMDAR antagonists as neuroprotectants have been discouraging. The development of novel neuroprotectant molecules is being vigorously pursued. Here, we report that downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator (DREAM) significantly inhibits surface expression of NMDARs and NMDAR-mediated current. Overexpression of DREAM showed neuroprotection against excitotoxic neuronal injury, whereas knockdown of DREAM enhanced NMDA-induced toxicity. DREAM could directly bind to the C0 domain of the NR1 subunit. Although DREAM contains multiple binding sites for the NR1 subunit, residues 21-40 of the N terminus are the main binding site for the NR1 subunit. Thus, 21-40 residues might relieve the autoinhibition conferred by residues 1-50 and derepress the DREAM core domain by a competitive mechanism. Intriguingly, the cell-permeable TAT-21-40 peptide, constructed according to the critical binding site of DREAM to the NR1 subunit, inhibits NMDAR-mediated currents in primary cultured hippocampal neurons and has a neuroprotective effect on in vitro neuronal excitotoxic injury and in vivo ischemic brain damage. Moreover, both pretreatment and posttreatment of TAT-21-40 is effective against excitotoxicity. In summary, this work reveals a novel, negative regulator of NMDARs and provides an attractive candidate for the treatment of excitotoxicity-related disease.

  20. Expression of nuclear receptors (AhR, PXR, CAR) and transcription factor (Nrf2) in human parotid gland.

    PubMed

    Droździk, Agnieszka; Kowalczyk, Robert; Urasińska, Elzbieta; Kurzawski, Mateusz

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear receptors and transcription factors coordinate expression of many genes, and regulation of their expression determines cellular response to various endo- and exogenous factors. There is paucity of data regarding expression of nuclear receptors and factors in salivary glands. In the present study, a focus was placed on human parotid gland expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), pregnane X receptor (PXR, NR1I2), constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3) and nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). Parotid salivary tissue was obtained from patients undergoing the gland dissection. Quantitative real-time PCR aimmunohistochemical staining were used for expression studies. The highest mRNA expression was documented for NFE2L2 coding for Nrf2. Lower expression was seen in the case of AHR gene coding for AhR. PXR was constitutively present at very low level and CAR expression was below the limit of quantification. Immunohistochemical evaluation of the parotid gland specimens revealed cytoplasmic Nrf2 expression in striated duct cells as well as within myoepithelial cells. Acinar cells were mostly negative for Nrf2. Expression of AhR was found within the cytoplasm in striated duct cells. Acinar and myoepithelial cells were negative for AhR. Having in mind their role in regulating function of many enzymes and transmembrane transporters, expression of these factors seem play a role in salivary gland physiology, pathology as well as drug transport and metabolism.

  1. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor and genetically engineered PAF receptor mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Ishii, S; Shimizu, T

    2000-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF, 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) is a biologically active phospholipid mediator. Although PAF was initially recognized for its potential to induce platelet aggregation and secretion, intense investigations have elucidated potent biological actions of PAF in a broad range of cell types and tissues, many of which also produce the molecule. PAF acts by binding to a unique G-protein-coupled seven transmembrane receptor. PAF receptor is linked to intracellular signal transduction pathways, including turnover of phosphatidylinositol, elevation in intracellular calcium concentration, and activation of kinases, resulting in versatile bioactions. On the basis of numerous pharmacological reports, PAF is thought to have many pathophysiological and physiological functions. Recently advanced molecular technics enable us not only to clone PAF receptor cDNAs and genes, but also generate PAF receptor mutant animals, i.e., PAF receptor-overexpressing mouse and PAF receptor-deficient mouse. These mutant mice gave us a novel and specific approach for identifying the pathophysiological and physiological functions of PAF. This review also describes the phenotypes of these mutant mice and discusses them by referring to previously reported pharmacological and genetical data.

  2. Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Receptor Is a Prognostic Factor in Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Zheng; Diepstra, Arjan; Xu, Chuanhui; van Imhoff, Gustaaf; Plattel, Wouter; Van Den Berg, Anke; Visser, Lydia

    2014-01-01

    The interaction between the tumor cells in classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) and the microenvironment includes aberrant activity of receptor tyrosine kinases. In this study we evaluated the expression, functionality and prognostic significance of Insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) in cHL. IGF-1R was overexpressed in 55% (44/80) of cHL patients. Phosphorylated IGF-1R was detectable in a minority of the IGF-1R positive tumor cells. The overall survival (OS, 98%) and 5-year progression-free survival (PFS, 93%) was significantly higher in IGF-1R positive cHL patients compared to IGF-1R negative patients (OS 83%, p = .029 and PFS 77%, p = .047, respectively). Three cHL cell lines showed expression of IGF-1R, with strong staining especially in the mitotic cells and expression of IGF-1. IGF-1 treatment had a prominent effect on the cell growth of L428 and L1236 cells and resulted in an increased phosphorylation of IGF1R, Akt and ERK. Inhibition of IGF-1R with cyclolignan picropodophyllin (PPP) decreased cell growth and induced a G2/M cell cycle arrest in all three cell lines. Moreover, a decrease in pCcd2 and an increase in CyclinB1 levels were observed which is consistent with the G2/M cell cycle arrest. In conclusion, IGF-1R expression in HRS cells predicts a favorable outcome, despite the oncogenic effect of IGF-1R in cHL cell lines. PMID:24489919

  3. Insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor is a prognostic factor in classical Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zheng; Diepstra, Arjan; Xu, Chuanhui; van Imhoff, Gustaaf; Plattel, Wouter; Van Den Berg, Anke; Visser, Lydia

    2014-01-01

    The interaction between the tumor cells in classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) and the microenvironment includes aberrant activity of receptor tyrosine kinases. In this study we evaluated the expression, functionality and prognostic significance of Insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) in cHL. IGF-1R was overexpressed in 55% (44/80) of cHL patients. Phosphorylated IGF-1R was detectable in a minority of the IGF-1R positive tumor cells. The overall survival (OS, 98%) and 5-year progression-free survival (PFS, 93%) was significantly higher in IGF-1R positive cHL patients compared to IGF-1R negative patients (OS 83%, p = .029 and PFS 77%, p = .047, respectively). Three cHL cell lines showed expression of IGF-1R, with strong staining especially in the mitotic cells and expression of IGF-1. IGF-1 treatment had a prominent effect on the cell growth of L428 and L1236 cells and resulted in an increased phosphorylation of IGF1R, Akt and ERK. Inhibition of IGF-1R with cyclolignan picropodophyllin (PPP) decreased cell growth and induced a G2/M cell cycle arrest in all three cell lines. Moreover, a decrease in pCcd2 and an increase in CyclinB1 levels were observed which is consistent with the G2/M cell cycle arrest. In conclusion, IGF-1R expression in HRS cells predicts a favorable outcome, despite the oncogenic effect of IGF-1R in cHL cell lines.

  4. Identification of the epidermal growth factor receptor as the receptor for Salmonella Rck-dependent invasion.

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, Agnès; Mijouin, Lily; Ayoub, Mohammed Akli; Barilleau, Emilie; Canepa, Sylvie; Teixeira-Gomes, Ana Paula; Le Vern, Yves; Rosselin, Manon; Reiter, Eric; Velge, Philippe

    2016-12-01

    The Salmonella Rck outer membrane protein binds to the cell surface, which leads to bacterial internalization via a Zipper mechanism. This invasion process requires induction of cellular signals, including phosphorylation of tyrosine proteins, and activation of c-Src and PI3K, which arises as a result of an interaction with a host cell surface receptor. In this study, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was identified as the cell signaling receptor required for Rck-mediated adhesion and internalization. First, Rck-mediated adhesion and internalization were shown to be altered when EGFR expression and activity were modulated. Then, immunoprecipitations were performed to demonstrate the Rck-EGFR interaction. Furthermore, surface plasmon resonance biosensor and homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence technologies were used to demonstrate the direct interaction of Rck with the extracellular domain of human EGFR. Finally, our study strongly suggests a noncompetitive binding of Rck and EGF to EGFR. Overall, these results demonstrate that Rck is able to bind to EGFR and thereby establish a tight adherence to provide a signaling cascade, which leads to internalization of Rck-expressing bacteria.-Wiedemann, A., Mijouin, L., Ayoub, M. A., Barilleau, E., Canepa, S., Teixeira-Gomes, A. P., Le Vern, Y., Rosselin, M., Reiter, E., Velge, P. Identification of the epidermal growth factor receptor as the receptor for Salmonella Rck-dependent invasion.

  5. Fibroblast growth factor signalling induces loss of progesterone receptor in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Piasecka, Dominika; Kitowska, Kamila; Czaplinska, Dominika; Mieczkowski, Kamil; Mieszkowska, Magdalena; Turczyk, Lukasz; Skladanowski, Andrzej C.; Zaczek, Anna J.; Biernat, Wojciech; Kordek, Radzislaw; Romanska, Hanna M.; Sadej, Rafal

    2016-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that, fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGFR2), signalling via ribosomal S6 kinase 2 (RSK2), promotes progression of breast cancer (BCa). Loss of progesterone receptor (PR), whose activity in BCa cells can be stimulated by growth factor receptors (GFRs), is associated with poor patient outcome. Here we showed that FGF7/FGFR2 triggered phosphorylation of PR at Ser294, PR ubiquitination and subsequent receptor`s degradation via the 26S proteasome pathway in BCa cells. We further demonstrated that RSK2 mediated FGF7/FGFR2-induced PR downregulation. In addition, a strong synergistic effect of FGF7 and progesterone (Pg), reflected in the enhanced anchorage-independent growth and cell migration, was observed. Analysis of clinical material demonstrated that expression of PR inversely correlated with activated RSK (RSK-P) (p = 0.016). Patients with RSK-P(+)/PR(–) tumours had 3.629-fold higher risk of recurrence (p = 0.002), when compared with the rest of the cohort. Moreover, RSK-P(+)/PR(–) phenotype was shown as an independent prognostic factor (p = 0.006). These results indicate that the FGF7/FGFR2-RSK2 axis promotes PR turnover and activity, which may sensitize BCa cells to stromal stimuli and contribute to the progression toward steroid hormone negative BCa. PMID:27852068

  6. Anti-epidermal growth factor receptor skin toxicity: a matter of topical hydration.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Daris; Codecà, Carla; Bocci, Barbara; Crepaldi, Francesca; Violati, Martina; Viale, Giulia; Careri, Carmela; Caldiera, Sarah; Bordin, Veronica; Luciani, Andrea; Zonato, Sabrina; Cassinelli, Gabriela; Foa, Paolo

    2016-02-01

    Skin toxicity is a frequent complication of anti-epidermal growth factor receptor therapy, which can be an obstacle in maintaining the dose intensity and may negatively impact on the clinical outcome of cancer patients. Skin lesions depend on the disruption of the keratinocyte development pathways and no treatment is clearly effective in resolving the cutaneous alterations frequently found during anti-epidermal growth factor receptor therapy. Among systemic treatments, oral tetracycline proved to be useful in preventing skin manifestations. We describe the case of a patient affected by metastatic colorectal cancer, for whom a combination of chemotherapy and cetuximab was used as second-line treatment. The patient developed a symptomatic papulopustular skin rash that disappeared completely after a twice-daily application of a hydrating and moisturizing cream, mainly consisting of a mixture of paraffin, silicone compounds, and macrogol. The marked cutaneous amelioration allowed the patient to continue cetuximab without any further symptoms and was associated with a partial radiological response.

  7. CrkII signals from epidermal growth factor receptor to Ras.

    PubMed Central

    Kizaka-Kondoh, S; Matsuda, M; Okayama, H

    1996-01-01

    A rat fibroblast mutant defective in oncogenic transformation and signaling from epidermal growth factor receptor to Ras has been isolated. The mutant contains dominant negative-type point mutations in the C-terminal SH3 domain of one crkII gene. Among the adapters tested, the mutant is complemented only by crkII cDNA. Expression of the mutated crkII in parent cells generates the phenotype indistinguishable from the mutant cell. Yet overexpression or reduced expression of Grb2 in the mutant before and after complementation with crkII have little effect on its phenotype. We conclude that adapter molecules are highly specific and that the oncogenic growth signal from epidermal growth factor receptor to Ras is predominantly mediated by CrkII in rat fibroblast. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8901553

  8. Regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor signalling by inducible feedback inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Segatto, Oreste; Anastasi, Sergio; Alemà, Stefano

    2011-06-01

    Signalling by the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) controls morphogenesis and/or homeostasis of several tissues from worms to mammals. The correct execution of these programmes requires the generation of EGFR signals of appropriate strength and duration. This is obtained through a complex circuitry of positive and negative feedback regulation. Feedback inhibitory mechanisms restrain EGFR activity in time and space, which is key to ensuring that receptor outputs are commensurate to the cell and tissue needs. Here, we focus on the emerging field of inducible negative feedback regulation of the EGFR in mammals. In mammalian cells, four EGFR inducible feedback inhibitors (IFIs), namely LRIG1, RALT (also known as MIG6 and ERRFI1), SOCS4 and SOCS5, have been discovered recently. EGFR IFIs are expressed de novo in the context of early or delayed transcriptional responses triggered by EGFR activation. They all bind to the EGFR and suppress receptor signalling through several mechanisms, including catalytic inhibition and receptor downregulation. Here, we review the mechanistic basis of IFI signalling and rationalise the function of IFIs in light of gene-knockout studies that assign LRIG1 and RALT an essential role in restricting cell proliferation. Finally, we discuss how IFIs might participate in system control of EGFR signalling and highlight the emerging roles for IFIs in the suppression of EGFR-driven tumorigenesis.

  9. Negative regulation of inflammatory responses by immunoglobulin A receptor (FcαRI) inhibits the development of Toll-like receptor-9 signalling-accelerated glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, T; Kanamaru, Y; Liu, C; Suzuki, Y; Tada, N; Okumura, K; Horikoshi, S; Tomino, Y

    2011-11-01

    Myeloid FcαRI, a receptor for immunoglobulin (Ig)A, mediates cell activation or inhibition depending on the type of ligand interaction, which can be either multivalent or monovalent. Anti-inflammatory signalling is triggered by monomeric targeting using anti-FcαRI Fab or IgA ligand binding, which inhibits immune and non-immune-mediated renal inflammation. The participation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in kidney pathology in experimental models and various forms of human glomerular nephritis has been discussed. However, little is known about negative regulation of innate-immune activation. In the present study, we generated new transgenic mice that express FcαRI(R209L) /FcRγ chimeric protein and showed that the monovalent targeting of FcαRI exhibited inhibitory effects in an in vivo model of TLR-9 signalling-accelerated nephritis. Mouse monoclonal anti-FcαRI MIP8a Fab improved urinary protein levels and reduced the number of macrophages and immunoglobulin deposition in the glomeruli. Monovalent targeting using MIP8a Fab attenuates the TLR-9 signalling pathway and is associated with phosphorylation of extracellular signal-related protein kinases [extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), P38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)] and the activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB. The inhibitory mechanism involves recruitment of tyrosine phosphatase Src homology 2 domain-containing phosphatase-1 (SHP-1) to FcαRI. Furthermore, cell transfer studies with macrophages pretreated with MIP8a Fab showed that blockade of FcαRI signalling in macrophages prevents the development of TLR-9 signalling-accelerated nephritis. These results suggest a role of anti-FcαRI Fab as a negative regulator in controlling the magnitude of the innate immune response and a new type of anti-inflammatory drug for treatment of kidney disease. © 2011 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Immunology © 2011 British Society for Immunology.

  10. Accumulation of the advanced glycation end product carboxymethyl lysine in breast cancer is positively associated with estrogen receptor expression and unfavorable prognosis in estrogen receptor-negative cases.

    PubMed

    Nass, Norbert; Ignatov, Atanas; Andreas, Ludwig; Weißenborn, Christine; Kalinski, Thomas; Sel, Saadettin

    2016-12-23

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) accumulate as a result of high concentrations of reactive aldehydes, oxidative stress, and insufficient degradation of glycated proteins. AGEs are therefore accepted biomarkers for aging, diabetes, and several degenerative diseases. Due to the Warburg effect and increased oxidative stress, cancer cells frequently accumulate significant amounts of AGEs. As the accumulation of AGEs may reflect the metabolic state and receptor signaling, we evaluated the potential prognostic and predictive value of this biomarker. We used immunohistochemistry to determine the AGE Nε-carboxymethyl lysine (CML) in 213 mammary carcinoma samples and Western blotting to detect AGEs in cell cultures. Whereas no significant correlation between hormone receptor status and CML was observed in cell lines, CML accumulation in tumors was positively correlated with the presence of estrogen receptor alpha, the postmenopausal state, and age. A negative correlation was found for grade III carcinomas and triple-negative cases. In a retrospective Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, there was a statistical trend that high CML accumulation correlated with a more favorable prognosis (relapse-free survival, RFS) under tamoxifen treatment (p = 0.1). In estrogen receptor-negative cases, the high CML content was significantly correlated with an unfavorable outcome (RFS) of chemotherapy (p = 0.046). CML is a therefore a potentially predictive marker for the treatment of breast cancer patients with tamoxifen or chemotherapy.

  11. Amylin Receptor Signaling in the Nucleus Accumbens Negatively Modulates μ-opioid-Driven Feeding

    PubMed Central

    Baisley, Sarah K; Baldo, Brian A

    2014-01-01

    Amylin is a peptide co-secreted with insulin that penetrates into the brain, and produces satiation-like effects via actions in the brainstem, hypothalamus, and mesencephalon. Little is known, however, about the effects of amylin in the nucleus accumbens shell (AcbSh), where a circumscribed zone of intense amylin receptor (AMY-R) binding overlaps reported mappings of a ‘hotspot' for μ-opioid receptor (μ-OR) amplification of food reward. Here, the ability of intra-AcbSh AMY-R signaling to modulate μ-OR-driven feeding was explored. Amylin (1–30 ng) was administered with the μ-OR agonist, D-Ala2, N-MePhe4, Gly-ol]-enkephalin (DAMGO) (0.25 μg), directly into the AcbSh of ad libitum-maintained rats. Amylin dose-dependently reversed DAMGO-induced hyperphagia; 3 ng of amylin reduced DAMGO-mediated feeding by nearly 50%. This dose was, however, completely ineffective at altering DAMGO-induced feeding in the anterior dorsal striatum. Intra-AcbSh amylin alone (3–30 ng) modestly suppressed 10% sucrose intake in ad libitum-maintained rats, and chow in food-deprived rats, but only at the 30-ng dose. This result indicates that reversal of AcbSh DAMGO-induced feeding at a 10-fold lower dose was neither due to malaise nor motoric impairment. Finally, intra-AcbSh infusion of the AMY-R antagonist, AC187 (20 μg), significantly attenuated the ability of prefeeding to suppress DAMGO-induced food intake, with no effects in non-prefed rats. Hence, AMY-R signaling negatively modulates μ-OR-mediated appetitive responses at the level of the AcbSh. The results with AC187 indicate that endogenous AMY-R transmission in the AcbSh curtails opioid function in the postprandial period, suggesting a novel pathway for peripheral-central integration in the control of appetitive motivation and opioid reward. PMID:24957819

  12. Up-Regulation of Soluble Axl and Mer Receptor Tyrosine Kinases Negatively Correlates with Gas6 in Established Multiple Sclerosis Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Weinger, Jason G.; Omari, Kakuri M.; Marsden, Kurt; Raine, Cedric S.; Shafit-Zagardo, Bridget

    2009-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a disease that is characterized by inflammation, demyelination, and axonal damage; it ultimately forms gliotic scars and lesions that severely compromise the function of the central nervous system. Evidence has shown previously that altered growth factor receptor signaling contributes to lesion formation, impedes recovery, and plays a role in disease progression. Growth arrest-specific protein 6 (Gas6), the ligand for the TAM receptor tyrosine kinase family, consisting of Tyro3, Axl, and Mer, is important for cell growth, survival, and clearance of debris. In this study, we show that levels of membrane-bound Mer (205 kd), soluble Mer (∼150 kd), and soluble Axl (80 kd) were all significantly elevated in homogenates from established multiple sclerosis lesions comprised of both chronic active and chronic silent lesions. Whereas in normal tissue Gas6 positively correlated with soluble Axl and Mer, there was a negative correlation between Gas6 and soluble Axl and Mer in established multiple sclerosis lesions. In addition, increased levels of soluble Axl and Mer were associated with increased levels of mature ADAM17, mature ADAM10, and Furin, proteins that are associated with Axl and Mer solubilization. Soluble Axl and Mer are both known to act as decoy receptors and block Gas6 binding to membrane-bound receptors. These data suggest that in multiple sclerosis lesions, dysregulation of protective Gas6 receptor signaling may prolong lesion activity. PMID:19541935

  13. Expression of the estrogen receptor α, progesterone receptor and epidermal growth factor receptor in papillary thyroid carcinoma tissues

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, DAN; QI, WENJING; ZHANG, PENGXIN; GUAN, HONGWEI; WANG, LIFEN

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine the protein expression, in addition to the clinical value of the expression, of estrogen receptor α (ERα), progesterone receptor (PR) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). The expression of ERα, PR and EGFR was examined immunohistochemically on paraffin-embedded thyroid tissues obtained from 64 patients with PTC and 14 patients with nodular thyroid goiter (NTG). The expression level of ERα, PR and EGFR was found to be significantly elevated in the PTC tissues compared with the NTG tissues. In addition, the expression of ERα was found to be correlated with the size of PTC tumors. However, there was no significant difference between the expression levels of ERα, PR and EGFR in males and females with PTC. Thus, immunohistochemical evaluation of ERα, PR and EGFR expression in patients with PTC may aid in the prediction of the prognosis of patients with PTC. PMID:26171022

  14. Computational analysis of negative and positive allosteric modulator binding and function in metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (in)activation.

    PubMed

    Dalton, James A R; Gómez-Santacana, Xavier; Llebaria, Amadeu; Giraldo, Jesús

    2014-05-27

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are high-profile G-protein coupled receptors drug targets because of their involvement in several neurological disease states, and mGluR5 in particular is a subtype whose controlled allosteric modulation, both positive and negative, can potentially be useful for the treatment of schizophrenia and relief of chronic pain, respectively. Here we model mGluR5 with a collection of positive and negative allosteric modulators (PAMs and NAMs) in both active and inactive receptor states, in a manner that is consistent with experimental information, using a specialized protocol that includes homology to increase docking accuracy, and receptor relaxation to generate an individual induced fit with each allosteric modulator. Results implicate two residues in particular for NAM and PAM function: NAM interaction with W785 for receptor inactivation, and NAM/PAM H-bonding with S809 for receptor (in)activation. Models suggest the orientation of the H-bond between allosteric modulator and S809, controlled by PAM/NAM chemistry, influences the position of TM7, which in turn influences the shape of the allosteric site, and potentially the receptor state. NAM-bound and PAM-bound mGluR5 models also reveal that although PAMs and NAMs bind in the same pocket and share similar binding modes, they have distinct effects on the conformation of the receptor. Our models, together with the identification of a possible activation mechanism, may be useful in the rational design of new allosteric modulators for mGluR5.

  15. Correlation between mammographic and sonographic findings and prognostic factors in patients with node-negative invasive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Shin, H J; Kim, H H; Huh, M O; Kim, M J; Yi, A; Kim, H; Son, B H; Ahn, S H

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to correlate sonographic and mammographic findings with prognostic factors in patients with node-negative invasive breast cancer. Sonographic and mammographic findings in 710 consecutive patients (age range 21-81 years; mean age 49 years) with 715 node-negative invasive breast cancers were retrospectively evaluated. Pathology reports relating to tumour size, histological grade, lymphovascular invasion (LVI), extensive intraductal component (EIC), oestrogen receptor (ER) status and HER-2/neu status were reviewed and correlated with the imaging findings. Statistical analysis was performed using logistic regression analysis and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). On mammography, non-spiculated masses with calcifications were associated with all poor prognostic factors: high histological grade, positive LVI, EIC, HER-2/neu status and negative ER. Other lesions were associated with none of these poor prognostic factors. Hyperdense masses on mammography, the presence of mixed echogenicity, posterior enhancement, calcifications in-or-out of masses and diffusely increased vascularity on sonography were associated with high histological grade and negative ER. Associated calcifications on both mammograms and sonograms were correlated with EIC and HER-2/neu overexpression. The ICC value for the disease extent was 0.60 on mammography and 0.70 on sonography. Several sonographic and mammographic features can have a prognostic value in the subsequent treatment of patients with node-negative invasive breast cancer. Radiologists should pay more attention to masses that are associated with calcifications because on both mammography and sonography associated calcifications were predictors of positive EIC and HER-2/neu overexpression.

  16. A negative feedback loop controls NMDA receptor function in cortical interneurons via neuregulin 2/ErbB4 signalling

    PubMed Central

    Vullhorst, Detlef; Mitchell, Robert M.; Keating, Carolyn; Roychowdhury, Swagata; Karavanova, Irina; Tao-Cheng, Jung-Hwa; Buonanno, Andres

    2015-01-01

    The neuregulin receptor ErbB4 is an important modulator of GABAergic interneurons and neural network synchronization. However, little is known about the endogenous ligands that engage ErbB4, the neural processes that activate them or their direct downstream targets. Here we demonstrate, in cultured neurons and in acute slices, that the NMDA receptor is both effector and target of neuregulin 2 (NRG2)/ErbB4 signalling in cortical interneurons. Interneurons co-express ErbB4 and NRG2, and pro-NRG2 accumulates on cell bodies atop subsurface cisternae. NMDA receptor activation rapidly triggers shedding of the signalling-competent NRG2 extracellular domain. In turn, NRG2 promotes ErbB4 association with GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors, followed by rapid internalization of surface receptors and potent downregulation of NMDA but not AMPA receptor currents. These effects occur selectively in ErbB4-positive interneurons and not in ErbB4-negative pyramidal neurons. Our findings reveal an intimate reciprocal relationship between ErbB4 and NMDA receptors with possible implications for the modulation of cortical microcircuits associated with cognitive deficits in psychiatric disorders. PMID:26027736

  17. Loss of p16 expression is associated with the stem cell characteristics of surface markers and therapeutic resistance in estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Arima, Yoshimi; Hayashi, Naoki; Hayashi, Hidemi; Sasaki, Mikako; Kai, Kazuharu; Sugihara, Eiji; Abe, Eriko; Yoshida, Atsushi; Mikami, Shuji; Nakamura, Seigo; Saya, Hideyuki

    2012-06-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer [TNBC, which is negative for the estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2] is a high-risk form of the disease without a specific therapy. DNA microarray and immunohistochemical analyses have shown that most TNBCs fall within the basal-like histological subset of breast cancers, which frequently exhibit inactivation of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor (Rb) and upregulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p16(INK4a) (p16). However, downregulation of p16 expression has been observed in some basal-like breast cancer cell lines, suggesting that such cells can be divided into two groups according to Rb and p16 status. We now show that cells that are CD44(+) and CD24(-) , a phenotype associated with stem-like breast cancer cells, are more abundant in ER(-) /p16(-) breast cancer cell lines than in ER(-) /p16(+) lines. It was also found that p16 expression was downregulated in mammospheres from an ER-negative breast cancer cell line. Depletion of p16 by RNA interference in ER-negative breast cancer cells increased the percentage of CD44(+) /CD24(-) cells and increased the expression of mRNA of the ES-like genes Nanog, Oct4, and Sox2 through an Rb-independent pathway. Furthermore, such depletion of p16 reduced chemosensitivity. The loss of p16 expression may thus reduce the response of ER-negative breast cancer cells to chemotherapy by conferring cancer stem cell-like properties. Consistent with this conclusion, immunohistochemical analysis of the clinical samples suggests that low p16 expression in TNBC is associated with resistance to preoperative chemotherapy. Copyright © 2011 UICC.

  18. The Circadian Rhythm Gene Arntl2 Is a Metastasis Susceptibility Gene for Estrogen Receptor-Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Ngoc-Han; Long, Jirong; Cai, Qiuyin; Shu, Xiao Ou

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer mortality is primarily due to metastasis rather than primary tumors, yet relatively little is understood regarding the etiology of metastatic breast cancer. Previously, using a mouse genetics approach, we demonstrated that inherited germline polymorphisms contribute to metastatic disease, and that these single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) could be used to predict outcome in breast cancer patients. In this study, a backcross between a highly metastatic (FVB/NJ) and low metastatic (MOLF/EiJ) mouse strain identified Arntl2, a gene encoding a circadian rhythm transcription factor, as a metastasis susceptibility gene associated with progression, specifically in estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer patients. Integrated whole genome sequence analysis with DNase hypersensitivity sites reveals SNPs in the predicted promoter of Arntl2. Using CRISPR/Cas9-mediated substitution of the MOLF promoter, we demonstrate that the SNPs regulate Arntl2 transcription and affect metastatic burden. Finally, analysis of SNPs associated with ARNTL2 expression in human breast cancer patients revealed reproducible associations of ARNTL2 expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) SNPs with disease-free survival, consistent with the mouse studies. PMID:27656887

  19. Association of psychosocial and demographic factors with postpartum negative thoughts and appraisals.

    PubMed

    Hall, Pauline L; Holden, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    The impact of psychosocial and demographic factors on symptoms of postpartum depression remains unclear. This study aimed to explore whether particular maternal sociodemographic variables were associated with postpartum negative thoughts and negative appraisals. Data were collected from a community sample of 181 mothers with infants aged 0 to 7 months. Participants completed and returned anonymous questionnaires including the Postnatal Negative Thoughts Questionnaire (PNTQ) and a sociodemographic questionnaire. The PNTQ is a self-report scale to detect and measure postpartum negative cognitions. It consists of 2 factors: "baby- related and motherhood negative thoughts" (BRM-NT) and "appraisals of cognition, emotion and situation" (ACES). Analyses revealed that practical and emotional support and satisfaction with this support were related to low ACES scores, and mothers of infant boys were more likely to have high ACES scores (ie, more negative appraisals of their own thinking). Satisfaction with practical and emotional support was also related to low BRM-NT scores. Logistic regression analyses revealed that sex of infant predicted ACES scores, whereby having a boy predicted high ACES scores. In conclusion, this study found that postpartum negative thoughts and negative appraisals are correlated with the amount and satisfaction of support received, and having an infant boy was found to reliably predict a tendency to appraise thoughts negatively.

  20. Toll-Like Receptor 9 Alternatively Spliced Isoform Negatively Regulates TLR9 Signaling in Teleost Fish

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Nai-Yu; Nagarajan, Govindarajulu; Chiou, Pinwen Peter

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) recognizes and binds unmethylated CpG motifs in DNA, which are found in the genomes of bacteria and DNA viruses. In fish, Tlr9 is highly diverse, with the number of introns ranging from 0 to 4. A fish Tlr9 gene containing two introns has been reported to express two alternatively spliced isoforms, namely gTLR9A (full-length) and gTLR9B (with a truncated Cʹ-terminal signal transducing domain), whose regulation and function remain unclear. Here, we report a unique regulatory mechanism of gTLR9 signaling in orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides), whose gTlr9 sequence also contains two introns. We demonstrated that the grouper gTlr9 gene indeed has the capacity to produce two gTLR9 isoforms via alternative RNA splicing. We found that gTLR9B could function as a negative regulator to suppress gTLR9 signaling as demonstrated by the suppression of downstream gene expression. Following stimulation with CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN), gTLR9A and gTLR9B were observed to translocate into endosomes and co-localize with ODN and the adaptor protein gMyD88. Both gTLR9A and gTLR9B could interact with gMyD88; however, gTLR9B could not interact with downstream IRAK4 and TRAF6. Further analysis of the expression profile of gTlr9A and gTlr9B upon immune-stimulation revealed that the two isoforms were differentially regulated in a time-dependent manner. Overall, these data suggest that fish TLR9B functions as a negative regulator, and that its temporal expression is mediated by alternative RNA splicing. This has not been observed in mammalian TLR9s and might have been acquired relatively recently in the evolution of fish. PMID:25955250

  1. Lysophosphatidic acid receptor-5 negatively regulates cellular responses in mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Yan; Hirane, Miku; Araki, Mutsumi; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • LPA{sub 5} inhibits the cell growth and motile activities of 3T3 cells. • LPA{sub 5} suppresses the cell motile activities stimulated by hydrogen peroxide in 3T3 cells. • Enhancement of LPA{sub 5} on the cell motile activities inhibited by LPA{sub 1} in 3T3 cells. • The expression and activation of Mmp-9 were inhibited by LPA{sub 5} in 3T3 cells. • LPA signaling via LPA{sub 5} acts as a negative regulator of cellular responses in 3T3 cells. - Abstract: Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling via G protein-coupled LPA receptors (LPA{sub 1}–LPA{sub 6}) mediates a variety of biological functions, including cell migration. Recently, we have reported that LPA{sub 1} inhibited the cell motile activities of mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells. In the present study, to evaluate a role of LPA{sub 5} in cellular responses, Lpar5 knockdown (3T3-L5) cells were generated from 3T3 cells. In cell proliferation assays, LPA markedly stimulated the cell proliferation activities of 3T3-L5 cells, compared with control cells. In cell motility assays with Cell Culture Inserts, the cell motile activities of 3T3-L5 cells were significantly higher than those of control cells. The activity levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were measured by gelatin zymography. 3T3-L5 cells stimulated the activation of Mmp-2, correlating with the expression levels of Mmp-2 gene. Moreover, to assess the co-effects of LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 5} on cell motile activities, Lpar5 knockdown (3T3a1-L5) cells were also established from Lpar1 over-expressing (3T3a1) cells. 3T3a1-L5 cells increased the cell motile activities of 3T3a1 cells, while the cell motile activities of 3T3a1 cells were significantly lower than those of control cells. These results suggest that LPA{sub 5} may act as a negative regulator of cellular responses in mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells, similar to the case for LPA{sub 1}.

  2. Nuclear transportation of exogenous epidermal growth factor receptor and androgen receptor via extracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    Read, Jolene; Ingram, Alistair; Al Saleh, Hassan A; Platko, Khrystyna; Gabriel, Kathleen; Kapoor, Anil; Pinthus, Jehonathan; Majeed, Fadwa; Qureshi, Talha; Al-Nedawi, Khalid

    2017-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays a central role in the progression of several human malignancies. Although EGFR is a membrane receptor, it undergoes nuclear translocation, where it has a distinct signalling pathway. Herein, we report a novel mechanism by which cancer cells can directly transport EGFR to the nucleus of other cells via extracellular vesicles (EVs). The transported receptor is active and stimulates the nuclear EGFR pathways. Interestingly, the translocation of EGFR via EVs occurs independently of the nuclear localisation sequence that is required for nuclear translocation of endogenous EGFR. Also, we found that the mutant receptor EGFRvIII could be transported to the nucleus of other cells via EVs. To assess the role of EVs in the regulation of an actual nuclear receptor, we studied the regulation of androgen receptor (AR). We found that full-length AR and mutant variant ARv7 are secreted in EVs derived from prostate cancer cell lines and could be transported to the nucleus of AR-null cells. The EV-derived AR was able to bind the androgen-responsive promoter region of prostate specific antigen, and recruit RNA Pol II, an indication of active transcription. The nuclear-translocated AR via EVs enhanced the proliferation of acceptor cells in the absence of androgen. Finally, we provide evidence that nuclear localisation of AR could occur in vivo via orthotopically-injected EVs in male SCID mice prostate glands. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing the nuclear translocation of nuclear receptors via EVs, which significantly extends the role of EVs as paracrine transcriptional regulators. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Negative Allosteric Modulators of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors Subtype 5 in Addiction: a Therapeutic Window

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background: Abundant evidence at the anatomical, electrophysiological, and molecular levels implicates metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGluR5) in addiction. Consistently, the effects of a wide range of doses of different mGluR5 negative allosteric modulators (NAMs) have been tested in various animal models of addiction. Here, these studies were subjected to a systematic review to find out if mGluR5 NAMs have a therapeutic potential that can be translated to the clinic. Methods: Literature on consumption/self-administration and reinstatement of drug seeking as outcomes of interest published up to April 2015 was retrieved via PubMed. The review focused on the effects of systemic (i.p., i.v., s.c.) administration of the mGluR5 NAMs 3-((2-Methyl-4-thiazolyl)ethynyl)pyridine (MTEP) and 2-Methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine (MPEP) on paradigms with cocaine, ethanol, nicotine, and food in rats. Results: MTEP and MPEP were found to reduce self-administration of cocaine, ethanol, and nicotine at doses ≥1mg/kg and 2.5mg/kg, respectively. Dose-response relationship resembled a sigmoidal curve, with low doses not reaching statistical significance and high doses reliably inhibiting self-administration of drugs of abuse. Importantly, self-administration of cocaine, ethanol, and nicotine, but not food, was reduced by MTEP and MPEP in the dose range of 1 to 2mg/kg and 2.5 to 3.2mg/kg, respectively. This dose range corresponds to approximately 50% to 80% mGluR5 occupancy. Interestingly, the limited data found in mice and monkeys showed a similar therapeutic window. Conclusion: Altogether, this review suggests a therapeutic window for mGluR5 NAMs that can be translated to the treatment of substance-related and addictive disorders. PMID:26802568

  4. Lysophosphatidic acid receptor-5 negatively regulates cellular responses in mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yan; Hirane, Miku; Araki, Mutsumi; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2014-04-04

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling via G protein-coupled LPA receptors (LPA1-LPA6) mediates a variety of biological functions, including cell migration. Recently, we have reported that LPA1 inhibited the cell motile activities of mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells. In the present study, to evaluate a role of LPA5 in cellular responses, Lpar5 knockdown (3T3-L5) cells were generated from 3T3 cells. In cell proliferation assays, LPA markedly stimulated the cell proliferation activities of 3T3-L5 cells, compared with control cells. In cell motility assays with Cell Culture Inserts, the cell motile activities of 3T3-L5 cells were significantly higher than those of control cells. The activity levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were measured by gelatin zymography. 3T3-L5 cells stimulated the activation of Mmp-2, correlating with the expression levels of Mmp-2 gene. Moreover, to assess the co-effects of LPA1 and LPA5 on cell motile activities, Lpar5 knockdown (3T3a1-L5) cells were also established from Lpar1 over-expressing (3T3a1) cells. 3T3a1-L5 cells increased the cell motile activities of 3T3a1 cells, while the cell motile activities of 3T3a1 cells were significantly lower than those of control cells. These results suggest that LPA5 may act as a negative regulator of cellular responses in mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells, similar to the case for LPA1.

  5. Phosphodiesterase 4B negatively regulates endotoxin-activated interleukin-1 receptor antagonist responses in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing-Xing; Hsieh, Kou-Chou; Chen, Yi-Ling; Lee, Chien-Kuo; Conti, Marco; Chuang, Tsung-Hsien; Wu, Chin-Pyng; Jin, S.-L. Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Activation of TLR4 by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces both pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokine production in macrophages. Type 4 phosphodiesterases (PDE4) are key cAMP-hydrolyzing enzymes, and PDE4 inhibitors are considered as immunosuppressors to various inflammatory responses. We demonstrate here that PDE4 inhibitors enhance the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) secretion in LPS-activated mouse peritoneal macrophages, and this response was regulated at the transcriptional level rather than an increased IL-1Ra mRNA stability. Studies with PDE4-deficient macrophages revealed that the IL-1Ra upregulation elicited by LPS alone is PKA-independent, whereas the rolipram-enhanced response was mediated by inhibition of only PDE4B, one of the three PDE4 isoforms expressed in macrophages, and it requires PKA but not Epac activity. However, both pathways activate CREB to induce IL-1Ra expression. PDE4B ablation also promoted STAT3 phosphorylation (Tyr705) to LPS stimulation, but this STAT3 activation is not entirely responsible for the IL-1Ra upregulation in PDE4B-deficient macrophages. In a model of LPS-induced sepsis, only PDE4B-deficient mice displayed an increased circulating IL-1Ra, suggesting a protective role of PDE4B inactivation in vivo. These findings demonstrate that PDE4B negatively modulates anti-inflammatory cytokine expression in innate immune cells, and selectively targeting PDE4B should retain the therapeutic benefits of nonselective PDE4 inhibitors. PMID:28383060

  6. Fibroblast growth factor receptor levels decrease during chick embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Two putative receptors for fibroblast growth factor (FGF) of approximately 150 and 200 kD were identified in membrane preparations from chick embryos. Specific binding (femtomoles/milligram) of 125I- aFGF to whole chick embryonic membranes was relatively constant from day 2 to 7, then decreased fivefold between days 7 and 13. Day-19 chick embryos retained 125I-aFGF binding at low levels to brain, eye, and liver tissues but not to skeletal muscle or cardiac tissues. The 200-kD FGF receptor began to decline between day 4.5 and 7 and was barely detectable by day 9, whereas the 150-kD FGF receptor began to decline by day 7 but was still detectable in day-9 embryonic membranes. It is not known whether the two FGF-binding proteins represent altered forms of one polypeptide, but it is clear that their levels undergo differential changes during development. Because endogenous chick FGF may remain bound to FGF receptor in membrane preparations, membranes were treated with acidic (pH 4.0) buffers to release bound FGF; such treatment did not affect 125I-aFGF binding and moderately increased the number of binding sites in day-7 and -19 embryos. Consequently, the observed loss of high affinity 125I-aFGF binding sites and FGF-binding polypeptides most likely represents a loss of FGF receptor protein. These experiments provide in vivo evidence to support the hypothesis that regulation of FGF receptor levels may function as a mechanism for controlling FGF-dependent processes during embryonic development. PMID:2153684

  7. Probing the existence of G protein-coupled receptor dimers by positive and negative ligand-dependent cooperative binding.

    PubMed

    Albizu, Laura; Balestre, Marie-Noëlle; Breton, Christophe; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Manning, Maurice; Mouillac, Bernard; Barberis, Claude; Durroux, Thierry

    2006-11-01

    An increasing amount of ligand binding data on G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is not compatible with the prediction of the simple mass action law. This may be related to the propensity of most GPCRs, if not all, to oligomerize. Indeed, one of the consequences of receptor oligomerization could be a possible cross-talk between the protomers, which in turn could lead to negative or positive cooperative ligand binding. We prove here that this can be demonstrated experimentally. Saturation, dissociation, and competition binding experiments were performed on vasopressin and oxytocin receptors expressed in Chinese hamster ovary or COS-7 cells. Linear, concave, and convex Scatchard plots were then obtained, depending on the ligand used. Moreover, some competition curves exhibited an increase of the radiotracer binding for low concentrations of competitors, suggesting a cooperative binding process. These data demonstrate that various vasopressin analogs display either positive or negative cooperative binding. Because positive cooperative binding cannot be explained without considering receptor as multivalent, these binding data support the concept of GPCR dimerization process. The results, which are in good accordance with the predictions of previous mathematical models, suggest that binding experiments can be used to probe the existence of receptor dimers.

  8. Identification of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) residues essential for leukemia inhibitory factor receptor binding and generation of CNTF receptor antagonists.

    PubMed Central

    Di Marco, A; Gloaguen, I; Graziani, R; Paonessa, G; Saggio, I; Hudson, K R; Laufer, R

    1996-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) drives the sequential assembly of a receptor complex containing the ligand-specific alpha-receptor subunit (CNTFR alpha) and the signal transducers gp130 and leukemia inhibitory factor receptor-beta (LIFR). The D1 structural motif, located at the beginning of the D-helix of human CNTF, contains two amino acid residues, F152 and K155, which are conserved among all cytokines that signal through LIFR. The functional importance of these residues was assessed by alanine mutagenesis. Substitution of either F152 or K155 with alanine was found to specifically inhibit cytokine interaction with LIFR without affecting binding to CNTFR alpha or gp130. The resulting variants behaved as partial agonists with varying degrees of residual bioactivity in different cell-based assays. Simultaneous alanine substitution of both F152 and K155 totally abolished biological activity. Combining these mutations with amino acid substitutions in the D-helix, which enhance binding affinity for the CNTFR alpha, gave rise to a potent competitive CNTF receptor antagonist. This protein constitutes a new tool for studies of CNTF function in normal physiology and disease. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 6 PMID:8799186

  9. Expression of melatonin receptors in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) in African American and Caucasian women: relation to survival.

    PubMed

    Oprea-Ilies, Gabriela; Haus, Erhard; Sackett-Lundeen, Linda; Liu, Yuan; McLendon, Lauren; Busch, Robert; Adams, Amy; Cohen, Cynthia

    2013-02-01

    In the normal rodent breast, the pineal hormone melatonin controls the development of ductal and alveolar tissue. Melatonin counteracts tumor occurrence and tumor cell progression in vivo and in vitro in animal and human breast cancer cell cultures. It acts predominantly through its melatonin MT1 receptor. Our aim was to investigate the presence or absence of the MT1 melatonin receptor in the aggressive triple negative group of human breast carcinoma (TNBC) and its possible relationship to the course of the disease. A total of 167 patients with a ER-, PR-, Her-2/neu- phenotype in which tissue for receptor studies was available were examined. The MT1 receptor immunostain was evaluated semiquantitatively as staining intensity (0, 1, 2, 3), percentage of stained cells and the weighted index (WI) (staining intensity times percentage of stained cells). A score of WI < 60 was regarded as "negative". There was a striking difference in incidence of MT1 positivity and staining intensity between carcinomas in African American (AA) and Caucasian (C) women. The AA showed a higher incidence of MT1 negative tumors (41/84 = 48.8 % in AA, 6/51 = 11.8 % in C) and a lower average WI. MT1 positivity in TNBC was associated with a lower stage and a smaller tumor size at time of diagnosis. In multivariable survival analysis, MT1 negative TNBC in all cases regardless of race showed a significantly higher hazard ratio for disease progression, shorter progression free survival, and disease-related death, and shorter OS. This was especially pronounced in the AA group but did not reach statistical significance in the smaller group of C alone. These results suggest that melatonin or a melatonin receptor agonist may be useful biologic additions in the treatment of some forms of TNBC, especially in AA who generally show a more aggressive course of their disease.

  10. Negative regulation of transcription in vitro by a glucocorticoid response element is mediated by a trans-acting factor.

    PubMed Central

    Langer, S J; Ostrowski, M C

    1988-01-01

    In vitro experiments with cell extracts prepared from a mouse mammary epithelial cell line demonstrated that a cis-acting glucocorticoid response element (GRE) of the mouse mammary tumor virus represses transcription from its homologous promoter. Competition transcription experiments, in which a molar excess of a restriction fragment that contains the GRE is added to the cell-free assay, revealed that a nuclear factor mediates in trans the negative regulation of mammary tumor virus transcription in vitro. Gel retention assays indicated that a factor in the extracts specifically recognizes the GRE. One unusual result of the gel retention studies was that heating the GRE probe to 65 degrees C before addition to a binding assay increases the formation of the specific protein-DNA complex 20-fold. Exonuclease III footprinting demonstrated that the sequences recognized by the factor are identical for either untreated or heat-treated probe. The footprinting also demonstrated that this factor recognizes sequences that are distinct from those recognized by the glucocorticoid receptor. A synthetic oligonucleotide based on the sequences identified by the footprinting experiments repressed the activity of a heterologous enhancer-promoter in vivo, as assayed by transient expression assays. We propose that this negative transcription element may control the basal level of expression of some glucocorticoid-modulated genes and may explain the insensitivity of certain tumor cells to steroid hormone action. Images PMID:2851730

  11. Methods for studying the platelet-derived growth factor receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen-Pope, D.F.; Ross, R.

    1985-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) is a basic 30,000-dalton protein circulating in normal blood sequestered within the platelet alpha granule. Radioiodinated PDGF shows saturable (e.g., 60,000-120,000 receptors per diploid human fibroblast) high affinity binding to culture PDGF-responsive cells. The apparent dissociation constant reported for this binding interaction has varied widely. This paper focuses on factors which affect (/sup 125/I)PGDF binding and on the development of a radioreceptor assay for PDGF.

  12. Conformational thermostabilisation of corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Kean, James; Bortolato, Andrea; Hollenstein, Kaspar; Marshall, Fiona H.; Jazayeri, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Recent technical advances have greatly facilitated G-protein coupled receptors crystallography as evidenced by the number of successful x-ray structures that have been reported recently. These technical advances include novel detergents, specialised crystallography techniques as well as protein engineering solutions such as fusions and conformational thermostabilisation. Using conformational thermostabilisation, it is possible to generate variants of GPCRs that exhibit significantly increased stability in detergent micelles whilst preferentially occupying a single conformation. In this paper we describe for the first time the application of this technique to a member of a class B GPCR, the corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1 (CRF1R). Mutational screening in the presence of the inverse agonist, CP-376395, resulted in the identification of a construct with twelve point mutations that exhibited significantly increased thermal stability in a range of detergents. We further describe the subsequent construct engineering steps that eventually yielded a crystallisation-ready construct which recently led to the solution of the first x-ray structure of a class B receptor. Finally, we have used molecular dynamic simulation to provide structural insight into CRF1R instability as well as the stabilising effects of the mutants, which may be extended to other class B receptors considering the high degree of structural conservation. PMID:26159865

  13. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor -2 in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Shanchun; Colbert, Laronna S.; Fuller, Miles; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Gonzalez-Perez, Ruben R.

    2010-01-01

    Investigations over the last decade have established the essential role of growth factors and their receptors during angiogenesis and carcinogenesis. The vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) family in mammals contains three members, VEGFR-1 (Flt-1), VEGFR-2 (KDR/Flk-1) and VEGFR-3 (Flt-4), which are transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptors that regulate the formation of blood and lymphatic vessels. In the early 1990s, the above VEGFR were structurally characterized by cDNA cloning. Among these three receptors, VEGFR-2 is generally recognized to have a principal role in mediating VEGF-induced responses. VEGFR-2 is considered as the earliest marker for endothelial cell development. Importantly, VEGFR-2 directly regulates tumor angiogenesis. Therefore, several inhibitors of VEGFR-2 have been developed and many of them are now in clinical trials. In addition to targeting endothelial cells, the VEGF/VEGFR-2 system works as an essential autocrine/paracrine process for cancer cell proliferation and survival. Recent studies mark the continuous and increased interest in this related, but distinct, function of VEGF/VEGFR-2 in cancer cells: the autocrine/paracrine loop. Several mechanisms regulate VEGFR-2 levels and modulate its role in tumor angiogenesis and physiologic functions, i.e.: cellular localization/trafficking, regulation of cis-elements of promoter, epigenetic regulation and signaling from Notch, cytokines/growth factors and estrogen, etc. In this review, we will focus on updated information regarding VEGFR-2 research with respect to the molecular mechanisms of VEGFR-2 regulation in human breast cancer. Investigations in the activation, function, and regulation of VEGFR-2 in breast cancer will allow the development of new pharmacological strategies aimed at directly targeting cancer cell proliferation and survival. PMID:20462514

  14. SHARPIN controls regulatory T cells by negatively modulating the T cell antigen receptor complex

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yoon; Jin, Hyung-seung; Lopez, Justine; Lee, Jeeho; Liao, Lujian; Elly, Chris; Liu, Yun-Cai

    2016-01-01

    SHARPIN forms a linear-ubiquitin-chain-assembly complex that promotes signaling via the transcription factor NF-κB. SHARPIN deficiency leads to progressive multi-organ inflammation and immune system malfunction, but how SHARPIN regulates T cell responses is unclear. Here we found that SHARPIN deficiency resulted in a substantial reduction in the number of and defective function of regulatory T cells (Treg cells). Transfer of SHARPIN-sufficient Treg cells into SHARPIN-deficient mice considerably alleviated their systemic inflammation. SHARPIN-deficient T cells displayed enhanced proximal signaling via the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) without an effect on the activation of NF-κB. SHARPIN conjugated with Lys63 (K63)-linked ubiquitin chains, which led to inhibition of the association of TCRζ with the signaling kinase Zap70; this affected the generation of Treg cells. Our study therefore identifies a role for SHARPIN in TCR signaling whereby it maintains immunological homeostasis and tolerance by regulating Treg cells. PMID:26829767

  15. The Internal Structure of Positive and Negative Affect: A Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the PANAS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuccitto, Daniel E.; Giacobbi, Peter R., Jr.; Leite, Walter L.

    2010-01-01

    This study tested five confirmatory factor analytic (CFA) models of the Positive Affect Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS) to provide validity evidence based on its internal structure. A sample of 223 club sport athletes indicated their emotions during the past week. Results revealed that an orthogonal two-factor CFA model, specifying error…

  16. The Internal Structure of Positive and Negative Affect: A Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the PANAS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuccitto, Daniel E.; Giacobbi, Peter R., Jr.; Leite, Walter L.

    2010-01-01

    This study tested five confirmatory factor analytic (CFA) models of the Positive Affect Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS) to provide validity evidence based on its internal structure. A sample of 223 club sport athletes indicated their emotions during the past week. Results revealed that an orthogonal two-factor CFA model, specifying error…

  17. Neural crest transcription factor Sox10 is preferentially expressed in triple-negative and metaplastic breast carcinomas☆,☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Cimino-Mathews, Ashley; Subhawong, Andrea P.; Elwood, Hillary; Warzecha, Hind Nassar; Sharma, Rajni; Park, Ben Ho; Taube, Janis M.; Illei, Peter B.; Argani, Pedram

    2014-01-01

    Summary The transcription factor Sox10 mediates the differentiation of neural crest–derived cells, and Sox10 labeling by immunohistochemistry (IHC) is used clinically primarily to support the diagnosis of melanoma. Sox10 expression by IHC has been previously documented in benign breast myoepithelial cells but not in breast carcinomas. Here, we report the first systematic study of Sox10 expression in invasive ductal carcinomas subclassified by IHC-defined molecular subtype (100 cases), as well as in 24 cases of ductal carcinoma in situ and 44 mammary fibroepithelial neoplasms. Tissue microarrays containing 168 primary breast tumors were subjected to IHC for Sox10. The extent of nuclear Sox10 labeling was scored by percentage labeling as follows: 0 (0%), 1+ (1%–25%), 2+ (25%–50%), 3+ (50%–75%), and 4+ (>75%). Overall, 40 (40%) of 100 invasive breast carcinomas demonstrated Sox10 immunoreactivity, which was seen primarily in the basal-like, unclassified triple-negative, and metaplastic carcinomas. Sox10 labeling was seen in 66% (38/58) of the basal-like, unclassified triple-negative, and metaplastic carcinomas as compared with 5% (2/42) of the luminal A, luminal B, and Her-2 carcinomas (P < .00001). Sox10 labeling was seen in 1 (4%) of 24 cases of ductal carcinoma in situ, which was negative for estrogen receptor/progesterone receptor. No labeling was seen in the stromal component of phyllodes tumors or fibroadenomas. These findings show that breast carcinoma must be considered in the differential diagnosis of melanoma for an S100-positive, Sox10-positive metastatic malignant neoplasm. Sox10 expression in the basal-like, unclassified triple-negative, and metaplastic carcinomas types supports the concept that these neoplasms show myoepithelial differentiation. PMID:23260325

  18. Can genetic factors explain the spillover of warmth and negativity across family relationships?

    PubMed

    Ganiban, Jody M; Spotts, Erica L; Lichtenstein, Paul; Khera, Gagan S; Reiss, David; Neiderhiser, Jenae M

    2007-04-01

    Previous studies indicate that the emotional quality of marital relationships is mirrored in parent-child relationships. We explored the degree to which these associations are explained by genetic and environmental factors. Participants were drawn from the Twin and Offspring Study in Sweden (TOSS), and included 544 female twin pairs (258 monozygotic [MZ], 286 dizygotic [DZ]), and 311 male twin pairs (128 MZ, 183 DZ). The spouses and one adolescent child of each twin also participated in this study. The twins completed self-report measures that assessed their marital quality and their warmth and negativity towards their children. Observational ratings of marital warmth and negativity, and of maternal warmth and negativity were obtained for a subset of female twin pairs (150 MZ, 176 DZ). Self-reported marital satisfaction was associated with self-reported parental warmth and negativity for mothers (rs = .25, -.36) and fathers (rs = .25, -.44). For the observational measures, marital warmth was associated with maternal warmth (r = .42), while marital negativity was associated with maternal negativity (r = .34). On average genetic factors explained nearly half of the covariance between self-reported marital satisfaction and parenting for mothers (48%) and fathers (47%). Genetic factors explained 21% of the covariance between observed marital and maternal warmth, but did not contribute to associations between marital and maternal negativity. These findings indicate that parents' genetically influenced characteristics help shape the emotional climate of the family.

  19. Epidermal growth factor receptor activity is necessary for mouse basal cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Brechbuhl, Heather M.; Li, Bilan; Smith, Russell W.

    2014-01-01

    ERB family receptors (EGFR, ERB-B2, ERB-B3, and ERB-B4) regulate epithelial cell function in many tissue types. In the human airway epithelium, changes in ERB receptor expression are associated with epithelial repair defects. However, the specific role(s) played by ERB receptors in repair have not been determined. We aimed to determine whether ERB receptors regulate proliferation of the tracheobronchial progenitor, the basal cell. Receptor tyrosine kinase arrays were used to evaluate ERB activity in normal and naphthalene (NA)-injured mouse trachea and in air-liquid interface cultures. Roles for epidermal growth factor (EGF), EGFR, and ERB-B2 in basal cell proliferation were evaluated in vitro. NA injury and transgenic expression of an EGFR-dominant negative (DN) receptor were used to evaluate roles for EGFR signaling in vivo. EGFR and ERB-B2 were active in normal and NA-injured trachea and were the only active ERB receptors detected in proliferating basal cells in vitro. EGF was necessary for basal cell proliferation in vitro. The EGFR inhibitor, AG1478, decreased proliferation by 99, and the Erb-B2 inhibitor, AG825, decreased proliferation by ∼66%. In vivo, EGFR-DN expression in basal cells significantly decreased basal cell proliferation after NA injury. EGF and EGFR are necessary for basal cell proliferation. The EGFR/EGFR homo- and the EGFR/ERB-B2 heterodimer account for ∼34 and 66%, respectively, of basal cell proliferation in vitro. Active EGFR is necessary for basal cell proliferation after NA injury. We conclude that EGFR activation is necessary for mouse basal cell proliferation and normal epithelial repair. PMID:25217659

  20. Non-negative factor analysis supporting the interpretation of elemental distribution images acquired by XRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfeld, Matthias; Wahabzada, Mirwaes; Bauckhage, Christian; Kersting, Kristian; Wellenreuther, Gerd; Falkenberg, Gerald

    2014-04-01

    Stacks of elemental distribution images acquired by XRF can be difficult to interpret, if they contain high degrees of redundancy and components differing in their quantitative but not qualitative elemental composition. Factor analysis, mainly in the form of Principal Component Analysis (PCA), has been used to reduce the level of redundancy and highlight correlations. PCA, however, does not yield physically meaningful representations as they often contain negative values. This limitation can be overcome, by employing factor analysis that is restricted to non-negativity. In this paper we present the first application of the Python Matrix Factorization Module (pymf) on XRF data. This is done in a case study on the painting Saul and David from the studio of Rembrandt van Rijn. We show how the discrimination between two different Co containing compounds with minimum user intervention and a priori knowledge is supported by Non-Negative Matrix Factorization (NMF).

  1. The Medicago truncatula E3 Ubiquitin Ligase PUB1 Interacts with the LYK3 Symbiotic Receptor and Negatively Regulates Infection and Nodulation[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Mbengue, Malick; Camut, Sylvie; de Carvalho-Niebel, Fernanda; Deslandes, Laurent; Froidure, Solène; Klaus-Heisen, Dörte; Moreau, Sandra; Rivas, Susana; Timmers, Ton; Hervé, Christine; Cullimore, Julie; Lefebvre, Benoit

    2010-01-01

    LYK3 is a lysin motif receptor-like kinase of Medicago truncatula, which is essential for the establishment of the nitrogen-fixing, root nodule symbiosis with Sinorhizobium meliloti. LYK3 is a putative receptor of S. meliloti Nod factor signals, but little is known of how it is regulated and how it transduces these symbiotic signals. In a screen for LYK3-interacting proteins, we identified M. truncatula Plant U-box protein 1 (PUB1) as an interactor of the kinase domain. In planta, both proteins are localized and interact in the plasma membrane. In M. truncatula, PUB1 is expressed specifically in symbiotic conditions, is induced by Nod factors, and shows an overlapping expression pattern with LYK3 during nodulation. Biochemical studies show that PUB1 has a U-box–dependent E3 ubiquitin ligase activity and is phosphorylated by the LYK3 kinase domain. Overexpression and RNA interference studies in M. truncatula show that PUB1 is a negative regulator of the LYK3 signaling pathway leading to infection and nodulation and is important for the discrimination of rhizobia strains producing variant Nod factors. The potential role of PUB E3 ubiquitin ligases in controlling plant–microbe interactions and development through interacting with receptor-like kinases is discussed. PMID:20971894

  2. Upregulation of epidermal growth factor receptor 4 in oral leukoplakia

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Kumagai, Kenichi; Gotoh, Akito; Eguchi, Takanori; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Hamada, Yoshiki; Suzuki, Satsuki; Suzuki, Ryuji

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, we investigate the expression profile of the epidermal growth factor receptor family, which comprises EGFR/ErbB1, HER2/ErbB2, HER3/ErbB3 and HER4/ErbB4 in oral leukoplakia (LP). The expression of four epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family genes and their ligands were measured in LP tissues from 14 patients and compared with levels in 10 patients with oral lichen planus (OLP) and normal oral mucosa (NOM) from 14 healthy donors by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and immunohistochemistry. Synchronous mRNA coexpression of ErbB1, ErbB2, ErbB3 and ErbB4 was detected in LP lesions. Out of the receptors, only ErbB4 mRNA and protein was more highly expressed in LP compared with NOM tissues. These were strongly expressed by epithelial keratinocytes in LP lesions, as shown by immunohistochemistry. Regarding the ligands, the mRNA of Neuregulin2 and 4 were more highly expressed in OLP compared with NOM tissues. Therefore, enhanced ErbB4 on the keratinocytes and synchronous modulation of EGFR family genes may contribute to the pathogenesis and carcinogenesis of LP. PMID:23492901

  3. Cannabinoid receptors activation and glucocorticoid receptors deactivation in the amygdala prevent the stress-induced enhancement of a negative learning experience.

    PubMed

    Ramot, Assaf; Akirav, Irit

    2012-05-01

    The enhancement of emotional memory is clearly important as emotional stimuli are generally more significant than neutral stimuli for surviving and reproduction purposes. Yet, the enhancement of a negative emotional memory following exposure to stress may result in dysfunctional or intrusive memory that underlies several psychiatric disorders. Here we examined the effects of stress exposure on a negative emotional learning experience as measured by a decrease in the magnitude of the expected quantity of reinforcements in an alley maze. In contrast to other fear-related negative experiences, reward reduction is more associated with frustration and is assessed by measuring the latency to run the length of the alley to consume the reduced quantity of reward. We also examined whether the cannabinoid receptors agonist WIN55,212-2 (5 μg/side) and the glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) antagonist RU-486 (10 ng/side) administered into the rat basolateral amygdala (BLA) could prevent the stress-induced enhancement. We found that intra-BLA RU-486 or WIN55,212 before stress exposure prevented the stress-induced enhancement of memory consolidation for reduction in reward magnitude. These findings suggest that cannabinoid receptors and GRs in the BLA are important modulators of stress-induced enhancement of emotional memory.

  4. The Src homology 2 domain-containing inositol 5-phosphatase negatively regulates Fcgamma receptor-mediated phagocytosis through immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-bearing phagocytic receptors.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Koji; Malykhin, Alexander; Coggeshall, K Mark

    2002-11-01

    Molecular mechanisms by which the Src homology 2 domain-containing inositol 5-phosphatase (SHIP) negatively regulates phagocytosis in macrophages are unclear. We addressed the issue using bone marrow-derived macrophages from FcgammaR- or SHIP-deficient mice. Phagocytic activities of macrophages from FcgammaRII(b)(-/-) and SHIP(-/-) mice were enhanced to a similar extent, relative to those from wild type. However, calcium influx was only marginally affected in FcgammaRII(b)(-/-), but greatly enhanced in SHIP(-/-) macrophages. Furthermore, SHIP was phosphorylated on tyrosine residues upon FcgammaR aggregation even in macrophages from FcgammaRII(b)(-/-) mice or upon clustering of a chimeric receptor containing CD8 and the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-bearing gamma-chain or human-restricted FcgammaRIIa. These findings indicate that, unlike B cells, SHIP is efficiently phosphorylated in the absence of an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motif (ITIM)-bearing receptor. We further demonstrate that SHIP directly bound to phosphorylated peptides derived from FcgammaRIIa with a high affinity, comparable to that of FcgammaRII(b). Lastly, FcgammaRIIa-mediated phagocytosis was significantly enhanced in THP-1 cells overexpressing dominant-negative form of SHIP in the absence of FcgammaRII(b). These results indicate that SHIP negatively regulates FcgammaR-mediated phagocytosis through all ITAM-containing IgG receptors using a molecular mechanism distinct from that in B cells.

  5. Topography of human placental receptors for epidermal growth factor.

    PubMed

    Rao, C V; Ramani, N; Chegini, N; Stadig, B K; Carman, F R; Woost, P G; Schultz, G S; Cook, C L

    1985-02-10

    These studies were undertaken to determine whether term human placental microvillus plasma membranes, which are exposed to maternal blood, and basolateral plasma membranes, which are in close proximity to fetal blood capillaries, contain receptors for epidermal growth factor (EGF). These two highly purified membranes bound 125I-EGF with similar affinity (apparent dissociation constants, 0.07-0.12 nM, but the total number of available receptors was greater in microvillus (8.2 pmol/mg protein) compared to basolateral (4.9 pmol/mg protein) plasma membranes. Detailed characterization of 125I-EGF binding to these membranes revealed numerous similarities as well as differences. The two membranes contained two major (155 and 140 kDa) and at least three minor (115, 175, and 210 kDa) specific 125I-EGF binding proteins. The 115-kDa protein was only found in basolateral plasma membranes. The 155-kDa protein was predominantly labeled in microvillus, whereas the 140-kDa protein was labeled predominantly in basolateral plasma membranes. The addition of protease inhibitors did not alter the multiple 125I-EGF binding proteins pattern found in these membranes. EGF stimulated phosphorylation of 140- and 155-kDa proteins in both microvillus and basolateral plasma membranes. However, the 155-kDa protein was phosphorylated to a greater extent in microvillus, whereas both 140- and 155-kDa proteins were phosphorylated equally in basolateral plasma membranes. Light and electron microscope autoradiographic studies revealed that 125I-EGF preferentially associated with microvillus plasma membranes. The data demonstrates the presence of EGF receptors in outer cell membranes of syncytiotrophoblasts and suggests that maternal EGF may influence syncytiotrophoblast function by binding to receptors in microvillus plasma membranes, while fetal EGF may also influence syncytiotrophoblast function but via receptors in basolateral plasma membranes.

  6. Inhibiting the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    The Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) is a widely distributed cell surface receptor that responds to several extracellular signaling molecules through an intracellular tyrosine kinase, which phosphorylates target enzymes to trigger a downstream molecular cascade. Since the discovery that EGFR mutations and amplifications are critical in a number of cancers, efforts have been under way to develop and use targeted EGFR inhibitors. These efforts have met with some spectacular successes, but many patients have not responded as expected, have subsequently developed drug-resistant tumors, or have suffered serious side effects from the therapies to date. CCR Investigators are studying EGFR from multiple vantage points with the goal of developing even better strategies to defeat EGFR-related cancers.

  7. Signal Transduction by Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Sina; Claesson-Welsh, Lena

    2012-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs) are master regulators of vascular development and of blood and lymphatic vessel function during health and disease in the adult. It is therefore important to understand the mechanism of action of this family of five mammalian ligands, which act through three receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). In addition, coreceptors like neuropilins (NRPs) and integrins associate with the ligand/receptor signaling complex and modulate the output. Therapeutics to block several of the VEGF signaling components have been developed with the aim to halt blood vessel formation, angiogenesis, in diseases that involve tissue growth and inflammation, such as cancer. In this review, we outline the current information on VEGF signal transduction in relation to blood and lymphatic vessel biology. PMID:22762016

  8. Brassinosteroid signal transduction from receptor kinases to transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Wuk; Wang, Zhi-Yong

    2010-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are growth-promoting steroid hormones in plants. Genetic studies in Arabidopsis illustrated the essential roles of BRs in a wide range of developmental processes and helped identify many genes involved in BR biosynthesis and signal transduction. Recently, proteomic studies identified missing links. Together, these approaches established the BR signal transduction cascade, which includes BR perception by the BRI1 receptor kinase at the cell surface, activation of BRI1/BAK1 kinase complex by transphosphorylation, subsequent phosphorylation of the BSK kinases, activation of the BSU1 phosphatase, dephosphorylation and inactivation of the BIN2 kinase, and accumulation of unphosphorylated BZR transcription factors in the nucleus. Mass spectrometric analyses are providing detailed information on the phosphorylation events involved in each step of signal relay. Thus, the BR signaling pathway provides a paradigm for understanding receptor kinase-mediated signal transduction as well as tools for the genetic improvement of the productivity of crop plants.

  9. Negative thinking: a key factor in depressive symptoms in Thai adolescents.

    PubMed

    Charoensuk, Sukjai

    2007-01-01

    Negative thinking, self-esteem, parental bonding, and everyday stressors are factors related to depressive symptoms in studies conducted in the United States, but they have been rarely explored in Thailand. An understanding of factors influencing depressive symptoms in Thai youth will lead to the development of interventions to decrease depressive symptoms among this age group. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of parental bonding, everyday stressors, self-esteem, and negative thinking on depressive symptoms among Thai adolescents. A random sample of 812 high school students in Chon Buri, Thailand, participated in the study. The prevalence of depressive symptoms varied from 20-21% depending on the measures used. Negative thinking was the best predictor of depressive symptoms in Thai adolescents. Negative thinking also mediated the effects of parental bonding, everyday stressors, and self-esteem on depressive symptoms.

  10. Expression of sarcosine metabolism-related proteins in estrogen receptor negative breast cancer according to the androgen receptor and HER-2 status

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Ju; Jung, Woo Hee; Koo, Ja Seung

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the expression of sarcosine metabolism related proteins according to androgen receptor (AR) and HER-2 status in estrogen receptor (ER) negative breast cancer and to analyze its clinical implications. Tissue microarray was constructed for a total of 334 cases of ER negative breast cancer. Immunohistochemical stain was conducted for sarcosine metabolism related proteins such as glycine N-methyltransferase (GNMT), sarcosine dehydrogenase (SARDH), and l-pipecolic acid oxidase (PIPOX). There were 131 AR positive, 205 AR negative cases and 143 HER-2 positive, 193 HER-2 negative cases. When subdividing into four groups according to AR and HER-2 status, there were 55 AR(+)/HER-2(-) cases, 76 AR(+)/HER-2(+) cases, 67 AR(-)/HER-2(+) cases and 138 AR(-)/HER-2(-) cases. GNMT and PIPOX expression was highest in the AR(+)/HER-2(-) group while expressed lowest in the AR(-)/HER-2(-) group (P<0.001). Stromal PIPOX expression was highest in the AR(-)/HER-2(+) group and lowest in the AR(-)/HER-2(-) group (P=0.010). GNMT and PIPOX expression was higher in the AR positive group compared with those of AR negative group (P=0.001, and P<0.001, respectively), while tumoral and stromal PIPOX expression showed a significant association with HER-2 positivity (P=0.006, and P=0.005, respectively). AR positive group had the highest ratio of low sarcosine type while the AR negative group had the highest ratio of null type (P<0.001). In conclusion, ER negative breast cancer showed different expression of sarcosine metabolism related proteins according to AR and HER-2 status. GNMT and PIPOX expression was high in the AR positive group while tumoral and stromal PIPOX expression was high in the HER-2 positive group. PMID:26339363

  11. Concordance between core needle biopsy and surgical specimen for oestrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 status in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Asogan, Aravind Barathi; Hong, Ga Sze; Prabhakaran, Subash Kumar Arni

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This study aimed to analyse the concordance rate, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value of core needle biopsy (CNB) and subsequent surgical specimen (SS) in assessing levels of oestrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PgR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2/neu). It also evaluated the revised American Society of Clinical Oncology/College of American Pathologists (ASCO/CAP) guidelines for ER/PgR positivity. METHODS We analysed the breast cancer database of KK Women’s and Children’s Hospital, Singapore, from 1 June 2005 to 30 December 2012. Invasive breast cancer patients who had CNB and subsequent SS were included. RESULTS A total of 560 patients were included. The concordance of ER, PgR and HER2/neu positivity between CNB and SS was 96.1%, 89.1% and 96.8%, respectively. When the ‘ER ≥ 10% positive’ group was compared with the ‘ER ≥ 1% positive’ group, specificity increased from 79.7% to 92.5% and PPV increased from 93.9% to 97.5%. When the ‘PgR ≥ 10% positive’ group was compared with the ‘PgR ≥ 1% positive’ group, specificity increased from 84.2% to 89.3% and PPV improved from 89.7% to 92.9%. The revised ASCO/CAP guidelines decreased discordant results by > 50% for ER and by 18.2% for PgR. CONCLUSION CNB has high concordance with SS in the evaluation of the molecular profile of invasive breast cancer. Thus, molecular evaluation does not need to be repeated with SS except for ER-, PgR- and HER2/neu-negative CNB results. The revised ASCO/CAP guidelines resulted in more precise ER and PgR status on CNB. PMID:27029805

  12. Ets-1 is a transcriptional mediator of oncogenic nitric oxide signaling in estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The Ets-1 transcription factor is a candidate breast cancer oncogene that regulates the expression of genes involved in tumor progression and metastasis. Ets-1 signaling has also been linked to the development of a basal-like breast cancer phenotype. We recently described a nitric oxide (NO)-induced gene signature that is associated with poor disease outcome in estrogen receptor-negative (ER-) breast cancer and contains both stem cell-like and basal-like components. Thus, we examined the role of Ets-1 in NO signaling and NO-induced phenotypes in ER- human breast cancer cells. Methods Promoter region analyses were performed on genes upregulated in inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) high expressing tumors for Ets-binding sites. In vitro mechanisms were examined in human basal-like breast cancer cells lines. NO signaling effects were studied using either forced NOS2 expression or the use of a chemical NO-donor, diethlylenetriamine NONOate (DETANO). Results Promoter region analysis of genes that are up-regulated in human ER-negative breast tumors with high NOS2 expression revealed that the Ets-binding sequence is the only common promoter element present in all of these genes, indicating that Ets-1 is the key transcriptional factor down-stream of oncogenic NOS2-signaling. Accordingly, both forced NOS2 over-expression and exposure to NO-donors resulted in significant Ets-1 transcriptional activation in ER- breast cancer cells. Functional studies showed that NO activated Ets-1 transcriptional activity via a Ras/MEK/ERK signaling pathway by a mechanism that involved Ras S-nitrosylation. RNA knock-down of Ets-1 suppressed NO-induced expression of selected basal-like breast cancer markers such as P-cadherin, S100A8, IL-8 and αβ-crystallin. Additionally, Ets-1 knock-down reduced NO-mediated cellular proliferation, matrix metalloproteinase and cathepsin B activities, as well as matrigel invasion. Conclusions These data show that Ets-1 is a key

  13. Orexin–Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Receptor Heteromers in the Ventral Tegmental Area as Targets for Cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Gemma; Quiroz, César; Moreno-Delgado, David; Sierakowiak, Adam; McDowell, Kimberly; Moreno, Estefanía; Rea, William; Cai, Ning-Sheng; Aguinaga, David; Howell, Lesley A.; Hausch, Felix; Cortés, Antonio; Mallol, Josefa; Casadó, Vicent; Lluís, Carme; Canela, Enric I.

    2015-01-01

    Release of the neuropeptides corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and orexin-A in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) play an important role in stress-induced cocaine-seeking behavior. We provide evidence for pharmacologically significant interactions between CRF and orexin-A that depend on oligomerization of CRF1 receptor (CRF1R) and orexin OX1 receptors (OX1R). CRF1R–OX1R heteromers are the conduits of a negative crosstalk between orexin-A and CRF as demonstrated in transfected cells and rat VTA, in which they significantly modulate dendritic dopamine release. The cocaine target σ1 receptor (σ1R) also associates with the CRF1R–OX1R heteromer. Cocaine binding to the σ1R–CRF1R–OX1R complex promotes a long-term disruption of the orexin-A–CRF negative crosstalk. Through this mechanism, cocaine sensitizes VTA cells to the excitatory effects of both CRF and orexin-A, thus providing a mechanism by which stress induces cocaine seeking. PMID:25926444

  14. Orexin-corticotropin-releasing factor receptor heteromers in the ventral tegmental area as targets for cocaine.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Gemma; Quiroz, César; Moreno-Delgado, David; Sierakowiak, Adam; McDowell, Kimberly; Moreno, Estefanía; Rea, William; Cai, Ning-Sheng; Aguinaga, David; Howell, Lesley A; Hausch, Felix; Cortés, Antonio; Mallol, Josefa; Casadó, Vicent; Lluís, Carme; Canela, Enric I; Ferré, Sergi; McCormick, Peter J

    2015-04-29

    Release of the neuropeptides corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and orexin-A in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) play an important role in stress-induced cocaine-seeking behavior. We provide evidence for pharmacologically significant interactions between CRF and orexin-A that depend on oligomerization of CRF1 receptor (CRF1R) and orexin OX1 receptors (OX1R). CRF1R-OX1R heteromers are the conduits of a negative crosstalk between orexin-A and CRF as demonstrated in transfected cells and rat VTA, in which they significantly modulate dendritic dopamine release. The cocaine target σ1 receptor (σ1R) also associates with the CRF1R-OX1R heteromer. Cocaine binding to the σ1R-CRF1R-OX1R complex promotes a long-term disruption of the orexin-A-CRF negative crosstalk. Through this mechanism, cocaine sensitizes VTA cells to the excitatory effects of both CRF and orexin-A, thus providing a mechanism by which stress induces cocaine seeking.

  15. Phosphorylation of insulin-like growth factor I receptor by insulin receptor tyrosine kinase in intact cultured skeletal muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Beguinot, F.; Smith, R.J.; Kahn, C.R.; Maron, R.; Moses, A.C.; White, M.F.

    1988-05-03

    The interaction between insulin and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF I) receptors was examined by determining the ability of each receptor type to phosphorylate tyrosine residues on the other receptor in intact L6 skeletal muscle cells. This was made possible through a sequential immunoprecipitation method with two different antibodies that effectively separated the phosphorylated insulin and IGF I receptors. After incubation of intact L6 cells with various concentrations of insulin or IGF I in the presence of (/sup 32/P)-orthophosphate, insulin receptors were precipitated with one of two human polyclonal anti-insulin receptor antibodies (B2 or B9). Phosphorylated IGF I receptors remained in solution and were subsequently precipitated by anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies. The identifies of the insulin and IGF I receptor ..beta..-subunits in the two immunoprecipitates were confirmed by binding affinity, by phosphopeptide mapping after trypsin digestion, and by the distinct patterns of expression of the two receptors during differentiation. Stimulated phosphorylation of the ..beta..-subunit of the insulin receptor correlated with the occupancy of the ..beta..-subunit of the insulin receptor by either insulin or IGF I as determined by affinity cross-linking. Similarly, stimulation of phosphorylation of the ..beta..-subunit of the IGF I receptor by IGF I correlated with IGF I receptor occupancy. In contrast, insulin stimulated phosphorylation of the ..beta..-subunit of the IGF I receptor at hormone concentrations that were associated with significant occupancy of the insulin receptor but negligible IGF I receptor occupancy. These findings indicate that the IGF I receptor can be a substrate for the hormone-activated insulin receptor tyrosine kinase activity in intact L6 skeletal muscle cells.

  16. Optical control of pain in vivo with a photoactive mGlu5 receptor negative allosteric modulator.

    PubMed

    Font, Joan; López-Cano, Marc; Notartomaso, Serena; Scarselli, Pamela; Di Pietro, Paola; Bresolí-Obach, Roger; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Malhaire, Fanny; Rovira, Xavier; Catena, Juanlo; Giraldo, Jesús; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Fernández-Dueñas, Víctor; Goudet, Cyril; Nonell, Santi; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Llebaria, Amadeu; Ciruela, Francisco

    2017-04-11

    Light-operated drugs constitute a major target in drug discovery, since they may provide spatiotemporal resolution for the treatment of complex diseases (i.e. chronic pain). JF-NP-26 is an inactive photocaged derivative of the metabotropic glutamate type 5 (mGlu5) receptor negative allosteric modulator raseglurant. Violet light illumination of JF-NP-26 induces a photochemical reaction prompting the active-drug's release, which effectively controls mGlu5 receptor activity both in ectopic expressing systems and in striatal primary neurons. Systemic administration in mice followed by local light-emitting diode (LED)-based illumination, either of the thalamus or the peripheral tissues, induced JF-NP-26-mediated light-dependent analgesia both in neuropathic and in acute/tonic inflammatory pain models. These data offer the first example of optical control of analgesia in vivo using a photocaged mGlu5 receptor negative allosteric modulator. This approach shows potential for precisely targeting, in time and space, endogenous receptors, which may allow a better management of difficult-to-treat disorders.

  17. Optical control of pain in vivo with a photoactive mGlu5 receptor negative allosteric modulator

    PubMed Central

    Font, Joan; López-Cano, Marc; Notartomaso, Serena; Scarselli, Pamela; Di Pietro, Paola; Bresolí-Obach, Roger; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Malhaire, Fanny; Rovira, Xavier; Catena, Juanlo; Giraldo, Jesús; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Fernández-Dueñas, Víctor; Goudet, Cyril; Nonell, Santi; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Llebaria, Amadeu; Ciruela, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Light-operated drugs constitute a major target in drug discovery, since they may provide spatiotemporal resolution for the treatment of complex diseases (i.e. chronic pain). JF-NP-26 is an inactive photocaged derivative of the metabotropic glutamate type 5 (mGlu5) receptor negative allosteric modulator raseglurant. Violet light illumination of JF-NP-26 induces a photochemical reaction prompting the active-drug’s release, which effectively controls mGlu5 receptor activity both in ectopic expressing systems and in striatal primary neurons. Systemic administration in mice followed by local light-emitting diode (LED)-based illumination, either of the thalamus or the peripheral tissues, induced JF-NP-26-mediated light-dependent analgesia both in neuropathic and in acute/tonic inflammatory pain models. These data offer the first example of optical control of analgesia in vivo using a photocaged mGlu5 receptor negative allosteric modulator. This approach shows potential for precisely targeting, in time and space, endogenous receptors, which may allow a better management of difficult-to-treat disorders. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.23545.001 PMID:28395733

  18. Breast cancer patients with estrogen receptor-negative/progesterone receptor-positive tumors: being younger and getting less benefit from adjuvant tamoxifen treatment.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ke-da; Di, Gen-hong; Wu, Jiong; Lu, Jin-song; Shen, Kun-wei; Liu, Guang-yu; Shen, Zhen-zhou; Shao, Zhio-ming

    2008-12-01

    Most breast cancer patients with estrogen receptor-negative/progesterone receptor-positive (ER-/PgR+) tumors are premenopausal cases, with few alternatives of adjuvant endocrine therapy but tamoxifen (TAM). The efficacy of adjuvant TAM on ER-/PgR+ patients is still controversial. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of adjuvant TAM on patients with ER-/PgR+ tumors. Among all 1,836 consecutive patients with operable primary breast cancer, 798 cases were with ER+/PgR+ tumors and 205 with ER-/PgR+ tumors. By sub-grouping the patients according to ER/PR phenotypes and whether the patients had been treated with adjuvant TAM therapy or not, we investigated the differences of survivals between groups. Patients with ER-/PgR+ tumors were younger than those with ER+/PgR+ tumors (P = 0.021), and were mainly premenopausal (P = 0.013). ER-/PgR+ patients were related to more involved lymph nodes and later stage. In the absence of TAM treatment, ER+/PgR+ group had a similar survival to ER-/PgR+ group in terms of 5-year disease-free survival (DFS), as well as overall survival (OS). After TAM treatment, both groups had increased survival rates comparing with the baseline of non-TAM-treated groups. Moreover, significant survival differences were then observed between TAM-treated ER+/PgR+ group and TAM-treated ER-/PgR+ group either in DFS (P = 0.016) or OS (P = 0.007). Of the TAM-treated patients, by sub-dividing the chemotherapy-treated population into CMF (cyclophosphamide, methotrexate and 5-fluorouracil) group and CA(E)F (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin/epirubicin and 5-fluorouracil) group, we found that ER-/PgR+ group got more benefits from CMF regimen than from CA(E)F. Subpopulation treatment effect pattern plot (STEPP) analysis showed that the ER-/PgR+ group had an obvious worse survival than ER+/PgR+ group in younger patients (<55 years). Axillary lymph nodes involvement was the only independent prognostic factor for ER-/PgR+ group. Our results indicate that patients with

  19. Trastuzumab Emtansine in Treating Older Patients With Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-Positive Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-03

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2 Positive Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  20. Different Use of Cell Surface Glycosaminoglycans As Adherence Receptors to Corneal Cells by Gram Positive and Gram Negative Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    García, Beatriz; Merayo-Lloves, Jesús; Rodríguez, David; Alcalde, Ignacio; García-Suárez, Olivia; Alfonso, José F.; Baamonde, Begoña; Fernández-Vega, Andrés; Vazquez, Fernando; Quirós, Luis M.

    2016-01-01

    The epithelium of the cornea is continuously exposed to pathogens, and adhesion to epithelial cells is regarded as an essential first step in bacterial pathogenesis. In this article, the involvement of glycosaminoglycans in the adhesion of various pathogenic bacteria to corneal epithelial cells is analyzed. All microorganisms use glycosaminoglycans as receptors, but arranged in different patterns depending on the Gram-type of the bacterium. The heparan sulfate chains of syndecans are the main receptors, though other molecular species also seem to be involved, particularly in Gram-negative bacteria. Adherence is inhibited differentially by peptides, including heparin binding sequences, indicating the participation of various groups of Gram-positive, and -negative adhesins. The length of the saccharides produces a major effect, and low molecular weight chains inhibit the binding of Gram-negative microorganisms but increase the adherence of Gram-positives. Pathogen adhesion appears to occur preferentially through sulfated domains, and is very dependent on N- and 6-O-sulfation of the glucosamine residue and, to a lesser extent, 2-O sulfation of uronic acid. These data show the differential use of corneal receptors, which could facilitate the development of new anti-infective strategies. PMID:27965938

  1. Different Use of Cell Surface Glycosaminoglycans As Adherence Receptors to Corneal Cells by Gram Positive and Gram Negative Pathogens.

    PubMed

    García, Beatriz; Merayo-Lloves, Jesús; Rodríguez, David; Alcalde, Ignacio; García-Suárez, Olivia; Alfonso, José F; Baamonde, Begoña; Fernández-Vega, Andrés; Vazquez, Fernando; Quirós, Luis M

    2016-01-01

    The epithelium of the cornea is continuously exposed to pathogens, and adhesion to epithelial cells is regarded as an essential first step in bacterial pathogenesis. In this article, the involvement of glycosaminoglycans in the adhesion of various pathogenic bacteria to corneal epithelial cells is analyzed. All microorganisms use glycosaminoglycans as receptors, but arranged in different patterns depending on the Gram-type of the bacterium. The heparan sulfate chains of syndecans are the main receptors, though other molecular species also seem to be involved, particularly in Gram-negative bacteria. Adherence is inhibited differentially by peptides, including heparin binding sequences, indicating the participation of various groups of Gram-positive, and -negative adhesins. The length of the saccharides produces a major effect, and low molecular weight chains inhibit the binding of Gram-negative microorganisms but increase the adherence of Gram-positives. Pathogen adhesion appears to occur preferentially through sulfated domains, and is very dependent on N- and 6-O-sulfation of the glucosamine residue and, to a lesser extent, 2-O sulfation of uronic acid. These data show the differential use of corneal receptors, which could facilitate the development of new anti-infective strategies.

  2. Non-negative matrix factorization in texture feature for classification of dementia with MRI data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarwinda, D.; Bustamam, A.; Ardaneswari, G.

    2017-07-01

    This paper investigates applications of non-negative matrix factorization as feature selection method to select the features from gray level co-occurrence matrix. The proposed approach is used to classify dementia using MRI data. In this study, texture analysis using gray level co-occurrence matrix is done to feature extraction. In the feature extraction process of MRI data, we found seven features from gray level co-occurrence matrix. Non-negative matrix factorization selected three features that influence of all features produced by feature extractions. A Naïve Bayes classifier is adapted to classify dementia, i.e. Alzheimer's disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) and normal control. The experimental results show that non-negative factorization as feature selection method able to achieve an accuracy of 96.4% for classification of Alzheimer's and normal control. The proposed method also compared with other features selection methods i.e. Principal Component Analysis (PCA).

  3. GWAS in the SIGNAL/PHARE clinical cohort restricts the association between the FGFR2 locus and estrogen receptor status to HER2-negative breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Cox, David G.; Curtit, Elsa; Romieu, Gilles; Fumoleau, Pierre; Rios, Maria; Bonnefoi, Hervé; Bachelot, Thomas; Soulié, Patrick; Jouannaud, Christelle; Bourgeois, Hugues; Petit, Thierry; Tennevet, Isabelle; Assouline, David; Mathieu, Marie-Christine; Jacquin, Jean-Philippe; Lavau-Denes, Sandrine; Darut-Jouve, Ariane; Ferrero, Jean-Marc; Tarpin, Carole; Lévy, Christelle; Delecroix, Valérie; Trillet-Lenoir, Véronique; Cojocarasu, Oana; Meunier, Jérôme; Pierga, Jean-Yves; Faure-Mercier, Céline; Blanché, Hélène; Sahbatou, Mourad; Boland, Anne; Bacq, Delphine; Besse, Céline; Deleuze, Jean-François; Pauporté, Iris; Thomas, Gilles; Pivot, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms are associated with breast cancer risk. Clinical and epidemiological observations suggest that clinical characteristics of breast cancer, such as estrogen receptor or HER2 status, are also influenced by hereditary factors. To identify genetic variants associated with pathological characteristics of breast cancer patients, a Genome Wide Association Study was performed in a cohort of 9365 women from the French nationwide SIGNAL/PHARE studies (NCT00381901/RECF1098). Strong association between the FGFR2 locus and ER status of breast cancer patients was observed (ER-positive n=6211, ER-negative n=2516; rs3135718 OR=1.34 p=5.46×10−12). This association was limited to patients with HER2-negative tumors (ER-positive n=4267, ER-negative n=1185; rs3135724 OR=1.85 p=1.16×10−11). The FGFR2 locus is known to be associated with breast cancer risk. This study provides sound evidence for an association between variants in the FGFR2 locus and ER status among breast cancer patients, particularly among patients with HER2-negative disease. This refinement of the association between FGFR2 variants and ER-status to HER2-negative disease provides novel insight to potential biological and clinical influence of genetic polymorphisms on breast tumors. PMID:27764800

  4. GWAS in the SIGNAL/PHARE clinical cohort restricts the association between the FGFR2 locus and estrogen receptor status to HER2-negative breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Cox, David G; Curtit, Elsa; Romieu, Gilles; Fumoleau, Pierre; Rios, Maria; Bonnefoi, Hervé; Bachelot, Thomas; Soulié, Patrick; Jouannaud, Christelle; Bourgeois, Hugues; Petit, Thierry; Tennevet, Isabelle; Assouline, David; Mathieu, Marie-Christine; Jacquin, Jean-Philippe; Lavau-Denes, Sandrine; Darut-Jouve, Ariane; Ferrero, Jean-Marc; Tarpin, Carole; Lévy, Christelle; Delecroix, Valérie; Trillet-Lenoir, Véronique; Cojocarasu, Oana; Meunier, Jérôme; Pierga, Jean-Yves; Faure-Mercier, Céline; Blanché, Hélène; Sahbatou, Mourad; Boland, Anne; Bacq, Delphine; Besse, Céline; Deleuze, Jean-François; Pauporté, Iris; Thomas, Gilles; Pivot, Xavier

    2016-11-22

    Genetic polymorphisms are associated with breast cancer risk. Clinical and epidemiological observations suggest that clinical characteristics of breast cancer, such as estrogen receptor or HER2 status, are also influenced by hereditary factors. To identify genetic variants associated with pathological characteristics of breast cancer patients, a Genome Wide Association Study was performed in a cohort of 9365 women from the French nationwide SIGNAL/PHARE studies (NCT00381901/RECF1098). Strong association between the FGFR2 locus and ER status of breast cancer patients was observed (ER-positive n=6211, ER-negative n=2516; rs3135718 OR=1.34 p=5.46×10-12). This association was limited to patients with HER2-negative tumors (ER-positive n=4267, ER-negative n=1185; rs3135724 OR=1.85 p=1.16×10-11). The FGFR2 locus is known to be associated with breast cancer risk. This study provides sound evidence for an association between variants in the FGFR2 locus and ER status among breast cancer patients, particularly among patients with HER2-negative disease. This refinement of the association between FGFR2 variants and ER-status to HER2-negative disease provides novel insight to potential biological and clinical influence of genetic polymorphisms on breast tumors.

  5. Understanding the Mechanism of Insulin and Insulin-Like Growth Factor (IGF) Receptor Activation by IGF-II

    PubMed Central

    Alvino, Clair L.; Ong, Shee Chee; McNeil, Kerrie A.; Delaine, Carlie; Booker, Grant W.; Wallace, John C.; Forbes, Briony E.

    2011-01-01

    Background Insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) promotes cell proliferation and survival and plays an important role in normal fetal development and placental function. IGF-II binds both the insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) and insulin receptor isoform A (IR-A) with high affinity. Interestingly both IGF-II and the IR-A are often upregulated in cancer and IGF-II acts via both receptors to promote cancer proliferation. There is relatively little known about the mechanism of ligand induced activation of the insulin (IR) and IGF-1R. The recently solved IR structure reveals a folded over dimer with two potential ligand binding pockets arising from residues on each receptor half. Site-directed mutagenesis has mapped receptor residues important for ligand binding to two separate sites within the ligand binding pocket and we have recently shown that the IGFs have two separate binding surfaces which interact with the receptor sites 1 and 2. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study we describe a series of partial IGF-1R and IR agonists generated by mutating Glu12 of IGF-II. By comparing receptor binding affinities, abilities to induce negative cooperativity and potencies in receptor activation, we provide evidence that residue Glu12 bridges the two receptor halves leading to receptor activation. Conclusions/Significance This study provides novel insight into the mechanism of receptor binding and activation by IGF-II, which may be important for the future development of inhibitors of its action for the treatment of cancer. PMID:22140443

  6. Inhibitory leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptors: Immune checkpoint proteins and tumor sustaining factors

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Xunlei; Kim, Jaehyup; Deng, Mi; John, Samuel; Chen, Heyu; Wu, Guojin; Phan, Hiep; Zhang, Cheng Cheng

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Inhibitory leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptors (LILRBs 1-5) transduce signals via intracellular immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs) that recruit protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 6 (PTPN6 or SHP-1), protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 11 (PTPN11 or SHP-2), or Src homology 2 domain-containing inositol phosphatase (SHIP), leading to negative regulation of immune cell activation. Certain of these receptors also play regulatory roles in neuronal activity and osteoclast development. The activation of LILRBs on immune cells by their ligands may contribute to immune evasion by tumors. Recent studies found that several members of LILRB family are expressed by tumor cells, notably hematopoietic cancer cells, and may directly regulate cancer development and relapse as well as the activity of cancer stem cells. LILRBs thus have dual concordant roles in tumor biology – as immune checkpoint molecules and as tumor-sustaining factors. Importantly, the study of knockout mice indicated that LILRBs do not affect hematopoiesis and normal development. Therefore LILRBs may represent ideal targets for tumor treatment. This review aims to summarize current knowledge on expression patterns, ligands, signaling, and functions of LILRB family members in the context of cancer development. PMID:26636629

  7. Inhibitory leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptors: Immune checkpoint proteins and tumor sustaining factors.

    PubMed

    Kang, Xunlei; Kim, Jaehyup; Deng, Mi; John, Samuel; Chen, Heyu; Wu, Guojin; Phan, Hiep; Zhang, Cheng Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptors (LILRBs 1-5) transduce signals via intracellular immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs) that recruit protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 6 (PTPN6 or SHP-1), protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 11 (PTPN11 or SHP-2), or Src homology 2 domain-containing inositol phosphatase (SHIP), leading to negative regulation of immune cell activation. Certain of these receptors also play regulatory roles in neuronal activity and osteoclast development. The activation of LILRBs on immune cells by their ligands may contribute to immune evasion by tumors. Recent studies found that several members of LILRB family are expressed by tumor cells, notably hematopoietic cancer cells, and may directly regulate cancer development and relapse as well as the activity of cancer stem cells. LILRBs thus have dual concordant roles in tumor biology - as immune checkpoint molecules and as tumor-sustaining factors. Importantly, the study of knockout mice indicated that LILRBs do not affect hematopoiesis and normal development. Therefore LILRBs may represent ideal targets for tumor treatment. This review aims to summarize current knowledge on expression patterns, ligands, signaling, and functions of LILRB family members in the context of cancer development.

  8. Epidermal growth factor receptors in the canine antrum

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, R.P.; Gates, T.S.; Boehmer, C.G.; Mantyh, P.W.

    1988-11-01

    In this study we localized receptor binding sites for /sup 125/I-human epidermal growth factor (hEGF) in the antrum of the adult canine stomach. High levels of specific /sup 125/I-hEGF binding sites were observed over the mucosa and muscularis mucosa, whereas specific binding sites were not detectable over the submucosa, external circular and longitudinal muscle or myenteric neurons. These results are in agreement with previous studies which indicated that EGF stimulates the proliferation of cultured epithelial cells and inhibits gastric acid secretion. This suggests that EGF may be a useful therapeutic agent in the healing of gastric ulcers.

  9. Epidermal growth factor and its receptors in human pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.F.; Pan, G.Z.; Hou, X.; Liu, T.H.; Chen, J.; Yanaihara, C.; Yanaihara, N. )

    1990-05-01

    The role of epidermal growth factor (EGF) in oncogenesis and progression of malignant tumors is a subject of vast interest. In this study, radioimmunoassay and radioreceptor assay of EGF were established. EGF contents in malignant and benign pancreatic tumors, in normal pancreas tissue, and in culture media of a human pancreatic carcinoma cell line were determined. EGF receptor binding studies were performed. It was shown that EGF contents in pancreatic carcinomas were significantly higher than those in normal pancreas or benign pancreatic tumors. EGF was also detected in the culture medium of a pancreatic carcinoma cell line. The binding of 125I-EGF to the pancreatic carcinoma cells was time and temperature dependent, reversible, competitive, and specific. Scatchard analysis showed that the dissociation constant of EGF receptor was 2.1 X 10(-9) M, number of binding sites was 1.3 X 10(5) cell. These results indicate that there is an over-expression of EGF/EGF receptors in pancreatic carcinomas, and that an autocrine regulatory mechanism may exist in the growth-promoting effect of EGF on tumor cells.

  10. ABD1 is an Arabidopsis DCAF substrate receptor for CUL4-DDB1-based E3 ligases that acts as a negative regulator of abscisic acid signaling.

    PubMed

    Seo, Kyoung-In; Lee, Jae-Hoon; Nezames, Cynthia D; Zhong, Shangwei; Song, Eunyoung; Byun, Myung-Ok; Deng, Xing Wang

    2014-02-01

    Members of the DDB1-CUL4-associated factors (DCAFs) family directly bind to DAMAGED DNA BINDING PROTEIN1 (DDB1) and function as the substrate receptors in CULLIN4-based E3 (CUL4) ubiquitin ligases, which regulate the selective ubiquitination of proteins. Here, we describe a DCAF protein, ABD1 (for ABA-hypersensitive DCAF1), that negatively regulates abscisic acid (ABA) signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana. ABD1 interacts with DDB1 in vitro and in vivo, indicating that it likely functions as a CUL4 E3 ligase substrate receptor. ABD1 expression is induced by ABA, and mutations in ABD1 result in ABA- and NaCl-hypersensitive phenotypes. Loss of ABD1 leads to hyperinduction of ABA-responsive genes and higher accumulation of the ABA-responsive transcription factor ABA INSENSITIVE5 (ABI5), hypersensitivity to ABA during seed germination and seedling growth, enhanced stomatal closure, reduced water loss, and, ultimately, increased drought tolerance. ABD1 directly interacts with ABI5 in yeast two-hybrid assays and associates with ABI5 in vivo by coimmunoprecipitation, and the interaction was found in the nucleus by bimolecular fluorescence complementation. Furthermore, loss of ABD1 results in a retardation of ABI5 degradation by the 26S proteasome. Taken together, these data suggest that the DCAF-CUL4 E3 ubiquitin ligase assembled with ABD1 is a negative regulator of ABA responses by directly binding to and affecting the stability of ABI5 in the nucleus.

  11. Fibroblast Growth Factor 10-Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 2b Mediated Signaling Is Not Required for Adult Glandular Stomach Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Sala, Frederic G.; Ford, Henri R.; Bellusci, Saverio; Grikscheit, Tracy C.

    2012-01-01

    The signaling pathways that are essential for gastric organogenesis have been studied in some detail; however, those that regulate the maintenance of the gastric epithelium during adult homeostasis remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of Fibroblast growth factor 10 (FGF10) and its main receptor, Fibroblast growth factor receptor 2b (FGFR2b), in adult glandular stomach homeostasis. We first showed that mouse adult glandular stomach expressed Fgf10, its receptors, Fgfr1b and Fgfr2b, and most of the other FGFR2b ligands (Fgf1, Fgf7, Fgf22) except for Fgf3 and Fgf20. Fgf10 expression was mesenchymal whereas FGFR1 and FGFR2 expression were mostly epithelial. Studying double transgenic mice that allow inducible overexpression of Fgf10 in adult mice, we showed that Fgf10 overexpression in normal adult glandular stomach increased epithelial proliferation, drove mucous neck cell differentiation, and reduced parietal and chief cell differentiation. Although a similar phenotype can be associated with the development of metaplasia, we found that Fgf10 overexpression for a short duration does not cause metaplasia. Finally, investigating double transgenic mice that allow the expression of a soluble form of Fgfr2b, FGF10's main receptor, which acts as a dominant negative, we found no significant changes in gastric epithelial proliferation or differentiation in the mutants. Our work provides evidence, for the first time, that the FGF10-FGFR2b signaling pathway is not required for epithelial proliferation and differentiation during adult glandular stomach homeostasis. PMID:23133671

  12. Fibroblast growth factor 10-fibroblast growth factor receptor 2b mediated signaling is not required for adult glandular stomach homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Speer, Allison L; Al Alam, Denise; Sala, Frederic G; Ford, Henri R; Bellusci, Saverio; Grikscheit, Tracy C

    2012-01-01

    The signaling pathways that are essential for gastric organogenesis have been studied in some detail; however, those that regulate the maintenance of the gastric epithelium during adult homeostasis remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of Fibroblast growth factor 10 (FGF10) and its main receptor, Fibroblast growth factor receptor 2b (FGFR2b), in adult glandular stomach homeostasis. We first showed that mouse adult glandular stomach expressed Fgf10, its receptors, Fgfr1b and Fgfr2b, and most of the other FGFR2b ligands (Fgf1, Fgf7, Fgf22) except for Fgf3 and Fgf20. Fgf10 expression was mesenchymal whereas FGFR1 and FGFR2 expression were mostly epithelial. Studying double transgenic mice that allow inducible overexpression of Fgf10 in adult mice, we showed that Fgf10 overexpression in normal adult glandular stomach increased epithelial proliferation, drove mucous neck cell differentiation, and reduced parietal and chief cell differentiation. Although a similar phenotype can be associated with the development of metaplasia, we found that Fgf10 overexpression for a short duration does not cause metaplasia. Finally, investigating double transgenic mice that allow the expression of a soluble form of Fgfr2b, FGF10's main receptor, which acts as a dominant negative, we found no significant changes in gastric epithelial proliferation or differentiation in the mutants. Our work provides evidence, for the first time, that the FGF10-FGFR2b signaling pathway is not required for epithelial proliferation and differentiation during adult glandular stomach homeostasis.

  13. Immunocytochemical localization of vascular endothelial growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 of the human deciduous molar tooth germ development in the human fetus.

    PubMed

    Miwa, Yoko; Fujita, Toshiya; Sunohara, Masataka; Sato, Iwao

    2008-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a key regulator of blood vessel endothelial development. We used immunohistochemical methods to demonstrate the localization of VEGF and its receptors, showing the specific expression pattern of VEGF and VEGF receptor in the human deciduous tooth from the cap to late bell stages in the human fetus. Immunoreactivity to VEGF and its receptor VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) was intensely positive in the inner enamel epithelium at the cap stage and ranged from negative to moderately positive in the bell stage. At the late bell stage, VEGF immunoreactivity was mainly positive but weak for VEGFR-2. The intensity of VEGF and VEGFR-2 in odontoblasts increases from cap stage to late bell stage. We postulate that the dissimilar expression of VEGF in inner enamel epithelium, ameloblast and odontoblast during each stage of human tooth development may affect tooth germ formation.

  14. Individual differences in positivity offset and negativity bias: Gender-specific associations with two serotonin receptor genes.

    PubMed

    Ashare, Rebecca L; Norris, Catherine J; Wileyto, E Paul; Cacioppo, John T; Strasser, Andrew A

    2013-09-01

    Individual differences in the evaluation of affective stimuli, such as the positivity offset and negativity bias may have a biological basis. We tested whether two SNPs (HTR2A; 102T>C and HTR1A; 1019C>G) related to serotonin receptor function, a biological pathway associated with affective regulation, were differentially related to positivity offset and negativity bias for males and females. Participants were 109 cigarette smokers who rated a series of affective stimuli to assess reactions to positive and negative pictures. Gender × genotype interactions were found for both SNPs. Males with the 102T allele showed a greater positivity offset than males with the 102C allele. For females, in contrast, the 1019C allele was associated with a greater positivity offset than the 1019G allele, whereas the 102T allele was associated with a greater negativity bias than the 102C allele. Identifying how gender differences may moderate the effect of serotonin receptor genes on affective information processing may provide insight into their role in guiding behavior and regulating affect.

  15. The σ1 Receptor Engages the Redox-Regulated HINT1 Protein to Bring Opioid Analgesia Under NMDA Receptor Negative Control

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Muñoz, María; Sánchez-Blázquez, Pilar; Herrero-Labrador, Raquel; Martínez-Murillo, Ricardo; Merlos, Manuel; Vela, José Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The in vivo pharmacology of the sigma 1 receptor (σ1R) is certainly complex; however, σ1R antagonists are of therapeutic interest, because they enhance mu-opioid receptor (MOR)-mediated antinociception and reduce neuropathic pain. Thus, we investigated whether the σ1R is involved in the negative control that glutamate N-methyl-d-aspartate acid receptors (NMDARs) exert on opioid antinociception. Results: The MOR C terminus carries the histidine triad nucleotide-binding protein 1 (HINT1) coupled to the regulator of G-protein signaling RGSZ2-neural nitric oxide synthase assembly. Activated MORs stimulate the production of nitric oxide (NO), and the redox zinc switch RGSZ2 converts this signal into free zinc ions that are required to recruit the redox sensor PKCγ to HINT1 proteins. Then, PKCγ impairs HINT1-RGSZ2 association and enables σ1R-NR1 interaction with MOR-HINT1 complexes to restrain opioid signaling. The inhibition of NOS or the absence of σ1Rs prevents HINT1-PKCγ interaction, and MOR-NMDAR cross-regulation fails. The σ1R antagonists transitorily remove the binding of σ1Rs to NR1 subunits, facilitate the entrance of negative regulators of NMDARs, likely Ca2+-CaM, and prevent NR1 interaction with HINT1, thereby impairing the negative feedback of glutamate on opioid analgesia. Innovation: A redox-regulated process situates MOR signaling under NMDAR control, and in this context, the σ1R binds to the cytosolic C terminal region of the NMDAR NR1 subunit. Conclusion: The σ1R antagonists enhance opioid analgesia in naïve mice by releasing MORs from the negative influence of NMDARs, and they also reset antinociception in morphine tolerant animals. Moreover, σ1R antagonists alleviate neuropathic pain, probably by driving the inhibition of up-regulated NMDARs. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 799–818. PMID:25557043

  16. Vandetanib (ZD6474), a dual inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinases: current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Morabito, Alessandro; Piccirillo, Maria Carmela; Falasconi, Fabiano; De Feo, Gianfranco; Del Giudice, Antonia; Bryce, Jane; Di Maio, Massimo; De Maio, Ermelinda; Normanno, Nicola; Perrone, Francesco

    2009-04-01

    Vandetanib is a novel, orally available inhibitor of different intracellular signaling pathways involved in tumor growth, progression, and angiogenesis: vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, epidermal growth factor receptor, and REarranged during Transfection tyrosine kinase activity. Phase I clinical trials have shown that vandetanib is well tolerated as a single agent at daily doses < or =300 mg. In the phase II setting, negative results were observed with vandetanib in small cell lung cancer, metastatic breast cancer, and multiple myeloma. In contrast, three randomized phase II studies showed that vandetanib prolonged the progression-free survival (PFS) time of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as a single agent when compared with gefitinib or when added to chemotherapy. Rash, diarrhea, hypertension, fatigue, and asymptomatic QTc prolongation were the most common adverse events. Antitumor activity was also observed in medullary thyroid cancer. Four randomized phase III clinical trials in NSCLC are exploring the efficacy of vandetanib in combination with docetaxel, the Zactima in cOmbination with Docetaxel In non-small cell lung Cancer (ZODIAC) trial, or with pemetrexed, the Zactima Efficacy with Alimta in Lung cancer (ZEAL) trial, or as a single agent, the Zactima Efficacy when Studied versus Tarceva (ZEST) and the Zactima Efficacy trial for NSCLC Patients with History of EGFR-TKI chemo-Resistance (ZEPHYR) trials. Based on a press release by the sponsor of these trials, the PFS time was longer with vandetanib in the ZODIAC and ZEAL trials; the ZEST trial was negative for its primary superiority analysis, but was successful according to a preplanned noninferiority analysis of PFS. Ongoing phase II and III clinical trials will better define the appropriate schedule, the optimal setting of evaluation, and the safety of long-term use of vandetanib.

  17. Insulin-Insulin-like Growth Factors Hybrids as Molecular Probes of Hormone:Receptor Binding Specificity.

    PubMed

    Křížková, Květoslava; Chrudinová, Martina; Povalová, Anna; Selicharová, Irena; Collinsová, Michaela; Vaněk, Václav; Brzozowski, Andrzej M; Jiráček, Jiří; Žáková, Lenka

    2016-05-31

    Insulin, insulin-like growth factors 1 and 2 (IGF-1 and -2, respectively), and their receptors (IR and IGF-1R) are the key elements of a complex hormonal system that is essential for the development and functioning of humans. The C and D domains of IGFs (absent in insulin) likely play important roles in the differential binding of IGF-1 and -2 to IGF-1R and to the isoforms of IR (IR-A and IR-B) and specific activation of these receptors. Here, we attempted to probe the impact of IGF-1 and IGF-2 D domains (DI and DII, respectively) and the IGF-2 C domain (CII) on the receptor specificity of these hormones. For this, we made two types of insulin hybrid analogues: (i) with the C-terminus of the insulin A chain extended by the amino acids from the DI and DII domains and (ii) with the C-terminus of the insulin B chain extended by some amino acids derived from the CII domain. The receptor binding affinities of these analogues and their receptor autophosphorylation potentials were characterized. Our results indicate that the DI domain has a more negative impact than the DII domain does on binding to IR, and that the DI domain Pro-Leu-Lys residues are important factors for a different IR-A versus IR-B binding affinity of IGF-1. We also showed that the additions of amino acids that partially "mimic" the CII domain, to the C-terminus of the insulin B chain, change the binding and autophosphorylation specificity of insulin in favor of the "metabolic" IR-B isoform. This opens new venues for rational enhancement of insulin IR-B specificity by modifications beyond the C-terminus of its B chain.

  18. The TRAIL Receptor Agonist Drozitumab Targets Basal B Triple Negative Breast Cancer Cells that Express Vimentin and Axl

    PubMed Central

    Dine, Jennifer L.; O’Sullivan, Ciara C.; Voeller, Donna; Greer, Yoshimi E.; Chavez, Kathryn J.; Conway, Catherine M.; Sinclair, Sarah; Stone, Brandon; Amiri-Kordestani, Laleh; Merchant, Anand S.; Hewitt, Stephen M.; Steinberg, Seth M.; Swain, Sandra M.; Lipkowitz, Stanley

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Previously, we found that GST-tagged tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) preferentially killed triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells with a mesenchymal phenotype by activating death receptor 5 (DR5). The purpose of this study was to explore the sensitivity of breast cancer cell lines to drozitumab, a clinically tested DR5 specific agonist; identify potential biomarkers of drozitumab-sensitive breast cancer cells; and determine if those biomarkers were present in tumors from patients with TNBC. Methods We evaluated viability, caspase activity, and sub-G1 DNA content in drozitumab-treated breast cancer cell lines and we characterized expression of potential biomarkers by immunoblot. Expression levels of vimentin and Axl were then explored in 177 TNBC samples from a publically available cDNA microarray dataset and by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in tumor tissue samples obtained from 53 African American women with TNBC. Results and Conclusions Drozitumab induced apoptosis in mesenchymal TNBC cell lines but not in cell lines from other breast cancer subtypes. The drozitumab-sensitive TNBC cell lines expressed the mesenchymal markers vimentin and Axl. Vimentin and Axl mRNA and protein were expressed in a subset of human TNBC tumors. By IHC, ~15% of TNBC tumors had vimentin and Axl expression in the top quartile for both. These findings indicate that drozitumab-sensitive mesenchymal TNBC cells express vimentin and Axl, which can be identified in a subset of human TNBC tumors. Thus, vimentin and Axl may be useful to identify TNBC patients who would be most likely to benefit from a DR5 agonist. PMID:26759246

  19. Linking γ-aminobutyric acid A receptor to epidermal growth factor receptor pathways activation in human prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Weijuan; Yang, Qing; Fung, Kar-Ming; Humphreys, Mitchell R; Brame, Lacy S; Cao, Amy; Fang, Yu-Ting; Shih, Pin-Tsen; Kropp, Bradley P; Lin, Hsueh-Kung

    2014-03-05

    Neuroendocrine (NE) differentiation has been attributed to the progression of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Growth factor pathways including the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling have been implicated in the development of NE features and progression to a castration-resistant phenotype. However, upstream molecules that regulate the growth factor pathway remain largely unknown. Using androgen-insensitive bone metastasis PC-3 cells and androgen-sensitive lymph node metastasis LNCaP cells derived from human prostate cancer (PCa) patients, we demonstrated that γ-aminobutyric acid A receptor (GABA(A)R) ligand (GABA) and agonist (isoguvacine) stimulate cell proliferation, enhance EGF family members expression, and activate EGFR and a downstream signaling molecule, Src, in both PC-3 and LNCaP cells. Inclusion of a GABA(A)R antagonist, picrotoxin, or an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Gefitinib (ZD1839 or Iressa), blocked isoguvacine and GABA-stimulated cell growth, trans-phospohorylation of EGFR, and tyrosyl phosphorylation of Src in both PCa cell lines. Spatial distributions of GABAAR α₁ and phosphorylated Src (Tyr416) were studied in human prostate tissues by immunohistochemistry. In contrast to extremely low or absence of GABA(A)R α₁-positive immunoreactivity in normal prostate epithelium, elevated GABA(A)R α₁ immunoreactivity was detected in prostate carcinomatous glands. Similarly, immunoreactivity of phospho-Src (Tyr416) was specifically localized and limited to the nucleoli of all invasive prostate carcinoma cells, but negative in normal tissues. Strong GABAAR α₁ immunoreactivity was spatially adjacent to the neoplastic glands where strong phospho-Src (Tyr416)-positive immunoreactivity was demonstrated, but not in adjacent to normal glands. These results suggest that the GABA signaling is linked to the EGFR pathway and may work through autocrine or paracine mechanism to promote CRPC progression. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier

  20. Common genetic influences on negative emotionality and a general psychopathology factor in childhood and adolescence.

    PubMed

    Tackett, Jennifer L; Lahey, Benjamin B; van Hulle, Carol; Waldman, Irwin; Krueger, Robert F; Rathouz, Paul J

    2013-11-01

    Previous research using confirmatory factor analysis to model psychopathology comorbidity has supported the hypothesis of a broad general factor (i.e., a "bifactor"; Holzinger & Swineford, 1937) of psychopathology in children, adolescents, and adults, with more specific higher order internalizing and externalizing factors reflecting additional shared variance in symptoms (Lahey et al., 2012; Lahey, van Hulle, Singh, Waldman, & Rathouz, 2011). The psychological nature of this general factor has not been explored, however. The current study tested a prediction, derived from the spectrum hypothesis of personality and psychopathology, that variance in a general psychopathology bifactor overlaps substantially-at both phenotypic and genetic levels-with the dispositional trait of negative emotionality. Data on psychopathology symptoms and dispositional traits were collected from both parents and youth in a representative sample of 1,569 twin pairs (ages 9-17 years) from Tennessee. Predictions based on the spectrum hypothesis were supported, with variance in negative emotionality and the general factor overlapping substantially at both phenotypic and etiologic levels. Furthermore, stronger correlations were found between negative emotionality and the general psychopathology factor than among other dispositions and other psychopathology factors.

  1. Common Genetic Influences on Negative Emotionality and a General Psychopathology Factor in Childhood and Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Tackett, Jennifer L.; Lahey, Benjamin B.; Hulle, Carol Van; Waldman, Irwin; Krueger, Robert F.; Rathouz, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Previous research using confirmatory factor analysis to model psychopathology comorbidity supported the hypothesis of a broad general factor (i.e., a “bifactor”; Holzinger & Swineford, 1937) of psychopathology in children, adolescents, and adults, with more specific higher-order internalizing and externalizing factors reflecting additional shared variance in symptoms (Lahey et al., 2012; Lahey, Van Hulle, Singh, Waldman, & Rathouz, 2011). The psychological nature of this general factor has not been explored, however. The current study tests a prediction derived from the spectrum hypothesis of personality and psychopathology, that variance in a general psychopathology bifactor overlaps substantially—at both phenotypic and genetic levels—with the dispositional trait of negative emotionality. Data on psychopathology symptoms and dispositional traits were collected from both parents and youth in a representative sample of 1,569 twin pairs (ages 9–17) from Tennessee. Predictions based on the spectrum hypothesis were supported, with variance in negative emotionality and the general factor overlapping substantially at both phenotypic and etiologic levels. Furthermore, stronger correlations were found between negative emotionality and the general psychopathology factor than among other dispositions and other psychopathology factors. PMID:24364617

  2. The coexpression and prognostic significance of c-MET, fibroblast growth factor receptor 2, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 in resected gastric cancer: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yong-Xu; Li, Teng-Fei; Zhang, Dan-Dan; Fan, Zong-Min; Fan, Hui-Jie; Yan, Jie; Chen, Li-Juan; Tang, Hong; Qin, Yan-Ru; Li, Xing-Ya

    2016-01-01

    Molecular-targeted therapy against tyrosine kinase receptors (RTKs) plays an important role in gastric cancer (GC) treatment. Understanding the correlation between RTK coexpression could better guide clinical drug use. In the present study, the coexpression status of c-MET, fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) in human GC and their clinical significance in clinical therapy were explored. Immunohistochemical (IHC) staining, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and fluorescent in situ hybridization were performed in 143 cases of GC who had undergone gastrectomy without preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Their association with clinicopathological features and clinical prognosis was analyzed. The frequencies of c-MET, FGFR2, and HER2 overexpression were 47.6% (68/143), 34.3% (49/143), and 10.5% (15/143), respectively. In the RTK coexpression study, 30.1% of patients (43/143) were positive for only one RTK, 25.8% (37/143) were positive for two RTKs, 3.5% (5/143) had triple-positive status, and 40.6% (58/143) had triple-negative status. In survival analysis, the overexpression of c-MET, FGFR2, and HER2 were significantly associated with overall survival (OS) (P=0.018, 0.004, and 0.049, respectively). In coexpression analysis, patients with triple-positive GC had the poorest OS (P=0.013). In conclusion, RTK coexpression is significantly associated with poor clinical outcome in GC. PMID:27729801

  3. Generation of monoclonal antibody targeting fibroblast growth factor receptor 3.

    PubMed

    Gorbenko, Olena; Ovcharenko, Galyna; Klymenko, Tetyana; Zhyvoloup, Olexandr; Gaman, Nadia; Volkova, Darija; Gout, Ivan; Filonenko, Valeriy

    2009-08-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) is a member of the FGFR family of receptor tyrosine kinases, whose function has been implicated in diverse biological processes, including cell proliferation, differentiation, survival, and tumorigenesis. Deregulation of FGFR3 signaling has been implicated with human pathologies, including cancer. Activating mutations in FGFR3 gene are frequently detected in bladder cancer, multiple myeloma, and noninvasive papillary urothelial cell carcinomas, while the overexpression of the receptor is observed in thyroid lymphoma and bladder cancer. The main aim of this study was to generate hybridoma clones producing antibody that could specifically recognize FGFR3/S249C mutant, but not the wild-type FGFR. To achieve this, we used for immunization bacterially expressed fragment of FGFR3 corresponding to loops II-III of the extracellular domain (GST-His/FGFR3/S249C-LII-III), which possesses oncogenic mutation at Ser249 detected in at least 50% of bladder cancers. Primary ELISA screening allowed us to isolate several hybridoma clones that showed specificity towards FGFR3/S249C, but not FGFR3wt protein. Unfortunately, these clones were not stable during single-cell cloning and expansion and lost the ability to recognize specifically FGFR3/S249C. However, this study allowed us to generate several monoclonal antibodies specific towards both FGFR3wt and FGFR3/S249C recombinant proteins. Produced hybridomas secreted MAbs that were specific in Western blotting towards bacterially expressed FGFR3wt and FGFR3/S249C, as well as the full-length receptors ectopically expressed in Sf21 and HEK293 cells. Moreover, transiently expressed wild-type and oncogenic forms of FGFR were efficiently immunoprecipitated with selected antibodies from the lysates of infected Sf21 and transiently transfected HEK293. In summary, generated antibodies should be useful as tools for examining the expression pattern and biological functions of FGFR3 in normal and

  4. Coregulation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor/Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2) Levels and Locations: Quantitative Analysis of HER2 Overexpression Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Hendriks, Bart S.; Opresko, Lee; Wiley, H. S.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2003-03-01

    Elevated expression of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is know to alter cell signalilng and behavioral responses implicated in tumor progression. However, multiple diverse mechanisms may be involved in these overall effects, including signaling by HER2 itself, modulation of signalilng by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and modification of trafficking dynamics for both EGFR and HER2. Continued....

  5. Diversification of Neu differentiation factor and epidermal growth factor signaling by combinatorial receptor interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Pinkas-Kramarski, R; Soussan, L; Waterman, H; Levkowitz, G; Alroy, I; Klapper, L; Lavi, S; Seger, R; Ratzkin, B J; Sela, M; Yarden, Y

    1996-01-01

    The ErbB family includes two receptors, ErbB-1 and ErbB-3, that respectively bind to epidermal growth factor and Neu differentiation factor, and an orphan receptor, ErbB-2. Unlike ErbB-1 and ErbB-2, the intrinsic tyrosine kinase of ErbB-3 is catalytically impaired. By using interleukin-3-dependent cells that ectopically express the three ErbB proteins or their combinations, we found that ErbB-3 is devoid of any biological activity but both ErbB-1 and ErbB-2 can reconstitute its extremely potent mitogenic activity. Transactivation of ErbB-3 correlates with heterodimer formation and is reflected in receptor phosphorylation and the transregulation of ligand affinity. Inter-receptor interactions enable graded proliferative and survival signals: heterodimers are more potent than homodimers, and ErbB-3-containing complexes, especially the ErbB-2/ErbB-3 heterodimer, are more active than ErbB-1 complexes. Nevertheless, ErbB-1 signaling displays dominance over ErbB-3 when the two receptors are coexpressed. Although all receptor combinations activate the mitogen-activated protein kinases ERK and c-Jun kinase, they differ in their rate of endocytosis and in coupling to intervening signaling proteins. It is conceivable that combinatorial receptor interactions diversify signal transduction and confer double regulation, in cis and in trans, of the superior mitogenic activity of the kinase-defective ErbB-3. Images PMID:8665853

  6. Regulation of growth factor receptor degradation by ADP-ribosylation factor domain protein (ARD) 1.

    PubMed

    Meza-Carmen, Victor; Pacheco-Rodriguez, Gustavo; Kang, Gi Soo; Kato, Jiro; Donati, Chiara; Zhang, Chun-Yi; Vichi, Alessandro; Payne, D Michael; El-Chemaly, Souheil; Stylianou, Mario; Moss, Joel; Vaughan, Martha

    2011-06-28

    ADP-ribosylation factor domain protein 1 (ARD1) is a 64-kDa protein containing a functional ADP-ribosylation factor (GTP hydrolase, GTPase), GTPase-activating protein, and E3 ubiquitin ligase domains. ARD1 activation by the guanine nucleotide-exchange factor cytohesin-1 was known. GTPase and E3 ligase activities of ARD1 suggest roles in protein transport and turnover. To explore this hypothesis, we used mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) from ARD1-/- mice stably transfected with plasmids for inducible expression of wild-type ARD1 protein (KO-WT), or ARD1 protein with inactivating mutations in E3 ligase domain (KO-E3), or containing persistently active GTP-bound (KO-GTP), or inactive GDP-bound (KO-GDP) GTPase domains. Inhibition of proteasomal proteases in mifepristone-induced KO-WT, KO-GDP, or KO-GTP MEFs resulted in accumulation of these ARD1 proteins, whereas KO-E3 accumulated without inhibitors. All data were consistent with the conclusion that ARD1 regulates its own steady-state levels in cells by autoubiquitination. Based on reported growth factor receptor-cytohesin interactions, EGF receptor (EGFR) was investigated in induced MEFs. Amounts of cell-surface and total EGFR were higher in KO-GDP and lower in KO-GTP than in KO-WT MEFs, with levels in both mutants greater (p = 0.001) after proteasomal inhibition. Significant differences among MEF lines in content of TGF-β receptor III were similar to those in EGFR, albeit not as large. Differences in amounts of insulin receptor mirrored those in EGFR, but did not reach statistical significance. Overall, the capacity of ARD1 GTPase to cycle between active and inactive forms and its autoubiquitination both appear to be necessary for the appropriate turnover of EGFR and perhaps additional growth factor receptors.

  7. Arsenite and insulin exhibit opposing effects on epidermal growth factor receptor and keratinocyte proliferative potential

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, Timothy J.; Rice, Robert H. . E-mail: rhrice@ucdavis.edu

    2007-05-15

    Previous work has suggested that arsenic exposure contributes to skin carcinogenesis by preserving the proliferative potential of human epidermal keratinocytes, thereby slowing the exit of putative target stem cells into the differentiation pathway. To find a molecular basis for this action, present work has explored the influence of arsenite on keratinocyte responses to epidermal growth factor (EGF). The ability of cultured keratinocytes to found colonies upon passaging several days after confluence was preserved by arsenite and EGF in an additive fashion, but neither was effective when the receptor tyrosine kinase activity was inhibited. Arsenite prevented the loss of EGF receptor protein and phosphorylation of tyrosine 1173, preserving its capability to signal. The level of nuclear {beta}-catenin was higher in cells treated with arsenite and EGF in parallel to elevated colony forming ability, and expression of a dominant negative {beta}-catenin suppressed the increase in both colony forming ability and yield of putative stem cells induced by arsenite and EGF. As judged by expression of three genes regulated by {beta}-catenin, this transcription factor had substantially higher activity in the arsenite/EGF-treated cells. Trivalent antimony exhibited the same effects as arsenite. A novel finding is that insulin in the medium induced the loss of EGF receptor protein, which was largely prevented by arsenite exposure.

  8. TAM receptors affect adult brain neurogenesis by negative regulation of microglial cell activation.

    PubMed

    Ji, Rui; Tian, Shifu; Lu, Helen J; Lu, Qingjun; Zheng, Yan; Wang, Xiaomin; Ding, Jixiang; Li, Qiutang; Lu, Qingxian

    2013-12-15

    TAM tyrosine kinases play multiple functional roles, including regulation of the target genes important in homeostatic regulation of cytokine receptors or TLR-mediated signal transduction pathways. In this study, we show that TAM receptors affect adult hippocampal neurogenesis and loss of TAM receptors impairs hippocampal neurogenesis, largely attributed to exaggerated inflammatory responses by microglia characterized by increased MAPK and NF-κB activation and elevated production of proinflammatory cytokines that are detrimental to neuron stem cell proliferation and neuronal differentiation. Injection of LPS causes even more severe inhibition of BrdU incorporation in the Tyro3(-/-)Axl(-/-)Mertk(-/-) triple-knockout (TKO) brains, consistent with the LPS-elicited enhanced expression of proinflammatory mediators, for example, IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, and inducible NO synthase, and this effect is antagonized by coinjection of the anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin in wild-type but not TKO brains. Conditioned medium from TKO microglia cultures inhibits neuron stem cell proliferation and neuronal differentiation. IL-6 knockout in Axl(-/-)Mertk(-/-) double-knockout mice overcomes the inflammatory inhibition of neurogenesis, suggesting that IL-6 is a major downstream neurotoxic mediator under homeostatic regulation by TAM receptors in microglia. Additionally, autonomous trophic function of the TAM receptors on the proliferating neuronal progenitors may also promote progenitor differentiation into immature neurons.

  9. Combined impact of negative lifestyle factors on cardiovascular risk in children: a randomized prospective study.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Ursina; Schindler, Christian; Bloesch, Tamara; Schmocker, Eliane; Zahner, Lukas; Puder, Jardena J; Kriemler, Susi

    2014-12-01

    Negative lifestyle factors are known to be associated with increased cardiovascular risk (CVR) in children, but research on their combined impact on a general population of children is sparse. Therefore, we aimed to quantify the combined impact of easily assessable negative lifestyle factors on the CVR scores of randomly selected children after 4 years. Of the 540 randomly selected 6- to 13-year-old children, 502 children participated in a baseline health assessment, and 64% were assessed again after 4 years. Measures included anthropometry, fasting blood samples, and a health assessment questionnaire. Participants scored one point for each negative lifestyle factor at baseline: overweight; physical inactivity; high media consumption; little outdoor time; skipping breakfast; and having a parent who has ever smoked, is inactive, or overweight. A CVR score at follow-up was constructed by averaging sex- and age-related z-scores of waist circumference, blood pressure, glucose, inverted high-density lipoprotein, and triglycerides. The age-, sex-, pubertal stage-, and social class-adjusted probabilities (95% confidence interval) for being in the highest CVR score tertile at follow-up for children who had at most one (n = 48), two (n = 64), three (n = 56), four (n = 41), or five or more (n = 14) risky lifestyle factors were 15.4% (8.9-25.3), 24.3% (17.4-32.8), 36.0% (28.6-44.2), 49.8% (38.6-61.0), and 63.5% (47.2-77.2), respectively. Even in childhood, an accumulation of negative lifestyle factors is associated with higher CVR scores after 4 years. These negative lifestyle factors are easy to assess in clinical practice and allow early detection and prevention of CVR in childhood. Copyright © 2014 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Negative and positive urgency may both be risk factors for compulsive buying.

    PubMed

    Rose, Paul; Segrist, Daniel J

    2014-06-01

    Descriptions of compulsive buying often emphasize the roles of negative moods and trait impulsivity in the development of problematic buying habits. Trait impulsivity is sometimes treated as a unidimensional trait in compulsive buying research, but recent factor analyses suggest that impulsivity consists of multiple components that are probably best treated as independent predictors of problem behavior. In order to draw greater attention to the role of positive moods in compulsive buying, in this study we tested whether negative urgency (the tendency to act rashly while in negative moods) and positive urgency (the tendency to act rashly while in positive moods) account for similar amounts of variance in compulsive buying. North American adults (N = 514) completed an online survey containing the Richmond Compulsive Buying Scale (Ridgway, Kukar-Kinney & Monroe, 2008), established measures of positive and negative urgency (Cyders et al., 2007), ad hoc measures of buying-specific positive and negative urgency, measures of extraversion and neuroticism obtained from the International Personality Item Pool (http://ipip.ori.org/), and demographic questions. In several multiple regression analyses, when demographic variables, neuroticism, and extraversion were controlled, positive urgency and negative urgency both emerged as significant predictors of compulsive buying. Whether the two urgency variables were domain-general or buying-specific, they accounted for similar amounts of variance in compulsive buying. Preventing and reducing compulsive buying may require attention not only to the purchasing decisions people make while in negative states, but also to the purchasing decisions they make while in positive states.

  11. Aromatase overexpression induces malignant changes in estrogen receptor α negative MCF-10A cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Gildea, J J; Yue, W

    2013-10-31

    Estrogen is a risk factor of breast cancer. Elevated expression of aromatase (estrogen synthase) in breast tissues increases local estradiol concentrations and is associated with breast cancer development, but the causal relationship between aromatase and breast cancer has not been identified. Accumulating data suggest that both estrogen receptor (ER)-dependent and -independent effects are involved in estrogen carcinogenesis. We established a model by expressing aromatase in ERα- MCF-10A human breast epithelial cells to investigate ERα-independent effects of estrogen in the process of malignant transformation. Overexpression of aromatase significantly increased anchorage-independent growth. Parental- or vector-expressing MCF-10A cells did not form colonies under the same conditions. The anchorage-independent growth of MCF-10A(arom) cells can be completely abolished by pre-treatment with the aromatase inhibitor, letrozole. Neither MCF-10A(arom) nor MCF-10A(vector) cells grown in monolayer were affected by short-term exposure to estradiol. Enhanced motility is another characteristic of cellular transformation. Motility of MCF-10A(arom) cells was increased, which could be inhibited by letrozole. Increases in stem cell population in breast cancer tissues are associated with tumor recurrence and metastasis. CD44(high)/CD24(low) is a stem cell marker. We found that CD24 mRNA levels were reduced in MCF-10A(arom) cells compared with those in parental- and vector-transfected cells. By examining individual clones of MCF-10A(arom) with various aromatase activities, we found that the CD24 mRNA levels were inversely correlated with aromatase activity. The ability of MCF-10A(arom) cells to form mammospheres in the absence of serum was increased. Our results suggest that overexpression of aromatase in MCF-10A cells causes malignant transformation. Estrogen metabolite-mediated genotoxicity and induction of a stem cell/progenitor cell population are possible mechanisms. These

  12. Proteinase-activated receptor-2 transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptor and transforming growth factorreceptor signaling pathways contributes to renal fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hyunjae; Ramachandran, Rithwik; Hollenberg, Morley D; Muruve, Daniel A

    2013-12-27

    Chronic kidney diseases cause significant morbidity and mortality in the population. During renal injury, kidney-localized proteinases can signal by cleaving and activating proteinase-activated receptor-2 (PAR2), a G-protein-coupled receptor involved in inflammation and fibrosis that is highly expressed in renal tubular cells. Following unilateral ureteric obstruction, PAR2-deficient mice displayed reduced renal tubular injury, fibrosis, collagen synthesis, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), and α-smooth muscle actin gene expression at 7 days, compared with wild-type controls. In human proximal tubular epithelial cells in vitro, PAR2 stimulation with PAR2-activating peptide (PAR2-AP) alone significantly up-regulated the expression of CTGF, a potent profibrotic cytokine. The induction of CTGF by PAR2-AP was synergistically increased when combined with transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β). Consistent with these findings, treating human proximal tubular epithelial cells with PAR2-AP induced Smad2/3 phosphorylation in the canonical TGF-β signaling pathway. The Smad2 phosphorylation and CTGF induction required signaling via both the TGFβ-receptor and EGF receptor suggesting that PAR2 utilizes transactivation mechanisms to initiate fibrogenic signaling. Taken together, our data support the hypothesis that PAR2 synergizes with the TGFβ signaling pathway to contribute to renal injury and fibrosis.

  13. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 3 directly regulates murine neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Calvo, Charles-Félix; Fontaine, Romain H.; Soueid, Jihane; Tammela, Tuomas; Makinen, Taija; Alfaro-Cervello, Clara; Bonnaud, Fabien; Miguez, Andres; Benhaim, Lucile; Xu, Yunling; Barallobre, Maria-José; Moutkine, Imane; Lyytikkä, Johannes; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Pytowski, Bronislaw; Zalc, Bernard; Richardson, William; Kessaris, Nicoletta; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Alitalo, Kari; Eichmann, Anne; Thomas, Jean-Léon

    2011-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are slowly dividing astrocytes that are intimately associated with capillary endothelial cells in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the brain. Functionally, members of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family can stimulate neurogenesis as well as angiogenesis, but it has been unclear whether they act directly via VEGF receptors (VEGFRs) expressed by neural cells, or indirectly via the release of growth factors from angiogenic capillaries. Here, we show that VEGFR-3, a receptor required for lymphangiogenesis, is expressed by NSCs and is directly required for neurogenesis. Vegfr3:YFP reporter mice show VEGFR-3 expression in multipotent NSCs, which are capable of self-renewal and are activated by the VEGFR-3 ligand VEGF-C in vitro. Overexpression of VEGF-C stimulates VEGFR-3-expressing NSCs and neurogenesis in the SVZ without affecting angiogenesis. Conversely, conditional deletion of Vegfr3 in neural cells, inducible deletion in subventricular astrocytes, and blocking of VEGFR-3 signaling with antibodies reduce SVZ neurogenesis. Therefore, VEGF-C/VEGFR-3 signaling acts directly on NSCs and regulates adult neurogenesis, opening potential approaches for treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:21498572

  14. Role of fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling in kidney development.

    PubMed

    Bates, Carlton M

    2011-08-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptors (Fgfrs) consist of four signaling family members and one nonsignaling "decoy" receptor, Fgfr-like 1 (Fgfrl1), all of which are expressed in the developing kidney. Several studies have shown that exogenous fibroblast growth factors (Fgfs) affect growth and maturation of the metanephric mesenchyme (MM) and ureteric bud (UB) in cultured tissues. Transgenic and conditional knockout approaches in whole animals have shown that Fgfr1 and Fgfr2 (predominantly the IIIc isoform) in kidney mesenchyme are critical for early MM and UB formation. Conditional deletion of the ligand, Fgf8, in nephron precursors or global deletion of Fgfrl1 interrupts nephron formation. Fgfr2 (likely the IIIb isoform signaling downstream of Fgf7 and Fgf10) is critical for ureteric morphogenesis. Moreover, Fgfr2 appears to act independently of Frs2α (the major signaling adapter for Fgfrs) in regulating UB branching. Loss of Fgfr2 in the MM leads to many kidney and urinary tract anomalies, including vesicoureteral reflux. Thus Fgfr signaling is critical for patterning of virtually all renal lineages at early and later stages of development.

  15. Polychlorinated Biphenyls Disrupt Hepatic Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Signaling.

    PubMed

    Hardesty, Josiah E; Wahlang, Banrida; Falkner, K Cameron; Clair, Heather B; Clark, Barbara J; Ceresa, Brian P; Prough, Russell A; Cave, Matthew C

    2016-07-26

    1. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent environmental pollutants that disrupt hepatic xenobiotic and intermediary metabolism, leading to metabolic syndrome and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). 2. Since phenobarbital indirectly activates Constitutive Androstane Receptor (CAR) by antagonizing growth factor binding to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), we hypothesised that PCBs may also diminish EGFR signaling. 3. The effects of the PCB mixture Aroclor 1260 on the protein phosphorylation cascade triggered by EGFR activation were determined in murine (in vitro and in vivo) and human models (in vitro). EGFR tyrosine residue phosphorylation was decreased by PCBs in all models tested. 4. The IC50 values for Aroclor 1260 concentrations that decreased Y1173 phosphorylation of EGFR were similar in murine AML-12 and human HepG2 cells (∼2-4 μg/mL). Both dioxin and non-dioxin-like PCB congeners decreased EGFR phosphorylation in cell culture. 5. PCB treatment reduced phosphorylation of downstream EGFR effectors including Akt and mTOR, as well as other phosphoprotein targets including STAT3 and c-RAF in vivo. 6. PCBs diminish EGFR signaling in human and murine hepatocyte models and may dysregulate critical phosphoprotein regulators of energy metabolism and nutrition, providing a new mechanism of action in environmental diseases.

  16. Pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor and hepatocyte nuclear factors as emerging players in cancer precision medicine.

    PubMed

    De Mattia, Elena; Cecchin, Erika; Roncato, Rossana; Toffoli, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    Great research effort has been focused on elucidating the contribution of host genetic variability on pharmacological outcomes in cancer. Nuclear receptors have emerged as mediators between environmental stimuli and drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. The pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor and hepatocyte nuclear factors have been reported to regulate transcription of genes that encode drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters. Altered nuclear receptor expression has been shown to affect the metabolism and pharmacological profile of traditional chemotherapeutics and targeted agents. Accordingly, polymorphic variants in these genes have been studied as pharmacogenetic markers of outcome variability. This review summarizes the state of knowledge about the roles played by pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor and hepatocyte nuclear factor expression and genetics as predictive markers of anticancer drug toxicity and efficacy, which can improve cancer precision medicine.

  17. Transcription factor Foxo1 is a negative regulator of natural killer cell maturation and function.

    PubMed

    Deng, Youcai; Kerdiles, Yann; Chu, Jianhong; Yuan, Shunzong; Wang, Youwei; Chen, Xilin; Mao, Hsiaoyin; Zhang, Lingling; Zhang, Jianying; Hughes, Tiffany; Deng, Yafei; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Fangjie; Zou, Xianghong; Liu, Chang-Gong; Freud, Aharon G; Li, Xiaohui; Caligiuri, Michael A; Vivier, Eric; Yu, Jianhua

    2015-03-17

    Little is known about the role of negative regulators in controlling natural killer (NK) cell development and effector functions. Foxo1 is a multifunctional transcription factor of the forkhead family. Using a mouse model of conditional deletion in NK cells, we found that Foxo1 negatively controlled NK cell differentiation and function. Immature NK cells expressed abundant Foxo1 and little Tbx21 relative to mature NK cells, but these two transcription factors reversed their expression as NK cells proceeded through development. Foxo1 promoted NK cell homing to lymph nodes by upregulating CD62L expression and inhibited late-stage maturation and effector functions by repressing Tbx21 expression. Loss of Foxo1 rescued the defect in late-stage NK cell maturation in heterozygous Tbx21(+/-) mice. Collectively, our data reveal a regulatory pathway by which the negative regulator Foxo1 and the positive regulator Tbx21 play opposing roles in controlling NK cell development and effector functions.

  18. A Prospective Study Investigating the Impact of School Belonging Factors on Negative Affect in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shochet, Ian M.; Smith, Coral L.; Furlong, Michael J.; Homel, Ross

    2011-01-01

    School belonging, measured as a unidimensional construct, is an important predictor of negative affective problems in adolescents, including depression and anxiety symptoms. A recent study found that one such measure, the Psychological Sense of School Membership scale, actually comprises three factors: Caring Relations, Acceptance, and Rejection.…

  19. Factors Negatively Affect Speaking Skills at Saudi Colleges for Girls in the South

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamad, Mona M.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated factors negatively affect English language speaking skills in Saudi colleges for girls in the South in terms of: a) Instructors. b) Students. c) Curriculum and textbook. d) English Language teaching methods and exercises. e) Teaching and learning environment. To collect data for the study, a questionnaire papers were…

  20. Factors Influencing Pronunciation Accuracy: L1 Negative Transfer, Task Variables and Individual Aptitude

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Qian

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the influence of three factors on pronunciation accuracy of Chinese adult foreign language learners. Ten target sounds including phonemes and syllables are included in the pre-test, an analysis of which shows that the mispronunciation of the randomly chosen target sounds mainly results from L1 negative transfer. It is…

  1. A Prospective Study Investigating the Impact of School Belonging Factors on Negative Affect in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shochet, Ian M.; Smith, Coral L.; Furlong, Michael J.; Homel, Ross

    2011-01-01

    School belonging, measured as a unidimensional construct, is an important predictor of negative affective problems in adolescents, including depression and anxiety symptoms. A recent study found that one such measure, the Psychological Sense of School Membership scale, actually comprises three factors: Caring Relations, Acceptance, and Rejection.…

  2. Negative Intrusive Thoughts and Dissociation as Risk Factors for Self-Harm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batey, Helen; May, Jon; Andrade, Jackie

    2010-01-01

    Relationships between self-harm and vulnerability factors were studied in a general population of 432 participants, of whom 30% reported some experience of self-harm. This group scored higher on dissociation and childhood trauma, had lower self-worth, and reported more negative intrusive thoughts. Among the non-harming group, 10% scored similarly…

  3. Negative School Factors and Their Influence on Math and Science Achievement in TIMSS 2003

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perse, Tina Vrsnik; Kozina, Ana; Leban, Tina Rutar

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to conduct an analysis of TIMSS (Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study) 2003 database and to determine how negative school factors, such as aggression, are associated to the mathematical and science achievement of students. The analyses were conducted separately for national and international data.…

  4. Negative School Factors and Their Influence on Math and Science Achievement in TIMSS 2003

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perse, Tina Vrsnik; Kozina, Ana; Leban, Tina Rutar

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to conduct an analysis of TIMSS (Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study) 2003 database and to determine how negative school factors, such as aggression, are associated to the mathematical and science achievement of students. The analyses were conducted separately for national and international data.…

  5. Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 5 is an essential mediator of ischemic brain infarction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lang; Lu, Yanyun; Guan, Hongjing; Jiang, Dingsheng; Guan, Yu; Zhang, Xin; Nakano, Hiroyasu; Zhou, Yan; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Li; Li, Hongliang

    2013-08-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 5 (TRAF5) is an adaptor protein of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor superfamily and the interleukin-1 receptor/Toll-like receptor superfamily and plays important roles in regulating multiple signaling pathways. This study was conducted to investigate the role of TRAF5 in the context of brain ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Transient occlusion of the middle cerebral artery was performed on TRAF5 knockout mice (KO), neuron-specific TRAF5 transgene (TG), and the appropriate controls. Compared with the WT mice, the TRAF5 KO mice showed lower infarct volumes and better outcomes in the neurological tests. A low neuronal apoptosis level, an attenuated blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption and an inhibited inflammatory response were exhibited in TRAF5 KO mice. TRAF5 TG mice exhibited an opposite phenotype. Moreover, the Akt/FoxO1 signaling pathway was enhanced in the ischemic brains of the TRAF5 KO mice. These results provide the first demonstration that TRAF5 is a critical mediator of I/R injury in an experimental stroke model. The Akt /FoxO1 signaling pathway probably plays an important role in the biological function of TRAF5 in this model. © 2013 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  6. The P2Y2 Nucleotide Receptor Mediates Tissue Factor Expression in Human Coronary Artery Endothelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ling; Ma, Wanshu; Littmann, Timothy; Camp, Riley; Shen, Jianzhong

    2011-01-01

    The discovery of the role of P2Y12 receptor in platelet aggregation leads to a new anti-thrombotic drug Plavix; however, little is known about non-platelet P2Y receptors in thrombosis. This study tested the hypothesis that endothelial P2Y receptor(s) mediates up-regulation of tissue factor (TF), the initiator of coagulation cascade. Stimulation of human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC) by UTP/ATP increased the mRNA level of TF but not of its counterpart-tissue factor pathway inhibitor, which was accompanied by up-regulation of TF protein and cell surface activity. RT-PCR revealed a selective expression of P2Y2 and P2Y11 receptors in HCAEC. Consistent with this, TF up-regulation was inhibited by suramin or by siRNA silencing of P2Y2 receptor, but not by NF-157, a P2Y11-selective antagonist, suggesting a role for the P2Y2 receptor. In addition, P2Y2 receptor activated ERK1/2, JNK, and p38 MAPK pathways without affecting the positive NF-κB and negative AKT regulatory pathways of TF expression. Furthermore, TF up-regulation was abolished or partially suppressed by inhibition of p38 or JNK but not ERK1/2. Interestingly, blockade of the PLC/Ca2+ pathway did not affect P2Y2 receptor activation of p38, JNK, and TF induction. However, blockade of Src kinase reduced phosphorylation of p38 but not JNK, eliminating TF induction. In contrast, inhibition of Rho kinase reduced phosphorylation of JNK but not p38, decreasing TF expression. These findings demonstrate that P2Y2 receptor mediates TF expression in HCAEC through new mechanisms involving Src/p38 and Rho/JNK pathways, possibly contributing to a pro-thrombotic status after vascular injury. PMID:21652710

  7. Blocking Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor Signaling Inhibits Tumor Growth, Lymphangiogenesis, and Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Larrieu-Lahargue, Frédéric; Welm, Alana L.; Bouchecareilh, Marion; Alitalo, Kari; Li, Dean Y.; Bikfalvi, Andreas; Auguste, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Fibroblast Growth Factor receptor (FGFR) activity plays crucial roles in tumor growth and patient survival. However, FGF (Fibroblast Growth Factor) signaling as a target for cancer therapy has been under-investigated compared to other receptor tyrosine kinases. Here, we studied the effect of FGFR signaling inhibition on tumor growth, metastasis and lymphangiogenesis by expressing a dominant negative FGFR (FGFR-2DN) in an orthotopic mouse mammary 66c14 carcinoma model. We show that FGFR-2DN-expressing 66c14 cells proliferate in vitro slower than controls. 66c14 tumor outgrowth and lung metastatic foci are reduced in mice implanted with FGFR-2DN-expressing cells, which also exhibited better overall survival. We found 66c14 cells in the lumen of tumor lymphatic vessels and in lymph nodes. FGFR-2DN-expressing tumors exhibited a decrease in VEGFR-3 (Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-3) or podoplanin-positive lymphatic vessels, an increase in isolated intratumoral lymphatic endothelial cells and a reduction in VEGF-C (Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-C) mRNA expression. FGFs may act in an autocrine manner as the inhibition of FGFR signaling in tumor cells suppresses VEGF-C expression in a COX-2 (cyclooxygenase-2) or HIF1-α (hypoxia-inducible factor-1 α) independent manner. FGFs may also act in a paracrine manner on tumor lymphatics by inducing expression of pro-lymphangiogenic molecules such as VEGFR-3, integrin α9, prox1 and netrin-1. Finally, in vitro lymphangiogenesis is impeded in the presence of FGFR-2DN 66c14 cells. These data confirm that both FGF and VEGF signaling are necessary for the maintenance of vascular morphogenesis and provide evidence that targeting FGFR signaling may be an interesting approach to inhibit tumor lymphangiogenesis and metastatic spread. PMID:22761819

  8. Sex hormones and androgen receptor: risk factors of coronary heart disease in elderly men.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jian; Zou, Hui; Zhu, Bing-Po; Wang, Hao; Li, Jian; Ding, Yu; Li, Xiao-Ying

    2010-03-01

    To investigate the variation of sex hormone and its receptor level in elderly male patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) and to evaluate the correlations between CHD and sex hormone as well as sex hormone receptor. Altogether 139 male CHD patients (CHD group) aged 60-92 years and 400 healthy men (control group) aged 60-90 years were included in this cross sectional study. The plasma concentrations of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), total testosterone (TT), free testosterone (FT), estradiol (E2), sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), luteinizing hormone (LH), and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) were measured. The androgen receptor (AR) was tested by flow cytometry. Correlations between CHD and levels of sex hormones and AR were analyzed. Compared with the control group, the levels of DHEAS, TT, FT, SHBG, and the fluorescence intensity of AR in the CHD group significantly reduced (P < 0.05), while the levels of FSH and E2 significantly increased (P < 0.01). Age was negatively correlated with TT (r = -0.28, P = 0.00) and FT (r = -0.17, P = 0.01), while it was positively correlated with SHBG (r = 0.14, P = 0.04) and E2 (r = 0.33, P = 0.00). AR fluorescence intensity was negatively correlated with systolic blood pressure (r = -0.12, P = 0.01). Binary logistic regression analysis showed that TT, SHBG, and AR were all negatively correlated with CHD (P < 0.05). Elderly male patients with CHD are found to have low levels of DHEAS, TT, FT, SHBG, and AR, while high concentrations of E2 and FSH. Low levels of TT and SHBG may be the potential risk factors of CHD in elderly men.

  9. Psychometric validation of the consensus five-factor model of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale.

    PubMed

    Fong, Ted C T; Ho, Rainbow T H; Wan, Adrian H Y; Siu, Pantha Joey C Y; Au-Yeung, Friendly S W

    2015-10-01

    The Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) is widely used for clinical assessment of symptoms in schizophrenia. Instead of the traditional pyramidal model, recent literature supports the pentagonal model for the dimensionality of the PANSS. The present study aimed to validate the consensus five-factor model of the PANSS and evaluate its convergent validity. Participants were 146 Chinese chronic schizophrenic patients who completed diagnostic interviews and cognitive assessments. Exploratory structural equation modeling (ESEM) was performed to investigate the dimensionality of the PANSS. Covariates (age, sex, and education level) and concurrent outcomes (perceived stress, memory, daily living functions, and motor deficits) were added in the ESEM model. The results supported the consensus 5-factor underlying structure, which comprised 20 items categorized into positive, negative, excitement, depression, and cognitive factors with acceptable reliability (α=.69-.85) and strong factor loadings (λ=.41-.93). The five factors, especially the cognitive factor, showed evident convergent validity with the covariates and concurrent outcomes. The results support the consensus five-factor structure of the PANSS as a robust measure of symptoms in schizophrenia. Future studies could explore the clinical and practical utility of the consensus five-factor model. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Negative regulation of opioid receptor-G protein-Ca2+ channel pathway by the nootropic nefiracetam.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, Mitsunobu; Furukawa, Taiji; Ogihara, Yoshiyasu; Watabe, Shigeo; Shiotani, Tadashi; Ishikawa, Yasuro; Nishimura, Masao; Nukada, Toshihide

    2004-10-01

    It has recently been reported that nefiracetam, a nootropic agent, is capable of attenuating the development of morphine dependence and tolerance in mice. The mechanism of this antimorphine action is not clear. The present study was designed to address this issue using Xenopus oocytes expressing delta-opioid receptors, G proteins (G(i3alpha) or G(o1alpha)), and N-type (alpha1B) Ca2+ channels. Membrane currents through Ca2+ channels were recorded from the oocytes under voltage-clamp conditions. The Ca2+ channel currents were reduced reversibly by 40-60% in the presence of 1 microM leucine-enkephalin (Leu-Enk). The Leu-Enk-induced current inhibition was recovered promptly by nefiracetam (1 microM), while control currents in the absence of Leu-Enk were not influenced by nefiracetam. A binding assay revealed that 3H-nefiracetam preferentially bound to the membrane fraction of oocytes expressing G(i3alpha). When delta-opioid receptors were coexpressed, the binding was significantly increased. However, an additional expression of alpha1B Ca2+ channels decreased the binding. The results suggest that nefiracetam preferentially binds to G(i3alpha) associated with delta-opioid receptors, thereby inhibiting the association of G proteins with Ca2+ channels. In conclusion, nefiracetam negatively regulates the inhibitory pathway of opioid receptor-G protein-Ca2+ channel.

  11. Young premenopausal women with breast cancer, especially estrogen receptor negative, are at significantly increased risk for subsequent ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Lehrer, Steven; Rheinstein, Peter H; Green, Sheryl; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E

    2016-10-01

    There is a modest risk of second cancers, among them ovarian cancer, after breast cancer. For BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers, the risk increases substantially. We have analyzed the risk of ovarian cancer after breast cancer based on patient age and the estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) characteristics of the breast tumor. The study population was assembled using records from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program of the National Cancer Institute. The SEER program statistical analysis software package (SEER*Stat, version 8.2.1) was used to identify patients diagnosed with a primary breast cancer from 1990-2010. The SEER*Stat MP-SIR (Multiple Primary-Standardized Incidence Ratio) tool was used to calculate standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and excess risk for ovarian cancer by comparing the patients' subsequent cancer profile to the number of cancers that would be expected based on incidence rates for the general U.S. We used data from 316,801 cases of breast cancer. The overall number of ovarian cancer cases (n = 288) after ER negative PR negative breast cancer was significantly higher than expected (O/E = 1.89, p < 0.05). In premenopausal women, that is, women younger than fifty, the ovarian cancer O/E was considerably higher than expected. Analysis of latency of ovarian cancer (months) after ER negative PR negative breast cancer revealed that in the youngest women the latency was shortest (p = 0.001, linear by linear association test for trend). Young women with pre-menopausal breast cancer, especially ER negative, are at significantly increased risk for subsequent ovarian cancer; the younger they are, the higher the risk. These women should be routinely tested for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations, and many might benefit from measures to prevent subsequent ovarian cancer.

  12. The Role of Fatty Acid Metabolism in Estrogen Receptor Negative Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    cells results in a molecular fingerprint characteristic of ER-negative human breast tu- mors. Our studies showed that MCF-7 cells, which express ER and...expression and exhibit an ER-negative molecular fingerprint . An examination of the microarray data accompanying these experiments indicates that Raf-1...H, Kim Y, Wang P, Lapointe J, Tibshirani R, Pollack JR, et al. (2005). Genome-wide characterization of gene expression variations and DNA copy num

  13. Mammary tumorigenesis induced by fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 requires activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Bade, Lindsey K; Goldberg, Jodi E; Dehut, Hazel A; Hall, Majken K; Schwertfeger, Kathryn L

    2011-09-15

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) is an oncoprotein with known involvement in mammary tumorigenesis. To understand how FGFR1 signaling promotes mammary tumorigenesis, an inducible FGFR1 (iFGFR1) system was created previously. Previous studies have demonstrated that upon iFGFR1 activation in vivo, the epidermal growth factor (EGF) ligands amphiregulin (AREG) and epiregulin (EREG) are upregulated. Both AREG and EREG interact with the EGF receptor (EGFR). Here, we investigated whether the FGFR1-induced increase in AREG and EREG expression might coordinately increase EGFR signaling to promote mammary tumorigenesis. Treatment of mouse mammary epithelial cells with either AREG or EREG conferred a greater migratory potential, increased cellular proliferation and increased extracellular regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) activation. These effects could be blocked with the EGFR-specific inhibitor erlotinib, suggesting that they are EGFR-dependent. In transgenic mice with iFGFR1 under the control of the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoter, iFGFR1 activation also led to increased mammary epithelial cell proliferation that was inhibited with erlotinib. Taken together, these data suggest that AREG and EREG mediate tumorigenic phenotypes by activating EGFR signaling, and that the oncogenic potential of FGFR1 requires EGFR activation to promote mammary tumorigenesis.

  14. A20 is an early responding negative regulator of Toll-like receptor 5 signalling in intestinal epithelial cells during inflammation.

    PubMed

    Oshima, N; Ishihara, S; Rumi, M A K; Aziz, M M; Mishima, Y; Kadota, C; Moriyama, I; Ishimura, N; Amano, Y; Kinoshita, Y

    2010-02-01

    Several negative regulatory mechanisms control Toll-like receptor (TLR)-mediated inflammatory responses and restore immune system balance, including the zinc-finger protein A20, a negative regulator of TLR signalling that inhibits nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) activity. In the present study, we investigated TLR-5-mediated A20 expression and its role in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) during inflammation. HCT-15 and HT-29 cells were stimulated with flagellin, then the expressions of A20, interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase (IRAK-M) and Tollip were evaluated using RNase protection assay. Furthermore, experimental colitis was induced in tlr4-deficient CH3/HeJ mice by administration of dextran sodium sulphate (DSS), then flagellin was injected anally, and the colonic expression of A20 was examined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and immunohistochemistry. To confirm flagellin-induced expression of A20, we employed an organ culture system. The role of A20 in flagellin-induced tolerance induction was evaluated in vitro, using a gene knock-down method targeting A20. A20 expression increased rapidly and peaked at 1 h after flagellin stimulation in cultured IECs, then declined gradually to the basal level. In vivo, anal injection of flagellin induced epithelial expression of A20 in injured colonic tissue, whereas flagellin did not cause a significant increase in A20 expression in non-injured normal tissue, which was also confirmed in vitro using the organ culture system. Gene knock-down using A20 siRNA did not influence tolerance induced by restimulation with flagellin. A20 is an early response negative regulator of TLR-5 signalling in IECs that functions during intestinal inflammation. Our results provide new insights into the negative feedback regulation of TLR-5 signalling that maintains the innate immune system in the gut.

  15. A20 is an early responding negative regulator of Toll-like receptor 5 signalling in intestinal epithelial cells during inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Oshima, N; Ishihara, S; Rumi, M A K; Aziz, M M; Mishima, Y; Kadota, C; Moriyama, I; Ishimura, N; Amano, Y; Kinoshita, Y

    2010-01-01

    Several negative regulatory mechanisms control Toll-like receptor (TLR)-mediated inflammatory responses and restore immune system balance, including the zinc-finger protein A20, a negative regulator of TLR signalling that inhibits nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activity. In the present study, we investigated TLR-5-mediated A20 expression and its role in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) during inflammation. HCT-15 and HT-29 cells were stimulated with flagellin, then the expressions of A20, interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase (IRAK-M) and Tollip were evaluated using RNase protection assay. Furthermore, experimental colitis was induced in tlr4-deficient CH3/HeJ mice by administration of dextran sodium sulphate (DSS), then flagellin was injected anally, and the colonic expression of A20 was examined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and immunohistochemistry. To confirm flagellin-induced expression of A20, we employed an organ culture system. The role of A20 in flagellin-induced tolerance induction was evaluated in vitro, using a gene knock-down method targeting A20. A20 expression increased rapidly and peaked at 1 h after flagellin stimulation in cultured IECs, then declined gradually to the basal level. In vivo, anal injection of flagellin induced epithelial expression of A20 in injured colonic tissue, whereas flagellin did not cause a significant increase in A20 expression in non-injured normal tissue, which was also confirmed in vitro using the organ culture system. Gene knock-down using A20 siRNA did not influence tolerance induced by restimulation with flagellin. A20 is an early response negative regulator of TLR-5 signalling in IECs that functions during intestinal inflammation. Our results provide new insights into the negative feedback regulation of TLR-5 signalling that maintains the innate immune system in the gut. PMID:19912257

  16. Dynamic regulation of platelet-derived growth factor receptor α expression in alveolar fibroblasts during realveolarization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Leiling; Acciani, Thomas; Le Cras, Tim; Lutzko, Carolyn; Perl, Anne-Karina T

    2012-10-01

    Although the importance of platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR)-α signaling during normal alveogenesis is known, it is unclear whether this signaling pathway can regulate realveolarization in the adult lung. During alveolar development, PDGFR-α-expressing cells induce α smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and differentiate to interstitial myofibroblasts. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling regulates myofibroblast differentiation during alveolarization, whereas peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ activation antagonizes myofibroblast differentiation in lung fibrosis. Using left lung pneumonectomy, the roles of FGF and PPAR-γ signaling in differentiation of myofibroblasts from PDGFR-α-positive precursors during compensatory lung growth were assessed. FGF receptor (FGFR) signaling was inhibited by conditionally activating a soluble dominant-negative FGFR2 transgene. PPAR-γ signaling was activated by administration of rosiglitazone. Changes in α-SMA and PDGFR-α protein expression were assessed in PDGFR-α-green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter mice using immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry, and real-time PCR. Immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry demonstrated that the cell ratio and expression levels of PDGFR-α-GFP changed dynamically during alveolar regeneration and that α-SMA expression was induced in a subset of PDGFR-α-GFP cells. Expression of a dominant-negative FGFR2 and administration of rosiglitazone inhibited induction of α-SMA in PDGFR-α-positive fibroblasts and formation of new septae. Changes in gene expression of epithelial and mesenchymal signaling molecules were assessed after left lobe pneumonectomy, and results demonstrated that inhibition of FGFR2 signaling and increase in PPAR-γ signaling altered the expression of Shh, FGF, Wnt, and Bmp4, genes that are also important for epithelial-mesenchymal crosstalk during early lung development. Our data demonstrate for the first time that a comparable epithelial

  17. Loss of Nuclear Receptor SHP Impairs but Does Not Eliminate Negative Feedback Regulation of Bile Acid Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Thomas A.; Saeki, Shigeru; Schneider, Manfred; Schaefer, Karen; Berdy, Sara; Redder, Thadd; Shan, Bei; Russell, David W.; Schwarz, Margrit

    2014-01-01

    Summary The in vivo role of the nuclear receptor SHP in feedback regulation of bile acid synthesis was examined. Loss of SHP in mice caused abnormal accumulation and increased synthesis of bile acids due to derepression of rate-limiting CYP7A1 and CYP8B1 hydroxylase enzymes in the biosynthetic pathway. Dietary bile acids induced liver damage and restored feedback regulation. A synthetic agonist of the nuclear receptor FXR was not hepatotoxic and had no regulatory effects. Reduction of the bile acid pool with cholestyramine enhanced CYP7A1 and CYP8B1 expression. We conclude that input from three negative regulatory pathways controls bile acid synthesis. One is mediated by SHP, and two are SHP independent and invoked by liver damage and changes in bile acid pool size. PMID:12062084

  18. Recombinant pigment epithelium-derived factor PEDF binds vascular endothelial growth factor receptors 1 and 2.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Erin K; Francis, Mary K; Knepper, Janice E

    2015-08-01

    Angiogenesis, or the formation of new blood vessels, is stimulated by angiogenic factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) is a potent inhibitor of angiogenesis. To explore the mechanism by which PEDF acts, recombinant PEDF was expressed with a 6x-His tag (for purification) and a green fluorescent protein (GFP) tag. The PEDF fusion protein was confirmed to be active in inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation and migration. Direct binding of PEDF to both vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 (VEGFR-1) and VEGFR-2 was demonstrated in an in vitro assay similar to an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). PEDF was shown by immune-confocal microscopy to be localized within treated endothelial cells. When VEGF-stimulated endothelial cells were incubated with PEDF the VEGF receptors showed intracellular localization. These data suggest that the interaction between PEDF and VEGFR-1 or VEGFR-2 may be a possible mechanism for inhibiting angiogenesis. PEDF may be binding to the VEGF receptors to promote their internalization and/or degradation to limit VEGF responses in treated cells.

  19. From bench to bedside: What do we know about hormone receptor-positive and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive breast cancer?

    PubMed

    Wu, Victoria Shang; Kanaya, Noriko; Lo, Chiao; Mortimer, Joanne; Chen, Shiuan

    2015-09-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease. Thanks to extensive efforts from research scientists and clinicians, treatment for breast cancer has advanced into the era of targeted medicine. With the use of several well-established biomarkers, such as hormone receptors (HRs) (i.e., estrogen receptor [ER] and progesterone receptor [PgR]) and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2), breast cancer patients can be categorized into multiple subgroups with specific targeted treatment strategies. Although therapeutic strategies for HR-positive (HR+) HER2-negative (HER2-) breast cancer and HR-negative (HR-) HER2-positive (HER2+) breast cancer are well-defined, HR+ HER2+ breast cancer is still an overlooked subgroup without tailored therapeutic options. In this review, we have summarized the molecular characteristics, etiology, preclinical tools and therapeutic options for HR+ HER2+ breast cancer. We hope to raise the attention of both the research and the medical community on HR+ HER2+ breast cancer, and to advance patient care for this subtype of disease.

  20. From bench to bedside: what do we know about Hormone Receptor-positive and Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-positive breast cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Victoria Shang; Kanaya, Noriko; Lo, Chiao; Mortimer, Joanne; Chen, Shiuan

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease. Thanks to extensive efforts from research scientists and clinicians, treatment for breast cancer has advanced into the era of targeted medicine. With the use of several well-established biomarkers, such as hormone receptors (HRs) (i.e. estrogen receptor [ER] and progesterone receptor [PgR]) and Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-2 (HER2), breast cancer patients can be categorized into multiple subgroups with specific targeted treatment strategies. Although therapeutic strategies for HR-positive (HR+) HER2-negative (HER2−) breast cancer and HR-negative (HR−) HER2-positive (HER2+) breast cancer are well-defined, HR+ HER2+ breast cancer is still an overlooked subgroup without tailored therapeutic options. In this review, we have summarized the molecular characteristics, etiology, preclinical tools and therapeutic options for HR+ HER2+ breast cancer. We hope to raise the attention of both the research and the medical community on HR+ HER2+ breast cancer, and to advance patient care for this subtype of disease. PMID:25998416

  1. Receptors for luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (GnRH) as therapeutic targets in triple negative breast cancers (TNBC).

    PubMed

    Kwok, C W; Treeck, O; Buchholz, S; Seitz, S; Ortmann, O; Engel, J B

    2015-09-01

    Triple negative breast cancers express receptors for gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in more than 50% of the cases, which can be targeted with peptidic analogs of GnRH, such as triptorelin. The current study investigates cytotoxic activity of triptorelin as a monotherapy and in treatment combinations with chemotherapeutic agents and inhibitors of the PI3K and the ERK pathways in in vitro models of triple negative breast cancers (TNBC). GnRH receptor expression of TNBC cell lines MDA-MB-231 and HCC1806 was investigated. Cells were treated with triptorelin, chemotherapeutic agents (cisplatin, docetaxel, AEZS-112), PI3K/AKT inhibitors (perifosine, AEZS-129), an ERK inhibitor (AEZS-134), and dual PI3K/ERK inhibitor AEZS-136 applied as single agent therapies and in combinations. MDA-MB-231 and HCC1806 TNBC cells both expressed receptors for GnRH on messenger (m)RNA and protein level and were found sensitive to triptorelin with a respective median effective concentration (EC50) of 31.21 ± 0.21 and 58.50 ± 19.50. Synergistic effects occurred when triptorelin was combined with cisplatin. In HCC1806 cells, synergy occurred when triptorelin was applied with PI3K/AKT inhibitors perifosine and AEZS-129. In MDA-MB-231 cells, synergy was observed after co-treatment with triptorelin and ERK inhibitor AEZS-134 and dual PI3K/ERK inhibitor AEZS-136. GnRH receptors on TNBC cells can be used for targeted therapy of these cancers with GnRH agonist triptorelin. Treatment combinations based on triptorelin and PI3K and ERK inhibitors and chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin have synergistic effects in in vitro models of TNBC. If confirmed in vivo, clinical trials based on triptorelin and cisplatin could be quickly carried out, as triptorelin is FDA approved for other indications and known to be well tolerated.

  2. Nuclear receptors, nuclear-receptor factors, and nuclear-receptor-like orphans form a large paralog cluster in Homo sapiens.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Vallvé, S; Palau, J

    1998-06-01

    We studied a human protein paralog cluster formed by 38 nonredundant sequences taken from the Swiss-Prot database and its supplement, TrEMBL. These sequences include nuclear receptors, nuclear-receptor factors and nuclear-receptor-like orphans. Working separately with both the central cysteine-rich DNA-binding domain and the carboxy-terminal ligand-binding domain, we performed multialignment analyses that included drawings of paralog trees. Our results show that the cluster is highly multibranched, with considerable differences in the amino acid sequence in the ligand-binding domain (LBD), and 17 proximal subbranches which are identifiable and fully coincident when independent trees from both domains are compared. We identified the six recently proposed subfamilies as groups of neighboring clusters in the LBD paralog tree. We found similarities of 80%-100% for the N-terminal transactivation domain among mammalian ortholog receptors, as well as some paralog resemblances within diverse subbranches. Our studies suggest that during the evolutionary process, the three domains were assembled in a modular fashion with a nonshuffled modular fusion of the LBD. We used the EMBL server PredictProtein to make secondary-structure predictions for all 38 LBD subsequences. Amino acid residues in the multialigned homologous domains--taking the beginning of helix H3 of the human retinoic acid receptor-gamma as the initial point of reference--were substituted with H or E, which identify residues predicted to be helical or extended, respectively. The result was a secondary structure multialignment with the surprising feature that the prediction follows a canonical pattern of alignable alpha-helices with some short extended elements in between, despite the fact that a number of subsequences resemble each other by less than 25% in terms of the similarity index. We also identified the presence of a binary patterning in all of the predicted helices that were conserved throughout the 38

  3. Anti-oncogenic activity of signalling-defective epidermal growth factor receptor mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Redemann, N; Holzmann, B; von Rüden, T; Wagner, E F; Schlessinger, J; Ullrich, A

    1992-01-01

    Overexpression and autocrine activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) cause transformation of cultured cells and correlate with tumor progression in cancer patients. Dimerization and transphosphorylation are crucial events in the process by which receptors with tyrosine kinase activity generate normal and transforming cellular signals. Interruption of this process by inactive receptor mutants offers the potential to inhibit ligand-induced cellular responses. Using recombinant retroviruses, we have examined the effects of signalling-incompetent EGF-R mutants on the growth-promoting and transforming potential of ligand-activated, overexpressed wild-type EGF-R and the v-erbB oncogene product. Expression of a soluble extracellular EGF-R domain had little if any effect on the growth and transformation of NIH 3T3 cells by either tyrosine kinase. However, both a kinase-negative EGF-R point mutant (HERK721A) and an EGF-R lacking 533 C-terminal amino acids efficiently inhibited wild-type EGF-R-mediated, de novo DNA synthesis and cell transformation in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, coexpression with the v-erbBES4 oncogene product in NIH 3T3 cells resulted in transphosphorylation of the HERK721A mutant receptor and reduced soft-agar colony growth but had no effect in a focus formation assay. These results demonstrate that signalling-defective receptor tyrosine kinase mutants differentially interfere with oncogenic signals generated by either overexpressed EGF-R or the retroviral v-erbBES4 oncogene product. Images PMID:1346334

  4. Changing the insulin receptor to possess insulin-like growth factor I ligand specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, A.S.; Kjeldsen, T.; Wiberg, F.C.; Christensen, P.M.; Rasmussen, J.S.; Norris, K.; Moeller, K.B.; Moeller, N.P.H. )

    1990-08-14

    To examine the role of the N-terminal part of the insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) receptor and insulin receptor in determining ligand specificity, the authors prepared an expression vector encoding a hybrid receptor where exon 1 (encoding the signal peptide and seven amino acids of the {alpha}-subunit), exon 2, and exon 3 of the insulin receptor were replaced with the corresponding IGF-I receptor cDNA (938 nucleotides). To allow direct quantitative comparison of the binding capabilities of this hybrid receptor with those of the human IGF-I receptor and the insulin receptor, all three receptors were expressed in baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells as soluble molecules and partially purified before characterization. The hybrid IGF-I/insulin receptor bound IGF-I with an affinity comparable to that of the wild-type IGF-I receptor. In contrast, the hybrid receptor no longer displayed high-affinity binding of insulin. These results directly demonstrate that it is possible to change the specificity of the insulin receptor to that of the IGF-I receptor and, furthermore, that the binding specificity for IGF-I is encoded within the nucleotide sequence from 135 to 938 of the IGF-I receptor cDNA. Since the hybrid receptor only bound insulin with low affinity, the insulin binding region is likely to be located within exons 2 and 3 of the insulin receptor.

  5. Sequence and structural diversity of transferrin receptors in Gram-negative porcine pathogens.

    PubMed

    Curran, David M; Adamiak, Paul J; Fegan, Jamie E; Qian, Chenzhe; Yu, Rong-Hua; Schryvers, Anthony B

    2015-10-13

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, Actinobacillus suis, and Haemophilus parasuis are bacterial pathogens from the upper respiratory tract that are responsible for a substantial burden of porcine disease. Although reduction of disease has been accomplished by intensive management practices, immunization remains an important strategy for disease prevention, particularly when intensive management practices are not feasible or suitable. An attractive target for vaccine development is the surface receptor involved in acquiring iron from host transferrin, since it is common to all three pathogenic species and has been shown to be essential for survival and disease causation. It has also recently been demonstrated that an engineered antigen derived from the lipoprotein component of the receptor, transferrin-binding protein B (TbpB), was more effective at preventing infection by H. parasuis than a commercial vaccine product. This study was initiated to explore the genetic and immunogenic diversity of the transferrin receptor system from these species. Nucleic acid sequences were obtained from a geographically and temporally diverse collection of isolates, consisting of 41 A. pleuropneumoniae strains, 30 H. parasuis strains, and 2 A. suis strains. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that the receptor protein sequences cluster independently of species, suggesting that there is genetic exchange between these species such that receptor-based vaccines should logically target all three species. To evaluate the cross-reactive response of TbpB-derived antigens, pigs were immunized with the intact TbpB, the TbpB N-lobe and the TbpB C-lobe from A. pleuropneumoniae strain H49 and the resulting sera were tested against a representative panel of TbpBs; demonstrating that the C-lobe induces a broadly cross-reactive response. Overall our results indicate that there is a common reservoir for transferrin receptor antigenic variation amongst these pathogens. While this could present a

  6. Factors related to a negative birth experience - A mixed methods study.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Lena; Grimsrud, Elisabeth; Schei, Berit; Lukasse, Mirjam

    2017-08-01

    this study aimed to explore factors associated with a negative childbirth experience including descriptions from women themselves. we performed a mixed methods study based on data from the Norwegian cohort of the Bidens study, including a total of 1352 multiparous women. Quantitative information was analysed in addition to thematic analysis of 103 free-text comments provided by women with a prior negative childbirth experience. the total prevalence of a negative birth experience was 21.1%. A negative experience was associated with fear of birth (AOR: 5.00 95% CI 3.40-7.23) and a history of abuse (AOR 1.34 95% CI 1.01-1.79) in multivariate analysis. Women who indicated they were para 2 were less likely or report a negative childbirth (AOR 0.66 95% CI 0.46-0.94). Three major themes were identified: 'complications for mother, child or both', 'not being seen or heard'; and 'experience of pain and loss of control'. The majority of respondents reported experiences of unexpected and dramatic complications during childbirth. Further, several of the respondents felt a lack of support, that they had not been treated with respect or included in decisions regarding their birth. A minority described pain and loss of control as the main reason for their negative birth experience. comments by the women show that they were unprepared for complications and inadequate care during birth. The feeling of not being seen or heard during childbirth contributed to a negative experience. Midwives can use the information gained from this study to prevent negative birth experiences. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Location of triple-negative breast cancers: comparison with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancers on MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won Hwa; Han, Wonshik; Chang, Jung Min; Cho, Nariya; Park, In Ae; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2015-01-01

    There has been a major need to better understand the biological characteristics of triple-negative breast cancers. Compared with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive cancers, several magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings have been reported as characteristic findings. However, information regarding their location has not been described. Our study was to compare the location of triple-negative breast cancers with that of ER-positive breast cancers using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The locations of 1102 primary breast cancers (256 triple-negative and 846 ER-positive) in 1090 women (mean, 52.1 years) were reviewed using three-dimensional (3D) coordinates. The x-axis measurement was recorded as the transverse distance from the posterior nipple line; y-axis measurement as the anteroposterior distance from the chest wall; z-axis measurement as the superoinferior distance from the posterior nipple line. The association between breast cancer subtype and tumor location was evaluated using multiple linear regression analysis. Triple-negative breast cancers were significantly closer to the chest wall than ER-positive breast cancers in absolute (1.8 cm vs. 2.3 cm, P < .0001) and normalized (0.21 vs. 0.25, P < .0001) y-axis distances. The x- and z-axes distances were not significantly different between triple-negative and ER-positive breast cancers. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that age, mammographic density, axillary nodal status, and triple-negative subtype were significantly associated with absolute and normalized distances from the chest wall (all P < .05). Our results show that triple-negative breast cancers have a tendency toward a posterior or prepectoral location compared with ER-positive breast cancers.

  8. Relationship between serum response factor and androgen receptor in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Prencipe, Maria; O'Neill, Amanda; O'Hurley, Gillian; Nguyen, Lan K; Fabre, Aurelie; Bjartell, Anders; Gallagher, William M; Morrissey, Colm; Kay, Elaine W; Watson, R William

    2015-11-01

    Serum response factor (SRF) is an important transcription factor in castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Since CRPC is associated with androgen receptor (AR) hypersensitivity, we investigated the relationship between SRF and AR. Transcriptional activity was assessed by luciferase assay. Cell proliferation was measured by MTT and flow cytometry. Protein expression in patients was assessed by immunohistochemistry. To investigate AR involvement in SRF response to androgen, AR expression was down-regulated using siRNA. This resulted in the abrogation of SRF induction post-DHT. Moreover, DHT stimulation failed to induce SRF transcriptional activity in AR-negative PC346 DCC cells, which was only restored following AR over-expression. Next, SRF expression was down-regulated by siRNA, resulting in AR increased transcriptional activity in castrate-resistant LNCaP Abl cells but not in the parental LNCaP. This negative feedback loop in the resistant cells was confirmed by immunohistochemistry which showed a negative correlation between AR and SRF expression in CRPC bone metastases and a positive correlation in androgen-naïve prostatectomies. Cell proliferation was next assessed following SRF inhibition, demonstrating that SRF inhibition is more effective than AR inhibition in castrate-resistant cells. Our data support SRF as a promising therapeutic target in combination with current treatments. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Glucocorticoids and atrial natriuretic factor receptors on vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Yasunari, K; Kohno, M; Murakawa, K; Yokokawa, K; Takeda, T

    1990-11-01

    The effect of glucocorticoids on the atrial natriuretic factor (ANF)-mediated formation of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) by intact vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) was studied in rats. Cultured VSMC were obtained from the renal arteries of 14-week-old Wistar rats by the explant method. Micromolar concentrations of dexamethasone, given as pretreatment for 48 hours, suppressed the ANF-mediated response. The dexamethasone-induced suppression was detectable at 6 hours and reached a maximum 24 hours after administration in a dose-dependent manner. Inhibitors of protein synthesis blocked this effect of the glucocorticoid. The basal activity of guanylate cyclase in the dexamethasone-treated cells was lower than in the control cells. Other steroids having glucocorticoid action mimicked this suppression of the ANF-mediated response. This suppression was blocked by a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist. The results suggest that glucocorticoids suppress ANF-mediated cGMP formation by VSMC through glucocorticoid type II receptors and the induction of protein synthesis. Suppression of the ANF-mediated response may play a role in glucocorticoid-induced hypertension.

  10. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Cell Survival Signaling Requires Phosphatidylcholine Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Crook, Matt; Upadhyay, Awani; Ido, Liyana J.; Hanna-Rose, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    Identification of pro-cell survival signaling pathways has implications for cancer, cardiovascular, and neurodegenerative disease. We show that the Caenorhabditis elegans epidermal growth factor receptor LET-23 (LET-23 EGFR) has a prosurvival function in counteracting excitotoxicity, and we identify novel molecular players required for this prosurvival signaling. uv1 sensory cells in the C. elegans uterus undergo excitotoxic death in response to activation of the OSM-9/OCR-4 TRPV channel by the endogenous agonist nicotinamide. Activation of LET-23 EGFR can effectively prevent this excitotoxic death. We investigate the roles of signaling pathways known to act downstream of LET-23 EGFR in C. elegans and find that the LET-60 Ras/MAPK pathway, but not the IP3 receptor pathway, is required for efficient LET-23 EGFR activity in its prosurvival function. However, activation of LET-60 Ras/MAPK pathway does not appear to be sufficient to fully mimic LET-23 EGFR activity. We screen for genes that are required for EGFR prosurvival function and uncover a role for phosphatidylcholine biosynthetic enzymes in EGFR prosurvival function. Finally, we show that exogenous application of phosphatidylcholine is sufficient to prevent some deaths in this excitotoxicity model. Our work implicates regulation of lipid synthesis downstream of EGFR in cell survival and death decisions. PMID:27605519

  11. Argos inhibits epidermal growth factor receptor signalling by ligand sequestration.

    PubMed

    Klein, Daryl E; Nappi, Valerie M; Reeves, Gregory T; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y; Lemmon, Mark A

    2004-08-26

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has critical functions in development and in many human cancers. During development, the spatial extent of EGFR signalling is regulated by feedback loops comprising both well-understood activators and less well-characterized inhibitors. In Drosophila melanogaster the secreted protein Argos functions as the only known extracellular inhibitor of EGFR, with clearly identified roles in multiple stages of development. Argos is only expressed when the Drosophila EGFR (DER) is activated at high levels, and downregulates further DER signalling. Although there is ample genetic evidence that Argos inhibits DER activation, the biochemical mechanism has not been established. Here we show that Argos inhibits DER signalling without interacting directly with the receptor, but instead by sequestering the DER-activating ligand Spitz. Argos binds tightly to the EGF motif of Spitz and forms a 1:1 (Spitz:Argos) complex that does not bind DER in vitro or at the cell surface. Our results provide an insight into the mechanism of Argos function, and suggest new strategies for EGFR inhibitor design.

  12. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor in Prostate Cancer Derived Exosomes

    PubMed Central

    Kharmate, Geetanjali; Hosseini-Beheshti, Elham; Caradec, Josselin; Chin, Mei Yieng; Tomlinson Guns, Emma S.

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes proteins and microRNAs have gained much attention as diagnostic tools and biomarker potential in various malignancies including prostate cancer (PCa). However, the role of exosomes and membrane-associated receptors, particularly epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) as mediators of cell proliferation and invasion in PCa progression remains unexplored. EGFR is frequently overexpressed and has been associated with aggressive forms of PCa. While PCa cells and tissues express EGFR, it is unknown whether exosomes derived from PCa cells or PCa patient serum contains EGFR. The aim of this study was to detect and characterize EGFR in exosomes derived from PCa cells, LNCaP xenograft and PCa patient serum. Exosomes were isolated from conditioned media of different PCa cell lines; LNCaP xenograft serum as well as patient plasma/serum by differential centrifugation and ultracentrifugation on a sucrose density gradient. Exosomes were confirmed by electron microscopy, expression of exosomal markers and NanoSight™ analysis. EGFR expression was determined by western blot analysis and ELISA. This study demonstrates that exosomes may easily be derived from PCa cell lines, serum obtained from PCa xenograft bearing mice and clinical samples derived from PCa patients. Presence of exosomal EGFR in PCa patient exosomes may present a novel approach for measuring of the disease state. Our work will allow to build on this finding for future understanding of PCa exosomes and their potential role in PCa progression and as minimal invasive biomarkers for PCa. PMID:27152724

  13. Epidermal growth factor receptor activation in developing rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Cybulsky, A V; Goodyer, P R; McTavish, A J

    1994-09-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) binding increases in late-gestational rat kidney and then falls toward basal adult levels postnatally during the 1st wk. We report that the increase in EGF binding is accompanied by an increase in EGF receptor (EGFR) protein and activation of EGFR tyrosine kinase. Multiple proteins were endogenously tyrosine phosphorylated in kidney membranes from fetal rats, and the phosphorylation pattern was similar in rats ranging from 16 to 21 days of gestation. Tyrosine phosphorylation was, however, almost undetectable in 12-wk adult rat kidneys (controls). Among the phosphoproteins in fetal kidney, a prominent 170-kDa protein was identified as EGFR. Endogenous tyrosine phosphorylation of EGFR (reflecting receptor activation) was 30-fold higher in fetal kidney membranes than in adult (3- to 7-fold higher when adjusted for differences in EGF binding or EGFR protein content). The EGFR substrate, phospholipase C-gamma 1, was tyrosine phosphorylated in fetal kidneys but not adult, and a greater proportion was membrane-associated in fetal kidneys, consistent with activation of phospholipase C-gamma 1. Thus EGFR tyrosine kinase activity is increased in late-gestational rat kidney. Induction and activation of EGFR may mediate perinatal renal cell growth and development.

  14. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Cell Proliferation Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wee, Ping; Wang, Zhixiang

    2017-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that is commonly upregulated in cancers such as in non-small-cell lung cancer, metastatic colorectal cancer, glioblastoma, head and neck cancer, pancreatic cancer, and breast cancer. Various mechanisms mediate the upregulation of EGFR activity, including common mutations and truncations to its extracellular domain, such as in the EGFRvIII truncations, as well as to its kinase domain, such as the L858R and T790M mutations, or the exon 19 truncation. These EGFR aberrations over-activate downstream pro-oncogenic signaling pathways, including the RAS-RAF-MEK-ERK MAPK and AKT-PI3K-mTOR pathways. These pathways then activate many biological outputs that are beneficial to cancer cell proliferation, including their chronic initiation and progression through the cell cycle. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms that regulate EGFR signal transduction, including the EGFR structure and its mutations, ligand binding and EGFR dimerization, as well as the signaling pathways that lead to G1 cell cycle progression. We focus on the induction of CYCLIN D expression, CDK4/6 activation, and the repression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor proteins (CDKi) by EGFR signaling pathways. We also discuss the successes and challenges of EGFR-targeted therapies, and the potential for their use in combination with CDK4/6 inhibitors. PMID:28513565

  15. Role of Toll Interleukin-1 Receptor (IL-1R) 8, a Negative Regulator of IL-1R/Toll-Like Receptor Signaling, in Resistance to Acute Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lung Infection

    PubMed Central

    Véliz Rodriguez, Tania; Moalli, Federica; Polentarutti, Nadia; Paroni, Moira; Bonavita, Eduardo; Anselmo, Achille; Nebuloni, Manuela; Mantero, Stefano; Jaillon, Sébastien; Bragonzi, Alessandra; Mantovani, Alberto; Riva, Federica

    2012-01-01

    Toll interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R) 8 (TIR8), also known as single Ig IL-1 receptor (IL-R)-related molecule, or SIGIRR, is a member of the IL-1R-like family, primarily expressed by epithelial cells. Current evidence suggests that TIR8 plays a nonredundant role as a negative regulator in vivo under different inflammatory conditions that are dependent on IL-R and Toll-like receptor (TLR) activation. In the present study, we examined the role of TIR8 in innate resistance to acute lung infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a Gram-negative pathogen responsible for life-threatening infections in immunocompromised individuals and cystic fibrosis patients. We show that Tir8 deficiency in mice was associated with increased susceptibility to acute P. aeruginosa infection, in terms of mortality and bacterial load, and to exacerbated local and systemic production of proinflammatory cytokines (gamma interferon [IFN-γ], tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α], IL-1β, and IL-6) and chemokines (CXCL1, CXCL2, and CCL2). It has been reported that host defense against P. aeruginosa acute lung infection can be improved by blocking IL-1 since exaggerated IL-1β production may be harmful for the host in this infection. In agreement with these data, IL-1RI deficiency rescues the phenotype observed in Tir8-deficient mice: in Tir8−/− IL-1RI−/− double knockout mice we observed higher survival rates, enhanced bacterial clearance, and reduced levels of local and systemic cytokine and chemokine levels than in Tir8-deficient mice. These results suggest that TIR8 has a nonredundant effect in modulating the inflammation caused by P. aeruginosa, in particular, by negatively regulating IL-1RI signaling, which plays a major role in the pathogenesis of this infectious disease. PMID:22025515

  16. Negative Suppressors of Oncogenic Activation of the Met Receptor Tyrosine Kinase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    JV*., Frigault M., Park M., (July 2006). The role of the Gab1 scaffold protein in downregulation of the Met receptor tyrosine kinase. Poster at Gordon ...2002; Suetsugu et al, 2003). CrkI/II proteins couple upstream activators to Rac ( Feller , 2001) and the Gab1-Crk complex promotes Rac activation in...WAVE1-induced actin nucleation by Rac1 and Nck. Nature 418: 790-793 Feller SM (2001) Crk family adaptors-signalling complex formation and

  17. Estrogen and progesterone receptor expression in HPV-positive and HPV-negative cervical carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Kwasniewska, Anna; Postawski, Krzysztof; Gozdzicka-Jozefiak, Anna; Kwasniewski, Wojciech; Grywalska, Ewelina; Zdunek, Malgorzata; Korobowicz, Elzbieta

    2011-07-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is widely accepted as the main cause of cervical cancer. However, the presence of HPV DNA does not inescapably lead to the development of the cancerous phenotype of the infected cell. Therefore, it is considered that the induction of full cancerous expression of HPV requires additional cofactors. The aim of this study was to assess the expression of estrogen receptor α (ERα) and progesterone receptor (PR) in archived tissue blocks of squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix and to ascertain whether expression of these receptors is associated with the presence of HPV DNA. The investigation was performed using formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded cervical cancer specimens obtained from 250 women who underwent surgery for histologically confirmed neoplastic lesions. The control group consisted of normal cervical tissues obtained from 50 patients who underwent myomectomy. The results of this study revealed that the expression of ER and PR in planoepithelial cancers and adenocarcinomas of the cervix were decreased to undetectable levels. Only in singular cases in the pattern of staining the expression of ER and PR was noted. In stromal cells of the tested neoplasms, higher expression of both types of receptors was found. Comparison of the expression of ER and PR in the staining pattern and stroma of both squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcioma of the cervix, showed statistically higher expression in the stromal cells. Strong expression (+1, +2, +3) of ER and PR was noted in the stromal cells irrespective of HPV infection, histopathological type of cancer, and clinical and histopathological grade.

  18. Tamoxifen Citrate or Z-Endoxifen Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic, Estrogen Receptor-Positive, HER2-Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-10-11

    Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage III Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  19. Genetic Analysis in Blood and Tumor Samples From Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Estrogen