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Sample records for factor zapb stimulates

  1. Spatial resolution of two bacterial cell division proteins: ZapA recruits ZapB to the inner face of the Z-ring.

    PubMed

    Galli, Elisa; Gerdes, Kenn

    2010-06-01

    FtsZ, the essential regulator of bacterial cell division, is a dynamic cytoskeletal protein that forms helices that condense into the Z-ring prior to division. Two small coiled-coil proteins, ZapA and ZapB, are both recruited early to the Z-ring. We show here that ZapB is recruited to the Z-ring by ZapA. A direct interaction between ZapA and ZapB is supported by bacterial two-hybrid and in vitro interaction assays. Using high-resolution 3-D reconstruction microscopy, we find that, surprisingly, ZapB is located inside the Z-ring in virtually all cells investigated. We propose a molecular model in which ZapA increases lateral interactions between FtsZ proto-filaments and ZapB mediates further stabilization of this interaction by cross-linking ZapA molecules bound to adjacent FtsZ proto-filaments. Gene deletion and complementation assays show that ZapB can mitigate cell division and Z-ring assembly defects even in the absence of ZapA, raising the possibility that ZapB stimulates Z-ring assembly by two different mechanisms.

  2. Factors stimulating bone formation.

    PubMed

    Lind, M; Bünger, C

    2001-10-01

    The aim of this review is to describe major approaches for stimulating bone healing and to review other factors affecting bone healing. Spinal bone fusion after surgery is a demanding process requiring optimal conditions for clinical success. Bone formation and healing can be enhanced through various methods. Experimental studies have revealed an array of stimulative measures. These include biochemical stimulation by use of hormones and growth factors, physical stimulation through mechanical and electromagnetic measures, and bone grafting by use of bone tissue or bone substitutes. Newer biological techniques such as stem cell transplantation and gene therapy can also be used to stimulate bone healing. Apart from bone transplantation, clinical experience with the many stimulation modalities is limited. Possible areas for clinical use of these novel methods are discussed.

  3. Factors Associated with Speech-Sound Stimulability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lof, Gregory L.

    1996-01-01

    This study examined stimulability in 30 children (ages 3 to 5) with articulation impairments. Factors found to relate to stimulability were articulation visibility, the child's age, the family's socioeconomic status, and the child's overall imitative ability. Perception, severity, otitis media history, language abilities, consistency of…

  4. Factors Associated with Speech-Sound Stimulability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lof, Gregory L.

    1996-01-01

    This study examined stimulability in 30 children (ages 3 to 5) with articulation impairments. Factors found to relate to stimulability were articulation visibility, the child's age, the family's socioeconomic status, and the child's overall imitative ability. Perception, severity, otitis media history, language abilities, consistency of…

  5. In vivo organization of the FtsZ-ring by ZapA and ZapB revealed by quantitative super-resolution microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Buss, Jackson; Coltharp, Carla; Huang, Tao; Pohlmeyer, Chris; Wang, Shih-Chin; Hatem, Christine; Xiao, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Summary In most bacterial cells, cell division is dependent on the polymerization of the FtsZ protein to form a ring-like structure (Z-ring) at the midcell. Despite its essential role, the molecular architecture of the Z-ring remains elusive. In this work we examine the roles of two FtsZ-associated proteins, ZapA and ZapB, in the assembly dynamics and structure of the Z-ring in E. coli cells. In cells deleted of zapA or zapB, we observed abnormal septa and highly dynamic FtsZ structures. While details of these FtsZ structures are difficult to discern under conventional fluorescence microscopy, single-molecule based superresolution imaging method Photoactivated Localization Microscopy (PALM) reveals that these FtsZ structures arise from disordered arrangements of FtsZ clusters. Quantitative analysis finds these clusters are larger and comprise more molecules than a single FtsZ protofilament, and likely represent a distinct polymeric species that is inherent to the assembly pathway of the Z-ring. Furthermore, we find these clusters are not due to the loss of ZapB-MatP interaction in ΔzapA and ΔzapB cells. Our results suggest that the main function of ZapA and ZapB in vivo may not be to promote the association of individual protofilaments but to align FtsZ clusters that consist of multiple FtsZ protofilaments. PMID:23859153

  6. Stimulation of neutrophils by tumor necrosis factor

    SciTech Connect

    Klebanoff, S.J.; Vadas, M.A.; Harlan, J.M.; Sparks, L.H.; Gamble, J.R.; Agosti, J.M.; Waltersdorph, A.M.

    1986-06-01

    Human recombinant tumor necrosis factor (TNF) was shown to be a weak direct stimulus of the neutrophil respiratory burst and degranulation. The stimulation, as measured by iodination, H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ production, and lysozyme release, was considerably increased by the presence of unopsonized zymosan in the reaction mixture, an effect which was associated with the increased ingestion of the zymosan. TNF does not act as an opsonin but, rather, reacts with the neutrophil to increase its phagocytic activity. TNF-dependent phagocytosis, as measured indirectly by iodination, is inhibited by monoclonal antibodies (Mab) 60.1 and 60.3, which recognize different epitopes on the C3bi receptor/adherence-promoting surface glycoprotein of neutrophils. Other neutrophil stimulants, namely N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine, the Ca2+ ionophore A23187, and phorbol myristic acetate, also increase iodination in the presence of zymosan; as with TNF, the effect of these stimulants is inhibited by Mab 60.1 and 60.3, whereas, in contrast to that of TNF, their stimulation of iodination is unaffected by an Mab directed against TNF. TNF may be a natural stimulant of neutrophils which promotes adherence to endothelial cells and to particles, leading to increased phagocytosis, respiratory burst activity, and degranulation.

  7. The colony-stimulating factors and cancer.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Donald

    2013-12-01

    The colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) are the master regulators of granulocyte and macrophage populations. There are four different aspects of the connection between the CSFs and cancer: (a) the CSFs can accelerate the regeneration of protective white cells damaged by chemotherapy; (b) the CSFs can mobilize stem cells to the peripheral blood in convenient numbers for transplantation; (c) the CSFs can enhance anticancer immune responses and (d) the CSFs are potentially involved in the genesis of the myeloid leukemias.

  8. The colony-stimulating factors and cancer.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Donald

    2010-06-01

    The four colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) are glycoproteins that regulate the generation and some functions of infection-protective granulocytes and macrophages. Recombinant granulocyte-CSF (G-CSF) and granulocyte-macrophage-CSF (GM-CSF) have now been used to increase dangerously low white blood cell levels in many millions of cancer patients following chemotherapy. These CSFs also release haematopoietic stem cells to the peripheral blood, and these cells have now largely replaced bone marrow as more effective populations for transplantation to cancer patients who have treatment-induced bone marrow damage.

  9. In vivo organization of the FtsZ-ring by ZapA and ZapB revealed by quantitative super-resolution microscopy.

    PubMed

    Buss, Jackson; Coltharp, Carla; Huang, Tao; Pohlmeyer, Chris; Wang, Shih-Chin; Hatem, Christine; Xiao, Jie

    2013-09-01

    In most bacterial cells, cell division is dependent on the polymerization of the FtsZ protein to form a ring-like structure (Z-ring) at the midcell. Despite its essential role, the molecular architecture of the Z-ring remains elusive. In this work we examine the roles of two FtsZ-associated proteins, ZapA and ZapB, in the assembly dynamics and structure of the Z-ring in Escherichia coli cells. In cells deleted of zapA or zapB, we observed abnormal septa and highly dynamic FtsZ structures. While details of these FtsZ structures are difficult to discern under conventional fluorescence microscopy, single-molecule-based super-resolution imaging method Photoactivated Localization Microscopy (PALM) reveals that these FtsZ structures arise from disordered arrangements of FtsZ clusters. Quantitative analysis finds these clusters are larger and comprise more molecules than a single FtsZ protofilament, and likely represent a distinct polymeric species that is inherent to the assembly pathway of the Z-ring. Furthermore, we find these clusters are not due to the loss of ZapB-MatP interaction in ΔzapA and ΔzapB cells. Our results suggest that the main function of ZapA and ZapB in vivo may not be to promote the association of individual protofilaments but to align FtsZ clusters that consist of multiple FtsZ protofilaments. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Factors stimulating migration of holotrich protozoa into the rumen.

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, M R; Drone, P E; Woodford, S T

    1985-01-01

    The effects of feeding and various reticular infusions on ruminal holotrich concentrations were studied in an attempt to identify possible factors stimulating their migration into the rumen. It was concluded that glucose entering the reticulo-rumen shortly after feeding could stimulate migration of holotrich protozoa. PMID:4004248

  11. The role of MatP, ZapA and ZapB in chromosomal organization and dynamics in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Männik, Jaana; Castillo, Daniel E.; Yang, Da; Siopsis, George; Männik, Jaan

    2016-01-01

    Despite extensive research over several decades, a comprehensive view of how the Escherichia coli chromosome is organized within the nucleoid, and how two daughter chromosomes segregate has yet to emerge. Here we investigate the role of the MatP, ZapA and ZapB proteins in organizing the replication terminus (Ter) region and in the chromosomal segregation process. Quantitative image analysis of the fluorescently labeled Ter region shows that the replication terminus attaches to the divisome in a single segment along the perimeter of the cell in a MatP, ZapA and ZapB-dependent manner. The attachment does not significantly affect the bulk chromosome segregation in slow growth conditions. With or without the attachment, two chromosomal masses separate from each other at a speed comparable to the cell growth. The separation starts even before the replication terminus region positions itself at the center of the nucleoid. Modeling of the segregation based on conformational entropy correctly predicts the positioning of the replication terminus region within the nucleoid. However, the model produces a distinctly different chromosomal density distribution than the experiment, indicating that the conformational entropy plays a limited role in segregating the chromosomes in the late stages of replication. PMID:26762981

  12. The role of MatP, ZapA and ZapB in chromosomal organization and dynamics in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Mannik, Jaana; Castillo, Daniel E.; Yang, Da; Siopsis, George; Mannik, Jaan

    2016-01-13

    Despite extensive research over several decades, a comprehensive view of how the Escherichia coli chromosome is organized within the nucleoid, and how two daughter chromosomes segregate has yet to emerge. Here we investigate the role of the MatP, ZapA and ZapB proteins in organizing the replication terminus (Ter) region and in the chromosomal segregation process. Quantitative image analysis of the fluorescently labeled Ter region shows that the replication terminus attaches to the divisome in a single segment along the perimeter of the cell in a MatP, ZapA and ZapB-dependent manner. The attachment does not significantly affect the bulk chromosome segregation in slow growth conditions. With or without the attachment, two chromosomal masses separate from each other at a speed comparable to the cell growth. The separation starts even before the replication terminus region positions itself at the center of the nucleoid. Modeling of the segregation based on conformational entropy correctly predicts the positioning of the replication terminus region within the nucleoid. Furthermore, the model produces a distinctly different chromosomal density distribution than the experiment, indicating that the conformational entropy plays a limited role in segregating the chromosomes in the late stages of replication.

  13. The role of MatP, ZapA and ZapB in chromosomal organization and dynamics in Escherichia coli

    DOE PAGES

    Mannik, Jaana; Castillo, Daniel E.; Yang, Da; ...

    2016-01-13

    Despite extensive research over several decades, a comprehensive view of how the Escherichia coli chromosome is organized within the nucleoid, and how two daughter chromosomes segregate has yet to emerge. Here we investigate the role of the MatP, ZapA and ZapB proteins in organizing the replication terminus (Ter) region and in the chromosomal segregation process. Quantitative image analysis of the fluorescently labeled Ter region shows that the replication terminus attaches to the divisome in a single segment along the perimeter of the cell in a MatP, ZapA and ZapB-dependent manner. The attachment does not significantly affect the bulk chromosome segregationmore » in slow growth conditions. With or without the attachment, two chromosomal masses separate from each other at a speed comparable to the cell growth. The separation starts even before the replication terminus region positions itself at the center of the nucleoid. Modeling of the segregation based on conformational entropy correctly predicts the positioning of the replication terminus region within the nucleoid. Furthermore, the model produces a distinctly different chromosomal density distribution than the experiment, indicating that the conformational entropy plays a limited role in segregating the chromosomes in the late stages of replication.« less

  14. Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor therapy for pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Shende, Ruchira P; Sampat, Bhavin K; Prabhudesai, Pralhad; Kulkarni, Satish

    2013-03-01

    We report a case of 58 year old female diagnosed with Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis (PAP) with recurrence of PAP after 5 repeated whole lung lavage, responding to subcutaneous injections of Granulocyte Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor therapy (GM-CSF). Thus indicating that GM-CSF therapy is a promising alternative in those requiring repeated whole lung lavage

  15. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor induces indirect angiogenesis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Phillips, G D; Aukerman, S L; Whitehead, R A; Knighton, D R

    1993-01-01

    The cytokine macrophage colony-stimulating factor was implanted in the rabbit cornea over a wide dose range (1 ng to 100 microg) to assay its angiogenic activity in vivo. Neovascularization occurred in a dose-dependent manner, and maximum angiogenesis occurred only with 100 microg. Histologic analysis revealed that the corneas were free of inflammation at the lower doses, but had slight inflammation at 50 and 100 microg. Nonspecific esterase staining of frozen sections and transmission electron microscopy revealed that the inflammatory cells were predominantly macrophages, with very few neutrophils present. This association of capillary formation with inflammation suggests an indirect mechanism of angiogenesis. The lack of neutrophils within the inflammatory cell infiltrate demonstrates that indirect angiogenesis can proceed without the local presence of neutrophils. This distinguishes macrophage colony-stimulating factor from other indirect-acting angiogenesis factors that have been identified to date.

  16. Rac regulates vascular endothelial growth factor stimulated motility.

    PubMed

    Soga, N; Connolly, J O; Chellaiah, M; Kawamura, J; Hruska, K A

    2001-01-01

    During angiogenesis endothelial cells migrate towards a chemotactic stimulus. Understanding the mechanism of endothelial cell migration is critical to the therapeutic manipulation of angiogenesis and ultimately cancer prevention. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent chemotactic stimulus of endothelial cells during angiogenesis. The endothelial cell signal transduction pathway of VEGF represents a potential target for cancer therapy, but the mechanisms of post-receptor signal transduction including the roles of rho family GTPases in regulating the cytoskeletal effects of VEGF in endothelial cells are not understood. Here we analyze the mechanisms of cell migration in the mouse brain endothelial cell line (bEND3). Stable transfectants containing a tetracycline repressible expression vector were used to induce expression of Rac mutants. Endothelial cell haptotaxis was stimulated by constitutively active V12Rac on collagen and vitronectin coated supports, and chemotaxis was further stimulated by VEGF. Osteopontin coated supports were the most stimulatory to bEND3 haptotaxis, but VEGF was not effective in further increasing migration on osteopontin coated supports. Haptotaxis on support coated with collagen, vitronectin, and to a lesser degree osteopontin was inhibited by N17 Rac. N17 Rac expression blocked stimulation of endothelial cell chemotaxis by VEGF. As part of the chemotactic stimulation, VEGF caused a loss of actin organization at areas of cell-cell contact and increased stress fiber expression in endothelial cells which were directed towards pores in the transwell membrane. N17 Rac prevented the stimulation of cell-cell contact disruption and the stress fiber stimulation by VEGF. These data demonstrate two pathways of regulating endothelial cell motility, one in which Rac is activated by matrix/integrin stimulation and is a crucial modulator of endothelial cell haptotaxis. The other pathway, in the presence of osteopontin, is Rac independent

  17. Stimulation of canine hematopoiesis by recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Schuening, F G; Storb, R; Goehle, S; Nash, R; Graham, T C; Appelbaum, F R; Hackman, R; Sandmaier, B M; Urdal, D L

    1989-09-01

    The effect of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) on canine hematopoiesis was evaluated. rhGM-CSF stimulated granulocyte-macrophage colony formation of canine marrow depleted of accessory cells up to tenfold. Stimulation of colony formation was abrogated by anti-rhGM-CSF antiserum or heat inactivation. rhGM-CSF also stimulated in vivo canine hematopoiesis both when given as continuous i.v. infusion and as intermittent s.c. injections. Neutrophil, monocyte, and lymphocyte counts were increased three- to eightfold above controls, whereas values for eosinophils, reticulocytes, and hematocrits were not changed. Bone marrow histology after 2 weeks of treatment with rhGM-CSF showed hypercellularity with myeloid hyperplasia and left-shifted granulocytopoiesis. After discontinuation of rhGM-CSF, peripheral leukocyte counts returned to control level within 3-7 days. Platelet counts decreased rapidly after starting rhGM-CSF, to 5000-15,000 platelets/mm3, and increased within 24 h after stopping rhGM-CSF treatment, whereas marrow histology after 2 weeks of rhGM-CSF application showed the normal number and morphology of megakaryocytes.

  18. Pituitary transcription factor Prop-1 stimulates porcine follicle-stimulating hormone beta subunit gene expression.

    PubMed

    Aikawa, Satoko; Kato, Takako; Susa, Takao; Tomizawa, Kyoko; Ogawa, Satoshi; Kato, Yukio

    2004-11-12

    Molecular cloning of the transcription factor that modulates the expression of porcine follicle-stimulating hormone beta subunit (FSHbeta) gene was performed by the yeast one-hybrid cloning system using the -852/-746 upstream region (Fd2) as a bait sequence. We eventually cloned a pituitary transcription factor, Prop-1, which has been identified as an upstream transcription factor of Pit-1 gene. Binding ability of Prop-1 to the bait sequence was confirmed using recombinant Prop-1, and the binding property was investigated by DNase I footprinting, revealing that Prop-1 certainly bound to the large AT-rich region throughout the Fd2. Co-transfection of Prop-1 expression vector together with a reporter gene fused with Fd2 in CHO cells demonstrated an attractive stimulation of reporter gene expression. Immunohistochemistry of adult porcine pituitary confirmed the colocalization of the Prop-1 and FSHbeta subunit. This study is the first to report that Prop-1 participates in the regulation of FSHbeta gene. The present finding will provide new insights into the development of pituitary cell lineage and combined pituitary hormone deficiency (CPHD), since why the defect of Prop-1 causes CPHD including gonadotropins (FSH and LH) has yet to be clarified.

  19. A sensitive new bioassay for erythroid colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Feldman, L; Davis, K L; Feeley, D M; Sytkowski, A J

    1993-12-01

    Erythroid colony-stimulating factor (E-CSF) is a B cell-derived membrane protein that specifically affects the growth and development of human and murine committed erythroid progenitors. We report the development of a sensitive new bioassay for E-CSF, based on the ability of the growth factor to stimulate 3H-thymidine incorporation into cloned Rauscher murine erythroleukemia cells. The assay has among its advantages the ability to measure growth factor activity on a purified target cell population in the absence of endogenous growth factor-producing accessory cells. In addition, this assay measures E-CSF's proliferative effect on erythroid progenitors in the absence of erythropoietin (Epo) after 72 to 96 hours. In contrast, the standard bone marrow fibrin clot assay traditionally used to measure E-CSF requires the addition of Epo to promote the development of hemoglobinized erythroid colonies that are quantified after 7 days (for murine cells) to 12 days (for human cells). With the use of this new Rauscher cell bioassay, we have identified an E-CSF-producing human cell line and, further, have measured E-CSF activity derived from nonhuman splenic B lymphocytes.

  20. Interleukin-6 stimulates neutrophil production of platelet-activating factor.

    PubMed

    Biffl, W L; Moore, E E; Moore, F A; Barnett, C C; Silliman, C C; Peterson, V M

    1996-04-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is an integral mediator of the acute phase response to injury and infection; an exaggerated IL-6 response has been associated with adverse clinical events. The precise role of IL-6 is unclear, but it appears capable of modulating the functional repertoire of mature neutrophils (PMNs). Our previous work demonstrated that IL-6 -stimulated PMNs are primed by lower concentrations of platelet-activating factor (PAF) than nonstimulated PMNs. Recently, we have found that IL-6 suppresses PMN apoptosis via a PAF-like mechanism. We hypothesized that IL-6 stimulates PMNs to produce PAF. PMNs isolated from healthy human donors were incubated with IL-6 (0.1-100 ng/ml) at 37 degrees C. Lipid production was measured by use of thin-layer chromatography, and PAF quantitated with a scintillation proximity assay. IL-6 (1 and 10 ng/ml) stimulated PMNs to produce increase quantities of PAF. PAF production was associated with an increase in PMN cytosolic calcium. These data may provide mechanistic insight into IL-6 regulation of PMN-mediated cytotoxicity and the role of PAF in mediating IL-6 effects on PMNs.

  1. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor induces in vitro lymphangiogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ae Sin; Kim, Dal; Wagle, Susbin Raj; Lee, Jung Eun; Jung, Yu Jin; Kang, Kyung Pyo; Lee, Sik; Park, Sung Kwang; Kim, Won

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •G-CSF induces tube formation, migration and proliferation of lymphatic cells. •G-CSF increases phosphorylation of MAPK and Akt in lymphatic endothelial cells. •MAPK and Akt pathways are linked to G-CSF-induced in vitro lymphangiogenesis. •G-CSF increases sprouting of a lymphatic ring. •G-CSF produces peritoneal lymphangiogenesis. -- Abstract: Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is reported to induce differentiation in cells of the monocyte lineage and angiogenesis in vascular endothelial cells, but its effects on lymphangiogenesis is uncertain. Here we examined the effects and the mechanisms of G-CSF-induced lymphangiogenesis using human lymphatic endothelial cells (hLECs). Our results showed that G-CSF induced capillary-like tube formation, migration and proliferation of hLECs in a dose- and time-dependent manner and enhanced sprouting of thoracic duct. G-CSF increased phosphorylation of Akt and ERK1/2 in hLECs. Supporting the observations, specific inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3′-kinase and MAPK suppressed the G-CSF-induced in vitro lymphangiogenesis and sprouting. Intraperitoneal administration of G-CSF to mice also stimulated peritoneal lymphangiogenesis. These findings suggest that G-CSF is a lymphangiogenic factor.

  2. Modulation of colony stimulating factor release and apoptosis in human colon cancer cells by anticancer drugs

    PubMed Central

    Calatayud, S; Warner, T D; Mitchell, J A

    2002-01-01

    Modulation of the immune response against tumour cells is emerging as a valuable approach for cancer treatment. Some experimental studies have shown that secretion of colony stimulating factors by cancer cells reduces their tumorigenicity and increases their immunogenicity probably by promoting the cytolitic and antigen presenting activities of leukocytes. We have observed that human colon cancer cells (HT-29) are able to secrete granulocyte-macrophage-colony stimulating factor, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor and macrophage-colony stimulating factor when stimulated with cytokines (IL-1β and TNF-α). In this study we assessed, for the first time, the effects of several anticancer drugs on colony stimulating factor release or apoptosis in HT-29 cells. Cytokine-induced release of granulocyte-macrophage-colony stimulating factor, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor and macrophage-colony stimulating factor was significantly increased by cisplatin and 6-mercaptopurine. Taxol only increased macrophage-colony stimulating factor release while reduced that of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor. No changes in colony stimulating factor secretion were observed after treatment with methotrexate. Only cisplatin and taxol induced apoptosis in these cells. Secretion of colony stimulating factors by colon cancer cells may contribute to the immune host response against them. Anticancer drugs such as cisplatin and 6-mercaptopurine increase colony stimulating factor secretion by cytokine stimulated cancer cells probably through mechanisms different to those leading to cell apoptosis, an effect that may contribute to their anti-neoplasic action. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 86, 1316–1321. DOI: 10.1038/sj/bjc/6600240 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:11953891

  3. Factors stimulating propagation of legionellae in cooling tower water

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Sugiura, Minoru; Kusunoki, Shinji; Ezaki, Takayuki; Ikedo, Masanari; Yabuuchi, Eiko )

    1992-04-01

    The authors survey of cooling tower water demonstrated that the highest density of legionellae, {ge}10{sup 4} CFU/100 ml, appeared in water containing protozoa, {ge}10{sup 2} MPN/100 ml, and heterotrophic bacteria, {ge}10{sup 6} CFU/100 ml, at water temperatures between 25 and 35C. Viable counts of legionellae were detected even in the winter samples, and propagation, up to 10{sup 5} CFU/100 ml, occurs in summer. The counts of legionellae correlated positively with increases in water temperature, pH, and protozoan counts, but not with heterotrophic bacterial counts. The water temperature of cooling towers may promote increases in the viable counts of legionellae, and certain microbes, e.g., protozoa or some heterotrophic bacteria, may be a factor stimulating the propagation of legionellae.

  4. Nerve growth factor: stimulation of polymorphonuclear leukocyte chemotaxis in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Gee, A P; Boyle, M D; Munger, K L; Lawman, M J; Young, M

    1983-01-01

    Topical application of mouse nerve growth factor (NGF) to superficial skin wounds of mice has previously been shown to accelerate the rate of wound contraction. Results of the present study reveal that NGF in the presence of plasma is also chemotactic for human polymorphonuclear leukocytes in vitro, and the concentration of NGF required for this effect is similar to that which stimulates ganglionic neurite outgrowth. This property does not arise from liberation of the C5a fragment of complement, nor does it require the known enzymic activity of NGF. (NGF inactivated with diisopropyl fluorophosphate is equally active.) We conclude that NGF can display biological effects on cells of nonneural origin and function, and this feature might play a role in the early inflammatory response to injury. PMID:6580641

  5. Epidermal growth factor-stimulated protein phosphorylation in rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Connelly, P.A.; Sisk, R.B.; Johnson, R.M.; Garrison, J.C.

    1987-05-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) causes a 6-fold increase in the phosphorylation state of a cytosolic protein (pp36, M/sub r/ = 36,000, pI = 5.5) in hepatocytes isolated from fasted, male, Wistar rats. Stimulation of /sup 32/P incorporation is observed as early as 1 min following treatment of hepatocytes with EGF and is still present at 30 min after exposure to the growth factor. The phosphate incorporated into pp36 in response to EGF is located predominantly in serine but not tyrosine residues. Phosphorylation of pp36 does not occur in response to insulin or to agents which specifically activate the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (S/sub p/ -cAMPS), protein kinase C (PMA) or Ca/sup 2 +//calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (A23187) in these cells. Prior treatment of hepatocytes with the cAMP analog, S/sub p/-cAMPS, or ADP-ribosylation of N/sub i/, the inhibitory GTP-binding protein of the adenylate cyclase complex, does not prevent EGF-stimulated phosphorylation of pp36. However, as seen in other cell types, pretreatment of hepatocytes with PMA abolishes all EGF-mediated responses including phosphorylation of pp36. These results suggest that EGP specifically activates an uncharacterized, serine protein kinase in hepatocytes that is distal to the intrinsic EGF receptor tyrosine protein kinase. The rapid activation of this kinase suggests that it may play an important role in the early response of the cell to EGF.

  6. Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor ameliorates DSS induced experimental colitis

    PubMed Central

    Sainathan, Satheesh K.; Hanna, Eyad M.; Gong, Qingqing; Bishnupuri, Kumar S.; Luo, Qizhi; Colonna, Marco; White, Frances V.; Croze, Ed; Houchen, Courtney; Anant, Shrikant; Dieckgraefe, Brian K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Sargramostim, granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a hematopoietic growth factor, stimulates cells of the intestinal innate immune system. Clinical trials show that Sargramostim induces clinical response and remission in patients with active Crohn's disease. To study the mechanism, we examined the effects of GM-CSF in the dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) induced acute colitis model. We hypothesized that GM-CSF may work through effects on dendritic cells (DCs). Methods Acute colitis was induced in Balb/c mice by administration of DSS in drinking water. Mice were treated with daily GM-CSF or PBS. To probe the role of plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) in the response to GM-CSF, we further examine the effects of monoclonal antibody 440c, which is specific for a sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin (Ig)-like lectin expressed on pDCs. Results GM-CSF ameliorates acute DSS-induced colitis; resulting in significantly improved clinical parameters and histology. Microarray analysis showed reduced expression of pro-inflammatory genes including TNFα and IL1β; results further confirmed by real-time RT-PCR and serum Bio-plex analysis. GM-CSF treatment significantly expands pDCs and type 1 IFN production. Administration of mAb 440c completely blocked the therapeutic effect of GM-CSF. GM-CSF is also effective in RAG1−/− mice, demonstrating activity independent effects on T and B cells. IFN-β administration mimics the therapeutic effect of GM-CSF in DSS-treated mice. GM-CSF increases systemic and mucosal type 1 IFN expression and exhibits synergy with pDC activators, such as microbial CpG DNA. Conclusions GM-CSF is effective in the treatment of DSS colitis in a mechanism involving the 440c+ plasmacytoid DC population. PMID:17932977

  7. The structure of granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor and its relationship to other growth factors.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, C P; Osslund, T D; Eisenberg, D

    1993-01-01

    We have determined the three-dimensional structure of recombinant human granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor by x-ray crystallography. Phases were initially obtained at 3.0-A resolution by multiple isomorphous replacement and were refined by solvent flattening and by averaging of the electron density of the three molecules in the asymmetric unit. The current R factor is 21.5% for all data between 6.0- and 2.2-A resolution. The structure is predominantly helical, with 104 of the 175 residues forming a four-alpha-helix bundle. The only other secondary structure is also helical. In the loop between the first two long helices a four-residue 3(10)-helix is immediately followed by a 6-residue alpha-helix. Three residues in the short connection between the second and third bundle helices form almost one turn of left-handed helix. The up-up-down-down connectivity with two long crossover connections has been reported previously for five other proteins, which like granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor are all signaling ligands: growth hormone, granulocyte/macrophage-colony-stimulating factor, interferon beta, interleukin 2, and interleukin 4. Structural similarity among these growth factors occurs despite the absence of similarity in their amino acid sequences. Conservation of this tertiary structure suggests that these different growth factors might all bind to their respective sequence-related receptors in an equivalent manner. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7685117

  8. Role of colony-stimulating factors in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Di Gregoli, Karina; Johnson, Jason L

    2012-10-01

    The varied effects of colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) on monocytes and macrophages during inflammation and atherosclerosis and its clinical presentation prompt the question whether the differing effects of CSFs dictate macrophage function and disease progression. CSFs can give rise to heterogeneous populations of monocyte-derived macrophages that are characterized by disparate expression of distinct molecules which dictate their ability to process lipid and regulate inflammatory and immune responses. The CSFs have been found within atherosclerotic plaques and in the circulation where their levels may act as predictive biomarkers of disease progression. Accordingly, differing exposure to these factors imparts divergent genomic signatures and functional properties on macrophages and may impact the multifactorial steps involved in atherogenesis, plaque progression and instability. Great interest in macrophage heterogeneity in the genesis and progression of atherosclerosis has led to the search for consistent markers of specific subsets in both animal models and humans. A better understanding of the overlap and competition between CSF regulation of macrophage phenotypes is therefore warranted, to allow their characterization in plaques. Subsequent targeted genetic and pharmacological intervention will facilitate the generation of therapeutic approaches to halt the progression and rupture of advanced atherosclerotic plaques.

  9. In vivo stimulation of granulopoiesis by recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, A.M.; Zsebo, K.M.; Inoue, H.; Hines, D.; Boone, T.C.; Chazin, V.R.; Tsai, L.; Ritch, T.; Souza, L.M.

    1987-04-01

    Osmotic pumps containing Escherichia coli-derived recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) were attached to indwelling jugular vein catheters and implanted subcutaneously into Golden Syrian hamsters. Within 3 days, peripheral granulocyte counts had increased > 10-fold with a concomitant 4-fold increase in total leukocytes. Microscopic examination of Wright-Giemsa-stained blood smears from rhG-CSF hamsters showed that only the neutrophil subpopulation of granulocytes had increased. After subcutaneous injection at /sup 35/S-labeled rhG-CSF doses of up to 10 ..mu..g x kg/sup -1/ x day/sup -1/ only granulocyte counts were affected. However, at higher dose levels, a transient thrombocytopenia was noted. Erythrocyte and lymphocyte/monocyte counts remained unaffected by rhG-CSF over the entire dose range studied. Total leukocyte counts increased 3-fold within 12 hr after a single s.c. injection of rhG-CSF. This early effect was associated with an increase in the total number of colony-forming cells and the percent of active cycling cells in the marrow. A sustained elevation of peripheral leukocyte and marrow progenitor counts was observed following seven daily s.c. injections of rhG-CSF. The ability of rhG-CSF to increase the production and release of granulocytes from the marrow may underlie the beneficial effect it produced on the restoration of peripheral leukocyte counts in hamsters made leukopenic by treatment with 5-fluorouracil.

  10. Tissue factor: A potent stimulator of Von Willebrand factor synthesis by human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Meiring, Muriel; Allers, W.; Le Roux, E.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation and dysfunction of endothelial cells are thought to be triggers for the secretion of Von Willebrand factor. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and the coagulation factors, tissue factor and thrombin on the release and cleavage potential of ultra-large von Willebrand factor (ULVWF) and its cleavage protease by cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). HUVEC were treated with IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α, tissue factor (TF) and thrombin, and combinations thereof for 24 hours under static conditions. The cells were then exposed to shear stress after which the VWF-propeptide levels and the VWF cleavage protease, ADAMTS13 content were measured. All treatments and their combinations, excluding IL-6, significantly stimulated the secretion of VWF from HUVEC. The VWF secretion from the HUVEC was stimulated most by the combination of TF with TNF-α. Slightly lower levels of ADAMTS13 secretion were found with all treatments. This may explain the thrombogenicity of patients with inflammation where extremely high VWF levels and slightly lower ADAMTS13 levels are present. PMID:27766025

  11. Colony-Stimulating Factor-1 Signaling Suppresses Renal Crystal Formation

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Kazumi; Kitamura, Hiroshi; Yasui, Takahiro; Naiki, Taku; Hamamoto, Shuzo; Ando, Ryosuke; Mizuno, Kentaro; Kawai, Noriyasu; Tozawa, Keiichi; Asano, Kenichi; Tanaka, Masato; Miyoshi, Ichiro; Kohri, Kenjiro

    2014-01-01

    We recently reported evidence suggesting that migrating macrophages (Mϕs) eliminate renal crystals in hyperoxaluric mice. Mϕs can be inflammatory (M1) or anti-inflammatory (M2), and colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) mediates polarization to the M2Mϕ phenotype. M2Mϕs promote renal tissue repair and regeneration, but it is not clear whether these cells are involved in suppressing renal crystal formation. We investigated the role of M2Mϕs in renal crystal formation during hyperoxaluria using CSF-1–deficient mice, which lack M2Mϕs. Compared with wild-type mice, CSF-1–deficient mice had significantly higher amounts of renal calcium oxalate crystal deposition. Treatment with recombinant human CSF-1 increased the expression of M2-related genes and markedly decreased the number of renal crystals in both CSF-1–deficient and wild-type mice. Flow cytometry of sorted renal Mϕs showed that CSF-1 deficiency resulted in a smaller population of CD11b+F4/80+CD163+CD206hi cells, which represent M2-like Mϕs. Additionally, transfusion of M2Mϕs into CSF-1–deficient mice suppressed renal crystal deposition. In vitro phagocytosis assays with calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals showed a higher rate of crystal phagocytosis by M2-polarized Mϕs than M1-polarized Mϕs or renal tubular cells. Gene array profiling showed that CSF-1 deficiency resulted in disordered M2- and stone-related gene expressions. Collectively, our results provide compelling evidence for a suppressive role of CSF-1 signaling in renal crystal formation. PMID:24578130

  12. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor versus granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor for collection of peripheral blood progenitor cells from healthy donors.

    PubMed

    Fischmeister, G; Gadner, H

    2000-05-01

    The harvesting of peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPCs) after granulocyte colony-stimulating factor or granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor stimulation instead of bone marrow in healthy donors has become increasingly popular. Donors, given the choice between bone marrow and PBPC donation, often prefer cytapheresis because of the easier access, no necessity for general anesthesia, and no multiple bone marrow punctures. In addition, accelerated engraftment and immunomodulation by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized PBPCs are advantageous for the recipient. However, because of donor inconvenience and poor mobilization, there is a need to develop improved procedures. Aspects such as durability of hematopoietic engraftment, characterization of the earliest stem cell, and composition of PBPCs are not yet well defined, and international donor registration and follow-up must be considered when evaluating long-term safety profiles in healthy donors. This review concentrates on the most significant developments on mobilization of PBPCs published during the past year.

  13. Granulocyte, granulocyte–macrophage, and macrophage colony-stimulating factors can stimulate the invasive capacity of human lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Pei, X-H; Nakanishi, Y; Takayama, K; Bai, F; Hara, N

    1999-01-01

    We and other researchers have previously found that colony-stimulating factors (CSFs), which generally include granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF), promote invasion by lung cancer cells. In the present study, we studied the effects of these CSFs on gelatinase production, urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) production and their activity in human lung cancer cells. Gelatin zymographs of conditioned media derived from human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines revealed two major bands of gelatinase activity at 68 and 92 kDa, which were characterized as matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 respectively. Treatment with CSFs increased the 68- and 92-kDa activity and converted some of a 92-kDa proenzyme to an 82-kDa enzyme that was consistent with an active form of the MMP-9. Plasminogen activator zymographs of the conditioned media from the cancer cells showed that CSF treatment resulted in an increase in a 48–55 kDa plasminogen-dependent gelatinolytic activity that was characterized as human uPA. The conditioned medium from the cancer cells treated with CSFs stimulated the conversion of plasminogen to plasmin, providing a direct demonstration of the ability of enhanced uPA to increase plasmin-dependent proteolysis. The enhanced invasive behaviour of the cancer cells stimulated by CSFs was well correlated with the increase in MMPs and uPA activities. These data suggest that the enhanced production of extracellular matrix-degrading proteinases by the cancer cells in response to CSF treatment may represent a biochemical mechanism which promotes the invasive behaviour of the cancer cells. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10408691

  14. Colony-stimulating factor 1 potentiates lung cancer bone metastasis.

    PubMed

    Hung, Jaclyn Y; Horn, Diane; Woodruff, Kathleen; Prihoda, Thomas; LeSaux, Claude; Peters, Jay; Tio, Fermin; Abboud-Werner, Sherry L

    2014-04-01

    Colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF1) is essential for osteoclastogenesis that mediates osteolysis in metastatic tumors. Patients with lung cancer have increased CSF1 in serum and high levels are associated with poor survival. Adenocarcinomas metastasize rapidly and many patients suffer from bone metastasis. Lung cancer stem-like cells sustain tumor growth and potentiate metastasis. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of CSF1 in lung cancer bone metastasis and whether inhibition of CSF1 ameliorates the disease. Human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells were examined in vitro for CSF1/CSF1R. A549-luc cells were injected intracardiac in NOD/SCID mice and metastasis was assessed. To determine the effect of CSF1 knockdown (KD) in A549 cells on bone metastasis, cells were stably transfected with a retroviral vector containing short-hairpin CSF1 (KD) or empty vector (CT). Results showed that A549 cells express CSF1/CSF1R; CSF1 increased their proliferation and invasion, whereas soluble CSF1R inhibited invasion. Mice injected with A549-luc cells showed osteolytic bone lesions 3.5 weeks after injection and lesions increased over 5 weeks. Tumors recapitulated adenocarcinoma morphology and showed osteoclasts along the tumor/bone interface, trabecular, and cortical bone loss. Analyses of KD cells showed decreased CSF1 protein levels, reduced colony formation in soft agar assay, and decreased fraction of stem-like cells. In CSF1KD mice, the incidence of tumor metastasis was similar to controls, although fewer CSF1KD mice had metastasis in both hind limbs. KD tumors showed reduced CSF1 expression, Ki-67+ cells, and osteoclasts. Importantly, there was a low incidence of large tumors >0.1 mm(2) in CSF1KD mice compared with control mice (10% vs 62.5%). This study established a lung osteolytic bone metastasis model that resembles human disease and suggests that CSF1 is a key determinant of cancer stem cell survival and tumor growth. Results may lead to novel strategies to

  15. A microassay for colony-stimulating factor based on thymidine incorporation.

    PubMed Central

    Prystowsky, M. B.; Naujokas, M. F.; Ihle, J. N.; Goldwasser, E.; Fitch, F. W.

    1984-01-01

    A variety of growth factors and lectins were tested; only colony-stimulating factors CSF-1, Interleukin 3, and a T-lymphocyte GM CSF induced colony formation in semisolid medium and stimulated thymidine incorporation in liquid culture. All other growth factors and lectins were inactive in both assays. Factor-stimulated thymidine incorporation was detectable 24 hours after stimulation and reached maximal levels 4-6 days after stimulation. A convenient microassay for measuring CSF activity has been developed, enabling a large number of samples to be screened qualitatively in 2 days and permitting CSF activity to be measured quantitatively in 4-5 days. This microassay can supplement the clonal-cell assay method and be especially useful as an initial screening assay for CSF activity. PMID:6606982

  16. Epidermal growth factor receptor-dependent stimulation of amphiregulin expression in androgen-stimulated human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, I; Bailey, J; Hitzemann, K; Pittelkow, M R; Maihle, N J

    1994-01-01

    Amphiregulin is a heparin-binding epidermal growth factor (EGF)-related peptide that binds to the EGF receptor (EGF-R) with high affinity. In this study, we report a role for amphiregulin in androgen-stimulated regulation of prostate cancer cell growth. Androgen is known to enhance EGF-R expression in the androgen-sensitive LNCaP human prostate carcinoma cell line, and it has been suggested that androgenic stimuli may regulate proliferation, in part, through autocrine mechanisms involving the EGF-R. In this study, we demonstrate that LNCaP cells express amphiregulin mRNA and peptide and that this expression is elevated by androgenic stimulation. We also show that ligand-dependent EGF-R stimulation induces amphiregulin expression and that androgenic effects on amphiregulin synthesis are mediated through this EGF-R pathway. Parallel studies using the estrogen-responsive breast carcinoma cell line, MCF-7, suggest that regulation of amphiregulin by estrogen may also be mediated via an EGF-R pathway. In addition, heparin treatment of LNCaP cells inhibits androgen-stimulated cell growth further suggesting that amphiregulin can mediate androgen-stimulated LNCaP proliferation. Together, these results implicate an androgen-regulated autocrine loop composed of amphiregulin and its receptor in prostate cancer cell growth and suggest that the mechanism of steroid hormone regulation of amphiregulin synthesis may occur through androgen upregulation of the EGF-R and subsequent receptor-dependent pathways. Images PMID:8049525

  17. Colony-stimulating factors for chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Mhaskar, Rahul; Clark, Otavio Augusto Camara; Lyman, Gary; Engel Ayer Botrel, Tobias; Morganti Paladini, Luciano; Djulbegovic, Benjamin

    2014-10-30

    Febrile neutropenia is a frequent adverse event experienced by people with cancer who are undergoing chemotherapy, and is a potentially life-threatening situation. The current treatment is supportive care plus antibiotics. Colony-stimulating factors (CSFs), such as granulocyte-CSF (G-CSF) and granulocyte-macrophage CSF (GM-CSF), are cytokines that stimulate and accelerate the production of one or more cell lines in the bone marrow. Clinical trials have addressed the question of whether the addition of a CSF to antibiotics could improve outcomes in individuals diagnosed with febrile neutropenia. However, the results of these trials are conflicting. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of adding G-CSF or GM-CSF to standard treatment (antibiotics) when treating chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia in individuals diagnosed with cancer. We conducted the search in March 2014 and covered the major electronic databases: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, and SCI. We contacted experts in hematology and oncology and also scanned the citations from the relevant articles. We searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared CSF plus antibiotics versus antibiotics alone for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia in adults and children. We used the standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. We performed meta-analysis of the selected studies using Review Manager 5 software. Fourteen RCTs (15 comparisons) including a total of 1553 participants addressing the role of CSF plus antibiotics in febrile neutropenia were included. Overall mortality was not improved by the use of CSF plus antibiotics versus antibiotics alone (hazard ratio (HR) 0.74 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.47 to 1.16) P = 0.19; 13 RCTs; 1335 participants; low quality evidence). A similar finding was seen for infection-related mortality (HR 0.75 (95% CI 0.47 to 1.20) P = 0.23; 10 RCTs; 897

  18. Does granulocyte colony-stimulating factor ameliorate the proinflammatory response in human meningococcal septic shock?

    PubMed

    Rojahn, Astrid; Brusletto, Berit; Øvstebø, Reidun; Haug, Kari B F; Kierulf, Peter; Brandtzaeg, Petter

    2008-09-01

    To test the hypothesis that granulocyte colony-stimulating factor acts cooperatively with interleukin-10 in down-regulating monocyte function in severe meningococcal septic shock. 1) We quantified the plasma levels of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, interleukin-10, Neisseria meningitidis lipopolysaccharide and the number of N. meningitidis DNA copies in 28 patients with systemic meningococcal disease. 2) We studied the inhibitory effect of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on normal human monocytes stimulated with purified meningococcal lipopolysaccaride. 3) We monitored the inhibitory effects of endogenously produced granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and interleukin-10 in meningococcal shock plasmas on monocytes. Comparative, experimental study. University Hospital and laboratory. Twenty-eight patients with systemic meningococcal disease, 13 with persistent shock, 7 died, and 15 without shock. The median levels of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in shock and nonshock patients were 1.7 x 10(6) and 8.1 x 10(2) pg/mL; interleukin-10, 2.1 x 10(4) and 4 x 10(1) pg/mL; number of N. meningitidis DNA copies, 2.9 x 10(7) and <10(3)/mL; and lipopolysaccharide, 105 and <0.04 endotoxin units/mL, respectively. The plasma levels of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor were reduced by 50% within 4 to 6 hrs after initiation of antibiotic treatment. In model experiments with lipopolysaccharide-stimulated human monocytes, recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and interleukin-10 reduced the release of tumor necrosis factor-alpha by mean 30% and 92%, respectively. When plasmas from three shock patients were depleted of native granulocyte colony-stimulating factor or interleukin-10 by immunoprecipitation, no increase in tumor necrosis factor-alpha release occurred after removal of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, whereas removal of interleukin-10 increased the tumor necrosis factor-alpha release eight-fold. Although

  19. Effect of Corynebacterium parvum on colony-stimulating factor and granulocyte-macrophage colony formation.

    PubMed

    Foster, R S; MacPherson, B R; Browdie, D A

    1977-05-01

    Because Corynebacterium parvum has tumor-inhibitory properties and stimulates granulocyte-macrophage production, it may have clinical value in combination with chemotherapy. The leukopoietic effect of killed suspensions of C. parvum was studied in mice using the technique of in vitro clonal culture of hematopoietic cells. After C. parvum injection, there was a prompt, sustained elevation of serum colony-stimulating factor followed by an increase in granulocyte-macrophage precursor cells in the spleen and increases in blood mononuclear and granulocyte cells. Colony-stimulating factor production is suggested as a major mechanism of stimulation of granulocyte-macrophage proliferation by C. parvum. Since rapidly proliferating hematopoietic cells may have increased sensititity to cytotoxic agents, the details of hematopoietic stimulation by C. parvum may be critical in the sequential timing of combined C. parvum and chemotherapy treatment to obtain maximal tumor inhibition and minimal hematopoietic toxicity.

  20. Expression of interleukin-34 and colony stimulating factor-1 in the stimulated periodontal ligament cells with tumor necrosis factor-α.

    PubMed

    Kawabe, Mutsuki; Ohyama, Hideki; Kato-Kogoe, Nahoko; Yamada, Naoko; Yamanegi, Koji; Nishiura, Hiroshi; Hirano, Hirotugu; Kishimoto, Hiromitsu; Nakasho, Keiji

    2015-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) directly and indirectly plays a crucial role in osteoclastogenesis. However, the indirect effects of TNF-α on colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF-1R)-mediated osteoclastogenesis achieved via periodontal ligament (PDL) cells are not fully understood. We herein examined the potency of osteoclast differentiation and maturation induced by fivefold supernatants in the stimulated human PDL cells with a physiologically high concentration (10 ng/mL) of recombinant TNF-α to human peripheral blood monocytes/macrophages in the simultaneous presence of the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand. The number of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive cells with multiple nuclei, but not those with a single nucleus, was decreased by approximately 50% by neutralization with rabbit IgG against either interleukin-34 (IL-34) or CSF-1. Small and large amounts of IL34 and CSF1 transcripts were measured in the stimulated PDL cells using real-time polymerase chain reaction. The corresponding amounts of proteins to IL34 and CSF1 transcripts were observed in the stimulated PDL cells on immunohistochemical staining or Western blotting. Moreover, 0.13 ng/mL of IL-34 and 5.0 ng/mL of CSF-1 were measured in the supernatants of the stimulated PDL cells using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. IL-34 derived from the stimulated PDL cells with TNF-α appeared to synergistically function with CSF-1 in the CSF-1R-mediated maturation of osteoclastogenesis.

  1. Identification of a unique B-cell-stimulating factor produced by a cloned dendritic cell.

    PubMed Central

    Clayberger, C; DeKruyff, R H; Fay, R; Cantor, H

    1985-01-01

    We describe a cloned dendritic cell, clone Den-1, which is a potent accessory cell for some B-cell responses. Clone Den-1 produces a unique lymphokine that induces polyclonal B-cell proliferation in the absence of other costimulators. This clone or factors produced by it also stimulate purified B cells to develop plaque-forming cell responses to type 2 antigens. The effect of this factor(s) on various B-cell populations and its relationship to previously described B-cell-stimulating factors is discussed. Images PMID:3871522

  2. Dynamic localization and persistent stimulation of factor-dependent cells by a stem cell factor / cellulose binding domain fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Jervis, Eric J; Guarna, M Marta; Doheny, J Greg; Haynes, Charles A; Kilburn, Douglas G

    2005-08-05

    The extracellular matrix provides structural components that support the development of tissue morphology and the distribution of growth factors that modulate the overall cellular response to those growth factors. The ability to manipulate the presentation of factors in culture systems should provide an additional degree of control in regulating the stimulation of factor-dependent cells for tissue engineering applications. Cellulose binding domain (CBD) fusion protein technology facilitates the binding of bioactive cytokines to cellulose materials, and has permitted the analysis of several aspects of cell stimulation by surface-localized growth factors. We previously reported the synthesis and initial characterization of a fusion protein comprised of a CBD and murine stem cell factor (SCF) (Doheny et al. [1999] Biochem J 339:429-434). A significant advantage of the CBD fusion protein system is that it permits the stimulation of factor-dependent cells with localized growth factor, essentially free of nonfactor-derived interactions between the cell and matrix. In this work, the long-term stability and bioactivity of SCF-CBD fusions adsorbed to microcrystalline cellulose under cell culture conditions is demonstrated. Cellulose-bound SCF-CBD is shown to stimulate receptor polarization in the cell membrane and adherence to the cellulose matrix. In addition, cellulose-surface presentation of the SCF-CBD attenuates c-kit dephosphorylation kinetics, potentially modulating the overall response of the cell to the SCF signal.

  3. Mechanically stimulated bone cells secrete paracrine factors that regulate osteoprogenitor recruitment, proliferation, and differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Robert T.; O'Brien, Fergal J.; Hoey, David A.

    2015-03-27

    Bone formation requires the recruitment, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal progenitors. A potent stimulus driving this process is mechanical loading, yet the signalling mechanisms underpinning this are incompletely understood. The objective of this study was to investigate the role of the mechanically-stimulated osteocyte and osteoblast secretome in coordinating progenitor contributions to bone formation. Initially osteocytes (MLO-Y4) and osteoblasts (MC3T3) were mechanically stimulated for 24hrs and secreted factors within the conditioned media were collected and used to evaluate mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) and osteoblast recruitment, proliferation and osteogenesis. Paracrine factors secreted by mechanically stimulated osteocytes significantly enhanced MSC migration, proliferation and osteogenesis and furthermore significantly increased osteoblast migration and proliferation when compared to factors secreted by statically cultured osteocytes. Secondly, paracrine factors secreted by mechanically stimulated osteoblasts significantly enhanced MSC migration but surprisingly, in contrast to the osteocyte secretome, inhibited MSC proliferation when compared to factors secreted by statically cultured osteoblasts. A similar trend was observed in osteoblasts. This study provides new information on mechanically driven signalling mechanisms in bone and highlights a contrasting secretome between cells at different stages in the bone lineage, furthering our understanding of loading-induced bone formation and indirect biophysical regulation of osteoprogenitors. - Highlights: • Physically stimulated osteocytes secrete factors that regulate osteoprogenitors. • These factors enhance recruitment, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. • Physically stimulated osteoblasts secrete factors that also regulate progenitors. • These factors enhance recruitment but inhibit proliferation of osteoprogenitors. • This study highlights a contrasting

  4. Luteinizing hormone releasing factor in rat hypophysial portal blood collected during electrical stimulation of the hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Harris, G. W.; Ruf, K. B.

    1970-01-01

    1. Ovulation was induced in Nembutal-blocked pro-oestrous rats by electrical stimulation of the hypothalamus. 2. The same type of electrical stimulation was applied during the collection of hypophysial portal blood. 3. Pooled hypophysial portal plasma from donors in pro-oestrus, oestrus and met-oestrus was assayed for ovarian ascorbic acid depleting (OAAD) activity. 4. Electrical stimulation of the hypothalamus increased the OAAD activity, believed to be due to luteinizing hormone releasing factor (LRF), in pro-oestrus and met-oestrus, but not in oestrus. 5. It is concluded that the hypothalamic nerve fibres responsible for releasing LRF into the hypophysial portal vessels are depleted of their store of this releasing factor, or are refractory to electrical stimulation, during oestrus. PMID:5499765

  5. Production of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor by carcinomas in a dog and a cat with paraneoplastic leukocytosis.

    PubMed

    Sharkey, L C; Rosol, T J; Gröne, A; Ward, H; Steinmeyer, C

    1996-01-01

    A dog with a pulmonary papillary carcinoma and a cat with a dermal tubular adenocarcinoma had profound paraneoplastic neutrophilic leukocytosis with no clinically detectable inflammatory foci. To investigate the mechanism of the leukocytosis, oligonucleotide primers were designed from the cDNA sequences of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) of dogs. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was performed on tumor tissues, and specific amplification of G-CSF and GM-CSF was obtained with the tumor RNA in the dog. The tumor RNA in the cat demonstrated specific amplification of G-CSF but not GM-CSF. These findings are consistent with the production of G-CSF and/or GM-CSF by neoplasms as a mechanism for paraneoplastic leukocytosis in small animals.

  6. STIMULATION OF DEFENSE FACTORS FOR OYSTERS DEPLOYED TO CONTAMINATED SITES IN PENSACOLA BAY, FLORIDA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A positive association between chemical contaminants and defense factors has been established for eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica) from Florida, but it is unknown whether such factors can be stimulated through short-term exposure to contaminants in the field. Hatchery oyst...

  7. STIMULATION OF DEFENSE FACTORS FOR OYSTERS DEPLOYED TO CONTAMINATED SITES IN PENSACOLA BAY, FLORIDA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A positive association between chemical contaminants and defense factors has been established for eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica) from Florida, but it is unknown whether such factors can be stimulated through short-term exposure to contaminants in the field. Hatchery oyst...

  8. Cancer drug troglitazone stimulates the growth and response of renal cells to hypoxia inducible factors

    SciTech Connect

    Taub, Mary

    2016-03-11

    Troglitazone has been used to suppress the growth of a number of tumors through apoptosis and autophagy. However, previous in vitro studies have employed very high concentrations of troglitazone (≥10{sup −5} M) in order to elicit growth inhibitory effects. In this report, when employing lower concentrations of troglitazone in defined medium, troglitazone was observed to stimulate the growth of primary renal proximal tubule (RPT) cells. Rosiglitazone, like troglitazone, is a thiazolidinedione (TZD) that is known to activate Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor Υ (PPARΥ). Notably, rosiglitazone also stimulates RPT cell growth, as does Υ-linolenic acids, another PPARΥ agonist. The PPARΥ antagonist GW9662 inhibited the growth stimulatory effect of troglitazone. In addition, troglitazone stimulated transcription by a PPAR Response Element/Luciferase construct. These results are consistent with the involvement of PPARΥ as a mediator of the growth stimulatory effect of troglitazone. In a number of tumor cells, the expression of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) is increased, promoting the expression of HIF inducible genes, and vascularization. Troglitazone was observed to stimulate transcription by a HIF/luciferase construct. These observations indicate that troglitazone not only promotes growth, also the survival of RPT cells under conditions of hypoxia. - Highlights: • Troglitazone and rosiglitazone stimulate renal proximal tubule cell growth. • Troglitazone and linolenic acid stimulate growth via PPARϒ. • Linolenic acid stimulates growth in the presence of fatty acid free serum albumin. • Rosiglitazone stimulates transcription by a HRE luciferase construct.

  9. Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor: More Than a Hemopoietin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    Clark, S., and Donahue, R. E., Stimulation of hematopoiesis in canines by in vivo administration of human GM - CSF (rhGM- CSF ). J. Cell. Biochem. Suppl...Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Bethesda, Maryland 20814-5145 INTRODUCTION Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor ( GM - CSF ) is a...concentration of GM - CSF is below levels detectable by existing techniques (6). It has been shown to be produced in variety of cell types (T-lymphocytes

  10. Platelet activation using electric pulse stimulation: growth factor profile and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Torres, Andrew S; Caiafa, Antonio; Garner, Allen L; Klopman, Steve; LaPlante, Nicole; Morton, Christine; Conway, Kenneth; Michelson, Alan D; Frelinger, Andrew L; Neculaes, V Bogdan

    2014-09-01

    Autologous platelet gel therapy using platelet-rich plasma has emerged as a promising alternative for chronic wound healing, hemostasis, and wound infection control. A critical step for this therapeutic approach is platelet activation, typically performed using bovine thrombin (BT) and calcium chloride. However, exposure of humans to BT can stimulate antibody formation, potentially resulting in severe hemorrhagic or thrombotic complications. Electric pulse stimulation using nanosecond PEFs (pulse electric fields) is an alternative, nonbiochemical platelet activation method, thereby avoiding exposure to xenogeneic thrombin and associated risks. In this study, we identified specific requirements for a clinically relevant activator instrument by dynamically measuring current, voltage, and electric impedance for platelet-rich plasma samples. From these samples, we investigated the profile of growth factors released from human platelets with electric pulse stimulation versus BT, specifically platelet-derived growth factor, transforming growth factor β, and epidermal growth factor, using commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. Electric pulse stimulation triggers growth factor release from platelet α-granules at the same or higher level compared with BT. Electric pulse stimulation is a fast, inexpensive, easy-to-use platelet activation method for autologous platelet gel therapy.

  11. Platelet-derived growth factor stimulated mechanisms of glucosamine incorporation

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, M.A.; Pledger, W.J. )

    1987-10-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) treatment of density-arrested BALB/c-3T3 cells results in increased ({sup 3}H)glucosamine (GlcN) incorporation into cellular material. The enhanced GlcN incorporation is not due to a preferential increase in proteoglycan synthesis as measured by ({sup 35}S)H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} incorporation. Approximately 50% of the GlcN incorporated in PDGF or platelet-poor plasma (PPP)-treated cultures enters N-linked glycoproteins. Addition of dolichol-phosphate (dolichol-P), a required intermediate in N-linked glycosylation, did not alter ({sup 3}H)GlcN incorporation in PDGF-treated cells but did increase incorporation in PPP-treated cultures to a level comparable to that observed for PDGF-treated cultures. PDGF-treated cultures contained twofold greater quantities of ({sup 3}H)GlcN dolichol intermediates and lipid-free glycoprotein. Over a 12-h time course 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMG CoA reductase) activity was similar in cultures treated with PDGF or PPP. Results of these studies reveal that enhanced protein glycosylation in response to PDGF treatment is not the result of a direct effect on HMG CoA reductase.

  12. The Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor has a dual role in neuronal and vascular plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Wallner, Stephanie; Peters, Sebastian; Pitzer, Claudia; Resch, Herbert; Bogdahn, Ulrich; Schneider, Armin

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a growth factor that has originally been identified several decades ago as a hematopoietic factor required mainly for the generation of neutrophilic granulocytes, and is in clinical use for that. More recently, it has been discovered that G-CSF also plays a role in the brain as a growth factor for neurons and neural stem cells, and as a factor involved in the plasticity of the vasculature. We review and discuss these dual properties in view of the neuroregenerative potential of this growth factor. PMID:26301221

  13. Social contextual risk factors for stimulant use among adolescent American Indians.

    PubMed

    Spillane, Nichea S; Weyandt, Lisa; Oster, Danielle; Treloar, Hayley

    2017-10-01

    Stimulants are the most common and efficacious treatment for Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). We examined the relationship between stimulant misuse and social factors that could be malleable to prevention among American Indian (AI) adolescents. Participants were AI students (N=3498) sampled from 33 schools in 11 states. Participants completed the American Drug and Alcohol Survey. A multilevel analytic approach was used to evaluate the effects of participant-level (level 1) variables (i.e., gender, grade, peer, school, family, stimulant prescribed by doctor) on lifetime and current simulant use to 'get high.' Nearly 7% of our sample had been prescribed stimulants and nearly 6% of the sample reported using stimulants to get high. Age [OR=1.22; 95% CI=1.09, 1.36, p<0.001], perception of peer substance use [OR=1.19; 95% CI=1.14, 1.23, p<0.001], parental monitoring [OR=0.96; 95% CI=0.92, 1.99, p=0.04], and stimulants prescribed by a doctor [OR=8.79, 95% CI=5.86, 13.18, p<0.001] were associated with ever using stimulants to get high. Perception of peer substance use, [b=0.09, SE=0.02, p<0.001, 95%CI [0.05, 0.13], and having stimulants prescribed by a doctor, [b=0.58, SE=0.21, p=0.006, 95%CI [0.17, 0.99], were associated with frequency of past month use to get high. There was also a significant quadratic effect for parental monitoring, suggesting that low and high levels were associated with increased stimulant use. Our results suggest a need for prevention efforts to be directed to AI youth who are prescribed stimulants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Granulocyte and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factors as therapy in human and veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Varón, Emilio; Villamayor, Lucía

    2007-07-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSFs) and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factors (GM-CSFs) are endogenous cytokines that regulate granulocyte colonies and play a major role in the stimulation of granulopoiesis (neutrophils, basophils and eosinophils) and in the regulation of microbicidal functions. There are numerous pathological conditions in which neutrophils are decreased, the most common being neutropenia associated with cancer chemotherapy, which increases the risk of serious microbial infections developing with the potential for high morbidity and mortality. New methods in molecular biology have led to the identification and cloning of CSF genes and biopharmaceutical production. Since then, CSFs have been widely used for the prevention and treatment of neutropenia associated with cancer chemotherapy, for mobilising haematopoietic cell precursors, and for other neutropenia-related pathologies. This review focuses on the use of CSFs within both human and veterinary medicine. Clinical applications, pharmacology, tolerability and the potential role of these factors in veterinary medicine are considered.

  15. Stimulation of human neutrophil leukocyte aerobic glucose metabolism by purified chemotactic factors.

    PubMed Central

    Goetzl, E J; Austen, K F

    1974-01-01

    The interaction of human neutrophils adherent to plastic petri dishes with the purified chemotactic factors C5a and kallikrein increased their rate of aerobic glycolysis 25-120% and the activity of their hexose monophosphate shunt (HMPS) 100-600%, reaching a plateau after 2 hr at 37 degrees C. The stimulation of either pathway required a chemotactically active stimulus since neither C5 nor prekallikrein or inactivated kallikrein could enhance metabolic activity. Marked suppression of the neutrophil chemotactic response by preincubation with a chemotactic factor to achieve deactivation, 5 x 10(-7) M diisopropyl fluorophosphate, or the neutrophil immobilizing factor (NIF) did not prevent the stimulation of HMPS activity or glycolysis by chemotactic factors. The metabolic inhibitors iodoacetate and 6-aminonicotinamide at concentrations which blocked enhancement of glycolysis or HMPS activity, respectively, partially suppressed the chemotactic response of neutrophils to the chemotactic factors. The capacity of a chemotactic factor to stimulate glucose metabolism of human neutrophils is associated with a maximal chemotactic response, but this stimulation is not alone sufficient for chemotaxis. Images PMID:11344574

  16. Progressive transfusion and growth factor independence with adjuvant sertraline in low risk myelodysplastic syndrome treated with an erythropoiesis stimulating agent and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor

    PubMed Central

    Nautiyal, Kirtan; Li, Rui; Yellapragada, Sarvari; Thiagarajan, Perumal; Mims, Martha; Rivero, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    Refractoriness to growth factor therapy is commonly associated with inferior outcome in patients with low-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (LR-MDS) who require treatment for cytopenias. However, the mechanisms leading to refractoriness are unknown. Here we describe a clinically depressed 74-year-old male with refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia (RCMD) and documented growth factor refractory anemia after erythropoeisis stimulating agent (ESA) therapy, who attained transfusion and growth factor independence after the addition of sertraline to his medication regimen. Our case demonstrates hematological improvement-erythroid (HI-E) in growth factor refractory, low risk MDS and highlights a potential mechanistic link between common inflammatory diseases and LR-MDS. PMID:25709889

  17. Recurrent spleen enlargement during cyclic granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor therapy for myelodysplastic syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Delmer, A.; Karmochkine, M.; Cadiou, M.; Gerhartz, H.; Zittoun, R. )

    1990-05-01

    A 65-year-old woman with refractory anemia with excess of blasts received sequential courses of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor therapy (GM-CSF) and low-dose cytosine arabinoside. Each course of GM-CSF induced a rapid and tremendous increase in leukocyte count as well as in spleen size, 111-indium chloride scanning suggested a myeloid metaplasia of the spleen. This observation suggests that in some patients the granulopoietic response to the myeloid growth factor stimulation may be predominant in the spleen.

  18. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) transiently suppresses mitogen-stimulated T-cell proliferative response

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, E; García-Castro, I; Esquivel, F; Hornedo, J; Cortes-Funes, H; Solovera, J; Alvarez-Mon, M

    1999-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulation factor (G-CSF) is a cytokine that selectively promotes growth and maturation of neutrophils and may modulate the cytokine response to inflammatory stimuli. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of G-CSF on ex vivo peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) functions. Ten patients with breast cancer were included in a clinical trial in which r-metHuG-CSF was administrered daily for 5 days to mobilize peripheral blood stem cells. Ten healthy women were also included as controls. Our data show that G-CSF treatment induces an increase in peripheral blood leucocyte, neutrophil, lymphocyte and monocyte counts. We have found a modulation in the percentages of CD19+, CD45+CD14+, CD4+CD45RA+ and CD4+CD45RO+ cells in PBMC fractions during G-CSF treatment. We have also found a significant reduction in the proliferative response of PBMC to mitogenic stimulation that reverted 14 days after the fifth and the last dose of G-CSF. Furthermore, it was not associated with significant changes in the pattern of cytokine production. The mechanism of this immunoregulatory effect is probably indirect since G-CSF receptor has not been found in T lymphocytes. This mechanism and its potential clinical applications remain to be elucidated. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10390001

  19. Heparin stimulates epidermal growth factor receptor-mediated phosphorylation of tyrosine and threonine residues.

    PubMed

    Revis-Gupta, S; Abdel-Ghany, M; Koland, J; Racker, E

    1991-07-15

    We have described previously that in extracts of A431 cells epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulates the phosphorylation of tyrosine as well as of threonine residues in the EGF receptor and in lipocortin 1. We now report that heparin at low concentrations also stimulates the autophosphorylation of the EGF receptor and of the recombinant 56-kDa domain of the EGF receptor that lacks the EGF binding site. To study the stimulations of phosphorylation of threonine residues, a fusion protein was prepared with glutathione S-transferase (GST) and an EGF receptor fragment, TK8 (residues 647-688), that contains the threonine phosphorylation site but no tyrosine. We show that the phosphorylation of threonine residues in GST-TK8 by extracts of A431 cells is stimulated by heparin but not by EGF. These and other results suggest that heparin acts as a chaperone, a substrate modulator, that enhances the susceptibility of the substrate to phosphorylation by protein kinases.

  20. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) inhibits stimulated thyroid hormone secretion in the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Ahren, B.

    1987-07-01

    It is known that epidermal growth factor (EGF) inhibits iodide uptake in the thyroid follicular cells and lowers plasma levels of thyroid hormones upon infusion into sheep and ewes. In this study, the effects of EGF on basal and stimulated thyroid hormone secretion were investigated in the mouse. Mice were pretreated with /sup 125/I and thyroxine; the subsequent release of /sup 125/I is an estimation of thyroid hormone secretion. It was found that basal radioiodine secretion was not altered by intravenous injection of EGF (5 micrograms/animal). However, the radioiodine secretion stimulated by both TSH (120 microU/animal) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP; 5 micrograms/animal) were inhibited by EGF (5 micrograms/animal). At a lower dose level (0.5 microgram/animal), EGF had no influence on stimulated radioiodine secretion. In conclusion, EGF inhibits stimulated thyroid hormone secretion in the mouse.

  1. Static Magnetic Field Stimulation Enhances Oligodendrocyte Differentiation and Secretion of Neurotrophic Factors.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Ankshita; Teh, Daniel B Loong; Blasiak, Agata; Chai, Chou; Wu, Yang; Gharibani, Payam M; Yang, In Hong; Phan, Thang T; Lim, Kah Leong; Yang, Hyunsoo; Liu, Xiaogang; All, Angelo H

    2017-07-27

    The cellular-level effects of low/high frequency oscillating magnetic field on excitable cells such as neurons are well established. In contrast, the effects of a homogeneous, static magnetic field (SMF) on Central Nervous System (CNS) glial cells are less investigated. Here, we have developed an in vitro SMF stimulation set-up to investigate the genomic effects of SMF exposure on oligodendrocyte differentiation and neurotrophic factors secretion. Human oligodendrocytes precursor cells (OPCs) were stimulated with moderate intensity SMF (0.3 T) for a period of two weeks (two hours/day). The differential gene expression of cell activity marker (c-fos), early OPC (Olig1, Olig2. Sox10), and mature oligodendrocyte markers (CNP, MBP) were quantified. The enhanced myelination capacity of the SMF stimulated oligodendrocytes was validated in a dorsal root ganglion microfluidics chamber platform. Additionally, the effects of SMF on the gene expression and secretion of neurotrophic factors- BDNF and NT3 was quantified. We also report that SMF stimulation increases the intracellular calcium influx in OPCs as well as the gene expression of L-type channel subunits-CaV1.2 and CaV1.3. Our findings emphasize the ability of glial cells such as OPCs to positively respond to moderate intensity SMF stimulation by exhibiting enhanced differentiation, functionality as well as neurotrophic factor release.

  2. PGE2 is a UVR-inducible autocrine factor for human melanocytes that stimulates tyrosinase activation

    PubMed Central

    Starner, Renny J.; McClelland, Lindy; Abdel-Malek, Zalfa; Fricke, Alex; Scott, Glynis

    2013-01-01

    Melanocyte proliferation, dendrite formation, and pigmentation are controlled by paracrine factors, particularly following exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR). Little is known about autocrine factors for melanocytes. Prostaglandins activate signaling pathways involved in growth, differentiation and apoptosis. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is the most abundant prostaglandin released by keratinocytes following UVR, and stimulates the formation of dendrites in melanocytes. Synthesis of PGE2 is controlled by cPLA2, which releases arachidonic acid from membranes, and COX-2 and prostaglandin E2 synthases (PGES), which convert arachidonic acid to PGH2 and PGH2 to PGE2, respectively. In this report we show that multiple irradiations of human melanocytes with UVR stimulates tyrosinase activity, independent of expression of a functional melanocortin 1 receptor, suggesting the presence of a non-melanocortin autocrine factor. Irradiation of melanocytes activated cPLA2, the rate-limiting step in eicosanoid synthesis, and stimulated PGE2 secretion. PGE2 increased cAMP production, tyrosinase activity and proliferation in melanocytes. PGE2 binds to four distinct G-protein coupled receptors (EP1–4). We show that EP4 receptor signaling stimulates cAMP production in melanocytes. Conversely, stimulation of the EP3 receptor lowered basal cAMP levels. These data suggest that relative levels or activity of these receptors controls effects of PGE2 on cAMP in melanocytes. The data are the first to identify PGE2 as an UVR-inducible autocrine factor for melanocytes that stimulates tyrosinase activity and proliferation, and to show that EP3 and EP4 receptor signaling have opposing effects on cAMP production, a critical signaling pathway that regulates proliferation and melanogenesis in melanocytes. PMID:20500768

  3. Childhood Conduct Problems and Other Early Risk Factors in Rural Adult Stimulant Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, Teresa L.; Han, Xiaotong; Leukefeld, Carl; Booth, Brenda M.; Edlund, Carrie

    2009-01-01

    Context: Understanding childhood risk factors associated with adult substance use and legal problems is important for treatment and prevention. Purpose: To examine the relationship of early substance use, conduct problems before age 15, and family history of substance abuse on adult outcomes in rural, stimulant users. Methods: Adult cocaine and…

  4. Which Factors Obstruct or Stimulate Teacher Educators to Use ICT Innovatively?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drent, Marjolein; Meelissen, Martina

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses the factors which stimulate or limit the innovative use of ICT by teacher educators in the Netherlands. Innovative use of ICT is defined as the use of ICT applications that support the educational objectives based on the needs of the current knowledge society. Explorative path analysis and case studies were used to study the…

  5. Childhood Conduct Problems and Other Early Risk Factors in Rural Adult Stimulant Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, Teresa L.; Han, Xiaotong; Leukefeld, Carl; Booth, Brenda M.; Edlund, Carrie

    2009-01-01

    Context: Understanding childhood risk factors associated with adult substance use and legal problems is important for treatment and prevention. Purpose: To examine the relationship of early substance use, conduct problems before age 15, and family history of substance abuse on adult outcomes in rural, stimulant users. Methods: Adult cocaine and…

  6. Platelet-activating factor stimulates metabolism of phosphoinositides in horse platelets: possible relationship to Ca2+ mobilization during stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Billah, M M; Lapetina, E G

    1983-01-01

    Stimulation of horse platelets with platelet-activating factor (PAF) induces a rapid degradation of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P2]. Addition of 0.1 microM PAF for 5 sec to platelets prelabeled with 32P induces a 50% loss of [32P]PtdIns(4,5)P2. 32P-Labeled phosphatidylinositol 4-monophosphate (PtdIns4P) and [32P]phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) also are decreased, albeit at a slower rate. Loss of 32P radioactivity correlates with a net loss of fatty acids from both polyphosphoinositides. Stimulation of platelets with PAF also produces formation of [32P]phosphatidic acid and [32P]lysophosphatidylinositol. The initial disappearance of inositol lipids is subsequently followed by resynthesis, as evidenced by increased incorporation of 32P into PtdIns(4,5)P2, PtdIns4P, and PtdIns. The resynthesis of the inositides increases with time and is proportional to the concentration of PAF. Prostacyclin (1 microM) inhibits (i) the formation of phosphatidic acid and lysophosphatidylinositol and (ii) the resynthesis of polyphosphoinositides induced by 0.03 microM PAF without affecting the initial loss of PtdIns(4,5)P2. The loss of inositol lipids appears to be a primary event of platelet activation. The initial loss of polyphosphoinositides might be linked to the initiation of cellular activation by mobilizing membrane-bound Ca2+, whereas the subsequent formation of these lipids might be involved in mechanisms to prevent overstimulation of the cell. PMID:6341992

  7. Nerve growth factor stimulates cellular proliferation of human epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Urzua, U; Tapia, V; Geraldo, M P; Selman, A; Vega, M; Romero, C

    2012-09-01

    Due to its ability to induce vascular endothelial growth factor expression and proliferation, migration, and vasculogenesis of endothelial cells, nerve growth factor (NGF) has been considered as an angiogenic factor in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). In this work, we evaluated the angiogenic and proliferative mRNA expression profiles of EOC and addressed the responsiveness of EOC explants to NGF stimulation. Twenty EOC samples were obtained from Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, University of Chile's Clinical Hospital. Global gene expression profiles of selected poorly differentiated serous EOC samples were obtained with DNA oligonucleotide microarrays. In addition, EOC explants were subjected to NGF stimulation and levels of p-AKT, BAX, BCL2, Ki-67, c-MYC, and FOXL2 proteins were determined by immunohistochemistry. Results showed that mRNAs coding for specific transcriptional regulators and antiapoptotic components of the NGF signaling pathway were upregulated in EOC cells. At the protein level, key members of the NGF pathway including p-AKT, BCL2/BAX, Ki-67, and c-MYC were found increased, while FOXL2 was decreased in response to NGF stimulation. These findings strongly suggest that NGF stimulates cellular proliferation of human EOC. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor with radiotherapy promotes tumor growth by stimulating vascularization in tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joong Sun; Son, Yeonghoon; Bae, Min Ji; Lee, Minyoung; Lee, Chang Geun; Jo, Wol Soon; Kim, Sung Dae; Yang, Kwangmo

    2015-07-01

    Although granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is commonly used to support recovery from radiation-induced side-effects, the precise effects of G-CSF on colon cancer under radiotherapy remain poorly understood. In the present study, to investigate the effects of tumor growth following radiotherapy and G-CSF administration in a murine xenograft model of colon cancer, female BALB/c mice were injected with cells of a colon carcinoma cell line (CT26) with irradiation and G-CSF, alone or in combination. Mice received 2 Gy of focal radiation daily for 5 days and intraperitoneal injection of G-CSF (100 µg/kg/day) after irradiation for 7 days. Changes in the levels of myeloperoxidase (MPO), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), matrix metalloproteinase type 9 (MMP-9) and CD31 were assessed in the mouse cancer induced by injection of colon cancer cells. We observed that G-CSF increased the number of circulating neutrophils, but facilitated tumor growth. However, G-CSF treatment did not affect radiation-induced cytotoxicity and cell viability in CT26 cells in vitro. Increased levels of myeloperoxidase, a neutrophil marker and those of vascular endothelial growth factor were observed in tumors with G-CSF supplementation. In addition, we found that increased levels of CD31 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 were correlated with the enhanced tumor growth after G-CSF treatment. Therefore, these data suggest that G-CSF may contribute to tumor growth and decrease the antitumor effect of radiotherapy, possibly by promoting vascularization in cancer lesions.

  9. Factor Xa stimulates fibroblast procollagen production, proliferation, and calcium signaling via PAR{sub 1} activation

    SciTech Connect

    Blanc-Brude, Olivier P. . E-mail: olivier.blanc-brude@larib.inserm.fr; Archer, Fabienne; Leoni, Patricia; Derian, Claudia; Bolsover, Steven; Laurent, Geoffrey J.; Chambers, Rachel C.

    2005-03-10

    Fibroblast proliferation and procollagen production are central features of tissue repair and fibrosis. In addition to its role in blood clotting, the coagulation cascade proteinase thrombin can contribute to tissue repair by stimulating fibroblasts via proteolytic activation of proteinase-activated receptor-1 (PAR{sub 1}). During hemostasis, the coagulation cascade proteinase factor X is converted into factor Xa. We have previously shown that factor Xa upregulates fibroblast proliferation via production of autocrine PDGF. In this study, we further examined the effects of factor Xa on fibroblast function and aimed to identify its signaling receptor. We showed that factor Xa stimulates procollagen promoter activity and protein production by human and mouse fibroblasts. This effect was independent of PDGF and thrombin production, but dependent on factor Xa proteolytic activity. We also showed that PAR{sub 1}-deficient mouse fibroblasts did not upregulate procollagen production, mobilize cytosolic calcium, or proliferate in response to factor Xa. Desensitization techniques and PAR{sub 1}-specific agonists and inhibitors were used to demonstrate that PAR{sub 1} mediates factor Xa signaling in human fibroblasts. This is the first report that factor Xa stimulates extracellular matrix production. In contrast with endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells, fibroblasts appear to be the only cell type in which the effects of factor Xa are mediated mainly via PAR{sub 1} and not PAR{sub 2}. These findings are critical for our understanding of tissue repair and fibrotic mechanisms, and for the design of novel approaches to inhibit the profibrotic effects of the coagulation cascade without compromising blood hemostasis.

  10. Involvement of nuclear factor of activated T cells in granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor production in canine keratinocytes stimulated with a cysteine protease.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Tsuyoshi; Sekido, Machiko; Iio, Aki; Chimura, Naoki; Shibata, Sanae; Kamishina, Harumi; Kamishina, Hiroaki; Maeda, Sadatoshi

    2013-06-01

    A previous study demonstrated that the cysteine protease of Dermatophagoides farinae induced production of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in a canine epidermal keratinocyte progenitor cell line (CPEK); however, the molecular mechanism has not been elucidated. Given that the transcription of GM-CSF mRNA in human lymphocytes is mainly regulated by the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT), it is hypothesized that NFAT also contributes to GM-CSF production in canine keratinocytes stimulated with a cysteine protease. Nuclear translocation of NFAT was evaluated in CPEK cells in the absence or presence of the cysteine protease papain. We also investigated whether blockade of NFAT could inhibit GM-CSF production. Papain-induced nuclear translocation of NFAT, producing GM-CSF, was partly inhibited by ciclosporin. The results suggest that GM-CSF production mediated by the cysteine protease is regulated not only by NFAT but also by unknown signalling pathways in canine keratinocytes. © 2013 The Authors. Veterinary Dermatology © 2013 ESVD and ACVD.

  11. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in the treatment of acute radiation syndrome: a concise review.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Michal; Pospíšil, Milan; Komůrková, Denisa; Hoferová, Zuzana

    2014-04-16

    This article concisely summarizes data on the action of one of the principal and best known growth factors, the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), in a mammalian organism exposed to radiation doses inducing acute radiation syndrome. Highlighted are the topics of its real or anticipated use in radiation accident victims, the timing of its administration, the possibilities of combining G-CSF with other drugs, the ability of other agents to stimulate endogenous G-CSF production, as well as of the capability of this growth factor to ameliorate not only the bone marrow radiation syndrome but also the gastrointestinal radiation syndrome. G-CSF is one of the pivotal drugs in the treatment of radiation accident victims and its employment in this indication can be expected to remain or even grow in the future.

  12. Increased Expression of Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 6 Stimulates Hepatocyte Proliferation during Mouse Liver Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yongjun; Yoshida, Yuichi; Hughes, Douglas E.; Costa, Robert H.

    2005-01-01

    Background & Aims The Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 6 (HNF6 or ONECUT-1) protein is a cell-type specific transcription factor that regulates expression of hepatocyte-specific genes. Using hepatocytes for Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays, the HNF6 protein was shown to associate with cell cycle regulatory promoters. Here, we examined whether increased levels of HNF6 stimulate hepatocyte proliferation during mouse liver regeneration. Methods Tail vein injection of adenovirus expressing the HNF6 cDNA (AdHNF6) was used to increase hepatic HNF6 levels during mouse liver regeneration induced by partial hepatectomy, and DNA replication was determined by Bromodeoxyuridine incorporation. Cotransfection and ChIP assays were used to determine transcriptional target promoters. Results Elevated expression of HNF6 during mouse liver regeneration causes a significant increase in the number of hepatocytes entering DNA replication (S-phase) and mouse hepatoma Hepa1-6 cells diminished for HNF6 levels by siRNA transfection exhibit a 50% reduction in S-phase following serum stimulation. This stimulation in hepatocyte S-phase progression was associated with increased expression of the hepatocyte mitogen Tumor Growth Factor α (TGFα) and the cell cycle regulators Cyclin D1 and Forkhead Box m1 (Foxm1) transcription factor. Cotransfection and ChIP assays show that TGFα, Cyclin D1, and HNF6 promoter regions are direct transcriptional targets of the HNF6 protein. Co-immunoprecipitation assays with regenerating mouse liver extracts reveal association between HNF6 and Foxm1 proteins and cotransfection assays show that HNF6 stimulates Foxm1 transcriptional activity. Conclusion These mouse liver regeneration studies show that increased HNF6 levels stimulate hepatocyte proliferation through transcriptional induction of cell cycle regulatory genes. PMID:16618419

  13. Imatinib mesylate inhibits platelet derived growth factor stimulated proliferation of rheumatoid synovial fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Sandler, Charlotta; Joutsiniemi, Saima; Lindstedt, Ken A.; Juutilainen, Timo; Kovanen, Petri T.; Eklund, Kari K. . E-mail: kari.eklund@hus.fi

    2006-08-18

    Synovial fibroblast is the key cell type in the growth of the pathological synovial tissue in arthritis. Here, we show that platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) is a potent mitogen for synovial fibroblasts isolated from patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Inhibition of PDGF-receptor signalling by imatinib mesylate (1 {mu}M) completely abrogated the PDGF-stimulated proliferation and inhibited approximately 70% of serum-stimulated proliferation of synovial fibroblasts. Similar extent of inhibition was observed when PDGF was neutralized with anti-PDGF antibodies, suggesting that imatinib mesylate does not inhibit pathways other than those mediated by PDGF-receptors. No signs of apoptosis were detected in synovial fibroblasts cultured in the presence of imatinib. These results suggest that imatinib mesylate specifically inhibits PDGF-stimulated proliferation of synovial fibroblasts, and that inhibition of PDGF-receptors could represent a feasible target for novel antirheumatic therapies.

  14. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) stimulation test in normal subjects and patients with Cushing's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zacharieva, S; Matrosov, P; Stoeva, I; Kirilov, G

    1989-04-01

    The hormonal responses to human corticotropin-releasing factor (hCRF) were investigated in 6 normal subjects, 13 patients with Cushing's disease (8 with diffuse bilateral hyperplasia and 5 with nodular hyperplasia) and one patient with Cushing's syndrome due to an adrenal adenoma. hCRF (100 micrograms i.v.) was a potent stimulant of ACTH and cortisol in normal subjects. Patients with Cushing's disease due to diffuse hyperplasia showed variable ACTH and cortisol responses to hCRF. In both normal subjects and in patients hCRF consistently stimulated serum aldosterone levels. Patients with nodular hyperplasia had extremely suppressed plasma ACTH levels and no responses of ACTH, cortisol and aldosterone to hCRF like in the patient with adrenal adenoma. Our results suggest that hCRF-stimulation test may be a useful tool for differentiating pituitary and adrenal forms of Cushing's syndrome.

  15. Calreticulin Regulates Transforming Growth Factor-β-stimulated Extracellular Matrix Production*

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Kurt A.; Graham, Lauren V.; Pallero, Manuel A.; Murphy-Ullrich, Joanne E.

    2013-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is an emerging factor in fibrotic disease, although precise mechanisms are not clear. Calreticulin (CRT) is an ER chaperone and regulator of Ca2+ signaling up-regulated by ER stress and in fibrotic tissues. Previously, we showed that ER CRT regulates type I collagen transcript, trafficking, secretion, and processing into the extracellular matrix (ECM). To determine the role of CRT in ECM regulation under fibrotic conditions, we asked whether CRT modified cellular responses to the pro-fibrotic cytokine, TGF-β. These studies show that CRT−/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and rat and human idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis lung fibroblasts with siRNA CRT knockdown had impaired TGF-β stimulation of type I collagen and fibronectin. In contrast, fibroblasts with increased CRT expression had enhanced responses to TGF-β. The lack of CRT does not impact canonical TGF-β signaling as TGF-β was able to stimulate Smad reporter activity in CRT−/− MEFs. CRT regulation of TGF-β-stimulated Ca2+ signaling is important for induction of ECM. CRT−/− MEFs failed to increase intracellular Ca2+ levels in response to TGF-β. NFAT activity is required for ECM stimulation by TGF-β. In CRT−/− MEFs, TGF-β stimulation of NFAT nuclear translocation and reporter activity is impaired. Importantly, CRT is required for TGF-β stimulation of ECM under conditions of ER stress, as tunicamycin-induced ER stress was insufficient to induce ECM production in TGF-β stimulated CRT−/− MEFs. Together, these data identify CRT-regulated Ca2+-dependent pathways as a critical molecular link between ER stress and TGF-β fibrotic signaling. PMID:23564462

  16. Tissue-engineered cartilage: the crossroads of biomaterials, cells and stimulating factors.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Nandana; Devi, Dipali; Mandal, Biman B

    2015-02-01

    Damage to cartilage represents one of the most challenging tasks of musculoskeletal therapeutics due to its limited propensity for healing and regenerative capabilities. Lack of current treatments to restore cartilage tissue function has prompted research in this rapidly emerging field of tissue regeneration of functional cartilage tissue substitutes. The development of cartilaginous tissue largely depends on the combination of appropriate biomaterials, cell source, and stimulating factors. Over the years, various biomaterials have been utilized for cartilage repair, but outcomes are far from achieving native cartilage architecture and function. This highlights the need for exploration of suitable biomaterials and stimulating factors for cartilage regeneration. With these perspectives, we aim to present an overview of cartilage tissue engineering with recent progress, development, and major steps taken toward the generation of functional cartilage tissue. In this review, we have discussed the advances and problems in tissue engineering of cartilage with strong emphasis on the utilization of natural polymeric biomaterials, various cell sources, and stimulating factors such as biophysical stimuli, mechanical stimuli, dynamic culture, and growth factors used so far in cartilage regeneration. Finally, we have focused on clinical trials, recent innovations, and future prospects related to cartilage engineering.

  17. Cross talk between inflammatory cytokines and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in transplant vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Sterpetti, Antonio V; Borrelli, Valeria; Ventura, Marco; Cucina, Alessandra

    2017-05-15

    Transplant vasculopathy limits the clinical results of solid organ transplantation. Thirty-three arterial grafts were implanted in the abdominal aorta of Lewis rats. The animals were humanely sacrificed 4 wk after surgery. The study groups had 15 arterial isografts and 18 arterial allografts. Growth factors and inflammatory cytokines, released by the removed grafts, were studied in organ culture. The released growth factors were analyzed in vitro to assess their effect on the proliferation of endothelial, smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts. In arterial isogenic and allogenic grafts, platelet-derived growth factor and basic fibroblastic growth factor release was minimal (P < 0.01). There was a significant release of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α; P < 0.001) in allografts. GM-CSF and TNF-α, at concentrations in the allograft organ cultures, stimulated significantly the growth of smooth muscle cells. The simultaneous action of TNF-α and GM-CSF had an exponential growth effect on endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells. Interleukin (IL)-1, IL-2, and IL-9 were released in high quantities by allografts. In vitro, IL-1, IL-2, and IL-9 facilitated the growth effect of GM-CSF and TNF-α. Transplant vasculopathy depends on the simultaneous and complementary additive effects of several growth factors and cytokines, which have a continuous "cross talk." Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-based stem cell mobilization in patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Cara; Peace, David; Rich, Elizabeth; Van Besien, Koen

    2008-06-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been reported to exacerbate vaso-occlusive crises in sickle cell disease. It has been recommended to avoid its use for stem cell mobilization in this population, yet autologous transplant is the standard of care and at times a life-saving treatment for patients with various hematologic malignancies such as relapsed aggressive lymphoma or multiple myeloma. We report 5 cases of patients with sickle cell disease and related hemoglobinopathies who underwent granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF)-mobilization of peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC). Three of them developed manageable vaso-occlusive pain symptoms requiring parenteral narcotics alone. The 2 others had no complications. These cases demonstrate that stem cell mobilization using G-CSF, although complicated and not without risk, is feasible in patients with sickle cell syndromes.

  19. Stimulation of DNA and Collagen Synthesis by Autologous Growth Factor in Cultured Fetal Rat Calvaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canalis, Ernesto; Peck, William A.; Raisz, Lawrence G.

    1980-11-01

    Conditioned medium derived from organ or cell cultures prepared from 19- to 21-day fetal rat calvaria stimulated the incorporation of [3H]proline into collagen and of [3H]thymidine into DNA in organ cultures of the same tissue. Addition of cortisol enhanced the effect on collagen but not on DNA synthesis. These effects appeared to be due to a nondialyzable and heat-stable growth factor.

  20. Tumor-Derived Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor and Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Prolong the Survival of Neutrophils Infiltrating Bronchoalveolar Subtype Pulmonary Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wislez, Marie; Fleury-Feith, Jocelyne; Rabbe, Nathalie; Moreau, Joelle; Cesari, Danielle; Milleron, Bernard; Mayaud, Charles; Antoine, Martine; Soler, Paul; Cadranel, Jacques

    2001-01-01

    We evaluated the role of the tumor environment in the regulation of apoptosis of tumor-infiltrating neutrophils, the number of which correlates negatively with outcome, in patients with adenocarcinoma of the bronchioloalveolar (BAC) subtype. We examined three different parameters of apoptosis, namely morphological aspect, annexin-V expression, and DNA fragmentation. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) supernatants from patients with BAC significantly inhibited the 24-hour spontaneous apoptosis of normal peripheral blood neutrophils in vitro compared to BALF supernatants from control patients (64 ± 4% versus 90 ± 2% measured by annexin-V flow cytometry, P = 0.04). The alveolar neutrophil count correlated positively with the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) concentrations in the patient’s BALF. Furthermore, neutralizing antibodies (Abs) against GM-CSF and G-CSF significantly inhibited BALF anti-apoptotic activity (15 to 40% and 34 to 63% inhibition, respectively), whereas neutralizing Abs against interleukin (IL)-8, IL-6, IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α had no significant effect. In an attempt to identify the cell origin of anti-apoptotic cytokines, we tested in vitro the effect of BAC cells (A549 cell line and primary culture derived from a patient’s BAC tumor) on the apoptosis of peripheral blood neutrophils. Cell-free supernatants from tumor cells did not inhibit neutrophil apoptosis. In contrast, cell-free supernatants from tumor cells previously exposed to conditioned media from peripheral blood mononuclear cells and alveolar macrophages significantly inhibited spontaneous neutrophil apoptosis. This inhibition was partially lifted when conditioned media from mononuclear cells were previously treated with Abs against IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α. As in vivo, neutralizing Abs against GM-CSF significantly inhibited the anti-apoptotic activity of cell culture supernatants

  1. Risk factors for stimulant use among homeless and unstably housed adult women

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Elise D.; Shumway, Martha; Knight, Kelly R.; Guzman, David; Cohen, Jennifer; Weiser, Sheri D.

    2015-01-01

    Background One of the most common causes of death among homeless and unstably housed women is acute intoxication where cocaine is present. While correlates of stimulant use have been determined in prior research, few studies have assessed risk factors of use specifically in this high-risk population. Methods We sampled biological women with a history of housing instability from community-based venues to participate in a cohort study. Baseline and 6-month follow-up data were used to determine the relative risk of stimulant use (crack cocaine, powder cocaine or methamphetamine) among individuals who did not use at baseline. Results Among 260 study participants, the median age was 47 years, 70% were women of color; 47% reported having unmet subsistence needs and 53% reported abstinence from stimulants at baseline. In analyses adjusting for baseline sociodemographics and drug treatment, the risk of using stimulants within 6 months was significantly higher among women who reported recent sexual violence (Adjusted Relative Risk [ARR] = 4.31; 95% CI:1.97–9.45), sleeping in a shelter or public place (ARR = 2.75; 95% CI:1.15–6.57), and using unprescribed opioid analgesics (ARR = 2.54; 95% CI:1.01–6.38). Conclusion We found that almost half of homeless and unstably housed women used stimulants at baseline and 14% of those who did not use began within 6 months. Addressing homelessness and sexual violence is critical to reduce stimulant use among impoverished women. PMID:26070454

  2. Endothelium-Derived Hyperpolarizing Factor Mediates Bradykinin Stimulated Tissue Plasminogen Activator Release In Humans

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Ayaz M.; Murrow, Jonathan R.; Ozkor, Muhiddin A.; Kavtaradze, Nino; Lin, Ji; De Staercke, Christine; Hooper, W. Craig; Manatunga, Amita; Hayek, Salim; Quyyumi, Arshed A.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Bradykinin stimulates tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) release from human endothelium. Although bradykinin stimulates both nitric oxide and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) release, the role of EDHF in t-PA release remains unexplored. This study sought to determine the mechanisms of bradykinin-stimulated t-PA release in the forearm vasculature of healthy human subjects. Methods In 33 healthy subjects (age 40.3±1.9 years) forearm blood flow (FBF) and t-PA release were measured at rest, and after intra-arterial infusions of bradykinin (400ng/min) and sodium nitroprusside (3.2 mg/min). Measurements were repeated after intra-arterial infusion of TEA (1 μmol/min), fluconazole (0.4 μmol.min-1.L-1), and NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA, 8 μmol/min) to block nitric oxide, and their combination in separate studies. Results Bradykinin significantly increased net t-PA release across the forearm (P<0.0001). Fluconazole attenuated both bradykinin-mediated vasodilation (-23.3±2.7% FBF, P<0.0001) and t-PA release (from 50.9±9.0 to 21.3±8.9 ng/min/100ml, P=0.02). TEA attenuated FBF (-14.7±3.2%, P=0.002) and abolished bradykinin-stimulated t-PA release (from 22.9+5.7 to - 0.8±3.6 ng/min/100ml, P=0.0002). L-NMMA attenuated FBF (P<0.0001), but did not inhibit bradykinin-induced t-PA release (P=NS). Conclusion Bradykinin-stimulated t-PA release is partly due to cytochrome P450-derived epoxides, and is inhibited by K+ca channel blockade. Thus, bradykinin stimulates both EDHF-dependent vasodilation and t-PA release. PMID:24925526

  3. Analysis of the bimodal chemiluminescence pattern stimulated in human neutrophils by chemotactic factors.

    PubMed Central

    Bender, J G; Van Epps, D E

    1983-01-01

    Chemotactic factors, which are important in attracting neutrophils to inflammatory sites, have also been shown to stimulate oxidative metabolism, resulting in increased chemiluminescence and release of superoxide anion (O2-). We observed a unique bimodal chemiluminescence pattern upon stimulation with either the complement-derived factor C5a or formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine. A sharp peak of activity occurred within 1 to 2 min, and a second more extended peak was seen between 3 and 6 min. Enhancement of both peaks occurred when the cells were pretreated with cytochalasin B. Expression of both peaks was found to be related to cell density, and expression of the second peak was not dependent upon extracellular metabolites released during the first peak. Cells preincubated in luminol and then thoroughly washed responded with only a single peak coincident with the second peak. Together these findings indicate that the first peak is extracellular in origin, whereas the second peak is cell associated. Studies with scavengers of oxygen intermediates and inhibitors of myeloperoxidase for the oxidation of luminol, which may occur in part through the formation of HOCl as well as through a non-HOCl-mediated mechanism. Evidence for a non-HOCl-mediated mechanism comes from experiments in which luminol, myeloperoxidase, and O2- generated by xanthine-xanthine oxidase produce luminescence in the absence of chloride ion. These studies provide further insight into the sequence of events which occur during the stimulation of neutrophils with chemotactic factors and the nature of neutrophil chemiluminescence. PMID:6309658

  4. Effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor on glial scar formation after spinal cord injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Chung, Joonho; Kim, Moon Hang; Yoon, Yong Je; Kim, Kil Hwan; Park, So Ra; Choi, Byung Hyune

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on glial scar formation after spinal cord injury (SCI) in rats and compared the therapeutic effects between G-CSF and granulocytemacrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) to evaluate G-CSF as a potential substitute for GM-CSF in clinical application. Rats were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 groups: a sham-operated group (Group 1), an SCI group without treatment (Group 2), an SCI group treated with G-CSF (Group 3), and an SCI group treated with GM-CSF (Group 4). G-CSF and GM-CSF were administered via intraperitoneal injection immediately after SCI. The effects of G-CSF and GM-CSF on functional recovery, glial scar formation, and axonal regeneration were evaluated and compared. The rats in Groups 3 and 4 showed better functional recovery and more decreased cavity sizes than those in Group 2 (p < 0.05). Both G-CSF and GM-CSF suppressed intensive expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein around the cavity at 4 weeks and reduced the expression of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (p < 0.05). Also, early administration of G-CSF and GM-CSF protected axon fibers from destructive injury and facilitated axonal regeneration. There were no significant differences in comparisons of functional recovery, glial scar formation, and axonal regeneration between G-CSF and GM-CSF. G-CSF suppressed glial scar formation after SCI in rats, possibly by restricting the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, which might facilitate functional recovery from SCI. GM-CSF and G-CSF had similar effects on glial scar formation and functional recovery after SCI, suggesting that G-CSF can potentially be substituted for GM-CSF in the treatment of SCI.

  5. Toxoplasma gondii Induces Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor and Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Secretion by Human Fibroblasts: Implications for Neutrophil Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Channon, Jacqueline Y.; Miselis, Kristin A.; Minns, Laurie A.; Dutta, Chaitali; Kasper, Lloyd H.

    2002-01-01

    Human neutrophils are rescued from apoptosis following incubation with once-washed, fibroblast-derived Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites. Both infected and uninfected neutrophils are rescued, implicating a soluble mediator. In this study we investigated the origin and identity of this soluble mediator. Neutrophils were incubated either with purified tachyzoites or with conditioned medium derived from T. gondii-infected human fibroblasts. Conditioned medium was found to be a potent stimulus that delayed neutrophil apoptosis up to 72 h, whereas purified and extensively washed tachyzoites had no effect. Delayed apoptosis correlated with up-regulation of the neutrophil antiapoptotic protein, Mcl-1, and the neutrophil interleukin 3 receptor α subunit (IL-3Rα), suggesting a role for granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). GM-CSF and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) were measurable in conditioned medium by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Neutralizing antibodies to GM-CSF and G-CSF were additive in abrogating delayed neutrophil apoptosis induced by conditioned medium. Inhibitors of Src family tyrosine kinases, Gi proteins, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, p44erk1 and p42erk2 mitogen-activated protein kinases, and Jak2 kinases partially attenuated the effect of conditioned medium, consistent with a role for G-CSF and/or GM-CSF. Hence, delayed neutrophil apoptosis is mediated by GM-CSF and G-CSF secreted by T. gondii-infected human fibroblasts. This enhanced neutrophil survival may contribute to the robust proinflammatory response elicited in the T. gondii-infected host. PMID:12379681

  6. Some growth factors stimulate cultured adult rabbit ventricular myocyte hypertrophy in the absence of mechanical loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, R. S.; Cook, M. G.; Behnke-Barclay, M.; Decker, M. L.

    1995-01-01

    Cultured adult rabbit cardiac myocytes treated with recombinant growth factors display enhanced rates of protein accumulation (ie, growth) in response to insulin and insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), but epidermal growth factor, acidic or basic fibroblast growth factor, and platelet-derived growth factor failed to increase contractile protein synthesis or growth of the heart cells. Insulin and IGF-1 increased growth rates by stimulating anabolic while simultaneously inhibiting catabolic pathways, whereas IGF-2 elevated growth modestly by apparently inhibiting lysosomal proteolysis. Neutralizing antibodies directed against either IGF-1 or IGF-2 or IGF binding protein 3 blocked protein accumulation. A monoclonal antibody directed against the IGF-1 receptor also inhibited changes in protein turnover provoked by recombinant human IGF-1 but not IGF-2. Of the other growth factors tested, only transforming growth factor-beta 1 increased the fractional rate of myosin heavy chain (MHC) synthesis, with beta-MHC synthesis being elevated and alpha-MHC synthesis being suppressed. However, the other growth factors were able to modestly stimulate the rate of DNA synthesis in this preparation. Bromodeoxyuridine labeling revealed that these growth factors increased DNA synthesis in myocytes and nonmyocytes alike, but the heart cells displayed neither karyokinesis or cytokinesis. In contrast, cocultures of cardiac myocytes and nonmyocytes and nonmyocyte-conditioned culture medium failed to enhance the rate of cardiac MHC synthesis or its accumulation, implying that quiescent heart cells do not respond to "conditioning" by cardiac nonmyocytes. These findings demonstrated that insulin and the IGFs promote passively loaded cultured adult rabbit heart cells to hypertrophy but suggest that other growth factors tested may be limited in this regard.

  7. Some growth factors stimulate cultured adult rabbit ventricular myocyte hypertrophy in the absence of mechanical loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, R. S.; Cook, M. G.; Behnke-Barclay, M.; Decker, M. L.

    1995-01-01

    Cultured adult rabbit cardiac myocytes treated with recombinant growth factors display enhanced rates of protein accumulation (ie, growth) in response to insulin and insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), but epidermal growth factor, acidic or basic fibroblast growth factor, and platelet-derived growth factor failed to increase contractile protein synthesis or growth of the heart cells. Insulin and IGF-1 increased growth rates by stimulating anabolic while simultaneously inhibiting catabolic pathways, whereas IGF-2 elevated growth modestly by apparently inhibiting lysosomal proteolysis. Neutralizing antibodies directed against either IGF-1 or IGF-2 or IGF binding protein 3 blocked protein accumulation. A monoclonal antibody directed against the IGF-1 receptor also inhibited changes in protein turnover provoked by recombinant human IGF-1 but not IGF-2. Of the other growth factors tested, only transforming growth factor-beta 1 increased the fractional rate of myosin heavy chain (MHC) synthesis, with beta-MHC synthesis being elevated and alpha-MHC synthesis being suppressed. However, the other growth factors were able to modestly stimulate the rate of DNA synthesis in this preparation. Bromodeoxyuridine labeling revealed that these growth factors increased DNA synthesis in myocytes and nonmyocytes alike, but the heart cells displayed neither karyokinesis or cytokinesis. In contrast, cocultures of cardiac myocytes and nonmyocytes and nonmyocyte-conditioned culture medium failed to enhance the rate of cardiac MHC synthesis or its accumulation, implying that quiescent heart cells do not respond to "conditioning" by cardiac nonmyocytes. These findings demonstrated that insulin and the IGFs promote passively loaded cultured adult rabbit heart cells to hypertrophy but suggest that other growth factors tested may be limited in this regard.

  8. Glucagon and Insulin Cooperatively Stimulate Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 Gene Transcription by Increasing the Expression of Activating Transcription Factor 4.

    PubMed

    Alonge, Kimberly M; Meares, Gordon P; Hillgartner, F Bradley

    2017-03-31

    Previous studies have shown that glucagon cooperatively interacts with insulin to stimulate hepatic FGF21 gene expression. Here we investigated the mechanism by which glucagon and insulin increased FGF21 gene transcription in primary hepatocyte cultures. Transfection analyses demonstrated that glucagon plus insulin induction of FGF21 transcription was conferred by two activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) binding sites in the FGF21 gene. Glucagon plus insulin stimulated a 5-fold increase in ATF4 protein abundance, and knockdown of ATF4 expression suppressed the ability of glucagon plus insulin to increase FGF21 expression. In hepatocytes incubated in the presence of insulin, treatment with a PKA-selective agonist mimicked the ability of glucagon to stimulate ATF4 and FGF21 expression. Inhibition of PKA, PI3K, Akt, and mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) suppressed the ability of glucagon plus insulin to stimulate ATF4 and FGF21 expression. Additional analyses demonstrated that chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) induced a 6-fold increase in ATF4 expression and that knockdown of ATF4 expression suppressed the ability of CDCA to increase FGF21 gene expression. CDCA increased the phosphorylation of eIF2α, and inhibition of eIF2α signaling activity suppressed CDCA regulation of ATF4 and FGF21 expression. These results demonstrate that glucagon plus insulin increases FGF21 transcription by stimulating ATF4 expression and that activation of cAMP/PKA and PI3K/Akt/mTORC1 mediates the effect of glucagon plus insulin on ATF4 expression. These results also demonstrate that CDCA regulation of FGF21 transcription is mediated at least partially by an eIF2α-dependent increase in ATF4 expression. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Transcutaneous cervical vagal nerve stimulation modulates cardiac vagal tone and tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed

    Brock, C; Brock, B; Aziz, Q; Møller, H J; Pfeiffer Jensen, M; Drewes, A M; Farmer, A D

    2016-12-12

    The vagus nerve is a central component of cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathways. We sought to evaluate the effect of bilateral transcutaneous cervical vagal nerve stimulation (t-VNS) on validated parameters of autonomic tone and cytokines in 20 healthy subjects. 24 hours after t-VNS, there was an increase in cardiac vagal tone and a reduction in tumor necrosis factor-α in comparison to baseline. No change was seen in blood pressure, cardiac sympathetic index or other cytokines. These preliminary data suggest that t-VNS exerts an autonomic and a subtle antitumor necrosis factor-α effect, which warrants further evaluation in larger controlled studies.

  10. The potential role of recombinant hematopoietic colony-stimulating factors in preventing infections in the immunocompromised host

    PubMed Central

    Rusthoven, James

    1991-01-01

    Hematopoietic colony-stimulating factors coordinate the proliferation and maturation of bone marrow and peripheral blood cells during normal hematopoiesis. Most of these factors are now available as recombinant human colony-stimulating factors, and preclinical and clinical testing is proceeding rapidly. Granulocyte and granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factors have been the most extensively studied to date. In human clinical trials, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor improves neutrophil counts and function, reduces episodes of febrile neutropenia, improves neutrophil recovery after disease- or treatment-induced myelosuppression, and reduces the number of serious infections in several neutropenic disease states. Granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor has similar biological properties but may also improve eosinophil proliferation and function, and platelet cell recovery after myelotoxic bone marrow injury, Interleukin-1 boosts the effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor, but also may promote the resolution of established infections in conjunction with antibiotics. The therapeutic realities and future therapeutic implications of these agents for the therapy of infections, cancer and hemopoietic disorders are discussed. PMID:22529714

  11. [Lymphocyte transformation test following stimulation with a protein factor from neutrophilic granulocytes (PMNL) in psoriasis patients].

    PubMed

    Ruszczak, Z; Ciborska, L; Kaszuba, A

    1988-12-01

    The lymphocyte transformation test (LTT) was given to 20 healthy subjects and 43 patients with generalized psoriasis vulgaris: it was given right after stimulation with PHA (spontaneous) and after stimulation with allogenic and autogenic protein factor (NPF). NPF was isolated from secondary lysosome granules of peripheral blood neutrophils. The results were analyzed using computer statistic tests. No distinct differences were noticed between the spontaneous transformation test in psoriatic patients compared to the controls. After stimulation with PHA, the percentage of blast cells was significantly lower in patients with psoriasis. When allogenic and autogenic NPF was used for stimulation, the LTT values were significantly higher in the psoriasis group than in the control subjects. This fact points out the increase in sensitivity of lymphocytes to NPF in active psoriasis and the possibility of abnormal neutrophil-lymphocyte interactions in vivo. This phenomenon may be intensified when under the influence of bacterial or viral agents, or medicaments; the degranulation of secondary lysosome granules of neutrophils occurs, causing the release of NPF. These investigations support our opinion that psoriasis is a systemic disease and that NPF plays a considerable role in the psoriatic reaction.

  12. Stimulation of DNA synthesis in cultured primary human mesothelial cells by specific growth factors

    SciTech Connect

    Gabrielson, E.W.; Gerwin, B.I.; Harris, C.C.; Roberts, A.B.; Sporn, M.B.; Lechner, J.F.

    1988-08-01

    Monolayer cultures of human mesothelial cells made quiescent by serum deprivation are induced to undergo one round of DNA synthesis by platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), or transforming growth factor type beta 1 (TGF-beta 1). This one-time stimulation is independent of other serum components. The kinetics for induction of DNA synthesis observed for PDGF, EGF, and TGF-beta 1 are all similar to one another, with a peak of DNA synthesis occurring 24-36 h after the addition of the growth factors. Repetitive rounds of DNA synthesis and cell division do not ensue after addition of PDGF, EGF, or TGF-beta 1 alone or in combination; however, in media supplemented with chemically denatured serum, each of these factors is capable of sustaining continuous replication of mesothelial cells. Stimulation of growth by PDGF and TGF-beta 1 is unusual for an epithelial cell type, and indicates that mesothelial cells have growth regulatory properties similar to connective tissue cells.

  13. Enhancement of tendon-bone osteointegration of anterior cruciate ligament graft using granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Ken; Kuroda, Ryosuke; Ishida, Kazunari; Kubo, Seiji; Matsumoto, Tomoyuki; Mifune, Yutaka; Kinoshita, Keisuke; Tei, Katsumasa; Akisue, Toshihiro; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2008-08-01

    Whereas anterior cruciate ligament rupture usually requires reconstruction, the attachment between the tendon and the bone is the weakest region in the early posttransplantation period. In this process, the acquisition of appropriate vascularity is a key for early bone-tendon healing. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor has an effect on the maturation of bone-tendon integration of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Controlled laboratory study. Twenty-eight healthy adult beagle dogs underwent bilateral anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using the ipsilateral flexor digitorum superficialis tendon and were divided into 2 groups. A granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-incorporated gelatin surrounded the graft in the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor group, and the same gelatin without granulocyte colony-stimulating factor was used as the control group. Assessment was done at 2 and 4 weeks. Histological analysis at week 2 demonstrated that, in addition to more Sharpey fibers, microvessels were significantly enhanced in the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor group's grafts. Computed tomography at week 4 showed a significantly smaller tibial bone tunnel in the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor group. Real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed significantly elevated messenger ribonucleic acid expression levels of vascular endothelial growth factor and osteocalcin in the tibial bone tunnel and graft compared with controls. Furthermore, biomechanical testing of force during loading to ultimate failure at week 4 demonstrated a significant increase in strength in the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor group. This study demonstrated that a local application of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-incorporated gelatin significantly accelerates bone-tendon interface strength via enhanced angiogenesis and osteogenesis. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor has therapeutic potential in promoting an environment conductive to angiogenesis and

  14. Ex Vivo Assay of Electrical Stimulation to Rat Sciatic Nerves: Cell Behaviors and Growth Factor Expression.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhiyong; Bondarenko, Olexandr; Wang, Dingkun; Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Zhang, Ze

    2016-06-01

    Neurite outgrowth and axon regeneration are known to benefit from electrical stimulation. However, how neuritis and their surroundings react to electrical field is difficult to replicate by monolayer cell culture. In this work freshly harvested rat sciatic nerves were cultured and exposed to two types of electrical field, after which time the nerve tissues were immunohistologically stained and the expression of neurotrophic factors and cytokines were evaluated. ELISA assay was used to confirm the production of specific proteins. All cell populations survived the 48 h culture with little necrosis. Electrical stimulation was found to accelerate Wallerian degeneration and help Schwann cells to switch into migratory phenotype. Inductive electrical stimulation was shown to upregulate the secretion of multiple neurotrophic factors. Cellular distribution in nerve tissue was altered upon the application of an electrical field. This work thus presents an ex vivo model to study denervated axon in well controlled electrical field, bridging monolayer cell culture and animal experiment. It also demonstrated the critical role of electrical field distribution in regulating cellular activities.

  15. Multi-factorial modulation of IGD motogenic potential in MSF (migration stimulating factor).

    PubMed

    Ellis, Ian R; Jones, Sarah J; Staunton, David; Vakonakis, Ioannis; Norman, David G; Potts, Jennifer R; Milner, Caroline M; Meenan, Nicola A G; Raibaud, Sophie; Ohea, Go; Schor, Ana M; Schor, Seth L

    2010-09-10

    Migration Stimulating Factor (MSF) is a genetically truncated isoform of fibronectin (Fn). MSF is a potent stimulator of fibroblast migration, whereas full length Fn is devoid of motogenic activity. MSF and Fn contain four IGD motifs, located in the 3rd, 5th, 7th and 9th type I modules; these modules are referred to as (3)FnI, (5)FnI, (7)FnI and (9)FnI, respectively. We have previously reported that mutation of IGD motifs in modules (7)FnI and (9)FnI of MSF is sufficient to completely abolish the motogenic response of target adult skin fibroblasts. We now report that the IGD sequences in (3)FnI and (5)FnI are also capable of exhibiting motogenic activity when present within fragments of MSF. When present within (1-5)FnI, these sequences require the presence of serum or vitronectin for their motogenic activity to be manifest, whereas the IGD sequences in (7)FnI and (9)FnI are bioactive in the absence of serum factors. All MSF and IGD-containing peptides stimulated the phosphorylation of the integrin binding protein focal adhesion kinase (FAK) but did not necessarily affect migration. These results suggest that steric hindrance determines the motogenic activity of MSF and Fn, and that both molecules contain cryptic bioactive fragments.

  16. GROWTH REGULATING FACTOR5 stimulates Arabidopsis chloroplast division, photosynthesis, and leaf longevity.

    PubMed

    Vercruyssen, Liesbeth; Tognetti, Vanesa B; Gonzalez, Nathalie; Van Dingenen, Judith; De Milde, Liesbeth; Bielach, Agnieszka; De Rycke, Riet; Van Breusegem, Frank; Inzé, Dirk

    2015-03-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaf development relies on subsequent phases of cell proliferation and cell expansion. During the proliferation phase, chloroplasts need to divide extensively, and during the transition from cell proliferation to expansion, they differentiate into photosynthetically active chloroplasts, providing the plant with energy. The transcription factor GROWTH REGULATING FACTOR5 (GRF5) promotes the duration of the cell proliferation period during leaf development. Here, it is shown that GRF5 also stimulates chloroplast division, resulting in a higher chloroplast number per cell with a concomitant increase in chlorophyll levels in 35S:GRF5 leaves, which can sustain higher rates of photosynthesis. Moreover, 35S:GRF5 plants show delayed leaf senescence and are more tolerant for growth on nitrogen-depleted medium. Cytokinins also stimulate leaf growth in part by extending the cell proliferation phase, simultaneously delaying the onset of the cell expansion phase. In addition, cytokinins are known to be involved in chloroplast development, nitrogen signaling, and senescence. Evidence is provided that GRF5 and cytokinins synergistically enhance cell division and chlorophyll retention after dark-induced senescence, which suggests that they also cooperate to stimulate chloroplast division and nitrogen assimilation. Taken together with the increased leaf size, ectopic expression of GRF5 has great potential to improve plant productivity.

  17. Mechanism of kinase activation in the receptor for colony-stimulating factor 1.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, A W; Nienhuis, A W

    1990-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases remain dormant until activated by ligand binding to the extracellular domain. Two mechanisms have been proposed for kinase activation: (i) ligand binding to the external domain of a receptor monomer may induce a conformational change that is transmitted across the cell membrane (intramolecular model) or (ii) the ligand may facilitate oligomerization, thereby allowing interactions between the juxtaposed kinase domains (intermolecular model). The receptor for colony-stimulating factor 1 was used to test these models. Large insertions at the junction between the external and transmembrane domains of the receptor, introduced by site-directed mutagenesis of the cDNA, were positioned to isolate the external domain and prevent transmembrane conformational propagation while allowing for receptor oligomerization. Such mutant receptors were expressed on the cell surface, bound ligand with high affinity, exhibited ligand-stimulated autophosphorylation, and signaled mitogenesis and cellular proliferation in the presence of ligand. A second experimental strategy directly tested the intermolecular model of ligand activation. A hybrid receptor composed of the external domain of human glycophorin A and the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of the colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor exhibited anti-glycophorin antibody-induced kinase activity that supported mitogenesis. Our data strongly support a mechanism of receptor activation based on ligand-induced receptor oligomerization. Images PMID:2169623

  18. DC electric stimulation upregulates angiogenic factors in endothelial cells through activation of VEGF receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Huai; Forrester, John V.; Zhao, Min

    2015-01-01

    Small direct current (DC) electric fields direct some important angiogenic responses of vascular endothelial cells. Those responses indicate promising use of electric fields to modulate angiogenesis. We sought to determine the regulation of electric fields on transcription and expression of a serial of import angiogenic factors by endothelial cells themselves. Using semi-quantitative PCR and ELISA we found that electric stimulation upregulates the levels of mRNAs and proteins of a number of angiogenic proteins, most importantly VEGF165, VEGF121 and IL-8 in human endothelial cells. The up-regulation of mRNA levels might be specific, as the mRNA encoding bFGF, TGF-beta and eNOS are not affected by DC electric stimulation at 24 h time-point. Inhibition of VEGF receptor (VEGFR1 or VEGFR2) signaling significantly decreased VEGF production and completely abolished IL-8 production. DC electric stimulation selectively regulates production of some growth factors and cytokines important for angiogenesis through a feed-back loop mediated by VEGF receptors. PMID:21524919

  19. GROWTH REGULATING FACTOR5 Stimulates Arabidopsis Chloroplast Division, Photosynthesis, and Leaf Longevity1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Vercruyssen, Liesbeth; Tognetti, Vanesa B.; Gonzalez, Nathalie; Van Dingenen, Judith; De Milde, Liesbeth; Bielach, Agnieszka; De Rycke, Riet; Van Breusegem, Frank; Inzé, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaf development relies on subsequent phases of cell proliferation and cell expansion. During the proliferation phase, chloroplasts need to divide extensively, and during the transition from cell proliferation to expansion, they differentiate into photosynthetically active chloroplasts, providing the plant with energy. The transcription factor GROWTH REGULATING FACTOR5 (GRF5) promotes the duration of the cell proliferation period during leaf development. Here, it is shown that GRF5 also stimulates chloroplast division, resulting in a higher chloroplast number per cell with a concomitant increase in chlorophyll levels in 35S:GRF5 leaves, which can sustain higher rates of photosynthesis. Moreover, 35S:GRF5 plants show delayed leaf senescence and are more tolerant for growth on nitrogen-depleted medium. Cytokinins also stimulate leaf growth in part by extending the cell proliferation phase, simultaneously delaying the onset of the cell expansion phase. In addition, cytokinins are known to be involved in chloroplast development, nitrogen signaling, and senescence. Evidence is provided that GRF5 and cytokinins synergistically enhance cell division and chlorophyll retention after dark-induced senescence, which suggests that they also cooperate to stimulate chloroplast division and nitrogen assimilation. Taken together with the increased leaf size, ectopic expression of GRF5 has great potential to improve plant productivity. PMID:25604530

  20. DC electric stimulation upregulates angiogenic factors in endothelial cells through activation of VEGF receptors.

    PubMed

    Bai, Huai; Forrester, John V; Zhao, Min

    2011-07-01

    Small direct current (DC) electric fields direct some important angiogenic responses of vascular endothelial cells. Those responses indicate promising use of electric fields to modulate angiogenesis. We sought to determine the regulation of electric fields on transcription and expression of a serial of import angiogenic factors by endothelial cells themselves. Using semi-quantitative PCR and ELISA we found that electric stimulation upregulates the levels of mRNAs and proteins of a number of angiogenic proteins, most importantly VEGF165, VEGF121 and IL-8 in human endothelial cells. The up-regulation of mRNA levels might be specific, as the mRNA encoding bFGF, TGF-beta and eNOS are not affected by DC electric stimulation at 24h time-point. Inhibition of VEGF receptor (VEGFR1 or VEGFR2) signaling significantly decreased VEGF production and completely abolished IL-8 production. DC electric stimulation selectively regulates production of some growth factors and cytokines important for angiogenesis through a feed-back loop mediated by VEGF receptors.

  1. Differential acute effects of sleep on spontaneous and stimulated production of tumor necrosis factor in men.

    PubMed

    Dimitrov, Stoyan; Besedovsky, Luciana; Born, Jan; Lange, Tanja

    2015-07-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is considered a key molecule in the regulation of sleep in health and disease. Conversely, sleep compared to sleep deprivation can modulate TNF release, but overall results are conflicting. In this study we focused on the influence of sleep on spontaneous, i.e., unstimulated TNF production, which might be involved in sleep regulation under normal non-infectious conditions, and on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated TNF production, which reflects the capacity of the immune system to respond to a pathogen. To this end, we monitored 10 healthy men during a regular sleep-wake cycle and during 24h of wakefulness while blood was sampled repeatedly to analyze circulating TNF levels in serum as well as intracellular TNF production in monocytes spontaneously and after stimulation with LPS employing whole blood cell cultures. In addition we assessed numbers of monocyte subsets and levels of various hormones in blood. In comparison with nocturnal wakefulness, sleep acutely decreased serum TNF levels, with no parallel decrease in spontaneous monocytic TNF production, but was associated with a striking nighttime increase in the percentage of TNF producing monocytes after stimulation with LPS. The following day circulating TNF showed a reverse pattern with higher levels after regular sleep than after the nocturnal vigil. The mechanisms mediating the differential effects of sleep on circulating TNF (acutely decreased) vs. stimulated monocytic TNF production (acutely increased) remain unclear, although explorative correlational analyses pointed to a regulatory involvement of cortisol, norepinephrine and prolactin. The acute enhancing effect of sleep on LPS stimulated monocytic TNF production adds to the notion that nocturnal sleep favors immune defense to a microbial challenge. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Decrease in platelet activating factor stimulated phosphoinositide turnover during storage of human platelets in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, M.G.; Shukla, S.D. )

    1987-05-01

    Human platelet concentrate from the American Red Cross Blood Center was stored at 24{degree}C in a shaker and aliquots were taken out at time intervals aseptically. Platelet activating factor (PAF) stimulated turnover of phosphoinositide (PPI) was monitored by assaying {sup 32}P incorporation into phosphoinositides using platelet rich plasma (PRP). Platelets in PRP were incubated with 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} M PAF at 37{degree}C with gentle shaking and after 5 min their lipids were extracted and analysed by TLC for {sup 32}P-phosphoinositides. The percent stimulation of {sup 32}P incorporation by PAF (over control) into PPI was approximately 250, 100, 60, 25 and 20 on days 1, 2, 3, 5 and 6, respectively. This indicated a dramatic decrease in PAF responsive turnover of platelet PPI during storage. These findings have important implications in relation to PAF receptor activity and viability of platelets at different periods of storage.

  3. Cytokine Response of Cultured Skeletal Muscle Cells Stimulated with Proinflammatory Factors Depends on Differentiation Stage

    PubMed Central

    Podbregar, Matej; Lainscak, Mitja; Prelovsek, Oja; Mars, Tomaz

    2013-01-01

    Myoblast proliferation and myotube formation are critical early events in skeletal muscle regeneration. The attending inflammation and cytokine signaling are involved in regulation of skeletal muscle cell proliferation and differentiation. Secretion of muscle-derived cytokines upon exposure to inflammatory factors may depend on the differentiation stage of regenerating muscle cells. Cultured human myoblasts and myotubes were exposed to 24-hour treatment with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Secretion of interleukin 6 (IL-6), a major muscle-derived cytokine, and interleukin 1 (IL-1), an important regulator of inflammatory response, was measured 24 hours after termination of TNF-α or LPS treatment. Myoblasts pretreated with TNF-α or LPS displayed robustly increased IL-6 secretion during the 24-hour period after removal of treatments, while IL-1 secretion remained unaltered. IL-6 secretion was also increased in myotubes, but the response was less pronounced compared with myoblasts. In contrast to myoblasts, IL-1 secretion was markedly stimulated in LPS-pretreated myotubes. We demonstrate that preceding exposure to inflammatory factors stimulates a prolonged upregulation of muscle-derived IL-6 and/or IL-1 in cultured skeletal muscle cells. Our findings also indicate that cytokine response to inflammatory factors in regenerating skeletal muscle partially depends on the differentiation stage of myogenic cells. PMID:23509435

  4. Interactions of Aspergillus fumigatus with endothelial cells: internalization, injury, and stimulation of tissue factor activity.

    PubMed

    Lopes Bezerra, Leila M; Filler, Scott G

    2004-03-15

    Invasive aspergillosis causes significant mortality among patients with hematologic malignancies. This infection is characterized by vascular invasion and thrombosis. To study the pathogenesis of invasive aspergillosis, we investigated the interactions of Aspergillus fumigatus conidia and hyphae with endothelial cells in vitro. We found that both forms of the organism induced endothelial cell microfilament rearrangement and subsequent endocytosis. Conidia were endocytosed 2-fold more avidly than hyphae, and endocytosis was independent of fungal viability. Endocytosed conidia and hyphae caused progressive endothelial cell injury after 4 hours of infection. Live conidia induced more endothelial cell injury than did live hyphae. However, endothelial cell injury caused by conidia was dependent on fungal viability, whereas injury caused by hyphae was not, indicating that conidia and hyphae injure endothelial cells by different mechanisms. Neither live nor killed conidia increased tissue factor activity of endothelial cells. In contrast, both live and killed hyphae stimulated significant endothelial cell tissue factor activity, as well as the expression of tissue factor antigen on the endothelial cell surface. These results suggest that angioinvasion and thrombosis caused by A fumigatus hyphae in vivo may be due in part to endothelial cell invasion, induction of injury, and stimulation of tissue factor activity.

  5. PU/PTFE-stimulated monocyte-derived soluble factors induced inflammatory activation in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yang; Liu, Xin; Sun, Jiao

    2010-03-01

    Polyurethane (PU) and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) are two commonly used blood-contacting biomaterials. In the present study, we used a noncontact coculture model to evaluate the thrombosis-causing potential of monocyte-mediated PU and PTFE. We used human endothelial cells from umbilical cord (HUVECs) and human monocytes (THP1 cells). The THP1 cells were directly exposed to PU/PTFE, and the resultant cell-free supernatants were harvested for stimulating HUVECs. The treated HUVECs constituted the test group. HUVECs treated with supernatants of LPS-stimulated THP1 cells were used as the positive controls. To investigate the effects of the supernatant treatment on HUVECs, we measured the expression of the leukocyte-endothelial-cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) CD54 (ICAM-1), CD106 (VCAM-1), and CD62E (E-selectin) and evaluated the release of tissue factor (TF). The results demonstrated that both PU and PTFE induced the expressions of CD62E and TF. These activation effects were accompanied by activation of the NF-kappaB transcription factor. To further investigate the monocyte-derived soluble factors that might contribute to these effects, we evaluated the effects of the PU/PTFE stimulation on the expression of reactive oxygen species (ROS), TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and IL-6 in monocyte monocultures. In comparison with the results for the negative control, both PU and PTFE significantly induced ROS release after 0.5h, while the expressions of TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and IL-6 were variably increased after 24h. Our results suggest that the biomaterial induces monocytic activation and subsequently causes the release of soluble factors, which contribute to the inflammatory activation in HUVECs.

  6. A neuroprotective function for the hematopoietic protein granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF).

    PubMed

    Schäbitz, Wolf-Rüdiger; Krüger, Carola; Pitzer, Claudia; Weber, Daniela; Laage, Rico; Gassler, Nikolaus; Aronowski, Jaroslaw; Mier, Walter; Kirsch, Friederike; Dittgen, Tanjew; Bach, Alfred; Sommer, Clemens; Schneider, Armin

    2008-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a hematopoietic cytokine responsible for the proliferation, differentiation, and maturation of cells of the myeloid lineage, which was cloned more than 20 years ago. Here we uncovered a novel function of GM-CSF in the central nervous system (CNS). We identified the GM-CSF alpha-receptor as an upregulated gene in a screen for ischemia-induced genes in the cortex. This receptor is broadly expressed on neurons throughout the brain together with its ligand and induced by ischemic insults. In primary cortical neurons and human neuroblastoma cells, GM-CSF counteracts programmed cell death and induces BCL-2 and BCL-Xl expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Of the signaling pathways studied, GM-CSF most prominently induced the PI3K-Akt pathway, and inhibition of Akt strongly decreased antiapoptotic activity. Intravenously given GM-CSF passes the blood-brain barrier, and decreases infarct damage in two different experimental stroke models (middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), and combined common carotid/distal MCA occlusion) concomitant with induction of BCL-Xl expression. Thus, GM-CSF acts as a neuroprotective protein in the CNS. This finding is remarkably reminiscent of the recently discovered functionality of two other hematopoietic factors, erythropoietin and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in the CNS. The identification of a third hematopoietic factor acting as a neurotrophic factor in the CNS suggests a common principle in the functional evolution of these factors. Clinically, GM-CSF now broadens the repertoire of hematopoietic factors available as novel drug candidates for stroke and neurodegenerative diseases.

  7. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) for sepsis: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction To investigate the effects of G-CSF or GM-CSF therapy in non-neutropenic patients with sepsis. Methods A systematic literature search of Medline, Embase and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials was conducted using specific search terms. A manual review of references was also performed. Eligible studies were randomized control trials (RCTs) that compared granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) or granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) therapy with placebo for the treatment of sepsis in adults. Main outcome measures were all-cause mortality at 14 days and 28 days after initiation of G-CSF or GM-CSF therapy, in-hospital mortality, reversal rate from infection, and adverse events. Results Twelve RCTs with 2,380 patients were identified. In regard to 14-day mortality, a total of 9 death events occurred among 71 patients (12.7%) in the treatment group compared with 13 events among 67 patients (19.4%) in the placebo groups. Meta-analysis showed there was no significant difference in 28-day mortality when G-CSF or GM-CSF were compared with placebo (relative risks (RR) = 0.93, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.79 to 1.11, P = 0.44; P for heterogeneity = 0.31, I2 = 15%). Compared with placebo, G-CSF or GM-CSF therapy did not significantly reduce in-hospital mortality (RR = 0.97, 95% CI: 0.69 to 1.36, P = 0.86; P for heterogeneity = 0.80, I2 = 0%). However, G-CSF or GM-CSF therapy significantly increased the reversal rate from infection (RR = 1.34, 95% CI: 1.11 to 1.62, P = 0.002; P for heterogeneity = 0.47, I2 = 0%). No significant difference was observed in adverse events between groups (RR = 0.93, 95% CI: 0.70 to 1.23, P = 0.62; P for heterogeneity = 0.03, I2 = 58%). Sensitivity analysis by excluding one trial did not significantly change the results of adverse events (RR = 1.05, 95% CI: 0.84 to 1.32, P = 0.44; P for heterogeneity = 0.17, I2 = 36%). Conclusions There is no current evidence supporting the routine use of G-CSF or

  8. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) for sepsis: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Bo, Lulong; Wang, Fei; Zhu, Jiali; Li, Jinbao; Deng, Xiaoming

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the effects of G-CSF or GM-CSF therapy in non-neutropenic patients with sepsis. A systematic literature search of Medline, Embase and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials was conducted using specific search terms. A manual review of references was also performed. Eligible studies were randomized control trials (RCTs) that compared granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) or granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) therapy with placebo for the treatment of sepsis in adults. Main outcome measures were all-cause mortality at 14 days and 28 days after initiation of G-CSF or GM-CSF therapy, in-hospital mortality, reversal rate from infection, and adverse events. Twelve RCTs with 2,380 patients were identified. In regard to 14-day mortality, a total of 9 death events occurred among 71 patients (12.7%) in the treatment group compared with 13 events among 67 patients (19.4%) in the placebo groups. Meta-analysis showed there was no significant difference in 28-day mortality when G-CSF or GM-CSF were compared with placebo (relative risks (RR) = 0.93, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.79 to 1.11, P = 0.44; P for heterogeneity = 0.31, I2 = 15%). Compared with placebo, G-CSF or GM-CSF therapy did not significantly reduce in-hospital mortality (RR = 0.97, 95% CI: 0.69 to 1.36, P = 0.86; P for heterogeneity = 0.80, I2 = 0%). However, G-CSF or GM-CSF therapy significantly increased the reversal rate from infection (RR = 1.34, 95% CI: 1.11 to 1.62, P = 0.002; P for heterogeneity = 0.47, I2 = 0%). No significant difference was observed in adverse events between groups (RR = 0.93, 95% CI: 0.70 to 1.23, P = 0.62; P for heterogeneity = 0.03, I2 = 58%). Sensitivity analysis by excluding one trial did not significantly change the results of adverse events (RR = 1.05, 95% CI: 0.84 to 1.32, P = 0.44; P for heterogeneity = 0.17, I2 = 36%). There is no current evidence supporting the routine use of G-CSF or GM-CSF in patients with sepsis. Large

  9. Factors influencing serum progesterone level on triggering day in stimulated in vitro fertilization cycles.

    PubMed

    Park, Ju Hee; Jee, Byung Chul; Kim, Seok Hyun

    2015-06-01

    Elevated serum progesterone (P) levels on triggering day have been known to affect the pregnancy rate of in vitro fertilization (IVF). This study aimed to identify the possible factors influencing serum P levels on triggering day in stimulated IVF cycles. Three hundred and thirty consecutive fresh IVF cycles were included in the study. All cycles were first attempts and were performed in a single infertility center. The indications for IVF were male factor infertility (n=114), ovulatory infertility (n=84), endometriosis (n=61), tubal infertility (n=59), unexplained infertility (n=41), and uterine factor infertility (n=39). A luteal long protocol of a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist (n=184) or a GnRH antagonist protocol (n=146) was used for pituitary suppression. Ovarian sensitivity was defined as the serum estradiol level on triggering day per 500 IU of administered gonadotropins (OS[a]) or the retrieved oocyte number per 500 IU of administered gonadotropins (OS[b]). Univariate analysis revealed that the serum P level on triggering day was associated with the serum estradiol level on triggering day (r=0.379, p<0.001), the number of follicles ≥14 mm (r=0.247, p<0.001), the number of retrieved oocytes (r=0.384, p<0.001), and ovarian sensitivity (OS[a]: r=0.245, p<0.001; OS[b]: r=0.170, p=0.002). The woman's age, body mass index, antral follicle count, and basal serum follicle stimulating hormone and estradiol levels were not associated with serum P level on triggering day. The serum P level on triggering day did not show significant variation depending on the type or cause of infertility, pituitary suppression protocol, or the type of gonadotropins used. The serum P level on triggering day was closely related to the response to ovarian stimulation.

  10. Factors influencing serum progesterone level on triggering day in stimulated in vitro fertilization cycles

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ju Hee; Jee, Byung Chul

    2015-01-01

    Objective Elevated serum progesterone (P) levels on triggering day have been known to affect the pregnancy rate of in vitro fertilization (IVF). This study aimed to identify the possible factors influencing serum P levels on triggering day in stimulated IVF cycles. Methods Three hundred and thirty consecutive fresh IVF cycles were included in the study. All cycles were first attempts and were performed in a single infertility center. The indications for IVF were male factor infertility (n=114), ovulatory infertility (n=84), endometriosis (n=61), tubal infertility (n=59), unexplained infertility (n=41), and uterine factor infertility (n=39). A luteal long protocol of a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist (n=184) or a GnRH antagonist protocol (n=146) was used for pituitary suppression. Ovarian sensitivity was defined as the serum estradiol level on triggering day per 500 IU of administered gonadotropins (OS[a]) or the retrieved oocyte number per 500 IU of administered gonadotropins (OS[b]). Results Univariate analysis revealed that the serum P level on triggering day was associated with the serum estradiol level on triggering day (r=0.379, p<0.001), the number of follicles ≥14 mm (r=0.247, p<0.001), the number of retrieved oocytes (r=0.384, p<0.001), and ovarian sensitivity (OS[a]: r=0.245, p<0.001; OS[b]: r=0.170, p=0.002). The woman's age, body mass index, antral follicle count, and basal serum follicle stimulating hormone and estradiol levels were not associated with serum P level on triggering day. The serum P level on triggering day did not show significant variation depending on the type or cause of infertility, pituitary suppression protocol, or the type of gonadotropins used. Conclusion The serum P level on triggering day was closely related to the response to ovarian stimulation. PMID:26161336

  11. Review of granulocyte colony-stimulating factors in the treatment of established febrile neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Pérez Velasco, Román

    2011-09-01

    To assess the value of granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSF) in promoting recovery from established episodes of febrile neutropenia (FN) after chemotherapy in cancer patients. The literature was searched using the MEDLINE, EMBASE, BIOSIS, and IPA databases. Reference lists from the retrieved papers and hand searches of relevant journals complemented the search. Eleven randomized controlled trials were selected for review. G-CSF use in established FN appears to be limited to a small reduction in neutropenia duration, length of hospitalization, and duration of antibiotic use. Overall, there are no significant reductions in time to neutrophil recovery and fever resolution. The cost analyses performed do not show significant cost savings. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSF) are biological agents typically used for prevention of febrile neutropenia (FN) or as adjunctive treatment with antibiotics of established FN. Most clinical guidelines discourage the general use of G-CSF for adjunctive treatment of ongoing neutropenic fever; however, its use in special situations, such as high-risk for infectious complications or adverse prognostic factors, is advised. G-CSF should be reserved for high-risk cancer patients, in accordance with the results of this review. This recommendation needs to be taken with caution in view of the disparities and methodological flaws found among trials. It is necessary to design further trials appropriately, well-powered and focused on high-risk patients. Moreover, it is necessary to perform an appropriate economic evaluation for this setting.

  12. Macrophage colony stimulating factor: not just for macrophages anymore! A gateway into complex biologies.

    PubMed

    Douglass, Thomas G; Driggers, Lara; Zhang, Jian Gang; Hoa, Neil; Delgado, Christina; Williams, Christopher C; Dan, Qinhong; Sanchez, Ramon; Jeffes, Edward W B; Wepsic, H Terry; Myers, Michael P; Koths, Kirston; Jadus, Martin R

    2008-10-01

    Macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF, also called colony stimulating factor-1) has traditionally been viewed as a growth/differentiation factor for monocytes, macrophages, and some female-specific tumors. As a result of alternative mRNA splicing and post-translational processing, several forms of M-CSF protein are produced: a secreted glycoprotein, a longer secreted form containing proteoglycan, and a short membrane-bound isoform. These different forms of M-CSF all initiate cell signaling in cells bearing the M-CSF receptor, called c-fms. Here we review the biology of M-CSF, which has important roles in bone physiology, the intestinal tract, cancer metastases to the bone, macrophage-mediated tumor cell killing and tumor immunity. Although this review concentrates mostly on the membrane form of human M-CSF (mM-CSF), the biology of the soluble forms and the M-CSF receptor will also be discussed for comparative purposes. The mechanisms of the biological effects of the membrane-bound M-CSF reveal that this cytokine is unexpectedly involved in many complex molecular events. Recent experiments suggest that a tumor vaccine based on membrane-bound M-CSF-transduced tumor cells, combined with anti-angiogenic therapy, should be evaluated further for use in clinical trials.

  13. Mast Cell Proteases 6 and 7 Stimulate Angiogenesis by Inducing Endothelial Cells to Release Angiogenic Factors

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Devandir Antonio; Borges, Antonio Carlos; Santana, Ana Carolina; Oliver, Constance; Jamur, Maria Célia

    2015-01-01

    Mast cell proteases are thought to be involved with tumor progression and neo-vascularization. However, their exact role is still unclear. The present study was undertaken to further elucidate the function of specific subtypes of recombinant mouse mast cell proteases (rmMCP-6 and 7) in neo-vascularization. SVEC4-10 cells were cultured on Geltrex® with either rmMCP-6 or 7 and tube formation was analyzed by fluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Additionally, the capacity of these proteases to induce the release of angiogenic factors and pro and anti-angiogenic proteins was analyzed. Both rmMCP-6 and 7 were able to stimulate tube formation. Scanning electron microscopy showed that incubation with the proteases induced SVEC4-10 cells to invade the gel matrix. However, the expression and activity of metalloproteases were not altered by incubation with the mast cell proteases. Furthermore, rmMCP-6 and rmMCP-7 were able to induce the differential release of angiogenic factors from the SVEC4-10 cells. rmMCP-7 was more efficient in stimulating tube formation and release of angiogenic factors than rmMCP-6. These results suggest that the subtypes of proteases released by mast cells may influence endothelial cells during in vivo neo-vascularization. PMID:26633538

  14. Prostaglandin E2 regulates macrophage colony stimulating factor secretion by human bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Besse, A; Trimoreau, F; Faucher, J L; Praloran, V; Denizot, Y

    1999-07-08

    Bone marrow stromal cells regulate marrow haematopoiesis by secreting growth factors such as macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) that regulates the proliferation, differentiation and several functions of cells of the mononuclear-phagocytic lineage. By using a specific ELISA we found that their constitutive secretion of M-CSF is enhanced by tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). The lipid mediator prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) markedly reduces in a time- and dose-dependent manner the constitutive and TNF-alpha-induced M-CSF synthesis by bone marrow stromal cells. In contrast, other lipid mediators such as 12-HETE, 15-HETE, leukotriene B4, leukotriene C4 and lipoxin A4 have no effect. EP2/EP4 selective agonists (11-deoxy PGE1 and 1-OH PGE1) and EP2 agonist (19-OH PGE2) inhibit M-CSF synthesis by bone marrow stromal cells while an EP1/EP3 agonist (sulprostone) has no effect. Stimulation with PGE2 induces an increase of intracellular cAMP levels in bone marrow stromal cells. cAMP elevating agents (forskolin and cholera toxin) mimic the PGE2-induced inhibition of M-CSF production. In conclusion, PGE2 is a potent regulator of M-CSF production by human bone marrow stromal cells, its effects being mediated via cAMP and PGE receptor EP2/EP4 subtypes.

  15. Factors predicting improvement in primary generalized dystonia treated by pallidal deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Vasques, Xavier; Cif, Laura; Gonzalez, Victoria; Nicholson, Claire; Coubes, Philippe

    2009-04-30

    Despite the beneficial effects of Globus Pallidus internus (GPi) deep brain stimulation (DBS) in patients with primary generalized dystonia (PGD), the degree of improvement varies from one patient to another. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of clinical, anatomical (volume of the GPi), and electrical variables on the postoperative Burke-Fahn-Marsden Dystonia rating scale (BFMDRS) motor score to identify which factors may be predictive of the degree of improvement. We reviewed retrospectively the clinical records of 40 steady-state patients with PGD who had been treated by bilateral GPi lead implantation. The follow-up period was 2 to 8 years. The correlation between the electrical parameters (voltage, impedance, and current) and the clinical outcome was studied. An analysis of covariance was performed to identify factors predictive of the magnitude of improvement. The most influential factors according to the model are as follows: the preoperative BFMDRS score (P < 0.0001); age at surgery (P < 0.0001); the right GPi volume (P = 0.002); the left stimulated GPi volume (P = 0.005). No significant correlation was found between the electrical parameters used and the mean motor scores in steady state. (c) 2009 Movement Disorder Society.

  16. Marked stimulation of growth and motility of human keratinocytes by hepatocyte growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, K.; Hashimoto, K.; Yoshikawa, K.; Nakamura, T. )

    1991-09-01

    Effect of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) on normal human epidermal keratinocytes cultured under conditions of low Ca2+ (0.1 mM, growth-promoting condition) and physiological Ca2+ (1.8 mM, differentiation-promoting condition) was investigated. In low Ca2+, HGF markedly enhanced the migration of keratinocytes while it suppressed cell growth and DNA synthesis in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, HGF enhanced the migration, cell growth, and DNA synthesis of keratinocytes cultured under conditions of physiological Ca2+. The maximal stimulation of DNA synthesis (2.4-fold stimulation) in physiological Ca2+ was seen at 2.5-5 ng/ml HGF and the stimulatory effect of HGF was suppressed by transforming growth factor-beta 1. Analysis of the HGF receptor using 125I-HGF as a ligand showed that human keratinocytes expressed a single class of specific, saturable receptor for HGF in both low and physiological Ca2+ conditions, exhibiting a Kd = 17.3 pM and approximately 690 binding sites/cell under physiological Ca2+. Thus, HGF is a potent factor which enhances growth and migration of normal human keratinocytes under conditions of physiological Ca2+. HGF may play an important role in epidermal tissue repair as it enhances both the migration and growth of keratinocytes.

  17. Highly metastatic 13762NF rat mammary adenocarcinoma cell clones stimulate bone marrow by secretion of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor/interleukin-3 activity.

    PubMed

    McGary, C T; Miele, M E; Welch, D R

    1995-12-01

    Circulating neutrophil (polymorphonuclear leukocyte levels rise 50-fold in 13762NF tumor-bearing rats in proportion to the tumor's metastatic potential. Purified tumor-elicited neutrophils enhance metastasis of syngeneic tumor cells when co-injected intravenously; however, circulating and phorbol ester-activated polymorphonuclear neutrophils do not. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the source of tumor-elicited neutrophils in metastatic tumor-bearing rats. We examined the bone marrow in rats bearing tumors of poorly, moderately, and highly metastatic cell clones. Marrow from rats with highly metastatic tumors had increased cellularity (100%), myeloid to erythroid ratio (10:1), and megakaryocytes compared with control rats (cellularity, approximately 80%; myeloid to erythroid ratio, 5:1), with marrows from rats with moderately metastatic tumors having intermediate values. This suggested production of a colony-stimulating factor by the metastatic cells. To confirm this, bone marrow colony formation from control and tumor-bearing rats was compared. Colony number increased in proportion to the metastatic potential of the tumor. Conditioned medium from metastatic cells supported growth of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor/interleukin-3-dependent 32Dcl3 cell line, but media from nonmetastatic or moderately metastatic cells did not. Antibodies to murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor neutralized 32Dcl3 growth in tumor cell conditioned medium. These results suggest production of a granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor or interleukin-3-like activity by highly metastatic 13762NF clones and implicate a possible role for colony-stimulating factors in regulating the metastatic potential of mammary adenocarcinoma cell clones.

  18. ADP-ribosylation factor 6 modulates adrenergic stimulated lipolysis in adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yingqiu; Zhou, Dequan; Abumrad, Nada A.

    2010-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation factor 6 (Arf6) is a small GTPase that influences membrane receptor trafficking and the actin cytoskeleton. In adipocytes, Arf6 regulates the trafficking of the glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4) and consequently insulin-stimulated glucose transport. Previous studies also indicated a role of Arf6 in adrenergic receptor trafficking, but whether this contributes to the control of lipolysis in adipocytes remains unknown. This was examined in the present study by using RNA interference (RNAi) and pharmaceutical inhibition in murine cultured 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Downregulation of Arf6 by RNAi impairs isoproterenol-stimulated lipolysis specifically but does not alter triacylglycerol (TAG) synthesis or the insulin signaling pathway. Neither total TAG amounts nor TAG fatty acid compositions are altered. The inhibitory effect on lipolysis is mimicked by dynasore, a specific inhibitor for dynamin, which is required for endocytosis. In contrast, lipolysis triggered by reagents that bypass events at the plasma membrane (e.g., forskolin, isobutylmethylxanthine or 8-bromo-cAMP) is not affected. Moreover, Arf6 protein levels in white adipose tissues are markedly increased in ob/ob mice, whereas they are decreased in obesity-resistant CD36 null mice. These changes reflect at least in part alterations in Arf6 mRNA levels. Collectively, these results suggest a role of the endocytic pathway and its regulation by Arf6 in adrenergic stimulation of lipolysis in adipocytes and potentially in the development of obesity. PMID:20107045

  19. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) stimulates glycogen synthase activity in 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, C.P.; Bowen-Pope, D.F.; Ross, R.; Krebs, E.G.

    1986-05-01

    Hormonal regulation of glycogen synthase, an enzyme that can be phosphorylated on multiple sites, is often associated with changes in its phosphorylation state. Enzyme activation is conventionally monitored by determining the synthase activity ratio ((activity in the absence of glucose 6-P)/(activity in the presence of glucose 6-P)). Insulin causes an activation of glycogen synthase with a concomitant decrease in its phosphate content. In a previous report, the authors showed that epidermal growth factor (EGF) increases the glycogen synthase activity ratio in Swiss 3T3 cells. The time and dose-dependency of this response was similar to that of insulin. Their recent results indicate that PDGF also stimulates glycogen synthase activity. Enzyme activation was maximal after 30 min. of incubation with PDGF; the time course observed was very similar to that with insulin and EGF. At 1 ng/ml (0.03nM), PDGF caused a maximal stimulation of 4-fold in synthase activity ratio. Half-maximal stimulation was observed at 0.2 ng/ml (6 pM). The time course of changes in enzyme activity ratio closely followed that of /sup 125/I-PDGF binding. The authors data suggest that PDGF, as well as EFG and insulin, may be important in regulating glycogen synthesis through phosphorylation/dephosphorylation mechanisms.

  20. Insulin-like growth factor I stimulates elastin synthesis by bovine pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Badesch, D B; Lee, P D; Parks, W C; Stenmark, K R

    1989-04-14

    Insulin-like growth factor I stimulates mitogenesis in smooth muscle cells, and upregulates elastin synthesis in embryonic aortic tissue. Increased smooth muscle elastin synthesis may play an important role in vascular remodeling in chronic pulmonary hypertension. Therefore, we studied the effect of IGF-I on elastin and total protein synthesis by pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells in vitro. Tropoelastin synthesis was measured by enzyme immunoassay, and total protein synthesis was measured by [3H]-leucine incorporation. In addition, the steady-state levels of tropoelastin mRNA were determined by slot blot hybridization. Incubation of confluent cultures with various concentrations of IGF-I resulted in a dose-dependent stimulation of elastin synthesis, with a 2.4-fold increase over control levels at 1000 ng/ml of IGF. The increase in elastin synthesis was reflected by a stimulation of the steady-state levels of tropoelastin mRNA. We conclude that IGF-I has potent elastogenic effects on vascular smooth muscle cells, and speculate that it may contribute to vascular wall remodeling in chronic hypertension.

  1. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor stimulates energy metabolism in developing cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Burkhalter, Julia; Fiumelli, Hubert; Allaman, Igor; Chatton, Jean-Yves; Martin, Jean-Luc

    2003-09-10

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) promotes the biochemical and morphological differentiation of selective populations of neurons during development. In this study we examined the energy requirements associated with the effects of BDNF on neuronal differentiation. Because glucose is the preferred energy substrate in the brain, the effect of BDNF on glucose utilization was investigated in developing cortical neurons via biochemical and imaging studies. Results revealed that BDNF increases glucose utilization and the expression of the neuronal glucose transporter GLUT3. Stimulation of glucose utilization by BDNF was shown to result from the activation of Na+/K+-ATPase via an increase in Na+ influx that is mediated, at least in part, by the stimulation of Na+-dependent amino acid transport. The increased Na+-dependent amino acid uptake by BDNF is followed by an enhancement of overall protein synthesis associated with the differentiation of cortical neurons. Together, these data demonstrate the ability of BDNF to stimulate glucose utilization in response to an enhanced energy demand resulting from increases in amino acid uptake and protein synthesis associated with the promotion of neuronal differentiation by BDNF.

  2. Corticotropin releasing factor stimulates cAMP formation in pituitary corticotropic tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Parenti, M.; Cantalamessa, L.; Catania, A.; Reschini, E.; Mueller, E.E.

    1984-01-23

    Addition of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) to membranes from two ACTH-secreting pituitary tumors strikingly increased in a dose-dependent fashion adenylate cyclase (AC) activity. Stimulation of AC activity by CRF in membranes from non-tumoral tissue adjacent to tumoral corticotrophs was considerably lower, and was lacking in membranes from a growth hormone secreting tumor. These data correlated well with in vivo pre-surgery and post-surgery ACTH responsiveness to CRF of the tumor bearing patients. Basal AC activity was higher in pituitary adenomas than in non-tumoral adjacent tissue.

  3. Potentiation of photodynamic therapy by granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor immunotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krosl, Gorazd; Korbelik, Mladen; Krosl, Jana; Dougherty, Graeme J.

    1995-03-01

    The murine squamous carcinoma cell line (SCCVII) was genetically engineered to produce high levels of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Lethally irradiated GM-CSF producing cells were injected under the subcutaneously growing parental SCCVII tumor at various times before and/or after PDT. Even a single treatment with GM- CSF producing cells injected two days before PDT markedly enhanced the tumor cure rate when compared to the PDT treatment alone. Effective potentiation was observed with PDT mediated either by Photofrin or by benzoporphyrin derivative.

  4. Neuroprotective Activities of Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor Following Controlled Cortical Impact

    PubMed Central

    Kelso, Matthew L.; Elliott, Bret R.; Haverland, Nicole A.; Mosley, R. Lee; Gendelman, Howard E.

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegeneration after traumatic brain injury (TBI) is facilitated by innate and adaptive immunity and can be harnessed to effect brain repair. In mice subjected to controlled cortical impact (CCI) we show that treatment with granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) affects regulatory T cell numbers coincident with decreased lesion volumes and increased cortical tissue sparing. This paralleled increases in neurofilament and diminished reactive microglial staining. Transcriptomic analysis showed that GM-CSF induces robust immune neuroprotective responses seven days following CCI. Together, these results support the therapeutic potential of GM-CSF for TBI. PMID:25468272

  5. Evidence for multiple bone resorption-stimulating factors produced by normal human keratinocytes in culture.

    PubMed

    Fried, R M; Voelkel, E F; Rice, R H; Levine, L; Tashjian, A H

    1988-06-01

    Conditioned medium from cultured normal human foreskin keratinocytes enhanced the release of calcium from neonatal mouse calvaria in organ culture. Unfractionated keratinocyte-conditioned medium (KCM) stimulated bone resorption in a dose-dependent manner, but it did not increase the concentration of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in the bone culture medium until a maximal dose of KCM for resorption was used. Furthermore, inhibitors of PGE2 synthesis, indomethacin, ibuprofen, and piroxicam, did not inhibit KCM-induced calcium release. High concentrations of KCM increased cAMP production by calvaria in the presence of isobutylmethylxanthine, but the increase was small compared with that produced by a dose of bovine PTH that caused a similar level of bone resorption. The bone resorption-stimulating activity of KCM was not lost after incubation at 56 C for 60 min, but it was lost after heating at 100 C for 10 min. Fractionation of KCM by gel filtration chromatography revealed two distinct peaks of bone resorption-stimulating activity. One peak, KCMI, caused a significant increase in bone resorption at 2 micrograms protein/ml. KCMI did not increase medium PGE2, and inhibition of PGE2 synthesis in bone had no effect on KCMI-induced bone resorption. KCMI failed to increase cAMP production by human osteosarcoma SaOS-2 cells. Another peak, KCMII, caused a dose-dependent increase in bone resorption, and a significant increase in medium calcium was noted at a 20-fold lower concentration (0.1 microgram protein/ml) than with KCMI. In contrast to KCMI, the increase in bone resorption stimulated by KCMII was accompanied by a parallel increase in the production of PGE2, and inhibition of PGE2 synthesis completely inhibited the bone resorption-stimulating activity of KCMII. KCMII also caused an increase in cAMP production by SaOS-2 cells. We conclude that KCM contains at least two distinct bone resorption-stimulating factors, one of which acts via a PG-mediated mechanism and the other by

  6. Nerve growth factor and epidermal growth factor stimulate clusterin gene expression in PC12 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gutacker, C; Klock, G; Diel, P; Koch-Brandt, C

    1999-01-01

    Clusterin (apolipoprotein J) is an extracellular glycoprotein that might exert functions in development, cell death and lipid transport. Clusterin gene expression is elevated at sites of tissue remodelling, such as differentiation and apoptosis; however, the signals responsible for this regulation have not been identified. We use here the clusterin gene as a model system to examine expression in PC12 cells under the control of differentiation and proliferation signals produced by nerve growth factor (NGF) and by epidermal growth factor (EGF) respectively. NGF induced clusterin mRNA, which preceded neurite outgrowth typical of neuronal differentiation. EGF also activated the clusterin mRNA, demonstrating that both proliferation and differentiation signals regulate the gene. To localize NGF- and EGF-responsive elements we isolated the clusterin promoter and tested it in PC12 cell transfections. A 2.5 kb promoter fragment and two 1.5 and 0.3 kb deletion mutants were inducible by NGF and EGF. The contribution to this response of a conserved activator protein 1 (AP-1) motif located in the 0.3 kb fragment was analysed by mutagenesis. The mutant promoter was not inducible by NGF or EGF, which identifies the AP-1 motif as an element responding to both factors. Binding studies with PC12 nuclear extracts showed that AP-1 binds to this sequence in the clusterin promoter. These findings suggest that NGF and EGF, which give differential gene regulation in PC12 cells, resulting in neuronal differentiation and proliferation respectively, use the common Ras/extracellular signal-regulated kinase/AP-1 signalling pathway to activate clusterin expression. PMID:10215617

  7. Arginine vasopressin stimulates mesangial cell proliferation by activating the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, P M; Mikhailova, M; Bedolla, R; Kreisberg, J I

    2001-06-01

    The potent vasoconstrictor arginine vasopressin (AVP) is also a mitogen for mesangial cells. Treatment with AVP decreased transit time through the cell cycle. AVP-stimulated mesangial cell growth by activating both the Ras mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) cell signaling pathways. Both the selective PI3K inhibitor LY-294002 and the MAPK kinase (MEK) inhibitor PD-98059 inhibited AVP-stimulated mesangial cell proliferation. However, LY-294002 was more potent, indicating an important role for PI3K activation in AVP-stimulated mesangial cell proliferation. AVP appeared to exert its effect on MAPK and PI3K activation, as well as on cell proliferation, by activating the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R). Pretreatment with the tyrphostin-derived EGF-R antagonist AG-1478 inhibited mesangial cell proliferation as well as the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2 or p42/p44(MAPK)), and p70S6 kinase, a downstream effector of PI3K, providing evidence that MAPK and PI3K activation, respectively, occurred downstream of EGF-R activation. Treatment with rapamycin, an inhibitor of the p70S6 kinase activator mTOR, also resulted in growth inhibition, further suggesting the importance of the PI3K signaling pathway in AVP-induced proliferation. AVP treatment appeared to transactivate EGF-R by inducing tyrosine phosphorylation of the Ca(2+)/protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent nonreceptor tyrosine kinase, Pyk2, leading to Pyk2/c-Src association and c-Src activation. This was followed by association of c-Src with EGF-R and EGF-R activation. These data suggested that AVP-stimulated Pyk2 tyrosine phosphorylation to activate c-Src, thereby leading to EGF-R transactivation.

  8. Activation of Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Factors by Fenofibrate and Gemfibrozil Stimulates Myelination in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Ashikawa, Yoshifumi; Nishimura, Yuhei; Okabe, Shiko; Sasagawa, Shota; Murakami, Soichiro; Yuge, Mizuki; Kawaguchi, Koki; Kawase, Reiko; Tanaka, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes are major myelin-producing cells and play essential roles in the function of a healthy nervous system. However, they are also one of the most vulnerable neural cell types in the central nervous system (CNS), and myelin abnormalities in the CNS are found in a wide variety of neurological disorders, including multiple sclerosis, adrenoleukodystrophy, and schizophrenia. There is an urgent need to identify small molecular weight compounds that can stimulate myelination. In this study, we performed comparative transcriptome analysis to identify pharmacodynamic effects common to miconazole and clobetasol, which have been shown to stimulate myelination by mouse oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs). Of the genes differentially expressed in both miconazole- and clobetasol-treated mouse OPCs compared with untreated cells, we identified differentially expressed genes (DEGs) common to both drug treatments. Gene ontology analysis revealed that these DEGs are significantly associated with the sterol biosynthetic pathway, and further bioinformatics analysis suggested that sterol regulatory element binding factors (SREBFs) might be key upstream regulators of the DEGs. In silico screening of a public database for chemicals associated with SREBF activation identified fenofibrate, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) agonist, as a drug that increases the expression of known SREBF targets, raising the possibility that fenofibrate may also stimulate myelination. To test this, we performed in vivo imaging of zebrafish expressing a fluorescent reporter protein under the control of the myelin basic protein (mbp) promoter. Treatment of zebrafish with fenofibrate significantly increased expression of the fluorescent reporter compared with untreated zebrafish. This increase was attenuated by co-treatment with fatostatin, a specific inhibitor of SREBFs, confirming that the fenofibrate effect was mediated via SREBFs. Furthermore, incubation of zebrafish

  9. Platelet factor 4 stimulates thrombomodulin protein C-activating cofactor activity. A structure-function analysis.

    PubMed

    Slungaard, A; Key, N S

    1994-10-14

    Thrombomodulin (TM) is an anionic (pI approximately 4) protein cofactor that promotes thrombin (THR) cleavage of protein C to generate activated protein C (APC), a potent anticoagulant. We find that the cationic platelet alpha-granule protein platelet factor 4 (PF4) stimulates 4-25-fold the cofactor activity of rabbit TM and two differentially glycanated versions of an extracellular domain human TM polypeptide in which the glycosaminoglycan (GAG) is either present (GAG+ TM) or absent (GAG- TM) with an ED50 of 3.3-10 micrograms/ml. No such stimulation occurs in response to beta-thromboglobulin or thrombospondin, or when protein C lacking its gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain is the substrate. Heparin and chondroitin sulfates A and E reverse PF4 stimulation. PF4 minimally affects the Kd for THR but decreases 30-fold (from 8.3 to 0.3 microM) the Km for protein C of APC generation by GAG+ TM. PF4 also strikingly transforms the [Ca2+] dependence profile of rabbit and GAG+ TM to resemble that of GAG- TM. A potential explanation for this is that PF4, like Ca2+, induces heparin-reversible alterations in native (but not Gla-domainless) protein C conformation as assessed by autofluorescence emission analysis. We conclude that PF4 stimulates TM APC generation by interacting electrostatically with both the TM GAG and the protein C Gla domain to enhance markedly the affinity of the THR.TM complex for protein C. By this mechanism, PF4 may play a previously unsuspected role in the physiologic regulation of clotting.

  10. Transforming growth factor Beta 1 stimulates profibrotic activities of luteal fibroblasts in cows.

    PubMed

    Maroni, Dulce; Davis, John S

    2012-11-01

    Luteolysis is characterized by angioregression, luteal cell apoptosis, and remodeling of the extracellular matrix characterized by deposition of collagen 1. Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFB1) is a potent mediator of wound healing and fibrotic processes through stimulation of the synthesis of extracellular matrix components. We hypothesized that TGFB1 stimulates profibrotic activities of luteal fibroblasts. We examined the actions of TGFB1 on luteal fibroblast proliferation, extracellular matrix production, floating gel contraction, and chemotaxis. Fibroblasts were isolated from the bovine corpus luteum. Western blot analysis showed that luteal fibroblasts expressed collagen 1 and prolyl 4-hydroxylase but did not express markers of endothelial or steroidogenic cells. Treatment of fibroblasts with TGFB1 stimulated the phosphorylation of SMAD2 and SMAD3. [(3)H]thymidine incorporation studies showed that TGFB1 caused concentration-dependent reductions in DNA synthesis in luteal fibroblasts and significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the proliferative effect of FGF2 and fetal calf serum. However, TGFB1 did not reduce the viability of luteal fibroblasts. Treatment of luteal fibroblasts with TGFB1 induced the expression of laminin, collagen 1, and matrix metalloproteinase 1 as determined by Western blot analysis and gelatin zymography of conditioned medium. TGFB1 increased the chemotaxis of luteal fibroblasts toward fibronectin in a transwell system. Furthermore, TGFB1 increased the fibroblast-mediated contraction of floating bovine collagen 1 gels. These results suggest that TGFB1 contributes to the structural regression of the corpus luteum by stimulating luteal fibroblasts to remodel and contract the extracellular matrix.

  11. Exploring bikeability in a metropolitan setting: stimulating and hindering factors in commuting route environments

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Route environments may influence people's active commuting positively and thereby contribute to public health. Assessments of route environments are, however, needed in order to better understand the possible relationship between active commuting and the route environment. The aim of this study was, therefore, to assess the potential associations between perceptions of whether the route environment on the whole hinders or stimulates bicycle commuting and perceptions of environmental factors. Methods The Active Commuting Route Environment Scale (ACRES) was used for the assessment of bicycle commuters' perceptions of their route environments in the inner urban parts of Greater Stockholm, Sweden. Bicycle commuters (n = 827) were recruited by advertisements in newspapers. Simultaneous multiple regression analyses were used to assess the relation between predictor variables (such as levels of exhaust fumes, noise, traffic speed, traffic congestion and greenery) and the outcome variable (hindering - stimulating route environments). Two models were run, (Model 1) without and (Model 2) with the item traffic: unsafe or safe included as a predictor. Results Overall, about 40% of the variance of hindering - stimulating route environments was explained by the environmental predictors in our models (Model 1, R2 = 0.415, and Model 2, R 2= 0.435). The regression equation for Model 1 was: y = 8.53 + 0.33 ugly or beautiful + 0.14 greenery + (-0.14) course of the route + (-0.13) exhaust fumes + (-0.09) congestion: all types of vehicles (p ≤ 0.019). The regression equation for Model 2 was y = 6.55 + 0.31 ugly or beautiful + 0.16 traffic: unsafe or safe + (-0.13) exhaust fumes + 0.12 greenery + (-0.12) course of the route (p ≤ 0.001). Conclusions The main results indicate that beautiful, green and safe route environments seem to be, independently of each other, stimulating factors for bicycle commuting in inner urban areas. On the other hand, exhaust fumes, traffic

  12. Acetylation impacts Fli-1-driven regulation of granulocyte colony stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Lennard Richard, Mara L; Brandon, Danielle; Lou, Ning; Sato, Shuzo; Caldwell, Tomika; Nowling, Tamara K; Gilkeson, Gary; Zhang, Xian K

    2016-10-01

    Fli-1 has emerged as a critical regulator of inflammatory mediators, including MCP-1, CCL5, and IL-6. The cytokine, granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) regulates neutrophil precursor maturation and survival, and activates mature neutrophils. Previously, a significant decrease in neutrophil infiltration into the kidneys of Fli-1(+/-) lupus-prone mice was observed. In this study, a significant decrease in G-CSF protein expression was detected in stimulated murine and human endothelial cells when expression of Fli-1 was inhibited. The murine G-CSF promoter contains numerous putative Fli-1 binding sites and several regions within the proximal promoter are significantly enriched for Fli-1 binding. Transient transfection assays indicate that Fli-1 drives transcription from the G-CSF promoter and mutation of the Fli-1 DNA binding domain resulted in a 94% loss of transcriptional activation. Mutation of a known acetylation site, led to a significant increase in G-CSF promoter activation. The histone acetyltransferases p300/CBP and p300/CBP associated factor (PCAF) significantly decrease Fli-1 specific activation of the G-CSF promoter. Thus, acetylation appears to be an important mechanism behind Fli-1 driven activation of the G-CSF promoter. These results further support the theory that Fli-1 plays a major role in the regulation of several inflammatory mediators, ultimately affecting inflammatory disease pathogenesis.

  13. Treatment of leg ischemia with biodegradable gelatin hydrogel microspheres incorporating granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Itta; Takemura, Genzou; Tsujimoto, Akiko; Watanabe, Takatomo; Kanamori, Hiromitsu; Esaki, Masayasu; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Takeyama, Toshiaki; Kawaguchi, Tomonori; Goto, Kazuko; Maruyama, Rumi; Fujiwara, Takako; Fujiwara, Hisayoshi; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Minatoguchi, Shinya

    2011-04-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a potent angiogenic factor. We hypothesized that G-CSF-immersed gelatin hydrogel microspheres (G-CSF-GHMs) injected into the ischemic legs might continuously release a small amount of G-CSF to locally stimulate angiogenesis without unfavorable systemic effects. Just after ligation of the right femoral artery of BALB/c mice, recombinant human G-CSF (100-μg/kg)-immersed GHM was injected into the right hindlimb muscles; the controls included a saline-injected group, an intramuscularly injected G-CSF group, a subcutaneously injected G-CSG group, and an empty GHM-injected group. Eight weeks later, improvement of blood perfusion to the ischemic limb was significantly augmented in the G-CSF-GHM group compared with any of the control groups. Despite there being no increase in the serum concentration of G-CSF, in peripheral granulocytes, or in circulating endothelial progenitor cells, not only capillary but also arteriolar density was significantly increased in this group. Next, we started treatment with G-CSF-GHM 4 weeks after ligation to examine whether the treatment is effective if performed during the chronic stage of ischemia. The late treatment was also found to effectively improve blood flow in the ischemic leg. In conclusion, G-CSF-GHM administration is suggested to be a promising and readily usable approach to treating peripheral artery disease, applicable even during the chronic stage.

  14. Side-effects of subthalamic stimulation in Parkinson's disease: clinical evolution and predictive factors.

    PubMed

    Guehl, D; Cuny, E; Benazzouz, A; Rougier, A; Tison, F; Machado, S; Grabot, D; Gross, C; Bioulac, B; Burbaud, P

    2006-09-01

    Chronic bilateral high-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is an alternative treatment for disabling forms of Parkinson's disease when on-off fluctuations and levodopa-induced dyskinesias compromise patients' quality of life. The aim of this study was to assess the evolution of side-effects during the first year of follow-up and search for clinical predictive factors accounting for their occurrence. We compared the frequency of side-effects at 3 and 12 months after surgery in a cohort of 44 patients. The off-medication scores of Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) II, III, axial symptoms, disease duration and age at surgery were retained for correlation analysis. Dysarthria/hypophonia, weight gain and postural instability were the most frequent chronic side-effects. Whereas dysarthria/hypophonia remained stable over time, weight gain and postural instability increased during the first year post-op. High axial and UPDRS II scores at surgery were predictive of dysarthria/hypophonia. Age and axial score at surgery were positively correlated with postural instability. Despite the occurrence of side-effects, the benefit/side-effects ratio of STN stimulation was largely positive during the first year of follow-up. Age, intensity of axial symptoms and UDPRS II off-medication score before surgery are predictive factors of dysarthria/hypophonia and postural instability after surgery.

  15. Stimulation of body weight increase and epiphyseal cartilage growth by insulin like growth factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, S.

    1981-01-01

    The ability of insulin-like growth factor (IGF) to induce growth in hypophysectomized immature rats was tested by continuous infusion of the partially purified factor at daily doses of 6, 21, and 46 mU for an 8-day period. A dose-dependent growth of the proximal epiphyseal cartilage of the tibia and an associated stimulation of the primary spongiosa were produced by these amounts of IGF. The two highest doses of IGF also resulted in dose-dependent increases of body weight. Gel permeation of the sera at neutrality showed that the large-molecular-weight IGF binding protein was not induced by the infusion of IGF, whereas it ws generated in the sera of hypophysectomized rats that were infused with daily doses of 86 mU of human growth hormone.

  16. Tissue factor expression in human arterial smooth muscle cells. TF is present in three cellular pools after growth factor stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Schecter, A D; Giesen, P L; Taby, O; Rosenfield, C L; Rossikhina, M; Fyfe, B S; Kohtz, D S; Fallon, J T; Nemerson, Y; Taubman, M B

    1997-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is a transmembrane glycoprotein that initiates the coagulation cascade. Because of the potential role of TF in mediating arterial thrombosis, we have examined its expression in human aortic and coronary artery smooth muscle cells (SMC). TF mRNA and protein were induced in SMC by a variety of growth agonists. Exposure to PDGF AA or BB for 30 min provided all of the necessary signals for induction of TF mRNA and protein. This result was consistent with nuclear runoff analyses, demonstrating that PDGF-induced TF transcription occurred within 30 min. A newly developed assay involving binding of digoxigenin-labeled FVIIa (DigVIIa) and digoxigenin-labeled Factor X (DigX) was used to localize cellular TF. By light and confocal microscopy, prominent TF staining was seen in the perinuclear cytoplasm beginning 2 h after agonist treatment and persisting for 10-12 h. Surface TF activity, measured on SMC monolayers under flow conditions, increased transiently, peaking 4-6 h after agonist stimulation and returning to baseline within 16 h. Peak surface TF activity was only approximately 20% of total TF activity measured in cell lysates. Surface TF-blocking experiments demonstrated that the remaining TF was found as encrypted surface TF, and also in an intracellular pool. The relatively short-lived surface expression of TF may be critical for limiting the thrombotic potential of intact SMC exposed to growth factor stimulation. In contrast, the encrypted surface and intracellular pools may provide a rich source of TF under conditions associated with SMC damage, such as during atherosclerotic plaque rupture or balloon arterial injury. PMID:9410905

  17. Promiscuous stimulation of ParF protein polymerization by heterogeneous centromere binding factors.

    PubMed

    Machón, Cristina; Fothergill, Timothy J G; Barillà, Daniela; Hayes, Finbarr

    2007-11-16

    The segrosome is the nucleoprotein complex that mediates accurate segregation of bacterial plasmids. The segrosome of plasmid TP228 comprises ParF and ParG proteins that assemble on the parH centromere. ParF, which exemplifies one clade of the ubiquitous ParA superfamily of segregation proteins, polymerizes extensively in response to ATP binding. Polymerization is modulated by the ParG centromere binding factor (CBF). The segrosomes of plasmids pTAR, pVT745 and pB171 include ParA homologues of the ParF subgroup, as well as diverse homodimeric CBFs with no primary sequence similarity to ParG, or each other. Centromere binding by these analogues is largely specific. Here, we establish that the ParF homologues of pTAR and pB171 filament modestly with ATP, and that nucleotide hydrolysis is not required for this polymerization, which is more prodigious when the cognate CBF is also present. By contrast, the ParF homologue of plasmid pVT745 did not respond appreciably to ATP alone, but polymerized extensively in the presence of both its cognate CBF and ATP. The co-factors also stimulated nucleotide-independent polymerization of cognate ParF proteins. Moreover, apart from the CBF of pTAR, the disparate ParG analogues promoted polymerization of non-cognate ParF proteins suggesting that filamentation of the ParF proteins is enhanced by a common mechanism. Like ParG, the co-factors may be modular, possessing a centromere-specific interaction domain linked to a flexible region containing determinants that promiscuously stimulate ParF polymerization. The CBFs appear to function as bacterial analogues of formins, microtubule-associated proteins or related ancillary factors that regulate eucaryotic cytoskeletal dynamics.

  18. Human Bronchial Epithelial Cell-Derived Factors from Severe Asthmatic Subjects Stimulate Eosinophil Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Salter, Brittany M A; Smith, Steven G; Mukherjee, Manali; Plante, Sophie; Krisna, Sakktee; Nusca, Graeme; Oliveria, John Paul; Irshad, Anam; Gauvreau, Gail M; Chakir, Jamila; Nair, Parameswaran; Sehmi, Roma

    2017-08-30

    Activated bronchial epithelial cells release alarmins, including thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) that drive type 2 inflammatory responses. We hypothesize that bronchial epithelial-derived factors enhance in situ eosinophil differentiation and maturation from myeloid precursors, a process that is driven by an IL-5 rich micro-environment within asthma airways. To assess the eosinophilopoietic potential of epithelial-derived factors, eosinophil/basophil colony forming units (Eo/B-CFU) were enumerated in 14-day methylcellulose cultures of blood-derived mononuclear cells (NAMNCs) incubated with bronchial epithelial cell supernatants (BECSN) from healthy non-atopic controls (NC; n = 8), mild atopic asthmatics (MA; n = 9) and severe asthmatics (SA; n = 5). Receptor blocking antibodies were used to evaluate the contribution of alarmins. Modulation of mRNA expression of transcription factors crucial for eosinophil differentiation was evaluated. BECSN stimulated the clonogenic expansion of eosinophil progenitors, in vitro. In the presence of IL-5, Eo/B-CFU growth was significantly greater in co-cultures of BESCN from SA, compared to MA and NC. This effect was attenuated by a TSLP receptor blocking antibody but not by an ST2 antibody. Recombinant human TSLP (optimal at 100 pg/ml) stimulated significant Eo/B-CFU growth, which was significantly enhanced in presence of IL-5 (1 ng/ml). Overnight culture of CD34+ cells with IL-5 and TSLP synergistically increased GATA-2 and CEBP-alpha mRNA expression. The eosinophilopoietic potential of factors derived from bronchial epithelial cells is increased in severe asthma. Our data suggest that TSLP is a key alarmin produced by bronchial epithelial cells, which promotes in situ eosinophilopoiesis in a type 2 rich microenvironment.

  19. Multiple Growth Factors, But Not VEGF, Stimulate Glycosaminoglycan Hyperelongation in Retinal Choroidal Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Al Gwairi, Othman; Osman, Narin; Getachew, Robel; Zheng, Wenhua; Liang, X-L.; Kamato, Danielle; Thach, Lyna; Little, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    A major feature of early age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the thickening of Bruch's membrane in the retina and an alteration in its composition with increased lipid deposition. In certain pathological conditions proteoglycans are responsible for lipid retention in tissues. Growth factors are known to increase the length of glycosaminoglycan chains and this can lead to a large increase in the interaction between proteoglycans and lipids. Using choroidal endothelial cells, we investigated the effects of a number of AMD relevant growth factors TGFβ, thrombin, PDGF, IGF and VEGF on proteoglycan synthesis. Cells were characterized as of endothelial origin using the specific cell markers endothelial nitric oxide synthesis and von Willebrand factor and imaged using confocal microscopy. Cells were treated with growth factors in the presence and absence of the appropriate inhibitors and were radiolabeled with [35S]-SO4. Proteoglycans were isolated by ion exchange chromatography and sized using SDS-PAGE. Radiosulfate incorporation was determined by the cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) precipitation technique. To measure cellular glycosaminoglycan synthesizing capacity we added xyloside and assessed the xyloside-GAGs by SDS-PAGE. TGFβ, thrombin, PDGF & IGF dose-dependently stimulated radiosulfate incorporation and GAG elongation as well as xyloside-GAG synthesis, however VEGF treatment did not stimulate any changes in proteoglycan synthesis. VEGF did not increase pAKT but caused a large increase in pERK relative to the response to PDGF. Thus, AMD relevant agonists cause glycosaminoglycan hyperelongation of proteoglycans synthesised and secreted by retinal choroidal endothelial cells. The absence of a response to VEGF is intriguing and identifies proteoglycans as a novel potential target in AMD. Future studies will examine the relevance of these changes to enhanced lipid binding and the development of AMD. PMID:27570478

  20. Down-regulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-2 in PC12 cells by nerve growth factor stimulation.

    PubMed

    Naranjo-Suárez, Salvador; Castellanos, María Carmen; Alvarez-Tejado, Miguel; Vara, Alicia; Landázuri, Manuel O; del Peso, Luis

    2003-08-22

    Cellular responses to low oxygen tension are mediated, at least in part, by the activation of the hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). In the presence of oxygen, specific HIF residues become hydroxylated by the action of a recently described group of dioxygenases. These post-translational modifications target HIF for proteosomal degradation and prevent its transcriptional activity. Despite these detailed studies, little is known about the regulation of HIF by stimuli other than hypoxia. Here we report that, in rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells, nerve growth factor (NGF) stimulation results in a decrease of both basal and hypoxia-induced levels of HIF-2 alpha protein. NGF treatment did not increase HIF-hydroxylase gene expression or activity, and the reduction of the HIF-2 alpha protein level upon stimulation was observed even in the presence of HIF-hydroxylase inhibitors such as deferoxamine or dimethyloxoglutarate. Thus, in contrast to the response to hypoxia, the effect of NGF on HIF-2 alpha protein levels is not mediated by the HIF hydroxilases. Quantitative real time (RT)-PCR showed that NGF stimulation results in a decrease of the HIF-2 alpha mRNA level similar to that found at the protein level. Interestingly, NGF effect was specific for HIF-2 alpha mRNA because it did not affect HIF-1 alpha mRNA levels. NGF treatment reduced HIF-2 alpha mRNA levels even in the presence of actinomycin D, suggesting an effect on mRNA stability. Finally, the effect of NGF on HIF2 alpha correlates with reduction of both basal and hypoxia-induced vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA levels. Reporter assays suggest that the reduced expression of hypoxia-inducible genes upon NGF treatment is related, at least in part, to the reduction of HIF-2 alpha protein. Hence, in PC12 cells the level of HIF-2 alpha protein and its effect on gene expression can be down-regulated by stimuli other than oxygen.

  1. Gut-derived endotoxin stimulates factor VIII secretion from endothelial cells. Implications for hypercoagulability in cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Carnevale, Roberto; Raparelli, Valeria; Nocella, Cristina; Bartimoccia, Simona; Novo, Marta; Severino, Anna; De Falco, Elena; Cammisotto, Vittoria; Pasquale, Chiara; Crescioli, Clara; Scavalli, Antonio Sili; Riggio, Oliviero; Basili, Stefania; Violi, Francesco

    2017-07-14

    Patients with cirrhosis display enhanced blood levels of factor VIII, which may result in harmful activation of the clotting system; however, the underlying mechanism is unknown. We performed a cross-sectional study in patients with cirrhosis (n=61) and matched controls (n=61) comparing blood levels of factor VIII, von Willebrand factor (vWf), lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and positivity for Escherichia coli DNA. Furthermore, we performed an in vitro study to investigate if LPS, in a concentration range similar to that found in the peripheral circulation of cirrhotic patients, was able to elicit factor VIII secretion from human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Patients with cirrhosis displayed higher serum levels of LPS (55.8 [42.2-79.9] vs. 23.0 [7.0-34.0]pg/ml, p<0.001), factor VIII (172.0 [130.0-278.0] vs. 39.0 [26.0-47.0]U/dl, p<0.0001), vWf (265.0 [185.0-366.0] vs. 57.0 [48.0-65.0]U/dl, p<0.001) and positivity for Escherichia coli DNA (88% vs. 3%, p<0.001, n=34) compared to controls. Serum LPS correlated significantly with factor VIII (r=0.80, p<0.001) and vWf (r=0.63, p<0.001). Only LPS (beta-coefficient=0.70, p<0.0001) independently predicted factor VIII levels. The in vitro study showed that LPS provoked factor VIII and vWf release from HUVEC via formation and secretion of Weibel-Palade bodies, a phenomenon blunted by pre-treating HUVEC with an inhibitor of Toll-like receptor 4. The study provides the first evidence that LPS derived from gut microbiota increases the systemic levels of factor VIII via stimulating its release by endothelial cells. Lay summary: Cirrhosis is associated with thrombosis in portal and systemic circulation. Enhanced levels of factor VIII have been suggested to play a role but the underlying mechanism is still unclear. Here we show that patients with cirrhosis display a concomitant increase of factor VIII and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Escherichia coli and suggest that LPS contributes to the release of factor VIII from

  2. Phosphorylation and Activation of RhoA by ERK in Response to Epidermal Growth Factor Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Junfeng; Li, Laiji; Ballermann, Barbara; Wang, Zhixiang

    2016-01-01

    The small GTPase RhoA has been implicated in various cellular activities, including the formation of stress fibers, cell motility, and cytokinesis. In addition to the canonical GTPase cycle, recent findings have suggested that phosphorylation further contributes to the tight regulation of Rho GTPases. Indeed, RhoA is phosphorylated on serine 188 (188S) by a number of protein kinases. We have recently reported that Rac1 is phosphorylated on threonine 108 (108T) by extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) in response to epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulation. Here, we provide evidence that RhoA is phosphorylated by ERK on 88S and 100T in response to EGF stimulation. We show that ERK interacts with RhoA and that this interaction is dependent on the ERK docking site (D-site) at the C-terminus of RhoA. EGF stimulation enhanced the activation of the endogenous RhoA. The phosphomimetic mutant, GFP-RhoA S88E/T100E, when transiently expressed in COS-7 cells, displayed higher GTP-binding than wild type RhoA. Moreover, the expression of GFP-RhoA S88E/T100E increased actin stress fiber formation in COS-7 cells, which is consistent with its higher activity. In contrast to Rac1, phosphorylation of RhoA by ERK does not target RhoA to the nucleus. Finally, we show that regardless of the phosphorylation status of RhoA and Rac1, substitution of the RhoA PBR with the Rac1 PBR targets RhoA to the nucleus and substitution of Rac1 PBR with RhoA PBR significantly reduces the nuclear localization of Rac1. In conclusion, ERK phosphorylates RhoA on 88S and 100T in response to EGF, which upregulates RhoA activity. PMID:26816343

  3. Mechanisms of amphibian macrophage development: characterization of the Xenopus laevis colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Grayfer, Leon; Edholm, Eva-Stina; Robert, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Macrophage-lineage cells are indispensable to vertebrate homeostasis and immunity. In turn, macrophage development is largely regulated through colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF1) binding to its cognate receptor (CSF1R). To study amphibian monopoiesis, we identified and characterized the X. laevis CSF1R cDNA transcript. Quantitative analysis revealed that CSF1R tissue gene expression increased with X. laevis development, with greatest transcript levels detected in the adult lung, spleen and liver tissues. Notably, considerable levels of CSF1R mRNA were also detected in the regressing tails of metamorphosing animals, suggesting macrophage involvement in this process, and in the adult bone marrow; corroborating the roles for this organ in Xenopus monopoiesis. Following animal infections with the ranavirus Frog Virus 3 (FV3), both tadpole and adult X. laevis exhibited increased kidney CSF1R gene expression. Conversely, while FV3-infected tadpoles increased their spleen and liver CSF1R mRNA levels, the FV3-challenged adults did not. Notably, FV3 induced elevated bone marrow CSF1R expression, and while stimulation of tadpoles with heat-killed E. coli had no transcriptional effects, bacterial stimulation of adult frogs resulted in significantly increased spleen, liver and bone marrow CSF1R expression. We produced the X. laevis CSF1R in recombinant form (rXlCSF1R) and determined, via in vitro cross-linking studies, that two molecules of rXlCSF1R bound the dimeric rXlCSF1. Finally, administration of rXlCSF1R abrogated the rXlCSF1-induced tadpole macrophage recruitment and differentiation as well as bacterial and FV3-elicited peritoneal leukocyte accumulation. This work marks a step towards garnering greater understanding of the unique mechanisms governing amphibian macrophage biology.

  4. The effect of diet on tumor necrosis factor stimulation of hepatic lipogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Feingold, K.R.; Soued, M.; Serio, M.K.; Adi, S.; Moser, A.H.; Grunfeld, C. )

    1990-06-01

    In this study, we determined the effects of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) on serum lipid levels and hepatic lipid synthesis in animals whose diets and feeding conditions were varied to induce changes in baseline serum lipid levels and/or rates of hepatic lipid synthesis. In animals studied at both the nadir and peak of the diurnal cycle of hepatic lipid synthesis, TNF acutely increases serum triglyceride levels, stimulates hepatic fatty acid synthesis, and increases the quantity of newly synthesized fatty acids found in the serum. Similarly, in animals ingesting either high-sucrose or cholesterol-enriched diets, TNF induces the characteristic rapid increase in serum triglyceride levels, hepatic fatty acid synthesis, and quantity of labeled fatty acids in the serum. In animals fed a diet high in triglycerides, using either corn oil or lard, TNF stimulates hepatic fatty acid synthesis and increases the quantity of newly synthesized fatty acids in the serum, but serum triglyceride levels do not change. However, TNF inhibits gastric emptying, which results in a marked decrease in fat absorption in TNF-treated animals. It is likely that a decrease in the dietary contribution to serum triglyceride levels during high-triglyceride feeding counterbalances the increased hepatic contribution induced by TNF treatment. In animals fasted before TNF administration there was no acute change in either serum lipid levels, hepatic fatty acid synthesis, or the quantity of labeled fatty acids in the serum. Thus, TNF stimulates hepatic fatty acid synthesis and increases serum triglyceride levels under many diverse dietary conditions, suggesting that there is a strong linkage between the immune system and lipid metabolism that is independent of most dietary manipulations and may be of fundamental importance in the body's response to infection.

  5. Modulation of cultured porcine granulosa cell responsiveness to follicle stimulating hormone and epidermal growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    Ovarian follicular development is dependent upon the coordinated growth and differentiation of the granulosa cells which line the follicle. Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) induces granulosa cell differentiation both in vivo and in vitro. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulates granulosa cell proliferation in vitro. The interaction of these two effectors upon selected parameters of growth and differentiation was examined in monolayer cultures of porcine granulose cells. Analysis of the EGF receptor by /sup 125/I-EGF binding revealed that the receptor was of high affinity with an apparent dissociation constant of 4-6 x 10/sup -10/ M. The average number of receptors per cell varied with the state of differentiation both in vivo and in vitro; highly differentiated cells bound two-fold less /sup 125/I-EGF and this effect was at least partially induced by FSH in vitro. EGF receptor function was examined by assessing EGF effects on cell number and /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation. EGF stimulated thymidine incorporation in both serum-free and serum-supplemented culture, but only in serum-supplemented conditions was cell number increased. EGF receptor function was inversely related to the state of differentiation and was attenuated by FSH. The FSH receptor was examined by /sup 125/I-FSH binding. EGF increased FSH receptor number, and lowered the affinity of the receptor. The function of these receptors was assessed by /sup 125/I-hCG binding and progesterone radioimmunoassay. If EGF was present continuously in the cultures. FSH receptor function was attenuated regardless of FSH receptor number. A preliminary effort to examine the mechanism of this interaction was performed by analyzing hormonally controlled protein synthesis with /sup 35/S-methionine labeling, SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography. FSH promoted the expression of a 27,000 dalton protein. This effect was attenuated by EGF.

  6. Perinatal factors associated with neonatal thyroid-stimulating hormone in normal newborns

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was to evaluate the effect of neonatal, maternal, and delivery factors on neonatal thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) of healthy newborns. Methods Medical records of 705 healthy infants born through normal vaginal delivery were reviewed. Neonatal TSH levels obtained by neonatal screening tests were analyzed in relation to perinatal factors and any associations with free thyroxine (FT4) and 17-α hydroxyprogesterone (17OHP) levels. Results An inverse relationship was found between TSH and sampling time after birth. Twin babies and neonates born by vacuum-assisted delivery had higher TSH levels than controls. First babies had higher TSH levels than subsequent babies. Birth weight, gestational age, maternal age and duration from the rupture of the membrane to birth were not related to neonatal TSH. There were no significant differences in TSH level according to sex, Apgar scores, labor induction, the presence of maternal disease and maternal medications. There was a positive association between TSH and 17OHP level but not between TSH and FT4 level. Multiple linear regression analyses showed that sampling time, mode of delivery, birth order, and 17OHP level were significant factors affecting neonatal TSH level. Conclusion Neonatal TSH levels of healthy normal newborns are related with multiple factors. Acute stress during delivery may influence the neonatal TSH level in early neonatal period. PMID:28164073

  7. Vascular endothelial growth factor stimulates osteoblastic differentiation of cultured human periosteal-derived cells expressing vascular endothelial growth factor receptors.

    PubMed

    Hah, Young-Sool; Jun, Jin-Su; Lee, Seong-Gyun; Park, Bong-Wook; Kim, Deok Ryong; Kim, Uk-Kyu; Kim, Jong-Ryoul; Byun, June-Ho

    2011-02-01

    Angiogenesis plays an important role in bone development and postnatal bone fracture repair. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFRs) are primarily involved in angiogenesis. This study investigated the expression of VEGF isoforms, VEGFR-1, and VEGFR-2 during the osteoblastic differentiation of cultured human periosteal-derived cells. In addition, the effect of exogenous VEGF on the osteoblastic differentiation of cultured human periosteal-derived cells was also examined. The expression of the VEGF isoforms (VEGF(121), VEGF(165), VEGF(189), and VEGF(206)), VEGFR-1, and VEGFR-2 was observed in the periosteal-derived cells. Administration of KRN633, a VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2 inhibitor, decreased the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity during the osteoblastic differentiation of cultured human periosteal-derived cells. However, the administration of VEGFR2 Kinase Inhibitor IV, a VEGFR-2 inhibitor, did not affect the ALP activity. The addition of recombinant human VEGF(165) elevated the ALP activity and increased the calcium content in the periosteal-derived cells. Treating the periosteal-derived cells with recombinant human VEGF(165) resulted in an increase in Runx2 transactivation in the periosteal-derived cells. These results suggest that exogenous VEGF stimulates the osteoblastic differentiation of cultured human periosteal-derived cells and VEGF might act as an autocrine growth factor for the osteoblastic differentiation of cultured human periosteal-derived cells.

  8. Design of Recombinant Stem Cell Factor macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor Fusion Proteins and their Biological Activity In Vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tao; Yang, Jie; Wang, Yuelang; Zhan, Chenyang; Zang, Yuhui; Qin, Junchuan

    2005-05-01

    Stem cell factor (SCF) and macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) can act in synergistic way to promote the growth of mononuclear phagocytes. SCF-M-CSF fusion proteins were designed on the computer using the Homology and Biopolymer modules of the software packages InsightII. Several existing crystal structures were used as templates to generate models of the complexes of receptor with fusion protein. The structure rationality of the fusion protein incorporated a series of flexible linker peptide was analyzed on InsightII system. Then, a suitable peptide GGGGSGGGGSGG was chosen for the fusion protein. Two recombinant SCF-M-CSF fusion proteins were generated by construction of a plasmid in which the coding regions of human SCF (1-165aa) and M-CSF (1-149aa) cDNA were connected by this linker peptide coding sequence followed by subsequent expression in insect cell. The results of Western blot and activity analysis showed that these two recombinant fusion proteins existed as a dimer with a molecular weight of 84 KD under non-reducing conditions and a monomer of 42 KD at reducing condition. The results of cell proliferation assays showed that each fusion protein induced a dose-dependent proliferative response. At equimolar concentration, SCF/M-CSF was about 20 times more potent than the standard monomeric SCF in stimulating TF-1 cell line growth, while M-CSF/SCF was 10 times of monomeric SCF. No activity difference of M-CSF/SCF or SCF/M-CSF to M-CSF (at same molar) was found in stimulating the HL-60 cell linear growth. The synergistic effect of SCF and M-CSF moieties in the fusion proteins was demonstrated by the result of clonogenic assay performed with human bone mononuclear, in which both SCF/M-CSF and M-CSF/SCF induced much higher number of CFU-M than equimolar amount of SCF or M-CSF or that of two cytokines mixture.

  9. Insulin-like growth factor-1 stimulates regulatory T cells and suppresses autoimmune disease

    PubMed Central

    Bilbao, Daniel; Luciani, Luisa; Johannesson, Bjarki; Piszczek, Agnieszka; Rosenthal, Nadia

    2014-01-01

    The recent precipitous rise in autoimmune diseases is placing an increasing clinical and economic burden on health systems worldwide. Current therapies are only moderately efficacious, often coupled with adverse side effects. Here, we show that recombinant human insulin-like growth factor-1 (rhIGF-1) stimulates proliferation of both human and mouse regulatory T (Treg) cells in vitro and when delivered systemically via continuous minipump, it halts autoimmune disease progression in mouse models of type 1 diabetes (STZ and NOD) and multiple sclerosis (EAE) in vivo. rhIGF-1 administration increased Treg cells in affected tissues, maintaining their suppressive properties. Genetically, ablation of the IGF-1 receptor specifically on Treg cell populations abrogated the beneficial effects of rhIGF-1 administration on the progression of multiple sclerotic symptoms in the EAE model, establishing a direct effect of IGF-1 on Treg cell proliferation. These results establish systemically delivered rhIGF-1 as a specific, effective stimulator of Treg cell action, underscoring the clinical feasibility of manipulating natural tolerance mechanisms to suppress autoimmune disease. PMID:25339185

  10. Processing of newly synthesized cachectin/tumor necrosis factor in endotoxin-stimulate macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Jue, Dae-Myung; Sherry, B.; Luedke, C.; Manogue, K.R.; Cerami, A. )

    1990-09-11

    The biosynthesis and processing of cachetin/tumor necrosis factor (TNF) were examined in the murine macrophage-like cell line RAW 264.7. Lipipolysaccharide-stimulated cells secreted both glycosylated and nonglycosylated 17-kilodalton (kDa) mature cachectin/TNF into the culture medium. Secreted cachectin/TNF was derived from membrane-associated precursors that were precipitated by polyclonal antisera raised against either the mature protein or synthetic peptide fragments of the 79 amino acid cachectin/TNF prohormone sequence. About half of the precursors were N-glycosylated, apparently cotranslationally. The cachectin/TNF precursors were then proteolytically cleaved to release soluble mature cytokine into the medium, while the membrane-bound 14-kDa prosequence remained cell associated. During the period of LPS stimulation, the amount of macrophage cell surface cachectin/TNF remained at a low level, suggesting that both nonglycosylated and glycosylated precursors of cachectin/TNF are efficiently cleaved by these cells. These findings suggest the presence of a unique mechanism for the secretion of cachectin/TNF.

  11. Requirement of Src kinase Lyn for induction of DNA synthesis by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Corey, S J; Dombrosky-Ferlan, P M; Zuo, S; Krohn, E; Donnenberg, A D; Zorich, P; Romero, G; Takata, M; Kurosaki, T

    1998-02-06

    Treatment of cells with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) leads to tyrosine phosphorylation of cellular proteins. G-CSF stimulates both the activation of protein tyrosine kinases Lyn, Jak1, and Jak2 and the association of these enzymes with the G-CSF receptor. Wild-type, lyn-deficient, and syk-deficient chicken B lymphocyte cell lines were transfected with the human G-CSF receptor, and stable transfectants were studied. G-CSF-dependent tyrosyl phosphorylation of Jak1 and Jak2 occurred in all three cell lines. Wild-type and syk-deficient transfectants responded to G-CSF in a dose-responsive fashion with increased thymidine incorporation, but none of the clones of lyn-deficient transfectants did. Ectopic expression of Lyn, but not that of c-Src, in the lyn-deficient cells restored their mitogenic responsiveness to G-CSF. Ectopic expression in wild-type cells of the kinase-inactive form of Lyn, but not of the kinase-inactive form of Jak2, inhibited thymidine incorporation in response to G-CSF. These studies show that the absence of Lyn results in the loss of mitogenic signaling in the G-CSF signaling pathway and that activation of Jak1 or Jak2 is not sufficient to cause mitogenesis.

  12. Role of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) in human granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Song; Zhang, Zhifen; Xia, Li-Xia; Huang, Jian

    2016-12-01

    Macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) has been proved to have a positive role in the follicular development. We investigated its effect on human granulosa cells and found that M-CSF could stimulate the production of E2. The production of FSH receptors was enhanced by M-CSF in vitro in a dose-dependent manner with or without the addition of tamoxifen (p <0.05). Correspondingly, FSH was also able to coordinate the expression of M-CSF and its receptor (p <0.05). That maybe important to maintain the level of Nppc and the meiotic arrest of the oocyte. The protein p-JAK2 and p-STAT3 in JAK/STAT-signaling pathway elevated after the influence of M-CSF (p < 0.05). These results suggest that M-CSF has a role in regulating the response of granulosa cells to gonadotropins. Its function is associated with JAK/STAT-signaling pathway.

  13. Hematologic improvement in dogs with parvovirus infection treated with recombinant canine granulocyte-colony stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Duffy, A; Dow, S; Ogilvie, G; Rao, S; Hackett, T

    2010-08-01

    Previously, dogs with canine parvovirus-induced neutropenia have not responded to treatment with recombinant human granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (rhG-CSF). However, recombinant canine G-CSF (rcG-CSF) has not been previously evaluated for treatment of parvovirus-induced neutropenia in dogs. We assessed the effectiveness of rcG-CSF in dogs with parvovirus-induced neutropenia with a prospective, open-label, nonrandomized clinical trial. Endpoints of our study were time to recovery of WBC and neutrophil counts, and duration of hospitalization. 28 dogs with parvovirus and neutropenia were treated with rcG-CSF and outcomes were compared to those of 34 dogs with parvovirus and neutropenia not treated with rcG-CSF. We found that mean WBC and neutrophil counts were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in the 28 dogs treated with rcG-CSF compared to disease-matched dogs not treated with rcG-CSF. In addition, the mean duration of hospitalization was reduced (P = 0.01) in rcG-CSF treated dogs compared to untreated dogs. However, survival times were decreased in dogs treated with rcG-CSF compared to untreated dogs. These results suggest that treatment with rcG-CSF was effective in stimulating neutrophil recovery and shortening the duration of hospitalization in dogs with parvovirus infection, but indicate the need for additional studies to evaluate overall safety of the treatment.

  14. Cyclic mechanical deformation stimulates human lung fibroblast proliferation and autocrine growth factor activity.

    PubMed

    Bishop, J E; Mitchell, J J; Absher, P M; Baldor, L; Geller, H A; Woodcock-Mitchell, J; Hamblin, M J; Vacek, P; Low, R B

    1993-08-01

    Cellular hypertrophy and hyperplasia and increased extracellular matrix deposition are features of tissue hypertrophy resulting from increased work load. It is known, for example, that mechanical forces play a critical role in lung development, cardiovascular remodeling following pressure overload, and skeletal muscle growth. The mechanisms involved in these processes, however, remain unclear. Here we examined the effect of mechanical deformation on fibroblast function in vitro. IMR-90 human fetal lung fibroblasts grown on collagen-coated silastic membranes were subjected to cyclical mechanical deformation (10% increase in culture surface area; 1 Hz) for up to 5 days. Cell number was increased by 39% after 2 days of deformation (1.43 +/- .01 x 10(5) cells/membrane compared with control, 1.03 +/- 0.02 x 10(5) cells; mean +/- SEM; P < 0.02) increasing to 163% above control by 4 days (2.16 +/- 0.16 x 10(5) cells compared with 0.82 +/- 0.03 x 10(5) cells; P < 0.001). The medium from mechanically deformed cells was mitogenic for IMR-90 cells, with maximal activity in the medium from cells mechanically deformed for 2 days (stimulating cell replication by 35% compared with media control; P < 0.002). These data suggest that mechanical deformation stimulates human lung fibroblast replication and that this effect is mediated by the release of autocrine growth factors.

  15. Insulin-like growth factor I stimulates erythropoiesis in hypophysectomized rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, A.; Zapf, J.; Eckardt, K.U.; Clemons, G.; Froesch, E.R.; Bauer, C. )

    1988-10-01

    Stimulation of erythropoiesis during growth is necessary to ensure proportionality between erythrocyte mass and body mass. However, the way by which erythrocyte formation is adapted to body growth is still unknown. Growth arrest in hypophysectomized rats is accompanied by decreased erythropoiesis. The authors have, therefore, examined whether insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), the mediator of growth hormone effects on body growth, is able to restore erythropoiesis in these animals. Subcutaneous infusions of 120 {mu}g of recombinant human IGF-I per day in hypophysectomized rats led to increases in body weight, {sup 59}Fe incorporation into erythrocytes, and the number of reticulocytes that were similar to increases caused by infusions of 28 milliunits of human growth hormone per day. Body weight gain and {sup 59}Fe incorporation were linearly correlated. Like growth hormone, IGF-I also caused a significant rise in serum erythropoietin concentrations. However, the stimulatory effect on erythropoiesis occurred before serum erythropoietin levels had risen. These results demonstrate that IGF-I mediates the stimulatory effect of growth hormone on erythropoiesis in vivo and thus further support the somatomedin concept. They also show that IGF-I can stimulate erythropoiesis in an endocrine manner, and they suggest two possible routes of action: a direct one and an indirect one by means of enhanced erythropoietin production.

  16. Inhibitory effect of trichothecene mycotoxins on bovine platelets stimulated by platelet activating factor.

    PubMed Central

    Gentry, P A; Ross, M L; Bondy, G S

    1987-01-01

    Several species of fungi, which infect cereals and grains, can produce a class of compounds, known as trichothecene mycotoxins, which is characterized by a substituted epoxy-trichothecene ring structure. Cattle are susceptible to intoxication from feeds contaminated with T-2 toxin, one of the more potent trichothecene mycotoxins, while swine refuse to ingest feed contaminated with T-2 toxin. The bovine platelet has been used as a model cell system to evaluate the effects of T-2 toxin and its natural metabolites, HT-2 toxin and T-2 tetraol, on cell function in vitro. Due to the lipophilic nature of these mycotoxins, a biologically active phospholipid was used to stimulate the platelets in the presence and absence of the toxins. The mycotoxin T-2 toxin and its major metabolite HT-2 toxin inhibited platelet activating factor-stimulated bovine platelets, suspended in homologous plasma, in a concentration but not time dependent manner. Significant inhibition of platelet function (p less than 0.01) occurred with 135 ng T-2 toxin per 10(6) platelets and with 77 ng HT-2 toxin per 10(6) platelets. These mycotoxins exerted an additive inhibitory effect on the platelet aggregation response. In contrast, the minor metabolite T-2 tetraol had no inhibitory effect on platelet function and had no influence on the responses of T-2 toxin or HT-2 toxin when the mycotoxins were present together in the platelet suspensions.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3453270

  17. In vitro modulation of canine polymorphonuclear leukocyte function by granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    D'Alesandro, M M; Gruber, D F; O'Halloran, K P; MacVittie, T J

    1991-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GMCSF) promotes the growth of granulocytes and macrophages from undifferentiated bone marrow cells and modulates the oxidative responses of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) to endogenous chemoattractants. We found that, in vitro, naturally occurring glycolsylated human GMCSF does not disturb the resting canine PMN membrane potential, may attentuate PMN oxidative responses to PMA, and is, to a small degree, chemotaxigenic. GMCSF, however, inhibits PMN chemotaxis to zymosan-activated plasma (ZAP). Compared to temperature controls, GMCSF (1-100 U/ml) produced up to 1.5-fold increases in H2O2 production after 15 minutes, while phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) treated cells increased H2O2 production 8-12-fold after 15 minutes. Preincubation of cells with GMCSF (1-100 U/ml) prior to PMA stimulation significantly reduced the H2O2 levels induced by PMA. H2O2 production was inhibited up to 15% after 15 minutes of GMCSF preincubation and up to 40% after 60 minutes of preincubation. As a chemotaxigenic agent, GMCSF (10-1000 U/ml) was able to elicit 49%-102% increases in quantitative cellular migration, compared to random migration. Total cellular chemotaxis to GMCSF was less than 30% of the response to ZAP. Preincubation of PMNs with GMCSF for 15 minutes significantly inhibited ZAP-induced cellular migration. Human GMCSF does not appear to activate canine PMN in vitro and may actually down-regulate PMN inflammatory responses.

  18. Molecular cloning and in vivo evaluation of canine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Nash, R A; Schuening, F; Appelbaum, F; Hammond, W P; Boone, T; Morris, C F; Slichter, S J; Storb, R

    1991-08-15

    Canine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (caGM-CSF) was cloned and expressed to allow further investigation of GM-CSF in a large animal model. The cDNA is 850 base pairs (bp) long and encodes a peptide of 144 amino acids. The nucleotide and amino acid sequence homology between caGM-CSF and human GM-CSF (hGM-CSF) is 80% and 70%, respectively. A mammalian expression vector pCMV/CAGM was constructed and used to transfect COS cells for expression of caGM-CSF. Supernatant from transfected COS cells enriched with caGM-CSF was shown to have significant stimulating activity in granulocyte-macrophage colony forming unit (CFU-GM) assays of canine marrow. caGM-CSF, expressed from bacteria, was used to treat seven dogs at varying doses twice daily subcutaneously (sc) for 14 to 16 days. Circulating blood neutrophils and monocytes increased significantly. The increase in circulating eosinophils was variable. Thrombocytopenia developed during administration of caGM-CSF but corrected rapidly after cessation of treatment. Evaluation of survival times of 51Cr-labeled autologous platelets suggested increased consumption as the primary reason for thrombocytopenia. A species-specific GM-CSF will be a useful tool for hematologic or immunologic studies in dogs.

  19. Molecular cloning and expression of woodchuck granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Wu, H L; Chen, P J; Lin, H K; Lee, R S; Lin, H L; Liu, C J; Lee, P J; Lee, J J; Chen, D S

    2001-11-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has immunoregulatory and antiviral effects, and may thus be promising for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B. Using woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV)-infected woodchuck as an animal model to test the efficacy and safety of GM-CSF on the therapy of chronic hepatitis B, woodchuck GM-CSF will be required due to the apparent species-specific activity of GM-CSF. The cDNA of woodchuck GM-CSF was cloned using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with primers deriving from highly conserved regions of GM-CSF genes from other species. The deduced amino acids, including the signal peptide, is 138 in length and its identities to human, murine, canine and bovine GM-CSFs are 63, 49, 63, and 63% respectively. The genomic DNA of woodchuck GM-CSF was also cloned by PCR. Its organization is highly homologous to that of human and murine GM-CSF genes, consisting of four exons and three introns. Cloned woodchuck GM-CSF was expressed transiently in 293T cells. The recombinant protein expressed was found to stimulate the growth and differentiation of woodchuck bone marrow cells, indicating the protein expressed by the cloned gene is functional. These results pave the way for future studies on the potential role of GM-CSF for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B by using this animal model. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. [Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), preclinical and phase I clinical investigations].

    PubMed

    Shen, B; Yang, Z; Xu, J

    1996-09-01

    To conduct preclinical studies and phase I trial of the recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF). Pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetic and toxicology of the rhGM-CSF were studied in animal models, and the safety was also evaluated in humans. The human bone marrow cells could be stimulated by purified rhGM-CSF to form multilineage colonies (CFU-GM and BFU-E). The rhGM-CSF administered for 7 days to Beagle dogs and monkeys subjected to 60Co r-ray irradiation was shown to induce both rapid and sustained increase in circulating leukocyte counts. Toxicology testing showed that the LD50 (i.v) was over 5000 micrograms/kg, and LD50 (i.p) over 10000 micrograms/kg in mice. Administration of the rhGM-CSF in excess of four times as much as clinical dosages was not associated with severe chronic toxicities. Most injected rhGM-CSF was excreted from urine, and did not accumulate in the body. In the phase I clinical trial, injecting 2.5-7.5 micrograms/day of rhGM-CSF was safe. It is effective and safe to use rhGM-CSF in the treatment of leukocytopenia.

  1. The contribution of interindividual factors to variability of response in transcranial direct current stimulation studies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lucia M.; Uehara, Kazumasa; Hanakawa, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    There has been an explosion of research using transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) for investigating and modulating human cognitive and motor function in healthy populations. It has also been used in many studies seeking to improve deficits in disease populations. With the slew of studies reporting “promising results” for everything from motor recovery after stroke to boosting memory function, one could be easily seduced by the idea of tDCS being the next panacea for all neurological ills. However, huge variability exists in the reported effects of tDCS, with great variability in the effect sizes and even contradictory results reported. In this review, we consider the interindividual factors that may contribute to this variability. In particular, we discuss the importance of baseline neuronal state and features, anatomy, age and the inherent variability in the injured brain. We additionally consider how interindividual variability affects the results of motor-evoked potential (MEP) testing with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), which, in turn, can lead to apparent variability in response to tDCS in motor studies. PMID:26029052

  2. Functional heterogeneity of colony-stimulating factor-induced human monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Akagawa, Kiyoko S; Komuro, Iwao; Kanazawa, Hiroko; Yamazaki, Toshio; Mochida, Keiko; Kishi, Fumio

    2006-01-01

    Macrophages (Mphis) have various functions and play a critical role in host defense and the maintenance of homeostasis. Mphis exist in every tissue in the body, but Mphis from different tissues exhibit a wide range of phenotypes with regard to their morphology, cell surface antigen expression and function, and are called by different names. However, the precise mechanism of the generation of macrophage heterogeneity is not known. In the present study, the authors examined the functional heterogeneity of Mphis generated from human monocytes under the influence of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and macrophage-CSF (M-CSF). CD14 positive human monocytes (Mos) were incubated with M-CSF and GM-CSF for 6-7 days to stimulate the generation of M-CSF-induced monocyte-derived Mphis (M-Mphis) and GM-CSF-induced monocyte-derived Mphis (GM-Mphis), respectively. The expression of cell surface antigens and several functions such as antigen presenting cell activity, susceptibility to oxidant stress, and the susceptibility to HIV-1 and mycobacterium tuberculosis infection were examined. GM-Mphis and M-Mphis are distinct in their morphology, cell surface antigen expression, and functions examined. The phenotype of GM-Mphis closely resembles that of human Alveolar-Mphis (A-Mphis), indicating that CSF-induced human monocyte-derived Mphis are useful to clarify the molecular mechanism of heterogeneity of human Mphis, and GM-Mphis will become a model of human A-Mphis.

  3. Allograft inflammatory factor-1 stimulates chemokine production and induces chemotaxis in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Kadoya, Masatoshi; Yamamoto, Aihiro; Hamaguchi, Masahide; Obayashi, Hiroshi; Mizushima, Katsura; Ohta, Mitsuhiro; Seno, Takahiro; Oda, Ryo; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Kohno, Masataka; Kawahito, Yutaka

    2014-06-06

    Allograft inflammatory factor-1 (AIF-1) is expressed by macrophages, fibroblasts, endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells in immune-inflammatory disorders such as systemic sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis and several vasculopathies. However, its molecular function is not fully understood. In this study, we examined gene expression profiles and induction of chemokines in monocytes treated with recombinant human AIF (rhAIF-1). Using the high-density oligonucleotide microarray technique, we compared mRNA expression profiles of rhAIF-1-stimulated CD14(+) peripheral blood mononuclear cells (CD14(+) PBMCs) derived from healthy volunteers. We demonstrated upregulation of genes for several CC chemokines such as CCL1, CCL2, CCL3, CCL7, and CCL20. Next, using ELISAs, we confirmed that rhAIF-1 promoted the secretion of CCL3/MIP-1α and IL-6 by CD14(+) PBMCs, whereas only small amounts of CCL1, CCL2/MCP-1, CCL7/MCP-3 and CCL20/MIP-3α were secreted. Conditioned media from rhAIF-1stimulated CD14(+) PBMCs resulted in migration of PBMCs. These findings suggest that AIF-1, which induced chemokines and enhanced chemotaxis of monocytes, may represent a molecular target for the therapy of immune-inflammatory disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma upregulated factor serves as adjuvant by activating dendritic cells through stimulation of TLR4

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Benjamin; Lee, Je-Jung; Lee, Hyun-Ju; Lee, Jaemin; Jung, In Duk; Han, Hee Dong; Lee, Seung-Hyun; Koh, Sang Seok; Wu, T.-C.; Park, Yeong-Min

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) based cancer vaccines represent a promising immunotherapeutic strategy against cancer. To enhance the modest immunogenicity of DC vaccines, various adjuvants are often incorporated. Particularly, most of the common adjuvants are derived from bacteria. In the current study, we evaluate the use of a human pancreatic cancer derived protein, pancreatic adenocarcinoma upregulated factor (PAUF), as a novel DC vaccine adjuvant. We show that PAUF can induce activation and maturation of DCs and activate NFkB by stimulating the Toll-like receptor signaling pathway. Furthermore, vaccination with PAUF treated DCs pulsed with E7 or OVA peptides leads to generation of E7 or OVA-specific CD8+ T cells and memory T cells, which correlate with long term tumor protection and antitumor effects against TC-1 and EG.7 tumors in mice. Finally, we demonstrated that PAUF mediated DC activation and immune stimulation are dependent on TLR4. Our data provides evidence supporting PAUF as a promising adjuvant for DC based therapies, which can be applied in conjunction with other cancer therapies. Most importantly, our results serve as a reference for future investigation of human based adjuvants. PMID:26336989

  5. Transcriptional mechanisms that control expression of the macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor locus.

    PubMed

    Rojo, Rocio; Pridans, Clare; Langlais, David; Hume, David A

    2017-08-15

    The proliferation, differentiation, and survival of cells of the macrophage lineage depends upon signals from the macrophage colony-stimulating factor (CSF) receptor (CSF1R). CSF1R is expressed by embryonic macrophages and induced early in adult hematopoiesis, upon commitment of multipotent progenitors to the myeloid lineage. Transcriptional activation of CSF1R requires interaction between members of the E26 transformation-specific family of transcription factors (Ets) (notably PU.1), C/EBP, RUNX, AP-1/ATF, interferon regulatory factor (IRF), STAT, KLF, REL, FUS/TLS (fused in sarcoma/ranslocated in liposarcoma) families, and conserved regulatory elements within the mouse and human CSF1R locus. One element, the Fms-intronic regulatory element (FIRE), within intron 2, is conserved functionally across all the amniotes. Lineage commitment in multipotent progenitors also requires down-regulation of specific transcription factors such as MYB, FLI1, basic leucine zipper transcriptional factor ATF-like (BATF3), GATA-1, and PAX5 that contribute to differentiation of alternative lineages and repress CSF1R transcription. Many of these transcription factors regulate each other, interact at the protein level, and are themselves downstream targets of CSF1R signaling. Control of CSF1R transcription involves feed-forward and feedback signaling in which CSF1R is both a target and a participant; and dysregulation of CSF1R expression and/or function is associated with numerous pathological conditions. In this review, we describe the regulatory network behind CSF1R expression during differentiation and development of cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  6. Factor structure of the human gamma band oscillatory response to visual (contrast) stimulation.

    PubMed

    Carozzo, Simone; De Carli, Fabrizio; Beelke, Manolo; Saturno, Moreno; Garbarino, Sergio; Martello, Cristina; Sannita, Walter G

    2004-07-01

    Visual contrast stimulation evokes in man an oscillatory mass response at approximately 20.0-35.0 Hz, consistent with stimulus-dependent synchronous oscillations in multiunit animal recordings from visual cortex, but shorter in duration and phase-locked to stimulus. A factor analysis was applied to characterize the signal structure under stimulus conditions inducing an oscillatory response and to identify possible subcomponents in normal volunteers. Contrast stimuli were gratings with a sinusoidal luminance profile (9.0 degrees; 5.0 cycle/degree; 80% contrast; reversal 1.06 Hz). The amplitude spectrum of the signal was computed by Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT) and the oscillatory response was separated from the corresponding visually evoked potential (VEP) by DFT high-pass filter at 19.0 Hz. Nine consecutive waves were identified in all subjects (60 volunteers), with amplitudes/latencies consistent with normative studies. A factor analysis was computed 1- in the frequency domain, on the amplitude values of the signal components (2 Hz resolution), and 2- in the time domain, on the latencies/amplitudes of the averaged VEP and oscillatory responses. (1) Two non-overlapping factors accounted for the approximately 2-20.0 and approximately 20.0-40.0 Hz signal components, with separation of the approximately 20.0-35.0 Hz oscillatory response from low frequency VEPs. (2) Two factors on latencies and one factor on amplitudes (independent of each other and from those of VEPs) accounted for the average approximately 20.0-35.0 Hz oscillatory response. The factor structure further indicates an oscillatory structure and some independence from conventional VEPs of the human oscillatory response to contrast, with a separation between the oscillatory response early and late waves possibly reflecting functional differences.

  7. The hematopoietic factor GM-CSF (granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor) promotes neuronal differentiation of adult neural stem cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Carola; Laage, Rico; Pitzer, Claudia; Schäbitz, Wolf-Rüdiger; Schneider, Armin

    2007-10-22

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a hematopoietic growth factor involved in the generation of granulocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells from hematopoietic progenitor cells. We have recently demonstrated that GM-CSF has anti-apoptotic functions on neurons, and is neuroprotective in animal stroke models. The GM-CSF receptor alpha is expressed on adult neural stem cells in the rodent brain, and in culture. Addition of GM-CSF to NSCs in vitro increased neuronal differentiation in a dose-dependent manner as determined by quantitative PCR, reporter gene assays, and FACS analysis. Similar to the hematopoietic factor Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), GM-CSF stimulates neuronal differentiation of adult NSCs. These data highlight the astonishingly similar functions of major hematopoietic factors in the brain, and raise the clinical attractiveness of GM-CSF as a novel drug for neurological disorders.

  8. Nicotine Stimulates Nerve Growth Factor in Lung Fibroblasts through an NFκB-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Wongtrakool, Cherry; Grooms, Kora; Bijli, Kaiser M.; Crothers, Kristina; Fitzpatrick, Anne M.; Hart, C. Michael

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) is classically found in asthma, and persistent AHR is associated with poor asthma control. Although airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells play a critical pathophysiologic role in AHR, the paracrine contributions of surrounding cells such as fibroblasts to the contractile phenotype of ASM cells have not been examined fully. This study addresses the hypothesis that nicotine promotes a contractile ASM cell phenotype by stimulating fibroblasts to increase nerve growth factor (NGF) secretion into the environment. Methods Primary lung fibroblasts isolated from wild type and α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAChR) deficient mice were treated with nicotine (50 µg/ml) in vitro for 72 hours. NGF levels were measured in culture media and in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid from asthmatic, smoking and non-smoking subjects by ELISA. The role of the NFκB pathway in nicotine-induced NGF expression was investigated by measuring NFκB nuclear translocation, transcriptional activity, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, and si-p65 NFκB knockdown. The ability of nicotine to stimulate a fibroblast-mediated, contractile ASM cell phenotype was confirmed by examining expression of contractile proteins in ASM cells cultured with fibroblast-conditioned media or BAL fluid. Results NGF levels were elevated in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of nicotine-exposed mice, current smokers, and asthmatic children. Nicotine increased NGF secretion in lung fibroblasts in vitro in a dose-dependent manner and stimulated NFκB nuclear translocation, p65 binding to the NGF promoter, and NFκB transcriptional activity. These responses were attenuated in α7 nAChR deficient fibroblasts and in wild type fibroblasts following NFκB inhibition. Nicotine-treated, fibroblast-conditioned media increased expression of contractile proteins in ASM cells. Conclusion Nicotine stimulates NGF release by lung fibroblasts through α7 nAChR and NFκB dependent pathways

  9. Circulating macrophage colony-stimulating factor is not reduced in malignant osteopetrosis.

    PubMed

    Orchard, P J; Dahl, N; Aukerman, S L; Blazar, B R; Key, L L

    1992-01-01

    Malignant osteopetrosis is a disorder characterized by a deficiency in osteoclast number or function. In one animal model of osteopetrosis, the op/op mouse, macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) is absent, and the administration of M-CSF corrects the defects. We evaluated the serum of 13 patients with malignant osteopetrosis by an M-CSF radioimmunoassay to determine if a quantitative M-CSF deficiency existed in these patients. All patients had M-CSF present in levels equal to or higher than control serum. In addition, serum from 6 osteopetrotic patients was tested in a bioassay to determine if the M-CSF present is biologically active, and in all cases there was demonstrable activity in these samples. We provide evidence that deficiency of circulating M-CSF is unlikely to be a major contributor to the etiologic basis for the majority of children with malignant osteopetrosis.

  10. Treatment of clozapine- and molindone-induced agranulocytosis with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Geibig, C B; Marks, L W

    1993-10-01

    To report a case of clozapine- and molindone-induced agranulocytosis and to discuss treatment using filgrastim, a granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. A 64-year-old woman who had been on long-term clozapine therapy for schizophrenia was hospitalized with presumed drug-induced agranulocytosis. She had also been on short-term molindone therapy. A bone marrow biopsy and the initial white blood cell (WBC) count were consistent with drug-induced agranulocytosis. Following seven days of treatment with subcutaneous filgrastim 300 micrograms/d, her absolute neutrophil count was above 500 x 10(6)/L. Reports in the literature discussing antipsychotic drug-induced agranulocytosis are reviewed. A relationship between treatment with filgrastim and WBC response is postulated. Filgrastim may be useful in ameliorating the effects of clozapine- and molindone-induced agranulocytosis.

  11. Functional heterogeneity of colony-stimulating factor-induced human monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Akagawa, Kiyoko S

    2002-07-01

    Macrophages have various functions and play a critical role in host defense and the maintenance of homeostasis. However, macrophages are heterogeneous and exhibit a wide range of phenotypes with regard to their morphology, cell surface antigen expression, and function. When blood monocytes are cultured in medium alone in vitro, monocytes die, and colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) such as macrophage (M)-CSF or granulocyte-macrophage (GM)-CSF are necessary for their survival and differentiation into macrophages. However, M-CSF-induced monocyte-derived macrophages (M-Mphi) and GM-CSF-induced monocyte-derived macrophages (GM-Mphi) are distinct in their morphology, cell surface antigen expression, and functions, including Fcgamma receptor mediated-phagocytosis, H2O2 production, H2O2 sensitivity, catalase activity, susceptibility to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and suppressor activity. The characteristics of GM-Mphi resemble those of human alveolar macrophages.

  12. Expression and purification of canine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (cG-CSF).

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Akira; Iwata, Akira; Saito, Toshiki; Watanabe, Fumiko; Ueda, Susumu

    2009-08-15

    Canine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (cG-CSF) with modification of cysteine at position 17 to serine was expressed in Brevibacillus choshinensis HPD31. cG-CSF secreted into the culture medium was purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation and consecutive column chromatography, using butyl sepharose and DEAE sepharose. Biological activity of the recombinant cG-CSF was 8.0 x 10(6) U/mg protein, as determined by its stimulatory effect on NFS-60 cell proliferation. Purified cG-CSF was subcutaneously administered once a day for two successive days to dogs (1, 5, 25, or 125 microg). Neutrophil count increased the following day in all dogs except those administered the lowest dose (1 microg). No severe side effects were observed in dogs after administration of cG-CSF.

  13. Autopsy of anaplastic carcinoma of the pancreas producing granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Haruna; Eguchi, Noriaki; Sumimoto, Kyoku; Matsumoto, Kenta; Azakami, Takahiro; Sumida, Tomonori; Tamura, Tadamasa; Sumii, Masaharu; Uraoka, Naohiro; Shimamoto, Fumio

    2016-08-01

    A 50-year-old man presented to a nearby hospital with high fever and anorexia. An abdominal tumor was detected, and he was referred to our hospital. A pancreatic tumor was detected by computed tomography and abdominal ultrasonography. He had high fever, leukocytosis, and high serum granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). We performed a tumor biopsy and histological examination revealed anaplastic carcinoma of the pancreas. Based on the diagnosis, we initiated chemotherapy using gemcitabine plus S-1. However, the tumor rapidly progressed and he deteriorated and died 123 days after admission. As immunohistochemical study showed positive staining for G-CSF in the tumor cell, we diagnosed the tumor producing G-CSF during autopsy. Anaplastic carcinoma of the pancreas producing G-CSF is very rare, with 10 cases, including ours, reported in the literature.

  14. Recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor as treatment for chronic leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Borbolla-Escoboza, J R; María-Aceves, R; López-Hernández, M A; Collados-Larumbe, M T

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a single subcutaneous perilesional administration of 300 micrograms of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (rHGM-CSF) for the treatment of chronic leg ulcers. Prospective, descriptive evaluation in an outpatient group. The Centro Médico Nacional 20 de Noviembre, ISSSTE, Mexico City. 10 patients with chronic leg ulcers. Ulcer diameter and side effects. After 4 weeks observation, 8 of the 10 ulcers had healed; the other two had a mean diameter decrease of 21%. The only side effect was found in a 58 year old female who complained of moderate perilesional pain two days after having received treatment: it was successfully treated with paracetamol. We believe that a single perilesional subcutaneous administration of rhGM-CSF is safe and effective for the treatment of chronic leg ulcers.

  15. Using Student-Centred Learning Environments to Stimulate Deep Approaches to Learning: Factors Encouraging or Discouraging Their Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baeten, Marlies; Kyndt, Eva; Struyven, Katrien; Dochy, Filip

    2010-01-01

    This review outlines encouraging and discouraging factors in stimulating the adoption of deep approaches to learning in student-centred learning environments. Both encouraging and discouraging factors can be situated in the context of the learning environment, in students' perceptions of that context and in characteristics of the students…

  16. Using Student-Centred Learning Environments to Stimulate Deep Approaches to Learning: Factors Encouraging or Discouraging Their Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baeten, Marlies; Kyndt, Eva; Struyven, Katrien; Dochy, Filip

    2010-01-01

    This review outlines encouraging and discouraging factors in stimulating the adoption of deep approaches to learning in student-centred learning environments. Both encouraging and discouraging factors can be situated in the context of the learning environment, in students' perceptions of that context and in characteristics of the students…

  17. Vaccination with Irradiated Tumor Cells Engineered to Secrete Murine Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Stimulates Potent, Specific, and Long-Lasting Anti-Tumor Immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dranoff, Glenn; Jaffee, Elizabeth; Lazenby, Audrey; Golumbek, Paul; Levitsky, Hyam; Brose, Katja; Jackson, Valerie; Hamada, Hirofumi; Pardoll, Drew; Mulligan, Richard C.

    1993-04-01

    To compare the ability of different cytokines and other molecules to enhance the immunogenicity of tumor cells, we generated 10 retroviruses encoding potential immunomodulators and studied the vaccination properties of murine tumor cells transduced by the viruses. Using a B16 melanoma model, in which irradiated tumor cells alone do not stimulate significant anti-tumor immunity, we found that irradiated tumor cells expressing murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) stimulated potent, long-lasting, and specific anti-tumor immunity, requiring both CD4^+ and CD8^+ cells. Irradiated cells expressing interleukins 4 and 6 also stimulated detectable, but weaker, activity. In contrast to the B16 system, we found that in a number of other tumor models, the levels of anti-tumor immunity reported previously in cytokine gene transfer studies involving live, transduced cells could be achieved through the use of irradiated cells alone. Nevertheless, manipulation of the vaccine or challenge doses made it possible to demonstrate the activity of murine GM-CSF in those systems as well. Overall, our results have important implications for the clinical use of genetically modified tumor cells as therapeutic cancer vaccines.

  18. Fibroblast interleukin 1 beta: synergistic stimulation by recombinant interleukin 1 and tumor necrosis factor and posttranscriptional regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Elias, J A; Reynolds, M M; Kotloff, R M; Kern, J A

    1989-01-01

    To understand the role fibroblasts play in mediating and amplifying the effects of inflammatory cytokines, we determined whether recombinant interleukin 1 (IL-1) and recombinant tumor necrosis factor (TNF), alone and in combination, stimulated fibroblasts to produce IL-1 beta. Recombinant IL-1 (alpha and beta) stimulated fibroblast IL-1 beta mRNA accumulation, whereas recombinant TNF did not. In addition, simultaneous stimulation with recombinant IL-1 (alpha or beta) and recombinant TNF resulted in a synergistic increase in IL-1 beta mRNA levels. However, in all cases, IL-1 beta mRNA accumulation was not associated with fibroblast production of soluble IL-1 beta protein. Lysates of unstimulated, recombinant IL-1-stimulated, and recombinant TNF-stimulated fibroblasts did not contain IL-1 beta prohormone. In contrast, IL-1 beta prohormone was detected in lysates of fibroblasts incubated simultaneously with recombinant IL-1 and recombinant TNF. These studies demonstrate that recombinant IL-1 stimulates fibroblast IL-1 beta mRNA accumulation and that recombinant IL-1 and recombinant TNF synergize to further up-regulate IL-1 beta mRNA levels. In addition, they show that IL-1 beta production by human lung fibroblasts is inhibited at a posttranscriptional level. Translational control appears to be important in recombinant IL-1-stimulated fibroblasts and posttranslational control is important in fibroblasts stimulated simultaneously with recombinant IL-1 and recombinant TNF. Images PMID:2788284

  19. Stimulation of prostaglandin E/sub 2/ production by phorbol esters and epidermal growth factor in porcine thyroid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kasai, K.; Hiraiwa, M.; Emoto, T.; Akimoto, K.; Takaoka, T.; Shimoda, S.I.

    1987-07-13

    Effects of phorbol esters and epidermal growth factor (EGF) on prostaglandin E/sub 2/ production by cultured porcine thyroid cells were examined. Both phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and EGF stimulated prostaglandin E/sub 2/ production by the cells in dose related fashion. PMA stimulated prostaglandin E/sub 2/ production over fifty-fold with the dose of 10/sup -7/ M compared with control. EGF (10/sup -7/ M) also stimulated it about ten-fold. The ED/sub 50/ values of PMA and EGF were respectively around 1 x 10/sup -9/ M and 5 x 10/sup -10/ M. Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), however, did not stimulate prostaglandin E/sub 2/ production from 1 to 24-h incubation. The release of radioactivity from (/sup 3/H)-arachidonic acid prelabeled cells was also stimulated by PMA and EGF, but not by TSH. These results indicate that both PMA and EGF are potent stimulators of prostaglandin E/sub 2/ production, associated with the activity to stimulate arachidonic acid release in porcine thyroid cells. 36 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  20. Colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) inhibitors in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Cannarile, Michael A; Weisser, Martin; Jacob, Wolfgang; Jegg, Anna-Maria; Ries, Carola H; Rüttinger, Dominik

    2017-07-18

    The tumor-permissive and immunosuppressive characteristics of tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) have fueled interest in therapeutically targeting these cells. In this context, the colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF1)/colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) axis has gained the most attention, and various approaches targeting either the ligands or the receptor are currently in clinical development. Emerging data on the tolerability of CSF1/CSF1R-targeting agents suggest a favorable safety profile, making them attractive combination partners for both standard treatment modalities and immunotherapeutic agents. The specificity of these agents and their potent blocking activity has been substantiated by impressive response rates in diffuse-type tenosynovial giant cell tumors, a benign connective tissue disorder driven by CSF1 in an autocrine fashion. In the malignant disease setting, data on the clinical activity of immunotherapy combinations with CSF1/CSF1R-targeting agents are pending. As our knowledge of macrophage biology expands, it becomes apparent that the complex phenotypic and functional properties of macrophages are heavily influenced by a continuum of survival, differentiation, recruitment, and polarization signals within their specific tissue environment. Thus, the role of macrophages in regulating tumorigenesis and the impact of depleting and/or reprogramming TAM as therapeutic approaches for cancer patients may vary greatly depending on organ-specific characteristics of these cells. We review the currently available clinical safety and efficacy data with CSF1/CSF1R-targeting agents and provide a comprehensive overview of ongoing clinical studies. Furthermore, we discuss the local tissue macrophage and tumor-type specificities and their potential impact on CSF1/CSF1R-targeting treatment strategies for the future.

  1. Macrophage-colony stimulating factor (CSF1) predicts breast cancer progression and mortality.

    PubMed

    Richardsen, Elin; Uglehus, Rebecca Dale; Johnsen, Stein Harald; Busund, Lill-Tove

    2015-02-01

    Macrophage colony-stimulating factor (CSF1), also known as colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF1), and its receptor CSF1R have been correlated with poor prognosis in many cancer types including breast cancer. Herein, we investigated the prognostic impact of CSF1 and CSF1R expression in tumor epithelial and stromal compartments in primary breast cancer and axillary lymph node metastases. In addition, the density of CD68+ tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) and CD3+ T-lymphocytes was examined. Tumor tissue was obtained at the time of primary surgery from 68 prior treatment breast cancer patients, 38 with axillary lymph node metastases and 30 patients without metastases. Digital video analysis was performed on immunohistochemically stained slides. The expression of CSF1, CSF1R and the density of TAMs and CD3+ T-lymphocytes were then correlated to metastases and disease-specific mortality. Metastasized primary cancers had higher tumor epithelial and stromal expressions of CSF1 (p<0.001 and p=0.002, respectively) and CSF1R (both p=0.03) compared to non-metastatic cancers. Similar findings were made for the density of CD68+ (p=0.003) and CD3+ cells in the tumor epithelium (p<0.001). In multivariate analysis, a high tumor epithelial expression of CSF1 in primary breast cancer predicted mortality (hazard ratio (HR)=8.6, p=0.039). High expression of CSF1 and CSF1R and high density of TAMs and CD3+ T-lymphocytes were related to breast cancer progression. CSF1 expression in tumor epithelium predicted breast cancer mortality. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  2. Mechanism of arachidonic acid liberation in platelet-activating factor-stimulated human polymorphonuclear neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Nakashima, S.; Suganuma, A.; Sato, M.; Tohmatsu, T.; Nozawa, Y. )

    1989-08-15

    Upon stimulation of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils with platelet-activating factor (PAF), arachidonic acid (AA) is released from membrane phospholipids. The mechanism for AA liberation, a key step in the synthesis of biologically active eicosanoids, was investigated. PAF was found to elicit an increase in the cytoplasmic level of free Ca2+ as monitored by fluorescent indicator fura 2. When (3H) AA-labeled neutrophils were exposed to PAF, the enhanced release of AA was observed with a concomitant decrease of radioactivity in phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylcholine fractions. The inhibitors of phospholipase A2, mepacrine and 2-(p-amylcinnamoyl)-amino-4-chlorobenzoic acid, effectively suppressed the liberation of (3H)AA from phospholipids, indicating that liberation of AA is mainly catalyzed by the action of phospholipase A2. The extracellular Ca2+ is not required for AA release. However, intracellular Ca2+ antagonists, TMB-8 and high dose of quin 2/AM drastically reduced the liberation of AA induced by PAF, indicating that Ca2+ is an essential factor for phospholipase A2 activation. PAF raised the fluorescence of fura 2 at concentrations as low as 8 pM which reached a maximal level about 8 nM, whereas more than nM order concentrations of PAF was required for the detectable release of (3H)AA. Pretreatment of neutrophils with pertussis toxin resulted in complete abolition of AA liberation in response to PAF. However, the fura 2 response to PAF was not effectively inhibited by toxin treatment. In human neutrophil homogenate and membrane preparations, guanosine 5'-O-(thiotriphosphate) stimulated AA release and potentiated the action of PAF. Guanosine 5'-O-(thiodiphosphate) inhibited the effects of guanosine 5'-O-(thiotriphosphate).

  3. Predictive Factors for Clinical Improvement with Enterra Gastric Electric Stimulation Treatment for Refractory Gastroparesis

    PubMed Central

    Maranki, Jennifer L.; Lytes, Vanessa; Meilahn, John E.; Harbison, Sean; Friedenberg, Frank K.; Fisher, Robert S.

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the clinical response to Enterra gastric electric stimulation (GES) in patients with refractory gastroparesis and to determine factors associated with a favorable response. Methods This study was conducted in patients undergoing Enterra GES for refractory gastroparesis. Symptoms were scored before and after GES implantation using the Gastroparesis Cardinal Symptom Index (GCSI) with additional questions about abdominal pain and global clinical response. Results During an 18-month period, 29 patients underwent GES implantation. Follow-up data were available for 28 patients, with average follow-up of 148 days. At follow-up, 14 of 28 patients felt improved, 8 remained the same, and 6 worsened. The overall GCSI significantly decreased with improvement in the nausea/vomiting sub-score and the post-prandial subscore, but no improvement in the bloating subscore or abdominal pain. The decrease in GCSI was greater for diabetic patients than idiopathic patients. Patients with main symptom of nausea/vomiting had a greater improvement than patients with the main symptom of abdominal pain. Patients taking narcotic analgesics at the time of implant had a poorer response compared to patients who were not. Conclusions GES resulted in clinical improvement in 50% of patients with refractory gastroparesis. Three clinical parameters were associated with a favorable clinical response: (1) diabetic rather than idiopathic gastroparesis, (2) nausea/vomiting rather than abdominal pain as the primary symptom, and (3) independence from narcotic analgesics prior to stimulator implantation. Knowledge of these three factors may allow improved patient selection for GES. PMID:18080765

  4. [Expression and role of nuclear transcription factor Sp1 in macrophages stimulated by silicon dioxide].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin-sheng; Zeng, Qing-fu; Feng, De-yun; Hu, Yong-bin; Wen, Ji-fang

    2006-09-01

    To study the expression and localization of nuclear transcription factor Sp1 in macrophages after stimulated by silicon dioxide in vivo and in vitro. Forty Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into the control group and the silica exposure group, 20 in each group. The rat silicosis models were established by direct tracheal instillation of silica into rat lung (0.2 g/kg) only once while the control group was instilled with equal amount of saline. Animals were killed at 1st, 7th, 14th, 21st and 28th day after instillation. Dynamic changes of Sp1 protein expression and its cellular localization were detected by immunohistochemistry in pulmonary macrophages. In vitro, Sp1 mRNA and protein expression and their dynamic changes were monitored by RT-PCR and western blotting after stimulated by silicon dioxide in cultured RAW264.7 macrophages respectively. Cellular localization of Sp1 protein was characterized by immunocytochemistry. Compared to the control group, the Sp1 protein expression was increased in pulmonary macrophages and reached the peak at the 14th day in the silica exposure group. In vitro, the Sp1 mRNA level began to rise at 30 minutes after the administration of silicon dioxide and reached the peak at 240 minutes and then decreased to the minimal level at 960 minutes. The Sp1 total protein and nuclear protein also exhibited the similar trend. The former reached the peak at 240 minutes and the latter at 480 minutes. The significant nuclear translocation of Sp1 protein was observed at 120 minutes after the administration of silicon dioxide and became most significant at 480 minutes. Silicon dioxide can activate nuclear transcription factor Sp1 in macrophages in vivo and in vitro. Sp1 might play an important pathogenic role in the development of silicosis.

  5. Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Production and Tissue Eosinophilia in Chronic Rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Peric, Aleksandar; Spadijer-Mirkovic, Cveta; Matkovic-Jozin, Svjetlana; Jovancevic, Ljiljana; Vojvodic, Danilo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a strong proinflammatory cytokine that takes part in allergic nasal inflammation as an eosinophil colony-stimulating factor. However, the role of GM-CSF in non-allergic rhinitis has not been fully explored. Objectives The aim of this investigation was to assess the concentration of GM-CSF in nasal secretions of patients with non-allergic rhinitis with eosinophilia syndrome (NARES) in comparison to patients with perennial allergic rhinitis (PAR) and healthy subjects, as well as to assess the relationship with the degree of eosinophilic inflammation and clinical characteristics of the patients. Methods Fourteen patients with diagnosis of NARES, 14 PAR patients, and 14 healthy subjects were included in this cross-sectional study. All patients underwent symptom score assessment, nasal endoscopy, allergy testing, and cytological evaluation. The concentration of GM-CSF in nasal secretions of all participants was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results We found significantly higher levels of GM-CSF in patients with NARES than in the control group (p = 0.035). The percent of eosinophils in nasal mucosa was higher in NARES patients in comparison to patients with PAR (p < 0.001) and control patients (p < 0.0001). We found positive correlations between GM-CSF levels and eosinophil counts only in NARES patients. Conclusion The concentrations of GM-CSF in nasal secretions correlate well with eosinophil counts in the nasal mucosa of NARES patients. These facts indicate a possible role of GM-CSF as a favorable marker for assessment of nasal disease severity and the degree of chronic eosinophilic inflammation in the nasal mucosa. PMID:27746841

  6. Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor ameliorates DSS-induced experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Sainathan, Satheesh K; Hanna, Eyad M; Gong, Qingqing; Bishnupuri, Kumar S; Luo, Qizhi; Colonna, Marco; White, Frances V; Croze, Ed; Houchen, Courtney; Anant, Shrikant; Dieckgraefe, Brian K

    2008-01-01

    Sargramostim, granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a hematopoietic growth factor, stimulates cells of the intestinal innate immune system. Clinical trials show that sargramostim induces clinical response and remission in patients with active Crohn's disease. To study the mechanism, we examined the effects of GM-CSF in the dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced acute colitis model. We hypothesized that GM-CSF may work through effects on dendritic cells (DCs). Acute colitis was induced in Balb/c mice by administration of DSS in drinking water. Mice were treated with daily GM-CSF or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). To probe the role of plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) in the response to GM-CSF, we further examined the effects of monoclonal antibody 440c, which is specific for a sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin (Ig)-like lectin expressed on pDCs. GM-CSF ameliorates acute DSS-induced colitis, resulting in significantly improved clinical parameters and histology. Microarray analysis showed reduced expression of proinflammatory genes including TNF-alpha and IL1-beta; the results were further confirmed by real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and serum Bio-plex analysis. GM-CSF treatment significantly expands pDCs and type 1 IFN production. Administration of mAb 440c completely blocked the therapeutic effect of GM-CSF. GM-CSF is also effective in RAG1(-/-) mice, demonstrating activity-independent effects on T and B cells. IFN-beta administration mimics the therapeutic effect of GM-CSF in DSS-treated mice. GM-CSF increases systemic and mucosal type 1 IFN expression and exhibits synergy with pDC activators, such as microbial cytosine-phosphate-guanosine (CpG) DNA. GM-CSF is effective in the treatment of DSS colitis in a mechanism involving the 440c(+) pDC population.

  7. Adjunctive granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for treatment of septic shock due to melioidosis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Allen C; Stephens, Dianne P; Anstey, Nicholas M; Currie, Bart J

    2004-01-01

    Melioidosis, caused by the intracellular pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei, is endemic in northern Australia and Southeast Asia. Risk factors for this infection have also been associated with functional neutrophil defects. Because of this, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) was adopted for use in patients with septic shock due to melioidosis in December 1998. We compared the mortality rates from before and after the introduction of G-CSF therapy at the Royal Darwin Hospital (Darwin, Australia) during the period of 1989-2002. The mortality rate decreased from 95% to 10% after the introduction of G-CSF. Risk factors, the duration of illness before presentation, and the severity of illness were similar in both groups. A smaller decrease in mortality among patients in the intensive care unit who did not have melioidosis was observed, suggesting that other changes in management did not account for the magnitude of the benefit seen. We conclude that G-CSF may have contributed to the reduction in the mortality rate among patients with septic shock due to melioidosis.

  8. Human Granulocyte Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Enhances Antibiotic Susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Persister Cells.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Geetika S; Yao, Xiangyu; Wang, Jing; Peng, Bo; Bader, Rebecca A; Ren, Dacheng

    2015-11-30

    Bacterial persister cells are highly tolerant to antibiotics and cause chronic infections. However, little is known about the interaction between host immune systems with this subpopulation of metabolically inactive cells, and direct effects of host immune factors (in the absence of immune cells) on persister cells have not been studied. Here we report that human granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) can sensitize the persister cells of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and PDO300 to multiple antibiotics including ciprofloxacin, tobramycin, tetracycline, and gentamicin. GM-CSF also sensitized the biofilm cells of P. aeruginosa PAO1 and PDO300 to tobramycin in the presence of biofilm matrix degrading enzymes. The DNA microarray and qPCR results indicated that GM-CSF induced the genes for flagellar motility and pyocin production in the persister cells, but not the normal cells of P. aeruginosa PAO1. Consistently, the supernatants from GM-CSF treated P. aeruginosa PAO1 persister cell suspensions were found cidal to the pyocin sensitive strain P. aeruginosa PAK. Collectively, these findings suggest that host immune factors and bacterial persisters may directly interact, leading to enhanced susceptibility of persister cells to antibiotics.

  9. Recombinant human granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor in deep second-degree burn wound healing.

    PubMed

    Yan, Dexiong; Liu, Sha; Zhao, Xiaochun; Bian, Huijuan; Yao, Xingwei; Xing, Jiping; Sun, Weijing; Chen, Xiangjun

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the effects of recombinant human granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) on deep second-degree burn wound healing. In this study, 95 patients with a total of 190 burn wounds were treated with either rhGM-CSF or placebo, separated into 2 groups by treatment type. Wound healing rate, wound healing time, histopathological condition, and scar scale were all compared between the 2 groups. The healing rates in the rhGM-CSF group were remarkably higher than those in the placebo group (P < .01). The wound healing time in the rhGM-CSF group (18.8 ± 7.6 days) was significantly shorter than that in the placebo group (25.5 ± 4.6 days, P < .01). On the 14th day and 28th day, the average optical density of vascular endothelial factor (VEGF) in the rhGM-CSF group was larger than that in the placebo group. Meanwhile, the average optical density of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) in the rhGM-CSF group was also larger than that in the placebo group. Furthermore, the Vancouver scar scale scores of pigmentation, pliability, height, and vascularity were notable lower in the rhGM-CSF group than those in the placebo group (P < .01). The results suggest that rhGM-CSF can significantly accelerate deep second-degree burn wound healing.

  10. Human Granulocyte Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Enhances Antibiotic Susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Persister Cells

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Geetika S.; Yao, Xiangyu; Wang, Jing; Peng, Bo; Bader, Rebecca A.; Ren, Dacheng

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial persister cells are highly tolerant to antibiotics and cause chronic infections. However, little is known about the interaction between host immune systems with this subpopulation of metabolically inactive cells, and direct effects of host immune factors (in the absence of immune cells) on persister cells have not been studied. Here we report that human granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) can sensitize the persister cells of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and PDO300 to multiple antibiotics including ciprofloxacin, tobramycin, tetracycline, and gentamicin. GM-CSF also sensitized the biofilm cells of P. aeruginosa PAO1 and PDO300 to tobramycin in the presence of biofilm matrix degrading enzymes. The DNA microarray and qPCR results indicated that GM-CSF induced the genes for flagellar motility and pyocin production in the persister cells, but not the normal cells of P. aeruginosa PAO1. Consistently, the supernatants from GM-CSF treated P. aeruginosa PAO1 persister cell suspensions were found cidal to the pyocin sensitive strain P. aeruginosa PAK. Collectively, these findings suggest that host immune factors and bacterial persisters may directly interact, leading to enhanced susceptibility of persister cells to antibiotics. PMID:26616387

  11. Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor is required for aortic dissection/intramural haematoma.

    PubMed

    Son, Bo-Kyung; Sawaki, Daigo; Tomida, Shota; Fujita, Daishi; Aizawa, Kenichi; Aoki, Hiroki; Akishita, Masahiro; Manabe, Ichiro; Komuro, Issei; Friedman, Scott L; Nagai, Ryozo; Suzuki, Toru

    2015-04-29

    Aortic dissection and intramural haematoma comprise an aortopathy involving separation of the aortic wall. Underlying mechanisms of the condition remain unclear. Here we show that granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a triggering molecule for this condition. Transcription factor Krüppel-like factor 6 (KLF6)-myeloid-specific conditional deficient mice exhibit this aortic phenotype when subjected to aortic inflammation. Mechanistically, KLF6 downregulates expression and secretion of GM-CSF. Administration of neutralizing antibody against GM-CSF prevents the condition in these mice. Conversely, administration of GM-CSF in combination with aortic inflammation to wild-type mice is sufficient to induce the phenotype, suggesting the general nature of effects. Moreover, patients with this condition show highly increased circulating levels of GM-CSF, which is also locally expressed in the dissected aorta. GM-CSF is therefore a key regulatory molecule causative of this aortopathy, and modulation of this cytokine might be an exploitable treatment strategy for the condition.

  12. Bioengineered sequential growth factor delivery stimulates brain tissue regeneration after stroke.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanfei; Cooke, Michael J; Sachewsky, Nadia; Morshead, Cindi M; Shoichet, Molly S

    2013-11-28

    Stroke is a leading cause of disability with no effective regenerative treatment. One promising strategy for achieving tissue repair involves the stimulation of endogenous neural stem/progenitor cells through sequential delivery of epidermal growth factor (EGF) followed by erythropoietin (EPO). Yet currently available delivery strategies such as intracerebroventricular (ICV) infusion cause significant tissue damage. We designed a novel delivery system that circumvents the blood brain barrier and directly releases growth factors to the brain. Sequential release of the two growth factors is a key in eliciting tissue repair. To control release, we encapsulate pegylated EGF (EGF-PEG) in poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles and EPO in biphasic microparticles comprised of a PLGA core and a poly(sebacic acid) coating. EGF-PEG and EPO polymeric particles are dispersed in a hyaluronan methylcellulose (HAMC) hydrogel which spatially confines the particles and attenuates the inflammatory response of brain tissue. Our composite-mediated, sequential delivery of EGF-PEG and EPO leads to tissue repair in a mouse stroke model and minimizes damage compared to ICV infusion.

  13. Free bone graft reconstruction of irradiated facial tissue: Experimental effects of basic fibroblast growth factor stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Eppley, B.L.; Connolly, D.T.; Winkelmann, T.; Sadove, A.M.; Heuvelman, D.; Feder, J. )

    1991-07-01

    A study was undertaken to evaluate the potential utility of basic fibroblast growth factor in the induction of angiogenesis and osseous healing in bone previously exposed to high doses of irradiation. Thirty New Zealand rabbits were evaluated by introducing basic fibroblast growth factor into irradiated mandibular resection sites either prior to or simultaneous with reconstruction by corticocancellous autografts harvested from the ilium. The fate of the free bone grafts was then evaluated at 90 days postoperatively by microangiographic, histologic, and fluorochrome bone-labeling techniques. Sequestration, necrosis, and failure to heal to recipient osseous margins was observed both clinically and histologically in all nontreated irradiated graft sites as well as those receiving simultaneous angiogenic stimulation at the time of graft placement. No fluorescent activity was seen in these graft groups. In the recipient sites pretreated with basic fibroblast growth factor prior to placement of the graft, healing and reestablishment of mandibular contour occurred in nearly 50 percent of the animals. Active bone formation was evident at cortical margins adjacent to the recipient sites but was absent in the more central cancellous regions of the grafts.

  14. Factors to predict positive results of gonadotropin releasing hormone stimulation test in girls with suspected precocious puberty.

    PubMed

    Nam, Hyo-Kyoung; Rhie, Young Jun; Son, Chang Sung; Park, Sang Hee; Lee, Kee-Hyoung

    2012-02-01

    Sometimes, the clinical findings and the results of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) stimulation test are inconsistent in girls with early breast development and bone age advancement. We aimed to investigate the factors predicting positive results of the GnRH stimulation test in girls with suspected central precocious puberty (CPP). We reviewed the records of 574 girls who developed breast budding before the age of 8 yr and underwent the GnRH stimulation test under the age of 9 yr. Positive results of the GnRH stimulated peak luteinizing hormone (LH) level were defined as 5 IU/L and over. Girls with the initial positive results (n = 375) showed accelerated growth, advanced bone age and higher serum basal LH, follicle-stimulating hormone, and estradiol levels, compared to those with the initial negative results (n = 199). Girls with the follow-up positive results (n = 64) showed accelerated growth and advanced bone age, compared to those with the follow-up negative results. In the binary logistic regression, the growth velocity ratio was the most significant predictive factor of positive results. We suggest that the rapid growth velocity is the most useful predictive factor for positive results in the GnRH stimulation test in girls with suspected precocious puberty.

  15. Cloning and expression of porcine Colony Stimulating Factor-1 (CSF-1) and Colony Stimulating Factor-1 Receptor (CSF-1R) and analysis of the species specificity of stimulation by CSF-1 and Interleukin 34

    PubMed Central

    Gow, Deborah J.; Garceau, Valerie; Kapetanovic, Ronan; Sester, David P.; Fici, Greg J.; Shelly, John A.; Wilson, Thomas L.; Hume, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor (CSF-1) controls the survival, differentiation and proliferation of cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system. A second ligand for the CSF-1R, Interleukin 34 (IL-34), has been described, but its physiological role is not yet known. The domestic pig provides an alternative to traditional rodent models for evaluating potential therapeutic applications of CSF-1R agonists and antagonists. To enable such studies, we cloned and expressed active pig CSF-1. To provide a bioassay, pig CSF-1R was expressed in the factor-dependent Ba/F3 cell line. On this transfected cell line, recombinant porcine CSF-1 and human CSF-1 had identical activity. Mouse CSF-1 does not interact with the human CSF-1 receptor but was active on pig. By contrast, porcine CSF-1 was active on mouse, human, cat and dog cells. IL-34 was previously shown to be species-specific, with mouse and human proteins demonstrating limited cross-species activity. The pig CSF-1R was equally responsive to both mouse and human IL-34. Based upon the published crystal structures of CSF-1/CSF-1R and IL34/CSF-1R complexes, we discuss the molecular basis for the species specificity. PMID:22974529

  16. Activation of adenosine A(3) receptors supports hematopoiesis-stimulating effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in sublethally irradiated mice.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Michal; Pospísil, Milan; Sefc, Ludek; Dusek, Ladislav; Vacek, Antonín; Holá, Jirina; Hoferová, Zuzana; Streitová, Denisa

    2010-08-01

    Research areas of 'post-exposure treatment' and 'cytokines and growth factors' have top priority among studies aimed at radiological nuclear threat countermeasures. The experiments were aimed at testing the ability of N(6)-(3-iodobenzyl)adenosine-5'-N-methyluronamide (IB-MECA), an adenosine A(3) receptor agonist, to modulate hematopoiesis in sublethally irradiated mice, when administered alone or in a combination with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in a two-day post-irradiation treatment regimen. A complete analysis of hematopoiesis including determination of numbers of bone marrow hematopoietic progenitor and precursor cells, as well as of numbers of peripheral blood cells, was performed. The outcomes of the treatment were assessed at days 3 to 22 after irradiation. IB-MECA alone has been found to induce a significant elevation of numbers of bone marrow granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cells (GM-CFC) and peripheral blood neutrophils. IB-MECA given concomitantly with G-CSF increased significantly bone marrow GM-CFC and erythroid progenitor cells (BFU-E) in comparison with the controls and with animals administered each of the drugs alone. The findings suggest the ability of IB-MECA to stimulate hematopoiesis and to support the hematopoiesis-stimulating effects of G-CSF in sublethally irradiated mice.

  17. Transforming growth factor type beta specifically stimulates synthesis of proteoglycan in human adult arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J K; Hoshi, H; McKeehan, W L

    1987-01-01

    Myo-intimal proteoglycan metabolism is thought to be important in blood vessel homeostasis, blood clotting, atherogenesis, and atherosclerosis. Human platelet-derived transforming growth factor type beta (TGF-beta) specifically stimulated synthesis of at least two types of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans in nonproliferating human adult arterial smooth muscle cells in culture. Stimulation of smooth muscle cell proteoglycan synthesis by smooth muscle cell growth promoters (epidermal growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, and heparin-binding growth factors) was less than 20% of that elicited by TGF-beta. TGF-beta neither significantly stimulated proliferation of quiescent smooth muscle cells nor inhibited proliferating cells. The extent of TGF-beta stimulation of smooth muscle cell proteoglycan synthesis was similar in both nonproliferating and growth-stimulated cells. TGF-beta, which is a reversible inhibitor of endothelial cell proliferation, had no comparable effect on endothelial cell proteoglycan synthesis. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that TGF-beta is a cell-type-specific regulator of proteoglycan synthesis in human blood vessels and may contribute to the myo-intimal accumulation of proteoglycan in atherosclerotic lesions. Images PMID:3474655

  18. Synergy of interleukin 1 and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor: in vivo stimulation of stem-cell recovery and hematopoietic regeneration following 5-fluorouracil treatment of mice

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, M.A.S.; Warren, D.J.

    1987-10-01

    The human bladder carcinoma cell line 5637 produces hematopoietic growth factors (granulocyte and granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factors (G-CSF and GM-CSF)) and hemopoietin 1, which synergizes with CSFs to stimulate colony formation by primitive hematopoietic stem cells in 5-fluorouracil-treated mouse bone marrow. Molecular and functional properties of hemopoietin 1 identified it as identical to interleukin 1..cap alpha.. (IL-1..cap alpha..). When bone marrow cells from 5-fluorouracil-treated mice were cultured in suspension for 7 days with recombinant human IL-1..cap alpha.. and/or G-CSF, it was found that the two factors synergized to enhance recovery of myelopoietic cells and colony-forming cells of both high and low proliferative potential. G-CSF alone did not sustain these populations, but the combination had greater-than-additive stimulating capacity. In vivo, 5-fluorouracil (150 mg/kg) produced profound myelosuppression and delayed neutrophil regeneration for up to 2 weeks in C3H/HeJ mice. Daily administration of recombinant human G-CSF or human IL-1..cap alpha.. accelerated recovery of stem cells, progenitor cells, and blood neutrophils by up to 4 days in 5-fluorouracil-treated C3H/HeJ and B6D2F/sub 1/ mice. The combination of IL-1..cap alpha.. and G-CSF acted synergistically, reducing neutropenia and accelerating recovery of normal neutrophil numbers by up to 7 days. These results indicate the possible therapeutic potential of combination therapy with IL-1 and hematopoietic growth factors such as G-CSF in the treatment of chemotherapy- or radiation-induced myelosuppression.

  19. Expression and function of the human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor alpha subunit.

    PubMed

    Jubinsky, P T; Laurie, A S; Nathan, D G; Yetz-Aldepe, J; Sieff, C A

    1994-12-15

    To determine the expression and function of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) receptor alpha chain (GMR alpha) during hematopoiesis and on leukemic cells, monoclonal antibodies were raised by immunizing mice with cells expressing high levels of human GMR alpha. A pool of five antibodies isolated from three different mice was used to characterize GMR alpha. This antibody pool (anti-GMR alpha) immunoprecipitated a protein with the expected molecular weight of GMR alpha from COS cells transiently transfected with the GMR alpha gene. In factor-dependent cells, GMR alpha existed as a phosphoprotein. However, its phosphorylation was not stimulated by the presence of GM-CSF. Anti-GMR alpha inhibited the GM-CSF-dependent growth of cell lines and normal bone marrow cells and inhibited the binding of iodinated GM-CSF to its receptor. Cell surface expression of GMR alpha was examined using anti-GMR alpha and flow cytometry. GMR alpha was readily detectable on both blood monocytes and neutrophils. In adherence-depleted normal bone marrow, two separate populations expressed GMR alpha. The most positive cells were predominantly macrophages, whereas the cells that expressed less GMR alpha were largely myelocytes and metamyelocytes. A small population of lin-CD34+ or CD34+CD38- cells also expressed GMR alpha, but they were not capable of significant growth in colony-forming assays. In contrast, the majority of lin-CD34+ and CD34+CD38- cells were GMR alpha-, yet they produced large numbers of myeloid and erythroid colonies in the same assay. Malignant cells from patients with leukemia were also tested for GMR alpha expression. All of the myeloid leukemias and only rare lymphoid leukemias surveyed tested positive for GMR alpha. These results show that anti-GMR alpha is useful for the functional characterization of the GMR alpha and for the detection of myeloid leukemia and that GMR alpha is expressed on certain lineages throughout hematopoietic

  20. Characterisation of a novel Fc conjugate of macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Gow, Deborah J; Sauter, Kristin A; Pridans, Clare; Moffat, Lindsey; Sehgal, Anuj; Stutchfield, Ben M; Raza, Sobia; Beard, Philippa M; Tsai, Yi Ting; Bainbridge, Graeme; Boner, Pamela L; Fici, Greg; Garcia-Tapia, David; Martin, Roger A; Oliphant, Theodore; Shelly, John A; Tiwari, Raksha; Wilson, Thomas L; Smith, Lee B; Mabbott, Neil A; Hume, David A

    2014-09-01

    We have produced an Fc conjugate of colony-stimulating factor (CSF) 1 with an improved circulating half-life. CSF1-Fc retained its macrophage growth-promoting activity, and did not induce proinflammatory cytokines in vitro. Treatment with CSF1-Fc did not produce adverse effects in mice or pigs. The impact of CSF1-Fc was examined using the Csf1r-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter gene in MacGreen mice. Administration of CSF1-Fc to mice drove extensive infiltration of all tissues by Csf1r-EGFP positive macrophages. The main consequence was hepatosplenomegaly, associated with proliferation of hepatocytes. Expression profiles of the liver indicated that infiltrating macrophages produced candidate mediators of hepatocyte proliferation including urokinase, tumor necrosis factor, and interleukin 6. CSF1-Fc also promoted osteoclastogenesis and produced pleiotropic effects on other organ systems, notably the testis, where CSF1-dependent macrophages have been implicated in homeostasis. However, it did not affect other putative CSF1 targets, notably intestine, where Paneth cell numbers and villus architecture were unchanged. CSF1 has therapeutic potential in regenerative medicine in multiple organs. We suggest that the CSF1-Fc conjugate retains this potential, and may permit daily delivery by injection rather than continuous infusion required for the core molecule.

  1. Colony-stimulating factor-1 promotes kidney growth and repair via alteration of macrophage responses.

    PubMed

    Alikhan, Maliha A; Jones, Christina V; Williams, Timothy M; Beckhouse, Anthony G; Fletcher, Anne L; Kett, Michelle M; Sakkal, Samy; Samuel, Chrishan S; Ramsay, Robert G; Deane, James A; Wells, Christine A; Little, Melissa H; Hume, David A; Ricardo, Sharon D

    2011-09-01

    Colony-stimulating factor (CSF)-1 controls the survival, proliferation, and differentiation of macrophages, which are recognized as scavengers and agents of the innate and the acquired immune systems. Because of their plasticity, macrophages are endowed with many other essential roles during development and tissue homeostasis. We present evidence that CSF-1 plays an important trophic role in postnatal organ growth and kidney repair. Notably, the injection of CSF-1 postnatally enhanced kidney weight and volume and was associated with increased numbers of tissue macrophages. Moreover, CSF-1 promotes postnatal renal repair in mice after ischemia-reperfusion injury by recruiting and influencing macrophages toward a reparative state. CSF-1 treatment rapidly accelerated renal repair with tubular epithelial cell replacement, attenuation of interstitial fibrosis, and functional recovery. Analysis of macrophages from CSF-1-treated kidneys showed increased expression of insulin-like growth factor-1 and anti-inflammatory genes that are known CSF-1 targets. Taken together, these data suggest that CSF-1 is important in kidney growth and the promotion of endogenous repair and resolution of inflammatory injury.

  2. Characterisation of a Novel Fc Conjugate of Macrophage Colony-stimulating Factor

    PubMed Central

    Gow, Deborah J; Sauter, Kristin A; Pridans, Clare; Moffat, Lindsey; Sehgal, Anuj; Stutchfield, Ben M; Raza, Sobia; Beard, Philippa M; Tsai, Yi Ting; Bainbridge, Graeme; Boner, Pamela L; Fici, Greg; Garcia-Tapia, David; Martin, Roger A; Oliphant, Theodore; Shelly, John A; Tiwari, Raksha; Wilson, Thomas L; Smith, Lee B; Mabbott, Neil A; Hume, David A

    2014-01-01

    We have produced an Fc conjugate of colony-stimulating factor (CSF) 1 with an improved circulating half-life. CSF1-Fc retained its macrophage growth-promoting activity, and did not induce proinflammatory cytokines in vitro. Treatment with CSF1-Fc did not produce adverse effects in mice or pigs. The impact of CSF1-Fc was examined using the Csf1r-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter gene in MacGreen mice. Administration of CSF1-Fc to mice drove extensive infiltration of all tissues by Csf1r-EGFP positive macrophages. The main consequence was hepatosplenomegaly, associated with proliferation of hepatocytes. Expression profiles of the liver indicated that infiltrating macrophages produced candidate mediators of hepatocyte proliferation including urokinase, tumor necrosis factor, and interleukin 6. CSF1-Fc also promoted osteoclastogenesis and produced pleiotropic effects on other organ systems, notably the testis, where CSF1-dependent macrophages have been implicated in homeostasis. However, it did not affect other putative CSF1 targets, notably intestine, where Paneth cell numbers and villus architecture were unchanged. CSF1 has therapeutic potential in regenerative medicine in multiple organs. We suggest that the CSF1-Fc conjugate retains this potential, and may permit daily delivery by injection rather than continuous infusion required for the core molecule. PMID:24962162

  3. Colony-Stimulating Factor-1 Promotes Kidney Growth and Repair via Alteration of Macrophage Responses

    PubMed Central

    Alikhan, Maliha A.; Jones, Christina V.; Williams, Timothy M.; Beckhouse, Anthony G.; Fletcher, Anne L.; Kett, Michelle M.; Sakkal, Samy; Samuel, Chrishan S.; Ramsay, Robert G.; Deane, James A.; Wells, Christine A.; Little, Melissa H.; Hume, David A.; Ricardo, Sharon D.

    2011-01-01

    Colony-stimulating factor (CSF)-1 controls the survival, proliferation, and differentiation of macrophages, which are recognized as scavengers and agents of the innate and the acquired immune systems. Because of their plasticity, macrophages are endowed with many other essential roles during development and tissue homeostasis. We present evidence that CSF-1 plays an important trophic role in postnatal organ growth and kidney repair. Notably, the injection of CSF-1 postnatally enhanced kidney weight and volume and was associated with increased numbers of tissue macrophages. Moreover, CSF-1 promotes postnatal renal repair in mice after ischemia-reperfusion injury by recruiting and influencing macrophages toward a reparative state. CSF-1 treatment rapidly accelerated renal repair with tubular epithelial cell replacement, attenuation of interstitial fibrosis, and functional recovery. Analysis of macrophages from CSF-1-treated kidneys showed increased expression of insulin-like growth factor-1 and anti-inflammatory genes that are known CSF-1 targets. Taken together, these data suggest that CSF-1 is important in kidney growth and the promotion of endogenous repair and resolution of inflammatory injury. PMID:21762674

  4. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor ameliorates irradiation-induced suppression of hippocampal neurogenesis in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joong-Sun; Yang, Miyoung; Jang, Hyosun; Oui, Heejin; Kim, Sung-Ho; Shin, Taekyun; Jang, Won-Suk; Lee, Seung-Sook; Moon, Changjong

    2010-12-03

    Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-csf) is a member of the hematopoietic growth factor family and demonstrates neuroprotective functions in neurodegenerative diseases. This study evaluated the radioprotective effects of G-csf in the suppression of hippocampal neurogenesis in adult mice undergoing irradiation. The radioprotective effects were assessed using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling assay and immunohistochemical markers of neurogenesis, including the proliferating cell marker Ki-67 and the immature progenitor neuron marker doublecortin (DCX). Acute exposure to cranial irradiation (5Gy γ-rays) induced neural apoptosis and inhibited neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the adult mouse hippocampus. Pretreatment with G-csf (100μg/kg every 12h subcutaneously on three consecutive days) attenuated neural apoptosis and decreased the number of Ki-67- and DCX-positive cells in the DG of the irradiated mouse hippocampus. Therefore, G-csf inhibited the detrimental effects of irradiation on hippocampal neurogenesis, suggesting that G-csf administration has potential therapeutic utility in brain irradiation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Arecoline-stimulated connective tissue growth factor production in human buccal mucosal fibroblasts: Modulation by curcumin.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yi-Ting; Chen, Hsin-Ming; Cheng, Shih-Jung; Chiang, Chun-Pin; Kuo, Mark Yen-Ping

    2009-09-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is associated with the onset and progression of fibrosis in many human tissues. Areca nut (AN) chewing is the most important etiological factor in the pathogenesis of oral submucous fibrosis (OSF). We immunohistochemically examined the expression of CTGF protein in 20 cases of OSF and found positive CTGF staining in fibroblasts and endothelial cells in all cases. Western blot analysis showed that arecoline, a main alkaloid found in AN, stimulated CTGF synthesis in a dose- and time-dependent manner in buccal mucosal fibroblasts. Constitutive overexpression of CTGF during AN chewing may enhance the fibrotic activity in OSF and play a role in the pathogenesis of OSF. Pretreatment with NF-kappaB inhibitor Bay 11-7082, JNK inhibitor SP600125, p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 and antioxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine, but not ERK inhibitor PD98059, significantly reduced arecoline-induced CTGF synthesis. Furthermore, curcumin completely inhibited arecoline-induced CTGF synthesis and the inhibition is dose-dependent. These results indicated that arecoline-induced CTGF synthesis was mediated by ROS, NF-kappaB, JNK, P38 MAPK pathways and curcumin could be a useful agent in controlling OSF.

  6. Factor Analysis of Low-Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation to the Temporoparietal Junction for Tinnitus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bei; Wang, Meiye; Li, Ming; Yin, Shankai

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. We investigated factors that contribute to suppression of tinnitus after repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). Methods. A total of 289 patients with tinnitus underwent active 1 Hz rTMS in the left temporoparietal region. A visual analog scale (VAS) was used to assess tinnitus loudness. All participants were interviewed regarding age, gender, tinnitus duration, laterality and pitch, audiometric parameters, sleep, and so forth. The resting motor thresholds (RMTs) were measured in all patients and 30 age- and gender-matched volunteers. Results. With respect to different factors that contribute to tinnitus suppression, we found improvement in the following domains: shorter duration, normal hearing (OR: 3.25, 95%CI: 2.01–5.27, p = 0.001), and without sleep disturbance (OR: 2.51, 95%CI: 1.56–4.1, p = 0.005) adjusted for age and gender. The patients with tinnitus lasting less than 1 year were more likely to show suppression of tinnitus (OR: 2.77, 95%CI: 1.48–5.19, p = 0.002) compared to those with tinnitus lasting more than 5 years. Tinnitus patients had significantly lower RMTs compared with healthy volunteers. Conclusion. Active low-frequency rTMS results in a significant reduction in the loudness of tinnitus. Significant tinnitus suppression was shown in subjects with shorter tinnitus duration, with normal hearing, and without sleep disturbance. PMID:27847647

  7. Effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor on neutrophil function in idiopathic bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Ruchaud-Sparagano, Marie-Hélène; Gertig, Helen; Hester, Katy L M; Macfarlane, James G; Corris, Paul A; Simpson, A John; De Soyza, Anthony

    2013-11-01

    Neutrophils are consistently found in inflamed and infected airways in idiopathic bronchiectasis, but relatively little is known about the function of blood neutrophils in this condition. We hypothesized that peripheral blood neutrophil (PBN) phagocytosis and superoxide generation are impaired in bronchiectasis, and that granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is capable of improving neutrophil function. Neutrophils were isolated from the peripheral blood of patients with idiopathic bronchiectasis who were free of exacerbation, and from healthy controls of similar age (n = 21 in both groups). Ingestion of serum-opsonized zymosan by neutrophils was used to quantify phagocytic capacity. Superoxide generation in neutrophils was measured in response to addition of platelet activating factor and formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine. Experiments were performed in the presence or absence of GM-CSF. No differences were observed in either phagocytic capacity (P = 0.99) or superoxide generation (P = 0.81) when comparing patients and controls. However, a significant increase in phagocytic capacity above baseline levels in both patients (P < 0.005) and controls (P < 0.005) was induced by GM-CSF. Similarly, the superoxide generation in patients (P < 0.005) and controls (P = 0.001) was significantly increased by GM-CSF. PBN function was preserved in idiopathic bronchiectasis. Enhancement of neutrophil phagocytosis and superoxide generation by GM-CSF requires further study. © 2013 The Authors. Respirology © 2013 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  8. Local delivery of Granulocyte/Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor protects mice from lethal pneumococcal pneumonia1

    PubMed Central

    Steinwede, Kathrin; Tempelhof, Ole; Bolte, Kristine; Maus, Regina; Bohling, Jennifer; Ueberberg, Bianca; Länger, Florian; Christman, John W.; Paton, James C.; Ask, Kjetil; Maharaj, Shyam; Kolb, Martin; Gauldie, Jack; Welte, Tobias; Maus, Ulrich A.

    2013-01-01

    The growth factor granulocyte/macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has an important role in pulmonary surfactant metabolism and the regulation of antibacterial activities of lung sentinel cells. However, the potential of intra-alveolar GM-CSF to augment lung protective immunity against inhaled bacterial pathogens has not been defined in preclinical infection models. We hypothesized that transient overexpression of GM-CSF in the lungs of mice by adenoviral gene transfer (Ad-GM-CSF) would protect mice from subsequent lethal pneumococcal pneumonia. Our data show that intra-alveolar delivery of Ad-GM-CSF led to sustained increased pSTAT5 expression and PU.1 protein expression in alveolar macrophages during a 28 day observation period. Pulmonary Ad-GM-CSF delivery two or four weeks prior to infection of mice with S. pneumoniae significantly reduced mortality rates relative to control vector treated mice. This increased survival was accompanied by increased iNOS expression, antibacterial activity and a significant reduction in caspase 3 dependent apoptosis and secondary necrosis of lung sentinel cells. Importantly, therapeutic treatment of mice with recombinant GM-CSF improved lung protective immunity and accelerated bacterial clearance after pneumococcal challenge. We conclude that prophylactic delivery of GM-CSF triggers long-lasting immunostimulatory effects in the lung in vivo and rescues mice from lethal pneumococcal pneumonia by improving antibacterial immunity. These data support use of novel antibiotic-independent immunostimulatory therapies to protect patients against bacterial pneumonias. PMID:22003204

  9. Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor induces CCL17 production via IRF4 to mediate inflammation.

    PubMed

    Achuthan, Adrian; Cook, Andrew D; Lee, Ming-Chin; Saleh, Reem; Khiew, Hsu-Wei; Chang, Melody W N; Louis, Cynthia; Fleetwood, Andrew J; Lacey, Derek C; Christensen, Anne D; Frye, Ashlee T; Lam, Pui Yeng; Kusano, Hitoshi; Nomura, Koji; Steiner, Nancy; Förster, Irmgard; Nutt, Stephen L; Olshansky, Moshe; Turner, Stephen J; Hamilton, John A

    2016-09-01

    Data from preclinical and clinical studies have demonstrated that granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) can function as a key proinflammatory cytokine. However, therapies that directly target GM-CSF function could lead to undesirable side effects, creating a need to delineate downstream pathways and mediators. In this work, we provide evidence that GM-CSF drives CCL17 production by acting through an IFN regulatory factor 4-dependent (IRF4-dependent) pathway in human monocytes, murine macrophages, and mice in vivo. In murine models of arthritis and pain, IRF4 regulated the formation of CCL17, which mediated the proinflammatory and algesic actions of GM-CSF. Mechanistically, GM-CSF upregulated IRF4 expression by enhancing JMJD3 demethylase activity. We also determined that CCL17 has chemokine-independent functions in inflammatory arthritis and pain. These findings indicate that GM-CSF can mediate inflammation and pain by regulating IRF4-induced CCL17 production, providing insights into a pathway with potential therapeutic avenues for the treatment of inflammatory diseases and their associated pain.

  10. Monocyte activation following systemic administration of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Chachoua, A; Oratz, R; Hoogmoed, R; Caron, D; Peace, D; Liebes, L; Blum, R H; Vilcek, J

    1994-04-01

    Twenty-four patients with solid malignancies were treated with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) on a Phase 1b trial. The objective of the study was to evaluate the effects of GM-CSF on peripheral blood monocyte activation. GM-CSF was administered by subcutaneous injection daily for 14 days. Immune parameters measured were monocyte cytotoxicity against the human colon carcinoma (HT29) cell line, serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1 beta, and in vitro TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta induction. All patients were evaluable for toxicity. Fifteen patients were evaluable for immunologic response. Treatment with GM-CSF led to a statistically significant enhancement in direct monocyte cytotoxicity against HT29 cells. There was no increase in serum TNF-alpha or IL-1 beta and no consistent in vitro induction of TNF-alpha or IL-1 beta from monocytes posttreatment. Treatment was well tolerated overall. We conclude that treatment with GM-CSF can lead to enhanced monocyte cytotoxicity. Further studies are in progress to evaluate the effect of GM-CSF on other parameters of monocyte functions.

  11. Sodium caseinate induces secretion of macrophage colony-stimulating factor from neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Santiago-Osorio, E; Mora, L; Bautista, M; Montesinos, J J; Martínez, I; Ramos-Mandujano, G; Zambrano, R; Monroy-García, A; Weiss-Steider, B; Ledesma-Martínez, E; Aguiñiga, I

    2010-04-01

    In this work we provide evidence that granulocytes produce macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) in the band cell stage and secrete it upon sodium caseinate-mediated differentiation to polymorphonuclear cells. We identified M-CSF in an enriched population of myeloid band cells from murine bone marrow using a chromophore-labeled monoclonal anti-M-CSF antibody. An ELISA assay was then used to detect secreted M-CSF in culture supernatants of enriched band cells differentiated to mature neutrophils using sodium caseinate. Colony formation in vitro by the supernatants from differentiating band cells was blocked by anti-M-CSF, thus suggesting that this factor is the only one responsible for this activity. Our data imply that casein can modulate hematopoiesis possibly via M-CSF production. Finally we discuss the possibility whether this M-CSF in concert with G-CSF could establish a cellular communication network between macrophages and granulocytes allowing them to simultaneously arrive at the inflammatory site. 2009 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Colony-stimulating factor-1 antisense treatment suppresses growth of human tumor xenografts in mice.

    PubMed

    Aharinejad, Seyedhossein; Abraham, Dietmar; Paulus, Patrick; Abri, Hojatollah; Hofmann, Michael; Grossschmidt, Karl; Schäfer, Romana; Stanley, E Richard; Hofbauer, Reinhold

    2002-09-15

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) foster cellular invasion by disrupting extracellular matrix barriers and thereby facilitate tumor development. MMPs are synthesized by both cancer cells and adjacent stromal cells, primarily macrophages. The production of macrophages is regulated by colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1). Tissue CSF-1 expression increased significantly in embryonic and colon cancer xenografts. We, therefore, hypothesized that blocking CSF-1 may suppress tumor growth by decelerating macrophage-mediated extracellular matrix breakdown. Cells expressing CSF-1 and mice xenografted with CSF-1 receptor (c-fms)- and CSF-1-negative malignant human embryonic or colon cancer cells were treated with mouse CSF-1 antisense oligonucleotides. Two weeks of CSF-1 antisense treatment selectively down-regulated CSF-1 mRNA and protein tissue expression in tumor lysates. CSF-1 blockade suppressed the growth of embryonic tumors to dormant levels and the growth of the colon carcinoma by 50%. In addition, tumor vascularity and the expression of MMP-2 and angiogenic factors were reduced. Six-month survival was observed in colon carcinoma mice only after CSF-1 blockade, whereas controls were all dead at day 65. These results suggest that human embryonic and colon cancer cells up-regulate host CSF-1 and MMP-2 expression. Because the cancer cells used were CSF-1 negative, CSF-1 antisense targeted tumor stromal cell CSF-1 production. CSF-1 blockade could be a novel strategy in treatment of solid tumors.

  13. Simulation of epiretinal prostheses - Evaluation of geometrical factors affecting stimulation thresholds

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background An accurate understanding of the electrical interaction between retinal prostheses and retinal tissue is important to design effective devices. Previous studies have used modelling approaches to simulate electric fields generated by epiretinal prostheses in saline and to simulate retinal ganglion cell (RGC) activation using passive or/and active biophysical models of the retina. These models have limited scope for studying an implanted human retinal prosthesis as they often do not account for real geometry and composition of the prosthesis-retina interface. This interface consists of real dimensions and location of stimulation and ground electrodes that are separated by the retinal tissue and surrounded by physiological fluids. Methods In this study, we combined the prosthesis-retina interface elements into a framework to evaluate the geometrical factors affecting stimulation thresholds for epiretinal prostheses used in clinical human trials, as described by Balthasar et al. in their Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science (IOVS) paper published in 2008 using the Argus I epiretinal implants. Finite element method (FEM) based computations were used to estimate threshold currents based on a threshold criterion employing a passive electric model of the retina. Results Threshold currents and impedances were estimated for different electrode-retina distances. The profiles and the values for thresholds and impedances obtained from our simulation framework are within the range of measured values in the only elaborate published clinical trial until now using Argus I epiretinal implants. An estimation of resolution for the electrodes used in these trials was provided. Our results reiterate the importance of close proximity between electrodes and retina for safe and efficient retinal stimulation. Conclusions The validation of our simulation framework being relevant for epiretinal prosthesis research is derived from the good agreement of the computed trends

  14. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes released from the bone marrow by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor: intravascular behavior.

    PubMed

    Mukae, H; Zamfir, D; English, D; Hogg, J C; van Eeden, S F

    2000-01-01

    Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) treatment stimulates the bone marrow and releases polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) into the circulation. This study was designed to measure the intravascular margination, demargination and survival of PMN released from the marrow by G-CSF. To trace PMN in the circulation, dividing PMN in the bone marrow of rabbits were labeled with 5'-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and the effects of a single dose of G-CSF (12.5 microg/kg) on the behavior of these labeled cells in the circulation were measured. The results show that G-CSF induced a granulocytosis that peaked 12 h after treatment. This granulocytosis was associated with stimulation of the bone marrow characterized by shortening of the transit time of PMN through the marrow (97.3+/-2.5 h n=4 control vs 78.9+/-3.6 h n=5 G-CSF) particularly in the post-mitotic pool (P<0.01). Morphometric studies of the lung show a reduced sequestration of BrdU-labeled PMN in lung microvessels in G-CSF-treated animals (P<0.05) and a approximately 14-fold (G-CSF-group) vs a approximately 65-fold (control-group) enrichment of BrdU-labeled PMN in lung tissue if compared to circulating blood. The effect of G-CSF on demargination of PMN was measured by transferring BrdU-labeled PMN from donor animals treated with G-CSF to recipients. G-CSF did not cause demargination of intravascular PMN but delayed the clearance of G-CSF-treated PMN in the circulation. This delayed clearance was associated with inhibition of apoptosis in circulating PMN when measured both by morphology (17.7+/-2.3 vs 7.5+/-1.4%, P<0.01) and flow cytometry (16.2+/-1.1 vs 5+/-1.9%, P<0.01) using a DNA end-labeling method (control vs G-CSF group). We conclude that PMN released from the bone marrow by G-CSF sequestered less in the lung microvessels and have a prolonged intravascular life span.

  15. Neuropeptide W stimulates adrenocorticotrophic hormone release via corticotrophin-releasing factor but not via arginine vasopressin.

    PubMed

    Yogo, Kosuke; Oki, Yutaka; Iino, Kazumi; Yamashita, Miho; Shibata, Shoko; Hayashi, Chiga; Sasaki, Shigekazu; Suenaga, Toshiko; Nakahara, Daiichiro; Nakamura, Hirotoshi

    2012-01-01

    Neuropeptide W (NPW) was isolated as an endogenous ligand for NPBWR1, an orphan G protein-coupled receptor localized in the rat brain, including the paraventricular nucleus. It has been reported that central administration of NPW stimulates corticosterone secretion in rats. We hypothesized that NPW activates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis via corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) and/or arginine vasopressin (AVP). NPW at 1 pM to 10 nM did not affect basal or ACTH-induced corticosterone release from dispersed rat adrenocortical cells, or basal and CRF-induced ACTH release from dispersed rat anterior pituitary cells. In conscious and unrestrained male rats, intravenous administration of 2.5 and 25 nmol NPW did not affect plasma ACTH levels. However, intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of 2.5 and 5.0 nmol NPW increased plasma ACTH levels in a dose-dependent manner at 15 min after stimulation (5.0 vs. 2.5 nmol NPW vs. vehicle: 1802 ± 349 vs. 1170 ± 204 vs. 151 ± 28 pg/mL, respectively, mean ± SEM). Pretreatment with astressin, a CRF receptor antagonist, inhibited the increase in plasma ACTH levels induced by icv administration of 2.5 nmol NPW at 15 min (453 ± 176 vs. 1532 ± 343 pg/mL, p<0.05) and at 30 min (564 ± 147 vs. 1214 ± 139 pg/mL, p<0.05) versus pretreatment with vehicle alone. However, pretreatment with [1-(β-mercapto-β, β-cyclopentamethylenepropionic acid), 2-(Ο-methyl)tyrosine]-arg-vasopressin, a V1a/V1b receptor antagonist, did not affect icv NPW-induced ACTH release at any time (p>0.05). In conclusion, we suggest that central NPW activates the HPA axis by activating hypothalamic CRF but not AVP.

  16. Collagen degradation and platelet-derived growth factor stimulate the migration of vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Stringa, E; Knäuper, V; Murphy, G; Gavrilovic, J

    2000-06-01

    Cell migration is a key event in many biological processes and depends on signals from both extracellular matrix and soluble motogenic factors. During atherosclerotic plaque development, vascular smooth muscle cells migrate from the tunica media to the intima through a basement membrane and interstitial collagenous matrix and proliferate to form a neointima. Matrix metalloproteinases have previously been implicated in neointimal formation and in this study smooth muscle cell adhesion and migration on degraded collagen have been evaluated. Vascular smooth muscle cells adhered to native intact collagen type I and to its first degradation by-product, 3/4 fragment (generated by collagenase-3 cleavage), unwound at 35 degrees C to mimic physiological conditions. PDGF-BB pre-treatment induced a fourfold stimulation of smooth muscle cell motility on the collagen 3/4 fragment whereas no increase in smooth muscle cell motility on collagen type I was observed. Cell migration on collagen type I was mediated by alpha2 integrin, whereas PDGF-BB-stimulated migration on the 3/4 collagen fragment was dependent on alphavbeta3 integrin. alphavbeta3 integrin was organised in clusters concentrated at the leading and trailing edges of the cells and was only expressed when cells were exposed to the 3/4 collagen fragment. Tyrphostin A9, an inhibitor of PDGF receptor-beta tyrosine kinase activity, resulted in complete abolition of migration of PDGF-BB treated cells on collagen type I and 3/4 fragment. These results strongly support the hypothesis that the cellular migratory response to soluble motogens can be regulated by proteolytic modification of the extracellular matrix.

  17. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in repeated IVF failure, a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Aleyasin, Ashraf; Abediasl, Zhila; Nazari, Atefeh; Sheikh, Mahdi

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies have revealed key roles for granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF) in embryo implantation process and maintenance of pregnancy, and some studies showed promising results by using local intrauterine infusion of GCSF in patients undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF). This multicenter, randomized, controlled trial included 112 infertile women with repeated IVF failure to evaluate the efficacy of systemic single-dose subcutaneous GCSF administration on IVF success in these women. In this study, the Long Protocol of ovarian stimulation was used for all participants. Sealed, numbered envelopes assigned 56 patients to receive subcutaneous 300 µg GCSF before implantation and 56 in the control group. The implantation (number of gestational sacs on the total number of transferred embryos), chemical pregnancy (positive serum β-HCG), and clinical pregnancy (gestational sac and fetal heart) rates were compared between the two groups. This trial is registered at www.irct.ir (IRCT201503119568N11). The successful implantation (18% vs 7.2%, P=0.007), chemical pregnancy (44.6% vs 19.6%, P=0.005), and clinical pregnancy (37.5% vs 14.3%, P=0.005) rates were significantly higher in the intervention group than in the control group. After adjustment for participants' age, endometrial thickness, good-quality oocyte counts, number of transferred embryos, and anti-Mullerian hormone levels, GCSF treatment remained significantly associated with successful implantation (OR=2.63, 95% CI=1.09-6.96), having chemical pregnancy (OR= 2.74, 95% CI=1.11-7.38) and clinical pregnancy (OR=2.94, 95% CI=1.23-8.33). In conclusion, administration of single-dose systemic subcutaneous GCSF before implantation significantly increases the IVF success, implantation, and pregnancy rates in infertile women with repeated IVF failure.

  18. Hepatocyte growth factor stimulates root growth during the development of mouse molar teeth.

    PubMed

    Sakuraba, H; Fujiwara, N; Sasaki-Oikawa, A; Sakano, M; Tabata, Y; Otsu, K; Ishizeki, K; Harada, H

    2012-02-01

    It is well known that tooth root formation is initiated by the development of Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS). However, relatively little is known about the regulatory mechanisms involved in root development. As hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is one of the mediators of epithelial-mesenchymal interactions in rodent tooth, the objective of this study was to examine the effects of HGF on the root development of mouse molars. The HERS of mouse molars and HERS01a, a cell line originated from HERS, were used in this study. For detection of HGF receptors in vivo and in vitro, we used immunochemical procedures. Root development was assessed by implanting molar tooth germs along with HGF-soaked beads into kidney capsules, by counting cell numbers in HERS01a cell cultures and by performing a 5'-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) assay in an organ-culture system. HGF receptors were expressed in the enamel epithelium of molar germs as well as in HERS cells. HGF stimulated root development in the transplanted tooth germs, the proliferation of HERS01a cells in culture and HERS elongation in the organ-culture system. Examination using BrdU revealed that cell proliferation in HERS was increased by treatment with HGF, especially that in the outer layer of HERS. This effect was down-regulated when antibody against HGF receptor was present in the culture medium. Our results raise the possibility that HGF signaling controls root formation via the development of HERS. This study is the first to show that HGF is one of the stimulators of root development. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  19. Arecoline-stimulated placenta growth factor production in gingival epithelial cells: modulation by curcumin.

    PubMed

    Cheng, S-J; Ko, H-H; Cheng, S-L; Lee, J-J; Chen, H-M; Chang, H-H; Kok, S-H; Kuo, M Y-P; Chiang, C-P

    2013-07-01

    Placenta growth factor (PlGF) is associated with the progression and prognosis of oral cancer. This study used ELISA, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and Western blotting to study the arecoline-stimulated (PlGF) protein or mRNA expression in human gingival epithelial S-G cells. Arecoline, a major areca nut alkaloid and an oral carcinogen, could stimulate PlGF protein synthesis in S-G cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The levels of PlGF protein secretion increased about 3.1- and 3.8-fold after 24-h exposure to 0.4 and 0.8 mM arecoline, respectively. Pretreatment with antioxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) and ERK inhibitor PD98059, but not NF-κB inhibitor Bay 11-7082, JNK inhibitor SP600125, p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580, and PI3-K inhibitor LY294002, significantly reduced arecoline-induced PlGF protein synthesis. ELISA analyses demonstrated that NAC and PD98059 reduced about 43% and 38% of the arecoline-induced PlGF protein secretion, respectively. However, combined treatment with NAC and PD98059 did not show additive effect. Moreover, 10 μM curcumin and 4 mM NAC significantly inhibited arecoline-induced ERK activation. Furthermore, 10 μM curcumin completely blocked arecoline-induced PlGF mRNA expression. Arecoline-induced PlGF synthesis is probably mediated by reactive oxygen species/ERK pathways, and curcumin may be an useful agent in controlling oral carcinogenesis. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Potent stimulation of fibroblast growth factor 19 expression in the human ileum by bile acids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Justine H; Nolan, Jonathan D; Kennie, Sarah L; Johnston, Ian M; Dew, Tracy; Dixon, Peter H; Williamson, Catherine; Walters, Julian R F

    2013-05-15

    Fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) is proposed to be a negative feedback regulator of hepatic bile acid (BA) synthesis. We aimed to clarify the distribution of FGF19 expression in human intestine and to investigate induction in a novel explant system. Ileal and colonic mucosal biopsies were obtained at endoscopy and analyzed for FGF19 transcript expression. Primary explants were incubated with physiological concentrations of various BA for up to 6 h, and expression of FGF19 and other genes was determined. FGF19 transcripts were detected in ileum but were unquantifiable in colon. No loss of FGF19 mRNA occurred as a consequence of the explant system. Ileal FGF19 transcript expression was induced 350-fold by 50 μM chenodeoxycholate (CDCA, n = 24, P < 0.0001) and 161-fold by 50 μM glycochenodeoxycholate (GCDCA, n = 12, P = 0.0005). The responses of other genes to CDCA or GCDCA (50 μM) were smaller: median increases of ileal bile acid binding protein, organic solute transporter-α and -β, and short heterodimer partner were 2.4- to 4.0-fold; apical membrane sodium bile acid transporter and farnesoid X receptor (FXR) showed little change. The EC50 for FGF19 transcript induction by CDCA was 20 μM. FGF19 protein concentrations were significantly higher in the culture fluid from BA-stimulated explants. FGF19 induction with cholate was 81% of that found with CDCA, but deoxycholate (40%) and lithocholate (4%) were significantly less potent. The synthetic FXR agonist obeticholic acid was much more potent than CDCA with a 70-fold FGF19 stimulation at 1 μM. We concluded that FGF19 expression in human ileum is very highly responsive to BA. Changes in FGF19 induction are a potential mechanism involved in disorders of BA homeostasis.

  1. Potent stimulation of fibroblast growth factor 19 expression in the human ileum by bile acids

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Justine H.; Nolan, Jonathan D.; Kennie, Sarah L.; Johnston, Ian M.; Dew, Tracy; Dixon, Peter H.; Williamson, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) is proposed to be a negative feedback regulator of hepatic bile acid (BA) synthesis. We aimed to clarify the distribution of FGF19 expression in human intestine and to investigate induction in a novel explant system. Ileal and colonic mucosal biopsies were obtained at endoscopy and analyzed for FGF19 transcript expression. Primary explants were incubated with physiological concentrations of various BA for up to 6 h, and expression of FGF19 and other genes was determined. FGF19 transcripts were detected in ileum but were unquantifiable in colon. No loss of FGF19 mRNA occurred as a consequence of the explant system. Ileal FGF19 transcript expression was induced 350-fold by 50 μM chenodeoxycholate (CDCA, n = 24, P < 0.0001) and 161-fold by 50 μM glycochenodeoxycholate (GCDCA, n = 12, P = 0.0005). The responses of other genes to CDCA or GCDCA (50 μM) were smaller: median increases of ileal bile acid binding protein, organic solute transporter-α and -β, and short heterodimer partner were 2.4- to 4.0-fold; apical membrane sodium bile acid transporter and farnesoid X receptor (FXR) showed little change. The EC50 for FGF19 transcript induction by CDCA was 20 μM. FGF19 protein concentrations were significantly higher in the culture fluid from BA-stimulated explants. FGF19 induction with cholate was 81% of that found with CDCA, but deoxycholate (40%) and lithocholate (4%) were significantly less potent. The synthetic FXR agonist obeticholic acid was much more potent than CDCA with a 70-fold FGF19 stimulation at 1 μM. We concluded that FGF19 expression in human ileum is very highly responsive to BA. Changes in FGF19 induction are a potential mechanism involved in disorders of BA homeostasis. PMID:23518683

  2. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor induces prolactin expression in rat pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Satoya; Kurotani, Reiko; Miyano, Yuki; Sakahara, Satoshi; Koike, Kanako; Maruyama, Minoru; Ishikawa, Fumio; Sakatai, Ichiro; Abe, Hiroyuki; Sakai, Takafumi

    2014-06-01

    We investigated the role of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) in the pituitary gland to understand the effect of M-CSF on pituitary hormones and the relationship between the endocrine and immune systems. When we attempted to establish pituitary cell lines from a thyrotropic pituitary tumor (TtT), a macrophage cell line, TtT/M-87, was established. We evaluated M-CSF-like activity in conditioned media (CM) from seven pituitary cell lines using TtT/M-87 cells. TtT/M-87 proliferation significantly increased in the presence of CM from TtT/GF cells, a pituitary folliculostellate (FS) cell line. M-CSF mRNA was detected in TtT/GF and MtT/E cells by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and its expression in TtT/GF cells was increased in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) dose-dependent manner. M-CSF mRNA expression was also increased in rat anterior pituitary glands by LPS. M-CSF receptor (M-CSFR) mRNA was only detected in TtT/ M-87 cells and increased in the LPS-stimulated rat pituitary glands. In rat pituitary glands, M-CSF and M-CSFR were found to be localized in FS cells and prolactin (PRL)-secreting cells, respectively, by immunohistochemistry. The PRL concentration in rat sera was significantly increased at 24 h after M-CSF administration, and mRNA levels significantly increased in primary culture cells of rat anterior pituitary glands. In addition, TNF-α mRNA was increased in the primary culture cells by M-CSF. These results revealed that M-CSF was secreted from FS cells and M-CSF regulated PRL expression in rat pituitary glands.

  3. Rhinovirus stimulation of interleukin-6 in vivo and in vitro. Evidence for nuclear factor kappa B-dependent transcriptional activation.

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Z; Tang, W; Ray, A; Wu, Y; Einarsson, O; Landry, M L; Gwaltney, J; Elias, J A

    1996-01-01

    To further understand the biology of rhinovirus (RV), we determined whether IL-6 was produced during RV infections and characterized the mechanism by which RV stimulates lung cell IL-6 production. In contrast to normals and minimally symptomatic volunteers, IL-6 was detected in the nasal washings from patients who developed colds after RV challenge. RV14 and RV1A, major and minor receptor group RVs, respectively, were potent stimulators of IL-6 protein production in vitro. These effects were associated with significant increases in IL-6 mRNA accumulation and gene transcription. RV was also a potent stimulator of IL-6 promoter-driven luciferase activity. This stimulation was modestly decreased by mutation of the nuclear factor (NF)-IL-6 site and abrogated by mutation of the NF-kappa B site in this promoter. An NF-kappa B-DNA binding activity, mediated by p65, p50, and p52 NF-kappa B moieties, was rapidly induced in RV-infected cells. Activator protein 1-DNA binding was not similarly altered. These studies demonstrate that IL-6 is produced during symptomatic RV infections, that RVs are potent stimulators of IL-6 elaboration, and that RV stimulation IL-6 production is mediated by an NF-kappa B-dependent transcriptional stimulation pathway. IL-6 may play an important role in the pathogenesis of RV infection, and NF-kappa B activation is likely to be an important event in RV-induced pathologies. PMID:8567963

  4. Immunostimulation using granulocyte- and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock.

    PubMed

    Schefold, Joerg C

    2011-01-01

    Sepsis is associated with failure of multiple organs, including failure of the immune system. The resulting 'sepsis-associated immunosuppression' resembles a state of immunological anergy that is characterized by repeated 'infectious hits', prolonged multiple-organ failure, and death. As a consequence, adjunctive treatment approaches using measures of immunostimulation with colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) were tested in animal experiments and clinical trials. Herein, data from randomized clinical trials will be discussed in the context of a recently published meta-analysis investigating the effects of granulocyte- and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor therapy in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock.

  5. Transforming growth factor-beta stimulates the expression of fibronectin by human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Wikner, N E; Persichitte, K A; Baskin, J B; Nielsen, L D; Clark, R A

    1988-09-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) is a 25-kD protein which has regulatory activity over a variety of cell types. It is distinct from epidermal growth factor (EGF) and EGF analogs, and exerts its action via a distinct receptor. Its effect on proliferation or differentiation can be positive or negative depending on the cell type and the presence of other growth factors. It also modulates the expression of cellular products. TGF-beta causes fibroblasts to increase their production of the extracellular matrix components, fibronectin and collagen. Human keratinocytes (HK) are known to have TGF-beta receptors. We wished to study the effect of TGF-beta on the production of extracellular matrix proteins by human keratinocytes in culture. Human keratinocytes were grown in serum-free defined medium (MCDB-153) to about 70% confluence. Following a 16-h incubation in medium lacking EGF and TGF-beta, cells were incubated for 12 h in medium containing varying concentrations of EGF and TGF-beta. Cells were then labeled with 35S-methionine for 10 h in the same conditions. Labeled proteins from the medium were analyzed by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography. TGF-beta at 10 ng/ml induced a sixfold increase in the secretion of fibronectin, as well as an unidentified 50-kD protein. Thrombospondin production was also increased, but not over a generalized twofold increase in the production of all other proteins. EGF, at 10 ng/ml, caused a smaller additive effect. TGF-beta may be an important stimulator of extracellular matrix production by human keratinocytes.

  6. Differential processing of colony-stimulating factor 1 precursors encoded by two human cDNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Rettenmier, C W; Roussel, M F

    1988-01-01

    The biosynthesis of macrophage colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1) was examined in mouse NIH-3T3 fibroblasts transfected with a retroviral vector expressing the 554-amino-acid product of a human 4-kilobase (kb) CSF-1 cDNA. Similar to results previously obtained with a 1.6-kb human cDNA that codes for a 256-amino-acid CSF-1 precursor, the results of the present study showed that NIH-3T3 cells expressing the product of the 4-kb clone produced biologically active human CSF-1 and were transformed by an autocrine mechanism when cotransfected with a vector containing a human c-fms (CSF-1 receptor) cDNA. The 4-kb CSF-1 cDNA product was synthesized as an integral transmembrane glycoprotein that was assembled into disulfide-linked dimers and rapidly underwent proteolytic cleavage to generate a soluble growth factor. Although the smaller CSF-1 precursor specified by the 1.6-kb human cDNA was stably expressed as a membrane-bound glycoprotein at the cell surface and was slowly cleaved to release the extracellular growth factor, the cell-associated product of the 4-kb clone was efficiently processed to the secreted form and was not detected on the plasma membrane. Digestion with glycosidic enzymes indicated that soluble CSF-1 encoded by the 4-kb cDNA contained both asparagine(N)-linked and O-linked carbohydrate chains, whereas the product of the 1.6-kb clone had only N-linked oligosaccharides. Removal of the carbohydrate indicated that the polypeptide chain of the secreted 4-kb cDNA product was longer than that of the corresponding form encoded by the smaller clone. These differences in posttranslational processing may reflect diverse physiological roles for the products of the two CSF-1 precursors in vivo. Images PMID:3264877

  7. Cloning and expression of feline colony stimulating factor receptor (CSF-1R) and analysis of the species specificity of stimulation by colony stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) and interleukin-34 (IL-34)

    PubMed Central

    Gow, Deborah J.; Garceau, Valerie; Pridans, Clare; Gow, Adam G.; Simpson, Kerry E.; Gunn-Moore, Danielle; Hume, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Colony stimulating factor (CSF-1) and its receptor, CSF-1R, have been previously well studied in humans and rodents to dissect the role they play in development of cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system. A second ligand for the CSF-1R, IL-34 has been described in several species. In this study, we have cloned and expressed the feline CSF-1R and examined the responsiveness to CSF-1 and IL-34 from a range of species. The results indicate that pig and human CSF-1 and human IL-34 are equally effective in cats, where both mouse CSF-1 and IL-34 are significantly less active. Recombinant human CSF-1 can be used to generate populations of feline bone marrow and monocyte derived macrophages that can be used to further dissect macrophage-specific gene expression in this species, and to compare it to data derived from mouse, human and pig. These results set the scene for therapeutic use of CSF-1 and IL-34 in cats. PMID:23260168

  8. The combination of stem cell factor and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor for chronic stroke treatment in aged animals

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Stroke occurs more frequently in the elderly population and presents the number one leading cause of persistent disability worldwide. Lack of effective treatment to enhance brain repair and improve functional restoration in chronic stroke, the recovery phase of stroke, is a challenging medical problem to be solved in stroke research. Our early study has revealed the therapeutic effects of stem cell factor (SCF) in combination with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) (SCF+G-CSF) on chronic stroke in young animals. However, whether this treatment is effective and safe to the aged population remains to be determined. Methods Cortical brain ischemia was produced in aged C57BL mice or aged spontaneously hypertensive rats. SCF+G-CSF or equal volume of vehicle solution was subcutaneously injected for 7 days beginning at 3–4 months after induction of cortical brain ischemia. Using the approaches of biochemistry assays, flow cytometry, pathology, and evaluation of functional outcome, several doses of SCF+G-CSF have been examined for their safety and efficiency on chronic stroke in aged animals. Results All tested doses did not show acute or chronic toxicity in the aged animals. Additionally, SCF+G-CSF treatment in chronic stroke of aged animals mobilized bone marrow stem cells and improved functional outcome in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusions SCF+G-CSF treatment is a safe and effective approach to chronic stroke in the aged condition. This study provides important information needed for developing a new therapeutic strategy to improve the health of older adults with chronic stroke. PMID:23254113

  9. Adiponectin stimulates Wnt inhibitory factor-1 expression through epigenetic regulations involving the transcription factor specificity protein 1.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Lam, Janice B B; Chow, Kim H M; Xu, Aimin; Lam, Karen S L; Moon, Randall T; Wang, Yu

    2008-11-01

    Adiponectin (ADN) is an adipokine possessing growth inhibitory activities against various types of cancer cells. Our previous results demonstrated that ADN could impede Wnt/beta-catenin-signaling pathways in MDA-MB-231 human breast carcinoma cells [Wang,Y. et al. (2006) Adiponectin modulates the glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta/beta-catenin signaling pathway and attenuates mammary tumorigenesis of MDA-MB-231 cells in nude mice. Cancer Res., 66, 11462-11470]. Here, we extended our studies to elucidate the effects of ADN on regulating the expressions of Wnt inhibitory factor-1 (WIF1), a Wnt antagonist frequently silenced in human breast tumors. Our results showed that ADN time dependently stimulated WIF1 gene and protein expressions in MDA-MB-231 cells. Overexpression of WIF1 exerted similar inhibitory effects to those of ADN on cell proliferations, nuclear beta-catenin activities, cyclin D1 expressions and serum-induced phosphorylations of Akt and glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta. Blockage of WIF1 activities significantly attenuated the suppressive effects of ADN on MDA-MB-231 cell growth. Furthermore, our in vivo studies showed that both supplementation of recombinant ADN and adenovirus-mediated overexpression of this adipokine substantially enhanced WIF1 expressions in MDA-MB-231 tumors implanted in nude mice. More interestingly, we found that ADN could alleviate methylation of CpG islands located within the proximal promoter region of WIF1, possibly involving the specificity protein 1 (Sp1) transcription factor and its downstream target DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1). Upon ADN treatment, the protein levels of both Sp1 and DNMT1 were significantly decreased. Using silencing RNA approaches, we confirmed that downregulation of Sp1 resulted in an increased expression of WIF1 and decreased methylation of WIF1 promoter. Taken together, these data suggest that ADN might elicit its antitumor activities at least partially through promoting WIF1 expressions.

  10. Stem cell factor and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor exhibit therapeutic effects in a mouse model of CADASIL.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Yun; Gonzalez-Toledo, Maria E; Fagan, Austin; Duan, Wei-Ming; Liu, Yanying; Zhang, Siyuan; Li, Bin; Piao, Chun-Shu; Nelson, Lila; Zhao, Li-Ru

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL), a Notch3 dominant mutation-induced cerebral small vascular disease, is characterized by progressive degeneration of vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMCs) of small arteries in the brain, leading to recurrent ischemic stroke, vascular dementia and death. To date, no treatment can stop or delay the progression of this disease. Herein, we determined the therapeutic effects of stem cell factor (SCF) in combination with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) (SCF+G-CSF) in a mouse model of CADASIL carrying the human mutant Notch3 gene. SCF+G-CSF was subcutaneously administered for 5 days and repeated 4 times with 1-4 month intervals. We found through water maze testing that SCF+G-CSF treatment improved cognitive function. SCF+G-CSF also attenuated vSMC degeneration in small arteries, increased cerebral blood vascular density, and inhibited apoptosis in CADASIL mice. We also discovered that loss of cerebral capillary endothelial cells and neural stem cells/neural progenitor cells (NSCs/NPCs) occurred in CADASIL mice. SCF+G-CSF treatment inhibited the CADASIL-induced cell loss in the endothelia and NSCs/NPCs and promoted neurogenesis. In an in vitro model of apoptosis, SCF+G-CSF prevented apoptotic cell death in vSMCs through AKT signaling and by inhibiting caspase-3 activity. These data suggest that SCF+G-CSF restricts the pathological progression of CADASIL. This study offers new insights into developing therapeutic strategies for CADASIL.

  11. Structure of the SH3 domain of human osteoclast-stimulating factor at atomic resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Liqing Wang, Yujun; Wells, David; Toh, Diana; Harold, Hunt; Zhou, Jing; DiGiammarino, Enrico; Meehan, Edward J.

    2006-09-01

    The crystal structure of the SH3 domain of human osteoclast-stimulating factor has been determined and refined to the ultrahigh resolution of 1.07 Å. The structure at atomic resolution provides an accurate framework for structure-based design of its inhibitors. Osteoclast-stimulating factor (OSF) is an intracellular signaling protein, produced by osteoclasts themselves, that enhances osteoclast formation and bone resorption. It is thought to act via an Src-related signaling pathway and contains SH3 and ankyrin-repeat domains which are involved in protein–protein interactions. As part of a structure-based anti-bone-loss drug-design program, the atomic resolution X-ray structure of the recombinant human OSF SH3 domain (hOSF-SH3) has been determined. The domain, residues 12–72, yielded crystals that diffracted to the ultrahigh resolution of 1.07 Å. The overall structure shows a characteristic SH3 fold consisting of two perpendicular β-sheets that form a β-barrel. Structure-based sequence alignment reveals that the putative proline-rich peptide-binding site of hOSF-SH3 consists of (i) residues that are highly conserved in the SH3-domain family, including residues Tyr21, Phe23, Trp49, Pro62, Asn64 and Tyr65, and (ii) residues that are less conserved and/or even specific to hOSF, including Thr22, Arg26, Thr27, Glu30, Asp46, Thr47, Asn48 and Leu60, which might be key to designing specific inhibitors for hOSF to fight osteoporosis and related bone-loss diseases. There are a total of 13 well defined water molecules forming hydrogen bonds with the above residues in and around the peptide-binding pocket. Some of those water molecules might be important for drug-design approaches. The hOSF-SH3 structure at atomic resolution provides an accurate framework for structure-based design of its inhibitors.

  12. Human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (hG-CSF): cloning, overexpression, purification and characterization

    PubMed Central

    Vanz, Ana LS; Renard, Gaby; Palma, Mario S; Chies, Jocelei M; Dalmora, Sérgio L; Basso, Luiz A; Santos, Diógenes S

    2008-01-01

    Background Biopharmaceutical drugs are mainly recombinant proteins produced by biotechnological tools. The patents of many biopharmaceuticals have expired, and biosimilars are thus currently being developed. Human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (hG-CSF) is a hematopoietic cytokine that acts on cells of the neutrophil lineage causing proliferation and differentiation of committed precursor cells and activation of mature neutrophils. Recombinant hG-CSF has been produced in genetically engineered Escherichia coli (Filgrastim) and successfully used to treat cancer patients suffering from chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. Filgrastim is a 175 amino acid protein, containing an extra N-terminal methionine, which is needed for expression in E. coli. Here we describe a simple and low-cost process that is amenable to scaling-up for the production and purification of homogeneous and active recombinant hG-CSF expressed in E. coli cells. Results Here we describe cloning of the human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor coding DNA sequence, protein expression in E. coli BL21(DE3) host cells in the absence of isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) induction, efficient isolation and solubilization of inclusion bodies by a multi-step washing procedure, and a purification protocol using a single cationic exchange column. Characterization of homogeneous rhG-CSF by size exclusion and reverse phase chromatography showed similar yields to the standard. The immunoassay and N-terminal sequencing confirmed the identity of rhG-CSF. The biological activity assay, in vivo, showed an equivalent biological effect (109.4%) to the standard reference rhG-CSF. The homogeneous rhG-CSF protein yield was 3.2 mg of bioactive protein per liter of cell culture. Conclusion The recombinant protein expression in the absence of IPTG induction is advantageous since cost is reduced, and the protein purification protocol using a single chromatographic step should reduce cost even further for large

  13. Effect of endotoxin on serum granulocyte and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor levels in dogs.

    PubMed

    Dale, D C; Lau, S; Nash, R; Boone, T; Osborne, W

    1992-04-01

    The biologic effects of endotoxin are attributed to the release of several cytokines, including interleukin-1, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor, and the colony-stimulating factors. To investigate the mechanism of endotoxin-induced neutrophilia in dogs, several cell lines known to proliferate selectively in response to recombinant human colony-stimulating factors were examined to determine their responses to recombinant canine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rcG-CSF) or recombinant canine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rcGM-CSF). The murine cell line NFS-60 was found to respond well to rcG-CSF and the human cell line TALL-101 to rcGM-CSF, and these responses were neutralized by antibodies to these recombinant proteins. These bioassays were then used to determine G-CSF and GM-CSF levels in dogs after intravenous endotoxin administration. G-CSF levels increased by 2 h, peaked at 4 h, and had not returned to normal by 24 h after endotoxin. In contrast, GM-CSF was not detectible before or after endotoxin administration.

  14. A pre-formed Pyrogenic Factor Released by Lipopolysaccharide Stimulated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Zampronio, A. R.; Melo, M. C. C.; Silva, C. A. A.; Pelá, I. R.; Hopkins, S. J.

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the pyrogenic activity of factor(s) released by rat peritoneal macrophages following a brief stimulation with LPS. The effect of this factor on the number of circulating leukocytes and serum Fe, Cu and Zn levels, was also evaluated. The possibility that the content of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF) in the supernatant could explain the observations was investigated. Supernatant produced over a period of 1 h by peritoneal macrophages, following a 30 min incubation with LPS at 37°C, was ultrafiltered through a 10 000 MW cut-off Amicon membrane, sterilized, and concentrated 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 times. The intravenous (i.v.) injection of this supernatant induced a concentration-dependent fever in rats with a maximal response at 2 h. The pyrogenic activity was produced by macrophages elicited with thioglycollate and by resident cells. The supernatants also induced neutrophilia and reduction in Fe and Zn 6 h after the injection. Absence of activity in boiled supernatants, or supernatants from macrophages incubated at 4°C with LPS, indicates that LPS was not responsible for the activity. In vitro treatment with indomethacin (Indo), dexamethasone (Dex), or cycloheximide (Chx) did not modify the release of pyrogenic activity into the supernatant or its effects on the reduction in serum metal levels. Although Chx abolished the production of mediator(s) inducing neutrophilia, and Dex reduced the induction of IL-1β, TNF and IL-6, injection of the highest concentration of these cytokines detected in the supernatants did not induce fever. In vivo treatment with Dex, but not Indo, abolished the fever induced by the supernatant. These results suggest that macrophages contain pre-formed pyrogenic mediator(s), not related to IL-1β, IL-6 or TNF, that acts indirectly and independently of prostaglandtn. It also seems likely that the pyrogenic activity is related to the factor responsible for the reduction of serum Fe

  15. The reaction of the sponge Chondrosia reniformis to mechanical stimulation is mediated by the outer epithelium and the release of stiffening factor(s).

    PubMed

    Fassini, Dario; Parma, Lorenzo; Lembo, Francesco; Candia Carnevali, M Daniela; Wilkie, Iain C; Bonasoro, Francesco

    2014-08-01

    Although sponges are still often considered to be simple, inactive animals, both larvae and adults of different species show clear coordination phenomena triggered by extrinsic and intrinsic stimuli. Chondrosia reniformis, a common Mediterranean demosponge, lacks both endogenous siliceous spicules and reinforcing spongin fibers and has a very conspicuous collagenous mesohyl. Although this species can stiffen its body in response to mechanical stimulation when handled, almost no quantitative data are available in the literature on this phenomenon. The present work was intended to quantify the dynamic response to mechanical stimulation both of intact animals and isolated tissue samples in order to evaluate: (i) the magnitude of stiffening; (ii) the relationship between the amount of stimulation and the magnitude of the stiffening response; (iii) the ability of the whole body to react to localized stimulation; (iv) the possible occurrence of a conduction mechanism and the role of the exopinacoderm (outer epithelium). Data on mesohyl tensility obtained with mechanical tests confirmed the difference between stimulated and non-stimulated isolated tissue samples, showing a significant relationship between ectosome stiffness and the amount of mechanical stimulation. Our experiments revealed a significant difference in tensility between undisturbed and maximally stiffened sponges and evidence of signal transmission that requires a continuous exopinacoderm. We also provide further evidence for the presence of a chemical factor that alters the interaction between collagen fibrils, thereby changing the mechanical properties of the mesohyl. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Induction of prostaglandin E synthesis in normal and neoplastic macrophages: role for colony-stimulating factor(s) distinct from effects on myeloid progenitor cell proliferation.

    PubMed Central

    Kurland, J I; Pelus, L M; Ralph, P; Bockman, R S; Moore, M A

    1979-01-01

    The biosynthesis of prostaglandin E (PGE) by normal and neoplastic macrophages is intrinsically linked to their synthesis of, and exposure to, myeloid colony-stimulating factors (CS-factors). The defect in responsiveness to endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) by macrophages from C3H/HeJ mice extends equally to the synthesis of CS-factor and PGE. However, C3H/HeJ macrophages can be stimulated to synthesize PGE by treatment with agents other than LPS [zymosan, tuberculin purified protein derivative, concanavalin A, poly(I).poly(C)], which also stimulate CS-factor production, or by the addition of various preparations of soluble CS-factor. In peritoneal wash preparations, constitutive PGE synthesis occurred in rapidly sedimenting macrophage cells, whereas constitutive CS-factor production and inducible PGE synthesis occurred in slower sedimenting adherent cells. A similar functional heterogeneity in CS-factor and PGE production was found in neoplastic macrophagae cell lines. The association of elevated CS-factor levels and PGE synthesis by macrophages suggests a role for CS-factor in many of the physiological responses heretofore associated with elevated tissue levels of the E type prostaglandins. PMID:313054

  17. Biphasic Stimulation of Translational Activity Correlates with Induction of Translation Elongation Factor 1 Subunit [alpha] upon Wounding in Potato Tubers.

    PubMed Central

    Morelli, J. K.; Shewmaker, C. K.; Vayda, M. E.

    1994-01-01

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum) tubers exhibit an increase in translational activity in response to mechanical wounding. The response is biphasic, with an initial stimulation apparent within the first 2 h after wounding and a second increase occurring 12 to 24 h after wounding. Increased activity is apparent by measurement of protein synthesis both in vivo and in vitro using a cell-free extract. Accumulation of the translational elongation factor 1 subunit [alpha] (EF-1[alpha]) parallels translational activity. Changes in the steady-state level of EF-1[alpha] mRNA, and expression of a chimeric EF-1[alpha] promoter/[beta]-glucuronidase construct in transgenic potato tubers, indicate that the gene encoding EF-1[alpha] is transcribed during both periods of translational stimulation. These results indicate that stimulation of translational activity is coordinated with increased expression and accumulation of translation factors. PMID:12232374

  18. Pro-inflammatory stimulation of meniscus cells increases production of matrix metalloproteinases and additional catabolic factors involved in osteoarthritis pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Austin V.; Loeser, Richard F.; Vanderman, Kadie S.; Long, David L.; Clark, Stephanie C.; Ferguson, Cristin M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Meniscus injury increases the risk of osteoarthritis; however, the biologic mechanism remains unknown. We hypothesized that pro-inflammatory stimulation of meniscus would increase production of matrix-degrading enzymes, cytokines and chemokines which cause joint tissue destruction and could contribute to osteoarthritis development. Design Meniscus and cartilage tissue from healthy tissue donors and total knee arthroplasties was cultured. Primary cell cultures were stimulated with pro-inflammatory factors [IL-1β, IL-6, or fibronectin fragments (FnF)] and cellular responses were analyzed by real-time PCR, protein arrays and immunoblots. To determine if NF-κB was required for MMP production, meniscus cultures were treated with inflammatory factors with and without the NF-κB inhibitor, hypoestoxide. Results Normal and osteoarthritic meniscus cells increased their MMP secretion in response to stimulation, but specific patterns emerged that were unique to each stimulus with the greatest number of MMPs expressed in response to FnF. Meniscus collagen and connective tissue growth factor gene expression was reduced. Expression of cytokines (IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6), chemokines (IL-8, CXCL1, CXCL2, CSF1) and components of the NF-κB and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family were significantly increased. Cytokine and chemokine protein production was also increased by stimulation. When primary cell cultures were treated with hypoestoxide in conjunction with pro-inflammatory stimulation, p65 activation was reduced as were MMP-1 and MMP-3 production. Conclusions Pro-inflammatory stimulation of meniscus cells increased matrix metalloproteinase production and catabolic gene expression. The meniscus could have an active biologic role in osteoarthritis development following joint injury through increased production of cytokines, chemokines, and matrix-degrading enzymes. PMID:24315792

  19. Human Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor (hG-CSF) Expression in Plastids of Lactuca sativa

    PubMed Central

    Sharifi Tabar, Mehdi; Habashi, Ali Akbar; Rajabi Memari, Hamid

    2013-01-01

    Background: Human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (hG-CSF) can serve as valuable biopharmaceutical for research and treatment of the human blood cancer. Transplastomic plants have been emerged as a new and high potential candidate for production of recombinant biopharmaceutical proteins in comparison with transgenic plants due to extremely high level expression, biosafety and many other advantages. Methods: hG-CSF gene was cloned into pCL vector between prrn16S promoter and TpsbA terminator. The recombinant vector was coated on nanogold particles and transformed to lettuce chloroplasts through biolistic method. Callogenesis and regeneration of cotyledonary explants were obtained by Murashige and Skoog media containing 6-benzylaminopurine and 1-naphthaleneacetic acid hormones. The presence of hG-CSF gene in plastome was studied with four specific PCR primers and expression by Western immunoblotting. Results: hG-CSF gene cloning was confirmed by digestion and sequencing. Transplastomic lettuce lines were regenerated and subjected to molecular analysis. The presence of hG-CSF in plastome was confirmed by PCR using specific primers designed from the plastid genome. Western immunoblotting of extracted protein from transplastomic plants showed a 20-kDa band, which verified the expression of recombinant protein in lettuce chloroplasts. Conclusions: This study is the first report that successfully express hG-CSF gene in lettuce chloroplast. The lettuce plastome can provide a cheap and safe expression platform for producing valuable biopharmaceuticals for research and treatment. PMID:23748895

  20. Granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor attenuates endothelial hyperpermeability after thermal injury.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jingling; Chen, Lei; Shu, Bin; Tang, Jinming; Zhang, Lijun; Xie, Julin; Liu, Xusheng; Xu, Yingbin; Qi, Shaohai

    2015-01-01

    Microvascular hyperpermeability followed by burn injury is the main cause of shock, and cardiovascular collapse can result if the condition is treated improperly. Our previous studies demonstrated that granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) clearly reduces microvascular permeability and protects microvessels against burn injury. However, the mechanism underlying the protective function of GM-CSF on burn-injured microvessels remains unknown. This study aimed to investigate the effect and mechanism of GM-CSF on endothelial cells after exposure to burn serum. We demonstrated that GM-CSF reduced post-burn endothelial "capillary leak" by inhibiting the activity of RhoA and maintaining the membrane localization of VE-cadherin. Membranous VE-cadherin enhances adherens junctions between endothelial cells and co-localizes with and activates VEGFR2, which protect cells from burn serum-induced apoptosis. Our findings suggest that the protective mechanism of GM-CSF on burn serum-injured endothelial monolayer hyperpermeability is achieved by strengthening cell adherens junctions and improving cell viability.

  1. NUTRITIONAL FACTORS STIMULATING THE FORMATION OF LYSINE DECARBOXYLASE IN ESCHERICHIA COLI

    PubMed Central

    Maretzki, Andrew; Mallette, M. F.

    1962-01-01

    Maretzki, Andrew (Pennsylvania State University, University Park) and M. F. Mallette. Nutritional factors stimulating the formation of lysine decarboxylase in Escherichia coli. J. Bacteriol. 83:720–726. 1962 — Inclusion of complex nitrogen sources in the induction medium was shown to be necessary for the synthesis of appreciable amounts of l-lysine decarboxylase by Escherichia coli B. Hy-case, a commercial acid hydrolyzate of casein, was especially effective in enzyme production, which was assayed manometrically after lysis of the bacteria from without by bacteriophage. Partial fractionation of the Hy-case, identification of the free amino acids, and addition of these amino acids to test media revealed stimulatory effects by methionine, threonine, proline, leucine, and tyrosine. A full complement of amino acids did not match the enzyme levels reached in the presence of Hy-case. Certain peptide fractions obtained from this mixture supplemented the effects of the amino acids in such a way as to suggest direct incorporation of peptide rather than transport or protective roles. Added purines, pyrimidines, iron, and water-soluble vitamins were without effect. Neither carbohydrates nor phosphorylated materials could be detected in the stimulatory fractions. PMID:14469751

  2. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor increases the platelet volume in peripheral stem cell apheresis donors.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Akihiro; Matsui, Keiko; Minami, Ryouta; Uchida, Shuzou; Ueda, Shuji; Nishiura, Tetsuo

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the short-term influence of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) administration on platelet counts and platelet indices in 12 donors (8 males and 4 females; median age 34 years, range 16-49) for peripheral stem cell transplantation using an automated blood cell analyzer. On day 3 (D3) compared with D0, 11 donors with normal laboratory and physical findings showed increases in platelet indices (chi(2) = 12.0, p = 0.0025). Furthermore, mean platelet volume (MPV) was significantly increased (p = 0.04). Also, platelet count decreased, and platelet distribution width and platelet-large cell ratio were increased, but these were not significant. On the contrary, 1 donor with abnormal laboratory findings who had large platelets (MPV 11.4 fl) before G-CSF administration showed decreases in platelet indices (MPV 10.3 fl) on D3, although platelet count (18.2 x 10(4)/microl) decreased after G-CSF administration. G-CSF administration induces an inflammatory process with endothelial cell activation. This is probably the reason why platelet volume increases after G-CSF use. This is the first report showing that G-CSF administration immediately induces increases in large platelets in peripheral stem cell transplant donors before harvest.

  3. Sulfasalazine-induced DRESS and severe agranulocytosis successfully treated by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Fathallah, Neila; Slim, Raoudha; Rached, Salaheddine; Hachfi, Wissem; Letaief, Amel; Ben Salem, Chaker

    2015-08-01

    A drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptom (DRESS) is a severe and rare adverse-drug hypersensitivity syndrome. The evolution of DRESS is unpredictable and haematological abnormalities may occur in 50 % of cases. Sulfasalazine (SSZ) is rarely associated with DRESS. Agranulocytosis is a rare but recognized side-effect to SSZ. Both DRESS and agranulocytosis were not reported previously with SSZ. We report a case of SSZ-induced DRESS followed by severe agranulocytosis occurring in a 25-year-old man. The patient's general condition and laboratory tests gradually improved after the administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF). In our patient, the co-occurrence of DRESS and agranulocytosis is unlikely to be coincidental. Immunological mechanisms may play an important role in drug associated agranulocytosis in patients presenting DRESS. According to the Naranjo's algorithm the likelihood that our patient's DRESS and agranulocytosis occurred as a result of therapy with SSZ is probable. G-CSF was found to be useful in shortening the duration of granulocyte recovery in drug-induced agranulocytosis. Careful monitoring of neutrophil counts is required on SSZ therapy as well as in the course of DRESS.

  4. Functional characterization of recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (hGMCSF) immobilized onto silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Vanitha, Selvarajan; Goswami, Upashi; Chaubey, Nidhi; Ghosh, Siddhartha S; Sanpui, Pallab

    2016-02-01

    Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GMCSF), an important therapeutic cytokine, was immobilized onto silica nanoparticles. Maintenance of structural integrity and biological performance in immobilized cytokine was assessed to augment its applicability in possible biomedical implications. Following its cloning and expression in E. coli, the recombinant human GMCSF (hGMCSF) was purified as a GST-tagged protein corresponding to a 42 kDa band on SDS-PAGE. The purified cytokine was immobilized onto biocompatible silica nanoparticles (~129.4 nm) by adsorption and the binding was confirmed by dynamic light scattering and infrared spectroscopy. Maximum binding of hGMCSF was at 6.4 µg mg(-1) silica nanoparticles. Efficient release of the cytokine from the nanoparticles with its structural integrity intact was deduced from circular dichroism spectroscopy. hGMCSF-immobilized silica nanoparticles efficiently increased the proliferation of RAW 264.7 macrophage cells with 50 % increase in proliferation at 600 ng hGMCSF µg(-1) silica nanoparticles. Silica nanoparticles successfully immobilized hGMCSF maintaining its structural integrity. The release of the immobilized cytokine from silica nanoparticles resulted in the increased proliferation of macrophages indicating the potential of the system in future applications.

  5. Biosimilar granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor for healthy donor stem cell mobilization: need we be afraid?

    PubMed

    Bonig, Halvard; Becker, Petra S; Schwebig, Arnd; Turner, Matthew

    2015-02-01

    Biosimilars are approved biologics with comparable quality, safety, and efficacy to a reference product. Unlike generics, which are chemically manufactured copies of small-molecule drugs with relatively simple chemical structures, the biosimilar designation is applied to drugs that are produced by living organisms, implying much more difficult to control manufacturing and purification procedures. To account for these complexities, the European Medicines Agency (EMA), the US Food and Drug Administration, the Australian Therapeutic Goods Administration, and other regulatory authorities have devised and implemented specific, markedly more demanding pathways for the evaluation and approval of biosimilars. To date, several biosimilars have been approved, including versions of somatropin, erythropoietin, and granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), and several biosimilar monoclonal antibodies are currently in development. The reference G-CSF product (Neupogen, Amgen) has been used for many years for prevention and treatment of neutropenia and also for mobilization of peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs). However, concerns have been raised about the safety and efficacy of biosimilar G-CSF during PBSC mobilization procedures, especially in healthy donors. This article reviews the available evidence on the use of biosimilar G-CSF in this setting. Aggregate clinical evidence supports the assessment by the EMA of biosimilar and originator G-CSF as highly biologically similar, with respect to desired and undesired effects.

  6. In vivo effect of human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor on megakaryocytopoiesis

    SciTech Connect

    Aglietta, M.; Monzeglio, C.; Sanavio, F.; Apra, F.; Morelli, S.; Stacchini, A.; Piacibello, W.; Bussolino, F.; Bagnara, G.; Zauli, G. )

    1991-03-15

    The effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) on megakaryocytopoiesis and platelet production was investigated in patients with normal hematopoiesis. Three findings indicated that GM-CSF plays a role in megakaryocytopoiesis. During treatment with GM-CSF (recombinant mammalian, glycosylated; Sandoz/Schering-Plough, 5.5 micrograms protein/kg/d, subcutaneously for 3 days) the percentage of megakaryocyte progenitors (megakaryocyte colony forming unit (CFU-Mk)) in S phase (evaluated by the suicide technique with high 3H-Tdr doses) increased from 31% +/- 16% to 88% +/- 11%; and the maturation profile of megakaryocytes was modified, with a relative increase in more immature stage I-III forms. Moreover, by autoradiography (after incubation of marrow cells with 125I-labeled GM-CSF) specific GM-CSF receptors were detectable on megakaryocytes. Nevertheless, the proliferative stimulus induced on the progenitors was not accompanied by enhanced platelet production (by contrast with the marked granulomonocytosis). It may be suggested that other cytokines are involved in the regulation of the intermediate and terminal stages of megakaryocytopoiesis in vivo and that their intervention is an essential prerequisite to turn the GM-CSF-induced proliferative stimulus into enhanced platelet production.

  7. Protective, restorative, and therapeutic properties of recombinant colony-stimulating factors

    SciTech Connect

    Talmadge, J.E.; Tribble, H.; Pennington, R.; Bowersox, O.; Schneider, M.A.; Castelli, P.; Black, P.L.; Abe, F. )

    1989-06-01

    Pretreatment of mice with recombinant murine (rM) colony-stimulating factor-granulocyte-macrophage (CSF-gm) or recombinant human (rH) CSF-g provides partial protection from the lethal effects of ionizing radiation or the alkylating agent cyclophosphamide (CTX). In addition, these agents can significantly prolong survival if administered following lethal doses of irradiation or CTX. To induce protective activity, cytokines were injected 20 hours before lethal irradiation or CTX administration. To accelerate recovery from lethal irradiation, the cytokines must be administered shortly following irradiation, and the induction of maximal levels of activity is dependent on chronic administration. In contrast, because of their longer half-lives, accelerated recovery from alkylating agents requires a delay of at least 24 to 48 hours to allow complete clearance of CTX before administration of a CSF. Studies quantitating peripheral blood leukocytes and bone marrow cellularity as well as colony-forming units per culture (CFU-C) frequency and CFU-C per femur revealed a significant correlation between these parameters and the ability to survive lethal irradiation.

  8. Functional factor XIII-A is exposed on the stimulated platelet surface

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Joanne L.; Lionikiene, Ausra S.; Fraser, Steven R.; Whyte, Claire S.; Booth, Nuala A.

    2014-01-01

    Factor XIII (FXIII) stabilizes thrombi against fibrinolysis by cross-linking α2-antiplasmin (α2AP) to fibrin. Cellular FXIII (FXIII-A) is abundant in platelets, but the extracellular functions of this pool are unclear because it is not released by classical secretion mechanisms. We examined the function of platelet FXIII-A using Chandler model thrombi formed from FXIII-depleted plasma. Platelets stabilized FXIII-depleted thrombi in a transglutaminase-dependent manner. FXIII-A activity on activated platelets was unstable and was rapidly lost over 1 hour. Inhibiting platelet activation abrogated the ability of platelets to stabilize thrombi. Incorporating a neutralizing antibody to α2AP into FXIII-depleted thrombi revealed that the stabilizing effect of platelet FXIII-A on lysis was α2AP dependent. Platelet FXIII-A activity and antigen were associated with the cytoplasm and membrane fraction of unstimulated platelets, and these fractions were functional in stabilizing FXIII-depleted thrombi against lysis. Fluorescence confocal microscopy and flow cytometry revealed exposure of FXIII-A on activated membranes, with maximal signal detected with thrombin and collagen stimulation. FXIII-A was evident in protruding caps on the surface of phosphatidylserine-positive platelets. Our data show a functional role for platelet FXIII-A through exposure on the activated platelet membrane where it exerts antifibrinolytic function by cross-linking α2AP to fibrin. PMID:25331118

  9. Proepithelin stimulates growth plate chondrogenesis via nuclear factor-kappaB-p65-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shufang; Zang, Weijin; Li, Xu; Sun, Hongzhi

    2011-07-08

    Proepithelin, a previously unrecognized growth factor in cartilage, has recently emerged as an important regulator for cartilage formation and function. In the present study, we provide several lines of evidences in proepithelin-mediated induction of cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis in the metatarsal growth plate. Proepithelin-mediated stimulation of metatarsal growth and growth plate chondrogenesis was neutralized by pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, a known NF-κB inhibitor. In rat growth plate chondrocytes, proepithelin induced NF-κB-p65 nuclear translocation, and nuclear NF-κB-p65 initiated its target gene cyclin D1 to regulate chondrocyte functions. The inhibition of NF-κB-p65 expression and activity (by p65 short interfering RNA (siRNA) and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, respectively) in chondrocytes reversed the proepithelin-mediated induction of cell proliferation and differentiation and the proepithelin-mediated prevention of cell apoptosis. Moreover, the inhibition of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and Akt abolished the effects of proepithelin on NF-κB activation. Finally, using siRNA and antisense strategies, we demonstrated that endogenously produced proepithelin by chondrocytes is important for chondrocyte growth in serum-deprived conditions. These results support the hypothesis that the induction of NF-κB activity of in growth plate chondrocytes is critical in proepithelin-mediated growth plate chondrogenesis and longitudinal bone growth.

  10. Granulocyte Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor-Activated Eosinophils Promote Interleukin-23 Driven Chronic Colitis.

    PubMed

    Griseri, Thibault; Arnold, Isabelle C; Pearson, Claire; Krausgruber, Thomas; Schiering, Chris; Franchini, Fanny; Schulthess, Julie; McKenzie, Brent S; Crocker, Paul R; Powrie, Fiona

    2015-07-21

    The role of intestinal eosinophils in immune homeostasis is enigmatic and the molecular signals that drive them from protective to tissue damaging are unknown. Most commonly associated with Th2 cell-mediated diseases, we describe a role for eosinophils as crucial effectors of the interleukin-23 (IL-23)-granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) axis in colitis. Chronic intestinal inflammation was characterized by increased bone marrow eosinopoiesis and accumulation of activated intestinal eosinophils. IL-5 blockade or eosinophil depletion ameliorated colitis, implicating eosinophils in disease pathogenesis. GM-CSF was a potent activator of eosinophil effector functions and intestinal accumulation, and GM-CSF blockade inhibited chronic colitis. By contrast neutrophil accumulation was GM-CSF independent and dispensable for colitis. In addition to TNF secretion, release of eosinophil peroxidase promoted colitis identifying direct tissue-toxic mechanisms. Thus, eosinophils are key perpetrators of chronic inflammation and tissue damage in IL-23-mediated immune diseases and it suggests the GM-CSF-eosinophil axis as an attractive therapeutic target. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor is neuroprotective in experimental traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Shultz, Sandy R; Tan, Xin L; Wright, David K; Liu, Shijie J; Semple, Bridgette D; Johnston, Leigh; Jones, Nigel C; Cook, Andrew D; Hamilton, John A; O'Brien, Terence J

    2014-05-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an international health concern with a complex pathogenesis resulting in major long-term neurological, neurocognitive, and neuropsychiatric outcomes. Although neuroinflammation has been identified as an important pathophysiological process resulting from TBI, the function of specific inflammatory mediators in the aftermath of TBI remains poorly understood. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is an inflammatory cytokine that has been reported to have neuroprotective effects in various animal models of neurodegenerative disease that share pathological similarities with TBI. The importance of GM-CSF in TBI has yet to be studied, however. We examined the role of GM-CSF in TBI by comparing the effects of a lateral fluid percussion (LFP) injury or sham injury in GM-CSF gene deficient (GM-CSF(-/-)) versus wild-type (WT) mice. After a 3-month recovery interval, mice were assessed using neuroimaging and behavioral outcomes. All mice given a LFP injury displayed significant brain atrophy and behavioral impairments compared with those given sham-injuries; however, this was significantly worse in the GM-CSF(-/-) mice compared with the WT mice. GM-CSF(-/-) mice given LFP injury also had reduced astrogliosis compared with their WT counterparts. These novel findings indicate that the inflammatory mediator, GM-CSF, may have significant protective properties in the chronic sequelae of experimental TBI and suggest that further research investigating GM-CSF and its potential benefits in the injured brain is warranted.

  12. Cytokine refacing effect reduces granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor susceptibility to antibody neutralization.

    PubMed

    Heinzelman, Pete; Carlson, Sharon J; Cox, George N

    2015-10-01

    Crohn's Disease (CD) afflicts over half a million Americans with an annual economic impact exceeding $10 billion. Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) can increase patient immune responses against intestinal microbes that promote CD and has been effective for some patients in clinical trials. We have made important progress toward developing GM-CSF variants that could be more effective CD therapeutics by virtue of being less prone to neutralization by the endogenous GM-CSF autoantibodies that are highly expressed in CD patients. Yeast display engineering revealed mutations that increase GM-CSF variant binding affinity by up to ∼3-fold toward both GM-CSF receptor alpha and beta subunits in surface plasmon resonance experiments. Increased binding affinity did not reduce GM-CSF half-maximum effective concentration (EC50) values in conventional in vitro human leukocyte proliferation assays. Affinity-enhancing mutations did, however, promote a 'refacing effect' that imparted all five evaluated GM-CSF variants with increased in vitro bioactivity in the presence of GM-CSF-neutralizing polyclonal antisera. The most improved variant, H15L/R23L, was 6-fold more active than wild-type GM-CSF. Incorporation of additional known affinity-increasing mutations could augment the refacing effect and concomitant bioactivity improvements described here. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Chronic neutropenia. A new canine model induced by human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, W P; Csiba, E; Canin, A; Hockman, H; Souza, L M; Layton, J E; Dale, D C

    1991-01-01

    Normal dogs were treated with recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) at 10 micrograms/kg/day for 30 d, which caused an initial neutrophilia, followed by a prolonged period of chronic neutropenia. A control dog treated with recombinant canine G-CSF (rcG-CSF) showed persistent neutrophilia over 3 mo. Serum from dogs during neutropenia contained an antibody to rhG-CSF, which neutralized the stimulatory effects of both rhG-CSF and rcG-CSF on dog marrow neutrophilic progenitor cell growth and on NFS-60 cell proliferation. 4 mo after discontinuation of rhG-CSF, the dogs' neutrophil counts returned to the normal range. Rechallenge with the rhG-CSF re-induced severe neutropenia in 1 wk. Neutropenia was transferred by plasma infusion from a neutropenic dog to a previously normal dog. These data suggest that human rhG-CSF immunizes normal dogs and thereby induces neutralization of endogenous canine G-CSF and neutropenia. This model system should allow more precise definition of the in vivo role of G-CSF. PMID:1704019

  14. Neuroprotection of Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor for Early Stage Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Sheng-Tzung; Chu, Sung-Chao; Liu, Shu-Hsin; Pang, Cheng-Yoong; Hou, Ting-Wen; Lin, Shinn-Zong; Chen, Shin-Yuan

    2017-03-13

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a slowly progressive neurodegenerative disease. Both medical and surgical choices provide symptomatic treatment. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), a conventional treatment for hematological diseases, has demonstrated its effectiveness in acute and chronic neurological diseases through its anti-inflammatory and antiapoptosis mechanisms. Based on previous in vitro and in vivo studies, we administered a lower dose (3.3 μg/kg) G-CSF injection for 5 days and six courses for 1 year in early-stage PD patients as a phase I trial. The four PD patient's mean unified PD rating scale motor scores in medication off status remained stable from 23 before the first G-CSF injection to 22 during the 2-year follow-up. 3,4-Dihydroxy-6-18F-fluoro-l-phenylalanine (18F-DOPA) positron emission tomography (PET) studies also revealed an annual 3.5% decrease in radiotracer uptake over the caudate nucleus and 7% in the putamen, both slower than those of previous reports of PD. Adverse effects included transient muscular-skeletal pain, nausea, vomiting, and elevated liver enzymes. Based on this preliminary report, G-CSF seems to alleviate disease deterioration for early stage PD patients. The effectiveness of G-CSF was possibly due to its amelioration of progressive dopaminergic neuron degeneration.

  15. Multipronged attenuation of macrophage-colony stimulating factor signaling by Epstein-Barr virus BARF1

    SciTech Connect

    Shim, Ann Hye-Ryong; Chang, Rhoda Ahn; Chen, Xiaoyan; Longnecker, Richard; He, Xiaolin

    2014-10-02

    The ubiquitous EBV causes infectious mononucleosis and is associated with several types of cancers. The EBV genome encodes an early gene product, BARF1, which contributes to pathogenesis, potentially through growth-altering and immune-modulating activities, but the mechanisms for such activities are poorly understood. We have determined the crystal structure of BARF1 in complex with human macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF), a hematopoietic cytokine with pleiotropic functions in development and immune response. BARF1 and M-CSF form a high-affinity, stable, ring-like complex in both solution and the crystal, with a BARF1 hexameric ring surrounded by three M-CSF dimers in triangular array. The binding of BARF1 to M-CSF dramatically reduces but does not completely abolish M-CSF binding and signaling through its cognate receptor FMS. A three-pronged down-regulation mechanism is proposed to explain the biological effect of BARF1 on M-CSF:FMS signaling. These prongs entail control of the circulating and effective local M-CSF concentration, perturbation of the receptor-binding surface of M-CSF, and imposition of an unfavorable global orientation of the M-CSF dimer. Each prong may reduce M-CSF:FMS signaling to a limited extent but in combination may alter M-CSF:FMS signaling dramatically. The downregulating mechanism of BARF1 underlines a viral modulation strategy, and provides a basis for understanding EBV pathogenesis.

  16. Electrical stimulation drives chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells in the absence of exogenous growth factors

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hyuck Joon; Lee, Gyu Seok; Chun, Honggu

    2016-01-01

    Electrical stimulation (ES) is known to guide the development and regeneration of many tissues. However, although preclinical and clinical studies have demonstrated superior effects of ES on cartilage repair, the effects of ES on chondrogenesis remain elusive. Since mesenchyme stem cells (MSCs) have high therapeutic potential for cartilage regeneration, we investigated the actions of ES during chondrogenesis of MSCs. Herein, we demonstrate for the first time that ES enhances expression levels of chondrogenic markers, such as type II collagen, aggrecan, and Sox9, and decreases type I collagen levels, thereby inducing differentiation of MSCs into hyaline chondrogenic cells without the addition of exogenous growth factors. ES also induced MSC condensation and subsequent chondrogenesis by driving Ca2+/ATP oscillations, which are known to be essential for prechondrogenic condensation. In subsequent experiments, the effects of ES on ATP oscillations and chondrogenesis were dependent on extracellular ATP signaling via P2X4 receptors, and ES induced significant increases in TGF-β1 and BMP2 expression. However, the inhibition of TGF-β signaling blocked ES-driven condensation, whereas the inhibition of BMP signaling did not, indicating that TGF-β signaling but not BMP signaling mediates ES-driven condensation. These findings may contribute to the development of electrotherapeutic strategies for cartilage repair using MSCs. PMID:28004813

  17. Exploring risk factors for stuttering development in Parkinson disease after deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Picillo, Marina; Vincos, Gustavo B; Sammartino, Francesco; Lozano, Andres M; Fasano, Alfonso

    2017-05-01

    Stuttering is a speech disorder with disruption of verbal fluency, occasionally present in Parkinson's disease (PD). PD co-incident stuttering may either worsen or improve after Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS). Sixteen out of 453 PD patients (3.5%) exhibited stuttering after DBS (PD-S) and were compared with a group of patients without stuttering (PD-NS) using non-parametric statistics. After DBS, stuttering worsened in 3 out of 4 patients with co-incidental stuttering. Most PD-S underwent subthalamic (STN) DBS, but 4 were implanted in the globus pallidus (GPi). Nine out of 16 PD-S (56.3%) reported a positive familial history for stuttering compared to none of the PD-NS. PD-S were mainly male (81.3%) with slight worse motor features compared to PD-NS. Herein, we describe a group of PD patients developing stuttering after DBS and report the presence of a positive familial history for stuttering as the most relevant risk factor, suggesting a possible underlying genetic cause. The fact that stuttering occurred after either STN or GPi DBS is an argument against the impact of medication reduction on stuttering. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Enhanced and Secretory Expression of Human Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor by Bacillus subtilis SCK6

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Shaista; Sadaf, Saima; Ahmad, Sajjad; Akhtar, Muhammad Waheed

    2015-01-01

    This study describes a simplified approach for enhanced expression and secretion of a pharmaceutically important human cytokine, that is, granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF), in the culture supernatant of Bacillus subtilis SCK6 cells. Codon optimized GCSF and pNWPH vector containing SpymwC signal sequence were amplified by prolonged overlap extension PCR to generate multimeric plasmid DNA, which was used directly to transform B. subtilis SCK6 supercompetent cells. Expression of GCSF was monitored in the culture supernatant for 120 hours. The highest expression, which corresponded to 17% of the total secretory protein, was observed at 72 hours of growth. Following ammonium sulphate precipitation, GCSF was purified to near homogeneity by fast protein liquid chromatography on a QFF anion exchange column. Circular dichroism spectroscopic analysis showed that the secondary structure contents of the purified GCSF are similar to the commercially available GCSF. Biological activity, as revealed by the regeneration of neutrophils in mice treated with ifosfamine, was also similar to the commercial preparation of GCSF. This, to our knowledge, is the first study that reports secretory expression of human GCSF in B. subtilis SCK6 with final recovery of up to 96 mg/L of the culture supernatant, without involvement of any chemical inducer. PMID:26881203

  19. Endotoxin down-modulates granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor (CD114) on human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Hollenstein, U; Homoncik, M; Stohlawetz, P J; Marsik, C; Sieder, A; Eichler, H G; Jilma, B

    2000-07-01

    During infection, the development of nonresponsiveness to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) may be influenced by the down-modulation of G-CSF receptor (G-CSFR) by cytokines. This down-modulation was studied during experimental human endotoxemia. Healthy volunteers received either 2 ng/kg endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide [LPS], n=20) or placebo (n=10) in a randomized, controlled trial. Endotoxin infusion increased the mean fluorescence intensity of the neutrophil activation marker CD11b >300% after 1 h (P<.001 vs. placebo). LPS infusion down-modulated G-CSFR expression in as early as 60 min (-17%; P=.001 vs. placebo). Down-modulation was almost maximal at 90 min and persisted for 6 h (-50% from baseline; P<.0001 vs. placebo). Plasma levels of G-CSF started to increase only after G-CSFR down-modulation had occurred and peaked 37-fold above baseline at 4 h (P<.0001 vs. placebo). In conclusion, LPS down-modulates G-CSFR expression in humans, which may render neutrophils less responsive to the effects of G-CSF and, thereby, compromise host defense mechanisms.

  20. The use of granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor in volunteer unrelated hemopoietic stem cell donors.

    PubMed

    Pamphilon, Derwood; Nacheva, Elisabeth; Navarrete, Cristina; Madrigal, Alejandro; Goldman, John

    2008-07-01

    Granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is used for the mobilization of hemopoietic stem cells in healthy donors. It has a number of common side effects such as bone pain, which resolve rapidly after administration is discontinued. Recent publications have raised concern that it might act as a trigger for the development of hematologic malignancy in susceptible individuals, possibly by causing genomic instability, but to date there is no evidence that healthy volunteer donors who receive G-CSF are at any increased risk. Ongoing studies aim to confirm whether or not G-CSF can cause chromosomal abnormalities in healthy donors. In the UK, the British Bone Marrow Registry and Anthony Nolan Trust give G-CSF to donors who have agreed to donate peripheral blood stem cells. It is recommended by the UK Registries at present that all stem cell donors are given updated information explaining the current uncertainties with regard to the use of G-CSF before they give informed consent to its administration. This information is based on a statement agreed by the World Marrow Donor Association for use by individual donor registries. Further, it is our current practice that all donors who have received G-CSF, as well as marrow donors who do not, should be under regular review for at least 10 years to allow the occurrence of any long-term adverse events to be documented.

  1. Interleukin 1 stimulates platelet-activating factor production in cultured human endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bussolino, F; Breviario, F; Tetta, C; Aglietta, M; Mantovani, A; Dejana, E

    1986-01-01

    Monocyte-derived interleukin 1 (IL-1) was found to be a potent inducer of platelet-activating factor (PAF) in cultured human vascular endothelial cells (HEC). The product was identified as PAF by its behavior in chromatographic systems, its recovery of biological activity, and its physico-chemical properties and susceptibility to lipases. The response of HEC to IL-1 was concentration-dependent, took more than 2 h to become apparent, and decreased after 18 h of incubation. Most of the PAF produced was cell-associated and only a small amount (about 25% of the total) was released in the culture medium. To study the mechanism of IL-1-induced HEC-PAF production we tested the activity of 1-O-alkyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine:acetyl/coenzyme A acetyltransferase in HEC. Acetyltransferase activity measured in IL-1-stimulated HEC lysates showed a three to five times greater maximum velocity, but the same Michaelis constant, as untreated cells. The regulation of PAF generation in HEC by IL-1 may be an important aspect of the two-way interaction between immunocompetent cells and vascular tissue. PMID:2872233

  2. Recovery from severe hematopoietic suppression using recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor

    SciTech Connect

    Monroy, R.L.; Skelly, R.R.; Taylor, P.; Dubois, A.; Donahue, R.E.; MacVittie, T.J.

    1988-06-01

    The ability of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) to enhance recovery of a radiation-suppressed hematopoietic system was evaluated in a nonuniform radiation exposure model using the rhesus monkey. Recombinant human GM-CSF treatment for 7 days after a lethal, nonuniform radiation exposure of 800 cGy was sufficient to enhance hematopoietic reconstitution, leading to an earlier recovery. Monkeys were treated with 72,000 U/kg/day of rhGM-CSF delivered continuously through an Alzet miniosmotic pump implanted subcutaneously on day 3. Treated monkeys demonstrated effective granulocyte and platelet levels in the peripheral blood, 4 and 7 days earlier, respectively, than control monkeys. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming unit (CFU-GM) activity in the bone marrow was monitored to evaluate the effect of rhGM-CSF on marrow recovery. Treatment with rhGM-CSF led to an early recovery of CFU-GM activity suggesting that rhGM-CSF acted on an earlier stem cell population to generate CFU-GM. Thus, the effect of rhGM-CSF on hematopoietic regeneration, granulocyte recovery, and platelet recovery are evaluated in this paper.

  3. Recovery from severe hematopoietic suppression using recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor

    SciTech Connect

    Monroy, R.L.; Skelly, R.R.; Taylor, P.; Dubois, A.; Donahue, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    The ability of recombinant human granulocytemacrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) to enhance recovery of a radiation-suppressed hematopoietic system was evaluated in a nonuniform radiation-exposure model using the rhesus monkey. Recombinant human GM-CSF treatment for 7 days after a lethal, nonuniform radiation exposure of 800 cGy was sufficient to enhance hematopoietic reconstitution, leading to an earlier recovery. Monkeys were treated with 72,000 U/kg/day of rhGm-CSF delivered continuously through an Alzet mini-osmotic pump implanted subcutaneously on day 3. Treated monkeys demonstrated effective granulocyte and platelet levels in the peripheral blood, 4 and 7 days earlier, respectively, than control monkeys. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming unit (CFU-GM) activity in the bone marrow was monitored to evaluate the effect of rhGM-CSF on marrow recovery. Treatment with rhGM-CSF led to an early recovery of CFU-GM activity suggesting that rhGM-CSF acted on an earlier stem cell population to generate CFU-GM. Thus, the effect of rhGM-CSF on hematopoietic regeneration, granulocyte recovery, and platelet recovery are evaluated.

  4. Long-active granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for peripheral blood hematopoietic progenitor cell mobilization.

    PubMed

    Martino, Massimo; Laszlo, Daniele; Lanza, Francesco

    2014-06-01

    Peg-filgrastim (PEG-FIL), a polyethylene glycol-conjugated form of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), has been introduced in clinical practice and is effective in shortening the time of neutropenia after cytotoxic chemotherapy. G-CSF has emerged as the preferred cytokine for hematopoietic progenitor cells' (HPC) mobilization. Nevertheless, data on the ability of PEG-FIL in this field have been published. We review publications in the field with the goal of providing an overview of this approach. PEG-FIL may be able to mobilize CD34(+) cells in a more timely fashion than G-CSF, with the advantages of only a single-dose administration, an earlier start and a reduction in the number of apheresis procedures. The main controversies concern the dosage of the drug and the optimal dose. In the context of chemo-mobilization, a single dose of 6 mg PEG-FIL seems effective in terms of HPC's mobilization and there is no increase in this effect if the dose is doubled to 12 mg. Steady-state mobilization requires higher doses of PEG-FIL and this approach is not cost-effective when compared with G-CSF. The experiences with PEG-FIL in the healthy donor setting are very limited.

  5. Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Is Neuroprotective in Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xin L.; Wright, David K.; Liu, Shijie J.; Semple, Bridgette D.; Johnston, Leigh; Jones, Nigel C.; Cook, Andrew D.; Hamilton, John A.; O'Brien, Terence J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an international health concern with a complex pathogenesis resulting in major long-term neurological, neurocognitive, and neuropsychiatric outcomes. Although neuroinflammation has been identified as an important pathophysiological process resulting from TBI, the function of specific inflammatory mediators in the aftermath of TBI remains poorly understood. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is an inflammatory cytokine that has been reported to have neuroprotective effects in various animal models of neurodegenerative disease that share pathological similarities with TBI. The importance of GM-CSF in TBI has yet to be studied, however. We examined the role of GM-CSF in TBI by comparing the effects of a lateral fluid percussion (LFP) injury or sham injury in GM-CSF gene deficient (GM-CSF-/-) versus wild-type (WT) mice. After a 3-month recovery interval, mice were assessed using neuroimaging and behavioral outcomes. All mice given a LFP injury displayed significant brain atrophy and behavioral impairments compared with those given sham-injuries; however, this was significantly worse in the GM-CSF-/- mice compared with the WT mice. GM-CSF-/- mice given LFP injury also had reduced astrogliosis compared with their WT counterparts. These novel findings indicate that the inflammatory mediator, GM-CSF, may have significant protective properties in the chronic sequelae of experimental TBI and suggest that further research investigating GM-CSF and its potential benefits in the injured brain is warranted. PMID:24392832

  6. Immunocytochemical localization of latent transforming growth factor-beta1 activation by stimulated macrophages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chong, H.; Vodovotz, Y.; Cox, G. W.; Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta) is secreted in a latent form consisting of mature TGF-beta noncovalently associated with its amino-terminal propeptide, which is called latency associated peptide (LAP). Biological activity depends upon the release of TGF-beta from the latent complex following extracellular activation, which appears to be the key regulatory mechanism controlling TGF-beta action. We have identified two events associated with latent TGF-beta (LTGF-beta) activation in vivo: increased immunoreactivity of certain antibodies that specifically detect TGF-beta concomitant with decreased immunoreactivity of antibodies to LAP. Macrophages stimulated in vitro with interferon-gamma and lipopolysaccharide reportedly activate LTGF-beta via cell membrane-bound protease activity. We show through dual immunostaining of paraformaldehyde-fixed macrophages that such physiological TGF-beta activation is accompanied by a loss of LAP immunoreactivity with concomitant revelation of TGF-beta epitopes. The induction of TGF-beta immunoreactivity colocalized with immunoreactive betaglycan/RIII in activated macrophages, suggesting that LTGF-beta activation occurs on the cell surface. Confocal microscopy of metabolically active macrophages incubated with antibodies to TGF-beta and betaglycan/RIII prior to fixation supported the localization of activation to the cell surface. The ability to specifically detect and localize LTGF-beta activation provides an important tool for studies of its regulation.

  7. Drivers and Risk Factors of Unplanned 30-Day Readmission Following Spinal Cord Stimulator Implantation.

    PubMed

    Elsamadicy, Aladine A; Sergesketter, Amanda; Ren, Xinru; Mohammed Qasim Hussaini, Syed; Laarakker, Avra; Rahimpour, Shervin; Ejikeme, Tiffany; Yang, Siyun; Pagadala, Promila; Parente, Beth; Xie, Jichun; Lad, Shivanand P

    2017-09-29

    Unplanned 30-day readmission rates contribute significantly to growing national healthcare expenditures. Drivers of unplanned 30-day readmission after spinal cord stimulator (SCS) implantation are relatively unknown. The aim of this study was to determine drivers of 30-day unplanned readmission following SCS implantation. The National Readmission Database was queried to identify all patients who underwent SCS implantation for the 2013 calendar year. Patients were grouped by readmission status, "No Readmission" and "Unplanned 30-day Readmission." Patient demographics and comorbidities were collected for each patient. The primary outcome of interest was the rate of unplanned 30-day readmissions and associated driving factors. A multivariate analysis was used to determine independent predictors of unplanned 30-day readmission after SCS implantation. We identified 1521 patients who underwent SCS implantation, with 113 (7.4%) experiencing an unplanned readmission within 30 days. Baseline patient demographics, comorbidities, and hospital characteristics were similar between both cohorts. The three main drivers for 30-day readmission after SCS implantation include: 1) infection (not related to SCS device), 2) infection due to device (limited to only hardware infection), and 3) mechanical complication of SCS device. Furthermore, obesity was found to be an independent predictor of 30-day readmission (OR: 1.86, p = 0.008). Our study suggests that infectious and mechanical complications are the primary drivers of unplanned 30-day readmission after SCS implantation, with obesity as an independent predictor of unplanned readmission. Given the technological advancements in SCS, repeated studies are necessary to identify factors associated with unplanned 30-day readmission rates after SCS implantation to improve patient outcomes and reduce associated costs. © 2017 International Neuromodulation Society.

  8. Pedagogical Factors Stimulating the Self-Development of Students' Multi-Dimensional Thinking in Terms of Subject-Oriented Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andreev, Valentin I.

    2014-01-01

    The main aim of this research is to disclose the essence of students' multi-dimensional thinking, also to reveal the rating of factors which stimulate the raising of effectiveness of self-development of students' multi-dimensional thinking in terms of subject-oriented teaching. Subject-oriented learning is characterized as a type of learning where…

  9. An interleukin-1 receptor antagonist blocks lipopolysaccharide-induced colony-stimulating factor production and early endotoxin tolerance.

    PubMed Central

    Henricson, B E; Neta, R; Vogel, S N

    1991-01-01

    In this report, administration of a recombinant interleukin-1 receptor antagonist protein to mice was found to inhibit induction of colony-stimulating factor as well as induction of early endotoxin tolerance by lipopolysaccharide. These findings provide direct evidence that interleukin-1 is an intermediate in these two lipopolysaccharide-induced phenomena. PMID:1825485

  10. Metal: ATP characteristics of insulin- and epidermal growth factor-stimulated phosphorylation in detergent extracts of rat liver plasma membranes.

    PubMed

    Uhing, R J; Exton, J H

    1986-09-01

    The metal: ATP characteristics of insulin- and epidermal growth factor-(EGF)-stimulated protein kinase activities were examined in Nonidet P40 extracts of rat liver plasma membranes. The two kinase activities were capable of utilizing either manganese or magnesium, although differences were observed. Insulin-stimulated 32P incorporation into an Mr 95 000 protein exhibited a higher affinity for ATP in the presence of manganese compared to magnesium. At 200 microM ATP, insulin stimulated 32P incorporation into the Mr 95 000 protein 3- to 5-fold after 5 min in the presence of either metal. At 1 mM ATP, insulin-stimulated 32P incorporation was significantly greater in the presence of magnesium. In contrast, EGF-stimulated 32P incorporation into an Mr 170 000 protein exhibited similar ATP dependencies in the presence of magnesium or manganese. Basal phosphorylation of the Mr 170 000 protein was 2- to 3-fold higher in the presence of manganese, however. Since the higher basal phosphorylation persisted after chromatography on wheat germ lectin-Sepharose, it may represent an inherent activity of the receptor kinase. In the presence of magnesium: ATP, low concentrations of manganese enhanced both insulin- and EGF-stimulated phosphorylation of angiotensin II suggesting involvement of a second metal binding site which regulates the kinase activity. The results presented show major differences in the metal: ATP properties of the two major hormonally regulated protein kinase activities observed in detergent-extracted liver membranes.

  11. Epidermal growth factor stimulates Rac activation through Src and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase to promote colonic epithelial cell migration.

    PubMed

    Dise, Rebecca S; Frey, Mark R; Whitehead, Robert H; Polk, D Brent

    2008-01-01

    Regulated intestinal epithelial cell migration plays a key role in wound healing and maintenance of a healthy gastrointestinal tract. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulates cell migration and wound closure in intestinal epithelial cells through incompletely understood mechanisms. In this study we investigated the role of the small GTPase Rac in EGF-induced cell migration using an in vitro wound-healing assay. In mouse colonic epithelial (MCE) cell lines, EGF-stimulated wound closure was accompanied by a doubling of the number of cells containing lamellipodial extensions at the wound margin, increased Rac membrane translocation in cells at the wound margin, and rapid Rac activation. Either Rac1 small interfering (si)RNA or a Rac1 inhibitor completely blocked EGF-stimulated wound closure. Whereas EGF failed to activate Rac in colon cells from EGF receptor (EGFR) knockout mice, stable expression of wild-type EGFR restored EGF-stimulated Rac activation and migration. Pharmacological inhibition of either phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) or Src family kinases reduced EGF-stimulated Rac activation. Cotreatment of cells with both inhibitors completely blocked EGF-stimulated Rac activation and localization to the leading edge of cells and lamellipodial extension. Our results present a novel mechanism by which the PI3K and Src signaling cascades cooperate to activate Rac and promote intestinal epithelial cell migration downstream of EGFR.

  12. Synergistic action of the benzene metabolite hydroquinone on myelopoietic stimulating activity of granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irons, R. D.; Stillman, W. S.; Colagiovanni, D. B.; Henry, V. A.; Clarkson, T. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    The effects of in vitro pretreatment with benzene metabolites on colony-forming response of murine bone marrow cells stimulated with recombinant granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rGM-CSF) were examined. Pretreatment with hydroquinone (HQ) at concentrations ranging from picomolar to micromolar for 30 min resulted in a 1.5- to 4.6-fold enhancement in colonies formed in response to rGM-CSF that was due to an increase in granulocyte/macrophage colonies. The synergism equaled or exceeded that reported for the effects of interleukin 1, interleukin 3, or interleukin 6 with GM-CSF. Optimal enhancement was obtained with 1 microM HQ and was largely independent of the concentration of rGM-CSF. Pretreatment with other authentic benzene metabolites, phenol and catechol, and the putative metabolite trans, trans-muconaldehyde did not enhance growth factor response. Coadministration of phenol and HQ did not enhance the maximal rGM-CSF response obtained with HQ alone but shifted the optimal concentration to 100 pM. Synergism between HQ and rGM-CSF was observed with nonadherent bone marrow cells and lineage-depleted bone marrow cells, suggesting an intrinsic effect on recruitment of myeloid progenitor cells not normally responsive to rGM-CSF. Alterations in differentiation in a myeloid progenitor cell population may be of relevance in the pathogenesis of acute myelogenous leukemia secondary to drug or chemical exposure.

  13. Synergistic action of the benzene metabolite hydroquinone on myelopoietic stimulating activity of granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irons, R. D.; Stillman, W. S.; Colagiovanni, D. B.; Henry, V. A.; Clarkson, T. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    The effects of in vitro pretreatment with benzene metabolites on colony-forming response of murine bone marrow cells stimulated with recombinant granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rGM-CSF) were examined. Pretreatment with hydroquinone (HQ) at concentrations ranging from picomolar to micromolar for 30 min resulted in a 1.5- to 4.6-fold enhancement in colonies formed in response to rGM-CSF that was due to an increase in granulocyte/macrophage colonies. The synergism equaled or exceeded that reported for the effects of interleukin 1, interleukin 3, or interleukin 6 with GM-CSF. Optimal enhancement was obtained with 1 microM HQ and was largely independent of the concentration of rGM-CSF. Pretreatment with other authentic benzene metabolites, phenol and catechol, and the putative metabolite trans, trans-muconaldehyde did not enhance growth factor response. Coadministration of phenol and HQ did not enhance the maximal rGM-CSF response obtained with HQ alone but shifted the optimal concentration to 100 pM. Synergism between HQ and rGM-CSF was observed with nonadherent bone marrow cells and lineage-depleted bone marrow cells, suggesting an intrinsic effect on recruitment of myeloid progenitor cells not normally responsive to rGM-CSF. Alterations in differentiation in a myeloid progenitor cell population may be of relevance in the pathogenesis of acute myelogenous leukemia secondary to drug or chemical exposure.

  14. Effect of maternal and neonatal factors on cord blood thyroid stimulating hormone

    PubMed Central

    Lakshminarayana, Sheetal G.; Sadanandan, Nidhish P.; Mehaboob, A. K.; Gopaliah, Lakshminarayana R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) is most common preventable cause of mental retardation in children. Cord blood Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (CBTSH) level is an accepted screening tool for CH. Objectives: To study CBTSH profile in neonates born at tertiary care referral center and to analyze the influence of maternal and neonatal factors on their levels. Design: Cross retrospective sectional study. Methods: Study population included 979 neonates (males = 506 to females = 473). The CBTSH levels were estimated using electrochemiluminescence immunoassay on Cobas analyzer. Kit based cut-offs of TSH level were used for analysis. All neonates with abnormal CBSTH levels, were started on levothyroxine supplementation 10 μg/Kg/day and TSH levels were reassessed as per departmental protocol. Results: The mean CBTSH was 7.82 μIU/mL (Range 0.112 to 81.4, SD = 5.48). The mean CBTSH level was significantly higher in first order neonates, neonates delivered by assisted vaginal delivery and normal delivery, delivered at term or preterm, neonates with APGAR score <5 and those needing advanced resuscitation after birth. The CBTSH level >16.10 and <1.0 μIU/mL was found in 4.39 % and 1.02 % neonates respectively. The prevalence rate of CBTSH level >16.1 μIU/mL was significantly higher in neonates delivered by assisted vaginal delivery and normal delivery, term and preterm neonates, APAGR score of <5, presence of fetal distress, need for resuscitation beyond initial steps and in those with birth weight of <1.5 Kg. Three neonates were confirmed to have CH after retesting of TSH level. Conclusions: The CBTSH estimation is an easy, non-invasive method for screening for CH. The cutoff level of CB TSH (μIU/mL) >16.10 and <1.0 led to a recall of 5.41% of neonates which is practicable given the scenario in our Country. The mode of delivery and perinatal stress factors have a significant impact on CBTSH levels and any rise to be seen in the light of these factors. The prevalence

  15. Regulation of Wound Healing by Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor after Vocal Fold Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jae-Yol; Choi, Byung Hyune; Lee, Songyi; Jang, Yun Ho; Choi, Jeong-Seok; Kim, Young-Mo

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Vocal fold (VF) scarring remains a therapeutic challenge. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) facilitates epithelial wound healing, and recently, growth factor therapy has been applied to promote tissue repair. This study was undertaken to investigate the effect of GM-CSF on VF wound healing in vivo and in vitro. Methods VF scarring was induced in New Zealand white rabbits by direct injury. Immediately thereafter, either GM-CSF or PBS was injected into the VFs of rabbits. Endoscopic, histopathological, immunohistochemical, and biomechanical evaluations of VFs were performed at 3 months post-injury. Human vocal fold fibroblasts (hVFFs) were cultured with GM-CSF. Production of type I and III collagen was examined immunocytochemically, and the synthesis of elastin and hyaluronic acids was evaluated by ELISA. The mRNA levels of genes related to ECM components and ECM production-related growth factors, such as HGF and TGF-ß1, were examined by real time RT-PCR. Results The GM-CSF-treated VFs showed reduced collagen deposition in comparison to the PBS-injected controls (P<0.05). Immunohistochemical staining revealed lower amounts of type I collagen and fibronectin in the GM-CSF-treated VFs (P<0.05 and P<0.01, respectively). Viscous and elastic shear moduli of VF samples were significantly lower in the GM-CSF group than in the PBS-injected group (P<0.001 and P<0.01, respectively). Mucosal waves in the GM-CSF group showed significant improvement when compared to the PBS group (P = 0.0446). GM-CSF inhibited TGF-β1-induced collagen synthesis by hVFFs (P<0.05) and the production of hyaluronic acids increased at 72 hours post-treatment (P<0.05). The expressions of HAS-2, tropoelastin, MMP-1, HGF, and c-Met mRNA were significantly increased by GM-CSF, although at different time points (P<0.05). Conclusion The present study shows that GM-CSF offers therapeutic potential for the remodeling of VF wounds and the promotion of VF regeneration

  16. Modulation of the Endocannabinoid System: Vulnerability Factor and New Treatment Target for Stimulant Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Olière, Stéphanie; Jolette-Riopel, Antoine; Potvin, Stéphane; Jutras-Aswad, Didier

    2013-01-01

    Cannabis is one of the most widely used illicit substance among users of stimulants such as cocaine and amphetamines. Interestingly, increasing recent evidence points toward the involvement of the endocannabinoid system (ECBS) in the neurobiological processes related to stimulant addiction. This article presents an up-to-date review with deep insights into the pivotal role of the ECBS in the neurobiology of stimulant addiction and the effects of its modulation on addictive behaviors. This article aims to: (1) review the role of cannabis use and ECBS modulation in the neurobiological substrates of psychostimulant addiction and (2) evaluate the potential of cannabinoid-based pharmacological strategies to treat stimulant addiction. A growing number of studies support a critical role of the ECBS and its modulation by synthetic or natural cannabinoids in various neurobiological and behavioral aspects of stimulants addiction. Thus, cannabinoids modulate brain reward systems closely involved in stimulants addiction, and provide further evidence that the cannabinoid system could be explored as a potential drug discovery target for treating addiction across different classes of stimulants. PMID:24069004

  17. Involvement of Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CTGF) in Insulin-like Growth Factor-I (IGF1) Stimulation of Proliferation of a Bovine Mammary Epithelial Cell Line

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF1) plays an important role in mammary gland development and lactation in part by stimulating proliferation of the milk-producing epithelial cells. In this study, we used the bovine mammary epithelial cell line MAC-T cells as a model to understand the mechanism by whi...

  18. Effects of acetylcholine and electrical stimulation on glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor production in skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Vianney, John-Mary; Miller, Damon A; Spitsbergen, John M

    2014-11-07

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is a neurotrophic factor required for survival of neurons in the central and peripheral nervous system. Specifically, GDNF has been characterized as a survival factor for spinal motor neurons. GDNF is synthesized and secreted by neuronal target tissues, including skeletal muscle in the peripheral nervous system; however, the mechanisms by which GDNF is synthesized and released by skeletal muscle are not fully understood. Previous results suggested that cholinergic neurons regulate secretion of GDNF by skeletal muscle. In the current study, GDNF production by skeletal muscle myotubes following treatment with acetylcholine was examined. Acetylcholine receptors on myotubes were identified with labeled alpha-bungarotoxin and were blocked using unlabeled alpha-bungarotoxin. The question of whether electrical stimulation has a similar effect to that of acetylcholine was also investigated. Cells were stimulated with voltage pulses; at 1 and 5 Hz frequencies for times ranging from 30 min to 48 h. GDNF content in myotubes and GDNF in conditioned culture medium were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay. Results suggest that acetylcholine and short-term electrical stimulation reduce GDNF secretion, while treatment with carbachol or long-term electrical stimulation enhances GDNF production by skeletal muscle.

  19. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor gene expression in vascular cells and in experimental and human atherosclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Clinton, S. K.; Underwood, R.; Hayes, L.; Sherman, M. L.; Kufe, D. W.; Libby, P.

    1992-01-01

    The infiltration of monocytes into the vascular wall and their transformation into lipid-laden foam cells characterizes early atherogenesis. Macrophages are also present in more advanced human atherosclerotic plaques and can produce many mediators that may contribute to lesion formation and progression. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor (MCSF) enhances the proliferation and differentiation of monocyte progenitors and is required for the survival and activation of mature monocytes and macrophages. The authors therefore examined the expression of the MCSF gene in cultured human vascular endothelial (EC) and smooth muscle cells (SMC) as well as in atheromatous lesions from rabbits and humans. Growth arrested EC and SMC contain a low level of MCSF mRNA. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), recombinant human interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha) or tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) induced MCSF mRNA accumulation in a concentration-dependent manner in both EC and SMC. These stimuli induced large increases in MCSF mRNA with peak induction between 4-8 hours after treatment. LPS, IL-1 alpha, and TNF alpha stimulated EC and SMC also showed increased fluorescent antibody staining for MCSF protein and released immunoreactive MCSF in a time-dependent manner. In contrast, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) was a less potent inducer of MCSF gene expression and iron-oxidized low-density lipoproteins (ox-LDL) did not increase consistently MCSF mRNA or the synthesis and secretion of immunoreactive protein. Northern analysis of mRNA isolated from the atheromatous aorta of rabbits fed a 1% cholesterol diet for 10 weeks showed elevated MCSF mRNA compared with controls. Immunostaining of atheromatous arterial lesions of rabbits demonstrated MCSF protein in association with intimal SMC as well as macrophages. Furthermore, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of MCSF mRNA in human atheromata showed higher levels than found in nonatherosclerotic arteries and veins. Since the

  20. Ascorbic acid stimulates the resorption of canine articular cartilage induced by a factor derived from activated rabbit macrophages.

    PubMed

    Dean, D D; Sellers, A; Howell, D S; Kerwar, S S; Woessner, J F

    1985-01-01

    Articular cartilage explants from the knees of mongrel dogs release 5-10% of their proteoglycan content spontaneously when cultured for 4 days in serum-free modified Bigger's medium. A factor synthesized and secreted by lipopolysaccharide-stimulated rabbit macrophages can stimulate this release of proteoglycan by 2 to 3-fold. The release of proteoglycan in response to macrophage factor is maximal in the presence of 1.5-50 micrograms/ml L-ascorbic acid. In the absence of ascorbate, or with high levels of ascorbate (150 micrograms/ml), the effect of the factor is diminished by 50%. D-isoascorbate, reduced glutathione, or dithiothreitol cannot substitute for L-ascorbate in producing this effect, while dehydroascorbate can.

  1. Inhibition of colony-stimulating factor-1 promoter activity by the product of the Wilms' tumor locus.

    PubMed

    Harrington, M A; Konicek, B; Song, A; Xia, X L; Fredericks, W J; Rauscher, F J

    1993-10-05

    Colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) is a member of the immediate early gene family, which is expressed in mitogen-stimulated quiescent fibroblasts. The biological effects of CSF-1 are multifaceted and include stimulation of the proliferation and differentiation of myeloid progenitors and activity of circulating monocytes and tissue-specific macrophages. Ablation of circulating levels of biologically active CSF-1 in mice leads to osteopetrosis and sterility, thus implicating a role for CSF-1 in bone remodeling and implantation. Identification of regulatory elements and cognate transcription factors that bind the csf-1 promoter and mediate such diverse expression patterns is of great interest. We identified a sequence element at -273 to -265 (relative to the transcription initiation site) in the murine csf-1 promoter, which contains overlapping consensus sequences for the Wilms' tumor protein (WT1), EGR-1, SP1, and SP3 proteins. WT1 and EGR-1 proteins produced in vitro bound to this sequence, and co-transfection of wt1 with a csf-1-cat reporter plasmid resulted in repression of promoter activity. Interestingly, nuclear extracts prepared from serum-stimulated C3H10T1/2 cells contained predominantly SP1 and SP3 binding activities, which recognized the -273 to -265 site. Thus repression of the csf-1 promoter by WT1 at this site may involve competition between SP1 family transcriptional activators and the WT1 repressor. Colony-stimulating factor-1 may be a physiologically relevant target gene for regulation by the WT1 transcription factor.

  2. Effect of thrombopoietin and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on platelets and polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Schattner, M; Pozner, R G; Gorostizaga, A B; Lazzari, M A

    2000-07-15

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) may be administered together in aplastic patients. We evaluated the effect of both cytokines alone or combined on platelets and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) functional responses. TPO, G-CSF, or the combination of both cytokines, induced neither platelet nor PMN activation. TPO but not G-CSF synergized with threshold ADP concentrations to induce maximal aggregation and ATP release. The synergistic effect of TPO with ADP was not modified by the presence of G-CSF. Flow cytometry studies have shown that thrombin-induced loss of GPIb from platelet surface was significantly increased by pretreatment of platelets with TPO, G-CSF, or both cytokines. P-selectin expression induced by thrombin was augmented by TPO, but not by G-CSF. Coincubation of the cells with TPO and G-CSF did not modify the values obtained with TPO alone. Expression of CD11b on PMN surface was augmented by G-CSF or fMLP. G-CSF-treated PMN increased the effect of fMLP on CD11b expression. TPO did not modify either basal levels of CD11b or the increased expression induced by G-CSF or fMLP. Incubation of PMN with both cytokines showed no differences compared to G-CSF alone. Platelet-PMN aggregates induced by thrombin in whole blood were augmented by TPO. G-CSF alone neither synergized with thrombin nor changed the results observed with TPO. These data show that in vitro functional responses of platelets, or PMN induced by TPO or G-CSF alone, were neither further increased nor inhibited by treatment of the cells with both cytokines.

  3. Molecular Mechanism of Regulation of MTA1 Expression by Granulocyte Colony-stimulating Factor*

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Arathy S.; Jagadeeshan, Sankar; Subramanian, Anirudh; Chidambaram, Saravana Babu; Surabhi, Rohan Prasad; Singhal, Mahak; Bhoopalan, Hemadev; Sekar, Sathiya; Pitani, Ravi Shankar; Duvuru, Prathiba; Venkatraman, Ganesh; Rayala, Suresh K.

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder with loss of dopaminergic neurons of the brain, which results in insufficient synthesis and action of dopamine. Metastasis-associated protein 1 (MTA1) is an upstream modulator of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in dopamine synthesis, and hence MTA1 plays a significant role in PD pathogenesis. To impart functional and clinical significance to MTA1, we analyzed MTA1 and TH levels in the substantia nigra region of a large cohort of human brain tissue samples by Western blotting, quantitative PCR, and immunohistochemistry. Our results showed that MTA1 and TH levels were significantly down-regulated in PD samples as compared with normal brain tissue. Correspondingly, immunohistochemistry analysis for MTA1 in substantia nigra sections revealed that 74.1% of the samples had a staining intensity of <6 in the PD samples as compared with controls, 25.9%, with an odds ratio of 8.54. Because of the clinical importance of MTA1 established in PD, we looked at agents to modulate MTA1 expression in neuronal cells, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) was chosen, due to its clinically proven neurogenic effects. Treatment of the human neuronal cell line KELLY and acute 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine mouse model with G-CSF showed significant induction of MTA1 and TH with rescue of phenotype in the mouse model. Interestingly, the observed induction of TH was compromised on silencing of MTA1. The underlying molecular mechanism of MTA1 induction by G-CSF was proved to be through induction of c-Fos and its recruitment to the MTA1 promoter. PMID:27044752

  4. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor attenuates inflammation in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF) is protective in animal models of various neurodegenerative diseases. We investigated whether pegfilgrastim, GCSF with sustained action, is protective in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). ALS is a fatal neurodegenerative disease with manifestations of upper and lower motoneuron death and muscle atrophy accompanied by inflammation in the CNS and periphery. Methods Human mutant G93A superoxide dismutase (SOD1) ALS mice were treated with pegfilgrastim starting at the presymptomatic stage and continued until the end stage. After long-term pegfilgrastim treatment, the inflammation status was defined in the spinal cord and peripheral tissues including hematopoietic organs and muscle. The effect of GCSF on spinal cord neuron survival and microglia, bone marrow and spleen monocyte activation was assessed in vitro. Results Long-term pegfilgrastim treatment prolonged mutant SOD1 mice survival and attenuated both astro- and microgliosis in the spinal cord. Pegfilgrastim in SOD1 mice modulated the inflammatory cell populations in the bone marrow and spleen and reduced the production of pro-inflammatory cytokine in monocytes and microglia. The mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells into the circulation was restored back to basal level after long-term pegfilgrastim treatment in SOD1 mice while the storage of Ly6C expressing monocytes in the bone marrow and spleen remained elevated. After pegfilgrastim treatment, an increased proportion of these cells in the degenerative muscle was detected at the end stage of ALS. Conclusions GCSF attenuated inflammation in the CNS and the periphery in a mouse model of ALS and thereby delayed the progression of the disease. This mechanism of action targeting inflammation provides a new perspective of the usage of GCSF in the treatment of ALS. PMID:21711557

  5. Hemoglobin stimulates mononuclear leukocytes to release interleukin-8 and tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed

    McFaul, S J; Bowman, P D; Villa, V M; Gutierrez-Ibanez, M J; Johnson, M; Smith, D

    1994-11-01

    Incubation of human mononuclear leukocytes (MNL) with human stroma-free hemolysate (SFH), purified adult hemoglobin Ao (HbAo), and oxidized HbAo (METHb) caused MNL to release compounds into the supernate that mediated neutrophil (polymorphonuclear leukocytes, PMN) chemotaxis and PMN adherence to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Chemotaxis and PMN adherence to HUVEC were reduced significantly when supernates were preincubated with neutralizing antibodies to interleukin-8 (IL-8) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), respectively, suggesting that IL-8 and TNF-alpha played significant roles in mediating these activities. Greatest chemotactic activity was observed in supernates of MNL treated with HbAo; while greatest PMN/endothelial cell (EC) adherence activity was observed in supernates of MNL treated with METHb. Furthermore, PMN/EC adherence activity was a function of METHb content in each hemoglobin solution. PMN chemotaxis, PMN adherence to HUVEC, and cytokine release increased as a function of increasing incubation time. Chemotactic activity was detected in HbAo-treated and METHb-treated MNL supernates after incubation for 6 hours and was maximal by 10 hours. IL-8 was detected in both HbAo and METHb-MNL supernates by 4 hours. PMN/EC adherence activity was detected in HbAo-MNL supernates at 10 hours and in METHb-MNL supernates at 4 hours. TNF-alpha was detected in METHb and HbAo-MNL supernates at 4 and 12 hours, respectively. These results suggest that hemoglobin solutions stimulate MNL to release IL-8 and TNF-alpha in quantities sufficient to induce PMN chemotaxis and PMN adherence to HUVEC. This is a US government work. There are no restrictions on its use.

  6. Trypanosome Lytic Factor-1 Initiates Oxidation-stimulated Osmotic Lysis of Trypanosoma brucei brucei*

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Amy Styer; Hajduk, Stephen L.

    2016-01-01

    Human innate immunity against the veterinary pathogen Trypanosoma brucei brucei is conferred by trypanosome lytic factors (TLFs), against which human-infective T. brucei gambiense and T. brucei rhodesiense have evolved resistance. TLF-1 is a subclass of high density lipoprotein particles defined by two primate-specific apolipoproteins: the ion channel-forming toxin ApoL1 (apolipoprotein L1) and the hemoglobin (Hb) scavenger Hpr (haptoglobin-related protein). The role of oxidative stress in the TLF-1 lytic mechanism has been controversial. Here we show that oxidative processes are involved in TLF-1 killing of T. brucei brucei. The lipophilic antioxidant N,N′-diphenyl-p-phenylenediamine protected TLF-1-treated T. brucei brucei from lysis. Conversely, lysis of TLF-1-treated T. brucei brucei was increased by the addition of peroxides or thiol-conjugating agents. Previously, the Hpr-Hb complex was postulated to be a source of free radicals during TLF-1 lysis. However, we found that the iron-containing heme of the Hpr-Hb complex was not involved in TLF-1 lysis. Furthermore, neither high concentrations of transferrin nor knock-out of cytosolic lipid peroxidases prevented TLF-1 lysis. Instead, purified ApoL1 was sufficient to induce lysis, and ApoL1 lysis was inhibited by the antioxidant DPPD. Swelling of TLF-1-treated T. brucei brucei was reminiscent of swelling under hypotonic stress. Moreover, TLF-1-treated T. brucei brucei became rapidly susceptible to hypotonic lysis. T. brucei brucei cells exposed to peroxides or thiol-binding agents were also sensitized to hypotonic lysis in the absence of TLF-1. We postulate that ApoL1 initiates osmotic stress at the plasma membrane, which sensitizes T. brucei brucei to oxidation-stimulated osmotic lysis. PMID:26645690

  7. NF-κB family of transcription factors: biochemical players of CD28 co-stimulation.

    PubMed

    Tuosto, Loretta

    2011-03-30

    The signalling pathways that lead from antigen-receptor and/or co-receptor triggering to the activation of transcription factors of the NF-κB family have a crucial role in the regulation of immune responses. The understanding of the molecular mechanisms that control NF-κB activation in lymphocytes has, therefore, important implications for the therapy of immune diseases. CD28 is one of the most important co-stimulatory receptors necessary for full T lymphocyte activation. CD28-mediated signals lower T cell receptor (TCR) activation threshold, thus leading to the enhancement of several T cell functions, including cytokine production, cell cycle progression, survival and regulation of both cytotoxic and humoral T cell responses. However, most of these pathways are under the tight control of TCR and may be bypassed by repeated antigen stimulation. On the contrary, the activation of the NF-κB pathway and NF-κB-regulated genes is a unique feature of CD28. The ultimate nature of CD28 signalling relies on its cytoplasmic tail and on its ability to recruit several signalling mediators involved in coupling CD28 to distinct NF-κB cascades. This review will focus on the current knowledge of the molecular mechanisms whereby CD28 co-operates with the TCR in activating NF-κB. We also describe recent finding on the existence of autonomous signals emanating from CD28, which through a non-conventional NF-κB cascade may account for the critical role of CD28 in regulating cytokine/chemokine production and T cell survival. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor expression on human transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder.

    PubMed Central

    Tachibana, M.; Miyakawa, A.; Uchida, A.; Murai, M.; Eguchi, K.; Nakamura, K.; Kubo, A.; Hata, J. I.

    1997-01-01

    Receptors for granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSFRs) have been confirmed on the cell surfaces of several non-haematopoietic cell types, including bladder cancer cells. This observation has naturally led to the hypothesis that the expression of G-CSFR on these cells may enhance their growth by G-CSF. In this study, the expression of G-CSFR was determined in both established human bladder cancer cell lines and primary bladder cancers. We studied five different human bladder cancer cell lines (KU-1, KU-7, T-24, NBT-2 and KK) and 26 newly diagnosed bladder tumours. G-CSFR mRNA expressions on cultured cell lines were determined using the reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method. Furthermore, the G-CSFR binding experiments on the cultured cell lines were conducted using the Na(125)I-labelled G-CSF ligand-binding assay method. Moreover, the G-CSFR mRNA expressions on primary bladder tumour specimens were assessed using the in situ RT-PCR method. Three out of the five cultured cell lines (KU-1, NBT-2 and KK) exhibited G-CSFR mRNA signals when the RT-PCR method was used. The G-CSFR binding experiments showed an equilibrium dissociation constant (K[d]) of 490 pM for KU-1, 340 pM for NBT-2 and 103 pM for KK cells. With in situ RT-PCR, the tumour cells of 6 out of 26 primary bladder tumour specimens (23.1%) presented positive G-CSFR mRNA signals. Thus, in this study, G-CSFR expression was frequently observed on bladder cancer cells. Therefore, the clinical use of G-CSF for patients with bladder cancer should be selected with great care. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9166942

  9. Use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor during pregnancy in women with chronic neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Boxer, Laurence A; Bolyard, Audrey Anna; Kelley, Merideth L; Marrero, Tracy M; Phan, Lan; Bond, Jordan M; Newburger, Peter E; Dale, David C

    2015-01-01

    To report outcomes associated with the administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) to women with chronic neutropenia during pregnancy. We conducted an observational study of women of childbearing potential with congenital, cyclic, idiopathic, or autoimmune neutropenia enrolled in the Severe Chronic Neutropenia International Registry to determine outcomes of pregnancies, without and with chronic G-CSF therapy, 1999-2014. Treatment decisions were made by the patients' personal physicians. A research nurse conducted telephone interviews of all enrolled U.S. women of childbearing potential using a standard questionnaire. Comparisons used Fisher's exact test analysis and Student's t test. One hundred seven women reported 224 pregnancies, 124 without G-CSF therapy and 100 on chronic G-CSF therapy (median dose 1.0 micrograms/kg per day, range 0.02-8.6 micrograms/kg per day). There were no significant differences in adverse events between the groups considering all pregnancies or individual mothers, for example, spontaneous terminations (all pregnancies: no G-CSF in 27/124, G-CSF in 13/100; P=.11, Fisher's exact test), preterm labors (all pregnancies, no G-CSF in 9/124, G-CSF in 2/100, P=.12). A study with at least 300 per group would be needed to detect a difference in these events with 80% statistical power (α=0.05). Four newborns of mothers with idiopathic or autoimmune neutropenia not on G-CSF (4/101) had life-threatening infections, whereas there were no similar events (0/90) in the treated group, but this difference was also not statistically significant (P=.124). Adverse events in the neonates were similar for the two groups. This observational study showed no significant adverse effects of administration of G-CSF to women with severe chronic neutropenia during pregnancy. III.

  10. Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor auto-antibodies and disease relapse in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Däbritz, Jan; Bonkowski, Erin; Chalk, Claudia; Trapnell, Bruce C; Langhorst, Jost; Denson, Lee A; Foell, Dirk

    2013-12-01

    Along with others, we have reported that neutralization of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) increases intestinal permeability and bacterial translocation, and reduces neutrophil bacterial killing and anti-microbial seroreactivity. The objective was to investigate the utility of serum GM-CSF auto-antibody (Ab) as a marker for confirmation of stable remission and prediction of relapses in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We consecutively included 181 adults and children with Crohn's disease (CD, n=61) or ulcerative colitis (UC, n=120). Over a 3-year period, we collected 861 serum samples and 610 stool samples during regular follow-up visits. GM-CSF Abs and fecal S100 proteins were measured by an enzyme-linked immunoassay. Serum GM-CSF Ab levels correlated with disease activity, location, and extent. Time course analysis before and after relapse showed a clear increase of GM-CSF Ab concentrations up to 6 months before clinical relapse. At 1.7 μg/ml (CD) and 0.5 μg/ml (UC), the sensitivity and specificity of GM-CSF Ab for predicting relapse already 2-6 months earlier were 88% and 95% in CD and 62% and 68% in UC, respectively. A baseline GM-CSF Ab level of >1.7 μg/ml was significantly associated with relapse of CD within 18 months. As GM-CSF is required for myeloid cell antimicrobial functions and homeostatic responses to tissue injury, serum GM-CSF Ab levels might reflect the degree of bowel permeability and bacterial translocation. Therefore, GM-CSF Ab might identify IBD patients at risk of disease relapse at an early stage, which makes the test a potential tool for monitoring disease activity and optimizing therapy.

  11. Granulocyte macrophage - colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) significantly enhances articular cartilage repair potential by microfracture.

    PubMed

    Truong, M-D; Choi, B H; Kim, Y J; Kim, M S; Min, B-H

    2017-08-01

    To investigate whether granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) can be used to increase the number of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in blood clots formed by microfracture arthroplasty (MFX) and whether it can improve the therapeutic outcome for cartilage repair. Thirty-six New Zealand white rabbits were divided into four groups: (1) control, (2) GM-CSF, (3) MFX, and (4) GM-CSF + MFX. GM-CSF was administrated intravenously (IV) at 10 μg/kg body weight 20 min before the MFX surgery. The repaired tissues were retrieved and examined by histological observation, quantitative assessment, and biochemical assays at 4, 8, and 12 weeks after treatment. The number of MSCs was measured in the blood clots by the colony forming unit-fibroblast (CFU-F) assay. The kinetic profile and distribution of GM-CSF in vivo was also evaluated by near-Infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging and enzyme-linked immune sorbent assay. In the histological observations and chemical assays examined at 4, 8, and 12 weeks, the MFX after GM-CSF administration showed better cartilage repair than the one without GM-CSF. The CFU-F assay showed a significantly larger amount of MSCs present in the blood clots of the GM-CSF + MFX group than in the blood clots of the other groups. The blood concentration of GM-CSF peaked at 10 min and decreased back to almost the initial level after a couple of hours. GM-CSF was distributed in many organs including the bone marrow but was not observed clearly in the joint cavity. Intravenous administration of GM-CSF together with MFX could be a promising therapeutic protocol to enhance the repair of cartilage defects. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Current status of granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor in the immunotherapy of melanoma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, it was estimated that 9180 people in the United States would die from melanoma and that more than 76,000 new cases would be diagnosed. Surgical resection is effective for early-stage melanoma, but outcomes are poor for patients with advanced disease. Expression of tumor-associated antigens by melanoma cells makes the disease a promising candidate for immunotherapy. The hematopoietic cytokine granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has a variety of effects on the immune system including activation of T cells and maturation of dendritic cells, as well as an ability to promote humoral and cell-mediated responses. Given its immunobiology, there has been interest in strategies incorporating GM-CSF in the treatment of melanoma. Preclinical studies with GM-CSF have suggested that it has antitumor activity against melanoma and can enhance the activity of anti-melanoma vaccines. Numerous clinical studies have evaluated recombinant GM-CSF as a monotherapy, as adjuvant with or without cancer vaccines, or in combination with chemotherapy. Although there have been suggestions of clinical benefit in some studies, results have been inconsistent. More recently, novel approaches incorporating GM-CSF in the treatment of melanoma have been evaluated. These have included oncolytic immunotherapy with the GM-CSF–expressing engineered herpes simplex virus talimogene laherparepvec and administration of GM-CSF in combination with ipilimumab, both of which have improved patient outcomes in phase 3 studies. This review describes the diverse body of preclinical and clinical evidence regarding use of GM-CSF in the treatment of melanoma. PMID:24971166

  13. Differential alterations in plasma colony-stimulating factor concentrations in meningococcaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Waring, P M; Presneill, J; Maher, D W; Layton, J E; Cebon, J; Waring, L J; Metcalf, D

    1995-01-01

    To determine whether circulating levels of any of the colony-stimulating factors (CSF) might contribute to the host response in severe sepsis, plasma concentrations of granulocyte CSF (G-CSF), granulocyte-macrophage CSF (GM-CSF), and macrophage CSF (M-CSF) were measured by immunoassays in 20 subjects with meningococcaemia, a bloodstream infection caused by Neisseria meningitidis, that has proven to be a valuable model to study the responses of other inflammatory mediators during sepsis and septic shock in humans. Plasma G-CSF concentrations were transiently elevated in most subjects during the early phase of meningococcaemia, and were higher in subjects with septic shock (mean +/- s.d. = 165 +/- 142 ng/ml, n = 9) compared with those who remained normotensive (mean +/- s.d. = 7 +/- 2 ng/ml, n = 10) (P < 0.05). Peak plasma G-CSF concentrations > 10 ng/ml were associated with the development of septic shock (P < 0.01), disseminated intravascular coagulation (P < 0.01), fulminant infection (P < 0.05), and a fatal outcome (P < 0.01). Plasma GM-CSF concentrations > 1 ng/ml were briefly present in subjects with life-threatening septic shock (1-15 ng/ml, n = 5), and were strongly associated with fulminant meningococcaemia (P < 0.01). Plasma M-CSF concentrations were marginally elevated in all subjects, but were not associated with complications related to or arising from sepsis-induced organ injury. This study demonstrates that plasma levels of G-CSF, GM-CSF and M-CSF show very different responses during meningococcaemia, changes which presumably reflect the different roles played by these mediators in sepsis and, potentially, in septic shock. PMID:8536364

  14. Immobilized transition metals stimulate contact activation and drive factor XII-mediated coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Mutch, N.J.; Waters, E.K.; Morrissey, J. H.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Upon contact with an appropriate surface, factor XII (FXII) undergoes autoactivation or cleavage by kallikrein. Zn2+ is known to facilitate binding of FXII and the cofactor, high molecular weight kininogen (HK), to anionic surfaces. Objectives To investigate whether transition metals immobilized on liposome surfaces can initiate coagulation via the contact pathway. Methods & Results Liposomes containing a metal ion-chelating lipid (DOGS-NTA) were prepared by membrane extrusion (20% DOGS-NTA, 40% phosphatidylcholine, 10% phosphatidylserine, and 30% phosphatidylethanolamine). Ni2+ immobilized on such liposomes accelerated clotting in normal, but not FXI- or FXII-deficient plasma. Results were comparable to a commercial aPTT reagent. Charging such liposomes with other transition metals revealed differences in their procoagulant capacity, with Ni2+> Cu2+> Co2+ and Zn2+. Plasma could be depleted of FXI, FXII and HK by adsorption with Ni2+-containing beads, resulting in delayed clot times. Consistent with this, FXI, FXII and HK bound to immobilized Ni2+ or Cu2+ with high affinity as determined by surface plasmon resonance. In the presence of Ni2+-bearing liposomes, Km and kcat values derived for autoactivation of FXII and prekallikrein, as well as for activation of FXII by kallikrein or prekallikrein by FXIIa, were similar to literature values in the presence of dextran sulfate. Conclusions Immobilized Ni2+ and Cu2+ bind FXII, FXI and HK with high affinity and stimulate activation of the contact pathway, driving FXII-mediated coagulation. Activation of the contact system by immobilized transition metals may have implications during pathogenic infection or in individuals exposed to high levels of pollution. PMID:22905925

  15. L1CAM stimulates glioma cell motility and proliferation through the fibroblast growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Mohanan, Vishnu; Temburni, Murali K; Kappes, John C; Galileo, Deni S

    2013-04-01

    The L1CAM cell adhesion/recognition molecule (L1, CD171) and fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) both are expressed by human high-grade glioma cells, but their potential actions in controlling cell behavior have not been linked. L1 actions in cancer cells have been attributed mainly to integrin receptors, and we demonstrated previously that L1-stimulated glioma cell migration correlates with integrin expression, increased focal adhesion kinase activation and focal complex turnover. Our analyses of datasets revealed FGFR is overexpressed in glioma regardless of grade, while ADAM10 metalloprotease expression increases with glioma grade. Here, we used dominant-negative and short hairpin RNA approaches to inhibit the activation of FGFR1 and expression of L1, respectively. An L1 peptide that inhibits L1-FGFR interaction and PD173074, a chemical inhibitor of FGFR1 activity, also were used to elucidate the involvement of L1-FGFR interactions on glioma cell behavior. Time-lapse cell motility studies and flow cytometry cell cycle analyses showed that L1 operates to increase glioma cell motility and proliferation through FGFR activation. Shutdown of both L1 expression and FGFR activity in glioma cells resulted in a complete termination of cell migration in vitro. These studies show for the first time that soluble L1 ectodomain (L1LE) acts on glioma cells through FGFRs, and that FGFRs are used by glioma cells for increasing motility as well as proliferation in response to activation by L1LE ligand. Thus, effective treatment of high-grade glioma may require simultaneous targeting of L1, FGFRs, and integrin receptors, which would reduce glioma cell motility as well as proliferation.

  16. Skin impedance is not a factor in transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Vance, Carol GT; Rakel, Barbara A; Dailey, Dana L; Sluka, Kathleen A

    2015-01-01

    Objective Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a nonpharmacological intervention used to manage pain using skin surface electrodes. Optimal electrode placement is unclear. We hypothesized that better analgesia would occur if electrodes were placed over sites with lower skin impedance. Optimal site selection (OSS) and sham site selection (SSS) electrode sites on the forearm were identified using a standard clinical technique. Methods Experiment 1 measured skin impedance in the forearm at OSS and SSS. Experiment 2 was a crossover design double-blind randomized controlled trial comparing OSS-TENS, SSS-TENS, and placebo TENS (P-TENS) to confirm differences in skin impedance between OSS and SSS, and measure change in pressure pain threshold (PPT) following a 30-minute TENS treatment. Healthy volunteers were recruited (ten for Experiment 1 [five male, five female] and 24 for Experiment 2 [12 male, 12 female]). TENS was applied for 30 minutes at 100 Hz frequency, 100 µs pulse duration, and “strong but nonpainful” amplitude. Results Experiment 1 results demonstrate significantly higher impedance at SSS (17.69±1.24 Ω) compared to OSS (13.53±0.57 Ω) (P=0.007). For Experiment 2, electrode site impedance was significantly higher over SSS, with both the impedance meter (P=0.001) and the TENS unit (P=0.012) compared to OSS. PPT change was significantly greater for both OSS-TENS (P=0.024) and SSS-TENS (P=0.025) when compared to P-TENS. PPT did not differ between the two active TENS treatments (P=0.81). Conclusion Skin impedance is lower at sites characterized as optimal using the described technique of electrode site selection. When TENS is applied at adequate intensities, skin impedance is not a factor in attainment of hypoalgesia of the forearm in healthy subjects. Further investigation should include testing in patients presenting with painful conditions. PMID:26316808

  17. Tumor necrosis factor alpha/cachectin stimulates eosinophil oxidant production and toxicity towards human endothelium

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Eosinophils (EOs) participate in a variety of inflammatory states characterized by endothelial cell damage, such as vasculitis, pneumonitis, and endocarditis. We find that 100 U/ml TNF- alpha/cachectin (TNF), a concentration attainable in the blood of humans with parasitic infestations, stimulates highly purified populations of EOs to damage human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), a model of human endothelium. This TNF-dependent EO cytotoxicity is strongly inhibited by heparin and methyprednisolone but unaffected by the platelet-activating factor antagonist BN52012 or scavengers of superoxide anion and H2O2, superoxide dismutase and catalase. However, addition of a physiologically relevant concentration of Br- (100 microM) enhances EO/TNF damage to HUVEC, implicating the possible participation of EO peroxidase (EPO) in the killing mechanism. EOs adherent to FCS-coated plastic wells more than double their production of superoxide anion and the cytotoxic EPO-derived oxidant HOBr when exposed to TNF, showing that TNF activates the respiratory burst of EOs attached to a "physiologic" surface. Unlike PMNs, EOs were not irreversibly activated to kill unopsonized endothelium by previous exposure to TNF, and did not degranulate or upregulate CR3 expression as detected by Mo1 in the presence of 100 U/ml TNF. HUVEC exposed 18 h to TNF were considerably more susceptible to lysis by PMA-activated EOs and reagent H2O2, demonstrating a direct effect of TNF upon endothelium, perhaps through inhibition of antioxidant defenses. These findings suggest that abnormally elevated serum levels of TNF may provoke EOs to damage endothelial cells and thereby play a role in the pathogenesis of tissue damage in hypereosinophilic states. PMID:1972179

  18. Tumor necrosis factor alpha/cachectin stimulates eosinophil oxidant production and toxicity towards human endothelium.

    PubMed

    Slungaard, A; Vercellotti, G M; Walker, G; Nelson, R D; Jacob, H S

    1990-06-01

    Eosinophils (EOs) participate in a variety of inflammatory states characterized by endothelial cell damage, such as vasculitis, pneumonitis, and endocarditis. We find that 100 U/ml TNF-alpha/cachectin (TNF), a concentration attainable in the blood of humans with parasitic infestations, stimulates highly purified populations of EOs to damage human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), a model of human endothelium. This TNF-dependent EO cytotoxicity is strongly inhibited by heparin and methyprednisolone but unaffected by the platelet-activating factor antagonist BN52012 or scavengers of superoxide anion and H2O2, superoxide dismutase and catalase. However, addition of a physiologically relevant concentration of Br- (100 microM) enhances EO/TNF damage to HUVEC, implicating the possible participation of EO peroxidase (EPO) in the killing mechanism. EOs adherent to FCS-coated plastic wells more than double their production of superoxide anion and the cytotoxic EPO-derived oxidant HOBr when exposed to TNF, showing that TNF activates the respiratory burst of EOs attached to a "physiologic" surface. Unlike PMNs, EOs were not irreversibly activated to kill unopsonized endothelium by previous exposure to TNF, and did not degranulate or upregulate CR3 expression as detected by Mo1 in the presence of 100 U/ml TNF. HUVEC exposed 18 h to TNF were considerably more susceptible to lysis by PMA-activated EOs and reagent H2O2, demonstrating a direct effect of TNF upon endothelium, perhaps through inhibition of antioxidant defenses. These findings suggest that abnormally elevated serum levels of TNF may provoke EOs to damage endothelial cells and thereby play a role in the pathogenesis of tissue damage in hypereosinophilic states.

  19. Clonidine stimulates atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) release in water-deprived rats.

    PubMed

    Baranowska, B; Tremblay, J; Gutkowska, J

    1988-01-01

    To determine the effect of clonidine, an alpha 2-adrenergic agonist, on atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) release during water deprivation, plasma immunoreactive ANF (IR-ANF) arginine vasopressin, diuresis and natriuresis were measured in rats which had been deprived of water for 24 and 48 hr after intravenous (IV) administration of 50 micrograms clonidine. In normally-hydrated rats clonidine produced a marked elevation of plasma IR-ANF from 40.5 +/- 4.6 pg/ml to 1064 +/- 22 pg/ml (mean +/- SEM) and sodium excretion from 73.3 +/- 6.8 microEq to 723.4 +/- 62.3 microEq. Clonidine evoked an increase in plasma IR-ANF from 16.6 +/- 5.9 pg/ml to 229.5 +/- 60 pg/ml (mean +/- SEM) after 24 hr water deprivation and from 13.6 +/- 7.4 pg/ml to 104.8 +/- 21 pg/ml (mean +/- SEM) after 48 hr water deprivation. Clonidine did not induce any significant changes in vasopressin levels. During 24 hr and 48 hr water deprivation vasopressin rose from 3.1 +/- 0.3 pg/ml to 7.3 +/- 1.3 pg/ml and 8.4 +/- 0.6 pg/ml (mean +/- SEM), respectively. In normally-hydrated rats clonidine produced a marked diuresis and natriuresis. These effects and urinary cGMP excretion were significantly inhibited by anti-ANF antibodies. Clonidine caused a significant increase in urine output in 24 hr water-deprived rats but the response was markedly lower than that seen in normally-hydrated rats. In conclusion, clonidine stimulates ANF release both in normally-hydrated and water-deprived rats. The diuretic effect of clonidine appears to be related to ANF release but not to inhibition of vasopressin.

  20. Elevated levels of macrophage colony-stimulating factor in human fracture healing.

    PubMed

    Sarahrudi, Kambiz; Mousavi, Mehdi; Thomas, Anita; Eipeldauer, Stefan; Vécsei, Vilmos; Pietschmann, Peter; Aharinejad, Seyedhossein

    2010-05-01

    Macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) plays a unique role in bone remodeling. However, to our knowledge, no data on the role of M-CSF in fracture healing in humans have been published so far. This study addressed this issue. One hundred and thirteen patients with long-bone fractures were included in the study and divided into two groups, according to their course of fracture healing. The first group contained 103 patients with normal fracture healing. Ten patients with impaired fracture healing formed the second group of the study. Volunteers donated blood samples as control. Serum samples were collected over a period of 6 months, following a standardized time schedule. In addition, M-CSF levels were measured in fracture hematoma and serum of 11 patients with bone fractures. M-CSF concentrations were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Fracture hematoma contained significantly higher M-CSF concentrations compared to M-CSF concentrations in patient's serum. M-CSF levels in fracture hematoma and in patient's serum were both significantly higher than M-CSF concentrations measured in serum of healthy controls. Highly elevated M-CSF serum concentrations were found in patients with physiological fracture healing over the entire observation period. Significant differences in the M-CSF serum concentration between patients with normal fracture healing and patients with impaired fracture healing were not observed. This study indicates, for the first time, to our knowledge, a possible local and systemic involvement of M-CSF in humans during fracture healing.

  1. Factors predicting incremental administration of antihypertensive boluses during deep brain stimulator placement for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Shobana; Deogaonkar, Milind; Kaw, Roop; Nada, Eman Ms; Hernandez, Adrian V; Ebrahim, Zeyd; Avitsian, Rafi

    2014-10-01

    Hypertension is common in deep brain stimulator (DBS) placement predisposing to intracranial hemorrhage. This retrospective review evaluates factors predicting incremental antihypertensive use intraoperatively. Medical records of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients undergoing DBS procedure between 2008-2011 were reviewed after Institutional Review Board approval. Anesthesia medication, preoperative levodopa dose, age, preoperative use of antihypertensive medications, diabetes mellitus, anxiety, motor part of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale score and PD duration were collected. Univariate and multivariate analysis was done between each patient characteristic and the number of antihypertensive boluses. From the 136 patients included 60 were hypertensive, of whom 32 were on angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB), told to hold on the morning of surgery. Antihypertensive medications were given to 130 patients intraoperatively. Age (relative risk [RR] 1.01; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.00-1.02; p=0.005), high Joint National Committee (JNC) class (p<0.0001), diabetes mellitus (RR 1.4; 95%CI 1.2-17; p<0.0001) and duration of PD >10 years (RR 1.2; 95%CI 1.1-1.3; p=0.001) were independent predictors for antihypertensive use. No difference was noted in the mean dose of levodopa (p=0.1) and levodopa equivalent dose (p=0.4) between the low (I/II) and high severity (III/IV) JNC groups. Addition of dexmedetomidine to propofol did not influence antihypertensive boluses required (p=0.38). Intraoperative hypertension during DBS surgery is associated with higher age group, hypertensive, diabetic patients and longer duration of PD. Withholding ACEI or ARB is an independent predictor of hypertension requiring more aggressive therapy. Levodopa withdrawal and choice of anesthetic agent is not associated with higher intraoperative antihypertensive medications.

  2. Heavy chain transfer by tumor necrosis factor-stimulated gene 6 to the bikunin proteoglycan.

    PubMed

    Lamkin, Elliott; Cheng, Georgiana; Calabro, Anthony; Hascall, Vincent C; Joo, Eun Ji; Li, Lingyun; Linhardt, Robert J; Lauer, Mark E

    2015-02-20

    We present data that hyaluronan (HA) polysaccharides, about 14-86 monosaccharides in length, are capable of accepting only a single heavy chain (HC) from inter-α-inhibitor via transfer by tumor necrosis factor-stimulated gene 6 (TSG-6) and that this transfer is irreversible. We propose that either the sulfate groups (or the sulfation pattern) at the reducing end of the chondroitin sulfate (CS) chain of bikunin, or the core protein itself, enables the bikunin proteoglycan (PG) to accept more than a single HC and permits TSG-6 to transfer these HCs from its relatively small CS chain to HA. To test these hypotheses, we investigated HC transfer to the intact CS chain of the bikunin PG, and to the free chain of bikunin. We observed that both the free CS chain and the intact bikunin PG were only able to accept a single HC from inter-α-inhibitor via transfer by TSG-6 and that HCs could be swapped from the bikunin PG and its free CS chain to HA. Furthermore, a significant portion of the bikunin PG was unable to accept a single heavy chain. We discuss explanations for these observations, including the intracellular assembly of inter-α-inhibitor. In summary, these data demonstrate that the sulfation of the CS chain of bikunin and/or its core protein promote HC transfer by TSG-6 to its relatively short CS chain, although they are insufficient to enable the CS chain of bikunin to accept more than one HC in the absence of other cofactors. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. The effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in preclinical models of infection and acute inflammation.

    PubMed

    Marshall, John C

    2005-12-01

    The cytokine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a potent endogenous trigger for the release of neutrophils from bone marrow stores and for their activation for enhanced antimicrobial activity. G-CSF has been widely evaluated in preclinical models of acute illness, with generally promising though divergent results. A recombinant G-CSF molecule has recently undergone clinical trials to assess its efficacy as an adjuvant therapy in community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia, however, these studies failed to provide convincing evidence of benefit. We undertook a systematic review of the published literature reporting the effects of modulation of G-CSF in preclinical in vivo models to determine whether evidence of differential efficacy might explain the disappointing results of human studies and point to disease states that might be more likely to benefit from G-CSF therapy. G-CSF has been evaluated in 86 such studies involving a variety of different models. The strongest evidence of benefit was seen in studies involving intraperitoneal challenge with live organisms; benefit was evident whether the agent was given before or after challenge. G-CSF demonstrates anti-inflammatory activity in models of systemic challenge with viable organisms or endotoxin, but only when the agent is given before challenge; evidence of benefit after challenge was minimal. Preclinical models of intrapulmonary challenge only show efficacy when the cytokine is administered before the infectious challenge, and suggested harm in gram-negative pneumonia resulting from challenge with Escherichia coli or Klebsiella. There is little evidence for therapeutic efficacy in noninfectious models of acute illness. We conclude that the most promising populations for evaluation of G-CSF are neutropenic patients with invasive infection and patients with intra-abdominal infection, particularly those with the syndrome of tertiary, or recurrent, peritonitis. Significant variability in the design

  4. Heavy Chain Transfer by Tumor Necrosis Factor-stimulated Gene 6 to the Bikunin Proteoglycan*

    PubMed Central

    Lamkin, Elliott; Cheng, Georgiana; Calabro, Anthony; Hascall, Vincent C.; Joo, Eun Ji; Li, Lingyun; Linhardt, Robert J.; Lauer, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    We present data that hyaluronan (HA) polysaccharides, about 14–86 monosaccharides in length, are capable of accepting only a single heavy chain (HC) from inter-α-inhibitor via transfer by tumor necrosis factor-stimulated gene 6 (TSG-6) and that this transfer is irreversible. We propose that either the sulfate groups (or the sulfation pattern) at the reducing end of the chondroitin sulfate (CS) chain of bikunin, or the core protein itself, enables the bikunin proteoglycan (PG) to accept more than a single HC and permits TSG-6 to transfer these HCs from its relatively small CS chain to HA. To test these hypotheses, we investigated HC transfer to the intact CS chain of the bikunin PG, and to the free chain of bikunin. We observed that both the free CS chain and the intact bikunin PG were only able to accept a single HC from inter-α-inhibitor via transfer by TSG-6 and that HCs could be swapped from the bikunin PG and its free CS chain to HA. Furthermore, a significant portion of the bikunin PG was unable to accept a single heavy chain. We discuss explanations for these observations, including the intracellular assembly of inter-α-inhibitor. In summary, these data demonstrate that the sulfation of the CS chain of bikunin and/or its core protein promote HC transfer by TSG-6 to its relatively short CS chain, although they are insufficient to enable the CS chain of bikunin to accept more than one HC in the absence of other cofactors. PMID:25561734

  5. Current status of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in the immunotherapy of melanoma.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Howard L; Ruby, Carl E; Hughes, Tasha; Slingluff, Craig L

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, it was estimated that 9180 people in the United States would die from melanoma and that more than 76,000 new cases would be diagnosed. Surgical resection is effective for early-stage melanoma, but outcomes are poor for patients with advanced disease. Expression of tumor-associated antigens by melanoma cells makes the disease a promising candidate for immunotherapy. The hematopoietic cytokine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has a variety of effects on the immune system including activation of T cells and maturation of dendritic cells, as well as an ability to promote humoral and cell-mediated responses. Given its immunobiology, there has been interest in strategies incorporating GM-CSF in the treatment of melanoma. Preclinical studies with GM-CSF have suggested that it has antitumor activity against melanoma and can enhance the activity of anti-melanoma vaccines. Numerous clinical studies have evaluated recombinant GM-CSF as a monotherapy, as adjuvant with or without cancer vaccines, or in combination with chemotherapy. Although there have been suggestions of clinical benefit in some studies, results have been inconsistent. More recently, novel approaches incorporating GM-CSF in the treatment of melanoma have been evaluated. These have included oncolytic immunotherapy with the GM-CSF-expressing engineered herpes simplex virus talimogene laherparepvec and administration of GM-CSF in combination with ipilimumab, both of which have improved patient outcomes in phase 3 studies. This review describes the diverse body of preclinical and clinical evidence regarding use of GM-CSF in the treatment of melanoma.

  6. Stimulation of BK virus DNA replication by NFI family transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Liang, Bo; Tikhanovich, Irina; Nasheuer, Heinz Peter; Folk, William R

    2012-03-01

    BK polyomavirus (BKV) establishes persistent, low-level, and asymptomatic infections in most humans and causes polyomavirus-associated nephropathy (PVAN) and other pathologies in some individuals. The activation of BKV replication following kidney transplantation, leading to viruria, viremia, and, ultimately, PVAN, is associated with immune suppression as well as inflammation and stress from ischemia-reperfusion injury of the allograft, but the stimuli and molecular mechanisms leading to these pathologies are not well defined. The replication of BKV DNA in cell cultures is regulated by the viral noncoding control region (NCCR) comprising the core origin and flanking sequences, to which BKV T antigen (Tag), cellular proteins, and small regulatory RNAs bind. Six nuclear factor I (NFI) binding sites occur in sequences flanking the late side of the core origin (the enhancer) of the archetype virus, and their mutation, either individually or in toto, reduces BKV DNA replication when placed in competition with templates containing intact BKV NCCRs. NFI family members interacted with the helicase domain of BKV Tag in pulldown assays, suggesting that NFI helps recruit Tag to the viral core origin and may modulate its function. However, Tag may not be the sole target of the replication-modulatory activities of NFI: the NFIC/CTF1 isotype stimulates BKV template replication in vitro at low concentrations of DNA polymerase-α primase (Pol-primase), and the p58 subunit of Pol-primase associates with NFIC/CTF1, suggesting that NFI also recruits Pol-primase to the NCCR. These results suggest that NFI proteins (and the signaling pathways that target them) activate BKV replication and contribute to the consequent pathologies caused by acute infection.

  7. Use of Granulocyte Colony–Stimulating Factor During Pregnancy in Women With Chronic Neutropenia

    PubMed Central

    Boxer, Laurence A.; Bolyard, Audrey Anna; Kelley, Merideth L.; Marrero, Tracy M.; Phan, Lan; Bond, Jordan M.; Newburger, Peter E.; Dale, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To report outcomes associated with the administration of granulocyte colony–stimulating factor (G-CSF) to women with chronic neutropenia during pregnancy. Methods We conducted an observational study of women of child-bearing potential with congenital, cyclic, idiopathic, or autoimmune neutropenia enrolled in the Severe Chronic Neutropenia International Registry to determine outcomes of pregnancies, without and with chronic G-CSF therapy, 1999–2014. Treatment decisions were made by the patients’ personal physicians. A research nurse conducted telephone interviews of all enrolled U.S. women of child-bearing potential using a standard questionnaire. Comparisons utilized Fisher’s exact test analysis and Student’s t-test. Results One-hundred seven women reported 224 pregnancies, 124 without G-CSF therapy and 100 on chronic G-CSF therapy (median dose: 1.0 mcg/kg/day, range 0.02–8.6 mcg/kg/day). There were no significant differences in adverse events between the groups considering all pregnancies or individual mothers, e.g., spontaneous terminations (all pregnancies: no G-CSF 27/124, G-CSF 13/100; P=0.11, Fisher’s exact test,), preterm labors (all pregnancies, no G-CSF 9/124, G-CSF 2/100, P=0.12,). A study with at least 300 per group would be needed to detect a difference in these events with 80% statistical power (alpha=0.05). Four newborns of mothers with idiopathic or autoimmune neutropenia not on G-CSF (4/101) had life-threatening infections, whereas there were no similar events (0/90) in the treated group, but this difference was also not statistically significant. (p=0.124). Adverse events in the neonates were similar for the two groups. Conclusions This observational study showed no significant adverse effects of administration of G-CSF to women with severe chronic neutropenia during pregnancy. PMID:25560125

  8. Vascular endothelial growth factor directly stimulates tumour cell proliferation in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Devery, Aoife M; Wadekar, Rekha; Bokobza, Sivan M; Weber, Anika M; Jiang, Yanyan; Ryan, Anderson J

    2015-09-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a key stimulator of physiological and pathological angiogenesis. VEGF signals primarily through VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2), a receptor tyrosine kinase whose expression is found predominantly on endothelial cells. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of VEGFR2 expression in NSCLC cells. NSCLC cells and tissue sections were stained for VEGFR2 expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Immunoblotting and ELISA were used to determine the activation and inhibition of VEGFR2 and its downstream signalling pathways. Five-day proliferation assays were carried out in the presence or absence of VEGF. IHC analysis of NSCLC demonstrated tumour cell VEGFR2 expression in 20% of samples. Immunoblot analysis showed expression of VEGFR2 protein in 3/8 NSCLC cell lines that correlated with VEGFR2 mRNA expression levels. VEGF-dependent VEGFR2 activation was apparent in NSCLC cells, and was associated with increased tumor cell proliferation. Cediranib treatment or siRNA against VEGFR2 inhibited VEGF-dependent increases in cell proliferation. Inhibition of VEGFR2 tyrosine kinase activity using cediranib was more effective than inhibition of AKT (MK2206) or MEK (AZD6244) for overcoming VEGFR2-driven cell proliferation. VEGF treatment did not affect cell survival following treatment with radiation, cisplatin, docetaxel or gemcitabine. Our data suggest that a subset of NSCLC tumour cells express functional VEGFR2 which can act to promote VEGF-dependent tumour cell growth. In this tumour subset, therapies targeting VEGFR2 signalling, such as cediranib, have the potential to inhibit both tumour cell proliferation and angiogenesis.

  9. Effects of growth factors on hormonal stimulation of amino acid transport in primary cultures of rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Auberger, P; Samson, M; Le Cam, A

    1983-01-01

    In primary cultures of rat hepatocytes, epidermal growth factor (EGF), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and foetal-calf serum (FCS) prevented the stimulation of amino acid transport by glucagon (cyclic AMP-dependent) and by catecholamines (cyclic AMP-independent), but not by insulin. The insulin effect, as well as the effect of other hormones, were totally inhibited by thrombin through a mechanism independent of its proteolytic activity. The inhibitory effect of growth factors, not found in freshly isolated hepatocytes, was expressed very early in culture (4h). Induction of tyrosine aminotransferase by glucagon or dexamethasone, which, like stimulation of transport, represents a late hormonal effect, was not affected by EGF, PDGF or FCS, but was inhibited by thrombin. In contrast, none of the rapid changes in protein phosphorylation caused by hormones was altered by growth factors. Thus the inhibition by growth factors of hormonal stimulation of transport presumably involves late step(s) in the cascade of events implicated in this hormonal effect. Images Fig. 6. PMID:6134522

  10. Biosynthesis of platelet-activating factor by cultured rat Kupffer cells stimulated with calcium ionophore A23187.

    PubMed Central

    Chao, W; Siafaka-Kapadai, A; Olson, M S; Hanahan, D J

    1989-01-01

    Cultured rat Kupffer cells synthesize and release platelet-activating factor (PAF) when stimulated with calcium ionophore A23187. The production of PAF is concentration- and time-dependent and, based upon [3H]serotonin release assays, approx. 1.0 pmol of PAF is formed per 8 x 10(6) cells during 10 min of ionophore stimulation. It is suggested that Kupffer cells are important cellular components which produce and release PAF in order to facilitate communication between hepatic sinusoidal and parenchymal cells. Further, it is suggested that such mediator production in response to reticulo-endothelial cell stimulation causes the hepatic glycogenolytic response previously in the isolated perfused rat liver. PMID:2494988

  11. Purification of a Factor from Human Placenta That Stimulates Capillary Endothelial Cell Protease Production, DNA Synthesis, and Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moscatelli, David; Presta, Marco; Rifkin, Daniel B.

    1986-04-01

    A protein that stimulates the production of plasminogen activator and latent collagenase in cultured bovine capillary endothelial cells has been purified 106-fold from term human placenta by using a combination of heparin affinity chromatography, ion-exchange chromatography, and gel chromatography. The purified molecule has a molecular weight of 18,700 as determined by NaDodSO4/PAGE under both reducing and nonreducing conditions. The purified molecule stimulates the production of plasminogen activator and latent collagenase in a dose-dependent manner between 0.1 and 10 ng of protein/ml. The purified protein also stimulates DNA synthesis and chemotaxis in capillary endothelial cells in the same concentration range. Thus, this molecule has all of the properties predicted for an angiogenic factor.

  12. Curcumin attenuates lipolysis stimulated by tumor necrosis factor-α or isoproterenol in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiao-yun; Kong, Po-Ren; Wu, Jin-feng; Li, Ying; Li, Yan-xiang

    2012-12-15

    Curcumin, an active component derived from dietary spice turmeric (Curcuma longa), has been demonstrated antihyperglycemic, antiinflammatory and hypocholesterolemic activities in obesity and diabetes. These effects are associated with decreased level of circulating free fatty acids (FFA), however the mechanism has not yet been elucidated. The flux of FFA and glycerol from adipose tissue to the blood stream primarily depends on the lipolysis of triacylglycerols in the adipocytes. Adipocyte lipolysis is physiologically stimulated by catecholamine hormones. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) stimulates chronic lipolysis in obesity and type 2 diabetes. In this study, we examined the role of curcumin in inhibiting lipolytic action upon various stimulations in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Glycerol release from TNFα or isoproterenol-stimulated 3T3-L1 adipocytes in the absence or presence of curcumin was determined using a colorimetric assay (GPO-Trinder). Western blotting was used to investigate the TNFα-induced phosphorylation of MAPK and perilipin expression. Fatcake and cytosolic fractions were prepared to examine the isoproterenol-stimulated hormone-sensitive lipase translocation. Treatment with curcumin attenuated TNFα-mediated lipolysis by suppressing phosphorylation of extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and reversing the downregulation of perilipin protein in TNFα-stimulated adipocytes (p<0.05). The acute lipolytic response to adrenergic stimulation of isoproterenol was also restricted by curcumin (10-20 μM, p<0.05), which was compatible with reduced perilipin phosphorylation(29%, p<0.05) and hormone-sensitive lipase translocation(20%, p<0.05). This study provides evidence that curcumin acts on adipocytes to suppress the lipolysis response to TNFα and catecholamines. The antilipolytic effect could be a cellular basis for curcumin decreasing plasma FFA levels and improving insulin sensitivity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Endothelin receptor B protects granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor mRNA from degradation.

    PubMed

    Jungck, David; Knobloch, Jürgen; Körber, Sandra; Lin, Yingfeng; Konradi, Jürgen; Yanik, Sarah; Stoelben, Erich; Koch, Andrea

    2015-06-01

    Evidence is lacking on the differential effects of the two therapeutic concepts of endothelin receptor antagonists (ERAs): the blockade of only the endothelin receptor A (ETAR; selective antagonism) versus both ETAR and endothelin receptor B (ETBR; dual blockade). Ambrisentan, a selective ERA, and bosentan, a dual blocker, are both available for therapy. We hypothesized that there are differences in the potential of ERAs to ameliorate inflammatory processes in human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) and aimed to unravel underlying mechanisms. We used HASMC culture, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) induced transcription and expression of chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 2 (CXCL2), chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 3 (CXCL3), granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and matrix metalloproteinase 12 (MMP12) in HASMCs. In concentration-response experiments, bosentan led to a significantly greater reduction of GM-CSF and MMP12 protein release than ambrisentan, whereas there was no significant difference in their effect on GM-CSF and MMP12 mRNA. Both ERAs reduced CXCL3 protein and mRNA equally but had no effect on CXCL2. Blocking mitogen-activated protein kinases revealed that both ETAR and ETBR signal through p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, but ETBR also signals through extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 to induce GM-CSF expression. In the presence of the transcription inhibitor actinomycin D, bosentan, but not ambrisentan, reduced GM-CSF but not MMP12 or CXCL3 mRNA. In conclusion, blockade of each endothelin receptor subtype reduces GM-CSF transcription, but blocking ETBR additionally protects GM-CSF mRNA from degradation via ERK-1/2. Accordingly, blocking both ETAR and ETBR leads to a stronger reduction of TNFα-induced GM-CSF protein expression. This mechanism might be specific to GM-CSF. Our data stress the anti-inflammatory potential

  14. Combination of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and erythropoietin improves outcomes of patients with decompensated cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Kedarisetty, Chandan Kumar; Anand, Lovkesh; Bhardwaj, Ankit; Bhadoria, Ajeet Singh; Kumar, Guresh; Vyas, Ashish Kumar; David, Paul; Trehanpati, Nirupama; Rastogi, Archana; Bihari, Chhagan; Maiwall, Rakhi; Garg, Hitendra Kumar; Vashishtha, Chitranshu; Kumar, Manoj; Bhatia, Vikram; Sarin, Shiv Kumar

    2015-06-01

    Patients with decompensated cirrhosis have significantly reduced survival without liver transplantation. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been shown to increase survival in patients with acute-on-chronic liver failure, and erythropoietin promoted hepatic regeneration in animal studies. We performed a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial to determine whether co-administration of these growth factors improved outcomes for patients with advanced cirrhosis. In a prospective study, consecutive patients with decompensated cirrhosis seen at the Institute of Liver and Biliary Sciences, New Delhi (from May 2011 through June 2012) were randomly assigned to groups given subcutaneous G-CSF (5 μg/kg/d) for 5 days and then every third day (12 total doses), along with subcutaneous darbopoietin α(40 mcg/wk) for 4 weeks (GDP group, n = 29), or only placebos (control group, n = 26). All patients also received standard medical therapy and were followed for 12 months. Histology was performed on liver biopsies. The primary end point was survival at 12 months. Baseline characteristics of patients were comparable; alcohol intake was the most common etiology of cirrhosis. A higher proportion of patients in the GDP group than controls survived until 12 months (68.6% vs 26.9%; P = .003). At 12 months, Child-Turcotte Pugh scores were reduced by 48.6% in the GDP group and 39.1% in the control group, from baseline (P = .001); Model for End Stage Liver Disease scores were reduced by 40.4% and 33%, respectively (P = .03). The need for large-volume paracentesis was significantly reduced in GDP group, compared with controls (P < .05). A lower proportion of patients in the GDP group developed septic shock (6.9%) during follow-up compared with controls (38.5%; P = .005). No major adverse events were observed in either group. In a single-center randomized trial, a significantly larger proportion of patients with decompensated cirrhosis given a combination of G-CSF and

  15. Granulocyte-Colony-Stimulating Factor Stimulation of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Promotes CD34+ Cell Migration Via a Matrix Metalloproteinase-2-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Ponte, Adriana López; Ribeiro-Fleury, Tatiana; Chabot, Valérie; Gouilleux, Fabrice; Langonné, Alain; Hérault, Olivier; Charbord, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) can be mobilized into the circulation using granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), for graft collection in view of hematopoietic transplantation. This process has been related to bone marrow (BM) release of serine proteases and of the matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). Yet, the role of these mediators in HSC egress from their niches remains questionable, because they are produced by nonstromal cells (mainly neutrophils and monocytes/macrophages) that are not a part of the niche. We show here that the G-CSF receptor (G-CSFR) is expressed by human BM mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs), and that G-CSF prestimulation of MSCs enhances the in vitro trans-stromal migration of CD34+ cells. Zymography analysis indicates that pro-MMP-2 (but not pro-MMP-9) is expressed in MSCs, and that G-CSF treatment increases its expression and induces its activation at the cell membrane. We further demonstrate that G-CSF-stimulated migration depends on G-CSFR expression and is mediated by a mechanism that involves MMPs. These results suggest a molecular model whereby G-CSF infusion may drive, by the direct action on MSCs, HSPC egress from BM niches via synthesis and activation of MMPs. In this model, MMP-2 instead of MMP-9 is implicated, which constitutes a major difference with mouse mobilization models. PMID:22651889

  16. Immobilized alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone 10-13 (GKPV) inhibits tumor necrosis factor-alpha stimulated NF-kappaB activity.

    PubMed

    Kelly, J M; Moir, A J G; Carlson, K; Yang, Y; MacNeil, S; Haycock, J W

    2006-02-01

    alpha-MSH is an anti-inflammatory peptide which signals by binding to the melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R) and elevating cyclic AMP in several different cells and tissues. The carboxyl terminal peptides of alpha-MSH (KPV/GKPV) are the smallest minimal sequences that prevent inflammation, but it is not known if they operate via MC1R or cyclic AMP. The aim of this study was to examine the intracellular signaling potential of the GKPV peptide sequence when immobilized to polystyrene beads via a polyethylene glycol moiety. Beads containing an immobilized GKPV peptide were investigated for their ability to inhibit proinflammatory tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) stimulated activation of NF-kappaB in HBL cells stably transfected with an NF-kappaB-luciferase reporter construct. Peptide functionalized beads were compared with the ability of soluble peptide alone (alpha-MSH or GKPV) or non-functionalized beads to inhibit TNF-alpha stimulated activation of NF-kappaB. GKPV peptide functionalized beads significantly inhibited NF-kappaB-luciferase activity in comparison to beads containing no peptide moiety in one of two growths conditions investigated. Soluble alpha-MSH and GKPV peptides were also confirmed to inhibit NF-kappaB-luciferase. The present study suggests that the carboxyl terminal MSH peptide acts via a cell receptor-based mechanism and furthermore may support the potential use of such immobilized ligands for anti-inflammatory therapeutic use.

  17. Stimulation of tumor necrosis factor alpha production in human monocytes by inhibitors of protein phosphatase 1 and 2A

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The protein phosphatase 1 and 2A inhibitor, okadaic acid, has been shown to stimulate many cellular functions by increasing the phosphorylation state of phosphoproteins. In human monocytes, okadaic acid by itself stimulates tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) mRNA accumulation and TNF-alpha synthesis. Calyculin A, a more potent inhibitor of phosphatase 1, has similar effects. TNF-alpha mRNA accumulation in okadaic acid-treated monocytes is due to increased TNF- alpha mRNA stability and transcription rate. The increase in TNF-alpha mRNA stability is more remarkable in okadaic acid-treated monocytes than the mRNA stability of other cytokines, such as interleukin 1 alpha (IL-1 alpha), IL-1 beta, and IL-6. Gel retardation studies show the stimulation of AP-1, AP-2, and NF-kappa B binding activities in okadaic acid-stimulated monocytes. This increase may correlate with the increase in TNF-alpha mRNA transcription rate. In addition to the stimulation of TNF-alpha secretion by monocytes, okadaic acid appears to modulate TNF-alpha precursor processing, as indicated by a marked increase in the cell-associated 26-kD precursor. These results suggest that active basal phosphorylation/dephosphorylation occurs in monocytes, and that protein phosphatase 1 or 2A is important in regulating TNF-alpha gene transcription, translation, and posttranslational modification. PMID:1324971

  18. Nod factors and a diffusible factor from arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi stimulate lateral root formation in Medicago truncatula via the DMI1/DMI2 signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Oláh, Boglárka; Brière, Christian; Bécard, Guillaume; Dénarié, Jean; Gough, Clare

    2005-10-01

    Legumes form two different types of intracellular root symbioses, with fungi and bacteria, resulting in arbuscular mycorrhiza and nitrogen-fixing nodules, respectively. Rhizobial signalling molecules, called Nod factors, play a key role in establishing the rhizobium-legume association and genes have been identified in Medicago truncatula that control a Nod factor signalling pathway leading to nodulation. Three of these genes, the so-called DMI1, DMI2 and DMI3 genes, are also required for formation of mycorrhiza, indicating that the symbiotic pathways activated by both the bacterial and the fungal symbionts share common steps. To analyse possible cross-talk between these pathways we have studied the effect of treatment with Nod factors on mycorrhization in M. truncatula. We show that Nod factors increase mycorrhizal colonization and stimulate lateral root formation. The stimulation of lateral root formation by Nod factors requires both the same structural features of Nod factors and the same plant genes (NFP, DMI1, DMI2, DMI3 and NSP1) that are required for other Nod factor-induced symbiotic responses such as early nodulin gene induction and cortical cell division. A diffusible factor from arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi was also found to stimulate lateral root formation, while three root pathogens did not have the same effect. Lateral root formation induced by fungal signal(s) was found to require the DMI1 and DMI2 genes, but not DMI3. The idea that this diffusible fungal factor might correspond to a previously hypothesized mycorrhizal signal, the 'Myc factor', is discussed.

  19. Growth differentiation factor-9 stimulates progesterone synthesis in granulosa cells via a prostaglandin E2/EP2 receptor pathway.

    PubMed

    Elvin, J A; Yan, C; Matzuk, M M

    2000-08-29

    Growth differentiation factor-9 (GDF-9), an oocyte-secreted member of the transforming growth factor beta superfamily, progesterone receptor, cyclooxygenase 2 (Cox2; Ptgs2), and the EP2 prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) receptor (EP2; Ptgerep2) are required for fertility in female but not male mice. To define the interrelationship of these factors, we used a preovulatory granulosa cell culture system in which we added recombinant GDF-9, prostaglandins, prostaglandin receptor agonists, or cyclooxygenase inhibitors. GDF-9 stimulated Cox2 mRNA within 2 h, and PGE(2) within 6 h; however, progesterone was not increased until 12 h after addition of GDF-9. This suggested that Cox2 is a direct downstream target of GDF-9 but that progesterone synthesis required an intermediate. To determine whether prostaglandin synthesis was required for progesterone production, we analyzed the effects of PGE(2) and cyclooxygenase inhibitors on this process. PGE(2) can stimulate progesterone synthesis by itself, although less effectively than GDF-9 (3-fold vs. 6-fold increase over 24 h, respectively). Furthermore, indomethacin or NS-398, inhibitors of Cox2, block basal and GDF-9-stimulated progesterone synthesis. However, addition of PGE(2) to cultures containing both GDF-9 and NS-398 overrides the NS-398 block in progesterone synthesis. To further define the PGE(2)-dependent pathway, we show that butaprost, a specific EP2 agonist, stimulates progesterone synthesis and overrides the NS-398 block. In addition, GDF-9 stimulates EP2 mRNA synthesis by a prostaglandin- and progesterone-independent pathway. Thus, GDF-9 induces an EP2 signal transduction pathway which appears to be required for progesterone synthesis in cumulus granulosa cells. These studies further demonstrate the importance of oocyte-somatic cell interactions in female reproduction.

  20. Neuronal expression of nuclear transcription factor MafG in the rat medulla oblongata after baroreceptor stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kumaki, Iku; Yang, Dawei; Koibuchi, Noriyuki; Takayama, Kiyoshige

    2006-03-06

    The medulla oblongata is the site of central baroreceptive neurons in mammals. These neurons express specific basic-leucine zipper transcription factors (bZIP) after baroreceptor stimulation. Previously we showed that activation of baroreceptors induced expression of nuclear transcription factors c-Fos and FosB in central baroreceptive neurons. Here we studied the effects of baroreceptor stimulation on induction of MafG, a member of small Maf protein family that functions as dimeric partners for various bZIP transcription factors by forming transcription-regulating complexes, in the rat medulla oblongata. To determine whether gene expression of MafG is induced by stimulation of arterial baroreceptors, we examined the expression of its mRNA by semi-quantitative reverse transcription-PCR method and its gene product by immunohistochemistry. We found that the number of MafG transcripts increased significantly in the medulla oblongata after baroreceptor stimulation. MafG-immunoreactive neurons were distributed in the nucleus tractus solitarii, the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve, the ambiguous nucleus and the ventrolateral medulla. The numbers of MafG-immunoreactive neurons in these nuclei were significantly greater in test rats than in saline-injected control rats. We also found approximately 20% of MafG-immunoreactive neurons coexpress FosB after baroreceptor stimulation. Our results suggest that MafG cooperates with FosB to play critical roles as an immediate early gene in the signal transduction of cardiovascular regulation mediated by baroreceptive signals in the medulla oblongata.

  1. Rapid phosphorylation of Elk-1 transcription factor and activation of MAP kinase signal transduction pathways in response to visual stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kaminska, B; Kaczmarek, L; Zangenehpour, S; Chaudhuri, A

    1999-06-01

    The AP-1 transcription factor, which is composed of various combinations of Fos and Jun proteins, is believed to be a key participant in molecular processes that guide activity-dependent changes in gene expression. In this study, we investigated the activity of different MAP kinases that have been implicated in AP-1 activation. We examined the activities of ERK, JNK/SAPK, and p38 MAPK along with their nuclear targets (Elk-1 and c-Jun) in rat visual cortex after light stimulation. The transcription factor Elk-1 (a possible regulator of c-fos expression) was found to be transiently modified by phosphorylation when visual stimulation was applied after a period of dark rearing. In vitro kinase assay with Elk-1 as substrate showed that light stimulation activated MAPK/ERK in visual cortex but not frontal cortex. Furthermore, ERK activation was temporally matched to onset of Elk-1 phosphorylation. The activity of JNK1 (c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1) was elevated at 2-6 h after visual exposure and was also temporally correlated to increase of endogenous P-c-Jun levels and its appearance within the AP-1 DNA-binding complex. The activities of p38 MAP kinases did not change significantly. These results demonstrate the differential engagement of MAPK signaling pathways following sensory stimulation and their relative effects upon AP-1 expression in the intact brain. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  2. Enhancement of Neurotrophic Factors in Astrocyte for Neuroprotective Effects in Brain Disorders Using Low-intensity Pulsed Ultrasound Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Feng-Yi; Lu, Wen-Wei; Lin, Wei-Ting; Chang, Chi-Wei; Huang, Sin-Luo

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes play an important role in the growth and survival of developing neurons by secreting neurotrophic factors. The goal of this study was to investigate how low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) stimulation directly affects brain astrocyte function. Here, we report that LIPUS stimulation increased protein levels of BDNF, GDNF, VEGF, and GLUT1 in rat brain astrocytes as measured by western blot analysis. Histological outcomes including demyelination and apoptosis were examined in rats after administration of aluminum chloride (AlCl3). At the mechanistic level, integrin inhibitor (RGD peptide) attenuated the LIPUS-induced neurotrophic factor expression. The data suggest that neurotrophic factor protein levels may be promoted by LIPUS through activation of integrin receptor signaling. In addition, LIPUS stimulation protected cells against aluminum toxicity as demonstrated by an increase in the median lethal dose for AlCl3 from 3.77 to 6.25 mM. In in vivo histological evaluations, LIPUS significantly reduced cerebral damages in terms of myelin loss and apoptosis induced by AlCl3. The results of this study demonstrate that transcranial LIPUS is capable of enhancing the protein levels of neurotrophic factors, which could have neuroprotective effects against neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Extracellular calcium stimulates DNA synthesis in synergism with zinc, insulin and insulin-like growth factor I in fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Huang, J S; Mukherjee, J J; Chung, T; Crilly, K S; Kiss, Z

    1999-12-01

    In serum-starved mouse NIH 3T3 fibroblasts cultured in 1.8 mM Ca2+-containing medium, addition of 0.75-2 mM extra Ca2+ stimulated DNA synthesis in synergism with zinc (15-60 microM), insulin and insulin-like growth factor I. Extra Ca2+ stimulated phosphorylation/activation of p42/p44 mitogen-activated protein kinases by an initially (10 min) zinc-independent mechanism; however, insulin, and particularly zinc, significantly prolonged Ca2+-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation. In addition, extra Ca2+ activated p70 S6 kinase by a zinc-dependent mechanism and enhanced the stimulatory effect of zinc on choline kinase activity. Insulin and insulin-like growth factor I also commonly increased both p70 S6 kinase and choline kinase activities. In support of the role of the choline kinase product phosphocholine in the mediation of mitogenic Ca2+ effects, cotreatments with the choline kinase substrate choline (250 microM) and the choline kinase inhibitor hemicholinium-3 (2 mM) enhanced and inhibited, respectively, the combined stimulatory effect of extra Ca2+ (3.8 mM total) and zinc on DNA synthesis. In various human skin fibroblast lines, 1-2 mM extra Ca2+ also stimulated DNA synthesis in synergism with zinc and insulin. The results show that in various fibroblast cultures, high concentrations of extracellular Ca2+ can collaborate with zinc and certain growth factors to stimulate DNA synthesis. Considering the high concentration of extracellular Ca2+ in the dermal layer, Ca2+ may promote fibroblast growth during wound healing in concert with zinc, insulin growth factor-I insulin, and perhaps other growth factors.

  4. Effects of low- and high-frequency repetitive magnetic stimulation on neuronal cell proliferation and growth factor expression: A preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Yong; Park, Hyung Joong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Cho, Byung Pil; Cho, Sung-Rae; Kim, Sung Hoon

    2015-09-14

    Repetitive magnetic stimulation is a neuropsychiatric and neurorehabilitation tool that can be used to investigate the neurobiology of sensory and motor functions. Few studies have examined the effects of repetitive magnetic stimulation on the modulation of neurotrophic/growth factors and neuronal cells in vitro. Therefore, the current study examined the differential effects of repetitive magnetic stimulation on neuronal cell proliferation as well as various growth factor expression. Immortalized mouse neuroblastoma cells were used as the cell model in this study. Dishes of cultured cells were randomly divided into control, sham, low-frequency (0.5Hz, 1Tesla) and high-frequency (10Hz, 1Tesla) groups (n=4 dishes/group) and were stimulated for 3 days. Expression of neurotrophic/growth factors, Akt and Erk was investigated by Western blotting analysis 3 days after repetitive magnetic stimulation. Neuroblastoma cell proliferation was determined with a cell counting assay. There were differences in cell proliferation based on stimulus frequency. Low-frequency stimulation did not alter proliferation relative to the control, while high-frequency stimulation elevated proliferation relative to the control group. The expression levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) were elevated in the high-frequency magnetic stimulation group. Akt and Erk expression was also significantly elevated in the high-frequency stimulation group, while low-frequency stimulation decreased the expression of Akt and Erk compared to the control. In conclusion, we determined that different frequency magnetic stimulation had an influence on neuronal cell proliferation via regulation of Akt and ERK signaling pathways and the expression of growth factors such as BDNF, GDNF, NT-3 and PDGF. These findings represent a promising opportunity to gain insight into how different

  5. In vivo production of macrophage migration inhibition and stimulation factors during the inductive phase of the alloimmune response

    SciTech Connect

    Suslov, A.P.; Yazova, A.K.; Berkova, N.P.

    1986-12-01

    This paper offers a study of the production of macrophage migration inhibition factor (MIF), and also of the alternative macrophage migration stimulation factor (MSF), in vivo. Mice were injected with mouse spleen cells, irradiated with a dose of 1500 rads. The animals were divided into three groups, two of which were injected for a second time with irradiated mouse spleen cells. Samples of all fractions obtained by electrophoresis of sera of unimmunized mice had no significant effect of macrophage migration, while unfractionated sera of immunized mice obtained after a second injection of alloantigen as a rule stimulated macrophage migration. The results are evidence that T cells may function in vivo during the period before development of the antigen-specific proliferative response of T cells. The technique used to approach the problem, described in this study, can be used for preparative isolation of purified MIF and MSF without contamination by embryonic calf serum proteins which are usually present in culture in vitro.

  6. Prophylactic use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor after consolidation therapy with high-dose cytarabine for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Shadman, Mazyar; Estey, Elihu H

    2013-04-01

    Prophylactic use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor after chemotherapy in acute myeloid leukemia patients has become part of the supportive care strategy in some institutions. Despite shortening the neutropenia period and lowering the hospitalization rate, randomized studies have not shown any improvement in the clinical outcomes with this intervention. In their single-institution retrospective study, Bradley et al. reported that granulocyte colony-stimulating factor administration following consolidation therapy with high-dose cytarabine is associated with decreased hospitalization rate and improved survival. This finding is not consistent with the prior knowledge from the randomized studies. Herein, we review some of the explanations for the findings and re-emphasize the limitations of nonrandomized studies in assessing acute myeloid leukemia outcomes, as appreciated by the authors.

  7. Chemical allergens stimulate human epidermal keratinocytes to produce lymphangiogenic vascular endothelial growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Ok-Nam; Ahn, Seyeon; Jin, Sun Hee; Hong, Soo Hyun; Lee, Jinyoung; Kim, Eun-Sun; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Chun, Young-Jin; Lee, Ai-Young; Noh, Minsoo

    2015-03-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) is a cell-mediated immune response that involves skin sensitization in response to contact with various allergens. Angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis both play roles in the allergic sensitization process. Epidermal keratinocytes can produce vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in response to UV irradiation and during wound healing. However, the effect of haptenic chemical allergens on the VEGF production of human keratinocytes, which is the primary contact site of toxic allergens, has not been thoroughly researched. We systematically investigated whether immune-regulatory cytokines and chemical allergens would lead to the production of VEGF in normal human keratinocytes (NHKs) in culture. VEGF production significantly increased when NHKs were treated with IFNγ, IL-1α, IL-4, IL-6, IL-17A, IL-22 or TNFα. Among the human sensitizers listed in the OECD Test Guideline (TG) 429, we found that CMI/MI, DNCB, 4-phenylenediamine, cobalt chloride, 2-mercaptobenzothiazole, citral, HCA, cinnamic alcohol, imidazolidinyl urea and nickel chloride all significantly upregulated VEGF production in NHKs. In addition, common human haptenic allergens such as avobenzone, formaldehyde and urushiol, also induced the keratinocyte-derived VEGF production. VEGF upregulation by pro-inflammatory stimuli, IFNγ, DNCB or formaldehyde is preceded by the production of IL-8, an acute inflammatory phase cytokine. Lymphangiogenic VEGF-C gene transcription was significantly increased when NHKs were treated with formaldehyde, DNCB or urushiol, while transcription of VEGF-A and VEGF-B did not change. Therefore, the chemical allergen-induced VEGF upregulation is mainly due to the increase in lymphangiogenic VEGF-C transcription in NHKs. These results suggest that keratinocyte-derived VEGF may regulate the lymphangiogenic process during the skin sensitization process of ACD. - Highlights: • Pro-inflammatory cytokines induced VEGF production in normal human

  8. Association between colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor gene polymorphisms and asthma risk

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Eun Kyong; Lee, Shin-Hwa; Cho, Sung-Hwan; Jung, Seok; Yoon, Sang Hyuk; Park, Sung Woo; Park, Jong Sook; Uh, Soo Taek; Kim, Yang Ki; Kim, Yong Hoon; Choi, Jae-Sung; Park, Byung-Lae

    2010-01-01

    Colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) is expressed in monocytes/macrophages and dendritic cells. These cells play important roles in the innate immune response, which is regarded as an important aspect of asthma development. Genetic alterations in the CSF1R gene may contribute to the development of asthma. We investigated whether CSF1R gene polymorphisms were associated with the risk of asthma. Through direct DNA sequencing of the CSF1R gene, we identified 28 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and genotyped them in 303 normal controls and 498 asthmatic patients. Expression of CSF1R protein and mRNA were measured on CD14-positive monocytes and neutrophils in peripheral blood of asthmatic patients using flow cytometry and real-time PCR. Among the 28 polymorphisms, two intronic polymorphism (+20511C>T and +22693T>C) were associated with the risk of asthma by logistic regression analysis. The frequencies of the minor allele at CSF1R +20511C>T and +22693T>C were higher in asthmatic subjects than in normal controls (4.6 vs. 7.7%, p = 0.001 in co-dominant and dominant models; 16.4 vs. 25.8%, p = 0.0006 in a recessive model). CSF1R mRNA levels in neutrophils of the asthmatic patients having the +22693CC allele were higher than in those having the +22693TT allele (p = 0.026). Asthmatic patients with the +22693CC allele also showed significantly higher CSF1R expression on CD14-positive monocytes and neutrophils than did those with the +22693TT allele (p = 0.045 and p = 0.044). The +20511C>T SNP had no association with CSF1R mRNA or protein expression. In conclusion, the minor allele at CSF1R +22693T>C may have a susceptibility effect in the development of asthma, via increased CSF1R protein and mRNA expression in inflammatory cells. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00439-010-0850-3) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20574656

  9. Association between colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor gene polymorphisms and asthma risk.

    PubMed

    Shin, Eun Kyong; Lee, Shin-Hwa; Cho, Sung-Hwan; Jung, Seok; Yoon, Sang Hyuk; Park, Sung Woo; Park, Jong Sook; Uh, Soo Taek; Kim, Yang Ki; Kim, Yong Hoon; Choi, Jae-Sung; Park, Byung-Lae; Shin, Hyoung Doo; Park, Choon-Sik

    2010-09-01

    Colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) is expressed in monocytes/macrophages and dendritic cells. These cells play important roles in the innate immune response, which is regarded as an important aspect of asthma development. Genetic alterations in the CSF1R gene may contribute to the development of asthma. We investigated whether CSF1R gene polymorphisms were associated with the risk of asthma. Through direct DNA sequencing of the CSF1R gene, we identified 28 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and genotyped them in 303 normal controls and 498 asthmatic patients. Expression of CSF1R protein and mRNA were measured on CD14-positive monocytes and neutrophils in peripheral blood of asthmatic patients using flow cytometry and real-time PCR. Among the 28 polymorphisms, two intronic polymorphism (+20511C>T and +22693T>C) were associated with the risk of asthma by logistic regression analysis. The frequencies of the minor allele at CSF1R +20511C>T and +22693T>C were higher in asthmatic subjects than in normal controls (4.6 vs. 7.7%, p = 0.001 in co-dominant and dominant models; 16.4 vs. 25.8%, p = 0.0006 in a recessive model). CSF1R mRNA levels in neutrophils of the asthmatic patients having the +22693CC allele were higher than in those having the +22693TT allele (p = 0.026). Asthmatic patients with the +22693CC allele also showed significantly higher CSF1R expression on CD14-positive monocytes and neutrophils than did those with the +22693TT allele (p = 0.045 and p = 0.044). The +20511C>T SNP had no association with CSF1R mRNA or protein expression. In conclusion, the minor allele at CSF1R +22693T>C may have a susceptibility effect in the development of asthma, via increased CSF1R protein and mRNA expression in inflammatory cells.

  10. Nasal lavage levels of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and chronic nasal hypereosinophilia.

    PubMed

    De Corso, Eugenio; Baroni, Silvia; Lucidi, Daniela; Battista, Mariapina; Romanello, Matteo; Autilio, Chiara; Morelli, Renato; Di Nardo, Walter; Passali, Giulio Cesare; Sergi, Bruno; Bussu, Francesco; Fetoni, Anna Rita; Zuppi, Cecilia; Paludetti, Gaetano

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to measure levels of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in nasal lavage of patients affected by chronic eosinophilic sinonasal inflammation to clarify the relationship with eosinophilic tissue infiltration and clinical features. Between November 2012 and June 2013, we selected 70 patients with chronic eosinophilic inflammation (average age 41.8 years) who were classified into the following groups: persistent allergic rhinitis (group 1), noninfectious non-allergic rhinitis with eosinophilia syndrome (group 2) and chronic rhinosinusitis with polyps (group 3). Finally, we enrolled 20 healthy subjects as controls (group 4). All patients underwent symptoms score questionnaire based on a visual analogue scale, nasal endoscopy and/or computed tomography (CT) scan, and allergy testing. Nasal cytology by scraping of the mucosa and GM-CSF assays in nasal lavage were performed in all subjects. Detectable levels of GM-CSF were found in 34 of 70 (48.57%) patients, with an average concentration of 2.67 ± 0.8 pg/mL, whereas in controls only 1 of 20 individuals showed detectable GM-CSF levels. Eosinophil infiltration was significantly higher in patients with detectable GM-CSF compared to those with undetectable levels (49.4% vs 39.2%, respectively; p < 0.05). Furthermore, significant weakly-moderate correlation was found between GM-CSF levels and percentage of eosinophil infiltration in tissue (p < 0.05). Correlation between symptom scores and GM-CSF levels was significant only in group 2, which showed higher average concentrations of GM-CSF compared to groups 1 and 3 (2.9 pg/mL vs 1.6 pg/mL and 1.8 pg/mL, respectively; p < 0.05). Our data confirm that GM-CSF is more frequently detectable in nasal lavages of patients affected by chronic sinonasal eosinophilic inflammation than in controls. Statistical analyses revealed a significant weakly-moderate correlation between GM-CSF levels in nasal lavage of all patients and

  11. Insulin-like growth factor-II stimulates steroidogenesis in cultured bovine thecal cells.

    PubMed

    Spicer, L J; Voge, J L; Allen, D T

    2004-11-30

    The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) on luteinizing hormone (LH)-induced progesterone and androstenedione production by bovine thecal cells and compare it to that of insulin and IGF-I. Cells from large (>7.9 mm) bovine follicles were collected and cultured for 2 days in the presence of 10% fetal calf serum. Then cells were cultured for an additional 1 or 2 days in serum-free medium with various doses of recombinant human IGF-II, bovine LH (30 ng/ml), IGF-I, and(or) insulin. Cell numbers were determined at the end of treatments via Coulter counting and used to correct steroid production data. In the presence of LH, 1-day treatment with 3-300 ng/ml of IGF-II had no significant effect on progesterone or androstenedione production, whereas 2-day treatment with 30, 100 and 300 ng/ml of IGF-II increased (P < 0.05) both progesterone and androstenedione production by 2-3-fold. The estimated effective dose of IGF-II stimulating 50% of the maximal steroidogenic response was calculated to be 25 ng/ml. In the absence of LH, 2-day treatment of IGF-I or -II had no effect on thecal androstenedione production but increased (P < 0.05) thecal progesterone production. In the presence of LH, 100 ng/ml of IGF-I increased progesterone and androstenedione production to a greater degree than did 100 ng/ml of IGF-II. Maximal effects of IGF-I and insulin on thecal steroidogenesis were similar and were not additive. Anti-IGF type I receptor antibodies attenuated (P < 0.05) the stimulatory effect of both IGF-I and IGF-II on thecal cell steroidogenesis. Use of radioligand assays demonstrated that specific receptors for (125)I-IGF-II existed in thecal cells with a 25 ng/well of IGF-II causing 50% inhibition of binding. IGF-I cross-reactivity with (125)I-IGF-II receptors averaged 3% whereas cross-reactivity of IGF-II with (125)I-IGF-I receptors averaged 114%. These results indicate that the stimulatory effects of IGF-II on

  12. Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) enhances cumulus cell expansion in bovine oocytes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The objectives of the study were to characterize the expression of the α- and β-subunits of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) receptor in bovine cumulus cells and oocytes and to determine the effect of exogenous GM-CSF on cumulus cells expansion, oocyte maturation, IGF-2 transcript expression and subsequent competence for embryonic development. Methods Cumulus-oocyte complexes (COC) were obtained by aspirating follicles 3- to 8-mm in diameter with an 18 G needle connected to a vacuum pump at −50 mmHg. Samples of cumulus cells and oocytes were used to detect GM- CSF receptor by immunofluorescence. A dose–response experiment was performed to estimate the effect of GM-CSF on cumulus cell expansion and nuclear/cytoplasmic maturation. Also, the effect of GM-CSF on IGF-2 expression was evaluated in oocytes and cumulus cells after in vitro maturation by Q-PCR. Finally, a batch of COC was randomly assigned to in vitro maturation media consisting of: 1) synthetic oviductal fluid (SOF, n = 212); 2) synthetic oviductal fluid supplemented with 100 ng/ml of GM-CSF (SOF + GM-CSF, n = 224) or 3) tissue culture medium (TCM 199, n = 216) and then subsequently in vitro fertilized and cultured for 9 days. Results Immunoreactivity for both α and β GM-CSF receptors was localized in the cytoplasm of both cumulus cells and oocytes. Oocytes in vitro matured either with 10 or 100 ng/ml of GM-CSF presented a higher (P < 0.05) cumulus cells expansion than that of the control group (0 ng/ml of GM-CSF). GM-CSF did not affect the proportion of oocytes in metaphase II, cortical granules dispersion and IGF-2 expression. COC exposed to 100 ng/ml of GM-CSF during maturation did not display significant differences in terms of embryo cleavage rate (50.4% vs. 57.5%), blastocyst development at day 7 (31.9% vs. 28.7%) and at day 9 (17.4% vs. 17.9%) compared to untreated control (SOF alone, P = 0.2). Conclusions GM-CSF enhanced cumulus

  13. Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) enhances cumulus cell expansion in bovine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Peralta, Oscar A; Bucher, Danai; Fernandez, Ana; Berland, Marco; Strobel, Pablo; Ramirez, Alfredo; Ratto, Marcelo H; Concha, Ilona

    2013-06-24

    The objectives of the study were to characterize the expression of the α- and β-subunits of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) receptor in bovine cumulus cells and oocytes and to determine the effect of exogenous GM-CSF on cumulus cells expansion, oocyte maturation, IGF-2 transcript expression and subsequent competence for embryonic development. Cumulus-oocyte complexes (COC) were obtained by aspirating follicles 3- to 8-mm in diameter with an 18 G needle connected to a vacuum pump at -50 mmHg. Samples of cumulus cells and oocytes were used to detect GM- CSF receptor by immunofluorescence. A dose-response experiment was performed to estimate the effect of GM-CSF on cumulus cell expansion and nuclear/cytoplasmic maturation. Also, the effect of GM-CSF on IGF-2 expression was evaluated in oocytes and cumulus cells after in vitro maturation by Q-PCR. Finally, a batch of COC was randomly assigned to in vitro maturation media consisting of: 1) synthetic oviductal fluid (SOF, n = 212); 2) synthetic oviductal fluid supplemented with 100 ng/ml of GM-CSF (SOF + GM-CSF, n = 224) or 3) tissue culture medium (TCM 199, n = 216) and then subsequently in vitro fertilized and cultured for 9 days. Immunoreactivity for both α and β GM-CSF receptors was localized in the cytoplasm of both cumulus cells and oocytes. Oocytes in vitro matured either with 10 or 100 ng/ml of GM-CSF presented a higher (P < 0.05) cumulus cells expansion than that of the control group (0 ng/ml of GM-CSF). GM-CSF did not affect the proportion of oocytes in metaphase II, cortical granules dispersion and IGF-2 expression. COC exposed to 100 ng/ml of GM-CSF during maturation did not display significant differences in terms of embryo cleavage rate (50.4% vs. 57.5%), blastocyst development at day 7 (31.9% vs. 28.7%) and at day 9 (17.4% vs. 17.9%) compared to untreated control (SOF alone, P = 0.2). GM-CSF enhanced cumulus cell expansion of in vitro matured bovine

  14. Targeting granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in epithelial and vascular remodeling in experimental eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    McNamee, E N; Biette, K A; Hammer, J; Harris, R; Miyazawa, H; Lee, J J; Furuta, G T; Masterson, J C

    2017-08-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic antigen-mediated clinicopathologic disease of the esophagus characterized by an eosinophil-predominant inflammatory infiltrate. A clinical hallmark is extensive tissue remodeling including basal zone hyperplasia, fibrosis, and angiogenesis. However, the cellular mechanisms responsible for these processes are not fully defined. We hypothesized that targeting granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF; an agonist cytokine linked with eosinophil survival and activation) would be protective in a preclinical model of EoE. Eosinophilic esophagitis-like esophageal inflammation was induced in the L2-IL5(OXA) EoE mouse model, and GM-CSF production was assessed by mRNA and protein analyses. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-receptor-alpha expression patterns were examined by flow cytometric and immunofluorescence analysis. L2-IL5(OXA) EoE mice were treated with anti-GM-CSF neutralizing antibody or isotype control and assessed for histopathological indices of eosinophilia, epithelial hyperplasia, and angiogenesis by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. Significantly increased levels of esophageal GM-CSF expression was detected in the L2-IL5(OXA) mouse EoE model during active inflammation. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-receptor-alpha was predominantly expressed on esophageal eosinophils during EoE, in addition to select cells within the lamina propria. Anti-GM-CSF neutralization in L2-IL5(OXA) EoE mice resulted in a significant diminution of epithelial eosinophilia in addition to basal cell hyperplasia and vascular remodeling. This treatment response was independent of effects on esophageal eosinophil maturation or activation. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor is a potential therapeutic target to reduce esophageal eosinophilia and remodeling. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor treatment of resistant thin endometrium in women with frozen-thawed blastocyst transfer.

    PubMed

    Kunicki, Michał; Łukaszuk, Krzysztof; Liss, Joanna; Skowrońska, Patrycja; Szczyptańska, Joanna

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) effect on unresponsive thin (<7 mm) endometrium in women undergoing frozen-thawed embryo transfer at the blastocyst stage. A total of 62 women with thin unresponsive endometrium were included in the study, of which, 29 received a G-CSF infusion and 33 who opted out of the study served as controls. Patients in both groups had similar endometrial thickness at the time of the initial evaluation: 6.50 mm (5.50-6.80) in the G-CSF and 6.40 mm (5.50-7.0) in the control group. However, after the infusion endometrial thickness increased significantly in the G-CSF group in comparison with the controls (p=0.01), (Δ) 0.5 (0.02-1.2) (p=0.005). In the G-CSF group endometrium expanded to 7.90 mm (6.58-8.70) while in the control group to 6.90 mm (6.0-7.75). Five women in each group conceived. The clinical pregnancy rate was 5/29 (17.24%) in the G-CSF treated group and 5/33 (15.15%) in the control group (p>0.05). The live birth rate was 2/29 (6.89%) in the G-CSF group and 2/33 (6.06%) in the control group (p>0.05). We concluded that G-CSF infusion leads to an improvement in endometrium thickness but not to any improvement in the clinical pregnancy and live birth rates. Until more data is available G-CSF treatment should be considered to be of limited value in increasing pregnancy rate. G-CSF: granulocyte colony-stimulating factor; M-CSF: macrophagecolony-stimulating factor; GM-CSF: granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor; FET: frozen embryo transfer; IVF: in vitro fertilization.

  16. Pharmacological properties of granulocytic colony-stimulating factor pegylated using electron beam synthesis nanotechnologies.

    PubMed

    Dygai, A M; Zyuz'kov, G N; Zhdanov, V V; Madonov, P G; Udut, E V; Miroshnichenko, L A; Khrichkova, T Yu; Simanina, E V; Stavrova, L A; Artamonov, A V; Bekarev, A A; Kinsht, D N; Chaikovskiy, A V; Markova, T S; Gurto, R V

    2011-11-01

    Granulocytic CSF pegylated using electron-beam synthesis nanotechnology exhibits pronounced granulomonocytopoiesis-stimulating and SC-mobilizing activity. More potent stimulation of committed precursors against the background of less pronounced activation of polypotent hemopoietic cells is a peculiarity of hemostimulating action of pegylated using electron-beam synthesis nanotechnology granulocytic CSF in comparison with its non-modified analog. The mobilizing effect of pegylated using electron-beam synthesis nanotechnology granulocytic CSF on early progenitor elements surpasses that of non-conjugated cytokine.

  17. Integrin α6β4 Promotes Autocrine Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) Signaling to Stimulate Migration and Invasion toward Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF).

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Brittany L; Chen, Min; Knifley, Teresa; Davis, Kelley A; Harrison, Susan M W; Stewart, Rachel L; O'Connor, Kathleen L

    2015-11-06

    Integrin α6β4 is up-regulated in pancreatic adenocarcinomas where it contributes to carcinoma cell invasion by altering the transcriptome. In this study, we found that integrin α6β4 up-regulates several genes in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway, including amphiregulin (AREG), epiregulin (EREG), and ectodomain cleavage protease MMP1, which is mediated by promoter demethylation and NFAT5. The correlation of these genes with integrin α6β4 was confirmed in The Cancer Genome Atlas Pancreatic Cancer Database. Based on previous observations that integrin α6β4 cooperates with c-Met in pancreatic cancers, we examined the impact of EGFR signaling on hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-stimulated migration and invasion. We found that AREG and EREG were required for autocrine EGFR signaling, as knocking down either ligand inhibited HGF-mediated migration and invasion. We further determined that HGF induced secretion of AREG, which is dependent on integrin-growth factor signaling pathways, including MAPK, PI3K, and PKC. Moreover, matrix metalloproteinase activity and integrin α6β4 signaling were required for AREG secretion. Blocking EGFR signaling with EGFR-specific antibodies or an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor hindered HGF-stimulated pancreatic carcinoma cell chemotaxis and invasive growth in three-dimensional culture. Finally, we found that EGFR was phosphorylated in response to HGF stimulation that is dependent on EGFR kinase activity; however, c-Met phosphorylation in response to HGF was unaffected by EGFR signaling. Taken together, these data illustrate that integrin α6β4 stimulates invasion by promoting autocrine EGFR signaling through transcriptional up-regulation of key EGFR family members and by facilitating HGF-stimulated EGFR ligand secretion. These signaling events, in turn, promote pancreatic carcinoma migration and invasion.

  18. Glucose and Insulin Stimulate Lipogenesis in Porcine Adipocytes: Dissimilar and Identical Regulation Pathway for Key Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Zhang Guo; Xiong, Lu Jian; Yan, Chen; Wei, Dai Hong; YingPai, ZhaXi; Qing, Zhao Yong; Lin, Qiao Zi; Fei, Feng Ruo; Ling, Wang Ya; Ren, Ma Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Lipogenesis is under the concerted action of ChREBP, SREBP-1c and other transcription factors in response to glucose and insulin. The isolated porcine preadipocytes were differentiated into mature adipocytes to investigate the roles and interrelation of these transcription factors in the context of glucose- and insulin-induced lipogenesis in pigs. In ChREBP-silenced adipocytes, glucose-induced lipogenesis decreased by ~70%, however insulin-induced lipogenesis was unaffected. Moreover, insulin had no effect on ChREBP expression of unperturbed adipocytes irrespective of glucose concentration, suggesting ChREBP mediate glucose-induced lipogenesis. Insulin stimulated SREBP-1c expression and when SREBP-1c activation was blocked, and the insulin-induced lipogenesis decreased by ~55%, suggesting SREBP-1c is a key transcription factor mediating insulin-induced lipogenesis. LXRα activation promoted lipogenesis and lipogenic genes expression. In ChREBP-silenced or SREBP-1c activation blocked adipocytes, LXRα activation facilitated lipogenesis and SREBP-1c expression, but had no effect on ChREBP expression. Therefore, LXRα might mediate lipogenesis via SREBP-1c rather than ChREBP. When ChREBP expression was silenced and SREBP-1c activation blocked simultaneously, glucose and insulin were still able to stimulated lipogenesis and lipogenic genes expression, and LXRα activation enhanced these effects, suggesting LXRα mediated directly glucose- and insulin-induced lipogenesis. In summary, glucose and insulin stimulated lipogenesis through both dissimilar and identical regulation pathway in porcine adipocytes. PMID:27871177

  19. Granulocyte Colony-stimulating Factor Producing Anaplastic Carcinoma of the Pancreas: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Vinzens, Sarah; Zindel, Joel; Zweifel, Martin; Rau, Tilman; Gloor, Beat; Wochner, Annette

    2017-01-01

    We report on the case of a 67-year-old man with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) producing anaplastic carcinoma of the pancreas. Preoperative routine tests revealed an elevated white blood cell (WBC) count of 25.2 G/l, consisting almost exclusively of neutrophilic granulocytes (23.31 G/l) with a predominance of segmented neutrophils (78% of all neutrophilic granulocytes), and elevated levels of C-reactive protein at 87 mg/l. Upon surgery, local tumour infiltration was more extensive than expected from preoperative imaging. However, no peritoneal dissemination was found and curative resection was attempted. Only seven days after the operation, signs of relapse were seen upon computed tomograpy. Histology revealed an undifferentiated anaplastic carcinoma, on the basis of a poorly differentiated ductal adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated G-CSF and G-CSF-Receptor expression in some CD68-positive syncytial macrophages. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in serum was elevated at 5.6 pg/ml, which further raised to 43 pg/ml one week after FOLFIRINOX chemotherapy (oxaliplatin, irinotecan, 5-fluorouracil), while WBC decreased from 103.3 G/l to 59.3 G/l. Granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in serum was normal (<0.5 pg/ml). The patient died on postoperative day 34.

  20. Nutrient-independent and nutrient-dependent factors stimulate protein synthesis in colostrum-fed newborn pigs.

    PubMed

    Burrin, D G; Davis, T A; Ebner, S; Schoknecht, P A; Fiorotto, M L; Reeds, P J; McAvoy, S

    1995-05-01

    We hypothesized that nonnutrient components, including growth factors, present in colostrum contribute to the stimulation of protein synthesis in colostrum-fed neonatal pigs. We studied neonatal pigs fed mature milk, colostrum, or a formula containing a macronutrient composition comparable to that of colostrum for 24 h. We measured the circulating concentrations of insulin, insulin-like growth factor I, glucose, and amino acids at intervals throughout the 24-h period, after which we measured in vivo protein synthesis using a flooding dose of [3H]phenylalanine. The rates of protein synthesis in several tissues measured after 24 h of feeding were greater than those we reported previously after 6 h of feeding. The acute (within 6 h) stimulation of protein synthesis in visceral and skeletal muscle tissues of neonatal pigs fed milk, colostrum, or formula was primarily influenced by nutrient intake and associated with rapid secretion of insulin. Indirect evidence suggests that intestinal absorption of ingested colostral insulin was minimal. However, the sustained increase in tissue protein synthesis between 6 and 24 h coincided with an increase in circulating insulin-like growth factor I. We found a novel, specific stimulation of skeletal muscle and jejunal protein synthesis in colostrum-fed pigs that can be attributed to some nonnutrient component of colostrum.

  1. RhoC Mediates Epidermal Growth Factor-Stimulated Migration and Invasion in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tumur, Zohra; Katebzadeh, Shahbaz; Guerra, Carlos; Bhushan, Lokesh; Alkam, Tursun; Henson, Bradley S.

    2015-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is overexpressed in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) where it has been shown to promote tumor cell invasion upon phosphorylation. One mechanism by which EGFR promotes tumor progression is by activating signal cascades that lead to loss of E-cadherin, a transmembrane glycoprotein of the cell-cell adherence junctions; however mediators of these signaling cascades are not fully understood. One such mediator, RhoC, is activated upon a number of external stimuli, such as epidermal growth factor (EGF), but its role as a mediator of EGF-stimulated migration and invasion has not been elucidated in HNSCC. In the present study, we investigate the role of RhoC as a mediator of EGF-stimulated migration and invasion in HNSCC. We show that upon EGF stimulation, EGFR and RhoC were strongly activated in HNSCC. This resulted in activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase Akt pathway (PI3K-Akt), phosphorylation of GSK-3β at the Ser9 residue, and subsequent down regulation of E-cadherin cell surface expression resulting in increased tumor cell invasion. Knockdown of RhoC restored E-cadherin expression and inhibited EGF-stimulated migration and invasion. This is the first report in HNSCC demonstrating the role RhoC plays in mediating EGF-stimulated migration and invasion by down-regulating the PI3K-Akt pathway and E-cadherin expression. RhoC may serve as a treatment target for HNSCC. PMID:25622907

  2. Differential Regulation of Macrophage Glucose Metabolism by Macrophage Colony-stimulating Factor and Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-stimulating Factor: Implications for (18)F FDG PET Imaging of Vessel Wall Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Tavakoli, Sina; Short, John D; Downs, Kevin; Nguyen, Huynh Nga; Lai, Yanlai; Zhang, Wei; Jerabek, Paul; Goins, Beth; Sadeghi, Mehran M; Asmis, Reto

    2017-04-01

    Purpose To determine the divergence of immunometabolic phenotypes of macrophages stimulated with macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and granulocyte-M-CSF (GM-CSF) and its implications for fluorine 18 ((18)F) fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) imaging of atherosclerosis. Materials and Methods This study was approved by the animal care committee. Uptake of 2-deoxyglucose and various indexes of oxidative and glycolytic metabolism were evaluated in nonactivated murine peritoneal macrophages (MΦ0) and macrophages stimulated with M-CSF (MΦM-CSF) or GM-CSF (MΦGM-CSF). Intracellular glucose flux was measured by using stable isotope tracing of glycolytic and tricyclic acid intermediary metabolites. (18)F-FDG uptake was evaluated in murine atherosclerotic aortas after stimulation with M-CSF or GM-CSF by using quantitative autoradiography. Results Despite inducing distinct activation states, GM-CSF and M-CSF stimulated progressive but similar levels of increased 2-deoxyglucose uptake in macrophages that reached up to sixfold compared with MΦ0. The expression of glucose transporters, oxidative metabolism, and mitochondrial biogenesis were induced to similar levels in MΦM-CSF and MΦGM-CSF. Unexpectedly, there was a 1.7-fold increase in extracellular acidification rate, a 1.4-fold increase in lactate production, and overexpression of several critical glycolytic enzymes in MΦM-CSF compared with MΦGM-CSF with associated increased glucose flux through glycolytic pathway. Quantitative autoradiography demonstrated a 1.6-fold induction of (18)F-FDG uptake in murine atherosclerotic plaques by both M-CSF and GM-CSF. Conclusion The proinflammatory and inflammation-resolving activation states of macrophages induced by GM-CSF and M-CSF in either cell culture or atherosclerotic plaques may not be distinguishable by the assessment of glucose uptake. (©) RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  3. Transforming growth factor-beta 1 stimulates synthesis of proteoglycan aggregates in calf articular cartilage organ cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, T.I. )

    1991-04-01

    Previous work showed that transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1), added alone to bovine cartilage organ cultures, stimulated (35S)sulfate incorporation into macromolecular material but did not investigate the fidelity of the stimulated system to maintain synthesis of cartilage-type proteoglycans. This paper provides evidence that chondrocytes synthesize the appropriate proteoglycan matrix under TGF-beta 1 stimulation: (1) there is a coordinated increase in hyaluronic acid and proteoglycan monomer synthesis, (2) link-stable proteoglycan aggregates are assembled, (3) the hybrid chondroitin sulfate/keratan sulfate monomeric species is synthesized, and (4) there is an increase in protein core synthesis. Some variation in glycosylation patterns was observed when proteoglycans synthesized under TGF-beta 1 stimulation were compared to those synthesized under basal conditions. Thus comparing TGF-beta 1 to basal samples respectively, the monomers were larger (Kav on Sepharose CL-2B = 0.29 vs 0.41), the chondroitin sulfate chains were longer by approximately 3.5 kDa, the percentage of total glycosaminoglycan in keratan sulfate increased slightly from approximately 4% (basal) to approximately 6%, and the unsulfated disaccharide decreased from 28% (basal) to 12%. All of these variations are in the direction of a more anionic proteoglycan. Since the ability of proteoglycans to confer resiliency to the cartilage matrix is directly related to their anionic nature, these changes would presumably have a beneficial effect on tissue function.

  4. Insulin-like growth factor I stimulates lipid oxidation, reduces protein oxidation, and enhances insulin sensitivity in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, M A; Schmitz, O; Mengel, A; Keller, A; Christiansen, J S; Zapf, J; Froesch, E R

    1993-01-01

    To elucidate the effects of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) on fuel oxidation and insulin sensitivity, eight healthy subjects were treated with saline and recombinant human (IGF-I (10 micrograms/kg.h) during 5 d in a crossover, randomized fashion, while receiving an isocaloric diet (30 kcal/kg.d) throughout the study period. On the third and fourth treatment days, respectively, an L-arginine stimulation test and an intravenous glucose tolerance test were performed. A euglycemic, hyperinsulinemic clamp combined with indirect calorimetry and a glucose tracer infusion were performed on the fifth treatment day. IGF-I treatment led to reduced fasting and stimulated (glucose and/or L-arginine) insulin and growth hormone secretion. Basal and stimulated glucagon secretion remained unchanged. Intravenous glucose tolerance was unaltered despite reduced insulin secretion. Resting energy expenditure and lipid oxidation were both elevated, while protein oxidation was reduced, and glucose turnover rates were unaltered on the fifth treatment day with IGF-I as compared to the control period. Enhanced lipolysis was reflected by elevated circulating free fatty acids. Moreover, insulin-stimulated oxidative and nonoxidative glucose disposal (i.e., insulin sensitivity) were enhanced during IGF-I treatment. Thus, IGF-I treatment leads to marked changes in lipid and protein oxidation, whereas, at the dose used, carbohydrate metabolism remains unaltered in the face of reduced insulin levels and enhanced insulin sensitivity. Images PMID:8227340

  5. Epidermal growth factor-stimulated intestinal epithelial cell migration requires Src family kinase-dependent p38 MAPK signaling.

    PubMed

    Frey, Mark R; Golovin, Anastasia; Polk, D Brent

    2004-10-22

    Members of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) family of ligands and their receptors regulate migration and growth of intestinal epithelial cells. However, our understanding of the signal transduction pathways determining these responses is incomplete. In this study we tested the hypothesis that p38 is required for EGF-stimulated intestinal epithelial monolayer restitution. EGF-stimulated migration in a wound closure model required continuous presence of ligand for several hours for maximal response, suggesting a requirement for sustained signal transduction pathway activation. In this regard, prolonged exposure of cells to EGF activated p38 for up to 5 h. Furthermore genetic or pharmacological blockade of p38 signaling inhibited the ability of EGF to accelerate wound closure. Interestingly p38 inhibition was associated with increased EGF-stimulated ERK1/ERK2 phosphorylation and cell proliferation, suggesting that p38 regulates the balance of proliferation/migration signaling in response to EGF receptor activity. Activation of p38 in intestinal epithelial cells through EGF receptor was abolished by blockade of Src family tyrosine kinase signaling but not inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase or protein kinase C. Taken together, these data suggest that Src family kinase-dependent p38 activation is a key component of a signaling switch routing EGF-stimulated responses to epithelial cell migration/restitution rather than proliferation during wound closure.

  6. Chicken tumor necrosis-like factor. I. In vitro production by macrophages stimulated with Eimeria tenella or bacterial lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S; Lillehoj, H S; Ruff, M D

    1995-08-01

    HD11, a transformed avian macrophage cell line, and chicken peripheral blood leukocyte-derived macrophages (PBL-M phi) were stimulated with bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or Eimeria tenella sporozoites and merozoites. The specific cytotoxicities of the culture supernatants against different target cell lines were measured, and the kinetics of tumor necrosis-like factor (TNF) production by HD11 and PBL-M phi were also measured. The results showed that HD11 and PBL-M phi secreted a TNF-like factor when stimulated with Eimeria parasites or LPS. A time- and dose-dependent TNF-like factors production by PBL-M phi was observed poststimulation with Eimeria parasites. Chicken TNF-like factor preferentially kills CHCC OU-2 cells, a fibroblast cell line of chicken origin, when compared to LM cells, a murine cell line used for mammalian TNF. This study indicates that chicken M phi produce a significant level of TNF-like factor following coccidial infection.

  7. Catalase Overexpression Prevents Nuclear Factor Erythroid 2–Related Factor 2 Stimulation of Renal Angiotensinogen Gene Expression, Hypertension, and Kidney Injury in Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Abdo, Shaaban; Shi, Yixuan; Otoukesh, Abouzar; Ghosh, Anindya; Lo, Chao-Sheng; Chenier, Isabelle; Filep, Janos G.; Ingelfinger, Julie R.; Zhang, Shao Ling

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of catalase (Cat) overexpression in renal proximal tubule cells (RPTCs) on nuclear factor erythroid 2–related factor 2 (Nrf2) stimulation of angiotensinogen (Agt) gene expression and the development of hypertension and renal injury in diabetic Akita transgenic mice. Additionally, adult male mice were treated with the Nrf2 activator oltipraz with or without the inhibitor trigonelline. Rat RPTCs, stably transfected with plasmid containing either rat Agt or Nrf2 gene promoter, were also studied. Cat overexpression normalized systolic BP, attenuated renal injury, and inhibited RPTC Nrf2, Agt, and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) gene expression in Akita Cat transgenic mice compared with Akita mice. In vitro, high glucose level, hydrogen peroxide, and oltipraz stimulated Nrf2 and Agt gene expression; these changes were blocked by trigonelline, small interfering RNAs of Nrf2, antioxidants, or pharmacological inhibitors of nuclear factor-κB and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. The deletion of Nrf2-responsive elements in the rat Agt gene promoter abolished the stimulatory effect of oltipraz. Oltipraz administration also augmented Agt, HO-1, and Nrf2 gene expression in mouse RPTCs and was reversed by trigonelline. These data identify a novel mechanism, Nrf2-mediated stimulation of intrarenal Agt gene expression and activation of the renin-angiotensin system, by which hyperglycemia induces hypertension and renal injury in diabetic mice. PMID:24812425

  8. Immunomodulation of Bu-Zhong-Yi-Qi-Tang on in vitro granulocyte colony-stimulating-factor and tumor necrosis factor-alpha production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Kao, S T; Yang, S L; Hsieh, C C; Yang, M D; Wang, T F; Lin, J G

    2000-11-01

    Bu-Zhong-Yi-Qi-Tang (BZYQT) is a Chinese medicine, and has been used for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. At present, we still do not fully understand the effects of BZYQT on the cellular physiology. Present in vitro study demonstrated that BZYQT is capable of increasing granulocyte colony-stimulating-factor (G-CSF) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in healthy volunteers and patients with HCC. The productions of G-CSF and TNF-alpha by PBMC of volunteers were significantly stimulated by more than 125 microg/ml of BZYQT. G-CSF levels stimulated by PBMC of healthy volunteers were higher than in PBMC of the HCC patients when more than 625 microg/ml of BZYQT was administrated. The reason may be due to the impaired immunologic reactivity of mononuclear cells in HCC patients. However, the production levels of TNF-alpha in HCC patients can be stimulated to levels as high as those in healthy volunteers. When adding high concentration (3.125 mg/ml) of BZYQT to the cultured PBMC, the increments of G-CSF and TNF-alpha production decreased although there were no obvious changes in the number of metabolic active PBMC changed. TNF-alpha andG-CSF are known to play important roles in the biological defensive mechanism. These findings show that BZYQT is a unique formula for the stimulation of PBMC to produce G-CSF and TNF-alpha. Administration of BZYQT may be beneficial for patients with HCC to modulate these cytokines.

  9. TNFα and IL-17 cooperatively stimulate glucose metabolism and growth factor production in human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Straus, Daniel S

    2013-07-17

    Inflammation is a well-known etiological factor for colorectal cancer, but mechanisms underlying the linkage between inflammation and cancer are incompletely understood. We hypothesized that two pro-inflammatory cytokines, TNFα and IL-17, might play a role in promoting colorectal carcinogenesis. Aerobic glycolysis is a metabolic adaptation that promotes the survival/proliferation of cancer cells. Paracrine signaling between tumor cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts also plays a role in carcinogenesis. The effect of TNFα and IL-17 on aerobic glycolysis and growth factor production in cultured human colorectal cancer cells was investigated. Glucose utilization and lactate production were quantified by measuring the disappearance of glucose and appearance of lactate in the culture medium. Glucose transporter and glycolytic enzyme expression levels were measured by immunoblotting. TNFα and IL-17 cooperatively stimulated glycolysis in HT-29, T84, Caco-2 and HCT116 colorectal cancer cells. Treatment of HT-29 cells with TNFα plus IL-17 also increased the expression of HIF-1α and c-myc, two factors know to induce the transcription of genes encoding components of the glycolytic pathway. To further investigate mechanisms for cytokine-stimulated glycolysis, the effects of TNFα and IL-17 on expression of six members and one regulator of the glycolytic pathway were investigated. TNFα and IL-17 cooperatively increased the expression of the glucose transporter SLC2A1 and hexokinase-2 but did not regulate expression of glucose transporter SLC2A3, enolase-1, pyruvate kinase M2, lactate dehydrogenase A, or 6-phoshofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase-3 (PFKFB3). Experiments with inhibitors indicated that HIF-1α played a role in induction of SLC2A1 and that the transcription factor NF-κB played a role in induction of hexokinase-2 by TNFα and IL-17. TNFα and IL-17 also synergistically stimulated production by HT-29 cells of a growth factor that simulated

  10. Insulin-like growth factor-I-stimulated Akt phosphorylation and oligodendrocyte progenitor cell survival require cholesterol-enriched membranes.

    PubMed

    Romanelli, Robert J; Mahajan, Kedar R; Fulmer, Clifton G; Wood, Teresa L

    2009-11-15

    Previously we showed that insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) promotes sustained phosphorylation of Akt in oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) and that Akt phosphorylation is required for survival of these cells. The direct mechanisms, however, by which IGF-I promotes Akt phosphorylation are currently undefined. Recently, cholesterol-enriched membranes (CEMs) have been implicated in regulation of growth factor-mediated activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway and survival of mature oligodendrocytes; however, less is know about their role in OPC survival. In the present study, we investigate the role of CEMs in IGF-I-mediated Akt phosphorylation and OPC survival. We report that acute disruption of membrane cholesterol with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin results in altered OPC morphology and inhibition of IGF-I-mediated Akt phosphorylation. We also report that long-term inhibition of cholesterol biosynthesis with 25-hydroxycholesterol blocks IGF-I stimulated Akt phosphorylation and cell survival. Moreover, we show that the PI3K regulatory subunit, p85, Akt, and the IGF-IR are sequestered within cholesterol-enriched fractions in steady-state stimulation of the IGF-IR and that phosphorylated Akt and IGF-IR are present in cholesterol-enriched fractions with IGF-I stimulation. Together, the results of these studies support a role for CEMs or "lipid rafts" in IGF-I-mediated Akt phosphorylation and provide a better understanding of the mechanisms by which IGF-I promotes OPC survival.

  11. Tumor necrosis factor inhibits ligand-stimulated EGF receptor activation through a TNF receptor 1-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    McElroy, Steven J.; Frey, Mark R.; Yan, Fang; Edelblum, Karen L.; Goettel, Jeremy A.; John, Sutha; Polk, D. Brent

    2008-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) are key regulators in the intricate balance maintaining intestinal homeostasis. Previous work from our laboratory shows that TNF attenuates ligand-driven EGF receptor (EGFR) phosphorylation in intestinal epithelial cells. To identify the mechanisms underlying this effect, we examined EGFR phosphorylation in cells lacking individual TNF receptors. TNF attenuated EGF-stimulated EGFR phosphorylation in wild-type and TNFR2−/−, but not TNFR1−/−, mouse colon epithelial (MCE) cells. Reexpression of wild-type TNFR1 in TNFR1−/− MCE cells rescued TNF-induced EGFR inhibition, but expression of TNFR1 deletion mutant constructs lacking the death domain (DD) of TNFR1 did not, implicating this domain in EGFR downregulation. Blockade of p38 MAPK, but not MEK, activation of ERK rescued EGF-stimulated phosphorylation in the presence of TNF, consistent with the ability of TNFR1 to stimulate p38 phosphorylation. TNF promoted p38-dependent EGFR internalization in MCE cells, suggesting that desensitization is achieved by reducing receptor accessible to ligand. Taken together, these data indicate that TNF activates TNFR1 by DD- and p38-dependent mechanisms to promote EGFR internalization, with potential impact on EGF-induced proliferation and migration key processes that promote healing in inflammatory intestinal diseases. PMID:18467504

  12. Stimulating effect of space flight factors on Artemia cysts: comparison with irradiation by gamma rays

    SciTech Connect

    Gaubin, Y.; Pianezzi, B.; Gasset, G.; Plannel, H.; Kovalev, E.E.

    1986-06-01

    The Artemia cyst, a gastrula in dormant state, is a very suitable material to investigate the individual effects of HZE cosmic particles. Monolayers of Artemia cysts, sandwiched with nuclear emulsions, flew aboard the Soviet biosatellite Cosmos 1129. The space flight stimulated the developmental capacity expressed by higher percentages of emergence, hatching, and alive nauplii at day 4-5. A greater mean life span was reported in Artemias developed from Artemia cysts hit by the cosmic heavy ions. On Earth, Artemia cysts were exposed to 1, 10, 100, 200 and 400 Gy of gamma (gamma) rays. A stimulating effect on developmental capacity was observed for 10 Gy; the mean life span was significantly increased for this dose. These results are discussed in comparison with previous investigations performed on Earth and in space.

  13. [LED LIGHTING AS A FACTOR FOR THE STIMULATION OF THE HORMONE SYSTEM].

    PubMed

    Deynego, V N; Kaptsov, V A

    2015-01-01

    There are considered questions of non-visual effects of blue LED light sources on hormonal systems (cortisol, glucose, insulin) providing the high human performance. In modern conditions hygiene strategy for child and adolescent health strategy was shown to be replaced by a strategy of light stimulation of the hormonal profile. There was performed a systematic analysis of the axis "light stimulus-hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenals-cortisol-glucose-insulin". The elevation of the content of cortisol leads to the increase of the glucose level in the blood and the stimulation of the production of insulin, which can, like excessive consumption of food, give rise to irreversible decline in the number of insulin receptors on the cell surface, and thus--to a steady reduction in the ability of cells to utilize glucose, i.e. to type 2 diabetes or its aggravation.

  14. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor primes interleukin-13 production by macrophages via protease-activated receptor-2.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Manabu; Yamaguchi, Rui; Yamamoto, Takatoshi; Ishimaru, Yasuji; Ono, Tomomichi; Sakamoto, Arisa; Narahara, Shinji; Sugiuchi, Hiroyuki; Hirose, Eiji; Yamaguchi, Yasuo

    2015-04-01

    Chronic inflammation is often linked to the presence of type 2-polarized macrophages, which are induced by the T helper type 2 cytokines interleukin-4 and interleukin-13 (IL-13). IL-13 is a key mediator of tissue fibrosis caused by T helper type 2-based inflammation. Human neutrophil elastase (HNE) plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. This study investigated the priming effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) on IL-13 expression by macrophages stimulated with HNE. Adherent macrophages were obtained from primary cultures of human mononuclear cells. Expression of IL-13 mRNA and protein by GM-CSF-dependent macrophages was investigated after stimulation with HNE, using the polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. GM-CSF had a priming effect on IL-13 mRNA and protein expression by macrophages stimulated with HNE, while this effect was not observed for various other cytokines. GM-CSF-dependent macrophages showed a significant increase in the expression of protease activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) mRNA and protein. The response of IL-13 mRNA to HNE was significantly decreased by pretreatment with alpha1-antitrypsin, a PAR-2 antibody (SAM11), or a PAR-2 antagonist (ENMD-1068). These findings suggest that stimulation with HNE can induce IL-13 production by macrophages, especially GM-CSF-dependent macrophages. Accordingly, neutrophil elastase may have a key role in fibrosis associated with chronic inflammation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Pharmacological analysis for mechanisms of GPI-80 release from tumour necrosis factor-alpha-stimulated human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Nitto, Takeaki; Araki, Yoshihiko; Takeda, Yuji; Sendo, Fujiro

    2002-10-01

    1 GPI-80, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein initially identified on human neutrophils, plays a role(s) in the regulation of beta2 integrin function. Previous studies have shown that GPI-80 is sublocated in secretory vesicles. It is also found in soluble form in the synovial fluid of rheumatoid arthritis patients, and in the culture supernatant of formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine-stimulated neutrophils. To understand the behaviour of GPI-80 under conditions of stimulation, we investigated the effects of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha on its expression and release. We also probed the mechanism of its release with various pharmacologic tools. 2 TNF-alpha induced the release of GPI-80 from human neutrophils in a concentration- and time-dependent manner (in the range of 1-100 u ml(-1) and 30-120 min, respectively), but did not affect surface GPI-80 levels. 3 Cytochalasin B, genistein, and SB203580 but not PD98059 inhibited TNF-alpha-stimulated GPI-80 release and neutrophil adherence at the same concentration. In addition, TNF-alpha-induced GPI-80 release was inhibited by blocking monoclonal antibodies specific to components of Mac-1 (CD11b and CD18). 4 Antioxidants (pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate and N-acetyl-L-cysteine) inhibited GPI-80 release by TNF-alpha stimulation, but superoxide dismutase did not. Antioxidants but not superoxide dismutase reduced an intracellular oxidation state. 5 These findings indicate that TNF-alpha-stimulated GPI-80 release from human neutrophils depends upon adherence via beta2 integrins. They also suggest that cytochalasin B, genistein, and SB203580 inhibit GPI-80 release by suppressing signals for cell adherence, rather than by a direct effect on its secretion. Finally, we suggest that GPI-80 release involves an intracellular change in a redox state.

  16. Factors involved in the relaxation of female pig urethra evoked by electrical field stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Werkström, V.; Persson, K.; Ny, L.; Bridgewater, M.; Brading, A. F.; Andersson, K. E.

    1995-01-01

    1. Non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic (NANC) relaxations induced by electrical field stimulation (EFS) were studied in pig isolated urethra. The mechanism for relaxation was characterized by measurement of cyclic nucleotides and by study of involvement of different subsets of voltage-operated calcium channels (VOCCs). 2. EFS evoked frequency-dependent and tetrodotoxin-sensitive relaxations in the presence of propranolol (1 microM), phentolamine (1 microM) and scopolamine (1 microM). At low frequencies (< 12 Hz), relaxations were rapid, whereas at high (> 12 Hz) frequencies distinct biphasic relaxations were evoked. The latter consisted of a rapidly developing first phase followed by a more long-lasting second phase. 3. Treatment with the NO-synthesis inhibitor NG-nitro-L-arginine (L-NOARG; 0.3 mM) inhibited relaxations at low frequencies of stimulation. At high frequencies (> 12 Hz) only the first relaxation phase was affected. 4. Measurement of cyclic nucleotides in preparations subjected to continuous nerve-stimulation, revealed an increase in guanosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic GMP) levels from 1.3 +/- 0.3 to 3.0 +/- 0.4 pmol mg-1 protein (P < 0.01). In the presence of L-NOARG, there was a significant decrease in cyclic GMP content to control. However, there was no increase in cyclic GMP content in response to EFS. Levels of cyclic AMP remained unchanged following EFS. 5. Treatment with the N-type VOCC-inhibitor, omega-conotoxin GVIA (0.1 microM) reduced NO-dependent relaxations, the effect being most pronounced at low frequencies (1-4 Hz) of stimulation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8564225

  17. The influence of stimulants, sedatives, and fatigue on tunnel vision: risk factors for driving and piloting.

    PubMed

    Mills, K C; Spruill, S E; Kanne, R W; Parkman, K M; Zhang, Y

    2001-01-01

    A computerized task was used in two studies to examine the influence of stimulants, sedatives, and fatigue on single-target and divided-attention responses in different parts of the visual field. The drug effects were evaluated over time with repeated behavioral and subjective measures against ascending and descending drug levels. In the first study, 18 fully rested participants received placebo, alprazolam (0.5 mg), and dextroamphetamine (10 mg). Alprazolam impairs performance, whereas dextroamphetamine induces enhancement and tunnel vision. Study 2 exposed 32 participants to fatigue and no fatigue with a repeated-measures crossover design. Four independent groups subsequently received placebo, dextroamphetamine (10 mg), caffeine (250 mg), or alcohol (.07%). Under fatigue, stimulants have no performance-enhancing effects, whereas impairment from alcohol is severe. Under no fatigue, alcohol has a modest effect, caffeine has no effect, and dextroamphetamine significantly enhances divided-attention performance coincident with tunnel vision. Participants rate all drug effects more stimulating and less sedating while fatigued. Implications for transportation safety are discussed. Actual or potential applications of this research include driver and pilot training.

  18. The granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) regulates amyloid beta (Abeta) production.

    PubMed

    Volmar, Claude-Henry; Ait-Ghezala, Ghania; Frieling, Jeremy; Paris, Daniel; Mullan, Michael J

    2008-06-01

    One of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the accumulation of amyloid beta (Abeta) plaques in the brain parenchyma. An inflammatory component to AD has been suggested in association with increased cytokine release. We have previously shown that CD40L stimulation of microglia induces increases in pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), IL-6, IL-8 and GM-CSF. We have also shown that CD40L stimulation increases Abeta levels in HEK-293 cells over-expressing both the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and CD40 (HEK/APPsw/CD40). In this study, we show that GM-CSF neutralizing antibodies mitigate the CD40L-induced production of Abeta in HEK/APPsw/CD40 cells. In addition, we demonstrate that treatment of these cells with recombinant GM-CSF significantly increases Abeta levels. Furthermore, we show that shRNA silencing of the GM-CSF receptor gene significantly reduces Abeta levels to below base line in non-stimulated HEK/APPsw/CD40 cells. Analysis of cell surface proteins revealed that silencing of the GM-CSF receptor also decreases APP endocytosis (therefore reducing the availability of APP to be cleaved in the endosomes). Taken together, our results suggest that GM-CSF operates downstream of CD40/CD40L interaction and that GM-CSF modulates Abeta production by influencing APP trafficking. GM-CSF signaling may be a suitable therapeutic target against Abeta production in AD.

  19. Colony-stimulating factor-1 mediates macrophage-related neural damage in a model for Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1X.

    PubMed

    Groh, Janos; Weis, Joachim; Zieger, Hanna; Stanley, E Richard; Heuer, Heike; Martini, Rudolf

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory have shown that in models for three distinct forms of the inherited and incurable nerve disorder, Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy, low-grade inflammation implicating phagocytosing macrophages mediates demyelination and perturbation of axons. In the present study, we focus on colony-stimulating factor-1, a cytokine implicated in macrophage differentiation, activation and proliferation and fostering neural damage in a model for Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy 1B. By crossbreeding a model for the X-linked form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy with osteopetrotic mice, a spontaneous null mutant for colony-stimulating factor-1, we demonstrate a robust and persistent amelioration of demyelination and axon perturbation. Furthermore, functionally important domains of the peripheral nervous system, such as juxtaparanodes and presynaptic terminals, were preserved in the absence of colony-stimulating factor-1-dependent macrophage activation. As opposed to other Schwann cell-derived cytokines, colony-stimulating factor-1 is expressed by endoneurial fibroblasts, as revealed by in situ hybridization, immunocytochemistry and detection of β-galactosidase expression driven by the colony-stimulating factor-1 promoter. By both light and electron microscopic studies, we detected extended cell-cell contacts between the colony-stimulating factor-1-expressing fibroblasts and endoneurial macrophages as a putative prerequisite for the effective and constant activation of macrophages by fibroblasts in the chronically diseased nerve. Interestingly, in human biopsies from patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1, we also found frequent cell-cell contacts between macrophages and endoneurial fibroblasts and identified the latter as main source for colony-stimulating factor-1. Therefore, our study provides strong evidence for a similarly pathogenic role of colony-stimulating factor-1 in genetically mediated demyelination in mice and Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1

  20. Colony-stimulating factor-1 mediates macrophage-related neural damage in a model for Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 1X

    PubMed Central

    Groh, Janos; Weis, Joachim; Zieger, Hanna; Stanley, E. Richard; Heuer, Heike

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory have shown that in models for three distinct forms of the inherited and incurable nerve disorder, Charcot–Marie–Tooth neuropathy, low-grade inflammation implicating phagocytosing macrophages mediates demyelination and perturbation of axons. In the present study, we focus on colony-stimulating factor-1, a cytokine implicated in macrophage differentiation, activation and proliferation and fostering neural damage in a model for Charcot–Marie–Tooth neuropathy 1B. By crossbreeding a model for the X-linked form of Charcot–Marie–Tooth neuropathy with osteopetrotic mice, a spontaneous null mutant for colony-stimulating factor-1, we demonstrate a robust and persistent amelioration of demyelination and axon perturbation. Furthermore, functionally important domains of the peripheral nervous system, such as juxtaparanodes and presynaptic terminals, were preserved in the absence of colony-stimulating factor-1-dependent macrophage activation. As opposed to other Schwann cell-derived cytokines, colony-stimulating factor-1 is expressed by endoneurial fibroblasts, as revealed by in situ hybridization, immunocytochemistry and detection of β-galactosidase expression driven by the colony-stimulating factor-1 promoter. By both light and electron microscopic studies, we detected extended cell–cell contacts between the colony-stimulating factor-1-expressing fibroblasts and endoneurial macrophages as a putative prerequisite for the effective and constant activation of macrophages by fibroblasts in the chronically diseased nerve. Interestingly, in human biopsies from patients with Charcot–Marie–Tooth type 1, we also found frequent cell–cell contacts between macrophages and endoneurial fibroblasts and identified the latter as main source for colony-stimulating factor-1. Therefore, our study provides strong evidence for a similarly pathogenic role of colony-stimulating factor-1 in genetically mediated demyelination in mice and Charcot

  1. Identification of key factors in Accelerated Low Water Corrosion through experimental simulation of tidal conditions: influence of stimulated indigenous microbiota.

    PubMed

    Marty, Florence; Gueuné, Hervé; Malard, Emilie; Sánchez-Amaya, José M; Sjögren, Lena; Abbas, Ben; Quillet, Laurent; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Muyzer, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Biotic and abiotic factors favoring Accelerated Low Water Corrosion (ALWC) on harbor steel structures remain unclear warranting their study under controlled experimental tidal conditions. Initial stimulation of marine microbial consortia by a pulse of organic matter resulted in localized corrosion and the highest corrosion rates (up to 12-times higher than non-stimulated conditions) in the low water zone, persisting after nine months exposure to natural seawater. Correlations between corrosion severity and the abundance and composition of metabolically active sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) indicated the importance and persistence of specific bacterial populations in accelerated corrosion. One phylotype related to the electrogenic SRB Desulfopila corrodens appeared as the major causative agent of the accelerated corrosion. The similarity of bacterial populations related to sulfur and iron cycles, mineral and tuberculation with those identified in ALWC support the relevance of experimental simulation of tidal conditions in the management of steel corrosion exposed to harbor environments.

  2. Abscopal effect of metastatic pancreatic cancer after local radiotherapy and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor therapy.

    PubMed

    Shi, Fang; Wang, Xin; Teng, Feifei; Kong, Li; Yu, Jinming

    2017-03-04

    The role of immunotherapy in combination with traditional treatment regime in improving the survival of cancer patients has attracted more and more attention. Especially the abscopal effect that describes the phenomenon of localized radiotherapy leading to regression of distant unirradiated tumors and the role of enhanced radiotherapy-induced immunogenic cell death and activation of immune system have become a focus of the studies. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is known a powerful stimulator of the generation, migration and activation of antigen presenting cells such as dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages. Here we report a case of a 67-year-old refractory metastatic pancreatic cancer patient who obtained evident abscopal effect and survival benefit from concurrent localized radiotherapy and GM-CSF.

  3. Opposing effects of a ras oncogene on growth factor-stimulated phosphoinositide hydrolysis: desensitization to platelet-derived growth factor and enhanced sensitivity to bradykinin

    SciTech Connect

    Parries, G.; Hoebel, R.; Racker, E.

    1987-05-01

    Expression of a transforming Harvey or Kirsten ras gene caused opposing effects in the ability of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and bradyknin to activate phospholipase C-mediated phosphoinositide hydrolysis. In (/sup 3/H)inositol-labeled rat-1 fibroblasts, PDGF resulted in a 2-fold increase in the level of (/sup 3/H)inositol trisphosphate (InsP/sub 3/) after 2 min and, in the presence of LiCl, a 3- to 8-fold increase in the level of (/sup 3/H)inositol monophosphate (InsP/sub 1/) after 30 min. However, in EJ-ras-transfected rat-1 cells, which exhibit near normal levels of PDGF receptors, PDGF resulted in little or no accumulation of either (/sup 3/H)InsP/sub 3/ or (/sup 3/H)InsP/sub 1/. Similarly, marked stimulations by PDGF were observed in NIH 3T3 cells, as well as in v-src-transformed 3T3 cells, but not in 3T3 cells transformed by Kirsten sarcoma virus or by transfection with v-Ha-ras DNA. This diminished phosphoinositide response in ras-transformed cells was associated with a markedly attenuated mitogenic response to PDGF. On the other hand, both phosphoinositide metabolism and DNA synthesis in ras-transformed fibroblasts were stimulated several-fold by serum. In NIH 3T3 cells carrying a glucocorticoid-inducible v-Ha-ras gene, a close correlation was found between the expression of p21/sup ras/ and the loss of PDGF-stimulated (/sup 3/H)InsP/sub 1/ accumulation. The authors propose that a ras gene product (p21) can, directly or indirectly, influence growth factor-stimulated phosphoinositide hydrolysis, as well as DNA synthesis, via alterations in the properties of specific growth factor receptors.

  4. Transforming growth factor-alpha in vivo stimulates epithelial cell proliferation in digestive tissues of suckling rats.

    PubMed Central

    Hormi, K; Lehy, T

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The role that exogenous transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha) may exert on cell proliferation in vivo is poorly understood. AIM: To investigate the effect of rat TGF-alpha on epithelial cell proliferation in all suckling rat digestive tissues and to compare it with that of rat epidermal growth factor (EGF). ANIMAL AND METHODS: TGF-alpha and EGF were given three times daily either subcutaneously (10 or 20 micrograms/kg) or intraperitoneally (100 micrograms/kg) to rats from the ninth postnatal day. Cell proliferation was assessed through 5-bromo- 2-deoxyuridine incorporation and estimation of labelling indices. RESULTS: For both growth factors, the highest dose given for only two days significantly increased stomach and intestinal weights compared with controls (p < 0.05 to p < 0.001). The proliferative responded depended on the dose given, colonic mucosa being the most sensitive whereas oxyntic mucosa remained unresponsive. TGF-alpha was as potent as EGF in stimulating epithelial cell proliferation in antral, duodenal, and colonic mucosae. However, EGF was more active on oesophageal and jejunal cell proliferation whereas TGF-alpha was more active on pancreatic exocrine cell proliferation and the differences between the two growth factor treated groups were significant. CONCLUSIONS: These results prove for the first time the stimulating effect in vivo of exogenous rat TGF-alpha on epithelial cell proliferation in rat digestive tissues during the developmental period and support a functional role for TGF-alpha at that time. PMID:8944561

  5. Dendritic Cell-Lymphocyte Cross Talk Downregulates Host Restriction Factor SAMHD1 and Stimulates HIV-1 Replication in Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Biedma, Marina Elizabeth; Lederle, Alexandre; Peressin, Maryse; Lambotin, Mélanie; Proust, Alizé; Decoville, Thomas; Schmidt, Sylvie; Laumond, Géraldine

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication in dendritic cells (DCs) is restricted by SAMHD1. This factor is counteracted by the viral protein Vpx; Vpx is found in HIV-2 and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) from sooty mangabeys (SIVsm) or from macaques (SIVmac) but is absent from HIV-1. We previously observed that HIV-1 replication in immature DCs is stimulated by cocultivation with primary T and B lymphocytes, suggesting that HIV-1 restriction in DCs may be overcome under coculture conditions. Here, we aimed to decipher the mechanism of SAMHD1-mediated restriction in DC-lymphocyte coculture. We found that coculture with lymphocytes downregulated SAMHD1 expression and was associated with increased HIV-1 replication in DCs. Moreover, in infected DC-T lymphocyte cocultures, DCs acquired maturation status and secreted type 1 interferon (alpha interferon [IFN-α]). The blockade of DC-lymphocyte cross talk by anti-ICAM-1 antibody markedly inhibited the stimulation of HIV-1 replication and prevented the downregulation of SAMHD1 expression in cocultured DCs. These results demonstrate that, in contrast to purified DCs, cross talk with lymphocytes downregulates SAMHD1 expression in DCs, triggering HIV-1 replication and an antiviral immune response. Therefore, HIV-1 replication and immune sensing by DCs should be investigated in more physiologically relevant models of DC/lymphocyte coculture. IMPORTANCE SAMHD1 restricts HIV-1 replication in dendritic cells (DCs). Here, we demonstrate that, in a coculture model of DCs and lymphocytes mimicking early mucosal HIV-1 infection, stimulation of HIV-1 replication in DCs is associated with downregulation of SAMHD1 expression and activation of innate immune sensing by DCs. We propose that DC-lymphocyte cross talk occurring in vivo modulates host restriction factor SAMHD1, promoting HIV-1 replication in cellular reservoirs and stimulating immune sensing. PMID:24574390

  6. Induction of retinoic acid receptor-alpha by granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor in human myeloid leukemia cell lines.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, T; Takeda, K

    2000-08-15

    We reported previously that treatment with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) induces differentiation of human myeloblastic leukemia ML-1 cells to granulocytes, whereas treatment with ATRA alone induces practically no differentiation of these cells. To investigate the mechanism of the synergistic effect of these factors, we examined the effect of GM-CSF on retinoic acid receptors (RARs) and retinoid X receptors (RXRs) in ML-1 cells. We reveal that GM-CSF induces the expression of RAR alpha mRNA and protein and stimulates the binding of nuclear proteins to direct repeat 5, a consensus sequence with high affinity for RAR-RXR heterodimers. Furthermore, expression of CD38 mRNA mediated through RAR alpha is induced synergistically by treatment with ATRA + GM-CSF. These results suggest that GM-CSF stimulates transcriptional activity mediated via RAR alpha in ML-1 cells. The induction of RAR alpha by GM-CSF may therefore be a mechanism for stimulation by GM-CSF. The induction of RAR alpha by GM-CSF was also detected in other myeloid leukemia cell lines (THP-1 and KG-1) that showed a synergistic effect similar to that seen in ML-1 cells in response to ATRA + GM-CSF. We also found that GM-CSF induced the expression of RAR alpha in blood cells obtained from patients with acute myeloid leukemia. This activity of GM-CSF may serve as a useful adjunct to differentiation therapy for retinoic acid-nonresponsive leukemias.

  7. Tumor Progression of Skin Carcinoma Cells in Vivo Promoted by Clonal Selection, Mutagenesis, and Autocrine Growth Regulation by Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor and Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Margareta M.; Peter, Wolfgang; Mappes, Marion; Huelsen, Andrea; Steinbauer, Heinrich; Boukamp, Petra; Vaccariello, Michael; Garlick, Jonathan; Fusenig, Norbert E.

    2001-01-01

    Tumor microenvironment is crucial for cancer growth and progression as evidenced by reports on the significance of tumor angiogenesis and stromal cells. Using the HaCaT/HaCaT-ras human skin carcinogenesis model, we studied tumor progression from benign tumors to highly malignant squamous cell carcinomas. Progression of tumorigenic HaCaT-ras clones to more aggressive and eventually metastatic phenotypes was reproducibly achieved by their in vivo growth as subcutaneous tumors in nude mice. Their enhanced malignant phenotype was stably maintained in recultured tumor cells that represented, identified by chromosomal analysis, a distinct subpopulation of the parental line. Additional mutagenic effects were apparent in genetic alterations involving chromosomes 11 and 2, and in amplification and overexpression of the H-ras oncogene. Importantly, in vitro clonal selection of benign and malignant cell lines never resulted in late-stage malignant clones, indicating the importance of the in vivo environment in promoting an enhanced malignant phenotype. Independently of their H-ras status, all in vivo-progressed tumor cell lines (five of five) exhibited a constitutive and stable expression of the hematopoietic growth factors granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, which may function as autocrine/paracrine mediators of tumor progression in vivo. Thus, malignant progression favored by the in vivo microenvironment requires both clonal selection of subpopulations adapted to in vivo growth and mutational events leading to stable functional alterations. PMID:11583982

  8. Stimulation of human monocytes with macrophage colony-stimulating factor induces a Grb2-mediated association of the focal adhesion kinase pp125FAK and dynamin.

    PubMed Central

    Kharbanda, S; Saleem, A; Yuan, Z; Emoto, Y; Prasad, K V; Kufe, D

    1995-01-01

    Macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) is required for the growth and differentiation of mononuclear phagocytes. In the present studies using human monocytes, we show that M-CSF induces interaction of the Grb2 adaptor protein with the focal adhesion kinase pp125FAK. The results demonstrate that tyrosine-phosphorylated pp125FAK directly interacts with the SH2 domain of Grb2. The findings indicate that a pYENV site at Tyr-925 in pp125FAK is responsible for this interaction. We also demonstrate that the Grb2-FAK complex associates with the GTPase dynamin. Dynamin interacts with the SH3 domains of Grb2 and exhibits M-CSF-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation in association with pp125FAK. These findings suggest that M-CSF-induced signaling involves independent Grb2-mediated pathways, one leading to Ras activation and another involving pp125FAK and a GTPase implicated in receptor internalization. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7597091

  9. [Economic stimulation as a factor of enhancing the effectiveness of health care].

    PubMed

    Andreeva, O V; Lindenbraten, A L; Dubodelova, N K; Solov'eva, N B

    2002-01-01

    How to achieve a higher efficiency in managing the activities of the subjects of the compulsory health insurance (CHI) system is considered in the paper. In the authors' opinion, they are, to a considerable extent, caused by the existing economic levers aimed at optimizing the activities of its main subjects such as medical service producers and purchasers. The results of introduction of economic stimulation mechanisms into practice of the CHI system are given. These mechanisms used on a specific territory may enhance the total level of efficiency of the activities of therapeutical-and-prophylactic institutions and insurers.

  10. Frequency mismatch in stimulated scattering processes: An important factor for the transverse distribution of scattered light

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Tao; Zheng, Jian; Li, Zhichao; Yang, Dong; Ding, Yongkun; Hu, Guangyue; Zhao, Bin

    2016-06-15

    A 2D cylindrically symmetric model with inclusion of both diffraction and self-focus effects is developed to deal with the stimulated scattering processes of a single hotspot. The calculated results show that the transverse distribution of the scattered light is sensitive to the longitudinal profiles of the plasma parameters. The analysis of the evolution of the scattered light indicates that it is the frequency mismatch of coupling due to the inhomogeneity of plasmas that determines the transverse distribution of the scattered light.

  11. Comparative proteome analysis of Tumor necrosis factor α-stimulated human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells in response to melittin

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bee venom has been used to relieve pain and to treat inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, in humans. To better understand the mechanisms of the anti-inflammatory and anti-atherosclerosis effect of bee venom, gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry were used to identify proteins whose expression was altered in human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells (hVSMCs) stimulated by tumor necrosis factor alpha after 12 h in the presence of melittin. Results To obtain valuable insights into the anti-inflammatory and anti-atherosclerosis mechanisms of melittin, two-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF/TOF were used. The proteome study, we showed 33 significant proteins that were differentially expressed in the cells treated with tumor necrosis factor alpha and melittin. Thirteen proteins were significantly increased in the cells treated with tumor necrosis factor alpha, and those proteins were reduced in the cells treated with melittin. Five of the proteins that showed increased expression in the cells treated with tumor necrosis factor alpha are involved in cell migration, including calreticulin, an essential factor of development that plays a role in transcription regulation. The proteins involved in cell migration were reduced in the melittin treated cells. The observed changes in the expression of GRP75, prohibitin, and a select group of other proteins were validated with reverse transcribed-PCR. It was confirmed that the observed change in the protein levels reflected a change in the genes level. In addition, the phosphorylation of EGFR and ERK was validated by analyzing the protein pathway. Conclusion Taken together, these data established that the expression of some proteins was significantly changed by melittin treatment in tumor necrosis factor alpha stimulated the cells and provided insights into the mechanism of the melittin function for its potential use as an anti-inflammatory agent. PMID:23651618

  12. Platelet-rich plasma stimulated by pulse electric fields: Platelet activation, procoagulant markers, growth factor release and cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Frelinger, A L; Torres, A S; Caiafa, A; Morton, C A; Berny-Lang, M A; Gerrits, A J; Carmichael, S L; Neculaes, V B; Michelson, A D

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic use of activated platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been explored for wound healing, hemostasis and antimicrobial wound applications. Pulse electric field (PEF) stimulation may provide more consistent platelet activation and avoid complications associated with the addition of bovine thrombin, the current state of the art ex vivo activator of therapeutic PRP. The aim of this study was to compare the ability of PEF, bovine thrombin and thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP) to activate human PRP, release growth factors and induce cell proliferation in vitro. Human PRP was prepared in the Harvest SmartPreP2 System and treated with vehicle, PEF, bovine thrombin, TRAP or Triton X-100. Platelet activation and procoagulant markers and microparticle generation were measured by flow cytometry. Released growth factors were measured by ELISA. The releasates were tested for their ability to stimulate proliferation of human epithelial cells in culture. PEF produced more platelet-derived microparticles, P-selectin-positive particles and procoagulant annexin V-positive particles than bovine thrombin or TRAP. These differences were associated with higher levels of released epidermal growth factor after PEF than after bovine thrombin or TRAP but similar levels of platelet-derived, vascular-endothelial, and basic fibroblast growth factors, and platelet factor 4. Supernatant from PEF-treated platelets significantly increased cell proliferation compared to plasma. In conclusion, PEF treatment of fresh PRP results in generation of microparticles, exposure of prothrombotic platelet surfaces, differential release of growth factors compared to bovine thrombin and TRAP and significant cell proliferation. These results, together with PEF's inherent advantages, suggest that PEF may be a superior alternative to bovine thrombin activation of PRP for therapeutic applications.

  13. Persistent Arthralgia Induced by Chikungunya Virus Infection is Associated with Interleukin-6 and Granulocyte Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Angela; Her, Zhisheng; Ong, Edward K. S.; Chen, Jin-miao; Dimatatac, Frederico; Kwek, Dyan J. C.; Barkham, Timothy; Yang, Henry; Rénia, Laurent; Leo, Yee-Sin

    2011-01-01

    Background. Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infection induces arthralgia. The involvement of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines has been suggested, but very little is known about their secretion profile in CHIKV-infected patients. Methods. A case-control longitudinal study was performed that involved 30 adult patients with laboratory-confirmed Chikungunya fever. Their profiles of clinical disease, viral load, and immune mediators were investigated. Results. When patients were segregated into high viral load and low viral load groups during the acute phase, those with high viremia had lymphopenia, lower levels of monocytes, neutrophilia, and signs of inflammation. The high viral load group was also characterized by a higher production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as interferon-α and interleukin (IL)–6, during the acute phase. As the disease progressed to the chronic phase, IL-17 became detectable. However, persistent arthralgia was associated with higher levels of IL-6 and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor, whereas patients who recovered fully had high levels of Eotaxin and hepatocyte growth factor. Conclusions. The level of CHIKV viremia during the acute phase determined specific patterns of pro-inflammatory cytokines, which were associated with disease severity. At the chronic phase, levels of IL-6, and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor found to be associated with persistent arthralgia provide a possible explanation for the etiology of arthralgia that plagues numerous CHIKV-infected patients. PMID:21288813

  14. Glucose Stimulation of Transforming Growth Factor-β Bioactivity in Mesangial Cells Is Mediated by Thrombospondin-1

    PubMed Central

    Poczatek, Maria H.; Hugo, Christian; Darley-Usmar, Victor; Murphy-Ullrich, Joanne E.

    2000-01-01

    Glucose is a key factor in the development of diabetic complications, including diabetic nephropathy. The development of diabetic glomerulosclerosis is dependent on the fibrogenic growth factor, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β). Previously we showed that thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) activates latent TGF-β both in vitro and in vivo. Activation occurs as the result of specific interactions of latent TGF-β with TSP-1, which potentially alter the conformation of latent TGF-β. As glucose also up-regulates TSP-1 expression, we hypothesized that the increased TGF-β bioactivity observed in rat and human mesangial cells cultured with high glucose concentrations is the result of latent TGF-β activation by autocrine TSP-1. Glucose-induced bioactivity of TGF-β in mesangial cell cultures was reduced to basal levels by peptides from two different sequences that antagonize activation of latent TGF-β by TSP, but not by the plasmin inhibitor, aprotinin. Furthermore, glucose-dependent stimulation of matrix protein synthesis was inhibited by these antagonist peptides. These studies demonstrate that glucose stimulation of TGF-β activity and the resultant matrix protein synthesis are dependent on the action of autocrine TSP-1 to convert latent TGF-β to its biologically active form. These data suggest that antagonists of TSP-dependent TGF-β activation may be the basis of novel therapeutic approaches for ameliorating diabetic renal fibrosis. PMID:11021838

  15. The Oligo Fucoidan Inhibits Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-Stimulated Proliferation of Airway Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chao-Huei; Tsao, Chiung-Fang; Ko, Wang-Sheng; Chiou, Ya-Ling

    2016-01-01

    In the pathogenesis of asthma, the proliferation of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) is a key factor in airway remodeling and causes airway narrowing. In addition, ASMCs are also the effector cells of airway inflammation. Fucoidan extracted from marine brown algae polysaccharides has antiviral, antioxidant, antimicrobial, anticlotting, and anticancer properties; however, its effectiveness for asthma has not been elucidated thus far. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-treated primary ASMCs were cultured with or without oligo-fucoidan (100, 500, or 1000 µg/mL) to evaluate its effects on cell proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis, and Akt, ERK1/2 signaling pathway. We found that PDGF (40 ng/mL) increased the proliferation of ASMCs by 2.5-fold after 48 h (p < 0.05). Oligo-fucoidan reduced the proliferation of PDGF-stimulated ASMCs by 75%–99% after 48 h (p < 0.05) and induced G1/G0 cell cycle arrest, but did not induce apoptosis. Further, oligo-fucoidan supplementation reduced PDGF-stimulated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), Akt, and nuclear factor (NF)-κB phosphorylation. Taken together, oligo-fucoidan supplementation might reduce proliferation of PDGF-treated ASMCs through the suppression of ERK1/2 and Akt phosphorylation and NF-κB activation. The results provide basis for future animal experiments and human trials. PMID:26761017

  16. The Oligo Fucoidan Inhibits Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-Stimulated Proliferation of Airway Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao-Huei; Tsao, Chiung-Fang; Ko, Wang-Sheng; Chiou, Ya-Ling

    2016-01-09

    In the pathogenesis of asthma, the proliferation of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) is a key factor in airway remodeling and causes airway narrowing. In addition, ASMCs are also the effector cells of airway inflammation. Fucoidan extracted from marine brown algae polysaccharides has antiviral, antioxidant, antimicrobial, anticlotting, and anticancer properties; however, its effectiveness for asthma has not been elucidated thus far. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-treated primary ASMCs were cultured with or without oligo-fucoidan (100, 500, or 1000 µg/mL) to evaluate its effects on cell proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis, and Akt, ERK1/2 signaling pathway. We found that PDGF (40 ng/mL) increased the proliferation of ASMCs by 2.5-fold after 48 h (p < 0.05). Oligo-fucoidan reduced the proliferation of PDGF-stimulated ASMCs by 75%-99% after 48 h (p < 0.05) and induced G₁/G₀ cell cycle arrest, but did not induce apoptosis. Further, oligo-fucoidan supplementation reduced PDGF-stimulated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), Akt, and nuclear factor (NF)-κB phosphorylation. Taken together, oligo-fucoidan supplementation might reduce proliferation of PDGF-treated ASMCs through the suppression of ERK1/2 and Akt phosphorylation and NF-κB activation. The results provide basis for future animal experiments and human trials.

  17. Characterization of platelet-activating factor synthesized by normal and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-primed human eosinophils.

    PubMed Central

    Triggiani, M; Schleimer, R P; Tomioka, K; Hubbard, W C; Chilton, F H

    1992-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF; 1-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3- phosphocholine) is a mediator involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases associated with tissue eosinophil infiltration. Previous studies utilizing bioassay or assaying enzymes associated with PAF biosynthesis have suggested that human eosinophils produce PAF. The present study has extended these initial studies by identifying and quantifying the different PAF molecular species and analogues synthesized by human eosinophils in response to A23187 and f-Met-Leu-Phe (FMLP). Gas chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis indicated that A23187-stimulated eosinophils produce at least three molecular species of PAF. The predominant species is 1-hexadecyl-2-acetyl-GPC (16:0) followed by 1-octadecyl-2-acetyl-GPC (18:0) and 1-octadecyl-2-acetyl-GPC (18:1). Eosinophils stimulated with FMLP produce approximately 100-fold smaller quantities of PAF relative to those produced in response to A23187 and only the 16:0 molecular species could be measured. A small percentage (comprising between 2 and 5%) of the 2-acetylated phospholipids produced by eosinophils was the 1-acyl analogue of PAF. Long-term (72 hr) incubation with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) resulted in a three- to fourfold increase in PAF synthesis from eosinophils stimulated with FMLP, without changes in the profile of PAF molecular species or in the percentage of the 1-acyl analogue of PAF. These data indicate that human eosinophils can produce various molecular species of PAF and that this process can be quantitatively enhanced by GM-CSF. PMID:1493922

  18. Site-specific regulation of tissue dendritic cell function by granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating-factor

    PubMed Central

    Lees, Joanne; Boam, David; Proungvitaya, Tanakorn; Wood, Peter J

    2004-01-01

    Tissue dendritic cells (DC) are usually associated with phagocytic function but poor T-cell immunostimulatory capacity. Following activation, dendritic cells are stimulated to leave tissue sites and migrate to lymphoid tissue, acquiring immunostimulatory capacity during the process. We provide evidence that the immunostimulatory capacity of tissue DC, but not spleen cells, can be affected in situ by granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating-factor (GM-CSF). Initially it was found that islet cells from non-obese diabetic and BALB/c mice, which produce GM-CSF, showed significantly higher immunostimulatory capacity than islets from C3H and C57BL/6 mice, which do not produce GM-CSF. Second, pretreatment of nonobese diabetic mice with anti-GM-CSF antibody significantly reduced the immunostimulatory capacity of islet cells, but not spleen cells, although it had no effect on the numbers of cells expressing DC-associated antigens. Therefore the immunostimulatory function of islet DC is partially dependent on GM-CSF. By contrast, spleen DC immunostimulatory function does not show the same dependence on GM-CSF. This may affect the ability of dendritic cells to stimulate autoimmune responses or tolerance. PMID:15554926

  19. Endobronchial allergen challenge in asthma. Demonstration of cellular source of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor by in situ hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Broide, D H; Firestein, G S

    1991-01-01

    Airway inflammation is thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis of asthma. We have used in situ hybridization and an immunoassay to determine whether granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) (a cytokine capable of eosinophil activation) is present in the airway of asthmatics (n = 6) who have 37.0 +/- 15.1% airway eosinophilia after endobronchial allergen challenge. Levels of immunoreactive GM-CSF (less than 4 pg/ml pre-allergen versus 180.5 +/- 46.9 pg/ml post-allergen) increased significantly 24 h after endobronchial allergen stimulation. The cellular source of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) GM-CSF, as determined by in situ hybridization and immunoperoxidase staining, was derived predominantly from UCHL-1 positive BAL lymphocytes, as well as from a smaller population of alveolar macrophages. Before local endobronchial allergen challenge, less than 1% of lymphocytes and alveolar macrophages recovered by BAL expressed GM-CSF mRNA, whereas after allergen stimulation 92.6 +/- 3.4% of lymphocytes and 17.5 +/- 22.7% of alveolar macrophages expressed GM-CSF mRNA. This study provides evidence that in an experimental model of allergen-induced asthma, activation of the immune and inflammatory response (BAL lymphocyte and alveolar macrophage production of GM-CSF) is temporally associated with an inflammatory cell influx of eosinophils into the airway. Images PMID:1885766

  20. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor mRNA and protein in atherosclerotic lesions of rabbits and humans.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenfeld, M. E.; Ylä-Herttuala, S.; Lipton, B. A.; Ord, V. A.; Witztum, J. L.; Steinberg, D.

    1992-01-01

    In this study, the authors demonstrate the expression of mRNA and the presence of protein for macrophage colony-stimulating factor (MCSF) in atherosclerotic lesions from humans and rabbits. In situ hybridization of serial sections of human fatty streaks demonstrated expression of MCSF mRNA by cells dispersed throughout the lesions. Immunocytochemical staining with a panel of MCSF-specific antibodies showed extensive cell-associated staining of all of the cell types in the lesions. Immunocytochemical studies of atherosclerotic lesions from Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHL) and cholesterol-fed rabbits demonstrated a similar cell-associated pattern of staining. There was no MCSF-specific staining of aortas from normal rabbits or of cultured aortic smooth muscle cells from either humans or rabbits. Macrophage-derived foam cells (MFC) were isolated from the aortas of ballooned, cholesterol-fed rabbits. A Northern blot demonstrated that RNA isolated from the MFC hybridized with a human cDNA probe for MCSF. RNA from alveolar macrophages isolated simultaneously from the same rabbits did not hybridize with the MCSF probe. Conditioned media from an 18- to 24-hour incubation of the MFC contained colony-stimulating activity as demonstrated in a mouse bone marrow culture assay. Most of this colony-stimulating activity was neutralized by preincubating the conditioned media with an MCSF-specific antibody. Images Figure 2 Figure 1 Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:1739123

  1. Temperature and other factors affecting chloramphenicol stimulation of the germination of light-sensitive lettuce seeds.

    PubMed

    Frankland, B; Smith, H

    1967-12-01

    D-threo-chloramphenicol at concentrations ranging from 1000 to 3000 μg/ml stimulated the germination of the light-sensitive seeds of the lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) varieties Attractie and Grand Rapids. This stimulatory effect of chloramphenicol was markedly temperature dependent, increasing with decrereasing temperature. Seeds showed little response to chloramphenicol at temperatures of 28°C and above except in the case of light treated Attractie seed. The failure of one batch of Grand Rapids seed to respond to chloramphenicol was associated with the low degree of dormancy in this batch.When the germination of half-seeds or intact excised embryos of Attractie seed was inhibited osmotically with 0.15 M NaCl a stimulatory response to chloramphenicol was obtained suggesting that the site of action was in the embryo itself.Other inhibitors of protein synthesis, cycloheximide, puromycin and p-fluorophenylalanine, did not stimulate germination. Cycloheximide at concentrations of 10 μg/ml and above inhibited germination whereas puromycin and p-fluorophenylalanine were relatively ineffective as germination inhibitors.

  2. Production and secretion of biologically active human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor in transgenic tomato suspension cultures.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Tae-Ho; Kim, Young-Sook; Lee, Jae-Hwa; Yang, Moon-Sik

    2003-09-01

    A complementary DNA encoding human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) was cloned and introduced into tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum cv. Seokwang) using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Genomic PCR and Northern blot analysis demonstrated the integration of the construction into the plant nuclear genome and expression of the hGM-CSF in transgenic tomato. The cell suspension culture was established from leaf-derived calli of the transgenic tomato plants transformed with the hGM-CSF gene. Recombinant hGM-CSF was synthesized by the transgenic cell culture and secreted into the growth medium at 45 microg l(-1) after 10 d' cultivation.

  3. Protective effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on endotoxin shock in mice with retrovirus-induced immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Toki, S; Hiromatsu, K; Aoki, Y; Makino, M; Yoshikai, Y

    1997-10-01

    Mice with retrovirus-induced murine acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (MAIDS) were hypersensitive to lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced lethal shock accompanied by marked elevations of systematic interleukin 1beta (IL-beta) and interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) after LPS challenge. Pretreatment with 10 microg of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) protected MAIDS mice from hypersensitivity to LPS-induced lethal shock and this protection was concomitant with suppression of IFN-gamma production. Copyright 1997 Academic Press Limited.

  4. Excess glucose induces hypoxia-inducible factor-1α in pancreatic cancer cells and stimulates glucose metabolism and cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhiwen; Jia, Xiaohui; Duan, Yijie; Xiao, Huijie; Sundqvist, Karl-Gösta; Permert, Johan; Wang, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer patients frequently show hyperglycemia, but it is uncertain whether hyperglycemia stimulates pancreatic cancer cells. We have investigated whether excess glucose induces hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and stimulates glucose metabolism and cell migration in pancreatic cancer cells. We studied wild-type (wt) MiaPaCa2 pancreatic cancer cells and a MiaPaCa2 subline (namely si-MiaPaCa2) that had HIF-1α-specific small interfering RNA. Wt-MiaPaCa2 cells are known to be HIF-1α-positive in hypoxia and HIF-1α-negative in normoxia, whereas si-MiaPaCa2 cells are devoid of HIF-1α in both normoxia and hypoxia. We incubated these cells with different amounts of glucose and determined HIF-1α mRNA and protein by real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. We determined glucose consumption, lactate production and intracellular hexokinase-II and ATP to assess glucose metabolisms and determined pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-1, reactive oxygen species and fumarate to assess mitochondrial activities. Further, we studied cell migration using a Boyden chamber. Excess glucose (16.7−22.2mM) increased HIF-1α in hypoxic wt-MiaPaCa2 cells. HIF-1α expression increased ATP contents and inhibited mitochondrial activities. Extracellular glucose and hypoxia stimulated glucose metabolisms independent of HIF-1α. Excess glucose stimulated the migration of wt- and si-MiaPaCa2 cells in both normoxia and hypoxia. Thus, glucose stimulated cell migration independent of HIF-1α. Nevertheless, hypoxic wt-MiaPaCa2 cells showed greater migrating ability than their si-MiaPaCa2 counterparts. We conclude that (1) excess glucose increases HIF-1α and ATP in hypoxic wt-MiaPaCa2 cells, (2) extracellular glucose and hypoxia regulate glucose metabolisms independent of HIF-1α and (3) glucose stimulates cell migration by mechanisms that are both dependent on HIF-1α and independent of it. PMID:23377827

  5. Transcription factors involved in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion of pancreatic beta cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Shiying; Fang, Zhong; Yu, Xuefeng; Zhang, Muxun

    2009-07-10

    GSIS, the most important function of pancreatic beta cell, is essential for maintaining the glucose homeostasis. Transcription factors are known to control different biological processes such as differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis. In pancreas, some transcription factors are involved in regulating the function of beta cells. In this review, the role of these transcription factors including Pdx-1, FoxO1, SREBP-1c, and MafA in GSIS is highlighted. The related molecular mechanisms are analyzed as well. Furthermore, the association between the role of transcription factors in GSIS and the development of T2DM is discussed.

  6. Oligodeoxynucleotides enhance lipopolysaccharide-stimulated synthesis of tumor necrosis factor: dependence on phosphorothioate modification and reversal by heparin.

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, G.; Krug, A.; Waller-Fontaine, K.; Endres, S.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Specific inhibition of target proteins by antisense oligodeoxynucleotides is an extensively studied experimental approach. This technique is currently being tested in clinical trials applying phosphorothioate-modified oligonucleotides as therapeutic agents. These polyanionic molecules, however, may also exert non-antisense-mediated effects. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We examined the influence of oligonucleotides on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) synthesis in freshly isolated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Oligonucleotides (18 mer) with different degrees of phosphorothioate modification were studied. RESULTS: The addition of phosphorothioate oligonucleotides (5 microM) caused amplification of TNF synthesis of up to 410% compared with the control with LPS alone. Without LPS stimulation, phosphorothioate oligonucleotides did not induce TNF production. We demonstrate that the enhancement of LPS-stimulated TNF production by phosphorothioate oligonucleotides does not rely on the intracellular presence of oligonucleotides and is not mediated by LPS contamination. Partially phosphorothioate-modified oligonucleotides and unmodified oligonucleotides did not increase TNF synthesis. High concentrations of the polyanion heparin reversed the oligonucleotide-induced enhancement of TNF synthesis. CONCLUSIONS: The data suggest that amplification of TNF synthesis may be caused by binding of the polyanionic phosphorothioate oligonucleotide to cationic sites on the cell surface. Such binding sites have been proposed for polyanionic glycoaminoglycans of the extracellular matrix, which have also been described to augment LPS-stimulated TNF synthesis. The present results are relevant to all in vitro studies attempting to influence protein synthesis in monocytes by using phosphorothioate oligonucleotides. The significance of our findings for in vivo applications of phosphorothioates in situations where there is a stimulus for

  7. Protein kinase C and epidermal growth factor stimulation of Raf1 potentiates adenylyl cyclase type 6 activation in intact cells.

    PubMed

    Beazely, Michael A; Alan, Jamie K; Watts, Val J

    2005-01-01

    Adenylyl cyclase type 6 (AC6) activity is inhibited by protein kinase C (PKC) in vitro; however, in intact cells, PKC activation does not inhibit the activity of transiently expressed AC6. To investigate the effects of PKC activation on AC6 activity in intact cells, we constructed human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells that stably express wild-type AC6 (AC6-WT) or an AC6 mutant lacking a PKC and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) phosphorylation site, Ser674 (AC6-S674A). In contrast to in vitro observations, we observed a PKC-mediated enhancement of forskolin- and isoproterenol-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation in HEK-AC6 cells. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate also potentiated cyclic AMP accumulation in cells expressing endogenous AC6, including Chinese hamster ovary cells and differentiated Cath.a differentiated cells. In HEK-AC6-S674A cells, the potentiation of AC6 stimulation was significantly greater than in cells expressing AC6-WT. The positive effect of PKC activation on AC6 activity seemed to involve Raf1 kinase because the Raf1 inhibitor 3-(3,5-dibromo-4-hydroxybenzylidene-5-iodo-1,3-dihydro-indol-2-one (GW5074) inhibited the PKC potentiation of AC6 activity. Furthermore, the forskolin-stimulated activity of a recombinant AC6 in which the putative Raf1 regulatory sites have been eliminated was not potentiated by activation of PKC. The ability of Raf1 to regulate AC6 may involve a direct interaction because AC6 and a constitutively active Raf1 construct were coimmunoprecipitated. In addition, we report that epidermal growth factor receptor activation also enhances AC6 signaling in a Raf1-dependent manner. These data suggest that Raf1 potentiates drug-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation in cells expressing AC6 after activation of multiple signaling pathways.

  8. Platelet-activating factor stimulates metabolism of phosphoinositides via phospholipase A2 in primary cultured rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Okayasu, T.; Hasegawa, K.; Ishibashi, T.

    1987-07-01

    Addition of platelet-activating factor (PAF) to cells doubly labeled with (/sup 14/C)glycerol plus (/sup 3/H)arachidonic acid resulted in a transient decrease of (/sup 14/C)glycerol-labeled phosphatidylinositol (PI) and a transient increase of (/sup 14/C)glycerol-labeled lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI). (/sup 3/H)Arachidonate-labeled PI, on the other hand, decreased in a time-dependent manner. The radioactivity in phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine, sphingomyelin, and phosphatidylserine did not change significantly. The /sup 3/H//sup 14/C ratio decreased in PI in a time-dependent manner, suggesting the involvement of a phospholipase A2 activity. Although PAF also induced a gradual increase of diacylglycerol (DG), the increase of (/sup 14/C)glycerol-labeled DG paralleled the loss of triacyl (/sup 14/C)glycerol and the /sup 3/H//sup 14/C ratio of DG was 16 times smaller than that of PI. Thus, DG seemed not to be derived from PI. In myo- (/sup 3/H)inositol-prelabeled cells, PAF induced a transient decrease of (/sup 3/H)phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bis-phosphate (TPI) and (/sup 3/H)phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (DPI) at 1 min. PAF stimulation of cultured hepatocytes prelabeled with /sup 32/Pi induced a transient decrease of (/sup 32/P)polyphosphoinositides at 20 sec to 1 min. (/sup 32/P)LPI appeared within 10 sec after stimulation and paralleled the loss of (/sup 32/P)PI. (/sup 3/H)Inositol triphosphate, (/sup 3/H)inositol diphosphate, and (/sup 3/H)inositol phosphate, which increased in a time-dependent manner upon stimulation with adrenaline, did not accumulate with the stimulation due to PAF. These observations indicate that PAF causes degradation of inositol phospholipids via phospholipase A2 and induces a subsequent resynthesis of these phospholipids.

  9. Down-Regulation by Resveratrol of Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor-Stimulated Osteoprotegerin Synthesis through Suppression of Akt in Osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Kuroyanagi, Gen; Otsuka, Takanobu; Yamamoto, Naohiro; Matsushima-Nishiwaki, Rie; Nakakami, Akira; Mizutani, Jun; Kozawa, Osamu; Tokuda, Haruhiko

    2014-01-01

    It is firmly established that resveratrol, a natural food compound abundantly found in grape skins and red wine, has beneficial properties for human health. In the present study, we investigated the effect of basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) on osteoprotegerin (OPG) synthesis in osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells and whether resveratrol affects the OPG synthesis. FGF-2 stimulated both the OPG release and the expression of OPG mRNA. Resveratrol significantly suppressed the FGF-2-stimulated OPG release and the mRNA levels of OPG. SRT1720, an activator of SIRT1, reduced the FGF-2-induced OPG release and the OPG mRNA expression. PD98059, an inhibitor of upstream kinase activating p44/p42 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, had little effect on the FGF-2-stimulated OPG release. On the other hand, SB203580, an inhibitor of p38 MAP kinase, SP600125, an inhibitor of stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase (SAPK/JNK), and Akt inhibitor suppressed the OPG release induced by FGF-2. Resveratrol failed to affect the FGF-2-induced phosphorylation of p44/p42 MAP kinase, p38 MAP kinase or SAPK/JNK. The phosphorylation of Akt induced by FGF-2 was significantly suppressed by resveratrol or SRT1720. These findings strongly suggest that resveratrol down-regulates FGF-2-stimulated OPG synthesis through the suppression of the Akt pathway in osteoblasts and that the inhibitory effect of resveratrol is mediated at least in part by SIRT1 activation. PMID:25290095

  10. START Trial: a pilot study on STimulation of ARTeriogenesis using subcutaneous application of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor as a new treatment for peripheral vascular disease.

    PubMed

    van Royen, Niels; Schirmer, Stephan H; Atasever, Bektas; Behrens, Casper Y H; Ubbink, Dirk; Buschmann, Eva E; Voskuil, Michiel; Bot, Pieter; Hoefer, Imo; Schlingemann, Reinier O; Biemond, Bart J; Tijssen, J G; Bode, Christoph; Schaper, Wolfgang; Oskam, Jacques; Legemate, Dink A; Piek, Jan J; Buschmann, Ivo

    2005-08-16

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) was recently shown to increase collateral flow index in patients with coronary artery disease. Experimental models showed beneficial effects of GM-CSF on collateral artery growth in the peripheral circulation. Thus, in the present study, we evaluated the effects of GM-CSF in patients with peripheral artery disease. A double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled study was performed in 40 patients with moderate or severe intermittent claudication. Patients were treated with placebo or subcutaneously applied GM-CSF (10 microg/kg) for a period of 14 days (total of 7 injections). GM-CSF treatment led to a strong increase in total white blood cell count and C-reactive protein. Monocyte fraction initially increased but thereafter decreased significantly as compared with baseline. Both the placebo group and the treatment group showed a significant increase in walking distance at day 14 (placebo: 127+/-67 versus 184+/-87 meters, P=0.03, GM-CSF: 126+/-66 versus 189+/-141 meters, P=0.04) and at day 90. Change in walking time, the primary end point of the study, was not different between groups. No change in ankle-brachial index was found on GM-CSF treatment at day 14 or at day 90. Laser Doppler flowmetry measurements showed a significant decrease in microcirculatory flow reserve in the control group (P=0.03) and no change in the GM-CSF group. The present study does not support the use of GM-CSF for treatment of patients with moderate or severe intermittent claudication. Issues that need to be addressed are dosing, the selection of patients, and potential differences between GM-CSF effects in the coronary and the peripheral circulation.

  11. Secretoneurin is a potential paracrine factor from lactotrophs stimulating gonadotropin release in the goldfish pituitary.

    PubMed

    Zhao, E; Grey, Caleb L; Zhang, Dapeng; Mennigen, Jan A; Basak, Ajoy; Chang, John P; Trudeau, Vance L

    2010-11-01

    Secretoneurin (SN) is a functional neuropeptide derived from the evolutionarily conserved part of precursor protein secretogranin II (SgII). In the time course study, SN (10 nM) stimulates luteinizing hormone (LH) production and secretion after 6 h of static incubation of goldfish pituitary cells. Due to the existence of SN-immunoreactivity (SN-IR) in goldfish lactotrophs, endogenous SN might exert a paracrine effect on LH in the pituitary. In an in vitro immunoneutralization experiment, coincubation with anti-SN antiserum reduces the stimulatory effect of salmon gonadotropin-releasing hormone (sGnRH) on LH release by 64%. Using Western blot analysis, we demonstrate that sGnRH significantly increases the expression of the major SgII-derived peptide (∼57 kDa, with SN-IR) and prolactin (PRL) after 12 h in the static culture of goldfish pituitary cells. Furthermore, there exists a significant correlation between the levels of these two proteins (R = 0.76, P = 0.004). Another ∼30 kDa SgII-derived peptide containing SN is only observed in sGnRH-treated pituitary cells. Consistent with the Western blot analysis results, real-time RT-PCR analysis shows that a 12-h treatment with sGnRH induced 1.6- and 1.7-fold increments in SgII and PRL mRNA levels, respectively. SgII gene expression was also associated with PRL gene expression (R = 0.66; P = 0.02). PRL cells loaded with the calcium-sensitive dye, fura 2/AM, respond to sGnRH treatment with increases in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration level, suggesting a potential mechanism of GnRH on PRL cells and thus SgII processing and SN secretion. Taken together, endogenous lactotroph-generated SN, under the control of hypothalamic GnRH, exerts a paracrine action on neighboring gonadotrophs to stimulate LH release.

  12. Effect of Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Immobilized by the Electron-Beam Synthesis Nanotechnology on Reparative Regeneration of Spermatogenous Tissue.

    PubMed

    Borovskaya, T G; Dygai, A M; Shchemerova, Yu A; Kamalova, S I; Mashanova, V A; Vychuzhanina, A V; Poluektova, M E; Madonov, P G; Kinsht, D N; Goldberg, V E

    2016-09-01

    Effectiveness of the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor immobilized by using electronbeam synthesis nanotechnology was investigated on the model of experimental testicular failure caused by the toxic effect on stem spermatogonia. Administration of the drug to experimental paclitaxel-treated animals increased the number of sources of the proliferative pool of spermatogenesis and its productivity. The effectiveness of immobilized granulocyte colony-stimulating factor was based on its ability to stimulate reparative regeneration of the spermatogenic tissue, which manifested in a decrease in spermatogenic layer maturity and increase in the number of microenvironment cells. Effectiveness of the immobilized form of the drug was superior to that of non-immobilized form.

  13. Selective Endothelin-B Receptor Stimulation Increases Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in the Rat Brain during Postnatal Development.

    PubMed

    Leonard, M G; Prazad, P; Puppala, B; Gulati, A

    2015-11-01

    Endothelin, vascular endothelial growth factor and nerve growth factor play important roles in development of the central nervous system. ET(B) receptors have been shown to promote neurovascular remodeling in the adult ischemic brain through an increase in VEGF and NGF. It is possible that ET(B) receptors may be involved in postnatal development of the brain through VEGF and NGF. In the present study, the brains of male rat pups on postnatal days 1, 7, 14 and 28 were analyzed for expression of ET(B) receptors, VEGF and NGF. In order to determine the effect of ET(B) receptor stimulation, a separate group of pups were administered saline or ET(B) receptor agonist, IRL-1620, on day 21, and their brains were analyzed on day 28. The intensity of ET(B) receptor and VEGF staining in the vasculature as well as the number of blood vessels of normal pups increased with age and was significantly higher on postnatal day 14 compared to day 1 and day 7. In contrast, both ET(B) and NGF staining intensity in the cortex and subventricular zones decreased (P<0.01) at postnatal day 14 compared to earlier time points. Stimulation of ET(B) receptors resulted in a significant increase in VEGF and ET(B) intensity both in the vasculature and the brain (P<0.05), however, IRL-1620 did not produce any change in NGF expression. Results indicate that ET(B) receptors appear to play a role in the development of the CNS and selective stimulation of ET(B) receptors enhances VEGF but not NGF in the postnatal rat brain. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Mechanochemical switching between growth and differentiation during fibroblast growth factor-stimulated angiogenesis in vitro: role of extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    The angiogenic factor, basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF), either stimulates endothelial cell growth or promotes capillary differentiation depending upon the microenvironment in which it acts. Analysis of various in vitro models of spontaneous angiogenesis, in combination with time-lapse cinematography, demonstrated that capillary tube formation was greatly facilitated by promoting multicellular retraction and cell elevation above the surface of the rigid culture dish or by culturing endothelial cells on malleable extracellular matrix (ECM) substrata. These observations suggested to us that mechanical (i.e., tension-dependent) interactions between endothelial cells and ECM may serve to regulate capillary development. To test this hypothesis, FGF-stimulated endothelial cells were grown in chemically defined medium on bacteriological (nonadhesive) dishes that were precoated with different densities of fibronectin. Extensive cell spreading and growth were promoted by fibronectin coating densities that were highly adhesive (greater than 500 ng/cm2), whereas cell rounding, detachment, and loss of viability were observed on dishes coated with low fibronectin concentrations (less than 100 ng/cm2). Intermediate fibronectin coating densities (100-500 ng/cm2) promoted cell extension, but they could not completely resist cell tractional forces. Partial retraction of multicellular aggregates resulted in cell shortening, cessation of growth, and formation of branching tubular networks within 24-48 h. Multicellular retraction and subsequent tube formation also could be elicited on highly adhesive dishes by overcoming the mechanical resistance of the substratum using higher cell plating numbers. Dishes coated with varying concentrations of type IV collagen or gelatin produced similar results. These results suggest that ECM components may act locally to regulate the growth and pattern- regulating actions of soluble FGF based upon their ability to resist cell-generated mechanical

  15. High-grade serous ovarian cancer cell lines exhibit heterogeneous responses to growth factor stimulation.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, Danielle L; Kabarowski, Karl A; Porubsky, Veronica L; Kreeger, Pamela K

    2015-01-01

    The factors driving the onset and progression of ovarian cancer are not well understood. Recent reports have identified cell lines that are representative of the genomic pattern of high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC), in which greater than 90 % of tumors have a mutation in TP53. However, many of these representative cell lines have not been widely used so it is unclear if these cell lines capture the variability that is characteristic of the disease. We investigated six TP53-mutant HGSOC cell lines (Caov3, Caov4, OV90, OVCA432, OVCAR3, and OVCAR4) for migration, MMP2 expression, proliferation, and VEGF secretion, behaviors that play critical roles in tumor progression. In addition to comparing baseline variation between the cell lines, we determined how these behaviors changed in response to four growth factors implicated in ovarian cancer progression: HB-EGF, NRG1β, IGF1, and HGF. Baseline levels of each behavior varied across the cell lines and this variation was comparable to that seen in tumors. All four growth factors impacted cell proliferation or VEGF secretion, and HB-EGF, NRG1β, and HGF impacted wound closure or MMP2 expression in at least two cell lines. Growth factor-induced responses demonstrated substantial heterogeneity, with cell lines sensitive to all four growth factors, a subset of the growth factors, or none of the growth factors, depending on the response of interest. Principal component analysis demonstrated that the data clustered together based on cell line rather than growth factor identity, suggesting that response is dependent on intrinsic qualities of the tumor cell rather than the growth factor. Significant variation was seen among the cell lines, consistent with the heterogeneity of HGSOC.

  16. Efficacy of Intrauterine infusion of granulocyte colony stimulating factor on patients with history of implantation failure: A randomized control trial

    PubMed Central

    Eftekhar, Maryam; Miraj, Sepideh; Farid Mojtahedi, Maryam; Neghab, Nosrat

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although pregnancy rate in in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer (IVF-ET) cycles has been increased over the preceding years, but the majority of IVF-ET cycles still fail. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF) is a glycoprotein that stimulates cytokine growth factor and induces immune system which may improve pregnancy rate in women with history of implantation failure. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate GCSF ability to improve pregnancy rate in women with history of implantation failure Materials and Methods: 0.5 ml (300 µg/ml) GCSF was infused intrauterine in intervention group. Pregnancy outcomes were assessed based on clinical pregnancy. Results: The mean age of participants was 31.95±4.71 years old. There were no significant differences between demographic characteristics in two groups (p>0.05). The pregnancy outcome in GCSF group was improved significantly (p=0.043). Conclusion: GCSF can improve pregnancy outcome in patients with history of implantation failure. PMID:27981253

  17. The efficiency of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in hemorrhagic mucositis and febrile neutropenia resulted from methotrexate toxicity.

    PubMed

    Ozkol, Hatice Uce; Toptas, Tayfur; Calka, Omer; Akdeniz, Necmettin

    2015-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) remains one of the most frequently used anti-metabolite agents in dermatology. MTX is an analog of folate that competitively and irreversibly inhibits dihydrofolate reductase. Oral mucositis is a common side effect of chemotherapy drugs and is characterized by erythema, pain, poor oral intake, pseudomembranous destruction, open ulceration and hemorrhage of the oral mucosa. In this paper, we report a 32-year-old female with a case of mucositis due to MTX intoxication that resulted from an overdose for rheumatoid arthritis. The patient had abdominal pain, vomiting, and nausea. During follow-up, the patient's white blood cell count was found to be 0.9 × 10(9)/L (4-10 × 10(9)/L). The patient developed fever exceeding 40 °C. The patient was consulted to the hematology service. They suggested using granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for febrile neutropenia. On the fifth day of treatment, the white blood cell count reached 5.3 × 10(9)/L and the patient's fever and mucositis started to resolve. Here, we presented a case of hemorrhagic mucositis and febrile neutropenia resulted from high-dose MTX that responded very well to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor treatment and we reviewed the literature.

  18. Hematological and hepatic effects of vascular epidermal growth factor (VEGF) used to stimulate hair growth in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Gnann, Laís Angelo; Castro, Rafael Ferreira; Azzalis, Ligia Ajaime; Feder, David; Perazzo, Fabio Ferreira; Pereira, Edimar Cristiano; Rosa, Paulo César Pires; Junqueira, Virginia Berlanga Campos; Rocha, Katya Cristina; Machado, Carlos D' Aparecida; Paschoal, Francisco Camargo; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos; Valenti, Vitor Engrácia; Fonseca, Fernando Luiz Affonso

    2013-10-29

    Alopecia areata is the hair loss usually reversible, in sharply defined areas. The treatment of alopecia using growth factors shows interesting activity in promoting hair growth. In this concept, VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) is a marker of angiogenesis, stimulating hair growth by facilitating the supply of nutrients to the hair follicle, increasing follicular diameter. The aim of this study was the evaluation of a topical gel enriched with VEGF liposomes on the hair growth stimulation and its toxicological aspects. Mesocricetus auratus were randomly divided into three groups. Control group was treated with Aristoflex® gel, 1% group with the same gel but added 1% VEGF and 3% group with 3% VEGF. Biochemical, hematological and histological analyses were done. At the end of the experiment (15th day of VEGF treatment) efficacy was determined macroscopically by hair density dermatoscopy analysis, and microscopically by hair diameter analysis. They both demonstrated that hair of the VEGF group increased faster and thicker than control. On the other hand, biochemical and hematological results had shown that VEGF was not 100% inert. VEGF increased hair follicle area, but more studies are necessary to confirm its toxicity.

  19. Hematological and hepatic effects of vascular epidermal growth factor (VEGF) used to stimulate hair growth in an animal model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Alopecia areata is the hair loss usually reversible, in sharply defined areas. The treatment of alopecia using growth factors shows interesting activity in promoting hair growth. In this concept, VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) is a marker of angiogenesis, stimulating hair growth by facilitating the supply of nutrients to the hair follicle, increasing follicular diameter. The aim of this study was the evaluation of a topical gel enriched with VEGF liposomes on the hair growth stimulation and its toxicological aspects. Methods Mesocricetus auratus were randomly divided into three groups. Control group was treated with Aristoflex® gel, 1% group with the same gel but added 1% VEGF and 3% group with 3% VEGF. Biochemical, hematological and histological analyses were done. Results At the end of the experiment (15th day of VEGF treatment) efficacy was determined macroscopically by hair density dermatoscopy analysis, and microscopically by hair diameter analysis. They both demonstrated that hair of the VEGF group increased faster and thicker than control. On the other hand, biochemical and hematological results had shown that VEGF was not 100% inert. Conclusions VEGF increased hair follicle area, but more studies are necessary to confirm its toxicity. PMID:24168457

  20. Sitagliptin attenuates inflammatory responses in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated cardiomyocytes via nuclear factor-κB pathway inhibition.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chien-Hung; Lin, Chung-Ching

    2016-06-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1Rs) are responsible for glucose homeostasis, and have been shown to reduce inflammation in preclinical studies. The aim of the present study was to determine whether sitagliptin, an inhibitor of the enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4), as a GLP-1 receptor agonist, exerts an anti-inflammatory effect on cardiomyoblasts during lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation. Exposure to LPS increased the expression levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin-6 (IL)-6 and IL-1β in H9c2 cells, and also resulted in elevations in cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) nuclear translocation. Treatment with the DPP-4 inhibitor sitagliptin dose-dependently downregulated the mRNA levels of IL-6, COX-2 and iNOS in LPS-stimulated H9c2 cells. In addition, sitagliptin inhibited the increased protein expression of IL-6, TNF-α and IL-1β. NF-κB mRNA expression was reduced and its translocation to the nucleus was suppressed by treatment with sitagliptin. The present results demonstrated that sitagliptin exerts a beneficial effect on cardiomyoblasts exposed to LPS by inhibiting expression of inflammatory mediators and suppressing NF-κB activation. These findings indicate that the DPP-4 inhibitor sitagliptin may serve a function in cardiac remodeling attributed to sepsis-induced inflammation.

  1. Growth factor- and cytokine-stimulated endothelial progenitor cells in post-ischemic cerebral neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Peplow, Philip V.

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells are resident in the bone marrow blood sinusoids and circulate in the peripheral circulation. They mobilize from the bone marrow after vascular injury and home to the site of injury where they differentiate into endothelial cells. Activation and mobilization of endothelial progenitor cells from the bone marrow is induced via the production and release of endothelial progenitor cell-activating factors and includes specific growth factors and cytokines in response to peripheral tissue hypoxia such as after acute ischemic stroke or trauma. Endothelial progenitor cells migrate and home to specific sites following ischemic stroke via growth factor/cytokine gradients. Some growth factors are less stable under acidic conditions of tissue ischemia, and synthetic analogues that are stable at low pH may provide a more effective therapeutic approach for inducing endothelial progenitor cell mobilization and promoting cerebral neovascularization following ischemic stroke. PMID:25317152

  2. Cultured human foreskin fibroblasts produce a factor that stimulates their growth with properties similar to basic fibroblast growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Story, M.T. )

    1989-05-01

    To determine if fibroblasts could be a source of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) in tissue, cells were initiated in culture from newborn human foreskin. Fibroblast cell lysates promoted radiolabeled thymidine uptake by cultured quiescent fibroblasts. Seventy-nine percent of the growth-promoting activity of lysates was recovered from heparin-Sepharose. The heparin-binding growth factor reacted on immunoblots with antiserum to human placenta-derived basic FGF and competed with iodinated basic FGF for binding to antiserum to (1-24)bFGF synthetic peptide. To confirm that fibroblasts were the source of the growth factor, cell lysates were prepared from cells incubated with radiolabeled methionine. Heparin affinity purified material was immunoprecipitated with basic FGF antiserum and electrophoresed. Radiolabeled material was detected on gel autoradiographs in the same molecular weight region as authentic iodinated basic FGF. The findings are consistant with the notion that cultured fibroblasts express basic FGF. As these cells also respond to the mitogen, it is possible that the regulation of their growth is under autocrine control. Fibroblasts may be an important source of the growth factor in tissue.

  3. Magnetic Nanoparticles for Efficient Delivery of Growth Factors: Stimulation of Peripheral Nerve Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Giannaccini, Martina; Calatayud, M Pilar; Poggetti, Andrea; Corbianco, Silvia; Novelli, Michela; Paoli, Melania; Battistini, Pietro; Castagna, Maura; Dente, Luciana; Parchi, Paolo; Lisanti, Michele; Cavallini, Gabriella; Junquera, Concepción; Goya, Gerardo F; Raffa, Vittoria

    2017-04-01

    The only clinically approved alternative to autografts for treating large peripheral nerve injuries is the use of synthetic nerve guidance conduits (NGCs), which provide physical guidance to the regenerating stump and limit scar tissue infiltration at the injury site. Several lines of evidence suggest that a potential future strategy is to combine NGCs with cellular or molecular therapies to deliver growth factors that sustain the regeneration process. However, growth factors are expensive and have a very short half-life; thus, the combination approach has not been successful. In the present paper, we proposed the immobilization of growth factors (GFs) on magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) for the time- and space-controlled release of GFs inside the NGC. We tested the particles in a rat model of a peripheral nerve lesion. Our results revealed that the injection of a cocktail of MNPs functionalized with nerve growth factor (NGF) and with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) strongly accelerate the regeneration process and the recovery of motor function compared to that obtained using the free factors. Additionally, we found that injecting MNPs in the NGC is safe and does not impair the regeneration process, and the MNPs remain in the conduit for weeks. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Myeloid Engraftment in Humanized Mice: Impact of Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor Treatment and Transgenic Mouse Strain.

    PubMed

    Coughlan, Alice M; Harmon, Cathal; Whelan, Sarah; O'Brien, Eóin C; O'Reilly, Vincent P; Crotty, Paul; Kelly, Pamela; Ryan, Michelle; Hickey, Fionnuala B; O'Farrelly, Cliona; Little, Mark A

    2016-04-01

    Poor myeloid engraftment remains a barrier to experimental use of humanized mice. Focusing primarily on peripheral blood cells, we compared the engraftment profile of NOD-scid-IL2Rγc(-/-) (NSG) mice with that of NSG mice transgenic for human membrane stem cell factor (hu-mSCF mice), NSG mice transgenic for human interleukin (IL)-3, granulocyte-macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and stem cell factor (SGM3 mice). hu-mSCF and SGM3 mice showed enhanced engraftment of human leukocytes compared to NSG mice, and this was reflected in the number of human neutrophils and monocytes present in these strains. Importantly, discrete classical, intermediate, and nonclassical monocyte populations were identifiable in the blood of NSG and hu-mSCF mice, while the nonclassical population was absent in the blood of SGM3 mice. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (GCSF) treatment increased the number of blood monocytes in NSG and hu-mSCF mice, and neutrophils in NSG and SGM3 mice; however, this effect appeared to be at least partially dependent on the stem cell donor used to engraft the mice. Furthermore, GCSF treatment resulted in a preferential expansion of nonclassical monocytes in both NSG and hu-mSCF mice. Human tubulointerstitial CD11c(+) cells were present in the kidneys of hu-mSCF mice, while monocytes and neutrophils were identified in the liver of all strains. Bone marrow-derived macrophages prepared from NSG mice were most effective at phagocytosing polystyrene beads. In conclusion, hu-mSCF mice provide the best environment for the generation of human myeloid cells, with GCSF treatment further enhancing peripheral blood human monocyte cell numbers in this strain.

  5. [The plasma levels and diagnostic utility of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) and granulocyte-macrophage - colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in patients with I and II stage of breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Ławicki, Sławomir; Czygier, Małgorzata; Wojtukiewicz, Marek; Szmitkowski, Maciej

    2009-01-01

    Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) and granulocyte-macrophage - colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) belong to hematopoetic growth factors (HGFs). Few clinical investigation have shown their autologous production both in vitro by human cell lines and in vivo by tumors, for example in breast cancer. We have investigated the plasma levels of G-CSF, GM-CSF and commonly accepted tumor marker (CA 15-3) before treatment of breast cancer patients in relation to the healthy controls. Additionally, the diagnostic criteria: sensitivity, specificity, the predictive value of positive and negative results were defined. Tested group--50 patients with breast cancer, control group--30 healthy women. G-CSF and GM-CSF were determined using ELISA method, CA 15-3--was measured by chemilumunescence immunoassay (CMIA) (ABBOTT). Median values of G-CSF, GM-CSF and CA 15-3 plasma levels were significantly higher in the II stage of breast cancer patients before surgery compared to the control group. The diagnostic sensitivity of G-CSF and GM-CSF was slightly lower than CA 15-3. The higher range of the diagnostic sensitivity of tested cytokines and CA 15-3 in more advanced breast stages was observed. The combined use of both cytokines and CA 15-3 analysis resulted also in the increased sensitivity range (69%). The diagnostic specificities of tested cytokines were high for both cytokines (equal 90%) and CA 15-3 (95%). The positive and negative predictive values were high for all tested parameters and were higher in more advanced tumor stage. This study suggests that tested cytokines, especially G-CSF, can be clinically useful in diagnostics of breast cancer patients, but further investigation and confirmation by a prospective study are necessary.

  6. Plasma granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor levels in critical illness including sepsis and septic shock: relation to disease severity, multiple organ dysfunction, and mortality.

    PubMed

    Presneill, J J; Waring, P M; Layton, J E; Maher, D W; Cebon, J; Harley, N S; Wilson, J W; Cade, J F

    2000-07-01

    To define the circulating levels of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) during critical illness and to determine their relationship to the severity of illness as measured by the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, the development of multiple organ dysfunction, or mortality. Prospective cohort study. University hospital intensive care unit. A total of 82 critically ill adult patients in four clinically defined groups, namely septic shock (n = 29), sepsis without shock (n = 17), shock without sepsis (n = 22), and nonseptic, nonshock controls (n = 14). None. During day 1 of septic shock, peak plasma levels of G-CSF, interleukin (IL)-6, and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), but not GM-CSF, were greater than in sepsis or shock alone (p < .001), and were correlated among themselves (rs = 0.44-0.77; p < .02) and with the APACHE II score (rs = 0.25-0.40; p = .03 to .18). G-CSF, IL-6, and UF, and sepsis, shock, septic shock, and APACHE II scores were strongly associated with organ dysfunction or 5-day mortality by univariate analysis. However, multiple logistic regression analysis showed that only septic shock remained significantly associated with organ dysfunction and only APACHE II scores and shock with 5-day mortality. Similarly, peak G-CSF, IL-6, and LIF were poorly predictive of 30-day mortality. Plasma levels of G-CSF, IL-6, and LIF are greatly elevated in critical illness, including septic shock, and are correlated with one another and with the severity of illness. However, they are not independently predictive of mortality, or the development of multiple organ dysfunction. GM-CSF was rarely elevated, suggesting different roles for G-CSF and GM-CSF in human septic shock.

  7. Vitamin D Receptor Deficiency and Low Vitamin D Diet Stimulate Aortic Calcification and Osteogenic Key Factor Expression in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Nadine; Brandsch, Corinna; Kühne, Hagen; Thiele, Alexandra; Hirche, Frank; Stangl, Gabriele I.

    2012-01-01

    Low levels of 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25(OH)D) are associated with cardiovascular diseases. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that vitamin D deficiency could be a causal factor in atherosclerotic vascular changes and vascular calcification. Aortic root sections of vitamin D receptor knockout (VDR−/−) mice that were stained for vascular calcification and immunostained for osteoblastic differentiation factors showed more calcified areas and a higher expression of the osteogenic key factors Msx2, Bmp2, and Runx2 than the wild-type mice (P<0.01). Data from LDL receptor knockout (LDLR−/−) mice that were fed western diet with either low (50 IU/kg), recommended (1,000 IU/kg), or high (10,000 IU/kg) amounts of vitamin D3 over 16 weeks revealed increasing plasma concentrations of 25(OH)D (P<0.001) with increasing intake of vitamin D, whereas levels of calcium and phosphorus in plasma and femur were not influenced by the dietary treatment. Mice treated with the low vitamin D diet had more calcified lesions and a higher expression of Msx2, Bmp2, and Runx2 in aortic roots than mice fed recommended or high amounts of vitamin D (P<0.001). Taken together, these findings indicate vitamin D deficiency as a risk factor for aortic valve and aortic vessel calcification and a stimulator of osteogenic key factor expression in these vascular areas. PMID:22536373

  8. Formation of STAT5-containing DNA binding complexes in response to colony-stimulating factor-1 and platelet-derived growth factor.

    PubMed

    Novak, U; Mui, A; Miyajima, A; Paradiso, L

    1996-08-02

    Colony-stimulating factor (CSF-1) activates several members belonging to the STAT (signal transducers and activators of transcription) family of transcription factors. We investigated the DNA binding complexes activated by CSF-1 in several cell lines and compared them with complexes activated by platelet-derived growth factor and interleukin 3. Our results indicate that the SIF-A complex activated by CSF-1 and platelet-derived growth factor may contain STAT3/STAT5 heterodimers binding to the high affinity SIF binding site, m67. In addition, both growth factors activate one or several STAT5-containing protein complexes binding to the prolactin-inducible element, PIE. The formation of these complexes was cell type and growth factor specific. Interleukin 3 activated only PIE binding complexes containing STAT5A and STAT5B and did not activate m67 binding complexes. It appears, therefore, that STAT5 cannot bind to m67 as a homodimer, but it can bind if it is dimerized with STAT3, whereas it can bind to the PIE element without being either complexed with STAT3 or any other known STAT protein, possibly as a homodimer or as STAT5A/STAT5B heterodimer. However, in addition, STAT5 may heterodimerize with other proteins and form novel PIE binding complexes.

  9. Energy absorption buildup factors, exposure buildup factors and Kerma for optically stimulated luminescence materials and their tissue equivalence for radiation dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vishwanath P.; Badiger, N. M.

    2014-11-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) materials are sensitive dosimetric materials used for precise and accurate dose measurement for low-energy ionizing radiation. Low dose measurement capability with improved sensitivity makes these dosimeters very useful for diagnostic imaging, personnel monitoring and environmental radiation dosimetry. Gamma ray energy absorption buildup factors and exposure build factors were computed for OSL materials using the five-parameter Geometric Progression (G-P) fitting method in the energy range 0.015-15 MeV for penetration depths up to 40 mean free path. The computed energy absorption buildup factor and exposure buildup factor values were studied as a function of penetration depth and incident photon energy. Effective atomic numbers and Kerma relative to air of the selected OSL materials and tissue equivalence were computed and compared with that of water, PMMA and ICRU standard tissues. The buildup factors and kerma relative to air were found dependent upon effective atomic numbers. Buildup factors determined in the present work should be useful in radiation dosimetry, medical diagnostics and therapy, space dosimetry, accident dosimetry and personnel monitoring.

  10. Generating elastin-rich small intestinal submucosa-based smooth muscle constructs utilizing exogenous growth factors and cyclic mechanical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Heise, Rebecca Long; Ivanova, Julia; Parekh, Aron; Sacks, Michael S

    2009-12-01

    Successful approaches to tissue engineering smooth muscle tissues utilize biodegradable scaffolds seeded with autologous cells. One common problem in using biological scaffolds specifically is the difficulty of inducing cellular penetration and controlling de novo extracellular matrix deposition/remodeling in vitro. Our hypothesis was that small intestinal submucosa (SIS) exposed to specific mechanical stimulation regimes would modulate the synthesis of de novo collagen and elastin by bladder smooth muscle cells (BSMC) within the SIS matrix. We further hypothesized that the cytokines vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), two key growth factors involved in epithelial mesenchymal signaling, will promote the cellular penetration into SIS necessary for mechanical stimulation. BSMC were seeded at 0.5 x 10(6) cells/cm(2) onto the luminal side of SIS specimens. VEGF (10 ng/mL) and FGF-2 (5 ng/mL) were added to each insert in the media every other day for up to 7 days in static culture. Following static culture, specimens were stretched strip-biaxially under 15% peak strain at either 0.5 or 0.1 Hz for an additional 7 days. Following the culture period, specimens were assayed histologically and biochemically for cellular penetration, proliferation, elastin, collagen, and protease activity. Histological analyses demonstrated that in standard culture media, BSMC remained on the surface of the SIS while both FGF-2 and VEGF profoundly promoted ingrowth of the BSMC into the SIS. The penetration of the cells in response to these cytokines was confirmed using a Transwell assay. Following cellular penetration, BSMC produced significant amounts of elastic fibers under cyclic mechanical stretching at 0.1 Hz under 15% stretch, as evidenced by colorimetric assay and histology using a Verhoeff-Van Gieson stain. Protease activity was assessed in the media and found to be statistically increased in static culture following FGF-2 treatment. These

  11. Factors affecting predicted speech intelligibility with cochlear implants in an auditory model for electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Fredelake, Stefan; Hohmann, Volker

    2012-05-01

    A model of the auditory response to stimulation with cochlear implants (CIs) was used to predict speech intelligibility in electric hearing. The model consists of an auditory nerve cell population that generates delta pulses as action potentials in response to temporal and spatial excitation with a simulated CI signal processing strategy. The auditory nerve cells are modeled with a leaky integrate-and-fire model with membrane noise. Refractory behavior is introduced by raising the threshold potential with an exponentially decreasing function. Furthermore, the action potentials are delayed to account for latency and jitter. The action potentials are further processed by a central model stage, which includes spatial and temporal integration, resulting in an internal representation of the sound presented. Multiplicative noise is included in the internal representations to limit resolution. Internal representations of complete word sets for a sentence intelligibility test were computed and classified using a Dynamic-Time-Warping classifier to quantify information content and to estimate speech intelligibility. The number of auditory nerve cells, the spatial spread of the electrodes' electric field, and the internal noise intensity were found to have a major impact on the modeled speech intelligibility, whereas the influence of refractory behavior, membrane noise, and latency and jitter was minor. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Development of Aggressive Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinomas Depends on Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor Secretion in Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Pickup, Michael W; Owens, Philip; Gorska, Agnieszka E; Chytil, Anna; Ye, Fei; Shi, Chanjuan; Weaver, Valerie M; Kalluri, Raghu; Moses, Harold L; Novitskiy, Sergey V

    2017-09-01

    The survival rate for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains low. More therapeutic options to treat this disease are needed, for the current standard of care is ineffective. Using an animal model of aggressive PDAC (Kras/p48(TGFβRIIKO)), we discovered an effect of TGFβ signaling in regulation of G-CSF secretion in pancreatic epithelium. Elevated concentrations of G-CSF in PDAC promoted differentiation of Ly6G(+) cells from progenitors, stimulated IL10 secretion from myeloid cells, and decreased T-cell proliferation via upregulation of Arg, iNOS, VEGF, IL6, and IL1b from CD11b(+) cells. Deletion of csf3 in PDAC cells or use of a G-CSF-blocking antibody decreased tumor growth. Anti-G-CSF treatment in combination with the DNA synthesis inhibitor gemcitabine reduced tumor size, increased the number of infiltrating T cells, and decreased the number of Ly6G(+) cells more effectively than gemcitabine alone. Human analysis of human datasets from The Cancer Genome Atlas and tissue microarrays correlated with observations from our mouse model experiments, especially in patients with grade 1, stage II disease. We propose that in aggressive PDAC, elevated G-CSF contributes to tumor progression through promoting increases in infiltration of neutrophil-like cells with high immunosuppressive activity. Such a mechanism provides an avenue for a neoadjuvant therapeutic approach for this devastating disease. Cancer Immunol Res; 5(9); 718-29. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Stimulated production of steroids in Inonotus obliquus by host factors from birch.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lian-Xia; Lu, Zhen-Ming; Geng, Yan; Zhang, Xiao-Mei; Xu, Guo-Hua; Shi, Jin-Song; Xu, Zheng-Hong

    2014-12-01

    Steroids was considered as one of the bioactive components in Inonotus obliquus, while this kind of secondary metabolites are less accumulated in cultured mycelia. In this study, effect of extracts from bark and core of host-related species, birch (Betula platyphylla Suk.), on steroid production of I. obliquus in submerged culture were evaluated. The results showed that all dosages (0.01 and 0.1 g/L) of aqueous extracts and methanol extracts from birch bark and birch core possessed significantly stimulatory effect on steroid production of I. obliquus (P < 0.05). Among the eight extracts, the aqueous extract (0.01 g/L) from birch bark gave the highest steroid production (225.5 ± 8.7 mg/L), which is 97.3% higher than that of the control group. The aqueous extract (0.01 and 0.1 g/L) from birch bark could simultaneously stimulated mycelial growth and steroid content, while the methanol extract from birch bark only elevated the steroid content. High performance liquid chromatography analysis showed that productions of betulin, ergosterol, cholesterol, lanosterol, stigmasterol, and sitosterol in I. obliquus simultaneously increased in the presence of aqueous extract and methanol extract from birch bark. The results presented herein indicate that extracts from birch bark could act as an inducer for steroid biosynthesis of I. obliquus. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Effective stimulating factors for microbial levan production by Halomonas smyrnensis AAD6T.

    PubMed

    Sarilmiser, Hande Kazak; Ates, Ozlem; Ozdemir, Gonca; Arga, Kazim Yalcin; Oner, Ebru Toksoy

    2015-04-01

    Levan is a bioactive fructan polymer that is mainly associated with high-value applications where exceptionally high purity requirements call for well-defined cultivation conditions. In this study, microbial levan production by the halophilic extremophile Halomonas smyrnensis AAD6(T) was investigated systematically. For this, different feeding strategies in fed-batch cultures were employed and fermentation profiles of both shaking and bioreactor cultures were analyzed. Initial carbon and nitrogen source concentrations, production pH, NaCl and nitrogen pulses, nitrogen and phosphorous limitations, trace elements and thiamine contents of the basal production medium were found to affect the levan yields at different extends. Boric acid was found to be the most effective stimulator of levan production by increasing the sucrose utilization three-fold and levan production up to five-fold. This significant improvement implied the important role of quorum sensing phenomenon and its regulatory impact on levan production mechanism. Levan produced by bioreactor cultures under conditions optimized within this study was found to retain its chemical structure. Moreover, its biocompatibility was assessed for a broad concentration range. Hence H. smyrnensis AAD6(T) has been firmly established as an industrially important resource microorganism for high-quality levan production.

  15. First trimester thyroid stimulating hormone as an independent risk factor for adverse pregnancy outcome.

    PubMed

    Arbib, Nissim; Hadar, Eran; Sneh-Arbib, Orly; Chen, Rony; Wiznitzer, Arnon; Gabbay-Benziv, Rinat

    2017-09-01

    Maternal thyroid gland dysfunction may adversely affect pregnancy outcome. We aimed to examine the association between subclinical thyroid dysfunction, both hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism, to adverse pregnancy outcome. Retrospective cohort study of all women with an available first trimester thyroid function testing and known pregnancy outcome, categorized to subclinical hypothyroidism, or hyperthyroidism and evaluated for complication during gestation and delivery. Four thousand five hundred and four women were included in the final analysis - 3231 were euthyroid, 73 (1.6%) were categorized as subclinical hyperthyroidism and 1200 (26.6%) had subclinical hypothyroidism. Low thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels, i.e. subclinical hyperthyroidism, correlates with higher rates of placental abruption and extremely low birth weight, below 1500 g. Also, the risk for preterm delivery prior to 34 gestational weeks is higher among women with subclinical hypothyroidism, with greater risk among those with a higher TSH level. (OR 1.81, 95% CI 1.0-3.28 for TSH 2.5-4.0 mIU/L and OR 2.33, 95% CI 1.11-4.42 for those with TSH > 4 4.0 mIU/L). Subclinical hypothyroidism is associated with an increased risk for preterm delivery prior to 34 gestational weeks. Additionally, subclinical hyperthyroidism may also have a role in adverse pregnancy outcome - low birth weight and placental abruption - although this needs to be further explored.

  16. Follow-up of healthy donors receiving granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for peripheral blood progenitor cell mobilization and collection. Results of the Spanish Donor Registry.

    PubMed

    de la Rubia, Javier; de Arriba, Felipe; Arbona, Cristina; Pascual, María J; Zamora, Concha; Insunza, Andrés; Martínez, Dorleta; Paniagua, Carmen; Díaz, Miguel A; Sanz, Miguel A

    2008-05-01

    Information about the long-term follow-up and safety of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor administration to healthy donors is limited. The aims of this study were to analyze the side effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor administration in donors included in a Spanish Registry of hematopoietic stem cell donors and to determine the long-term outcome of these donors. The Spanish National Donor Registry was developed to record the short- and long-term results of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor administration to mobilize peripheral blood progenitor cells in normal donors. To date, 1436 donors (771 males, 665 females) with a median age of 37 years (range, 1 to 74 years) have been registered. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor was the only cytokine administered. A baseline investigation was performed in every donor before granulocyte colony-stimulating factor administration and follow-up investigations (controls) were planned at 4 weeks and annually thereafter for up to 5 years after the mobilization. At least one of the scheduled controls was performed in 736 donors, while 320 donors have been followed for 2 years or more. The peripheral white blood cell count decreased significantly from 6.8 x 10(9)/L at baseline to 5.9 x 10(9)/L at 4 weeks after leukapheresis (p<0.0001) and remained at values lower than those observed premobilization until 2 years after mobilization. In contrast, hemoglobin concentration and platelet count returned to normal values within 1 year after mobilization. Bone pain (90%) and headache (33%) were the most frequently reported granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-related side effects. Five patients (0.68%) were diagnosed as having solid tumors (lung cancer in two patients and thyroid carcinoma, choroid melanoma, and colon carcinoma in one patient each) between 10 and 64 months after administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. No hematologic malignancies have been reported. The clinical side effects of

  17. Fibroblast growth factor-2 stimulates adipogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kakudo, Natsuko . E-mail: kakudon@takii.kmu.ac.jp; Shimotsuma, Ayuko; Kusumoto, Kenji

    2007-07-27

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) have demonstrated a capacity for differentiating into a variety of lineages, including bone, cartilage, or fat, depending on the inducing stimuli and specific growth and factors. It is acknowledged that fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) promotes chondrogenic and inhibits osteogenic differentiation of ASCs, but thorough investigations of its effects on adipogenic differentiation are lacking. In this study, we demonstrate at the cellular and molecular levels the effect of FGF-2 on adipogenic differentiation of ASCs, as induced by an adipogenic hormonal cocktail consisting of 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX), dexamethasone, insulin, and indomethacin. FGF-2 significantly enhances the adipogenic differentiation of human ASCs. Furthermore, in cultures receiving FGF-2 before adipogenic induction, mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma}2 (PPAR{gamma}2), a key transcription factor in adipogenesis, was upregulated. The results of FGF-2 supplementation suggest the potential applications of FGF-2 and ASCs in adipose tissue regeneration.

  18. Nuclear factor-κB does not mediate the inhibitory effects of dexamethasone on granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor expression

    PubMed Central

    Bergmann, Martin W; Staples, Karl J; Barnes, Peter J; Newton, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Human granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) reporter constructs containing up to 3·3 kb of upstream promoter sequence were transiently transfected into both Jurkat and HUT78 human T-cell lines. In Jurkat cells, stimulation with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) plus phytohemaglutinin (PHA) produced robust increases in reporter activity, whereas HUT78 cells showed low levels of reporter induction attributable to constitutive nuclear factor (NF)-κB activity. Following mutation of either the proximal NF-κB site (−85/−76) or the activator protein1 (AP-1) motif within the conserved lymphokine element 0 (CLE0) site (−54/−31), reporter activity was markedly reduced in both cell lines. Despite this dependence on NF-κB and CLE0/AP-1, GM-CSF reporter activity was unaffected by dexamethasone in either cell line. Similarly, an NF-κB-dependent reporter was also not repressed by dexamethasone, yet GM-CSF release from HUT78 T cells was inhibited. These data therefore confirm a critical role for both NF-κB and CLE0 sites in GM-CSF promoter activation and indicate that NF-κB may not mediate glucocorticoid-dependent repression of GM-CSF in these cells. PMID:15056380

  19. Acemannan stimulates gingival fibroblast proliferation; expressions of keratinocyte growth factor-1, vascular endothelial growth factor, and type I collagen; and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Jettanacheawchankit, Suwimon; Sasithanasate, Siriruk; Sangvanich, Polkit; Banlunara, Wijit; Thunyakitpisal, Pasutha

    2009-04-01

    Aloe vera has long been used as a traditional medicine for inducing wound healing. Gingival fibroblasts (GFs) play an important role in oral wound healing. In this study, we investigated the effects of acemannan, a polysaccharide extracted from Aloe vera gel, on GF proliferation; keratinocyte growth factor-1 (KGF-1), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and type I collagen production; and oral wound healing in rats. [(3)H]-Thymidine incorporation assay and ELISA were used. Punch biopsy wounds were created at the hard palate of male Sprague Dawley rats. All treatments (normal saline; 0.1% triamcinolone acetonide; plain 1% Carbopol; and Carbopol containing 0.5%, 1%, and 2% acemannan (w/w)) were applied daily. Wounded areas and histological features were observed at day 7 after treatment. From our studies, acemannan at concentrations of 2, 4, 8, and 16 mg/ml significantly induced cell proliferation (P<0.05). Acemannan concentrations between 2 - 16 mg/ml significantly stimulated KGF-1, VEGF, and type I collagen expressions (P<0.05). Wound healing of animals receiving Carbopol containing 0.5% acemannan (w/w) was significantly better than that of the other groups (P<0.05). These findings suggest that acemannan plays a significant role in the oral wound healing process via the induction of fibroblast proliferation and stimulation of KGF-1, VEGF, and type I collagen expressions.

  20. Stimulation of chick embryo cartilage sulfate and thymidine uptake: comparison of human serum, purified somatomedins, and other growth factors.

    PubMed

    Jennings, J; Buchanan, F; Freeman, D; Garland, J T

    1980-11-01

    We have compared the stimulation of sulfate and thymidine uptake into 10-day-old embryonic chick cartilage by normal human serum, partially purified somatomedins (Sm) A and B, homogeneous insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) I and II, and several other substances. With the exception of epidermal growth factor, all growth factors ((GFs) were assayed in the absence of other protein. Pelvic rudiments were preincubated in buffer for 6 h and then incubated for 24 h with the GF or serum, with labels added for the final 6 h. Human serum enhanced cartilage uptake of both thymidine and sulfate. There was a dose-dependent stimulation of thymidine uptake by Sm A or B (0.05--2 microgram/ml) and IGF I or II (0.5--20 ng/ml). Unlike serum, neither Sms nor IGFs increased SO4 uptake under these conditions. Bovine GH (10--500 ng/ml), albumin (100-1000 ng/ml), fibroblast GF (1--100 ng/ml), and epidermal GF (1--100 ng/ml) were inactive for both thymidine and sulfate. When a shorter incubation was used (7 h), Sm A enhanced SO4 uptake, and discrimination was increased by preincubation of the rudiments in buffer for 24 h. With this procedure, IGF I (0.5 ng/ml) was nearly equipotent to 5% serum. On a weight basis, IGF I was more active than either Sm A or IGF II. The data suggest that assay conditions are crucial for demonstration of Sm activity. Appropriate conditions may be different for isolated GF than for a complex medium such as serum. The results further suggest that with certain protocols, the responsiveness of chick embryo cartilage is qualitatively similar to that of hypophysectomized rat cartilage.

  1. Identification and characterization of receptors for granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on human placenta and trophoblastic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Uzumaki, Hiroya; Okabe, Tetsuro; Sasaki, Norio; Hagiwara, Koichi; Takaku, Fumimaro; Tobita, Masahito; Yasukawa, Kaoru ); Ito, Seiga ); Umezawa, Yoshimi )

    1989-12-01

    Since radioiodination of human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is difficult, the authors synthesized a mutein of human G-CSF that retains full biological activity and receptor-binding capacity for at least 2 weeks after radioiodination. Receptors for human G-CSF were characterized in the plasma membrane fraction from the human term placenta (human placental membranes) and trophoblastic cells by using the {sup 125}I-labeled mutein of human G-CSF (KW-2228). The specific binding of {sup 125}I-labeled KW-2228 to placental membranes was pH-dependent, with maximal specific binding at pH 7.8; it increased linearly with protein to 3.7 mg of protein per ml and was both time- and temperature-dependent, with maximal binding at 4{degree}C after a 24-hr incubation. When the authors examined the ability of hematopoietic growth factors to inhibit {sup 125}I-labeled KW-2228 binding, they found that KW-2228 and intact human G-CSF ihibited {sup 125}I-labeled KW-2228 binding, whereas erythropoietin or granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor did not. Scatchard analysis revealed a single receptor type. The human G-CSF receptors on human placental membranes were shown to consist of two molecular species that could be specifically cross-linked to {sup 125}I-labeled KW-2228. Human trophoblastic cells, T3M-3, also possessed a single receptor for G-CSF. They have identified the receptor for human G-CSF on human placental membranes and trophoblastic cells.

  2. Breast cancer cells induce osteoclast formation by stimulating host IL-11 production and downregulating granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Hayley; Tumber, Anthony; Hill, Peter A

    2004-05-01

    Breast cancer cells frequently metastasize to the skeleton, where they induce OCL formation and activity, resulting in extensive bone destruction. However, the mechanisms by which breast cancer cells mediate increased osteolysis remain unclear. To elucidate this point, we investigated how 3 human breast cancer cell lines, MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-435 and MCF-7, induce OCL formation using a murine osteoblast-spleen cell coculture system and compared their effects with a human colorectal cancer cell line, HCT-15; a human lung cancer cell line, HT-1080; and a normal human breast cell line, HME. The breast cancer cell lines supported OCL formation only when osteoblasts were present in spleen cell cocultures, whilst the non-breast cancer cell lines and the normal breast cell line, HME, had no effect. Fractionation of BCCM by ultrafiltration established that osteoclastogenic activity was associated with factors having m.w. >3 kDa. Breast cancer cell lines produced primarily PTHrP, with lesser amounts of IL-6, IL-11 and TNF-alpha. The effect of BCCM on OCL formation in osteoblast-spleen cell cocultures was partially prevented by a neutralising antibody to human PTHrP and completely prevented by a neutralising antibody to either murine IL-11 or the murine IL-11 receptor; neutralising antibodies to human IL-6, IL-11 or TNF-alpha were without effect. BCCM or human PTHrP induced an increase in murine osteoblast IL-11 mRNA and protein production, effects that were prevented in the presence of a neutralising antibody to human PTHrP. The osteoclastogenic activity of IL-11 was mediated by enhancing osteoblast production of PGE(2) effects, which were abrogated by an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase. PGE(2) apparently enhanced OCL formation by downregulating GM-CSF production by spleen cells since recombinant murine GM-CSF inhibited OCL formation and a neutralising antibody to murine GM-CSF blocked these inhibitory effects. We conclude that breast cancer cells induce OCL formation by

  3. Induction of monocyte migration by recombinant macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Wang, J M; Griffin, J D; Rambaldi, A; Chen, Z G; Mantovani, A

    1988-07-15

    Human recombinant macrophage-CSF (M-CSF) induced migration across polycarbonate or nitrocellulose filters of human peripheral blood monocytes. Checkerboard analysis of M-CSF-induced migration, performed by seeding different cytokine concentrations above and below the filter, revealed that the locomotory response involved chemotaxis, though some gradient-independent augmentation of migration occurred. Polymixin B did not affect M-CSF chemotaxis and M-CSF was active on monocytes from the LPS-unresponsive mouse strain C3H/HeJ. These findings rule out a contribution of minute endotoxin contamination, below the sensitivity of the Limulus assay, in M-CSF chemotaxis. Rabbit anti-M-CSF antibodies inhibited the chemotactic activity of recombinant M-CSF, thus further indicating that the M-CSF molecule was indeed responsible for chemotaxis. M-CSF preparations encoded by 224 or 522 amino acid cDNA clones were equally effective in inducing monocyte migration. Recombinant M-CSF did not elicit a migratory response in large granular lymphocytes and in endothelial cells under conditions in which appropriate reference attractants were active. A modest stimulation of migration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes, inhibitable by antibodies, was observed at high cytokine concentrations (10 to 100 times higher than those required for monocyte locomotion). The maximal polymorphonuclear leukocytes response evoked by M-CSF was small compared to that evoked by reference chemoattractants or to that evoked by the same cytokine in monocytes. Hence, M-CSF is a potent chemoattractant for mononuclear phagocytes and exerts its action preferentially on cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage. M-CSF, produced locally by activated macrophages, may play a role in the selective recruitment from the blood compartment of mononuclear phagocytes to amplify resistance against certain noxious agents.

  4. Hyaluronan inhibits Akt, leading to nuclear factor-κB down-regulation in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated U937 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Tadashi

    2011-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) of high molecular weight is used in the treatment of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis by intra-articular injection. While HA has been shown to suppress nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation by proinflammatory cytokines and lipopolysaccharide (LPS), intracellular upstream events that cause NF-κB down-regulation in response to HA remain unclear. Thus, this study was performed to investigate the involvement of phosphoinositide-3-OH kinase (PI3K)/Akt in the inhibition of the LPS-activated NF-κB pathway by HA in U937 macrophages. In adherent U937 macrophage cultures, pretreatment with HA of 2700 kDa (1 mg/ml, 1 h) significantly inhibited interleukin-6 (IL-6) production by LPS (200 ng/ml, 24 h)-stimulated U937 cells. LPS (200 ng/ml) activated Akt and NF-κB, whereas HA (1 mg/ml) down-regulated LPS-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt and NF-κB. Inhibition studies using LY294002 (20 µM) revealed the requirement of the PI3K/Akt pathway for LPS-stimulated IL-6 production and NF-κB activation. Pretreatment with anti-intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) antibody (20 µg/ml) reversed the inhibitory effects of HA on LPS-induced production of IL-6 and activation of Akt and NF-κB. Herein, we provided the first evidence that HA suppresses the LPS-activated PI3K/Akt pathway, leading to down-regulation of NF-κB with diminished IL-6 production through interaction with ICAM-1.

  5. Design Rationale and Development Approach for Pegfilgrastim as a Long-Acting Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor.

    PubMed

    Arvedson, Tara; O'Kelly, James; Yang, Bing-Bing

    2015-06-01

    Filgrastim, a recombinant methionyl human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) (r-metHuG-CSF), is efficacious in stimulating neutrophil production and maturation to prevent febrile neutropenia (FN) in response to chemotherapy. Because of its relatively short circulating half-life, daily filgrastim injections are required to stimulate neutrophil recovery. In an effort to develop a long-acting form of filgrastim that was as safe and efficacious as filgrastim but had a longer in vivo residence time, a number of strategies were considered. Ultimately, fusion of filgrastim to polyethylene glycol (PEG) was selected. Following extensive analysis of conjugation chemistries as well as in vitro and in vivo characterization of a panel of PEGylated proteins, a construct containing a 20 kDa PEG moiety covalently conjugated to the N-terminus of filgrastim was chosen for advancement as pegfilgrastim. Pegfilgrastim is primarily cleared by neutrophils and neutrophil precursors (rather than the kidneys), meaning that clearance from the circulation is self-regulating and pegfilgrastim is eliminated only after neutrophils start to recover. Importantly, addition of PEG did not alter the mechanism of action and safety profile compared to filgrastim. Clinical evaluation revealed that a single 6 mg dose effectively reduces the duration of neutropenia and risk of FN in patients receiving chemotherapy. This work demonstrates the benefit of using PEGylation to generate pegfilgrastim, which allows for once-per-chemotherapy cycle administration while maintaining similar safety and efficacy profiles as those for multiple daily administration of filgrastim. Approaches that may provide advances for therapeutic agonists of G-CSF receptor are also discussed.

  6. The novel growth factor, progranulin, stimulates mouse cholangiocyte proliferation via sirtuin-1-mediated inactivation of FOXO1.

    PubMed

    Frampton, Gabriel; Ueno, Yoshiyuki; Quinn, Matthew; McMillin, Matthew; Pae, Hae Yong; Galindo, Cheryl; Leyva-Illades, Dinorah; DeMorrow, Sharon

    2012-12-01

    Progranulin (PGRN), a secreted growth factor, regulates the proliferation of various epithelial cells. Its mechanism of action is largely unknown. Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) is a protein deacetylase that is known to regulate the transcriptional activity of the forkhead receptor FOXO1, thereby modulating the balance between proapoptotic and cell cycle-arresting genes. We have shown that PGRN is overexpressed in cholangiocarcinoma and stimulates proliferation. However, its effects on hyperplastic cholangiocyte proliferation are unknown. In the present study, the expression of PGRN and its downstream targets was determined after bile duct ligation (BDL) in mice and in a mouse cholangiocyte cell line after stimulation with PGRN. The effects of PGRN on cholangiocyte proliferation were assessed in sham-operated (sham) and BDL mice treated with PGRN or by specifically knocking down endogenous PGRN expression using Vivo-Morpholinos or short hairpin RNA. PGRN expression and secretion were upregulated in proliferating cholangiocytes isolated after BDL. Treatment of mice with PGRN increased biliary mass and cholangiocyte proliferation in vivo and in vitro and enhanced cholangiocyte proliferation observed after BDL. PGRN treatment decreased Sirt1 expression and increased the acetylation of FOXO1, resulting in the cytoplasmic accumulation of FOXO1 in cholangiocytes. Overexpression of Sirt1 in vitro prevented the proliferative effects of PGRN. Conversely, knocking down PGRN expression in vitro or in vivo inhibited cholangiocyte proliferation. In conclusion, these data suggest that the upregulation of PGRN may be a key feature stimulating cholangiocyte proliferation. Modulating PGRN levels may be a viable technique for regulating the balance between ductal proliferation and ductopenia observed in a variety of cholangiopathies.

  7. Human transcription factor USF stimulates transcription through the initiator elements of the HIV-1 and the Ad-ML promoters.

    PubMed Central

    Du, H; Roy, A L; Roeder, R G

    1993-01-01

    Earlier in vitro studies identified USF as a cellular factor which activates the adenovirus major late (Ad-ML) promoter by binding to an E-box motif located at position -60 with respect to the cap site. Purified USF contains 44 and 43 kDa polypeptides, and the latter was found (by cDNA cloning) to be a helix-loop-helix protein. In this report, we demonstrate a 25-to 30-fold stimulation of transcription via an upstream binding site by ectopic expression of the 43 kDa form of USF (USF43) in transient transfection assays. More recent data have also revealed alternate interactions of USF43 at pyrimidine-rich (consensus YYAYTCYY) initiator (Inr) elements present in a variety of core promoters. In agreement with this observation, we show here that USF43 can recognize the initiator elements of the HIV-1 promoter, as well as those in the Ad-ML promoter, and that ectopic expression of USF43 can stimulate markedly the corresponding core promoters (TATA and initiator elements) when analyzed in transient co-transfection assays. Mutations in either Inr 1 or Inr 2 reduced the USF43-dependent transcription activity in vivo. In addition, in vitro transcription assays showed that mutations in either or both of the Inr 1 and Inr 2 sequences of the HIV-1 and Ad-ML promoters could affect transcription efficiency, but not the position of the transcriptional start site. These results indicate that USF43 can stimulate transcription through initiator elements in two viral promoters, although the exact mechanism and physiological significance of this effect remain unclear. Images PMID:8440240

  8. Clinical Factors Underlying the Inter-individual Variability of the Resting Motor Threshold in Navigated Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Motor Mapping.

    PubMed

    Sollmann, Nico; Tanigawa, Noriko; Bulubas, Lucia; Sabih, Jamil; Zimmer, Claus; Ringel, Florian; Meyer, Bernhard; Krieg, Sandro M

    2017-01-01

    Correctly determining individual's resting motor threshold (rMT) is crucial for accurate and reliable mapping by navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS), which is especially true for preoperative motor mapping in brain tumor patients. However, systematic data analysis on clinical factors underlying inter-individual rMT variability in neurosurgical motor mapping is sparse. The present study examined 14 preselected clinical factors that may underlie inter-individual rMT variability by performing multiple regression analysis (backward, followed by forward model comparisons) on the nTMS motor mapping data of 100 brain tumor patients. Data were collected from preoperative motor mapping of abductor pollicis brevis (APB), abductor digiti minimi (ADM), and flexor carpi radialis (FCR) muscle representations among these patients. While edema and age at exam in the ADM model only jointly reduced the unexplained variance significantly, the other factors kept in the ADM model (gender, antiepileptic drug intake, and motor deficit) and each of the factors kept in the APB and FCR models independently significantly reduced the unexplained variance. Hence, several clinical parameters contribute to inter-individual rMT variability and should be taken into account during initial and follow-up motor mappings. Thus, the present study adds basic evidence on inter-individual rMT variability, whereby some of the parameters are specific to brain tumor patients.

  9. The La protein counteracts cisplatin-induced cell death by stimulating protein synthesis of anti-apoptotic factor Bcl2.

    PubMed

    Heise, Tilman; Kota, Venkatesh; Brock, Alexander; Morris, Amanda B; Rodriguez, Reycel M; Zierk, Avery W; Howe, Philip H; Sommer, Gunhild

    2016-05-17

    Up-regulation of anti-apoptotic factors is a critical mechanism of cancer cell resistance and often counteracts the success of chemotherapeutic treatment. Herein, we identified the cancer-associated RNA-binding protein La as novel factor contributing to cisplatin resistance. Our data demonstrate that depletion of the RNA-binding protein La in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells (HNSCC) increases the sensitivity toward cisplatin-induced cell death paralleled by reduced expression of the anti-apoptotic factor Bcl2. Furthermore, it is shown that transient expression of Bcl2 in La-depleted cells protects against cisplatin-induced cell death. By dissecting the underlying mechanism we report herein, that the La protein is required for Bcl2 protein synthesis in cisplatin-treated cells. The RNA chaperone La binds in close proximity to the authentic translation start site and unwinds a secondary structure embedding the authentic AUG. Altogether, our data support a novel model, whereby cancer-associated La protein contributes to cisplatin resistance by stimulating the translation of anti-apoptotic factor Bcl2 in HNSCC cells.

  10. Elevated serum granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor levels during radiotherapy predict favorable outcomes in lung and esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Deng, Guodong; Hu, Pingping; Zhang, Jingxin; Liu, Qiqi; Liang, Ning; Xie, Jian; Qiao, Lili; Luo, Hui; Xu, Deguo; Liu, Fengjun; Yu, Xinshuang; Liu, Zhen; Lv, Yajuan; Zhang, Jiandong

    2016-12-20

    The combination of exogenous granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) with radiotherapy (RT) has been demonstrated to strengthen the antitumor immune response. We hypothesized that the variation of GM-CSF during RT was correlated with cancer prognosis. We measured serum levels of GM-CSF and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) before and during RT in 126 unresectable lung and esophageal cancer patients and performed survival analyses. Upregulated GM-CSF levels during RT correlated with longer overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). On the other hand, no difference in OS or PFS was seen at different IFN-γ levels. However, the "integrated factor", computed as the combination of high pre-RT IFN-γ levels and upregulated GM-CSF, correlated with prolonged OS and PFS. Multivariate analyses revealed that GM-CSF levels and the integrated factor were both stronger independent prognostic factors than disease stage. These data demonstrate that GM-CSF levels during RT can be used as a prognostic biomarker for lung and esophageal cancer.

  11. Transcranial ultrasound stimulation promotes brain-derived neurotrophic factor and reduces apoptosis in a mouse model of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Su, Wei-Shen; Wu, Chun-Hu; Chen, Szu-Fu; Yang, Feng-Yi

    2017-09-07

    The protein expressions of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) can be elevated by transcranial ultrasound stimulation in the rat brain. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects and underlying mechanisms of BDNF enhancement by low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) on traumatic brain injury (TBI). Mice subjected to controlled cortical impact injury were treated with LIPUS in the injured region daily for a period of 4 days. Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry were performed to assess the effects of LIPUS. The results showed that the LIPUS treatment significantly promoted the neurotrophic factors BDNF and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) at day 4 after TBI. Meanwhile, LIPUS also enhanced the phosphorylation of Tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB), Akt, and cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB). Furthermore, treatment with LIPUS significantly decreased the level of cleaved caspase-3. The reduction of apoptotic process was inhibited by the anti-BDNF antibody. In short, post-injury LIPUS treatment increased BDNF protein levels and inhibited the progression of apoptosis following TBI. The neuroprotective effects of LIPUS may be associated with enhancements of the protein levels of neurotrophic factors, at least partially via the TrkB/Akt-CREB signaling pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The La protein counteracts cisplatin-induced cell death by stimulating protein synthesis of anti-apoptotic factor Bcl2

    PubMed Central

    Heise, Tilman; Kota, Venkatesh; Brock, Alexander; Morris, Amanda B.; Rodriguez, Reycel M.; Zierk, Avery W.; Howe, Philip H.; Sommer, Gunhild

    2016-01-01

    Up-regulation of anti-apoptotic factors is a critical mechanism of cancer cell resistance and often counteracts the success of chemotherapeutic treatment. Herein, we identified the cancer-associated RNA-binding protein La as novel factor contributing to cisplatin resistance. Our data demonstrate that depletion of the RNA-binding protein La in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells (HNSCC) increases the sensitivity toward cisplatin-induced cell death paralleled by reduced expression of the anti-apoptotic factor Bcl2. Furthermore, it is shown that transient expression of Bcl2 in La-depleted cells protects against cisplatin-induced cell death. By dissecting the underlying mechanism we report herein, that the La protein is required for Bcl2 protein synthesis in cisplatin-treated cells. The RNA chaperone La binds in close proximity to the authentic translation start site and unwinds a secondary structure embedding the authentic AUG. Altogether, our data support a novel model, whereby cancer-associated La protein contributes to cisplatin resistance by stimulating the translation of anti-apoptotic factor Bcl2 in HNSCC cells. PMID:27105491

  13. Protein kinase C-theta isoenzyme selective stimulation of the transcription factor complex AP-1 in T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Baier-Bitterlich, G; Uberall, F; Bauer, B; Fresser, F; Wachter, H; Grunicke, H; Utermann, G; Altman, A; Baier, G

    1996-01-01

    T-lymphocyte stimulation requires activation of several protein kinases, including the major phorbol ester receptor protein kinase C (PKC), ultimately leading to induction of lymphokines, such as interleukin-2 (IL-2). The revelant PKC isoforms which are involved in the activation cascades of nuclear transcription factors involved in IL-2 production have not yet been clearly defined. We have examined the potential role of two representative PKC isoforms in the induction of the IL-2 gene, i.e., PKC-alpha and PKC-theta, the latter being expressed predominantly in hematopoietic cell lines, particularly T cells. Similar to that of PKC-alpha, PKC-theta overexpression in murine EL4 thymoma cells caused a significant increase in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced transcriptional activation of full-length IL-2-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) and NF-AT-CAT but not of NF-IL2A-CAT or NF-kappaB promoter-CAT reporter gene constructs. Importantly, the critical AP-1 enhancer element was differentially modulated by these two distinct PKC isoenzymes, since only PKC-theta but not PKC-alpha overexpression resulted in an approximately 2.8-fold increase in AP-1-collagenase promoter CAT expression in comparison with the vector control. Deletion of the AP-1 enhancer site in the collagenase promoter rendered it unresponsive to PKC-theta. Expression of a constitutively active mutant PKC-theta A148E (but not PKC-alpha A25E) was sufficient to induce activation of AP-1 transcription factor complex in the absence of PMA stimulation. Conversely, a catalytically inactive PKC-theta K409R (but not PKC-alpha K368R) mutant abrogated endogenous PMA-mediated activation of AP-1 transcriptional complex. Dominant negative mutant Ha-RasS17N completely inhibited the PKC-O A148E-induced signal, PKC-O. Expression of a constitutively active mutant PKC-O A148E (but not PKC-alpha A25E) was sufficient to induce activation of AP-1 transcription factor complex in the absence of PMA stimulation

  14. Trophic factors and cell therapy to stimulate brain repair after ischaemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Fernández, María; Fuentes, Blanca; Rodríguez-Frutos, Berta; Ramos-Cejudo, Jaime; Vallejo-Cremades, María Teresa; Díez-Tejedor, Exuperio

    2012-01-01

    Brain repair involves a compendium of natural mechanisms that are activated following stroke. From a therapeutic viewpoint, reparative therapies that encourage cerebral plasticity are needed. In the last years, it has been demonstrated that modulatory treatments for brain repair such as trophic factor- and stem cell-based therapies can promote neurogenesis, gliogenesis, oligodendrogenesis, synaptogenesis and angiogenesis, all of which having a beneficial impact on infarct volume, cell death and, finally, and most importantly, on the functional recovery. However, even when promising results have been obtained in a wide range of experimental animal models and conditions these preliminary results have not yet demonstrated their clinical efficacy. Here, we focus on brain repair modulatory treatments for ischaemic stroke, that use trophic factors, drugs with trophic effects and stem cell therapy. Important and still unanswered questions for translational research ranging from experimental animal models to recent and ongoing clinical trials are reviewed here. PMID:22452968

  15. Heterogeneity Within Macrophage Populations: A Possible Role for Colony Stimulating Factors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-04

    a heterogeneous population of progenitors by a variety of growth factors with hormone -like effects (i.e., active at w-10 M concentrations), as well...redundancy by examining the responsiveness of murine bone marrow progenitors to highly purified or recombinant preparations of GM-CSF and CSF-1, in both...HT, hydroxylapatite BMP, bone marrow progenitors BSA, bovine seriun albumin ABBREVIATIONS But-LPS, butanol-extracted lipopolysaccharide °C

  16. Factors Promoting Tamoxifen Resistance in Breast Cancer via Stimulating Breast Cancer Stem Cell Expansion.

    PubMed

    Ojo, Diane; Wei, Fengxiang; Liu, Yun; Wang, Enli; Zhang, Hongde; Lin, Xiaozeng; Wong, Nicholas; Bane, Anita; Tang, Damu

    2015-01-01

    Estrogen receptor-alpha positive (ER(+)) breast cancer constitutes 70-75% of the disease incidence. Tamoxifen has been the basis of endocrine therapy for patients with ER(+) breast cancer for more than three decades. The treatment reduces the annual mortality rate of breast cancer by 31%, and remains the most effective targeted cancer therapy. However, approximately one-third of patients treated with adjuvant tamoxifen suffer from aggressive recurrent disease. Resistance to tamoxifen, thus, remains a major challenge in providing effective treatments for these patients. In an effort to overcome the resistance, intensive research has been conducted to understand the underlying mechanisms; this has resulted in the identification of complex factors/pathways contributing to tamoxifen resistance, including modulations of the ERsignaling, upregulation of a set of growth factor receptor networks (HER2, EGFR, FGFR, and IGF1R), alterations of the PI3K-PTEN/AKT/mTOR pathway, and an elevation of the NF-κB signaling. Despite these advances, our understanding of the acquired resistance remains fragmented and there is a lack of a platform to integrate these diversified molecular factors/ pathways into a cohesive mechanistic model. Nonetheless, at the cellular level, it is becoming increasingly recongnized that cancer stem cells (CSCs) are key in driving cancer metastasis and therapy resistance. Likewise, evidence is emerging for the critical contributions of breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) to tamoxifen resistance. In this review, we will discuss these recent developments of BCSC-mediated resistance to tamoxifen and the contributions of those demonstrated molecular factors/pathways to BCSC expansion during the emergency of tamoxifen resistance.

  17. Oral phosphorus supplementation secondarily increases circulating fibroblast growth factor 23 levels at least partially via stimulation of parathyroid hormone secretion.

    PubMed

    Takasugi, Satoshi; Akutsu, Miho; Nagata, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    Oral phosphorus supplementation stimulates fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) secretion; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of parathyroid hormone (PTH) in increased plasma FGF23 levels after oral phosphorus supplementation in rats. Rats received single dose of phosphate with concomitant subcutaneous injection of saline or human PTH (1-34) after treatment with cinacalcet or its vehicle. Cinacalcet is a drug that acts as an allosteric activator of the calcium-sensing receptor and reduces PTH secretion. Plasma phosphorus and PTH levels significantly increased 1 h after oral phosphorus administration and returned to basal levels within 3 h, while plasma FGF23 levels did not change up to 2 h post-treatment, but rather significantly increased at 3 h after administration and maintained higher levels for at least 6 h compared with the 0 time point. Plasma PTH and FGF23 levels were significantly lower in the cinacalcet-treated rats than in the vehicle-treated rats. Plasma phosphorus levels were significantly higher in the cinacalcet-treated rats than in the vehicle-treated rats at 2, 3, 4, and 6 h after oral phosphorus administration. Furthermore, rats treated with cinacalcet+human PTH (1-34) showed transiently but significantly higher plasma FGF23 levels at 3 h after oral phosphorus administration compared with cinacalcet-treated rats. These results suggest that oral phosphorus supplementation secondarily increases circulating FGF23 levels at least partially by stimulation of PTH secretion.

  18. Effects of a granulocyte colony stimulating factor, Neulasta, in mini pigs exposed to total body proton irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Sanzari, Jenine K.; Krigsfeld, Gabriel S.; Shuman, Anne L.; Diener, Antonia K.; Lin, Liyong; Mai, Wilfried; Kennedy, Ann R.

    2015-01-01

    Astronauts could be exposed to solar particle event (SPE) radiation, which is comprised mostly of proton radiation. Proton radiation is also a treatment option for certain cancers. Both astronauts and clinical patients exposed to ionizing radiation are at risk for white blood cell (WBC) loss, which are the body’s main defense against infection. In this report, the effect of Neulasta treatment, a granulocyte colony stimulating factor, after proton radiation exposure is discussed. Mini pigs exposed to total body proton irradiation