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Sample records for factor receptor-targeted gelatin-based

  1. Gelatin-based hydrogel for vascular endothelial growth factor release in peripheral nerve tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Gnavi, S; di Blasio, L; Tonda-Turo, C; Mancardi, A; Primo, L; Ciardelli, G; Gambarotta, G; Geuna, S; Perroteau, I

    2017-02-01

    Hydrogels are promising materials in regenerative medicine applications, due to their hydrophilicity, biocompatibility and capacity to release drugs and growth factors in a controlled manner. In this study, biocompatible and biodegradable hydrogels based on blends of natural polymers were used in in vitro and ex vivo experiments as a tool for VEGF-controlled release to accelerate the nerve regeneration process. Among different candidates, the angiogenic factor VEGF was selected, since angiogenesis has been long recognized as an important and necessary step during tissue repair. Recent studies have pointed out that VEGF has a beneficial effect on motor neuron survival and Schwann cell vitality and proliferation. Moreover, VEGF administration can sustain and enhance the growth of regenerating peripheral nerve fibres. The hydrogel preparation process was optimized to allow functional incorporation of VEGF, while preventing its degradation and denaturation. VEGF release was quantified through ELISA assay, whereas released VEGF bioactivity was validated in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and in a Schwann cell line (RT4-D6P2T) by assessing VEGFR-2 and downstream effectors Akt and Erk1/2 phosphorylation. Moreover, dorsal root ganglia explants cultured on VEGF-releasing hydrogels displayed increased neurite outgrowth, providing confirmation that released VEGF maintained its effect, as also confirmed in a tubulogenesis assay. In conclusion, a gelatin-based hydrogel system for bioactive VEGF delivery was developed and characterized for its applicability in neural tissue engineering. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted therapy for pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Henry Q; Abbruzzese, James L

    2002-10-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays an important role in tumor development and maintenance. It is a cell surface molecule that mediates signal transduction from the cell surface to cytoplasm. Elevated expression of EGFR or its ligand correlates with worse prognosis in a variety of human cancers. Therefore, blockade of EGFR activity would provide a novel strategy for the treatment of cancer. Two classes of EGFR inhibitors, monoclonal antibodies and tyrosine kinase inhibitors, have been described. The preclinical activity of these EGFR inhibitors and phase I clinical data are summarized in this article. A phase II trial of the EGFR inhibitor IMC-C225 in combination with gemcitabine for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer is discussed. Copyright 2002, Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

  3. A highly versatile adaptor protein for the tethering of growth factors to gelatin-based biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Addi, Cyril; Murschel, Frédéric; Liberelle, Benoît; Riahi, Nesrine; De Crescenzo, Gregory

    2017-03-01

    In the field of tissue engineering, the tethering of growth factors to tissue scaffolds in an oriented manner can enhance their activity and increase their half-life. We chose to investigate the capture of the basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (bFGF) and the Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) on a gelatin layer, as a model for the functionalization of collagen-based biomaterials. Our strategy relies on the use of two high affinity interactions, that is, the one between two distinct coil peptides as well as the one occurring between a collagen-binding domain (CBD) and gelatin. We expressed a chimeric protein to be used as an adaptor that comprises one of the coil peptides and a CBD derived from the human fibronectin. We proved that it has the ability to bind simultaneously to a gelatin substrate and to form a heterodimeric coiled-coil domain with recombinant growth factors being tagged with the complementary coil peptide. The tethering of the growth factors was characterized by ELISA and surface plasmon resonance-based biosensing. The bioactivity of the immobilized bFGF and EGF was evaluated by a human umbilical vein endothelial cell proliferation assay and a vascular smooth muscle cell survival assay. We found that the tethering of EGF preserved its mitogenic and anti-apoptotic activity. In the case of bFGF, when captured via our adaptor protein, changes in its natural mode of interaction with gelatin were observed.

  4. Predicting response to epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted therapy in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Adams, Richard; Maughan, Tim

    2007-04-01

    The discovery over 20 years ago by the Nobel Laureate Stanley Cohen of epidermal growth factor and its receptor, followed by the recognition that this receptor is overexpressed in multiple cancer types, has been of phenomenal significance. From these events the 'Holy Grail' of targeted therapy has looked increasingly realistic. Over the last 5 years this work has come of age with the licensing of multiple agents targeting this important mitogenic pathway in multiple tumor types. However, these agents and the technology behind them, while impressive, have resulted in lower clinical response rates than anticipated. In this review we will focus on the epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted therapies in colorectal cancer, why our expectations from these therapies have not yet been fulfilled and how we may predict those cancers that are likely to respond or be resistant to these therapies through a greater appreciation of the intricacy, diversity and dynamism of cellular signaling mechanisms.

  5. ETS transcription factor family member GABPA contributes to vitamin D receptor target gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Seuter, Sabine; Neme, Antonio; Carlberg, Carsten

    2017-09-11

    Binding motifs of the ETS-domain transcription factor GABPA are found with high significance below the summits of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) cistrome. VDR is the nuclear receptor for the biologically most active vitamin D metabolite 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3). In this study, we determined the GABPA cistrome in THP-1 human monocytes and found that it is comprised of 3822 genomic loci, some 20% of which were modulated by 1,25(OH)2D3. The GABPA cistrome showed a high overlap rate with accessible chromatin and the pioneer transcription factor PU.1. Interestingly, 23 and 12% of persistent and transient VDR binding sites, respectively, co-localized with GABPA, which is clearly higher than the rate of secondary VDR loci (4%). Some 40% of GABPA binding sites were found at transcription start sites, nearly 100 of which are of 1,25(OH)2D3 target genes. On 593 genomic loci VDR and GABPA co-localized with PU.1, while only 175 VDR sites bound GABPA in the absence of PU.1. In total, VDR sites with GABPA co-localization may control some 450 vitamin D target genes. Those genes that are co-controlled by PU.1 preferentially participate in cellular and immune signaling processes, while the remaining genes are involved in cellular metabolism pathways. In conclusion, GABPA may contribute to differential VDR target gene regulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Reformulating Tylocrebrine in Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Targeted Polymeric Nanoparticles Improves Its Therapeutic Index.

    PubMed

    Kirtane, Ameya R; Wong, Henry L; Guru, Bharath Raja; Lis, Lev G; Georg, Gunda I; Gurvich, Vadim J; Panyam, Jayanth

    2015-08-03

    Several promising anticancer drug candidates have been sidelined owing to their poor physicochemical properties or unfavorable pharmacokinetics, resulting in high overall cost of drug discovery and development. Use of alternative formulation strategies that alleviate these issues can help advance new molecules to the clinic at a significantly lower cost. Tylocrebrine is a natural product with potent anticancer activity. Its clinical trial was discontinued following the discovery of severe central nervous system toxicities. To improve the safety and potency of tylocrebrine, we formulated the drug in polymeric nanoparticles targeted to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) overexpressed on several types of tumors. Through in vitro studies in different cancer cell lines, we found that EGFR targeted nanoparticles were significantly more effective in killing tumor cells than the free drug. In vivo pharmacokinetic studies revealed that encapsulation in nanoparticles resulted in lower brain penetration and enhanced tumor accumulation of the drug. Further, targeted nanoparticles were characterized by significantly enhanced tumor growth inhibitory activity in a mouse xenograft model of epidermoid cancer. These results suggest that the therapeutic index of drugs that were previously considered unusable could be significantly improved by reformulation. Application of novel formulation strategies to previously abandoned drugs provides an opportunity to advance new molecules to the clinic at a lower cost. This can significantly increase the repertoire of treatment options available to cancer patients.

  7. mTOR inhibition improves fibroblast growth factor receptor targeting in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Scheller, T; Hellerbrand, C; Moser, C; Schmidt, K; Kroemer, A; Brunner, S M; Schlitt, H J; Geissler, E K; Lang, S A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Systemic therapy has proven only marginal effects in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) so far. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of targeting fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) on tumour and stromal cells in HCC models. Methods: Human and murine HCC cells, endothelial cells (ECs), vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), human HCC samples, FGFR inhibitor BGJ398 and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor rapamycin were used. Effects on growth, motility, signalling and angiogenic markers were determined. In vivo subcutaneous and syngeneic orthotopic tumour models were used. Results: In tumour cells and ECs, targeting FGFR showed significant inhibitory effects on signalling and motility. Minor effects of FGFR inhibition were observed on VSMCs and HSCs, which were significantly enhanced by combining FGFR and mTOR blockade. In vivo daily (5 mg kg−1) treatment with BGJ398 led to a significant growth inhibition in subcutaneous tumour models, but only a combination of FGFR and mTOR blockade impaired tumour growth in the orthotopic model. This was paralleled by reduced tumour cell proliferation, vascularisation, pericytes and increased apoptosis. Conclusions: Targeting FGFR with BGJ398 affects tumour cells and ECs, whereas only a combination with mTOR inhibition impairs recruitment of VSMCs and HSCs. Therefore, this study provides evidence for combined FGFR/mTOR inhibition in HCC. PMID:25688743

  8. Reformulating Tylocrebrine in Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Targeted Polymeric Nanoparticles Improves Its Therapeutic Index

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Several promising anticancer drug candidates have been sidelined owing to their poor physicochemical properties or unfavorable pharmacokinetics, resulting in high overall cost of drug discovery and development. Use of alternative formulation strategies that alleviate these issues can help advance new molecules to the clinic at a significantly lower cost. Tylocrebrine is a natural product with potent anticancer activity. Its clinical trial was discontinued following the discovery of severe central nervous system toxicities. To improve the safety and potency of tylocrebrine, we formulated the drug in polymeric nanoparticles targeted to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) overexpressed on several types of tumors. Through in vitro studies in different cancer cell lines, we found that EGFR targeted nanoparticles were significantly more effective in killing tumor cells than the free drug. In vivo pharmacokinetic studies revealed that encapsulation in nanoparticles resulted in lower brain penetration and enhanced tumor accumulation of the drug. Further, targeted nanoparticles were characterized by significantly enhanced tumor growth inhibitory activity in a mouse xenograft model of epidermoid cancer. These results suggest that the therapeutic index of drugs that were previously considered unusable could be significantly improved by reformulation. Application of novel formulation strategies to previously abandoned drugs provides an opportunity to advance new molecules to the clinic at a lower cost. This can significantly increase the repertoire of treatment options available to cancer patients. PMID:26065924

  9. Phthalocyanine-Peptide Conjugates for Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Targeting1

    PubMed Central

    Ongarora, Benson G.; Fontenot, Krystal R.; Hu, Xiaoke; Sehgal, Inder; Satyanarayana-Jois, Seetharama D.; Vicente, M. Graça H.

    2012-01-01

    Four phthalocyanine (Pc)-peptide conjugates designed to target the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) were synthesized and evaluated in vitro using four cell lines: human carcinoma A431 and HEp2, human colorectal HT-29, and kidney Vero (negative control) cells. Two peptide ligands for EGFR were investigated: EGFR-L1 and -L2, bearing 6 and 13 amino acid residues, respectively. The peptides and Pc-conjugates were shown to bind to EGFR using both theoretical (Autodock) and experimental (SPR) investigations. The Pc-EGFR-L1 conjugates 5a and 5b efficiently targeted EGFR and were internalized, in part due to their cationic charge, whereas the uncharged Pc-EGFR-L2 conjugates 4b and 6a poorly targeted EGFR maybe due to their low aqueous solubility. All conjugates were non-toxic (IC50 > 100 µM) to HT-29 cells, both in the dark and upon light activation (1 J/cm2). Intravenous (iv) administration of conjugate 5b into nude mice bearing A431 and HT-29 human tumor xenografts resulted in a near-IR fluorescence signal at ca. 700 nm, 24 h after administration. Our studies show that Pc-EGFR-L1 conjugates are promising near-IR fluorescent contrast agents for CRC, and potentially other EGFR over-expressing cancers. PMID:22468711

  10. Epidermal growth factor receptor targeted therapy in stages III and IV head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Cripps, C; Winquist, E; Devries, M C; Stys-Norman, D; Gilbert, R

    2010-06-01

    What are the benefits associated with the use of anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (anti-EGFR) therapies in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC)? Anti-EGFR therapies of interest included cetuximab, gefitinib, lapatinib, zalutumumab, erlotinib, and panitumumab. Head-and-neck cancer includes malignant tumours arising from a variety of sites in the upper aerodigestive tract. The most common histologic type is squamous cell carcinoma, and most common sites are the oral cavity, the oropharynx, the hypopharynx, and the larynx. Worldwide, HNSCC is the sixth most common neoplasm, and despite advances in therapy, long-term survival in HNSCC patients is poor. Primary surgery followed by chemoradiation, or primary chemoradiation, are the standard treatment options for patients with locally advanced (stages III-IVB) HNSCC; however, meta-analytic data indicate that the benefit of concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy disappears in patients over the age of 70 years. Cetuximab is a monoclonal antibody approved for use in combination with radiation in the treatment of patients with untreated locally advanced HNSCC and as monotherapy for patients with recurrent or metastatic (stage IVC) HNSCC who have progressed on platinum-based therapy. Given the interest in anti-EGFR agents in advanced HNSCC, the Head and Neck Cancer Disease Site Group (DSG) of Cancer Care Ontario's Program in Evidence-Based Care (PEBC) chose to systematically review the literature pertaining to this topic so as to develop evidence-based recommendations for treatment. Outcomes of interest included overall and progression-free survival, quality of life, tumour response rate and duration, and the toxicity associated with the use of anti-EGFR therapies. The medline, embase, and Cochrane Library databases, the American Society of Clinical Oncology online conference proceedings, the Canadian Medical Association InfoBase, and the National Guidelines Clearinghouse were systematically searched to

  11. Design and characteristics of cytotoxic fibroblast growth factor 1 conjugate for fibroblast growth factor receptor-targeted cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Szlachcic, Anna; Zakrzewska, Malgorzata; Lobocki, Michal; Jakimowicz, Piotr; Otlewski, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) are attractive candidate cancer therapy targets as they are overexpressed in multiple types of tumors, such as breast, prostate, bladder, and lung cancer. In this study, a natural ligand of FGFR, an engineered variant of fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF1V), was conjugated to a potent cytotoxic drug, monomethyl auristatin E (MMAE), and used as a targeting agent for cancer cells overexpressing FGFRs, similar to antibodies in antibody–drug conjugates. The FGF1V–valine–citrulline–MMAE conjugate showed a favorable stability profile, bound FGFRs on the cell surface specifically, and efficiently released the drug (MMAE) upon cleavage by the lysosomal protease cathepsin B. Importantly, the conjugate showed a prominent cytotoxic effect toward cell lines expressing FGFR. FGF1V–vcMMAE was highly cytotoxic at concentrations even an order of magnitude lower than those found for free MMAE. This effect was FGFR-specific as cells lacking FGFR did not show any increased mortality. PMID:27563235

  12. Fabrication of growth factor- and extracellular matrix-loaded, gelatin-based scaffolds and their biocompatibility with Schwann cells and dorsal root ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Gámez Sazo, Rodolfo E.; Maenaka, Katsumi; Gu, Weiyong; Wood, Patrick M.; Bunge, Mary Bartlett

    2012-01-01

    One of the most exciting new avenues of research to repair the injured spinal cord is to combine cells for implantation with scaffolds that protect the cells and release growth factors to improve their survival and promote host axonal regeneration. To realize this goal, we fabricated biodegradable, photocurable gelatin tubes and membranes for exploratory in vitro studies. Detailed methods are described for their fabrication with a high gelatin concentration. Gelatin membranes fabricated in the same way as tubes and photo-co-immobilized with rhBDNF or rhNT-3, with or without Schwann cells (SCs), showed an initial burst of neurotrophin release within 24h, with release diminishing progressively for 21 days thereafter. SCs attained their typical bipolar conformation on membranes without neurotrophins but adhesion, alignment and proliferation were improved with neurotrophins, particularly rhBDNF. When dorsal root ganglion explants were cultured on membranes containing laminin and fibronectin plus both neurotrophins, neurite outgrowth was lengthier compared to combining one neurotrophin with laminin and fibronectin. Thus, these gelatin membranes allow SC survival and effectively release growth factors and harbor extracellular matrix components to improve cell survival and neurite growth. These scaffolds, based on the combination of cross-linked gelatin technology and incorporation of neurotrophins and extracellular matrix components, are promising candidates for spinal cord repair. PMID:22906605

  13. Axonal regeneration and remyelination evaluation of chitosan/gelatin-based nerve guide combined with transforming growth factor-β1 and Schwann cells.

    PubMed

    Nie, Xin; Deng, Manjing; Yang, Maojin; Liu, Luchuan; Zhang, Yongjie; Wen, Xiujie

    2014-01-01

    Despite efforts in peripheral nerve injury and regeneration, it is difficult to achieve a functional recovery following extended peripheral nerve lesions. Even if artificial nerve conduit, cell components and growth factors can enhance nerve regeneration, integration in peripheral nerve repair and regeneration remains yet to be explored. For this study, we used chitosan/gelatin nerve graft constructed with collagenous matrices as a vehicle for Schwann cells and transforming growth factor-β1 to bridge a 10-mm gap of the sciatic nerve and explored the feasibility of improving regeneration and reinnervation in rats. The nerve regeneration was assessed with functional recovery, electrophysiological test, retrograde labeling, and immunohistochemistry analysis during the post-operative period of 16 weeks. The results showed that the internal sides of the conduits were compact enough to prevent the connective tissues from ingrowth. Nerve conduction velocity, average regenerated myelin area, and myelinated axon count were similar to those treated with autograft (p > 0.05) but significantly higher than those bridged with chitosan/gelatin nerve graft alone (p < 0.05). Evidences from retrograde labeling and immunohistochemistry analysis are further provided in support of improving axonal regeneration and remyelination. A designed graft incorporating all of the tissue-engineering strategies for peripheral nerve regeneration may provide great progress in tissue engineering for nerve repair.

  14. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor targeting in non-small cell lung cancer: revisiting different strategies against the same target.

    PubMed

    Castañón, Eduardo; Martín, Patricia; Rolfo, Christian; Fusco, Juan P; Ceniceros, Lucía; Legaspi, Jairo; Santisteban, Marta; Gil-Bazo, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have changed the paradigm of treatment in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The molecular biology study of EGFR has led to clinical trials that select patients more accurately, regarding the presence of EGFR activating mutations. Nonetheless, a lack of response or a temporary condition of the response has been detected in patients on EGFR TKIs. This has urged to study potential resistance mechanisms underneath. The most important ones are the presence of secondary mutations in EGFR, such as T790M, or the overexpression of mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor (MET) that may explain why patients who initially respond to EGFR TKIs, may ultimately become refractory. Several approaches have been taken and new drugs both targeting EGFR resistance-mutation or MET are currently being developed. Here we review and update the EGFR biological pathway as well as the clinical data leading to approval of the EGFR TKIs currently in the market. New compounds under investigation targeting resistance mutations or dually targeting EGFR and other relevant receptors are also reviewed and discussed.

  15. Epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted lipid nanoparticles retain self-assembled nanostructures and provide high specificity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Jiali; Scoble, Judith A.; Li, Nan; Lovrecz, George; Waddington, Lynne J.; Tran, Nhiem; Muir, Benjamin W.; Coia, Gregory; Kirby, Nigel; Drummond, Calum J.; Mulet, Xavier

    2015-02-01

    Next generation drug delivery utilising nanoparticles incorporates active targeting to specific sites. In this work, we combined targeting with the inherent advantages of self-assembled lipid nanoparticles containing internal nano-structures. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeting, PEGylated lipid nanoparticles using phytantriol and 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-PEG-maleimide amphiphiles were created. The self-assembled lipid nanoparticles presented here have internal lyotropic liquid crystalline nano-structures, verified by synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering and cryo-transmission electron microscopy, that offer the potential of high drug loading and enhanced cell penetration. Anti-EGFR Fab' fragments were conjugated to the surface of nanoparticles via a maleimide-thiol reaction at a high conjugation efficiency and retained specificity following conjugation to the nanoparticles. The conjugated nanoparticles were demonstrated to have high affinity for an EGFR target in a ligand binding assay.Next generation drug delivery utilising nanoparticles incorporates active targeting to specific sites. In this work, we combined targeting with the inherent advantages of self-assembled lipid nanoparticles containing internal nano-structures. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeting, PEGylated lipid nanoparticles using phytantriol and 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-PEG-maleimide amphiphiles were created. The self-assembled lipid nanoparticles presented here have internal lyotropic liquid crystalline nano-structures, verified by synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering and cryo-transmission electron microscopy, that offer the potential of high drug loading and enhanced cell penetration. Anti-EGFR Fab' fragments were conjugated to the surface of nanoparticles via a maleimide-thiol reaction at a high conjugation efficiency and retained specificity following conjugation to the nanoparticles. The conjugated nanoparticles

  16. Combined epidermal growth factor receptor targeting with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor gefitinib (ZD1839) and the monoclonal antibody cetuximab (IMC-C225): superiority over single-agent receptor targeting.

    PubMed

    Matar, Pablo; Rojo, Federico; Cassia, Raúl; Moreno-Bueno, Gema; Di Cosimo, Serena; Tabernero, José; Guzmán, Marta; Rodriguez, Sonia; Arribas, Joaquín; Palacios, José; Baselga, José

    2004-10-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is abnormally activated in cancer and two classes of anti-EGFR agents, monoclonal antibodies and low-molecular-weight tyrosine kinase inhibitors, have shown antitumor activity in patients. Because these two classes of antireceptor agents target the EGFR at different sites, we decided to explore whether the combined administration of gefitinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, and cetuximab, a monoclonal antibody, had superior antitumor activity than either agent given alone. We studied the effects of the combination of gefitinib and cetuximab in a panel of human cancer cell lines and in an EGFR-dependent human tumor xenograft model (A431). The effects of these two agents on EGFR signaling, proliferation, apoptosis, and vascularization were evaluated. In addition, we analyzed, with cDNA arrays, changes in gene expression profiles induced by both agents. The combined treatment with gefitinib and cetuximab resulted in a synergistic effect on cell proliferation and in superior inhibition of EGFR-dependent signaling and induction of apoptosis. In a series of in vivo experiments, single-agent gefitinib or cetuximab resulted in transient complete tumor remission only at the highest doses. In contrast, suboptimal doses of gefitinib and cetuximab given together resulted in a complete and permanent regression of large tumors. In the combination-treated tumors, there was a superior inhibition of EGFR, mitogen-activated protein kinase, and Akt phosphorylation, as well as greater inhibition of cell proliferation and vascularization and enhanced apoptosis. Using cDNA arrays, we found 59 genes that were coregulated and 45 genes differentially regulated, including genes related to cell proliferation and differentiation, transcription, DNA synthesis and repair, angiogenesis, signaling molecules, cytoskeleton organization, and tumor invasion and metastasis. Our findings suggest both shared and complementary mechanisms of action with gefitinib

  17. Gelatin-Based Materials in Ocular Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Rose, James B; Pacelli, Settimio; Haj, Alicia J El; Dua, Harminder S; Hopkinson, Andrew; White, Lisa J; Rose, Felicity R A J

    2014-04-17

    Gelatin has been used for many years in pharmaceutical formulation, cell culture and tissue engineering on account of its excellent biocompatibility, ease of processing and availability at low cost. Over the last decade gelatin has been extensively evaluated for numerous ocular applications serving as cell-sheet carriers, bio-adhesives and bio-artificial grafts. These different applications naturally have diverse physical, chemical and biological requirements and this has prompted research into the modification of gelatin and its derivatives. The crosslinking of gelatin alone or in combination with natural or synthetic biopolymers has produced a variety of scaffolds that could be suitable for ocular applications. This review focuses on methods to crosslink gelatin-based materials and how the resulting materials have been applied in ocular tissue engineering. Critical discussion of recent innovations in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine will highlight future opportunities for gelatin-based materials in ophthalmology.

  18. Receptor-targeted metalloradiopharmaceuticals. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Mark A.

    2000-03-22

    Copper (II) and platinum (II) coordination complexes were prepared and characterized. These complexes were designed to afford structural homology with steroidal and non-steroidal estrogens for possible use as receptor-targeted radiopharmaceuticals. While weak affinity for the estrogen receptor was detectable, none would appear to have sufficient receptor-affinity for estrogen-receptor-targeted imaging or therapy.

  19. Angiogenic potential of endothelial and tumor cells seeded on gelatin-based hydrogels in response to electrical stimulations.

    PubMed

    Tzoneva, Rumiana; Uzunova, Veselina; Apostolova, Sonia; Krüger-Genge, Anne; Neffe, Axel T; Jung, Friedrich; Lendlein, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis is one of the key processes during development, wound healing and tumor formation. Prerequisite for its existence is the presence of endogenous electrical fields (EFs) generated by active ion transport across polarized epithelia and endothelia, and appearance of the transcellular potentials. During angiogenesis cellular factor as endothelial growth factor (VEGF), synthesis of adhesive proteins and membrane metalloproteinases (MMPs) govern the angiogenic response to different external stimuli as biomaterials interactions and/or exogenous EF. Gelatin-based hydrogels with elasticities comparable to human tissues have shown to influence cell behavior as well as cell attachment, protein synthesis, VEGF and MMP's production after the application of EF. Gelatin-based matrices with 3 (G10_LNCO3), 5 (G10_LNCO5), and 8 (G10_LNCO8) fold excess of isocyanate groups per mol of amine groups present in gelatin were used. Human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVEC) (Lonza Basel, Switzerland) and highly invasive breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells (ATCC®HTB-26TM) were used. For an estimation of the amount of VEGF released from cells a commercially available VEGF ELISA (Thermo Fisher Scientific, Germany) kit was used. Fibronectin (FN) enzyme immunoassay (EIA) was used to analyze the secreted amount of FN by cells seeded on the materials. Secreted MMPs were analyzed by zymography. Gelatin-based hydrogels attracted HUVEC adhesion and diminished the adhesion of MDA-MB-231 cells. The applied direct current (DC) EF induced an almost 5-fold increase in VEGF production by HUVEC seeded on gelatin-based hydrogels, while in contrast, the applied EF decreased the production of VEGF by cancer cells. FN synthesis was elevated in HUVEC cells seeded on gelatin-based materials in comparison to FN synthesis by cancer cells. HUVEC seeded on gelatin hydrogels showed an expression mainly of MMP-2. The application of EF increased the production of MMP-2 in HUVEC seeded on gelatin materials. In

  20. Electrochemical Fabrication of Functional Gelatin-Based Bioelectronic Interface.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xianghong; Liu, Yi; Bentley, William E; Payne, Gregory F

    2016-02-08

    Gelatin remains one of the most important biopolymeric material platforms because of its availability, safety, biocompatibility, biodegradability, and stimuli-responsive properties. Here we report a simple, rapid, and reagentless anodic deposition method to assemble gelatin hydrogels from aqueous salt solutions onto an electrode surface. Results indicate that anodic reactions partially oxidize gelatin to yield a covalently cross-linked network that can perform multiple functions. First, anodically deposited gelatin remains activated, allowing covalent protein grafting and thus enabling biofunctionalization for electrochemical biosensing. Second, the anodically deposited gelatin retains its thermally responsive physical cross-linking properties that enable switching functions. Finally, the physical and chemical cross-linking mechanisms are reversible, which enables self-healing functions. Thus, anodic deposition provides a facile method to assemble gelatin-based multifunctional matrices for diverse applications in bioelectronics.

  1. In vivo anticancer evaluation of the hyperthermic efficacy of anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted PEG-based nanocarrier containing magnetic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Baldi, Giovanni; Ravagli, Costanza; Mazzantini, Filippo; Loudos, George; Adan, Jaume; Masa, Marc; Psimadas, Dimitrios; Fragogeorgi, Eirini A; Locatelli, Erica; Innocenti, Claudia; Sangregorio, Claudio; Comes Franchini, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Polymeric nanoparticles with targeting moieties containing magnetic nanoparticles as theranostic agents have considerable potential for the treatment of cancer. Here we report the chemical synthesis and characterization of a poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide)-b-poly(ethylene glycol)-based nanocarrier containing iron oxide nanoparticles and human epithelial growth factor receptor on the outer shell. The nanocarrier was also radiolabeled with 99mTc and tested as a theranostic nanomedicine, ie, it was investigated for both its diagnostic ability in vivo and its therapeutic hyperthermic effects in a standard A431 human tumor cell line. Following radiolabeling with 99mTc, the biodistribution and therapeutic hyperthermic effects of the nanosystem were studied noninvasively in vivo in tumor-bearing mice. A substantial decrease in tumor size correlated with an increase in both nanoparticle concentration and local temperature was achieved, confirming the possibility of using this multifunctional nanosystem as a therapeutic tool for epidermoid carcinoma. PMID:25028545

  2. Angiopoietin-like 4 (ANGPTL4, fasting-induced adipose factor) is a direct glucocorticoid receptor target and participates in glucocorticoid-regulated triglyceride metabolism.

    PubMed

    Koliwad, Suneil K; Kuo, Taiyi; Shipp, Lauren E; Gray, Nora E; Backhed, Fredrik; So, Alex Yick-Lun; Farese, Robert V; Wang, Jen-Chywan

    2009-09-18

    Glucocorticoids are important regulators of lipid homeostasis, and chronically elevated glucocorticoid levels induce hypertriglyceridemia, hepatic steatosis, and visceral obesity. The occupied glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is a transcription factor. However, those genes regulating lipid metabolism under GR control are not fully known. Angiopoietin-like 4 (ANGPTL4, fasting-induced adipose factor), a protein inhibitor of lipoprotein lipase, is synthesized and secreted during fasting, when circulating glucocorticoid levels are physiologically increased. We therefore tested whether the ANGPTL4 gene (Angptl4) is transcriptionally controlled by GR. We show that treatment with the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone increased Angptl4 mRNA levels in primary hepatocytes and adipocytes (2-3-fold) and in the livers and white adipose tissue of mice (approximately 4-fold). We tested the mechanism of this increase in H4IIE hepatoma cells and found that dexamethasone treatment increased the transcriptional rate of Angptl4. Using bioinformatics and chromatin immunoprecipitation, we identified a GR binding site within the rat Angptl4 sequence. A reporter plasmid containing this site was markedly activated by dexamethasone, indicative of a functional glucocorticoid response element. Dexamethasone treatment also increased histone H4 acetylation and DNase I accessibility in genomic regions near this site, further supporting that it is a glucocorticoid response element. Glucocorticoids promote the flux of triglycerides from white adipose tissue to liver. We found that mice lacking ANGPTL4 (Angptl4(-/-)) had reductions in dexamethasone-induced hypertriglyceridemia and hepatic steatosis, suggesting that ANGPTL4 is required for this flux. Overall, we establish that ANGPTL4 is a direct GR target that participates in glucocorticoid-regulated triglyceride metabolism.

  3. Mad2 Checkpoint Gene Silencing Using Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-Targeted Chitosan Nanoparticles in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Model

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference has emerged as a powerful strategy in cancer therapy because it allows silencing of specific genes associated with tumor progression and resistance. Mad2 is an essential mitotic checkpoint component required for accurate chromosome segregation during mitosis, and its complete abolition leads to cell death. We have developed an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeted chitosan system for silencing the Mad2 gene as a strategy to efficiently induce cell death in EGFR overexpressing human A549 non-small cell lung cancer cells. Control and EGFR-targeted chitosan nanoparticles loaded with small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) against Mad2 were formulated and characterized for size, charge, morphology, and encapsulation efficiency. Qualitative and quantitative intracellular uptake studies by confocal imaging and flow cytometry, respectively, showed time-dependent enhanced and selective intracellular internalization of EGFR-targeted nanoparticles compared to nontargeted system. Targeted nanoparticles showed nearly complete depletion of Mad2 expression in A549 cells contrasting with the partial depletion in the nontargeted system. Accordingly, Mad2-silencing-induced apoptotic cell death was confirmed by cytotoxicity assay and flow cytometry. Our results demonstrate that EGFR-targeted chitosan loaded with Mad2 siRNAs is a potent delivery system for selective killing of cancer cells. PMID:25256346

  4. Preparation of clinical-grade 89Zr-panitumumab as a positron emission tomography biomarker for evaluating epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Ling; Shi, Jianfeng; Afari, George; Bhattacharyya, Sibaprasad

    2014-01-01

    Panitumumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody approved for the treatment of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) positive colorectal cancer. Recently, panitumumab has been radiolabeled with 89Zr and evaluated for its potential to be used as immuno-positron emission tomography (PET) probe for EGFR positive cancers. Interesting preclinical results published by several groups of researchers have prompted us to develop a robust procedure for producing clinical-grade 89Zr-panitumumab as an immuno-PET probe to evaluate EGFR-targeted therapy. In this process, clinical-grade panitumumab is bio-conjugated with desferrioxamine chelate and subsequently radiolabeled with 89Zr resulting in high radiochemical yield (>70%, n=3) and purity (>98%, n=3). All quality control (QC) tests were performed according to United States Pharmacopeia specifications. QC tests showed that 89Zr-panitumumab met all specifications for human injection. Herein, we describe a step-by-step method for the facile synthesis and QC tests of 89Zr-panitumumab for medical use. The entire process of bioconjugation, radiolabeling, and all QC tests will take about 5h. Because the synthesis is fully manual, two rapid, in-process QC tests have been introduced to make the procedure robust and error free. PMID:24448743

  5. Epidermal growth factor receptor targeting alters gene expression and restores the adhesion function of cancerous cells as measured by single cell force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Azadi, Shohreh; Tafazzoli-Shadpour, Mohammad; Omidvar, Ramin; Moradi, Lida; Habibi-Anbouhi, Mahdi

    2016-12-01

    Loss of cell-cell adhesion function is a common characteristic of many human epithelial carcinomas that is frequently due to loss of E-cadherin expression. In cancer progression, loss of E-cadherin is associated with invasion and metastasis potential, hence restoration of its function may contribute to the metastasis inhibition. This study examined effect of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR/Her1) blockade on the E-cadherin expression, cellular adherence, and cell elasticity in two human epithelial cancer cell lines, MCF7 and A431. EGFR blocking agents as antibodies or small molecules target EGFR directly. Furthermore, due to intracellular signaling pathways they influence cell behavior and activities. The idea here is to investigate the effect of reduced activity of this signaling pathway using anti-EGFR Antibody (Cetuximab) and tyrosine kinase inhibitor (Lapatinib) on cell-cell adhesion and cell mechanical properties. Real-Time PCR analysis demonstrated that treatment of cells with considered drugs increased the expression of E-cadherin gene among samples. The atomic force microscopy-based single cell force spectroscopy technique was used to measure adhesive force of cancerous cells. Results indicated that inhibition of EGFR activity elevated cell-cell adhesion force, accompanied by stiffening of the cell bodies. In summary, Cetuximab and Lapatinib have been found to mediate cell-cell adhesion by restoration of E-cadherin expression and function. Our data suggest possible therapeutic potential for inhibition of metastasis via the blockade of EGFR signaling.

  6. Synthesis of (68)Ga-labeled NOTA-RGD-GE11 heterodimeric peptide for dual integrin and epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted tumor imaging.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hung-Man; Chen, Jyun-Hong; Lin, Kun-Liang; Lin, Wuu-Jyh

    2015-06-15

    Radiolabeled Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide analogs have been extensively studied for αvβ3 integrin-targeted angiogenesis imaging. According to recently presented evidence, the dodecapeptide GE11 has high affinity to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which is overexpressed in many types of cancer. Dual-receptor molecular imaging probes with two different heterodimeric peptides exhibit improved cancer targeting efficacy. In the present study, the design and synthesis of a new RGD-GE11 peptide heterodimer for dual αvβ3 integrin/EGFR-targeted cancer imaging are described. The RGD-GE11 heterodimer was linked with 6-aminohexanoic acid (6-Ahx) and cysteine and conjugated with 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-N,N',N″-triacetic acid (NOTA) to form NOTA-RGD-cys-6-Ahx-GE11. The monomeric peptides, NOTA-cys-6-Ahx-GE11 and c(RGDyK), were formed by a peptide synthesizer. The peptide heterodimer NOTA-RGD-GE11 was obtained by NOTA-cys-6-Ahx-GE11 and maleimidopropyl-c(RGDyK) conjugation with a thioether linkage. The NOTA peptide conjugate was labeled with freshly eluted (68)Ga and purified using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The (68)Ga-NOTA-RGD-cys-6-Ahx-GE11 was successfully prepared, in this study, with a radiochemical yield of 85% and a radiochemical purity of >98%. These results warrant further investigation of this heterodimeric peptide's binding affinity to the receptors. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Cellular Uptake and Cytotoxic Effect of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Targeted and Plitidepsin Loaded Co-Polymeric Polymersomes on Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Goñi-de-Cerio, Felipe; Thevenot, Julie; Oliveira, Hugo; Pérez-Andrés, Encarnación; Berra, Edurne; Masa, Marc; Suárez-Merino, Blanca; Lecommandoux, Sébastien; Heredia, Pedro

    2015-11-01

    Encapsulating chemotherapy drugs in targeted nanodelivery systems is one of the most promising approaches to tackle cancer disease, avoiding side effects of common treatment. In the last decade, several nanocarriers with different nature have been tested, but polypeptide-based copolymers have attracted considerable attention for their biocompatibility, controlled and slow biodegradability as well as their low toxicity. In this work, we synthesized, characterized and evaluated poly(trimethylene carbonate)-bock-poly(L-glutamic acid) derived polymersomes, targeted to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), loaded with plitidepsin and ultimately tested in HT29 and LS174T colorectal cancer cell lines for specificity and efficacy. Furthermore, morphology, physico-chemical properties and plitidepsin loading were carefully investigated. A thorough in vitro cytotoxicity analysis of the unloaded polymersomes was carried out for biocompatibility check, studying viability, cell membrane asymmetry and reactive oxygen species levels. Those cytotoxicity assays showed good biocompatibility for plitidepsin-unloaded polymersomes. Cellular uptake and cytotoxic effect of EGFR targeted and plitidepsin loaded polymersome indicated that colorectal cancer cell lines were.more sensitive to anti-EGFR-drug-loaded than untargeted drug-loaded polymersomes. Also, in both cell lines, the use of untargeted polymersomes greatly reduced plitidepsin cytotoxicity as well as the cellular uptake, indicating that the use of this targeted nanocarrier is a promising approach to tackle colorectal cancer disease and avoid the undesired effects of the usual treatment. Furthermore, in vivo assays support the in vitro conclusions that EGFR targeted polymersomes could be a good drug delivery system. This work provides a proof of concept for the use of encapsulated targeted drugs as future therapeutic treatments for cancer.

  8. Radionuclide therapy using ¹³¹I-labeled anti-epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted nanoparticles suppresses cancer cell growth caused by EGFR overexpression.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Liu, Zhongyun; Li, Chengxia; Li, Ning; Fang, Lei; Chang, Jin; Tan, Jian

    2016-03-01

    Anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeted nanoparticles can be used to deliver a therapeutic and imaging agent to EGFR-overexpressing tumor cells. (131)I-labeled anti-EGFR nanoparticles derived from cetuximab were used as a tumor-targeting vehicle in radionuclide therapy. This paper describes the construction of the anti-EGFR nanoparticle EGFR-BSA-PCL. This nanoparticle was characterized for EGFR-targeted binding and cellular uptake in EGFR-overexpressing cancer cells by using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Anti-EGFR and non-targeted nanoparticles were labeled with (131)I using the chloramine-T method. Analyses of cytotoxicity and targeted cell killing with (131)I were performed using the MTT assay. The time-dependent cellular uptake of (131)I-labeled anti-EGFR nanoparticles proved the slow-release effects of nanoparticles. A radioiodine therapy study was also performed in mice. The EGFR-targeted nanoparticle EGFR-BSA-PCL and the non-targeted nanoparticle BSA-PCL were constructed; the effective diameters were approximately 100 nm. The results from flow cytometry and confocal microscopy revealed significant uptake of EGFR-BSA-PCL in EGFR-overexpressing tumor cells. Compared with EGFR-BSA-PCL, BSA-PCL could also bind to cells, but tumor cell retention was minimal and weak. In MTT assays, the EGFR-targeted radioactive nanoparticle (131)I-EGFR-BSA-PCL showed greater cytotoxicity and targeted cell killing than the non-targeted nanoparticle (131)I-BSA-PCL. The radioiodine uptake of both (131)I-labeled nanoparticles, (131)I-EGFR-BSA-PCL and (131)I-BSA-PCL, was rapid and reached maximal levels 4 h after incubation, but the (131)I uptake of (131)I-EGFR-BSA-PCL was higher than that of (131)I-BSA-PCL. On day 15, the average tumor volumes of the (131)I-EGFR-BSA-PCL and (131)I-BSA-PCL groups showed a slow growth relationship compared with that of the control group. The EGFR-targeted nanoparticle EGFR-BSA-PCL demonstrated superior cellular binding and uptake

  9. Gelatin-based laser direct-write technique for the precise spatial patterning of cells.

    PubMed

    Schiele, Nathan R; Chrisey, Douglas B; Corr, David T

    2011-03-01

    Laser direct-writing provides a method to pattern living cells in vitro, to study various cell-cell interactions, and to build cellular constructs. However, the materials typically used may limit its long-term application. By utilizing gelatin coatings on the print ribbon and growth surface, we developed a new approach for laser cell printing that overcomes the limitations of Matrigel™. Gelatin is free of growth factors and extraneous matrix components that may interfere with cellular processes under investigation. Gelatin-based laser direct-write was able to successfully pattern human dermal fibroblasts with high post-transfer viability (91% ± 3%) and no observed double-strand DNA damage. As seen with atomic force microscopy, gelatin offers a unique benefit in that it is present temporarily to allow cell transfer, but melts and is removed with incubation to reveal the desired application-specific growth surface. This provides unobstructed cellular growth after printing. Monitoring cell location after transfer, we show that melting and removal of gelatin does not affect cellular placement; cells maintained registry within 5.6 ± 2.5 μm to the initial pattern. This study demonstrates the effectiveness of gelatin in laser direct-writing to create spatially precise cell patterns with the potential for applications in tissue engineering, stem cell, and cancer research.

  10. Gelatin-Based Laser Direct-Write Technique for the Precise Spatial Patterning of Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schiele, Nathan R.; Chrisey, Douglas B.

    2011-01-01

    Laser direct-writing provides a method to pattern living cells in vitro, to study various cell–cell interactions, and to build cellular constructs. However, the materials typically used may limit its long-term application. By utilizing gelatin coatings on the print ribbon and growth surface, we developed a new approach for laser cell printing that overcomes the limitations of Matrigel™. Gelatin is free of growth factors and extraneous matrix components that may interfere with cellular processes under investigation. Gelatin-based laser direct-write was able to successfully pattern human dermal fibroblasts with high post-transfer viability (91% ± 3%) and no observed double-strand DNA damage. As seen with atomic force microscopy, gelatin offers a unique benefit in that it is present temporarily to allow cell transfer, but melts and is removed with incubation to reveal the desired application-specific growth surface. This provides unobstructed cellular growth after printing. Monitoring cell location after transfer, we show that melting and removal of gelatin does not affect cellular placement; cells maintained registry within 5.6 ± 2.5 μm to the initial pattern. This study demonstrates the effectiveness of gelatin in laser direct-writing to create spatially precise cell patterns with the potential for applications in tissue engineering, stem cell, and cancer research. PMID:20849381

  11. Review: Receptor Targeted Nuclear Imaging of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dalm, Simone U.; Verzijlbergen, John Fred; De Jong, Marion

    2017-01-01

    Receptor targeted nuclear imaging directed against molecular markers overexpressed on breast cancer (BC) cells offers a sensitive and specific method for BC imaging. Currently, a few targets such as estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), somatostatin receptor (SSTR), and the gastrin releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) are being investigated for this purpose. Expression of these targets is BC subtype dependent and information that can be gained from lesion visualization is dependent on the target; ER-targeting radiotracers, e.g., can be used to monitor response to anti-estrogen treatment. Here we give an overview of the studies currently under investigation for receptor targeted nuclear imaging of BC. Main findings of imaging studies are summarized and (potential) purposes of lesion visualization by targeting these molecular markers are discussed. Since BC is a very heterogeneous disease and molecular target expression can vary per subtype, but also during disease progression or under influence of treatment, radiotracers for selected imaging purposes should be chosen carefully. PMID:28134770

  12. Review: Receptor Targeted Nuclear Imaging of Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Dalm, Simone U; Verzijlbergen, John Fred; De Jong, Marion

    2017-01-26

    Receptor targeted nuclear imaging directed against molecular markers overexpressed on breast cancer (BC) cells offers a sensitive and specific method for BC imaging. Currently, a few targets such as estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), somatostatin receptor (SSTR), and the gastrin releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) are being investigated for this purpose. Expression of these targets is BC subtype dependent and information that can be gained from lesion visualization is dependent on the target; ER-targeting radiotracers, e.g., can be used to monitor response to anti-estrogen treatment. Here we give an overview of the studies currently under investigation for receptor targeted nuclear imaging of BC. Main findings of imaging studies are summarized and (potential) purposes of lesion visualization by targeting these molecular markers are discussed. Since BC is a very heterogeneous disease and molecular target expression can vary per subtype, but also during disease progression or under influence of treatment, radiotracers for selected imaging purposes should be chosen carefully.

  13. Folate-receptor-targeted radionuclide imaging agents.

    PubMed

    Ke, Chun-Yen; Mathias, Carla J; Green, Mark A

    2004-04-29

    The cell-membrane folate receptor is a potential molecular target for tumor-selective drug delivery, including delivery of radiolabeled folate-chelate conjugates for diagnostic imaging. This review surveys the growing literature on tumor imaging with radionuclide agents targeted to the folate receptor. Successful folate-receptor targeting has been reported, both in vitro and in vivo, using a variety of radionuclides that are suitable for clinical diagnostic imaging (67Ga, 111In, 99mTc, 66Ga, and 64Cu). While none of these agents has, to date, been demonstrated to have clinical efficacy as a diagnostic tool, existing data indicates that it is feasible to noninvasively assess (at least qualitatively) tissue folate receptor levels by external radionuclide imaging.

  14. Development of a gelatin-based polyurethane vascular graft by spray, phase-inversion technology.

    PubMed

    Losi, Paola; Mancuso, Luisa; Al Kayal, Tamer; Celi, Simona; Briganti, Enrica; Gualerzi, Alice; Volpi, Silvia; Cao, Giacomo; Soldani, Giorgio

    2015-08-04

    The capacity of a composite vascular graft constituting polyurethane (PU) and gelatin to support cell growth was investigated using human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Gelatin-based polyurethane grafts were fabricated by co-spraying polyurethane and gelatin using a spray, phase-inversion technique. Graft microstructure was investigated by light and scanning electron microscopy. Uniaxial tensile tests were performed to assess the grafts' mechanical properties in longitudinal and circumferential directions. hMSCs obtained from bone marrow aspirate were seeded onto flat graft samples. After 24, 48, and 72 h of incubation, cell morphology was evaluated by Giemsa staining and cell viability was calculated by XTT assay. SEM analysis evidenced that PU samples display a microporous structure, whereas the gelatin-based PU samples show a fibrillar appearance. The presence of cross-linked gelatin produced a significant increase of ultimate tensile strength and ultimate elongation in circumferential directions compared to PU material. Qualitative analysis of hMSC adhesion onto the grafts revealed remarkable differences between gelatin-based PU and control graft. hMSCs grown onto gelatin-based PU graft form a monolayer that reached confluence at 72 h, whereas cells seeded onto the control graft were not able to undergo appropriate spreading. hMSCs grown onto gelatin-based PU graft showed significantly higher viability than cells seeded onto bare PU at all time points. In conclusion, a composite vascular graft was successfully manufactured by simultaneous co-spraying of a synthetic polymer and a protein to obtain a scaffold that combines the mechanical characteristics of polyurethanes with the favorable cell interaction features of gelatin.

  15. Photofabricated gelatin-based nerve conduits: nerve tissue regeneration potentials.

    PubMed

    Gámez, Eduardo; Goto, Yoshinobu; Nagata, Kengo; Iwaki, Toru; Sasaki, Tomio; Matsuda, Takehisa

    2004-01-01

    There is a strong demand for development of nerve guide conduit with prompt nerve regeneration potential for injury-induced nerve defect. Prior to study on nerve tissue engineering using Schwann cells or nerve stem cells, the effectiveness of photofabricated scaffolds based on photocurable gelatin was examined. This study describes the evaluation of in vivo nerve tissue regeneration potentials of three custom-designed and -fabricated prostheses (inner diameter, 1.2 mm; outer diameter, 2.4 mm; wall thickness, 0.60 mm; and length, 15 mm) made of photocured gelatin: a plain photocured gelatin tube (model I), a photocured gelatin tube packed with bioactive substances (laminin, fibronectin, and nerve growth factor) coimmobilized in a photocured gelatin rod (model II), and a photocured gelatin tube packed with bioactive substances coimmobilized in multifilament fibers (model III). These prostheses were implanted between the proximal and distal stumps 10 mm of the dissected right sciatic nerve of 70 adult male Lewis rats for up to 1 year. The highest regenerative potentials were found using the model III prosthesis, followed by the model II prosthesis. Markedly retarded neural regeneration was observed using the model I prosthesis. These were evaluated from the viewpoints of functional recovery, electrophysiological responses, and tissue morphological regeneration. The significance of the synergistic cooperative functions of multifilaments, which serve as a platform that provides contact guidance to direct longitudinal cell movement and tissue ingrowth and as a cell adhesive matrix with high surface area, and immobilized bioactive substances, which enhance nerve regeneration via biological stimulation, is discussed.

  16. Non-toxic agarose/gelatin-based microencapsulation system containing gallic acid for antifungal application.

    PubMed

    Lam, P-L; Gambari, R; Kok, S H-L; Lam, K-H; Tang, J C-O; Bian, Z-X; Lee, K K-H; Chui, C-H

    2015-02-01

    Aspergillus niger (A. niger) is a common species of Aspergillus molds. Cutaneous aspergillosis usually occurs in skin sites near intravenous injection and approximately 6% of cutaneous aspergillosis cases which do not involve burn or HIV-infected patients are caused by A. niger. Biomaterials and biopharmaceuticals produced from microparticle-based drug delivery systems have received much attention as microencapsulated drugs offer an improvement in therapeutic efficacy due to better human absorption. The frequently used crosslinker, glutaraldehyde, in gelatin-based microencapsulation systems is considered harmful to human beings. In order to tackle the potential risks, agarose has become an alternative polymer to be used with gelatin as wall matrix materials of microcapsules. In the present study, we report the eco-friendly use of an agarose/gelatin-based microencapsulation system to enhance the antifungal activity of gallic acid and reduce its potential cytotoxic effects towards human skin keratinocytes. We used optimal parameter combinations, such as an agarose/gelatin ratio of 1:1, a polymer/oil ratio of 1:60, a surfactant volume of 1% w/w and a stirring speed of 900 rpm. The minimum inhibitory concentration of microencapsulated gallic acid (62.5 µg/ml) was significantly improved when compared with that of the original drug (>750 µg/ml). The anti-A. niger activity of gallic acid -containing microcapsules was much stronger than that of the original drug. Following 48 h of treatment, skin cell survival was approximately 90% with agarose/gelatin microcapsules containing gallic acid, whereas cell viability was only 25-35% with free gallic acid. Our results demonstrate that agarose/gelatin-based microcapsules containing gallic acid may prove to be helpful in the treatment of A. niger-induced skin infections near intravenous injection sites.

  17. Asialoglycoprotein receptor-targeted radiopharmaceuticals for measurement of liver function.

    PubMed

    Yang, W; Zhang, X; Liu, Y

    2014-01-01

    The number of Asialoglycoprotein (ASGP) receptors on the hepatocytes of patients with liver disease is reduced and is thus considered a good indicator for the evaluation of liver function. ASGP receptor-targeted radiopharmaceuticals permit a non-invasive way to evaluate total and regional hepatic function and hepatic functional reserve visually and quantitatively. Over the past three decades, a variety of ASGP receptor-targeted probes have been developed with different molecular backbones (albumin, polymer, small-molecular-weight ligand), different glycol-residues (galactose, lactose, N-acetyl-galactosamine) and different chelating systems suitable for radiolabeling with SPECT isotopes ((99m)Tc, (111)In, (67)Ga, (131/125)I, (153)Sm) and PET isotopes ((68)Ga, (18)F). In this review, we present an overview of ASGP receptor-targeted radiopharmaceuticals, discuss their chemistry, biodistribution, catabolism and challenge as well as application for measurement of liver function.

  18. Fabrication of Gelatin-Based Electrospun Composite Fibers for Anti-Bacterial Properties and Protein Adsorption

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ya; Wang, Yingbo; Wang, Yimin; Cui, Wenguo

    2016-01-01

    A major goal of biomimetics is the development of chemical compositions and structures that simulate the extracellular matrix. In this study, gelatin-based electrospun composite fibrous membranes were prepared by electrospinning to generate bone scaffold materials. The gelatin-based multicomponent composite fibers were fabricated using co-electrospinning, and the composite fibers of chitosan (CS), gelatin (Gel), hydroxyapatite (HA), and graphene oxide (GO) were successfully fabricated for multi-function characteristics of biomimetic scaffolds. The effect of component concentration on composite fiber morphology, antibacterial properties, and protein adsorption were investigated. Composite fibers exhibited effective antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. The study observed that the composite fibers have higher adsorption capacities of bovine serum albumin (BSA) at pH 5.32–6.00 than at pH 3.90–4.50 or 7.35. The protein adsorption on the surface of the composite fiber increased as the initial BSA concentration increased. The surface of the composite reached adsorption equilibrium at 20 min. These results have specific applications for the development of bone scaffold materials, and broad implications in the field of tissue engineering. PMID:27775645

  19. Preparation and Characterization of Gelatin-Based Mucoadhesive Nanocomposites as Intravesical Gene Delivery Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ching-Wen; Chang, Li-Ching; Lin, Kai-Jen; Yu, Tsan-Jung; Tsai, Ching-Chung; Wang, Hao-Kuang; Tsai, Tong-Rong

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to develop optimal gelatin-based mucoadhesive nanocomposites as scaffolds for intravesical gene delivery to the urothelium. Hydrogels were prepared by chemically crosslinking gelatin A or B with glutaraldehyde. Physicochemical and delivery properties including hydration ratio, viscosity, size, yield, thermosensitivity, and enzymatic degradation were studied, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was carried out. The optimal hydrogels (H), composed of 15% gelatin A175, displayed an 81.5% yield rate, 87.1% hydration ratio, 42.9 Pa·s viscosity, and 125.8 nm particle size. The crosslinking density of the hydrogels was determined by performing pronase degradation and ninhydrin assays. In vitro lentivirus (LV) release studies involving p24 capsid protein analysis in 293T cells revealed that hydrogels containing lentivirus (H-LV) had a higher cumulative release than that observed for LV alone (3.7-, 2.3-, and 2.3-fold at days 1, 3, and 5, resp.). Lentivirus from lentivector constructed green fluorescent protein (GFP) was then entrapped in hydrogels (H-LV-GFP). H-LV-GFP showed enhanced gene delivery in AY-27 cells in vitro and to rat urothelium by intravesical instillation in vivo. Cystometrogram showed mucoadhesive H-LV reduced peak micturition and threshold pressure and increased bladder compliance. In this study, we successfully developed first optimal gelatin-based mucoadhesive nanocomposites as intravesical gene delivery scaffolds. PMID:25580433

  20. Fabrication of Gelatin-Based Electrospun Composite Fibers for Anti-Bacterial Properties and Protein Adsorption.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ya; Wang, Yingbo; Wang, Yimin; Cui, Wenguo

    2016-10-21

    A major goal of biomimetics is the development of chemical compositions and structures that simulate the extracellular matrix. In this study, gelatin-based electrospun composite fibrous membranes were prepared by electrospinning to generate bone scaffold materials. The gelatin-based multicomponent composite fibers were fabricated using co-electrospinning, and the composite fibers of chitosan (CS), gelatin (Gel), hydroxyapatite (HA), and graphene oxide (GO) were successfully fabricated for multi-function characteristics of biomimetic scaffolds. The effect of component concentration on composite fiber morphology, antibacterial properties, and protein adsorption were investigated. Composite fibers exhibited effective antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. The study observed that the composite fibers have higher adsorption capacities of bovine serum albumin (BSA) at pH 5.32-6.00 than at pH 3.90-4.50 or 7.35. The protein adsorption on the surface of the composite fiber increased as the initial BSA concentration increased. The surface of the composite reached adsorption equilibrium at 20 min. These results have specific applications for the development of bone scaffold materials, and broad implications in the field of tissue engineering.

  1. Death receptors: Targets for cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, Zafar; Shukla, Yogeshwer

    2010-04-01

    Apoptosis is the cell's intrinsic program to death, which plays an important role in physiologic growth control and homeostasis. Apoptosis can be triggered by death receptors (DRs), without any adverse effects. DRs are the members of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor superfamily, known to be involved in apoptosis signaling, independent of p53 tumor-supressor gene. Selective triggering of DR-mediated apoptosis in cancer cells is a novel approach in cancer therapy. So far, the best characterized DRs are CD95 (Fas/Apo1), TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand receptor (TRAILR) and tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR). Among these, TRAILR is emerging as most promising agent for cancer therapy, because it induces apoptosis in a variety of tumor and transformed cells without any toxicity to normal cells. TRAIL treatment in combination with chemotherapy or radiotherapy enhances TRAIL sensitivity or reverses TRAIL resistance by regulating downstream effectors. This review covers the current knowledge about the DRs, summarizes main signaling in DRs and also summarizes the preclinical approaches of these DRs in cancer therapy.

  2. Somatostatin Analogues for Receptor Targeted Photodynamic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kaščáková, Slávka; Hofland, Leo J.; De Bruijn, Henriette S.; Ye, Yunpeng; Achilefu, Samuel; van der Wansem, Katy; van der Ploeg-van den Heuvel, Angelique; van Koetsveld, Peter M.; Brugts, Michael P.; van der Lelij, Aart-Jan; Sterenborg, Henricus J. C. M.; ten Hagen, Timo L. M.; Robinson, Dominic J.; van Hagen, Martin P.

    2014-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an established treatment modality, used mainly for anticancer therapy that relies on the interaction of photosensitizer, light and oxygen. For the treatment of pathologies in certain anatomical sites, improved targeting of the photosensitizer is necessary to prevent damage to healthy tissue. We report on a novel dual approach of targeted PDT (vascular and cellular targeting) utilizing the expression of neuropeptide somatostatin receptor (sst2) on tumor and neovascular-endothelial cells. We synthesized two conjugates containing the somatostatin analogue [Tyr3]-octreotate and Chlorin e6 (Ce6): Ce6-K3-[Tyr3]-octreotate (1) and Ce6-[Tyr3]-octreotate-K3-[Tyr3]-octreotate (2). Investigation of the uptake and photodynamic activity of conjugates in-vitro in human erythroleukemic K562 cells showed that conjugation of [Tyr3]-octreotate with Ce6 in conjugate 1 enhances uptake (by a factor 2) in cells over-expressing sst2 compared to wild-type cells. Co-treatment with excess free Octreotide abrogated the phototoxicity of conjugate 1 indicative of a specific sst2-mediated effect. In contrast conjugate 2 showed no receptor-mediated effect due to its high hydrophobicity. When compared with un-conjugated Ce6, the PDT activity of conjugate 1 was lower. However, it showed higher photostability which may compensate for its lower phototoxicity. Intra-vital fluorescence pharmacokinetic studies of conjugate 1 in rat skin-fold observation chambers transplanted with sst2+ AR42J acinar pancreas tumors showed significantly different uptake profiles compared to free Ce6. Co-treatment with free Octreotide significantly reduced conjugate uptake in tumor tissue (by a factor 4) as well as in the chamber neo-vasculature. These results show that conjugate 1 might have potential as an in-vivo sst2 targeting photosensitizer conjugate. PMID:25111655

  3. Synthesis of folate receptor-targeted photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yanyan; Wang, Xiaopu; Zou, Qianli; Zhao, Yuxia; Wu, Feipeng

    2014-11-01

    A series of amphiphilic benzylidene cycloalkanes ketone photosensitizers C1-C4 with or without folate receptor-targeted agent were designed and synthesized. Their photophysical properties and in vitro photodynamic therapy (PDT) effects were studied. The results showed that all compounds exhibited appropriate lipid-water partition coefficients and high reactive oxygen yields. The introduction of the folate receptor-targeted agent had no obvious influence on the basic photophysical & photochemical properties of C2 and C4 compared to those of their corresponding prototype compounds (C1 and C3). In vitro studies were carried out using MCF-7 cells (FR+), Hela cells (FR+) and A549 cells (FR-), which represented different levels of folate receptor (FR) expression. All of C1-C4 showed low dark toxicity and superior PDT effects compared with the clinical drug PSD-007 (a mixture of porphyrins). What's more, folate receptor-targeted photosensitizers (C2 and C4) achieved higher accumulation and more excellent PDT effects in MCF-7 cells (FR+) and Hela cells (FR+) than photosensitizers (C1 and C3) without folate receptor-targeted agent and PSD-007. The photocytotoxicity of these photosensitizers showed no obvious differences in A549 cells (FR-).

  4. Differences between graphene and graphene oxide in gelatin based systems for transient biodegradable energy storage applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landi, G.; Sorrentino, A.; Iannace, S.; Neitzert, H. C.

    2017-02-01

    A comparison between graphene flakes and graphene oxide as filler in gelatin based systems for low-cost transient biodegradable energy storage applications has been carried out. The two bio-composites have been prepared and characterized by rheological measurements, cyclic voltammetry measurements, chronopotentiometry measurements and impedance spectroscopy. Differences in dielectric and mechanical properties have been correlated to the different structural organizations determinate by the hydrophobic/hydrophilic character of the used filler. In particular, the addition of the graphene oxide to the gelatin causes an increase in the elastic modulus with a parallel increase in the mechanical stability with time as compared to the composites obtained by adding graphene. Conversely, the surface capacitance is slightly increased by the graphene oxide addition compared to the pure gelatin sample. On the other hand, the introduction of the graphene flakes into the gelatin leads to a marked increase of the dielectric properties of the resulting bio-composite.

  5. Synthesis and Characterization of Gelatin-Based Crosslinkers for the Fabrication of Superabsorbent Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Amonpattaratkit, Penphitcha; Khunmanee, Sureerat; Kim, Dong Hyun; Park, Hansoo

    2017-01-01

    In this work, crosslinkers were prepared by conjugating high- and low-molecular-weight gelatin with different mole ratios of itaconic acid (IA) with double bonds. Then, the gelatin-itaconic acid (gelatin-IA) crosslinkers were compared with the gelatin-methacrylate (gelatin-MA) crosslinkers. The molecular weights and structures of gelatin-MA and gelatin-IA were confirmed using gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Additionally, the swelling ratio and biodegradation properties of the hydrogels using IA as starting monomers and gelatin-IA and gelatin-MA as crosslinkers were investigated. Both hydrogels prepared with high and low molecular weights of gelatin-IA showed higher swelling ratios than those prepared with the gelatin-MA. The results also showed that absorbent hydrogels with different biodegradabilities and swelling ratios could be prepared by changing the ratio of the gelatin-based crosslinkers. PMID:28773186

  6. Gelatin-based nanoparticles as DNA delivery systems: Synthesis, physicochemical and biocompatible characterization.

    PubMed

    Morán, M C; Rosell, N; Ruano, G; Busquets, M A; Vinardell, M P

    2015-10-01

    The rapidly rising demand for therapeutic grade DNA molecules requires associated improvements in encapsulation and delivery technologies. One of the challenges for the efficient intracellular delivery of therapeutic biomolecules after their cell internalization by endocytosis is to manipulate the non-productive trafficking from endosomes to lysosomes, where degradation may occur. The combination of the endosomal acidity with the endosomolytic capability of the nanocarrier can increase the intracellular delivery of many drugs, genes and proteins, which, therefore, might enhance their therapeutic efficacy. Among the suitable compounds, the gelification properties of gelatin as well as the strong dependence of gelatin ionization with pH makes this compound an interesting candidate to be used to the effective intracellular delivery of active biomacromolecules. In the present work, gelatin (either high or low gel strength) and protamine sulfate has been selected to form particles by interaction of oppositely charged compounds. Particles in the absence of DNA (binary system) and in the presence of DNA (ternary system) have been prepared. The physicochemical characterization (particle size, polydispersity index and degree of DNA entrapment) have been evaluated. Cytotoxicity experiments have shown that the isolated systems and the resulting gelatin-based nanoparticles are essentially non-toxic. The pH-dependent hemolysis assay and the response of the nanoparticles co-incubated in buffers at defined pHs that mimic extracellular, early endosomal and late endo-lysosomal environments demonstrated that the nanoparticles tend to destabilize and DNA can be successfully released. It was found that, in addition to the imposed compositions, the gel strength of gelatin is a controlling parameter of the final properties of these nanoparticles. The results indicate that these gelatin-based nanoparticles have excellent properties as highly potent and non-toxic intracellular delivery

  7. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Targeted Nuclear Delivery and High Resolution Whole Cell X-Ray Imaging of Fe3O4@TiO2 Nanoparticles in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Ye; Chen, Si; Paunesku, Tatjana; Gleber, Sophie Charlotte; Liu, William C.; Doty, Caroline B.; Mak, Rachel; Deng, Junjing; Jin, Qiaoling; Lai, Barry; Brister, Keith; Flachenecker, Claus; Jacobsen, Chris; Vogt, Stefan; Woloschak, Gayle E.

    2014-01-01

    Sequestration within the cytoplasm often limits the efficacy of therapeutic nanoparticles that have specific subcellular targets. To allow for both cellular and subcellular nanoparticle delivery we have created Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) targeted Fe3O4@TiO2 nanoparticles that use the native intracellular trafficking of EGFR to improve internalization and nuclear translocation in EGFR-expressing HeLa cells. While bound to EGFR these nanoparticles do not interfere with the interaction between EGFR and karyopherin-β, a protein that is critical for the translocation of ligand-bound EGFR to the nucleus. Thus, a portion of the EGFR targeted nanoparticles taken up by the cells also reaches cell nuclei. We were able to track nanoparticle accumulation in cells by flow cytometry and nanoparticle subcellular distribution by confocal fluorescent microscopy indirectly, using fluorescently labeled nanoparticles. More importantly, we imaged and quantified intracellular nanoparticles directly, by their elemental signatures, using X-ray fluorescence microscopy at the Bionanoprobe, the first instrument of its kind in the world. The Bionanoprobe can focus hard X-rays down to a 30 nm spot size to map the positions of chemical elements tomographically within whole frozen-hydrated cells. Finally, we show that photoactivation of targeted nanoparticles in cell nuclei, dependent on successful EGFR nuclear accumulation, induces significantly more double-stranded DNA breaks then photoactivation of nanoparticles that remain exclusively in the cytoplasm. PMID:24219664

  8. Gelatin-based 3D conduits for transdifferentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into Schwann cell-like phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Uz, Metin; Büyüköz, Melda; Sharma, Anup D; Sakaguchi, Donald S; Altinkaya, Sacide Alsoy; Mallapragada, Surya K

    2017-02-16

    In this study, gelatin-based 3D conduits with three different microstructures (nanofibrous, macroporous and ladder-like) were fabricated for the first time via combined molding and thermally induced phase separation (TIPS) technique for peripheral nerve regeneration. The effects of conduit microstructure and mechanical properties on the transdifferentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into Schwann cell (SC) like phenotypes were examined to help facilitate neuroregeneration and understand material-cell interfaces. Results indicated that 3D macroporous and ladder-like structures enhanced MSC attachment, proliferation and spreading, creating interconnected cellular networks with large numbers of viable cells compared to nanofibrous and 2D-tissue culture plate counterparts. 3D-ladder-like conduit structure with complex modulus of ∼0.4×10(6)Pa and pore size of ∼150μm provided the most favorable microenvironment for MSC transdifferentiation leading to ∼85% immunolabeling of all SC markers. On the other hand, the macroporous conduits with complex modulus of ∼4×10(6)Pa and pore size of ∼100μm showed slightly lower (∼65% for p75, ∼75% for S100 and ∼85% for S100β markers) immunolabeling. Transdifferentiated MSCs within 3D-ladder-like conduits secreted significant amounts (∼2.5pg/mL NGF and ∼0.7pg/mL GDNF per cell) of neurotrophic factors, while MSCs in macroporous conduits released slightly lower (∼1.5pg/mL NGF and 0.7pg/mL GDNF per cell) levels. PC12 cells displayed enhanced neurite outgrowth in media conditioned by conduits with transdifferentiated MSCs. Overall, conduits with macroporous and ladder-like 3D structures are promising platforms in transdifferentiation of MSCs for neuroregeneration and should be further tested in vivo.

  9. In vivo performance of novel soybean/gelatin-based bioactive and injectable hydroxyapatite foams

    PubMed Central

    Kovtun, Anna; Goeckelmann, Melanie J.; Niclas, Antje A.; Montufar, Edgar B.; Ginebra, Maria-Pau; Planell, Josep A.; Santin, Matteo; Ignatius, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Major limitations of calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) are their relatively slow degradation rate and the lack of macropores allowing the ingrowth of bone tissue. The development of self-setting cement foams has been proposed as a suitable strategy to overcome these limitations. In previous work we developed a gelatine-based hydroxyapatite foam (G-foam), which exhibited good injectability and cohesion, interconnected porosity and good biocompatibility in vitro. In the present study we evaluated the in vivo performance of the G-foam. Furthermore, we investigated whether enrichment of the foam with soybean extract (SG-foam) increased its bioactivity. G-foam, SG-foam and non-foamed CPC were implanted in a critical-size bone defect in the distal femoral condyle of New Zealand white rabbits. Bone formation and degradation of the materials were investigated after 4, 12 and 20 weeks using histological and biomechanical methods. The foams maintained their macroporosity after injection and setting in vivo. Compared to non-foamed CPC, cellular degradation of the foams was considerably increased and accompanied by new bone formation. The additional functionalization with soybean extract in the SG-foam slightly reduced the degradation rate and positively influenced bone formation in the defect. Furthermore, both foams exhibited excellent biocompatibility, implying that these novel materials may be promising for clinical application in non-loaded bone defects. PMID:25448348

  10. Multiphoton imaging of myogenic differentiation in gelatin-based hydrogels as tissue engineering scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Jeong; Shin, Yong Cheol; Lee, Jong Ho; Jun, Seung Won; Kim, Chang-Seok; Lee, Yunki; Park, Jong-Chul; Lee, Soo-Hong; Park, Ki Dong; Han, Dong-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogels can serve as three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds for cell culture and be readily injected into the body. Recent advances in the image technology for 3D scaffolds like hydrogels have attracted considerable attention to overcome the drawbacks of ordinary imaging technologies such as optical and fluorescence microscopy. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) is an effective method based on the excitation of two-photons. In the present study, C2C12 myoblasts differentiated in 3D gelatin hydroxyphenylpropionic acid (GHPA) hydrogels were imaged by using a custom-built multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscopy to compare the difference in the imaging capacity between conventional microscopy and MPM. The physicochemical properties of GHPA hydrogels were characterized by using scanning electron microscopy and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. In addition, the cell viability and proliferation of C2C12 myoblasts cultured in the GHPA hydrogels were analyzed by using Live/Dead Cell and CCK-8 assays, respectively. It was found that C2C12 cells were well grown and normally proliferated in the hydrogels. Furthermore, the hydrogels were shown to be suitable to facilitate the myogenic differentiation of C2C12 cells incubated in differentiation media, which had been corroborated by MPM. It was very hard to get clear images from a fluorescence microscope. Our findings suggest that the gelatin-based hydrogels can be beneficially utilized as 3D scaffolds for skeletal muscle engineering and that MPM can be effectively applied to imaging technology for tissue regeneration.

  11. Chitosan and gelatin based prototype delivery systems for the treatment of oral mucositis: from material to performance in vitro.

    PubMed

    Perchyonok, V Tamara; Zhang, Shengmiao; Oberholzer, Theunis

    2013-02-01

    In this study we developed and evaluated a prototype of an effective occlusive mucoadhesive system for prophylaxis and/or treatment of oral mucositis based on chitosan and gelatine models together with nystatin as a prophylactic agent incorporated into the formulation and investigated drug release in-vitro. Results of in vitro studies showed that chitosan and gelatine based gels posses properties that makes them excellent candidates for treatment of oral mucositis. These properties include not only the palliative effects of an occlusive dressing but also the potential for delivering therapeutic compounds with chitosan gels providing drug concentrations above their minimum inhibition concentration and extending the retention time in the oral cavity due to their bioadhesive properties. Chitosan also offers an advantage over suspensions because of its inherent antimicrobial properties. The performance of gelatin-based gels highlights the novel, non-toxic, in situ forming gelatine based hydrogel. The results of in vitro drug release experiments demonstrated that all the hydrogel showed sustained release properties.

  12. Physical properties of fish gelatin-based bio-nanocomposite films incorporated with ZnO nanorods

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Well-dispersed fish gelatin-based nanocomposites were prepared by adding ZnO nanorods (NRs) as fillers to aqueous gelatin. The effects of ZnO NR fillers on the mechanical, optical, and electrical properties of fish gelatin bio-nanocomposite films were investigated. Results showed an increase in Young's modulus and tensile strength of 42% and 25% for nanocomposites incorporated with 5% ZnO NRs, respectively, compared with unfilled gelatin-based films. UV transmission decreased to zero with the addition of a small amount of ZnO NRs in the biopolymer matrix. X-ray diffraction showed an increase in the intensity of the crystal facets of (10ī1) and (0002) with the addition of ZnO NRs in the biocomposite matrix. The surface topography of the fish gelatin films indicated an increase in surface roughness with increasing ZnO NR concentrations. The conductivity of the films also significantly increased with the addition of ZnO NRs. These results indicated that bio-nanocomposites based on ZnO NRs had great potentials for applications in packaging technology, food preservation, and UV-shielding systems. PMID:23981366

  13. Physical properties of fish gelatin-based bio-nanocomposite films incorporated with ZnO nanorods.

    PubMed

    Rouhi, Jalal; Mahmud, Shahrom; Naderi, Nima; Ooi, Ch Raymond; Mahmood, Mohamad Rusop

    2013-08-27

    Well-dispersed fish gelatin-based nanocomposites were prepared by adding ZnO nanorods (NRs) as fillers to aqueous gelatin. The effects of ZnO NR fillers on the mechanical, optical, and electrical properties of fish gelatin bio-nanocomposite films were investigated. Results showed an increase in Young's modulus and tensile strength of 42% and 25% for nanocomposites incorporated with 5% ZnO NRs, respectively, compared with unfilled gelatin-based films. UV transmission decreased to zero with the addition of a small amount of ZnO NRs in the biopolymer matrix. X-ray diffraction showed an increase in the intensity of the crystal facets of (10ī1) and (0002) with the addition of ZnO NRs in the biocomposite matrix. The surface topography of the fish gelatin films indicated an increase in surface roughness with increasing ZnO NR concentrations. The conductivity of the films also significantly increased with the addition of ZnO NRs. These results indicated that bio-nanocomposites based on ZnO NRs had great potentials for applications in packaging technology, food preservation, and UV-shielding systems.

  14. Use of gum arabic to improve the fabrication of chitosan-gelatin-based nanofibers for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ruei-Yi; Kuo, Ting-Yun; Hung, Shih-Chieh; Lin, Che-Min; Hsien, Tzu-Yang; Wang, Da-Ming; Hsieh, Hsyue-Jen

    2015-01-22

    Current techniques for fabricating chitosan-gelatin-based nanofibers require the use of corrosive and expensive solvents. Our novel method, however, using gum arabic and a mild (20 wt%) aqueous acetic acid solution as solvent can produce a solution with much higher chitosan-gelatin content (16 wt%). Without gum arabic, which greatly decreases the viscosity of the solution, such an outcome was unachievable. The solution was utilized to prepare electrospun chitosan-gelatin-polyvinyl alcohol-gum arabic nanofibers with a weight ratio of 8:8:2:0.5 (C8G8P2A0.5 nanofibers), in which polyvinyl alcohol could stabilize the electrospinning process. The stability and tensile strength (2.53 MPa) of C8G8P2A0.5 nanofibers (mats) were enhanced by glutaraldehyde crosslinking. Furthermore, mesenchymal stem cells attached and proliferated well on the mat. The strength-enhanced and cytocompatible C8G8P2A0.5 mats are thereby suitable for tissue engineering applications. More importantly, we have created a less expensive and safer method (one not using hazardous solvents) to fabricate chitosan-gelatin-based nanofibers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Impact of immobilizing of low molecular weight hyaluronic acid within gelatin-based hydrogel through enzymatic reaction on behavior of enclosed endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Khanmohammadi, Mehdi; Sakai, Shinji; Taya, Masahito

    2017-04-01

    The hydrogels having the ability to promote migration and morphogenesis of endothelial cells (ECs) are useful for fabricating vascularized dense tissues in vitro. The present study explores the immobilization of low molecular weight hyaluronic acid (LMWHA) derivative within gelatin-based hydrogel to stimulate migration of ECs. The LMWHA derivative possessing phenolic hydroxyl moieties (LMWHA-Ph) was bound to gelatin-based derivative hydrogel through the horseradish peroxidase-catalyzed reaction. The motility of ECs was analyzed by scratch migration assay and microparticle-based cell migration assay. The incorporated LMWHA-Ph molecules within hydrogel was found to be preserved stably through covalent bonds during incubation. The free and immobilized LMWHA-Ph did not lose an inherent stimulatory effect on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The immobilized LMWHA-Ph within gelatin-based hydrogel induced the high motility of HUVECs, accompanied by robust cytoskeleton extension, and cell subpopulation expressing CD44 cell receptor. In the presence of immobilized LMWHA-Ph, the migration distance and the number of existing HUVECs were demonstrated to be encouraged in dose-dependent and time-dependent manners. Based on the results obtained in this work, it was concluded that the enzymatic immobilization of LMWHA-Ph within gelatin-based hydrogel represents a promising approach to promote ECs' motility and further exploitation for vascular tissue engineering applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Gelatin-based membrane containing usnic acid-loaded liposome improves dermal burn healing in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Paula Santos; Rabelo, Alessandra Silva; Souza, Jamille Cristina Campos de; Santana, Bruno Vasconcelos; da Silva, Thailson Monteiro Menezes; Serafini, Mairim Russo; Dos Passos Menezes, Paula; Dos Santos Lima, Bruno; Cardoso, Juliana Cordeiro; Alves, Júlio César Santana; Frank, Luiza Abrahão; Guterres, Sílvia Stanisçuaski; Pohlmann, Adriana Raffin; Pinheiro, Malone Santos; de Albuquerque, Ricardo Luiz Cavalcanti; Araújo, Adriano Antunes de Souza

    2016-11-20

    There are a range of products available which claim to accelerate the healing of burns; these include topical agents, interactive dressings and biomembranes. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of a gelatin-based membrane containing usnic acid/liposomes on the healing of burns in comparison to silver sulfadiazine ointment and duoDerme(®) dressing, as well as examining its quantification by high performance liquid chromatography. The quantification of the usnic acid/liposomes was examined using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) by performing separate in vitro studies of the efficiency of the biomembranes in terms of encapsulation, drug release and transdermal absorption. Then, second-degree 5cm(2) burn wounds were created on the dorsum of nine male pigs, assigned into three groups (n=3): SDZ - animals treated with silver sulfadiazine ointment; GDU - animals treated with duoDerme(®); UAL - animals treated with a gelatin-based membrane containing usnic acid/liposomes. These groups were treated for 8, 18 and 30days. In the average rate of contraction, there was no difference among the groups (p>0.05). The results of the quantification showed that biomembranes containing usnic acid/liposomes were controlled released systems capable of transdermal absorption by skin layers. A macroscopic assay did not observe any clinical signs of secondary infections. Microscopy after 8days showed hydropic degeneration of the epithelium, with intense neutrophilic infiltration in all three groups. At 18days, although epidermal neo-formation was only partial in all three groups, it was most incipient in the SDZ group. Granulation tissue was more exuberant and cellularized in the UAL and GDU groups. At 30days, observed restricted granulation tissue in the region below the epithelium in the GDU and UAL groups was observed. In the analysis of collagen though picrosirius, the UAL group showed greater collagen density. Therefore, the UAL group displayed development and

  17. Receptor-targeted liposome-peptide-siRNA nanoparticles represent an efficient delivery system for MRTF silencing in conjunctival fibrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu-Wai-Man, Cynthia; Tagalakis, Aristides D.; Manunta, Maria D.; Hart, Stephen L.; Khaw, Peng T.

    2016-02-01

    There is increasing evidence that the Myocardin-related transcription factor/Serum response factor (MRTF/SRF) pathway plays a key role in fibroblast activation and that knocking down MRTF can lead to reduced scarring and fibrosis. Here, we have developed a receptor-targeted liposome-peptide-siRNA nanoparticle as a non-viral delivery system for MRTF-B siRNA in conjunctival fibrosis. Using 50 nM siRNA, the MRTF-B gene was efficiently silenced by 76% and 72% with LYR and LER nanoparticles, respectively. The silencing efficiency was low when non-targeting peptides or siRNA alone or liposome-siRNA alone were used. LYR and LER nanoparticles also showed higher silencing efficiency than PEGylated LYR-P and LER-P nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were not cytotoxic using different liposomes, targeting peptides, and 50 nM siRNA. Three-dimensional fibroblast-populated collagen matrices were also used as a functional assay to measure contraction in vitro, and showed that MRTF-B LYR nanoparticles completely blocked matrix contraction after a single transfection treatment. In conclusion, this is the first study to develop and show that receptor-targeted liposome-peptide-siRNA nanoparticles represent an efficient and safe non-viral siRNA delivery system that could be used to prevent fibrosis after glaucoma filtration surgery and other contractile scarring conditions in the eye.

  18. Receptor-targeted liposome-peptide-siRNA nanoparticles represent an efficient delivery system for MRTF silencing in conjunctival fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Yu-Wai-Man, Cynthia; Tagalakis, Aristides D.; Manunta, Maria D.; Hart, Stephen L.; Khaw, Peng T.

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that the Myocardin-related transcription factor/Serum response factor (MRTF/SRF) pathway plays a key role in fibroblast activation and that knocking down MRTF can lead to reduced scarring and fibrosis. Here, we have developed a receptor-targeted liposome-peptide-siRNA nanoparticle as a non-viral delivery system for MRTF-B siRNA in conjunctival fibrosis. Using 50 nM siRNA, the MRTF-B gene was efficiently silenced by 76% and 72% with LYR and LER nanoparticles, respectively. The silencing efficiency was low when non-targeting peptides or siRNA alone or liposome-siRNA alone were used. LYR and LER nanoparticles also showed higher silencing efficiency than PEGylated LYR-P and LER-P nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were not cytotoxic using different liposomes, targeting peptides, and 50 nM siRNA. Three-dimensional fibroblast-populated collagen matrices were also used as a functional assay to measure contraction in vitro, and showed that MRTF-B LYR nanoparticles completely blocked matrix contraction after a single transfection treatment. In conclusion, this is the first study to develop and show that receptor-targeted liposome-peptide-siRNA nanoparticles represent an efficient and safe non-viral siRNA delivery system that could be used to prevent fibrosis after glaucoma filtration surgery and other contractile scarring conditions in the eye. PMID:26905457

  19. Pharmacodynamics of long-acting folic acid-receptor targeted ritonavir boosted atazanavir nanoformulations

    PubMed Central

    Puligujja, Pavan; Balkundi, Shantanu; Kendrick, Lindsey; Baldridge, Hannah; Hilaire, James; Bade, Aditya N.; Dash, Prasanta K.; Zhang, Gang; Poluektova, Larisa; Gorantla, Santhi; Liu, Xin-Ming; Ying, Tianlei; Feng, Yang; Wang, Yanping; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.; McMillan, JoEllyn M.; Gendelman, Howard E.

    2014-01-01

    Long-acting nanoformulated antiretroviral therapy (nanoART) that target monocyte-macrophage could improve the drug’s half-life and protein binding capacities while facilitating cell and tissue depots. To this end, ART nanoparticles that target the folic acid (FA) receptor and permit cell-based drug depots were examined using pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PD) tests. FA receptor-targeted poloxamer 407 nanocrystals, containing ritonavir-boosted atazanavir (ATV/r), significantly affected several therapeutic factors: drug bioavailability increased as much as 5 times and PD activity improved as much as 100 times. Drug particles administered to human peripheral blood lymphocyte reconstituted NOD.Cg-PrkdcscidIl2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ mice and infected with HIV-1ADA at a tissue culture infective dose50 of 104 infectious viral particles/ml led to ATV/r drug concentrations that paralleled FA receptor beta staining in both the macrophage-rich parafollicular areas of spleen and lymph nodes. Drug levels were higher in these tissues than what could be achieved by either native drug or untargeted nanoART particles. The data also mirrored potent reductions in viral loads, tissue viral RNA and numbers of HIV-1p24+ cells in infected and treated animals. We conclude that FA-P407 coating of ART nanoparticles readily facilitate drug carriage and facilitate antiretroviral responses. PMID:25522973

  20. In situ-forming click-crosslinked gelatin based hydrogels for 3D culture of thymic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Truong, Vinh X; Hun, Michael L; Li, Fanyi; Chidgey, Ann P; Forsythe, John S

    2016-07-21

    Hydrogels prepared from naturally derived gelatin can provide a suitable environment for cell attachment and growth, making them favourable materials in tissue engineering. However, physically crosslinked gelatin hydrogels are not stable under physiological conditions while chemical crosslinking of gelatin by radical polymerization may be harmful to cells. In this study, we attached the norbornene functional group to gelatin, which was subsequently crosslinked with a polyethylene glycol (PEG) linker via the nitrile oxide-norbornene click reaction. The rapid crosslinking process allows the hydrogel to be formed within minutes of mixing the polymer solutions under physiological conditions, allowing the gels to be used as injectable materials. The hydrogels properties including mechanical strength, swelling and degradation, can be tuned by changing either the ratio of the reacting groups or the total concentration of the polymer precursors. Murine embryonic fibroblastic cells cultured in soft gels (2 wt% of gelatin and 1 wt% of PEG linker) demonstrated high cell viability as well as similar phenotypic profiles (PDGFRα and MTS15) to Matrigel cultures over 5 days. Thymic epithelial cell and fibroblast co-cultures produced epithelial colonies in these gels following 7 days incubation. These studies demonstrate that gelatin based hydrogels, prepared using "click" crosslinking, provide a robust cell culture platform with retained benefits of the gelatin material, and are therefore suitable for use in various tissue engineering applications.

  1. Biocompatibility and inflammatory response in vitro and in vivo to gelatin-based biomaterials with tailorable elastic properties.

    PubMed

    Ullm, Sandra; Krüger, Anne; Tondera, Christoph; Gebauer, Tim P; Neffe, Axel T; Lendlein, Andreas; Jung, Friedrich; Pietzsch, Jens

    2014-12-01

    Hydrogels prepared from gelatin and lysine diisocyanate ethyl ester provide tailorable elastic properties and degradation behavior. Their interaction with human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) as well as human macrophages (Mɸ) and granulocytes (Gɸ) were explored. The experiments revealed a good biocompatibility, appropriate cell adhesion, and cell infiltration. Direct contact to hydrogels, but not contact to hydrolytic or enzymatic hydrogel degradation products, resulted in enhanced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in all cell types, indicating a weak inflammatory activation in vitro. Only Mɸ altered their cytokine secretion profile after direct hydrogel contact, indicating a comparably pronounced inflammatory activation. On the other hand, in HAEC the expression of tight junction proteins, as well as cytokine and matrix metalloproteinase secretion were not influenced by the hydrogels, suggesting a maintained endothelial cell function. This was in line with the finding that in HAEC increased thrombomodulin synthesis but no thrombomodulin membrane shedding occurred. First in vivo data obtained after subcutaneous implantation of the materials in immunocompetent mice revealed good integration of implants in the surrounding tissue, no progredient fibrous capsule formation, and no inflammatory tissue reaction in vivo. Overall, the study demonstrates the potential of gelatin-based hydrogels for temporal replacement and functional regeneration of damaged soft tissue.

  2. Effect of Graphite Concentration on Shear-Wave Speed in Gelatin-Based Tissue-Mimicking Phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Pamela G.; Rouze, Ned C.; Palmeri, Mark L.

    2011-01-01

    Elasticity-based imaging modalities are becoming popular diagnostic tools in clinical practice. Gelatin-based, tissue mimicking phantoms that contain graphite as the acoustic scattering material are commonly used in testing and validating elasticity-imaging methods to quantify tissue stiffness. The gelatin bloom strength and concentration are used to control phantom stiffness. While it is known that graphite concentration can be modulated to control acoustic attenuation, the impact of graphite concentrationon phantom elasticity has not been characterized in these gelatin phantoms. This work investigates the impact of graphite concentration on phantom shear stiffness as characterized by shear-wave speed measurements using impulsive acoustic-radiation-force excitations. Phantom shear-wave speed increased by 0.83 (m/s)/(dB/(cm MHz)) when increasing the attenuation coefficient slope of the phantom material through increasing graphite concentration. Therefore, gelatin-phantom stiffness can be affected by the conventional ways that attenuation is modulated through graphite concentration in these phantoms. PMID:21710828

  3. Selection of a chitosan gelatin-based edible coating for color preservation of beef in retail display.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Giselle Pereira; Dutra, Monalisa Pereira; Fontes, Paulo Rogério; Ramos, Alcinéia de Lemos Souza; Gomide, Lúcio Alberto de Miranda; Ramos, Eduardo Mendes

    2016-04-01

    Chitosan gelatin-based coating films were applied to beef steaks, and their effects on color preservation and lipid oxidation during retail display were evaluated. Response surface methodology was used to model and describe the effects of different biopolymer concentrations (0 to 6% gelatin; 0.5 to 1.5% chitosan; and 0 to 12% glycerol based on dry gelatin+chitosan weight) in the coating film for optimizing the best combination for meat application. Film application reduced weight loss and lipid oxidation of the steaks after 5 days of storage, and films with higher gelatin concentrations were more effective. The percentage levels of different myoglobin-redox forms were not affected by coating, but myoglobin oxidation during retail display was reduced and the percentage of deoxymyoglobin increased with the gelatin content of the film. Steak color stability during retail display was promoted by film application; the steaks exhibited a darker, more intensely red color when coated in blends with higher gelatin and chitosan contents. Blends containing between 3% and 6% gelatin, between 0.5% and 1.0% chitosan and 6% glycerol exhibited the best results and provide a promising alternative to the preservation of beef in retail display.

  4. Safety and efficacy evaluation of gelatin-based nanoparticles associated with UV filters.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Camila Areias; Dario, Michelli Ferrera; Sarruf, Fernanda Daud; Mariz, Inês Fátima Afonso; Velasco, Maria Valéria Robles; Rosado, Catarina; Baby, André Rolim

    2016-04-01

    The safety and efficacy assessment of nanomaterials is a major concern of industry and academia. These materials, due to their nanoscale size, can have chemical, physical, and biological properties that differ from those of their larger counterparts. The encapsulation of natural ingredients can provide marked improvements in sun protection efficacy. This strategy promotes solubility enhancement of flavonoids and yields an improved active ingredient with innovative physical, physicochemical and functional characteristics. Rutin, a flavonoid, has chemical and functional stability in topical vehicles exerting a synergistic effect in association with ultraviolet (UV) filters. However, the solubility of rutin is a limiting factor. Additionally, this bioactive compound does not have tendency to permeate across the stratum corneum. As an alternative to common synthetic based sunscreens, rutin-entrapped gelatin nanoparticles were designed. The present study investigated the pre-clinical safety of gelatin nanoparticles (GNPs) using an in vitro method and also assessed the clinical safety and efficacy of the association of GNPs with three commonly used chemical UV filters (ethylhexyl dimethyl PABA, ethylhexyl methoxycinnamate and methoxydibenzoylmethane). The non-irritant and adequate safety profile under sun-exposed skin conditions of the nanomaterials and the emulsions qualified the products for clinical efficacy assays. The in vivo results indicated that the GNPs increased the antioxidant protection of the emulsions developed. However, the presence of rutin in the nanosized material did not enhance performance on the SPF test. In conclusion, these findings characterized the nanomaterials as an innovative platform for multifunctional bioactive sunscreens.

  5. Peptide Receptor Targeting in Cancer: The Somatostatin Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, Federica; Bajetto, Adriana; Pattarozzi, Alessandra; Gatti, Monica; Würth, Roberto; Thellung, Stefano; Corsaro, Alessandro; Villa, Valentina; Nizzari, Mario; Florio, Tullio

    2013-01-01

    Peptide receptors involved in pathophysiological processes represent promising therapeutic targets. Neuropeptide somatostatin (SST) is produced by specialized cells in a large number of human organs and tissues. SST primarily acts as inhibitor of endocrine and exocrine secretion via the activation of five G-protein-coupled receptors, named sst1–5, while in central nervous system, SST acts as a neurotransmitter/neuromodulator, regulating locomotory and cognitive functions. Critical points of SST/SST receptor biology, such as signaling pathways of individual receptor subtypes, homo- and heterodimerization, trafficking, and cross-talk with growth factor receptors, have been extensively studied, although functions associated with several pathological conditions, including cancer, are still not completely unraveled. Importantly, SST exerts antiproliferative and antiangiogenic effects on cancer cells in vitro, and on experimental tumors in vivo. Moreover, SST agonists are clinically effective as antitumor agents for pituitary adenomas and gastro-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. However, SST receptors being expressed by tumor cells of various tumor histotypes, their pharmacological use is potentially extendible to other cancer types, although to date no significant results have been obtained. In this paper the most recent findings on the expression and functional roles of SST and SST receptors in tumor cells are discussed. PMID:23476673

  6. Psoralens and coumarins for receptor targeting on epidermal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jetter, M.M.

    1989-01-01

    Specific binding sites have been identified for the psoralens, discrete from DNA, in different epidermal cell lines. These receptors are saturable and are alkylated by the action of psoralens + UVA light. A psoralen receptor has been partially purified and established to be a protein of approximately 20,000 daltons. Inhibition of the binding of epidermal growth factor to its receptor and inhibition of the tyrosine kinase activity of the EGF receptor has been associated with PUVA treatment. These findings conflict with the general assumption that the biological effects of psoralens as photoactive compounds are associated with their ability to covalently bind to and crosslink DNA. In collaboration with Laskin's,laboratory, several classes of psoralen agonists were synthesized. These compounds include coumarins, furocoumarin and benzodipyran-2-one derivatives. The methods of preparation were varied and include variants of the Claisen rearrangement, acid and base-catalyzed condensations. The synthesized compounds were tested for their potential inhibition of {sup 125}I-EGF receptor binding. It was discovered that many of these agents showed potent inhibition activity similar to the psoralens. This data offers the possibility that sites of action, other than DNA, are involved in the mechanism by which photoactivated psoralens modulate epidermal cell lines.

  7. Expression of androgen receptor target genes in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Rana, Kesha; Lee, Nicole K L; Zajac, Jeffrey D; MacLean, Helen E

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to determine the mechanisms of the anabolic actions of androgens in skeletal muscle by investigating potential androgen receptor (AR)-regulated genes in in vitro and in vivo models. The expression of the myogenic regulatory factor myogenin was significantly decreased in skeletal muscle from testosterone-treated orchidectomized male mice compared to control orchidectomized males, and was increased in muscle from male AR knockout mice that lacked DNA binding activity (AR(ΔZF2)) versus wildtype mice, demonstrating that myogenin is repressed by the androgen/AR pathway. The ubiquitin ligase Fbxo32 was repressed by 12 h dihydrotestosterone treatment in human skeletal muscle cell myoblasts, and c-Myc expression was decreased in testosterone-treated orchidectomized male muscle compared to control orchidectomized male muscle, and increased in AR(∆ZF2) muscle. The expression of a group of genes that regulate the transition from myoblast proliferation to differentiation, Tceal7 , p57(Kip2), Igf2 and calcineurin Aa, was increased in AR(∆ZF2) muscle, and the expression of all but p57(Kip2) was also decreased in testosterone-treated orchidectomized male muscle compared to control orchidectomized male muscle. We conclude that in males, androgens act via the AR in part to promote peak muscle mass by maintaining myoblasts in the proliferative state and delaying the transition to differentiation during muscle growth and development, and by suppressing ubiquitin ligase-mediated atrophy pathways to preserve muscle mass in adult muscle.

  8. Cell surface receptor targeted biomimetic apatite nanocrystals for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Iafisco, Michele; Delgado-Lopez, Josè Manuel; Varoni, Elena Maria; Tampieri, Anna; Rimondini, Lia; Gomez-Morales, Jaime; Prat, Maria

    2013-11-25

    Nanosized drug carriers functionalized with moieties specifically targeting tumor cells are promising tools in cancer therapy, due to their ability to circulate in the bloodstream for longer periods and their selectivity for tumor cells, enabling the sparing of healthy tissues. Because of its biocompatibility, high bioresorbability, and responsiveness to pH changes, synthetic biomimetic nanocrystalline apatites are used as nanocarriers to produce multifunctional nanoparticles, by coupling them with the chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin (DOXO) and the DO-24 monoclonal antibody (mAb) directed against the Met/Hepatocyte Growth Factor receptor (Met/HGFR), which is over-expressed on different types of carcinomas and thus represents a useful tumor target. The chemical-physical features of the nanoparticles are fully investigated and their interaction with cells expressing (GTL-16 gastric carcinoma line) or not expressing (NIH-3T3 fibroblasts) the Met/HGFR is analyzed. Functionalized nanoparticles specifically bind to and are internalized in cells expressing the receptor (GTL-16) but not in the ones that do not express it (NIH-3T3). Moreover they discharge DOXO in the targeted GTL-16 cells that reach the nucleus and display cytotoxicity as assessed in an MTT assay. Two different types of ternary nanoparticles are prepared, differing for the sequence of the functionalization steps (adsorption of DOXO first and then mAb or vice versa), and it is found that the ones in which mAb is adsorbed first are more efficient under all the examined aspects (binding, internalization, cytotoxicity), possibly because of a better mAb orientation on the nanoparticle surface. These multifunctional nanoparticles could thus be useful instruments for targeted local or systemic drug delivery, allowing a reduction in the therapeutic dose of the drug and thus adverse side effects. Moreover, this work opens new perspectives in the use of nanocrystalline apatites as a new platform for theranostic

  9. Time-Resolved Spectroscopy and Near Infrared Imaging for Prostate Cancer Detection: Receptor-targeted and Native Biomarker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Yang

    Optical spectroscopy and imaging using near-infrared (NIR) light provides powerful tools for non-invasive detection of cancer in tissue. Optical techniques are capable of quantitative reconstructions maps of tissue absorption and scattering properties, thus can map in vivo the differences in the content of certain marker chromophores and/or fluorophores in normal and cancerous tissues (for example: water, tryptophan, collagen and NADH contents). Potential clinical applications of optical spectroscopy and imaging include functional tumor detection and photothermal therapeutics. Optical spectroscopy and imaging apply contrasts from intrinsic tissue chromophores such as water, collagen and NADH, and extrinsic optical contrast agents such as Indocyanine Green (ICG) to distinguish disease tissue from the normal one. Fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging also gives high sensitivity and specificity for biomedical diagnosis. Recent developments on specific-targeting fluorophores such as small receptor-targeted dye-peptide conjugate contrast agent offer high contrast between normal and cancerous tissues hence provide promising future for early tumour detection. This thesis focus on a study to distinguish the cancerous prostate tissue from the normal prostate tissues with enhancement of specific receptor-targeted prostate cancer contrast agents using optical spectroscopy and imaging techniques. The scattering and absorption coefficients, and anisotropy factor of cancerous and normal prostate tissues were investigated first as the basis for the biomedical diagnostic and optical imaging. Understanding the receptors over-expressed prostate cancer cells and molecular target mechanism of ligand, two small ICG-derivative dye-peptides, namely Cypate-Bombesin Peptide Analogue Conjugate (Cybesin) and Cypate-Octreotate Peptide Conjugate (Cytate), were applied to study their clinical potential for human prostate cancer detection. In this work, the steady-state and time

  10. Mechanical, physico-chemical, and antimicrobial properties of gelatin-based film incorporated with catechin-lysozyme

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Microbial activity is a primary cause of deterioration in many foods and is often responsible for reduced quality and safety. Food-borne illnesses associated with E. coli O157:H7, S. aureus, S. enteritidis and L. monocytogenes are a major public health concern throughout the world. A number of methods have been employed to control or prevent the growth of these microorganisms in food. Antimicrobial packaging is one of the most promising active packaging systems for effectively retarding the growth of food spoilage and pathogenic microorganisms. The aim of this study was to determine the mechanical, physico-chemical properties and inhibitory effects of the fish gelatin films against selected food spoilage microorganisms when incorporated with catechin-lysozyme. Results The effect of the catechin-lysozyme combination addition (CLC: 0, 0.125, 0.25, and 0.5%, w/v) on fish gelatin film properties was monitored. At the level of 0.5% addition, the CLC showed the greatest elongation at break (EAB) at 143.17% with 0.039 mm thickness, and the lowest water vapor permeability (WVP) at 6.5 x 10−8 g·mm·h-1·cm-2·Pa-1, whereas the control showed high tensile strength (TS) and the highest WVP. Regarding color attributes, the gelatin film without CLC addition gave the highest lightness (L* 91.95) but lowest in redness (a*-1.29) and yellowness (b* 2.25) values. The light transmission of the film did not significantly decrease and nor did film transparency (p>0.05) with increased CLC. Incorporating CLC could not affect the film microstructure. The solubility of the gelatin based film incorporated with CLC was not affected, especially at a high level of addition (p>0.05). Inhibitory activity of the fish gelatin film against E.coli, S.aureus, L. innocua and S. cerevisiae was concentration dependent. Conclusions These findings suggested that CLC incorporation can improve mechanical, physico-chemical, and antimicrobial properties of the resulting films, thus allowing the

  11. Monolayer formation and shear- resistance of human vein endothelial cells on gelatin-based hydrogels with tailorable elasticity and degradability.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Christian; Vukićević, Radovan; Krüger-Genge, Anne; Neffe, Axel T; Lendlein, Andreas; Jung, Friedrich

    2016-01-01

    The formation of a functionally-confluent and shear-resistant endothelial cell (EC) monolayer on cardiovascular implants is a promising strategy to prevent thrombogenic processes after implantation. On the basis of existing studies with arterial endothelial cells adhering after two hours on gelatin-based hydrogels in marked higher numbers compared to tissue culture plates, we hypothesized that also venous endothelial cells (HUVEC) should be able to adhere and form an endothelial monolayer on these hydrogels after days. Furthermore, variation of the hydrogel composition, which slightly influences the materials elasticity and even more the degradation behaviour, should have no considerable effect on HUVEC. Therefore, the monolayer formation and shear resistance of HUVEC were explored on two gelatin-based hydrogels differing in their elasticity (Young's moduli between 35 and 55 kPa) in comparison to a positive control (HUVEC on glass cover slips) and a negative control (HUVEC on glass cover slips activated with interleukin-1β) after 9 days of culturing. HUVEC density after 9 days of culturing under static conditions was lower on the hydrogels compared to both controls (p < 0.05 each). On G10_LNCO8 slightly more EC adhered than on G10_LNCO5. Staining of the actin cytoskeleton and VE-cadherin revealed a pronounced cell-substrate interaction while the cell-cell interaction was comparable to the controls (HUVEC on glass). The secretion of vasoactive and inflammatory mediators did not differ between the hydrogels and the controls. Adherent HUVEC seeded on the hydrogels were able to resist physiological shear forces and the release of cyto- and chemokines in response to the shear forces did not differ from controls (HUVEC on glass). Therefore, both gelatin-based hydrogels are a suitable substrate for EC and a promising candidate for cardiovascular applications.

  12. A rapid shaking-based ionic liquid dispersive liquid phase microextraction for the simultaneous determination of six synthetic food colourants in soft drinks, sugar- and gelatin-based confectionery by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Guo, Jing-Bo; Du, Li-Ming; Tian, Hong; Hao, Cheng-Xuan; Wang, Zhi-Feng; Wang, Jie-Yan

    2013-11-01

    A novel and simple rapid shaking-based method of ionic liquid dispersive liquid phase microextraction for the determination of six synthetic food colourants (Tartrazine, Amaranth, Sunset Yellow, Allura Red, Ponceau 4R, and Erythrosine) in soft drinks, sugar- and gelatin-based confectionery was established. High-performance liquid chromatography coupled with an ultraviolet detector was used for the determinations. The extraction procedure did not require a dispersive solvent, heat, ultrasonication, or additional chemical reagents. 1-Octyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([C8MIM][BF4]) was dispersed in an aqueous sample solution as fine droplets by manual shaking, enabling the easier migration of analytes into the ionic liquid phase. Factors such as the [C8MIM][BF4] volume, sample pH, extraction time, and centrifugation time were investigated. Under the optimum experimental conditions, the proposed method showed excellent detection sensitivity with limits of detection (signal-to-noise ratio=3) within 0.015-0.32 ng/mL. The method was also successfully used in analysing real food samples. Good spiked recoveries from 95.8%-104.5% were obtained. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. In vivo photoacoustic molecular imaging of breast carcinoma with folate receptor-targeted indocyanine green nanoprobes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huina; Liu, Chengbo; Gong, Xiaojing; Hu, Dehong; Lin, Riqiang; Sheng, Zonghai; Zheng, Cuifang; Yan, Meng; Chen, Jingqin; Cai, Lintao; Song, Liang

    2014-11-06

    As an optical-acoustic hybrid imaging technology, photoacoustic imaging uniquely combines the advantages of rich optical contrast with high ultrasonic resolution in depth, opening up many new possibilities not attainable with conventional pure optical imaging technologies. To perform photoacoustic molecular imaging, optically absorbing exogenous contrast agents are needed to enhance the signals from specifically targeted disease activity. In this work, we designed and developed folate receptor targeted, indocyanine green dye doped poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) lipid nanoparticles (FA-ICG-PLGA-lipid NPs) for molecular photoacoustic imaging of tumor. The fabricated FA-ICG-PLGA-lipid NPs exhibited good aqueous stability, a high folate-receptor targeting efficiency, and remarkable optical absorption in near-infrared wavelengths, providing excellent photoacoustic signals in vitro. Furthermore, after intravenous administration of FA-ICG-PLGA-lipid NPs, mice bearing MCF-7 breast carcinomas showed significantly enhanced photoacoustic signals in vivo in the tumor regions, compared with those using non-targeted ICG-PLGA-lipid NPs. Given the existing wide clinical use of ICG and PLGA, the developed FA-ICG-PLGA-lipid NPs, in conjunction with photoacoustic imaging technology, offer a great potential to be translated into the clinic for non-ionizing molecular imaging of breast cancer in vivo.

  14. In vivo photoacoustic molecular imaging of breast carcinoma with folate receptor-targeted indocyanine green nanoprobes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huina; Liu, Chengbo; Gong, Xiaojing; Hu, Dehong; Lin, Riqiang; Sheng, Zonghai; Zheng, Cuifang; Yan, Meng; Chen, Jingqin; Cai, Lintao; Song, Liang

    2014-11-01

    As an optical-acoustic hybrid imaging technology, photoacoustic imaging uniquely combines the advantages of rich optical contrast with high ultrasonic resolution in depth, opening up many new possibilities not attainable with conventional pure optical imaging technologies. To perform photoacoustic molecular imaging, optically absorbing exogenous contrast agents are needed to enhance the signals from specifically targeted disease activity. In this work, we designed and developed folate receptor targeted, indocyanine green dye doped poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) lipid nanoparticles (FA-ICG-PLGA-lipid NPs) for molecular photoacoustic imaging of tumor. The fabricated FA-ICG-PLGA-lipid NPs exhibited good aqueous stability, a high folate-receptor targeting efficiency, and remarkable optical absorption in near-infrared wavelengths, providing excellent photoacoustic signals in vitro. Furthermore, after intravenous administration of FA-ICG-PLGA-lipid NPs, mice bearing MCF-7 breast carcinomas showed significantly enhanced photoacoustic signals in vivo in the tumor regions, compared with those using non-targeted ICG-PLGA-lipid NPs. Given the existing wide clinical use of ICG and PLGA, the developed FA-ICG-PLGA-lipid NPs, in conjunction with photoacoustic imaging technology, offer a great potential to be translated into the clinic for non-ionizing molecular imaging of breast cancer in vivo.

  15. Transferrin receptor targeted PLA-TPGS micelles improved efficacy and safety in docetaxel delivery.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rahul Pratap; Sharma, Gunjan; Sonali; Agrawal, Poornima; Pandey, Bajarangprasad L; Koch, Biplob; Muthu, Madaswamy S

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this work was to develop targeted polymeric micelles of poly-lactic acid-D-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (PLA-TPGS), which are assembled along with D-alpha-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate-transferrin conjugate (TPGS-Tf), and loaded docetaxel (DTX) as a model drug for enhanced treatment of lung cancer in comparison to non-targeted polymeric micelles and DTX injection (Docel™). A549 human lung cancer cells were employed as an in vitro model to access cytotoxicity study of the DTX loaded polymeric micelles. The safety of DTX formulations were studied by the measurement of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and total protein levels in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid of rats after the treatments. The IC50 values demonstrated that the non-targeted and transferrin receptor targeted polymeric micelles could be 7 and 70 folds more effective than Docel™ after 24 h treatment with the A549 cells. Results suggested that transferrin receptor targeted polymeric micelles have showed better efficacy and safety than the non-targeted polymeric micelles and Docel™.

  16. Peptide Receptor-Targeted Fluorescent Probe: Visualization and Discrimination between Chronic and Acute Ulcerative Colitis.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Meiying; Shao, Andong; Li, Hui; Tang, Yan; Li, Qiang; Guo, Zhiqian; Wu, Chungen; Cheng, Yingsheng; Tian, He; Zhu, Wei-Hong

    2017-03-28

    The inflammatory activity of ulcerative colitis plays an important role in the medical treatment. However, accurate and real-time monitoring of the colitis activity with noninvasive bioimaging method is still challenging, especially in distinguishing between chronic and acute colitis. As a good receptor, the oligopeptide transporter (PepT1) is over-expressed in colonic epithelial cells of chronic ulcerative colitis, which can deliver the tripeptide KPV (Lys-Pro-Val, the C-terminal sequence of α-MSH) into cytosol in the intestine. Herein, we report a PepT1 peptide receptor-targeted fluorescent probe DCM-KPV, with the strategy of conjugating the KPV into dicyanomethylene-4H-pyran (DCM) chromophore. The diagnostic fluorescent probe bestows a specific receptor-targeted interaction with PepT1 through the KPV moiety, possessing several beneficial characteristics, such as the efficient long emission, low photobleaching, negligible cytotoxicity and high cytocompatibility in living cells. We build the overexpressed PepT1 on the cytomembrane of ulcerative colitis model Caco-2 cell as the efficient receptor to accumulate the targeted tripeptide KPV in the cytoplasm and nucleus. With the co-localization of DCM-KPV and the DNA-specific fluorophore DAPI, the specifically long emission from chromophore DCM and efficient receptor-targeted peptide KPV, the fluorescent probe of DCM-KPV makes a breakthrough to the direct noninvasive observation to the accumulation in colon inflammation regions via intestinal mucosa, even successfully distinguishing the chronic, acute ulcerative colitis and normal groups. Compared with traditional unenhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, we make full use of exploiting the specific target-receptor interaction between the tripeptide unit KPV and oligopeptide transporter PepT1 for sensing selectivity. The desirable diagnostic ability of DCM-KPV can guarantee the real-time tracking and visualization of

  17. Mechanisms of acquired resistance to androgen receptor targeting drugs in castration resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chism, David D.; De Silva, Dinuka; Whang, Young E.

    2014-01-01

    After initial response to androgen receptor targeting drugs abiraterone or enzalutamide, most patients develop progressive disease and therefore, castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) remains a terminal disease. Multiple mechanisms underlying acquired resistance have been postulated. Intratumoral androgen synthesis may resume after abiraterone treatment. A point mutation in the ligand binding domain of androgen receptor may confer resistance to enzalutamide. Emergence of androgen receptor splice variants lacking the ligand binding domain may mediate resistance to abiraterone and enzalutamide. Steroid receptors such as glucocorticoid receptor may substitute for androgen receptor. Drugs with novel mechanisms of action or combination therapy, along with biomarkers for patient selection, may be needed to improve the therapy of CRPC. PMID:24927631

  18. Preclinical evaluation of a urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-targeted nanoprobe in rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yushu; Gong, Li; Gao, Ning; Liao, Jichun; Sun, Jiayu; Wang, Yuqing; Wang, Lei; Zhu, Pengjin; Fan, Qing; Wang, Yongqiang Andrew; Zeng, Wen; Mao, Hui; Yang, Lily; Gao, Fabao

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To translate a recombinant peptide containing the amino-terminal fragment (ATF) of urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-targeted magnetic iron oxide (IO) nanoparticles (uPAR-targeted human ATF-IONPs) into clinical applications, we conducted a pilot study to evaluate the toxicity and pharmacokinetics of this nanoparticle in normal rhesus monkeys. Methods We assessed the changes in the following: magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signals from pretreatment stage to 14 days posttreatment, serum iron concentrations from 5 minutes posttreatment to 12 weeks posttreatment, routine blood examination and serum chemistry analysis results from pretreatment stage to 12 weeks after administration, and results of staining of the liver with Perls’ Prussian Blue and hematoxylin–eosin at 24 hours and 3 months posttreatment in two rhesus monkeys following an intravenous administration of the targeted nanoparticles either with a polyethylene glycol (ATF-PEG-IONP) or without a PEG (ATF-IONP) coating. Results The levels of alkaline phosphatase, alanine transaminase, and direct bilirubin in the two monkeys increased immediately after the administration of the IONPs but returned to normal within 20 days and stayed within the normal reference range 3 months after the injection. The creatinine levels of the two monkeys stayed within the normal range during the study. In addition, red blood cells, white blood cells, hemoglobin level, and platelets remained normal during the 3 months of the study. Conclusion All of the results suggest that a transient injury in terms of normal organ functions, but no microscopic necrotic lesions, was observed at a systemic delivery dose of 5 mg/kg of iron equivalent concentration in the acute phase, and that no chronic toxicity was found 3 months after the injection. Therefore, we conclude that uPAR-targeted IONPs have the potential to be used as receptor-targeted MRI contrasts as well as theranostic agents for the detection and treatment of

  19. Interaction of Human Plasma Proteins with Thin Gelatin-Based Hydrogel Films: A QCM-D and ToF-SIMS Study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In the fields of surgery and regenerative medicine, it is crucial to understand the interactions of proteins with the biomaterials used as implants. Protein adsorption directly influences cell-material interactions in vivo and, as a result, regulates, for example, cell adhesion on the surface of the implant. Therefore, the development of suitable analytical techniques together with well-defined model systems allowing for the detection, characterization, and quantification of protein adsorbates is essential. In this study, a protocol for the deposition of highly stable, thin gelatin-based films on various substrates has been developed. The hydrogel films were characterized morphologically and chemically. Due to the obtained low thickness of the hydrogel layer, this setup allowed for a quantitative study on the interaction of human proteins (albumin and fibrinogen) with the hydrogel by Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation Monitoring (QCM-D). This technique enables the determination of adsorbant mass and changes in the shear modulus of the hydrogel layer upon adsorption of human proteins. Furthermore, Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry and principal component analysis was applied to monitor the changed composition of the topmost adsorbate layer. This approach opens interesting perspectives for a sensitive screening of viscoelastic biomaterials that could be used for regenerative medicine. PMID:24956040

  20. A novel gelatin-based micro-cavitary hydrogel for potential application in delivery of anchorage dependent cells: A study with vasculogenesis model.

    PubMed

    Leong, Wenyan; Fan, Changjiang; Wang, Dong-An

    2016-10-01

    Hydrogels have been widely regarded as promising tissue engineering scaffolds and cell delivery vehicles, however, their inherent submicron- or nano-scale polymer networks severely inhibit the settlement of anchorage dependent cells (ADCs). Here, using endothelial progenitor outgrowth cells (EPOCs) as the typical ADCs, a gelatin-based micro-cavitary gel (namely Gel-MCG) is developed with gelatin-methacrylate and gelatin microspheres as precursor and porogens, respectively, to promote cellular focal adhesion and functions. The introduction of micro-cavitary structures within the Gel-MCG improves its physical properties as well as creates numerous gel-microcavity interfaces within gel-based matrices. Compared with conventional gelatin gel (Gel-G) scaffold, the Gel-MCG provides more suitable microenvironments for EPOCs' attachment, spreading, and proliferation, and then which leads to enhanced endothelial differentiation and vascularization as demonstrated by higher expressions of endothelial markers. The Gel-MCG system shows great potential as vehicle for the delivery of ADCs in tissue engineering. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Neurobeachin Regulates Glutamate- and GABA-Receptor Targeting to Synapses via Distinct Pathways.

    PubMed

    Farzana, F; Zalm, R; Chen, N; Li, K W; Grant, Seth G N; Smit, A B; Toonen, R F; Verhage, M

    2016-05-01

    Neurotransmission and synaptic strength depend on expression of post-synaptic receptors on the cell surface. Post-translational modification of receptors, trafficking to the synapse through the secretory pathway, and subsequent insertion into the synapse involves interaction of the receptor with A-kinase anchor proteins (AKAPs) and scaffolding proteins. Neurobeachin (Nbea), a brain specific AKAP, is required for synaptic surface expression of both glutamate and GABA receptors. Here, we investigated the role of Nbea-dependent targeting of postsynaptic receptors by studying Nbea interaction with synapse-associated protein 102 (SAP102/Dlg3) and protein kinase A subunit II (PKA II). A Nbea mutant lacking the PKA binding domain showed a similar distribution as wild-type Nbea in Nbea null neurons and partially restored GABA receptor surface expression. To understand the relevance of Nbea interaction with SAP102, we analysed SAP102 null mutant mice. Nbea levels were reduced by ~80% in SAP102 null mice, but glutamatergic receptor expression was normal. A single-point mutation in the pleckstrin homology domain of Nbea (E2218R) resulted in loss of binding with SAP102. When expressed in Nbea null neurons, this mutant fully restored GABA receptor surface expression, but not glutamate receptor expression. Our results suggest that the PKA-binding domain is not essential for Nbea's role in receptor targeting and that Nbea targets glutamate and GABA receptors to the synapse via distinct molecular pathways by interacting with specific effector proteins.

  2. Folate Receptor-Targeting Gold Nanoclusters as Fluorescence Enzyme Mimetic Nanoprobes for Tumor Molecular Colocalization Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Dehong; Sheng, Zonghai; Fang, Shengtao; Wang, Yanan; Gao, Duyang; Zhang, Pengfei; Gong, Ping; Ma, Yifan; Cai, Lintao

    2014-01-01

    Nanoprobes with enzyme-like properties attracted a growing interest in early screening and diagnosis of cancer. To achieve high accuracy and specificity of tumor detection, the design and preparation of enzyme mimetic nanoprobes with high enzyme activity, tumor targeting and excellent luminescence property is highly desirable. Herein, we described a novel kind of fluorescence enzyme mimetic nanoprobe based on folate receptor-targeting Au nanoclusters. The nanoprobes exhibited excellent stability, low cytotoxicity, high fluorescence and enzyme activity. We demonstrated that the nanoprobes could be used for tumor tissues fluorescence/visualizing detection. For the same tumor tissue slice, the nanoprobes peroxidase staining and fluorescent staining were obtained simultaneously, and the results were mutually complementary. Therefore, the fluorescence enzyme mimetic nanoprobes could provide a molecular colocalization diagnosis strategy, efficiently avoid false-positive and false-negative results, and further improve the accuracy and specificity of cancer diagnoses. By examining different clinical samples, we demonstrated that the nanoprobes could distinguish efficiently cancerous cells from normal cells, and exhibit a clinical potential for cancer diagnosis. PMID:24465272

  3. Folate-receptor-targeted NIR-sensitive polydopamine nanoparticles for chemo-photothermal cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Jin, Zhen; Cho, Sunghoon; Jeon, Mi Jeong; Nguyen, Van Du; Park, Jong-Oh; Park, Sukho

    2017-10-20

    We propose the use of folate-receptor-targeted, near-infrared-sensitive polydopamine nanoparticles (NPs) for chemo-photothermal cancer therapy as an enhanced type of drug-delivery system which can be synthesized by in situ polymerization and conjugation with folic acid. The NPs consist of a Fe3O4/Au core, coated polydopamine, conjugated folic acid, and loaded anti-cancer drug (doxorubicin). The proposed multifunctional NPs show many advantages for therapeutic applications such as good biocompatibility and easy bioconjugation. The polydopamine coating of the NPs show a higher photothermal effect and thus more effective cancer killing compared to Fe3O4/Au nanoparticles at the same intensity as near-infrared laser irradiation. In addition, the conjugation of folic acid was shown to enhance cancer cellular uptake efficiency via the folate receptor and thus improve chemotherapeutic efficiency. Through in vitro cancer cell treatment testing, the proposed multifunctional NPs showed advanced photothermal and chemotherapeutic performance. Based on these enhanced anti-cancer properties, we expect that the proposed multifunctional NPs can be used as a drug-delivery system in cancer therapy.

  4. Molecular photoacoustic tomography of breast cancer using receptor targeted magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Xi, Lei; Grobmyer, Stephen R; Zhou, Guangyin; Qian, Weiping; Yang, Lily; Jiang, Huabei

    2014-06-01

    In this report, we present a breast imaging technique combining high-resolution near-infrared (NIR) light induced photoacoustic tomography (PAT) with NIR dye-labeled amino-terminal fragments of urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) targeted magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NIR830-ATF-IONP) for breast cancer imaging using an orthotopic mouse mammary tumor model. We show that accumulation of the targeted nanoparticles in the tumor led to photoacoustic contrast enhancement due to the high absorption of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONP). NIR fluorescence images were used to validate specific delivery of NIR830-ATF-IONP to mouse mammary tumors. We found that systemic delivery of the targeted IONP produced 4- and 10-fold enhancement in photoacoustic signals in the tumor, compared to the tumor of the mice that received non-targeted IONP or control mice. The use of targeted nanoparticles allowed imaging of tumors located as deep as 3.1 cm beneath the normal tissues. Our study indicates the potential of the combination of photoacoustic tomography and receptor-targeted NIR830-ATF-IONP as a clinical tool that can provide improved specificity and sensitivity for breast cancer detection. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Folate-receptor-targeted NIR-sensitive polydopamine nanoparticles for chemo-photothermal cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hao; Jin, Zhen; Cho, Sunghoon; Jeon, Mi Jeong; Du Nguyen, Van; Park, Jong-Oh; Park, Sukho

    2017-10-01

    We propose the use of folate-receptor-targeted, near-infrared-sensitive polydopamine nanoparticles (NPs) for chemo-photothermal cancer therapy as an enhanced type of drug-delivery system which can be synthesized by in situ polymerization and conjugation with folic acid. The NPs consist of a Fe3O4/Au core, coated polydopamine, conjugated folic acid, and loaded anti-cancer drug (doxorubicin). The proposed multifunctional NPs show many advantages for therapeutic applications such as good biocompatibility and easy bioconjugation. The polydopamine coating of the NPs show a higher photothermal effect and thus more effective cancer killing compared to Fe3O4/Au nanoparticles at the same intensity as near-infrared laser irradiation. In addition, the conjugation of folic acid was shown to enhance cancer cellular uptake efficiency via the folate receptor and thus improve chemotherapeutic efficiency. Through in vitro cancer cell treatment testing, the proposed multifunctional NPs showed advanced photothermal and chemotherapeutic performance. Based on these enhanced anti-cancer properties, we expect that the proposed multifunctional NPs can be used as a drug-delivery system in cancer therapy.

  6. TIGIT and CD96: new checkpoint receptor targets for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dougall, William C; Kurtulus, Sema; Smyth, Mark J; Anderson, Ana C

    2017-03-01

    While therapies targeting the co-inhibitory or immune checkpoint receptors PD-1 and CTLA-4 have shown remarkable success in many cancers, not all patients benefit from these therapies. This has catalyzed enormous interest in the targeting of other immune checkpoint receptors. In this regard, TIGIT and CD96 have recently entered the limelight as novel immune checkpoint receptor targets. TIGIT and CD96 together with the co-stimulatory receptor CD226 form a pathway that is analogous to the CD28/CTLA-4 pathway, in which shared ligands and differential receptor:ligand affinities fine-tune the immune response. Although the roles of TIGIT and CD96 as immune checkpoint receptors in T cell and natural killer cell biology are just beginning to be uncovered, accumulating data support the targeting of these receptors for improving anti-tumor immune responses. A clear understanding of the immune cell populations regulated by TIGIT and CD96 is key to the design of immunotherapies that target these receptors in combination with other existing immune checkpoint blockade therapies.

  7. Pharmacodynamics of long-acting folic acid-receptor targeted ritonavir-boosted atazanavir nanoformulations.

    PubMed

    Puligujja, Pavan; Balkundi, Shantanu S; Kendrick, Lindsey M; Baldridge, Hannah M; Hilaire, James R; Bade, Aditya N; Dash, Prasanta K; Zhang, Gang; Poluektova, Larisa Y; Gorantla, Santhi; Liu, Xin-Ming; Ying, Tianlei; Feng, Yang; Wang, Yanping; Dimitrov, Dimiter S; McMillan, JoEllyn M; Gendelman, Howard E

    2015-02-01

    Long-acting nanoformulated antiretroviral therapy (nanoART) that targets monocyte-macrophages could improve the drug's half-life and protein-binding capacities while facilitating cell and tissue depots. To this end, ART nanoparticles that target the folic acid (FA) receptor and permit cell-based drug depots were examined using pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PD) tests. FA receptor-targeted poloxamer 407 nanocrystals, containing ritonavir-boosted atazanavir (ATV/r), significantly increased drug bioavailability and PD by five and 100 times, respectively. Drug particles administered to human peripheral blood lymphocyte reconstituted NOD.Cg-Prkdc(scid)Il2rg(tm1Wjl)/SzJ mice and infected with HIV-1ADA led to ATV/r drug concentrations that paralleled FA receptor beta staining in both the macrophage-rich parafollicular areas of spleen and lymph nodes. Drug levels were higher in these tissues than what could be achieved by either native drug or untargeted nanoART particles. The data also mirrored potent reductions in viral loads, tissue viral RNA and numbers of HIV-1p24+ cells in infected and treated animals. We conclude that FA-P407 coating of ART nanoparticles readily facilitates drug carriage and antiretroviral responses.

  8. GHB receptor targets in the CNS: focus on high-affinity binding sites.

    PubMed

    Bay, Tina; Eghorn, Laura F; Klein, Anders B; Wellendorph, Petrine

    2014-01-15

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is an endogenous compound in the mammalian brain with both low- and high-affinity receptor targets. GHB is used clinically in the treatment of symptoms of narcolepsy and alcoholism, but also illicitly abused as the recreational drug Fantasy. Major pharmacological effects of exogenous GHB are mediated by GABA subtype B (GABAB) receptors that bind GHB with low affinity. The existence of GHB high-affinity binding sites has been known for more than three decades, but the uncovering of their molecular identity has only recently begun. This has been prompted by the generation of molecular tools to selectively study high-affinity sites. These include both genetically modified GABAB knock-out mice and engineered selective GHB ligands. Recently, certain GABA subtype A (GABAA) receptor subtypes emerged as high-affinity GHB binding sites and potential physiological mediators of GHB effects. In this research update, a description of the various reported receptors for GHB is provided, including GABAB receptors, certain GABAA receptor subtypes and other reported GHB receptors. The main focus will thus be on the high-affinity binding targets for GHB and their potential functional roles in the mammalian brain.

  9. Multifunctional receptor-targeted nanocomplexes for the delivery of therapeutic nucleic acids to the brain.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Gavin D; Bienemann, Alison S; Tagalakis, Aristides D; Pugh, John A; Welser, Katharina; Campbell, Frederick; Tabor, Alethea B; Hailes, Helen C; Gill, Steven S; Lythgoe, Mark F; McLeod, Cameron W; White, Edward A; Hart, Stephen L

    2013-12-01

    Convection enhanced delivery (CED) is a method of direct injection to the brain that can achieve widespread dispersal of therapeutics, including gene therapies, from a single dose. Non-viral, nanocomplexes are of interest as vectors for gene therapy in the brain, but it is essential that administration should achieve maximal dispersal to minimise the number of injections required. We hypothesised that anionic nanocomplexes administered by CED should disperse more widely in rat brains than cationics of similar size, which bind electrostatically to cell-surface anionic moieties such as proteoglycans, limiting their spread. Anionic, receptor-targeted nanocomplexes (RTN) containing a neurotensin-targeting peptide were prepared with plasmid DNA and compared with cationic RTNs for dispersal and transfection efficiency. Both RTNs were labelled with gadolinium for localisation in the brain by MRI and in brain sections by LA-ICP-MS, as well as with rhodamine fluorophore for detection by fluorescence microscopy. MRI distribution studies confirmed that the anionic RTNs dispersed more widely than cationic RTNs, particularly in the corpus callosum. Gene expression levels from anionic formulations were similar to those of cationic RTNs. Thus, anionic RTN formulations can achieve both widespread dispersal and effective gene expression in brains after administration of a single dose by CED.

  10. Synthesis of a Fluorescently Labeled (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC Analog for Somatostatin Receptor Targeting.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sukhen C; Hernandez Vargas, Servando; Rodriguez, Melissa; Kossatz, Susanne; Voss, Julie; Carmon, Kendra S; Reiner, Thomas; Schonbrunn, Agnes; Azhdarinia, Ali

    2017-07-13

    Fluorescently labeled imaging agents can identify surgical margins in real-time to help achieve complete resections and minimize the likelihood of local recurrence. However, photon attenuation limits fluorescence-based imaging to superficial lesions or lesions that are a few millimeters beneath the tissue surface. Contrast agents that are dual-labeled with a radionuclide and fluorescent dye can overcome this limitation and combine quantitative, whole-body nuclear imaging with intraoperative fluorescence imaging. Using a multimodality chelation (MMC) scaffold, IRDye 800CW was conjugated to the clinically used somatostatin analog, (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC, to produce the dual-labeled analog, (68)Ga-MMC(IRDye 800CW)-TOC, with high yield and specific activity. In vitro pharmacological assays demonstrated retention of receptor-targeting properties for the dual-labeled compound with robust internalization that was somatostatin receptor (SSTR) 2-mediated. Biodistribution studies in mice identified the kidneys as the primary excretion route for (68)Ga-MMC(IRDye 800CW)-TOC, along with clearance via the reticuloendothelial system. Higher uptake was observed in most tissues compared to (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC but decreased as a function of time. The combination of excellent specificity for SSTR2-expressing cells and suitable biodistribution indicate potential application of (68)Ga-MMC(IRDye 800CW)-TOC for intraoperative detection of SSTR2-expressing tumors.

  11. A study of diffusion in poly(ethyleneglycol)-gelatin based semi-interpenetrating networks for use in wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Kyle T.; Kao, W. John

    2013-01-01

    Semi-interpenetrating networks (sIPNs) designed to mimic extracellular matrix via covalent crosslinking of poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate in the presence of gelatin have been shown to aid in wound healing, particularly when loaded with soluble factors. Ideal systems for tissue repair permit an effective release of therapeutic agents and flow of nutrients to proliferating cells. Appropriate network characterization can, consequently, be used to convey an understanding of the mass transfer kinetics necessary for materials to aid in the wound healing process. Solute transport from and through sIPNs has not yet been thoroughly evaluated. In the current study, the diffusivity of growth factors and nutrients through the polymeric system was determined. Transport of keratinocyte growth factor was modeled by treating the sIPN as a plane sheet into which the protein was loaded. The diffusion coefficient was determined to be 4.86 × 10−9 ± 1.86 × 10−12 cm2/s. Glucose transport was modeled as flow through a semi-permeable membrane. Using lag-time analysis, the diffusion coefficient was calculated to be 2.25 × 10−6 ± 1.98 × 10−7 cm2/s. The results were evaluated in conjunction with previous studies on controlled drug release from sIPNs. As expected from Einstein-Stokes equation, diffusivity decreased as molecular size increased. The results offer insight into the structure-function design paradigm and show that release from the polymeric system is diffusion controlled, rather than dissolution controlled. PMID:24311827

  12. Cutaneous biocompatible rutin-loaded gelatin-based nanoparticles increase the SPF of the association of UVA and UVB filters.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Camila Areias de; Peres, Daniela D'Almeida; Graziola, Fabiana; Chacra, Nádia Araci Bou; Araújo, Gabriel Lima Barros de; Flórido, Ana Catarina; Mota, Joana; Rosado, Catarina; Velasco, Maria Valéria Robles; Rodrigues, Luís Monteiro; Fernandes, Ana Sofia; Baby, André Rolim

    2016-01-01

    The encapsulation of natural ingredients, such as rutin, can offer improvements in sun protection effectiveness. This strategy can provide enhanced flavonoid content and produces an improved bioactive compound with new physical and functional characteristics. As an alternative to common synthetic-based sunscreens, rutin-entrapped gelatin nanoparticles (GNPs) were designed and associated with ethylhexyl dimethyl PABA (EHDP), ethylhexyl methoxycinnamate (EHMC) and methoxydibenzoylmethane (BMDBM) in sunscreen formulations. The purpose of this study was to develop rutin-loaded gelatin nanoparticles and characterize their physicochemical, thermal, functional and safety properties. Rutin-loaded gelatin nanoparticles increased antioxidant activity by 74% relative to free-rutin (FR) solution. Also, this new ingredient upgraded the Sun Protection Factor (SPF) by 48%, indicating its potential as a raw material for bioactive sunscreens. The safety profile indicated that GNPs and glutaraldehyde (GTA) decreased HaCaT cell viability in a concentration/time-dependent manner. However, both blank nanoparticles (B-NC) and rutin-loaded nanoparticles (R-NC) had good performance on skin compatibility tests. These results functionally characterized rutin-loaded nanoparticles as a safe SPF enhancer in sunscreens, especially in association with UV filters.

  13. A molecular receptor targeted, hydroxyapatite nanocrystal based multi-modal contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Ashokan, Anusha; Menon, Deepthy; Nair, Shantikumar; Koyakutty, Manzoor

    2010-03-01

    upto relatively higher doses of 500 microg/mL and 48 h of incubation. Flow-cytometry based reactive oxygen species (ROS) analysis also showed no significant levels of ROS generation in the nHAp treated cells. The tri-modal contrast imaging functionality together with molecular receptor targeting capability and biocompatibility makes MF-nHAp a promising biomineral contrast agent for combinatorial molecular imaging.

  14. Combined effects of radiation and interleukin-13 receptor-targeted cytotoxin on glioblastoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Kawakami, Koji; Kawakami, Mariko; Liu Qi; Puri, Raj K. . E-mail: puri@cber.fda.gov

    2005-09-01

    Purpose: Interleukin-13 receptor-targeted cytotoxin (IL13-PE38) is highly cytotoxic to human glioblastoma (GBM) cells. Although this molecule is being tested in a multicenter Phase III clinical trial (PRECISE Study) in patients with recurrent disease, the activity of IL13-PE38 when combined with radiation therapy has not been investigated. Methods and Materials: Cytotoxicity of IL13-PE38 to GBM cell lines was assessed by protein synthesis inhibition and clonogenic assays, and the growth of GBM cells receiving radiation was assessed by thymidine uptake assays. Expression of IL-13 receptor {alpha}2 (IL-13R{alpha}2) messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) in GBM cells exposed to radiation was assessed by quantitative reverse transcriptase/polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and IL-13R density by radiolabeled IL-13 binding assays. Results: Prior irradiation of GBM cell lines followed by IL13-PE38 treatment did not enhance cytotoxicity; however, concomitant 5 Gy irradiation and IL13-PE38 treatment was highly cytotoxic to T98G, M059K, A172, and LN-229 cell lines as determined by cell viability assays. There was a statistically significant decrease in number of viable cells in IL13-PE38 and irradiated cells compared with irradiated cells alone (p < 0.05) or IL13-PE38 treated cells alone (p < 0.05). In contrast, U251, SN19, and U87MG cell lines did not show any combined effect. These results were confirmed by clonogenic assays. Although three GBM cell lines-U251, SN19, and A172-showed 2.8- to 13.9-fold upregulation of IL-13R{alpha}2 mRNA expression at 6-24 h after exposure to 5 Gy radiation, specific binding of radiolabeled IL-13 to these cell lines did not improve. Conclusions: Our results suggest that concomitant radiation therapy and IL13-PE38 treatment may be beneficial for the treatment of patients with GBM. This strategy may be worth exploring in animal models of human glioma.

  15. Trout-skin gelatin-based edible films containing phenolic antioxidants: effect on physical properties and oxidative stability of cod-liver oil model food.

    PubMed

    Tammineni, Nageshwar; Unlü, Gülhan; Rasco, Barbara; Powers, Joseph; Sablani, Shyam; Nindo, Caleb

    2012-11-01

    Trout-skin (Oncorhynchus mykiss) gelatin-based films containing antioxidants (epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), 50 and 250 ppm w/w) and green tea powder (1% and 20% w/w of gelatin) were tested for tensile strength, elastic modulus, and elongation, and oxygen and water vapor transmission rates, in vitro antioxidant activity using the DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) assay and effect on stabilizing cod-liver oil held under mild thermal abuse conditions. Cod-liver oil overlaid with films was stored at 40 °C for 20 d and analyzed for peroxide value (PV) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). Antioxidant activity was retained in films containing green tea powder, but was reduced (P < 0.05) in EGCG films (20 d, 23 °C). Water vapor transmission rate of the films incorporated with antioxidants did not change significantly (P > 0.05), but the oxygen transmission rate for films with 50 ppm EGCG and 20% green tea powder was significant (P < 0.05). Other physical properties varied with antioxidant incorporation. The TBARS and PV of control oil increased from 0.05 ± 0.01 to 4.71 ± 0.30 g MDA/kg oil and from 3.6 ± 0.2 to 178.3 ± 24.5 millieq peroxides/kg oil, respectively, after 20 d. For cod-liver oil covered with control or antioxidant-containing films, TBARS remained below 0.37 g MDA/kg oil and PV below 7 millieq peroxides/kg oil. Incorporation of antioxidants to the films did not reduce oil oxidation (P > 0.05) at the levels tested and this was confirmed by activation energy calculations. The rate of oil oxidation was more dependent upon the inherent oxygen barrier property of the films than the presence of antioxidants. This research has the potential to enhance the utilization of fish skins, a valuable food processing by-product, as edible films with natural antioxidants to extend the shelf life of foods. The film physical properties and barrier to oxygen and water are investigated. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  16. Influence of sex and estrous cycle on the effects of acute tryptophan depletion induced by a gelatin-based mixture in adult Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Jans, L A W; Lieben, C K J; Blokland, A

    2007-06-29

    Women are more vulnerable to develop depression and anxiety disorders than men. This may be related to higher serotonergic vulnerability in women. Serotonergic vulnerability entails that differences between people in the regulation of serotonin (5-HT) determine the vulnerability of an individual to develop depression or other 5-HT-related disorders. The aim of the present experiment was to evaluate whether male and female Wistar rats differ in serotonergic vulnerability. Here, a stronger behavioral response to acute tryptophan (TRP) depletion was assumed to reflect serotonergic vulnerability. Twenty-four male and 48 female rats were repeatedly subjected to treatment with a gelatin-based protein-carbohydrate mixture, either with or without L-tryptophan. Female estrous cycle phase was determined by means of vaginal smears and the females were divided into two groups based on their estrous cycle phase: pro-estrus/estrus and met-estrus/di-estrus. Blood samples showed stronger TRP depletion in males than females. There was no effect of estrous cycle on plasma TRP concentrations. In contrast, treatment effects on some brain TRP concentrations were influenced by estrous cycle phase, females in pro-estrus/estrus showed the strongest response to TRP depletion. In the open field test and home cage emergence test, females in pro-estrus/estrus also showed the strongest behavioral response to acute TRP depletion. In general, females showed more activity than males in anxiety-related situations and this effect appeared to be enhanced by TRP depletion. In the social interaction test, passive body contact in males and females in pro-estrus/estrus was decreased after TRP depletion whereas it was increased in females in the met-estrus/di-estrus phase. Acute TRP depletion affected object recognition, but did not affect behavior in the forced swimming test and a reaction time task. It is concluded that sex and estrous cycle phase can influence the behavioral response to TRP depletion

  17. Folate Receptor Targeted Polymeric Micellar Nanocarriers for Delivery of Orlistat as a Repurposed Drug against Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Bhethanabotla, Rohith; Mishra, Kaushik; Devulapally, Rammohan; Foygel, Kira; Sekar, Thillai V; Ananta, Jeyarama S; Massoud, Tarik F; Joy, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a recalcitrant malignancy with no available targeted therapy. Off target effects and poor bioavailability of the FDA approved anti-obesity drug orlistat hinder its clinical translation as a repurposed new drug against TNBC. Here we demonstrate a newly engineered drug formulation for packaging orlistat tailored to TNBC treatment. We synthesized TNBC-specific folate receptor targeted micellar nanoparticles (NPs) carrying orlistat, which improved the solubility (70-80 μg/ml) of this water insoluble drug. The targeted NPs also improved the delivery and bioavailability of orlistat to MDA-MB-231 cells in culture and to tumor xenografts in nude mouse model. We prepared HEA-EHA copolymer micellar NPs by copolymerization of 2-hydroxyethylacrylate (HEA) and 2-ethylhexylacrylate (EHA), and functionalized them with folic acid and an imaging dye. Fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis of TNBC cells indicated a dose dependent increase in apoptotic populations in cells treated with free orlistat, orlistat NPs, and folate-receptor targeted Fol-HEA-EHA-orlistat NPs in which Fol-HEA-EHA-orlistat NPs showed significantly higher cytotoxicity than free orlistat. In vitro analysis data demonstrated significant apoptosis at nanomolar concentrations in cells activated through caspase 3 and PARP inhibition. In vivo analysis demonstrated significant antitumor effects in living mice after targeted treatment of tumors, and confirmed by fluorescence imaging. Moreover, Folate receptor targeted Fol-DyLight747-orlistat NPs treated mice exhibited significantly higher reduction in tumor volume compared to control group. Taken together, these results indicate that orlistat packaged in HEA-b-EHA micellar NPs is a highly promising new drug formulation for TNBC therapy. PMID:26553061

  18. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor targets for the treatment of metabolic diseases.

    PubMed

    Monsalve, Francisco A; Pyarasani, Radha D; Delgado-Lopez, Fernando; Moore-Carrasco, Rodrigo

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is estimated to affect more than one in five adults, and its prevalence is growing in the adult and pediatric populations. The most widely recognized metabolic risk factors are atherogenic dyslipidemia, elevated blood pressure, and elevated plasma glucose. Individuals with these characteristics commonly manifest a prothrombotic state and a proinflammatory state as well. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) may serve as potential therapeutic targets for treating the metabolic syndrome and its related risk factors. The PPARs are transcriptional factors belonging to the ligand-activated nuclear receptor superfamily. So far, three isoforms of PPARs have been identified, namely, PPAR- α, PPAR-β/δ, and PPAR-γ. Various endogenous and exogenous ligands of PPARs have been identified. PPAR- α and PPAR- γ are mainly involved in regulating lipid metabolism, insulin sensitivity, and glucose homeostasis, and their agonists are used in the treatment of hyperlipidemia and T2DM. Whereas PPAR- β / δ function is to regulate lipid metabolism, glucose homeostasis, anti-inflammation, and fatty acid oxidation and its agonists are used in the treatment of metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases. This review mainly focuses on the biological role of PPARs in gene regulation and metabolic diseases, with particular focus on the therapeutic potential of PPAR modulators in the treatment of thrombosis.

  19. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Targets for the Treatment of Metabolic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Monsalve, Francisco A.; Pyarasani, Radha D.; Delgado-Lopez, Fernando; Moore-Carrasco, Rodrigo

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is estimated to affect more than one in five adults, and its prevalence is growing in the adult and pediatric populations. The most widely recognized metabolic risk factors are atherogenic dyslipidemia, elevated blood pressure, and elevated plasma glucose. Individuals with these characteristics commonly manifest a prothrombotic state and a proinflammatory state as well. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) may serve as potential therapeutic targets for treating the metabolic syndrome and its related risk factors. The PPARs are transcriptional factors belonging to the ligand-activated nuclear receptor superfamily. So far, three isoforms of PPARs have been identified, namely, PPAR-α, PPAR-β/δ, and PPAR-γ. Various endogenous and exogenous ligands of PPARs have been identified. PPAR-α and PPAR-γ are mainly involved in regulating lipid metabolism, insulin sensitivity, and glucose homeostasis, and their agonists are used in the treatment of hyperlipidemia and T2DM. Whereas PPAR-β/δ function is to regulate lipid metabolism, glucose homeostasis, anti-inflammation, and fatty acid oxidation and its agonists are used in the treatment of metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases. This review mainly focuses on the biological role of PPARs in gene regulation and metabolic diseases, with particular focus on the therapeutic potential of PPAR modulators in the treatment of thrombosis. PMID:23781121

  20. Orexin Receptor Targets for Anti-Relapse Medication Development in Drug Addiction.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Luyi; Sun, Wei-Lun; See, Ronald E

    2011-06-14

    Drug addiction is a chronic illness characterized by high rates of relapse. Relapse to drug use can be triggered by re-exposure to drug-associated cues, stressful events, or the drug itself after a period of abstinence. Pharmacological intervention to reduce the impact of relapse-instigating factors offers a promising target for addiction treatment. Growing evidence has implicated an important role of the orexin/hypocretin system in drug reward and drug-seeking, including animal models of relapse. Here, we review the evidence for the role of orexins in modulating reward and drug-seeking in animal models of addiction and the potential for orexin receptors as specific targets for anti-relapse medication approaches.

  1. Accessing Structurally Diverse Near-Infrared Cyanine Dyes for Folate Receptor-Targeted Cancer Cell Staining.

    PubMed

    König, Sandra G; Krämer, Roland

    2017-03-24

    Folate receptor (FR) targeting is one of the most promising strategies for the development of small-molecule based cancer imaging agents since the FR is highly overexpressed on the surface of many cancer cell types. FR-targeted conjugates of NIR emissive cyanine dyes are in advanced clinical trials for fluorescence-guided surgery and are valuable research tools for optical molecular imaging in animal models. Only a small number of promising conjugates has been evaluated so far. Analysis of structure-performance relations to identify critical factors modulating the performance of targeted conjugates is essential for successful further optimization. This contribution addresses the need for convenient synthetic access to structurally diverse NIR-emissive cyanine dyes for conjugation with folic acid. Structural variations were introduced to readily available cyanine precursors in particular via C-C-coupling reactions including Suzuki- and (for the first time with these types of dyes) Sonogashira cross couplings. Photophysical properties such as absorbance maxima, brightness, and photostability are highly dependent on the molecular structure. Selected modified cyanines were conjugated to folic acid for cancer cell targeting. Several conjugates display a favorable combination of high fluorescence brightness and photostability with high affinity to FR positive cancer cells, and enable the selective imaging of these cells with low background.

  2. Anti-CD22-chimeric antigen receptors targeting B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Haso, Waleed; Lee, Daniel W; Shah, Nirali N; Stetler-Stevenson, Maryalice; Yuan, Constance M; Pastan, Ira H; Dimitrov, Dimiter S; Morgan, Richard A; FitzGerald, David J; Barrett, David M; Wayne, Alan S; Mackall, Crystal L; Orentas, Rimas J

    2013-02-14

    Immune targeting of B-cell malignancies using chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) is a promising new approach, but critical factors impacting CAR efficacy remain unclear. To test the suitability of targeting CD22 on precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL), lymphoblasts from 111 patients with BCP-ALL were assayed for CD22 expression and all were found to be CD22-positive, with median CD22 expression levels of 3500 sites/cell. Three distinct binding domains targeting CD22 were fused to various TCR signaling domains ± an IgG heavy chain constant domain (CH2CH3) to create a series of vector constructs suitable to delineate optimal CAR configuration. CARs derived from the m971 anti-CD22 mAb, which targets a proximal CD22 epitope demonstrated superior antileukemic activity compared with those incorporating other binding domains, and addition of a 4-1BB signaling domain to CD28.CD3 constructs diminished potency, whereas increasing affinity of the anti-CD22 binding motif, and extending the CD22 binding domain away from the membrane via CH2CH3 had no effect. We conclude that second-generation m971 mAb-derived anti-CD22 CARs are promising novel therapeutics that should be tested in BCP-ALL.

  3. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors: Targets for the treatment of metabolic illnesses (Review).

    PubMed

    Moore-Carrasco, Rodrigo; Poblete Bustamante, Mauricio; González Guerra, Oscar; Leiva Madariaga, Elba; Mujica Escudero, Veronica; Aranguez Arellano, Claudio; Palomo, Iván

    2008-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) belong to a family of transcription factors of which three isotypes, PPARα, PPARδ (β) and PPARγ, are known. These play a central role in regulating intermediate metabolism and in incidences of inflammation. In recent years, a greater understanding of their mechanisms of action and their effects, principally in the management of cardiovascular disease, has been achieved. PPAR agonists, catalysts and agents have been used since the 1990s, when it was confirmed that fibrates possess lipid modifying properties when selectively activating PPARα. In addition, thiazolidinediones, structures analogous to fibrates, showed PPARγ activity with an insulin-sensitizing effect, leading to their use in the control and even prevention of diabetes mellitus type 2. Currently, studies are oriented to the development of agents that activate multiple PPAR isoforms - not only dual (PPARα/γ), but also PPAR panagonists (α/γ/δ). The purpose of this review is to explain the mechanisms of the molecular action and the effects of PPAR agonists, and also to analyze existing and current studies concerning their use in cardiovascular and metabolic illnesses.

  4. Signaling cross-talk in the resistance to HER family receptor targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, H; Chang, S-S; Hsu, J L; Hung, M-C

    2014-02-27

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and human EGFR 2 (HER2) have an important role in the initiation and progression of various types of cancer. Inhibitors targeting these receptor tyrosine kinases are some of the most successful targeted anticancer drugs widely used for cancer treatment; however, cancer cells have mechanisms of intrinsic and acquired drug resistance that pose as major obstacles in drug efficacy. Extensive studies from both clinical and laboratory research have identified several molecular mechanisms underlying resistance. Among them is the role of signaling cross-talk between the EGFR/HER2 and other signaling pathways. In this review, we focus particularly on this signaling cross-talk at the receptor, mediator and effector levels, and further discuss alternative approaches to overcome resistance. In addition to well-recognized signaling cross-talk involved in the resistance, we also introduce the cross-talk between EGFR/HER2-mediated pathways and pathways triggered by other types of receptors, including those of the Notch, Wnt and TNFR/IKK/NF-κB pathways, and discuss the potential role of targeting this cross-talk to sensitize cells to EGFR/HER2 inhibitors.

  5. Positive allosteric modulators as an approach to nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-targeted therapeutics: advantages and limitations.

    PubMed

    Williams, Dustin K; Wang, Jingyi; Papke, Roger L

    2011-10-15

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR), recognized targets for drug development in cognitive and neuro-degenerative disorders, are allosteric proteins with dynamic interconversions between multiple functional states. Activation of the nAChR ion channel is primarily controlled by the binding of ligands (agonists, partial agonists, competitive antagonists) at conventional agonist binding sites, but is also regulated in either negative or positive ways by the binding of ligands to other modulatory sites. In this review, we discuss models for the activation and desensitization of nAChR, and the discovery of multiple types of ligands that influence those processes in both heteromeric nAChR, such as the high-affinity nicotine receptors of the brain, and homomeric α7-type receptors. In recent years, α7 nAChRs have been identified as a potential target for therapeutic indications leading to the development of α7-selective agonists and partial agonists. However, unique properties of α7 nAChR, including low probability of channel opening and rapid desensitization, may limit the therapeutic usefulness of ligands binding exclusively to conventional agonist binding sites. New enthusiasm for the therapeutic targeting of α7 has come from the identification of α7-selective positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) that work effectively on the intrinsic factors that limit α7 ion channel activation. While these new drugs appear promising for therapeutic development, we also consider potential caveats and possible limitations for their use, including PAM-insensitive forms of desensitization and cytotoxicity issues.

  6. Estrogen Receptor-Targeted Contrast Agents for Molecular Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Breast Cancer Hormonal Status

    PubMed Central

    Pais, Adi; Degani, Hadassa

    2016-01-01

    The estrogen receptor (ER) α is overexpressed in most breast cancers, and its level serves as a major prognostic factor. It is important to develop quantitative molecular imaging methods that specifically detect ER in vivo and assess its function throughout the entire primary breast cancer and in metastatic breast cancer lesions. This study presents the biochemical and molecular features, as well as the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) effects of two novel ER-targeted contrast agents (CAs), based on pyridine-tetra-acetate-Gd(III) chelate conjugated to 17β-estradiol (EPTA-Gd) or to tamoxifen (TPTA-Gd). The experiments were conducted in solution, in human breast cancer cells, and in severe combined immunodeficient mice implanted with transfected ER-positive and ER-negative MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer xenografts. Binding studies with ER in solution and in human breast cancer cells indicated affinities in the micromolar range of both CAs. Biochemical and molecular studies in breast cancer cell cultures showed that both CAs exhibit estrogen-like agonistic activity, enhancing cell proliferation, as well as upregulating cMyc oncogene and downregulating ER expression levels. The MRI longitudinal relaxivity was significantly augmented by EPTA-Gd in ER-positive cells as compared to ER-negative cells. Dynamic contrast-enhanced studies with EPTA-Gd in vivo indicated specific augmentation of the MRI water signal in the ER-positive versus ER-negative xenografts, confirming EPTA-Gd-specific interaction with ER. In contrast, TPTA-Gd did not show increased enhancement in ER-positive tumors and did not appear to interact in vivo with the tumors’ ER. However, TPTA-Gd was found to interact strongly with muscle tissue, enhancing muscle signal intensity in a mechanism independent of the presence of ER. The specificity of EPTA-Gd interaction with ER in vivo was further verified by acute and chronic competition with tamoxifen. The chronic tamoxifen treatment also revealed that this

  7. The transport mechanism of integrin αvβ3 receptor targeting nanoparticles in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yining; Xu, Juan; Shan, Wei; Liu, Min; Cui, Yi; Li, Lian; Liu, Chong; Huang, Yuan

    2016-03-16

    As for the existence of epithelium barrier, accelerating the transport remains huge challenges for orally delivered protein and peptide drugs into blood circulation. Modifying nanopaticles (NPs) with targeting peptides can enhance the intestinal absorption of loaded macromolecular drugs. However, the transport process, which mainly means how the NPs pass through the apical membrane and the basolateral side and then enter into blood circulation, is needed comprehensive investigation. In this study, we systemically studied the transport mechanisms in Caco-2 cell model of trimethyl chitosan based NPs (TMC NPs) before and after modification of FQS, an integrin αvβ3 receptor targeting peptide. Our results showed FQS peptide mediated multiple endocytosis pathways and could activate integrin αvβ3 receptor by interacting with FAK and Src-family kinases to induce receptor-mediated endocytosis of the NPs. Then, both endocytosed NPs could transport from early endosome to lysososmes via late endosomes/lysosome pathway, as well as to recycling endosomes and Golgi apparatus through early endosome/recycling endosomes and Golgi apparatus/recycling endosomes/plasma membrane pathways, respectively. After FQS peptide modification, the endocytosis subpathways of NPs have been changed, and more pathways are involved in exocytosis process for FQS-modified NPs compared with non-modified NPs. Our study indicated the ligand modification could enhance the uptake and transport by altering some pathways in whole transport process of NPs.

  8. Atomic Force Microscopy Probing of Receptor–Nanoparticle Interactions for Riboflavin Receptor Targeted Gold–Dendrimer Nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Riboflavin receptors are overexpressed in malignant cells from certain human breast and prostate cancers, and they constitute a group of potential surface markers important for cancer targeted delivery of therapeutic agents and imaging molecules. Here we report on the fabrication and atomic force microscopy (AFM) characterization of a core–shell nanocomposite consisting of a gold nanoparticle (AuNP) coated with riboflavin receptor-targeting poly(amido amine) dendrimer. We designed this nanocomposite for potential applications such as a cancer targeted imaging material based on its surface plasmon resonance properties conferred by AuNP. We employed AFM as a technique for probing the binding interaction between the nanocomposite and riboflavin binding protein (RfBP) in solution. AFM enabled precise measurement of the AuNP height distribution before (13.5 nm) and after chemisorption of riboflavin-conjugated dendrimer (AuNP–dendrimer; 20.5 nm). Binding of RfBP to the AuNP–dendrimer caused a height increase to 26.7 nm, which decreased to 22.8 nm when coincubated with riboflavin as a competitive ligand, supporting interaction of AuNP–dendrimer and its target protein. In summary, physical determination of size distribution by AFM imaging can serve as a quantitative approach to monitor and characterize the nanoscale interaction between a dendrimer-covered AuNP and target protein molecules in vitro. PMID:24571134

  9. Magnetic core-shell hybrid nanoparticles for receptor targeted anti-cancer therapy and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Shanavas, Asifkhan; Sasidharan, Sisini; Bahadur, Dhirendra; Srivastava, Rohit

    2017-01-15

    Hybrid nanoparticles with magnetic poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticle 'core', surface modified with folate-chitosan (fol-cht) conjugate 'shell' are evaluated as simultaneous anti-cancer therapeutic and MRI contrast agent. The fol-cht conjugate is prepared using carbodiimide crosslinking chemistry at an optimized folate to amine (chitosan) molar ratio for further coating on PLGA nanoparticles loaded with docetaxel and well packed super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs). Apart from possessing a targeting moiety, the coating provides a physical barrier to avoid undesired burst release of drug and also imparts sensitivity to acidic pH, due to protonated amine group dependent decondensation of the coating and subsequent drug release. The biocompatible hybrid nanoparticles provide receptor targeted docetaxel and SPION delivery for anti-cancer therapy and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging respectively, as tested in both folate receptor positive and negative cancer cells. Enhancement in nanoparticle uptake by folate receptor positive oral cancer cells caused significant increase in docetaxel mediated cytotoxicity. While polymeric encapsulation and fol-cht coating negatively affects the magnetic property of iron oxide nanoparticles, their aggregation in the core, shortened the overall T2 relaxation time thereby enhancing the nanoparticle relaxivity to provide better in vitro MR imaging.

  10. Scavenger receptor-targeted photodynamic therapy of J774 tumors in mice: tumor response and concomitant immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamblin, Michael R.; O'Donnell, David A.; Huzaira, Misbah; Zahra, Touqir

    2002-06-01

    J774 is a cell line derived from Balb/c mice that in vitro behaves as macrophages (including scavenger-receptor expression) and has been widely used to study macrophage cell biology. In vivo it produces histiocytic lymphoma tumors that are invasive and metastatic. We report here on the response of subcutaneous J774 tumors to photodynamic therapy with scavenger-receptor targeted chlorin(e6). Bovine serum albumin was covalently conjugated with chlorin(e6), maleylated and purified by acetone precipitation and both this and free chlorin(e6) were injected IV into mice at 2 mg/kg. When tumors were illuminated with 665 nm laser-light after 24 hours there was a highly significant response (tumor volume and growth rate) for the conjugate, but this led to a relatively small survival increase due to the highly metastatic nature of the tumor. The free chlorin(e6) gave very little tumor response. When light was delivered 3 hours after injection the response from the conjugate disappeared due to insufficient time for the tumor cells to take up the photosensitizer by receptor-mediated endocytosis. Free chlorin(e6) at 3 hours, however, produced a total regression of the tumors due to a primarily vascular effect, but the mice died sooner than control animals. When J774 tumors were surgically removed at different times after implantation the mouse survival was proportional to the length of time they had had the tumor. We interpret this data to show that mice with J774 tumors slowly develop concomitant immunity and a PDT regimen that swiftly ablates the tumor will give worse survival results than a regimen with a slower tumor response.

  11. Decreased non-specific adhesivity, receptor targeted (DART) nanoparticles exhibit improved dispersion, cellular uptake, and tumor retention in invasive gliomas.

    PubMed

    Wadajkar, Aniket S; Dancy, Jimena G; Roberts, Nathan B; Connolly, Nina P; Strickland, Dudley K; Winkles, Jeffrey A; Woodworth, Graeme F; Kim, Anthony J

    2017-09-05

    The most common and deadly form of primary brain cancer, glioblastoma (GBM), is characterized by significant intratumoral heterogeneity, microvascular proliferation, immune system suppression, and brain tissue invasion. Delivering effective and sustained treatments to the invasive GBM cells intermixed with functioning neural elements is a major goal of advanced therapeutic systems for brain cancer. Previously, we investigated the nanoparticle characteristics that enable targeting of invasive GBM cells. This revealed the importance of minimizing non-specific binding within the relatively adhesive, 'sticky' microenvironment of the brain and brain tumors in particular. We refer to such nanoformulations with decreased non-specific adhesivity and receptor targeting as 'DART' therapeutics. In this work, we applied this information toward the design and characterization of biodegradable nanocarriers, and in vivo testing in orthotopic experimental gliomas. We formulated particulate nanocarriers using poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and PLGA-polyethylene glycol (PLGA-PEG) polymers to generate sub-100nm nanoparticles with minimal binding to extracellular brain components and strong binding to the Fn14 receptor - an upregulated, conserved component in invasive GBM. Multiple particle tracking in brain tissue slices and in vivo testing in orthotopic murine malignant glioma revealed preserved nanoparticle diffusivity and increased uptake in brain tumor cells. These combined characteristics also resulted in longer retention of the DART nanoparticles within the orthotopic tumors compared to non-targeted versions. Taken together, these results and nanoparticle design considerations offer promising new methods to optimize therapeutic nanocarriers for improving drug delivery and treatment for invasive brain tumors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Synthesis and biological evaluation of folate receptor-targeted boronated PAMAM dendrimers as potential agents for neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Supriya; Wu, Gong; Chatterjee, Madhumita; Yang, Weilian; Sekido, Masaru; Diop, Lamine A; Müller, Rainer; Sudimack, Jennifer J; Lee, Robert J; Barth, Rolf F; Tjarks, Werner

    2003-01-01

    Successful treatment of cancer by boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) requires the selective delivery of (10)B to constituent cells within a tumor. The expression of the folate receptor is amplified in a variety of human tumors and potentially might serve as a molecular target for BNCT. In the present study we have investigated the possibility of targeting the folate receptor on cancer cells using folic acid conjugates of boronated poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) containing 3rd generation polyamidoamine dendrimers to obtain (10)B concentrations necessary for BNCT by reducing the uptake of these conjugates by the reticuloendothelial system. First we covalently attached 12-15 decaborate clusters to 3rd generation polyamidoamine dendrimers. Varying quantities of PEG units with varying chain lengths were then linked to these boronated dendrimers to reduce hepatic uptake. Among all prepared combinations, boronated dendrimers with 1-1.5 PEG(2000) units exhibited the lowest hepatic uptake in C57BL/6 mice (7.2-7.7% injected dose (ID)/g liver). Thus, two folate receptor-targeted boronated 3rd generation polyamidoamine dendrimers were prepared, one containing approximately 15 decaborate clusters and approximately 1 PEG(2000) unit with folic acid attached to the distal end, the other containing approximately 13 decaborate clusters, approximately 1 PEG(2000) unit, and approximately 1 PEG(800) unit with folic acid attached to the distal end. In vitro studies using folate receptor (+) KB cells demonstrated receptor-dependent uptake of the latter conjugate. Biodistribution studies with this conjugate in C57BL/6 mice bearing folate receptor (+) murine 24JK-FBP sarcomas resulted in selective tumor uptake (6.0% ID/g tumor), but also high hepatic (38.8% ID/g) and renal (62.8% ID/g) uptake, indicating that attachment of a second PEG unit and/or folic acid may adversely affect the pharmacodynamics of this conjugate.

  13. Novel receptor targets for production and action of allopregnanolone in the central nervous system: a focus on pregnane xenobiotic receptor

    PubMed Central

    Frye, Cheryl A.; Koonce, Carolyn J.; Walf, Alicia A.

    2014-01-01

    Neurosteroids are cholesterol-based hormones that can be produced in the brain, independent of secretion from peripheral endocrine glands, such as the gonads and adrenals. A focus in our laboratory for over 25 years has been how production of the pregnane neurosteroid, allopregnanolone, is regulated and the novel (i.e., non steroid receptor) targets for steroid action for behavior. One endpoint of interest has been lordosis, the mating posture of female rodents. Allopregnanolone is necessary and sufficient for lordosis, and the brain circuitry underlying it, such as actions in the midbrain ventral tegmental area (VTA), has been well-characterized. Published and recent findings supporting a dynamic role of allopregnanolone are included in this review. First, contributions of ovarian and adrenal sources of precursors of allopregnanolone, and the requisite enzymatic actions for de novo production in the central nervous system will be discussed. Second, how allopregnanolone produced in the brain has actions on behavioral processes that are independent of binding to steroid receptors, but instead involve rapid modulatory actions via neurotransmitter targets (e.g., γ-amino butyric acid-GABA, N-methyl-D-aspartate- NMDA) will be reviewed. Third, a recent focus on characterizing the role of a promiscuous nuclear receptor, pregnane xenobiotic receptor (PXR), involved in cholesterol metabolism and expressed in the VTA, as a target for allopregnanolone and how this relates to both actions and production of allopregnanolone will be addressed. For example, allopregnanolone can bind PXR and knocking down expression of PXR in the midbrain VTA attenuates actions of allopregnanolone via NMDA and/or GABAA for lordosis. Our understanding of allopregnanolone’s actions in the VTA for lordosis has been extended to reveal the role of allopregnanolone for broader, clinically-relevant questions, such as neurodevelopmental processes, neuropsychiatric disorders, epilepsy, and aging. PMID

  14. CD44 Receptor Targeting and Endosomal pH-Sensitive Dual Functional Hyaluronic Acid Micelles for Intracellular Paclitaxel Delivery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanhua; Zhou, Chengming; Wang, Wenping; Yang, Jianhong; Wang, Hao; Hong, Wei; Huang, Yu

    2016-12-05

    A novel CD44 receptor targeting and endosome pH-sensitive dual functional hyaluronic acid-deoxycholic acid-histidine (HA-DOCA-His) micellar system was designed for intracellular paclitaxel (PTX) delivery. The HA-DOCA-His micelles exhibited desirable endosome pH (5.0-6.0)-induced aggregation and deformation behavior verified by size distribution, critical micellar concentration, and zeta potential changes. The HA-DOCA-His micelles presented excellent encapsulation efficiency and loading capacity of 90.0% and 18.9% for PTX, respectively. The PTX release from HA-DOCA-His micelles was pH-dependent, with more rapid PTX release at pH 6.0 and 5.0 than those at pH 7.4 and 6.5. The cellular uptake performance of HA-DOCA-His micelles was enhanced comparing with pH-insensitive HA-DOCA micelles by qualitative and quantitative measurements. HA-DOCA-His micelles could be taken up via CD44-receptor mediated endocytosis, transported into endosomes, and triggered drug release to cytoplasm. In vitro cytotoxicity study exhibited PTX-loaded HA-DOCA-His micelles were more active in tumor cell growth inhibition in MCF-7 cells at pH 5.8 than those at pH 6.8 and pH 7.4. A superior antitumor efficacy was demonstrated with HA-DOCA-His micelles in a MCF-7 breast tumor model. These indicated that the dual functional HA-DOCA-His micelles combined targeted intracellular delivery and endosomal release strategies could be developed as a promising nanocarrier for anticancer efficacy improvement of PTX.

  15. Receptor-Targeted Nipah Virus Glycoproteins Improve Cell-Type Selective Gene Delivery and Reveal a Preference for Membrane-Proximal Cell Attachment

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Ruben R.; Muth, Anke; Schneider, Irene C.; Friedel, Thorsten; Hartmann, Jessica; Plückthun, Andreas; Maisner, Andrea; Buchholz, Christian J.

    2016-01-01

    Receptor-targeted lentiviral vectors (LVs) can be an effective tool for selective transfer of genes into distinct cell types of choice. Moreover, they can be used to determine the molecular properties that cell surface proteins must fulfill to act as receptors for viral glycoproteins. Here we show that LVs pseudotyped with receptor-targeted Nipah virus (NiV) glycoproteins effectively enter into cells when they use cell surface proteins as receptors that bring them closely enough to the cell membrane (less than 100 Å distance). Then, they were flexible in receptor usage as demonstrated by successful targeting of EpCAM, CD20, and CD8, and as selective as LVs pseudotyped with receptor-targeted measles virus (MV) glycoproteins, the current standard for cell-type specific gene delivery. Remarkably, NiV-LVs could be produced at up to two orders of magnitude higher titers compared to their MV-based counterparts and were at least 10,000-fold less effectively neutralized than MV glycoprotein pseudotyped LVs by pooled human intravenous immunoglobulin. An important finding for NiV-LVs targeted to Her2/neu was an about 100-fold higher gene transfer activity when particles were targeted to membrane-proximal regions as compared to particles binding to a more membrane-distal epitope. Likewise, the low gene transfer activity mediated by NiV-LV particles bound to the membrane distal domains of CD117 or the glutamate receptor subunit 4 (GluA4) was substantially enhanced by reducing receptor size to below 100 Å. Overall, the data suggest that the NiV glycoproteins are optimally suited for cell-type specific gene delivery with LVs and, in addition, for the first time define which parts of a cell surface protein should be targeted to achieve optimal gene transfer rates with receptor-targeted LVs. PMID:27281338

  16. Valproic acid induces NET cell growth arrest and enhances tumor suppression of the receptor-targeted peptide-drug conjugate via activating somatostatin receptor type II.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lichun; Qian, Qingqing; Sun, Guangchun; Mackey, L Vienna; Fuselier, Joseph A; Coy, David H; Yu, Cui-Yun

    2016-01-01

    Human pancreatic carcinoids, a type of neuroendocrine tumors, are asymptomatic and difficult to diagnose, with the effects of traditional anti-cancer therapies being limited. The histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor valproic acid (VPA) was evaluated for its effects alone and in combination with receptor-targeting peptide-drug conjugate via increasing drug internalization. The in vitro and in vivo assays were used to evaluate the effects of VPA and somatostatin receptor-targeting camptothecin-somatostatin conjugate (CPT-SST). VPA induced proliferation suppression, cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. VPA acts as a HDAC inhibitor to induce a decrease of HDAC4 and an increase of acetylated histone 4 (AcH4). Meanwhile, most importantly, besides activating Notch signaling, VPA was observed to stimulate the expression of somatostatin receptor type 2 (SSTR2) that has been applied for receptor-targeting therapies. This characteristic was used for a combination therapy of VPA and CPT-SST. The combination displayed much more potent anti-tumor effects on carcinoid tumor growth by increasing SSTR2 density and drug internalization in target tumor cells. The combination of VPA and a SSTR2-targeting agent provides us a promising approach in treatment of carcinoid tumors.

  17. Chip electrophoresis of gelatin-based nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Victor U; Lehner, Angela; Grombe, Ringo; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Allmaier, Günter

    2013-08-01

    Recently, biodegradable nanoparticles received increasing attention for pharmaceutical applications as well as applications in the food industry. With the current investigation we demonstrate chip electrophoresis of fluorescently (FL) labeled gelatin nanoparticles (gelatin NPs) on a commercially available instrument. FL labeling included a step for the removal of low molecular mass material (especially excess dye molecules). Nevertheless, for the investigated gelatin NP preparation two analyte peaks, one very homogeneous with an electrophoretic net mobility of μ = -24.6 ± 0.3 × 10(-9) m(2) /Vs at the peak apex (n = 17) and another more heterogeneous peak with μ between approximately -27.2 ± 0.2 × 10(-9) m(2) /Vs and -36.6 ± 0.2 × 10(-9) m(2) /Vs at the peak beginning and end point (n = 11, respectively) were recorded. Filtration allowed enrichment of particles in the size range of approximately 35 nm (pore size employed for concentration of gelatin NPs) to 200 nm (pore size employed during FL labeling). This corresponded to the very homogeneous peak linking it to gelatin NPs, whereas the more heterogeneous peak probably corresponds to gelatin not cross-linked to such a high degree (NP building blocks). Several further gelatin NP preparations were analyzed according to the same protocol yielding peaks with electrophoretic net mobilities between -23.3 ± 0.3 × 10(-9) m(2) /Vs and -28.9 ± 0.2 × 10(-9) m(2) /Vs at peak apexes (n = 15 and 6). Chip electrophoresis allows analyte separation in less than two minutes (including electrophoretic sample injection). Together with the high sensitivity of the FL detection - the LOD as derived for the first main peak of the applied dye from the threefold standard deviation of the background noise values 80 pM for determined separation conditions - this leads to a very promising high throughput separation technique especially for the analysis of bionanoparticles. For gelatin NP preparations, chip electrophoresis allows for example the comparison of preparation batches concerning the amount of NPs and gelatin building blocks as well as the indirect assessment of the degree of gelatin cross-linking (from obtained FL signals).

  18. Macrophage Folate Receptor-Targeted Antiretroviral Therapy Facilitates Drug Entry, Retention, Antiretroviral Activities and Biodistribution for Reduction of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Puligujja, Pavan; McMillan, JoEllyn; Kendrick, Lindsey; Li, Tianyuzi; Balkundi, Shantanu; Smith, Nathan; Veerubhotla, Ram S.; Edagwa, Benson J.; Kabanov, Alexander V.; Bronich, Tatiana; Gendelman, Howard E.; Liu, Xin-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages serve as vehicles for the carriage and delivery of polymer-coated nanoformulated antiretroviral therapy (nanoART). Although superior to native drug, high drug concentrations are required for viral inhibition. Herein, folate-modified atazanavir/ritonavir (ATV/r)-encased polymers facilitated macrophage receptor targeting for optimizing drug dosing. Folate coating of nanoART ATV/r significantly enhanced cell uptake, retention and antiretroviral activities without altering cell viability. Enhanced retentions of folate-coated nanoART within recycling endosomes provided a stable subcellular drug depot. Importantly, five-fold enhanced plasma and tissue drug levels followed folate-coated formulation injection in mice. Folate polymer encased ATV/r improves nanoART pharmacokinetics bringing the technology one step closer to human use. PMID:23680933

  19. Functional binding surface of a β-hairpin VEGF receptor targeting peptide determined by NMR spectroscopy in living cells.

    PubMed

    Diana, Donatella; Russomanno, Anna; De Rosa, Lucia; Di Stasi, Rossella; Capasso, Domenica; Di Gaetano, Sonia; Romanelli, Alessandra; Russo, Luigi; D'Andrea, Luca D; Fattorusso, Roberto

    2015-01-02

    In this study, the functional interaction of HPLW peptide with VEGFR2 (Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 2) was determined by using fast (15)N-edited NMR spectroscopic experiments. To this aim, (15)N uniformly labelled HPLW has been added to Porcine Aortic Endothelial Cells. The acquisition of isotope-edited NMR spectroscopic experiments, including (15)N relaxation measurements, allowed a precise characterization of the in-cell HPLW epitope recognized by VEGFR2.

  20. Dual Receptor-Targeted Theranostic Nanoparticles for Localized Delivery and Activation of Photodynamic Therapy Drug in Glioblastomas

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Suraj; Miller, Kayla; Zhu, Yun; McKinnon, Emilie; Novak, Thomas; Kenney, Malcolm E.; Broome, Ann-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Targeting gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with two or more receptor binding peptides has been proposed to address intratumoral heterogeneity of glioblastomas that overexpress multiple cell surface receptors to ultimately improve therapeutic efficacy. AuNPs conjugated with peptides against both the epidermal growth factor and transferrin receptors and loaded with the photosensitizer phthalocyanine 4 (Pc 4) have been designed and compared with monotargeted AuNPs for in vitro and in vivo studies. The (EGFpep+Tfpep)-AuNPs-Pc 4 with a particle size of ~41 nm improved both specificity and worked synergistically to decrease time of maximal accumulation in human glioma cells that overexpressed two cell surface receptors as compared to cells that overexpressed only one. Enhanced cellular association and increased cytotoxicity were achieved. In vivo studies show notable accumulation of these agents in the brain tumor regions. PMID:26198693

  1. Anti-CD22–chimeric antigen receptors targeting B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Haso, Waleed; Lee, Daniel W.; Shah, Nirali N.; Stetler-Stevenson, Maryalice; Yuan, Constance M.; Pastan, Ira H.; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.; Morgan, Richard A.; FitzGerald, David J.; Barrett, David M.; Wayne, Alan S.; Mackall, Crystal L.

    2013-01-01

    Immune targeting of B-cell malignancies using chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) is a promising new approach, but critical factors impacting CAR efficacy remain unclear. To test the suitability of targeting CD22 on precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL), lymphoblasts from 111 patients with BCP-ALL were assayed for CD22 expression and all were found to be CD22-positive, with median CD22 expression levels of 3500 sites/cell. Three distinct binding domains targeting CD22 were fused to various TCR signaling domains ± an IgG heavy chain constant domain (CH2CH3) to create a series of vector constructs suitable to delineate optimal CAR configuration. CARs derived from the m971 anti-CD22 mAb, which targets a proximal CD22 epitope demonstrated superior antileukemic activity compared with those incorporating other binding domains, and addition of a 4-1BB signaling domain to CD28.CD3ζ constructs diminished potency, whereas increasing affinity of the anti-CD22 binding motif, and extending the CD22 binding domain away from the membrane via CH2CH3 had no effect. We conclude that second-generation m971 mAb-derived anti-CD22 CARs are promising novel therapeutics that should be tested in BCP-ALL. PMID:23243285

  2. EGF receptor targeted lipo-oligocation polyplexes for antitumoral siRNA and miRNA delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Katharina; Klein, Philipp M.; Heissig, Philipp; Roidl, Andreas; Wagner, Ernst

    2016-11-01

    Antitumoral siRNA and miRNA delivery was demonstrated by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) targeted oligoaminoamide polyplexes. For this purpose, the T-shaped lipo-oligomer 454 was used to complex RNA into a core polyplex, which was subsequently functionalized with the targeting peptide ligand GE11 via a polyethylene glycol (PEG) linker. To this end, free cysteines on the surface of 454 polyplex were coupled with a maleimide-PEG-GE11 reagent (Mal-GE11). Resulting particles with sizes of 120-150 nm showed receptor-mediated uptake into EGFR-positive T24 bladder cancer cells, MDA-MB 231 breast cancer cells and Huh7 liver cancer cells. Furthermore, these formulations led to ligand-dependent gene silencing. RNA interference (RNAi) triggered antitumoral effects were observed for two different therapeutic RNAs, a miRNA-200c mimic or EG5 siRNA. Using polyplexes modified with a ratio of 0.8 molar equivalents of Mal-GE11, treatment of T24 or MDA-MB 231 cancer cells with miR-200c led to the expected decreased proliferation and migration, changes in cell cycle and enhanced sensitivity towards doxorubicin. Delivery of EG5 siRNA into Huh7 cells resulted in antitumoral activity with G2/M arrest, triggered by loss of mitotic spindle separation and formation of mono-astral spindles. These findings demonstrate the potential of GE11 ligand-containing RNAi polyplexes for cancer treatment.

  3. IGF-1 receptor targeted nanoparticles for image-guided therapy of stroma-rich and drug resistant human cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hongyu; Qian, Weiping; Uckun, Fatih M.; Zhou, Zhiyang; Wang, Liya; Wang, Andrew; Mao, Hui; Yang, Lily

    2016-05-01

    Low drug delivery efficiency and drug resistance from highly heterogeneous cancer cells and tumor microenvironment represent major challenges in clinical oncology. Growth factor receptor, IGF-1R, is overexpressed in both human tumor cells and tumor associated stromal cells. The level of IGF-1R expression is further up-regulated in drug resistant tumor cells. We have developed IGF-1R targeted magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) carrying multiple anticancer drugs into human tumors. This IGF-1R targeted theranostic nanoparticle delivery system has an iron core for non-invasive MR imaging, amphiphilic polymer coating to ensure the biocompatibility as well as for drug loading and conjugation of recombinant human IGF-1 as targeting molecules. Chemotherapy drugs, Doxorubicin (Dox), was encapsulated into the polymer coating and/or conjugated to the IONP surface by coupling with the carboxyl groups. The ability of IGF1R targeted theranostic nanoparticles to penetrate tumor stromal barrier and enhance tumor cell killing has been demonstrated in human pancreatic cancer patient tissue derived xenograft (PDX) models. Repeated systemic administrations of those IGF-1R targeted theranostic IONP carrying Dox led to breaking the tumor stromal barrier and improved therapeutic effect. Near infrared (NIR) optical and MR imaging enabled noninvasive monitoring of nanoparticle-drug delivery and therapeutic responses. Our results demonstrated that IGF-1R targeted nanoparticles carrying multiple drugs are promising combination therapy approaches for image-guided therapy of stroma-rich and drug resistant human cancer, such as pancreatic cancer.

  4. Receptor-targeted, magneto-mechanical stimulation of osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bin; El Haj, Alicia J; Dobson, Jon

    2013-09-23

    Mechanical cues are employed to promote stem cell differentiation and functional tissue formation in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. We have developed a Magnetic Force Bioreactor (MFB) that delivers highly targeted local forces to cells at a pico-newton level, utilizing magnetic micro- and nano-particles to target cell surface receptors. In this study, we investigated the effects of magnetically targeting and actuating specific two mechanical-sensitive cell membrane receptors-platelet-derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα) and integrin ανβ3. It was found that a higher mineral-to-matrix ratio was obtained after three weeks of magneto-mechanical stimulation coupled with osteogenic medium culture by initially targeting PDGFRα compared with targeting integrin ανβ3 and non-treated controls. Moreover, different initiation sites caused a differentiated response profile when using a 2-day-lagged magneto-mechanical stimulation over culture periods of 7 and 12 days). However, both resulted in statistically higher osteogenic marker genes expression compared with immediate magneto-mechanical stimulation. These results provide insights into important parameters for designing appropriate protocols for ex vivo induced bone formation via magneto-mechanical actuation.

  5. IGF-1 receptor targeted nanoparticles for image-guided therapy of stroma-rich and drug resistant human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hongyu; Qian, Weiping; Uckun, Fatih M.; Zhou, Zhiyang; Wang, Liya; Wang, Andrew; Mao, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Low drug delivery efficiency and drug resistance from highly heterogeneous cancer cells and tumor microenvironment represent major challenges in clinical oncology. Growth factor receptor, IGF-1R, is overexpressed in both human tumor cells and tumor associated stromal cells. The level of IGF-1R expression is further up-regulated in drug resistant tumor cells. We have developed IGF-1R targeted magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) carrying multiple anticancer drugs into human tumors. This IGF-1R targeted theranostic nanoparticle delivery system has an iron core for non-invasive MR imaging, amphiphilic polymer coating to ensure the biocompatibility as well as for drug loading and conjugation of recombinant human IGF-1 as targeting molecules. Chemotherapy drugs, Doxorubicin (Dox), was encapsulated into the polymer coating and/or conjugated to the IONP surface by coupling with the carboxyl groups. The ability of IGF1R targeted theranostic nanoparticles to penetrate tumor stromal barrier and enhance tumor cell killing has been demonstrated in human pancreatic cancer patient tissue derived xenograft (PDX) models. Repeated systemic administrations of those IGF-1R targeted theranostic IONP carrying Dox led to breaking the tumor stromal barrier and improved therapeutic effect. Near infrared (NIR) optical and MR imaging enabled noninvasive monitoring of nanoparticle-drug delivery and therapeutic responses. Our results demonstrated that IGF-1R targeted nanoparticles carrying multiple drugs are promising combination therapy approaches for image-guided therapy of stroma-rich and drug resistant human cancer, such as pancreatic cancer. PMID:27313332

  6. Dynamics of 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3-dependent chromatin accessibility of early vitamin D receptor target genes.

    PubMed

    Seuter, Sabine; Pehkonen, Petri; Heikkinen, Sami; Carlberg, Carsten

    2013-12-01

    The signaling cascade of the transcription factor vitamin D receptor (VDR) is triggered by its specific ligand 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1α,25(OH)2D3). In this study we demonstrate that in THP-1 human monocytic leukemia cells 87.4% of the 1034 most prominent genome-wide VDR binding sites co-localize with loci of open chromatin. At 165 of them 1α,25(OH)2D3 strongly increases chromatin accessibility and has at further 217 sites weaker effects. Interestingly, VDR binding sites in 1α,25(OH)2D3-responsive chromatin regions are far more often composed of direct repeats with 3 intervening nucleotides (DR3s) than those in ligand insensitive regions. DR3-containing VDR sites are enriched in the neighborhood of genes that are involved in controling cellular growth, while non-DR3 VDR binding is often found close to genes related to immunity. At the example of six early VDR target genes we show that the slope of their 1α,25(OH)2D3-induced transcription correlates with the basal chromatin accessibility of their major VDR binding regions. However, the chromatin loci controlling these genes are indistinguishable in their VDR association kinetics. Taken together, ligand responsive chromatin loci represent dynamically regulated contact points of VDR with the genome, from where it controls early 1α,25(OH)2D3 target genes.

  7. Global analysis of transcription in castration-resistant prostate cancer cells uncovers active enhancers and direct androgen receptor targets

    PubMed Central

    Toropainen, Sari; Niskanen, Einari A.; Malinen, Marjo; Sutinen, Päivi; Kaikkonen, Minna U.; Palvimo, Jorma J.

    2016-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) is a male sex steroid-activated transcription factor (TF) that plays a critical role in prostate cancers, including castration-resistant prostate cancers (CRPC) that typically express amplified levels of the AR. CRPC-derived VCaP cells display an excessive number of chromatin AR-binding sites (ARBs) most of which localize to distal inter- or intragenic regions. Here, we analyzed direct transcription programs of the AR in VCaP cells using global nuclear run-on sequencing (GRO-seq) and integrated the GRO-seq data with the ARB and VCaP cell-specific TF-binding data. Androgen immediately activated transcription of hundreds of protein-coding genes, including IGF-1 receptor and EGF receptor. Androgen also simultaneously repressed transcription of a large number of genes, including MYC. As functional enhancers have been postulated to produce enhancer-templated non-coding RNAs (eRNAs), we also analyzed the eRNAs, which revealed that only a fraction of the ARBs reside at functional enhancers. Activation of these enhancers was most pronounced at the sites that also bound PIAS1, ERG and HDAC3, whereas binding of HDAC3 and PIAS1 decreased at androgen-repressed enhancers. In summary, our genome-wide data of androgen-regulated enhancers and primary target genes provide new insights how the AR can directly regulate cellular growth and control signaling pathways in CPRC cells. PMID:27641228

  8. Development of a receptor-targeted gene delivery system using CXCR4 ligand-conjugated cross-linking peptides.

    PubMed

    Egorova, Anna; Bogacheva, Maria; Shubina, Anastasia; Baranov, Vladislav; Kiselev, Anton

    2014-01-01

    Success in gene therapy greatly depends on the efficiency of nucleic acid delivery. Important features of the carriers for gene delivery should include an enhanced transfection ability, targeting of specific receptors and low toxicity. In the present study, we characterized CXCR4-targeted cross-linking peptides modified with an N-terminal fragment of chemokine stromal cell-derived factor-1α as carriers for gene delivery. We studied three variants of DNA/carrier complexes with different targeting ligand content. The physicochemical characteristics of the complexes, including their DNA-binding and protective ability, interaction with glycosaminoglycans and size, were determined. Transfection efficacy was studied in cell lines with different levels of CXCR4 expression (HeLa, A172, CHO, Е.А.hy926) and also in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). The influence of the ligand content on the efficacy of transfection was studied by means of chlorpromazine blockage of clathrin-mediated endocytosis, competition with CXCR4-antagonist AMD3100, and valproic acid treatment of hMSCs. CXCR4-targeted peptides were evaluated for their physicochemical properties and in vitro transfection capacities. Ligand-modified carriers were found to be 10- to 50-fold more effective than unmodified carriers in CXCR4-positive cells. By contrast, their transfection efficacy in CXCR4-negative cells was similar to unmodified carriers. Experiments with chlorpromazine demonstrated receptor-specific transfection in A172 cells. The transfection efficacy of CXCR4-targeted carriers in AMD3100-treated HeLa cells was reduced by two-fold compared to the untreated control. Valproic acid treatment resulted in a four- to 15-fold increase of transfection efficacy for ligand-modified carriers in hMSCs. CXCR4-targeted cross-linking peptides should be considered as useful tools for nonviral gene delivery into tumor and mesenchymal stem cells. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Transcriptome profiling of equine vitamin E deficient neuroaxonal dystrophy identifies upregulation of liver X receptor target genes.

    PubMed

    Finno, Carrie J; Bordbari, Matthew H; Valberg, Stephanie J; Lee, David; Herron, Josi; Hines, Kelly; Monsour, Tamer; Scott, Erica; Bannasch, Danika L; Mickelson, James; Xu, Libin

    2016-12-01

    Specific spontaneous heritable neurodegenerative diseases have been associated with lower serum and cerebrospinal fluid α-tocopherol (α-TOH) concentrations. Equine neuroaxonal dystrophy (eNAD) has similar histologic lesions to human ataxia with vitamin E deficiency caused by mutations in the α-TOH transfer protein gene (TTPA). Mutations in TTPA are not present with eNAD and the molecular basis remains unknown. Given the neuropathologic phenotypic similarity of the conditions, we assessed the molecular basis of eNAD by global transcriptome sequencing of the cervical spinal cord. Differential gene expression analysis identified 157 significantly (FDR<0.05) dysregulated transcripts within the spinal cord of eNAD-affected horses. Statistical enrichment analysis identified significant downregulation of the ionotropic and metabotropic group III glutamate receptor, synaptic vesicle trafficking and cholesterol biosynthesis pathways. Gene co-expression analysis identified one module of upregulated genes significantly associated with the eNAD phenotype that included the liver X receptor (LXR) targets CYP7A1, APOE, PLTP and ABCA1. Validation of CYP7A1 and APOE dysregulation was performed in an independent biologic group and CYP7A1 was found to be additionally upregulated in the medulla oblongata of eNAD horses. Evidence of LXR activation supports a role for modulation of oxysterol-dependent LXR transcription factor activity by tocopherols. We hypothesize that the protective role of α-TOH in eNAD may reside in its ability to prevent oxysterol accumulation and subsequent activation of the LXR in order to decrease lipid peroxidation associated neurodegeneration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Optimization via specific fluorescence brightness of a receptor-targeted probe for optical imaging and positron emission tomography of sentinel lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Qin, Zhengtao; Hall, David J; Liss, Michael A; Hoh, Carl K; Kane, Christopher J; Wallace, Anne M; Vera, David R

    2013-10-01

    The optical properties of a receptor-targeted probe designed for dual-modality mapping of the sentinel lymph node (SLN) was optimized. Specific fluorescence brightness was used as the design criterion, which was defined as the fluorescence brightness per mole of the contrast agent. Adjusting the molar ratio of the coupling reactants, IRDye 800CW-NHS-ester and tilmanocept, enabled us to control the number of fluorescent molecules attached to each tilmanocept, which was quantified by H1 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Quantum yields and molar absorptivities were measured for unconjugated IRDye 800CW and IRDye 800CW-tilmanocept (800CW-tilmanocept) preparations at 0.7, 1.5, 2.3, 2.9, and 3.8 dyes per tilmanocept. Specific fluorescence brightness was calculated by multiplication of the quantum yield by the molar absorptivity and the number of dyes per tilmanocept. It predicted that the preparation with 2.3 dyes per tilmanocept would exhibit the brightest signal, which was confirmed by fluorescence intensity measurements using three optical imaging systems. When radiolabeled with Ga68 and injected into the footpads of mice, the probe identified SLNs by both fluorescence and positron emission tomography (PET) while maintaining high percent extraction by the SLN. These studies demonstrated the feasibility of 800CW-tilmanocept for multimodal SLN mapping via fluorescence and PET-computed tomography imaging.

  11. GABAA receptor target of tetramethylenedisulfotetramine

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chunqing; Hwang, Sung Hee; Buchholz, Bruce A.; Carpenter, Timothy S.; Lightstone, Felice C.; Yang, Jun; Hammock, Bruce D.; Casida, John E.

    2014-01-01

    Use of the highly toxic and easily prepared rodenticide tetramethylenedisulfotetramine (TETS) was banned after thousands of accidental or intentional human poisonings, but it is of continued concern as a chemical threat agent. TETS is a noncompetitive blocker of the GABA type A receptor (GABAAR), but its molecular interaction has not been directly established for lack of a suitable radioligand to localize the binding site. We synthesized [14C]TETS (14 mCi/mmol, radiochemical purity >99%) by reacting sulfamide with H14CHO and s-trioxane then completion of the sequential cyclization with excess HCHO. The outstanding radiocarbon sensitivity of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) allowed the use of [14C]TETS in neuroreceptor binding studies with rat brain membranes in comparison with the standard GABAAR radioligand 4′-ethynyl-4-n-[3H]propylbicycloorthobenzoate ([3H]EBOB) (46 Ci/mmol), illustrating the use of AMS for characterizing the binding sites of high-affinity 14C radioligands. Fourteen noncompetitive antagonists of widely diverse chemotypes assayed at 1 or 10 µM inhibited [14C]TETS and [3H]EBOB binding to a similar extent (r2 = 0.71). Molecular dynamics simulations of these 14 toxicants in the pore region of the α1β2γ2 GABAAR predict unique and significant polar interactions for TETS with α1T1′ and γ2S2′, which are not observed for EBOB or the GABAergic insecticides. Several GABAAR modulators similarly inhibited [14C]TETS and [3H]EBOB binding, including midazolam, flurazepam, avermectin Ba1, baclofen, isoguvacine, and propofol, at 1 or 10 μM, providing an in vitro system for recognizing candidate antidotes. PMID:24912155

  12. Adenosine receptor targets for pain.

    PubMed

    Sawynok, J

    2016-12-03

    The main focus for the development of adenosine targets as analgesics to date has been A1Rs due to its antinociceptive profile in various preclinical pain models. The usefulness of systemic A1R agonists may be limited by other effects (cardiovascular, motor), but enhanced selectivity for pain might occur with partial agonists, potent and highly selective agonists, or allosteric modulators. A2AR agonists exhibit some peripheral pronociceptive effects, but also act on immune cells to suppress inflammation and on spinal glia to suppress pain signaling and may be useful for inflammatory and neuropathic pain. A2BR agonists exhibit peripheral proinflammatory effects on immune cells, but also spinal antinociceptive effects similar to A2AR agonists. A3Rs are now demonstrated to produce antinociception in several preclinical neuropathic pain models, with mechanistic actions on glial cells, and may be useful for neuropathic pain. Endogenous adenosine levels can be augmented by inhibition of metabolism (via adenosine kinase) or increased generation (via nucleotidases), and these approaches have implications for pain. Endogenous adenosine contributes to antinociception by several pharmacological agents, herbal remedies, acupuncture, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, exercise, joint mobilization, and water immersion via spinal and/or peripheral effects, such that this system appears to constitute a major pain regulatory system. Finally, caffeine inhibits A1-, A2A- and A3Rs with similar potency, and dietary caffeine intake will need attention in trials of: (a) agonists and/or modulators acting at these receptors, (b) some pharmacological and herbal analgesics, and (c) manipulations that enhance endogenous adenosine levels, all of which are inhibited by caffeine and/or A1R antagonists in preclinical studies. All adenosine receptors have effects on spinal glial cells in regulating nociception, and gender differences in the involvement of such cells in chronic neuropathic pain indicate gender may also need attention in preclinical and human trials evaluating the efficacy of adenosine-based analgesics.

  13. In vivo and in vitro sensitivity of blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm to SL-401, an interleukin-3 receptor targeted biologic agent

    PubMed Central

    Angelot-Delettre, Fanny; Roggy, Anne; Frankel, Arthur E.; Lamarthee, Baptiste; Seilles, Estelle; Biichle, Sabeha; Royer, Bernard; Deconinck, Eric; Rowinsky, Eric K.; Brooks, Christopher; Bardet, Valerie; Benet, Blandine; Bennani, Hind; Benseddik, Zehaira; Debliquis, Agathe; Lusina, Daniel; Roussel, Mikael; Solly, Françoise; Ticchioni, Michel; Saas, Philippe; Garnache-Ottou, Francine

    2015-01-01

    Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm is an aggressive malignancy derived from plasmacytoid dendritic cells. There is currently no accepted standard of care for treating this neoplasm, and therapeutic strategies have never been prospectively evaluated. Since blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm cells express high levels of interleukin-3 receptor α chain (IL3-Rα or CD123), antitumor effects of the interleukin-3 receptor-targeted drug SL-401 against blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The cytotoxicity of SL-401 was assessed in patient-derived blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm cell lines (CAL-1 and GEN2.2) and in primary blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm cells isolated from 12 patients using flow cytometry and an in vitro cytotoxicity assay. The cytotoxic effects of SL-401 were compared to those of several relevant cytotoxic agents. SL-401 exhibited a robust cytotoxicity against blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm cells in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, the cytotoxic effects of SL-401 were observed at substantially lower concentrations than those achieved in clinical trials to date. Survival of mice inoculated with a blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm cell line and treated with a single cycle of SL-401 was significantly longer than that of untreated controls (median survival, 58 versus 17 days, P<0.001). These findings indicate that blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm cells are highly sensitive to SL-401, and support further evaluation of SL-401 in patients suffering from blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm. PMID:25381130

  14. In vivo and in vitro sensitivity of blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm to SL-401, an interleukin-3 receptor targeted biologic agent.

    PubMed

    Angelot-Delettre, Fanny; Roggy, Anne; Frankel, Arthur E; Lamarthee, Baptiste; Seilles, Estelle; Biichle, Sabeha; Royer, Bernard; Deconinck, Eric; Rowinsky, Eric K; Brooks, Christopher; Bardet, Valerie; Benet, Blandine; Bennani, Hind; Benseddik, Zehaira; Debliquis, Agathe; Lusina, Daniel; Roussel, Mikael; Solly, Françoise; Ticchioni, Michel; Saas, Philippe; Garnache-Ottou, Francine

    2015-02-01

    Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm is an aggressive malignancy derived from plasmacytoid dendritic cells. There is currently no accepted standard of care for treating this neoplasm, and therapeutic strategies have never been prospectively evaluated. Since blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm cells express high levels of interleukin-3 receptor α chain (IL3-Rα or CD123), antitumor effects of the interleukin-3 receptor-targeted drug SL-401 against blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The cytotoxicity of SL-401 was assessed in patient-derived blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm cell lines (CAL-1 and GEN2.2) and in primary blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm cells isolated from 12 patients using flow cytometry and an in vitro cytotoxicity assay. The cytotoxic effects of SL-401 were compared to those of several relevant cytotoxic agents. SL-401 exhibited a robust cytotoxicity against blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm cells in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, the cytotoxic effects of SL-401 were observed at substantially lower concentrations than those achieved in clinical trials to date. Survival of mice inoculated with a blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm cell line and treated with a single cycle of SL-401 was significantly longer than that of untreated controls (median survival, 58 versus 17 days, P<0.001). These findings indicate that blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm cells are highly sensitive to SL-401, and support further evaluation of SL-401 in patients suffering from blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  15. The activity against Ehrlich's ascites tumors of doxorubicin contained in self assembled, cell receptor targeted nanoparticle with simultaneous oral delivery of the green tea polyphenol epigallocatechin-3-gallate.

    PubMed

    Ray, Lipika; Kumar, Pradeep; Gupta, Kailash C

    2013-04-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a well-known anticancer drug used for the treatment of a wide variety of cancers. However, undesired toxicity of DOX limits its uses. To address the issue of minimizing toxicity of DOX by making it targeted towards cancer cells, DOX was entrapped in self-assembled 6-O-(3-hexadecyloxy-2-hydroxypropyl)-hyaluronic acid (HDHA) nanoparticles. We hypothesized that by encapsulating the drug in biodegradable nanoparticles, its therapeutic efficacy would improve, if targeted against cancer cells. We synthesized cell receptor targeted, DOX loaded HDHA nanoparticles (NPs) and non-targeted DOX loaded O-hexadecylated dextran (HDD) nanoparticles (NPs) and characterized them for their entrapment efficiency, percent yield, drug load, surface morphology, particle size and in vitro drug release. The anticancer efficacy of DOX loaded HDHA-NPs was evaluated by measuring the changes in tumor volumes, tumor weights, and mean survival rate of Swiss albino mice grafted with Ehrlich's ascites carcinoma (EAC) cells. For this, the animals were given HDHA-DOX-NPs (1.5 mg/kg b.wt.) intravenously and a green tea polyphenol, Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) (20 mg/kg b.wt.), orally through gavage. The targeted NP dose with EGCG significantly increased mean survival time of the animals and enhanced the therapeutic efficacy of the drug compared to the non-targeted NPs and free DOX. Further, we showed that these NPs (HDD and HDHA) were more active in the presence of EGCG than DOX alone in inducing apoptosis in EAC cells as evident by an increase in sub-G1 cells (percent), Annexin V positive cells and chromatin condensation along with the reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). The study demonstrates that DOX loaded HDHA-NPs along with EGCG significantly inhibit the growth of EAC cells with ∼38-fold dose advantage compared to DOX alone and thus opens a new dimension in cancer chemotherapy.

  16. Feasibility of olanzapine, multi acting receptor targeted antipsychotic agent, for the prevention of emesis caused by continuous cisplatin- or ifosfamide-based chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bun, Seiko; Yonemori, Kan; Akagi, Toru; Noguchi, Emi; Shimoi, Tatsunori; Shimomura, Akihiko; Yunokawa, Mayu; Shimizu, Chikako; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Makino, Yoshinori; Hayashi, Yoshikazu; Tamura, Kenji

    2017-07-21

    Background To determine the feasibility and efficacy of olanzapine, which is approved by the Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency as multi acting receptor targeted antipsychotic agent of the thienobenzodiazepine class, for prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) in patients undergoing continuous five-day chemotherapy. Patients and methods This study was a prospective dose escalation study at a single center (UMIN ID: UMIN000015386). Patients received a combination of adriamycin and ifosfamide (AI) or a combination of bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin (BEP). On days 1-5, all patients received intravenous granisetron (1 mg) and intravenous dexamethasone sodium phosphate (24 mg). Olanzapine was administrated on day-1 to day5 at bedtime. The dose of olanzapine followed a dose-escalation scheme, with monitoring of safety and tolerability at each dose. A 3 + 3 cohort design was used, with three to six patients per cohort. Results Nine patients were enrolled (three for each cohort). No patients experienced dose-limiting toxicity (DLT). The most frequent adverse events were dry mouth and constipation. In each cohort, the maximum severity of nausea was Grade 2, and no patients experienced a vomiting episode. Conclusion A 2.5 mg/day dosage of olanzapine is sufficient to prevent from CINV in Japanese patients receiving continuous five-day chemotherapy. A dose of 10 mg/day, which is recommended by international CINV guidelines, is also tolerated. If CINV is not controlled by an initial dose of 2.5 mg/day of olanzapine, dosage escalation is encouraged. Future studies should compare olanzapine with aprepitant.

  17. Folic acid-conjugated GdPO4:Tb3+@SiO2 Nanoprobe for folate receptor-targeted optical and magnetic resonance bi-modal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xianzhu; Zhang, Xiaoying; Wu, Yanli

    2016-11-01

    Both fluorescent and magnetic nanoprobes have great potential applications for diagnostics and therapy. In the present work, a folic acid-conjugated and silica-modified GdPO4:Tb3+ (GdPO4:Tb3+@SiO2-FA) dual nanoprobe was strategically designed and synthesized for the targeted dual-modality optical and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging via a facile aqueous method. Their structural, optical, and magnetic properties were determined using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), ultraviolet-visible spectra (UV-Vis), photoluminescence (PL), and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). These results indicated that GdPO4:Tb3+@SiO2-FA were uniform monodisperse core-shell structured nanorods (NRs) with an average length of 200 nm and an average width of 25 nm. The paramagnetic property of the synthesized GdPO4:Tb3+@SiO2-FA NRs was confirmed with its linear hysteresis plot (M-H). In addition, the NRs displayed an obvious T1-weighted effect and thus it could potentially serve as a T1-positive contrast agent. The NRs emitted green lights due to the 5D4 → 7F5 transition of the Tb3+. The in vitro assays with NCI-H460 lung cancer cells and human embryonic kidney cell line 293T cells indicated that the GdPO4:Tb3+@SiO2-FA nanoprobe could specifically bind the cells bearing folate receptors (FR). The MTT assay of the NRs revealed that its cytotoxicity was very low. Further in vivo MRI experiments distinctively depict enhanced anatomical features in a xenograft tumor. These results suggest that the GdPO4:Tb3+@SiO2-FA NPs have excellent imaging and cell-targeting abilities for the folate receptor-targeted dual-modality optical and MR imaging and can be potentially used as the nanoprobe for bioimaging.

  18. Folate receptor-targeted multimodal polymersomes for delivery of quantum dots and doxorubicin to breast adenocarcinoma: In vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Alibolandi, Mona; Abnous, Khalil; Sadeghi, Fatemeh; Hosseinkhani, Hossein; Ramezani, Mohammad; Hadizadeh, Farzin

    2016-03-16

    In this study, we report the design and delivery of tumor-targeted, quantum dot (QD) and doxorubicin (DOX)-encapsulated PEG-PLGA nanopolymersomes (NPs) for the imaging and chemotherapy of breast cancer. To achieve active cancer targeting, QD and DOX-encapsulated NPs were conjugated with folate for folate-binding protein receptor-guided delivery, which overexpressed in many cancer cells. Hydrophobic DOX and hydrophilic MSA-capped QD were encapsulated in the bilayer and core of the PEG-PLGA nanopolymersomes, respectively. The data show that the formulated NPs sustained DOX release for a period of 12 days. Fluorescence microscopy and MTT assay demonstrated that the developed folate-targeted DOX-QD NPs had higher cytotoxicity than non-targeted NPs and the free form of the drug; moreover, they preferentially accumulated in 4T1 and MCF-7 cells in vitro. In vivo experiments including whole organ tissue-homogenate analysis and organ fluorescence microscopy imaging of BALB/c mice bearing 4T1 breast adenocarcinoma showed that the folate receptor-targeted QD encapsulated NPs accumulate at tumor sites 6h following intravenous injection. Acute toxicity studies of the prepared targeted QD-loaded NPs showed no evidence of long-term harmful histopathological and physiological effects on the treated animals. The in vivo tumor inhibitory effect of folic acid (FA)-QD-DOX NPs demonstrated an augmented therapeutic efficacy of targeted formulation over the non-targeted and free drug. The data obtained illustrate a high potential of the prepared targeted theranostic nanoplatform in the treatment and imaging of breast cancer. This study may open new directions for preparation of QD-based theranostic polymersomes for clinical application. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The association of statins plus LDL receptor-targeted liposome-encapsulated doxorubicin increases in vitro drug delivery across blood–brain barrier cells

    PubMed Central

    Pinzón-Daza, ML; Garzón, R; Couraud, PO; Romero, IA; Weksler, B; Ghigo, D; Bosia, A; Riganti, C

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The passage of drugs across the blood–brain barrier (BBB) limits the efficacy of chemotherapy in brain tumours. For instance, the anticancer drug doxorubicin, which is effective against glioblastoma in vitro, has poor efficacy in vivo, because it is extruded by P-glycoprotein (Pgp/ABCB1), multidrug resistance-related proteins and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) in BBB cells. The aim of this study was to convert poorly permeant drugs like doxorubicin into drugs able to cross the BBB. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Experiments were performed on primary human cerebral microvascular endothelial hCMEC/D3 cells, alone and co-cultured with human brain and epithelial tumour cells. KEY RESULTS Statins reduced the efflux activity of Pgp/ABCB1 and BCRP/ABCG2 in hCMEC/D3 cells by increasing the synthesis of NO, which elicits the nitration of critical tyrosine residues on these transporters. Statins also increased the number of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors exposed on the surface of BBB cells, as well as on tumour cells like human glioblastoma. We showed that the association of statins plus drug-loaded nanoparticles engineered as LDLs was effective as a vehicle for non-permeant drugs like doxorubicin to cross the BBB, allowing its delivery into primary and metastatic brain tumour cells and to achieve significant anti-tumour cytotoxicity. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS We suggest that our ‘Trojan horse’ approach, based on the administration of statins plus a LDL receptor-targeted liposomal drug, might have potential applications in the pharmacological therapy of different brain diseases for which the BBB represents an obstacle. PMID:22788770

  20. Dual receptor-targeting ⁹⁹mTc-labeled Arg-Gly-Asp-conjugated Alpha-Melanocyte stimulating hormone hybrid peptides for human melanoma imaging.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jingli; Yang, Jianquan; Miao, Yubin

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether the substitution of the Lys linker with the aminooctanoic acid (Aoc) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) linker could substantially decrease the non-specific renal uptake of (99m)Tc-labeled Arg-Gly-Asp-conjugated α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) hybrid peptides. The RGD motif {Arg-Gly-Asp-DTyr-Asp} was coupled to [Cys(3,4,10), D-Phe(7), Arg(11)]α-MSH₃₋₁₃ via the Aoc or PEG₂ linker to generate RGD-Aoc-(Arg(11))CCMSH and RGD-PEG-(Arg(11))CCMSH. The biodistribution results of (99m)Tc-RGD-Aoc-(Arg(11))CCMSH and (99m)Tc-RGD-PEG₂-(Arg(11))CCMSH were examined in M21 human melanoma-xenografted nude mice. The substitution of Lys linker with Aoc and PEG₂ linker significantly reduced the renal uptake of (99m)Tc-RGD-Aoc-(Arg(11))CCMSH and (99m)Tc-RGD-PEG₂-(Arg(11))CCMSH by 58% and 63% at 2h post-injection. The renal uptake of (99m)Tc-RGD-Aoc-(Arg(11))CCMSH and (99m)Tc-RGD-PEG₂-(Arg(11))CCMSH was 27.93 ± 3.98 and 22.01 ± 9.89% ID/g at 2 h post-injection. (99m)Tc-RGD-Aoc-(Arg(11))CCMSH displayed higher tumor uptake than (99m)Tc-RGD-PEG₂-(Arg(11))CCMSH (2.35 ± 0.12 vs. 1.71 ± 0.25% ID/g at 2 h post-injection). The M21 human melanoma lesions could be clearly visualized by SPECT/CT using (99m)Tc-RGD-Aoc-(Arg(11))CCMSH as an imaging probe. The favorable effect of Aoc and PEG₂ linker in reducing the renal uptake provided a new insight into the design of novel dual receptor-targeting radiolabeled peptides. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Preparation of astaxanthin nanodispersions using gelatin-based stabilizer systems.

    PubMed

    Anarjan, Navideh; Nehdi, Imededdine Arbi; Sbihi, Hassen Mohamed; Al-Resayes, Saud Ibrahim; Malmiri, Hoda Jafarizadeh; Tan, Chin Ping

    2014-09-10

    The incorporation of lipophilic nutrients, such as astaxanthin (a fat soluble carotenoid) in nanodispersion systems can either increase the water solubility, stability and bioavailability or widen their applications in aqueous food and pharmaceutical formulations. In this research, gelatin and its combinations with sucrose oleate as a small molecular emulsifier, sodium caseinate (SC) as a protein and gum Arabic as a polysaccharide were used as stabilizer systems in the formation of astaxanthin nanodispersions via an emulsification-evaporation process. The results indicated that the addition of SC to gelatin in the stabilizer system could increase the chemical stability of astaxanthin nanodispersions significantly, while using a mixture of gelatin and sucrose oleate as a stabilizer led to production of nanodispersions with the smallest particle size (121.4±8.6 nm). It was also shown that a combination of gelatin and gum Arabic could produce optimal astaxanthin nanodispersions in terms of physical stability (minimum polydispersity index (PDI) and maximum zeta-potential). This study demonstrated that the mixture of surface active compounds showed higher emulsifying and stabilizing functionality compared to using them individually in the preparation of astaxanthin nanodispersions.

  2. Facile fabrication of gelatin-based biopolymeric optical waveguides.

    PubMed

    Manocchi, Amy K; Domachuk, Peter; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G; Yi, Hyunmin

    2009-07-01

    The rapid development in optical detection techniques for sensing applications has led to an increased need for biocompatible, biodegradable, and disposable optical components. We present a controllable fabrication technique for an entirely biopolymeric planar optical waveguide via simple spin-coating. The refractive index difference, thermal responsive properties, and inherent biocompatibility of gelatin and agarose were exploited in the fabrication of thin, stacked films that efficiently guide light in a core layer with higher index of refraction. These planar waveguides were fabricated using a simple spin-coating technique, which resulted in controllable layer thicknesses and smooth layer interfaces. This technique, therefore, offers a path for routine engineering of biopolymer structures with contrasting refractive indices. The thermal stability of the gelatin core layer was improved using two crosslinkers; glutaraldehyde or microbial Transglutaminase. Light guiding in the core layer of the waveguide was demonstrated using a simple He-Ne laser setup. Guiding efficiency was further illustrated by directly embedding fluorescent markers within the core layer and detecting their spectral signature. Combined with the biopolymers' inherent biocompatibility and biodegradability, our simple strategy to fabricate disposable optical components holds the potential for the development of applications in biological sensing and implantable biomedical devices.

  3. Topological Analysis, Modeling, and Imaging of Gelatin-Based Hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koga, Maho; Marmorat, Clement; Rafailovich, Miriam; Talmon, Yishai; Zussman, Eyal; Arinstein, Arkadii

    Gelatin is a component of natural biocompatible scaffolds used in tissue engineering constructs. However, due its supra-molecular structure, the mesh size is drastically larger compared to synthetic polymers having the same moduli, and therefore the Rubber Elastic Theory cannot be used to describe properties of gelatin. Gelatin forms distinct fibrils, bundles of triple helix chains, which form rigid areas. We experimented with two different gel moduli, made possible by varying the concentration of microbial transglutaminase (mTG). mTG forms permanent cross links and affects the morphology of the gelatin by changing the number of fibrils formed. Thus, the mesh size calculated from the Rubber Elastic Theory was much smaller than the actual size of the mesh, as measured from cryoscanning electron microscopy images and fluorescent bead particle migration. We also observed the en-mass migration behavior of dermal fibroblast cells as a function of the substrate rheological response. Our results will present the ability of the cells to sense the structure of the underlying substrate, as well as the absolute value of the modulus. Furthermore, the data will be interpreted in terms of a modified theoretical model, which takes into account the structure and mesh size of the gel.

  4. A study of a tissue equivalent gelatine based tissue substitute

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, J.L.

    1992-11-01

    A study of several tissue substitutes for use as volumetric dosimeters was performed. The tissue substitutes studied included tissue substitutes from previous studies and from ICRU 44. The substitutes were evaluated for an overall match to Reference Man which was used as a basis for this study. The evaluation was based on the electron stopping power, the mass attenuation coefficient, the electron density, and the specific gravity. The tissue substitute chosen also had to be capable of changing from a liquid into a solid form to maintain an even distribution of thermoluminesent dosimetry (TLD) powder and then back to a liquid for recovery of the TLD powder without adversely effecting the TLD powder. The gelatine mixture provided the closest match to the data from Reference Man tissue. The gelatine mixture was put through a series of test to determine it's usefulness as a reliable tissue substitute. The TLD powder was cast in the gelatine mixture and recovered to determine if the TLD powder was adversely effected. The distribution of the TLD powder after being cast into the gelatin mixture was tested in insure an even was maintained.

  5. A study of a tissue equivalent gelatine based tissue substitute

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, J.L.

    1992-11-01

    A study of several tissue substitutes for use as volumetric dosimeters was performed. The tissue substitutes studied included tissue substitutes from previous studies and from ICRU 44. The substitutes were evaluated for an overall match to Reference Man which was used as a basis for this study. The evaluation was based on the electron stopping power, the mass attenuation coefficient, the electron density, and the specific gravity. The tissue substitute chosen also had to be capable of changing from a liquid into a solid form to maintain an even distribution of thermoluminesent dosimetry (TLD) powder and then back to a liquid for recovery of the TLD powder without adversely effecting the TLD powder. The gelatine mixture provided the closest match to the data from Reference Man tissue. The gelatine mixture was put through a series of test to determine it`s usefulness as a reliable tissue substitute. The TLD powder was cast in the gelatine mixture and recovered to determine if the TLD powder was adversely effected. The distribution of the TLD powder after being cast into the gelatin mixture was tested in insure an even was maintained.

  6. Delivery of S1P receptor-targeted drugs via biodegradable polymer scaffolds enhances bone regeneration in a critical size cranial defect.

    PubMed

    Das, Anusuya; Tanner, Shaun; Barker, Daniel A; Green, David; Botchwey, Edward A

    2014-04-01

    Biodegradable polymer scaffolds can be used to deliver soluble factors to enhance osseous remodeling in bone defects. To this end, we designed a poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLAGA) microsphere scaffold to sustain the release of FTY720, a selective agonist for sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptors. The microsphere scaffolds were created from fast degrading 50:50 PLAGA and/or from slow-degrading 85:15 PLAGA. Temporal and spatial regulation of bone remodeling depended on the use of appropriate scaffolds for drug delivery. The release profiles from the scaffolds were used to design an optimal delivery system to treat critical size cranial defects in a rodent model. The ability of local FTY720 delivery to maximize bone regeneration was evaluated with micro-computed tomography (microCT) and histology. Following 4 weeks of defect healing, FTY720 delivery from 85:15 PLAGA scaffolds resulted in a significant increase in bone volumes in the defect region compared to the controls. A 85:15 microsphere scaffolds maintain their structural integrity over a longer period of time, and cause an initial burst release of FTY720 due to surface localization of the drug. This encourages cellular in-growth and an increase in new bone formation. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Generation of T-cell receptors targeting a genetically stable and immunodominant cytotoxic T-lymphocyte epitope within hepatitis C virus non-structural protein 3.

    PubMed

    Pasetto, Anna; Frelin, Lars; Brass, Anette; Yasmeen, Anila; Koh, Sarene; Lohmann, Volker; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Magalhaes, Isabelle; Maeurer, Markus; Sällberg, Matti; Chen, Margaret

    2012-02-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of severe liver disease, and one major contributing factor is thought to involve a dysfunction of virus-specific T-cells. T-cell receptor (TCR) gene therapy with HCV-specific TCRs would increase the number of effector T-cells to promote virus clearance. We therefore took advantage of HLA-A2 transgenic mice to generate multiple TCR candidates against HCV using DNA vaccination followed by generation of stable T-cell-BW (T-BW) tumour hybrid cells. Using this approach, large numbers of non-structural protein 3 (NS3)-specific functional T-BW hybrids can be generated efficiently. These predominantly target the genetically stable HCV genotype 1 NS3(1073-1081) CTL epitope, frequently associated with clearance of HCV in humans. These T-BW hybrid clones recognized the NS3(1073) peptide with a high avidity. The hybridoma effectively recognized virus variants and targeted cells with low HLA-A2 expression, which has not been reported previously. Importantly, high-avidity murine TCRs effectively redirected human non-HCV-specific T-lymphocytes to recognize human hepatoma cells with HCV RNA replication driven by a subgenomic HCV replicon. Taken together, TCR candidates with a range of functional avidities, which can be used to study immune recognition of HCV-positive targets, have been generated. This has implications for TCR-related immunotherapy against HCV.

  8. FOXO3 is a glucocorticoid receptor target and regulates LKB1 and its own expression based on cellular AMP levels via a positive autoregulatory loop.

    PubMed

    Lützner, Nicolas; Kalbacher, Hubert; Krones-Herzig, Anja; Rösl, Frank

    2012-01-01

    FOXO3 is a transcription factor involved in the regulation of multiple physiological processes including cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, oxidative stress-response and energy metabolism. Although much is known about its post-translational modification, the transcriptional regulation of FOXO3, as well as the cross-talk between transcription and post-translational events, is still poorly understood. In the present study, we show that FOXO3 is an immediate early glucocorticoid receptor (GR) target, whose transcription is even further enhanced by conditions that mimic metabolic stress. Induction of FOXO3 transcription by GR-binding steroids was reversed by concomitant treatment with the GR antagonist RU-486, but further enhanced by stimuli that activate the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Analysis of genomic DNA and chromatin immunoprecipitation, as well as luciferase reporter assays, revealed two functional glucocorticoid responsive elements within the FOXO3 promoter. Furthermore, we provide functional evidence for a phosphorylation switch that explains how glucocorticoids induce transcriptional activation of the gene but subsequently inactivate the corresponding protein by site-specific phosphorylation. Only when AMPK is stimulated, pre-existing FOXO3 becomes reverted toward an active form. Energy deprived conditions thus activate FOXO3 on two different levels, namely transcriptional and post-translational. In that way, FOXO3 acts as a metabolic stress sensor that coordinates expression of LKB1, the master upstream kinase involved in metabolic sensing, depending on the energy status of the cell. Additionally, we show that FOXO3 binds and activates its own promoter via a positive autoregulatory feedback loop. In conclusion, our data explain how catabolic glucocorticoid hormones and high intracellular AMP levels cooperate in inducing FOXO3 transcription and in activating the corresponding protein.

  9. DNA double strand breaks as predictor of efficacy of the alpha-particle emitter Ac-225 and the electron emitter Lu-177 for somatostatin receptor targeted radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Graf, Franziska; Fahrer, Jörg; Maus, Stephan; Morgenstern, Alfred; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Venkatachalam, Senthil; Fottner, Christian; Weber, Matthias M; Huelsenbeck, Johannes; Schreckenberger, Mathias; Kaina, Bernd; Miederer, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Key biologic effects of the alpha-particle emitter Actinium-225 in comparison to the beta-particle emitter Lutetium-177 labeled somatostatin-analogue DOTATOC in vitro and in vivo were studied to evaluate the significance of γH2AX-foci formation. To determine the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) between the two isotopes (as - biological consequence of different ionisation-densities along a particle-track), somatostatin expressing AR42J cells were incubated with Ac-225-DOTATOC and Lu-177-DOTATOC up to 48 h and viability was analyzed using the MTT assay. DNA double strand breaks (DSB) were quantified by immunofluorescence staining of γH2AX-foci. Cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry. In vivo uptake of both radiolabeled somatostatin-analogues into subcutaneously growing AR42J tumors and the number of cells displaying γH2AX-foci were measured. Therapeutic efficacy was assayed by monitoring tumor growth after treatment with activities estimated from in vitro cytotoxicity. Ac-225-DOTATOC resulted in ED50 values of 14 kBq/ml after 48 h, whereas Lu-177-DOTATOC displayed ED50 values of 10 MBq/ml. The number of DSB grew with increasing concentration of Ac-225-DOTATOC and similarly with Lu-177-DOTATOC when applying a factor of 700-fold higher activity compared to Ac-225. Already 24 h after incubation with 2.5-10 kBq/ml, Ac-225-DOTATOC cell-cycle studies showed up to a 60% increase in the percentage of tumor cells in G2/M phase. After 72 h an apoptotic subG1 peak was also detectable. Tumor uptake for both radio peptides at 48 h was identical (7.5%ID/g), though the overall number of cells with γH2AX-foci was higher in tumors treated with 48 kBq Ac-225-DOTATOC compared to tumors treated with 30 MBq Lu-177-DOTATOC (35% vs. 21%). Tumors with a volume of 0.34 ml reached delayed exponential tumor growth after 25 days (44 kBq Ac-225-DOTATOC) and after 21 days (34 MBq Lu-177-DOTATOC). γH2AX-foci formation, triggered by beta- and alpha-irradiation, is an early key

  10. DNA Double Strand Breaks as Predictor of Efficacy of the Alpha-Particle Emitter Ac-225 and the Electron Emitter Lu-177 for Somatostatin Receptor Targeted Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Graf, Franziska; Fahrer, Jörg; Maus, Stephan; Morgenstern, Alfred; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Venkatachalam, Senthil; Fottner, Christian; Weber, Matthias M.; Huelsenbeck, Johannes; Schreckenberger, Mathias; Kaina, Bernd; Miederer, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Key biologic effects of the alpha-particle emitter Actinium-225 in comparison to the beta-particle emitter Lutetium-177 labeled somatostatin-analogue DOTATOC in vitro and in vivo were studied to evaluate the significance of γH2AX-foci formation. Methods To determine the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) between the two isotopes (as - biological consequence of different ionisation-densities along a particle-track), somatostatin expressing AR42J cells were incubated with Ac-225-DOTATOC and Lu-177-DOTATOC up to 48 h and viability was analyzed using the MTT assay. DNA double strand breaks (DSB) were quantified by immunofluorescence staining of γH2AX-foci. Cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry. In vivo uptake of both radiolabeled somatostatin-analogues into subcutaneously growing AR42J tumors and the number of cells displaying γH2AX-foci were measured. Therapeutic efficacy was assayed by monitoring tumor growth after treatment with activities estimated from in vitro cytotoxicity. Results Ac-225-DOTATOC resulted in ED50 values of 14 kBq/ml after 48 h, whereas Lu-177-DOTATOC displayed ED50 values of 10 MBq/ml. The number of DSB grew with increasing concentration of Ac-225-DOTATOC and similarly with Lu-177-DOTATOC when applying a factor of 700-fold higher activity compared to Ac-225. Already 24 h after incubation with 2.5–10 kBq/ml, Ac-225-DOTATOC cell-cycle studies showed up to a 60% increase in the percentage of tumor cells in G2/M phase. After 72 h an apoptotic subG1 peak was also detectable. Tumor uptake for both radio peptides at 48 h was identical (7.5%ID/g), though the overall number of cells with γH2AX-foci was higher in tumors treated with 48 kBq Ac-225-DOTATOC compared to tumors treated with 30 MBq Lu-177-DOTATOC (35% vs. 21%). Tumors with a volume of 0.34 ml reached delayed exponential tumor growth after 25 days (44 kBq Ac-225-DOTATOC) and after 21 days (34 MBq Lu-177-DOTATOC). Conclusion γH2AX-foci formation, triggered by beta- and

  11. Synergism of peptide receptor-targeted Auger electron radiation therapy with anti-angiogenic compounds in a mouse model of neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Neuroendocrine tumors are well vascularized and express specific cell surface markers, such as somatostatin receptors and the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R). Using the Rip1Tag2 transgenic mouse model of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNET), we have investigated the potential benefit of a combination of anti-angiogenic treatment with targeted internal radiotherapy. Methods [Lys40(Ahx-DTPA-111In)NH2]-exendin-4, a radiopeptide that selectively binds to GLP-1R expressed on insulinoma and other neuroendocrine tumor cells, was co-administered with oral vatalanib (an inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFR)) or imatinib (a c-kit/PDGFR inhibitor). The control groups included single-agent kinase inhibitor treatments and [Lys40(Ahx-DTPA-natIn)NH2]-exendin-4 monotherapy. For biodistribution, Rip1Tag2 mice were pre-treated with oral vatalanib or imatinib for 0, 3, 5, or 7 days at a dose of 100 mg/kg. Subsequently, [Lys40(Ahx-DTPA-111In)NH2]-exendin-4 was administered i.v., and the biodistribution was assessed after 4 h. For therapy, the mice were injected with 1.1 MBq [Lys40(Ahx-DTPA-111In)NH2]-exendin-4 and treated with vatalanib or imatinib 100 mg/kg orally for another 7 days. Tumor volume, tumor cell apoptosis and proliferation, and microvessel density were quantified. Results Combination of [Lys40(Ahx-DTPA-111In)NH2]-exendin-4 and vatalanib was significantly more effective than single treatments (p < 0.05) and reduced the tumor volume by 97% in the absence of organ damage. The pre-treatment of mice with vatalanib led to a reduction in the tumor uptake of [Lys40(Ahx-DTPA-111In)NH2]-exendin-4, indicating that concomitant administration of vatalanib and the radiopeptide was the best approach. Imatinib did not show a synergistic effect with [Lys40(Ahx-DTPA-111In)NH2]-exendin-4. Conclusion The combination of 1.1 MBq of [Lys40(Ahx-DTPA-111In)NH2]-exendin-4 with 100 mg/kg vatalanib had the same effect on a neuroendocrine tumor

  12. Adenosine receptor targeting in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Gessi, Stefania; Merighi, Stefania; Fazzi, Debora; Stefanelli, Angela; Varani, Katia; Borea, Pier Andrea

    2011-12-01

    The adenosine receptors A(1), A(2A), A(2B) and A(3) are important and ubiquitous mediators of cellular signaling that play vital roles in protecting tissues and organs from damage. In particular, adenosine triggers tissue protection and repair by different receptor-mediated mechanisms, including increasing the oxygen supply:demand ratio, pre-conditioning, anti-inflammatory effects and the stimulation of angiogenesis. The state of the art of the role of adenosine receptors which have been proposed as targets for drug design and discovery, in health and disease, and an overview of the ligands for these receptors in clinical development. Selective ligands of A(1), A(2A), A(2B) and A(3) adenosine receptors are likely to find applications in the treatment of pain, ischemic conditions, glaucoma, asthma, arthritis, cancer and other disorders in which inflammation is a feature. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the present knowledge regarding the role of these adenosine receptors in health and disease.

  13. Integrins as Receptor Targets for Neurological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xin; Reddy, Doodipala Samba

    2012-01-01

    This review focuses on the neurobiology of integrins, pathophysiological roles of integrins in neuroplasticity and nervous system disorders, and therapeutic implications of integrins as potential drug targets and possible delivery pathways. Neuroplasticity is a central phenomenon in many neurological conditions such as seizures, trauma, and traumatic brain injury. During the course of many brain diseases, in addition to intracellular compartment changes, alterations in non-cell compartments such as extracellular matrix (ECM) are recognized as an essential process in forming and reorganizing neural connections. Integrins are heterodimeric transmembrane receptors that mediate cell–ECM and cell–cell adhesion events. Although the mechanisms of neuroplasticity remain unclear, it has been suggested that integrins undergo plasticity including clustering through interactions with ECM proteins, modulating ion channels, intracellular Ca2+ and protein kinases signaling, and reorganization of cytoskeletal filaments. As cell surface receptors, integrins are central to the pathophysiology of many brain diseases, such as epilepsy, and are potential targets for the development of new drugs for neurological disorders. PMID:22233753

  14. The diagnostic role of 99mTc-dual receptor targeted probe and targeted peptide bombesin (RGD-BBN) SPET/CT in the detection of malignant and benign breast tumors and axillary lymph nodes compared to ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Ji, Tiefeng; Sun, Yu; Chen, Bin; Ji, Bin; Gao, Shi; Ma, Qingjie; Cheng, Guanghui; Zhang, Haishan

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the diagnostic role of a new dual receptor-targeted probe, integrin ανβ3 and gastrin releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) targeted peptide Glu-c(RGDyK)-bombesin (RGD-BBN) labeled with technetium-99m ((99m)Tc-RGD-BBN), using single photon emission tomography/computed tomography (SPET/CT) in the detection of breast tumor in comparison to ultrasound (US). One hundred and twenty six female patients with suspicious breast lesions who had already been scheduled for biopsy or surgery were enrolled in this study. All patients had previously underwent breast US and (99m)Tc-RGD-BBN SPET/CT. The US findings were evaluated according to the breast imaging report and the data system (BI-RADS). Technetium-99m-RGD-BBN SPET/CT images were interpreted independently by two experienced nuclear medicine physicians. A final diagnosis was made by histopathology of the specimens. A total of 130 lesions, 77 malignant and 53 benign lesions were ascertained. One hundred and twelve breast lesions, 69 malignant and 43 benign lesions were above 10mm in diameter and 18 breast lesions (8 malignant lesions and 10 benign lesions) were below 10mm. The overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and accuracy of (99m)Tc-RGD-BBN SPET/CT and US for breast lesions were 93.5% vs. 81.8% (P<0.05), 79.2% vs. 75.5% (P>0.05), 86.7% vs. 82.9% (P>0.05), 89.4% vs. 74.1% (P<0.05) and 87.7% vs. 79.2% (P>0.05). Technetium-99m-RGD-BBN SPET/CT detected all lesions ≥10mm and US only detected 57 (P<0.05). In malignant lesions <10mm, US was superior than (99m)Tc-RGD-BBN SPET/CT (75.0% vs. 37.5%, P<0.05). There was no significant difference between the two methods no matter the size of the benign lesions. The overall sensitivity and specificity of (99m)Tc-RGD-BBN SPET/CT and US for axillae lymph nodes were 87.5% vs. 71.9% (P<0.05) and 77.6% vs. 68.9% (P>0.05), respectively. For the metastatic lymph nodes of <10mm, the sensitivity of (99m

  15. Report: Optimization study of the preparation factors for argan oil microcapsule based on hybrid-level orthogonal array design via SPSS modeling.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xi; Wu, Xiaoli; Zhou, Hui; Jiang, Tao; Chen, Chun; Liu, Mingshi; Jin, Yuanbao; Yang, Dongsheng

    2014-11-01

    To optimize the preparation factors for argan oil microcapsule using complex coacervation of chitosan cross-linked with gelatin based on hybrid-level orthogonal array design via SPSS modeling. Eight relatively significant factors were firstly investigated and selected as calculative factors for the orthogonal array design from the total of ten factors effecting the preparation of argan oil microcapsule by utilizing the single factor variable method. The modeling of hybrid-level orthogonal array design was built in these eight factors with the relevant levels (9, 9, 9, 9, 7, 6, 2 and 2 respectively). The preparation factors for argan oil microcapsule were investigated and optimized according to the results of hybrid-level orthogonal array design. The priorities order and relevant optimum levels of preparation factors standard to base on the percentage of microcapsule with the diameter of 30~40 μm via SPSS. Experimental data showed that the optimum factors were controlling the chitosan/gelatin ratio, the systemic concentration and the core/shell ratio at 1:2, 1.5% and 1:7 respectively, presetting complex coacervation pH at 6.4, setting cross-linking time and complex coacervation at 75 min and 30 min, using the glucose-delta lactone as the type of cross-linking agent, and selecting chitosan with the molecular weight of 2000~3000.

  16. Diet-derived 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 activates vitamin D receptor target gene expression and suppresses EGFR mutant non-small cell lung cancer growth in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Verone-Boyle, Alissa R.; Shoemaker, Suzanne; Attwood, Kristopher; Morrison, Carl D.; Makowski, Andrew J.; Battaglia, Sebastiano; Hershberger, Pamela A.

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies implicate vitamin D status as a factor that influences growth of EGFR mutant lung cancers. However, laboratory based evidence of the biological effect of vitamin D in this disease is lacking. To fill this knowledge gap, we determined vitamin D receptor (VDR) expression in human lung tumors using a tissue microarray constructed of lung cancer cases from never-smokers (where EGFR gene mutations are prevalent). Nuclear VDR was detected in 19/19 EGFR mutant tumors. Expression tended to be higher in tumors with EGFR exon 19 deletions than those with EGFR L858R mutations. To study anti-proliferative activity and signaling, EGFR mutant lung cancer cells were treated with the circulating metabolite of vitamin D, 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25D3). 25D3 inhibited clonogenic growth in a dose-dependent manner. CYP27B1 encodes the 1α-hydroxylase (1αOHase) that converts 25D3 to the active metabolite, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D3). Studies employing VDR siRNA, CYP27B1 zinc finger nucleases, and pharmacologic inhibitors of the vitamin D pathway indicate that 25D3 regulates gene expression in a VDR-dependent manner but does not strictly require 1αOHase-mediated conversion of 25D3 to 1,25D3. To determine the effects of modulating serum 25D3 levels on growth of EGFR mutant lung tumor xenografts, mice were fed diets containing 100 or 10,000 IU vitamin D3/kg. High dietary vitamin D3 intake resulted in elevated serum 25D3 and significant inhibition of tumor growth. No toxic effects of supplementation were observed. These results identify EGFR mutant lung cancer as a vitamin D-responsive disease and diet-derived 25D3 as a direct VDR agonist and therapeutic agent. PMID:26654942

  17. 2-hydroxyethyl metahcrylate/gelatin based superporous hydrogels for tissue regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomić, Simonida Lj.; Babić, Marija M.; Vuković, Jovana S.; Perišić, Marija D.; Filipović, Vuk V.; Davidović, Sladjana Z.; Filipović, Jovanka M.

    2016-05-01

    In this study, superporous hydrogels were synthesized by free radical polymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate without and in the presence of gelatin. Highly porous hydrogel structures were obtained by two different techniques: using a gas blowing agent, sodium bicarbonate, and a cryogenic treatment followed by freeze-drying. After the gel synthesis, gelatin molecules were covalently immobilised onto PHEMA via glytaraldehyde activation. All samples were characterized for morphological, mechanical, swelling and antibacterial properties. The results obtained show that samples with gelatin show better properties in comparison with PHEMA samples, which make these materials highly attractive for developing hydrogel scaffolds for tissue regeneration.

  18. Green synthesis of a new gelatin-based antimicrobial scaffold for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Yazdimamaghani, Mostafa; Vashaee, Daryoosh; Assefa, Senait; Shabrangharehdasht, Mitra; Rad, Armin Tahmasbi; Eastman, Margaret A; Walker, Kenneth J; Madihally, Sundar V; Köhler, Gerwald A; Tayebi, Lobat

    2014-06-01

    With the aim of developing appropriate scaffolds for tissue engineering to suppress the formation of biofilms, an effective one-pot process was applied in this study to produce scaffolds with inherent antibacterial activity. A new method to synthesize genipin-crosslinked gelatin/nanosilver scaffolds with "green" in situ formation of silver nanoparticles by heat treatment is presented in this paper. In this procedure, toxic solvents, reducing agents, and stabilizing agents are avoided. UV-visible absorption spectra of the synthesized gelatin/nanosilver solutions were obtained immediately and three months after the synthesis revealing the presence and high stability of the silver nanoparticles. The TEM of gelatin/nanosilver solutions showed silver particles with spherical shapes that were less than 5nm in size. Interestingly, contact angle was found to increase from 80° to 125° with the increase in concentration of nanosilver in gelatin. All gelatin/nanosilver solutions showed antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. However, only the highest concentration showed antifungal effects against Candida albicans pathogens. Scaffolds were prepared by a lyophilization technique from this solution and their antimicrobial activities were examined. Introducing this facile green one-pot process of synthesizing scaffolds with antimicrobial and anti-biofilm properties may lead to key applications in tissue engineering techniques.

  19. A biomimetic gelatin-based platform elicits a pro-differentiation effect on podocytes through mechanotransduction

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Mufeng; Azeloglu, Evren U.; Ron, Amit; Tran-Ba, Khanh-Hoa; Calizo, Rhodora C.; Tavassoly, Iman; Bhattacharya, Smiti; Jayaraman, Gomathi; Chen, Yibang; Rabinovich, Vera; Iyengar, Ravi; Hone, James C.; He, John C.; Kaufman, Laura J.

    2017-01-01

    Using a gelatin microbial transglutaminase (gelatin-mTG) cell culture platform tuned to exhibit stiffness spanning that of healthy and diseased glomeruli, we demonstrate that kidney podocytes show marked stiffness sensitivity. Podocyte-specific markers that are critical in the formation of the renal filtration barrier are found to be regulated in association with stiffness-mediated cellular behaviors. While podocytes typically de-differentiate in culture and show diminished physiological function in nephropathies characterized by altered tissue stiffness, we show that gelatin-mTG substrates with Young’s modulus near that of healthy glomeruli elicit a pro-differentiation and maturation response in podocytes better than substrates either softer or stiffer. The pro-differentiation phenotype is characterized by upregulation of gene and protein expression associated with podocyte function, which is observed for podocytes cultured on gelatin-mTG gels of physiological stiffness independent of extracellular matrix coating type and density. Signaling pathways involved in stiffness-mediated podocyte behaviors are identified, revealing the interdependence of podocyte mechanotransduction and maintenance of their physiological function. This study also highlights the utility of the gelatin-mTG platform as an in vitro system with tunable stiffness over a range relevant for recapitulating mechanical properties of soft tissues, suggesting its potential impact on a wide range of research in cellular biophysics. PMID:28262745

  20. Composite alginate and gelatin based bio-polymeric wafers containing silver sulfadiazine for wound healing.

    PubMed

    Boateng, Joshua; Burgos-Amador, Rocio; Okeke, Obinna; Pawar, Harshavardhan

    2015-08-01

    Lyophilized wafers comprising sodium alginate (SA) and gelatin (GE) (0/100, 75/25, 50/50, 25/75, 0/100 SA/GE, respectively) with silver sulfadiazine (SSD, 0.1% w/w) have been developed for potential application on infected chronic wounds. Polymer-drug interactions and physical form were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively, while morphological structure was examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Functional characteristics [(mechanical hardness and adhesion using texture analyzer, and swelling capacity)] of blank wafers were determined in order to select the optimal formulations for drug loading. Finally, the in vitro drug dissolution properties of two selected drug loaded wafers were investigated. There was an increase in hardness and a decrease in mucoadhesion with increasing GE content. FTIR showed hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interaction between carboxyl of SA and amide of GE but no interaction between the polymers and drug was observed, with XRD showing that SSD remained crystalline during gel formulation and freeze-drying. The results suggest that 75/25 SA/GE formulations are the ideal formulations due to their uniformity and optimal mucoadhesivity and hydration. The drug loaded wafers showed controlled release of SSD over a 7h period which is expected to reduce bacterial load within infected wounds.

  1. Influence of palm oil and glycerol on properties of fish skin gelatin-based films.

    PubMed

    Nilsuwan, Krisana; Benjakul, Soottawat; Prodpran, Thummanoon

    2016-06-01

    Properties of fish skin gelatin film incorporated with palm oil at 50 and 75 % (w/w) as affected by glycerol at 0-30 % (w/w) were investigated. Increases in water vapour permeability and elongation at break along with decrease in tensile strength were noticed when levels of glycerol were increased (p < 0.05). Decrease in L*- and a*-values with coincidental increase in b*- and ΔE*-values were observed in emulsified films when amount of palm oil incorporated increased (p < 0.05). Light transmittance of all films increased as glycerol levels were increased (p < 0.05). FTIR results suggested that the protein-protein interaction in film matrix decreased when palm oil was incorporated. Films added with palm oil had lower glass transition and degradation temperatures than control films. The addition of 75 % palm oil and 10 % glycerol improved water vapour barrier property of fish skin gelatin films without drastic alteration of mechanical properties.

  2. Gelatin based bio-films prepared from grey triggerfish' skin influenced by enzymatic pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Souissi, Nabil; Abdelhedi, Ola; Mbarek, Aïcha; Kammoun, Wassim; Kechaou, Hela; Nasri, Moncef

    2017-09-08

    Gelatins from grey triggerfish skin were extracted with different methods The supplementation by pepsin (PG) improved the yield of extraction when compared with untreated gelatin (UG) and acidic gelatin (AG). The outputs of gelatins AG, UG and PG, obtained respectively, with acitic acid, glycine buffer and glycine buffer added with 5U of pepsin/g of the skin beforehand treated by alkali, were 6.9%, 7.9% and 9.7%, respectively. The enzymatic treatment of the alkali-pretreated skin of grey triggerfish altered the electrophoresis profile, biophysical, gellification, rheological and thermal properties of the prepared gelatins extracted under acidic condition. However, the untreated gelatin obtained without pepsin exhibited the highest transition and enthaply temperatures. In addition, the properties of the prepared films were interconnected to their microstructure as demonstrated by scanning electron microscopy. Furthermore, films with PG and UG had a regular surface and a more condensed structure, however films prepared with AG had rougher surface. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Sustained delivery of latanoprost by thermosensitive chitosan-gelatin-based hydrogel for controlling ocular hypertension.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yung-Hsin; Hung, Kuo-Hsuan; Tsai, Tung-Hu; Lee, Chia-Jung; Ku, Ruy-Yu; Chiu, Allen Wen-Hsiang; Chiou, Shih-Hwa; Liu, Catherine Jui-Ling

    2014-10-01

    Glaucoma is an irreversible ocular disease that may lead to progressive visual field loss and eventually to blindness with inadequately controlled intraocular pressure (IOP). Latanoprost is one of the most potent ocular hypotensive compounds, the current first-line therapy in glaucoma. However, the daily instillation required for efficacy and undesirable side-effects are major causes of treatment adherence failure and persistence in glaucoma therapy. In the present study, we developed an injectable thermosensitive chitosan/gelatin/glycerol phosphate (C/G/GP) hydrogel as a sustained-release system of latanoprost for glaucoma treatment. The latanoprost-loaded C/G/GP hydrogel can gel within 1min at 37°C. The results show a sustained release of latanoprost from C/G/GP hydrogel in vitro and in vivo. The latanoprost-loaded C/G/GP hydrogel showed a good in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility. A rabbit model of glaucoma was established by intravitreal injection of triamcinolone acetonide. After a single subconjunctival injection of latanoprost-loaded C/G/GP hydrogel, IOP was significantly decreased within 8days and then remained at a normal level. The results of the study suggest that latanoprost-loaded C/G/GP hydrogel may have a potential application in glaucoma therapy.

  4. Cellular interaction influenced by surface modification strategies of gelatin-based nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tse, Wai Hei; Gyenis, Laszlo; Litchfield, David W; Zhang, Jin

    2017-02-01

    Theranostic applications of gelatin nanospheres require two major components, a method of detection and good biocompatibility. We characterized the response of UTA-6 human osteosarcoma cells to the introduction of functionalized 90 bloom-based gelatin nanospheres (158 ± 49 nm) modified with three elements in different order: (a) hybridization with cadmium-based quantum dots for optical detection, (b) bioconjugation with anti-human IgG FAB (anti-IgG) for cell targeting, with/without (c) capping with polyethylene glycol on the surface for enhanced biocompatibility. A one-pot process is developed for incorporating quantum dots and antibody with gelatin nanospheres. Path A of modifying gelatin nanospheres with quantum dots first followed by anti-IgG resulted in a significantly greater cellular viability than Path B with anti-IgG first followed by quantum dots. Capping with polyethylene glycol as the final step in modification yielded significantly opposing results with decreases in Path A and increases in Path B. Three-dimensional z-stacking fluorescent images of hybrid gelatin nanospheres with anti-IgG is observed to have an increase in cellular association. The observed results suggest the modification order for building hybrid nanospheres may have an impact on cellular response.

  5. Biodegradable gelatin-based nanospheres as pH-responsive drug delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curcio, Manuela; Altimari, Ilaria; Spizzirri, Umile Gianfranco; Cirillo, Giuseppe; Vittorio, Orazio; Puoci, Francesco; Picci, Nevio; Iemma, Francesca

    2013-04-01

    Native gelatin, N, N'-ethylenebisacrylamide, and sodium methacrylate were inserted into a spherical crosslinked structure by a solvent-free emulsion polymerization method, in which sunflower seed oil containing different amounts of lecithin was selected as continuous phase. Nanogels were characterized by morphological analysis, particle size distribution, and determination of swelling degree. Different dimensional distributions (100-500 nm) and water affinities were obtained by varying the amount of surfactant in the polymerization feed. Nanogels were non-toxic on human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells and enzymatically stable in the gastric tract, with weight losses ranging from 58 to 20 % in pancreatin solution. Release profiles of diclofenac sodium salt from the nanogels were evaluated at different pH and found to depend on crosslinking degree and drug-polymer interactions; while in pancreatin solution, a complete release of the drug was observed. The release mechanism and the diffusional contribution were evaluated by semiempirical equations.

  6. Asialoglycoprotein receptor targeted delivery of doxorubicin nanoparticles for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pranatharthiharan, Sandhya; Patel, Mitesh D; Malshe, Vinod C; Pujari, Vaishali; Gorakshakar, Ajit; Madkaikar, Manisha; Ghosh, Kanjaksha; Devarajan, Padma V

    2017-11-01

    We report asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR)-targeted doxorubicin hydrochloride (Dox) nanoparticles (NPs) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Polyethylene sebacate (PES)-Gantrez® AN 119 Dox NPs of average size 220 nm with PDI < 0.62 and ∼20% Dox loading were prepared by modified nanoprecipitation. ASGPR ligands, pullulan (Pul), arabinogalactan (AGn), and the combination (Pul-AGn), were anchored by adsorption. Ligand anchoring enabled high liver uptake with a remarkable hepatocyte:nonparenchymal cell ratio of 85:15. Furthermore, Pul-AGn NPs exhibited an additive effect implying incredibly high hepatocyte accumulation. Galactose-mediated competitive inhibition confirmed ASGPR-mediated uptake of ligand-anchored NPs in HepG2 cell lines. Subacute toxicity in rats confirmed the safety of the NP groups. However, histopathological evaluation suggested mild renal toxicity of AGn. Pul NPs revealed sustained reduction in tumor volume in PLC/PRF/5 liver tumor-bearing Nod/Scid mice up to 46 days. Extensive tumor necrosis, reduced collagen content, reduction in the HCC biomarker serum α-fetoprotein (p < 0.05), a mitotic index of 1.135 (day 46), and tumor treated/tumor control (T/C) values of <0.42 signified superior efficacy of Pul NPs. Furthermore, weight gain in the NP groups, and no histopathological alterations indicated that they were well tolerated by the mice. The high efficacy coupled with greater safety portrayed Pul Dox NPs as a promising nanocarrier for improved therapy of HCC.

  7. Prospects in Folate Receptor-Targeted Radionuclide Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Cristina; Schibli, Roger

    2013-01-01

    Targeted radionuclide therapy is based on systemic application of particle-emitting radiopharmaceuticals which are directed toward a specific tumor-associated target. Accumulation of the radiopharmaceutical in targeted cancer cells results in high doses of absorbed radiation energy whereas toxicity to non-targeted healthy tissue is limited. This strategy has found widespread application in the palliative treatment of neuroendocrine tumors using somatostatin-based radiopeptides. The folate receptor (FR) has been identified as a target associated with a variety of frequent tumor types (e.g., ovarian, lung, brain, renal, and colorectal cancer). In healthy organs and tissue FR-expression is restricted to only a few sites such as for instance the kidneys. This demonstrates why FR-targeting is an attractive strategy for the development of new therapy concepts. Due to its high FR-binding affinity (KD < 10−9 M) the vitamin folic acid has emerged as an almost ideal targeting agent. Therefore, a variety of folic acid radioconjugates for nuclear imaging have been developed. However, in spite of the large number of cancer patients who could benefit of a folate-based radionuclide therapy, a therapeutic concept with folate radioconjugates has not yet been envisaged for clinical application. The reason is the generally high accumulation of folate radioconjugates in the kidneys where emission of particle-radiation may result in damage to the renal tissue. Therefore, the design of more sophisticated folate radioconjugates providing improved tissue distribution profiles are needed. This review article summarizes recent developments with regard to a therapeutic application of folate radioconjugates. A new construct of a folate radioconjugate and an application protocol which makes use of a pharmacological interaction allowed the first preclinical therapy experiments with radiofolates. These results raise hope for future application of such new concepts also in the clinic. PMID:24069581

  8. [G-protein-coupled receptors targeting: the allosteric approach].

    PubMed

    Sebag, Julien A; Pantel, Jacques

    2012-10-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) are a major family of drug targets. Essentially all drugs targeting these receptors on the market compete with the endogenous ligand (agonists or antagonists) for binding the receptor. Recently, non-competitive compounds binding to distinct sites from the cognate ligand were documented in various classes of these receptors. These compounds, called allosteric modulators, generally endowed of a better selectivity are able to modulate specifically the endogenous signaling of the receptor. To better understand the promising potential of this class of GPCRs targeting compounds, this review highlights the properties of allosteric modulators, the strategies used to identify them and the challenges associated with the development of these compounds.

  9. Folate Receptor-Targeted Diagnostics and Therapeutics for Inflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation, an innate immune response mediated by macrophages, forms the first line of defence to protect our body from the invasion of various pathogens. Although inflammation is a defensive response, chronic inflammation has been regarded as the major cause of many types of human diseases such as inflammatory/autoimmune diseases, cancers, neurological diseases, and cardiovascular diseases. Folate receptor (FR) is a cell surface glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored glycoprotein, and its three isoforms, FR-α, FR-β, and FR-γ, are found in humans. Interestingly, FRs are highly expressed on a variety of cells, including cancer cells and activated macrophages, whereas their expression on normal cells is undetectable, indicating that FR-targeting could be a good selective strategy for the diagnosis and therapeutic treatment of cancers and activated macrophage-mediated inflammatory diseases. Previous studies successfully showed FR-targeted imaging of many types of cancers in animal models as well as human patients. Recently, a number of emerging studies have found that activated macrophages, which are critical players for a variety of inflammatory diseases, highly express FRs, and selective targeting of these FR-positive activated macrophages is a good approach to diagnose and treat inflammatory diseases. In this review, we describe the characteristics and structure of FRs, and further discuss FR-targeted diagnostics and therapeutics of human diseases, in particular, activated macrophage-mediated inflammatory diseases. PMID:28035209

  10. THE TRPV1 RECEPTOR: TARGET OF TOXICANTS AND THERAPEUTICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding the structural and functional complexities of the TRPV1 is essential to the therapeutic modulation of inflammation and pain. Because of its central role in initiating inflammatory processes and integrating painful stimuli, there is an understandable interest...

  11. Folate Receptor Targeted Alpha-Therapy Using Terbium-149

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Cristina; Reber, Josefine; Haller, Stephanie; Dorrer, Holger; Köster, Ulli; Johnston, Karl; Zhernosekov, Konstantin; Türler, Andreas; Schibli, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Terbium-149 is among the most interesting therapeutic nuclides for medical applications. It decays by emission of short-range α-particles (Eα = 3.967 MeV) with a half-life of 4.12 h. The goal of this study was to investigate the anticancer efficacy of a 149Tb-labeled DOTA-folate conjugate (cm09) using folate receptor (FR)-positive cancer cells in vitro and in tumor-bearing mice. 149Tb was produced at the ISOLDE facility at CERN. Radiolabeling of cm09 with purified 149Tb resulted in a specific activity of ~1.2 MBq/nmol. In vitro assays performed with 149Tb-cm09 revealed a reduced KB cell viability in a FR-specific and activity concentration-dependent manner. Tumor-bearing mice were injected with saline only (group A) or with 149Tb-cm09 (group B: 2.2 MBq; group C: 3.0 MBq). A significant tumor growth delay was found in treated animals resulting in an increased average survival time of mice which received 149Tb-cm09 (B: 30.5 d; C: 43 d) compared to untreated controls (A: 21 d). Analysis of blood parameters revealed no signs of acute toxicity to the kidneys or liver in treated mice over the time of investigation. These results demonstrated the potential of folate-based α-radionuclide therapy in tumor-bearing mice. PMID:24633429

  12. THE TRPV1 RECEPTOR: TARGET OF TOXICANTS AND THERAPEUTICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding the structural and functional complexities of the TRPV1 is essential to the therapeutic modulation of inflammation and pain. Because of its central role in initiating inflammatory processes and integrating painful stimuli, there is an understandable interest...

  13. Ultrasound-Mediated Therapies Using Receptor-Targeted Nanodroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, P.; LaBell, R.; Penrose, K.; Kerschen, A.; Unger, E.; Matsunaga, T.; Zutshi, R.

    2006-05-01

    Angiogenic vessels at tumor sites are leaky and allow particles less than 400 nm to pass through. We have developed targeted nanodroplets that are less than 400 nm in size and are capable of encapsulating drug molecules which can be released at the tumor site upon insonation. These nanodroplets are targeted to the α6β1 receptor, which is upregulated in prostate cancer.

  14. Identification of the platelet ADP receptor targeted by antithrombotic drugs.

    PubMed

    Hollopeter, G; Jantzen, H M; Vincent, D; Li, G; England, L; Ramakrishnan, V; Yang, R B; Nurden, P; Nurden, A; Julius, D; Conley, P B

    2001-01-11

    Platelets have a crucial role in the maintenance of normal haemostasis, and perturbations of this system can lead to pathological thrombus formation and vascular occlusion, resulting in stroke, myocardial infarction and unstable angina. ADP released from damaged vessels and red blood cells induces platelet aggregation through activation of the integrin GPIIb-IIIa and subsequent binding of fibrinogen. ADP is also secreted from platelets on activation, providing positive feedback that potentiates the actions of many platelet activators. ADP mediates platelet aggregation through its action on two G-protein-coupled receptor subtypes. The P2Y1 receptor couples to Gq and mobilizes intracellular calcium ions to mediate platelet shape change and aggregation. The second ADP receptor required for aggregation (variously called P2Y(ADP), P2Y(AC), P2Ycyc or P2T(AC)) is coupled to the inhibition of adenylyl cyclase through Gi. The molecular identity of the Gi-linked receptor is still elusive, even though it is the target of efficacious antithrombotic agents, such as ticlopidine and clopidogrel and AR-C66096 (ref. 9). Here we describe the cloning of this receptor, designated P2Y12, and provide evidence that a patient with a bleeding disorder has a defect in this gene. Cloning of the P2Y12 receptor should facilitate the development of better antiplatelet agents to treat cardiovascular diseases.

  15. Cholecystokinin and gastrin receptors targeting in gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Rai, Rajani; Chandra, Vishal; Tewari, Mallika; Kumar, Mohan; Shukla, Hari S

    2012-12-01

    Cholecystokinin and Gastrin are amongst the first gastrointestinal hormone discovered. In addition to classical actions (contraction of gallbladder, growth and secretion in the stomach and pancreas), these also act as growth stimulants for gastrointestinal malignancies and cell lines. Growth of these tumours is inhibited by antagonists of the cholecystokinin and gastrin receptors. These receptors provides most promising approach in clinical oncology and several specific radiolabelled ligands have been synthesized for specific tumour targeting and therapy of tumours overexpressing these receptors. Therefore, definition of the molecular structure of the receptor involved in the autocrine/paracrine loop may contribute to novel therapies for gastrointestinal cancer. Hence, this review tries to focus on the role and distribution of these hormones and their receptors in gastrointestinal cancer with a brief talk about the clinical trial using available agonist and antagonist in gastrointestinal cancers.

  16. P2X receptors: targets for novel analgesics?

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Charles

    2005-08-01

    The ability of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) to evoke acute pain has been known for many years, but its role in nociceptive signaling is only now becoming clear. ATP acts via P2X and P2Y receptors, and of particular importance here is the P2X(3) receptor. It is expressed selectively at high levels in nociceptive sensory neurons, where it forms functional receptors on its own and in combination with the P2X(2) receptor. Recent reports using gene knockout methods; antisense oligonucleotide and small, interfering RNA technologies; and a novel, selective P2X(3) antagonist, A-317491, show that P2X(3) receptors are involved in chronic inflammatory and neuropathic pain. The mRNA for other P2X subunits is also found in sensory neurons, and there is evidence for functional P2X(1/5) or P2X(2/6) heteromers in some of these. These data support the possibility that P2X receptors, particularly the P2X(3) subtype, could be targeted in the search for new, effective analgesics.

  17. Imidazoline I2 receptors: target for new analgesics?

    PubMed

    Li, Jun-Xu; Zhang, Yanan

    2011-05-11

    Pain remains a major clinical challenge because there are no effective analgesics for some pain conditions and the mainstay analgesics for severe pain, opioids, have serious unwanted effects. There is a dire need for novel analgesics in the clinic. Imidazoline receptors are a family of three receptors (I(1), I(2) and I(3)) that all can recognize compounds with an imidazoline structure. Accumulating evidence suggests that I(2) receptors are involved in pain modulation. Ligands acting at I(2) receptors are effective for tonic inflammatory and neuropathic pain but are much less effective for acute phasic pain. When studied in combination, I(2) receptor ligands enhance the analgesic effects of opioids in both acute phasic and chronic tonic pain. During chronic use, patients can develop tolerance to and dependence on opioids. Imidazoline I(2) receptor ligands can attenuate the development of tolerance to opioid analgesia and inhibit drug withdrawal or antagonist precipitation induced abstinence syndrome in animals. Taken together, drugs acting on I(2) receptors may be useful as a monotherapy or combined with opioids as an adjuvant for treating pain. Future studies should focus on understanding the relative efficacy of I(2) receptor ligands and developing new compounds to fill the gap in intrinsic efficacy continuum of I(2) receptors.

  18. [Adiponectin receptor-targeted therapy for lifestyle-related diseases].

    PubMed

    Iwabu, Masato; Yamauchi, Toshimasa; Okada-Iwabu, Miki; Kadowaki, Takashi

    2016-03-01

    Given that appropriate control of responses of the body to nutritional status is assumed to modulate the pace of aging, thus prolonging lifespan and maintaining youth in humans, expectations are mounting worldwide for modalities targeting the pathways in metabolic regulation for healthy longevity. Of these, this review focuses attention on adiponectin-targeted therapy and discusses milestones in this approach, which include the discovery of the ability of adiponectin to protect against lifestyle-related diseases, identification of its receptors (AdipoRs), elucidation of AdipoR-mediated signaling pathways that promote healthy longevity and acquisition of small-molecule AdipoR agonist, and explores future prospects on adiponectin-targeted therapy.

  19. Identification of novel androgen receptor target genes in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jariwala, Unnati; Prescott, Jennifer; Jia, Li; Barski, Artem; Pregizer, Steve; Cogan, Jon P; Arasheben, Armin; Tilley, Wayne D; Scher, Howard I; Gerald, William L; Buchanan, Grant; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Frenkel, Baruch

    2007-01-01

    Background The androgen receptor (AR) plays critical roles in both androgen-dependent and castrate-resistant prostate cancer (PCa). However, little is known about AR target genes that mediate the receptor's roles in disease progression. Results Using Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) Display, we discovered 19 novel loci occupied by the AR in castrate resistant C4-2B PCa cells. Only four of the 19 AR-occupied regions were within 10-kb 5'-flanking regulatory sequences. Three were located up to 4-kb 3' of the nearest gene, eight were intragenic and four were in gene deserts. Whereas the AR occupied the same loci in C4-2B (castrate resistant) and LNCaP (androgen-dependent) PCa cells, differences between the two cell lines were observed in the response of nearby genes to androgens. Among the genes strongly stimulated by DHT in C4-2B cells – D-dopachrome tautomerase (DDT), Protein kinase C delta (PRKCD), Glutathione S- transferase theta 2 (GSTT2), Transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 3 (TRPV3), and Pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase 1 (PYCR1) – most were less strongly or hardly stimulated in LNCaP cells. Another AR target gene, ornithine aminotransferase (OAT), was AR-stimulated in a ligand-independent manner, since it was repressed by AR siRNA knockdown, but not stimulated by DHT. We also present evidence for in vivo AR-mediated regulation of several genes identified by ChIP Display. For example, PRKCD and PYCR1, which may contribute to PCa cell growth and survival, are expressed in PCa biopsies from primary tumors before and after ablation and in metastatic lesions in a manner consistent with AR-mediated stimulation. Conclusion AR genomic occupancy is similar between LNCaP and C4-2B cells and is not biased towards 5' gene flanking sequences. The AR transcriptionally regulates less than half the genes nearby AR-occupied regions, usually but not always, in a ligand-dependent manner. Most are stimulated and a few are repressed. In general, response is stronger in C4-2B compared to LNCaP cells. Some of the genes near AR-occupied regions appear to be regulated by the AR in vivo as evidenced by their expression levels in prostate cancer tumors of various stages. Several AR target genes discovered in the present study, for example PRKCD and PYCR1, may open avenues in PCa research and aid the development of new approaches for disease management. PMID:17553165

  20. Impact Factor? Shmimpact Factor!

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    The journal impact factor is a measure of the citability of articles published in that journal—the more citations generated, the more important that article is considered to be, and as a consequence the prestige of the journal is enhanced. The impact factor is not without controversy, and it can be manipulated. It no longer dominates the choices of journals to search for information. Online search engines, such as PubMed, can locate articles of interest in seconds across journals regardless of high or low impact factors. Editors desiring to increase their influence will need to focus on a fast and friendly submission and review process, early online and speedy print publication, and encourage the rapid turnaround of high-quality peer reviews. Authors desiring to have their results known to the world have never had it so good—the internet permits anyone with computer access to find the author's work. PMID:20806031

  1. Gelatin-based Hydrogel Degradation and Tissue Interaction in vivo: Insights from Multimodal Preclinical Imaging in Immunocompetent Nude Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tondera, Christoph; Hauser, Sandra; Krüger-Genge, Anne; Jung, Friedrich; Neffe, Axel T.; Lendlein, Andreas; Klopfleisch, Robert; Steinbach, Jörg; Neuber, Christin; Pietzsch, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogels based on gelatin have evolved as promising multifunctional biomaterials. Gelatin is crosslinked with lysine diisocyanate ethyl ester (LDI) and the molar ratio of gelatin and LDI in the starting material mixture determines elastic properties of the resulting hydrogel. In order to investigate the clinical potential of these biopolymers, hydrogels with different ratios of gelatin and diisocyanate (3-fold (G10_LNCO3) and 8-fold (G10_LNCO8) molar excess of isocyanate groups) were subcutaneously implanted in mice (uni- or bilateral implantation). Degradation and biomaterial-tissue-interaction were investigated in vivo (MRI, optical imaging, PET) and ex vivo (autoradiography, histology, serum analysis). Multimodal imaging revealed that the number of covalent net points correlates well with degradation time, which allows for targeted modification of hydrogels based on properties of the tissue to be replaced. Importantly, the degradation time was also dependent on the number of implants per animal. Despite local mechanisms of tissue remodeling no adverse tissue responses could be observed neither locally nor systemically. Finally, this preclinical investigation in immunocompetent mice clearly demonstrated a complete restoration of the original healthy tissue. PMID:27698944

  2. Gelatine-Based Antioxidant Packaging Containing Caesalpinia decapetala and Tara as a Coating for Ground Beef Patties.

    PubMed

    Gallego, María Gabriela; Gordon, Michael H; Segovia, Francisco; Almajano Pablos, María Pilar

    2016-03-31

    The development of antioxidant-active packaging has numerous advantages, such as the reduction of synthetic additives in food, the reduction of plastic waste and food protection against oxidation reactions. Different concentrations of extracts of the plants Caesalpinia decapetala (CD) and Caesalpinia spinosa "Tara" (CS) were incorporated into gelatine films as natural antioxidants. The physical, mechanical and antioxidant properties of these films were studied. Films containing plant extracts at a high concentration had lower tensile strength with higher elongation at break points, compared to the control film (p < 0.05). Films exhibited antioxidant activity in the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) and Trolox equivalence antioxidant capacity (TEAC) assays when added at 0.2%. The application of gelatine film containing CD and CS was found to be effective in delaying lipid oxidation and deterioration of beef patty quality during storage. Therefore, the films prepared in this study offered an alternative edible coating for the preservation of fresh food.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of bacterial cellulose and gelatin-based hydrogel composites for drug-delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Treesuppharat, W; Rojanapanthu, P; Siangsanoh, C; Manuspiya, H; Ummartyotin, S

    2017-09-01

    Bacterial cellulose and gelatin were successfully used to develop a hydrogel composite material. Hydrogel was synthesized by copolymerization between bacterial cellulose and gelatin. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images showed that the bacterial cellulose chain was uniform in size and shape. Glutaraldehyde was employed as a crosslinking agent. H-bonds were formed via the reaction between the amine and hydroxyl groups, which were the functional groups of the gelatin and bacterial cellulose, respectively. The hydrogel composite presented excellent properties in terms of its thermal stability, chemical resistance, and mechanical properties. Moreover, the swelling ratio of the hydrogel network, in water, was estimated to be 400-600%. Importantly, the hydrogel composite developed during this study is considered a good candidate for drug-delivery systems.

  4. A gelatin based antioxidant enriched biomaterial by grafting and saturation: towards sustained drug delivery from antioxidant matrix.

    PubMed

    Raja, I Selestin; Fathima, Nishter Nishad

    2015-04-01

    Proteins grafted with antioxidant molecules have drawn much attention due to their increased life time and biocompatibility. When protein macromolecules are cross linked chemically and physically with antioxidant molecules, they can act as antioxidant biomaterials as well as scaffolds to release the antioxidant molecules by diffusion. In our work, we have attempted to release catechin molecules from the matrix of glutathione grafted gelatin. Conjugation of glutathione and cross linkage was done by carbodiimide method to achieve smaller pores in the gelatin matrix and the characterization was performed by means of FTIR-ATR and calorimetric analyses. The glutathione grafted gelatin (GGSH) has been shown to have more thermal stability and pores with lesser radii than blank gelatin (bGEL). Free radical scavenging activity of GGSH was also found to be more than that of bGEL. Catechin was added to GGSH and bGEL by physical blending in order to achieve short term release of antioxidant molecules. CD spectra revealed that significant conformational changes occurred in secondary structure of gelatin upon interaction with catechin. Slower rate of catechin release from GGSH reflected the influence of cross linkage and physical interactive forces on the drug release properties. We conclude that the mixture of catechin with GGSH can be a potent antioxidant biomaterial releasing catechin at slower rate than the mixture of catechin with bGEL.

  5. Emulsion stability and properties of fish gelatin-based films as affected by palm oil and surfactants.

    PubMed

    Nilsuwan, Krisana; Benjakul, Soottawat; Prodpran, Thummanoon

    2016-05-01

    Gelatin films exhibit the poor water vapour barrier properties. The use of palm oil, which is abundant and available in Thailand, can be a means to lower water vapour migration. To disperse oil in film-forming dispersion (FFD), a surfactant along with appropriate homogenization is required. The study aimed to investigate the influence of palm oil level and surfactants in the absence or presence of glycerol on characteristics of FFD and resulting gelatin films. Similar oil droplet sizes, both d32 and d43 values, of FFD containing soy lecithin were observed, regardless of palm oil level used (P > 0.05). FFD with Tween-20 had larger droplet size as the levels of oil increased (P < 0.05). After 12 h storage, slight increases in d32 and d43 were noticeable in all FFD samples. When the films were determined, lower water vapour permeability (WVP) and tensile strength (TS) but higher elongation at break (EAB) were obtained as palm oil level increased (P < 0.05), regardless of glycerol and surfactant used. Films without glycerol had lower WVP and EAB with higher TS than those containing 300 g kg(-1) glycerol (P < 0.05). No differences in WVP and mechanical properties were found between films containing both surfactants (P > 0.05). FFD containing 500 or 750 g kg(-1) palm oil using soy lecithin as a surfactant in the presence of 300 g kg(-1) glycerol had the enhanced homogeneity and stability of oil droplets. The resulting gelatin film had the improved water vapour barrier properties. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Gelatine-Based Antioxidant Packaging Containing Caesalpinia decapetala and Tara as a Coating for Ground Beef Patties

    PubMed Central

    Gallego, María Gabriela; Gordon, Michael H.; Segovia, Francisco; Almajano Pablos, María Pilar

    2016-01-01

    The development of antioxidant-active packaging has numerous advantages, such as the reduction of synthetic additives in food, the reduction of plastic waste and food protection against oxidation reactions. Different concentrations of extracts of the plants Caesalpinia decapetala (CD) and Caesalpinia spinosa “Tara” (CS) were incorporated into gelatine films as natural antioxidants. The physical, mechanical and antioxidant properties of these films were studied. Films containing plant extracts at a high concentration had lower tensile strength with higher elongation at break points, compared to the control film (p < 0.05). Films exhibited antioxidant activity in the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) and Trolox equivalence antioxidant capacity (TEAC) assays when added at 0.2%. The application of gelatine film containing CD and CS was found to be effective in delaying lipid oxidation and deterioration of beef patty quality during storage. Therefore, the films prepared in this study offered an alternative edible coating for the preservation of fresh food. PMID:27043638

  7. Improving the stability of chitosan-gelatin-based hydrogels for cell delivery using transglutaminase and controlled release of doxycycline.

    PubMed

    Tormos, Christian J; Abraham, Carol; Madihally, Sundararajan V

    2015-12-01

    Although local cell delivery is an option to repair tissues, particularly using chitosan-based hydrogels, significant attrition of injected cells prior to engraftment has been a problem. To address this problem, we explored the possibility of stabilizing the chitosan-gelatin (CG) injectable hydrogels using (1) controlled release of doxycycline (DOX) to prevent premature degradation due to increased gelatinase activity (MMP-2 and MMP-9), and (2) transglutaminase (TG) to in situ cross-link gelatin to improve the mechanical stability. We prepared DOX-loaded PLGA nanoparticles, loaded into the CG hydrogels, measured DOX release for 5 days, and modeled using a single-compartmental assumption. Next, we assessed the influence of TG and DOX on hydrogel compression properties by incubating hydrogels for 7 days in PBS. We evaluated the effect of these changes on retention of fibroblasts and alterations in MMP-2/MMP-9 activity by seeding 500,000 fibroblasts for 5 days. These results showed that 90 % of DOX released from cross-linked CG hydrogels after 4 days, unlike CG hydrogels where 90 % of DOX was released within the first day. Addition of TG enhanced the CG hydrogel stability significantly. More than 60 % of seeded fibroblasts were recovered from the CG-TG hydrogels at day 5, unlike 40 % recovered from CG-hydrogels. Inhibition of MMP-2/MMP-9 were observed. In summary, controlled release of DOX from CG hydrogels cross-linked with TG shows a significant potential as a carrier for cell delivery.

  8. Preparation of gelatin based porous biocomposite for bone tissue engineering and evaluation of gamma irradiation effect on its properties.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Minhajul; Khan, Mubarak A; Rahman, Mohammed Mizanur

    2015-04-01

    Biodegradable porous hybrid polymer composites were prepared by using gelatin as base polymer matrix, β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) and calcium sulfate (CS) as cementing materials, chitosan as an antimicrobial agent, and glutaraldehyde and polyethylene glycol (PEG) as crosslinkers at different mass ratios. Thereafter, the composites were subjected to γ-radiation sterilization. The structure and properties of these composite scaffolds were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), mechanical properties testing (compressive, bending, tensile and impact), thermogravimetry/differential thermal analysis (TG/DTA), and physical stability test in simulated body fluid (SBF). We found that TCP rich composites showed enhanced mechanical properties among all the crosslinked composites. γ-Radiation sterilization triggered further cross linking in polymer matrix resulting a decrease in pore size of the composites and an increase in pore wall thickness with improved mechanical and thermal properties. The chemically crosslinked composite with 40% TCP followed by γ-radiation sterilization showed the smallest pore size distribution with a mean pore diameter of 159.22μm, which falls in the range of 100-350μm - known to be suitable for osteoconduction. Considering its improved mechanical and thermal properties along with osteoconduction ability without cytotoxicity, we propose this biocomposite as a viable candidate for bone tissue engineering.

  9. Improvement of endothelial progenitor outgrowth cell (EPOC)-mediated vascularization in gelatin-based hydrogels through pore size manipulation.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jiayin; Wiraja, Christian; Muhammad, Hamizan B; Xu, Chenjie; Wang, Dong-An

    2017-08-01

    In addition to chemical compositions, physical properties of scaffolds, such as pore size, can also influence vascularization within the scaffolds. A larger pore has been shown to improve host vascular tissue invasion into scaffolds. However, the influence of pore sizes on vascularization by endothelial cells directly encapsulated in hydrogels remains unknown. In this study, micro-cavitary hydrogels with different pore sizes were created in gelatin-methacrylate hydrogels with dissolvable gelatin microspheres (MS) varying in sizes. The effect of pore sizes on vascular network formation by endothelial progenitor outgrowth cells (EPOCs) encapsulated in hydrogels was then investigated both in vitro and in vivo. When cultured in vitro, vascular networks were formed around pore structures in micro-cavitary hydrogels. The middle pore size supported best differentiation of EPOCs and thus best hydrogel vascularization in vitro. When implantation in vivo, functional connections between encapsulated EPOCs and host vasculature micro-cavitary hydrogels were established. Vascularization in vivo was promoted best in hydrogels with the large pore size due to the increased vascular tissue invasion. These results highlight the difference between in vitro and in vivo culture conditions and indicate that pore sizes shall be designed for in vitro and in vivo hydrogel vascularization respectively. Pore sizes for hydrogel vascularization in vitro shall be middle ones and pore sizes for hydrogel vascularization in vivo shall be large ones. This study reveals that the optimal pore size for hydrogel vascularization in vitro and in vivo is different. The middle pore size supported best differentiation of EPOCs and thus best hydrogel vascularization in vitro, while vascularization in vivo was promoted best in hydrogels with the large pore size due to the increased vascular tissue invasion. These results highlight the difference between in vitro and in vivo culture conditions and indicate that pore sizes shall be designed for in vitro and in vivo hydrogel vascularization respectively. Pore sizes for hydrogel vascularization in vitro shall be middle ones and pore sizes for hydrogel vascularization in vivo shall be large ones. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Transfer factor.

    PubMed

    1998-01-01

    Transfer factor, a natural substance of the immune system, was discovered in 1949. More than 3,000 scientific articles have established it as an effective treatment for many diseases, usually those related to the immune system. In China, more than six million people have used transfer factor as a prophylaxis for hepatitis. Information on ordering articles on transfer factor, olive leaf extract, and coconut oil is included.

  11. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha, Kidney function and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Mehaffey, Eamonn; Majid, Dewan Syed Abdul

    2017-07-19

    Hypertension is considered to be a low-grade inflammatory condition characterized by the presence of various pro-inflammatory cytokines. The inflammatory cytokine Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNF-α) is a constituent of the pro-inflammatory environment that is associated with salt-sensitive hypertension (SSH) and related renal injury. Elevated angiotensin II (AngII) and other factors such as oxidative stress conditions promote TNF-α formation. Many recent studies have provided evidence that TNF-α exerts a direct renal action by regulating hemodynamic and excretory function in the kidney. The cytokine incites a strong natriuretic response and plays a part in regulation of the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system. The exact mechanistic role of TNF-α in the development of SSH is yet poorly understood. While TNF-α antagonism has been shown to attenuate hypertensive responses in many hypertensive animal models, contrasting findings demonstrate that the direct systemic administration of TNF-α usually induces hypotensive as well as natriuretic responses, indicating a counter-regulatory role of TNF-α in SSH. Differential activities of two cell surfaced receptors of TNF-α (receptor type 1 and type 2) may explain the contradictory functions of TNF-α in the setting of hypertension. This mini-review will evaluate ongoing research studies that investigate the action of TNF-α within the kidney and its role as an influential pathophysiologic variable in the development of SSH and renal injury. This information may help to develop specific TNF-α receptor targeting as an effective treatment strategy in this clinical condition. Copyright © 2016, American Journal of Physiology-Renal Physiology.

  12. A novel computational approach for the prediction of networked transcription factors of aryl hydrocarbon-receptor-regulated genes.

    PubMed

    Kel, Alexander; Reymann, Susanne; Matys, Volker; Nettesheim, Paul; Wingender, Edgar; Borlak, Jürgen

    2004-12-01

    A novel computational method based on a genetic algorithm was developed to study composite structure of promoters of coexpressed genes. Our method enabled an identification of combinations of multiple transcription factor binding sites regulating the concerted expression of genes. In this article, we study genes whose expression is regulated by a ligand-activated transcription factor, aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), that mediates responses to a variety of toxins. AhR-mediated change in expression of AhR target genes was measured by oligonucleotide microarrays and by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction in human and rat hepatocytes. Promoters and long-distance regulatory regions (>10 kb) of AhR-responsive genes were analyzed by the genetic algorithm and a variety of other computational methods. Rules were established on the local oligonucleotide context in the flanks of the AhR binding sites, on the occurrence of clusters of AhR recognition elements, and on the presence in the promoters of specific combinations of multiple binding sites for the transcription factors cooperating in the AhR regulatory network. Our rules were applied to search for yet unknown Ah-receptor target genes. Experimental evidence is presented to demonstrate high fidelity of this novel in silico approach.

  13. Receptor-targeted recombinant adenovirus conglomerates: a novel molecular conjugate vector with improved expression characteristics.

    PubMed Central

    Schwarzenberger, P; Hunt, J D; Robert, E; Theodossiou, C; Kolls, J K

    1997-01-01

    To develop improved strategies for gene transfer to hematopoietic cells, we have explored targeted gene transfer using molecular conjugate vectors (MCVs). MCVs are constructed by condensing plasmid DNA containing the gene of interest with polylysine (PL), PL linked to a replication-incompetent adenovirus (endosomolytic agent), and PL linked to streptavidin for targeting with biotinylated ligands. In this report, we compare gene transfer to K562 cells by using the previously described transferrin-targeted MCV (Trans-MCV) to a novel transferrin-targeted MCV. In the novel MCV, the transferred gene (luciferase) is in the genome of recombinant replication-incompetent adenovirus (recMCV), which also acts as the endosomolytic agent. The level of luciferase gene expression was fivefold higher in K562 cells transfected with Trans-recMCV than in cells transfected with Trans-MCV. Furthermore, targeted transfection with recMCV resulted in prolonged luciferase expression that declined 14 to 20 days after transfection, in comparison with Trans-MCV, where luciferase expression declined by 4 to 8 days. Moreover, targeted transfection of K562 cells with the Trans-recMCV resulted in persistent luciferase gene expression for 6 months. Analysis of luciferase gene expression in K562 single-cell clones that were subcloned 5 weeks after transfection with Trans-recMCV showed that 35 to 50% of the single-cell clones had intermediate to high levels of luciferase gene expression that was stable for 6 months, with the remaining clones showing low or no luciferase gene expression. Stable gene expression was associated with integration of adenovirus sequences into genomic DNA. PMID:9343214

  14. Folate Receptor-Targeted Multimodality Imaging of Ovarian Cancer in a Novel Syngeneic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A new transplantable ovarian tumor model is presented using a novel folate receptor (FR) positive, murine ovarian cancer cell line that emulates the human disease and induces widespread intraperitoneal (i.p.) tumors in immunocompetent mice within 4–8 weeks of implantation. Tumor development was monitored using a new positron emission tomography (PET) FR-targeting reporter with PET/computerized tomography (PET/CT) and fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) using a commercial FR-targeting reporter. Conventional structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was also performed. Adult female C57BL/6 mice were injected i.p. with 6 × 106 MKP-L FR+ cells. Imaging was performed weekly beginning 2 weeks after tumor induction. The albumin-binding, FR-targeting ligand cm09 was radiolabeled with the positron emitter 68Ga and used to image the tumors with a small animal PET/CT. The FR-reporter FolateRSense 680 (PerkinElmer) was used for FMT and flow cytometry. Preclinical MRI (7 T) without FR-targeting was compared with the PET and FMT molecular imaging. Tumors were visible by all three imaging modalities. PET/CT had the highest imaging sensitivity at 3–3.5 h postadministration (mean %IA/g mean > 6) and visualized tumors earlier than the other two modalities with lower kidney uptake (mean %IA/g mean < 17) than previously reported FR-targeting agents in late stage disease. FMT showed relatively low FR-targeted agent in the bladder and kidneys, but yielded the lowest anatomical image resolution. MRI produced the highest resolution images, but it was difficult to distinguish tumors from abdominal organs during early progression since a FR-targeting MRI reporter was not used. Nevertheless, there was good correlation of imaging biomarkers between the three modalities. Tumors in the mouse ovarian cancer model could be detected using FR-targeted imaging as early as 2 weeks post i.p. injection of tumor cells. An imaging protocol should combine one or more of the modalities, e.g., PET/CT or PET/MRI for optimal tumor detection and delineation from surrounding tissues. PMID:25536192

  15. The pre-clinical characterization of an alpha-emitting sigma-2 receptor targeted radiotherapeutic.

    PubMed

    Makvandi, Mehran; Lieberman, Brian P; LeGeyt, Ben; Hou, Catherine; Mankoff, David A; Mach, Robert H; Pryma, Daniel A

    2016-01-01

    The sigma-2 receptor is a protein with a Heme binding region and is capable of receptor-mediated endocytosis. It is overexpressed in many cancers making it a potential vector for therapeutic drug delivery. Our objective was to introduce an alpha-emitting radionuclide, astatine-211, into a selective sigma-2 ligand moiety to provide cytotoxic capabilities without adversely altering the pharmacological characteristics. In this study we investigated the in vitro/in vivo tumor targeting and estimated dosimetry of alpha-emitting sigma-2 ligand, 5-(astato-(211)At)-N-(4-(6,7-dimethoxy-3,4-dihydroisoquinolin-2(1H)-yl)butyl)-2,3-dimethoxybenzamide ((211)At-MM3), in a pre-clinical human breast cancer model. Astatine-211 was produced in a cyclotron and isolated by dry distillation. Radiosynthesis of (211)At-MM3 was performed using a tin precursor through radioastatodestannylation. In vitro sigma-2 binding experiments using (211)At-MM3 were carried out in live EMT6 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells and liver homogenate tissue. In vivo biodistribution experiments were performed using EMT6 mouse breast cancer cells in BALB/c female mice. Approximately 370 kBq of (211)At-MM3 was administered intravenously and at time points of 5 min, 1, 2, 4, 8, and 24 h organs/tissue were harvested. Estimated human dosimetry was extrapolated from biodistribution data using OLINDA/EXM (VU e-Innovations). Astatine-211 was successfully produced and isolated in quantities suitable for in vitro and small animal in vivo experiments. Radiosynthesis of (211)At-MM3 was reproducible with high radiochemical purity. Astatine-211-MM3 exhibited picomolar affinity to the sigma-2 receptor in contrast to the iodinated analog that had nanomolar affinity. Prolonged tumor targeting was measured through biodistribution studies with a maximal tumor to muscle ratio of 9.02 at 4h. Estimated human dosimetry revealed doses of up to 370 MBq in an adult female patient were below organ radiation limits with the potential to provide a high therapeutic dose to tumors. The sigma-2 receptor could serve as a suitable targeting platform for designing radiotherapeutics. (211)At-MM3 showed tumor targeting properties in vitro/in vivo and favorable estimated human dosimetry establishing the proof of concept for future development as a radiotherapeutic for the treatment of breast cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Cancer cell-selective promoter recognition accompanies antitumor effect by glucocorticoid receptor-targeted gold nanoparticle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sau, Samaresh; Agarwalla, Pritha; Mukherjee, Sudip; Bag, Indira; Sreedhar, Bojja; Pal-Bhadra, Manika; Patra, Chitta Ranjan; Banerjee, Rajkumar

    2014-05-01

    Nanoparticles, such as gold nanoparticles (GNP), upon convenient modifications perform multi tasks catering to many biomedical applications. However, GNP or any other type of nanoparticles is yet to achieve the feat of intracellular regulation of endogenous genes of choice such as through manipulation of a gene-promoter in a chromosome. As for gene modulation and delivery, GNP (or other nanoparticles) showed only limited gene therapy potential, which relied on the delivery of `exogenous' genes invoking gene knockdown or replacement. Practically, there are no instances for the nanoparticle-mediated promoter regulation of `endogenous' genes, more so, as a cancer selective phenomenon. In this regard, we report the development of a simple, easily modifiable GNP-formulation, which promoted/up-regulated the expression of a specific category of `endogenous' genes, the glucocorticoid responsive genes. This genetic up-regulation was induced in only cancer cells by modified GNP-mediated transcriptional activation of its cytoplasmic receptor, glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Normal cells and their GR remained primarily unperturbed by this GNP-formulation. The most potent gene up-regulating GNP-formulation down-regulated a cancer-specific proliferative signal, phospho-Akt in cancer cells, which accompanied retardation of tumor growth in the murine melanoma model. We show that GR-targeted GNPs may find potential use in the targeting and modulation of genetic information in cancer towards developing novel anticancer therapeutics.Nanoparticles, such as gold nanoparticles (GNP), upon convenient modifications perform multi tasks catering to many biomedical applications. However, GNP or any other type of nanoparticles is yet to achieve the feat of intracellular regulation of endogenous genes of choice such as through manipulation of a gene-promoter in a chromosome. As for gene modulation and delivery, GNP (or other nanoparticles) showed only limited gene therapy potential, which relied on the delivery of `exogenous' genes invoking gene knockdown or replacement. Practically, there are no instances for the nanoparticle-mediated promoter regulation of `endogenous' genes, more so, as a cancer selective phenomenon. In this regard, we report the development of a simple, easily modifiable GNP-formulation, which promoted/up-regulated the expression of a specific category of `endogenous' genes, the glucocorticoid responsive genes. This genetic up-regulation was induced in only cancer cells by modified GNP-mediated transcriptional activation of its cytoplasmic receptor, glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Normal cells and their GR remained primarily unperturbed by this GNP-formulation. The most potent gene up-regulating GNP-formulation down-regulated a cancer-specific proliferative signal, phospho-Akt in cancer cells, which accompanied retardation of tumor growth in the murine melanoma model. We show that GR-targeted GNPs may find potential use in the targeting and modulation of genetic information in cancer towards developing novel anticancer therapeutics. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr00974f

  17. Towards improved receptor targeting: anterograde transport, internalization and postendocytic trafficking of neuropeptide Y receptors.

    PubMed

    Babilon, Stefanie; Mörl, Karin; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G

    2013-08-01

    The neuropeptide Y system is known to be involved in the regulation of many central physiological and pathophysiological processes, such as energy homeostasis, obesity, cancer, mood disorders and epilepsy. Four Y receptor subtypes have been cloned from human tissue (hY1, hY2, hY4 and hY5) that form a multiligand/multireceptor system together with their three peptidic agonists (NPY, PYY and PP). Addressing this system for medical application requires on the one hand detailed information about the receptor-ligand interaction to design subtype-selective compounds. On the other hand comprehensive knowledge about alternative receptor signaling, as well as desensitization, localization and downregulation is crucial to circumvent the development of undesired side-effects and drug resistance. By bringing such knowledge together, highly potent and long-lasting drugs with minimized side-effects can be engineered. Here, current knowledge about Y receptor export, internalization, recycling, and degradation is summarized, with a focus on the human Y receptor subtypes, and is discussed in terms of its impact on therapeutic application.

  18. Dual pH-responsive and CD44 receptor targeted multifunctional nanoparticles for anticancer intracellular delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Daquan; Sun, Jingfang; Lian, Shengnan; Liu, Zongliang; Sun, Kaoxiang; Liu, Wanhui; Wu, Zimei; Zhang, Qiang

    2014-11-01

    In this article, we prepared a multifunctional oligosaccharides of hyaluronan (oHA) conjugates, oHA-histidine-menthone 1,2-glycerol ketal (oHM). The oHM conjugates possess pH-sensitive menthone 1,2-glycerol ketal (MGK) as hydrophobic moieties and oHA as the target of CD44 receptor. The polymeric mPEG-Chitosan-Ketal (PCK) carrying pH-sensitive ketal group as hydrophobic moieties and PEG group as hydrophilic moieties were synthesized. The two pH-sensitive ketal derivatives were employed to fabricate nanoparticles for anti-tumor drug delivery. The oHM-PCK nanoparticles (oHPN) can spontaneously self-assemble into mixed micellar structure with nano-sized spherical shape of 100-200 nm at pH 7.4 PBS conditions. The oHPN could release encapsulated curcumin with 92.6 % at pH 5.0 compared with 55.3 % at pH 7.4. The results of cytotoxicity assay indicated that encapsulated curcumin in oHPN (Cur-oHPN) have less toxicity compared to curcumin suspension. The anti-tumor efficacy in vivo suggested that Cur-oHPN suppressed tumor growth most efficiently. These results present the promising potential of oHPN as an effective nano-sized pH-sensitive drug delivery system for intracellular delivery.

  19. Low-Dose Radiation Potentiates the Therapeutic Efficacy of Folate Receptor-Targeted Hapten Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sega, Emanuela I.; Lu Yingjuan; Ringor, Michael; Leamon, Christopher P.; Low, Philip S.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: Human cancers frequently overexpress a high-affinity cell-surface receptor for the vitamin folic acid. Highly immunogenic haptens can be targeted to folate receptor-expressing cell surfaces by administration of folate-hapten conjugates, rendering the decorated tumor cell surfaces more recognizable by the immune system. Treatment of antihapten-immunized mice with folate-hapten constructs results in elimination of moderately sized tumors by the immune system. However, when subcutaneous tumors exceed 300 mm{sup 3} before initiation of therapy, antitumor activity is significantly decreased. In an effort to enhance the efficacy of folate-targeted hapten immunotherapy (FTHI) against large tumors, we explored the combination of targeted hapten immunotherapy with low-dose radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Mice bearing 300-mm{sup 3} subcutaneous tumors were treated concurrently with FTHI (500 nmol/kg of folate conjugated to fluorescein isothiocyanate, 20,000 U/dose of interleukin 2, and 25,000 U/dose of interferon {alpha}) and low-dose radiotherapy (3 Gy/dose focused directly on the desired tumor mass). The efficacy of therapy was evaluated by measuring tumor volume. Results: Tumor growth analyses show that radiotherapy synergizes with FTHI in antihapten-immunized mice, thereby allowing for cures of animals bearing tumors greater than 300 mm{sup 3}. More importantly, nonirradiated distal tumor masses in animals containing locally irradiated tumors also showed improved response to hapten immunotherapy, suggesting that not all tumor lesions must be identified and irradiated to benefit from the combination therapy. Conclusions: These results suggest that simultaneous treatment with FTHI and radiation therapy can enhance systemic antitumor activity in tumor-bearing mice.

  20. Comparison of Folate Receptor Targeted Optical Contrast Agents for Intraoperative Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    De Jesus, Elizabeth; Keating, Jane J.; Kularatne, Sumith A.; Jiang, Jack; Judy, Ryan; Predina, Jarrod; Nie, Shuming; Low, Philip; Singhal, Sunil

    2015-01-01

    Background. Intraoperative imaging can identify cancer cells in order to improve resection; thus fluorescent contrast agents have emerged. Our objective was to do a preclinical comparison of two fluorescent dyes, EC17 and OTL38, which both target folate receptor but have different fluorochromes. Materials. HeLa and KB cells lines were used for in vitro and in vivo comparisons of EC17 and OTL38 brightness, sensitivity, pharmacokinetics, and biodistribution. In vivo experiments were then performed in mice. Results. The peak excitation and emission wavelengths of EC17 and OTL38 were 470/520 nm and 774/794 nm, respectively. In vitro, OTL38 required increased incubation time compared to EC17 for maximum fluorescence; however, peak signal-to-background ratio (SBR) was 1.4-fold higher compared to EC17 within 60 minutes (p < 0.001). Additionally, the SBR for detecting smaller quantity of cells was improved with OTL38. In vivo, the mean improvement in SBR of tumors visualized using OTL38 compared to EC17 was 3.3 fold (range 1.48–5.43). Neither dye caused noticeable toxicity in animal studies. Conclusions. In preclinical testing, OTL38 appears to have superior sensitivity and brightness compared to EC17. This coincides with the accepted belief that near infrared (NIR) dyes tend to have less autofluorescence and scattering issues than visible wavelength fluorochromes. PMID:26491562

  1. Fc receptor targeting in the treatment of allergy, autoimmune diseases and cancer.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Akira; Kubo, Tomohiro; Takai, Toshiyuki

    2008-01-01

    Fc receptors (FcRs) play an important role in the maintenance of an adequate activation threshold of various cells in antibody-mediated immune responses. Analyses of murine models show that the inhibitory FcR, FcyRIIB plays a pivotal role in the suppression of antibody-mediated allergy and autoimmunity. On the other hand, the activating-type FcRs are essential for the development of these diseases, suggesting that regulation of inhibitory or activating FcR is an ideal target for a therapeutic agent. Recent experimental or clinical studies also indicate that FcRs function as key receptors in the treatment with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) therapy. This review summarizes FcR functions and highlights possible FcR-targeting therapies including mAb therapies for allergy, autoimmune diseases and cancer.

  2. Fc receptor targeting in the treatment of allergy, autoimmune diseases and cancer.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Akira; Akiyama, Kenichi; Takai, Toshiyuki

    2005-02-01

    Immune activation and inhibitory receptors play an important role in the maintenance of an adequate activation threshold of various cells in our immune system. Analyses of murine models show that the inhibitory Fcreceptor, FcgammaRIIB plays an indispensable role in the suppression of anti-body-mediated allergy and autoimmunity. In contrast, the activating-type Fcreceptors (FcRs) are essential for the development of these diseases, suggesting that regulation of inhibitory or activating FcR is an ideal target as a therapeutic agent. In addition, recent crystal structural analyses of FcR-Ig-Fc fragment complexes provide an effective approach for developing FcR-targeting drugs. This review summarises recent advances of FcR, which were mainly obtained by murine studies, and highlights novel antibodies as possible FcR-targeting therapies for allergy, autoimmune diseases and cancer.

  3. Emerging Peripheral Receptor Targets for Deep-tissue Craniofacial Pain Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Ambalavanar, R.; Dessem, D.

    2009-01-01

    While effective therapies are available for some types of craniofacial pain, treatments for deep-tissue craniofacial pain such as temporomandibular disorders are less efficacious. Several ion channels and receptors which are prominent in craniofacial nociceptive mechanisms have been identified on trigeminal primary afferent neurons. Many of these receptors and channels exhibit unusual distributions compared with extracranial regions. For example, expression of the ATP receptor P2X3 is strongly implicated in nociception and is more abundant on trigeminal primary afferent neurons than analogous extracranial neurons, making them potentially productive targets specifically for craniofacial pain therapies. The initial part of this review therefore focuses on P2X3 as a potential therapeutic target to treat deep-tissue craniofacial pain. In the trigeminal ganglion, P2X3 receptors are often co-expressed with the nociceptive neuropeptides CGRP and SP. Therefore, we discuss the role of CGRP and SP in deep-tissue craniofacial pain and suggest that neuropeptide antagonists, which have shown promise for the treatment of migraine, may have wider therapeutic potential, including the treatment of deep-tissue craniofacial pain. P2X3, TRPV1, and ASIC3 are often co-expressed in trigeminal neurons, implying the formation of functional complexes that allow craniofacial nociceptive neurons to respond synergistically to altered ATP and pH in pain. Future therapeutics for craniofacial pain thus might be more efficacious if targeted at combinations of P2X3, CGRP, TRPV1, and ASIC3. PMID:19329451

  4. Data for stable formulation of steroid hormone receptor-targeted liposomes for cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Priyanka; Banerjee, Rajkumar; Narayan, Kumar Pranav

    2016-06-01

    A detailed description of steroid hormone ligand containing liposomes and their stability has been given. Liposomes were complexed with β-gal DNA and used to transfect cancer and non-cancer cells. The stability of the liposomes and lipoplexes were analysed using dynamic light scattering and DNA-binding gel images. The formulations were used to assess the delivery of anticancer gene, p53 in cancer cells. The dataset consists of DNA-binding gel images, transfection, cytotoxicity and reverse transcriptase PCR images.

  5. Fluorescence microscopy studies of a peripheral-benzodiazepine-receptor-targeted molecular probe for brain tumor imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcu, Laura; Vernier, P. Thomas; Manning, H. Charles; Salemi, Sarah; Li, Aimin; Craft, Cheryl M.; Gundersen, Martin A.; Bornhop, Darryl J.

    2003-10-01

    This study investigates the potential of a new multi-modal lanthanide chelate complex for specifically targeting brain tumor cells. We report here results from ongoing studies of up-take, sub-cellular localization and binding specificity of this new molecular imaging probe. Fluorescence microscopy investigations in living rat C6 glioma tumor cells demonstrate that the new imaging agent has affinity for glioma cells and binds to mitochondria.

  6. A Modular Dual Labeling Scaffold That Retains Agonistic Properties for Somatostatin Receptor Targeting.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sukhen C; Rodriguez, Melissa; Carmon, Kendra S; Voss, Julie; Wilganowski, Nathaniel L; Schonbrunn, Agnes; Azhdarinia, Ali

    2017-06-01

    Fluorescence-guided surgery is an emerging imaging technique that can enhance the ability of surgeons to detect tumors when compared with visual observation. To facilitate characterization, fluorescently labeled probes have been dual-labeled with a radionuclide to enable cross-validation with nuclear imaging. In this study, we selected the somatostatin receptor (SSTR) imaging agent, DOTA-Phe1-Tyr3-octreotide (DOTA-TOC), as the foundation for developing a dual-labeled analog. We hypothesized that a customized dual labeling approach with a multimodality chelation (MMC) scaffold would minimize steric effects of dye conjugation and retain agonist properties. Methods: An MMC-conjugate (MMC-TOC) was synthesized on solid-phase and compared to an analog prepared using conventional methods (DA-TOC). Both analogs were conjugated to IRDye 800 using copper-free click chemistry. The resulting compounds, MMC(IR800)-TOC and DA(IR800)-TOC, were labeled with Cu and (64)Cu and tested in vitro in SSTR subtype-2 (SSTR2)-overexpressing HEK-293 cells to assess agonist properties, and in AR42J rat pancreatic cancer cells to determine receptor binding characteristics. Multimodality imaging was performed in AR42J xenografts. Results: Cu-MMC(IR800)-TOC demonstrated higher potency for cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) inhibition (EC50: 0.21±0.05 vs. 1.38±0.22 nM) and receptor internalization (EC50: 41.8±17.2 vs. 455±172 nM) compared to Cu-DA(IR800)-TOC. Radioactive uptake studies showed that blocking with octreotide caused a dose-dependent reduction in (64)Cu-MMC(IR800)-TOC uptake while (64)Cu-DA(IR800)-TOC was not affected. In vivo studies revealed higher tumor uptake for (64)Cu-MMC(IR800)-TOC compared to (64)Cu-DA(IR800)-TOC (5.2±0.2 vs. 3.6±0.4 %ID/g). In vivo blocking studies with octreotide reduced tumor uptake of (64)Cu-MMC(IR800)-TOC by 66%. Excretion of (64)Cu-MMC(IR800)-TOC was primarily through the liver and spleen whereas (64)Cu-DA(IR800)-TOC was cleared through the kidneys. Ex vivo analysis at 24 h confirmed Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography (PET/CT) data by showing near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) signal in tumors and a tumor-to-muscle ratio of 5.3±0.8 as determined by gamma counting. Conclusion: The findings demonstrate that drug design affected receptor pharmacology and suggest that the MMC scaffold is a useful tool for the development of dual-labeled imaging agents. Copyright © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  7. A low molecular weight folate receptor targeted contrast agent for magnetic resonance tumor imaging.

    PubMed

    Kalber, Tammy L; Kamaly, Nazila; So, Po-Wah; Pugh, John A; Bunch, Josephine; McLeod, Cameron W; Jorgensen, Michael R; Miller, Andrew D; Bell, Jimmy D

    2011-08-01

    This study aims to develop a low molecular weight folate receptor (FR) contrast agent for MR tumor imaging. Gadolinium-tetraazacyclododecane tetraacetic acid (Gd.DOTA) was conjugated to folic acid to create Gd.DOTA.Folate. The efficacy of Gd.DOTA.Folate to bind FR was evaluated in vitro by inductively coupled mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and in vivo by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tumor enhancement over 14 h, utilizing an overexpressing α-FR cell line (IGROV-1), compared to an α-FR-negative cell line (OVCAR-3). Gd.DOTA.Folate localization ex vivo was verified by laser ablation ICP-MS. ICP-MS confirmed Gd.DOTA.Folate uptake by IGROV-1 cells and competitive binding with free folic acid inhibited binding. IGROV-1 tumors showed an increase in R (1) at 2 h, which increased significantly over 14 h post-Gd.DOTA.Folate with clear enhancement on MR images. This was not observed in controls. These data support the use of FR-targeted small molecular weight MRI contrast agents for tumor imaging in vivo.

  8. Boron-containing folate receptor-targeted liposomes as potential delivery agents for neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xing Q; Wang, Huaqing; Shukla, Supriya; Sekido, Masaru; Adams, Dianne M; Tjarks, Werner; Barth, Rolf F; Lee, Robert J

    2002-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) depends on the selective delivery of a sufficient number of (10)B atoms to tumor cells to sustain a lethal (10)B(n,alpha)(7)Li reaction. Expression of FR frequently is amplified among human tumors. The goal of the present study was to investigate folate receptor (FR)-targeted liposomes as potential carriers for a series of boron-containing agents. Two highly ionized boron compounds, Na(2)[B(12)H(11)SH] and Na(3) (B(20)H(17)NH(3)), were incorporated into liposomes by passive loading with encapsulation efficiencies of 6% and 15%, respectively. In addition, five weakly basic boronated polyamines were investigated. Two were the spermidine derivatives: N(5)-(4-carboranylbutyl)spermidine.3HCl (SPD-5), N(5)-[4-(2-aminoethyl-o-carboranyl)butyl]spermidine.4HCl (ASPD-5). Three were the spermine derivatives: N(5)-(4-carboranylbutyl)spermine.4HCl (SPM-5), N(5)-[4-(2-aminoethyl-o-carboranyl)butyl]spermine.5HCl (ASPM-5), and N(5),N(10)-bis(4-carboranylbutyl)spermine.4 HCl (SPM-5,10). These were incorporated into liposomes by a pH-gradient-driven remote-loading method with varying loading efficiencies, which were influenced by the specific trapping agent and the structure of the boron compound. Greater loading efficiencies were obtained with lower molecular weight boron derivatives, using ammonium sulfate as the trapping agent, compared to those obtained with sodium citrate. The in vitro uptake of folate-derivatized, boronated liposomes was investigated using human KB squamous epithelial cancer cells, which have amplified FR expression. Higher cellular boron uptake (up to 1584 microg per 10(9) cells) was observed with FR-targeted liposomes than with nontargeted control liposomes (up to 154 microg per 10(9) cells), irrespective of the chemical form of the boron and the method used for liposomal preparation. KB cell binding of the FR-targeted liposomes was saturable and could be blocked by 1 mM free folic acid. Our findings suggest that further evaluation of FR-targeted liposomes is warranted to assess their potential as boron carriers for neutron capture therapy.

  9. Theranostic Nanoparticles Loaded with Imaging Probes and Rubrocurcumin for Combined Cancer Therapy by Folate Receptor Targeting.

    PubMed

    Alberti, Diego; Protti, Nicoletta; Franck, Morgane; Stefania, Rachele; Bortolussi, Silva; Altieri, Saverio; Deagostino, Annamaria; Aime, Silvio; Geninatti Crich, Simonetta

    2017-04-06

    The combination of different therapeutic modalities is a promising option to combat the recurrence of tumors. In this study, polylactic and polyglycolic acid nanoparticles were used for the simultaneous delivery of a boron-curcumin complex (RbCur) and an amphiphilic gadolinium complex into tumor cells with the aim of performing boron and gadolinium neutron capture therapy (NCT) in conjunction with the additional antiproliferative effects of curcumin. Furthermore, the use of Gd complexes allows magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) assessment of the amount of B and Gd internalized by tumor cells. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles were targeted to ovarian cancer (IGROV-1) cells through folate receptors, by including in the formulation a PEGylated phospholipid functionalized with the folate moiety. NCT was performed on IGROV-1 cells internalizing 6.4 and 78.6 μg g(-1) of (10) B and (157) Gd, respectively. The synergic action of neutron treatment and curcumin cytotoxicity was shown to result in a significant therapeutic improvement. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Antitumor activity of a folate receptor-targeted immunoglobulin G-doxorubicin conjugate

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tan; Xu, Ling; Li, Bin; Li, Weijie; Ma, Xiang; Fan, Lingling; Lee, Robert J; Xu, Chuanrui; Xiang, Guangya

    2017-01-01

    Development of antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) is a promising therapeutic strategy for cancer therapy. In this study, folate was conjugated via a polyethyleneglycol (PEG) linker to immunoglobulin G (IgG), which was linked to doxorubicin (DOX), to form a novel ADC folate-PEG-IgG-DOX (FA-PEG-IgG-DOX). The FA-PEG-IgG-DOX showed high targeting efficiency in HeLa and KB cells and significantly improved the uptake and retention of DOX compared with IgG-DOX about 10-fold. Subsequently, FA-PEG-IgG-DOX was shown to have at least 8 times higher antitumor activity than IgG-DOX both in HeLa and KB cells and also induced more apoptosis in those cells than IgG-DOX. Moreover, FA-PEG-IgG-DOX had a 2 times longer circulating time than FA-IgG-DOX, but did not increase the DOX distribution in mouse hearts. Importantly, FA-PEG-IgG-DOX treatment significantly inhibited tumor growth in xenograft mice. Together, our results indicate that FA-PEG-IgG is an effective ADC carrier for delivery of chemotherapeutic agents and that conjugating tumor targeting ligands to antibodies is a promising strategy for producing ADC drugs. PMID:28408821

  11. Toll-like receptors targeting technology for the treatment of lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Batool, Maria; Anwar, Muhammad Ayaz; Choi, Sangdun

    2016-11-01

    The crucial role of Toll-like Receptors (TLRs) in innate and adaptive immune systems is well discussed in the literature. In cancer, TLRs act as a double-edged sword that can promote or suppress tumor growth. Areas covered: In this article, the authors uncover the potential role of TLRs in lymphomas, which are cancers related to the lymphatic system and blood cells. TLRs are de facto inflammation-inducing receptors that can either worsen disease or ameliorate lymphoma treatment. From this perspective, the usage of TLRs to modulate the immune system toward lymphoma regression is desirable. Various strategies have been used so far, and novel ways are being sought out to cure lymphoma. Expert opinion: TLR ligands have successfully been used to improve patient health; however, these receptors must be finely tuned to further optimize therapy. For a better outcome, novel specific ligands, improved pharmacodynamics, and unique targets should be discerned. Ligands with conjugated molecules, nanoparticles, and targeted drug delivery can highly optimize the therapy for lymphoma with various etiologies.

  12. Refinement of adsorptive coatings for fluorescent riboflavin-receptor-targeted iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tsvetkova, Yoanna; Beztsinna, Nataliia; Jayapaul, Jabadurai; Weiler, Marek; Arns, Susanne; Shi, Yang; Lammers, Twan; Kiessling, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    Flavin mononucleotide (FMN) is a riboflavin derivative that can be exploited to target the riboflavin transporters (RFTs) and the riboflavin carrier protein (RCP) in cells with high metabolic activity. In this study we present the synthesis of different FMN-coated ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (USPIOs) and their efficiency as targeting contrast agents. Since FMN alone cannot stabilize the nanoparticles, we used adenosine phosphates--AMP, ADP and ATP--as spacers to obtain colloidally stable nanoparticles. Nucleotides with di- and triphosphate groups were intended to increase the USPIO charge and thus improve zeta potential and stability. However, all nanoparticles formed negatively charged clusters with similar properties in terms of zeta potential (-28 ± 2 mV), relaxivity (228-259 mM(-1) s(-1) at 3 T) and hydrodynamic radius (53-85 nm). Molecules with a higher number of phosphate groups, such as ADP and ATP, have a higher adsorption affinity towards iron oxide, which, instead of providing more charge, led to partial desorption and replacement of FMN. Hence, we obtained USPIOs carrying different amounts of targeting agent, which significantly influenced the nanoparticles' uptake. The nanoparticles' uptake by different cancer cells and HUVECs was evaluated photometrically and with MR relaxometry, showing that the cellular uptake of the USPIOs increases with the FMN amount on their surface. Thus, for USPIOs targeted with riboflavin derivatives the use of spacers with increasing numbers of phosphate groups does not improve either zeta potential or the particles' stability, but rather detaches the targeting moieties from their surface, leading to lower cellular uptake.

  13. A folate receptor-targeted lipoplex delivering interleukin-15 gene for colon cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiao; Luo, Min; Wei, Xia-Wei; Ma, Cui-Cui; Yang, Yu-Han; Shao, Bin; Liu, Yan-Tong; Liu, Ting; Ren, Jun; Liu, Li; He, Zhi-Yao; Wei, Yu-Quan

    2016-08-09

    Interleukin-15 has been implicated as a promising cytokine for cancer immunotherapy, while folate receptor α (FRα) has been shown to be a potentially useful target for colon cancer therapy. Herein, we developed F-PLP/pIL15, a FRα-targeted lipoplex loading recombinant interleukin-15 plasmid (pIL15) and studied its antitumor effects in vivo using a CT26 colon cancer mouse model. Compared with control (normal saline) treatment, F-PLP/pIL15 significantly suppressed tumor growth in regard to tumor weight (P < 0.001) and reduced tumor nodule formation (P < 0.001). Moreover, when compared to other lipoplex-treated mice, F-PLP/pIL15-treated mice showed higher levels of IL15 secreted in the serum (P < 0.001) and ascites (P < 0.01). These results suggested that the targeted delivery of IL15 gene might be associated with its in vivo antitumor effects, which include inducing tumor cell apoptosis, inhibiting tumor proliferation and promoting the activation of immune cells such as T cells and natural killer cells. Furthermore, hematoxylin and eosin staining of vital organs following F-PLP/pIL15 treatment showed no detectable toxicity, thus indicating that intraperitoneal administration may be a viable route of delivery. Overall, these results suggest that F-PLP/pIL15 may serve as a potential targeting preparation for colon cancer therapy.

  14. Importance of receptor-targeted systems in the battle against atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Rosas, Elisabet; Sobenin, Igor; Orekhov, Alexander; Edelman, Elazer R; Balcells, Mercedes

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of death in the Western World and has been for decades a field of intense research. Yet, while there is a rich and diverse literature describing in detail the players and mechanisms involved in this complex disease in cell and animal models, we remain today with virtually no reliable markers for early diagnosis and targeted treatments options. This review is centered upon the latter. We summarize the latest studies focused on detecting endothelial dysfunction during the early stages of atherosclerosis, when the disease is asymptomatic and describe strategies recently proposed to image and target advanced plaque.

  15. Cholesterol anchored arabinogalactan for asialoglycoprotein receptor targeting: synthesis, characterization, and proof of concept of hepatospecific delivery.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Pankaj Omprakash; Nagarsenker, Mangal Shailesh; Barhate, Chandrashekhar Rishikant; Padhye, Sameer Govind; Dhawan, Vivek Vijay; Bhattacharyya, Dibyendu; Viswanathan, C L; Steiniger, Frank; Fahr, Alfred

    2015-05-18

    Asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGPR) are hepatocyte bound receptors, which exhibit receptor mediated endocytosis (RME) for galactose specific moieties. Arabinogalactan (AG), a liver specific high galactose containing branched polysaccharide was hydrophobized using cholesterol (CHOL) as a lipid anchor via a two step reaction process to yield the novel polysaccharide lipid conjugated ligand (CHOL-AL-AG). CHOL-AL-AG was characterized by Fourier transform infra red (FTIR) spectroscopy, (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic spectroscopy (NMR), size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Conventional liposomes (CL) and surface modified liposomes (SML) containing CHOL-AL-AG were prepared using reverse phase evaporation technique. Effect of CHOL-AL-AG concentration on particle size and zeta potential of SML was evaluated. Surface morphology of CL and SML was studied using cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM). In vitro binding affinity of SML and CL was evaluated using Ricinus communis agglutinin (RCA) assay. Cellular uptake of SML and CL was determined on ASGPR expressing HepG2 cell lines by confocal laser scanning microscopy technique (CLSM). FTIR spectra revealed bands at 1736 cm(-1) and 1664 cm(-1) corresponding to ester and carbamate functional groups, respectively. Signals at δ 0.5-2.5 corresponding to the cholestene ring and δ 3-5.5 corresponding to the carbohydrate backbone were observed in (1)H NMR spectrum of the product. CHOL-AL-AG possessed a mean average molecular weight of 27 KDa as determined by size exclusion chromatography. An endothermic peak at 207 °C was observed in the DSC thermogram of CHOL-AL-AG, which was not observed in thermograms of reactants and intermediate product. Synthesized CHOL-AL-AG was successfully incorporated in liposomes to yield SML. Both CL and SML possessed a mean particle size of ∼ 200 nm with polydispersity index of ∼ 0.25. The zeta potential of CLs was observed to be -17 mV whereas zeta potential of SMLs varied from -18 to -22 mV. RCA assay revealed enhanced binding of SML compared to CL confirming presence of galactose on surface of SML. CLSM studies demonstrated enhanced cellular uptake of SMLs compared to CL by HepG2 cells post 3 h administration indicating enhanced uptake by the ASGPR. Thus surface modified liposomes specific to target heptocytes demonstrate a promising approach for targeted drug delivery in liver cancer therapeutics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Emerging peripheral receptor targets for deep-tissue craniofacial pain therapies.

    PubMed

    Ambalavanar, R; Dessem, D

    2009-03-01

    While effective therapies are available for some types of craniofacial pain, treatments for deep-tissue craniofacial pain such as temporomandibular disorders are less efficacious. Several ion channels and receptors which are prominent in craniofacial nociceptive mechanisms have been identified on trigeminal primary afferent neurons. Many of these receptors and channels exhibit unusual distributions compared with extracranial regions. For example, expression of the ATP receptor P2X(3) is strongly implicated in nociception and is more abundant on trigeminal primary afferent neurons than analogous extracranial neurons, making them potentially productive targets specifically for craniofacial pain therapies. The initial part of this review therefore focuses on P2X(3) as a potential therapeutic target to treat deep-tissue craniofacial pain. In the trigeminal ganglion, P2X(3) receptors are often co-expressed with the nociceptive neuropeptides CGRP and SP. Therefore, we discuss the role of CGRP and SP in deep-tissue craniofacial pain and suggest that neuropeptide antagonists, which have shown promise for the treatment of migraine, may have wider therapeutic potential, including the treatment of deep-tissue craniofacial pain. P2X(3), TRPV1, and ASIC3 are often co-expressed in trigeminal neurons, implying the formation of functional complexes that allow craniofacial nociceptive neurons to respond synergistically to altered ATP and pH in pain. Future therapeutics for craniofacial pain thus might be more efficacious if targeted at combinations of P2X(3), CGRP, TRPV1, and ASIC3.

  17. Differential receptor targeting of liver cells using 99mTc-neoglycosylated human serum albumins.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sungeun; Jeong, Jae Min; Hong, Mee Kyung; Jang, Ja-June; Lee, Jaetae; Lee, Dong Soo; Chung, June-Key; Lee, Myung Chul

    2008-01-01

    Neolactosyl human serum albumin (LSA) targets asialoglycoprotein receptor and shows high liver uptake due to accumulation in hepatocytes. Although neomannosyl human serum albumin (MSA) also shows high liver uptake, it has been reported to be taken up by Kupffer cells and endothelial cells. We compared the biological properties of LSA and MSA. 99mTc-LSA and 99mTc-MSA biodistribution in mice were investigated after intravenous injection. In vivo localization of rhodaminisothiocyanate (RITC)-LSA and fluoresceineisothiocyanate (FITC)-MSA were investigated in mouse liver. Excretion routes of 99mTc-LSA and 99mTc-MSA metabolites were examined. Both 99mTc-LSA and 99mTc-MSA showed high liver uptakes. RITC-LSA was taken up by hepatocytes whereas FITC-MSA was taken up by Kupffer cells and endothelial cells. 99mTc-MSA showed higher spleen and kidney uptakes than 99mTc-LSA. 99mTc-LSA metabolites excreted in urine and feces accounted for 44.4 and 50.0% of 99mTc-LSA injected, respectively, while 99mTc-MSA metabolites accounted for 51.5 and 10.3%, respectively. In conclusion, LSA is specifically taken up by hepatcytes while MSA by Kupffer cells and endothelial cells. After taken up by the liver, LSA is metabolized by the hepatocytes and then excreted through both the hepatobiliary tract and kidney, whereas MSA is metabolized by Kupffer cells and endoghelial cells and then excreted mainly through the kidney.

  18. Receptor-targeting mechanisms of pain-causing toxins: How ow?

    PubMed Central

    Bohlen, Christopher J.; Julius, David

    2012-01-01

    Venoms often target vital processes to cause paralysis or death, but many types of venom also elicit notoriously intense pain. While these pain-producing effects can result as a byproduct of generalized tissue trauma, there are now multiple examples of venom-derived toxins that target somatosensory nerve terminals in order to activate nociceptive (pain-sensing) neural pathways. Intriguingly, investigation of the venom components that are responsible for evoking pain has revealed novel roles and/or configurations of well-studied toxin motifs. This review serves to highlight pain-producing toxins that target the capsaicin receptor, TRPV1, or members of the acid-sensing ion channel family, and to discuss the utility of venom-derived multivalent and multimeric complexes. PMID:22538196

  19. Tc-99m Labeled and VIP-Receptor Targeted Liposomes for Effective Imaging of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    computer. The images (100,000 counts/image) were acquired and stored in a 512X512 matrix. Image Analysis : The Odyssey software program was used to...as well as between normal and tumor- were calculated. Statistical analysis was performed bearing rats for each of the formulations using using...large signal-to-noise ratio, thereby rendering data analysis impractical. Moreover, -helicity of VIP associated with SSM is potentiated in the presence

  20. Transferrin receptor-targeted theranostic gold nanoparticles for photosensitizer delivery in brain tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, Suraj; Novak, Thomas; Miller, Kayla; Zhu, Yun; Kenney, Malcolm E.; Broome, Ann-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is not only inefficient, but also nonspecific to brain stroma. These are major limitations in the effective treatment of brain cancer. Transferrin peptide (Tfpep) targeted gold nanoparticles (Tfpep-Au NPs) loaded with the photodynamic pro-drug, Pc 4, have been designed and compared with untargeted Au NPs for delivery of the photosensitizer to brain cancer cell lines. In vitro studies of human glioma cancer lines (LN229 and U87) overexpressing the transferrin receptor (TfR) show a significant increase in cellular uptake for targeted conjugates as compared to untargeted particles. Pc 4 delivered from Tfpep-Au NPs clusters within vesicles after targeting with the Tfpep. Pc 4 continues to accumulate over a 4 hour period. Our work suggests that TfR-targeted Au NPs may have important therapeutic implications for delivering brain tumor therapies and/or providing a platform for noninvasive imaging.

  1. A folate receptor-targeted lipoplex delivering interleukin-15 gene for colon cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xiao; Luo, Min; Wei, Xia-Wei; Ma, Cui-Cui; Yang, Yu-Han; Shao, Bin; Liu, Yan-Tong; Liu, Ting; Ren, Jun; Liu, Li; He, Zhi-Yao; Wei, Yu-Quan

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-15 has been implicated as a promising cytokine for cancer immunotherapy, while folate receptor α (FRα) has been shown to be a potentially useful target for colon cancer therapy. Herein, we developed F-PLP/pIL15, a FRα-targeted lipoplex loading recombinant interleukin-15 plasmid (pIL15) and studied its antitumor effects in vivo using a CT26 colon cancer mouse model. Compared with control (normal saline) treatment, F-PLP/pIL15 significantly suppressed tumor growth in regard to tumor weight (P < 0.001) and reduced tumor nodule formation (P < 0.001). Moreover, when compared to other lipoplex-treated mice, F-PLP/pIL15-treated mice showed higher levels of IL15 secreted in the serum (P < 0.001) and ascites (P < 0.01). These results suggested that the targeted delivery of IL15 gene might be associated with its in vivo antitumor effects, which include inducing tumor cell apoptosis, inhibiting tumor proliferation and promoting the activation of immune cells such as T cells and natural killer cells. Furthermore, hematoxylin and eosin staining of vital organs following F-PLP/pIL15 treatment showed no detectable toxicity, thus indicating that intraperitoneal administration may be a viable route of delivery. Overall, these results suggest that F-PLP/pIL15 may serve as a potential targeting preparation for colon cancer therapy. PMID:27438147

  2. Folate receptor targeted three-layered micelles and hydrogels for gene delivery to activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Mariam; Li, Ying; Abebe, Daniel G; Xie, Yuran; Kandil, Rima; Kraus, Teresa; Gomez-Lopez, Nardhy; Fujiwara, Tomoko; Merkel, Olivia M

    2016-12-28

    New folic acid (FA) coupled three layered micelles (3LM) were designed to encapsulate DNA, and their application as delivery system that specifically targets activated macrophages was investigated for new treatment options in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). FA coupled poly(l-lactide)-b-poly(ethylene glycol) (FA-PEG-PLLA) was synthesized via the NHS-ester activated/amine coupling method. Fluorescein labeled folic acid was used for flow cytometric detection of the expression of functional folic receptor β in LPS-activated and resting macrophages. FA coupled 3LM were formulated in a two-step procedure and characterized regarding hydrodynamic diameters and zeta potentials. The presence of the targeting ligand was shown not to increase the size of the 3LM compared to their non-targeted counterparts. Targeted and non-targeted 3LM were used in vitro to optimize uptake conditions in the RAW 264.7 macrophage cell line. The amount of FA coupled polymer in the final formulation was found to be optimal at 75% FA-PEG-PLLA and 25% PLLA-PEG-PLLA. Subsequently, transgene expression in vitro in RAW 264.7 cells and ex vivo in primary activated and resting mouse macrophages was determined as a function of FR-mediated internalization of 3LM encapsulating GFP expressing plasmid. FR-overexpressing activated cells, as successfully identified by internalization of FA-fluorescein, showed significantly higher GFP expression in vitro and ex vivo than resting macrophages with only a basal level of FR expression. Lastly, injectable hydrogels as depot formulation were formed by stereocomplexation, and their degradation, DNA release profiles, and dissociation into intact 3LM were found to be beneficial for potential in vivo application. Our findings confirm that FA-3LM are taken up by activated macrophages via folate receptor mediated endocytosis and that their hydrogels release intact 3LM for efficient transfection of primary macrophages. Therefore, FA-3LM could become a promising delivery system for receptor-mediated drug or gene delivery and novel therapy for rheumatoid arthritis in an in situ forming gel formulation.

  3. Somatostatin receptor targeted liposomes with Diacerein inhibit IL-6 for breast cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Bharti, Rashmi; Dey, Goutam; Banerjee, Indranil; Dey, Kaushik Kumar; Parida, Sheetal; Kumar, B N Prashanth; Das, Chandan Kanta; Pal, Ipsita; Mukherjee, Manabendra; Misra, Mridula; Pradhan, Anjan K; Emdad, Luni; Das, Swadesh K; Fisher, Paul B; Mandal, Mahitosh

    2017-03-01

    Selective targeting to the tumor niche remains a major challenge in successful cancer therapy. Somatostatin receptor 2 (SSTR2) is overexpressed in breast cancer cells thus making this receptor an attractive target for selective guidance of ligand-conjugated drug liposomes to the tumor site. In this study, a synthetic somatostatin analogue (SST) was used as SSTR2 targeting agent and Diacerein was employed as therapeutic molecule. Diacerein loaded liposomes (DNL) were prepared and they were further decorated with the synthetic and stable analogue of somatostatin (SST-DNL). Fabricated liposomes were nano-size in range and biocompatible. SST-DNL displayed significantly better anti-tumor efficacy as compared to free Diacerein (DN) and DNL in breast cancer models. Enhanced apoptosis in breast cancer cells was detected in SST-DNL treated groups as monitored by cell cycle analysis and changes in expression level of apoptotic/anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2, Bax, cleaved Caspase 3 and PARP. SST-DNL more effectively inhibited the oncogenic IL-6/IL-6R/STAT3/MAPK/Akt signalling pathways as compared to DN or DNL in cancer cells. In addition, SST-DNL effectively suppressed angiogenesis and cancer cell invasion. In vivo tumor growth in a MDA-MB-231 mouse xenograft model was significantly suppressed following SST-DNL treatment. In xenograft model, immunohistochemistry of Ki-67 and CD-31 indicated that SST-DNL improved the anti-proliferative and anti-angiogenic impacts of Diacerein. In vivo pharmacokinetic studies in rats showed enhanced circulation time in the DNL or SST-DNL treated groups as compared to free DN. Considering all of these findings, we conclude that SST-DNL provides a novel strategy with better efficacy for breast cancer therapy.

  4. Pharmacodynamics of folic acid-receptor targeted antiretroviral nanotherapy in HIV-1-infected humanized mice

    PubMed Central

    Puligujja, Pavan; Araínga, Mariluz; Dash, Prasanta; Palandri, Diana; Mosley, R. Lee; Gorantla, Santhi; Poluektova, Larisa; McMillan, JoEllyn; Gendelman, Howard E.

    2015-01-01

    Long acting nanoformulated antiretroviral therapy (nanoART) can sustain plasma drug levels and improve its biodistribution. Cell targeted-nanoART can achieve this and bring drug efficiently to viral reservoirs. However, if such improvements affect antiretroviral responses remains unknown. To these ends, we tested folic acid (FA)-linked poloxamer407 coated-ritonavir boosted atazanavir (FA-nanoATV/r) nanoparticles for their ability to affect chronic HIV-1 infection in humanized mice. Following three every other week 100 mg/kg FA-nanoATV/r intramuscular injection administered to infected animals viral RNA was at or below the detection limit, cell-associated HIV-1p24 reduced and CD4+ T cell counts protected. The dosing regimen improved treatment outcomes more than two fold from what was reported for untargeted nanoATV/r. We posit that these nanoformulations have potential for translation to human use. PMID:26026666

  5. Multifunctional receptor-targeted nanocomplexes for magnetic resonance imaging and transfection of tumours.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Gavin D; Villegas-Llerena, Claudio; Tagalakis, Aristides D; Campbell, Frederick; Welser, Katharina; Botta, Mauro; Tabor, Alethea B; Hailes, Helen C; Lythgoe, Mark F; Hart, Stephen L

    2012-10-01

    The efficient targeted delivery of nucleic acids in vivo provides some of the greatest challenges to the development of genetic therapies. We aim to develop nanocomplex formulations that achieve targeted transfection of neuroblastoma tumours that can be monitored simultaneously by MRI. Here, we have compared nanocomplexes comprising self-assembling mixtures of liposomes, plasmid DNA and one of three different peptide ligands derived from ApoE, neurotensin and tetanus toxin for targeted transfection in vitro and in vivo. Neurotensin-targeted nanocomplexes produced the highest levels of transfection and showed a 4.7-fold increase in transfected luciferase expression over non-targeted nanocomplexes in Neuro-2A cells. Transfection of subcutaneous Neuro-2A tumours in vivo with neurotensin-targeted nanocomplexes produced a 9.3-fold increase in gene expression over non-targeted controls. Confocal microscopy analysis elucidated the time course of DNA delivery with fluorescently labelled nanocomplex formulations in cells. It was confirmed that addition of a gadolinium lipid conjugate contrast agent allowed real time in vivo monitoring of nanocomplex localisation in tumours by MRI, which was maintained for at least 24 h. The peptide-targeted nanocomplexes developed here allow for the specific enhancement of targeted gene therapy both in vitro and in vivo, whilst allowing real time monitoring of delivery with MRI.

  6. Estrogen receptor-targeted optical imaging of breast cancer cells with near-infrared fluorescent dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jose, Iven; Deodhar, Kodand; Chiplunkar, Shuba V.; Patkar, Meena

    2010-02-01

    Molecular imaging provides the in vivo characterization of cellular molecular events involved in normal and pathologic processes. With the advent of optical molecular imaging, specific molecules, proteins and genes may be tagged with a luminescent reporter and visualized in small animals. This powerful new tool has pushed in vivo optical imaging to the forefront as it allows for direct determination of drug bio-distribution and uptake kinetics as well as an indicator of biochemical activity and drug efficacy. Although optical imaging encompasses diverse techniques and makes use of various wavelengths of light, a great deal of excitement in molecular research lies in the use of tomographic and fluorescence techniques to image living tissues with near-infrared (NIR) light. Nonionizing, noninvasive near-infrared optical imaging has great potential to become promising alternative for breast cancer detection. Fluorescence spectroscopy studies of human tissue suggest that a variety of lesions show distinct fluorescence spectra compared to those of normal tissue. It has also been shown that exogenous dyes exhibit selective uptake in neoplastic lesions and may offer the best contrast for optical imaging. Use of exogenous agents would provide fluorescent markers, which could serve to detect embedded tumors in the breast. In particular, the ability to monitor the fluorescent yield and lifetime may also enable biochemical specificity if the fluorophore is sensitive to a specific metabolite, such as oxygen. As a first step, we have synthesized and characterized one such NIR fluorescent dye conjugate, which could potentially be used to detect estrogen receptors (ER)[2] . The conjugate was synthesized by ester formation between 17-β estradiol and a hydrophilic derivative of indocyanine green (ICG) cyanine dye, bis-1, 1-(4-sulfobutyl) indotricarbocyanine-5- carboxylic acid, sodium salt. The ester formed was found to have an extra binding ability with the receptor cites as compared to ICG, which was established by the partition coefficient studies. The replacement of the sodium ion in the ester by a larger glucosammonium ion was found to enhance the hydrophilicity and reduce the toxic effect on the cell lines. The excitation and emission peaks for the conjugate were recorded in the NIR region as 750nm and 788nm respectively. The ester was found nontoxic on adenocarcinoma breast cancer cell lines MCF-7/MDA-MB-231. Specific binding and endocytosis of the estrogen-labeled conjugate was studied on the MCF-7 (ER positive) and MDA-MB-231 (ER negative). Conjugate staining of MCF-7 cells showed ~ 4-fold increase in signal intensity compared to MDA-MB- 231. Further, estrogen molecules were found to be specifically localized to the nuclear region of MCF-7 cells, whereas MDA-MB-231 showed plasma membrane staining. This technique offers the potential of noninvasive detection of hormone receptor status in breast cancer cells and would help in decreasing the load of unnecessary biopsies. Here, we have reported the progress made in the development of a novel NIR external contrast agent and the work is in progress to use this conjugate for the molecular based, diagnostic imaging of breast cancer.

  7. Importance of Receptor-targeted Systems in the Battle Against Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Rosas, Elisabet; Sobenin, Igor; Orekhov, Alexander; Edelman, Elazer R.; Balcells, Mercedes

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of death in the Western World and has been for decades a field of intense research. Yet, while there is a rich and diverse literature describing in detail the players and mechanisms involved in this complex disease in cell and animal models, we remain today with virtually no reliable markers for early diagnosis and targeted treatments options. This review is centered upon the latter. We summarize the latest studies focused on detecting endothelial dysfunction during the early stages of atherosclerosis, when the disease is asymptomatic and describe strategies recently proposed to image and target advanced plaque. PMID:23438961

  8. Receptor-targeted, drug-loaded, functionalized graphene oxides for chemotherapy and photothermal therapy

    PubMed Central

    Thapa, Raj Kumar; Choi, Ju Yeon; Poudel, Bijay Kumar; Choi, Han-Gon; Yong, Chul Soon; Kim, Jong Oh

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Although different chemotherapeutic agents have been developed to treat cancers, their use can be limited by low cellular uptake, drug resistance, and side effects. Hence, targeted drug delivery systems are continually being developed in order to improve the efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents. The main aim of this study was to prepare folic acid (FA)-conjugated polyvinyl pyrrolidone-functionalized graphene oxides (GO) (FA-GO) for targeted delivery of sorafenib (SF). GO were prepared using a modified Hummer’s method and subsequently altered to prepare FA-GO and SF-loaded FA-GO (FA-GO/SF). Characterization of GO derivatives was done using ultraviolet/visible spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, zeta potential measurements, and determination of in vitro drug release. Hemolytic toxicity, in vitro cytotoxicity, cellular uptake, and apoptotic effects of FA-GO/SF were also investigated. The results revealed that GO was successfully synthesized and that further transformation to FA-GO improved the stability and SF drug-loading capacity. In addition, the enhanced SF release under acidic conditions suggested possible benefits for cancer treatment. Conjugation of FA within the FA-GO/SF delivery system enabled targeted delivery of SF to cancer cells expressing high levels of FA receptors, thus increasing the cellular uptake and apoptotic effects of SF. Furthermore, the photothermal effect achieved by exposure of GO to near-infrared irradiation enhanced the anticancer effects of FA-GO/SF. Taken together, FA-GO/SF is a potential carrier for targeted delivery of chemotherapeutic agents in cancer. PMID:27358565

  9. Enhanced noscapine delivery using estrogen-receptor-targeted nanoparticles for breast cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Madan, Jitender; Gundala, Sushma R; Kasetti, Yoganjaneyulu; Bharatam, Prasad V; Aneja, Ritu; Katyal, Anju; Jain, Upendra K

    2014-07-01

    Noscapine (Nos), an orally available plant-derived antitussive alkaloid, is in phase II clinical trials for cancer chemotherapy. It has extensively been shown to inhibit tumor growth in nude mice bearing human xenografts of hematopoietic, breast, lung, ovarian, brain, and prostate origin. However, high tumor-suppressive Nos dosages encumber the development of oral controlled-release formulations because of a short biological half-life (<2 h), poor absorption, low aqueous solubility, and extensive first-pass metabolism. Here, we present the design, fabrication, optimization, characterization, and biological evaluation of estrone-conjugated noscapine-loaded gelatin nanoparticles (Nos-ES-GN) for targeting estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer MCF-7 cells. Gelatin nanoparticles (GN) were a uniformly compact size, stable at physiological pH, and showed a drug entrapment efficiency of 66.1±5.9 and 65.2±5.6% for Nos-GN and Nos-ES-GN, respectively. The secondary structure of gelatin nanocoacervates was predicted using circular dichroism and in-silico molecular modeling. Our data suggest that ethanol-fabricated GN retained the α-helical content of gelatin, whereas acetone favored the formation of random coils. The conjugation of estrone to Nos-GN did not affect the release rate of the drug, and both formulations followed first-order release kinetics with an initial burst, followed by a slow release. The IC50 value of Nos-ES-GN was 21.2 μmol/l, which was ∼50% lower than the free drug (43.3 μmol/l), suggesting targeted drug delivery. Our cell uptake study carried out in an estrogen-receptor-positive (MCF-7) and negative (MDA-MB-231) cancer cell lines showed greater accumulation of Nos-ES-GN in MCF-7 cells instead of MDA-MB-231 cells. Our data indicated that estrone-conjugated nanoparticles may potentially be used for targeting breast cancer cells.

  10. Behavioral factors.

    PubMed

    Zero, D T; Lussi, A

    2006-01-01

    During and after an erosive challenge, behavioral factors play a role in modifying the extent of erosive tooth wear. The manner that dietary acids are introduced into the mouth (gulping, sipping, use of a straw) will affect how long the teeth are in contact with the erosive challenge. The frequency and duration of exposure to an erosive agent is of paramount importance. Night-time exposure (e.g. baby bottle-feeding) to erosive agents may be particularly destructive because of the absence of salivary flow. Health-conscious individuals tend to ingest acidic drinks and juices more frequently and tend to have higher than average oral hygiene. While good oral hygiene is of proven value in the prevention of periodontal disease and dental caries, frequent toothbrushing with abrasive oral hygiene products may enhance erosive tooth wear. Unhealthy lifestyles such as consumption of designer drugs, alcopops and alcohol abuse are other important behavioral factors.

  11. Factor IX assay

    MedlinePlus

    Christmas factor assay; Serum factor IX; Hemophilic factor B; Plasma thromboplastin component; PTC ... chap 137. Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Factor IX (Christmas factor, hemophilic factor B, plasma thromboplastin component, PTC) - ...

  12. Pancreatic Cancer Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Pancreatic Cancer Risk Factors A risk factor is anything that affects ... these are risk factors for exocrine pancreatic cancer . Risk factors that can be changed Tobacco use Smoking ...

  13. Effect of a gelatin-based edible coating containing cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) on the quality and nutrient retention of fresh strawberries during storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhouri, F. M.; Casari, A. C. A.; Mariano, M.; Yamashita, F.; Innocnentini Mei, L. H.; Soldi, V.; Martelli, S. M.

    2014-08-01

    Strawberry is a non-climacteric fruit with a very short postharvest shelf-life. Loss of quality in this fruit is mostly due to its relatively high metabolic activity and sensitivity to fungal decay, meanly grey mold (Botrytis cinerea). In this study, the ability of gelatin coatings containing cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) to extend the shelf-life of strawberry fruit (Fragaria ananassa) over 8 days were studied. The filmogenic solution was obtained by the hydration of 5 g of gelatin (GEL) in 100 mL of distillated water containing different amounts of CNC dispersion (10 mg CNC/g of GEL or 50 mg of CNC/g of GEL) for 1 hour at room temperature. After this period, the solution was heated to 70 °C and maintained at this temperature for 10 minutes. The plasticizer (glycerol) (10g/100g of the GEL) was then added with constant, gentle stirring in order to avoid forming air bubbles and also to avoid gelatin denaturation until complete homogenization. Strawberries (purchased at the local market) were immersed in the filmogenic solution for 1 minute and after coated were dried at 15 °C by 24 hours. The strawberries were then kept under refrigeration and characterized in terms of their properties (weight loss, ascorbic acid content, titratable acidity, water content). The results have shown that samples covered with GEL/CNC had a significant improvement in its shelf- life. For instance, for the control sample (without coating) the weight loss after 8 days of storage was around 65%, while covered samples loss in the range of 31-36%. Edible coating was also effective in the retention of ascorbic acid (AA) in the strawberries, while control sample presented a fast decay in the AA content, covered samples showed a slow decay in the AA concentration. Moreover, the use of GEL/CNC edible coating had an antimicrobial effect in the fruits.

  14. Gelatin based on Power-gel.TM. as solders for Cr.sup.4+laser tissue welding and sealing of lung air leak and fistulas in organs

    DOEpatents

    Alfano, Robert R.; Tang, Jing; Evans, Jonathan M.; Ho, Peng Pei

    2006-04-25

    Laser tissue welding can be achieved using tunable Cr.sup.4+ lasers, semiconductor lasers and fiber lasers, where the weld strength follows the absorption spectrum of water. The use of gelatin and esterified gelatin as solders in conjunction with laser inducted tissue welding impart much stronger tensile and torque strengths than albumin solders. Selected NIR wavelength from the above lasers can improve welding and avoid thermal injury to tissue when used alone or with gelatin and esterified gelatin solders. These discoveries can be used to enhance laser tissue welding of tissues such as skin, mucous, bone, blood vessel, nerve, brain, liver, pancreas, spleen, kidney, lung, bronchus, respiratory track, urinary tract, gastrointestinal tract, or gynecologic tract and as a sealant for pulmonary air leaks and fistulas such as intestinal, rectal and urinary fistulas.

  15. Acute tryptophan depletion induced by a gelatin-based mixture impairs object memory but not affective behavior and spatial learning in the rat.

    PubMed

    Lieben, Cindy K J; van Oorsouw, Kim; Deutz, Nicolaas E P; Blokland, Arjan

    2004-05-05

    One manner to study the role of serotonin (5-HT) in behavioral functions is through nutritional manipulation of its precursor tryptophan (TRP). By means of the method of acute TRP depletion, plasma TRP levels can be reduced in a reversible way in both humans and rats. In the present study a TRP-free protein-carbohydrate mixture was used to investigate the behavioral effects of lowering TRP and 5-HT concentrations in adult male rats. These animals were tested in models of anxiety (open field, home cage emergence test), depression (forced swimming test) and cognition (object recognition test and Morris water escape test). The TRP-free protein-carbohydrate mixture substantially reduced the ratio TRP/SigmaLNAA within 2 and 4 h by 75 and 60%, respectively. It was found that 4 h after administration, the treatment did not affect anxiety-related behavior nor did it cause depressive-like behavior. Also, no treatment effect was found on spatial learning performance in a Morris water escape test. On the other hand, performance in an object recognition test was clearly impaired after TRP depletion. Taken together, these data suggest that acute lowered central 5-HT levels are not associated with changes in affective behavior (i.e. anxiety and depression), but do impair object memory in adult rats.

  16. Development of a Novel Enzyme-Targeting Radiosensitizer (New KORTUC) Using a Gelatin-Based Hydrogel Instead of a Sodium Hyaluronate

    PubMed Central

    Morita-Tokuhiro, Shiho; Ogawa, Yasuhiro; Yokota, Norikazu; Tsuzuki, Akira; Oda, Hideki; Ishida, Naoya; Aoyama, Nobutaka; Nishioka, Akihito

    2016-01-01

    We recently developed Kochi Oxydol-Radiation Therapy for Unresectable Carcinomas (KORTUC) as a strategy to increase intratumoral oxygen concentrations and degrade antioxidant enzymes such as peroxidase and catalase. We then developed KORTUC II, which uses sodium hyaluronate containing hydrogen peroxide as a radiosensitizer. KORTUC II requires twice-weekly administration to sustain its effects, but decreasing the frequency of radiosensitizer injections to once-weekly would reduce the burden on the patients and the physicians. The goal of this study was thus to develop a new formulation of KORTUC (New KORTUC) that only requires once-weekly administration. We performed experimental studies using a mouse tumor model and biodegradable hydrogel. C3H/He mice were allocated to control, KORTUC, or hydrogel groups. At 72 h after injection, each tumor was irradiated with a 6 MeV electron beam to a total dose of 30 Gy. During a 62-day observation period, changes in tumor volume and survival rates were assessed in each group. Tumor growth rate was slowest in the hydrogel groups. These data suggest that hydrogel could represent a useful adjunct as a long-acting radiosensitizer in place of sodium hyaluronate. New KORTUC, which contains hydrogen peroxide and hydrogel, exerted a radiosensitizing effect that persisted beyond 72 h following injection of the agent. Use of this new formulation allows radiosensitizer injections to be performed once-weekly with good effect. PMID:26751477

  17. Enhanced Sealing by Hydrophobic Modification of Alaska Pollock-Derived Gelatin-Based Surgical Sealants for the Treatment of Pulmonary Air Leaks.

    PubMed

    Mizuta, Ryo; Taguchi, Tetsushi

    2016-11-15

    Pulmonary air leaks are medical complications of thoracic surgery for which fibrin sealant is the main treatment. In this study, innovative sealants based on hydrophobically modified Alaska pollock-derived gelatin (hm-ApGltn) and a poly(ethylene)glycol-based 4-armed cross-linker (4S-PEG) have been developed and their burst strengths have been evaluated using fresh rat lung. The developed sealants show higher lung burst strength compared with the nonmodified original ApGltn (Org-ApGltn)-based sealant and a commercial fibrin sealant. The maximum burst strength of the hm-ApGltn-based sealant is 1.6-fold higher than the Org-ApGltn-based sealant (n = 5, p < 0.05), and 2.1-fold higher than the commercial fibrin sealant (n = 5, p < 0.05). Cell culture experiments show that modification of ApGltn with cholesteryl or stearoyl groups effectively enhances anchoring to the cell surface. In addition, binding constants between hm-ApGltn and extracellular matrix proteins such as fibronectin and fibrillin are increased. Therefore, the new hm-ApGltn/4S-PEG-based sealant has the potential for applications in thoracic surgery.

  18. Purification method directly influences effectiveness of an epidermal growth factor-coupled targeting agent for noninvasive tumor detection in mice.

    PubMed

    Kovar, Joy L; Volcheck, William M; Chen, Jiyan; Simpson, Melanie A

    2007-02-01

    Receptor targeting is an effective method of enhancing fluorescence signal in tumors for optical imaging. We previously used epidermal growth factor (EGF) conjugated to IRDye 800CW to detect and track orthotopic prostate tumors in mice. In this study, our goal was to identify a reliable assay for targeting agent integrity in vitro that correlated with signal strength in vivo. Binding of IRDye 800CW EGF to intact A431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells was quantified in a microplate assay. Specificity was confirmed by competition with unlabeled EGF or monoclonal antibody blocking. Biological activity of intact and damaged targeting agents relative to unlabeled EGF was determined by binding and stimulation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation. Both assays indicated a reduction of up to 60% of the fluorescence intensity with damaged agents. Using a research prototype imaging system optimized for IRDye 800CW detection, we compared the efficacy of intact and damaged targeting agents for imaging subcutaneous tumors in mice. In live animal images and in sections of the excised tumors, damaged targeting agents consistently yielded diminished fluorescence signals corresponding to the reduction observed in microplate assays. This is the first study to directly correlate targeting agent signal strength in whole cell binding, In-Cell Western, and in vivo near-infrared imaging.

  19. SOX9 Is a Progressive Factor in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    implicated in supporting stem cells in small intestine and hair follicle (52–54). Recent lineage tracing studies found that SOX9 marks the adult stem cell... target . 15. SUBJECT TERMS SOX9, caner stem cells 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF...proliferate despite the castration level of circulating testosterone. Although enthusiasm for androgen receptor targeting approaches remains high

  20. Factor VII deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... if one or more of these factors are missing or are not functioning like they should. Factor VII is one such coagulation factor. Factor VII deficiency runs in families (inherited) and is very rare. Both parents must ...

  1. Factor II deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... if one or more of these factors are missing or are not functioning like they should. Factor II is one such coagulation factor. Factor II deficiency runs in families (inherited) and is very rare. Both parents must ...

  2. Heart disease - risk factors

    MedlinePlus

    Heart disease - prevention; CVD - risk factors; Cardiovascular disease - risk factors; Coronary artery disease - risk factors; CAD - risk ... a certain health condition. Some risk factors for heart disease you cannot change, but some you can. ...

  3. Risk Factors and Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Risk Factors & Prevention Back to Patient Resources Risk Factors & Prevention Even people who look healthy and ... Blood Pressure , high cholesterol, diabetes, and thyroid disease. Risk Factors For Arrhythmias and Heart Disease The following ...

  4. Resolution with Limited Factoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dafa

    The resolution principle was originally proposed by J.A. Robinson. Resolution with factoring rule is complete for the first-order logic. However, unlimited applications of factoring rule may generate many irrelevant and redundant clauses. Noll presented resolution rule with half-factoring. In this paper, we demonstrate how to eliminate the half-factoring.

  5. Constructivism, Factoring, and Beliefs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rauff, James V.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses errors made by remedial intermediate algebra students in factoring polynomials in light of student definitions of factoring. Found certain beliefs about factoring to logically imply many of the errors made. Suggests that belief-based teaching can be successful in teaching factoring. (16 references) (Author/MKR)

  6. Psychological factors affecting migraine.

    PubMed

    Shulman, B H

    1989-01-01

    Psychological factors are known to increase the severity and intensity of headaches. When they are shown to be present, an appropriate psychiatric diagnosis is the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual's (DSMIII-R) category of psychological factors affecting physical condition (code no. 316.0). These factors can be differentiated into stress factors, personality traits, psychodynamic factors, learned behaviors, and mood disturbances. The factors overlap and intertwine in the average headache patient. Attention to these factors in a systematic way should enhance our understanding and treatment of the chronic headache patient.

  7. ISS Payload Human Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellenberger, Richard; Duvall, Laura; Dory, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    The ISS Payload Human Factors Implementation Team (HFIT) is the Payload Developer's resource for Human Factors. HFIT is the interface between Payload Developers and ISS Payload Human Factors requirements in SSP 57000. ? HFIT provides recommendations on how to meet the Human Factors requirements and guidelines early in the design process. HFIT coordinates with the Payload Developer and Astronaut Office to find low cost solutions to Human Factors challenges for hardware operability issues.

  8. Activation of human factor IX (Christmas factor).

    PubMed Central

    Di Scipio, R G; Kurachi, K; Davie, E W

    1978-01-01

    Human Factor IX (Christmas factor) is a single-chain plasma glycoprotein (mol wt 57,000) that participates in the middle phase of the intrinsic pathway of blood coagulation. It is present in plasma as a zymogen and is converted to a serine protease, Factor IXabeta, by Factor XIa (activated plasma thromboplastin antecedent) in the presence of calcium ions. In the activation reaction, two internal peptide bonds are hydrolyzed in Factor IX. These cleavages occur at a specific arginyl-alanine peptide bond and a specific arginyl-valine peptide bond. This results in the release of an activation peptide (mol wt approximately equal to 11,000) from the internal region of the precursor molecule and the generation of Factor IXabeta (mol wt approximately equal to 46,000). Factor IXabeta is composed of a light chain (mol wt approximately equal to 18,000) and a heavy chain (mol wt approximately equal to 28,000), and these chains are held together by a disulfide bond(s). The light chain originates from the amino terminal portion of the precursor molecule and has an amino terminal sequence of Tyr-Asn-Ser-Gly-Lys. The heavy chain originates from the carboxyl terminal region of the precursor molecule and contains an amino terminal sequence of Val-Val-Gly-Gly-Glu. The heavy chain of Factor IXabeta also contains the active site sequence of Phe-Cys-Ala-Gly-Phe-His-Glu-Gly-Arg-Asp-Ser-Cys-Gln-Gly-Asp-SER-Gly-Gly-Pro. The active site serine residue is shown in capital letters. Factor IX is also converted to Factor IXaalpha by a protease from Russell's viper venom. This activation reaction, however, occurs in a single step and involves only the cleavage of the internal arginyl-valine peptide bond. Human Factor IXabeta was inhibited by human antithrombin III by the formation of a one-to-one complex of enzyme and inhibitor. In this reaction, the inhibitor was tightly bound to the heavy chain of the enzyme. These data indicate that the mechanism of activation of human Factor IX and its

  9. Factoring Polynomials and Fibonacci.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartzman, Steven

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the factoring of polynomials and Fibonacci numbers, offering several challenges teachers can give students. For example, they can give students a polynomial containing large numbers and challenge them to factor it. (JN)

  10. Factoring Polynomials and Fibonacci.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartzman, Steven

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the factoring of polynomials and Fibonacci numbers, offering several challenges teachers can give students. For example, they can give students a polynomial containing large numbers and challenge them to factor it. (JN)

  11. Risk Factors for Scleroderma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home For Patients Risk Factors Risk Factors for Scleroderma The cause of scleroderma is still unknown. Scientists ... help find improved therapies and a cure for scleroderma! Your gift today will be matched to have ...

  12. Prognostic factors in cancer.

    PubMed

    Gospodarowicz, Mary; O'Sullivan, Brian

    2003-01-01

    Diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment are the three core elements of the art of medicine. Modern medicine pays more attention to diagnosis and treatment but prognosis has been a part of the practice of medicine much longer than diagnosis. Cancer is a heterogeneous group of disease characterized by growth, invasion and metastasis. To plan the management of an individual cancer patient, the fundamental knowledge base includes the site of origin of the cancer, its morphologic type, and the prognostic factors specific to that particular patient and cancer. Most prognostic factors literature describes those factors that directly relate to the tumor itself. However, many other factors, not directly related to the tumor, also affect the outcome. To comprehensively represent these factors we propose three broad groupings of prognostic factors: 'tumor'-related prognostic factors, 'host'-related prognostic factors, and 'environment'-related prognostic factors. Some prognostic factors are essential to decisions about the goals and choice treatment, while others are less relevant for these purposes. To guide the use of various prognostic factors we have proposed a grouping of factors based on their relevance in everyday practice; these comprise 'essential,' 'additional,' and 'new and promising factors.' The availability of a comprehensive classification of prognostic factors assures an ordered and deliberate approach to the subject and provide safeguard against skewed approaches that may ignore large parts of the field. The current attention to tumor factors has diminished the importance of 'patient' (i.e., 'host'), and almost completely overshadows the importance of the 'environment'. This ignores the fact that the latter presents the greatest potential for immediate impact. The acceptance of a generic prognostic factor classification would facilitate communication and education about this most important subject in oncology.

  13. Rh Factor Blood Test

    MedlinePlus

    Tests and Procedures Rh factor blood test By Mayo Clinic Staff Rhesus (Rh) factor is an inherited protein found on the surface of red ... positive. Your health care provider will recommend an Rh factor test during your first prenatal visit. This test ...

  14. Multilevel Mixture Factor Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varriale, Roberta; Vermunt, Jeroen K.

    2012-01-01

    Factor analysis is a statistical method for describing the associations among sets of observed variables in terms of a small number of underlying continuous latent variables. Various authors have proposed multilevel extensions of the factor model for the analysis of data sets with a hierarchical structure. These Multilevel Factor Models (MFMs)…

  15. A Factor Simplicity Index.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorenzo-Seva, Urbano

    2003-01-01

    Proposes an index for assessing the degree of factor simplicity in the context of principal components and exploratory factor analysis. The index does not depend on the scale of the factors, and its maximum and minimum are related only to the degree of simplicity in the loading matrix. (SLD)

  16. Development of erythropoietin receptor-targeted drug delivery system against breast cancer using tamoxifen-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers

    PubMed Central

    Beh, Chaw Yee; How, Chee Wun; Foo, Jhi Biau; Foong, Jia Ning; Selvarajah, Gayathri Thevi; Rasedee, Abdullah

    2017-01-01

    Tamoxifen (TAM) has been used in the treatment of breast cancers and is supplemented with erythropoietin (EPO) to alleviate the cancer-related anemia. The purported deleterious effects caused by the use of EPO with chemotherapeutic agents in the treatment of cancer-related anemia vary across studies and remain controversial. The use of nanoparticles as a drug delivery system has the potential to improve the specificity of anticancer drugs. In this study, we simultaneously incorporated two pharmacological active ingredients in one nanocarrier to develop EPO-conjugated TAM-loaded lipid nanoparticles (EPO-TAMNLC), a targeted delivery system, to enhance the cytotoxic activity while reducing the side effects of the ingredients. The effect of temperature in modulating the thermodynamic parameters associated with the binding of EPO and TAMNLC was assessed using isothermal titration calorimetry, while the unfolding of EPO structure was determined using fluorescence-quenching approach. The association efficiency of EPO and TAMNLC was 55.43%. Unlike binding of albumin to TAMNLC, the binding of EPO to TAMNLC occurred through endothermic and entropy-driven reaction. The EPO-TAMNLC formulation was stable because of the hydrophobic interaction and the high free energy, suggesting the spontaneity of the interactions between EPO and TAMNLC. The EPO-TAMNLC enhanced the in vitro cytotoxicity of TAM to MCF-7 cells. The EPO surface-functionalized TAMNLC could sequentially deliver EPO and TAM as well as improving site-specific delivery of these therapeutic compounds. PMID:28352153

  17. Enhanced production of 24S-hydroxycholesterol is not sufficient to drive liver X receptor target genes in vivo.

    PubMed

    Shafaati, M; Olin, M; Båvner, A; Pettersson, H; Rozell, B; Meaney, S; Parini, P; Björkhem, I

    2011-10-01

    Oxysterols such as 24S-hydroxycholesterol (OHC) and 27-OHC are intermediates of cholesterol excretion pathways. In addition, they are putative endogenous agonists of the liver X receptor (LXR) class of nuclear hormone receptors and are thought to be important mediators of cholesterol-dependent gene regulation. 24S-OHC is one of the most efficient endogenous LXR agonists known and is present in the brain and in the circulation at relatively high levels. To explore the regulatory importance of 24S-OHC in vivo. We developed a transgenic mouse model in which human cholesterol 24-hydroxylase, the enzyme responsible for the formation of 24S-OHC, was expressed under the control of a promoter derived from the β-actin gene. Both male and female transgenic mice had elevated levels of cerebral, plasma, biliary and faecal 24S-OHC. According to the faecal excretion results, production of 24S-OHC was increased four- to sevenfold. Gene expression profiling revealed that the elevated production of 24S-OHC did not result in the anticipated activation of LXR target genes in the brain or liver. In spite of the fact that 24S-OHC is a highly effective agonist of LXRs in vitro, it is not a critical activator of target genes to this nuclear receptor in vivo, either in the brain or in the liver. © 2011 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  18. Characterization of Estrogen-Receptor-Targeted Contrast-Agents in Solution, Breast Cancer Cells and Tumors in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Pais, Adi; Biton, Inbal Eti; Margalit, Raanan; Degani, Hadassa

    2012-01-01

    The estrogen receptor (ER) is a major prognostic biomarker of breast cancer, currently determined in surgical specimens by immunohistochemistry. Two new ER targeted probes, pyridine-tetra-acetate-Gd chelate (PTA-Gd) conjugated either to 17β-estradiol (EPTA-Gd) or to tamoxifen (TPTA-Gd), were explored as contrast agents for molecular imaging of ER. In solution both probes exhibited a micromolar ER binding-affinity, fast water exchange-rate (~107s−1) and water proton-relaxivity of 4.7 to 6.8 mM−1s−1. In human breast cancer cells, both probes acted as estrogen agonists and enhanced the water protons T1 relaxation-rate and relaxivity in ER-positive as compared to ER-negative cells, with EPTA-Gd showing a higher ER-specific relaxivity than TPTA-Gd. In studies of breast cancer tumors in vivo EPTA-Gd induced the highest enhancement in ER-positive tumors as compared to ER-negative tumors and muscle tissue, enabling in vivo detection of ER. TPTA-Gd demonstrated the highest enhancement in muscle tissue indicating non specific interaction of this agent with muscle components. The extracellular contrast agents, PTA-Gd and GdDTPA, showed no difference in the perfusion capacity of ER-positive and negative tumors confirming the specific interaction of EPTA-Gd with ER. These findings lay a basis for the molecular imaging of the estrogen receptor using EPTA-Gd as a template for further developments. PMID:22887470

  19. Real-time detection of implant-associated neutrophil responses using a formyl peptide receptor-targeting NIR nanoprobe

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jun; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Weng, Hong; Tang, Ewin N; Nair, Ashwin; Davé, Digant P; Tang, Liping

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophils play an important role in implant-mediated inflammation and infection. Unfortunately, current methods which monitor neutrophil activity, including enzyme measurements and histological evaluation, require many animals and cannot be used to accurately depict the dynamic cellular responses. To understand the neutrophil interactions around implant-mediated inflammation and infection it is critical to develop methods which can monitor in vivo cellular activity in real time. In this study, formyl peptide receptor (FPR)-targeting near-infrared nanoprobes were fabricated. This was accomplished by conjugating near-infrared dye with specific peptides having a high affinity to the FPRs present on activated neutrophils. The ability of FPR-targeting nanoprobes to detect and quantify activated neutrophils was assessed both in vitro and in vivo. As expected, FPR-targeting nanoprobes preferentially accumulated on activated neutrophils in vitro. Following transplantation, FPR-targeting nanoprobes preferentially accumulated at the biomaterial implantation site. Equally important, a strong relationship was observed between the extent of fluorescence intensity in vivo and the number of recruited neutrophils at the implantation site. Furthermore, FPR-targeting nanoprobes may be used to detect and quantify the number of neutrophils responding to a catheter-associated infection. The results show that FPR-targeting nanoprobes may serve as a powerful tool to monitor and measure the extent of neutrophil responses to biomaterial implants in vivo. PMID:22619542

  20. Interactions of serotonin (5-HT)2 receptor-targeting ligands and nicotine: locomotor activity studies in rats.

    PubMed

    Zaniewska, Magdalena; McCreary, Andrew C; Filip, Małgorzata

    2009-08-01

    Male Wistar rats were used to verify the hypothesis that serotonin (5-HT)(2A) or 5-HT(2C) receptors may control the locomotor effects evoked by nicotine (0.4 mg/kg). The 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonist (M100,907), the 5-HT(2A) receptor agonist (DOI), the 5-HT(2C) receptor antagonist (SB 242,084), and the 5-HT(2C) receptor agonists (Ro 60-0175 and WAY 163,909) were used. M100,907 (0.5-2mg/kg) did not alter, while DOI (1 mg/kg) enhanced the nicotine-induced hyperlocomotion. The effect of DOI was antagonized by M100,907 (1 mg/kg). SB 242,084 (0.25-1 mg/kg) augmented, while Ro 60-0175 (1 and 3 mg/kg) and WAY 163,909 (1.5 mg/kg) decreased the overall effect of acute nicotine; effects of Ro 60-0175 and WAY 163,909 were attenuated by SB 242,084 (0.125 mg/kg). In another set of experiments, M100,907 (2 mg/kg) on Day 10 attenuated, while DOI (0.1-1 mg/kg) enhanced the nicotine-evoked conditioned hyperlocomotion in rats repeatedly (Days 1-5) treated with nicotine in experimental chambers. SB 242,084 (0.125 or 1 mg/kg) did not change, while Ro 60-0175 (1 mg/kg) or WAY 163,909 (1.5 mg/kg) decreased the expression of nicotine-induced conditioned hyperactivity. Only DOI (0.3 and 1 mg/kg) and SB 242,084 (1 mg/kg) enhanced the basal locomotion. The present data indicate that 5-HT(2A) receptors are significant for the expression of nicotine-evoked conditioned hyperactivity. Conversely, 5-HT(2C) receptors play a pivotal role in the acute effects of nicotine. Pharmacological stimulation of 5-HT(2A) receptors enhances the conditioned hyperlocomotion, while activation of 5-HT(2C) receptors decreases both the response to acute nicotine and conditioned hyperactivity.

  1. Differential effects of serotonin (5-HT)2 receptor-targeting ligands on locomotor responses to nicotine-repeated treatment.

    PubMed

    Zaniewska, Magdalena; McCreary, Andrew C; Wydra, Karolina; Filip, Małgorzata

    2010-07-01

    We verified the hypothesis that serotonin (5-HT)(2) receptors control the locomotor effects of nicotine (0.4 mg kg(-1)) in rats by using the 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonist M100907, the preferential 5-HT(2A) receptor agonist DOI, the 5-HT(2C) receptor antagonist SB 242084, and the 5-HT(2C) receptor agonists Ro 60-0175 and WAY 163909. Repeated pairings of a test environment with nicotine for 5 days, on Day 10 significantly augmented the locomotor activity following nicotine administration. Of the investigated 5-HT(2) receptor ligands, M100907 (2 mg kg(-1)) or DOI (1 mg kg(-1)) administered during the first 5 days in combination with nicotine attenuated or enhanced, respectively, the development of nicotine sensitization. Given acutely on Day 10, M100907 (2 mg kg(-1)), Ro 60-0175 (1 mg kg(-1)), and WAY 163909 (1.5 mg kg(-1)) decreased the expression of nicotine sensitization. In another set of experiments, where the nicotine challenge test was performed on Day 15 in animals treated repeatedly (Days: 1-5, 10) with nicotine, none of 5-HT(2) receptor ligands administered during the second withdrawal period (Days: 11-14) to nicotine-treated rats altered the sensitizing effect of nicotine given on Day 15. Our data indicate that 5-HT(2A) receptors (but not 5-HT(2C) receptors) play a permissive role in the sensitizing effects of nicotine, while stimulation of 5-HT(2A) receptors enhances the development of nicotine sensitization and activation of 5-HT(2C) receptors is essential for the expression of nicotine sensitization. Repeated treatment with the 5-HT(2) receptor ligands within the second nicotine withdrawal does not inhibit previously established sensitization.

  2. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors target family landscape: A chemometrical approach to ligand selectivity based on protein binding site analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirard, Bernard

    2003-11-01

    The Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors (PPARs) are nuclear receptors which over the last couple of years have been the focus of considerable research efforts aiming to identify compounds with well-defined selectivity profiles for the treatment of metabolic diseases. The ligand binding domains (LBD) of the three known PPAR subtypes exhibit between 60 and 70% sequence identity. To gain insight into the structural determinants of selectivity for the PPAR subtypes, a set of 13 crystal structures of PPAR LBD were classified, using the GRID/CPCA approach. As a result, nearly all of the crystal structures of each different PPAR subtype were found clustered in different regions of the CPCA score plots, and hydrophobic as well as steric interactions were identified as the major determinants of PPAR subtypes selectivity. Furthermore, interpretation of the GRID/CPCA model in structural terms led to the identification of LBD regions which could be targeted to improve the selectivity for a given PPAR subtype. Our findings are consistent with published structure-activity relationships for PPAR ligands as well as with site-directed mutagenesis results.

  3. Broomhead-King Hydrophobic Modes in Receptor-Targeted Peptide Design: How to Find Modes in a Short Data Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandell, Arnold J.; Selz, Karen A.; Owens, Michael J.; Shlesinger, Michael F.

    2003-05-01

    Broomhead-King modes are a lagged vector version of the Karhunen-Loeve orthogonal mode decomposition. We employ the Broomhead-King method to seek modes in short but evolutionarily stationary, protein and peptide, hydrophobically transformed, amino acid data sequences. We then use these modes to design 12-20 mer peptides whose amino acid series possess hydrophobic modes that match the leading modes of the targeted G-protein coupled, seven transmembrane, receptor proteins and act as indirect agonists and/or modulators of their in vitro and in vivo physiological activity. An example is briefly described involving peptide design targeting the human brain D2 dopamine receptor, thought to be involved in Parkinson's disease and the action of some antipsychotic drugs.

  4. ELEVATION OF C-FLIP IN CASTRATE-RESISTANT PROSTATE CANCER ANTAGONIZES THERAPEUTIC RESPONSE TO ANDROGEN-RECEPTOR TARGETED THERAPY

    PubMed Central

    McCourt, Clare; Maxwell, Pamela; Mazzucchelli, Roberta; Montironi, Rodolfo; Scarpelli, Marina; Salto-Tellez, Manuel; O’Sullivan, Joe M.; Longley, Daniel B.; Waugh, David J.J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To characterize the importance of cellular Fas-associated death domain (FADD)-like interleukin 1β-converting enzyme (FLICE) inhibitory protein (c-FLIP), a key regulator of caspase 8 (FLICE)-promoted apoptosis, in modulating the response of prostate cancer (CaP) cells to androgen receptor (AR)-targeted therapy. Experimental Design c-FLIP expression was characterized by immunohistochemical analysis of prostatectomy tissue. The functional importance of c-FLIP to survival and modulating response to bicalutamide was studied by molecular and pharmacological interventions. Results c-FLIP expression was increased in high-grade prostatic intra-epithelial neoplasia (HGPIN) and CaP tissue relative to normal prostate epithelium (P<0.001). Maximal c-FLIP expression was detected in castrate-resistant CaP (CRPC) (P<0.001). In vitro, silencing of c-FLIP induced spontaneous apoptosis and increased 22Rv1 and LNCaP cell sensitivity to bicalutamide, determined by flow cytometry, PARP cleavage and caspase activity assays. The histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi), droxinostat and SAHA, also down-regulated c-FLIP expression, induced caspase-8 and caspase-3/7 mediated apoptosis and increased apoptosis in bicalutamide-treated cells. Conversely, the elevated expression of c-FLIP detected in the CRPC cell line VCaP underpinned their insensitivity to bicalutamide and SAHA in vitro. However, knockdown of c-FLIP induced spontaneous apoptosis in VCaP cells, indicating its relevance to cell survival and therapeutic resistance. Conclusion c-FLIP reduces the efficacy of AR-targeted therapy and maintains the viability of CaP cells. A combination of HDACi with androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) may be effective in early-stage disease, using c-FLIP expression as a predictive biomarker of sensitivity. Direct targeting of c-FLIP however may be relevant to enhance the response of existing and novel therapeutics in CRPC. PMID:22623731

  5. Effect of IL-2-Bax, a novel interleukin-2-receptor-targeted chimeric protein, on bleomycin lung injury.

    PubMed

    Segel, Michael J; Aqeilan, Rami; Zilka, Keren; Lorberboum-Galski, Haya; Wallach-Dayan, Shulamit B; Conner, Michael W; Christensen, Thomas G; Breuer, Raphael

    2005-10-01

    The role of lymphocytes in the pathogenesis of lung fibrosis is not clear, but the weight of the evidence supports a pro-fibrotic effect for lymphocytes. The high-affinity interleukin-2 receptor (haIL-2R) is expressed on activated, but not quiescent, T lymphocytes. This selective expression of haIL-2R provides the basis for therapeutic strategies that target IL-2R-expressing cells. We hypothesized that elimination of activated lymphocytes by IL-2R-targeted chimeric proteins might ameliorate lung fibrosis. We investigated the effects of IL-2-Bax, a novel apoptosis-inducing IL-2R-targeted chimeric protein, on bleomycin-induced lung injury in mice. Treatment groups included (i) a single intratracheal instillation of bleomycin and twice-daily intraperitoneal injections of IL-2-Bax; (ii) intratracheal bleomycin and intraperitoneal IL-2-PE66(4Glu), an older-generation chimeric protein; (iii) intratracheal bleomycin/intraperitoneal PBS; (iv) intratracheal saline/intraperitoneal PBS. Lung injury was evaluated 14 days after intratracheal instillation by cell count in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, semi-quantitative and quantitative histomorphological measurements and by biochemical analysis of lung hydroxyproline. Bleomycin induced a BAL lymphocytosis that was significantly attenuated by IL-2-Bax and IL-2-PE66(4Glu). However, morphometric parameters and lung hydroxyproline were unaffected by the chimeric proteins. These results show that IL-2-Bax reduces the lymphocytic infiltration of the lungs in response to bleomycin, but this effect is not accompanied by a decrease in lung fibrosis.

  6. Near-infrared fluorescent imaging of metastatic ovarian cancer using folate receptor-targeted high-density lipoprotein nanocarriers

    PubMed Central

    Corbin, Ian R; Ng, Kenneth K; Ding, Lili; Jurisicova, Andrea; Zheng, Gang

    2013-01-01

    Aim The targeting efficiency of folate receptor-α (FR-α)-targeted high-density lipoprotein nanoparticles (HDL NPs) was evaluated in a syngeneic mouse model of ovarian cancer. Materials & methods Folic acid was conjugated to the surface of fluorescent-labeled HDL NPs. In vivo tumor targeting of folic acid-HDL NPs and HDL NPs were evaluated in mice with metastatic ovarian cancer following intravenous or intraperitoneal (ip.) administration. Results & discussion Intravenous FR-α-targeted HDL resulted in high uptake of the fluorescent nanoparticle in host liver and spleen. The ip. injection of fluorescent HDL produced moderate fluorescence throughout the abdomen. Conversely, animals receiving the ip. FR-α-targeted HDL showed a high fluorescence signal in ovarian tumors, surpassing that seen in all of the host tissues. Conclusion The authors' findings demonstrate that the combination of local–regional ip. administration and FR-α-directed nanoparticles provides an enhanced approach to selectively targeting ovarian cancer cells for drug treatment. PMID:23067398

  7. Neonicotinoids show selective and diverse actions on their nicotinic receptor targets: electrophysiology, molecular biology, and receptor modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Kazuhiko; Shimomura, Masaru; Ihara, Makoto; Akamatsu, Miki; Sattelle, David B

    2005-08-01

    Neonicotinoid insecticides, which act selectively on insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), are used worldwide for insect pest management. Studies that span chemistry, biochemistry, molecular biology, and electrophysiology have contributed to our current understanding of the important physicochemical and structural properties essential for neonicotinoid actions as well as key receptor residues contributing to the high affinity of neonicotinoids for insect nAChRs. Research to date suggests that electrostatic interactions and possibly hydrogen bond formation between neonicotinoids and nAChRs contribute to the selectivity of these chemicals. A rich diversity of neonicotinoid-nAChR interactions has been demonstrated using voltage-clamp electrophysiology. Computational modeling of nAChR-imidacloprid interaction has assisted in the interpretation of these results.

  8. Amphiphilic Nanoparticles Repress Macrophage Atherogenesis: Novel Core/Shell Designs for Scavenger Receptor Targeting and Down-Regulation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, an inflammatory lipid-rich plaque disease is perpetuated by the unregulated scavenger-receptor-mediated uptake of oxidized lipoproteins (oxLDL) in macrophages. Current treatments lack the ability to directly inhibit oxLDL accumulation and foam cell conversion within diseased arteries. In this work, we harness nanotechnology to design and fabricate a new class of nanoparticles (NPs) based on hydrophobic mucic acid cores and amphiphilic shells with the ability to inhibit the uncontrolled uptake of modified lipids in human macrophages. Our results indicate that tailored NP core and shell formulations repress oxLDL internalization via dual complementary mechanisms. Specifically, the most atheroprotective molecules in the NP cores competitively reduced NP-mediated uptake to scavenger receptor A (SRA) and also down-regulated the surface expression of SRA and CD36. Thus, nanoparticles can be designed to switch activated, lipid-scavenging macrophages to antiatherogenic phenotypes, which could be the basis for future antiatherosclerotic therapeutics. PMID:24972372

  9. An EGF receptor targeting Ranpirnase-diabody fusion protein mediates potent antitumour activity in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kiesgen, Stefan; Arndt, Michaela A E; Körber, Christoph; Arnold, Ulrich; Weber, Tobias; Halama, Niels; Keller, Armin; Bötticher, Benedikt; Schlegelmilch, Anne; Liebers, Nora; Cremer, Martin; Herold-Mende, Christel; Dyckhoff, Gerhard; Federspil, Philippe A; Jensen, Alexandra D; Jäger, Dirk; Kontermann, Roland E; Mier, Walter; Krauss, Jürgen

    2015-02-01

    Cytotoxic ribonucleases such as the leopard frog derivative Ranpirnase (Onconase(®)) have emerged as a valuable new class of cancer therapeutics. Clinical trials employing single agent Ranpirnase in cancer patients have demonstrated significant clinical activity and surprisingly low immunogenicity. However, dose-limiting toxicity due to unspecific uptake of the RNase into non-cancerous cells is reached at relatively low concentrations of > 1 mg/m(2). We have in the present study generated a dimeric anti-EGFR Ranpirnase-diabody fusion protein capable to deliver two Ranpirnase moieties per molecule to EGFR-positive tumour cells. We show that this compound mediated far superior efficacy for killing EGFR-positive tumour cells than a monomeric counterpart. Most importantly, cell killing was restricted to EGFR-positive target cells and no dose-limiting toxicity of Ranpirnase-diabody was observed in mice. These data indicate that by targeted delivery of Ranpirnase non-selective toxicity can be abolished and suggests Ranpirnase-diabody as a promising new drug for therapeutic interventions in EGFR-positive cancers.

  10. Design, synthesis and evaluation of (18)F-labeled bradykinin B1 receptor-targeting small molecules for PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengxing; Kuo, Hsiou-Ting; Lau, Joseph; Jenni, Silvia; Zhang, Chengcheng; Zeisler, Jutta; Bénard, François; Lin, Kuo-Shyan

    2016-08-15

    Two fluorine-18 ((18)F) labeled bradykinin B1 receptor (B1R)-targeting small molecules, (18)F-Z02035 and (18)F-Z02165, were synthesized and evaluated for imaging with positron emission tomography (PET). Z02035 and Z02165 were derived from potent antagonists, and showed high binding affinity (0.93±0.44 and 2.80±0.50nM, respectively) to B1R. (18)F-Z02035 and (18)F-Z02165 were prepared by coupling 2-[(18)F]fluoroethyl tosylate with their respective precursors, and were obtained in 10±5 (n=4) and 22±14% (n=3), respectively, decay-corrected radiochemical yield with >99% radiochemical purity. (18)F-Z02035 and (18)F-Z02165 exhibited moderate lipophilicity (LogD7.4=1.10 and 0.59, respectively), and were stable in mouse plasma. PET imaging and biodistribution studies in mice showed that both tracers enabled visualization of the B1R-positive HEK293T::hB1R tumor xenografts with better contrast than control B1R-negative HEK293T tumors. Our data indicate that small molecule antagonists can be used as pharmacophores for the design of B1R-targeting PET tracers.

  11. Folate receptor-targeted nanoparticle delivery of HuR-RNAi suppresses lung cancer cell proliferation and migration.

    PubMed

    Muralidharan, Ranganayaki; Babu, Anish; Amreddy, Narsireddy; Basalingappa, Kanthesh; Mehta, Meghna; Chen, Allshine; Zhao, Yan Daniel; Kompella, Uday B; Munshi, Anupama; Ramesh, Rajagopal

    2016-06-21

    Human antigen R (HuR) is an RNA binding protein that is overexpressed in many human cancers, including lung cancer, and has been shown to regulate the expression of several oncoproteins. Further, HuR overexpression in cancer cells has been associated with poor-prognosis and therapy resistance. Therefore, we hypothesized that targeted inhibition of HuR in cancer cells should suppress several HuR-regulated oncoproteins resulting in an effective anticancer efficacy. To test our hypothesis, in the present study we investigated the efficacy of folate receptor-α (FRA)-targeted DOTAP:Cholesterol lipid nanoparticles carrying HuR siRNA (HuR-FNP) against human lung cancer cells. The therapeutic efficacy of HuR-FNP was tested in FRA overexpressing human H1299 lung cancer cell line and compared to normal lung fibroblast (CCD16) cells that had low to no FRA expression. Physico-chemical characterization studies showed HuR-FNP particle size was 303.3 nm in diameter and had a positive surface charge (+4.3 mV). Gel retardation and serum stability assays showed that the FNPs were efficiently protected siRNA from rapid degradation. FNP uptake was significantly higher in H1299 cells compared to CCD16 cells indicating a receptor-dose effect. The results of competitive inhibition studies in H1299 cells demonstrated that HuR-FNPs were efficiently internalized via FRA-mediated endocytosis. Biologic studies demonstrated HuR-FNP but not C-FNP (control siRNA) induced G1 phase cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in H1299 cells resulting in significant growth inhibition. Further, HuR-FNP exhibited significantly higher cytotoxicity against H1299 cells than it did against CCD16 cells. The reduction in H1299 cell viability was correlated with a marked decrease in HuR mRNA and protein expression. Further, reduced expression of HuR-regulated oncoproteins (cyclin D1, cyclin E, and Bcl-2) and increased p27 tumor suppressor protein were observed in HuR-FNP-treated H1299 cells but not in C-FNP-treated cells. Finally, cell migration was significantly inhibited in HuR-FNP-treated H1299 cells compared to C-FNP. Our results demonstrate that HuR is a molecular target for lung cancer therapy and its suppression using HuR-FNP produced significant therapeutic efficacy in vitro.

  12. Characterization and evaluation of a folic acid receptor-targeted cyclodextrin complex as an anticancer drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiaojiao; Xu, Beihua; Shou, Dan; Qin, Fuhua; Xu, Yong; Hu, Ying

    2016-02-15

    To improve the water solubility and tumor targeting ability of docetaxel (DTX), and thus enhance the drug's antitumor efficacy and safety, a novel folate receptor (FR)-targeted cyclodextrin drug delivery vehicle (FA-CD) was successfully synthesized. The synthesis of the designed cyclodextrin was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The in vitro cytotoxicity was investigated using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and the results showed that no significant differences (p>0.05) appeared in cytotoxicity between the different cyclodextrins in the different cell lines. Besides, the DTX/FA-CD inclusion complex was prepared. The cellular uptake and competition assays were examined using the HepG2, HeLa, and KB cell lines, which have different levels of folate receptor expression. Interestingly, the Cy5.5/FA-CD complex had higher uptake in the HepG2, HeLa, and KB cells, compared with non-targeted Cy5.5/CD complex (p<0.001). The time-dependent drug uptake into KB cells observed by LSCM confirmed the drug delivery via endocytic routes. Data from the competition assays, especially in KB cells, showed that a significant inhibitory effect (p<0.001) was obtained when the concentration of FA was increased, and suggested that the Cy5.5/FA-CD was internalized through a FR-mediated mechanism. Moreover, the in vitro bioactivity assay also demonstrated efficient antitumor activity, and the order of the cell viabilities (% of control) was OB>HepG2>HeLa>KB for DTX/FA-CD (p<0.001). For DTX/CD, however, it displayed minimum antitumor behavior in all cell types. An apoptosis study by FCM and LSCM also revealed that the FA-modified complexes were more effective in inducing apoptosis in FR-expressing cells. Finally, an in vivo biodistribution study in KB-bearing healthy mice revealed that the DTX/FA-CD complex has enhanced tumor-targeting efficacy and diminished systemic side effects. These results suggest that the novel FR-targeted cyclodextrin complex is a promising alternative as an anticancer drug delivery system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Total internal reflectance fluorescence imaging of genetically engineered ryanodine receptor-targeted Ca(2+) probes in rat ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Pahlavan, Sara; Morad, Marin

    2017-09-01

    The details of cardiac Ca(2+) signaling within the dyadic junction remain unclear because of limitations in rapid spatial imaging techniques, and availability of Ca(2+) probes localized to dyadic junctions. To critically monitor ryanodine receptors' (RyR2) Ca(2+) nano-domains, we combined the use of genetically engineered RyR2-targeted pericam probes, (FKBP-YCaMP, Kd=150nM, or FKBP-GCaMP6, Kd=240nM) with rapid total internal reflectance fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy (resolution, ∼80nm). The punctate z-line patterns of FKBP,(2)-targeted probes overlapped those of RyR2 antibodies and sharply contrasted to the images of probes targeted to sarcoplasmic reticulum (SERCA2a/PLB), or cytosolic Fluo-4 images. FKBP-YCaMP signals were too small (∼20%) and too slow (2-3s) to detect Ca(2+) sparks, but the probe was effective in marking where Fluo-4 Ca(2+) sparks developed. FKBP-GCaMP6, on the other hand, produced rapidly decaying Ca(2+) signals that: a) had faster kinetics and activated synchronous with ICa(3) but were of variable size at different z-lines and b) were accompanied by spatially confined spontaneous Ca(2+) sparks, originating from a subset of eager sites. The frequency of spontaneously occurring sparks was lower in FKBP-GCaMP6 infected myocytes as compared to Fluo-4 dialyzed myocytes, but isoproterenol enhanced their frequency more effectively than in Fluo-4 dialyzed cells. Nevertheless, isoproterenol failed to dissociate FKBP-GCaMP6 from the z-lines. The data suggests that FKBP-GCaMP6 binds predominantly to junctional RyR2s and has sufficient on-rate efficiency as to monitor the released Ca(2+) in individual dyadic clefts, and supports the idea that β-adrenergic agonists may modulate the stabilizing effects of native FKBP on RyR2. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Folate Receptor-targeted Bioflavonoid Genistein-loaded Chitosan Nanoparticles for Enhanced Anticancer Effect in Cervical Cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Limei; Yu, Rufen; Hao, Xi; Ding, Xiangcui

    2017-08-01

    In this study, novel folic acid-conjugated chitosan nanoparticle was formulated for specific delivery of bioflavonoid, Genistein (GEN), to the cervical cancer cells. The prepared GEN-loaded chitosan nanoparticles (GCN) and folic acid-conjugated GCN (FGCN) showed smaller size with a controlled drug release profile. FGCN exhibited enhanced internalization potential in HeLa cells than that of GCN. The specific internalization of FGCN was mainly due to the affinity of folic acid (FA) with FRs-α which is present in large numbers in HeLa cells. The results revealed that FGCN has a specific affinity towards HeLa cells that will contribute to the better treatment. Folic acid-tagged nanoformulations exhibited a superior cytotoxic effect compared to that of non-targeted formulations. Consistently, IC50 value of GEN decreased from 33.8 to 14.6 μg/ml when treated with FGCN after 24 h incubation. The apoptosis studies indicated that the FGCN nanoparticles were then either GCN or free GEN in terms of anticancer activity. Overall, results revealed that folate conjugation to the delivery system might have great effect on the survival of cervical cancers that will be beneficial for overall cancer treatment.

  15. Somatostatin receptor-targeted radionuclide therapy for progressive meningioma: benefit linked to 68Ga-DOTATATE/-TOC uptake.

    PubMed

    Seystahl, Katharina; Stoecklein, Veit; Schüller, Ulrich; Rushing, Elisabeth; Nicolas, Guillaume; Schäfer, Niklaus; Ilhan, Harun; Pangalu, Athina; Weller, Michael; Tonn, Jörg-Christian; Sommerauer, Michael; Albert, Nathalie L

    2016-11-01

    The prognosis of patients with progressive meningioma after failure of surgery and radiotherapy is poor. We retrospectively evaluated the safety and efficacy of somatostatin-receptor (SSTR)-targeted radionuclide therapy ((177)Lu-DOTATATE [n = 16], (90)Y-DOTATOC [n = 3], or both [n = 1]) in patients with progressive, treatment-refractory meningiomas (5 World Health Organization [WHO] grade I, 7 WHO grade II, 8 WHO grade III) and in part multifocal disease (17 of 20 patients). SSTR radionuclide treatment (median of 3 treatment cycles, median administered dose/cycle 7400 MBq) led to a disease stabilization in 10 of 20 patients for a median time of 17 months. Stratification according to WHO grade showed a median progression-free survival (PFS) of 32.2 months for grade I tumors, 7.2 for grade II, and 2.1 for grade III. PFS at 6 months was 100% for grade I, 57% for grade II, and 0% for grade III. Median overall survival was 17.2 months in WHO grade III patients and not reached for WHO I and II at a median follow-up of 20 months. In the analysis of single meningioma lesions, maximal and mean standardized uptake values in pretherapeutic (68)Ga-DOTATOC/-TATE PET/CT were significantly higher in those lesions with radiographic stability after 6 months. In line with this, high expression of SSTR via immunohistochemistry was associated with PFS >6 months. SSTR-targeted radionuclide treatment has activity in a subset of patients with meningioma. Expression of SSTR via immunohistochemistry or radionuclide uptake might serve as a predictive biomarker for outcome to facilitate individualized treatment optimization in patients with uni- and multifocal meningiomas. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Transferrin receptor-targeted vitamin E TPGS micelles for brain cancer therapy: preparation, characterization and brain distribution in rats.

    PubMed

    Sonali; Agrawal, Poornima; Singh, Rahul Pratap; Rajesh, Chellappa V; Singh, Sanjay; Vijayakumar, Mahalingam R; Pandey, Bajrangprasad L; Muthu, Madaswamy Sona

    2016-06-01

    The effective treatment of brain cancer is hindered by the poor transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the low penetration across the blood-tumor barrier (BTB). The objective of this work was to formulate transferrin-conjugated docetaxel (DTX)-loaded d-alpha-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (vitamin E TPGS or TPGS) micelles for targeted brain cancer therapy. The micelles with and without transferrin conjugation were prepared by the solvent casting method and characterized for their particle size, polydispersity, drug encapsulation efficiency, drug loading, in vitro release study and brain distribution study. Particle sizes of prepared micelles were determined at 25 °C by dynamic light scattering technique. The external surface morphology was determined by transmission electron microscopy analysis and atomic force microscopy. The encapsulation efficiency was determined by spectrophotometery. In vitro release studies of micelles and control formulations were carried out by dialysis bag diffusion method. The particle sizes of the non-targeted and targeted micelles were <20 nm. About 85% of drug encapsulation efficiency was achieved with micelles. The drug release from transferrin-conjugated micelles was sustained for >24 h with 50% of drug release. The in vivo results indicated that transferrin-targeted TPGS micelles could be a promising carrier for brain targeting due to nano-sized drug delivery, solubility enhancement and permeability which provided an improved and prolonged brain targeting of DTX in comparison to the non-targeted micelles and marketed formulation.

  17. A comparison of high- versus low-linear energy transfer somatostatin receptor targeted radionuclide therapy in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Tapan; Norenberg, Jeffrey; Anderson, Tamara; Atcher, Robert

    2005-02-01

    The somatostatin analog [DOTA(0)-Tyr(3)]-octreotide (DOTATOC) has been widely used to target somatostatin receptor expressing tumors for therapy using radionuclides such as (90)Y or (177)Lu. This aim of this study was to compare the effects of DOTATOC labeled to high linear energy transfer (LET) alpha-emitter (213)Bi and low-LET beta-emitter (177)Lu in vitro. Somatostatin receptor (sstr)-positive cell line Capan-2 and sstr-negative control cell line A549 were used for the experiments. The effects of two exposure times using different radiation doses of high-LET alpha-emitter (213)Bi and low-LET beta-emitter (177)Lu were investigated using cell survival assay. The apoptotic effects were investigated using Cell Death Detection ELISA(PLUS)10x. The cumulated activity and the mean absorbed dose per unit cumulated activity were calculated using MIRD cellular Svalues. (213)Bi-DOTATOC had an approximately four times greater induction of apoptosis than (177)Lu-DOTATOC and a 100 times greater induction of apoptosis than nonradiolabeled DOTATOC. Nonspecific radiolabeled tetra-azacyclododecanetetra-acetic acid (DOTA) had a less pronounced effect on the cell survival and apoptosis, as compared to the sstr-specific radiolabeled DOTATOC. (213)Bi-DOTATOC is significantly more potent than (177)Lu-DOTATOC in vitro because of its high-LET alpha-emission.(213)Bi-DOTATOC shows enhanced effects on mitotic and apoptotic cell deaths.

  18. CD30 Receptor-Targeted Lentiviral Vectors for Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Specific Gene Modification.

    PubMed

    Friedel, Thorsten; Jung-Klawitter, Sabine; Sebe, Attila; Schenk, Franziska; Modlich, Ute; Ivics, Zoltán; Schumann, Gerald G; Buchholz, Christian J; Schneider, Irene C

    2016-05-01

    Cultures of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) often contain cells of varying grades of pluripotency. We present novel lentiviral vectors targeted to the surface receptor CD30 (CD30-LV) to transfer genes into iPSCs that are truly pluripotent as demonstrated by marker gene expression. We demonstrate that CD30 expression is restricted to SSEA4(high) cells of human iPSC cultures and a human embryonic stem cell line. When CD30-LV was added to iPSCs during routine cultivation, efficient and exclusive transduction of cells positive for the pluripotency marker Oct-4 was achieved, while retaining their pluripotency. When added during the reprogramming process, CD30-LV solely transduced cells that became fully reprogrammed iPSCs as confirmed by co-expression of endogenous Nanog and the reporter gene. Thus, CD30-LV may serve as novel tool for the selective gene transfer into PSCs with broad applications in basic and therapeutic research.

  19. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Novel Folic Acid Receptor-Targeted, β-Cyclodextrin-Based Drug Complexes for Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Juan-Juan; Sharma, Sonali; Shumyak, Stepan P.; Wang, Zhi-Xin; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; Zhang, Yangde; Guo, Peixuan; Li, Chen-Zhong; Kanwar, Jagat R.; Yang, Tianxin; Mohapatra, Shyam S.; Liu, Wanqing; Duan, Wei; Wang, Jian-Cheng; Li, Qi; Zhang, Xueji; Tan, Jun; Jia, Lee; Liang, Jun; Wei, Ming Q.; Li, Xiaotian; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2013-01-01

    Drug targeting is an active area of research and nano-scaled drug delivery systems hold tremendous potential for the treatment of neoplasms. In this study, a novel cyclodextrin (CD)-based nanoparticle drug delivery system has been assembled and characterized for the therapy of folate receptor-positive [FR(+)] cancer. Water-soluble folic acid (FA)-conjugated CD carriers (FACDs) were successfully synthesized and their structures were confirmed by 1D/2D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer (MALDI-TOF-MS), high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and circular dichroism. Drug complexes of adamatane (Ada) and cytotoxic doxorubicin (Dox) with FACD were readily obtained by mixed solvent precipitation. The average size of FACD-Ada-Dox was 1.5–2.5 nm. The host-guest association constant Ka was 1,639 M−1 as determined by induced circular dichroism and the hydrophilicity of the FACDs was greatly enhanced compared to unmodified CD. Cellular uptake and FR binding competitive experiments demonstrated an efficient and preferentially targeted delivery of Dox into FR-positive tumor cells and a sustained drug release profile was seen in vitro. The delivery of Dox into FR(+) cancer cells via endocytosis was observed by confocal microscopy and drug uptake of the targeted nanoparticles was 8-fold greater than that of non-targeted drug complexes. Our docking results suggest that FA, FACD and FACD-Ada-Dox could bind human hedgehog interacting protein that contains a FR domain. Mouse cardiomyocytes as well as fibroblast treated with FACD-Ada-Dox had significantly lower levels of reactive oxygen species, with increased content of glutathione and glutathione peroxidase activity, indicating a reduced potential for Dox-induced cardiotoxicity. These results indicate that the targeted drug complex possesses high drug association and sustained drug release properties with good biocompatibility and physiological stability. The novel FA-conjugated β-CD based drug complex might be promising as an anti-tumor treatment for FR(+) cancer. PMID:23658721

  20. Synthesis and biological evaluation of (68) Ga-labeled Pteroyl-Lys conjugates for folate receptor-targeted tumor imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuran; Yu, Qian; He, Yingfang; Zhang, Chun; Zhu, Hua; Yang, Zhi; Lu, Jie

    2016-07-01

    In order to develop novel (68) Ga-labeled PET tracers for folate receptor imaging, two DOTA-conjugated Pteroyl-Lys derivatives, Pteroyl-Lys-DOTA and Pteroyl-Lys-DAV-DOTA, were designed, synthesized and radiolabeled with (68) Ga. Biological evaluations of the two radiotracers were performed with FR-positive KB cell line and athymic nude mice bearing KB tumors. Both (68) Ga-DOTA-Lys-Pteroyl and (68) Ga-DOTA-DAV-Lys-Pteroyl exhibited receptor specific binding in KB cells in vitro. The tumor uptake values of (68) Ga-DOTA-Lys-Pteroyl and (68) Ga-DOTA-DAV-Lys-Pteroy were 10.06 ± 0.59%ID/g and 11.05 ± 0.60%ID/g at 2 h post-injection, respectively. Flank KB tumor was clearly visualized with (68) Ga-DOTA-DAV-Lys-Pteroyl by Micro-PET imaging at 2 h post-injection, suggesting the feasibility of using (68) Ga-labeled Pteroyl-Lys conjugates as a novel class of FR targeted probes.

  1. Asialoglycoprotein receptor targeted gene delivery using galactosylated polyethylenimine-graft-poly(ethylene glycol): in vitro and in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Mi; Jeong, Hwan-Jeong; Park, In-Kyu; Cho, Chong-Su; Moon, Hyung-Bae; Yu, Dae-Yeul; Bom, Hee-Seung; Sohn, Myung-Hee; Oh, In-Joon

    2005-11-28

    The asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGP-R) on the hepatocyte membrane is a specific targeting marker for gene and drug delivery. Polyethylenimine (PEI) is a polycationic nonviral vector that is used for gene transfer. We have synthesized galactosylated polyethylenimine-graft-poly(ethylene glycol) (GPP) for performing gene delivery to the hepatocytes. The present study reports on the in vitro and in vivo data that was achieved in hepatoma bearing transgenic mice. The cytotoxicity was decreased with the increasing PEG content. The particle size of the complex was increased with the increasing PEG at an N/P ratio of 3.0, while the zeta potentials were decreased. The (99m)Tc labeled complexes were transfected into HepG2 and HeLa cells, while the GFP reporter genes were mainly expressed in the HepG2 cells. The in vivo data was achieved in ALB/c-Ha-ras transgenic mice. (99m)Tc labeled GPP(50)/DNA was injected into the mice via the tail vein, and the gamma images were acquired at 5, 15 and 30 min. The (99m)Tc labeled complexes were mainly localized in the heart and liver, and they were excreted through the kidneys. The GFP gene was mainly expressed in the proliferating cells at the tumor periphery. This result was confirmed by PCNA staining. The GPP(50)/DNA complexes were bound to ASGP-R of the proliferating hepatocytes in vitro and in vivo. The present results demonstrate the feasibility of nonviral gene transfer using galactosylated PEI-PEG in vivo.

  2. Inhibition of macrophage phagocytotic activity by a receptor-targeted polymer vesicle-based drug delivery formulation of pravastatin.

    PubMed

    Broz, Pavel; Ben-Haim, Nadav; Grzelakowski, Mariusz; Marsch, Stephan; Meier, Wolfgang; Hunziker, Patrick

    2008-03-01

    Ruptures of macrophage-rich atherosclerotic plaques in the coronary arteries are the main reason for heart attack. Targeted therapeutic interventions with an inhibitory effect on the macrophages promise to be beneficial, but currently available drugs such as statins achieve event reductions of only 30%. Dose-limiting adverse effects in remote organs prohibit achieving higher drug levels known to have strong inhibitory effects on macrophages. Receptor-specific targeting using statin-loaded nanometer-sized triblock copolymer vesicles with targeting moieties might allow high-dose treatment for improved efficacy, while minimizing toxicity in other cells. Vesicle uptake by target cells but not other cell types and slow intracellular content release was observed. A major improvement in biologic efficacy was observed for polymer vesicles compared to free drug, whereas no increased cytotoxicity was observed in muscle cells. Such high-dose, targeted therapy of statins through cell-specific polymer vesicles allows novel treatment paradigms not only for atherosclerosis, but appears promising for a wide range of drugs and diseases.

  3. Development of erythropoietin receptor-targeted drug delivery system against breast cancer using tamoxifen-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers.

    PubMed

    Beh, Chaw Yee; How, Chee Wun; Foo, Jhi Biau; Foong, Jia Ning; Selvarajah, Gayathri Thevi; Rasedee, Abdullah

    2017-01-01

    Tamoxifen (TAM) has been used in the treatment of breast cancers and is supplemented with erythropoietin (EPO) to alleviate the cancer-related anemia. The purported deleterious effects caused by the use of EPO with chemotherapeutic agents in the treatment of cancer-related anemia vary across studies and remain controversial. The use of nanoparticles as a drug delivery system has the potential to improve the specificity of anticancer drugs. In this study, we simultaneously incorporated two pharmacological active ingredients in one nanocarrier to develop EPO-conjugated TAM-loaded lipid nanoparticles (EPO-TAMNLC), a targeted delivery system, to enhance the cytotoxic activity while reducing the side effects of the ingredients. The effect of temperature in modulating the thermodynamic parameters associated with the binding of EPO and TAMNLC was assessed using isothermal titration calorimetry, while the unfolding of EPO structure was determined using fluorescence-quenching approach. The association efficiency of EPO and TAMNLC was 55.43%. Unlike binding of albumin to TAMNLC, the binding of EPO to TAMNLC occurred through endothermic and entropy-driven reaction. The EPO-TAMNLC formulation was stable because of the hydrophobic interaction and the high free energy, suggesting the spontaneity of the interactions between EPO and TAMNLC. The EPO-TAMNLC enhanced the in vitro cytotoxicity of TAM to MCF-7 cells. The EPO surface-functionalized TAMNLC could sequentially deliver EPO and TAM as well as improving site-specific delivery of these therapeutic compounds.

  4. Aerostructural safety factor criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verderaime, V.

    1992-01-01

    The present modification of the conventional safety factor method for aircraft structures evaluation involves the expression of deterministic safety factors in probabilistic tolerance limit ratios; these are found to involve a total of three factors that control the interference of applied and resistive stress distributions. The deterministic expression is extended so that it may furnish a 'relative ultimate safety' index that encompasses all three distribution factors. Operational reliability is developed on the basis of the applied and the yield stress distribution interferences. Industry standards are suggested to be derivable from factor selections that are based on the consequences of failure.

  5. Bayesian Exploratory Factor Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Gabriella; Frühwirth-Schnatter, Sylvia; Heckman, James J.; Piatek, Rémi

    2014-01-01

    This paper develops and applies a Bayesian approach to Exploratory Factor Analysis that improves on ad hoc classical approaches. Our framework relies on dedicated factor models and simultaneously determines the number of factors, the allocation of each measurement to a unique factor, and the corresponding factor loadings. Classical identification criteria are applied and integrated into our Bayesian procedure to generate models that are stable and clearly interpretable. A Monte Carlo study confirms the validity of the approach. The method is used to produce interpretable low dimensional aggregates from a high dimensional set of psychological measurements. PMID:25431517

  6. Acquired Factor V Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Hirai, Daisuke; Yamashita, Yugo; Masunaga, Nobutoyo; Katsura, Toshiaki; Akao, Masaharu; Okuno, Yoshiaki; Koyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitors directed against factor V rarely occur, and the clinical symptoms vary. We herein report the case of a patient who presented with a decreased factor V activity that had decreased to <3 %. We administered vitamin K and 6 units of fresh frozen plasma, but she thereafter developed an intracerebral hemorrhage. It is unclear whether surgery >10 years earlier might have caused the development of a factor V inhibitor. The treatment of acquired factor V inhibitors is mainly the transfusion of platelet concentrates and corticosteroids. Both early detection and the early initiation of the treatment of factor V inhibitor are thus considered to be important. PMID:27746446

  7. Epidemiologic Study of Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 Expression in Advanced/Metastatic Gastric Cancer: an Assessment of Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 Status in Tumor Tissue Samples of Gastric and Gastro-Esophageal Junction Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Kyung Won; Jeon, Taeyong; Kim, Sewon; Kim, Sung Soo; Kim, Kwanghee; Suh, Byoung-Jo; Hwang, Sunhwi; Choi, SeongHee; Ryu, Seungwan; Min, Jae Seok; Lee, Young-Joon; Jee, Ye Seob; Chae, Hyeondong

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The Trastuzumab for gastric cancer (GC) trial identified human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) as a predictor of successful treatment with trastuzumab (HER2 receptor targeting agent) among patients with advanced/metastatic GC. To date, the prevalence of HER2 overexpression in the Korean population is unknown. The present study aimed to assess the incidence of HER2 positivity among GC and gastroesophageal (GE) junction cancer samples and the relationship between HER2 overexpression and clinicopathological characteristics in Korean patients. Materials and Methods Tumor samples collected from 1,695 patients with histologically proven GC or GE junction enrolled at 14 different hospitals in Korea were examined. After gathering clinicopathological data of all patients, HER2 status was assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) at each hospital, and IHC 2+ cases were subjected to silver-enhanced in situ hybridization at 3 central laboratories. Results A total of 182 specimens tested positive for HER2, whereas 1,505 tested negative. Therefore, the overall HER2-positive rate in this study was 10.8% (95% confidence interval=9.3%–12.3%). The HER2-positive rate was higher among intestinal-type cases (17.6%) than among other types, and was higher among patients older than 70 years and 50 years of age, compared to other age groups. Conclusions Our evaluation of the HER2 positivity rate (10.8%) among Korean patients with GC and GE junction indicated the necessity of epidemiological data when conducting studies related to HER2 expression in GC and GE junction. PMID:28337363

  8. Novel toll-like receptor 9 agonist induces epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibition and synergistic antitumor activity with EGFR inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Damiano, Vincenzo; Caputo, Rosa; Bianco, Roberto; D'Armiento, Francesco P; Leonardi, Antonio; De Placido, Sabino; Bianco, A Raffaele; Agrawal, Sudhir; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2006-01-15

    Immunostimulating Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) agonists cause antitumor activity interfering also with cancer proliferation and angiogenesis by mechanisms still incompletely understood. We hypothesized that modified TLR9 agonists could impair epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling and, by this means, greatly enhance EGFR inhibitors effect, acting on both the receptor targeting and the immunologic arm. We used a novel second-generation, modified, immunomodulatory TLR9 agonist (IMO), alone and in combination with the anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody cetuximab or tyrosine kinase inhibitor gefitinib, on the growth of GEO and cetuximab-resistant derivatives GEO-CR colon cancer xenografts. We have also evaluated the expression of several proteins critical for cell proliferation, apoptosis, and angiogenesis, including EGFR, mitogen-activated protein kinase, Akt, bcl-2, cyclooxygenase-2, vascular endothelial growth factor, and nuclear factor-kappaB. IMO inhibited GEO growth and signaling by EGFR and the other proteins critical for cell proliferation and angiogenesis. IMO plus the anti-EGFR antibody cetuximab synergistically inhibited tumor growth, signaling proteins, and microvessel formation. EGFR signaling inhibition by IMO is relevant because IMO cooperated also with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor gefitinib in GEO tumors, while it was inactive against GEO-CR xenografts. On the other hand, IMO boosted the non-EGFR-dependent cetuximab activity, causing a cooperative antitumor effect in GEO-CR cells. Finally, combination of IMO, cetuximab and chemotherapeutic irinotecan eradicated the tumors in 90% of mice. IMO interferes with EGFR-related signaling and angiogenesis and has a synergistic antitumor effect with EGFR inhibitors, especially with cetuximab, boosting both the EGFR dependent and independent activity of this agent. Moreover, this therapeutic strategy could be translated in patients affected by colorectal cancer.

  9. Functional RNAi screen targeting cytokine and growth factor receptors reveals oncorequisite role for interleukin-2 gamma receptor in JAK3-mutation-positive leukemia.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, A; MacKenzie, R J; Eide, C A; Davare, M A; Watanabe-Smith, K; Tognon, C E; Mongoue-Tchokote, S; Park, B; Braziel, R M; Tyner, J W; Druker, B J

    2015-06-04

    To understand the role of cytokine and growth factor receptor-mediated signaling in leukemia pathogenesis, we designed a functional RNA interference (RNAi) screen targeting 188 cytokine and growth factor receptors that we found highly expressed in primary leukemia specimens. Using this screen, we identified interleukin-2 gamma receptor (IL2Rγ) as a critical growth determinant for a JAK3(A572V) mutation-positive acute myeloid leukemia cell line. We observed that knockdown of IL2Rγ abrogates phosphorylation of JAK3 and downstream signaling molecules, JAK1, STAT5, MAPK and pS6 ribosomal protein. Overexpression of IL2Rγ in murine cells increased the transforming potential of activating JAK3 mutations, whereas absence of IL2Rγ completely abrogated the clonogenic potential of JAK3(A572V), as well as the transforming potential of additional JAK3-activating mutations such as JAK3(M511I). In addition, mutation at the IL2Rγ interaction site in the FERM domain of JAK3 (Y100C) completely abrogated JAK3-mediated leukemic transformation. Mechanistically, we found IL2Rγ contributes to constitutive JAK3 mutant signaling by increasing JAK3 expression and phosphorylation. Conversely, we found that mutant, but not wild-type JAK3, increased the expression of IL2Rγ, indicating IL2Rγ and JAK3 contribute to constitutive JAK/STAT signaling through their reciprocal regulation. Overall, we demonstrate a novel role for IL2Rγ in potentiating oncogenesis in the setting of JAK3-mutation-positive leukemia. In addition, our study highlights an RNAi-based functional assay that can be used to facilitate the identification of non-kinase cytokine and growth factor receptor targets for inhibiting leukemic cell growth.

  10. Gelatin device for the delivery of growth factors involved in endochondral ossification

    PubMed Central

    Ahrens, Lucas A. J.; Vonwil, Daniel; Christensen, Jon

    2017-01-01

    Controlled release drug delivery systems are well established as oral and implantable dosage forms. However, the controlled release paradigm can also be used to present complex soluble signals responsible for cellular organization during development. Endochondral ossification (EO), the developmental process of bone formation from a cartilage matrix is controlled by several soluble signals with distinct functions that vary in structure, molecular weight and stability. This makes delivering them from a single vehicle rather challenging. Herein, a gelatin-based delivery system suitable for the delivery of small molecules as well as recombinant human (rh) proteins (rhWNT3A, rhFGF2, rhVEGF, rhBMP4) is reported. The release behavior and biological activity of the released molecules was validated using analytical and biological assays, including cell reporter systems. The simplicity of fabrication of the gelatin device should foster its adaptation by the diverse scientific community interested in interrogating developmental processes, in vivo. PMID:28380024

  11. Oversimplifying quantum factoring.

    PubMed

    Smolin, John A; Smith, Graeme; Vargo, Alexander

    2013-07-11

    Shor's quantum factoring algorithm exponentially outperforms known classical methods. Previous experimental implementations have used simplifications dependent on knowing the factors in advance. However, as we show here, all composite numbers admit simplification of the algorithm to a circuit equivalent to flipping coins. The difficulty of a particular experiment therefore depends on the level of simplification chosen, not the size of the number factored. Valid implementations should not make use of the answer sought.

  12. Graphical mass factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humpert, B.; van Neerven, W. L.

    1981-07-01

    We point to the close analogy between (multiplicative) BPHZ-renormalization and mass factorization. Adapation of the forest formula to mass singular graphs allows an alternative proof of mass factorization. A diagrammatic method is developed to carry out diagram-by-diagram mass factorization with the mass singularities being subtracted by counter terms which built up the operator matrix element. The reasoning is exposed for deep-inelastic (DI) scattering and for the Drell-Yan (DY) process.

  13. [Acquired coagulant factor inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Nogami, Keiji

    2015-02-01

    Acquired coagulation factor inhibitors are an autoimmune disease causing bleeding symptoms due to decreases in the corresponding factor (s) which result from the appearance of autoantibodies against coagulation factors (inhibitor). This disease is quite different from congenital coagulation factor deficiencies based on genetic abnormalities. In recent years, cases with this disease have been increasing, and most have anti-factor VIII autoantibodies. The breakdown of the immune control mechanism is speculated to cause this disease since it is common in the elderly, but the pathology and pathogenesis are presently unclear. We herein describe the pathology and pathogenesis of factor VIII and factor V inhibitors. Characterization of these inhibitors leads to further analysis of the coagulation process and the activation mechanisms of clotting factors. In the future, with the development of new clotting examination method (s), we anticipate that further novel findings will be obtained in this field through inhibitor analysis. In addition, detailed elucidation of the coagulation inhibitory mechanism possibly leading to hemostatic treatment strategies for acquired coagulation factor disorders will be developed.

  14. Analytic Couple Modeling Introducing Device Design Factor, Fin Factor, Thermal Diffusivity Factor, and Inductance Factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackey, Jon; Sehirlioglu, Alp; Dynys, Fred

    2014-01-01

    A set of convenient thermoelectric device solutions have been derived in order to capture a number of factors which are previously only resolved with numerical techniques. The concise conversion efficiency equations derived from governing equations provide intuitive and straight-forward design guidelines. These guidelines allow for better device design without requiring detailed numerical modeling. The analytical modeling accounts for factors such as i) variable temperature boundary conditions, ii) lateral heat transfer, iii) temperature variable material properties, and iv) transient operation. New dimensionless parameters, similar to the figure of merit, are introduced including the device design factor, fin factor, thermal diffusivity factor, and inductance factor. These new device factors allow for the straight-forward description of phenomenon generally only captured with numerical work otherwise. As an example a device design factor of 0.38, which accounts for thermal resistance of the hot and cold shoes, can be used to calculate a conversion efficiency of 2.28 while the ideal conversion efficiency based on figure of merit alone would be 6.15. Likewise an ideal couple with efficiency of 6.15 will be reduced to 5.33 when lateral heat is accounted for with a fin factor of 1.0.

  15. Exploratory Bi-Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennrich, Robert I.; Bentler, Peter M.

    2011-01-01

    Bi-factor analysis is a form of confirmatory factor analysis originally introduced by Holzinger. The bi-factor model has a general factor and a number of group factors. The purpose of this article is to introduce an exploratory form of bi-factor analysis. An advantage of using exploratory bi-factor analysis is that one need not provide a specific…

  16. Exploratory Bi-Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennrich, Robert I.; Bentler, Peter M.

    2011-01-01

    Bi-factor analysis is a form of confirmatory factor analysis originally introduced by Holzinger. The bi-factor model has a general factor and a number of group factors. The purpose of this article is to introduce an exploratory form of bi-factor analysis. An advantage of using exploratory bi-factor analysis is that one need not provide a specific…

  17. Overview of environmental factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purvis, C. K.

    1989-01-01

    The orbital environment is complex, dynamic, and comprised of both natural and system-induced components. Several environment factors are important for materials. Materials selection/suitability determination requires consideration of each and all factors, including synergisms among them. Understanding and evaluating these effects will require ground testing, modeling, and focused flight experimentation.

  18. Rasch Factor Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Benjamin D.

    Factor analysis and Rasch measurement are compared, showing how they address the same data with different interpretations of numerical status. Both methods use the same estimation method, with different measurement models, and they solve the same problem, with different utility. Factor analysis is faulted for mistaking stochastic observations of…

  19. Lung injury and lung cancer caused by cigarette smoke-induced oxidative stress: Molecular mechanisms and therapeutic opportunities involving the ceramide-generating machinery and epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Goldkorn, Tzipora; Filosto, Simone; Chung, Samuel

    2014-11-20

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer are frequently caused by tobacco smoking. However, these diseases present opposite phenotypes involving redox signaling at the cellular level. While COPD is characterized by excessive airway epithelial cell death and lung injury, lung cancer is caused by uncontrolled epithelial cell proliferation. Notably, epidemiological studies have demonstrated that lung cancer incidence is significantly higher in patients who have preexisting emphysema/lung injury. However, the molecular link and common cell signaling events underlying lung injury diseases and lung cancer are poorly understood. This review focuses on studies of molecular mechanism(s) underlying smoking-related lung injury (COPD) and lung cancer. Specifically, the role of the ceramide-generating machinery during cigarette smoke-induced oxidative stress leading to both apoptosis and proliferation of lung epithelial cells is emphasized. Over recent years, it has been established that ceramide is a sphingolipid playing a major role in lung epithelia structure/function leading to lung injury in chronic pulmonary diseases. However, new and unexpected findings draw attention to its potential role in lung development, cell proliferation, and tumorigenesis. To address this dichotomy in detail, evidence is presented regarding several protein targets, including Src, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and neutral sphingomyelinase 2, the major sphingomyelinase that controls ceramide generation during oxidative stress. Furthermore, their roles are presented not only in apoptosis and lung injury but also in enhancing cell proliferation, lung cancer development, and resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted therapy for treating lung cancer.

  20. Exposure Factors Handbook Chapter 16

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Exposure Factors Handbook: 2011 Edition. The Exposure Factors Handbook provides information on various physiological and behavioral factors commonly used in assessing exposure to environmental chemicals.

  1. Exposure Factors Handbook Chapter 6

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Exposure Factors Handbook: 2011 Edition. The Exposure Factors Handbook provides information on various physiological and behavioral factors commonly used in assessing exposure to environmental chemicals.

  2. Exposure Factors Handbook Chapter 11

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Exposure Factors Handbook: 2011 Edition. The Exposure Factors Handbook provides information on various physiological and behavioral factors commonly used in assessing exposure to environmental chemicals.

  3. Exposure Factors Handbook Chapter 12

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Exposure Factors Handbook: 2011 Edition. The Exposure Factors Handbook provides information on various physiological and behavioral factors commonly used in assessing exposure to environmental chemicals.

  4. Exposure Factors Handbook Chapter 7

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Exposure Factors Handbook: 2011 Edition. The Exposure Factors Handbook provides information on various physiological and behavioral factors commonly used in assessing exposure to environmental chemicals.

  5. Exposure Factors Handbook Chapter 15

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Exposure Factors Handbook: 2011 Edition. The Exposure Factors Handbook provides information on various physiological and behavioral factors commonly used in assessing exposure to environmental chemicals.

  6. Exposure Factors Handbook (2011 Edition)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Exposure Factors Handbook: 2011 Edition. The Exposure Factors Handbook provides information on various physiological and behavioral factors commonly used in assessing exposure to environmental chemicals.

  7. Exposure Factors Handbook Chapter 19

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Exposure Factors Handbook: 2011 Edition. The Exposure Factors Handbook provides information on various physiological and behavioral factors commonly used in assessing exposure to environmental chemicals.

  8. Exposure Factors Handbook Chapter 1

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Exposure Factors Handbook: 2011 Edition. The Exposure Factors Handbook provides information on various physiological and behavioral factors commonly used in assessing exposure to environmental chemicals.

  9. Exposure Factors Handbook Chapter 17

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Exposure Factors Handbook: 2011 Edition. The Exposure Factors Handbook provides information on various physiological and behavioral factors commonly used in assessing exposure to environmental chemicals.

  10. Exposure Factors Handbook Chapter 5

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Exposure Factors Handbook: 2011 Edition. The Exposure Factors Handbook provides information on various physiological and behavioral factors commonly used in assessing exposure to environmental chemicals.

  11. Exposure Factors Handbook Chapter 9

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Exposure Factors Handbook: 2011 Edition. The Exposure Factors Handbook provides information on various physiological and behavioral factors commonly used in assessing exposure to environmental chemicals.

  12. Exposure Factors Handbook Chapter 2

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Exposure Factors Handbook: 2011 Edition. The Exposure Factors Handbook provides information on various physiological and behavioral factors commonly used in assessing exposure to environmental chemicals.

  13. Exposure Factors Handbook Chapter 3

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Exposure Factors Handbook: 2011 Edition. The Exposure Factors Handbook provides information on various physiological and behavioral factors commonly used in assessing exposure to environmental chemicals.

  14. Exposure Factors Handbook Chapter 18

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Exposure Factors Handbook: 2011 Edition. The Exposure Factors Handbook provides information on various physiological and behavioral factors commonly used in assessing exposure to environmental chemicals.

  15. Exposure Factors Handbook Chapter 14

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Exposure Factors Handbook: 2011 Edition. The Exposure Factors Handbook provides information on various physiological and behavioral factors commonly used in assessing exposure to environmental chemicals.

  16. Exposure Factors Handbook Chapter 10

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Exposure Factors Handbook: 2011 Edition. The Exposure Factors Handbook provides information on various physiological and behavioral factors commonly used in assessing exposure to environmental chemicals.

  17. Exposure Factors Handbook Chapter 8

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Exposure Factors Handbook: 2011 Edition. The Exposure Factors Handbook provides information on various physiological and behavioral factors commonly used in assessing exposure to environmental chemicals.

  18. Exposure Factors Handbook Chapter 13

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Exposure Factors Handbook: 2011 Edition. The Exposure Factors Handbook provides information on various physiological and behavioral factors commonly used in assessing exposure to environmental chemicals.

  19. Exposure Factors Handbook Chapter 4

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Exposure Factors Handbook: 2011 Edition. The Exposure Factors Handbook provides information on various physiological and behavioral factors commonly used in assessing exposure to environmental chemicals.

  20. Risk Factors for Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Narasimhan, Padmanesan; Wood, James; MacIntyre, Chandini Raina; Mathai, Dilip

    2013-01-01

    The risk of progression from exposure to the tuberculosis bacilli to the development of active disease is a two-stage process governed by both exogenous and endogenous risk factors. Exogenous factors play a key role in accentuating the progression from exposure to infection among which the bacillary load in the sputum and the proximity of an individual to an infectious TB case are key factors. Similarly endogenous factors lead in progression from infection to active TB disease. Along with well-established risk factors (such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), malnutrition, and young age), emerging variables such as diabetes, indoor air pollution, alcohol, use of immunosuppressive drugs, and tobacco smoke play a significant role at both the individual and population level. Socioeconomic and behavioral factors are also shown to increase the susceptibility to infection. Specific groups such as health care workers and indigenous population are also at an increased risk of TB infection and disease. This paper summarizes these factors along with health system issues such as the effects of delay in diagnosis of TB in the transmission of the bacilli. PMID:23476764

  1. Environmental Factors in Autism

    PubMed Central

    Grabrucker, Andreas M.

    2013-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by impairments in communication and social behavior, and by repetitive behaviors. Although genetic factors might be largely responsible for the occurrence of autism they cannot fully account for all cases and it is likely that in addition to a certain combination of autism-related genes, specific environmental factors might act as risk factors triggering the development of autism. Thus, the role of environmental factors in autism is an important area of research and recent data will be discussed in this review. Interestingly, the results show that many environmental risk factors are interrelated and their identification and comparison might unveil a common scheme of alterations on a contextual as well as molecular level. For example, both, disruption in the immune system and in zinc homeostasis may affect synaptic transmission in autism. Thus, here, a model is proposed that interconnects the most important and scientifically recognized environmental factors. Moreover, similarities in how these risk factors impact synapse function are discussed and a possible influence on an already well described genetic pathway leading to the development of autism via zinc homeostasis is proposed. PMID:23346059

  2. Factor V Leiden thrombophilia.

    PubMed

    Kujovich, Jody Lynn

    2011-01-01

    Factor V Leiden is a genetic disorder characterized by a poor anticoagulant response to activated Protein C and an increased risk for venous thromboembolism. Deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism are the most common manifestations, but thrombosis in unusual locations also occurs. The current evidence suggests that the mutation has at most a modest effect on recurrence risk after initial treatment of a first venous thromboembolism. Factor V Leiden is also associated with a 2- to 3-fold increased relative risk for pregnancy loss and possibly other obstetric complications, although the probability of a successful pregnancy outcome is high. The clinical expression of Factor V Leiden is influenced by the number of Factor V Leiden alleles, coexisting genetic and acquired thrombophilic disorders, and circumstantial risk factors. Diagnosis requires the activated Protein C resistance assay (a coagulation screening test) or DNA analysis of the F5 gene, which encodes the Factor V protein. The first acute thrombosis is treated according to standard guidelines. Decisions regarding the optimal duration of anticoagulation are based on an individualized assessment of the risks for venous thromboembolism recurrence and anticoagulant-related bleeding. In the absence of a history of thrombosis, long-term anticoagulation is not routinely recommended for asymptomatic Factor V Leiden heterozygotes, although prophylactic anticoagulation may be considered in high-risk clinical settings. In the absence of evidence that early diagnosis reduces morbidity or mortality, decisions regarding testing at-risk family members should be made on an individual basis.

  3. Environmental factors in autism.

    PubMed

    Grabrucker, Andreas M

    2012-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by impairments in communication and social behavior, and by repetitive behaviors. Although genetic factors might be largely responsible for the occurrence of autism they cannot fully account for all cases and it is likely that in addition to a certain combination of autism-related genes, specific environmental factors might act as risk factors triggering the development of autism. Thus, the role of environmental factors in autism is an important area of research and recent data will be discussed in this review. Interestingly, the results show that many environmental risk factors are interrelated and their identification and comparison might unveil a common scheme of alterations on a contextual as well as molecular level. For example, both, disruption in the immune system and in zinc homeostasis may affect synaptic transmission in autism. Thus, here, a model is proposed that interconnects the most important and scientifically recognized environmental factors. Moreover, similarities in how these risk factors impact synapse function are discussed and a possible influence on an already well described genetic pathway leading to the development of autism via zinc homeostasis is proposed.

  4. Factorized Graph Matching.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Feng; de la Torre, Fernando

    2015-11-19

    Graph matching (GM) is a fundamental problem in computer science, and it plays a central role to solve correspondence problems in computer vision. GM problems that incorporate pairwise constraints can be formulated as a quadratic assignment problem (QAP). Although widely used, solving the correspondence problem through GM has two main limitations: (1) the QAP is NP-hard and difficult to approximate; (2) GM algorithms do not incorporate geometric constraints between nodes that are natural in computer vision problems. To address aforementioned problems, this paper proposes factorized graph matching (FGM). FGM factorizes the large pairwise affinity matrix into smaller matrices that encode the local structure of each graph and the pairwise affinity between edges. Four are the benefits that follow from this factorization: (1) There is no need to compute the costly (in space and time) pairwise affinity matrix; (2) The factorization allows the use of a path-following optimization algorithm, that leads to improved optimization strategies and matching performance; (3) Given the factorization, it becomes straight-forward to incorporate geometric transformations (rigid and non-rigid) to the GM problem. (4) Using a matrix formulation for the GM problem and the factorization, it is easy to reveal commonalities and differences between different GM methods. The factorization also provides a clean connection with other matching algorithms such as iterative closest point; Experimental results on synthetic and real databases illustrate how FGM outperforms state-of-the-art algorithms for GM. The code is available at http://humansensing.cs.cmu.edu/fgm.

  5. Conundrums with uncertainty factors.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Roger

    2010-03-01

    The practice of uncertainty factors as applied to noncancer endpoints in the IRIS database harkens back to traditional safety factors. In the era before risk quantification, these were used to build in a "margin of safety." As risk quantification takes hold, the safety factor methods yield to quantitative risk calculations to guarantee safety. Many authors believe that uncertainty factors can be given a probabilistic interpretation as ratios of response rates, and that the reference values computed according to the IRIS methodology can thus be converted to random variables whose distributions can be computed with Monte Carlo methods, based on the distributions of the uncertainty factors. Recent proposals from the National Research Council echo this view. Based on probabilistic arguments, several authors claim that the current practice of uncertainty factors is overprotective. When interpreted probabilistically, uncertainty factors entail very strong assumptions on the underlying response rates. For example, the factor for extrapolating from animal to human is the same whether the dosage is chronic or subchronic. Together with independence assumptions, these assumptions entail that the covariance matrix of the logged response rates is singular. In other words, the accumulated assumptions entail a log-linear dependence between the response rates. This in turn means that any uncertainty analysis based on these assumptions is ill-conditioned; it effectively computes uncertainty conditional on a set of zero probability. The practice of uncertainty factors is due for a thorough review. Two directions are briefly sketched, one based on standard regression models, and one based on nonparametric continuous Bayesian belief nets.

  6. Introduction to human factors.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Eric

    2012-03-01

    This paper provides an introduction to "human factors engineering," an applied science that seeks to optimize usability and safety of systems. Human factors engineering pursues this goal by aligning system design with the perceptual, cognitive, and physical capabilities of users. Human factors issues loom large in the diabetes management domain because patients and health care professionals interact with a complex variety of systems, including medical device hardware and software, which are themselves embedded within larger systems of institutions, people, and processes. Usability considerations must be addressed in these systems and devices to ensure safe and effective diabetes management.

  7. Factors Influencing Army Maintenance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    ARI Research Note 89-11 (N 00 Factors Influencing Army Maintenance LOloD Debra C. Evans and J. Thomas Roth Applied Science Associates, Inc. for...1.2.7 .2.7.C.1 11. TITLE (Include Security ClassifIcarIon) Factors Influencing Army Maintenance i2. FERSONAL AuTtiOR(S) Evans, Debra C., and Roth, J...y • ’ Factors and variables that influence maintenance for systems and related manpower, per- sonnel, and training (MPT) characteristics were

  8. Scaling factors: transcription factors regulating subcellular domains.

    PubMed

    Mills, Jason C; Taghert, Paul H

    2012-01-01

    Developing cells acquire mature fates in part by selective (i.e. qualitatively different) expression of a few cell-specific genes. However, all cells share the same basic repertoire of molecular and subcellular building blocks. Therefore, cells must also specialize according to quantitative differences in cell-specific distributions of those common molecular resources. Here we propose the novel hypothesis that evolutionarily-conserved transcription factors called scaling factors (SFs) regulate quantitative differences among mature cell types. SFs: (1) are induced during late stages of cell maturation; (2) are dedicated to specific subcellular domains; and, thus, (3) allow cells to emphasize specific subcellular features. We identify candidate SFs and discuss one in detail: MIST1 (BHLHA15, vertebrates)/DIMM (CG8667, Drosophila); professional secretory cells use this SF to scale up regulated secretion. Because cells use SFs to develop their mature properties and also to adapt them to ever-changing environmental conditions, SF aberrations likely contribute to diseases of adult onset.

  9. WRKY transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Rushton, Paul J; Somssich, Imre E; Ringler, Patricia; Shen, Qingxi J

    2010-05-01

    WRKY transcription factors are one of the largest families of transcriptional regulators in plants and form integral parts of signalling webs that modulate many plant processes. Here, we review recent significant progress in WRKY transcription factor research. New findings illustrate that WRKY proteins often act as repressors as well as activators, and that members of the family play roles in both the repression and de-repression of important plant processes. Furthermore, it is becoming clear that a single WRKY transcription factor might be involved in regulating several seemingly disparate processes. Mechanisms of signalling and transcriptional regulation are being dissected, uncovering WRKY protein functions via interactions with a diverse array of protein partners, including MAP kinases, MAP kinase kinases, 14-3-3 proteins, calmodulin, histone deacetylases, resistance proteins and other WRKY transcription factors. WRKY genes exhibit extensive autoregulation and cross-regulation that facilitates transcriptional reprogramming in a dynamic web with built-in redundancy. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Aerospace Human Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Kevin

    1999-01-01

    The following contains the final report on the activities related to the Cooperative Agreement between the human factors research group at NASA Ames Research Center and the Psychology Department at San Jose State University. The participating NASA Ames division has been, as the organization has changed, the Aerospace Human Factors Research Division (ASHFRD and Code FL), the Flight Management and Human Factors Research Division (Code AF), and the Human Factors Research and Technology Division (Code IH). The inclusive dates for the report are November 1, 1984 to January 31, 1999. Throughout the years, approximately 170 persons worked on the cooperative agreements in one capacity or another. The Cooperative Agreement provided for research personnel to collaborate with senior scientists in ongoing NASA ARC research. Finally, many post-MA/MS and post-doctoral personnel contributed to the projects. It is worth noting that 10 former cooperative agreement personnel were hired into civil service positions directly from the agreements.

  11. Sleep regulatory factors.

    PubMed

    Porkka-Heiskanen, T

    2014-01-01

    The state of sleep consists of different phases that proceed in successive, tightly regulated order through the night forming a physiological program, which for each individual is different but stabile from one night to another. Failure to accomplish this program results in feeling of unrefreshing sleep and tiredness in the morning. The pro- gram core is constructed by genetic factors but regulated by circadian rhythm and duration and intensity of day time brain activity. Many environmental factors modulate sleep, including stress, health status and ingestion of vigilance-affecting nutrients or medicines (e.g. caffeine). Knowledge of the factors that regulate the spontaneous sleep-wake cycle and factors that can affect this regulation forms the basis for diagnosis and treatment of the many common disorders of sleep.

  12. Factors Affecting Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Guo, S.; DiPietro, L.A.

    2010-01-01

    Wound healing, as a normal biological process in the human body, is achieved through four precisely and highly programmed phases: hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. For a wound to heal successfully, all four phases must occur in the proper sequence and time frame. Many factors can interfere with one or more phases of this process, thus causing improper or impaired wound healing. This article reviews the recent literature on the most significant factors that affect cutaneous wound healing and the potential cellular and/or molecular mechanisms involved. The factors discussed include oxygenation, infection, age and sex hormones, stress, diabetes, obesity, medications, alcoholism, smoking, and nutrition. A better understanding of the influence of these factors on repair may lead to therapeutics that improve wound healing and resolve impaired wounds. PMID:20139336

  13. Rheumatoid Factors: Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Castelli, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid factors are antibodies directed against the Fc region of immunoglobulin G. First detected in patients with rheumatoid arthritis 70 years ago, they can also be found in patients with other autoimmune and nonautoimmune conditions, as well as in healthy subjects. Rheumatoid factors form part of the workup for the differential diagnosis of arthropathies. In clinical practice, it is recommended to measure anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies and rheumatoid factors together because anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies alone are only moderately sensitive, and the combination of the two markers improves diagnostic accuracy, especially in the case of early rheumatoid arthritis. Furthermore, different rheumatoid factor isotypes alone or in combination can be helpful when managing rheumatoid arthritis patients, from the time of diagnosis until deciding on the choice of therapeutic strategy. PMID:24324289

  14. von Willebrand Factor Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Was this page helpful? Also known as: VWF:Ag; VWF:RCo; von Willebrand Panel; Ristocetin Cofactor Formal ... may include: Ratio of VWF:RCo to VWF:Ag Factor VIII binding assay Platelet VWF studies Collagen ...

  15. Explicit correlation factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Cole M.; Hirata, So; Ten-no, Seiichiro

    2017-09-01

    We analyze the performance of 17 different correlation factors in explicitly correlated second-order many-body perturbation calculations for correlation energies. Highly performing correlation factors are found to have near-universal shape and size in the short range of electron-electron distance (0 1.5 a.u.) is insignificant insofar as the factor becomes near constant, leaving an orbital expansion to describe decoupled electrons. An analysis based on a low-rank Taylor expansion of the correlation factor seems limited, except that a negative second derivative with the value of around -1.3 a.u. correlates with high performance.

  16. New microbial growth factor.

    PubMed Central

    Bok, S H; Casida, L E

    1977-01-01

    A screening procedure was used to isolate from soil a Penicillium sp., two bacterial isolates, and a Streptomyces sp. that produced a new microbial growth factor. This factor was an absolute growth requirement for three soil bacteria. The Penicillium sp. and one of the bacteria requiring the factor, an Arthrobacter sp., were selected for more extensive study concerning the production and characteristics of the growth factor. It did not seem to be related to the siderochromes. It was not present in soil extract, rumen fluid, or any other medium component tested. It appears to be a glycoprotein of high molecular weight, and it has high specific activity. When added to the diets for a meadow vole mammalian test system, it caused an increased consumption of diet without a concurrent increase in rate of weight gain. PMID:327929

  17. New microbial growth factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bok, S. H.; Casida, L. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A screening procedure was used to isolate from soil a Penicillium sp., two bacterial isolates, and a Streptomyces sp. that produced a previously unknown microbial growth factor. This factor was an absolute growth requirement for three soil bacteria. The Penicillium sp. and one of the bacteria requiring the factor, an Arthrobacter sp., were selected for more extensive study concerning the production and characteristics of the growth factor. It did not seem to be related to the siderochromes. It was not present in soil extract, rumen fluid, or any other medium component tested. It appears to be a glycoprotein of high molecular weight and has high specific activity. When added to the diets for a meadow-vole mammalian test system, it caused an increased consumption of diet without a concurrent increase in rate of weight gain.

  18. New microbial growth factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bok, S. H.; Casida, L. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A screening procedure was used to isolate from soil a Penicillium sp., two bacterial isolates, and a Streptomyces sp. that produced a previously unknown microbial growth factor. This factor was an absolute growth requirement for three soil bacteria. The Penicillium sp. and one of the bacteria requiring the factor, an Arthrobacter sp., were selected for more extensive study concerning the production and characteristics of the growth factor. It did not seem to be related to the siderochromes. It was not present in soil extract, rumen fluid, or any other medium component tested. It appears to be a glycoprotein of high molecular weight and has high specific activity. When added to the diets for a meadow-vole mammalian test system, it caused an increased consumption of diet without a concurrent increase in rate of weight gain.

  19. Factors affecting bone growth.

    PubMed

    Gkiatas, Ioannis; Lykissas, Marios; Kostas-Agnantis, Ioannis; Korompilias, Anastasios; Batistatou, Anna; Beris, Alexandros

    2015-02-01

    Bone growth and development are products of the complex interactions of genetic and environmental factors. Longitudinal bone growth depends on the growth plate. The growth plate has 5 different zones-each with a different functional role-and is the final target organ for longitudinal growth. Bone length is affected by several systemic, local, and mechanical factors. All these regulation systems control the final length of bones in a complicated way. Despite its significance to bone stability, bone growth in width has not been studied as extensively as longitudinal bone growth. Bone growth in width is also controlled by genetic factors, but mechanical loading regulates periosteal apposition. In this article, we review the most recent data regarding bone growth from the embryonic age and analyze the factors that control bone growth. An understanding of this complex system is important in identifying metabolic and developmental bone diseases and fracture risk.

  20. Impact factor distribution revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ding-wei

    2017-09-01

    We explore the consistency of a new type of frequency distribution, where the corresponding rank distribution is Lavalette distribution. Empirical data of journal impact factors can be well described. This distribution is distinct from Poisson distribution and negative binomial distribution, which were suggested by previous study. By a log transformation, we obtain a bell-shaped distribution, which is then compared to Gaussian and catenary curves. Possible mechanisms behind the shape of impact factor distribution are suggested.

  1. General Factors in Graphs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-07-01

    conjectured that the general factor problem can be solved in polynomial time when, in each Bi, all the gaps (if any) have length one. We prove this conjecture...exactly bi edges incident with node i, for each i. This problem is well-solved. A polynomial algorithm is known (Edmonds and Johnson (1970)) as well as a...powerful theorem to characterize the existence of solutions ( Tutte (1952)). The following generalization of the factor problem was studied by Lovtsz

  2. FGF growth factor analogs

    DOEpatents

    Zamora, Paul O [Gaithersburg, MD; Pena, Louis A [Poquott, NY; Lin, Xinhua [Plainview, NY; Takahashi, Kazuyuki [Germantown, MD

    2012-07-24

    The present invention provides a fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the formula: ##STR00001## where R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4, R.sub.5, X, Y and Z are as defined, pharmaceutical compositions, coating compositions and medical devices including the fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the foregoing formula, and methods and uses thereof.

  3. [Pathological gambling: risk factors].

    PubMed

    Bouju, G; Grall-Bronnec, M; Landreat-Guillou, M; Venisse, J-L

    2011-09-01

    In France, consumption of gambling games increased by 148% between 1960 and 2005. In 2004, gamblers lost approximately 0.9% of household income, compared to 0.4% in 1960. This represents approximately 134 Euros per year and per head. In spite of this important increase, the level remains lower than the European average (1%). However, gambling practices may continue to escalate in France in the next few years, particularly with the recent announce of the legalisation of online games and sports betting. With the spread of legalised gambling, pathological gambling rates may increase in France in the next years, in response to more widely available and more attractive gambling opportunities. In this context, there is a need for better understanding of the risk factors that are implicated in the development and maintenance of pathological gambling. This paper briefly describes the major risk factors for pathological gambling by examining the recent published literature available during the first quarter of 2008. This documentary basis was collected by Inserm for the collective expert report procedure on Gambling (contexts and addictions). Seventy-two articles focusing on risk factors for pathological gambling were considered in this review. Only 47 of them were taken into account for analysis. The selection of these 47 publications was based on the guide on literature analysis established by the French National Agency for Accreditation and Assessment in Health (ANAES, 2000). Some publications from more recent literature have also been added, mostly about Internet gambling. We identify three major types of risk factors implicated in gambling problems: some of them are related to the subject (individual factors), others are related to the object of the addiction, here the gambling activity by itself (structural factors), and the last are related to environment (contextual or situational factors). Thus, the development and maintenance of pathological gambling seems to be

  4. Purification and characterization of an abnormal factor IX (Christmas factor) molecule. Factor IX Chapel Hill.

    PubMed Central

    Chung, K S; Madar, D A; Goldsmith, J C; Kingdon, H S; Roberts, H R

    1978-01-01

    Human Factor IX (Christmas factor) was isolated from the plasma of a patient with mild hemophilia B. The patient's plasma contained 5% Factor IX clotting activity but 100% Factor IX antigenic activity as determined by immunological assays, which included inhibitor neutralization and a radioimmunoassay for Factor IX. This abnormal Factor IX is called Factor IX Chapel Hill (Factor IXCH). Both normal Factor IX and Factor IXCH have tyrosine as the NH2-terminal amino acid. The two proteins have a similar molecular weight, a similar amino acid analysis, the same number of gamma-carboxyglutamic acid residues (10 gamma-carboxyglutamic acid residues), and a similar carbohydrate content. Both exist as a single-chain glycoprotein in plasma. The major difference between normal Factor IX and Factor IXCH is that the latter exhibits delayed activation to Factor IXa in the presence of Factor XIa and Ca2+. Thus, Factor IXCH differs from other previously described abnormal Factor IX molecules. Images PMID:711853

  5. CATTELL AND EYSENCK FACTOR SCORES RELATED TO COMREY PERSONALITY FACTORS.

    PubMed

    Comrey, A L; Duffy, K E

    1968-10-01

    The Eysenck Personality Inventory, the Cattell 16 PF Inventory, and the Comrey Personality Inventory were administered to 272 volunteers. Eysenck and Cattell factor scores were correlated with scores over homogeneous item groups (FHIDs) which define the Comrey test factors. This matrix was factor analyzed to relate the Eysenck and Cattell factor scores to the factor structure underlying the Comrey test. The Eysenck Neuroticism, Comrey Neuroticism, and Cattell second-order Anxiety factors appeared to match. The Eysenck Introversion and the Comrey Shyness factors also matched. The 16 Cattell primary factors overlapped but did not match with the Comrey factors.

  6. Breast cancer risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Ciszewski, Tomasz; Łopacka-Szatan, Karolina; Miotła, Paweł; Starosławska, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed neoplastic disease in women around menopause often leading to a significant reduction of these women's ability to function normally in everyday life. The increased breast cancer incidence observed in epidemiological studies in a group of women actively participating in social and professional life implicates the necessity of conducting multidirectional studies in order to identify risk factors associated with the occurrence of this type of neoplasm. Taking the possibility of influencing the neoplastic transformation process in individuals as a criterion, all the risk factors initiating the process can be divided into two groups. The first group would include inherent factors such as age, sex, race, genetic makeup promoting familial occurrence of the neoplastic disease or the occurrence of benign proliferative lesions of the mammary gland. They all constitute independent parameters and do not undergo simple modification in the course of an individual's life. The second group would include extrinsic factors conditioned by lifestyle, diet or long-term medical intervention such as using oral hormonal contraceptives or hormonal replacement therapy and their influence on the neoplastic process may be modified to a certain degree. Identification of modifiable factors may contribute to development of prevention strategies decreasing breast cancer incidence. PMID:26528110

  7. [Prognostic factors in resuscitation].

    PubMed

    Bahloul, F; Le Gall, J R; Loirat, P; Alperovitch, A; Patois, E

    1988-10-08

    The outcome from intensive care is known to be influenced by such factors as age, previous health status, severity of the disease and diagnosis. In order to assess the influence of each individual factor, 3,687 patients from 38 French intensive care units were studied. For each patient were recorded: age, simplified acute physiological score (SAPS), previous health status, diagnosis, type of intensive care unit (medicine, scheduled or elective surgery) and immediate outcome. Each of these factors was found to influence the immediate survival rate. A multivariate analysis ranked the factors in the following order: SAPS, age, type of intensive care unit and previous health status. Diagnosis played a role in the prognosis since with a 10-15 points SAPS mortality was nil for drug overdose, 12 per cent for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and 38 per cent for cardiogenic shock. However, a single diagnosis was made in only 37 per cent of the patients, as against 3 diagnoses in 17 per cent and 4 diagnoses or more in 7 per cent. When the type of intensive care unit was considered, the mean death rate was 20 per cent in medicine, 27 per cent in scheduled surgery and 5 per cent in elective surgery (P less than 0.001). Since this study showed a definite influence of each of the four factors on immediate survival, intensive care patients can be described and classified according to this system. However, it must be stressed that individual prognoses are extremely vague.

  8. Factor Loading Estimation Error and Stability Using Exploratory Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sass, Daniel A.

    2010-01-01

    Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) is commonly employed to evaluate the factor structure of measures with dichotomously scored items. Generally, only the estimated factor loadings are provided with no reference to significance tests, confidence intervals, and/or estimated factor loading standard errors. This simulation study assessed factor loading…

  9. Factor Loading Estimation Error and Stability Using Exploratory Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sass, Daniel A.

    2010-01-01

    Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) is commonly employed to evaluate the factor structure of measures with dichotomously scored items. Generally, only the estimated factor loadings are provided with no reference to significance tests, confidence intervals, and/or estimated factor loading standard errors. This simulation study assessed factor loading…

  10. Geothermal Plant Capacity Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Greg Mines; Jay Nathwani; Christopher Richard; Hillary Hanson; Rachel Wood

    2015-01-01

    The capacity factors recently provided by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) indicated this plant performance metric had declined for geothermal power plants since 2008. Though capacity factor is a term commonly used by geothermal stakeholders to express the ability of a plant to produce power, it is a term frequently misunderstood and in some instances incorrectly used. In this paper we discuss how this capacity factor is defined and utilized by the EIA, including discussion on the information that the EIA requests from operations in their 923 and 860 forms that are submitted both monthly and annually by geothermal operators. A discussion is also provided regarding the entities utilizing the information in the EIA reports, and how those entities can misinterpret the data being supplied by the operators. The intent of the paper is to inform the facility operators as the importance of the accuracy of the data that they provide, and the implications of not providing the correct information.

  11. Multi-factor authentication

    DOEpatents

    Hamlet, Jason R; Pierson, Lyndon G

    2014-10-21

    Detection and deterrence of spoofing of user authentication may be achieved by including a cryptographic fingerprint unit within a hardware device for authenticating a user of the hardware device. The cryptographic fingerprint unit includes an internal physically unclonable function ("PUF") circuit disposed in or on the hardware device, which generates a PUF value. Combining logic is coupled to receive the PUF value, combines the PUF value with one or more other authentication factors to generate a multi-factor authentication value. A key generator is coupled to generate a private key and a public key based on the multi-factor authentication value while a decryptor is coupled to receive an authentication challenge posed to the hardware device and encrypted with the public key and coupled to output a response to the authentication challenge decrypted with the private key.

  12. Electromagnetic nucleon form factors

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, A.; Roberts, C.D.; Frank, M.R.

    1995-08-01

    The Dyson-Schwinger equation framework is employed to obtain expressions for the electromagnetic nucleon form factor. In generalized impulse approximation the form factor depends on the dressed quark propagator, the dressed quark-photon vertex, which is crucial to ensuring current conservation, and the nucleon Faddeev amplitude. The approach manifestly incorporates the large space-like-q{sup 2} renormalization group properties of QCD and allows a realistic extrapolation to small space-like-q{sup 2}. This extrapolation allows one to relate experimental data to the form of the quark-quark interaction at small space-like-q{sup 2}, which is presently unknown. The approach provides a means of unifying, within a single framework, the treatment of the perturbative and nonperturbative regimes of QCD. The wealth of experimental nucleon form factor data, over a large range of q{sup 2}, ensures that this application will provide an excellent environment to test, improve and extend our approach.

  13. DSN human factors project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chafin, R. L.; Martin, T. H.

    1980-01-01

    The project plan was to hold focus groups to identify the factors influencing the ease of use characteristics of software and to bond the problem. A questionnaire survey was conducted to evaluate those factors which were more appropriately measured with that method. The performance oriented factors were analyzed and relationships hypothesized. The hypotheses were put to test in the experimental phase of the project. In summary, the initial analysis indicates that there is an initial performance effect favoring computer controlled dialogue but the advantage fades fast as operators become experienced. The user documentation style is seen to have a significant effect on performance. The menu and prompt command formats are preferred by inexperienced operators. The short form mnemonic is least favored. There is no clear best command format but the short form mnemonic is clearly the worst.

  14. Psychological Factors in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Asthma has long been considered a condition in which psychological factors have a role. As in many illnesses, psychological variables may affect outcome in asthma via their effects on treatment adherence and symptom reporting. Emerging evidence suggests that the relation between asthma and psychological factors may be more complex than that, however. Central cognitive processes may influence not only the interpretation of asthma symptoms but also the manifestation of measurable changes in immune and physiologic markers of asthma. Furthermore, asthma and major depressive disorder share several risk factors and have similar patterns of dysregulation in key biologic systems, including the neuroendocrine stress response, cytokines, and neuropeptides. Despite the evidence that depression is common in people with asthma and exerts a negative impact on outcome, few treatment studies have examined whether improving symptoms of depression do, in fact, result in better control of asthma symptoms or improved quality of life in patients with asthma. PMID:20525122

  15. Factor D Enzyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The trauma caused by the open heart surgery often triggers massive inflammation because the immune system overreacts. Factor D, the protein which plays a key role in the biological steps that activate this immune response prevents the imune system from inappropriately rurning out of control, allowing the patient to recover more rapidly. Factor D blockers, with their great potential to alleviate the complication of inflammation associated with heart surgery, are now being developed for clinical trials. These new drugs, developed from space research, should be commercially available as soon as year 2001.

  16. WRKY transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Bakshi, Madhunita; Oelmüller, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    WRKY transcription factors are one of the largest families of transcriptional regulators found exclusively in plants. They have diverse biological functions in plant disease resistance, abiotic stress responses, nutrient deprivation, senescence, seed and trichome development, embryogenesis, as well as additional developmental and hormone-controlled processes. WRKYs can act as transcriptional activators or repressors, in various homo- and heterodimer combinations. Here we review recent progress on the function of WRKY transcription factors in Arabidopsis and other plant species such as rice, potato, and parsley, with a special focus on abiotic, developmental, and hormone-regulated processes. PMID:24492469

  17. The Transcription Factor Encyclopedia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Here we present the Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), a new web-based compendium of mini review articles on transcription factors (TFs) that is founded on the principles of open access and collaboration. Our consortium of over 100 researchers has collectively contributed over 130 mini review articles on pertinent human, mouse and rat TFs. Notable features of the TFe website include a high-quality PDF generator and web API for programmatic data retrieval. TFe aims to rapidly educate scientists about the TFs they encounter through the delivery of succinct summaries written and vetted by experts in the field. TFe is available at http://www.cisreg.ca/tfe. PMID:22458515

  18. [Natural factors influencing sleep].

    PubMed

    Jurkowski, Marek K; Bobek-Billewicz, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Sleep is a universal phenomenon of human and animal lives, although the importance of sleep for homeo-stasis is still unknown. Sleep disturbances influence many behavioral and physiologic processes, leading to health complications including death. On the other hand, sleep improvement can beneficially influence the course of healing of many disorders and can be a prognostic of health recovery. The factors influencing sleep have different biological and chemical origins. They are classical hormones, hypothalamic releasing and inhibitory hormones, neuropeptides, peptides and others as cytokines, prostaglandins, oleamid, adenosine, nitric oxide. These factors regulate most physiologic processes and are likely elements integrating sleep with physiology and physiology with sleep in health and disorders.

  19. The transcription factor encyclopedia.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, Dimas; Butland, Stefanie L; Swanson, Magdalena I; Bolotin, Eugene; Ticoll, Amy; Cheung, Warren A; Zhang, Xiao Yu Cindy; Dickman, Christopher T D; Fulton, Debra L; Lim, Jonathan S; Schnabl, Jake M; Ramos, Oscar H P; Vasseur-Cognet, Mireille; de Leeuw, Charles N; Simpson, Elizabeth M; Ryffel, Gerhart U; Lam, Eric W-F; Kist, Ralf; Wilson, Miranda S C; Marco-Ferreres, Raquel; Brosens, Jan J; Beccari, Leonardo L; Bovolenta, Paola; Benayoun, Bérénice A; Monteiro, Lara J; Schwenen, Helma D C; Grontved, Lars; Wederell, Elizabeth; Mandrup, Susanne; Veitia, Reiner A; Chakravarthy, Harini; Hoodless, Pamela A; Mancarelli, M Michela; Torbett, Bruce E; Banham, Alison H; Reddy, Sekhar P; Cullum, Rebecca L; Liedtke, Michaela; Tschan, Mario P; Vaz, Michelle; Rizzino, Angie; Zannini, Mariastella; Frietze, Seth; Farnham, Peggy J; Eijkelenboom, Astrid; Brown, Philip J; Laperrière, David; Leprince, Dominique; de Cristofaro, Tiziana; Prince, Kelly L; Putker, Marrit; del Peso, Luis; Camenisch, Gieri; Wenger, Roland H; Mikula, Michal; Rozendaal, Marieke; Mader, Sylvie; Ostrowski, Jerzy; Rhodes, Simon J; Van Rechem, Capucine; Boulay, Gaylor; Olechnowicz, Sam W Z; Breslin, Mary B; Lan, Michael S; Nanan, Kyster K; Wegner, Michael; Hou, Juan; Mullen, Rachel D; Colvin, Stephanie C; Noy, Peter John; Webb, Carol F; Witek, Matthew E; Ferrell, Scott; Daniel, Juliet M; Park, Jason; Waldman, Scott A; Peet, Daniel J; Taggart, Michael; Jayaraman, Padma-Sheela; Karrich, Julien J; Blom, Bianca; Vesuna, Farhad; O'Geen, Henriette; Sun, Yunfu; Gronostajski, Richard M; Woodcroft, Mark W; Hough, Margaret R; Chen, Edwin; Europe-Finner, G Nicholas; Karolczak-Bayatti, Magdalena; Bailey, Jarrod; Hankinson, Oliver; Raman, Venu; LeBrun, David P; Biswal, Shyam; Harvey, Christopher J; DeBruyne, Jason P; Hogenesch, John B; Hevner, Robert F; Héligon, Christophe; Luo, Xin M; Blank, Marissa Cathleen; Millen, Kathleen Joyce; Sharlin, David S; Forrest, Douglas; Dahlman-Wright, Karin; Zhao, Chunyan; Mishima, Yuriko; Sinha, Satrajit; Chakrabarti, Rumela; Portales-Casamar, Elodie; Sladek, Frances M; Bradley, Philip H; Wasserman, Wyeth W

    2012-01-01

    Here we present the Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), a new web-based compendium of mini review articles on transcription factors (TFs) that is founded on the principles of open access and collaboration. Our consortium of over 100 researchers has collectively contributed over 130 mini review articles on pertinent human, mouse and rat TFs. Notable features of the TFe website include a high-quality PDF generator and web API for programmatic data retrieval. TFe aims to rapidly educate scientists about the TFs they encounter through the delivery of succinct summaries written and vetted by experts in the field. TFe is available at http://www.cisreg.ca/tfe.

  20. Factor D Enzyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The trauma caused by the open heart surgery often triggers massive inflammation because the immune system overreacts. Factor D, the protein which plays a key role in the biological steps that activate this immune response prevents the imune system from inappropriately rurning out of control, allowing the patient to recover more rapidly. Factor D blockers, with their great potential to alleviate the complication of inflammation associated with heart surgery, are now being developed for clinical trials. These new drugs, developed from space research, should be commercially available as soon as year 2001.

  1. Endodontic surgery prognostic factors.

    PubMed

    Azarpazhooh, Amir; Shah, Prakesh S

    2011-01-01

    Medline, (PubMed) and the Cochrane databases together with hand searching of the following journals: Journal of Endodontics, International Endodontic Journal, Oral Surgery Oral Medicine Oral Pathology (name changed to Oral Surgery Oral Medicine Oral Pathology Oral Radiology and Endodontics in 1995), Endodontics and Dental Traumatology (name changed to Dental Traumatology in 2001), Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, and International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. Clinical studies evaluating apical surgery with placement of a root-end filling were included. Studies on apical surgery with orthograde root canal filling or about apicectomy alone without root-end filling were excluded, as were experimental and animal studies. Only studies with ≥ ten patients with a minimum six month follow-up period and clearly defined radiographic and clinical healing criteria, with healing reported for at least two categories of a specific prognostic factor were accepted. Studies reporting in English, German, French, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese and Scandinavian languages were included. All studies were assessed separately by two of the three authors, with disagreements resolved by discussion. Prognostic factors were divided into patient related, tooth-related or treatment-related factors. The reported percentages of healed teeth were pooled per category. The statistical method of Mantel-Haenszel was applied to estimate the odds ratios and their 95% confidence intervals. Homogeneity was assessed using Woolf's test. With regard to tooth-related factors, the following were identified as predictors of healing: absence of preoperative pain or signs, good density of the root canal filling and a periapical lesion size of ≤ 5 mm. With regard to treatment-related factors, teeth treated with the use of an endoscope tended to have higher healed rates than teeth treated without the use of an endoscope. Although the clinician may be able to control treatment

  2. Factor Analysis and Counseling Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, David J.

    1970-01-01

    Topics discussed include factor analysis versus cluster analysis, analysis of Q correlation matrices, ipsativity and factor analysis, and tests for the significance of a correlation matrix prior to application of factor analytic techniques. Techniques for factor extraction discussed include principal components, canonical factor analysis, alpha…

  3. Peptide growth factors, part A

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, D.; Sirbasku, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains information on the following topics: Epidermal Growth Factor;Transforming Growth Factors;Bone and Cartilage Growth Factors;Somatomedin/Insulin-Like Growth Factors;Techniques for the Study of Growth Factor Activity;Assays, Phosphorylation, and Surface Membrane Effects.

  4. Factor Analysis and Counseling Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, David J.

    1970-01-01

    Topics discussed include factor analysis versus cluster analysis, analysis of Q correlation matrices, ipsativity and factor analysis, and tests for the significance of a correlation matrix prior to application of factor analytic techniques. Techniques for factor extraction discussed include principal components, canonical factor analysis, alpha…

  5. Stressor and glucocorticoid-dependent induction of the immediate early gene kruppel-like factor 9: implications for neural development and plasticity.

    PubMed

    Bonett, Ronald M; Hu, Fang; Bagamasbad, Pia; Denver, Robert J

    2009-04-01

    Krüppel-like factor 9 (KLF9) is a thyroid hormone-induced, immediate early gene implicated in neural development in vertebrates. We analyzed stressor and glucocorticoid (GC)-dependent regulation of KLF9 expression in the brain of the frog Xenopus laevis, and investigated a possible role for KLF9 in neuronal differentiation. Exposure to shaking/confinement stressor increased plasma corticosterone (CORT) concentration, and KLF9 immunoreactivity in several brain regions, which included the medial amygdala and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, anterior preoptic area (homologous to the mammalian paraventricular nucleus), and optic tectum (homologous to the mammalian superior colliculus). The stressor-induced KLF9 mRNA expression in the brain was blocked by pretreatment with the GC receptor antagonist RU486, or mimicked by injection of CORT. Treatment with CORT also caused a rapid and dose-dependent increase in KLF9 mRNA in X. laevis XTC-2 cells that was resistant to inhibition of protein synthesis. The action of CORT on KLF9 expression in XTC-2 cells was blocked by RU486, but not by the mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist spironolactone. To test for functional consequences of up-regulation of KLF9, we introduced a KLF9 expression plasmid into living tadpole brain by electroporation-mediated gene transfer. Forced expression of KLF9 in tadpole brain caused an increase in Golgi-stained cells, reflective of neuronal differentiation/maturation. Our results support that KLF9 is a direct, GC receptor target gene that is induced by stress, and functions as an intermediary in the actions of GCs on brain gene expression and neuronal structure.

  6. Sciatic nerve injury in adult rats causes distinct changes in the central projections of sensory neurons expressing different glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor family receptors

    PubMed Central

    Keast, Janet R.; Forrest, Shelley L.; Osborne, Peregrine B.

    2010-01-01

    Most small unmyelinated neurons in adult rat dorsal ganglia (DRG) express one or more of the co-receptors targeted by glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), neurturin and artemin (GFRα1, GFRα2 and GFRα3 respectively). The function of these GDNF family ligands (GFLs) is not fully elucidated but recent evidence suggests GFLs could function in sensory neuron regeneration after nerve injury and peripheral nociceptor sensitisation. In this study, we used immunohistochemistry to determine if the DRG neurons targeted by each GFL change after sciatic nerve injury. We compared complete sciatic nerve transection and the chronic constriction model and found the pattern of changes incurred by each injury was broadly similar. In lumbar spinal cord, there was a widespread increase in neuronal GFRα1 immunoreactivity (IR) in the L1-6 dorsal horn. GFRα3-IR also increased but in a more restricted area. In contrast, GFRα2-IR decreased in patches of superficial dorsal horn and this loss was more extensive after transection injury. No change in calcitonin gene-related peptide-IR was detected after either injury. Analysis of double-immunolabelled L5 DRG sections suggested the main effect of injury on GFRα1- and GFRα3-IR was to increase expression in both myelinated and unmyelinated neurons. In contrast, no change in basal expression of GFRα2-IR was detected in DRG by analysis of fluorescence intensity and there was a small but significant reduction in GFRα2-IR neurons. Our results suggest the DRG neuronal populations targeted by GDNF, neurturin or artemin, and the effect of exogenous GFLs could change significantly after a peripheral nerve injury. PMID:20533358

  7. Exercise and food factors.

    PubMed

    Aoi, Wataru

    2009-01-01

    Habitual exercise is beneficial to health as it improves metabolism, reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease, and maintains the immune system. Appropriate nutrition contributes to acceleration of health promotion due to exercise. Recommended daily allowance is elevated by physical activity and intake of various food factors such carbohydrates, proteins, vitamins, minerals, and other phytochemicals is required to avoid their shortage. Additional dietary food factors are effective not only in supplementation to satisfy the allowance but also in further acceleration of the benefits of fitness. Dietary nutrition is also important to maintain active function in the elderly by preventing aging-induced muscle atrophy and avoiding intense exercise-induced disorders. Recently, several food components have been found to show physiological effects, and some of them are considered to be useful for promoting or alternating the beneficial effects of exercise, maintaining homeostasis, and preventing muscle aging. However, some of these food factors should only be used when there is clear scientific evidence. Also, it is important to understand the physiological changes caused by exercise to use them correctly. This article describes various food factors that have been reported to be effective for improving health promotion, along with the relevant physiological changes that occur during exercise.

  8. Factors leading to dermatophytosis.

    PubMed

    Qadim, Hamideh Herizchi; Golforoushan, Farideh; Azimi, Hamideh; Goldust, Mohamad

    2013-01-01

    Tinea or dermatophytoses are of skin superficial and fungous infections affecting keratinized tissues such as hair, nail, and superficial layer of epidermis. This study aimed at evaluating some predisposing factors for tinea corporis, because elimination or treatment of them not only ceases spreading of the lesion but also prevents reinfection. In this descriptive cross-sectional study patients who were visited in Sina Hospital in Tabriz and had confirmed tinea corporis with direct fungal smear were selected. Other regarding were age, sex, occupation and predisposing factors. Of 76 confirmed cases, 46 (60.5%) were males and 30 (30.5%) were females. Tinea corporis was common in the third decade. The main predisposing factor was dry skin. Diabetes was found only in 4 (5.2%) patients. According to the results of the present research, xerosis was the most common factor leading to tinea corporis in these patients rather than diabetes or lymphoma that it's diagnosis, treatment and some simple educations may inhence improvement of tinea corporis and prevents other superficial infections too.

  9. Affective Factors: Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tasnimi, Mahshad

    2009-01-01

    Affective factors seem to play a crucial role in success or failure in second language acquisition. Negative attitudes can reduce learners' motivation and harm language learning, while positive attitudes can do the reverse. Discovering students' attitudes about language will help both teacher and student in teaching learning process. Anxiety is…

  10. Managing Multiple Risk Factors.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-01

    cardiovascular disease among black women can be better controlled through the use of a stress reduction intervention that reduces the sympathetic nervous...All participants will have high normal (130/80) or mild hypertension and at least two additional risk factors for cardiovascular disease (e.g

  11. ERYTHROPOIETIC FACTOR PURIFICATION

    DOEpatents

    White, W.F.; Schlueter, R.J.

    1962-05-01

    A method is given for purifying and concentrating the blood plasma erythropoietic factor. Anemic sheep plasma is contacted three times successively with ion exchange resins: an anion exchange resin, a cation exchange resin at a pH of about 5, and a cation exchange resin at a pH of about 6. (AEC)

  12. Introduction to human factors

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, J.M.

    1988-03-01

    Some background is given on the field of human factors. The nature of problems with current human/computer interfaces is discussed, some costs are identified, ideal attributes of graceful system interfaces are outlined, and some reasons are indicated why it's not easy to fix the problems. (LEW)

  13. Factor Analysis and AIC.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akaike, Hirotugu

    1987-01-01

    The Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) was introduced to extend the method of maximum likelihood to the multimodel situation. Use of the AIC in factor analysis is interesting when it is viewed as the choice of a Bayesian model; thus, wider applications of AIC are possible. (Author/GDC)

  14. Assessment of Human Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mount, Frances; Foley, Tico

    1999-01-01

    Human Factors Engineering, often referred to as Ergonomics, is a science that applies a detailed understanding of human characteristics, capabilities, and limitations to the design, evaluation, and operation of environments, tools, and systems for work and daily living. Human Factors is the investigation, design, and evaluation of equipment, techniques, procedures, facilities, and human interfaces, and encompasses all aspects of human activity from manual labor to mental processing and leisure time enjoyments. In spaceflight applications, human factors engineering seeks to: (1) ensure that a task can be accomplished, (2) maintain productivity during spaceflight, and (3) ensure the habitability of the pressurized living areas. DSO 904 served as a vehicle for the verification and elucidation of human factors principles and tools in the microgravity environment. Over six flights, twelve topics were investigated. This study documented the strengths and limitations of human operators in a complex, multifaceted, and unique environment. By focusing on the man-machine interface in space flight activities, it was determined which designs allow astronauts to be optimally productive during valuable and costly space flights. Among the most promising areas of inquiry were procedures, tools, habitat, environmental conditions, tasking, work load, flexibility, and individual control over work.

  15. [Risk factors for stroke].

    PubMed

    Mandić, Milan; Rancić, Natasa

    2011-01-01

    Stroke is the third cause of mortality both in men and in women throughout the world. In Serbia, stroke is the first cause of mortality in women older than 55 years of age and the second cause of death in men of the same age. Both ischemic heart diseases and ischemic stroke correlate with the same predisposing, potentially modifiable risk factors (hypertension, abnormal blood lipids and lipoproteins, cigarette smoking, physical inactivity, obesity, diabetes mellitus). Stroke does not usually occur on its own. Patients with stroke have a high prevalence of associated medical problems. These conditions may predict the stroke ("preexisting conditions"), occur for the first time after stroke ("post-stroke complications"), or present as manifestations of preexisting medical conditions after stroke. Risk factors for stroke are divided into the three groups: risk factors which cannot be influenced on such as: age, gender, positive family history of stroke, race: those which are modifiable such as: hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking cigarettes, obesity, physical inactivity and the third group consists of potential risk factors for stroke (consumption of alcohol, hormones, changes in fibrinolysis, changes in blood. Stroke remains a leading cause of long-term disability and premature death of both men and women. Consequently, stroke survivors are often handicapped and doomed to sedentary lifestyle which restrains performance of activities of daily living, increases the risk for falls, and may contribute to a higher risk for recurrent stroke and cardiovascular disease. Prevention of stroke is still a great medical and social problem. Further studies are required to investigate potential risk factors for the occurrence of stroke as well as the measures of primary and secondary prevention.

  16. On The Factor Score Controversy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Bert F. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A summary and interpretation of the recent literature on the indeterminancy of factor scores is given in simple terms. A good index of factor score determinancy is the squared multiple correlation of the factor with the observed variables. (Author)

  17. Helicopter human factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Sandra G.

    1988-01-01

    The state-of-the-art helicopter and its pilot are examined using the tools of human-factors analysis. The significant role of human error in helicopter accidents is discussed; the history of human-factors research on helicopters is briefly traced; the typical flight tasks are described; and the noise, vibration, and temperature conditions typical of modern military helicopters are characterized. Also considered are helicopter controls, cockpit instruments and displays, and the impact of cockpit design on pilot workload. Particular attention is given to possible advanced-technology improvements, such as control stabilization and augmentation, FBW and fly-by-light systems, multifunction displays, night-vision goggles, pilot night-vision systems, night-vision displays with superimposed symbols, target acquisition and designation systems, and aural displays. Diagrams, drawings, and photographs are provided.

  18. Factors regulating microglia activation

    PubMed Central

    Kierdorf, Katrin; Prinz, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Microglia are resident macrophages of the central nervous system (CNS) that display high functional similarities to other tissue macrophages. However, it is especially important to create and maintain an intact tissue homeostasis to support the neuronal cells, which are very sensitive even to minor changes in their environment. The transition from the “resting” but surveying microglial phenotype to an activated stage is tightly regulated by several intrinsic (e.g., Runx-1, Irf8, and Pu.1) and extrinsic factors (e.g., CD200, CX3CR1, and TREM2). Under physiological conditions, minor changes of those factors are sufficient to cause fatal dysregulation of microglial cell homeostasis and result in severe CNS pathologies. In this review, we discuss recent achievements that gave new insights into mechanisms that ensure microglia quiescence. PMID:23630462

  19. [Streptococcus pyogenes pathogenic factors].

    PubMed

    Bidet, Ph; Bonacorsi, S

    2014-11-01

    The pathogenicity of ß-hemolytic group A streptococcus (GAS) is particularly diverse, ranging from mild infections, such as pharyngitis or impetigo, to potentially debilitating poststreptococcal diseases, and up to severe invasive infections such as necrotizing fasciitis or the dreaded streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. This variety of clinical expressions, often radically different in individuals infected with the same strain, results from a complex interaction between the bacterial virulence factors, the mode of infection and the immune system of the host. Advances in comparative genomics have led to a better understanding of how, following this confrontation, GAS adapts to the immune system's pressure, either peacefully by reducing the expression of certain virulence factors to achieve an asymptomatic carriage, or on the contrary, by overexpressing them disproportionately, resulting in the most severe forms of invasive infection.

  20. Helicopter human factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Sandra G.

    1988-01-01

    The state-of-the-art helicopter and its pilot are examined using the tools of human-factors analysis. The significant role of human error in helicopter accidents is discussed; the history of human-factors research on helicopters is briefly traced; the typical flight tasks are described; and the noise, vibration, and temperature conditions typical of modern military helicopters are characterized. Also considered are helicopter controls, cockpit instruments and displays, and the impact of cockpit design on pilot workload. Particular attention is given to possible advanced-technology improvements, such as control stabilization and augmentation, FBW and fly-by-light systems, multifunction displays, night-vision goggles, pilot night-vision systems, night-vision displays with superimposed symbols, target acquisition and designation systems, and aural displays. Diagrams, drawings, and photographs are provided.

  1. Smad transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Massagué, Joan; Seoane, Joan; Wotton, David

    2005-12-01

    Smad transcription factors lie at the core of one of the most versatile cytokine signaling pathways in metazoan biology-the transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta) pathway. Recent progress has shed light into the processes of Smad activation and deactivation, nucleocytoplasmic dynamics, and assembly of transcriptional complexes. A rich repertoire of regulatory devices exerts control over each step of the Smad pathway. This knowledge is enabling work on more complex questions about the organization, integration, and modulation of Smad-dependent transcriptional programs. We are beginning to uncover self-enabled gene response cascades, graded Smad response mechanisms, and Smad-dependent synexpression groups. Our growing understanding of TGFbeta signaling through the Smad pathway provides general principles for how animal cells translate complex inputs into concrete behavior.

  2. Analytic pion form factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomon, Earle L.; Pacetti, Simone

    2016-09-01

    The pion electromagnetic form factor and two-pion production in electron-positron collisions are simultaneously fitted by a vector dominance model evolving to perturbative QCD at large momentum transfer. This model was previously successful in simultaneously fitting the nucleon electromagnetic form factors (spacelike region) and the electromagnetic production of nucleon-antinucleon pairs (timelike region). For this pion case dispersion relations are used to produce the analytic connection of the spacelike and timelike regions. The fit to all the data is good, especially for the newer sets of timelike data. The description of high-q2 data, in the timelike region, requires one more meson with ρ quantum numbers than listed in the 2014 Particle Data Group review.

  3. Safety performance factor.

    PubMed

    Venkataraman, Naray

    2008-01-01

    Workplace safety performance is computed using frequency rate (FR) and severity rate (SR). Only work time lost due to occupational incidents that need to be reported is counted. FR and SR are the 2 most important safety performance indicators that are applied universally; however, calculations differ from country to country. All injuries and time lost should be considered while calculating safety performance. The extent of severity does not matter as every incident is counted. So, a new factor has to be defined; it should be based on the hours or days lost due to each occupational incident, irrespective of its severity. The new safety performance factor is defined as the average human-hour unit lost due to occupational accidents/incidents, including fatalities, first-aid incidents, bruises and cuts. The formula is simple and easy to apply.

  4. Factors stimulating bone formation.

    PubMed

    Lind, M; Bünger, C

    2001-10-01

    The aim of this review is to describe major approaches for stimulating bone healing and to review other factors affecting bone healing. Spinal bone fusion after surgery is a demanding process requiring optimal conditions for clinical success. Bone formation and healing can be enhanced through various methods. Experimental studies have revealed an array of stimulative measures. These include biochemical stimulation by use of hormones and growth factors, physical stimulation through mechanical and electromagnetic measures, and bone grafting by use of bone tissue or bone substitutes. Newer biological techniques such as stem cell transplantation and gene therapy can also be used to stimulate bone healing. Apart from bone transplantation, clinical experience with the many stimulation modalities is limited. Possible areas for clinical use of these novel methods are discussed.

  5. Human factors workplace considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, Richard F.

    1988-01-01

    Computer workstations assume many different forms and play different functions today. In order for them to assume the effective interface role which they should play they must be properly designed to take into account the ubiguitous human factor. In addition, the entire workplace in which they are used should be properly configured so as to enhance the operational features of the individual workstation where possible. A number of general human factors workplace considerations are presented. This ongoing series of notes covers such topics as achieving comfort and good screen visibility, hardware issues (e.g., mouse maintenance), screen symbology features (e.g., labels, cursors, prompts), and various miscellaneous subjects. These notes are presented here in order to: (1) illustrate how one's workstation can be used to support telescience activities of many other people working within an organization, and (2) provide a single complete set of considerations for future reference.

  6. Growth factors for nanobacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciftcioglu, Neva; Kajander, E. Olavi

    1999-12-01

    Nanobacteria are novel microorganisms recently isolated from fetal bovine serum and blood of cows and humans. These coccoid, gram negative bacteria in alpha-2 subgroup of Proteobacteria grow slowly under mammalian cell culture conditions but not in common media for microbes. Now we have found two different kinds of culture supplement preparations that improve their growth and make them culturable in the classical sense. These are supernatant fractions of conditioned media obtained from 1 - 3 months old nanobacteria cultures and from about a 2 weeks old Bacillus species culture. Both improved multiplication and particle yields and the latter increased their resistance to gentamicin. Nanobacteria cultured with any of the methods shared similar immunological property, structure and protein pattern. The growth supporting factors were heat-stabile and nondialyzable, and dialysis improved the growth promoting action. Nanobacteria formed stony colonies in a bacteriological medium supplemented with the growth factors. This is an implication that nanobacterial growth is influenced by pre-existing bacterial flora.

  7. Factorized Diffusion Map Approximation

    PubMed Central

    Amizadeh, Saeed; Valizadegan, Hamed; Hauskrecht, Milos

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion maps are among the most powerful Machine Learning tools to analyze and work with complex high-dimensional datasets. Unfortunately, the estimation of these maps from a finite sample is known to suffer from the curse of dimensionality. Motivated by other machine learning models for which the existence of structure in the underlying distribution of data can reduce the complexity of estimation, we study and show how the factorization of the underlying distribution into independent subspaces can help us to estimate diffusion maps more accurately. Building upon this result, we propose and develop an algorithm that can automatically factorize a high dimensional data space in order to minimize the error of estimation of its diffusion map, even in the case when the underlying distribution is not decomposable. Experiments on both the synthetic and real-world datasets demonstrate improved estimation performance of our method over the standard diffusion-map framework. PMID:25309676

  8. Psychosomatic factors in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Urpe, Mauro; Pallanti, Stefano; Lotti, Torello

    2005-10-01

    Psychosomatics describes any aspect of dermatology with psychologic or psychiatric elements. Dermatologists know that a significant proportion of their practice involves patients for whom psychologic elements either partially or sometimes entirely dominate their presenting chief complaints. This article explores the role of psychosomatic factors in dermatologic disorders. The authors discuss the clinical interface between psychiatry, psychology and dermatology and the interpretation of possible relationships between cutaneous diseases, the role of the mind, and psychotherapeutic interventions.

  9. FACTORS INFLUENCING THE DESIGN OF BIOACCUMULATION FACTOR AND BIOTA-SEDIMENT ACCUMULATION FACTOR FIELD STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    General guidance for designing field studies to measure bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) and biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) is not available. To develop such guidance, a series of modeling simulations were performed to evaluate the underlying factors and principles th...

  10. FACTORS INFLUENCING THE DESIGN OF BIOACCUMULATION FACTOR AND BIOTA-SEDIMENT ACCUMULATION FACTOR FIELD STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A series of modeling simulations were performed to develop an understanding of the underlying factors and principles involved in developing field sampling designs for measuring bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) and biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs. These simulations reveal...

  11. Risk Factors for Cholelithiasis.

    PubMed

    Pak, Mila; Lindseth, Glenda

    2016-01-01

    Gallstone disease is one of the most common public health problems in the United States. Approximately 10%-20% of the national adult populations currently carry gallstones, and gallstone prevalence is rising. In addition, nearly 750,000 cholecystectomies are performed annually in the United States; direct and indirect costs of gallbladder surgery are estimated to be $6.5 billion. Cholelithiasis is also strongly associated with gallbladder, pancreatic, and colorectal cancer occurrence. Moreover, the National Institutes of Health estimates that almost 3,000 deaths (0.12% of all deaths) per year are attributed to complications of cholelithiasis and gallbladder disease. Although extensive research has tried to identify risk factors for cholelithiasis, several studies indicate that definitive findings still remain elusive. In this review, predisposing factors for cholelithiasis are identified, the pathophysiology of gallstone disease is described, and nonsurgical preventive options are discussed. Understanding the risk factors for cholelithiasis may not only be useful in assisting nurses to provide resources and education for patients who are diagnosed with gallstones, but also in developing novel preventive measures for the disease.

  12. Fano factor estimation.

    PubMed

    Rajdl, Kamil; Lansky, Petr

    2014-02-01

    Fano factor is one of the most widely used measures of variability of spike trains. Its standard estimator is the ratio of sample variance to sample mean of spike counts observed in a time window and the quality of the estimator strongly depends on the length of the window. We investigate this dependence under the assumption that the spike train behaves as an equilibrium renewal process. It is shown what characteristics of the spike train have large effect on the estimator bias. Namely, the effect of refractory period is analytically evaluated. Next, we create an approximate asymptotic formula for the mean square error of the estimator, which can also be used to find minimum of the error in estimation from single spike trains. The accuracy of the Fano factor estimator is compared with the accuracy of the estimator based on the squared coefficient of variation. All the results are illustrated for spike trains with gamma and inverse Gaussian probability distributions of interspike intervals. Finally, we discuss possibilities of how to select a suitable observation window for the Fano factor estimation.

  13. Nucleon Electromagnetic Form Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Kees de Jager

    2004-08-01

    Although nucleons account for nearly all the visible mass in the universe, they have a complicated structure that is still incompletely understood. The first indication that nucleons have an internal structure, was the measurement of the proton magnetic moment by Frisch and Stern (1933) which revealed a large deviation from the value expected for a point-like Dirac particle. The investigation of the spatial structure of the nucleon, resulting in the first quantitative measurement of the proton charge radius, was initiated by the HEPL (Stanford) experiments in the 1950s, for which Hofstadter was awarded the 1961 Nobel prize. The first indication of a non-zero neutron charge distribution was obtained by scattering thermal neutrons off atomic electrons. The recent revival of its experimental study through the operational implementation of novel instrumentation has instigated a strong theoretical interest. Nucleon electro-magnetic form factors (EMFFs) are optimally studied through the exchange of a virtual photon, in elastic electron-nucleon scattering. The momentum transferred to the nucleon by the virtual photon can be selected to probe different scales of the nucleon, from integral properties such as the charge radius to scaling properties of its internal constituents. Polarization instrumentation, polarized beams and targets, and the measurement of the polarization of the recoiling nucleon have been essential in the accurate separation of the charge and magnetic form factors and in studies of the elusive neutron charge form factor.

  14. The malingering factor.

    PubMed

    Williams, J Michael

    2011-04-01

    The influence of malingering and suboptimal performance on neuropsychological tests has become a major interest of clinical neuropsychologists. Methods to detect malingering have focused on specialized tests or embedded patterns associated with malingering present in the conventional neuropsychology tests. There are two stages to the study of their validity. The first stage involves whether the method can discriminate malingering subjects from those who are not malingering. In the second stage, they must be examined for their relationship to the conventional tests used to establish impairment and disability. Constantinou, Bauer, Ashendorf, Fisher, and McCaffrey (2005. Is poor performance on recognition memory effort measures indicative of generalized poor performance on neuropsychological tests? Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, 20, 191-198.) conducted the only study in which correlations are presented between a commonly used symptom validity test, the Test of Memory Malingering (TOMM) and the subtests of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R). A factor analysis was conducted using these correlations. It revealed a clear malingering factor that explained significant variance in the TOMM and the WAIS-R subtests. The relationship of malingering with cognitive tests is complex: some tests are sensitive to malingering and others are not. Factor analysis can summarize the magnitude of variance associated with each test and reveal the patterns of inter-relationships between malingering and clinical tests. The analysis also suggested that malingering assessment methods could be improved by the addition of timing the responses.

  15. Molecular factors in migraine

    PubMed Central

    Kowalska, Marta; Prendecki, Michał; Kozubski, Wojciech; Lianeri, Margarita; Dorszewska, Jolanta

    2016-01-01

    Migraine is a common neurological disorder that affects 11% of adults worldwide. This disease most likely has a neurovascular origin. Migraine with aura (MA) and more common form - migraine without aura (MO) – are the two main clinical subtypes of disease. The exact pathomechanism of migraine is still unknown, but it is thought that both genetic and environmental factors are involved in this pathological process. The first genetic studies of migraine were focused on the rare subtype of MA: familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM). The genes analysed in familial and sporadic migraine are: MTHFR, KCNK18, HCRTR1, SLC6A4, STX1A, GRIA1 and GRIA3. It is possible that migraine is a multifactorial disease with polygenic influence. Recent studies have shown that the pathomechanisms of migraine involves both factors responsible for immune response and oxidative stress such as: cytokines, tyrosine metabolism, homocysteine; and factors associated with pain transmission and emotions e.g.: serotonin, hypocretin-1, calcitonin gene-related peptide, glutamate. The correlations between genetic variants of the HCRTR1 gene, the polymorphism 5-HTTLPR and hypocretin-1, and serotonin were observed. It is known that serotonin inhibits the activity of hypocretin neurons and may affect the appearance of the aura during migraine attack. The understanding of the molecular mechanisms of migraine, including genotype-phenotype correlations, may contribute to finding markers important for the diagnosis and treatment of this disease. PMID:27191890

  16. Human Factors Review Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Paramore, B.; Peterson, L.R.

    1985-12-01

    ''Human Factors'' is concerned with the incorporation of human user considerations into a system in order to maximize human reliability and reduce errors. This Review Plan is intended to assist in the assessment of human factors conditions in existing DOE facilities. In addition to specifying assessment methodologies, the plan describes techniques for improving conditions which are found to not adequately support reliable human performance. The following topics are addressed: (1) selection of areas for review describes techniques for needs assessment to assist in selecting and prioritizing areas for review; (2) human factors engineering review is concerned with optimizing the interfaces between people and equipment and people and their work environment; (3) procedures review evaluates completeness and accuracy of procedures, as well as their usability and management; (4) organizational interface review is concerned with communication and coordination between all levels of an organization; and (5) training review evaluates training program criteria such as those involving: trainee selection, qualification of training staff, content and conduct of training, requalification training, and program management.

  17. Human Platelets and Factor XI

    PubMed Central

    Lipscomb, Myatt S.; Walsh, Peter N.

    1979-01-01

    Because human platelets participate in the contact phase of intrinsic coagulation and contain a Factor XI-like coagulant activity, the nature of the Factor XI-like activity was examined and compared with purified plasma Factor XI. The platelet factor XI-like activity was sedimented with the particulate fraction of a platelet lysate, was inactivated by heat (t1/2 3.5 min, 56°C), was not a nonspecific phospholipid activity, and was destroyed by treatment with Triton X-100. Isolated platelet membranes were four-fold enriched in Factor XI activity and similarly enriched in plasma membrane marker enzymes. The Factor XI-like activity of platelet membranes was detected only when assayed in the presence of kaolin, which suggests that it is present in an unactivated form and can participate in contact activation. Concanavalin A inhibited the Factor XI-like activity of platelet lysates and platelet membranes but not of plasma or purified Factor XI. A platelet membrane-Factor XI complex was isolated after incubation of membranes with purified Factor XI. The Factor XI activity of the platelet membrane-plasma Factor XI complex was inhibited by concanavalin A, whereas unbound plasma Factor XI retained activity. An antibody raised against plasma Factor XI inhibited the in vitro Factor XI activity of plasma and of the platelet membrane-plasma Factor XI complex but had no effect on the endogenous Factor XI-like activity of washed lysed platelets or isolated platelet membranes. Washed platelets and isolated platelet membranes obtained from a Factor XI-deficient donor without a history of excessive bleeding had normal quantities of platelet Factor XI-like activity and normal behavior in the contact phase of coagulation (collagen-induced coagulant activity). These results indicate that platelet membranes contain an endogenous Factor XI-like activity that is functionally distinct from plasma Factor XI. PMID:447822

  18. Risk Factors for Eating Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Striegel-Moore, Ruth H.; Bulik, Cynthia M.

    2007-01-01

    The authors review research on risk factors for eating disorders, restricting their focus to studies in which clear precedence of the hypothesized risk factor over onset of the disorder is established. They illustrate how studies of sociocultural risk factors and biological factors have progressed on parallel tracks and propose that major advances…

  19. Inhibition of the activation of Hageman factor (factor XII) by platelet factor 4.

    PubMed

    Dumenco, L L; Everson, B; Culp, L A; Ratnoff, O D

    1988-09-01

    Platelet factor 4 is a polypeptide constituent of platelet alpha granules that is released during platelet aggregation and inhibits heparin-mediated reactions. Hageman factor (factor XII) is a plasma proenzyme that, when activated by certain negatively charged agents, initiates clotting via the intrinsic pathway of thrombin formation. In earlier studies using crude systems, platelet factor 4 inhibited activation of Hageman factor by dextran sulfate or cerebrosides, but not activation of Hageman factor by kaolin or ellagic acid. In the present study we examined the mechanisms of inhibition by platelet factor 4, using purified reagents. Platelet factor 4 inhibited activation of Hageman factor by ellagic acid, as measured by amidolysis of a synthetic substrate of activated Hageman factor, an effect inhibited by heparin or by an anti-platelet factor 4 antiserum. Coating glass tubes with platelet factor 4 before addition of normal plasma significantly lengthened the partial thromboplastin time of normal plasma. In addition, the clot-promoting properties of kaolin were inhibited by its prior exposure to platelet factor 4. Thus, the inhibitory properties of platelet factor 4 directed against the activation of Hageman factor were confirmed in a purified system. In this purified system, in contrast to earlier studies using crude systems, platelet factor 4 inhibited activation of Hageman factor by glass, ellagic acid, or kaolin.

  20. Neutron quality factor

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    Both the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) have recommended that the radiation quality weighting factor for neutrons (Q{sub n}, or the corresponding new modifying factor, w{sub R}) be increased by a value of two for most radiation protection practices. This means an increase in the recommended value for Q{sub n} from a nominal value of 10 to a nominal value of 20. This increase may be interpreted to mean that the biological effectiveness of neutrons is two times greater than previously thought. A decision to increase the value of Q{sub n} will have a major impact on the regulations and radiation protection programs of Federal agencies responsible for the protection of radiation workers. Therefore, the purposes of this report are: (1) to examine the general concept of {open_quotes}quality factor{close_quotes} (Q) in radiation protection and the rationale for the selection of specific values of Q{sub n}; and (2) to make such recommendations to the Federal agencies, as appropriate. This report is not intended to be an exhaustive review of the scientific literature on the biological effects of neutrons, with the aim of defending a particular value for Q{sub n}. Rather, the working group examined the technical issues surrounding the current recommendations of scientific advisory bodies on this matter, with the aim of determining if these recommendations should be adopted by the Federal agencies. Ultimately, the group concluded that there was no compelling basis for a change in Q{sub n}. The report was prepared by Federal scientists working under the auspices of the Science Panel of the Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination (CIRRPC).

  1. [Factors affecting postoperative pain].

    PubMed

    Soler Company, E; Faus Soler, M; Montaner Abasolo, M; Morales Olivas, F; Martínez-Pons Navarro, V

    2001-04-01

    To determine the influence on the intensity of postoperative pain of the following variables: sex, age, type of surgery, surgical approach, anesthetic technique and analgesia administered. Six hundred twenty-three hospitalized patients were enrolled from the units of general and digestive surgery, gynecology and obstetrics, ophthalmology, otorhinolaryngology, traumatology and orthopedics, and urology. Pain intensity was measured on a visual analog scale (VAS) when the patient left the post-anesthesia recovery ward (PARU) and 24 and 48 h after surgery, and on a verbal evaluation scale (VES) during the first and second days after surgery. Gynecology is the department where the most pain is reported, both when the patient leaves the PARU (>= 4 for 56.6% of patients) and during the first day on the ward (71.3% of patients suffer pain of moderate or high intensity). The correlation of pain with duration of procedure was strongest in the urology and surgery units, with common variances of 32.3% and 23.4%, respectively. More pain is felt during open procedures in the traumatology and urology units, which is not the case in gynecology and surgery. Patients receiving general anesthesia leave the PARU with pain at 3.4 +/- 1.8 cm on the VAS scale, versus 1.3 +/- 1.6 cm for patients receiving locoregional anesthesia. Patients who received only ketorolac for pain in the PARU generally experienced less intense pain (2.5 +/- 2.0 cm) than did those who received metamizol (3.3 +/- 1.5 cm), morphine (4.0 +/- 1.8 cm) or tramadol (4.5 +/- 1.8 cm). Surgical department, surgical approach, anesthetic technique and, finally, analgesic administered are the factors that determine the intensity of postoperative pain. These factors should therefore be taken into account when establishing treatment protocols to assure adequate control of postoperative pain. Neither sex nor age were determining factors for the intensity of postoperative pain.

  2. Milestones and Impact Factors

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Environmental Health has just received its first Impact Factor by Thomson ISI. At a level of 2.48, this achievement is quite satisfactory and places Environmental Health in the top 25% of environmental science journals. When the journal was launched in 2002, it was still unclear whether the Open Access publishing model could be made into a viable commercial enterprise within the biomedical field. During the past eight years, Open Access journals have become widely available, although still covering only about 15% of journal titles. Major funding agencies and institutions, including prominent US universities, now require that researchers publish in Open Access journals. Because of the profound role of scientific journals for the sharing of results and communication between researchers, the advent of Open Access may be of as much significance as the transition from handwriting to printing via moveable type. As Environmental Health is an electronic Open Access journal, the numbers of downloads at the journal website can be retrieved. The top-20 list of articles most frequently accessed shows that all of them have been downloaded over 10,000 times. Back in 2002, the first article published was accessed only 49 times during the following month. A year later, the server had over 1,000 downloads per month, and now the total number of monthly downloads approaches 50,000. These statistics complement the Impact Factor and confirm the viability of Open Access in our field of research. The advent of digital media and its decentralized mode of distribution - the internet - have dramatically changed the control and financing of scientific information dissemination, while facilitating peer review, accelerating editorial handling, and supporting much needed transparency. Both the meaning and means of "having an impact" are therefore changing, as will the degree and way in which scientific journals remain "factors" in that impact. PMID:20615249

  3. From compatible factorization to near-compatible factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldiabat, Raja'i.; Ibrahim, Haslinda

    2014-12-01

    A compatible factorization of order ν, is an ν× ν-1/2 array in which the entries in row i form a near-one-factor with focus i, and the triples associated with the rows contain no repetitions. In this paper, we aim to amend this compatible factorization so that we can display ν(ν-1)/2 - 2ν/3 triples with the minimum repeated triples. Throughout this paper we propose a new type of factorization called near-compatible factorization. First, we present the compatible factorization towards developing a near-compatible factorization. Second, we discuss briefly the necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of near-compatible factorization. Then, we exemplify the construction for case ν = 9 as a groundwork in developing near-compatible factorization.

  4. Human Factors Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Jack is an advanced human factors software package that provides a three dimensional model for predicting how a human will interact with a given system or environment. It can be used for a broad range of computer-aided design applications. Jack was developed by the computer Graphics Research Laboratory of the University of Pennsylvania with assistance from NASA's Johnson Space Center, Ames Research Center and the Army. It is the University's first commercial product. Jack is still used for academic purposes at the University of Pennsylvania. Commercial rights were given to Transom Technologies, Inc.

  5. Electromagnetic pion form factor

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, C.D.

    1995-08-01

    A phenomenological Dyson-Schwinger/Bethe-Salpeter equation approach to QCD, formalized in terms of a QCD-based model field theory, the Global Color-symmetry Model (GCM), was used to calculate the generalized impulse approximation contribution to the electromagnetic pion form factor at space-like q{sup 2} on the domain [0,10] GeV{sup 2}. In effective field theories this form factor is sometimes understood as simply being due to Vector Meson Dominance (VMD) but this does not allow for a simple connection with QCD where the VMD contribution is of higher order than that of the quark core. In the GCM the pion is treated as a composite bound state of a confined quark and antiquark interacting via the exchange of colored vector-bosons. A direct study of the quark core contribution is made, using a quark propagator that manifests the large space-like-q{sup 2} properties of QCD, parameterizes the infrared behavior and incorporates confinement. It is shown that the few parameters which characterize the infrared form of the quark propagator may be chosen so as to yield excellent agreement with the available data. In doing this one directly relates experimental observables to properties of QCD at small space-like-q{sup 2}. The incorporation of confinement eliminates endpoint and pinch singularities in the calculation of F{sub {pi}}(q{sup 2}). With asymptotic freedom manifest in the dressed quark propagator the calculation yields q{sup 4}F{sub {pi}}(q{sup 2}) = constant, up to [q{sup 2}]- corrections, for space-like-q{sup 2} {approx_gt} 35 GeV{sup 2}, which indicates that soft, nonperturbative contributions dominate the form factor at presently accessible q{sup 2}. This means that the often-used factorization Ansatz fails in this exclusive process. A paper describing this work was submitted for publication. In addition, these results formed the basis for an invited presentation at a workshop on chiral dynamics and will be published in the proceedings.

  6. The "impact factor" revisited

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Peng; Loh, Marie; Mondry, Adrian

    2005-01-01

    The number of scientific journals has become so large that individuals, institutions and institutional libraries cannot completely store their physical content. In order to prioritize the choice of quality information sources, librarians and scientists are in need of reliable decision aids. The "impact factor" (IF) is the most commonly used assessment aid for deciding which journals should receive a scholarly submission or attention from research readership. It is also an often misunderstood tool. This narrative review explains how the IF is calculated, how bias is introduced into the calculation, which questions the IF can or cannot answer, and how different professional groups can benefit from IF use. PMID:16324222

  7. SARSCEST (human factors)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, H. Mcilvaine

    1988-01-01

    People interact with the processes and products of contemporary technology. Individuals are affected by these in various ways and individuals shape them. Such interactions come under the label 'human factors'. To expand the understanding of those to whom the term is relatively unfamiliar, its domain includes both an applied science and applications of knowledge. It means both research and development, with implications of research both for basic science and for development. It encompasses not only design and testing but also training and personnel requirements, even though some unwisely try to split these apart both by name and institutionally. The territory includes more than performance at work, though concentration on that aspect, epitomized in the derivation of the term ergonomics, has overshadowed human factors interest in interactions between technology and the home, health, safety, consumers, children and later life, the handicapped, sports and recreation education, and travel. Two aspects of technology considered most significant for work performance, systems and automation, and several approaches to these, are discussed.

  8. Auxin response factors.

    PubMed

    Chandler, John William

    2016-05-01

    Auxin signalling involves the activation or repression of gene expression by a class of auxin response factor (ARF) proteins that bind to auxin response elements in auxin-responsive gene promoters. The release of ARF repression in the presence of auxin by the degradation of their cognate auxin/indole-3-acetic acid repressors forms a paradigm of transcriptional response to auxin. However, this mechanism only applies to activating ARFs, and further layers of complexity of ARF function and regulation are being revealed, which partly reflect their highly modular domain structure. This review summarizes our knowledge concerning ARF binding site specificity, homodimer and heterodimer multimeric ARF association and cooperative function and how activator ARFs activate target genes via chromatin remodelling and evolutionary information derived from phylogenetic comparisons from ARFs from diverse species. ARFs are regulated in diverse ways, and their importance in non-auxin-regulated pathways is becoming evident. They are also embedded within higher-order transcription factor complexes that integrate signalling pathways from other hormones and in response to the environment. The ways in which new information concerning ARFs on many levels is causing a revision of existing paradigms of auxin response are discussed.

  9. Fungal CSL transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Převorovský, Martin; Půta, František; Folk, Petr

    2007-01-01

    Background The CSL (CBF1/RBP-Jκ/Suppressor of Hairless/LAG-1) transcription factor family members are well-known components of the transmembrane receptor Notch signaling pathway, which plays a critical role in metazoan development. They function as context-dependent activators or repressors of transcription of their responsive genes, the promoters of which harbor the GTG(G/A)GAA consensus elements. Recently, several studies described Notch-independent activities of the CSL proteins. Results We have identified putative CSL genes in several fungal species, showing that this family is not confined to metazoans. We have analyzed their sequence conservation and identified the presence of well-defined domains typical of genuine CSL proteins. Furthermore, we have shown that the candidate fungal protein sequences contain highly conserved regions known to be required for sequence-specific DNA binding in their metazoan counterparts. The phylogenetic analysis of the newly identified fungal CSL proteins revealed the existence of two distinct classes, both of which are present in all the species studied. Conclusion Our findings support the evolutionary origin of the CSL transcription factor family in the last common ancestor of fungi and metazoans. We hypothesize that the ancestral CSL function involved DNA binding and Notch-independent regulation of transcription and that this function may still be shared, to a certain degree, by the present CSL family members from both fungi and metazoans. PMID:17629904

  10. Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF).

    PubMed

    Nicola, Nicos A; Babon, Jeffrey J

    2015-10-01

    Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) is the most pleiotropic member of the interleukin-6 family of cytokines. It utilises a receptor that consists of the LIF receptor β and gp130 and this receptor complex is also used by ciliary neurotrophic growth factor (CNTF), oncostatin M, cardiotrophin1 (CT1) and cardiotrophin-like cytokine (CLC). Despite common signal transduction mechanisms (JAK/STAT, MAPK and PI3K) LIF can have paradoxically opposite effects in different cell types including stimulating or inhibiting each of cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. While LIF can act on a wide range of cell types, LIF knockout mice have revealed that many of these actions are not apparent during ordinary development and that they may be the result of induced LIF expression during tissue damage or injury. Nevertheless LIF does appear to have non-redundant actions in maternal receptivity to blastocyst implantation, placental formation and in the development of the nervous system. LIF has also found practical use in the maintenance of self-renewal and totipotency of embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [Fibroblast growth factor-2].

    PubMed

    Faitová, J

    2004-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor-2 is a member of a large family of proteins that bind heparin and heparan sulfate and modulate the function of a wide range of cell types. FGF-2 occurs in several isoforms resulting from alternative initiations of traslation: an 18 kDa cytoplasmic isoform and four larger molecular weight nuclear isoforms (22, 22.5, 24 and 34 kDa). It acts mainly through a paracrine/autocrine mechanism involving high affinity transmembrane receptors and heparan sulfate proteoglycan low affinity receptors. It is expressed mostly in tissues of mesoderm and neuroectoderm origin, and plays an important role in mesoderm induction, stimulates the growth and development of the new blood vessels (angiogenesis), normal wound healing and tissue development. FGF-2 positively regulates hematopoiesis by acting on various cellular targets: stromal cells, early and committed hematopoietic progenitors and possibly some mature blood cells. FGF-2 is a potent hematopoietic growth factor that is likely to play an important role in physiological and pathological hematopoiesis.

  12. Leukemia Inhibitory Factor (LIF)

    PubMed Central

    Nicola, Nicos A; Babon, Jeffrey J

    2015-01-01

    Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) is the most pleiotropic member of the interleukin-6 family of cytokines. It utilises a receptor that consists of the LIF receptor β and gp130 and this receptor complex is also used by ciliary neurotrophic growth factor (CNTF), oncostatin M, cardiotrophin1 (CT1) and cardiotrophin-like cytokine (CLC). Despite common signal transduction mechanisms (JAK/STAT, MAPK and PI3K) LIF can have paradoxically opposite effects in different cell types including stimulating or inhibiting each of cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. While LIF can act on a wide range of cell types, LIF knockout mice have revealed that many of these actions are not apparent during ordinary development and that they may be the result of induced LIF expression during tissue damage or injury. Nevertheless LIF does appear to have non-redundant actions in maternal receptivity to blastocyst implantation, placental formation and in the development of the nervous system. LIF has also found practical use in the maintenance of self-renewal and totipotency of embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells. PMID:26187859

  13. The atrial natriuretic factor.

    PubMed Central

    Genest, J

    1986-01-01

    In less than three years since the rapid and potent natriuretic response to intravenous injection of atrial myocardial extract in rats was reported the factor responsible for the diuretic, natriuretic, and vasodilating activity of the atrial homogenates was isolated, its chemical structure elucidated, and its total synthesis achieved. Also the cDNA and the gene encoding for the atrial natriuretic factor in mice, rats, and man have been cloned and the chromosomal site identified. The major effects of this hormone are vasodilatation, prevention and inhibition of the contraction induced by noradrenaline and angiotensin II, diuresis, and natriuresis associated in most instances with a pronounced increase in glomerular filtration rate and filtration fraction, inhibition of aldosterone secretion, and considerable stimulation of particulate guanylate cyclase activity. High density specific binding sites have been demonstrated in the zona glomerulosa of the adrenal cortex, in the renal glomeruli, and in the collecting ducts, and in the brain areas involved in the regulation of blood pressure and of sodium and water (AV3V region, subfornical organ, nucleus tractus solitarius, area postrema). Images Fig 1 Fig 5 PMID:2945572

  14. Tumor necrosis factor.

    PubMed

    Chu, Wen-Ming

    2013-01-28

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a critical cytokine, which contributes to both physiological and pathological processes. This mini-review will briefly touch the history of TNF discovery, its family members and its biological and pathological functions. Then, it will focus on new findings on the molecular mechanisms of how TNF triggers activation of the NF-κB and AP-1 pathways, which are critical for expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, as well as the MLKL cascade, which is critical for the generation of ROS in response to TNF. Finally, this review will briefly summarize recent advances in understanding TNF-induced cell survival, apoptosis and necrosis (also called necroptosis). Understanding new findings and emerging concepts will impact future research on the molecular mechanisms of TNF signaling in immune disorders and cancer-related inflammation.

  15. Human factors in aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiener, Earl L. (Editor); Nagel, David C. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The fundamental principles of human-factors (HF) analysis for aviation applications are examined in a collection of reviews by leading experts, with an emphasis on recent developments. The aim is to provide information and guidance to the aviation community outside the HF field itself. Topics addressed include the systems approach to HF, system safety considerations, the human senses in flight, information processing, aviation workloads, group interaction and crew performance, flight training and simulation, human error in aviation operations, and aircrew fatigue and circadian rhythms. Also discussed are pilot control; aviation displays; cockpit automation; HF aspects of software interfaces; the design and integration of cockpit-crew systems; and HF issues for airline pilots, general aviation, helicopters, and ATC.

  16. Factorization of Observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliaš, Peter; Frič, Roman

    2017-06-01

    Categorical approach to probability leads to better understanding of basic notions and constructions in generalized (fuzzy, operational, quantum) probability, where observables—dual notions to generalized random variables (statistical maps)—play a major role. First, to avoid inconsistencies, we introduce three categories L, S, and P, the objects and morphisms of which correspond to basic notions of fuzzy probability theory and operational probability theory, and describe their relationships. To illustrate the advantages of categorical approach, we show that two categorical constructions involving observables (related to the representation of generalized random variables via products, or smearing of sharp observables, respectively) can be described as factorizing a morphism into composition of two morphisms having desired properties. We close with a remark concerning products.

  17. [Pathogenic factors of mycoplasma].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasmas are smallest organisms capable of self-replication and cause various diseases in human. Especially, Mycoplasma pneumoniae is known as an etiological agent of pneumonia. From 2010 to 2012, epidemics of M. pneumoniae infections were reported worldwide (e.g., in France, Israel, and Japan). In the diseases caused by mycoplasmas, strong inflammatory responses induced by mycoplasmas have been thought to be important. However, mycoplasmas lack of cell wall and do not possess inflammation-inducing endotoxin such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We purified inflammation-inducing factors from pathogenic mycoplasmas and identified that they were lipoproteins. Lipoproteins derived from mycoplasmas induced inflammatory responses through Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2. In addition, we demonstrated that cytadherent property of M. pneumoniae played an important role in induction of inflammatory responses. Cytadherent property of M. pneumoniae induced inflammatory responses through TLR2 independent pathway. TLR4, inflammasomes, and autophagy were involved in this TLR2 independent induction of inflammatory responses.

  18. Exposure factors handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Konz, J.J.; Lisi, K.; Friebele, E.; Dixon, D.A.

    1989-07-01

    The document provides a summary of the available data on various factors used in assessing human exposure including drinking-water consumption, consumption rates of broad classes of food including fruits, vegetables, beef, dairy products, and fish; soil ingestion; inhalation rate; skin area; lifetime; activity patterns; and body weight. Additionally, a number of specific exposure scenarios are identified with recommendations for default values to use when site-specific data are not available. The basic equations using these parameters to calculate exposure levels are also presented for each scenario. Default values are presented as ranges from typical to reasonable worst case and as frequency distributions where appropriate data were available. Finally, procedures for assessing the uncertainties in exposure assessments are also presented with illustrative examples. These procedures include qualitative and quantitative methods such as Monte Carlo and sensitivity analysis.

  19. Pion form factor

    SciTech Connect

    Ryong Ji, C.; Pang, A.; Szczepaniak, A.

    1994-04-01

    It is pointed out that the correct criterion to define the legal PQCD contribution to the exclusive processes in the lightcone perturbative expansion should be based on the large off-shellness of the lightcone energy in the intermediate states. In the lightcone perturbative QCD calculation of the pion form factor, the authors find that the legal PQCD contribution defined by the lightcone energy cut saturates in the smaller Q{sup 2} region compared to that defined by the gluon four-momentum square cut. This is due to the contribution by the highly off-energy-shell gluons in the end point regions of the phase space, indicating that the gluon four-momentum-square cut may have cut too much to define the legal PQCD.

  20. Unity power factor converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wester, Gene W. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A unity power factor converter capable of effecting either inversion (dc-to-dc) or rectification (ac-to-dc), and capable of providing bilateral power control from a DC source (or load) through an AC transmission line to a DC load (or source) for power flow in either direction, is comprised of comparators for comparing the AC current i with an AC signal i.sub.ref (or its phase inversion) derived from the AC ports to generate control signals to operate a switch control circuit for high speed switching to shape the AC current waveform to a sine waveform, and synchronize it in phase and frequency with the AC voltage at the AC ports, by selectively switching the connections to a series inductor as required to increase or decrease the current i.

  1. Pediatric rhinitis risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yaofeng; Liu, Yin; Yang, Na

    2016-01-01

    Rhinitis is a common global disorder that impacts on the quality of life of the sufferer and caregivers. Treatment for pediatric rhinitis is empirical and does not include a detailed history of the allergy triggers or allergy testing. Thus, allergen avoidance advice is not tailored to the child's sensitivities, which may result in adenoid hypertrophy. However, infant onset rhinitis, especially its relationship with respiratory viruses, remains to be further clarified. Rhinitis basically involves inflammation of the upper nasal lining, presenting typically with symptoms of runny nose (rhinorrhea), nasal blockage, and/or sneezing. While not typically fatal, it does impose significant health, psychological, and monetary burden to its sufferers, and is thus considered a global health problem. Previous findings showed that immunotherapy had significant clinical efficacy in children with allergic rhinitis. The present review article aims to highlight recent perspectives pertaining to the rhinitis risk factors especially in pediatric patients. PMID:27698737

  2. Psychosomatic factors in pruritus.

    PubMed

    Tey, Hong Liang; Wallengren, Joanna; Yosipovitch, Gil

    2013-01-01

    Pruritus and psyche are intricately and reciprocally related, with psychophysiological evidence and psychopathological explanations helping us to understand their complex association. Their interaction may be conceptualized and classified into 3 groups: pruritic diseases with psychiatric sequelae, pruritic diseases aggravated by psychosocial factors, and psychiatric disorders causing pruritus. Management of chronic pruritus is directed at treating the underlying causes and adopting a multidisciplinary approach to address the dermatologic, somatosensory, cognitive, and emotional aspects. Pharmcotherapeutic agents that are useful for chronic pruritus with comorbid depression and/or anxiety comprise selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, mirtazapine, tricyclic antidepressants (amitriptyline and doxepin), and anticonvulsants (gabapentin, pregabalin); the role of neurokinin receptor-1 antagonists awaits verification. Antipsychotics are required for treating itch and formication associated with schizophrenia and delusion of parasitosis (including Morgellons disease).

  3. Psychosomatic factors in pruritus

    PubMed Central

    Tey, Hong Liang; Wallengren, Joanna; Yosipovitch, Gil

    2013-01-01

    Pruritus and psyche are intricately and reciprocally related, with psychophysiological evidence and psychopathological explanations helping us to understand their complex association. Their interaction may be conceptualized and classified into 3 groups: pruritic diseases with psychiatric sequelae, pruritic diseases aggravated by psychosocial factors, and psychiatric disorders causing pruritus. Management of chronic pruritus is directed at treating the underlying causes and adopting a multidisciplinary approach to address the dermatologic, somatosensory, cognitive, and emotional aspects. Pharmcotherapeutic agents that are useful for chronic pruritus with comorbid depression and/or anxiety comprise selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, mirtazapine, tricyclic antidepressants (amitriptyline and doxepin), and anticonvulsants (gabapentin, pregabalin); the role of neurokinin receptor-1 antagonists awaits verification. Antipsychotics are required for treating itch and formication associated with schizophrenia and delusion of parasitosis (including Morgellons disease). PMID:23245971

  4. Nucleon Electromagnetic Form Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Marc Vanderhaeghen; Charles Perdrisat; Vina Punjabi

    2007-10-01

    There has been much activity in the measurement of the elastic electromagnetic proton and neutron form factors in the last decade, and the quality of the data has greatly improved by performing double polarization experiments, in comparison with previous unpolarized data. Here we review the experimental data base in view of the new results for the proton, and neutron, obtained at JLab, MAMI, and MIT-Bates. The rapid evolution of phenomenological models triggered by these high-precision experiments will be discussed, including the recent progress in the determination of the valence quark generalized parton distributions of the nucleon, as well as the steady rate of improvements made in the lattice QCD calculations.

  5. Helicopter Human Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Sandra G.; Sridhar, Banavar (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Even under optimal conditions, helicopter flight is a most demanding form of human-machine interaction, imposing continuous manual, visual, communications, and mental demands on pilots. It is made even more challenging by small margins for error created by the close proximity of terrain in NOE flight and missions flown at night and in low visibility. Although technology advances have satisfied some current and proposed requirements, hardware solutions alone are not sufficient to ensure acceptable system performance and pilot workload. However, human factors data needed to improve the design and use of helicopters lag behind advances in sensor, display, and control technology. Thus, it is difficult for designers to consider human capabilities and limitations when making design decisions. This results in costly accidents, design mistakes, unrealistic mission requirements, excessive training costs, and challenge human adaptability. NASA, in collaboration with DOD, industry, and academia, has initiated a program of research to develop scientific data bases and design principles to improve the pilot/vehicle interface, optimize training time and cost, and maintain pilot workload and system performance at an acceptable level. Work performed at Ames, and by other research laboratories, will be reviewed to summarize the most critical helicopter human factors problems and the results of research that has been performed to: (1) Quantify/model pilots use of visual cues for vehicle control; (2) Improve pilots' performance with helmet displays of thermal imagery and night vision goggles for situation awareness and vehicle control; (3) Model the processes by which pilots encode maps and compare them to the visual scene to develop perceptually and cognitively compatible electronic map formats; (4) Evaluate the use of spatially localized auditory displays for geographical orientation, target localization, radio frequency separation; (5) Develop and flight test control

  6. Helicopter Human Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Sandra G.; Sridhar, Banavar (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Even under optimal conditions, helicopter flight is a most demanding form of human-machine interaction, imposing continuous manual, visual, communications, and mental demands on pilots. It is made even more challenging by small margins for error created by the close proximity of terrain in NOE flight and missions flown at night and in low visibility. Although technology advances have satisfied some current and proposed requirements, hardware solutions alone are not sufficient to ensure acceptable system performance and pilot workload. However, human factors data needed to improve the design and use of helicopters lag behind advances in sensor, display, and control technology. Thus, it is difficult for designers to consider human capabilities and limitations when making design decisions. This results in costly accidents, design mistakes, unrealistic mission requirements, excessive training costs, and challenge human adaptability. NASA, in collaboration with DOD, industry, and academia, has initiated a program of research to develop scientific data bases and design principles to improve the pilot/vehicle interface, optimize training time and cost, and maintain pilot workload and system performance at an acceptable level. Work performed at Ames, and by other research laboratories, will be reviewed to summarize the most critical helicopter human factors problems and the results of research that has been performed to: (1) Quantify/model pilots use of visual cues for vehicle control; (2) Improve pilots' performance with helmet displays of thermal imagery and night vision goggles for situation awareness and vehicle control; (3) Model the processes by which pilots encode maps and compare them to the visual scene to develop perceptually and cognitively compatible electronic map formats; (4) Evaluate the use of spatially localized auditory displays for geographical orientation, target localization, radio frequency separation; (5) Develop and flight test control

  7. Anthrax lethal factor inhibition.

    PubMed

    Shoop, W L; Xiong, Y; Wiltsie, J; Woods, A; Guo, J; Pivnichny, J V; Felcetto, T; Michael, B F; Bansal, A; Cummings, R T; Cunningham, B R; Friedlander, A M; Douglas, C M; Patel, S B; Wisniewski, D; Scapin, G; Salowe, S P; Zaller, D M; Chapman, K T; Scolnick, E M; Schmatz, D M; Bartizal, K; MacCoss, M; Hermes, J D

    2005-05-31

    The primary virulence factor of Bacillus anthracis is a secreted zinc-dependent metalloprotease toxin known as lethal factor (LF) that is lethal to the host through disruption of signaling pathways, cell destruction, and circulatory shock. Inhibition of this proteolytic-based LF toxemia could be expected to provide therapeutic value in combination with an antibiotic during and immediately after an active anthrax infection. Herein is shown the crystal structure of an intimate complex between a hydroxamate, (2R)-2-[(4-fluoro-3-methylphenyl)sulfonylamino]-N-hydroxy-2-(tetrahydro-2H-pyran-4-yl)acetamide, and LF at the LF-active site. Most importantly, this molecular interaction between the hydroxamate and the LF active site resulted in (i) inhibited LF protease activity in an enzyme assay and protected macrophages against recombinant LF and protective antigen in a cell-based assay, (ii) 100% protection in a lethal mouse toxemia model against recombinant LF and protective antigen, (iii) approximately 50% survival advantage to mice given a lethal challenge of B. anthracis Sterne vegetative cells and to rabbits given a lethal challenge of B. anthracis Ames spores and doubled the mean time to death in those that died in both species, and (iv) 100% protection against B. anthracis spore challenge when used in combination therapy with ciprofloxacin in a rabbit "point of no return" model for which ciprofloxacin alone provided 50% protection. These results indicate that a small molecule, hydroxamate LF inhibitor, as revealed herein, can ameliorate the toxemia characteristic of an active B. anthracis infection and could be a vital adjunct to our ability to combat anthrax.

  8. Factors affecting corneoscleral topography.

    PubMed

    Hall, Lee A; Hunt, Chris; Young, Graeme; Wolffsohn, James

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate factors affecting corneoscleral profile (CSP) using anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT) in combination with conventional videokeratoscopy. OCT DATA WERE COLLECTED FROM 204 SUBJECTS OF MEAN AGE 34.9 YEARS (SD: ±15.2 years, range 18-65) using the Zeiss Visante AS-OCT and Medmont M300 corneal topographer. Measurements of corneal diameter (CD), corneal sagittal height (CS), iris diameter (ID), corneoscleral junction angle (CSJ), and scleral radius (SR) were extracted from multiple OCT images. Horizontal visible iris diameter (HVID) and vertical palpebral aperture (PA) were measured using a slit lamp graticule. Subject body height was also measured. Associations were then sought between CSP variables and age, height, ethnicity, sex, and refractive error. Significant correlations were found between age and ocular topography variables of HVID, PA, CSJ, SR, and ID (P < 0.0001), while height correlated with HVID, CD, and ID, and power vector terms with vertical plane keratometry, CD, and CS. Significant differences were noted between ethnicities with respect to CD (P = 0.0046), horizontal and vertical CS (P = 0.0068 and P = 0.0095), and horizontal ID (P = 0.0010). The same variables, with the exception of vertical CS, also varied with sex; horizontal CD (P = 0.0018), horizontal CS (P = 0.0018), and ID (P = 0.0012). Age accounted for the greatest variance in topography variables (36%). Age is the main factor influencing CSP; this should be taken into consideration in contact lens design, IOL selection, and in the optimization of surgical procedures. Ocular topography also varied with height, sex, ethnicity, and refractive error.

  9. Factor Rotation and Standard Errors in Exploratory Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Guangjian; Preacher, Kristopher J.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we report a surprising phenomenon: Oblique CF-varimax and oblique CF-quartimax rotation produced similar point estimates for rotated factor loadings and factor correlations but different standard error estimates in an empirical example. Influences of factor rotation on asymptotic standard errors are investigated using a numerical…

  10. Factor Rotation and Standard Errors in Exploratory Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Guangjian; Preacher, Kristopher J.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we report a surprising phenomenon: Oblique CF-varimax and oblique CF-quartimax rotation produced similar point estimates for rotated factor loadings and factor correlations but different standard error estimates in an empirical example. Influences of factor rotation on asymptotic standard errors are investigated using a numerical…

  11. Environmental factors and aggressive behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, A.C.

    1982-07-01

    This paper briefly reviews some of the research areas which indicate a correlation between environmental factors and initiation of aggressive behavior. Environmental factors including lunar influences, month of birth, climate and the effects of crowding and certain chemicals are discussed.

  12. FACTORING TO FIT OFF DIAGONALS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    imply an upper bound on the number of factors. When applied to somatotype data, the method improved substantially on centroid solutions and indicated a reinterpretation of earlier factoring studies. (Author)

  13. Air Emissions Factors and Quantification

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Emissions factors are used in developing air emissions inventories for air quality management decisions and in developing emissions control strategies. This area provides technical information on and support for the use of emissions factors.

  14. Salivary Gland Cancer: Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer > Salivary Gland Cancer: Risk Factors Request Permissions Salivary Gland Cancer: Risk Factors Approved by the Cancer.Net ... f t k e P Types of Cancer Salivary Gland Cancer Guide Cancer.Net Guide Salivary Gland Cancer ...

  15. Electromagnetic Hadronic Form-Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Edwards

    2004-06-01

    We present a calculation of the nucleon electromagnetic form-factors as well as the pion and rho to pion transition form-factors in a hybrid calculation with domain wall valence quarks and improved staggered (Asqtad) sea quarks.

  16. THE ASSAY AND PROPERTIES OF LABILE FACTOR (FACTOR V)

    PubMed Central

    Quick, Armand J.

    1960-01-01

    Human oxalated plasma stored at 4° C. until the prothrombin time is increased beyond 60 sec. is a reliable medium for assaying labile factor (factor V) because its response to added labile factor corresponds quantitatively to that of plasma from patients with congenital deficiency of this factor. Such an agreement is not obtained with plasma stored at 37°C. The stability of labile factor is closely associated with ionized calcium. The addition of thrombin to fresh oxalated plasma causes an apparent hyperactivity of labile factor, but this is completely removed by adsorption with Ca3(PO)2. Oxalated plasma when adsorbed with Ca3(PO4)2 before treatment with thrombin does not develop this adventitious activity, nor does it occur in stored plasma treated with thrombin. The seemingly high labile factor activity in serum can be explained by the activation of this factor which is independent of labile factor but acts synergistically with it. The true labile factor concentration can be determined only after the accelerator is removed by adsorption with Ca3(PO4)2. A close agreement between the consumption of prothrombin and the loss of labile factor during clotting is observed. PMID:13738700

  17. Current status on tissue factor activation of factor VIIa.

    PubMed

    Persson, Egon; Olsen, Ole H

    2010-04-01

    Free factor VIIa displays a zymogen-like behavior with low intrinsic activity. Formation of a complex between factor VIIa and tissue factor is necessary to enhance the procoagulant activity of factor VIIa, not only by providing membrane localization, substrate exosites and positioning the active site at an appropriate distance above the surface but also by allosteric enhancement of the enzymatic activity, and this event signals initiation of blood coagulation. The interaction is of high affinity and all the domains are engaged at the interface. The crosstalk between the protease domain of factor VIIa, in particular residue Met-306, and the N-terminal domain of tissue factor provides the starting point for the allosteric activation of factor VIIa. The pathway(s) of conformational transitions in factor VIIa ensuing tissue factor binding has not been entirely mapped. The present paper is a brief compilation of our current knowledge of the allosteric mechanism by which tissue factor induces and stabilizes the active conformation of factor VIIa.

  18. Plasma factor XIII and platelet factor XIII in hyperlipaemia.

    PubMed

    Cucuianu, M P; Miloszewski, K; Porutiu, D; Losowsky, M S

    1976-12-31

    Plasma factor XIII activity measured by a quantitative assay was found to be significantly higher in hypertriglyceridaemic patients (type IV and combined hyperlipoproteinaemia), as compared to normolipaemic controls. No such elevation in plasma factor XIII activity was found in patients with type Ha hyperlipaemia. Plasma pseudocholinesterase was found to parallel the elevated factor XIII activity in hypertriglyceridaemic subjects. In contrast, platelet factor XIII activity was not raised in hyperlipaemic subjects, and plasma factor XIII was found to be normal in a normolipaemic subjects with thrombocythaemia. It was concluded that there is no significant contribution from platelets to plasma factor XIII activity, and that the observed increase in plasma factor XIII in hypertriglyceridaemia results from enhanced hepatic synthesis of the enzyme.

  19. Factor Analysis of Intern Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Womack, Sid T.; Hannah, Shellie Louise; Bell, Columbus David

    2012-01-01

    Four factors in teaching intern effectiveness, as measured by a Praxis III-similar instrument, were found among observational data of teaching interns during the 2010 spring semester. Those factors were lesson planning, teacher/student reflection, fairness & safe environment, and professionalism/efficacy. This factor analysis was as much of a…

  20. Risk Factor Assessment Branch (RFAB)

    Cancer.gov

    The Risk Factor Assessment Branch (RFAB) focuses on the development, evaluation, and dissemination of high-quality risk factor metrics, methods, tools, technologies, and resources for use across the cancer research continuum, and the assessment of cancer-related risk factors in the population.

  1. Phonological Awareness: Factors of Influence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frohlich, Linda Paulina; Petermann, Franz; Metz, Dorothee

    2013-01-01

    Early child development is influenced by various genetic and environmental factors. This study aims to identify factors that affect the phonological awareness of preschool and first grade children. Based on a sample of 330 German-speaking children (mean age = 6.2 years) the following domains were evaluated: Parent factors, birth and pregnancy,…

  2. Phonological Awareness: Factors of Influence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frohlich, Linda Paulina; Petermann, Franz; Metz, Dorothee

    2013-01-01

    Early child development is influenced by various genetic and environmental factors. This study aims to identify factors that affect the phonological awareness of preschool and first grade children. Based on a sample of 330 German-speaking children (mean age = 6.2 years) the following domains were evaluated: Parent factors, birth and pregnancy,…

  3. Factor Analysis via Components Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bentler, Peter M.; de Leeuw, Jan

    2011-01-01

    When the factor analysis model holds, component loadings are linear combinations of factor loadings, and vice versa. This interrelation permits us to define new optimization criteria and estimation methods for exploratory factor analysis. Although this article is primarily conceptual in nature, an illustrative example and a small simulation show…

  4. Quantification of Emission Factor Uncertainty

    EPA Science Inventory

    Emissions factors are important for estimating and characterizing emissions from sources of air pollution. There is no quantitative indication of uncertainty for these emission factors, most factors do not have an adequate data set to compute uncertainty, and it is very difficult...

  5. Quantification of Emission Factor Uncertainty

    EPA Science Inventory

    Emissions factors are important for estimating and characterizing emissions from sources of air pollution. There is no quantitative indication of uncertainty for these emission factors, most factors do not have an adequate data set to compute uncertainty, and it is very difficult...

  6. Human Factors in Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barshi, Immanuel; Byrne, Vicky; Arsintescu, Lucia; Connell, Erin

    2010-01-01

    Future space missions will be significantly longer than current shuttle missions and new systems will be more complex than current systems. Increasing communication delays between crews and Earth-based support means that astronauts need to be prepared to handle the unexpected on their own. As crews become more autonomous, their potential span of control and required expertise must grow to match their autonomy. It is not possible to train for every eventuality ahead of time on the ground, or to maintain trained skills across long intervals of disuse. To adequately prepare NASA personnel for these challenges, new training approaches, methodologies, and tools are required. This research project aims at developing these training capabilities. By researching established training principles, examining future needs, and by using current practices in space flight training as test beds, both in Flight Controller and Crew Medical domains, this research project is mitigating program risks and generating templates and requirements to meet future training needs. Training efforts in Fiscal Year 09 (FY09) strongly focused on crew medical training, but also began exploring how Space Flight Resource Management training for Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) Flight Controllers could be integrated with systems training for optimal Mission Control Center (MCC) operations. The Training Task addresses Program risks that lie at the intersection of the following three risks identified by the Project: 1) Risk associated with poor task design; 2) Risk of error due to inadequate information; and 3) Risk associated with reduced safety and efficiency due to poor human factors design.

  7. Human Factors in Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barshi, Immanuel; Byrne, Vicky; Arsintescu, Lucia; Connell, Erin; Sandor, Aniko

    2009-01-01

    Future space missions will be significantly longer than current shuttle missions and new systems will be more complex than current systems. Increasing communication delays between crews and Earth-based support means that astronauts need to be prepared to handle the unexpected on their own. As crews become more autonomous, their potential span of control and required expertise must grow to match their autonomy. It is not possible to train for every eventuality ahead of time on the ground, or to maintain trained skills across long intervals of disuse. To adequately prepare NASA personnel for these challenges, new training approaches, methodologies, and tools are required. This research project aims at developing these training capabilities. By researching established training principles, examining future needs, and by using current practices in space flight training as test beds, both in Flight Controller and Crew Medical domains, this research project is mitigating program risks and generating templates and requirements to meet future training needs. Training efforts in Fiscal Year 08 (FY08) strongly focused on crew medical training, but also began exploring how Space Flight Resource Management training for Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) Flight Controllers could be integrated with systems training for optimal Mission Control Center (MCC) operations. The Training Task addresses Program risks that lie at the intersection of the following three risks identified by the Project: (1) Risk associated with poor task design (2) Risk of error due to inadequate information (3) Risk associated with reduced safety and efficiency due to poor human factors design

  8. Human Factors in Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barshi, Immanuel; Byme, Vicky; Arsintescu, Lucia

    2008-01-01

    Future space missions will be significantly longer than current Shuttle missions and new systems will be more complex than current systems. Increasing communication delays between crews and Earth-based support means that astronauts need to be prepared to handle the unexpected on their own. As crews become more autonomous, their potential span of control and required expertise must grow to match their autonomy. It is not possible to train for every eventuality ahead of time on the ground, or to maintain trained skills across long intervals of disuse. To adequately prepare NASA personnel for these challenges, new training approaches, methodologies, and tools are required. This research project aims at developing these training capabilities. Training efforts in FY07 strongly focused on crew medical training, but also began exploring how Space Flight Resource Management training for Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) Flight Controllers could be integrated with systems training for optimal Mission Control Center operations. Beginning in January 2008, the training research effort will include team training prototypes and tools. The Training Task addresses Program risks that lie at the intersection of the following three risks identified by the Project: 1) Risk associated with poor task design; 2) Risk of error due to inadequate information; 3) Risk associated with reduced safety and efficiency due to poor human factors design.

  9. Factorizing monolithic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, J.H.; Ankeny, L.A.; Clancy, S.P.

    1998-12-31

    The Blanca project is part of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI), which focuses on Science-Based Stockpile Stewardship through the large-scale simulation of multi-physics, multi-dimensional problems. Blanca is the only Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)-based ASCI project that is written entirely in C++. Tecolote, a new framework used in developing Blanca physics codes, provides an infrastructure for gluing together any number of components; this framework is then used to create applications that encompass a wide variety of physics models, numerical solution options, and underlying data storage schemes. The advantage of this approach is that only the essential components for the given model need be activated at runtime. Tecolote has been designed for code re-use and to isolate the computer science mechanics from the physics aspects as much as possible -- allowing physics model developers to write algorithms in a style quite similar to the underlying physics equations that govern the computational physics. This paper describes the advantages of component architectures and contrasts the Tecolote framework with Microsoft`s OLE and Apple`s OpenDoc. An actual factorization of a traditional monolithic application into its basic components is also described.

  10. Von Willebrand factor processing.

    PubMed

    Brehm, Maria A

    2017-01-31

    Von Willebrand factor (VWF) is a multimeric glycoprotein essential for primary haemostasis that is produced only in endothelial cells and megakaryocytes. Key to VWF's function in recruitment of platelets to the site of vascular injury is its multimeric structure. The individual steps of VWF multimer biosynthesis rely on distinct posttranslational modifications at specific pH conditions, which are realized by spatial separation of the involved processes to different cell organelles. Production of multimers starts with translocation and modification of the VWF prepropolypeptide in the endoplasmic reticulum to produce dimers primed for glycosylation. In the Golgi apparatus they are further processed to multimers that carry more than 300 complex glycan structures functionalized by sialylation, sulfation and blood group determinants. Of special importance is the sequential formation of disulfide bonds with different functions in structural support of VWF multimers, which are packaged, stored and further processed after secretion. Here, all these processes are being reviewed in detail including background information on the occurring biochemical reactions.

  11. Proteolytic factors in exosomes.

    PubMed

    Shimoda, Masayuki; Khokha, Rama

    2013-05-01

    Exosomes are small microvesicles secreted from the late endosomal compartment of cells. Although an increasing body of evidence indicates that they play a pivotal role in cell-to-cell communication, the biological functions of exosomes are far from fully understood. Recent work has revealed detailed proteomic profiles of exosomes from cell lines and body fluids, which may provide clues to understanding their biological significance and general importance in human diseases. Metalloproteinases include the cell surface-anchored sheddases a disintegrin and metalloproteinases, as well as cell surface-bound and soluble matrix metalloproteinases and these extracellular proteases have been detected in exosomes by proteomic analyses. Exosomes play a key role in the transfer of proteins to other cells and metalloproteinases may provide a novel platform where ectodomain shedding by these membrane proteases alters the makeup of the recipient cell's surface. This review aims to address some of the facets of exosome biology with particular emphasis on the proteolytic factors and we discuss their potential involvement in human diseases, especially tumor biology.

  12. Factor XII Contact Activation.

    PubMed

    Naudin, Clément; Burillo, Elena; Blankenberg, Stefan; Butler, Lynn; Renné, Thomas

    2017-03-27

    Contact activation is the surface-induced conversion of factor XII (FXII) zymogen to the serine protease FXIIa. Blood-circulating FXII binds to negatively charged surfaces and this contact to surfaces triggers a conformational change in the zymogen inducing autoactivation. Several surfaces that have the capacity for initiating FXII contact activation have been identified, including misfolded protein aggregates, collagen, nucleic acids, and platelet and microbial polyphosphate. Activated FXII initiates the proinflammatory kallikrein-kinin system and the intrinsic coagulation pathway, leading to formation of bradykinin and thrombin, respectively. FXII contact activation is well characterized in vitro and provides the mechanistic basis for the diagnostic clotting assay, activated partial thromboplastin time. However, only in the past decade has the critical role of FXII contact activation in pathological thrombosis been appreciated. While defective FXII contact activation provides thromboprotection, excess activation underlies the swelling disorder hereditary angioedema type III. This review provides an overview of the molecular basis of FXII contact activation and FXII contact activation-associated disease states.

  13. Factor XI and factor XII as targets for new anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Weitz, Jeffrey I

    2016-05-01

    Although the non-vitamin antagonist oral anticoagulants produce less intracranial bleeding than warfarin, serious bleeding still occurs. Therefore, the search for safer anticoagulants continues. Factor XII and factor XI have emerged as promising targets whose inhibition has the potential to prevent thrombosis with little or no disruption of hemostasis. Thus, thrombosis is attenuated in mice deficient in factor XII or factor XI and patients with congenital factor XII deficiency do not bleed and those with factor XI deficiency rarely have spontaneous bleeding. Strategies targeting factor XII and XI include antisense oligonucleotides to decrease their synthesis, inhibitory antibodies or aptamers, and small molecule inhibitors. These strategies attenuate thrombosis in various animal models and factor XI knockdown with an antisense oligonucleotide in patients undergoing knee replacement surgery reduced postoperative venous thromboembolism to a greater extent than enoxaparin without increasing bleeding. Therefore, current efforts are focused on evaluating the efficacy and safety of factor XII and factor XI directed anticoagulant strategies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Respiratory factors limiting exercise.

    PubMed

    Bye, P T; Farkas, G A; Roussos, C

    1983-01-01

    The question of respiratory factors limiting exercise has been examined in terms of possible limitations arising from the function of gas exchange, the respiratory mechanics, the energetics of the respiratory muscles, or the development of respiratory muscle fatigue. Exercise capacity is curtailed in the presence of marked hypoxia, and this is readily observed in patients with chronic airflow limitation and interstitial lung disease and in some athletes at high intensities of exercise. In patients with interstitial lung disease, gas exchange abnormality--partly the result of diffusion disequilibrium for oxygen transfer--occurs during exercise despite abnormally high ventilations. In contrast, in certain athletes arterial hypoxemia has been documented during heavy exercise, apparently as a result of relative hypoventilation. During strenuous exercise the maximum expiratory flow volume curves are attained both by patients with chronic airflow limitation and by normal subjects, in particular when they breathe dense gas, so that a mechanical constraint is imposed on further increases in ventilation. Similarly, the force velocity characteristics of the inspiratory muscles may also impose a constraint to further increases in inspiratory flows that affects the ability to increase ventilation. In addition, the oxygen cost of maintaining high ventilations is large. Analysis of results from blood flow experiments reveal a substantial increase in blood flow to the respiratory muscles during exercise, with the result that oxygen supply to the rest of the body may be lessened. Alternatively, high exercise ventilations may not be sustained indefinitely owing to the development of respiratory muscle fatigue that results in hypoventilation and reduced arterial oxygen tension.

  15. Platelet Activating Factor: A Growth Factor for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    Factor for Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Larry W. Daniel, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Wake Forest University...A Growth Factor for Breast Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-04-1-0682 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Larry W...Relevance: If PAF is found to be a growth and angiogenic factor for breast cancer cells, these studies can be followed up by in vivo studies in nude

  16. The population factor.

    PubMed

    Kats, G

    1983-01-01

    Reducing population growth is essentil to Egypt's broader efforts to improve facilities, services, and the phsycial quality of life. Although a family planning program has existed since the mid-1950s, the 2.7% annual rate of population growth has not changed in 30 years. Nasser and the other "free officers" who seized power in 1952 became concerned about the adverse effects of the rapidly growing population, but perhaps out of concern with a possible religious backlash, they confined themselves to launching studies and subsidizing several dozen private family planning clinics. From 1962-72, the number of private clinics grew from 28 to 480, and family planning was introduced in government healthclinics in 1965. Such clinics are mainly located in rural areas and are staffed by doctors and other personnel who are not members of the local community and are not very effective at promoting family planning. Local girls and women called Rayadet were recruited to promote the idea to birth control in local communities. By 1970, 12.6% of Egyptians were using reliable contraception. A national survey 12 years later found 34% using contraception, buth the figure seems high. Approximately 60-65% of eligible couples would need to practice birth control for Egypt to reach a less than 1% annuel increase. The Egyptian government hopes to slow population growth to 1% by the year 2000, but major problems of motivation remain especially among the rural poor. Several factors may lead to success of the family planning effort: 1) financial and technical support from international family planning sources has grown rapidley and is likely to remain high; 2) the mortality rate has dropped from 17.8/1000 in 1952 to about half that level, while the rate of natural increase is about the same, suggesting that future reductions in the birth rate will translate to a reduced rate of natural increase, and that parents will be less reluctant to practice faimly planning if there is a greater chance

  17. Risk factors for periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Genco, Robert J; Borgnakke, Wenche S

    2013-06-01

    Risk factors play an important role in an individual's response to periodontal infection. Identification of these risk factors helps to target patients for prevention and treatment, with modification of risk factors critical to the control of periodontal disease. Shifts in our understanding of periodontal disease prevalence, and advances in scientific methodology and statistical analysis in the last few decades, have allowed identification of several major systemic risk factors for periodontal disease. The first change in our thinking was the understanding that periodontal disease is not universal, but that severe forms are found only in a portion of the adult population who show abnormal susceptibility. Analysis of risk factors and the ability to statistically adjust and stratify populations to eliminate the effects of confounding factors have allowed identification of independent risk factors. These independent but modifiable, risk factors for periodontal disease include lifestyle factors, such as smoking and alcohol consumption. They also include diseases and unhealthy conditions such as diabetes mellitus, obesity, metabolic syndrome, osteoporosis, and low dietary calcium and vitamin D. These risk factors are modifiable and their management is a major component of the contemporary care of many periodontal patients. Genetic factors also play a role in periodontal disease and allow one to target individuals for prevention and early detection. The role of genetic factors in aggressive periodontitis is clear. However, although genetic factors (i.e., specific genes) are strongly suspected to have an association with chronic adult periodontitis, there is as yet no clear evidence for this in the general population. It is important to pursue efforts to identify genetic factors associated with chronic periodontitis because such factors have potential in identifying patients who have a high susceptibility for development of this disease. Many of the systemic risk factors

  18. Growth factors in synaptic function

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Vivian Y.; Choi, Sojoong; Park, Mikyoung

    2013-01-01

    Synapses are increasingly recognized as key structures that malfunction in disorders like schizophrenia, mental retardation, and neurodegenerative diseases. The importance and complexity of the synapse has fuelled research into the molecular mechanisms underlying synaptogenesis, synaptic transmission, and plasticity. In this regard, neurotrophic factors such as netrin, Wnt, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and others have gained prominence for their ability to regulate synaptic function. Several of these factors were first implicated in neuroprotection, neuronal growth, and axon guidance. However, their roles in synaptic development and function have become increasingly clear, and the downstream signaling pathways employed by these factors have begun to be elucidated. In this review, we will address the role of these factors and their downstream effectors in synaptic function in vivo and in cultured neurons. PMID:24065916

  19. Risk factors in school shootings.

    PubMed

    Verlinden, S; Hersen, M; Thomas, J

    2000-01-01

    Nine incidents of multiple-victim homicide in American secondary schools are examined and common risk factors are identified. The literature dealing with individual, family, social, societal, and situational risk factors for youth violence and aggression is reviewed along with existing risk assessment methods. Checklists of risk factors for serious youth violence and school violence are used in reviewing each school shooting case. Commonalties among the cases and implications for psychologists practicing in clinical and school settings are discussed.

  20. Contributive factors to aviation accidents.

    PubMed

    Fajer, Marcia; Almeida, Ildeberto Muniz de; Fischer, Frida Marina

    2011-04-01

    The objective of the study was to compare the results of aviation accident analyses performed by the Center for Investigation and Prevention of Aviation Accidents (CENIPA) with the method Human Factors Analysis and Classification System (HFACS). The final reports of thirty-six general aviation accidents occurring between 2000 and 2005 in the State of São Paulo, Southeastern Brazil were analyzed and compared. CENIPA reports mentioned 163 contributive factors, while HFACS identified 370 factors. It was concluded that CENIPA reports did not contemplate the organizational factors associated with aviation accidents.

  1. NASA human factors programmatic overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connors, Mary M.

    1992-01-01

    Human factors addresses humans in their active and interactive capacities, i.e., in the mental and physical activities that they perform and in the contributions they make to achieving the goals of the mission. The overall goal of space human factors in NASA is to support the safety, productivity, and reliability of both the on-board crew and the ground support staff. Safety and reliability are fundamental requirements that human factors shares with other disciplines, while productivity represents the defining contribution of the human factors discipline.

  2. Five Describing Factors of Dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Tamboer, Peter; Vorst, Harrie C M; Oort, Frans J

    2016-09-01

    Two subtypes of dyslexia (phonological, visual) have been under debate in various studies. However, the number of symptoms of dyslexia described in the literature exceeds the number of subtypes, and underlying relations remain unclear. We investigated underlying cognitive features of dyslexia with exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses. A sample of 446 students (63 with dyslexia) completed a large test battery and a large questionnaire. Five factors were found in both the test battery and the questionnaire. These 10 factors loaded on 5 latent factors (spelling, phonology, short-term memory, rhyme/confusion, and whole-word processing/complexity), which explained 60% of total variance. Three analyses supported the validity of these factors. A confirmatory factor analysis fit with a solution of five factors (RMSEA = .03). Those with dyslexia differed from those without dyslexia on all factors. A combination of five factors provided reliable predictions of dyslexia and nondyslexia (accuracy >90%). We also looked for factorial deficits on an individual level to construct subtypes of dyslexia, but found varying profiles. We concluded that a multiple cognitive deficit model of dyslexia is supported, whereas the existence of subtypes remains unclear. We discussed the results in relation to advanced compensation strategies of students, measures of intelligence, and various correlations within groups of those with and without dyslexia. © Hammill Institute on Disabilities 2014.

  3. Factorization method of quadratic template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotyrba, Martin

    2017-07-01

    Multiplication of two numbers is a one-way function in mathematics. Any attempt to distribute the outcome to its roots is called factorization. There are many methods such as Fermat's factorization, Dixońs method or quadratic sieve and GNFS, which use sophisticated techniques fast factorization. All the above methods use the same basic formula differing only in its use. This article discusses a newly designed factorization method. Effective implementation of this method in programs is not important, it only represents and clearly defines its properties.

  4. Strange nucleon form-factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maas, F. E.; Paschke, K. D.

    2017-07-01

    A broad program measuring parity-violation in electron-nuclear scattering has now provided a large set of precision data on the weak-neutral-current form-factors of the proton. Under comparison with well-measured electromagnetic nucleon form-factors, these measurements reveal the role of the strange quark sea on the low-energy interactions of the proton through the strange-quark-flavor vector form-factors. This review will describe the experimental program and the implications of the global data for the strange-quark vector form-factors. We present here a new fit to the world data.

  5. Women's Career Success: A Factor Analytic Study of Contributing Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaskill, LuAnn Ricketts

    1991-01-01

    A survey of 466 women employed in retailing received 205 responses identifying (1) factors influencing the success and advancement of women in retailing and (2) how those factors differ for women in upper versus middle positions. Upper-level executives placed more importance on ambition and abilities; midlevel executives credited opportunity and…

  6. Women's Career Success: A Factor Analytic Study of Contributing Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaskill, LuAnn Ricketts

    1991-01-01

    A survey of 466 women employed in retailing received 205 responses identifying (1) factors influencing the success and advancement of women in retailing and (2) how those factors differ for women in upper versus middle positions. Upper-level executives placed more importance on ambition and abilities; midlevel executives credited opportunity and…

  7. Factorized molecular wave functions: Analysis of the nuclear factor

    SciTech Connect

    Lefebvre, R.

    2015-06-07

    The exact factorization of molecular wave functions leads to nuclear factors which should be nodeless functions. We reconsider the case of vibrational perturbations in a diatomic species, a situation usually treated by combining Born-Oppenheimer products. It was shown [R. Lefebvre, J. Chem. Phys. 142, 074106 (2015)] that it is possible to derive, from the solutions of coupled equations, the form of the factorized function. By increasing artificially the interstate coupling in the usual approach, the adiabatic regime can be reached, whereby the wave function can be reduced to a single product. The nuclear factor of this product is determined by the lowest of the two potentials obtained by diagonalization of the potential matrix. By comparison with the nuclear wave function of the factorized scheme, it is shown that by a simple rectification, an agreement is obtained between the modified nodeless function and that of the adiabatic scheme.

  8. Some Human Factors in Codebreaking

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-10-01

    thereafter. Some human factors that can lead to vital ‘breaks’ are highlighted. Bletchley Park’s current rôle in Anglo-Polish diplomatic relations...Human Factors in Codebreaking 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f

  9. Factors That Shape Design Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Colin M.

    2013-01-01

    A wide range of design literature discusses the role of the studio and its related pedagogy in the development of design thinking. Scholars in a variety of design disciplines pose a number of factors that potentially affect this development process, but a full understanding of these factors as experienced from a critical pedagogy or student…

  10. Human Factors in CAI Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rambally, Gerard K.; Rambally, Rodney S.

    1987-01-01

    Identifies human factor issues involved in the student-computer interface in computer assisted instruction and makes specific recommendations for screen design. Factors considered include simplicity, spaciousness, relevance, standardization, changing display screen contents, color coding, shape and size coding, and brightness coding. (Author/LRW)

  11. Statistical Factors in Complexation Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, Chung-Sun

    1985-01-01

    Four cases which illustrate statistical factors in complexation reactions (where two of the reactants are monodentate ligands) are presented. Included are tables showing statistical factors for the reactions of: (1) square-planar complexes; (2) tetrahedral complexes; and (3) octahedral complexes. (JN)

  12. Eight Factors in School Vitality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strommen, Merton P.

    1980-01-01

    A survey of 30 National Catholic Educational Association Schools examined their ability to make needed program changes according to Davis' eight factors: Awareness of Need, Resistances, Values, Information, Ability, Timing, Circumstances, and Yield. This article compares a vital, growing school and a declining one on these eight factors.…

  13. Factors That Influence Teacher Attrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Patricia

    1995-01-01

    External, employment, and personal factors which influence teacher decisions to stay, leave, or transfer from teaching assignments are discussed, with emphasis on special education teachers. Factors attributed to teacher attrition in urban and rural environments also are briefly reviewed, along with attrition of related services professionals.…

  14. Research Needs for Human Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Army Research Inst. for the Behavioral and Social Sciences, Arlington, VA.

    Human factors engineering can be defined as the application of scientific principles, methods, and data drawn from a variety of disciplines to the development of engineering systems in which people play a significant role. Since human factors issues arise in every domain in which humans interact with the products of a technological society, six…

  15. Matrix factorizations and elliptic fibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omer, Harun

    2016-09-01

    I use matrix factorizations to describe branes at simple singularities of elliptic fibrations. Each node of the corresponding Dynkin diagrams of the ADE-type singularities is associated with one indecomposable matrix factorization which can be deformed into one or more factorizations of lower rank. Branes with internal fluxes arise naturally as bound states of the indecomposable factorizations. Describing branes in such a way avoids the need to resolve singularities. This paper looks at gauge group breaking from E8 fibers down to SU (5) fibers due to the relevance of such fibrations for local F-theory GUT models. A purpose of this paper is to understand how the deformations of the singularity are understood in terms of its matrix factorizations. By systematically factorizing the elliptic fiber equation, this paper discusses geometries which are relevant for building semi-realistic local models. In the process it becomes evident that breaking patterns which are identical at the level of the Kodaira type of the fibers can be inequivalent at the level of matrix factorizations. Therefore the matrix factorization picture supplements information which the conventional less detailed descriptions lack.

  16. Activity Factors of the Korean Exposure Factors Handbook

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Soo-Nam; Kim, So-Yeon; Lee, Kyung-Eun; Choi, Kyung-Ho; Kim, Young-Hee

    2014-01-01

    Exposure factors based on the Korean population are required for making appropriate risk assessment. It is expected that handbooks for exposure factors will be applied in many fields, as well as by health department risk assessors. The present article describes the development of an exposure factors handbook that specifically focuses on human activities in situations involving the possible risk of exposure to environmental contaminants. We define majour exposure factors that represent behavioral patterns for risk assessment, including time spent on routine activities, in different places, on using transportation, and engaged in activities related to water contact including swimming, bathing and washing. Duration of residence and employment are also defined. National survey data were used to identify recommended levels of exposure factors in terms of time spent on routine activities and period of residence and employment. An online survey was conducted with 2073 subjects who were selected using a stratified random sampling method in order to develop a list of exposure factors for the time spent in different places and in performing water-related activities. We provide the statistical distribution of the variables, and report reference levels of average exposure based on the reliable data in our exposure factors handbook. PMID:24570804

  17. Activity factors of the Korean exposure factors handbook.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jae-Yeon; Jo, Soo-Nam; Kim, So-Yeon; Lee, Kyung-Eun; Choi, Kyung-Ho; Kim, Young-Hee

    2014-01-01

    Exposure factors based on the Korean population are required for making appropriate risk assessment. It is expected that handbooks for exposure factors will be applied in many fields, as well as by health department risk assessors. The present article describes the development of an exposure factors handbook that specifically focuses on human activities in situations involving the possible risk of exposure to environmental contaminants. We define majour exposure factors that represent behavioral patterns for risk assessment, including time spent on routine activities, in different places, on using transportation, and engaged in activities related to water contact including swimming, bathing and washing. Duration of residence and employment are also defined. National survey data were used to identify recommended levels of exposure factors in terms of time spent on routine activities and period of residence and employment. An online survey was conducted with 2073 subjects who were selected using a stratified random sampling method in order to develop a list of exposure factors for the time spent in different places and in performing water-related activities. We provide the statistical distribution of the variables, and report reference levels of average exposure based on the reliable data in our exposure factors handbook.

  18. Human factors in visualization research.

    PubMed

    Tory, Melanie; Möller, Torsten

    2004-01-01

    Visualization can provide valuable assistance for data analysis and decision making tasks. However, how people perceive and interact with a visualization tool can strongly influence their understanding of the data as well as the system's usefulness. Human factors therefore contribute significantly to the visualization process and should play an important role in the design and evaluation of visualization tools. Several research initiatives have begun to explore human factors in visualization, particularly in perception-based design. Nonetheless, visualization work involving human factors is in its infancy, and many potentially promising areas have yet to be explored. Therefore, this paper aims to 1) review known methodology for doing human factors research, with specific emphasis on visualization, 2) review current human factors research in visualization to provide a basis for future investigation, and 3) identify promising areas for future research.

  19. Knockout, Transfer and Spectroscopic Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemper, Kirby; Keeley, Nicholas; Rusek, Krzysztof

    2011-10-01

    As derived quantities rather than observables, spectroscopic factors extracted from fits to data are model dependent. The main source of uncertainty is the choice of binding potential, but other factors such as adequate modeling of the reaction mechanism, the Perey effect, choice of distorting nuclear potentials etc. can also play a significant role. Recently, there has been some discussion of apparent discrepancies in spectroscopic factors derived from knockout reactions compared to those obtained from low-energy direct reactions. It should be possible to reconcile these discrepancies and we explore this prospect by attempting to describe the 10Be(d,t)9Be data of Nucl. Phys. A157, 305 (1970) using the 10Be/9Be form factors from a recent knockout study, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 162502 (2011). The influence of such factors as choice of distorting potentials and multi-step reactions paths will be explored.

  20. Universally conserved translation initiation factors.

    PubMed

    Kyrpides, N C; Woese, C R

    1998-01-06

    The process by which translation is initiated has long been considered similar in Bacteria and Eukarya but accomplished by a different unrelated set of factors in the two cases. This not only implies separate evolutionary histories for the two but also implies that at the universal ancestor stage, a translation initiation mechanism either did not exist or was of a different nature than the extant processes. We demonstrate herein that (i) the "analogous" translation initiation factors IF-1 and eIF-1A are actually related in sequence, (ii) the "eukaryotic" translation factor SUI1 is universal in distribution, and (iii) the eukaryotic/archaeal translation factor eIF-5A is homologous to the bacterial translation factor EF-P. Thus, the rudiments of translation initiation would seem to have been present in the universal ancestor stage. However, significant development and refinement subsequently occurred independently on both the bacterial lineage and on the archaeal/eukaryotic line.

  1. [Risk factors for arterial disease].

    PubMed

    Madoery, Roberto; Rubin, Graciela; Luquez, Hugo; Luquez, Cecilia; Cravero, Cecilia

    2004-01-01

    The risk factors of arterial disease (FREA) predict a future damage over the vascular system of the human body. Its detection are considered a key for the diagnostic as well as for the preventive and even curative strategies. For a long time, scientist considered those factors originated as a consecuence of large studies during the middle of the last century, with current validity up to our days. A simple classification spoke of them as traditionals. Further investigations described the so called new or emergents.factors that where joint together accordingly to their actions: coagulation factors, psicosocial, inflamatories and infectious. A recent classification, taking into account the type of impact, divided them into; causatives, predisposals and conditionals. Also, it was described a mechanism, the oxidative power, with consecuences over the endothelium, in the last part of the process. Before, another mechanism was described: the insulin resistance and the hiperinsulinism, bases for the Metabolic Syndrome, that includes a number of traditional risk factors.

  2. Great Lakes management: Ecological factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonzogni, W. C.; Robertson, A.; Beeton, A. M.

    1983-11-01

    Although attempts to improve the quality of the Great Lakes generally focus on chemical pollution, other factors are important and should be considered Ecological factors, such as invasion of the lakes by foreign species, habitat changes, overfishing, and random variations in organism populations, are especially influential. Lack of appreciation of the significance of ecological factors stems partly from the inappropriate application of the concept of eutrophication to the Great Lakes. Emphasis on ecological factors is not intended to diminish the seriousness of pollution, but rather to point out that more cost-effective management, as well as more realistic expectations of management efforts by the public, should result from an ecosystem management approach in which ecological factors are carefully considered.

  3. Factoring in Factor VIII With Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Siegler, James E; Samai, Alyana; Albright, Karen C; Boehme, Amelia K; Martin-Schild, Sheryl

    2015-10-01

    There is growing research interest into the etiologies of cryptogenic stroke, in particular as it relates to hypercoagulable states. An elevation in serum levels of the procoagulant factor VIII is recognized as one such culprit of occult cerebral infarctions. It is the objective of the present review to summarize the molecular role of factor VIII in thrombogenesis and its clinical use in the diagnosis and prognosis of acute ischemic stroke. We also discuss the utility of screening for serum factor VIII levels among patients at risk for, or those who have experienced, ischemic stroke.

  4. Factors Affecting Medical Service Quality

    PubMed Central

    MOSADEGHRAD, Ali Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background A better understanding of factors influencing quality of medical service can pinpoint better strategies for quality assurance in medical services. This study aimed to identify factors affecting the quality of medical services provided by Iranian physicians. Methods Exploratory in-depth individual interviews were conducted with sixty-four physicians working in various medical institutions in Iran. Results Individual, organizational and environmental factors enhance or inhibit the quality of medical services. Quality of medical services depends on the personal factors of the physician and patient, and factors pertaining to the healthcare setting and the broader environment. Conclusion Differences in internal and external factors such as availability of resources, patient cooperation and collaboration among providers affect the quality of medical services and patient outcomes. Supportive leadership, proper planning, education and training and effective management of resources and processes improve the quality of medical services. This article contributes to healthcare theory and practice by developing a conceptual framework for understanding factors that influence medical services quality. PMID:26060745

  5. [In vitro fertilization. Prognostic factors].

    PubMed

    Alpüstün, S; al-Hasani, S; Diedrich, K; Bauer, O; Werner, A; Krebs, D

    1993-05-01

    Multiple factors influence the outcome of in vitro fertilisation and embryo transfer (IVF-ET). In our prospective study different factors have been subject of examination concerning their effect on the outcome of in vitro fertilisation and embryo transfer. 1237 couples undergoing 1675 consecutive treatment cycles between 1.1.1990-31.12.1991 were included in this study. Prior to treatment, couples were divided into "good" and "poor" prognosis groups. Cycles were prospectively labelled as carrying a potentially "poor prognosis", if one or more of the following factors were noted: 1) female age > 35; 2) an existence of male factor; 3) couples with more than 3 previous unsuccessful treatment cycles. Couples with none of these factors were assigned to the "good" prognosis group. The pregnancy rate per cycle in the "poor" prognosis group was 5.96%, compared with 17.92% per cycle in the "good" prognosis group (p < 0.001). The most important factors determining pregnancy rates were female age and male factor, and we observed that the rate of pregnancy declined after the third treatment cycle. An explanation may be seen in lower fertilisation rates after the age of 35 and cases of poor semen quality. Both will result in poor embryo quality.

  6. Environmental risk factors for autism

    PubMed Central

    Dietert, Rodney R.; Dietert, Janice M.; Dewitt, Jamie C.

    2010-01-01

    Autism is a devastating childhood condition that has emerged as an increasing social concern just as it has increased in prevalence in recent decades. Autism and the broader category of autism spectrum disorders are among the increasingly seen examples in which there is a fetal basis for later disease or disorder. Environmental, genetic, and epigenetic factors all play a role in determining the risk of autism and some of these effects appear to be transgenerational. Identification of the most critical windows of developmental vulnerability is paramount to understanding when and under what circumstances a child is at elevated risk for autism. No single environmental factor explains the increased prevalence of autism. While a handful of environmental risk factors have been suggested based on data from human studies and animal research, it is clear that many more, and perhaps the most significant risk factors, remain to be identified. The most promising risk factors identified to date fall within the categories of drugs, environmental chemicals, infectious agents, dietary factors, and other physical/psychological stressors. However, the rate at which environmental risk factors for autism have been identified via research and safety testing has not kept pace with the emerging health threat posed by this condition. For the way forward, it seems clear that additional focused research is needed. But more importantly, successful risk reduction strategies for autism will require more extensive and relevant developmental safety testing of drugs and chemicals. PMID:24149029

  7. Corrosion effects on friction factors

    SciTech Connect

    Magleby, H.L.; Shaffer, S.J.

    1996-03-01

    This paper presents the results of NRC-sponsored material specimen tests that were performed to determine if corrosion increases the friction factors of sliding surfaces of motor-operated gate valves, which could require higher forces to close and open safety-related valves when subjected to their design basis differential pressures. Friction tests were performed with uncorroded specimens and specimens subjected to accelerated corrosion. Preliminary tests at ambient conditions showed that corrosion increased the friction factors, indicating the need for additional tests duplicating valve operating parameters at hot conditions. The additional tests showed friction factors of corroded specimens were 0.1 to 0.2 higher than for uncorroded specimens, and that the friction factors of the corroded specimens were not very dependent on contact stress or corrosion film thickness. The measured values of friction factors for the three corrosion films tested (simulating three operating times) were in the range of 0.3 to 0.4. The friction factor for even the shortest simulated operating time was essentially the same as the others, indicating that the friction factors appear to reach a plateau and that the plateau is reached quickly.

  8. Factors controlling pancreatic islet neogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Vinik, A.; Pittenger, G.; Rafaeloff, R.; Rosenberg, L.

    1992-01-01

    We have established a model in which cellophane wrapping induces reiteration of the normal ontogeny of beta-cell differentiation from ductal tissue. The secretion of insulin is physiologic and coordinated to the needs of the animal. Streptozotocin-induced diabetes in hamsters can be "cured" at least half the time. There appears to be activation of growth factor(s) within the pancreas, acting in an autocrine, paracrine, or juxtacrine manner to induce ductal cell proliferation and differentiation into functioning beta cells. Given the results of our studies to date, it does not seem premature to envisage new approaches to the treatment of diabetes mellitus. Identification of the factor(s) regulating islet-cell proliferation and differentiation in our model may permit islets to be grown in culture. This concept could be extended to induce endocrine cell differentiation in vitro as well. Furthermore, islet-cell growth factors could be used to provide "trophic support" to islet transplants as a means of maintaining graft viability. There may also be greater scope for gene therapy when the growth factor(s) have been isolated, purified, sequenced, and cloned. Images FIG. 2 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 FIG. 9 PMID:1364089

  9. Impact factors: uses and abuses.

    PubMed

    Neuberger, James; Counsell, Christopher

    2002-03-01

    Quantitative assessment of the scientific merit of journals and articles is being used increasingly to assess and compare researchers and institutions. The most commonly used measure is the 2 year Impact Factor, which broadly reflects the number of times each article in the journal has been cited over the previous 2 years. There are clear limitations to the use of such measures - not least, Impact Factors reflect the journal not the article, vary with time and correlate only poorly with perceived excellence. Simple comparison of impact factors in different specialties may be misleading. Review journals often have higher Impact Factors than those with original data. Both authors and editors can try to manipulate journal Impact Factors. However, despite valid concerns, Impact Factors are widely used and offer, at present, the best simple tool for comparison of output. Like all measures, the use of Impact Factors has to be tempered with knowledge of their limitations and common sense used in interpreting any data based on any analysis.

  10. GATA factors in endocrine neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Pihlajoki, Marjut; Färkkilä, Anniina; Soini, Tea; Heikinheimo, Markku; Wilson, David B.

    2015-01-01

    GATA transcription factors are structurally-related zinc finger proteins that recognize the consensus DNA sequence WGATAA (the GATA motif), an essential cis-acting element in the promoters and enhancers of many genes. These transcription factors regulate cell fate specification and differentiation in a wide array of tissues. As demonstrated by genetic analyses of mice and humans, GATA factors play pivotal roles in the development, homeostasis, and function of several endocrine organs including the adrenal cortex, ovary, pancreas, parathyroid, pituitary, and testis. Additionally, GATA factors have been shown to be mutated, overexpressed, or underexpressed in a variety of endocrine tumors (e.g., adrenocortical neoplasms, parathyroid tumors, pituitary adenomas, and sex cord stromal tumors). Emerging evidence suggests that GATA factors play a direct role in the initiation, proliferation, or propagation of certain endocrine tumors via modulation of key developmental signaling pathways implicated in oncogenesis, such as the WNT/β-catenin and TGFβ pathways. Altered expression or function of GATA factors can also affect the metabolism, ploidy, and invasiveness of tumor cells. This article provides an overview of the role of GATA factors in endocrine neoplasms. Relevant animal models are highlighted. PMID:26027919

  11. Sequence Factorization with Multiple References

    PubMed Central

    Wandelt, Sebastian; Leser, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    The success of high-throughput sequencing has lead to an increasing number of projects which sequence large populations of a species. Storage and analysis of sequence data is a key challenge in these projects, because of the sheer size of the datasets. Compression is one simple technology to deal with this challenge. Referential factorization and compression schemes, which store only the differences between input sequence and a reference sequence, gained lots of interest in this field. Highly-similar sequences, e.g., Human genomes, can be compressed with a compression ratio of 1,000:1 and more, up to two orders of magnitude better than with standard compression techniques. Recently, it was shown that the compression against multiple references from the same species can boost the compression ratio up to 4,000:1. However, a detailed analysis of using multiple references is lacking, e.g., for main memory consumption and optimality. In this paper, we describe one key technique for the referential compression against multiple references: The factorization of sequences. Based on the notion of an optimal factorization, we propose optimization heuristics and identify parameter settings which greatly influence 1) the size of the factorization, 2) the time for factorization, and 3) the required amount of main memory. We evaluate a total of 30 setups with a varying number of references on data from three different species. Our results show a wide range of factorization sizes (optimal to an overhead of up to 300%), factorization speed (0.01 MB/s to more than 600 MB/s), and main memory usage (few dozen MB to dozens of GB). Based on our evaluation, we identify the best configurations for common use cases. Our evaluation shows that multi-reference factorization is much better than single-reference factorization. PMID:26422374

  12. A chimeric switch-receptor targeting PD1 augments the efficacy of second generation CAR T-Cells in advanced solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaojun; Ranganathan, Raghuveer; Jiang, Shuguang; Fang, Chongyun; Sun, Jing; Kim, Soyeon; Newick, Kheng; Lo, Albert; June, Carl H.; Zhao, Yangbing; Moon, Edmund K.

    2015-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified adoptive T-cell therapy (ATC) has been successfully applied to the treatment of hematologic malignancies, but faces many challenges in solid tumors. One major obstacle is the immune-suppressive effects induced in both naturally-occurring and genetically-modified tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) by inhibitory receptors (IRs), namely PD1. We hypothesized that interfering with PD1 signaling would augment CAR T cell activity against solid tumors. To address this possibility, we introduced a genetically-engineered switch receptor construct, comprising the truncated extracellular domain of PD1 and the transmembrane and cytoplasmic signaling domains of CD28, into CAR T-cells. We tested the effect of this supplement, “PD1CD28”, on human CAR T-cells targeting aggressive models of human solid tumors expressing relevant tumor antigens. Treatment of mice bearing large, established solid tumors with PD1CD28 CAR T-cells led to significant regression in tumor volume due to enhanced CAR TIL infiltrate, decreased susceptibility to tumor-induced hypofunction, and attenuation of IR expression compared to treatments with CAR T-cells alone or PD1 antibodies. Taken together, our findings suggest that the application of PD1CD28 to boost CAR T-cell activity is efficacious against solid tumors via a variety of mechanisms, prompting clinical investigation of this potentially promising treatment modality. PMID:26979791

  13. Low density lipoprotein receptor targeted doxorubicin/DNA-Gold Nanorods as a chemo- and thermo-dual therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nan; Li, Shasha; Hua, Haiying; Liu, Dan; Song, Lili; Sun, Pengchao; Huang, Weiwei; Tang, Yafang; Zhao, Yongxing

    2016-11-20

    As drug vehicles and therapeutics, Gold Nanorods (GNRs) have various merits such as easy preparation and modification, passive accumulation to tumor tissues, effective intracellular delivery of therapeutics, and thermal responses to laser radiation. Doxorubicin (DOX) has been the standard chemotherapy for cancer. To enhance the anti-cancer efficacy, chemotherapy and thermotherapy were combined in the present study. To load sufficient DOX, DOX was first intercalated into DNA double strands and then absorbed to GNRs. PEG (polyethylene glycol) was used to modify DOX/DNA-GNRs to prolong circulation in vivo and to enhance its stability. Low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) targeted peptide-RLT (R) was also bound to DOX/DNA-GNRs to increase their specificity to LDLR over-expressed cancer cells. DNA-GNRs-PEG/R was successfully prepared with high in vitro stability in this study and DOX was loaded sufficiently to obtain DOX/DNA-GNRs-PEG/R. DOX/DNA-GNRs-PEG/R with near infrared (NIR) laser treatment showed higher inhibition to MCF-7 cells and PC-3 cells and both DOX/DNA-GNRs-PEG/R with/without NIR laser treatment were more potent than free DOX. Cell uptake experiment indicated that DOX loaded in DNA-GNRs-PEG/R was taken by PC-3 cells much faster than free DOX. With DOX/DNA-GNRs-PEG/R, the apoptosis rate and necrosis rate of PC-3 cells increased 1.7 and 6.4 folds respectively compared to free DOX. Additional NIR laser treatment caused significantly increases in PC-3 cell necrosis. DOX/DNA-GNRs-PEG/R+laser also enhanced the inhibition of S phase of PC-3 cells by DOX. ROS (reactive oxygen species) assay showed that DOX/DNA-GNRs-PEG/R produced much more ROS than free DOX. With additional laser treatment, further increase in ROS was detected. Prostate cancer model was achieved by injecting PC-3 cells into nude mice and the results showed that more DNA-GNRs-PEG/R was observed in tumor cells and higher tumor inhibition rate was achieved in vivo with R modification. Conclusively, all results consistently indicated that DNA-GNRs-PEG/R was able to increase in vitro and in vivo anti-cancer efficacy of DOX. With additional NIR laser treatment, GNRs produced heat and further enhanced the anti-cancer effect achieved by DOX/DNA-GNRs-PEG/R. Therefore, the chemo- and thermo-dual therapy could be a potential combined therapy for more efficient anti-cancer treatment in clinical applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Clinical Translation of a Dual Integrin αvβ3- and Gastrin-Releasing Peptide Receptor-Targeting PET Radiotracer, 68Ga-BBN-RGD.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingjing; Niu, Gang; Lang, Lixin; Li, Fang; Fan, Xinrong; Yan, Xuefeng; Yao, Shaobo; Yan, Weigang; Huo, Li; Chen, Libo; Li, Zhiyuan; Zhu, Zhaohui; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed to document the first-in-human application of a (68)Ga-labeled heterodimeric peptide BBN-RGD (bombesin-RGD) that targets both integrin αvβ3 and gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR). We evaluated the safety and assessed the clinical diagnostic value of (68)Ga-BBN-RGD PET/CT in prostate cancer patients in comparison with (68)Ga-BBN. Five healthy volunteers (4 men and 1 woman; age range, 28-53 y) were enrolled to validate the safety of (68)Ga-BBN-RGD. Dosimetry was calculated using the OLINDA/EXM software. Thirteen patients with prostate cancer (4 newly diagnosed and 9 posttherapy) were enrolled. All the patients underwent PET/CT scans 15-30 min after intravenous injection of 1.85 MBq (0.05 mCi) per kilogram of body weight of (68)Ga-BBN-RGD and also accepted (68)Ga-BBN PET/CT within 2 wk for comparison. With a mean injected dose of 107.3 ± 14.8 MBq per patient, no side effect was found during the whole procedure and 2 wk follow-up, demonstrating the safety of (68)Ga-BBN-RGD. A patient would be exposed to a radiation dose of 2.90 mSv with an injected dose of 129.5 MBq (3.5 mCi), which is much lower than the dose limit set by the Food and Drug Administration. In 13 patients with prostate cancer diagnosed by biopsy, (68)Ga-BBN-RGD PET/CT detected 3 of 4 primary tumors, 14 metastatic lymph nodes, and 20 bone lesions with an SUVmax of 4.46 ± 0.50, 6.26 ± 2.95, and 4.84 ± 1.57, respectively. Only 2 of 4 primary tumors, 5 lymph nodes, and 12 bone lesions were positive on (68)Ga-BBN PET/CT, with the SUVmax of 2.98 ± 1.24, 4.17 ± 1.89, and 3.61 ± 1.85, respectively. This study indicates the safety and efficiency of a new type of dual integrin αvβ3- and GRPR-targeting PET radiotracer in prostate cancer diagnosis and staging. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  15. The somatostatin receptor-targeted radiotherapeutic [90Y-DOTA-DPhe1, Tyr3]octreotide (90Y-SMT 487) eradicates experimental rat pancreatic CA 20948 tumours.

    PubMed

    Stolz, B; Weckbecker, G; Smith-Jones, P M; Albert, R; Raulf, F; Bruns, C

    1998-07-01

    Somatostatin receptor-expressing tumours are potential targets for therapy with radiolabelled somatostatin analogues. We have synthesized a number of such analogues in the past and identified [DOTA-dPhe1, Tyr3]octreotide (SMT 487) as the most promising candidate molecule because of its advantageous properties in cellular and in vivo tumour models. In the current paper we describe the radiotherapeutic effect of yttrium-90 labelled SMT 487 in Lewis rats bearing the somatostatin receptor-positive rat pancreatic tumour CA 20948. SMT 487 binds with nanomolar affinity to both the human and the rat somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (sst2) (human sst2 IC50=0.9 nM, rat sst2 IC50=0.5 nM). In vivo, 90Y-SMT 487 distributed rapidly to the sst2 expressing CA 20948 rat pancreatic tumour, with a tumour-to-blood ratio of 49.15 at 24 h post injection. A single intravenous administration of 10 mCi/kg 90Y-SMT 487 resulted in a complete remission of the tumours in five out of seven CA 20948 tumour-bearing Lewis rats. No regrowth of the tumours occurred 8 months post injection. Control animals that were treated with 30 microg/kg of unlabelled SMT 487 had to be sacrificed 10 days post injection due to excessive growth or necrotic areas on the tumour surface. Upon re-inoculation of tumour cells into those rats that had shown complete remission, the tumours disappeared after 3-4 weeks of moderate growth without any further treatment. The present study shows for the first time the curative potential of 90Y-SMT 487-based radiotherapy for somatostatin receptor-expressing tumours. Clinical phase I studies with yttrium-labelled SMT 487 have started in September 1997.

  16. Intracellular delivery and ultrasonic activation of folate receptor-targeted phase-change contrast agents in breast cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Marshalek, Joseph P; Sheeran, Paul S; Ingram, Pier; Dayton, Paul A; Witte, Russell S; Matsunaga, Terry O

    2016-12-10

    Breast cancer is a diverse and complex disease that remains one of the leading causes of death among women. Novel, outside-of-the-box imaging and treatment methods are needed to supplement currently available technologies. In this study, we present evidence for the intracellular delivery and ultrasound-stimulated activation of folate receptor (FR)-targeted phase-change contrast agents (PCCAs) in MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast cancer cells in vitro. PCCAs are lipid-coated, perfluorocarbon-filled particles formulated as nanoscale liquid droplets capable of vaporization into gaseous microbubbles for imaging or therapy. Cells were incubated with 1:1 decafluorobutane (DFB)/octafluoropropane (OFP) PCCAs for 1h, imaged via confocal microscopy, exposed to ultrasound (9MHz, MI=1.0 or 1.5), and imaged again after insonation. FR-targeted PCCAs were observed intracellularly in both cell lines, but uptake was significantly greater (p<0.001) in MDA-MB-231 cells (93.0% internalization at MI=1.0, 79.5% at MI=1.5) than MCF-7 cells (42.4% internalization at MI=1.0, 35.7% at MI=1.5). Folate incorporation increased the frequency of intracellular PCCA detection 45-fold for MDA-MB-231 cells and 7-fold for MCF-7 cells, relative to untargeted PCCAs. Intracellularly activated PCCAs ranged from 500nm to 6μm (IQR=800nm-1.5μm) with a mean diameter of 1.15±0.59 (SD) microns. The work presented herein demonstrates the feasibility of PCCA intracellular delivery and activation using breast cancer cells, illuminating a new platform toward intracellular imaging or therapeutic delivery with ultrasound.

  17. Folate Receptor-targeted Aggregation-enhanced Near-IR Emitting Silica Nanoprobe for One-photon in vivo and Two-photon ex vivo Fluorescence Bioimaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuhua; Morales, Alma R.; Urakami, Takeo; Zhang, Lifu; Bondar, Mykhailo V.; Komatsu, Masanobu; Belfield, Kevin D.

    2011-01-01

    A two-photon absorbing (2PA) and aggregation-enhanced near infrared (NIR) emitting pyran derivative, encapsulated in and stabilized by silica nanoparticles (SiNPs), is reported as a nanoprobe for two-photon fluorescence microscopy (2PFM) bioimaging that overcomes fluorescence quenching associated with high chromophore loading. The new SiNP probe exhibited aggregate-enhanced emission producing nearly twice as strong signal as the unaggregated dye, a three-fold increase in two-photon absorption relative to the DFP in solution, and approx. four-fold increase in photostability. The surface of the nanoparticles was functionalized with a folic acid (FA) derivative for folate-mediated delivery of the nanoprobe for 2PFM bioimaging. Surface modification of SiNPs with the FA derivative was supported by zeta potential variation and 1H NMR spectral characterization of the SiNPs as a function of surface modification. In vitro studies using HeLa cells expressing folate receptor (FR) indicated specific cellular uptake of the functionalized nanoparticles. The nanoprobe was demonstrated for FRtargeted one-photon in vivo imaging of HeLa tumor xenograft in mice upon intravenous injection of the probe. The FR-targeting nanoprobe not only exhibited highly selective tumor targeting but also readily extravasated from tumor vessels, penetrated into the tumor parenchyma, and was internalized by the tumor cells. Two-photon fluorescence microscopy bioimaging provided three-dimensional (3D) cellular-level resolution imaging up to 350 µm deep in the HeLa tumor. PMID:21688841

  18. Folate receptor targeted self-assembled chitosan-based nanoparticles for SPECT/CT imaging: demonstrating a preclinical proof of concept.

    PubMed

    Polyák, András; Hajdu, István; Bodnár, Magdolna; Dabasi, Gabriella; Jóba, Róbert P; Borbély, János; Balogh, Lajos

    2014-10-20

    A new biocompatible, biodegradable, self-assembled chitosan-based nanoparticulate product was successfully synthesized and radiolabeled with technetium-99m, and studied as a potential new SPECT or SPECT/CT imaging agent for diagnosis of folate receptor overexpressing tumors. In the present study we examined the conditions of a preclinical application of this labeled nanosystem in early diagnosis of spontaneously diseased veterinary patient using a human SPECT/CT device. The results confirmed that the nanoparticles accumulated in tumor cells overexpressing folate receptors, contrast agent revealed higher uptake in the tumor for a long time. Preclinical trials verified that the new nanoparticles are able to detect folate-receptor-overexpressing tumors in spontaneously diseased animal models with enhanced contrast.

  19. Gateways for the intracellular access of nanocarriers: a review of receptor-mediated endocytosis mechanisms and of strategies in receptor targeting.

    PubMed

    Zaki, Noha M; Tirelli, Nicola

    2010-08-01

    The last 10 years have seen a dramatic growth in understanding and controlling how complex, drug-loaded (nano)structures, as well as pathogens, or biopharmaceuticals can gather access to the cytoplasm, which is a key step to increasing the effectiveness of their action. The review offers an updated overview of the current knowledge of endocytic processes; furthermore, the cell surface receptors most commonly used in drug delivery are here discussed on the basis of their reported internalization mechanisms, with examples of their use as nanocarrier targets taken from the most recent scientific literature. Knowledge of molecular biology details is increasingly necessary for a rational design of drug delivery systems. Here, the aim is to provide the reader with an attempt to link a mechanistic knowledge of endocytic mechanisms with the identification of appropriate targets (internalization receptors) for nanocarriers. Much advance is still needed to create a complete and coherent biological picture of endocytosis, but current knowledge already allows individuation of a good number of targetable groups for a predetermined intracellular fate of nanocarriers.

  20. The Role of Skp1-Cul1-F-box Ubiquitin Ligases in Src-Stimulated Estrogen Receptor Proteolysis and Estrogen Receptor Target Gene Expression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    feed forward loop whereby estrogen stimulates SKP2- dependent ERa transactivation of E2F-1, which in turn induces further cyclin E and SKP2 expression to...SKP2 overexpression enhanced estrogen- induced E2F-1 and BLM expression. SKP2 knockdown impaired estrogen-stimulated ERα, SKP2, SRC3 and RNA polymerase... dependent   Several F‐box proteins contain the signature steroid hormone co‐activator motif LXXLL. To test if  SCFs regulate ERα proteolysis, a