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Sample records for factor receptor-specific affibody

  1. Cy5.5-labeled Affibody molecule for near-infrared fluorescent optical imaging of epidermal growth factor receptor positive tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Zheng; Ren, Gang; Liu, Hongguang; Jiang, Lei; Cheng, Zhen

    2010-05-01

    Affibody protein is an engineered protein scaffold with a three-helical bundle structure. Affibody molecules of small size (7 kD) have great potential for targeting overexpressed cancer biomarkers in vivo. To develop an Affibody-based molecular probe for in vivo optical imaging of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) positive tumors, an anti-EGFR Affibody molecule, Ac-Cys-ZEGFR:1907 (7 kD), is site-specifically conjugated with a near-IR fluorescence dye, Cy5.5-mono-maleimide. Using fluorescent microscopy, the binding specificity of the probe Cy5.5-ZEGFR:1907 is checked by a high-EGFR-expressing A431 cell and low-EGFR-expressing MCF7 cells. The binding affinity of Cy5.5-ZEGFR:1907 (KD) to EGFR is 43.6+/-8.4 nM, as determined by flow cytometry. For an in vivo imaging study, the probe shows fast tumor targeting and good tumor contrast as early as 0.5 h postinjection (p.i.) for A431 tumors, while MCF7 tumors are barely visible. An ex vivo imaging study also demonstrates that Cy5.5-ZEGFR:1907 has high tumor, liver, and kidney uptakes at 24 h p.i.. In conclusion, Cy5.5-ZEGFR:1907 shows good affinity and high specificity to the EGFR. There is rapid achievement of good tumor-to-normal-tissue contrasts of Cy5.5-ZEGFR:1907, thus demonstrating its potential for EGFR-targeted molecular imaging of cancers.

  2. Affibody molecules as engineered protein drugs

    PubMed Central

    Frejd, Fredrik Y; Kim, Kyu-Tae

    2017-01-01

    Affibody molecules can be used as tools for molecular recognition in diagnostic and therapeutic applications. There are several preclinical studies reported on diagnostic and therapeutic use of this molecular class of alternative scaffolds, and early clinical evidence is now beginning to accumulate that suggests the Affibody molecules to be efficacious and safe in man. The small size and ease of engineering make Affibody molecules suitable for use in multispecific constructs where AffiMabs is one such that offers the option to potentiate antibodies for use in complex disease. PMID:28336959

  3. Feasibility of imaging of epidermal growth factor receptor expression with ZEGFR:2377 affibody molecule labeled with 99mTc using a peptide-based cysteine-containing chelator

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Ken G.; Oroujeni, Maryam; Garousi, Javad; Mitran, Bogdan; Ståhl, Stefan; Orlova, Anna; Löfblom, John; Tolmachev, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is overexpressed in a number of malignant tumors and is a molecular target for several specific anticancer antibodies and tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The overexpression of EGFR is a predictive biomarker for response to several therapy regimens. Radionuclide molecular imaging might enable detection of EGFR overexpression by a non-invasive procedure and could be used repeatedly. Affibody molecules are engineered scaffold proteins, which could be selected to have a high affinity and selectivity to predetermined targets. The anti-EGFR ZEGFR:2377 affibody molecule is a potential imaging probe for EGFR detection. The use of the generator-produced radionuclide 99mTc should facilitate clinical translation of an imaging probe due to its low price, availability and favorable dosimetry of the radionuclide. In the present study, we evaluated feasibility of ZEGFR:2377 labeling with 99mTc using a peptide-based cysteine-containing chelator expressed at the C-terminus of ZEGFR:2377. The label was stable in vitro under cysteine challenge. In addition, 99mTc-ZEGFR:2377 was capable of specific binding to EGFR-expressing cells with high affinity (274 pM). Studies in BALB/C nu/nu mice bearing A431 xenografts demonstrated that 99mTc-ZEGFR:2377 accumulates in tumors in an EGFR-specific manner. The tumor uptake values were 3.6±1 and 2.5±0.4% ID/g at 3 and 24 h after injection, respectively. The corresponding tumor-to-blood ratios were 1.8±0.4 and 8±3. The xenografts were clearly visualized at both time-points. This study demonstrated the potential of 99mTc-labeled ZEGFR:2377 for imaging of EGFR in vivo. PMID:27748899

  4. Nanobubble-Affibody: Novel ultrasound contrast agents for targeted molecular ultrasound imaging of tumor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hengli; Cai, Wenbin; Xu, Lei; Lv, Xiuhua; Qiao, Youbei; Li, Pan; Wu, Hong; Yang, Yilin; Zhang, Li; Duan, Yunyou

    2015-01-01

    Nanobubbles (NBs), as novel ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs), have attracted increasing attention in the field of molecular ultrasound imaging for tumors. However, the preparation of uniform-sized NBs is considered to be controversial, and poor tumor selectivity in in vivo imaging has been reported. In this study, we fabricated uniform nano-sized NBs (478.2 ± 29.7 nm with polydispersity index of 0.164 ± 0.044, n = 3) using a thin-film hydration method by controlling the thickness of phospholipid films; we then conjugated the NBs with Affibody molecules to produce nano-sized UCAs referred to as NB-Affibody with specific affinity to human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2)-overexpressing tumors. NB-Affibody presented good ultrasound enhancement, demonstrating a peak intensity of 104.5 ± 2.1 dB under ultrasound contrast scanning. Ex vivo experiments further confirmed that the NB-Affibody conjugates were capable of targeting HER2-expressing tumor cells in vivo with high affinity. The newly prepared nano-sized NB-Affibody conjugates were observed to be novel targeted UCAs for efficient and safe specific molecular imaging and may have potential applications in early cancer quantitative diagnosis and targeted therapy in the future.

  5. Probing Receptor Specificity by Sampling the Conformational Space of the Insulin-like Growth Factor II C-domain*

    PubMed Central

    Hexnerová, Rozálie; Křížková, Květoslava; Fábry, Milan; Sieglová, Irena; Kedrová, Kateřina; Collinsová, Michaela; Ullrichová, Pavlína; Srb, Pavel; Williams, Christopher; Crump, Matthew P.; Tošner, Zdeněk; Jiráček, Jiří; Veverka, Václav; Žáková, Lenka

    2016-01-01

    Insulin and insulin-like growth factors I and II are closely related protein hormones. Their distinct evolution has resulted in different yet overlapping biological functions with insulin becoming a key regulator of metabolism, whereas insulin-like growth factors (IGF)-I/II are major growth factors. Insulin and IGFs cross-bind with different affinities to closely related insulin receptor isoforms A and B (IR-A and IR-B) and insulin-like growth factor type I receptor (IGF-1R). Identification of structural determinants in IGFs and insulin that trigger their specific signaling pathways is of increasing importance in designing receptor-specific analogs with potential therapeutic applications. Here, we developed a straightforward protocol for production of recombinant IGF-II and prepared six IGF-II analogs with IGF-I-like mutations. All modified molecules exhibit significantly reduced affinity toward IR-A, particularly the analogs with a Pro-Gln insertion in the C-domain. Moreover, one of the analogs has enhanced binding affinity for IGF-1R due to a synergistic effect of the Pro-Gln insertion and S29N point mutation. Consequently, this analog has almost a 10-fold higher IGF-1R/IR-A binding specificity in comparison with native IGF-II. The established IGF-II purification protocol allowed for cost-effective isotope labeling required for a detailed NMR structural characterization of IGF-II analogs that revealed a link between the altered binding behavior of selected analogs and conformational rearrangement of their C-domains. PMID:27510031

  6. Site-Specific Radioiodination of HER2-Targeting Affibody Molecules using 4-Iodophenethylmaleimide Decreases Renal Uptake of Radioactivity

    PubMed Central

    Strand, Joanna; Nordeman, Patrik; Honarvar, Hadis; Altai, Mohamed; Orlova, Anna; Larhed, Mats; Tolmachev, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Affibody molecules are small scaffold-based affinity proteins with promising properties as probes for radionuclide-based molecular imaging. However, a high reabsorption of radiolabeled Affibody molecules in kidneys is an issue. We have shown that the use of 125I-3-iodo-((4-hydroxyphenyl)ethyl)maleimide (IHPEM) for site-specific labeling of cysteine-containing Affibody molecules provides high tumor uptake but low radioactivity retention in kidneys. We hypothesized that the use of 4-iodophenethylmaleimide (IPEM) would further reduce renal retention of radioactivity because of higher lipophilicity of radiometabolites. An anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2) Affibody molecule (ZHER2:2395) was labeled using 125I-IPEM with an overall yield of 45±3 %. 125I-IPEM-ZHER2:2395 bound specifically to HER2-expressing human ovarian carcinoma cells (SKOV-3 cell line). In NMRI mice, the renal uptake of 125I-IPEM-ZHER2:2395 (24±2 and 5.7±0.3 % IA g−1at 1 and 4 h after injection, respectively) was significantly lower than uptake of 125I-IHPEM-ZHER2:2395 (50±8 and 12±2 % IA g−1at 1 and 4 h after injection, respectively). In conclusion, the use of a more lipophilic linker for the radioiodination of Affibody molecules reduces renal radioactivity. PMID:25969816

  7. A new prodrug form of Affibody molecules (pro-Affibody) is selectively activated by cancer-associated proteases.

    PubMed

    Sandersjöö, Lisa; Jonsson, Andreas; Löfblom, John

    2015-04-01

    Affinity proteins have advanced the field of targeted therapeutics due to their generally higher specificity compared to small molecular compounds. However, side effects caused by on-target binding in healthy tissues are still an issue. Here, we design and investigate a prodrug strategy for improving tissue specificity of Affibody molecules in future in vivo studies. The prodrug Affibody (pro-Affibody) against the HER2 receptor was constructed by fusing a HER2-specific Affibody (ZHER2) to an anti-idiotypic Affibody (anti-ZHER2). The linker was engineered to comprise a substrate peptide for the cancer-associated matrix metalloprotease 1 (MMP-1). The hypothesis was that the binding surface of ZHER2 would thereby be blocked from interacting with HER2 until the substrate peptide was specifically hydrolyzed by MMP-1. Binding should thereby only occur where MMP-1 is overexpressed, potentially decreasing on-target toxicities in normal tissues. The pro-Affibody was engineered to find a suitable linker and substrate peptide, and the different constructs were evaluated with a new bacterial display assay. HER2-binding of the pro-Affibody was efficiently masked and proteolytic activation of the best variant yielded over 1,000-fold increase in apparent binding affinity. Biosensor analysis revealed that blocking of the pro-Affibody primarily affected the association phase. In a cell-binding assay, the activated pro-Affibody targeted native HER2 on cancer cells as opposed to the non-activated pro-Affibody. We believe this prodrug approach with proteolytic activation is promising for improving tissue specificity in future in vivo targeting applications and can hopefully be extended to other Affibody molecules and similar affinity proteins as well.

  8. The cytokines cardiotrophin-like cytokine/cytokine-like factor-1 (CLC/CLF) and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) differ in their receptor specificities.

    PubMed

    Tormo, Aurélie Jeanne; Letellier, Marie-Claude; Lissilaa, Rami; Batraville, Laurie-Anne; Sharma, Mukut; Ferlin, Walter; Elson, Greg; Crabé, Sandrine; Gauchat, Jean-François

    2012-12-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and cardiotrophin-like cytokine (CLC) are two cytokines with neurotrophic and immunomodulatory activities. CNTF is a cytoplasmic factor believed to be released upon cellular damage, while CLC requires interaction with a soluble cytokine receptor, cytokine-like factor 1 (CLF), to be efficiently secreted. Both cytokines activate a receptor complex comprising the cytokine binding CNTF receptor α (CNTFRα) and two signaling chains namely, leukemia inhibitory factor receptor β (LIFRβ) and gp130. Human CNTF can recruit and activate an alternative receptor in which CNTFRα is substituted by IL-6Rα. As both CNTF and CLC have immune-regulatory activities in mice, we compared their ability to recruit mouse receptors comprising both gp130 and LIFRβ signaling chains and either IL-6Rα or IL-11Rα which, unlike CNTFRα, are expressed by immune cells. Our results indicate that 1) mouse CNTF, like its human homologue, can activate cells expressing gp130/LIFRβ with either CNTFRα or IL-6Rα and, 2) CLC/CLF is more restricted in its specificity in that it activates only the tripartite CNTFR. Several gp130 signaling cytokines influence T helper cell differentiation. We therefore investigated the effect of CNTF on CD4 T cell cytokine production. We observed that CNTF increased the number of IFN-γ producing CD4 T cells. As IFN-γ is considered a mediator of the therapeutic effect of IFN-β in multiple sclerosis, induction of IFN-γ by CNTF may contribute to the beneficial immunomodulatory effect of CNTF in mouse multiple sclerosis models. Together, our results indicate that CNTF activates the same tripartite receptors in mouse and human cells and further validate rodent models for pre-clinical investigation of CNTF and CNTF derivatives. Furthermore, CNTF and CLC/CLF differ in their receptor specificities. The receptor α chain involved in the immunomodulatory effects of CLC/CLF remains to be identified.

  9. Evaluation ecological risks using receptor-specific toxicity reference values and USEPA`s wildlife exposure factors handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, E.K.; Brenzikofer, A.M.; Schmeising, L.M.

    1995-12-31

    An ecological risk assessment was performed for a site at a closing US Air Force Base in Colorado; contaminated abiotic media included shallow soil, surface water, and sediment. To evaluate the potential for impacts on wildlife species exposed to contaminants in these media, a two-phased approach was used. First, dietary Toxicity Reference Values (TRVs) were developed to represent No Observed Adverse Effect Levels (NOAELs) for each chemical of potential concern for the selected wildlife indicator species, red fox (Vulpes vulpes), deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus), and mallard (Anasplatyrhynchos). TRVs were determined by applying a series of Uncertainty Factors (UFs) to dietary toxic effects data obtained from the literature for each chemical. UFs were assigned for three uncertainty categories (intertaxon, study duration, and study endpoint). Dietary TRVs were then compared to the site exposure-point concentrations for contaminants in each medium. If a TRV exceeded the site concentration for a given chemical, then that chemical was retained for the second phase of the evaluation, the exposure assessment. Exposure was evaluated for each species using predictive models for ingestion of soil/sediment, and water, as provided in the USEPA Wildlife Exposure Factors Handbook (1993). These models estimate the potential Average Daily Dose (ADD{sub pot}) received by wildlife species exposed to contaminants in abiotic media. The ADD{sub pot}s were then compared to the TRVs on a dose basis. If an ADD{sub pot} exceeded the dose-based TRV for a given chemical, it was assumed that the predicted amount of contaminant ingested was potentially capable of causing adverse effects to the wildlife indicator species. ADD{sub pot}s for each ingestion route were summed for species exposed to contaminants in multiple media to determine the total average daily dose received via all direct routes.

  10. Affibody-mediated PET imaging of HER3 expression in malignant tumours

    PubMed Central

    Rosestedt, Maria; Andersson, Ken G.; Mitran, Bogdan; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Löfblom, John; Orlova, Anna; Ståhl, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 3 (HER3) is involved in the progression of various cancers and in resistance to therapies targeting the HER family. In vivo imaging of HER3 expression would enable patient stratification for anti-HER3 immunotherapy. Key challenges with HER3-targeting are the relatively low expression in HER3-positive tumours and HER3 expression in normal tissues. The use of positron-emission tomography (PET) provides advantages of high resolution, sensitivity and quantification accuracy compared to SPECT. Affibody molecules, imaging probes based on a non-immunoglobulin scaffold, provide high imaging contrast shortly after injection. The aim of this study was to evaluate feasibility of PET imaging of HER3 expression using 68Ga-labeled affibody molecules. The anti-HER3 affibody molecule HEHEHE-Z08698-NOTA was successfully labelled with 68Ga with high yield, purity and stability. The agent bound specifically to HER3-expressing cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. At 3 h pi, uptake of 68Ga-HEHEHE-Z08698-NOTA was significantly higher in xenografts with high HER3 expression (BT474, BxPC-3) than in xenografts with low HER3 expression (A431). In xenografts with high expression, tumour-to-blood ratios were >20, tumour-to-muscle >15, and tumour-to-bone >7. HER3-positive xenografts were visualised using microPET 3 h pi. In conclusion, PET imaging of HER3 expression is feasible using 68Ga-HEHEHE-Z08698-NOTA shortly after administration. PMID:26477646

  11. In vivo evaluation of a novel format of a bivalent HER3-targeting and albumin-binding therapeutic affibody construct

    PubMed Central

    Bass, Tarek Z.; Rosestedt, Maria; Mitran, Bogdan; Frejd, Fredrik Y.; Löfblom, John; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Ståhl, Stefan; Orlova, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Overexpression of human epidermal growth factor receptor 3 (HER3) is involved in resistance to several therapies for malignant tumours. Currently, several anti-HER3 monoclonal antibodies are under clinical development. We introduce an alternative approach to HER3-targeted therapy based on engineered scaffold proteins, i.e. affibody molecules. We designed a small construct (22.5 kDa, denoted 3A3), consisting of two high-affinity anti-HER3 affibody molecules flanking an albumin-binding domain ABD, which was introduced for prolonged residence in circulation. In vitro, 3A3 efficiently inhibited growth of HER3-expressing BxPC-3 cells. Biodistribution in mice was measured using 3A3 that was site-specifically labelled with 111In via a DOTA chelator. The residence time of 111In-DOTA-3A3 in blood was extended when compared with the monomeric affibody molecule. 111In-DOTA-3A3 accumulated specifically in HER3-expressing BxPC-3 xenografts in mice. However, 111In-DOTA-3A3 cleared more rapidly from blood than a size-matched control construct 111In-DOTA-TAT, most likely due to sequestering of 3A3 by mErbB3, the murine counterpart of HER3. Repeated dosing and increase of injected protein dose decreased uptake of 111In-DOTA-3A3 in mErbB3-expressing tissues. Encouragingly, growth of BxPC-3 xenografts in mice was delayed in an experimental (pilot-scale) therapy study using 3A3. We conclude that the 3A3 affibody format seems promising for treatment of HER3-overexpressing tumours. PMID:28230065

  12. Synthesis and chemoselective intramolecular crosslinking of a HER2-binding affibody.

    PubMed

    Ekblad, Torun; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Orlova, Anna; Lendel, Christofer; Abrahmsén, Lars; Karlström, Amelie Eriksson

    2009-01-01

    The human epidermal growth factor receptor HER2 has emerged as an important target for molecular imaging of breast cancer. This article presents the design and synthesis of a HER2-targeting affibody molecule with improved stability and tumor targeting capacity, and with potential use as an imaging agent. The 58 aa three-helix bundle protein was assembled using solid-phase peptide synthesis, and a chemoselective ligation strategy was used to establish an intramolecular thioether bond between the side chain thiol group of a cysteine residue, positioned in the loop between helices I and II, and a chloroacetyl group on the side chain amino group of the C-terminal lysine residue. The tethered protein offered an increased thermal stability, with a melting temperature of 64 degrees C, compared to 54 degrees C for the linear control. The ligation did not have a major influence on the HER2 binding affinity, which was 320 and 380 pM for the crosslinked and linear molecules, respectively. Biodistribution studies were performed both in normal and tumor-bearing mice to evaluate the impact of the crosslinking on the in vivo behavior and on the tumor targeting performance. The distribution pattern was characterized by a low uptake in all organs except kidney, and rapid clearance from blood and normal tissue. Crosslinking of the protein resulted in a significantly increased tumor accumulation, rendering the tethered HER2-binding affibody molecule a valuable lead in the development of superior HER2 imaging agents.

  13. Anti-idiotypic protein domains selected from protein A-based affibody libraries.

    PubMed

    Eklund, Malin; Axelsson, Lars; Uhlén, Mathias; Nygren, Per-Ake

    2002-08-15

    Three pairs of small protein domains showing binding behavior in analogy with anti-idiotypic antibodies have been selected using phage display technology. From an affibody protein library constructed by combinatorial variegation of the Fc binding surface of the 58 residue staphylococcal protein A (SPA)-derived domain Z, affibody variants have been selected to the parental SPA scaffold and to two earlier identified SPA-derived affibodies. One selected affibody (Z(SPA-1)) was shown to recognize each of the five domains of wild-type SPA with dissociation constants (K(D)) in the micromolar range. The binding of the Z(SPA-1) affibody to its parental structure was shown to involve the Fc binding site of SPA, while the Fab-binding site was not involved. Similarly, affibodies showing anti-idiotypic binding characteristics were also obtained when affibodies previously selected for binding to Taq DNA polymerase and human IgA, respectively, were used as targets for selections. The potential applications for these types of affinity pairs were exemplified by one-step protein recovery using affinity chromatography employing the specific interactions between the respective protein pair members. These experiments included the purification of the Z(SPA-1) affibody from a total Escherichia coli cell lysate using protein A-Sepharose, suggesting that this protein A/antiprotein A affinity pair could provide a basis for novel affinity gene fusion systems. The use of this type of small, robust, and easily expressed anti-idiotypic affibody pair for affinity technology applications, including self-assembled protein networks, is discussed.

  14. cDNA cloning and expression of a human platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor specific for B-chain-containing PDGF molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Claesson-Welsh, L.; Eriksson, A.; Moren, A.; Severinsson, L.; Ek, B.; Ostman, A.; Betsholtz, C.; Heldin, C.H.

    1988-08-01

    The structure of the human receptor for platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) has been deduced through cDNA cloning. A 5.45-kilobase-pair cDNA clone predicts a 1,106-amino-acid polypeptide, including the cleavable signal sequence. The overall amino acid sequence similarity with the murine PDGFR receptor is 85%. After transcription of the cDNA and translation in vitro, a PDGR receptor antiserum was used to immunoprecipitate a product of predicted size, which also could be phosphorylated in vitro. Stable introduction of the cDNA into Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells led to the expression of a 190-kilodalton component, which was immunoprecipitated by the PDGF receptor antiserum; this most probably represents the mature PDGF receptor. Binding assays with different /sup 125/I-labeled dimeric forms of PDGF A and B chains showed that the PDGFR receptor expressed in CHO cells bound PDGF-BB and, to a lesser extent, PDGF-AB, but not PDGF-AA.

  15. 17AAG-induced internalisation of HER2-specific Affibody molecules

    PubMed Central

    Göstring, Lovisa; Lindegren, Sture; Gedda, Lars

    2016-01-01

    The geldanamycin derivative 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG) is known to induce internalisation and degradation of the otherwise internalisation-resistant human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) receptor. In the present study, 17-AAG was used to increase internalisation of the HER2-specific Affibody molecule ABY-025. The cellular redistribution of halogen-labelled 211At-ABY-025 and radiometal-labelled 111In-ABY-025 following treatment with 17-AAG was studied. 17-AAG treatment of SKOV-3 human ovarian carcinoma and SKBR-3 human breast carcinoma cells to some extent shifted the localisation of 111In-ABY-025 from the cell surface to intracellular compartments in the two cell lines. ABY-025 labelled with the high-linear energy transfer α emitter 211At was also internalised to a higher degree; however, due to its physiological properties, this nuclide was excreted faster. The results indicate that 17-AAG may be used to facilitate cell-specific intracellular localisation of a suitable cytotoxic or radioactive agent coupled to ABY-025 in HER2-overexpressing cells. PMID:27698830

  16. SpyLigase peptide–peptide ligation polymerizes affibodies to enhance magnetic cancer cell capture

    PubMed Central

    Fierer, Jacob O.; Veggiani, Gianluca; Howarth, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Individual proteins can now often be modified with atomic precision, but there are still major obstacles to connecting proteins into larger assemblies. To direct protein assembly, ideally, peptide tags would be used, providing the minimal perturbation to protein function. However, binding to peptides is generally weak, so assemblies are unstable over time and disassemble with force or harsh conditions. We have recently developed an irreversible protein–peptide interaction (SpyTag/SpyCatcher), based on a protein domain from Streptococcus pyogenes, that locks itself together via spontaneous isopeptide bond formation. Here we develop irreversible peptide–peptide interaction, through redesign of this domain and genetic dissection into three parts: a protein domain termed SpyLigase, which now ligates two peptide tags to each other. All components expressed efficiently in Escherichia coli and peptide tags were reactive at the N terminus, at the C terminus, or at internal sites. Peptide–peptide ligation enabled covalent and site-specific polymerization of affibodies or antibodies against the tumor markers epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and HER2. Magnetic capture of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is one of the most promising approaches to improve cancer prognosis and management, but CTC capture is limited by inefficient recovery of cells expressing low levels of tumor antigen. SpyLigase-assembled protein polymers made possible the isolation of cancerous cells expressing lower levels of tumor antigen and should have general application in enhancing molecular capture. PMID:24639550

  17. Generation of affibody molecules specific for HPV16 E7 recognition

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chanqiong; Song, Yiling; Cai, Yiqi; Cen, Danwei; Wang, Ledan; Xiong, Yirong; Jiang, Pengfei; Zhu, Shanli; Zhao, Kong-Nan; Zhang, Lifang

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer caused by infection with high-risk human papillomavirus remains to be the most deadly gynecologic malignancy worldwide. It is well documented that persistent expression of two oncogenes (E6/E7) plays the key roles in cervical cancer. Thus, in vivo detection of the oncoproteins is very important for the diagnosis of the cancer. Recently, affibody molecules have been demonstrated to be a powerful targeting probe for tumor–targeted imaging and diagnosis. In this study, four HPV16 E7-binding affibody molecules (ZHPV16 E7127, ZHPV16E7301, ZHPV16E7384 and ZHPV16E7745) were screened from a phage-displayed peptide library and used for molecular imaging in tumor-bearing mice. Biosensor binding analyses showed first that the four affibody molecules bound to HPV16 E7 with very high affinity and specificity. They co-localized with E7 protein only in two HPV16-positive cancer cells (SiHa and CaSki). Furthermore, affibody ZHPV16E7384 was conjugated with Dylight755 and used for in vivo tumor-imaging. Strongly high-contrast tumor retention of this affibody only occurred in HPV16-derived tumors of mice as early as 30 min post-injection, not in HPV-negative and HPV18-derived tumors. The accumulation of Dylight755-conjugated ZHPV16E7384 in tumor was achieved over a longer time period (24 h). The data here provide strong evidence that E7-specific affibody molecules have great potential used for molecular imaging and diagnosis of HPV-induced cancers. PMID:27659535

  18. In vivo targeting of HER2-positive tumor using 2-helix affibody molecules.

    PubMed

    Ren, Gang; Webster, Jack M; Liu, Zhe; Zhang, Rong; Miao, Zheng; Liu, Hongguang; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Syud, Faisal A; Cheng, Zhen

    2012-07-01

    Molecular imaging of human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2) expression has drawn significant attention because of the unique role of the HER2 gene in diagnosis, therapy and prognosis of human breast cancer. In our previous research, a novel cyclic 2-helix small protein, MUT-DS, was discovered as an anti-HER2 Affibody analog with high affinity through rational protein design and engineering. MUT-DS was then evaluated for positron emission tomography (PET) of HER2-positive tumor by labeling with two radionuclides, 68Ga and 18F, with relatively short half-life (t1/2<2 h). In order to fully study the in vivo behavior of 2-helix small protein and demonstrate that it could be a robust platform for labeling with a variety of radionuclides for different applications, in this study, MUT-DS was further radiolabeled with 64Cu or 111In and evaluated for in vivo targeting of HER2-positive tumor in mice. Design 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) conjugated MUT-DS (DOTA-MUT-DS) was chemically synthesized using solid phase peptide synthesizer and I2 oxidation. DOTA-MUT-DS was then radiolabeled with 64Cu or 111In to prepare the HER2 imaging probe (64Cu/111In-DOTA-MUT-DS). Both biodistribution and microPET imaging of the probe were evaluated in nude mice bearing subcutaneous HER2-positive SKOV3 tumors. DOTA-MUT-DS could be successfully synthesized and radiolabeled with 64Cu or 111In. Biodistribution study showed that tumor uptake value of 64Cu or 111In-labeled DOTA-MUT-DS was 4.66±0.38 or 2.17±0.15%ID/g, respectively, in nude mice bearing SKOV3 xenografts (n=3) at 1 h post-injection (p.i.). Tumor-to-blood and tumor-to-muscle ratios for 64Cu-DOTA-MUT-DS were attained to be 3.05 and 3.48 at 1 h p.i., respectively, while for 111In-DOTA-MUT-DS, they were 2.04 and 3.19, respectively. Co-injection of the cold Affibody molecule ZHER2:342 with 64Cu-DOTA-MUT-DS specifically reduced the SKOV3 tumor uptake of the probe by 48%. 111In

  19. Affinity enhancement of HER2-binding Z(HER2:342) affibody via rational design approach: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Ghaffari, Mohammad Ali; Zeinali, Majid; Barzegari Asadabadi, Ebrahim; Jamalan, Mostafa; Jahandideh, Samad

    2014-12-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) contributes to the development of breast cancers and malignancies. On the other hand, engineered affibody Z(HER2:342) that binds to HER2 can be successfully used for both diagnostic purposes and specific ablation of malignant HER2-positive cell lines. In the current study, electrostatics-based prediction was applied for improving Z(HER2:342) binding affinity using computational design. The affibody Z(HER2:342) alone and in complex with HER2 was energetically minimized, solvated in explicit water, and neutralized. After heating and equilibration steps, the system was studied by isothermal-isobaric (NPT) MD simulation. According to trajectories, Z(HER2:342) specifically binds to HER2 through hydrogen bonds and salt bridges. Based on the electrostatic binding contributions, two affinity-matured variants namely V1 (Tyr35Arg) and V2 (Asn6Asp and Met9Glu) were rationally designed. More investigations through MD simulation show that V1 interacts with HER2 receptor more strongly, compared to Z(HER2:342) and V2.

  20. Feasibility of Affibody Molecule-Based PNA-Mediated Radionuclide Pretargeting of Malignant Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Honarvar, Hadis; Westerlund, Kristina; Altai, Mohamed; Sandström, Mattias; Orlova, Anna; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Karlström, Amelie Eriksson

    2016-01-01

    Affibody molecules are small (7 kDa), non-immunoglobulin scaffold proteins with a potential as targeting agents for radionuclide imaging of cancer. However, high renal re-absorption of Affibody molecules prevents their use for radionuclide therapy with residualizing radiometals. We hypothesized that the use of Affibody-based peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-mediated pretargeting would enable higher accumulation of radiometals in tumors than in kidneys. To test this hypothesis, we designed an Affibody-PNA chimera ZHER2:342-SR-HP1 containing a 15-mer HP1 PNA recognition tag and a complementary HP2 hybridization probe permitting labeling with both 125I and 111In. 111In-ZHER2:342-SR-HP1 bound specifically to HER2-expressing BT474 and SKOV-3 cancer cells in vitro, with a KD of 6±2 pM for binding to SKOV-3 cells. Specific high affinity binding of the radiolabeled complementary PNA probe 111In-/125I-HP2 to ZHER2:342-SR-HP1 pre-treated cells was demonstrated. 111In-ZHER2:342-SR-HP1 demonstrated specific accumulation in SKOV-3 xenografts in BALB/C nu/nu mice and rapid clearance from blood. Pre-saturation of SKOV-3 with non-labeled anti-HER2 Affibody or the use of HER2-negative Ramos xenografts resulted in significantly lower tumor uptake of 111In-ZHER2:342-SR-HP1. The complementary PNA probe 111In/125I-HP2 accumulated in SKOV-3 xenografts when ZHER2:342-SR-HP1 was injected 4 h earlier. The tumor accumulation of 111In/125I-HP2 was negligible without ZHER2:342-SR-HP1 pre-injection. The uptake of 111In-HP2 in SKOV-3 xenografts was 19±2 %ID/g at 1 h after injection. The uptake in blood and kidneys was approximately 50- and 2-fold lower, respectively. In conclusion, we have shown that the use of Affibody-based PNA-mediated pretargeting enables specific delivery of radiometals to tumors and provides higher radiometal concentration in tumors than in kidneys. PMID:26722376

  1. EGFR-directed Affibody for fluorescence-guided glioma surgery: time-dose analysis (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro de Souza, Ana Luiza; Marra, Kayla; Gunn, Jason R.; Elliott, Jonathan T.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Draney, Daniel R.; Feldwisch, Joachim

    2016-03-01

    The key to fluorescence guided surgical oncology is the ability to create specific contrast between normal and glioma tissue. The blood brain barrier that limits the delivery of substances to the normal brain is broken in tumors, allowing accumulation of agents in the tumor interior. However, for a clinical success, imaging agents should be in the infiltrative edges to minimize the resection of normal brain while enable the removal of tumor. The aberrant overexpression and/or activation of EGFR is associated with many types of cancers, including glioblastoma and the injection of a fluorescent molecule targeted to these receptors would improve tumor contrast during fluorescence guided surgery. Affibody molecules have intentional medium affinity and high potential specificity, which are the desirable features of a good surgical imaging agent. The aim of this study was evaluate the brain/glioma uptake of ABY029 labeled with near-infrared dye IRDye800CW after intravenous injection. Rats were either inoculated with orthotopic implantations of U251 human glioma cell line or PBS (shams control) in the brain. The tumors were allowed to grow for 2-3 weeks before carrying out fluorescent tracer experiments. Fluorescent imaging of ex vivo brain slices from rats was acquired at different time points after infection of fluorescently labeled EGFR-specific affibody to verify which time provided maximal contrast tumor to normal brain. Although the tumor was most clearly visualized after 1h of IRDye800CW-labeled ABY029 injection, the tumor location could be identified from the background after 48h. These results suggest that the NIR-labeled affibody examined shows excellent potential to increase surgical visualization for confirmed EGFR positive tumors.

  2. An in vitro selected binding protein (affibody) shows conformation-dependent recognition of the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) G protein.

    PubMed

    Hansson, M; Ringdahl, J; Robert, A; Power, U; Goetsch, L; Nguyen, T N; Uhlén, M; Ståhl, S; Nygren, P A

    1999-03-01

    Using phage-display technology, a novel binding protein (Z-affibody) showing selective binding to the RSV (Long strain) G protein was selected from a combinatorial library of a small alpha-helical protein domain (Z), derived from staphylococcal protein A (SPA). Biopanning of the Z-library against a recombinant fusion protein comprising amino acids 130-230 of the G protein from RSV-subgroup A, resulted in the selection of a Z-affibody (Z(RSV1)) which showed G protein specific binding. Using biosensor technology, the affinity (K(D)) between Z(RSV1) and the recombinant protein was determined to be in the micromolar range (10(-6) M). Interestingly, the Z(RSV1) affibody was demonstrated to also recognize the partially (54%) homologous G protein of RSV subgroup B with similar affinity. Using different recombinant RSV G protein derived fragments, the binding was found to be dependent on the presence of the cysteinyl residues proposed to be involved in the formation of an intramolecular disulfide-constrained loop structure, indicating a conformation-dependent binding. Results from epitope mapping studies, employing a panel of monoclonal antibodies directed to different RSV G protein subfragments, suggest that the Z(RSV1) affibody binding site is located within the region of amino acids 164-186 of the G protein. This region contains a 13 amino acid residue sequence which is totally conserved between subgroups A and B of RSV and extends into the cystein loop region (amino acids 173-186). The potential use of the RSV G protein-specific Z(RSV1) affibody in diagnostic and therapeutic applications is discussed.

  3. An affibody-adalimumab hybrid blocks combined IL-6 and TNF-triggered serum amyloid A secretion in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yu, Feifan; Gudmundsdotter, Lindvi; Akal, Anastassja; Gunneriusson, Elin; Frejd, Fredrik; Nygren, Per-Åke

    2014-01-01

    In inflammatory disease conditions, the regulation of the cytokine system is impaired, leading to tissue damages. Here, we used protein engineering to develop biologicals suitable for blocking a combination of inflammation driving cytokines by a single construct. From a set of interleukin (IL)-6-binding affibody molecules selected by phage display, five variants with a capability of blocking the interaction between complexes of soluble IL-6 receptor α (sIL-6Rα) and IL-6 and the co-receptor gp130 were identified. In cell assays designed to analyze any blocking capacity of the classical or the alternative (trans) signaling IL-6 pathways, one variant, ZIL-6_13 with an affinity (KD) for IL-6 of ∼500 pM, showed the best performance. To construct fusion proteins ("AffiMabs") with dual cytokine specificities, ZIL-6_13 was fused to either the N- or C-terminus of both the heavy and light chains of the anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) monoclonal antibody adalimumab (Humira®). One AffiMab construct with ZIL-6_13 positioned at the N-terminus of the heavy chain, denoted ZIL-6_13-HCAda, was determined to be the most optimal, and it was subsequently evaluated in an acute Serum Amyloid A (SAA) model in mice. Administration of the AffiMab or adalimumab prior to challenge with a mix of IL-6 and TNF reduced the levels of serum SAA in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, the highest dose (70 mg/kg body weight) of adalimumab only resulted in a 50% reduction of SAA-levels, whereas the corresponding dose of the ZIL-6_13-HCAda AffiMab with combined IL-6/TNF specificity, resulted in SAA levels below the detection limit.

  4. Target-specific cytotoxic effects on HER2-expressing cells by the tripartite fusion toxin ZHER2:2891-ABD-PE38X8, including a targeting affibody molecule and a half-life extension domain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao; Seijsing, Johan; Frejd, Fredrik Y; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Gräslund, Torbjörn

    2015-08-01

    Development of cancer treatment regimens including immunotoxins is partly hampered by their immunogenicity. Recently, deimmunized versions of toxins have been described, potentially being better suited for translation to the clinic. In this study, a recombinant tripartite fusion toxin consisting of a deimmunized version of exotoxin A from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PE38) genetically fused to an affibody molecule specifically interacting with the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), and also an albumin binding domain (ABD) for half-life extension, has been produced and characterized in terms of functionality of the three moieties. Biosensor based assays showed that the fusion toxin was able to interact with human and mouse serum albumin, but not with bovine serum albumin and that it interacted with HER2 (KD=5 nM). Interestingly, a complex of the fusion toxin and human serum albumin also interacted with HER2 but with a somewhat weaker affinity (KD=12 nM). The IC50-values of the fusion toxin ranged from 6 to 300 pM on SKOV-3, SKBR-3 and A549 cells and was lower for cells with higher surface densities of HER2. The fusion toxin was found specific for HER2 as shown by blocking available HER2 receptors with free affibody molecule before subjecting the cells to the toxin. Analysis of contact time showed that 10 min was sufficient to kill 50% of the cells. In conclusion, all three regions of the fusion toxin were found to be functional.

  5. Comparative Evaluation of Affibody Molecules for Radionuclide Imaging of in Vivo Expression of Carbonic Anhydrase IX.

    PubMed

    Garousi, Javad; Honarvar, Hadis; Andersson, Ken G; Mitran, Bogdan; Orlova, Anna; Buijs, Jos; Löfblom, John; Frejd, Fredrik Y; Tolmachev, Vladimir

    2016-11-07

    Overexpression of the enzyme carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) is documented for chronically hypoxic malignant tumors as well as for normoxic renal cell carcinoma. Radionuclide molecular imaging of CAIX would be useful for detection of hypoxic areas in malignant tumors, for patients' stratification for CAIX-targeted therapies, and for discrimination of primary malignant and benign renal tumors. Earlier, we have reported feasibility of in vivo radionuclide based imaging of CAIX expressing tumors using Affibody molecules, small affinity proteins based on a nonimmunoglobulin scaffold. In this study, we compared imaging properties of several anti-CAIX Affibody molecules having identical scaffold parts and competing for the same epitope on CAIX, but having different binding paratopes. Four variants were labeled using residualizing (99m)Tc and nonresidualizing (125)I labels. All radiolabeled variants demonstrated high-affinity detection of CAIX-expressing cell line SK-RC-52 in vitro and specific accumulation in SK-RC-52 xenografts in vivo. (125)I-labeled conjugates demonstrated much lower radioactivity uptake in kidneys but higher radioactivity concentration in blood compared with (99m)Tc-labeled counterparts. Although all variants cleared rapidly from blood and nonspecific compartments, there was noticeable difference in their biodistribution. The best variant for imaging of expression of CAIX in disseminated cancer was (99m)Tc-(HE)3-ZCAIX:2 providing tumor uptake of 16.3 ± 0.9% ID/g and tumor-to-blood ratio of 44 ± 7 at 4 h after injection. For primary renal cell carcinoma, the most promising imaging candidate was (125)I-ZCAIX:4 providing tumor-kidney ratio of 2.1 ± 0.5. In conclusion, several clones of scaffold proteins should be evaluated to select the best variant for development of an imaging probe with optimal sensitivity for the intended application.

  6. Identification of Androgen Receptor-Specific Enhancer RNAs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    AND SUBTITLE Identification of Androgen Receptor-Specific Enhancer RNAs 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0120 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...enhancer RNAs in response to androgen treatment such that these enhancer RNAs may serve as novel biomarkers for prostate cancer diagnosis and prognosis

  7. The synthesis of multifunctional nanoparticles conjugated with anti-Her2 affibody and monomethylauristatin E

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pala, Katarzyna; Jakimowicz, Piotr; Cyranka-Czaja, Anna; Otlewski, Jacek

    2015-04-01

    Conjugation of bioactive xenobiotics with innert particles often improves their efficacy and/or specificity. In this work we designed superparamagnetic ferric oxide nanoparticles (NPs) conjugated with a strong cytotoxic drug, monomethylauristatin E (MMAE), and evaluated their potential against cancer cells. Cytotoxicity tests showed that the conjugate was at least twice as toxic as the free drug. We then studied the cytotoxic potential of the conjugate at an elevated temperature achieved due to the superparamagnetic properties of the NPs, finding no enhancement of cytotoxicity in comparison with that at 37 °C. Next, multifunctional NPs containing MMAE and a targeting agent were synthesized. The targeting agent was the ZHer2:342 affibody specific to Her2 receptor. The selectivity and effectiveness of the conjugates was evaluated using SK-BR3 (Her2-positive) and U-87 MG (a negative control) cell lines. The multifunctional NPs selectively decrease of the viability of the SK-BR3 cells, showing their specificity towards cells overexpressing the Her2 receptor.

  8. Classification of Na channel receptors specific for various scorpion toxins.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, K P; Watt, D D; Lazdunski, M

    1983-04-01

    1. The specific binding to rat brain synaptosomes of a radiolabelled derivative of toxin II from the scorpion Centruroides suffusus suffusus could be prevented by toxins III and IV, but not by toxin V or variants 1-3, from the venom of Centruroides sculpturatus. 2. The specific binding of a similar derivative of toxin II from Androctonus australis Hector was not affected by any of the toxins from Centruroides sculpturatus. 3. There is biochemical evidence for only two distinct classes of Na channel receptors specific for known scorpion toxins.

  9. Human Serum Albumin and HER2-Binding Affibody Fusion Proteins for Targeted Delivery of Fatty Acid-Modified Molecules and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Dong, Daoyuan; Xia, Guanjun; Li, Zhijun; Li, Zhiyu

    2016-10-03

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is a well-studied therapeutic target as well as a biomarker of breast cancer. HER2-targeting affibody (ZHER2:342) is a novel small scaffold protein with an extreme high affinity against HER2 screened by phage display. However, the small molecular weight of ZHER2:342 has limited its pharmaceutical application. Human serum albumin (HSA) and ZHER2:342 fusion protein may not only extend the serum half-life of ZHER2:342 but also preserve the biological function of HSA to bind and transport fatty acids, which can be used to deliver fatty acid-modified therapeutics to HER2-positive cancer cells. Two HSA and ZHER2:342 fusion proteins, one with a single ZHER2:342 domain fused to the C terminus of HSA (rHSA-ZHER2) and another with two tandem copies of ZHER2:342 fused to the C terminus of HSA (rHSA-(ZHER2)2), have been constructed, expressed, and purified. Both fusion proteins possessed the HER2 and fatty acid (FA) binding abilities demonstrated by in vitro assays. Interestingly, rHSA-(ZHER2)2, not rHSA-ZHER2, was able to inhibit the proliferation of SK-BR-3 cells at a relatively low concentration, and the increase of HER2 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation followed by rHSA-(ZHER2)2 treatment has been observed. HSA fusion proteins are easy and economical to express, purify, and formulate. As expected, HSA fusion proteins and fusion protein-bound fatty acid-modified FITC could be efficiently taken up by cells. These results proved the feasibility of using HSA fusion proteins as therapeutic agents as well as carriers for targeted drug delivery.

  10. Influence of macrocyclic chelators on the targeting properties of (68)Ga-labeled synthetic affibody molecules: comparison with (111)In-labeled counterparts.

    PubMed

    Strand, Joanna; Honarvar, Hadis; Perols, Anna; Orlova, Anna; Selvaraju, Ram Kumar; Karlström, Amelie Eriksson; Tolmachev, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Affibody molecules are a class of small (7 kDa) non-immunoglobulin scaffold-based affinity proteins, which have demonstrated substantial potential as probes for radionuclide molecular imaging. The use of positron emission tomography (PET) would further increase the resolution and quantification accuracy of Affibody-based imaging. The rapid in vivo kinetics of Affibody molecules permit the use of the generator-produced radionuclide (68)Ga (T1/2=67.6 min). Earlier studies have demonstrated that the chemical nature of chelators has a substantial influence on the biodistribution properties of Affibody molecules. To determine an optimal labeling approach, the macrocyclic chelators 1,4,7,10-tetraazacylododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA), 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-N,N,N-triacetic acid (NOTA) and 1-(1,3-carboxypropyl)-1,4,7- triazacyclononane-4,7-diacetic acid (NODAGA) were conjugated to the N-terminus of the synthetic Affibody molecule ZHER2:S1 targeting HER2. Affibody molecules were labeled with (68)Ga, and their binding specificity and cellular processing were evaluated. The biodistribution of (68)Ga-DOTA-ZHER2:S1, (68)Ga-NOTA-ZHER2:S1 and (68)Ga-NODAGA-ZHER2:S1, as well as that of their (111)In-labeled counterparts, was evaluated in BALB/C nu/nu mice bearing HER2-expressing SKOV3 xenografts. The tumor uptake for (68)Ga-DOTA-ZHER2:S1 (17.9 ± 0.7%IA/g) was significantly higher than for both (68)Ga-NODAGA-ZHER2:S1 (16.13 ± 0.67%IA/g) and (68)Ga-NOTA-ZHER2:S1 (13 ± 3%IA/g) at 2 h after injection. (68)Ga-NODAGA-ZHER2:S1 had the highest tumor-to-blood ratio (60 ± 10) in comparison with both (68)Ga-DOTA-ZHER2:S1 (28 ± 4) and (68)Ga-NOTA-ZHER2:S1 (42 ± 11). The tumor-to-liver ratio was also higher for (68)Ga-NODAGA-ZHER2:S1 (7 ± 2) than the DOTA and NOTA conjugates (5.5 ± 0.6 vs.3.3 ± 0.6). The influence of chelator on the biodistribution and targeting properties was less pronounced for (68)Ga than for (111)In. The results of this study demonstrate that

  11. Engineering of a bispecific affibody molecule towards HER2 and HER3 by addition of an albumin-binding domain allows for affinity purification and in vivo half-life extension.

    PubMed

    Malm, Magdalena; Bass, Tarek; Gudmundsdotter, Lindvi; Lord, Martin; Frejd, Fredrik Y; Ståhl, Stefan; Löfblom, John

    2014-09-01

    Emerging strategies in cancer biotherapy include the generation and application of bispecific antibodies, targeting two tumor-associated antigens for improved tumor selectivity and potency. Here, an alternative format for bispecific molecules was designed and investigated, in which two Affibody molecules were linked by an albumin-binding domain (ABD). Affibody molecules are small (6 kDa) affinity proteins and this new format allows for engineering of molecules with similar function as full-length bispecific antibodies, but in a dramatically smaller size (around eight-fold smaller). The ABD was intended to function both as a tag for affinity purification as well as for in vivo half-life extension in future preclinical and clinical investigations. Affinity-purified bispecific Affibody molecules, targeting HER2 and HER3, showed simultaneous binding to the three target proteins (HER2, HER3, and albumin) when investigated in biosensor assays. Moreover, simultaneous interactions with the receptors and albumin were demonstrated using flow cytometry on cancer cells. The bispecific Affibody molecules were also able to block ligand-induced phosphorylation of the HER receptors, indicating an anti-proliferative effect. We believe that this compact and flexible format has great potential for developing new potent bispecific affinity proteins in the future, as it combines the benefits of a small size (e.g. improved tissue penetration and reduced cost of goods) with a long circulatory half-life.

  12. Validation of a P2Y12-receptor specific whole blood platelet aggregation assay.

    PubMed

    Amann, Michael; Ferenc, Miroslaw; Valina, Christian M; Bömicke, Timo; Stratz, Christian; Leggewie, Stefan; Trenk, Dietmar; Neumann, Franz-Josef; Hochholzer, Willibald

    2016-11-01

    Testing of P2Y12-receptor antagonist effects can support clinical decision-making. However, most platelet function assays use only ADP as agonist which is not P2Y12-receptor specific. For this reason P2Y12-receptor specific assays have been developed by adding prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) to reduce ADP-induced platelet activation via the P2Y1-receptor. The present study sought to evaluate a P2Y12-receptor specific assay for determination of pharmacodynamic and clinical outcomes. This study enrolled 400 patients undergoing coronary stenting after loading with clopidogrel or prasugrel. ADP-induced platelet reactivity was assessed by whole blood aggregometry at multiple time points with a standard ADP assay (ADPtest) and a P2Y12-receptor specific assay (ADPtest HS, both run on Multiplate Analyzer, Roche Diagnostics). Patients were clinically followed for 1 month and all events adjudicated by an independent committee. In total, 2084 pairs of test results of ADPtest and ADPtest HS were available showing a strong correlation between results of both assays (r = 0.96, p < 0.001). These findings prevailed in multiple prespecified subgroups (e.g., age; body mass index; diabetes). Calculated cutoffs for ADPtest HS and the established cutoffs of ADPtest showed a substantial agreement for prediction of ischemic and hemorrhagic events with a Cohen's κ of 0.66 and 0.66, respectively. The P2Y12-receptor specific ADPtest HS assay appears similarly predictive for pharmacodynamic and clinical outcomes as compared to the established ADPtest assay indicating its applicability for clinical use. Further evaluation in large cohorts is needed to determine if P2Y12-receptor specific testing offers any advantage for prediction of clinical outcome.

  13. Measuring HER2-Receptor Expression In Metastatic Breast Cancer Using [68Ga]ABY-025 Affibody PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Sörensen, Jens; Velikyan, Irina; Sandberg, Dan; Wennborg, Anders; Feldwisch, Joachim; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Orlova, Anna; Sandström, Mattias; Lubberink, Mark; Olofsson, Helena; Carlsson, Jörgen; Lindman, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging of HER2 expression could potentially be used to select patients for HER2-targed therapy, predict response based on uptake and be used for monitoring. In this phase I/II study the HER2-binding Affibody molecule ABY-025 was labeled with 68Ga-gallium ([68Ga]ABY-025) for PET to study effect of peptide mass, test-retest variability and correlation of quantified uptake in tumors to histopathology. Experimental design: Sixteen women with known metastatic breast cancer and on-going treatment were included and underwent FDG PET/CT to identify viable metastases. After iv injection of 212±46 MBq [68Ga]ABY-025 whole-body PET was performed at 1, 2 and 4 h. In the first 10 patients (6 with HER2-positive and 4 with HER2-negative primary tumors), [68Ga]ABY-025 PET/CT with two different doses of injected peptide was performed one week apart. In the last six patients (5 HER2-positive and 1 HER2-negative primary tumors), repeated [68Ga]ABY-025 PET were performed one week apart as a test-retest of uptake in individual lesions. Biopsies from 16 metastases in 12 patients were collected for verification of HER2 expression by immunohistochemistry and in-situ hybridization. Results: Imaging 4h after injection with high peptide content discriminated HER2-positive metastases best (p<0.01). PET SUV correlated with biopsy HER2-scores (r=0.91, p<0.001). Uptake was five times higher in HER2-positive than in HER2-negative lesions with no overlap (p=0.005). The test-retest intra-class correlation was r=0.996. [68Ga]ABY-025 PET correctly identified conversion and mixed expression of HER2 and targeted treatment was changed in 3 of the 16 patients. Conclusion: [68Ga]ABY-025 PET accurately quantifies whole-body HER2-receptor status in metastatic breast cancer. PMID:26877784

  14. Envelope determinants for dual-receptor specificity in feline leukemia virus subgroup A and T variants.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Heather H; Anderson, Maria M; Hankenson, F Claire; Johnston, Lily; Kotwaliwale, Chitra V; Overbaugh, Julie

    2006-02-01

    Gammaretroviruses, including the subgroups A, B, and C of feline leukemia virus (FeLV), use a multiple-membrane-spanning transport protein as a receptor. In some cases, such as FeLV-T, a nonclassical receptor that includes both a transport protein (Pit1) and a soluble cofactor (FeLIX) is required for entry. To define which regions confer specificity to classical versus nonclassical receptor pathways, we engineered mutations found in either FeLV-A/T or FeLV-T, individually and in combination, into the backbone of the transmissible form of the virus, FeLV-A. The receptor specificities of these viruses were tested by measuring infection and binding to cells expressing the FeLV-A receptor or the FeLV-T receptors. FeLV-A receptor specificity was maintained when changes at amino acid position 6, 7, or 8 of the mature envelope glycoprotein were introduced, although differences in infection efficiency were observed. When these N-terminal mutations were introduced together with a C-terminal 4-amino-acid insertion and an adjacent amino acid change, the resulting viruses acquired FeLV-T receptor specificity. Additionally, a W-->L change at amino acid position 378, although not required, enhanced infectivity for some viruses. Thus, we have found that determinants in the N and C termini of the envelope surface unit can direct entry via the nonclassical FeLV-T receptor pathway. The region that has been defined as the receptor binding domain of gammaretroviral envelope proteins determined entry via the FeLV-A receptor independently of the presence of the N- and C-terminal FeLV-T receptor determinants.

  15. Macrophage mannose receptor-specific gene delivery vehicle for macrophage engineering.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Gui-Xin; Chen, Yu-Zhe; Yao, Xing-Lei; Du, Anariwa; Tang, Gu-Ping; Shen, You-Qing; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Gao, Jian-Qing

    2014-05-01

    Macrophages are the most plastic cells in the hematopoietic system and they exhibit great functional diversity. They have been extensively applied in anti-inflammatory, anti-fibrotic and anti-cancer therapies. However, the application of macrophages is limited by the efficiency of their engineering. The macrophage mannose receptor (MMR, CD206), a C-type lectin receptor, is ubiquitously expressed on macrophages and has a high affinity for mannose oligosaccharides. In the present study, we developed a novel non-viral vehicle with specific affinity for MMR. Mannan was cationized with spermine at a grafted ratio of ∼12% to deliver DNA and was characterized as a stable system for delivery. This spermine-mannan (SM)-based delivery system was evaluated as a biocompatible vehicle with superior transfection efficiency on murine macrophages, up to 28.5-fold higher than spermine-pullulan, 11.5-fold higher than polyethylenimine and 3.0-fold higher than Lipofectamine™ 2000. We confirmed that the SM-based delivery system for macrophages transfection was MMR-specific and we described the intracellular transport of the delivery system. To our knowledge, this is the first study using SM to demonstrate a mannose receptor-specific gene delivery system, thereby highlighting the potential of a novel specific non-viral delivery vehicle for macrophage engineering.

  16. Adjuvant hormonal therapy for breast cancer and risk of hormone receptor-specific subtypes of contralateral breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Christopher I; Daling, Janet R; Porter, Peggy L; Tang, Mei-Tzu C; Malone, Kathleen E

    2009-09-01

    Compared with the breast cancer risk women in the general population have, breast cancer survivors have a substantially higher risk of developing a second primary contralateral breast cancer. Adjuvant hormonal therapy reduces this risk, but preliminary data indicate that it may also increase risk of hormone receptor-negative contralateral tumors. We conducted a population-based nested case-control study including 367 women diagnosed with both first primary estrogen receptor (ER)-positive invasive breast cancer and second primary contralateral breast cancer and 728 matched control women diagnosed only with a first breast cancer. Data on adjuvant hormonal therapy, other treatments, and breast cancer risk factors were ascertained through telephone interviews and medical record abstractions. Two-sided statistical tests using conditional logistic regression were conducted to quantify associations between adjuvant hormonal therapy and risk of hormone receptor-specific subtypes of contralateral breast cancer (n = 303 ER+ and n = 52 ER- cases). Compared with women not treated with hormonal therapy, users of adjuvant tamoxifen for >or=5 years had a reduced risk of ER+ contralateral breast cancer [odds ratio, 0.4; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.3-0.7], but a 4.4-fold (95% CI, 1.03-19.0) increased risk of ER- contralateral breast cancer. Tamoxifen use for <5 years was not associated with ER- contralateral breast cancer risk. Although adjuvant hormonal therapy has clear benefits, risk of the relatively uncommon outcome of ER- contralateral breast cancer may now need to be tallied among its risks. This is of clinical concern given the poorer prognosis of ER- compared with ER+ tumors.

  17. Screening of hormone-like activities in bottled waters available in Southern Spain using receptor-specific bioassays.

    PubMed

    Real, Macarena; Molina-Molina, José-Manuel; Jiménez-Díaz, Inmaculada; Arrebola, Juan Pedro; Sáenz, José-María; Fernández, Mariana F; Olea, Nicolás

    2015-01-01

    Bottled water consumption is a putative source of human exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Research has been conducted on the presence of chemicals with estrogen-like activity in bottled waters and on their estrogenicity, but few data are available on the presence of hormonal activities associated with other nuclear receptors (NRs). The aim of this study was to determine the presence of endocrine activities dependent on the activation of human estrogen receptor alpha (hERa) and/or androgen receptor (hAR) in water in glass or plastic bottles sold to consumers in Southern Spain. Hormone-like activities were evaluated in 29 bottled waters using receptor-specific bioassays based on reporter gene expression in PALM cells [(anti-)androgenicity] and cell proliferation assessment in MCF-7 cells [(anti-)estrogenicity] after optimized solid phase extraction (SPE). All of the water samples analyzed showed hormonal activity. This was estrogenic in 79.3% and anti-estrogenic in 37.9% of samples and was androgenic in 27.5% and anti-androgenic in 41.3%, with mean concentrations per liter of 0.113pM 17β-estradiol (E2) equivalent units (E2Eq), 11.01pM anti-estrogen (ICI 182780) equivalent units (ICI 182780Eq), 0.33pM methyltrienolone (R1881) equivalent units (R1881Eq), and 0.18nM procymidone equivalent units (ProcEq). Bottled water consumption contributes to EDC exposure. Hormone-like activities observed in waters from both plastic and glass bottles suggest that plastic packaging is not the sole source of contamination and that the source of the water and bottling process may play a role, among other factors. Further research is warranted on the cumulative effects of long-term exposure to low doses of EDCs.

  18. Receptor specificity of subtype H1 influenza A viruses isolated from swine and humans in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The evolution of receptor specificity of classical swine influenza viruses leading to the 2009 H1N1 pandemic virus was analyzed in glycan microarrays. Classical influenza viruses from the alpha, beta, and gamma antigenic clusters isolated between 1945 and 2009 revealed a binding profile very simila...

  19. Linearized method: A new approach for kinetic analysis of central dopamine D{sub 2} receptor specific binding

    SciTech Connect

    Watabe, Hiroshi; Hatazawa, Jun; Ishiwata, Kiichi; Ido, Tatsuo; Itoh, Masatoshi; Iwata, Ren; Nakamura, Takashi; Takahashi, Toshihiro; Hatano, Kentaro

    1995-12-01

    The authors proposed a new method (Linearized method) to analyze neuroleptic ligand-receptor specific binding in a human brain using positron emission tomography (PET). They derived the linear equation to solve four rate constants, k{sub 3}, k{sub 4}, k{sub 5}, k{sub 6} from PET data. This method does not demand radioactivity curve in plasma as an input function to brain, and can do fast calculations in order to determine rate constants. They also tested Nonlinearized method including nonlinear equations which is conventional analysis using plasma radioactivity corrected for ligand metabolites as an input function. The authors applied these methods to evaluate dopamine D{sub 2} receptor specific binding of [{sup 11}C] YM-09151-2. The value of B{sub max}/K{sub d} = k{sub 3}k{sub 4} obtained by Linearized method was 5.72 {+-} 3.1 which was consistent with the value of 5.78 {+-} 3.4 obtained by Nonlinearized method.

  20. Dopamine D3 receptor specifically modulates motor and sensory symptoms in iron-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Dowling, Pascal; Klinker, Florian; Stadelmann, Christine; Hasan, Kenan; Paulus, Walter; Liebetanz, David

    2011-01-05

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common neurological disorder whose exact pathophysiological mechanism remains unclear despite the successful use of dopaminergic treatment and recent discovery of predisposing genetic factors. As iron deficiency has been associated with RLS for some patients and there is evidence for decreased spinal dopamine D(3)-receptor (D3R) signaling in RLS, we aimed at establishing whether D3R activity and iron deficiency share common pathways within the pathophysiology of RLS sensory and motor symptoms. Using a combined mouse model of iron deficiency and dopamine D(3)-receptor deficiency (D3R-/-), circadian motor symptoms were evaluated by continuous recording of spontaneous wheel running activity. Testing the acute and persistent pain responses with the hot-plate test and formalin test, respectively, assessed sensory symptoms. A 15 week iron-deficient (ID) diet alone increased acute and persistent pain responses as compared to control diet. As compared to C57BL/6 (WT), homozygous D3R-/- mice already exhibited elevated responses to acute and persistent pain stimuli, where the latter was further elevated by concurrent iron deficiency. ID changed the circadian activity pattern toward an increased running wheel usage before the resting period, which resembled the RLS symptom of restlessness before sleep. Interestingly, D3R-/- shifted this effect of iron deficiency to a time point 3-4 h earlier. The results confirm the ability of iron deficiency and D3R-/- to evoke sensory and motor symptoms in mice resembling those observed in RLS patients. Furthermore this study suggests an increase of ID-related sensory symptoms and modification of ID-related motor symptoms by D3R-/-.

  1. In vitro evolution of H5N1 avian influenza virus toward human-type receptor specificity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Mei; Blixt, Ola; Stevens, James; Lipatov, Aleksandr S; Davis, Charles T; Collins, Brian E; Cox, Nancy J; Paulson, James C; Donis, Ruben O

    2012-01-05

    Acquisition of α2-6 sialoside receptor specificity by α2-3 specific highly-pathogenic avian influenza viruses (H5N1) is thought to be a prerequisite for efficient transmission in humans. By in vitro selection for binding α2-6 sialosides, we identified four variant viruses with amino acid substitutions in the hemagglutinin (S227N, D187G, E190G, and Q196R) that revealed modestly increased α2-6 and minimally decreased α2-3 binding by glycan array analysis. However, a mutant virus combining Q196R with mutations from previous pandemic viruses (Q226L and G228S) revealed predominantly α2-6 binding. Unlike the wild type H5N1, this mutant virus was transmitted by direct contact in the ferret model although not by airborne respiratory droplets. However, a reassortant virus with the mutant hemagglutinin, a human N2 neuraminidase and internal genes from an H5N1 virus was partially transmitted via respiratory droplets. The complex changes required for airborne transmissibility in ferrets suggest that extensive evolution is needed for H5N1 transmissibility in humans.

  2. An amphipathic sequence in the cytoplasmic tail of HIV-1 Env alters cell tropism and modulates viral receptor specificity.

    PubMed

    Vzorov, A N; Yang, C; Compans, R W

    2015-09-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) 92UG046 Env protein, obtained from a CD4-independent HIV-1 primary isolate (Zerhouni et al., 2004), has the ability to initiate an infection in HeLa cells expressing CD4 when carrying the full-length (FL) Env, but uses CD8 molecules for receptor-mediated entry when carrying a truncated Env (CT84). To determine whether a specific length or structure in the cytoplasmic tail (CT) is responsible for this alteration of tropism, we compared a series of Env constructs with different CT truncations and the presence or absence of an amphipathic alpha- helical sequence. We found that truncated constructs containing the alpha-helical LLP-2 structure in their CT domains conferred a switch from CD4 to CD8 tropism. The results support the conclusion that the structure of the CT domain can play an important role in determining receptor specificity.

  3. Chemosensory Receptor Specificity and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Ryan P.; Lomvardas, Stavros

    2016-01-01

    The senses provide a means by which data on the physical and chemical properties of the environment may be collected and meaningfully interpreted. Sensation begins at the periphery, where a multitude of different sensory cell types are activated by environmental stimuli as different as photons and odorant molecules. Stimulus sensitivity is due to expression of different cell surface sensory receptors, and therefore the receptive field of each sense is defined by the aggregate of expressed receptors in each sensory tissue. Here, we review current understanding on patterns of expression and modes of regulation of sensory receptors. PMID:25938729

  4. Cannabinoid receptor-specific mechanisms to alleviate pain in sickle cell anemia via inhibition of mast cell activation and neurogenic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Lucile; Vang, Derek; Nguyen, Julia; Benson, Barbara; Lei, Jianxun; Gupta, Kalpna

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is a manifestation of a single point mutation in hemoglobin, but inflammation and pain are the insignia of this disease which can start in infancy and continue throughout life. Earlier studies showed that mast cell activation contributes to neurogenic inflammation and pain in sickle mice. Morphine is the common analgesic treatment but also remains a major challenge due to its side effects and ability to activate mast cells. We, therefore, examined cannabinoid receptor-specific mechanisms to mitigate mast cell activation, neurogenic inflammation and hyperalgesia, using HbSS-BERK sickle and cannabinoid receptor-2-deleted sickle mice. We show that cannabinoids mitigate mast cell activation, inflammation and neurogenic inflammation in sickle mice via both cannabinoid receptors 1 and 2. Thus, cannabinoids influence systemic and neural mechanisms, ameliorating the disease pathobiology and hyperalgesia in sickle mice. This study provides ‘proof of principle’ for the potential of cannabinoid/cannabinoid receptor-based therapeutics to treat several manifestations of sickle cell anemia. PMID:26703965

  5. Characterization of a FGF19 variant with altered receptor specificity revealed a central role for FGFR1c in the regulation of glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ge, Hongfei; Baribault, Helene; Vonderfecht, Steven; Lemon, Bryan; Weiszmann, Jennifer; Gardner, Jonitha; Lee, Ki Jeong; Gupte, Jamila; Mookherjee, Paramita; Wang, Minghan; Sheng, Jackie; Wu, Xinle; Li, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes and associated metabolic conditions have reached pandemic proportions worldwide, and there is a clear unmet medical need for new therapies that are both effective and safe. FGF19 and FGF21 are distinctive members of the FGF family that function as endocrine hormones. Both have potent effects on normalizing glucose, lipid, and energy homeostasis, and therefore, represent attractive potential next generation therapies for combating the growing epidemics of type 2 diabetes and obesity. The mechanism responsible for these impressive metabolic effects remains unknown. While both FGF19 and FGF21 can activate FGFRs 1c, 2c, and 3c in the presence of co-receptor βKlotho in vitro, which receptor is responsible for the metabolic activities observed in vivo remains unknown. Here we have generated a variant of FGF19, FGF19-7, that has altered receptor specificity with a strong bias toward FGFR1c. We show that FGF19-7 is equally efficacious as wild type FGF19 in regulating glucose, lipid, and energy metabolism in both diet-induced obesity and leptin-deficient mouse models. These results are the first direct demonstration of the central role of the βKlotho/FGFR1c receptor complex in glucose and lipid regulation, and also strongly suggest that activation of this receptor complex alone might be sufficient to achieve all the metabolic functions of endocrine FGF molecules.

  6. Receptor specificity and trigemino-vascular inhibitory actions of a novel 5-HT1B/1D receptor partial agonist, 311C90 (zolmitriptan)

    PubMed Central

    Martin, G R; Robertson, A D; MacLennan, S J; Prentice, D J; Barrett, V J; Buckingham, J; Honey, A C; Giles, H; Moncada, S

    1997-01-01

    311C90 (zolmitriptan zomig: (S)-4[[3-[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl]-1H-indol-5-yl]methyl]-2-oxazolidinone) is a novel 5-HT1B/1D receptor agonist with proven efficacy in the acute treatment of migraine. Here, we describe the receptor specificity of the drug and its actions on trigeminal-evoked plasma protein extravasation into the dura mater of the anaesthetized guinea-pig. At the ‘5-HT1B-like' receptor mediating vascular contraction (rabbit saphenous vein), the compound was a potent (p[A50]=6.79±0.06) partial agonist achieving 77±4% of the maximum effect to 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT). In the same experiments, sumatriptan (p[A50]=6.48±0.04) was half as potent as 311C90 and produced 97±2% of the 5-HT maximum effect. Studies in which receptor inactivation methods were used to estimate the affinity (pKA) and efficacy relative to 5-HT (τrel.) for each agonist confirmed that 311C90 exhibits higher affinity than sumatriptan (pKA=6.63±0.04 and 6.16±0.03, respectively) and that both drugs are partial agonists relative to 5-HT (τrel=0.61±0.03 and 0.63±0.10, respectively, compared to 5-HT=1.0). Consistent with its effects in rabbit saphenous vein, 311C90 also produced concentration-dependent contractions of primate basilar artery and human epicardial coronary artery rings. In basilar artery, agonist potency (p[A50]=6.92±0.07) was similar to that demonstrated in rabbit saphenous vein, again being 2–3 fold higher than for sumatriptan (p[A50]=6.46±0.03). Both agonists produced about 50% of the maximum response obtained with 5-HT in the same preparations. In rings of human coronary artery, the absolute potency of 311C90 and sumatriptan was higher than in primate basilar artery (p[A50]=7.3±0.1 and 6.7±0.1, respectively), but maximum effects relative to 5-HT were lower (37±8% and 35±7%, respectively). In both types of vessel, the inability of 5-HT1B/1D agonists to achieve the same maximum as the endogenous agonist 5-HT is explained by the additional presence of 5-HT2A

  7. Is it safe to use TNF-α blockers for systemic inflammatory disease in patients with heart failure? Importance of dosage and receptor specificity.

    PubMed

    Diamantopoulos, Andreas P; Larsen, Alf I; Omdal, Roald

    2013-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) blockers are widely used in the treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases, especially chronic arthritis. Current guidelines advise against the use of such agents in patients who have a concomitant heart failure. Consequently, a group of patients with a devastating inflammatory disease cannot benefit from an excellent treatment option. After a critical review of the current literature, we conclude that there is not sufficient evidence to warn against such a regimen if recommended standard doses are used. A negative effect on the heart function seems to occur if unconventional high doses of TNF-α blockers are given. The theoretical background for this is discussed.

  8. Characterisation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-specific [(3)H]Ifenprodil binding to recombinant human NR1a/NR2B receptors compared with native receptors in rodent brain membranes.

    PubMed

    Grimwood, S; Richards, P; Murray, F; Harrison, N; Wingrove, P B; Hutson, P H

    2000-12-01

    We have performed [(3)H]ifenprodil binding experiments under NMDA receptor-specific assay conditions to provide the first detailed characterisation of the pharmacology of the ifenprodil site on NMDA NR1/NR2B receptors, using recombinant human NR1a/NR2B receptors stably expressed in L(tk-) cells, in comparison with rat cortex/hippocampus membranes. [(3)H]Ifenprodil bound to a single, saturable site on both human recombinant NR1a/NR2B receptors and native rat receptors with B:(max) values of 1.83 and 2.45 pmol/mg of protein, respectively, and K:(D) values of 33.5 and 24.8 nM:, respectively. The affinity of various ifenprodil site ligands-eliprodil, (R:(*), R:(*))-4-hydroxy-alpha-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-beta-methyl-4-pehnyl-1-pi per idineethanol [(+/-)-CP-101,606], cis-3-[4-(4-fluorophenyl)-4-hydroxy-1-piperidinyl]-3, 4-dihydro-2H:-1-benzopyran-4,7-diol [(+/-)-CP-283,097], and (R:(*), S:(*))-alpha-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-beta-methyl-4-(phenylmethyl)-1-piperid inepropanol [(+/-)-Ro 25-6981] was very similar for inhibition of [(3)H]ifenprodil binding to recombinant human NR1a/NR2B and native rat receptors, whereas allosteric inhibition of [(3)H]ifenprodil binding by polyamine site ligands (spermine, spermidine, and arcaine) showed approximately twofold lower affinity for recombinant receptors compared with native receptors. Glutamate site ligands were less effective at modulating [(3)H]ifenprodil binding to recombinant NR1a/NR2B receptors compared with native rat receptors. The NMDA receptor-specific [(3)H]ifenprodil binding conditions described were also applied to ex vivo experiments to determine the receptor occupancy of ifenprodil site ligands [ifenprodil, (+/-)-CP-101,606, (+/-)-CP-283,097, and (+/-)-Ro 25-6981] given systemically.

  9. Molecular dynamics simulation of the effects of single (S221P) and double (S221P and K216E) mutations in the hemagglutinin protein of influenza A H5N1 virus: a study on host receptor specificity.

    PubMed

    Behera, Abhisek Kumar; Chandra, Ishwar; Cherian, Sarah S

    2016-09-01

    Avian influenza viruses of subtype H5N1 circulating in animals continue to pose threats to human health. The binding preference of the viral surface protein hemagglutinin (HA) to sialosaccharides of receptors is an important area for understanding mutations in the receptor binding site that could be the cause for avian-to-human transmission. In the present work, we studied the effect of two receptor binding site mutations, S221P singly and in combination with another mutation K216E in the HA protein of influenza A H5N1 viruses. Docking of sialic acid ligands corresponding to both avian and human receptors and molecular dynamics simulations of the complexes for wild and mutant strains of H5N1 viruses were carried out. The H5N1 strain possessing the S221P mutation indicated decreased binding to α2,3-linked sialic acids (avian receptor, SAα2,3Gal) when compared to the binding of the wild-type strain that did not possess the HA-221 mutation. The binding to α2,6-linked sialic acids (human receptor, SAα2,6Gal) was found to be comparable, indicating that the mutant strain shows limited dual receptor specificity. On the other hand, the S221P mutation in synergism with the K216E mutation in the binding site, resulted in increased binding affinity for SAα2,6Gal when compared to SAα2,3Gal, indicative of enhanced binding to human receptors. The in-depth study of the molecular interactions in the docked complexes could explain how co-occurring mutations in the HA viral protein can aid in providing fitness advantage to the virus, in the context of host receptor specificity in emerging variants of H5N1 influenza viruses.

  10. Crystal structure analysis reveals a spring-loaded latch as molecular mechanism for GDF-5–type I receptor specificity

    PubMed Central

    Kotzsch, Alexander; Nickel, Joachim; Seher, Axel; Sebald, Walter; Müller, Thomas D

    2009-01-01

    Dysregulation of growth and differentiation factor 5 (GDF-5) signalling, a member of the TGF-β superfamily, is strongly linked to skeletal malformation. GDF-5-mediated signal transduction involves both BMP type I receptors, BMPR-IA and BMPR-IB. However, mutations in either GDF-5 or BMPR-IB lead to similar phenotypes, indicating that in chondrogenesis GDF-5 signalling seems to be exclusively mediated through BMPR-IB. Here, we present structural insights into the GDF-5:BMPR-IB complex revealing how binding specificity for BMPR-IB is generated on a molecular level. In BMPR-IB, a loop within the ligand-binding epitope functions similar to a latch allowing high-affinity binding of GDF-5. In BMPR-IA, this latch is in a closed conformation leading to steric repulsion. The new structural data now provide also a molecular basis of how phenotypically relevant missense mutations in GDF-5 might impair receptor binding and activation. PMID:19229295

  11. Receptor Specific Ligands for Spect Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kung, H. F.

    2003-02-25

    In the past funding period we have concentrated in developing new 99mTc labeled MIBG analogs. Basic chemistry of ligand synthesis, radiochemistry of Re and 99mTc complex formation, separation of stereoisomers and in vitro stability were investigated. We have prepared a number of new MIBG derivatives containing chelating moiety N2S2 and additional groups to increase lipophilicity. Unfortunately none of the new 99mTc labeled MIBG analogs showed promise as an imaging agent for myocardial neuronal function. Radioactive-iodine-labeled meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) is currently being used as an in vivo imaging agent to evaluate neuroendocrine tumors as well as the myocardial sympathetic nervous system in patients with myocardial infarct and cardiomyopathy. It is generally accepted that MIBG is an analog of norepinephrine and its uptake in the heart corresponds to the distribution of norepinephrine and the density of sympathetic neurons. A series of MIBG derivatives containing suitable chelating functional groups N2S2 for the formation of [Tcv0]+3N2S2 complex was successfully synthesized and the 99mTc-labeled complexes were prepared and tested in rats. One of the compounds, [99mTc]M2, tested showed significant, albeit lower, heart uptakes post iv injection in rats (0.18% dose/organ at 4 hours) as compared to [l25l]MIBG (1.4% dose/organ at 4 hours). The heart uptake of the 99mTc-labeled complex, [99mTc]M2, appears to be specific and can be reduced by coinjection with nonradioactive MIBG or by pretreatment with desipramine. a selective norepinephrine transporter inhibitor. Further evaluation of the in vitro uptake of [99mTc]M2 in cultured neuroblastoma cells displayed consistently lower, but measurable uptake (app. 10% of that for [125l]MlBG). These preliminary results suggested that the mechanisms of heart uptake of [99mTc]M2 may be related to those for [125l]MIBG uptake. To improve the heart uptake of the MIBG derivatives we have developed chemistry related to the preparation of new ligands, M4 and M5. The radiolabeling was successful, but the biodistribution of the new MIBG derivatives did not show any improvements in heart uptake. Our effort in this area has met with only limited success. Unfortunately, the new [99mTc]labeled MIBG derivatives showed lower uptake in the heart in biodistribution study.

  12. Rethinking Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Ziv

    2014-01-01

    This article describes an exciting exploration-based activity in which students develop an alternative definition of factor that can help them solve problems like the one presented above. Students work in groups to collect data, analyze the data to make conjectures, and then spend a significant amount of time debating and justifying their…

  13. Behavioral factors.

    PubMed

    Zero, D T; Lussi, A

    2006-01-01

    During and after an erosive challenge, behavioral factors play a role in modifying the extent of erosive tooth wear. The manner that dietary acids are introduced into the mouth (gulping, sipping, use of a straw) will affect how long the teeth are in contact with the erosive challenge. The frequency and duration of exposure to an erosive agent is of paramount importance. Night-time exposure (e.g. baby bottle-feeding) to erosive agents may be particularly destructive because of the absence of salivary flow. Health-conscious individuals tend to ingest acidic drinks and juices more frequently and tend to have higher than average oral hygiene. While good oral hygiene is of proven value in the prevention of periodontal disease and dental caries, frequent toothbrushing with abrasive oral hygiene products may enhance erosive tooth wear. Unhealthy lifestyles such as consumption of designer drugs, alcopops and alcohol abuse are other important behavioral factors.

  14. Conformationally restricted analogs of somatostatin with high mu-opiate receptor specificity.

    PubMed Central

    Pelton, J T; Gulya, K; Hruby, V J; Duckles, S P; Yamamura, H I

    1985-01-01

    A series of cyclic, conformationally restricted analogs of somatostatin have been prepared and tested for their ability to inhibit the binding of [3H]naloxone and [D-Ala2, D-Leu5] [3H]enkephalin to rat brain membranes. The most potent analog, D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Lys-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2 where Pen is penicillamine in [D-Phe5, Cys6, Tyr7, D-Trp8, Pen11]somatostatin-(5-12)-octapeptide amide, exhibited high affinity for mu-opiate receptors (IC50 value of [3H]naloxone = 3.5 nM), being 7800 times more potent than somatostatin. The cyclic octapeptide also displayed high mu-opiate receptor selectivity with an IC50 [( D-Ala2,D-Leu5]enkephalin)/IC50 (naloxone) ratio of 271. The high affinity and selectivity of the somatostatin analog for mu-opiate receptors may be of use in examining the physiological role(s) of the mu-opiate receptor. PMID:2857488

  15. A Novel Method for Screening Adenosine Receptor Specific Agonists for Use in Adenosine Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Karlie R.; Choi, Uimook; Gao, Ji-Liang; Thompson, Robert D.; Rodman, Larry E.; Malech, Harry L.; Kang, Elizabeth M.

    2017-01-01

    Agonists that target the A1, A2A, A2B and A3 adenosine receptors have potential to be potent treatment options for a number of diseases, including autoimmune diseases, cardiovascular disease and cancer. Because each of these adenosine receptors plays a distinct role throughout the body, obtaining highly specific receptor agonists is essential. Of these receptors, the adenosine A2AR and A2BR share many sequence and structural similarities but highly differ in their responses to inflammatory stimuli. Our laboratory, using a combination of specially developed cell lines and calcium release analysis hardware, has created a new and faster method for determining specificity of synthetic adenosine agonist compounds for the A2A and A2B receptors in human cells. A2A receptor expression was effectively removed from K562 cells, resulting in the development of a distinct null line. Using HIV-lentivector and plasmid DNA transfection, we also developed A2A and A2B receptor over-expressing lines. As adenosine is known to cause changes in intracellular calcium levels upon addition to cell culture, calcium release can be determined in these cell lines upon compound addition, providing a functional readout of receptor activation and allowing us to isolate the most specific adenosine agonist compounds. PMID:28317879

  16. Optimization of cell receptor-specific targeting through multivalent surface decoration of polymeric nanocarriers

    PubMed Central

    D’Addio, Suzanne M.; Baldassano, Steven; Shi, Lei; Cheung, Lila; Adamson, Douglas H.; Bruzek, Matthew; Anthony, John E.; Laskin, Debra L.; Sinko, Patrick J.; Prud’homme, Robert K.

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of tuberculosis is impaired by poor drug bioavailability, systemic side effects, patient non-compliance, and pathogen resistance to existing therapies. The mannose receptor (MR) is known to be involved in the recognition and internalization of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We present a new assembly process to produce nanocarriers with variable surface densities of mannose targeting ligands in a single step, using kinetically-controlled, block copolymer-directed assembly. Nanocarrier association with murine macrophage J774 cells expressing the MR is examined as a function of incubation time and temperature, nanocarrier size, dose, and PEG corona properties. Amphiphilic diblock copolymers are prepared with terminal hydroxyl, methoxy, or mannoside functionality and incorporated into nanocarrier formulations at specific ratios by Flash NanoPrecipitation. Association of nanocarriers protected by a hydroxyl-terminated PEG corona with J774 cells is size dependent, while nanocarriers with methoxy-terminated PEG coronas do not associate with cells, regardless of size. Specific targeting of the MR is investigated using nanocarriers having 0-75% mannoside-terminated PEG chains in the PEG corona. This is a wider range of mannose densities than has been previously studied. Maximum nanocarrier association is attained with 9% mannoside-terminated PEG chains, increasing uptake more than 3-fold compared to non-targeted nanocarriers with a 5 kg mol−1 methoxy-terminated PEG corona. While a 5 kg mol−1 methoxy-terminated PEG corona prevents non-specific uptake, a 1.8 kg mol−1 methoxy-terminated PEG corona does not sufficiently protect the nanocarriers from nonspecific association. There is continuous uptake of MR-targeted nanocarriers at 37°C, but a saturation of association at 4°C. The majority of targeted nanocarriers associate with J774E cells are internalized at 37°C and uptake is receptor-dependent, diminishing with competitive inhibition by dextran. This characterization of nanocarrier uptake and targeting provides promise for optimizing drug delivery to macrophages for TB treatment and establishes a general route for optimizing targeted formulations of nanocarriers for specific delivery at targeted sites. PMID:23419950

  17. Optimization of cell receptor-specific targeting through multivalent surface decoration of polymeric nanocarriers.

    PubMed

    D'Addio, Suzanne M; Baldassano, Steven; Shi, Lei; Cheung, Lila; Adamson, Douglas H; Bruzek, Matthew; Anthony, John E; Laskin, Debra L; Sinko, Patrick J; Prud'homme, Robert K

    2013-05-28

    Treatment of tuberculosis is impaired by poor drug bioavailability, systemic side effects, patient non-compliance, and pathogen resistance to existing therapies. The mannose receptor (MR) is known to be involved in the recognition and internalization of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We present a new assembly process to produce nanocarriers with variable surface densities of mannose targeting ligands in a single step, using kinetically-controlled, block copolymer-directed assembly. Nanocarrier association with murine macrophage J774 cells expressing the MR is examined as a function of incubation time and temperature, nanocarrier size, dose, and PEG corona properties. Amphiphilic diblock copolymers are prepared with terminal hydroxyl, methoxy, or mannoside functionality and incorporated into nanocarrier formulations at specific ratios by Flash NanoPrecipitation. Association of nanocarriers protected by a hydroxyl-terminated PEG corona with J774 cells is size dependent, while nanocarriers with methoxy-terminated PEG coronas do not associate with cells, regardless of size. Specific targeting of the MR is investigated using nanocarriers having 0-75% mannoside-terminated PEG chains in the PEG corona. This is a wider range of mannose densities than has been previously studied. Maximum nanocarrier association is attained with 9% mannoside-terminated PEG chains, increasing uptake more than 3-fold compared to non-targeted nanocarriers with a 5kgmol(-1) methoxy-terminated PEG corona. While a 5kgmol(-1) methoxy-terminated PEG corona prevents non-specific uptake, a 1.8kgmol(-1) methoxy-terminated PEG corona does not sufficiently protect the nanocarriers from nonspecific association. There is continuous uptake of MR-targeted nanocarriers at 37°C, but a saturation of association at 4°C. The majority of targeted nanocarriers associated with J774E cells are internalized at 37°C and uptake is receptor-dependent, diminishing with competitive inhibition by dextran. This characterization of nanocarrier uptake and targeting provides promise for optimizing drug delivery to macrophages for TB treatment and establishes a general route for optimizing targeted formulations of nanocarriers for specific delivery at targeted sites.

  18. Chemokine Receptor-Specific Antibodies in Cancer Immunotherapy: Achievements and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Vela, Maria; Aris, Mariana; Llorente, Mercedes; Garcia-Sanz, Jose A.; Kremer, Leonor

    2015-01-01

    The 1990s brought a burst of information regarding the structure, expression pattern, and role in leukocyte migration and adhesion of chemokines and their receptors. At that time, the FDA approved the first therapeutic antibodies for cancer treatment. A few years later, it was reported that the chemokine receptors CXCR4 and CCR7 were involved on directing metastases to liver, lung, bone marrow, or lymph nodes, and the over-expression of CCR4, CCR6, and CCR9 by certain tumors. The possibility of inhibiting the interaction of chemokine receptors present on the surface of tumor cells with their ligands emerged as a new therapeutic approach. Therefore, many research groups and companies began to develop small molecule antagonists and specific antibodies, aiming to neutralize signaling from these receptors. Despite great expectations, so far, only one anti-chemokine receptor antibody has been approved for its clinical use, mogamulizumab, an anti-CCR4 antibody, granted in Japan to treat refractory adult T-cell leukemia and lymphoma. Here, we review the main achievements obtained with anti-chemokine receptor antibodies for cancer immunotherapy, including discovery and clinical studies, proposed mechanisms of action, and therapeutic applications. PMID:25688243

  19. A Cholecystokinin B Receptor-Specific DNA Aptamer for Targeting Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Thomas; Pan, Weihua; Tang, Xiaomeng; Linton, Samuel S.; McGovern, Christopher O.; Loc, Welley S.; Smith, Jill P.; Butler, Peter J.; Kester, Mark; Adair, James H.; Matters, Gail L.

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs) constitutively express the G-protein-coupled cholecystokinin B receptor (CCKBR). In this study, we identified DNA aptamers (APs) that bind to the CCKBR and describe their characterization and targeting efficacy. Using dual SELEX selection against “exposed” CCKBR peptides and CCKBR-expressing PDAC cells, a pool of DNA APs was identified. Further downselection was based on predicted structures and properties, and we selected eight APs for initial characterizations. The APs bound specifically to the CCKBR, and we showed not only that they did not stimulate proliferation of PDAC cell lines but rather inhibited their proliferation. We chose one AP, termed AP1153, for further binding and localization studies. We found that AP1153 did not activate CCKBR signaling pathways, and three-dimensional Confocal microscopy showed that AP1153 was internalized by PDAC cells in a receptor-mediated manner. AP1153 showed a binding affinity of 15 pM. Bioconjugation of AP1153 to the surface of fluorescent NPs greatly facilitated delivery of NPs to PDAC tumors in vivo. The selectivity of this AP-targeted NP delivery system holds promise for enhanced early detection of PDAC lesions as well as improved chemotherapeutic treatments for PDAC patients. PMID:27754762

  20. Sex Pheromone Receptor Specificity in the European Corn Borer Moth, Ostrinia nubilalis.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The European corn borer (ECB), Ostrinia nubilalis, exists as two separate sex pheromone races. ECB(Z) females produce a 97:3 blend of Z11- and E11-14:OAc whereas ECB(E) females produce an opposite 1:99 ratio of the Z and E isomers. Males of each race respond specifically to their conspecific female...

  1. Structural Characterization of the Hemagglutinin Receptor Specificity from the 2009 H1N1 Influenza Pandemic

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Rui; McBride, Ryan; Nycholat, Corwin M.; Paulson, James C.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2012-02-13

    Influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) is the viral envelope protein that mediates viral attachment to host cells and elicits membrane fusion. The HA receptor-binding specificity is a key determinant for the host range and transmissibility of influenza viruses. In human pandemics of the 20th century, the HA normally has acquired specificity for human-like receptors before widespread infection. Crystal structures of the H1 HA from the 2009 human pandemic (A/California/04/2009 [CA04]) in complex with human and avian receptor analogs reveal conserved recognition of the terminal sialic acid of the glycan ligands. However, favorable interactions beyond the sialic acid are found only for {alpha}2-6-linked glycans and are mediated by Asp190 and Asp225, which hydrogen bond with Gal-2 and GlcNAc-3. For {alpha}2-3-linked glycan receptors, no specific interactions beyond the terminal sialic acid are observed. Our structural and glycan microarray analyses, in the context of other high-resolution HA structures with {alpha}2-6- and {alpha}2-3-linked glycans, now elucidate the structural basis of receptor-binding specificity for H1 HAs in human and avian viruses and provide a structural explanation for the preference for {alpha}2-6 siaylated glycan receptors for the 2009 pandemic swine flu virus.

  2. Characterization of putative receptors specific for quercetin on bovine aortic smooth-muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S.C.; Becker, C.G.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have reported that tobacco glycoprotein (TGP), rutin-bovine serum albumin conjugates (R-BSA), quercetin, and chlorogenic acid are mitogenic for bovine aortic smooth-muscle cells (SMC). To investigate whether there are binding sites or receptors for these polyphenol-containing molecules on SMC, the authors have synthesized /sup 125/I-labeled rutin-bovine serum albumin ((/sup 125/I)R-BSA) of high specific activity (20 Ci/mmol). SMC were isolated from a bovine thoracic aorta and maintained in Eagle's minimum essential medium with 10% calf serum in culture. These SMC at early subpassages were suspended (3-5 x 10/sup 7/ cells/ml) in phosphate-buffered saline and incubated with (/sup 125/I)R-BSA (10 pmol) in the presence or absence of 200-fold unlabeled R-BSA, TGP, BSA, rutin, quercetin or related polyphenols, and catecholamines. Binding of (/sup 125/I)R-BSA to SMC was found to be reproducible and the radioligand was displaced by R-BSA, and also by TGP, rutin, quercetin, and chlorogenic acid, but not by BSA, ellagic acid, naringin, hesperetin, dopamine, epinephrine, or isoproterenol. The binding was saturable, reversible, and pH-dependent. These results demonstrate the presence of specific binding sites for quercetinon arterial SMC.

  3. Crystal structure of human interferon-γ receptor 2 reveals the structural basis for receptor specificity

    PubMed Central

    Mikulecký, Pavel; Zahradník, Jirí; Kolenko, Petr; Černý, Jiří; Charnavets, Tatsiana; Kolářová, Lucie; Nečasová, Iva; Pham, Phuong Ngoc; Schneider, Bohdan

    2016-01-01

    Interferon-γ receptor 2 is a cell-surface receptor that is required for interferon-γ signalling and therefore plays a critical immunoregulatory role in innate and adaptive immunity against viral and also bacterial and protozoal infections. A crystal structure of the extracellular part of human interferon-γ receptor 2 (IFNγR2) was solved by molecular replacement at 1.8 Å resolution. Similar to other class 2 receptors, IFNγR2 has two fibronectin type III domains. The characteristic structural features of IFNγR2 are concentrated in its N-terminal domain: an extensive π–cation motif of stacked residues KWRWRH, a NAG–W–NAG sandwich (where NAG stands for N-acetyl-d-glucosamine) and finally a helix formed by residues 78–85, which is unique among class 2 receptors. Mass spectrometry and mutational analyses showed the importance of N-linked glycosylation to the stability of the protein and confirmed the presence of two disulfide bonds. Structure-based bioinformatic analysis revealed independent evolutionary behaviour of both receptor domains and, together with multiple sequence alignment, identified putative binding sites for interferon-γ and receptor 1, the ligands of IFNγR2. PMID:27599734

  4. CqsA-CqsS quorum-sensing signal-receptor specificity in Photobacterium angustum

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Xiaobo; Miller, Laura C.; Ng, Wai-Leung; Bassler, Bonnie L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Quorum sensing (QS) is a process of bacterial cell-cell communication that relies on the production, detection, and population-wide response to extracellular signal molecules called autoinducers. The QS system commonly found in vibrios and photobacteria consists of the CqsA synthase/CqsS receptor pair. Vibrio cholerae CqsA/S synthesizes and detects (S)-3-hydroxytridecan-4-one (C10-CAI-1), whereas Vibrio harveyi produces and detects a distinct but similar molecule, (Z)-3-aminoundec-2-en-4-one (Ea-C8-CAI-1). To understand the signaling properties of the larger family of CqsA-CqsS pairs, here, we characterize the Photobacterium angustum CqsA/S system. Many photobacterial cqsA genes harbor a conserved frameshift mutation that abolishes CAI-1 production. By contrast, their cqsS genes are intact. Correcting the P. angustum cqsA reading frame restores production of a mixture of CAI-1 moieties, including C8-CAI-1, C10-CAI-1, Ea-C8-CAI-1 and Ea-C10-CAI-1. This signal production profile matches the P. angustum CqsS receptor ligand-detection capability. The receptor exhibits a preference for molecules with 10-carbon tails, and the CqsS Ser168 residue governs this preference. P. angustum can overcome the cqsA frameshift to produce CAI-1 under particular limiting growth conditions presumably through a ribosome slippage mechanism. Thus, we propose that P. angustum uses CAI-1 signaling for adaptation to stressful environments. PMID:24372841

  5. EGF-receptor specificity for phosphotyrosine-primed substrates provides signal integration with Src.

    PubMed

    Begley, Michael J; Yun, Cai-hong; Gewinner, Christina A; Asara, John M; Johnson, Jared L; Coyle, Anthony J; Eck, Michael J; Apostolou, Irina; Cantley, Lewis C

    2015-12-01

    Aberrant activation of the EGF receptor (EGFR) contributes to many human cancers by activating the Ras-MAPK pathway and other pathways. EGFR signaling is augmented by Src-family kinases, but the mechanism is poorly understood. Here, we show that human EGFR preferentially phosphorylates peptide substrates that are primed by a prior phosphorylation. Using peptides based on the sequence of the adaptor protein Shc1, we show that Src mediates the priming phosphorylation, thus promoting subsequent phosphorylation by EGFR. Importantly, the doubly phosphorylated Shc1 peptide binds more tightly than singly phosphorylated peptide to the Ras activator Grb2; this binding is a key step in activating the Ras-MAPK pathway. Finally, a crystal structure of EGFR in complex with a primed Shc1 peptide reveals the structural basis for EGFR substrate specificity. These results provide a molecular explanation for the integration of Src and EGFR signaling with downstream effectors such as Ras.

  6. Receptor-specific positron emission tomography radiopharmaceuticals: /sup 75/Br-labeled butyrophenone neuroleptics

    SciTech Connect

    Moerlein, S.M.; Stoecklin, G.; Weinhard, K.; Pawlik, G.; Heiss, W.D.

    1985-11-01

    Cerebral dopaminergic D/sub 2/ receptors are involved in several common disease states, such as schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease, and Huntington's chorea. The use of radiolabeled D/sub 2/ receptor-binding ligands with positron emission tomography (PET) to noninvasively quantitate D/sub 2/ receptor densities thus has potential application in medicine. Butyrophenone neuroleptics have a high in vitro and in vivo binding affinity for cerebral D/sub 2/ receptors, and due to the useful chemical and nuclear decay properties of /sup 74/Br (76% ..beta../sup +/, half-life = 1.6 h), the authors have evaluated radiobrominated bromospiperone (BSP), brombenperidol (BBP), and bromperidol (BP) as radiopharmaceuticals for use with PET.

  7. The use of receptor-specific antibodies to study G-protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Achla; Devi, Lakshmi A

    2006-07-01

    The identification of G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) cDNAs has facilitated a number of studies characterizing the biochemical properties of the receptor protein. Most of these studies have used antibodies directed against the epitope-tagged receptor expressed in heterologous cells, because of the lack of sensitive and selective antibodies capable of recognizing endogenous receptors in their native state. In order to facilitate studies with endogenous receptors, efforts have been made to generate receptor-type selective, sensitive antibodies that are able to recognize endogenous receptors. In this review, we discuss the strategies as well as the details of the techniques used for the generation of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies with a focus on family A GPCRs.

  8. Endothelin receptor-specific control of endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptosis in the kidney

    PubMed Central

    De Miguel, Carmen; Hamrick, William C.; Hobbs, Janet L.; Pollock, David M.; Carmines, Pamela K.; Pollock, Jennifer S.

    2017-01-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) promotes renal damage during cardiovascular disease; yet, the molecular mechanisms involved remain unknown. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, triggered by unfolded protein accumulation in the ER, contributes to apoptosis and organ injury. These studies aimed to determine whether the ET-1 system promotes renal ER stress development in response to tunicamycin. ETB deficient (ETB def) or transgenic control (TG-con) rats were used in the presence or absence of ETA receptor antagonism. Tunicamycin treatment similarly increased cortical ER stress markers in both rat genotypes; however, only ETB def rats showed a 14–24 fold increase from baseline for medullary GRP78, sXBP-1, and CHOP. Pre-treatment of TG-con rats with the ETA blocker ABT-627 for 1 week prior to tunicamycin injection significantly reduced the ER stress response in cortex and medulla, and also inhibited renal apoptosis. Pre-treatment with ABT-627 failed to decrease renal ER stress and apoptosis in ETB def rats. In conclusion, the ET-1 system is important for the development of tunicamycin-induced renal ER stress and apoptosis. ETA receptor activation induces renal ER stress genes and apoptosis, while functional activation of the ETB receptor has protective effects. These results highlight targeting the ETA receptor as a therapeutic approach against ER stress-induced kidney injury. PMID:28230089

  9. New England harbor seal H3N8 influenza virus retains avian-like receptor specificity

    PubMed Central

    Hussein, Islam T. M.; Krammer, Florian; Ma, Eric; Estrin, Michael; Viswanathan, Karthik; Stebbins, Nathan W.; Quinlan, Devin S.; Sasisekharan, Ram; Runstadler, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    An influenza H3N8 virus, carrying mammalian adaptation mutations, was isolated from New England harbor seals in 2011. We sought to assess the risk of its human transmissibility using two complementary approaches. First, we tested the binding of recombinant hemagglutinin (HA) proteins of seal H3N8 and human-adapted H3N2 viruses to respiratory tissues of humans and ferrets. For human tissues, we observed strong tendency of the seal H3 to bind to lung alveoli, which was in direct contrast to the human-adapted H3 that bound mainly to the trachea. This staining pattern was also consistent in ferrets, the primary animal model for human influenza pathogenesis. Second, we compared the binding of the recombinant HAs to a library of 610 glycans. In contrast to the human H3, which bound almost exclusively to α-2,6 sialylated glycans, the seal H3 bound preferentially to α-2,3 sialylated glycans. Additionally, the seal H3N8 virus replicated in human lung carcinoma cells. Our data suggest that the seal H3N8 virus has retained its avian-like receptor binding specificity, but could potentially establish infection in human lungs. PMID:26888262

  10. Smart dual-functional warhead for folate receptor-specific activatable imaging and photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jisu; Tung, Ching-Hsuan; Choi, Yongdoo

    2014-09-21

    A smart dual-targeted theranostic agent becomes highly fluorescent and phototoxic only when its linker is cleaved by tumor-associated lysosomal enzyme cathepsin B after internalization into folate receptor-positive cancer cells.

  11. A Cholecystokinin B Receptor-Specific DNA Aptamer for Targeting Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Clawson, Gary A; Abraham, Thomas; Pan, Weihua; Tang, Xiaomeng; Linton, Samuel S; McGovern, Christopher O; Loc, Welley S; Smith, Jill P; Butler, Peter J; Kester, Mark; Adair, James H; Matters, Gail L

    2017-02-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs) constitutively express the G-protein-coupled cholecystokinin B receptor (CCKBR). In this study, we identified DNA aptamers (APs) that bind to the CCKBR and describe their characterization and targeting efficacy. Using dual SELEX selection against "exposed" CCKBR peptides and CCKBR-expressing PDAC cells, a pool of DNA APs was identified. Further downselection was based on predicted structures and properties, and we selected eight APs for initial characterizations. The APs bound specifically to the CCKBR, and we showed not only that they did not stimulate proliferation of PDAC cell lines but rather inhibited their proliferation. We chose one AP, termed AP1153, for further binding and localization studies. We found that AP1153 did not activate CCKBR signaling pathways, and three-dimensional Confocal microscopy showed that AP1153 was internalized by PDAC cells in a receptor-mediated manner. AP1153 showed a binding affinity of 15 pM. Bioconjugation of AP1153 to the surface of fluorescent NPs greatly facilitated delivery of NPs to PDAC tumors in vivo. The selectivity of this AP-targeted NP delivery system holds promise for enhanced early detection of PDAC lesions as well as improved chemotherapeutic treatments for PDAC patients.

  12. Interneuron- and GABAA receptor-specific inhibitory synaptic plasticity in cerebellar Purkinje cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qionger; Duguid, Ian; Clark, Beverley; Panzanelli, Patrizia; Patel, Bijal; Thomas, Philip; Fritschy, Jean-Marc; Smart, Trevor G.

    2015-07-01

    Inhibitory synaptic plasticity is important for shaping both neuronal excitability and network activity. Here we investigate the input and GABAA receptor subunit specificity of inhibitory synaptic plasticity by studying cerebellar interneuron-Purkinje cell (PC) synapses. Depolarizing PCs initiated a long-lasting increase in GABA-mediated synaptic currents. By stimulating individual interneurons, this plasticity was observed at somatodendritic basket cell synapses, but not at distal dendritic stellate cell synapses. Basket cell synapses predominantly express β2-subunit-containing GABAA receptors; deletion of the β2-subunit ablates this plasticity, demonstrating its reliance on GABAA receptor subunit composition. The increase in synaptic currents is dependent upon an increase in newly synthesized cell surface synaptic GABAA receptors and is abolished by preventing CaMKII phosphorylation of GABAA receptors. Our results reveal a novel GABAA receptor subunit- and input-specific form of inhibitory synaptic plasticity that regulates the temporal firing pattern of the principal output cells of the cerebellum.

  13. Profiling of benzophenone derivatives using fish and human estrogen receptor-specific in vitro bioassays

    SciTech Connect

    Molina-Molina, Jose-Manuel Escande, Aurelie; Pillon, Arnaud; Gomez, Elena; Pakdel, Farzad; Cavailles, Vincent; Olea, Nicolas; Ait-Aissa, Selim; Balaguer, Patrick

    2008-11-01

    Benzophenone (BP) derivatives, BP1 (2,4-dihydroxybenzophenone), BP2 (2,2',4,4'-tetrahydroxybenzophenone), BP3 (2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone), and THB (2,4,4'-trihydroxybenzophenone) are UV-absorbing chemicals widely used in pharmaceutical, cosmetics, and industrial applications, such as topical sunscreens in lotions and hair sprays to protect skin and hair from UV irradiation. Studies on their endocrine disrupting properties have mostly focused on their interaction with human estrogen receptor alpha (hER{alpha}), and there has been no comprehensive analysis of their potency in a system allowing comparison between hER{alpha} and hER{beta} activities. The objective of this study was to provide a comprehensive ER activation profile of BP derivatives using ER from human and fish origin in a battery of in vitro tests, i.e., competitive binding, reporter gene based assays, vitellogenin (Vtg) induction in isolated rainbow trout hepatocytes, and proliferation based assays. The ability to induce human androgen receptor (hAR)-mediated reporter gene expression was also examined. All BP derivatives tested except BP3 were full hER{alpha} and hER{beta} agonists (BP2 > THB > BP1) and displayed a stronger activation of hER{beta} compared with hER{alpha}, the opposite effect to that of estradiol (E{sub 2}). Unlike E{sub 2}, BPs were more active in rainbow trout ER{alpha} (rtER{alpha}) than in hER{alpha} assay. All four BP derivatives showed anti-androgenic activity (THB > BP2 > BP1 > BP3). Overall, the observed anti-androgenic potencies of BP derivatives, together with their proposed greater effect on ER{beta} versus ER{alpha} activation, support further investigation of their role as endocrine disrupters in humans and wildlife.

  14. Heart disease - risk factors

    MedlinePlus

    Heart disease - prevention; CVD - risk factors; Cardiovascular disease - risk factors; Coronary artery disease - risk factors; CAD - risk ... a certain health condition. Some risk factors for heart disease you cannot change, but some you can. ...

  15. Coagulation Factors Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page helpful? Also known as: Factor Assays; Blood Clotting Factors; Clotting Factors [or by the individual factor ... person has enough coagulation activity to control the blood clotting process. It is used by healthcare practitioners to ...

  16. Factor VII deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... if one or more of these factors are missing or are not functioning like they should. Factor VII is one such coagulation factor. Factor VII deficiency runs in families (inherited) and is very rare. Both parents must ...

  17. Factor II deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... if one or more of these factors are missing or are not functioning like they should. Factor II is one such coagulation factor. Factor II deficiency runs in families (inherited) and is very rare. Both parents must ...

  18. The Fish Pathogen Vibrio vulnificus Biotype 2: Epidemiology, Phylogeny, and Virulence Factors Involved in Warm-Water Vibriosis.

    PubMed

    Amaro, Carmen; Sanjuán, Eva; Fouz, Belén; Pajuelo, David; Lee, Chung-Te; Hor, Lien-I; Barrera, Rodolfo

    2015-06-01

    Vibrio vulnificus biotype 2 is the etiological agent of warm-water vibriosis, a disease that affects eels and other teleosts, especially in fish farms. Biotype 2 is polyphyletic and probably emerged from aquatic bacteria by acquisition of a transferable virulence plasmid that encodes resistance to innate immunity of eels and other teleosts. Interestingly, biotype 2 comprises a zoonotic clonal complex designated as serovar E that has extended worldwide. One of the most interesting virulence factors produced by serovar E is RtxA13, a multifunctional protein that acts as a lethal factor for fish, an invasion factor for mice, and a survival factor outside the host. Two practically identical copies of rtxA13 are present in all biotype 2 strains regardless of the serovar, one in the virulence plasmid and the other in chromosome II. The plasmid also contains other genes involved in survival and growth in eel blood: vep07, a gene for an outer membrane (OM) lipoprotein involved in resistance to eel serum and vep20, a gene for an OM receptor specific for eel-transferrin and, probably, other related fish transferrins. All the three genes are highly conserved within biotype 2, which suggests that they are under a strong selective pressure. Interestingly, the three genes are related with transferable plasmids, which emphasizes the role of horizontal gene transfer in the evolution of V. vulnificus in nutrient-enriched aquatic environments, such as fish farms.

  19. Molecular Mechanisms of Fibroblast Growth Factor Signaling in Physiology and Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Belov, Artur A.; Mohammadi, Moosa

    2013-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) signal in a paracrine or endocrine fashion to mediate a myriad of biological activities, ranging from issuing developmental cues, maintaining tissue homeostasis, and regulating metabolic processes. FGFs carry out their diverse functions by binding and dimerizing FGF receptors (FGFRs) in a heparan sulfate (HS) cofactor- or Klotho coreceptor-assisted manner. The accumulated wealth of structural and biophysical data in the past decade has transformed our understanding of the mechanism of FGF signaling in human health and development, and has provided novel concepts in receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling. Among these contributions are the elucidation of HS-assisted receptor dimerization, delineation of the molecular determinants of ligand–receptor specificity, tyrosine kinase regulation, receptor cis-autoinhibition, and tyrosine trans-autophosphorylation. These structural studies have also revealed how disease-associated mutations highjack the physiological mechanisms of FGFR regulation to contribute to human diseases. In this paper, we will discuss the structurally and biophysically derived mechanisms of FGF signaling, and how the insights gained may guide the development of therapies for treatment of a diverse array of human diseases. PMID:23732477

  20. Expression of corticotropin-releasing factor in inflamed tissue is required for intrinsic peripheral opioid analgesia.

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, M; Mousa, S A; Zhang, Q; Carter, L; Stein, C

    1996-01-01

    Immune cell-derived opioid peptides can activate opioid receptors on peripheral sensory nerves to inhibit inflammatory pain. The intrinsic mechanisms triggering this neuroimmune interaction are unknown. This study investigates the involvement of endogenous corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and interleukin-1beta (IL-1). A specific stress paradigm, cold water swim (CWS), produces potent opioid receptor-specific antinociception in inflamed paws of rats. This effect is dose-dependently attenuated by intraplantar but not by intravenous alpha-helical CRF. IL-1 receptor antagonist is ineffective. Similarly, local injection of antiserum against CRF, but not to IL-1, dose-dependently reverses this effect. Intravenous anti-CRF is only inhibitory at 10(4)-fold higher concentrations and intravenous CRF does not produce analgesia. Pretreatment of inflamed paws with an 18-mer 3'-3'-end inverted CRF-antisense oligodeoxynucleotide abolishes CWS-induced antinociception. The same treatment significantly reduces the amount of CRF extracted from inflamed paws and the number of CRF-immunostained cells without affecting gross inflammatory signs. A mismatch oligodeoxynucleotide alters neither the CWS effect nor CRF immunoreactivity. These findings identify locally expressed CRF as the predominant agent to trigger opioid release within inflamed tissue. Endogenous IL-1, circulating CRF or antiinflammatory effects, are not involved. Thus, an intact immune system plays an essential role in pain control, which is important for the understanding of pain in immunosuppressed patients with cancer or AIDS. Images Fig. 4 PMID:8650225

  1. Constructivism, Factoring, and Beliefs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rauff, James V.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses errors made by remedial intermediate algebra students in factoring polynomials in light of student definitions of factoring. Found certain beliefs about factoring to logically imply many of the errors made. Suggests that belief-based teaching can be successful in teaching factoring. (16 references) (Author/MKR)

  2. Resolution with Limited Factoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dafa

    The resolution principle was originally proposed by J.A. Robinson. Resolution with factoring rule is complete for the first-order logic. However, unlimited applications of factoring rule may generate many irrelevant and redundant clauses. Noll presented resolution rule with half-factoring. In this paper, we demonstrate how to eliminate the half-factoring.

  3. Psychological factors affecting migraine.

    PubMed

    Shulman, B H

    1989-01-01

    Psychological factors are known to increase the severity and intensity of headaches. When they are shown to be present, an appropriate psychiatric diagnosis is the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual's (DSMIII-R) category of psychological factors affecting physical condition (code no. 316.0). These factors can be differentiated into stress factors, personality traits, psychodynamic factors, learned behaviors, and mood disturbances. The factors overlap and intertwine in the average headache patient. Attention to these factors in a systematic way should enhance our understanding and treatment of the chronic headache patient.

  4. ISS Payload Human Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellenberger, Richard; Duvall, Laura; Dory, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    The ISS Payload Human Factors Implementation Team (HFIT) is the Payload Developer's resource for Human Factors. HFIT is the interface between Payload Developers and ISS Payload Human Factors requirements in SSP 57000. ? HFIT provides recommendations on how to meet the Human Factors requirements and guidelines early in the design process. HFIT coordinates with the Payload Developer and Astronaut Office to find low cost solutions to Human Factors challenges for hardware operability issues.

  5. Activation of human factor IX (Christmas factor).

    PubMed Central

    Di Scipio, R G; Kurachi, K; Davie, E W

    1978-01-01

    Human Factor IX (Christmas factor) is a single-chain plasma glycoprotein (mol wt 57,000) that participates in the middle phase of the intrinsic pathway of blood coagulation. It is present in plasma as a zymogen and is converted to a serine protease, Factor IXabeta, by Factor XIa (activated plasma thromboplastin antecedent) in the presence of calcium ions. In the activation reaction, two internal peptide bonds are hydrolyzed in Factor IX. These cleavages occur at a specific arginyl-alanine peptide bond and a specific arginyl-valine peptide bond. This results in the release of an activation peptide (mol wt approximately equal to 11,000) from the internal region of the precursor molecule and the generation of Factor IXabeta (mol wt approximately equal to 46,000). Factor IXabeta is composed of a light chain (mol wt approximately equal to 18,000) and a heavy chain (mol wt approximately equal to 28,000), and these chains are held together by a disulfide bond(s). The light chain originates from the amino terminal portion of the precursor molecule and has an amino terminal sequence of Tyr-Asn-Ser-Gly-Lys. The heavy chain originates from the carboxyl terminal region of the precursor molecule and contains an amino terminal sequence of Val-Val-Gly-Gly-Glu. The heavy chain of Factor IXabeta also contains the active site sequence of Phe-Cys-Ala-Gly-Phe-His-Glu-Gly-Arg-Asp-Ser-Cys-Gln-Gly-Asp-SER-Gly-Gly-Pro. The active site serine residue is shown in capital letters. Factor IX is also converted to Factor IXaalpha by a protease from Russell's viper venom. This activation reaction, however, occurs in a single step and involves only the cleavage of the internal arginyl-valine peptide bond. Human Factor IXabeta was inhibited by human antithrombin III by the formation of a one-to-one complex of enzyme and inhibitor. In this reaction, the inhibitor was tightly bound to the heavy chain of the enzyme. These data indicate that the mechanism of activation of human Factor IX and its

  6. Factoring Polynomials and Fibonacci.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartzman, Steven

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the factoring of polynomials and Fibonacci numbers, offering several challenges teachers can give students. For example, they can give students a polynomial containing large numbers and challenge them to factor it. (JN)

  7. Factor V deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... as many as 20 different proteins in blood plasma. These proteins are called blood coagulation factors. Factor ... You will be given fresh blood plasma or fresh frozen plasma infusions ... These treatments will correct the deficiency temporarily.

  8. Prognostic factors in cancer.

    PubMed

    Gospodarowicz, Mary; O'Sullivan, Brian

    2003-01-01

    Diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment are the three core elements of the art of medicine. Modern medicine pays more attention to diagnosis and treatment but prognosis has been a part of the practice of medicine much longer than diagnosis. Cancer is a heterogeneous group of disease characterized by growth, invasion and metastasis. To plan the management of an individual cancer patient, the fundamental knowledge base includes the site of origin of the cancer, its morphologic type, and the prognostic factors specific to that particular patient and cancer. Most prognostic factors literature describes those factors that directly relate to the tumor itself. However, many other factors, not directly related to the tumor, also affect the outcome. To comprehensively represent these factors we propose three broad groupings of prognostic factors: 'tumor'-related prognostic factors, 'host'-related prognostic factors, and 'environment'-related prognostic factors. Some prognostic factors are essential to decisions about the goals and choice treatment, while others are less relevant for these purposes. To guide the use of various prognostic factors we have proposed a grouping of factors based on their relevance in everyday practice; these comprise 'essential,' 'additional,' and 'new and promising factors.' The availability of a comprehensive classification of prognostic factors assures an ordered and deliberate approach to the subject and provide safeguard against skewed approaches that may ignore large parts of the field. The current attention to tumor factors has diminished the importance of 'patient' (i.e., 'host'), and almost completely overshadows the importance of the 'environment'. This ignores the fact that the latter presents the greatest potential for immediate impact. The acceptance of a generic prognostic factor classification would facilitate communication and education about this most important subject in oncology.

  9. Rh Factor Blood Test

    MedlinePlus

    Tests and Procedures Rh factor blood test By Mayo Clinic Staff Rhesus (Rh) factor is an inherited protein found on the surface of red ... positive. Your health care provider will recommend an Rh factor test during your first prenatal visit. This test ...

  10. A Factor Simplicity Index.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorenzo-Seva, Urbano

    2003-01-01

    Proposes an index for assessing the degree of factor simplicity in the context of principal components and exploratory factor analysis. The index does not depend on the scale of the factors, and its maximum and minimum are related only to the degree of simplicity in the loading matrix. (SLD)

  11. Aerostructural safety factor criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verderaime, V.

    1992-01-01

    The present modification of the conventional safety factor method for aircraft structures evaluation involves the expression of deterministic safety factors in probabilistic tolerance limit ratios; these are found to involve a total of three factors that control the interference of applied and resistive stress distributions. The deterministic expression is extended so that it may furnish a 'relative ultimate safety' index that encompasses all three distribution factors. Operational reliability is developed on the basis of the applied and the yield stress distribution interferences. Industry standards are suggested to be derivable from factor selections that are based on the consequences of failure.

  12. Acquired Factor V Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Hirai, Daisuke; Yamashita, Yugo; Masunaga, Nobutoyo; Katsura, Toshiaki; Akao, Masaharu; Okuno, Yoshiaki; Koyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitors directed against factor V rarely occur, and the clinical symptoms vary. We herein report the case of a patient who presented with a decreased factor V activity that had decreased to <3 %. We administered vitamin K and 6 units of fresh frozen plasma, but she thereafter developed an intracerebral hemorrhage. It is unclear whether surgery >10 years earlier might have caused the development of a factor V inhibitor. The treatment of acquired factor V inhibitors is mainly the transfusion of platelet concentrates and corticosteroids. Both early detection and the early initiation of the treatment of factor V inhibitor are thus considered to be important. PMID:27746446

  13. Bayesian Exploratory Factor Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Gabriella; Frühwirth-Schnatter, Sylvia; Heckman, James J.; Piatek, Rémi

    2014-01-01

    This paper develops and applies a Bayesian approach to Exploratory Factor Analysis that improves on ad hoc classical approaches. Our framework relies on dedicated factor models and simultaneously determines the number of factors, the allocation of each measurement to a unique factor, and the corresponding factor loadings. Classical identification criteria are applied and integrated into our Bayesian procedure to generate models that are stable and clearly interpretable. A Monte Carlo study confirms the validity of the approach. The method is used to produce interpretable low dimensional aggregates from a high dimensional set of psychological measurements. PMID:25431517

  14. Graphical mass factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humpert, B.; van Neerven, W. L.

    1981-07-01

    We point to the close analogy between (multiplicative) BPHZ-renormalization and mass factorization. Adapation of the forest formula to mass singular graphs allows an alternative proof of mass factorization. A diagrammatic method is developed to carry out diagram-by-diagram mass factorization with the mass singularities being subtracted by counter terms which built up the operator matrix element. The reasoning is exposed for deep-inelastic (DI) scattering and for the Drell-Yan (DY) process.

  15. Oversimplifying quantum factoring.

    PubMed

    Smolin, John A; Smith, Graeme; Vargo, Alexander

    2013-07-11

    Shor's quantum factoring algorithm exponentially outperforms known classical methods. Previous experimental implementations have used simplifications dependent on knowing the factors in advance. However, as we show here, all composite numbers admit simplification of the algorithm to a circuit equivalent to flipping coins. The difficulty of a particular experiment therefore depends on the level of simplification chosen, not the size of the number factored. Valid implementations should not make use of the answer sought.

  16. [Acquired coagulant factor inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Nogami, Keiji

    2015-02-01

    Acquired coagulation factor inhibitors are an autoimmune disease causing bleeding symptoms due to decreases in the corresponding factor (s) which result from the appearance of autoantibodies against coagulation factors (inhibitor). This disease is quite different from congenital coagulation factor deficiencies based on genetic abnormalities. In recent years, cases with this disease have been increasing, and most have anti-factor VIII autoantibodies. The breakdown of the immune control mechanism is speculated to cause this disease since it is common in the elderly, but the pathology and pathogenesis are presently unclear. We herein describe the pathology and pathogenesis of factor VIII and factor V inhibitors. Characterization of these inhibitors leads to further analysis of the coagulation process and the activation mechanisms of clotting factors. In the future, with the development of new clotting examination method (s), we anticipate that further novel findings will be obtained in this field through inhibitor analysis. In addition, detailed elucidation of the coagulation inhibitory mechanism possibly leading to hemostatic treatment strategies for acquired coagulation factor disorders will be developed.

  17. Analytic Couple Modeling Introducing Device Design Factor, Fin Factor, Thermal Diffusivity Factor, and Inductance Factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackey, Jon; Sehirlioglu, Alp; Dynys, Fred

    2014-01-01

    A set of convenient thermoelectric device solutions have been derived in order to capture a number of factors which are previously only resolved with numerical techniques. The concise conversion efficiency equations derived from governing equations provide intuitive and straight-forward design guidelines. These guidelines allow for better device design without requiring detailed numerical modeling. The analytical modeling accounts for factors such as i) variable temperature boundary conditions, ii) lateral heat transfer, iii) temperature variable material properties, and iv) transient operation. New dimensionless parameters, similar to the figure of merit, are introduced including the device design factor, fin factor, thermal diffusivity factor, and inductance factor. These new device factors allow for the straight-forward description of phenomenon generally only captured with numerical work otherwise. As an example a device design factor of 0.38, which accounts for thermal resistance of the hot and cold shoes, can be used to calculate a conversion efficiency of 2.28 while the ideal conversion efficiency based on figure of merit alone would be 6.15. Likewise an ideal couple with efficiency of 6.15 will be reduced to 5.33 when lateral heat is accounted for with a fin factor of 1.0.

  18. Involvement of leukotriene B4 receptor 1 signaling in platelet-activating factor-mediated neutrophil degranulation and chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Gaudreault, Eric; Stankova, Jana; Rola-Pleszczynski, Marek

    2005-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent lipid mediator of inflammation that can act on human neutrophils. When neutrophils are stimulated with PAF at concentrations greater than 10 nM, a double peak of intracellular calcium mobilization is observed. The second calcium peak observed in PAF-treated neutrophils has already been suggested to come from the production of endogenous leukotriene B4 (LTB4). Here we demonstrate the involvement of endogenous LTB4 production and subsequent activation of the high affinity LTB4 receptor (BLT1) in this second calcium mobilization peak observed after stimulation with PAF. We also show that the second, but not the first peak, could be desensitized by prior exposure to LTB4. Moreover, when neutrophils were pre-treated with pharmacological inhibitors of LTB4 production or with the specific BLT1 antagonist, U75302, PAF-mediated neutrophil degranulation was inhibited by more than 50%. On the other hand, pre-treating neutrophils with the PAF receptor specific antagonist (WEB2086) did not prevent any LTB4-induced degranulation. Also, when human neutrophils were pre-treated with U75302, PAF-mediated chemotaxis was reduced by more than 60%. These data indicate the involvement of BLT1 signaling in PAF-mediated neutrophil activities.

  19. Exploratory Bi-Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennrich, Robert I.; Bentler, Peter M.

    2011-01-01

    Bi-factor analysis is a form of confirmatory factor analysis originally introduced by Holzinger. The bi-factor model has a general factor and a number of group factors. The purpose of this article is to introduce an exploratory form of bi-factor analysis. An advantage of using exploratory bi-factor analysis is that one need not provide a specific…

  20. Overview of environmental factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purvis, C. K.

    1989-01-01

    The orbital environment is complex, dynamic, and comprised of both natural and system-induced components. Several environment factors are important for materials. Materials selection/suitability determination requires consideration of each and all factors, including synergisms among them. Understanding and evaluating these effects will require ground testing, modeling, and focused flight experimentation.

  1. Exposure Factors Handbook Chapter 16

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Exposure Factors Handbook: 2011 Edition. The Exposure Factors Handbook provides information on various physiological and behavioral factors commonly used in assessing exposure to environmental chemicals.

  2. Exposure Factors Handbook Chapter 18

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Exposure Factors Handbook: 2011 Edition. The Exposure Factors Handbook provides information on various physiological and behavioral factors commonly used in assessing exposure to environmental chemicals.

  3. Exposure Factors Handbook Chapter 14

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Exposure Factors Handbook: 2011 Edition. The Exposure Factors Handbook provides information on various physiological and behavioral factors commonly used in assessing exposure to environmental chemicals.

  4. Exposure Factors Handbook Chapter 15

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Exposure Factors Handbook: 2011 Edition. The Exposure Factors Handbook provides information on various physiological and behavioral factors commonly used in assessing exposure to environmental chemicals.

  5. Exposure Factors Handbook Chapter 6

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Exposure Factors Handbook: 2011 Edition. The Exposure Factors Handbook provides information on various physiological and behavioral factors commonly used in assessing exposure to environmental chemicals.

  6. Exposure Factors Handbook Chapter 10

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Exposure Factors Handbook: 2011 Edition. The Exposure Factors Handbook provides information on various physiological and behavioral factors commonly used in assessing exposure to environmental chemicals.

  7. Exposure Factors Handbook Chapter 9

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Exposure Factors Handbook: 2011 Edition. The Exposure Factors Handbook provides information on various physiological and behavioral factors commonly used in assessing exposure to environmental chemicals.

  8. Exposure Factors Handbook Chapter 13

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Exposure Factors Handbook: 2011 Edition. The Exposure Factors Handbook provides information on various physiological and behavioral factors commonly used in assessing exposure to environmental chemicals.

  9. Exposure Factors Handbook (2011 Edition)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Exposure Factors Handbook: 2011 Edition. The Exposure Factors Handbook provides information on various physiological and behavioral factors commonly used in assessing exposure to environmental chemicals.

  10. Exposure Factors Handbook Chapter 8

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Exposure Factors Handbook: 2011 Edition. The Exposure Factors Handbook provides information on various physiological and behavioral factors commonly used in assessing exposure to environmental chemicals.

  11. Exposure Factors Handbook Chapter 5

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Exposure Factors Handbook: 2011 Edition. The Exposure Factors Handbook provides information on various physiological and behavioral factors commonly used in assessing exposure to environmental chemicals.

  12. Exposure Factors Handbook Chapter 3

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Exposure Factors Handbook: 2011 Edition. The Exposure Factors Handbook provides information on various physiological and behavioral factors commonly used in assessing exposure to environmental chemicals.

  13. Exposure Factors Handbook Chapter 17

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Exposure Factors Handbook: 2011 Edition. The Exposure Factors Handbook provides information on various physiological and behavioral factors commonly used in assessing exposure to environmental chemicals.

  14. Exposure Factors Handbook Chapter 2

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Exposure Factors Handbook: 2011 Edition. The Exposure Factors Handbook provides information on various physiological and behavioral factors commonly used in assessing exposure to environmental chemicals.

  15. Exposure Factors Handbook Chapter 12

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Exposure Factors Handbook: 2011 Edition. The Exposure Factors Handbook provides information on various physiological and behavioral factors commonly used in assessing exposure to environmental chemicals.

  16. Exposure Factors Handbook Chapter 11

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Exposure Factors Handbook: 2011 Edition. The Exposure Factors Handbook provides information on various physiological and behavioral factors commonly used in assessing exposure to environmental chemicals.

  17. Exposure Factors Handbook Chapter 7

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Exposure Factors Handbook: 2011 Edition. The Exposure Factors Handbook provides information on various physiological and behavioral factors commonly used in assessing exposure to environmental chemicals.

  18. Exposure Factors Handbook Chapter 19

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Exposure Factors Handbook: 2011 Edition. The Exposure Factors Handbook provides information on various physiological and behavioral factors commonly used in assessing exposure to environmental chemicals.

  19. Exposure Factors Handbook Chapter 1

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Exposure Factors Handbook: 2011 Edition. The Exposure Factors Handbook provides information on various physiological and behavioral factors commonly used in assessing exposure to environmental chemicals.

  20. Exposure Factors Handbook Chapter 4

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Exposure Factors Handbook: 2011 Edition. The Exposure Factors Handbook provides information on various physiological and behavioral factors commonly used in assessing exposure to environmental chemicals.

  1. Risk Factors for Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Narasimhan, Padmanesan; Wood, James; MacIntyre, Chandini Raina; Mathai, Dilip

    2013-01-01

    The risk of progression from exposure to the tuberculosis bacilli to the development of active disease is a two-stage process governed by both exogenous and endogenous risk factors. Exogenous factors play a key role in accentuating the progression from exposure to infection among which the bacillary load in the sputum and the proximity of an individual to an infectious TB case are key factors. Similarly endogenous factors lead in progression from infection to active TB disease. Along with well-established risk factors (such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), malnutrition, and young age), emerging variables such as diabetes, indoor air pollution, alcohol, use of immunosuppressive drugs, and tobacco smoke play a significant role at both the individual and population level. Socioeconomic and behavioral factors are also shown to increase the susceptibility to infection. Specific groups such as health care workers and indigenous population are also at an increased risk of TB infection and disease. This paper summarizes these factors along with health system issues such as the effects of delay in diagnosis of TB in the transmission of the bacilli. PMID:23476764

  2. Environmental factors in autism.

    PubMed

    Grabrucker, Andreas M

    2012-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by impairments in communication and social behavior, and by repetitive behaviors. Although genetic factors might be largely responsible for the occurrence of autism they cannot fully account for all cases and it is likely that in addition to a certain combination of autism-related genes, specific environmental factors might act as risk factors triggering the development of autism. Thus, the role of environmental factors in autism is an important area of research and recent data will be discussed in this review. Interestingly, the results show that many environmental risk factors are interrelated and their identification and comparison might unveil a common scheme of alterations on a contextual as well as molecular level. For example, both, disruption in the immune system and in zinc homeostasis may affect synaptic transmission in autism. Thus, here, a model is proposed that interconnects the most important and scientifically recognized environmental factors. Moreover, similarities in how these risk factors impact synapse function are discussed and a possible influence on an already well described genetic pathway leading to the development of autism via zinc homeostasis is proposed.

  3. Factorized Graph Matching.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Feng; de la Torre, Fernando

    2015-11-19

    Graph matching (GM) is a fundamental problem in computer science, and it plays a central role to solve correspondence problems in computer vision. GM problems that incorporate pairwise constraints can be formulated as a quadratic assignment problem (QAP). Although widely used, solving the correspondence problem through GM has two main limitations: (1) the QAP is NP-hard and difficult to approximate; (2) GM algorithms do not incorporate geometric constraints between nodes that are natural in computer vision problems. To address aforementioned problems, this paper proposes factorized graph matching (FGM). FGM factorizes the large pairwise affinity matrix into smaller matrices that encode the local structure of each graph and the pairwise affinity between edges. Four are the benefits that follow from this factorization: (1) There is no need to compute the costly (in space and time) pairwise affinity matrix; (2) The factorization allows the use of a path-following optimization algorithm, that leads to improved optimization strategies and matching performance; (3) Given the factorization, it becomes straight-forward to incorporate geometric transformations (rigid and non-rigid) to the GM problem. (4) Using a matrix formulation for the GM problem and the factorization, it is easy to reveal commonalities and differences between different GM methods. The factorization also provides a clean connection with other matching algorithms such as iterative closest point; Experimental results on synthetic and real databases illustrate how FGM outperforms state-of-the-art algorithms for GM. The code is available at http://humansensing.cs.cmu.edu/fgm.

  4. Environmental Factors in Autism

    PubMed Central

    Grabrucker, Andreas M.

    2013-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by impairments in communication and social behavior, and by repetitive behaviors. Although genetic factors might be largely responsible for the occurrence of autism they cannot fully account for all cases and it is likely that in addition to a certain combination of autism-related genes, specific environmental factors might act as risk factors triggering the development of autism. Thus, the role of environmental factors in autism is an important area of research and recent data will be discussed in this review. Interestingly, the results show that many environmental risk factors are interrelated and their identification and comparison might unveil a common scheme of alterations on a contextual as well as molecular level. For example, both, disruption in the immune system and in zinc homeostasis may affect synaptic transmission in autism. Thus, here, a model is proposed that interconnects the most important and scientifically recognized environmental factors. Moreover, similarities in how these risk factors impact synapse function are discussed and a possible influence on an already well described genetic pathway leading to the development of autism via zinc homeostasis is proposed. PMID:23346059

  5. Conundrums with uncertainty factors.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Roger

    2010-03-01

    The practice of uncertainty factors as applied to noncancer endpoints in the IRIS database harkens back to traditional safety factors. In the era before risk quantification, these were used to build in a "margin of safety." As risk quantification takes hold, the safety factor methods yield to quantitative risk calculations to guarantee safety. Many authors believe that uncertainty factors can be given a probabilistic interpretation as ratios of response rates, and that the reference values computed according to the IRIS methodology can thus be converted to random variables whose distributions can be computed with Monte Carlo methods, based on the distributions of the uncertainty factors. Recent proposals from the National Research Council echo this view. Based on probabilistic arguments, several authors claim that the current practice of uncertainty factors is overprotective. When interpreted probabilistically, uncertainty factors entail very strong assumptions on the underlying response rates. For example, the factor for extrapolating from animal to human is the same whether the dosage is chronic or subchronic. Together with independence assumptions, these assumptions entail that the covariance matrix of the logged response rates is singular. In other words, the accumulated assumptions entail a log-linear dependence between the response rates. This in turn means that any uncertainty analysis based on these assumptions is ill-conditioned; it effectively computes uncertainty conditional on a set of zero probability. The practice of uncertainty factors is due for a thorough review. Two directions are briefly sketched, one based on standard regression models, and one based on nonparametric continuous Bayesian belief nets.

  6. Factors Influencing Army Maintenance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    ARI Research Note 89-11 (N 00 Factors Influencing Army Maintenance LOloD Debra C. Evans and J. Thomas Roth Applied Science Associates, Inc. for...1.2.7 .2.7.C.1 11. TITLE (Include Security ClassifIcarIon) Factors Influencing Army Maintenance i2. FERSONAL AuTtiOR(S) Evans, Debra C., and Roth, J...y • ’ Factors and variables that influence maintenance for systems and related manpower, per- sonnel, and training (MPT) characteristics were

  7. Introduction to human factors.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Eric

    2012-03-01

    This paper provides an introduction to "human factors engineering," an applied science that seeks to optimize usability and safety of systems. Human factors engineering pursues this goal by aligning system design with the perceptual, cognitive, and physical capabilities of users. Human factors issues loom large in the diabetes management domain because patients and health care professionals interact with a complex variety of systems, including medical device hardware and software, which are themselves embedded within larger systems of institutions, people, and processes. Usability considerations must be addressed in these systems and devices to ensure safe and effective diabetes management.

  8. Receptor specificity of retinoid-induced epidermal hyperplasia: effect of RXR-selective agonists and correlation with topical irritation.

    PubMed

    Thacher, S M; Standeven, A M; Athanikar, J; Kopper, S; Castilleja, O; Escobar, M; Beard, R L; Chandraratna, R A

    1997-08-01

    Retinoid induction of epidermal hyperplasia was investigated in hairless mice with synthetic ligands for the retinoic acid (RAR) and retinoid X (RXR) nuclear receptors. Induction of hyperplasia by all-trans retinoic acid and the RAR-specific retinoids TTNPB, tazarotene and AGN 190121 varied over a wide range (ED50 = 0.2-100 nmol/animal in three daily applications). Potency of induction was not directly correlated to receptor-binding affinity, but specificity of action could be demonstrated by inhibition with the high-affinity antagonist of the RARs, AGN 193109. Although RAR is functionally complexed with RXR in vivo, RXR-selective compounds have only weak potency in induction of hyperplasia. The ED50 value of the RXR-selective AGN 191701 was 600 nmol/animal compared with an ED50 value of 0.2 nmol for the structurally similar RAR-selective TTNPB. SR11237 and SR11217, also RXR-selective, each have an ED50 value of >1000 nmol. Unlike RAR-specific retinoids, RXR-selective retinoids cause only very mild skin flaking at high doses. Relative potencies for cumulative topical irritation (flaking and abrasion) of both RAR and RXR ligands were well correlated with epidermal hyperplasia. These data are consistent with RXR as a silent partner in the RAR-RXR heterodimer in skin.

  9. Development of CD8+ T cells expressing two distinct receptors specific for MTB and HIV-1 peptides

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Pei-Pei; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Luo, Wei; Zhou, Chao-Ying; Wen, Qian; Yang, Zhi; Liu, Su-Dong; Jiang, Zhen-Min; Zhou, Ming-Qian; Jin, Qi; Ma, Li

    2013-01-01

    The immune response in individuals co-infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) and the human immunodeficiency virus (MTB/HIV) gradually deteriorates, particularly in the cellular compartment. Adoptive transfer of functional effector T cells can confer protective immunity to immunodeficient MTB/HIV co-infected recipients. However, few such effector T cells exist in vivo, and their isolation and amplification to sufficient numbers is difficult. Therefore, enhancing immune responses against both pathogens is critical for treating MTB/HIV co-infected patients. One approach is adoptive transfer of T cell receptor (TCR) gene-modified T cells for the treatment of MTB/HIV co-infections because lymphocyte numbers and their functional avidity is significantly increased by TCR gene transfer. To generate bispecific CD8+ T cells, MTB Ag85B199–207 peptide-specific TCRs (MTB/TCR) and HIV-1 Env120–128 peptide-specific TCRs (HIV/TCR) were isolated and introduced into CD8+ T cells simultaneously using a retroviral vector. To avoid mispairing among exogenous and endogenous TCRs, and to improve the function and stability of the introduced TCRs, several strategies were employed, including introducing mutations in the MTB/TCR constant (C) regions, substituting part of the HIV/TCR C regions with CD3ζ, and linking gene segments with three different 2A peptides. Results presented in this report suggest that the engineered T cells possessed peptide-specific specificity resulting in cytokine production and cytotoxic activity. This is the first report describing the generation of engineered T cells specific for two different pathogens and provides new insights into TCR gene therapy for the treatment of immunocompromised MTB/HIV co-infected patients.

  10. Immunoglobulin class switching appears to be regulated by B cell antigen receptor-specific T cell action

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Hans; Hecht, Oliver; Zemlin, Michael; Trad, Ahmad; Tanasa, Radu I.; Schroeder, Harry W.; Lemke, Hilmar

    2013-01-01

    Summary Antigen affinity is commonly viewed as the driving force behind the selection for dominant clonotypes that can occur during the T cell-dependent processes of class switch recombination (CSR) and immune maturation. To test this view, we analyzed the variable gene repertoires of natural monoclonal antibodies to the hapten 2-phenyloxazolone (phOx) as well as those generated after phOx protein carrier-induced thymus-dependent or Ficoll-induced thymus independent antigen stimulation. In contrast to expectations, the extent of IgM heterogeneity proved similar and many IgM from these three populations exhibited similar or even greater affinities than the classic Ox1 clonotype that dominates only after CSR among primary and memory IgG. The population of clones that were selected during CSR exhibited a reduced VH/VL repertoire that was enriched for variable domains with shorter and more uniform CDR-H3 lengths and almost completely stripped of variable domains encoded by the large VH1 family. Thus, contrary to the current paradigm, T-cell dependent clonal selection during CSR appeared to select for VH family and CDR-H3 loop content even when the affinity provided by alternative clones exhibited similar to increased affinity for antigen. PMID:22531925

  11. Coupling of T cell receptor specificity to natural killer T cell development by bivalent histone H3 methylation.

    PubMed

    Dobenecker, Marc-Werner; Kim, Jong Kyong; Marcello, Jonas; Fang, Terry C; Prinjha, Rab; Bosselut, Remy; Tarakhovsky, Alexander

    2015-03-09

    The fidelity of T cell immunity depends greatly on coupling T cell receptor signaling with specific T cell effector functions. Here, we describe a chromatin-based mechanism that enables integration of TCR specificity into definite T cell lineage commitment. Using natural killer T cells (iNKT cell) as a model of a T cell subset that differentiates in response to specific TCR signaling, we identified a key role of histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3) in coupling iNKT cell TCR specificity with the generation of iNKT cells. We found that the Zbtb16/PLZF gene promoter that drives iNKT cell differentiation possesses a bivalent chromatin state characterized by the simultaneous presence of negative and positive H3K27me3 and H3K4me3 modifications. Depletion of H3K27me3 at the Zbtb16/PLZF promoter leads to uncoupling of iNKT cell development from TCR specificity and is associated with accumulation of iNKT-like CD4(+) cells that express a non-iNKT cell specific T cell repertoire. In turn, stabilization of H3K27me3 leads to a drastic reduction of the iNKT cell population. Our data suggest that H3K27me3 levels at the bivalent Zbtb16/PLZF gene define a threshold enabling precise coupling of TCR specificity to lineage commitment.

  12. Molecular-receptor-specific, non-toxic, near-infrared-emitting Au cluster-protein nanoconjugates for targeted cancer imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retnakumari, Archana; Setua, Sonali; Menon, Deepthy; Ravindran, Prasanth; Muhammed, Habeeb; Pradeep, Thalappil; Nair, Shantikumar; Koyakutty, Manzoor

    2010-02-01

    Molecular-receptor-targeted imaging of folate receptor positive oral carcinoma cells using folic-acid-conjugated fluorescent Au25 nanoclusters (Au NCs) is reported. Highly fluorescent Au25 clusters were synthesized by controlled reduction of Au+ ions, stabilized in bovine serum albumin (BSA), using a green-chemical reducing agent, ascorbic acid (vitamin-C). For targeted-imaging-based detection of cancer cells, the clusters were conjugated with folic acid (FA) through amide linkage with the BSA shell. The bioconjugated clusters show excellent stability over a wide range of pH from 4 to 14 and fluorescence efficiency of ~5.7% at pH 7.4 in phosphate buffer saline (PBS), indicating effective protection of nanoclusters by serum albumin during the bioconjugation reaction and cell-cluster interaction. The nanoclusters were characterized for their physico-chemical properties, toxicity and cancer targeting efficacy in vitro. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) suggests binding energies correlating to metal Au 4f7/2~83.97 eV and Au 4f5/2~87.768 eV. Transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy revealed the formation of individual nanoclusters of size ~1 nm and protein cluster aggregates of size ~8 nm. Photoluminescence studies show bright fluorescence with peak maximum at ~674 nm with the spectral profile covering the near-infrared (NIR) region, making it possible to image clusters at the 700-800 nm emission window where the tissue absorption of light is minimum. The cell viability and reactive oxygen toxicity studies indicate the non-toxic nature of the Au clusters up to relatively higher concentrations of 500 µg ml-1. Receptor-targeted cancer detection using Au clusters is demonstrated on FR+ve oral squamous cell carcinoma (KB) and breast adenocarcinoma cell MCF-7, where the FA-conjugated Au25 clusters were found internalized in significantly higher concentrations compared to the negative control cell lines. This study demonstrates the potential of using non-toxic fluorescent Au nanoclusters for the targeted imaging of cancer.

  13. Combined mitigation of the gastrointestinal and hematopoietic acute radiation syndromes by an LPA2 receptor-specific nonlipid agonist.

    PubMed

    Patil, Renukadevi; Szabó, Erzsébet; Fells, James I; Balogh, Andrea; Lim, Keng G; Fujiwara, Yuko; Norman, Derek D; Lee, Sue-Chin; Balazs, Louisa; Thomas, Fridtjof; Patil, Shivaputra; Emmons-Thompson, Karin; Boler, Alyssa; Strobos, Jur; McCool, Shannon W; Yates, C Ryan; Stabenow, Jennifer; Byrne, Gerrald I; Miller, Duane D; Tigyi, Gábor J

    2015-02-19

    Pharmacological mitigation of injuries caused by high-dose ionizing radiation is an unsolved medical problem. A specific nonlipid agonist of the type 2 G protein coupled receptor for lysophosphatidic acid (LPA2) 2-[4-(1,3-dioxo-1H,3H-benzoisoquinolin-2-yl)butylsulfamoyl]benzoic acid (DBIBB) when administered with a postirradiation delay of up to 72 hr reduced mortality of C57BL/6 mice but not LPA2 knockout mice. DBIBB mitigated the gastrointestinal radiation syndrome, increased intestinal crypt survival and enterocyte proliferation, and reduced apoptosis. DBIBB enhanced DNA repair by augmenting the resolution of γ-H2AX foci, increased clonogenic survival of irradiated IEC-6 cells, attenuated the radiation-induced death of human CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitors and enhanced the survival of the granulocyte/macrophage lineage. DBIBB also increased the survival of mice suffering from the hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome after total-body irradiation. DBIBB represents a drug candidate capable of mitigating acute radiation syndrome caused by high-dose γ-radiation to the hematopoietic and gastrointestinal system.

  14. Receptor specificity and functional comparison of recombinant sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) gonadotropins (FSH and LH) produced in different host systems.

    PubMed

    Molés, Gregorio; Zanuy, Silvia; Muñoz, Iciar; Crespo, Berta; Martínez, Iago; Mañanós, Evaristo; Gómez, Ana

    2011-06-01

    Different yields, biopotency, and in vivo pharmacokinetics are obtained for recombinant sea bass gonadoltropins depending on the production system and DNA construct, but they show specific activation of their corresponding receptors. Gonadotropins (GTHs) are glycoprotein hormones that play a major role in the regulation of gonadal functions. Recently, we succeeded in isolating the native sea bass Fsh from sea bass pituitaries, but to ensure the availability of bioactive GTHs and no cross-contamination with other related glycoproteins, recombinant sea bass GTHs were produced using two expression systems-insect and mammalian cells-and different constructs that yielded tethered or noncovalently bound dimers. Their production levels, binding specificity to their homologous cognate receptors, and bioactivity were investigated and compared. Both expression systems were successful in the generation of bioactive recombinant GTHs, but insect Sf9 cells yielded higher amounts of recombinant proteins than mammalian Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) stable clones. All recombinant GTHs activated their cognate receptors without cross-ligand binding and were able to stimulate sea bass gonadal steroidogenesis in vitro, although with different biopotencies. To assess their use for in vivo applications, their half-life in sea bass plasma was evaluated. Sf9-GTHs had a lower in vivo stability compared with CHO-GTHs due to their rapid clearance from the blood circulation. Cell-dependent glycosylation could be contributing to the final in vivo stability and biopotency of these recombinant glycoproteins. In conclusion, both insect and mammalian expression systems produced bioactive sea bass recombinant gonadotropins, although with particular features useful for different proposes (e.g., antibody production or in vivo studies, respectively).

  15. Hard wiring of T cell receptor specificity for the major histocompatibility complex is underpinned by TCR adaptability

    SciTech Connect

    Burrows, Scott R.; Chen, Zhenjun; Archbold, Julia K.; Tynan, Fleur E.; Beddoe, Travis; Kjer-Nielsen, Lars; Miles, John J.; Khanna, Rajiv; Moss, Denis J.; Liu, Yu Chih; Gras, Stephanie; Kostenko, Lyudmila; Brennan, Rebekah M.; Clements, Craig S.; Brooks, Andrew G.; Purcell, Anthony W.; McCluskey, James; Rossjohn, Jamie

    2010-07-07

    {alpha}{beta} T cell receptors (TCRs) are genetically restricted to corecognize peptide antigens bound to self-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) molecules; however, the basis for this MHC specificity remains unclear. Despite the current dogma, evaluation of the TCR-pMHC-I structural database shows that the nongermline-encoded complementarity-determining region (CDR)-3 loops often contact the MHC-I, and the germline-encoded CDR1 and -2 loops frequently participate in peptide-mediated interactions. Nevertheless, different TCRs adopt a roughly conserved docking mode over the pMHC-I, in which three MHC-I residues (65, 69, and 155) are invariably contacted by the TCR in one way or another. Nonetheless, the impact of mutations at these three positions, either individually or together, was not uniformly detrimental to TCR recognition of pHLA-B*0801 or pHLA-B*3508. Moreover, when TCR-pMHC-I recognition was impaired, this could be partially restored by expression of the CD8 coreceptor. The structure of a TCR-pMHC-I complex in which these three (65, 69, and 155) MHC-I positions were all mutated resulted in shifting of the TCR footprint relative to the cognate complex and formation of compensatory interactions. Collectively, our findings reveal the inherent adaptability of the TCR in maintaining peptide recognition while accommodating changes to the central docking site on the pMHC-I.

  16. FSH receptor-specific residues L501 and I505 in extracellular loop 2 are essential for its function.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Antara A; Dupakuntla, Madhavi; Pathak, Bhakti R; Mahale, Smita D

    2015-06-01

    The extracellular loop 2 (EL2) of FSH receptor (FSHR) plays a pivotal role in various events downstream of FSH stimulation. Because swapping the six FSHR-specific residues in EL2 (chimeric EL2M) with those from LH/choriogonadotropin receptor resulted in impaired internalization of FSH-FSHR complex and low FSH-induced cAMP production, six substitution mutants of EL2 were generated to ascertain the contribution of individual amino acids to the effects shown by chimeric EL2M. Results revealed that L(501)F mainly and I(505)V to a lesser extent contribute to the diminished receptor function in chimeric EL2M. HEK293 cells stably expressing WT and chimeric EL2M FSHR were generated to track the fate of the receptors post FSH induction. The chimeric EL2M FSHR stable clone showed weak internalization and cAMP response similar to transiently transfected cells. Furthermore, reduced FSH-induced ERK phosphorylation was also observed. The interaction of activated chimeric EL2M and L(501)F FSHR with β-arrestins was weak compared with WT FSHR, thus explaining the impaired internalization of chimeric EL2M and corroborating the indispensable role of EL2 in receptor function.

  17. Directed Molecular Evolution of an Engineered Gammaretroviral Envelope Protein with Dual Receptor Use Shows Stable Maintenance of Both Receptor Specificities

    PubMed Central

    Friis, Kristina Pagh; Iturrioz, Xavier; Thomsen, Jonas; Alvear-Perez, Rodrigo; Bahrami, Shervin; Llorens-Cortes, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We have previously reported the construction of a murine leukemia virus-based replication-competent gammaretrovirus (SL3-AP) capable of utilizing the human G protein-coupled receptor APJ (hAPJ) as its entry receptor and its natural receptor, the murine Xpr1 receptor, with equal affinities. The apelin receptor has previously been shown to function as a coreceptor for HIV-1, and thus, adaptation of the viral vector to this receptor is of significant interest. Here, we report the molecular evolution of the SL3-AP envelope protein when the virus is cultured in cells harboring either the Xpr1 or the hAPJ receptor. Interestingly, the dual receptor affinity is maintained even after 10 passages in these cells. At the same time, the chimeric viral envelope protein evolves in a distinct pattern in the apelin cassette when passaged on D17 cells expressing hAPJ in three separate molecular evolution studies. This pattern reflects selection for reduced ligand-receptor interaction and is compatible with a model in which SL3-AP has evolved not to activate hAPJ receptor internalization. IMPORTANCE Few successful examples of engineered retargeting of a retroviral vector exist. The engineered SL3-AP envelope is capable of utilizing either the murine Xpr1 or the human APJ receptor for entry. In addition, SL3-AP is the first example of an engineered retrovirus retaining its dual tropism after several rounds of passaging on cells expressing only one of its receptors. We demonstrate that the virus evolves toward reduced ligand-receptor affinity, which sheds new light on virus adaptation. We provide indirect evidence that such reduced affinity leads to reduced receptor internalization and propose a novel model in which too rapid receptor internalization may decrease virus entry. PMID:26608314

  18. Characterization of RyR1-slow, a ryanodine receptor specific to slow-twitch skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Morrissette, J; Xu, L; Nelson, A; Meissner, G; Block, B A

    2000-11-01

    Two distinct skeletal muscle ryanodine receptors (RyR1s) are expressed in a fiber type-specific manner in fish skeletal muscle (11). In this study, we compare [(3)H]ryanodine binding and single channel activity of RyR1-slow from fish slow-twitch skeletal muscle with RyR1-fast and RyR3 isolated from fast-twitch skeletal muscle. Scatchard plots indicate that RyR1-slow has a lower affinity for [(3)H]ryanodine when compared with RyR1-fast. In single channel recordings, RyR1-slow and RyR1-fast had similar slope conductances. However, the maximum open probability (P(o)) of RyR1-slow was threefold less than the maximum P(o) of RyR1-fast. Single channel studies also revealed the presence of two populations of RyRs in tuna fast-twitch muscle (RyR1-fast and RyR3). RyR3 had the highest P(o) of all the RyR channels and displayed less inhibition at millimolar Ca(2+). The addition of 5 mM Mg-ATP or 2.5 mM beta, gamma-methyleneadenosine 5'-triphosphate (AMP-PCP) to the channels increased the P(o) and [(3)H]ryanodine binding of both RyR1s but also caused a shift in the Ca(2+) dependency curve of RyR1-slow such that Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation was attenuated. [(3)H]ryanodine binding data also showed that Mg(2+)-dependent inhibition of RyR1-slow was reduced in the presence of AMP-PCP. These results indicate differences in the physiological properties of RyRs in fish slow- and fast-twitch skeletal muscle, which may contribute to differences in the way intracellular Ca(2+) is regulated in these muscle types.

  19. Laminin receptor specific therapeutic gold nanoparticles (198AuNP-EGCg) show efficacy in treating prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, R.; Chanda, N.; Zambre, A.; Upendran, A.; Katti, K.; Kulkarni, R. R.; Nune, S. K.; Casteel, S. W.; Smith, C. J.; Vimal, J.; Boote, E.; Robertson, J. D.; Kan, P.; Engelbrecht, H.; Watkinson, L. D.; Carmack, T. L.; Lever, J. R.; Cutler, C. S.; Caldwell, C.; Kannan, R.; Katti, K. V.

    2012-07-16

    Systemic delivery of therapeutic agents to solid tumors is hindered by vascular and interstitial barriers. We hypothesized that prostate tumor specific epigallocatechingallate( EGCg) functionalized radioactive gold nanoparticles, when delivered intratumorally (IT), will circumvent transport barriers, resulting in targeted delivery of therapeutic payloads. The results described herein provide unequivocal validation of our hypothesis. We report the development of inherently therapeutic gold nanoparticles derived from Au-198 isotope; the range of 198Au β-particle ( ~ 11 mm in tissue or ~1100 cell diameters) is sufficiently long to provide cross-fire effects of radiation dose delivered to cells within the prostate gland and short enough to minimize radiation dose to critical tissues near the periphery of the capsule. The formulation of biocompatible 198AuNPs utilizes the redox chemistry of prostate tumor specific phytochemical EGCg as it converts gold salt into gold nanoparticles and also selectively binds with excellent affinity to Laminin67R receptors which are over expressed in prostate tumor cells. Pharmacokinetic studies in PC-3 xenograft SCID mice showed ~72% retention of 198AuNP-EGCg in tumors 24 h after intratumoral administration. Therapeutic studies showed 80% reduction of tumor volumes after 28 days demonstrating significant inhibition of tumor growth compared to controls. This innovative “green nanotechnological“approach serves as a basis for designing target specific antineoplastic agents. This novel intratumorally injectable 198AuNP-EGCg nanotherapeutic agent may provide significant advances in oncology for use as an effective treatment for prostate and other solid tumors.

  20. Polymorphism in the Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte-binding ligand JESEBL/EBA-181 alters its receptor specificity

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, D. C. Ghislaine; Mu, Jian-Bing; Kaneko, Osamu; Duan, Junhui; Su, Xin-zhuan; Miller, Louis H.

    2004-01-01

    The malaria parasite lives within erythrocytes and depends on the binding of parasite ligands to host cell surface receptors for invasion. The most virulent human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, uses multiple ligands, including EBA-175, BAEBL, and JESEBL of the Duffy-binding-like (DBL) family of erythrocyte-binding proteins, for invasion of human erythrocytes. Region II of these parasite ligands is the erythrocyte-binding domain. Previously, we had shown that polymorphism in region II of BAEBL leads to different erythrocyte-binding specificities. We have now identified and characterized the binding specificity of six JESEBL variants. We sequenced region II of JESEBL from 20 P. falciparum clones collected from various parts of the world where malaria is endemic. We observed eight JESEBL variants that contained amino acid polymorphisms at five positions among all clones. Seven of the eight variants could be connected by a single base change that led to an amino acid change. We investigated the functional significance of these polymorphisms by transiently expressing region II from six of JESEBL variants on the surface of Chinese hamster ovary cells. We observed four erythrocyte-binding patterns to enzyme-treated erythrocytes. Thus, P. falciparum DBL ligands JESEBL and BAEBL can recognize multiple receptors on the erythrocyte surface. In contrast to Plasmodium vivax, which has disappeared from West Africa because of the Duffy-negative blood group, P. falciparum may have been successful in endemic areas because it has mutated the ligands of the DBL family to create multiple pathways of invasion, thus making selection of refractory erythrocytes unlikely. PMID:14983041

  1. Crystal structure of a Gammadelta T-cell Receptor Specific for the Human MHC class I Homolog MICA

    SciTech Connect

    B Xu; J Pizarro; M Holmes; C McBeth; V Groh; T Spies; R Strong

    2011-12-31

    {gamma}{delta} T cells play important roles in bridging innate and adaptive immunity, but their recognition mechanisms remain poorly understood. Human {gamma}{delta} T cells of the V{sub {delta}}1 subset predominate in intestinal epithelia and respond to MICA and MICB (MHC class I chain-related, A and B; MIC) self-antigens, mediating responses to tumorigenesis or viral infection. The crystal structure of an MIC-reactive V{sub {delta}}1 {gamma}{delta} T-cell receptor (TCR) showed expected overall structural homology to antibodies, {alpha}{beta}, and other {gamma}{delta} TCRs, but complementary determining region conformations and conservation of V{sub {delta}}1 use revealed an uncharacteristically flat potential binding surface. MIC, likewise, serves as a ligand for the activating immunoreceptor natural killer group 2, D (NKG2D), also expressed on {gamma}{delta} T cells. Although MIC recognition drives both the TCR-dependent stimulatory and NKG2D-dependent costimulatory signals necessary for activation, interaction analyses showed that MIC binding by the two receptors was mutually exclusive. Analysis of relative binding kinetics suggested sequential recognition, defining constraints for the temporal organization of {gamma}{delta} T-cell/target cell interfaces.

  2. The cannabinoid CB2 receptor-specific agonist AM1241 increases pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure severity in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Cristiane R; Hoeller, Alexandre A; Franco, Pedro L C; Martini, Athos P S; Soares, Flávia M S; Lin, Katia; Prediger, Rui D; Whalley, Benjamin J; Walz, Roger

    2016-11-01

    The potential efficacy of cannabinoid receptor ligands for the treatment of epilepsy remains controversial; cannabis components that act via cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptors produce anticonvulsant effects in animal models despite treatment with the CB receptor agonist reliably inducing convulsions in various species. Moreover, the potential role of cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2) to modulate seizures remains under-investigated. This study assessed the effects of the selective CB2 receptor agonist, AM1241, on pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures in rats. A stereotactically placed guide cannula was surgically implanted into the right lateral ventricle in adult Wistar rats which, 5-6days later, received an acute intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) microinfusion of AM1241 (0.01, 1 or 10μg/2μl or vehicle) 5min before intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of PTZ (70mg/kg). Rats were observed for 30min and the seizure severity behavior measured using a modified Racine's scale. Additional groups of rats were pretreated with a single low dose of the selective CB2 receptor antagonist, AM630 (dose 1mg/kg; i.p.), or vehicle, 30min prior to i.c.v. microinfusion of AM1241 (1μg/2μl). AM1241 administration significantly increased tonic-clonic seizure incidence and severity while also decreasing the onset of generalized seizures (AM1241 1 and 10μg/2μl). Pretreatment with AM630 prevented the proconvulsant effects of AM1241. This study shows, for the first time, that selective activation of CB2 receptors can increase generalized seizure susceptibility and suggests that pathological hyperexcitability phenomena can be differentially regulated by targeting CB1 and CB2 receptors.

  3. Scaling factors: transcription factors regulating subcellular domains.

    PubMed

    Mills, Jason C; Taghert, Paul H

    2012-01-01

    Developing cells acquire mature fates in part by selective (i.e. qualitatively different) expression of a few cell-specific genes. However, all cells share the same basic repertoire of molecular and subcellular building blocks. Therefore, cells must also specialize according to quantitative differences in cell-specific distributions of those common molecular resources. Here we propose the novel hypothesis that evolutionarily-conserved transcription factors called scaling factors (SFs) regulate quantitative differences among mature cell types. SFs: (1) are induced during late stages of cell maturation; (2) are dedicated to specific subcellular domains; and, thus, (3) allow cells to emphasize specific subcellular features. We identify candidate SFs and discuss one in detail: MIST1 (BHLHA15, vertebrates)/DIMM (CG8667, Drosophila); professional secretory cells use this SF to scale up regulated secretion. Because cells use SFs to develop their mature properties and also to adapt them to ever-changing environmental conditions, SF aberrations likely contribute to diseases of adult onset.

  4. Factors affecting bone growth.

    PubMed

    Gkiatas, Ioannis; Lykissas, Marios; Kostas-Agnantis, Ioannis; Korompilias, Anastasios; Batistatou, Anna; Beris, Alexandros

    2015-02-01

    Bone growth and development are products of the complex interactions of genetic and environmental factors. Longitudinal bone growth depends on the growth plate. The growth plate has 5 different zones-each with a different functional role-and is the final target organ for longitudinal growth. Bone length is affected by several systemic, local, and mechanical factors. All these regulation systems control the final length of bones in a complicated way. Despite its significance to bone stability, bone growth in width has not been studied as extensively as longitudinal bone growth. Bone growth in width is also controlled by genetic factors, but mechanical loading regulates periosteal apposition. In this article, we review the most recent data regarding bone growth from the embryonic age and analyze the factors that control bone growth. An understanding of this complex system is important in identifying metabolic and developmental bone diseases and fracture risk.

  5. New microbial growth factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bok, S. H.; Casida, L. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A screening procedure was used to isolate from soil a Penicillium sp., two bacterial isolates, and a Streptomyces sp. that produced a previously unknown microbial growth factor. This factor was an absolute growth requirement for three soil bacteria. The Penicillium sp. and one of the bacteria requiring the factor, an Arthrobacter sp., were selected for more extensive study concerning the production and characteristics of the growth factor. It did not seem to be related to the siderochromes. It was not present in soil extract, rumen fluid, or any other medium component tested. It appears to be a glycoprotein of high molecular weight and has high specific activity. When added to the diets for a meadow-vole mammalian test system, it caused an increased consumption of diet without a concurrent increase in rate of weight gain.

  6. Risk Factors and Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... atherosclerosis (“clogged” arteries) and High Blood Pressure . Preventing Arrhythmias and Heart Disease Prevent heart disease by lowering ... cholesterol, diabetes, and thyroid disease. Risk Factors For Arrhythmias and Heart Disease The following conditions can increase ...

  7. Factor XII assay

    MedlinePlus

    ... D, Neff AT. Rare coagulation factor deficiencies. In: Hoffman R, Benz EJ Jr, Silberstein LE, Heslop HE, ... Laboratory evaluation of hemostatic and thrombotic disorders. In: Hoffman R, Benz EJ Jr, Silberstein LE, Heslop HE, ...

  8. Sleep regulatory factors.

    PubMed

    Porkka-Heiskanen, T

    2014-01-01

    The state of sleep consists of different phases that proceed in successive, tightly regulated order through the night forming a physiological program, which for each individual is different but stabile from one night to another. Failure to accomplish this program results in feeling of unrefreshing sleep and tiredness in the morning. The pro- gram core is constructed by genetic factors but regulated by circadian rhythm and duration and intensity of day time brain activity. Many environmental factors modulate sleep, including stress, health status and ingestion of vigilance-affecting nutrients or medicines (e.g. caffeine). Knowledge of the factors that regulate the spontaneous sleep-wake cycle and factors that can affect this regulation forms the basis for diagnosis and treatment of the many common disorders of sleep.

  9. Aerospace Human Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Kevin

    1999-01-01

    The following contains the final report on the activities related to the Cooperative Agreement between the human factors research group at NASA Ames Research Center and the Psychology Department at San Jose State University. The participating NASA Ames division has been, as the organization has changed, the Aerospace Human Factors Research Division (ASHFRD and Code FL), the Flight Management and Human Factors Research Division (Code AF), and the Human Factors Research and Technology Division (Code IH). The inclusive dates for the report are November 1, 1984 to January 31, 1999. Throughout the years, approximately 170 persons worked on the cooperative agreements in one capacity or another. The Cooperative Agreement provided for research personnel to collaborate with senior scientists in ongoing NASA ARC research. Finally, many post-MA/MS and post-doctoral personnel contributed to the projects. It is worth noting that 10 former cooperative agreement personnel were hired into civil service positions directly from the agreements.

  10. FGF growth factor analogs

    DOEpatents

    Zamora, Paul O [Gaithersburg, MD; Pena, Louis A [Poquott, NY; Lin, Xinhua [Plainview, NY; Takahashi, Kazuyuki [Germantown, MD

    2012-07-24

    The present invention provides a fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the formula: ##STR00001## where R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4, R.sub.5, X, Y and Z are as defined, pharmaceutical compositions, coating compositions and medical devices including the fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the foregoing formula, and methods and uses thereof.

  11. CATTELL AND EYSENCK FACTOR SCORES RELATED TO COMREY PERSONALITY FACTORS.

    PubMed

    Comrey, A L; Duffy, K E

    1968-10-01

    The Eysenck Personality Inventory, the Cattell 16 PF Inventory, and the Comrey Personality Inventory were administered to 272 volunteers. Eysenck and Cattell factor scores were correlated with scores over homogeneous item groups (FHIDs) which define the Comrey test factors. This matrix was factor analyzed to relate the Eysenck and Cattell factor scores to the factor structure underlying the Comrey test. The Eysenck Neuroticism, Comrey Neuroticism, and Cattell second-order Anxiety factors appeared to match. The Eysenck Introversion and the Comrey Shyness factors also matched. The 16 Cattell primary factors overlapped but did not match with the Comrey factors.

  12. Factor Loading Estimation Error and Stability Using Exploratory Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sass, Daniel A.

    2010-01-01

    Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) is commonly employed to evaluate the factor structure of measures with dichotomously scored items. Generally, only the estimated factor loadings are provided with no reference to significance tests, confidence intervals, and/or estimated factor loading standard errors. This simulation study assessed factor loading…

  13. Breast cancer risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Ciszewski, Tomasz; Łopacka-Szatan, Karolina; Miotła, Paweł; Starosławska, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed neoplastic disease in women around menopause often leading to a significant reduction of these women's ability to function normally in everyday life. The increased breast cancer incidence observed in epidemiological studies in a group of women actively participating in social and professional life implicates the necessity of conducting multidirectional studies in order to identify risk factors associated with the occurrence of this type of neoplasm. Taking the possibility of influencing the neoplastic transformation process in individuals as a criterion, all the risk factors initiating the process can be divided into two groups. The first group would include inherent factors such as age, sex, race, genetic makeup promoting familial occurrence of the neoplastic disease or the occurrence of benign proliferative lesions of the mammary gland. They all constitute independent parameters and do not undergo simple modification in the course of an individual's life. The second group would include extrinsic factors conditioned by lifestyle, diet or long-term medical intervention such as using oral hormonal contraceptives or hormonal replacement therapy and their influence on the neoplastic process may be modified to a certain degree. Identification of modifiable factors may contribute to development of prevention strategies decreasing breast cancer incidence. PMID:26528110

  14. [Prognostic factors in resuscitation].

    PubMed

    Bahloul, F; Le Gall, J R; Loirat, P; Alperovitch, A; Patois, E

    1988-10-08

    The outcome from intensive care is known to be influenced by such factors as age, previous health status, severity of the disease and diagnosis. In order to assess the influence of each individual factor, 3,687 patients from 38 French intensive care units were studied. For each patient were recorded: age, simplified acute physiological score (SAPS), previous health status, diagnosis, type of intensive care unit (medicine, scheduled or elective surgery) and immediate outcome. Each of these factors was found to influence the immediate survival rate. A multivariate analysis ranked the factors in the following order: SAPS, age, type of intensive care unit and previous health status. Diagnosis played a role in the prognosis since with a 10-15 points SAPS mortality was nil for drug overdose, 12 per cent for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and 38 per cent for cardiogenic shock. However, a single diagnosis was made in only 37 per cent of the patients, as against 3 diagnoses in 17 per cent and 4 diagnoses or more in 7 per cent. When the type of intensive care unit was considered, the mean death rate was 20 per cent in medicine, 27 per cent in scheduled surgery and 5 per cent in elective surgery (P less than 0.001). Since this study showed a definite influence of each of the four factors on immediate survival, intensive care patients can be described and classified according to this system. However, it must be stressed that individual prognoses are extremely vague.

  15. A load factor formula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Roy G

    1927-01-01

    The ultimate test of a load factor formula is experience. The chief advantages of a semi rational formula over arbitrary factors are that it fairs in between points of experience and it differentiates according to variables within a type. Structural failure of an airplane apparently safe according to the formula would call for a specific change in the formula. The best class of airplanes with which to check a load factor formula seems to be those which have experienced structural failure. Table I comprises a list of the airplanes which have experienced failure in flight traceable to the wing structure. The load factor by formula is observed to be greater than the designed strength in each case, without a single exception. Table II comprises the load factor by formula with the designed strength of a number of well-known service types. The formula indicates that by far the majority of these have ample structural strength. One case considered here in deriving a suitable formula is that of a heavy load carrier of large size and practically no reserve power.

  16. Multi-factor authentication

    DOEpatents

    Hamlet, Jason R; Pierson, Lyndon G

    2014-10-21

    Detection and deterrence of spoofing of user authentication may be achieved by including a cryptographic fingerprint unit within a hardware device for authenticating a user of the hardware device. The cryptographic fingerprint unit includes an internal physically unclonable function ("PUF") circuit disposed in or on the hardware device, which generates a PUF value. Combining logic is coupled to receive the PUF value, combines the PUF value with one or more other authentication factors to generate a multi-factor authentication value. A key generator is coupled to generate a private key and a public key based on the multi-factor authentication value while a decryptor is coupled to receive an authentication challenge posed to the hardware device and encrypted with the public key and coupled to output a response to the authentication challenge decrypted with the private key.

  17. Psychological Factors in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Asthma has long been considered a condition in which psychological factors have a role. As in many illnesses, psychological variables may affect outcome in asthma via their effects on treatment adherence and symptom reporting. Emerging evidence suggests that the relation between asthma and psychological factors may be more complex than that, however. Central cognitive processes may influence not only the interpretation of asthma symptoms but also the manifestation of measurable changes in immune and physiologic markers of asthma. Furthermore, asthma and major depressive disorder share several risk factors and have similar patterns of dysregulation in key biologic systems, including the neuroendocrine stress response, cytokines, and neuropeptides. Despite the evidence that depression is common in people with asthma and exerts a negative impact on outcome, few treatment studies have examined whether improving symptoms of depression do, in fact, result in better control of asthma symptoms or improved quality of life in patients with asthma. PMID:20525122

  18. DSN human factors project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chafin, R. L.; Martin, T. H.

    1980-01-01

    The project plan was to hold focus groups to identify the factors influencing the ease of use characteristics of software and to bond the problem. A questionnaire survey was conducted to evaluate those factors which were more appropriately measured with that method. The performance oriented factors were analyzed and relationships hypothesized. The hypotheses were put to test in the experimental phase of the project. In summary, the initial analysis indicates that there is an initial performance effect favoring computer controlled dialogue but the advantage fades fast as operators become experienced. The user documentation style is seen to have a significant effect on performance. The menu and prompt command formats are preferred by inexperienced operators. The short form mnemonic is least favored. There is no clear best command format but the short form mnemonic is clearly the worst.

  19. Geothermal Plant Capacity Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Greg Mines; Jay Nathwani; Christopher Richard; Hillary Hanson; Rachel Wood

    2015-01-01

    The capacity factors recently provided by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) indicated this plant performance metric had declined for geothermal power plants since 2008. Though capacity factor is a term commonly used by geothermal stakeholders to express the ability of a plant to produce power, it is a term frequently misunderstood and in some instances incorrectly used. In this paper we discuss how this capacity factor is defined and utilized by the EIA, including discussion on the information that the EIA requests from operations in their 923 and 860 forms that are submitted both monthly and annually by geothermal operators. A discussion is also provided regarding the entities utilizing the information in the EIA reports, and how those entities can misinterpret the data being supplied by the operators. The intent of the paper is to inform the facility operators as the importance of the accuracy of the data that they provide, and the implications of not providing the correct information.

  20. Electromagnetic nucleon form factors

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, A.; Roberts, C.D.; Frank, M.R.

    1995-08-01

    The Dyson-Schwinger equation framework is employed to obtain expressions for the electromagnetic nucleon form factor. In generalized impulse approximation the form factor depends on the dressed quark propagator, the dressed quark-photon vertex, which is crucial to ensuring current conservation, and the nucleon Faddeev amplitude. The approach manifestly incorporates the large space-like-q{sup 2} renormalization group properties of QCD and allows a realistic extrapolation to small space-like-q{sup 2}. This extrapolation allows one to relate experimental data to the form of the quark-quark interaction at small space-like-q{sup 2}, which is presently unknown. The approach provides a means of unifying, within a single framework, the treatment of the perturbative and nonperturbative regimes of QCD. The wealth of experimental nucleon form factor data, over a large range of q{sup 2}, ensures that this application will provide an excellent environment to test, improve and extend our approach.

  1. The transcription factor encyclopedia.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, Dimas; Butland, Stefanie L; Swanson, Magdalena I; Bolotin, Eugene; Ticoll, Amy; Cheung, Warren A; Zhang, Xiao Yu Cindy; Dickman, Christopher T D; Fulton, Debra L; Lim, Jonathan S; Schnabl, Jake M; Ramos, Oscar H P; Vasseur-Cognet, Mireille; de Leeuw, Charles N; Simpson, Elizabeth M; Ryffel, Gerhart U; Lam, Eric W-F; Kist, Ralf; Wilson, Miranda S C; Marco-Ferreres, Raquel; Brosens, Jan J; Beccari, Leonardo L; Bovolenta, Paola; Benayoun, Bérénice A; Monteiro, Lara J; Schwenen, Helma D C; Grontved, Lars; Wederell, Elizabeth; Mandrup, Susanne; Veitia, Reiner A; Chakravarthy, Harini; Hoodless, Pamela A; Mancarelli, M Michela; Torbett, Bruce E; Banham, Alison H; Reddy, Sekhar P; Cullum, Rebecca L; Liedtke, Michaela; Tschan, Mario P; Vaz, Michelle; Rizzino, Angie; Zannini, Mariastella; Frietze, Seth; Farnham, Peggy J; Eijkelenboom, Astrid; Brown, Philip J; Laperrière, David; Leprince, Dominique; de Cristofaro, Tiziana; Prince, Kelly L; Putker, Marrit; del Peso, Luis; Camenisch, Gieri; Wenger, Roland H; Mikula, Michal; Rozendaal, Marieke; Mader, Sylvie; Ostrowski, Jerzy; Rhodes, Simon J; Van Rechem, Capucine; Boulay, Gaylor; Olechnowicz, Sam W Z; Breslin, Mary B; Lan, Michael S; Nanan, Kyster K; Wegner, Michael; Hou, Juan; Mullen, Rachel D; Colvin, Stephanie C; Noy, Peter John; Webb, Carol F; Witek, Matthew E; Ferrell, Scott; Daniel, Juliet M; Park, Jason; Waldman, Scott A; Peet, Daniel J; Taggart, Michael; Jayaraman, Padma-Sheela; Karrich, Julien J; Blom, Bianca; Vesuna, Farhad; O'Geen, Henriette; Sun, Yunfu; Gronostajski, Richard M; Woodcroft, Mark W; Hough, Margaret R; Chen, Edwin; Europe-Finner, G Nicholas; Karolczak-Bayatti, Magdalena; Bailey, Jarrod; Hankinson, Oliver; Raman, Venu; LeBrun, David P; Biswal, Shyam; Harvey, Christopher J; DeBruyne, Jason P; Hogenesch, John B; Hevner, Robert F; Héligon, Christophe; Luo, Xin M; Blank, Marissa Cathleen; Millen, Kathleen Joyce; Sharlin, David S; Forrest, Douglas; Dahlman-Wright, Karin; Zhao, Chunyan; Mishima, Yuriko; Sinha, Satrajit; Chakrabarti, Rumela; Portales-Casamar, Elodie; Sladek, Frances M; Bradley, Philip H; Wasserman, Wyeth W

    2012-01-01

    Here we present the Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), a new web-based compendium of mini review articles on transcription factors (TFs) that is founded on the principles of open access and collaboration. Our consortium of over 100 researchers has collectively contributed over 130 mini review articles on pertinent human, mouse and rat TFs. Notable features of the TFe website include a high-quality PDF generator and web API for programmatic data retrieval. TFe aims to rapidly educate scientists about the TFs they encounter through the delivery of succinct summaries written and vetted by experts in the field. TFe is available at http://www.cisreg.ca/tfe.

  2. Factor D Enzyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The trauma caused by the open heart surgery often triggers massive inflammation because the immune system overreacts. Factor D, the protein which plays a key role in the biological steps that activate this immune response prevents the imune system from inappropriately rurning out of control, allowing the patient to recover more rapidly. Factor D blockers, with their great potential to alleviate the complication of inflammation associated with heart surgery, are now being developed for clinical trials. These new drugs, developed from space research, should be commercially available as soon as year 2001.

  3. [Natural factors influencing sleep].

    PubMed

    Jurkowski, Marek K; Bobek-Billewicz, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Sleep is a universal phenomenon of human and animal lives, although the importance of sleep for homeo-stasis is still unknown. Sleep disturbances influence many behavioral and physiologic processes, leading to health complications including death. On the other hand, sleep improvement can beneficially influence the course of healing of many disorders and can be a prognostic of health recovery. The factors influencing sleep have different biological and chemical origins. They are classical hormones, hypothalamic releasing and inhibitory hormones, neuropeptides, peptides and others as cytokines, prostaglandins, oleamid, adenosine, nitric oxide. These factors regulate most physiologic processes and are likely elements integrating sleep with physiology and physiology with sleep in health and disorders.

  4. The Transcription Factor Encyclopedia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Here we present the Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), a new web-based compendium of mini review articles on transcription factors (TFs) that is founded on the principles of open access and collaboration. Our consortium of over 100 researchers has collectively contributed over 130 mini review articles on pertinent human, mouse and rat TFs. Notable features of the TFe website include a high-quality PDF generator and web API for programmatic data retrieval. TFe aims to rapidly educate scientists about the TFs they encounter through the delivery of succinct summaries written and vetted by experts in the field. TFe is available at http://www.cisreg.ca/tfe. PMID:22458515

  5. Factor Analysis and Counseling Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, David J.

    1970-01-01

    Topics discussed include factor analysis versus cluster analysis, analysis of Q correlation matrices, ipsativity and factor analysis, and tests for the significance of a correlation matrix prior to application of factor analytic techniques. Techniques for factor extraction discussed include principal components, canonical factor analysis, alpha…

  6. Peptide growth factors, part A

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, D.; Sirbasku, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains information on the following topics: Epidermal Growth Factor;Transforming Growth Factors;Bone and Cartilage Growth Factors;Somatomedin/Insulin-Like Growth Factors;Techniques for the Study of Growth Factor Activity;Assays, Phosphorylation, and Surface Membrane Effects.

  7. USAR Recruiting Success Factors.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    recruiters. Conventional multi. * variate statistical techniques have not prov ed-adequate in identifying successful recruiters, largely because of the...statistical techniques to the problem of identifying the relative importance of factors affecting recruiter success. Me t hod This study applies a...recruiters; background characteristics, suggestions about recruiter training, the value of various prospecting and selling techniques , workload, attitudes

  8. Introduction to human factors

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, J.M.

    1988-03-01

    Some background is given on the field of human factors. The nature of problems with current human/computer interfaces is discussed, some costs are identified, ideal attributes of graceful system interfaces are outlined, and some reasons are indicated why it's not easy to fix the problems. (LEW)

  9. ERYTHROPOIETIC FACTOR PURIFICATION

    DOEpatents

    White, W.F.; Schlueter, R.J.

    1962-05-01

    A method is given for purifying and concentrating the blood plasma erythropoietic factor. Anemic sheep plasma is contacted three times successively with ion exchange resins: an anion exchange resin, a cation exchange resin at a pH of about 5, and a cation exchange resin at a pH of about 6. (AEC)

  10. Assessment of Human Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mount, Frances; Foley, Tico

    1999-01-01

    Human Factors Engineering, often referred to as Ergonomics, is a science that applies a detailed understanding of human characteristics, capabilities, and limitations to the design, evaluation, and operation of environments, tools, and systems for work and daily living. Human Factors is the investigation, design, and evaluation of equipment, techniques, procedures, facilities, and human interfaces, and encompasses all aspects of human activity from manual labor to mental processing and leisure time enjoyments. In spaceflight applications, human factors engineering seeks to: (1) ensure that a task can be accomplished, (2) maintain productivity during spaceflight, and (3) ensure the habitability of the pressurized living areas. DSO 904 served as a vehicle for the verification and elucidation of human factors principles and tools in the microgravity environment. Over six flights, twelve topics were investigated. This study documented the strengths and limitations of human operators in a complex, multifaceted, and unique environment. By focusing on the man-machine interface in space flight activities, it was determined which designs allow astronauts to be optimally productive during valuable and costly space flights. Among the most promising areas of inquiry were procedures, tools, habitat, environmental conditions, tasking, work load, flexibility, and individual control over work.

  11. Managing Multiple Risk Factors.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-01

    cardiovascular disease among black women can be better controlled through the use of a stress reduction intervention that reduces the sympathetic nervous...All participants will have high normal (130/80) or mild hypertension and at least two additional risk factors for cardiovascular disease (e.g

  12. Affective Factors: Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tasnimi, Mahshad

    2009-01-01

    Affective factors seem to play a crucial role in success or failure in second language acquisition. Negative attitudes can reduce learners' motivation and harm language learning, while positive attitudes can do the reverse. Discovering students' attitudes about language will help both teacher and student in teaching learning process. Anxiety is…

  13. Nucleon electromagnetic form factors

    SciTech Connect

    Kees de Jager

    2000-01-01

    A review of data on the nucleon electromagnetic form factors in the space-like region is presented. Recent results from experiments using polarized beams and polarized targets or nucleon recoil polarimeters have yielded a significant improvement on the precision of the data obtained with the traditional Rosenbluth separation. Future plans for extended measurements are outlined.

  14. Nucleon Magnetic Form Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Kees de Jager

    2001-12-01

    A review of data on the nucleon electromagnetic form factors in the space-like region is presented. Recent results from experiments using polarized beams and polarized targets or nucleon recoil polarimeters have yielded a significant improvement on the precision of the data obtained with the traditional Rosenbluth separation. Future plans for extended measurements are outlined.

  15. Nucleon Form Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Kees de Jager

    2002-10-01

    A review of data on the nucleon electro-weak form factors in the space-like region is presented. Recent results from experiments using polarized beams and either polarized targets or nucleon recoil polarimeters have yielded a significant improvement on the precision of the electromagnetic data obtained with the traditional Rosenbluth separation. An outlook is presented of planned experiments.

  16. On The Factor Score Controversy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Bert F. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A summary and interpretation of the recent literature on the indeterminancy of factor scores is given in simple terms. A good index of factor score determinancy is the squared multiple correlation of the factor with the observed variables. (Author)

  17. Factorized Diffusion Map Approximation.

    PubMed

    Amizadeh, Saeed; Valizadegan, Hamed; Hauskrecht, Milos

    2012-01-01

    Diffusion maps are among the most powerful Machine Learning tools to analyze and work with complex high-dimensional datasets. Unfortunately, the estimation of these maps from a finite sample is known to suffer from the curse of dimensionality. Motivated by other machine learning models for which the existence of structure in the underlying distribution of data can reduce the complexity of estimation, we study and show how the factorization of the underlying distribution into independent subspaces can help us to estimate diffusion maps more accurately. Building upon this result, we propose and develop an algorithm that can automatically factorize a high dimensional data space in order to minimize the error of estimation of its diffusion map, even in the case when the underlying distribution is not decomposable. Experiments on both the synthetic and real-world datasets demonstrate improved estimation performance of our method over the standard diffusion-map framework.

  18. Factors stimulating bone formation.

    PubMed

    Lind, M; Bünger, C

    2001-10-01

    The aim of this review is to describe major approaches for stimulating bone healing and to review other factors affecting bone healing. Spinal bone fusion after surgery is a demanding process requiring optimal conditions for clinical success. Bone formation and healing can be enhanced through various methods. Experimental studies have revealed an array of stimulative measures. These include biochemical stimulation by use of hormones and growth factors, physical stimulation through mechanical and electromagnetic measures, and bone grafting by use of bone tissue or bone substitutes. Newer biological techniques such as stem cell transplantation and gene therapy can also be used to stimulate bone healing. Apart from bone transplantation, clinical experience with the many stimulation modalities is limited. Possible areas for clinical use of these novel methods are discussed.

  19. Analytic pion form factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomon, Earle L.; Pacetti, Simone

    2016-09-01

    The pion electromagnetic form factor and two-pion production in electron-positron collisions are simultaneously fitted by a vector dominance model evolving to perturbative QCD at large momentum transfer. This model was previously successful in simultaneously fitting the nucleon electromagnetic form factors (spacelike region) and the electromagnetic production of nucleon-antinucleon pairs (timelike region). For this pion case dispersion relations are used to produce the analytic connection of the spacelike and timelike regions. The fit to all the data is good, especially for the newer sets of timelike data. The description of high-q2 data, in the timelike region, requires one more meson with ρ quantum numbers than listed in the 2014 Particle Data Group review.

  20. Factorized Diffusion Map Approximation

    PubMed Central

    Amizadeh, Saeed; Valizadegan, Hamed; Hauskrecht, Milos

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion maps are among the most powerful Machine Learning tools to analyze and work with complex high-dimensional datasets. Unfortunately, the estimation of these maps from a finite sample is known to suffer from the curse of dimensionality. Motivated by other machine learning models for which the existence of structure in the underlying distribution of data can reduce the complexity of estimation, we study and show how the factorization of the underlying distribution into independent subspaces can help us to estimate diffusion maps more accurately. Building upon this result, we propose and develop an algorithm that can automatically factorize a high dimensional data space in order to minimize the error of estimation of its diffusion map, even in the case when the underlying distribution is not decomposable. Experiments on both the synthetic and real-world datasets demonstrate improved estimation performance of our method over the standard diffusion-map framework. PMID:25309676

  1. [Streptococcus pyogenes pathogenic factors].

    PubMed

    Bidet, Ph; Bonacorsi, S

    2014-11-01

    The pathogenicity of ß-hemolytic group A streptococcus (GAS) is particularly diverse, ranging from mild infections, such as pharyngitis or impetigo, to potentially debilitating poststreptococcal diseases, and up to severe invasive infections such as necrotizing fasciitis or the dreaded streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. This variety of clinical expressions, often radically different in individuals infected with the same strain, results from a complex interaction between the bacterial virulence factors, the mode of infection and the immune system of the host. Advances in comparative genomics have led to a better understanding of how, following this confrontation, GAS adapts to the immune system's pressure, either peacefully by reducing the expression of certain virulence factors to achieve an asymptomatic carriage, or on the contrary, by overexpressing them disproportionately, resulting in the most severe forms of invasive infection.

  2. Helicopter human factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Sandra G.

    1988-01-01

    The state-of-the-art helicopter and its pilot are examined using the tools of human-factors analysis. The significant role of human error in helicopter accidents is discussed; the history of human-factors research on helicopters is briefly traced; the typical flight tasks are described; and the noise, vibration, and temperature conditions typical of modern military helicopters are characterized. Also considered are helicopter controls, cockpit instruments and displays, and the impact of cockpit design on pilot workload. Particular attention is given to possible advanced-technology improvements, such as control stabilization and augmentation, FBW and fly-by-light systems, multifunction displays, night-vision goggles, pilot night-vision systems, night-vision displays with superimposed symbols, target acquisition and designation systems, and aural displays. Diagrams, drawings, and photographs are provided.

  3. Human factors workplace considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, Richard F.

    1988-01-01

    Computer workstations assume many different forms and play different functions today. In order for them to assume the effective interface role which they should play they must be properly designed to take into account the ubiguitous human factor. In addition, the entire workplace in which they are used should be properly configured so as to enhance the operational features of the individual workstation where possible. A number of general human factors workplace considerations are presented. This ongoing series of notes covers such topics as achieving comfort and good screen visibility, hardware issues (e.g., mouse maintenance), screen symbology features (e.g., labels, cursors, prompts), and various miscellaneous subjects. These notes are presented here in order to: (1) illustrate how one's workstation can be used to support telescience activities of many other people working within an organization, and (2) provide a single complete set of considerations for future reference.

  4. Factors regulating microglia activation

    PubMed Central

    Kierdorf, Katrin; Prinz, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Microglia are resident macrophages of the central nervous system (CNS) that display high functional similarities to other tissue macrophages. However, it is especially important to create and maintain an intact tissue homeostasis to support the neuronal cells, which are very sensitive even to minor changes in their environment. The transition from the “resting” but surveying microglial phenotype to an activated stage is tightly regulated by several intrinsic (e.g., Runx-1, Irf8, and Pu.1) and extrinsic factors (e.g., CD200, CX3CR1, and TREM2). Under physiological conditions, minor changes of those factors are sufficient to cause fatal dysregulation of microglial cell homeostasis and result in severe CNS pathologies. In this review, we discuss recent achievements that gave new insights into mechanisms that ensure microglia quiescence. PMID:23630462

  5. FACTORS INFLUENCING THE DESIGN OF BIOACCUMULATION FACTOR AND BIOTA-SEDIMENT ACCUMULATION FACTOR FIELD STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    General guidance for designing field studies to measure bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) and biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) is not available. To develop such guidance, a series of modeling simulations were performed to evaluate the underlying factors and principles th...

  6. FACTORS INFLUENCING THE DESIGN OF BIOACCUMULATION FACTOR AND BIOTA-SEDIMENT ACCUMULATION FACTOR FIELD STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A series of modeling simulations were performed to develop an understanding of the underlying factors and principles involved in developing field sampling designs for measuring bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) and biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs. These simulations reveal...

  7. Psychosomatic factors in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Urpe, Mauro; Pallanti, Stefano; Lotti, Torello

    2005-10-01

    Psychosomatics describes any aspect of dermatology with psychologic or psychiatric elements. Dermatologists know that a significant proportion of their practice involves patients for whom psychologic elements either partially or sometimes entirely dominate their presenting chief complaints. This article explores the role of psychosomatic factors in dermatologic disorders. The authors discuss the clinical interface between psychiatry, psychology and dermatology and the interpretation of possible relationships between cutaneous diseases, the role of the mind, and psychotherapeutic interventions.

  8. The malingering factor.

    PubMed

    Williams, J Michael

    2011-04-01

    The influence of malingering and suboptimal performance on neuropsychological tests has become a major interest of clinical neuropsychologists. Methods to detect malingering have focused on specialized tests or embedded patterns associated with malingering present in the conventional neuropsychology tests. There are two stages to the study of their validity. The first stage involves whether the method can discriminate malingering subjects from those who are not malingering. In the second stage, they must be examined for their relationship to the conventional tests used to establish impairment and disability. Constantinou, Bauer, Ashendorf, Fisher, and McCaffrey (2005. Is poor performance on recognition memory effort measures indicative of generalized poor performance on neuropsychological tests? Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, 20, 191-198.) conducted the only study in which correlations are presented between a commonly used symptom validity test, the Test of Memory Malingering (TOMM) and the subtests of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R). A factor analysis was conducted using these correlations. It revealed a clear malingering factor that explained significant variance in the TOMM and the WAIS-R subtests. The relationship of malingering with cognitive tests is complex: some tests are sensitive to malingering and others are not. Factor analysis can summarize the magnitude of variance associated with each test and reveal the patterns of inter-relationships between malingering and clinical tests. The analysis also suggested that malingering assessment methods could be improved by the addition of timing the responses.

  9. Molecular factors in migraine

    PubMed Central

    Kowalska, Marta; Prendecki, Michał; Kozubski, Wojciech; Lianeri, Margarita; Dorszewska, Jolanta

    2016-01-01

    Migraine is a common neurological disorder that affects 11% of adults worldwide. This disease most likely has a neurovascular origin. Migraine with aura (MA) and more common form - migraine without aura (MO) – are the two main clinical subtypes of disease. The exact pathomechanism of migraine is still unknown, but it is thought that both genetic and environmental factors are involved in this pathological process. The first genetic studies of migraine were focused on the rare subtype of MA: familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM). The genes analysed in familial and sporadic migraine are: MTHFR, KCNK18, HCRTR1, SLC6A4, STX1A, GRIA1 and GRIA3. It is possible that migraine is a multifactorial disease with polygenic influence. Recent studies have shown that the pathomechanisms of migraine involves both factors responsible for immune response and oxidative stress such as: cytokines, tyrosine metabolism, homocysteine; and factors associated with pain transmission and emotions e.g.: serotonin, hypocretin-1, calcitonin gene-related peptide, glutamate. The correlations between genetic variants of the HCRTR1 gene, the polymorphism 5-HTTLPR and hypocretin-1, and serotonin were observed. It is known that serotonin inhibits the activity of hypocretin neurons and may affect the appearance of the aura during migraine attack. The understanding of the molecular mechanisms of migraine, including genotype-phenotype correlations, may contribute to finding markers important for the diagnosis and treatment of this disease. PMID:27191890

  10. Human Factors Review Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Paramore, B.; Peterson, L.R.

    1985-12-01

    ''Human Factors'' is concerned with the incorporation of human user considerations into a system in order to maximize human reliability and reduce errors. This Review Plan is intended to assist in the assessment of human factors conditions in existing DOE facilities. In addition to specifying assessment methodologies, the plan describes techniques for improving conditions which are found to not adequately support reliable human performance. The following topics are addressed: (1) selection of areas for review describes techniques for needs assessment to assist in selecting and prioritizing areas for review; (2) human factors engineering review is concerned with optimizing the interfaces between people and equipment and people and their work environment; (3) procedures review evaluates completeness and accuracy of procedures, as well as their usability and management; (4) organizational interface review is concerned with communication and coordination between all levels of an organization; and (5) training review evaluates training program criteria such as those involving: trainee selection, qualification of training staff, content and conduct of training, requalification training, and program management.

  11. Fano factor estimation.

    PubMed

    Rajdl, Kamil; Lansky, Petr

    2014-02-01

    Fano factor is one of the most widely used measures of variability of spike trains. Its standard estimator is the ratio of sample variance to sample mean of spike counts observed in a time window and the quality of the estimator strongly depends on the length of the window. We investigate this dependence under the assumption that the spike train behaves as an equilibrium renewal process. It is shown what characteristics of the spike train have large effect on the estimator bias. Namely, the effect of refractory period is analytically evaluated. Next, we create an approximate asymptotic formula for the mean square error of the estimator, which can also be used to find minimum of the error in estimation from single spike trains. The accuracy of the Fano factor estimator is compared with the accuracy of the estimator based on the squared coefficient of variation. All the results are illustrated for spike trains with gamma and inverse Gaussian probability distributions of interspike intervals. Finally, we discuss possibilities of how to select a suitable observation window for the Fano factor estimation.

  12. Nucleon Electromagnetic Form Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Kees de Jager

    2004-08-01

    Although nucleons account for nearly all the visible mass in the universe, they have a complicated structure that is still incompletely understood. The first indication that nucleons have an internal structure, was the measurement of the proton magnetic moment by Frisch and Stern (1933) which revealed a large deviation from the value expected for a point-like Dirac particle. The investigation of the spatial structure of the nucleon, resulting in the first quantitative measurement of the proton charge radius, was initiated by the HEPL (Stanford) experiments in the 1950s, for which Hofstadter was awarded the 1961 Nobel prize. The first indication of a non-zero neutron charge distribution was obtained by scattering thermal neutrons off atomic electrons. The recent revival of its experimental study through the operational implementation of novel instrumentation has instigated a strong theoretical interest. Nucleon electro-magnetic form factors (EMFFs) are optimally studied through the exchange of a virtual photon, in elastic electron-nucleon scattering. The momentum transferred to the nucleon by the virtual photon can be selected to probe different scales of the nucleon, from integral properties such as the charge radius to scaling properties of its internal constituents. Polarization instrumentation, polarized beams and targets, and the measurement of the polarization of the recoiling nucleon have been essential in the accurate separation of the charge and magnetic form factors and in studies of the elusive neutron charge form factor.

  13. Nucleon form factors '99

    SciTech Connect

    Kees de Jager; B. Pire

    1999-06-01

    The authors review recent progress in the experimental knowledge of and theoretical speculations about nucleon form factors, with special emphasis on the large Q{sup 2} region. There is now a long history of continuous progress in the understanding of electromagnetic form factors at large momentum transfer. After the pioneering works leading to the celebrated quark counting rules, the understanding of hard scattering exclusive processes has been solidly founded. A perturbative QCD subprocess is factorized from a wave function-like distribution amplitude {var_phi}(x{sub i},Q{sup 2}) (x{sub i} being the light cone fractions of momentum carried by valence quarks), the Q{sup 2} dependence of which is analyzed in the renormalization group approach. Although an asymptotic expression emerges from this analysis for the x dependence of the distribution, it was quickly understood that the evolution to the asymptotic Q{sub 2} is very slow and that indeed some non perturbative input is required to get reliable estimates of this distribution amplitude at measurable Q{sup 2}.

  14. Risk Factors for Eating Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Striegel-Moore, Ruth H.; Bulik, Cynthia M.

    2007-01-01

    The authors review research on risk factors for eating disorders, restricting their focus to studies in which clear precedence of the hypothesized risk factor over onset of the disorder is established. They illustrate how studies of sociocultural risk factors and biological factors have progressed on parallel tracks and propose that major advances…

  15. Inhibition of the activation of Hageman factor (factor XII) by platelet factor 4.

    PubMed

    Dumenco, L L; Everson, B; Culp, L A; Ratnoff, O D

    1988-09-01

    Platelet factor 4 is a polypeptide constituent of platelet alpha granules that is released during platelet aggregation and inhibits heparin-mediated reactions. Hageman factor (factor XII) is a plasma proenzyme that, when activated by certain negatively charged agents, initiates clotting via the intrinsic pathway of thrombin formation. In earlier studies using crude systems, platelet factor 4 inhibited activation of Hageman factor by dextran sulfate or cerebrosides, but not activation of Hageman factor by kaolin or ellagic acid. In the present study we examined the mechanisms of inhibition by platelet factor 4, using purified reagents. Platelet factor 4 inhibited activation of Hageman factor by ellagic acid, as measured by amidolysis of a synthetic substrate of activated Hageman factor, an effect inhibited by heparin or by an anti-platelet factor 4 antiserum. Coating glass tubes with platelet factor 4 before addition of normal plasma significantly lengthened the partial thromboplastin time of normal plasma. In addition, the clot-promoting properties of kaolin were inhibited by its prior exposure to platelet factor 4. Thus, the inhibitory properties of platelet factor 4 directed against the activation of Hageman factor were confirmed in a purified system. In this purified system, in contrast to earlier studies using crude systems, platelet factor 4 inhibited activation of Hageman factor by glass, ellagic acid, or kaolin.

  16. From compatible factorization to near-compatible factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldiabat, Raja'i.; Ibrahim, Haslinda

    2014-12-01

    A compatible factorization of order ν, is an ν× ν-1/2 array in which the entries in row i form a near-one-factor with focus i, and the triples associated with the rows contain no repetitions. In this paper, we aim to amend this compatible factorization so that we can display ν(ν-1)/2 - 2ν/3 triples with the minimum repeated triples. Throughout this paper we propose a new type of factorization called near-compatible factorization. First, we present the compatible factorization towards developing a near-compatible factorization. Second, we discuss briefly the necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of near-compatible factorization. Then, we exemplify the construction for case ν = 9 as a groundwork in developing near-compatible factorization.

  17. Neutron quality factor

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    Both the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) have recommended that the radiation quality weighting factor for neutrons (Q{sub n}, or the corresponding new modifying factor, w{sub R}) be increased by a value of two for most radiation protection practices. This means an increase in the recommended value for Q{sub n} from a nominal value of 10 to a nominal value of 20. This increase may be interpreted to mean that the biological effectiveness of neutrons is two times greater than previously thought. A decision to increase the value of Q{sub n} will have a major impact on the regulations and radiation protection programs of Federal agencies responsible for the protection of radiation workers. Therefore, the purposes of this report are: (1) to examine the general concept of {open_quotes}quality factor{close_quotes} (Q) in radiation protection and the rationale for the selection of specific values of Q{sub n}; and (2) to make such recommendations to the Federal agencies, as appropriate. This report is not intended to be an exhaustive review of the scientific literature on the biological effects of neutrons, with the aim of defending a particular value for Q{sub n}. Rather, the working group examined the technical issues surrounding the current recommendations of scientific advisory bodies on this matter, with the aim of determining if these recommendations should be adopted by the Federal agencies. Ultimately, the group concluded that there was no compelling basis for a change in Q{sub n}. The report was prepared by Federal scientists working under the auspices of the Science Panel of the Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination (CIRRPC).

  18. Milestones and Impact Factors

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Environmental Health has just received its first Impact Factor by Thomson ISI. At a level of 2.48, this achievement is quite satisfactory and places Environmental Health in the top 25% of environmental science journals. When the journal was launched in 2002, it was still unclear whether the Open Access publishing model could be made into a viable commercial enterprise within the biomedical field. During the past eight years, Open Access journals have become widely available, although still covering only about 15% of journal titles. Major funding agencies and institutions, including prominent US universities, now require that researchers publish in Open Access journals. Because of the profound role of scientific journals for the sharing of results and communication between researchers, the advent of Open Access may be of as much significance as the transition from handwriting to printing via moveable type. As Environmental Health is an electronic Open Access journal, the numbers of downloads at the journal website can be retrieved. The top-20 list of articles most frequently accessed shows that all of them have been downloaded over 10,000 times. Back in 2002, the first article published was accessed only 49 times during the following month. A year later, the server had over 1,000 downloads per month, and now the total number of monthly downloads approaches 50,000. These statistics complement the Impact Factor and confirm the viability of Open Access in our field of research. The advent of digital media and its decentralized mode of distribution - the internet - have dramatically changed the control and financing of scientific information dissemination, while facilitating peer review, accelerating editorial handling, and supporting much needed transparency. Both the meaning and means of "having an impact" are therefore changing, as will the degree and way in which scientific journals remain "factors" in that impact. PMID:20615249

  19. Human Factors Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Jack is an advanced human factors software package that provides a three dimensional model for predicting how a human will interact with a given system or environment. It can be used for a broad range of computer-aided design applications. Jack was developed by the computer Graphics Research Laboratory of the University of Pennsylvania with assistance from NASA's Johnson Space Center, Ames Research Center and the Army. It is the University's first commercial product. Jack is still used for academic purposes at the University of Pennsylvania. Commercial rights were given to Transom Technologies, Inc.

  20. The "impact factor" revisited

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Peng; Loh, Marie; Mondry, Adrian

    2005-01-01

    The number of scientific journals has become so large that individuals, institutions and institutional libraries cannot completely store their physical content. In order to prioritize the choice of quality information sources, librarians and scientists are in need of reliable decision aids. The "impact factor" (IF) is the most commonly used assessment aid for deciding which journals should receive a scholarly submission or attention from research readership. It is also an often misunderstood tool. This narrative review explains how the IF is calculated, how bias is introduced into the calculation, which questions the IF can or cannot answer, and how different professional groups can benefit from IF use. PMID:16324222

  1. Electromagnetic pion form factor

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, C.D.

    1995-08-01

    A phenomenological Dyson-Schwinger/Bethe-Salpeter equation approach to QCD, formalized in terms of a QCD-based model field theory, the Global Color-symmetry Model (GCM), was used to calculate the generalized impulse approximation contribution to the electromagnetic pion form factor at space-like q{sup 2} on the domain [0,10] GeV{sup 2}. In effective field theories this form factor is sometimes understood as simply being due to Vector Meson Dominance (VMD) but this does not allow for a simple connection with QCD where the VMD contribution is of higher order than that of the quark core. In the GCM the pion is treated as a composite bound state of a confined quark and antiquark interacting via the exchange of colored vector-bosons. A direct study of the quark core contribution is made, using a quark propagator that manifests the large space-like-q{sup 2} properties of QCD, parameterizes the infrared behavior and incorporates confinement. It is shown that the few parameters which characterize the infrared form of the quark propagator may be chosen so as to yield excellent agreement with the available data. In doing this one directly relates experimental observables to properties of QCD at small space-like-q{sup 2}. The incorporation of confinement eliminates endpoint and pinch singularities in the calculation of F{sub {pi}}(q{sup 2}). With asymptotic freedom manifest in the dressed quark propagator the calculation yields q{sup 4}F{sub {pi}}(q{sup 2}) = constant, up to [q{sup 2}]- corrections, for space-like-q{sup 2} {approx_gt} 35 GeV{sup 2}, which indicates that soft, nonperturbative contributions dominate the form factor at presently accessible q{sup 2}. This means that the often-used factorization Ansatz fails in this exclusive process. A paper describing this work was submitted for publication. In addition, these results formed the basis for an invited presentation at a workshop on chiral dynamics and will be published in the proceedings.

  2. SARSCEST (human factors)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, H. Mcilvaine

    1988-01-01

    People interact with the processes and products of contemporary technology. Individuals are affected by these in various ways and individuals shape them. Such interactions come under the label 'human factors'. To expand the understanding of those to whom the term is relatively unfamiliar, its domain includes both an applied science and applications of knowledge. It means both research and development, with implications of research both for basic science and for development. It encompasses not only design and testing but also training and personnel requirements, even though some unwisely try to split these apart both by name and institutionally. The territory includes more than performance at work, though concentration on that aspect, epitomized in the derivation of the term ergonomics, has overshadowed human factors interest in interactions between technology and the home, health, safety, consumers, children and later life, the handicapped, sports and recreation education, and travel. Two aspects of technology considered most significant for work performance, systems and automation, and several approaches to these, are discussed.

  3. [Fibroblast growth factor-2].

    PubMed

    Faitová, J

    2004-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor-2 is a member of a large family of proteins that bind heparin and heparan sulfate and modulate the function of a wide range of cell types. FGF-2 occurs in several isoforms resulting from alternative initiations of traslation: an 18 kDa cytoplasmic isoform and four larger molecular weight nuclear isoforms (22, 22.5, 24 and 34 kDa). It acts mainly through a paracrine/autocrine mechanism involving high affinity transmembrane receptors and heparan sulfate proteoglycan low affinity receptors. It is expressed mostly in tissues of mesoderm and neuroectoderm origin, and plays an important role in mesoderm induction, stimulates the growth and development of the new blood vessels (angiogenesis), normal wound healing and tissue development. FGF-2 positively regulates hematopoiesis by acting on various cellular targets: stromal cells, early and committed hematopoietic progenitors and possibly some mature blood cells. FGF-2 is a potent hematopoietic growth factor that is likely to play an important role in physiological and pathological hematopoiesis.

  4. Fungal CSL transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Převorovský, Martin; Půta, František; Folk, Petr

    2007-01-01

    Background The CSL (CBF1/RBP-Jκ/Suppressor of Hairless/LAG-1) transcription factor family members are well-known components of the transmembrane receptor Notch signaling pathway, which plays a critical role in metazoan development. They function as context-dependent activators or repressors of transcription of their responsive genes, the promoters of which harbor the GTG(G/A)GAA consensus elements. Recently, several studies described Notch-independent activities of the CSL proteins. Results We have identified putative CSL genes in several fungal species, showing that this family is not confined to metazoans. We have analyzed their sequence conservation and identified the presence of well-defined domains typical of genuine CSL proteins. Furthermore, we have shown that the candidate fungal protein sequences contain highly conserved regions known to be required for sequence-specific DNA binding in their metazoan counterparts. The phylogenetic analysis of the newly identified fungal CSL proteins revealed the existence of two distinct classes, both of which are present in all the species studied. Conclusion Our findings support the evolutionary origin of the CSL transcription factor family in the last common ancestor of fungi and metazoans. We hypothesize that the ancestral CSL function involved DNA binding and Notch-independent regulation of transcription and that this function may still be shared, to a certain degree, by the present CSL family members from both fungi and metazoans. PMID:17629904

  5. Leukemia Inhibitory Factor (LIF)

    PubMed Central

    Nicola, Nicos A; Babon, Jeffrey J

    2015-01-01

    Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) is the most pleiotropic member of the interleukin-6 family of cytokines. It utilises a receptor that consists of the LIF receptor β and gp130 and this receptor complex is also used by ciliary neurotrophic growth factor (CNTF), oncostatin M, cardiotrophin1 (CT1) and cardiotrophin-like cytokine (CLC). Despite common signal transduction mechanisms (JAK/STAT, MAPK and PI3K) LIF can have paradoxically opposite effects in different cell types including stimulating or inhibiting each of cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. While LIF can act on a wide range of cell types, LIF knockout mice have revealed that many of these actions are not apparent during ordinary development and that they may be the result of induced LIF expression during tissue damage or injury. Nevertheless LIF does appear to have non-redundant actions in maternal receptivity to blastocyst implantation, placental formation and in the development of the nervous system. LIF has also found practical use in the maintenance of self-renewal and totipotency of embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells. PMID:26187859

  6. The atrial natriuretic factor.

    PubMed Central

    Genest, J

    1986-01-01

    In less than three years since the rapid and potent natriuretic response to intravenous injection of atrial myocardial extract in rats was reported the factor responsible for the diuretic, natriuretic, and vasodilating activity of the atrial homogenates was isolated, its chemical structure elucidated, and its total synthesis achieved. Also the cDNA and the gene encoding for the atrial natriuretic factor in mice, rats, and man have been cloned and the chromosomal site identified. The major effects of this hormone are vasodilatation, prevention and inhibition of the contraction induced by noradrenaline and angiotensin II, diuresis, and natriuresis associated in most instances with a pronounced increase in glomerular filtration rate and filtration fraction, inhibition of aldosterone secretion, and considerable stimulation of particulate guanylate cyclase activity. High density specific binding sites have been demonstrated in the zona glomerulosa of the adrenal cortex, in the renal glomeruli, and in the collecting ducts, and in the brain areas involved in the regulation of blood pressure and of sodium and water (AV3V region, subfornical organ, nucleus tractus solitarius, area postrema). Images Fig 1 Fig 5 PMID:2945572

  7. Auxin response factors.

    PubMed

    Chandler, John William

    2016-05-01

    Auxin signalling involves the activation or repression of gene expression by a class of auxin response factor (ARF) proteins that bind to auxin response elements in auxin-responsive gene promoters. The release of ARF repression in the presence of auxin by the degradation of their cognate auxin/indole-3-acetic acid repressors forms a paradigm of transcriptional response to auxin. However, this mechanism only applies to activating ARFs, and further layers of complexity of ARF function and regulation are being revealed, which partly reflect their highly modular domain structure. This review summarizes our knowledge concerning ARF binding site specificity, homodimer and heterodimer multimeric ARF association and cooperative function and how activator ARFs activate target genes via chromatin remodelling and evolutionary information derived from phylogenetic comparisons from ARFs from diverse species. ARFs are regulated in diverse ways, and their importance in non-auxin-regulated pathways is becoming evident. They are also embedded within higher-order transcription factor complexes that integrate signalling pathways from other hormones and in response to the environment. The ways in which new information concerning ARFs on many levels is causing a revision of existing paradigms of auxin response are discussed.

  8. Lymphotoxin is an autocrine growth factor for Epstein-Barr virus- infected B cell lines

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Because human lymphotoxin (LT) was originally isolated from a lymphoblastoid cell line, we investigated the role of this molecule in three newly established Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected human B cell lines. These lines were derived from acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Z- 6), myelodysplastic syndrome (Z-43), and acute myelogenous leukemia (Z- 55) patients who had a prior EBV infection. Each lymphoblastoid cell line had a karyotype that was different from that of the original parent leukemic cells, and all expressed B cell, but not T cell or myeloid surface markers. In all three lines, rearranged immunoglobulin heavy chain joining region (JH) bands were found, and the presence of EBV DNA was confirmed by Southern blotting. Z-6, Z-43, and Z-55 cell lines constitutively produced 192, 48, and 78 U/ml LT, respectively, as assessed by a cytotoxicity assay and antibody neutralization. Levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) were undetectable. Scatchard analysis revealed that all the cell lines expressed high-affinity TNF/LT receptors with receptor densities of 4197, 1258, and 1209 sites/cell on Z-6, Z-43, and Z-55, respectively. Furthermore, labeled TNF binding could be reversed by both unlabeled TNF, as well as by LT. Studies with p60 and p80 receptor-specific antibodies revealed that the three lines expressed primarily the p80 form of the TNF receptor. When studied in a clonogenic assay, exogenous LT stimulated proliferation of all three cell lines in a dose-dependent fashion at concentrations ranging from 25 to 500 U/ml. Similar results were obtained with [3H]TdR incorporation. Monoclonal anti-LT neutralizing antibodies at concentrations of 25-500 U/ml inhibited cellular multiplication in a dose-dependent manner. It is interesting that in spite of a common receptor, TNF (1,000 U/ml) had no direct effect on Z-55 cell growth, whereas it partially reversed the stimulatory effect of exogenous LT. In addition, TNF inhibited Z-6 and Z-43 cell proliferation, and its

  9. Neuropilin-1 modulates vascular endothelial growth factor-induced poly(ADP-ribose)-polymerase leading to reduced cerebrovascular apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Mey, Lilli; Hörmann, Mareike; Schleicher, Nadine; Reuter, Peter; Dönges, Simone; Kinscherf, Ralf; Gassmann, Max; Gerriets, Tibo; Al-Fakhri, Nadia

    2013-11-01

    Cerebral ischemia is encompassed by cerebrovascular apoptosis, yet the mechanisms behind apoptosis regulation are not fully understood. We previously demonstrated inhibition of endothelial apoptosis by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) through upregulation of poly(ADP-ribose)-polymerase (PARP) expression. However, PARP overactivation through oxidative stress can lead to necrosis. This study tested the hypothesis that neuropilin-1 (NP-1), an alternative VEGF receptor, regulates the response to cerebral ischemia by modulating PARP expression and, in turn, apoptosis inhibition by VEGF. In endothelial cell culture, NP-1 colocalized with VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) and acted as its coreceptor. This significantly enhanced VEGF-induced PARP mRNA and protein expression demonstrated by receptor-specific inhibitors and VEGF-A isoforms. NP-1 augmented the inhibitory effect of VEGF/VEGFR-2 interaction on apoptosis induced by adhesion inhibition through the αV-integrin inhibitor cRGDfV. NP-1/VEGFR-2 signal transduction involved JNK and Akt. In rat models of permanent and temporary middle cerebral artery occlusion, the ischemic cerebral hemispheres displayed endothelial and neuronal apoptosis next to increased endothelial NP-1 and VEGFR-2 expression compared to non-ischemic cerebral hemispheres, sham-operated or untreated controls. Increased vascular superoxide dismutase-1 and catalase expression as well as decreased glycogen reserves indicated oxidative stress in the ischemic brain. Of note, protein levels of intact PARP remained stable despite pro-apoptotic conditions through increased PARP mRNA production during cerebral ischemia. In conclusion, NP-1 is upregulated in conditions of imminent cerebrovascular apoptosis to reinforce apoptosis inhibition and modulate VEGF-dependent PARP expression and activation. We propose that NP-1 is a key modulator of VEGF maintaining cerebrovascular integrity during ischemia. Modulating the function of NP-1 to target PARP could help to

  10. Pediatric rhinitis risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yaofeng; Liu, Yin; Yang, Na

    2016-01-01

    Rhinitis is a common global disorder that impacts on the quality of life of the sufferer and caregivers. Treatment for pediatric rhinitis is empirical and does not include a detailed history of the allergy triggers or allergy testing. Thus, allergen avoidance advice is not tailored to the child's sensitivities, which may result in adenoid hypertrophy. However, infant onset rhinitis, especially its relationship with respiratory viruses, remains to be further clarified. Rhinitis basically involves inflammation of the upper nasal lining, presenting typically with symptoms of runny nose (rhinorrhea), nasal blockage, and/or sneezing. While not typically fatal, it does impose significant health, psychological, and monetary burden to its sufferers, and is thus considered a global health problem. Previous findings showed that immunotherapy had significant clinical efficacy in children with allergic rhinitis. The present review article aims to highlight recent perspectives pertaining to the rhinitis risk factors especially in pediatric patients. PMID:27698737

  11. Pion form factor

    SciTech Connect

    Ryong Ji, C.; Pang, A.; Szczepaniak, A.

    1994-04-01

    It is pointed out that the correct criterion to define the legal PQCD contribution to the exclusive processes in the lightcone perturbative expansion should be based on the large off-shellness of the lightcone energy in the intermediate states. In the lightcone perturbative QCD calculation of the pion form factor, the authors find that the legal PQCD contribution defined by the lightcone energy cut saturates in the smaller Q{sup 2} region compared to that defined by the gluon four-momentum square cut. This is due to the contribution by the highly off-energy-shell gluons in the end point regions of the phase space, indicating that the gluon four-momentum-square cut may have cut too much to define the legal PQCD.

  12. Unity power factor converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wester, Gene W. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A unity power factor converter capable of effecting either inversion (dc-to-dc) or rectification (ac-to-dc), and capable of providing bilateral power control from a DC source (or load) through an AC transmission line to a DC load (or source) for power flow in either direction, is comprised of comparators for comparing the AC current i with an AC signal i.sub.ref (or its phase inversion) derived from the AC ports to generate control signals to operate a switch control circuit for high speed switching to shape the AC current waveform to a sine waveform, and synchronize it in phase and frequency with the AC voltage at the AC ports, by selectively switching the connections to a series inductor as required to increase or decrease the current i.

  13. [Pathogenic factors of mycoplasma].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasmas are smallest organisms capable of self-replication and cause various diseases in human. Especially, Mycoplasma pneumoniae is known as an etiological agent of pneumonia. From 2010 to 2012, epidemics of M. pneumoniae infections were reported worldwide (e.g., in France, Israel, and Japan). In the diseases caused by mycoplasmas, strong inflammatory responses induced by mycoplasmas have been thought to be important. However, mycoplasmas lack of cell wall and do not possess inflammation-inducing endotoxin such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We purified inflammation-inducing factors from pathogenic mycoplasmas and identified that they were lipoproteins. Lipoproteins derived from mycoplasmas induced inflammatory responses through Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2. In addition, we demonstrated that cytadherent property of M. pneumoniae played an important role in induction of inflammatory responses. Cytadherent property of M. pneumoniae induced inflammatory responses through TLR2 independent pathway. TLR4, inflammasomes, and autophagy were involved in this TLR2 independent induction of inflammatory responses.

  14. Nucleon Electromagnetic Form Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Marc Vanderhaeghen; Charles Perdrisat; Vina Punjabi

    2007-10-01

    There has been much activity in the measurement of the elastic electromagnetic proton and neutron form factors in the last decade, and the quality of the data has greatly improved by performing double polarization experiments, in comparison with previous unpolarized data. Here we review the experimental data base in view of the new results for the proton, and neutron, obtained at JLab, MAMI, and MIT-Bates. The rapid evolution of phenomenological models triggered by these high-precision experiments will be discussed, including the recent progress in the determination of the valence quark generalized parton distributions of the nucleon, as well as the steady rate of improvements made in the lattice QCD calculations.

  15. Exposure factors handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Konz, J.J.; Lisi, K.; Friebele, E.; Dixon, D.A.

    1989-07-01

    The document provides a summary of the available data on various factors used in assessing human exposure including drinking-water consumption, consumption rates of broad classes of food including fruits, vegetables, beef, dairy products, and fish; soil ingestion; inhalation rate; skin area; lifetime; activity patterns; and body weight. Additionally, a number of specific exposure scenarios are identified with recommendations for default values to use when site-specific data are not available. The basic equations using these parameters to calculate exposure levels are also presented for each scenario. Default values are presented as ranges from typical to reasonable worst case and as frequency distributions where appropriate data were available. Finally, procedures for assessing the uncertainties in exposure assessments are also presented with illustrative examples. These procedures include qualitative and quantitative methods such as Monte Carlo and sensitivity analysis.

  16. Tumor necrosis factor.

    PubMed

    Chu, Wen-Ming

    2013-01-28

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a critical cytokine, which contributes to both physiological and pathological processes. This mini-review will briefly touch the history of TNF discovery, its family members and its biological and pathological functions. Then, it will focus on new findings on the molecular mechanisms of how TNF triggers activation of the NF-κB and AP-1 pathways, which are critical for expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, as well as the MLKL cascade, which is critical for the generation of ROS in response to TNF. Finally, this review will briefly summarize recent advances in understanding TNF-induced cell survival, apoptosis and necrosis (also called necroptosis). Understanding new findings and emerging concepts will impact future research on the molecular mechanisms of TNF signaling in immune disorders and cancer-related inflammation.

  17. Psychosomatic factors in pruritus.

    PubMed

    Tey, Hong Liang; Wallengren, Joanna; Yosipovitch, Gil

    2013-01-01

    Pruritus and psyche are intricately and reciprocally related, with psychophysiological evidence and psychopathological explanations helping us to understand their complex association. Their interaction may be conceptualized and classified into 3 groups: pruritic diseases with psychiatric sequelae, pruritic diseases aggravated by psychosocial factors, and psychiatric disorders causing pruritus. Management of chronic pruritus is directed at treating the underlying causes and adopting a multidisciplinary approach to address the dermatologic, somatosensory, cognitive, and emotional aspects. Pharmcotherapeutic agents that are useful for chronic pruritus with comorbid depression and/or anxiety comprise selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, mirtazapine, tricyclic antidepressants (amitriptyline and doxepin), and anticonvulsants (gabapentin, pregabalin); the role of neurokinin receptor-1 antagonists awaits verification. Antipsychotics are required for treating itch and formication associated with schizophrenia and delusion of parasitosis (including Morgellons disease).

  18. Psychosomatic factors in pruritus

    PubMed Central

    Tey, Hong Liang; Wallengren, Joanna; Yosipovitch, Gil

    2013-01-01

    Pruritus and psyche are intricately and reciprocally related, with psychophysiological evidence and psychopathological explanations helping us to understand their complex association. Their interaction may be conceptualized and classified into 3 groups: pruritic diseases with psychiatric sequelae, pruritic diseases aggravated by psychosocial factors, and psychiatric disorders causing pruritus. Management of chronic pruritus is directed at treating the underlying causes and adopting a multidisciplinary approach to address the dermatologic, somatosensory, cognitive, and emotional aspects. Pharmcotherapeutic agents that are useful for chronic pruritus with comorbid depression and/or anxiety comprise selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, mirtazapine, tricyclic antidepressants (amitriptyline and doxepin), and anticonvulsants (gabapentin, pregabalin); the role of neurokinin receptor-1 antagonists awaits verification. Antipsychotics are required for treating itch and formication associated with schizophrenia and delusion of parasitosis (including Morgellons disease). PMID:23245971

  19. Factor Rotation and Standard Errors in Exploratory Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Guangjian; Preacher, Kristopher J.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we report a surprising phenomenon: Oblique CF-varimax and oblique CF-quartimax rotation produced similar point estimates for rotated factor loadings and factor correlations but different standard error estimates in an empirical example. Influences of factor rotation on asymptotic standard errors are investigated using a numerical…

  20. Helicopter Human Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Sandra G.; Sridhar, Banavar (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Even under optimal conditions, helicopter flight is a most demanding form of human-machine interaction, imposing continuous manual, visual, communications, and mental demands on pilots. It is made even more challenging by small margins for error created by the close proximity of terrain in NOE flight and missions flown at night and in low visibility. Although technology advances have satisfied some current and proposed requirements, hardware solutions alone are not sufficient to ensure acceptable system performance and pilot workload. However, human factors data needed to improve the design and use of helicopters lag behind advances in sensor, display, and control technology. Thus, it is difficult for designers to consider human capabilities and limitations when making design decisions. This results in costly accidents, design mistakes, unrealistic mission requirements, excessive training costs, and challenge human adaptability. NASA, in collaboration with DOD, industry, and academia, has initiated a program of research to develop scientific data bases and design principles to improve the pilot/vehicle interface, optimize training time and cost, and maintain pilot workload and system performance at an acceptable level. Work performed at Ames, and by other research laboratories, will be reviewed to summarize the most critical helicopter human factors problems and the results of research that has been performed to: (1) Quantify/model pilots use of visual cues for vehicle control; (2) Improve pilots' performance with helmet displays of thermal imagery and night vision goggles for situation awareness and vehicle control; (3) Model the processes by which pilots encode maps and compare them to the visual scene to develop perceptually and cognitively compatible electronic map formats; (4) Evaluate the use of spatially localized auditory displays for geographical orientation, target localization, radio frequency separation; (5) Develop and flight test control

  1. Air Emissions Factors and Quantification

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Emissions factors are used in developing air emissions inventories for air quality management decisions and in developing emissions control strategies. This area provides technical information on and support for the use of emissions factors.

  2. FACTORING TO FIT OFF DIAGONALS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    imply an upper bound on the number of factors. When applied to somatotype data, the method improved substantially on centroid solutions and indicated a reinterpretation of earlier factoring studies. (Author)

  3. Environmental factors and aggressive behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, A.C.

    1982-07-01

    This paper briefly reviews some of the research areas which indicate a correlation between environmental factors and initiation of aggressive behavior. Environmental factors including lunar influences, month of birth, climate and the effects of crowding and certain chemicals are discussed.

  4. Current status on tissue factor activation of factor VIIa.

    PubMed

    Persson, Egon; Olsen, Ole H

    2010-04-01

    Free factor VIIa displays a zymogen-like behavior with low intrinsic activity. Formation of a complex between factor VIIa and tissue factor is necessary to enhance the procoagulant activity of factor VIIa, not only by providing membrane localization, substrate exosites and positioning the active site at an appropriate distance above the surface but also by allosteric enhancement of the enzymatic activity, and this event signals initiation of blood coagulation. The interaction is of high affinity and all the domains are engaged at the interface. The crosstalk between the protease domain of factor VIIa, in particular residue Met-306, and the N-terminal domain of tissue factor provides the starting point for the allosteric activation of factor VIIa. The pathway(s) of conformational transitions in factor VIIa ensuing tissue factor binding has not been entirely mapped. The present paper is a brief compilation of our current knowledge of the allosteric mechanism by which tissue factor induces and stabilizes the active conformation of factor VIIa.

  5. THE ASSAY AND PROPERTIES OF LABILE FACTOR (FACTOR V)

    PubMed Central

    Quick, Armand J.

    1960-01-01

    Human oxalated plasma stored at 4° C. until the prothrombin time is increased beyond 60 sec. is a reliable medium for assaying labile factor (factor V) because its response to added labile factor corresponds quantitatively to that of plasma from patients with congenital deficiency of this factor. Such an agreement is not obtained with plasma stored at 37°C. The stability of labile factor is closely associated with ionized calcium. The addition of thrombin to fresh oxalated plasma causes an apparent hyperactivity of labile factor, but this is completely removed by adsorption with Ca3(PO)2. Oxalated plasma when adsorbed with Ca3(PO4)2 before treatment with thrombin does not develop this adventitious activity, nor does it occur in stored plasma treated with thrombin. The seemingly high labile factor activity in serum can be explained by the activation of this factor which is independent of labile factor but acts synergistically with it. The true labile factor concentration can be determined only after the accelerator is removed by adsorption with Ca3(PO4)2. A close agreement between the consumption of prothrombin and the loss of labile factor during clotting is observed. PMID:13738700

  6. Quantification of Emission Factor Uncertainty

    EPA Science Inventory

    Emissions factors are important for estimating and characterizing emissions from sources of air pollution. There is no quantitative indication of uncertainty for these emission factors, most factors do not have an adequate data set to compute uncertainty, and it is very difficult...

  7. Factor Analysis via Components Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bentler, Peter M.; de Leeuw, Jan

    2011-01-01

    When the factor analysis model holds, component loadings are linear combinations of factor loadings, and vice versa. This interrelation permits us to define new optimization criteria and estimation methods for exploratory factor analysis. Although this article is primarily conceptual in nature, an illustrative example and a small simulation show…

  8. Factor Analysis of Intern Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Womack, Sid T.; Hannah, Shellie Louise; Bell, Columbus David

    2012-01-01

    Four factors in teaching intern effectiveness, as measured by a Praxis III-similar instrument, were found among observational data of teaching interns during the 2010 spring semester. Those factors were lesson planning, teacher/student reflection, fairness & safe environment, and professionalism/efficacy. This factor analysis was as much of a…

  9. Risk Factor Assessment Branch (RFAB)

    Cancer.gov

    The Risk Factor Assessment Branch (RFAB) focuses on the development, evaluation, and dissemination of high-quality risk factor metrics, methods, tools, technologies, and resources for use across the cancer research continuum, and the assessment of cancer-related risk factors in the population.

  10. Phonological Awareness: Factors of Influence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frohlich, Linda Paulina; Petermann, Franz; Metz, Dorothee

    2013-01-01

    Early child development is influenced by various genetic and environmental factors. This study aims to identify factors that affect the phonological awareness of preschool and first grade children. Based on a sample of 330 German-speaking children (mean age = 6.2 years) the following domains were evaluated: Parent factors, birth and pregnancy,…

  11. Von Willebrand factor processing.

    PubMed

    Brehm, Maria A

    2017-01-31

    Von Willebrand factor (VWF) is a multimeric glycoprotein essential for primary haemostasis that is produced only in endothelial cells and megakaryocytes. Key to VWF's function in recruitment of platelets to the site of vascular injury is its multimeric structure. The individual steps of VWF multimer biosynthesis rely on distinct posttranslational modifications at specific pH conditions, which are realized by spatial separation of the involved processes to different cell organelles. Production of multimers starts with translocation and modification of the VWF prepropolypeptide in the endoplasmic reticulum to produce dimers primed for glycosylation. In the Golgi apparatus they are further processed to multimers that carry more than 300 complex glycan structures functionalized by sialylation, sulfation and blood group determinants. Of special importance is the sequential formation of disulfide bonds with different functions in structural support of VWF multimers, which are packaged, stored and further processed after secretion. Here, all these processes are being reviewed in detail including background information on the occurring biochemical reactions.

  12. Proteolytic factors in exosomes.

    PubMed

    Shimoda, Masayuki; Khokha, Rama

    2013-05-01

    Exosomes are small microvesicles secreted from the late endosomal compartment of cells. Although an increasing body of evidence indicates that they play a pivotal role in cell-to-cell communication, the biological functions of exosomes are far from fully understood. Recent work has revealed detailed proteomic profiles of exosomes from cell lines and body fluids, which may provide clues to understanding their biological significance and general importance in human diseases. Metalloproteinases include the cell surface-anchored sheddases a disintegrin and metalloproteinases, as well as cell surface-bound and soluble matrix metalloproteinases and these extracellular proteases have been detected in exosomes by proteomic analyses. Exosomes play a key role in the transfer of proteins to other cells and metalloproteinases may provide a novel platform where ectodomain shedding by these membrane proteases alters the makeup of the recipient cell's surface. This review aims to address some of the facets of exosome biology with particular emphasis on the proteolytic factors and we discuss their potential involvement in human diseases, especially tumor biology.

  13. Human Factors in Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barshi, Immanuel; Byrne, Vicky; Arsintescu, Lucia; Connell, Erin; Sandor, Aniko

    2009-01-01

    Future space missions will be significantly longer than current shuttle missions and new systems will be more complex than current systems. Increasing communication delays between crews and Earth-based support means that astronauts need to be prepared to handle the unexpected on their own. As crews become more autonomous, their potential span of control and required expertise must grow to match their autonomy. It is not possible to train for every eventuality ahead of time on the ground, or to maintain trained skills across long intervals of disuse. To adequately prepare NASA personnel for these challenges, new training approaches, methodologies, and tools are required. This research project aims at developing these training capabilities. By researching established training principles, examining future needs, and by using current practices in space flight training as test beds, both in Flight Controller and Crew Medical domains, this research project is mitigating program risks and generating templates and requirements to meet future training needs. Training efforts in Fiscal Year 08 (FY08) strongly focused on crew medical training, but also began exploring how Space Flight Resource Management training for Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) Flight Controllers could be integrated with systems training for optimal Mission Control Center (MCC) operations. The Training Task addresses Program risks that lie at the intersection of the following three risks identified by the Project: (1) Risk associated with poor task design (2) Risk of error due to inadequate information (3) Risk associated with reduced safety and efficiency due to poor human factors design

  14. Human Factors in Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barshi, Immanuel; Byme, Vicky; Arsintescu, Lucia

    2008-01-01

    Future space missions will be significantly longer than current Shuttle missions and new systems will be more complex than current systems. Increasing communication delays between crews and Earth-based support means that astronauts need to be prepared to handle the unexpected on their own. As crews become more autonomous, their potential span of control and required expertise must grow to match their autonomy. It is not possible to train for every eventuality ahead of time on the ground, or to maintain trained skills across long intervals of disuse. To adequately prepare NASA personnel for these challenges, new training approaches, methodologies, and tools are required. This research project aims at developing these training capabilities. Training efforts in FY07 strongly focused on crew medical training, but also began exploring how Space Flight Resource Management training for Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) Flight Controllers could be integrated with systems training for optimal Mission Control Center operations. Beginning in January 2008, the training research effort will include team training prototypes and tools. The Training Task addresses Program risks that lie at the intersection of the following three risks identified by the Project: 1) Risk associated with poor task design; 2) Risk of error due to inadequate information; 3) Risk associated with reduced safety and efficiency due to poor human factors design.

  15. Human Factors in Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barshi, Immanuel; Byrne, Vicky; Arsintescu, Lucia; Connell, Erin

    2010-01-01

    Future space missions will be significantly longer than current shuttle missions and new systems will be more complex than current systems. Increasing communication delays between crews and Earth-based support means that astronauts need to be prepared to handle the unexpected on their own. As crews become more autonomous, their potential span of control and required expertise must grow to match their autonomy. It is not possible to train for every eventuality ahead of time on the ground, or to maintain trained skills across long intervals of disuse. To adequately prepare NASA personnel for these challenges, new training approaches, methodologies, and tools are required. This research project aims at developing these training capabilities. By researching established training principles, examining future needs, and by using current practices in space flight training as test beds, both in Flight Controller and Crew Medical domains, this research project is mitigating program risks and generating templates and requirements to meet future training needs. Training efforts in Fiscal Year 09 (FY09) strongly focused on crew medical training, but also began exploring how Space Flight Resource Management training for Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) Flight Controllers could be integrated with systems training for optimal Mission Control Center (MCC) operations. The Training Task addresses Program risks that lie at the intersection of the following three risks identified by the Project: 1) Risk associated with poor task design; 2) Risk of error due to inadequate information; and 3) Risk associated with reduced safety and efficiency due to poor human factors design.

  16. Factor XII Contact Activation.

    PubMed

    Naudin, Clément; Burillo, Elena; Blankenberg, Stefan; Butler, Lynn; Renné, Thomas

    2017-03-27

    Contact activation is the surface-induced conversion of factor XII (FXII) zymogen to the serine protease FXIIa. Blood-circulating FXII binds to negatively charged surfaces and this contact to surfaces triggers a conformational change in the zymogen inducing autoactivation. Several surfaces that have the capacity for initiating FXII contact activation have been identified, including misfolded protein aggregates, collagen, nucleic acids, and platelet and microbial polyphosphate. Activated FXII initiates the proinflammatory kallikrein-kinin system and the intrinsic coagulation pathway, leading to formation of bradykinin and thrombin, respectively. FXII contact activation is well characterized in vitro and provides the mechanistic basis for the diagnostic clotting assay, activated partial thromboplastin time. However, only in the past decade has the critical role of FXII contact activation in pathological thrombosis been appreciated. While defective FXII contact activation provides thromboprotection, excess activation underlies the swelling disorder hereditary angioedema type III. This review provides an overview of the molecular basis of FXII contact activation and FXII contact activation-associated disease states.

  17. Respiratory factors limiting exercise.

    PubMed

    Bye, P T; Farkas, G A; Roussos, C

    1983-01-01

    The question of respiratory factors limiting exercise has been examined in terms of possible limitations arising from the function of gas exchange, the respiratory mechanics, the energetics of the respiratory muscles, or the development of respiratory muscle fatigue. Exercise capacity is curtailed in the presence of marked hypoxia, and this is readily observed in patients with chronic airflow limitation and interstitial lung disease and in some athletes at high intensities of exercise. In patients with interstitial lung disease, gas exchange abnormality--partly the result of diffusion disequilibrium for oxygen transfer--occurs during exercise despite abnormally high ventilations. In contrast, in certain athletes arterial hypoxemia has been documented during heavy exercise, apparently as a result of relative hypoventilation. During strenuous exercise the maximum expiratory flow volume curves are attained both by patients with chronic airflow limitation and by normal subjects, in particular when they breathe dense gas, so that a mechanical constraint is imposed on further increases in ventilation. Similarly, the force velocity characteristics of the inspiratory muscles may also impose a constraint to further increases in inspiratory flows that affects the ability to increase ventilation. In addition, the oxygen cost of maintaining high ventilations is large. Analysis of results from blood flow experiments reveal a substantial increase in blood flow to the respiratory muscles during exercise, with the result that oxygen supply to the rest of the body may be lessened. Alternatively, high exercise ventilations may not be sustained indefinitely owing to the development of respiratory muscle fatigue that results in hypoventilation and reduced arterial oxygen tension.

  18. Platelet Activating Factor: A Growth Factor for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    Factor for Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Larry W. Daniel, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Wake Forest University...A Growth Factor for Breast Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-04-1-0682 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Larry W...Relevance: If PAF is found to be a growth and angiogenic factor for breast cancer cells, these studies can be followed up by in vivo studies in nude

  19. Enterovirus Capsid Interactions with Decay-Accelerating Factor Mediate Lytic Cell Infection

    PubMed Central

    Newcombe, Nicole G.; Johansson, E. Susanne; Au, Gough; Lindberg, A. Michael; Barry, Richard D.; Shafren, Darren R.

    2004-01-01

    The cellular receptor usage of numerous human enteroviruses can differ significantly between low-cell-culture-passaged clinical isolates and highly laboratory-passaged prototype strains. The prototype strain of coxsackievirus A21 (CVA21) displays a dual-receptor specificity as determined with a receptor complex consisting of decay-accelerating factor (DAF) and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1). In this study, the cellular receptor interactions of low-cell-passage CVA21 clinical isolates with respect to their interactions with cell surface-expressed DAF and ICAM-1 were compared to those of the CVA21 prototype (Kuykendall) strain. Dual-receptor usage of DAF and ICAM-1 by CVA21 clinical isolates was confirmed by cell transfection and radiolabeled binding assays. The cellular attachment of clinical and prototype CVA21 strains to cells that coexpressed DAF and ICAM-1 was not additive compared to the viral binding to cells expressing one or other receptor. In fact, the binding data suggest there is an inhibition of CVA21 cellular attachment in environments where high-level coexpression of both DAF and ICAM-1 occurs. Antibody cross-linking of DAF rendered cells susceptible to lytic infection by the CVA21 clinical isolates. In a novel finding, three clinical isolates could, to various degrees, infect and lyse DAF-expressing cells in the absence of DAF-antibody cross-linking and ICAM-1 expression. Sequence analysis of the P1 region of clinical and prototype virus genomes identified a number of coding changes that may contribute to the observed enhanced DAF usage phenotype of the clinical CVA21 isolates. None of the amino acid changes was located in the previously postulated ICAM-1 footprint, a receptor-binding environment that was conserved on the capsid surface of all CVA21 clinical isolates. Taken together, the data suggest that community-circulating strains of CVA21 can infect target cells expressing either ICAM-1 or DAF alone and that such interactions extend

  20. Risk factors for periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Genco, Robert J; Borgnakke, Wenche S

    2013-06-01

    Risk factors play an important role in an individual's response to periodontal infection. Identification of these risk factors helps to target patients for prevention and treatment, with modification of risk factors critical to the control of periodontal disease. Shifts in our understanding of periodontal disease prevalence, and advances in scientific methodology and statistical analysis in the last few decades, have allowed identification of several major systemic risk factors for periodontal disease. The first change in our thinking was the understanding that periodontal disease is not universal, but that severe forms are found only in a portion of the adult population who show abnormal susceptibility. Analysis of risk factors and the ability to statistically adjust and stratify populations to eliminate the effects of confounding factors have allowed identification of independent risk factors. These independent but modifiable, risk factors for periodontal disease include lifestyle factors, such as smoking and alcohol consumption. They also include diseases and unhealthy conditions such as diabetes mellitus, obesity, metabolic syndrome, osteoporosis, and low dietary calcium and vitamin D. These risk factors are modifiable and their management is a major component of the contemporary care of many periodontal patients. Genetic factors also play a role in periodontal disease and allow one to target individuals for prevention and early detection. The role of genetic factors in aggressive periodontitis is clear. However, although genetic factors (i.e., specific genes) are strongly suspected to have an association with chronic adult periodontitis, there is as yet no clear evidence for this in the general population. It is important to pursue efforts to identify genetic factors associated with chronic periodontitis because such factors have potential in identifying patients who have a high susceptibility for development of this disease. Many of the systemic risk factors

  1. Growth factors in synaptic function

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Vivian Y.; Choi, Sojoong; Park, Mikyoung

    2013-01-01

    Synapses are increasingly recognized as key structures that malfunction in disorders like schizophrenia, mental retardation, and neurodegenerative diseases. The importance and complexity of the synapse has fuelled research into the molecular mechanisms underlying synaptogenesis, synaptic transmission, and plasticity. In this regard, neurotrophic factors such as netrin, Wnt, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and others have gained prominence for their ability to regulate synaptic function. Several of these factors were first implicated in neuroprotection, neuronal growth, and axon guidance. However, their roles in synaptic development and function have become increasingly clear, and the downstream signaling pathways employed by these factors have begun to be elucidated. In this review, we will address the role of these factors and their downstream effectors in synaptic function in vivo and in cultured neurons. PMID:24065916

  2. Women's Career Success: A Factor Analytic Study of Contributing Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaskill, LuAnn Ricketts

    1991-01-01

    A survey of 466 women employed in retailing received 205 responses identifying (1) factors influencing the success and advancement of women in retailing and (2) how those factors differ for women in upper versus middle positions. Upper-level executives placed more importance on ambition and abilities; midlevel executives credited opportunity and…

  3. A novel fully-human cytolytic fusion protein based on granzyme B shows in vitro cytotoxicity and ex vivo binding to solid tumors overexpressing the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Niesen, Judith; Hehmann-Titt, Grit; Woitok, Mira; Fendel, Rolf; Barth, Stefan; Fischer, Rainer; Stein, Christoph

    2016-05-01

    Human cytolytic fusion proteins (hCFPs) offer a promising immunotherapeutic approach for the treatment of solid tumors, avoiding the immunogenicity and undesirable side-effects caused by immunotoxins derived from plants or bacteria. The well-characterized human serine protease granzyme B has already been used as a therapeutic pro-apoptotic effector domain. We therefore developed a novel recombinant hCFP (GbR201K-scFv1711) consisting of an epidermal growth factor receptor-specific human antibody fragment and a granzyme B point mutant (R201K) that is insensitive to serpin B9 (PI9), a natural inhibitor of wild-type granzyme B that is often expressed in solid tumors. We found that GbR201K-scFv1711 selectively bound to epidermoid cancer and rhabdomyosarcoma cells and was rapidly internalized by them. Nanomolar concentrations of GbR201K-scFv1711 achieved the specific killing of epidermoid cancer cells by inducing apoptosis, and similar effects were observed in rhabdomyosarcoma cells when GbR201K-scFv1711 was combined with the endosomolytic substance chloroquine. The novel hCFP was stable in serum and bound to human rhabdomyosarcoma tissue ex vivo. These data confirm that GbR201K-scFv1711 is a promising therapeutic candidate suitable for further clinical investigation.

  4. Factorized molecular wave functions: Analysis of the nuclear factor

    SciTech Connect

    Lefebvre, R.

    2015-06-07

    The exact factorization of molecular wave functions leads to nuclear factors which should be nodeless functions. We reconsider the case of vibrational perturbations in a diatomic species, a situation usually treated by combining Born-Oppenheimer products. It was shown [R. Lefebvre, J. Chem. Phys. 142, 074106 (2015)] that it is possible to derive, from the solutions of coupled equations, the form of the factorized function. By increasing artificially the interstate coupling in the usual approach, the adiabatic regime can be reached, whereby the wave function can be reduced to a single product. The nuclear factor of this product is determined by the lowest of the two potentials obtained by diagonalization of the potential matrix. By comparison with the nuclear wave function of the factorized scheme, it is shown that by a simple rectification, an agreement is obtained between the modified nodeless function and that of the adiabatic scheme.

  5. Factors That Influence Teacher Attrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Patricia

    1995-01-01

    External, employment, and personal factors which influence teacher decisions to stay, leave, or transfer from teaching assignments are discussed, with emphasis on special education teachers. Factors attributed to teacher attrition in urban and rural environments also are briefly reviewed, along with attrition of related services professionals.…

  6. Eight Factors in School Vitality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strommen, Merton P.

    1980-01-01

    A survey of 30 National Catholic Educational Association Schools examined their ability to make needed program changes according to Davis' eight factors: Awareness of Need, Resistances, Values, Information, Ability, Timing, Circumstances, and Yield. This article compares a vital, growing school and a declining one on these eight factors.…

  7. Estimation of Unattenuated Factor Loadings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodward, Todd S.; Hunter, Michael A.

    1999-01-01

    Demonstrates that traditional exploratory factor analytic methods, when applied to correlation matrices, cannot be used to estimate unattenuated factor loadings. Presents a mathematical basis for the accurate estimation of such values when the disattenuated correlation matrix or the covariance matrix is used as input. Explains how the equations…

  8. Research Needs for Human Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Army Research Inst. for the Behavioral and Social Sciences, Arlington, VA.

    Human factors engineering can be defined as the application of scientific principles, methods, and data drawn from a variety of disciplines to the development of engineering systems in which people play a significant role. Since human factors issues arise in every domain in which humans interact with the products of a technological society, six…

  9. Factors That Shape Design Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Colin M.

    2013-01-01

    A wide range of design literature discusses the role of the studio and its related pedagogy in the development of design thinking. Scholars in a variety of design disciplines pose a number of factors that potentially affect this development process, but a full understanding of these factors as experienced from a critical pedagogy or student…

  10. Human Factors in CAI Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rambally, Gerard K.; Rambally, Rodney S.

    1987-01-01

    Identifies human factor issues involved in the student-computer interface in computer assisted instruction and makes specific recommendations for screen design. Factors considered include simplicity, spaciousness, relevance, standardization, changing display screen contents, color coding, shape and size coding, and brightness coding. (Author/LRW)

  11. Statistical Factors in Complexation Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, Chung-Sun

    1985-01-01

    Four cases which illustrate statistical factors in complexation reactions (where two of the reactants are monodentate ligands) are presented. Included are tables showing statistical factors for the reactions of: (1) square-planar complexes; (2) tetrahedral complexes; and (3) octahedral complexes. (JN)

  12. Matrix factorizations and elliptic fibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omer, Harun

    2016-09-01

    I use matrix factorizations to describe branes at simple singularities of elliptic fibrations. Each node of the corresponding Dynkin diagrams of the ADE-type singularities is associated with one indecomposable matrix factorization which can be deformed into one or more factorizations of lower rank. Branes with internal fluxes arise naturally as bound states of the indecomposable factorizations. Describing branes in such a way avoids the need to resolve singularities. This paper looks at gauge group breaking from E8 fibers down to SU (5) fibers due to the relevance of such fibrations for local F-theory GUT models. A purpose of this paper is to understand how the deformations of the singularity are understood in terms of its matrix factorizations. By systematically factorizing the elliptic fiber equation, this paper discusses geometries which are relevant for building semi-realistic local models. In the process it becomes evident that breaking patterns which are identical at the level of the Kodaira type of the fibers can be inequivalent at the level of matrix factorizations. Therefore the matrix factorization picture supplements information which the conventional less detailed descriptions lack.

  13. [Risk factors for arterial disease].

    PubMed

    Madoery, Roberto; Rubin, Graciela; Luquez, Hugo; Luquez, Cecilia; Cravero, Cecilia

    2004-01-01

    The risk factors of arterial disease (FREA) predict a future damage over the vascular system of the human body. Its detection are considered a key for the diagnostic as well as for the preventive and even curative strategies. For a long time, scientist considered those factors originated as a consecuence of large studies during the middle of the last century, with current validity up to our days. A simple classification spoke of them as traditionals. Further investigations described the so called new or emergents.factors that where joint together accordingly to their actions: coagulation factors, psicosocial, inflamatories and infectious. A recent classification, taking into account the type of impact, divided them into; causatives, predisposals and conditionals. Also, it was described a mechanism, the oxidative power, with consecuences over the endothelium, in the last part of the process. Before, another mechanism was described: the insulin resistance and the hiperinsulinism, bases for the Metabolic Syndrome, that includes a number of traditional risk factors.

  14. Human factors in visualization research.

    PubMed

    Tory, Melanie; Möller, Torsten

    2004-01-01

    Visualization can provide valuable assistance for data analysis and decision making tasks. However, how people perceive and interact with a visualization tool can strongly influence their understanding of the data as well as the system's usefulness. Human factors therefore contribute significantly to the visualization process and should play an important role in the design and evaluation of visualization tools. Several research initiatives have begun to explore human factors in visualization, particularly in perception-based design. Nonetheless, visualization work involving human factors is in its infancy, and many potentially promising areas have yet to be explored. Therefore, this paper aims to 1) review known methodology for doing human factors research, with specific emphasis on visualization, 2) review current human factors research in visualization to provide a basis for future investigation, and 3) identify promising areas for future research.

  15. Knockout, Transfer and Spectroscopic Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemper, Kirby; Keeley, Nicholas; Rusek, Krzysztof

    2011-10-01

    As derived quantities rather than observables, spectroscopic factors extracted from fits to data are model dependent. The main source of uncertainty is the choice of binding potential, but other factors such as adequate modeling of the reaction mechanism, the Perey effect, choice of distorting nuclear potentials etc. can also play a significant role. Recently, there has been some discussion of apparent discrepancies in spectroscopic factors derived from knockout reactions compared to those obtained from low-energy direct reactions. It should be possible to reconcile these discrepancies and we explore this prospect by attempting to describe the 10Be(d,t)9Be data of Nucl. Phys. A157, 305 (1970) using the 10Be/9Be form factors from a recent knockout study, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 162502 (2011). The influence of such factors as choice of distorting potentials and multi-step reactions paths will be explored.

  16. Great Lakes management: Ecological factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonzogni, W. C.; Robertson, A.; Beeton, A. M.

    1983-11-01

    Although attempts to improve the quality of the Great Lakes generally focus on chemical pollution, other factors are important and should be considered Ecological factors, such as invasion of the lakes by foreign species, habitat changes, overfishing, and random variations in organism populations, are especially influential. Lack of appreciation of the significance of ecological factors stems partly from the inappropriate application of the concept of eutrophication to the Great Lakes. Emphasis on ecological factors is not intended to diminish the seriousness of pollution, but rather to point out that more cost-effective management, as well as more realistic expectations of management efforts by the public, should result from an ecosystem management approach in which ecological factors are carefully considered.

  17. Factoring in Factor VIII With Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Siegler, James E; Samai, Alyana; Albright, Karen C; Boehme, Amelia K; Martin-Schild, Sheryl

    2015-10-01

    There is growing research interest into the etiologies of cryptogenic stroke, in particular as it relates to hypercoagulable states. An elevation in serum levels of the procoagulant factor VIII is recognized as one such culprit of occult cerebral infarctions. It is the objective of the present review to summarize the molecular role of factor VIII in thrombogenesis and its clinical use in the diagnosis and prognosis of acute ischemic stroke. We also discuss the utility of screening for serum factor VIII levels among patients at risk for, or those who have experienced, ischemic stroke.

  18. Corrosion effects on friction factors

    SciTech Connect

    Magleby, H.L.; Shaffer, S.J.

    1996-03-01

    This paper presents the results of NRC-sponsored material specimen tests that were performed to determine if corrosion increases the friction factors of sliding surfaces of motor-operated gate valves, which could require higher forces to close and open safety-related valves when subjected to their design basis differential pressures. Friction tests were performed with uncorroded specimens and specimens subjected to accelerated corrosion. Preliminary tests at ambient conditions showed that corrosion increased the friction factors, indicating the need for additional tests duplicating valve operating parameters at hot conditions. The additional tests showed friction factors of corroded specimens were 0.1 to 0.2 higher than for uncorroded specimens, and that the friction factors of the corroded specimens were not very dependent on contact stress or corrosion film thickness. The measured values of friction factors for the three corrosion films tested (simulating three operating times) were in the range of 0.3 to 0.4. The friction factor for even the shortest simulated operating time was essentially the same as the others, indicating that the friction factors appear to reach a plateau and that the plateau is reached quickly.

  19. Impact factors: uses and abuses.

    PubMed

    Neuberger, James; Counsell, Christopher

    2002-03-01

    Quantitative assessment of the scientific merit of journals and articles is being used increasingly to assess and compare researchers and institutions. The most commonly used measure is the 2 year Impact Factor, which broadly reflects the number of times each article in the journal has been cited over the previous 2 years. There are clear limitations to the use of such measures - not least, Impact Factors reflect the journal not the article, vary with time and correlate only poorly with perceived excellence. Simple comparison of impact factors in different specialties may be misleading. Review journals often have higher Impact Factors than those with original data. Both authors and editors can try to manipulate journal Impact Factors. However, despite valid concerns, Impact Factors are widely used and offer, at present, the best simple tool for comparison of output. Like all measures, the use of Impact Factors has to be tempered with knowledge of their limitations and common sense used in interpreting any data based on any analysis.

  20. Factors controlling pancreatic islet neogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Vinik, A.; Pittenger, G.; Rafaeloff, R.; Rosenberg, L.

    1992-01-01

    We have established a model in which cellophane wrapping induces reiteration of the normal ontogeny of beta-cell differentiation from ductal tissue. The secretion of insulin is physiologic and coordinated to the needs of the animal. Streptozotocin-induced diabetes in hamsters can be "cured" at least half the time. There appears to be activation of growth factor(s) within the pancreas, acting in an autocrine, paracrine, or juxtacrine manner to induce ductal cell proliferation and differentiation into functioning beta cells. Given the results of our studies to date, it does not seem premature to envisage new approaches to the treatment of diabetes mellitus. Identification of the factor(s) regulating islet-cell proliferation and differentiation in our model may permit islets to be grown in culture. This concept could be extended to induce endocrine cell differentiation in vitro as well. Furthermore, islet-cell growth factors could be used to provide "trophic support" to islet transplants as a means of maintaining graft viability. There may also be greater scope for gene therapy when the growth factor(s) have been isolated, purified, sequenced, and cloned. Images FIG. 2 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 FIG. 9 PMID:1364089

  1. Factors Affecting Medical Service Quality

    PubMed Central

    MOSADEGHRAD, Ali Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background A better understanding of factors influencing quality of medical service can pinpoint better strategies for quality assurance in medical services. This study aimed to identify factors affecting the quality of medical services provided by Iranian physicians. Methods Exploratory in-depth individual interviews were conducted with sixty-four physicians working in various medical institutions in Iran. Results Individual, organizational and environmental factors enhance or inhibit the quality of medical services. Quality of medical services depends on the personal factors of the physician and patient, and factors pertaining to the healthcare setting and the broader environment. Conclusion Differences in internal and external factors such as availability of resources, patient cooperation and collaboration among providers affect the quality of medical services and patient outcomes. Supportive leadership, proper planning, education and training and effective management of resources and processes improve the quality of medical services. This article contributes to healthcare theory and practice by developing a conceptual framework for understanding factors that influence medical services quality. PMID:26060745

  2. GATA factors in endocrine neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Pihlajoki, Marjut; Färkkilä, Anniina; Soini, Tea; Heikinheimo, Markku; Wilson, David B.

    2015-01-01

    GATA transcription factors are structurally-related zinc finger proteins that recognize the consensus DNA sequence WGATAA (the GATA motif), an essential cis-acting element in the promoters and enhancers of many genes. These transcription factors regulate cell fate specification and differentiation in a wide array of tissues. As demonstrated by genetic analyses of mice and humans, GATA factors play pivotal roles in the development, homeostasis, and function of several endocrine organs including the adrenal cortex, ovary, pancreas, parathyroid, pituitary, and testis. Additionally, GATA factors have been shown to be mutated, overexpressed, or underexpressed in a variety of endocrine tumors (e.g., adrenocortical neoplasms, parathyroid tumors, pituitary adenomas, and sex cord stromal tumors). Emerging evidence suggests that GATA factors play a direct role in the initiation, proliferation, or propagation of certain endocrine tumors via modulation of key developmental signaling pathways implicated in oncogenesis, such as the WNT/β-catenin and TGFβ pathways. Altered expression or function of GATA factors can also affect the metabolism, ploidy, and invasiveness of tumor cells. This article provides an overview of the role of GATA factors in endocrine neoplasms. Relevant animal models are highlighted. PMID:26027919

  3. Sequence Factorization with Multiple References

    PubMed Central

    Wandelt, Sebastian; Leser, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    The success of high-throughput sequencing has lead to an increasing number of projects which sequence large populations of a species. Storage and analysis of sequence data is a key challenge in these projects, because of the sheer size of the datasets. Compression is one simple technology to deal with this challenge. Referential factorization and compression schemes, which store only the differences between input sequence and a reference sequence, gained lots of interest in this field. Highly-similar sequences, e.g., Human genomes, can be compressed with a compression ratio of 1,000:1 and more, up to two orders of magnitude better than with standard compression techniques. Recently, it was shown that the compression against multiple references from the same species can boost the compression ratio up to 4,000:1. However, a detailed analysis of using multiple references is lacking, e.g., for main memory consumption and optimality. In this paper, we describe one key technique for the referential compression against multiple references: The factorization of sequences. Based on the notion of an optimal factorization, we propose optimization heuristics and identify parameter settings which greatly influence 1) the size of the factorization, 2) the time for factorization, and 3) the required amount of main memory. We evaluate a total of 30 setups with a varying number of references on data from three different species. Our results show a wide range of factorization sizes (optimal to an overhead of up to 300%), factorization speed (0.01 MB/s to more than 600 MB/s), and main memory usage (few dozen MB to dozens of GB). Based on our evaluation, we identify the best configurations for common use cases. Our evaluation shows that multi-reference factorization is much better than single-reference factorization. PMID:26422374

  4. Genetics Home Reference: factor V Leiden thrombophilia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions factor V Leiden thrombophilia factor V Leiden thrombophilia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Open All Close All Description Factor V Leiden thrombophilia is an inherited disorder of blood clotting . Factor ...

  5. [Cardiovascular risk factors in women].

    PubMed

    Cengel, Atiye

    2010-03-01

    It is estimated that at least 80% of patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD) have conventional risk factors and optimization of these risk factors can reduce morbidity and mortality due to this disease considerably. Contemporary women have increased burden of some of these risk factors such as obesity, metabolic syndrome and smoking. Turkish women have a worse CV risk profile than Turkish men in some aspects. Risk stratification systems such as Framingham have a tendency of underestimating the risk in women. Coronary artery disease remains in vessel wall for a longer period of time in women; therefore obstructive disease appear later in their lifespan necessitating risk stratification systems for estimating their lifetime risk.

  6. A Trematode Parasite Derived Growth Factor Binds and Exerts Influences on Host Immune Functions via Host Cytokine Receptor Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Sulaiman, Azad A.; Zolnierczyk, Katarzyna; Japa, Ornampai; Owen, Jonathan P.; Maddison, Ben C.; Hodgkinson, Jane E.; Gough, Kevin C.

    2016-01-01

    The trematode Fasciola hepatica is responsible for chronic zoonotic infection globally. Despite causing a potent T-helper 2 response, it is believed that potent immunomodulation is responsible for rendering this host reactive non-protective host response thereby allowing the parasite to remain long-lived. We have previously identified a growth factor, FhTLM, belonging to the TGF superfamily can have developmental effects on the parasite. Herein we demonstrate that FhTLM can exert influence over host immune functions in a host receptor specific fashion. FhTLM can bind to receptor members of the Transforming Growth Factor (TGF) superfamily, with a greater affinity for TGF-β RII. Upon ligation FhTLM initiates the Smad2/3 pathway resulting in phenotypic changes in both fibroblasts and macrophages. The formation of fibroblast CFUs is reduced when cells are cultured with FhTLM, as a result of TGF-β RI kinase activity. In parallel the wound closure response of fibroblasts is also delayed in the presence of FhTLM. When stimulated with FhTLM blood monocyte derived macrophages adopt an alternative or regulatory phenotype. They express high levels interleukin (IL)-10 and arginase-1 while displaying low levels of IL-12 and nitric oxide. Moreover they also undergo significant upregulation of the inhibitory receptor PD-L1 and the mannose receptor. Use of RNAi demonstrates that this effect is dependent on TGF-β RII and mRNA knock-down leads to a loss of IL-10 and PD-L1. Finally, we demonstrate that FhTLM aids newly excysted juveniles (NEJs) in their evasion of antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity (ADCC) by reducing the NO response of macrophages—again dependent on TGF-β RI kinase. FhTLM displays restricted expression to the F. hepatica gut resident NEJ stages. The altered fibroblast responses would suggest a role for dampened tissue repair responses in facilitating parasite migration. Furthermore, the adoption of a regulatory macrophage phenotype would allow for a reduced

  7. Factorization-based texture segmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Jiangye; Wang, Deliang; Cheriyadat, Anil M.

    2015-06-17

    This study introduces a factorization-based approach that efficiently segments textured images. We use local spectral histograms as features, and construct an M × N feature matrix using M-dimensional feature vectors in an N-pixel image. Based on the observation that each feature can be approximated by a linear combination of several representative features, we factor the feature matrix into two matrices-one consisting of the representative features and the other containing the weights of representative features at each pixel used for linear combination. The factorization method is based on singular value decomposition and nonnegative matrix factorization. The method uses local spectral histograms to discriminate region appearances in a computationally efficient way and at the same time accurately localizes region boundaries. Finally, the experiments conducted on public segmentation data sets show the promise of this simple yet powerful approach.

  8. Predisposition Factors in Anorexia Nervosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagel, K. L.; Jones, Karen H.

    1992-01-01

    Reviews literature concerned with investigating psychiatric disturbances and genetic variables hypothesized as predisposing factors in etiology of anorexia nervosa. Gives particular emphasis to research which discusses association between anorexia nervosa and depression. Reviews psychopharmacological evidence and family genetics studies. Offers…

  9. Salivary Gland Cancer: Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... continue reading this guide. ‹ Salivary Gland Cancer - Medical Illustrations up Salivary Gland Cancer - Screening › f t k ... Net Guide Salivary Gland Cancer Introduction Statistics Medical Illustrations Risk Factors Screening Symptoms and Signs Diagnosis Subtypes ...

  10. Hidden Risk Factors for Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... previous history of clots in the legs (deep vein thrombosis) and livedo reticularis, a mottled purplish discoloration of the skin. “Risk factors are cumulative,” Dr. Kittner adds. “Reducing even one ...

  11. Cabin crew stress factors examined.

    PubMed

    Barayan, O S

    1991-05-01

    The impact of reduced cockpit crew on the cabin crew in commercial airlines is examined. One hundred cabin crew members participated in a study to determine what stressors are present in contemporary transport aircraft, the extent of differences in rating context-related and task-related stressors, and the effect of peak versus normal periods of duty time on stress factors. Results indicate that under peak period conditions, context-related factors are more stressful than task-related factors. Recommendations to alleviate cabin crew stress factors include training to maximize crew knowledge and abilities, elevate cabin crew to the same status as cockpit crew, improve the cabin crew certification program, and expose cabin crew to cockpit crew procedures to foster better communication and enhance safety.

  12. Factorization-based texture segmentation

    DOE PAGES

    Yuan, Jiangye; Wang, Deliang; Cheriyadat, Anil M.

    2015-06-17

    This study introduces a factorization-based approach that efficiently segments textured images. We use local spectral histograms as features, and construct an M × N feature matrix using M-dimensional feature vectors in an N-pixel image. Based on the observation that each feature can be approximated by a linear combination of several representative features, we factor the feature matrix into two matrices-one consisting of the representative features and the other containing the weights of representative features at each pixel used for linear combination. The factorization method is based on singular value decomposition and nonnegative matrix factorization. The method uses local spectral histogramsmore » to discriminate region appearances in a computationally efficient way and at the same time accurately localizes region boundaries. Finally, the experiments conducted on public segmentation data sets show the promise of this simple yet powerful approach.« less

  13. Factors influencing dust suppressant effectiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, C.R.; Eisele, T.C.; Chesney, D.J.; Kawatra, S.K.

    2008-11-15

    Water sprays are a common method used to reduce particulate matter (PM) emissions. Various factors such as wettability, surface area coverage, fine particle engulfment rates, interparticle adhesion forces, suppressant penetration and suppressant longevity have all been suggested as critical factors in achieving effective PM control. However, it has not been established which of these factors are the most important. Experimental work indicated that suppressant penetration is the most critical of these factors. The length of time after application that suppressants were effective was also improved by using hygroscopic reagents that retained moisture to prevent evaporation. Maximizing suppressant penetration and improving suppressant longevity led to an average 86% reduction in PM10 concentrations in laboratory dust tower tests.

  14. Radiant-interchange Configuration Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, D C :; Morgan, W R

    1952-01-01

    A study is presented of the geometric configuration factors required for computing radiant heat transfer between opaque surfaces separated by a nonabsorbing medium and various methods of determining the configuration factors are discussed. Configuration-factor solutions available in the literature have been checked and the more complicated equations are presented as families of curves. Cases for point, line, and finite-area sources are worked out over a wide range of geometric proportions. These cases include several new configurations involving rectangles, triangles, and cylinders of finite length which are integrated and tabulated. An analysis is presented, in which configuration factors are employed of the radiant heat transfer to the rotor blades of a typical gas turbine under different conditions of temperature and pressure. (author)

  15. Formulas for Image Factor Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hakstian, A. Ralph

    1973-01-01

    Formulas are presented in this paper for computing scores associated with factors of G, the image covariance matrix, under three conditions. The subject of the paper is restricted to "pure" image analysis. (Author/NE)

  16. Environmental Factors Inducing Human Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Parsa, N

    2012-01-01

    Background An explosion of research has been done in discovering how human health is affected by environmental factors. I will discuss the impacts of environmental cancer causing factors and how they continue to cause multiple disruptions in cellular networking. Some risk factors may not cause cancer. Other factors initiate consecutive genetic mutations that would eventually alter the normal pathway of cellular proliferations and differentiation. Genetic mutations in four groups of genes; (Oncogenes, Tumor suppressor genes, Apoptosis genes and DNA repairing genes) play a vital role in altering the normal cell division. In recent years, molecular genetics have greatly increased our understanding of the basic mechanisms in cancer development and utilizing these molecular techniques for cancer screening, diagnosis, prognosis and therapies. Inhibition of carcinogenic exposures wherever possible should be the goal of cancer prevention programs to reduce exposures from all environmental carcinogens. PMID:23304670

  17. Research Needs for Human Factors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    Research Note 83-07 RESEARCH NEEDS FOR HUMAN FACTORS Conmmittee on Human Factors Cot ittee on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education National... Research Council IIJanuary 1983 i ~ Approvted for Dublit rellease; distribution unlimited. __ A N- This report, as submitted by the contractor, has...CATALOG NUMBE -- Research Note 83-07 A2{>/)/.2 ? ___ 4. TITLE (e 5110) S. TyPE of REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Renearch Needs for Human Facotrs S. PERFORMING

  18. Human Factors in Aircraft Maintenance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-03-01

    significant effect on the design of new systems but it can also mitigate problems found in the sub-optimal designs of current systems. 2. Human Factors...and parts 3. Airplane design and configuration 4. Job and task 5. Technical knowledge and skills 6. Factors affecting individual performance-e.g...software failures (e.g. documentation design ) were found. Note that there are typically multiple latent failures for each hazard pattern, so that

  19. Rank Revealing QR-Factorizations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-06-01

    amount to finding an appropriate column permutation of A. Perhaps the most well- known of these is the column pivoting strategy [2j. Although this... strategy is usually very effective in producing a triangular factor R with a small IIR2211, very little is known in theory about its behaviour and it can...is analogous to the strategy proposed in [6], in which the permutation of II is obtained via a QR-factorization with column pivoting applied to

  20. Industrial Power Factor Analysis Guidebook.

    SciTech Connect

    Electrotek Concepts.

    1995-03-01

    Power factor is a way of measuring the percentage of reactive power in an electrical system. Reactive power represents wasted energy--electricity that does no useful work because the electrical current is out of phase with the voltage. Reactive power is used by inductive loads (such as, motors, transformers, fluorescent lights, arc welders and induction furnaces) to sustain their magnetic fields. Electric systems with many motors exhibit low power factors, increased conductor and transformer losses, and lower voltages. Utilities must supply both active and reactive power and compensate for these losses. Power factor can be improved by the addition of shunt capacitors. Capacitors act in opposition to inductive loads, thereby minimizing the reactive power required to serve them. In raising the power factor, shunt capacitors release energy to the system, reduce system losses, and ultimately decrease power costs. Improving system power factor can reduce reactive and active power losses for both industry and utilities through the addition of shunt capacitors. This Guide Book gives electric utility technical staff, industrial end-users, consultants and BPA employees a step-by-step method for evaluating the cost effectiveness of installing power factor correction capacitors in an industrial plant.

  1. Sexual harassment: identifying risk factors.

    PubMed

    O'Hare, E A; O'Donohue, W

    1998-12-01

    A new model of the etiology of sexual harassment, the four-factor model, is presented and compared with several models of sexual harassment including the biological model, the organizational model, the sociocultural model, and the sex role spillover model. A number of risk factors associated with sexually harassing behavior are examined within the framework of the four-factor model of sexual harassment. These include characteristics of the work environment (e.g., sexist attitudes among co-workers, unprofessional work environment, skewed sex ratios in the workplace, knowledge of grievance procedures for sexual harassment incidents) as well as personal characteristics of the subject (e.g., physical attractiveness, job status, sex-role). Subjects were 266 university female faculty, staff, and students who completed the Sexual Experience Questionnaire to assess the experience of sexual harassment and a questionnaire designed to assess the risk factors stated above. Results indicated that the four-factor model is a better predictor of sexual harassment than the alternative models. The risk factors most strongly associated with sexual harassment were an unprofessional environment in the workplace, sexist atmosphere, and lack of knowledge about the organization's formal grievance procedures.

  2. Interstitial fibrosis and growth factors.

    PubMed Central

    Lasky, J A; Brody, A R

    2000-01-01

    Interstitial pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is scarring of the lung caused by a variety of inhaled agents including mineral particles, organic dusts, and oxidant gases. The disease afflicts millions of individuals worldwide, and there are no effective therapeutic approaches. A major reason for this lack of useful treatments is that few of the molecular mechanisms of disease have been defined sufficiently to design appropriate targets for therapy. Our laboratory has focused on the molecular mechanisms through which three selected peptide growth factors could play a role in the development of IPF. Hundreds of growth factors and cytokines could be involved in the complex disease process. We are studying platelet-derived growth factor because it is the most potent mesenchymal cell mitogen yet described, transforming growth factor beta because it is a powerful inducer of extracellular matrix (scar tissue) components by mesenchymal cells, and tumor necrosis factor alpha because it is a pleiotropic cytokine that we and others have shown is essential for the development of IPF in animal models. This review describes some of the evidence from studies in humans, in animal models, and in vitro, that supports the growth factor hypothesis. The use of modern molecular and transgenic technologies could elucidate those targets that will allow effective therapeutic approaches. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:10931794

  3. [Neuronal growth factors--neurotrophins].

    PubMed

    Meyer, M; Rasmussen, J Z

    1999-04-05

    Neurotrophic factors are polypeptides primarily known to regulate the survival and differentiation of nerve cells during the development of the peripheral and central nervous systems. The neurotrophic factors act via specific receptors after retrograde axonal transport from the nerve fibre target areas back to the cell bodies, and locally through autocrine and paracrine mechanisms linked to nerve cell activity. In the mature nervous system, neurotrophic factors maintain morphological and neurochemical characteristics of nerve cells and promote activity-dependent dynamic/plastic changes in the synaptic contacts between nerve cells by strengthening functionally active synaptic connections. Induction and increased production of neurotrophic factors in relation to neural injuries are thought to serve protective and reparative purposes. Specific neurotrophic factors have thus been shown to protect nerve cells in a number of experimental models for neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson disease, Alzheimer disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, just as specific neurotrophic factors have been shown to stimulate regenerative growth of both peripheral and central nerve fibres. Today, problems with continuous and localized delivery of specific neurotrophins or combinations thereof into the nervous system appear to be the most important obstacle for more widespread clinical application.

  4. Quantitative Analysis of HER2-mediated Effects on HER2 and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Endocytosis: DISTRIBUTION OF HOMO- AND HETERODIMERS DEPENDS ON RELATIVE HER2 LEVELS

    SciTech Connect

    Hendriks, Bart S.; Opresko, Lee ); Wiley, H Steven ); Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2003-05-15

    Endocytic trafficking plays an important role in the regulation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family. Many cell types express multiple EGFR family members (including EGFR, HER2, HER3 and/or HER4) that interact to form an array of homo- and hetero-dimers. Differential trafficking of these receptors should strongly affect signaling through this system by changing substrate access and heterodimerization efficiency. Because of the complexity of these dynamic processes we used a quantitative, computational model to understand this system. As a test case, parameters characterizing EGFR and HER2 interactions were derived using experimental data obtained from mammary epithelial cells constructed to express different levels of HER2. With this data we were able to estimate receptor-specific internalization rate constants and dimer uncoupling rate constants. These parameters were not otherwise experimentally accessible due to the complex system interplay. Our models indicated that HER2:EGFR heterodimers traffic as single entities. Direct experiments using EGF and anti-HER2 and anti-EGFR antibodies using independently derived cell lines confirmed many of the predictions of the model. Furthermore, our model could predict the relationship between HER2 expression levels and the transient distribution of EGFR homodimers and heterodimers. Our results suggest that the levels of HER2 found on normal cells are barely at the threshold necessary to drive efficient heterodimerization. Thus, altering local HER2 concentrations in membrane microdomains could serve as an effective mechanism for regulating HER2 heterodimerization and could explain why HER2 overexpression found in some cancers have such a profound effect on cell physiology.

  5. Differential effects of tumour necrosis factor-α and interleukin-12 on isopentenyl pyrophosphate-stimulated interferon-γ production by cord blood Vγ9 T cells

    PubMed Central

    Alberto, Eduardo Jose Campos; Shimojo, Naoki; Aoyagi, Masahiko; Kohno, Yoichi

    2009-01-01

    Lower numbers of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells in cord blood (CB) than in adult peripheral blood (PB), as well as their impaired ability to produce interferon-γ (IFN-γ) in response to stimulation, are associated with functional deficiency in the immune system in newborns. In this study, we stimulated CB Vγ9 T cells with their T-cell receptor-specific ligand, isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP), plus exogenous costimulatory cytokines such as interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-12 and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), which are known to play important roles in the activation of PB γδ T cells. Our data show that CB Vγ9 T cells are able to produce IFN-γ at levels comparable to PB Vγ9 T cells by the addition of TNF-α in the presence of IPP and IL-2; however, under the same culture conditions, IL-12 does not efficiently activate CB Vγ9 T cells to produce IFN-γ. The frequency of TNF-α receptor II-positive Vγ9T cells and the expression levels of TNF-α receptor II are similar in CB and PB; in contrast, the frequency of IL-12 receptor βI (IL-12RβI)-positive Vγ9T cells and expression levels of IL-12RβI are significantly lower in CB than PB. TNF-α but not IL-12 increases the expression of IL-2Rβ on CB Vγ9 T cells. These results provide new insights into the role of TNF-α in the activation of CB Vγ9 T cells. PMID:19019091

  6. Growth hormone-like factor produced by the tapeworm, Spirometra mansonoides, displaces human growth hormone (hGH) from its receptors on cultured human lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, D.J.; Phares, C.K.

    1986-03-01

    An analogue of hGH isolated from plerocercoids of the tapeworm Spirometra mansonoides displaces (/sup 125/I)hGH from its receptors in rabbit, rat, and hamster liver membranes. Biologically, plerocercoid growth factor (PGF) is more similar to hGH than to other mammalian GH's but has not been shown to bond human cells. Receptors specific for hGH have been described on cultured human lymphocytes (IM-9). In this study, the authors compared the binding of PGF and hGH in IM-9 cells and in rabbit hepatic membranes. IM-9 lymphocytes (12 x 10/sup 6/ cells/tube) were incubated with (/sup 125/I)hGH and increasing concentrations of hGH (ng/ml) or PGF (serial dilutions) for 90 min at 30/sup 0/ C. Specific binding (B/sub 0/ - NSB) was determined for each dose of hGH or PGF and the binding curves were analyzed by logit-log regression. The results show that PGF displaced (/sup 125/I)hGH from human cells in a dose dependent manner (r = 0.98). Based on the IM-9 assay, 1 ml of the PGF had an activity equivalent to 625 ng of the hGH standard (ngE). However, the binding activity of the PGF in the rabbit liver RRA was 1653 ngE/ml, indicating that the binding potency of PGF in IM-9 cells was only 38% of that in the rabbit liver. These results clearly demonstrate that PGF binds hGH receptors in cells of human origin, suggesting that PGF will be effective in humans.

  7. Factors influencing healthcare service quality

    PubMed Central

    Mosadeghrad, Ali Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background: The main purpose of this study was to identify factors that influence healthcare quality in the Iranian context. Methods: Exploratory in-depth individual and focus group interviews were conducted with 222 healthcare stakeholders including healthcare providers, managers, policy-makers, and payers to identify factors affecting the quality of healthcare services provided in Iranian healthcare organisations. Results: Quality in healthcare is a production of cooperation between the patient and the healthcare provider in a supportive environment. Personal factors of the provider and the patient, and factors pertaining to the healthcare organisation, healthcare system, and the broader environment affect healthcare service quality. Healthcare quality can be improved by supportive visionary leadership, proper planning, education and training, availability of resources, effective management of resources, employees and processes, and collaboration and cooperation among providers. Conclusion: This article contributes to healthcare theory and practice by developing a conceptual framework that provides policy-makers and managers a practical understanding of factors that affect healthcare service quality. PMID:25114946

  8. Elongation factors in protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kraal, B; Bosch, L; Mesters, J R; de Graaf, J M; Woudt, L P; Vijgenboom, E; Heinstra, P W; Zeef, L A; Boon, C

    1993-01-01

    Recent discoveries of elongation factor-related proteins have considerably complicated the simple textbook scheme of the peptide chain elongation cycle. During growth and differentiation the cycle may be regulated not only by factor modification but also factor replacement. In addition, rare tRNAs may have their own rare factor proteins. A special case is the acquisition of resistance by bacteria to elongation factor-directed antibiotics. Pertinent data from the literature and our own work with Escherichia coli and Streptomyces are discussed. The GTP-binding domain of EF-Tu has been studied extensively, but little molecular detail is available on the interactions with its other ligands or effectors, or on the way they are affected by the GTPase switch signal. A growing number of EF-Tu mutants obtained by ourselves and others are helping us in testing current ideas. We have found a synergistic effect between EF-Tu and EF-G in their uncoupled GTPase reactions on empty ribosomes. Only the EF-G reaction is perturbed by fluoroaluminates.

  9. Geomorphological factors of flash floods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, Yulia

    2016-04-01

    Growing anthropogenic load, rise of extreme meteorological events frequency and total precipitation depth often lead to increasing danger of catastrophic fluvial processes worldwide. Flash floods are one of the most dangerous and less understood types of them. Difficulties of their study are mainly related to short duration of single events, remoteness and hard access to origin areas. Most detailed researches of flash floods focus on hydrological parameters of the flow itself and its meteorological factors. At the same time, importance of the basin geological and geomorphological structure for flash floods generation and the role they play in global sediment redistribution is yet poorly understood. However, understanding and quantitative assessment of these features is a real basis for a complete concept of factors, characteristics and dynamics of flash floods. This work is a review of published data on flash floods, and focuses on the geomorphological factors of the phenomenon. We consider both individual roles and interactions between different geomorphological features (the whole basin parameters, characteristics of the single slopes and valley bottom). Special attention is paid to critical values of certain factors. This approach also highlights the gaps or less studied factors of flash floods. Finally, all data is organized into a complex diagram that may be used for flash floods modeling. This also may help to reach a new level of flash flood predictions and risk assessment.

  10. Derived Basic Ability Factors: A Factor Analysis Replication Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Mickey, M.; Lee, Lynda Newby

    The purpose of this study was to replicate the study conducted by Potter, Sagraves, and McDonald to determine whether their recommended analysis could separate criterion variables into similar factors that were stable from year to year and from school to school. The replication samples consisted of all students attending Louisiana State University…

  11. Environmental risk factors for osteoporosis

    SciTech Connect

    Goyer, R.A.; Korach, K.S. ); Epstein, S. ); Bhattacharyya, M. ); Pounds, J. )

    1994-04-01

    Environmental risk factors for osteoporosis were reviewed at a conference held at the National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences 8-9 November 1993. The conference was co-sponsored by the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Disease and the NIH Office of Research in Women's Health. The objective of the conference was to review what is known about risk factors for osteoporosis and to identify gaps in the present state of knowledge that might be addressed by future research. The conference was divided into two broad themes. The first session focused on current knowledge regarding etiology, risk factors, and approaches to clinical and laboratory diagnosis. This was followed by three sessions in which various environmental pollutants were discussed. Topics selected for review included environmental agents that interfere with bone and calcium metabolism, such as the toxic metals lead, cadmium, aluminum, and fluoride, natural and antiestrogens, calcium, and vitamin D.

  12. [Bifidogenic factors as drug preparations].

    PubMed

    Murashova, A O; Lisitsin, O B; Abramov, N A

    1999-01-01

    The review of new data on the study of bifidobacterial factors of different origin and the probable mechanisms of their favorable action on the microflora of the intestinal tract if presented. The main emphasis is made on the analysis of data on the use of oligosaccharides, including fructo-oligosaccharides, as compounds stimulating the growth and development of bifidobacteria both in pure cultures and in intestinal microflora. Methods for the treatment of natural compounds with a view to enhancing their bifidogenic effect are presented. The possibilities and/or advantages of using bifidogenic factors in vivo and in vitro as medicinal preparations either alone or incorporated in probiotic compositions are evaluated. Suggestion has been made that the choice of the method for using bifidogenic factors may depend on the kind and severity of disturbances in indigenous microflora.

  13. [Success factors in hospital management].

    PubMed

    Heberer, M

    1998-12-01

    The hospital environment of most Western countries is currently undergoing dramatic changes. Competition among hospitals is increasing, and economic issues have become decisive factors for the allocation of medical care. Hospitals therefore require management tools to respond to these changes adequately. The balanced scorecard is a method of enabling development and implementation of a business strategy that equally respects the financial requirements, the needs of the customers, process development, and organizational learning. This method was used to derive generally valid success factors for hospital management based on an analysis of an academic hospital in Switzerland. Strategic management, the focus of medical services, customer orientation, and integration of professional groups across the hospital value chain were identified as success factors for hospital management.

  14. Efficiency factors in Mie scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nussenzveig, H. M.; Wiscombe, W. J.

    1980-11-01

    Asymptotic approximations to the Mie efficiency factors for extinction, absorption and radiation pressure are obtained and compared with the exact results. The approximations are derived from the complex-angular-momentum theory of Mie scattering and averaged oxygen ranges of the size parameter (the product of the wave number and the droplet radius) of approximately pi. The accuracy of the approximation with respect to the exact results is found to increase with increasing values of the size parameter and the real component of the refractive index, resulting in relative errors from 1-10% at a size parameter of 10 and from 0.01-0.001% at a size factor of 1000. Computing time with respect to exact computations is also found to be reduced by a factor on the order of the size parameter. It is thus concluded that the Mie formula can advantageously be replaced by the asymptotic ones in most applications.

  15. Factor H and Neisserial pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Welsch, Jo Anne; Ram, Sanjay

    2009-01-01

    Both Neisseria gonorrhoeae and N. meningitidis bind to factor H which enhances their ability to evade complement dependent killing. While porin is the ligand for human fH on gonococci, meningococci use a lipoprotein called factor H binding protein (fHbp) to bind to factor H and enhance their ability to evade complement dependent killing. This protein is currently being intensively investigated as a meningococcal vaccine candidate antigen. Consistent with the observation that meningococci cause natural infection only in humans, the organism resists human complement, and are more readily killed by complement from lower animals. This human species-specific complement evasion has important implications for evaluation of vaccine-elicited antibodies using non-human complement sources and development of animal models of disease. PMID:19388163

  16. Factor models for cancer signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakushadze, Zura; Yu, Willie

    2016-11-01

    We present a novel method for extracting cancer signatures by applying statistical risk models (http://ssrn.com/abstract=2732453) from quantitative finance to cancer genome data. Using 1389 whole genome sequenced samples from 14 cancers, we identify an "overall" mode of somatic mutational noise. We give a prescription for factoring out this noise and source code for fixing the number of signatures. We apply nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) to genome data aggregated by cancer subtype and filtered using our method. The resultant signatures have substantially lower variability than those from unfiltered data. Also, the computational cost of signature extraction is cut by about a factor of 10. We find 3 novel cancer signatures, including a liver cancer dominant signature (96% contribution) and a renal cell carcinoma signature (70% contribution). Our method accelerates finding new cancer signatures and improves their overall stability. Reciprocally, the methods for extracting cancer signatures could have interesting applications in quantitative finance.

  17. Impact beyond the impact factor.

    PubMed

    Zupanc, Günther K H

    2014-02-01

    The journal impact factor is an annually calculated number for each scientific journal, based on the average number of times its articles published in the two preceding years have been cited. It was originally devised as a tool for librarians and publishers to provide information about the citation performance of a journal as a whole, but over the last few decades it has increasingly been used to assess the quality of specific articles and the research performance of individual investigators, institutions, and countries. In addition to this clear abuse of the journal impact factor, several conceptual and technical issues limit its usability as a measure of journal reputation, especially when journals are compared across different fields. An author's decision regarding the suitability of a scholarly journal for publication should, therefore, be based on the impact that this journal makes in the field of research, rather than on the journal impact factor.

  18. Inhibition of Hageman factor activation

    PubMed Central

    Nossel, H. L.; Rubin, H.; Drillings, M.; Hsieh, R.

    1968-01-01

    A method for studying inhibitors of the contact stages of blood coagulation is described. A number of positively charged substances were shown to inhibit the contact stages. The inhibitory substances include spermine, cytochrome c, ribonuclease, and lysozyme. The inhibitory effect of these substances was neutralized by the addition of an activated plasma thromboplastin antecedent, factor XI, (PTA) fraction. Other positively charged substances including protamine, hexadimethrine, polylysine, polyornithine, methylene blue, and ortho-toluidine blue also inhibited the contact stages of coagulation, but the inhibitory effect on coagulation was not neutralized by the activated PTA fraction. Negatively charged substances such as heparin and insulin did not inhibit the contact stages of coagulation. Cytochrome c inhibited Celite adsorption of a partially purified Hageman factor fraction, and cytochrome, ribonuclease, spermine, and lysozome inhibited the adsorption of Hageman factor from PTA-deficient plasma. Very much smaller quantities of Celite completely adsorbed Hageman factor from the fraction rather than from whole plasma, which suggested the possibility that plasma contains an inhibitor or inhibitors of Hageman factor adsorption. Furthermore cytochrome c, spermine, ribonuclease, and lysozyme inhibited the coagulant activity of the following activators of the Hageman and PTA factors: Celite, kaolin, sodium stearate, ellagic acid, and skin. It is suggested that negatively charged sites on these activators are critical for adsorption and activation and that inhibition results from neutralization of the negatively charged sites by the adsorbed inhibtor. Tests with polylysine polymers indicate that inhibitory activity is directly related to molecular size over the molecular weight range of 4000 to 100,000. PMID:5645860

  19. Risk factors for Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Coppedè, Fabio

    2016-12-01

    Down syndrome (DS) originates, in most of the cases (95 %), from a full trisomy of chromosome 21. The remaining cases are due to either mosaicism for chromosome 21 or the inheritance of a structural rearrangement leading to partial trisomy of the majority of its content. Full trisomy 21 and mosaicism are not inherited, but originate from errors in cell divisions during the development of the egg, sperm or embryo. In addition, full trisomy for chromosome 21 should be further divided into cases of maternal origin, the majority, and cases of paternal origin, less than 10 %. Among cases of maternal origin, a further stratification should be performed into errors that have occurred or originated during the first meiotic division in the maternal grandmother's body and errors that occurred later in life during the second maternal meiotic division. This complex scenario suggests that our understanding of the risk factors for trisomy 21 should take into account the above stratification as it reflects different individuals and generations in which the first error has occurred. Unfortunately, most of the available literature is focused on maternal risk factors, and the only certain risk factors for the birth of a child with DS are advanced maternal age at conception and recombination errors, even though the molecular mechanisms leading to chromosome 21 nondisjunction are still a matter of debate. This article critically reviews the hypotheses and the risk factors which have been suggested to contribute to the birth of a child with DS, including folate metabolism, dietary, lifestyle, environmental, occupational, genetic and epigenetic factors, with focus on maternal and paternal risk factors, and taking into account the possible contribution of the maternal grandmother and that of the developing trisomic embryo, in a complex scenario depicting the birth of a child with DS as the result of complex gene-environment interactions and selection processes involving different

  20. Environmental factors associated with asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Bailus; Stokes, Lynette D.; Warren, Rueben

    2003-01-01

    Asthma, a disease of attacks and remission, continues to account for substantial morbidity and direct economic costs. Numerous studies--epidemiologic, toxicologic and clinical--present evidence for a broad spectrum of environmental risk factors associated with asthma. This review summarizes current thinking on a subset of these factors. Knowledge of potential environmental determinants of asthma is important to both the patient and healthcare professional in the application of multiple modalities of medical and environmental intervention for management of the development, and exacerbation of this chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways. PMID:12760611

  1. Bayes factors and multimodel inference

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Link, W.A.; Barker, R.J.; Thomson, David L.; Cooch, Evan G.; Conroy, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Multimodel inference has two main themes: model selection, and model averaging. Model averaging is a means of making inference conditional on a model set, rather than on a selected model, allowing formal recognition of the uncertainty associated with model choice. The Bayesian paradigm provides a natural framework for model averaging, and provides a context for evaluation of the commonly used AIC weights. We review Bayesian multimodel inference, noting the importance of Bayes factors. Noting the sensitivity of Bayes factors to the choice of priors on parameters, we define and propose nonpreferential priors as offering a reasonable standard for objective multimodel inference.

  2. Risk Factors in Adolescent Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ewald, D. Rose; Haldeman, Lauren A.

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is a complex and multifaceted disease, with many contributing factors. While diet and nutrition are important influences, the confounding effects of overweight and obesity, metabolic and genetic factors, racial and ethnic predispositions, socioeconomic status, cultural influences, growth rate, and pubertal stage have even more influence and make diagnosis quite challenging. The prevalence of hypertension in adolescents far exceeds the numbers who have been diagnosed; studies have found that 75% or more go undiagnosed. This literature review summarizes the challenges of blood pressure classification in adolescents, discusses the impact of these confounding influences, and identifies actions that will improve diagnosis and treatment outcomes. PMID:27335997

  3. Campylobacter virulence and survival factors.

    PubMed

    Bolton, Declan J

    2015-06-01

    Despite over 30 years of research, campylobacteriosis is the most prevalent foodborne bacterial infection in many countries including in the European Union and the United States of America. However, relatively little is known about the virulence factors in Campylobacter or how an apparently fragile organism can survive in the food chain, often with enhanced pathogenicity. This review collates information on the virulence and survival determinants including motility, chemotaxis, adhesion, invasion, multidrug resistance, bile resistance and stress response factors. It discusses their function in transition through the food processing environment and human infection. In doing so it provides a fundamental understanding of Campylobacter, critical for improved diagnosis, surveillance and control.

  4. Causal Indicators Can Help to Interpret Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bentler, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    The latent factor in a causal indicator model is no more than the latent factor of the factor part of the model. However, if the causal indicator variables are well-understood and help to improve the prediction of individuals' factor scores, they can help to interpret the meaning of the latent factor. Aguirre-Urreta, Rönkkö, and Marakas (2016)…

  5. 48 CFR 2015.304 - Evaluation factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Evaluation factors. 2015... Evaluation factors. The evaluation factors included in the solicitation serve as the standard against which... factors and subfactors by assigning a numerical weight to each factor. If a solicitation uses...

  6. Heredity Factors in Spatial Visualization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandenberg, S. G.

    Spatial visualization is not yet clearly understood. Some researchers have concluded that two factors or abilities are involved, spatial orientation and spatial visualization. Different definitions and different tests have been proposed for these two abilities. Several studies indicate that women generally perform more poorly on spatial tests than…

  7. Factors Affecting Willingness to Mentor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghislieri, Chiara; Gatti, Paola; Quaglino, Gian Piero

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents a survey among 300 employees in Northern Italy to assess the willingness to mentor and identify the factors that affect it. Men and respondents with previous mentoring experience indicate a higher willingness to be a mentor. Willingness is affected by personal characteristics that are perceived as necessary for a mentor and the…

  8. Transcription factor-based biosensor

    DOEpatents

    Dietrich, Jeffrey A; Keasling, Jay D

    2013-10-08

    The present invention provides for a system comprising a BmoR transcription factor, a .sigma..sup.54-RNA polymerase, and a pBMO promoter operatively linked to a reporter gene, wherein the pBMO promoter is capable of expression of the reporter gene with an activated form of the BmoR and the .sigma..sup.54-RNA polymerase.

  9. Five Describing Factors of Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamboer, Peter; Vorst, Harrie C. M.; Oort, Frans J.

    2016-01-01

    Two subtypes of dyslexia (phonological, visual) have been under debate in various studies. However, the number of symptoms of dyslexia described in the literature exceeds the number of subtypes, and underlying relations remain unclear. We investigated underlying cognitive features of dyslexia with exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses. A…

  10. Risk factors for persistent diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Shahid, N S; Sack, D A; Rahman, M; Alam, A N; Rahman, N

    1988-10-22

    With a systematically sampled population of children aged under 5 attending this centre for diarrhoeal disease research during 1983-5 a retrospective analysis of persistent diarrhoea (defined as greater than 14 days' duration) was performed to identify the possible risk factors for this syndrome. Of the 4155 children included in the analysis, 410 (10%) gave a history of persistent diarrhoea. A comparison with children with acute diarrhoea matched for age showed that 11 factors were correlated with persistent diarrhoea, and strongly associated factors were stools with blood or mucus, or both, lower respiratory tract infection, malnutrition, vitamin A deficiency, and antibiotic use before presentation. The peak age was 2 years, and there was no sex difference. Deaths occurred more often in the group with persistent diarrhoea. Although Shigella spp, Campylobacter jejuni, and Giardia lamblia were frequently identified, their rates of isolation were not significantly higher among patients with persistent diarrhoea. No seasonal variation was observed in the rates of persistent diarrhoea. Although the introduction of family food to the diet was associated with higher rates, this factor was difficult to separate from the age dependent risks.

  11. Factors in Adolescent Rebellious Feelings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemens, Patricia W.; Rust, James O.

    1979-01-01

    This study examined 15- and 16-year-old youths' (Midteens') feelings of anomie and rebellion in relation to family and situational factors. Only parents' formal education level and midteens' approval of the way they were being reared correlated significantly with midteens' scores on the Anomia and Rebellion Scales. (Author/SJL)

  12. Family Factors and Student Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xia, Nailing

    2009-01-01

    There is considerable debate about the relative importance of family versus school factors in producing academic and nonacademic student outcomes, and whether and how their impacts vary across different student groups. In addition to critically reviewing and synthesizing earlier work, this study extends the literature by (a) using the ECLS-K, a…

  13. Human factors in software development

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, B.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents an overview of ergonomics/human factors in software development, recent research, and classic papers. Articles are drawn from the following areas of psychological research on programming: cognitive ergonomics, cognitive psychology, and psycholinguistics. Topics examined include: theoretical models of how programmers solve technical problems, the characteristics of programming languages, specification formats in behavioral research and psychological aspects of fault diagnosis.

  14. Factors Influencing College Science Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tai, Robert H.; Sadler, Philip M.; Mintzes, Joel J.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the authors report some of the salient findings of a large-scale, four-year national study, conducted at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, entitled "Factors Influencing College Science Success" (FICSS), which surveyed college students who enrolled in first-year biology, chemistry, and physics courses…

  15. Risk factors for persistent diarrhoea.

    PubMed Central

    Shahid, N. S.; Sack, D. A.; Rahman, M.; Alam, A. N.; Rahman, N.

    1988-01-01

    With a systematically sampled population of children aged under 5 attending this centre for diarrhoeal disease research during 1983-5 a retrospective analysis of persistent diarrhoea (defined as greater than 14 days' duration) was performed to identify the possible risk factors for this syndrome. Of the 4155 children included in the analysis, 410 (10%) gave a history of persistent diarrhoea. A comparison with children with acute diarrhoea matched for age showed that 11 factors were correlated with persistent diarrhoea, and strongly associated factors were stools with blood or mucus, or both, lower respiratory tract infection, malnutrition, vitamin A deficiency, and antibiotic use before presentation. The peak age was 2 years, and there was no sex difference. Deaths occurred more often in the group with persistent diarrhoea. Although Shigella spp, Campylobacter jejuni, and Giardia lamblia were frequently identified, their rates of isolation were not significantly higher among patients with persistent diarrhoea. No seasonal variation was observed in the rates of persistent diarrhoea. Although the introduction of family food to the diet was associated with higher rates, this factor was difficult to separate from the age dependent risks. PMID:3142603

  16. Transcription factors in alkaloid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yasuyuki; Sato, Fumihiko

    2013-01-01

    Higher plants produce a large variety of low-molecular weight secondary compounds. Among them, nitrogen-containing alkaloids are the most biologically active and are often used pharmaceutically. Whereas alkaloid chemistry has been intensively investigated, alkaloid biosynthesis, including the relevant biosynthetic enzymes, genes and their regulation, and especially transcription factors, is largely unknown, as only a limited number of plant species produce certain types of alkaloids and they are difficult to study. Recently, however, several groups have succeeded in isolating the transcription factors that are involved in the biosynthesis of several types of alkaloids, including bHLH, ERF, and WRKY. Most of them show Jasmonate (JA) responsiveness, which suggests that the JA signaling cascade plays an important role in alkaloid biosynthesis. Here, we summarize the types and functions of transcription factors that have been isolated in alkaloid biosynthesis, and characterize their similarities and differences compared to those in other secondary metabolite pathways, such as phenylpropanoid and terpenoid biosyntheses. The evolution of this biosynthetic pathway and regulatory network, as well as the application of these transcription factors to metabolic engineering, is discussed.

  17. Neurophysiological Factors in Spatial Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Lauren Jay

    Some of the major lines of investigation that point to neurophysiological factors in spatial skill are presented. These lines include: the two hemispheres of the brain, recent studies, tachistoscopic studies, morphological differences between the cerebral hemispheres, Geschwind and Levitsky's discovery, cerebral dominance re-examined, sex…

  18. Three phase power factor controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nola, F. J. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A power control circuit for a three phase induction motor is described. Power factors for the three phases are summed to provide a control signal, and this control signal is particularly filtered and then employed to control the duty cycle of each phase of input power to the motor.

  19. Three phase power factor controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nola, F. J. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A power control circuit for a three phase induction motor is described. The power factors for the three phases are summed to provide a control signal. This control signal is particularly filtered and then employed to control the duty cycle of each phase of input power to the motor.

  20. Soft Factors Influence College Enrollment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogg, Neeta P.; Harrington, Paul E.

    2010-01-01

    Evidence about the role that "soft factors" like student engagement and school environment play in influencing whether high school students go on to enroll in college is hard to come by. Over the past two years, the Center for Labor Market Studies (CLMS) of Northeastern University, with support from the Nellie Mae Education Foundation…

  1. Suicidal Adolescents: Factors in Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gispert, Maria; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Examined factors (family structure, functioning in school, suicidal risk, depression, and stressful life events) related to suicide attempts in 82 adolescents. Suicide risk correlated with current stress, while depression correlated with life-long and current stress. Results indicated most were depressed, angry, and experienced family disruption,…

  2. NASA Space Human Factors Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This booklet briefly and succinctly treats 23 topics of particular interest to the NASA Space Human Factors Program. Most articles are by different authors who are mainly NASA Johnson or NASA Ames personnel. Representative topics covered include mental workload and performance in space, light effects on Circadian rhythms, human sleep, human reasoning, microgravity effects and automation and crew performance.

  3. Factors Affecting Auditory Training Gains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreau, Roberta M.

    1980-01-01

    A study was undertaken to determine which of nine variables were most related to success in auditory training, using as Ss 43 students at the National Technical Institute for the Deaf. Findings showed that the single largest contributing factor to postcourse gain was the entering English score. (PHR)

  4. Highly parallel sparse Cholesky factorization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, John R.; Schreiber, Robert

    1990-01-01

    Several fine grained parallel algorithms were developed and compared to compute the Cholesky factorization of a sparse matrix. The experimental implementations are on the Connection Machine, a distributed memory SIMD machine whose programming model conceptually supplies one processor per data element. In contrast to special purpose algorithms in which the matrix structure conforms to the connection structure of the machine, the focus is on matrices with arbitrary sparsity structure. The most promising algorithm is one whose inner loop performs several dense factorizations simultaneously on a 2-D grid of processors. Virtually any massively parallel dense factorization algorithm can be used as the key subroutine. The sparse code attains execution rates comparable to those of the dense subroutine. Although at present architectural limitations prevent the dense factorization from realizing its potential efficiency, it is concluded that a regular data parallel architecture can be used efficiently to solve arbitrarily structured sparse problems. A performance model is also presented and it is used to analyze the algorithms.

  5. HUMAN PROSTATE CANCER RISK FACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prostate cancer has the highest prevalence of any non-skin cancer in the human body, with similar likelihood of neoplastic foci found within the prostates of men around the world regardless of diet, occupation, lifestyle, or other factors. Essentially all men with circulating an...

  6. Logistical Factors in Teachers' Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, Erika

    2016-01-01

    Research in education and psychology contributes to an understanding of how educators create contexts for learning that encourage intrinsic motivation and increase academic achievement. In this article, the researcher investigated how teachers themselves define effectiveness and identified what factors influence their motivation, both positively…

  7. Cognitive Factors in Academic Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuasay, Peter

    1992-01-01

    This review explores the factors of cognitive processing, style, and metacognitive organization as they contribute to academic success. Specific discussions consider aspects of short- and long-term memory, including how these affect learning and academic performance, and the keys to attaining long-term memory capability by involving redundancy,…

  8. 2012 Critical Success Factors Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina Community College System (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Critical Success Factors Report is the North Carolina Community College System's major accountability document. This annual performance report is based on data compiled from the previous year and serves to inform colleges and the public on the performance of North Carolina's 58 community colleges. In 1993, the State Board of Community Colleges…

  9. 2011 Critical Success Factors Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina Community College System (NJ1), 2011

    2011-01-01

    The Critical Success Factors Report is the North Carolina Community College System's major accountability document. This annual performance report serves to inform colleges and the public on the performance of North Carolina's 58 community colleges. In 1993, the State Board of Community Colleges began monitoring performance data on specific…

  10. Liver fibrogenesis and metabolic factors.

    PubMed

    Anty, Rodolphe; Lemoine, Maud

    2011-06-01

    Mechanisms of liver fibrosis are complex and varied. Among them, metabolic factors are particularly important in the development of fibrosis associated with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). These factors are some of the "multiple parallel hits" responsible for liver damage during NASH. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. Major profibrogenic protagonists, such as hepatic stellate cells and Kupffer cells, are activated by insulin resistance, apoptosis and local inflammation. Relations between steatosis, insulin resistance and fibrosis are complex. Initially, simple steatosis may be a way to store deleterious free fatty acid in neutral triglycerides. If the lipid storage threshold is exceeded, steatosis may become associated with lipotoxicity. Similarly, interindividual variations of adipose tissue expandability might explain various phenotypes, ranging from "metabolically obese patients with normal weight" to "metabolically normal morbidly obese patients". The metabolic abnormalities in subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue are insulin resistance and low-grade inflammation, which are associated with increased release of free fatty acid flux and changes in adipocytokines production such as leptin, adiponectin and interleukin 6. The nuclear transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) and the endocannabinoid system might have important roles in liver fibrogenesis and are potential therapeutic targets. Finally, with the development of new molecular tools, gut microbiota has been recently identified for its pleiotropic functions, including metabolism regulation. Better knowledge of these mechanisms should lead to new strategies for the treatment of metabolic factors that play a key role in liver injuries.

  11. Time dependent view factor methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, R.C.

    1998-03-01

    View factors have been used for treating radiation transport between opaque surfaces bounding a transparent medium for several decades. However, in recent years they have been applied to problems involving intense bursts of radiation in enclosed volumes such as in the laser fusion hohlraums. In these problems, several aspects require treatment of time dependence.

  12. Psychological Risk Factors in Headache

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, Robert A.; Houle, Timothy T.; Rhudy, Jamie L.; Norton, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    Headache is a chronic disease that occurs with varying frequency and results in varying levels of disability. To date, the majority of research and clinical focus has been on the role of biological factors in headache and headache-related disability. However, reliance on a purely biomedical model of headache does not account for all aspects of headache and associated disability. Using a biopsychosocial framework, the current manuscript expands the view of what factors influence headache by considering the role psychological (i.e., cognitive and affective) factors have in the development, course, and consequences of headache. The manuscript initially reviews evidence showing that neural circuits responsible for cognitive–affective phenomena are highly interconnected with the circuitry responsible for headache pain. The manuscript then reviews the influence cognitions (locus of control and self-efficacy) and negative affect (depression, anxiety, and anger) have on the development of headache attacks, perception of headache pain, adherence to prescribed treatment, headache treatment outcome, and headache-related disability. The manuscript concludes with a discussion of the clinical implications of considering psychological factors when treating headache. PMID:17371358

  13. Residue-based scattering factors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hongliang

    2016-11-01

    A glob is defined as a group of atoms in the crystal which can be chosen in various ways. Globs themselves can be used as scattering elements in the theory of structure determination, just as atoms are used at present. In this paper, amino-acid residues are chosen to form globs and empirical formulas for residue-based scattering factors have been developed.

  14. Peak compression factor of proteins.

    PubMed

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges

    2009-08-14

    An experimental protocol is proposed in order to measure with accuracy and precision the band compression factor G(12)(2) of a protein in gradient RPLC. Extra-column contributions to bandwidth and the dependency of both the retention factor and the reduced height equivalent to a theoretical plate (HETP) on the mobile phase composition were taken into account. The band compression factor of a small protein (insulin, MW kDa) was measured on a 2.1mm x 50mm column packed with 1.7 microm C(4)-bonded bridged ethylsiloxane BEH-silica particles, for 1 microL samples of dilute insulin solution (<0.05g/L). A linear gradient profile of acetonitrile (25-28% acetonitrile in water containing 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid) was applied during three different gradient times (5, 12.5, and 20 min). The mobile phase flow rate was set at 0.20 mL/min in order to avoid heat friction effects (maximum column inlet pressure 180 bar). The band compression factor of insulin is defined as the ratio of the experimental space band variance measured under gradient conditions to the reference space band variance, which would be observed if no thermodynamic compression would take place during gradient elution. It was 0.56, 0.71, and 0.76 with gradient times of 5, 12.5, and 20 min, respectively. These factors are 20-30% smaller than the theoretical band compression factors (0.79, 0.89, and 0.93) calculated from an equation derived from the well-known Poppe equation, later extended to any retention models and columns whose HETP depends on the mobile phase composition. This difference is explained in part by the omission in the model of the effect of the pressure gradient on the local retention factor of insulin during gradient elution. A much better agreement is obtained for insulin when this effect is taken into account. For lower molecular weight compounds, the pressure gradient has little effect but the finite retention of acetonitrile causes a distortion of the gradient shape during the migration of

  15. Differential roles of prostaglandin E-type receptors in activation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 by prostaglandin E1 in vascular-derived cells under non-hypoxic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Kengo; Nishi, Kenichiro; Takabuchi, Satoshi; Kai, Shinichi; Matsuyama, Tomonori; Kurosawa, Shin; Adachi, Takehiko; Maruyama, Takayuki; Fukuda, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Prostaglandin E1 (PGE1), known pharmaceutically as alprostadil, has vasodilatory properties and is used widely in various clinical settings. In addition to acute vasodilatory properties, PGE1 may exert beneficial effects by altering protein expression of vascular cells. PGE1 is reported to be a potent stimulator of angiogenesis via upregulation of VEGF expression, which is under the control of the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1). However, the molecular mechanisms behind the phenomenon are largely unknown. In the present study, we investigated the mechanism by which PGE1 induces HIF-1 activation and VEGF gene expression in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), both vascular-derived cells. HUVECs and HASMCs were treated with PGE1 at clinically relevant concentrations under 20% O2 conditions and HIF-1 protein expression was investigated. Expression of HIF- 1α protein and the HIF-1-downstream genes were low under 20% O2 conditions and increased in response to PGE1 treatment in both HUVECs and HASMCs in a dose- and time-dependent manner under 20% O2 conditions as comparable to exposure to 1% O2 conditions. Studies using EP-receptor-specific agonists and antagonists revealed that EP1 and EP3 are critical to PGE1-induced HIF-1 activation. In vitro vascular permeability assays using HUVECs indicated that PGE1 increased vascular permeability in HUVECs. Thus, we demonstrate that PGE1 induces HIF- 1α protein expression and HIF-1 activation under non-hypoxic conditions and also provide evidence that the activity of multiple signal transduction pathways downstream of EP1 and EP3 receptors is required for HIF-1 activation. PMID:24349900

  16. Motivating factors among Iranian nurses

    PubMed Central

    Negarandeh, Reza; Dehghan-Nayeri, Nahid; Ghasemi, Elham

    2015-01-01

    Background: One of the most important challenges of Iranian health care system is “quality of care,” and it is assumed that motivated nurses are more ready to provide better care. There are limited studies investigating Iranian nurses’ motivations; however, factors which motivate them have not been studied yet. Identifying the motivating factors enables nurse managers to inspire nurses for continuous quality improvement. The aim of this study was to identify motivating factors for Iranian hospital nurses. Materials and Methods: This is a cross-sectional descriptive study in which 310 nurses working at 14 hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Sciences were selected by proportionate stratified random sampling. Data were collected in 2010 by a researcher-developed questionnaire. Descriptive statistics and independent t-test, analysis of variance, Tukey post-hoc test, Chi-Square and Fisher's exact test were used for statistical analysis by Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 16. Results: The mean score of motivation was 90.53 ± 10.76 (range: 59–121). Four motivating factors including “career development” (22.63 ± 5.66), “job characteristics” (34.29 ± 4), “job authority” (18.48 ± 2.79), and “recognition” (15.12 ± 2.5) were recognized. The least mean of the motivation score, considering the number of items, was 3.23 for career development, while the highest mean was 3.81 for job characteristics. Conclusions: The findings showed that motivation of nurses was at a medium level, which calls for improvement. The factors that have the greatest potential to motivate nurses were identified in this study and they can help managers to achieve the goal of continuous quality improvement. PMID:26257797

  17. Prognostic factors in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Braeckman, Johan; Michielsen, Dirk

    2007-01-01

    In the nineteenth century the main goal of medicine was predictive: diagnose the disease and achieve a satisfying prognosis of the patient's chances. Today the effort has shifted to cure the disease. Since the twentieth century, the word prognosis has also been used in nonmedical contexts, for example in corporate finance or elections. The most accurate form of prognosis is achieved statistically. Based on different prognostic factors it should be possible to tell patients how they are expected to do after prostate cancer has been diagnosed and how different treatments may change this outcome. A prognosis is a prediction. The word prognosis comes from the Greek word (see text) and means foreknowing. In the nineteenth century this was the main goal of medicine: diagnose the disease and achieve a satisfying prognosis of the patient's chances. Today the effort has shifted towards seeking a cure. Prognostic factors in (prostate) cancer are defined as "variables that can account for some of the heterogeneity associated with the expected course and outcome of a disease". Bailey defined prognosis as "a reasoned forecast concerning the course, pattern, progression, duration, and end of the disease. Prognostic factors are not only essential to understand the natural history and the course of the disease, but also to predict possible different outcomes of different treatments or perhaps no treatment at all. This is extremely important in a disease like prostate cancer where there is clear evidence that a substantial number of cases discovered by prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing are unlikely ever to become clinically significant, not to mention mortal. Furthermore, prognostic factors are of paramount importance for correct interpretation of clinical trials and for the construction of future trials. Finally, according to WHO national screening committee criteria for implementing a national screening programme, widely accepted prognostic factors must be defined before

  18. Factors influencing permanent teeth eruption. Part one--general factors.

    PubMed

    Almonaitiene, Ruta; Balciuniene, Irena; Tutkuviene, Janina

    2010-01-01

    Variation in the normal eruption of teeth is a common finding, but significant deviation from established norms should alert the clinician to take some diagnostic procedures in order to evaluate patient health and development. Disturbance in tooth eruption time could be a symptom of general condition or indication of altered physiology and craniofacial development. The aim of this review is to analyze general factors that could influence permanent teeth eruption. The articles from 1965 to 2009 in English related to topic were identified. 84 articles were selected for data collection. Although permanent teeth eruption is under significant genetic control, various general factors such as gender, socioeconomic status, craniofacial morphology, body composition can influence this process. Most significant disturbance in teeth emergence is caused by systemic diseases and syndromes.

  19. Sequential coagulation factor VIIa domain binding to tissue factor

    SciTech Connect

    Oesterlund, Maria; Persson, Egon; Freskgard, Per-Ola . E-mail: msv@ifm.liu.se

    2005-12-02

    Vessel wall tissue factor (TF) is exposed to blood upon vascular damage which enables association with factor VIIa (FVIIa). This leads to initiation of the blood coagulation cascade through localization and allosteric induction of FVIIa procoagulant activity. To examine the docking pathway of the FVIIa-TF complex, various residues in the extracellular part of TF (sTF) that are known to interact with FVIIa were replaced with cysteines labelled with a fluorescent probe. By using stopped-flow fluorescence kinetic measurements in combination with surface plasmon resonance analysis, we studied the association of the resulting sTF variants with FVIIa. We found the docking trajectory to be a sequence of events in which the protease domain of FVIIa initiates contact with sTF. Thereafter, the two proteins are tethered via the first epidermal growth factor-like and finally the {gamma}-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain. The two labelled sTF residues interacting with the protease domain of FVIIa bind or become eventually ordered at different rates, revealing kinetic details pertinent to the allosteric activation of FVIIa by sTF. Moreover, when the Gla domain of FVIIa is removed the difference in the rate of association for the remaining domains is much more pronounced.

  20. [Risk factors and protective factors of the insanities].

    PubMed

    Clément, Jean-Pierre

    2007-12-01

    The Alzheimer's disease (AD) is multifactorial. How to explain this group of very heterogeneous factors? Many of them can be considered as biopsychosocial risk factors. In other words, the risk factors, in link with the physiological functioning and a physiopathology, are difficultly dissociable of contingencies of psychological and/or social nature. The vital lead could be the stress bound to these variables, be it biological or psychosocial. It remains to ask the question of the preventive efficiency of treatments to relieve the impact of the traumatizing events of life that entail a depressive state or a state of posttraumatic stress. The hippocamp has to be the object of a quite particular attention. AD is a disease of the adaptation. This integrative model combines three vulnerabilities: a genetic vulnerability which would be there to dictate the type of lesions, their localization and the age of occurence; a psychobiographic vulnerability corresponding to a personality with inadequate mechanisms of defence, precarious adaptability in front of the adversity, weak impact strength and biography built on events of life during childhood, then during the grown-up life of traumatic nature, with a psychosocial environment insufficiently auxiliary; a neuroendocrinologic vulnerability which would base on a deregulation of the corticotrope axis, acquired during its infantile maturation, hampered by too premature stress. It would lead to a bad biological adaptability in stress later, at the origin of the observable lesions in the insanities.

  1. Transgenic mice demonstrate that epithelial homing of gamma/delta T cells is determined by cell lineages independent of T cell receptor specificity

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    gamma/delta T cells with different TCR repertoires are compartmentalized in different epithelia. This raises the possibility that the TCR-gamma/delta directs homing of T cells to these epithelia. Alternatively, the signals that induce TCR-gamma/delta expression in developing T cells may also induce homing properties in such cells, presumably in the form of cell surface receptors. We have examined this issue by studying the homing of gamma/delta T cells in transgenic mice constructed with specific pairs of rearranged gamma and delta genes. In such mice, most gamma/delta T cells express the transgene-encoded TCR. We find that homing to both skin and gut epithelia is a property of T cells and is not determined by the type of gamma and delta genes used to encode their TCR. We also studied the effect of TCR replacement on the expression of Thy-1 and CD8 proteins on the gamma/delta T cells associated with gut epithelia. Our results show that the expression of the appropriate type of TCR-gamma/delta is not required for the Thy-1 expression by these T cells, suggesting that Thy-1 is not an activation marker. In contrast, CD8 expression by gut gamma/delta T cells seems to depend on the expression of the appropriate type of TCR. PMID:2109035

  2. In Silico Prediction and Experimental Confirmation of HA Residues Conferring Enhanced Human Receptor Specificity of H5N1 Influenza A Viruses.

    PubMed

    Schmier, Sonja; Mostafa, Ahmed; Haarmann, Thomas; Bannert, Norbert; Ziebuhr, John; Veljkovic, Veljko; Dietrich, Ursula; Pleschka, Stephan

    2015-06-19

    Newly emerging influenza A viruses (IAV) pose a major threat to human health by causing seasonal epidemics and/or pandemics, the latter often facilitated by the lack of pre-existing immunity in the general population. Early recognition of candidate pandemic influenza viruses (CPIV) is of crucial importance for restricting virus transmission and developing appropriate therapeutic and prophylactic strategies including effective vaccines. Often, the pandemic potential of newly emerging IAV is only fully recognized once the virus starts to spread efficiently causing serious disease in humans. Here, we used a novel phylogenetic algorithm based on the informational spectrum method (ISM) to identify potential CPIV by predicting mutations in the viral hemagglutinin (HA) gene that are likely to (differentially) affect critical interactions between the HA protein and target cells from bird and human origin, respectively. Predictions were subsequently validated by generating pseudotyped retrovirus particles and genetically engineered IAV containing these mutations and characterizing potential effects on virus entry and replication in cells expressing human and avian IAV receptors, respectively. Our data suggest that the ISM-based algorithm is suitable to identify CPIV among IAV strains that are circulating in animal hosts and thus may be a new tool for assessing pandemic risks associated with specific strains.

  3. In Silico Prediction and Experimental Confirmation of HA Residues Conferring Enhanced Human Receptor Specificity of H5N1 Influenza A Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Schmier, Sonja; Mostafa, Ahmed; Haarmann, Thomas; Bannert, Norbert; Ziebuhr, John; Veljkovic, Veljko; Dietrich, Ursula; Pleschka, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Newly emerging influenza A viruses (IAV) pose a major threat to human health by causing seasonal epidemics and/or pandemics, the latter often facilitated by the lack of pre-existing immunity in the general population. Early recognition of candidate pandemic influenza viruses (CPIV) is of crucial importance for restricting virus transmission and developing appropriate therapeutic and prophylactic strategies including effective vaccines. Often, the pandemic potential of newly emerging IAV is only fully recognized once the virus starts to spread efficiently causing serious disease in humans. Here, we used a novel phylogenetic algorithm based on the informational spectrum method (ISM) to identify potential CPIV by predicting mutations in the viral hemagglutinin (HA) gene that are likely to (differentially) affect critical interactions between the HA protein and target cells from bird and human origin, respectively. Predictions were subsequently validated by generating pseudotyped retrovirus particles and genetically engineered IAV containing these mutations and characterizing potential effects on virus entry and replication in cells expressing human and avian IAV receptors, respectively. Our data suggest that the ISM-based algorithm is suitable to identify CPIV among IAV strains that are circulating in animal hosts and thus may be a new tool for assessing pandemic risks associated with specific strains. PMID:26091504

  4. Combined Mitigation of the Gastrointestinal and Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndromes by a Novel LPA2 Receptor-specific Non-lipid Agonist

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Renukadevi; Szabó, Erzsébet; Fells, James I.; Balogh, Andrea; Lim, Keng G.; Fujiwara, Yuko; Norman, Derek B.; Lee, Sue-Chin; Balazs, Louisa; Thomas, Fridtjof; Patil, Shivaputra; Emmons-Thompson, Karin; Boler, Alyssa; Strobos, Jur; McCool, Shannon W.; Yates, C. Ryan; Stabenow, Jennifer; Byrne, Gerrald I.; Miller, Duane D.; Tigyi, Gábor J.

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacological mitigation of injuries caused by high-dose ionizing radiation is an unsolved medical problem. A specific nonlipid agonists of the type 2 GPCR for lysophosphatidic acid (LPA2) 2-[4-(1,3-Dioxo-1H,3H-benzoisoquinolin-2-yl)butylsulfamoyl]benzoic acid (DBIBB) when administered with a postirradiation delay up to 72 hours reduced mortality of C57BL/6 mice but not in LPA2 KO mice. DBIBB mitigated the gastrointestinal radiation syndrome, increased intestinal crypt survival and enterocyte proliferation, and reduced apoptosis. DBIBB enhanced DNA repair by augmenting the resolution of γ–H2AX foci, increased clonogenic survival of irradiated IEC-6 cells, attenuated the radiation-induced death of human CD34+ hematopoietic progenitors and enhanced the survival of the granulocyte/macrophage lineage. DBIBB also increased the survival of mice suffering of the hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome after total body irradiation. DBIBB represents the first drug candidate capable of mitigating acute radiation syndrome caused by high-dose γ-radiation to the hematopoietic and gastrointestinal system. PMID:25619933

  5. A Comparison of D2 Receptor Specific Binding in Obese and Normal-weight Individuals Using PET with (N-[11C]methyl)benperidol

    PubMed Central

    Eisenstein, Sarah A.; Antenor-Dorsey, Jo Ann V.; Gredysa, Danuta M.; Koller, Jonathan M.; Bihun, Emily C.; Ranck, Samantha A.; Arbeláez, Ana Maria; Klein, Samuel; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Moerlein, Stephen M.; Black, Kevin J.; Hershey, Tamara

    2013-01-01

    Previous PET imaging studies have demonstrated mixed findings regarding dopamine D2/D3 receptor availability in obese relative to non-obese humans. Nonspecific D2/D3 radioligands do not allow for separate estimation of D2 receptor (D2R) and D3 receptor (D3R) subtypes of the D2 receptor family, which may play different roles in behavior and are distributed differently throughout the brain. These radioligands are also displaceable by endogenous dopamine, confounding interpretation of differences in receptor availability with differing levels of dopamine release. The present study used PET imaging with the D2R-selective radioligand (N-[11C] methyl)benperidol ([11C]NMB), which is non-displaceable by endogenous dopamine, to estimate D2R specific binding (BPND) and its relationship to body mass index (BMI) and age in 15 normal-weight (mean BMI = 22.6 kg/m2) and 15 obese (mean BMI = 40.3 kg/m2) men and women. Subjects with illnesses or taking medications that interfere with dopamine signaling were excluded. Striatal D2R BPND was calculated using the Logan graphical method with cerebellum as a reference region. D2R BPND estimates were higher in putamen and caudate relative to nucleus accumbens, but did not differ between normal-weight and obese groups. BMI values did not correlate with D2R BPND. Age was negatively correlated with putamen D2R BPND in both groups. These results suggest that altered D2R specific binding is not involved in the pathogenesis of obesity per se and underscore the need for additional studies evaluating the relationship between D3R, dopamine reuptake, or endogenous dopamine release and human obesity. PMID:23650017

  6. A comparison of D2 receptor specific binding in obese and normal-weight individuals using PET with (N-[(11)C]methyl)benperidol.

    PubMed

    Eisenstein, Sarah A; Antenor-Dorsey, Jo Ann V; Gredysa, Danuta M; Koller, Jonathan M; Bihun, Emily C; Ranck, Samantha A; Arbeláez, Ana Maria; Klein, Samuel; Perlmutter, Joel S; Moerlein, Stephen M; Black, Kevin J; Hershey, Tamara

    2013-11-01

    Previous PET imaging studies have demonstrated mixed findings regarding dopamine D2/D3 receptor availability in obese relative to nonobese humans. Nonspecific D2/D3 radioligands do not allow for separate estimation of D2 receptor (D2R) and D3 receptor (D3R) subtypes of the D2 receptor family, which may play different roles in behavior and are distributed differently throughout the brain. These radioligands are also displaceable by endogenous dopamine, confounding interpretation of differences in receptor availability with differing levels of dopamine release. The present study used PET imaging with the D2R-selective radioligand (N-[(11)C] methyl)benperidol ([(11)C]NMB), which is nondisplaceable by endogenous dopamine, to estimate D2R specific binding (BPND) and its relationship to body mass index (BMI) and age in 15 normal-weight (mean BMI = 22.6 kg/m(2)) and 15 obese (mean BMI = 40.3 kg/m(2)) men and women. Subjects with illnesses or taking medications that interfere with dopamine signaling were excluded. Striatal D2R BPND was calculated using the Logan graphical method with cerebellum as a reference region. D2R BPND estimates were higher in putamen and caudate relative to nucleus accumbens, but did not differ between normal-weight and obese groups. BMI values did not correlate with D2R BPND . Age was negatively correlated with putamen D2R BPND in both groups. These results suggest that altered D2R specific binding is not involved in the pathogenesis of obesity per se and underscore the need for additional studies evaluating the relationship between D3R, dopamine reuptake, or endogenous dopamine release and human obesity.

  7. Mitogen-activated protein kinase activity is involved in effector functions triggered by the CD94/NKG2-C NK receptor specific for HLA-E.

    PubMed

    Carretero, M; Llano, M; Navarro, F; Bellón, T; López-Botet, M

    2000-10-01

    The CD94/NKG2C heterodimer constitutes an activating receptor involved in NK cell-mediated recognition of the class lb molecule HLA-E. It transduces the triggering signal through an ITAM-bearing molecule, DAP12/KARAP, coupled non-covalently to the receptor. Here we show that specific engagement of the receptor complex expressed on the surface of an NK clone induced the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). By the use of the MEK inhibitor PD098059 we demonstrate that the MAPK pathway participates in the CD94-dependent TNF-alpha production and cytotoxicity. Moreover, we transferred the activating function by transfection of the heterologous RBL cell line with CD94/NKG2-C/DAP12. In this system, cross-linking of the receptor induced calcium mobilization, serotonin release and phosphorylation of MAPK.

  8. Lack of transmission of a human influenza virus with avian receptor specificity between ferrets is not due to decreased virus shedding but rather a lower infectivity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Kim L; Shelton, Holly; Scull, Margaret; Pickles, Raymond; Barclay, Wendy S

    2011-08-01

    Influenza virus attaches to host cells by sialic acid (SA). Human influenza viruses show preferential affinity for α2,6-linked SA, whereas avian influenza viruses bind α2,3-linked SA. In this study, mutation of the haemagglutinin receptor-binding site of a human H3N2 influenza A virus to switch binding to α2,3-linked SA did not eliminate infection of ferrets but prevented transmission, even in a co-housed model. The mutant virus was shed from the noses of ferrets directly inoculated with virus in the same amounts and for the same length of time as wild-type virus. Mutant virus infection was localized to the same anatomical regions of the upper respiratory tract of directly inoculated animals. Interestingly, wild-type virus was more readily neutralized than the mutant virus in vitro by ferret nasal washes containing mucus. Moreover after inoculation of equal doses, the mutant virus grew poorly in ex vivo ferret nasal turbinate tissue compared with wild-type virus. The dose of mutant virus required to establish infection in the directly inoculated ferrets was 40-fold higher than for wild-type virus. It was concluded that minimum infectious dose is a predictor of virus transmissibility and it is suggested that, as virus passes from one host to another through stringent environmental conditions, viruses with a preference for α2,3-linked SA are unlikely to inoculate a new mammalian host in sufficient quantities to initiate a productive infection.

  9. Conserved Anti-Müllerian Hormone: Anti-Müllerian Hormone Type-2 Receptor Specific Interaction and Intracellular Signaling in Teleosts.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Ana; Zanuy, Silvia; Gómez, Ana

    2016-06-01

    In higher vertebrates, anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) is required for Müllerian duct regression in fetal males. AMH is also produced during postnatal life in both sexes regulating steroidogenesis and early stages of folliculogenesis. Teleosts lack Müllerian ducts, but Amh has been identified in several species including European sea bass. However, information on Amh type-2 receptor (Amhr2), the specific receptor for Amh binding, is restricted to a couple of fish species. Here, we report on cloning sea bass amhr2, the production of a recombinant sea bass Amh, and the functional analysis of this ligand-receptor couple. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that sea bass amhr2 segregates with Amhr2 from other vertebrates. This piscine receptor is capable of activating Smad proteins. Antibodies raised against sea bass Amh were used to study native and recombinant Amh, revealing proteins in the range of 66-70 kDa corresponding to the full length Amh. Once proteolytically treated, recombinant sea bass Amh generates a 12 kDa C-terminal mature protein, suggesting that contrary to what has been described for other fish Amh proteins, this protein is processed in a similar way as mammalian AMH. The mature sea bass Amh is a biologically active protein able to bind sea bass Amhr2 and, surprisingly, also human AMHR2. In prepubertal sea bass testes, Amh was detected by immunohistochemistry mostly in Sertoli cells surrounding early germ-cell generations. During spermatogenesis, a weaker staining signal could be observed in Sertoli cells surrounding spermatocytes.

  10. LBD1 of Vitellogenin Receptor Specifically Binds to the Female-Specific Storage Protein SP1 via LBR1 and LBR3

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lina; Wang, Yejing; Li, Yu; Lin, Ying; Hou, Yong; Zhang, Yan; Wei, Shuguang; Zhao, Peng; Zhao, Ping; He, Huawei

    2016-01-01

    Storage proteins are the major protein synthesized in the fat body, released into hemolymph and re-sequestered into the fat body before pupation in most insect species. Storage proteins are important amino acid and nutrition resources during the non-feeding pupal period and play essential roles for the metamorphosis and oogenesis of insects. The sequestration of storage protein is a selective, specific receptor-mediated process. However, to date, the potential receptor mediating the sequestration of storage protein has not been determined in Bombyx mori. In this study, we expressed and purified the first ligand binding domain of Bombyx mori vitellogenin receptor (BmVgR), LBD1, and found LBD1 could bind with an unknown protein from the hemolymph of the ultimate silkworm larval instar via pull-down assay. This unknown protein was subsequently identified to be the female-specific storage protein SP1 by mass spectrometry. Furthermore, far western blotting assay, immunoprecipitation and isothermal titration calorimetry analysis demonstrated LBD1 specifically bound with the female-specific SP1, rather than another unisex storage protein SP2. The specific binding of LBD1 with SP1 was dependent on the presence of Ca2+ as it was essential for the proper conformation of LBD1. Deletion mutagenesis and ITC analysis revealed the first and third ligand binding repeats LBR1 and LBR3 were indispensable for the binding of LBD1 with SP1, and LBR2 and LBR4 also had a certain contribution to the specific binding. Our results implied BmVgR may mediate the sequestration of SP1 from hemolymph into the fat body during the larval-pupal transformation of Bombyx mori. PMID:27637099

  11. Assessment of hormone-like activities in Ginkgo biloba, Elettaria cardamomum and Plantago ovata extracts using in vitro receptor-specific bioassays.

    PubMed

    Real, Macarena; Molina-Molina, José-Manuel; Jimenez, Jesús; Diéguez, Horacio R; Fernández, Mariana F; Olea, Nicolás

    2015-01-01

    Medicinal plants are widely used for the treatment of diseases and for the development of new drugs. This study was designed to determine the presence of hormone-like activities dependent on the activation of human estrogen receptor alpha (hERa) and/or androgen receptor (hAR) in methanol extracts prepared from three medicinal plants historically and currently used for therapeutic purposes: Ginkgo biloba leaves (GBL), Elettaria cardamomum seeds (ECS) and Plantago ovata seeds (POS). After a solid-liquid extraction (SLE) step, their effects on hERa function were assessed in MCF-7 breast cancer cells using the E-Screen bioassay, and their ability to induce hAR-mediated reporter gene expression was evaluated using the androgen-sensitive stable prostatic PALM cell line. Unlike POS extracts, GBL and ECS extracts showed estrogenic (0.07 and 0.20 nM E2Eq mg(-1), respectively) and anti-estrogenic (0.01 and 0.02 μM ICI182780Eq mg(-1), respectively) activities. ECS extracts evidenced androgenic activity (0.30 nM R1881Eq mg(-1)) and POS extracts anti-androgenic activity (22.30 μM ProcEq mg(-1)). According to these findings, these plant extracts may interfere with the endocrine system via one or more hormonal receptors, and further investigation is warranted into their role as endocrine disrupters in humans.

  12. Modular Integration of Upconverting Nanocrystal-Dendrimer Composites for Folate Receptor-Specific NIR Imaging and Light-Triggered Drug Release.

    PubMed

    Wong, Pamela T; Chen, Dexin; Tang, Shengzhuang; Yanik, Sean; Payne, Michael; Mukherjee, Jhindan; Coulter, Alexa; Tang, Kenny; Tao, Ke; Sun, Kang; Baker, James R; Choi, Seok Ki

    2015-12-02

    Upconversion nanocrystals (UCNs) display near-infrared (NIR)-responsive photoluminescent properties for NIR imaging and drug delivery. The development of effective strategies for UCN integration with other complementary nanostructures for targeting and drug conjugation is highly desirable. This study reports on a core/shell-based theranostic system designed by UCN integration with a folate (FA)-conjugated dendrimer for tumor targeting and with photocaged doxorubicin as a cytotoxic agent. Two types of UCNs (NaYF4:Yb/Er (or Yb/Tm); diameter = ≈50 to 54 nm) are described, each displaying distinct emission properties upon NIR (980 nm) excitation. The UCNs are surface modified through covalent attachment of photocaged doxorubicin (ONB-Dox) and a multivalent FA-conjugated polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer G5(FA)6 to prepare UCN@(ONB-Dox)(G5FA). Surface plasmon resonance experiments performed with G5(FA)6 dendrimer alone show nanomolar binding avidity (KD = 5.9 × 10(-9) M) to the folate binding protein. This dendrimer binding corresponds with selective binding and uptake of UCN@(ONB-Dox)(G5FA) by FAR-positive KB carcinoma cells in vitro. Furthermore, UCN@(ONB-Dox)(G5FA) treatment of FAR(+) KB cells inhibits cell growth in a light dependent manner. These results validate the utility of modularly integrated UCN-dendrimer nanocomposites for cell type specific NIR imaging and light-controlled drug release, thus serving as a new theranostic system.

  13. Neuroprotection by Exendin-4 Is GLP-1 Receptor Specific but DA D3 Receptor Dependent, Causing Altered BrdU Incorporation in Subventricular Zone and Substantia Nigra

    PubMed Central

    Harkavyi, A.; Rampersaud, N.; Whitton, P. S.

    2013-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) activation by exendin-4 (EX-4) is effective in preclinical models of Parkinson's disease (PD) and appears to promote neurogenesis even in severely lesioned rats. In the present study, we determined the effects of EX-4 on cellular BrdU incorporation in the rat subventricular zone (SVZ) and substantia nigra (SN). We also determined the specificity of this effect with the GLP-1R antagonist EX-(9-39) as well as the potential role of dopamine (DA) D3 receptors. Rats were administered 6-OHDA and 1 week later given EX-4 alone, with EX-(9-39) or nafadotride (D3 antagonist) and BrdU. Seven days later, rats were challenged with apomorphine to evaluate circling. Extracellular DA was measured using striatal microdialysis and subsequently tissue DA measured. Tyrosine hydroxylase and BrdU were verified using immunohistochemistry. Apomorphine circling was reversed by EX-4 in lesioned rats, an effect reduced by EX-4, while both EX-(9-39) and NAF attenuated this. 6-OHDA decreased extracellular and tissue DA, both reversed by EX-4 but again attenuated by EX-(9-39) or NAF. Analysis of BrdU+ cells in the SVZ revealed increases in 6-OHDA-treated rats which were reversed by EX-4 and antagonised by either EX-(9-39) or NAF, while in the SN the opposite profile was seen. PMID:26316987

  14. In Silico Prediction and Experimental Confirmation of HA Residues Conferring Enhanced Human Receptor Specificity of H5N1 Influenza A Viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmier, Sonja; Mostafa, Ahmed; Haarmann, Thomas; Bannert, Norbert; Ziebuhr, John; Veljkovic, Veljko; Dietrich, Ursula; Pleschka, Stephan

    2015-06-01

    Newly emerging influenza A viruses (IAV) pose a major threat to human health by causing seasonal epidemics and/or pandemics, the latter often facilitated by the lack of pre-existing immunity in the general population. Early recognition of candidate pandemic influenza viruses (CPIV) is of crucial importance for restricting virus transmission and developing appropriate therapeutic and prophylactic strategies including effective vaccines. Often, the pandemic potential of newly emerging IAV is only fully recognized once the virus starts to spread efficiently causing serious disease in humans. Here, we used a novel phylogenetic algorithm based on the informational spectrum method (ISM) to identify potential CPIV by predicting mutations in the viral hemagglutinin (HA) gene that are likely to (differentially) affect critical interactions between the HA protein and target cells from bird and human origin, respectively. Predictions were subsequently validated by generating pseudotyped retrovirus particles and genetically engineered IAV containing these mutations and characterizing potential effects on virus entry and replication in cells expressing human and avian IAV receptors, respectively. Our data suggest that the ISM-based algorithm is suitable to identify CPIV among IAV strains that are circulating in animal hosts and thus may be a new tool for assessing pandemic risks associated with specific strains.

  15. Factors influencing susceptibility to metals.

    PubMed Central

    Gochfeld, M

    1997-01-01

    Although the long-neglected field of human susceptibility to environmental toxicants is currently receiving renewed attention, there is only scant literature on factors influencing susceptibility to heavy metals. Genetic factors may influence the availability of sulfhydryl-containing compounds such as glutathione and metallothionein, which modify the distribution and toxicity of certain metals. Age and gender play a role in modifying uptake and distribution, although the mechanisms are often obscure. Concurrent exposure to divalent cations may enhance or reduce the toxicity of certain metals through competition for receptor-mediated transport or targets. Increasing use of biomarkers of exposure should greatly increase our understanding of the underlying distribution of susceptibility to various environmental agents. PMID:9255566

  16. Factors Impacting Decommissioning Costs - 13576

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Karen; McGrath, Richard

    2013-07-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) studied United States experience with decommissioning cost estimates and the factors that impact the actual cost of decommissioning projects. This study gathered available estimated and actual decommissioning costs from eight nuclear power plants in the United States to understand the major components of decommissioning costs. Major costs categories for decommissioning a nuclear power plant are removal costs, radioactive waste costs, staffing costs, and other costs. The technical factors that impact the costs were analyzed based on the plants' decommissioning experiences. Detailed cost breakdowns by major projects and other cost categories from actual power plant decommissioning experiences will be presented. Such information will be useful in planning future decommissioning and designing new plants. (authors)

  17. Nutritional Factors Affecting Mental Health

    PubMed Central

    Lim, So Young; Kim, Eun Jin; Kim, Arang; Lee, Hee Jae; Choi, Hyun Jin

    2016-01-01

    Dietary intake and nutritional status of individuals are important factors affecting mental health and the development of psychiatric disorders. Majority of scientific evidence relating to mental health focuses on depression, cognitive function, and dementia, and limited evidence is available about other psychiatric disorders including schizophrenia. As life span of human being is increasing, the more the prevalence of mental disorders is, the more attention rises. Lists of suggested nutritional components that may be beneficial for mental health are omega-3 fatty acids, phospholipids, cholesterol, niacin, folate, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12. Saturated fat and simple sugar are considered detrimental to cognitive function. Evidence on the effect of cholesterol is conflicting; however, in general, blood cholesterol levels are negatively associated with the risk of depression. Collectively, the aims of this review are to introduce known nutritional factors for mental health, and to discuss recent issues of the nutritional impact on cognitive function and healthy brain aging. PMID:27482518

  18. Continuous analogues of matrix factorizations

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Alex; Trefethen, Lloyd N.

    2015-01-01

    Analogues of singular value decomposition (SVD), QR, LU and Cholesky factorizations are presented for problems in which the usual discrete matrix is replaced by a ‘quasimatrix’, continuous in one dimension, or a ‘cmatrix’, continuous in both dimensions. Two challenges arise: the generalization of the notions of triangular structure and row and column pivoting to continuous variables (required in all cases except the SVD, and far from obvious), and the convergence of the infinite series that define the cmatrix factorizations. Our generalizations of triangularity and pivoting are based on a new notion of a ‘triangular quasimatrix’. Concerning convergence of the series, we prove theorems asserting convergence provided the functions involved are sufficiently smooth. PMID:25568618

  19. Human factors in contingency operations.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Simon J; Khan, M A; Scott, T; Matthews, J J; Henning, Dcw; Stapley, S

    2016-06-10

    The UK Defence Medical Services are currently supporting contingency operations following a period of intensive activity in relatively mature trauma systems in Iraq and Afghanistan. Among the key lessons identified, human factors or non-technical skills played an important role in the improvement of patient care. This article describes the importance of human factors on Role 2 Afloat, one of the Royal Navy's maritime contingency capabilities, and illustrates how they are vital to ensuring that correct decisions are made for patient care in a timely manner. Teamwork and communication are particularly important to ensure that limited resources such as blood products and other consumables are best used and that patients are evacuated promptly, allowing the facility to accept further casualties and therefore maintain operational capability. These ideas may be transferred to any small specialist team given a particular role to perform.

  20. Factors influencing pacing in triathlon.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sam Sx; Peiffer, Jeremiah J; Brisswalter, Jeanick; Nosaka, Kazunori; Abbiss, Chris R

    2014-01-01

    Triathlon is a multisport event consisting of sequential swim, cycle, and run disciplines performed over a variety of distances. This complex and unique sport requires athletes to appropriately distribute their speed or energy expenditure (ie, pacing) within each discipline as well as over the entire event. As with most physical activity, the regulation of pacing in triathlon may be influenced by a multitude of intrinsic and extrinsic factors. The majority of current research focuses mainly on the Olympic distance, whilst much less literature is available on other triathlon distances such as the sprint, half-Ironman, and Ironman distances. Furthermore, little is understood regarding the specific physiological, environmental, and interdisciplinary effects on pacing. Therefore, this article discusses the pacing strategies observed in triathlon across different distances, and elucidates the possible factors influencing pacing within the three specific disciplines of a triathlon.

  1. Factorization of chiral string amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yu-tin; Siegel, Warren; Yuan, Ellis Ye

    2016-09-01

    We re-examine a closed-string model defined by altering the boundary conditions for one handedness of two-dimensional propagators in otherwise-standard string theory. We evaluate the amplitudes using Kawai-Lewellen-Tye factorization into open-string amplitudes. The only modification to standard string theory is effectively that the spacetime Minkowski metric changes overall sign in one open-string factor. This cancels all but a finite number of states: as found in earlier approaches, with enough supersymmetry (e.g., type II) the tree amplitudes reproduce those of the massless truncation of ordinary string theory. However, we now find for the other cases that additional fields, formerly thought to be auxiliary, describe new spin-2 states at the two adjacent mass levels (tachyonic and tardyonic). The tachyon is always a ghost, but can be avoided in the heterotic case.

  2. [Environmental factors in juvenile delinquency].

    PubMed

    Barbagallo, A; Bellia, A; Benvenuto, G; Contiguglia, M A; Cosentino, F

    1975-09-12

    Experimental data are cited for the proposition that the complicated aspects of juvenile delinquency can only be understood and explained by adopting a simultaneous psychological and sociological approach. It is also shown that the manifestations of delinquency, though not its actual presence, may be influenced by sex and a depressed city or rural background. Environmental factors serving as stimulating features and hereditary (i.e. predisposing) factors undoubtedly contribute to the formation of the Ego. The former, however, are elaborated by their receipient and are not sufficient to explain a certain type of behaviour. The influence of cultural models should not be underestimated. These, where predominant, tend to render normative what may be considered as deviant.

  3. Factors contributing to adolescent obesity.

    PubMed

    Al-Kloub, Manal I; Froelicher, Erika S

    2009-06-01

    Obesity in children is a significant public health concern. The prevalence of overweight and obesity in Jordanian children, and adolescents has increased in the last decade. The consequences of obesity to health in childhood and adulthood have both medical, and economic cost to individuals and society. This paper reviews the factors that contribute to adolescent obesity and emphasizes behavioral and environmental factors. An individual's behaviors such as increased consumption of high caloric foods, increased sedentary activity while decreasing physical activity has been identified as key issues in the development of obesity. Additionally, the current environment in homes, schools, and neighborhoods tend to discourage a healthy lifestyle. A comprehensive approach that involves the whole community is the best strategy for preventing adolescent obesity. Nurses are in a unique position to provide leadership in developing programs for healthier lifestyle choices for adolescents' and adoption of these goals into their daily lives.

  4. Factors influencing pacing in triathlon

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Sam SX; Peiffer, Jeremiah J; Brisswalter, Jeanick; Nosaka, Kazunori; Abbiss, Chris R

    2014-01-01

    Triathlon is a multisport event consisting of sequential swim, cycle, and run disciplines performed over a variety of distances. This complex and unique sport requires athletes to appropriately distribute their speed or energy expenditure (ie, pacing) within each discipline as well as over the entire event. As with most physical activity, the regulation of pacing in triathlon may be influenced by a multitude of intrinsic and extrinsic factors. The majority of current research focuses mainly on the Olympic distance, whilst much less literature is available on other triathlon distances such as the sprint, half-Ironman, and Ironman distances. Furthermore, little is understood regarding the specific physiological, environmental, and interdisciplinary effects on pacing. Therefore, this article discusses the pacing strategies observed in triathlon across different distances, and elucidates the possible factors influencing pacing within the three specific disciplines of a triathlon. PMID:25258562

  5. On factorization of molecular wavefunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jecko, Thierry; Sutcliffe, Brian T.; Woolley, R. Guy

    2015-11-01

    Recently there has been a renewed interest in the chemical physics literature of factorization of the position representation eigenfunctions Φ of the molecular Schrödinger equation as originally proposed by Hunter in the 1970s. The idea is to represent Φ in the form φχ where χ is purely a function of the nuclear coordinates, while φ must depend on both electron and nuclear position variables in the problem. This is a generalization of the approximate factorization originally proposed by Born and Oppenheimer, the hope being that an ‘exact’ representation of Φ can be achieved in this form with φ and χ interpretable as ‘electronic’ and ‘nuclear’ wavefunctions respectively. We offer a mathematical analysis of these proposals that identifies ambiguities stemming mainly from the singularities in the Coulomb potential energy.

  6. Endometriosis, Angiogenesis and Tissue Factor

    PubMed Central

    Krikun, Graciela

    2012-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF), is a cellular receptor that binds the factor VII/VIIa to initiate the blood coagulation cascade. In addition to its role as the initiator of the hemostatic cascade, TF is known to be involved in angiogenesis via intracellular signaling that utilizes the protease activated receptor-2 (PAR-2). We now review the physiologic expression of TF in the endometrium and its altered expression in multiple cell types derived from eutopic and ectopic endometrium from women with endometriosis compared with normal endometrium. Our findings suggest that TF might be an ideal target for therapeutic intervention in endometriosis. We have employed a novel immunoconjugate molecule known as Icon and were able to eradicate endometrial lesions in a mouse model of endometriosis without affecting fertility. These findings have major implications for potential treatment in humans. PMID:24278684

  7. Graybody Factors and Infrared Divergences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Paul; Fabbri, Alessandro; Balbinot, Roberto; Parentani, Renaud

    2015-04-01

    A method of computing the gray-body factors for static spherically symmetric and BEC acoustic black holes using a Volterra integral equation is given. The results are used to investigate infrared divergences in the particle number, two-point function, point-split stress-energy tensor and density-density correlation function. Infrared divergences in the particle number and two-point function occur if the gray-body factor approaches a nonzero constant in the zero frequency limit, as happens for Schwarzschild-de Sitter black holes and BEC acoustic black holes. However, no infrared divergences occur in the point-split stress-energy tensor or the density-density correlation function. Supported in part by the National Science Foundation under Grant Nos. PHY-0856050 and PHY-1308325.

  8. [Preeclampsia as cardiovascular risk factor].

    PubMed

    Heida, Karst Y; Franx, Arie; Bots, Michiel L

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are the primary cause of death in women. Guidelines for identifying high-risk individuals have been developed, e.g. the Dutch Guideline on Cardiovascular Risk Management. In the most recent version of this guideline, diabetes mellitus (DM) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are cited as cardiovascular risk factors; therefore, individuals with these conditions are identified as being at high risk. As with DM and RA, there is strong evidence that the experience of having a hypertensive disorder during pregnancy is a cardiovascular risk factor. This is particularly the case for early preeclampsia, which constitutes a 7-fold increased risk of ischemic heart disease. However, in the Netherlands, there are no guidelines and there is no consensus on how to screen or treat these women. Trial evidence is therefore urgently needed to substantiate the value of cardiovascular risk management for those women with a history of hypertension during pregnancy.

  9. Mixed real/complex factorization

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, L.T.G. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Martines, N.; Pinto, H.J.C.P. . Centro de Pesquisas de Energia Electrica)

    1993-02-01

    This paper describes a mixed real/complex sparse matrix factorization and solution scheme applied to a large matrix problem. Large system eigenanalysis and frequency domain methods will directly benefit from the proposed scheme, which can reduce both memory and CPU time requirements when compared to conventional complex-only solutions. The application in hand is the small signal electromechanical stability analysis of large power systems. The savings obtained are significant considering the CPU intensive nature of these matrix problems.

  10. Factor weighting in DRASTIC modeling.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, F A L; Pires, L M G R; Santos, R M B; Sanches Fernandes, L F

    2015-02-01

    Evaluation of aquifer vulnerability comprehends the integration of very diverse data, including soil characteristics (texture), hydrologic settings (recharge), aquifer properties (hydraulic conductivity), environmental parameters (relief), and ground water quality (nitrate contamination). It is therefore a multi-geosphere problem to be handled by a multidisciplinary team. The DRASTIC model remains the most popular technique in use for aquifer vulnerability assessments. The algorithm calculates an intrinsic vulnerability index based on a weighted addition of seven factors. In many studies, the method is subject to adjustments, especially in the factor weights, to meet the particularities of the studied regions. However, adjustments made by different techniques may lead to markedly different vulnerabilities and hence to insecurity in the selection of an appropriate technique. This paper reports the comparison of 5 weighting techniques, an enterprise not attempted before. The studied area comprises 26 aquifer systems located in Portugal. The tested approaches include: the Delphi consensus (original DRASTIC, used as reference), Sensitivity Analysis, Spearman correlations, Logistic Regression and Correspondence Analysis (used as adjustment techniques). In all cases but Sensitivity Analysis, adjustment techniques have privileged the factors representing soil characteristics, hydrologic settings, aquifer properties and environmental parameters, by leveling their weights to ≈4.4, and have subordinated the factors describing the aquifer media by downgrading their weights to ≈1.5. Logistic Regression predicts the highest and Sensitivity Analysis the lowest vulnerabilities. Overall, the vulnerability indices may be separated by a maximum value of 51 points. This represents an uncertainty of 2.5 vulnerability classes, because they are 20 points wide. Given this ambiguity, the selection of a weighting technique to integrate a vulnerability index may require additional

  11. Impact fact-or fiction?

    PubMed Central

    Pulverer, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    The Journal Impact Factor dominates research assessment in many disciplines and in many countries. While research assessment will always have to rely to some extent on quantitative, standardized metrics, the focus on this single measure has gone so far as to hamper and distort scientific research. The Declaration on Research Assessment (DORA), signed by influential journals, funders, academic institutions and individuals across the natural sciences, aims to raise awareness and to redress the use of non-objective research assessment practices. PMID:23685358

  12. Congenital deficiency of factor VII.

    PubMed

    Sikka, M; Gomber, S; Madan, N; Rusia, U; Sharma, S

    1996-01-01

    A case of congenital factor VII deficiency in a five-year-old child is reported. The patient, born of a non-consanguineous marriage, presented with repeated bouts of epistaxis since childhood. The prothrombin time (PT) was markedly prolonged with a normal bleeding time (BT), partial thromboplastin time with Kaolin (PTTK) and platelet count. The patient has been on follow up for the last four years and is doing apparently well.

  13. Human Factors in Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Patricia M.; Fiedler, Edna

    2010-01-01

    The exploration of space is one of the most fascinating domains to study from a human factors perspective. Like other complex work domains such as aviation (Pritchett and Kim, 2008), air traffic management (Durso and Manning, 2008), health care (Morrow, North, and Wickens, 2006), homeland security (Cooke and Winner, 2008), and vehicle control (Lee, 2006), space exploration is a large-scale sociotechnical work domain characterized by complexity, dynamism, uncertainty, and risk in real-time operational contexts (Perrow, 1999; Woods et ai, 1994). Nearly the entire gamut of human factors issues - for example, human-automation interaction (Sheridan and Parasuraman, 2006), telerobotics, display and control design (Smith, Bennett, and Stone, 2006), usability, anthropometry (Chaffin, 2008), biomechanics (Marras and Radwin, 2006), safety engineering, emergency operations, maintenance human factors, situation awareness (Tenney and Pew, 2006), crew resource management (Salas et aI., 2006), methods for cognitive work analysis (Bisantz and Roth, 2008) and the like -- are applicable to astronauts, mission control, operational medicine, Space Shuttle manufacturing and assembly operations, and space suit designers as they are in other work domains (e.g., Bloomberg, 2003; Bos et al, 2006; Brooks and Ince, 1992; Casler and Cook, 1999; Jones, 1994; McCurdy et ai, 2006; Neerincx et aI., 2006; Olofinboba and Dorneich, 2005; Patterson, Watts-Perotti and Woods, 1999; Patterson and Woods, 2001; Seagull et ai, 2007; Sierhuis, Clancey and Sims, 2002). The human exploration of space also has unique challenges of particular interest to human factors research and practice. This chapter provides an overview of those issues and reports on sorne of the latest research results as well as the latest challenges still facing the field.

  14. Human factors in incident reporting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, S. G.

    1993-01-01

    The paper proposes a cooperative research effort be undertaken by academic institutions and industry organizations toward the compilation of a human factors data base in conjunction with technical information. Team members in any discipline can benefit and learn from observing positive examples of decision making and performance by crews under stressful or less than optimal circumstances. The opportunity to note trends in interpersonal and interactive behaviors and to categorize them is terms of more or less desirable outcomes should not be missed.

  15. Nonproductive Factor Allowance. (Pilot Study).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-31

    a separate factor for each size of facility, i.e., MEDCEN, Large MEDDAC, and Small MEDDAC. f. In a GAO audit report, "Development and Use of Military...measurement in determining and Justifying staffing requirements. g. Another GAO audit report, "Uniform Accounting and Workload Measurement Systems Needed for...Effective Writing, AFIT, Survival, TDY, Technical Training, IDEA High School, CDC and Survey Taking. Also taking tests such as PFE , SKT, AF Sup Exam, CLEP

  16. Dietary factors affecting polyphenol bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Bohn, Torsten

    2014-07-01

    While many epidemiological studies have associated the consumption of polyphenols within fruits and vegetables with a decreased risk of developing several chronic diseases, intervention studies have generally not confirmed these beneficial effects. The reasons for this discrepancy are not fully understood but include potential differences in dosing, interaction with the food matrix, and differences in polyphenol bioavailability. In addition to endogenous factors such as microbiota and digestive enzymes, the food matrix can also considerably affect bioaccessibility, uptake, and further metabolism of polyphenols. While dietary fiber (such as hemicellulose), divalent minerals, and viscous and protein-rich meals are likely to cause detrimental effects on polyphenol bioaccessibility, digestible carbohydrates, dietary lipids (especially for hydrophobic polyphenols, e.g., curcumin), and additional antioxidants may enhance polyphenol availability. Following epithelial uptake, polyphenols such as flavonoids may reduce phase II metabolism and excretion, enhancing polyphenol bioavailability. Furthermore, polyphenols may act synergistically due to their influence on efflux transporters such as p-glycoprotein. In order to understand polyphenol bioactivity, increased knowledge of the factors affecting polyphenol bioavailability, including dietary factors, is paramount.

  17. [Nutritional factors in preventing osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Martín Jiménez, Juan Antonio; Consuegra Moya, Belkis; Martín Jiménez, María Teresa

    2015-07-18

    Osteoporosis, main risk factor for suffering fragility fractures, is an important public health problem which has undoubted social, health and economic impact; but mainly causes pain, functional limitation and severe alterations in the patient's quality of life. Its current prevalence is very high and a further increase is expected due to a higher life expectancy and the progressive ageing of the population. In the prevention of osteoporosis, the main goal is to prevent fragility fractures; for this reason, it is necessary to: 1) promote bone formation in youth, to get sufficient bone mass peak, 2) reduce bone loss in adulthood, especially after menopause, 3) maintain bone health throughout life, and 4) prevent falls. There is enough evidence that multifactorial strategies (assessment of risk factors, healthy lifestyle habits, smoking cessation, moderation in alcohol consumption, physical exercise, outdoor activity with prudent exposure to sunlight, and a varied and balanced diet), are effective in the population at risk. Regarding factors for the prevention of osteoporosis, current recommendations are: increased consumption of calcium, phosphorus, magnesium and fluoride; provide adequate vitamin D (even with fortified food if necessary); consumption of foods rich in omega-3 acids; reduction of salt and prepared ready meals; sufficient but moderate intake of protein and, in the absence of intolerance, promote the consumption of milk and dairy products, especially yogurt and fermented milk products.

  18. Advances of Coagulation Factor XIII

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Da-Yu; Wang, Shu-Jie

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To provide a comprehensive literature review on roles of coagulation factor XIII (FXIII) in coagulation, wound healing, neoplasm, bone metabolism, and pregnancy. Data Sources: All articles in PubMed with key words Coagulation factor XIII, wound, leukemia, tumor, bone, and pregnancy with published date from 2001 to 2016 were included in the study. Frequently cited publications before 2000 were also included. Study Selection: We reviewed the role of FXIII in biologic processes as documented in clinical, animal, and in vitro studies. Results: FXIII, a member of the transglutaminase (TG) family, plays key roles in various biological processes. Besides its well-known function in coagulation, the cross-linking of small molecules catalyzed by FXIII has been found in studies to help promote wound healing, improve bone metabolism, and prevent miscarriages. The study has also shown that FXIII concentration level differs in the blood of patients with leukemia and solid tumors and offers promises as a diagnostic indicator. Conclusions: FXIII has many more biologic functions besides being known as coagulation factor. The TG activity of FXIII contributes to several processes, including wound healing, bone extracellular matrix stabilization, and the interaction between embryo and decidua of uterus. Further research is needed to elucidate the link between FXIII and leukemia and solid tumors. PMID:28091415

  19. [Perception of reproductive risk factors].

    PubMed

    Salinas-Martinez, A M; Martínez-Sanchez, C; Pérez-Segura, J

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify risk perception on several factors related to reproductive health, with the goal of implementing an educational intervention based on detected needs. 405 women between 12 and 44 years were interviewed at home. 62.2% perceived the risk of pregnancy at 17 years and younger; 78.8% the risk of pregnancy at 35 years and older; 76.6% the risk of parity of 5 and higher; and 55.1% the risk of birth interval of 2 years and less. 60.5% recognized family history of birth defects, 80.2% age 35 years and older, and 84.4% rubella during pregnancy, as risk factors for newborns with congenital malformations. 27.7% identified history of a low birth weight and 61.0% birth interval of 1 year and less, as risk factors for low birth weight. The majority perceived the risk of tobacco, alcohol and drugs consumption during pregnancy, diseases with no treatment and deficient nutrition. There was an inconsistent influence of social and obstetric variables on risk perception. No linear correlation was detected. Health educators should recognize differences on knowledge and behavior of future receptors before an educational intervention starts.

  20. Human Factors in Financial Trading

    PubMed Central

    Leaver, Meghan; Reader, Tom W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study tests the reliability of a system (FINANS) to collect and analyze incident reports in the financial trading domain and is guided by a human factors taxonomy used to describe error in the trading domain. Background Research indicates the utility of applying human factors theory to understand error in finance, yet empirical research is lacking. We report on the development of the first system for capturing and analyzing human factors–related issues in operational trading incidents. Method In the first study, 20 incidents are analyzed by an expert user group against a referent standard to establish the reliability of FINANS. In the second study, 750 incidents are analyzed using distribution, mean, pathway, and associative analysis to describe the data. Results Kappa scores indicate that categories within FINANS can be reliably used to identify and extract data on human factors–related problems underlying trading incidents. Approximately 1% of trades (n = 750) lead to an incident. Slip/lapse (61%), situation awareness (51%), and teamwork (40%) were found to be the most common problems underlying incidents. For the most serious incidents, problems in situation awareness and teamwork were most common. Conclusion We show that (a) experts in the trading domain can reliably and accurately code human factors in incidents, (b) 1% of trades incur error, and (c) poor teamwork skills and situation awareness underpin the most critical incidents. Application This research provides data crucial for ameliorating risk within financial trading organizations, with implications for regulation and policy. PMID:27142394

  1. Factors Affecting Radiologist's PACS Usage.

    PubMed

    Forsberg, Daniel; Rosipko, Beverly; Sunshine, Jeffrey L

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if any of the factors radiologist, examination category, time of week, and week effect PACS usage, with PACS usage defined as the sequential order of computer commands issued by a radiologist in a PACS during interpretation and dictation. We initially hypothesized that only radiologist and examination category would have significant effects on PACS usage. Command logs covering 8 weeks of PACS usage were analyzed. For each command trace (describing performed activities of an attending radiologist interpreting a single examination), the PACS usage variables number of commands, number of command classes, bigram repetitiveness, and time to read were extracted. Generalized linear models were used to determine the significance of the factors on the PACS usage variables. The statistical results confirmed the initial hypothesis that radiologist and examination category affect PACS usage and that the factors week and time of week to a large extent have no significant effect. As such, this work provides direction for continued efforts to analyze system data to better understand PACS utilization, which in turn can provide input to enable optimal utilization and configuration of corresponding systems. These continued efforts were, in this work, exemplified by a more detailed analysis using PACS usage profiles, which revealed insights directly applicable to improve PACS utilization through modified system configuration.

  2. Temporal Control of Transforming Growth Factor (TGF) - Betal Expression on Mammary Cell Multistep Transformation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-10-01

    phosphorylation of Smad2 tumors, EMT appears to be initiated by TGF-P produced and Smad3 at specific Erk consensus sites in the linker by peritumoral host...1243-1252. linker region of Smad2 and Smad3 , which, in turn, inhibit Smad accumula- Inhibition of autocrine TGF-j signaling, by expression of dominant...mediated mostly by TGF-P1 and TGF-j2 are potent immunosuppressants the receptor specific Smad2 and Smad3 proteins [47,48], [73]. Thus, elevated levels

  3. Academic Success Factors: An IT Student Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Aimao; Aasheim, Cheryl L.

    2011-01-01

    Numerous studies have identified causal factors for academic success. Factors vary from personal factors, such as cognitive style (McKenzie & Schweitzer, 2001), to social factors, such as culture differences (Aysan, Tanriogen, & Tanriogen, 1996). However, in these studies it is re-searchers who theorized the causal dimensions and…

  4. 28 CFR 51.57 - Relevant factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Relevant factors. 51.57 Section 51.57... factors. Among the factors the Attorney General will consider in making determinations with respect to the... language minority groups into account in making the change; and (e) The factors set forth in Village...

  5. 28 CFR 51.57 - Relevant factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Relevant factors. 51.57 Section 51.57... factors. Among the factors the Attorney General will consider in making determinations with respect to the... language minority groups into account in making the change; and (e) The factors set forth in Village...

  6. 14 CFR 25.619 - Special factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Special factors. 25.619 Section 25.619... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction General § 25.619 Special factors. The factor of safety prescribed in § 25.303 must be multiplied by the highest pertinent special factor of...

  7. 24 CFR 598.305 - Designation factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Designation factors. 598.305... Designation Process § 598.305 Designation factors. In choosing among nominated urban areas eligible for... connection with the strategic plan (see § 598.215(b)); and (c) Other factors. Other factors established...

  8. 5 CFR 841.404 - Demographic factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Demographic factors. 841.404 Section 841... factors. (a) The Office of Personnel Management (OPM) will consider the factors listed below in determining normal cost percentages. To the extent data are available for the factor by specific category...

  9. 24 CFR 598.305 - Designation factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Designation factors. 598.305 Section... § 598.305 Designation factors. In choosing among nominated urban areas eligible for designation, the... strategic plan (see § 598.215(b)); and (c) Other factors. Other factors established by HUD, as specified...

  10. 14 CFR 23.619 - Special factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Special factors. 23.619 Section 23.619... Special factors. The factor of safety prescribed in § 23.303 must be multiplied by the highest pertinent special factors of safety prescribed in §§ 23.621 through 23.625 for each part of the structure...

  11. 14 CFR 23.619 - Special factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Special factors. 23.619 Section 23.619... Special factors. The factor of safety prescribed in § 23.303 must be multiplied by the highest pertinent special factors of safety prescribed in §§ 23.621 through 23.625 for each part of the structure...

  12. 14 CFR 25.619 - Special factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Special factors. 25.619 Section 25.619... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction General § 25.619 Special factors. The factor of safety prescribed in § 25.303 must be multiplied by the highest pertinent special factor of...

  13. Bayesian Estimation of Categorical Dynamic Factor Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Nesselroade, John R.

    2007-01-01

    Dynamic factor models have been used to analyze continuous time series behavioral data. We extend 2 main dynamic factor model variations--the direct autoregressive factor score (DAFS) model and the white noise factor score (WNFS) model--to categorical DAFS and WNFS models in the framework of the underlying variable method and illustrate them with…

  14. The Arabidopsis thaliana Nuclear Factor Y Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hang; Wu, Di; Kong, Fanying; Lin, Ke; Zhang, Haishen; Li, Gang

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear factor Y (NF-Y) is an evolutionarily conserved trimeric transcription factor complex present in nearly all eukaryotes. The heterotrimeric NF-Y complex consists of three subunits, NF-YA, NF-YB, and NF-YC, and binds to the CCAAT box in the promoter regions of its target genes to regulate their expression. Yeast and mammal genomes generally have single genes with multiple splicing isoforms that encode each NF-Y subunit. By contrast, plant genomes generally have multi-gene families encoding each subunit and these genes are differentially expressed in various tissues or stages. Therefore, different subunit combinations can lead to a wide variety of NF-Y complexes in various tissues, stages, and growth conditions, indicating the potentially diverse functions of this complex in plants. Indeed, many recent studies have proved that the NF-Y complex plays multiple essential roles in plant growth, development, and stress responses. In this review, we highlight recent progress on NF-Y in Arabidopsis thaliana, including NF-Y protein structure, heterotrimeric complex formation, and the molecular mechanism by which NF-Y regulates downstream target gene expression. We then focus on its biological functions and underlying molecular mechanisms. Finally, possible directions for future research on NF-Y are also presented. PMID:28119722

  15. Cardiac risk factors: environmental, sociodemographic, and behavioral cardiovascular risk factors.

    PubMed

    Anthony, David; George, Paul; Eaton, Charles B

    2014-06-01

    Several environmental exposures are associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Exposure to secondhand smoke may increase the risk by as much as 25% to 30%. Exposure to third hand smoke, residual components of tobacco smoke that remain in the environment after a cigarette is extinguished, also appears to increase risk. These residual components can remain in rooms and automobiles for up to 30 years and enter the body through the skin or via inhalation or ingestion. Exposure to particulate matter air pollution from automobile emissions, power plants, and other sources is yet another environmental risk factor for CHD, resulting in tens of thousands of deaths annually in the United States. Exposure to other environmental toxins, particularly bisphenol A and phthalates, also has been linked to CHD. There are sociodemographic risks for CHD, with numerous studies showing that lower socioeconomic status is associated with higher risk. Behavioral risk factors include poor diet, such as frequent consumption of fast food and processed meals; sleep disturbance; and psychological stress, particularly related to marital or work issues. Finally, although high alcohol consumption is associated with increased CHD risk, moderate alcohol consumption (ie, less than 1 to 2 drinks/day), particularly of wine and possibly beer, appears to reduce the risk.

  16. The Arabidopsis thaliana Nuclear Factor Y Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hang; Wu, Di; Kong, Fanying; Lin, Ke; Zhang, Haishen; Li, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear factor Y (NF-Y) is an evolutionarily conserved trimeric transcription factor complex present in nearly all eukaryotes. The heterotrimeric NF-Y complex consists of three subunits, NF-YA, NF-YB, and NF-YC, and binds to the CCAAT box in the promoter regions of its target genes to regulate their expression. Yeast and mammal genomes generally have single genes with multiple splicing isoforms that encode each NF-Y subunit. By contrast, plant genomes generally have multi-gene families encoding each subunit and these genes are differentially expressed in various tissues or stages. Therefore, different subunit combinations can lead to a wide variety of NF-Y complexes in various tissues, stages, and growth conditions, indicating the potentially diverse functions of this complex in plants. Indeed, many recent studies have proved that the NF-Y complex plays multiple essential roles in plant growth, development, and stress responses. In this review, we highlight recent progress on NF-Y in Arabidopsis thaliana, including NF-Y protein structure, heterotrimeric complex formation, and the molecular mechanism by which NF-Y regulates downstream target gene expression. We then focus on its biological functions and underlying molecular mechanisms. Finally, possible directions for future research on NF-Y are also presented.

  17. Understanding adverse events: human factors.

    PubMed Central

    Reason, J

    1995-01-01

    (1) Human rather than technical failures now represent the greatest threat to complex and potentially hazardous systems. This includes healthcare systems. (2) Managing the human risks will never be 100% effective. Human fallibility can be moderated, but it cannot be eliminated. (3) Different error types have different underlying mechanisms, occur in different parts of the organisation, and require different methods of risk management. The basic distinctions are between: Slips, lapses, trips, and fumbles (execution failures) and mistakes (planning or problem solving failures). Mistakes are divided into rule based mistakes and knowledge based mistakes. Errors (information-handling problems) and violations (motivational problems) Active versus latent failures. Active failures are committed by those in direct contact with the patient, latent failures arise in organisational and managerial spheres and their adverse effects may take a long time to become evident. (4) Safety significant errors occur at all levels of the system, not just at the sharp end. Decisions made in the upper echelons of the organisation create the conditions in the workplace that subsequently promote individual errors and violations. Latent failures are present long before an accident and are hence prime candidates for principled risk management. (5) Measures that involve sanctions and exhortations (that is, moralistic measures directed to those at the sharp end) have only very limited effectiveness, especially so in the case of highly trained professionals. (6) Human factors problems are a product of a chain of causes in which the individual psychological factors (that is, momentary inattention, forgetting, etc) are the last and least manageable links. Attentional "capture" (preoccupation or distraction) is a necessary condition for the commission of slips and lapses. Yet, its occurrence is almost impossible to predict or control effectively. The same is true of the factors associated with

  18. Psychological factors affecting oncology conditions.

    PubMed

    Grassi, Luigi; Biancosino, Bruno; Marmai, Luciana; Rossi, Elena; Sabato, Silvana

    2007-01-01

    The area of psychological factors affecting cancer has been the object of research starting from the early 1950s and consolidating from the 1970s with the development of psychooncology. A series of problems in the DSM and ICD nosological systems, such as the difficult application of the criteria for psychiatric diagnoses (i.e. major depression, adjustment disorders) and the scarce space dedicated to the rubric of psychosocial implications of medical illness (i.e. Psychological Factors Affecting a Medical Condition under 'Other Conditions That May Be a Focus of Clinical Attention' in the DSM-IV) represent a major challenge in psycho-oncology. The application of the Diagnostic Criteria for Psychosomatic Research (DCPR) has been shown to be useful in a more precise identification of several psychological domains in patients with cancer. The DCPR dimensions of health anxiety, demoralization and alexithymia have been shown to be quite frequent in cancer patient (37.7, 28.8 and 26%, respectively). The overlap between a formal DSM-IV diagnosis and the DCPR is low, with 58% of patients being categorized as non-cases on the DSM-IV having at least one DCPR syndrome. The specific quality of the DCPR in characterizing psychosocial aspects secondary to cancer is also confirmed by the fact that some dimensions of coping (e.g. Mini-Mental Adjustment to Cancer subscale hopelessness) correlate with the DCPR dimension of demoralization, while a quantitative approach on symptom assessment (e.g. stress symptoms on the Brief Symptom Inventory) is not useful in discriminating the patients with and without DCPR syndromes. More research is needed in order to understand the relationship between DCPR constructs (e.g. alexithymia) and psychosocial factors which have been shown to be significant in oncology (e.g. emotional repression and avoidance). The role of specific DCPR constructs in influencing the course of illness is also an area that should be investigated.

  19. [Conditioning factors of weight condition].

    PubMed

    San Mauro, Ismael; Megias, Ana; Bodega, Patricia; García de Angulo, Belén; Rodríguez, Paula; Grande, Graciela; Micó, Víctor; Romero, Elena; Fajardo, Diana; García, Nuria

    2015-01-01

    Introducción: Estudios epidemiológicos muestran que durante las últimas dos décadas la obesidad infantil ha aumentado convertirse en una de las principales preocupaciones de salud pública. Los hábitos dietéticos, la falta de actividad física y, el grado de obesidad empeoran con el paso de los años convirtiendo a los niños con sobrepeso en adultos con sobrepeso. Objetivo: Conocer la influencia de diversos factores modificables (hábitos alimentarios, práctica de actividad física, sedentarismo y horas de sueño), sobre el estado ponderal de un colectivo de niños en edad escolar. Método: Se realizó un estudio observacional de corte transversal retrospectivo de 129 escolares de Madrid entre 6 y 12 años con recogida de datos antropométricos (peso, talla y circunferencia de cintura), dietéticos (Kidmed), de actividad física (IPAQ adaptado), sedentarismo y horas de sueño. Resultados: El resultado más relevante fue el exceso ponderal de los niños (28,1%), aunque estos resultados no fueron significativos respecto a ninguno de los factores estudiados. Se estudió el factor de actividad física y el tiempo dedicado a actividades sedentarias en función del sexo, en ambos casos se vieron valores menores en niñas que en niños siendo estas diferencias estadísticamente significativas (p.

  20. Aetiological factors in paediatric urolithiasis.

    PubMed

    van't Hoff, William G

    2004-01-01

    The aetiology of stones in children differs from that in adults. Young children, especially boys, are prone to infective stones, although this type of calculi is decreasing in frequency over time in prosperous countries. Two monogenic causes, cystinuria and hyperoxaluria, each account for 5-15% of paediatric stones. Increased factors for stone formation in children include prematurity, neurological problems, ketogenic diet and reconstructed or augmented bladders. Hypercalciuria is commonly found in paediatric stone formers, is usually idiopathic and is only rarely associated with hypercalcaemia. All children with stones should undergo a metabolic evaluation.

  1. Prognostic factors in bunion surgery.

    PubMed

    Scranton, P E; McDermott, J E

    1995-11-01

    Between 1977 and 1992, 42 patients were seen who had 51 feet operated upon for bunions in which the surgery failed. A total of 105 procedures were done on these 51 feet until the patients either achieved satisfactory correction (N = 28) or they declined (N = 14) further surgery. An analysis of these failures and review of literature revealed 12 anatomic variations and 7 secondary factors that were seen in association with surgical failure. These findings were correlated with published criteria and our experience with various bunion procedures to advance general indications and contraindications for specific bunion procedures.

  2. Targeting Transcription Factors in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bhagwat, Anand S.; Vakoc, Christopher R.

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are commonly deregulated in the pathogenesis of human cancer and are a major class of cancer cell dependencies. Consequently, targeting of TFs can be highly effective in treating particular malignancies, as highlighted by the clinical efficacy of agents that target nuclear hormone receptors. In this review we discuss recent advances in our understanding of TFs as drug targets in oncology, with an emphasis on the emerging chemical approaches to modulate TF function. The remarkable diversity and potency of TFs as drivers of cell transformation justifies a continued pursuit of TFs as therapeutic targets for drug discovery. PMID:26645049

  3. Additional factors in chronic bronchitis.

    PubMed

    Cullen, K J; Elder, J; Adams, A R; Stenhouse, N S

    1970-02-14

    A review of persons with chronic bronchitis and controls without bronchitis showed several irritants around the home that aggravated cough, such as house dust, flowers and grasses, smoke, strong fumes, hair spray, insecticide, and soap powders. Most subjects with bronchitis were affected by exposure to one or more of these irritants for at least once a day for three months of the year or more. Out of 163 subjects with chronic bronchitis only six non-smokers were free of factors associated with pulmonary irritation. This evidence from non-smokers not exposed to air pollution adds further strength to the hypothesis that daily phlegm is caused by persistent inhalation of irritants.

  4. Human factors in spacecraft design.

    PubMed

    Harrison, A A; Connors, M M

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes some of the salient implications of evolving mission parameters for spacecraft design. Among the requirements for future spacecraft are new, higher standards of living, increased support of human productivity, and greater accommodation of physical and cultural variability. Design issues include volumetric allowances, architecture and layouts, closed life support systems, health maintenance systems, recreational facilities, automation, privacy, and decor. An understanding of behavioral responses to design elements is a precondition for critical design decisions. Human factors research results must be taken into account early in the course of the design process.

  5. [Environmental factors in Asperger syndrome].

    PubMed

    Abe, Takaaki; Kato, Satoshi

    2007-03-01

    This paper reviews what is currently known about the environmental factors in Asperger syndrome that is a neurodevelopmental disorder of genetic origins. Its characteristics tend to occur in families of those with the syndrome. The rate of complications during pregnancy or the neonatal period in the patients with Asperger syndrome was about the same as that in the control group. It is true that their involvement in their outer world could not influence the core social deficits very much. But it might facilitate the appearance of the second symptoms such as dissociation, anxiety, depression, persecutory delusion as well as antisocial behavior including serious criminal acts.

  6. Human factors in spacecraft design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, Albert A.; Connors, Mary M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes some of the salient implications of evolving mission parameters for spacecraft design. Among the requirements for future spacecraft are new, higher standards of living, increased support of human productivity, and greater accommodation of physical and cultural variability. Design issues include volumetric allowances, architecture and layouts, closed life support systems, health maintenance systems, recreational facilities, automation, privacy, and decor. An understanding of behavioral responses to design elements is a precondition for critical design decisions. Human factors research results must be taken into account early in the course of the design process.

  7. Human factors in space telepresence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akin, D. L.; Howard, R. D.; Oliveria, J. S.

    1983-01-01

    The problems of interfacing a human with a teleoperation system, for work in space are discussed. Much of the information presented here is the result of experience gained by the M.I.T. Space Systems Laboratory during the past two years of work on the ARAMIS (Automation, Robotics, and Machine Intelligence Systems) project. Many factors impact the design of the man-machine interface for a teleoperator. The effects of each are described in turn. An annotated bibliography gives the key references that were used. No conclusions are presented as a best design, since much depends on the particular application desired, and the relevant technology is swiftly changing.

  8. Human Factors in Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woolford, Barbara J.; Mount, Frances

    2005-01-01

    After forty years of experience with human space flight (Table 1), the current emphasis is on the design of space vehicles, habitats, and missions to ensure mission success. What lessons have we learned that will affect the design of spacecraft for future space exploration, leading up to exploring Mars? This chapter addresses this issue in four sections: Anthropometry and Biomechanics; Environmental Factors; Habitability and Architecture; and Crew Personal Sustenance. This introductory section introduces factors unique to space flight. A unique consideration for design of a habitable volume in a space vehicle is the lack of gravity during a space flight, referred to as microgravity. This affects all aspects of life, and drives special features in the habitat, equipment, tools, and procedures. The difference in gravity during a space mission requires designing for posture and motion differences. In Earth s gravity, or even with partial gravity, orientation is not a variable because the direction in which gravity acts defines up and down. In a microgravity environment the working position is arbitrary; there is no gravity cue. Orientation is defined primarily through visual cues. The orientation within a particular crew station or work area is referred to as local vertical, and should be consistent within a module to increase crew productivity. Equipment was intentionally arranged in various orientations in one module on Skylab to assess the efficiency in use of space versus the effects of inconsistent layout. The effects of that arrangement were confusion on entering the module, time spent in re-orientation, and conflicts in crew space requirements when multiple crew members were in the module. Design of a space vehicle is constrained by the three major mission drivers: mass, volume and power. Each of these factors drives the cost of a mission. Mass and volume determine the size of the launch vehicle directly; they can limit consumables such as air, water, and

  9. Environmental Risk Factors for ARDS

    PubMed Central

    Moazed, Farzad; Calfee, Carolyn S.

    2014-01-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Over the past several decades, alcohol abuse and cigarette smoke exposure have been identified as risk factors for the development of ARDS. The mechanisms underlying these relationships are complex and remain under investigation but are thought to involve pulmonary immune impairment as well as alveolar epithelial and endothelial dysfunction. This review summarizes the epidemiologic data supporting links between these exposures and ARDS susceptibility and outcomes and highlights key mechanistic investigations that provide insight into the pathways by which each exposure is linked to ARDS. PMID:25453414

  10. Weak-shock reflection factors

    SciTech Connect

    Reichenbach, H.; Kuhl, A.L.

    1993-09-07

    The purpose of this paper is to compare reflection factors for weak shocks from various surfaces, and to focus attention on some unsolved questions. Three different cases are considered: square-wave planar shock reflection from wedges; square-wave planar shock reflection from cylinders; and spherical blast wave reflection from a planar surface. We restrict ourselves to weak shocks. Shocks with a Mach number of M{sub O} < 1.56 in air or with an overpressure of {Delta}{sub PI} < 25 psi (1.66 bar) under normal ambient conditions are called weak.

  11. Human Factors Checklist: Think Human Factors - Focus on the People

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Darcy; Stelges, Katrine; Barth, Timothy; Stambolian, Damon; Henderson, Gena; Dischinger, Charles; Kanki, Barbara; Kramer, Ian

    2016-01-01

    A quick-look Human Factors (HF) Checklist condenses industry and NASA Agency standards consisting of thousands of requirements into 14 main categories. With support from contractor HF and Safety Practitioners, NASA developed a means to share key HF messages with Design, Engineering, Safety, Project Management, and others. It is often difficult to complete timely assessments due to the large volume of HF information. The HF Checklist evolved over time into a simple way to consider the most important concepts. A wide audience can apply the checklist early in design or through planning phases, even before hardware or processes are finalized or implemented. The checklist is a good place to start to supplement formal HF evaluation. The HF Checklist was based on many Space Shuttle processing experiences and lessons learned. It is now being applied to ground processing of new space vehicles and adjusted for new facilities and systems.

  12. Regulation of Myocyte Enhancer Factor-2 Transcription Factors by Neurotoxins

    PubMed Central

    She, Hua; Mao, Zixu

    2011-01-01

    Various isoforms of myocyte enhancer factor-2 (MEF2) constitute a group of nuclear proteins found to play important roles in increasing types of cells. In neurons, MEF2s are required to regulate neuronal development, synaptic plasticity, as well as survival. MEF2s promote the survival of several types of neurons under different conditions. In cellular models, negative regulation of MEF2s by stress and toxic signals contributes to neuronal death. In contrast, enhancing MEF2 activity not only protects cultured primary neurons from death in vitro but also attenuates the loss of dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra pars compacta in a 1-methyl 4-phenyl 1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine mouse model of Parkinson’s disease. In this work, the mechanisms of regulation of MEF2 function by several well-known neurotoxins and their implications in various neurodegenerative diseases are reviewed. PMID:21741404

  13. Clearance of von Willebrand factor.

    PubMed

    Denis, Cécile V; Christophe, Olivier D; Oortwijn, Beatrijs D; Lenting, Peter J

    2008-02-01

    The life cycle of von Willebrand factor (VWF) comprises a number of distinct steps, ranging from the controlled expression of the VWF gene in endothelial cells and megakaryocytes to the removal of VWF from the circulation. The various aspects of VWF clearance have been the objects of intense research in the last few years, stimulated by observations that VWF clearance is a relatively common component of the pathogenesis of type 1 von Willebrand disease (VWD). Moreover, improving the survival of VWF is now considered as a viable therapeutic strategy to prolong the half-life of factor VIII in order to optimise treatment of haemophilia A. The present review aims to provide an overview of recent findings with regard to the molecular basis of VWF clearance. A number of parameters have been identified that influence VWF clearance, including its glycosylation profile and a number of VWF missense mutations. In addition, in-vivo studies have been used to identify cells that contribute to the catabolism of VWF, providing a starting point for the identification of receptors that mediate the cellular uptake of VWF. Finally, we discuss recent data describing chemically modification of VWF as an approach to prolong the half-life of the VWF/FVIII complex.

  14. Factors influencing breath ammonia determination.

    PubMed

    Solga, Steven F; Mudalel, Matthew; Spacek, Lisa A; Lewicki, Rafal; Tittel, Frank; Loccioni, Claudio; Russo, Adolfo; Risby, Terence H

    2013-09-01

    Amongst volatile compounds (VCs) present in exhaled breath, ammonia has held great promise and yet it has confounded researchers due to its inherent reactivity. Herein we have evaluated various factors in both breath instrumentation and the breath collection process in an effort to reduce variability. We found that the temperature of breath sampler and breath sensor, mouth rinse pH, and mode of breathing to be important factors. The influence of the rinses is heavily dependent upon the pH of the rinse. The basic rinse (pH 8.0) caused a mean increase of the ammonia concentration by 410 ± 221 ppb. The neutral rinse (pH 7.0), slightly acidic rinse (pH 5.8), and acidic rinse (pH 2.5) caused a mean decrease of the ammonia concentration by 498 ± 355 ppb, 527 ± 198 ppb, and 596 ± 385 ppb, respectively. Mode of breathing (mouth-open versus mouth-closed) demonstrated itself to have a large impact on the rate of recovery of breath ammonia after a water rinse. Within 30 min, breath ammonia returned to 98 ± 16% that of the baseline with mouth open breathing, while mouth closed breathing allowed breath ammonia to return to 53 ± 14% of baseline. These results contribute to a growing body of literature that will improve reproducibly in ammonia and other VCs.

  15. Salmonella-secreted Virulence Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Heffron, Fred; Niemann, George; Yoon, Hyunjin; Kidwai, Afshan S.; Brown, Roslyn N.; McDermott, Jason E.; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2011-05-01

    In this short review we discuss secreted virulence factors of Salmonella, which directly affect Salmonella interaction with its host. Salmonella secretes protein to subvert host defenses but also, as discussed, to reduce virulence thereby permitting the bacteria to persist longer and more successfully disperse. The type III secretion system (TTSS) is the best known and well studied of the mechanisms that enable secretion from the bacterial cytoplasm to the host cell cytoplasm. Other secretion systems include outer membrane vesicles, which are present in all Gram-negative bacteria examined to date, two-partner secretion, and type VI secretion will also be addressed. Excellent reviews of Salmonella secreted effectors have focused on themes such as actin rearrangements, vesicular trafficking, ubiquitination, and the activities of the virulence factors themselves. This short review is based on S. Typhimurium infection of mice because it is a model of typhoid like disease in humans. We have organized effectors in terms of events that happen during the infection cycle and how secreted effectors may be involved.

  16. Suicidal adolescents: factors in evaluation.

    PubMed

    Gispert, M; Wheeler, K; Marsh, L; Davis, M S

    1985-01-01

    Suicide attempts among adolescents are occurring more frequently and their evaluation is a difficult task. The factors related to suicide attempts in eighty-two adolescents, ages 12 to 18 were examined. They had been admitted to the adolescent unit of a large, urban general hospital for evaluation of self-destructive behavior. A systematic review of the patients' charts was performed to gather information about family structure, functioning in school, suicidal risk, degree of depression, and stressful life events. Although most were moderately depressed, a significant proportion denied having tried to harm themselves. While some repressed their anger, the majority expressed anger openly, tended to feel sad and to carry out premeditated as well as more serious suicide attempts. Most had experienced family disruption, and nearly half were functioning poorly in school. Suicide risk correlated only with current stress, while depression correlated with life-long as well as current stress. Results suggest that identification of the suicide attempt and the contributory factors, especially the degree of overt anger and depression, are crucial in deciding appropriate interventions, providing adequate treatment, and avoiding recurrence.

  17. Liver fibrogenesis and genetic factors.

    PubMed

    Boursier, Jérôme; Louvet, Alexandre

    2011-06-01

    Chronic liver diseases lead to the accumulation of fibrosis in the liver with eventual progression to cirrhosis and its complications. However, there is a wide range of inter-individual variation in the liver fibrogenesis process, thus posing a challenge to physicians to identify patients with poor prognosis. As demographic and environmental factors only account for a small portion of fibrogenesis variability, host genetic factors have been suggested as playing an important role. Due to technical limitations, the first genetic studies were restricted to the evaluation of candidate genes having a known or supposed function in liver fibrogenesis. Recently, technological improvements have made it possible to study the whole human genome in a single scan. Genome-wide association studies have considerably heightened the interest in genetics as part of the study of liver fibrogenesis through their identification of previously unsuspected genes that are statistically associated with liver fibrosis. It is thus possible to determine new diagnostic or prognostic genetic markers for the management of patients with chronic liver diseases. Moreover, functional analyses of these genes may provide new insights into the pathophysiology of liver fibrogenesis.

  18. Limiting factors of starch hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Colonna, P; Leloup, V; Buléon, A

    1992-10-01

    Foods appear as complex structures, in which starch may be present in different forms. These, including the molecular characteristics and the crystalline organization, depend on processing conditions and compositions of ingredients. The main changes in starch macro- and microstructures are the increase of surface area to volume ratio in the solid phase, the modification of the crystallinity as affected by gelatinization and gelation, and the depolymerization of amylose and amylopectin. Starch modification may be estimated by different methodologies, which should be selected according to the level of structure considered. When amylose and amylopectin are in solution, rapid and total hydrolysis leads to the formation of a mixture of linear oligosaccharides and branched alpha-limit dextrins. However, starch usually occurs in foods as solid structures. Structural factors of starchy materials influence their enzymic hydrolysis. A better understanding of the enzymatic process enables the identification of the structural factors limiting hydrolysis: diffusion of enzyme molecules, porosity of solid substrates, adsorption of enzymes onto solid substrates, and the catalytic event. A mechanistic modelling should be possible in the future.

  19. The transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B and cancer.

    PubMed

    Escárcega, R O; Fuentes-Alexandro, S; García-Carrasco, M; Gatica, A; Zamora, A

    2007-03-01

    Since the discovery of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) in 1986, many studies have been conducted showing the link between the NF-kappaB signalling pathway and control of the inflammatory response. Today it is well known that control of the inflammatory response and apoptosis is closely related to the activation of NF-kappaB. Three NF-kappaB activation pathways exist. The first (the classical pathway) is normally triggered in response to microbial and viral infections or exposure to pro-inflammatory cytokines that activate the tripartite IKK complex, leading to phosphorylation-induced IkappaB degradation and depends mainly on IKKbeta activity. The second (the alternative pathway), leads to selective activation of p52:RelB dimers by inducing the processing of the NF-kappaB2/p100 precursor protein, which mostly occurs as a heterodimer with RelB in the cytoplasm. This pathway is triggered by certain members of the tumour necrosis factor cytokine family, through selective activation of IKKalpha homodimers by the upstream kinase NIK. The third pathway is named CK2 and is IKK independent. NF-kappaB acts through the transcription of anti-apoptotic proteins, leading to increased proliferation of cells and tumour growth. It is also known that some drugs act directly in the inhibition of NF-kappaB, thus producing regulation of apoptosis; some examples are aspirin and corticosteroids. Here we review the role of NF-kappaB in the control of apoptosis, its link to oncogenesis, the evidence of several studies that show that NF-kappaB activation is closely related to different cancers, and finally the potential target of NF-kappaB as cancer therapy.

  20. A Two-Factor Model of Temperament.

    PubMed

    Evans, David E; Rothbart, Mary K

    2009-10-01

    The higher order structure of temperament was examined in two studies using the Adult Temperament Questionnaire. Because previous research showed robust levels of convergence between Rothbart's constructs of temperament and the Big Five factors, we hypothesized a higher order two-factor model of temperament based on Digman's higher order two-factor model of personality traits derived from factor analysis of the Big Five factors. Study 1 included 258 undergraduates. Digman's model did not fit the data well, so we conducted an exploratory two-factor solution. One factor included extraversion/positive emotionality, orienting sensitivity, and affiliativeness, and the other, negative affect versus effortful control content. This two-factor model of temperament model diverged from the Digman model only on the agreeableness-affiliativeness loadings. Study 2 involved a community sample of 700 participants. Confirmatory factor analysis supported the alternative model found in Study 1. Findings are discussed in relation to research on attention and emotion.

  1. Factors Affecting Aerosol Radiative Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingxu; Lin, Jintai; Ni, Ruijing

    2016-04-01

    Rapid industrial and economic growth has meant a large amount of aerosols in the atmosphere with strong radiative forcing (RF) upon the climate system. Over parts of the globe, the negative forcing of aerosols has overcompensated for the positive forcing of greenhouse gases. Aerosol RF is determined by emissions and various chemical-transport-radiative processes in the atmosphere, a multi-factor problem whose individual contributors have not been well quantified. In this study, we analyze the major factors affecting RF of secondary inorganic aerosols (SIOAs, including sulfate, nitrate and ammonium), primary organic aerosol (POA), and black carbon (BC). We analyze the RF of aerosols produced by 11 major regions across the globe, including but not limited to East Asia, Southeast Asia, South Asia, North America, and Western Europe. Factors analyzed include population size, per capita gross domestic production (GDP), emission intensity (i.e., emissions per unit GDP), chemical efficiency (i.e., mass per unit emissions) and radiative efficiency (i.e., RF per unit mass). We find that among the 11 regions, East Asia produces the largest emissions and aerosol RF, due to relatively high emission intensity and a tremendous population size. South Asia produce the second largest RF of SIOA and BC and the highest RF of POA, in part due to its highest chemical efficiency among all regions. Although Southeast Asia also has large emissions, its aerosol RF is alleviated by its lowest chemical efficiency. The chemical efficiency and radiative efficiency of BC produced by the Middle East-North Africa are the highest across the regions, whereas its RF is lowered by a small per capita GDP. Both North America and Western Europe have low emission intensity, compensating for the effects on RF of large population sizes and per capita GDP. There has been a momentum to transfer industries to Southeast Asia and South Asia, and such transition is expected to continue in the coming years. The

  2. Taking the Error Term of the Factor Model into Account: The Factor Score Predictor Interval

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beauducel, Andre

    2013-01-01

    The problem of factor score indeterminacy implies that the factor and the error scores cannot be completely disentangled in the factor model. It is therefore proposed to compute Harman's factor score predictor that contains an additive combination of factor and error variance. This additive combination is discussed in the framework of classical…

  3. Using Horn's Parallel Analysis Method in Exploratory Factor Analysis for Determining the Number of Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Çokluk, Ömay; Koçak, Duygu

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the number of factors obtained from parallel analysis, a method used for determining the number of factors in exploratory factor analysis, was compared to that of the factors obtained from eigenvalue and scree plot--two traditional methods for determining the number of factors--in terms of consistency. Parallel analysis is based on…

  4. The Second-Order Factor Structure of the 16 PF: A Four Factor Solution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marth, Joseph R.; Newman, Isadore

    A review of the research into the second-order factor structure of the 16 Personality Factor Questionnaire (16 PF) indicates disagreement about the number and meaning of the second-order factors. However, repeated analyses of the second-order factor structure have consistently found fewer than the eight factors suggested by Catell (1973) and the…

  5. Manned Mars mission crew factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santy, Patricia A.

    1986-01-01

    Crew factors include a wide range of concerns relating to the human system and its role in a Mars mission. There are two important areas which will play a large part in determining the crew for a Mars mission. The first relates to the goals and priorities determined for such a vast endeavor. The second is the design of the vehicle for the journey. The human system cannot be separated from the other systems in that vehicle. In fact it will be the human system which drives the development of many of the technical breakthroughs necessary to make a Mars mission successful. As much as possible, the engineering systems must adapt to the needs of the human system and its individual components.

  6. Form factors from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Dru Renner

    2012-04-01

    Precision computation of hadronic physics with lattice QCD is becoming feasible. The last decade has seen precent-level calculations of many simple properties of mesons, and the last few years have seen calculations of baryon masses, including the nucleon mass, accurate to a few percent. As computational power increases and algorithms advance, the precise calculation of a variety of more demanding hadronic properties will become realistic. With this in mind, I discuss the current lattice QCD calculations of generalized parton distributions with an emphasis on the prospects for well-controlled calculations for these observables as well. I will do this by way of several examples: the pion and nucleon form factors and moments of the nucleon parton and generalized-parton distributions.

  7. The Main Aeromonas Pathogenic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Tomás, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    The members of the Aeromonas genus are ubiquitous, water-borne bacteria. They have been isolated from marine waters, rivers, lakes, swamps, sediments, chlorine water, water distribution systems, drinking water and residual waters; different types of food, such as meat, fish, seafood, vegetables, and processed foods. Aeromonas strains are predominantly pathogenic to poikilothermic animals, and the mesophilic strains are emerging as important pathogens in humans, causing a variety of extraintestinal and systemic infections as well as gastrointestinal infections. The most commonly described disease caused by Aeromonas is the gastroenteritis; however, no adequate animal model is available to reproduce this illness caused by Aeromonas. The main pathogenic factors associated with Aeromonas are: surface polysaccharides (capsule, lipopolysaccharide, and glucan), S-layers, iron-binding systems, exotoxins and extracellular enzymes, secretion systems, fimbriae and other nonfilamentous adhesins, motility and flagella. PMID:23724321

  8. Unity power factor switching regulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rippel, Wally E. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A single or multiphase boost chopper regulator operating with unity power factor, for use such as to charge a battery is comprised of a power section for converting single or multiphase line energy into recharge energy including a rectifier (10), one inductor (L.sub.1) and one chopper (Q.sub.1) for each chopper phase for presenting a load (battery) with a current output, and duty cycle control means (16) for each chopper to control the average inductor current over each period of the chopper, and a sensing and control section including means (20) for sensing at least one load parameter, means (22) for producing a current command signal as a function of said parameter, means (26) for producing a feedback signal as a function of said current command signal and the average rectifier voltage output over each period of the chopper, means (28) for sensing current through said inductor, means (18) for comparing said feedback signal with said sensed current to produce, in response to a difference, a control signal applied to the duty cycle control means, whereby the average inductor current is proportionate to the average rectifier voltage output over each period of the chopper, and instantaneous line current is thereby maintained proportionate to the instantaneous line voltage, thus achieving a unity power factor. The boost chopper is comprised of a plurality of converters connected in parallel and operated in staggered phase. For optimal harmonic suppression, the duty cycles of the switching converters are evenly spaced, and by negative coupling between pairs 180.degree. out-of-phase, peak currents through the switches can be reduced while reducing the inductor size and mass.

  9. Activation of factor X by rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Willingham, A.K.; Matschiner, J.T.

    1986-05-01

    Synthesis and secretion of blood coagulation factor X was studied in hepatocytes prepared by perfusion of rat livers with collagenase. Hepatocytes were incubated in the presence of vitamin K and /sup 3/H-leucine for up to 4h at 37/sup 0/C. Factor X was isolated from the incubation medium by immunochemical techniques and analyzed by SDS-PAGE. The recovered /sup 3/H-labeled proteins migrated, after reduction of disulfides, as two polypeptide chains with apparent molecular weights (M/sub r/) of approximately 42,000 and 22,000 representing the heavy and light chains of factor X respectively. The apparent M/sub r/ of the heavy chain was about 10,000 daltons lighter than seen with the heavy chain of factor X isolated from rat plasma and was more characteristic of the heavy chain of factor Xa. When the levels of factor X secreted by hepatocytes were determined by clotting assays, activity was present as factor Xa. Also, when purified plasma factor X was added to incubations of hepatocytes (>95% parenchymal cells) the added factor X was rapidly converted to factor Xa. Plasma membranes prepared from isolated hepatocytes or from liver homogenates contained an enzyme that converted factor X to factor Xa in a calcium dependent reaction. The physiological significance of a factor X activating enzyme on hepatocyte plasma membranes is not clear.

  10. A protease-like permeability factor in guinea pig skin: immunologic identity with plasma Hageman factor.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, T.; Cochrane, C. G.

    1982-01-01

    Vascular permeability enhancement activity of the protease-like permeability factor derived from guinea pig skin and of active guinea pig Hageman factor (beta HFa) were both inhibited by anti-guinea pig Hageman factor rabbit F(ab')2 antibody. The permeability activity of both factors was also absorbed on anti-Hageman factor F(ab')2-Sepharose beads. The latent form of the permeability factor derived from skin extracts produced a single immunoprecipitation line with anti-Hageman factor and gave a reaction of identity with a precipitation band developing between purified Hageman factor and anti-Hageman factor. The latent permeability factor in the fraction corrected the clotting activity of Hageman-factor-deficient human plasma. The clotting activity was also blocked by anti-Hageman factor F(ab')2 antibody. From these results, it was concluded that the skin permeability factor was immunologically and functionally indistinguishable from Hageman factor of plasma. Extracts were obtained from skin of guinea pigs given intravenous injections of 125I-guinea pig Hageman factor immediately before sacrifice to calculate the amount of Hageman factor in the extravascular tissue space of the skin. The pseudoglobulin fractions of the extracts containing a concentration of Hageman factor of approximately 9 microgram of Hageman factor per gram of skin. This was determined both by immunologic means and procoagulant activity. Only 4% of the Hageman factor in the extract was obtained from the intravascular plasma volume of the skin. Images Figure 1 PMID:7044129

  11. Heart Disease Risk Factors You Can Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Stroke Heart disease risk factors you can control Did you know? In women, high triglycerides combined ... information on Heart disease risk factors you can control Read more from womenshealth.gov Heart Disease Fact ...

  12. 48 CFR 2015.304 - Evaluation factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES CONTRACTING BY NEGOTIATION Source Selection Processes and Techniques 2015.304... factors and subfactors by assigning a numerical weight to each factor. If a solicitation uses...

  13. Skin Cancer: Biology, Risk Factors & Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn Javascript on. Feature: Skin Cancer Skin Cancer: Biology, Risk Factors & Treatment Past Issues / Summer 2013 Table ... Articles Skin Cancer Can Strike Anyone / Skin Cancer: Biology, Risk Factors & Treatment / Timely Healthcare Checkup Catches Melanoma ...

  14. Helping Students Understand Factors and Terms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Joseph G. R.

    1988-01-01

    An approach to teaching factors and terms is offered that builds directly on students' knowledge of arithmetic. Errors arising from factor and term confusions are noted, followed by the pedagogical strategy of exploration, invention, and discovery. (MNS)

  15. 23 CFR 650.707 - Rating factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS BRIDGES, STRUCTURES, AND HYDRAULICS Discretionary Bridge Candidate Rating Factor § 650.707 Rating factor. (a) The following formula is to be used in the selection process for ranking discretionary bridge...

  16. 23 CFR 650.707 - Rating factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS BRIDGES, STRUCTURES, AND HYDRAULICS Discretionary Bridge Candidate Rating Factor § 650.707 Rating factor. (a) The following formula is to be used in the selection process for ranking discretionary bridge...

  17. 23 CFR 650.707 - Rating factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS BRIDGES, STRUCTURES, AND HYDRAULICS Discretionary Bridge Candidate Rating Factor § 650.707 Rating factor. (a) The following formula is to be used in the selection process for ranking discretionary bridge...

  18. 23 CFR 650.707 - Rating factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS BRIDGES, STRUCTURES, AND HYDRAULICS Discretionary Bridge Candidate Rating Factor § 650.707 Rating factor. (a) The following formula is to be used in the selection process for ranking discretionary bridge...

  19. 23 CFR 650.707 - Rating factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS BRIDGES, STRUCTURES, AND HYDRAULICS Discretionary Bridge Candidate Rating Factor § 650.707 Rating factor. (a) The following formula is to be used in the selection process for ranking discretionary bridge...

  20. [Recurrent intestinal ischemia due to factor VIII].

    PubMed

    Castellanos Monedero, Jesús Javier; Legaz Huidobro, María Luisa; Galindo Andugar, María Angeles; Rodríguez Pérez, Alvaro; Mantrana del Valle, José María

    2008-01-01

    Intestinal ischemia is difficult to diagnose and can be caused by several etiologic processes. We report the case of a female patient with recurrent bowel ischemia due to small vessel thrombosis, which is caused by factor VIII, a procoagulant factor.

  1. Cone Penetrometer N Factor Determination Testing Results

    SciTech Connect

    Follett, Jordan R.

    2014-03-05

    This document contains the results of testing activities to determine the empirical 'N Factor' for the cone penetrometer in kaolin clay simulant. The N Factor is used to releate resistance measurements taken with the cone penetrometer to shear strength.

  2. 14 CFR 31.43 - Fitting factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: MANNED FREE BALLOONS Design Construction § 31.43 Fitting factor. (a) A fitting factor of at least... joint design is made in accordance with approved practices and is based on comprehensive test data....

  3. 45 CFR 800.202 - Rating factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... PROGRAM Premiums, Rating Factors, Medical Loss Ratios, and Risk Adjustment § 800.202 Rating factors. (a... Act. (c) Age rating. For age rating, an MSPP issuer must use the ratio established by the State...

  4. 45 CFR 800.202 - Rating factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... PROGRAM Premiums, Rating Factors, Medical Loss Ratios, and Risk Adjustment § 800.202 Rating factors. (a... Act. (c) Age rating. For age rating, an MSPP issuer must use the ratio established by the State...

  5. Risk factors identified for certain lymphoma subtypes

    Cancer.gov

    In a large international collaborative analysis of risk factors for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), scientists were able to quantify risk associated with medical history, lifestyle factors, family history of blood or lymph-borne cancers, and occupation for 11

  6. [Risk factors for destructive periodontitis. I. Behavioral and acquired factors (literature review)].

    PubMed

    Gera, István

    2004-02-01

    Dental plaque is a necessary but not sufficient etiologic factor of the destructive periodontal disease. The manifestation of periodontal destruction is influenced by a wide variety of risk factors and determinants. In the introduction the terminology of different etiologic and risk factors are discussed in general. Than the risk factors and determinants of destructive periodontitis are overviewed. In the first part the acquired and behavioral factors and determinates are discussed. Among the local factors the role of the individual oral hygiene, the specificity of subgingival dental plaque the plaque retentive factors and occlusal traumatism are discussed. The hormonal, the acquired immunological factors, osteoporosis and the age are discussed as systemic risk factors and determinants. Among the behavioral factors smoking, psychological stress and socio-economic factors are covered. The second part is going to cover the genetic predisposing factors.

  7. Iatrogenic Factors Affecting the Periodontium: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Ravi Varma; Chincholi, Siddharth; V, Deepika; Sirajuddin, Syed; Biswas, Shriparna; Prabhu, Sandeep S; MP, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    The principal reason of gingival inflammation is bacterial plaque, along with other predisposing factors. These predisposing factors are calculus, malocclusion, faulty restorations, complications associated with orthodontic therapy, self- inflicted injuries, use of tobacco & radiation therapy. The contributing factors to gingival inflammation & periodontal destruction are deficient dental restorations and prosthesis. Inadequate dental procedures that add to the weakening of the periodontal tissues are referred to as iatrogenic factors. PMID:26312088

  8. Iatrogenic Factors Affecting the Periodontium: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Ravi Varma; Chincholi, Siddharth; V, Deepika; Sirajuddin, Syed; Biswas, Shriparna; Prabhu, Sandeep S; Mp, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    The principal reason of gingival inflammation is bacterial plaque, along with other predisposing factors. These predisposing factors are calculus, malocclusion, faulty restorations, complications associated with orthodontic therapy, self- inflicted injuries, use of tobacco & radiation therapy. The contributing factors to gingival inflammation & periodontal destruction are deficient dental restorations and prosthesis. Inadequate dental procedures that add to the weakening of the periodontal tissues are referred to as iatrogenic factors.

  9. Coprime factorizations in stable linear systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desoer, Charles A.; Gundes, A. Nazli; Kabuli, M. Guntekin

    1988-01-01

    A block-diagonal linear (not necessarily time-invariant) map P with a right-coprime factorization ND-1 (or a left-coprime factorization D-1N) is considered. It is shown that the individual blocks in P have right-coprime factorizations (left-coprime factorizations, respectively) if and only if the denominator map D has a special block-triangular structure. This condition is applied to the stable linear feedback system S(P1,P2).

  10. Human factors training for aviation personnel.

    PubMed

    Johnston, A N; Maurino, D E

    1990-05-01

    The authors examine the reasons for new human factors training requirements contained in the ICAO circular 227-AN/136, Training of Operational Personnel in Human Factors. The circular, produced by the ICAO Flight Safety and Human Factors Study Group, includes a philosophical approach, a conceptual approach, and a model of software, hardware, environment, and liveware or the human element (SHEL model). Guidelines for human factors training, curriculum development, and trainee performance appraisal are included.

  11. GROUP AND ORGANIZATIONAL FACTORS INFLUENCING CREATIVITY.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    SOCIAL COMMUNICATION, GROUP DYNAMICS, MOTIVATION, SOCIOMETRICS, MEASUREMENT, BEHAVIOR, CULTURE, PERSONALITY, COMPUTER PROGRAMMING, APTITUDE TESTS, COMPUTERS, LEADERSHIP, PSYCHOLOGICAL TESTS, FACTOR ANALYSIS.

  12. Eysenck Personality Inventory Item Factor Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comrey, Andrew L.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Three methods were used to test the factor structure of the Eysenck Personality Inventory administered to 583 Australians. The preferred method was to extract factors by the minimum residual method, use the Tandem Criteria Method, and then rotate that number of factors by the Tandem Criteria I method. (SLD)

  13. Measurement Bias Detection through Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barendse, M. T.; Oort, F. J.; Werner, C. S.; Ligtvoet, R.; Schermelleh-Engel, K.

    2012-01-01

    Measurement bias is defined as a violation of measurement invariance, which can be investigated through multigroup factor analysis (MGFA), by testing across-group differences in intercepts (uniform bias) and factor loadings (nonuniform bias). Restricted factor analysis (RFA) can also be used to detect measurement bias. To also enable nonuniform…

  14. Comparing Factor Structures of Adolescent Psychopathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verona, Edelyn; Javdani, Shabnam; Sprague, Jenessa

    2011-01-01

    Research on the structure of adolescent psychopathology can provide information on broad factors that underlie different forms of maladjustment in youths. Multiple studies from the literature on adult populations suggest that 2 factors, Internalizing and Externalizing, meaningfully comprise the factor structure of adult psychopathology (e.g.,…

  15. Exposure Factors Handbook 2011 Edition (Final Report) ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA announced the release of the final report, Exposure Factors Handbook: 2011 Edition (EPA/600/R-09/052F), prepared by the Office of Research and Development's National Center for Environmental Assessments (NCEA). This updated edition of the handbook provides the most up-to-date data on the various human factors used in assessing exposure. The Exposure Factors Handbook (EFH or

  16. The impact factor of Angewandte Chemie ….

    PubMed

    Gölitz, Peter

    2015-01-02

    What does the Impact Factor tell us? This question is addressed by Peter Glitz in his Editorial, particularly in light of the surprising drop in the 2013 Impact Factor of Angewandte Chemie. An explanation is sought and found. Most importantly the influence of the individual variables that determine the Impact Factor needs to be understood.

  17. 40 CFR 227.15 - Factors considered.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Factors considered. 227.15 Section 227... Factors considered. The need for dumping will be determined by evaluation of the following factors: (a... could be used; (c) The relative environmental risks, impact and cost for ocean dumping as opposed...

  18. 14 CFR 29.623 - Bearing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Bearing factors. 29.623 Section 29.623... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction General § 29.623 Bearing factors. (a... subject to pounding or vibration, must have a bearing factor large enough to provide for the effects...

  19. 14 CFR 29.623 - Bearing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Bearing factors. 29.623 Section 29.623... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction General § 29.623 Bearing factors. (a... subject to pounding or vibration, must have a bearing factor large enough to provide for the effects...

  20. 14 CFR 25.623 - Bearing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Bearing factors. 25.623 Section 25.623... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction General § 25.623 Bearing factors. (a) Except... subject to pounding or vibration, must have a bearing factor large enough to provide for the effects...

  1. 14 CFR 27.623 - Bearing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bearing factors. 27.623 Section 27.623... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction General § 27.623 Bearing factors. (a) Except... subject to pounding or vibration, must have a bearing factor large enough to provide for the effects...

  2. 14 CFR 25.623 - Bearing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bearing factors. 25.623 Section 25.623... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction General § 25.623 Bearing factors. (a) Except... subject to pounding or vibration, must have a bearing factor large enough to provide for the effects...

  3. 14 CFR 23.623 - Bearing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Bearing factors. 23.623 Section 23.623... Bearing factors. (a) Each part that has clearance (free fit), and that is subject to pounding or vibration, must have a bearing factor large enough to provide for the effects of normal relative motion. (b)...

  4. 14 CFR 29.623 - Bearing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Bearing factors. 29.623 Section 29.623... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction General § 29.623 Bearing factors. (a... subject to pounding or vibration, must have a bearing factor large enough to provide for the effects...

  5. 14 CFR 23.623 - Bearing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Bearing factors. 23.623 Section 23.623... Bearing factors. (a) Each part that has clearance (free fit), and that is subject to pounding or vibration, must have a bearing factor large enough to provide for the effects of normal relative motion. (b)...

  6. 14 CFR 27.623 - Bearing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Bearing factors. 27.623 Section 27.623... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction General § 27.623 Bearing factors. (a) Except... subject to pounding or vibration, must have a bearing factor large enough to provide for the effects...

  7. 14 CFR 25.623 - Bearing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Bearing factors. 25.623 Section 25.623... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction General § 25.623 Bearing factors. (a) Except... subject to pounding or vibration, must have a bearing factor large enough to provide for the effects...

  8. 14 CFR 25.623 - Bearing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Bearing factors. 25.623 Section 25.623... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction General § 25.623 Bearing factors. (a) Except... subject to pounding or vibration, must have a bearing factor large enough to provide for the effects...

  9. 14 CFR 23.623 - Bearing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Bearing factors. 23.623 Section 23.623... Bearing factors. (a) Each part that has clearance (free fit), and that is subject to pounding or vibration, must have a bearing factor large enough to provide for the effects of normal relative motion. (b)...

  10. 14 CFR 29.623 - Bearing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Bearing factors. 29.623 Section 29.623... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction General § 29.623 Bearing factors. (a... subject to pounding or vibration, must have a bearing factor large enough to provide for the effects...

  11. 14 CFR 29.623 - Bearing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bearing factors. 29.623 Section 29.623... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction General § 29.623 Bearing factors. (a... subject to pounding or vibration, must have a bearing factor large enough to provide for the effects...

  12. 14 CFR 23.623 - Bearing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Bearing factors. 23.623 Section 23.623... Bearing factors. (a) Each part that has clearance (free fit), and that is subject to pounding or vibration, must have a bearing factor large enough to provide for the effects of normal relative motion. (b)...

  13. 14 CFR 25.623 - Bearing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Bearing factors. 25.623 Section 25.623... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction General § 25.623 Bearing factors. (a) Except... subject to pounding or vibration, must have a bearing factor large enough to provide for the effects...

  14. 14 CFR 27.623 - Bearing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Bearing factors. 27.623 Section 27.623... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction General § 27.623 Bearing factors. (a) Except... subject to pounding or vibration, must have a bearing factor large enough to provide for the effects...

  15. 14 CFR 23.623 - Bearing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bearing factors. 23.623 Section 23.623... Bearing factors. (a) Each part that has clearance (free fit), and that is subject to pounding or vibration, must have a bearing factor large enough to provide for the effects of normal relative motion. (b)...

  16. 14 CFR 27.623 - Bearing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Bearing factors. 27.623 Section 27.623... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction General § 27.623 Bearing factors. (a) Except... subject to pounding or vibration, must have a bearing factor large enough to provide for the effects...

  17. 14 CFR 27.623 - Bearing factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Bearing factors. 27.623 Section 27.623... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction General § 27.623 Bearing factors. (a) Except... subject to pounding or vibration, must have a bearing factor large enough to provide for the effects...

  18. ESTIMATING UNCERTAINITIES IN FACTOR ANALYTIC MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    When interpreting results from factor analytic models as used in receptor modeling, it is important to quantify the uncertainties in those results. For example, if the presence of a species on one of the factors is necessary to interpret the factor as originating from a certain ...

  19. 14 CFR 27.621 - Casting factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Casting factors. 27.621 Section 27.621... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction General § 27.621 Casting factors. (a) General. The factors, tests, and inspections specified in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section must...

  20. 7 CFR 652.39 - Mitigating factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mitigating factors. 652.39 Section 652.39 Agriculture... factors. In considering whether to decertify, the period of decertification, and scope of decertification, the deciding official will take into consideration any mitigating factors. Examples of...

  1. 7 CFR 29.3057 - Special factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Special factor. 29.3057 Section 29.3057 Agriculture... Special factor. A symbol or term authorized to be used with specified grades. Tobacco to which a special factor is applied may meet the general specifications but has a peculiar side or characteristic...

  2. 14 CFR 29.619 - Special factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Special factors. 29.619 Section 29.619... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction General § 29.619 Special factors. (a) The special factors prescribed in §§ 29.621 through 29.625 apply to each part of the structure whose...

  3. 14 CFR 29.621 - Casting factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Casting factors. 29.621 Section 29.621... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction General § 29.621 Casting factors. (a) General. The factors, tests, and inspections specified in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section must...

  4. 14 CFR 29.625 - Fitting factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fitting factors. 29.625 Section 29.625... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction General § 29.625 Fitting factors. For each... are simulated in the fitting and surrounding structures, a fitting factor of at least 1.15 must...

  5. 7 CFR 29.2551 - Special factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Special factor. 29.2551 Section 29.2551 Agriculture...-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2551 Special factor. A symbol or term authorized to be used with specified grades. Tobacco to which a special factor is applied may meet...

  6. 7 CFR 29.1059 - Special factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Special factor. 29.1059 Section 29.1059 Agriculture... Type 92) § 29.1059 Special factor. A symbol or term authorized to be used with specified grades. Tobacco to which a special factor is applied may meet the general specifications but which has a...

  7. 14 CFR 23.625 - Fitting factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fitting factors. 23.625 Section 23.625... Fitting factors. For each fitting (a part or terminal used to join one structural member to another), the... actual stress conditions are simulated in the fitting and surrounding structures, a fitting factor of...

  8. 14 CFR 27.621 - Casting factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Casting factors. 27.621 Section 27.621... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction General § 27.621 Casting factors. (a) General. The factors, tests, and inspections specified in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section must...

  9. 14 CFR 29.621 - Casting factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Casting factors. 29.621 Section 29.621... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction General § 29.621 Casting factors. (a) General. The factors, tests, and inspections specified in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section must...

  10. 48 CFR 2415.304 - Evaluation factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Evaluation factors. 2415... Evaluation factors. (d)(1) The solicitation shall state the basis for the source selection decision as either....1). (2) When using the trade-off process, each technical evaluation factor and subfactor shall...

  11. 14 CFR 27.619 - Special factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Special factors. 27.619 Section 27.619... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction General § 27.619 Special factors. (a) The special factors prescribed in §§ 27.621 through 27.625 apply to each part of the structure whose...

  12. 7 CFR 652.39 - Mitigating factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mitigating factors. 652.39 Section 652.39 Agriculture... factors. In considering whether to decertify, the period of decertification, and scope of decertification, the deciding official will take into consideration any mitigating factors. Examples of...

  13. 14 CFR 25.621 - Casting factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Casting factors. 25.621 Section 25.621... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction General § 25.621 Casting factors. (a) General. The factors, tests, and inspections specified in paragraphs (b) through (d) of this section...

  14. 7 CFR 29.3057 - Special factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Special factor. 29.3057 Section 29.3057 Agriculture... Special factor. A symbol or term authorized to be used with specified grades. Tobacco to which a special factor is applied may meet the general specifications but has a peculiar side or characteristic...

  15. 7 CFR 29.2299 - Special factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Special factor. 29.2299 Section 29.2299 Agriculture... Special factor. A symbol or term authorized to be used with specified grades. Tobacco to which a special factor is applied may meet the general specifications but has a peculiar side or characteristic...

  16. 7 CFR 29.1059 - Special factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Special factor. 29.1059 Section 29.1059 Agriculture... Type 92) § 29.1059 Special factor. A symbol or term authorized to be used with specified grades. Tobacco to which a special factor is applied may meet the general specifications but which has a...

  17. 14 CFR 27.625 - Fitting factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fitting factors. 27.625 Section 27.625... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction General § 27.625 Fitting factors. For each... are simulated in the fitting and surrounding structures, a fitting factor of at least 1.15 must...

  18. 7 CFR 29.2551 - Special factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Special factor. 29.2551 Section 29.2551 Agriculture...-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2551 Special factor. A symbol or term authorized to be used with specified grades. Tobacco to which a special factor is applied may meet...

  19. 14 CFR 25.621 - Casting factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Casting factors. 25.621 Section 25.621... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction General § 25.621 Casting factors. (a) General. The factors, tests, and inspections specified in paragraphs (b) through (d) of this section...

  20. 14 CFR 25.625 - Fitting factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fitting factors. 25.625 Section 25.625... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction General § 25.625 Fitting factors. For each... conditions are simulated in the fitting and surrounding structures, a fitting factor of at least 1.15 must...