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Sample records for factor receptor-1 investigated

  1. Conformational thermostabilisation of corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Kean, James; Bortolato, Andrea; Hollenstein, Kaspar; Marshall, Fiona H.; Jazayeri, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Recent technical advances have greatly facilitated G-protein coupled receptors crystallography as evidenced by the number of successful x-ray structures that have been reported recently. These technical advances include novel detergents, specialised crystallography techniques as well as protein engineering solutions such as fusions and conformational thermostabilisation. Using conformational thermostabilisation, it is possible to generate variants of GPCRs that exhibit significantly increased stability in detergent micelles whilst preferentially occupying a single conformation. In this paper we describe for the first time the application of this technique to a member of a class B GPCR, the corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1 (CRF1R). Mutational screening in the presence of the inverse agonist, CP-376395, resulted in the identification of a construct with twelve point mutations that exhibited significantly increased thermal stability in a range of detergents. We further describe the subsequent construct engineering steps that eventually yielded a crystallisation-ready construct which recently led to the solution of the first x-ray structure of a class B receptor. Finally, we have used molecular dynamic simulation to provide structural insight into CRF1R instability as well as the stabilising effects of the mutants, which may be extended to other class B receptors considering the high degree of structural conservation. PMID:26159865

  2. Recombinant pigment epithelium-derived factor PEDF binds vascular endothelial growth factor receptors 1 and 2.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Erin K; Francis, Mary K; Knepper, Janice E

    2015-08-01

    Angiogenesis, or the formation of new blood vessels, is stimulated by angiogenic factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) is a potent inhibitor of angiogenesis. To explore the mechanism by which PEDF acts, recombinant PEDF was expressed with a 6x-His tag (for purification) and a green fluorescent protein (GFP) tag. The PEDF fusion protein was confirmed to be active in inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation and migration. Direct binding of PEDF to both vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 (VEGFR-1) and VEGFR-2 was demonstrated in an in vitro assay similar to an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). PEDF was shown by immune-confocal microscopy to be localized within treated endothelial cells. When VEGF-stimulated endothelial cells were incubated with PEDF the VEGF receptors showed intracellular localization. These data suggest that the interaction between PEDF and VEGFR-1 or VEGFR-2 may be a possible mechanism for inhibiting angiogenesis. PEDF may be binding to the VEGF receptors to promote their internalization and/or degradation to limit VEGF responses in treated cells.

  3. Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 1 as a Putative Therapy Target in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Göke, Friederike; Göke, Antonia; von Mässenhausen, Anne; Franzen, Alina; Sharma, Rakesh; Kirsten, Robert; Böhm, Diana; Kristiansen, Glen; Stenzinger, Albrecht; Wynes, Murry; Hirsch, Fred R.; Weichert, Wilko; Heasley, Lynn; Buettner, Reinhard; Perner, Sven

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Resembling a potential therapeutic drug target, fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) amplification and expression was assessed in 515 human colorectal cancer (CRC) tissue samples, lymph node metastases and CRC cell lines. Methods FGFR1 amplification status was determined using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Additionally, we assessed protein levels employing Western blots and immunohistochemistry. The FGFR1 mRNA localization was analyzed using mRNA in situ hybridization. Functional studies employed the FGFR inhibitor NVP-BGJ398. Results Of 454 primary CRCs, 24 displayed FGFR1 amplification. 92/94 lymph node metastases presented the same amplification status as the primary tumor. Of 99 investigated tumors, 18 revealed membranous activated pFGFR1 protein. FGFR1 mRNA levels were independent of the amplification status or pFGFR1 protein occurrence. In vitro, a strong antiproliferative effect of NVP-BGJ398 could be detected in cell lines exhibiting high FGFR1 protein. Conclusion FGFR1 is a potential therapeutic target in a subset of CRC. FGFR1 protein is likely to represent a central factor limiting the efficacy of FGFR inhibitors. The lack of correlation between its evaluation at genetic/mRNA level and its protein occurrence indicates that the assessment of the receptor at an immunohistochemical level most likely represents a suitable way to assess FGFR1 as a predictive biomarker for patient selection in future clinical trials. PMID:24135816

  4. Prostaglandin E2 regulates angiogenesis via activation of fibroblast growth factor receptor-1.

    PubMed

    Finetti, Federica; Solito, Raffaella; Morbidelli, Lucia; Giachetti, Antonio; Ziche, Marina; Donnini, Sandra

    2008-01-25

    Prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) behaves as a mitogen in epithelial tumor cells as well as in many other cell types. We investigated the actions of PGE(2) on microvascular endothelial cells (capillary venular endothelial cells) with the purpose of delineating the signaling pathway leading to the acquisition of the angiogenic phenotype and to new vessel formation. PGE(2) (100 nM) produced activation of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR-1), as measured by its phosphorylation, but not of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2. PGE(2) stimulated the EP3 subtype receptor, as deduced by abrogation of EP3 Galpha(i) subunit activity through pertussis toxin. Consistent with this result, in human umbilical venular endothelial cells missing the EP3 receptor, PGE(2) did not phosphorylate FGFR-1. Upon binding to its receptor, PGE(2) initiated an autocrine/paracrine signaling cascade involving the intracellular activation of c-Src, activation of matrix metalloproteinase (predominantly MMP2), which in turn caused the mobilization of membrane-anchored fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2). In fact, in cells unable to release FGF-2 the transfection with both FGFR-1 and EP3 did not result in FGFR-1 phosphorylation in response to PGE(2). Relevance for the FGF2-FGFR-1 system was highlighted by confocal analysis, showing receptor internalization after cell exposure to the prostanoid. ERK1/2 appeared to be the distal signal involved, its phosphorylation being sensitive to either cSrc inhibitor or FGFR-1 blocker. Finally, PGE(2) stimulated cell migration and capillary formation in aortic rings, which were severely reduced by inhibitors of signaling molecules or by receptor antagonist. In conclusion, this study provides evidence for the involvement of FGFR-1 through FGF2 in eliciting PGE(2) angiogenic responses. This signaling pattern is similar to the autocrine-paracrine mechanism which operates in endothelial cells to support neovascular growth.

  5. miR-29a suppresses MCF-7 cell growth by downregulating tumor necrosis factor receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yiling; Yang, Fenghua; Li, Wenyuan; Xu, Chunyan; Li, Li; Chen, Lifei; Liu, Yancui; Sun, Ping

    2017-02-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 is the main receptor mediating many tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced cellular events. Some studies have shown that tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 promotes tumorigenesis by activating nuclear factor-kappa B signaling pathway, while other studies have confirmed that tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 plays an inhibitory role in tumors growth by inducing apoptosis in breast cancer. Therefore, the function of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 in breast cancer requires clarification. In this study, we first found that tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 was significantly increased in human breast cancer tissues and cell lines, and knockdown of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 by small interfering RNA inhibited cell proliferation by arresting the cell cycle and inducing apoptosis. In addition, miR-29a was predicted as a regulator of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 by TargetScan and was shown to be inversely correlated with tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 expression in human breast cancer tissues and cell lines. Luciferase reporter assay further confirmed that miR-29a negatively regulated tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 expression by binding to the 3' untranslated region. In our functional study, miR-29a overexpression remarkably suppressed cell proliferation and colony formation, arrested the cell cycle, and induced apoptosis in MCF-7 cell. Furthermore, in combination with tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 transfection, miR-29a significantly reversed the oncogenic role caused by tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 in MCF-7 cell. In addition, we demonstrated that miR-29a suppressed MCF-7 cell growth by inactivating the nuclear factor-kappa B signaling pathway and by decreasing cyclinD1 and Bcl-2/Bax protein levels. Taken together, our results suggest that miR-29a is an important regulator of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 expression in breast cancer and functions as a tumor suppressor by targeting tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 to

  6. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 (VEGFR-1) expression in human corneal fibroblast decreased with age

    PubMed Central

    Berthaut, Alexandre; Mirshahi, Pezhman; Benabbou, Nadia; Azzazene, Dalel; Bordu, Camille; Therwath, Amu; Legeais, Jean-marc

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Mechanisms by which fibroblast networks between stromal lamellae are laid in the corneal stroma are far from clear. We have investigated the role of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFRs) by in vitro studies in the human corneal network formation obtained from donors whose ages ranged from 19 to 89 years. Methods Corneal fibroblasts were prepared from cornea donations. The functional properties of these cells to form networks were analyzed using a semi solid matrix (substratum) of Matrigel™. The presence of VEGF receptor-1 (VEGFR-1) and the functionality in these fibroblasts were investigated using immunofluorescence, molecular analysis (gene microarray, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction [RT–PCR] and VEGFR siRNA transfections), and cell culture. Results Corneal fibroblasts from 61 donors were classified into two groups according to whether they formed (82%) a reticulum on Matrigel™ or not (18%). By RT–PCR and immunofluorescence analysis, we showed that corneal fibroblasts expressed VEGFR-1 (mRNA and protein). Further, cell culture analysis revealed that only the network (reticulum) forming corneal fibroblast expressed VEGFR-1 in contrast to non network-forming fibroblasts. Use of inhibitors such as VEGFR-1 siRNA transfection or neutralizing antibody (Avastin™) indicated that VEGFR-1 was essential to the formation of the corneal network in vitro. Conclusions The cell reticulum formation seemed to be directly related to the expression of VEGFR-1 in the corneal fibroblast, and this expression decreased with age. The decrease in VEGFR-1 expression is probably related to the diminution of autocrine functions, which may alter the overall tissular homeostasis. This may culminate in the gradual development of poor vision, which is observed in certain pathologies and in aging individuals. PMID:19816604

  7. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha suppresses the expression of macrophage scavenger receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Shirato, Ken; Kizaki, Takako; Sakurai, Takuya; Ogasawara, Jun-Etsu; Ishibashi, Yoshinaga; Iijima, Takehiko; Okada, Chikako; Noguchi, Izumi; Imaizumi, Kazuhiko; Taniguchi, Naoyuki; Ohno, Hideki

    2009-11-01

    Macrophages are distributed in all peripheral tissues and play a critical role in the first line of the innate immune defenses against bacterial infection by phagocytosis of bacterial pathogens through the macrophage scavenger receptor 1 (MSR1). Within tissues, the partial pressure of oxygen (pO2) decreases depending on the distance of cells from the closest O2-supplying blood vessel. However, it is not clear how the expression of MSR1 in macrophages is regulated by low pO2. On the other hand, hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1alpha is well known to control hypoxic responses through regulation of hypoxia-inducible genes. Therefore, we investigated the effects of hypoxia and HIF-1alpha on MSR1 expression and function in the macrophage cell line RAW264. Exposure to 1% O2 or treatment with the hypoxia-mimetic agent cobalt chloride (CoCl2) significantly suppressed the expression of MSR1 mRNA, accompanied by a markedly increase in levels of nuclear HIF-1alpha protein. The overexpression of HIF-1alpha in RAW264 cells suppressed the expression of MSR1 mRNA and protein, transcriptional activity of the MSR1 gene, and phagocytic capacity against the Gram-positive bacteria Listeria monocytogenes. The suppression of MSR1 mRNA by hypoxia or CoCl2 was inhibited by YC-1, an inhibitor of HIF-1alpha, or by the depletion of HIF-1alpha expression by small interference RNA. These results indicate that hypoxia transcriptionally suppresses MSR1 expression through HIF-1alpha.

  8. Mammary tumorigenesis induced by fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 requires activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Bade, Lindsey K; Goldberg, Jodi E; Dehut, Hazel A; Hall, Majken K; Schwertfeger, Kathryn L

    2011-09-15

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) is an oncoprotein with known involvement in mammary tumorigenesis. To understand how FGFR1 signaling promotes mammary tumorigenesis, an inducible FGFR1 (iFGFR1) system was created previously. Previous studies have demonstrated that upon iFGFR1 activation in vivo, the epidermal growth factor (EGF) ligands amphiregulin (AREG) and epiregulin (EREG) are upregulated. Both AREG and EREG interact with the EGF receptor (EGFR). Here, we investigated whether the FGFR1-induced increase in AREG and EREG expression might coordinately increase EGFR signaling to promote mammary tumorigenesis. Treatment of mouse mammary epithelial cells with either AREG or EREG conferred a greater migratory potential, increased cellular proliferation and increased extracellular regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) activation. These effects could be blocked with the EGFR-specific inhibitor erlotinib, suggesting that they are EGFR-dependent. In transgenic mice with iFGFR1 under the control of the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoter, iFGFR1 activation also led to increased mammary epithelial cell proliferation that was inhibited with erlotinib. Taken together, these data suggest that AREG and EREG mediate tumorigenic phenotypes by activating EGFR signaling, and that the oncogenic potential of FGFR1 requires EGFR activation to promote mammary tumorigenesis.

  9. A common mutation in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 gene in Pfeiffer syndrome.

    PubMed

    Muenke, M; Schell, U; Hehr, A; Robin, N H; Losken, H W; Schinzel, A; Pulleyn, L J; Rutland, P; Reardon, W; Malcolm, S

    1994-11-01

    Pfeiffer syndrome (PS) is one of the classic autosomal dominant craniosynostosis syndromes with craniofacial anomalies and characteristic broad thumbs and big toes. We have previously mapped one of the genes for PS to the centromeric region of chromosome 8 by linkage analysis. Here we present evidence that mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor-1 (FGFR1) gene, which maps to 8p, cause one form of familial Pfeiffer syndrome. A C to G transversion in exon 5, predicting a proline to arginine substitution in the putative extracellular domain, was identified in all affected members of five unrelated PS families but not in any unaffected individuals. FGFR1 therefore becomes the third fibroblast growth factor receptor to be associated with an autosomal dominant skeletal disorder.

  10. Regulation of brachyury by fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yunping; Feng, Xin; Mintz, Akiva; Petty, W. Jeffrey; Hsu, Wesley

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that T-box transcription factor brachyury plays an important role in lung cancer development and progression. However, the mechanisms underlying brachyury-driven cellular processes remain unclear. Here we found that fibroblast growth factor receptor 1/mitogen-activated protein kinase (FGFR1/MAPK) signaling regulated brachyury in lung cancer. Analysis of FGFR1-4 and brachyury expression in human lung tumor tissue and cell lines found that only expression of FGFR1 was positively correlated with brachyury expression. Specific knockdown of FGFR1 by siRNA suppressed brachyury expression and epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) (upregulation of E-cadherin and β-catenin and downregulation of Snail and fibronectin), whereas forced overexpression of FGFR1 induced brachyury expression and promoted EMT in lung cancer cells. Activation of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)/FGFR1 signaling promoted phosphorylated MAPK extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 translocation from cytoplasm to nucleus, upregulated brachyury expression, and increased cell growth and invasion. In addition, human lung cancer cells with higher brachyury expression were more sensitive to inhibitors targeting FGFR1/MAPK pathway. These findings suggest that FGFR1/MAPK may be important for brachyury activation in lung cancer, and this pathway may be an appealing therapeutic target for a subset of brachyury-driven lung cancer. PMID:27893433

  11. AP-2{alpha} suppresses skeletal myoblast proliferation and represses fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 promoter activity

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Darrion L.; DiMario, Joseph X.

    2010-01-15

    Skeletal muscle development is partly characterized by myoblast proliferation and subsequent differentiation into postmitotic muscle fibers. Developmental regulation of expression of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) gene is required for normal myoblast proliferation and muscle formation. As a result, FGFR1 promoter activity is controlled by multiple transcriptional regulatory proteins during both proliferation and differentiation of myogenic cells. The transcription factor AP-2{alpha} is present in nuclei of skeletal muscle cells and suppresses myoblast proliferation in vitro. Since FGFR1 gene expression is tightly linked to myoblast proliferation versus differentiation, the FGFR1 promoter was examined for candidate AP-2{alpha} binding sites. Mutagenesis studies indicated that a candidate binding site located at - 1035 bp functioned as a repressor cis-regulatory element. Furthermore, mutation of this site alleviated AP-2{alpha}-mediated repression of FGFR1 promoter activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that AP-2{alpha} interacted with the FGFR1 promoter in both proliferating myoblasts and differentiated myotubes. In total, these results indicate that AP-2{alpha} is a transcriptional repressor of FGFR1 gene expression during skeletal myogenesis.

  12. Paediatric phenotype of Kallmann syndrome due to mutations of fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1).

    PubMed

    Zenaty, Delphine; Bretones, Patricia; Lambe, Cécile; Guemas, Isabelle; David, Michel; Léger, Juliane; de Roux, Nicolas

    2006-07-25

    Kallmann syndrome characterised by hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) and anosmia is genetically heterogeneous with X-linked, autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive forms. The autosomal dominant form due to loss of function mutation in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) accounts for about 10% of cases. We report here three paediatric cases of Kallmann syndrome with unusual phenotype in two unrelated patients with severe ear anomalies (hypoplasia or agenesis of external ear) associated with classical features, such as cleft palate, dental agenesis, syndactylia, micropenis and cryptorchidism. We found de novo mutation in these two patients (Cys178Ser and Arg622Gly, respectively), and one inherited Arg622Gln mutation with intrafamilial variable phenotype. These genotype-phenotype correlations indicate that paediatric phenotypic expression of FGFR1 loss of function mutations is highly variable, the severity of the oro-facial malformations at birth does not predict gonadotropic function at the puberty and that de novo mutations of FGFR1 are relatively frequent.

  13. Characterization of fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 in small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Anish; Lee, Jih-Hsiang; Abdullaev, Zied; Park, Kang-Seo; Pineda, Marbin; Saidkhodjaeva, Lola; Miettinen, Markku; Wang, Yisong; Pack, Svetlana D; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2014-04-01

    There remains a significant therapeutic need for small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). We and others have reported high frequency of copy number gains in cytogenetic bands encoding fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) in SCLC tumors and cell lines. Thirteen SCLC cell lines and 68 SCLC patient tumor samples were studied for FGFR1 amplification. Growth inhibition assays were performed using PD173074, a pan-FGFR inhibitor to determine the correlation between FGFR1 expression and drug sensitivity. We did not detect FGFR1 mutations in SCLC cell lines. Focal amplification of FGFR1 gene was found in five tumor samples (7%), with high-level focal amplification in only one tumor sample (1%). Amplification owing to polysomy of chromosome 8, where FGFR1 locates, was observed in 22 tumor samples (32%). There was no correlation between FGFR1 gene copy number and messenger RNA expression or protein expression in SCLC cells. FGFR inhibitor sensitivity correlated with FGFR1 copy number determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction assay (r= -0.79; p = 0.01). FGFR1 gene mutations and focal amplification are rare in SCLC, but polysomy of chromosome 8 is relatively common. FGFR1 copy number gain predicts sensitivity to FGFR inhibition, and FGFR expression correlates inversely with chemosensitivity.

  14. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 mediates melanocyte transformation via transactivation of insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Teh, Jessica L F; Shah, Raj; Shin, Seung-Shick; Wen, Yu; Mehnert, Janice M; Goydos, James; Chen, Suzie

    2014-07-01

    Our laboratory previously described the oncogenic properties of metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1) in melanocytes. mGluR1 transformed immortalized mouse melanocytes in vitro and induced vigorous tumor formation in vivo. Subsequently, we observed the activation of PI3K/AKT in mGluR1-mediated melanocytic tumorigenesis in vivo. In particular, we identified AKT2 being the predominant isoform contributing to the activation of AKT. Suppression of Grm1 or AKT2 using an inducible Tet-R siRNA system resulted in a 60 or 30% reduction, respectively, in in vivo tumorigenesis. We show that simultaneous downregulation of Grm1 plus AKT2 results in a reduction of approximately 80% in tumor volumes, suggesting that both mGluR1 and AKT2 contribute to the tumorigenic phenotype in vivo. The discrepancy between the mild in vitro transformation characteristics and the aggressive in vivo tumorigenic phenotypes of these stable mGluR1-melanocytic clones led us to investigate the possible involvement of other growth factors. Here, we highlight a potential crosstalk network between mGluR1 and tyrosine kinase, insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R). © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Multiorgan chronic inflammatory hepatobiliary pancreatic murine model deficient in tumor necrosis factor receptors 1 and 2

    PubMed Central

    Oz, Helieh S

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To provoke persistent/chronic multiorgan inflammatory response and to contribute to stones formation followed by fibrosis in hepatobiliary and pancreatic tissues. METHODS: Tumor necrosis factor receptors 1 and 2 (TNFR1/R2) deficient mice reared in-house were given dibutyltin dichloride (DBTC) twice within 10 d by oral gavage delivery. Sham control animals received vehicle treatment and naïve animals remained untreated throughout the study. Animals were monitored daily for symptoms of pain and discomfort. The abdominal and hindpaw hypersensitivity were assessed with von Frey microfilaments. Exploratory behaviors were recorded at the baseline, after initiation of treatment, and before study termination. Histopathological changes were examined postmortem in tissues. Collagen accumulation and fibrosis were confirmed with Sirius Red staining. RESULTS: Animals lost weight after oral administration of DBTC and developed persistent inflammatory abdominal and hindpaw hypersensitivity compared to sham-treated controls (P < 0.0001). These pain related secondary mechanical hypersensitivity responses increased more than 2-fold in DBTC-treated animals. The drastically diminished rearing and grooming rates persisted after DBTC administration throughout the study. Gross as well as micropathology at one month confirmed that animals treated with DBTC developed chronic hepatobiliary injuries evidenced with activation of stellate cells, multifocal necrosis, fatty degeneration of hepatocytes, periportal infiltration of inflammatory cells, and prominent biliary ductal dilation. The severity of hepatitis was scored 3.7 ± 0.2 (severe) in DBTC-treated animals vs score 0 (normal) in sham-treated animals. Fibrotic thickening was extensive around portal ducts, in hepatic parenchyma as well as in lobular pancreatic structures and confirmed with Sirius Red histopathology. In addition, pancreatic microarchitecture was presented with distortion of islets, and parenchyma, infiltration of

  16. Study of natural IgG antibodies against vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yilai; Yan, Zhaoping; Huang, Yile; Qiu, Cailing; Chen, Xiangyun; Hu, Ying; Meng, Qingyong; Wei, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Natural antibodies have been found to have anti-tumorigenic function. This study was designed to investigate whether natural IgG antibodies against vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (VEGFR1) could suppress the growth of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. Three HCC cell lines and A549 lung cancer cells were used for this study. They were grown, respectively, with human plasma positive or negative for anti-VEGFR1 IgG. Cell viability, apoptosis and VEGFR1 gene expression were examined. Three patients with HCC were recruited for a case study. The results showed that plasma anti-VEGFR1 IgG significantly inhibited the proliferation of all three HCC cell lines but not A549 cell line; the proportions of apoptotic cells were significantly higher in HCC cells treated with anti-VEGFR1 IgG positive plasma than those treated with IgG negative plasma. The expression of the VEGFR1 gene was significantly higher in HCC cells than A549 cells. Of three HCC patients who received transfusion of anti-VEGFR1 IgG positive plasma, two cases with stage B showed a good response to the treatment but one with distant metastasis did not. Human plasma IgG against VEGFR1 may be a promising agent for anti-HCC therapy.

  17. -383 A/C tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 polymorphism and ankylosing spondylitis in Mexicans: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Corona-Sanchez, Esther Guadalupe; Muñoz-Valle, José Francisco; Gonzalez-Lopez, Laura; Sanchez-Hernandez, Julia Dolores; Vazquez-Del Mercado, Monica; Ontiveros-Mercado, Heriberto; Huerta, Miguel; Trujillo, Xochitl; Rocha-Muñoz, Alberto Daniel; Celis, Alfredo; Ortega-Flores, Ricardo; Gamez-Nava, Jorge Ivan

    2012-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the differences in allele and genotype frequencies of -383 tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1) polymorphism between ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and controls. Mexican Mestizos with AS were matched by gender, age, and ethnicity with healthy controls and compared in allele and genotype frequencies of the -383 TNFR1 polymorphism. Polymorphisms were genotyped using PCR-RFLP. The AA genotype occurred at a higher frequency in the AS group (92%) compared with controls (79%, P = 0.03). A allele was increased in AS (96% vs. 88%, P = 0.015) and was associated with genetic susceptibility for AS (odds ratio = 3.48, 95% CI = 1.23-10.61). This preliminary study is the first assessing the association of the -383 A/C TNFR1 polymorphism with AS, although it has the limitation of a small sample size. These data are of interest for the genetic epidemiology of AS in the Mexican population, requiring further investigation in other countries.

  18. Immunolocalization of fibroblast growth factor receptors 1 and 2 in mouse palate development.

    PubMed

    Lee, S; Crisera, C A; Erfani, S; Maldonado, T S; Lee, J J; Alkasab, S L; Longaker, M T

    2001-06-01

    Recent evidence has implicated mutations of fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGF-R) in the pathogenesis of craniosynostotic syndromes. Cleft palate can be a component of such syndromes. The expression of FGF-R1 and FGF-R2 has been delineated in normally developing cranium, where they seem to regulate cellular differentiation and proliferation, respectively. The specific role of fibroblast growth factor signaling in mammalian palate development is unclear. The authors investigated the patterns of expression of FGF-R1 and FGF-R2 throughout mouse palatal development in the embryo. Time-dated CD-1 mouse heads (n = 135) were harvested at embryonic ages 12.5, 13.5, 14.5, 15.5, and 16.5 days (term gestation = 19.5 days), fixed in paraformaldehyde, embedded in paraffin, and sectioned. In addition, paired palatal shelves (n = 30) were isolated by means of microdissection from embryonic day--13.5 embryos, grown on Millipore filters in serum-free medium in vitro for 24, 48, 72, or 96 hours and processed for histological analysis. Immunohistochemical analysis for FGF-R1 and FGF-R2 was performed on the in vivo and in vitro specimens. FGF-R1 and FGF-R2 were found to be specifically expressed in the epithelium of the developing palatal shelves from the time of their outgrowth from the maxillary processes through completion of fusion in vivo and in vitro. Expression of both receptors was particularly strong during the phases of medial epithelial-medial epithelial contact between the individual shelves, through the formation of the medial epithelial seam, to the ultimate dissolution of the seam. Such a pattern of expression seems to implicate fibroblast growth factor signaling in the regulation of the critical phase of fusion of the bilateral shelves. The expression of both FGF-R1 and FGF-R2 in the lateral palatal mesenchyme, where such secondary structures as tooth primordia and bone begin to appear, also suggests a role for fibroblast growth factor signaling in the induction

  19. DNA methylation in the Neuropeptide S Receptor 1 (NPSR1) promoter in relation to asthma and environmental factors.

    PubMed

    Reinius, Lovisa E; Gref, Anna; Sääf, Annika; Acevedo, Nathalie; Joerink, Maaike; Kupczyk, Maciej; D'Amato, Mauro; Bergström, Anna; Melén, Erik; Scheynius, Annika; Dahlén, Sven-Erik; Pershagen, Göran; Söderhäll, Cilla; Kere, Juha

    2013-01-01

    Asthma and allergy are complex disorders influenced by both inheritance and environment, a relationship that might be further clarified by epigenetics. Neuropeptide S Receptor 1 (NPSR1) has been associated with asthma and allergy and a study suggested modulation of the genetic risk by environmental factors. We aimed to study DNA methylation in the promoter region of NPSR1 in relation to asthma and environmental exposures. Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay (EMSA) was used to investigate potential functional roles of both genotypes and methylation status in the NPSR1 promoter. DNA methylation was analysed using EpiTYPER in blood samples from two well-characterized cohorts; the BIOAIR study of severe asthma in adults and the Swedish birth cohort BAMSE. We observed that DNA methylation and genetic variants in the promoter influenced the binding of nuclear proteins to DNA, suggesting functional relevance. Significant, although small, differences in methylation were related to both adult severe asthma (p = 0.0001) and childhood allergic asthma (p = 0.01). Furthermore, DNA methylation was associated with exposures such as current smoking in adults for two CpG sites (p = 0.005 and 0.04), parental smoking during infancy in the children (p = 0.02) and in which month the sample was taken (p = 0.01). In summary, DNA methylation levels in the promoter of NPSR1 showed small but significant associations with asthma, both in adults and in children, and to related traits such as allergy and certain environmental exposures. Both genetic variation and the methylated state of CpG sites seem to have an effect on the binding of nuclear proteins in the regulatory region of NPSR1 suggesting complex regulation of this gene in asthma and allergy.

  20. DNA Methylation in the Neuropeptide S Receptor 1 (NPSR1) Promoter in Relation to Asthma and Environmental Factors

    PubMed Central

    Reinius, Lovisa E.; Gref, Anna; Sääf, Annika; Acevedo, Nathalie; Joerink, Maaike; Kupczyk, Maciej; D'Amato, Mauro; Bergström, Anna; Melén, Erik; Scheynius, Annika; Dahlén, Sven-Erik; Pershagen, Göran; Söderhäll, Cilla; Kere, Juha

    2013-01-01

    Asthma and allergy are complex disorders influenced by both inheritance and environment, a relationship that might be further clarified by epigenetics. Neuropeptide S Receptor 1 (NPSR1) has been associated with asthma and allergy and a study suggested modulation of the genetic risk by environmental factors. We aimed to study DNA methylation in the promoter region of NPSR1 in relation to asthma and environmental exposures. Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay (EMSA) was used to investigate potential functional roles of both genotypes and methylation status in the NPSR1 promoter. DNA methylation was analysed using EpiTYPER in blood samples from two well-characterized cohorts; the BIOAIR study of severe asthma in adults and the Swedish birth cohort BAMSE. We observed that DNA methylation and genetic variants in the promoter influenced the binding of nuclear proteins to DNA, suggesting functional relevance. Significant, although small, differences in methylation were related to both adult severe asthma (p = 0.0001) and childhood allergic asthma (p = 0.01). Furthermore, DNA methylation was associated with exposures such as current smoking in adults for two CpG sites (p = 0.005 and 0.04), parental smoking during infancy in the children (p = 0.02) and in which month the sample was taken (p = 0.01). In summary, DNA methylation levels in the promoter of NPSR1 showed small but significant associations with asthma, both in adults and in children, and to related traits such as allergy and certain environmental exposures. Both genetic variation and the methylated state of CpG sites seem to have an effect on the binding of nuclear proteins in the regulatory region of NPSR1 suggesting complex regulation of this gene in asthma and allergy. PMID:23372674

  1. High Levels of Soluble Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptors 1 and 2 and Their Association with Mortality in Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Carlsson, Axel C.; Carrero, Juan-Jesús; Stenvinkel, Peter; Bottai, Matteo; Barany, Peter; Larsson, Anders; Ärnlöv, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Objective Circulating soluble tumor necrosis factor receptors 1 and 2 (sTNFR1 and sTNFR2) are associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression in patients with CKD or diabetes, and with higher mortality. However, data in patients with end-stage renal disease are scarce. Therefore, we analyzed serum levels of sTNFR1 and sTNFR2 and investigated their association with inflammatory markers and mortality in dialysis patients. Research Design and Methods This was a longitudinal cohort study of 207 prevalent patients (median age 66 years, 56% men) undergoing hemodialysis in Stockholm, Sweden. Demographics, clinical characteristics, including comorbidities and laboratory data, were obtained at baseline, together with prospective follow-up for mortality. Results The median sTNFR1 and sTNFR2 levels were 17,680 ng/l [95% confidence interval (CI) 17,023-18,337] and 24,450 ng/l (95% CI 23,721-25,179), respectively. During a follow-up of 31 months (interquartile range, 21-38), 77 patients died. There was no association between the levels of sTNFRs and mortality in Cox regression models, and no consistent trend towards higher or lower mortality was seen in Laplace regression models. sTNFR1 and sTNFR2 levels were highly associated with other inflammatory markers including interleukin-6, pentraxin 3 and TNF-α. Conclusions Prevalent hemodialysis patients have several-fold higher levels of sTNFRs compared to previous studies in CKD stage 4 patients. As no consistent association between TNFR and mortality was observed, clinical implications of measuring these receptors to predict outcome end-stage renal disease patients provide limited results. PMID:25999957

  2. MUC4 potentiates invasion and metastasis of pancreatic cancer cells through stabilization of fibroblast growth factor receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Macha, Muzafar A; Ponnusamy, Moorthy P.; Batra, Surinder K

    2012-01-01

    MUC4 is a type-1 transmembrane mucin differentially expressed in multiple cancers and has previously been shown to potentiate progression and metastasis of pancreatic cancer. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms associated with the MUC4-induced invasion and metastasis in pancreatic cancer. Stable silencing of MUC4 in multiple pancreatic cancer cells resulted in the downregulation of N-cadherin and its interacting partner fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) through downregulation of partly by pFAK, pMKK7, pJNK and pc-Jun pathway and partly through PI-3K/Akt pathway. The downregulation of FGFR1 in turn led to downregulation of pAkt, pERK1/2, pNF-κB, pIkBα, uPA, MMP-9, vimentin, N-cadherin, Twist, Slug and Zeb1 and upregulation of E-cadherin, Occludin, Cytokeratin-18 and Caspase-9 in MUC4 knockdown BXPC3 and Capan1 cells compared with scramble vector transfected cells. Further, downregulation of FGFR1 was associated with a significant change in morphology and reorganization of the actin-cytoskeleton, leading to a significant decrease in motility (P < 0.00001) and invasion (P < 0.0001) in vitro and decreased tumorigenicity and incidence of metastasis in vivo upon orthotopic implantation in the athymic mice. Taken together, the results of the present study suggest that MUC4 promotes invasion and metastasis by FGFR1 stabilization through the N-cadherin upregulation. PMID:22791819

  3. Constitutively active transforming growth factor β receptor 1 in the mouse ovary promotes tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yang; Vincent, David F.; Davis, Anna Jane; Sansom, Owen J.; Bartholin, Laurent; Li, Qinglei

    2016-01-01

    Despite the well-established tumor suppressive role of TGFβ proteins, depletion of key TGFβ signaling components in the mouse ovary does not induce a growth advantage. To define the role of TGFβ signaling in ovarian tumorigenesis, we created a mouse model expressing a constitutively active TGFβ receptor 1 (TGFBR1) in ovarian somatic cells using conditional gain-of-function approach. Remarkably, these mice developed ovarian sex cord-stromal tumors with complete penetrance, leading to reproductive failure and mortality. The tumors expressed multiple granulosa cell markers and caused elevated serum inhibin and estradiol levels, reminiscent of granulosa cell tumors. Consistent with the tumorigenic effect, overactivation of TGFBR1 altered tumor microenvironment by promoting angiogenesis and enhanced ovarian cell proliferation, accompanied by impaired cell differentiation and dysregulated expression of critical genes in ovarian function. By further exploiting complementary genetic models, we substantiated our finding that constitutively active TGFBR1 is a potent oncogenic switch in mouse granulosa cells. In summary, overactivation of TGFBR1 drives gonadal tumor development. The TGFBR1 constitutively active mouse model phenocopies a number of morphological, hormonal, and molecular features of human granulosa cell tumors and are potentially valuable for preclinical testing of targeted therapies to treat granulosa cell tumors, a class of poorly defined ovarian malignancies. PMID:27344183

  4. Investigation of Interactions at the Extracellular Loops of the Relaxin Family Peptide Receptor 1 (RXFP1)*

    PubMed Central

    Diepenhorst, Natalie A.; Petrie, Emma J.; Chen, Catherine Z.; Wang, Amy; Hossain, Mohammed Akhter; Bathgate, Ross A. D.; Gooley, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    Relaxin, an emerging pharmaceutical treatment for acute heart failure, activates the relaxin family peptide receptor (RXFP1), which is a class A G-protein-coupled receptor. In addition to the classic transmembrane (TM) domain, RXFP1 possesses a large extracellular domain consisting of 10 leucine-rich repeats and an N-terminal low density lipoprotein class A (LDLa) module. Relaxin-mediated activation of RXFP1 requires multiple coordinated interactions between the ligand and various receptor domains including a high affinity interaction involving the leucine-rich repeats and a predicted lower affinity interaction involving the extracellular loops (ELs). The LDLa is essential for signal activation; therefore the ELs/TM may additionally present an interaction site to facilitate this LDLa-mediated signaling. To overcome the many challenges of investigating relaxin and the LDLa module interactions with the ELs, we engineered the EL1 and EL2 loops onto a soluble protein scaffold, mapping specific ligand and loop interactions using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Key EL residues were subsequently mutated in RXFP1, and changes in function and relaxin binding were assessed alongside the RXFP1 agonist ML290 to monitor the functional integrity of the TM domain of these mutant receptors. The outcomes of this work make an important contribution to understanding the mechanism of RXFP1 activation and will aid future development of small molecule RXFP1 agonists/antagonists. PMID:25352603

  5. Global Developmental Gene Programing Involves a Nuclear Form of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor-1 (FGFR1).

    PubMed

    Terranova, Christopher; Narla, Sridhar T; Lee, Yu-Wei; Bard, Jonathan; Parikh, Abhirath; Stachowiak, Ewa K; Tzanakakis, Emmanuel S; Buck, Michael J; Birkaya, Barbara; Stachowiak, Michal K

    2015-01-01

    Genetic studies have placed the Fgfr1 gene at the top of major ontogenic pathways that enable gastrulation, tissue development and organogenesis. Using genome-wide sequencing and loss and gain of function experiments the present investigation reveals a mechanism that underlies global and direct gene regulation by the nuclear form of FGFR1, ensuring that pluripotent Embryonic Stem Cells differentiate into Neuronal Cells in response to Retinoic Acid. Nuclear FGFR1, both alone and with its partner nuclear receptors RXR and Nur77, targets thousands of active genes and controls the expression of pluripotency, homeobox, neuronal and mesodermal genes. Nuclear FGFR1 targets genes in developmental pathways represented by Wnt/β-catenin, CREB, BMP, the cell cycle and cancer-related TP53 pathway, neuroectodermal and mesodermal programing networks, axonal growth and synaptic plasticity pathways. Nuclear FGFR1 targets the consensus sequences of transcription factors known to engage CREB-binding protein, a common coregulator of transcription and established binding partner of nuclear FGFR1. This investigation reveals the role of nuclear FGFR1 as a global genomic programmer of cell, neural and muscle development.

  6. Fibroblast growth factor receptor-1 is essential for in vitro cardiomyocyte development.

    PubMed

    Dell'Era, Patrizia; Ronca, Roberto; Coco, Laura; Nicoli, Stefania; Metra, Marco; Presta, Marco

    2003-09-05

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF)/FGF receptor (FGFR) signaling plays a crucial role in mesoderm formation and patterning. Heartless mutant studies in Drosophila suggest that FGFR1, among the different FGFRs, may play a role in cardiogenesis. However, fgfr1-/- mice die during gastrulation before heart formation. To establish the contribution of FGFR1 in cardiac development, we investigated the capacity of murine fgfr1+/- and fgfr1-/- embryonic stem (ES) cells to differentiate to cardiomyocytes in vitro. Clusters of pulsating cardiomyocytes were observed in >90% of 3-dimensional embryoid bodies (EBs) originated from fgfr1+/- ES cells at day 9 to 10 of differentiation. In contrast, 10% or less of fgfr1-/- EBs showed beating foci at day 16. Accordingly, fgfr1-/- EBs were characterized by impaired expression of early cardiac transcription factors Nkx2.5 and d-Hand and of late structural cardiac genes myosin heavy chain (MHC)-alpha, MHC-beta, and ventricular myosin light chain. Homozygous fgfr1 mutation resulted also in alterations of the expression of mesoderm-related early genes, including nodal, BMP2, BMP4, T(bra), and sonic hedgehog. Nevertheless, fgfr1+/- and fgfr1-/- EBs similarly express cardiogenic precursor, endothelial, hematopoietic, and skeletal muscle markers, indicating that fgfr1-null mutation exerts a selective effect on cardiomyocyte development in differentiating ES cells. Accordingly, inhibitors of FGFR signaling, including the FGFR1 tyrosine kinase inhibitor SU 5402, the MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126, and the protein kinase C inhibitor GF109 all prevented cardiomyocyte differentiation in fgfr1+/- EBs without affecting the expression of the hematopoietic/endothelial marker flk-1. In conclusion, the data point to a nonredundant role for FGFR1-mediated signaling in cardiomyocyte development.

  7. Wall discontinuities and increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor-A and vascular endothelial growth factor receptors 1 and 2 in endometrial blood vessels of women with menorrhagia.

    PubMed

    Mints, Miriam; Hultenby, Kjell; Zetterberg, Eva; Blomgren, Bo; Falconer, Christian; Rogers, Rick; Palmblad, Jan

    2007-09-01

    To investigate whether the structure or regulation of the growth of endometrial blood vessels might be abnormal in women with idiopathic menorrhagia (IM). Perturbation of angiogenesis is associated with IM. Prospective, clinical study. Department of gynecology at a university hospital. Twenty-four patients with IM, and 18 women with eumenorrhea. Endometrial biopsy samples underwent immunohistochemical staining for CD34, CD31, von Willebrand factor, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A, and VEGF receptors 1 and 2. Differences in immunostaining for these markers by computer-assisted stereological analysis. Endometrial vessels in patients and controls manifested focal discontinuities, or gaps, in endothelial staining for CD34, CD31, and von Willebrand factor. Electron and confocal microscopy revealed that perivascular cells, probably pericytes, covered these gaps in the vessel wall. The relative size of the gaps was significantly greater in patients with IM than in controls. Vessel circumference was also larger, and more vessels were positive for VEGF-A and for VEGF receptors 1 and 2, in patients than in controls. Gap size was significantly correlated with the number of vessels expressing VEGF-A or VEGF receptor 1. Endometrial blood vessels possess a discrete morphology that is characterized by endothelial gaps, and these gaps [1] are more pronounced in women with IM, [2] are related to overexpression of VEGF-A and VEGF receptor 1, and [3] might contribute to IM, e.g., by destablizing vessels.

  8. Critical role of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 in the pathogenesis of pulmonary emphysema in mice.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Masaki; Ouchi, Hiroshi; Ikegame, Satoshi; Harada, Eiji; Matsumoto, Takemasa; Uchino, Junji; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Watanabe, Kentaro

    2016-01-01

    COPD is a major cause of chronic morbidity and mortality throughout the world. Although tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) has a critical role in the development of COPD, the role of different TNF receptors (TNFRs) in pulmonary emphysema has not been resolved. We aimed to clarify the role of TNFRs in the development of pulmonary emphysema. TNF-α transgenic mice, a murine model of COPD in which the mice spontaneously develop emphysema with a large increase in lung volume and pulmonary hypertension, were crossed with either TNFR1-deficient mice or TNFR2-deficient mice. After 6 months, the gross appearance of the lung, lung histology, and pulmonary and cardiac physiology were determined. In addition, the relationship between apoptosis and emphysema was investigated. Pulmonary emphysema-like changes disappeared with deletion of TNFR1. However, slight improvements were attained with deletion of TNFR2. Apoptotic cells in the interstitium of the lung were observed in TNF-α transgenic mice. The apoptotic signals through TNFR1 appear critical for the pathogenesis of pulmonary emphysema. In contrast, the inflammatory process has a less important role for the development of emphysema.

  9. Fibroblastic growth factor receptor 1 amplification in osteosarcoma is associated with poor response to neo-adjuvant chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Fernanda Amary, M; Ye, Hongtao; Berisha, Fitim; Khatri, Bhavisha; Forbes, Georgina; Lehovsky, Katie; Frezza, Anna M; Behjati, Sam; Tarpey, Patrick; Pillay, Nischalan; Campbell, Peter J; Tirabosco, Roberto; Presneau, Nadège; Strauss, Sandra J; Flanagan, Adrienne M

    2014-08-01

    Osteosarcoma, the most common primary bone sarcoma, is a genetically complex disease with no widely accepted biomarker to allow stratification of patients for treatment. After a recent report of one osteosarcoma cell line and one tumor exhibiting fibroblastic growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) gene amplification, the aim of this work was to assess the frequency of FGFR1 amplification in a larger cohort of osteosarcoma and to determine if this biomarker could be used for stratification of patients for treatment. About 352 osteosarcoma samples from 288 patients were analyzed for FGFR1 amplification by interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization. FGFR1 amplification was detected in 18.5% of patients whose tumors revealed a poor response to chemotherapy, and no patients whose tumors responded well to therapy harbored this genetic alteration. FGFR1 amplification is present disproportionately in the rarer histological variants of osteosarcoma. This study provides a rationale for inclusion of patients with osteosarcoma in clinical trials using FGFR kinase inhibitors.

  10. Ecological factors drive natural selection pressure of avian aryl hydrocarbon receptor 1 genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Ji-Hee; Park, Jin-Young; Park, Hae-Jeong; Bak, Su-Min; Hirano, Masashi; Iwata, Hisato; Park, Young-Suk; Kim, Eun-Young

    2016-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) mediates dioxin toxicities. Several studies have suggested that two amino acid residues corresponding to the 324th and 380th positions in the ligand binding domain (LBD) of the chicken AHR1 (Ile_Ser as high sensitivity, Ile_Ala as moderate sensitivity, and Val_Ala as low sensitivity), could be an important factor determining dioxin sensitivity in avian species. Here, we analyzed the association between ecological factors and AHR1 LBD genotypes of 113 avian species. Cluster analyses showed that 2 major clusters and sub-clusters of the cluster 3 were associated with specific AHR1 genotypes depending on the food, habitat, and migration of the animal. The majority of the species with Ile_Ala type were the Passeriformes, which are omnivorous or herbivorous feeders in the terrestrial environment. The species with Val_Ala type was primarily composed of raptors and waterbirds, which have been exposed to naturally occurring dioxins. An in vitro reporter gene assay revealed that the sensitivity to a natural dioxin, 1,3,7-tribromodibenzo-p-dioxin was in the order of Ile_Ser > Ile_Ala > Val_Ala. These results suggest that ecological factors related to the exposure of natural dioxins contribute to natural selection of the avian AHR1 genotype, which consequently leads to different sensitivity to man-made dioxins. PMID:27283192

  11. A Familial C3GN Secondary to Defective C3 Regulation by Complement Receptor 1 and Complement Factor H

    PubMed Central

    Roumenina, Lubka T.; Bruneau, Sarah; Marinozzi, Maria Chiara; Rybkine, Tania; Schramm, Elizabeth C.; Java, Anuja; Atkinson, John P.; Aldigier, Jean Claude; Bridoux, Frank; Touchard, Guy; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique

    2016-01-01

    C3 glomerulopathy is a recently described form of CKD. C3GN is a subtype of C3 glomerulopathy characterized by predominant C3 deposits in the glomeruli and is commonly the result of acquired or genetic abnormalities in the alternative pathway (AP) of the complement system. We identified and characterized the first mutation of the C3 gene (p. I734T) in two related individuals diagnosed with C3GN. Immunofluorescence and electron microscopy studies showed C3 deposits in the subendothelial space, associated with unusual deposits located near the complement receptor 1 (CR1)-expressing podocytes. In vitro, this C3 mutation exhibited decreased binding to CR1, resulting in less CR1-dependent cleavage of C3b by factor 1. Both patients had normal plasma C3 levels, and the mutant C3 interacted with factor B comparably to wild-type (WT) C3 to form a C3 convertase. Binding of mutant C3 to factor H was normal, but mutant C3 was less efficiently cleaved by factor I in the presence of factor H, leading to enhanced C3 fragment deposition on glomerular cells. In conclusion, our results reveal that a CR1 functional deficiency is a mechanism of intraglomerular AP dysregulation and could influence the localization of the glomerular C3 deposits. PMID:26471127

  12. Discovery of Novel Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 1 Kinase Inhibitors by Structure-Based Virtual Screening

    SciTech Connect

    Ravindranathan, K.; Mandiyan, V; Ekkati, A; Bae, J; Schlessinger, J; Jorgensen, W

    2010-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) play important roles in embryonic development, angiogenesis, wound healing, and cell proliferation and differentiation. In search of inhibitors of FGFR1 kinase, 2.2 million compounds were docked into the ATP binding site of the protein. A co-crystal structure, which shows two alternative conformations for the nucleotide binding loop, is reported. Docking was performed on both conformations and, ultimately, 23 diverse compounds were purchased and assayed. Following hit validation, two compounds 10 and 16, a benzylidene derivative of pseudothiohydantoin and a thienopyrimidinone derivative, respectively, were discovered that inhibit FGFR1 kinase with IC{sub 50} values of 23 and 50 {micro}M. Initial optimization of 16 led to the more unsaturated 40, which has significantly enhanced potency, 1.9 {micro}M. The core structures represent new structural motifs for FGFR1 kinase inhibitors. The study also illustrates complexities associated with the choice of protein structures for docking, possible use of multiple kinase structures to seek selectivity, and hit identification.

  13. Recombinant human vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 effectively inhibits angiogenesis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinliang; Shi, Minglei; Xi, Yongyi; Gao, Lihua; Zhang, Guanyi; Shao, Yong; Chen, Huipeng; Hu, Xianwen

    2015-05-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays an important role in both physiological and pathological angiogenesis. VEGF receptor‑1 (VEGFR‑1) acts as a decoy VEGF receptor that enables the regulation of VEGF on the vascular endothelium. In the present study, the recombinant human VEGFR1D1‑3/Fc (rhVEGFR‑1), which contains key domains for VEGF binding, was cloned and expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The rhVEGFR‑1 protein was purified using protein‑A affinity chromatography. The molecular weight of rhVEGFR‑1 was found to be ~162 and 81 kD in non‑reducing and reducing SDS‑PAGE, respectively. The majority of the final protein products were in the dimeric conformation. Western blot analysis revealed that rhVEGFR‑1 was only capable of binding to the full glycan form of rhVEGF‑165 and rhVEGF‑121. The dissociation constant for the binding of rhVEGFR‑1 to VEGF‑165, detected using Biacore, was 285 pM. In addition, rhVEGFR‑1 inhibited the proliferation and migration of human microvascular endothelial cells. In vivo experiments also demonstrated that rhVEGFR‑1 inhibited chicken chorioallantoic membrane neovascularization and angiogenesis in nude mice. In conclusion, an anti‑angiogenic recombinant soluble VEGFR was expressed (up to 5 mg/l) in CHO cells and was shown to be capable of inhibiting neovascularization in vivo and in vitro.

  14. Molecular expression of vascular endothelial growth factor, prokineticin receptor-1 and other biomarkers in infiltrating canalicular carcinoma of the breast

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Angélica; Morimoto, Sumiko; Vilchis, Felipe; Taniyama, Natsuko; Bautista, Claudia J.; Robles, Carlos; Bargalló, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is important in the growth and metastasis of cancer cells. In 2001, another angiogenic factor, endocrine gland-derived VEGF (EG-VEGF), was characterized and sequenced. EG-VEGF activity appears to be restricted to endothelial cells derived from endocrine glands. At the molecular level, its expression is regulated by hypoxia and steroid hormones. Although VEGF and EG-VEGF are structurally different, they function in a coordinated fashion. Since the majority of mammary tumors are hormone-dependent, it was hypothesized that EG-VEGF would be expressed in these tumors, and therefore, represent a potential target for anti-angiogenic therapy. The aim of the present study was to assess the expression of VEGF, EG-VEGF and its receptor (prokineticin receptor-1), as well as that of breast cancer resistant protein, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, in 50 breast samples of infiltrating canalicular carcinoma (ICC) and their correlation with tumor staging. The samples were analyzed using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. Both angiogenic growth factors were identified in all samples. However, in 90% of the samples, the expression level of VEGF was significantly higher than that of EG-VEGF (P=0.024). There was no association between the expression of VEGF, EG-VEGF or its receptor with tumor stage. In ICC, the predominant angiogenic factor expressed was VEGF. The expression level of either factor was not correlated with the tumor-node-metastasis stage. Although ICC is derived from endothelial cells, EG-VEGF expression was not the predominant angiogenic/growth factor in ICC. PMID:27703528

  15. Molecular expression of vascular endothelial growth factor, prokineticin receptor-1 and other biomarkers in infiltrating canalicular carcinoma of the breast.

    PubMed

    Morales, Angélica; Morimoto, Sumiko; Vilchis, Felipe; Taniyama, Natsuko; Bautista, Claudia J; Robles, Carlos; Bargalló, Enrique

    2016-10-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is important in the growth and metastasis of cancer cells. In 2001, another angiogenic factor, endocrine gland-derived VEGF (EG-VEGF), was characterized and sequenced. EG-VEGF activity appears to be restricted to endothelial cells derived from endocrine glands. At the molecular level, its expression is regulated by hypoxia and steroid hormones. Although VEGF and EG-VEGF are structurally different, they function in a coordinated fashion. Since the majority of mammary tumors are hormone-dependent, it was hypothesized that EG-VEGF would be expressed in these tumors, and therefore, represent a potential target for anti-angiogenic therapy. The aim of the present study was to assess the expression of VEGF, EG-VEGF and its receptor (prokineticin receptor-1), as well as that of breast cancer resistant protein, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, in 50 breast samples of infiltrating canalicular carcinoma (ICC) and their correlation with tumor staging. The samples were analyzed using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. Both angiogenic growth factors were identified in all samples. However, in 90% of the samples, the expression level of VEGF was significantly higher than that of EG-VEGF (P=0.024). There was no association between the expression of VEGF, EG-VEGF or its receptor with tumor stage. In ICC, the predominant angiogenic factor expressed was VEGF. The expression level of either factor was not correlated with the tumor-node-metastasis stage. Although ICC is derived from endothelial cells, EG-VEGF expression was not the predominant angiogenic/growth factor in ICC.

  16. Association Between Serum Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor 1 and Trajectories of Functional Status: The Northern Manhattan Study.

    PubMed

    Dhamoon, Mandip S; Cheung, Ying-Kuen; Moon, Yeseon P; Wright, Clinton B; Willey, Joshua Z; Sacco, Ralph L; Elkind, Mitchell S V

    2017-07-01

    We hypothesized that tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1) levels are associated with long-term trajectories of functional status independently of vascular risk factors and the occurrence of stroke and myocardial infarction (MI) during follow-up. In the Northern Manhattan Study, stroke-free persons aged ≥40 years in northern Manhattan (New York, New York) had annual assessments with the Barthel index (BI) for a median of 13 years (1993-2015). Assessment of baseline demographic factors, risk factors, and laboratory studies included measurement of TNFR1 (n = 1,863). Generalized estimating equations models were used to estimate standardized associations between TNFR1 and 1) baseline functional status and 2) change in function over time, adjusting for demographic factors, vascular risk factors, social variables, cognition, and depression, as well as stroke and MI occurrence during follow-up. The mean age of participants was 70 (standard deviation (SD), 10) years; 66% were women, and 55% were Hispanic. The mean TNFR1 level was 2.57 mg/L. TNFR1 was associated with baseline BI (-0.93 BI points per SD increment in TNFR1; 95% confidence interval: -1.59, -0.26) and change over time (-0.36 BI points per year per SD increment in TNFR1; 95% confidence interval: -0.69, -0.03). In this large population-based study, higher TNFR1 levels were associated with greater baseline disability and disability over time, even with adjustment for baseline covariates and stroke and MI occurrence during follow-up. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Tumor necrosis factorreceptor 1 contributes to ethanol-induced vascular reactive oxygen species generation and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Simplicio, Janaina A; Gonzaga, Natália A; Nakashima, Marcelo A; De Martinis, Bruno S; Cunha, Thiago M; Tirapelli, Luis F; Tirapelli, Carlos R

    2017-07-22

    We evaluated the contribution of tumor necrosis factorreceptor 1 (TNFR1) to ethanol-induced hypertension and vascular oxidative stress and the possible role of perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT) in such responses. Male C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) or TNFR1-deficient mice (TNFR1(-/-)) were treated with ethanol (20% vol/vol) for 12 weeks. Ethanol induced an increase in blood pressure in WT mice and TNFR1(-/-) at 4 and 5 weeks of treatment, respectively. Treatment with ethanol increased tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 levels in aortas with or without PVAT (PVAT+ and PVAT-, respectively) from WT mice, but not TNFR1(-/-). Ethanol increased superoxide anion (O2(-)) generation, thiobarbituric acid reactive substance concentration, and the activity of superoxide dismutase and catalase in aortas (PVAT- and PVAT+) from WT mice, but not TNFR1(-/-). Conversely, ethanol consumption decreased the concentration of nitrate/nitrite in aortas (PVAT- and PVAT+) from WT mice, but not TNFR1(-/-). Treatment with ethanol increased myeloperoxidase activity in aortas (PVAT- and PVAT+) from WT mice, but not TNFR1(-/-). The major finding of our study is that TNFR1 contributes to ethanol-induced hypertension and oxidative stress in the vasculature. Additionally, TNFR1 plays a role in ethanol-induced increase in proinflammatory cytokines and neutrophils migration. However, PVAT does not counteract or aggravate the effects induced by ethanol. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Hypertension. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Melatonin-receptor-1-deficiency affects neurogenic differentiation factor immunoreaction in pancreatic islets and enteroendocrine cells of mice.

    PubMed

    Shalabi, Andree; Fischer, Claudia; Korf, Horst-Werner; von Gall, Charlotte

    2013-09-01

    Neurogenic differentiation factor (NeuroD) is a transcription factor involved in the differentiation of neurons and in the control of energy balance and metabolism. It plays a key role in type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Melatonin is an important rhythmic endocrine signal within the circadian system of mammals and modulates insulin secretion and glucose metabolism. In the mouse pars tuberalis, NeuroD mRNA levels show day/night variation, which is independent of the molecular clock gene mPER1 but depends on the functional melatonin receptor 1 (MT1). So far, little is known about the effect of melatonin on NeuroD synthesis in the gastrointestinal tract. Thus, NeuroD protein levels and cellular localization were analyzed by immunohistochemistry in pancreatic islets and duodenal enteroendocrine cells of MT1- and mPER1-deficienct mice. In addition, the localization of NeuroD-positive cells was analyzed by double-immunofluorescence and confocal laser microscopy. In duodenal enteroendocrine cells and pancreatic islets of WT and PER1-deficient mice, NeuroD immunoreaction showed a peak during the early subjective night. In contrast, this peak was absent in MT1-deficent mice. These data suggest that melatonin, by acting on MT1 receptors, affects NeuroD expression in the gastrointestinal tract and thus might contribute to circadian regulation in metabolic functions.

  19. Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 1 Overexpression Is Associated with Poor Survival in Patients with Resected Muscle Invasive Urothelial Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seungtaek; Koh, Myoung Ju; Jeong, Hyeon Joo; Cho, Nam Hoon; Choi, Young Deuk; Cho, Do Yeun; Lee, Hoi Young; Rha, Sun Young

    2016-07-01

    To examine the usefulness of various receptor tyrosine kinase expressions as prognostic markers and therapeutic targets in muscle invasive urothelial cancer (UC) patients. We retrospectively analyzed the data of 98 patients with muscle invasive UC who underwent radical cystectomy between 2005 and 2010 in Yonsei Cancer Center. Using formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissues of primary tumors, immunohistochemical staining was done for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1), and fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3). There were 41 (41.8%), 44 (44.9%), and 14 (14.2%) patients who have over-expressed HER2, FGFR1, and FGFR3, respectively. In univariate analysis, significantly shorter median time to recurrence (TTR) (12.9 months vs. 49.0 months; p=0.008) and overall survival (OS) (22.3 months vs. 52.7 months; p=0.006) was found in patients with FGFR1 overexpression. By contrast, there was no difference in TTR or OS according to the HER2 and FGFR3 expression status. FGFR1 remained as a significant prognostic factor for OS with hazard ratio of 2.23 (95% confidence interval: 1.27-3.90, p=0.006) in multivariate analysis. Our result showed that FGFR1 expression, but not FGFR3, is an adverse prognostic factor in muscle invasive UC patients after radical cystectomy. FGFR1 might be feasible for prognosis prediction and a potential therapeutic target after thorough validation in muscle invasive UC.

  20. Residues remote from the binding pocket control the antagonist selectivity towards the corticotropin-releasing factor receptor-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xianqiang; Cheng, Jianxin; Wang, Xu; Tang, Yun; Ågren, Hans; Tu, Yaoquan

    2015-01-01

    The corticotropin releasing factors receptor-1 and receptor-2 (CRF1R and CRF2R) are therapeutic targets for treating neurological diseases. Antagonists targeting CRF1R have been developed for the potential treatment of anxiety disorders and alcohol addiction. It has been found that antagonists targeting CRF1R always show high selectivity, although CRF1R and CRF2R share a very high rate of sequence identity. This has inspired us to study the origin of the selectivity of the antagonists. We have therefore built a homology model for CRF2R and carried out unbiased molecular dynamics and well-tempered metadynamics simulations for systems with the antagonist CP-376395 in CRF1R or CRF2R to address this issue. We found that the side chain of Tyr6.63 forms a hydrogen bond with the residue remote from the binding pocket, which allows Tyr6.63 to adopt different conformations in the two receptors and results in the presence or absence of a bottleneck controlling the antagonist binding to or dissociation from the receptors. The rotameric switch of the side chain of Tyr3566.63 allows the breaking down of the bottleneck and is a perquisite for the dissociation of CP-376395 from CRF1R.

  1. Fibroblastic growth factor receptor 1 amplification in osteosarcoma is associated with poor response to neo-adjuvant chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Fernanda Amary, M; Ye, Hongtao; Berisha, Fitim; Khatri, Bhavisha; Forbes, Georgina; Lehovsky, Katie; Frezza, Anna M; Behjati, Sam; Tarpey, Patrick; Pillay, Nischalan; Campbell, Peter J; Tirabosco, Roberto; Presneau, Nadège; Strauss, Sandra J; Flanagan, Adrienne M

    2014-01-01

    Osteosarcoma, the most common primary bone sarcoma, is a genetically complex disease with no widely accepted biomarker to allow stratification of patients for treatment. After a recent report of one osteosarcoma cell line and one tumor exhibiting fibroblastic growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) gene amplification, the aim of this work was to assess the frequency of FGFR1 amplification in a larger cohort of osteosarcoma and to determine if this biomarker could be used for stratification of patients for treatment. About 352 osteosarcoma samples from 288 patients were analyzed for FGFR1 amplification by interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization. FGFR1 amplification was detected in 18.5% of patients whose tumors revealed a poor response to chemotherapy, and no patients whose tumors responded well to therapy harbored this genetic alteration. FGFR1 amplification is present disproportionately in the rarer histological variants of osteosarcoma. This study provides a rationale for inclusion of patients with osteosarcoma in clinical trials using FGFR kinase inhibitors. PMID:24861215

  2. Constitutive Activation of Transforming Growth Factor Beta Receptor 1 in the Mouse Uterus Impairs Uterine Morphology and Function1

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yang; Duran, Samantha; Lydon, John P.; DeMayo, Francesco J.; Burghardt, Robert C.; Bayless, Kayla J.; Bartholin, Laurent; Li, Qinglei

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite increasing evidence pointing to the essential involvement of the transforming growth factor beta (TGFB) superfamily in reproduction, a definitive role of TGFB signaling in the uterus remains to be unveiled. In this study, we generated a gain-of-function mouse model harboring a constitutively active (CA) TGFB receptor 1 (TGFBR1), the expression of which was conditionally induced by the progesterone receptor (Pgr)-Cre recombinase. Overactivation of TGFB signaling was verified by enhanced phosphorylation of SMAD2 and increased expression of TGFB target genes in the uterus. TGFBR1 Pgr-Cre CA mice were sterile. Histological, cellular, and molecular analyses demonstrated that constitutive activation of TGFBR1 in the mouse uterus promoted formation of hypermuscled uteri. Accompanying this phenotype was the upregulation of a battery of smooth muscle genes in the uterus. Furthermore, TGFB ligands activated SMAD2/3 and stimulated the expression of a smooth muscle maker gene, alpha smooth muscle actin (ACTA2), in human uterine smooth muscle cells. Immunofluorescence microscopy identified a marked reduction of uterine glands in TGFBR1 Pgr-Cre CA mice within the endometrial compartment that contained myofibroblast-like cells. Thus, constitutive activation of TGFBR1 in the mouse uterus caused defects in uterine morphology and function, as evidenced by abnormal myometrial structure, dramatically reduced uterine glands, and impaired uterine decidualization. These results underscore the importance of a precisely controlled TGFB signaling system in establishing a uterine microenvironment conducive to normal development and function. PMID:25505200

  3. Design, synthesis and screening studies of potent thiazol-2-amine derivatives as fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kumar, B V S Suneel; Lakshmi, Narasu; Kumar, M Ravi; Rambabu, Gundla; Manjashetty, Thimmappa H; Arunasree, Kalle M; Sriram, Dharmarajan; Ramkumar, Kavya; Neamati, Nouri; Dayam, Raveendra; Sarma, J A R P

    2014-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) a tyrosine kinase receptor, plays important roles in angiogenesis, embryonic development, cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and wound healing. The FGFR isoforms and their receptors (FGFRs) considered as a potential targets and under intense research to design potential anticancer agents. Fibroblast growth factors (FGF's) and its growth factor receptors (FGFR) plays vital role in one of the critical pathway in monitoring angiogenesis. In the current study, quantitative pharmacophore models were generated and validated using known FGFR1 inhibitors. The pharmacophore models were generated using a set of 28 compounds (training). The top pharmacophore model was selected and validated using a set of 126 compounds (test set) and also using external validation. The validated pharmacophore was considered as a virtual screening query to screen a database of 400,000 virtual molecules and pharmacophore model retrieved 2800 hits. The retrieved hits were subsequently filtered based on the fit value. The selected hits were subjected for docking studies to observe the binding modes of the retrieved hits and also to reduce the false positives. One of the potential hits (thiazole-2-amine derivative) was selected based the pharmacophore fit value, dock score, and synthetic feasibility. A few analogues of the thiazole-2-amine derivative were synthesized. These compounds were screened for FGFR1 activity and anti-proliferative studies. The top active compound showed 56.87% inhibition of FGFR1 activity at 50 µM and also showed good cellular activity. Further optimization of thiazole-2-amine derivatives is in progress.

  4. Interferon Regulatory Factor 6 (IRF6) and Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 1 (FGFR1) Contribute to Human Tooth Agenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Alexandre R.; Modesto, Adriana; Meira, Raquel; Barbosa, Anna Renata Schneider; Lidral, Andrew C.; Murray, Jeffrey C.

    2008-01-01

    Phenotypic characteristics expressed in syndromes give clues to the factors involved in the cause of isolated forms of the same defects. We investigated two genes responsible for craniofacial syndromes, FGFR1 and IRF6, in a collection of families with isolated tooth agenesis. Cheek swab samples were obtained for DNA analysis from 116 case/parent trios. Probands had at least one developmentally missing tooth, excluding third molars. In addition, we studied 89 cases and 50 controls from Ohio to replicate any positive findings. Genotyping was performed by kinetic polymerase chain-reaction or TaqMan assays. Linkage disequilibrium analysis and transmission distortion of the marker alleles were performed. The same variants in the IRF6 gene that are associated with isolated orofacial clefts are also associated with human tooth agenesis (rs861019, P = 0.058; rs17015215—V274I, P = 0.0006; rs7802, P = 0.004). Mutations in IRF6 cause Van der Woude and popliteal pterygium syndromes. The craniofacial phenotypic characteristics of these syndromes include oral clefts and preferential tooth agenesis of incisors and premolars, besides pits on the lower lips. Also it appears that preferential premolar agenesis is associated with FGFR1 (P = 0.014) and IRF6 (P = 0.002) markers. There were statistically significant data suggesting that IRF6 interacts not only with MSX1 (P = 0.001), but also with TGFA (P = 0.03). PMID:17318851

  5. Kallmann syndrome: somatic and germline mutations of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 gene in a mother and the son.

    PubMed

    Sato, Naoko; Ohyama, Kenji; Fukami, Maki; Okada, Michiyo; Ogata, Tsutomu

    2006-04-01

    Although Kallmann syndrome (KS) caused by heterozygous loss of function mutations of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 gene (FGFR1) is occasionally associated with characteristic features, such as dental agenesis and cleft palate, FGFR1 mutations remain unidentified in several KS patients with such characteristic features. We examined a 14-yr-old Japanese boy with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, olfactory dysfunction, and dental agenesis and his fertile mother with olfactory dysfunction and dental agenesis. Direct sequencing was performed for FGFR1 using leukocyte genomic DNA from the proband and leukocyte and nail genomic DNA from the mother. To examine a possible somatic mutation, a specific forward primer was designed to introduce a BstXI site into the normal allele only, and nested PCR amplification, followed by BstXI digestion, was carried out three times with different reverse primers. After standard PCR amplifications, a heterozygous 2-bp deletion at exon 10 (1317_1318delTG), which is predicted to cause a frameshift at the 439th codon for serine and resultant termination at the 461st codon (S439fsX461), was identified in the proband, but was not found in the mother. After selective amplification of the mutant allele, this deletion was detected in nail DNA, but not in leukocyte DNA, from the mother. The results suggest that the 2-bp deletion took place as a somatic mutation in the mother and was transmitted to the boy because of germline mosaicism. Such a somatic mutation occurs in some apparently FGFR1 mutation-negative KS patients with dental agenesis.

  6. Tumour necrosis factor receptor 1 and mortality in a multi-ethnic cohort: the Northern Manhattan Study.

    PubMed

    Luna, Jorge M; Moon, Yeseon; Liu, Khin; Spitalnik, Steven; Paik, Myunghee; Sacco, Ralph; Elkind, Mitchell S V

    2013-05-01

    to study the association between soluble tumour necrosis factor receptor 1 (sTNFR1) levels and mortality in the population-based Northern Manhattan Study (NOMAS). NOMAS is a multi-ethnic, community-based cohort study with mean 8.4 years of follow-up. sTNFR1 was measured using ELISA. Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals (HR, 95% CI) for the association of sTNFR1 with risk of all-cause mortality after adjusting for relevant confounders. sTNFR1 measurements were available in 1,862 participants (mean age 69.2 ± 10.2 years) with 512 all-cause deaths. Median sTNFR1 was 2.28 ng/ml. Those with sTNFR1 levels in the highest quartile (Q4), compared with those with sTNFR1 in the lowest quartile (Q1), were at an increased risk of all-cause mortality (adjusted HR: 1.8, 95% CI: 1.4-2.4) and non-vascular mortality (adjusted HR: 2.5, 95% CI: 1.5-3.6), but not vascular mortality (adjusted HR: 1.3, 95% CI: 0.9-1.9). There were interactions between sTNFR1 quartiles and medical insurance-status [likelihood ratio test (LRT) with 3 degrees of freedom, Pinteraction = 0.02] and alcohol consumption (LRT with 3 degrees of freedom, Pinteraction < 0.01) for all-cause mortality. In participants with no insurance or Medicaid, those with sTNFR1 in the top quartile had nearly a threefold increased risk of total mortality than the lowest quartile (adjusted HR: 2.9, 95% CI: 1.9-4.4). in this multi-ethnic cohort, sTNFR1 was associated with all-cause and non-vascular mortality, particularly among those of a lower socioeconomic status.

  7. Soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 in hemolytic uremic syndrome with encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Masahiro; Ichiyama, Takashi; Matsushige, Takeshi; Iwaki, Takuma; Iyoda, Kuniaki; Fukuda, Ken; Makata, Haruyuki; Matsubara, Tomoyo; Furukawa, Susumu

    2008-05-30

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) induces hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). Morbidity and mortality are increased in HUS patients with neurologic complications. To determine the pathogenesis of the central nervous system (CNS) involvement in HUS by EHEC, we determined the serum concentrations of interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), soluble TNF receptor 1 (sTNFR1), IL-10, interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), IL-2, IL-4, soluble E-selectin (sE-selectin), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) during the acute stage in children with HUS with or without CNS involvement. Serum concentrations of IL-6, IL-10, sTNFR1, sE-selectin, MMP-9, and TIMP-1, but not TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, IL-2, or IL-4, were significantly higher in patients with HUS with encephalopathy compared with controls. Serum IL-6, sTNFR1 and TIMP-1 concentrations were significantly higher in patients with HUS with encephalopathy compared with those with HUS without encephalopathy (P=0.031, P=0.005, and P=0.007, respectively) and those with acute colitis without HUS (P=0.011, P<0.001, and P=0.005, respectively). There were no significant differences in hemoglobin, platelet counts, leukocyte counts, or serum concentrations of IL-10, sE-selectin, MMP-9, aspartate aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, or C-reactive protein between the HUS patients with and without encephalopathy. Our preliminary study suggests that serum IL-6, sTNFR1 and TIMP-1 levels, particularly sTNFR1 and TIMP-1, are important for predicting neurological complications in patients with HUS.

  8. MAGI Proteins Regulate the Trafficking and Signaling of Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Receptor 1 via a Compensatory Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Hammad, Maha M.; Dunn, Henry A.

    2016-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptor1 (CRFR1) is associated with psychiatric illness and is a proposed target for the treatment of anxiety and depression. Similar to many G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), CRFR1 harbors a PDZ (PSD-95/Disc Large/Zona Occludens)-binding motif at the end of its carboxyl-terminal tail. The interactions of PDZ proteins with GPCRs are crucial for the regulation of receptor function. In the present study, we characterize the interaction of all members of the membrane-associated guanylate kinase with inverted orientation PDZ (MAGI) proteins with CRFR1. We show using co-immunoprecipitation that CRFR1 interacts with MAGI-1 and MAGI-3 in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells in a PDZ motif-dependent manner. We find that overexpression as well as knockdown of MAGI proteins result in a significant reduction in CRFR1 endocytosis. This effect is dependent on an intact PDZ binding motif for MAGI-2 and MAGI-3 but not MAGI-1. We show that the alteration in expression levels of MAGI-1, MAGI-2 or MAGI-3 can interfere with β-arrestin recruitment to CRFR1. This could explain the effects observed with receptor internalization. We also find that knockdown of endogenous MAGI-1, MAGI-2 or MAGI-3 in HEK293 cells can lead to an enhancement in ERK1/2 signaling but has no effect on cAMP formation. Interestingly, we observe a compensation effect between MAGI-1 and MAGI-3. Taken together, our data suggest that the MAGI proteins, MAGI-1, MAGI-2 and MAGI-3 can regulate β-arrestin-mediated internalization of CRFR1 as well as its signaling and that there is a compensatory mechanism involved in regulating the function of the MAGI subfamily.

  9. miR-15b Inhibits the Progression of Glioblastoma Cells Through Targeting Insulin-like Growth Factor Receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Liu, Huaqiang; Tian, Lin; Wang, Fachen; Han, Liangbo; Zhang, Wei; Bai, Yun-An

    2017-02-01

    The microRNAs (miRNAs) have been suggested as a tumor suppressor in recent years. miR-15b was reported to exert an anti-oncogenic role in the proliferation, migration, and invasion of diverse tumor cells. However, the mechanisms underlying miR-15b-mediated biology of glioblastoma are still unclear. In the present study, the expression of miR-15b was down-regulated in glioblastoma tumor tissues and U87 and U251 cells, but insulin-like growth factor receptor 1 (IGF1R) expression became up-regulated in these tumor tissues and cells (all p < 0.001). Furthermore, IGF1R expression was inversely associated with miR-15b expression. Notably, patients with lower miR-15b expression have a much shorter survival period compared with high expression (log-rank test p = 0.045). In vitro data demonstrated that miR-15b mimics inhibited the proliferation, cell cycle arrest, and invasion of U87 and U251 cells. Besides, we validated IGF1R as a direct target of miR-15b using dual luciferase assays, and IGF1R plasmids partially abrogated miR-15b mimics inhibited cell proliferation. In vivo, miR-15b mimics indeed repressed cell proliferation in mouse xenograft model. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that miR-15b inhibits the progression of glioblastoma cells through targeting IGF1R, and miR-15b can be recommended as a tumor suppressor in the progression of glioblastoma.

  10. Constitutive activation of transforming growth factor Beta receptor 1 in the mouse uterus impairs uterine morphology and function.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yang; Duran, Samantha; Lydon, John P; DeMayo, Francesco J; Burghardt, Robert C; Bayless, Kayla J; Bartholin, Laurent; Li, Qinglei

    2015-02-01

    Despite increasing evidence pointing to the essential involvement of the transforming growth factor beta (TGFB) superfamily in reproduction, a definitive role of TGFB signaling in the uterus remains to be unveiled. In this study, we generated a gain-of-function mouse model harboring a constitutively active (CA) TGFB receptor 1 (TGFBR1), the expression of which was conditionally induced by the progesterone receptor (Pgr)-Cre recombinase. Overactivation of TGFB signaling was verified by enhanced phosphorylation of SMAD2 and increased expression of TGFB target genes in the uterus. TGFBR1 Pgr-Cre CA mice were sterile. Histological, cellular, and molecular analyses demonstrated that constitutive activation of TGFBR1 in the mouse uterus promoted formation of hypermuscled uteri. Accompanying this phenotype was the upregulation of a battery of smooth muscle genes in the uterus. Furthermore, TGFB ligands activated SMAD2/3 and stimulated the expression of a smooth muscle maker gene, alpha smooth muscle actin (ACTA2), in human uterine smooth muscle cells. Immunofluorescence microscopy identified a marked reduction of uterine glands in TGFBR1 Pgr-Cre CA mice within the endometrial compartment that contained myofibroblast-like cells. Thus, constitutive activation of TGFBR1 in the mouse uterus caused defects in uterine morphology and function, as evidenced by abnormal myometrial structure, dramatically reduced uterine glands, and impaired uterine decidualization. These results underscore the importance of a precisely controlled TGFB signaling system in establishing a uterine microenvironment conducive to normal development and function. © 2015 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  11. Neuroprotection in a rabbit model of intraventricular haemorrhage by cyclooxygenase-2, prostanoid receptor-1 or tumour necrosis factor-alpha inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Vinukonda, Govindaiah; Csiszar, Anna; Hu, Furong; Dummula, Krishna; Pandey, Nishi Kant; Zia, Muhammad T.; Ferreri, Nicholas R.; Ungvari, Zoltan; LaGamma, Edmund F.

    2010-01-01

    Intraventricular haemorrhage is a major complication of prematurity that results in neurological dysfunctions, including cerebral palsy and cognitive deficits. No therapeutic options are currently available to limit the catastrophic brain damage initiated by the development of intraventricular haemorrhage. As intraventricular haemorrhage leads to an inflammatory response, we asked whether cyclooxygenase-2, its derivative prostaglandin E2, prostanoid receptors and pro-inflammatory cytokines were elevated in intraventricular haemorrhage; whether their suppression would confer neuroprotection; and determined how cyclooxygenase-2 and cytokines were mechanistically-linked. To this end, we used our rabbit model of intraventricular haemorrhage where premature pups, delivered by Caesarian section, were treated with intraperitoneal glycerol at 2 h of age to induce haemorrhage. Intraventricular haemorrhage was diagnosed by head ultrasound at 6 h of age. The pups with intraventricular haemorrhage were treated with inhibitors of cyclooxygenase-2, prostanoid receptor-1 or tumour necrosis factor-α; and cell-infiltration, cell-death and gliosis were compared between treated-pups and vehicle-treated controls during the first 3 days of life. Neurobehavioural performance, myelination and gliosis were assessed in pups treated with cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor compared to controls at Day 14. We found that both protein and messenger RNA expression of cyclooxygenase-2, prostaglandin E2, prostanoid receptor-1, tumour necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β were consistently higher in the forebrain of pups with intraventricular haemorrhage relative to pups without intraventricular haemorrhage. However, cyclooxygenase-1 and prostanoid receptor 2–4 levels were comparable in pups with and without intraventricular haemorrhage. Cyclooxygenase-2, prostanoid receptor-1 or tumour necrosis factor-α inhibition reduced inflammatory cell infiltration, apoptosis, neuronal degeneration and gliosis

  12. Radiolabeling of monoclonal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (VEGFR 1) with (177)Lu for potential use in radioimmunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, So-Young; Hong, Young-Don; Pyun, Mi-Sun; Felipe, Penelope M; Choi, Sun-Ju

    2009-01-01

    The main goal of this study was to optimize the radioimmunoconjugation of monoclonal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (VEGFR 1) with (177)Lu as a potential angiogenic molecular tracer for radioimmunotherapy (RIT). For a successful radiolabeling, we chose cysteine derivative DTPA-NCS as the bifunctional chelating agent and optimized radiolabeling condition with modifications on the factors such as the reaction time and molar ratio which are known to be very critical in radiolabeling. Under the optimized conditions, radiolabeling yield was greater than 99%. Immunoactivity of the radioimmunoconjugate was investigated using combinations of radioanalytical and bioanalytical techniques (ITLC-SG, Cyclone phosphorimager, and SDS-PAGE). For biological evaluations we carried out the cell binding assay and biodistribution study using mice bearing Calu6 non-small cell lung cancer xenografts. The biodistribution study showed high specificity in accumulating in tumor tissues where the tumor-to-blood ratio was 3.25:1 24h post-injection. In conclusion, the anti-VEGFR1 monoclonal antibody for angiogenesis targeting was effectively radioconjugated with (177)Lu. This radioimmunoconjugate is applicable to detect of angiogenesis sites in various diseases and treat tumors overexpressing VEGFR 1.

  13. Tumour necrosis factor receptor 1 and mortality in a multi-ethnic cohort: the Northern Manhattan Study

    PubMed Central

    Luna, Jorge M.; Moon, Yeseon; Liu, Khin; Spitalnik, Steven; Paik, Myunghee; Sacco, Ralph; Elkind, Mitchell S. V.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: to study the association between soluble tumour necrosis factor receptor 1 (sTNFR1) levels and mortality in the population-based Northern Manhattan Study (NOMAS). Methods: NOMAS is a multi-ethnic, community-based cohort study with mean 8.4 years of follow-up. sTNFR1 was measured using ELISA. Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals (HR, 95% CI) for the association of sTNFR1 with risk of all-cause mortality after adjusting for relevant confounders. Results: sTNFR1 measurements were available in 1,862 participants (mean age 69.2 ± 10.2 years) with 512 all-cause deaths. Median sTNFR1 was 2.28 ng/ml. Those with sTNFR1 levels in the highest quartile (Q4), compared with those with sTNFR1 in the lowest quartile (Q1), were at an increased risk of all-cause mortality (adjusted HR: 1.8, 95% CI: 1.4–2.4) and non-vascular mortality (adjusted HR: 2.5, 95% CI: 1.5–3.6), but not vascular mortality (adjusted HR: 1.3, 95% CI: 0.9–1.9). There were interactions between sTNFR1 quartiles and medical insurance-status [likelihood ratio test (LRT) with 3 degrees of freedom, Pinteraction = 0.02] and alcohol consumption (LRT with 3 degrees of freedom, Pinteraction < 0.01) for all-cause mortality. In participants with no insurance or Medicaid, those with sTNFR1 in the top quartile had nearly a threefold increased risk of total mortality than the lowest quartile (adjusted HR: 2.9, 95% CI: 1.9–4.4). Conclusion: in this multi-ethnic cohort, sTNFR1 was associated with all-cause and non-vascular mortality, particularly among those of a lower socioeconomic status. PMID:23321203

  14. Investigation of allosteric modulation mechanism of metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 by molecular dynamics simulations, free energy and weak interaction analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Qifeng; Yao, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGlu1), which belongs to class C G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), can be coupled with G protein to transfer extracellular signal by dimerization and allosteric regulation. Unraveling the dimer packing and allosteric mechanism can be of great help for understanding specific regulatory mechanism and designing more potential negative allosteric modulator (NAM). Here, we report molecular dynamics simulation studies of the modulation mechanism of FITM on the wild type, T815M and Y805A mutants of mGlu1 through weak interaction analysis and free energy calculation. The weak interaction analysis demonstrates that van der Waals (vdW) and hydrogen bonding play an important role on the dimer packing between six cholesterol molecules and mGlu1 as well as the interaction between allosteric sites T815, Y805 and FITM in wild type, T815M and Y805A mutants of mGlu1. Besides, the results of free energy calculations indicate that secondary binding pocket is mainly formed by the residues Thr748, Cys746, Lys811 and Ser735 except for FITM-bound pocket in crystal structure. Our results can not only reveal the dimer packing and allosteric regulation mechanism, but also can supply useful information for the design of potential NAM of mGlu1. PMID:26887338

  15. Investigation of allosteric modulation mechanism of metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 by molecular dynamics simulations, free energy and weak interaction analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Qifeng; Yao, Xiaojun

    2016-02-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGlu1), which belongs to class C G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), can be coupled with G protein to transfer extracellular signal by dimerization and allosteric regulation. Unraveling the dimer packing and allosteric mechanism can be of great help for understanding specific regulatory mechanism and designing more potential negative allosteric modulator (NAM). Here, we report molecular dynamics simulation studies of the modulation mechanism of FITM on the wild type, T815M and Y805A mutants of mGlu1 through weak interaction analysis and free energy calculation. The weak interaction analysis demonstrates that van der Waals (vdW) and hydrogen bonding play an important role on the dimer packing between six cholesterol molecules and mGlu1 as well as the interaction between allosteric sites T815, Y805 and FITM in wild type, T815M and Y805A mutants of mGlu1. Besides, the results of free energy calculations indicate that secondary binding pocket is mainly formed by the residues Thr748, Cys746, Lys811 and Ser735 except for FITM-bound pocket in crystal structure. Our results can not only reveal the dimer packing and allosteric regulation mechanism, but also can supply useful information for the design of potential NAM of mGlu1.

  16. A Functional Switch in Tonic GABA Currents Alters the Output of Central Amygdala Corticotropin Releasing Factor Receptor-1 Neurons Following Chronic Ethanol Exposure.

    PubMed

    Herman, Melissa A; Contet, Candice; Roberto, Marisa

    2016-10-19

    The corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) system in the central amygdala (CeA) has been implicated in the effects of acute ethanol and the development of alcohol dependence. We previously demonstrated that CRF receptor 1 (CRF1) neurons comprise a specific component of the CeA microcircuitry that is selectively engaged by acute ethanol. To investigate the impact of chronic ethanol exposure on inhibitory signaling in CRF1+ CeA neurons, we used CRF1:GFP mice subjected to chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) inhalation and examined changes in local inhibitory control, the effects of acute ethanol, and the output of these neurons from the CeA. Following CIE, CRF1+ neurons displayed decreased phasic inhibition and a complete loss of tonic inhibition that persisted into withdrawal. CRF1- neurons showed a cell type-specific upregulation of both phasic and tonic signaling with CIE, the latter of which persists into withdrawal and is likely mediated by δ subunit-containing GABAA receptors. The loss of tonic inhibition with CIE was seen in CRF1+ and CRF1- neurons that project out of the CeA and into the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. CRF1+ projection neurons displayed an increased baseline firing rate and loss of sensitivity to acute ethanol following CIE. These data demonstrate that chronic ethanol exposure produces profound and long-lasting changes in local inhibitory control of the CeA, resulting in an increase in the output of the CeA and the CRF1 receptor system, in particular. These cellular changes could underlie the behavioral manifestations of alcohol dependence and potentially contribute to the pathology of addiction. The corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) system in the central amygdala (CeA) has been implicated in the effects of acute and chronic ethanol. We showed previously that CRF receptor 1-expressing (CRF1+) neurons in the CeA are under tonic inhibitory control and are differentially regulated by acute ethanol (Herman et al., 2013). Here we show that

  17. A Functional Switch in Tonic GABA Currents Alters the Output of Central Amygdala Corticotropin Releasing Factor Receptor-1 Neurons Following Chronic Ethanol Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Contet, Candice; Roberto, Marisa

    2016-01-01

    The corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) system in the central amygdala (CeA) has been implicated in the effects of acute ethanol and the development of alcohol dependence. We previously demonstrated that CRF receptor 1 (CRF1) neurons comprise a specific component of the CeA microcircuitry that is selectively engaged by acute ethanol. To investigate the impact of chronic ethanol exposure on inhibitory signaling in CRF1+ CeA neurons, we used CRF1:GFP mice subjected to chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) inhalation and examined changes in local inhibitory control, the effects of acute ethanol, and the output of these neurons from the CeA. Following CIE, CRF1+ neurons displayed decreased phasic inhibition and a complete loss of tonic inhibition that persisted into withdrawal. CRF1− neurons showed a cell type-specific upregulation of both phasic and tonic signaling with CIE, the latter of which persists into withdrawal and is likely mediated by δ subunit-containing GABAA receptors. The loss of tonic inhibition with CIE was seen in CRF1+ and CRF1− neurons that project out of the CeA and into the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. CRF1+ projection neurons displayed an increased baseline firing rate and loss of sensitivity to acute ethanol following CIE. These data demonstrate that chronic ethanol exposure produces profound and long-lasting changes in local inhibitory control of the CeA, resulting in an increase in the output of the CeA and the CRF1 receptor system, in particular. These cellular changes could underlie the behavioral manifestations of alcohol dependence and potentially contribute to the pathology of addiction. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) system in the central amygdala (CeA) has been implicated in the effects of acute and chronic ethanol. We showed previously that CRF receptor 1-expressing (CRF1+) neurons in the CeA are under tonic inhibitory control and are differentially regulated by acute ethanol (Herman et al

  18. Assessment of Lipocalin 2, Clusterin, Soluble Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-1, Interleukin-6, Homocysteine, and Uric Acid Levels in Patients with Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Kesli, Recep; Kurtipek, Gulcan Saylam; Ozturk, Perihan

    2014-01-01

    Background. Chronic inflammation may play a role in psoriasis pathogenesis. Lipocalin 2, clusterin, soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 (sTNFR-1), interleukin-6, homocysteine, and uric acid are inflammatory and/or biochemical markers. However, both the roles of these markers and the pathogenesis of psoriasis are unknown. Objective. The aim of this study was to investigate serum levels of lipocalin 2, clusterin, sTNFR-1, interleukin-6, homocysteine, and uric acid in patients and controls groups. Methods. Fifty-six patients with psoriasis and 33 healthy controls were included in the study. Serum concentrations of the markers were evaluated by ELISA. The Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) was evaluated in all psoriasis patients. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated by dividing weight (kg) by height (m) squared. Results. The serum value of lipocalin and sTNFR-1 were significantly higher in psoriasis patients than in controls (resp., P < 0.001, P < 0.05). The others showed no significant differences between psoriasis and the control groups (all of them P > 0.05). The mean PASI score in the patient group was 8.3 ± 6.5. Conclusions. These findings suggest that lipocalin 2 and sTNFR-1 might play a role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis and can be used as markers of the disease. PMID:24803721

  19. Protease-Activated Receptor 1 and Hematopoietic Cell Tissue Factor Are Required for Hepatic Steatosis in Mice Fed a Western Diet

    PubMed Central

    Kassel, Karen M.; Owens, A. Phillip; Rockwell, Cheryl E.; Sullivan, Bradley P.; Wang, Ruipeng; Tawfik, Ossama; Li, Guodong; Guo, Grace L.; Mackman, Nigel; Luyendyk, James P.

    2011-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the hepatic manifestation of obesity and metabolic syndrome and contributes to increased risk of cardiovascular disease and liver-related morbidity and mortality. Indeed, obese patients with metabolic syndrome generate greater amounts of thrombin, an indication of coagulation cascade activation. However, the role of the coagulation cascade in Western diet–induced NAFLD has not been investigated. Using an established mouse model of Western diet–induced NAFLD, we tested whether the thrombin receptor protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR-1) and hematopoietic cell–derived tissue factor (TF) contribute to hepatic steatosis. In association with hepatic steatosis, plasma thrombin-antithrombin levels and hepatic fibrin deposition increased significantly in C57Bl/6J mice fed a Western diet for 3 months. PAR-1 deficiency reduced hepatic inflammation, particularly monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 expression and macrophage accumulation. In addition, PAR-1 deficiency was associated with reduced steatosis in mice fed a Western diet, including reduced liver triglyceride accumulation and CD36 expression. Similar to PAR-1 deficiency, hematopoietic cell TF deficiency was associated with reduced inflammation and reduced steatosis in livers of low-density lipoprotein receptor–deficient mice fed a Western diet. Moreover, hematopoietic cell TF deficiency reduced hepatic fibrin deposition. These studies indicate that PAR-1 and hematopoietic cell TF are required for liver inflammation and steatosis in mice fed a Western diet. PMID:21907177

  20. A correlation between decreased parathyroid α-Klotho and fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 expression with pathological category and parathyroid gland volume in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Yan, Junfang; Jingbo, Chen; Wang, Deguang; Xie, Shengxue; Yuan, Liang; Zhong, Xing; Hao, Li

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate α-Klotho and fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) expression in hyperplastic parathyroid glands, as well as their role in the development of renal hyperparathyroidism. Hyperplastic parathyroid glands (n = 90) were obtained from 24 patients who received parathyroidectomy due to secondary renal hyperparathyroidism. Normal parathyroid tissue was obtained from glands (n = 6) that were inadvertently removed, in conjunction with thyroidectomy, from patients with thyroid carcinoma. The expression of α-Klotho and FGFR1 in the parathyroid tissue was detected using immunohistochemical staining. The expression of α-Klotho and FGFR1 was significantly reduced in the hyperplastic parathyroid tissue compared to that in the normal parathyroid tissue. The expression of α-Klotho decreased further with increasing parathyroid pathology. A significant positive correlation was observed between α-Klotho and FGFR1 (r = 0.38, P < 0.01). FGFR1 (r = -0.21, P < 0.05) and α-Klotho (r = -0.42, P < 0.01) were negatively correlated with the volume of the hyperplastic parathyroid tissue. The expression of α-Klotho and FGFR1 decreases in the parathyroid glands of dialysis patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism, and this decrease may play an important role in the pathogenesis of secondary renal hyperparathyroidism.

  1. Association between single nucleotide polymorphisms of the estrogen receptor 1 and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand genes and bone mineral density in postmenopausal Taiwanese.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Bi-Hua; Wang, Tzu-Hao; Kang, Hong-Yo; Lin, Ying-Chu; Huang, Chun-Chen; Hsu, Te-Yao; Kung, Fu-Tsai; Huang, Ko-En

    2013-06-01

    To investigate the relationship between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the genes encoding the estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1) and the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL) and bone mineral density (BMD) in postmenopausal Taiwanese. Five ESR1 SNPs and three RANKL SNPs in 467 women were genotyped. Results of genotyping were correlated with BMD that had been adjusted for body mass index (BMI), age, and years after menopause. Those with the ESR1 Crs1884054 allele were found to have a lower BMD at LS2-4/Lateral view (p = 0.005 and permutated p = 0.046), and those with the ESR1 haplotype Trs2234693-Ars922996 had a higher risk for low BMD also at LS2-4/Lat (OR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.1-2.9). In addition, women without the RANKL haplotype Grs2148072-Crs2200287-Grs922996 had a higher risk for low BMD at LS1-4/AP (OR = 2.09, 95% CI = 1.21 ∼ 3.64). Stratification analyses revealed that those with ESR1 AArs1884054 and RANKL Ars2148072 (p = 0.032) or RANKL Trs2200287 (p = 0.007) had a lower BMD at LS1-4/AP. Genotypes of these SNPs of ESR1 and RANKL may help us predict the osteoporosis risk in menopausal women. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Deregulation of Flk-1/vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 in fibroblast growth factor receptor-1-deficient vascular stem cell development.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, Peetra; Rolny, Charlotte; Jakobsson, Lars; Wikner, Charlotte; Wu, Yan; Hicklin, Daniel J; Claesson-Welsh, Lena

    2004-03-15

    We have employed embryoid bodies derived from murine embryonal stem cells to study effects on vascular development induced by fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 and FGF receptor-1, in comparison to the established angiogenic factor vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A and its receptor VEGF receptor-2. Exogenous FGF-2 promoted formation of morphologically distinct, long slender vessels in the embryoid bodies, whereas VEGF-A-treated bodies displayed a compact plexus of capillaries. FGF-2 stimulation of embryonal stem cells under conditions where VEGF-A/VEGFR-2 function was blocked, led to formation of endothelial cell clusters, which failed to develop into vessels. FGFR-1(-/-) embryoid bodies responded to VEGF-A by establishment of the characteristic vascular plexus, but FGF-2 had no effect on vascular development in the absence of FGFR-1. The FGFR-1(-/-) embryoid bodies displayed considerably increased basal level of vessel formation, detected by immunohistochemical staining for platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM)/CD31. This basal vascularization was blocked by neutralizing antibodies against VEGFR-2 or VEGF-A and biochemical analyses indicated changes in regulation of VEGFR-2 in the absence of FGFR-1 expression. We conclude that VEGF-A/VEGFR-2-dependent vessel formation occurs in the absence of FGF-2/FGFR-1, which, however, serve to modulate vascular development.

  3. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-receptor 1 and 2 mediate homeostatic synaptic plasticity of denervated mouse dentate granule cells

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Denise; Deller, Thomas; Vlachos, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Neurological diseases are often accompanied by neuronal cell death and subsequent deafferentation of connected brain regions. To study functional changes after denervation we generated entorhino-hippocampal slice cultures, transected the entorhinal pathway, and denervated dentate granule cells in vitro. Our previous work revealed that partially denervated neurons respond to the loss of input with a compensatory, i.e., homeostatic, increase in their excitatory synaptic strength. TNFα maintains this denervation-induced homeostatic strengthening of excitatory synapses. Here, we used pharmacological approaches and mouse genetics to assess the role of TNF-receptor 1 and 2 in lesion-induced excitatory synaptic strengthening. Our experiments disclose that both TNF-receptors are involved in the regulation of denervation-induced synaptic plasticity. In line with this result TNF-receptor 1 and 2 mRNA-levels were upregulated after deafferentation in vitro. These findings implicate TNF-receptor signaling cascades in the regulation of homeostatic plasticity of denervated networks and suggest an important role for TNFα-signaling in the course of neurological diseases accompanied by deafferentation. PMID:26246237

  4. Single-domain antibodies that compete with the natural ligand fibroblast growth factor block the internalization of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1

    SciTech Connect

    Veggiani, Gianluca; Ossolengo, Giuseppe; Aliprandi, Marisa; Cavallaro, Ugo; Marco, Ario de

    2011-05-20

    Highlights: {yields} Recombinant antibodies for FGFR1 were isolated from a llama naive library in VHH format. {yields} These antibodies compete with the natural ligand FGF-2 for the same epitope on FGFR1. {yields} The antibody competition inhibits the FGF-2-dependent internalization of FGFR1. -- Abstract: Single-domain antibodies in VHH format specific for fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) were isolated from a phage-display llama naive library. In particular, phage elution in the presence of the natural receptor ligand fibroblast growth factor (FGF) allowed for the identification of recombinant antibodies that compete with FGF for the same region on the receptor surface. These antibodies posses a relatively low affinity for FGFR1 and were never identified when unspecific elution conditions favoring highly affine binders were applied to panning procedures. Two populations of competitive antibodies were identified that labeled specifically the receptor-expressing cells in immunofluorescence and recognize distinct epitopes. Antibodies from both populations effectively prevented FGF-dependent internalization and nuclear accumulation of the receptor in cultured cells. This achievement indicates that these antibodies have a capacity to modulate the receptor physiology and, therefore, constitute powerful reagents for basic research and a potential lead for therapeutic applications.

  5. A novel signaling pathway of tissue kallikrein in promoting keratinocyte migration: Activation of proteinase-activated receptor 1 and epidermal growth factor receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Lin; Chao, Lee; Chao, Julie

    2010-02-01

    Biological functions of tissue kallikrein (TK, KLK1) are mainly mediated by kinin generation and subsequent kinin B2 receptor activation. In this study, we investigated the potential role of TK and its signaling pathways in cultured human keratinocyte migration and in a rat skin wound healing model. Herein, we show that TK promoted cell migration and proliferation in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Inactive TK or kinin had no significant effect on cell migration. Interestingly, cell migration induced by active TK was not blocked by icatibant or L-NAME, indicating an event independent of kinin B2 receptor and nitric oxide formation. TK's stimulatory effect on cell migration was inhibited by small interfering RNA for proteinase-activated receptor 1 (PAR{sub 1}), and by PAR{sub 1} inhibitor. TK-induced migration was associated with increased phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), which was blocked by inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC), Src, EGFR and ERK. TK-induced cell migration and EGFR phosphorylation were blocked by metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitor, heparin, and antibodies against EGFR external domain, heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) and amphiregulin (AR). Local application of TK promoted skin wound healing in rats, whereas icatibant and EGFR inhibitor blocked TK's effect. Skin wound healing was further delayed by aprotinin and neutralizing TK antibody. This study demonstrates a novel role of TK in skin wound healing and uncovers new signaling pathways mediated by TK in promoting keratinocyte migration through activation of the PAR{sub 1}-PKC-Src-MMP pathway and HB-EGF/AR shedding-dependent EGFR transactivation.

  6. Mumps Virus SH Protein Inhibits NF-κB Activation by Interacting with Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor 1, Interleukin-1 Receptor 1, and Toll-Like Receptor 3 Complexes.

    PubMed

    Franz, Stephanie; Rennert, Paul; Woznik, Maria; Grützke, Josephine; Lüdde, Amy; Arriero Pais, Eva Maria; Finsterbusch, Tim; Geyer, Henriette; Mankertz, Annette; Friedrich, Nicole

    2017-09-15

    The mumps virus (MuV) small hydrophobic protein (SH) is a type I membrane protein expressed in infected cells. SH has been reported to interfere with innate immunity by inhibiting tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)-mediated apoptosis and NF-κB activation. To elucidate the underlying mechanism, we generated recombinant MuVs (rMuVs) expressing the SH protein with an N-terminal FLAG epitope or lacking SH expression due to the insertion of three stop codons into the SH gene. Using these viruses, we were able to show that SH reduces the phosphorylation of IKKβ, IκBα, and p65 as well as the translocation of p65 into the nucleus of infected A549 cells. Reporter gene assays revealed that SH interferes not only with TNF-α-mediated NF-κB activation but also with IL-1β- and poly(I·C)-mediated NF-κB activation, and that this inhibition occurs upstream of the NF-κB pathway components TRAF2, TRAF6, and TAK1. Since SH coimmunoprecipitated with tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1), RIP1, and IRAK1, we hypothesize that SH exerts its inhibitory function by interacting with TNFR1, interleukin-1 receptor type 1 (IL-1R1), and TLR3 complexes in the plasma membrane of infected cells.IMPORTANCE The MuV SH has been shown to impede TNF-α-mediated NF-κB activation and is therefore thought to contribute to viral immune evasion. However, the mechanisms by which SH mediates NF-κB inhibition remained largely unknown. In this study, we show that SH interacts with TNFR1, IL-1R1, and TLR3 complexes in infected cells. We thereby not only shed light on the mechanisms of SH-mediated NF-κB inhibition but also reveal that SH interferes with NF-κB activation induced by interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and double-stranded RNA. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  7. Effect of tumour necrosis factorreceptor 1 genetic deletion on carrageenan-induced acute inflammation: a comparison with etanercept

    PubMed Central

    Mazzon, E; Esposito, E; Di Paola, R; Muià, C; Crisafulli, C; Genovese, T; Caminiti, R; Meli, R; Bramanti, P; Cuzzocrea, S

    2008-01-01

    In the present study, we used tumour necrosis factorreceptor 1 knock-out mice (TNF-αR1KO) to evaluate an in vivo role of TNF-αR1 on the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. We used a murine model of carrageenan-induced acute inflammation (pleurisy), a preclinical model of airway inflammation. The data proved that TNF-αR1KO were resistant to carrageenan-induced acute inflammation compared with TNF-α wild-type mice. TNF-αR1KO showed a significant reduction in accumulation of pleural exudate and in the number of inflammatory cells, in lung infiltration of polymorphonuclear leucocytes and lipid peroxidation and showed a decreased production of nitrite/nitrate in pleural exudates. Furthermore, the intensity and degree of the adhesion molecule intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and P-selectin, Fas ligand (FasL), inducible nitric oxide sythase and nitrotyrosine determined by immunohistochemical analysis were reduced markedly in lung tissues from TNF-αR1KO at 4 h and 24 h after carrageenan injection. Moreover, TNF-α and interleukin-1β concentrations were reduced in inflamed areas and in pleural exudates from TNF-αR1KO. To support the results generated using pleural inflammation, carrageenan-induced paw oedema models were also performed. In order to elucidate whether the observed anti-inflammatory effects were related to the inhibition of TNF-α, we also investigated the effect of etanercept, a TNF-α soluble receptor construct, on carrageenan-induced pleurisy. The treatment with etanercept (5 mg/kg subcutaneously 2 h before the carrageenan injection) reduces markedly both laboratory and histological signs of carrageenan-induced pleurisy. Our results showed that administration of etanercept resulted in the same outcome as that of deletion of the TNF-αR1 receptor, adding a new insight to TNF-α as an excellent target by therapeutic applications. PMID:18505433

  8. Monoclonal Antibody Targeting of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 1c Ameliorates Obesity and Glucose Intolerance via Central Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Lelliott, Christopher J.; Ahnmark, Andrea; Admyre, Therese; Ahlstedt, Ingela; Irving, Lorraine; Keyes, Feenagh; Patterson, Laurel; Mumphrey, Michael B.; Bjursell, Mikael; Gorman, Tracy; Bohlooly-Y, Mohammad; Buchanan, Andrew; Harrison, Paula; Vaughan, Tristan; Berthoud, Hans-Rudolf; Lindén, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    We have generated a novel monoclonal antibody targeting human FGFR1c (R1c mAb) that caused profound body weight and body fat loss in diet-induced obese mice due to decreased food intake (with energy expenditure unaltered), in turn improving glucose control. R1c mAb also caused weight loss in leptin-deficient ob/ob mice, leptin receptor-mutant db/db mice, and in mice lacking either the melanocortin 4 receptor or the melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1. In addition, R1c mAb did not change hypothalamic mRNA expression levels of Agrp, Cart, Pomc, Npy, Crh, Mch, or Orexin, suggesting that R1c mAb could cause food intake inhibition and body weight loss via other mechanisms in the brain. Interestingly, peripherally administered R1c mAb accumulated in the median eminence, adjacent arcuate nucleus and in the circumventricular organs where it activated the early response gene c-Fos. As a plausible mechanism and coinciding with the initiation of food intake suppression, R1c mAb induced hypothalamic expression levels of the cytokines Monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 and 3 and ERK1/2 and p70 S6 kinase 1 activation. PMID:25427253

  9. Secondary amyloidosis in a patient carrying mutations in the familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) and tumour necrosis factor receptor-1 syndrome (TRAPS) genes.

    PubMed

    Clementi, Anna; Cruz, Dinna N; Granata, Antonio; Virzì, Grazia Maria; Battaglia, Giorgio

    2013-12-01

    Secondary amyloidosis (AA) is characterized by the extracellular tissue deposition of fibrils composed of fragments of an acute-phase reactant protein, serum amyloid A (SAA), due to chronic inflammatory diseases, infections and several neoplasms. AA amyloidosis may also complicate several hereditary diseases, where genetic factors play a pivotal role in the expression of amyloidosis. Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) and tumour necrosis factor receptor-1 syndrome (TRAPS) are the most frequently involved. We describe a case of a 21-year-old Romanian woman who presented at the 35th week of gestation with acute abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. The laboratory workup performed after delivery showed proteinuria in the nephrotic range and increased SAA protein. Kidney amyloid deposits were detected and genetic testing for secondary amyloidosis was performed identifying two mutations, one involving the gene of FMF (MEFV), and the other involving the tumour necrosis factor receptor-1 gene (TNFRSF1A). To our knowledge, this is the first case in the literature where secondary amyloidosis develops in a patient carrying mutations involving the genes of both FMF and TRAPS.

  10. Soluble complement receptor 1 is increased in patients with leukemia and after administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Sadallah, S; Lach, E; Schwarz, S; Gratwohl, A; Spertini, O; Schifferli, J A

    1999-01-01

    Complement receptor type 1 is expressed by erythrocytes and most leukocytes. A soluble form is shed from the leukocytes and found in plasma (sCR1). sCR1 is a powerful inhibitor of complement. We report an increased sCR1 in the plasma of leukemia patients, up to levels producing measurable complement inhibition. Half of the 180 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) had sCR1 levels above the normal range. The highest levels were observed in T-ALL (17 patients). The complement function of a T-ALL serum was improved by blocking sCR1 with a specific mAb (3D9). Measurements in 16 peripheral stein cell donors before and after granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) administration showed an increase in sCR1 (before, 43.8+/-15.4; at day 5, 118.3+/-44.7 ng/mL; P < 0.0001). This increase paralleled the increase in total leukocyte counts and was concomitant with de novo leukocyte mRNA CR1 expression in all three individuals tested. Whether pharmacological intervention may be used to up-regulate sCR1 so as to inhibit complement in vivo should be further investigated.

  11. The anti-vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 monoclonal antibody D16F7 inhibits invasiveness of human glioblastoma and glioblastoma stem cells.

    PubMed

    Atzori, Maria Grazia; Tentori, Lucio; Ruffini, Federica; Ceci, Claudia; Lisi, Lucia; Bonanno, Elena; Scimeca, Manuel; Eskilsson, Eskil; Daubon, Thomas; Miletic, Hrvoje; Ricci Vitiani, Lucia; Pallini, Roberto; Navarra, Pierluigi; Bjerkvig, Rolf; D'Atri, Stefania; Lacal, Pedro Miguel; Graziani, Grazia

    2017-08-10

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a highly migratory, invasive, and angiogenic brain tumor. Like vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A), placental growth factor (PlGF) promotes GBM angiogenesis. VEGF-A is a ligand for both VEGF receptor-1 (VEGFR-1) and VEGFR-2, while PlGF interacts exclusively with VEGFR-1. We recently generated the novel anti-VEGFR-1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) D16F7 that diminishes VEGFR-1 homodimerization/activation without affecting VEGF-A and PlGF binding. In the present study, we evaluated the expression of VEGFR-1 in human GBM tissue samples (n = 42) by immunohistochemistry, in cell lines (n = 6) and GBM stem cells (GSCs) (n = 18) by qRT-PCR and/or western blot analysis. In VEGFR-1 positive GBM or GSCs we also analyzed the ability of D16F7 to inhibit GBM invasiveness in response to VEGF-A and PlGF. Most of GBM specimens stained positively for VEGFR-1 and all but one GBM cell lines expressed VEGFR-1. On the other hand, in GSCs the expression of the receptor was heterogeneous. D16F7 reduced migration and invasion of VEGFR-1 positive GBM cell lines and patient-derived GSCs in response to VEGF-A and PlGF. Interestingly, this effect was also observed in VEGFR-1 positive GSCs transfected to over-express wild-type EGFR (EGFRwt(+)) or mutant EGFR (ligand binding domain-deficient EGFRvIII(+)). Furthermore, D16F7 suppressed intracellular signal transduction in VEGFR-1 over-expressing GBM cells by reducing receptor auto-phosphorylation at tyrosine 1213 and downstream Erk1/2 activation induced by receptor ligands. The results from this study suggest that VEGFR-1 is a relevant target for GBM therapy and that D16F7-derived humanized mAbs warrant further investigation.

  12. Serotoninergic receptor 1A in the sudden infant death syndrome brainstem medulla and associations with clinical risk factors.

    PubMed

    Machaalani, Rita; Say, Meichien; Waters, Karen A

    2009-03-01

    The immunoreactivity of the serotoninergic receptor subtype 1A (5HT(1A)R) was quantitatively analyzed in the human infant brainstem medulla (caudal and rostral levels). We hypothesized that immunoreactivity of 5HT(1A)R would be reduced in infants diagnosed with sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). In particular that those infants with known clinical risk factors (including cigarette smoke exposure, bed sharing and sleep position) would have greater changes than those without clinical risks. Comparing SIDS (n = 67) to infants who died suddenly with another diagnosis (non-SIDS, n = 25), we found decreased 5HT(1A)R immunoreactivity in the majority of the nuclei studied at the rostral medulla level including dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMNV), nucleus of the solitary tract, vestibular, and inferior olivary nucleus (ION). There was a significant relationship with all risk factors for 5HT(1A)R, especially for DMNV, suggesting that 5HT(1A)Rs are highly vulnerable to various insults within the SIDS DMNV. This study not only provides further evidence of abnormalities within the brainstem serotoninergic system of SIDS infants, but also shows that these changes may be associated with exposure to clinical risk factors.

  13. Tumor necrosis factor inhibits ligand-stimulated EGF receptor activation through a TNF receptor 1-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    McElroy, Steven J.; Frey, Mark R.; Yan, Fang; Edelblum, Karen L.; Goettel, Jeremy A.; John, Sutha; Polk, D. Brent

    2008-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) are key regulators in the intricate balance maintaining intestinal homeostasis. Previous work from our laboratory shows that TNF attenuates ligand-driven EGF receptor (EGFR) phosphorylation in intestinal epithelial cells. To identify the mechanisms underlying this effect, we examined EGFR phosphorylation in cells lacking individual TNF receptors. TNF attenuated EGF-stimulated EGFR phosphorylation in wild-type and TNFR2−/−, but not TNFR1−/−, mouse colon epithelial (MCE) cells. Reexpression of wild-type TNFR1 in TNFR1−/− MCE cells rescued TNF-induced EGFR inhibition, but expression of TNFR1 deletion mutant constructs lacking the death domain (DD) of TNFR1 did not, implicating this domain in EGFR downregulation. Blockade of p38 MAPK, but not MEK, activation of ERK rescued EGF-stimulated phosphorylation in the presence of TNF, consistent with the ability of TNFR1 to stimulate p38 phosphorylation. TNF promoted p38-dependent EGFR internalization in MCE cells, suggesting that desensitization is achieved by reducing receptor accessible to ligand. Taken together, these data indicate that TNF activates TNFR1 by DD- and p38-dependent mechanisms to promote EGFR internalization, with potential impact on EGF-induced proliferation and migration key processes that promote healing in inflammatory intestinal diseases. PMID:18467504

  14. In Silico Investigation of the Neurotensin Receptor 1 Binding Site: Overlapping Binding Modes for Small Molecule Antagonists and the Endogenous Peptide Agonist.

    PubMed

    Lückmann, Michael; Holst, Birgitte; Schwartz, Thue W; Frimurer, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    The neurotensin receptor 1 (NTSR1) belongs to the family of 7TM, G protein-coupled receptors, and is activated by the 13-amino-acid peptide neurotensin (NTS) that has been shown to play important roles in neurological disorders and the promotion of cancer cells. Recently, a high-resolution x-ray crystal structure of NTSR1 in complex with NTS8-13 has been determined, providing novel insights into peptide ligand recognition by 7TM receptors. SR48692, a potent and selective small molecule antagonist has previously been used extensively as a tool compound to study NTSR1 receptor signaling properties. To investigate the binding mode of SR48692 and other small molecule compounds to NTSR1, we applied an Automated Ligand-guided Backbone Ensemble Receptor Optimization protocol (ALiBERO), taking receptor flexibility and ligand knowledge into account. Structurally overlapping binding poses for SR48692 and NTS8-13 were observed, despite their distinct chemical nature and inverse pharmacological profiles. The optimized models showed significantly improved ligand recognition in a large-scale virtual screening assessment compared to the crystal structure. Our models provide new insights into small molecule ligand binding to NTSR1 and could facilitate the structure-based design of non-peptide ligands for the evaluation of the pharmacological potential of NTSR1 in neurological disorders and cancer. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Brefeldin A-Inhibited Guanine Nucleotide-Exchange Factor 1 (BIG1) Governs the Recruitment of Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-Associated Factor 2 (TRAF2) to Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor 1 (TNFR1) Signaling Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Takuya; Tsuchida, Mei; Kogue, Yosuke; Spadini, Christian; Hirata, Yusuke; Matsuzawa, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 2 (TRAF2) is a critical mediator of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) signaling. However, the regulatory mechanisms of TRAF2 are not fully understood. Here we show evidence that TRAF2 requires brefeldin A-inhibited guanine nucleotide-exchange factor 1 (BIG1) to be recruited into TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1) signaling complexes. In BIG1 knockdown cells, TNF-α-induced c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation was attenuated and the sensitivity to TNF-α-induced apoptosis was increased. Since these trends correlated well with those of TRAF2 deficient cells as previously demonstrated, we tested whether BIG1 functions as an upstream regulator of TRAF2 in TNFR1 signaling. As expected, we found that knockdown of BIG1 suppressed TNF-α-dependent ubiquitination of TRAF2 that is required for JNK activation, and impaired the recruitment of TRAF2 to the TNFR1 signaling complex (complex I). Moreover, we found that the recruitment of TRAF2 to the death-inducing signaling complex termed complex II was also impaired in BIG1 knockdown cells. These results suggest that BIG1 is a key component of the machinery that drives TRAF2 to the signaling complexes formed after TNFR1 activation. Thus, our data demonstrate a novel and unexpected function of BIG1 that regulates TNFR1 signaling by targeting TRAF2. PMID:27834853

  16. Involvement of leukotriene B4 receptor 1 signaling in platelet-activating factor-mediated neutrophil degranulation and chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Gaudreault, Eric; Stankova, Jana; Rola-Pleszczynski, Marek

    2005-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent lipid mediator of inflammation that can act on human neutrophils. When neutrophils are stimulated with PAF at concentrations greater than 10 nM, a double peak of intracellular calcium mobilization is observed. The second calcium peak observed in PAF-treated neutrophils has already been suggested to come from the production of endogenous leukotriene B4 (LTB4). Here we demonstrate the involvement of endogenous LTB4 production and subsequent activation of the high affinity LTB4 receptor (BLT1) in this second calcium mobilization peak observed after stimulation with PAF. We also show that the second, but not the first peak, could be desensitized by prior exposure to LTB4. Moreover, when neutrophils were pre-treated with pharmacological inhibitors of LTB4 production or with the specific BLT1 antagonist, U75302, PAF-mediated neutrophil degranulation was inhibited by more than 50%. On the other hand, pre-treating neutrophils with the PAF receptor specific antagonist (WEB2086) did not prevent any LTB4-induced degranulation. Also, when human neutrophils were pre-treated with U75302, PAF-mediated chemotaxis was reduced by more than 60%. These data indicate the involvement of BLT1 signaling in PAF-mediated neutrophil activities.

  17. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptor-1 is involved in cardiac noradrenergic activity observed during naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Laorden, Elena; García-Carmona, Juan-Antonio; Baroja-Mazo, Alberto; Romecín, Paola; Atucha, Noemí M; Milanés, María-Victoria; Laorden, María-Luisa

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose The negative affective states of withdrawal involve the recruitment of brain and peripheral stress circuitry [noradrenergic activity, induction of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenocortical (HPA) axis and activation of heat shock proteins (Hsps)]. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) pathways are important mediators in the negative symptoms of opioid withdrawal. We performed a series of experiments to characterize the role of the CRF1 receptor in the response of stress systems to morphine withdrawal and its effect in the heart using genetically engineered mice lacking functional CRF1 receptors. Experimental Approach Wild-type and CRF1 receptor-knockout mice were treated with increasing doses of morphine. Precipitated withdrawal was induced by naloxone. Plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone levels, the expression of myocardial Hsp27, Hsp27 phosphorylated at Ser82, membrane (MB)- COMT, soluble (S)-COMT protein and NA turnover were evaluated by RIA, immunoblotting and HPLC. Key Results During morphine withdrawal we observed an enhancement of NA turnover in parallel with an increase in mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) in wild-type mice. In addition, naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal induced an activation of HPA axis and Hsp27. The principal finding of the present study was that plasma ACTH and corticosterone levels, MB-COMT, S-COMT, NA turnover, and Hsp27 expression and activation observed during morphine withdrawal were significantly inhibited in the CRF1 receptor-knockout mice. Conclusion and Implications Our results demonstrate that CRF/CRF1 receptor activation may contribute to stress-induced cardiovascular dysfunction after naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal and suggest that CRF/CRF1 receptor pathways could contribute to cardiovascular disease associated with opioid addiction. PMID:24490859

  18. Photochemically enhanced binding of small molecules to the tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 inhibits the binding of TNF-[alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, Percy H.; Scherle, Peggy A.; Muckelbauer, Jodi K.; Voss, Matthew E.; Liu, Rui-qin; Thompson III, Lorin A.; Xu, Meizhong; Lo, Yvonne C.; Li, Zhong; Strzemienski, Paul; Yang, Gengjie; Falahatpishen, Nikoo; Farrow, Neil A.; Tebben, Andrew J.; Underwood, Denis; Trzaskos, James M.; Friedman, Steven M.; Newton, Robert C.; Decicco, Carl P.

    2010-03-05

    The binding of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-{alpha}) to the type-1 TNF receptor (TNFRc1) plays an important role in inflammation. Despite the clinical success of biologics (antibodies, soluble receptors) for treating TNF-based autoimmune conditions, no potent small molecule antagonists have been developed. Our screening of chemical libraries revealed that N-alkyl 5-arylidene-2-thioxo-1,3-thiazolidin-4-ones were antagonists of this protein-protein interaction. After chemical optimization, we discovered IW927, which potently disrupted the binding of TNF-{alpha} to TNFRc1 (IC{sub 50} = 50 nM) and also blocked TNF-stimulated phosphorylation of I{kappa}-B in Ramos cells (IC{sub 50} = 600 nM). This compound did not bind detectably to the related cytokine receptors TNFRc2 or CD40, and did not display any cytotoxicity at concentrations as high as 100 {micro}M. Detailed evaluation of this and related molecules revealed that compounds in this class are 'photochemically enhanced' inhibitors, in that they bind reversibly to the TNFRc1 with weak affinity (ca. 40-100 mM) and then covalently modify the receptor via a photochemical reaction. We obtained a crystal structure of IV703 (a close analog of IW927) bound to the TNFRc1. This structure clearly revealed that one of the aromatic rings of the inhibitor was covalently linked to the receptor through the main-chain nitrogen of Ala-62, a residue that has already been implicated in the binding of TNF-{alpha} to the TNFRc1. When combined with the fact that our inhibitors are reversible binders in light-excluded conditions, the results of the crystallography provide the basis for the rational design of nonphotoreactive inhibitors of the TNF-{alpha}-TNFRc1 interaction.

  19. Photochemically enhanced binding of small molecules to the tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 inhibits the binding of TNF-alpha.

    PubMed

    Carter, P H; Scherle, P A; Muckelbauer, J K; Voss, M E; Liu, R Q; Thompson, L A; Tebben, A J; Solomon, K A; Lo, Y C; Li, Z; Strzemienski, P; Yang, G; Falahatpisheh, N; Xu, M; Wu, Z; Farrow, N A; Ramnarayan, K; Wang, J; Rideout, D; Yalamoori, V; Domaille, P; Underwood, D J; Trzaskos, J M; Friedman, S M; Newton, R C; Decicco, C P; Muckelbauer, J A

    2001-10-09

    The binding of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) to the type-1 TNF receptor (TNFRc1) plays an important role in inflammation. Despite the clinical success of biologics (antibodies, soluble receptors) for treating TNF-based autoimmune conditions, no potent small molecule antagonists have been developed. Our screening of chemical libraries revealed that N-alkyl 5-arylidene-2-thioxo-1,3-thiazolidin-4-ones were antagonists of this protein-protein interaction. After chemical optimization, we discovered IW927, which potently disrupted the binding of TNF-alpha to TNFRc1 (IC(50) = 50 nM) and also blocked TNF-stimulated phosphorylation of Ikappa-B in Ramos cells (IC(50) = 600 nM). This compound did not bind detectably to the related cytokine receptors TNFRc2 or CD40, and did not display any cytotoxicity at concentrations as high as 100 microM. Detailed evaluation of this and related molecules revealed that compounds in this class are "photochemically enhanced" inhibitors, in that they bind reversibly to the TNFRc1 with weak affinity (ca. 40-100 microM) and then covalently modify the receptor via a photochemical reaction. We obtained a crystal structure of IV703 (a close analog of IW927) bound to the TNFRc1. This structure clearly revealed that one of the aromatic rings of the inhibitor was covalently linked to the receptor through the main-chain nitrogen of Ala-62, a residue that has already been implicated in the binding of TNF-alpha to the TNFRc1. When combined with the fact that our inhibitors are reversible binders in light-excluded conditions, the results of the crystallography provide the basis for the rational design of nonphotoreactive inhibitors of the TNF-alpha-TNFRc1 interaction.

  20. Soluble Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor 1 Released by Skin-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Is Critical for Inhibiting Th17 Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Fang; Zhang, Lingyun; Liu, Zhaoyuan; Yan, Sha; Xu, Zhenyao; Bai, Jing; Zhu, Huiyuan; Lou, Fangzhou; Cai, Wei; Sun, Yang; Gao, Yuanyuan; Wang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    T helper 17 (Th17) cells play an important role in multiple sclerosis (MS) and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Th17 cell differentiation from naïve T cells can be induced in vitro by the cytokines transforming growth factor β1 and interleukin-6. However, it remains unclear whether other regulatory factors control the differentiation of Th17 cells. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have emerged as a promising candidate for inhibiting Th17 cell differentiation and autoimmune diseases. Despite the fact that several molecules have been linked to the immunomodulatory function of MSCs, many other key MSC-secreted regulators that are involved in inhibiting Th17 cell polarization are ill-defined. In this study, we demonstrated that the intraperitoneal administration of skin-derived MSCs (S-MSCs) substantially ameliorated the development of EAE in mice. We found that the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, a key mediator in the pathophysiology of MS and EAE, was capable of promoting Th17 cell differentiation. Moreover, under inflammatory conditions, we demonstrated that S-MSCs produced high amounts of soluble TNF receptor 1 (sTNFR1), which binds TNF-α and antagonizes its function. Knockdown of sTNFR1 in S-MSCs decreased their inhibitory effect on Th17 cell differentiation ex vivo and in vivo. Thus, our data identified sTNFR1 and its target TNF-α as critical regulators for Th17 cell differentiation, suggesting a previously unrecognized mechanism for MSC therapy in Th17-mediated autoimmune diseases. Significance This study showed that administration of skin-derived mesenchymal stem cells (S-MSCs) was able to alleviate the clinical score of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by inhibiting the differentiation of T helper 17 (Th17) cells. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α is a critical cytokine for promoting Th17 cell differentiation. It was discovered that activated S-MSCs produced high amount of soluble TNF receptor 1

  1. Ectodomain Shedding of Lymphatic Vessel Endothelial Hyaluronan Receptor 1 (LYVE-1) Is Induced by Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A (VEGF-A)*

    PubMed Central

    Nishida-Fukuda, Hisayo; Araki, Ryoichi; Shudou, Masachika; Okazaki, Hidenori; Tomono, Yasuko; Nakayama, Hironao; Fukuda, Shinji; Sakaue, Tomohisa; Shirakata, Yuji; Sayama, Koji; Hashimoto, Koji; Detmar, Michael; Higashiyama, Shigeki; Hirakawa, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor 1 (LYVE-1), a type I transmembrane glycoprotein, is known as one of the most specific lymphatic vessel markers in the skin. In this study, we found that the ectodomain of LYVE-1 undergoes proteolytic cleavage, and this process produces soluble LYVE-1. We further identified the cleavage site for ectodomain shedding and generated an uncleavable mutant of LYVE-1. In lymphatic endothelial cells, ectodomain shedding of LYVE-1 was induced by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A, an important factor for angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis under pathological conditions. VEGF-A-induced LYVE-1 ectodomain shedding was mediated via the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and a disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM) 17. Wild-type LYVE-1, but not uncleavable LYVE-1, promoted migration of lymphatic endothelial cells in response to VEGF-A. Immunostaining analyses in human psoriasis skin lesions and VEGF-A transgenic mouse skin suggested that the ectodomain shedding of LYVE-1 occurred in lymphatic vessels undergoing chronic inflammation. These results indicate that the ectodomain shedding of LYVE-1 might be involved in promoting pathological lymphangiogenesis. PMID:26966180

  2. A20 inhibits tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha-induced apoptosis by disrupting recruitment of TRADD and RIP to the TNF receptor 1 complex in Jurkat T cells.

    PubMed

    He, Kai-Li; Ting, Adrian T

    2002-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1) can trigger distinct signaling pathways leading to either the activation of NF-kappaB transcription factors or apoptosis. NF-kappaB activation results in the expression of antiapoptotic genes that inhibit the apoptosis pathway that is activated in parallel. However, the molecular mechanism of this inhibition remains poorly characterized. We have isolated a Jurkat T-cell mutant that exhibits enhanced sensitivity to TNF-induced apoptosis as a result of a deficiency in I-kappaB kinase gamma (IKKgamma)/NEMO, an essential component of the IKK complex and NF-kappaB pathway. We show here that the zinc finger protein A20 is an NF-kappaB-inducible gene that can protect the IKKgamma-deficient cells from TNF-induced apoptosis by disrupting the recruitment of the death domain signaling molecules TRADD and RIP to the receptor signaling complex. Our study, together with reports on the role of other antiapoptotic proteins such as c-FLIP and c-IAP, suggests that, in order to ensure an effective shutdown of the apoptotic pathway, TNF induces multiple NF-kappaB-dependent genes that inhibit successive steps in the TNFR1 death signaling pathway.

  3. Plasma FGF21 concentrations, adipose fibroblast growth factor receptor-1 and β-klotho expression decrease with fasting in northern elephant seals.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Miwa; Lee, Andrew Y; Vázquez-Medina, José Pablo; Viscarra, Jose A; Crocker, Daniel E; Ortiz, Rudy M

    2015-05-15

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-21 is secreted from the liver, pancreas, and adipose in response to prolonged fasting/starvation to facilitate lipid and glucose metabolism. Northern elephant seals naturally fast for several months, maintaining a relatively elevated metabolic rate to satisfy their energetic requirements. Thus, to better understand the impact of prolonged food deprivation on FGF21-associated changes, we analyzed the expression of FGF21, FGF receptor-1 (FGFR1), β-klotho (KLB; a co-activator of FGFR) in adipose, and plasma FGF21, glucose and 3-hydroxybutyrate in fasted elephant seal pups. Expression of FGFR1 and KLB mRNA decreased 98% and 43%, respectively, with fasting duration. While the 80% decrease in mean adipose FGF21 mRNA expression with fasting did not reach statistical significance, it paralleled the 39% decrease in plasma FGF21 concentrations suggesting that FGF21 is suppressed with fasting in elephant seals. Data demonstrate an atypical response of FGF21 to prolonged fasting in a mammal suggesting that FGF21-mediated mechanisms have evolved differentially in elephant seals. Furthermore, the typical fasting-induced, FGF21-mediated actions such as the inhibition of lipolysis in adipose may not be required in elephant seals as part of a naturally adapted mechanism to support their unique metabolic demands during prolonged fasting. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Reversible kallmann syndrome, delayed puberty, and isolated anosmia occurring in a single family with a mutation in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 gene.

    PubMed

    Pitteloud, Nelly; Acierno, James S; Meysing, Astrid U; Dwyer, Andrew A; Hayes, Frances J; Crowley, William F

    2005-03-01

    Kallmann syndrome (KS) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder. Recently, loss-of-function mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) gene have been shown to cause autosomal dominant KS. To date, the detailed reproductive phenotype of KS associated with mutations in the FGFR1 has yet to be described. We report a kindred comprising a male proband with KS and spontaneous reversibility, whose mother had delayed puberty and whose maternal grandfather isolated anosmia. The proband presented at age 18 yr with KS and was subsequently treated with testosterone (T) therapy. Upon discontinuation of T therapy, he recovered from his hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, as evidenced by a normal LH secretion pattern, sustained normal serum T levels, and active spermatogenesis. The three members of this single family harbor the same FGFR1 mutation (Arg(622)X) in the tyrosine kinase domain. This report demonstrates 1) the first genetic cause of the rare variant of reversible KS, 2) the reversal of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in a proband carrying an FGFR1 mutation suggests a role of FGFR1 beyond embryonic GnRH neuron migration, and 3) a loss of function mutation in the FGFR1 gene causing delayed puberty.

  5. Distinct role of interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 in oval cell- mediated liver regeneration and inflammation-associated hepatocarcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jie; Li, Xi; Lin, Hui; Cai, Xiujun; Cang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin 6 (IL6), tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) and TNF receptor-1(TNFR1) have been shown to involve in oval cell proliferation and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development. However, their role in these processes is still unclear. In the present study, by using hepatocytes-specific DDB1 deletion mouse models, we explored the role and mechanism of IL6, TNFα and TNFR1 in oval cell proliferation and HCC development in the context of inflammation, which is the common features of HCC pathogenesis in humans. Our results showed that IL6 promotes oval cell proliferation and liver regeneration, while TNFα/TNFR1 does not affect this process. Deletion of IL6 accelerates HCC development and increases tumor burden. The number of natural killer(NK) cells is significantly decreased in tumors without IL6, implying that IL6 suppresses HCC by NK cells. In contrast to IL6, TNFR1-mediated signaling pathway promotes HCC development, and deletion of TNFR1 reduced tumor incidence. Increased apoptosis, compensatory proliferation and activation of MAPK/MEK/ERK cascade contribute to the oncogenic function of TNFR1-mediated signaling pathway. Intriguingly, deletion of TNFα accelerates tumor development, which shows divergent roles of TNFα and TNFR1 in hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:27556180

  6. Radiolabeling and evaluation of 64Cu-DOTA-F56 peptide targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 in the molecular imaging of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hua; Zhao, Chuanke; Liu, Fei; Wang, Lixin; Feng, Junnan; Zhou, Zheng; Qu, Like; Shou, Chengchao; Yang, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive imaging of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (VEGFR1) remains a great challenge in early diagnosis of gastric cancer. Here we reported the synthesis, radiolabeling, and evaluation of a novel 64Cu-radiolabeled peptide for noninvasive positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of VEGFR1 positive gastric cancer. The binding of modified peptide WHSDMEWWYLLG (termed as F56) to VEGER-1 expressed in gastric cancer cell BCG823 has been confirmed by immune-fluorescence overlap. DOTA-F56 was designed and prepared by solid-phase synthesis and folded in vitro. 64Cu-DOTA-F56 was synthesized in high radiochemical yield and high specific activity (S.A. up to 255.6 GBq/mmol). It has excellent in vitro stability. Micro-PET imaging of 64Cu-DOTA-F56 identifies tumor in BCG823 tumor-bearing mice, while that of 18F-FDG does not. Immunohistochemical analysis of excised BCG823 xenograft showed colocalization between the PET images and the staining of VEGFR1. These results demonstrated that 64Cu-DOTA-F56 peptide has potential as a noninvasive imaging agent in VEGFR1 positive tumors. PMID:26807312

  7. Tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 is essential for LPS-induced sensitization and tolerance to oxygen-glucose deprivation in murine neonatal organotypic hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Markus, Tina; Cronberg, Tobias; Cilio, Corrado; Pronk, Cornelis; Wieloch, Tadeusz; Ley, David

    2009-01-01

    Inflammation and ischemia have a synergistic damaging effect in the immature brain. The role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptors 1 and 2 in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced sensitization and tolerance to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) was evaluated in neonatal murine hippocampal organotypic slices. Hippocampal slices from balb/c, C57BL/6 TNFR1(-/-), TNFR2(-/-), and wild-type (WT) mice obtained at P6 were grown in vitro for 9 days. Preexposure to LPS immediately before OGD increased propidium iodide-determined cell death in regions CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus from 4 up to 48 h after OGD (P<0.001). Extending the time interval between LPS exposure and OGD to 72 h resulted in tolerance, that is reduced neuronal cell death after OGD (P<0.05). Slices from TNFR1(-/-) mice showed neither LPS-induced sensitization nor LPS-induced tolerance to OGD, whereas both effects were present in slices from TNFR2(-/-) and WT mice. Cytokine secretion (TNFalpha and interleukin-6) during LPS exposure was decreased in TNFR1(-/-) slices and increased in TNFR2(-/-) as compared with WT slices. We conclude that LPS induces sensitization or tolerance to OGD depending on the time interval between exposure to LPS and OGD in murine hippocampal slice cultures. Both paradigms are dependent on signaling through TNFR1.

  8. Fcγ Receptor-induced Soluble Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-1 (VEGFR-1) Production Inhibits Angiogenesis and Enhances Efficacy of Anti-tumor Antibodies*

    PubMed Central

    Justiniano, Steven E.; Elavazhagan, Saranya; Fatehchand, Kavin; Shah, Prexy; Mehta, Payal; Roda, Julie M.; Mo, Xiaokui; Cheney, Carolyn; Hertlein, Erin; Eubank, Timothy D.; Marsh, Clay; Muthusamy, Natarajan; Butchar, Jonathan P.; Byrd, John C.; Tridandapani, Susheela

    2013-01-01

    Monocytes/macrophages are potent mediators of antitumor antibody therapy, where they engage target cells via Fcγ receptors (FcγR). Binding of these cells to opsonized tumor targets elicits cytokine production, phagocytosis, and antibody-mediated cellular cytotoxicity. Here we show for the first time that activation of monocyte FcγR results in the secretion of soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 (VEGFR-1/sFlt-1), which serves to antagonize VEGF-mediated angiogenesis and tumor growth. Consistent with this, using a murine solid tumor model of antibody therapy, we show that sFlt-1 is involved in restricting tumor growth. Analyzing the mechanism of induction of sFlt-1, we found that the Erk and PI3K pathways were required for transcription, and NF-κB was required for translation. Upon closer examination of the role of NF-κB, we found that a microRNA, miR181a, negatively regulates FcγR-mediated sFlt-1 production and that NF-κB serves to antagonize this microRNA. Taken together, these results demonstrate a novel and biologically important function of monocytes and macrophages during antibody therapy. PMID:23902770

  9. Fcγ receptor-induced soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 (VEGFR-1) production inhibits angiogenesis and enhances efficacy of anti-tumor antibodies.

    PubMed

    Justiniano, Steven E; Elavazhagan, Saranya; Fatehchand, Kavin; Shah, Prexy; Mehta, Payal; Roda, Julie M; Mo, Xiaokui; Cheney, Carolyn; Hertlein, Erin; Eubank, Timothy D; Marsh, Clay; Muthusamy, Natarajan; Butchar, Jonathan P; Byrd, John C; Tridandapani, Susheela

    2013-09-13

    Monocytes/macrophages are potent mediators of antitumor antibody therapy, where they engage target cells via Fcγ receptors (FcγR). Binding of these cells to opsonized tumor targets elicits cytokine production, phagocytosis, and antibody-mediated cellular cytotoxicity. Here we show for the first time that activation of monocyte FcγR results in the secretion of soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 (VEGFR-1/sFlt-1), which serves to antagonize VEGF-mediated angiogenesis and tumor growth. Consistent with this, using a murine solid tumor model of antibody therapy, we show that sFlt-1 is involved in restricting tumor growth. Analyzing the mechanism of induction of sFlt-1, we found that the Erk and PI3K pathways were required for transcription, and NF-κB was required for translation. Upon closer examination of the role of NF-κB, we found that a microRNA, miR181a, negatively regulates FcγR-mediated sFlt-1 production and that NF-κB serves to antagonize this microRNA. Taken together, these results demonstrate a novel and biologically important function of monocytes and macrophages during antibody therapy.

  10. Crosstalk between Protease-activated Receptor 1 and Platelet-activating Factor Receptor Regulates Melanoma Cell Adhesion Molecule (MCAM/MUC18) Expression and Melanoma Metastasis*

    PubMed Central

    Melnikova, Vladislava O.; Balasubramanian, Krishnakumar; Villares, Gabriel J.; Dobroff, Andrey S.; Zigler, Maya; Wang, Hua; Petersson, Frederik; Price, Janet E.; Schroit, Alan; Prieto, Victor G.; Hung, Mien-Chie; Bar-Eli, Menashe

    2009-01-01

    The cellular and molecular pathways that regulate platelet activation, blood coagulation, and inflammation are emerging as critical players in cancer progression and metastasis. Here, we demonstrate a novel signaling mechanism whereby protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) mediates expression of melanoma cell adhesion molecule MCAM/MUC18 (MUC18), a critical marker of melanoma metastasis, via activation of platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR) and cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB). We found that PAR1 silencing with small hairpin RNA inhibits MUC18 expression in metastatic melanoma cells by inhibiting CREB phosphorylation, activity, and binding to the MUC18 promoter. We further demonstrate that the PAF/PAFR pathway mediates MUC18 expression downstream of PAR1. Indeed, PAR1 silencing down-regulates PAFR expression and PAF production, PAFR silencing blocks MUC18 expression, and re-expression of PAFR in PAR1-silenced cells rescues MUC18 expression. We further demonstrate that the PAR1-PAFR-MUC18 pathway mediates melanoma cell adhesion to microvascular endothelial cells, transendothelial migration, and metastatic retention in the lungs. Rescuing PAFR expression in PAR1-silenced cells fully restores metastatic phenotype of melanoma, indicating that PAFR plays critical role in the molecular mechanism of PAR1 action. Our results link the two pro-inflammatory G-protein-coupled receptors, PAR1 and PAFR, with the metastatic dissemination of melanoma and suggest that PAR1, PAFR, and MUC18 are attractive therapeutic targets for preventing melanoma metastasis. PMID:19703903

  11. An inhibitor of fibroblast growth factor receptor-1 (FGFR1) promotes late-stage terminal differentiation from NGN3+ pancreatic endocrine progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita-Sugahara, Yzumi; Matsumoto, Masahito; Ohtaka, Manami; Nishimura, Ken; Nakanishi, Mahito; Mitani, Kohnosuke; Okazaki, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) provide a potential resource for regenerative medicine. To identify the signalling pathway(s) contributing to the development of functional β cells, we established a tracing model consisting of dual knock-in hiPSCs (INS-Venus/NGN3-mCherry) (hIveNry) expressing the fluorescent proteins Venus and mCherry under the control of intrinsic insulin (INS) and neurogenin 3 (NGN3) promoters, respectively. hIveNry iPSCs differentiated into NGN3- and mCherry-positive endocrine progenitors and then into Venus-positive β cells expressing INS, PDX1, NKX6.1, and glucokinase (GCK). Using these cells, we conducted high-throughput screening of chemicals and identified a specific kinase inhibitor of fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) that acted in a stage-dependent manner to promote the terminal differentiation of pancreatic endocrine cells, including β cells, from the intermediate stage of pancreatic endocrine progenitors while blocking the early development of pancreatic progenitors. This FGFR1 inhibitor augmented the expression of functional β cell markers (SLC30A8 and ABCC8) and improved glucose-stimulated INS secretion. Our findings indicate that the hIveNry model could provide further insights into the mechanisms of hiPS-derived β cell differentiation controlled by FGFR1-mediated regulatory pathways in a temporal-dependent fashion. PMID:27786288

  12. Plasma FGF21 Concentrations, Adipose Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor-1 and β-Klotho Expression Decrease with Fasting in Northern Elephant Seals

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Miwa; Lee, Andrew; Vázquez-Medina, Jose Pablo; Viscarra, Jose A.; Crocker, Daniel E.; Ortiz, Rudy M.

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-21 is secreted from the liver, pancreas, and adipose in response to prolonged fasting/starvation to facilitate lipid and glucose metabolism. Northern elephant seals naturally fast for several months, maintaining a relatively elevated metabolic rate to satisfy their energetic requirements. Thus, to better understand the impact of prolonged food deprivation on FGF21-associated changes, we analyzed the expression of FGF21, FGF receptor-1 (FGFR1), β-klotho (KLB; a co-activator of FGFR) in adipose, and plasma FGF21, glucose and 3-hydroxybutyrate in fasted elephant seal pups. Expression of FGFR1 and KLB mRNA decreased 98% and 43%, respectively, with fasting duration. While the 80% decrease in mean adipose FGF21 mRNA expression with fasting did not reach statistical significance, it paralleled the 39% decrease in plasma FGF21 concentrations suggesting that FGF21 is suppressed with fasting in elephant seals. Data demonstrate an atypical response of FGF21 to prolonged fasting in a mammal suggesting that FGF21-mediated mechanisms have evolved differentially in elephant seals. Furthermore, the typical fasting-induced, FGF21-mediated actions such as the inhibition of lipolysis in adipose may not be required in elephant seals as part of a naturally adapted mechanism to support their unique metabolic demands during prolonged fasting. PMID:25857751

  13. Antitumor activity of a novel anti-vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 monoclonal antibody that does not interfere with ligand binding

    PubMed Central

    Tentori, Lucio; Scimeca, Manuel; Dorio, Annalisa S.; Atzori, Maria Grazia; Failla, Cristina M.; Morea, Veronica; Bonanno, Elena; D'Atri, Stefania; Lacal, Pedro M.

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 (VEGFR-1) is a tyrosine kinase transmembrane receptor that has also a soluble isoform containing most of the extracellular ligand binding domain (sVEGFR-1). VEGF-A binds to both VEGFR-2 and VEGFR-1, whereas placenta growth factor (PlGF) interacts exclusively with VEGFR-1. In this study we generated an anti-VEGFR-1 mAb (D16F7) by immunizing BALB/C mice with a peptide that we had previously reported to inhibit angiogenesis and endothelial cell migration induced by PlGF. D16F7 did not affect binding of VEGF-A or PlGF to VEGFR-1, thus allowing sVEGFR-1 to act as decoy receptor for these growth factors, but it hampered receptor homodimerization and activation. D16F7 inhibited both the chemotactic response of human endothelial, myelomonocytic and melanoma cells to VEGFR-1 ligands and vasculogenic mimicry by tumor cells. Moreover, D16F7 exerted in vivo antiangiogenic effects in a matrigel plug assay. Importantly, D16F7 inhibited tumor growth and was well tolerated by B6D2F1 mice injected with syngeneic B16F10 melanoma cells. The antitumor effect was associated with melanoma cell apoptosis, vascular abnormalities and decrease of both monocyte/macrophage infiltration and myeloid progenitor mobilization. For all the above, D16F7 may be exploited in the therapy of metastatic melanoma and other tumors or pathological conditions involving VEGFR-1 activation. PMID:27655684

  14. Identification of Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptor 1 in Astroglial Cells as a Target for Glial Cell Line-derived Neurotrophic Factor Expression Induced by Antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Kajitani, Naoto; Miyano, Kanako; Okada-Tsuchioka, Mami; Abe, Hiromi; Itagaki, Kei; Hisaoka-Nakashima, Kazue; Morioka, Norimitsu; Uezono, Yasuhito; Takebayashi, Minoru

    2016-12-30

    Preclinical and clinical evidence suggests that glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is important in the therapeutic effect of antidepressants. A previous study demonstrated that the tricyclic antidepressant amitriptyline induces Gαi/o activation, which leads to GDNF expression in astrocytes. However, the specific target expressed in astrocytes that mediates antidepressant-evoked Gαi/o activation has yet to be identified. Thus, the current study explored the possibility that antidepressant-induced Gαi/o activation depends on lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 (LPAR1), a Gαi/o-coupled receptor. GDNF mRNA expression was examined using real-time PCR and Gαi/o activation was examined using the cell-based receptor assay system CellKey(TM) in rat C6 astroglial cells and rat primary cultured astrocytes. LPAR1 antagonists blocked GDNF mRNA expression and Gαi/o activation evoked by various classes of antidepressants (amitriptyline, nortriptyline, mianserin, and fluoxetine). In addition, deletion of LPAR1 by RNAi suppressed amitriptyline-evoked GDNF mRNA expression. Treatment of astroglial cells with the endogenous LPAR agonist LPA increased GDNF mRNA expression through LPAR1, whereas treatment of primary cultured neurons with LPA failed to affect GDNF mRNA expression. Astrocytic GDNF expression evoked by either amitriptyline or LPA utilized, in part, transactivation of fibroblast growth factor receptor and a subsequent ERK cascade. The current results suggest that LPAR1 is a novel, specific target of antidepressants that leads to GDNF expression in astrocytes. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 1 (FGFR1), Partly Related to Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and Microvessel Density, is an Independent Prognostic Factor for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Dan; Liu, Jiewei; Li, Zhixi; Zhu, Jiang; Hou, Mei

    2017-01-01

    Background This study aimed to explore the correlation between FGFR1 and clinical features, including survival analysis and the promotion of angiogenesis by fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2). FGFR1 gene amplification has been found in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the prognostic value of FGFR1 and the correlation between FGFR1 and clinical features are still controversial. Material/Methods A total of 92 patients with NSCLC who underwent R0 resection between July 2006 and July 2008 were enrolled in the study. The expression of FGFR1, VEGFR2, and CD34 was detected by immunohistochemistry. The correlations between the aforementioned markers and the patients’ clinical features were analyzed by the chi-square test. The impact factors of prognosis were evaluated by Cox regression analyses. Results The expression ratios of FGFR1 and VEGFR2 were 26.1% and 43.4%, respectively. The intensity of FGFR1 expression was related to VEGFR2 and histopathology. To some extent, the average microvessel density (MVD) had correlation to the expression of FGFR1 and VGEFR2. The pathological stages III–IV and high expression of FGFR1 were found to be independent prognostic factors. Conclusions The expression intensity of FGFR1 and VEGFR2 was associated with MVD, and the expression of FGFR1 is one of the independent prognostic indicators for NSCLC. PMID:28088809

  16. Exploration of the antagonist CP-376395 escape pathway for the corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 1 by random acceleration molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Bai, Qifeng; Shi, Danfeng; Zhang, Yang; Liu, Huanxiang; Yao, Xiaojun

    2014-07-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 1 (CRF1R), a member of class B G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), plays an important role in the treatment of osteoporosis, diabetes, depression, migraine and anxiety. To explore the escape pathway of the antagonist CP-376395 in the binding pocket of CRF1R, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, dynamical network analysis, random acceleration molecular dynamics (RAMD) simulations and adaptive biasing force (ABF) calculations were performed on the crystal structure of CRF1R in complex with CP-376395. The results of dynamical network analysis show that TM7 of CRF1R has the strongest edges during MD simulation. The bent part of TM7 forms a V-shape pocket with Gly356(7.50). Asn283(5.50) has high hydrogen bond occupancy during 100 ns MD simulations and is the key interaction residue with the antagonist in the binding pocket of CRF1R. RAMD simulation has identified three possible pathways (PW1, PW2 and PW3) for CP-376395 to escape from the binding pocket of CRF1R. The PW3 pathway was proved to be the most likely escape pathway for CP-376395. The free energy along the PW3 pathway was calculated by using ABF simulations. Two energy barriers were found along the reaction coordinates. Residues Leu323(6.49), Asn283(5.50) and Met206(3.47) contribute to the steric hindrance for the first energy barrier. Residues His199(3.40) and Gln355(7.49) contribute to the second energy barrier through the hydrogen bonding interaction between CP-376395 and CRF1R. The results of our study can not only provide useful information to understand the interaction mechanism between CP-376395 and CRF1R, but also provide the details about the possible escape pathway and the free energy profile of CP-376395 in the pocket of CRF1R.

  17. 5-Lipoxygenase and cysteinyl leukotriene receptor 1 regulate epidermal growth factor-induced cell migration through Tiam1 upregulation and Rac1 activation.

    PubMed

    Magi, Shigeyuki; Takemoto, Yasushi; Kobayashi, Hiroki; Kasamatsu, Masato; Akita, Takahiro; Tanaka, Ayako; Takano, Kei; Tashiro, Etsu; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Imoto, Masaya

    2014-03-01

    Cell migration is an essential step for tumor metastasis. The small GTPase Rac1 plays an important role in cell migration. Previously, we reported that epidermal growth factor (EGF) induced two waves of Rac1 activation; namely, at 5 min and 12 h after stimulation. A second wave of EGF-induced Rac1 activation was required for EGF-induced cell migration, however, the spatiotemporal regulation of the second wave of EGF-induced Rac1 activation remains largely unclear. In this study, we found that 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) is activated in the process of EGF-induced cell migration, and that leukotriene C4 (LTC4 ) produced by 5-LOX mediated the second wave of Rac1 activation, as well as cell migration. Furthermore, these effects caused by LTC4 were found to be blocked in the presence of the antagonist of cysteinyl leukotriene receptor 1 (CysLT1). This blockage indicates that LTC4 -mediated CysLT1 signaling regulates the second EGF-induced wave of Rac1 activation. We also found that 5-LOX inhibitors, CysLT1 antagonists and the knockdown of CysLT1 inhibited EGF-induced T cell lymphoma invasion and metastasis-inducing protein 1 (Tiam1) expression. Tiam1 expression is required for the second wave of EGF-induced Rac1 activation in A431 cells. Therefore, our results indicate that the 5-LOX/LTC4 /CysLT1 signaling pathway regulates EGF-induced cell migration by increasing Tiam1 expression, leading to a second wave of Rac1 activation. Thus, CysLT1 may serve as a new molecular target for antimetastatic therapy. In addition, the CysLT1 antagonist, montelukast, which is used clinically for allergy treatment, might have great potential as a novel type of antimetastatic agent. © 2013 The Authors. Cancer Science published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  18. Discoidin Domain Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Song, Sunmi; Shackel, Nicholas A.; Wang, Xin M.; Ajami, Katerina; McCaughan, Geoffrey W.; Gorrell, Mark D.

    2011-01-01

    Discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that binds and is activated by collagens. Transcriptional profiling of cirrhosis in human liver using a DNA array and quantitative PCR detected elevated mRNA expression of DDR1 compared with that in nondiseased liver. The present study characterized DDR1 expression in cirrhotic and nondiseased human liver and examined the cellular effects of DDR1 expression. mRNA expression of all five isoforms of DDR1 was detected in human liver, whereas DDR1a demonstrated differential expression in liver with hepatitis C virus and primary biliary cirrhosis compared with nondiseased liver. In addition, immunoblot analysis detected shed fragments of DDR1 more readily in cirrhotic liver than in nondiseased liver. Inasmuch as DDR1 is subject to protease-mediated cleavage after prolonged interaction with collagen, this differential expression may indicate more intense activation of DDR1 protein in cirrhotic compared with nondiseased liver. In situ hybridization and immunofluorescence localized intense DDR1 mRNA and protein expression to epithelial cells including hepatocytes at the portal-parenchymal interface and the luminal aspect of the biliary epithelium. Overexpression of DDR1a altered hepatocyte behavior including increased adhesion and less migration on extracelular matrix substrates. DDR1a regulated extracellular expression of matrix metalloproteinases 1 and 2. These data elucidate DDR1 function pertinent to cirrhosis and indicate the importance of epithelial cell–collagen interactions in chronic liver injury. PMID:21356365

  19. Coordinate expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 (flt-1) and its ligand suggests a paracrine regulation of murine vascular development.

    PubMed

    Breier, G; Clauss, M; Risau, W

    1995-11-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a candidate regulator of blood vessel growth during embryonic development and in tumors. To evaluate the role of VEGF receptor-1/flt-1 (VEGFR1/flt-1) in the development of the vascular system, we have characterized the murine homolog of the human flt-1 gene and have analyzed its expression pattern during mouse embryogenesis. Receptor binding studies using transfected COS cells revealed that the murine flt-1 gene encodes a high affinity receptor for VEGF. The apparent Kd for VEGF binding, as determined by Scatchard analysis, was 114 pM, demonstrating that VEGFR1/flt-1 has a higher affinity to VEGF than VEGF receptor-2/flk-1 (VEGFR2/flk-1). By in situ hybridization, VEGFR1/flt-1 was detected in the yolk sac mesoderm already at the early stages of vascular development, while the receptor ligand was expressed in the entire endoderm of 7.5-day mouse embryos. A comparison with VEGFR2/flk-1 showed that the two receptors shared a common expression domain in the yolk sac mesoderm, but were expressed at different sites in the ectoplacental cone. The differential expression of the two VEGF receptors persisted in the developing placenta, where VEGFR1/flt-1 mRNA was detected in the spongiotrophoblast layer, whereas VEGFR2/flk-1 transcripts were present in the labyrinthine layer which is the site of VEGF expression. In the embryo proper, VEGFR1/flt-1 mRNA was specifically localized in blood vessels and capillaries of the developing organs, closely resembling the pattern of VEGFR2/flk-1 transcript distribution. In the developing brain, the expression of VEGF receptors in the perineural capillary plexus and in capillary sprouts which have invaded the neuro-ectoderm correlated with endothelial cell proliferation and brain angiogenesis. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that VEGF and its receptors have an important function both in the differentiation of the endothelial lineage and in the neovascularization of developing organs

  20. Autophosphorylation is essential for the in vivo function of the Lotus japonicus Nod factor receptor 1 and receptor-mediated signalling in cooperation with Nod factor receptor 5.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Esben B; Antolín-Llovera, Meritxell; Grossmann, Christina; Ye, Juanying; Vieweg, Syndi; Broghammer, Angelique; Krusell, Lene; Radutoiu, Simona; Jensen, Ole N; Stougaard, Jens; Parniske, Martin

    2011-02-01

    Soil-living rhizobia secrete lipochitin oligosaccharides known as Nod factors, which in Lotus japonicus are perceived by at least two Nod-factor receptors, NFR1 and NFR5. Despite progress in identifying molecular components critical for initial legume host recognition of the microsymbiont and cloning of downstream components, little is known about the activation and signalling mechanisms of the Nod-factor receptors themselves. Here we show that both receptor proteins localize to the plasma membrane, and present evidence for heterocomplex formation initiating downstream signalling. Expression of NFR1 and NFR5 in Nicotiana benthamiana and Allium ampeloprasum (leek) cells caused a rapid cell-death response. The signalling leading to cell death was abrogated using a kinase-inactive variant of NFR1. In these surviving cells, a clear interaction between NFR1 and NFR5 was detected in vivo through bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC). To analyse the inter- and intramolecular phosphorylation events of the kinase complex, the cytoplasmic part of NFR1 was assayed for in vitro kinase activity, and autophosphorylation on 24 amino acid residues, including three tyrosine residues, was found by mass spectrometry. Substitution of the phosphorylated amino acids of NFR1 identified a single phosphorylation site to be essential for NFR1 Nod-factor signalling in vivo and kinase activity in vitro. In contrast to NFR1, no in vitro kinase activity of the cytoplasmic domain of NFR5 was detected. This is further supported by the fact that a mutagenized NFR5 construct, substituting an amino acid essential for ATP binding, restored nodulation of nfr5 mutant roots. © 2010 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor is a survival factor for isolectin B4-positive, but not vanilloid receptor 1-positive, neurons in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Zwick, Melissa; Davis, Brian M; Woodbury, C Jeffrey; Burkett, John N; Koerber, H Richard; Simpson, James F; Albers, Kathryn M

    2002-05-15

    Most, if not all, nociceptor sensory neurons are dependent on nerve growth factor (NGF) during early embryonic development. A large subpopulation of these sensory neurons loses NGF dependency between embryonic day 16 and postnatal day 14 and become responsive to glial cell line-derived growth factor (GDNF), a member of the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) family. To examine the survival and phenotypic effects of GDNF on sensory neurons in vivo, we generated transgenic mice that overexpress GDNF in the skin. GDNF-overexpresser mice had increased numbers of small unmyelinated sensory neurons that express the tyrosine kinase receptor Ret and bind the plant isolectin B4 (IB4). Surprisingly, in wild-type and transgenic mice, few ( approximately 2%) IB4-positive neurons expressed the vanilloid receptor VR1, a heat-sensitive receptor expressed by many IB4-positive neurons of the rat. Thus, in mouse, GDNF-dependent IB4-positive neurons must use a non-VR1 heat receptor. In addition, the behavior of GDNF-overexpresser animals to noxious heat or mechanical stimuli was indistinguishable from wild-type animals, indicating that, on a behavioral level, peripherally applied GDNF does not alter the sensitivity of the somatosensory system.

  2. Role of tumour necrosis factor receptor-1 and nuclear factor-κB in production of TNF-α-induced pro-inflammatory microparticles in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, S K; Yang, S-H; Kwon, I; Lee, O-H; Heo, J H

    2014-09-02

    Tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is upregulated in many inflammatory diseases and is also a potent agent for microparticle (MP) generation. Here, we describe an essential role of TNF-α in the production of endothelial cell-derived microparticles (EMPs) in vivo and the function of TNF-α-induced EMPs in endothelial cells. We found that TNF-α rapidly increased blood levels of EMPs in mice. Treatment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) with TNF-α also induced EMP formation in a time-dependent manner. Silencing of TNF receptor (TNFR)-1 or inhibition of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) in HUVECs impaired the production of TNF-α-induced EMP. Incubation of HUVECs with PKH-67-stained EMPs showed that endothelial cells readily engulfed EMPs, and the engulfed TNF-α-induced EMPs promoted the expression of pro-apoptotic molecules and upregulated intercellular adhesion molecule-1 level on the cell surface, which led to monocyte adhesion. Collectively, our findings indicate that the generation of TNF-α-induced EMPs was mediated by TNFR1 or NF-κB and that EMPs can contribute to apoptosis and inflammation of endothelial cells.

  3. Epstein-Barr virus immediate-early protein BZLF1 inhibits tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced signaling and apoptosis by downregulating tumor necrosis factor receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Thomas E; Mauser, Amy; Klingelhutz, Aloysius; Kenney, Shannon C

    2004-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) is a key mediator of host immune and inflammatory responses and inhibits herpesvirus replication by cytolytic and noncytolytic mechanisms. TNF-alpha effects are primarily mediated through the major TNF-alpha receptor, TNF-R1, which is constitutively expressed in most cell types. Here we show that the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) immediate-early protein BZLF1 prevents TNF-alpha activation of target genes and TNF-alpha-induced cell death. These effects are mediated by down-regulation of the promoter for TNF-R1. Additionally, we demonstrate that expression of TNF-R1 is downregulated during the EBV lytic replication cycle. Thus, EBV has developed a novel mechanism for evading TNF-alpha antiviral effects during lytic reactivation or primary infection.

  4. Fibroblast growth factor 8 signaling through fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 is required for the emergence of gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons.

    PubMed

    Chung, Wilson C J; Moyle, Sarah S; Tsai, Pei-San

    2008-10-01

    GnRH neurons are essential for the onset and maintenance of reproduction. Mutations in both fibroblast growth factor receptor (Fgfr1) and Fgf8 have been shown to cause Kallmann syndrome, a disease characterized by hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and anosmia, indicating that FGF signaling is indispensable for the formation of a functional GnRH system. Presently it is unclear which stage of GnRH neuronal development is most impacted by FGF signaling deficiency. GnRH neurons express both FGFR1 and -3; thus, it is also unclear whether FGFR1 or FGFR3 contributes directly to GnRH system development. In this study, we examined the developing GnRH system in mice deficient in FGF8, FGFR1, or FGFR3 to elucidate the individual contribution of these FGF signaling components. Our results show that the early emergence of GnRH neurons from the embryonic olfactory placode requires FGF8 signaling, which is mediated through FGFR1, not FGFR3. These data provide compelling evidence that the developing GnRH system is exquisitely sensitive to reduced levels of FGF signaling. Furthermore, Kallmann syndrome stemming from FGF signaling deficiency may be due primarily to defects in early GnRH neuronal development prior to their migration into the forebrain.

  5. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 contributes to resistance to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor drugs in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Roberto; Rosa, Roberta; Damiano, Vincenzo; Daniele, Gennaro; Gelardi, Teresa; Garofalo, Sonia; Tarallo, Valeria; De Falco, Sandro; Melisi, Davide; Benelli, Roberto; Albini, Adriana; Ryan, Anderson; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2008-08-15

    The resistance to selective EGFR inhibitors involves the activation of alternative signaling pathways, and Akt activation and VEGF induction have been described in EGFR inhibitor-resistant tumors. Combined inhibition of EGFR and other signaling proteins has become a successful therapeutic approach, stimulating the search for further determinants of resistance as basis for novel therapeutic strategies. We established human cancer cell lines with various degrees of EGFR expression and sensitivity to EGFR inhibitors and analyzed signal transducers under the control of EGFR-dependent and EGFR-independent pathways. Multitargeted inhibitor vandetanib (ZD6474) inhibited the growth and the phosphorylation of Akt and its effector p70S6 kinase in both wild-type and EGFR inhibitor-resistant human colon, prostate, and breast cancer cells. We found that the resistant cell lines exhibit, as common feature, VEGFR-1/Flt-1 overexpression, increased secretion of VEGF and placental growth factor, and augmented migration capabilities and that vandetanib is able to antagonize them. Accordingly, a new kinase assay revealed that in addition to VEGF receptor (VEGFR)-2, RET, and EGFR, vandetanib efficiently inhibits also VEGFR-1. The contribution of VEGFR-1 to the resistant phenotype was further supported by the demonstration that VEGFR-1 silencing in resistant cells restored sensitivity to anti-EGFR drugs and impaired migration capabilities, whereas exogenous VEGFR-1 overexpression in wild-type cells conferred resistance to these agents. This study shows that VEGFR-1 contributes to anti-EGFR drug resistance in different human cancer cells. Moreover, vandetanib inhibits VEGFR-1 activation, cell proliferation, and migration, suggesting its potential utility in patients resistant to EGFR inhibitors.

  6. Irciniastatin A induces potent and sustained activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase and thereby promotes ectodomain shedding of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 in human lung carcinoma A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Quach, Hue Tu; Hirano, Seiya; Fukuhara, Sayuri; Watanabe, Tsubasa; Kanoh, Naoki; Iwabuchi, Yoshiharu; Usui, Takeo; Kataoka, Takao

    2015-01-01

    Irciniastatin A is a pederin-type marine product that potently inhibits translation. We have recently shown that irciniastatin A induces ectodomain shedding of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor 1 with slower kinetics than other translation inhibitors. In human lung carcinoma A549 cells, irciniastatin A induced a marked and sustained activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and induced little activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Moreover, the TNF receptor 1 shedding induced by irciniastatin A was blocked by the MAP kinase/ERK kinase inhibitor U0126, but not by the p38 MAP kinase inhibitor SB203580 or the JNK inhibitor SP600125. Thus unlike other translation inhibitors that trigger ribotoxic stress response, our results show that irciniastatin A is a unique translation inhibitor that induces a potent and sustained activation of the ERK pathway, and thereby promotes the ectodomain shedding of TNF receptor 1 in A549 cells.

  7. Icariin attenuates high glucose-induced type IV collagen and fibronectin accumulation in glomerular mesangial cells by inhibiting transforming growth factor-β production and signalling through G protein-coupled oestrogen receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi-Chen; Ding, Xuan-Sheng; Li, Hui-Mei; Zhang, Cheng

    2013-09-01

    Icariin has been shown to attenuate diabetic nephropathy in rats by decreasing transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and type IV collagen expression, but its mode of action in glomerular mesangial cells is uncertain. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of icariin on excess mesangial type IV collagen and fibronectin accumulation induced by high glucose, and to determine the mechanism underlying its protective effects. Under high-glucose conditions, icariin diminished type IV collagen and fibronectin accumulation, as well as TGF-β production in human and rat mesangial cells. Mesangial cells treated with icariin after TGF-β1 exposure expressed less type IV collagen and fibronectin than those without icariin treatment, suggesting inhibition by icariin of TGF-β1 downstream pathways. On TGF-β1 stimulation, icariin inhibited TGF-β canonical Smad signalling and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 signalling by decreasing Smad2/3 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner. U0126, which blocked the ERK1/2 pathway, exerted an additive effect on the icariin suppression of type IV collagen and fibronectin expression, enhancing the beneficial effects of icariin. The G protein-coupled oestrogen receptor 1 (GPER) antagonist, G-15, abolished the icariin-induced inhibition of type IV collagen, and fibronectin overproduction and TGF-β signalling. Treatment of cells with fulvestrant, a downregulator of the oestrogen receptor, enhanced the action of icariin. In conclusion, icariin decreased type IV collagen and fibronectin accumulation induced by high glucose in mesangial cells by inhibiting TGF-β production, as well as Smad and ERK signalling in a GPER-dependent manner.

  8. Bisphenol A and Related Alkylphenols Exert Nongenomic Estrogenic Actions Through a G Protein-Coupled Estrogen Receptor 1 (Gper)/Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (Egfr) Pathway to Inhibit Meiotic Maturation of Zebrafish Oocytes1

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Amanda C.; Peyton, Candace; Dong, Jing; Thomas, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Xenobiotic estrogens, such as bisphenol A (BPA), disrupt a wide variety of genomic estrogen actions, but their nongenomic estrogen actions remain poorly understood. We investigated nongenomic estrogenic effects of low concentrations of BPA and three related alkylphenols on the inhibition of zebrafish oocye maturation (OM) mediated through a G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (Gper)-dependent epidermal growth factor receptor (Egfr) pathway. BPA (10–100 nM) treatment for 3 h mimicked the effects of estradiol-17beta (E2) and EGF, decreasing spontaneous maturation of defolliculated zebrafish oocytes, an effect not blocked by coincubation with actinomycin D, but blocked by coincubation with a Gper antibody. BPA displayed relatively high binding affinity (15.8% that of E2) for recombinant zebrafish Gper. The inhibitory effects of BPA were attenuated by inhibition of upstream regulators of Egfr, intracellular tyrosine kinase (Src) with PP2, and matrix metalloproteinase with ilomastat. Treatment with an inhibitor of Egfr transactivation, AG1478, and an inhibitor of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) 3/1 pathway, U0126, increased spontaneous OM and blocked the inhibitory effects of BPA, E2, and the selective GPER agonist, G-1. Western blot analysis showed that BPA (10–200 nM) mimicked the stimulatory effects of E2 and EGF on Mapk3/1 phosphorylation. Tetrabromobisphenol A, 4-nonylphenol, and tetrachlorobisphenol A (5–100 nM) also inhibited OM, an effect blocked by cotreatment with AG1478, as well as with the GPER antagonist, G-15, and displayed similar binding affinities as BPA to zebrafish Gper. The results suggest that BPA and related alkylphenols disrupt zebrafish OM by a novel nongenomic estrogenic mechanism involving activation of the Gper/Egfr/Mapk3/1 pathway. PMID:26490843

  9. The Major Leukocyte Chemotactic and Activating Factors in the Mouse Gut Lumen are not N-formylpeptide Receptor 1 (Fpr1) Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Ojode, Teresa; Schneider, Erich H.; Tiffany, H. Lee; Yung, Sunny; Gao, Ji-Liang; Murphy, Philip M.

    2013-01-01

    Cultured bacteria release N-formylpeptides, which are potent chemoattractants for phagocytic leukocytes acting at G protein-coupled receptors FPR1 and FPR2. However, the distribution and immunologic activity of these molecules at mucosal surfaces, where large numbers of bacteria are separated from the immune system by epithelium, remain undefined. To investigate this for the gut, we tested leukocyte responses to cell-free gut luminal contents from C57Bl/6 mice fed a chow diet. Small and large intestine contents were able to compete with labeled N-formylpeptide for binding to FPR1, indicating the presence of FPR1 ligands in the gut lumen. Material from both small and large intestine induced robust calcium flux responses by primary FPR1+ leukocytes (mouse bone marrow cells and splenocytes, and human peripheral blood neutrophils and mononuclear cells), as well as chemotactic responses by both mouse bone marrow cells and human peripheral blood neutrophils. However, unlike defined N-formylpeptides, calcium flux responses induced by gut luminal contents were insensitive both to pertussis toxin treatment of leukocytes and to proteinase K digestion of the samples. Moreover, the gut samples were fully active on neutrophils from mice lacking Fpr1, and the kinetics of the calcium flux response differed markedly for neutrophils and PBMCs. The active factor(s) could be dialyzed using a 3.5 kD pore size membrane. Thus, mouse intestinal lumen contains small, potent and highly efficacious leukocyte chemotactic and activating factors that may be distinct for neutrophils and PBMCs and distinct from Fpr1 agonists. PMID:22722599

  10. Wake-promoting actions of median nerve stimulation in TBI-induced coma: An investigation of orexin-A and orexin receptor 1 in the hypothalamic region.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Ying-Jun; Feng, Zhen; Wang, Liang; Wei, Tian-Qi

    2015-09-01

    A coma is a serious complication, which can occur following traumatic brain injury (TBI), for which no effective treatment has been established. Previous studies have suggested that neural electrical stimulation, including median nerve stimulation (MNS), may be an effective method for treating patients in a coma, and orexin‑A, an excitatory hypothalamic neuropeptide, may be involved in wakefulness. However, the exact mechanisms underlying this involvement remain to be elucidated. The present study aimed to examine the arousal‑promoting role of MNS in rats in a TBI‑induced coma and to investigate the potential mechanisms involved. A total of 90 rats were divided into three groups, comprising a control group, sham‑stimulated (TBI) group and a stimulated (TBI + MNS) group. MNS was performed on the animals, which were in a TBI‑induced comatose state. Changes in the behavior of the rats were observed following MNS. Subsequently, hypothalamic tissues were extracted from the rats 6, 12 and 24 h following TBI or MNS, respectively. The expression levels of orexin‑A and orexin receptor‑1 (OX1R) in the hypothalamus were examined using immunohistochemistry, western blotting and an enzyme‑linked immunosorbent assay. The results demonstrated that 21 rats subjected to TBI‑induced coma exhibited a restored righting reflex and response to pain stimuli following MNS. In addition, ignificant differences in the expression levels of orexin‑A and OXIR were observed among the three groups and among the time‑points. Orexin‑A and OX1R were upregulated following MNS. The rats in the stimulated group reacted to the MNS and exhibited a re‑awakening response. The results of the present study indicated that MNS may be a therapeutic option for TBI‑induced coma. The mechanism may be associated with increasing expression levels of the excitatory hypothalamic neuropeptide, orexin-A, and its receptor, OX1R, in the hypothalamic region.

  11. Role of Corticotropin-Releasing Factor (CRF) Receptor-1 on the Catecholaminergic Response to Morphine Withdrawal in the Nucleus Accumbens (NAc)

    PubMed Central

    Almela, Pilar; Navarro-Zaragoza, Javier; García-Carmona, Juan-Antonio; Mora, Lucía; Hidalgo, Juana; Milanés, María-Victoria; Laorden, María-Luisa

    2012-01-01

    Stress induces the release of the peptide corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) into the ventral tegmental area (VTA), and also increases dopamine (DA) levels in brain regions receiving dense VTA input. Since the role of stress in drug addiction is well established, the present study examined the possible involvement of CRF1 receptor in the interaction between morphine withdrawal and catecholaminergic pathways in the reward system. The effects of naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal on signs of withdrawal, hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis activity, dopamine (DA) and noradrenaline (NA) turnover in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and activation of VTA dopaminergic neurons, were investigated in rats pretreated with vehicle or CP-154,526 (selective CRF1R antagonist). CP-154,526 attenuated the increases in body weight loss and suppressed some of withdrawal signs. Pretreatment with CRF1 receptor antagonist resulted in no significant modification of the increased NA turnover at NAc or plasma corticosterone levels that were seen during morphine withdrawal. However, blockade of CRF1 receptor significantly reduced morphine withdrawal-induced increases in plasma adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) levels, DA turnover and TH phosphorylation at Ser40 in the NAc. In addition, CP-154,526 reduced the number of TH containing neurons expressing c-Fos in the VTA after naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal. Altogether, these results support the idea that VTA dopaminergic neurons are activated in response to naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal and suggest that CRF1 receptors are involved in the activation of dopaminergic pathways which project to NAc. PMID:23071721

  12. Cellular distribution of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) and B (VEGFB) and VEGF receptors 1 and 2 in focal cortical dysplasia type IIB

    PubMed Central

    Boer, Karin; Troost, Dirk; Spliet, Wim G. M.; van Rijen, Peter C.; Gorter, Jan A.

    2008-01-01

    Members of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family are key signaling proteins in the induction and regulation of angiogenesis, both during development and in pathological conditions. However, signaling mediated through VEGF family proteins and their receptors has recently been shown to have direct effects on neurons and glial cells. In the present study, we immunocytochemically investigated the expression and cellular distribution of VEGFA, VEGFB, and their associated receptors (VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2) in focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) type IIB from patients with medically intractable epilepsy. Histologically normal temporal cortex and perilesional regions displayed neuronal immunoreactivity (IR) for VEGFA, VEGFB, and VEGF receptors (VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2), mainly in pyramidal neurons. Weak IR was observed in blood vessels and there was no notable glial IR within the grey and white matter. In all FCD specimens, VEGFA, VEGFB, and both VEGF receptors were highly expressed in dysplastic neurons. IR in astroglial and balloon cells was observed for VEGFA and its receptors. VEGFR-1 displayed strong endothelial staining in FCD. Double-labeling also showed expression of VEGFA, VEGFB and VEGFR-1 in cells of the microglia/macrophage lineage. The neuronal expression of both VEGFA and VEGFB, together with their specific receptors in FCD, suggests autocrine/paracrine effects on dysplastic neurons. These autocrine/paracrine effects could play a role in the development of FCD, preventing the death of abnormal neuronal cells. In addition, the expression of VEGFA and its receptors in glial cells within the dysplastic cortex indicates that VEGF-mediated signaling could contribute to astroglial activation and associated inflammatory reactions. PMID:18317782

  13. Soluble complement receptor 1 (sCR1) is not as effective as cobra venom factor in the treatment of experimental allergic neuritis.

    PubMed

    Vriesendorp, F J; Flynn, R E; Pappolla, M A; Koski, C L

    1997-12-01

    To further investigate the role of complement activation in Experimental Allergic Neuritis (EAN), the effect of systemic complement blockade by soluble CR1 (sCR1) was compared to complement depletion by Cobra Venom Factor (CVF) in EAN rats immunized with bovine peripheral nerve myelin. EAN rats treated with CVF (n = 10) had significantly reduced clinical scores compared to rats treated with sCR1 (n = 9) or saline (n = 10) (score: sCR1 0.66 +/- 0.7; CVF 0; saline 0.6 +/- 0.8; mean +/- SD). CVF treatment more effectively decreased inflammation and demyelination compared to sCR1 treatment which had only a partial effect (inflammation: sCR1 1.8 +/- 1.4; CVF 0.3 +/- 0.7; saline 1.9 +/- 1.2; demyelination; sCR1 1.3 +/- 1; CVF 0.1 +/- 0.6; saline 1.7 +/- 1.2). In lumbosacral nerve roots significantly less infiltrating ED1 positive macrophages and CD11bc (expressing complement receptor 3 or CR3) positive inflammatory cells were present in CVF treated EAN rats while there was a limited decrease in inflammation in the sCR1 treated animals compared to the saline treated rats (ED1: sCR1 1.4 +/- 1.2; CVF 0.5 +/- 0.6; saline 1.7 +/- 1.2; CD11bc: sCR1 1.9 +/- 1.2; CVF 0.9 +/- 1; saline 2.1 +/- 1.2). Our findings suggest that complement depletion by CVF is more effective than complement blockade by sCR1 in reducing the severity of inflammatory peripheral nerve demyelination.

  14. Visualising dual downregulation of insulin-like growth factor receptor-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor-A by heat shock protein 90 inhibition effect in triple negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Terwisscha van Scheltinga, Anton G T; Berghuis, Paul; Nienhuis, Hilde H; Timmer-Bosscha, Hetty; Pot, Linda; Gaykema, Sietske B M; Lub-de Hooge, Marjolijn N; Kosterink, Jos G W; de Vries, Elisabeth G E; Schröder, Carolien P

    2014-09-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is biologically characterised by heterogeneous presence of molecular pathways underlying it. Insulin-like growth factor receptor-1 (IGF-1R) expression and vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) have been identified as key factors in these pathways in TNBC. In this study, we aimed at in vivo PET imaging the effect of heat shock protein (Hsp) 90 inhibition by means of NVP-AUY922 on these pathways, with zirconium-89 ((89)Zr) labelled antibodies targeting IGF-1R and VEGF-A. In vitro NVP-AUY922 effects on cellular IGF-1R expression and VEGF-A secretion were determined in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines. Moreover human TNBC bearing MDA-MB-231 mice received 50mg/kg NVP-AUY922 or vehicle q3d intraperitoneally for 21days. PET scans with (89)Zr-MAB391 and (89)Zr-bevacizumab for visualisation of IGF-1R and VEGF-A were performed before and during treatment. Ex vivo biodistribution and correlative tissue analyses were performed. NVP-AUY922 treatment reduced IGF-1R expression and VEGF-A excretion in both cell lines. Hsp90 inhibition lowered tumour uptake on (89)Zr-MAB391-PET by 37.3% (P<0.01) and on (89)Zr-bevacizumab-PET by 44.4% (P<0.01). This was confirmed by ex vivo biodistribution with a reduction of 41.3% injected dose (ID)/g for (89)Zr-MAB391 and 37.8% ID/g for (89)Zr-bevacizumab, while no differences were observed for other tissues. This coincided with reduced IGF-1R expression and mean vessel density in the NVP-AUY922 treated tumours. (89)Zr-MAB391 and (89)Zr-bevacizumab PET reflect effect of Hsp90 inhibitors and can therefore potentially be used to monitor therapeutic effects of Hsp90 inhibitor therapy in TNBC. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Human Factors in Cabin Accident Investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chute, Rebecca D.; Rosekind, Mark R. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Human factors has become an integral part of the accident investigation protocol. However, much of the investigative process remains focussed on the flight deck, airframe, and power plant systems. As a consequence, little data has been collected regarding the human factors issues within and involving the cabin during an accident. Therefore, the possibility exists that contributing factors that lie within that domain may be overlooked. The FAA Office of Accident Investigation is sponsoring a two-day workshop on cabin safety accident investigation. This course, within the workshop, will be of two hours duration and will explore relevant areas of human factors research. Specifically, the three areas of discussion are: Information transfer and resource management, fatigue and other physical stressors, and the human/machine interface. Integration of these areas will be accomplished by providing a suggested checklist of specific cabin-related human factors questions for investigators to probe following an accident.

  16. A longitudinal study of angiogenic (placental growth factor) and anti-angiogenic (soluble endoglin and soluble VEGF receptor-1) factors in normal pregnancy and patients destined to develop preeclampsia and deliver a small-for-gestational-age neonate

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Roberto; Nien, Jyh Kae; Espinoza, Jimmy; Todem, David; Fu, Wenjiang; Chung, Hwan; Kusanovic, Juan Pedro; Gotsch, Francesca; Erez, Offer; Mazaki-tovi, Shali; Gomez, Ricardo; Edwin, Sam; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Levine, Richard J.; Karumanchi, Ananth

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Accumulating evidence suggests that an imbalance between pro-angiogenic [i.e. vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and placental growth factor (PlGF)] and anti-angiogenic factors [i.e. soluble VEGF receptor-1 (sVEGFR-1, also referred to as sFlt1) is involved in the pathophysiology of preeclampsia (PE). Endoglin is a protein that regulates the pro-angiogenic effects of transforming growth factor β, and its soluble form has been recently implicated in the pathophysiology of PE. The objective of this study was to determine if changes in maternal plasma concentration of these angiogenic and anti-angiogenic factors differ prior to development of disease among patients with normal pregnancies, and those destined to develop PE (preterm and term) or to deliver an SGA neonate. Methods This longitudinal nested case-control study included 144 singleton pregnancies in the following groups: 1) patients with uncomplicated pregnancies who delivered appropriate for gestational age (AGA) neonates (n=46); 2) patients who delivered an SGA neonate but did not develop PE (n=56); and 3) patients who developed PE (n=42). Longitudinal samples were collected at each prenatal visit, which was scheduled at four-week intervals from the first or early second trimester until delivery. Plasma concentrations of soluble endoglin (s-Eng), sVEGFR-1 and PlGF were determined by specific and sensitive ELISA. Results 1) Patients destined to deliver an SGA neonate had higher plasma concentrations of s-Eng throughout gestation than those with normal pregnancies; 2) patients destined to develop preterm PE and term PE had significantly higher concentrations of s-Eng than those with normal pregnancies at 23 and 30 weeks, respectively (for preterm PE: p<0.036 and for term PE: 0=0.002); 3) patients destined to develop PE (term or preterm) and those who delivered an SGA neonate had lower plasma concentrations of PlGF than those with normal pregnancy throughout gestation, and the maternal

  17. Sustained Brown Fat Stimulation and Insulin Sensitization by a Humanized Bispecific Antibody Agonist for Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 1/βKlotho Complex.

    PubMed

    Kolumam, Ganesh; Chen, Mark Z; Tong, Raymond; Zavala-Solorio, Jose; Kates, Lance; van Bruggen, Nicholas; Ross, Jed; Wyatt, Shelby K; Gandham, Vineela D; Carano, Richard A D; Dunshee, Diana Ronai; Wu, Ai-Luen; Haley, Benjamin; Anderson, Keith; Warming, Søren; Rairdan, Xin Y; Lewin-Koh, Nicholas; Zhang, Yingnan; Gutierrez, Johnny; Baruch, Amos; Gelzleichter, Thomas R; Stevens, Dale; Rajan, Sharmila; Bainbridge, Travis W; Vernes, Jean-Michel; Meng, Y Gloria; Ziai, James; Soriano, Robert H; Brauer, Matthew J; Chen, Yongmei; Stawicki, Scott; Kim, Hok Seon; Comps-Agrar, Laëtitia; Luis, Elizabeth; Spiess, Christoph; Wu, Yan; Ernst, James A; McGuinness, Owen P; Peterson, Andrew S; Sonoda, Junichiro

    2015-07-01

    Dissipating excess calories as heat through therapeutic stimulation of brown adipose tissues (BAT) has been proposed as a potential treatment for obesity-linked disorders. Here, we describe the generation of a humanized effector-less bispecific antibody that activates fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) 1/βKlotho complex, a common receptor for FGF21 and FGF19. Using this molecule, we show that antibody-mediated activation of FGFR1/βKlotho complex in mice induces sustained energy expenditure in BAT, browning of white adipose tissue, weight loss, and improvements in obesity-associated metabolic derangements including insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia and hepatosteatosis. In mice and cynomolgus monkeys, FGFR1/βKlotho activation increased serum high-molecular-weight adiponectin, which appears to contribute over time by enhancing the amplitude of the metabolic benefits. At the same time, insulin sensitization by FGFR1/βKlotho activation occurs even before the onset of weight loss in a manner that is independent of adiponectin. Together, selective activation of FGFR1/βKlotho complex with a long acting therapeutic antibody represents an attractive approach for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and other obesity-linked disorders through enhanced energy expenditure, insulin sensitization and induction of high-molecular-weight adiponectin.

  18. Connexin 30 downregulates Insulin-like growth factor receptor-1, abolishes Erk and potentiates effects of an IGF-R inhibitor in a glioma cell line.

    PubMed

    Arun, Sankaradoss; Vanisree, Arambakkam Janardhanam; Ravisankar, Shantha

    2016-07-15

    Connexins (Cx) play a crucial role in cell communication though regulation of cell growth and proliferation. In recent decades, both suppressive and enhancing roles of gap junction proteins in malignancy have been proposed, though mechanisms remain unclear. We intend to evaluate the impact of Cx30 on dysregulated growth of glioma owing to an aberrant expression of Insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R). The study also examined whether Cx30 expression influenced sensitivity of glioma cells to Picropodophyllin (PPP), the potent inhibitor of IGF-1R. C6 cells transfected with full length Cx30 resulted in complete abolition of colony-forming efficiency. Interestingly, PPP-supplemented cells behaved differently with and without exogenous Cx as confirmed by wound closure assay. The expressions of phosphorylated and unphosphorylated IGF-1R along with its key signaling enzymes, pAkt/pErk, were also varied significantly in transfected and non-transfected C6 cells. pIGF-1R and IGF-1R were significantly reduced on Cx30 transfection when compared with that of non-transfected cells. pErk expression was abolished in transfected C6 with no significant difference in the expression of pAkt. The potency of PPP against C6 was more pronounced in the presence of Cx30. We demonstrate that Cx30 has the potential to alter the IGF-1R mediated pathway thereby influencing the growth, proliferation and migration of glioma cells which could further enhance the effect of therapeutic intervention. Though it could not be corroborated that the observations made are due to Cx30-mediated channel-dependent and/or independent impact, we stress the impact of significance of Cx30 on IGF-1R in glioma and also in therapeutic aspects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Positive and Negative Cross-Talk between Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptor 1, Free Fatty Acid Receptor 4, and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor in Human Prostate Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Mandi M; Liu, Ze; Meier, Kathryn E

    2016-10-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a lipid mediator that mediates cellular effects via G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is a peptide that acts via a receptor tyrosine kinase. LPA and EGF both induce proliferation of prostate cancer cells and can transactivate each other's receptors. The LPA receptor LPA1 is particularly important for LPA response in human prostate cancer cells. Previous work in our laboratory has demonstrated that free fatty acid 4 (FFA4), a GPCR activated by ω-3 fatty acids, inhibits responses to both LPA and EGF in these cells. One potential mechanism for the inhibition involves negative interactions between FFA4 and LPA1, thereby suppressing responses to EGF that require LPA1 In the current study, we examined the role of LPA1 in mediating EGF and FFA4 agonist responses in two human prostate cancer cell lines, DU145 and PC-3. The results show that an LPA1-selective antagonist inhibits proliferation and migration to both LPA and EGF. Knockdown of LPA1 expression, using silencing RNA, blocks responses to LPA and significantly inhibits responses to EGF. The partial response to EGF that is observed after LPA1 knockdown is not inhibited by FFA4 agonists. Finally, the role of arrestin-3, a GPCR-binding protein that mediates many actions of activated GPCRs, was tested. Knockdown of arrestin-3 completely inhibits responses to both LPA and EGF in prostate cancer cells. Taken together, these results suggest that LPA1 plays a critical role in EGF responses and that FFA4 agonists inhibit proliferation by suppressing positive cross-talk between LPA1 and the EGF receptor. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  20. The Epstein-Barr virus BZLF1 protein inhibits tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 expression through effects on cellular C/EBP proteins.

    PubMed

    Bristol, Jillian A; Robinson, Amanda R; Barlow, Elizabeth A; Kenney, Shannon C

    2010-12-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus immediate-early protein, BZLF1 (Z), initiates the switch between latent and lytic infection and plays an essential role in mediating viral replication. Z also inhibits expression of the major receptor for tumor necrosis factor (TNF), TNFR1, thus repressing TNF cytokine signaling, but the mechanism for this effect is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that Z prevents both C/EBPα- and C/EBPβ-mediated activation of the TNFR1 promoter (TNFR1p) by interacting directly with both C/EBP family members. We show that Z interacts directly with C/EBPα and C/EBPβ in vivo and that a Z mutant altered at alanine residue 204 in the bZIP domain is impaired for the ability to interact with both C/EBP proteins. Furthermore, we find that the Z(A204D) mutant is attenuated in the ability to inhibit the TNFR1p but mediates lytic viral reactivation and replication in vitro in 293 cells as well as wild-type Z. Although Z does not bind directly to the TNFR1p in EMSA studies, chromatin immunoprecipitation studies indicate that Z is complexed with this promoter in vivo. The Z(A204D) mutant has reduced interaction with the TNFR1p in vivo but is similar to wild-type Z in its ability to complex with the IL-8 promoter. Finally, we show that the effect of Z on C/EBPα- and C/EBPβ-mediated activation is promoter dependent. These results indicate that Z modulates the effects of C/EBPα and C/EBPβ in a promoter-specific manner and that in some cases (including that of the TNFR1p), Z inhibits C/EBPα- and C/EBPβ-mediated activation.

  1. Selective Imaging of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-1 and Receptor-2 in Atherosclerotic Lesions in Diabetic and Non-diabetic ApoE(-/-) Mice.

    PubMed

    Tekabe, Yared; Johnson, Lynne L; Rodriquez, Krissy; Li, Qing; Backer, Marina; Backer, Joseph M

    2017-04-18

    Plaque vulnerability is associated with inflammation and angiogenesis, processes that rely on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling via two receptors, VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2. We have recently reported that enhanced uptake of scVEGF-PEG-DOTA/Tc-99m (scV/Tc) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) tracer that targets both VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2, identifies accelerated atherosclerosis in diabetic relative to non-diabetic ApoE(-/-) mice. Since VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2 may play different roles in atherosclerotic plaques, we reasoned that selective imaging of each receptor can provide more detailed information on plaque biology. Recently described VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2 selective mutants of scVEGF, named scVR1 and scVR2, were site-specifically derivatized with Tc-99m chelator DOTA via 3.4 kDa PEG linker, and their selectivity to the cognate receptors was confirmed in vitro. scVR1 and scVR2 conjugates were radiolabeled with Tc-99m to specific activity of 110 ± 11 MBq/nmol, yielding tracers named scVR1/Tc and scVR2/Tc. 34-40 week old diabetic and age-matched non-diabetic ApoE(-/-) mice were injected with tracers, 2-3 h later injected with x-ray computed tomography (CT) contrast agent and underwent hybrid SPECT/CT imaging. Tracer uptake, localized to proximal aorta and brachiocephalic vessels, was quantified as %ID from. Tracer uptake was also quantified as %ID/g from gamma counting of harvested plaques. Harvested atherosclerotic arterial tissue was used for immunofluorescent analyses of VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2 and various lineage-specific markers. Focal, receptor-mediated uptake in proximal aorta and brachiocephalic vessels was detected for both scVR1/Tc and scVR2/Tc tracers. Uptake of scVR1/Tc and scVR2/Tc was efficiently inhibited only by "cold" proteins of the same receptor selectivity. Tracer uptake in this area, expressed as %ID, was higher in diabetic vs. non- diabetic mice for scVR1/Tc (p = 0.01) but not for scVR2/Tc. Immunofluorescent analysis

  2. Role of a Genetic Polymorphism in the Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Receptor 1 Gene in Alcohol Drinking and Seeking Behaviors of Marchigian Sardinian Alcohol-Preferring Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ayanwuyi, Lydia O.; Carvajal, Francisca; Lerma-Cabrera, Jose M.; Domi, Esi; Björk, Karl; Ubaldi, Massimo; Heilig, Markus; Roberto, Marisa; Ciccocioppo, Roberto; Cippitelli, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Marchigian Sardinian alcohol-preferring (msP) rats exhibit innate preference for alcohol, are highly sensitive to stress and stress-induced alcohol seeking. Genetic analysis showed that over-expression of the corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) system of msP rats is correlated with the presence of two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) occurring in the promoter region (position −1836 and −2097) of the CRF1 receptor (CRF1-R) gene. Here we examined whether these point mutations were associated to the innate alcohol preference, stress-induced drinking, and seeking. We have recently re-derived the msP rats to obtain two distinct lines carrying the wild type (GG) and the point mutations (AA), respectively. The phenotypic characteristics of these two lines were compared with those of unselected Wistar rats. Both AA and GG rats showed similar patterns of voluntary alcohol intake and preference. Similarly, the pharmacological stressor yohimbine (0.0, 0.625, 1.25, and 2.5 mg/kg) elicited increased operant alcohol self-administration under fixed and progressive ratio reinforcement schedules in all three lines. Following extinction, yohimbine (0.0, 0.625, 1.25, and 2.5 mg/kg) significantly reinstated alcohol seeking in the three groups. However, at the highest dose this effect was no longer evident in AA rats. Treatment with the CRF1-R antagonist antalarmin (0, 5, 10, and 20 mg/kg) significantly reduced alcohol-reinforced lever pressing in the AA line (10 and 20 mg/kg) while a weaker or no effect was observed in the Wistar and the GG group, respectively. Finally, antalarmin significantly reduced yohimbine-induced increase in alcohol drinking in all three groups. In conclusion, these specific SNPs in the CRF1-R gene do not seem to play a primary role in the expression of the msP excessive drinking phenotype or stress-induced drinking but may be associated with a decreased threshold for stress-induced alcohol seeking and an increased sensitivity to the effects

  3. Cycloart-24-ene-26-ol-3-one, a New Cycloartane Isolated from Leaves of Aglaia exima Triggers Tumour Necrosis Factor-Receptor 1-Mediated Caspase-Dependent Apoptosis in Colon Cancer Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Loong, Xe-Min; Cheah, Foo Kit; Supratman, Unang; Litaudon, Marc; Mustafa, Mohd Rais; Awang, Khalijah

    2016-01-01

    Plants in the Meliaceae family are known to possess interesting biological activities, such as antimalaral, antihypertensive and antitumour activities. Previously, our group reported the plant-derived compound cycloart-24-ene-26-ol-3-one isolated from the hexane extracts of Aglaia exima leaves, which shows cytotoxicity towards various cancer cell lines, in particular, colon cancer cell lines. In this report, we further demonstrate that cycloart-24-ene-26-ol-3-one, from here forth known as cycloartane, reduces the viability of the colon cancer cell lines HT-29 and CaCO-2 in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Further elucidation of the compound’s mechanism showed that it binds to tumour necrosis factor-receptor 1 (TNF-R1) leading to the initiation of caspase-8 and, through the activation of Bid, in the activation of caspase-9. This activity causes a reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and the release of cytochrome-C. The activation of caspase-8 and -9 both act to commit the cancer cells to apoptosis through downstream caspase-3/7 activation, PARP cleavage and the lack of NFkB translocation into the nucleus. A molecular docking study showed that the cycloartane binds to the receptor through a hydrophobic interaction with cysteine-96 and hydrogen bonds with lysine-75 and -132. The results show that further development of the cycloartane as an anti-cancer drug is worthwhile. PMID:27070314

  4. Cardiovascular risk factor investigation: a pediatric issue

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Anabel N; Abreu, Glaucia R; Resende, Rogério S; Goncalves, Washington LS; Gouvea, Sonia Alves

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To correlate cardiovascular risk factors (e.g., hypertension, obesity, hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, hyperglycemia, sedentariness) in childhood and adolescence with the occurrence of cardiovascular disease. Sources A systematic review of books and selected articles from PubMed, SciELO and Cochrane from 1992 to 2012. Summary of findings Risk factors for atherosclerosis are present in childhood, although cardiovascular disease arises during adulthood. This article presents the main studies that describe the importance of investigating the risk factors for cardiovascular diseases in childhood and their associations. Significant rates of hypertension, obesity, dyslipidemia, and sedentariness occur in children and adolescents. Blood pressure needs to be measured in childhood. An increase in arterial blood pressure in young people predicts hypertension in adulthood. The death rate from cardiovascular disease is lowest in children with lower cholesterol levels and in individuals who exercise regularly. In addition, there is a high prevalence of sedentariness in children and adolescents. Conclusions Studies involving the analysis of cardiovascular risk factors should always report the prevalence of these factors and their correlations during childhood because these factors are indispensable for identifying an at-risk population. The identification of risk factors in asymptomatic children could contribute to a decrease in cardiovascular disease, preventing such diseases as hypertension, obesity, and dyslipidemia from becoming the epidemics of this century. PMID:23515212

  5. Tumor necrosis factor stimulates matrix metalloproteinase 9 secretion from cultured human chorionic trophoblast cells through TNF receptor 1 signaling to IKBKB-NFKB and MAPK1/3 pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Li, Han; Bocking, Alan D; Challis, John R G

    2010-09-01

    The identification of proinflammatory signal transduction pathways may suggest new therapeutic targets. In this study, we examine which signaling pathways are involved in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-induced matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) secretion in human chorionic trophoblast (CT) cells. Purified CT cells were cultured in the presence of antibodies or chemical inhibitors that specifically block/inhibit distinct TNF receptors and kinase pathways. TNF-induced proMMP9 production, as measured by zymography, was significantly blocked/inhibited by TNF receptor 1 (TNFRSF1A) antibody, NFKB activation inhibitor (NFKBAI), and MAPK1/3 (ERK) inhibitor (U0126) (P < 0.01), but not by TNF receptor 2 (TNFRSF1B) antibody, MAPK14 (p38 MAPK) inhibitor (SB203580), and MAPK8/9/10 (JNK) inhibitor (SP600125). By Western blot analysis, we found that TNF rapidly and significantly increased phosphorylation of IKBKB, MAPK1/3, and MAPK8/9/10 and that the phosphorylation of these kinases by TNF was reduced significantly by TNFRSF1A neutralizing antibody, but not by TNFRSF1B neutralizing antibody. Moreover, we found that TNF increased TNF receptor-associated factor (TRAF) 1 and decreased TRAF2 protein expression through TNFRSF1A, but not TNFRSF1B. The CT cells that had increased TRAF1 and decreased TRAF2 after an initial TNF treatment demonstrated a dramatic deficiency in phosphorylation of the above protein kinases following a secondary TNF treatment. Localization of RELA subunit by immunocytochemistry was shifted to the nuclei after TNF treatment compared to cytosol in untreated controls. We also found cross-talk between the phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathway and ERK pathway. In summary, we have demonstrated that TNF stimulates proMMP9 production in CT cells through TNFRSF1A-TRAFs-IKBKB-NFKB and ERK signaling pathways, but not through TNFRSF1B and JNK/p38-AP-1 pathways.

  6. Small Cytoskeleton-Associated Molecule, Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 1 Oncogene Partner 2/Wound Inducible Transcript-3.0 (FGFR1OP2/wit3.0), Facilitates Fibroblast-Driven Wound Closure

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Audrey; Hokugo, Akishige; Choi, Jae; Nishimura, Ichiro

    2010-01-01

    Wounds created in the oral cavity heal rapidly and leave minimal scarring. We have examined a role of a previously isolated cDNA from oral wounds encoding wound inducible transcript-3.0 (wit3.0), also known as fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 oncogene partner 2 (FGFR1OP2). FGFR1OP2/wit3.0 was highly expressed in oral wound fibroblasts without noticeable up-regulation of α-smooth muscle actin. In silico analyses, denaturing and nondenaturing gel Western blot, and immunocytology together demonstrated that FGFR1OP2/wit3.0 were able to dimerize and oligomerize through coiled-coil structures and appeared to associate with cytoskeleton networks in oral wound fibroblasts. Overexpression of FGFR1OP2/wit3.0 increased the floating collagen gel contraction of naïve oral fibroblasts to the level of oral wound fibroblasts, which was in turn attenuated by small-interfering RNA knockdown. The FGFR1OP2/wit3.0 synthesis did not affect the expression of collagen I as well as procontractile peptides such as α-smooth muscle actin, and transforming growth factor-β1 had no effect on FGFR1OP2/wit3.0 expression. Fibroblastic cells derived from embryonic stem cells carrying FGFR1OP2/wit3.0 (+/−) mutation showed significant retardation in cell migration. Thus, we postulate that FGFR1OP2/wit3.0 may regulate cell motility and stimulate wound closure. FGFR1OP2/wit3.0 was not up-regulated during skin wound healing; however, when treated with FGFR1OP2/wit3.0 -expression vector, the skin wound closure was significantly accelerated, resulting in the limited granulation tissue formation. Our data suggest that FGFR1OP2/wit3.0 may possess a therapeutic potential for wound management. PMID:19959814

  7. The combination of insulin-like growth factor receptor 1 (IGF1R) antibody cixutumumab and mitotane as a first-line therapy for patients with recurrent/metastatic adrenocortical carcinoma: a multi-institutional NCI-sponsored trial.

    PubMed

    Lerario, Antonio M; Worden, Francis P; Ramm, Carole A; Hesseltine, Elizabeth A; Hasseltine, Elizabeth A; Stadler, Walter M; Else, Tobias; Shah, Manisha H; Agamah, Edem; Rao, Krishna; Hammer, Gary D

    2014-08-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is an aggressive malignancy, which lacks an effective systemic treatment. Abnormal activation of insulin-like growth factor receptor 1 (IGF1R) has been frequently observed. Preclinical studies demonstrated that pharmacological inhibition of IGF1R signaling in ACC has antiproliferative effects. A previous phase I trial with an IGF1R inhibitor has demonstrated biological activity against ACC. The objective of this study is to assess the efficacy of the combination of the IGF1R inhibitor cixutumumab (IMC-A12) in association with mitotane as a first-line treatment for advanced/metastatic ACC. We conducted a multicenter, randomized double-arm phase II trial in patients with irresectable recurrent/metastatic ACC. The original protocol included two treatment groups: IMC-A12 + mitotane and mitotane as a single agent, after an initial single-arm phase for safety evaluation with IMC-A12 + mitotane. IMC-A12 was dosed at 10 mg/kg intravenously every 2 weeks. The starting dose for mitotane was 2 g daily, subsequently adjusted according to serum levels/symptoms. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS) according to RECIST (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors). This study was terminated before the randomization phase due to slow accrual and limited efficacy. Twenty patients (13 males, 7 females) with a median age of 50.2 years (range 21.9-79.6) were enrolled for the single-arm phase. Therapeutic effects were observed in 8/20 patients, including one partial response and seven stable diseases. The median PFS was 6 weeks (range 2.66-48). Toxic events included two grade 4 (hyperglycemia and hyponatremia) and one grade 5 (multiorgan failure). Although the regimen demonstrated activity in some patients, the relatively low therapeutic efficacy precluded further studies with this combination of drugs.

  8. Investigating RNA editing factors from trypanosome mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Aphasizheva, Inna; Zhang, Liye; Aphasizhev, Ruslan

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial U-insertion/deletion mRNA editing is carried out by two principal multiprotein assemblies, enzymatic RNA editing core (RECC) and RNA editing substrate binding (RESC) complexes, and a plethora of auxiliary factors. An integral part of mitochondrial gene expression, editing receives inputs from primary mRNA and gRNA precursor processing pathways, and generates substrates for mRNA polyadenylation and translation. Although nearly all RECC-embedded enzymes have been implicated in specific editing reactions, the majority of proteins that populate the RESC are also essential for generating edited mRNAs. However, lack of recognizable motifs in RESC subunits limits the prowess of bioinformatics in guiding biochemical experiments and elucidating their specific biological functions. In this chapter, we describe a generic workflow for investigating mitochondrial mRNA editing in Trypanosoma brucei and focus on several methods that proved instrumental is assigning definitive functions to editing factors lacking known signature sequences. PMID:27020893

  9. Programmed cell death‐ligand 1 (PD‐L1) expression and fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) amplification in stage III/IV lung squamous cell carcinoma (SQC)

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qinxiang; Sun, Yu; Yu, Sifan; Bai, Hua; Zhao, Jun; Zhuo, Minglei

    2016-01-01

    Background This study was conducted to explore programmed cell death‐ligand‐1 (PD‐L1) expression and fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) amplification in stage IIIB/IV lung squamous cell carcinoma (SQC). Correlations between PD‐L1 and FGFR1, and with clinicopathological characteristics, efficacy of platinum‐based chemotherapy, and prognosis were analyzed. Methods One hundred and twenty‐eight consecutive stage III/IV SQC patients were enrolled in this study from 2009 to 2014. Seventy‐eight patients received platinum‐based chemotherapy. Immunohistochemistry was used to assess PD‐L1 expression and fluorescence in situ hybridization was applied to detect FGFR1 amplification. Results PD‐L1 expression was detected in 61.7% (79/128) of lung SQC patients. Smokers had significantly higher PD‐L1 expression rates than non‐smokers (66.1% vs. 44.0%, P = 0.042, respectively). The objective response and disease control rates for platinum‐based chemotherapy were not significantly different between PD‐L1 negative and positive patients (43.3% vs. 36.2%, P = 0.434; 80.0% vs. 78.7% P = 0.840, respectively); however, overall survival in PD‐L1‐negative patients was significantly longer than in PD‐L1‐positive patients (41.5 vs. 19.3 months, P = 0.001). Twenty‐five percent (32/128) of patients displayed FGFR1 amplification, with a lower rate in stage III patients compared to stage IV (17.1% vs. 36.5%, P = 0.013, respectively). There was no significant difference in FGFR1 amplification levels between overall response, disease control or overall survival rates. No correlation was observed between PD‐L1 expression and FGFR1 amplification (P = 0.916). Conclusion PD‐L1 expression may function as a prognostic factor in Chinese stage III/IV SQC patients. FGFR1 amplification is more prevalent in late stage SQC patients but does not predict chemotherapy response. There is no apparent correlation between PD‐L1 expression

  10. Differences between disease-associated endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 (ERAP1) isoforms in cellular expression, interactions with tumour necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNF-R1) and regulation by cytokines.

    PubMed

    Yousaf, N; Low, W Y; Onipinla, A; Mein, C; Caulfield, M; Munroe, P B; Chernajovsky, Y

    2015-05-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 (ERAP1) processes peptides for major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I presentation and promotes cytokine receptor ectodomain shedding. These known functions of ERAP1 may explain its genetic association with several autoimmune inflammatory diseases. In this study, we identified four novel alternatively spliced variants of ERAP1 mRNA, designated as ΔExon-11, ΔExon-13, ΔExon-14 and ΔExon-15. We also observed a rapid and differential modulation of ERAP1 mRNA levels and spliced variants in different cell types pretreated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We have studied three full-length allelic forms of ERAP1 (R127-K528, P127-K528, P127-R528) and one spliced variant (ΔExon-11) and assessed their interactions with tumour necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNF-R1) in transfected cells. We observed variation in cellular expression of different ERAP1 isoforms, with R127-K528 being expressed at a much lower level. Furthermore, the cellular expression of full-length P127-K528 and ΔExon-11 spliced variant was enhanced significantly when co-transfected with TNF-R1. Isoforms P127-K528, P127-R528 and ΔExon-11 spliced variant associated with TNF-R1, and this interaction occurred in a region within the first 10 exons of ERAP1. Supernatant-derived vesicles from transfected cells contained the full-length and ectodomain form of soluble TNF-R1, as well as carrying the full-length ERAP1 isoforms. We observed marginal differences between TNF-R1 ectodomain levels when co-expressed with individual ERAP1 isoforms, and treatment of transfected cells with tumour necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-10 exerted variable effects on TNF-R1 ectodomain cleavage. Our data suggest that ERAP1 isoforms may exhibit differential biological properties and inflammatory mediators could play critical roles in modulating ERAP1 expression, leading to altered functional activities of this enzyme.

  11. Interleukin-4 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor mediates the upregulation of soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 in RAW264.7 cells-a process in which p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling has an important role.

    PubMed

    Xia, Lin; Dong, Zhaogang; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Xiaoying; Song, Xiaobin; Sun, Mingxia; Hu, Yingwei; Liu, Shaohua; Wang, Ketao; Qu, Xun; Wei, Fengcai

    2016-06-01

    Soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 (sVEGFR1) antagonizes angiogenesis by inhibiting the biological function of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Immature dendritic cells (imDCs) express high levels of sVEGFR1 during development and are antiangiogenic. This study aimed to investigate the changes in VEGFR1, sVEGFR1, and VEGF levels during the development of imDCs and explore the underlying signaling mechanisms. To model the differentiation of imDCs from monocytes, RAW264.7 cells, a murine monocyte/macrophage cell line, were stimulated by interleukin-4 (IL-4; 10 ng/mL, 20 ng/mL, and 40 ng/mL) and/or by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF; 10 ng/mL, 20 ng/mL, and 50 ng/mL) and/or pretreated by the p38 inhibitor SB203580. The levels of VEGFR1, sVEGFR1, and VEGF were detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Western blot, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). IL-4 increased the VEGFR1 mRNA and sVEGFR1 levels in RAW264.7 (p < 0.05). This increase was inhibited by SB203580. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor increased the sVEGFR1 levels, but it had no significant effect on VEGFR1 mRNA levels. SB203580 decreased the expression of VEGFR1 mRNA induced by GM-CSF, whereas sVEGFR1 was unaffected. IL-4 had a greater effect on sVEGFR1 levels, compared to GM-CSF. IL-4 and GM-CSF increased sVEGFR1 levels, but did not significantly effect VEGF expression, and led to the antiangiogenesis properties of monocytes. p38 Mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling has an important role in the process. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Clinical assessment and mutation analysis of Kallmann syndrome 1 (KAL1) and fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1, or KAL2) in five families and 18 sporadic patients.

    PubMed

    Sato, Naoko; Katsumata, Noriyuki; Kagami, Masayo; Hasegawa, Tomonobu; Hori, Naoaki; Kawakita, Setsuyo; Minowada, Shigeru; Shimotsuka, Aki; Shishiba, Yoshimasa; Yokozawa, Masato; Yasuda, Toshiyuki; Nagasaki, Keisuke; Hasegawa, Daiichiro; Hasegawa, Yukihiro; Tachibana, Katsuhiko; Naiki, Yasuhiro; Horikawa, Reiko; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Ogata, Tsutomu

    2004-03-01

    We report on the clinical and molecular findings in 25 males and three females with Kallmann syndrome (KS) aged 10-53 yr. Ten males were from five families, and the remaining 15 males and three females were apparently sporadic cases. Molecular studies were performed for Kallmann syndrome 1 (KAL1) and fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1, also known as KAL2) by sequence analysis for all the coding exons, by PCR-based deletion analysis, and by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis, showing six novel and two recurrent intragenic KAL1 mutations in seven familial and four sporadic male cases and two novel intragenic FGFR1 mutations in two sporadic male cases. In addition, submicroscopic deletions at Xp22.3 involving VCX-A, STS, KAL1, and OA1 were identified in three familial cases and one sporadic male case affected by a contiguous gene syndrome. Clinical assessment in the 15 males with KAL1 mutations showed normal and borderline olfactory function in two males and right-side dominant renal lesion in seven males, in addition to variable degrees of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) in all the 15 males and olfactory dysfunction in 13 males. The two males with FGFR1 mutations had HH and anosmia and lacked other features. Clinical features in the remaining 11 cases with no demonstrable KAL1 or FGFR1 mutations included right renal aplasia in one female, cleft palate in one male, cleft palate and perceptive deafness in one male, and dental agenesis and perceptive deafness in one male, in addition to a variable extent of HH and olfactory dysfunction. The results suggest the following: 1) KAL1 mutations might be more prevalent in the Japanese patients than previously estimated in the Caucasian patients and can be associated with apparently normal olfactory function; 2) FGFR1 mutations account for approximately 10% of KS patients, as previously reported in the Caucasian patients, and can result in HH and olfactory dysfunction-only phenotype; and 3) renal

  13. Safety and Immunogenicity of a Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 1 (HER1)-Based Vaccine in Prostate Castration-Resistant Carcinoma Patients: A Dose-Escalation Phase I Study Trial

    PubMed Central

    Caballero, Iraida; Aira, Lazaro E.; Lavastida, Anabel; Popa, Xitlally; Rivero, Javier; González, Joaquín; Mesa, Mónica; González, Narjara; Coba, Kelly; Lorenzo-Luaces, Patricia; Wilkinson, Barbara; Santiesteban, Yuliannis; Santiesteban, Yanela; Troche, Mayelin; Suarez, Eduardo; Crombet, Tania; Sánchez, Belinda; Casacó, Angel; Macías, Amparo; Mazorra, Zaima

    2017-01-01

    Metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) remains incurable due to the lack of effective therapies. Activation of the human epidermal growth factor receptor 1 (HER1) in prostate cancer contributes to metastatic progression as well as to disease relapse. Here, we determined the toxicity and immunogenicity of a HER1-based cancer vaccine in CRPC patients included in a phase I clinical trial. CRPC patients (n = 24) were intramuscularly vaccinated with HER1 vaccine consisting of the extracellular domain of HER1 molecule (ECD) and very small size proteoliposome from Neisseria meningitidis (VSSP) and Montanide ISA-51 VG as adjuvants. Patients were included in five groups according to the vaccine dose (100, 200, 400, 600, and 800 μg). The primary endpoints were safety and immunogenicity. The anti-HER1 antibodies were measured by an ELISA, the recognition of an HER1 positive tumor cell line and the inhibition of HER1 phosphorylation by sera were determined by flow cytometry and western blot analysis, respectively. The HER1-specific T cell response was assessed by determination of IFN-γ-producing T cells using ELISpot assay. The vaccine was well tolerated. No grade III or IV adverse events were reported. High titers of anti-HER1 antibodies were observed in most of the evaluated patients. There were no significant differences regarding the geometric means of the anti-HER1 titers among the dose groups except the group of 100 μg in which antibody titers were significantly lower. A Th1-type IgG subclasses pattern was predominant in most patients. Only patients receiving the higher doses of vaccine showed significant tumor cell recognition and HER1 phosphorylation inhibition by hyperimmune sera. Forty two percent of the patients showed a specific T cell response against HER1 peptides pool in post-treatment samples. There was a trend toward survival benefit in those patients showing high anti-HER1 specific antibody titers and a significant association between

  14. The TNF receptor 1: a split personality complex.

    PubMed

    Barnhart, Bryan C; Peter, Marcus E

    2003-07-25

    The tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1), a prototypic member of the death receptor family signals both cell survival and apoptosis. In this issue of Cell, report that apoptotic TNFR1 signaling proceeds via the sequential formation of two distinct complexes. Since the first complex can activate survival signals and influence the activity of the second complex, this mechanism provides a checkpoint to control the execution of apoptosis.

  15. Fibroblast growth factor 21 protects rat cardiomyocytes from endoplasmic reticulum stress by promoting the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1-extracellular signal‑regulated kinase 1/2 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Liang, Pingping; Zhong, Lin; Gong, Lei; Wang, Jiahui; Zhu, Yujie; Liu, Weifeng; Yang, Jun

    2017-09-19

    Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21), as an endocrine factor, is secreted into circulation by injured cardiomyocytes. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced apoptosis has been proposed as an important pathophysiological mechanism for cardiomyocyte injury. However, whether the enhanced expression of FGF21 in cardiomyocytes is linked to ER stress, and the effect and underlying mechanism of FGF21 on ER stress-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis remain unclear. In the present study, it was demonstrated that mild ER stress resulted in upregulated expression levels of FGF21 and its main receptors, as a response to cell compensation, at the induction of ≤5 µM tunicamycin (TM). However, excessive ER stress (TM ≥10 µM) activated the ER stress-mediated apoptosis signaling pathways, including PKR-like ER kinase (PERK)-eukaryotic translational initiation factor 2α (eIF2α)-activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4)-CCAAT/-enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP) and inositol-requiring kinase 1α (IRE1α)-c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK), as well as inhibited the expression of FGF21 and its primary receptors. In addition, FGF21 overexpression provided protection against ER stress-induced cardiomyocyte injury, as evidenced by increased cell viability and reduced apoptosis. These changes were associated with the inhibition of ER stress-mediated apoptosis signaling pathways, as well as increased phosphorylation of FGFR1 and ERK1/2. However, the protective effects of overexpressed FGF21 were abolished following treatment with FGFR1 and ERK1/2 inhibitors. Thus, mild ER stress may induce the expression of FGF21 and its primary receptors in cardiomyocytes. FGF21 inhibits ER stress-induced cardiomyocyte injury as least in part via the FGFR1-ERK1/2 signaling pathway.

  16. Genetic moderation of child maltreatment effects on depression and internalizing symptoms by serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), norepinephrine transporter (NET), and corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRHR1) genes in African American children.

    PubMed

    Cicchetti, Dante; Rogosch, Fred A

    2014-11-01

    Genetic moderation of the effects of child maltreatment on depression and internalizing symptoms was investigated in a sample of low-income maltreated and nonmaltreated African American children (N = 1,096). Lifetime child maltreatment experiences were independently coded from Child Protective Services records and maternal report. Child depression and internalizing problems were assessed in the context of a summer research camp by self-report on the Children's Depression Inventory and adult counselor report on the Teacher Report Form. DNA was obtained from buccal cell or saliva samples and genotyped for polymorphisms of the following genes: serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), norepinephrine transporter, and corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1. Analyses of covariance with age and gender as covariates were conducted, with maltreatment status and respective polymorphism as main effects and their Gene × Environment (G × E) interactions. Maltreatment consistently was associated with higher Children's Depression Inventory and Teacher Report Form symptoms. The results for child self-report symptoms indicated a G × E interaction for BDNF and maltreatment. In addition, BDNF and triallelic 5-HTTLPR interacted with child maltreatment in a G × G × E interaction. Analyses for counselor report of child anxiety/depression symptoms on the Teacher Report Form indicated moderation of child maltreatment effects by triallelic 5-HTTLPR. These effects were elaborated based on variation in developmental timing of maltreatment experiences. Norepinephrine transporter was found to further moderate the G × E interaction of 5-HTTLPR and maltreatment status, revealing a G × G × E interaction. This G × G × E was extended by consideration of variation in maltreatment subtype experiences. Finally, G × G × E effects were observed for the co-action of BDNF and the corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1

  17. Investigating Change in Intraindividual Factor Structure over Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rausch, Joseph R.

    2009-01-01

    The investigation of change in factor structure over time can provide new opportunities for the development of theory in psychology. The method proposed to investigate change in intraindividual factor structure over time is an extension of P-technique factor analysis, in which the P-technique factor model is fit within relatively small windows of…

  18. Investigation of Power Factor Controller Applications.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-01

    16 V’. Auburn Report 16 Pacific Gas and Electric Study 25 San Diego Gas and Electric Study 34 Northern Natural Gas Study 42 6...application. San Diego Gas and Electric Study SDG&E’s testing was primarily to determine the effect the NASA PFC has on power consumption and power...Magdaluyo, and J. D. Huey, Three Phase Power Factor Controller Test (Internal Correspondence)(San Diego Gas and Electric Com- • .’-," pany, December 1981

  19. Experimental investigations of pupil accommodation factors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eui Chul; Lee, Ji Woo; Park, Kang Ryoung

    2011-08-17

    PURPOSE. The contraction and dilation of the iris muscle that controls the amount of light entering the retina causes pupil accommodation. In this study, experiments were performed and two of the three factors that influence pupil accommodation were analyzed: lighting conditions and depth fixations. The psychological benefits were not examined, because they could not be quantified. METHODS. A head-wearable eyeglasses-based, eye-capturing device was designed to measure pupil size. It included a near-infrared (NIR) camera and an NIR light-emitting diode. Twenty-four subjects watched two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) stereoscopic videos of the same content, and the changes in pupil size were measured by using the eye-capturing device and image-processing methods: RESULTS. The pupil size changed with the intensity of the videos and the disparities between the left and right images of a 3D stereoscopic video. There was correlation between the pupil size and average intensity. The pupil diameter could be estimated as being contracted from approximately 5.96 to 4.25 mm as the intensity varied from 0 to 255. Further, from the changes in the depth fixation for the pupil accommodation, it was confirmed that the depth fixation also affected accommodation of pupil size. CONCLUSIONS. It was confirmed that the lighting condition was an even more significant factor in pupil accommodation than was depth fixation (significance ratio: approximately 3.2:1) when watching 3D stereoscopic video. Pupil accommodation was more affected by depth fixation in the real world than was the binocular convergence in the 3D stereoscopic display.

  20. Specificity of human anti-variable heavy (VH ) chain autoantibodies and impact on the design and clinical testing of a VH domain antibody antagonist of tumour necrosis factorreceptor 1.

    PubMed

    Cordy, J C; Morley, P J; Wright, T J; Birchler, M A; Lewis, A P; Emmins, R; Chen, Y Z; Powley, W M; Bareille, P J; Wilson, R; Tonkyn, J; Bayliffe, A I; Lazaar, A L

    2015-11-01

    During clinical trials of a tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-R1 domain antibody (dAb™) antagonist (GSK1995057), infusion reactions consistent with cytokine release were observed in healthy subjects with high levels of a novel, pre-existing human anti-VH (HAVH) autoantibody. In the presence of HAVH autoantibodies, GSK1995057 induced cytokine release in vitro due to binding of HAVH autoantibodies to a framework region of the dAb. The epitope on GSK1995057 was characterized and dAbs with reduced binding to HAVH autoantibodies were generated; pharmacological comparability was determined in human in-vitro systems and in-vivo animal experiments. A Phase I clinical trial was conducted to investigate the safety and tolerability of the modified dAb (GSK2862277). A significant reduction in HAVH binding was achieved by adding a single alanine residue at the C-terminus to create GSK2862277. Screening a pool of healthy donors demonstrated a reduced frequency of pre-existing autoantibodies from 51% to 7%; in all other respects, GSK2862277 and the parent dAb were comparable. In the Phase I trial, GSK2862277 was well tolerated by both the inhaled and intravenous routes. One subject experienced a mild infusion reaction with cytokine release following intravenous dosing. Subsequently, this subject was found to have high levels of a novel pre-existing antibody specific to the extended C-terminus of GSK2862277. Despite the reduced binding of GSK2862277 to pre-existing HAVH autoantibodies, adverse effects associated with the presence of a novel pre-existing antibody response specific to the modified dAb framework were identified and highlight the challenge of developing biological antagonists to this class of receptor. © 2015 British Society for Immunology.

  1. Specificity of human anti-variable heavy (VH) chain autoantibodies and impact on the design and clinical testing of a VH domain antibody antagonist of tumour necrosis factorreceptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Cordy, J C; Morley, P J; Wright, T J; Birchler, M A; Lewis, A P; Emmins, R; Chen, Y Z; Powley, W M; Bareille, P J; Wilson, R; Tonkyn, J; Bayliffe, A I; Lazaar, A L

    2015-01-01

    During clinical trials of a tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-R1 domain antibody (dAb™) antagonist (GSK1995057), infusion reactions consistent with cytokine release were observed in healthy subjects with high levels of a novel, pre-existing human anti-VH (HAVH) autoantibody. In the presence of HAVH autoantibodies, GSK1995057 induced cytokine release in vitro due to binding of HAVH autoantibodies to a framework region of the dAb. The epitope on GSK1995057 was characterized and dAbs with reduced binding to HAVH autoantibodies were generated; pharmacological comparability was determined in human in-vitro systems and in-vivo animal experiments. A Phase I clinical trial was conducted to investigate the safety and tolerability of the modified dAb (GSK2862277). A significant reduction in HAVH binding was achieved by adding a single alanine residue at the C-terminus to create GSK2862277. Screening a pool of healthy donors demonstrated a reduced frequency of pre-existing autoantibodies from 51% to 7%; in all other respects, GSK2862277 and the parent dAb were comparable. In the Phase I trial, GSK2862277 was well tolerated by both the inhaled and intravenous routes. One subject experienced a mild infusion reaction with cytokine release following intravenous dosing. Subsequently, this subject was found to have high levels of a novel pre-existing antibody specific to the extended C-terminus of GSK2862277. Despite the reduced binding of GSK2862277 to pre-existing HAVH autoantibodies, adverse effects associated with the presence of a novel pre-existing antibody response specific to the modified dAb framework were identified and highlight the challenge of developing biological antagonists to this class of receptor. PMID:26178412

  2. Tetrahydroisoquinoline-7-carboxamide Derivatives as New Selective Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 (DDR1) Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen; Zhang, Yali; Bartual, Sergio G; Luo, Jinfeng; Xu, Tingting; Du, Wenting; Xun, Qiuju; Tu, Zhengchao; Brekken, Rolf A; Ren, Xiaomei; Bullock, Alex N; Liang, Guang; Lu, Xiaoyun; Ding, Ke

    2017-03-09

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a deadly symptom for serious lung inflammation. Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 (DDR1) is a new potential target for anti-inflammatory drug discovery. A new selective tetrahydroisoquinoline-7-carboxamide based DDR1 inhibitor 7ae was discovered to tightly bind the DDR1 protein and potently inhibit its kinase function with a Kd value of 2.2 nM and an IC50 value of 6.6 nM, respectively. The compound dose-dependently inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) release in mouse primary peritoneal macrophages (MPMs). In addition, 7ae also exhibited promising in vivo anti-inflammatory effects in a LPS-induced mouse ALI model. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first "proof of concept" investigation on the potential application of a small molecule DDR1 inhibitor to treat ALI.

  3. Sortilin receptor 1 predicts longitudinal cognitive change.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Chandra A; Zavala, Catalina; Gatz, Margaret; Vie, Loryana; Johansson, Boo; Malmberg, Bo; Ingelsson, Erik; Prince, Jonathan A; Pedersen, Nancy L

    2013-06-01

    The gene encoding sortilin receptor 1 (SORL1) has been associated with Alzheimer's disease risk. We examined 15 SORL1 variants and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) set risk scores in relation to longitudinal verbal, spatial, memory, and perceptual speed performance, testing for age trends and sex-specific effects. Altogether, 1609 individuals from 3 population-based Swedish twin studies were assessed up to 5 times across 16 years. Controlling for apolipoprotein E genotype (APOE), multiple simple and sex-moderated associations were observed for spatial, episodic memory, and verbal trajectories (p = 1.25E-03 to p = 4.83E-02). Five variants (rs11600875, rs753780, rs7105365, rs11820794, rs2070045) were associated across domains. Notably, in those homozygous for the rs2070045 risk allele, men demonstrated initially favorable performance but accelerating declines, and women showed overall lower performance. SNP set risk scores predicted spatial (Card Rotations, p = 5.92E-03) and episodic memory trajectories (Thurstone Picture Memory, p = 3.34E-02), where higher risk scores benefited men's versus women's performance up to age 75 but with accelerating declines. SORL1 is associated with cognitive aging, and might contribute differentially to change in men and women. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The Toll-like receptor 1/2 agonists Pam(3) CSK(4) and human β-defensin-3 differentially induce interleukin-10 and nuclear factor-κB signalling patterns in human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Funderburg, Nicholas T; Jadlowsky, Julie K; Lederman, Michael M; Feng, Zhimin; Weinberg, Aaron; Sieg, Scott F

    2011-10-01

    Human β-defensin 3 (hBD-3) activates antigen-presenting cells through Toll-like receptors (TLRs) 1/2. Several TLR1/2 agonists have been identified but little is known about how they might differentially affect cellular activation. We compared the effects of hBD-3 with those of another TLR1/2 agonist, Pam(3) CSK(4) , in human monocytes. Monocytes incubated with hBD-3 or Pam(3) CSK(4) produced interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8 and IL-1β, but only Pam(3) CSK(4) induced IL-10. The IL-10 induction by Pam(3) CSK(4) caused down-modulation of the co-stimulatory molecule, CD86, whereas CD86 expression was increased in monocytes exposed to hBD-3. Assessment of signalling pathways linked to IL-10 induction indicated that mitogen-activated protein kinases were activated similarly by hBD-3 or Pam(3) CSK(4) , whereas the non-canonical nuclear factor-κB pathway was only induced by Pam(3) CSK(4) . Our data suggest that the lack of non-canonical nuclear factor-κB signalling by hBD-3 could contribute to the failure of this TLR agonist to induce production of the anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10, in human monocytes. © 2011 The Authors. Immunology © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. The photomorphogenic factors UV-B RECEPTOR 1, ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL 5, and HY5 HOMOLOGUE are part of the UV-B signalling pathway in grapevine and mediate flavonol accumulation in response to the environment

    PubMed Central

    Loyola, Rodrigo; Herrera, Daniela; Mas, Abraham; Wong, Darren Chern Jan; Höll, Janine; Cavallini, Erika; Amato, Alessandra; Azuma, Akifumi; Ziegler, Tobias; Aquea, Felipe; Castellarin, Simone Diego; Bogs, Jochen; Tornielli, Giovanni Battista; Peña-Neira, Alvaro; Czemmel, Stefan; Alcalde, José Antonio; Matus, José Tomás; Arce-Johnson, Patricio

    2016-01-01

    Grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) is a species well known for its adaptation to radiation. However, photomorphogenic factors related to UV-B responses have not been molecularly characterized. We cloned and studied the role of UV-B RECEPTOR (UVR1), ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL 5 (HY5), and HY5 HOMOLOGUE (HYH) from V. vinifera. We performed gene functional characterizations, generated co-expression networks, and tested them in different environmental conditions. These genes complemented the Arabidopsis uvr8 and hy5 mutants in morphological and secondary metabolic responses to radiation. We combined microarray and RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) data with promoter inspections to identify HY5 and HYH putative target genes and their DNA binding preferences. Despite sharing a large set of common co-expressed genes, we found different hierarchies for HY5 and HYH depending on the organ and stress condition, reflecting both co-operative and partially redundant roles. New candidate UV-B gene markers were supported by the presence of HY5-binding sites. These included a set of flavonol-related genes that were up-regulated in a HY5 transient expression assay. We irradiated in vitro plantlets and fruits from old potted vines with high and low UV-B exposures and followed the accumulation of flavonols and changes in gene expression in comparison with non-irradiated conditions. UVR1, HY5, and HYH expression varied with organ, developmental stage, and type of radiation. Surprisingly, UVR1 expression was modulated by shading and temperature in berries, but not by UV-B radiation. We propose that the UV-B response machinery favours berry flavonol accumulation through the activation of HY5 and HYH at different developmental stages at both high and low UV-B exposures. PMID:27543604

  6. The photomorphogenic factors UV-B RECEPTOR 1, ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL 5, and HY5 HOMOLOGUE are part of the UV-B signalling pathway in grapevine and mediate flavonol accumulation in response to the environment.

    PubMed

    Loyola, Rodrigo; Herrera, Daniela; Mas, Abraham; Wong, Darren Chern Jan; Höll, Janine; Cavallini, Erika; Amato, Alessandra; Azuma, Akifumi; Ziegler, Tobias; Aquea, Felipe; Castellarin, Simone Diego; Bogs, Jochen; Tornielli, Giovanni Battista; Peña-Neira, Alvaro; Czemmel, Stefan; Alcalde, José Antonio; Matus, José Tomás; Arce-Johnson, Patricio

    2016-10-01

    Grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) is a species well known for its adaptation to radiation. However, photomorphogenic factors related to UV-B responses have not been molecularly characterized. We cloned and studied the role of UV-B RECEPTOR (UVR1), ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL 5 (HY5), and HY5 HOMOLOGUE (HYH) from V. vinifera We performed gene functional characterizations, generated co-expression networks, and tested them in different environmental conditions. These genes complemented the Arabidopsis uvr8 and hy5 mutants in morphological and secondary metabolic responses to radiation. We combined microarray and RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) data with promoter inspections to identify HY5 and HYH putative target genes and their DNA binding preferences. Despite sharing a large set of common co-expressed genes, we found different hierarchies for HY5 and HYH depending on the organ and stress condition, reflecting both co-operative and partially redundant roles. New candidate UV-B gene markers were supported by the presence of HY5-binding sites. These included a set of flavonol-related genes that were up-regulated in a HY5 transient expression assay. We irradiated in vitro plantlets and fruits from old potted vines with high and low UV-B exposures and followed the accumulation of flavonols and changes in gene expression in comparison with non-irradiated conditions. UVR1, HY5, and HYH expression varied with organ, developmental stage, and type of radiation. Surprisingly, UVR1 expression was modulated by shading and temperature in berries, but not by UV-B radiation. We propose that the UV-B response machinery favours berry flavonol accumulation through the activation of HY5 and HYH at different developmental stages at both high and low UV-B exposures.

  7. Lack of soluble tumor necrosis factor alpha receptor 1 and 2 and interleukin-1beta compartmentalization in lungs of mice after a single intratracheal inoculation with live Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed

    Nemec, Ana; Pavlica, Zlatko; Svete, Alenka Nemec; Erzen, Damijan; Crossley, David A; Petelin, Milan

    2009-09-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis aspiration pneumonia induces local and systemic cytokine responses, but the dynamic of the immune response following lung exposure to live P. gingivalis is poorly understood. Groups of 50 12-week-old male BALB/c mice were inoculated intratracheally with live P. gingivalis ATCC 33277 using low dose (2 x 10(5) colony-forming units [CFU]), high dose (2.9 x 10(9) CFU), or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS; sham-inoculated), and the 3 groups were sacrificed at 2, 6, 24, 72, 168 hours. Lung and serum samples were collected for tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), soluble TNF-alpha receptors (sTNFRs), interleukin (IL)-1beta, and IL-6 analysis and lung histology. Pneumonia, only observed in the high-dose group, was associated with an early increase in lung TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and IL-6, whereas no significant changes were observed in lung sTNFRs. Serum sTNFRs were significantly increased in high-dose animals at all times. IL-1beta elevation occurred earlier in serum than in lungs. IL-1beta was also significantly elevated in serum from low-dose animals at 6 hours. Serum IL-6 and sTNFRs remained raised at 7 days, whereas all other measured cytokines returned to basal levels with resolution of pneumonia. Development of pneumonia is dependent on the P. gingivalis dose; however, part of the cytokine response is unique to the systemic compartment, even in animals that do not develop pneumonia.

  8. Mouse Aorta Smooth Muscle Cells Differentiate Into Lymphoid Tissue Organizer-Like Cells on Combined Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-1/Lymphotoxin β-Receptor NF-κB Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lötzer, Katharina; Döpping, Sandra; Connert, Sabine; Gräbner, Rolf; Spanbroek, Rainer; Lemser, Birgit; Beer, Michael; Hildner, Markus; Hehlgans, Thomas; van der Wall, Michael; Mebius, Reina E.; Lovas, Agnes; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.; Weih, Falk; Habenicht, Andreas J.R.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Mouse aorta smooth muscle cells (SMC) express tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 1A (TNFR-1) and lymphotoxin β-receptor (LTβR). Circumstantial evidence has linked the SMC LTβR to tertiary lymphoid organogenesis in hyperlipidemic mice. Here, we explored TNFR-1 and LTβR signaling in cultured SMC. Methods and Results TNFR-1 signaling activated the classical RelA NF-κB pathway, whereas LTβR signaling activated the classical RelA and alternative RelB NF-κB pathways, and both signaling pathways synergized to enhance p100 inhibitor processing to the p52 subunit of NF-κB. Microarrays showed that simultaneous TNFR-1/LTβR activation resulted in elevated mRNA encoding leukocyte homeostatic chemokines CCL2, CCL5, CXCL1, and CX3CL1. Importantly, SMC acquired features of lymphoid tissue organizers, which control tertiary lymphoid organogenesis in autoimmune diseases through hyperinduction of CCL7, CCL9, CXCL13, CCL19, CXCL16, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1. TNFR-1/LTβR cross-talk resulted in augmented secretion of lymphorganogenic chemokine proteins. Supernatants of TNFR-1/LTβR–activated SMC markedly supported migration of splenic T cells, B cells, and macrophages/dendritic cells. Experiments with ltbr−/− SMC indicated that LTβR-RelB activation was obligatory to generate the lymphoid tissue organizer phenotype. Conclusion SMC may participate in the formation of tertiary lymphoid tissue in atherosclerosis by upregulation of lymphorganogenic chemokines involved in T-lymphocyte, B-lymphocyte, and macrophage/dendritic cell attraction. PMID:20139367

  9. Phase III, Double-Blind, Randomized Trial That Compared Maintenance Lapatinib Versus Placebo After First-Line Chemotherapy in Patients With Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 1/2-Positive Metastatic Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Powles, Thomas; Huddart, Robert A; Elliott, Tony; Sarker, Shah-Jalal; Ackerman, Charlotte; Jones, Robert; Hussain, Syed; Crabb, Simon; Jagdev, Satinder; Chester, John; Hilman, Serena; Beresford, Mark; Macdonald, Graham; Santhanam, Sundar; Frew, John A; Stockdale, Andrew; Hughes, Simon; Berney, Daniel; Chowdhury, Simon

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To establish whether maintenance lapatinib after first-line chemotherapy is beneficial in human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) 1/HER2-positive metastatic urothelial bladder cancer (UBC). Methods Patients with metastatic UBC were screened centrally for HER1/HER2 overexpression. Patients who screened positive for HER1/2 and who did not have progressive disease during chemotherapy (four to eight cycles) were randomly assigned one to one to lapatinib or placebo after completion of first-line/initial chemotherapy for metastatic disease. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS). Results Between 2007 and 2013, 446 patients with UBC were screened, and 232 with HER1- or HER2-positive disease were randomly assigned. The median PFS for lapatinib and placebo was 4.5 (95% CI, 2.8 to 5.4) and 5.1 (95% CI, 3.0 to 5.8) months, respectively (hazard ratio, 1.07; 95% CI, 0.81 to 1.43; P = .63). The overall survival for lapatinib and placebo was 12.6 (95% CI, 9.0 to 16.2) and 12.0 (95% CI, 10.5 to 14.9) months, respectively (hazard ratio, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.70 to 1.31; P = .80). Discontinuation due to adverse events were similar in both arms (6% lapatinib and 5% placebo). The rate of grade 3 to 4 adverse events for lapatinib and placebo was 8.6% versus 8.1% ( P = .82). Preplanned subset analysis of patients strongly positive for HER1/HER2 (3+ on immunohistochemistry; n = 111), patients positive for only HER1 (n = 102), and patients positive for only HER2 (n = 42) showed no significant benefit with lapatinib in terms of PFS and overall survival ( P > .05 for each). Conclusion This trial did not find significant improvements in outcome by the addition of maintenance lapatinib to standard of care.

  10. Simvastatin Attenuates Oxidative Stress, NF-κB Activation, and Artery Calcification in LDLR-/- Mice Fed with High Fat Diet via Down-regulation of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α and TNF Receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Pei; Huang, Po-Hsun; Lai, Chung Fang; Chen, Jaw-Wen; Lin, Shing-Jong; Chen, Jia-Shiong

    2015-01-01

    Simvastatin (SIM) is anti-inflammatory. We used low density lipoprotein receptor knockout (LDLR-/-) mice and human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) as model systems to study the effect of SIM on arterial calcification and to explore the potential mechanisms contributing to this protective effect. High-fat diet (HFD) caused the LRLR -/- to develop dyslipidemia, diabetics, atherosclerosis and aortic smooth muscle calcification. SIM, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC, a ROS scavenger) and apocynin (APO, a NADPH oxidase inhibitor) did not significantly retard the development of dyslipidemia or diabetic. However, those treatments were still effective in attenuating the HFD-induced atherosclerosis and aortic smooth muscle calcification. These findings suggest that the protective effect of SIM against aortic calcification is not contributed by the cholesterol lowering effect. SIM, NAC and APO were found to attenuate the HFD induced elevation of serum TNF-α, soluble TNFR1 (sTNFR1), 3-nitro-tyrosine. We hypothesized that the pro-inflammatory cytokine, oxidative stress and TNFR1 played a role in inducing aortic calcification. We used HASMC to investigate the role of TNF-α, oxidative stress and TNFR1 in inducing aortic calcification and to elucidate the mechanism contributes the protective effect of SIM against aortic calcification. We demonstrated that treating HASMC with TNF-α induced cell Ca deposit and result in an increase in ALP, NADPH oxidase activity, NF-kB subunit p65, BMP2, MSX2, and RUNX2 expression. SIM suppressed the TNF-α induced activation of NADPH oxidase subunit p47, the above-mentioned bone markers and TNFR1 expression. Furthermore, p65, p47 and TNFR1 siRNAs inhibited the TNF-α-mediated stimulation of BMP-2, MSX2, RUNX2 expression. SIM, APO, and NAC either partially inhibit or completely block the TNF-α induced H2O2 or superoxide production. These results suggest that SIM may, independent of its cholesterol-lowering effect, suppresses the progression of

  11. Investigating Test Equating Methods in Small Samples through Various Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asiret, Semih; Sünbül, Seçil Ömür

    2016-01-01

    In this study, equating methods for random group design using small samples through factors such as sample size, difference in difficulty between forms, and guessing parameter was aimed for comparison. Moreover, which method gives better results under which conditions was also investigated. In this study, 5,000 dichotomous simulated data…

  12. An Investigation of Factors Influencing a Relocation Decision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turban, Daniel B.; And Others

    The present study investigated factors influencing the decision of employees, who, faced with a facility relocation, either relocated to a new location or lost their current jobs. A large chemical company decided to close a research and development laboratory located in New England and to transfer employees to a laboratory located in the…

  13. Investigating the influence of social desirability on personality factor structure.

    PubMed

    Ellingson, J E; Smith, D B; Sackett, P R

    2001-02-01

    This study provides a comprehensive investigation into whether social desirability alters the factor structure of personality measures. The study brought together 4 large data sets wherein different organizational samples responded to different personality measures. This facilitated conducting 4 separate yet parallel investigations. Within each data set, individuals identified through a social desirability scale as responding in an honest manner were grouped together, and individuals identified as responding in a highly socially desirable manner were grouped together. Using various analyses, the fit of higher order factor structure models was compared across the 2 groups. Results were the same for each data set. Social desirability had little influence on the higher order factor structures that characterized the relationships among the scales of the personality measures.

  14. Hypocretin receptor 1 blockade preferentially reduces high effort responding for cocaine without promoting sleep

    PubMed Central

    Brodnik, Zachary D.; Bernstein, David L.; Prince, Courtney D.; España, Rodrigo A.

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that blockade of the hypocretin receptor 1 may act as a useful pharmacotherapy for cocaine abuse. Here we investigated the extent to which various doses of a hypocretin receptor 1 antagonist, SB-334867, affect cocaine self-administration at varying doses of cocaine and across a range of effort requirements, and tested if these SB-334867 doses produce sedative effects. First, we trained animals to self-administer one of three doses of cocaine on a progressive ratio schedule, and then tested the effects of three doses of SB-334867. Responding for cocaine was then analyzed to segregate features of relatively high and low effort requirements across the progressive ratio session. In another set of experiments we tested the sleep-promoting effects of the same doses of SB-334867. Our data indicate that blockade of hypocretin receptor 1 preferentially reduces high effort responding for cocaine at levels that do not promote sedation. PMID:26049058

  15. Using Multilevel Factor Analysis with Clustered Data: Investigating the Factor Structure of the Positive Values Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Francis L.; Cornell, Dewey G.

    2016-01-01

    Advances in multilevel modeling techniques now make it possible to investigate the psychometric properties of instruments using clustered data. Factor models that overlook the clustering effect can lead to underestimated standard errors, incorrect parameter estimates, and model fit indices. In addition, factor structures may differ depending on…

  16. Using Multilevel Factor Analysis with Clustered Data: Investigating the Factor Structure of the Positive Values Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Francis L.; Cornell, Dewey G.

    2016-01-01

    Advances in multilevel modeling techniques now make it possible to investigate the psychometric properties of instruments using clustered data. Factor models that overlook the clustering effect can lead to underestimated standard errors, incorrect parameter estimates, and model fit indices. In addition, factor structures may differ depending on…

  17. Investigation of various essential factors for optimum infrared thermography.

    PubMed

    Okada, Keiji; Takemura, Kei; Sato, Shigeru

    2013-10-01

    We investigated various essential factors for optimum infrared thermography for cattle clinics. The effect of various factors on the detection of surface temperature was investigated in an experimental room with a fixed ambient temperature using a square positioned on a wall. Various factors of animal objects were examined using cattle to determine the relationships among presence of hair, body surface temperature, surface temperature of the eyeball, the highest temperature of the eye circle, rectum temperature and ambient temperature. Also, the surface temperature of the flank at different time points after eating was examined. The best conditions of thermography for cattle clinics were determined and were as follows: (1) The distance between a thermal camera and an object should be fixed, and the camera should be set within a 45-degree angle with respect to the objects using the optimum focal length. (2) Factors that affect the camera temperature, such as extreme cold or heat, direct sunshine, high humidity and wind, should be avoided. (3) For the comparison of thermographs, imaging should be performed under identical conditions. If this is not achievable, hairless parts should be used.

  18. Investigation of Various Essential Factors for Optimum Infrared Thermography

    PubMed Central

    OKADA, Keiji; TAKEMURA, Kei; SATO, Shigeru

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT We investigated various essential factors for optimum infrared thermography for cattle clinics. The effect of various factors on the detection of surface temperature was investigated in an experimental room with a fixed ambient temperature using a square positioned on a wall. Various factors of animal objects were examined using cattle to determine the relationships among presence of hair, body surface temperature, surface temperature of the eyeball, the highest temperature of the eye circle, rectum temperature and ambient temperature. Also, the surface temperature of the flank at different time points after eating was examined. The best conditions of thermography for cattle clinics were determined and were as follows: (1) The distance between a thermal camera and an object should be fixed, and the camera should be set within a 45-degree angle with respect to the objects using the optimum focal length. (2) Factors that affect the camera temperature, such as extreme cold or heat, direct sunshine, high humidity and wind, should be avoided. (3) For the comparison of thermographs, imaging should be performed under identical conditions. If this is not achievable, hairless parts should be used. PMID:23759714

  19. Upregulation of transferrin receptor-1 induces cholangiocarcinoma progression via induction of labile iron pool.

    PubMed

    Jamnongkan, Wassana; Thanan, Raynoo; Techasen, Anchalee; Namwat, Nisana; Loilome, Watcharin; Intarawichian, Piyapharom; Titapun, Attapol; Yongvanit, Puangrat

    2017-07-01

    Labile iron pool is a cellular source of ions available for Fenton reactions resulting in oxidative stress. Living organisms avoid an excess of free irons by a tight control of iron homeostasis. We investigated the altered expression of iron regulatory proteins and iron discrimination in the development of liver fluke-associated cholangiocarcinoma. Additionally, the levels of labile iron pool and the functions of transferrin receptor-1 on cholangiocarcinoma development were also identified. Iron deposition was determined using the Prussian blue staining method in human cholangiocarcinoma tissues. We investigated the alteration of iron regulatory proteins including transferrin, transferrin receptor-1, ferritin, ferroportin, hepcidin, and divalent metal transporter-1 in cholangiocarcinoma tissues using immunohistochemistry. The clinicopathological data of cholangiocarcinoma patients and the expressions of proteins were analyzed. Moreover, the level of intracellular labile iron pool in cholangiocarcinoma cell lines was identified by the RhoNox-1 staining method. We further demonstrated transferrin receptor-1 functions on cell proliferation and migration upon small interfering RNA for human transferrin receptor 1 transfection. Results show that Iron was strongly stained in tumor tissues, whereas negative staining was observed in normal bile ducts of healthy donors. Interestingly, high iron accumulation was significantly correlated with poor prognosis of cholangiocarcinoma patients. The expressions of iron regulatory proteins in human cholangiocarcinoma tissues and normal liver from cadaveric donors revealed that transferrin receptor-1 expression was increased in the cancer cells of cholangiocarcinoma tissues when compared with the adjacent normal bile ducts and was significantly correlated with cholangiocarcinoma metastasis. Labile iron pool level and transferrin receptor-1 expression were significantly increased in KKU-214 and KKU-213 when compared with cholangiocyte

  20. Investigating factors for disaster preparedness among residents of Kuala Lumpur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad-pajooh, E.; Aziz, K. Ab.

    2014-05-01

    The review of past researches discussed that factors such as climate change and movement toward urbanization will result in more frequent and severe disasters in the near future (Yasuhara et al., 2011). Flash flood is the most common type of disaster that residents of Kuala Lumpur (KL) come across, thus in this study, it was desired to discover the factors affecting preparedness among residents of KL as well as assessing the variation of individual preparedness among residents. With the aid of SPSS analysis, the reliability of data, correlation and regression analysis between the investigated factors and disaster preparedness were obtained. According to this research it was found that level of preparedness of residents of KL is still below average; majority of social demographic indicators such as income, education, age, and property ownership showed significant contribution to the variation of disaster preparedness among the residents. For instance men were much more prepared in comparison to women; residents with high level of income and education had also significantly higher preparedness compared to those with low level of income and education. Race was the only factor that differs from the findings of previous studies; since race does not affect the preparedness.

  1. Fatigue factors affecting metropolitan bus drivers: a qualitative investigation.

    PubMed

    Biggs, Herbert; Dingsdag, Donald; Stenson, Nick

    2009-01-01

    Metropolitan bus drivers daily face work in a stressful and draining work environment, exposing them to the serious risk of driver fatigue. However, there has been a dearth of information exploring the unique antecedents and effects of such fatigue. To date, much of the research into metropolitan bus drivers has been under the umbrella of large heavy vehicle driving studies, which include a disproportionally large population of long-haul drivers, who are likely to face a significantly different set of fatigue factors [1]. The present study aimed to investigate which work and environmental factors may cause fatigue in metropolitan bus drivers by seeking drivers' own perspectives on the issues. To this end, focus groups were held at five bus depots in Sydney and Newcastle, with an effort made to include a stratified sample of drivers at each. Each of the groups were invited to nominate what factors they felt were most salient, with a number of common factors emerging across the depots. Key themes identified were: support from management; ticketing and related issues; interaction with passengers; cabin ergonomics; tight route schedules; turn-around and shift irregularity; extended shift cycles; interactions with other road users; and extended commute times.

  2. Bayes factor for investigative assessment of selected handwriting features.

    PubMed

    Taroni, F; Marquis, R; Schmittbuhl, M; Biedermann, A; Thiéry, A; Bozza, S

    2014-09-01

    This paper extends previous research on the use of multivariate continuous data in comparative handwriting examinations, notably for gender classification. A database has been constructed by analyzing the contour shape of loop characters of type a and d by means of Fourier analysis, which allows characters to be described in a global way by a set of variables (e.g., Fourier descriptors). Sample handwritings were collected from right- and left-handed female and male writers. The results reported in this paper provide further arguments in support of the view that investigative settings in forensic science represent an area of application for which the Bayesian approach offers a logical framework. In particular, the Bayes factor is computed for settings that focus on inference of gender and handedness of the author of an incriminated handwritten text. An emphasis is placed on comparing the efficiency for investigative purposes of characters a and d.

  3. Investigation of the factors responsible for burns during MRI.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, M F; Condon, B; Hadley, D M

    2001-04-01

    Numerous reported burn injuries have been sustained during clinical MRI procedures. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible factors that may be responsible for such burns. Experiments were performed to investigate three possible mechanisms for causing heating in copper wire during MRI: direct electromagnetic induction in a conductive loop, induction in a resonant conducting loop, and electric field resonant coupling with a wire (the antenna effect). Maximum recorded temperature rises were 0.6 degrees C for the loop, 61.1 degrees C for the resonant loop, and 63.5 degrees C for the resonant antenna. These experimental findings suggest that, contrary to common belief, it is unlikely that direct induction in a conductive loop will result in thermal injury. Burn incidents are more likely to occur due to the formation of resonant conducting loops and from extended wires forming resonant antenna. The characteristics of resonance should be considered when formulating safety guidelines.

  4. Cyclic strain increases protease-activated receptor-1 expression in vascular smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, K. T.; Frye, S. R.; Eskin, S. G.; Patterson, C.; Runge, M. S.; McIntire, L. V.

    2001-01-01

    Cyclic strain regulates many vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) functions through changing gene expression. This study investigated the effects of cyclic strain on protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) expression in VSMCs and the possible signaling pathways involved, on the basis of the hypothesis that cyclic strain would enhance PAR-1 expression, reflecting increased thrombin activity. Uniaxial cyclic strain (1 Hz, 20%) of cells cultured on elastic membranes induced a 2-fold increase in both PAR-1 mRNA and protein levels. Functional activity of PAR-1, as assessed by cell proliferation in response to thrombin, was also increased by cyclic strain. In addition, treatment of cells with antioxidants or an NADPH oxidase inhibitor blocked strain-induced PAR-1 expression. Preincubation of cells with protein kinase inhibitors (staurosporine or Ro 31-8220) enhanced strain-increased PAR-1 expression, whereas inhibitors of NO synthase, tyrosine kinase, and mitogen-activated protein kinases had no effect. Cyclic strain in the presence of basic fibroblast growth factor induced PAR-1 mRNA levels beyond the effect of cyclic strain alone, whereas no additive effect was observed between cyclic strain and platelet-derived growth factor-AB. Our findings that cyclic strain upregulates PAR-1 mRNA expression but that shear stress downregulates this gene in VSMCs provide an opportunity to elucidate signaling differences by which VSMCs respond to different mechanical forces.

  5. Multiple Roles for Nogo Receptor 1 in Visual System Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Stephany, Céleste-Élise; Frantz, Michael G; McGee, Aaron W

    2016-12-01

    During the developmental critical period for visual plasticity, discordant vision alters the responsiveness of neurons in visual cortex. The subsequent closure of the critical period not only consolidates neural function but also limits recovery of acuity from preceding abnormal visual experience. Despite species-specific differences in circuitry of the visual system, these characteristics are conserved. The nogo-66 receptor 1 (ngr1) is one of only a small number of genes identified thus far that is essential to closing the critical period. Mice lacking a functional ngr1 gene retain developmental visual plasticity as adults and their visual acuity spontaneously improves after prolonged visual deprivation. Experiments employing conditional mouse genetics have revealed that ngr1 restricts plasticity within distinct circuits for ocular dominance and visual acuity. However, the mechanisms by which NgR1 limits plasticity have not been elucidated, in part because the subcellular localization and signal transduction of the protein are only partially understood. Here we explore potential mechanisms for NgR1 function in relation to manipulations that reactivate visual plasticity in adults and propose lines of investigation to address relevant gaps in knowledge.

  6. Protective effects of genetic inhibition of Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 in experimental renal disease.

    PubMed

    Kerroch, Monique; Alfieri, Carlo; Dorison, Aude; Boffa, Jean-Jacques; Chatziantoniou, Christos; Dussaule, Jean-Claude

    2016-02-16

    Chronic kidney disease is a progressive incurable pathology affecting millions of people. Intensive investigations aim to identify targets for therapy. We have previously demonstrated that abnormal expression of the Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 (DDR1) is a key factor of renal disease by promoting inflammation and fibrosis. The present study investigates whether blocking the expression of DDR1 after the initiation of renal disease can delay or arrest the progression of this pathology. Severe renal disease was induced by either injecting nephrotoxic serum (NTS) or performing unilateral ureteral obstruction in mice, and the expression of DDR1 was inhibited by administering antisense oligodeoxynucleotides either at 4 or 8 days after NTS (corresponding to early or more established phases of disease, respectively), or at day 2 after ligation. DDR1 antisense administration at day 4 stopped the increase of proteinuria and protected animals against the progression of glomeruloneprhitis, as evidenced by functional, structural and cellular indexes. Antisense administration at day 8 delayed progression -but to a smaller degree- of renal disease. Similar beneficial effects on renal structure and inflammation were observed with the antisense administration of DDR1 after ureteral ligation. Thus, targeting DDR1 can be a promising strategy in the treatment of chronic kidney disease.

  7. Exploratory investigation of factors affecting the wing tip vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheiman, J.; Megrail, J. L.; Shivers, J. P.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley full-scale tunnel to study some factors affecting the tip vortex of a wing. It was found that there was a pronounced effect of Reynolds number on the tip-vortex core size. An attempt was made to determine what aerodynamic parameters, such as lift, drag, or induced drag, influence the size of the vortex core, but no particular function of the parameters was found to be superior to all others. Various spoilers placed on the upper and lower surfaces of the wing to increase the boundary-layer thickness resulted in a reduction in the vorticity as determined from the tuft grid. Various solid objects placed in the vortex core downstream of the wing tip seemed to decrease the vorticity within the vortex core.

  8. Investigation of factors impacting mobility and gait in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Christofoletti, Gustavo; McNeely, Marie E; Campbell, Meghan C; Duncan, Ryan P; Earhart, Gammon M

    2016-10-01

    Mobility and gait limitations are major issues for people with Parkinson disease (PD). Identification of factors that contribute to these impairments may inform treatment and intervention strategies. In this study we investigated factors that predict mobility and gait impairment in PD. Participants with mild to moderate PD and without dementia (n=114) were tested in one session 'off' medication. Mobility measures included the 6-Minute Walk test and Timed-Up-and-Go. Gait velocity was collected in four conditions: forward preferred speed, forward dual task, forward fast as possible and backward walking. The predictors analyzed were age, gender, disease severity, balance, balance confidence, fall history, self-reported physical activity, and executive function. Multiple regression models were used to assess the relationships between predictors and outcomes. The predictors, in different combinations for each outcome measure, explained 55.7% to 66.9% of variability for mobility and 39.5% to 52.8% for gait velocity. Balance was the most relevant factor (explaining up to 54.1% of variance in mobility and up to 45.6% in gait velocity). Balance confidence contributed to a lesser extent (2.0% to 8.2% of variance) in all models. Age explained a small percentage of variance in mobility and gait velocity (up to 2.9%). Executive function explained 3.0% of variance during forward walking only. The strong predictive relationships between balance deficits and mobility and gait impairment suggest targeting balance deficits may be particularly important for improving mobility and gait in people with PD, regardless of an individual's age, disease severity, fall history, or other demographic features.

  9. Investigation of factors affecting electrical contacts on single germanium nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sett, Shaili; Das, K.; Raychaudhuri, A. K.

    2017-03-01

    We report an experimental investigation of the quality of electrical contacts made on single Germanium nanowires (grown using Au catalyst from vapor) using Cr/Au contact pads. The nanowires are single crystalline and have a thin layer of oxide on them. We find that a low specific contact resistivity of 10-6 Ω cm2 can be obtained in nanowires with low resistance and the contact resistance enhances almost linearly with the nanowire resistivity. The metal semiconductor junction shows an ideality factor close to unity. A low barrier height of 0.15 eV can be obtained in nanowires of lower resistivities which increase to nearly 0.3 eV for nanowires of higher resistivity. The experiments were carried down to 10 K, and junction characteristics as a function of temperature were evaluated. The specific contact resistance increases on cooling but the barrier shows suppression as the nanowire is cooled, along with an enhancement of the ideality factor. We analyze the temperature dependence of these parameters using a model that assumes a Gaussian distribution of barrier heights in the contact region. The temperature dependence predicted by the model was observed, and the relevant parameters were obtained from the data.

  10. Some critical factors for engineering and environmental microgravity investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debeglia, N.; Dupont, F.

    2002-07-01

    The gravity method is one of the geophysical tools used for engineering and environmental investigations where the detection of cavities, karst phenomena, subsoil irregularities, or landfills is essential. In many cases, deep or small-scale heterogeneities generating low-amplitude anomalies have to be detected and the reliability of further interpretation requires highly accurate measurements, carefully corrected for any quantifiable disturbing effects. The purpose of this study is to investigate the factors likely to limit measurement quality and how to make improvements. Calibrations of a Scintrex gravimeter were made between French relative and absolute base stations, and the relative uncertainties on the calibration factors were estimated for these links. Ranging from 10 -3, for calibration on an old gravity net, to 10 -4, for a high amplitude absolute base line, this accuracy will be generally sufficient for microgravity surveys. Continuous gravity recordings of Scintrex gravimeters, installed at the same stable site, enabled the estimation of the stability and accuracy of the instruments and revealed that some of the time variations of g measurements, such as instrumental drift, tidal effects and seismic noise, are not entirely removed by standard processing procedures. The accuracy of corrected gravity measurements is mainly limited by inadequate corrections of tidal effects and by a poor estimation of ocean loading effects. In comparison with residual defaults in tidal corrections, instrumental and seismic noises are taken more properly into account by statistical data processing. In field operation, residual tidal effects are generally integrated into an experimental terrain drift estimated on the basis of frequent repeated measurements. A differential gravity approach, based on a fixed gravimeter reference whose recordings are used to correct measurements made with a mobile gravimeter, has also been investigated at a test site. Compared to standard

  11. Corneal avascularity is due to soluble VEGF receptor-1

    PubMed Central

    Ambati, Balamurali K.; Nozaki, Miho; Singh, Nirbhai; Takeda, Atsunobu; Jani, Pooja D.; Suthar, Tushar; Albuquerque, Romulo J. C.; Richter, Elizabeth; Sakurai, Eiji; Newcomb, Michael T.; Kleinman, Mark E.; Caldwell, Ruth B.; Lin, Qing; Ogura, Yuichiro; Orecchia, Angela; Samuelson, Don A.; Agnew, Dalen W.; Leger, Judy St.; Green, W. Richard; Mahasreshti, Parameshwar J.; Curiel, David T.; Kwan, Donna; Marsh, Helene; Ikeda, Sakae; Leiper, Lucy J.; Collinson, J. Martin; Bogdanovich, Sasha; Khurana, Tejvir S.; Shibuya, Masabumi; Baldwin, Megan E.; Ferrara, Napoleone; Gerber, Hans-Peter; Falco, Sandro De; Witta, Jassir; Baffi, Judit Z.; Raisler, Brian J.; Ambati, Jayakrishna

    2009-01-01

    Corneal avascularity—the absence of blood vessels in the cornea—is required for optical clarity and optimal vision, and has led to the cornea being widely used for validating pro- and anti-angiogenic therapeutic strategies for many disorders1-4. But the molecular underpinnings of the avascular phenotype have until now remained obscure5-10 and are all the more remarkable given the presence in the cornea of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A, a potent stimulator of angiogenesis, and the proximity of the cornea to vascularized tissues. Here we show that the cornea expresses soluble VEGF receptor-1 (sVEGFR-1; also known as sflt-1) and that suppression of this endogenous VEGF-A trap11 by neutralizing antibodies, RNA interference or Cre-lox-mediated gene disruption abolishes corneal avascularity in mice. The spontaneously vascularized corneas of corn1 and Pax6+/− mice12,13 and Pax6+/− patients with aniridia14 are deficient in sflt-1, and recombinant sflt-1 administration restores corneal avascularity in corn1 and Pax6+/− mice. Manatees, the only known creatures uniformly to have vascularized corneas15, do not express sflt-1, whereas the avascular corneas of dugongs, also members of the order Sirenia, elephants, the closest extant terrestrial phylogenetic relatives of manatees, and other marine mammals (dolphins and whales) contain sflt-1, indicating that it has a crucial, evolutionarily conserved role. The recognition that sflt-1 is essential for preserving the avascular ambit of the cornea can rationally guide its use as a platform for angiogenic modulators, supports its use in treating neovascular diseases, and might provide insight into the immunological privilege of the cornea. PMID:17051153

  12. Corneal avascularity is due to soluble VEGF receptor-1.

    PubMed

    Ambati, Balamurali K; Nozaki, Miho; Singh, Nirbhai; Takeda, Atsunobu; Jani, Pooja D; Suthar, Tushar; Albuquerque, Romulo J C; Richter, Elizabeth; Sakurai, Eiji; Newcomb, Michael T; Kleinman, Mark E; Caldwell, Ruth B; Lin, Qing; Ogura, Yuichiro; Orecchia, Angela; Samuelson, Don A; Agnew, Dalen W; St Leger, Judy; Green, W Richard; Mahasreshti, Parameshwar J; Curiel, David T; Kwan, Donna; Marsh, Helene; Ikeda, Sakae; Leiper, Lucy J; Collinson, J Martin; Bogdanovich, Sasha; Khurana, Tejvir S; Shibuya, Masabumi; Baldwin, Megan E; Ferrara, Napoleone; Gerber, Hans-Peter; De Falco, Sandro; Witta, Jassir; Baffi, Judit Z; Raisler, Brian J; Ambati, Jayakrishna

    2006-10-26

    Corneal avascularity-the absence of blood vessels in the cornea-is required for optical clarity and optimal vision, and has led to the cornea being widely used for validating pro- and anti-angiogenic therapeutic strategies for many disorders. But the molecular underpinnings of the avascular phenotype have until now remained obscure and are all the more remarkable given the presence in the cornea of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A, a potent stimulator of angiogenesis, and the proximity of the cornea to vascularized tissues. Here we show that the cornea expresses soluble VEGF receptor-1 (sVEGFR-1; also known as sflt-1) and that suppression of this endogenous VEGF-A trap by neutralizing antibodies, RNA interference or Cre-lox-mediated gene disruption abolishes corneal avascularity in mice. The spontaneously vascularized corneas of corn1 and Pax6+/- mice and Pax6+/- patients with aniridia are deficient in sflt-1, and recombinant sflt-1 administration restores corneal avascularity in corn1 and Pax6+/- mice. Manatees, the only known creatures uniformly to have vascularized corneas, do not express sflt-1, whereas the avascular corneas of dugongs, also members of the order Sirenia, elephants, the closest extant terrestrial phylogenetic relatives of manatees, and other marine mammals (dolphins and whales) contain sflt-1, indicating that it has a crucial, evolutionarily conserved role. The recognition that sflt-1 is essential for preserving the avascular ambit of the cornea can rationally guide its use as a platform for angiogenic modulators, supports its use in treating neovascular diseases, and might provide insight into the immunological privilege of the cornea.

  13. Expression and Functional Relevance of Cannabinoid Receptor 1 in Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Benz, Alexander H.; Renné, Christoph; Maronde, Erik; Koch, Marco; Grabiec, Urszula; Kallendrusch, Sonja; Rengstl, Benjamin; Newrzela, Sebastian; Hartmann, Sylvia; Hansmann, Martin-Leo; Dehghani, Faramarz

    2013-01-01

    Background Cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) is expressed in certain types of malignancies. An analysis of CB1 expression and function in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), one of the most frequent lymphomas, was not performed to date. Design and Methods We examined the distribution of CB1 protein in primary cases of HL. Using lymphoma derived cell lines, the role of CB1 signaling on cell survival was investigated. Results A predominant expression of CB1 was found in Hodgkin-Reed-Sternberg cells in a vast majority of classical HL cases. The HL cell lines L428, L540 and KM-H2 showed strong CB1-abundance and displayed a dose-dependent decline of viability under CB1 inhibition with AM251. Further, application of AM251 led to decrease of constitutively active NFκB/p65, a crucial survival factor of HRS-cells, and was followed by elevation of apoptotic markers in HL cells. Conclusions The present study identifies CB1 as a feature of HL, which might serve as a potential selective target in the treatment of Hodgkin lymphoma. PMID:24349109

  14. Contributing factors to medial tibial stress syndrome: a prospective investigation.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Tricia J; Carpenter, Erica Mullis; Cordova, Mitchell L

    2009-03-01

    To conduct a prospective, multisite, cohort study investigating the possible risk factors for medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS) in college athletes. One hundred and forty-six healthy, collegiate athletes from NCAA Division I and Division II institutions participated in the study. Subjects first completed a health history questionnaire to establish previous history of injury and underwent a physical examination to assess their ankle/foot strength, ankle/foot range of motion, tibial varum, and navicular drop before the start of their respective athletic season. Athletes were instructed to report to a certified athletic trainer if they developed pain on their tibia. If MTSS was present, subjects were then placed into the symptomatic group. Independent t-tests and chi-square analyses were used to determine whether differences existed between MTSS and healthy athletes for the continuous and the discrete dependent variables, respectively. The significant dependent variables were then used in the discriminant function analysis. Twenty-nine subjects developed MTSS during this study. Athletes that had been participating in athletic activity for fewer than 5 yr were significantly more likely to develop MTSS (P = 0.002). Additionally, athletes with a previous history of MTSS (P = 0.0001), a previous history of stress fracture (P = 0.039), and the use of orthotics (P = 0.031) were more likely to develop MTSS compared with those who did not develop MTSS. This study established that the factors most influencing MTSS development were previous history of MTSS and stress fracture, years of running experience, and orthotic use. These data demonstrate the importance of establishing a thorough history before the start of the season so that athletes who might be at risk for MTSS development can be identified.

  15. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 and glutamate signaling in human melanoma.

    PubMed

    Namkoong, Jin; Shin, Seung-Shick; Lee, Hwa Jin; Marín, Yarí E; Wall, Brian A; Goydos, James S; Chen, Suzie

    2007-03-01

    Recently, several laboratories have started to investigate the involvement of glutamate signaling in cancer. In previous studies, we reported on a transgenic mouse model that develops melanoma spontaneously. Subsequent studies in these mice identified that the aberrant expression of metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (GRM1) in melanocytes played a critical role in the onset of melanoma. Confirmation of the etiologic role of GRM1 in melanoma development was shown in a second transgenic line with GRM1 expression under the regulation of a melanocyte-specific dopachrome tautomerase promoter. Ectopic expression of GRM1 was also detected in a subset of human melanoma cell lines and biopsies, suggesting that aberrant expression of GRM1 in melanocytes may contribute to the development of human melanoma. GRM1, a seven-transmembrane domain G protein-coupled receptor, is normally expressed and functional in neuronal cells, and its ligand, glutamate, is the major excitatory neurotransmitter. Human melanoma cells are shown here to release elevated levels of glutamate, implying a possible autocrine loop. Treatment of GRM1-expressing human melanoma cells with a GRM1 antagonist (LY367385 or BAY36-7620) or a glutamate release inhibitor (riluzole) leads to a suppression of cell proliferation as well as a decrease in levels of extracellular glutamate. Treatment of human melanoma cell xenografts with riluzole for 18 days via p.o. gavage or i.v. injection leads to inhibition of tumor growth by 50% in comparison with controls. These data suggest the importance of glutamate signaling in human melanoma and imply that the suppression of glutamate signaling may be a new target for melanoma therapy.

  16. Infant siblings and the investigation of autism risk factors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Infant sibling studies have been at the vanguard of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) research over the past decade, providing important new knowledge about the earliest emerging signs of ASD and expanding our understanding of the developmental course of this complex disorder. Studies focused on siblings of children with ASD also have unrealized potential for contributing to ASD etiologic research. Moving targeted time of enrollment back from infancy toward conception creates tremendous opportunities for optimally studying risk factors and risk biomarkers during the pre-, peri- and neonatal periods. By doing so, a traditional sibling study, which already incorporates close developmental follow-up of at-risk infants through the third year of life, is essentially reconfigured as an enriched-risk pregnancy cohort study. This review considers the enriched-risk pregnancy cohort approach of studying infant siblings in the context of current thinking on ASD etiologic mechanisms. It then discusses the key features of this approach and provides a description of the design and implementation strategy of one major ASD enriched-risk pregnancy cohort study: the Early Autism Risk Longitudinal Investigation (EARLI). PMID:22958474

  17. Investigation of structural factors of safety for the space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A study was made of the factors governing the structural design of the fully reusable space shuttle booster to establish a rational approach to select optimum structural factors of safety. The study included trade studies of structural factors of safety versus booster service life, weight, cost, and reliability. Similar trade studies can be made on other vehicles using the procedures developed. The major structural components of a selected baseline booster were studied in depth, each being examined to determine the fatigue life, safe-life, and fail-safe capabilities of the baseline design. Each component was further examined to determine its reliability and safety requirements, and the change of structural weight with factors of safety. The apparent factors of safety resulting from fatigue, safe-life, proof test, and fail-safe requirements were identified. The feasibility of reduced factors of safety for design loads such as engine thrust, which are well defined, was examined.

  18. Evidence for association between polymorphisms in the Cannabinoid Receptor 1 (CNR1) gene and cannabis dependence

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Arpana; Wetherill, Leah; Dick, Danielle M.; Xuei, Xiaoling; Hinrichs, Anthony; Hesselbrock, Victor; Kramer, John; Nurnberger, John I.; Schuckit, Marc; Bierut, Laura J.; Edenberg, Howard J.; Foroud, Tatiana

    2009-01-01

    Genomic studies of cannabis use disorders have been limited. The cannabinoid receptor 1 gene (CNR1) on chromosome 6q14–15 is an excellent candidate gene for cannabis dependence due to the important role of the G-protein coupled receptor encoded by this gene in the rewarding effects of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol. Previous studies have found equivocal evidence for an association between SNPs in CNR1 and a general vulnerability to substance use disorders. We investigate the association between 9 SNPs spanning CNR1 and cannabis dependence in 1,923 individuals. Two SNPs that were previously associated with cannabis dependence in other studies were also significant with this phenotype in our analyses [rs806368 (p = 0.05) and rs806380 (p = 0.009)]. Haplotype analyses revealed the association to be largely driven by the SNP rs806380. These results suggest a role for the cannabinoid receptor 1 gene in cannabis dependence. PMID:19016476

  19. An Investigation of Institutional Enhancement Factors on Student College Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nwaokoro, Amaechi Nkemakolem

    2010-01-01

    This study focuses on the importance of students' hard work and institutional factors--technology, advising, mentoring, and tutoring on student's academic performance. It is important for institutions to emphasize both students' hard work and effective institutional factors that will have positive impact on student success.

  20. A Comparative Investigation of Rotation Criteria Within Exploratory Factor Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sass, Daniel A; Schmitt, Thomas A

    2010-01-29

    Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) is a commonly used statistical technique for examining the relationships between variables (e.g., items) and the factors (e.g., latent traits) they depict. There are several decisions that must be made when using EFA, with one of the more important being choice of the rotation criterion. This selection can be arduous given the numerous rotation criteria available and the lack of research/literature that compares their function and utility. Historically, researchers have chosen rotation criteria based on whether or not factors are correlated and have failed to consider other important aspects of their data. This study reviews several rotation criteria, demonstrates how they may perform with different factor pattern structures, and highlights for researchers subtle but important differences between each rotation criterion. The choice of rotation criterion is critical to ensure researchers make informed decisions as to when different rotation criteria may or may not be appropriate. The results suggest that depending on the rotation criterion selected and the complexity of the factor pattern matrix, the interpretation of the interfactor correlations and factor pattern loadings can vary substantially. Implications and future directions are discussed.

  1. Investigating Factors Affecting Group Processes in Virtual Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazari, Sunil; Thompson, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    With the widespread popularity of distance learning, there is a need to investigate elements of online courses that continue to pose significant challenges for educators. One of the challenges relates to creating and managing group projects. This study investigated business students' perceptions of group work in online classes. The constructs of…

  2. Investigating Factors Affecting Group Processes in Virtual Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazari, Sunil; Thompson, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    With the widespread popularity of distance learning, there is a need to investigate elements of online courses that continue to pose significant challenges for educators. One of the challenges relates to creating and managing group projects. This study investigated business students' perceptions of group work in online classes. The constructs of…

  3. Investigating the pharmacological and nonpharmacological factors that modulate drug reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Sigmon, Stacey C

    2007-02-01

    Drug use is driven by principles of reinforcement and is sensitive to influences in the environmental context in which it occurs. Although a wide range of factors has been shown to directly influence the reinforcing effects of commonly abused drugs, 2 general types include pharmacological and nonpharmacological factors. Both can assert a powerful impact on a drug's reinforcing effects and, therefore, the degree to which a particular drug comes to be used and abused. This invited review seeks to briefly describe some of the current psychopharmacology research on the interactions between these factors and drug abuse. Several pharmacological influences on drug use will be discussed, including the interactions between psychomotor stimulants and recent advances in the development of pharmacotherapies for opioid abuse. With regard to nonpharmacological factors, there is a large body of research demonstrating that nondrug reinforcers can exert a powerful influence on the reinforcing effects of commonly abused drugs. More specifically, identifying alternative nondrug sources of reinforcement can, if made available contingent on drug abstinence, produce robust decreases in drug self-administration. Presented here is a very brief review of some recent scientific efforts to develop and extend behavioral interventions targeting drug use across a wide range of clinical populations. In summary, understanding the interactions among the variables present in the context of drug use is critical to understanding risk factors for substance use disorders as well as developing efficacious treatments for drug dependence.

  4. Investigating Factors that Affect Dissolved Oxygen Concentration in Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jantzen, Paul G.

    1978-01-01

    Describes activities that demonstrate the effects of factors such as wind velocity, water temperature, convection currents, intensity of light, rate of photosynthesis, atmospheric pressure, humidity, numbers of decomposers, presence of oxidizable ions, and respiration by plants and animals on the dissolved oxygen concentration in water. (MA)

  5. Investigation of Multiple Human Factors in Personalized Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Sherry Y.; Huang, Pei-Ren; Shih, Yu-Cheng; Chang, Li-Ping

    2016-01-01

    In the past decade, a number of personalized learning systems have been developed and they mainly focus on learners' prior knowledge. On the other hand, previous research suggested that gender differences and cognitive styles have great effects on student learning. To this end, this study examines how human factors, especially gender differences…

  6. An Investigation of Classroom Factors That Influence Proof Construction Ability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCrone, Sharon Soucy; Martin, Tami S.; Dindyal, Jaguthsing; Wallace, Michelle L.

    This paper on classroom factors influencing students' proof construction ability reports findings from the data collected in the first two years of a three-year National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded project. Four different classrooms, two from each participating school, were involved in the project. Data sources included videotaped classroom…

  7. Investigating Factors that Affect Dissolved Oxygen Concentration in Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jantzen, Paul G.

    1978-01-01

    Describes activities that demonstrate the effects of factors such as wind velocity, water temperature, convection currents, intensity of light, rate of photosynthesis, atmospheric pressure, humidity, numbers of decomposers, presence of oxidizable ions, and respiration by plants and animals on the dissolved oxygen concentration in water. (MA)

  8. An Exploratory Investigation into Factors Affecting Visual Balance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niekamp, Walter

    1981-01-01

    Describes a study using ocular photography to examine factors which affect the visual weights of significant elements in a picture. Results indicating that the upper half of the visual fields has greatest weight are discussed, as are results showing insufficient support for side preferences. Included are 27 references. (Author/BK)

  9. Investigating the Effect of Complexity Factors in Gas Law Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuttlefield, Jennifer D.; Kirk, John; Pienta, Norbert J.; Tang, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Undergraduate students were asked to complete gas law questions using a Web-based tool as a first step in our understanding of the role of cognitive load in chemistry word questions and in helping us assess student problem-solving. Each question contained five different complexity factors, which were randomly assigned by the tool so that a…

  10. Investigating the Effect of Complexity Factors in Gas Law Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuttlefield, Jennifer D.; Kirk, John; Pienta, Norbert J.; Tang, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Undergraduate students were asked to complete gas law questions using a Web-based tool as a first step in our understanding of the role of cognitive load in chemistry word questions and in helping us assess student problem-solving. Each question contained five different complexity factors, which were randomly assigned by the tool so that a…

  11. Factors Influencing BI Data Collection Strategies: An Empirical Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramakrishnan, Thiagarajan

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation is to examine the external factors that influence an organizations' business intelligence (BI) data collection strategy when mediated by BI attributes. In this dissertation, data warehousing strategies are used as the basis on which to frame the exploration of BI data collection strategies. The attributes include…

  12. Investigating Factors that Influence Item Performance on ACS Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schroeder, Jacob; Murphy, Kristen L.; Holme, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    General chemistry tests from the Examinations Institute of the Division of Chemical Education of the American Chemical Society have been analyzed to identify factors that may influence how individual test items perform. In this paper, issues of item order (position within a set of items that comprise a test) and answer order (position of correct…

  13. Factors Influencing BI Data Collection Strategies: An Empirical Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramakrishnan, Thiagarajan

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation is to examine the external factors that influence an organizations' business intelligence (BI) data collection strategy when mediated by BI attributes. In this dissertation, data warehousing strategies are used as the basis on which to frame the exploration of BI data collection strategies. The attributes include…

  14. Investigation of Multiple Human Factors in Personalized Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Sherry Y.; Huang, Pei-Ren; Shih, Yu-Cheng; Chang, Li-Ping

    2016-01-01

    In the past decade, a number of personalized learning systems have been developed and they mainly focus on learners' prior knowledge. On the other hand, previous research suggested that gender differences and cognitive styles have great effects on student learning. To this end, this study examines how human factors, especially gender differences…

  15. A Factor Analytic Investigation of the Task of Public Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dziuban, Charles D.; And Others

    This study was designed to assess the conceptual structure of the Task of Public Education Opinionnaire (TPE). Since the development of the instrument, several psychometric techniques have been formulated. Two of those methods, image component and alpha factor analysis, were applied to the items of the TPE after the correlation matrices were…

  16. Investigation of Demographic Properties and Motivation Factors of Physics Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guzel, Hatice

    2011-01-01

    Scientific and technological developments resulted in an increase in the requirement of education in the society. In addition to this, the expectations from teachers differed and the need for more qualified teachers also increased. One of the factors affecting the quality of teachers is their motivation. In this research, it was aimed to reveal…

  17. ELectrothermal Guns -- A Theoretical Investigation of Factors for Optimal Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    standard pressure dependent law is r = 0.15545 * P98 (4) where r is in cm/(sec-MPa) and P is in MPa. For a pressure of 435 MPa the rate of regression would... dependent on pressure as indicated by equation (4), but dependent on other factors which admit a constant pressure but an increasing regression rate... pressure , velocity and temperature variability is strongly dependent on the plasma-working fluid interaction process. This has important implications for

  18. The Epidemiological Investigation on the Risk Factors of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Jianjun; Lin, Yong; Guo, Zhinan; Niu, Mu; Su, Chenghao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) ranked the fifth in male and ninth in the female counterparts, and 50% of incidence HCC cases were occurred in China with high hepatitis B virus (HBV) prevalence. HCC has seriously compromised the health status of general population in China. A case–control study of 314 HCC cases and 346 controls was conducted in Xiamen, which is an epidemic area in China for both hepatitis B infection and HCC. Face-to-face interview was conducted to gather information on demographic characteristics as well as exposure of environmental factors. Commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits were used to determine the status of serological markers of HBV infection. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by using unconditional logistic regression. Multivariate unconditional logistic regression analysis was applied to evaluate the potential interactions of variables or confounders. As expected, HBV and alcohol intake still are the major risk factors of HCC. Liver disease history and passive smoking are also associated with elevated HCC risk. Indoor air pollution and pesticide exposure have newly identified as risk factors of HCC. Fruit and tea intake can significantly lower the HCC risk. The application of HBV vaccine and reduction on alcohol intake should be further promoted in high-risk population. Fruit and tea can be served as chemoprevention in daily life due to their high accessibility. PMID:26871825

  19. Expression of Nogo receptor 1 in microglia during development and following traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gaoxiang; Ni, Jie; Mao, Lei; Yan, Ming; Pang, Tao; Liao, Hong

    2015-11-19

    As the receptor of myelin associated inhibitory factors Nogo receptor 1 (NgR1) plays an important role in central nervous system (CNS) injury and regeneration. It is found that NgR1 complex acts in neurons to transduce the signals intracelluarly including induction of growth cone collapse, inhibition of axonal regeneration and regulation of nerve inflammation. In recent studies, NgR1 has also been found to be expressed in the microglia. However, NgR1 expressed in microglia in the developing nervous systems and following CNS injury have not been widely investigated. In this study, we detected the expression and cellular localization of NgR1 in microglia during development and following traumatic brain injury (TBI) in mice. The results showed that NgR1 was mainly expressed in microglia during embryonic and postnatal periods. The expression levels peaked at P4 and decreased thereafter into adulthood, while increased significantly with aging representatively at 17 mo. On the other hand, there was no significant difference in the number of double positive NgR1(+)Iba1(+) cells between normal and TBI group. In summary, we first detected the expression of NgR1 in microglia during development and found that NgR1 protein expression increased significantly in microglia with aging. These findings will contribute to make a foundation for subsequent study about the role of NgR1 expressed in microglia on the CNS disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Inhibition of solid tumor growth by gene transfer of VEGF receptor-1 mutants.

    PubMed

    Heidenreich, Regina; Machein, Marcia; Nicolaus, Anke; Hilbig, Andreas; Wild, Carola; Clauss, Matthias; Plate, Karl H; Breier, Georg

    2004-09-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and the high-affinity VEGF receptor Flk-1/KDR (VEGFR-2) are key regulators of tumor angiogenesis. Strategies to block VEGF/VEGFR-2 signaling were successfully used to inhibit experimental tumor growth and indicated that VEGFR-2 is the main signaling VEGF receptor in proliferating tumor endothelium. Here, we investigated the role of the VEGF receptor-1 (VEGFR-1/Flt-1) in the vascularization of 2 different experimental tumors in vivo. VEGFR-1 mutants were generated that lack the intracellular tyrosine kinase domain. Retrovirus-mediated gene transfer of the VEGFR-1 mutants led to a strong reduction of tumor growth and angiogenesis in xenografted C6 glioma and in syngeneic BFS-1 fibrosarcoma. Histological analysis of the inhibited fibrosarcoma revealed reduced vascular density, decreased tumor cell proliferation as well as increased tumor cell apoptosis and the formation of necrosis. The retroviral gene transfer of the full length VEGFR-1 also caused a significant reduction of tumor growth in both models. The inhibitory effects of the VEGFR-1 mutants and the full length VEGFR-1 in BFS-1 fibrosarcoma were mediated through host tumor endothelial cells because the BFS-1 fibrosarcoma cells were not infected by the retrovirus. The formation of heterodimers between VEGFR-2 and full length or truncated VEGFR-1 was observed in vitro and might contribute to the growth inhibitory effect by modulating distinct signal transduction pathways. The results of our study underline the central role of the VEGF/VEGFR-1 signaling system in tumor angiogenesis and demonstrate that VEGFR-1 can serve as a target for anti-angiogenic gene therapy.

  1. Critical role of parathyroid hormone (PTH) receptor-1 phosphorylation in regulating acute responses to PTH

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Akira; Okazaki, Makoto; Baron, David M.; Dean, Thomas; Khatri, Ashok; Mahon, Mathew; Segawa, Hiroko; Abou-Samra, Abdul B.; Jüppner, Harald; Bloch, Kenneth D.; Potts, John T.; Gardella, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Agonist-induced phosphorylation of the parathyroid hormone (PTH) receptor 1 (PTHR1) regulates receptor signaling in vitro, but the role of this phosphorylation in vivo is uncertain. We investigated this role by injecting “knock-in” mice expressing a phosphorylation-deficient (PD) PTHR1 with PTH ligands and assessing acute biologic responses. Following injection with PTH (1–34), or with a unique, long-acting PTH analog, PD mice, compared with WT mice, exhibited enhanced increases in cAMP levels in the blood, as well as enhanced cAMP production and gene expression responses in bone and kidney tissue. Surprisingly, however, the hallmark hypercalcemic and hypophosphatemic responses were markedly absent in the PD mice, such that paradoxical hypocalcemic and hyperphosphatemic responses were observed, quite strikingly with the long-acting PTH analog. Spot urine analyses revealed a marked defect in the capacity of the PD mice to excrete phosphate, as well as cAMP, into the urine in response to PTH injection. This defect in renal excretion was associated with a severe, PTH-induced impairment in glomerular filtration, as assessed by the rate of FITC-inulin clearance from the blood, which, in turn, was explainable by an overly exuberant systemic hypotensive response. The overall findings demonstrate the importance in vivo of PTH-induced phosphorylation of the PTHR1 in regulating acute ligand responses, and they serve to focus attention on mechanisms that underlie the acute calcemic response to PTH and factors, such as blood phosphate levels, that influence it. PMID:23533279

  2. An Exploratory Investigation of the Factor Structure of the Reynolds Intellectual Assessment Scales (RIAS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dombrowski, Stefan C.; Watkins, Marley W.; Brogan, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the factor structure of the Reynolds Intellectual Assessment Scales (RIAS) using rigorous exploratory factor analytic and factor extraction procedures. The results of this study indicate that the RIAS is a single factor test. Despite these results, higher order factor analysis using the Schmid-Leiman procedure indicates…

  3. An Exploratory Investigation of the Factor Structure of the Reynolds Intellectual Assessment Scales (RIAS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dombrowski, Stefan C.; Watkins, Marley W.; Brogan, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the factor structure of the Reynolds Intellectual Assessment Scales (RIAS) using rigorous exploratory factor analytic and factor extraction procedures. The results of this study indicate that the RIAS is a single factor test. Despite these results, higher order factor analysis using the Schmid-Leiman procedure indicates…

  4. Factors Influencing Self-Directed Career Management: An Integrative Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Yongho

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to investigate the relationship between the protean career and other variables, including organizational learning climate, individual calling work orientation, and demographic variables. Design/methodology/approach: The research data were obtained from a sample consisting of 292 employees of two South Korean manufacturing…

  5. Factors Influencing Self-Directed Career Management: An Integrative Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Yongho

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to investigate the relationship between the protean career and other variables, including organizational learning climate, individual calling work orientation, and demographic variables. Design/methodology/approach: The research data were obtained from a sample consisting of 292 employees of two South Korean manufacturing…

  6. Investigation of factors affecting the quality of americium electroplating.

    PubMed

    Trdin, M; Benedik, L; Samardžija, Z; Pihlar, B

    2012-09-01

    Four different electrolyte solutions were used in the electrodeposition of americium and their influences on the quality of the thin layer of deposited americium isotopes in combination with three different cathode disc materials were investigated. The relations between alpha spectral resolution and disc surface properties were established.

  7. In vivo and in vitro investigations on cataract risk factors.

    PubMed

    Lerman, S

    1987-01-01

    The role of UV-visible slitlamp densitography in monitoring 'pre-cataractous' changes in the living human (as well as animals) lens has been amply documented. This apparatus can be easily employed in the field (as a part of an epidemiologic study) and provides biometric as well as densitographic data. These can be correlated with a concomitant evaluation of two cataractogenic risk factors (UV exposure and diet). In addition, all cataractous lenses (or lens matter) removed in the area being studied can be collected, stored in a frozen state, and shipped to the laboratory for further analysis. We have shown that spectroscopic studies (UV, fluorescence, phosphorescence and EPR) can be correlated with these in vivo data and further clarify the role of UV radiation and diet as part of such an epidemiologic study.

  8. Investigation of earthquake factor for optimum tuned mass dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigdeli, Sinan Melih; Bekdaş, Gebrail

    2012-09-01

    In this study the optimum parameters of tuned mass dampers (TMD) are investigated under earthquake excitations. An optimization strategy was carried out by using the Harmony Search (HS) algorithm. HS is a metaheuristic method which is inspired from the nature of musical performances. In addition to the HS algorithm, the results of the optimization objective are compared with the results of the other documented method and the corresponding results are eliminated. In that case, the best optimum results are obtained. During the optimization, the optimum TMD parameters were searched for single degree of freedom (SDOF) structure models with different periods. The optimization was done for different earthquakes separately and the results were compared.

  9. Investigation of Factors Affecting Aerodynamic Performance of Nebulized Nanoemulsion

    PubMed Central

    Kamali, Hosein; Abbasi, Shayan; Amini, Mohammad Ali; Amani, Amir

    2016-01-01

    This work aimed to prepare a nanoemulsion preparation containing budesonide and assess its aerodynamic behavior in comparison with suspension of budesonide. In-vitro aerodynamic performance of the corresponding micellar solution (ie. nanoemulsion preparation without oil) was investigated too. Nanoemulsions of almond oil containing budesonide, as a hydrophobic model drug molecule, were prepared and optimized. Then, the effect of variation of surfactant/co-surfactant concentration on the aerodynamic properties of the nebulized aerosol was studied. The results indicated that the most physically stable formulation makes the smallest aerodynamic size. The concentration of co-surfactant was also shown to be critical in determination of aerodynamic size. Furthermore, the optimized sample, with 3% w/w almond oil, 20% w/w Tween 80+Span 80 and 2% w/w ethanol showed a smaller MMAD in comparison with the commercially available suspension and the micellar solution. PMID:28243265

  10. Investigation of factors affecting asphalt pavement recycling and asphalt compatibility

    SciTech Connect

    Venable, R.L.; Petersen, J.C.; Robertson, R.E.; Plancher, H.

    1983-03-01

    Both economic and environmental factors dictate that asphalt pavement be recycled. Many recycling projects have been completed using a variety of recycling additives, but little work has been done on the physiochemical aspects of pavement recycling. The present exploratory study was undertaken to better define the physiochemical variables of recycling. Objectives of the present study include: (1) to determine if molecular structuring in the asphalt binder could be observed in oxidized (air-aged) asphalt-aggregate briquets, and if so, how was structuring affected during briquits, and if so, how was structuring affected during briquet recycling and (2) to determine if recycling agents penetrate the strongly adsorbed asphalt layer on the aggregate surface. Differences were seen in asphalt component compatibility as judged by the state of peptization parameters. In extreme cases the values of the parameters correlated with properties of asphalts of known compatibility; however, a relationship between the parameters determined on a series of asphalts in pavements was not established. The parameters might be useful in evaluating additives for pavement recycling; however, more systems need to be studied to fully assess their potential usefulness. Finally, the parameters need to be correlated with performance-related measurements such as asphalt rheological and mix properties. Examination of the parameters and their changes on asphalt oxidative aging may also be informative with regard to asphalt durability inasmuch as oxidation-induced changes are a major cause of asphalt pavement failure.

  11. Investigation of the risk factors for sporadically occurring Legionnaires` disease

    SciTech Connect

    Plouffe, J.F.; Breiman, R.F.; File, T.M.

    1995-05-01

    The potential of acquiring Legionnaires` disease in the home environment was studied using a case-control design with 146 cases of Legionnaires` disease and 275 matched controls living in two counties in Ohio. By multivariate analysis, cases were more likely than controls to have Legionellae cultured from water sources in the home, to have non-municipal water supplied to their home, and to have had recent plumbing work on their home. Franklin county residents with underlying health conditions had strongest associations with domestic risk of acquiring Legionnaires` disease presence of Legionellae in home (p<0.001), non-municipal water supply (p=0.031), and recent plumbing work (p=0.058). Use of electric home hot water heaters was more common in case homes, but was not a significant risk factor in multivariate analysis, because use of electric tanks was strongly associated with non-municipal water source (p=0.01). The authors feel that a portion of community acquired Legionnaires` disease is acquired in the home and that interventional studies which address means to decrease the risk of domestic acquisition of Legionnaires` disease need to be performed.

  12. An investigation of some factors affecting activated sludge population dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Juang, Derfong.

    1991-01-01

    Synthetic polymers are applied to many wastewater treatment plants to improve the settling characteristics of activated sludge, especially when the cause of the poor settleability is transient hydraulic overloading. After a few days polymer addition seems no longer necessary. However, many plants which only use synthetic polymers for a short period of time still face serious sludge settling problems immediately after the discontinuation of polymer addition. In the first part of this research, a study was conducted to investigate the reason for the poor settling of activated sludge after the addition of synthetic polymers is halted. The substrate utilization of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in two SBR (Sequencing Batch Reactor) activated sludges systems was investigated in the second part of this research. Crystal violet was applied to inhibit the Gram-positive bacteria in one of the SBR systems. The results were confirmed by testing under two different buffer intensity conditions. Nitrification characteristics in both systems and under different buffer intensity conditions were studied. The population structures of predominant microorganisms in each system under both buffer intensity conditions were also examined. Each species of bacteria displays different surface electrical potential due to the specific chemical structures on its cell surface. The zeta potential of activated sludge is always very high, therefore, extracellular polymers must be very important in the flocculation and the settleability of activated sludge. A study of the surface charge of microorganisms grown in pure culture as well as activated sludge was conducted in the third part of this research. The effects of monovalent (Na{sup +}) and divalent (Ca{sup +2}) cations on the zeta potential and settling velocity of activated sludge were demonstrated.

  13. Investigating the Nature of Method Factors through Multiple Informants: Evidence for a Specific Factor?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alessandri, Guido; Vecchione, Michele; Tisak, John; Barbaranelli, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    When a self-report instrument includes a balanced number of positively and negatively worded items, factor analysts often use method factors to aid model fitting. The nature of these factors, often referred to as acquiescence, is still debated. Relying upon previous results (Alessandri et al., 2010; DiStefano & Motl, 2006, 2008; Rauch, Schweizer,…

  14. Investigation of risk factors and characteristics of dance injuries.

    PubMed

    Campoy, Fernanda Assen Soares; Coelho, Lara Raquel de Oliveira; Bastos, Fabio Nascimento; Netto Júnior, Jayme; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos Marques; Monteiro, Henrique Luiz; Padovani, Carlos Roberto; Pastre, Carlos Marcelo

    2011-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify risk factors for the occurrence of sport injuries in dancers related to anthropometric variables, training, and specific dance characteristics. One-year, retrospective, cross-sectional study. 26th Dance Festival of Joinville (Brazil), 2008. Five hundred dancers (409 women and 91 men) with a mean age of 18.26 ± 4.55 years. Dancers participating in the 26th Dance Festival of Joinville (Brazil) were interviewed using the Reported Condition Inquiry, which was previously validated and modified for dance. This questionnaire contains questions addressing the anthropometric data of the volunteers and characteristics of injuries that occurred in the past 12 months. The data were collected through interviews addressing the occurrence of injuries and respective characteristics. Injury was considered any pain or musculoskeletal condition resulting from training and competition sufficient to alter the normal training routine in terms of form, duration, intensity, or frequency. A total of 377 injuries (75.40%) of the interviewees reported injuries in the past 12 months. The most affected anatomic segments were the ankle/foot (92 injuries; 28.75%) and thigh/leg (88 injuries; 27.50%) in classical ballet, the thigh/leg (43 injuries; 27.92%) in jazz/contemporary dance, and the knee (22 injuries; 43.14%) in tap/folk dance. The most reported causal mechanisms were dynamic overload and excessive use. Age and body weight were associated with injury in jazz/contemporary dance. Height was associated with injury in classical ballet and tap/folk dance. Duration of practice was associated with injury in classical ballet and jazz/contemporary dance.

  15. Investigating Factors Involved in Post Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy (LSG) Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Alsabah, Almaha; Al Sabah, Salman; Al-Sabah, Suleiman; Al-Serri, Ahmad; Al Haddad, Eliana; Renno, Waleed M

    2017-05-01

    Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) has gained popularity as the leading bariatric procedure for the treatment of morbid obesity. Due to the rising numbers of bariatric surgeries, neurologic complications have become increasingly recognized. Our aim was to examine biochemical and hormonal factors that are associated with neuropathy post-LSG. Thirty-two patients were included: 16 patients with neuropathy in the neuropathic group (NG) and 16 patients without neuropathy in the control group (CG). Diagnosis was made by a consultant neurologist, and blood samples were taken to examine vitamin deficiencies and hormones involved in neuropathy. There was no significant difference between the BMI (p = 0.1) in both groups as well as excess weight loss percentages post-LSG at 12 months (p = 0.6). B12 levels were within normal range, but higher in NG (p = 0.005). Vitamin B1 and B2 levels were significantly lower in NG; p values are 0.000 and 0.031, respectively. Vitamin B6 levels were significantly higher in NG (p = 0.02) and copper levels were lower in NG (p = 0.009). There was no significant difference in GLP-1 response in both groups. Our data showed post-LSG neuropathy is associated with lower levels of vitamin B1, B2, and copper, plus patients who are older in age. Vitamin B6 was significantly higher in the NG, which is, at toxic levels, associated with neuropathy. No difference in preoperative BMI, excess weight loss percent at 1 year, and GLP-1 levels was found. Larger data is required to validate our results.

  16. [Investigation of factors childhood asthma persisting into adulthood].

    PubMed

    Kanno, Noriko; Yoshihara, Shigemi; Arisaka, Osamu; Noda, Masayuki

    2010-01-01

    A questionnaire survey was conducted to determine the percentages of patients with childhood-onset asthma persisting into adulthood and adult-relapse asthma in the adult asthmatic population, and to identify the factors the childhood-onset asthma persisting into adulthood. The questionnaire survey included 822 adult asthmatic patients who visited out patient clinic at Nishikata Hospital. The characteristics of the three groups of adult asthmatics, namely, the childhood-onset asthma persisting into adulthood, adult-onset asthma and adult-relapse asthma, were compared with those of a group of 153 pediatric asthma patients with remission (control group). 1) The numbers of patients with adult-onset asthma, childhood-onset asthma persisting into adulthood and adult-relapse asthma in the survey population were 531 (64.7%), 168 (20.4%) and 123 (14.9%), respectively. 2) Comparison of the characteristics of the two groups of adult asthmatics (childhood-onset asthma persisting into adulthood and adult-relapse asthma) and control group revealed that the average age at onset and percentage of patients with a history of without preventive treatment, and delay in the start of early interventions were higher in the former groups than in the control group (p<0.01). Furthermore, the frequencies of severe asthma were significantly higher in the patients with childhood-onset asthma persisting into adulthood than in control group (p<0.01). The percentage of smokers was higher in the adult-relapse asthma group and childhood-onset asthma persisting into adulthood group than in control group. 1) In this adult asthmatic study population, the percentages of childhood-onset asthma persisting into adulthood and adult-relapse asthma in adult asthmatic population were 35.3%. 2) To prevent persistence of childhood-onset asthma into adulthood, it is important to prevent smoking, not keeping pets, and not delay in the onset of early interventions in childhood.

  17. [A STUDY INVESTIGATING THE FACTORS OF INTERNET ADDICTION].

    PubMed

    Puharić, Zrinka; Stašević, Ina; Ropac, Darko; Petričević, Nina; Jurišić, Irena

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the characteristics of Internet use among elementary school eighth-graders in the Bjelo- var-Bilogora County, to evaluate gender and sociodemographic differences, and to examine predictors for Internet addiction. The study included 437 (female 51%) eighth-graders, mean age 13.8 ± 0.5 years. An anonymous questionnaire was used to measure the participants' Internet use, the functions for which they used Internet, their parents' attitude towards the child's Internet use, and their signs of Internet addiction. Logistic regression was conducted to evaluate predictors for Internet addiction. The majority of children (71.5%) reported using Internet every day. Considering important risk factors of Internet addiction development, we found that 32% of children almost always stayed on-line longer than intended, 13% of boys and 4% of girls almost always neglected chores to spend more time on-line and 51.7% of children thought their life would be boring and uninteresting without the Internet. There was no significant difference between urban and rural students. In terms of the function for which they used the Internet, they were mostly engaged in on-line community/chat websites (70%), to listen to music and watch movies (81 %), and boys in gaming websites. Most of the students (43.4%) spent 1-2 hours daily on-line, 26.2% of students spent 3-4 hours on-line, and 9% spent more than 5 hours daily on-line. In conclusion, more public health preventive measures should be conducted to raise public awareness and concern about the negative effect of Internet use and Internet addiction, especially in the young population.

  18. Chemotherapy-induced antitumor immunity requires formyl peptide receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Vacchelli, Erika; Ma, Yuting; Baracco, Elisa E; Sistigu, Antonella; Enot, David P; Pietrocola, Federico; Yang, Heng; Adjemian, Sandy; Chaba, Kariman; Semeraro, Michaela; Signore, Michele; De Ninno, Adele; Lucarini, Valeria; Peschiaroli, Francesca; Businaro, Luca; Gerardino, Annamaria; Manic, Gwenola; Ulas, Thomas; Günther, Patrick; Schultze, Joachim L; Kepp, Oliver; Stoll, Gautier; Lefebvre, Céline; Mulot, Claire; Castoldi, Francesca; Rusakiewicz, Sylvie; Ladoire, Sylvain; Apetoh, Lionel; Bravo-San Pedro, José Manuel; Lucattelli, Monica; Delarasse, Cécile; Boige, Valérie; Ducreux, Michel; Delaloge, Suzette; Borg, Christophe; André, Fabrice; Schiavoni, Giovanna; Vitale, Ilio; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Mattei, Fabrizio; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido

    2015-11-20

    Antitumor immunity driven by intratumoral dendritic cells contributes to the efficacy of anthracycline-based chemotherapy in cancer. We identified a loss-of-function allele of the gene coding for formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) that was associated with poor metastasis-free and overall survival in breast and colorectal cancer patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy. The therapeutic effects of anthracyclines were abrogated in tumor-bearing Fpr1(-/-) mice due to impaired antitumor immunity. Fpr1-deficient dendritic cells failed to approach dying cancer cells and, as a result, could not elicit antitumor T cell immunity. Experiments performed in a microfluidic device confirmed that FPR1 and its ligand, annexin-1, promoted stable interactions between dying cancer cells and human or murine leukocytes. Altogether, these results highlight the importance of FPR1 in chemotherapy-induced anticancer immune responses.

  19. Immobilization of soluble complement receptor 1 on islets.

    PubMed

    Luan, Nguyen M; Teramura, Yuji; Iwata, Hiroo

    2011-07-01

    Transplantation of pancreatic islets of Langerhans (islets) is a promising method to treat insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Control of complement activation is necessary to improve graft survival in alloislet and xenoislet transplantation. In this study, human soluble complement receptor 1 (sCR1) was immobilized on the islet cell surface through poly(ethylene glycol)-conjugated phospholipid (PEG-lipid) without loss of islet cell viability or insulin secretion ability. sCR1 on islets effectively inhibits complement activation and protects islets against attack by xenoreactive antibodies and complement. This method will be an efficient means to control early islet loss in clinical islet transplantation and realize xenoislet transplantation in the future.

  20. Maternal plasma angiogenic index-1 (placental growth factor/soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1) is a biomarker for the burden of placental lesions consistent with uteroplacental underperfusion: a longitudinal case-cohort study.

    PubMed

    Korzeniewski, Steven J; Romero, Roberto; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Chaemsaithong, Piya; Kim, Chong Jai; Kim, Yeon Mee; Kim, Jung-Sun; Yoon, Bo Hyun; Hassan, Sonia S; Yeo, Lami

    2016-05-01

    Placental lesions consistent with maternal vascular underperfusion (MVU) are thought to be pathogenically linked to preeclampsia, small-for-gestational-age newborns, fetal death, and spontaneous preterm labor and delivery; yet, these lesions cannot be diagnosed antenatally. We previously reported that patients with such conditions and lesions have an abnormal profile of the angiogenic placental growth factor (PlGF) and antiangiogenic factors (eg, soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor [sVEGFR]-1). The objectives of this study were to: (1) examine the relationship between the maternal plasma PlGF/sVEGFR-1 concentration ratio (referred to herein as angiogenic index-1) and the burden of histologic placental features consistent with MVU; and (2) test the hypothesis that angiogenic index-1 can identify patients in the midtrimester who are destined to deliver before 34 weeks of gestation with multiple (ie, ≥3) histologic placental features consistent with MVU. A 2-stage case-cohort sampling strategy was used to select participants from among 4006 women with singleton gestations enrolled from 2006 through 2010 in a longitudinal study. Maternal plasma angiogenic index-1 ratios were determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Placentas underwent histologic examination according to standardized protocols by experienced pediatric pathologists who were blinded to clinical diagnoses and pregnancy outcomes. The diagnosis of lesions consistent with MVU was made using criteria proposed by the Perinatal Section of the Society for Pediatric Pathology. Weighted analyses were performed to reflect the parent cohort; "n*" is used to reflect weighted frequencies. (1) Angiogenic index-1 (PlGF/sVEGFR-1) concentration ratios were determined in 7560 plasma samples collected from 1499 study participants; (2) the prevalence of lesions consistent with MVU was 21% (n* = 833.9/3904) and 27% (n* = 11.4/42.7) of women with ≥3 MVU lesions delivered before 34 weeks of

  1. Central Administration of Galanin Receptor 1 Agonist Boosted Insulin Sensitivity in Adipose Cells of Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenwen; Fang, Penghua; He, Biao; Guo, Lili; Runesson, Johan; Langel, Ülo; Shi, Mingyi; Zhu, Yan; Bo, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Our previous studies testified the beneficial effect of central galanin on insulin sensitivity of type 2 diabetic rats. The aim of the study was further to investigate whether central M617, a galanin receptor 1 agonist, can benefit insulin sensitivity. The effects of intracerebroventricular administration of M617 on insulin sensitivity and insulin signaling were evaluated in adipose tissues of type 2 diabetic rats. The results showed that central injection of M617 significantly increased plasma adiponectin contents, glucose infusion rates in hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp tests, GLUT4 mRNA expression levels, GLUT4 contents in plasma membranes, and total cell membranes of the adipose cells but reduced the plasma C-reactive protein concentration in nondiabetic and diabetic rats. The ratios of GLUT4 contents were higher in plasma membranes to total cell membranes in both nondiabetic and diabetic M617 groups than each control. In addition, the central administration of M617 enhanced the ratios of pAkt/Akt and pAS160/AS160, but not phosphorylative cAMP response element-binding protein (pCREB)/CREB in the adipose cells of nondiabetic and diabetic rats. These results suggest that excitation of central galanin receptor 1 facilitates insulin sensitivity via activation of the Akt/AS160 signaling pathway in the fat cells of type 2 diabetic rats.

  2. Central Administration of Galanin Receptor 1 Agonist Boosted Insulin Sensitivity in Adipose Cells of Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhenwen; Fang, Penghua; He, Biao; Guo, Lili; Runesson, Johan; Langel, Ülo; Shi, Mingyi; Zhu, Yan; Bo, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Our previous studies testified the beneficial effect of central galanin on insulin sensitivity of type 2 diabetic rats. The aim of the study was further to investigate whether central M617, a galanin receptor 1 agonist, can benefit insulin sensitivity. The effects of intracerebroventricular administration of M617 on insulin sensitivity and insulin signaling were evaluated in adipose tissues of type 2 diabetic rats. The results showed that central injection of M617 significantly increased plasma adiponectin contents, glucose infusion rates in hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp tests, GLUT4 mRNA expression levels, GLUT4 contents in plasma membranes, and total cell membranes of the adipose cells but reduced the plasma C-reactive protein concentration in nondiabetic and diabetic rats. The ratios of GLUT4 contents were higher in plasma membranes to total cell membranes in both nondiabetic and diabetic M617 groups than each control. In addition, the central administration of M617 enhanced the ratios of pAkt/Akt and pAS160/AS160, but not phosphorylative cAMP response element-binding protein (pCREB)/CREB in the adipose cells of nondiabetic and diabetic rats. These results suggest that excitation of central galanin receptor 1 facilitates insulin sensitivity via activation of the Akt/AS160 signaling pathway in the fat cells of type 2 diabetic rats. PMID:27127795

  3. Melanin concentrating hormone receptor 1 (MCHR1) antagonists-Still a viable approach for obesity treatment?

    PubMed

    Högberg, Thomas; Frimurer, Thomas M; Sasmal, Pradip K

    2012-10-01

    Obesity is a global epidemic associated with multiple severe diseases. Several pharmacotherapies have been investigated including the melanin concentrating hormone (MCH) and its receptor 1. The development of MCHR1 antagonists are described with a specific perspective on different chemotypes investigated in efforts to overcome hERG liabilities while having orally active, potent and selective compounds with sufficient brain penetration. A chemometric comparison of ∼2000 diverse MCHR1 and ∼1000 diverse hERG ligands underline the structural similarities. A binding pocket analysis of a MCHR1 model and recent X-ray structures of GPCRs invoked in selectivity issues indicate a way to support future drug design. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Collagen Fibril Ultrastructure in Mice Lacking Discoidin Domain Receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Tonniges, Jeffrey R; Albert, Benjamin; Calomeni, Edward P; Roy, Shuvro; Lee, Joan; Mo, Xiaokui; Cole, Susan E; Agarwal, Gunjan

    2016-06-01

    The quantity and quality of collagen fibrils in the extracellular matrix (ECM) have a pivotal role in dictating biological processes. Several collagen-binding proteins (CBPs) are known to modulate collagen deposition and fibril diameter. However, limited studies exist on alterations in the fibril ultrastructure by CBPs. In this study, we elucidate how the collagen receptor, discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1) regulates the collagen content and ultrastructure in the adventitia of DDR1 knock-out (KO) mice. DDR1 KO mice exhibit increased collagen deposition as observed using Masson's trichrome. Collagen ultrastructure was evaluated in situ using transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Although the mean fibril diameter was not significantly different, DDR1 KO mice had a higher percentage of fibrils with larger diameter compared with their wild-type littermates. No significant differences were observed in the length of D-periods. In addition, collagen fibrils from DDR1 KO mice exhibited a small, but statistically significant, increase in the depth of the fibril D-periods. Consistent with these observations, a reduction in the depth of D-periods was observed in collagen fibrils reconstituted with recombinant DDR1-Fc. Our results elucidate how DDR1 modulates collagen fibril ultrastructure in vivo, which may have important consequences in the functional role(s) of the underlying ECM.

  5. Collagen Fibril Ultrastructure in Mice Lacking Discoidin Domain Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Tonniges, Jeffrey R.; Albert, Benjamin; Calomeni, Edward P.; Roy, Shuvro; Lee, Joan; Mo, Xiaokui; Cole, Susan E.; Agarwal, Gunjan

    2016-01-01

    The quantity and quality of collagen fibrils in the extracellular matrix (ECM) have a pivotal role in dictating biological processes. Several collagen-binding proteins (CBPs) are known to modulate collagen deposition and fibril diameter. However, limited studies exist on alterations in the fibril ultrastructure by CBPs. In this study, we elucidate how the collagen receptor, discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1) regulates the collagen content and ultrastructure in the adventitia of DDR1 knock-out (KO) mice. DDR1 KO mice exhibit increased collagen deposition as observed using Masson’s trichrome. Collagen ultrastructure was evaluated in situ using transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Although the mean fibril diameter was not significantly different, DDR1 KO mice had a higher percentage of fibrils with larger diameter compared with their wild-type littermates. No significant differences were observed in the length of D-periods. In addition, collagen fibrils from DDR1 KO mice exhibited a small, but statistically significant, increase in the depth of the fibril D-periods. Consistent with these observations, a reduction in the depth of D-periods was observed in collagen fibrils reconstituted with recombinant DDR1-Fc. Our results elucidate how DDR1 modulates collagen fibril ultrastructure in vivo, which may have important consequences in the functional role(s) of the underlying ECM. PMID:27329311

  6. Elastase and metalloproteinase activities regulate soluble complement receptor 1 release.

    PubMed

    Sadallah, S; Hess, C; Miot, S; Spertini, O; Lutz, H; Schifferli, J A

    1999-11-01

    Complement receptor 1 (CR1) is cleaved from the surface of polymorphonuclear cells (PMN) in the membrane-proximal region to yield a soluble fragment (sCR1) that contains the functional domains. The enzymes involved in this cleavage are produced by the PMN itself, since in vitro stimulation of purified PMN is followed by sCR1 release. Purified human neutrophil elastase (HNE) cleaved CR1 from erythrocytes and urinary vesicles originating from podocytes and enhanced tenfold the cleavage of CR1 from activated PMN. The largest fragment released from PMN by HNE was identical in size to CR1 shed spontaneously. The CR1 fragments cleaved from erythrocytes were functional. The shedding of sCR1 by activated PMN was inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (80 +/- 10%), alpha1-antiprotease (50 +/- 5%) and elafin (60 +/- 5%). Furthermore the cleavage was blocked by the metalloprotease inhibitor 1,10-phenanthroline (70 +/- 6 %) as well as by a monoclonal antibody against human neutrophil collagenase MMP8 (40 +/- 10%). Maximal inhibition of sCR1 shedding was obtained by a combination of 1,10-phenanthroline with elafin (86 +/- 6%). These inhibitors had no effect on L-selectin shedding, indicating that the cleavage of CR1 was specific. In conclusion, elastase or elastase-like activity may be responsible for the shedding of functional sCR1 in vivo, and this activity is controlled by the local release of PMN metalloproteases and alpha1antiprotease.

  7. Ligation of complement receptor 1 increases erythrocyte membrane deformability.

    PubMed

    Glodek, Aleksandra M; Mirchev, Rossen; Golan, David E; Khoory, Joseph A; Burns, Jennie M; Shevkoplyas, Sergey S; Nicholson-Weller, Anne; Ghiran, Ionita C

    2010-12-23

    Microbes as well as immune complexes and other continuously generated inflammatory particles are efficiently removed from the human circulation by red blood cells (RBCs) through a process called immune-adherence clearance. During this process, RBCs use complement receptor 1 (CR1, CD35) to bind circulating complement-opsonized particles and transfer them to resident macrophages in the liver and spleen for removal. We here show that ligation of RBC CR1 by antibody and complement-opsonized particles induces a transient Ca(++) influx that is proportional to the RBC CR1 levels and is inhibited by T1E3 pAb, a specific inhibitor of TRPC1 channels. The CR1-elicited RBC Ca(++) influx is accompanied by an increase in RBC membrane deformability that positively correlates with the number of preexisting CR1 molecules on RBC membranes. Biochemically, ligation of RBC CR1 causes a significant increase in phosphorylation levels of β-spectrin that is inhibited by preincubation of RBCs with DMAT, a specific casein kinase II inhibitor. We hypothesize that the CR1-dependent increase in membrane deformability could be relevant for facilitating the transfer of CR1-bound particles from the RBCs to the hepatic and splenic phagocytes.

  8. Encapsulated cells for long-term secretion of soluble VEGF receptor 1: Material optimization and simulation of ocular drug response.

    PubMed

    Kontturi, Leena-Stiina; Collin, Estelle C; Murtomäki, Lasse; Pandit, Abhay S; Yliperttula, Marjo; Urtti, Arto

    2015-09-01

    Anti-angiogenic therapies with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibiting factors are effective treatment options for neovascular diseases of the retina, but these proteins can only be delivered as intravitreal (IVT) injections. To sustain a therapeutic drug level in the retina, VEGF inhibitors have to be delivered frequently, every 4-8weeks, causing inconvenience for the patients and expenses for the healthcare system. The aim of this study was to investigate cell encapsulation as a delivery system for prolonged anti-angiogenic treatment of retinal neovascularization. Genetically engineered ARPE-19 cells secreting soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (sVEGFR1) were encapsulated in a hydrogel of cross-linked collagen and interpenetrating hyaluronic acid (HA). The system was optimized in terms of matrix composition and cell density, and long-term cell viability and protein secretion measurements were performed. sVEGFR1 ARPE-19 cells in the optimized hydrogel remained viable and secreted sVEGFR1 at a constant rate for at least 50days. Based on pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modeling, delivery of sVEGFR1 from this cell encapsulation system is expected to lead only to modest VEGF inhibition, but improvements of the protein structure and/or secretion rate should result in strong and prolonged therapeutic effect. In conclusion, the hydrogel matrix herein supported the survival and protein secretion from the encapsulated cells. The PK/PD simulation is a convenient approach to predict the efficiency of the cell encapsulation system before in vivo experiments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Involvement of Prokineticin 2 and Prokineticin Receptor 1 in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Testitis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Biao; Yu, Lili; Wang, Jiaojiao; Li, Cuiling; Zhao, Kai; Zhang, Huiping

    2016-04-01

    Prokineticin 2, a newly discovered proinflammatory peptide, has been amply evidenced to be involved in the occurrence and progress of local and systematical inflammation. Although the presence of Prokineticn 2 in mammal testis has been documented clearly, research targeting the involvement of prokineticin 2 in testicular pathology, especially testitis, is rather scarce. Employing a lipopolysaccharide-induced testitis rat model, we for the first time demonstrated the expression and upregulation of prokineticin 2 in orchitis at several levels. Our effort also addressed the differential expression patterns of prokineticin 2 and interleukin-1β, a key inflammation indicator, during testitis suggesting Prokineticn 2 serves more than a proinflammatory factor in the context of testitis. Given one of the cognate receptors of prokineticin 2, prokineticin receptor 1 (PKR1) was also significantly upregulated in orchitis as discussed in the current study, it is very likely that PK2/PKR1 signaling contribute to the development of inflammation-related testicular diseases.

  10. Trace amine-associated receptor 1-Family archetype or iconoclast?

    PubMed

    Grandy, David K

    2007-12-01

    Interest has recently been rekindled in receptors that are activated by low molecular weight, noncatecholic, biogenic amines that are typically found as trace constituents of various vertebrate and invertebrate tissues and fluids. The timing of this resurgent focus on receptors activated by the "trace amines" (TA) beta-phenylethylamine (PEA), tyramine (TYR), octopamine (OCT), synephrine (SYN), and tryptamine (TRYP) is the direct result of 2 publications that appeared in 2001 describing the cloning of a novel G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) referred to by their discoverers Borowsky et al. as TA1 and Bunzow et al. as TA receptor 1 (TAR1). When heterologously expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and various eukaryotic cell lines, recombinant rodent and human TAR dose-dependently couple to the stimulation of adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) production. Structure-activity profiling based on this functional response has revealed that in addition to the TA, other biologically active compounds containing a 2-carbon aliphatic side chain linking an amino group to at least 1 benzene ring are potent and efficacious TA receptor agonists with amphetamine (AMPH), methamphetamine, 3-iodothyronamine, thyronamine, and dopamine (DA) among the most notable. Almost 100 years after the search for TAR began, numerous TA1/TAR1-related sequences, now called TA-associated receptors (TAAR), have been identified in the genome of every species of vertebrate examined to date. Consequently, even though heterologously expressed TAAR1 fits the pharmacological criteria established for a bona fide TAR, a major challenge for those working in the field is to discern the in vivo pharmacology and physiology of each purported member of this extended family of GPCR. Only then will it be possible to establish whether TAAR1 is the family archetype or an iconoclast.

  11. Chimpanzee Personality and the Arginine Vasopressin Receptor 1A Genotype.

    PubMed

    Wilson, V A D; Weiss, A; Humle, T; Morimura, N; Udono, T; Idani, G; Matsuzawa, T; Hirata, S; Inoue-Murayama, M

    2017-03-01

    Polymorphisms of the arginine vasopressin receptor 1a (AVPR1a) gene have been linked to various measures related to human social behavior, including sibling conflict and agreeableness. In chimpanzees, AVPR1a polymorphisms have been associated with traits important for social interactions, including sociability, joint attention, dominance, conscientiousness, and hierarchical personality dimensions named low alpha/stability, disinhibition, and negative emotionality/low dominance. We examined associations between AVPR1a and six personality domains and hierarchical personality dimensions in 129 chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) living in Japan or in a sanctuary in Guinea. We fit three linear and three animal models. The first model included genotype, the second included sex and genotype, and the third included genotype, sex, and sex × genotype. All personality phenotypes were heritable. Chimpanzees possessing the long form of the allele were higher in conscientiousness, but only in models that did not include the other predictors; however, additional analyses suggested that this may have been a consequence of study design. In animal models that included sex and sex × genotype, chimpanzees homozygous for the short form of the allele were higher in extraversion. Taken with the findings of previous studies of chimpanzees and humans, the findings related to conscientiousness suggest that AVPR1a may be related to lower levels of impulsive aggression. The direction of the association between AVPR1a genotype and extraversion ran counter to what one would expect if AVPR1a was related to social behaviors. These results help us further understand the genetic basis of personality in chimpanzees.

  12. Trace Amine Associated Receptor 1 Modulates Behavioral Effects of Ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Laurie J.; Sullivan, Katherine A.; Vallender, Eric J.; Rowlett, James K.; Platt, Donna M.; Miller, Gregory M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Few treatment options for alcohol use disorders (AUDs) exist and more are critically needed. Here, we assessed whether trace amine associated receptor 1 (TAAR1), a modulator of brain monoamine systems, is involved in the behavioral and reinforcement-related effects of ethanol and whether it could potentially serve as a therapeutic target. Methods Wild-type (WT) and TAAR1 knockout (KO) mice (75% C57J/BL6 and 25% 129S1/Sv background) were compared in tests of ethanol consumption (two-bottle choice [TBC]), motor impairment (loss of righting reflex, [LORR], locomotor activity) and ethanol clearance (blood ethanol level [BEL]). Results As compared with WT mice, KO mice displayed (1) significantly greater preference for and consumption of ethanol in a TBC paradigm (3%–11% vol/vol escalating over 10 weeks), with no significant difference observed in TBC with sucrose (1%–3%); (2) significantly greater sedative-like effects of acute ethanol (2.0 or 2.5 g/kg, intraperitoneal [i.p.]) manifested as LORR observed at a lower dose and for longer time, with similar BELs and rates of ethanol clearance; and (3) lower cumulative locomotor activity over 60 minutes in response to an acute ethanol challenge (1.0–2.5 g/kg, i.p.). Conclusions The present findings are the first to implicate TAAR1 in the behavioral and reinforcement-related effects of ethanol and raise the question of whether specific drugs that target TAAR1 could potentially reduce alcohol consumption in humans with AUDs. PMID:23861588

  13. Interaction of lipids with the neurotensin receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Bolivar, Juan H; Muñoz-García, Juan C; Castro-Dopico, Tomas; Dijkman, Patricia M; Stansfeld, Phillip J; Watts, Anthony

    2016-06-01

    Information about lipid-protein interactions for G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is scarce. Here, we use electron spin resonance (ESR) and spin-labelled lipids to study lipid interactions with the rat neurotensin receptor 1 (NTS1). A fusion protein containing rat NTS1 fully able to bind its ligand neurotensin was reconstituted into phosphatidylcholine (PC) bilayers at specific lipid:protein molar ratios. The fraction of motionally restricted lipids in the range of 40:1 to 80:1 lipids per receptor suggested an oligomeric state of the protein, and the result was unaffected by increasing the hydrophobic thickness of the lipid bilayer from C-18 to C-20 or C-22 chain length PC membranes. Comparison of the ESR spectra of different spin-labelled lipids allowed direct measurement of lipid binding constants relative to PC (Kr), with spin-labelled phosphatidylethanolamine (PESL), phosphatidylserine (PSSL), stearic acid (SASL), and a spin labelled cholesterol analogue (CSL) Kr values of 1.05±0.05, 1.92±0.08, 5.20±0.51 and 0.91±0.19, respectively. The results contrast with those from rhodopsin, the only other GPCR studied this way, which has no selectivity for the lipids analysed here. Molecular dynamics simulations of NTS1 in bilayers are in agreement with the ESR data, and point to sites in the receptor where PS could interact with higher affinity. Lipid selectivity could be necessary for regulation of ligand binding, oligomerisation and/or G protein activation processes. Our results provide insight into the potential modulatory mechanisms that lipids can exert on GPCRs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Synthesis of Arylpiperazine Derivatives As Protease Activated Receptor 1 Antagonists And Their Evaluation As Antiproliferative Agents.

    PubMed

    Zotti, Andrea Ilaria; Di Gennaro, Elena; Corvino, Angela; Frecentese, Francesco; Magli, Elisa; Perissutti, Elisa; Cirino, Giuseppe; Roviezzo, Fiorentina; Terranova-Barberio, Manuela; Iannelli, Federica; Caliendo, Giuseppe; Santagada, Vincenzo; Fiorino, Ferdinando; Budillon, Alfredo; Severino, Beatrice

    2016-09-26

    Protease activated receptor-1 (PAR1) is a G-coupled receptor activated by α-thrombin and other proteases. Several reports demonstrate PAR1 involvement in tumorigenesis and tumor progression. In order to investigate on potential use of PAR1 antagonists as antiproliferative agents, we have identified a series of arylpiperazine derivatives acting as PAR1 antagonists; the selected molecules have been evaluated for their antiproliferative properties. All the compounds inhibited the growth of a panel of cell lines expressing PAR1; two of them, compounds 13 and 15, were able to inhibit, in a dose dependent manner, the growth of the selected cell lines with the lowest IC50 values, and were further characterized to define the mechanism responsible for the observed antiproliferative effect. This study directed us to the identification of two interesting leads that may help to further validate PAR1 as an important therapeutic target for cancer treatment.

  15. The Relationship between Protective Factors and Outcomes for Children Investigated for Maltreatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Dana; Tharp-Taylor, Shannah; Haviland, Amelia; Jaycox, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: This research explores the relationship between hypothesized protective factors and outcomes for children investigated for maltreatment. Methods: Using data from the National Survey on Child and Adolescent Well-Being (NSCAW), we ran logistic regression models to examine the relationship between hypothesized protective factors (social…

  16. Investigation of Individual Factors Associated with Anxiety in Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubin, Ashley H.; Lieberman-Betz, Rebecca; Michele Lease, A.

    2015-01-01

    As youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are more likely to experience anxiety than youth in the general population, investigation of associated factors is important for diagnosis and treatment. The present study extended prior research by examining factors associated with caregiver-reported anxiety in 2662 youth (mean age = 8.82 years) with…

  17. An Investigation of Factors Determining the Study Abroad Destination Choice: A Case Study of Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Cheng-Fei

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies on the field of education abroad have mainly focused on the factors influencing the mobility of international students from developing to developed countries and very few have been conducted to investigate the factors influencing the flow of international students to the Asia Pacific region. As a piece of country-specific…

  18. An Investigation of Factors Determining the Study Abroad Destination Choice: A Case Study of Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Cheng-Fei

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies on the field of education abroad have mainly focused on the factors influencing the mobility of international students from developing to developed countries and very few have been conducted to investigate the factors influencing the flow of international students to the Asia Pacific region. As a piece of country-specific…

  19. Investigating the Effect of Complexity Factors in Stoichiometry Problems Using Logistic Regression and Eye Tracking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Hui; Kirk, John; Pienta, Norbert J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper includes two experiments, one investigating complexity factors in stoichiometry word problems, and the other identifying students' problem-solving protocols by using eye-tracking technology. The word problems used in this study had five different complexity factors, which were randomly assigned by a Web-based tool that we developed. The…

  20. An Investigation of Factors Related to the Retention of Teachers in Rural Middle Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, Timothy M.

    2012-01-01

    Studies about factors specific to rural middle-school teachers' decisions to remain in the profession are limited. Within a framework of Boylan's spheres of influence, the purpose of this qualitative descriptive case study was to investigate the factors that teachers considered to be most important in decisions to remain teaching in a rural middle…

  1. Investigation of Individual Factors Associated with Anxiety in Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubin, Ashley H.; Lieberman-Betz, Rebecca; Michele Lease, A.

    2015-01-01

    As youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are more likely to experience anxiety than youth in the general population, investigation of associated factors is important for diagnosis and treatment. The present study extended prior research by examining factors associated with caregiver-reported anxiety in 2662 youth (mean age = 8.82 years) with…

  2. Investigating the Effect of Complexity Factors in Stoichiometry Problems Using Logistic Regression and Eye Tracking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Hui; Kirk, John; Pienta, Norbert J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper includes two experiments, one investigating complexity factors in stoichiometry word problems, and the other identifying students' problem-solving protocols by using eye-tracking technology. The word problems used in this study had five different complexity factors, which were randomly assigned by a Web-based tool that we developed. The…

  3. Accident investigation reporting deficiencies related to organizational factors in machinery space fires and explosions.

    PubMed

    Schröder-Hinrichs, Jens U; Baldauf, Michael; Ghirxi, Kevin T

    2011-05-01

    Careful accident investigation provides opportunities to review safety arrangements in socio-technical systems. There is consensus that human intervention is involved in the majority of accidents. Ever cautious of the consequences attributed to such a claim vis-à-vis the apportionment of blame, several authors have highlighted the importance of investigating organizational factors in this respect. Specific regulations to limit what were perceived as unsuitable organizational influences in shipping operations were adopted by the International Maritime Organization (IMO). Guidance is provided for the investigation of human and organizational factors involved in maritime accidents. This paper presents a review of 41 accident investigation reports related to machinery space fires and explosions. The objective was to find out if organizational factors are identified during maritime accident investigations. An adapted version of the Human Factor Analysis and Classification System (HFACS) with minor modifications related to machinery space features was used for this review. The results of the review show that organizational factors were not identified by maritime accident investigators to the extent expected had the IMO guidelines been observed. Instead, contributing factors at the lower end of organizational echelons are over-represented.

  4. Integrating human factors and operational research in a multidisciplinary investigation of road maintenance.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Brendan; Qu, Rong; Schock, Alex; Parry, Tony

    2011-05-01

    There has been limited collaboration between researchers in human factors and operational research disciplines, particularly in relation to work in complex, distributed systems. This study aimed to investigate work at the interface between human factors and operational research in the case example of road resurfacing work. Descriptive material on the factors affecting performance in road maintenance work was collected with support from a range of human factors-based methods and was used to inform operational research analyses. Investigation of the case example from a different perspective, for the supply of asphalt from a distribution centre to multiple work locations, gave a broader picture of the complexity and challenges for the improvement of road maintenance processes. Factors affecting performance in the road maintenance context have been assessed for their potential for further investigation using an integrated human factors and operational research approach. Relative strengths of the disciplines and a rationale for ongoing, collaborative work are described. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: The paper provides evidence of the potential benefits of greater collaboration across human factors and operational research disciplines, using investigation of a case example in the complex, distributed system of road resurfacing.

  5. Selective Cannabinoid Receptor-1 Agonists Regulate Mast Cell Activation in an Oxazolone-Induced Atopic Dermatitis Model

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Gaewon; Jeong, Se Kyoo; Park, Bu Man; Lee, Sin Hee; Kim, Hyun Jong; Hong, Seung-Phil; Kim, Beomjoon

    2016-01-01

    Background Many inflammatory mediators, including various cytokines (e.g. interleukins and tumor necrosis factor [TNF]), inflammatory proteases, and histamine are released following mast cell activation. However, the endogenous modulators for mast cell activation and the underlying mechanism have yet to be elucidated. Endogenous cannabinoids such as palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) and N-arachidonoylethanolamine (anandamide or AEA), were found in peripheral tissues and have been proposed to possess autacoid activity, implying that cannabinoids may downregulate mast cell activation and local inflammation. Objective In order to investigate the effect of cannabinoid receptor-1 (CB1R) agonists on mast cell activation, AEA-derived compounds were newly synthesized and evaluated for their effect on mast cell activation. Methods The effects of selected compounds on FcεRI-induced histamine and β-hexosaminidase release were evaluated in a rat basophilic leukemia cell line (RBL-2H3). To further investigate the inhibitory effects of CB1R agonist in vivo, an oxazolone-induced atopic dermatitis mouse model was exploited. Results We found that CB1R inhibited the release of inflammatory mediators without causing cytotoxicity in RBL-2H3 cells and that CB1R agonists markedly and dose-dependently suppressed mast cell proliferation indicating that CB1R plays an important role in modulating antigen-dependent immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated mast cell activation. We also found that topical application of CB1R agonists suppressed the recruitment of mast cells into the skin and reduced the level of blood histamine. Conclusion Our results indicate that CB1R agonists down-regulate mast cell activation and may be used for relieving inflammatory symptoms mediated by mast cell activation, such as atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, and contact dermatitis. PMID:26848215

  6. Epithelial estrogen receptor 1 intrinsically mediates squamous differentiation in the mouse vagina

    PubMed Central

    Miyagawa, Shinichi; Iguchi, Taisen

    2015-01-01

    Estrogen-mediated actions in female reproductive organs are tightly regulated, mainly through estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1). The mouse vaginal epithelium cyclically exhibits cell proliferation and differentiation in response to estrogen and provides a unique model for analyzing the homeostasis of stratified squamous epithelia. To address the role of ESR1-mediated tissue events during homeostasis, we analyzed mice with a vaginal epithelium-specific knockout of Esr1 driven by keratin 5-Cre (K5-Esr1KO). We show here that loss of epithelial ESR1 in the vagina resulted in aberrant epithelial cell proliferation in the suprabasal cell layers and led to failure of keratinized differentiation. Gene expression analysis showed that several known estrogen target genes, including erbB growth factor ligands, were not induced by estrogen in the K5-Esr1KO mouse vagina. Organ culture experiments revealed that the addition of erbB growth factor ligands, such as amphiregulin, could activate keratinized differentiation in the absence of epithelial ESR1. Thus, epithelial ESR1 integrates estrogen and growth factor signaling to mediate regulation of cell proliferation in squamous differentiation, and our results provide new insights into estrogen-mediated homeostasis in female reproductive organs. PMID:26438838

  7. Predicting cortisol stress responses in older individuals: influence of serotonin receptor 1A gene (HTR1A) and stressful life events.

    PubMed

    Armbruster, Diana; Mueller, Anett; Strobel, Alexander; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Brocke, Burkhard; Kirschbaum, Clemens

    2011-06-01

    Considerable variability in the activity of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in response to stress has been found in quantitative genetic studies investigating healthy individuals suggesting that at least part of this variance is due to genetic factors. Since the HPA axis is regulated by a neuronal network including amygdala, hippocampus, prefrontal cortex as well as brainstem circuits, the investigation of candidate genes that impact neurotransmitter systems related to these brain regions might further elucidate the genetic underpinnings of the stress response. However, aside from genetic risk factors, past stressful life events might also result in long-term adjustments of HPA axis reactivity. Here, we investigated the effects of the -1019 G/C polymorphism in the HTR1A gene encoding the serotonin (5-HT) receptor 1A (5-HT(1A)) and stressful life events experienced during childhood and adolescence on changes in cortisol levels in response to the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) in a sample of healthy older adults (N=97). Regression analyses revealed a significant effect of HTR1A genotype with the G allele being associated with a less pronounced stress response. In addition, an inverse relationship between past stressful life events and cortisol release but no gene × environment interaction was detected. The results further underscore the crucial role of functional serotonergic genetic variation as well as stressful events during critical stages of development on the acute stress response later in life. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A Role for Hypocretin/Orexin Receptor-1 in Cue-Induced Reinstatement of Nicotine-Seeking Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Plaza-Zabala, Ainhoa; Flores, África; Martín-García, Elena; Saravia, Rocío; Maldonado, Rafael; Berrendero, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Hypocretin/orexin signaling is critically involved in relapse to drug-seeking behaviors. In this study, we investigated the involvement of the hypocretin system in the reinstatement of nicotine-seeking behavior induced by nicotine-associated cues. Pretreatment with the hypocretin receptor-1 antagonist SB334867, but not with the hypocretin receptor-2 antagonist TCSOX229, attenuated cue-induced reinstatement of nicotine-seeking, which was associated with an activation of hypocretin neurons of the lateral and perifornical hypothalamic areas. In addition, relapse to nicotine-seeking increased the phosphorylation levels of GluR2-Ser880, NR1-Ser890, and p38 MAPK in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), but not in the prefrontal cortex. Notably, phosphorylation levels of NR1-Ser890 and p38 MAPK, but not GluR2-Ser880, were dependent on hypocretin receptor-1 activation. The intra-accumbens infusion of the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor NPC-15437 reduced nicotine-seeking behavior elicited by drug-paired cues consistent with the PKC-dependent phosphorylations of GluR2-Ser880 and NR1-Ser890. SB334867 failed to modify cue-induced reinstatement of food-seeking, which did not produce any biochemical changes in the NAc. These data identify hypocretin receptor-1 and PKC signaling as potential targets for the treatment of relapse to nicotine-seeking induced by nicotine-associated cues. PMID:23518606

  9. Working smarter on cold cases: identifying factors associated with successful cold case investigations.

    PubMed

    Davis, Robert C; Jensen, Carl J; Burgette, Lane; Burnett, Kathryn

    2014-03-01

    Cold case squads have garnered much attention; however, they have yet to undergo significant empirical scrutiny. In the present study, the authors interviewed investigators and reviewed 189 solved and unsolved cold cases in Washington, D.C., to determine whether there are factors that can predict cold case solvability. In the interviews, new information from witnesses or information from new witnesses was cited as the most prevalent reason for case clearance. The case reviews determined that there were factors in each of the following domains that predicted whether cases would be solved during cold case investigations: Crime Context, Initial Investigation Results, Basis for Opening Cold Case, and Cold Case Investigator Actions. The results suggest that it is possible to prioritize cold case work based on the likelihood of investigations leading to clearances. © 2014 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  10. Factors influencing post-traumatic stress in Korean forensic science investigators.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Yang-Sook; Cho, Ok-Hee; Cha, Kyeong-Sook; Boo, Yun-Jeong

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to understand factors that influence post-traumatic stress (PTS) in Korean forensic science investigators. A total of 111 forensic science investigators were recruited in Korea. PTS was measured using the tool modified by Choi (2001) from the original developed by Foa, Riggs, Dancu, and Rothbaum (1993) based on DSM-IV. Factors influencing PTS included demographic and job-related characteristics, emotional intelligence, and death anxiety. PTS scores were positively correlated with personality type, fatigue from work, and death anxiety. PTS scores were negatively correlated with length of career as a forensic science investigator and emotional intelligence. The factors that had the greatest influence on PTS were death anxiety, years spent as a forensic science investigator, personality type, emotional intelligence, fatigue, and homicide experience. The explanatory power of these six factors was 44.0%. Therefore, it is necessary to regularly evaluate the mental health of those who are vulnerable to PTS. Based on these results, various interventions could be implemented for promoting overall health of the forensic science investigators. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Risk factors for tuberculosis in contact investigations in Rotterdam, the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Verdier, Jesse Eduard; Jan de Vlas, Sake; Kidgell-Koppelaar, Inge D.; Richardus, Jan Hendrik

    2012-01-01

    Contact investigations around tuberculosis patients enable early detection of infection and disease, and prevention of secondary tuberculosis cases. We aim to identify risk factors for M. tuberculosis transmission to contacts of tuberculosis patients, based on unique data from routine contact investigations by the Public Health Service in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, collected between 2001 and 2006. Through logistic regression analysis, we determined the effect of various risk factors on the chance of finding a latent tuberculosis (TB) infection or overt tuberculosis case among contacts. A total of 1165 index patients with active tuberculosis were registered and at least one contact was investigated in 731, resulting in 21,540 contacts overall. Altogether, the contact investigations led to 91 cases of active tuberculosis. Of the 12,698 contacts eligible for screening by tuberculin skin test, 1091 (9%) were diagnosed with latent tuberculosis infections. Risk factors were old age of the contact, old age of the index patient, and the relationship to the index. A larger fraction of infected close contacts was strongly associated with infections among more distant contacts. Our findings emphasize the importance of including these personal and interpersonal risk factors in decision making in contact investigations. PMID:24470940

  12. Geotechnical Factors in the Dredgeability of Sediments. Report 2. Geotechnical Site Investigation Strategy for Dredging Projects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-01

    site investigations must be commu- tifed and discussed. Guidance on sequencing nicated to and understood by all persons in- an investigation includes a...are mechanically compacted in the containment area. 34. DiGeorge and Herbich (1978) reported a laboratory study of bulking factors in fine-grained...occupied by the same amount of soil in-situ. Laboratory tests used for this purpose were described in DiGeorge and Herbich (1978), based on work by Lacasse

  13. Cysteinyl Leukotriene Receptor-1 Antagonists as Modulators of Innate Immune Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Theron, A. J.; Steel, H. C.; Tintinger, G. R.; Gravett, C. M.; Anderson, R.; Feldman, C.

    2014-01-01

    Cysteinyl leukotrienes (cysLTs) are produced predominantly by cells of the innate immune system, especially basophils, eosinophils, mast cells, and monocytes/macrophages. Notwithstanding potent bronchoconstrictor activity, cysLTs are also proinflammatory consequent to their autocrine and paracrine interactions with G-protein-coupled receptors expressed not only on the aforementioned cell types, but also on Th2 lymphocytes, as well as structural cells, and to a lesser extent neutrophils and CD8+ cells. Recognition of the involvement of cysLTs in the immunopathogenesis of various types of acute and chronic inflammatory disorders, especially bronchial asthma, prompted the development of selective cysLT receptor-1 (cysLTR1) antagonists, specifically montelukast, pranlukast, and zafirlukast. More recently these agents have also been reported to possess secondary anti-inflammatory activities, distinct from cysLTR1 antagonism, which appear to be particularly effective in targeting neutrophils and monocytes/macrophages. Underlying mechanisms include interference with cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases, 5′-lipoxygenase, and the proinflammatory transcription factor, nuclear factor kappa B. These and other secondary anti-inflammatory mechanisms of the commonly used cysLTR1 antagonists are the major focus of the current review, which also includes a comparison of the anti-inflammatory effects of montelukast, pranlukast, and zafirlukast on human neutrophils in vitro, as well as an overview of both the current clinical applications of these agents and potential future applications based on preclinical and early clinical studies. PMID:24971371

  14. Postnatal handling reverses social anxiety in serotonin receptor 1A knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Zanettini, C; Carola, V; Lo Iacono, L; Moles, A; Gross, C; D'Amato, F R

    2010-02-01

    Mice lacking the serotonin receptor 1A (Htr1a knockout, Htr1a(KO)) show increased innate and conditioned anxiety. This phenotype depends on functional receptor activity during the third through fifth weeks of life and thus appears to be the result of long-term changes in brain function as a consequence of an early deficit in serotonin signaling. To evaluate whether this phenotype can be influenced by early environmental factors, we subjected Htr1a knockout mice to postnatal handling, a procedure known to reduce anxiety-like behavior and stress responses in adulthood. Offspring of heterozygous Htr1a knockout mice were separated from their mother and exposed 15 min each day from postnatal day 1 (PD1) to PD14 to clean bedding. Control animals were left undisturbed. Maternal behavior was observed during the first 13 days of life. Adult male offspring were tested in the open field, social approach and resident-intruder tests and assessed for corticosterone response to restraint stress. Knockout mice showed increased anxiety in the open field and in the social approach test as well as an enhanced corticosterone response to stress. However, while no effect of postnatal handling was seen in wild-type mice, handling reduced anxiety-like behavior in the social interaction test and the corticosterone response to stress in knockout mice. These findings extend the anxiety phenotype of Htr1a(KO) mice to include social anxiety and demonstrate that this phenotype can be moderated by early environmental factors.

  15. Cysteinyl leukotriene receptor-1 antagonists as modulators of innate immune cell function.

    PubMed

    Theron, A J; Steel, H C; Tintinger, G R; Gravett, C M; Anderson, R; Feldman, C

    2014-01-01

    Cysteinyl leukotrienes (cysLTs) are produced predominantly by cells of the innate immune system, especially basophils, eosinophils, mast cells, and monocytes/macrophages. Notwithstanding potent bronchoconstrictor activity, cysLTs are also proinflammatory consequent to their autocrine and paracrine interactions with G-protein-coupled receptors expressed not only on the aforementioned cell types, but also on Th2 lymphocytes, as well as structural cells, and to a lesser extent neutrophils and CD8(+) cells. Recognition of the involvement of cysLTs in the immunopathogenesis of various types of acute and chronic inflammatory disorders, especially bronchial asthma, prompted the development of selective cysLT receptor-1 (cysLTR1) antagonists, specifically montelukast, pranlukast, and zafirlukast. More recently these agents have also been reported to possess secondary anti-inflammatory activities, distinct from cysLTR1 antagonism, which appear to be particularly effective in targeting neutrophils and monocytes/macrophages. Underlying mechanisms include interference with cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases, 5'-lipoxygenase, and the proinflammatory transcription factor, nuclear factor kappa B. These and other secondary anti-inflammatory mechanisms of the commonly used cysLTR1 antagonists are the major focus of the current review, which also includes a comparison of the anti-inflammatory effects of montelukast, pranlukast, and zafirlukast on human neutrophils in vitro, as well as an overview of both the current clinical applications of these agents and potential future applications based on preclinical and early clinical studies.

  16. Tissue-Specific Expression of Estrogen Receptor 1 Is Regulated by DNA Methylation in a T-DMR.

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Ryo; Sato, Shun; Okada, Maki; Lee, Lifa; Tamura, Isao; Jozaki, Kosuke; Kajimura, Takuya; Asada, Hiromi; Yamagata, Yoshiaki; Tamura, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Shigeru; Sugino, Norihiro

    2016-03-01

    The mechanism controlling tissue-specific expression of estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1) is unclear. In other genes, DNA methylation of a region called the tissue-dependent and differentially methylated region (T-DMR) has been associated with tissue-specific gene expression. This study investigated whether human ESR1 has a T-DMR and whether DNA methylation of the T-DMR regulates its expression. ESR1 expression was tissue-specific, being high in the endometrium and mammary gland and low/nil in the placenta and skin. Therefore, DNA methylation profiles of the promoter of ESR1 were analyzed in these tissues and in breast cancer tissues. In all of the normal tissues, the proximal promoter regions were unmethylated. On the other hand, the distal regions (T-DMR) were unmethylated in the endometrium and mammary gland, but were moderately methylated and hypermethylated in the placenta and skin, respectively. T-DMR-methylated reporter assay was performed to examine whether DNA methylation at the T-DMR suppresses ESR1 transcription. T-DMR, but not the promoter region, had transcriptional activities and DNA methylation of the T-DMR suppressed ESR1 transcription. Early growth response protein 1 was shown to be a possible transcription factor to bind the T-DMR and up-regulate ESR1 expression. ESR1 has several upstream exons, and each upstream exon, Exon-A/Exon-B/Exon-C, had its own T-DMR. In some breast cancer cases and breast cancer cell lines, ESR1 expression was not regulated by DNA methylation at T-DMR as it is in normal tissues. In conclusion, ESR1 has a T-DMR. DNA methylation status at the T-DMR is involved in tissue-specific ESR1 expression in normal tissues but not always in breast cancer.

  17. Identification of TGF-β receptor-1 as a key regulator of carbon nanotube-induced fibrogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Anurag; Stueckle, Todd A.; Mercer, Robert R.; Derk, Raymond; Rojanasakul, Yon; Castranova, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) induce rapid interstitial lung fibrosis, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Previous studies indicated that the ability of CNTs to penetrate lung epithelium, enter interstitial tissue, and stimulate fibroblasts to produce collagen matrix is important to lung fibrosis. In this study, we investigated the activation of transforming growth factorreceptor-1 [TGF-β R1; i.e., activin receptor-like kinase 5 (ALK5) receptor] and TGF-β/Smad signaling pathway in CNT-induced collagen production in human lung fibroblasts. Human lung fibroblasts and epithelial cells were exposed to low, physiologically relevant concentrations (0.02–0.6 μg/cm2) of single-walled CNTs (SWCNT) and multiwalled CNTs (MWCNT) in culture and analyzed for collagen, TGF-β1, TGF-β R1, and SMAD proteins by Western blotting and immunofluorescence. Chemical inhibition of ALK5 and short-hairpin (sh) RNA targeting of TGF-β R1 and Smad2 were used to probe the fibrogenic mechanism of CNTs. Both SWCNT and MWCNT induced an overexpression of TGF-β1, TGF-β R1 and Smad2/3 proteins in lung fibroblasts compared with vehicle or ultrafine carbon black-exposed controls. SWCNT- and MWCNT-induced collagen production was blocked by ALK5 inhibitor or shRNA knockdown of TGF-β R1 and Smad2. Our results indicate the critical role of TGF-β R1/Smad2/3 signaling in CNT-induced fibrogenesis by upregulating collagen production in lung fibroblasts. This novel finding may aid in the design of mechanism-based risk assessment and development of rapid screening tests for nanomaterial fibrogenicity. PMID:26472812

  18. Protease-activated receptor-1 activation by granzyme B causes neurotoxicity that is augmented by interleukin-1β.

    PubMed

    Lee, Paul R; Johnson, Tory P; Gnanapavan, Sharmilee; Giovannoni, Gavin; Wang, Tongguang; Steiner, Joseph P; Medynets, Marie; Vaal, Mark J; Gartner, Valerie; Nath, Avindra

    2017-06-27

    The cause of neurodegeneration in progressive forms of multiple sclerosis is unknown. We investigated the impact of specific neuroinflammatory markers on human neurons to identify potential therapeutic targets for neuroprotection against chronic inflammation. Surface immunocytochemistry directly visualized protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) and interleukin-1 (IL-1) receptors on neurons in human postmortem cortex in patients with and without neuroinflammatory lesions. Viability of cultured neurons was determined after exposure to cerebrospinal fluid from patients with progressive multiple sclerosis or purified granzyme B and IL-1β. Inhibitors of PAR1 activation and of PAR1-associated second messenger signaling were used to elucidate a mechanism of neurotoxicity. Immunohistochemistry of human post-mortem brain tissue demonstrated cells expressing higher amounts of PAR1 near and within subcortical lesions in patients with multiple sclerosis compared to control tissue. Human cerebrospinal fluid samples containing granzyme B and IL-1β were toxic to human neuronal cultures. Granzyme B was neurotoxic through activation of PAR1 and subsequently the phospholipase Cβ-IP3 second messenger system. Inhibition of PAR1 or IP3 prevented granzyme B toxicity. IL-1β enhanced granzyme B-mediated neurotoxicity by increasing PAR1 expression. Neurons within the inflamed central nervous system are imperiled because they express more PAR1 and are exposed to a neurotoxic combination of both granzyme B and IL-1β. The effects of these inflammatory mediators may be a contributing factor in the progressive brain atrophy associated with neuroinflammatory diseases. Knowledge of how exposure to IL-1β and granzyme B act synergistically to cause neuronal death yields potential novel neuroprotective treatments for neuroinflammatory diseases.

  19. Binding of Hepatitis A Virus to its Cellular Receptor 1 Inhibits T-Regulatory Cell Functions in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Manangeeswaran, Mohanraj; Jacques, Jérôme; Tami, Cecilia; Konduru, Krishnamurthy; Amharref, Nadia; Perrella, Oreste; Casasnovas, Jose M.; Umetsu, Dale T.; DeKruyff, Rosemarie H.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Perrella, Alessandro; Kaplan, Gerardo G.

    2012-01-01

    Background & Aims CD4+ T regulatory (Treg) cells suppress immune responses and control self-tolerance and immunity to pathogens, cancer, and alloantigens. Most pathogens activate Treg cells to minimize immune-mediated tissue damage and prevent clearance, which promotes chronic infections. However, hepatitis A virus (HAV) temporarily inhibits Treg-cell functions. We investigated whether the interaction of HAV with its cellular receptor 1 (HAVCR1), a T-cell co-stimulatory molecule, inhibits the function of Treg cells to control HAV infection. Methods We studied the effects of HAV interaction with HAVCR1 on human T cells using binding, signal transduction, apoptosis, activation, suppression, cytokine production, and confocal microscopy analyses. Cytokines were analyzed in sera from 14 patients with HAV infection using bead arrays. Results Human Treg cells constitutively express HAVCR1. Binding of HAV to HAVCR1 blocked phosphorylation of Akt, prevented activation of the T-cell receptor, and inhibited function of Treg cells. At the peak viremia, patients with acute HAV infection had no Treg-cell suppression function, produced low levels of transforming growth factor-β (TGF–β), which limited leukocyte recruitment and survival, and high levels of interleukin-22, which prevented liver damage. Conclusions Interaction between HAV and its receptor HAVCR1 inhibits Treg cell function, resulting in an immune imbalance that allows viral expansion with limited hepatocellular damage during early stages of infection—a characteristic of HAV pathogenesis. The mechanism by which HAV is cleared in the absence of Treg-cell function could be used as a model to develop anti-cancer therapies, modulate autoimmune and allergic responses, and prevent transplant rejection. PMID:22430395

  20. The self-transcendence scale: an investigation of the factor structure among nursing home patients.

    PubMed

    Haugan, Gørill; Rannestad, Toril; Garåsen, Helge; Hammervold, Randi; Espnes, Geir Arild

    2012-09-01

    Self-transcendence, the ability to expand personal boundaries in multiple ways, has been found to provide well-being. The purpose of this study was to examine the dimensionality of the Norwegian version of the Self-Transcendence Scale, which comprises 15 items. Reed's empirical nursing theory of self-transcendence provided the theoretical framework; self-transcendence includes an interpersonal, intrapersonal, transpersonal, and temporal dimension. Cross-sectional data were obtained from a sample of 202 cognitively intact elderly patients in 44 Norwegian nursing homes. Exploratory factor analysis revealed two and four internally consistent dimensions of self-transcendence, explaining 35.3% (two factors) and 50.7% (four factors) of the variance, respectively. Confirmatory factor analysis indicated that the hypothesized two- and four-factor models fitted better than the one-factor model (cx (2), root mean square error of approximation, standardized root mean square residual, normed fit index, nonnormed fit index, comparative fit index, goodness-of-fit index, and adjusted goodness-of-fit index). The findings indicate self-transcendence as a multifactorial construct; at present, we conclude that the two-factor model might be the most accurate and reasonable measure of self-transcendence. This research generates insights in the application of the widely used Self-Transcendence Scale by investigating its psychometric properties by applying a confirmatory factor analysis. It also generates new research-questions on the associations between self-transcendence and well-being.

  1. Understanding Career Success and Its Contributing Factors for Clinical and Translational Investigators.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Georgeanna F W B; Schwartz, Lisa S; DiMeglio, Linda A; Ahluwalia, Jasjit S; Gabrilove, Janice L

    2016-04-01

    To understand the factors that facilitate career success for career development awardees in clinical and translational science and reconceptualize understand ing of career success for this population. In 2013-2014, the authors conducted semistructured interviews with former NIH KL2 or K12 scholars from nine Clinical and Translational Science Award-funded institutions. Participants either had or had not secured independent funding at least two years after the end of their last K award. Questions covered the factors that facilitate or hinder junior investigators' transition to independent funding. Interviews were recorded and transcribed, and the transcripts were analyzed thematically. Forty individuals participated, with equal representation by men and women and by independently and not independently funded investigators. Personal factors that facilitated success included networks, persistence and resilience, initiative, autonomy, and personal and professional balance. Organizational factors included appropriate mentorship, protected research time, and institutional resources and support.Even independently funded participants described challenges regarding career direction. Five participants without independent funding modeled a broad spectrum of successful career paths, having assumed leadership positions not reliant on grant funding. Alternative definitions of career success included improving public health, enjoying work, seeing mentees succeed, and receiving external acknowledgment of successes. Awareness of the factors that facilitate or hinder career success can help junior faculty, mentors, and institutional leaders support career development in clinical and translational science. New definitions of career success are needed, as are career paths for faculty who want to engage in research in roles other than principal investigator.

  2. Investigating Factors Related to Virtual Private Network Adoption in Small Businesses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lederer, Karen

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative study was to investigate six factors that may influence adoption of virtual private network (VPN) technologies in small businesses with fewer than 100 employees. Prior research indicated small businesses employing fewer than 100 workers do not adopt VPN technology at the same rate as larger competitors, and the…

  3. Factors Affecting Business-to-Business Electronic Commerce Success: An Empirical Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Chun-I Philip

    2010-01-01

    It is generally believed that Business to Business (B2B) e-commerce has a great impact on business performance improvement. Considerable research also shows that another dependent variable, B2B e-commerce success, can be a good overall measure of B2B systems. This paper investigated and examined the impact of several factors, which are either…

  4. An Investigation of Factors Affecting the Degree of Naive Impetus Theory Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Xiufeng; MacIsaac, Dan

    2005-01-01

    This study investigates factors affecting the degree of novice physics students application of the naive impetus theory. Six hundred and fourteen first-year university engineering physics students answered the Force Concept Inventory as a pre-test for their calculus-based course. We examined the degree to which students consistently applied the…

  5. Investigating Factors Related to Virtual Private Network Adoption in Small Businesses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lederer, Karen

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative study was to investigate six factors that may influence adoption of virtual private network (VPN) technologies in small businesses with fewer than 100 employees. Prior research indicated small businesses employing fewer than 100 workers do not adopt VPN technology at the same rate as larger competitors, and the…

  6. Factors Affecting Business-to-Business Electronic Commerce Success: An Empirical Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Chun-I Philip

    2010-01-01

    It is generally believed that Business to Business (B2B) e-commerce has a great impact on business performance improvement. Considerable research also shows that another dependent variable, B2B e-commerce success, can be a good overall measure of B2B systems. This paper investigated and examined the impact of several factors, which are either…

  7. An Investigation of the Learning Strategies as Bias Factors in Second Language Cloze Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ajideh, Parviz; Yaghoubi-Notash, Massoud; Khalili, Abdolreza

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigated the contribution of the EFL students' learning strategies to the explanation of the variance in their results on language tests. More specifically, it examined the role of these strategies as bias factors in the results of English cloze tests. Based on this aim, first, 158 intermediate EFL learners were selected from…

  8. Exploring Resiliency within Schools: An Investigation of the Effects of Protective Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Matthew D.; Turner, Michael G.; Holt, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Although research has explored the effects of protective factors on fostering resiliency within "individuals," the same level of inquiry has not emerged investigating the causes of why high-risk "organizations" are resilient to serious violent delinquency. One type of organization that seems particularly appropriate for…

  9. An Investigation into Factors Contributing to Iranian Secondary School English Teachers' Job Satisfaction and Dissatisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soodmand Afshar, Hassan; Doosti, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    This study explored factors contributing to job satisfaction and dissatisfaction of male and female Iranian secondary school English teachers. A Likert-scale 58-item questionnaire was developed which was completed by 210 participants. The questionnaire also included three open-ended questions which investigated participants' motivation and…

  10. Investigation of Primary Education Second Level Students' Motivations toward Science Learning in Terms of Various Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sert Çibik, Ayse

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the primary education second level students' motivations towards science learning in terms of various factors. Within the research, the variation of the total motivational scores in science learning according to the gender, class, socio-economic levels, success in science-technology course and…

  11. Investigation of Primary Education Second Level Students' Motivations toward Science Learning in Terms of Various Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sert Çibik, Ayse

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the primary education second level students' motivations towards science learning in terms of various factors. Within the research, the variation of the total motivational scores in science learning according to the gender, class, socio-economic levels, success in science-technology course and…

  12. Investigation of Factors Affecting Students' Science Achievement According to Student Science Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatar, Erdal; Tüysüz, Cengiz; Tosun, Cemal; Ilhan, Nail

    2016-01-01

    In this study, it was aimed to investigate the factors affecting students' science achievement according to student science teachers. The survey model which is one of the quantitative research methods was used. The sample was consisted of total 606 student science teachers from four state universities in Turkey. The data were obtained by using the…

  13. Investigating Factors Related to the Effects of Time-Out on Stuttering in Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Diane E.; Taylor, Catherine L.; Hennessey, Neville W.; Beilby, Janet M.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Response-contingent time-out has been shown to be an effective technique for enhancing fluency in people who stutter. However, the factors that determine individual responsiveness to time-out are not well understood. Aims: The study investigated the effectiveness of using response-contingent time-out to reduce stuttering frequency in…

  14. Investigating Factors Related to Retention of At-Risk College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laskey, Marcia L.; Hetzel, Carole J.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the factors that influence the retention and GPA of students in a college program designed for at-risk students. The study was conducted at a midsized private university in the Midwest. The sample consisted of 115 at-risk students enrolled in a Conditional Acceptance Program (CAP). Three years of CAP…

  15. An Investigation into Factors Contributing to Iranian Secondary School English Teachers' Job Satisfaction and Dissatisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soodmand Afshar, Hassan; Doosti, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    This study explored factors contributing to job satisfaction and dissatisfaction of male and female Iranian secondary school English teachers. A Likert-scale 58-item questionnaire was developed which was completed by 210 participants. The questionnaire also included three open-ended questions which investigated participants' motivation and…

  16. An Investigation of Factors Affecting the Use of Educational Technology in Turkish Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazu, Ibrahim Yasar

    2011-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to investigate the related factors that affect the usage of educational technology in primary schools. This study depends on literature analysis and the questionnaire to collect data. Specifically, the items employed in this study were derived from the teachers' and school administrators' perceptions of using…

  17. Investigating Factors Related to the Effects of Time-Out on Stuttering in Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Diane E.; Taylor, Catherine L.; Hennessey, Neville W.; Beilby, Janet M.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Response-contingent time-out has been shown to be an effective technique for enhancing fluency in people who stutter. However, the factors that determine individual responsiveness to time-out are not well understood. Aims: The study investigated the effectiveness of using response-contingent time-out to reduce stuttering frequency in…

  18. Investigating Factors in the Retention of Students in High School Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lodewyk, Ken R.; Pybus, Colin M.

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have reported declining student enrolment rates in optional physical education. This study--incorporating constructs from social cognitive, self-determination, and body image theory--investigated factors that might be influential to this trend. Surveys were administered to 227 tenth-grade students from five schools in one school…

  19. Investigation and calculation of filling factor of SnO2 inverse opal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinquan; Wu, Shimin; Ji, Xiaoyuan; Li, Jinpeng; Zhang, Rong; Zhang, Ming

    2016-04-01

    In the process of preparing inverse opal, the structure of inverse opal is affected by many factors, and the filling factor of inverse opal is difficult to directly test. In this paper, SnO2 inverse opal was prepared with the sol-gel method by cooperative opal template. The repetition times of the infiltrating precursor into the opal templates were investigated in detail. The band-gap positions of SnO2 inverse opal were tested. In order to prepare perfect inverse opal structure, the filling quantity of the precursor is greater, as the diameter of the PS microsphere of opal is bigger. The filling factor of air in inverse opal can be calculated with a formula derived from Bragg’s law. For inverse opal, the filling factor of air in inverse opal gradually enlarges as the diameter of the void increases.

  20. Investigations of the EPR g Factors for Er3+ in CaMoO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shao-Yi; Dong, Hui-Ning

    2004-06-01

    The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) g factors g‖ and g⊥ for Er3+ in CaMoO4 are theoretically investigated by using the perturbation formulas of the g factors for a 4f11 ion in tetragonal symmetry. In these formulas, the contributions to the g factors arising from the second-order perturbation terms and the admixture of various states are considered. The crystal-field parameters for the tetragonally distorted tetrahedra are determined by using the superposition model and the structural data of the impurity Er3+ on the host Ca2+ site in CaMoO4. The calculated g factors agree with the observed values. The validity of the results is discussed.

  1. Systematic investigation of transcription factors critical in the protection against cerebral ischemia by Danhong injection

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Junying; Zhang, Yanqiong; Jia, Qiang; Liu, Mingwei; Li, Defeng; Zhang, Yi; Song, Lei; Hu, Yanzhen; Xian, Minghua; Yang, Hongjun; Ding, Chen; Huang, Luqi

    2016-01-01

    Systematic investigations of complex pathological cascades during ischemic brain injury help to elucidate novel therapeutic targets against cerebral ischemia. Although some transcription factors (TFs) involved in cerebral ischemia, systematic surveys of their changes during ischemic brain injury have not been reported. Moreover, some multi-target agents effectively protected against ischemic stroke, but their mechanisms, especially the targets of TFs, are still unclear. Therefore, a comprehensive approach by integrating network pharmacology strategy and a new concatenated tandem array of consensus transcription factor response elements method to systematically investigate the target TFs critical in the protection against cerebral ischemia by a medication was first reported, and then applied to a multi-target drug, Danhong injection (DHI). High-throughput nature and depth of coverage, as well as high quantitative accuracy of the developed approach, make it more suitable for analyzing such multi-target agents. Results indicated that pre-B-cell leukemia transcription factor 1 and cyclic AMP-dependent transcription factor 1, along with six other TFs, are putative target TFs for DHI-mediated protection against cerebral ischemia. This study provides, for the first time, a systematic investigation of the target TFs critical to DHI-mediated protection against cerebral ischemia, as well as reveals more potential therapeutic targets for ischemic stroke. PMID:27431009

  2. Theoretical Investigation on Skin Effect Factor of Conductor in Power Cables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Hiroshi; Kanaoka, Mamoru

    This paper describes a newly-derived theoretical equation on the skin effect factor of power cables, and its application to large-size OF and XLPE cables with segmental conductors, including insulated wires. The skin effect factors calculated with the new equation were fit very well to measurements in wide range conductor sizes. In the new equation, the important factor which characterizes the skin effect of segmental conductors is the `equivalent conductivity ratio' ν defined by the ratio of longitudinal conductivity in axial direction of conductor to conductivity of conductor wires. Since the obtained ratio ν in XLPE cable was three times greater than that in OF cable, the larger longitudinal eddy current passing from a wire to another increased the eddy current loss in conductor, which increased the conductor loss of XLPE cable. The new equation enables us to investigate quantitatively the dominant loss component affecting the skin effect factor. Then, the skin effect factors and coefficients for OF and XLPE cables were investigated with the new equation. It was revealed that the best number of separation, in which the skin effect became minimum, existed in OF and XLPE cables with segmental conductors. In addition, it was confirmed that the skin effect coefficients ks1 calculated with the new equation were consistent well with those used in JCS.

  3. Formyl Peptide receptor 1 expression is associated with tumor progression and survival in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tsu-Yao; Wu, Ming-Shiang; Lin, Jaw-Town; Lin, Ming-Tsan; Shun, Chia-Tung; Hua, Kuo-Tai; Kuo, Min-Liang

    2014-05-01

    Formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) as a regulator of innate inflammatory response has been implicated in tumor progression of gliomas. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the prognostic significance and the ligand-receptor interaction of FPR1 in gastric cancer (GC). FPR1 was immunohistochemically-analyzed in tissue sections originating from 116 GC patients. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used for the assessment of interaction between FPR1 and the FPR1 ligand annexin A1 (AnxA1) in GC cells. High FPR1 expression was significantly associated with stage IV disease, submucosal invasion, serosal invasion, and clinical outcome of GC. Multivariate analysis showed that high FPR1 expression was an independent risk factor of poor overall survival in GC patients. FPR1 expression increased significantly when AnxA1 overexpression was present in GC cells. A positive feedback regulation of FPR1 was involved in the AnxA1-FPR1 signal transduction. FPR1 expression may be used as a novel indicator to predict outcome in GC patients after gastrectomy.

  4. Discoidin domain receptor 1 controls linear invadosome formation via a Cdc42–Tuba pathway

    PubMed Central

    Juin, Amélie; Di Martino, Julie; Leitinger, Birgit; Henriet, Elodie; Gary, Anne-Sophie; Paysan, Lisa; Bomo, Jeremy; Baffet, Georges; Gauthier-Rouvière, Cécile; Rosenbaum, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of type I collagen fibrils in tumors is associated with an increased risk of metastasis. Invadosomes are F-actin structures able to degrade the extracellular matrix. We previously found that collagen I fibrils induced the formation of peculiar linear invadosomes in an unexpected integrin-independent manner. Here, we show that Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 (DDR1), a collagen receptor overexpressed in cancer, colocalizes with linear invadosomes in tumor cells and is required for their formation and matrix degradation ability. Unexpectedly, DDR1 kinase activity is not required for invadosome formation or activity, nor is Src tyrosine kinase. We show that the RhoGTPase Cdc42 is activated on collagen in a DDR1-dependent manner. Cdc42 and its specific guanine nucleotide-exchange factor (GEF), Tuba, localize to linear invadosomes, and both are required for linear invadosome formation. Finally, DDR1 depletion blocked cell invasion in a collagen gel. Altogether, our data uncover an important role for DDR1, acting through Tuba and Cdc42, in proteolysis-based cell invasion in a collagen-rich environment. PMID:25422375

  5. ApoB-containing lipoproteins regulate angiogenesis by modulating expression of VEGF receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Avraham-Davidi, Inbal; Ely, Yona; Pham, Van N; Castranova, Daniel; Grunspan, Moshe; Malkinson, Guy; Gibbs-Bar, Liron; Mayseless, Oded; Allmog, Gabriella; Lo, Brigid; Warren, Carmen M; Chen, Tom T; Ungos, Josette; Kidd, Kameha; Shaw, Kenna; Rogachev, Ilana; Wan, Wuzhou; Murphy, Philip M; Farber, Steven A; Carmel, Liran; Shelness, Gregory S; Iruela-Arispe, M Luisa; Weinstein, Brant M; Yaniv, Karina

    2014-01-01

    Despite the clear major contribution of hyperlipidemia to the prevalence of cardiovascular disease in the developed world, the direct effects of lipoproteins on endothelial cells have remained obscure and are under debate. Here we report a previously uncharacterized mechanism of vessel growth modulation by lipoprotein availability. Using a genetic screen for vascular defects in zebrafish, we initially identified a mutation, stalactite (stl), in the gene encoding microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (mtp), which is involved in the biosynthesis of apolipoprotein B (ApoB)-containing lipoproteins. By manipulating lipoprotein concentrations in zebrafish, we found that ApoB negatively regulates angiogenesis and that it is the ApoB protein particle, rather than lipid moieties within ApoB-containing lipoproteins, that is primarily responsible for this effect. Mechanistically, we identified downregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (VEGFR1), which acts as a decoy receptor for VEGF, as a key mediator of the endothelial response to lipoproteins, and we observed VEGFR1 downregulation in hyperlipidemic mice. These findings may open new avenues for the treatment of lipoprotein-related vascular disorders. PMID:22581286

  6. ApoB-containing lipoproteins regulate angiogenesis by modulating expression of VEGF receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Avraham-Davidi, Inbal; Ely, Yona; Pham, Van N; Castranova, Daniel; Grunspan, Moshe; Malkinson, Guy; Gibbs-Bar, Liron; Mayseless, Oded; Allmog, Gabriella; Lo, Brigid; Warren, Carmen M; Chen, Tom T; Ungos, Josette; Kidd, Kameha; Shaw, Kenna; Rogachev, Ilana; Wan, Wuzhou; Murphy, Philip M; Farber, Steven A; Carmel, Liran; Shelness, Gregory S; Iruela-Arispe, M Luisa; Weinstein, Brant M; Yaniv, Karina

    2012-06-01

    Despite the clear major contribution of hyperlipidemia to the prevalence of cardiovascular disease in the developed world, the direct effects of lipoproteins on endothelial cells have remained obscure and are under debate. Here we report a previously uncharacterized mechanism of vessel growth modulation by lipoprotein availability. Using a genetic screen for vascular defects in zebrafish, we initially identified a mutation, stalactite (stl), in the gene encoding microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (mtp), which is involved in the biosynthesis of apolipoprotein B (ApoB)-containing lipoproteins. By manipulating lipoprotein concentrations in zebrafish, we found that ApoB negatively regulates angiogenesis and that it is the ApoB protein particle, rather than lipid moieties within ApoB-containing lipoproteins, that is primarily responsible for this effect. Mechanistically, we identified downregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (VEGFR1), which acts as a decoy receptor for VEGF, as a key mediator of the endothelial response to lipoproteins, and we observed VEGFR1 downregulation in hyperlipidemic mice. These findings may open new avenues for the treatment of lipoprotein-related vascular disorders.

  7. Improving risk assessment in schizophrenia: epidemiological investigation of criminal history factors.

    PubMed

    Witt, Katrina; Lichtenstein, Paul; Fazel, Seena

    2015-05-01

    Violence risk assessment in schizophrenia relies heavily on criminal history factors. To investigate which criminal history factors are most strongly associated with violent crime in schizophrenia. A total of 13 806 individuals (8891 men and 4915 women) with two or more hospital admissions for schizophrenia were followed up for violent convictions. Multivariate hazard ratios for 15 criminal history factors included in different risk assessment tools were calculated. The incremental predictive validity of these factors was estimated using tests of discrimination, calibration and reclassification. Over a mean follow-up of 12.0 years, 17.3% of men (n = 1535) and 5.7% of women (n = 281) were convicted of a violent offence. Criminal history factors most strongly associated with subsequent violence for both men and women were a previous conviction for a violent offence; for assault, illegal threats and/or intimidation; and imprisonment. However, only a previous conviction for a violent offence was associated with incremental predictive validity in both genders following adjustment for young age and comorbid substance use disorder. Clinical and actuarial approaches to assess violence risk can be improved if included risk factors are tested using multiple measures of performance. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  8. Improving risk assessment in schizophrenia: epidemiological investigation of criminal history factors

    PubMed Central

    Witt, Katrina; Lichtenstein, Paul; Fazel, Seena

    2015-01-01

    Background Violence risk assessment in schizophrenia relies heavily on criminal history factors. Aims To investigate which criminal history factors are most strongly associated with violent crime in schizophrenia. Method A total of 13 806 individuals (8891 men and 4915 women) with two or more hospital admissions for schizophrenia were followed up for violent convictions. Multivariate hazard ratios for 15 criminal history factors included in different risk assessment tools were calculated. The incremental predictive validity of these factors was estimated using tests of discrimination, calibration and reclassification. Results Over a mean follow-up of 12.0 years, 17.3% of men (n = 1535) and 5.7% of women (n = 281) were convicted of a violent offence. Criminal history factors most strongly associated with subsequent violence for both men and women were a previous conviction for a violent offence; for assault, illegal threats and/or intimidation; and imprisonment. However, only a previous conviction for a violent offence was associated with incremental predictive validity in both genders following adjustment for young age and comorbid substance use disorder. Conclusions Clinical and actuarial approaches to assess violence risk can be improved if included risk factors are tested using multiple measures of performance. PMID:25657352

  9. Serum amyloid A stimulates macrophage foam cell formation via lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 upregulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ha Young; Kim, Sang Doo; Baek, Suk-Hwan; Choi, Joon Hyuk; Cho, Kyung-Hyun; Zabel, Brian A.; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ► SAA induced macrophage foam cell formation. ► SAA stimulated upregulation of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 (LOX1). ► SAA-induced LOX1 expression and foam cell formation is mediated by JNK/NF-κB signaling. ► HDL-conjugated SAA also stimulates foam cell formation via LOX1 upregulation. ► The finding reveals a novel mechanism of action of SAA in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. -- Abstract: Elevated levels of serum amyloid A (SAA) is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, however, the role of SAA in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis remains unclear. Here we show that SAA induced macrophage foam cell formation. SAA-stimulated foam cell formation was mediated by c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling. Moreover, both SAA and SAA-conjugated high density lipoprotein stimulated the expression of the important scavenger receptor lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 (LOX1) via nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). A LOX1 antagonist carrageenan significantly blocked SAA-induced foam cell formation, indicating that SAA promotes foam cell formation via LOX1 expression. Our findings therefore suggest that SAA stimulates foam cell formation via LOX1 induction, and thus likely contributes to atherogenesis.

  10. Nogo Receptor 1 Confines a Disinhibitory Microcircuit to the Critical Period in Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Stephany, Céleste-Élise; Ikrar, Taruna; Nguyen, Collins

    2016-01-01

    A characteristic of the developing mammalian visual system is a brief interval of plasticity, termed the “critical period,” when the circuitry of primary visual cortex is most sensitive to perturbation of visual experience. Depriving one eye of vision (monocular deprivation [MD]) during the critical period alters ocular dominance (OD) by shifting the responsiveness of neurons in visual cortex to favor the nondeprived eye. A disinhibitory microcircuit involving parvalbumin-expressing (PV) interneurons initiates this OD plasticity. The gene encoding the neuronal nogo-66-receptor 1 (ngr1/rtn4r) is required to close the critical period. Here we combined mouse genetics, electrophysiology, and circuit mapping with laser-scanning photostimulation to investigate whether disinhibition is confined to the critical period by ngr1. We demonstrate that ngr1 mutant mice retain plasticity characteristic of the critical period as adults, and that ngr1 operates within PV interneurons to restrict the loss of intracortical excitatory synaptic input following MD in adult mice, and this disinhibition induces a “lower PV network configuration” in both critical-period wild-type mice and adult ngr1−/− mice. We propose that ngr1 limits disinhibition to close the critical period for OD plasticity and that a decrease in PV expression levels reports the diminished recent cumulative activity of these interneurons. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Life experience refines brain circuits throughout development during specified critical periods. Abnormal experience during these critical periods can yield enduring maladaptive changes in neural circuits that impair brain function. In the developing visual system, visual deprivation early in life can result in amblyopia (lazy-eye), a prevalent childhood disorder comprising permanent deficits in spatial vision. Here we identify that the nogo-66 receptor 1 gene restricts an early and essential step in OD plasticity to the critical period. These

  11. Safety and Clinical Activity of the Programmed Death-Ligand 1 Inhibitor Durvalumab in Combination With Poly (ADP-Ribose) Polymerase Inhibitor Olaparib or Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 1-3 Inhibitor Cediranib in Women's Cancers: A Dose-Escalation, Phase I Study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Min; Cimino-Mathews, Ashley; Peer, Cody J; Zimmer, Alexandra; Lipkowitz, Stanley; Annunziata, Christina M; Cao, Liang; Harrell, Maria I; Swisher, Elizabeth M; Houston, Nicole; Botesteanu, Dana-Adriana; Taube, Janis M; Thompson, Elizabeth; Ogurtsova, Aleksandra; Xu, Haiying; Nguyen, Jeffers; Ho, Tony W; Figg, William D; Kohn, Elise C

    2017-07-01

    Purpose Data suggest that DNA damage by poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibition and/or reduced vascular endothelial growth factor signaling by vascular endothelial growth factor receptor inhibition may complement antitumor activity of immune checkpoint blockade. We hypothesize the programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) inhibitor, durvalumab, olaparib, or cediranib combinations are tolerable and active in recurrent women's cancers. Patients and Methods This phase I study tested durvalumab doublets in parallel 3 + 3 dose escalations. Durvalumab was administered at 10 mg/kg every 2 weeks or 1,500 mg every 4 weeks with either olaparib tablets twice daily or cediranib on two schedules. The primary end point was the recommended phase II dose (RP2D). Response rate and pharmacokinetic analysis were secondary end points. Results Between June 2015 and May 2016, 26 women were enrolled. The RP2D was durvalumab 1,500 mg every 4 weeks with olaparib 300 mg twice a day, or cediranib 20 mg, 5 days on/2 days off. No dose-limiting toxicity was recorded with durvalumab plus olaparib. The cediranib intermittent schedule (n = 6) was examined because of recurrent grade 2 and non-dose-limiting toxicity grade 3 and 4 adverse events (AEs) on the daily schedule (n = 8). Treatment-emergent AEs included hypertension (two of eight), diarrhea (two of eight), pulmonary embolism (two of eight), pulmonary hypertension (one of eight), and lymphopenia (one of eight). Durvalumab plus intermittent cediranib grade 3 and 4 AEs were hypertension (one of six) and fatigue (one of six). Exposure to durvalumab increased cediranib area under the curve and maximum plasma concentration on the daily, but not intermittent, schedules. Two partial responses (≥15 months and ≥ 11 months) and eight stable diseases ≥ 4 months (median, 8 months [4 to 14.5 months]) were seen in patients who received durvalumab plus olaparib, yielding an 83% disease control rate. Six partial responses (≥ 5 to ≥ 8 months) and three

  12. Investigation of the factor structure of spirituality and religiosity in Iranian Shiite university students.

    PubMed

    Joshanloo, Mohsen

    2012-01-01

    One of the important challenges facing psychologists of religion pertains to the definition of religiosity and spirituality. One way of understanding the connection between these two concepts is to suppose that one of them is a subset of the other. Another useful and sensitive way, however, is to view spirituality and religiosity as overlapping constructs, sharing some characteristics but also retaining nonshared features. Empirical studies examining the factor structure of spirituality and religiosity are scant and almost all of them come from Western culture. These factor analytic studies generally confirm that religiosity and spirituality can best be described in terms of two distinct yet correlated factors. To date, no study has investigated the relationship between these two constructs in Islamic cultures. To redress this imbalance, confirmatory factor analysis was used to examine the factor structure of religiosity and spirituality in two Iranian Shiite samples using an extensive set of scales (including Santa Clara Strength of Religious Faith, Spiritual Involvement and Beliefs Scale - Revised, Spiritual Meaning Scale, and Spiritual Transcendence Scale). Two hypothetical models were tested: a model that viewed spirituality and religiosity as correlated but separate constructs and a model that combined the indicators of religiosity and spirituality into a single construct. In keeping with the results obtained in Western cultures, results of confirmatory factor analyses, conducted in Study 1 (N=225) and Study 2 (N=288), revealed that a two-factor model fitted the data better than a single-factor model. Implications of the results are discussed, as are study limitations and directions for further research.

  13. Aligning internal organizational factors with a service excellence mission: an exploratory investigation in health care.

    PubMed

    Ford, Robert C; Sivo, Stephen A; Fottler, Myron D; Dickson, Duncan; Bradley, Kenneth; Johnson, Lee

    2006-01-01

    In today's competitive health care environment, service excellence is rapidly becoming a major differentiating advantage between health care providers. Too often, senior executives talk about their commitment to a mission statement that extols the virtues of providing world class service to their patients only to undermine those statements with what they do, write, and say. This article presents an exploratory investigation into a new application of an internal mission alignment instrument that seeks to assess the extent to which an organization's internal processes are aligned with its service mission. This instrument was sent to 250 randomly selected employees from all clinical departments of a large southeastern hospital to explore the underlying alignment factors. A factor analysis of the data revealed eight factors that predicted beneficial employee outcomes such as organizational commitment and satisfaction with the job and organization.

  14. Raloxifene activates G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1/Akt signaling to protect dopamine neurons in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine mice.

    PubMed

    Bourque, Mélanie; Morissette, Marc; Di Paolo, Thérèse

    2014-10-01

    Raloxifene, used in the clinic, is reported to protect brain dopaminergic neurons in mice. Raloxifene was shown to mediate an effect through the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER1). We investigated if raloxifene neuroprotective effect in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-treated male mice is mediated through GPER1 by using its antagonist G15. Striatal concentrations of dopamine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, homovanillic acid to dopamine ratio as well as dopamine transporter and vesicular monoamine transporter 2 showed that raloxifene neuroprotection of dopaminergic neurons was blocked by G15. Protection by raloxifene was accompanied by activation of striatal Akt signaling (but not ERK1/2 signaling) and increased Bcl-2 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels; these effects were abolished by coadministration with G15. The effect of raloxifene was not mediated through increased levels of 17β-estradiol. MPTP mice had decreased plasma testosterone, dihydrotestosterone, and 3β-diol levels; this was prevented in raloxifene-treated MPTP mice. Our results suggest that raloxifene acted through GPER1 to mediate Akt activation, increase Bcl-2 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels, and protection of dopaminergic neurons and plasma androgens.

  15. A prospective investigation of injury incidence and risk factors among army recruits in combat engineer training

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background United States Army combat engineer (ENG) training is an intense 14-week course designed to introduce new recruits to basic soldiering activities, Army values and lifestyle, and engineering skills and knowledge. The present investigation examined injury rates and injury risk factors in ENG training. Methods At the start of their training, 1,633 male ENG recruits were administered a questionnaire containing items on date of birth, height, weight, tobacco use, prior physical activity, and injury history. Injuries during training were obtained from electronic medical records and the training units provided data on student graduation and attrition. Risk factors were identified using Cox regression. Results Ninety-two percent of the recruits successfully graduated from the course and 47% of the recruits experienced one or more injuries during training. Univariate Cox regression demonstrated that recruits were at higher injury risk if they reported that they were older, had a higher or lower body mass index, had smoked in the past, had performed less exercise (aerobic or muscle strength) or sports prior to ENG training, had experienced a previous time-loss lower limb injury (especially if they had not totally recovered from that injury), or had a lower educational level. Conclusions The present investigation was the first to identify injury rates and identify specific factors increasing injury risk during ENG training. The identified risk factors provide a basis for recommending future prevention strategies. PMID:23497620

  16. Discoidin domain receptor 1 activity drives an aggressive phenotype in gastric carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hur, Hoon; Ham, In-Hye; Lee, Dakeun; Jin, Hyejin; Aguilera, Kristina Y; Oh, Hye Jeong; Han, Sang-Uk; Kwon, Ji Eun; Kim, Young-Bae; Ding, Ke; Brekken, Rolf A

    2017-01-31

    Discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1), a receptor tyrosine kinase that utilizes collagen as a ligand, is a key molecule in the progression of solid tumors as it regulates the interaction of cancer cells with the tumor stroma. However, the clinical relevance of DDR1 expression in gastric carcinoma is yet to be investigated. Here, we assessed the role of DDR1 in mediating the aggressive phenotype of gastric carcinoma and its potential as a therapeutic target. We conducted DDR1 immunohistochemistry using a tissue microarray of 202 gastric carcinoma specimens. We examined the effect of collagen-induced activation of DDR1 on cell signaling, tumorigenesis, and cell migration in gastric cancer cell lines, and tumor growth in a xenograft animal model of gastric cancer. Our results showed that 50.5% of gastric cancer tissues are positive for DDR1 expression, and positive DDR1 expression was significantly correlated with a poor prognosis (P = 0.015). In a subgroup analysis, DDR1 expression was prognostically meaningful only in patients receiving adjuvant treatment (P = 0.013). We also demonstrated that collagen was able to activate DDR1 and increase the clonogenicity and migration of gastric cancer cells. We observed that a DDR1 inhibitor, 7rh benzamide, suppressed tumor growth in gastric cancer xenografts. Our findings suggest a key role for DDR1 signaling in mediating the aggressive phenotype of gastric carcinoma. Importantly, inhibition of DDR1 is an attractive strategy for gastric carcinoma therapy.

  17. Synthesis and evaluation of novel angiotensin II receptor 1 antagonists as anti-hypertension drugs.

    PubMed

    Bao, Xiaolu; Zhu, Weibo; Zhang, Ruijing; Wen, Caihong; Wang, Li; Yan, Yijia; Tang, Hesheng; Chen, Zhilong

    2016-05-01

    Three new angiotensin II receptor 1 antagonists, 1, 2 and 3 were designed, synthesized and evaluated. The AT1 receptor-binding assays in vitro showed that all the synthesized compounds had nanomolar affinity for the AT1 receptor. From which compound 3 was found to be the most potent ligands with an IC50 value of 2.67±0.23 nM. Biological evaluation in vivo revealed that all the compounds could cause significant decrease on MBP in a dose dependent manner in spontaneously hypertensive rats, and compound 3 especially showed an efficient and long-lasting effect in reducing blood pressure, whose maximal response lowered 41 mmHg of MBP at 10mg/kg and 62 mmHg at 15 mg/kg after oral administration, the significant anti-hypertensive effect lasted beyond 12 h, which is better than the reference compound losartan. The pharmacokinetic experiments showed that compound 3 could be absorbed efficiently and metabolized smoothly both in blood and in tissues in Wistar rats. The acute toxicity assay suggested that it has low toxicity with the LD50 value of 2974.35 mg/kg. These results demonstrate that compound 3 is a potent angiotensin AT1 receptor antagonist which could be considered as a novel anti-hypertension candidate and deserved for further investigation.

  18. Design and synthesis of tryptophan containing dipeptide derivatives as formyl peptide receptor 1 antagonist.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Tsong-Long; Hung, Chih-Hao; Hsu, Ching-Yun; Huang, Yin-Ting; Tsai, Yu-Chi; Hsieh, Pei-Wen

    2013-06-14

    Our previous studies identified an Fmoc-(S,R)-tryptophan-containing dipeptide derivative, 1, which selectively inhibited neutrophil elastase release induced by formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (FMLP) in human neutrophils. In an attempt to improve pharmacological activity, a series of tryptophan-containing dipeptides were synthesized and their pharmacological activities were investigated in human neutrophils. Of these, five compounds 3, 6, 19a, 24a, and 24b exhibited potent and dual inhibitory effects on FMLP-induced superoxide anion (O2˙(-)) generation and neutrophil elastase release in neutrophils with IC50 values of 0.23/0.60, 1.88/2.47, 1.87/3.60, 0.12/0.37, and 1.32/1.03 μM, respectively. Further studies indicated that inhibition of superoxide production in human neutrophils by these dipeptides was associated with the selective inhibition of formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1). Furthermore, the results of structure-activity relationship studies concluded that the fragment N-benzoyl-Trp-Phe-OMe (3) was most suitable as a core structure for interaction with FPR1, and may be approved as a lead for the development of new drugs in the treatment of neutrophilic inflammatory diseases. As some of the synthesized compounds exhibited separable conformational isomers, and showed diverse bioactivities, the conformation analysis of these compounds is also discussed herein.

  19. Characterization of Chronic Cutaneous Lesions from TNF-Receptor-1-Deficient Mice Infected by Leishmania major

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Carolina Ferreira; Manzoni-de-Almeida, Daniel; Mello, Paula Seixas; Natale, Caio Cotta; Santiago, Helton da Costa; Miranda, Luíza da Silva; Ferraz, Fernanda Oliveira; dos Santos, Liliane Martins; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Arantes, Rosa Maria Esteves; Vieira, Leda Quercia

    2012-01-01

    Leishmania major-infected TNF receptor 1 deficient (TNFR1 KO) mice resolve parasitism but fail to resolve lesions, while wild-type mice completely heal. We investigated the cell composition, cytokine production, and apoptosis in lesions from L. major-infected TNFR1 KO and wild-type (WT) mice. Chronic lesions from L. major-infected TNFR1 KO mice presented larger number of CD8+ T and Ly6G+ cells. In addition, higher concentrations of mRNA for IFN-γ CCL2 and CCL5, as well as protein, but lower numbers of apoptotic cells, were found in lesions from TNFR1 KO mice than in WT, at late time points of infection. Our studies showed that persistent lesions in L. major-infected TNFR1 KO mice may be mediated by continuous migration of cells to the site of inflammation due to the presence of chemokines and also by lower levels of apoptosis. We suggest that this model has some striking similarities to the mucocutaneous clinical form of leishmaniasis. PMID:22203861

  20. Relationship between estrogen receptor 1 gene polymorphisms and postmenopausal osteoporosis of the spine in Chinese women.

    PubMed

    Shang, D P; Lian, H Y; Fu, D P; Wu, J; Hou, S S; Lu, J M

    2016-06-03

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) variants of the estrogen receptor 1 gene (ESR1) at rs2234693 and rs9340799, as well as to investigate the relationship between ESR gene polymorphisms and postmenopausal osteoporosis (OP) of the spine in Chinese women. We recruited 198 postmenopausal women with OP and 276 healthy women between May 2012 and September 2015 in Zhongshan Hospital. Dual energy x-ray absorptiometry was used to measure the bone mineral density (BMD) of the lumbar vertebrae in all subjects. In addition, PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism based analysis was conducted to identify the genotypes of ESR1. The distribution of ESR1 in the osteoporosis group and the control group was determined; the relationship between ESR polymorphisms and BMD was analyzed. The distributions of BMD were: TT < TC < CC, GG < AG < AA. The TT, TTGG, and TCGG genotypes were found to be lower as compared to the other genotypes. Stratified analysis suggested that the TT genotype and the combined genotypes TTGG and TCGG were significantly higher in the OP group as compared to the control group (P < 0.01). Therefore, ESR1 polymorphisms at rs2234693 and rs9340799 may be associated with OP, and could be used as markers to screen those with high risks to postmenopausal OP in Chinese women.

  1. Nogo Receptor 1 Limits Tactile Task Performance Independent of Basal Anatomical Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Kast, Ryan J.; Chapman, Katherine S.; Dorton, Hilary M.; Stephany, Céleste-Élise; Arnett, Megan T.; Herman, David H.; McGee, Aaron W.

    2014-01-01

    The genes that govern how experience refines neural circuitry and alters synaptic structural plasticity are poorly understood. The nogo-66 receptor 1 gene (ngr1) is one candidate that may restrict the rate of learning as well as basal anatomical plasticity in adult cerebral cortex. To investigate if ngr1 limits the rate of learning we tested adult ngr1 null mice on a tactile learning task. Ngr1 mutants display greater overall performance despite a normal rate of improvement on the gap-cross assay, a whisker-dependent learning paradigm. To determine if ngr1 restricts basal anatomical plasticity in the associated sensory cortex, we repeatedly imaged dendritic spines and axonal varicosities of both constitutive and conditional adult ngr1 mutant mice in somatosensory barrel cortex for two weeks through cranial windows with two-photon chronic in vivo imaging. Neither constant nor acute deletion of ngr1 affected turnover or stability of dendritic spines or axonal boutons. The improved performance on the gap-cross task is not attributable to greater motor coordination, as ngr1 mutant mice possess a mild deficit in overall performance and a normal learning rate on the rotarod, a motor task. Mice lacking ngr1 also exhibit normal induction of tone-associated fear conditioning yet accelerated fear extinction and impaired consolidation. Thus, ngr1 alters tactile and motor task performance but does not appear to limit the rate of tactile or motor learning, nor determine the low set point for synaptic turnover in sensory cortex. PMID:25386856

  2. Treatment with BX471, a CC chemokine receptor 1 antagonist, attenuates systemic inflammatory response during sepsis.

    PubMed

    He, Min; Horuk, Richard; Moochhala, Shabbir M; Bhatia, Madhav

    2007-04-01

    Sepsis is a complex clinical syndrome resulting from a harmful host inflammatory response to infection. Chemokines and their receptors play a key role in the pathogenesis of sepsis. BX471 is a potent nonpeptide CC chemokine receptor-1 (CCR1) antagonist in both human and mouse. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of prophylactic and therapeutic treatment with BX471 on cecal ligation and puncture-induced sepsis in the mouse and to investigate the underlying mechanisms. In sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture, treatment with BX471 significantly protected mice against lung and liver injury by attenuating MPO activity, an indicator of neutrophil recruitment in lungs and livers and attenuating lung and liver morphological changes in histological sections. Blocking CCR1 by BX471 also downregulated ICAM-1, P-selectin, and E-selectin expression at mRNA and protein levels in lungs and livers compared with placebo-treated groups. These findings suggest that blockage of CCR1 by specific antagonist may represent a promising strategy to prevent disease progression in sepsis.

  3. Angiotensin II receptor 1 gene variants are associated with high-altitude pulmonary edema risk

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xikai; Li, Xun; Ouyang, Yongri; He, Xue; Zhang, Zhiying; Zhang, Yuan; Kang, Longli; Yuan, Dongya

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that Angiotensin II Receptor 1 (AGTR1) may play an important role in the development of high-altitude pulmonary edema. We envisaged a role for AGTR1 gene variants in the pathogenesis of HAPE and investigated their potential associations with HAPE in a Han Chinese population. We genotyped seven AGTR1 polymorphisms in 267 patients with diagnosed HAPE and 304 controls and evaluated their association with risk of HAPE. Statistically significant associations were found for the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs275651 (p = 0.017; odds ratio [OR] = 0.65) and rs275652 (p = 0.016; OR = 0.64). Another SNP rs10941679 showed a marginally significant association after adjusting for age and sex in the additive genetic model (adjusted OR = 1.44, 95% CI = 1.01-2.04, p = 0.040). Haplotype analysis confirmed that the haplotype “AG” was associated with a 35% reduction in the risk of developing HAPE, while the haplotype “AA” increased the risk of developing HAPE by 44%. These results provide the first evidence linking genetic variations in AGTR1 with HAPE risk in Han Chinese individuals. PMID:27732943

  4. Protease induced plasticity: matrix metalloproteinase-1 promotes neurostructural changes through activation of protease activated receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Megan; Ghosh, Suhasini; Ahern, Gerard P.; Villapol, Sonia; Maguire-Zeiss, Kathleen A.; Conant, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of secreted endopeptidases expressed by neurons and glia. Regulated MMP activity contributes to physiological synaptic plasticity, while dysregulated activity can stimulate injury. Disentangling the role individual MMPs play in synaptic plasticity is difficult due to overlapping structure and function as well as cell-type specific expression. Here, we develop a novel system to investigate the selective overexpression of a single MMP driven by GFAP expressing cells in vivo. We show that MMP-1 induces cellular and behavioral phenotypes consistent with enhanced signaling through the G-protein coupled protease activated receptor 1 (PAR1). Application of exogenous MMP-1, in vitro, stimulates PAR1 dependent increases in intracellular Ca2+ concentration and dendritic arborization. Overexpression of MMP-1, in vivo, increases dendritic complexity and induces biochemical and behavioral endpoints consistent with increased GPCR signaling. These data are exciting because we demonstrate that an astrocyte-derived protease can influence neuronal plasticity through an extracellular matrix independent mechanism. PMID:27762280

  5. Nogo Receptor 1 Confines a Disinhibitory Microcircuit to the Critical Period in Visual Cortex.

    PubMed

    Stephany, Céleste-Élise; Ikrar, Taruna; Nguyen, Collins; Xu, Xiangmin; McGee, Aaron W

    2016-10-26

    A characteristic of the developing mammalian visual system is a brief interval of plasticity, termed the "critical period," when the circuitry of primary visual cortex is most sensitive to perturbation of visual experience. Depriving one eye of vision (monocular deprivation [MD]) during the critical period alters ocular dominance (OD) by shifting the responsiveness of neurons in visual cortex to favor the nondeprived eye. A disinhibitory microcircuit involving parvalbumin-expressing (PV) interneurons initiates this OD plasticity. The gene encoding the neuronal nogo-66-receptor 1 (ngr1/rtn4r) is required to close the critical period. Here we combined mouse genetics, electrophysiology, and circuit mapping with laser-scanning photostimulation to investigate whether disinhibition is confined to the critical period by ngr1 We demonstrate that ngr1 mutant mice retain plasticity characteristic of the critical period as adults, and that ngr1 operates within PV interneurons to restrict the loss of intracortical excitatory synaptic input following MD in adult mice, and this disinhibition induces a "lower PV network configuration" in both critical-period wild-type mice and adult ngr1(-/-) mice. We propose that ngr1 limits disinhibition to close the critical period for OD plasticity and that a decrease in PV expression levels reports the diminished recent cumulative activity of these interneurons.

  6. Neurites regrowth of cortical neurons by GSK3beta inhibition independently of Nogo receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Seira, Oscar; Gavín, Rosalina; Gil, Vanessa; Llorens, Franc; Rangel, Alejandra; Soriano, Eduardo; del Río, José Antonio

    2010-06-01

    Lesioned axons do not regenerate in the adult mammalian CNS, owing to the over-expression of inhibitory molecules such as myelin-derived proteins or chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans. In order to overcome axon inhibition, strategies based on extrinsic and intrinsic treatments have been developed. For myelin-associated inhibition, blockage with NEP1-40, receptor bodies or IN-1 antibodies has been used. In addition, endogenous blockage of cell signalling mechanisms induced by myelin-associated proteins is a potential tool for overcoming axon inhibitory signals. We examined the participation of glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK3beta) and extracellular-related kinase (ERK) 1/2 in axon regeneration failure in lesioned cortical neurons. We also investigated whether pharmacological blockage of GSK3beta and ERK1/2 activities facilitates regeneration after myelin-directed inhibition in two models: (i) cerebellar granule cells and (ii) lesioned entorhino-hippocampal pathway in slice cultures, and whether the regenerative effects are mediated by Nogo Receptor 1 (NgR1). We demonstrate that, in contrast to ERK1/2 inhibition, the pharmacological treatment of GSK3beta inhibition strongly facilitated regrowth of cerebellar granule neurons over myelin independently of NgR1. Finally, these regenerative effects were corroborated in the lesioned entorhino-hippocampal pathway in NgR1-/- mutant mice. These results provide new findings for the development of new assays and strategies to enhance axon regeneration in injured cortical connections.

  7. Protease-activated receptor-1 modulates hippocampal memory formation and synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Almonte, Antoine G; Qadri, Laura H; Sultan, Faraz A; Watson, Jennifer A; Mount, Daniel J; Rumbaugh, Gavin; Sweatt, J David

    2013-01-01

    Protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) is an unusual G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) that is activated through proteolytic cleavage by extracellular serine proteases. Although previous work has shown that inhibiting PAR1 activation is neuroprotective in models of ischemia, traumatic injury, and neurotoxicity, surprisingly little is known about PAR1's contribution to normal brain function. Here, we used PAR1-/- mice to investigate the contribution of PAR1 function to memory formation and synaptic function. We demonstrate that PAR1-/- mice have deficits in hippocampus-dependent memory. We also show that while PAR1-/- mice have normal baseline synaptic transmission at Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses, they exhibit severe deficits in N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-dependent long-term potentiation (LTP). Mounting evidence indicates that activation of PAR1 leads to potentiation of NMDAR-mediated responses in CA1 pyramidal cells. Taken together, this evidence and our data suggest an important role for PAR1 function in NMDAR-dependent processes subserving memory formation and synaptic plasticity.

  8. Mutations of lysophosphatidic acid receptor-1 gene during progression of lung tumors in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Takanori; Obo, Yumi; Furukawa, Mami; Hotta, Mayuko; Yamasaki, Ayako; Honoki, Kanya; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2009-01-16

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive phospholipid that stimulates cell proliferation, migration, and protects cells from apoptosis. It interacts with specific G protein-coupled transmembrane receptors. In this study, mutations of lysophosphatidic acid receptor-1 (LPA1) gene were investigated to clarify the possible molecular mechanisms underlying the development of lung tumors induced by N-nitrosobis(2-hydroxypropyl)amine (BHP) in rats. Male Wistar rats, 6 weeks of age, were given 2000 ppm BHP in their drinking water for 12 weeks and then maintained without further treatment until sacrifice at 25 weeks. Genomic DNAs were extracted from paraffin-embedded tissues and exons 2-4 were examined for mutations, using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. No LPA1 mutations were detected in 15 hyperplasias, but 2 out of 12 adenomas (16.7%) and 7 out of 17 adenocarcinomas (41.2%). These results suggest that mutations of LPA1 gene may be involved in the acquisition of growth advantage from adenomas to adenocarcinomas in lung carcinogenesis induced in rats by BHP.

  9. Angiotensin II receptor 1 gene variants are associated with high-altitude pulmonary edema risk.

    PubMed

    Jin, Tianbo; Ren, Yongchao; Zhu, Xikai; Li, Xun; Ouyang, Yongri; He, Xue; Zhang, Zhiying; Zhang, Yuan; Kang, Longli; Yuan, Dongya

    2016-11-22

    Previous studies demonstrated that Angiotensin II Receptor 1 (AGTR1) may play an important role in the development of high-altitude pulmonary edema. We envisaged a role for AGTR1 gene variants in the pathogenesis of HAPE and investigated their potential associations with HAPE in a Han Chinese population. We genotyped seven AGTR1 polymorphisms in 267 patients with diagnosed HAPE and 304 controls and evaluated their association with risk of HAPE. Statistically significant associations were found for the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs275651 (p = 0.017; odds ratio [OR] = 0.65) and rs275652 (p = 0.016; OR = 0.64). Another SNP rs10941679 showed a marginally significant association after adjusting for age and sex in the additive genetic model (adjusted OR = 1.44, 95% CI = 1.01-2.04, p = 0.040). Haplotype analysis confirmed that the haplotype "AG" was associated with a 35% reduction in the risk of developing HAPE, while the haplotype "AA" increased the risk of developing HAPE by 44%. These results provide the first evidence linking genetic variations in AGTR1 with HAPE risk in Han Chinese individuals.

  10. Shear stress reduces protease activated receptor-1 expression in human endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, K. T.; Eskin, S. G.; Patterson, C.; Runge, M. S.; McIntire, L. V.

    2001-01-01

    Shear stress has been shown to regulate several genes involved in the thrombotic and proliferative functions of endothelial cells. Thrombin receptor (protease-activated receptor-1: PAR-1) increases at sites of vascular injury, which suggests an important role for PAR-1 in vascular diseases. However, the effect of shear stress on PAR-1 expression has not been previously studied. This work investigates effects of shear stress on PAR-1 gene expression in both human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and microvascular endothelial cells (HMECs). Cells were exposed to different shear stresses using a parallel plate flow system. Northern blot and flow cytometry analysis showed that shear stress down-regulated PAR-1 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels in both HUVECs and HMECs but with different thresholds. Furthermore, shear-reduced PAR-1 mRNA was due to a decrease of transcription rate, not increased mRNA degradation. Postshear stress release of endothelin-1 in response to thrombin was reduced in HUVECs and HMECs. Moreover, inhibitors of potential signaling pathways applied during shear stress indicated mediation of the shear-decreased PAR-1 expression by protein kinases. In conclusion, shear stress exposure reduces PAR-1 gene expression in HMECs and HUVECs through a mechanism dependent in part on protein kinases, leading to altered endothelial cell functional responses to thrombin.

  11. Brain structural and clinical changes after first episode psychosis: Focus on cannabinoid receptor 1 polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Pinilla, Paula; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Ortiz-García de la Foz, Víctor; Guest, Paul C; Ayesa-Arriola, Rosa; Córdova-Palomera, Aldo; Tordesillas-Gutierrez, Diana; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto

    2015-08-30

    Cannabinoid receptor 1 (CNR1) gene polymorphisms have been associated with central and peripheral effects of cannabis and schizophrenia pathophysiology. Here, we have tested whether three CNR1 variants (rs1049353, rs1535255 and rs2023239) are associated with changes in brain volumes, body mass index (BMI) or psychopathological scores in a 3-year longitudinal study of 65 first-episode psychosis patients. The rs1049353 at-risk allele was significantly associated with a greater reduction of caudate volume, and the rs2023239 T/C polymorphism showed a significant decrease in thalamic volume after the 3-year period. For those who were not cannabis users, the rs1535255 and rs2023239 polymorphisms had effects in lateral ventricle (LV), and LV and white matter, respectively. The rs2023239 variant also was associated with significant improvements in positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia. There was no significant effect of any of the variants on changes in BMI over the 3-year study. Finally, an interaction between all three polymorphisms was found involving evolution of positive symptoms. These findings suggest that the cannabinoid pathway is associated with schizophrenia evolution over time. However, further studies using larger cohorts are needed to confirm these results. If confirmed, the present findings could lead in subsequent investigations for identification of novel drug targets for improved treatment of patients suffering from schizophrenia.

  12. Shear stress reduces protease activated receptor-1 expression in human endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, K. T.; Eskin, S. G.; Patterson, C.; Runge, M. S.; McIntire, L. V.

    2001-01-01

    Shear stress has been shown to regulate several genes involved in the thrombotic and proliferative functions of endothelial cells. Thrombin receptor (protease-activated receptor-1: PAR-1) increases at sites of vascular injury, which suggests an important role for PAR-1 in vascular diseases. However, the effect of shear stress on PAR-1 expression has not been previously studied. This work investigates effects of shear stress on PAR-1 gene expression in both human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and microvascular endothelial cells (HMECs). Cells were exposed to different shear stresses using a parallel plate flow system. Northern blot and flow cytometry analysis showed that shear stress down-regulated PAR-1 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels in both HUVECs and HMECs but with different thresholds. Furthermore, shear-reduced PAR-1 mRNA was due to a decrease of transcription rate, not increased mRNA degradation. Postshear stress release of endothelin-1 in response to thrombin was reduced in HUVECs and HMECs. Moreover, inhibitors of potential signaling pathways applied during shear stress indicated mediation of the shear-decreased PAR-1 expression by protein kinases. In conclusion, shear stress exposure reduces PAR-1 gene expression in HMECs and HUVECs through a mechanism dependent in part on protein kinases, leading to altered endothelial cell functional responses to thrombin.

  13. Niacin ameliorates ulcerative colitis via prostaglandin D2-mediated D prostanoid receptor 1 activation.

    PubMed

    Li, Juanjuan; Kong, Deping; Wang, Qi; Wu, Wei; Tang, Yanping; Bai, Tingting; Guo, Liang; Wei, Lumin; Zhang, Qianqian; Yu, Yu; Qian, Yuting; Zuo, Shengkai; Liu, Guizhu; Liu, Qian; Wu, Sheng; Zang, Yi; Zhu, Qian; Jia, Daile; Wang, Yuanyang; Yao, Weiyan; Ji, Yong; Yin, Huiyong; Nakamura, Masataka; Lazarus, Michael; Breyer, Richard M; Wang, Lifu; Yu, Ying

    2017-03-24

    Niacin, as an antidyslipidemic drug, elicits a strong flushing response by release of prostaglandin (PG) D2 However, whether niacin is beneficial for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) remains unclear. Here, we observed niacin administration-enhanced PGD2 production in colon tissues in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-challenged mice, and protected mice against DSS or 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis in D prostanoid receptor 1 (DP1)-dependent manner. Specific ablation of DP1 receptor in vascular endothelial cells, colonic epithelium, and myeloid cells augmented DSS/TNBS-induced colitis in mice through increasing vascular permeability, promoting apoptosis of epithelial cells, and stimulating pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion of macrophages, respectively. Niacin treatment improved vascular permeability, reduced apoptotic epithelial cells, promoted epithelial cell update, and suppressed pro-inflammatory gene expression of macrophages. Moreover, treatment with niacin-containing retention enema effectively promoted UC clinical remission and mucosal healing in patients with moderately active disease. Therefore, niacin displayed multiple beneficial effects on DSS/TNBS-induced colitis in mice by activation of PGD2/DP1 axis. The potential efficacy of niacin in management of IBD warrants further investigation.

  14. Protease-activated receptor-1 modulates hippocampal memory formation and synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Almonte, Antoine G.; Qadri, Laura H.; Sultan, Faraz A.; Watson, Jennifer A.; Mount, Daniel J.; Rumbaugh, Gavin; Sweatt, J. David

    2012-01-01

    Protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) is an unusual G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) that is activated through proteolytic cleavage by extracellular serine proteases. While previous work has shown that inhibiting PAR1 activation is neuroprotective in models of ischemia, traumatic injury, and neurotoxicity, surprisingly little is known about PAR1’s contribution to normal brain function. Here we used PAR1 −/− mice to investigate the contribution of PAR1 function to memory formation and synaptic function. We demonstrate that PAR1 −/− mice have deficits in hippocampus-dependent memory. We also show that while PAR1 −/− mice have normal baseline synaptic transmission at Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses, they exhibit severe deficits in N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-dependent long-term potentiation (LTP). Mounting evidence indicates that activation of PAR1 leads to potentiation of NMDAR-mediated responses in CA1 pyramidal cells. Taken together, this evidence and our data suggest an important role for PAR1 function in NMDAR-dependent processes subserving memory formation and synaptic plasticity. PMID:23113835

  15. Discoidin domain receptor 1 null mice are protected against hypertension-induced renal disease.

    PubMed

    Flamant, Martin; Placier, Sandrine; Rodenas, Anita; Curat, Cyrile Anne; Vogel, Wolfgang F; Chatziantoniou, Christos; Dussaule, Jean-Claude

    2006-12-01

    A frequent complication of hypertension is the development of chronic renal failure. This pathology usually is initiated by inflammatory events and is characterized by the abnormal accumulation of collagens within the renal tissue. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1), a nonintegrin collagen receptor that displays tyrosine-kinase activity, in the development of renal fibrosis. To this end, hypertension was induced with angiotensin in mice that were genetically deficient of DDR1 and in wild-type controls. After 4 or 6 wk of angiotensin II administration, wild-type mice developed hypertension that was associated with perivascular inflammation, glomerular sclerosis, and proteinuria. Systolic pressure increase was similar in the DDR1-deficient mice, but the histologic lesions of glomerular fibrosis and inflammation were significantly blunted and proteinuria was markedly prevented. Immunostaining for lymphocytes, macrophages, and collagens I and IV was prominent in the renal cortex of wild-type mice but substantially reduced in DDR1 null mice. In separate experiments, renal cortical slices of DDR1 null mice showed a blunted response of chemokines to LPS that was accompanied by a considerable protection against the LPS-induced mortality. These results indicate the importance of DDR1 in mediating inflammation and fibrosis. Use of DDR1 inhibitors could provide a completely novel therapeutic approach against diseases that have these combined pathologies.

  16. Cannabinoid receptor 1 binding activity and quantitative analysis of Cannabis sativa L. smoke and vapor.

    PubMed

    Fischedick, Justin; Van Der Kooy, Frank; Verpoorte, Robert

    2010-02-01

    Cannabis sativa L. (cannabis) extracts, vapor produced by the Volcano vaporizer and smoke made from burning cannabis joints were analyzed by GC-flame ionization detecter (FID), GC-MS and HPLC. Three different medicinal cannabis varieties were investigated Bedrocan, Bedrobinol and Bediol. Cannabinoids plus other components such as terpenoids and pyrolytic by-products were identified and quantified in all samples. Cannabis vapor and smoke was tested for cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) binding activity and compared to pure Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(9)-THC). The top five major compounds in Bedrocan extracts were Delta(9)-THC, cannabigerol (CBG), terpinolene, myrcene, and cis-ocimene in Bedrobinol Delta(9)-THC, myrcene, CBG, cannabichromene (CBC), and camphene in Bediol cannabidiol (CBD), Delta(9)-THC, myrcene, CBC, and CBG. The major components in Bedrocan vapor (>1.0 mg/g) were Delta(9)-THC, terpinolene, myrcene, CBG, cis-ocimene and CBD in Bedrobinol Delta(9)-THC, myrcene and CBD in Bediol CBD, Delta(9)-THC, myrcene, CBC and terpinolene. The major components in Bedrocan smoke (>1.0 mg/g) were Delta(9)-THC, cannabinol (CBN), terpinolene, CBG, myrcene and cis-ocimene in Bedrobinol Delta(9)-THC, CBN and myrcene in Bediol CBD, Delta(9)-THC, CBN, myrcene, CBC and terpinolene. There was no statistically significant difference between CB1 binding of pure Delta(9)-THC compared to cannabis smoke and vapor at an equivalent concentration of Delta(9)-THC.

  17. A prospective community-based pilot study of risk factors for the investigation of elder mistreatment.

    PubMed

    Lachs, M S; Berkman, L; Fulmer, T; Horwitz, R I

    1994-02-01

    To identify risk factors for the investigation of elder abuse, neglect, self-neglect, exploitation, and abandonment in a population-based observational cohort of community living elders. Population-based sample of 2,812 community-living men and women in New Haven, Connecticut who were over age 65 in 1982. Matching process whereby cohort members who were investigated by Connecticut's State Ombudsman on Aging in 1985 or 1986 were identified. Relative risks for ombudsman investigation in 1985 or 1986 were calculated based on risk factors status at baseline interview in 1982. Sixty-eight (2.4%) members of the cohort received investigation. Features at cohort entry significantly associated with investigation in multiple logistic regression included: requiring assistance with feeding (Adjusted OR 3.5, 95% CI 1.2, 11.7), being a minority elder (Adj. OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.4, 2.8), over age 75 at cohort inception (Adj. OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.1, 3.1), and having a poor social network as defined by a social network index (Adj. OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.0, 2.7). When stratified by race, requiring assistance with feeding was associated with ombudsman investigation in minority elders (Adj. OR 10.8, 95% CI 2.8, 40.5) but not non-minority elders (Adj. OR 1.1, 95% CI 0.5, 7.5). Functional disability, minority status, older age, and poor social networks were associated with investigation for elder mistreatment in this prospective, community-based population of men and women over the age of 65.

  18. Regression methods for investigating risk factors of chronic kidney disease outcomes: the state of the art

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a progressive and usually irreversible disease. Different types of outcomes are of interest in the course of CKD such as time-to-dialysis, transplantation or decline of the glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Statistical analyses aiming at investigating the association between these outcomes and risk factors raise a number of methodological issues. The objective of this study was to give an overview of these issues and to highlight some statistical methods that can address these topics. Methods A literature review of statistical methods published between 2002 and 2012 to investigate risk factors of CKD outcomes was conducted within the Scopus database. The results of the review were used to identify important methodological issues as well as to discuss solutions for each type of CKD outcome. Results Three hundred and four papers were selected. Time-to-event outcomes were more often investigated than quantitative outcome variables measuring kidney function over time. The most frequently investigated events in survival analyses were all-cause death, initiation of kidney replacement therapy, and progression to a specific value of GFR. While competing risks were commonly accounted for, interval censoring was rarely acknowledged when appropriate despite existing methods. When the outcome of interest was the quantitative decline of kidney function over time, standard linear models focussing on the slope of GFR over time were almost as often used as linear mixed models which allow various numbers of repeated measurements of kidney function per patient. Informative dropout was accounted for in some of these longitudinal analyses. Conclusions This study provides a broad overview of the statistical methods used in the last ten years for investigating risk factors of CKD progression, as well as a discussion of their limitations. Some existing potential alternatives that have been proposed in the context of CKD or in other contexts are

  19. Photoreceptor avascular privilege is shielded by soluble VEGF receptor-1

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Ling; Uehara, Hironori; Zhang, Xiaohui; Das, Subrata K; Olsen, Thomas; Holt, Derick; Simonis, Jacquelyn M; Jackman, Kyle; Singh, Nirbhai; Miya, Tadashi R; Huang, Wei; Ahmed, Faisal; Bastos-Carvalho, Ana; Le, Yun Zheng; Mamalis, Christina; Chiodo, Vince A; Hauswirth, William W; Baffi, Judit; Lacal, Pedro M; Orecchia, Angela; Ferrara, Napoleone; Gao, Guangping; Young-hee, Kim; Fu, Yingbin; Owen, Leah; Albuquerque, Romulo; Baehr, Wolfgang; Thomas, Kirk; Li, Dean Y; Chalam, Kakarla V; Shibuya, Masabumi; Grisanti, Salvatore; Wilson, David J; Ambati, Jayakrishna; Ambati, Balamurali K

    2013-01-01

    Optimal phototransduction requires separation of the avascular photoreceptor layer from the adjacent vascularized inner retina and choroid. Breakdown of peri-photoreceptor vascular demarcation leads to retinal angiomatous proliferation or choroidal neovascularization, two variants of vascular invasion of the photoreceptor layer in age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of irreversible blindness in industrialized nations. Here we show that sFLT-1, an endogenous inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A), is synthesized by photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), and is decreased in human AMD. Suppression of sFLT-1 by antibodies, adeno-associated virus-mediated RNA interference, or Cre/lox-mediated gene ablation either in the photoreceptor layer or RPE frees VEGF-A and abolishes photoreceptor avascularity. These findings help explain the vascular zoning of the retina, which is critical for vision, and advance two transgenic murine models of AMD with spontaneous vascular invasion early in life. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00324.001 PMID:23795287

  20. Investigating the structure of the eating inventory (three-factor eating questionnaire): a confirmatory approach.

    PubMed

    Mazzeo, Suzanne E; Aggen, Steven H; Anderson, Charles; Tozzi, Federica; Bulik, Cynthia M

    2003-09-01

    To investigate the internal structure of the Eating Inventory using confirmatory factor analytic (CFA) methods. Female participants in a population-based twin study (N = 1,510) completed a reduced version of the Eating Inventory as part of a larger study of eating behaviors. Two CFA estimation methods were implemented using LISREL and Mplus to evaluate three different factor structures reported in the literature. Overall results for Stunkard and Messick's (1985) three-factor model indicated a poor fit to these data. The structure reported by Ganley resulted in an improper solution with factor correlations over 1 and several loadings estimated near 0 or with negative signs. The model proposed by Hyland et al. also fit poorly for all three models, the pattern of loadings on the Restraint factor proved most difficult to interpret. This study represents the first application of these confirmatory methods to the three subscales of the Eating Inventory. The instrument, as administered in this study, did not conform well to the structures proposed in previous studies. Because the Eating Inventory is recommended as a treatment planning tool, poor replication of the constructs purported to be assessed by this instrument underscores the importance of further internal validation research. Copyright 2003 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. An investigation of breast cancer risk factors in Cyprus: a case control study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is the most common form of malignancy affecting women worldwide. It is also the leading cancer in females in Cyprus, with approximately 400 new cases diagnosed annually. It is well recognized that genetic variation as well as environmental factors modulate breast cancer risk. The main aim of this study was to assess the strength of associations between recognized risk factors and breast cancer among Cypriot women. This is the first epidemiological investigation on risk factors of breast cancer among the Cypriot female population. Methods We carried out a case-control study, involving 1,109 breast cancer patients and a group of 1,177 controls who were recruited while participating in the National screening programme for breast cancer. Information on demographic characteristics and potential risk factors were collected from both groups during a standardized interview. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess the strength of the association between each risk factor and breast cancer risk, before and after adjusting for the possible confounding effect of other factors. Results In multivariable models, family history of breast cancer (OR 1.64, 95% CI 1.23, 2.19) was the strongest predictor of breast cancer risk in the Cypriot population. Late menarche (OR 0.64, 95% CI 0.45, 0.92 among women reaching menarche after the age of 15 vs. before the age of 12) and breastfeeding (OR 0.74, 95% CI 0.59, 0.92) exhibited a strong protective effect. In the case of breastfeeding, the observed effect appeared stronger than the effect of pregnancy alone. Surprisingly, we also observed an inverse association between hormone replacement therapy (HRT) although this may be a product of the retrospective nature of this study. Conclusion Overall the findings of our study corroborate with the results of previous investigations on descriptive epidemiology of risk factors for breast cancer. This investigation provides important background information for

  2. Metabotropic glutamate receptor-1 contributes to progression in triple negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Banda, Malathi; Speyer, Cecilia L; Semma, Sara N; Osuala, Kingsley O; Kounalakis, Nicole; Torres Torres, Keila E; Barnard, Nicola J; Kim, Hyunjin J; Sloane, Bonnie F; Miller, Fred R; Goydos, James S; Gorski, David H

    2014-01-01

    TNBC is an aggressive breast cancer subtype that does not express hormone receptors (estrogen and progesterone receptors, ER and PR) or amplified human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2), and there currently exist no targeted therapies effective against it. Consequently, finding new molecular targets in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is critical to improving patient outcomes. Previously, we have detected the expression of metabotropic glutamate receptor-1 (gene: GRM1; protein: mGluR1) in TNBC and observed that targeting glutamatergic signaling inhibits TNBC growth both in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we explored how mGluR1 contributes to TNBC progression, using the isogenic MCF10 progression series, which models breast carcinogenesis from nontransformed epithelium to malignant basal-like breast cancer. We observed that mGluR1 is expressed in human breast cancer and that in MCF10A cells, which model nontransformed mammary epithelium, but not in MCF10AT1 cells, which model atypical ductal hyperplasia, mGluR1 overexpression results in increased proliferation, anchorage-independent growth, and invasiveness. In contrast, mGluR1 knockdown results in a decrease in these activities in malignant MCF10CA1d cells. Similarly, pharmacologic inhibition of glutamatergic signaling in MCF10CA1d cells results in a decrease in proliferation and anchorage-independent growth. Finally, transduction of MCF10AT1 cells, which express c-Ha-ras, using a lentiviral construct expressing GRM1 results in transformation to carcinoma in 90% of resultant xenografts. We conclude that mGluR1 cooperates with other factors in hyperplastic mammary epithelium to contribute to TNBC progression and therefore propose that glutamatergic signaling represents a promising new molecular target for TNBC therapy.

  3. Understanding Career Success and Its Contributing Factors for Clinical and Translational Investigators

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Georgeanna F.W.B.; Schwartz, Lisa S.; DiMeglio, Linda A.; Ahluwalia, Jasjit S.; Gabrilove, Janice L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To understand the factors that facilitate career success for career development awardees in clinical and translational science and to reconceptualize understanding of career success for this population. Method In 2013–2014, the authors conducted semi-structured interviews with former NIH KL2 or K12 scholars from nine Clinical and Translational Science Award-funded institutions. Participants either had or had not secured independent funding at least two years after the end of their last K award. Questions covered the factors that facilitate or hinder junior investigators’ transition to independent funding. Interviews were recorded and transcribed and the transcripts analyzed thematically. Results Forty individuals participated, with equal representation by men and women and by independently and not independently funded investigators. Personal factors that facilitated success included: networks, persistence and resilience, initiative, autonomy, and personal and professional balance. Organizational factors included: appropriate mentorship, protected research time, and institutional resources and support. Even independently funded participants described challenges regarding career direction. Five participants without independent funding modeled a broad spectrum of successful career paths, having assumed leadership positions not reliant on grant funding. Alternative definitions of career success included: improving public health, enjoying work, seeing mentees succeed, and receiving external acknowledgement of successes. Conclusions Awareness of the factors that facilitate or hinder career success can help junior faculty, mentors, and institutional leaders support career development in clinical and translational science. New definitions of career success are needed, as are career paths for faculty who want to engage in research in roles other than principal investigator. PMID:26509600

  4. Bullying involvement and adolescent substance use: A multilevel investigation of individual and neighbourhood risk factors.

    PubMed

    Lambe, Laura J; Craig, Wendy M

    2017-09-01

    Youth involved with school bullying are vulnerable to many negative outcomes, including substance use. Research has yet to examine how this vulnerability operates in the context of other individual and neighbourhood differences. The current study aimed to fill this gap by using multilevel modeling to investigate both the individual and neighbourhood risk factors associated with frequent drunkenness and frequent cannabis use among adolescents. Data from the 2010 Canadian Health Behaviours in School-Aged Children (HBSC) survey were analyzed. Participants consisted of 8971 students from 173 neighbourhoods across Canada. Multilevel modeling was used to examine both individual (age, gender, bullying, victimization, peer deviancy, negative affect) and neighbourhood (socioeconomic status, crime, physical neighbourhood disorder, residential instability) risk factors. We tested whether the links between bullying involvement and frequent substance use were mediated by other risk factors. Both individual and neighbourhood risk factors were associated with an increased likelihood of frequent substance use. Specifically, bullying served as a unique risk factor for frequent substance use over and above more traditional risk factors. A cross-level interaction was observed between residential instability and peer deviancy, such that the link between peer deviancy and frequent drunkenness was stronger in more residentially-unstable neighbourhoods. Peer deviancy partially mediated the link between bullying and both types of frequent substance use, whereas both peer deviancy and negative affect mediated the link between victimization and both types of frequent substance use. Youth who bully others are vulnerable to frequent substance use across peer and neighbourhood contexts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Psychological factors related to donation behaviour among Chinese adults: results from a longitudinal investigation.

    PubMed

    Hu, H; Wang, T; Fu, Q

    2017-05-22

    Little is known about the psychological factors currently influencing blood donation in China. This study investigated the structure of psychological factors and their correlation with donation behaviour of adults in a transforming city in China over a 6-month period. Participants were recruited in Nanjing from May 2013 to April 2014. Preliminary focus group interviews with 102 participants were conducted to generate new items for a Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) questionnaire. The questionnaires were completed by 300 participants, and responses were subjected to factor analysis. We confirmed the resulting factorial structure with 861 respondents and examined the associations between these factors and donation behaviour during the next 6 months using structural equation modelling. Factor analysis and structural equation modelling of the data supported an extended TPB model with self-reported past donation behaviour as a covariate. After controlling for past donation behaviour, attitudes towards blood donation (β = 0·288), subjective norm (β = 0·149), self-efficacy (β = 0·199), trust in third-party health professionals (β = 0·237), mistrust towards blood collection agencies (BCAs) (β = -0·085) and traditional Chinese beliefs (β = -0·046) were significantly related to donation intention, whilst donation intention was positively (β = 0·212) associated with donation behaviour. These findings confirm that psychological factors such as attitudes are predictors of blood donation. Recruitment efforts using public information campaigns and interpersonal communications should focus on strengthening positive attitudes, increasing trust in third-party health professionals, elevating self-efficacy, changing traditional Chinese beliefs and relieving mistrust in blood collection agencies (BCAs). © 2017 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  6. Questioning context: a set of interdisciplinary questions for investigating contextual factors affecting health decision making

    PubMed Central

    Charise, Andrea; Witteman, Holly; Whyte, Sarah; Sutton, Erica J.; Bender, Jacqueline L.; Massimi, Michael; Stephens, Lindsay; Evans, Joshua; Logie, Carmen; Mirza, Raza M.; Elf, Marie

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective  To combine insights from multiple disciplines into a set of questions that can be used to investigate contextual factors affecting health decision making. Background  Decision‐making processes and outcomes may be shaped by a range of non‐medical or ‘contextual’ factors particular to an individual including social, economic, political, geographical and institutional conditions. Research concerning contextual factors occurs across many disciplines and theoretical domains, but few conceptual tools have attempted to integrate and translate this wide‐ranging research for health decision‐making purposes. Methods  To formulate this tool we employed an iterative, collaborative process of scenario development and question generation. Five hypothetical health decision‐making scenarios (preventative, screening, curative, supportive and palliative) were developed and used to generate a set of exploratory questions that aim to highlight potential contextual factors across a range of health decisions. Findings  We present an exploratory tool consisting of questions organized into four thematic domains – Bodies, Technologies, Place and Work (BTPW) – articulating wide‐ranging contextual factors relevant to health decision making. The BTPW tool encompasses health‐related scholarship and research from a range of disciplines pertinent to health decision making, and identifies concrete points of intersection between its four thematic domains. Examples of the practical application of the questions are also provided. Conclusions  These exploratory questions provide an interdisciplinary toolkit for identifying the complex contextual factors affecting decision making. The set of questions comprised by the BTPW tool may be applied wholly or partially in the context of clinical practice, policy development and health‐related research. PMID:21029277

  7. Dihydroartemisinin Exerts Its Anticancer Activity through Depleting Cellular Iron via Transferrin Receptor-1

    PubMed Central

    Ba, Qian; Zhou, Naiyuan; Duan, Juan; Chen, Tao; Hao, Miao; Yang, Xinying; Li, Junyang; Yin, Jun; Chu, Ruiai; Wang, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Artemisinin and its main active metabolite dihydroartemisinin, clinically used antimalarial agents with low host toxicity, have recently shown potent anticancer activities in a variety of human cancer models. Although iron mediated oxidative damage is involved, the mechanisms underlying these activities remain unclear. In the current study, we found that dihydroartemisinin caused cellular iron depletion in time- and concentration-dependent manners. It decreased iron uptake and disturbed iron homeostasis in cancer cells, which were independent of oxidative damage. Moreover, dihydroartemisinin reduced the level of transferrin receptor-1 associated with cell membrane. The regulation of dihydroartemisinin to transferrin receptor-1 could be reversed by nystatin, a cholesterol-sequestering agent but not the inhibitor of clathrin-dependent endocytosis. Dihydroartemisinin also induced transferrin receptor-1 palmitoylation and colocalization with caveolin-1, suggesting a lipid rafts mediated internalization pathway was involved in the process. Also, nystatin reversed the influences of dihydroartemisinin on cell cycle and apoptosis related genes and the siRNA induced downregulation of transferrin receptor-1 decreased the sensitivity to dihydroartemisinin efficiently in the cells. These results indicate that dihydroartemisinin can counteract cancer through regulating cell-surface transferrin receptor-1 in a non-classical endocytic pathway, which may be a new action mechanism of DHA independently of oxidative damage. PMID:22900042

  8. Serum amyloid A stimulates macrophage foam cell formation via lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 upregulation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ha Young; Kim, Sang Doo; Baek, Suk-Hwan; Choi, Joon Hyuk; Cho, Kyung-Hyun; Zabel, Brian A.; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2013-01-01

    Elevated levels of serum amyloid A (SAA) is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, however, the role of SAA in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis remains unclear. Here we show that SAA induced macrophage foam cell formation. SAA-stimulated foam cell formation was mediated by c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling. Moreover, both SAA and SAA-conjugated high density lipoprotein stimulated the expression of the important scavenger receptor lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 (LOX1) via nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). A LOX1 antagonist carrageenan significantly blocked SAA-induced foam cell formation, indicating that SAA promotes foam cell formation via LOX1 expression. Our findings therefore suggest that SAA stimulates foam cell formation via LOX1 induction, and thus likely contributes to atherogenesis. PMID:23454129

  9. Challenge of investigating biologically relevant functions of virulence factors in bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed Central

    Moxon, R; Tang, C

    2000-01-01

    Recent innovations have increased enormously the opportunities for investigating the molecular basis of bacterial pathogenicity, including the availability of whole-genome sequences, techniques for identifying key virulence genes, and the use of microarrays and proteomics. These methods should provide powerful tools for analysing the patterns of gene expression and function required for investigating host-microbe interactions in vivo. But, the challenge is exacting. Pathogenicity is a complex phenotype and the reductionist approach does not adequately address the eclectic and variable outcomes of host-microbe interactions, including evolutionary dynamics and ecological factors. There are difficulties in distinguishing bacterial 'virulence' factors from the many determinants that are permissive for pathogenicity, for example those promoting general fitness. A further practical problem for some of the major bacterial pathogens is that there are no satisfactory animal models or experimental assays that adequately reflect the infection under investigation. In this review, we give a personal perspective on the challenge of characterizing how bacterial pathogens behave in vivo and discuss some of the methods that might be most relevant for understanding the molecular basis of the diseases for which they are responsible. Despite the powerful genomic, molecular, cellular and structural technologies available to us, we are still struggling to come to grips with the question of 'What is a pathogen?' PMID:10874737

  10. Ciguatera on Kauai: investigation of factors associated with severity of illness.

    PubMed

    Katz, A R; Terrell-Perica, S; Sasaki, D M

    1993-10-01

    Epidemiologic characterization of ciguatera fish poisoning has been limited by lack of laboratory confirmation, absence of prospective follow-up, and incomplete analysis of age-related factors. A 1985 outbreak on the island of Kauai in the state of Hawaii that involved 15 persons of various ages was investigated to determine factors associated with disease severity. The presence of ciguatoxin was detected in leftover portions of the implicated fish by enzyme immunoassay. All cases were medically and epidemiologically investigated and followed prospectively. Ten of the 15 cases demonstrated bradycardia; seven were hospitalized, including two requiring placement in intensive care. Bradycardia was associated with increasing age and body weight (P < 0.01 and < 0.05, respectively) as well as the amount of toxic fish consumed (P < 0.01). Duration of illness ranged from two to 132 days. Increasing duration of illness was correlated with both increasing age and weight (rs = 0.64 and rs = 0.72, respectively, both P < 0.01) and was independent of amount and components of toxic fish consumed. The correlation between increasing age and weight with duration and severity of symptoms may be explained by prior subclinical toxin exposure and is consistent with the observation that repeated ciguatoxin exposures are associated with more severe illness. The association between amount of toxic fish consumed and bradycardia is consistent with an increased dose of ciguatoxin. The findings of this outbreak investigation support previously unconfirmed observations.

  11. Thermodynamic and kinetic investigation on the crucial factors affecting adefovir dipivoxil-saccharin cocrystallization.

    PubMed

    Ma, Kun; Zhang, Ying; Kan, Hongliang; Cheng, Linfeng; Luo, Ling; Su, Qing; Gao, Jing; Gao, Yuan; Zhang, Jianjun

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to perform a thermodynamic and kinetic investigation on the crucial factors affecting the cocrystallization between adefovir dipivoxil (AD) and saccharin (SAC). Phase solubility diagrams and ternary phase diagrams were constructed based on the solubility data of AD, SAC and their cocrystals in ethanol, isopropanol and ethyl acetate at different temperatures. The conductimetric method was used to determine the induction time. A quantitative and intuitive technique modified from dissolution testing was employed to investigate the cocrystallization kinetics. AD-SAC cocrystals exhibited different crystal habits but only one cocrystal polymorph was confirmed. The effects of several crucial factors, including the input amounts of two components, AD/SAC ratio, solvent and temperature, on the crystallization of single-component alone, cocrystal formation, cocrystal stability, supersaturation, nucleation, crystal growth and cocrystal yield were determined. Thermodynamic and kinetic parameters provided the rationale for this spontaneous cocrystallization system without the need of solvent evaporation and temperature change. This systemic investigation enriched the present understanding of thermodynamics and kinetics of cocrystals and built the groundwork for AD-SAC cocrystal scale-up.

  12. Human fear acquisition deficits in relation to genetic variants of the corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 and the serotonin transporter.

    PubMed

    Heitland, Ivo; Groenink, Lucianne; Bijlsma, Elisabeth Y; Oosting, Ronald S; Baas, Johanna M P

    2013-01-01

    The ability to identify predictors of aversive events allows organisms to appropriately respond to these events, and failure to acquire these fear contingencies can lead to maladaptive contextual anxiety. Recently, preclinical studies demonstrated that the corticotropin-releasing factor and serotonin systems are interactively involved in adaptive fear acquisition. Here, 150 healthy medication-free human subjects completed a cue and context fear conditioning procedure in a virtual reality environment. Fear potentiation of the eyeblink startle reflex (FPS) was measured to assess both uninstructed fear acquisition and instructed fear expression. All participants were genotyped for polymorphisms located within regulatory regions of the corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRHR1 - rs878886) and the serotonin transporter (5HTTLPR). These polymorphisms have previously been linked to panic disorder and anxious symptomology and personality, respectively. G-allele carriers of CRHR1 (rs878886) showed no acquisition of fear conditioned responses (FPS) to the threat cue in the uninstructed phase, whereas fear acquisition was present in C/C homozygotes. Moreover, carrying the risk alleles of both rs878886 (G-allele) and 5HTTLPR (short allele) was associated with increased FPS to the threat context during this phase. After explicit instructions regarding the threat contingency were given, the cue FPS and context FPS normalized in all genotype groups. The present results indicate that genetic variability in the corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1, especially in interaction with the 5HTTLPR, is involved in the acquisition of fear in humans. This translates prior animal findings to the human realm.

  13. Investigation of Social, Emotional, and Cognitive Factors with Effect on Suicidal Behaviour in Adolescents with Depression

    PubMed Central

    SOYLU, Nusret; TANELİ, Yeşim; TANELİ, Suna

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Our study aimed at investigating social, emotional, and cognitive factors playing a role in the development of suicidal ideation in depressed adolescents and its turning into a suicide attempt. Method Sixty-three adolescents (48 female, 15 male) aged 12 to 18 years were included in the study. In face-to-face interviews, suicide ideation, suicide plans, and previous suicide attempts were evaluated, sociodemographic data were collected. Additionally, the Children’s Depression Inventory, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-I, II), Beck Hopelessness Scale, Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory, Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, Strengths and the Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) parent forms were applied. SPSS version 13.0 for Windows was used for statistical analysis. Results It has been established that in the last six months, 71.4% of cases (n=45) had suicidal ideation and 27% (n=17) attempted suicide. Factors associated with suicidal ideation in depressed adolescents were: high depression and anxiety levels, hopelessness and low self-esteem (p<0.05). Factors associated with suicide attempts were: separated family background, lower perceived family support and high rates of conduct difficulties (p<0.05). Patients with suicide attempt differed from patients with suicidal ideation but without suicide attempt in lower perceived family support only (p<0.05). Discussion It is thought that keeping in mind the factors associated with the development of suicidal ideation and its turning into a suicide attempt, will help clinicians in preventing suicide attempts in depressed adolescents.

  14. Kinetic Investigations of the Role of Factor Inhibiting Hypoxia-inducible Factor (FIH) as an Oxygen Sensor*

    PubMed Central

    Tarhonskaya, Hanna; Hardy, Adam P.; Howe, Emily A.; Loik, Nikita D.; Kramer, Holger B.; McCullagh, James S. O.; Schofield, Christopher J.; Flashman, Emily

    2015-01-01

    The hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) hydroxylases regulate hypoxia sensing in animals. In humans, they comprise three prolyl hydroxylases (PHD1–3 or EGLN1–3) and factor inhibiting HIF (FIH). FIH is an asparaginyl hydroxylase catalyzing post-translational modification of HIF-α, resulting in reduction of HIF-mediated transcription. Like the PHDs, FIH is proposed to have a hypoxia-sensing role in cells, enabling responses to changes in cellular O2 availability. PHD2, the most important human PHD isoform, is proposed to be biochemically/kinetically suited as a hypoxia sensor due to its relatively high sensitivity to changes in O2 concentration and slow reaction with O2. To ascertain whether these parameters are conserved among the HIF hydroxylases, we compared the reactions of FIH and PHD2 with O2. Consistent with previous reports, we found lower Kmapp(O2) values for FIH than for PHD2 with all HIF-derived substrates. Under pre-steady-state conditions, the O2-initiated FIH reaction is significantly faster than that of PHD2. We then investigated the kinetics with respect to O2 of the FIH reaction with ankyrin repeat domain (ARD) substrates. FIH has lower Kmapp(O2) values for the tested ARDs than HIF-α substrates, and pre-steady-state O2-initiated reactions were faster with ARDs than with HIF-α substrates. The results correlate with cellular studies showing that FIH is active at lower O2 concentrations than the PHDs and suggest that competition between HIF-α and ARDs for FIH is likely to be biologically relevant, particularly in hypoxic conditions. The overall results are consistent with the proposal that the kinetic properties of individual oxygenases reflect their biological capacity to act as hypoxia sensors. PMID:26112411

  15. An Investigation of Factors Influencing Nurses' Clinical Decision-Making Skills.

    PubMed

    Wu, Min; Yang, Jinqiu; Liu, Lingying; Ye, Benlan

    2016-08-01

    This study aims to investigate the influencing factors on nurses' clinical decision-making (CDM) skills. A cross-sectional nonexperimental research design was conducted in the medical, surgical, and emergency departments of two university hospitals, between May and June 2014. We used a quantile regression method to identify the influencing factors across different quantiles of the CDM skills distribution and compared the results with the corresponding ordinary least squares (OLS) estimates. Our findings revealed that nurses were best at the skills of managing oneself. Educational level, experience, and the total structural empowerment had significant positive impacts on nurses' CDM skills, while the nurse-patient relationship, patient care and interaction, formal empowerment, and information empowerment were negatively correlated with nurses' CDM skills. These variables explained no more than 30% of the variance in nurses' CDM skills and mainly explained the lower quantiles of nurses' CDM skills distribution. © The Author(s) 2016.

  16. [THE RISK FACTORS OF THE DIALYSIS PERITONITIS (THREE-YEARS PROSPECTIVE INVESTIGATION)].

    PubMed

    Mishalov, V G; Zavodovskiy, E S; Markulan, L Yu; Goyda, S M

    2015-09-01

    The risk factors of the dialysis peritonitis occurrence were determined in patients with chronic renal disease, to whom a substitute renal therapy, using peritoneal dialysis, was conducted. The results of a three-year prospective investigation and treatment of 73 patients in Kyiv City Oleksandrivska Clinical Hospital on the base of the general surgery and nephrology departments in 2007 - 2010 yrs were studied. The dialysis peritonitis (first episode) have occurred in 42 (57.5%) patients. Cumulative rate of a dialysis peritonitis in accordance to a censored data (the dialysis peritonitis suspension or other causes) have constituted 67.7%. Due to the dialysis peritonitis occurrence the peritoneal dialysis was stopped in 14 (19.2%) patients. The obesity, raising of a serum albumin level, constipation, preliminary injection into the site of the catheter exit site we consider a risk factors for the dialysis peritonitis occurrence.

  17. Hydrophobic Residues in Helix 8 of Cannabinoid Receptor 1 Are Critical for Structural and Functional Properties†

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Kwang H.; Nishiyama, Akiko; Mierke, Dale F.; Kendall, Debra A.

    2010-01-01

    In addition to the heptahelical transmembrane domain shared by all G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), many class A GPCRs adopt a helical domain, termed helix 8, in the membrane-proximal region of the C terminus. We investigated the role of residues in the hydrophobic and hydrophilic faces of amphiphilic helix 8 of human cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1). To differentiate between a role for specific residues and global features, we made two key mutants: one involving replacement of the highly hydrophobic groups, Leu404, Phe408, and Phe412, all with alanine and the second involving substitution of the basic residues, Lys402, Arg405, and Arg409, all with the neutral glutamine. The former showed a very low Bmax based on binding isotherms, a minimal Emax based on GTPγS binding analysis, and defective localization relative to the wild-type CB1 receptor as revealed by confocal microscopy. However, the latter mutant and the wild-type receptors were indistinguishable. Circular dichroism spectroscopy of purified peptides with corresponding sequences indicated that the highly hydrophobic residues are critical for maintaining a strong helical structure in detergent, whereas the positively charged residues are not. Further investigation of mutant receptors revealed that CB1 localization requires a threshold level of hydrophobicity but not specific amino acids. Moreover, mutant receptors carrying two- to six-residue insertions amino-terminal to helix 8 revealed a graded decrease in Bmax values. Our results identify the key helix 8 components (including hydrophobicity of specific residues, structure, and location relative to TM7) determinant for receptor localization leading to robust ligand binding and G protein activation. PMID:20025243

  18. Coat colour phenotype of Qingyu pig is associated with polymorphisms of melanocortin receptor 1 gene.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoqian; Tan, Zhendong; Shen, Linyuan; Yang, Qiong; Cheng, Xiao; Liao, Kun; Bai, Lin; Shuai, Surong; Li, Mingzhou; Li, Xuewei; Zhang, Shunhua; Zhu, Li

    2017-07-01

    Qingyu pig, a Chinese indigenous pig breed, exhibits two types of coat colour phenotypes, including pure black and white with black spotting respectively. Melanocortin receptor 1 (MC1R) and agouti signaling protein (ASIP) are two widely reported pivotal genes that significantly affect the regulation of coat colour. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether the polymorphisms of these two genes are associated with coat colour and analyze the molecular mechanism of the coat colour separation in Qingyu pig. We studied the phenotype segregation and used polymerase chain reaction amplification and Sanger sequencing to investigate the polymorphism of MC1R and ASIP in 121 Qingyu pigs, consisting of 115 black and 6 white with black spotted pigs. Coat colour of Qingyu pig is associated with the polymorphisms of MC1R but not ASIP. We only found 2 haplotypes, E(QY) and E(qy) , based on the 13 observed mutations from MC1R gene. Among which, E(qy) presented a recessive inheritance mode in black spotted Qingyu pigs. Further analysis revealed a g.462-463CC insertion that caused a frameshift mutation and a premature stop codon, thus changed the first transmembrane domain completely and lost the remaining six transmembrane domains. Altogether, our results strongly support that the variety of Qingyu pig's coat colour is related to MC1R. Our findings indicated that black coat colour in Qingyu pig was dominant to white with black spotted phenotype and MC1R gene polymorphism was associated with coat colour separation in Qingyu pig.

  19. Mutations in fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 cause both Kallmann syndrome and normosmic idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Pitteloud, Nelly; Acierno, James S; Meysing, Astrid; Eliseenkova, Anna V; Ma, Jinghong; Ibrahimi, Omar A; Metzger, Daniel L; Hayes, Frances J; Dwyer, Andrew A; Hughes, Virginia A; Yialamas, Maria; Hall, Janet E; Grant, Ellen; Mohammadi, Moosa; Crowley, William F

    2006-04-18

    Mutations in KAL1 and FGFR1 cause Kallmann syndrome (KS), whereas mutations in the GNRHR and GPR54 genes cause idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism with normal olfaction (nIHH). Mixed pedigrees containing both KS and nIHH have also been described; however, the genetic cause of these rare cases is unknown. We examined the FGFR1 gene in seven nIHH subjects who either belonged to a mixed pedigree (n = 5) or who had associated midline defects (n = 2). Heterozygous FGFR1 mutations were found in three of seven unrelated nIHH probands with normal MRI of the olfactory system: (i) G237S in an nIHH female and a KS brother; (ii) (P722H and N724K) in an nIHH male missing two teeth and his mother with isolated hyposmia; and (iii) Q680X in a nIHH male with cleft lip/palate and missing teeth, his brother with nIHH, and his father with delayed puberty. We show that these mutations lead to receptor loss-of-function. The Q680X leads to an inactive FGFR1, which lacks a major portion of the tyrosine kinase domain (TKD). The G237S mutation inhibits proper folding of D2 of the FGFR1 and likely leads to the loss of cell-surface expression of FGFR1. In contrast, the (P722H and N724K) double mutation causes structural perturbations in TKD, reducing the catalytic activity of TKD. We conclude that loss-of-function mutations in FGFR1 cause nIHH with normal MRI of the olfactory system. These mutations also account for some of the mixed pedigrees, thus challenging the current idea that KS and nIHH are distinct entities.

  20. Fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) variants and craniofacial variation in Amerindians and related populations.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Valdés, Jorge A; Hünemeier, Tábita; Contini, Verônica; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Macin, Gastón; Ballesteros-Romero, Mónica; Corral, Pau; Ruiz-Linares, Andres; Sánchez-Mejorada, Gabriela; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Martínez-Abadías, Neus; Salzano, Francisco M; González-José, Rolando; Bortolini, Maria Cátira

    2013-01-01

    The polymorphic site rs4647905 of the FGFR1 gene was previously associated with a decrease in cephalic index (CI). Here, we evaluate the relationships between genotypes and cephalometric measurements and indices in one Mexican Native and two mestizo Mexican populations using two haplotype-tag SNPs (rs4647905 and rs3213849) that represent >85% of the FGFR1 variability, plus three other SNPs (rs2293971, rs2304000, and rs930828) situated nearby. In addition, we genotyped five South American natives, two European, one African, and one Siberian populations to evaluate their intra and intercontinental population diversity. The five SNPs were tested and the craniofacial measurements and indices were collected using standardized procedures. Principal Component Analysis was used to verify individual/population comparisons. Associations were performed through the generalized linear model (GLM), coefficient of determination R(2) and linear regression tests. We found a tendency for a decrease in CI in individuals homozygous for allele rs4647905C, regardless of the population to which they belong, though the effect is more pronounced in mestizo. When the GLM analyses were performed using the absolute/linear cephalometric measurements, a statistically significant association was found between four SNPs and head length in the mestizo population. FGFR1 polymorphisms, especially rs4647905, can have an important role in the normal human skull variation, primarily due to their influence in head length, which would affect other cephalometric absolute/linear measures as well as indices like CI as a result of the pervasive nature of the morphological integration that characterizes the human skull. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Generation and characterization of small single domain antibodies inhibiting human tumor necrosis factor receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Steeland, Sophie; Puimège, Leen; Vandenbroucke, Roosmarijn E; Van Hauwermeiren, Filip; Haustraete, Jurgen; Devoogdt, Nick; Hulpiau, Paco; Leroux-Roels, Geert; Laukens, Debby; Meuleman, Philip; De Vos, Martine; Libert, Claude

    2015-02-13

    The cytokine TNF is a well known drug target for several inflammatory diseases such as Crohn disease. Despite the great success of TNF blockers, therapy could be improved because of high costs and side effects. Selective inhibition of TNF receptor (TNFR) 1 signaling holds the potential to greatly reduce the pro-inflammatory activity of TNF, thereby preserving the advantageous immunomodulatory signals mediated by TNFR2. We generated a selective human TNFR1 inhibitor based on Nanobody (Nb) technology. Two anti-human TNFR1 Nbs were linked with an anti-albumin Nb to generate Nb Alb-70-96 named "TNF Receptor-One Silencer" (TROS). TROS selectively binds and inhibits TNF/TNFR1 and lymphotoxin-α/TNFR1 signaling with good affinity and IC50 values, both of which are in the nanomolar range. Surface plasmon resonance analysis reveals that TROS competes with TNF for binding to human TNFR1. In HEK293T cells, TROS strongly reduces TNF-induced gene expression, like IL8 and TNF, in a dose-dependent manner; and in ex vivo cultured colon biopsies of CD patients, TROS inhibits inflammation. Finally, in liver chimeric humanized mice, TROS antagonizes inflammation in a model of acute TNF-induced liver inflammation, reflected in reduced human IL8 expression in liver and reduced IL6 levels in serum. These results demonstrate the considerable potential of TROS and justify the evaluation of TROS in relevant disease animal models of both acute and chronic inflammation and eventually in patients.

  2. Investigation on the Regional Loss Factor and Its Anisotropy for Aortic Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Shahmansouri, Nastaran; Alreshidan, Mohammed; Emmott, Alexander; Lachapelle, Kevin; El-Hamamsy, Ismaïl; Cartier, Raymond; Leask, Richard L; Mongrain, Rosaire

    2016-10-26

    An aortic aneurysm is a lethal arterial disease that mainly occurs in the thoracic and abdominal regions of the aorta. Thoracic aortic aneurysms are prevalent in the root/ascending parts of the aorta and can lead to aortic rupture resulting in the sudden death of patients. Understanding the biomechanical and histopathological changes associated with ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms (ATAAs), this study investigates the mechanical properties of the aorta during strip-biaxial tensile cycles. The loss factor-defined as the ratio of dissipated energy to the energy absorbed during a tensile cycle-the incremental modulus, and their anisotropy indexes were compared with the media fiber compositions for aneurysmal (n = 26) and control (n = 4) human ascending aortas. The aneurysmal aortas were categorized into the aortas with bicuspid aortic valves (BAV) and tricuspid aortic valves (TAV). The strip-biaxial loss factor correlates well with the diameter of the aortas with BAV and TAV (for the axial direction, respectively, R² = 0.71, p = 0.0022 and R² = 0.54, p = 0.0096). The loss factor increases significantly with patients' age in the BAV group (for the axial direction: R² = 0.45, p = 0.0164). The loss factor is isotropic for all TAV quadrants, whereas it is on average only isotropic in the anterior and outer curvature regions of the BAV group. The results suggest that loss factor may be a useful surrogate measure to describe the histopathology of aneurysmal tissue and to demonstrate the differences between ATAAs with the BAV and TAV.

  3. Five-year experience with orthodontic miniscrew implants: a retrospective investigation of factors influencing success rates.

    PubMed

    Antoszewska, Joanna; Papadopoulos, Moschos A; Park, Hyo-Sang; Ludwig, Björn

    2009-08-01

    Anchorage control is important for efficient orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances. Successful osseointegration encouraged many orthodontists to use dental implants as stationary anchorage units for force application. However, their use has some drawbacks, which led to the development of miniscrew implants (MIs). Our aim was to investigate factors significantly contributing to the success rates of MIs in various orthodontic treatment procedures in white patients. In total, 350 self-tapping (187 Abso Anchor [Dentos, Daegu, South Korea] and 163 Ortho Easy Pin [Forestadent, Pforzheim, Germany]) MIs used to reinforce orthodontic anchorage and placed in 130 consecutively chosen patients were assessed retrospectively. Clinical variables possibly influencing the success rates of MIs were categorized into patient-related, implant-related, location-related, and orthodontic-related. Statistical evaluation included descriptive statistics and survival analysis. The survival curves of the MIs with respect to the various factors were estimated and plotted by using the Kaplan-Meier product-limit estimate. The MI survival distributions for each factor were compared with the log rank test for simple comparisons or the Cox regression for multiple variables. The overall success rates of MIs that remained stable during a mean treatment time of 19.2 +/- 2.3 months was 93.43%; this was considerably higher than in previous reports. Only a few factors were found to be associated with statistically significant higher success rates of MIs, including deep bites, placement in the attached gingiva of the maxilla, and en-masse distalization of teeth. The success rates of MIs in white patients were greater than the corresponding rates reported for Asian patients. Our results confirm the effectiveness of orthodontic MIs as temporary anchorage reinforcement devices and suggest various clinical factors as potential causes of failure.

  4. TNF receptor 1 signaling is critically involved in mediating angiotensin-II-induced cardiac fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Duerrschmid, Clemens; Crawford, Jeffrey R; Reineke, Erin; Taffet, George E; Trial, Joann; Entman, Mark L; Haudek, Sandra B

    2013-04-01

    Angiotensin-II (Ang-II) is associated with many conditions involving heart failure and pathologic hypertrophy. Ang-II induces the synthesis of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 that mediates the uptake of CD34(+)CD45(+) monocytic cells into the heart. These precursor cells differentiate into collagen-producing fibroblasts and are responsible for the Ang-II-induced development of non-adaptive cardiac fibrosis. In this study, we demonstrate that in vitro, using a human monocyte-to-fibroblast differentiation model, Ang-II required the presence of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) to induce fibroblast maturation from monocytes. In vivo, mice deficient in both TNF receptors did not develop cardiac fibrosis in response to 1week Ang-II infusion. We then subjected mice deficient in either TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1-KO) or TNF receptor 2 (TNFR2-KO) to continuous Ang-II infusion. Compared to wild-type, in TNFR1-KO, but not in TNFR2-KO hearts, collagen deposition was greatly attenuated, and markedly fewer CD34(+)CD45(+) cells were present. Quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated a striking reduction of key fibrosis-related, as well as inflammation-related mRNA expression in Ang-II-treated TNFR1-KO hearts. TNFR1-KO animals also developed less cardiac remodeling, cardiac hypertrophy, and hypertension compared to wild-type and TNFR2-KO in response to Ang-II. Our data suggest that TNF induced Ang-II-dependent cardiac fibrosis by signaling through TNFR1, which enhances the generation of monocytic fibroblast precursors in the heart.

  5. MiR-503 inhibits adipogenesis by targeting bone morphogenetic protein receptor 1a

    PubMed Central

    Man, Xiao-Fei; Tan, Shu-Wen; Tang, Hao-Neng; Guo, Yue; Tang, Chen-Yi; Tang, Jun; Zhou, Ci-La; Zhou, Hou-De

    2016-01-01

    Adipogenesis plays a key role in the regulation of whole-body energy homeostasis and is critically related to obesity. To overcome obesity and its associated disorders, it is necessary to elucidate the molecular mechanisms involved in adipogenesis. An adipogenesis-related miRNA array analysis demonstrated that miR-503 was differentially expressed before and after adipocyte differentiation; however, the exact role of miR-503 in adipocyte differentiation is unclear. Thus, the objective of this study was to further examine miR-503 in adipocyte differentiation. We found significantly decreased expression of miR-503 during adipocyte differentiation process. Using bioinformatic analysis, miR-503 was identified as a potential regulator of Bone Morphogenetic Protein Receptor 1a (BMPR1a). We then validated BMPR1a as the target of miR-503 using a dual luciferase assay, and found decreased miR-503 and increased BMPR1a expression during adipogenesis. Overexpression of miR-503 in preadipocytes repressed expression of BMPR1a and adipogenic-related factors such as CCAAT/enhancer binding protein a (C/EBPα), proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARγ), and adipocyte protein 2 (AP2). In addition, miR-503 overexpression impaired the phosphoinositol-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway. Inhibition of miR-503 had the opposite effect. Additionally, BMPR1a interference by siRNA attenuated adipocyte differentiation and the accumulation of lipid droplets via downregulating the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Our study provides the first evidence of the role miR-503 plays in adipocyte differentiation by regulating BMPR1a via the PI3K/Akt pathway, which may become a novel target for obesity therapy. PMID:27398155

  6. Staphylococcal protein Ecb impairs complement receptor-1 mediated recognition of opsonized bacteria.

    PubMed

    Amdahl, Hanne; Haapasalo, Karita; Tan, Lydia; Meri, Taru; Kuusela, Pentti I; van Strijp, Jos A; Rooijakkers, Suzan; Jokiranta, T Sakari

    2017-01-01

    Staphyloccus aureus is a major human pathogen leading frequently to sepsis and soft tissue infections with abscesses. Multiple virulence factors including several immune modulating molecules contribute to its survival in the host. When S. aureus invades the human body, one of the first line defenses is the complement system, which opsonizes the bacteria with C3b and attract neutrophils by release of chemotactic peptides. Neutrophils express Complement receptor-1 [CR1, CD35) that interacts with the C3b-opsonized particles and thereby plays an important role in pathogen recognition by phagocytic cells. In this study we observed that a fraction of S. aureus culture supernatant prevented binding of C3b to neutrophils. This fraction consisted of S. aureus leukocidins and Efb. The C-terminus of Efb is known to bind C3b and shares significant sequence homology to the extracellular complement binding protein [Ecb). Here we show that S. aureus Ecb displays various mechanisms to block bacterial recognition by neutrophils. The presence of Ecb blocked direct interaction between soluble CR1 and C3b and reduced the cofactor activity of CR1 in proteolytic inactivation of C3b. Furthermore, Ecb could dose-dependently prevent recognition of C3b by cell-bound CR1 that lead to impaired phagocytosis of NHS-opsonized S. aureus. Phagocytosis was furthermore reduced in the presence of soluble CR1 [sCR1). These data indicate that the staphylococcal protein Ecb prevents recognition of C3b opsonized bacteria by neutrophil CR1 leading to impaired killing by phagocytosis and thereby contribute to immune evasion of S. aureus.

  7. Staphylococcal protein Ecb impairs complement receptor-1 mediated recognition of opsonized bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Amdahl, Hanne; Tan, Lydia; Meri, Taru; Kuusela, Pentti I.; van Strijp, Jos A.

    2017-01-01

    Staphyloccus aureus is a major human pathogen leading frequently to sepsis and soft tissue infections with abscesses. Multiple virulence factors including several immune modulating molecules contribute to its survival in the host. When S. aureus invades the human body, one of the first line defenses is the complement system, which opsonizes the bacteria with C3b and attract neutrophils by release of chemotactic peptides. Neutrophils express Complement receptor-1 [CR1, CD35) that interacts with the C3b-opsonized particles and thereby plays an important role in pathogen recognition by phagocytic cells. In this study we observed that a fraction of S. aureus culture supernatant prevented binding of C3b to neutrophils. This fraction consisted of S. aureus leukocidins and Efb. The C-terminus of Efb is known to bind C3b and shares significant sequence homology to the extracellular complement binding protein [Ecb). Here we show that S. aureus Ecb displays various mechanisms to block bacterial recognition by neutrophils. The presence of Ecb blocked direct interaction between soluble CR1 and C3b and reduced the cofactor activity of CR1 in proteolytic inactivation of C3b. Furthermore, Ecb could dose-dependently prevent recognition of C3b by cell-bound CR1 that lead to impaired phagocytosis of NHS-opsonized S. aureus. Phagocytosis was furthermore reduced in the presence of soluble CR1 [sCR1). These data indicate that the staphylococcal protein Ecb prevents recognition of C3b opsonized bacteria by neutrophil CR1 leading to impaired killing by phagocytosis and thereby contribute to immune evasion of S. aureus. PMID:28273167

  8. Disruption of PTH Receptor 1 in T Cells Protects against PTH-Induced Bone Loss

    PubMed Central

    Tawfeek, Hesham; Bedi, Brahmchetna; Li, Jau-Yi; Adams, Jonathan; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Weitzmann, M. Neale; Kronenberg, Henry M.; Pacifici, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Background Hyperparathyroidism in humans and continuous parathyroid hormone (cPTH) treatment in mice cause bone loss by regulating the production of RANKL and OPG by stromal cells (SCs) and osteoblasts (OBs). Recently, it has been reported that T cells are required for cPTH to induce bone loss as the binding of the T cell costimulatory molecule CD40L to SC receptor CD40 augments SC sensitivity to cPTH. However it is unknown whether direct PTH stimulation of T cells is required for cPTH to induce bone loss, and whether T cells contribute to the bone catabolic activity of PTH with mechanisms other than induction of CD40 signaling in SCs. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we show that silencing of PTH receptor 1 (PPR) in T cells blocks the bone loss and the osteoclastic expansion induced by cPTH, thus demonstrating that PPR signaling in T cells is central for PTH-induced reduction of bone mass. Mechanistic studies revealed that PTH activation of the T cell PPR stimulates T cell production of the osteoclastogenic cytokine tumor necrosis factor α (TNF). Attesting to the relevance of this effect, disruption of T cell TNF production prevents PTH-induced bone loss. We also show that a novel mechanism by which TNF mediates PTH induced osteoclast formation is upregulation of CD40 expression in SCs, which increases their RANKL/OPG production ratio. Conclusions/Significance These findings demonstrate that PPR signaling in T cells plays an essential role in PTH induced bone loss by promoting T cell production of TNF. A previously unknown effect of TNF is to increase SC expression of CD40, which in turn increases SC osteoclastogenic activity by upregulating their RANKL/OPG production ratio. PPR-dependent stimulation of TNF production by T cells and the resulting TNF regulation of CD40 signaling in SCs are potential new therapeutic targets for the bone loss of hyperparathyroidism. PMID:20808842

  9. Binding between a Distal C-Terminus Fragment of Cannabinoid Receptor 1 and Arrestin-2

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shubhadra; Bakshi, Kunal; Mercier, Richard W.; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Pavlopoulos, Spiro

    2011-01-01

    Internalization of G-protein coupled receptors is mediated by phosphorylation of the C-terminus, followed by binding with the cytosolic protein arrestin. To explore structural factors that may play a role in internalization of cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1), we utilize a phosphorylated peptide derived from the distal C-terminus of CB1 (CB15P454-473). Complexes formed between the peptide and human arrestin-2 (wt-arr21-418) were compared to those formed with a truncated arrestin-2 mutant (tr-arr21-382) using isothermal titration calorimetry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The penta-phosphopeptide CB15P454-473 adopts a helix-loop conformation, whether binding to full-length arrestin-2 or its truncated mutant. This structure is similar to that of a hepta-phosphopeptide, mimicking the distal segment of the rhodopsin C-tail (Rh7P330-348), binding to visual arrestin, suggesting that this adopted structure bears functional significance. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) experiments show that the CB15P454-473 peptide binds to tr-arr21-382 with higher affinity than to the full-length wt-arr21-418. As the observed structure of the bound peptides is similar in either case, we attribute the increased affinity to a more exposed binding site on the N-domain of the truncated arrestin construct. The transferred nOe data from the bound phosphopeptides are used to predict a model describing the interaction with arrestin, using the data driven HADDOCK docking program. The truncation of arrestin-2 provides scope for positively charged residues in the polar core of the protein to interact with phosphates present in the loop of the CB15P454-473 peptide. PMID:21306178

  10. CONTRIBUTION OF PROTEASE-ACTIVATED RECEPTOR 1 IN STATUS EPILEPTICUS-INDUCED EPILEPTOGENESIS

    PubMed Central

    Isaev, D.; Lushnikova, I.; Lunko, O.; Zapukhliak, O.; Maximyuk, O.; Romanov, A.; Skibo, G.G.; Tian, C.; Holmes, G.L.; Isaeva, E.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical observations and studies on different animal models of acquired epilepsy consistently demonstrate that blood-brain barrier (BBB) leakage can be an important risk factor for developing recurrent seizures. However, the involved signaling pathways remain largely unclear. Given the important role of thrombin and its major receptor in the brain, protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1), in the pathophysiology of neurological injury, we hypothesized that PAR1 may contribute to status epilepticus (SE)-induced epileptogenesis and that its inhibition shortly after SE will have neuroprotective and antiepileptogenic effects. Adult rats subjected to lithium-pilocarpine SE were administrated SCH79797 (a PAR1 selective antagonist) after SE termination. Thrombin and PAR1 levels and neuronal cell survival were evaluated 48 hr following SE. The effect of PAR1 inhibition on animal survival, interictal spikes (IIS) and electrographic seizures during the first two weeks after SE and behavioral seizures during the chronic period were evaluated. SE resulted in a high mortality rate and incidence of IIS and seizures in the surviving animals. There was a marked increase in thrombin, decrease in PAR1 immunoreactivity and hippocampal cell loss in the SE-treated rats. Inhibition of PAR1 following SE resulted in a decrease in mortality and morbidity, increase in neuronal cell survival in the hippocampus and suppression of IIS, electrographic and behavioral seizures following SE. These data suggest that the PAR1 signaling pathway contributes to epileptogenesis following SE. Because breakdown of the BBB occurs frequently in brain injuries, PAR1 inhibition may have beneficial effects in a variety of acquired injuries leading to epilepsy. PMID:25843668

  11. Neurochemical characterization of neurons expressing melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 in the mouse hypothalamus1

    PubMed Central

    Chee, Melissa J. S.; Pissios, Pavlos; Maratos-Flier, Eleftheria

    2013-01-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is a hypothalamic neuropeptide that acts via MCH receptor 1 (MCHR1) in the mouse. It promotes positive energy balance thus mice lacking MCH or MCHR1 are lean, hyperactive, and resistant to diet-induced obesity. Identifying the cellular targets of MCH is an important step to understanding the mechanisms underlying MCH actions. We generated the Mchr1-cre mouse that expressed cre recombinase driven by the MCHR1 promoter and crossed it with a tdTomato reporter mouse. The resulting Mchr1-cre/tdTomato progeny expressed easily detectable tdTomato fluorescence in MCHR1 neurons, which were found throughout the olfactory system, striatum, and hypothalamus. To chemically identify MCH-targeted cell populations that play a role in energy balance, MCHR1 hypothalamic neurons were characterized by colabeling select hypothalamic neuropeptides with tdTomato fluorescence. TdTomato fluorescence colocalized with dynorphin, oxytocin, vasopressin, enkephalin, thyrothropin-releasing hormone, and corticotropin-releasing factor immunoreactive cells in the paraventricular nucleus. In the lateral hypothalamus, neurotensin but neither orexin nor MCH neurons expressed tdTomato. In the arcuate nucleus, both Neuropeptide Y and proopiomelanocortin cells expressed tdTomato. We further demonstrated that some of these arcuate neurons were also targets of leptin action. Interestingly, MCHR1 was expressed in the vast majority of leptin-sensitive proopiomelanocortin neurons, highlighting their importance for the orexigenic actions of MCH. Taken together, this study supports the use of the Mchr1-cre mouse for outlining the neuroanatomical distribution and neurochemical phenotype of MCHR1 neurons. PMID:23605441

  12. Administration of orexin receptor 1 antagonist into the rostral ventromedial medulla increased swim stress-induced antinociception in rat

    PubMed Central

    Soliemani, Neda; Moslem, Alireza; Shamsizadeh, Ali; Azhdari-Zarmehri, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Intracerebroventricular injection of orexin-A (hypocretin-1) antagonist has been shown to inhibit stress-induced analgesia. However the locations of central sites that may mediate these effects have not been totally demonstrated. This study was performed to investigate the role of rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) orexin receptor 1 in stress-induced analgesia (SIA). Materials and Methods: Forced swim stress in water was employed to adult male rats (200-250 g). Nociceptive responses were measured by formalin test (50 µl injection of formalin 2% subcutaneously into hind paw) and, pain related behaviors were monitored for 90 min following intra-microinjection of SB-334867 (orexin receptor 1 antagonist) into RVM. Results: Exposure to swimming stress test after administration of SB-334867 into RVM significantly reduces the formalin-induced nociceptive behaviors in phase1, interphase, and phase 2 in rats. Conclusion: The result demonstrated the involvement of OXR1 in antinociceptive behaviors induced by swim stress in RVM. PMID:27403261

  13. Investigation of Key Factors for Accident Severity at Railroad Grade Crossings by Using a Logit Model

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shou-Ren; Li, Chin-Shang; Lee, Chi-Kang

    2009-01-01

    Although several studies have used logit or probit models and their variants to fit data of accident severity on roadway segments, few have investigated accident severity at a railroad grade crossing (RGC). Compared to accident risk analysis in terms of accident frequency and severity of a highway system, investigation of the factors contributing to traffic accidents at an RGC may be more complicated because of additional highway–railway interactions. Because the proportional odds assumption was violated while fitting cumulative logit modeled by the proportional odds models with stepwise variable selection to ordinal accident severity data collected at 592 RGCs in Taiwan, as suggested by Strokes et al. (2000, p. 249) a generalized logit model with stepwise variable selection was used instead to identify explanatory variables (factors or covariates) that were significantly associated with the severity of collisions. Hence, the fitted model was used to predict the level of accident severity, given a set of values in the explanatory variables. Number of daily trains, highway separation, number of daily trucks, obstacle detection device, and approaching crossing markings significantly affected levels of accident severity at an RGC (p-value = 0.0009, 0.0008, 0.0112, 0.0017, and 0.0003, respectively). Finally, marginal effect analysis on the number of daily trains and law enforcement camera was conducted to evaluate the effect of the number of daily trains and presence of a law enforcement camera on the potential accident severity. PMID:20161414

  14. Bidirectional associations between family factors and Internet addiction among adolescents in a prospective investigation.

    PubMed

    Ko, Chih-Hung; Wang, Peng-Wei; Liu, Tai-Ling; Yen, Cheng-Fang; Chen, Cheng-Sheng; Yen, Ju-Yu

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the effect of family factors on the occurrence of Internet addiction and determining whether Internet addiction could make any difference in the family function. A total of 2293 adolescents in grade 7 participated in the study. We assessed their Internet addiction, family function, and family factors with a 1-year follow up. In the prospective investigation, inter-parental conflict predicted the incidence of Internet addiction 1 year later in forward regression analysis, followed by not living with mother and allowance to use Internet more than 2 h per day by parents or caregiver. The inter-parental conflict and allowance to use Internet more than 2 h per day also predicted the incidence in girls. Not cared for by parents and family APGAR score predicted the incidence of Internet addiction among boys. The prospective investigation demonstrated that the incidence group had more decreased scores on family APGAR than did the non-addiction group in the 1-year follow-up. This effect was significant only among girls. Inter-parental conflict and inadequate regulation of unessential Internet use predicted risk of Internet addiction, particularly among adolescent girls. Family intervention to prevent inter-parental conflict and promote family function and Internet regulation were necessary to prevent Internet addiction. Among adolescents with Internet addiction, it is necessary to pay attention to deterioration of family function, particularly among girls. © 2014 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2014 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  15. Investigating factors influencing construction waste management efforts in developing countries: an experience from Thailand.

    PubMed

    Manowong, Ektewan

    2012-01-01

    Rapid economic growth and urbanization in developing countries lead to extensive construction activities that generate a large amount of waste. A challenge is how to manage construction waste in the most sustainable way. In the developing world, research on construction waste management is scarce and such academic knowledge needs to be responsive to actual practices in the industry in order to be implemented. As construction projects involve a number of participants and stakeholders, their participation and commitment can have a major influence on the goals of green and sustainable construction for urban development. This study provides a significant step in conducting a very first research of this kind in Thailand by aiming to investigate the level of construction stakeholders' commitment as well as the achievement of construction waste management in order to improve short-term practices and to establish a long-term strategic construction waste management plan. In this study, a structural equation model was employed to investigate the influence of factors that are related to environmental aspects, social aspects, and economic aspect of construction waste management. Concern about health and safety was found to be the most significant and dominant influence on the achievement of sustainable construction waste management. Other factors affecting the successful management of construction waste in Thai construction projects were also identified. It is perceived that this study has potential to contribute useful guidelines for practitioners both in Thailand and other developing countries with similar contexts.

  16. Investigation of the influence factors of polyethylene molecule encapsulated into carbon nanotubes by molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qun; He, Guofang; Zhao, Rengao; Li, Yanfei

    2011-09-01

    In this work, the influence factors, namely chirality, temperature, radius and surface chemical modification, of the interaction energy for polyethylene (PE) molecule encapsulated into single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) had been investigated by molecular mechanics (MM) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The results showed that all these factors would influence the interaction energy between PE and SWNTs. The interaction energy between PE molecule and the armchair SWNTs is largest among eight kinds of chiral SWNTs. The interaction energy decreases with the increase of temperature or the SWNT radius. The methyl, phenyl, hydroxyl, carboxyl, -F, and amino groups, have been introduced onto the surface of the SWNTs by the simulation software and the influence of SWNT chemical modification has also been investigated. The interaction energy between PE and chemically modified SWNTs is larger than that between PE and pristine SWNTs, and increases with increasing the concentration of the modified groups monotonously. In addition, the group electronegativity and van der Waals force will affect the interaction energy between PE and chemically modified SWNTs greatly, which can be attributed to the electronic structures of the chemically modified groups. This study can provide some useful suggestions for the composite material design and drug transport.

  17. Lectin-like, oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1-deficient mice show resistance to age-related knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Kazuhiko; Oda, Yutaka; Nakamura, Fumihisa; Kakinoki, Ryosuke; Akagi, Masao

    2017-01-01

    The lectin-like, oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) receptor-1 (LOX-1)/ox-LDL system contributes to atherosclerosis and may be involved in cartilage degeneration. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the LOX-1/ox-LDL system contributes to age-related osteoarthritis (OA) in vivo, using LOX-1 knockout (LOX-1 KO) mice. Knee cartilage from 6, 12, and 18-month old (n = 10/group) C57Bl/6 wild-type (WT) and LOX-1 KO mice was evaluated by determining the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) score of Safranin-O stained samples. The prevalence of knee OA in both mouse strains was also investigated. Expression levels of LOX-1, ox-LDL, runt-related transcription factor-2 (Runx2), type-X collagen (COL X), and matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) in the articular chondrocytes were analyzed immunohistologically. No significant difference was observed in the mean scores of WT (2.00±0.61) and LOX-1 KO mice (2.00±0.49) at 6 months of age (P=1.00, n=10). At 12 and 18 months of age, the mean scores of LOX-1 KO mice (3.75±0.93 and 5.50±0.78) were significantly lower than those of WT mice (5.25±1.14 and 9.00±1.01; P<0.001 in both cases; n=10). The prevalence of OA in LOX-1 KO mice was lower than that in WT mice at 12 and 18 months of age (40 vs 70%, 70 vs 90%, respectively; n=10). The expression levels of Runx2, COL X, and MMP-13 in articular chondrocytes significantly decreased in LOX-1 KO, mice compared with those in WT mice. The study indicated that the LOX-1/ox-LDL system in chondrocytes plays a role in the pathogenesis of age-related knee OA, which is potentially a target for preventing OA progression. PMID:28348422

  18. A 3'-UTR polymorphism in the oxidized LDL receptor 1 gene increases Abeta40 load as cerebral amyloid angiopathy in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jing; Tian, Jinzhou; Pritchard, Antonia; Lendon, Corinne; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Iwatsubo, Takeshi; Mann, David M A

    2006-01-01

    It is presently unclear whether polymorphic variations in the oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 (OLR1), or low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1), genes act as risk factors for Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the present study, we have investigated the extent of amyloid beta protein (Abeta) deposition as cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) or senile plaques (SP) in relationship to OLR1 +1071 and +1073 polymorphisms and LRP1 C766T polymorphism in patients with AD There was an increased Abeta40 load as CAA, but not as SP, in frontal cortex of AD patients carrying OLR1+1073 CC genotype, compared to those with CT, TT or CT+TT genotypes, but only in those individuals without apolipoprotein (APOE) epsilon4 allele. No differences in total Abeta or Abeta42 load as CAA or SP between OLR1+1073 genotypes was seen, nor were there any differences between OLR1+1071 and LRP1 genotypes for any measure of Abeta. Present data suggests that homozygosity for the C allele for OLR1+1073 polymorphism, selectively in individuals without APOE epsilon4 allele, may impair clearance of Abeta, and particularly Abeta40, from the brain across the blood-brain barrier, leading to its 'diversion' into perivascular drainage channels, thereby increasing the severity of CAA in such persons.

  19. Numerical investigation of the enhancement factor of Raman scattering using plasmonic properties of gold nanorhomb arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrvar, L.; Dizaji, Z. V.; Tavassoli, S. H.

    2017-03-01

    Plasmonic nanostructures with sharp tips like nanorhomb array provide strong electric field enhancement and consequently meaningful Raman signal enhancement. In this study, the near-field electromagnetic enhancement of the gold nanorhomb array formed by a new proposed approach has been investigated using the finite element method (FEM). Feasibility and ease of fabrication, which are very important in practical applications, are intended in this approach. This nanorhomb array is achieved by arranging holes tangentially together in a square lattice. In other words, nanorhombs are formed by transition from nanohole to nanoparticle array. Optimization of this structure for a surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) substrate is performed by sweeping through the geometric parameters. The most privileged nanorhomb array substrate with highest hot spot density and EM field enhancement is obtained by calculating the enhancement factor (EF) and normalized EF (EFN) for Raman lines of pyridine. Our simulations indicate that the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) mode of such nanorhomb array leads to high electromagnetic enhancement factor (EMEF) and average surface integral of field enhancement factor (\\overlineEF), which are hundreds of times greater than the nanohole arrays. It is found that this LSPR mode is thickness-dependent besides being periodicity-dependent. Finally, accurate EF is calculated by considering local incident field enhancement in terms of the excitation process and local density of states (LDOS) enhancements on emission process and then the best structure with highest EF is obtained.

  20. Investigating the Underlying Factors of Corruption in the Public Construction Sector: Evidence from China.

    PubMed

    Shan, Ming; Le, Yun; Yiu, Kenneth T W; Chan, Albert P C; Hu, Yi

    2016-12-30

    Over recent years, the issue of corruption in the public construction sector has attracted increasing attention from both practitioners and researchers worldwide. However, limited efforts are available for investigating the underlying factors of corruption in this sector. Thus, this study attempted to bridge this knowledge gap by exploring the underlying factors of corruption in the public construction sector of China. To achieve this goal, a total of 14 structured interviews were first carried out, and a questionnaire survey was then administered to 188 professionals in China. Two iterations of multivariate analysis approaches, namely, stepwise multiple regression analysis and partial least squares structural equation modeling were successively utilized to analyze the collected data. In addition, a case study was also conducted to triangulate the findings obtained from the statistical analysis. The results generated from these three research methods achieve the same conclusion: the most influential underlying factor leading to corruption was immorality, followed by opacity, unfairness, procedural violation, and contractual violation. This study has contributed to the body of knowledge by exploring the properties of corruption in the public construction sector. The findings from this study are also valuable to the construction authorities as they can assist in developing more effective anti-corruption strategies.

  1. Investigation of Roadway Geometric and Traffic Flow Factors for Vehicle Crashes Using Spatiotemporal Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, G.; Sakrani, T.; Cheng, W.; Zhou, J.

    2017-09-01

    Traffic safety is a major concern in the transportation industry due to immense monetary and emotional burden caused by crashes of various severity levels, especially the injury and fatality ones. To reduce such crashes on all public roads, the safety management processes are commonly implemented which include network screening, problem diagnosis, countermeasure identification, and project prioritization. The selection of countermeasures for potential mitigation of crashes is governed by the influential factors which impact roadway crashes. Crash prediction model is the tool widely adopted by safety practitioners or researchers to link various influential factors to crash occurrences. Many different approaches have been used in the past studies to develop better fitting models which also exhibit prediction accuracy. In this study, a crash prediction model is developed to investigate the vehicular crashes occurring at roadway segments. The spatial and temporal nature of crash data is exploited to form a spatiotemporal model which accounts for the different types of heterogeneities among crash data and geometric or traffic flow variables. This study utilizes the Poisson lognormal model with random effects, which can accommodate the yearly variations in explanatory variables and the spatial correlations among segments. The dependency of different factors linked with roadway geometric, traffic flow, and road surface type on vehicular crashes occurring at segments was established as the width of lanes, posted speed limit, nature of pavement, and AADT were found to be correlated with vehicle crashes.

  2. Investigation of factors associated with health-related quality of life and psychological distress in vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Bonotis, Konstantinos; Pantelis, Konstantinos; Karaoulanis, Sokratis; Katsimaglis, Chrysanthos; Papaliaga, Maria; Zafiriou, Efterpi; Tsogas, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    Skin diseases distort the body image with possible negative effects on the quality of life and psychosocial health of patients. While vitiligo does not affect the physical well-being, it may be psychologically distressing. The present study was based on the hypothesis that particular factors might be critical regarding the adjustment to the disease. We investigated the vitiligo-related quality of life and psychological distress of 216 patients diagnosed with the disease in relation to demographic factors, disease components, and personality traits. For this purpose, we administered the self-completed questionnaires Dermatological Quality of Life Index, General Health Questionnaire, Eysenck Personality Inventory, and Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. Statistical analysis revealed a significant positive correlation between patients' distress and health-related quality of life. Moreover, the impact of vitiligo on the quality of life was significantly associated with disease variables as well as personality traits and gender. On the other hand, psychological distress was significantly associated with personality traits and gender, but not with disease components. Our results indicate that the psychosocial adjustment to the disease is mainly influenced by subjective factors. This observation could imply the need for targeted support interventions in the treatment of vitiligo. © 2015 Deutsche Dermatologische Gesellschaft (DDG). Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. [Investigation of psychological state and its influencing factors in children with epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jin-Hua; Zhou, Hui; Xu, Ming; Lu, Sheng-Li; Hong, Fei

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the psychological state of children with epilepsy and analyze its influencing factors. The Mental Health Scale for Child and Adolescent was used to survey 113 children with epilepsy and 114 normal children to evaluate and compare their psychological state. Questionnaires were used to investigate the general status of all subjects and the disease condition and treatment of children with epilepsy. The possible influencing factors for the psychological state of children with epilepsy were analyzed. The mental health status of children with epilepsy was poorer than that of normal children in cognition, thinking, emotion, will-behavior, and personality traits (P<0.05). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that family education, family relations, seizure frequency, seizure duration, EEG epileptiform discharges in the last six months, and number of types of antiepileptic drugs were correlated with the psychological state of children with epilepsy. There is a wider range of psychological health problems in children with epilepsy than in normal children. Poor family living environment, poor seizure control, and use of many antiepileptic drugs are the risk factors affecting the psychological state of children with epilepsy. Improving family living environment, controlling seizures, and monotherapy help to improve the psychological state of children with epilepsy.

  4. Perinatal risk factors in offenders with severe personality disorder: a population-based investigation

    PubMed Central

    Fazel, Seena; Bakiyeva, Liliya; Cnattingius, Sven; Grann, Martin; Hultman, Christina M.; Lichtenstein, Paul; Geddes, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Although perinatal factors are associated with the development of several psychiatric disorders, it is unknown whether these factors are linked with personality disorder. Cases of personality disorder were drawn from a national registry of all forensic psychiatric evaluations (n=150). Two control groups were used: 1. A sample of forensic evaluations without any psychiatric disorder (n=97) allowing for a nested case-control investigation; 2: A population-based sample matched by age and gender with no history of psychiatric hospitalization (n=1498). Prematurity (<37 weeks of completed gestation) was significantly associated with a diagnosis of personality disorder, both in the nested and the population-based case-control comparisons with adjusted odds ratios (OR) for this risk factors ranging from 2 to 4. Asphyxia (adjusted OR=2.4, 95% CI: 1.4-4.1) and complicated delivery (adjusted OR=1.5, 1.0-2.1) were associated with personality disorder in the population-based study, and the former remained significant in multivariate models. Overall, perinatal complications were found to be associated with a later diagnosis of personality disorder in this selected sample. As with other psychiatric disorders where such associations have been demonstrated, changes during the perinatal period may lead to abnormal brain development and function. PMID:23013342

  5. [Epidemiological investigation and correlation factors analysis of voice diseases of 5758 business dealers].

    PubMed

    Lou, Zhengcai; Zhu, Qiaoying; Zong, Huiqin; Fu, Weiqing; Zhang, Jian

    2008-02-01

    To investigate the epidemic features and risk factors of voice diseases of 5758 business dealers. Questionnaire survey was conducted among 5785 business dealers of four markets in Yiwu city by random cluster sampling from March to July, 2006. They were also examined by indirect laryngoscopy. The incidence of voice disease was calculated and the risk factors were evaluated in four markets. The incidence of voice disease was 39.3%, 18.8%, 28.4% and 58.1% in garment market, crafts market, stock market, and vegetable market, respectively. The average incidence was 30.4% in four markets. The difference of incidence among four markets was statistically significant (P < 0.01). The difference of incidence between female and male was statistically significant in any market. Chronic laryngitis and polyp of vocal cord were found to be the major pathological manifestations in men, while Chronic laryngitis and vocal nodules were found to be the major pathological manifestations in women. In addition, laryngeal carcinoma was confirmed in 8 cases. Market noise, pollution, unhealthy habits of business trade and excessive voice were the high risk factors. The female and the business dealers aged from 30 to 50 were the high risk people. Varied relevant measures should be taken to prevent and control voice disease in different subgroups of population. People should be examined thoroughly as soon as they got voice problem. Improvement of market environment and timely intervention may reduce the prevalence rate of voice disease.

  6. Investigating risk factors and possible infectious aetiologies of mummified fetuses on a large piggery in Australia.

    PubMed

    Dron, N; Hernández-Jover, M; Doyle, R E; Holyoake, P K

    2014-12-01

    To investigate risk factors and potential infectious aetiologies of an increased mummification rate (>2%) identified over time on a 1200-sow farrow-to-finish farm in Australia. Association of potential non-infectious risk factors and the mummification rate was investigated using 15 years of breeding herd data (40,940 litters) and logistic regression analysis. Samples from a limited number of mummified fetuses were taken to identify potential infectious aetiologies (porcine parvovirus, Leptospira pomona, porcine circovirus type 2, Bungowannah virus and enterovirus). Logistic regression analysis suggested that the mummification rate was significantly associated with sow breed and parity, year and total born and stillborn piglets per litter. The mummification rate was lower (P < 0.001) in Landrace (3.4%) and Large White (2.6%) sows than in Duroc sows (4.9%). Gilts (2.9%) had a lower (P < 0.001) mummification rate than older sows. The mummification rate increased with total born litter size and decreased with the number of stillborn piglets (P < 0.001). A clustering effect within individual sows was identified, indicating that some sows with mummified fetuses in a litter were more likely to have repeated mummifications in subsequent litters. No infectious agents were identified in the samples taken. Results from this study suggest that the increased mummification rate identified over time on this farm is likely to be a non-infectious multifactorial problem predisposing the occurrence of mummification. Further research is required to better understand the pathophysiology of mummification and the role that different non-infectious factors play in the occurrence of mummified fetuses. © 2014 Australian Veterinary Association.

  7. Association of melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 5' polymorphism with early-onset extreme obesity.

    PubMed

    Bell, Christopher G; Meyre, David; Samson, Chantal; Boyle, Cliona; Lecoeur, Cécile; Tauber, Maïte; Jouret, Béatrice; Jaquet, Delphine; Levy-Marchal, Claire; Charles, Marie Aline; Weill, Jacques; Gibson, Fernando; Mein, Charles A; Froguel, Philippe; Walley, Andrew J

    2005-10-01

    Murine models have been highly effective in identifying the monogenic forms of human obesity discovered to date. Melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 (MCHR1) has been shown to be significant in the downstream orexigenic activity of the leptin-melanocortin pathway by such models. In this study, the human MCHR1 gene was extensively characterized by sequencing 3.5 kb of coding, untranslated and intronic regions plus 1 kb of putative promoter region in 180 morbidly obese adults and 87 morbidly obese children, a total of >2.4 Mb of sequencing. Thirty-nine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were found, seven of which encode an amino acid change. One mutation, R248Q, appeared to cosegregate with the obesity trait in one pedigree but was also found to be a rare polymorphism in control samples. To investigate the possible polygenic role of MCHR1, the six common SNPs (minor allele frequency >5%) found in the sequenced regions were then screened in 557 morbidly obese adults, 552 obese children, and 1,195 nonobese nondiabetic control subjects. The plausible promoter SNP, rs133068, was found to be associated with protection against obesity in obese children only (allele frequency P = 0.006 and genotype frequency P = 0.004). Most significant results were found when using a dominant model (P = 0.001, odds ratio 0.695 [95% CI 0.560-0.863]). However, similar associations were found when both adults and children were analyzed together (P = 0.006, 0.783 [0.658-0.930]), suggesting that severe forms of obesity with early onset may be associated with SNPs in MCHR1.

  8. Targeting formyl peptide receptor 1 of activated macrophages to monitor inflammation of experimental osteoarthritis in rat.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinlin; Chordia, Mahendra D; Du, Xuejun; Graves, John L; Zhang, Yi; Park, Yong-Sang; Guo, Yongfei; Pan, Dongfeng; Cui, Quanjun

    2016-09-01

    Macrophages play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). In this study, the feasibility of a formyl peptide receptor 1 (Fpr1)-targeting peptide probe cFLFLF-PEG-(64) Cu via positron emission tomography (PET) imaging was investigated for detection of macrophage activity during development of OA. Monoiodoacetate (MIA) was intraarticularly injected into the knee joint of Sprague-Dawley rats to induce OA. Five days later, cFLFLF-PEG-(64) Cu (∼7,400 kBq/rat) was injected into the tail vein and microPET/CT imaging was performed to assess the OA inflammation by detecting infiltration of macrophages by Fpr1 expression. In addition, a murine macrophage cell line RAW264.7 and two fluorescent probes cFLFLF-PEG-cyanine 7 (cFLFLF-PEG-Cy7) and cFLFLF-PEG-cyanine 5 (cFLFLF-PEG-Cy5) were used to define the binding specificity of the peptide to macrophages. It was found with the MIA model that the maximal standard uptake values (SUVmax ) for right (MIA treated) and left (control) knees were 17.96 ± 5.45 and 3.00 ± 1.40, respectively. Histological evaluation of cryomicrotome sections showed that Fpr1 expression, cFLFLF-PEG-Cy5 binding, and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activity were elevated in the injured synovial membranes. The in vitro experiments demonstrated that both fluorescent peptide probes could bind specifically to RAW264.7 cells, which was blocked by cFLFLF but not by the scramble peptide. The findings highlighted the use of cFLFLF-PEG-(64) Cu/PET as an effective method potentially applied for detection and treatment evaluation of OA. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1529-1538, 2016. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Activation of protease activated receptor 1 increases the excitability of the dentate granule neurons of hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Protease activated receptor-1 (PAR1) is expressed in multiple cell types in the CNS, with the most prominent expression in glial cells. PAR1 activation enhances excitatory synaptic transmission secondary to the release of glutamate from astrocytes following activation of astrocytically-expressed PAR1. In addition, PAR1 activation exacerbates neuronal damage in multiple in vivo models of brain injury in a manner that is dependent on NMDA receptors. In the hippocampal formation, PAR1 mRNA appears to be expressed by a subset of neurons, including granule cells in the dentate gyrus. In this study we investigate the role of PAR activation in controlling neuronal excitability of dentate granule cells. We confirm that PAR1 protein is expressed in neurons of the dentate cell body layer as well as in astrocytes throughout the dentate. Activation of PAR1 receptors by the selective peptide agonist TFLLR increased the intracellular Ca2+ concentration in a subset of acutely dissociated dentate neurons as well as non-neuronal cells. Bath application of TFLLR in acute hippocampal slices depolarized the dentate gyrus, including the hilar region in wild type but not in the PAR1-/- mice. PAR1 activation increased the frequency of action potential generation in a subset of dentate granule neurons; cells in which PAR1 activation triggered action potentials showed a significant depolarization. The activation of PAR1 by thrombin increased the amplitude of NMDA receptor-mediated component of EPSPs. These data suggest that activation of PAR1 during normal function or pathological conditions, such as during ischemia or hemorrhage, can increase the excitability of dentate granule cells. PMID:21827709

  10. The oxoglutarate receptor 1 (OXGR1) modulates pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy in mice.

    PubMed

    Omede, Ameh; Zi, Min; Prehar, Sukhpal; Maqsood, Arfa; Stafford, Nicholas; Mamas, Mamas; Cartwright, Elizabeth; Oceandy, Delvac

    2016-10-28

    The G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) family of proteins play essential roles in the heart, including in the regulation of cardiac hypertrophy. One member of this family, the oxoglutarate receptor 1 (OXGR1), may have a crucial role in the heart because it acts as a receptor for α-ketoglutarate, a metabolite that is elevated in heart failure patients. OXGR1 is expressed in the heart but its precise function during cardiac pathophysiological process is unknown. Here we used both in vivo and in vitro approaches to investigate the role of OXGR1 in cardiac hypertrophy. Genetic ablation of Oxgr1 in mice (OXGR1(-/-)) resulted in a significant increase in hypertrophy following transverse aortic constriction (TAC). This was accompanied by reduction in contractile function as indicated by cardiac fractional shortening and ejection fraction. Conversely, adenoviral mediated overexpression of OXGR1 in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes significantly reduced phenylephrine-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, a result that was consistent with the in vivo data. Using a combination of yeast two hybrid screening and phospho-antibody array analysis we identified novel interacting partner and downstream signalling pathway that might be regulated by the OXGR1. First, we found that OXGR1 forms a molecular complex with the COP9 signalosome complex subunit 5 (CSN5). Secondly, we observed that the STAT3 signalling pathway was upregulated in OXGR1(-/-) hearts. Since CSN5 interacts with TYK2, a major upstream regulator of STAT3, OXGR1 might regulate the pro-hypertrophic STAT3 pathway via interaction with the CSN5-TYK2 complex. In conclusion, our study has identified OXGR1 as a novel regulator of pathological hypertrophy via the regulation of the STAT3. Identification of molecules that can specifically activate or inhibit this receptor may be very useful in the development of novel therapeutic approach for pathological cardiac hypertrophy. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc

  11. Murine complement receptor 1 is required for germinal center B cell maintenance but not initiation.

    PubMed

    Donius, Luke R; Weis, Janis J; Weis, John H

    2014-06-01

    Germinal centers are the anatomic sites for the generation of high affinity immunoglobulin expressing plasma cells and memory B cells. The germinal center B cells that are precursors of these cells circulate between the light zone B cell population that interact with antigen laden follicular dendritic cells (FDC) and the proliferative dark zone B cell population. Antigen retention by follicular dendritic cells is dependent on Fc receptors and complement receptors, and complement receptor 1 (Cr1) is the predominant complement receptor expressed by FDC. The newly created Cr1KO mouse was used to test the effect of Cr1-deficiency on the kinetics of the germinal center reaction and the generation of IgM and switched memory B cell formation. Immunization of Cr1KO mice with a T cell-dependent antigen resulted in the normal initial expansion of B cells with a germinal center phenotype however these cells were preferentially lost in the Cr1KO animal over time (days). Bone marrow chimera animals documented the surprising finding that the loss of germinal center B cell maintenance was linked to the expression of Cr1 on B cells, not the FDC. Cr1-deficiency further resulted in antigen-specific IgM titer and IgM memory B cell reductions, but not antigen-specific IgG after 35-37 days. Investigations of nitrophenyl (NP)-specific IgG demonstrated that Cr1 is not necessary for affinity maturation during the response to particulate antigen. These data, along with those generated in our initial description of the Cr1KO animal describe unique functions of Cr1 on the surface of both B cells and FDC.

  12. Atypical chemokine receptor 1 deficiency reduces atherogenesis in ApoE-knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Wan, Wuzhou; Liu, Qian; Lionakis, Michail S; Marino, Ana Paula M P; Anderson, Stasia A; Swamydas, Muthulekha; Murphy, Philip M

    2015-06-01

    Atypical chemokine receptor 1 (Ackr1; previously known as the Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines or Darc) is thought to regulate acute inflammatory responses in part by scavenging inflammatory CC and CXC chemokines; however, evidence for a role in chronic inflammation has been lacking. Here we investigated the role of Ackr1 in chronic inflammation, in particular in the setting of atherogenesis, using the apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mouse model. Ackr1(-/-)ApoE(-/-) and Ackr1(+/+)ApoE(-/-) littermates were obtained by crossing ApoE(-/-) mice and Ackr1(-/-) mice on a C57BL/6J background. Ackr1 (+/+)ApoE(-/-)mice fed a Western diet up-regulated Ackr1 expression in the aorta and had markedly increased atherosclerotic lesion size compared with Ackr1(-/-)ApoE(-/-) mice. This difference was observed in both the whole aorta and the aortic root in both early and late stages of the model. Ackr1 deficiency did not affect serum cholesterol levels or macrophage, collagen or smooth muscle cell content in atherosclerotic plaques, but significantly reduced the expression of Ccl2 and Cxcl1 in the whole aorta of ApoE(-/-) mice. In addition, Ackr1 deficiency resulted in a modest decrease in T cell subset frequency and inflammatory mononuclear phagocyte content in aorta and blood in the model. Ackr1 deficiency appears to be protective in the ApoE knockout model of atherogenesis, but it is associated with only modest changes in cytokine and chemokine expression as well as T-cell subset frequency and inflammatory macrophage content. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  13. Riluzole mediates anti-tumor properties in breast cancer cells independent of metabotropic glutamate receptor-1.

    PubMed

    Speyer, Cecilia L; Nassar, Mahdy A; Hachem, Ali H; Bukhsh, Miriam A; Jafry, Waris S; Khansa, Rafa M; Gorski, David H

    2016-06-01

    Riluzole, the only drug approved by the FDA for treating amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, inhibits melanoma proliferation through its inhibitory effect on glutamatergic signaling. We demonstrated that riluzole also inhibits the growth of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) and described a role for metabotropic glutamate receptor-1 (GRM1) in regulating TNBC cell growth and progression. However, the role of GRM1 in mediating riluzole's effects in breast cancer has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we seek to determine how much of riluzole's action in breast cancer is mediated through GRM1. We investigated anti-tumor properties of riluzole in TNBC and ER+ cells using cell growth, invasion, and soft-agar assays and compared riluzole activity with GRM1 levels. Using Lentiviral vectors expressing GRM1 or shGRM1, these studies were repeated in cells expressing high or low GRM1 levels where the gene was either silenced or overexpressed. Riluzole inhibited proliferation, invasion, and colony formation in both TNBC and ER+ cells. There was a trend between GRM1 expression in TNBC cells and their response to riluzole in both cell proliferation and invasion assays. However, silencing and overexpression studies had no effect on cell sensitivity to riluzole. Our results clearly suggest a GRM1-independent mechanism through which riluzole mediates its effects on breast cancer cells. Understanding the mechanism by which riluzole mediates breast cancer progression will be useful in identifying new therapeutic targets for treating TNBC and in facilitating stratification of patients in clinical trials using riluzole in conjunction with conventional therapy.

  14. Soluble complement receptor 1 inhibits both complement and granulocyte activation during ex vivo hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Himmelfarb, J; McMonagle, E; Holbrook, D; Toth, C

    1995-10-01

    Hemodialysis with cellulosic membranes results in both complement and granulocyte activation. We investigated the effects of soluble complement receptor 1 (sCR1), a potent complement inhibitor, on both complement and granulocyte activation in an ex vivo model of dialysis. Measurements were made of complement activation (radioimmunoassay for C3a desArg) as well as granulocyte activation (flow cytometric measurements of reactive oxygen species production, granulocyte CD11b/CD18 (MAC-1) expression and CD62L (L-selectin) expression). sCR1 completely abolished the generation of plasma C3a desArg during ex vivo hemodialysis. Without sCR1, C3a desArg levels rose from 968 +/- 373 ng/ml to 4961 +/- 40 ng/ml by the end of the ex vivo procedure (p < 0.001). sCR1 also completely inhibited MAC-1 upregulation and L-selectin shedding from granulocytes during ex vivo hemodialysis. With sCR1 there was still a statistically significant increase in granulocyte reactive oxygen species production (from 2.42 +/- 0.1 fluorescence channels to 6.47 +/- 0.7 fluorescence channels, p < 0.01) but a 50% inhibition when compared with experiments without sCR1 (3.15 +/- 0.5 to 11.2 +/- 1.9, p < 0.01). We conclude that sCR1 completely abolishes complement activation and changes in granulocyte cell adhesion molecules during ex vivo hemodialysis with cellulosic membranes. sCR1 partially inhibits granulocyte reactive oxygen species formation.

  15. Soluble complement receptor 1 preserves endothelial barrier function and microcirculation in postischemic pancreatitis in the rat.

    PubMed

    von Dobschuetz, E; Bleiziffer, O; Pahernik, S; Dellian, M; Hoffmann, T; Messmer, K

    2004-05-01

    Components of the activated complement cascade are considered to play a pivotal role in ischemia-reperfusion-induced organ injury. With the use of intravital epifluorescence microscopy, we investigated the effect of complement inhibition by the recombinant soluble complement receptor 1 (sCR1; TP10) on the effect of macromolecular microvascular permeability, functional capillary perfusion, and leukocyte endothelium interaction in postischemic pancreatitis. Anaesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 60 min of normothermic pancreatic ischemia induced by microclipping of the blood-supplying arteries of the organ. Rats who received sCR1 (15 mg/kg body wt iv; n = 7) during reperfusion showed a significant reduction of permeability (1.77 +/- 1.34 x 10(-8) cm/s; n = 7) of tetramethylrhodamine isothiocyanate-labeled albumin injected 90 min after the onset of reperfusion compared with vehicle-treated animals (6.95 +/- 1.56 x 10(-8) cm/s; n = 7). At 120 min after the onset of reperfusion, the length of red blood cell-perfused capillaries (functional capillary density) was significantly improved (from 279 +/- 15.7 to 330 +/- 3.7 cm(-1); n = 7) and the number of leukocytes adherent to postcapillary venules was significantly reduced (from 314 +/- 87 to 163 +/- 71 mm(-2); n = 7) by sCR1 compared with vehicle treatment. Complement inhibition by sCR1 effectively ameliorates pancreatic ischemia-reperfusion-induced microcirculatory disturbances and might be considered for treatment of postischemic pancreatitis.

  16. Rare MTNR1B variants impairing melatonin receptor 1B function contribute to type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bonnefond, Amélie; Clément, Nathalie; Fawcett, Katherine; Yengo, Loïc; Vaillant, Emmanuel; Guillaume, Jean-Luc; Dechaume, Aurélie; Payne, Felicity; Roussel, Ronan; Czernichow, Sébastien; Hercberg, Serge; Hadjadj, Samy; Balkau, Beverley; Marre, Michel; Lantieri, Olivier; Langenberg, Claudia; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Charpentier, Guillaume; Vaxillaire, Martine; Rocheleau, Ghislain; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Sladek, Robert; McCarthy, Mark I.; Dina, Christian; Barroso, Inês; Jockers, Ralf; Froguel, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies revealed that common non-coding variants in MTNR1B (encoding melatonin receptor 1B, also known as MT2) increase type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk1,2. Although the strongest association signal was highly significant (P<10−20), its contribution to T2D risk was modest (odds ratio, OR~1.10-1.15)1-3. We performed large-scale exon resequencing in 7,632 Europeans including 2,186 T2D patients and identified 40 non-synonymous variants, including 36 very rare variants (minor allele frequency, MAF<0.1%) associated with T2D (OR=3.31[1.78;6.18]95%); P=1.64×10−4. A four-tier functional investigation of all 40 mutants revealed that 14 were non-functional and rare (MAF<1%); four were very rare with complete loss of melatonin binding and signaling capabilities. Among the very rare variants, the partial or total loss-of-function variants, but not the neutral ones, contributed to T2D (OR=5.67[2.17;14.82]95%; P=4.09×10−4). Genotyping the four complete loss-of-function variants in 11,854 additional individuals revealed their association with T2D risk (Ncases=8,153/Ncontrols=10,100; OR=3.88[1.49;10.07]95%; P=5.37×10−3). This study establishes a firm functional link between MTNR1B and T2D risk. PMID:22286214

  17. Possible role of rare variants in Trace amine associated receptor 1 in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    John, Jibin; Kukshal, Prachi; Bhatia, Triptish; Chowdari, K V; Nimgaonkar, V L; Deshpande, S N; Thelma, B K

    2017-02-24

    Schizophrenia (SZ) is a chronic mental illness with behavioral abnormalities. Recent common variant based genome wide association studies and rare variant detection using next generation sequencing approaches have identified numerous variants that confer risk for SZ, but etiology remains unclear propelling continuing investigations. Using whole exome sequencing, we identified a rare heterozygous variant (c.545G>T; p.Cys182Phe) in Trace amine associated receptor 1 gene (TAAR1 6q23.2) in three affected members in a small SZ family. The variant predicted to be damaging by 15 prediction tools, causes breakage of a conserved disulfide bond in this G-protein-coupled receptor. On screening this intronless gene for additional variant(s) in ~800 sporadic SZ patients, we identified six rare protein altering variants (MAF<0.001) namely p.Ser47Cys, p.Phe51Leu, p.Tyr294Ter, p.Leu295Ser in four unrelated north Indian cases (n=475); p.Ala109Thr and p.Val250Ala in two independent Caucasian/African-American patients (n=310). Five of these variants were also predicted to be damaging. Besides, a rare synonymous variant was observed in SZ patients. These rare variants were absent in north Indian healthy controls (n=410) but significantly enriched in patients (p=0.036). Conversely, three common coding SNPs (rs8192621, rs8192620 and rs8192619) and a promoter SNP (rs60266355) tested for association with SZ in the north Indian cohort were not significant (P>0.05). TAAR1 is a modulator of monoaminergic pathways and interacts with AKT signaling pathways. Substantial animal model based pharmacological and functional data implying its relevance in SZ are also available. However, this is the first report suggestive of the likely contribution of rare variants in this gene to SZ.

  18. Chemokine-Like Receptor 1 Regulates the Proliferation and Migration of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huadong; Xiong, Wei; Liu, Qiyun; Zhang, Jian; Dong, Shaohong

    2016-10-28

    BACKGROUND We aimed to explore how chemokine-like receptor 1 (CMKLR1) influences the proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). MATERIAL AND METHODS Normal VSMCs, negative control VSMCs interfered by CMKLR1 gene, and VSMCs with stable knockdown of CMKLR1 gene were divided into the control group, PDGF group, negative-shRNA group, and CMKLR1-shRNA group. Both cell number counting and BrdU incorporation assays were employed to investigate the proliferation status of VSMCs. Transwell migration assay was used to measure the migration status of VSMCs. Inflammation markers, including cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, and chemokines MCP-1 in VSMCs, were detected by real-time quantitative RT-PCR. Western blotting assay was used to detect protein expressions of the MAPK pathway in VSMCs. RESULTS The number of VSMCs and the OD value of BrdU in PDGF group were significantly higher than those in the control group (both P<0.05). Compared with the control and negative-shRNA group, the CMKLR1-shRNA group exhibited significantly reduced VSMCs number and BrdU OD value (both P<0.05). Transwell migration assay indicated that PDGF-BB promoted whereas CMKLR1-shRNA inhibited the migration of VSMCs. The expression of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, and MCP-1 were up-regulated in the PDGF group but down-regulated in the CMKLR1-shRNA group. Compared with normal VSMCs, the protein level of p-ERK1/2 was up-regulated in VSMCs treated with PDGF-BB, while it was down-regulated in the CMKLR1-shRNA group. CONCLUSIONS CMKLR1 exacerbated the proliferation and migration of VSMCs by activating ERK1/2.

  19. The hypocretin/orexin receptor-1 as a novel target to modulate cannabinoid reward.

    PubMed

    Flores, África; Maldonado, Rafael; Berrendero, Fernando

    2014-03-15

    Cannabis is the most widely used illicit drug in the world. Although there is a high prevalence of users who seek treatment for cannabis dependence, no accepted pharmacologic treatment is available to facilitate and maintain abstinence. The hypocretin/orexin system plays a critical role in drug addiction, but the potential participation of this system in the addictive properties of cannabinoids is unknown. We investigated the effects of hypocretins in the intravenous self-administration of the synthetic cannabinoid agonist WIN55,212-2 using hypocretin receptor-1 (Hcrtr-1) and hypocretin receptor-2 antagonists and Hcrtr-1 knockout mice. Additional groups of mice were trained to obtain water to rule out operant responding impairments. Activation of hypocretin neurons was analyzed by using double-label immunofluorescence of FosB/ΔFosB with hypocretin-1. Microdialysis studies were performed to evaluate dopamine extracellular levels in the nucleus accumbens after acute Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol administration. Systemic administration of the Hcrtr-1 antagonist SB334867 reduced intravenous self-administration of WIN55,212-2, as well as the maximum effort to obtain a WIN55,212-2 infusion, as revealed under a progressive ratio schedule. This role of Hcrtr-1 in the reinforcing and motivational properties of WIN55,212-2 was confirmed in Hcrtr-1 knockout mice. Contingent, but not noncontingent, WIN55,212-2 self-administration increased the percentage of hypocretin cells expressing FosB/ΔFosB in the lateral hypothalamus. The enhancement in dopamine extracellular levels in the nucleus accumbens induced by Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol was blocked in mice lacking the Hcrtr-1. These findings demonstrate that Hcrtr-1 modulates the reinforcing properties of cannabinoids, which could have a clear therapeutic interest. Copyright © 2014 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Injury rates and injury risk factors among federal bureau of investigation new agent trainees

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A one-year prospective examination of injury rates and injury risk factors was conducted in Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) new agent training. Methods Injury incidents were obtained from medical records and injury compensation forms. Potential injury risk factors were acquired from a lifestyle questionnaire and existing data at the FBI Academy. Results A total of 426 men and 105 women participated in the project. Thirty-five percent of men and 42% of women experienced one or more injuries during training. The injury incidence rate was 2.5 and 3.2 injuries/1,000 person-days for men and women, respectively (risk ratio (women/men) = 1.3, 95% confidence interval = 0.9-1.7). The activities most commonly associated with injuries (% of total) were defensive tactics training (58%), physical fitness training (20%), physical fitness testing (5%), and firearms training (3%). Among the men, higher injury risk was associated with older age, slower 300-meter sprint time, slower 1.5-mile run time, lower total points on the physical fitness test (PFT), lower self-rated physical activity, lower frequency of aerobic exercise, a prior upper or lower limb injury, and prior foot or knee pain that limited activity. Among the women higher injury risk was associated with slower 300-meter sprint time, slower 1.5-mile run time, lower total points on the PFT, and prior back pain that limited activity. Conclusion The results of this investigation supported those of a previous retrospective investigation emphasizing that lower fitness and self-reported pain limiting activity were associated with higher injury risk among FBI new agents. PMID:22166096

  1. Investigation of Factors Affecting Body Temperature Changes During Routine Clinical Head Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myeong Seong

    2016-01-01

    Background Pulsed radiofrequency (RF) magnetic fields, required to produce magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signals from tissue during the MRI procedure have been shown to heat tissues. Objectives To investigate the relationship between body temperature rise and the RF power deposited during routine clinical MRI procedures, and to determine the correlation between this effect and the body’s physiological response. Patients and Methods We investigated 69 patients from the Korean national cancer center to identify the main factors that contribute to an increase in body temperature (external factors and the body’s response) during a clinical brain MRI. A routine protocol sequence of MRI scans (1.5 T and 3.0 T) was performed. The patient’s tympanic temperature was recorded before and immediately after the MRI procedure and compared with changes in variables related to the body’s physiological response to heat. Results Our investigation of the physiological response to RF heating indicated a link between increasing age and body temperature. A higher increase in body temperature was observed in older patients after a 3.0-T MRI (r = 0.07, P = 0.29 for 1.5-T MRI; r = 0.45, P = 0.002 for 3.0-T MRI). The relationship between age and body heat was related to the heart rate (HR) and changes in HR during the MRI procedure; a higher RF power combined with a reduction in HR resulted in an increase in body temperature. Conclusion A higher magnetic field strength and a decrease in the HR resulted in an increase in body temperature during the MRI procedure. PMID:27895872

  2. Investigation of Factors Affecting Body Temperature Changes During Routine Clinical Head Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myeong Seong

    2016-10-01

    Pulsed radiofrequency (RF) magnetic fields, required to produce magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signals from tissue during the MRI procedure have been shown to heat tissues. To investigate the relationship between body temperature rise and the RF power deposited during routine clinical MRI procedures, and to determine the correlation between this effect and the body's physiological response. We investigated 69 patients from the Korean national cancer center to identify the main factors that contribute to an increase in body temperature (external factors and the body's response) during a clinical brain MRI. A routine protocol sequence of MRI scans (1.5 T and 3.0 T) was performed. The patient's tympanic temperature was recorded before and immediately after the MRI procedure and compared with changes in variables related to the body's physiological response to heat. Our investigation of the physiological response to RF heating indicated a link between increasing age and body temperature. A higher increase in body temperature was observed in older patients after a 3.0-T MRI (r = 0.07, P = 0.29 for 1.5-T MRI; r = 0.45, P = 0.002 for 3.0-T MRI). The relationship between age and body heat was related to the heart rate (HR) and changes in HR during the MRI procedure; a higher RF power combined with a reduction in HR resulted in an increase in body temperature. A higher magnetic field strength and a decrease in the HR resulted in an increase in body temperature during the MRI procedure.

  3. Investigating Happiness and its Related Factors in Married Women Referred to Health Centers of Shahroud City

    PubMed Central

    Sooky, Zahra; Keramat, Afsaneh; Sharifi, Khadijeh; Dehghani, Mohsen; Tagharrobi, Zahra; Taebi, Mahboubeh; Sadat, Zohreh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Happiness is one of the most important factors affecting women's mental health. Several factors contribute to happiness in different societies. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the level of happiness in married women and its related factors. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study with stratified sampling proportional to different age groups of married women in selected health centers (based on socioeconomic status). Subjects were 379 married women. The Oxford Happiness Inventory (scale: 0-87) was used to measure happiness. The Enrich Marital Satisfaction Inventory including 47 questions (scale: 47-235) and demographic information questionnaires were also used. Descriptive statistics, correlation, T-test, One-way ANOVA and Regression were used to analyze data. Results: The mean of happiness was 45.11 ± 14.40. Marital satisfaction was 164.68 ± 28.33 and 64% of the participants had a relative marital satisfaction. Univariate analysis of happiness showed significant effects of husband and wife education, husband job, economic status, stress in past six months, marital satisfaction and having social activates, but was not statistically significant for other factors (P < 0.05). Adjusting for the confounding effect of other variables, multiple linear regressions showed significant association of happiness with marital satisfaction, economic status and social activity. Conclusions: Regarding lower level of happiness of married women in Shahroud comparing to some other studies in Iran and abroad, leisure time programs, training life skills especially stress management skills, increasing marital satisfaction and improving economic status should be considered. PMID:25593738

  4. A preliminary study investigating the factors influencing STEM major selection by African American females

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Tiffany Monique

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the significant factors influencing STEM major selection by African American females. A quantitative research design with a qualitative component was employed. Ex post facto survey research was conducted utilizing an online questionnaire to collect data from participants. African American undergraduate females that had declared a major in STEM comprised the target population for the study. As a basis for comparison, a second data collection ensued. All non-African American undergraduate females majoring in STEM also received the survey instrument to determine if there was a significant difference between factors that influence STEM major selection between the two groups. The Social Cognitive Career Choice Model comprised the conceptual framework for this study. Frequencies and percentages illustrated the demographic characteristics of the sample, as well as the average influence levels of each of the items without regard for level of significance. The researcher conducted an independent samples t-test to compare the mean scores for undergraduate African American females majoring in STEM and non-African American females majoring in STEM on each influential factor on the survey instrument. The researcher coded responses to open-ended questions to generate themes and descriptions. The data showed that African American female respondents were very influenced by the following items: specific interest in the subject, type of work, availability of career opportunities after graduation, parent/guardian, precollege coursework in science, and introductory college courses. In addition, the majority of respondents were very influenced by each of the confidence factors. African American females were overwhelmingly not influenced by aptitude tests. African American females were more influenced than their non-African American female counterparts for the following factors: reputation of the university, college or department, high level

  5. Psychophysiological and other factors affecting human performance in accident prevention and investigation. [Comparison of aviation with other industries

    SciTech Connect

    Klinestiver, L.R.

    1980-01-01

    Psychophysiological factors are not uncommon terms in the aviation incident/accident investigation sequence where human error is involved. It is highly suspect that the same psychophysiological factors may also exist in the industrial arena where operator personnel function; but, there is little evidence in literature indicating how management and subordinates cope with these factors to prevent or reduce accidents. It is apparent that human factors psychophysological training is quite evident in the aviation industry. However, while the industrial arena appears to analyze psychophysiological factors in accident investigations, there is little evidence that established training programs exist for supervisors and operator personnel.

  6. Investigation of Model Sunscreen Formulations Comparing the Sun Protection Factor, the Universal Sun Protection Factor and the Radical Formation Ratio.

    PubMed

    Syring, Felicia; Weigmann, Hans-Jürgen; Schanzer, Sabine; Meinke, Martina C; Knorr, Fanny; Lademann, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    In view of globally rising skin cancer rates and harmful effects exerted by sunlight throughout the ultraviolet, visible and infrared ranges, an objective, safe and comprehensive method for determining sunscreen efficacy is required in order to warrant safe sun exposure. In this study, the influence of characteristic active ingredients (chemical filters, physical filters and antioxidants) on different sunscreen indicators, including the universal sun protection factor and the radical formation ratio, was determined and compared to their influence on sun protection factor values. Spectroscopic universal sun protection factor measurements were conducted ex vivo by analyzing tape strips taken from human skin, and radical formation ratio determination was performed via electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy using porcine ear skin ex vivo. The sun protection factor determination was conducted according to ISO standards (ISO 24444:2010). It was shown that chemical filters provide a protective effect which was measurable by all methods examined (spectroscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and erythema formation). Physical filters, when used as single active ingredients, increased protective values in universal sun protection factor and sun protection factor measurements but exhibited no significant effect on universal sun protection factor measurements when used in combination with chemical filters or antioxidants. Antioxidants were shown to increase sun protection factor values. Radical formation ratio values were shown to be influenced merely by chemical filters, leading to the conclusion that the universal sun protection factor is the most suitable efficacy indicator for the ultraviolet range.

  7. An Investigation of the Factor Structure and Convergent and Discriminant Validity of the Five-Factor Model Rating Form

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuel, Douglas B.; Mullins-Sweatt, Stephanie N.; Widiger, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    The Five-Factor Model Rating Form (FFMRF) is a one-page measure designed to provide an efficient assessment of the higher order domains of the Five Factor Model (FFM) as well as the more specific, lower order facets proposed by McCrae and Costa. Although previous research has suggested that the FFMRF's assessment of the lower order facets converge…

  8. An Investigation of the Factor Structure and Convergent and Discriminant Validity of the Five-Factor Model Rating Form

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuel, Douglas B.; Mullins-Sweatt, Stephanie N.; Widiger, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    The Five-Factor Model Rating Form (FFMRF) is a one-page measure designed to provide an efficient assessment of the higher order domains of the Five Factor Model (FFM) as well as the more specific, lower order facets proposed by McCrae and Costa. Although previous research has suggested that the FFMRF's assessment of the lower order facets converge…

  9. Quantitative investigation of physical factors contributing to gold nanoparticle-mediated proton dose enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jongmin; Gonzalez-Lepera, Carlos; Manohar, Nivedh; Kerr, Matthew; Krishnan, Sunil; Cho, Sang Hyun

    2016-03-01

    Some investigators have shown tumor cell killing enhancement in vitro and tumor regression in mice associated with the loading of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) before proton treatments. Several Monte Carlo (MC) investigations have also demonstrated GNP-mediated proton dose enhancement. However, further studies need to be done to quantify the individual physical factors that contribute to the dose enhancement or cell-kill enhancement (or radiosensitization). Thus, the current study investigated the contributions of particle-induced x-ray emission (PIXE), particle-induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE), Auger and secondary electrons, and activation products towards the total dose enhancement. Specifically, GNP-mediated dose enhancement was measured using strips of radiochromic film that were inserted into vials of cylindrical GNPs, i.e. gold nanorods (GNRs), dispersed in a saline solution (0.3 mg of GNRs/g or 0.03% of GNRs by weight), as well as vials containing water only, before proton irradiation. MC simulations were also performed with the tool for particle simulation code using the film measurement setup. Additionally, a high-purity germanium detector system was used to measure the photon spectrum originating from activation products created from the interaction of protons and spherical GNPs present in a saline solution (20 mg of GNPs/g or 2% of GNPs by weight). The dose enhancement due to PIXE/PIGE recorded on the films in the GNR-loaded saline solution was less than the experimental uncertainty of the film dosimetry (<2%). MC simulations showed highly localized dose enhancement (up to a factor 17) in the immediate vicinity (<100 nm) of GNRs, compared with hypothetical water nanorods (WNRs), mostly due to GNR-originated Auger/secondary electrons; however, the average dose enhancement over the entire GNR-loaded vial was found to be minimal (0.1%). The dose enhancement due to the activation products from GNPs was minimal (<0.1%) as well. In conclusion, under the

  10. Quantitative investigation of physical factors contributing to gold nanoparticle-mediated proton dose enhancement.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jongmin; Gonzalez-Lepera, Carlos; Manohar, Nivedh; Kerr, Matthew; Krishnan, Sunil; Cho, Sang Hyun

    2016-03-21

    Some investigators have shown tumor cell killing enhancement in vitro and tumor regression in mice associated with the loading of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) before proton treatments. Several Monte Carlo (MC) investigations have also demonstrated GNP-mediated proton dose enhancement. However, further studies need to be done to quantify the individual physical factors that contribute to the dose enhancement or cell-kill enhancement (or radiosensitization). Thus, the current study investigated the contributions of particle-induced x-ray emission (PIXE), particle-induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE), Auger and secondary electrons, and activation products towards the total dose enhancement. Specifically, GNP-mediated dose enhancement was measured using strips of radiochromic film that were inserted into vials of cylindrical GNPs, i.e. gold nanorods (GNRs), dispersed in a saline solution (0.3 mg of GNRs/g or 0.03% of GNRs by weight), as well as vials containing water only, before proton irradiation. MC simulations were also performed with the tool for particle simulation code using the film measurement setup. Additionally, a high-purity germanium detector system was used to measure the photon spectrum originating from activation products created from the interaction of protons and spherical GNPs present in a saline solution (20 mg of GNPs/g or 2% of GNPs by weight). The dose enhancement due to PIXE/PIGE recorded on the films in the GNR-loaded saline solution was less than the experimental uncertainty of the film dosimetry (<2%). MC simulations showed highly localized dose enhancement (up to a factor 17) in the immediate vicinity (<100 nm) of GNRs, compared with hypothetical water nanorods (WNRs), mostly due to GNR-originated Auger/secondary electrons; however, the average dose enhancement over the entire GNR-loaded vial was found to be minimal (0.1%). The dose enhancement due to the activation products from GNPs was minimal (<0.1%) as well. In conclusion, under the currently

  11. Simulation investigation of impact factors in photodarkening-induced beam degradation in fiber amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Chen; Wang, Xiaolin; Zhang, Hanwei; Su, Rongtao; Ma, Pengfei; Zhou, Pu; Xu, Xiaojun; Lu, Qisheng

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we have numerically investigated the photodarkening induced long-term beam degradations in ytterbium doped fiber amplifiers under different fiber types, doping concentrations, pumping schemes and pumping powers. The influence of different factors on this degradation procedure was theoretically revealed. First, the coupling strength characteristics of active fibers are mainly determined by the fiber core dimension and pumping wavelength. Second, amplifiers with a stronger coupling strength will experience the degradation procedure faster than those with a weaker coupling strength. Third, the interaction length of the fiber amplifier could also affect the beam degradation process. Lastly, the more intense pumping power will enhance the degradation process. Our simulation results can provide instructive suggestions when designing ytterbium-doped fiber based fiber amplification systems.

  12. Investigations on the Mechanical Properties of Conducting Polymer Coating-Substrate Structures and Their Influencing Factors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xi-Shu; Tang, Hua-Ping; Li, Xu-Dong; Hua, Xin

    2009-01-01

    This review covers recent advances and work on the microstructure features, mechanical properties and cracking processes of conducting polymer film/coating- substrate structures under different testing conditions. An attempt is made to characterize and quantify the relationships between mechanical properties and microstructure features. In addition, the film cracking mechanism on the micro scale and some influencing factors that play a significant role in the service of the film-substrate structure are presented. These investigations cover the conducting polymer film/coating nucleation process, microstructure-fracture characterization, translation of brittle-ductile fractures, and cracking processes near the largest inherent macromolecule defects under thermal-mechanical loadings, and were carried out using in situ scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations, as a novel method for evaluation of interface strength and critical failure stress. PMID:20054470

  13. Investigation of locally resonant absorption and factors affecting the absorption band of a phononic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Meng; Jiang, Heng; Feng, Yafei; Wang, Yuren

    2014-12-01

    We experimentally and theoretically investigated the mechanisms of acoustic absorption in phononic glass to optimize its properties. First, we experimentally studied its locally resonant absorption mechanism. From these results, we attributed its strong sound attenuation to its locally resonant units and its broadband absorption to its networked structure. These experiments also indicated that the porosity and thickness of the phononic glass must be tuned to achieve the best sound absorption at given frequencies. Then, using lumped-mass methods, we studied how the absorption bandgaps of the phononic glass were affected by various factors, including the porosity and the properties of the coating materials. These calculations gave optimal ranges for selecting the porosity, modulus of the coating material, and ratio of the compliant coating to the stiff matrix to achieve absorption bandgaps in the range of 6-30 kHz. This paper provides guidelines for designing phononic glasses with proper structures and component materials to work in specific frequency ranges.

  14. An investigation of factors affecting elementary school students' BMI values based on the system dynamics modeling.

    PubMed

    Lan, Tian-Syung; Chen, Kai-Ling; Chen, Pin-Chang; Ku, Chao-Tai; Chiu, Pei-Hsuan; Wang, Meng-Hsiang

    2014-01-01

    This study used system dynamics method to investigate the factors affecting elementary school students' BMI values. The construction of the dynamic model is divided into the qualitative causal loop and the quantitative system dynamics modeling. According to the system dynamics modeling, this study consisted of research on the four dimensions: student's personal life style, diet-relevant parenting behaviors, advocacy and implementation of school nutrition education, and students' peer interaction. The results of this study showed that students with more adequate health concepts usually have better eating behaviors and consequently have less chance of becoming obese. In addition, this study also verified that educational attainment and socioeconomic status of parents have a positive correlation with students' amounts of physical activity, and nutrition education has a prominent influence on changing students' high-calorie diets.

  15. A numerical investigation of factors affecting cervical spine injuries during rollover crashes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jingwen; Yang, King H; Chou, Clifford C; King, Albert I

    2008-11-01

    Factors affecting the risk of cervical spine injury in rollover crashes were investigated using a detailed finite element human head-neck model. Analyze systematically neck responses and associated injury predictors under complex loading conditions similar to real-world rollover scenarios and use the findings to identify potential design improvements. Although many previous experimental and numerical studies have focused on cervical spine injury mechanisms and tolerance, none of them have investigated the risk of cervical spine injuries under loading condition similar to that in rollovers. The effects of changing the coefficient of friction (COF), impact velocity, padding material thickness and stiffness, and muscle force on the risk of neck injuries were analyzed in 16 different impact orientations based on a Taguchi array of design of experiments. Impact velocity is the most important factor in determining the risk of cervical spine fracture (P = 0.000). Decreases in the COF between the head and impact surface can effectively reduce the risk of cervical spine fracture (P = 0.038). If the COF is not 0, an impact with lateral force component could sometimes increase the risk of cervical spine fracture; and the larger the oriented angle of the impact surface, the more important it becomes to reduce the COF to protect the neck. Soft (P = 0.033) and thick (P = 0.137) padding can actually decrease the neck fracture risk, which is in contrast to previous experimental data. A careful selection of proper padding stiffness and thickness, along with a minimized COF between the head and impact surface or between the padding and its supporting structure, may simultaneously decrease the risk of head and neck injuries during rollover crashes. A seatbelt design to effectively reduce/eliminate the head-to-roof impact velocity is also very crucial to enhance the neck protection in rollovers.

  16. An investigation into the determining factors of zoo visitor attendances in UK zoos.

    PubMed

    Whitworth, Andrew William

    2012-01-01

    The debate as to which animals are most beneficial to keep in zoos in terms of financial and conservative value is readily disputed; however, demographic factors have also been shown to relate to visitor numbers on an international level. The main aims of this research were: (1) To observe the distribution and location of zoos across the UK, (2) to develop a way of calculating zoo popularity in terms of the species kept within a collection and (3) to investigate the factors related to visitor numbers regarding admission costs, popularity of the collection in terms of the species kept and local demographic factors. Zoo visitor numbers were positively correlated with generated popularity ratings for zoos based on the species kept within a collection and admission prices (Pearson correlation: n = 34, r = 0.268, P = 0.126 and n = 34, r = -0.430, P = 0.011). Animal collections are aggregated around large cities and tourist regions, particularly coastal areas. No relationship between demographic variables and visitor numbers was found (Pearson correlation: n = 34, r = 0.268, P = 0.126), which suggests that the popularity of a zoo's collection relative to the types and numbers of species kept is more indicative of a collection's visitor numbers than its surrounding demographic figures. Zoos should incorporate generating high popularity scores as part of their collection planning strategies, to ensure that they thrive in the future, not only as tourist attractions but also as major conservation organizations.

  17. Identification of approved and investigational drugs that inhibit hypoxia-inducible factor-1 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chia-Wen; Huang, Ruili; Khuc, Thai; Shou, David; Bullock, Joshua; Grooby, Suzanne; Griffin, Sue; Zou, Chaozhong; Little, Annette; Astley, Holly; Xia, Menghang

    2016-01-01

    One of the requirements for tumor development is blood supply, most often driven by hypoxia-induced angiogenesis. Hypoxia induces the stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α), which induces expression of an angiogenic factor, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The purpose of this study is to validate a new screening platform combined with orthogonal assays to rapidly identify HIF-1 inhibitors and to evaluate the effectiveness of approved drugs on modulating HIF-1 signaling. We generated an endogenous HIF-1α–NanoLuc luciferase reporter allele in the human HCT116 colon cancer cell line using genome editing and screened a panel of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to 960 druggable targets and approximately 2,500 drugs on a quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS) platform. Selected compounds were further investigated with secondary assays to confirm their anti-HIF activity and to study their mode of action. The qHTS assay identified over 300 drugs that inhibited HIF-1α-NanoLuc expression. The siRNA screening results supported the effectiveness of several target-specific inhibitors. Moreover, the identified HIF-1 inhibitors, such as mycophenolate mofetil, niclosamide, and trametinib, were able to suppress cancer cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Our study indicates that blocking the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathways effectively inhibits hypoxia-induced HIF-1α accumulation and HIF-1α transactivation and that proteasome inhibitors induce accumulation and decrease transcriptional activity of HIF-1α. These findings underline the importance of developing a battery of robust assay platforms and confirmation studies that focus on endogenous protein targets so that only relevant and reliable data will be taken into pre-clinical and clinical studies. PMID:26882567

  18. An Investigation into the Determining Factors of Zoo Visitor Attendances in UK Zoos

    PubMed Central

    Whitworth, Andrew William

    2012-01-01

    The debate as to which animals are most beneficial to keep in zoos in terms of financial and conservative value is readily disputed; however, demographic factors have also been shown to relate to visitor numbers on an international level. The main aims of this research were: (1) To observe the distribution and location of zoos across the UK, (2) to develop a way of calculating zoo popularity in terms of the species kept within a collection and (3) to investigate the factors related to visitor numbers regarding admission costs, popularity of the collection in terms of the species kept and local demographic factors. Zoo visitor numbers were positively correlated with generated popularity ratings for zoos based on the species kept within a collection and admission prices (Pearson correlation: n = 34, r = 0.268, P = 0.126 and n = 34, r = −0.430, P = 0.011). Animal collections are aggregated around large cities and tourist regions, particularly coastal areas. No relationship between demographic variables and visitor numbers was found (Pearson correlation: n = 34, r = 0.268, P = 0.126), which suggests that the popularity of a zoo's collection relative to the types and numbers of species kept is more indicative of a collection's visitor numbers than its surrounding demographic figures. Zoos should incorporate generating high popularity scores as part of their collection planning strategies, to ensure that they thrive in the future, not only as tourist attractions but also as major conservation organizations. PMID:22253799

  19. Investigating geochemical factors affecting heavy metal bioaccessibility in surface sediment from Bernam River, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Kadhum, Safaa A; Ishak, Mohd Yusoff; Zulkifli, Syaizwan Zahmir; Hashim, Rohasliney Binti

    2017-05-01

    The present study applied the use of sequential extraction technique and simple bioaccessibility extraction test to investigate the bioavailable fractions and the human bioaccessible concentration of metals collected from nine stations in surface sediment of the Bernam River. The concentrations of total and bioaccessible metals from different stations were in the range of 0.30-1.43 μg g(-1) and 0.04-0.14 μg g(-1) for total cadmium and bioaccessibility of cadmium, respectively, 6.20-288 μg kg(-1) and 2.06-8.53 μg kg(-1) for total mercury and bioaccessibility of mercury, respectively, and 9.2-106.59 μg g(-1) and 0.4-2.75 μg kg(-1) for total tin and bioaccessibility of tin, respectively. The chemical speciation of Cd in most sampling stations was in the order of oxidisable-organic > acid-reducible > residual > exchangeable, while the chemical speciation of Hg was in the order of exchangeable > residual > oxidisable-organic > acid-reducible and the chemical speciation of Hg was in the order of residual > oxidisable-organic > acid-reducible > exchangeable. The principal component analysis showed that the main factors influencing the bioaccessibility of mercury in surface sediments were the sediment total organic matter, cation exchange capacity, and easily, freely, or leachable and exchangeable fraction, and the factors influencing the bioaccessibility of tin were the total tin and cation exchange capacity, while the bioaccessibility of Cd in surface sediments was influenced by the only factor which is the easily, freely, or leachable and exchangeable fraction.

  20. Snowboarding injuries in Australia: investigating risk factors in wrist fractures to enhance injury prevention strategies.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Tracey J; Terwiel, F Anne

    2011-09-01

    To investigate risk factors associated with wrist fractures in snowboarders to inform future snowsport safety strategies. A prospective case-control study using a nonprobability convenience sample was conducted with data collected via a respondent-completed questionnaire. Subjects consisted of snowboarders with a snowboard-related injury who presented to one of 10 medical centers and physiotherapy clinics in resort medical centers and gateway communities across the Australian snowsport season in 2007. Those presenting with injuries other than wrist fractures acted as the control. The 611 respondents reported 802 injuries (61.3% were males and 51.5% were aged 16-25 years). Protective equipment was worn by 57.0% of respondents. The main reason for not wearing a wrist guard was that they did not see the need; of these, 12.9% experienced a wrist fracture. Most injuries occurred on-piste, in a terrain park, or in a lesson. The main mechanism of injury was falling. The major risk factors for wrist fractures were being less than 16 years of age (OR 3.97, CI 2.54-6.22), being in the alpine area for a holiday (OR 2.77, CI 1.47-5.21), and being a first-day snowboard participant (OR 2.02, CI 1.15-3.64). A direct logistic regression indicated that 3 variables had a statistically significant contribution to the model (being less than 16 years old, being on holidays in the region, and not wearing a wrist guard). The key risk factors in this Australian study reflect other international studies, providing a clear market segment for targeted snowsport safety messages: those less than 16 years old, visitors to the alpine regions, and those not wearing wrist guards. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Temperament personality profiles in suicidal behaviour: an investigation of associated demographic, clinical and genetic factors.

    PubMed

    Perroud, Nader; Baud, Patrick; Ardu, Stefano; Krejci, Ivo; Mouthon, Dominique; Vessaz, Monique; Guillaume, Sébastien; Jaussent, Isabelle; Olié, Emilie; Malafosse, Alain; Courtet, Philippe

    2013-04-05

    Personality traits have been suggested as possible risk factors for suicidal behaviours. Cloninger's model of personality (TCI), given its neurobiological background, might provide an ideal tool for the identification of dimensions associated with suicide attempt. A number of 1333 suicide attempters and 589 non-suicide attempters suffering from different DSM-IV Axis I disorders were assessed using either the temperament and character inventory (TCI) or the tridimensional personality questionnaire (TPQ), as well as other self-report questionnaires evaluating dimensions associated with suicidal behaviour, such as impulsivity and anger traits. The severity of suicide attempts and the methods used were also assessed. Subjects were genotyped for polymorphisms within the key genes involved in monoaminergic pathways and the HPA axis. Compared with non-suicide attempters, suicide attempters scored higher for harm avoidance (HA) and novelty seeking (NS), and lower for self-directedness (SD). The difference was independent of Axis I disorders. Higher HA and NS scores were associated with a greater severity of suicidal behaviour. A multivariate model showed that HA was the single temperamental dimension independently related to suicide attempt history, beside impulsivity and anger-related traits. The genetic factors investigated did not play a significant role in modulating these temperamental dimensions. The TCI was available for only half of the sample. Early detection of subjects displaying high HA and low SD, associated with high impulsivity and poor anger control, may help to prevent suicidal behaviours. Physicians should therefore be aware of these risk factors so that they can offer the best primary care intervention. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Hearing loss in military aviation and other trades: investigation of prevalence and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Abel, Sharon M

    2005-12-01

    Continuous increase in the cost of claims for noise-induced hearing loss in Canadian Forces personnel prompted a review of hearing conservation practices. Investigations comprised retrospective analyses of hearing test results and a prospective survey of risk factors for hearing loss. There were 1057 individuals working in 107 air, land, and sea trades who contributed their current and first hearing test results. Subjects completed a 64-item questionnaire relating to demographics, occupational and non-occupational noise exposure history, training in and use of hearing protection, and non-noise risk factors, including head injury, ear disease, medications, and solvent exposure. Subject recruitment, hearing assessment, and questionnaire distribution were carried out by military personnel. Apparatus and protocols for hearing testing conformed to current clinical practice. Prevalence of moderate to severe hearing loss progressed with age, with hearing thresholds in those over 45 yr ranging broadly from normal to over 70 dB HL. Unprotected exposure to noise and solvents appeared to be the likely determinates of adverse outcome. Head injury, ear disease, and the use of ototoxic medications had minimal impact. The data for individuals in 17 selected trades in the 3 environments modeled that of the total sample. Responses to the questionnaire suggested that training on noise hazard and selection and use of hearing protection were inadequate. Hearing protection was reported to be incompatible with other gear, uncomfortable, and an impediment to communication. Approaches for upgrading hearing conservation strategies, including the creation of end-user focus groups, were considered.

  3. A data mining approach to investigate the factors influencing the crash severity of motorcycle pillion passengers.

    PubMed

    Tavakoli Kashani, Ali; Rabieyan, Rahim; Besharati, Mohammad Mehdi

    2014-12-01

    Motorcycle passengers comprise a considerable proportion of traffic crash victims. During a 5 year period (2006-2010) in Iran, an average of 3.4 pillion passengers are killed daily due to motorcycle crashes. This study investigated the main factors influencing crash severity of this group of road users. The Classification and Regression Trees (CART) method was employed to analyze the injury severity of pillion passengers in Iran over a 4 y ear period (2009-2012). The predictive accuracy of the model built with a total of 16 variables was 74%, which showed a considerable improvement compared to previous studies. The results indicate that area type, land use, and injured part of the body (head, neck, etc.) are the most influential factors affecting the fatality of motorcycle passengers. Results also show that helmet usage could reduce the fatality risk among motorcycle passengers by 28%. The findings of this study might help develop more targeted countermeasures to reduce the death rate of motorcycle pillion passengers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Investigation of Risk Factors Affecting Lactate Levels in Japanese Patients Treated with Metformin.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Shota; Tsuji, Hideyuki; Hiraoka, Sachiko; Nishihara, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Metformin is a biguanaide antidiabetic drug used worldwide, and its effectiveness and benefits have already been established. However, the safety of high doses of metformin in Japanese patients, especially in elderly patients with a decreased renal function, remains unclear. Among the side effects of metformin, lactate acidosis is the most problematic due to a high mortality rate. Therefore, we assessed plasma lactate levels in metformin-treated patients to identify independent risk factors for hyperlactemia. 290 outpatients receiving various doses of metformin at our hospital were enrolled between March and July 2014. Serum electrolytes, Cre (creatinine), BUN (blood urea nitrogen), UA (uric acid), HbA1c (hemoglobin A1c), and lactate levels were investigated. Lactate levels did not significantly differ between the elderly (≥75 years) and non-elderly (<75 years) groups. Patients in the elderly group had a significantly lower daily metformin dose and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), compared with the non-elderly group (both p<0.005). Between with and without hyperlactemia groups, no significant differences were observed in either Cre or age. On the other hand, patients with hyperlactemia had a significantly higher dose of metformin than those without hyperlactemia (p<0.05). In this study, we found that old age and mildly impaired kidney function were not associated with increased lactate levels, and that a higher dose of metformin may be an independent risk factor for elevated lactate levels in Japanese patients.

  5. An observational investigation of poker style and the five-factor personality model.

    PubMed

    Brown, Steven C; Mitchell, Laura A

    2010-06-01

    Little empirical investigation has been made of the relationship between personality and gambling play style. In an observation of on-table poker behavior, this study classified 44 players competing in an amateur league (43 male; mean age 32) according to two main dimensions of play style; tight or loose and aggressive or passive. Superstitious beliefs towards the game were additionally measured. The NEO-PI-R questionnaire (Costa and McCrae, Revised NEO personality inventory (NEO-PI-R) and NEO-five factor inventory (NEO-FFI) professional manual, 1992) was used to measure personality according to the five-factor model. Results showed players with superstitious beliefs to be significantly higher in neuroticism and lower in conscientiousness and than those with no superstitious beliefs. Results approaching significance showed players adopting an aggressive style to be higher in extraversion than passive players and superstitious players to be lower in extraversion than non-superstitious players. Analysis of play style according to age of player revealed a significantly higher mean age among loose compared to tight players. Implications of results concerning validity of these style classifications and potential development in future work are discussed.

  6. Investigation of factors influencing burnout levels in the professional and private lives of nurses.

    PubMed

    Demir, A; Ulusoy, M; Ulusoy, M F

    2003-11-01

    This is a descriptive, cross-sectional and partly analytic study aiming to determine the factors causing burnout in professional and private lives of nurses working in the university and state hospitals in a city. About 333 nurses were reached by sampling method. Data collection was made by a question form consisting of two parts. The first part was developed by the investigators. In this part, data on demographic, professional and private life conditions of individuals were collected. In the second part, "Maslach Burnout Inventory" was used to determine the burnout levels of individuals. The most important findings of the present study are as follows: higher education level, work experience and higher status decrease burnout while working at night shifts increases it. In addition, nurses who have problems in relations with the other team members and are not satisfied with their work conditions have higher levels of burnout. Having difficulty in childcare and in doing house chores, health problems of the nurse herself or her children, economic hardships and difficulties encountered in transportation are other factors increasing burnout.

  7. Investigation of Influential Factors for Bicycle Crashes Using a Spatiotemporal Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, G.; Sakrani, T.; Cheng, W.; Zhou, J.

    2017-09-01

    Despite the numerous potential advantages of indulging in bicycling, such as elevation of health and environment along with mitigation of congestion, the cyclists are a vulnerable group of commuters which is exposed to safety risks. This study aims to investigate the explanatory variables at transportation planning level which have a significant impact on the bicycle crashes. To account for the serial changes around the built environment, the linear time trend as well as time-varying coefficients are utilized for the covariates. These model modifications help account for the variations in the environment which may escape the incorporated variables due to lack of robustness in data. Also, to incorporate the interaction of roadway, demographic, and socioeconomic features within a Traffic Analysis Zone (TAZ), with the bicycle crashes of that area, a spatial correlation is integrated. This spatial correlation accounts for the spatially structured random effects which capture the unobserved heterogeneity and add towards building more comprehensive model with relatively precise estimates. Two different age groups, the student population in the TAZs, the presence of arterial roads and bike lanes, were observed to be statistically significant variables related with bicycle crashes. These observations will guide the transportation planning organizations which focus on the entity of TAZ while developing policies. The results of the current study establish a quantifies relationship between the significant factors and the crash count which will enable the planners to choose the most cost-efficient, yet most productive, factors which needs to be addressed for mitigation of crashes.

  8. Investigating the accessibility factors that influence antenatal care services utilisation in Mangwe district, Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Nyathi, Leoba; Tugli, Augustine K; Tshitangano, Takalani G; Mpofu, Molyn

    2017-06-29

    Maternal and infant mortality remains a huge public health problem in developing countries. One of the strategies to minimise the risks of both maternal and infant mortality is access to and utilisation of antenatal care (ANC) services. This study aimed to investigate the accessibility factors that influence the use of ANC services in Mangwe district. A qualitative approach using explorative design was adopted to target women who have babies under 1 year of age. The study was conducted in Mangwe district, Matabeleland South province, Zimbabwe. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews and observations. Data saturation was reached after 15 women who were conveniently sampled were interviewed. Field notes were analysed thematically using Tech's steps. Lincoln and Guba's criteria ensured trustworthiness of the study findings. Accessibility factors such as lack of transport, high transport costs and long distances to health care facilities, health care workers' attitudes, type and quality of services as well as delays in receiving care influence women's utilisation of ANC services in Mangwe district, Zimbabwe. The study concluded that women were still facing problems of unavailability of nearby clinics; therefore, it was recommended that the government should avail resources for women to use. Mangwe District Health Department should provide mobile clinics rendering ANC services in distant rural areas.

  9. An investigation of factors affecting the entry of radon into structures on the Island of Guam

    SciTech Connect

    Kladder, D.L.; Burkhart, J.F.; Thorburn, M.S.

    1995-12-31

    Factors affecting the entry of radon-222 gas into structures on the Island of Guam were investigated during the summer of 1993. Research findings indicated that radon transport into buildings on Guam, and perhaps in other tropical areas, is driven by sub-grade soil pressure (positive with respect to atmospheric pressure) rather than interior buildings vacuums. Immediate and substantive increases in indoor radon concentrations were associated with environmental effects of wind and rain. Radon entry, and hence indoor radon concentrations, is significantly greater during the rainy season as opposed to the dry season. In the absence of mechanically induced interior vacuums in buildings, external environmental forces creating sub-slab pressures are the predominant factor in affecting radon entry in Guam. Indoor radon potentials can be correlated to the locations where the underlying geology is limestone. Furthermore, the radon source appears to be within the first few feet of the surface of these limestones rather than uniformly distributed throughout the limestone. The effects of seismic activity on radon entry are short-lived unless significant damage occurs to a structure. Radon entry during calm weather conditions may also be a function of the rising and falling of ocean tides.

  10. [Investigation on a group of autistic children: risk factors and medical social considerations].

    PubMed

    Troili, G M; Businaro, R; Massoni, F; Ricci, L; Petrone, L; Ricci, P; Ricci, S

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study the association between autism in a group of autistic children and risk factors for specific familiar diseases and developmental disease in the early years of life, through a medical social investigation. For this study, we have submitted an anamnestic questionnaire to 29 autistic children and their families in a South Italy region (Basilicata), collecting data about children and their parents. The results show that many children have a family history of autoimmune diseases (psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, celiac disease, Takayasu's arteritis), allergies and food intolerances, suggesting a putative involvement of the immune system in autism etiopathogenesis. Analyzing residences areas of patients, Potenza and Matera, with their environmental factors (radioactive waste repositories, incinerators, intensive farming), we demonstrate that the particular territorial characteristics don't affect autism. Autistic disorder is a spectrum of neurologic disorders complex both in etiopathogenesis and healthcare. So we aim to continue the study already undertaken on cytokines of autistic subjects serum and to extend it through biomolecular approaches assessing the presence of specific genetic polymorphisms in order to identify the physiopathogenetic mechanisms underlying the disease and to evaluate the predictive risk with the aim to improve care interventions.

  11. Deoxynivalenol induces ectodomain shedding of TNF receptor 1 and thereby inhibits the TNF-α-induced NF-κB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Seiya; Kataoka, Takao

    2013-02-15

    Trichothecene mycotoxins are known to inhibit eukaryotic translation and to trigger the ribotoxic stress response, which regulates gene expression via the activation of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase superfamily. In this study, we found that deoxynivalenol induced the ectodomain shedding of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor 1 (TNFRSF1A) and thereby inhibited the TNF-α-induced signaling pathway. In human lung carcinoma A549 cells, deoxynivalenol and 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol inhibited the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) induced by TNF-α more strongly than that induced by interleukin 1α (IL-1α), whereas T-2 toxin and verrucarin A exerted nonselective inhibitory effects. Deoxynivalenol and 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol also inhibited the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway induced by TNF-α, but not that induced by IL-1α. Consistent with these findings, deoxynivalenol and 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol induced the ectodomain shedding of TNF receptor 1 by TNF-α-converting enzyme (TACE), also known as a disintegrin and metalloproteinase 17 (ADAM17). In addition to the TACE inhibitor TAPI-2, the MAP kinase or extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) kinase (MEK) inhibitor U0126 and the p38 MAP kinase inhibitor SB203580, but not the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor SP600125, suppressed the ectodomain shedding of TNF receptor 1 induced by deoxynivalenol and reversed its selective inhibition of TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 expression. Our results demonstrate that deoxynivalenol induces the TACE-dependent ectodomain shedding of TNF receptor 1 via the activation of ERK and p38 MAP kinase, and thereby inhibits the TNF-α-induced NF-κB signaling pathway.

  12. Investigation of biological factors influencing the placental mRNA profile in maternal plasma.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Nancy B Y; Wong, Cesar S C; Chow, Katherine C K; Lo, Elena S F; Cheng, Yvonne K Y

    2014-03-01

    Circulating placental-derived RNA is useful for noninvasive prenatal investigation. However, in addition to placental gene expression, there are limited investigations on other biological parameters that may affect the circulating placental RNA profile. In this study, we explored two of these potential parameters. We first demonstrated the existence of such biological parameters by comparing the relative levels of a panel of placental-derived transcripts between the placentas and maternal plasma by digital PCRs. We then compared the post-delivery clearance of the transcripts by serial plasma samples collected from pregnant women after delivery. We also studied the placental in vivo localization of the transcripts by in situ hybridization. There was an imperfect correlation of the transcript levels between the placentas and maternal plasma, with placenta-specific 4 (PLAC4) mRNA showing the largest discrepancy. Although PLAC4 mRNA showed a similar clearance half-life with other transcripts, we observed a preferential localization of PLAC4 mRNA around the villous surface. We speculated that this phenomenon might play a role in favoring the release of PLAC4 mRNA molecules into maternal plasma. We revealed that in addition to expression levels in the placenta, other biological factors might interplay to determine the maternal plasma profile of placental-derived RNAs. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. [Investigation of incidence and risk factors of subcutaneous granulomas induced by injection of leuprorelin acetate].

    PubMed

    Fukui, Shinji; Nakai, Yasushi; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Kagebayashi, Yoriaki; Samma, Shoji

    2015-02-01

    We investigated the incidence of granuloma and its related factors in 180 patients with prostate cancer who showed subcutaneous granuloma formation during androgen deprivation therapy with subcutaneously administered leuprorelin acetate. A granuloma was defined as a persistent induration over 30 mm in diameter in the injected portion. Small indurations which often developed and disappeared after every injection were excluded. The survey was performed using a questionnaire after receiving written informed consent. Among the 180 patients with prostate cancer, 21 (11.7%) developed a granuloma at the injection portion, and subsequently the injection of leuprorelin acetate had to be discontinued. Eighteen of the 21 patients alternatively received goserelin acetate. Three patients had high-grade granulomas with ulcer and abscess formation, and were successfully treated with oral antibiotics. The average duration between the first injection of leuprorelin acetate and granuloma formation was 20.2 months (range : 4 to 62 months). There was no association between granuloma formation and patient backgrounds, such as allergic predisposition and past history. Twenty-one of the 180 prostatic cancer patients developed subcutaneous granuloma induced by the injection of leuprorelin acetate. The investigation showed an unexpectedly high incidence of granuloma formation. We must explain the risk of developing subcutaneous granuloma to the patients before introducing leuprorelin acetate.

  14. Epigenetics applied to epidemiology: investigating environmental factors and lifestyle influence on human health.

    PubMed

    Motta, Valeria; Bonzini, Matteo; Grevendonk, Lotte; Iodice, Simona; Bollati, Valentina

    2017-02-15

    Epigenetics modifications, that include variations in DNA methylation, histone acetylation and micro RNA (miRNA) expression, co-operate together, influencing genome expression and function, in response to exogenous stimuli or exposures. Thus, epigenetic tools applied to epidemiology are useful in investigating, at the population level, the relationships between exposures to environmental, lifestyle, genetic, socioeconomic risk factors, and the epigenome, and/or specific health outcomes. But the choice of an appropriate study design and of valid epidemiological methods has a key role in determining the achievement of the study. This review summarises available evidence about the role of the most investigated epigenetic mechanisms in mediating lifestyle or environmental exposure effects on human health, considering the entire life-course, from in-utero to adulthood. Moreover, we illustrate the most important variables that should be properly considered when designing an epigenetic epidemiology study: the choice of an appropriate study design, a proper estimation of the required sample size, a correct biological sample selection, a validation strategy for epigenetics data, and an integrated exposure assessment methodology.

  15. Human and Host Species Transferrin Receptor 1 Use by North American Arenaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Min; Fofana, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT At least five New World (NW) arenaviruses cause hemorrhagic fevers in South America. These pathogenic clade B viruses, as well as nonpathogenic arenaviruses of the same clade, use transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) of their host species to enter cells. Pathogenic viruses are distinguished from closely related nonpathogenic ones by their additional ability to utilize human TfR1 (hTfR1). Here, we investigate the receptor usage of North American arenaviruses, whose entry proteins share greatest similarity with those of the clade B viruses. We show that all six North American arenaviruses investigated utilize host species TfR1 orthologs and present evidence consistent with arenavirus-mediated selection pressure on the TfR1 of the North American arenavirus host species. Notably, one of these viruses, AV96010151, closely related to the prototype Whitewater Arroyo virus (WWAV), entered cells using hTfR1, consistent with a role for a WWAV-like virus in three fatal human infections whose causative agent has not been identified. In addition, modest changes were sufficient to convert hTfR1 into a functional receptor for most of these viruses, suggesting that a minor alteration in virus entry protein may allow these viruses to use hTfR1. Our data establish TfR1 as a cellular receptor for North American arenaviruses, highlight an “arms race” between these viruses and their host species, support the association of North American arenavirus with fatal human infections, and suggest that these viruses have a higher potential to emerge and cause human diseases than has previously been appreciated. IMPORTANCE hTfR1 use is a key determinant for a NW arenavirus to cause hemorrhagic fevers in humans. All known pathogenic NW arenaviruses are transmitted in South America by their host rodents. North American arenaviruses are generally considered nonpathogenic, but some of these viruses have been tentatively implicated in human fatalities. We show that these North American

  16. Factors associated with dropout in a group weight-loss programme: a longitudinal investigation.

    PubMed

    Yackobovitch-Gavan, M; Steinberg, D M; Endevelt, R; Benyamini, Y

    2015-02-01

    Attrition is a major limitation of most weight management intervention programmes. The present study aimed to conduct an extensive investigation of personal, sociodemographic and treatment-related factors associated with attrition at different stages of a 10-week group weight-loss programme. The present study is part of a longitudinal, clinical intervention study comparing three conditions in a 10-week group programme: Control, Behavioural Intentions and Implementation Intentions. The study included 587 participants with a mean (SD) age of 46 (11) years (range 18-78 years) and a mean (SD) body mass index (BMI) of 31.9 (5.5) kg m(-2), with 90% being female. To characterise dropout in each week separately, as well as overall dropout (dropout until week 9, the median time of dropout), we tested several logistic regression models, including multiple imputations to cope with missing data. The results of the different dropout models consistently showed that a smaller reduction in BMI in the first 2 weeks of the programme was the strongest predictor of dropout. Dropout in the tenth and last week differed from the earlier weeks both in the relatively high dropout rate (56% of total dropout) and in that, in contrast to earlier weeks, the week 10 model included the reduction in BMI during the last 2 weeks before dropout but did not include the reduction in BMI at the initiation of the intervention. Weight-loss in the beginning of the programme is a crucial independent determinant of dropout in each week except the last one. This finding is important because it suggests a simple assessment for a major dropout risk factor in adult weight-loss intervention programmes. © 2014 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  17. Investigating Veterans’ Pre-, Peri-, and Post-Deployment Experiences as Potential Risk Factors for Problem Gambling

    PubMed Central

    Whiting, Seth W.; Potenza, Marc N.; Park, Crystal L.; McKee, Sherry A.; Mazure, Carolyn M.; Hoff, Rani A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims Gambling disorder and its comorbid diagnoses are observed at higher rates in military veterans than in the general population. A significant research gap exists regarding the relationships of veterans’ life and service experiences to problematic gambling. The present study explored pre-, peri-, and post-deployment factors associated with problem gambling in veterans. Methods Veterans of Operation Iraqi Freedom, Operation Enduring Freedom, and Operation New Dawn (n = 738; 463 males, and 275 females) completed questionnaires via structured telephone interview. We conducted bivariate and multinomial logistic regression analyses exploring associations among problem-gambling severity and socio-demographic variables, psychiatric comorbidities, and 10 scales of the Deployment Risk and Resilience Inventory measuring experiences pre-, peri-, and post-deployment. Results Approximately 4.2% of veterans indicated at-risk or probable pathological gambling (ARPG) post-deployment (two or more DSM-IV criteria for pathological gambling). Bivariate analyses found more severe gambling in males, higher frequencies of post-traumatic stress disorder, substance dependence, traumatic brain injury, panic disorder, and depression in veterans with ARPG, and higher general harassment during deployment, and lower social support and more stressful life events post-deployment in those with ARPG. In multivariable models, both post-deployment factors remained significantly associated with ARPG. Discussion The study suggests that problem gambling among veterans is related to service experiences, and particularly to life experiences post-deployment. Conclusions Adverse service and life experiences and lack of social support may contribute to the risk of problem gambling in military veterans. Investigation of how Veterans Affairs clinical settings may serve veterans following deployment to prevent behavioral addictions is warranted. PMID:27156377

  18. Investigating Veterans' Pre-, Peri-, and Post-Deployment Experiences as Potential Risk Factors for Problem Gambling.

    PubMed

    Whiting, Seth W; Potenza, Marc N; Park, Crystal L; McKee, Sherry A; Mazure, Carolyn M; Hoff, Rani A

    2016-06-01

    Background and aims Gambling disorder and its comorbid diagnoses are observed at higher rates in military veterans than in the general population. A significant research gap exists regarding the relationships of veterans' life and service experiences to problematic gambling. The present study explored pre-, peri-, and post-deployment factors associated with problem gambling in veterans. Methods Veterans of Operation Iraqi Freedom, Operation Enduring Freedom, and Operation New Dawn (n = 738; 463 males, and 275 females) completed questionnaires via structured telephone interview. We conducted bivariate and multinomial logistic regression analyses exploring associations among problem-gambling severity and socio-demographic variables, psychiatric comorbidities, and 10 scales of the Deployment Risk and Resilience Inventory measuring experiences pre-, peri-, and post-deployment. Results Approximately 4.2% of veterans indicated at-risk or probable pathological gambling (ARPG) post-deployment (two or more DSM-IV criteria for pathological gambling). Bivariate analyses found more severe gambling in males, higher frequencies of post-traumatic stress disorder, substance dependence, traumatic brain injury, panic disorder, and depression in veterans with ARPG, and higher general harassment during deployment, and lower social support and more stressful life events post-deployment in those with ARPG. In multivariable models, both post-deployment factors remained significantly associated with ARPG. Discussion The study suggests that problem gambling among veterans is related to service experiences, and particularly to life experiences post-deployment. Conclusions Adverse service and life experiences and lack of social support may contribute to the risk of problem gambling in military veterans. Investigation of how Veterans Affairs clinical settings may serve veterans following deployment to prevent behavioral addictions is warranted.

  19. Uni- and multivariate models for investigating potential prognostic factors in idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Lionello, Marco; Staffieri, Claudia; Breda, Stefano; Turato, Chiara; Giacomelli, Luciano; Magnavita, Paola; de Filippis, Cosimo; Staffieri, Alberto; Marioni, Gino

    2015-08-01

    With a worldwide incidence estimated at 8-15 per 100,000 population a year, idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSHL) is a common clinical finding for otologists. There is a shortage of information on the clinical factors capable of predicting hearing recovery and response to therapy. The aim of the present study was to retrospectively investigate the prognostic value of clinical variables in relation to hearing recovery, in a cohort of 117 consecutive patients with ISSHL. Clinical parameters (signs, symptoms, comorbidities and treatments) and audiometric data were analyzed with univariate and multivariate statistical approaches for prognostic purposes to identify any correlation with hearing recovery, also expressed according to the Wilson criteria. Univariate analysis showed that age and hypertension were significantly related to hearing outcome (p = 0.004 and p = 0.015, respectively). Elderly patients and those with hypertension were at higher risk of experiencing no hearing recovery (OR = 3.25 and OR = 2.89, respectively). Age was an independent prognostic factor on multivariate analysis (p = 0.007). Tinnitus as a presenting symptom showed a trend towards an association with hearing recovery (p = 0.07). The treatment regimen, the time elapsing between the onset of symptoms and the start of therapy (p = 0.34), and the duration of the treatment (p = 0.83) were unrelated to recovery on univariate analysis. Among the parameters considered, only age was significantly and independently related to hearing outcome. There is a need for well-designed, randomized clinical trials to enable an evidence-based protocol to be developed for the treatment of ISSHL.

  20. Incidence and risk factors for surgically acquired pressure ulcers: a prospective cohort study investigators.

    PubMed

    Webster, Joan; Lister, Carolyn; Corry, Jean; Holland, Michelle; Coleman, Kerrie; Marquart, Louise

    2015-01-01

    To assess the incidence of hospital-acquired, surgery-related pressure injury (ulcers) and identify risk factors for these injuries. We used a prospective cohort study to investigate the research question. The study was conducted at a major metropolitan hospital in Brisbane, Australia. Five hundred thirty-four adult patients booked for any surgical procedure expected to last more than 30 minutes were eligible for inclusion. Patients who provided informed consent for study participation were assessed for pressure ulcers, using the European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel and National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel Guidelines, before entering the operating room and again in the post-anesthetic care unit (PACU). Research nurses and all PACU nurses were trained in skin assessment and in pressure ulcer staging. Patients were not assessed again after their discharge from the PACU. Seven patients (1.3%) had existing pressure injuries (ulcers) and a further 6 (1.3%) developed a surgery-related pressure ulcer. Risk factors associated with surgery-related pressure injuries were similar to non-surgically related risks and included older age, skin condition, and being admitted from a location other than one's own home. Length of surgery was not associated with pressure ulcer development in this cohort. Perioperative nurses play an important role in identifying existing or new pressure injuries. However, many of these nurses are unfamiliar with pressure ulcer classification, so education in this area is essential. Although the incidence of surgically acquired pressure ulcers was low in this cohort, careful skin inspection before and after surgery provides an opportunity for early treatment and may prevent existing lesions progressing to higher stages.

  1. An investigation of the early factors which influence women's career choices in physical science and technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Anneliese

    The composition of the workforce has begun to undergo a change. The U.S. Department of Labor estimates that women, minorities, and immigrants will constitute 80 percent of the additions to the labor force between 1987 and the year 2000 (Oakes, 1990). The National Science Foundation projects that the United States may have a shortfall of 400,000 scientists and over 250,000 engineers by the year 2006 (Argonne, 1990). Since women are among those who are significantly underrepresented among individuals preparing for a career in science, thirty women who are currently pursuing a successful career in physical science and technology were interviewed. This study determined participants' perceptions of the factors that first influenced an early interest in physical science and technology. The investigation included perceptions regarding: (1) whether certain identifiable events or experiences influenced the decision to pursue science as a career and what those events and experiences were; (2) at what age these events occurred; (3) whether an adult(s) was influential and which adult(s) it was; and (4) identification of where these events and experiences occurred. The interview technique was selected as the best research method for collecting the qualitative and demographic data needed for this study. The results represent the participants' recollections of out-of-school and in-school activities, family, friends and teacher support, self-image during the formative years, parents as the most important factor which influenced an interest in physical science, and major obstacles that had to be overcome by the participants in order to pursue successful careers in physical science and technology. Also included is participants' advice to parents and teachers who want to encourage females to pursue a career in physical science and technology.

  2. Adult Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptor 1-Deficient Rats with Hyperoxia-Induced Neonatal Chronic Lung Disease Are Protected against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xueyu; Walther, Frans J.; Laghmani, El H.; Hoogeboom, Annemarie M.; Hogen-Esch, Anne C. B.; van Ark, Ingrid; Folkerts, Gert; Wagenaar, Gerry T. M.

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Survivors of neonatal chronic lung disease or bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) suffer from compromised lung function and are at high risk for developing lung injury by multiple insults later in life. Because neonatal lysophosphatidic acid receptor-1 (LPAR1)-deficient rats are protected against hyperoxia-induced lung injury, we hypothesize that LPAR1-deficiency may protect adult survivors of BPD from a second hit response against lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-induced lung injury. Methods: Directly after birth, Wistar control and LPAR1-deficient rat pups were exposed to hyperoxia (90%) for 8 days followed by recovery in room air. After 7 weeks, male rats received either LPS (2 mg kg−1) or 0.9% NaCl by intraperitoneal injection. Alveolar development and lung inflammation were investigated by morphometric analysis, IL-6 production, and mRNA expression of cytokines, chemokines, coagulation factors, and an indicator of oxidative stress. Results: LPAR1-deficient and control rats developed hyperoxia-induced neonatal emphysema, which persisted into adulthood, as demonstrated by alveolar enlargement and decreased vessel density. LPAR1-deficiency protected against LPS-induced lung injury. Adult controls with BPD exhibited an exacerbated response toward LPS with an increased expression of pro-inflammatory mRNAs, whereas LPAR1-deficient rats with BPD were less sensitive to this “second hit” with a decreased pulmonary influx of macrophages and neutrophils, interleukin-6 (IL-6) production, and mRNA expression of IL-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant 1, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, and tissue factor. Conclusion: LPAR1-deficient rats have increased hyperoxia-induced BPD survival rates and, despite the presence of neonatal emphysema, are less sensitive to an aggravated “second hit” than Wistar controls with BPD. Intervening in LPA-LPAR1-dependent signaling may not only have therapeutic potential for neonatal chronic

  3. Pilot case-control investigation of risk factors for hip fractures in the urban Indian population

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Despite the reported high prevalence of osteoporosis in India, there have been no previous studies examining the risk factors for hip fracture in the Indian population. Methods We carried out a case control investigation comprising 100 case subjects (57 women and 43 men) admitted with a first hip fracture into one of three hospitals across New Delhi. The 100 controls were age and sex matched subjects who were either healthy visitors not related to the case patients or hospital staff. Information from all subjects was obtained through a questionnaire based interview. Results There was a significant increase in the number of cases of hip fracture with increasing age. There were significantly more women (57%) than men (43%). Univariate analysis identified protective effects for increased activity, exercise, calcium and vitamin supplements, almonds, fish, paneer (cottage cheese), curd (plain yogurt), and milk. However, tea and other caffeinated beverages were significant risk factors. In women, hormone/estrogen therapy appeared to have a marginal protective effect. For all cases, decreased agility, visual impairment, long term medications, chronic illnesses increased the risk of hip fracture. The multivariate analysis confirmed a protective effect of increased activity and also showed a decrease in hip fracture risk with increasing body mass index (odds ratio (OR) 0.024, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.006-0.10 & OR 0.81, 95% CI 0.68-0.97 respectively). Individuals who take calcium supplements have a decreased risk of hip fracture (OR 0.076; CI 0.017-0.340), as do individuals who eat fish (OR 0.094; CI 0.020-0.431), and those who eat paneer (OR 0.152; 0.031-0.741). Tea drinkers have a higher risk of hip fracture (OR 22.8; 95% CI 3.73-139.43). Difficulty in getting up from a chair also appears to be an important risk factor for hip fractures (OR 14.53; 95% CI 3.86-54.23). Conclusions In the urban Indian population, dietary calcium, vitamin D, increased body

  4. Pilot case-control investigation of risk factors for hip fractures in the urban Indian population.

    PubMed

    Jha, Ruchira M; Mithal, Ambrish; Malhotra, Nidhi; Brown, Edward M

    2010-03-14

    Despite the reported high prevalence of osteoporosis in India, there have been no previous studies examining the risk factors for hip fracture in the Indian population. We carried out a case control investigation comprising 100 case subjects (57 women and 43 men) admitted with a first hip fracture into one of three hospitals across New Delhi. The 100 controls were age and sex matched subjects who were either healthy visitors not related to the case patients or hospital staff. Information from all subjects was obtained through a questionnaire based interview. There was a significant increase in the number of cases of hip fracture with increasing age. There were significantly more women (57%) than men (43%). Univariate analysis identified protective effects for increased activity, exercise, calcium and vitamin supplements, almonds, fish, paneer (cottage cheese), curd (plain yogurt), and milk. However, tea and other caffeinated beverages were significant risk factors. In women, hormone/estrogen therapy appeared to have a marginal protective effect. For all cases, decreased agility, visual impairment, long term medications, chronic illnesses increased the risk of hip fracture. The multivariate analysis confirmed a protective effect of increased activity and also showed a decrease in hip fracture risk with increasing body mass index (odds ratio (OR) 0.024, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.006-0.10 & OR 0.81, 95% CI 0.68-0.97 respectively). Individuals who take calcium supplements have a decreased risk of hip fracture (OR 0.076; CI 0.017-0.340), as do individuals who eat fish (OR 0.094; CI 0.020-0.431), and those who eat paneer (OR 0.152; 0.031-0.741). Tea drinkers have a higher risk of hip fracture (OR 22.8; 95% CI 3.73-139.43). Difficulty in getting up from a chair also appears to be an important risk factor for hip fractures (OR 14.53; 95% CI 3.86-54.23). In the urban Indian population, dietary calcium, vitamin D, increased body mass index, and higher activity levels

  5. Using medico-legal data to investigate fatal older road user crash circumstances and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Koppel, Sjaan; Bugeja, Lyndal; Smith, Daisy; Lamb, Ashne; Dwyer, Jeremy; Fitzharris, Michael; Newstead, Stuart; D'Elia, Angelo; Charlton, Judith

    2017-07-31

    This study used medico-legal data to investigate fatal older road user (ORU, aged 65 years and older) crash circumstances and risk factors relating to 4 key components of the Safe System approach (e.g., roads and roadsides, vehicles, road users, and speeds) to identify areas of priority for targeted prevention activity. The Coroners' Court of Victoria's (CCOV) Surveillance Database was searched to identify and describe the frequency and rate per 100,000 population of fatal ORU crashes in the Australian state of Victoria for 2013-2014. Information relating to the deceased ORU, crash characteristics and circumstances, and risk factors was extracted and analyzed. One hundred and thirty-eight unintentional fatal ORU crashes were identified in the CCOV Surveillance Database. Of these fatal ORU crashes, most involved older drivers (44%), followed by older pedestrians (32%), older passengers (17%), older pedal cyclists (4%), older motorcyclists (1%), and older mobility scooter users (1%). The average annual rate of fatal ORU crashes per 100,000 population was 8.1 (95% confidence interval [CI], 6.0-10.2). In terms of the crash characteristics and circumstances, most fatal ORU crashes involved a counterpart (98%), of which the majority were passenger cars (50%) or fixed/stationary objects (25%), including trees (46%) or embankments (23%). In addition, most fatal ORU crashes occurred close to home (73%), on-road (87%), on roads that were paved (94%), on roads with light traffic volume (37%), and during low-risk conditions: between 12 p.m. and 6 p.m. (44%), on weekdays (80%), during daylight (75%), and under dry/clear conditions (81%). Road user (RU) error was identified by the police and/or the coroner for the majority of fatal crashes (55%), with a significant proportion of deceased ORUs deemed to have failed to yield (54%) or misjudged (41%). RU error was the most significant factor identified in fatal ORU crashes, which suggests that there is a limited capacity of the

  6. Human Fear Acquisition Deficits in Relation to Genetic Variants of the Corticotropin Releasing Hormone Receptor 1 and the Serotonin Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Heitland, Ivo; Groenink, Lucianne; Bijlsma, Elisabeth Y.; Oosting, Ronald S.; Baas, Johanna M. P.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to identify predictors of aversive events allows organisms to appropriately respond to these events, and failure to acquire these fear contingencies can lead to maladaptive contextual anxiety. Recently, preclinical studies demonstrated that the corticotropin-releasing factor and serotonin systems are interactively involved in adaptive fear acquisition. Here, 150 healthy medication-free human subjects completed a cue and context fear conditioning procedure in a virtual reality environment. Fear potentiation of the eyeblink startle reflex (FPS) was measured to assess both uninstructed fear acquisition and instructed fear expression. All participants were genotyped for polymorphisms located within regulatory regions of the corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRHR1 - rs878886) and the serotonin transporter (5HTTLPR). These polymorphisms have previously been linked to panic disorder and anxious symptomology and personality, respectively. G-allele carriers of CRHR1 (rs878886) showed no acquisition of fear conditioned responses (FPS) to the threat cue in the uninstructed phase, whereas fear acquisition was present in C/C homozygotes. Moreover, carrying the risk alleles of both rs878886 (G-allele) and 5HTTLPR (short allele) was associated with increased FPS to the threat context during this phase. After explicit instructions regarding the threat contingency were given, the cue FPS and context FPS normalized in all genotype groups. The present results indicate that genetic variability in the corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1, especially in interaction with the 5HTTLPR, is involved in the acquisition of fear in humans. This translates prior animal findings to the human realm. PMID:23717480

  7. Investigation of Microstructural Factors that Cause Low Fracture Toughness in Silicon Carbide Whisker/Al Alloy Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-10-01

    TOUGHNESS IN SILICON CARBIDE WHISKER/Al ALLOY COMPOSITES oSubmittLJ to: Office of Naval Research 800 N. Quincy Street Arlington, VA 22217-5000...September 30, 1988 INVESTIGATION OF MICROSTRUCTURAL FACTORS THAT CAUSE LOW FRACTURE TOUGHNESS IN SILICON CARBIDE WHISKER/Al ALLOY COMPOSITES Submitted...Investigation of Microstructural Factors that Cause Low Fracture Toughness in Silicon Carbide Whisker/Al Alloy Composites .12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) F. E. Wawner

  8. An Investigation of the Higher-Order Symbolic Factors of Cognition and Convergent Production within the Structure of Intellect Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bachelor, Patricia A.; Bachelor, Barry G.

    1989-01-01

    The existence of higher-order factors within the cognition and convergent production operations and product dimensions of the structure-of-intellect model of J. P. Guilford was investigated. Data from 240 aviation officer candidates and Naval air cadets were reanalyzed via maximum likelihood confirmatory factor analysis, using the LISREL program.…

  9. An Investigation of the Factors That Influence Preservice Teachers' Intentions and Integration of Web 2.0 Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadaf, Ayesha; Newby, Timothy J.; Ertmer, Peggy A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate factors that predict preservice teachers' intentions and actual uses of Web 2.0 tools in their classrooms. A two-phase, mixed method, sequential explanatory design was used. The first phase explored factors, based on the decomposed theory of planned behavior, that predict preservice teachers' intentions…

  10. An Investigation of the Factors That Influence Preservice Teachers' Intentions and Actual Integration of Web 2.0 Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadaf, Ayesha

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this two phase mixed methods sequential explanatory study was to investigate factors that predict preservice teachers' intentions to use Web 2.0 technologies in their future classrooms and their ability to carry out their intentions during student teaching. The first phase explored factors based on the Decomposed Theory of Planned…

  11. An Investigation of the Higher-Order Symbolic Factors of Cognition and Convergent Production within the Structure of Intellect Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bachelor, Patricia A.; Bachelor, Barry G.

    1989-01-01

    The existence of higher-order factors within the cognition and convergent production operations and product dimensions of the structure-of-intellect model of J. P. Guilford was investigated. Data from 240 aviation officer candidates and Naval air cadets were reanalyzed via maximum likelihood confirmatory factor analysis, using the LISREL program.…

  12. An Investigation of the Factors That Influence Preservice Teachers' Intentions and Integration of Web 2.0 Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadaf, Ayesha; Newby, Timothy J.; Ertmer, Peggy A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate factors that predict preservice teachers' intentions and actual uses of Web 2.0 tools in their classrooms. A two-phase, mixed method, sequential explanatory design was used. The first phase explored factors, based on the decomposed theory of planned behavior, that predict preservice teachers' intentions…

  13. An Investigation of the Factors That Influence Preservice Teachers' Intentions and Actual Integration of Web 2.0 Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadaf, Ayesha

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this two phase mixed methods sequential explanatory study was to investigate factors that predict preservice teachers' intentions to use Web 2.0 technologies in their future classrooms and their ability to carry out their intentions during student teaching. The first phase explored factors based on the Decomposed Theory of Planned…

  14. A Multilevel Modelling Approach to Investigating Factors Impacting Science Achievement for Secondary School Students: PISA Hong Kong Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Letao; Bradley, Kelly D.; Akers, Kathryn

    2012-01-01

    This study utilized data from the 2006 Programme for International Student Assessment Hong Kong sample to investigate the factors that impact the science achievement of 15-year-old students. A multilevel model was used to examine the factors from both student and school perspectives. At the student level, the results indicated that male students,…

  15. Investigation of factors influencing production of the monocyclic carotenoid torulene in metabolically engineered Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lee, Pyung Cheon; Mijts, Benjamin N; Schmidt-Dannert, Claudia

    2004-10-01

    Factors influencing production of the monocyclic carotenoid torulene in recombinant Escherichia coli were investigated by modulating enzyme expression level, culture conditions, and engineering of the isoprenoid precursor pathway. The gene dosage of in vitro evolved lycopene cyclase crtY2 significantly changed the carotenoid profile. A culture temperature of 28 degrees C showed better production of torulene than 37 degrees C while initial culture pH had no significant effect on torulene production. Glucose-containing LB, 2xYT, TB and MR media significantly repressed the production of torulene, and the other carotenoids lycopene, tetradehydrolycopene, and beta-carotene, in E. coli. In contrast, glycerol-containing LB, 2xYT, TB, and MR media enhanced torulene production. Overexpression of dxs, dxr, idi and/or ispA, individually and combinatorially, enhanced torulene production up to 3.1-3.3 fold. High torulene production was observed in a high dissolved oxygen level bioreactor in TB and MR media containing glycerol. Lycopene was efficiently converted into torulene during aerobic cultures, indicating that the engineered torulene synthesis pathway is well coordinated, and maintains the functionality and integrity of the carotenogenic enzyme complex.

  16. A Total Factor Productivity Based Structure for Tactical Cluster Assessment: Empirical Investigation in the Airline Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasigh, Bijan; Fleming, Kenneth

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we analyze and assess the efficiency of the United States (U.S.) airline industry through the total factor productivity (TFP) method. While airlines use various resources to produce a heterogeneous group of outputs, this article focuses on certain fundamental outputs as final products of selected airlines. The results from this analysis indicate that the national airlines (US. domestic carriers) have higher TFP as compared to the major airlines. While major airlines have drastically cut costs in the past few years, they also need to improve efficiency or risk going out of business. In this paper, we investigate the efficiency and productivity of a selection of U.S. airlines for the years 1996 through 2001. These years have been chosen as a good example of years in which the industry experienced normal growth and generally positively returns. Subsequent to 2001 the industry experienced two severe external shocks, namely, the September 11, 2001. terrorist attacks and the Iraq war. These anomalous shocks make the years after 2001 inconsistent with respect to the type of index developed in this article.

  17. An investigation of the factors that affect surgical hand disinfection with polyvidone iodine.

    PubMed

    Aksoy, A; Caglayan, F; Cakmak, M; Apan, T Z; Gocmen, J S; Cakmak, A; Somuncu, S; Akman, H

    2005-09-01

    This study investigated the factors influencing the effectiveness of 7.5% polyvidone iodine as a surgical antiseptic. The study involved 100 operating staff (75 doctors and 25 nurses) from hospital surgical teams. Fingertips of both hands of the subjects were pressed on to agar culture before and after washing and after completion of surgery. Handwashing lasting for more than 3 min led to a significant decrease in the number of colonies compared with handwashing lasting for less than 3 min. Moreover, the number of colonies was significantly higher when surgery lasted for longer than 95 min. However, the handwashing style (with or without brushing) was not found to have a significant effect on the outcome of the disinfection procedure in terms of bacterial colonization. Subjects who had colonization of their hands after surgery were found to have significantly higher colony counts before handwashing compared with those who did not have any colonization on their hands after surgery. The results of this study revealed that in order to attain effective disinfection with polyvidone iodine, the duration of handwashing should be at least 3 min. The risk of recolonization increases when the duration of surgery exceeds 95 min.

  18. What do you think of my picture? Investigating factors of influence in profile images context perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazza, F.; Da Silva, M. P.; Le Callet, P.; Heynderickx, I. E. J.

    2015-03-01

    Multimedia quality assessment has been an important research topic during the last decades. The original focus on artifact visibility has been extended during the years to aspects as image aesthetics, interestingness and memorability. More recently, Fedorovskaya proposed the concept of 'image psychology': this concept focuses on additional quality dimensions related to human content processing. While these additional dimensions are very valuable in understanding preferences, it is very hard to define, isolate and measure their effect on quality. In this paper we continue our research on face pictures investigating which image factors influence context perception. We collected perceived fit of a set of images to various content categories. These categories were selected based on current typologies in social networks. Logistic regression was adopted to model category fit based on images features. In this model we used both low level and high level features, the latter focusing on complex features related to image content. In order to extract these high level features, we relied on crowdsourcing, since computer vision algorithms are not yet sufficiently accurate for the features we needed. Our results underline the importance of some high level content features, e.g. the dress of the portrayed person and scene setting, in categorizing image.

  19. Investigating Limiting Factors in Stretchable All-Carbon Transistors for Reliable Stretchable Electronics.

    PubMed

    Chortos, Alex; Zhu, Chenxin; Oh, Jin Young; Yan, Xuzhou; Pochorovski, Igor; To, John W-F; Liu, Nan; Kraft, Ulrike; Murmann, Boris; Bao, Zhenan

    2017-08-22

    Stretchable form factors enable electronic devices to conform to irregular 3D structures, including soft and moving entities. Intrinsically stretchable devices have potential advantages of high surface coverage of active devices, improved durability, and reduced processing costs. This work describes intrinsically stretchable transistors composed of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) electrodes and semiconductors and a dielectric that consists of a nonpolar elastomer. The use of a nonpolar elastomer dielectric enabled hysteresis-free device characteristics. Compared to devices on SiO2 dielectrics, stretchable devices with nonpolar dielectrics showed lower mobility in ambient conditions because of the absence of doping from water. The effect of a SWNT band gap on device characteristics was investigated by using different SWNT sources as the semiconductor. Large-band-gap SWNTs exhibited trap-limited behavior caused by the low capacitance of the dielectric. In contrast, high-current devices based on SWNTs with smaller band gaps were more limited by contact resistance. Of the tested SWNT sources, SWNTs with a maximum diameter of 1.5 nm performed the best, with a mobility of 15.4 cm(2)/Vs and an on/off ratio >10(3) for stretchable transistors. Large-band-gap devices showed increased sensitivity to strain because of a pronounced dependence on the dielectric thickness, whereas contact-limited devices showed substantially less strain dependence.

  20. Investigation of factors affecting terrestrial passive sampling device performance and uptake rates in laboratory chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.A.; Weisskopf, C.P.

    1995-12-31

    A rapid sampling method using passive sampling devices (PSDS) for soil contaminant characterization shows extreme promise. The use of PSDs increases ease and speed of analysis, decreases solvent usage and cost, and minimizes the transport of contaminated soils. Time and cost savings allow a high sampling frequency, providing a more thorough site characterization than traditional methods. The authors have conducted both laboratory and field studies with terrestrial PSDS. Laboratory studies demonstrated the concentration and moisture dependence of sampler uptake and provided an estimate of the optimal field sampling time for soils contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). These PSDs were also used to accurately estimate PCB concentrations at hazardous waste site where concentrations ranged from 0.01 to 200 ug PCB/g soil. However, PSDs in the field had sampling rates approximately three times greater than in the laboratory. As a result several factors affecting PSD sampling rates and/or performance in laboratory chambers were evaluated. The parameters investigated were soil bulk density or compactness, chamber size and air flow. The chemicals used in these studies included two PCB congeners (52 and 153), three organochlorine pesticides (DDT, dieldrin and methoxychlor), three organophosphate pesticides (chlorpyrifos, diazinon and terbufos) and three herbicides (alachlor, atrazine and metolachlor).

  1. An investigation into the factors affecting the natural reproduction of Opsaridium peringueyi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyo, N. A. G.

    An endangered freshwater fish, Opsaridium peringueyi, was studied from January, 2009 to December, 2009. The analysis of the environmental conditions indicated that the fish is found in streams with moderate to fast flow, high oxygen levels, a depth greater than 0.6 m and temperatures between 10 and 24 °C. O. peringueyi is sexually dimorphic with males growing at a faster rate and attaining a larger size than females. The breeding biology of this species was investigated in glass aquarium tanks. The spawning behaviour is described for the first time. The breeding colour of the male is deep red on the operculum, ventral part, caudal and ventral fins. The breeding colour in the female is the same as the male except the red colour is lighter. The breeding of O. peringueyi is a four stage process which begins with the appearance of breeding colour culminating in the laying of eggs after courtship. Temperature, flow-rate, conductivity and substrate were identified as the environmental cues important in the reproduction of this species. All these factors had a significant effect on the breeding activity of O. peringueyi. The possible effect of climate change on O. peringueyi is discussed.

  2. Leucemia inhibitory factor; investigating the time-dependent effect on viability of vitrified bovine embryos.

    PubMed

    Kocyigit, A; Cevik, M

    2017-07-30

    Leucemia inhibitory factor (LIF) is involved in various reproductive processes, including sperm development, regulation of ovulation, as well as blastocyst formation, hatching and implantation in embryos. Moreover, LIF has also been shown significantly to enhance the blastocyst formation rates of bovine embryos, a finding that remains controversial. Our purpose was to investigate time-dependent effect of LIF on bovine embryo culture, especially in terms of addition timing. Presumptive zygotes were cultured in five different groups. In this study, 100 ng/ml LIF was added to the culture medium were as follows; control: SOF alone, group A: at day 0 (fertilization day), group B: at day 4 post-insemination (p.i.), group C: at day 4 to 7 (p.i. before vitrification) and group D: at day 8 (p.i. after thawing). Addition of LIF to the culture medium at day 4 significantly increased the percentage of blastocyst rate when compared day 0, day 4 at 6/7 and control group (41.8% versus 24.3%, 19.7%, 34.6%). In conclusion, the addition of LIF only on day 4 (p.i.) to the culture medium was found to be beneficial for bovine embryonic development based on several measures, including blastocysts rate, re-expansion rate and cellular cryotolerance after vitrification. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  3. Investigation of factors affecting the calibration of strain gage based transducers ( Goodzeit gages'') for SSC magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, M.; Gilbertson, A.; Dougherty, M.

    1991-03-01

    These transducers are designed to measure stresses on SSC collared coils. They are individually calibrated with a bonded ten-stack of SSC inner coil cable by applying a known load and reading corresponding output from the gages. The transducer is supported by a notched backing plate'' that allows for bending of the gage beam during calibration or in use with an actual coil. Several factors affecting the calibration and use of the transducers are: the number of times a backing plate'' is used, the similarities or difficulties between bonded ten-stacks, and the differences between the ten-stacks and the coil they represent. The latter is probably the most important because a calibration curve is a model of how a transducer should react within a coil. If the model is wrong, the calibration curve is wrong. Information will be presented regarding differences in calibrations between Brookhaven National Labs (also calibrating these transducers) and Fermilab -- what caused these differences, the investigation into the differences between coils and ten-stacks and how they relate to transducer calibration, and some suggestions for future calibrations.

  4. Pulmonary atelectasis and other respiratory complications after cardiopulmonary bypass and investigation of aetiological factors.

    PubMed

    Gale, G D; Teasdale, S J; Sanders, D E; Bradwell, P J; Russell, A; Solaric, B; York, J E

    1979-01-01

    Radiological evidence of pulmonary complications and possible aetiological factors were investigated in 50 consecutive patients after heart operations with cardiopulmonary bypass. Atelectasis was the most frequent pulmonary complication except for small pleural effusions, with an incidence of 64 per cent. Several types of atelectasis frequently co-existed, with a predominance of the less extensive plate and subsegmental forms. The incidence of atelectasis was the same on each side and the site of atelectasis was basal in three quarters of the patients. Preoperative clinical and catheter data were unrelated to the incidence of atelectasis. There was a significant positive correlation between a short cardiopulmonary bypass time and plate atelectasis, between a large fluid load after bypass and segmental atelectasis, between re-operation for bleeding and subsegmental atelectasis and between post-operative gastric dilation and atelectasis. The type of operation, the use of the intra-aortic balloon and the length of postoperative respiratory ventilation were unrelated to the incidence of atelectasis. The mechanism of development of atelectasis is discussed.

  5. Inhibition of proinflammatory cytokines by SCH79797, a selective protease-activated receptor 1 antagonist, protects rat kidney against ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    El Eter, Eman Abdelazeem; Aldrees, Abdulmajeed

    2012-06-01

    Renal ischemia-reperfusion injury (I/R) is the most common cause of acute renal failure. It is partially mediated by thrombin as it is attenuated by thrombin inhibition or deletion of its receptor protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1). However, the role of PAR1 in renal I/R injury needs to be further elucidated. The present study investigated the effect of PAR1 antagonist, SCH79797 (SCH), on renal protection and downstream effectors involved. Male Wistar rats were pretreated with SCH (25 μg/kg i.p.) or vehicle, 15 min before 45 min of clamping of left renal pedicle after right nephrectomy. To investigate the involvement of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt, a group of rats was subjected to pretreatment with an inhibitor of PI3K/Akt (LY 29004, 3 mg/kg i.p.) before renal ischemia and SCH treatment. A sham-operated group served as control and received saline. All rats were killed 24 h after reperfusion or sham operation, and blood samples collected and kidney tissues processed either for immunostaining and histological assessment or for biochemical analysis. SCH79797 markedly attenuated kidney damage histologically and by improving serum creatinine. Both plasma and protein expression of P selectin were markedly reduced as well as neutrophil infiltration, cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant 1, and tumor necrosis factor α. These protective effects of blocking PAR1 receptor were abolished by preadministration of LY29004. These results suggest that PAR1 mediates renal I/R injury and that blocking PAR1 using SCH limits renal injury by an anti-inflammatory effect possibly signaling via PI3K/Akt.

  6. Investigating the Construct Validity of the ISLLC 2008 Standards through Exploratory Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramaswami, Soundaram; Babo, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents and discusses the statistical analysis of the responses from an online survey administered to a sample of US superintendents (n=225) in an attempt to explore and authenticate the construct validity of the ISLLC 2008 Standards through exploratory factor analysis. Using a Principal Axis Factor method, 6 factors were extracted…

  7. An investigation into the factors that encourage learner participation in a large group medical classroom.

    PubMed

    Moffett, Jennifer; Berezowski, John; Spencer, Dustine; Lanning, Shari

    2014-01-01

    Effective lectures often incorporate activities that encourage learner participation. A challenge for educators is how to facilitate this in the large group lecture setting. This study investigates the individual student characteristics involved in encouraging (or dissuading) learners to interact, ask questions, and make comments in class. Students enrolled in a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine program at Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine, St Kitts, were invited to complete a questionnaire canvassing their participation in the large group classroom. Data from the questionnaire were analyzed using Excel (Microsoft, Redmond, WA, USA) and the R software environment (http://www.r-project.org/). One hundred and ninety-two students completed the questionnaire (response rate, 85.7%). The results showed statistically significant differences between male and female students when asked to self-report their level of participation (P=0.011) and their confidence to participate (P<0.001) in class. No statistically significant difference was identified between different age groups of students (P=0.594). Student responses reflected that an "aversion to public speaking" acted as the main deterrent to participating during a lecture. Female participants were 3.56 times more likely to report a fear of public speaking than male participants (odds ratio 3.56, 95% confidence interval 1.28-12.33, P=0.01). Students also reported "smaller sizes of class and small group activities" and "other students participating" as factors that made it easier for them to participate during a lecture. In this study, sex likely played a role in learner participation in the large group veterinary classroom. Male students were more likely to participate in class and reported feeling more confident to participate than female students. Female students in this study commonly identified aversion to public speaking as a factor which held them back from participating in the large group lecture setting

  8. Experimental investigation of factors affecting the absolute recovery coefficients in iodine-124 PET lesion imaging.

    PubMed

    Jentzen, Walter

    2010-04-21

    The use of recovery coefficients (RCs) in (124)I PET lesion imaging is a simple method to correct the imaged activity concentration (AC) primarily for the partial-volume effect and, to a minor extent, for the prompt gamma coincidence effect. The aim of this phantom study was to experimentally investigate a number of various factors affecting the (124)I RCs. Three RC-based correction approaches were considered. These approaches differ with respect to the volume of interest (VOI) drawn, which determines the imaged AC and the RCs: a single voxel VOI containing the maximum value (maximum RC), a spherical VOI with a diameter of the scanner resolution (resolution RC) and a VOI equaling the physical object volume (isovolume RC). Measurements were performed using mainly a stand-alone PET scanner (EXACT HR(+)) and a latest-generation PET/CT scanner (BIOGRAPH mCT). The RCs were determined using a cylindrical phantom containing spheres or rotational ellipsoids and were derived from images acquired with a reference acquisition protocol. For each type of RC, the influence of the following factors on the RC was assessed: object shape, background activity spill in and iterative image reconstruction parameters. To evaluate the robustness of the RC-based correction approaches, the percentage deviation between RC-corrected and true ACs was determined from images acquired with a clinical acquisition protocol of different AC regimes. The observed results of the shape and spill-in effects were compared with simulation data derived from a convolution-based model. The study demonstrated that the shape effect was negligible and, therefore, was in agreement with theoretical expectations. In contradiction to the simulation results, the observed spill-in effect was unexpectedly small. To avoid variations in the determination of RCs due to reconstruction parameter changes, image reconstruction with a pixel length of about one-third or less of the scanner resolution and an OSEM 1 x 32

  9. Experimental investigation of factors affecting the absolute recovery coefficients in iodine-124 PET lesion imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jentzen, Walter

    2010-04-01

    The use of recovery coefficients (RCs) in 124I PET lesion imaging is a simple method to correct the imaged activity concentration (AC) primarily for the partial-volume effect and, to a minor extent, for the prompt gamma coincidence effect. The aim of this phantom study was to experimentally investigate a number of various factors affecting the 124I RCs. Three RC-based correction approaches were considered. These approaches differ with respect to the volume of interest (VOI) drawn, which determines the imaged AC and the RCs: a single voxel VOI containing the maximum value (maximum RC), a spherical VOI with a diameter of the scanner resolution (resolution RC) and a VOI equaling the physical object volume (isovolume RC). Measurements were performed using mainly a stand-alone PET scanner (EXACT HR+) and a latest-generation PET/CT scanner (BIOGRAPH mCT). The RCs were determined using a cylindrical phantom containing spheres or rotational ellipsoids and were derived from images acquired with a reference acquisition protocol. For each type of RC, the influence of the following factors on the RC was assessed: object shape, background activity spill in and iterative image reconstruction parameters. To evaluate the robustness of the RC-based correction approaches, the percentage deviation between RC-corrected and true ACs was determined from images acquired with a clinical acquisition protocol of different AC regimes. The observed results of the shape and spill-in effects were compared with simulation data derived from a convolution-based model. The study demonstrated that the shape effect was negligible and, therefore, was in agreement with theoretical expectations. In contradiction to the simulation results, the observed spill-in effect was unexpectedly small. To avoid variations in the determination of RCs due to reconstruction parameter changes, image reconstruction with a pixel length of about one-third or less of the scanner resolution and an OSEM 1 × 32 algorithm or

  10. An investigation into the factors that encourage learner participation in a large group medical classroom

    PubMed Central

    Moffett, Jennifer; Berezowski, John; Spencer, Dustine; Lanning, Shari

    2014-01-01

    Background Effective lectures often incorporate activities that encourage learner participation. A challenge for educators is how to facilitate this in the large group lecture setting. This study investigates the individual student characteristics involved in encouraging (or dissuading) learners to interact, ask questions, and make comments in class. Methods Students enrolled in a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine program at Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine, St Kitts, were invited to complete a questionnaire canvassing their participation in the large group classroom. Data from the questionnaire were analyzed using Excel (Microsoft, Redmond, WA, USA) and the R software environment (http://www.r-project.org/). Results One hundred and ninety-two students completed the questionnaire (response rate, 85.7%). The results showed statistically significant differences between male and female students when asked to self-report their level of participation (P=0.011) and their confidence to participate (P<0.001) in class. No statistically significant difference was identified between different age groups of students (P=0.594). Student responses reflected that an “aversion to public speaking” acted as the main deterrent to participating during a lecture. Female participants were 3.56 times more likely to report a fear of public speaking than male participants (odds ratio 3.56, 95% confidence interval 1.28–12.33, P=0.01). Students also reported “smaller sizes of class and small group activities” and “other students participating” as factors that made it easier for them to participate during a lecture. Conclusion In this study, sex likely played a role in learner participation in the large group veterinary classroom. Male students were more likely to participate in class and reported feeling more confident to participate than female students. Female students in this study commonly identified aversion to public speaking as a factor which held them back from

  11. Inferring transcription factor activity from microarray data reveals novel targets for toxicological investigations.

    PubMed

    Souza, T M; van den Beucken, T; Kleinjans, J C S; Jennen, D G J

    2017-08-15

    Transcription factors (TFs) are important modulators of the inducible portion of the transcriptome, and therefore relevant in the context of exposure to exogenous compounds. Current approaches to predict the activity of TFs in biological systems are usually restricted to a few entities at a time due to low-throughput techniques targeting a limited fraction of annotated human TFs. Therefore, high-throughput altern