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Sample records for factors mouse sos1

  1. Human Sos1: A guanine nucleotide exchange factor for ras that binds to GRB2

    SciTech Connect

    Chardin, P. ); Camonis, J.; Gale, N.W.; Aelst, L. Van; Wigler, M.H.; Bar-Sagi, D. ); Schlessinger, J. )

    1993-05-28

    A human complementary DNA was isolated that encodes a widely expressed protein, hSos1, that is closely related to Sos, the product of the Drosophila son of sevenless gene. The hSos1 protein contains a region of significant sequence similarity to CDC25, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Ras from yeast. A fragment of hSos1 encoding the CDC25-related domain complemented loss of CDC25 function in yeast. This hSos1 domain specifically stimulated guanine nucleotide exchange on mammalian Ras proteins in vitro. Mammalian cells overexpressing full-length hSos1 had increased guanine nucleotide exchange activity. Thus hSos1 is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Ras. The hSos1 interacted with growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (GRB2) in vivo and in vitro. This interaction was mediated by the carboxyl-terminal domain of hSos1 and the Src homology 3 (SH3) domains of GRB2. These results suggest that the coupling of receptor tyrosine kinases to Ras signaling is mediated by a molecular complex consisting of GRB2 and hSos1. 42 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Human Sos1: a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Ras that binds to GRB2.

    PubMed

    Chardin, P; Camonis, J H; Gale, N W; van Aelst, L; Schlessinger, J; Wigler, M H; Bar-Sagi, D

    1993-05-28

    A human complementary DNA was isolated that encodes a widely expressed protein, hSos1, that is closely related to Sos, the product of the Drosophila son of sevenless gene. The hSos1 protein contains a region of significant sequence similarity to CDC25, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Ras from yeast. A fragment of hSos1 encoding the CDC25-related domain complemented loss of CDC25 function in yeast. This hSos1 domain specifically stimulated guanine nucleotide exchange on mammalian Ras proteins in vitro. Mammalian cells overexpressing full-length hSos1 had increased guanine nucleotide exchange activity. Thus hSos1 is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Ras. The hSos1 interacted with growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (GRB2) in vivo and in vitro. This interaction was mediated by the carboxyl-terminal domain of hSos1 and the Src homology 3 (SH3) domains of GRB2. These results suggest that the coupling of receptor tyrosine kinases to Ras signaling is mediated by a molecular complex consisting of GRB2 and hSos1.

  3. SH3 Domains of Grb2 Adaptor Bind to PXψPXR Motifs Within the Sos1 Nucleotide Exchange Factor in a Discriminate Manner†

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Caleb B.; Seldeen, Kenneth L.; Deegan, Brian J.; Farooq, Amjad

    2009-01-01

    Ubiquitously encountered in a wide variety of cellular processes, the Grb2-Sos1 interaction is mediated through the combinatorial binding of nSH3 and cSH3 domains of Grb2 to various sites containing PXψPXR motifs within Sos1. Here, using isothermal titration calorimetry, we demonstrate that while the nSH3 domain binds with affinities in the physiological range to all four sites containing PXψPXR motifs, designated S1, S2, S3 and S4, the cSH3 domain can only do so at S1 site. Further scrutiny of these sites yields rationale for the recognition of various PXψPXR motifs by the SH3 domains in a discriminate manner. Unlike the PXψPXR motifs at S2, S3 and S4 sites, the PXψPXR motif at S1 site is flanked at its C-terminus with two additional arginine residues that are absolutely required for high-affinity binding of cSH3 domain. In striking contrast, these two additional arginine residues augment the binding of nSH3 domain to S1 site but their role is not critical for the recognition of S2, S3 and S4 sites. Site-directed mutagenesis suggests that the two additional arginine residues flanking the PXψPXR motif at S1 site contribute to free energy of binding via the formation of salt bridges with specific acidic residues in SH3 domains. Molecular modeling is employed to project these novel findings into the 3D structures of SH3 domains in complex with a peptide containing the PXψPXR motif and flanking arginine residues at S1 site. Taken together, this study furthers our understanding of the assembly of a key signaling complex central to cellular machinery. PMID:19323566

  4. SH3 domains of Grb2 adaptor bind to PXpsiPXR motifs within the Sos1 nucleotide exchange factor in a discriminate manner.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Caleb B; Seldeen, Kenneth L; Deegan, Brian J; Farooq, Amjad

    2009-05-19

    Ubiquitously encountered in a wide variety of cellular processes, the Grb2-Sos1 interaction is mediated through the combinatorial binding of nSH3 and cSH3 domains of Grb2 to various sites containing PXpsiPXR motifs within Sos1. Here, using isothermal titration calorimetry, we demonstrate that while the nSH3 domain binds with affinities in the physiological range to all four sites containing PXpsiPXR motifs, designated S1, S2, S3, and S4, the cSH3 domain can only do so at the S1 site. Further scrutiny of these sites yields rationale for the recognition of various PXpsiPXR motifs by the SH3 domains in a discriminate manner. Unlike the PXpsiPXR motifs at S2, S3, and S4 sites, the PXpsiPXR motif at the S1 site is flanked at its C-terminus with two additional arginine residues that are absolutely required for high-affinity binding of the cSH3 domain. In striking contrast, these two additional arginine residues augment the binding of the nSH3 domain to the S1 site, but their role is not critical for the recognition of S2, S3, and S4 sites. Site-directed mutagenesis suggests that the two additional arginine residues flanking the PXpsiPXR motif at the S1 site contribute to free energy of binding via the formation of salt bridges with specific acidic residues in SH3 domains. Molecular modeling is employed to project these novel findings into the 3D structures of SH3 domains in complex with a peptide containing the PXpsiPXR motif and flanking arginine residues at the S1 site. Taken together, this study furthers our understanding of the assembly of a key signaling complex central to cellular machinery.

  5. Chromosomal localization of two genes encoding human ras exchange factors: SOS1 maps to the 2p22-->p16 region and SOS2 to the 14q21-->q22 region of the human genome.

    PubMed

    Chardin, P; Mattei, M G

    1994-01-01

    The human SOS1 and SOS2 genes encode proteins that control GDP-->GTP exchange on ras proteins and are involved in signal transduction by tyrosine kinase receptors. In situ hybridization shows that SOS1 maps to 2p22-->p16 and SOS2 to 14q21-->q22 in the human genome.

  6. Germ line gain of function with SOS1 mutation in hereditary gingival fibromatosis.

    PubMed

    Jang, Shyh-Ing; Lee, Eun-Jin; Hart, P Suzanne; Ramaswami, Mukundhan; Pallos, Debora; Hart, Thomas C

    2007-07-13

    Mutation of human SOS1 is responsible for hereditary gingival fibromatosis type 1, a benign overgrowth condition of the gingiva. Here, we investigated molecular mechanisms responsible for the increased rate of cell proliferation in gingival fibroblasts caused by mutant SOS1 in vitro. Using ectopic expression of wild-type and mutant SOS1 constructs, we found that truncated SOS1 could localize to the plasma membrane, without growth factor stimuli, leading to sustained activation of Ras/MAPK signaling. Additionally, we observed an increase in the magnitude and duration of ERK signaling in hereditary gingival fibromatosis gingival fibroblasts that was associated with phosphorylation of retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein and the up-regulation of cell cycle regulators, including cyclins C, D, and E and the E2F/DP transcription factors. These factors promote cell cycle progression from G(1) to S phase, and their up-regulation may underlie the increased gingival fibroblast proliferation observed. Selective depletion of wild-type and mutant SOS1 through small interfering RNA demonstrates the link between mutation of SOS1, ERK signaling, cell proliferation rate, and the expression levels of Egr-1 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen. These findings elucidate the mechanisms for gingival overgrowth mediated by SOS1 gene mutation in humans.

  7. A Mutation in the SOS1 Gene Causes Hereditary Gingival Fibromatosis Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Thomas C.; Zhang, Yingze; Gorry, Michael C.; Hart, P. Suzanne; Cooper, Margaret; Marazita, Mary L.; Marks, Jared M.; Cortelli, Jose R.; Pallos, Debora

    2002-01-01

    Hereditary gingival fibromatosis (HGF) is a rare, autosomal dominant form of gingival overgrowth. Affected individuals have a benign, slowly progressive, nonhemorrhagic, fibrous enlargement of the oral masticatory mucosa. Genetic loci for autosomal dominant forms of HGF have been localized to chromosome 2p21-p22 (HGF1) and chromosome 5q13-q22 (HGF2). To identify the gene responsible for HGF1, we extended genetic linkage studies to refine the chromosome 2p21-p22 candidate interval to ∼2.3 Mb. Development of an integrated physical and genetic map of the interval identified 16 genes. Sequencing of these genes, in affected and unaffected HGF1 family members, identified a mutation in the Son of sevenless–1 (SOS1) gene in affected individuals. In this report, we describe the genomic structure of the SOS1 gene and present evidence that insertion of a cytosine between nucleotides 126,142 and 126,143 in codon 1083 of the SOS1 gene is responsible for HGF1. This insertion mutation, which segregates in a dominant manner over four generations, introduces a frameshift and creates a premature stop codon, abolishing four functionally important proline-rich SH3 binding domains normally present in the carboxyl-terminal region of the SOS1 protein. The resultant protein chimera contains the wild-type SOS1 protein for the N-terminal amino acids 1–1083 fused to a novel 22–amino acid carboxyl terminus. Similar SOS1 deletion constructs are functional in animal models, and a transgenic mouse construct with a comparable SOS1 chimera produces a phenotype with skin hypertrophy. Clarification of the functional role of this SOS1 mutant has implications for understanding other forms of gingival fibromatosis and corrective gingival-tissue management. PMID:11868160

  8. Gain-of-function SOS1 mutations cause a distinctive form of noonansyndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Tartaglia, Marco; Pennacchio, Len A.; Zhao, Chen; Yadav, KamleshK.; Fodale, Valentina; Sarkozy, Anna; Pandit, Bhaswati; Oishi, Kimihiko; Martinelli, Simone; Schackwitz, Wendy; Ustaszewska, Anna; Martin, Joes; Bristow, James; Carta, Claudio; Lepri, Francesca; Neri, Cinzia; Vasta,Isabella; Gibson, Kate; Curry, Cynthia J.; Lopez Siguero, Juan Pedro; Digilio, Maria Cristina; Zampino, Giuseppe; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Gelb, Brude D.

    2006-09-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) is a developmental disordercharacterized by short stature, facial dysmorphia, congenital heartdefects and skeletal anomalies1. Increased RAS-mitogenactivated proteinkinase (MAPK) signaling due to PTPN11 and KRAS mutations cause 50 percentof NS2-6. Here, we report that 22 of 129 NS patients without PTPN11 orKRAS mutation (17 percent) have missense mutations in SOS1, which encodesa RAS-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF). SOS1 mutationscluster at residues implicated in the maintenance of SOS1 in itsautoinhibited form and ectopic expression of two NS-associated mutantsinduced enhanced RAS activation. The phenotype associated with SOS1defects is distinctive, although within NS spectrum, with a highprevalence of ectodermal abnormalities but generally normal developmentand linear growth. Our findings implicate for the first timegain-of-function mutations in a RAS GEF in inherited disease and define anew mechanism by which upregulation of the RAS pathway can profoundlychange human development.

  9. SpAHA1 and SpSOS1 Coordinate in Transgenic Yeast to Improve Salt Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yang; Yin, Xiaochang; Duan, Ruijun; Hao, Gangping; Guo, Jianchun; Jiang, Xingyu

    2015-01-01

    In plant cells, the plasma membrane Na+/H+ antiporter SOS1 (salt overly sensitive 1) mediates Na+ extrusion using the proton gradient generated by plasma membrane H+-ATPases, and these two proteins are key plant halotolerance factors. In the present study, two genes from Sesuvium portulacastrum, encoding plasma membrane Na+/H+ antiporter (SpSOS1) and H+-ATPase (SpAHA1), were cloned. Localization of each protein was studied in tobacco cells, and their functions were analyzed in yeast cells. Both SpSOS1 and SpAHA1 are plasma membrane-bound proteins. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses showed that SpSOS1 and SpAHA1 were induced by salinity, and their expression patterns in roots under salinity were similar. Compared with untransformed yeast cells, SpSOS1 increased the salt tolerance of transgenic yeast by decreasing the Na+ content. The Na+/H+ exchange activity at plasma membrane vesicles was higher in SpSOS1-transgenic yeast than in the untransformed strain. No change was observed in the salt tolerance of yeast cells expressing SpAHA1 alone; however, in yeast transformed with both SpSOS1 and SpAHA1, SpAHA1 generated an increased proton gradient that stimulated the Na+/H+ exchange activity of SpSOS1. In this scenario, more Na+ ions were transported out of cells, and the yeast cells co-expressing SpSOS1 and SpAHA1 grew better than the cells transformed with only SpSOS1 or SpAHA1. These findings demonstrate that the plasma membrane Na+/H+ antiporter SpSOS1 and H+-ATPase SpAHA1 can function in coordination. These results provide a reference for developing more salt-tolerant crops via co-transformation with the plasma membrane Na+/H+ antiporter and H+-ATPase.

  10. SOS1 over-expression in genital skin fibroblasts from hirsute women: a putative role of the SOS1/RAS pathway in the pathogenesis of hirsutism.

    PubMed

    Minella, D; Wannenes, F; Biancolella, M; Amati, F; Testa, B; Nardone, A; Bueno, S; Fabbri, A; Lauro, D; Novelli, G; Moretti, C

    2011-01-01

    Hirsutism is the development of androgen-dependent terminal body hair in women in places in which terminal hair are normally not found. It is often associated with hyperandrogenemia and/or polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), but the existence of uncommom hirsutism forms that are not related to altered androgen plasma levels lead also to the definition of - idiopathic hirsutism. Although the pathophysiology of hirsutism has been linked to increasing 5-alpha reductase (SRD5A) activity and to an alteration of the androgen receptor (AR) transcriptional machinery, many aspects remain unclear. In particular, the relationships between androgens and local factors are poorly understood. In the present paper, we selected for a genital skin biopsy, 8 women affected with severe hirsutism (Ferriman-Gallway score greater than 25) but with normal plasma androgen levels, with the exception of slightly higher serum 3alpha-diol-glucuronide levels, and 6 healthy controls and analyzed their androgen- and insulin-specific transcriptional profile using a specific custom low density microarray (AndroChip 2, GPL9164). We identified the over-expression of the Son of Sevenless-1 (SOS1) gene in all of the hirsute skin fibroblast primary cell cultures compared to control healthy women. Since SOS1 is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor that couples receptor tyrosine kinases to the RAS signaling pathway that controls cell proliferation and differentiation, we further analyzed SOS1 expression, protein level and RAS signaling activation pathway in an in vitro model (NHDF, normal human dermal fibroblast cell line). NHDF treated for 24 h with different concentrations of DHT and T showed an increase in SOS1 levels (both mRNA and protein) and also an activation of the RAS pathway. Our in vivo and in vitro data represent a novel preliminary observation that factors activating SOS1 could act as local proliferative modulators linked to the androgen pathway in the pilosebaceous unit. SOS1 over

  11. Assembly of the Sos1-Grb2-Gab1 Ternary Signaling Complex Is Under Allosteric Control

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Caleb B.; Seldeen, Kenneth L.; Deegan, Brian J.; Bhat, Vikas; Farooq, Amjad

    2009-01-01

    Allostery has evolved as a form of local communication between interacting protein partners allowing them to quickly sense changes in their immediate vicinity in response to external cues. Herein, using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) in conjunction with circular dichroism (CD) and macromolecular modeling (MM), we show that the binding of Grb2 adaptor — a key signaling molecule involved in the activation of Ras GTPase — to its downstream partners Sos1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor and Gab1 docker is under tight allosteric regulation. Specifically, our findings reveal that the binding of one molecule of Sos1 to the nSH3 domain allosterically induces a conformational change within Grb2 such that the loading of a second molecule of Sos1 onto the cSH3 domain is blocked and, in so doing, allows Gab1 access to the cSH3 domain in an exclusively non-competitive manner to generate the Sos1-Grb2-Gab1 ternary signaling complex. PMID:20005866

  12. SOS1 is the second most common Noonan gene but plays no major role in cardio‐facio‐cutaneous syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zenker, Martin; Horn, Denise; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Allanson, Judith; Pauli, Silke; van der Burgt, Ineke; Doerr, Helmuth‐Guenther; Gaspar, Harald; Hofbeck, Michael; Gillessen‐Kaesbach, Gabriele; Koch, Andreas; Meinecke, Peter; Mundlos, Stefan; Nowka, Anja; Rauch, Anita; Reif, Silke; von Schnakenburg, Christian; Seidel, Heide; Wehner, Lars‐Erik; Zweier, Christiane; Bauhuber, Susanne; Matejas, Verena; Kratz, Christian P; Thomas, Christoph; Kutsche, Kerstin

    2007-01-01

    Background Heterozygous gain‐of‐function mutations in various genes encoding proteins of the Ras‐MAPK signalling cascade have been identified as the genetic basis of Noonan syndrome (NS) and cardio‐facio‐cutaneous syndrome (CFCS). Mutations of SOS1, the gene encoding a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Ras, have been the most recent discoveries in patients with NS, but this gene has not been studied in patients with CFCS. Methods and results We investigated SOS1 in a large cohort of patients with disorders of the NS–CFCS spectrum, who had previously tested negative for mutations in PTPN11, KRAS, BRAF, MEK1 and MEK2. Missense mutations of SOS1 were discovered in 28% of patients with NS. In contrast, none of the patients classified as having CFCS was found to carry a pathogenic sequence change in this gene. Conclusion We have confirmed SOS1 as the second major gene for NS. Patients carrying mutations in this gene have a distinctive phenotype with frequent ectodermal anomalies such as keratosis pilaris and curly hair. However, the clinical picture associated with SOS1 mutations is different from that of CFCS. These findings corroborate that, despite being caused by gain‐of‐function mutations in molecules belonging to the same pathway, NS and CFCS scarcely overlap genotypically. PMID:17586837

  13. A novel SOS1 mutation in Costello/CFC syndrome affects signaling in both RAS and PI3K pathways.

    PubMed

    Tumurkhuu, Munkhtuya; Saitoh, Makiko; Takita, Junko; Mizuno, Yoko; Mizuguchi, Masashi

    2013-04-01

    Pathological upregulation of the RAS/MAPK pathway causes Costello, Noonan and cardio-facio-cutaneous (CFC) syndrome; however, little is known about PI3K/AKT signal transduction in these syndromes. Previously, we found a novel mutation of the SOS1 gene (T158A) in a patient with Costello/CFC overlapping phenotype. The aim of this study was to investigate how this mutation affects RAS/MAPK as well as PI3K/AKT pathway signal transduction. Wild-type and mutant (T158A) Son of Sevenless 1 (SOS1) were transfected into 293T cells. The levels of phospho- and total ERK1/2, AKT, p70S6K and pS6 were examined under epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulation. After EGF stimulation, the ratio of phospho-ERK1/2 to total ERK1/2 was highest at 5 min in mutant (T158A) SOS1 cells, and at 15 min in wild-type SOS1 cells. Phospho-AKT was less abundant at 60 min in mutant than in wild-type SOS1 cells. Phosphorylation at various sites in p70S6K differed between wild-type and mutant cells. Eighteen hours after activation by EGF, the ratio of phospho-ERK1/2 to total ERK1/2 remained significantly higher in mutant than in wild-type SOS1 cells, but that of phospho-AKT to total AKT was unchanged. T158A is located in the histone-like domain, which may have a role in auto-inhibition of RAS exchanger activity of SOS1. T158A may disrupt auto-inhibition and enhance RAS signaling. T158A also affects PI3K/AKT signaling, probably via negative feedback via phospho-p70S6K. The SOS1 T158A mutation altered the phosphorylation of gene products involved in both RAS/MAPK and PI3K/AKT pathways.

  14. Multivalent binding and facilitated diffusion account for the formation of the Grb2-Sos1 signaling complex in a cooperative manner.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Caleb B; Balke, Jordan E; Bhat, Vikas; Mikles, David C; Deegan, Brian J; Seldeen, Kenneth L; Farooq, Amjad

    2012-03-13

    Despite its key role in driving cellular growth and proliferation through receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling, the Grb2-Sos1 macromolecular interaction remains poorly understood in mechanistic terms. Herein, using an array of biophysical methods, we provide evidence that although the Grb2 adaptor can potentially bind to all four PXψPXR motifs (designated herein S1-S4) located within the Sos1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor, the formation of the Grb2-Sos1 signaling complex occurs with a 2:1 stoichiometry. Strikingly, such bivalent binding appears to be driven by the association of the Grb2 homodimer to only two of four potential PXψPXR motifs within Sos1 at any one time. Of particular interest is the observation that of a possible six pairwise combinations in which S1-S4 motifs may act in concert for the docking of the Grb2 homodimer through bivalent binding, only S1 and S3, S1 and S4, S2 and S4, and S3 and S4 do so, while pairwise combinations of sites S1 and S2 and sites S2 and S3 appear to afford only monovalent binding. This salient observation implicates the role of local physical constraints in fine-tuning the conformational heterogeneity of the Grb2-Sos1 signaling complex. Importantly, the presence of multiple binding sites within Sos1 appears to provide a physical route for Grb2 to hop in a flip-flop manner from one site to the next through facilitated diffusion, and such rapid exchange forms the basis of positive cooperativity driving the bivalent binding of Grb2 to Sos1 with high affinity. Collectively, our study sheds new light on the assembly of a key macromolecular signaling complex central to cellular machinery in health and disease.

  15. Characterization of Salt Overly Sensitive 1 (SOS1) gene homoeologs in quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.).

    PubMed

    Maughan, P J; Turner, T B; Coleman, C E; Elzinga, D B; Jellen, E N; Morales, J A; Udall, J A; Fairbanks, D J; Bonifacio, A

    2009-07-01

    Salt tolerance is an agronomically important trait that affects plant species around the globe. The Salt Overly Sensitive 1 (SOS1) gene encodes a plasma membrane Na+/H+ antiporter that plays an important role in germination and growth of plants in saline environments. Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) is a halophytic, allotetraploid grain crop of the family Amaranthaceae with impressive nutritional content and an increasing worldwide market. Many quinoa varieties have considerable salt tolerance, and research suggests quinoa may utilize novel mechanisms to confer salt tolerance. Here we report the cloning and characterization of two homoeologous SOS1 loci (cqSOS1A and cqSOS1B) from C. quinoa, including full-length cDNA sequences, genomic sequences, relative expression levels, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis, and a phylogenetic analysis of SOS1 genes from 13 plant taxa. The cqSOS1A and cqSOS1B genes each span 23 exons spread over 3477 bp and 3486 bp of coding sequence, respectively. These sequences share a high level of similarity with SOS1 homologs of other species and contain two conserved domains, a Nhap cation-antiporter domain and a cyclic-nucleotide binding domain. Genomic sequence analysis of two BAC clones (98 357 bp and 132 770 bp) containing the homoeologous SOS1 genes suggests possible conservation of synteny across the C. quinoa sub-genomes. This report represents the first molecular characterization of salt-tolerance genes in a halophytic species in the Amaranthaceae as well as the first comparative analysis of coding and non-coding DNA sequences of the two homoeologous genomes of C. quinoa.

  16. Direct inhibition of oncogenic KRAS by hydrocarbon-stapled SOS1 helices.

    PubMed

    Leshchiner, Elizaveta S; Parkhitko, Andrey; Bird, Gregory H; Luccarelli, James; Bellairs, Joseph A; Escudero, Silvia; Opoku-Nsiah, Kwadwo; Godes, Marina; Perrimon, Norbert; Walensky, Loren D

    2015-02-10

    Activating mutations in the Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) underlie the pathogenesis and chemoresistance of ∼ 30% of all human tumors, yet the development of high-affinity inhibitors that target the broad range of KRAS mutants remains a formidable challenge. Here, we report the development and validation of stabilized alpha helices of son of sevenless 1 (SAH-SOS1) as prototype therapeutics that directly inhibit wild-type and mutant forms of KRAS. SAH-SOS1 peptides bound in a sequence-specific manner to KRAS and its mutants, and dose-responsively blocked nucleotide association. Importantly, this functional binding activity correlated with SAH-SOS1 cytotoxicity in cancer cells expressing wild-type or mutant forms of KRAS. The mechanism of action of SAH-SOS1 peptides was demonstrated by sequence-specific down-regulation of the ERK-MAP kinase phosphosignaling cascade in KRAS-driven cancer cells and in a Drosophila melanogaster model of Ras85D(V12) activation. These studies provide evidence for the potential utility of SAH-SOS1 peptides in neutralizing oncogenic KRAS in human cancer.

  17. Clinical manifestations in patients with SOS1 mutations range from Noonan syndrome to CFC syndrome.

    PubMed

    Narumi, Yoko; Aoki, Yoko; Niihori, Tetsuya; Sakurai, Masahiro; Cavé, Hélène; Verloes, Alain; Nishio, Kimio; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Kurosawa, Kenji; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Kawame, Hiroshi; Mizuno, Seiji; Kondoh, Tatsuro; Addor, Marie-Claude; Coeslier-Dieux, Anne; Vincent-Delorme, Catherine; Tabayashi, Koichi; Aoki, Masashi; Kobayashi, Tomoko; Guliyeva, Afag; Kure, Shigeo; Matsubara, Yoichi

    2008-01-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) and cardio-facio-cutaneous (CFC) syndrome are autosomal dominant disorders characterized by heart defects, facial dysmorphism, ectodermal abnormalities, and mental retardation. There is a significant clinical overlap between NS and CFC syndrome, but ectodermal abnormalities and mental retardation are more frequent in CFC syndrome. Mutations in PTPN11 and KRAS have been identified in patients with NS and those in KRAS, BRAF and MAP2K1/2 have been identified in patients with CFC syndrome, establishing a new role of the RAS/MAPK pathway in human development. Recently, mutations in the son of sevenless gene (SOS1) have also been identified in patients with NS. To clarify the clinical spectrum of patients with SOS1 mutations, we analyzed 24 patients with NS, including 3 patients in a three-generation family, and 30 patients with CFC syndrome without PTPN11, KRAS, HRAS, BRAF, and MAP2K1/2 (MEK1/2) mutations. We identified two SOS1 mutations in four NS patients, including three patients in the above-mentioned three-generation family. In the patients with a CFC phenotype, three mutations, including a novel three amino-acid insertion, were identified in one CFC patient and two patients with both NS and CFC phenotypes. These three patients exhibited ectodermal abnormalities, such as curly hair, sparse eyebrows, and dry skin, and two of them showed mental retardation. Our results suggest that patients with SOS1 mutations range from NS to CFC syndrome.

  18. Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma in Association With a RASopathy Clinical Phenotype and Mosaic Germline SOS1 Duplication.

    PubMed

    Salem, Baheyeldin; Hofherr, Sean; Turner, Joyce; Doros, Leslie; Smpokou, Patroula

    2016-11-01

    Childhood rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) accounts for approximately 3.5% of cancer cases among children 0 to 14 years of age. Genetic conditions associated with high risk of childhood RMS include Li-Fraumeni syndrome, pleuropulmonary blastoma, Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, and some RASopathies, such as neurofibromatosis type 1, Costello syndrome (CS), and Noonan syndrome (NS). Here, we report the rare case of a 4-year-old girl with clinical features of NS who developed an embryonal RMS of the chest and needed emergent treatment. Molecular genetic testing identified a de novo, large, mosaic duplication of chromosome 2 encompassing the SOS1 gene, presumably caused by a mosaic, unbalanced translocation between chromosomes 2 and 17 found on routine cytogenetic analysis. Sequence analysis of all known genes causing Noonan spectrum disorders was negative. RMS has been reported in a few patients with NS, associated in very few with germline SOS1 mutations, but none with copy number abnormalities. This is the first report to our knowledge of early-onset RMS developing in a child with features of NS and a mosaic RAS pathway gene aberration, a large SOS1 duplication. We hypothesize that the inciting event for tumor development in this case is due to the germline mosaic duplication of SOS1, which was duplicated in all cells of the tumor, and the ultimate development of the tumor was further driven by multiple chromosomal aberrations in the tumor itself, all described as somatic events in isolated RMS tumors.

  19. Loss of Halophytism by Interference with SOS1 Expression1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Dong-Ha; Leidi, Eduardo; Zhang, Quan; Hwang, Sung-Min; Li, Youzhi; Quintero, Francisco J.; Jiang, Xingyu; D'Urzo, Matilde Paino; Lee, Sang Yeol; Zhao, Yanxiu; Bahk, Jeong Dong; Bressan, Ray A.; Yun, Dae-Jin; Pardo, José M.; Bohnert, Hans J.

    2009-01-01

    The contribution of SOS1 (for Salt Overly Sensitive 1), encoding a sodium/proton antiporter, to plant salinity tolerance was analyzed in wild-type and RNA interference (RNAi) lines of the halophytic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana)-relative Thellungiella salsuginea. Under all conditions, SOS1 mRNA abundance was higher in Thellungiella than in Arabidopsis. Ectopic expression of the Thellungiella homolog ThSOS1 suppressed the salt-sensitive phenotype of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain lacking sodium ion (Na+) efflux transporters and increased salt tolerance of wild-type Arabidopsis. thsos1-RNAi lines of Thellungiella were highly salt sensitive. A representative line, thsos1-4, showed faster Na+ accumulation, more severe water loss in shoots under salt stress, and slower removal of Na+ from the root after removal of stress compared with the wild type. thsos1-4 showed drastically higher sodium-specific fluorescence visualized by CoroNa-Green, a sodium-specific fluorophore, than the wild type, inhibition of endocytosis in root tip cells, and cell death in the adjacent elongation zone. After prolonged stress, Na+ accumulated inside the pericycle in thsos1-4, while sodium was confined in vacuoles of epidermis and cortex cells in the wild type. RNAi-based interference of SOS1 caused cell death in the root elongation zone, accompanied by fragmentation of vacuoles, inhibition of endocytosis, and apoplastic sodium influx into the stele and hence the shoot. Reduction in SOS1 expression changed Thellungiella that normally can grow in seawater-strength sodium chloride solutions into a plant as sensitive to Na+ as Arabidopsis. PMID:19571313

  20. Sequence analysis of the Ras-MAPK pathway genes SOS1, EGFR & GRB2 in silver foxes (Vulpes vulpes): candidate genes for hereditary hyperplastic gingivitis.

    PubMed

    Clark, Jo-Anna B J; Tully, Sara J; Dawn Marshall, H

    2014-12-01

    Hereditary hyperplastic gingivitis (HHG) is an autosomal recessive disease that presents with progressive gingival proliferation in farmed silver foxes. Hereditary gingival fibromatosis (HGF) is an analogous condition in humans that is genetically heterogeneous with several known autosomal dominant loci. For one locus the causative mutation is in the Son of sevenless homologue 1 (SOS1) gene. For the remaining loci, the molecular mechanisms are unknown but Ras pathway involvement is suspected. Here we compare sequences for the SOS1 gene, and two adjacent genes in the Ras pathway, growth receptor bound protein 2 (GRB2) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), between HHG-affected and unaffected foxes. We conclude that the known HGF causative mutation does not cause HHG in foxes, nor do the coding regions or intron-exon boundaries of these three genes contain any candidate mutations for fox gum disease. Patterns of molecular evolution among foxes and other mammals reflect high conservation and strong functional constraints for SOS1 and GRB2 but reveal a lineage-specific pattern of variability in EGFR consistent with mutational rate differences, relaxed functional constraints, and possibly positive selection.

  1. Nax loci affect SOS1-like Na+/H+ exchanger expression and activity in wheat

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Min; Shabala, Lana; Cuin, Tracey A; Huang, Xin; Zhou, Meixue; Munns, Rana; Shabala, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    Salinity stress tolerance in durum wheat is strongly associated with a plant’s ability to control Na+ delivery to the shoot. Two loci, termed Nax1 and Nax2, were recently identified as being critical for this process and the sodium transporters HKT1;4 and HKT1;5 were identified as the respective candidate genes. These transporters retrieve Na+ from the xylem, thus limiting the rates of Na+ transport from the root to the shoot. In this work, we show that the Nax loci also affect activity and expression levels of the SOS1-like Na+/H+ exchanger in both root cortical and stelar tissues. Net Na+ efflux measured in isolated steles from salt-treated plants, using the non-invasive ion flux measuring MIFE technique, decreased in the sequence: Tamaroi (parental line)>Nax1=Nax2>Nax1:Nax2 lines. This efflux was sensitive to amiloride (a known inhibitor of the Na+/H+ exchanger) and was mirrored by net H+ flux changes. TdSOS1 relative transcript levels were 6–10-fold lower in Nax lines compared with Tamaroi. Thus, it appears that Nax loci confer two highly complementary mechanisms, both of which contribute towards reducing the xylem Na+ content. One enhances the retrieval of Na+ back into the root stele via HKT1;4 or HKT1;5, whilst the other reduces the rate of Na+ loading into the xylem via SOS1. It is suggested that such duality plays an important adaptive role with greater versatility for responding to a changing environment and controlling Na+ delivery to the shoot. PMID:26585227

  2. SOS1 mutations in Noonan syndrome: molecular spectrum, structural insights on pathogenic effects, and genotype-phenotype correlations.

    PubMed

    Lepri, Francesca; De Luca, Alessandro; Stella, Lorenzo; Rossi, Cesare; Baldassarre, Giuseppina; Pantaleoni, Francesca; Cordeddu, Viviana; Williams, Bradley J; Dentici, Maria L; Caputo, Viviana; Venanzi, Serenella; Bonaguro, Michela; Kavamura, Ines; Faienza, Maria F; Pilotta, Alba; Stanzial, Franco; Faravelli, Francesca; Gabrielli, Orazio; Marino, Bruno; Neri, Giovanni; Silengo, Margherita Cirillo; Ferrero, Giovanni B; Torrrente, Isabella; Selicorni, Angelo; Mazzanti, Laura; Digilio, Maria C; Zampino, Giuseppe; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Gelb, Bruce D; Tartaglia, Marco

    2011-07-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) is among the most common nonchromosomal disorders affecting development and growth. NS is caused by aberrant RAS-MAPK signaling and is genetically heterogeneous, which explains, in part, the marked clinical variability documented for this Mendelian trait. Recently, we and others identified SOS1 as a major gene underlying NS. Here, we explored further the spectrum of SOS1 mutations and their associated phenotypic features. Mutation scanning of the entire SOS1 coding sequence allowed the identification of 33 different variants deemed to be of pathological significance, including 16 novel missense changes and in-frame indels. Various mutation clusters destabilizing or altering orientation of regions of the protein predicted to contribute structurally to the maintenance of autoinhibition were identified. Two previously unappreciated clusters predicted to enhance SOS1's recruitment to the plasma membrane, thus promoting a spatial reorientation of domains contributing to inhibition, were also recognized. Genotype-phenotype analysis confirmed our previous observations, establishing a high frequency of ectodermal anomalies and a low prevalence of cognitive impairment and reduced growth. Finally, mutation analysis performed on cohorts of individuals with nonsyndromic pulmonic stenosis, atrial septal defects, and ventricular septal defects excluded a major contribution of germline SOS1 lesions to the isolated occurrence of these cardiac anomalies. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. SOS1 Mutations in Noonan Syndrome: Molecular Spectrum, Structural Insights on Pathogenic Effects, and Genotype–Phenotype Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Lepri, Francesca; De Luca, Alessandro; Stella, Lorenzo; Rossi, Cesare; Baldassarre, Giuseppina; Pantaleoni, Francesca; Cordeddu, Viviana; Williams, Bradley J; Dentici, Maria L; Caputo, Viviana; Venanzi, Serenella; Bonaguro, Michela; Kavamura, Ines; Faienza, Maria F; Pilotta, Alba; Stanzial, Franco; Faravelli, Francesca; Gabrielli, Orazio; Marino, Bruno; Neri, Giovanni; Silengo, Margherita Cirillo; Ferrero, Giovanni B; Torrrente, Isabella; Selicorni, Angelo; Mazzanti, Laura; Digilio, Maria C; Zampino, Giuseppe; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Gelb, Bruce D; Tartaglia, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) is among the most common nonchromosomal disorders affecting development and growth. NS is caused by aberrant RAS-MAPK signaling and is genetically heterogeneous, which explains, in part, the marked clinical variability documented for this Mendelian trait. Recently, we and others identified SOS1 as a major gene underlying NS. Here, we explored further the spectrum of SOS1 mutations and their associated phenotypic features. Mutation scanning of the entire SOS1 coding sequence allowed the identification of 33 different variants deemed to be of pathological significance, including 16 novel missense changes and in-frame indels. Various mutation clusters destabilizing or altering orientation of regions of the protein predicted to contribute structurally to the maintenance of autoinhibition were identified. Two previously unappreciated clusters predicted to enhance SOS1's recruitment to the plasma membrane, thus promoting a spatial reorientation of domains contributing to inhibition, were also recognized. Genotype–phenotype analysis confirmed our previous observations, establishing a high frequency of ectodermal anomalies and a low prevalence of cognitive impairment and reduced growth. Finally, mutation analysis performed on cohorts of individuals with nonsyndromic pulmonic stenosis, atrial septal defects, and ventricular septal defects excluded a major contribution of germline SOS1 lesions to the isolated occurrence of these cardiac anomalies. Hum Mutat 32:760–772, 2011. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:21387466

  4. Targeted Covalent Inhibition of Grb2-Sos1 Interaction through Proximity-Induced Conjugation in Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yongsheng; Nie, Yunyu; Feng, Qian; Qu, Jiale; Wang, Rui; Bian, Liming; Xia, Jiang

    2017-05-01

    Targeted covalent inhibitors of protein-protein interactions differ from reversible inhibitors in that the former bind and covalently bond the target protein at a specific site of the target. The site specificity is the result of the proximity of two reactive groups at the bound state, for example, one mild electrophile in the inhibitor and a natural cysteine in the target close to the ligand binding site. Only a few pharmaceutically relevant proteins have this structural feature. Grb2, a key adaptor protein in maintaining the ERK activity via binding Sos1 to activated RTKs, is one: the N-terminal SH3 domain of Grb2 (Grb2(N-SH3)) carries a unique solvent-accessible cysteine Cys(32) close to its Sos1-binding site. Here we report the design of a peptide-based antagonist (a reactive peptide) that specifically binds to Grb2(N-SH3) and subsequently undergoes a nucleophilic reaction with Cys(32) to form a covalent bond thioether, to block Grb2-Sos1 interaction. Through rounds of optimization, we eventually obtained a dimeric reaction reactive peptide that can form a covalent adduct with endogenous Grb2 protein inside the cytosol of SK-BR-3 human breast cancer cells with pronounced inhibitory effect on cell mobility and viability. This work showcases a rational design of Grb2-targeted site-specific covalent inhibitor and its pronounced anticancer effect by targeting Grb2-Sos1 interaction.

  5. E3B1, a human homologue of the mouse gene product Abi-1, sensitizes activation of Rap1 in response to epidermal growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Jenei, Veronika; Andersson, Tommy; Jakus, Judit; Dib, Karim . E-mail: k.dib@qub.ac.uk

    2005-11-01

    E3B1, a human homologue of the mouse gene product Abi-1, has been implicated in growth-factor-mediated regulation of the small GTPases p21{sup Ras} and Rac. E3b1 is a regulator of Rac because it can form a complex with Sos-1 and eps8, and such a Sos-1-e3B1-eps8 complex serves as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rac. In the present study, we found that overexpression of e3B1 in NIH3T3/EGFR cells sensitized EGF-induced activation of Rac1, whereas it had no impact on EGF-induced activation of p21{sup Ras}. Remarkably, we found that EGF-induced activation of the p21{sup Ras}-related GTPase Rap1 was also sensitized in NIH3T3/EGFR-e3B1 cells. Thus, in NIH3T3/EGFR-e3B1 cells, maximal EGF-induced activation of Rap1 occurs with a dose of EGF much lower than in NIH3T3/EGFR cells. We also report that overexpression of e3B1 in NIH3T3/EGFR cells renders EGF-induced activation of Rap1 completely dependent on Src tyrosine kinases but not on c-Abl. However, EGF-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the Rap GEF C3G occurred regardless of whether e3B1 was overexpressed or not, and this did not involve Src tyrosine kinases. Accordingly, we propose that overexpression of e3B1 in NIH3T3/EGFR cells leads to mobilization of Src tyrosine kinases that participate in EGF-induced activation of Rap1 and inhibition of cell proliferation.

  6. Quantitative expression analysis of TaSOS1 and TaSOS4 genes in cultivated and wild wheat plants under salt stress.

    PubMed

    Ramezani, Amin; Niazi, Ali; Abolimoghadam, Ali Asghar; Zamani Babgohari, Mahboobeh; Deihimi, Tahereh; Ebrahimi, Mahmod; Akhtardanesh, Hosein; Ebrahimie, Esmail

    2013-02-01

    Salt stress is a mixture of ionic, osmotic, and oxidative stresses. The expression of TaSOS1 (a transmembrane Na(+)/H(+) antiporter) and TaSOS4 [a cytoplasmic pyridoxal (PL) kinase] genes were measured in four different salinity levels and different time courses of salinity exposure using qRT-PCR technique. Mahuti (salt tolerant) and Alamut (salt sensitive) cultivars were used as cultivated wheat, and T. boeticum and Aegilops crassa as wild wheat plants. Salt-induced expression of TaSOS1 in these wild wheat plants indicates the presence of active TaSOS1 gene on the genomes A and D. The TaSOS1 and TaSOS4 transcript levels were found to be downregulated after salt treatment in all cultivars except in A. crassa, which was in contrast with its expression pattern in roots that was being upregulated from a very low-basal expression, after salt treatments. Duncan's Multiple Range Test showed a significant difference between expression in the 200-mM NaCl concentration with the 50 and 100 mM for the TaSOS1 gene, and no significant difference for TaSOS4. Lack of significant correlation between the TaSOS1 and TaSOS4 gene expressions confirms the theory that PLP has no significant effect on the expression of the TaSOS1 gene in wheat leaves.

  7. The plasma membrane Na+/H+ antiporter SOS1 is essential for salt tolerance in tomato and affects the partitioning of Na+ between plant organs.

    PubMed

    Olías, Raquel; Eljakaoui, Zakia; Li, Jun; De Morales, Paz Alvarez; Marín-Manzano, Mari Carmen; Pardo, Jose M; Belver, Andrés

    2009-07-01

    We have identified a plasma membrane Na(+)/H(+) antiporter gene from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), SlSOS1, and used heterologous expression in yeast to confirm that SlSOS1 was the functional homolog of AtSOS1. Using post-transcriptional gene silencing, we evaluated the role played by SlSOS1 in long-distance Na(+) transport and salt tolerance of tomato. Tomato was used because of its anatomical structure, more complex than that of Arabidopsis, and its agricultural significance. Transgenic tomato plants with reduced expression of SlSOS1 exhibited reduced growth rate compared to wild-type (WT) plants in saline conditions. This sensitivity correlated with higher accumulation of Na(+) in leaves and roots, but lower contents in stems of silenced plants under salt stress. Differential distribution of Na(+) and lower net Na(+) flux were observed in the xylem sap in the suppressed plants. In addition, K(+) concentration was lower in roots of silenced plants than in WT. Our results demonstrate that SlSOS1 antiporter is not only essential in maintaining ion homeostasis under salinity, but also critical for the partitioning of Na(+) between plant organs. The ability of tomato plants to retain Na(+) in the stems, thus preventing Na(+) from reaching the photosynthetic tissues, is largely dependent on the function of SlSOS1.

  8. SOS1, HKT1;5, and NHX1 Synergistically Modulate Na(+) Homeostasis in the Halophytic Grass Puccinellia tenuiflora.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei-Dan; Wang, Pei; Bao, Zhulatai; Ma, Qing; Duan, Li-Jie; Bao, Ai-Ke; Zhang, Jin-Lin; Wang, Suo-Min

    2017-01-01

    Puccinellia tenuiflora is a typical salt-excluding halophytic grass with excellent salt tolerance. Plasma membrane Na(+)/H(+) transporter SOS1, HKT-type protein and tonoplast Na(+)/H(+) antiporter NHX1 are key Na(+) transporters involved in plant salt tolerance. Based on our previous research, we had proposed a function model for these transporters in Na(+) homeostasis according to the expression of PtSOS1 and Na(+), K(+) levels in P. tenuiflora responding to salt stress. Here, we analyzed the expression patterns of PtSOS1, PtHKT1;5, and PtNHX1 in P. tenuiflora under 25 and 150 mM NaCl to further validate this model by combining previous physiological characteristics. Results showed that the expressions of PtSOS1 and PtHKT1;5 in roots were significantly induced and peaked at 6 h under both 25 and 150 mM NaCl. Compared to the control, the expression of PtSOS1 significantly increased by 5.8-folds, while that of PtHKT1;5 increased only by 1.2-folds in roots under 25 mM NaCl; on the contrary, the expression of PtSOS1 increased by 1.4-folds, whereas that of PtHKT1;5 increased by 2.2-folds in roots under 150 mM NaCl. In addition, PtNHX1 was induced instantaneously under 25 mM NaCl, while its expression was much higher and more persistent in shoots under 150 mM NaCl. These results provide stronger evidences for the previous hypothesis and extend the model which highlights that SOS1, HKT1;5, and NHX1 synergistically regulate Na(+) homeostasis by controlling Na(+) transport systems at the whole-plant level under both lower and higher salt conditions. Under mild salinity, PtNHX1 in shoots compartmentalized Na(+) into vacuole slowly, and vacuole potential capacity for sequestering Na(+) would enhance Na(+) loading into the xylem of roots by PtSOS1 through feedback regulation; and consequently, Na(+) could be transported from roots to shoots by transpiration stream for osmotic adjustment. While under severe salinity, Na(+) was rapidly sequestrated into vacuoles of mesophyll

  9. Modeling and simulation of aggregation of membrane protein LAT with molecular variability in the number of binding sites for cytosolic Grb2-SOS1-Grb2.

    PubMed

    Nag, Ambarish; Monine, Michael; Perelson, Alan S; Goldstein, Byron

    2012-01-01

    The linker for activation of T cells (LAT), the linker for activation of B cells (LAB), and the linker for activation of X cells (LAX) form a family of transmembrane adaptor proteins widely expressed in lymphocytes. These scaffolding proteins have multiple binding motifs that, when phosphorylated, bind the SH2 domain of the cytosolic adaptor Grb2. Thus, the valence of LAT, LAB and LAX for Grb2 is variable, depending on the strength of receptor activation that initiates phosphorylation. During signaling, the LAT population will exhibit a time-varying distribution of Grb2 valences from zero to three. In the cytosol, Grb2 forms 1:1 and 2:1 complexes with the guanine nucleotide exchange factor SOS1. The 2:1 complex can bridge two LAT molecules when each Grb2, through their SH2 domains, binds to a phosphorylated site on a separate LAT. In T cells and mast cells, after receptor engagement, receptor phosphoyrlation is rapidly followed by LAT phosphorylation and aggregation. In mast cells, aggregates containing more than one hundred LAT molecules have been detected. Previously we considered a homogeneous population of trivalent LAT molecules and showed that for a range of Grb2, SOS1 and LAT concentrations, an equilibrium theory for LAT aggregation predicts the formation of a gel-like phase comprising a very large aggregate (superaggregate). We now extend this theory to investigate the effects of a distribution of Grb2 valence in the LAT population on the formation of LAT aggregates and superaggregate and use stochastic simulations to calculate the fraction of the total LAT population in the superaggregate.

  10. Modeling and Simulation of Aggregation of Membrane Protein LAT with Molecular Variability in the Number of Binding Sites for Cytosolic Grb2-SOS1-Grb2

    PubMed Central

    Nag, Ambarish; Monine, Michael; Perelson, Alan S.; Goldstein, Byron

    2012-01-01

    The linker for activation of T cells (LAT), the linker for activation of B cells (LAB), and the linker for activation of X cells (LAX) form a family of transmembrane adaptor proteins widely expressed in lymphocytes. These scaffolding proteins have multiple binding motifs that, when phosphorylated, bind the SH2 domain of the cytosolic adaptor Grb2. Thus, the valence of LAT, LAB and LAX for Grb2 is variable, depending on the strength of receptor activation that initiates phosphorylation. During signaling, the LAT population will exhibit a time-varying distribution of Grb2 valences from zero to three. In the cytosol, Grb2 forms 1∶1 and 2∶1 complexes with the guanine nucleotide exchange factor SOS1. The 2∶1 complex can bridge two LAT molecules when each Grb2, through their SH2 domains, binds to a phosphorylated site on a separate LAT. In T cells and mast cells, after receptor engagement, receptor phosphoyrlation is rapidly followed by LAT phosphorylation and aggregation. In mast cells, aggregates containing more than one hundred LAT molecules have been detected. Previously we considered a homogeneous population of trivalent LAT molecules and showed that for a range of Grb2, SOS1 and LAT concentrations, an equilibrium theory for LAT aggregation predicts the formation of a gel-like phase comprising a very large aggregate (superaggregate). We now extend this theory to investigate the effects of a distribution of Grb2 valence in the LAT population on the formation of LAT aggregates and superaggregate and use stochastic simulations to calculate the fraction of the total LAT population in the superaggregate. PMID:22396725

  11. SOS1 gene overexpression increased salt tolerance in transgenic tobacco by maintaining a higher K(+)/Na(+) ratio.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yuesen; Zhang, Mingcai; Zhang, Jiachang; Duan, Liusheng; Li, Zhaohu

    2012-02-15

    Crop productivity is greatly affected by soil salinity, so improvement in salinity tolerance of crops is a major objective of many studies. We overexpressed the Arabidopsis thaliana SOS1 gene, which encodes a plasma membrane Na(+)/H(+) antiporter, in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi-nc). Compared with nontransgenic plants, seeds from transgenic tobacco had better germination under 120 mM (mmol L(-1)) NaCl stress; chlorophyll loss in the transgenic seedlings treated with 360 mM NaCl was less; transgenic tobacco showed superior growth after irrigation with NaCl solutions; and transgenic seedlings with 150 mM NaCl stress accumulated less Na(+) and more K(+). In addition, roots of SOS1-overexpressing seedlings lost less K(+) instantaneously in response to 50 mM NaCl than control plants. These results showed that the A. thaliana SOS1 gene potentially can improve the salt tolerance of other plant species. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Mouse models for core binding factor leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chin, D W L; Watanabe-Okochi, N; Wang, C Q; Tergaonkar, V; Osato, M

    2015-10-01

    RUNX1 and CBFB are among the most frequently mutated genes in human leukemias. Genetic alterations such as chromosomal translocations, copy number variations and point mutations have been widely reported to result in the malfunction of RUNX transcription factors. Leukemias arising from such alterations in RUNX family genes are collectively termed core binding factor (CBF) leukemias. Although adult CBF leukemias generally are considered a favorable risk group as compared with other forms of acute myeloid leukemia, the 5-year survival rate remains low. An improved understanding of the molecular mechanism for CBF leukemia is imperative to uncover novel treatment options. Over the years, retroviral transduction-transplantation assays and transgenic, knockin and knockout mouse models alone or in combination with mutagenesis have been used to study the roles of RUNX alterations in leukemogenesis. Although successful in inducing leukemia, the existing assays and models possess many inherent limitations. A CBF leukemia model which induces leukemia with complete penetrance and short latency would be ideal as a platform for drug discovery. Here, we summarize the currently available mouse models which have been utilized to study CBF leukemias, discuss the advantages and limitations of individual experimental systems, and propose suggestions for improvements of mouse models.

  13. The SbSOS1 gene from the extreme halophyte Salicornia brachiata enhances Na(+) loading in xylem and confers salt tolerance in transgenic tobacco.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Narendra Singh; Shukla, Pushp Sheel; Jha, Anupama; Agarwal, Pradeep K; Jha, Bhavanath

    2012-10-11

    Soil salinity adversely affects plant growth and development and disturbs intracellular ion homeostasis resulting cellular toxicity. The Salt Overly Sensitive 1 (SOS1) gene encodes a plasma membrane Na(+)/H(+) antiporter that plays an important role in imparting salt stress tolerance to plants. Here, we report the cloning and characterisation of the SbSOS1 gene from Salicornia brachiata, an extreme halophyte. The SbSOS1 gene is 3774 bp long and encodes a protein of 1159 amino acids. SbSOS1 exhibited a greater level of constitutive expression in roots than in shoots and was further increased by salt stress. Overexpressing the S. brachiata SbSOS1 gene in tobacco conferred high salt tolerance, promoted seed germination and increased root length, shoot length, leaf area, fresh weight, dry weight, relative water content (RWC), chlorophyll, K(+)/Na(+) ratio, membrane stability index, soluble sugar, proline and amino acid content relative to wild type (WT) plants. Transgenic plants exhibited reductions in electrolyte leakage, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and MDA content in response to salt stress, which probably occurred because of reduced cytosolic Na(+) content and oxidative damage. At higher salt stress, transgenic tobacco plants exhibited reduced Na(+) content in root and leaf and higher concentrations in stem and xylem sap relative to WT, which suggests a role of SbSOS1 in Na(+) loading to xylem from root and leaf tissues. Transgenic lines also showed increased K(+) and Ca(2+) content in root tissue compared to WT, which reflect that SbSOS1 indirectly affects the other transporters activity. Overexpression of SbSOS1 in tobacco conferred a high degree of salt tolerance, enhanced plant growth and altered physiological and biochemical parameters in response to salt stress. In addition to Na(+) efflux outside the plasma membrane, SbSOS1 also helps to maintain variable Na(+) content in different organs and also affect the other transporters activity indirectly. These

  14. The SbSOS1 gene from the extreme halophyte Salicornia brachiata enhances Na+ loading in xylem and confers salt tolerance in transgenic tobacco

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Soil salinity adversely affects plant growth and development and disturbs intracellular ion homeostasis resulting cellular toxicity. The Salt Overly Sensitive 1 (SOS1) gene encodes a plasma membrane Na+/H+ antiporter that plays an important role in imparting salt stress tolerance to plants. Here, we report the cloning and characterisation of the SbSOS1 gene from Salicornia brachiata, an extreme halophyte. Results The SbSOS1 gene is 3774 bp long and encodes a protein of 1159 amino acids. SbSOS1 exhibited a greater level of constitutive expression in roots than in shoots and was further increased by salt stress. Overexpressing the S. brachiata SbSOS1 gene in tobacco conferred high salt tolerance, promoted seed germination and increased root length, shoot length, leaf area, fresh weight, dry weight, relative water content (RWC), chlorophyll, K+/Na+ ratio, membrane stability index, soluble sugar, proline and amino acid content relative to wild type (WT) plants. Transgenic plants exhibited reductions in electrolyte leakage, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and MDA content in response to salt stress, which probably occurred because of reduced cytosolic Na+ content and oxidative damage. At higher salt stress, transgenic tobacco plants exhibited reduced Na+ content in root and leaf and higher concentrations in stem and xylem sap relative to WT, which suggests a role of SbSOS1 in Na+ loading to xylem from root and leaf tissues. Transgenic lines also showed increased K+ and Ca2+ content in root tissue compared to WT, which reflect that SbSOS1 indirectly affects the other transporters activity. Conclusions Overexpression of SbSOS1 in tobacco conferred a high degree of salt tolerance, enhanced plant growth and altered physiological and biochemical parameters in response to salt stress. In addition to Na+ efflux outside the plasma membrane, SbSOS1 also helps to maintain variable Na+ content in different organs and also affect the other transporters activity indirectly

  15. Aggregation of Membrane Proteins by Cytosolic Cross-Linkers: Theory and Simulation of the LAT-Grb2-SOS1 System

    PubMed Central

    Nag, Ambarish; Monine, Michael I.; Faeder, James R.; Goldstein, Byron

    2009-01-01

    Ligand-induced receptor aggregation is a well-known mechanism for initiating intracellular signals but oligomerization of distal signaling molecules may also be required for signal propagation. Formation of complexes containing oligomers of the transmembrane adaptor protein, linker for the activation of T cells (LAT), has been identified as critical in mast cell and T cell activation mediated by immune response receptors. Cross-linking of LAT arises from the formation of a 2:1 complex between the adaptor Grb2 and the nucleotide exchange factor SOS1, which bridges two LAT molecules through the interaction of the Grb2 SH2 domain with a phosphotyrosine on LAT. We model this oligomerization and find that the valence of LAT for Grb2, which ranges from zero to three, is critical in determining the nature and extent of aggregation. A dramatic rise in oligomerization can occur when the valence switches from two to three. For valence three, an equilibrium theory predicts the possibility of forming a gel-like phase. This prediction is confirmed by stochastic simulations, which make additional predictions about the size of the gel and the kinetics of LAT oligomerization. We discuss the model predictions in light of recent experiments on RBL-2H3 and Jurkat E6.1 cells and suggest that the gel phase has been observed in activated mast cells. PMID:19348745

  16. Constitutive high-level SOS1 expression and absence of HKT1;1 expression in the salt-accumulating halophyte Salicornia dolichostachya.

    PubMed

    Katschnig, D; Bliek, T; Rozema, J; Schat, H

    2015-05-01

    We investigated the effects of salinity on ion accumulation and expression of candidate salt tolerance genes in the highly tolerant salt accumulating halophyte Salicornia dolichostachya and the taxonomically related glycophytic Spinacia oleracea. S. dolichostachya, in comparison with S. oleracea, constitutively expressed SOS1 at a high level, but did not detectably express HKT1;1. These findings suggest that the constitutive high level of shoot salt accumulation in S. dolichostachya is accomplished through enhancement of SOS1-mediated Na(+) xylem loading, in combination with complete suppression of HKT1;1-mediated Na(+) retrieval from the xylem. Our findings demonstrate the importance of gene expression comparisons between highly tolerant halophytes and taxonomically related glycophytes to improve the understanding of mechanisms of Na(+) movement and salt tolerance in plants.

  17. Arabidopsis sos1 mutant in a salt-tolerant accession revealed an importance of salt acclimation ability in plant salt tolerance.

    PubMed

    Ariga, Hirotaka; Katori, Taku; Yoshihara, Ryouhei; Hase, Yoshihiro; Nozawa, Shigeki; Narumi, Issay; Iuchi, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Masatomo; Tezuka, Kenji; Sakata, Yoichi; Hayashi, Takahisa; Taji, Teruaki

    2013-07-01

    An analysis of the salinity tolerance of 354 Arabidopsis thaliana accessions showed that some accessions were more tolerant to salt shock than the reference accession, Col-0, when transferred from 0 to 225 mM NaCl. In addition, several accessions, including Zu-0, showed marked acquired salt tolerance after exposure to moderate salt stress. It is likely therefore that Arabidopsis plants have at least two types of tolerance, salt shock tolerance and acquired salt tolerance. To evaluate a role of well-known salt shock tolerant gene SOS1 in acquired salt tolerance, we isolated a sos1 mutant from ion-beam-mutagenized Zu-0 seedlings. The mutant showed severe growth inhibition under salt shock stress owing to a single base deletion in the SOS1 gene and was even more salt sensitive than Col-0. Nevertheless, it was able to survive after acclimation on 100 mM NaCl for 7 d followed by 750 mM sorbitol for 20 d, whereas Col-0 became chlorotic under the same conditions. We propose that genes for salt acclimation ability are different from genes for salt shock tolerance and play an important role in the acquisition of salt or osmotic tolerance.

  18. Arabidopsis sos1 mutant in a salt-tolerant accession revealed an importance of salt acclimation ability in plant salt tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Ariga, Hirotaka; Katori, Taku; Yoshihara, Ryouhei; Hase, Yoshihiro; Nozawa, Shigeki; Narumi, Issay; Iuchi, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Masatomo; Tezuka, Kenji; Sakata, Yoichi; Hayashi, Takahisa; Taji, Teruaki

    2013-01-01

    An analysis of the salinity tolerance of 354 Arabidopsis thaliana accessions showed that some accessions were more tolerant to salt shock than the reference accession, Col-0, when transferred from 0 to 225 mM NaCl. In addition, several accessions, including Zu-0, showed marked acquired salt tolerance after exposure to moderate salt stress. It is likely therefore that Arabidopsis plants have at least two types of tolerance, salt shock tolerance and acquired salt tolerance. To evaluate a role of well-known salt shock tolerant gene SOS1 in acquired salt tolerance, we isolated a sos1 mutant from ion-beam-mutagenized Zu-0 seedlings. The mutant showed severe growth inhibition under salt shock stress owing to a single base deletion in the SOS1 gene and was even more salt sensitive than Col-0. Nevertheless, it was able to survive after acclimation on 100 mM NaCl for 7 d followed by 750 mM sorbitol for 20 d, whereas Col-0 became chlorotic under the same conditions. We propose that genes for salt acclimation ability are different from genes for salt shock tolerance and play an important role in the acquisition of salt or osmotic tolerance. PMID:23656872

  19. Four factors underlying mouse behavior in an open field

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Shoji; Young, Jared W.; Halberstadt, Adam L.; Masten, Virginia L.; Geyer, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    The observation of the locomotor and exploratory behaviors of rodents in an open field is one of the most fundamental methods used in the field of behavioral pharmacology. A variety of behaviors can be recorded automatically and can readily generate a multivariate pattern of pharmacological effects. Nevertheless, the optimal ways to characterize observed behaviors and concomitant drug effects are still under development. The aim of this study was to extract meaningful behavioral factors that could explain variations in the observed variables from mouse exploration. Behavioral data were recorded from male C57BL/6J mice (n = 268) using the Behavioral Pattern Monitor (BPM). The BPM data were subjected to the exploratory factor analysis. The factor analysis extracted four factors: activity, sequential organization, diversive exploration, and inspective exploration. The activity factor and the two types of exploration factors correlated positively with one another, while the sequential organization factor negatively correlated with the remaining factors. The extracted factor structure constitutes a behavioral model of mouse exploration. This model will provide a platform on which one can assess the effects of psychoactive drugs and genetic manipulations on mouse exploratory behavior. Further studies are currently underway to examine the factor structure of similar multivariate data sets from humans tested in a human BPM. PMID:22569582

  20. Mediation of mouse natural cytotoxic activity by tumour necrosis factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortaldo, John R.; Mason, Llewellyn H.; Mathieson, Bonnie J.; Liang, Shu-Mei; Flick, David A.; Herberman, Ronald B.

    1986-06-01

    Natural cell-mediated cytotoxic activity in the mouse has been associated with two types of effector cells, the natural killer (NK) cell and the natural cytotoxic (NC) cell, which seem to differ with regard to their patterns of target selectivity, cell surface characteristics and susceptibility to regulatory factors1. During studies on the mechanism of action of cytotoxic molecules, it became evident that WEHI-164, the prototype NC target cell, was highly susceptible to direct lysis by both human and mouse recombinant tumour necrosis factor (TNF). Here we show that NC, but not NK activity mediated by normal splenocytes, is abrogated by rabbit antibodies to recombinant and natural TNF, respectively. Thus, the cell-mediated activity defined as NC is due to release of TNF by normal spleen cells and does not represent a unique natural effector mechanism.

  1. TFCat: the curated catalog of mouse and human transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Fulton, Debra L; Sundararajan, Saravanan; Badis, Gwenael; Hughes, Timothy R; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Roach, Jared C; Sladek, Rob

    2009-01-01

    Unravelling regulatory programs governed by transcription factors (TFs) is fundamental to understanding biological systems. TFCat is a catalog of mouse and human TFs based on a reliable core collection of annotations obtained by expert review of the scientific literature. The collection, including proven and homology-based candidate TFs, is annotated within a function-based taxonomy and DNA-binding proteins are organized within a classification system. All data and user-feedback mechanisms are available at the TFCat portal . PMID:19284633

  2. Heat shock factor 2 is activated during mouse heart development.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, M; Jokinen, E; Sistonen, L; Leppä, S

    2000-08-01

    Two members of the heat shock transcription factor family, HSF1 and HSF2, have been identified as activators of mammalian heat shock gene expression. HSF1 acts as a classical stress-responsive factor, whereas HSF2 might play a role in embryogenesis, since it is active during pre- and post-implantation periods up to 15.5 days of mouse embryonic development. In this study, we analyzed HSF1 and HSF2 expression and activation during mouse heart formation. Our results show an abundant expression of HSF1 throughout heart development. In contrast, expression of the alternatively spliced HSF2-alpha and HSF2-beta, and an additional higher molecular weight isoform is strongly upregulated in the developing mouse heart at E11.5-12.5, a stage after which tubular heart has looped and chambers formed, and the myocardial walls are maturating and the valves differentiating. At the same developmental stage, HSF2 DNA-binding activity is transiently induced, whereas the weak HSE-binding activity, which is detected throughout heart development, consists primarily of HSF1. Interestingly, heat shock gene expression shows no temporal or spatial correlation with HSF2 expression and activation. Taken together, our results indicate that HSF2 activation is associated with specific stages of heart formation but is not involved in the regulation of inducible heat shock gene expression.

  3. Factors affecting the cryosurvival of mouse two-cell embryos.

    PubMed

    Critser, J K; Arneson, B W; Aaker, D V; Huse-Benda, A R; Ball, G D

    1988-01-01

    A series of 4 experiments was conducted to examine factors affecting the survival of frozen-thawed 2-cell mouse embryos. Rapid addition of 1.5 M-DMSO (20 min equilibration at 25 degrees C) and immediate, rapid removal using 0.5 M-sucrose did not alter the frequency (mean +/- s.e.m.) of blastocyst development in vitro when compared to untreated controls (90.5 +/- 2.7% vs 95.3 +/- 2.8%). There was an interaction between the temperature at which slow cooling was terminated and thawing rate. Termination of slow cooling (-0.3 degrees C/min) at -40 degrees C with subsequent rapid thawing (approximately 1500 degrees C/min) resulted in a lower frequency of blastocyst development than did termination of slow cooling at -80 degrees C with subsequent slow thawing (+8 degrees C/min) (36.8 +/- 5.6% vs 63.9 +/- 5.7%). When slow cooling was terminated between -40 and -60 degrees C, higher survival rates were achieved with rapid thawing. When slow cooling was terminated below -60 degrees C, higher survival rates were obtained with slow thawing rates. In these comparisons absolute survival rates were highest among embryos cooled below -60 degrees C and thawed slowly. However, when slow cooling was terminated at -32 degrees C, with subsequent rapid warming, survival rates were not different from those obtained when embryos were cooled to -80 degrees C and thawed slowly (52.4 +/- 9.5%, 59.5 +/- 8.6%). These results suggest that optimal cryosurvival rates may be obtained from 2-cell mouse embryos by a rapid or slow thawing procedure, as has been found for mouse preimplantation embryos at later stages.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Characterization of the mouse von Willebrand factor promoter.

    PubMed

    Guan, J; Guillot, P V; Aird, W C

    1999-11-15

    Expression of the von Willebrand factor (vWF) gene is restricted to the endothelial and megakaryocyte lineages. Within the endothelium, expression of vWF varies between different vascular beds. We have previously shown that the human vWF promoter spanning a region between -2182 (relative to the start site of transcription) and the end of the first intron contains information for environmentally responsive, vascular bed-specific expression in the heart, skeletal muscle, and brain. In the present study, we cloned the mouse vWF (mvWF) promoter and studied its function in cultured endothelial cells and transgenic mice. In transient transfection assays, the mvWF gene was found to be regulated by distinct mechanisms in different endothelial cell subtypes. In independent lines of transgenic mice, an mvWF promoter fragment containing DNA sequences between -2645 and the end of the first intron directed endothelial cell-specific expression in the microvascular beds of the heart, brain, and skeletal muscle as well as the endothelial lining of the aorta. In 1 line of mice, reporter gene activity was also detected in bone marrow megakaryocytes. Taken together, these findings suggest that both the mouse and human vWF promoters are regulated by vascular bed-specific mechanisms.

  5. Function of GATA Factors in the Adult Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Rena; Rebolledo-Jaramillo, Boris; Zong, Yiwei; Wang, Liqing; Russo, Pierre; Hancock, Wayne; Stanger, Ben Z.; Hardison, Ross C.; Blobel, Gerd A.

    2013-01-01

    GATA transcription factors and their Friend of Gata (FOG) cofactors control the development of diverse tissues. GATA4 and GATA6 are essential for the expansion of the embryonic liver bud, but their expression patterns and functions in the adult liver are unclear. We characterized the expression of GATA and FOG factors in whole mouse liver and purified hepatocytes. GATA4, GATA6, and FOG1 are the most prominently expressed family members in whole liver and hepatocytes. GATA4 chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq) identified 4409 occupied sites, associated with genes enriched in ontologies related to liver function, including lipid and glucose metabolism. However, hepatocyte-specific excision of Gata4 had little impact on gross liver architecture and function, even under conditions of regenerative stress, and, despite the large number of GATA4 occupied genes, resulted in relatively few changes in gene expression. To address possible redundancy between GATA4 and GATA6, both factors were conditionally excised. Surprisingly, combined Gata4,6 loss did not exacerbate the phenotype resulting from Gata4 loss alone. This points to the presence of an unusually robust transcriptional network in adult hepatocytes that ensures the maintenance of liver function. PMID:24367609

  6. Distribution of corticotropin-releasing factor neurons in the mouse brain: a study using corticotropin-releasing factor-modified yellow fluorescent protein knock-in mouse.

    PubMed

    Kono, Junko; Konno, Kohtarou; Talukder, Ashraf Hossain; Fuse, Toshimitsu; Abe, Manabu; Uchida, Katsuya; Horio, Shuhei; Sakimura, Kenji; Watanabe, Masahiko; Itoi, Keiichi

    2017-05-01

    We examined the morphological features of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) neurons in a mouse line in which modified yellow fluorescent protein (Venus) was expressed under the CRF promoter. We previously generated the CRF-Venus knock-in mouse, in which Venus is inserted into the CRF gene locus by homologous recombination. In the present study, the neomycin phosphotransferase gene (Neo), driven by the pgk-1 promoter, was deleted from the CRF-Venus mouse genome, and a CRF-Venus∆Neo mouse was generated. Venus expression is much more prominent in the CRF-Venus∆Neo mouse when compared to the CRF-Venus mouse. In addition, most Venus-expressing neurons co-express CRF mRNA. Venus-expressing neurons constitute a discrete population of neuroendocrine neurons in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVH) that project to the median eminence. Venus-expressing neurons were also found in brain regions outside the neuroendocrine PVH, including the olfactory bulb, the piriform cortex (Pir), the extended amygdala, the hippocampus, the neocortices, Barrington's nucleus, the midbrain/pontine dorsal tegmentum, the periaqueductal gray, and the inferior olivary nucleus (IO). Venus-expressing perikarya co-expressing CRF mRNA could be observed clearly even in regions where CRF-immunoreactive perikarya could hardly be identified. We demonstrated that the CRF neurons contain glutamate in the Pir and IO, while they contain gamma-aminobutyric acid in the neocortex, the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, the hippocampus, and the amygdala. A population of CRF neurons was demonstrated to be cholinergic in the midbrain tegmentum. The CRF-Venus∆Neo mouse may be useful for studying the structural and functional properties of CRF neurons in the mouse brain.

  7. Development of a mouse-feline chimeric antibody against feline tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed

    Doki, Tomoyoshi; Takano, Tomomi; Hohdatsu, Tsutomu

    2016-10-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a fatal inflammatory disease caused by FIP virus infection. Feline tumor necrosis factor (fTNF)-alpha is closely involved in the aggravation of FIP pathology. We previously described the preparation of neutralizing mouse anti-fTNF-alpha monoclonal antibody (mAb 2-4) and clarified its role in the clinical condition of cats with FIP using in vitro systems. However, administration of mouse mAb 2-4 to cat may lead to a production of feline anti-mouse antibodies. In the present study, we prepared a mouse-feline chimeric mAb (chimeric mAb 2-4) by fusing the variable region of mouse mAb 2-4 to the constant region of feline antibody. The chimeric mAb 2-4 was confirmed to have fTNF-alpha neutralization activity. Purified mouse mAb 2-4 and chimeric mAb 2-4 were repeatedly administered to cats, and the changes in the ability to induce feline anti-mouse antibody response were investigated. In the serum of cats treated with mouse mAb 2-4, feline anti-mouse antibody production was induced, and the fTNF-alpha neutralization effect of mouse mAb 2-4 was reduced. In contrast, in cats treated with chimeric mAb 2-4, the feline anti-mouse antibody response was decreased compared to that of mouse mAb 2-4-treated cats.

  8. Development of a mouse-feline chimeric antibody against feline tumor necrosis factor-alpha

    PubMed Central

    DOKI, Tomoyoshi; TAKANO, Tomomi; HOHDATSU, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a fatal inflammatory disease caused by FIP virus infection. Feline tumor necrosis factor (fTNF)-alpha is closely involved in the aggravation of FIP pathology. We previously described the preparation of neutralizing mouse anti-fTNF-alpha monoclonal antibody (mAb 2–4) and clarified its role in the clinical condition of cats with FIP using in vitro systems. However, administration of mouse mAb 2–4 to cat may lead to a production of feline anti-mouse antibodies. In the present study, we prepared a mouse-feline chimeric mAb (chimeric mAb 2–4) by fusing the variable region of mouse mAb 2–4 to the constant region of feline antibody. The chimeric mAb 2–4 was confirmed to have fTNF-alpha neutralization activity. Purified mouse mAb 2–4 and chimeric mAb 2–4 were repeatedly administered to cats, and the changes in the ability to induce feline anti-mouse antibody response were investigated. In the serum of cats treated with mouse mAb 2–4, feline anti-mouse antibody production was induced, and the fTNF-alpha neutralization effect of mouse mAb 2–4 was reduced. In contrast, in cats treated with chimeric mAb 2–4, the feline anti-mouse antibody response was decreased compared to that of mouse mAb 2–4-treated cats. PMID:27264736

  9. Key factors in experimental mouse hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nevozhay, Dmitry; Opolski, Adam

    2006-01-01

    The first mouse model of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) was developed more than 50 years ago. HSCT is currently being widely used in a broad range of research areas, which include studies of the engraftment process, the pathogenesis of graft-versus-host disease and possible ways of its treatment and prophylaxis, attempts to use the graft-versus-leukemia/tumor effect in treating hematological and oncological malignancies, cancer vaccine development, induction of transplanted organ tolerance, and gene therapy. However, although this model is widely distributed, many laboratories use different protocols for the procedure. There are a number of papers discussing different HSCT protocols in clinical work, but no articles summarizing mouse laboratory models are available. This review attempts to bring together different details about HSCT in the mouse model, such as the types of transplantation, possible pretreatment regimens and their combinations, methods and sources of graft harvesting and preparation for the transplantation procedure, the influence of graft cell dose and content on the engraftment process, the transplantation method itself, possible complications, symptoms and techniques of their prophylaxis or treatment, as well as follow-up and engraftment assessment. We have also tried to reflect current knowledge of the biology of the engraftment.

  10. Generation of mouse ES cell lines engineered for the forced induction of transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Correa-Cerro, Lina S.; Piao, Yulan; Sharov, Alexei A.; Nishiyama, Akira; Cadet, Jean S.; Yu, Hong; Sharova, Lioudmila V.; Xin, Li; Hoang, Hien G.; Thomas, Marshall; Qian, Yong; Dudekula, Dawood B.; Meyers, Emily; Binder, Bernard Y.; Mowrer, Gregory; Bassey, Uwem; Longo, Dan L.; Schlessinger, David; Ko, Minoru S. H.

    2011-01-01

    Here we report the generation and characterization of 84 mouse ES cell lines with doxycycline-controllable transcription factors (TFs) which, together with the previous 53 lines, cover 7–10% of all TFs encoded in the mouse genome. Global gene expression profiles of all 137 lines after the induction of TFs for 48 hrs can associate each TF with the direction of ES cell differentiation, regulatory pathways, and mouse phenotypes. These cell lines and microarray data provide building blocks for a variety of future biomedical research applications as a community resource. PMID:22355682

  11. Genomic cloning of mouse MIF (macrophage inhibitory factor) and genetic mapping of the human and mouse expressed gene and nine mouse pseudogenes

    SciTech Connect

    Kozak, C.A.; Adamson, M.C.; Buckler, C.E.

    1995-06-10

    The single functional mouse gene for MIF (macrophage migration inhibitory factor) has been cloned from a P1 library, and its exon/intron structure determined and shown to resemble that of the human gene. The gene was mapped to chromosome 10 using two multilocus crosses between laboratory strains and either Mus musculus or Mus spretus. Nine additional loci containing related sequences, apparently all processed pseudogenes, were also mapped to chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 7, 8, 9, 12, 17, and 19. While most of these pseudogenes were also found in inbred mice and M. spretus, some are species specific. This suggests that there have been active phases of pseudogene formation in Mus both before and after the separation of musculus and spretus. The human gene contains no pseudogene; we assigned the human gene to chromosome 19, consistent with the location of mouse and human functional genes for MIF in a region of conserved linkage. 43 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Generation and gene expression profiling of 48 transcription-factor-inducible mouse embryonic stem cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Yamamizu, Kohei; Sharov, Alexei A.; Piao, Yulan; Amano, Misa; Yu, Hong; Nishiyama, Akira; Dudekula, Dawood B.; Schlessinger, David; Ko, Minoru S. H.

    2016-01-01

    Mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) can differentiate into a wide range – and possibly all cell types in vitro, and thus provide an ideal platform to study systematically the action of transcription factors (TFs) in cell differentiation. Previously, we have generated and analyzed 137 TF-inducible mouse ESC lines. As an extension of this “NIA Mouse ESC Bank,” we generated and characterized 48 additional mouse ESC lines, in which single TFs in each line could be induced in a doxycycline-controllable manner. Together, with the previous ESC lines, the bank now comprises 185 TF-manipulable ESC lines (>10% of all mouse TFs). Global gene expression (transcriptome) profiling revealed that the induction of individual TFs in mouse ESCs for 48 hours shifts their transcriptomes toward specific differentiation fates (e.g., neural lineages by Myt1 Isl1, and St18; mesodermal lineages by Pitx1, Pitx2, Barhl2, and Lmx1a; white blood cells by Myb, Etv2, and Tbx6, and ovary by Pitx1, Pitx2, and Dmrtc2). These data also provide and lists of inferred target genes of each TF and possible functions of these TFs. The results demonstrate the utility of mouse ESC lines and their transcriptome data for understanding the mechanism of cell differentiation and the function of TFs. PMID:27150017

  13. Depressed adrenomedullin in the embryonic transforming growth factor-beta1 null mouse becomes elevated postnatally.

    PubMed

    Bodegas, Elena; Martínez, Alfredo; Ozbun, Laurent L; Garayoa, Mercedes; Letterio, John J; Montuenga, Luis M; Jakowlew, Sonia B

    2004-02-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) and adrenomedullin are multifunctional regulatory proteins which are expressed in developing embryonic and adult tissues. Because of their colocalization, TGF-beta1 and adrenomedullin may be able to coordinately act to influence development and differentiation. In order to learn more about the biology of adrenomedullin in the absence of the effects of TGF-beta1 in vivo, we examined adrenomedullin in the TGF-beta1 null mouse. A generally lower amount of adrenomedullin was detected by immunohistochemical staining analysis in multiple tissues from embryonic TGF-beta1 null mice compared to wildtype animals, including the heart, lung, brain, liver, and kidney, among others. In contrast, immunohistochemical staining for adrenomedullin was more intense in tissues of the postnatal TGF-beta1 null mouse compared to the wildtype mouse. These observations were confirmed by quantitative real time RT-PCR for adrenomedullin in both embryos and postnatal animals, as well as in cultured mouse embryo fibroblasts from TGF-beta1 null and wildtype mice. In addition, when cultured mouse embryo fibroblasts were treated with a neutralizing monoclonal antibody against TGF-beta1, the levels of adrenomedullin expression were statistically reduced compared to untreated cells. Our data show that expression of adrenomedullin is reduced in tissues of the developing embryonic TGF-beta1 null mouse compared to the wildtype mouse, but increases during postnatal development in TGF-beta1 null mice. The elevated expression of adrenomedullin which occurs postnatally in the TGF-beta1 null mouse may be a cause or a consequence of the multifocal wasting syndrome which is characteristic of postnatal TGF-beta1 null mice.

  14. Increased Expression of Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 6 Stimulates Hepatocyte Proliferation during Mouse Liver Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yongjun; Yoshida, Yuichi; Hughes, Douglas E.; Costa, Robert H.

    2005-01-01

    Background & Aims The Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 6 (HNF6 or ONECUT-1) protein is a cell-type specific transcription factor that regulates expression of hepatocyte-specific genes. Using hepatocytes for Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays, the HNF6 protein was shown to associate with cell cycle regulatory promoters. Here, we examined whether increased levels of HNF6 stimulate hepatocyte proliferation during mouse liver regeneration. Methods Tail vein injection of adenovirus expressing the HNF6 cDNA (AdHNF6) was used to increase hepatic HNF6 levels during mouse liver regeneration induced by partial hepatectomy, and DNA replication was determined by Bromodeoxyuridine incorporation. Cotransfection and ChIP assays were used to determine transcriptional target promoters. Results Elevated expression of HNF6 during mouse liver regeneration causes a significant increase in the number of hepatocytes entering DNA replication (S-phase) and mouse hepatoma Hepa1-6 cells diminished for HNF6 levels by siRNA transfection exhibit a 50% reduction in S-phase following serum stimulation. This stimulation in hepatocyte S-phase progression was associated with increased expression of the hepatocyte mitogen Tumor Growth Factor α (TGFα) and the cell cycle regulators Cyclin D1 and Forkhead Box m1 (Foxm1) transcription factor. Cotransfection and ChIP assays show that TGFα, Cyclin D1, and HNF6 promoter regions are direct transcriptional targets of the HNF6 protein. Co-immunoprecipitation assays with regenerating mouse liver extracts reveal association between HNF6 and Foxm1 proteins and cotransfection assays show that HNF6 stimulates Foxm1 transcriptional activity. Conclusion These mouse liver regeneration studies show that increased HNF6 levels stimulate hepatocyte proliferation through transcriptional induction of cell cycle regulatory genes. PMID:16618419

  15. Construction of a mouse model of factor VIII deficiency by gene targeting

    SciTech Connect

    Bi, L.; Lawler, A.; Gearhart, J.

    1994-09-01

    To develop a small animal model of hemophilia A for gene therapy experiments, we set out to construct a mouse model for factor VIII deficiency by gene targeting. First, we screened a mouse liver cDNA library using a human FVIII cDNA probe. We cloned a 2.6 Kb partial mouse factor VIII cDNA which extends from 800 base pairs of the 3{prime} end of exon 14 to the 5{prime} end of exon 26. A mouse genomic library made from strain 129 was then screened to obtain genomic fragments covering the exons desired for homologous recombination. Two genomic clones were obtained, and one covering exon 15 through 22 was used for gene targeting. To make gene targeting constructs, a 5.8 Kb genomic DNA fragment covering exons 15 to 19 of the mouse FVIII gene was subcloned, and the neo expression cassette was inserted into exons 16 and 17 separately by different strategies. These two constructs were named MFVIIIC-16 and MFVIIIC-17. The constructs were linearized and transfected into strain 129 mouse ES cells by electroporation. Factor VIII gene-knockout ES cell lines were selected by G-418 and screened by genomic Southern blots. Eight exon 16 targeted cell lines and five exon 17 targeted cell lines were obtained. Three cell lines from each construct were injected into blastocysts and surgically transferred into foster mothers. Multiple chimeric mice with 70-90% hair color derived from the ES-cell genotype were seen with both constructs. Germ line transmission of the ES-cell genotype has been obtained for the MFVIIIC-16 construct, and multiple hemophilia A carrier females have been identified. Factor VIII-deficient males will be conceived soon.

  16. Transcriptional Profiling of Intrinsic PNS Factors in the Postnatal Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Robin P.; Lerch-Haner, Jessica K.; Pardinas, Jose R.; Buchser, William J.; Bixby, John L.; Lemmon, Vance P.

    2010-01-01

    Neurons in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) display a higher capacity to regenerate after injury than those in the central nervous system, suggesting cell specific transcriptional modules underlying axon growth and inhibition. We report a systems biology based search for PNS specific transcription factors (TFs). Messenger RNAs enriched in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons compared to cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) were identified using subtractive hybridization and DNA microarray approaches. Network and transcription factor binding site enrichment analyses were used to further identify TFs that may be differentially active. Combining these techniques, we identified 32 TFs likely to be enriched and/or active in the PNS. Twenty-five of these TFs were then tested for an ability to promote CNS neurite outgrowth in an overexpression screen. Real-time PCR and immunohistochemical studies confirmed that one representative TF, STAT3, is intrinsic to PNS neurons, and that constitutively active STAT3 is sufficient to promote CGN neurite outgrowth. PMID:20696251

  17. Transcriptional profiling of intrinsic PNS factors in the postnatal mouse.

    PubMed

    Smith, Robin P; Lerch-Haner, Jessica K; Pardinas, Jose R; Buchser, William J; Bixby, John L; Lemmon, Vance P

    2011-01-01

    Neurons in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) display a higher capacity to regenerate after injury than those in the central nervous system, suggesting cell specific transcriptional modules underlying axon growth and inhibition. We report a systems biology based search for PNS specific transcription factors (TFs). Messenger RNAs enriched in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons compared to cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) were identified using subtractive hybridization and DNA microarray approaches. Network and transcription factor binding site enrichment analyses were used to further identify TFs that may be differentially active. Combining these techniques, we identified 32 TFs likely to be enriched and/or active in the PNS. Twenty-five of these TFs were then tested for an ability to promote CNS neurite outgrowth in an overexpression screen. Real-time PCR and immunohistochemical studies confirmed that one representative TF, STAT3, is intrinsic to PNS neurons, and that constitutively active STAT3 is sufficient to promote CGN neurite outgrowth.

  18. Expression profile and transcription factor binding site exploration of imprinted genes in human and mouse

    PubMed Central

    Steinhoff, Christine; Paulsen, Martina; Kielbasa, Szymon; Walter, Jörn; Vingron, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Background In mammals, imprinted genes are regulated by an epigenetic mechanism that results in parental origin-specific expression. Though allele-specific regulation of imprinted genes has been studied for several individual genes in detail, little is known about their overall tissue-specific expression patterns and interspecies conservation of expression. Results We performed a computational analysis of microarray expression data of imprinted genes in human and mouse placentae and in a variety of adult tissues. For mouse, early embryonic stages were also included. The analysis reveals that imprinted genes are expressed in a broad spectrum of tissues for both species. Overall, the relative tissue-specific expression levels of orthologous imprinted genes in human and mouse are not highly correlated. However, in both species distinctive expression profiles are found in tissues of the endocrine pathways such as adrenal gland, pituitary, pancreas as well as placenta. In mouse, the placental and embryonic expression patterns of imprinted genes are highly similar. Transcription factor binding site (TFBS) prediction reveals correlation of tissue-specific expression patterns and the presence of distinct TFBS signatures in the upstream region of human imprinted genes. Conclusion Imprinted genes are broadly expressed pre- and postnatally and do not exhibit a distinct overall expression pattern when compared to non-imprinted genes. The relative expression of most orthologous gene pairs varies significantly between human and mouse suggesting rapid species-specific changes in gene regulation. Distinct expression profiles of imprinted genes are confined to certain human and mouse hormone producing tissues, and placentae. In contrast to the overall variability, distinct expression profiles and enriched TFBS signatures are found in human and mouse endocrine tissues and placentae. This points towards an important role played by imprinted gene regulation in these tissues. PMID

  19. Molecular characterization and expression analysis of mouse epidermal growth factor-like domain 8.

    PubMed

    Song, Ik-Jin; Ikram, Muhammad; Subhan, Fazli; Choi, Da-Jeong; Lee, Ja-Rang; Kim, Heui-Soo; Lim, Young-Tak; Yoon, Sik

    2015-08-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like (EGFL) domain, a common structural module in numerous secreted or transmembrane proteins, is generally involved in protein-protein interactions. To date, several EGFL proteins have been identified and characterized, but little is known about EGFL domain 8 (EGFL8). The present study reported the molecular characterization and expression analysis of EGFL8 in mice. Mouse EGFL8 amplified using a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction approach was sequenced and characterized. Mouse EGFL8 encodes a protein of 293 amino acids with two EGFL domains, an Emilin-like domain and a Ca(2+)-binding EGFL domain, which has a molecular mass of 32 kDa. The coding sequence has a high degree of amino acid sequence identity across species, and the EGFL domain has been highly conserved in various species during evolutionary radiation. A phylogenetic tree calculated using the neighbor-joining method revealed that EGFL8 and EGFL7 are more closely associated with each other than either is to EGFL3, and they cluster with EGFL6. It was found that mouse EGFL8 protein was highly expressed in diverse mouse tissue types, including the thymus, lymph nodes, testis, ovaries, epididymis, ductus deferens, ileum, colon, stomach, esophagus, lung, uterus, urinary bladder, skin, spleen, adrenal glands and penis. These results are of great use in understanding the biological roles of mouse EGFL8 for further study.

  20. The ontogeny of epidermal growth factor receptors during mouse development

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, E.D.; Meek, J.

    1984-05-01

    In an attempt to understand the role(s) of epidermal growth factor (EGF) in vivo during murine development, we have examined the /sup 125/I-EGF binding characteristics of EGF-receptors in membrane preparations of tissues from the 12th day of gestation to parturition. Using autoradiography, the earliest time that we could detect EGF-receptors was on trophoblast cells cultured for 3 days as blastocyst outgrowths. Trophoblast eventually forms a large portion of the placenta, where EGF-receptors have long been recognized. We measured the number and affinity of EGF-receptors on tissues dissected from conceptuses from the 12th day of gestation in order to identify a stage when tissues may be most sensitive to EGF. Whereas the number of EGF receptors increases during gestation for all tissues examined, the affinity of the receptors declines for carcass and placenta and remains relatively unchanged for brain and liver. This suggests that EGF may function differently throughout development. Our hypothesis is that EGF (or its embryonic equivalent) initially stimulates proliferation in embryonic cells and then stimulates differentiation as the tissues mature. In the adult, its main role could be to stimulate tissue repair after damage.

  1. Curcumin Inhibits Transforming Growth Factor β Induced Differentiation of Mouse Lung Fibroblasts to Myofibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Daishun; Gong, Ling; Zhu, Honglan; Pu, Shenglan; Wu, Yang; Zhang, Wei; Huang, Guichuan

    2016-01-01

    Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) induced differentiation of lung fibroblasts to myofibroblasts is a key event in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of curcumin on TGF-β induced differentiation of lung fibroblasts to myofibroblasts and explore the underlying mechanism. Mouse lung fibroblasts were cultured and treated with TGF-β2 and curcumin or rosiglitazone. Cell vitality was examined by MTT assay. The secretion of collagen-1 was assessed by ELISA. α smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) was visualized by immunofluorescence technique. The expression of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPAR-γ) and platelet derived growth factor R β (PDGFR-β) was detected by PCR and Western blot analysis. We found that curcumin and rosiglitazone inhibited the proliferation and TGF-β induced differentiation of mouse lung fibroblasts. In addition, curcumin and rosiglitazone inhibited collagen-1 secretion and α-SMA expression in mouse lung fibroblasts. Furthermore, curcumin and rosiglitazone upregulated PPAR-γ and downregulated PDGFR-β expression in mouse lung fibroblasts. In conclusion, our study reveals novel mechanism by which curcumin inhibits TGF-β2 driven differentiation of lung fibroblasts to myofibroblasts. Curcumin could potentially be used for effective treatment of pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:27877129

  2. Connective tissue growth factor expression and Smad signaling during mouse heart development and myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Chuva de Sousa Lopes, Susana M; Feijen, Alie; Korving, Jeroen; Korchynskyi, Olexander; Larsson, Jonas; Karlsson, Stefan; ten Dijke, Peter; Lyons, Karen M; Goldschmeding, Roel; Doevendans, Pieter; Mummery, Christine L

    2004-11-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is reported to be a target gene of transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) in vitro. Its physiological role in angiogenesis and skeletogenesis during mouse development has been described recently. Here, we have mapped expression of CTGF mRNA during mouse heart development, postnatal adult life, and after experimental myocardial infarction. Furthermore, we investigated the relationship between CTGF and the BMP/TGFbeta signaling pathway in particular during heart development in mutant mice. Postnatally, CTGF expression in the heart became restricted to the atrium. Strikingly, 1 week after myocardial infarction, when myocytes have disappeared from the infarct zone, CTGF and TGFbeta expression as well as activated forms of TGFbeta but not BMP, Smad effector proteins are colocalized exclusively in the fibroblasts of the scar tissue, suggesting possible cooperation between CTGF and TGFbeta during the pathological fibrotic response.

  3. Epidermal growth factor stimulates mouse placental lactogen I but inhibits mouse placental lactogen II secretion in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, M; Ogren, L; Endo, H; Thordarson, G; Kensinger, R; Talamantes, F

    1992-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether epidermal growth factor (EGF) regulates the secretion of mouse placental lactogen (mPL)-I and mPL-II. Primary cell cultures were prepared from placentas from days 7, 9, and 11 of pregnancy and cultured for up to 5 days. Addition of EGF (20 ng/ml) to the medium resulted in significant stimulation of mPL-I secretion by the second day of culture in cells from days 7 and 9 of pregnancy and significant inhibition of mPL-II secretion by the third or fourth day of culture in cells from days 7, 9, and 11. Dose-response studies carried out with cells from day 7 of pregnancy demonstrated that the minimum concentration of EGF that stimulated mPL-I secretion and inhibited mPL-II secretion was 1.0 ng/ml. EGF did not affect the DNA content of the cells or cell viability, assessed by trypan blue exclusion, nor did it have a general effect on protein synthesis. There are three types of PL-containing giant cells in mouse placental cell cultures: cells that contain either mPL-I or mPL-II and cells that contain both hormones. Immunocytochemical analysis and the reverse hemolytic plaque assay indicated that EGF treatment was accompanied by a significant increase in the number of cells that produce mPL-I, but among the PL cells that contained mPL-I, there was no change in the fraction of cells that contained only mPL-I or the fraction that contained both mPL-I and mPL-II. In contrast, EGF treatment did affect the distribution of mPL-II among PL cells. In control cultures, about 75% of the cells that contained mPL-II also contained mPL-I, but in EGF-treated cultures, all of the cells that contained mPL-II also contained mPL-I. These data suggest that EGF regulates mPL-I and mPL-II secretion at least partly by regulating PL cell differentiation. PMID:1454826

  4. Evaluation of the factors influencing the radiosensitivity of mouse ascites tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, M.; Tsuboi, A.; Tsuchiya, T.

    1983-02-01

    Factors influencing the radiosensitivity of the newly established mouse ascites tumor TMT-3 line were studied. In vivo radiosensitivity of the tumor cells decreased with the progression of the growth phase in mice. Oxygen depletion was the major cause of the decreased radiosensitivity. Polarographic measurement of the oxygen dissolved in suspension of various cell densities suggested that high cell density such as in the ascites might well cause severe hypoxia. Humoral factors in the ascites and cell-to-cell contact had no effect on tumor cell radiosensitivity when the influence of the repair of potentially lethal damage was excluded.

  5. alpha-Adrenergic regulation of secretion of mouse saliva rich in nerve growth factor.

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, L J; Partlow, L M

    1976-01-01

    Nerve growth factor has been quantified by both bioassay and radial immunodiffusion in mouse saliva elicited by several secretagogues. The concentrations by bioassay of nerve growth factor in both epinephrine- and norepinephrine-induced saliva (3400 and 900 mug/ml, respectively) are higher than reported in any other source. In contrast, the concentrations of nerve growth factor in isoproterenol- and pilocarpine-induced saliva are relatively low (17 and 2 mug/ml, respectively). The specific activity of the salivary nerve growth factor was 41, 36, 2, and 0.6 mug/mg of protein in secretions elicited by epinephrine, norepinephrine, pilocarpine, and isoproterenol, respectively. Salivation after administration of either epinephrine or norepinephrine was completely inhibited by the alpha-adrenergic blocker, phenoxybenzamine. These results suggest that the release of saliva rich in nerve growth factor is primarily regulated through alpha-adrenergic receptors. Images PMID:186790

  6. Cloning and characterization of the gene for mouse macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF)

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, R.; Bacher, M.; Bernhagen, J.

    1995-04-15

    An emerging body of data indicates that the protein mediator described originally as macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) exerts a central and wide ranging role in host inflammatory responses. MIF is a major constituent of corticotrophic cells within the anterior pituitary gland and is secreted into the circulation in a hormone-like fashion. MIF also exists preformed in monocytes/macrophages and is a pivotal mediator in the host response to endotoxic shock. To gain further insight into the biologic expression of this protein that encompasses components of both the immune and the endocrine systems, we have cloned the mouse MIF gene and identified potential regulatory sequences present within the 5{prime}-proximal promoter region. The gene for mouse MIF is located on chromosome 10, spans approximately 1 kb, and shares a high degree of structural homology with its human counterpart. Of note, the consensus enhancer/promoter motifs identified include both inflammatory/growth factor-related elements and sites associated with the genes for certain peptide hormones. We also report the structures of two MIF pseudogenes that account for early observations suggesting that mouse MIF is encoded by a highly homologous multigene family. 38 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Identification of a minimal promoter element of the mouse epidermal growth factor gene.

    PubMed Central

    Pascall, J C; Brown, K D

    1997-01-01

    We have previously generated a transgenic mouse line (EGF/Tag) in which simian virus 40 (SV40) T-antigen expression is directed by the mouse epidermal growth factor (EGF) gene promoter. In these mice, cellular hyperproliferation is observed in the submaxillary gland associated with SV40 T-antigen expression. In addition, SV40 T-antigen-expressing tumours of prostatic origin are seen. We have now derived immortalized cell lines from these tissues and have used the cells to perform a functional analysis of the EGF gene promoter. Cells were transfected with EGF promoter/reporter constructs, and an element located between 51 and 35 bases upstream of the EGF mRNA start site required for basal activity of the promoter was identified. Electrophoretic mobility-shift analysis suggests that three proteins bind to this region, one of which is either Sp1 or a closely related protein. PMID:9210411

  8. A functionally conserved Polycomb response element from mouse HoxD complex responds to heterochromatin factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasanthi, Dasari; Nagabhushan, A.; Matharu, Navneet Kaur; Mishra, Rakesh K.

    2013-10-01

    Anterior-posterior body axis in all bilaterians is determined by the Hox gene clusters that are activated in a spatio-temporal order. This expression pattern of Hox genes is established and maintained by regulatory mechanisms that involve higher order chromatin structure and Polycomb group (PcG) and trithorax group (trxG) proteins. We identified earlier a Polycomb response element (PRE) in the mouse HoxD complex that is functionally conserved in flies. We analyzed the molecular and genetic interactions of mouse PRE using Drosophila melanogaster and vertebrate cell culture as the model systems. We demonstrate that the repressive activity of this PRE depends on PcG/trxG genes as well as the heterochromatin components. Our findings indicate that a wide range of factors interact with the HoxD PRE that can contribute to establishing the expression pattern of homeotic genes in the complex early during development and maintain that pattern at subsequent stages.

  9. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) inhibits stimulated thyroid hormone secretion in the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Ahren, B.

    1987-07-01

    It is known that epidermal growth factor (EGF) inhibits iodide uptake in the thyroid follicular cells and lowers plasma levels of thyroid hormones upon infusion into sheep and ewes. In this study, the effects of EGF on basal and stimulated thyroid hormone secretion were investigated in the mouse. Mice were pretreated with /sup 125/I and thyroxine; the subsequent release of /sup 125/I is an estimation of thyroid hormone secretion. It was found that basal radioiodine secretion was not altered by intravenous injection of EGF (5 micrograms/animal). However, the radioiodine secretion stimulated by both TSH (120 microU/animal) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP; 5 micrograms/animal) were inhibited by EGF (5 micrograms/animal). At a lower dose level (0.5 microgram/animal), EGF had no influence on stimulated radioiodine secretion. In conclusion, EGF inhibits stimulated thyroid hormone secretion in the mouse.

  10. Exogenous fibroblast growth factor 8 rescues development of mouse diastemal vestigial tooth ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Li, Lu; Yuan, Guohua; Liu, Chao; Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Yanding; Chen, YiPing; Chen, Zhi

    2011-06-01

    Regression of vestigial tooth buds results in the formation of the toothless diastema, a unique feature of the mouse dentition. Revitalization of the diastemal vestigial tooth bud provides an excellent model for studying tooth regeneration and replacement. It has been previously shown that suppression of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling in the diastema results in vestigial tooth bud regression. In this study, we report that application of exogenous FGF8 to the mouse embryonic diastemal region rescues diastemal tooth development. However, this rescue of diastemal tooth development occurs only in an isolated diastemal regions and not in the mandibular quadrant, which includes the incisor and molar germs. FGF8 promotes cell proliferation and inhibits apoptosis in diastemal tooth epithelium, and revitalizes the tooth developmental program, as evidenced by the expression of genes critical for normal tooth development. Our results also support the idea that the adjacent tooth germs contribute to the suppression of diastemal vestigial tooth buds by means of multiple signals.

  11. Locations of human and mouse genes encoding the RFX1 and RFX2 transcription factor proteins.

    PubMed

    Doyle, J; Hoffman, S; Ucla, C; Reith, W; Mach, B; Stubbs, L

    1996-07-01

    RFX transcription factors constitute a highly conserved family of site-specific DNA binding proteins involved in the expression of a variety of cellular and viral genes, including major histocompatibility complex class II genes and genes in human hepatitis B virus. Five members of the RFX gene family have been isolated from human and mouse, and all share a highly characteristic DNA binding domain that is distinct from other known DNA binding motifs. The human RFX1 and RFX2 genes have been assigned by in situ hybridization to chromosome 19p13.1 and 19p13.3, respectively. In this paper, we present data that localize RFX1 and RFX2 precisely within the detailed physical map of human chromosome 19 and genetic data that assign Rfx1 and Rfx2 to homologous regions of mouse chromosomes 8 and 17, respectively. These data define the established relationships between these homologous mouse and human regions in further detail and provide new tools for linking cloned genes to phenotypes in both species.

  12. Structural characterization and chromosomal location of the mouse macrophage migration inhibitory factor gene and pseudogenes

    SciTech Connect

    Bozza, M.; Gerard, C.; Kolakowski, L.F. Jr.

    1995-06-10

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor, MIF, is a cytokine released by T-lymphocytes, macrophages, and the pituitary gland that serves to integrate peripheral and central inflammatory responses. Ubiquitous expression and developmental regulation suggest that MIF may have additional roles outside of the immune system. Here we report the structure and chromosomal location of the mouse Mif gene and the partial characterization of five Mif pseudogenes. The mouse Mif gene spans less than 0.7 kb of chromosomal DNA and is composed of three exons. A comparison between the mouse and the human genes shows a similar gene structure and common regulatory elements in both promoter regions. The mouse Mif gene maps to the middle region of chromosome 10, between Bcr and S100b, which have been mapped to human chromosomes 22q11 and 21q22.3, respectively. The entire sequence of two pseudogenes demonstrates the absence of introns, the presence of the 5{prime} untranslated region of the cDNA, a 3{prime} poly(A) tail, and the lack of sequence similarity with untranscribed regions of the gene. The five pseudogenes are highly homologous to the cDNA, but contain a variable number of mutations that would produce mutated or truncated MIF-like proteins. Phylogenetic analyses of MIF genes and pseudogenes indicate several independent genetic events that can account for multiple genomic integrations. Three of the Mif pseudogenes were also mapped by interspecific backcross to chromosomes 1, 9, and 17. These results suggest that Mif pseudogenes originated by retrotransposition. 46 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Mouse mammary tumors display Stat3 activation dependent on leukemia inhibitory factor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Quaglino, Ana; Schere-Levy, Carolina; Romorini, Leonardo; Meiss, Roberto P; Kordon, Edith C

    2007-01-01

    Introduction It has been demonstrated that leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) induces epithelium apoptosis through Stat3 activation during mouse mammary gland involution. In contrast, it has been shown that this transcription factor is commonly activated in breast cancer cells, although what causes this effect remains unknown. Here we have tested the hypothesis that locally produced LIF can be responsible for Stat3 activation in mouse mammary tumors. Methods The studies were performed in different tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic mammary cells. The expression of LIF and LIF receptor was tested by RT-PCR analysis. In tumors, LIF and Stat3 proteins were analyzed by immunohistochemistry, whereas Stat3 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 expression and phosphorylation were studied by Western blot analysis. A LIF-specific blocking antibody was used to determine whether this cytokine was responsible for Stat3 phosphorylation induced by conditioned medium. Specific pharmacological inhibitors (PD98059 and Stat3ip) that affect ERK1/2 and Stat3 activation were used to study their involvement in LIF-induced effects. To analyze cell survival, assays with crystal violet were performed. Results High levels of LIF expression and activated Stat3 were found in mammary tumors growing in vivo and in their primary cultures. We found a single mouse mammary tumor cell line, LM3, that showed low levels of activated Stat3. Incidentally, these cells also showed very little expression of LIF receptor. This suggested that autocrine/paracrine LIF would be responsible for Stat3 activation in mouse mammary tumors. This hypothesis was confirmed by the ability of conditioned medium of mammary tumor primary cultures to induce Stat3 phosphorylation, activity that was prevented by pretreatment with LIF-blocking antibody. Besides, we found that LIF increased tumor cell viability. Interestingly, blocking Stat3 activation enhanced this effect in mammary tumor cells. Conclusion LIF is

  14. Effects of olive polyphenols administration on nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    De Nicoló, Sara; Tarani, Luigi; Ceccanti, Mauro; Maldini, Mariateresa; Natella, Fausta; Vania, Andrea; Chaldakov, George N; Fiore, Marco

    2013-04-01

    Polyphenols are chemicals derived from plants known to possess antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. High intake of fruit and vegetables is believed to be beneficial to human health. Various studies have suggested that dietary polyphenols may protect against cancer and cardiometabolic and neurodegenerative diseases. Nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are neurotrophins that play key roles in brain cell development, growth, and survival. The aim of this study was to investigate whether or not administration of olive (Olea europaea L.) polyphenols could have an effect on NGF and BDNF content and the expression of their receptors, TrkA and TrkB, respectively, in the mouse brain. NGF and BDNF were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. TrkA and TrkB were measured by Western blotting. We found NGF and BDNF elevation in the hippocampus and olfactory bulbs and a decrease in the frontal cortex and striatum. These data were associated with potentiated expression of TrkA and TrkB in the hippocampus and olfactory bulbs but no differences between groups in the striatum and frontal cortex. Polyphenols did not affect some behavioral mouse parameters associated with stressing situations. Altogether, this study shows that olive polyphenols in the mouse may increase the levels of NGF and BDNF in crucial areas of the limbic system and olfactory bulbs, which play a key role in learning and memory processes and in the proliferation and migration of endogenous progenitor cells present in the rodent brain. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Regulation of factor IXa in vitro in human and mouse plasma and in vivo in the mouse. Role of the endothelium and the plasma proteinase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, H.E.; Trapp, H.G.; Griffith, M.J.; Roberts, H.R.; Pizzo, S.V.

    1984-06-01

    The regulation of human Factor IXa was studied in vitro in human and mouse plasma and in vivo in the mouse. In human plasma, approximately 60% of the /sup 125/I-Factor IXa was bound to antithrombin III (ATIII) by 2 h, with no binding to alpha 2-macroglobulin or alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor, as assessed by gel electrophoresis and IgG- antiproteinase inhibitor-Sepharose beads. In the presence of heparin, virtually 100% of the /sup 125/I-Factor IXa was bound to ATIII by 1 min. The distribution of /sup 125/I-Factor IXa in mouse plasma was similar. The clearance of /sup 125/I-Factor IXa was rapid (50% clearance in 2 min) and biphasic and was inhibited by large molar excesses of ATIII-thrombin and alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor-trypsin, but not alpha 2-macro-globulin-trypsin; it was also inhibited by large molar excesses of diisopropylphosphoryl - (DIP-) Factor Xa, DIP-thrombin, and Factor IX, but not by prothrombin or Factor X. The clearance of Factor IX was also rapid (50% clearance in 2.5 min) and was inhibited by a large molar excess of Factor IX, but not by large molar excesses of Factor X, prothrombin, DIP-Factor Xa, or DIP-thrombin. Electrophoresis and IgG- antiproteinase inhibitor-Sepharose bead studies confirmed that by 2 min after injection into the murine circulation, 60% of the /sup 125/I-Factor IXa was bound to ATIII. Organ distribution studies with /sup 125/I-Factor IXa demonstrated that most of the radioactivity was in the liver. These studies suggest that Factor IXa binds to at least two classes of binding sites on endothelial cells. One site apparently recognizes both Factors IX and IXa, but not Factor X, Factor Xa, prothrombin, or thrombin. The other site recognizes thrombin, Factor Xa, and Factor IXa, but not the zymogen forms of these clotting factors. After this binding, Factor IXa is bound to ATIII and the complex is cleared from the circulation by hepatocytes.

  16. Molecular cloning, functional expression, and chromosomal localization of mouse hepatocyte nuclear factor 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, C.J.; Conley, P.B.; Hsieh, Chihlin; Francke, U.; Crabtree, G.R. )

    1990-12-01

    The homeodomain-containing transcription factor hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 (HNF-1) most likely plays and essential role during liver organogenesis by transactivating a family of {gt}15 predominantly hepatic genes. The authors have isolated cDNA clones encoding mouse HNF-1 and expressed them in monkey COS cells and in the human T-cell line Jurkat, producing HNF-1 DNA-binding activity as well as transactivation of reporter constructs containing multimerized NHF-1 binding sites. In addition, the HNF-1 gene was assigned by somatic cell hybrids and recombinant inbred strain mapping to mouse chromosome 5 near Bcd-1 and to human chromosome 12 region q22-qter, revealing a homologous chromosome region in these two species. The presence of HNF-1 mRNA in multiple endodermal tissues (liver, stomach, intestine) suggests that HNF-1 may constitute an early marker for endodermal, rather than hepatocyte, differentiation. Further, that HNF-1 DNA-binding and transcriptional activity can be conferred by transfecting the HNF-1 cDNA into several cell lines indicates that it is sufficient to activate transcription in the context of ubiquitously expressed factors.

  17. Cognitive and social functions and growth factors in a mouse model of Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schaevitz, Laura R; Moriuchi, Jennifer M; Nag, Nupur; Mellot, Tiffany J; Berger-Sweeney, Joanne

    2010-06-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is an autism-spectrum disorder caused by mutations in the X-linked gene encoding methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2). Abnormalities in social behavior, stereotyped movements, and restricted interests are common features in both RTT and classic autism. While mouse models of both RTT and autism exist, social behaviors have not been explored extensively in mouse models of RTT. Here, we report cognitive and social abnormalities in Mecp2(1lox) null mice, an animal model of RTT. The null mice show severe deficits in short- and long-term object recognition memories, reminiscent of the severe cognitive deficits seen in RTT girls. Social behavior, however, is abnormal in that the null mice spend more time in contact with stranger mice than do wildtype controls. These findings are consistent with reports of increased reciprocal social interaction in RTT girls relative to classic autism. We also report here that the levels of the neurotrophins brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and nerve growth factor (NGF) are decreased in the hippocampus of the null mice, and discuss how this may provide an underlying mechanism for both the cognitive deficits and the increased motivation for social contact observed in the Mecp2(1lox) null mice. These studies support a differential etiology between RTT and autism, particularly with respect to sociability deficits.

  18. Comparison of melatonin with growth factors in promoting precursor cells proliferation in adult mouse subventricular zone

    PubMed Central

    Sotthibundhu, Areechun; Ekthuwapranee, Kasima; Govitrapong, Piyarat

    2016-01-01

    Melatonin, secreted mainly by the pineal gland, plays roles in various physiological functions including protecting cell death. We showed in previous study that the proliferation and differentiation of precursor cells from the adult mouse subventricular zone (SVZ) can be modulated by melatonin via the MT1 melatonin receptor. Since melatonin and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) share some signaling pathway components, we investigated whether melatonin can promote the proliferation of precursor cells from the adult mouse SVZ via the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase /mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK/MAPK) pathways in comparison with epidermal growth factor (EGF). Melatonin-induced ERK/MAPK pathways compared with EGF were measured by using in vitro and vivo models. We used neurosphere proliferation assay, immunocytochemistry, and immuno-blotting to analyze significant differences between melatonin and growth factor treatment. We also used specific antagonist and inhibitors to confirm the exactly signaling pathway including luzindole and U0126. We found that significant increase in proliferation was observed when two growth factors (EGF+bFGF) and melatonin were used simultaneously compared with EGF + bFGF or compared with melatonin alone. In addition, the present result suggested the synergistic effect occurred of melatonin and growth factors on the activating the ERK/MAPK pathway. This study exhibited that melatonin could act as a trophic factor, increasing proliferation in precursor cells mediated through the melatonin receptor coupled to ERK/MAPK signaling pathways. Understanding the mechanism by which melatonin regulates precursor cells may conduct to the development of novel strategies for neurodegenerative disease therapy. PMID:28275319

  19. Analysis of in vivo transcription factor recruitment by chromatin immunoprecipitation of mouse embryonic kidney.

    PubMed

    Heliot, Claire; Cereghini, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) is a powerful technique for examining transcription factor recruitment to chromatin, or histone modifications, at the level of specific genomic sequences. As such, it provides an invaluable tool for elucidating gene regulation at the molecular level. Combined with high-throughput methods such as second generation sequencing (ChIP-Seq), this technique is now commonly used for studying DNA-protein interactions at a genome-wide scale. The ChIP technique is based on covalent cross-linking of DNA and proteins with formaldehyde, followed by chromatin fragmentation, either enzymatic or by sonication, and immunoprecipitation of protein-DNA complexes using antibodies specific for the protein of interest. The immunoprecipitated DNA is then purified and the DNA sequences associated with the immunoprecipitated protein are identified by PCR (ChIP-PCR) or, alternatively, by direct sequencing (ChIP-Seq). Initially, the vast majority of ChIP experiments were performed on cultured cell lines. More recently, this technique has been adapted to a variety of tissues in different model organisms. We describe here a ChIP protocol on freshly isolated mouse embryonic kidneys for in vivo analysis of transcription factor recruitment on chromatin. This protocol has been easily adapted to other mouse embryonic tissues and has also been successfully scaled up to perform ChIP-Seq.

  20. Adipose-derived stromal cells overexpressing vascular endothelial growth factor accelerate mouse excisional wound healing.

    PubMed

    Nauta, Allison; Seidel, Catharina; Deveza, Lorenzo; Montoro, Daniel; Grova, Monica; Ko, Sae Hee; Hyun, Jeong; Gurtner, Geoffrey C; Longaker, Michael T; Yang, Fan

    2013-02-01

    Angiogenesis is essential to wound repair, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent factor to stimulate angiogenesis. Here, we examine the potential of VEGF-overexpressing adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) for accelerating wound healing using nonviral, biodegradable polymeric vectors. Mouse ASCs were transfected with DNA plasmid encoding VEGF or green fluorescent protein (GFP) using biodegradable poly (β-amino) esters (PBAE). Cells transfected using Lipofectamine 2000, a commercially available transfection reagent, were included as controls. ASCs transfected using PBAEs showed enhanced transfection efficiency and 12-15-fold higher VEGF production compared with cells transfected using Lipofectamine 2000 (*P < 0.05). When transplanted into a mouse wild-type excisional wound model, VEGF-overexpressing ASCs led to significantly accelerated wound healing, with full wound closure observed at 8 days compared to 10-12 days in groups treated with ASCs alone or saline control (*P < 0.05). Histology and polarized microscopy showed increased collagen deposition and more mature collagen fibers in the dermis of wound beds treated using PBAE/VEGF-modified ASCs than ASCs alone. Our results demonstrate the efficacy of using nonviral-engineered ASCs to accelerate wound healing, which may provide an alternative therapy for treating many diseases in which wound healing is impaired.

  1. Influence of some methodological factors on the radiosensitivity of the mouse zygote

    SciTech Connect

    Jacquet, P.; Grinfeld, S. )

    1990-10-01

    The experiments reported here were undertaken to investigate the influence of some methodological factors on the radiosensitivity of the mouse zygote. The following factors were studied: (1) the use of natural or hormone-stimulated ovulation; (2) the procedure followed for fertilization:mating overnight, or only during a short period in the morning after all oocytes have been ovulated, in vitro fertilization; (3) the type of irradiation, i.e., in vivo or in vitro irradiation. The radiosensitivity of the zygotes was estimated under the different experimental conditions by measuring the ability of the irradiated embryos to cleave and to develop further to the blastocyst stage. Our results suggest that the protocols used for mating and fertilization probably have a greater influence on embryonic survival following irradiation than the use of gonadotropins to stimulate ovulation. The highest degree of synchrony in the development of the embryos is achieved by restricting mating to a short period or by using in vitro fertilization. The very low LD50s obtained under such synchronous conditions confirm the high radiosensitivity of the mouse zygote at the early pronuclear stage. Comparison between the effects of in vivo and in vitro irradiation does not indicate a greater radiosensitivity of the embryo irradiated in vitro in comparison to the embryo irradiated in vivo.

  2. Mouse Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells Expressing Adipogenic and Osteogenic Transcription Factors Suppress the Macrophage Inflammatory Response.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Natalie; Renna, Heather; McHugh, Lauren; Mazolkova, Katie; Crugnola, William; Evans, Jodi F

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal progenitor cell characteristics that can identify progenitor populations with specific functions in immunity are actively being investigated. Progenitors from bone marrow and adipose tissue regulate the macrophage (MΦ) inflammatory response by promoting the switch from an inflammatory to an anti-inflammatory phenotype. Conversely, mesenchymal progenitors from the mouse aorta (mAo) support and contribute to the MΦ response under inflammatory conditions. We used cell lines with purported opposing immune-regulatory function, a bone marrow derived mesenchymal progenitor cell line (D1) and a mouse aorta derived mesenchymal progenitor cell line (mAo). Their interaction and regulation of the MΦ cell response to the inflammatory mediator, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), was examined by coculture. As expected, D1 cells suppressed NO, TNF-α, and IL-12p70 production but MΦ phagocytic activity remained unchanged. The mAo cells enhanced NO and TNF-α production in coculture and enhanced MΦ phagocytic activity. Using flow cytometry and PCR array, we then sought to identify sets of MSC-associated genes and markers that are expressed by these progenitor populations. We have determined that immune-supportive mesenchymal progenitors highly express chondrogenic and tenogenic transcription factors while immunosuppressive mesenchymal progenitors highly express adipogenic and osteogenic transcription factors. These data will be useful for the isolation, purification, and modification of mesenchymal progenitors to be used in the treatment of inflammatory diseases.

  3. Mouse Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells Expressing Adipogenic and Osteogenic Transcription Factors Suppress the Macrophage Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Natalie; Renna, Heather; McHugh, Lauren; Mazolkova, Katie; Crugnola, William

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal progenitor cell characteristics that can identify progenitor populations with specific functions in immunity are actively being investigated. Progenitors from bone marrow and adipose tissue regulate the macrophage (MΦ) inflammatory response by promoting the switch from an inflammatory to an anti-inflammatory phenotype. Conversely, mesenchymal progenitors from the mouse aorta (mAo) support and contribute to the MΦ response under inflammatory conditions. We used cell lines with purported opposing immune-regulatory function, a bone marrow derived mesenchymal progenitor cell line (D1) and a mouse aorta derived mesenchymal progenitor cell line (mAo). Their interaction and regulation of the MΦ cell response to the inflammatory mediator, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), was examined by coculture. As expected, D1 cells suppressed NO, TNF-α, and IL-12p70 production but MΦ phagocytic activity remained unchanged. The mAo cells enhanced NO and TNF-α production in coculture and enhanced MΦ phagocytic activity. Using flow cytometry and PCR array, we then sought to identify sets of MSC-associated genes and markers that are expressed by these progenitor populations. We have determined that immune-supportive mesenchymal progenitors highly express chondrogenic and tenogenic transcription factors while immunosuppressive mesenchymal progenitors highly express adipogenic and osteogenic transcription factors. These data will be useful for the isolation, purification, and modification of mesenchymal progenitors to be used in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:28191017

  4. Adipose-derived Stromal Cells Overexpressing Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Accelerate Mouse Excisional Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Nauta, Allison; Seidel, Catharina; Deveza, Lorenzo; Montoro, Daniel; Grova, Monica; Ko, Sae Hee; Hyun, Jeong; Gurtner, Geoffrey C; Longaker, Michael T; Yang, Fan

    2013-01-01

    Angiogenesis is essential to wound repair, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent factor to stimulate angiogenesis. Here, we examine the potential of VEGF-overexpressing adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) for accelerating wound healing using nonviral, biodegradable polymeric vectors. Mouse ASCs were transfected with DNA plasmid encoding VEGF or green fluorescent protein (GFP) using biodegradable poly (β-amino) esters (PBAE). Cells transfected using Lipofectamine 2000, a commercially available transfection reagent, were included as controls. ASCs transfected using PBAEs showed enhanced transfection efficiency and 12–15-fold higher VEGF production compared with cells transfected using Lipofectamine 2000 (*P < 0.05). When transplanted into a mouse wild-type excisional wound model, VEGF-overexpressing ASCs led to significantly accelerated wound healing, with full wound closure observed at 8 days compared to 10–12 days in groups treated with ASCs alone or saline control (*P < 0.05). Histology and polarized microscopy showed increased collagen deposition and more mature collagen fibers in the dermis of wound beds treated using PBAE/VEGF-modified ASCs than ASCs alone. Our results demonstrate the efficacy of using nonviral-engineered ASCs to accelerate wound healing, which may provide an alternative therapy for treating many diseases in which wound healing is impaired. PMID:23164936

  5. Nerve growth factor corrects developmental impairments of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons in the trisomy 16 mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Corsi, P; Coyle, J T

    1991-01-01

    The trisomy 16 (Ts16) mouse, which shares genetic and phenotypic homologies with Down syndrome, exhibits impaired development of the basal forebrain cholinergic system. Basal forebrains obtained from Ts16 and euploid littermate fetuses at 15 days of gestation were dissociated and cultured in completely defined medium, with cholinergic neurons identified by choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) immunoreactivity. The Ts16 cultures exhibited fewer ChAT-immunoreactive neurons, which were smaller and emitted shorter, smoother, and more simplified neurites than those from euploid littermates. Whereas the addition of beta-nerve growth factor (100 ng/ml) augmented the specific activity of ChAT and neuritic extension for both Ts16 and euploid cholinergic neurons, only Ts16 cultures exhibited an increase in the number and size of ChAT-immunoreactive neurons. Furthermore, Ts16 ChAT-immunoreactive neurites formed varicosities only in the presence of beta-nerve growth factor. Images PMID:2000385

  6. Tgif1 Counterbalances the Activity of Core Pluripotency Factors in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bum-Kyu; Shen, Wenwen; Lee, Jiwoon; Rhee, Catherine; Chung, Haewon; Kim, Kun-Yong; Park, In-Hyun; Kim, Jonghwan

    2015-10-06

    Core pluripotency factors, such as Oct4, Sox2, and Nanog, play important roles in maintaining embryonic stem cell (ESC) identity by autoregulatory feedforward loops. Nevertheless, the mechanism that provides precise control of the levels of the ESC core factors without indefinite amplification has remained elusive. Here, we report the direct repression of core pluripotency factors by Tgif1, a previously known terminal repressor of TGFβ/activin/nodal signaling. Overexpression of Tgif1 reduces the levels of ESC core factors, whereas its depletion leads to the induction of the pluripotency factors. We confirm the existence of physical associations between Tgif1 and Oct4, Nanog, and HDAC1/2 and further show the level of Tgif1 is not significantly altered by treatment with an activator/inhibitor of the TGFβ/activin/nodal signaling. Collectively, our findings establish Tgif1 as an integral member of the core regulatory circuitry of mouse ESCs that counterbalances the levels of the core pluripotency factors in a TGFβ/activin/nodal-independent manner. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Decomplementation with cobra venom factor prolongs survival of xenografted islets in a rat to mouse model

    PubMed Central

    OBERHOLZER, J; YU, D; TRIPONEZ, F; CRETIN, N; ANDEREGGEN, E; MENTHA, G; WHITE, D; BUEHLER, L; MOREL, P; LOU, J

    1999-01-01

    Although the involvement of complement in hyperacute rejection of xenotransplants is well recognized, its role in rejection of devascularized xenografts, such as pancreatic islets, is not completely understood. In this study, we investigated whether complement participates in the immunopathology of xeno-islet transplantation in a concordant rat to mouse model. Rat pancreatic islets were implanted under the kidney capsule of normal and cobra venom factor (CVF)-decomplementized diabetic C57BL/6 mice. Graft survival was monitored by blood glucose levels. Deposition of IgM and C3 on grafted islets in vivo or on isolated islets in vitro (after incubation with normal and decomplementized mouse serum), as well as CD4- and CD8-positive leucocyte infiltration of grafts, was checked by immunohistochemistry. In addition, complement-mediated cytotoxicity on rat islet cells was evaluated by a 3-(4,5-dimethythiazolyl)-2.5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium-bromide (MTT) assay. A significant C3 deposition was found on grafted islets from the first day after transplantation in vivo, as well as on isolated islets after incubation with mouse serum in vitro. By MTT assay, complement-mediated cytotoxicity for islet cells was found. Decomplementation by CVF decreased C3 deposition on either isolated or grafted islets, delayed CD4- and CD8-positive leucocyte infiltration, led to significant inhibition of complement-mediated cytotoxicity for islet cells, and prolonged graft survival (mean survival time 21·3 versus 8·5 days; P <0·01). Our results indicate that decomplementation can prolong the survival time of devascularized xenografts across concordant species. The deposition of complement on transplanted islets may contribute to xenograft rejection by direct cytotoxicity and by promoting leucocyte infiltration. PMID:10447729

  8. Factors affecting computer mouse use for young children: implications for AAC.

    PubMed

    Costigan, F Aileen; Light, Janice C; Newell, Karl M

    2012-06-01

    More than 12% of preschoolers receiving special education services have complex communication needs, including increasing numbers of children who do not have significant motor impairments (e.g., children with autism spectrum disorders, Down syndrome, etc.). In order to meet their diverse communication needs (e.g., face-to-face, written, Internet, telecommunication), these children may use mainstream technologies accessed via the mouse, yet little is known about factors that affect the mouse performance of young children. This study used a mixed factorial design to investigate the effects of age, target size, and angle of approach on accuracy and time required for accurate target selection with a mouse for 20 3-year-old and 20 4-year-old children. The 4-year-olds were generally more accurate and faster than the 3-year-olds. Target size and angle mediated differences in performance within age groups. The 3-year-olds were more accurate and faster in selecting the medium and large targets relative to the small target, were faster in selecting the large relative to the medium target, and were faster in selecting targets along the vertical relative to the diagonal angle. The 4-year-olds were faster in selecting the medium and large targets relative to the small target. Implications for improving access to AAC include the preliminary suggestion of age-related threshold target sizes that support sufficient accuracy, the possibility of efficiency benefits when target size is increased up to an age-related threshold, and identification of the potential utility of the vertical angle as a context for training navigational input device use.

  9. Prolonged cardiac allograft survival in mouse model after complement depletion with Yunnan cobra venom factor.

    PubMed

    Wu, W; Wang, H-D; Zhu, X-X; Lan, G; Yang, K

    2009-12-01

    Activation of the complement system is the leading mechanism that causes antibody-mediated acute rejection and hyperacute rejection after xenotransplantation. The major cause of acute rejection in allogeneic transplantation is the T cell-mediated specific immune response. We studied the effects of complement on acute rejection after cardiac allotransplantation using complement depletion with cobra venom factor (CVF) in the mouse. The Balb/c-C57 mouse model of heterotopic cardiac allograft was used. The mice were divided into 2 groups, a control group and a CVF-treated group. After intravenous injection of CVF, the experimental group was observed for allograft survival time. Twelve mice from the control and experimental groups were sacrificed on days 3, 5, and 7 after the operation. The pathologic grade of acute rejection, deposition of C3 in tissue, extent of infiltration by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, and expression of MHC-II, B7-1, and B7-2 were compared between the 2 groups. In the CVF-treated group, mean (SD) survival of the cardiac allograft was 26.2 (1.7) days, and in the control group was 8.4 (0.4) days (P < .01). Pathologic examination and immunohistochemistry demonstrated that the grade of acute rejection, deposition of C3 in tissue, extent of infiltration of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, and expression of MHC-II, B7-1, and B7-2 were significantly decreased in the CVF-treated group. Depletion of complement in the serum with CVF inhibits acute cardiac allograft rejection in the mouse.

  10. Dysfunctional Transforming Growth Factor-β Receptor II Accelerates Prostate Tumorigenesis in the TRAMP Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Hong; Collazo, Joanne; Jones, Elisabeth; Gayheart, Dustin; Sakamoto, Shinichi; Vogt, Adam; Mitchell, Bonnie; Kyprianou, Natasha

    2009-01-01

    The contribution of a dysfunctional TGF-β type II receptor (TGFβRII) to prostate cancer initiation and progression was investigated in an in vivo mouse model. Transgenic mice harboring the dominant-negative mutant TGF-β type II receptor (DNTGFβRII) in mouse epithelial cell were crossed with the TRAMP prostate cancer transgenic mouse to characterize the in vivo consequences of inactivated TGF-β signaling on prostate tumor initiation and progression. Histopathological diagnosis of prostate specimens from the TRAMP+/DNTGFβRII double transgenic mice, revealed the appearance of early malignant changes and subsequently highly aggressive prostate tumors at a younger age, compared to littermates TRAMP+/Wt TGFβRII mice. Immunohistochemical and western blotting analysis revealed significantly increased proliferative and apoptotic activities, as well as vascularity and macrophage infiltration that correlated with an elevated VEGF and MCP-1 protein levels in prostates from TRAMP+/DNTGFβRII+ mice. An epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-effect was also detected in prostates of TRAMP+/DNTGFβRII mice, as documented by the loss of epithelial markers (E-cadherin and β-catenin) and upregulation of mesenchymal markers (N-cadherin) and EMT-transcription factor Snail. A significant increase in the androgen receptor (AR) mRNA and protein levels was associated with the early onset of prostate tumorigenesis in TRAMP+/DNTGFβRII mice. Our results indicate that in vivo disruption of TGF-β signaling accelerates the pathological malignant changes in the prostate by altering the kinetics of prostate growth and inducing EMT. The study also suggests that a dysfunctional TGFβRII augments AR expression and promotes inflammation in early stage tumor growth thus conferring a significant contribution by TGF-β to prostate cancer progression. PMID:19738062

  11. Inhibition of transforming growth factor β signaling promotes epiblast formation in mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Ghimire, Sabitri; Heindryckx, Björn; Van der Jeught, Margot; Neupane, Jitesh; O'Leary, Thomas; Lierman, Sylvie; De Vos, Winnok H; Chuva de Sousa Lopes, Susana; Deroo, Tom; De Sutter, Petra

    2015-02-15

    Early lineage segregation in preimplantation embryos and maintenance of pluripotency in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are both regulated by specific signaling pathways. Small molecules have been shown to modulate these signaling pathways. We examined the influence of several small molecules and growth factors on second-lineage segregation of the inner cell mass toward hypoblast and epiblast lineage during mouse embryonic preimplantation development. We found that the second-lineage segregation is influenced by activation or inhibition of the transforming growth factor (TGF)β pathway. Inhibition of the TGFβ pathway from the two-cell, four-cell, and morula stages onward up to the blastocyst stage significantly increased the epiblast cell proliferation. The epiblast formed in the embryos in which TGFβ signaling was inhibited was fully functional as demonstrated by the potential of these epiblast cells to give rise to pluripotent ESCs. Conversely, activating the TGFβ pathway reduced epiblast formation. Inhibition of the glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)3 pathway and activation of bone morphogenetic protein 4 signaling reduced the formation of both epiblast and hypoblast cells. Activation of the protein kinase A pathway and of the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 pathway did not influence the second-lineage segregation in mouse embryos. The simultaneous inhibition of three pathways--TGFβ, GSK3β, and the fibroblast growth factor (FGF)/extracellular signal-regulated kinases (Erk)--significantly enhanced the proliferation of epiblast cells than that caused by inhibition of either TGFβ pathway alone or by combined inhibition of the GSK3β and FGF/Erk pathways only.

  12. Connective tissue growth factor/CCN2-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts retain intact transforming growth factor-{beta} responsiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Yasuji; Hinchcliff, Monique; Wu, Minghua; Warner-Blankenship, Matthew; Lyons, Karen M.

    2008-03-10

    Background: The matricellular protein connective tissue growth factor (CCN2) has been implicated in pathological fibrosis, but its physiologic role remains elusive. In vitro, transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF-{beta}) induces CCN2 expression in mesenchymal cells. Because CCN2 can enhance profibrotic responses elicited by TGF-{beta}, it has been proposed that CCN2 functions as an essential downstream signaling mediator for TGF-{beta}. To explore this notion, we characterized TGF-{beta}-induced activation of fibroblasts from CCN2-null (CCN2{sup -/-}) mouse embryos. Methods: The regulation of CCN2 expression was examined in vivo in a model of fibrosis induced by bleomycin. Cellular TGF-{beta} signal transduction and regulation of collagen gene expression were examined in CCN2{sup -/-} MEFs by immunohistochemistry, Northern, Western and RT-PCR analysis, immunocytochemistry and transient transfection assays. Results: Bleomycin-induced skin fibrosis in the mouse was associated with substantial CCN2 up-regulation in lesional fibroblasts. Whereas in vitro proliferation rate of CCN2{sup -/-} MEFs was markedly reduced compared to wild type MEFs, TGF-{beta}-induced activation of the Smad pathways, including Smad2 phosphorylation, Smad2/3 and Smad4 nuclear accumulation and Smad-dependent transcriptional responses, were unaffected by loss of CCN2. The stimulation of COL1A2 and fibronectin mRNA expression and promoter activity, and of corresponding protein levels, showed comparable time and dose-response in wild type and CCN2{sup -/-} MEFs, whereas stimulation of alpha smooth muscle actin and myofibroblast transdifferentiation showed subtle impairment in MEFs lacking CCN2. Conclusion: Whereas endogenous CCN2 plays a role in regulation of proliferation and TGF-{beta}-induced myofibroblast transdifferentiation, it appears to be dispensable for Smad-dependent stimulation of collagen and extracellular matrix synthesis in murine embryonic fibroblasts.

  13. Control of Mycobacterial Infections in Mice Expressing Human Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) but Not Mouse TNF

    PubMed Central

    Olleros, Maria L.; Chavez-Galan, Leslie; Segueni, Noria; Bourigault, Marie L.; Vesin, Dominique; Kruglov, Andrey A.; Drutskaya, Marina S.; Bisig, Ruth; Ehlers, Stefan; Aly, Sahar; Walter, Kerstin; Kuprash, Dmitry V.; Chouchkova, Miliana; Kozlov, Sergei V.; Erard, François; Ryffel, Bernard; Quesniaux, Valérie F. J.; Nedospasov, Sergei A.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is an important cytokine for host defense against pathogens but is also associated with the development of human immunopathologies. TNF blockade effectively ameliorates many chronic inflammatory conditions but compromises host immunity to tuberculosis. The search for novel, more specific human TNF blockers requires the development of a reliable animal model. We used a novel mouse model with complete replacement of the mouse TNF gene by its human ortholog (human TNF [huTNF] knock-in [KI] mice) to determine resistance to Mycobacterium bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis infections and to investigate whether TNF inhibitors in clinical use reduce host immunity. Our results show that macrophages from huTNF KI mice responded to BCG and lipopolysaccharide similarly to wild-type macrophages by NF-κB activation and cytokine production. While TNF-deficient mice rapidly succumbed to mycobacterial infection, huTNF KI mice survived, controlling the bacterial burden and activating bactericidal mechanisms. Administration of TNF-neutralizing biologics disrupted the control of mycobacterial infection in huTNF KI mice, leading to an increased bacterial burden and hyperinflammation. Thus, our findings demonstrate that human TNF can functionally replace murine TNF in vivo, providing mycobacterial resistance that could be compromised by TNF neutralization. This new animal model will be helpful for the testing of specific biologics neutralizing human TNF. PMID:26123801

  14. Gene expression based mouse brain parcellation using Markov random field regularized non-negative matrix factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Sayan D.; Haynor, David R.; Thompson, Carol L.; Lein, Ed; Hawrylycz, Michael

    2009-02-01

    Understanding the geography of genetic expression in the mouse brain has opened previously unexplored avenues in neuroinformatics. The Allen Brain Atlas (www.brain-map.org) (ABA) provides genome-wide colorimetric in situ hybridization (ISH) gene expression images at high spatial resolution, all mapped to a common three-dimensional 200μm3 spatial framework defined by the Allen Reference Atlas (ARA) and is a unique data set for studying expression based structural and functional organization of the brain. The goal of this study was to facilitate an unbiased data-driven structural partitioning of the major structures in the mouse brain. We have developed an algorithm that uses nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) to perform parts based analysis of ISH gene expression images. The standard NMF approach and its variants are limited in their ability to flexibly integrate prior knowledge, in the context of spatial data. In this paper, we introduce spatial connectivity as an additional regularization in NMF decomposition via the use of Markov Random Fields (mNMF). The mNMF algorithm alternates neighborhood updates with iterations of the standard NMF algorithm to exploit spatial correlations in the data. We present the algorithm and show the sub-divisions of hippocampus and somatosensory-cortex obtained via this approach. The results are compared with established neuroanatomic knowledge. We also highlight novel gene expression based sub divisions of the hippocampus identified by using the mNMF algorithm.

  15. Direct Reprogramming of Mouse and Human Fibroblasts into Multipotent Neural Stem Cells with a Single Factor

    PubMed Central

    Ring, Karen L.; Tong, Leslie M.; Balestra, Maureen E.; Javier, Robyn; Andrews-Zwilling, Yaisa; Li, Gang; Walker, David; Zhang, William R.; Kreitzer, Anatol C.; Huang, Yadong

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells and induced neuronal (iN) cells from somatic cells provides new avenues for basic research and potential transplantation therapies for neurological diseases. However, clinical applications must consider the risk of tumor formation by iPS cells and the inability of iN cells to self-renew in culture. Here we report the generation of induced neural stem cells (iNSCs) from mouse and human fibroblasts by direct reprogramming with a single factor, Sox2. iNSCs express NSC markers and resemble wild-type NSCs in their morphology, self-renewal, ability to form neurospheres, and gene expression profiles. Cloned iNSCs differentiate into several types of mature neurons, as well as astrocytes and oligodendrocytes, indicating multipotency. Implanted iNSCs can survive and integrate in mouse brains and, unlike iPS cell-derived NSCs, do not generate tumors. Thus, self-renewable and multipotent iNSCs without tumorigenic potential can be generated directly from fibroblasts by reprogramming. PMID:22683203

  16. Control of Mycobacterial Infections in Mice Expressing Human Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) but Not Mouse TNF.

    PubMed

    Olleros, Maria L; Chavez-Galan, Leslie; Segueni, Noria; Bourigault, Marie L; Vesin, Dominique; Kruglov, Andrey A; Drutskaya, Marina S; Bisig, Ruth; Ehlers, Stefan; Aly, Sahar; Walter, Kerstin; Kuprash, Dmitry V; Chouchkova, Miliana; Kozlov, Sergei V; Erard, François; Ryffel, Bernard; Quesniaux, Valérie F J; Nedospasov, Sergei A; Garcia, Irene

    2015-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is an important cytokine for host defense against pathogens but is also associated with the development of human immunopathologies. TNF blockade effectively ameliorates many chronic inflammatory conditions but compromises host immunity to tuberculosis. The search for novel, more specific human TNF blockers requires the development of a reliable animal model. We used a novel mouse model with complete replacement of the mouse TNF gene by its human ortholog (human TNF [huTNF] knock-in [KI] mice) to determine resistance to Mycobacterium bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis infections and to investigate whether TNF inhibitors in clinical use reduce host immunity. Our results show that macrophages from huTNF KI mice responded to BCG and lipopolysaccharide similarly to wild-type macrophages by NF-κB activation and cytokine production. While TNF-deficient mice rapidly succumbed to mycobacterial infection, huTNF KI mice survived, controlling the bacterial burden and activating bactericidal mechanisms. Administration of TNF-neutralizing biologics disrupted the control of mycobacterial infection in huTNF KI mice, leading to an increased bacterial burden and hyperinflammation. Thus, our findings demonstrate that human TNF can functionally replace murine TNF in vivo, providing mycobacterial resistance that could be compromised by TNF neutralization. This new animal model will be helpful for the testing of specific biologics neutralizing human TNF.

  17. Genistein nanoparticles protect mouse hematopoietic system and prevent proinflammatory factors after gamma irradiation.

    PubMed

    Ha, Cam T; Li, Xiang-Hong; Fu, Dadin; Xiao, Mang; Landauer, Michael R

    2013-09-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that genistein protects mice from radiation-induced bone marrow failure. To overcome genistein's extremely low water solubility, a nanoparticle suspension of genistein has been formulated for more rapid dissolution. In the current study, we evaluated the radioprotective effects of a nanoparticle formulation of genistein on survival and hematopoietic recovery in mice exposed to total-body gamma irradiation. A single intramuscular injection of a saline-based genistein nanosuspension (150 mg/kg) administered to CD2F1 mice 24 h before 9.25 Gy (60)Co radiation exposure resulted in a 30-day survival rate of 95% compared to 25% in vehicle-treated animals. In mice irradiated at 7 Gy, the genistein nanosuspension increased mouse bone marrow cellularity from approximately 2.9% (vehicle treated) to 28.3% on day 7 postirradiation. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated decreased radiation-induced hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC, Lineage(-)/cKit(+)) death from 77.0% (vehicle) to 43.9% (genistein nanosuspension) with a significant recovery of clonogenicity 7 days after irradiation. The genistein nanosuspension also attenuated the radiation-induced elevation of proinflammatory factors interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β), IL-6 and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in mouse bone marrow and spleen, which may contribute to protecting HSPCs.

  18. Recombinant Human Epidermal Growth Factor Accelerates Recovery of Mouse Small Intestinal Mucosa After Radiation Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kang Kyoo; Jo, Hyang Jeong; Hong, Joon Pio; Lee, Sang-wook Sohn, Jung Sook; Moon, Soo Young; Yang, Sei Hoon; Shim, Hyeok; Lee, Sang Ho; Ryu, Seung-Hee; Moon, Sun Rock

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: To determine whether systemically administered recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF) accelerates the recovery of mouse small intestinal mucosa after irradiation. Methods and Materials: A mouse mucosal damage model was established by administering radiation to male BALB/c mice with a single dose of 15 Gy applied to the abdomen. After irradiation, rhEGF was administered subcutaneously at various doses (0.04, 0.2, 1.0, and 5.0 mg/kg/day) eight times at 2- to 3-day intervals. The evaluation methods included histologic changes of small intestinal mucosa, change in body weight, frequency of diarrhea, and survival rate. Results: The recovery of small intestinal mucosa after irradiation was significantly improved in the mice treated with a high dose of rhEGF. In the mice that underwent irradiation without rhEGF treatment, intestinal mucosal ulceration, mucosal layer damage, and severe inflammation occurred. The regeneration of villi was noticeable in mice treated with more than 0.2 mg/kg rhEGF, and the villi recovered fully in mice given more than 1 mg/kg rhEGF. The frequency of diarrhea persisting for more than 3 days was significantly greater in the radiation control group than in the rhEGF-treated groups. Conclusions: Systemic administration of rhEGF accelerates recovery from mucosal damage induced by irradiation. We suggest that rhEGF treatment shows promise for the reduction of small intestinal damage after irradiation.

  19. Epidermal growth factor-like, corneal wound healing substance in mouse tears.

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsumi, O; Tsutsumi, A; Oka, T

    1988-01-01

    We have identified the presence of a putative corneal wound healing substance in mouse tears, which has a molecular size and immunological properties similar to those of epidermal growth factor (EGF). The substance was capable of binding to EGF receptors in mouse parenchymal cells and this binding was inhibited by anti-EGF serum. The concentration of the EGF-like substance in the tears of male and female mice was estimated to be 79.3 +/- 7.0 (SD) ng/ml and 76.5 +/- 8.1 (SD) ng/ml, respectively, by EGF radioimmunoassay. Removal of the submandibular glands, which produce large amounts of EGF, reduced plasma EGF to an undetectable level and also decreased the concentration of the EGF-like substance in tears to 27.3 +/- 3.9 (SD) ng/ml in male mice and 25.8 +/- 3.7 (SD) ng/ml in female mice. Approximately 50% of sialoadenectomized (submandibular glands removed) male mice with deep corneal wounds developed severe ocular lesions or loss of sight whereas none of normal male mice with similar wounds did. Topical application of EGF to deeply wounded eyes of sialoadenectomized mice eliminated the various complications and restored the healing rate and incidence of recovery to virtually normal levels. Images PMID:3258318

  20. Epidermal growth factor binding and receptor distribution in the mouse reproductive tract during development

    SciTech Connect

    Bossert, N.L.; Nelson, K.G.; Ross, K.A.; Takahashi, T.; McLachlan, J.A. )

    1990-11-01

    The ontogeny of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor in the different cell types in the neonatal and immature mouse uterus and vagina was examined. Immunohistochemical examination of prenatal and neonatal reproductive tracts with a polyclonal antibody to the EGF receptor shows immunoreactive EGF receptors as early as Day 13 of gestation. Autoradiographic analysis of tissue sections at 3 to 17 days of age (the day of birth is Day 1) demonstrates that both uterine and vaginal epithelial and stromal cells are capable of binding 125I-labeled EGF. Both the 125I-labeled EGF autoradiography and immunohistochemistry in whole tissue show higher EGF receptor levels in the uterine epithelium than the uterine stroma. The presence of EGF receptors was also confirmed by affinity labeling and Scatchard analysis of isolated uterine cell types at 7 and/or 17 days of age. However, in contrast to the autoradiography and immunohistochemistry data of intact tissue, the affinity labeling and Scatchard data of isolated cells indicate that the uterine stroma contains higher levels of EGF receptor than that of the uterine epithelium. The reason for this discrepancy between the different techniques is, as yet, unknown. Regardless of the differences in the actual numbers of EGF receptors obtained, our data demonstrate that the developing mouse reproductive tract contains immunoreactive EGF receptors that are capable of binding 125I-labeled EGF.

  1. Immunolocalization of fibroblast growth factor receptors 1 and 2 in mouse palate development.

    PubMed

    Lee, S; Crisera, C A; Erfani, S; Maldonado, T S; Lee, J J; Alkasab, S L; Longaker, M T

    2001-06-01

    Recent evidence has implicated mutations of fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGF-R) in the pathogenesis of craniosynostotic syndromes. Cleft palate can be a component of such syndromes. The expression of FGF-R1 and FGF-R2 has been delineated in normally developing cranium, where they seem to regulate cellular differentiation and proliferation, respectively. The specific role of fibroblast growth factor signaling in mammalian palate development is unclear. The authors investigated the patterns of expression of FGF-R1 and FGF-R2 throughout mouse palatal development in the embryo. Time-dated CD-1 mouse heads (n = 135) were harvested at embryonic ages 12.5, 13.5, 14.5, 15.5, and 16.5 days (term gestation = 19.5 days), fixed in paraformaldehyde, embedded in paraffin, and sectioned. In addition, paired palatal shelves (n = 30) were isolated by means of microdissection from embryonic day--13.5 embryos, grown on Millipore filters in serum-free medium in vitro for 24, 48, 72, or 96 hours and processed for histological analysis. Immunohistochemical analysis for FGF-R1 and FGF-R2 was performed on the in vivo and in vitro specimens. FGF-R1 and FGF-R2 were found to be specifically expressed in the epithelium of the developing palatal shelves from the time of their outgrowth from the maxillary processes through completion of fusion in vivo and in vitro. Expression of both receptors was particularly strong during the phases of medial epithelial-medial epithelial contact between the individual shelves, through the formation of the medial epithelial seam, to the ultimate dissolution of the seam. Such a pattern of expression seems to implicate fibroblast growth factor signaling in the regulation of the critical phase of fusion of the bilateral shelves. The expression of both FGF-R1 and FGF-R2 in the lateral palatal mesenchyme, where such secondary structures as tooth primordia and bone begin to appear, also suggests a role for fibroblast growth factor signaling in the induction

  2. Von Willebrand Factor Abnormalities Studied in the Mouse Model: What We Learned about VWF Functions

    PubMed Central

    Casari, Caterina; Lenting, Peter J.; Christophe, Olivier D.; Denis, Cécile V.

    2013-01-01

    Up until recently, von Willebrand Factor (VWF) structure-function relationships have only been studied through in vitro approaches. A powerful technique known as hydrodynamic gene transfer, which allows transient expression of a transgene by mouse hepatocytes, has led to an important shift in VWF research. Indeed this approach has now enabled us to transiently express a number of VWF mutants in VWF-deficient mice in order to test the relative importance of specific residues in different aspects of VWF biology and functions in an in vivo setting. As a result, mice reproducing various types of von Willebrand disease have been generated, models that will be useful to test new therapies. This approach also allowed a more precise identification of the importance of VWF interaction with subendothelial collagens and with platelets receptors in hemostasis and thrombosis. The recent advances gathered from these studies as well as the pros and cons of the technique will be reviewed here. PMID:23936618

  3. Atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) inhibits thyroid hormone secretion in the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Ahren, B. )

    1990-01-01

    Recently, thyroid follicular cells were shown to exhibit atrial natriuretic factor (ANF)-like immunoreactivity and high affinity ANF receptors. In this study, we therefore examined the effects of synthetic rat ANF{sub 1-28} on basal and stimulated thyroid hormone secretion in the mouse, according to the McKenzie technique. Iodine deficient mice were pretreated with {sup 125}I and thyroxine. ANF (3 nmol/animal) was found to inhibit the increase in blood radioiodine levels that was induced by TSH or vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP). Furthermore, ANF and norepinephrine additively inhibited the TSH-induced increase in blood radioiodine levels. It is concluded that ANF inhibits thyroid hormone secretion, which, therefore, might be locally regulated by intrathyroidal ANF.

  4. [Molecular structural characteristics and the functions of mouse DNA-dependent activator of interferon-regulatory factors].

    PubMed

    Jin, Qiwang; Li, Tingting; He, Xiaobing; Jia, Huaijie; Chen, Guohua; Zeng, Shuang; Fang, Yongxiang; Jing, Zhizhong; Yang, Xiaopu

    2015-12-01

    To study the structural characteristics of the mouse DNA-dependent activator of interferon-regulatory factors (DAI) and its related molecular mechanism in anti-viral innate immune responses and signal transduction. The coding sequence of mouse DAI gene was amplified from splenic mononuclear cells by reverse transcription-PCR, and the genetic evolution and molecular structure of the mouse DAI gene were analyzed by bioinformatics softwares. After mouse DAI was stimulated by poly(dA-dT) and poly(dG-dC), the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and interferon-beta (IFN-β) promoter-driven luciferase activity were detected by dual-luciferase reporter assay system. The open reading frame (ORF) of the cloned mouse DAI sequence was 1236 bp, encoding 411 amino acids, which exhibited identity with the corresponding sequences of cattle, pig, rat and other mammals ranging from 60%, 63.1%, 84%, and it contained two Z-DNA domains (Zα and Zβ), DNA binding region (D3) and signaling domain (SD). The stimulation of poly (dA-dT) increased the expressions of mouse DAI activated transcription factors NF-κB and IFN-β promoter. However, the stimulation of poly(dG-dC) only induced the activation of NF-κB but not IFN-β promoter. Mouse DAI as an important cytosolic DNA sensor, is responsible for the recognition of A/T or G/C-rich DNA derived from DNA virus. It may play an important role in anti-viral innate immune responses.

  5. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α regulates β cell function in mouse and human islets

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Kim; Ho, Kenneth; Stokes, Rebecca; Scott, Christopher; Lau, Sue Mei; Hawthorne, Wayne J.; O’Connell, Philip J.; Loudovaris, Thomas; Kay, Thomas W.; Kulkarni, Rohit N.; Okada, Terumasa; Wang, Xiaohui L.; Yim, Sun Hee; Shah, Yatrik; Grey, Shane T.; Biankin, Andrew V.; Kench, James G.; Laybutt, D. Ross; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Kahn, C. Ronald; Gunton, Jenny E.

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) is a transcription factor that regulates cellular stress responses. While the levels of HIF-1α protein are tightly regulated, recent studies suggest that it can be active under normoxic conditions. We hypothesized that HIF-1α is required for normal β cell function and reserve and that dysregulation may contribute to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Here we show that HIF-1α protein is present at low levels in mouse and human normoxic β cells and islets. Decreased levels of HIF-1α impaired glucose-stimulated ATP generation and β cell function. C57BL/6 mice with β cell–specific Hif1a disruption (referred to herein as β-Hif1a-null mice) exhibited glucose intolerance, β cell dysfunction, and developed severe glucose intolerance on a high-fat diet. Increasing HIF-1α levels by inhibiting its degradation through iron chelation markedly improved insulin secretion and glucose tolerance in control mice fed a high-fat diet but not in β-Hif1a-null mice. Increasing HIF-1α levels markedly increased expression of ARNT and other genes in human T2D islets and improved their function. Further analysis indicated that HIF-1α was bound to the Arnt promoter in a mouse β cell line, suggesting direct regulation. Taken together, these findings suggest an important role for HIF-1α in β cell reserve and regulation of ARNT expression and demonstrate that HIF-1α is a potential therapeutic target for the β cell dysfunction of T2D. PMID:20440072

  6. Adaptation of Hepatitis C Virus to Mouse CD81 Permits Infection of Mouse Cells in the Absence of Human Entry Factors

    PubMed Central

    Bitzegeio, Julia; Bankwitz, Dorothea; Hueging, Kathrin; Haid, Sibylle; Brohm, Christiane; Zeisel, Mirjam B.; Herrmann, Eva; Iken, Marcus; Ott, Michael; Baumert, Thomas F.; Pietschmann, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) naturally infects only humans and chimpanzees. The determinants responsible for this narrow species tropism are not well defined. Virus cell entry involves human scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI), CD81, claudin-1 and occludin. Among these, at least CD81 and occludin are utilized in a highly species-specific fashion, thus contributing to the narrow host range of HCV. We adapted HCV to mouse CD81 and identified three envelope glycoprotein mutations which together enhance infection of cells with mouse or other rodent receptors approximately 100-fold. These mutations enhanced interaction with human CD81 and increased exposure of the binding site for CD81 on the surface of virus particles. These changes were accompanied by augmented susceptibility of adapted HCV to neutralization by E2-specific antibodies indicative of major conformational changes of virus-resident E1/E2-complexes. Neutralization with CD81, SR-BI- and claudin-1-specific antibodies and knock down of occludin expression by siRNAs indicate that the adapted virus remains dependent on these host factors but apparently utilizes CD81, SR-BI and occludin with increased efficiency. Importantly, adapted E1/E2 complexes mediate HCV cell entry into mouse cells in the absence of human entry factors. These results further our knowledge of HCV receptor interactions and indicate that three glycoprotein mutations are sufficient to overcome the species-specific restriction of HCV cell entry into mouse cells. Moreover, these findings should contribute to the development of an immunocompetent small animal model fully permissive to HCV. PMID:20617177

  7. Multifaceted Therapeutic Benefits of Factors Derived From Dental Pulp Stem Cells for Mouse Liver Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Marina; Ishigami, Masatoshi; Matsushita, Yoshihiro; Ito, Takanori; Hattori, Hisashi; Hibi, Hideharu; Goto, Hidemi; Ueda, Minoru; Yamamoto, Akihito

    2016-10-01

    : Chronic liver injury from various causes often results in liver fibrosis (LF). Although the liver possesses endogenous tissue-repairing activities, these can be overcome by sustained inflammation and excessive fibrotic scar formation. Advanced LF leads to irreversible cirrhosis and subsequent liver failure and/or hepatic cancer. Here, using the mouse carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced LF model, we showed that a single intravenous administration of stem cells derived from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs) or of SHED-derived serum-free conditioned medium (SHED-CM) resulted in fibrotic scar resolution. SHED-CM suppressed the gene expression of proinflammatory mediators, such as TNF-α, IL-1β, and iNOS, and eliminated activated hepatic stellate cells by inducing their apoptosis, but protected parenchymal hepatocytes from undergoing apoptosis. In addition, SHED-CM induced tissue-repairing macrophages that expressed high levels of the profibrinolytic factor, matrix metalloproteinase 13. Furthermore, SHED-CM suppressed the CCl4-induced apoptosis of primary cultured hepatocytes. SHED-CM contained a high level of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). Notably, HGF-depleted SHED-CM (dHGF-CM) did not suppress the proinflammatory response or resolve fibrotic scarring. Furthermore, SHED-CM, but not dHGF-CM, inhibited CCl4-induced hepatocyte apoptosis. These results suggest that HGF plays a central role in the SHED-CM-mediated resolution of LF. Taken together, our findings suggest that SHED-CM provides multifaceted therapeutic benefits for the treatment of LF. This study demonstrated that a single intravenous administration of stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs) or of the serum-free conditioned medium (CM) derived from SHEDs markedly improved mouse liver fibrosis (LF). SHED-CM suppressed chronic inflammation, eliminated activated hepatic stellate cells by inducing their apoptosis, protected hepatocytes from undergoing apoptosis, and induced

  8. DNase I-hypersensitive sites and transcription factor-binding motifs within the mouse E beta meiotic recombination hot spot.

    PubMed

    Shenkar, R; Shen, M H; Arnheim, N

    1991-04-01

    The second intron of the E beta gene in the mouse major histocompatibility complex is the site of a meiotic recombination hot spot. We detected two DNase I-hypersensitive sites in this intron in meiotic cells isolated from mouse testes. One site appears to be constitutive and is found in other tissues regardless of whether or not they express the E beta gene. Near this hypersensitive site are potential binding motifs for H2TF1/KBF1, NF kappa B, and octamer transcription factors. Gel retardation studies with mouse lymphoma cell nuclear extracts confirmed that each of these motifs is capable of binding protein. The binding of transcription factors may contribute to the enhancement of recombination potential by altering chromatin structure and increasing the accessibility of the DNA to the recombination machinery.

  9. Characterization of FGF family growth factors concerning branching morphogenesis of mouse lung epithelium.

    PubMed

    Goto, Asami; Yamazaki, Naohiro; Nogawa, Hiroyuki

    2014-05-01

    Mouse lung rudiments express eight members of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family genes from embryonic day 10 (E10) to E13. Some of these are expressed in either the epithelium or mesenchyme, while others are expressed in both. Incorporating the results of our previous study, we characterized the branch-inducing activities of all of FGFs expressed in the early lung rudiment. Of these, FGF1, FGF2, FGF7, FGF9 and FGF10 induced branching morphogenesis in Matrigel-embedded E11 epithelium, and their effective concentrations varied (10 nM, 10 nM, 3 nM, 1 nM, and 100 nM, respectively). Whereas shaking culture dishes containing medium supplemented with FGF7 or FGF10 showed reduced branching morphogenesis, those supplemented with FGF1, FGF2, or FGF9 did not, suggesting the involvement of autocrine growth factor(s) in branching morphogenesis induced by FGF7 or FGF10. In the presence of heparin, a well-known activator of FGF signaling, cystic morphology with lumen expansion was observed in cultures containing FGF1, FGF7, or FGF10, but growth arrest was observed in cultures containing FGF2 or FGF9. These results indicate that several paracrine and autocrine FGFs function during branching morphogenesis of lung epithelium.

  10. Compound hierarchical correlated beta mixture with an application to cluster mouse transcription factor DNA binding data.

    PubMed

    Dai, Hongying; Charnigo, Richard

    2015-10-01

    Modeling correlation structures is a challenge in bioinformatics, especially when dealing with high throughput genomic data. A compound hierarchical correlated beta mixture (CBM) with an exchangeable correlation structure is proposed to cluster genetic vectors into mixture components. The correlation coefficient, [Formula: see text], is homogenous within a mixture component and heterogeneous between mixture components. A random CBM with [Formula: see text] brings more flexibility in explaining correlation variations among genetic variables. Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm and Stochastic Expectation-Maximization (SEM) algorithm are used to estimate parameters of CBM. The number of mixture components can be determined using model selection criteria such as AIC, BIC and ICL-BIC. Extensive simulation studies were conducted to compare EM, SEM and model selection criteria. Simulation results suggest that CBM outperforms the traditional beta mixture model with lower estimation bias and higher classification accuracy. The proposed method is applied to cluster transcription factor-DNA binding probability in mouse genome data generated by Lahdesmaki and others (2008, Probabilistic inference of transcription factor binding from multiple data sources. PLoS One, 3: , e1820). The results reveal distinct clusters of transcription factors when binding to promoter regions of genes in JAK-STAT, MAPK and other two pathways. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Mouse Proepicardium Exhibits a Sprouting Response to Exogenous Proangiogenic Growth Factors in vitro.

    PubMed

    Niderla-Bielińska, Justyna; Ciszek, Bogdan; Jankowska-Steifer, Ewa; Flaht-Zabost, Aleksandra; Gula, Grzegorz; Radomska-Leśniewska, Dorota M; Ratajska, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis contributes to the generation of the vascular bed but also affects the progression of many diseases, such as tumor growth. Many details of the molecular pathways controlling angiogenesis are still undefined due to the lack of appropriate models. We propose the proepicardial explant as a suitable model for studying certain aspects of angiogenesis. The proepicardium (PE) is a transient embryonic structure that contains a population of undifferentiated endothelial cells (ECs) forming a vascular net continuous with the sinus venosus. In this paper, we show that PE explants give rise to CD31-positive vascular sprouts in the presence of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and 2 isoforms of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A), i.e. VEGF-A120 and VEGF-A164. Vascular sprouts exhibit differences in number, length, thickness and the number of branches, depending on the combination of growth factors used. Moreover, the ECs of the sprouts express various levels of mRNA for Notch1 and its ligand Dll4. Additionally, stimulation with bFGF/VEGF-A164 upregulates the expression of Lyve-1 antigen in the ECs in the sprouts. In summary, we present a new model for angiogenesis studies involving mouse PE as a source of ECs. We believe that our model may act as a supplementary assay for angiogenesis studies along with the existing models.

  12. Death of serum-free mouse embryo cells caused by epidermal growth factor deprivation

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Serum-free mouse embryo (SFME) cells, derived in medium in which serum is replaced with growth factors and other supplements, are proastroblasts that are acutely dependent on epidermal growth factor (EGF) for survival. Ultrastructurally, an early change found in SFME cells deprived of EGF was a loss of polysomes which sedimentation analysis confirmed to be a shift from polysomes to monosomes. The ribosomal shift was not accompanied by decreased steady-state level of cytoplasmic actin mRNA examined as an indicator of cellular mRNA level. With time the cells became small and severely degenerate and exhibited nuclear morphology characteristic of apoptosis. Genomic DNA isolated from cultures undergoing EGF deprivation-dependent cell death exhibited a pattern of fragmentation resulting from endonuclease activation characteristic of cells undergoing apoptosis or programmed cell death. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that cultures in the absence of EGF contained almost exclusively G1-phase cells. Some of the phenomena associated with EGF deprivation of SFME cells are similar to those observed upon NGF deprivation of nerve cells in culture, suggesting that these neuroectodermal-derived cell types share common mechanisms of proliferative control involving peptide growth factor-dependent survival. PMID:2016341

  13. Transcription Factor RFX2 Is a Key Regulator of Mouse Spermiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yujian; Hu, Xiangjing; Li, Zhen; Wang, Min; Li, Sisi; Wang, Xiuxia; Lin, Xiwen; Liao, Shangying; Zhang, Zhuqiang; Feng, Xue; Wang, Si; Cui, Xiuhong; Wang, Yanling; Gao, Fei; Hess, Rex A.; Han, Chunsheng

    2016-01-01

    The regulatory factor X (RFX) family of transcription factors is crucial for ciliogenesis throughout evolution. In mice, Rfx1-4 are highly expressed in the testis where flagellated sperm are produced, but the functions of these factors in spermatogenesis remain unknown. Here, we report the production and characterization of the Rfx2 knockout mice. The male knockout mice were sterile due to the arrest of spermatogenesis at an early round spermatid step. The Rfx2-null round spermatids detached from the seminiferous tubules, forming large multinucleated giant cells that underwent apoptosis. In the mutants, formation of the flagellum was inhibited at its earliest stage. RNA-seq analysis identified a large number of cilia-related genes and testis-specific genes that were regulated by RFX2. Many of these genes were direct targets of RFX2, as revealed by chromatin immunoprecipitation-PCR assays. These findings indicate that RFX2 is a key regulator of the post-meiotic development of mouse spermatogenic cells. PMID:26853561

  14. Hepatocyte Tissue Factor Contributes to the Hypercoagulable State in a Mouse Model of Chronic Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Rautou, Pierre-Emmanuel; Tatsumi, Kohei; Antoniak, Silvio; Owens, A. Phillip; Sparkenbaugh, Erica; Holle, Lori A.; Wolberg, Alisa S.; Kopec, Anna K.; Pawlinski, Rafal; Luyendyk, James P.; Mackman, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background & Aims Patients with chronic liver disease and cirrhosis have a dysregulated coagulation system and are prone to thrombosis. The basis for this hypercoagulable state is not completely understood. Tissue factor (TF) is the primary initiator of coagulation in vivo. Patients with cirrhosis have increased TF activity in white blood cells and circulating microparticles. The aim of our study was to determine the contribution of TF to the hypercoagulable state in a mouse model of chronic liver injury. Methods We measured levels of TF activity in the liver, white blood cells and circulating microparticles, and a marker of activation of coagulation [thrombinantithrombin complexes (TATc)] in the plasma of mice subjected to bile duct ligation for 12 days. We used wild-type mice, mice with a global TF deficiency (low TF mice), and mice deficient for TF in either myeloid cells (TFflox/flox, LysMCre mice) or in hepatocytes (TFflox/flox, AlbCre). Results Wild-type mice with liver injury had increased levels of white blood cell, microparticle TF activity and TATc compared to sham mice. Low TF mice and mice lacking TF in hepatocytes had reduced levels of TF in the liver and in microparticles and exhibited reduced activation of coagulation without a change in liver fibrosis. In contrast, mice lacking TF in myeloid cells had reduced white blood cell TF but no change in microparticle TF activity or TATc. Conclusions Hepatocyte TF activates coagulation in a mouse model of chronic liver injury. TF may contribute to the hypercoagulable state associated with chronic liver diseases in patients. PMID:26325534

  15. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor attenuates inflammation in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF) is protective in animal models of various neurodegenerative diseases. We investigated whether pegfilgrastim, GCSF with sustained action, is protective in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). ALS is a fatal neurodegenerative disease with manifestations of upper and lower motoneuron death and muscle atrophy accompanied by inflammation in the CNS and periphery. Methods Human mutant G93A superoxide dismutase (SOD1) ALS mice were treated with pegfilgrastim starting at the presymptomatic stage and continued until the end stage. After long-term pegfilgrastim treatment, the inflammation status was defined in the spinal cord and peripheral tissues including hematopoietic organs and muscle. The effect of GCSF on spinal cord neuron survival and microglia, bone marrow and spleen monocyte activation was assessed in vitro. Results Long-term pegfilgrastim treatment prolonged mutant SOD1 mice survival and attenuated both astro- and microgliosis in the spinal cord. Pegfilgrastim in SOD1 mice modulated the inflammatory cell populations in the bone marrow and spleen and reduced the production of pro-inflammatory cytokine in monocytes and microglia. The mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells into the circulation was restored back to basal level after long-term pegfilgrastim treatment in SOD1 mice while the storage of Ly6C expressing monocytes in the bone marrow and spleen remained elevated. After pegfilgrastim treatment, an increased proportion of these cells in the degenerative muscle was detected at the end stage of ALS. Conclusions GCSF attenuated inflammation in the CNS and the periphery in a mouse model of ALS and thereby delayed the progression of the disease. This mechanism of action targeting inflammation provides a new perspective of the usage of GCSF in the treatment of ALS. PMID:21711557

  16. Epidermal growth factor precursor in mouse lactating mammary gland alveolar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C.F.; Teng, C.T.; Pentecost, B.T.; DiAugustine, R.P. )

    1989-07-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that high levels of epidermal growth factor (EGF) occur in human and rodent milk and that oral administration of this polypeptide stimulates rodent gastrointestinal development. It is not known whether EGF in milk originates from cells of the lactating mammary gland or is sequestered from an extramammary source. In the present study, prepro-EGF mRNA (approximately 4.7 kilobases) was detected in the CD-1 mouse mammary gland throughout the period of lactation; by comparison, negligible levels of this EGF transcript were found in the gland during pregnancy. Low levels of EGF immunoreactivity (4-5 ng/g wet wt tissue) were extracted from lactating (day 18) mammary glands with dilute acetic acid. Immunolocalization was evident with antisera to either EGF or two other regions of the EGF precursor in essentially all alveolar cells of the lactating gland. The most prominent staining with antiserum to EGF was observed along the luminal borders of cells; this pattern of cellular staining required proteolytic pretreatment of tissue sections. Western blot analyses of cell membranes isolated from the day 16 lactating mammary gland revealed an EGF-immunoreactive band at about 145K, which was equivalent in size to the EGF precursor found in mouse kidney cell membranes. Despite these findings, labeling of lactating mammary gland mince with L-(35S)methionine and cysteine for up to 4 h did not reveal any specific bands in immunoprecipitates. These cumulative findings suggest that the precursor form of EGF occurs in alveolar cells of lactating mammary gland and that this protein is translocated to the cell membrane.

  17. Hepatocyte growth factor stimulates root growth during the development of mouse molar teeth.

    PubMed

    Sakuraba, H; Fujiwara, N; Sasaki-Oikawa, A; Sakano, M; Tabata, Y; Otsu, K; Ishizeki, K; Harada, H

    2012-02-01

    It is well known that tooth root formation is initiated by the development of Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS). However, relatively little is known about the regulatory mechanisms involved in root development. As hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is one of the mediators of epithelial-mesenchymal interactions in rodent tooth, the objective of this study was to examine the effects of HGF on the root development of mouse molars. The HERS of mouse molars and HERS01a, a cell line originated from HERS, were used in this study. For detection of HGF receptors in vivo and in vitro, we used immunochemical procedures. Root development was assessed by implanting molar tooth germs along with HGF-soaked beads into kidney capsules, by counting cell numbers in HERS01a cell cultures and by performing a 5'-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) assay in an organ-culture system. HGF receptors were expressed in the enamel epithelium of molar germs as well as in HERS cells. HGF stimulated root development in the transplanted tooth germs, the proliferation of HERS01a cells in culture and HERS elongation in the organ-culture system. Examination using BrdU revealed that cell proliferation in HERS was increased by treatment with HGF, especially that in the outer layer of HERS. This effect was down-regulated when antibody against HGF receptor was present in the culture medium. Our results raise the possibility that HGF signaling controls root formation via the development of HERS. This study is the first to show that HGF is one of the stimulators of root development. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  18. Epidermal growth factor receptor activity is necessary for mouse basal cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Brechbuhl, Heather M.; Li, Bilan; Smith, Russell W.

    2014-01-01

    ERB family receptors (EGFR, ERB-B2, ERB-B3, and ERB-B4) regulate epithelial cell function in many tissue types. In the human airway epithelium, changes in ERB receptor expression are associated with epithelial repair defects. However, the specific role(s) played by ERB receptors in repair have not been determined. We aimed to determine whether ERB receptors regulate proliferation of the tracheobronchial progenitor, the basal cell. Receptor tyrosine kinase arrays were used to evaluate ERB activity in normal and naphthalene (NA)-injured mouse trachea and in air-liquid interface cultures. Roles for epidermal growth factor (EGF), EGFR, and ERB-B2 in basal cell proliferation were evaluated in vitro. NA injury and transgenic expression of an EGFR-dominant negative (DN) receptor were used to evaluate roles for EGFR signaling in vivo. EGFR and ERB-B2 were active in normal and NA-injured trachea and were the only active ERB receptors detected in proliferating basal cells in vitro. EGF was necessary for basal cell proliferation in vitro. The EGFR inhibitor, AG1478, decreased proliferation by 99, and the Erb-B2 inhibitor, AG825, decreased proliferation by ∼66%. In vivo, EGFR-DN expression in basal cells significantly decreased basal cell proliferation after NA injury. EGF and EGFR are necessary for basal cell proliferation. The EGFR/EGFR homo- and the EGFR/ERB-B2 heterodimer account for ∼34 and 66%, respectively, of basal cell proliferation in vitro. Active EGFR is necessary for basal cell proliferation after NA injury. We conclude that EGFR activation is necessary for mouse basal cell proliferation and normal epithelial repair. PMID:25217659

  19. Differential pathlength factor informs evoked stimulus response in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Alexander J.; Ponticorvo, Adrien; Durkin, Anthony J.; Venugopalan, Vasan; Choi, Bernard; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Baseline optical properties are typically assumed in calculating the differential pathlength factor (DPF) of mouse brains, a value used in the modified Beer–Lambert law to characterize an evoked stimulus response. We used spatial frequency domain imaging to measure in vivo baseline optical properties in 20-month-old control (n=8) and triple transgenic APP/PS1/tau (3xTg-AD) (n=5) mouse brains. Average μa for control and 3xTg-AD mice was 0.82±0.05 and 0.65±0.05  mm−1, respectively, at 460 nm; and 0.71±0.04 and 0.55±0.04  mm−1, respectively, at 530 nm. Average μs′ for control and 3xTg-AD mice was 1.5±0.1 and 1.7±0.1  mm−1, respectively, at 460 nm; and 1.3±0.1 and 1.5±0.1  mm−1, respectively, at 530 nm. The calculated DPF for control and 3xTg-AD mice was 0.58±0.04 and 0.64±0.04 OD mm, respectively, at 460 nm; and 0.66±0.03 and 0.73±0.05 OD mm, respectively, at 530 nm. In hindpaw stimulation experiments, the hemodynamic increase in brain tissue concentration of oxyhemoglobin was threefold larger and two times longer in the control mice compared to 3xTg-AD mice. Furthermore, the washout of deoxyhemoglobin from increased brain perfusion was seven times larger in controls compared to 3xTg-AD mice (p<0.05). PMID:26835482

  20. Targeting tissue factor on tumor vascular endothelial cells and tumor cells for immunotherapy in mouse models of prostatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Hu, Z; Garen, A

    2001-10-09

    The efficacy and safety of an immunoconjugate (icon) molecule, composed of a mutated mouse factor VII (mfVII) targeting domain and the Fc effector domain of an IgG1 Ig (mfVII/Fc icon), was tested with a severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse model of human prostatic cancer and an immunocompetent mouse model of mouse prostatic cancer. The SCID mice were first injected s.c. with a human prostatic tumor line, forming a skin tumor that produces a high blood titer of prostate-specific antigen and metastasizes to bone. The icon was encoded in a replication-incompetent adenoviral vector that was injected directly into the skin tumor. The tumor cells infected by the vector synthesize and secrete the icon into the blood, and the blood-borne icon binds with high affinity and specificity to mouse tissue factor expressed on endothelial cells lining the lumen of the tumor vasculature and to human tissue factor expressed on the tumor cells. The Fc domain of the icon activates a cytolytic immune attack against cells that bind the icon. The immunotherapy tests in SCID mice demonstrated that intratumoral injections of the adenoviral vector encoding the mfVII/human Fc icon resulted in long-term regression of the injected human prostatic tumor and also of a distant uninjected tumor, without associated toxicity to the mice. Comparable results were obtained with a SCID mouse model of human melanoma. At the end of the experiments the mice appeared to be free of viable tumor cells. This protocol also could be efficacious for treating cancer patients who have vascularized tumors.

  1. Hypoxia inducible factors are dispensable for myeloid cell migration into the inflamed mouse eye

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Peter J.; Liyanage, Sidath E.; Cristante, Enrico; Sampson, Robert D.; Dick, Andrew D.; Ali, Robin R.; Bainbridge, James W.

    2017-01-01

    Hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs) are ubiquitously expressed transcription factors important for cell homeostasis during dynamic oxygen levels. Myeloid specific HIFs are crucial for aspects of myeloid cell function, including their ability to migrate into inflamed tissues during autoimmune disease. This contrasts with the concept that accumulation of myeloid cells at ischemic and hypoxic sites results from a lack of chemotactic responsiveness. Here we seek to address the role of HIFs in myeloid trafficking during inflammation in a mouse model of human uveitis. We show using mice with myeloid-specific Cre-deletion of HIFs that myeloid HIFs are dispensable for leukocyte migration into the inflamed eye. Myeloid-specific deletion of Hif1a, Epas1, or both together, had no impact on the number of myeloid cells migrating into the eye. Additionally, stabilization of HIF pathways via deletion of Vhl in myeloid cells had no impact on myeloid trafficking into the inflamed eye. Finally, we chemically induce hypoxemia via hemolytic anemia resulting in HIF stabilization within circulating leukocytes to demonstrate the dispensable role of HIFs in myeloid cell migration into the inflamed eye. These data suggest, contrary to previous reports, that HIF pathways in myeloid cells during inflammation and hypoxia are dispensable for myeloid cell tissue trafficking. PMID:28112274

  2. Genomic organization of the mouse fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (Fgfr3) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Castro, A.V.; Wilson, J.; Altherr, M.R.

    1995-11-20

    The fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (Fgfr3) protein is a tyrosine kinase receptor involved in the signal transduction of various fibroblast growth factors. Recent studies suggest its important role in normal development. In humans, mutation in Fgfr3 is responsible for growth disorders such as achondroplasia, hypoachondroplasia, and thanatophoric dysplasia. Here, we report the complete genomic organization of the mouse Fgfr3 gene. The murine gene spans approximately 15 kb and consists of 19 exons and 18 introns. One major and one minor transcription initiation site were identified. Position +1 is located 614 nucleotides upstream from the ATG initiation codon. The translation initiation and termination sites are located in exons 2 and 19, respectively. Five Sp1 sites, two AP2 sites, one Zeste site, and one Krox 24 site were observed in the 5{prime}-flanking region. The Fgfr3 promoter appears to be contained within a CpG island and, as is common in genes having multiple Sp1-binding sites, lacks a TATA box. 35 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Complementing mutations in core binding factor leukemias: from mouse models to clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Müller, A M S; Duque, J; Shizuru, J A; Lübbert, M

    2008-10-02

    A great proportion of acute myeloid leukemias (AMLs) display cytogenetic abnormalities including chromosomal aberrations and/or submicroscopic mutations. These abnormalities significantly influence the prognosis of the disease. Hence, a thorough genetic work-up is an essential constituent of standard diagnostic procedures. Core binding factor (CBF) leukemias denote AMLs with chromosomal aberrations disrupting one of the CBF transcription factor genes; the most common examples are translocation t(8;21) and inversion inv(16), which result in the generation of the AML1-ETO and CBFbeta-MYH11 fusion proteins, respectively. However, in murine models, these alterations alone do not suffice to generate full-blown leukemia, but rather, complementary events are required. In fact, a substantial proportion of primary CBF leukemias display additional activating mutations, mostly of the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) c-KIT. The awareness of the impact and prognostic relevance of these 'second hits' is increasing with a wider range of mutations tested in clinical trials. Furthermore, novel agents targeting RTKs are emanating rapidly and entering therapeutic regimens. Here, we present a concise review on complementing mutations in CBF leukemias including pathophysiology, mouse models, and clinical implications.

  4. Selective insulin-like growth factor-I antagonist inhibits mouse embryo development in a dose-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Inzunza, Jose; Danielsson, Olle; Lalitkumar, Parameswaran Grace; Larsson, Olle; Axelson, Magnus; Töhönen, Virpi; Danielsson, Kristina Gemzell; Stavreus-Evers, Anneli

    2010-05-15

    To study the role of a synthetic insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR) antagonist, picropodophyllin, for mouse preimplantation embryo development in vivo and in vitro. In vitro and in vivo study. Hospital-based research unit. FVB/N mice and mouse embryos. The effect of picropodophyllin in mouse embryo development in vivo and in vitro, immunohistochemistry, ELISA, polymerase chain reaction. Embryo development, presence of IGF-IR, messenger RNA expression, IGF-I synthesis. The effect of picropodophyllin on embryo development in vitro and in vivo was not reversible. Mice treated with picropodophyllin 1 to 3 days after mating had a reduced number of blastocysts, 40.5% versus 78.8%, and a higher number of embryos with delayed development, 48.6% versus 11.5%. Insulin-like growth factor-IR protein is present in both phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated form at all stages of embryo development. The relative IGF-IR messenger RNA expression was highest in the oocyte and reduced during development to blastocyst stage. Insulin-like growth factor-I in culture media was reduced after picropodophyllin treatment. We conclude that IGF-I has an important role in normal mouse embryo development and that its receptor plays an essential role in the embryonic genome activation process. Copyright 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Structure of the chromosomal gene for granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor: comparison of the mouse and human genes.

    PubMed Central

    Miyatake, S; Otsuka, T; Yokota, T; Lee, F; Arai, K

    1985-01-01

    A cDNA clone that expresses granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) activity in COS-7 cells has been isolated from a pcD library prepared from mRNA derived from concanavalin A-activated mouse helper T cell clones. Based on homology with the mouse GM-CSF cDNA sequence, the mouse GM-CSF gene was isolated. The human GM-CSF gene was also isolated based on homology with the human GM-CSF cDNA sequence. The nucleotide sequences determined for the genes and their flanking regions revealed that both the mouse and human GM-CSF genes are composed of three introns and four exons. The organization of the mouse and human GM-CSF genes are highly homologous and strong sequence homology between the two genes is found both in the coding and non-coding regions. A 'TATA'-like sequence was found 20-25 bp upstream from the transcription initiation site. In the 5'-flanking region, there is a highly homologous region extending 330 bp upstream of the putative TATA box. This sequence may play a role in regulation of expression of the GM-CSF gene. These structures are compared with those of different lymphokine genes and their regulatory regions. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 6. PMID:3876930

  6. Identification and characterization of the mouse nuclear export factor (Nxf) family members

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Wei; Zolotukhin, Andrei S.; Tretyakova, Irina; Bear, Jenifer; Lindtner, Susan; Smulevitch, Sergey V.; Felber, Barbara K.

    2005-01-01

    TAP/hNXF1 is a key factor that mediates general cellular mRNA export from the nucleus, and its orthologs are structurally and functionally conserved from yeast to humans. Metazoans encode additional proteins that share homology and domain organization with TAP/hNXF1, suggesting their participation in mRNA metabolism; however, the precise role(s) of these proteins is not well understood. Here, we found that the human mRNA export factor hNXF2 is specifically expressed in the brain, suggesting a brain-specific role in mRNA metabolism. To address the roles of additional NXF factors, we have identified and characterized the two Nxf genes, Nxf2 and Nxf7, which together with the TAP/hNXF1's ortholog Nxf1 comprise the murine Nxf family. Both mNXF2 and mNXF7 have a domain structure typical of the NXF family. We found that mNXF2 protein is expressed during mouse brain development. Similar to TAP/hNXF1, the mNXF2 protein is found in the nucleus, the nuclear envelope and cytoplasm, and is an active mRNA export receptor. In contrast, mNXF7 localizes exclusively to cytoplasmic granules and, despite its overall conserved sequence, lacks mRNA export activity. We concluded that mNXF2 is an active mRNA export receptor similar to the prototype TAP/hNXF1, whereas mNXF7 may have a more specialized role in the cytoplasm. PMID:16027110

  7. Stem cell factor and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor exhibit therapeutic effects in a mouse model of CADASIL.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Yun; Gonzalez-Toledo, Maria E; Fagan, Austin; Duan, Wei-Ming; Liu, Yanying; Zhang, Siyuan; Li, Bin; Piao, Chun-Shu; Nelson, Lila; Zhao, Li-Ru

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL), a Notch3 dominant mutation-induced cerebral small vascular disease, is characterized by progressive degeneration of vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMCs) of small arteries in the brain, leading to recurrent ischemic stroke, vascular dementia and death. To date, no treatment can stop or delay the progression of this disease. Herein, we determined the therapeutic effects of stem cell factor (SCF) in combination with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) (SCF+G-CSF) in a mouse model of CADASIL carrying the human mutant Notch3 gene. SCF+G-CSF was subcutaneously administered for 5 days and repeated 4 times with 1-4 month intervals. We found through water maze testing that SCF+G-CSF treatment improved cognitive function. SCF+G-CSF also attenuated vSMC degeneration in small arteries, increased cerebral blood vascular density, and inhibited apoptosis in CADASIL mice. We also discovered that loss of cerebral capillary endothelial cells and neural stem cells/neural progenitor cells (NSCs/NPCs) occurred in CADASIL mice. SCF+G-CSF treatment inhibited the CADASIL-induced cell loss in the endothelia and NSCs/NPCs and promoted neurogenesis. In an in vitro model of apoptosis, SCF+G-CSF prevented apoptotic cell death in vSMCs through AKT signaling and by inhibiting caspase-3 activity. These data suggest that SCF+G-CSF restricts the pathological progression of CADASIL. This study offers new insights into developing therapeutic strategies for CADASIL.

  8. Research Resource: Comprehensive Expression Atlas of the Fibroblast Growth Factor System in Adult Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Fon Tacer, Klementina; Bookout, Angie L.; Ding, Xunshan; Kurosu, Hiroshi; John, George B.; Wang, Lei; Goetz, Regina; Mohammadi, Moosa; Kuro-o, Makoto; Mangelsdorf, David J.; Kliewer, Steven A.

    2010-01-01

    Although members of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family and their receptors have well-established roles in embryogenesis, their contributions to adult physiology remain relatively unexplored. Here, we use real-time quantitative PCR to determine the mRNA expression patterns of all 22 FGFs, the seven principal FGF receptors (FGFRs), and the three members of the Klotho family of coreceptors in 39 different mouse tissues. Unsupervised hierarchical cluster analysis of the mRNA expression data reveals that most FGFs and FGFRs fall into two groups the expression of which is enriched in either the central nervous system or reproductive and gastrointestinal tissues. Interestingly, the FGFs that can act as endocrine hormones, including FGF15/19, FGF21, and FGF23, cluster in a third group that does not include any FGFRs, underscoring their roles in signaling between tissues. We further show that the most recently identified Klotho family member, Lactase-like, is highly and selectively expressed in brown adipose tissue and eye and can function as an additional coreceptor for FGF19. This FGF atlas provides an important resource for guiding future studies to elucidate the physiological functions of FGFs in adult animals. PMID:20667984

  9. Sources and biology of regulatory factors active on mouse myeloid leukemic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Metcalf, D.

    1982-01-01

    The action of serum or cells in enforcing differentiation in mouse myelomonocytic leukemic cells was monitored in agar cultures of WEHI-3B leukemic cells. The repeated intravenous injection of 5 ..mu..g endotoxin initially increased serum differentiating activity but after the third injection responses to further injections decreased markedly. Congenitally athymic (nude) mice exhibited normal rises in serum differentiating activity when injected with endotoxin but C3H HeJ mice failed to respond to challenge with purified lipid A. Whole body irradiation up to 1,200 rads did not increase serum differentiating activity but did not suppress responses to challenge injection of endotoxin. Coculture of WEHI-3B cells with peritoneal cells from normal or irradiated BALB/c mice caused marked granulocytic differentiation in WEHI-3B colonies. This effect was not seen if leukemic cells were cultured with thymus, spleen, or bone marrow cells. The serum halflife of the factor in postendotoxin serum enforcing differentiation of WEHI-3B cells was shown to be 1.5-2.3 hr.

  10. von Willebrand factor contributes to poor outcome in a mouse model of intracerebral haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ximin; Cao, Yongliang; Wei, Lixiang; Cai, Ping; Xu, Haochen; Luo, Haiyu; Bai, Xiaofei; Lu, Lu; Liu, Jian-Ren; Fan, Wenying; Zhao, Bing-Qiao

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) is the most devastating stroke subtype and has no proven treatment. von Willebrand factor (VWF) has recently been demonstrated to promote inflammation processes. The present study investigated the pathophysiological role of VWF after experimental ICH. Functional outcomes, brain edema, blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability, cerebral inflammation and levels of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) were measured in a mouse model of ICH induced by autologous blood injection. We show that VWF were increased in the plasma and was accumulated in the perihematomal regions of mice subjected to ICH. Injection of VWF resulted in incerased expression of proinflammatory mediators and activation of ICAM-1 and MMP-9, associated with elevated myeloperoxidase, recruitment of neutrophils and microglia. Moreover, mice treated with VWF showed dramatically decreased pericyte coverage, more severe BBB damage and edema formation, and neuronal injury was increased compared with controls. In contrast, blocking antibodies against VWF reduced BBB damage and edema formation and improved neurological function. Together, these data identify a critical role for VWF in cerebral inflammation and BBB damage after ICH. The therapeutic interventions targeting VWF may be a novel strategy to reduce ICH-related injury. PMID:27782211

  11. Ontogeny of basic fibroblast growth factor binding sites in mouse ocular tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Fayein, N.A.; Courtois, Y.; Jeanny, J.C. )

    1990-05-01

    Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) binding to ocular tissues has been studied by autoradiographical and biochemical approaches directly performed on sections during mouse embryonic and postnatal development. Frozen sections of embryos (9 to 18 days), newborns, and adults (1 day to 6 months) were incubated with iodinated bFGF. One specific FGF binding site (KD = 2.5 nM) is colocalized with heparan sulfate proteoglycans of the basement membranes and is heparitinase sensitive. It first appears at Day 9 around the neural tube, the optic vesicles, and below the head ectoderm and by Day 14 of embryonic development is found in all basement membranes of the eye. At Day 16, very intensely labeled patches appear, corresponding to mast cells which have been characterized by metachromatic staining of their heparin-rich granulations with toluidine blue. In addition to the latter binding, we have also observed a general diffuse distribution of silver grains on all tissues and preferentially in the ecto- and neuroectodermic tissues. From Days 17-18, there is heterogeneous labeling inside the retina, localized in the pigmented epithelium and in three different layers colocalized with the inner and outer plexiform layers and with the inner segments of the photoreceptors. This binding is heparitinase resistant but N-glycanase sensitive and may represent a second specific binding site corresponding to cellular FGF receptors (KD = 280 pM). Both types of binding patterns observed suggest a significant role for bFGF in eye development and physiology.

  12. Connective tissue growth factor production by activated pancreatic stellate cells in mouse alcoholic chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Charrier, Alyssa; Brigstock, David R.

    2010-01-01

    Alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (ACP) is characterized by pancreatic necrosis, inflammation, and scarring, the latter of which is due to excessive collagen deposition by activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSC). The aim of this study was to establish a model of ACP in mice, a species that is usually resistant to the toxic effects of alcohol, and to identify the cell type(s) responsible for production of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), a pro-fibrotic molecule. C57Bl/6 male mice received intraperitoneal ethanol injections for three weeks against a background of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. Peak blood alcohol levels remained consistently high in ethanol-treated mice as compared to control mice. In mice receiving ethanol plus cerulein, there was increased collagen deposition as compared to other treatment groups as well as increased frequency of α-smooth muscle actin and desmin-positive PSC which also demonstrated significantly enhanced CTGF protein production. Expression of mRNA for collagen α1(I), α-smooth muscle actin or CTGF were all increased and co-localized exclusively to activated PSC in ACP. Pancreatic expression of mRNA for key profibrotic markers were all increased in ACP. In conclusion, a mouse model of ACP has been developed that mimics key pathophysiological features of the disease in humans and which shows that activated PSC are the principal producers of collagen and CTGF. PSC-derived CTGF is thus a candidate therapeutic target in anti-fibrotic strategies for ACP. PMID:20368699

  13. Autocrine growth factors are involved in branching morphogenesis of mouse lung epithelium.

    PubMed

    Okada, Kimiko; Noda, Masatsugu; Nogawa, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    The current model for branching morphogenesis of mouse lung proposes that the epithelium bifurcates as cells pursue separate sources of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 10, secreted from mesenchymal tissue through interactions with epithelial tissue. If so, it may be assumed that the lung epithelium will grow into a uniform, expanding ball (without branching) when uniformly exposed to a constant concentration of FGF10. To test this hypothesis, we cultured Matrigel-embedded lung epithelium explants in FGF10-supplemented medium while shaking the culture dishes. Shaking cultures with FGF10 resulted in inferior epithelial branching compared to control cultures at rest. However, this effect was unexpectedly accompanied by poor growth rather than by ball-like expansion. When using FGF1, epithelial cultures grew and branched similarly well under either culture condition. Thus, we hypothesized that FGF10 signaling must be mediated by autocrine FGFs, such as FGF1, which might easily diffuse through the culture medium in the shaking culture. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses showed that FGF9 as well as FGF1 were expressed in the epithelium in vivo and in FGF10-stimulated epithelium in vitro, and FGF9 induced epithelial branching at a much lower concentration than FGF10. These results suggest that FGF1 and FGF9 may mediate FGF10 signaling and induce branching in the lung epithelium via autocrine signaling.

  14. Constrained transcription factor spacing is prevalent and important for transcriptional control of mouse blood cells.

    PubMed

    Ng, Felicia S L; Schütte, Judith; Ruau, David; Diamanti, Evangelia; Hannah, Rebecca; Kinston, Sarah J; Göttgens, Berthold

    2014-12-16

    Combinatorial transcription factor (TF) binding is essential for cell-type-specific gene regulation. However, much remains to be learned about the mechanisms of TF interactions, including to what extent constrained spacing and orientation of interacting TFs are critical for regulatory element activity. To examine the relative prevalence of the 'enhanceosome' versus the 'TF collective' model of combinatorial TF binding, a comprehensive analysis of TF binding site sequences in large scale datasets is necessary. We developed a motif-pair discovery pipeline to identify motif co-occurrences with preferential distance(s) between motifs in TF-bound regions. Utilizing a compendium of 289 mouse haematopoietic TF ChIP-seq datasets, we demonstrate that haematopoietic-related motif-pairs commonly occur with highly conserved constrained spacing and orientation between motifs. Furthermore, motif clustering revealed specific associations for both heterotypic and homotypic motif-pairs with particular haematopoietic cell types. We also showed that disrupting the spacing between motif-pairs significantly affects transcriptional activity in a well-known motif-pair-E-box and GATA, and in two previously unknown motif-pairs with constrained spacing-Ets and Homeobox as well as Ets and E-box. In this study, we provide evidence for widespread sequence-specific TF pair interaction with DNA that conforms to the 'enhanceosome' model, and furthermore identify associations between specific haematopoietic cell-types and motif-pairs. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  15. Role of transforming growth factor-beta in the development of the mouse embryo

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Using immunohistochemical methods, we have investigated the role of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) in the development of the mouse embryo. For detection of TGF-beta in 11-18-d-old embryos, we have used a polyclonal antibody specific for TGF-beta type 1 and the peroxidase-antiperoxidase technique. Staining of TGF-beta is closely associated with mesenchyme per se or with tissues derived from mesenchyme, such as connective tissue, cartilage, and bone. TGF-beta is conspicuous in tissues derived from neural crest mesenchyme, such as the palate, larynx, facial mesenchyme, nasal sinuses, meninges, and teeth. Staining of all of these tissues is greatest during periods of morphogenesis. In many instances, intense staining is seen in mesenchyme when critical interactions with adjacent epithelium occur, as in the development of hair follicles, teeth, and the submandibular gland. Marked staining is also seen when remodeling of mesenchyme or mesoderm occurs, as during formation of digits from limb buds, formation of the palate, and formation of the heart valves. The presence of TGF-beta is often coupled with pronounced angiogenic activity. The histochemical results are discussed in terms of the known biochemical actions of TGF-beta, especially its ability to control both synthesis and degradation of both structural and adhesion molecules of the extracellular matrix. PMID:3320058

  16. Contributions of Steroidogenic Factor 1 to the Transcription Landscape of Y1 Mouse Adrenocortical Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schimmer, Bernard P.; Tsao, Jennivine; Cordova, Martha; Mostafavi, Sara; Morris, Quaid; Scheys, Joshua O.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The contribution of steroidogenic factor 1 (SF–1) to the gene expression profile of Y1 mouse adrenocortical cells was evaluated using short hairpin RNAs to knockdown SF–1. The reduced level of SF–1 RNA was associated with global changes that affected the accumulation of more than 2,000 transcripts. Among the down-regulated transcripts were several with functions in steroidogenesis that were affected to different degrees—i.e., Mc2r >Scarb1 > Star ≥ Hsd3b1 > Cyp11b1. For Star and Cyp11b1, the different levels of expression correlated with the amount of residual SF-1 bound to the proximal promoter regions. The knockdown of SF–1 did not affect the accumulation of Cyp11a1 transcripts even though the amount of SF–1 bound to the proximal promoter of the gene was reduced to background levels. Our results indicate that transcripts with functions in steroidogenesis vary in their dependence on SF–1 for constitutive expression. On a more global scale, SF–1 knockdown affects the accumulation of a large number of transcripts, most of which are not recognizably involved in steroid hormone biosynthesis. PMID:21111771

  17. Apoptosis of mouse hippocampal cells induced by Taenia crassiceps metacestode factor.

    PubMed

    Zepeda, N; Solano, S; Copitin, N; Chávez, J L; Fernández, A M; García, F; Tato, P; Molinari, J L

    2017-03-01

    Seizures, headache, depression and neurological deficits are the signs and symptoms most frequently reported in human neurocysticercosis. However, the cause of the associated learning and memory deficits is unknown. Here, we used Taenia crassiceps infection in mice as a model of human cysticercosis. The effects of T. crassiceps metacestode infection or T. crassiceps metacestode factor (MF) treatment on mouse hippocampal cells were studied; control mice were included. At 45 days after infection or treatment of the mice with MF, all mice were anaesthetized and perfused transcardially with saline followed by phosphate-buffered 10% formalin. Then the brains were carefully removed. Coronal sections stained using several techniques were analysed. Extensive and significant apoptosis was found in the experimental animals, mainly in the dentate gyrus, CA1, CA2, CA3 and neighbouring regions, in comparison with the apparently intact cells from control mice (P < 0.01). These results suggest that neurological deficits, especially the learning and memory deficits, may be generated by extensive apoptosis of hippocampal cells.

  18. Chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor (COUP-TF): expression during mouse embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pereira, F A; Qiu, Y; Tsai, M J; Tsai, S Y

    1995-06-01

    Members of the steroid/thyroid hormone receptor superfamily such as TR, RAR, RXR and VDR are known to play important roles in regulation of gene expression during development, differentiation and homeostasis. COUP-TFs are orphan members of this superfamily of nuclear receptors and have been shown to negatively regulate the ability of these nuclear receptors to transactivate target genes. Two different mechanisms are implicated in this repression. First, COUP-TFs bind to AGGTCA direct repeats and palindromes with various spacings, which include response elements for TR, RAR, RXR and VDR, allowing for direct competition of COUP-TFs for the response elements. Second, COUP-TFs can heterodimerize with RXRs, the essential cofactor for effective binding of VDR, TRs and RARs to their cognate response elements. The physiological significance of this negative effect of COUP-TF on the activity of these receptors has been analyzed. Detection of COUP-TF transcripts during mouse development reveal discrete spatial and temporal expression domains consistent with COUP-TFs being involved in regulation of gene expression during embryogenesis. Transcripts are localized within discrete regions of the central and peripheral nervous system including the inner ear. In addition, COUP-TFs are found in many tissues including testes, ovary, prostate, skin, kidney, lung, stomach, intestine, pancreas and salivary gland. Some of these expression domains colocalize with those of TR, RAR, and RXR. The simultaneous expression of these genes raise the possibility that COUP-TFs can act as negative regulatory factors during development and differentiation.

  19. Mouse Sensitivity is an Independent Risk Factor for Rhinitis in Children with Asthma.

    PubMed

    Sedaghat, Ahmad R; Matsui, Elizabeth C; Baxi, Sachin N; Bollinger, Mary E; Miller, Rachel; Perzanowski, Matthew; Phipatanakul, Wanda

    2016-01-01

    Although mouse and cockroach allergy is known to be important in urban children with asthma, the independent association of mouse and cockroach sensitization with rhinitis in these children is unknown. To determine the association of mouse and cockroach sensitization with rhinitis in urban children with asthma. As part of the Mouse Allergen and Asthma Intervention Trial, 499 urban children (5-17 years) with persistent asthma underwent spirometry, skin prick testing to 14 common environmental allergens, and serology for mouse-specific IgE. In 269 subjects, cockroach-specific IgE serology was also obtained. Patient/parent-reported rhinitis in the last 2 weeks and the last 1 year was the primary outcome measure. Mouse/cockroach exposure was measured by reported frequency of sightings. Mouse allergen-settled bedroom dust samples were also measured in mouse-sensitized children. Rhinitis was reported in 49.9% and 70.2% of the participants within the last 2 weeks and the last 1 year, respectively. Serum mouse IgE level of 0.35 IU/mL or more was associated with rhinitis in the past 2 weeks (adjusted odds ratio, 2.15; 95% CI, 1.02-4.54; P = .04) and the past 1 year (adjusted odds ratio, 2.40; 95% CI, 1.12-5.1; P = .02) after controlling for age, race, sex, the presence of any smokers at home, primary caregiver education level, number of allergen sensitivities, cockroach IgE level of 0.35 IU/mL or more, and study site (Boston or Baltimore). Measures of home mouse exposure were not associated with rhinitis, regardless of mouse sensitivity. Cockroach sensitivity was not associated with rhinitis regardless of sensitization to other allergens. In urban children with asthma, increased mouse IgE, but not cockroach IgE, in the sera (mouse IgE ≥ 0.35 IU/mL) may be associated independently with rhinitis. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Thyroid hormone and androgen regulation of nerve growth factor gene expression in the mouse submandibular gland.

    PubMed

    Black, M A; Lefebvre, F A; Pope, L; Lefebvre, Y A; Walker, P

    1992-03-01

    The nerve growth factor (NGF) content of the mouse submandibular gland (SMG) is under hormonal control and is modulated by both thyroid hormones (TH) and androgens. The sexual dimorphism of the gland is well documented. In the adult male mouse, the SMG contains 10 times more NGF compared to the female. Conversely, castration of male mice reduces the SMG NGF levels to those found in control females. In order to determine the locus at which androgens and TH exert their effect on NGF gene expression in the SMG, steady-state NGF mRNA levels were determined. Daily treatment of adult female mice with TH for 1 week increased NGF mRNA levels 6-fold. Androgen treatment produced a 20-fold increase in SMG NGF mRNA, which was comparable to levels detected in the control adult male SMG. The effect of TH on NGF mRNA levels was time-dependent and coincided with the increase in NGF protein concentrations. At 48 h after a single TH injection, NGF mRNA levels (measured in SMG total RNA) increased 2-4-fold, while heteronuclear (hn) RNA levels were increased 1.5-2-fold. The NGF gene transcription rate was determined by run-on assay following TH treatment. A small but significant 2-fold induction by TH of NGF gene transcription was found at 24-48 h. Cytoplasmic RNA prepared from the same SMGs used in the run-on experiments was tested by S1 nuclease protection; NGF cytoplasmic RNA was increased 7-fold in the SMGs of females treated with TH 48 h previously. These results demonstrate that the effect of TH on NGF gene expression is due in part to an induction of NGF gene transcription. The discrepancies observed between transcription rate and mRNA levels suggest that the major effect of TH is at the post-transcriptional level, possibly mRNA stabilization. The time required to observe an induction of TH on NGF gene transcription is suggestive of an indirect effect, possibly through the induction by TH of another protein which in turn activates the NGF gene.

  1. Krüppel-Like Factor 2 Is Required for Normal Mouse Cardiac Development

    PubMed Central

    Chiplunkar, Aditi R.; Lung, Tina K.; Alhashem, Yousef; Koppenhaver, Benjamin A.; Salloum, Fadi N.; Kukreja, Rakesh C.; Haar, Jack L.; Lloyd, Joyce A.

    2013-01-01

    Krüppel-like factor 2 (KLF2) is expressed in endothelial cells in the developing heart, particularly in areas of high shear stress, such as the atrioventricular (AV) canal. KLF2 ablation leads to myocardial thinning, high output cardiac failure and death by mouse embryonic day 14.5 (E14.5) in a mixed genetic background. This work identifies an earlier and more fundamental role for KLF2 in mouse cardiac development in FVB/N mice. FVB/N KLF2−/− embryos die earlier, by E11.5. E9.5 FVB/N KLF2−/− hearts have multiple, disorganized cell layers lining the AV cushions, the primordia of the AV valves, rather than the normal single layer. By E10.5, traditional and endothelial-specific FVB/N KLF2−/− AV cushions are hypocellular, suggesting that the cells accumulating at the AV canal have a defect in endothelial to mesenchymal transformation (EMT). E10.5 FVB/N KLF2−/− hearts have reduced glycosaminoglycans in the cardiac jelly, correlating with the reduced EMT. However, the number of mesenchymal cells migrating from FVB/N KLF2−/− AV explants into a collagen matrix is reduced considerably compared to wild-type, suggesting that the EMT defect is not due solely to abnormal cardiac jelly. Echocardiography of E10.5 FVB/N KLF2−/− embryos indicates that they have abnormal heart function compared to wild-type. E10.5 C57BL/6 KLF2−/− hearts have largely normal AV cushions. However, E10.5 FVB/N and C57BL/6 KLF2−/− embryos have a delay in the formation of the atrial septum that is not observed in a defined mixed background. KLF2 ablation results in reduced Sox9, UDP-glucose dehydrogenase (Ugdh), Gata4 and Tbx5 mRNA in FVB/N AV canals. KLF2 binds to the Gata4, Tbx5 and Ugdh promoters in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, indicating that KLF2 could directly regulate these genes. In conclusion, KLF2−/− heart phenotypes are genetic background-dependent. KLF2 plays a role in EMT through its regulation of important cardiovascular genes. PMID:23457456

  2. Soluble TNF Regulates TACE via AP-2α Transcription Factor in Mouse Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Ge, Lisheng; Vujanovic, Nikola L

    2017-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs), the essential immunoregulatory and APCs, are major producers of the central mediator of inflammation, soluble TNF-α (sTNF). sTNF is generated by TNF-α converting enzyme (TACE) proteolytic release of the transmembrane TNF (tmTNF) ectodomain. The mechanisms of TACE and sTNF regulation in DCs remain elusive. This study newly defines that sTNF regulates TACE in mouse DCs by engaging the AP-2α transcription factor. We found that the expression of AP-2α was higher, whereas the expression and activity of TACE were lower, in wild-type DCs (wtDCs) than in TNF knockout (TNFko) DCs. Exogenous sTNF rapidly and simultaneously induced increases of AP-2α expression and decreases of TACE expression and activity in wtDCs and TNFko DCs, indicating that AP-2α and TACE are inversely dependent on sTNF and are functionally associated. To define this functional association, we identified an AP-2α binding site in TACE promoter and demonstrated, using EMSAs and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, that AP-2α could bind to TACE promoter in a TNF-dependent manner. Additionally, sTNF simultaneously enhanced AP-2α expression and decreased TACE promoter luciferase activity in DCs. Similarly, transfection of AP-2α cDNA decreased TACE promoter luciferase activity, TACE expression, and TACE enzymatic activity in wtDCs or TNFko DCs. In contrast, transfection of AP-2α small interfering RNA increased TACE promoter luciferase activity, TACE expression, and TACE enzymatic activity in wtDCs. These results show that TACE is a target of, and is downregulated by, sTNF-induced AP-2α transcription factor in DCs.

  3. Comparative Analysis of Gene Regulation by the Transcription Factor PPARα between Mouse and Human

    PubMed Central

    Rakhshandehroo, Maryam; Hooiveld, Guido; Müller, Michael; Kersten, Sander

    2009-01-01

    Background Studies in mice have shown that PPARα is an important regulator of hepatic lipid metabolism and the acute phase response. However, little information is available on the role of PPARα in human liver. Here we set out to compare the function of PPARα in mouse and human hepatocytes via analysis of target gene regulation. Methodology/Principal Findings Primary hepatocytes from 6 human and 6 mouse donors were treated with PPARα agonist Wy14643 and gene expression profiling was performed using Affymetrix GeneChips followed by a systems biology analysis. Baseline PPARα expression was similar in human and mouse hepatocytes. Depending on species and time of exposure, Wy14643 significantly induced the expression of 362–672 genes. Surprisingly minor overlap was observed between the Wy14643-regulated genes from mouse and human, although more substantial overlap was observed at the pathway level. Xenobiotics metabolism and apolipoprotein synthesis were specifically regulated by PPARα in human hepatocytes, whereas glycolysis-gluconeogenesis was regulated specifically in mouse hepatocytes. Most of the genes commonly regulated in mouse and human were involved in lipid metabolism and many represented known PPARα targets, including CPT1A, HMGCS2, FABP1, ACSL1, and ADFP. Several genes were identified that were specifically induced by PPARα in human (MBL2, ALAS1, CYP1A1, TSKU) or mouse (Fbp2, lgals4, Cd36, Ucp2, Pxmp4). Furthermore, several putative novel PPARα targets were identified that were commonly regulated in both species, including CREB3L3, KLF10, KLF11 and MAP3K8. Conclusions/Significance Our results suggest that PPARα activation has a major impact on gene regulation in human hepatocytes. Importantly, the role of PPARα as master regulator of hepatic lipid metabolism is generally well-conserved between mouse and human. Overall, however, PPARα regulates a mostly divergent set of genes in mouse and human hepatocytes. PMID:19710929

  4. Monoclonal antibody-glial-derived neurotrophic factor fusion protein penetrates the blood-brain barrier in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qing-Hui; Boado, Ruben J; Lu, Jeff Zhiqiang; Hui, Eric Ka-Wai; Pardridge, William M

    2010-04-01

    Glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is a potent neuroprotective agent for multiple brain disorders, including Parkinson's disease. However, GDNF drug development is difficult because GDNF does not cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). To enable future drug development of GDNF in mouse models, the neurotrophin was re-engineered as an IgG fusion protein to enable penetration through the BBB after intravenous administration. The 134-amino acid GDNF was fused to the heavy chain of a chimeric monoclonal antibody (MAb) against the mouse transferrin receptor (TfR) designated the cTfRMAb. This antibody undergoes receptor-mediated transport across the BBB and acts as a molecular Trojan horse to ferry the GDNF into mouse brain. The cTfRMAb-GDNF fusion protein was expressed by stably transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells, affinity-purified, and the biochemical identity was confirmed by mouse IgG and GDNF Western blotting. The cTfRMAb-GDNF fusion protein was bifunctional and bound with high affinity to both the GDNF receptor alpha1, ED(50) = 1.7 +/- 0.2 nM, and the mouse TfR, ED(50) = 3.2 +/- 0.3 nM. The cTfRMAb-GDNF fusion protein was rapidly taken up by brain, and the brain uptake was 3.1 +/- 0.2% injected dose/g brain at 60 min after intravenous injection of a 1-mg/kg dose of the fusion protein. Brain capillary depletion analysis showed the majority of the fusion protein was transcytosed across the BBB with penetration into brain parenchyma. The brain uptake results indicate it is possible to achieve therapeutic elevations of GDNF in mouse brain with intravenous administration of the cTfRMAb-GDNF fusion protein.

  5. Development of a chemically defined medium and discovery of new mitogenic growth factors for mouse hepatocytes: mitogenic effects of FGF1/2 and PDGF.

    PubMed

    Bowen, William C; Michalopoulos, Amantha W; Orr, Anne; Ding, Michael Q; Stolz, Donna B; Michalopoulos, George K

    2014-01-01

    Chemically defined serum-free media for rat hepatocytes have been useful in identifying EGFR ligands and HGF/MET signaling as direct mitogenic factors for rat hepatocytes. The absence of such media for mouse hepatocytes has prevented screening for discovery of such mitogens for mouse hepatocytes. We present results obtained by designing such a chemically defined medium for mouse hepatocytes and demonstrate that in addition to EGFR ligands and HGF, the growth factors FGF1 and FGF2 are also important mitogenic factors for mouse hepatocytes. Smaller mitogenic response was also noticed for PDGF AB. Mouse hepatocytes are more likely to enter into spontaneous proliferation in primary culture due to activation of cell cycle pathways resulting from collagenase perfusion. These results demonstrate unanticipated fundamental differences in growth biology of hepatocytes between the two rodent species.

  6. Genetically modified neural stem cells for a local and sustained delivery of neuroprotective factors to the dystrophic mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Jung, Gila; Sun, Jing; Petrowitz, Bettina; Riecken, Kristoffer; Kruszewski, Katharina; Jankowiak, Wanda; Kunst, Frank; Skevas, Christos; Richard, Gisbert; Fehse, Boris; Bartsch, Udo

    2013-12-01

    A continuous intraocular delivery of neurotrophic factors (NFs) is being explored as a strategy to rescue photoreceptor cells and visual functions in degenerative retinal disorders that are currently untreatable. To establish a cell-based intraocular delivery system for a sustained administration of NFs to the dystrophic mouse retina, we used a polycistronic lentiviral vector to genetically modify adherently cultivated murine neural stem (NS) cells. The vector concurrently encoded a gene of interest, a reporter gene, and a resistance gene and thus facilitated the selection, cloning, and in vivo tracking of the modified cells. To evaluate whether modified NS cells permit delivery of functionally relevant quantities of NFs to the dystrophic mouse retina, we expressed a secretable variant of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) in NS cells and grafted the cells into the vitreous space of Pde6b(rd1) and Pde6b(rd10) mice, two animal models of retinitis pigmentosa. In both mouse lines, grafted cells attached to the retina and lens, where they differentiated into astrocytes and some neurons. Adverse effects of the transplanted cells on the morphology of host retinas were not observed. Importantly, the CNTF-secreting NS cells significantly attenuated photoreceptor degeneration in both mutant mouse lines. The neuroprotective effect was significantly more pronounced when clonally derived NS cell lines selected for high expression levels of CNTF were grafted into Pde6b(rd1) mice. Intravitreal transplantations of modified NS cells may thus represent a useful method for preclinical studies aimed at evaluating the therapeutic potential of a cell-based intraocular delivery of NFs in mouse models of photoreceptor degeneration.

  7. Endothelial injury in a transforming growth factor β-dependent mouse model of scleroderma induces pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Derrett-Smith, Emma C; Dooley, Audrey; Gilbane, Adrian J; Trinder, Sarah L; Khan, Korsa; Baliga, Reshma; Holmes, Alan M; Hobbs, Adrian J; Abraham, David; Denton, Christopher P

    2013-11-01

    To delineate the constitutive pulmonary vascular phenotype of the TβRIIΔk-fib mouse model of scleroderma, and to selectively induce pulmonary endothelial cell injury using vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibition to develop a model with features characteristic of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). The TβRIIΔk-fib mouse strain expresses a kinase-deficient transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) receptor type II driven by a fibroblast-specific promoter, leading to ligand-dependent up-regulation of TGFβ signaling, and replicates key fibrotic features of scleroderma. Structural, biochemical, and functional assessments of pulmonary vessels, including in vivo hemodynamic studies, were performed before and following VEGF inhibition, which induced pulmonary endothelial cell apoptosis. These assessments included biochemical analysis of the TGFβ and VEGF signaling axes in tissue sections and explanted smooth muscle cells. In the TβRIIΔk-fib mouse strain, a constitutive pulmonary vasculopathy with medial thickening, a perivascular proliferating chronic inflammatory cell infiltrate, and mildly elevated pulmonary artery pressure resembled the well-described chronic hypoxia model of pulmonary hypertension. Following administration of SU5416, the pulmonary vascular phenotype was more florid, with pulmonary arteriolar luminal obliteration by apoptosis-resistant proliferating endothelial cells. These changes resulted in right ventricular hypertrophy, confirming hemodynamically significant PAH. Altered expression of TGFβ and VEGF ligand and receptor was consistent with a scleroderma phenotype. In this study, we replicated key features of systemic sclerosis-related PAH in a mouse model. Our results suggest that pulmonary endothelial cell injury in a genetically susceptible mouse strain triggers this complication and support the underlying role of functional interplay between TGFβ and VEGF, which provides insight into the pathogenesis of this disease. Copyright

  8. Opposite effects of transforming growth factor alpha and epidermal growth factor on mouse placental lactogen I secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, M; Ogren, L; Kurachi, H; Hirota, K; Imai, T; Talamantes, F

    1995-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha) regulates the production of mouse placental lactogen I (mPL-I) and mPL-II in a manner that is similar to that of epidermal growth factor (EGF), which was previously shown to stimulate mPL-I secretion and inhibit mPL-II secretion. In contrast to the activity of EGF, human (h) and rat (r) TGF-alpha (each at 100 ng/ml) inhibited secretion of mPL-I by placental cells isolated from mice on day 7 of pregnancy. Maximum inhibition of mPL-I secretion occurred on the third day of a 5-day culture period and ranged between 37% and 56% in multiple trials. Incubation of cells with hTGF-alpha and EGF was not followed by a change in the mPL-I concentration of the medium, suggesting the peptides antagonized each other's effects. hTGF-alpha and rTGF-alpha inhibited secretion of mPL-II; maximum inhibition ranged between 62% and 84% in multiple trials. The lowest concentrations of hTGF-alpha that affected mPL-I and mPL-II secretion were 10 ng/ml and 1 ng/ml, respectively. EGF and hTGF-alpha bound to the same receptors on placental cells, as assessed by cross-linking, and both peptides stimulated receptor phosphorylation, as assessed by Western blot analysis. There are three types of mPL-containing cells in placental cultures: cells that contain only mPL-I, cells that contain only mPL-II, and cells that contain both mPLs. The percentage of each type of mPL-containing cell in the culture was determined by immunostaining. hTGF-alpha affected the differentiation of the subpopulations of PL-containing cells in a manner that differed from that of EGF. The data suggest that TGF-alpha and EGF do not regulate the production of mPL-I and mPL-II in a similar manner. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7535931

  9. Liver growth factor treatment reverses emphysema previously established in a cigarette smoke exposure mouse model.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Rial, Sandra; Del Puerto-Nevado, Laura; Girón-Martínez, Alvaro; Terrón-Expósito, Raúl; Díaz-Gil, Juan J; González-Mangado, Nicolás; Peces-Barba, Germán

    2014-11-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an inflammatory lung disease largely associated with cigarette smoke exposure (CSE) and characterized by pulmonary and extrapulmonary manifestations, including systemic inflammation. Liver growth factor (LGF) is an albumin-bilirubin complex with demonstrated antifibrotic, antioxidant, and antihypertensive actions even at extrahepatic sites. We aimed to determine whether short LGF treatment (1.7 μg/mouse ip; 2 times, 2 wk), once the lung damage was established through the chronic CSE, contributes to improvement of the regeneration of damaged lung tissue, reducing systemic inflammation. We studied AKR/J mice, divided into three groups: control (air-exposed), CSE (chronic CSE), and CSE + LGF (LGF-treated CSE mice). We assessed pulmonary function, morphometric data, and levels of various systemic inflammatory markers to test the LGF regenerative capacity in this system. Our results revealed that the lungs of the CSE animals showed pulmonary emphysema and inflammation, characterized by increased lung compliance, enlargement of alveolar airspaces, systemic inflammation (circulating leukocytes and serum TNF-α level), and in vivo lung matrix metalloproteinase activity. LGF treatment was able to reverse all these parameters, decreasing total cell count in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and T-lymphocyte infiltration in peripheral blood observed in emphysematous mice and reversing the decrease in monocytes observed in chronic CSE mice, and tends to reduce the neutrophil population and serum TNF-α level. In conclusion, LGF treatment normalizes the physiological and morphological parameters and levels of various systemic inflammatory biomarkers in a chronic CSE AKR/J model, which may have important pathophysiological and therapeutic implications for subjects with stable COPD.

  10. Mutations in Complement Factor H Impair Alternative Pathway Regulation on Mouse Glomerular Endothelial Cells in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Loeven, Markus A; Rops, Angelique L; Lehtinen, Markus J; van Kuppevelt, Toin H; Daha, Mohamed R; Smith, Richard J; Bakker, Marinka; Berden, Jo H; Rabelink, Ton J; Jokiranta, T Sakari; van der Vlag, Johan

    2016-03-04

    Complement factor H (FH) inhibits complement activation and interacts with glomerular endothelium via its complement control protein domains 19 and 20, which also recognize heparan sulfate (HS). Abnormalities in FH are associated with the renal diseases atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome and dense deposit disease and the ocular disease age-related macular degeneration. Although FH systemically controls complement activation, clinical phenotypes selectively manifest in kidneys and eyes, suggesting the presence of tissue-specific determinants of disease development. Recent results imply the importance of tissue-specifically expressed, sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), like HS, in determining FH binding to and activity on host tissues. Therefore, we investigated which GAGs mediate human FH and recombinant human FH complement control proteins domains 19 and 20 (FH19-20) binding to mouse glomerular endothelial cells (mGEnCs) in ELISA. Furthermore, we evaluated the functional defects of FH19-20 mutants during complement activation by measuring C3b deposition on mGEnCs using flow cytometry. FH and FH19-20 bound dose-dependently to mGEnCs and TNF-α treatment increased binding of both proteins, whereas heparinase digestion and competition with heparin/HS inhibited binding. Furthermore, 2-O-, and 6-O-, but not N-desulfation of heparin, significantly increased the inhibitory effect on FH19-20 binding to mGEnCs. Compared with wild type FH19-20, atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome-associated mutants were less able to compete with FH in normal human serum during complement activation on mGEnCs, confirming their potential glomerular pathogenicity. In conclusion, our study shows that FH and FH19-20 binding to glomerular endothelial cells is differentially mediated by HS but not other GAGs. Furthermore, we describe a novel, patient serum-independent competition assay for pathogenicity screening of FH19-20 mutants. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular

  11. Mutations in Complement Factor H Impair Alternative Pathway Regulation on Mouse Glomerular Endothelial Cells in Vitro*

    PubMed Central

    Loeven, Markus A.; Rops, Angelique L.; Lehtinen, Markus J.; van Kuppevelt, Toin H.; Daha, Mohamed R.; Smith, Richard J.; Bakker, Marinka; Berden, Jo H.; Rabelink, Ton J.; Jokiranta, T. Sakari; van der Vlag, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Complement factor H (FH) inhibits complement activation and interacts with glomerular endothelium via its complement control protein domains 19 and 20, which also recognize heparan sulfate (HS). Abnormalities in FH are associated with the renal diseases atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome and dense deposit disease and the ocular disease age-related macular degeneration. Although FH systemically controls complement activation, clinical phenotypes selectively manifest in kidneys and eyes, suggesting the presence of tissue-specific determinants of disease development. Recent results imply the importance of tissue-specifically expressed, sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), like HS, in determining FH binding to and activity on host tissues. Therefore, we investigated which GAGs mediate human FH and recombinant human FH complement control proteins domains 19 and 20 (FH19–20) binding to mouse glomerular endothelial cells (mGEnCs) in ELISA. Furthermore, we evaluated the functional defects of FH19–20 mutants during complement activation by measuring C3b deposition on mGEnCs using flow cytometry. FH and FH19–20 bound dose-dependently to mGEnCs and TNF-α treatment increased binding of both proteins, whereas heparinase digestion and competition with heparin/HS inhibited binding. Furthermore, 2-O-, and 6-O-, but not N-desulfation of heparin, significantly increased the inhibitory effect on FH19–20 binding to mGEnCs. Compared with wild type FH19–20, atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome-associated mutants were less able to compete with FH in normal human serum during complement activation on mGEnCs, confirming their potential glomerular pathogenicity. In conclusion, our study shows that FH and FH19–20 binding to glomerular endothelial cells is differentially mediated by HS but not other GAGs. Furthermore, we describe a novel, patient serum-independent competition assay for pathogenicity screening of FH19–20 mutants. PMID:26728463

  12. [Clinical efficacy of mouse nerve growth factor in the treatment of sudden deafness].

    PubMed

    Xu, Ting; Xiao, Dajiang; Wu, Sihai; Yuan, Yuan

    2014-05-01

    To study the clinical efficacy of mouse nerve growth factor (NGF) in the treatment of sudden deafness. A retrospective analysis was performed on 115 cases of hospitalized patients who were suffered from sudden deafness. Patients were divided into two groups according to treatment medicine. Control group: patients were treated with intravenous vasodilators, energy mixture, steroid pulse therapy, and methylcobalamin neurotrophic therapy. NGF group: intramuscular NGF treatment was added on the basis of conventional therapy mentioned above. Both treatments lasted 14 days, the total efficiency were compared. Patients were further divided into sub-groups according to age, duration and the level of pre-treatment PTA, and the treatment efficiency was further compared. By SPSS 11.0 statistical analysis, a P < 0.05 was considered as statistical significant difference. (1) The total efficiency of NGF group was significantly higher than control group. (2) Regard of age, the efficiency of NGF treatment group was significantly higher than control group. (3) For the patients whose duration were less than 7 d, or the PTA < or = 60 dBHL, the efficiency of NGF group were significantly higher. For the patients whose duration were more than 7 d, or the PTA>60 dBHL, the efficiency of NGF therapy was not superior to the traditional treatment. NGF can significantly improve the symptom of patients with short duration or low PTA. For this kind of patients, NGF adjuvant therapy should be recommended. For the patients with longer duration and higher level of PTA, NGF therapy is not advocated. NGF treatment should not be in consideration of the age.

  13. Specific epidermal growth factor receptor autophosphorylation sites promote mouse colon epithelial cell chemotaxis and restitution.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Toshimitsu; Frey, Mark R; Dise, Rebecca S; Bernard, Jessica K; Polk, D Brent

    2011-08-01

    Upon ligand binding, epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (R) autophosphorylates on COOH-terminal tyrosines, generating docking sites for signaling partners that stimulate proliferation, restitution, and chemotaxis. Specificity for individual EGFR tyrosines in cellular responses has been hypothesized but not well documented. Here we tested the requirement for particular tyrosines, and associated downstream pathways, in mouse colon epithelial cell chemotactic migration. We compared these requirements to those for the phenotypically distinct restitution (wound healing) migration. Wild-type, Y992/1173F, Y1045F, Y1068F, and Y1086F EGFR constructs were expressed in EGFR(-/-) cells; EGF-induced chemotaxis or restitution were determined by Boyden chamber or modified scratch wound assay, respectively. Pharmacological inhibitors of p38, phospholipase C (PLC), Src, MEK, JNK/SAPK, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase), and protein kinase C (PKC) were used to block EGF-stimulated signaling. Pathway activation was determined by immunoblot analysis. Unlike wild-type EGFR, Y992/1173F and Y1086F EGFR did not stimulate colon epithelial cell chemotaxis toward EGF; Y1045F and Y1068F EGFR partially stimulated chemotaxis. Only wild-type EGFR promoted colonocyte restitution. Inhibition of p38, PLC, and Src, or Grb2 knockdown, blocked chemotaxis; JNK, PI 3-kinase, and PKC inhibitors or c-Cbl knockdown blocked restitution but not chemotaxis. All four EGFR mutants stimulated downstream signaling in response to EGF, but Y992/1173F EGFR was partially defective in PLCγ activation whereas both Y1068F and Y1086F EGFR failed to activate Src. We conclude that specific EGFR tyrosines play key roles in determining cellular responses to ligand. Chemotaxis and restitution, which have different migration phenotypes and physiological consequences, have overlapping but not identical EGFR signaling requirements.

  14. Ethanol-mediated expression of connective tissue growth factor (CCN2) in mouse pancreatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Lawrencia, Carmel; Charrier, Alyssa; Huang, Guangcun; Brigstock, David R

    2009-04-01

    Activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSC) play a central role in the pathogenesis of pancreatic fibrosis, a common feature of chronic pancreatitis which is often caused by excessive alcohol consumption. In view of the central role of connective tissue growth factor (CCN2) in fibrosis, we investigated the mechanisms by which CCN2 is regulated in PSC following their exposure to ethanol or acetaldehyde. Primary cultures of PSC from Balb/c mice were treated with 0-50 mM ethanol or 0-200 microM acetaldehyde in the presence or absence of 4-methylpyrazole (4MP; an inhibitor of alcohol dehydrogenase), diallyl sulfide (DAS; an inhibitor of cytochrome P4502E1) or anti-oxidant catalase or vitamin D. CCN2 production, assessed by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction to measure CCN2 mRNA levels or by fluorescence activated cell sorting to assess CCN2 protein, was enhanced in a dose-dependent manner by ethanol or acetaldehyde. In the presence of 4MP, DAS, or the anti-oxidants vitamin D or catalase, there was a substantial decrease in the ability of ethanol to stimulate CCN2 mRNA expression and a concomitant decrease in CCN2-positive PSC. Accumulation of reactive oxygen species in PSC after exposure to ethanol was verified by loading the cells with dichlorofluorescin diacetate and showing that there was a stimulation of its oxidized fluorescent product, the latter of which was diminished in the presence of catalase or vitamin D. These results show the production of acetaldehyde and oxidant stress in mouse PSC are the cause of increased CCN2 mRNA and protein production after exposure of the cells to ethanol. The potential therapeutic effects of inhibitors of ethanol metabolism or anti-oxidants in alcoholic pancreatitis may arise in part through their ability to attenuate CCN2 production by PSC.

  15. Action of Administered Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor on the Mouse Dorsal Vagal Complex

    PubMed Central

    Senzacqua, Martina; Severi, Ilenia; Perugini, Jessica; Acciarini, Samantha; Cinti, Saverio; Giordano, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) induces weight loss in obese rodents and humans through activation of the hypothalamic Jak-STAT (Janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription) signaling pathway. Here, we tested the hypothesis that CNTF also affects the brainstem centers involved in feeding and energy balance regulation. To this end, wild-type and leptin-deficient (ob/ob and db/db) obese mice were acutely treated with intraperitoneal recombinant CNTF. Coronal brainstem sections were processed for immunohistochemical detection of STAT3, STAT1, STAT5 phosphorylation and c-Fos. In wild-type mice, CNTF treatment for 45 min induced STAT3, STAT1, and STAT5 phosphorylation in neurons as well as glial cells of the area postrema; here, the majority of CNTF-responsive cells activated multiple STAT isoforms, and a significant proportion of CNTF-responsive glial cells bore the immaturity and plasticity markers nestin and vimentin. After 120 min CNTF treatment, c-Fos expression was intense in glial cells and weak in neurons of the area postrema, it was intense in several neurons of the rostral and caudal solitary tract nucleus (NTS), and weak in some cholinergic neurons of the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus. In the ob/ob and db/db mice, Jak-STAT activation and c-Fos expression were similar to those induced in wild-type mouse brainstem. Treatment with CNTF (120 min, to induce c-Fos expression) and leptin (25 min, to induce STAT3 phosphorylation) demonstrated the co-localization of the two transcription factors in a small neuron population in the caudal NTS portion. Finally, weak immunohistochemical CNTF staining, detected in funiculus separans, and meningeal glial cells, matched the modest amount of CNTF found by RT-qPCR in micropunched area postrema tissue, which in contrast exhibited a very high amount of CNTF receptor. Collectively, the present findings show that the area postrema and the NTS exhibit high, distinctive responsiveness to circulating

  16. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor genotype impacts the prenatal cocaine-induced mouse phenotype.

    PubMed

    Kabir, Zeeba D; Lourenco, Frederico; Byrne, Maureen E; Katzman, Aaron; Lee, Francis; Rajadhyaksha, Anjali M; Kosofsky, Barry E

    2012-01-01

    Prenatal cocaine exposure leads to persistent alterations in the growth factor brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), particularly in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and hippocampus, brain regions important in cognitive functioning. BDNF plays an important role in the strengthening of existing synaptic connections as well as in the formation of new contacts during learning. A single nucleotide polymorphism in the BDNF gene (Val66Met), leading to a Met substitution for Val at codon 66 in the prodomain, is common in human populations, with an allele frequency of 20-30% in Caucasians. To study the interaction between prenatal cocaine exposure and BDNF, we have utilized a line of BDNF Val66Met transgenic mice on a Swiss Webster background in which BDNF(Met) is endogenously expressed. Examination of baseline levels of mature BDNF protein in the mPFC of prenatally cocaine-treated wild-type (Val66Val) and Val66Met mice revealed significantly lower levels compared to prenatally saline-treated mice. In contrast, in the hippocampus of prenatally saline- and cocaine-treated adult Val66Met mice, there were significantly lower levels of mature BDNF protein compared to Val66Val mice. In extinction of a conditioned fear, we found that prenatally cocaine-treated Val66Met mice had a deficit in recall of extinction. Examination of mature BDNF protein levels immediately after the test for extinction recall revealed lower levels in the mPFC of prenatally cocaine-treated Val66Met mice compared to saline-treated mice. However, 2 h after the extinction test, there was increased BDNF exons I, IV, and IX mRNA expression in the prelimbic cortex of the mPFC in the prenatally cocaine-treated BDNF Val66Met mice compared to prenatally saline-treated mice. Taken together, our results suggest the possibility that prenatal cocaine-induced constitutive alterations in BDNF mRNA and protein expression in the mPFC differentially poises animals for alterations in behaviorally induced gene

  17. Mouse ovarian follicles secrete factors affecting the growth and development of like-sized ovarian follicles in vitro.

    PubMed

    Spears, Norah; Baker, Stuart; Srsen, Vlastimil; Lapping, Rebecca; Mullan, Julie; Nelson, Robert; Allison, Vivian

    2002-12-01

    A series of experiments have been carried out to determine whether follicles secrete factors able to affect the growth and development of other, like-sized follicles. Late preantral mouse ovarian follicles were either cocultured or cultured in media conditioned by previously cultured follicles. In particular, the experiments examined whether follicles do secrete such factors, whether the level of FSH in the culture media can affect that process, and what the nature of such secretory factor(s) might be. First, pairs of follicles were cocultured across a polycarbonate membrane containing pores. This showed that communication between the follicles resulted in the stimulation of growth and that the stimulation was due, at least in part, to the production of secretory factor(s). In subsequent experiments, follicles were cultured in media that had been preconditioned by previously cultured follicles. The concentration of FSH in the cultures determined the effect of the conditioned media: conditioned media was stimulatory to follicle growth when levels of FSH remained high throughout the culture, but inhibitory when FSH levels were dropped midway through the cultures. Heat inactivation removed this inhibitory effect, showing that the factor was likely to be a protein; addition of follistatin to the conditioned media did not alter its effect, indicating that the factor was unlikely to be activin. We have shown through a series of culture experiments that mouse follicles secrete factor(s) that can affect the development of other like-sized follicles when cultured from the late preantral to Graafian stages. Furthermore, we have shown that the effect (or production) of such factors is dependent on the FSH environment of the follicles.

  18. Genomic Responses of Mouse Synovial Fibroblasts During Tumor Necrosis Factor-Driven Arthritogenesis Greatly Mimic Those in Human Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ntougkos, Evangelos; Chouvardas, Panagiotis; Roumelioti, Fani; Ospelt, Caroline; Frank-Bertoncelj, Mojca; Filer, Andrew; Buckley, Christopher D; Gay, Steffen; Nikolaou, Christoforos; Kollias, George

    2017-08-01

    Aberrant activation of synovial fibroblasts is a key determinant in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aims of this study were to produce a map of gene expression and epigenetic changes occurring in this cell type during disease progression in the human tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-transgenic model of arthritis and to identify commonalities with human synovial fibroblasts. We used deep sequencing to probe the transcriptome, the methylome, and the chromatin landscape of cultured mouse arthritogenic synovial fibroblasts at 3 stages of disease, as well as synovial fibroblasts stimulated with human TNF. We performed bioinformatics analyses at the gene, pathway, and network levels, compared mouse and human data, and validated selected genes in both species. We found that synovial fibroblast arthritogenicity was reflected in distinct dynamic patterns of transcriptional dysregulation, which was especially enriched in pathways of the innate immune response and mesenchymal differentiation. A functionally representative subset of these changes was associated with methylation, mostly in gene bodies. The arthritogenic state involved highly active promoters, which were marked by histone H3K4 trimethylation. There was significant overlap between the mouse and human data at the level of dysregulated genes and to an even greater extent at the level of pathways. This study is the first systematic examination of the pathogenic changes that occur in mouse synovial fibroblasts during progressive TNF-driven arthritogenesis. Significant correlations with the respective human RA synovial fibroblast data further validate the human TNF-transgenic mouse as a reliable model of the human disease. The resource of data generated in this work may serve as a framework for the discovery of novel pathogenic mechanisms and disease biomarkers. © 2017, American College of Rheumatology.

  19. Decreased brain-derived neurotrophic factor depends on amyloid aggregation state in transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Peng, Shiyong; Garzon, Diego J; Marchese, Monica; Klein, William; Ginsberg, Stephen D; Francis, Beverly M; Mount, Howard T J; Mufson, Elliott J; Salehi, Ahmad; Fahnestock, Margaret

    2009-07-22

    Downregulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the cortex occurs early in the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Since BDNF plays a critical role in neuronal survival, synaptic plasticity, and memory, BDNF reduction may contribute to synaptic and cellular loss and memory deficits characteristic of AD. In vitro evidence suggests that amyloid-beta (A beta) contributes to BDNF downregulation in AD, but the specific A beta aggregation state responsible for this downregulation in vivo is unknown. In the present study, we examined cortical levels of BDNF mRNA in three different transgenic AD mouse models harboring mutations in APP resulting in A beta overproduction, and in a genetic mouse model of Down syndrome. Two of the three A beta transgenic strains (APP(NLh) and TgCRND8) exhibited significantly decreased cortical BDNF mRNA levels compared with wild-type mice, whereas neither the other strain (APP(swe)/PS-1) nor the Down syndrome mouse model (Ts65Dn) was affected. Only APP(NLh) and TgCRND8 mice expressed high A beta(42)/A beta(40) ratios and larger SDS-stable A beta oligomers (approximately 115 kDa). TgCRND8 mice exhibited downregulation of BDNF transcripts III and IV; transcript IV is also downregulated in AD. Furthermore, in all transgenic mouse strains, there was a correlation between levels of large oligomers, A beta(42)/A beta(40), and severity of BDNF decrease. These data show that the amount and species of A beta vary among transgenic mouse models of AD and are negatively correlated with BDNF levels. These findings also suggest that the effect of A beta on decreased BDNF expression is specific to the aggregation state of A beta and is dependent on large oligomers.

  20. Increased connective tissue growth factor associated with cardiac fibrosis in the mdx mouse model of dystrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Au, Carol G; Butler, Tanya L; Sherwood, Megan C; Egan, Jonathan R; North, Kathryn N; Winlaw, David S

    2011-02-01

    Cardiomyopathy contributes to morbidity and mortality in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a progressive muscle-wasting disorder. A major feature of the hearts of DMD patients and the mdx mouse model of the disease is cardiac fibrosis. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is involved in the fibrotic process in many organs. This study utilized the mdx mouse model to assess the role of CTGF and other extracellular matrix components during the development of fibrosis in the dystrophic heart. Left ventricular function of mdx and control mice at 6, 29 and 43 weeks was measured by echocardiography. Young (6 weeks old) mdx hearts had normal function and histology. At 29 weeks of age, mdx mice developed cardiac fibrosis and increased collagen expression. The onset of fibrosis was associated with increased CTGF transcript and protein expression. Increased intensity of CTGF immunostaining was localized to fibrotic areas in mdx hearts. The upregulation of CTGF was also concurrent with increased expression of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMP-1). These changes persisted in 43 week old mdx hearts and were combined with impaired cardiac function and increased gene expression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2, MMP-9). In summary, an association was observed between cardiac fibrosis and increased CTGF expression in the mdx mouse heart. CTGF may be a key mediator of early and persistent fibrosis in dystrophic cardiomyopathy.

  1. Genomic organization and chromosomal localization of the human and mouse genes encoding the alpha receptor component for ciliary neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, D M; Rojas, E; Le Beau, M M; Espinosa, R; Brannan, C I; McClain, J; Masiakowski, P; Ip, N Y; Copeland, N G; Jenkins, N A

    1995-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) has recently been found to share receptor components with, and to be structurally related to, a family of broadly acting cytokines, including interleukin-6, leukemia inhibitory factor, and oncostatin M. However, the CNTF receptor complex also includes a CNTF-specific component known as CNTF receptor alpha (CNTFR alpha). Here we describe the molecular cloning of the human and mouse genes encoding CNTFR. We report that the human and mouse genes have an identical intron-exon structure that correlates well with the domain structure of CNTFR alpha. That is, the signal peptide and the immunoglobulin-like domain are each encoded by single exons, the cytokine receptor-like domain is distributed among 4 exons, and the C-terminal glycosyl phosphatidylinositol recognition domain is encoded by the final coding exon. The position of the introns within the cytokine receptor-like domain corresponds to those found in other members of the cytokine receptor superfamily. Confirming a recent study using radiation hybrids, we have also mapped the human CNTFR gene to chromosome band 9p13 and the mouse gene to a syntenic region of chromosome 4.

  2. MITOCHONDRIAL DISEASES PART I: MOUSE MODELS OF OXPHOS DEFICIENCIES CAUSED BY DEFECTS ON RESPIRATORY COMPLEX SUBUNITS OR ASSEMBLY FACTORS

    PubMed Central

    Torraco, Alessandra; Peralta, Susana; Iommarini, Luisa; Diaz, Francisca

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are the most common inborn errors of metabolism affecting the oxidative phosphorylation system (OXPHOS). Because the poor knowledge of the pathogenic mechanisms, a cure for these disorders is still unavailable and all the treatments currently in use are supportive more than curative. Therefore, in the past decade a great variety of mouse models have been developed to assess the in vivo function of several mitochondrial proteins involved in human diseases. Due to the genetic and physiological similarity to humans, mice represent reliable models to study the pathogenic mechanisms of mitochondrial disorders and are precious to test new therapeutic approaches. Here we summarize the features of several mouse models of mitochondrial diseases directly related to defects in subunits of the OXPHOS complexes or in assembly factors. We discuss how these models recapitulate many human conditions and how they have contributed to the understanding of mitochondrial function in health and disease. PMID:25660179

  3. Targeted expression of RALT in mouse skin inhibits epidermal growth factor receptor signalling and generates a Waved-like phenotype.

    PubMed

    Ballarò, Costanza; Ceccarelli, Sara; Tiveron, Cecilia; Tatangelo, Laura; Salvatore, Anna Maria; Segatto, Oreste; Alemà, Stefano

    2005-08-01

    Although it has been clearly established that negative feedback loops have a fundamental role in the regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signalling in flies, their role in the regulation of mammalian EGFR has been inferred only recently from in vitro studies. Here, we report on the forced expression of RALT/MIG-6, a negative feedback regulator of ErbB receptors, in mouse skin. A RALT transgene driven by the K14 promoter generated a dose-dependent phenotype resembling that caused by hypomorphic and antimorphic Egfr alleles-that is, wavy coat, curly whiskers and open eyes at birth. Ex vivo keratinocytes from K14-RALT mice showed reduced biochemical and biological responses when stimulated by ErbB ligands. Conversely, knockdown of RALT by RNA interference enhanced ErbB mitogenic signalling. Thus, RALT behaves as a suppressor of EGFR signalling in mouse skin.

  4. Targeted expression of RALT in mouse skin inhibits epidermal growth factor receptor signalling and generates a Waved-like phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Ballarò, Costanza; Ceccarelli, Sara; Tiveron, Cecilia; Tatangelo, Laura; Salvatore, Anna Maria; Segatto, Oreste; Alemà, Stefano

    2005-01-01

    Although it has been clearly established that negative feedback loops have a fundamental role in the regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signalling in flies, their role in the regulation of mammalian EGFR has been inferred only recently from in vitro studies. Here, we report on the forced expression of RALT/MIG-6, a negative feedback regulator of ErbB receptors, in mouse skin. A RALT transgene driven by the K14 promoter generated a dose-dependent phenotype resembling that caused by hypomorphic and antimorphic Egfr alleles—that is, wavy coat, curly whiskers and open eyes at birth. Ex vivo keratinocytes from K14-RALT mice showed reduced biochemical and biological responses when stimulated by ErbB ligands. Conversely, knockdown of RALT by RNA interference enhanced ErbB mitogenic signalling. Thus, RALT behaves as a suppressor of EGFR signalling in mouse skin. PMID:16007071

  5. Integrating Factor Analysis and a Transgenic Mouse Model to Reveal a Peripheral Blood Predictor of Breast Tumors

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Transgenic mouse tumor models have the advantage of facilitating controlled in vivo oncogenic perturbations in a common genetic background. This provides an idealized context for generating transcriptome-based diagnostic models while minimizing the inherent noisiness of high-throughput technologies. However, the question remains whether models developed in such a setting are suitable prototypes for useful human diagnostics. We show that latent factor modeling of the peripheral blood transcriptome in a mouse model of breast cancer provides the basis for using computational methods to link a mouse model to a prototype human diagnostic based on a common underlying biological response to the presence of a tumor. Methods We used gene expression data from mouse peripheral blood cell (PBC) samples to identify significantly differentially expressed genes using supervised classification and sparse ANOVA. We employed these transcriptome data as the starting point for developing a breast tumor predictor from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) by using a factor modeling approach. Results The predictor distinguished breast cancer patients from healthy individuals in a cohort of patients independent from that used to build the factors and train the model with 89% sensitivity, 100% specificity and an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.97 using Youden's J-statistic to objectively select the model's classification threshold. Both permutation testing of the model and evaluating the model strategy by swapping the training and validation sets highlight its stability. Conclusions We describe a human breast tumor predictor based on the gene expression of mouse PBCs. This strategy overcomes many of the limitations of earlier studies by using the model system to reduce noise and identify transcripts associated with the presence of a breast tumor over other potentially confounding factors. Our results serve as a proof-of-concept for using an animal model to develop a

  6. Nat1 promotes translation of specific proteins that induce differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, Hayami; Takahashi, Kazutoshi; Yamamoto, Takuya; Iwasaki, Mio; Narita, Megumi; Nakamura, Masahiro; Rand, Tim A.; Nakagawa, Masato; Watanabe, Akira; Yamanaka, Shinya

    2017-01-01

    Novel APOBEC1 target 1 (Nat1) (also known as “p97,” “Dap5,” and “Eif4g2”) is a ubiquitously expressed cytoplasmic protein that is homologous to the C-terminal two thirds of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4G (Eif4g1). We previously showed that Nat1-null mouse embryonic stem cells (mES cells) are resistant to differentiation. In the current study, we found that NAT1 and eIF4G1 share many binding proteins, such as the eukaryotic translation initiation factors eIF3 and eIF4A and ribosomal proteins. However, NAT1 did not bind to eIF4E or poly(A)-binding proteins, which are critical for cap-dependent translation initiation. In contrast, compared with eIF4G1, NAT1 preferentially interacted with eIF2, fragile X mental retardation proteins (FMR), and related proteins and especially with members of the proline-rich and coiled-coil–containing protein 2 (PRRC2) family. We also found that Nat1-null mES cells possess a transcriptional profile similar, although not identical, to the ground state, which is established in wild-type mES cells when treated with inhibitors of the ERK and glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) signaling pathways. In Nat1-null mES cells, the ERK pathway is suppressed even without inhibitors. Ribosome profiling revealed that translation of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 3 (Map3k3) and son of sevenless homolog 1 (Sos1) is suppressed in the absence of Nat1. Forced expression of Map3k3 induced differentiation of Nat1-null mES cells. These data collectively show that Nat1 is involved in the translation of proteins that are required for cell differentiation. PMID:28003464

  7. Tissue distribution of products of the mouse decay-accelerating factor (DAF) genes. Exploitation of a Daf1 knock-out mouse and site-specific monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Lin, F; Fukuoka, Y; Spicer, A; Ohta, R; Okada, N; Harris, C L; Emancipator, S N; Medof, M E

    2001-10-01

    Decay-accelerating factor (DAF) is a membrane regulator of C3 activation that protects self cells from autologous complement attack. In humans, DAF is uniformly expressed as a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored molecule. In mice, both GPI-anchored and transmembrane-anchored DAF proteins are produced, each of which can be derived from two different genes (Daf1 and Daf2). In this report, we describe a Daf1 gene knock-out mouse arising as the first product of a strategy for targeting one or both Daf genes. As part of the work, we characterize recently described monoclonal antibodies against murine DAF protein using deletion mutants synthesized in yeast, and then employ the monoclonal antibodies in conjunction with wild-type and the Daf1 knock-out mice to determine the tissue distribution of the mouse Daf1 and Daf2 gene products. To enhance the immunohistochemical detection of murine DAF protein, we utilized the sensitive tyramide fluorescence method. In wild-type mice, we found strong DAF labelling of glomeruli, airway and gut epithelium, the spleen, vascular endothelium throughout all tissues, and seminiferous tubules of the testis. In Daf1 knock-out mice, DAF labelling was ablated in most tissues, but strong labelling of the testis and splenic dendritic cells remained. In both sites, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses identified both GPI and transmembrane forms of Daf2 gene-derived protein. The results have relevance for studies of in vivo murine DAF function and of murine DAF structure.

  8. Characterization of human and mouse peroxiredoxin IV: evidence for inhibition by Prx-IV of epidermal growth factor- and p53-induced reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Wong, C M; Chun, A C; Kok, K H; Zhou, Y; Fung, P C; Kung, H F; Jeang, K T; Jin, D Y

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify and characterize human and mouse Prx-IV. We identified mouse peroxiredoxin IV (Prx-IV) by virtue of sequence homology to its human ortholog previously called AOE372. Mouse Prx-IV conserves an amino-terminal presequence coding for signal peptide. The amino acid sequences of mature mouse and human Prx-IV share 97.5% identity. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrates that Prx-IV is more closely related to Prx-I/-II/-III than to Prx-V/-VI. Previously, we mapped the mouse Prx-IV gene to chromosome X by analyzing two sets of multiloci genetic crosses. Here we performed further comparative analysis of mouse and human Prx-IV genomic loci. Consistent with the mouse results, human Prx-IV gene localized to chromosome Xp22.135-136, in close proximity to SAT and DXS7178. A bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone containing the complete human Prx-IV locus was identified. The size of 7 exons and the sequences of the splice junctions were confirmed by PCR analysis. We conclude that mouse Prx-IV is abundantly expressed in many tissues. However, we could not detect Prx-IV in the conditioned media of NIH-3T3 and Jurkat cells. Mouse Prx-IV was specifically found in the nucleus-excluded region of cultured mouse cells. Intracellularly, overexpression of mouse Prx-IV prevented the production of reactive oxygen species induced by epidermal growth factor or p53. Taken together, mouse Prx-IV is likely a cytoplasmic or organellar peroxiredoxin involved in intracellular redox signaling.

  9. Constitutively active transforming growth factor β receptor 1 in the mouse ovary promotes tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yang; Vincent, David F.; Davis, Anna Jane; Sansom, Owen J.; Bartholin, Laurent; Li, Qinglei

    2016-01-01

    Despite the well-established tumor suppressive role of TGFβ proteins, depletion of key TGFβ signaling components in the mouse ovary does not induce a growth advantage. To define the role of TGFβ signaling in ovarian tumorigenesis, we created a mouse model expressing a constitutively active TGFβ receptor 1 (TGFBR1) in ovarian somatic cells using conditional gain-of-function approach. Remarkably, these mice developed ovarian sex cord-stromal tumors with complete penetrance, leading to reproductive failure and mortality. The tumors expressed multiple granulosa cell markers and caused elevated serum inhibin and estradiol levels, reminiscent of granulosa cell tumors. Consistent with the tumorigenic effect, overactivation of TGFBR1 altered tumor microenvironment by promoting angiogenesis and enhanced ovarian cell proliferation, accompanied by impaired cell differentiation and dysregulated expression of critical genes in ovarian function. By further exploiting complementary genetic models, we substantiated our finding that constitutively active TGFBR1 is a potent oncogenic switch in mouse granulosa cells. In summary, overactivation of TGFBR1 drives gonadal tumor development. The TGFBR1 constitutively active mouse model phenocopies a number of morphological, hormonal, and molecular features of human granulosa cell tumors and are potentially valuable for preclinical testing of targeted therapies to treat granulosa cell tumors, a class of poorly defined ovarian malignancies. PMID:27344183

  10. MicroRNA-30 inhibits antiapoptotic factor Mcl-1 in mouse and human hematopoietic cells after radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang Hong; Ha, Cam T; Xiao, Mang

    2016-06-01

    We previously reported that microRNA-30 (miR-30) expression was initiated by radiation-induced proinflammatory factor IL-1β and NFkB activation in mouse and human hematopoietic cells. However, the downstream effectors of miR-30 and its specific role in radiation-induced cell death are not well understood. In the present study, we evaluated effects of radiation on miR-30 expression and activation of intrinsic apoptotic pathway Bcl-2 family factors in in vivo mouse and in vitro human hematopoietic cells. CD2F1 mice and human CD34+ cells were exposed to different doses of gamma-radiation. In addition to survival studies, mouse blood, bone marrow (BM) and spleen cells and human CD34+ cells were collected at 4 h, and 1, 3 and 4 days after irradiation to determine apoptotic and stress response signals. Our results showed that mouse serum miR-30, DNA damage marker γ-H2AX in BM, and Bim, Bax and Bak expression, cytochrome c release, and caspase-3 and -7 activation in BM and/or spleen cells were upregulated in a radiation dose-dependent manner. Antiapoptotic factor Mcl-1 was significantly downregulated, whereas Bcl-2 was less changed or unaltered in the irradiated mouse cells and human CD34+ cells. Furthermore, a putative miR-30 binding site was found in the 3' UTR of Mcl-1 mRNA. miR-30 directly inhibits the expression of Mcl-1 through binding to its target sequence, which was demonstrated by a luciferase reporter assay, and the finding that Mcl-1 was uninhibited by irradiation in miR-30 knockdown CD34+ cells. Bcl-2 expression was not affected by miR-30. Our data suggest miR-30 plays a key role in radiation-induced apoptosis through directly targeting Mcl-1in hematopoietic cells.

  11. Trefoil factor family peptides TFF1 and TFF3 in the nervous tissues of developing mouse embryo.

    PubMed

    Belovari, Tatjana; Bijelić, Nikola; Tolušić Levak, Maja; Baus Lončar, Mirela

    2015-02-01

    Trefoil factor family peptides (TFF1, TFF2, and TFF3) are predominantly found in mucous epithelia of various organs. However, they have also been reported in the nervous tissue, particularly mouse, rat, porcine, and human brain. The aim of this research was to determine the presence of TFF1 and TFF3 in the nervous system of developing mouse embryo. Mouse embryos, at the stages E15 to E17 were isolated, fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde and embedded in paraffin blocks. Sagittal 6µm sections were made, processed for immunohistochemistry, and incubated with anti-TFF1 or anti-TFF3 primary polyclonal rabbit antibodies. Labeled streptavidin-biotin method was used for TFF detection. TFF1 and 3 were found in the cytoplasm of ganglion cell somata, while TFF3 staining was also visible in the cytoplasm of neurons in different areas and nuclei of brain and medulla oblongata. Neurons in the gray matter of spinal cord were also TFF1 and TFF3 positive, and signal for both peptides was found in the choroid plexus. TFF peptides might be involved in the complex processes of nervous system development and differentiation and brain plasticity.

  12. Mouse Y-Encoded Transcription Factor Zfy2 Is Essential for Sperm Head Remodelling and Sperm Tail Development

    PubMed Central

    Vernet, Nadege; Mahadevaiah, Shantha K.; Decarpentrie, Fanny; Longepied, Guy; de Rooij, Dirk G.; Burgoyne, Paul S.; Mitchell, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    A previous study indicated that genetic information encoded on the mouse Y chromosome short arm (Yp) is required for efficient completion of the second meiotic division (that generates haploid round spermatids), restructuring of the sperm head, and development of the sperm tail. Using mouse models lacking a Y chromosome but with varying Yp gene complements provided by Yp chromosomal derivatives or transgenes, we recently identified the Y-encoded zinc finger transcription factors Zfy1 and Zfy2 as the Yp genes promoting the second meiotic division. Using the same mouse models we here show that Zfy2 (but not Zfy1) contributes to the restructuring of the sperm head and is required for the development of the sperm tail. The preferential involvement of Zfy2 is consistent with the presence of an additional strong spermatid-specific promotor that has been acquired by this gene. This is further supported by the fact that promotion of sperm morphogenesis is also seen in one of the two markedly Yp gene deficient models in which a Yp deletion has created a Zfy2/1 fusion gene that is driven by the strong Zfy2 spermatid-specific promotor, but encodes a protein almost identical to that encoded by Zfy1. Our results point to there being further genetic information on Yp that also has a role in restructuring the sperm head. PMID:26765744

  13. Characterization of a laboratory model of computer mouse use - applications for studying risk factors for musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Flodgren, G; Heiden, M; Lyskov, E; Crenshaw, A G

    2007-03-01

    In the present study, we assessed the wrist kinetics (range of motion, mean position, velocity and mean power frequency in radial/ulnar deviation, flexion/extension, and pronation/supination) associated with performing a mouse-operated computerized task involving painting rectangles on a computer screen. Furthermore, we evaluated the effects of the painting task on subjective perception of fatigue and wrist position sense. The results showed that the painting task required constrained wrist movements, and repetitive movements of about the same magnitude as those performed in mouse-operated design tasks. In addition, the painting task induced a perception of muscle fatigue in the upper extremity (Borg CR-scale: 3.5, p<0.001) and caused a reduction in the position sense accuracy of the wrist (error before: 4.6 degrees , error after: 5.6 degrees , p<0.05). This standardized painting task appears suitable for studying relevant risk factors, and therefore it offers a potential for investigating the pathophysiological mechanisms behind musculoskeletal disorders related to computer mouse use.

  14. Constitutive Activation of Transforming Growth Factor Beta Receptor 1 in the Mouse Uterus Impairs Uterine Morphology and Function1

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yang; Duran, Samantha; Lydon, John P.; DeMayo, Francesco J.; Burghardt, Robert C.; Bayless, Kayla J.; Bartholin, Laurent; Li, Qinglei

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite increasing evidence pointing to the essential involvement of the transforming growth factor beta (TGFB) superfamily in reproduction, a definitive role of TGFB signaling in the uterus remains to be unveiled. In this study, we generated a gain-of-function mouse model harboring a constitutively active (CA) TGFB receptor 1 (TGFBR1), the expression of which was conditionally induced by the progesterone receptor (Pgr)-Cre recombinase. Overactivation of TGFB signaling was verified by enhanced phosphorylation of SMAD2 and increased expression of TGFB target genes in the uterus. TGFBR1 Pgr-Cre CA mice were sterile. Histological, cellular, and molecular analyses demonstrated that constitutive activation of TGFBR1 in the mouse uterus promoted formation of hypermuscled uteri. Accompanying this phenotype was the upregulation of a battery of smooth muscle genes in the uterus. Furthermore, TGFB ligands activated SMAD2/3 and stimulated the expression of a smooth muscle maker gene, alpha smooth muscle actin (ACTA2), in human uterine smooth muscle cells. Immunofluorescence microscopy identified a marked reduction of uterine glands in TGFBR1 Pgr-Cre CA mice within the endometrial compartment that contained myofibroblast-like cells. Thus, constitutive activation of TGFBR1 in the mouse uterus caused defects in uterine morphology and function, as evidenced by abnormal myometrial structure, dramatically reduced uterine glands, and impaired uterine decidualization. These results underscore the importance of a precisely controlled TGFB signaling system in establishing a uterine microenvironment conducive to normal development and function. PMID:25505200

  15. Fibroblast growth factor 10 alters the balance between goblet and Paneth cells in the adult mouse small intestine.

    PubMed

    Al Alam, Denise; Danopoulos, Soula; Schall, Kathy; Sala, Frederic G; Almohazey, Dana; Fernandez, G Esteban; Georgia, Senta; Frey, Mark R; Ford, Henri R; Grikscheit, Tracy; Bellusci, Saverio

    2015-04-15

    Intestinal epithelial cell renewal relies on the right balance of epithelial cell migration, proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Intestinal epithelial cells consist of absorptive and secretory lineage. The latter is comprised of goblet, Paneth, and enteroendocrine cells. Fibroblast growth factor 10 (FGF10) plays a central role in epithelial cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation in several organs. The expression pattern of FGF10 and its receptors in both human and mouse intestine and their role in small intestine have yet to be investigated. First, we analyzed the expression of FGF10, FGFR1, and FGFR2, in the human ileum and throughout the adult mouse small intestine. We found that FGF10, FGFR1b, and FGFR2b are expressed in the human ileum as well as in the mouse small intestine. We then used transgenic mouse models to overexpress Fgf10 and a soluble form of Fgfr2b, to study the impact of gain or loss of Fgf signaling in the adult small intestine. We demonstrated that overexpression of Fgf10 in vivo and in vitro induces goblet cell differentiation while decreasing Paneth cells. Moreover, FGF10 decreases stem cell markers such as Lgr5, Lrig1, Hopx, Ascl2, and Sox9. FGF10 inhibited Hes1 expression in vitro, suggesting that FGF10 induces goblet cell differentiation likely through the inhibition of Notch signaling. Interestingly, Fgf10 overexpression for 3 days in vivo and in vitro increased the number of Mmp7/Muc2 double-positive cells, suggesting that goblet cells replace Paneth cells. Further studies are needed to determine the mechanism by which Fgf10 alters cell differentiation in the small intestine. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Effects of transforming growth factor type beta on expression of cytoskeletal proteins in endosteal mouse osteoblastic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lomri, A.; Marie, P.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta) has been shown to influence the growth and differentiation of many cell types in vitro. We have examined the effects of TGF beta on cell morphology and cytoskeletal organization in relation to parameters of cell proliferation and differentiation in endosteal osteoblastic cells isolated from mouse caudal vertebrae. Treatment of mouse osteoblastic cells cultured in serum free medium for 24 hours with TGF beta (1.5-30 ng/mL) slightly (-23%) inhibited alkaline phosphatase activity. In parallel, TGF beta (0.5-30 ng/mL, 24 hours) greatly increased cell replication as evaluated by (3H)-thymidine incorporation into DNA (157% to 325% of controls). At a median dose (1.5 ng/mL) that affected both alkaline phosphatase and DNA synthesis (235% of controls) TGF beta induced rapid (six hours) cell respreading of quiescent mouse osteoblastic cells. This effect was associated with increased polymerization of actin, alpha actinin, and tubulins, as evaluated by both biochemical and immunofluorescence methods. In addition, TGF beta (1.5 ng/mL) increased the de novo biosynthesis of actin, alpha actinin, vimentin, and tubulins, as determined by {sup 35}S methionine labeling and fractionation of cytoskeletal proteins using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. These effects were rapid and transient, as they occurred at six hours and were reversed after 24 hours of TGF beta exposure. The results indicate that the stimulatory effect of TGF beta on DNA synthesis in endosteal mouse osteoblastic cells is associated with a transient increase in cell spreading associated with enhanced polymerization and synthesis of cytoskeletal proteins.

  17. A deficiency of apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) in Harlequin mouse heart mitochondria paradoxically reduces ROS generation during ischemia-reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qun; Szczepanek, Karol; Hu, Ying; Thompson, Jeremy; Lesnefsky, Edward J.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims: AIF (apoptosis inducing factor) is a flavin and NADH containing protein located within mitochondria required for optimal function of the respiratory chain. AIF may function as an antioxidant within mitochondria, yet when released from mitochondria it activates caspase-independent cell death. The Harlequin (Hq) mouse has a markedly reduced content of AIF, providing an experimental model to query if the main role of AIF in the exacerbation of cell death is enhanced mitochondrial generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) or the activation of cell death programs. We asked if the ROS generation is altered in Hq heart mitochondria at baseline or following ischemia-reperfusion (IR). Methods: Buffer perfused mouse hearts underwent 30 min ischemia and 30 min reperfusion. Mitochondrial function including oxidative phosphorylation and H2O2 generation was measured. Immunoblotting was used to determine the contents of AIF and PAR [poly(ADP-ribose)] in cell fractions. Results: There were no differences in the release of H2O2 between wild type (WT) and Hq heart mitochondria at baseline. IR increased H2O2 generation from WT but not from Hq mitochondria compared to corresponding time controls. The complex I activity was decreased in WT but not in Hq mice following IR. The relocation of AIF from mitochondria to nucleus was increased in WT but not in Hq mice. IR activated PARP-1 only in WT mice. Cell injury was decreased in the Hq mouse heart following in vitro IR. Conclusion: A deficiency of AIF within mitochondria does not increase ROS production during IR, indicating that AIF functions less as an antioxidant within mitochondria. The decreased cardiac injury in Hq mouse heart accompanied by less AIF translocation to the nucleus suggests that AIF relocation, rather than the AIF content within mitochondria, contributes to cardiac injury during IR. PMID:25101006

  18. A deficiency of apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) in Harlequin mouse heart mitochondria paradoxically reduces ROS generation during ischemia-reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qun; Szczepanek, Karol; Hu, Ying; Thompson, Jeremy; Lesnefsky, Edward J

    2014-01-01

    AIF (apoptosis inducing factor) is a flavin and NADH containing protein located within mitochondria required for optimal function of the respiratory chain. AIF may function as an antioxidant within mitochondria, yet when released from mitochondria it activates caspase-independent cell death. The Harlequin (Hq) mouse has a markedly reduced content of AIF, providing an experimental model to query if the main role of AIF in the exacerbation of cell death is enhanced mitochondrial generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) or the activation of cell death programs. We asked if the ROS generation is altered in Hq heart mitochondria at baseline or following ischemia-reperfusion (IR). Buffer perfused mouse hearts underwent 30 min ischemia and 30 min reperfusion. Mitochondrial function including oxidative phosphorylation and H2O2 generation was measured. Immunoblotting was used to determine the contents of AIF and PAR [poly(ADP-ribose)] in cell fractions. There were no differences in the release of H2O2 between wild type (WT) and Hq heart mitochondria at baseline. IR increased H2O2 generation from WT but not from Hq mitochondria compared to corresponding time controls. The complex I activity was decreased in WT but not in Hq mice following IR. The relocation of AIF from mitochondria to nucleus was increased in WT but not in Hq mice. IR activated PARP-1 only in WT mice. Cell injury was decreased in the Hq mouse heart following in vitro IR. A deficiency of AIF within mitochondria does not increase ROS production during IR, indicating that AIF functions less as an antioxidant within mitochondria. The decreased cardiac injury in Hq mouse heart accompanied by less AIF translocation to the nucleus suggests that AIF relocation, rather than the AIF content within mitochondria, contributes to cardiac injury during IR.

  19. What's wrong with my mouse cage? Methodological considerations for modeling lifestyle factors and gene-environment interactions in mice.

    PubMed

    Mo, Christina; Renoir, Thibault; Hannan, Anthony J

    2016-05-30

    The mechanistic understanding of lifestyle contributions to disease has been largely driven by work in laboratory rodent models using environmental interventions. These interventions show an array of methodologies and sometimes unclear collective conclusions, hampering clinical interpretations. Here we discuss environmental enrichment, exercise and stress interventions to illustrate how different protocols can affect the interpretations of environmental factors in disease. We use Huntington's disease (HD) as an example because its mouse models exhibit excellent validity and HD was the first genetic animal model in which environmental stimulation was found to be beneficial. We make a number of observations and recommendations. Firstly, environmental enrichment and voluntary exercise generally show benefits across laboratories and mouse models. However, the extent to which these environmental interventions have beneficial effects depends on parameters such as the structural complexity of the cage in the case of enrichment, the timing of the intervention and the nature of the control conditions. In particular, clinical interpretations should consider deprived control living conditions and the ethological relevance of the enrichment. Secondly, stress can have negative effects on the phenotype in mouse models of HD and other brain disorders. When modeling stress, the effects of more than one type of experimental stressor should be investigated due to the heterogeneity and complexity of stress responses. With stress in particular, but ideally in all studies, both sexes should be used and the randomized group sizes need to be sufficiently powered to detect any sex effects. Opportunities for clinical translation will be guided by the 'environmental construct validity' of the preclinical data, including the culmination of complementary protocols across multiple animal models. Environmental interventions in mouse models of HD provide illustrative examples of how valid

  20. [Expression of TGFbeta family factors and FGF2 in mouse and human embryonic stem cells maintained in different culture systems].

    PubMed

    Lifantseva, N V; Kol'tsova, A M; Polianskaia, G G; Gordeeva, O F

    2013-01-01

    Mouse and human embryonic stem cells are in different states of pluripotency (naive/ground and primed states). Mechanisms of signaling regulation in cells with ground and primed states of pluripotency are considerably different. In order to understand the contribution of endogenous and exogenous factors in the maintenance of a metastable state of the cells in different phases ofpluripotency, we examined the expression of TGFbeta family factors (ActivinA, Nodal, Leftyl, TGFbeta1, GDF3, BMP4) and FGF2 initiating the appropriate signaling pathways in mouse and human embryonic stem cells (mESCs, hESCs) and supporting feeder cells. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis of gene expression showed that the expression patterns of endogenous factors studied were considerably different in mESCs and hESCs. The most significant differences were found in the levels of endogenous expression of TGFbeta1, BMP4 and ActivinA. The sources of exogenous factors ActivnA, TGFbeta1, and FGF2 for hESCs are feeder cells (mouse and human embryonic fibroblasts) expressing high levels of these factors, as well as low levels of BMP4. Thus, our data demonstrated that the in vitro maintenance of metastable state of undifferentiated pluripotent cells is achieved in mESCs and hESCs using different schemes of the regulations of ActivinA/Nodal/Lefty/Smad2/3BMP/Smad1/5/8 endogenous branches of TGFbeta signaling. The requirement for exogenous stimulation or inhibition of these signaling pathways is due to different patterns of endogenous expression of TGFbeta family factors and FGF2 in the mESCs and hESCs. For the hESCs, enhanced activity of ActivinA/Nodal/Lefty/Smad2/3 signaling by exogenous factor stimulation is necessary to mitigate the effects of BMP/Smadl/5/8 signaling pathways that promote cell differentiation into the extraembryonic structures. Significant differences in endogenous FGF2 expression in the cells in the ground and primary states of pluripotency demonstrate diverse involvement of this

  1. Inhibition of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A and Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1α Maximizes the Effects of Radiation in Sarcoma Mouse Models Through Destruction of Tumor Vasculature

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hae-June; Yoon, Changhwan; Park, Do Joong; Kim, Yeo-Jung; Schmidt, Benjamin; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Tap, William D.; Eisinger-Mathason, T.S. Karin; Choy, Edwin; Kirsch, David G.; Simon, M. Celeste; and others

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To examine the addition of genetic or pharmacologic inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) to radiation therapy (RT) and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) inhibition (ie trimodality therapy) for soft-tissue sarcoma. Methods and Materials: Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α was inhibited using short hairpin RNA or low metronomic doses of doxorubicin, which blocks HIF-1α binding to DNA. Trimodality therapy was examined in a mouse xenograft model and a genetically engineered mouse model of sarcoma, as well as in vitro in tumor endothelial cells (ECs) and 4 sarcoma cell lines. Results: In both mouse models, any monotherapy or bimodality therapy resulted in tumor growth beyond 250 mm{sup 3} within the 12-day treatment period, but trimodality therapy with RT, VEGF-A inhibition, and HIF-1α inhibition kept tumors at <250 mm{sup 3} for up to 30 days. Trimodality therapy on tumors reduced HIF-1α activity as measured by expression of nuclear HIF-1α by 87% to 95% compared with RT alone, and cytoplasmic carbonic anhydrase 9 by 79% to 82%. Trimodality therapy also increased EC-specific apoptosis 2- to 4-fold more than RT alone and reduced microvessel density by 75% to 82%. When tumor ECs were treated in vitro with trimodality therapy under hypoxia, there were significant decreases in proliferation and colony formation and increases in DNA damage (as measured by Comet assay and γH2AX expression) and apoptosis (as measured by cleaved caspase 3 expression). Trimodality therapy had much less pronounced effects when 4 sarcoma cell lines were examined in these same assays. Conclusions: Inhibition of HIF-1α is highly effective when combined with RT and VEGF-A inhibition in blocking sarcoma growth by maximizing DNA damage and apoptosis in tumor ECs, leading to loss of tumor vasculature.

  2. Recombinant vascular endothelial growth factor 121 injection for the prevention of fetal growth restriction in a preeclampsia mouse model.

    PubMed

    Sulistyowati, Sri; Bachnas, Muhammad Adrianes; Anggraini, Nuri Dyah; Yuliantara, Eric Edwin; Prabowo, Wisnu; Anggraini, Nutria Widya Purna; Pramono, Mochammad Besari Adi; Adityawarman; Dachlan, Erry Gumilar; Andonotopo, Wiku

    2017-02-01

    To discover the potential role of recombinant VEGF121 (rVEGF121) injection for the prevention of fetal growth restriction in a preeclampsia (PE) mouse model (Mus musculus). This is an experimental study of 30 pregnant mice that were randomly divided into three groups: normal, PE, and PE with rVEGF121 injection. The PE mouse model was created by injecting anti Qa-2 10 ng iv, which is deleterious to Qa-2 expression (homologous to HLA-G), from the first to the fourth day of gestation. PE was validated by measuring serum levels of soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1) and placental growth factor(PIGF) and also by kidney histopathology. Recombinant VEGF121 was given on the ninth day until the 11th day of pregnancy; mice were terminated on the 16th day. Fetal weights were acquired with a Denver analytical balance. Serum levels of sFlt-1 and PlGF were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The data were statistically analyzed via analysis of variance (ANOVA). On average, fetal birth weight was 0.7150 g in the normal group, 0.4936 g in the PE group, and 0.6768 g in the PE with rVEGF121 injection group. ANOVA showed significant growth restriction in the PE group (P=0.006), confirming the use of anti Qa-2 as a suitable PE model. Kidney histopathology results, sFlt-1 levels, and PlGF levels also demonstrated that anti Qa-2 consistently conferred hallmarks of PE in mice. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) injection prevented fetal growth restriction; comparable fetal weights were observed between the PE model with VEGF treatment and the normal group (P=0.610) but differed from the untreated PE group (P=0.021). Injection of rVEGF121 has the potential to prevent fetal growth restriction in a newly proposed PE mouse model.

  3. Specific fixation of bovine brain and retinal acidic and basic fibroblast growth factors to mouse embryonic eye basement membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Jeanny, J.C.; Fayein, N.; Courtois, Y. ); Moenner, M.; Chevallier, B.; Barritault, D. )

    1987-07-01

    The labeling pattern of mouse embryonic eye frozen sections incubated with radioiodinated brain acidic and basic fibroblasts growth factors (aFGF and bFGF) was investigated by autoradiography. Both growth factors bind to basement membranes in a dose-dependent way, with a higher affinity for bFGF. Similar data were obtained with eye-derived growth factors (EDGF), the retinal forms of FGF. There was a heterogeneity in the affinity of the various basement membranes toward these growth factors. The specificity of the growth factor-basement membrane interaction was demonstrated by the following experiments: (i) an excess of unlabeled growth factor displaced the labeling; (ii) unrelated proteins with different isoelectric points did not modify the labeling; and (iii) iodinated EGF or PDGF did not label basement membrane. In order to get a better understanding of the nature of this binding, the authors performed the incubation of the frozen sections with iodinated FGFs preincubated with various compounds. These results demonstrate that FGFs bind specifically to basement membranes, probably on the polysaccharidic part of the proteoheparan sulfate, and suggest that this type of interaction may be a general feature of the mechanism of action of these growth factors.

  4. Analysis of transcription factor Stk40 expression and function during mouse pre-implantation embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junqiang; Zhang, Juanjuan; Zhao, Chun; Shen, Rong; Guo, Xirong; Li, Chaojun; Ling, Xiufeng; Liu, Chang

    2014-02-01

    Determining the molecular mechanisms in the regulation of early embryonic development is crucial for assisted reproductive technology clinical applications. Serine/threonine protein kinase 40 (Stk40) is a member of the serine/threonine kinase family. It is essential in diverse signaling pathways associated with a wide range of cellular activities, including proliferation, differentiation, survival and apoptosis. However, its involvement and molecular mechanisms in pre‑implantation embryonic development have not been well‑defined. In the present study, it was demonstrated that Stk40 was involved in the development of mouse pre‑implantation embryos. Immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy analyses showed that Stk40 was equally expressed in the nuclei and cytoplasm during all stages of pre‑implantation mouse embryos of imprinting control region mice. Reverse transcription‑polymerase chain reaction showed a significantly higher transcription rate of Stk40 mRNA in the two‑cell stage. The results demonstrated that Stk40 downregulation by microinjection of small interfering RNA into the mouse zygote markedly decreased the blastulation compared with that in the control (Stk40i‑1 vs. control: 65.2% and 77.0%, P<0.05 and Stk40i‑2 vs. control: 49.8% and 70.1%, respectively, P<0.05). In addition, silencing of Stk40 significantly increased the transcription rate of reticulocalbin‑2, whereas that of the homeobox protein, Cdx2, was decreased. In conclusion, the results suggested that Stk40 may be critical in the development of pre‑implantation embryos.

  5. Microdrop preparation factors influence culture-media osmolality, which can impair mouse embryo preimplantation development.

    PubMed

    Swain, J E; Cabrera, L; Xu, X; Smith, G D

    2012-02-01

    Because media osmolality can impact embryo development, the effect of conditions during microdrop preparation on osmolality was examined. Various sizes of microdrops were prepared under different laboratory conditions. Drops were pipetted directly onto a dish and covered by oil (standard method) or pipetted on the dish, overlaid with oil before removing the underlying media and replaced with fresh media (wash-drop method). Drops were made at 23°C or on a heated stage (37°C) and with or without airflow. Osmolality was assessed at 5 min and 24h. The biological impact of osmolality change was demonstrated by culturing 1-cell mouse embryos in media with varying osmolality. Reduced drop volume, increased temperature and standard method were associated with a significant increase in osmolality at both 5 min and 24h (P-values <0.001, <0.0001 and <0.0001, respectively). There was a significant interaction between airflow, decreased volume, increased temperature and standard method that caused a significant increase in osmolality (40mOsm/kg) compared with controls (P<0.04). There was no significant change in osmolality over time. Mouse embryo development was significantly reduced in media with elevated osmolality (>310mOsm/kg; P<0.05). Procedures in the IVF laboratory can alter osmolality and impact embryo development.

  6. Mouse models to study the effect of cardiovascular risk factors on brain structure and cognition

    PubMed Central

    Bink, Diewertje I; Ritz, Katja; Aronica, Eleonora; van der Weerd, Louise; Daemen, Mat JAP

    2013-01-01

    Recent clinical data indicates that hemodynamic changes caused by cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis, heart failure, and hypertension affect cognition. Yet, the underlying mechanisms of the resulting vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) are poorly understood. One reason for the lack of mechanistic insights in VCI is that research in dementia primarily focused on Alzheimer's disease models. To fill in this gap, we critically reviewed the published data and various models of VCI. Typical findings in VCI include reduced cerebral perfusion, blood–brain barrier alterations, white matter lesions, and cognitive deficits, which have also been reported in different cardiovascular mouse models. However, the tests performed are incomplete and differ between models, hampering a direct comparison between models and studies. Nevertheless, from the currently available data we conclude that a few existing surgical animal models show the key features of vascular cognitive decline, with the bilateral common carotid artery stenosis hypoperfusion mouse model as the most promising model. The transverse aortic constriction and myocardial infarction models may be good alternatives, but these models are as yet less characterized regarding the possible cerebral changes. Mixed models could be used to study the combined effects of different cardiovascular diseases on the deterioration of cognition during aging. PMID:23963364

  7. Total absence of colony-stimulating factor 1 in the macrophage-deficient osteopetrotic (op/op) mouse.

    PubMed

    Wiktor-Jedrzejczak, W; Bartocci, A; Ferrante, A W; Ahmed-Ansari, A; Sell, K W; Pollard, J W; Stanley, E R

    1990-06-01

    Osteopetrotic (op/op) mutant mice suffer from congenital osteopetrosis due to a severe deficiency of osteoclasts. Furthermore, the total number of mononuclear phagocytes is extremely low in affected mice. Serum, 11 tissues, and different cell and organ conditioned media from op/op mice were shown to be devoid of biologically active colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1), whereas all of these preparations from littermate control +/+ and +/op mice contained the growth factor. The deficiency was specific for CSF-1 in that serum or conditioned media from op/op mice possessed elevated levels of at least three other macrophage growth factors. Partial correction of the op/op defect was observed following intraperitoneal implantation of diffusion chambers containing L929 cells, which in culture produce CSF-1 as their sole macrophage growth factor. No rearrangement of the CSF-1 gene in op/op mice was detected by Southern analysis. However, in contrast to control lung fibroblasts, which contained 4.6- and 2.3-kilobase CSF-1 mRNAs, only the 4.6-kilobase species was detected in op/op cells. An alteration in the CSF-1 gene is strongly implicated as the primary defect in op/op mice because they do not contain detectable CSF-1, their defect is correctable by administration of CSF-1, the op locus and the CSF-1 gene map within the same region of mouse chromosome 3, their CSF-1 mRNA biosynthesis is altered, and the op/op phenotype is consistent with the phenotype expected in a CSF-1 deficient mouse.

  8. The Effects of Imatinib Mesylate on Cellular Viability, Platelet Derived Growth Factor and Stem Cell Factor in Mouse Testicular Normal Leydig Cells.

    PubMed

    Kheradmand, Fatemeh; Hashemnia, Seyyed Mohammad Reza; Valizadeh, Nasim; Roshan-Milani, Shiva

    2016-01-01

    Growth factors play an essential role in the development of tumor and normal cells like testicular leydig cells. Treatment of cancer with anti-cancer agents like imatinib mesylate may interfere with normal leydig cell activity, growth and fertility through failure in growth factors' production or their signaling pathways. The purpose of the study was to determine cellular viability and the levels of, platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) and stem cell factor (SCF) in normal mouse leydig cells exposed to imatinib, and addressing the effect of imatinib on fertility potential. The mouse TM3 leydig cells were treated with 0 (control), 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 μM imatinib for 2, 4 and 6 days. Each experiment was repeated three times (15 experiments in each day).The cellular viability and growth factors levels were assessed by MTT and ELISA methods, respectively. For statistical analysis, one-way ANOVA with Tukey's post hoc and Kruskal-Wallis test were performed. A p-value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. With increasing drug concentration, cellular viability decreased significantly (p<0.05) and in contrast, PDGF levels increased (p<0.05). Different imatinib concentrations had no significant effect on SCF level. Increasing the duration of treatment from 2 to 6 days had no obvious effect on cellular viability, PDGF and SCF levels. Imatinib may reduce fertility potential especially at higher concentrations in patients treated with this drug by decreasing cellular viability. The effect of imatinib on leydig cells is associated with PDGF stimulation. Of course future studies can be helpful in exploring the long term effects of this drug.

  9. Insulin-like growth factor-II is produced by, signals to and is an important survival factor for the mature podocyte in man and mouse.

    PubMed

    Hale, L J; Welsh, G I; Perks, C M; Hurcombe, J A; Moore, S; Hers, I; Saleem, M A; Mathieson, P W; Murphy, A J; Jeansson, M; Holly, J M; Hardouin, S N; Coward, R J

    2013-05-01

    Podocytes are crucial for preventing the passage of albumin into the urine and, when lost, are associated with the development of albuminuria, renal failure and cardiovascular disease. Podocytes have limited capacity to regenerate, therefore pro-survival mechanisms are critically important. Insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) is a potent survival and growth factor; however, its major function is thought to be in prenatal development, when circulating levels are high. IGF-II has only previously been reported to continue to be expressed in discrete regions of the brain into adulthood in rodents, with systemic levels being undetectable. Using conditionally immortalized human and ex vivo adult mouse cells of the glomerulus, we demonstrated the podocyte to be the major glomerular source and target of IGF-II; it signals to this cell via the IGF-I receptor via the PI3 kinase and MAPK pathways. Functionally, a reduction in IGF signalling causes podocyte cell death in vitro and glomerular disease in vivo in an aged IGF-II transgenic mouse that produces approximately 60% of IGF-II due to a lack of the P2 promoter of this gene. Collectively, this work reveals the fundamental importance of IGF-II in the mature podocyte for glomerular health across mammalian species.

  10. Direct activation of human and mouse Oct4 genes using engineered TALE and Cas9 transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jiabiao; Lei, Yong; Wong, Wing-Ki; Liu, Senquan; Lee, Kai-Chuen; He, Xiangjun; You, Wenxing; Zhou, Rui; Guo, Jun-Tao; Chen, Xiongfong; Peng, Xianlu; Sun, Hao; Huang, He; Zhao, Hui; Feng, Bo

    2014-01-01

    The newly developed transcription activator-like effector protein (TALE) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/Cas9 transcription factors (TF) offered a powerful and precise approach for modulating gene expression. In this article, we systematically investigated the potential of these new tools in activating the stringently silenced pluripotency gene Oct4 (Pou5f1) in mouse and human somatic cells. First, with a number of TALEs and sgRNAs targeting various regions in the mouse and human Oct4 promoters, we found that the most efficient TALE-VP64s bound around −120 to −80 bp, while highly effective sgRNAs targeted from −147 to −89-bp upstream of the transcription start sites to induce high activity of luciferase reporters. In addition, we observed significant transcriptional synergy when multiple TFs were applied simultaneously. Although individual TFs exhibited marginal activity to up-regulate endogenous gene expression, optimized combinations of TALE-VP64s could enhance endogenous Oct4 transcription up to 30-fold in mouse NIH3T3 cells and 20-fold in human HEK293T cells. More importantly, the enhancement of OCT4 transcription ultimately generated OCT4 proteins. Furthermore, examination of different epigenetic modifiers showed that histone acetyltransferase p300 could enhance both TALE-VP64 and sgRNA/dCas9-VP64 induced transcription of endogenous OCT4. Taken together, our study suggested that engineered TALE-TF and dCas9-TF are useful tools for modulating gene expression in mammalian cells. PMID:24500196

  11. Direct activation of human and mouse Oct4 genes using engineered TALE and Cas9 transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiabiao; Lei, Yong; Wong, Wing-Ki; Liu, Senquan; Lee, Kai-Chuen; He, Xiangjun; You, Wenxing; Zhou, Rui; Guo, Jun-Tao; Chen, Xiongfong; Peng, Xianlu; Sun, Hao; Huang, He; Zhao, Hui; Feng, Bo

    2014-04-01

    The newly developed transcription activator-like effector protein (TALE) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/Cas9 transcription factors (TF) offered a powerful and precise approach for modulating gene expression. In this article, we systematically investigated the potential of these new tools in activating the stringently silenced pluripotency gene Oct4 (Pou5f1) in mouse and human somatic cells. First, with a number of TALEs and sgRNAs targeting various regions in the mouse and human Oct4 promoters, we found that the most efficient TALE-VP64s bound around -120 to -80 bp, while highly effective sgRNAs targeted from -147 to -89-bp upstream of the transcription start sites to induce high activity of luciferase reporters. In addition, we observed significant transcriptional synergy when multiple TFs were applied simultaneously. Although individual TFs exhibited marginal activity to up-regulate endogenous gene expression, optimized combinations of TALE-VP64s could enhance endogenous Oct4 transcription up to 30-fold in mouse NIH3T3 cells and 20-fold in human HEK293T cells. More importantly, the enhancement of OCT4 transcription ultimately generated OCT4 proteins. Furthermore, examination of different epigenetic modifiers showed that histone acetyltransferase p300 could enhance both TALE-VP64 and sgRNA/dCas9-VP64 induced transcription of endogenous OCT4. Taken together, our study suggested that engineered TALE-TF and dCas9-TF are useful tools for modulating gene expression in mammalian cells.

  12. Low Stress Reactivity and Neuroendocrine Factors in the BTBR T+tf/J Mouse Model of Autism

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, Jill L.; Yang, Mu; Turner, Sarah M.; Katz, Adam M.; Bell, Dana B.; Koenig, James I.; Crawley, Jacqueline N.

    2010-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by abnormal reciprocal social interactions, communication deficits, and repetitive behaviors with restricted interests. BTBR T+tf/J (BTBR) is an inbred mouse strain that displays robust behavioral phenotypes with analogies to all three of the diagnostic symptoms of autism, including low social interactions, reduced vocalizations in social settings, and high levels of repetitive self-grooming. Autism-relevant phenotypes in BTBR offer translational tools to discover neurochemical mechanisms underlying unusual mouse behaviors relevant to symptoms of autism. Because repetitive self-grooming in mice may be a displacement behavior elevated by stressors, we investigated neuroendocrine markers of stress and behavioral reactivity to stressors in BTBR mice, as compared to C57BL/6J, a standard inbred strain with high sociability. Radioimmunoassays replicated previous findings that circulating corticosterone is higher in the BTBR than in B6. Higher basal glucocorticoid receptor mRNA and higher oxytocin peptide levels were detected in the brains of BTBR as compared to B6. No significant differences were detected in corticotrophin releasing factor (CRF) peptide or CRF mRNA. In response to behavioral stressors, BTBR and B6 were generally similar on behavioral tasks including stress-induced hyperthermia, elevated plus-maze, light ↔ dark exploration, tail flick, acoustic startle and prepulse inhibition. BTBR displayed less reactivity than B6 to a noxious thermal stimulus in the hot plate, and less immobility than B6 in both the forced swim and tail suspension depression-related tasks. BTBR, therefore, exhibited less depression-like scores than B6 on two standard tests sensitive to antidepressants, did not differ from B6 on two well-validated anxiety-like behaviors, and did not exhibit unusual stress reactivity to sensory stimuli. Our findings support the interpretation that autism-relevant social deficits, vocalizations, and

  13. Stress response genes are suppressed in mouse preimplantation embryos by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF).

    PubMed

    Chin, Peck Y; Macpherson, Anne M; Thompson, Jeremy G; Lane, Michelle; Robertson, Sarah A

    2009-12-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is known to promote the development and survival of human and mouse preimplantation embryos; however, the mechanism of action of GM-CSF in embryos is not defined. Mouse blastocysts were cultured from zygote stage in vitro with and without recombinant mouse GM-CSF (rmGM-CSF), and in vivo developed blastocysts were flushed from Csf2 null mutant and wild-type mice. The effect of GM-CSF on blastocyst expression of stress response and apoptosis genes was evaluated by microarray, qPCR and immunochemistry. Microarray analysis of the gene transcription profile showed suppression of stress response and apoptosis gene pathways in blastocysts exposed to rmGM-CSF in vitro. qPCR analysis confirmed that rmGM-CSF inhibited expression of heat shock protein (HSP) and apoptosis pathway genes Cbl, Hspa5, Hsp90aa1, Hsp90ab1 and Gas5 in in vitro blastocysts. Immunocytochemical analysis of HSP 1 (HSPA1A/1B; HSP70), BAX, BCL2 and TRP53 (p53) in in vitro blastocysts showed that HSPA1A/1B and BCL2 proteins were less abundant when embryos were cultured with rmGM-CSF. BAX and TRP53 were unchanged at the protein level, but Bax mRNA expression was reduced after GM-CSF treatment. In in vivo developed blastocysts, Csf2 null mutation caused elevated expression of Hsph1 but not other stress response genes. We conclude that GM-CSF inhibits the cellular stress response and apoptosis pathways to facilitate embryo growth and survival, and the protective effects of GM-CSF are particularly evident in in vitro culture media, whereas in vivo other cytokines can partly compensate for absence of GM-CSF.

  14. Motoneuronotrophic factor analog GM6 reduces infarct volume and behavioral deficits following transient ischemia in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jin; Zhu, Hong; Ko, Dorothy; Kindy, Mark S.

    2012-01-01

    Motoneuronotrophic factor (MNTF) is an endogenous neurotrophin that is highly specific for the human nervous system, and some of the observed effects of MNTF include motoneuron differentiation, maintenance, survival, and reinnervation of target muscles and organs. MNTF is a neuro-signaling molecule that binds to specific receptors. Using In Silico Analysis, one of the active sites of MNTF was identified as an analog of six amino acids (GM6). The effect of chemically synthesized GM6 on ischemic stroke was studied in the middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo) mouse model. Mice were subjected to 1 hour of ischemia followed by 24 hours of reperfusion. Mice were injected intravenously with a bolus of GM6, at various doses (1 and 5 mg/kg) immediately after the start of reperfusion and examined for changes in physiological parameters, neurological deficits and infarct volume. GM6 was able to penetrate the blood brain barrier, and at both 1 and 5 mg/kg showed a significant protection from infarct damage, which translated to improvement of neurological deficits. Administration of GM6 demonstrated no changes in HR, BP, pO2, pCO2, or pH. A significant increase over the control group in CBF after reperfusion was observed with GM6 administration, which helped to mitigate the ischemic effect caused by the blockage of blood flow. The time window of treatment was assessed at various times following cerebral ischemia with GM6 demonstrating a significant protective effect up to 6–12 hours post ischemia. In addition, GM6 increased neurogenesis, and decreased apoptosis and inflammation in the mouse brain following cerebral ischemic injury. These data suggest that GM6 is neuroprotective to the brain following IV injection in the mouse model of MCAo. PMID:18789909

  15. Pim-3 promotes the growth of human pancreatic cancer in the orthotopic nude mouse model through vascular endothelium growth factor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Li, Hong-Yu; Liu, Bin; Huang, Sheng; Wu, Li; Li, Ying-Yi

    2013-12-01

    As one of the most lethal cancers, pancreatic cancer presents poor prognosis with an overall 5-y survival of less than 5%. We previously reported that Pim-3, a member of the proto-oncogene Pim family that encodes serine/threonine kinases, is aberrantly expressed in human pancreatic cancer lesions. In the current study, we investigated the role of Pim-3 in promoting tumor growth and angiogenesis in an orthotopic nude mouse model of human pancreatic cancer. We constructed retroviral vectors for human Pim-3 and a kinase-dead mutant of human Pim-3 (K69M); the retroviral supernatants generated from these vectors were then used to infect the human pancreatic cancer cell line MiaPaCa-2 to establish stable cell lines. We assessed cell proliferation using CCK-8, tumor growth, and angiogenesis in vivo in an orthotopic mouse model of pancreatic cancer. While tumor size was measured using magnetic resonance imaging, the tumor tissues were excised for protein extraction and histological analysis to detect vascular endothelium growth factor (VEGF) expression and vessel density. We established an orthotopic nude mouse model of human pancreatic cancer. We observed that Pim-3 promoted the proliferation of human pancreatic cancer cells, both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, Pim-3 is required for vasculogenesis of primary human pancreatic tumors in vivo and promotion of angiogenesis through the induction of VEGF expression. Pim-3 can promote tumor growth and angiogenesis by stimulating the VEGF pathway. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Constitutive activation of transforming growth factor Beta receptor 1 in the mouse uterus impairs uterine morphology and function.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yang; Duran, Samantha; Lydon, John P; DeMayo, Francesco J; Burghardt, Robert C; Bayless, Kayla J; Bartholin, Laurent; Li, Qinglei

    2015-02-01

    Despite increasing evidence pointing to the essential involvement of the transforming growth factor beta (TGFB) superfamily in reproduction, a definitive role of TGFB signaling in the uterus remains to be unveiled. In this study, we generated a gain-of-function mouse model harboring a constitutively active (CA) TGFB receptor 1 (TGFBR1), the expression of which was conditionally induced by the progesterone receptor (Pgr)-Cre recombinase. Overactivation of TGFB signaling was verified by enhanced phosphorylation of SMAD2 and increased expression of TGFB target genes in the uterus. TGFBR1 Pgr-Cre CA mice were sterile. Histological, cellular, and molecular analyses demonstrated that constitutive activation of TGFBR1 in the mouse uterus promoted formation of hypermuscled uteri. Accompanying this phenotype was the upregulation of a battery of smooth muscle genes in the uterus. Furthermore, TGFB ligands activated SMAD2/3 and stimulated the expression of a smooth muscle maker gene, alpha smooth muscle actin (ACTA2), in human uterine smooth muscle cells. Immunofluorescence microscopy identified a marked reduction of uterine glands in TGFBR1 Pgr-Cre CA mice within the endometrial compartment that contained myofibroblast-like cells. Thus, constitutive activation of TGFBR1 in the mouse uterus caused defects in uterine morphology and function, as evidenced by abnormal myometrial structure, dramatically reduced uterine glands, and impaired uterine decidualization. These results underscore the importance of a precisely controlled TGFB signaling system in establishing a uterine microenvironment conducive to normal development and function. © 2015 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  17. Loads, capacities and safety factors of maltase and the glucose transporter SGLT1 in mouse intestinal brush border

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Mandy M; O'Connor, Timothy P; Diamond, Jared

    2002-01-01

    Safety factors are defined as ratios of biological capacities to prevailing natural loads. We measured the safety factor of the mouse intestinal brush-border hydrolase maltase in series with the glucose transporter SGLT1, for comparison with previous studies of sucrase and lactase. Dietary maltose loads increased 4-fold from virgin to lactating mice. As in previous studies of intestinal adaptive regulation, that increase in load without change in dietary composition resulted in an increase in maltase and SGLT1 capacities mediated non-specifically by an increase in intestinal mass, without change in maltase or SGLT1 activities per milligram of tissue. Maltase and SGLT1 capacities increased only sublinearly with load during lactation, such that safety factors decreased with load: from 6.5 to 2.4 for maltase, and from 1.1 to 0.5 for SGLT1. The apparently high safety factor for maltase may be related to the multiple natural substrates hydrolysed by the multiple sites of maltase activity. The apparently low safety factor for SGLT1 is made possible by the contribution of hindgut fermentation to carbohydrate digestion. SGLT1 activity is paradoxically higher for mice consuming sucrose than for mice consuming maltose, despite maltose hydrolysis yielding double the glucose load yielded by sucrose hydrolysis, and despite glucose constituting the load upon SGLT1. PMID:12122147

  18. Prediction of Pathway Activation by Xenobiotic-Responsive Transcription Factors in the Mouse Liver

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many drugs and environmentally-relevant chemicals activate xenobioticresponsive transcription factors (TF). Identification of target genes of these factors would be useful in predicting pathway activation in in vitro chemical screening. Starting with a large compendium of Affymet...

  19. Prediction of Pathway Activation by Xenobiotic-Responsive Transcription Factors in the Mouse Liver

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many drugs and environmentally-relevant chemicals activate xenobioticresponsive transcription factors (TF). Identification of target genes of these factors would be useful in predicting pathway activation in in vitro chemical screening. Starting with a large compendium of Affymet...

  20. Nono, a Bivalent Domain Factor, Regulates Erk Signaling and Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Pluripotency.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chun; Karwacki-Neisius, Violetta; Tang, Haoran; Li, Wenjing; Shi, Zhennan; Hu, Haolin; Xu, Wenqi; Wang, Zhentian; Kong, Lingchun; Lv, Ruitu; Fan, Zheng; Zhou, Wenhao; Yang, Pengyuan; Wu, Feizhen; Diao, Jianbo; Tan, Li; Shi, Yujiang Geno; Lan, Fei; Shi, Yang

    2016-10-18

    Nono is a component of the para-speckle, which stores and processes RNA. Mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) lack para-speckles, leaving the function of Nono in mESCs unclear. Here, we find that Nono functions as a chromatin regulator cooperating with Erk to regulate mESC pluripotency. We report that Nono loss results in robust self-renewing mESCs with epigenomic and transcriptomic features resembling the 2i (GSK and Erk inhibitors)-induced "ground state." Erk interacts with and is required for Nono localization to a subset of bivalent genes that have high levels of poised RNA polymerase. Nono loss compromises Erk activation and RNA polymerase poising at its target bivalent genes in undifferentiated mESCs, thus disrupting target gene activation and differentiation. These findings argue that Nono collaborates with Erk signaling to regulate the integrity of bivalent domains and mESC pluripotency.

  1. Psychophysics of a Nociceptive Test in the Mouse: Ambient Temperature as a Key Factor for Variation

    PubMed Central

    Pincedé, Ivanne; Pollin, Bernard; Meert, Theo; Plaghki, Léon; Le Bars, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Background The mouse is increasingly used in biomedical research, notably in behavioral neurosciences for the development of tests or models of pain. Our goal was to provide the scientific community with an outstanding tool that allows the determination of psychophysical descriptors of a nociceptive reaction, which are inaccessible with conventional methods: namely the true threshold, true latency, conduction velocity of the peripheral fibers that trigger the response and latency of the central decision-making process. Methodology/Principal Findings Basically, the procedures involved heating of the tail with a CO2 laser, recording of tail temperature with an infrared camera and stopping the heating when the animal reacted. The method is based mainly on the measurement of three observable variables, namely the initial temperature, the heating rate and the temperature reached at the actual moment of the reaction following random variations in noxious radiant heat. The initial temperature of the tail, which itself depends on the ambient temperature, very markedly influenced the behavioral threshold, the behavioral latency and the conduction velocity of the peripheral fibers but not the latency of the central decision-making. Conclusions/Significance We have validated a psychophysical approach to nociceptive reactions for the mouse, which has already been described for rats and Humans. It enables the determination of four variables, which contribute to the overall latency of the response. The usefulness of such an approach was demonstrated by providing new fundamental findings regarding the influence of ambient temperature on nociceptive processes. We conclude by challenging the validity of using as “pain index" the reaction time of a behavioral response to an increasing heat stimulus and emphasize the need for a very careful control of the ambient temperature, as a prevailing environmental source of variation, during any behavioral testing of mice. PMID:22629325

  2. A Highly Active Isoform of Lentivirus Restriction Factor SAMHD1 in Mouse.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Nicolin; Gläsker, Sabine; Sitaram, Poojitha; Hofmann, Henning; Shepard, Caitlin N; Schultz, Megan L; Kim, Baek; Landau, Nathaniel R

    2017-01-20

    The triphosphohydrolase SAMHD1 (sterile α motif and histidine-aspartate domain-containing protein 1) restricts HIV-1 replication in nondividing myeloid cells by depleting the dNTP pool, preventing reverse transcription. SAMHD1 is also reported to have ribonuclease activity that degrades the virus genomic RNA. Human SAMHD1 is regulated by phosphorylation of its carboxyl terminus at Thr-592, which abrogates its antiviral function yet has only a small effect on its phosphohydrolase activity. In the mouse, SAMHD1 is expressed as two isoforms (ISF1 and ISF2) that differ at the carboxyl terminus due to alternative splicing of the last coding exon. In this study we characterized the biochemical and antiviral properties of the two mouse isoforms of SAMHD1. Both are antiviral in nondividing cells. Mass spectrometry analysis showed that SAMHD1 is phosphorylated at several amino acid residues, one of which (Thr-634) is homologous to Thr-592. Phosphomimetic mutation at Thr-634 of ISF1 ablates its antiviral activity yet has little effect on phosphohydrolase activity in vitro dGTP caused ISF1 to tetramerize, activating its catalytic activity. In contrast, ISF2, which lacks the phosphorylation site, was significantly more active, tetramerized, and was active without added dGTP. Neither isoform nor human SAMHD1 had detectable RNase activity in vitro or affected HIV-1 genomic RNA stability in newly infected cells. These data support a model in which SAMHD1 catalytic activity is regulated through tetramer stabilization by the carboxyl-terminal tail, phosphorylation destabilizing the complexes and inactivating the enzyme. ISF2 may serve to reduce the dNTP pool to very low levels as a means of restricting virus replication.

  3. Expression profiling and pathway analysis of Krüppel-like factor 4 in mouse embryonic fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Hagos, Engda G; Ghaleb, Amr M; Kumar, Amrita; Neish, Andrew S; Yang, Vincent W

    2011-01-01

    Background: Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) is a zinc-finger transcription factor with diverse regulatory functions in proliferation, differentiation, and development. KLF4 also plays a role in inflammation, tumorigenesis, and reprogramming of somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. To gain insight into the mechanisms by which KLF4 regulates these processes, we conducted DNA microarray analyses to identify differentially expressed genes in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) wild type and null for Klf4. Methods: Expression profiles of fibroblasts isolated from mouse embryos wild type or null for the Klf4 alleles were examined by DNA microarrays. Differentially expressed genes were subjected to the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID). The microarray data were also interrogated with the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) for pathway identification. Results obtained from the microarray analysis were confirmed by Western blotting for select genes with biological relevance to determine the correlation between mRNA and protein levels. Results: One hundred and sixty three up-regulated and 88 down-regulated genes were identified that demonstrated a fold-change of at least 1.5 and a P-value < 0.05 in Klf4-null MEFs compared to wild type MEFs. Many of the up-regulated genes in Klf4-null MEFs encode proto-oncogenes, growth factors, extracellular matrix, and cell cycle activators. In contrast, genes encoding tumor suppressors and those involved in JAK-STAT signaling pathways are down-regulated in Klf4-null MEFs. IPA and GSEA also identified various pathways that are regulated by KLF4. Lastly, Western blotting of select target genes confirmed the changes revealed by microarray data. Conclusions: These data are not only consistent with previous functional studies of KLF4's role in tumor suppression and somatic cell reprogramming, but also revealed novel target genes that mediate KLF4's

  4. Fasting Induces Nuclear Factor E2-Related Factor 2 and ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters via Protein Kinase A and Sirtuin-1 in Mouse and Human

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Supriya R.; Donepudi, Ajay C.; Xu, Jialin; Wei, Wei; Cheng, Qiuqiong C.; Driscoll, Maureen V.; Johnson, Delinda A.; Johnson, Jeffrey A.; Li, Xiaoling

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The purpose of this study was to determine whether 3′-5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-protein kinase A (PKA) and Sirtuin-1 (SIRT1) dependent mechanisms modulate ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) transport protein expression. ABC transport proteins (ABCC2–4) are essential for chemical elimination from hepatocytes and biliary excretion. Nuclear factor-E2 related-factor 2 (NRF2) is a transcription factor that mediates ABCC induction in response to chemical inducers and liver injury. However, a role for NRF2 in the regulation of transporter expression in nonchemical models of liver perturbation is largely undescribed. Results: Here we show that fasting increased NRF2 target gene expression through NRF2- and SIRT1–dependent mechanisms. In intact mouse liver, fasting induces NRF2 target gene expression by at least 1.5 to 5-fold. In mouse and human hepatocytes, treatment with 8-Bromoadenosine-cAMP, a cAMP analogue, increased NRF2 target gene expression and antioxidant response element activity, which was decreased by the PKA inhibitor, H-89. Moreover, fasting induced NRF2 target gene expression was decreased in liver and hepatocytes of SIRT1 liver-specific null mice and NRF2-null mice. Lastly, NRF2 and SIRT1 were recruited to MAREs and Antioxidant Response Elements (AREs) in the human ABCC2 promoter. Innovation: Oxidative stress mediated NRF2 activation is well described, yet the influence of basic metabolic processes on NRF2 activation is just emerging. Conclusion: The current data point toward a novel role of nutrient status in regulation of NRF2 activity and the antioxidant response, and indicates that cAMP/PKA and SIRT1 are upstream regulators for fasting-induced activation of the NRF2-ARE pathway. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 15–30. PMID:23725046

  5. The Effects of Imatinib Mesylate on Cellular Viability, Platelet Derived Growth Factor and Stem Cell Factor in Mouse Testicular Normal Leydig Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kheradmand, Fatemeh; Hashemnia, Seyyed Mohammad Reza; Valizadeh, Nasim; Roshan-Milani, Shiva

    2016-01-01

    Background: Growth factors play an essential role in the development of tumor and normal cells like testicular leydig cells. Treatment of cancer with anti-cancer agents like imatinib mesylate may interfere with normal leydig cell activity, growth and fertility through failure in growth factors’ production or their signaling pathways. The purpose of the study was to determine cellular viability and the levels of, platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) and stem cell factor (SCF) in normal mouse leydig cells exposed to imatinib, and addressing the effect of imatinib on fertility potential. Methods: The mouse TM3 leydig cells were treated with 0 (control), 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 μM imatinib for 2, 4 and 6 days. Each experiment was repeated three times (15 experiments in each day).The cellular viability and growth factors levels were assessed by MTT and ELISA methods, respectively. For statistical analysis, one-way ANOVA with Tukey’s post hoc and Kruskal-Wallis test were performed. A p-value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: With increasing drug concentration, cellular viability decreased significantly (p<0.05) and in contrast, PDGF levels increased (p<0.05). Different imatinib concentrations had no significant effect on SCF level. Increasing the duration of treatment from 2 to 6 days had no obvious effect on cellular viability, PDGF and SCF levels. Conclusion: Imatinib may reduce fertility potential especially at higher concentrations in patients treated with this drug by decreasing cellular viability. The effect of imatinib on leydig cells is associated with PDGF stimulation. Of course future studies can be helpful in exploring the long term effects of this drug. PMID:27141462

  6. Host pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) prevents progression of liver metastasis in a mouse model of uveal melanoma.

    PubMed

    Lattier, John M; Yang, Hua; Crawford, Susan; Grossniklaus, Hans E

    2013-12-01

    Uveal melanoma (UM) has a 30 % 5-year mortality rate, primarily due to liver metastasis. Both angiogenesis and stromagenesis are important mechanisms for the progression of liver metastasis. Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), an anti-angiogenic and anti-stromagenic protein, is produced by hepatocytes. Exogenous PEDF suppresses metastasis progression; however, the effects of host-produced PEDF on metastasis progression are unknown. We hypothesize that host PEDF inhibits liver metastasis progression through a mechanism involving angiogenesis and stromagenesis. Mouse melanoma cells were injected into the posterior ocular compartment of PEDF-null mice and control mice. After 1 month, the number, size, and mean vascular density (MVD) of liver metastases were determined. The stromal component of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and the type III collagen they produce was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Host PEDF inhibited the total area of liver metastasis and the frequency of macrometastases (diameter >200 μm) but did not affect the total number of metastases. Mice expressing PEDF exhibited significantly lower MVD and less type III collagen production in metastases. An increase in activated HSCs was seen in the absence of PEDF, but this result was not statistically significant. In conclusion, host PEDF inhibits the progression of hepatic metastases in a mouse model of UM, and loss of PEDF is accompanied by an increase in tumor blood vessel density and type III collagen.

  7. [X-ray irradiation induces apoptosis of mouse GC1 sperm cells via nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor].

    PubMed

    Yang, Huiying; Ding, Jingbin; Wang, Zhijun; Ding, Juan; Xia, Xinshe; Zhao, Wei

    2017-03-01

    Objective To study the effect of X-ray irradiation on the localization of apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) in mouse GC1 sperm cells. Methods After GC1 cells were treated with 0, 3, 6 and 9 Gy X irradiation, BrdU incorporation assay was performed to detect the proliferation of GC1 cells. Forty-eight hours after irradiation, the nuclear condensation was observed by DAPI staining. The subcellular localization of AIF was showed using the immunofluorescence staining, both in the whole cell extracts and in nuclear extracts, and the expression levels of AIF were detected using Western blot analysis. Results With the increase of X-ray irradiation dose, the proliferation of GC1 cells significantly decreased, and the activity of cells was weakened. After 6 Gy irradiation, in nuclear extracts, but not in the whole cell extracts, the protein AIF was upregulated significantly. It meant the nuclear translocation of protein AIF. Conclusion X-ray irradiation induces the apoptosis of mouse GC1 sperm cells, meanwhile, the nuclear translocation of AIF occurs.

  8. SNPs in putative regulatory regions identified by human mouse comparative sequencing and transcription factor binding site data

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Poulabi; Bahlo, Melanie; Schwartz, Jody R.; Loots, Gabriela G.; Houston, Kathryn A.; Dubchak, Inna; Speed, Terence P.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2002-01-01

    Genome wide disease association analysis using SNPs is being explored as a method for dissecting complex genetic traits and a vast number of SNPs have been generated for this purpose. As there are cost and throughput limitations of genotyping large numbers of SNPs and statistical issues regarding the large number of dependent tests on the same data set, to make association analysis practical it has been proposed that SNPs should be prioritized based on likely functional importance. The most easily identifiable functional SNPs are coding SNPs (cSNPs) and accordingly cSNPs have been screened in a number of studies. SNPs in gene regulatory sequences embedded in noncoding DNA are another class of SNPs suggested for prioritization due to their predicted quantitative impact on gene expression. The main challenge in evaluating these SNPs, in contrast to cSNPs is a lack of robust algorithms and databases for recognizing regulatory sequences in noncoding DNA. Approaches that have been previously used to delineate noncoding sequences with gene regulatory activity include cross-species sequence comparisons and the search for sequences recognized by transcription factors. We combined these two methods to sift through mouse human genomic sequences to identify putative gene regulatory elements and subsequently localized SNPs within these sequences in a 1 Megabase (Mb) region of human chromosome 5q31, orthologous to mouse chromosome 11 containing the Interleukin cluster.

  9. Whole Reproductive System Non-Negative Matrix Factorization Mass Spectrometry Imaging of an Early-Stage Ovarian Cancer Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaeyeon; Bennett, Rachel V.; Parry, R. Mitchell; Gaul, David A.; Wang, May D.; Matzuk, Martin M.; Fernández, Facundo M.

    2016-01-01

    High-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC) is the most common and deadliest form of ovarian cancer. Yet it is largely asymptomatic in its initial stages. Studying the origin and early progression of this disease is thus critical in identifying markers for early detection and screening purposes. Tissue-based mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) can be employed as an unbiased way of examining localized metabolic changes between healthy and cancerous tissue directly, at the onset of disease. In this study, we describe MSI results from Dicer-Pten double-knockout (DKO) mice, a mouse model faithfully reproducing the clinical nature of human HGSC. By using non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) for the unsupervised analysis of desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) datasets, tissue regions are segregated based on spectral components in an unbiased manner, with alterations related to HGSC highlighted. Results obtained by combining NMF with DESI-MSI revealed several metabolic species elevated in the tumor tissue and/or surrounding blood-filled cyst including ceramides, sphingomyelins, bilirubin, cholesterol sulfate, and various lysophospholipids. Multiple metabolites identified within the imaging study were also detected at altered levels within serum in a previous metabolomic study of the same mouse model. As an example workflow, features identified in this study were used to build an oPLS-DA model capable of discriminating between DKO mice with early-stage tumors and controls with up to 88% accuracy. PMID:27159635

  10. Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor ensures the elongation of axons and dendrites in the mouse frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Ohba, Koji; Takeda, Kazuhisa; Furuse, Tamio; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Wakana, Shigeharu; Suzuki, Takashi; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Shibahara, Shigeki

    2016-12-01

    Long interspersed element-1 (LINE-1) is a mammalian transposable element, and its genomic insertion could cause neurological disorders in humans. Incidentally, LINE-1 is present in intron 3 of the microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (Mitf) gene of the black-eyed white mouse (Mitf(mi-bw) allele). Mice homozygous for the Mitf(mi-bw) allele show the white coat color with black eye and deafness. Here, we explored the functional consequences of the LINE-1 insertion in the Mitf gene using homozygous Mitf(mi-bw) mice on the C3H background (C3H-bw mice) or on the C57BL/6 background (bw mice). The open-field test showed that C3H-bw mice moved more irregularly in an unfamiliar environment during the 20-min period, compared to wild-type mice, suggesting the altered emotionality. Moreover, C3H-bw mice showed the lower serum creatinine levels, which may reflect the creatine deficiency. In fact, morphologically abnormal neurons and astrocytes were detected in the frontal cortex of bw mice. The immunohistochemical analysis of bw mouse tissues showed the lower intensity for expression of guanidinoacetate methyltransferase, a key enzyme in creatine synthesis, in neurons of the frontal cortex and in glomeruli and renal tubules. Thus, Mitf may ensure the elongation of axons and dendrites by maintaining creatine synthesis in the frontal cortex. © 2016 Molecular Biology Society of Japan and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  11. A polymorphic form of steroidogenic factor-1 is associated with adrenocorticotropin resistance in y1 mouse adrenocortical tumor cell mutants.

    PubMed

    Frigeri, Claudia; Tsao, Jennivine; Cordova, Martha; Schimmer, Bernard P

    2002-10-01

    ACTH resistance in mutant derivatives of the Y1 mouse adrenocortical tumor cell line results from a defect that affects the activity of steroidogenic factor-1 (SF1), thereby preventing the expression of the melanocortin-2 receptor. In this report, we show that the SF1 genes in ACTH-resistant mutants differ from the gene in ACTH-responsive Y1 cells by two base changes-one that changes an Ala to Ser at codon 172, and one in the third position of codon 3 that does not affect the protein sequence. Furthermore, several of the mutants contain multiple copies of this alternate SF1 gene (SF1(S172)) on acentric chromosome fragments. The SF1(S172) allele represents a polymorphism rather than a spontaneous mutation because the two SF1 alleles can be traced to the hybrid mouse strain (C57L/J x A/HeJ) from which the original adrenal tumor was derived. The SF1(A172) allele also is found in C57Bl/6J and C57Bl/10J mice, whereas the SF1(S172) allele also is found in C3H/HeJ and DBA/2J mice. The two forms of SF1 had only modest differences in activity suggesting that the SF1 polymorphism per se is not directly responsible for ACTH resistance. Our results indicate that the SF1(S172) allele is a marker of ACTH resistance in this family of adrenocortical tumor cells.

  12. Whole Reproductive System Non-Negative Matrix Factorization Mass Spectrometry Imaging of an Early-Stage Ovarian Cancer Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Paine, Martin R L; Kim, Jaeyeon; Bennett, Rachel V; Parry, R Mitchell; Gaul, David A; Wang, May D; Matzuk, Martin M; Fernández, Facundo M

    2016-01-01

    High-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC) is the most common and deadliest form of ovarian cancer. Yet it is largely asymptomatic in its initial stages. Studying the origin and early progression of this disease is thus critical in identifying markers for early detection and screening purposes. Tissue-based mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) can be employed as an unbiased way of examining localized metabolic changes between healthy and cancerous tissue directly, at the onset of disease. In this study, we describe MSI results from Dicer-Pten double-knockout (DKO) mice, a mouse model faithfully reproducing the clinical nature of human HGSC. By using non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) for the unsupervised analysis of desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) datasets, tissue regions are segregated based on spectral components in an unbiased manner, with alterations related to HGSC highlighted. Results obtained by combining NMF with DESI-MSI revealed several metabolic species elevated in the tumor tissue and/or surrounding blood-filled cyst including ceramides, sphingomyelins, bilirubin, cholesterol sulfate, and various lysophospholipids. Multiple metabolites identified within the imaging study were also detected at altered levels within serum in a previous metabolomic study of the same mouse model. As an example workflow, features identified in this study were used to build an oPLS-DA model capable of discriminating between DKO mice with early-stage tumors and controls with up to 88% accuracy.

  13. Sustaining expression of B domain-deleted human factor VIII mediated by using lentiviral vectors in NOD/SCID mouse.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Jie; Chen, Chong; Zeng, Ling-Yu; Cao, Jiang; Xu, Kai-Lin

    2012-06-01

    Recently, gene therapy has been become a promising approach to cure hemophilia A, a most common recessive bleeding disease. The aim of this study was to determine the perspective of lentiviral vector in hemophilia A gene therapy in vitro and in NOD/SCID mice. Lentivirus transfer vector pXZ9/BDDFVIII containing human B-domain-deleted Factor VIII-IRES-eGFP coding sequence and mock control pXZ9 were constructed. Lentivirus was prepared by co-transfecting 3 plasmids into 293FT cells. 293FT, HLF, human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and Chang-liver cells were transfected with the prepared virus. Coagulant activity of human FVIII, human FVIII antigen, human FVIII mRNA transcription and genomic integration were assayed by ELISA, one-step method, RT-PCR and PCR after infection. Lentiviral particles were concentrated by ultracentrifugation and NOD/SCID mice were transfected via portal vein injection. Human FVIII antigen in mouse blood plasma was analyzed by ELISA. eGFP expression was observed by fluorescent microscopy and human FVIII transcription in mouse liver was analyzed by RT-PCR at one month after transduction. The results showed that the high titer of recombinant virus was prepared and used to efficiently transduce the target cells in vitro. At 72 h after transfection, high levels of FVIII activity and FVIII antigen were detected. Human FVIII gene transcription could be detected in the liver of NOD/SCID mice received lentiviral particles carrying FVIII gene. Mouse hepatocytes were transfected with recombinant lentivirus efficiently in vivo. Human FVIII level in mouse blood plasma reached to (49 ± 6) mU, (54 ± 8) mU and (23 ± 4) mU at 72 h, one week and one month after transfection respectively. It is concluded that the lentiviral particles carrying BDDhFVIII gene can high efficiently transfect the target cells both in vitro and in vivo, and the transfected target cells can secrete hFVIII efficiently. The sustained expression of human FVIII in NOD/SCID mice is

  14. Time Course of Behavioral Alteration and mRNA Levels of Neurotrophic Factor Following Stress Exposure in Mouse.

    PubMed

    Hashikawa, Naoya; Ogawa, Takumi; Sakamoto, Yusuke; Ogawa, Mami; Matsuo, Yumi; Zamami, Yoshito; Hashikawa-Hobara, Narumi

    2015-08-01

    Stress is known to affect neurotrophic factor expression, which induces depression-like behavior. However, whether there are time-dependent changes in neurotrophic factor mRNA expression following stress remains unclear. In the present study, we tested whether chronic stress exposure induces long-term changes in depression-related behavior, serum corticosterone, and hippocampal proliferation as well as neurotrophic factor family mRNA levels, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), in the mouse hippocampus. The mRNA level of neurotrophic factors (BDNF, NGF, NT-3, and CNTF) was measured using the real-time PCR. The serum corticosterone level was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and, for each subject, the hippocampal proliferation was examined by 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine immunostaining. Mice exhibited depression-like behavior in the forced-swim test (FST) and decreased BDNF mRNA and hippocampal proliferation in the middle of the stress exposure. After 15 days of stress exposure, we observed increased immobility in the FST, serum corticosterone levels, and BDNF mRNA levels and degenerated hippocampal proliferation, maintained for at least 2 weeks. Anhedonia-like behavior in the sucrose preference test and NGF mRNA levels were decreased following 15 days of stress. NGF mRNA levels were significantly higher 1 week after stress exposure. The current data demonstrate that chronic stress exposure induces prolonged BDNF and NGF mRNA changes and increases corticosterone levels and depression-like behavior in the FST, but does not alter other neurotrophic factors or performance in the sucrose preference test.

  15. Inhibition of In Vitro Fertilizing Capacity of Cryopreserved Mouse Sperm by Factors Released by Damaged Sperm, and Stimulation by Glutathione

    PubMed Central

    Bath, Mary L.

    2010-01-01

    Background In vitro fertilization (IVF) of eggs by frozen and thawed C57BL/6J mouse sperm is inhibited by dead sperm and enhanced by preincubation of the sperm in calcium-free medium. In other species, the presence of sperm killed by freezing and thawing has been associated with the generation of hydrogen peroxide. Methodology/Principal Findings The proportion of eggs fertilized by cryopreserved C57BL/6J mouse sperm was increased significantly by increasing the volume of fertilization medium in which sperm and eggs were coincubated. Enhanced fertilization occurred even though the concentration of potentially fertile sperm was decreased fivefold. This suggested that if a putative soluble factor was inhibiting fertilization, dilution of that factor, but not the sperm, should increase the fertilization rate. This was achieved by coincubation of the gametes in cell culture inserts (Transwells®) that during incubation were transferred progressively to wells containing fresh fertilization medium. Fertilization rates using inserts were high (66.6±2.4% versus 27.3%±2.8% in wells alone). On the assumption that the soluble factor could be H2O2, reduced glutathione was added to the fertilization medium. This enhanced fertilization rate significantly (76.6%±2.0% versus 21.2%±1.9%), while addition of oxidized glutathione did not (82.7%±6.5% with reduced glutathione; 44.5±8.8% with oxidized glutathione; 47.8%±12.1% with no glutathione). Positive effects of reduced glutathione on IVF were also seen with frozen 129S1, FVB, and C3H sperm, and sperm from two lines of genetically modified C57BL/6J mice. Conclusions/Significance IVF in cell culture inserts and addition of glutathione to fertilization medium significantly increased the proportion of eggs fertilized by cryopreserved mouse sperm from four inbred strains, suggesting that reactive oxygen species generated during fertilization inhibit fertilization. The modified IVF techniques developed here enhance the feasibility

  16. Transforming growth factor beta1 regulates melanocyte proliferation and differentiation in mouse neural crest cells via stem cell factor/KIT signaling.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Tamihiro; Soma, Yoshinao; Kawa, Yoko; Ito, Masaru; Yamasaki, Emiko; Watabe, Hidenori; Hosaka, Eri; Yajima, Kenji; Ohsumi, Kayoko; Mizoguchi, Masako

    2002-03-01

    Stem cell factor is essential to the migration and differentiation of melanocytes during embryogenesis based on the observation that mutations in either the stem cell factor gene, or its ligand, KIT, result in defects in coat pigmentation in mice. Stem cell factor is also required for the survival of melanocyte precursors while they are migrating towards the skin. Transforming growth factor beta1 has been implicated in the regulation of both cellular proliferation and differentiation. NCC-melb4, an immortal cloned cell line, was cloned from a mouse neural crest cell. NCC-melb4 cells provide a model to study the specific stage of differentiation and proliferation of melanocytes. They also express KIT as a melanoblast marker. Using the NCC-melb4 cell line, we investigated the effect of transforming growth factor beta1 on the differentiation and proliferation of immature melanocyte precursors. Immunohistochemically, NCC-melb4 cells showed transforming growth factor beta1 expression. The anti-transforming growth factor beta1 antibody inhibited the cell growth, and downregulated the KIT protein and mRNA expression. To investigate further the activation of autocrine transforming growth factor beta1, NCC-melb4 cells were incubated in nonexogenous transforming growth factor beta1 culture medium. KIT protein decreased with anti-transforming growth factor beta1 antibody concentration in a concentration-dependent manner. We concluded that in NCC-melb4 cells, transforming growth factor beta1 promotes melanocyte precursor proliferation in autocrine and/or paracrine regulation. We further investigated the influence of transforming growth factor beta1 in vitro using a neural crest cell primary culture system from wild-type mice. Anti-transforming growth factor beta1 antibody decreased the number of KIT positive neural crest cell. In addition, the anti-transforming growth factor beta1 antibody supplied within the wild-type neural crest explants abolished the growth of the neural

  17. Thymic hormone-containing cells. Characterization and localization of serum thymic factor in young mouse thymus studied by monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    The characterization and distribution of cells containing the serum thymic factor (FTS) in the thymus of young mice was studied by immunofluorescence using monoclonal anti-FTS antibodies. FTS+ cells were distributed throughout the thymic parenchyma but were more frequent in the medullary region than in the cortex. FTS-containing cells presented a stellate or globular aspect, and some of them exhibited fluorescent cytoplasmic granules. The epithelial nature of FTS+ cells was confirmed by double-labeling experiments using an anti- keratin antiserum (as an epithelial cell marker). Nevertheless, only a minority of keratin-positive epithelial reticular cells contained FTS. All controls, including the incubation of sections from nonthymic tissues with the anti-FTS antibodies, were negative. Taken together, these results confirm the exclusive localization of FTS-containing cells within the mouse thymus. PMID:7047671

  18. Loss of sigma factor RpoN increases intestinal colonization of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in an adult mouse model.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, W Brian; Richards, Gary P; Boyd, E Fidelma

    2014-02-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is the leading cause of bacterial seafood-borne gastroenteritis worldwide, yet little is known about how this pathogen colonizes the human intestine. The alternative sigma factor RpoN/sigma-54 is a global regulator that controls flagellar synthesis, as well as a wide range of nonflagellar genes. We constructed an in-frame deletion mutation in rpoN (VP2670) in V. parahaemolyticus RIMD2210633, a clinical serogroup O3:K6 isolate, and examined the effects in vivo using a streptomycin-treated mouse model of colonization. We confirmed that deletion of rpoN rendered V. parahaemolyticus nonmotile, and it caused reduced biofilm formation and an apparent defect in glutamine synthetase production. In in vivo competition assays between the rpoN mutant and a wild-type RIMD2210633 strain marked with the β-galactosidase gene lacZ (WBWlacZ), the mutant colonized significantly more proficiently. Intestinal persistence competition assays also demonstrated that the rpoN mutant had enhanced fitness and outcompeted WBWlacZ. Mutants defective in the polar flagellum biosynthesis FliAP sigma factor also outcompeted WBWlacZ but not to the same level as the rpoN mutant, which suggested that lack of motility is not the sole cause of the fitness effect. In an in vitro growth competition assay in mouse intestinal mucus, the rpoN mutant also outcompeted the wild type and exhibited faster doubling times when grown in mucus and on individual components of mucus. Genes in the pathways for the catabolism of mucus sugars also had significantly higher expression levels in a ΔrpoN mutant than in the wild type. These data suggest that in V. parahaemolyticus, RpoN plays an important role in carbon utilization regulation, which may significantly affect host colonization.

  19. Otoprotective effects of mouse nerve growth factor in DBA/2J mice with early-onset progressive hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingzhu; Zhao, Hongchun; Zheng, Tihua; Wang, Wenjun; Zhang, Xiaolin; Wang, Andi; Li, Bo; Wang, Yanfei; Zheng, Qingyin

    2017-10-01

    As it displays progressive hair-cell loss and degeneration of spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) characterized by early-onset progressive hearing loss (ePHL), DBA/2J is an inbred mouse strain widely used in hearing research. Mouse nerve growth factor (mNGF), as a common exogenous nerve growth factor (NGF), has been studied extensively for its ability to promote neuronal survival and growth. To determine whether mNGF can ameliorate progressive hearing loss (PHL) in DBA/2J mice, saline or mNGF was given to DBA/2J mice of either sex by daily intramuscular injection from the 1st to the 9th week after birth. At 5, 7, and 9 weeks of age, in comparison with vehicle groups, mNGF groups experienced decreased auditory-evoked brainstem response (ABR) thresholds and increased distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) amplitudes, the prevention of hair cell loss, and the inhibition of apoptosis of SGNs. Downregulation of Bak/Bax and Caspase genes and proteins in cochleae of mice receiving the mNGF treatment was detected by real-time PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. This suggests that the Bak-dependent mitochondrial apoptosis pathway may be involved in the otoprotective mechanism of mNGF in progressive hearing loss of DBA/2J mice. Our results demonstrate that mNGF can act as an otoprotectant in the DBA/2J mice for the early intervention of PHL and, thus, could become of great value in clinical applications. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Modulating immunogenicity of factor IX by fusion to an immunoglobulin Fc domain: a study using a hemophilia B mouse model.

    PubMed

    Levin, D; Lagassé, H A D; Burch, E; Strome, S; Tan, S; Jiang, H; Sauna, Z E; Golding, B

    2017-04-01

    Essentials Fc-fusion increases a therapeutic's half-life, but FcγR interactions may impact immunogenicity. Species-specific Fc-FcγR interactions allow for mechanistic in vivo studies using mouse models. Fc fusion modulates the immune response to factor IX in hemophilia B mice by eliciting Th1 bias. This model could inform future studies of IgE-associated anaphylaxis in hemophilia B patients. Background Fc fusion is a platform technology used to increase the circulating half-life of protein and peptide therapeutics. However, there are potential immunological consequences with this approach, such as changes in the molecule's immunogenicity as well as possible interactions with a repertoire of Fc receptors (FcR) that can modulate immune responses. Objectives/Methods Using a mouse hemophilia B (HB) model, we compared the immune responses to infusions of recombinant human factor IX (hFIX) and hFIX fused to mouse IgG2a-Fc (hFIX-mFc). The mFc was employed to allow species-specific Fc-FcγR interactions. Results Although treatment with hFIX-mFc altered the early development of anti-FIX IgG, no significant differences in anti-FIX antibody titers were observed at the end of the treatment regimen (5 weeks) or upon anamnestic response (5 months). However, treatment with hFIX-mFc elicited higher FIX-neutralizing antibody levels and resulted in reduced IgE titers compared with the hFIX-treated group. Additionally, differences in plasma cytokine levels and in vitro CD4(+) T-cell responses suggest that whereas hFIX treatment triggered a Th2-biased immune response, hFIX-mFc treatment induced Th1-biased CD4(+) T cells. We also show that hFIX-mFc bound to soluble FcγRs and engaged with FcγRs on different cell types, which may impact antigen presentation. Conclusions These studies provide a model system to study how Fc-fusion proteins may affect immune mechanisms. We used this model to demonstrate a plausible mechanism by which Fc fusion may modulate the IgE response to hFIX. This

  1. Bordetella pertussis filamentous hemagglutinin: evaluation as a protective antigen and colonization factor in a mouse respiratory infection model.

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, A; Mountzouros, K T; Relman, D A; Falkow, S; Cowell, J L

    1990-01-01

    Filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA) is a cell surface protein of Bordetella pertussis which functions as an adhesin for this organism. It is a component of many new acellular pertussis vaccines. The proposed role of FHA in immunity to pertussis is based on animal studies which have produced some conflicting results. To clarify this situation, we reexamined the protective activity of FHA in an adult mouse respiratory infection model. Four-week-old BALB/c mice were immunized with one or two doses of 4 or 8 micrograms of FHA and then aerosol challenged with B. pertussis Tohama I. In control mice receiving tetanus toxoid, the CFU in the lungs increased from 10(5) immediately following infection to greater than 10(6) by days 5 and 9 after challenge. Mice immunized with FHA by the intraperitoneal or intramuscular route had significantly reduced bacterial colonization in the lungs. A decrease in colonization of the trachea was also observed in FHA-immunized mice. Evaluation of antibody responses in these mice revealed high titers of immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM to FHA in sera and of IgG to FHA in lung lavage fluids. No IgA to FHA was detected. BALB/c mice were also passively immunized intravenously with either goat or rat antibodies to FHA and then aerosol challenged 24 h later, when anti-FHA antibodies were detected in the respiratory tract. Lung and tracheal colonization was markedly reduced in mice immunized with FHA-specific antibodies compared with those receiving control antibodies. In additional studies, the role of FHA in the colonization of the mouse respiratory tract was evaluated by using strain BP101, an FHA mutant of B. pertussis. FHA was important in the initial colonization of the mouse trachea, but was not required for colonization of the trachea later in the infection. FHA was not a factor in colonization of the lungs. Collectively, these experiments demonstrate (i) that systemic immunization with FHA can provide significant protection against B. pertussis

  2. Effect of ascorbate on fibrinolytic factors in septic mouse skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Swarbreck, Scott; Secor, Dan; Li, Fuyan; Gross, Peter L; Ellis, Christopher G; Sharpe, Michael D; Wilson, John X; Tyml, Karel

    2014-10-01

    Plugging of the capillary bed in tissues correlates with organ failure during sepsis. In septic mouse skeletal muscle, we showed that blood in capillaries becomes hypercoagulable and that ascorbate injection inhibits capillary plugging. In the present study, we hypothesized that ascorbate promotes fibrinolysis, reversing this plugging. Sepsis in mice was induced by fecal injection into peritoneum. Mice were injected intravenously with a bolus of streptokinase (fibrinolytic agent) or ascorbate at 5-6 h. Both agents reversed capillary plugging in muscle at 7 h. Sepsis increased mRNA expression of urokinase plasminogen activator (u-PA) (profibrinolytic) and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) (antifibrinolytic) in muscle and liver homogenates at 7 h. Ascorbate did not affect u-PA mRNA in either tissue, but it inhibited PAI-1 mRNA in muscle, suggesting enhanced fibrinolysis in this tissue. However, ascorbate did not affect increased PAI-1 mRNA in the liver (dominant source of soluble PAI-1 in systemic blood). Consistently, ascorbate affected neither elevated PAI-1 protein/enzymatic activity in septic liver nor lowered plasmin antiplasmin level in septic blood. Furthermore, hypocoagulability of septic blood revealed by thrombelastography and thrombin-induced PAI-1 release from isolated platelets (ex-vivo model of sepsis) were not affected by ascorbate. Based on the PAI-1 protein data, the present study does not support the hypothesis that ascorbate promotes fibrinolysis in sepsis.

  3. Mitochondrial fission and fusion factors reciprocally orchestrate mitophagic culling in mouse hearts and cultured fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Song, Moshi; Mihara, Katsuyoshi; Chen, Yun; Scorrano, Luca; Dorn, Gerald W

    2014-01-01

    Summary How mitochondrial dynamism (fission and fusion) affects mitochondrial quality control is unclear. We uncovered distinct effects on mitophagy of inhibiting Drp1-mediated mitochondrial fission versus mitofusin-mediated mitochondrial fusion. Conditional cardiomyocyte-specific Drp1 ablation evoked mitochondrial enlargement, lethal dilated cardiomyopathy, and cardiomyocyte necrosis. Conditionally ablating cardiomyocyte mitofusins (Mfn) caused mitochondrial fragmentation with eccentric remodeling and no cardiomyocyte dropout. Parallel studies in cultured murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and in vivo mouse hearts revealed that Mfn1/Mfn2 deletion provoked accumulation of defective mitochondria exhibiting an unfolded protein response, without appropriately increasing mitophagy. Conversely, interrupting mitochondrial fission by Drp1 ablation increased mitophagy and caused a generalized loss of mitochondria. Mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) opening in Drp1 null mitochondria was associated with mitophagy in MEFs and contributed to cardiomyocyte necrosis and dilated cardiomyopathy in mice. Drp1, MPTP, and cardiomyocyte mitophagy are functionally integrated. Mitochondrial fission and fusion have opposing roles during in vivo cardiac mitochondrial quality control. PMID:25600785

  4. Vascular endothelial growth factor-dependent angiogenesis and dynamic vascular plasticity in the sensory circumventricular organs of adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Morita, Shoko; Furube, Eriko; Mannari, Tetsuya; Okuda, Hiroaki; Tatsumi, Kouko; Wanaka, Akio; Miyata, Seiji

    2015-03-01

    The sensory circumventricular organs (CVOs), which comprise the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis (OVLT), the subfornical organ (SFO) and the area postrema (AP), lack a typical blood-brain barrier (BBB) and monitor directly blood-derived information to regulate body fluid homeostasis, inflammation, feeding and vomiting. Until now, almost nothing has been documented about vascular features of the sensory CVOs except fenestration of vascular endothelial cells. We therefore examine whether continuous angiogenesis occurs in the sensory CVOs of adult mouse. The angiogenesis-inducing factor vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) and the VEGF-A-regulating transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1α were highly expressed in neurons of the OVLT and SFO and in both neurons and astrocytes of the AP. Expression of the pericyte-regulating factor platelet-derived growth factor B was high in astrocytes of the sensory CVOs. Immunohistochemistry of bromodeoxyuridine and Ki-67, a nuclear protein that is associated with cellular proliferation, revealed active proliferation of endothelial cells. Moreover, immunohistochemistry of caspase-3 and the basement membrane marker laminin showed the presence of apoptosis and sprouting of endothelial cells, respectively. Treatment with the VEGF receptor-associated tyrosine kinase inhibitor AZD2171 significantly reduced proliferation and filopodia sprouting of endothelial cells, as well as the area and diameter of microvessels. The mitotic inhibitor cytosine-b-D-arabinofuranoside reduced proliferation of endothelial cells and the vascular permeability of blood-derived low-molecular-weight molecules without changing vascular area and microvessel diameter. Thus, our data indicate that continuous angiogenesis is dependent on VEGF signaling and responsible for the dynamic plasticity of vascular structure and permeability.

  5. Muscle atrophy reversed by growth factor activation of satellite cells in a mouse muscle atrophy model.

    PubMed

    Hauerslev, Simon; Vissing, John; Krag, Thomas O

    2014-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies comprise a large group of inherited disorders that lead to progressive muscle wasting. We wanted to investigate if targeting satellite cells can enhance muscle regeneration and thus increase muscle mass. We treated mice with hepatocyte growth factor and leukemia inhibitory factor under three conditions: normoxia, hypoxia and during myostatin deficiency. We found that hepatocyte growth factor treatment led to activation of the Akt/mTOR/p70S6K protein synthesis pathway, up-regulation of the myognic transcription factors MyoD and myogenin, and subsequently the negative growth control factor, myostatin and atrophy markers MAFbx and MuRF1. Hypoxia-induced atrophy was partially restored by hepatocyte growth factor combined with leukemia inhibitory factor treatment. Dividing satellite cells were three-fold increased in the treatment group compared to control. Finally, we demonstrated that myostatin regulates satellite cell activation and myogenesis in vivo following treatment, consistent with previous findings in vitro. Our results suggest, not only a novel in vivo pharmacological treatment directed specifically at activating the satellite cells, but also a myostatin dependent mechanism that may contribute to the progressive muscle wasting seen in severely affected patients with muscular dystrophy and significant on-going regeneration. This treatment could potentially be applied to many conditions that feature muscle wasting to increase muscle bulk and strength.

  6. Muscle Atrophy Reversed by Growth Factor Activation of Satellite Cells in a Mouse Muscle Atrophy Model

    PubMed Central

    Hauerslev, Simon; Vissing, John; Krag, Thomas O.

    2014-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies comprise a large group of inherited disorders that lead to progressive muscle wasting. We wanted to investigate if targeting satellite cells can enhance muscle regeneration and thus increase muscle mass. We treated mice with hepatocyte growth factor and leukemia inhibitory factor under three conditions: normoxia, hypoxia and during myostatin deficiency. We found that hepatocyte growth factor treatment led to activation of the Akt/mTOR/p70S6K protein synthesis pathway, up-regulation of the myognic transcription factors MyoD and myogenin, and subsequently the negative growth control factor, myostatin and atrophy markers MAFbx and MuRF1. Hypoxia-induced atrophy was partially restored by hepatocyte growth factor combined with leukemia inhibitory factor treatment. Dividing satellite cells were three-fold increased in the treatment group compared to control. Finally, we demonstrated that myostatin regulates satellite cell activation and myogenesis in vivo following treatment, consistent with previous findings in vitro. Our results suggest, not only a novel in vivo pharmacological treatment directed specifically at activating the satellite cells, but also a myostatin dependent mechanism that may contribute to the progressive muscle wasting seen in severely affected patients with muscular dystrophy and significant on-going regeneration. This treatment could potentially be applied to many conditions that feature muscle wasting to increase muscle bulk and strength. PMID:24963862

  7. Scatter factor/hepatocyte growth factor and its receptor, the c-met tyrosine kinase, can mediate a signal exchange between mesenchyme and epithelia during mouse development

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Scatter factor/hepatocyte growth factor (SF/HGF) has potent motogenic, mitogenic, and morphogenetic activities on epithelial cells in vitro. The cell surface receptor for this factor was recently identified: it is the product of the c-met protooncogene, a receptor-type tyrosine kinase. We report here the novel and distinct expression patterns of SF/HGF and its receptor during mouse development, which was determined by a combination of in situ hybridization and RNase protection experiments. Predominantly, we detect transcripts of c-met in epithelial cells of various developing organs, whereas the ligand is expressed in distinct mesenchymal cells in close vicinity. In addition, transient SF/HGF and c-met expression is found at certain sites of muscle formation; transient expression of the c-met gene is also detected in developing motoneurons. SF/HGF and the c-met receptor might thus play multiple developmental roles, most notably, mediate a signal given by mesenchyme and received by epithelial. Mesenchymal signals are known to govern differentiation and morphogenesis of many epithelia, but the molecular nature of the signals has remained poorly understood. Therefore, the known biological activities of SF/HGF in vitro and the embryonal expression pattern reported here indicate that this mesenchymal factor can transmit morphogenetic signals in epithelial development and suggest a molecular mechanism for mesenchymal epithelial interactions. PMID:8408200

  8. Astrocyte-Secreted Factors Selectively Alter Neural Stem and Progenitor Cell Proliferation in the Fragile X Mouse.

    PubMed

    Sourial, Mary; Doering, Laurie C

    2016-01-01

    An increasing body of evidence indicates that astrocytes contribute to the governance and fine tuning of stem and progenitor cell production during brain development. The effect of astrocyte function in cell production in neurodevelopmental disorders is unknown. We used the Neural Colony Forming Cell assay to determine the effect of astrocyte conditioned media (ACM) on the generation of neurospheres originating from either progenitor cells or functional stem cells in the knock out (KO) Fragile X mouse model. ACM from both normal and Fmr1-KO mice generated higher percentages of smaller neurospheres indicative of restricted proliferation of the progenitor cell population in Fmr1-KO brains. Wild type (WT) neurospheres, but not KO neurospheres, showed enhanced responses to ACM from the Fmr1-KO mice. In particular, Fmr1-KO ACM increased the percentage of large neurospheres generated, representative of spheres produced from neural stem cells. We also used 2D DIGE to initiate identification of the astrocyte-secreted proteins with differential expression between Fmr1-KO and WT cortices and hippocampi. The results further support the critical role of astrocytes in governing neural cell production in brain development and point to significant alterations in neural cell proliferation due to astrocyte secreted factors from the Fragile X brain. • We studied the proliferation of neural stem and progenitor cells in Fragile X.• We examined the role of astrocyte-secreted factors in neural precursor cell biology.• Astrocyte-secreted factors with differential expression in Fragile X identified.

  9. Adenoviral modification of mouse brain derived endothelial cells, bEnd3, to induce apoptosis by vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Mitsuuchi, Y; Powell, D R; Gallo, J M

    2006-02-09

    A second generation genetically-engineered cell-based drug delivery system, referred to as apoptotic-induced drug delivery (AIDD), was developed using endothelial cells (ECs) that undergo apoptosis upon binding of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) to a Flk-1:Fas fusion protein (FF). This new AIDD was redesigned using mouse brain derived ECs, bEnd3 cells, and an adenovirus vector in order to enhance and control the expression of FF. The FF was tagged with a HA epitope (FFHA) and designed to be coexpressed with green fluorescence protein (GFP) by the regulation of cytomegalovirus promoters in the adenovirus vector. bEnd3 cells showed favorable coexpression of FFHA and GFP consistent with the multiplicity of infection of the adenovirus. Immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated that FFHA was localized at the plasma membrane, whereas GFP was predominantly located in the cytoplasm of ECs. Cell death was induced by VEGF, but not by platelet derived growth factor or fibroblast growth factor in a dose-dependent manner (range 2-20 ng/ml), and revealed caspase-dependent apoptotic profiles. The FFHA expressing bEnd3 cells underwent apoptosis when cocultured with a glioma cell (SF188V+) line able to overexpress VEGF. The combined data indicated that the FFHA adenovirus system can induce apoptotic signaling in ECs in response to VEGF, and thus, is an instrumental modification to the development of AIDD.

  10. In vivo injection of fibroblast growth factor-2 into the cisterna magna induces glypican-6 expression in mouse brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Zivar

    2009-05-01

    The proteoglycans (PGs) are multifunctional macromolecules composed of a core polypeptide and a variable number of glycosaminoglycan chains. In the nervous system, PGs regulate the structural organization of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and modulate growth factor activities and cell proliferation and migration. Most cortical neurons are generated from neural precursor cells that reside in the ventricular zone of the embryonic brain. The proliferation and differentiation of neural precursor cells are regulated by various growth and neurotrophic factors. Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) is an important mitogen for cortical neural precursor cells, and glypicans regulate the action of FGF-2 on neural precursor cells. Glypican-6 is one of the most abundant ECM molecules in the brain. In this study the effects of FGF-2 on glypican-6 expression in brain tissue have been investigated. FGF-2 was injected into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) through the cisterna magna of mouse pups. Using Western blotting, it was shown that the expression of glypican-6 is increased in response to infusion of FGF-2 into the CSF. The injection of anti-FGF-2 antibody into the cisterna magna decreased glypican-6 expression in brain tissue. The results from this study suggest that glypican-6 is important in regulating FGF-2 activity during cerebral cortical development.

  11. Astrocyte-Secreted Factors Selectively Alter Neural Stem and Progenitor Cell Proliferation in the Fragile X Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Sourial, Mary; Doering, Laurie C.

    2016-01-01

    An increasing body of evidence indicates that astrocytes contribute to the governance and fine tuning of stem and progenitor cell production during brain development. The effect of astrocyte function in cell production in neurodevelopmental disorders is unknown. We used the Neural Colony Forming Cell assay to determine the effect of astrocyte conditioned media (ACM) on the generation of neurospheres originating from either progenitor cells or functional stem cells in the knock out (KO) Fragile X mouse model. ACM from both normal and Fmr1-KO mice generated higher percentages of smaller neurospheres indicative of restricted proliferation of the progenitor cell population in Fmr1-KO brains. Wild type (WT) neurospheres, but not KO neurospheres, showed enhanced responses to ACM from the Fmr1-KO mice. In particular, Fmr1-KO ACM increased the percentage of large neurospheres generated, representative of spheres produced from neural stem cells. We also used 2D DIGE to initiate identification of the astrocyte-secreted proteins with differential expression between Fmr1-KO and WT cortices and hippocampi. The results further support the critical role of astrocytes in governing neural cell production in brain development and point to significant alterations in neural cell proliferation due to astrocyte secreted factors from the Fragile X brain. Highlights: • We studied the proliferation of neural stem and progenitor cells in Fragile X. • We examined the role of astrocyte-secreted factors in neural precursor cell biology. • Astrocyte-secreted factors with differential expression in Fragile X identified. PMID:27242437

  12. Molecular cloning of the mouse grb2 gene: differential interaction of the Grb2 adaptor protein with epidermal growth factor and nerve growth factor receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Suen, K L; Bustelo, X R; Pawson, T; Barbacid, M

    1993-01-01

    We report the isolation and molecular characterization of the mouse grb2 gene. The product of this gene, the Grb2 protein, is highly related to the Caenorhabditis elegans sem-5 gene product and the human GRB2 protein and displays the same SH3-SH2-SH3 structural motifs. In situ hybridization studies revealed that the mouse grb2 gene is widely expressed throughout embryonic development (E9.5 to P0). However, grb2 transcripts are not uniformly distributed, and in certain tissues (e.g., thymus) they appear to be regulated during development. Recent genetic and biochemical evidence has implicated the Grb2 protein in the signaling pathways that link cell surface tyrosine kinase receptors with Ras. We have investigated the association of the Grb2 protein with epidermal growth factor (EGF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) receptors in PC12 pheochromocytoma cells. EGF treatment of PC12 cells results in the rapid association of Grb2 with the activated EGF receptors, an interaction mediated by the Grb2 SH2 domain. However, Grb2 does not bind to NGF-activated Trk receptors. Mitogenic signaling of NGF in NIH 3T3 cells ectopically expressing Trk receptors also takes place without detectable association between Grb2 and Trk. These results suggest that whereas EGF and NGF can activate the Ras signaling pathway in PC12 cells, only the EGF receptor is likely to do so through a direct interaction with Grb2. Finally, binding studies with glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins indicate that Grb2 binds two distinct subsets of proteins which are individually recognized by its SH2 and SH3 domains. These observations add further support to the concept that Grb2 is a modular adaptor protein. Images PMID:7689150

  13. ROLES OF EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR (EGF) AND TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR-ALPHA (TGF-A) IN MEDIATION OF DIOXIN (TCDD)-INDUCED DELAYS IN DEVELOPMENT OF THE MOUSE MAMMARY GLAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    Roles of Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) and Transforming Growth Factor-alpha (TGF-a) in Mediation of Dioxin (TCDD)-Induced Delays in Development of the Mouse Mammary Gland.
    Suzanne E. Fenton, Barbara Abbott, Lamont Bryant, and Angela Buckalew. U.S. EPA, NHEERL, Reproductive Tox...

  14. ROLES OF EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR (EGF) AND TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR-ALPHA (TGF-A) IN MEDIATION OF DIOXIN (TCDD)-INDUCED DELAYS IN DEVELOPMENT OF THE MOUSE MAMMARY GLAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    Roles of Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) and Transforming Growth Factor-alpha (TGF-a) in Mediation of Dioxin (TCDD)-Induced Delays in Development of the Mouse Mammary Gland.
    Suzanne E. Fenton, Barbara Abbott, Lamont Bryant, and Angela Buckalew. U.S. EPA, NHEERL, Reproductive Tox...

  15. The basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, Mist1, induces maturation of mouse fetal hepatoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Chikada, Hiromi; Ito, Keiichi; Yanagida, Ayaka; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Kamiya, Akihide

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic stem/progenitor cells, hepatoblasts, have a high proliferative ability and can differentiate into mature hepatocytes and cholangiocytes. Therefore, these cells are considered to be useful for regenerative medicine and drug screening for liver diseases. However, it is problem that in vitro maturation of hepatoblasts is insufficient in the present culture system. In this study, a novel regulator to induce hepatic differentiation was identified and the molecular function of this factor was examined in embryonic day 13 hepatoblast culture with maturation factor, oncostatin M and extracellular matrices. Overexpression of the basic helix-loop-helix type transcription factor, Mist1, induced expression of mature hepatocytic markers such as carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase1 and several cytochrome P450 (CYP) genes in this culture system. In contrast, Mist1 suppressed expression of cholangiocytic markers such as Sox9, Sox17, Ck19, and Grhl2. CYP3A metabolic activity was significantly induced by Mist1 in this hepatoblast culture. In addition, Mist1 induced liver-enriched transcription factors, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α and Hepatocyte nuclear factor 1α, which are known to be involved in liver functions. These results suggest that Mist1 partially induces mature hepatocytic expression and function accompanied by the down-regulation of cholangiocytic markers. PMID:26456005

  16. Dynamic expression of transcription factor Brn3b during mouse cranial nerve development

    PubMed Central

    Sajgo, Szilard; Ali, Seid; Popescu, Octavian; Badea, Tudor Constantin

    2015-01-01

    During development transcription factor combinatorial codes define a large variety of morphologically and physiologically distinct neurons. Such a combinatorial code has been proposed for the differentiation of projection neurons of the somatic and visceral components of cranial nerves. It is possible that individual neuronal cell types are not specified by unique transcription factors, but rather emerge through the intersection of their expression domains. Brn3a, Brn3b and Brn3c, in combination with each other and/or transcription factors of other families, can define subgroups of Retinal Ganglion Cells (RGC), Spiral and Vestibular Ganglia, inner ear and vestibular hair cell neurons in the vestibuloacoustic system, and groups of somatosensory neurons in the Dorsal Root Ganglia (DRG). In the present study we investigated the expression and potential role of the Brn3b transcription factor in cranial nerves and associated nuclei of the brainstem. We report the dynamic expression of Brn3b in the somatosensory component of cranial nerves II, V, VII and VIII and visceromotor nuclei of nerves VII, IX, X, as well as other brainstem nuclei during different stages of development into adult stage. We find that genetically identified Brn3bKO RGC axons show correct but delayed pathfinding during the early stages of embryonic development. However loss of Brn3b does not affect the anatomy of the other cranial nerves normally expressing this transcription factor. PMID:26356988

  17. Dynamic expression of transcription factor Brn3b during mouse cranial nerve development.

    PubMed

    Sajgo, Szilard; Ali, Seid; Popescu, Octavian; Badea, Tudor Constantin

    2016-04-01

    During development, transcription factor combinatorial codes define a large variety of morphologically and physiologically distinct neurons. Such a combinatorial code has been proposed for the differentiation of projection neurons of the somatic and visceral components of cranial nerves. It is possible that individual neuronal cell types are not specified by unique transcription factors but rather emerge through the intersection of their expression domains. Brn3a, Brn3b, and Brn3c, in combination with each other and/or transcription factors of other families, can define subgroups of retinal ganglion cells (RGC), spiral and vestibular ganglia, inner ear and vestibular hair cell neurons in the vestibuloacoustic system, and groups of somatosensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglia. The present study investigates the expression and potential role of the Brn3b transcription factor in cranial nerves and associated nuclei of the brainstem. We report the dynamic expression of Brn3b in the somatosensory component of cranial nerves II, V, VII, and VIII and visceromotor nuclei of nerves VII, IX, and X as well as other brainstem nuclei during different stages of development into adult stage. We find that genetically identified Brn3b(KO) RGC axons show correct but delayed pathfinding during the early stages of embryonic development. However, loss of Brn3b does not affect the anatomy of the other cranial nerves normally expressing this transcription factor. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Pravastatin induces placental growth factor (PGF) and ameliorates preeclampsia in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Kumasawa, Keiichi; Ikawa, Masahito; Kidoya, Hiroyasu; Hasuwa, Hidetoshi; Saito-Fujita, Tomoko; Morioka, Yuka; Takakura, Nobuyuki; Kimura, Tadashi; Okabe, Masaru

    2011-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a relatively common pregnancy-related disorder. Both maternal and fetal lives will be endangered if it proceeds unabated. Recently, the placenta-derived anti-angiogenic factors, such as soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFLT1) and soluble endoglin (sENG), have attracted attention in the progression of preeclampsia. Here, we established a unique experimental model to test the role of sFLT1 in preeclampsia using a lentiviral vector-mediated placenta-specific expression system. The model mice showed hypertension and proteinuria during pregnancy, and the symptoms regressed after parturition. Intrauterine growth restriction was also observed. We further showed that pravastatin induced the VEGF-like angiogenic factor placental growth factor (PGF) and ameliorated the symptoms. We conclude that our experimental preeclamptic murine model phenocopies the human case, and the model identifies low-dose statins and PGF as candidates for preeclampsia treatment. PMID:21187414

  19. Cortical Granule Exocytosis Is Mediated by Alpha-SNAP and N-Ethilmaleimide Sensitive Factor in Mouse Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    de Paola, Matilde; Bello, Oscar Daniel; Michaut, Marcela Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    Cortical granule exocytosis (CGE), also known as cortical reaction, is a calcium- regulated secretion that represents a membrane fusion process during meiotic cell division of oocytes. The molecular mechanism of membrane fusion during CGE is still poorly understood and is thought to be mediated by the SNARE pathway; nevertheless, it is unkown if SNAP (acronym for soluble NSF attachment protein) and NSF (acronym for N-ethilmaleimide sensitive factor), two key proteins in the SNARE pathway, mediate CGE in any oocyte model. In this paper, we documented the gene expression of α-SNAP, γ-SNAP and NSF in mouse oocytes. Western blot analysis showed that the expression of these proteins maintains a similar level during oocyte maturation and early activation. Their localization was mainly observed at the cortical region of metaphase II oocytes, which is enriched in cortical granules. To evaluate the function of these proteins in CGE we set up a functional assay based on the quantification of cortical granules metaphase II oocytes activated parthenogenetically with strontium. Endogenous α-SNAP and NSF proteins were perturbed by microinjection of recombinant proteins or antibodies prior to CGE activation. The microinjection of wild type α-SNAP and the negative mutant of α-SNAP L294A in metaphase II oocytes inhibited CGE stimulated by strontium. NEM, an irreversibly inhibitor of NSF, and the microinjection of the negative mutant NSF D1EQ inhibited cortical reaction. The microinjection of anti-α-SNAP and anti-NSF antibodies was able to abolish CGE in activated metaphase II oocytes. The microinjection of anti-γ SNAP antibody had no effect on CGE. Our findings indicate, for the first time in any oocyte model, that α-SNAP, γ-SNAP, and NSF are expressed in mouse oocytes. We demonstrate that α-SNAP and NSF have an active role in CGE and propose a working model. PMID:26267363

  20. A Novel mouse model of enhanced proteostasis: Full-length human heat shock factor 1 transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Anson; Wei, Rochelle; Halade, Dipti; Yoo, Si-Eun; Ran, Qitao; Richardson, Arlan

    2010-11-05

    Research highlights: {yields} Development of mouse overexpressing native human HSF1 in all tissues including CNS. {yields} HSF1 overexpression enhances heat shock response at whole-animal and cellular level. {yields} HSF1 overexpression protects from polyglutamine toxicity and favors aggresomes. {yields} HSF1 overexpression enhances proteostasis at the whole-animal and cellular level. -- Abstract: The heat shock response (HSR) is controlled by the master transcriptional regulator heat shock factor 1 (HSF1). HSF1 maintains proteostasis and resistance to stress through production of heat shock proteins (HSPs). No transgenic model exists that overexpresses HSF1 in tissues of the central nervous system (CNS). We generated a transgenic mouse overexpressing full-length non-mutant HSF1 and observed a 2-4-fold increase in HSF1 mRNA and protein expression in all tissues studied of HSF1 transgenic (HSF1{sup +/0}) mice compared to wild type (WT) littermates, including several regions of the CNS. Basal expression of HSP70 and 90 showed only mild tissue-specific changes; however, in response to forced exercise, the skeletal muscle HSR was more elevated in HSF1{sup +/0} mice compared to WT littermates and in fibroblasts following heat shock, as indicated by levels of inducible HSP70 mRNA and protein. HSF1{sup +/0} cells elicited a significantly more robust HSR in response to expression of the 82 repeat polyglutamine-YFP fusion construct (Q82YFP) and maintained proteasome-dependent processing of Q82YFP compared to WT fibroblasts. Overexpression of HSF1 was associated with fewer, but larger Q82YFP aggregates resembling aggresomes in HSF1{sup +/0} cells, and increased viability. Therefore, our data demonstrate that tissues and cells from mice overexpressing full-length non-mutant HSF1 exhibit enhanced proteostasis.

  1. Expression of macrophage migration inhibitory factor in the mouse neocortex and posterior piriform cortices during postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Li, Lingling; Wang, Jiutao; An, Lei; Hu, Xinde; Xie, Jiongfang; Yan, Runchuan; Chen, Shulin; Zhao, Shanting

    2014-11-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) functions as a pleiotropic protein, participating in a vast array of cellular and biological processes. Abnormal expression of MIF has been implicated in many neurological diseases, including Parkinson's disease, epilepsy, Alzheimer's Disease, stroke, and neuropathic pain. However, the expression patterns of mif transcript and MIF protein from the early postnatal period through adulthood in the mouse brain are still poorly understood. We therefore investigated the temporal and spatial expression of MIF in the mouse neocortex during postnatal development in detail and partially in posterior piriform cortices (pPC). As determined by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), mif transcript gradually increased during development, with the highest level noted at postnatal day 30 (P30) followed by a sharp decline at P75. In contrast, Western blotting results showed that MIF increased constantly from P7 to P75. The highest level of MIF was at P75, while the lowest level of MIF was at P7. Immunofluorescence histochemistry revealed that MIF-immunoreactive (ir) cells were within the entire depth of the developed neocortex, and MIF was heterogeneously distributed among cortical cells, especially at P7, P14, P30, and P75; MIF was abundant in the pyramidal layer within pPC. Double immunostaining showed that all the mature neurons were MIF-ir and all the intensely stained MIF-ir cells were parvalbumin positive (Pv +) at adult. Moreover, it was demonstrated that MIF protein localized in the perikaryon, processes, presynaptic structures, and the nucleus in neurons. Taken together, the developmentally regulated expression and the subcellular localization of MIF should form a platform for an analysis of MIF neurodevelopmental biology and MIF-related nerve diseases.

  2. The role of hypoxia inducible factor 1alpha in cobalt chloride induced cell death in mouse embryonic fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Vengellur, A; LaPres, J J

    2004-12-01

    Cobalt has been widely used in the treatment of anemia and as a hypoxia mimic in cell culture and it is known to activate hypoxic signaling by stabilizing the hypoxia inducible transcription factor 1alpha (HIF1alpha). However, cobalt exposure can lead to tissue and cellular toxicity. These studies were conducted to determine the role of HIF1alpha in mediating cobalt-induced toxicity. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) that were null for the HIF1alpha protein were used to show that HIF1alpha protein plays a major role in mediating cobalt-induced cytotoxicity. Previous work from our lab and others has shown that two BH3 domain containing cell death genes, BNip3 and NIX, are targets of hypoxia signaling. These experiments document that BNip3 and NIX expression is HIF1alpha-dependent, and cobalt induces their expression in a time and dose dependent manner. In addition, their expression is correlated with an increase in BNIP3 and NIX protein. Characteristically, the elevated level of BNIP3 was correlated with an increased presence of chromatin condensation, one marker for cell injury. Interestingly, this increased chromosomal condensation was not coupled to caspase-3 activation as usually seen in a typical apoptotic response. These results show that HIF1alpha is playing a major role in mediating cobalt-induced toxicity in mouse embryonic fibroblasts and may offer a possible mechanism for the underlying pathology of injuries seen in workers exposed to environmental contaminants that can influence the hypoxia signaling system, such as cobalt.

  3. Cortical Granule Exocytosis Is Mediated by Alpha-SNAP and N-Ethilmaleimide Sensitive Factor in Mouse Oocytes.

    PubMed

    de Paola, Matilde; Bello, Oscar Daniel; Michaut, Marcela Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    Cortical granule exocytosis (CGE), also known as cortical reaction, is a calcium- regulated secretion that represents a membrane fusion process during meiotic cell division of oocytes. The molecular mechanism of membrane fusion during CGE is still poorly understood and is thought to be mediated by the SNARE pathway; nevertheless, it is unkown if SNAP (acronym for soluble NSF attachment protein) and NSF (acronym for N-ethilmaleimide sensitive factor), two key proteins in the SNARE pathway, mediate CGE in any oocyte model. In this paper, we documented the gene expression of α-SNAP, γ-SNAP and NSF in mouse oocytes. Western blot analysis showed that the expression of these proteins maintains a similar level during oocyte maturation and early activation. Their localization was mainly observed at the cortical region of metaphase II oocytes, which is enriched in cortical granules. To evaluate the function of these proteins in CGE we set up a functional assay based on the quantification of cortical granules metaphase II oocytes activated parthenogenetically with strontium. Endogenous α-SNAP and NSF proteins were perturbed by microinjection of recombinant proteins or antibodies prior to CGE activation. The microinjection of wild type α-SNAP and the negative mutant of α-SNAP L294A in metaphase II oocytes inhibited CGE stimulated by strontium. NEM, an irreversibly inhibitor of NSF, and the microinjection of the negative mutant NSF D1EQ inhibited cortical reaction. The microinjection of anti-α-SNAP and anti-NSF antibodies was able to abolish CGE in activated metaphase II oocytes. The microinjection of anti-γ SNAP antibody had no effect on CGE. Our findings indicate, for the first time in any oocyte model, that α-SNAP, γ-SNAP, and NSF are expressed in mouse oocytes. We demonstrate that α-SNAP and NSF have an active role in CGE and propose a working model.

  4. Role of putative virulence factors of Streptococcus pyogenes in mouse models of long-term throat colonization and pneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Husmann, L K; Yung, D L; Hollingshead, S K; Scott, J R

    1997-01-01

    To investigate the role of putative virulence factors of Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus; GAS) in causing disease, we introduced specific mutations in GAS strain B514, a natural mouse pathogen, and tested the mutant strains in two models of infection. To study late stages of disease, we used our previously described mouse model (C3HeB/FeJ mice) in which pneumonia and systemic spread of the streptococcus follow intratracheal inoculation. To study the early stages of disease, we report here a model of long-term (at least 21 days) throat colonization following intranasal inoculation of C57BL/10SnJ mice. When the three emm family genes of GAS strain B514-Sm were deleted, the mutant showed no significant difference from the wild type in induction of long-term throat colonization or pneumonia. We inactivated the scpA gene, which encodes a complement C5a peptidase, by insertion of a nonreplicative plasmid and found no significant difference from the wild type in the incidence of throat colonization. However, there was a small but statistically significant decrease in the incidence of pneumonia caused by the scpA mutant. Finally, we demonstrated a very important effect of the hyaluronic acid capsule in both models. Following intranasal inoculation of mice with a mutant in which a nonreplicative plasmid was inserted into the hasA gene, which encodes hyaluronate synthase, we found that all bacteria recovered from the throats of the mice were encapsulated revertants. Following intratracheal inoculation with the hasA mutant, the incidence of pneumonia within 72 h was significantly reduced from that of the control strain (P = 0.006). These results indicate that the hyaluronic acid capsule of S. pyogenes B514 confers an important selective advantage for survival of the bacteria in the upper respiratory tract and is also an important determinant in induction of pneumonia in our model system. PMID:9119483

  5. Expression of corticotropin-releasing factor and urocortins in the normal and Schistosoma mansoni-infected mouse ileum.

    PubMed

    Buckinx, Roeland; Bagyanszki, Maria; Avula, Leela Rani; Adriaensen, Dirk; Van Nassauw, Luc; Timmermans, Jean-Pierre

    2015-02-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and urocortins (UCNs) are important ligands in the CRF signaling pathways, which are most known for their role in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal stress axis. However, peripheral CRF signaling also has profound effects on gastrointestinal functions. Although the murine animal model is highly relevant for the exploration of this complexly balanced pathway via genetic manipulation, little is known about the expression of CRF and UCNs in the mouse intestine. This study aims to investigate the cellular localization of CRF and UCNs in the ileum and to explore whether and how this cellular expression is altered in conditions of intestinal Schistosoma mansoni-induced inflammation. The results show a distinct expression pattern for the different CRF receptor ligands in the ileum. CRF was located in nerve fibers and stromal cells. All UCNs were expressed in polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Furthermore, UCN2 and UCN3 were found in the musculature. During acute schistosomiasis, UCN1 showed an increased immunoreactivity in blood vessels and UCN3 was de novo expressed mainly in submucous neurons. Typical features of S. mansoni-inflamed ileum, such as nerve fiber sprouting, muscle layer thickening and granuloma formation thus all have an impact on the CRF signaling pathways. In conclusion, we outline for the first time the expression of CRF signaling ligands in the mouse ileum; our results point to important changes of this signaling system in S. mansoni-induced intestinal inflammation, which warrants further functional investigation with specific focus on CRF2, given the exclusive binding of UCN2 and UCN3 to this receptor.

  6. Perfluorocarboxylic acids induce cytochrome P450 enzymes in mouse liver through activation of PPAR-alpha and CAR transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xingguo; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2008-11-01

    Cytochrome p450 enzymes (Cyps) are major phase-I xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes. Cyps are regulated by many environmental chemicals and drugs. However, knowledge about regulation of Cyps by perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs), which are persistent in the environment, is limited. Two days after a single i.p. administration (50 mg/kg) of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA) increased mRNA expression of Cyp2B10 (20-fold), 3A11 (two-fold), and 4A14 (32-fold), but not Cyp1A1/2 in mouse livers. PFDA and PFOA also markedly increased protein expression of Cyp2B (50-fold) and 4A (10-fold). PFDA increased Cyp4A14 mRNA expression at relatively low doses (0.5 mg/kg), but increased Cyp2B10 mRNA expression only at high doses (> 20 mg/kg). By using constitutive androstane receptor (CAR)-, pregnane-X receptor (PXR)-, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR)-alpha-, and farnesoid X receptor-null mouse models, PPAR-alpha and CAR were shown to play central roles in the induction of Cyps by PFDA. Specifically, PFDA increased Cyp4A14 mRNA expression in wild-type (WT) mice, but much less in PPAR-alpha-null mice. PFDA increased Cyp2B10 mRNA expression in WT mice, but not in CAR-null mice. In addition, PFDA increased mRNA expression and nuclear translocation of the transcription factor CAR. Therefore, the current studies provide important insight into understanding the regulatory mechanisms initiated by PFCAs, and may help to better predict and understand the toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics of various PFCAs. In conclusion, PFCAs increased Cyp2B10 and 4A14 expression by activating PPAR-alpha and CAR nuclear receptors, respectively. PPAR-alpha is activated at much lower doses of PFDA than CAR.

  7. Protease Omi facilitates neurite outgrowth in mouse neuroblastoma N2a cells by cleaving transcription factor E2F1

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qi; Hu, Qing-song; Xu, Ran-jie; Zhen, Xue-chu; Wang, Guang-hui

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Omi is an ATP-independent serine protease that is necessary for neuronal function and survival. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of protease Omi in regulating differentiation of mouse neuroblastoma cells and to identify the substrate of Omi involved in this process. Methods: Mouse neuroblastoma N2a cells and Omi protease-deficient mnd2 mice were used in this study. To modulate Omi and E2F1 expression, N2a cells were transfected with expression plasmids, shRNA plasmids or siRNA. Protein levels were detected using immunoblot assays. The interaction between Omi and E2F1 was studied using immunoprecipitation, GST pulldown and in vitro cleavage assays. N2a cells were treated with 20 μmol/L retinoic acid (RA) and 1% fetal bovine serum to induce neurite outgrowth, which was measured using Image J software. Results: E2F1 was significantly increased in Omi knockdown cells and in brain lysates of mnd2 mice, and was decreased in cells overexpressing wild-type Omi, but not inactive Omi S276C. In brain lysates of mnd2 mice, endogenous E2F1 was co-immunoprecipitated with endogenous Omi. In vitro cleavage assay demonstrated that Omi directly cleaved E2F1. Treatment of N2a cells with RA induced marked differentiation and neurite outgrowth accompanied by significantly increased Omi and decreased E2F1 levels, which were suppressed by pretreatment with the specific Omi inhibitor UCF-101. Knockdown of Omi in N2a cells suppressed RA-induced neurite outgrowth, which was partially restored by knockdown of E2F1. Conclusion: Protease Omi facilitates neurite outgrowth by cleaving the transcription factor E2F1 in differentiated neuroblastoma cells; E2F1 is a substrate of Omi. PMID:26238290

  8. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor is a survival factor for isolectin B4-positive, but not vanilloid receptor 1-positive, neurons in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Zwick, Melissa; Davis, Brian M; Woodbury, C Jeffrey; Burkett, John N; Koerber, H Richard; Simpson, James F; Albers, Kathryn M

    2002-05-15

    Most, if not all, nociceptor sensory neurons are dependent on nerve growth factor (NGF) during early embryonic development. A large subpopulation of these sensory neurons loses NGF dependency between embryonic day 16 and postnatal day 14 and become responsive to glial cell line-derived growth factor (GDNF), a member of the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) family. To examine the survival and phenotypic effects of GDNF on sensory neurons in vivo, we generated transgenic mice that overexpress GDNF in the skin. GDNF-overexpresser mice had increased numbers of small unmyelinated sensory neurons that express the tyrosine kinase receptor Ret and bind the plant isolectin B4 (IB4). Surprisingly, in wild-type and transgenic mice, few ( approximately 2%) IB4-positive neurons expressed the vanilloid receptor VR1, a heat-sensitive receptor expressed by many IB4-positive neurons of the rat. Thus, in mouse, GDNF-dependent IB4-positive neurons must use a non-VR1 heat receptor. In addition, the behavior of GDNF-overexpresser animals to noxious heat or mechanical stimuli was indistinguishable from wild-type animals, indicating that, on a behavioral level, peripherally applied GDNF does not alter the sensitivity of the somatosensory system.

  9. RE1 silencing transcription factor/neuron-restrictive silencing factor regulates expansion of adult mouse subventricular zone-derived neural stem/progenitor cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Soldati, Chiara; Caramanica, Pasquale; Burney, Matthew J; Toselli, Camilla; Bithell, Angela; Augusti-Tocco, Gabriella; Stanton, Lawrence W; Biagioni, Stefano; Buckley, Noel J; Cacci, Emanuele

    2015-08-01

    Adult neural stem cell (aNSC) activity is tuned by external stimuli through the recruitment of transcription factors. This study examines the RE1 silencing transcription factor (REST) in neural stem/progenitor cells isolated from the subventricular zone of adult mouse brain and provides the first extensive characterization of REST-mediated control of the cellular and molecular properties. This study shows that REST knockdown affects the capacity of progenitor cells to generate neurospheres, reduces cell proliferation, and triggers cell differentiation despite the presence of growth factors. Genome- and transcriptome-wide analyses show that REST binding sites are significantly enriched in genes associated with synaptic transmission and nervous system development and function. Seeking candidate regulators of aNSC function, this study identifies a member of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) family, BMP6, the mRNA and protein of which increased after REST knockdown. The results of this study extend previous findings, demonstrating a reciprocal control of REST expression by BMPs. Administration of exogenous BMP6 inhibits aNSC proliferation and induces the expression of the astrocytic marker glial fibrillary acidic protein, highlighting its antimitogenic and prodifferentiative effects. This study suggests that BMP6 produced in a REST-regulated manner together with other signals can contribute to regulation of NSC maintenance and fate.

  10. Inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factors limits tumor progression in a mouse model of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Simon, M.Celeste

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) accumulate in both neoplastic and inflammatory cells within the tumor microenvironment and impact the progression of a variety of diseases, including colorectal cancer. Pharmacological HIF inhibition represents a novel therapeutic strategy for cancer treatment. We show here that acriflavine (ACF), a naturally occurring compound known to repress HIF transcriptional activity, halts the progression of an autochthonous model of established colitis-associated colon cancer (CAC) in immunocompetent mice. ACF treatment resulted in decreased tumor number, size and advancement (based on histopathological scoring) of CAC. Moreover, ACF treatment corresponded with decreased macrophage infiltration and vascularity in colorectal tumors. Importantly, ACF treatment inhibited the hypoxic induction of M-CSFR, as well as the expression of the angiogenic factor (vascular endothelial growth factor), a canonical HIF target, with little to no impact on the Nuclear factor-kappa B pathway in bone marrow-derived macrophages. These effects probably explain the observed in vivo phenotypes. Finally, an allograft tumor model further confirmed that ACF treatment inhibits tumor growth through HIF-dependent mechanisms. These results suggest pharmacological HIF inhibition in multiple cell types, including epithelial and innate immune cells, significantly limits tumor growth and progression. PMID:24408928

  11. Transient and stable transfections of mouse myoblasts with genes coding for pro-angiogenic factors.

    PubMed

    Bialas, M; Krupka, M; Janeczek, A; Rozwadowska, N; Fraczek, M; Kotlinowski, J; Kucharzewska, P; Lackowska, B; Kurpisz, M

    2011-04-01

    Cardiomyocyte loss in the ischaemic heart can be the reason of many complications, eventually being even the cause of patient's death. Despite many promises, cell therapy with the use of skeletal muscle stem cells (SMSC) still remains to be modified and improved. Combined cell and gene therapy seems to be a promising strategy to heal damaged myocardium. In the present study we have investigated the influence of a simultaneous overexpression of two potent pro-angiogenic genes encoding the fibroblast growth factor-4 (FGF-4) and the vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) on a myogenic murine C2C12 cell line. We have demonstrated in in vitro conditions that myoblasts which overexpressed these factors exhibited significant changes in the cell cycle and pro-angiogenic potential with only slight differences in the expression of the myogenic genes. There was not observed the influence of transient or stable overexpression of FGF-4 and VEGF on cell apoptosis/necrosis in standard or oxidative stress conditions comparing to non transfected controls. Overall, our results suggest that the possible transplantation of myoblasts overexpressing pro-angiogenic factors may potentially improve the functionality of the injured myocardium although the definite proof must originate from in situ conducted pre-clinical studies.

  12. Dynamic expression of neurotrophic factor receptors in postnatal spinal motoneurons and in mouse model of ALS.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiasheng; Huang, Eric J

    2006-07-01

    Neurotrophic factors support the survival of spinal motoneurons (MNs) and have been considered as strong candidates for treating motoneuron diseases. However, it is unclear if the right combination of neurotrophic factor receptors is present in postnatal spinal MNs. In this study, we show that the level of c-ret expression remains relatively stable in embryonic and postnatal spinal MNs. In contrast, the mRNA and protein of GFRalpha1 and -2 are progressively down-regulated in postnatal life. By 3 and 6 months of age, both receptors are barely detectable in spinal MNs. The down-regulation of GFRalpha1 appears accelerated in transgenic mice expressing mutant SOD1(G93A). Despite the progressive loss of GFRalpha1 and -2, phosphorylation of c-ret shows no detectable reduction on tyrosine residues or on serine 696. In addition to the GFRalpha subunits, expression of TrkB also shows a dynamic change. During embryogenesis, there is twice as much full-length TrkB as the truncated TrkB isoform. However, this ratio is reversed in postnatal spinal cord. Expression of the mutant SOD1(G93A) appears to have no effect on the TrkB receptor ratio. Taken together, our data indicate that the expression of neurotrophic factor receptors, GFRalpha1, -2, and TrkB, is not static, but undergoes dynamic changes in postnatal spinal MNs. These results provide insights into the use of neurotrophic factors as therapeutic agents for ALS.

  13. Fasting induced up-regulation of activating transcription factor 5 in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Yusuke I; Morita, Momoko; Ohmi, Asako; Aoyagi, Shun; Ebihara, Hitomi; Tonaki, Daijuro; Horino, Yoko; Iijima, Mika; Hirose, Hidenori; Takahashi, Shigeru; Takahashi, Yuji

    2009-06-19

    Food deprivation (fasting) is commonly encountered in the lives of animals and humans. In mammals, adaptive responses predominantly include the induction of hepatic gluconeogenesis, but the regulatory mechanisms remain unclear. Atf5 (activating transcription factor 5) is a transcription factor of the ATF/cAMP response element-binding protein family and is expressed abundantly in human liver. Atf5 has been associated with stress responses, cell differentiation, proliferation, and survival. However, its role in the liver response to in vivo food deprivation has not yet been investigated. Adult mice were food-deprived for 48 h and the expression of two Atf5 mRNA subtypes (Atf5-R1 and Atf-R2) and gluconeogenic factors was investigated. Using in vitro cell culture, Pgc-1alpha (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1alpha) promoter activities after ectopic expression of Atf5 and Cebpg (CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein gamma) proteins were measured. The Atf5-R1 transcript was found to be abundant in liver and other energy metabolism-related organs; Atf5-R2 was prominent in the testis. Fasting resulted in elevation of the expression of both Atf5-R1 and R2 in the liver. Interestingly, up-regulation of Atf5 was accompanied by increased expression of Cebpg and Pgc-1alpha. In human hepatoma cells (HepG2), but not in human cervical carcinoma cells (HeLa), forced expression of Atf5 and Cebpg cooperatively stimulated Pgc-1alpha promoter activity, suggesting that hepatic Pgc-1alpha could be induced by Atf5 and Cebpg in cooperation with other hepatic factors. Hepatic Atf5 might be potentially involved in the induction of gluconeogenetic factors during in vivo fasting stress.

  14. Music exposure differentially alters the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and nerve growth factor in the mouse hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Angelucci, Francesco; Ricci, Enzo; Padua, Luca; Sabino, Andrea; Tonali, Pietro Attilio

    2007-12-18

    It has been reported that music may have physiological effects on blood pressure, cardiac heartbeat, respiration, and improve mood state in people affected by anxiety, depression and other psychiatric disorders. However, the physiological bases of these phenomena are not clear. Hypothalamus is a brain region involved in the regulation of body homeostasis and in the pathophysiology of anxiety and depression through the modulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Hypothalamic functions are also influenced by the presence of the neurotrophins brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF), which are proteins involved in the growth, survival and function of neurons in the central nervous system. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of music exposure in mice on hypothalamic levels of BDNF and NGF. We exposed young adult mice to slow rhythm music (6h per day; mild sound pressure levels, between 50 and 60 dB) for 21 consecutive days. At the end of the treatment mice were sacrificed and BDNF and NGF levels in the hypothalamus were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We found that music exposure significantly enhanced BDNF levels in the hypothalamus. Furthermore, we observed that music-exposed mice had decreased NGF hypothalamic levels. Our results demonstrate that exposure to music in mice can influence neurotrophin production in the hypothalamus. Our findings also suggest that physiological effects of music might be in part mediated by modulation of neurotrophins.

  15. Heparin-Binding Epidermal Growth Factor-Like Growth Factor Enhances Aquaporin 3 Expression and Function During Mouse Embryo Implantation.

    PubMed

    Fang, Chuan-Xiang; Nong, Ying-Qi; Liu, Feng-Hua; Fan, Lin; Chen, Ye

    2017-03-01

    Aquaporin 3 (AQP3) is highly expressed in peri-implantation blastocyst trophoblastic cells, indicating its role in cytotrophoblast invasion during embryo implantation. However, the mechanism underlying the regulation of AQP3 expression during embryo implantation remains unclear. In this study, an in vitro co-culture system of blastocysts on a monolayer of uterine endometrial cells was used to mimic in vivo process of embryo attachment and invasion to uterine endometrium and treated with different concentrations of heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF). The results showed that HB-EGF enhanced AQP3 expression in blastocysts in a dose-dependent manner and promoted the attachment and outgrowth of blastocysts on the monolayer of uterine endometrial cells. When the AQP3 activity was inhibited by copper sulfate, both the attachment and outgrowth of blastocysts were inhibited. Furthermore, HB-EGF induced the phosphorylation of EGF receptor (EGFR) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). PD153035 (EGFR inhibitor) and U0126 (ERK inhibitor) inhibited AQP3 expression and also the attachment and outgrowth of blastocysts. Collectively, our findings provide the first evidence that HB-EGF stimulates EGFR/ERK signaling to promote AQP3 expression in trophoblastic cells, and AQP3 plays a vital role in HB-EGF-induced embryo implantation.

  16. Hind Limb Unloading Model Alters Nuclear Factor kappa B and Activator Protein-1 Signaling in Mouse Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, Govindarajan; Vani, Vani; Renard, Renard; Vera, Vera; Wilosn, Wilosn; Ramesh, Govindarajan

    Microgravity induces inflammatory response and also modulates immune functions, which may increase oxidative stress. Exposure to the microgravity environment induces adverse neurological effects. However, there is little research exploring the etiology of neurological effects of exposure to this environment. To explore this area we evaluated changes in Nuclear Factor kappa B, Activator Protein 1, MAPP kinase and N terminal c-Jun kinase in mouse brain exposed to a simulated microgravity environment using the hindlimb unloading model. BALB/c male mice were randomly assigned to hindlimb unloading group (n=12) and control group (n=12) to simulate a microgravity environment, for 7 days. Changes observed in NF-κB, AP- 1 DNA binding, MAPKK and N terminal c-Jun kinase were measured using electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and western blot analysis and compared to unexposed brain regions. Hindlimb unloading exposed mice showed significant increases in generated NF-κB, AP-1, MAPKK and Kinase in all regions of the brain exposed to hindlimb unloading as compared to the control brain regions. Results suggest that exposure to simulated microgravity can induce expression of certain transcription factors and protein kinases. This work was supported by funding from NASA NCC 9-165. 504b030414000600080000002100828abc13fa0000001c020000130000005b436f6e74656e745f54797065735d2e78

  17. The guanine nucleotide exchange factor Vav3 regulates differentiation of progenitor cells in the developing mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Luft, Veronika; Reinhard, Jacqueline; Shibuya, Masabumi; Fischer, Klaus D; Faissner, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    The seven main cell types in the mammalian retina arise from multipotent retinal progenitor cells, a process that is tightly regulated by intrinsic and extrinsic signals. However, the molecular mechanisms that control proliferation, differentiation and cell-fate decisions of retinal progenitor cells are not fully understood yet. Here, we report that the guanine nucleotide exchange factor Vav3, a regulator of Rho-GTPases, is involved in retinal development. We demonstrate that Vav3 is expressed in the mouse retina during the embryonic period. In order to study the role of Vav3 in the developing retina, we generate Vav3-deficient mice. The loss of Vav3 results in an accelerated differentiation of retinal ganglion cells and cone photoreceptors during early and late embryonic development. We provide evidence that more retinal progenitor cells express the late progenitor marker Sox9 in Vav3-deficient mice than in wild-types. This premature differentiation is compensated during the postnatal period and late-born cell types such as bipolar cells and Müller glia display normal numbers. Taken together, our data imply that Vav3 is a regulator of retinal progenitor cell differentiation, thus highlighting a novel role for guanine nucleotide exchange factors in retinogenesis.

  18. Regulation by vascular endothelial growth factor of human colon cancer tumorigenesis in a mouse model of experimental liver metastasis.

    PubMed Central

    Warren, R S; Yuan, H; Matli, M R; Gillett, N A; Ferrara, N

    1995-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between angiogenesis and hepatic tumorigenesis, we examined the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in 8 human colon carcinoma cell lines and in 30 human colorectal cancer liver metastases. Abundant message for VEGF was found in all tumors, localized to the malignant cells within each neoplasm. Two receptors for VEGF, KDR and flt1, were also demonstrated in most of the tumors examined. KDR and flt1 mRNA were limited to tumor endothelial cells and were more strongly expressed in the hepatic metastases than in the sinusoidal endothelium of the surrounding liver parenchyma. VEGF monoclonal antibody administration in tumor-bearing athymic mice led to a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of growth of subcutaneous xenografts and to a marked reduction in the number and size of experimental liver metastases. In hepatic metastases of VEGF antibody-treated mice, neither blood vessels nor expression of the mouse KDR homologue flk-1 could be demonstrated. These data indicate that VEGF is a commonly expressed angiogenic factor in human colorectal cancer metastases, that VEGF receptors are up-regulated as a concomitant of hepatic tumorigenesis, and that modulation of VEGF gene expression or activity may represent a potentially effective antineoplastic therapy in colorectal cancer. Images PMID:7535799

  19. Protein Delivery of an Artificial Transcription Factor Restores Widespread Ube3a Expression in an Angelman Syndrome Mouse Brain.

    PubMed

    Bailus, Barbara J; Pyles, Benjamin; McAlister, Michelle M; O'Geen, Henriette; Lockwood, Sarah H; Adams, Alexa N; Nguyen, Jennifer Trang T; Yu, Abigail; Berman, Robert F; Segal, David J

    2016-03-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurological genetic disorder caused by loss of expression of the maternal copy of UBE3A in the brain. Due to brain-specific genetic imprinting at this locus, the paternal UBE3A is silenced by a long antisense transcript. Inhibition of the antisense transcript could lead to unsilencing of paternal UBE3A, thus providing a therapeutic approach for AS. However, widespread delivery of gene regulators to the brain remains challenging. Here, we report an engineered zinc finger-based artificial transcription factor (ATF) that, when injected i.p. or s.c., crossed the blood-brain barrier and increased Ube3a expression in the brain of an adult mouse model of AS. The factor displayed widespread distribution throughout the brain. Immunohistochemistry of both the hippocampus and cerebellum revealed an increase in Ube3a upon treatment. An ATF containing an alternative DNA-binding domain did not activate Ube3a. We believe this to be the first report of an injectable engineered zinc finger protein that can cause widespread activation of an endogenous gene in the brain. These observations have important implications for the study and treatment of AS and other neurological disorders.

  20. An Ancient Transcription Factor Initiates the Burst of piRNA Production During Early Meiosis in Mouse Testes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin Zhiguo; Roy, Christian K.; Dong, Xianjun; Bolcun-Filas, Ewelina; Wang, Jie; Han, Bo W.; Xu, Jia; Moore, Melissa J.; Schimenti, John C.; Weng, Zhiping; Zamore, Phillip D.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Animal germ cells produce PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs), small silencing RNAs that suppress transposons and enable gamete maturation. Mammalian transposon-silencing piRNAs accumulate early in spermatogenesis, whereas pachytene piRNAs are produced later during post-natal spermatogenesis and account for >95% of all piRNAs in the adult mouse testis. Mutants defective for pachytene piRNA pathway proteins fail to produce mature sperm, but neither the piRNA precursor transcripts nor the trigger for pachytene piRNA production is known. Here, we show that the transcription factor A-MYB initiates pachytene piRNA production. A-MYB drives transcription of both pachytene piRNA precursor RNAs and the mRNAs for core piRNA biogenesis factors, including MIWI, the protein through which pachytene piRNAs function. A-MYB regulation of piRNA pathway proteins and piRNA genes creates a coherent feed-forward loop that ensures the robust accumulation of pachytene piRNAs. This regulatory circuit, which can be detected in rooster testes, likely predates the divergence of birds and mammals. PMID:23523368

  1. Persistent expression of human clotting factor IX from mouse liver after intravenous injection of adeno-associated virus vectors

    PubMed Central

    Koeberl, Dwight D.; Alexander, Ian E.; Halbert, Christine L.; Russell, David W.; Miller, A. Dusty

    1997-01-01

    We previously found that gene transduction by adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors in cell culture can be stimulated over 100-fold by treatment of the target cells with agents that affect DNA metabolism, such as irradiation or topoisomerase inhibitors. Here we show that previous γ-irradiation increased the transduction rate in mouse liver by up to 900-fold, and the topoisomerase inhibitor etoposide increased transduction by about 20-fold. Similar rates of hepatic transduction were obtained by direct injection of the liver or by systemic delivery via tail vein injection. Hepatocytes were much more efficiently transduced than other cells after systemic delivery, and up to 3% of all hepatocytes could be transduced after one vector injection. The presence of wild-type AAV, which contaminates many AAV vector preparations, was required to observe a full response to γ-irradiation. Injection of mice with AAV vectors encoding human clotting factor IX after γ-irradiation resulted in synthesis of low levels of human clotting factor IX for the 5-month period of observation. These studies show the potential of targeted gene transduction of the liver by AAV vectors for treatment of various hematological or metabolic diseases. PMID:9037069

  2. The Candida albicans Pho4 Transcription Factor Mediates Susceptibility to Stress and Influences Fitness in a Mouse Commensalism Model

    PubMed Central

    Urrialde, Verónica; Prieto, Daniel; Pla, Jesús; Alonso-Monge, Rebeca

    2016-01-01

    The Pho4 transcription factor is required for growth under low environmental phosphate concentrations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A characterization of Candida albicans pho4 mutants revealed that these cells are more susceptible to both osmotic and oxidative stress and that this effect is diminished in the presence of 5% CO2 or anaerobiosis, reflecting the relevance of oxygen metabolism in the Pho4-mediated response. A pho4 mutant was as virulent as wild type strain when assayed in the Galleria mellonella infection model and was even more resistant to murine macrophages in ex vivo killing assays. The lack of Pho4 neither impairs the ability to colonize the murine gut nor alters the localization in the gastrointestinal tract. However, we found that Pho4 influenced the colonization of C. albicans in the mouse gut in competition assays; pho4 mutants were unable to attain high colonization levels when inoculated simultaneously with an isogenic wild type strain. Moreover, pho4 mutants displayed a reduced adherence to the intestinal mucosa in a competitive ex vivo assays with wild type cells. In vitro competitive assays also revealed defects in fitness for this mutant compared to the wild type strain. Thus, Pho4, a transcription factor involved in phosphate metabolism, is required for adaptation to stress and fitness in C. albicans. PMID:27458452

  3. Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I Increases Laminin, Integrin Subunits and Metalloprotease ADAM12 in Mouse Myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Grzelkowska-Kowalczyk, Katarzyna; Grabiec, Kamil; Tokarska, Justyna; Gajewska, Małgorzata; Błaszczyk, Maciej; Milewska, Marta

    2015-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is considered a part of the myogenesis signaling mechanism. we hypothesized that insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) modifies ECM during differentiation of mouse C2C12 cells. The myogenic effect of IGF-I (30 nmol/l) was manifested by increased myogenin and myosin heavy chain (MyHC) levels as well as fusion index (2.6 times over control) on the 3rd day of differentiation. IGF-I markedly augmented laminin, but not fibronectin. Cellular contents of integrin α3, α5 and β1 during 3-day differentiation increased in the presence of IGF-I. Treatment with IGF-I increased the expression of the long form of metalloprotease ADAM12 (100 kDa) in myocytes. In conclusion: i) IGF-I caused an increase of laminin, integrin α3 and β1 in C2C12 myogenic cells that can be secondary to stimulation of myogenesis; ii) IGF-I augmented integrin α5 and ADAM12 levels, suggesting a role of this growth factor in determination of the pool of reserve cells during myogenesis.

  4. Genes expressed in mouse cortical progenitors are enriched in Pax, Lhx, and Sox transcription factor putative binding sites.

    PubMed

    Bery, Amandine; Mérot, Yohann; Rétaux, Sylvie

    2016-02-15

    Considerable progress has been made in the understanding of molecular and cellular mechanisms controlling the development of the mammalian cortex. The proliferative and neurogenic properties of cortical progenitors located in the ventricular germinal zone start being understood. Little is known however on the cis-regulatory control that finely tunes gene expression in these progenitors. Here, we undertook an in silico-based approach to address this question, followed by some functional validation. Using the Eurexpress database, we established a list of 30 genes specifically expressed in the cortical germinal zone, we selected mouse/human conserved non-coding elements (CNEs) around these genes and we performed motif-enrichment search in these CNEs. We found an over-representation of motifs corresponding to binding sites for Pax, Sox, and Lhx transcription factors, often found as pairs and located within 100bp windows. A small subset of CNEs (n=7) was tested for enhancer activity, by ex-vivo and in utero electroporation assays. Two showed strong enhancer activity in the germinal zone progenitors. Mutagenesis experiments on a selected CNE showed the functional importance of the Pax, Sox, and Lhx TFBS for conferring enhancer activity to the CNE. Overall, from a cis-regulatory viewpoint, our data suggest an input from Pax, Sox and Lhx transcription factors to orchestrate corticogenesis. These results are discussed with regards to the known functional roles of Pax6, Sox2 and Lhx2 in cortical development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4 Alpha Is a Key Factor Related to Depression and Physiological Homeostasis in the Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Yamanishi, Kyosuke; Doe, Nobutaka; Sumida, Miho; Watanabe, Yuko; Yoshida, Momoko; Yamamoto, Hideyuki; Xu, Yunfeng; Li, Wen; Yamanishi, Hiromichi; Okamura, Haruki; Matsunaga, Hisato

    2015-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a common psychiatric disorder that involves marked disabilities in global functioning, anorexia, and severe medical comorbidities. MDD is associated with not only psychological and sociocultural problems, but also pervasive physical dysfunctions such as metabolic, neurobiological and immunological abnormalities. Nevertheless, the mechanisms underlying the interactions between these factors have yet to be determined in detail. The aim of the present study was to identify the molecular mechanisms responsible for the interactions between MDD and dysregulation of physiological homeostasis, including immunological function as well as lipid metabolism, coagulation, and hormonal activity in the brain. We generated depression-like behavior in mice using chronic mild stress (CMS) as a model of depression. We compared the gene expression profiles in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of CMS and control mice using microarrays. We subsequently categorized genes using two web-based bioinformatics applications: Ingenuity Pathway Analysis and The Database for Annotation, Visualization, and Integrated Discovery. We then confirmed significant group-differences by analyzing mRNA and protein expression levels not only in the PFC, but also in the thalamus and hippocampus. These web tools revealed that hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (Hnf4a) may exert direct effects on various genes specifically associated with amine synthesis, such as genes involved in serotonin metabolism and related immunological functions. Moreover, these genes may influence lipid metabolism, coagulation, and hormonal activity. We also confirmed the significant effects of Hnf4a on both mRNA and protein expression levels in the brain. These results suggest that Hnf4a may have a critical influence on physiological homeostasis under depressive states, and may be associated with the mechanisms responsible for the interactions between MDD and the dysregulation of physiological homeostasis

  6. The Influence of Stromal Transforming Growth Factor-Beta Receptor Signaling on Mouse Mammary Neoplasia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-01

    and -P3) are members of a family of peptide growth factors that include inhibins, bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs) and growth and differentiation...DNIIR) in the mammary epithelium and in stromal fibroblasts resulted in precocious lobuloalveolar development and increased lateral branching...necessary for proper ductal development during puberty . It has been suggested that TGF-P regulates pubertal mammary development through the epithelium and

  7. Absence of macrophage migration inhibitory factor reduces proliferative retinopathy in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Lin, Jihong; Kaiser, Ulrike; Wohlfart, Paulus; Hammes, Hans-Peter

    2017-04-01

    Ischemia-induced neovascularization is the key feature of proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a pleiotropic proinflammatory and proangiogenic cytokine, and its levels are elevated in the vitreous of patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy. In this study, we aimed at investigating the relative potential of MIF in the ischemia-induced retinal neovascularization. Both WT and MIF-knockout mice were subjected to the retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) model. Intraretinal vessel regrowth was assessed by whole-mount immunofluorescence, and preretinal neovascularization was analyzed in retinal vertical sections after periodic acid-Schiff staining in the hypoxic stage of the ROP model. Gene expression of selected proangiogenic and proinflammatory factors at postnatal day 13 (p13) was measured by real-time PCR. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, recruitment of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and microglial activation were analyzed with immunofluorescence. MIF deficiency increased areas of vascular obliteration by 49%, reduced sprouting tips by 27% and inhibited preretinal angiogenesis by 35%. VEGF expression was reduced in Müller cells of MIF-knockout mice. MIF absence reduced gene expression of erythropoietin, tumor necrosis factor alpha and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 by 30, 70 and 50%, respectively, decreased the number of retinal EPCs by 37.5% and inhibited microglial activation in the hypoxic condition. In conclusion, we found that MIF has proangiogenic and proinflammatory properties in retinal neovascularization. The proangiogenic role of MIF in ischemia-induced retinal neovascularization is associated with the expression of VEGF and erythropoietin, EPC recruitment and inflammation. Therefore, MIF has a potential role in the pathological angiogenesis of proliferative retinopathy.

  8. Edaravone enhances brain-derived neurotrophic factor production in the ischemic mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Okuyama, Satoshi; Morita, Mayu; Sawamoto, Atsushi; Terugo, Tsukasa; Nakajima, Mitsunari; Furukawa, Yoshiko

    2015-04-02

    Edaravone, a clinical drug used to treat strokes, protects against neuronal cell death and memory loss in the ischemic brains of animal models through its antioxidant activity. In the present study, we subcutaneously administrated edaravone to mice (3 mg/kg/day) for three days immediately after bilateral common carotid artery occlusion, and revealed through an immunohistochemical analysis that edaravone (1) accelerated increases in the production of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampus; (2) increased the number of doublecortin-positive neuronal precursor cells in the dentate gyrus subgranular zone; and (3) suppressed the ischemia-induced inactivation of calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in the hippocampus. We also revealed through a Western blotting analysis that edaravone (4) induced the phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding (CREB), a transcription factor that regulates BDNF gene expression; and (5) induced the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2, an upstream signal factor of CREB. These results suggest that the neuroprotective effects of edaravone following brain ischemia were mediated not only by the elimination of oxidative stress, but also by the induction of BDNF production.

  9. Generation of hyaline cartilaginous tissue from mouse adult dermal fibroblast culture by defined factors

    PubMed Central

    Hiramatsu, Kunihiko; Sasagawa, Satoru; Outani, Hidetatsu; Nakagawa, Kanako; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Tsumaki, Noriyuki

    2011-01-01

    Repair of cartilage injury with hyaline cartilage continues to be a challenging clinical problem. Because of the limited number of chondrocytes in vivo, coupled with in vitro de-differentiation of chondrocytes into fibrochondrocytes, which secrete type I collagen and have an altered matrix architecture and mechanical function, there is a need for a novel cell source that produces hyaline cartilage. The generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells has provided a tool for reprogramming dermal fibroblasts to an undifferentiated state by ectopic expression of reprogramming factors. Here, we show that retroviral expression of two reprogramming factors (c-Myc and Klf4) and one chondrogenic factor (SOX9) induces polygonal chondrogenic cells directly from adult dermal fibroblast cultures. Induced cells expressed marker genes for chondrocytes but not fibroblasts, i.e., the promoters of type I collagen genes were extensively methylated. Although some induced cell lines formed tumors when subcutaneously injected into nude mice, other induced cell lines generated stable homogenous hyaline cartilage–like tissue. Further, the doxycycline-inducible induction system demonstrated that induced cells are able to respond to chondrogenic medium by expressing endogenous Sox9 and maintain chondrogenic potential after substantial reduction of transgene expression. Thus, this approach could lead to the preparation of hyaline cartilage directly from skin, without generating iPS cells. PMID:21293062

  10. [Comparative analysis of conservation and regulatory network on core transcription factors in mouse inner ear development].

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi-Qiang; Han, Xin-Huan; Wei, Qin-Jun; Xing, Guang-Qian; Cao, Xin

    2013-10-01

    During vertebrate inner ear development, several core genes, such as Six1, Six4, Pax2, Pax8, Foxi1, Dlx5, Gbx2, Irx2/3, and Msx1, are crucial to the regulation of the otic placode induction. In order to get the gene regulatory network during inner ear development, bioinformatics methods were adopted to analyze conservation and regulation of the core transcription factors in mice. Pax2, Pax8, Foxi1, and Dlx5 remained to be the main regulators during inner ear development, which was consistent with the gene regulatory network from literature. Six1 was regulated by many transcription factors, and Gbx2, Irx2/3, and Msx1 played important roles in the regulatory network. The differences in the constructed regulatory network were reasonably analyzed. It was predicted that Msxl regulated the expression of Six1 and Gbx2. In addition, several transcription factors, such as Sox5, Lhx2, Rax, Otx1, Otx2, Pitxl, Pitx2, Nkx2-5, Irx4, Irx6, Dlx2, Hmx1/2/3, Pou4f3, Pax4 and Tlx2, were found to be involved in the regulatory network. Our results provide an improved understanding of the regulatory mechanism during inner ear development.

  11. Thyroid hormone regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor levels in mouse mammary glands

    SciTech Connect

    Vonderhaar, B.K.; Tang, E.; Lyster, R.R.; Nascimento, M.C.

    1986-08-01

    The specific binding of iodinated epidermal growth factor ((/sup 125/I)iodo-EGF) to membranes prepared from the mammary glands and spontaneous breast tumors of euthyroid and hypothyroid mice was measured in order to determine whether thyroid hormones regulate the EGF receptor levels in vivo. Membranes from hypothyroid mammary glands of mice at various developmental ages bound 50-65% less EGF than those of age-matched euthyroid controls. Treatment of hypothyroid mice with L-T4 before killing restored binding to the euthyroid control level. Spontaneous breast tumors arising in hypothyroid mice also bound 30-40% less EGF than tumors from euthyroid animals even after in vitro desaturation of the membranes of endogenous growth factors with 3 M MgCl2 treatment. The decrease in binding in hypothyroid membranes was due to a decrease in the number of binding sites, not to a change in affinity of the growth factor for its receptor, as determined by Scatchard analysis of the binding data. Both euthyroid and hypothyroid membranes bound EGF primarily to a single class of high affinity sites (dissociation constant (Kd) = 0.7-1.8 nM). Euthyroid membranes bound 28.4 +/- (SE) 0.6 fmol/mg protein, whereas hypothyroid membranes bound 15.5 +/- 1.0 fmol/mg protein. These data indicate that EGF receptor levels in normal mammary glands and spontaneous breast tumors in mice are subject to regulation by thyroid status.

  12. An enriched environment improves cognitive performance in mice from the senescence-accelerated prone mouse 8 strain: Role of upregulated neurotrophic factor expression in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zhenyun; Wang, Mingwei; Yan, Baoyong; Gu, Ping; Jiang, Xiangming; Yang, Xiufen; Cui, Dongsheng

    2012-08-15

    In this study, we examined 3-month-old female mice from the senescence-accelerated prone mouse 8 strain and age-matched homologous normal aging female mice from the senescence accelerated- resistant mouse 1 strain. Mice from each strain were housed in an enriched environment (including a platform, running wheels, tunnel, and some toys) or a standard environment for 3 months. The mice housed in the enriched environment exhibited shorter escape latencies and a greater percentage of time in the target quadrant in the Morris water maze test, and they exhibited reduced errors and longer latencies in step-down avoidance experiments compared with mice housed in the standard environment. Correspondently, brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA and protein expression in the hippocampus was significantly higher in mice housed in the enriched environment compared with those housed in the standard environment, and the level of hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor protein was positively correlated with the learning and memory abilities of mice from the senescence-accelerated prone mouse 8 strain. These results suggest that an enriched environment improved cognitive performance in mice form the senescence-accelerated prone mouse 8 strain by increasing brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in the hippocampus.

  13. Hepatocyte Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1 Mediates the Development of Liver Fibrosis in a Mouse Model of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Mesarwi, Omar A; Shin, Mi-Kyung; Bevans-Fonti, Shannon; Schlesinger, Christina; Shaw, Janet; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with the progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) to steatohepatitis and fibrosis. This progression correlates with the severity of OSA-associated hypoxia. In mice with diet induced obesity, hepatic steatosis leads to liver tissue hypoxia, which worsens with exposure to intermittent hypoxia. Emerging data has implicated hepatocyte cell signaling as an important factor in hepatic fibrogenesis. We hypothesized that hepatocyte specific knockout of the oxygen sensing α subunit of hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), a master regulator of the global response to hypoxia, may be protective against the development of liver fibrosis. Wild-type mice and mice with hepatocyte-specific HIF-1α knockout (Hif1a-/-hep) were fed a high trans-fat diet for six months, as a model of NAFLD. Hepatic fibrosis was evaluated by Sirius red stain and hydroxyproline assay. Liver enzymes, fasting insulin, and hepatic triglyceride content were also assessed. Hepatocytes were isolated from Hif1a-/-hep mice and wild-type controls and were exposed to sustained hypoxia (1% O2) or normoxia (16% O2) for 24 hours. The culture media was used to reconstitute type I collagen and the resulting matrices were examined for collagen cross-linking. Wild-type mice on a high trans-fat diet had 80% more hepatic collagen than Hif1a-/-hep mice (2.21 μg collagen/mg liver tissue, versus 1.23 μg collagen/mg liver tissue, p = 0.03), which was confirmed by Sirius red staining. Body weight, liver weight, mean hepatic triglyceride content, and fasting insulin were similar between groups. Culture media from wild-type mouse hepatocytes exposed to hypoxia allowed for avid collagen cross-linking, but very little cross-linking was seen when hepatocytes were exposed to normoxia, or when hepatocytes from Hif1a-/-hep mice were used in hypoxia or normoxia. Hepatocyte HIF-1 mediates an increase in liver fibrosis in a mouse model of NAFLD, perhaps due to liver tissue

  14. Effectiveness of Intracavernous Delivery of Recombinant Human Hepatocyte Growth Factor on Erectile Function in the Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Mouse.

    PubMed

    Das, Nando Dulal; Yin, Guo Nan; Choi, Min Ji; Song, Kang-Moon; Park, Jin-Mi; Limanjaya, Anita; Ghatak, Kalyan; Minh, Nguyen Nhat; Ock, Jiyeon; Park, Soo-Hwan; Kim, Ho Min; Ryu, Ji-Kan; Suh, Jun-Kyu

    2016-11-01

    Diabetic erectile dysfunction is a disease mostly of vascular origin and men with diabetic erectile dysfunction respond poorly to oral phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a pleiotropic factor that plays an essential role in the regulation of cell proliferation, survival, and angiogenesis. To determine the effectiveness of recombinant human (rh)-HGF in restoring erectile function in diabetic mice. Four groups of mice were used: control non-diabetic mice and streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice receiving two successive intracavernous injections of phosphate buffered saline (days -3 and 0), a single intracavernous injection of rh-HGF (day 0), or two successive intracavernous injections of rh-HGF (days -3 and 0). We also examined the effect of rh-HGF in primary cultured mouse cavernous endothelial cells and in major pelvic ganglion culture in vitro, which was incubated under a normal-glucose (5 mmol/L) or a high-glucose (30 mmol/L) condition. Two weeks after treatment, we measured erectile function by electrical stimulation of the cavernous nerve and the penis was harvested for histologic studies. Repeated intracavernous injections of rh-HGF protein induced significant restoration of erectile function in diabetic mice (89-100% of control values), whereas a single intracavernous injection of rh-HGF protein elicited modest improvement. Rh-HGF significantly induced phosphorylation of its receptor c-Met, increased the content of endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells, and decreased the generation of reactive oxygen species (superoxide anion and peroxynitrite) and extravasation of oxidized low-density lipoprotein in diabetic mice. Under the high-glucose condition, rh-HGF protein also promoted tube formation in mouse cavernous endothelial cells and enhanced neurite sprouting in major pelvic ganglion culture in vitro. The dual angiogenic and neurotrophic effects of HGF could open a new avenue through which diabetic erectile dysfunction

  15. Expression of Kruppel-Like Factor KLF4 in Mouse Hair Follicle Stem Cells Contributes to Cutaneous Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junfeng; Yu, Fang; Morris, Rebecca J.; Wang, Timothy C.; Huang, Shiang; Ai, Walden

    2012-01-01

    Background Kruppel-like factor KLF4 is a transcription factor critical for the establishment of the barrier function of the skin. Its function in stem cell biology has been recently recognized. Previous studies have revealed that hair follicle stem cells contribute to cutaneous wound healing. However, expression of KLF4 in hair follicle stem cells and the importance of such expression in cutaneous wound healing have not been investigated. Methodology/Principal Findings Quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis showed higher KLF4 expression in hair follicle stem cell-enriched mouse skin keratinocytes than that in control keratinocytes. We generated KLF4 promoter-driven enhanced green fluorescence protein (KLF4/EGFP) transgenic mice and tamoxifen-inducible KLF4 knockout mice by crossing KLF4 promoter-driven Cre recombinase fused with tamoxifen-inducible estrogen receptor (KLF4/CreER™) transgenic mice with KLF4(flox) mice. KLF4/EGFP cells purified from dorsal skin keratinocytes of KLF4/EGFP transgenic mice were co-localized with 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU)-label retaining cells by flow cytometric analysis and immunohistochemistry. Lineage tracing was performed in the context of cutaneous wound healing, using KLF4/CreER™ and Rosa26RLacZ double transgenic mice, to examine the involvement of KLF4 in wound healing. We found that KLF4 expressing cells were likely derived from bulge stem cells. In addition, KLF4 expressing multipotent cells migrated to the wound and contributed to the wound healing. After knocking out KLF4 by tamoxifen induction of KLF4/CreER™ and KLF4(flox) double transgenic mice, we found that the population of bulge stem cell-enriched population was decreased, which was accompanied by significantly delayed cutaneous wound healing. Consistently, KLF4 knockdown by KLF4-specific small hairpin RNA in human A431 epidermoid carcinoma cells decreased the stem cell population and was accompanied by compromised cell migration

  16. Hepatocyte Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1 Mediates the Development of Liver Fibrosis in a Mouse Model of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mesarwi, Omar A.; Shin, Mi-Kyung; Bevans-Fonti, Shannon; Schlesinger, Christina; Shaw, Janet; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y.

    2016-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with the progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) to steatohepatitis and fibrosis. This progression correlates with the severity of OSA-associated hypoxia. In mice with diet induced obesity, hepatic steatosis leads to liver tissue hypoxia, which worsens with exposure to intermittent hypoxia. Emerging data has implicated hepatocyte cell signaling as an important factor in hepatic fibrogenesis. We hypothesized that hepatocyte specific knockout of the oxygen sensing α subunit of hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), a master regulator of the global response to hypoxia, may be protective against the development of liver fibrosis. Methods Wild-type mice and mice with hepatocyte-specific HIF-1α knockout (Hif1a-/-hep) were fed a high trans-fat diet for six months, as a model of NAFLD. Hepatic fibrosis was evaluated by Sirius red stain and hydroxyproline assay. Liver enzymes, fasting insulin, and hepatic triglyceride content were also assessed. Hepatocytes were isolated from Hif1a-/-hep mice and wild-type controls and were exposed to sustained hypoxia (1% O2) or normoxia (16% O2) for 24 hours. The culture media was used to reconstitute type I collagen and the resulting matrices were examined for collagen cross-linking. Results Wild-type mice on a high trans-fat diet had 80% more hepatic collagen than Hif1a-/-hep mice (2.21 μg collagen/mg liver tissue, versus 1.23 μg collagen/mg liver tissue, p = 0.03), which was confirmed by Sirius red staining. Body weight, liver weight, mean hepatic triglyceride content, and fasting insulin were similar between groups. Culture media from wild-type mouse hepatocytes exposed to hypoxia allowed for avid collagen cross-linking, but very little cross-linking was seen when hepatocytes were exposed to normoxia, or when hepatocytes from Hif1a-/-hep mice were used in hypoxia or normoxia. Conclusions Hepatocyte HIF-1 mediates an increase in liver fibrosis in a mouse model of

  17. Screening of stimulatory effects of dietary risk factors on mouse intestinal cell kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Shivshankar, Pooja; Devi, Shyamala C. S.

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Although epidemiological and experimental studies validate influence of genetic, environmental and dietary factors in the causation of various types of cancers including colon, results from all these sources are inconclusive. Hypothesizing that high fat diet and obesity are among the major predisposing factors in the incidence of colon cancer, we evaluated the role of diet constituted with food material derived from a tropical plant, Tamarindus indica Linn (TI). METHODS: A two part randomized double-blind study was conducted employing inbred Swiss albino mice from a single generation for the whole investigation. One day-old neonates (n = 12) were subcutaneously administered with monosodium glutamate (MSG) to induce obesity (OB). At weaning these animals were maintained on modified AIN-76 diet supplemented with 10% TI and 10% fat bolus (w/w, TIFB) for 8 wk. Subsequently, in the second part of study, four groups of animals belonging to the same generation, age and gender (n = 12 per group), were maintained on: AIN-76 control diet (CD); AIN-76 mixed with 10% TI extract (TI); and, mixed with 10% TI and 10% FB (TIFB) for 8 wk, to determine intestinal crypt cell proliferation, functionally-specific enzyme activities, fermentation profile, and energy preferences. RESULTS: We observed a significant increase in the crypt cell production rate in distal colonic segment of experimental animals when compared with the controls. This segment also contained significantly low butyrate levels compared to control and TIFB groups. All the experimental groups showed a gross decrease in the enzyme activities viz., succinate dehydrogenase, acid-galactosidase and dipeptidyl amino peptidase IV demonstrating pathological stress caused by the test regimens, and an altered metabolic flux in the cellular environment. CONCLUSION: We have demonstrated a cumulative response to the three dietary factors, one of which (TI) is reported, herein, for the first time to modulate kinetics of large

  18. Connective tissue growth factor is not necessary for haze formation in excimer laser wounded mouse corneas

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xiaodi; Pi, Liya; Sriram, Sriniwas; Schultz, Gregory S.

    2017-01-01

    We sought to determine if connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is necessary for the formation of corneal haze after corneal injury. Mice with post-natal, tamoxifen-induced, knockout of CTGF were subjected to excimer laser phototherapeutic keratectomy (PTK) and the corneas were allowed to heal. The extent of scaring was observed in non-induced mice, heterozygotes, and full homozygous knockout mice and quantified by macrophotography. The eyes from these mice were collected after euthanization for re-genotyping to control for possible Cre-mosaicism. Primary corneal fibroblasts from CTGF knockout corneas were established in a gel plug assay. The plug was removed, simulating an injury, and the rate of hole closure and the capacity for these cells to form light reflecting cells in response to CTGF and platelet-derived growth factor B (PDGF-B) were tested and compared to wild-type cells. We found that independent of genotype, each group of mice was still capable of forming light reflecting haze in the cornea after laser ablation (p = 0.40). Results from the gel plug closure rate in primary cell cultures of knockout cells were not statistically different from serum starved wild-type cells, independent of treatment. Compared to the serum starved wild-type cells, stimulation with PDGF-BB significantly increased the KO cell culture’s light reflection (p = 0.03). Most interestingly, both reflective cultures were positive for α-SMA, but the cellular morphology and levels of α-SMA were distinct and not in proportion to the light reflection seen. This new work demonstrates that corneas without CTGF can still form sub-epithelial haze, and that the light reflecting phenotype can be reproduced in culture. These data support the possibilities of growth factor redundancy and that multiple pro-haze pathways exist. PMID:28207886

  19. Analysis of neurotrophic factors in limb and extraocular muscles of mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Harandi, Vahid M; Lindquist, Susanne; Kolan, Shrikant Shantilal; Brännström, Thomas; Liu, Jing-Xia

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is currently an incurable fatal motor neuron syndrome characterized by progressive weakness, muscle wasting and death ensuing 3-5 years after diagnosis. Neurotrophic factors (NTFs) are known to be important in both nervous system development and maintenance. However, the attempt to translate the potential of NTFs into the therapeutic options remains limited despite substantial number of approaches, which have been tested clinically. Using quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) technique, the present study investigated mRNA expression of four different NTFs: brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), neurotrophin-4/5 (NT-4) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) in limb muscles and extraocular muscles (EOMs) from SOD1G93A transgenic mice at early and terminal stages of ALS. General morphological examination revealed that muscle fibres were well preserved in both limb muscles and EOMs in early stage ALS mice. However, in terminal ALS mice, most muscle fibres were either atrophied or hypertrophied in limb muscles but unaffected in EOMs. qRT-PCR analysis showed that in early stage ALS mice, NT-4 was significantly down-regulated in limb muscles whereas NT-3 and GDNF were markedly up-regulated in EOMs. In terminal ALS mice, only GDNF was significantly up-regulated in limb muscles. We concluded that the early down-regulation of NT-4 in limb muscles is closely associated with muscle dystrophy and dysfunction at late stage, whereas the early up-regulations of GDNF and NT-3 in EOMs are closely associated with the relatively well-preserved muscle morphology at late stage. Collectively, the data suggested that comparing NTFs expression between limb muscles and EOMs from different stages of ALS animal models is a useful method in revealing the patho-physiology and progression of ALS, and eventually rescuing motor neuron in ALS patients.

  20. [An immunohistochemical study of the expression of transcription factor Oct3/4 in mouse spermatogenesis].

    PubMed

    Tomilin, A N; Kostyleva, E I; Drosdovskiĭ, M A; Seralini, J E; Vorob'ev, V I

    1996-01-01

    The expression of POU-domain transcription factor Oct3/4 in the testis of adult mice has been studied using indirect immunofluorescence with highly specific antibodies. The protein is shown to be expressed in germ cells of seminiferous epithelium in a stage specific manner. The protein synthesis is initiated in mid-pachytene spermatocytes, increases to reach its peak during meiotic division. The Oct3/4 level remains augmented in early spermatids, but gradually declines during their further developmental advancement. These findings imply that Oct3/4 may have a regulatory function providing for the control of meiosis and/or terminal differentiation of spermatogenic cells.

  1. TcoF-DB v2: update of the database of human and mouse transcription co-factors and transcription factor interactions

    PubMed Central

    Schmeier, Sebastian; Alam, Tanvir; Essack, Magbubah; Bajic, Vladimir B.

    2017-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) play a pivotal role in transcriptional regulation, making them crucial for cell survival and important biological functions. For the regulation of transcription, interactions of different regulatory proteins known as transcription co-factors (TcoFs) and TFs are essential in forming necessary protein complexes. Although TcoFs themselves do not bind DNA directly, their influence on transcriptional regulation and initiation, although indirect, has been shown to be significant, with the functionality of TFs strongly influenced by the presence of TcoFs. In the TcoF-DB v2 database, we collect information on TcoFs. In this article, we describe updates and improvements implemented in TcoF-DB v2. TcoF-DB v2 provides several new features that enables exploration of the roles of TcoFs. The content of the database has significantly expanded, and is enriched with information from Gene Ontology, biological pathways, diseases and molecular signatures. TcoF-DB v2 now includes many more TFs; has substantially increased the number of human TcoFs to 958, and now includes information on mouse (418 new TcoFs). TcoF-DB v2 enables the exploration of information on TcoFs and allows investigations into their influence on transcriptional regulation in humans and mice. TcoF-DB v2 can be accessed at http://tcofdb.org/. PMID:27789689

  2. [Effects of Kuntai Capsules on endometrial thickness and expressions of leukemia inhibitory factor and epidermal growth factor in mouse after controlled ovarian hyperstimulation].

    PubMed

    Chu, Xiying; Song, Yuxia; Wan, Lijing; Tan, Li

    2014-08-05

    To explore the effects of Kuntai Capsules on endometrial thickness and the expressions of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) in mouse after controlled ovarian hyperstimulation. Healthy Sprague-Dawley mice were randomly allocated into 4 groups of control (group A), controlled ovarian hyperstimulation [COH (group B)], COH plus low-dose Kuntai Capsules (group C) and COH plus large-dose Kuntai Capsules [2x low-dose (group D)]. The controlled ovarian hyperstimulation model was established. The endometrial thickness was measured by computerized multi-functional image analyzer. And the expressions of LIF and EGF in proliferating endometrium were examined by immunohistochemistry. The endometrial thickness of groups C and D were higher than that of groups A and B. And there were significant differences (P < 0.05). The expression levels of LIF protein in proliferating endometrium was weaker than implantation window phase, the expression levels of EGF and LIF in group B was weaker than group A, groups C and D stronger than groups B and D was stronger than group C. And there were significant differences (P < 0.05). Kuntai Capsules can promote the growth of endometrium and enhance the expression levels of EGF and LIF in mice. And it may improve the ability of endometrial receptivity through optimized microenvironment. And a larger dose of Kuntai Capsules yields better outcomes.

  3. Water extract isolated from Chelidonium majus enhances nitric oxide and tumour necrosis factor-alpha production via nuclear factor-kappaB activation in mouse peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hwan-Suck; An, Hyo-Jin; Jeong, Hyun-Ja; Won, Jin-Hee; Hong, Seung-Heon; Kim, Hyung-Min

    2004-01-01

    Chelidonium majus is used to treat several inflammatory diseases and tumours. We have examined the effect of C. majus on nitric oxide (NO) production using mouse peritoneal macrophages. When C. majus was used in combination with recombinant interferon-gamma (rIFN-gamma, 10 U mL(-1)), there was a marked cooperative induction of NO production. Treatment of rIFN-gamma plus C. majus (1 mgmL(-1)) in macrophages caused a significant increase in tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production. The increased production of NO and TNF-alpha from rIFN-gamma plus C. majus-stimulated cells was almost completely inhibited by nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) inhibitor, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (100 microM). These findings demonstrated that C. majus increased the production of NO and TNF-alpha by rIFN-gamma-primed macrophages and suggested that NF-kappaB played a critical role in mediating the effects of C. majus.

  4. Akt/hypoxia-inducible factor-1α signaling deficiency compromises skin wound healing in a type 1 diabetes mouse model

    PubMed Central

    JING, LIFENG; LI, SHUANG; LI, QIN

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the mechanisms for impaired skin wound healing in subjects with diabetes. Type 1 diabetes (T1DM) was induced in BALB/c mice using streptozotocin. One month after the establishment of the T1DM mouse model, a wound was formed on the back of the mice, and tissues from the wounds and the margins were collected on days 0, 3, 7 and 10. Protein levels of cluster of differentiation 31 (CD31) were detected using immunohistochemistry, and the mRNA levels of Akt, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (Hif-1α), vascular endothelial growth factor (Vegf), VEGF receptor 2 (Vegfr2), stromal cell-derived growth factor-1α (Sdf-1α) and CXC chemokine receptor 4 (Cxcr4) were determined using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis. The corresponding protein levels were determined using western blotting. The skin wound healing rate in the T1DM mice was significantly lower than that in the control mice, and the protein level of CD31 in the wounded skin of the T1DM mice was significantly decreased. Furthermore, the overall mRNA levels of Akt, Hif-1α, Vegf, Vegfr2, Sdf-1α and Cxcr4 in the T1DM mice were significantly lower than those in the control mice, and similar trends were observed in the protein levels. In conclusion, skin wound healing was impaired in the T1DM mice, and this may have been caused by a deficiency of Akt/HIF-1α and downstream signaling, as well as delayed angiogenesis. PMID:26136949

  5. Krüppel-like factor 4 regulates adaptive expression of the zinc transporter Zip4 in mouse small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Liuzzi, Juan P.; Guo, Liang; Chang, Shou-Mei; Cousins, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Epithelial cells of the small intestine are the site of zinc absorption. Intestinal uptake of zinc is inversely proportional to the dietary supply of this essential micronutrient. The mechanism responsible for this adaptive differential in apical zinc transport is not known. The zinc transporter Zip4 (Slc39a4) is essential for adequate enteric zinc uptake. In mice, Zip4 expression is upregulated at low zinc intakes with a concomitant ZIP4 localization to the apical enterocyte plasma membrane. With the present experiments, we show that the zinc finger transcription factor Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4), produced in high abundance in the intestine, is expressed at elevated levels in mice fed a low-zinc diet. In the murine intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) line MODE-K, zinc depletion of culture medium with cell-permeant and cell-impermeant chelators increased Zip4 and Klf4 mRNA and Zip4 heterogeneous nuclear RNA expression. Zinc depletion led to increased KLF4 in nuclear extracts. Knockdown of KLF4 using small interfering RNA transfection drastically limited ZIP4 induction upon zinc depletion and reduced 65Zn uptake by depleted IECs. EMSAs with nuclear extracts of IECs showed KLF4 binding to cis elements of the mouse Zip4 promoter, with increased binding under zinc-limited conditions. Reporter constructs with the Zip4 promoter and mutation studies further demonstrated that Zip4 is regulated through a KLF4 response element. These data from experiments with mice and murine IECs demonstrate that KLF4 is induced during zinc restriction and is a transcription factor involved in adaptive regulation of the zinc transporter ZIP4. PMID:19147802

  6. Intravitreal Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor Transiently Improves Cone-Mediated Function in a CNGB3-/- Mouse Model of Achromatopsia.

    PubMed

    Marangoni, Dario; Vijayasarathy, Camasamudram; Bush, Ronald A; Wei, Lisa L; Wen, Rong; Sieving, Paul A

    2015-10-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) was recently shown to augment cone function in CNGB3 mutant achromat dogs. However, testing CNTF-releasing implant in human CNGB3 achromats failed to show benefit. We evaluated the effects of CNTF protein on the retinal function in an additional achromatopsia model, the CNGB3-/- mouse. Fifty-nine CNGB3-/- mice (postnatal day [PD] ± SD = 30 ± 7) received a unilateral intravitreal injection of 1 or 2 μg CNTF protein, and 15 wild-type (WT) mice (PD = 34 ± 3) received 1 μg CNTF. Retinal function was evaluated by flash ERG and photopic flicker ERG (fERG) at 7 and 14 days after treatment. Seven days post CNTF, the photopic b-wave Vmax was significantly increased in CNGB3-/- mice (P < 0.01), whereas it was reduced in WT mice (P < 0.05). Ciliary neurotrophic factor significantly increased the amplitude of photopic fERG and the photopic oscillatory potentials (OPs) in CNGB3-/- mice. Ciliary neurotrophic factor did not alter the scotopic a-wave in either CNGB3-/- or WT mice, but it increased the scotopic b-wave k (P < 0.01) in CNGB3-/- mice, indicating diminished scotopic sensitivity, and reduced the scotopic b-wave Vmax in WT mice (P < 0.05). No difference was found in ERG parameters between 1 or 2 μg CNTF. Fourteen days after CNTF injection the ERG changes in CNGB3-/- mice were lost. Intravitreal bolus CNTF protein caused a small and transient improvement of cone-mediated function in CNGB3-/- mice, whereas it reduced rod-mediated function. The increase in photopic OPs and the lack of changes in scotopic a-wave suggest a CNTF effect on the inner retina.

  7. Three gene-targeted mouse models of RNA splicing factor RP show late-onset RPE and retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Graziotto, John J; Farkas, Michael H; Bujakowska, Kinga; Deramaudt, Bertrand M; Zhang, Qi; Nandrot, Emeline F; Inglehearn, Chris F; Bhattacharya, Shomi S; Pierce, Eric A

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in genes that produce proteins involved in mRNA splicing, including pre-mRNA processing factors 3, 8, and 31 (PRPF3, 8, and 31), RP9, and SNRNP200 are common causes of the late-onset inherited blinding disorder retinitis pigmentosa (RP). It is not known how mutations in these ubiquitously expressed genes lead to retina-specific disease. To investigate the pathogenesis of the RNA splicing factor forms of RP, the authors generated and characterized the retinal phenotypes of Prpf3-T494M, Prpf8-H2309P knockin mice. The retinal ultrastructure of Prpf31-knockout mice was also investigated. The knockin mice have single codon alterations in their endogenous Prpf3 and Prpf8 genes that mimic the most common disease causing mutations in human PRPF3 and PRPF8. The Prpf31-knockout mice mimic the null alleles that result from the majority of mutations identified in PRPF31 patients. The retinal phenotypes of the gene targeted mice were evaluated by electroretinography (ERG), light, and electron microscopy. The RPE cells of heterozygous Prpf3(+/T494M) and Prpf8(+/H2309P) knockin mice exhibited loss of the basal infoldings and vacuolization, with accumulation of amorphous deposits between the RPE and Bruch[b]'s membrane at age two years. These changes were more severe in the homozygous mice, and were associated with decreased rod function in the Prpf3-T494M mice. Similar degenerative changes in the RPE were detected in Prpf31(±) mice at one year of age. The finding of similar degenerative changes in RPE cells of all three mouse models suggests that the RPE may be the primary cell type affected in the RNA splicing factor forms of RP. The relatively late-onset phenotype observed in these mice is consistent with the typical adult onset of disease in patients with RP.

  8. Defects in subventricular zone pigmented epithelium-derived factor niche signaling in the senescence-accelerated mouse prone-8.

    PubMed

    Castro-Garcia, Paola; Díaz-Moreno, María; Gil-Gas, Carmen; Fernández-Gómez, Francisco J; Honrubia-Gómez, Paloma; Álvarez-Simón, Carmen Belén; Sánchez-Sánchez, Francisco; Cano, Juan Carlos Castillo; Almeida, Francisco; Blanco, Vicente; Jordán, Joaquín; Mira, Helena; Ramírez-Castillejo, Carmen

    2015-04-01

    We studied potential changes in the subventricular zone (SVZ) stem cell niche of the senescence-accelerated mouse prone-8 (SAM-P8) aging model. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) assays with longtime survival revealed a lower number of label-retaining stem cells in the SAM-P8 SVZ compared with the SAM-Resistant 1 (SAM-R1) control strain. We also found that in SAM-P8 niche signaling is attenuated and the stem cell pool is less responsive to the self-renewal niche factor pigmented epithelium-derived factor (PEDF). Protein analysis demonstrated stable amounts of the PEDF ligand in the SAM-P8 SVZ niche; however, SAM-P8 stem cells present a significant expression decrease of patatin-like phospholipase domain containing 2, a receptor for PEDF (PNPLA2-PEDF) receptor, but not of laminin receptor (LR), a receptor for PEDF (LR-PEDF) receptor. We observed changes in self-renewal related genes (hairy and enhancer of split 1 (Hes1), hairy and enhancer of split 1 (Hes5), Sox2] and report that although these genes are down-regulated in SAM-P8, differentiation genes (Pax6) are up-regulated and neurogenesis is increased. Finally, sheltering mammalian telomere complexes might be also involved given a down-regulation of telomeric repeat binding factor 1 (Terf1) expression was observed in SAM-P8 at young age periods. Differences between these 2 models, SAM-P8 and SAM-R1 controls, have been previously detected at more advanced ages. We now describe alterations in the PEDF signaling pathway and stem cell self-renewal at a very young age, which could be involved in the premature senescence observed in the SAM-P8 model. © FASEB.

  9. Ambroxol suppresses influenza-virus proliferation in the mouse airway by increasing antiviral factor levels.

    PubMed

    Yang, B; Yao, D F; Ohuchi, M; Ide, M; Yano, M; Okumura, Y; Kido, H

    2002-05-01

    The protective effect of ambroxol, a mucolytic agent which has antioxidant properties and stimulates the release of pulmonary surfactant, against influenza-virus proliferation in the airway was investigated in mice. Ambroxol or the vehicle was administered intraperitoneally twice a day for 5-7 days to mice shortly after intranasal infection with a lethal dose of influenza A/Aichi/68 (H3N2) virus, and the survival rate, virus titre and levels of factors regulating virus proliferation in the airway fluid were analysed. Ambroxol significantly suppressed virus multiplication and improved the survival rate of mice. The effect of ambroxol reached a peak at 10 mg x kg(-1) x day(-1), higher doses being less effective. Ambroxol stimulated the release of suppressors of influenza-virus multiplication, such as pulmonary surfactant, mucus protease inhibitor, immunoglobulin (Ig)-A and IgG, although it stimulated the release of a trypsin-type protease that potentiates virus proliferation. In addition, ambroxol transiently suppressed release of the cytokines, tumour necrosis factor-alpha, interferon-gamma and interleukin-12, into airway fluid. Although ambroxol had several negative effects on the host defence system, overall it strikingly increased the concentrations of suppressors of influenza-virus multiplication in the airway.

  10. Serum response factor is essential for mesoderm formation during mouse embryogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Arsenian, S; Weinhold, B; Oelgeschläger, M; Rüther, U; Nordheim, A

    1998-01-01

    The transcription factor serum response factor (SRF), a phylogenetically conserved nuclear protein, mediates the rapid transcriptional response to extracellular stimuli, e.g. growth and differentiation signals. DNA- protein complexes containing SRF or its homologues function as nuclear targets of the Ras/MAPK signalling network, thereby directing gene activities associated with processes as diverse as pheromone signalling, cell-cycle progression (transitions G0-G1 and G2-M), neuronal synaptic transmission and muscle cell differentiation. So far, the activity of mammalian SRF has been studied exclusively in cultured cells. To study SRF function in a multicellular organism we generated an Srf null allele in mice. SRF-deficient embryos (Srf -/-) have a severe gastrulation defect and do not develop to term. They consist of misfolded ectodermal and endodermal cell layers, do not form a primitive streak or any detectable mesodermal cells and fail to express the developmental marker genes Bra (T), Bmp-2/4 and Shh. Activation of the SRF-regulated immediate early genes Egr-1 and c-fos, as well as the alpha-Actin gene, is severely impaired. Our study identifies SRF as a new and essential regulator of mammalian mesoderm formation. We therefore suggest that in mammals Ras/MAPK signalling contributes to mesoderm induction, as is the case in amphibia. PMID:9799237

  11. Deep Proteomics of Mouse Skeletal Muscle Enables Quantitation of Protein Isoforms, Metabolic Pathways, and Transcription Factors*

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Atul S.; Murgia, Marta; Nagaraj, Nagarjuna; Treebak, Jonas T.; Cox, Jürgen; Mann, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle constitutes 40% of individual body mass and plays vital roles in locomotion and whole-body metabolism. Proteomics of skeletal muscle is challenging because of highly abundant contractile proteins that interfere with detection of regulatory proteins. Using a state-of-the art MS workflow and a strategy to map identifications from the C2C12 cell line model to tissues, we identified a total of 10,218 proteins, including skeletal muscle specific transcription factors like myod1 and myogenin and circadian clock proteins. We obtain absolute abundances for proteins expressed in a muscle cell line and skeletal muscle, which should serve as a valuable resource. Quantitation of protein isoforms of glucose uptake signaling pathways and in glucose and lipid metabolic pathways provides a detailed metabolic map of the cell line compared with tissue. This revealed unexpectedly complex regulation of AMP-activated protein kinase and insulin signaling in muscle tissue at the level of enzyme isoforms. PMID:25616865

  12. Deep proteomics of mouse skeletal muscle enables quantitation of protein isoforms, metabolic pathways, and transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Atul S; Murgia, Marta; Nagaraj, Nagarjuna; Treebak, Jonas T; Cox, Jürgen; Mann, Matthias

    2015-04-01

    Skeletal muscle constitutes 40% of individual body mass and plays vital roles in locomotion and whole-body metabolism. Proteomics of skeletal muscle is challenging because of highly abundant contractile proteins that interfere with detection of regulatory proteins. Using a state-of-the art MS workflow and a strategy to map identifications from the C2C12 cell line model to tissues, we identified a total of 10,218 proteins, including skeletal muscle specific transcription factors like myod1 and myogenin and circadian clock proteins. We obtain absolute abundances for proteins expressed in a muscle cell line and skeletal muscle, which should serve as a valuable resource. Quantitation of protein isoforms of glucose uptake signaling pathways and in glucose and lipid metabolic pathways provides a detailed metabolic map of the cell line compared with tissue. This revealed unexpectedly complex regulation of AMP-activated protein kinase and insulin signaling in muscle tissue at the level of enzyme isoforms.

  13. Heat shock transcription factor 1-deficiency attenuates overloading-associated hypertrophy of mouse soleus muscle.

    PubMed

    Koya, Tomoyuki; Nishizawa, Sono; Ohno, Yoshitaka; Goto, Ayumi; Ikuta, Akihiro; Suzuki, Miho; Ohira, Tomotaka; Egawa, Tatsuro; Nakai, Akira; Sugiura, Takao; Ohira, Yoshinobu; Yoshioka, Toshitada; Beppu, Moroe; Goto, Katsumasa

    2013-01-01

    Hypertrophic stimuli, such as mechanical stress and overloading, induce stress response, which is mediated by heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1), and up-regulate heat shock proteins (HSPs) in mammalian skeletal muscles. Therefore, HSF1-associated stress response may play a key role in loading-associated skeletal muscle hypertrophy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of HSF1-deficiency on skeletal muscle hypertrophy caused by overloading. Functional overloading on the left soleus was performed by cutting the distal tendons of gastrocnemius and plantaris muscles for 4 weeks. The right muscle served as the control. Soleus muscles from both hindlimbs were dissected 2 and 4 weeks after the operation. Hypertrophy of soleus muscle in HSF1-null mice was partially inhibited, compared with that in wild-type (C57BL/6J) mice. Absence of HSF1 partially attenuated the increase of muscle wet weight and fiber cross-sectional area of overloaded soleus muscle. Population of Pax7-positive muscle satellite cells in HSF1-null mice was significantly less than that in wild-type mice following 2 weeks of overloading (p<0.05). Significant up-regulations of interleukin (IL)-1β and tumor necrosis factor mRNAs were observed in HSF1-null, but not in wild-type, mice following 2 weeks of overloading. Overloading-related increases of IL-6 and AFT3 mRNA expressions seen after 2 weeks of overloading tended to decrease after 4 weeks in both types of mice. In HSF1-null mice, however, the significant overloading-related increase in the expression of IL-6, not ATF3, mRNA was noted even at 4th week. Inhibition of muscle hypertrophy might be attributed to the greater and prolonged enhancement of IL-6 expression. HSF1 and/or HSF1-mediated stress response may, in part, play a key role in loading-induced skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

  14. Heat Shock Transcription Factor 1-Deficiency Attenuates Overloading-Associated Hypertrophy of Mouse Soleus Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Koya, Tomoyuki; Nishizawa, Sono; Ohno, Yoshitaka; Goto, Ayumi; Ikuta, Akihiro; Suzuki, Miho; Ohira, Tomotaka; Egawa, Tatsuro; Nakai, Akira; Sugiura, Takao; Ohira, Yoshinobu; Yoshioka, Toshitada; Beppu, Moroe; Goto, Katsumasa

    2013-01-01

    Hypertrophic stimuli, such as mechanical stress and overloading, induce stress response, which is mediated by heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1), and up-regulate heat shock proteins (HSPs) in mammalian skeletal muscles. Therefore, HSF1-associated stress response may play a key role in loading-associated skeletal muscle hypertrophy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of HSF1-deficiency on skeletal muscle hypertrophy caused by overloading. Functional overloading on the left soleus was performed by cutting the distal tendons of gastrocnemius and plantaris muscles for 4 weeks. The right muscle served as the control. Soleus muscles from both hindlimbs were dissected 2 and 4 weeks after the operation. Hypertrophy of soleus muscle in HSF1-null mice was partially inhibited, compared with that in wild-type (C57BL/6J) mice. Absence of HSF1 partially attenuated the increase of muscle wet weight and fiber cross-sectional area of overloaded soleus muscle. Population of Pax7-positive muscle satellite cells in HSF1-null mice was significantly less than that in wild-type mice following 2 weeks of overloading (p<0.05). Significant up-regulations of interleukin (IL)-1β and tumor necrosis factor mRNAs were observed in HSF1-null, but not in wild-type, mice following 2 weeks of overloading. Overloading-related increases of IL-6 and AFT3 mRNA expressions seen after 2 weeks of overloading tended to decrease after 4 weeks in both types of mice. In HSF1-null mice, however, the significant overloading-related increase in the expression of IL-6, not ATF3, mRNA was noted even at 4th week. Inhibition of muscle hypertrophy might be attributed to the greater and prolonged enhancement of IL-6 expression. HSF1 and/or HSF1-mediated stress response may, in part, play a key role in loading-induced skeletal muscle hypertrophy. PMID:24167582

  15. Ductal morphogenesis in the mouse mammary gland: evidence supporting a role for epidermal growth factor.

    PubMed

    Coleman, S; Silberstein, G B; Daniel, C W

    1988-06-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is a potent mitogen for a variety of cells in vitro, but studies on its effects in vivo and its possible role as a natural growth regulator are few. Using slow-release plastic implants, capable of delivering EGF to small regions of the gland over a period of several days, we have shown that EGF reinitiated ductal growth and morphogenesis in growth-static glands of ovariectomized mice. The effects of implanted EGF were confined to the zone around the implant and were time and dose dependent. Unimplanted glands in the same animal were unaffected. Local effects included (1) the formation of new ductal growth points (end buds), (2) the restoration of normal end bud histomorphology and the reappearance of a stem (cap) cell layer, (3) the reinitiation of epithelial DNA synthesis, and (4) an increase in ductal diameter. No lobulo-alveolar or hyperplastic growth was seen. Competitive binding assays and autoradiography were used to characterize EGF receptor activity in growing and static glands. High and low affinity receptors were demonstrated in each tissue, while 125I-EGF autoradiography revealed differential, specific binding of the ligand to certain epithelial and stromal elements. In the epithelium, label was concentrated in the cap cells of the end buds and in myoepithelial cells of the mammary ducts. Stromal cell label was heaviest adjacent to the epithelium in the end bud flank and subtending ducts, suggesting the induction of stromal EGF receptors by mammary epithelium. Because exogenous EGF is both a mitogenic and morphogenetic factor in this tissue and can serve as a locally acting substitute for known systemic mammogens such as estrogen and prolactin, it must be considered a strong candidate for a naturally occurring mammary tissue mitogen.

  16. Rapamycin-sensitive induction of eukaryotic initiation factor 4F in regenerating mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Goggin, Melissa M; Nelsen, Christopher J; Kimball, Scot R; Jefferson, Leonard S; Morley, Simon J; Albrecht, Jeffrey H

    2004-09-01

    Following acute injuries that diminish functional liver mass, the remaining hepatocytes substantially increase overall protein synthesis to meet increased metabolic demands and to allow for compensatory liver growth. Previous studies have not clearly defined the mechanisms that promote protein synthesis in the regenerating liver. In the current study, we examined the regulation of key proteins involved in translation initiation following 70% partial hepatectomy (PH) in mice. PH promoted the assembly of eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4F complexes consisting of eIF4E, eIF4G, eIF4A1, and poly-A binding protein. eIF4F complex formation after PH occurred without detectable changes in eIF4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) phosphorylation or its binding eIF4E. The amount of serine 1108-phosphorylated eIF4G (but not Ser209-phosphorylated eIF4E) was induced following PH. These effects were antagonized by treatment with rapamycin, indicating that target of rapamycin (TOR) activity is required for eIF4F assembly in the regenerating liver. Rapamycin inhibited the induction of cyclin D1, a known eIF4F-sensitive gene, at the level of protein expression but not messenger RNA (mRNA) expression. In conclusion, increased translation initiation mediated by the mRNA cap-binding complex eIF4F contributes to the induction of protein synthesis during compensatory liver growth. Further study of factors that regulate translation initiation may provide insight into mechanisms that govern metabolic homeostasis and regeneration in response to liver injury.

  17. Two transcription factors can direct three photoreceptor outcomes from rod precursor cells in mouse retinal development

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Lily; Lu, Ailing; Swaroop, Alok; Sharlin, David; Swaroop, Anand; Forrest, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    The typical mammalian visual system is based upon three photoreceptor types: rods for dim light vision and two types of cones (M and S) for color vision in daylight. However, the process that generates photoreceptor diversity and the cell type in which diversity arises remain unclear. Mice deleted for thyroid hormone receptor ®2 (TR®2) and neural retina leucine zipper factor (NRL) lack M cones and rods, respectively, but gain S cones. We therefore tested the hypothesis that NRL and TR®2 direct a common precursor to a rod, M cone or S cone outcome using Nrlb2/b2 “knock-in” mice that express TR®2 instead of NRL from the endogenous Nrl gene. Nrlb2/b2 mice lacked rods and produced excess M cones in contrast to the excess S cones in Nrl−/− mice. Notably, the presence of both factors yielded rods in Nrl+/b2 mice. The results demonstrate innate plasticity in post-mitotic rod precursors that allows these cells to form three functional photoreceptor types in response to NRL or TRβ2. We also detected precursor cells in normal embryonic retina that transiently co-expressed Nrl and TRβ2, suggesting that some precursors may originate in a plastic state. The plasticity of the precursors revealed in Nrlb2/b2 mice suggests that a two-step transcriptional switch can direct three photoreceptor fates: first, rod versus cone identity dictated by NRL and secondly, if NRL fails to act, M versus S cone identity dictated by TR®2. PMID:21813673

  18. Two transcription factors can direct three photoreceptor outcomes from rod precursor cells in mouse retinal development.

    PubMed

    Ng, Lily; Lu, Ailing; Swaroop, Alok; Sharlin, David S; Swaroop, Anand; Forrest, Douglas

    2011-08-03

    The typical mammalian visual system is based upon three photoreceptor types: rods for dim light vision and two types of cones (M and S) for color vision in daylight. However, the process that generates photoreceptor diversity and the cell type in which diversity arises remain unclear. Mice deleted for thyroid hormone receptor β2 (TRβ2) and neural retina leucine zipper factor (NRL) lack M cones and rods, respectively, but gain S cones. We therefore tested the hypothesis that NRL and TRβ2 direct a common precursor to a rod, M cone, or S cone outcome using Nrl(b2/b2) "knock-in" mice that express TRβ2 instead of NRL from the endogenous Nrl gene. Nrl(b2/b2) mice lacked rods and produced excess M cones in contrast to the excess S cones in Nrl(-/-) mice. Notably, the presence of both factors yielded rods in Nrl(+/b2) mice. The results demonstrate innate plasticity in postmitotic rod precursors that allows these cells to form three functional photoreceptor types in response to NRL or TRβ2. We also detected precursor cells in normal embryonic retina that transiently coexpressed Nrl and TRβ2, suggesting that some precursors may originate in a plastic state. The plasticity of the precursors revealed in Nrl(b2/b2) mice suggests that a two-step transcriptional switch can direct three photoreceptor fates: first, rod versus cone identity dictated by NRL, and second, if NRL fails to act, M versus S cone identity dictated by TRβ2.

  19. Role of the homeodomain transcription factor Bapx1 in mouse distal stomach development

    PubMed Central

    Verzi, Michael P.; Stanfel, Monique N.; Moses, Kelvin A.; Kim, Byeong-Moo; Zhang, Yan; Schwartz, Robert J.; Shivdasani, Ramesh A.; Zimmer, Warren E.

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims Expansion and patterning of the endoderm generate a highly ordered, multi-organ digestive system in vertebrate animals. Among distal foregut derivatives, the gastric corpus, antrum, pylorus and duodenum are distinct structures with sharp boundaries. Some homeodomain transcription factors expressed in gut mesenchyme convey positional information required for anterior-posterior patterning of the digestive tract. Barx1, in particular, controls stomach differentiation and morphogenesis. The NK homeobox gene Bapx1 (Nkx3-2) has an established role in skeletal development but its function in the mammalian gut is less clear. Methods We generated a Bapx1Cre knock-in allele to fate map Bapx1-expressing cells and evaluate its function in gastrointestinal development. Results Bapx1-expressing cells populate the gut mesenchyme with a rostral boundary in the hindstomach, near the junction of the gastric corpus and antrum. Smooth muscle differentiation and distribution of early regional markers are ostensibly normal in Bapx1Cre/Cre gut, but there are distinctive morphologic abnormalities near this rostral Bapx1 domain: the antral segment of the stomach is markedly shortened and the pyloric constriction is lost. Comparison of expression domains and examination of stomach phenotypes in single and compound Barx1 and Bapx1 mutant mice suggest a hierarchy between these two factors; Bapx1 expression is lost in the absence of Barx1. Conclusions This study reveals the non-redundant requirement for Bapx1 in distal stomach development, places it within a Barx1-dependent pathway, and illustrates the pervasive influence of gut mesenchyme homeobox genes on endoderm differentiation and digestive organogenesis. PMID:19208343

  20. Mapping of Genetic Factors That Elicit Intermale Aggressive Behavior on Mouse Chromosome 15: Intruder Effects and the Complex Genetic Basis

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Aki; Sugimoto, Hiroki; Kato, Shogo; Shiroishi, Toshihiko; Koide, Tsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Despite high estimates of the heritability of aggressiveness, the genetic basis for individual differences in aggression remains unclear. Previously, we showed that the wild-derived mouse strain MSM/Ms (MSM) exhibits highly aggressive behaviors, and identified chromosome 15 (Chr 15) as the location of one of the genetic factors behind this escalated aggression by using a panel of consomic strains of MSM in a C57BL/6J (B6) background. To understand the genetic effect of Chr 15 derived from MSM in detail, this study examined the aggressive behavior of a Chr 15 consomic strain towards different types of opponent. Our results showed that both resident and intruder animals had to have the same MSM Chr 15 genotype in order for attack bites to increase and attack latency to be reduced, whereas there was an intruder effect of MSM Chr 15 on tail rattle behavior. To narrow down the region that contains the genetic loci involved in the aggression-eliciting effects on Chr 15, we established a panel of subconsomic strains of MSM Chr 15. Analysis of these strains suggested the existence of multiple genes that enhance and suppress aggressive behavior on Chr 15, and these loci interact in a complex way. Regression analysis successfully identified four genetic loci on Chr 15 that influence attack latency, and one genetic locus that partially elicits aggressive behaviors was narrowed down to a 4.1-Mbp region (from 68.40 Mb to 72.50 Mb) on Chr 15. PMID:26389588

  1. Growth Factor erv1-like Modulates Drp1 to Preserve Mitochondrial Dynamics and Function in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Todd, Lance R.; Damin, Matthew N.; Gomathinayagam, Rohini; Horn, Sarah R.; Means, Anthony R.

    2010-01-01

    The relationship of mitochondrial dynamics and function to pluripotency are rather poorly understood aspects of stem cell biology. Here we show that growth factor erv1-like (Gfer) is involved in preserving mouse embryonic stem cell (ESC) mitochondrial morphology and function. Knockdown (KD) of Gfer in ESCs leads to decreased pluripotency marker expression, embryoid body (EB) formation, cell survival, and loss of mitochondrial function. Mitochondria in Gfer-KD ESCs undergo excessive fragmentation and mitophagy, whereas those in ESCs overexpressing Gfer appear elongated. Levels of the mitochondrial fission GTPase dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) are highly elevated in Gfer-KD ESCs and decreased in Gfer-overexpressing cells. Treatment with a specific inhibitor of Drp1 rescues mitochondrial function and apoptosis, whereas expression of Drp1-dominant negative resulted in the restoration of pluripotency marker expression in Gfer-KD ESCs. Altogether, our data reveal a novel prosurvival role for Gfer in maintaining mitochondrial fission–fusion dynamics in pluripotent ESCs. PMID:20147447

  2. Generation of Potent Anti-Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Neutralizing Antibodies from Mouse Phage Display Library for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yan-Da; Wu, Yen-Yu; Tsai, Yi-Jiue; Tsai, Yi-San; Lin, Yu-Ying; Lai, Szu-Liang; Huang, Chao-Yang; Lok, Ying-Yung; Hu, Chih-Yung; Lai, Jiann-Shiun

    2016-02-05

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an important stimulator for angiogenesis in solid tumors. Blocking VEGF activity is an effective therapeutic strategy to inhibit tumor growth and metastasis. Avastin, a humanized monoclonal antibody recognizes VEGF, has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. To generate potential VEGF-recognizing antibodies with better tumor regression ability than that of Avastin, we have designed a systematic antibody selection plan. From mice immunized with recombinant human VEGF, we generated three phage display libraries, scFv-M13KO7, Fab-M13KO7, and scFv-Hyperphage, in single-chain Fv (scFv) or Fab format, displayed using either M13KO7 helper phage or Hyperphage. Solid-phase and solution-phase selection strategies were then applied to each library, generating six panning combinations. A total of sixty-four antibodies recognizing VEGF were obtained. Based on the results of epitope mapping, binding affinity, and biological functions in tumor inhibition, eight antibodies were chosen to examine their abilities in tumor regression in a mouse xenograft model using human COLO 205 cancer cells. Three of them showed improvement in the inhibition of tumor growth (328%-347% tumor growth ratio (% of Day 0 tumor volume) on Day 21 vs. 435% with Avastin). This finding suggests a potential use of these three antibodies for VEGF-targeted therapy.

  3. Production of mouse granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor by gateway technology and transgenic rice cell culture.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Kuo; Huang, Li-Fen; Ho, Shin-Lon; Liao, Chun-Yu; Liu, Hsin-Yi; Lai, Ying-Hui; Yu, Su-May; Lu, Chung-An

    2012-05-01

    To establish a production platform for recombinant proteins in rice suspension cells, we first constructed a Gateway-compatible binary T-DNA destination vector. It provided a reliable and effective method for the rapid directional cloning of target genes into plant cells through Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. We used the approach to produce mouse granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (mGM-CSF) in a rice suspension cell system. The promoter for the αAmy3 amylase gene, which is induced strongly by sugar depletion, drove the expression of mGM-CSF. The resulting recombinant protein was fused with the αAmy3 signal peptide and was secreted into the culture medium. The production of rice-derived mGM-CSF (rmGM-CSF) was scaled up successfully in a 2-L bioreactor, in which the highest yield of rmGM-CSF was 24.6 mg/L. Due to post-translational glycosylation, the molecular weight of rmGM-CSF was larger than that of recombinant mGM-CSF produced in Escherichia coli. The rmGM-CSF was bioactive and could stimulate the proliferation of a murine myeloblastic leukemia cell line, NSF-60. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Reduced nasal transport of insulin-like growth factor-1 to the mouse cerebrum with olfactory bulb resection.

    PubMed

    Shiga, Hideaki; Nagaoka, Mikiya; Washiyama, Kohshin; Yamamoto, Junpei; Yamada, Kentaro; Noda, Takuya; Harita, Masayuki; Amano, Ryohei; Miwa, Takaki

    2014-09-01

    Although the olfactory nerve is involved in nasal transport of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) to the brain, to our knowledge there have been no direct assessments of the effects of olfactory nerve damage on this transport. To determine whether olfactory bulb resection resulted in reduced transport of nasally administered human recombinant IGF-1 (hIGF-1) to the cerebrum, we measured the uptake of nasally administered iodine-125 hIGF-1 ((125)I-hIGF-1) in the cerebrum as a percentage of that in the blood in male ICR mice subjected to left olfactory bulb resection (model mice) and in sham-operated male ICR mice (control mice). Phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 (Thr202/Tyr204)/(Thr185/Tyr187) as a percentage of total ERK 1/2 in the left cerebrum was also assessed by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay after nasal administration of hIGF-1. Uptake of nasally administered (125)I-hIGF-1 in the cerebrum as a percentage of that in the blood was significantly lower in the model group than in the control group 30min after nasal administration of hIGF-1. Unilateral olfactory bulb resection prevented nasally administered hIGF-1 from increasing the phosphorylation of ERK 1/2 in the mouse cerebrum in vivo. These findings suggest that olfactory bulb damage reduces nasal transport of hIGF-1 to the brain in vivo.

  5. Expression of a synthetic gene encoding human insulin-like growth factor I in cultured mouse fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Bayne, M.L.; Cascieri, M.A.; Kelder, B.; Applebaum, J.; Chicchi, G.; Shapiro, J.A.; Pasleau, F.; Kopchick, J.J.

    1987-05-01

    A synthetic gene encoding human insulin-like growth factor I (hIGF-I) was assembled and inserted into an expression vector containing the cytomegalovirus immediate early (CMV-IE) transcriptional regulatory region and portions of the bovine growth hormone gene. The recombinant plasmid encodes a 97 amino acid fusion protein containing the first 27 amino acids of the bovine growth hormone precursor and the 70 amino acids of hIGF-I. This plasmid, when transiently introduced into cultured mouse fibroblasts, directs synthesis of the fusion protein, subsequent proteolytic removal of the bovine growth hormone signal peptide, and secretion of hIGF-I into the culture medium. Conditioned medium from transfected cells inhibits binding of /sup 125/I-labeled IGF-I to type I IGF receptors on human placental membranes and to acid-stable human serum carrier proteins. The recombinant hIGF-I produced is biologically active, as monitored by the stimulation of DNA synthesis in vascular smooth muscle cells.

  6. Peripheral orthopaedic surgery down-regulates hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor and impairs remote memory in mouse.

    PubMed

    Fidalgo, A R; Cibelli, M; White, J P M; Nagy, I; Noormohamed, F; Benzonana, L; Maze, M; Ma, D

    2011-09-08

    Peripheral orthopaedic surgery induces a profound inflammatory response. This includes a substantial increase in cytokines and, especially, in the level of interleukin (IL)-1β in the hippocampus, which has been shown to impair hippocampal-dependent memory in mice. We have employed two tests of contextual remote memory to demonstrate that the inflammatory response to surgical insult in mice also results in impairment of remote memory associated with prefrontal cortex (PFC). We have also found that, under the conditions presented in the social interaction test, peripheral orthopaedic surgery does not increase anxiety-like behaviour in our animal model. Although such surgery induces an increase in the level of IL-1β in the hippocampus, it fails to do so in the PFC. Peripheral orthopaedic surgery also results in a reduction in the level of hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and this may contribute, in part, to the memory impairment found after such surgery. Our data suggest that a reduction in the level of hippocampal BDNF and an increase in the level of hippocampal IL-1β following surgery may affect the transference of fear memory in the mouse brain.

  7. The docking protein FRS2alpha is an essential component of multiple fibroblast growth factor responses during early mouse development.

    PubMed

    Gotoh, N; Manova, K; Tanaka, S; Murohashi, M; Hadari, Y; Lee, A; Hamada, Y; Hiroe, T; Ito, M; Kurihara, T; Nakazato, H; Shibuya, M; Lax, I; Lacy, E; Schlessinger, J

    2005-05-01

    The docking protein FRS2alpha is a major mediator of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling. However, the physiological role of FRS2alpha in vivo remains unknown. In this report, we show that Frs2alpha-null mouse embryos have a defect in anterior-posterior (A-P) axis formation and are developmentally retarded, resulting in embryonic lethality by embryonic day 8. We demonstrate that FRS2alpha is essential for the maintenance of self-renewing trophoblast stem (TS) cells in response to FGF4 in the extraembryonic ectoderm (ExE) that gives rise to tissues of the placenta. By analyzing chimeric embryos, we found that FRS2alpha also plays a role in cell movement through the primitive streak during gastrulation. In addition, experiments are presented demonstrating that Bmp4 expression in TS cells is controlled by mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent FGF4 stimulation. Moreover, both the expression of Bmp4 in ExE and activation of Smad1/5 in epiblasts are reduced in Frs2alpha-null embryos. These experiments underscore the critical role of FRS2alpha in mediating multiple processes during embryonic development and reveal a potential new link between FGF and Bmp4 signaling pathways in early embryogenesis.

  8. Epithelium-dependent extracellular matrix synthesis in transforming growth factor-beta 1-growth-inhibited mouse mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Silberstein, G B; Strickland, P; Coleman, S; Daniel, C W

    1990-06-01

    Exogenous transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta 1) was shown in earlier studies to reversibly inhibit mouse mammary ductal growth. Using small plastic implants to treat regions of developing mammary glands in situ, we now report that TGF-beta 1 growth inhibition is associated with an ectopic accumulation of type I collagen messenger RNA and protein, as well as the glycosaminoglycan, chondroitin sulfate. Both macromolecules are normal components of the ductal extracellular matrix, which, under the influence of exogenous TGF-beta 1, became unusually concentrated immediately adjacent to the epithelial cells at the tip of the ductal growth points, the end buds. Stimulation of extracellular matrix was confined to aggregations of connective tissue cells around affected end buds and was not present around the TGF-beta 1 implants themselves, indicating that the matrix effect was epithelium dependent. Ectopic matrix synthesis was specific for TGF-beta 1 insofar as it was absent at ducts treated with other growth inhibitors, or at ducts undergoing normal involution in response to endogenous regulatory processes. These findings are consistent with the matrix-stimulating properties of TGF-beta 1 reported for other systems, but differ in their strict dependence upon epithelium. A possible role for endogenous TGF-beta 1 in modulating a mammary epithelium-stroma interaction is suggested.

  9. Dissecting mechanisms of mouse embryonic stem cells heterogeneity through a model-based analysis of transcription factor dynamics.

    PubMed

    Herberg, Maria; Glauche, Ingmar; Zerjatke, Thomas; Winzi, Maria; Buchholz, Frank; Roeder, Ingo

    2016-04-01

    Pluripotent mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) show heterogeneous expression levels of transcription factors (TFs) involved in pluripotency regulation, among them Nanog and Rex1. The expression of both TFs can change dynamically between states of high and low activity, correlating with the cells' capacity for self-renewal. Stochastic fluctuations as well as sustained oscillations in gene expression are possible mechanisms to explain this behaviour, but the lack of suitable data hampered their clear distinction. Here, we present a systems biology approach in which novel experimental data on TF heterogeneity is complemented by an agent-based model of mESC self-renewal. Because the model accounts for intracellular interactions, cell divisions and heredity structures, it allows for evaluating the consistency of the proposed mechanisms with data on population growth and on TF dynamics after cell sorting. Our model-based analysis revealed that a bistable, noise-driven network model fulfils the minimal requirements to consistently explain Nanog and Rex1 expression dynamics in heterogeneous and sorted mESC populations. Moreover, we studied the impact of TF-related proliferation capacities on the frequency of state transitions and demonstrate that cellular genealogies can provide insights into the heredity structures of mESCs. © 2016 The Author(s).

  10. Activation of the factor XII-driven contact system in Alzheimer’s disease patient and mouse model plasma

    PubMed Central

    Zamolodchikov, Daria; Chen, Zu-Lin; Conti, Brooke A.; Renné, Thomas; Strickland, Sidney

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by accumulation of the β-amyloid peptide (Aβ), which likely contributes to disease via multiple mechanisms. Increasing evidence implicates inflammation in AD, the origins of which are not completely understood. We investigated whether circulating Aβ could initiate inflammation in AD via the plasma contact activation system. This proteolytic cascade is triggered by the activation of the plasma protein factor XII (FXII) and leads to kallikrein-mediated cleavage of high molecular-weight kininogen (HK) and release of proinflammatory bradykinin. Aβ has been shown to promote FXII-dependent cleavage of HK in vitro. In addition, increased cleavage of HK has been found in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with AD. Here, we show increased activation of FXII, kallikrein activity, and HK cleavage in AD patient plasma. Increased contact system activation is also observed in AD mouse model plasma and in plasma from wild-type mice i.v. injected with Aβ42. Our results demonstrate that Aβ42-mediated contact system activation can occur in the AD circulation and suggest new pathogenic mechanisms, diagnostic tests, and therapies for AD. PMID:25775543

  11. Chronic Unpredictable Stress Decreases Expression of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) in Mouse Ovaries: Relationship to Oocytes Developmental Potential

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Xian-Hong; Han, Hui; Shen, Ni; Jin, Ren-Tao; Wang, Wei; Zhou, Gui-Xiang; He, Guo-Ping; Liu, Yu-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    Background Brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) was originally described in the nervous system but has been shown to be expressed in ovary tissues recently, acting as a paracrine/autocrine regulator required for developments of follicles and oocytes. Although it is generally accepted that chronic stress impairs female reproduction and decreases the expression of BDNF in limbic structures of central nervous system, which contributes to mood disorder. However, it is not known whether chronic stress affects oocytes developments, nor whether it affects expression of BDNF in ovary. Methods Mice were randomly assigned into control group, stressed group, BDNF-treated group and BDNF-treated stressed group. The chronic unpredictable mild stress model was used to produce psychosocial stress in mice, and the model was verified by open field test and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity. The methods of immunohistochemistry and western blotting were used to detect BDNF protein level and distribution. The number of retrieved oocytes, oocyte maturation, embryo cleavage and the rates of blastocyst formation after parthenogenetic activation were evaluated. Results Chronic unpredictable stress decreased the BDNF expression in antral follicles, but didn’t affect the BDNF expression in primordial, primary and secondary follicles. Chronic unpredictable stress also decreased the number of retrieved oocytes and the rate of blastocyst formation, which was rescued by exogenous BDNF treatment. Conclusion BDNF in mouse ovaries may be related to the decreased number of retrieved oocytes and impaired oocytes developmental potential induced by chronic unpredictable stress. PMID:23284991

  12. Growth factor erv1-like modulates Drp1 to preserve mitochondrial dynamics and function in mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Todd, Lance R; Damin, Matthew N; Gomathinayagam, Rohini; Horn, Sarah R; Means, Anthony R; Sankar, Uma

    2010-04-01

    The relationship of mitochondrial dynamics and function to pluripotency are rather poorly understood aspects of stem cell biology. Here we show that growth factor erv1-like (Gfer) is involved in preserving mouse embryonic stem cell (ESC) mitochondrial morphology and function. Knockdown (KD) of Gfer in ESCs leads to decreased pluripotency marker expression, embryoid body (EB) formation, cell survival, and loss of mitochondrial function. Mitochondria in Gfer-KD ESCs undergo excessive fragmentation and mitophagy, whereas those in ESCs overexpressing Gfer appear elongated. Levels of the mitochondrial fission GTPase dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) are highly elevated in Gfer-KD ESCs and decreased in Gfer-overexpressing cells. Treatment with a specific inhibitor of Drp1 rescues mitochondrial function and apoptosis, whereas expression of Drp1-dominant negative resulted in the restoration of pluripotency marker expression in Gfer-KD ESCs. Altogether, our data reveal a novel prosurvival role for Gfer in maintaining mitochondrial fission-fusion dynamics in pluripotent ESCs.

  13. A gene linked to the Igh-C locus controls the production of rheumatoid factor in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    In certain specific pathogen-free colonies, mice, upon aging, produce autoantibodies (RF) specific for the Fc portion of their IgG. In our colony, 129/Sv mice (H-2bvl; Igh-1a) have 10-20 times higher RF levels than C5BL/6 (h-2b; Igh-1b). In addition, the 129 have mainly IgA anti- IgG2a, and the B6 have mainly IgM anti-IgGl. We analyzed the genetic factors that control these differences. The high RF-producer phenotype of strain 129 was inherited as a recessive trait as indicated by the low RF levels of (129 X B6) F1 mice. About 1 of 4 129 X F1 (129 X B6) backcrosses and 1 of 10 (129 X B6) F2 mice had high RF levels, suggesting the involvement of two recessive genes in the control of this RF production. All F2 mice and all but one backcross with high IgA anti-IgG2a levels were homozygous for the Ihg-1a allele of the 129 mouse. In contrast, the B6-type RF was eight times more frequent in Igh- 1bb than in Igh-1ab or Igh-1aa mice. High RF titers of either type were suppressed in Igh-1ab mice. PMID:6972988

  14. Connexin30.3 is expressed in mouse embryonic stem cells and is responsive to leukemia inhibitory factor

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Mikako; Asai, Yuma; Imai, Keiichi; Hiratoko, Shoya; Tanaka, Kento

    2017-01-01

    The expression of 19 connexin (Cx) isoforms was observed in the mouse embryonic stem (ES) cell line, EB3. Their expression patterns could be classified into either pluripotent state-specific, differentiating stage-specific, or non-specific Cxs. We focused on Cx30.3 as typical of the first category. Cx30.3 was pluripotent state-specific and upregulated by leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), a specific cytokine that maintains the pluripotent state of ES cell, via a Jak signaling pathway. Cx30.3 protein was localized to both the cell membrane and cytosol. The dynamic movement of Cx30.3 in the cell membrane was suggested by the imaging analysis by means of overexpressed Cx30.3-EGFP fusion protein. The cytosolic portion was postulated to be a ready-to-use Cx pool. The Cx30.3 expression level in ES cell colonies dramatically decreased immediately after their separation into single cells. It was suggested that mRNA for Cx30.3 and Cx30.3 protein might be decomposed more rapidly than mRNA for Cx43 and Cx43 protein, respectively. These indicate possible involvement of Cx30.3 in the rapid formation and/or decomposition of gap junctions; implying a functional relay between Cx30.3 and other systems such as adhesion proteins. PMID:28205646

  15. Connective Tissue Growth Factor Regulates Cardiac Function and Tissue Remodeling in a Mouse Model of Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Koshman, Yevgeniya E.; Sternlicht, Mark D.; Kim, Taehoon; O'Hara, Christopher P.; Koczor, Christopher A.; Lewis, William; Seeley, Todd W.; Lipson, Kenneth E.; Samarel, Allen M.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac structural changes associated with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) include cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and myocardial fibrosis. Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CTGF) has been associated with tissue remodeling and is highly expressed in failing hearts. Our aim was to test if inhibition of CTGF would alter the course of cardiac remodeling and preserve cardiac function in the protein kinase Cε (PKCε) mouse model of DCM. Transgenic mice expressing constitutively active PKCε in cardiomyocytes develop cardiac dysfunction that was evident by 3 months of age, and that progressed to cardiac fibrosis, heart failure, and increased mortality. Beginning at 3 months of age, PKCε mice were treated with a neutralizing monoclonal antibody to CTGF (FG-3149) for an additional 3 months. CTGF inhibition significantly improved left ventricular (LV) systolic and diastolic function in PKCε mice, and slowed the progression of LV dilatation. Using gene arrays and quantitative PCR, the expression of many genes associated with tissue remodeling were elevated in PKCε mice, but significantly decreased by CTGF inhibition. However total collagen deposition was not attenuated. The observation of significantly improved LV function by CTGF inhibition in PKCε mice suggests that CTGF inhibition may benefit patients with DCM. Additional studies to explore this potential are warranted. PMID:26549358

  16. Involvement of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 α (HIF-1α) in inhibition of benzene on mouse hematopoietic system.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xing; Zhang, Juan; Yin, Lihong; Pu, Yuepu

    2016-01-01

    Benzene is an occupational and environmental pollutant that damages the hematopoietic system through oxidant mechanisms. The aims of this study were to assess the role of oxidation in benzene-mediated damage by determination of the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and to evaluate the role of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) in this process. C57BL/6 mice were exposed to benzene at varying concentrations of 60, 150, or 300 mg/kg/d for 15 d. Mice in the benzene groups displayed weight loss, and hematologic consequences including decreased red and white blood cell counts, reduced platelet count, diminished hemoglobin content, and lower number of hematopoietic stem cells in bone marrow (BM). There was an elevated proportional neutrophil count and decrease in relative thymus weight. In BM there was a significant increase in ROS levels at 150 mg/kg benzene. However, as a result of diminished cellular viability, ROS levels were not markedly different between the 300-mg/kg benzene dose and the control, as the number of hematopoietic stem cells was reduced. HIF-1α expression and protein levels were decreased in BM cells at all doses of benzene. In conclusion, data indicated that HIF-1α may be involved in benzene-induced inhibition of mouse hematopoiesis and that oxidative stress may play a role in the observed toxicity.

  17. Insulinlike growth factor (IGF)-1 administration ameliorates disease manifestations in a mouse model of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, Carlo; Bott, Laura C; Chen, Ke-lian; Harmison, George G; Katsuno, Masahisa; Sobue, Gen; Pennuto, Maria; Fischbeck, Kenneth H

    2012-12-06

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy is an X-linked motor neuron disease caused by polyglutamine expansion in the androgen receptor. Patients develop slowly progressive proximal muscle weakness, muscle atrophy and fasciculations. Affected individuals often show gynecomastia, testicular atrophy and reduced fertility as a result of mild androgen insensitivity. No effective disease-modifying therapy is currently available for this disease. Our recent studies have demonstrated that insulinlike growth factor (IGF)-1 reduces the mutant androgen receptor toxicity through activation of Akt in vitro, and spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy transgenic mice that also overexpress a noncirculating muscle isoform of IGF-1 have a less severe phenotype. Here we sought to establish the efficacy of daily intraperitoneal injections of mecasermin rinfabate, recombinant human IGF-1 and IGF-1 binding protein 3, in a transgenic mouse model expressing the mutant androgen receptor with an expanded 97 glutamine tract. The study was done in a controlled, randomized, blinded fashion, and, to reflect the clinical settings, the injections were started after the onset of disease manifestations. The treatment resulted in increased Akt phosphorylation and reduced mutant androgen receptor aggregation in muscle. In comparison to vehicle-treated controls, IGF-1-treated transgenic mice showed improved motor performance, attenuated weight loss and increased survival. Our results suggest that peripheral tissue can be targeted to improve the spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy phenotype and indicate that IGF-1 warrants further investigation in clinical trials as a potential treatment for this disease.

  18. Loss of Dlg-1 in the Mouse Lens Impairs Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lee, SungKyoung; Griep, Anne E.

    2014-01-01

    Coordination of cell proliferation, differentiation and survival is essential for normal development and maintenance of tissues in the adult organism. Growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase signaling pathways and planar cell polarity pathways are two regulators of many developmental processes. We have previously shown through analysis of mice conditionally null in the lens for the planar cell polarity gene (PCP), Dlg-1, that Dlg-1 is required for fiber differentiation. Herein, we asked if Dlg-1 is a regulator of the Fibroblast growth factor receptor (Fgfr) signaling pathway, which is known to be required for fiber cell differentiation. Western blot analysis of whole fiber cell extracts from control and Dlg-1 deficient lenses showed that levels of the Fgfr signaling intermediates pErk, pAkt, and pFrs2α, the Fgfr target, Erm, and the fiber cell specific protein, Mip26, were reduced in the Dlg-1 deficient fiber cells. The levels of Fgfr2 were decreased in Dlg-1 deficient lenses compared to controls. Conversely, levels of Fgfr1 in Dlg-1 deficient lenses were increased compared to controls. The changes in Fgfr levels were found to be specifically in the triton insoluble, cytoskeletal associated fraction of Dlg-1 deficient lenses. Immunofluorescent staining of lenses from E13.5 embryos showed that expression levels of pErk were reduced in the transition zone, a region of the lens that exhibits PCP, in the Dlg-1 deficient lenses as compared to controls. In control lenses, immunofluorescent staining for Fgfr2 was observed in the epithelium, transition zone and fibers. By E13.5, the intensity of staining for Fgfr2 was reduced in these regions of the Dlg-1 deficient lenses. Thus, loss of Dlg-1 in the lens impairs Fgfr signaling and leads to altered levels of Fgfrs, suggesting that Dlg-1 is a modulator of Fgfr signaling pathway at the level of the receptors and that Dlg-1 regulates fiber cell differentiation through its role in PCP. PMID:24824078

  19. Upregulation of macrophage migration inhibitory factor and calgizzarin by androgen in TM4 mouse Sertoli cells.

    PubMed

    Kasumi, Hiroyuki; Komori, Shinji; Sakata, Kazuko; Yamamoto, Naoko; Yamasaki, Tomohiko; Kanemura, Yonehiro; Koyama, Koji

    2006-09-01

    To identify proteins induced by androgen in Sertoli cells during spermatogenesis. We analyzed protein profiles in TM4 Sertoli cells treated with dihydrotestosterone (DHT) using surface enhanced laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS). We found increases in the expression of a 5.0-kDa protein at 15 min, an 11.3-kDa protein at 24 h and 4.3 kDa, 5.7 kDa, 5.8 kDa, 9.95 kDa and 9.98 kDa proteins at 48 h after the treatment. In contrast, the expression of 6.3 kDa and 8.6 kDa proteins decreased at 30 min, and 4.9 kDa, 5.0 kDa, 12.4 kDa and 19.8 kDa proteins at 48 h after the treatment. The 11.3-kDa protein was identified as macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) known to having various functions. The 9.98-kDa protein was identified as calgizzarin related to calcium channels. The timing of their expression suggests that MIF and calgizzarin are involved in late regulation of spermatogenesis in Sertoli cells by androgen. MIF and calgizzarin are two important androgen-responsive proteins produced by Sertoli cells and they might play a role in regulating spermatogenesis.

  20. A mouse model for achondroplasia produced by targeting fibroblast growth factor receptor 3

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yingcai; Spatz, Michal K.; Kannan, Karuppiah; Hayk, Hovhannisyan; Avivi, Aaron; Gorivodsky, Marat; Pines, Mark; Yayon, Avner; Lonai, Peter; Givol, David

    1999-01-01

    Achondroplasia, the most common form of dwarfism in man, is a dominant genetic disorder caused by a point mutation (G380R) in the transmembrane region of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3). We used gene targeting to introduce the human achondroplasia mutation into the murine FGFR3 gene. Heterozygotes for this point mutation that carried the neo cassette were normal whereas neo+ homozygotes had a phenotype similar to FGFR3-deficient mice, exhibiting bone overgrowth. This was because of interference with mRNA processing in the presence of the neo cassette. Removal of the neo selection marker by Cre/loxP recombination yielded a dominant dwarf phenotype. These mice are distinguished by their small size, shortened craniofacial area, hypoplasia of the midface with protruding incisors, distorted brain case with anteriorly shifted foramen magnum, kyphosis, and narrowed and distorted growth plates in the long bones, vertebrae, and ribs. These experiments demonstrate that achondroplasia results from a gain-of-FGFR3-function leading to inhibition of chondrocyte proliferation. These achondroplastic dwarf mice represent a reliable and useful model for developing drugs for potential treatment of the human disease. PMID:10200283

  1. Protective and detrimental effects of neuroectodermal cell–derived tissue factor in mouse models of stroke

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaobin; Reeves, Brandi; Sparkenbaugh, Erica M.; Russell, Janice; Soltys, Zbigniew; Zhang, Hua; Faber, James E.; Key, Nigel S.; Kirchhofer, Daniel; Granger, D. Neil; Mackman, Nigel

    2016-01-01

    Within the CNS, a dysregulated hemostatic response contributes to both hemorrhagic and ischemic strokes. Tissue factor (TF), the primary initiator of the extrinsic coagulation cascade, plays an essential role in hemostasis and also contributes to thrombosis. Using both genetic and pharmacologic approaches, we characterized the contribution of neuroectodermal (NE) cell TF to the pathophysiology of stroke. We used mice with various levels of TF expression and found that astrocyte TF activity reduced to ~5% of WT levels was still sufficient to maintain hemostasis after hemorrhagic stroke but was also low enough to attenuate inflammation, reduce damage to the blood-brain barrier, and improve outcomes following ischemic stroke. Pharmacologic inhibition of TF during the reperfusion phase of ischemic stroke attenuated neuronal damage, improved behavioral deficit, and prevented mortality of mice. Our data demonstrate that NE cell TF limits bleeding complications associated with the transition from ischemic to hemorrhagic stroke and also contributes to the reperfusion injury after ischemic stroke. The high level of TF expression in the CNS is likely the result of selective pressure to limit intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) after traumatic brain injury but, in the modern era, poses the additional risk of increased ischemia-reperfusion injury after ischemic stroke. PMID:27489885

  2. Mouse models for studying genetic influences on factors determining smoking cessation success in humans

    PubMed Central

    Hall, F. Scott; Markou, Athina; Levin, Edward D.; Uhl, George R.

    2014-01-01

    Humans differ in their ability to quit using addictive substances, including nicotine, the major psychoactive ingredient in tobacco. For tobacco smoking, a substantial body of evidence, largely derived from twin studies, indicates that approximately half of these individual differences in ability to quit are heritable [1, 2], genetic influences that likely overlap with those for other addictive substances [3]. Both twin and molecular genetic studies support overlapping influences on nicotine addiction vulnerability and smoking cessation success, although there is little formal analysis of the twin data that supports this important point [2, 3]. None of the current datasets provides clear data concerning which heritable factors might provide robust dimensions around which individuals differ in ability to quit smoking. One approach to this problem is to test mice with genetic variations in genes that contain human variants that alter quit-success. This review considers which features of quit success should be included in a comprehensive approach to elucidating the genetics of quit success, and how those features may be modeled in mice. PMID:22304675

  3. Mouse embryogenesis requires the tissue factor extracellular domain but not the cytoplasmic domain

    PubMed Central

    Parry, Graham C.N.; Mackman, Nigel

    2000-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that tissue factor (TF) acts in embryogenesis, metastasis, and angiogenesis. Three independent groups showed that targeted disruption of the murine TF (mTF) gene results in 90% lethality of mTF null embryos at embryonic days 9.5–10.5. We have demonstrated that expression of wild-type human TF (hTF) from a minigene rescues the embryonic lethality of mTF null embryos. To investigate the role of TF in embryogenesis, we made mutant hTF minigenes whose products either bound FVII/VIIa at a reduced level or lacked the cytoplasmic domain. Two independent transgenic lines expressing the hTF extracellular domain mutant failed to rescue the embryonic lethality of mTF null embryos, suggesting that FVII/VIIa binding by TF, proteolytic activity by the TF/FVIIa complex, or both were required for embryogenesis. In contrast, two transgenic lines expressing the hTF cytoplasmic domain mutant rescued the embryonic lethality of mTF null embryos, indicating that the cytoplasmic domain of TF was not required for embryogenesis. We propose that TF/FVIIa-dependent extracellular protease activity is required for embryogenesis. PMID:10841513

  4. Normal retina releases a diffusible factor stimulating cone survival in the retinal degeneration mouse.

    PubMed

    Mohand-Said, S; Deudon-Combe, A; Hicks, D; Simonutti, M; Forster, V; Fintz, A C; Léveillard, T; Dreyfus, H; Sahel, J A

    1998-07-07

    The role of cellular interactions in the mechanism of secondary cone photoreceptor degeneration in inherited retinal degenerations in which the mutation specifically affects rod photoreceptors was studied. We developed an organ culture model of whole retinas from 5-week-old mice carrying the retinal degeneration mutation, which at this age contain few remaining rods and numerous surviving cones cocultured with primary cultures of mixed cells from postnatal day 8 normal-sighted mice (C57BL/6) retinas or retinal explants from normal (C57BL/6) or dystrophic (C3H/He) 5-week-old mice. After 7 days, the numbers of residual cone photoreceptors were quantified after specific peanut lectin or anti-arrestin antibody labeling by using an unbiased stereological approach. Examination of organ cultured retinas revealed significantly greater numbers of surviving cones (15-20%) if cultured in the presence of retinas containing normal rods as compared with controls or cocultures with rod-deprived retinas. These data indicate the existence of a diffusible trophic factor released from retinas containing rod cells and acting on retinas in which only cones are present. Because cones are responsible for high acuity and color vision, such data could have important implications not only for eventual therapeutic approaches to human retinal degenerations but also to define interactions between retinal photoreceptor types.

  5. Development, maturation, and necessity of transcription factors in the mouse suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    PubMed

    VanDunk, Cassandra; Hunter, Lindsay A; Gray, Paul A

    2011-04-27

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus is the master mammalian circadian clock. The SCN is highly specialized because it is responsible for generating a near 24 h rhythm, integrating external cues, and translating the rhythm throughout the body. Currently, our understanding of the developmental origin and genetic program involved in the proper specification and maturation of the SCN is limited. Herein, we provide a detailed analysis of transcription factor (TF) and developmental-gene expression in the SCN from neurogenesis to adulthood in mice (Mus musculus). TF expression within the postmitotic SCN was not static but rather showed specific temporal and spatial changes during prenatal and postnatal development. In addition, we found both global and regional patterns of TF expression extending into the adult. We found that the SCN is derived from a distinct region of the neuroepithelium expressing a combination of developmental genes: Six3, Six6, Fzd5, and transient Rx, allowing us to pinpoint the origin of this region within the broader developing telencephalon/diencephalon. We tested the necessity of two TFs in SCN development, RORα and Six3, which were expressed during SCN development, persisted into adulthood, and showed diurnal rhythmicity. Loss of RORα function had no effect on SCN peptide expression or localization. In marked contrast, the conditional deletion of Six3 from early neural progenitors completely eliminated the formation of the SCN. Our results provide the first description of the involvement of TFs in the specification and maturation of a neural population necessary for circadian behavior.

  6. Epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor protects against abdominal aortic aneurysm in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Obama, Takashi; Tsuji, Toshiyuki; Kobayashi, Tomonori; Fukuda, Yamato; Takayanagi, Takehiko; Taro, Yoshinori; Kawai, Tatsuo; Forrester, Steven J; Elliott, Katherine J; Choi, Eric; Daugherty, Alan; Rizzo, Victor; Eguchi, Satoru

    2015-05-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) has been implicated in the development of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). In vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC), Ang II activates epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mediating growth promotion. We hypothesized that inhibition of EGFR prevents Ang II-dependent AAA. C57BL/6 mice were co-treated with Ang II and β-aminopropionitrile (BAPN) to induce AAA with or without treatment with EGFR inhibitor, erlotinib. Without erlotinib, 64.3% of mice were dead due to aortic rupture. All surviving mice had AAA associated with EGFR activation. Erlotinib-treated mice did not die and developed far fewer AAA. The maximum diameters of abdominal aortas were significantly shorter with erlotinib treatment. In contrast, both erlotinib-treated and non-treated mice developed hypertension. The erlotinib treatment of abdominal aorta was associated with lack of EGFR activation, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, oxidative stress, interleukin-6 induction and matrix deposition. EGFR activation in AAA was also observed in humans. In conclusion, EGFR inhibition appears to protect mice from AAA formation induced by Ang II plus BAPN. The mechanism seems to involve suppression of vascular EGFR and ER stress.

  7. White Matter Loss in a Mouse Model of Periventricular Leukomalacia Is Rescued by Trophic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa-Jeffrey, Araceli; Barajas, Socorro A. R.; Arrazola, Alfonso R.; Taniguchi, Alana; Zhao, Paul M.; Bokhoor, Payam; Holley, Sandra M.; Dejarme, Don P.; Chu, Brian; Cepeda, Carlos; Levine, Michael S.; Gressens, Pierre; Feria-Velasco, Alfredo; de Vellis, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) is the most frequent cause of cerebral palsy and other intellectual disabilities, and currently there is no treatment. In PVL, glutamate excitotoxicity (GME) leads to abnormal oligodendrocytes (OLs), myelin deficiency, and ventriculomegaly. We have previously identified that the combination of transferrin and insulin growth factors (TSC1) promotes endogenous OL regeneration and remyelination in the postnatal and adult rodent brain. Here, we produced a periventricular white matter lesion with a single intracerebral injection of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA). Comparing lesions produced by NMDA alone and those produced by NMDA + TSC1 we found that: NMDA affected survival and reduced migration of OL progenitors (OLPs). In contrast, mice injected with NMDA + TSC1 proliferated twice as much indicating that TSC1 supported regeneration of the OLP population after the insult. Olig2-mRNA expression showed 52% OLP survival in mice receiving a NMDA injection and increased to 78% when TSC1 + NMDA were injected simultaneously and ventricular size was reduced by TSC1. Furthermore, in striatal slices TSC1 reduced the inward currents induced by NMDA in medium-sized spiny neurons, demonstrating neuroprotection. Thus, white matter loss after excitotoxicity can be partially rescued as TSC1 conferred neuroprotection to preexisting OLP and regeneration via OLP proliferation. Furthermore, we showed that early TSC1 administration maximizes neuroprotection. PMID:24961618

  8. The Transcription Factor Nfatc2 Regulates β-Cell Proliferation and Genes Associated with Type 2 Diabetes in Mouse and Human Islets

    PubMed Central

    Rabaglia, Mary E.; Schueler, Kathryn L.; Ye, Shuyun Isabella; Leng, Ning; Neto, Elias Chaibub; Plaisier, Christopher L.; Kebede, Melkam A.; Klein, Mark A.; Baliga, Nitin S.; Kendziorski, Christina; Attie, Alan D.

    2016-01-01

    Human genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have shown that genetic variation at >130 gene loci is associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D). We asked if the expression of the candidate T2D-associated genes within these loci is regulated by a common locus in pancreatic islets. Using an obese F2 mouse intercross segregating for T2D, we show that the expression of ~40% of the T2D-associated genes is linked to a broad region on mouse chromosome (Chr) 2. As all but 9 of these genes are not physically located on Chr 2, linkage to Chr 2 suggests a genomic factor(s) located on Chr 2 regulates their expression in trans. The transcription factor Nfatc2 is physically located on Chr 2 and its expression demonstrates cis linkage; i.e., its expression maps to itself. When conditioned on the expression of Nfatc2, linkage for the T2D-associated genes was greatly diminished, supporting Nfatc2 as a driver of their expression. Plasma insulin also showed linkage to the same broad region on Chr 2. Overexpression of a constitutively active (ca) form of Nfatc2 induced β-cell proliferation in mouse and human islets, and transcriptionally regulated more than half of the T2D-associated genes. Overexpression of either ca-Nfatc2 or ca-Nfatc1 in mouse islets enhanced insulin secretion, whereas only ca-Nfatc2 was able to promote β-cell proliferation, suggesting distinct molecular pathways mediating insulin secretion vs. β-cell proliferation are regulated by NFAT. Our results suggest that many of the T2D-associated genes are downstream transcriptional targets of NFAT, and may act coordinately in a pathway through which NFAT regulates β-cell proliferation in both mouse and human islets. PMID:27935966

  9. Transcriptional activation of mouse mast cell Protease-7 by activin and transforming growth factor-beta is inhibited by microphthalmia-associated transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Funaba, Masayuki; Ikeda, Teruo; Murakami, Masaru; Ogawa, Kenji; Tsuchida, Kunihiro; Sugino, Hiromu; Abe, Matanobu

    2003-12-26

    Previous studies have revealed that activin A and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) induced migration and morphological changes toward differentiation in bone marrow-derived cultured mast cell progenitors (BMCMCs). Here we show up-regulation of mouse mast cell protease-7 (mMCP-7), which is expressed in differentiated mast cells, by activin A and TGF-beta1 in BMCMCs, and the molecular mechanism of the gene induction of mmcp-7. Smad3, a signal mediator of the activin/TGF-beta pathway, transcriptionally activated mmcp-7. Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF), a tissue-specific transcription factor predominantly expressed in mast cells, melanocytes, and heart and skeletal muscle, inhibited Smad3-mediated mmcp-7 transcription. MITF associated with Smad3, and the C terminus of MITF and the MH1 and linker region of Smad3 were required for this association. Complex formation between Smad3 and MITF was neither necessary nor sufficient for the inhibition of Smad3 signaling by MITF. MITF inhibited the transcriptional activation induced by the MH2 domain of Smad3. In addition, MITF-truncated N-terminal amino acids could associate with Smad3 but did not inhibit Smad3-mediated transcription. The level of Smad3 was decreased by co-expression of MITF but not of dominant-negative MITF, which resulted from proteasomal protein degradation. The changes in the level of Smad3 protein were paralleled by those in Smad3-mediated signaling activity. These findings suggest that MITF negatively regulates Smad-dependent activin/TGF-beta signaling in a tissue-specific manner.

  10. Effect of microgravity on glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor and cerebral dopamine neurotrophic factor gene expression in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Tsybko, A S; Ilchibaeva, T V; Kulikov, A V; Kulikova, E A; Krasnov, I B; Sychev, V N; Shenkman, B S; Popova, N K; Naumenko, V S

    2015-09-01

    Mice were exposed to 1 month of space flight on the Russian biosatellite BION-M1 to determine its effect on the expression of genes involved in the maintenance of the mouse brain dopamine system. The current article focuses on the genes encoding glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and cerebral dopamine neurotrophic factor (CDNF). Space flight reduced expression of the GDNF gene in the striatum and hypothalamus but increased it in the frontal cortex and raphe nuclei area. At the same time, actual space flight reduced expression of the gene encoding CDNF in the substantia nigra but increased it in the raphe nuclei area. To separate the effects of space flight from environmental stress contribution, we analyzed expression of the investigated genes in mice housed for 1 month on Earth in the same shuttle cabins that were used for space flight and in mice of the vivarium control group. Shuttle cabin housing failed to alter the expression of the GDNF and CDNF genes in the brain structures investigated. Thus, actual long-term space flight produced dysregulation in genetic control of GDNF and CDNF genes. These changes may be related to downregulation of the dopamine system after space flight, which we have shown earlier. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Our results provide the first evidence of microgravity effects on expression of the GDNF and CDNF neurotrophic factor genes. A considerable decrease in mRNA level of GDNF and CDNF in the nigrostriatal dopamine system was found. Because both GDNF and CDNF play a significant role in maintenance and survival of brain dopaminergic neurons, we can assume that this dysregulation in genetic control of GDNF and CDNF genes in substantia nigra could be among the reasons for the deleterious effects of space flight on the dopamine system. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Alternative Splicing of the LIM-Homeodomain Transcription Factor Isl1 in the Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Whitney, Irene E.; Kautzman, Amanda G.; Reese, Benjamin E.

    2015-01-01

    Islet-1 (Isl1) is a LIM-homeodomain (LIM-HD) transcription factor that functions in a combinatorial manner with other LIM-HD proteins to direct the differentiation of distinct cell types within the central nervous system and many other tissues. A study of pancreatic cell lines showed that Isl1 is alternatively spliced generating a second isoform, Isl1β, which is missing 23 amino acids within the C-terminal region. This study examines the expression of the canonical and alternative Isl1 transcripts across other tissues, in particular, within the retina, where Isl1 is required for the differentiation of multiple neuronal cell types. The alternative splicing of Isl1 is shown to occur in multiple tissues, but the relative abundance of Isl1α and Isl1 β expression varies greatly across them. In most tissues, Isl1α is the more abundant transcript, but in others the transcripts are expressed equally, or the alternative splice variant is dominant. Within the retina, differential expression of the two Isl1 transcripts increases as a function of development, with dynamic changes in expression peaking at E16.5 and again at P10. At the cellular level, individual retinal ganglion cells vary in their expression, with a subset of small-to-medium sized cells expressing only the alternative isoform. The functional significance of the difference in protein sequence between the two Isl1 isoforms was also assessed using a luciferase assay, demonstrating that the alternative isoform forms a less effective transcriptional complex for activating gene expression. These results demonstrate the differential presence of the canonical and alternative isoforms of Isl1 amongst retinal ganglion cell classes. As Isl1 participates in the differentiation of multiple cell types within the CNS, the present results support a role for alternative splicing in the establishment of cellular diversity in the developing nervous system. PMID:25752730

  12. Keratinocyte growth factor-2 inhibits bacterial infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Feng, Nana; Wang, Qin; Zhou, Jian; Li, Jing; Wen, Xiaoxing; Chen, Shujing; Zhu, Zhenhua; Bai, Chunxue; Song, Yuanlin; Li, Huayin

    2016-01-01

    To determine protective effects of concurrent administration of Keratinocyte growth factor-2 (KGF-2) with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) inoculation on the induced pneumonia. KGF-2 (5 mg/kg) was concurrently administered into the left lobe of 55 mice with P. aeruginosa PAO1 (5 × 10(6) CFU, half-lethal dose); 55 mice in the control group were concurrently administered PBS with the PAO1. We detected and analyzed: body temperature; amount of P. aeruginosa in homogenates; count of total number of nucleated cells and of mononuclear macrophages; protein concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF); lung wet-to-dry weight ratio; cytokines in BALF and blood; and lung morphology. To study survival rate, concurrent administration of KGF-2 (experimental group) versus PBS (control) with a lethal dose of PAO1 (1 × 10(7) CFU was performed, and survivorship was documented for 7 days post-inoculation. The bacterial CFU in lung homogenates was significantly decreased in the KGF-2 group compared to the control group. There were significantly more mononuclear macrophages in the BALF from the KGF-2 group than from the control group (p < 0.05). KGF-2 increased the surfactant protein and GM-CSF mRNA in lung at 6 h and 72 h after inoculation. Significant reduction of lung injury scores, protein concentrations, lung wet-to-dry weight ratio, and IL-6 and TNF-α levels was noted in the KGF-2 treated rats at 72 h after inoculation (p < 0.05). The 7-day survival rate of the KGF-2 group was significantly higher than that of the control group (p < 0.05). Concurrent administration of KGF-2 facilitates the clearance of P. aeruginosa from the lungs, attenuates P. aeruginosa-induced lung injury, and extends the 7-day survival rate in mice model with P. aeruginosa pneumonia.

  13. Examining the virulence of Candida albicans transcription factor mutants using Galleria mellonella and mouse infection models.

    PubMed

    Amorim-Vaz, Sara; Delarze, Eric; Ischer, Françoise; Sanglard, Dominique; Coste, Alix T

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify Candida albicans transcription factors (TFs) involved in virulence. Although mice are considered the gold-standard model to study fungal virulence, mini-host infection models have been increasingly used. Here, barcoded TF mutants were first screened in mice by pools of strains and fungal burdens (FBs) quantified in kidneys. Mutants of unannotated genes which generated a kidney FB significantly different from that of wild-type were selected and individually examined in Galleria mellonella. In addition, mutants that could not be detected in mice were also tested in G. mellonella. Only 25% of these mutants displayed matching phenotypes in both hosts, highlighting a significant discrepancy between the two models. To address the basis of this difference (pool or host effects), a set of 19 mutants tested in G. mellonella were also injected individually into mice. Matching FB phenotypes were observed in 50% of the cases, highlighting the bias due to host effects. In contrast, 33.4% concordance was observed between pool and single strain infections in mice, thereby highlighting the bias introduced by the "pool effect." After filtering the results obtained from the two infection models, mutants for MBF1 and ZCF6 were selected. Independent marker-free mutants were subsequently tested in both hosts to validate previous results. The MBF1 mutant showed impaired infection in both models, while the ZCF6 mutant was only significant in mice infections. The two mutants showed no obvious in vitro phenotypes compared with the wild-type, indicating that these genes might be specifically involved in in vivo adapt.

  14. Examining the virulence of Candida albicans transcription factor mutants using Galleria mellonella and mouse infection models

    PubMed Central

    Amorim-Vaz, Sara; Delarze, Eric; Ischer, Françoise; Sanglard, Dominique; Coste, Alix T

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify Candida albicans transcription factors (TFs) involved in virulence. Although mice are considered the gold-standard model to study fungal virulence, mini-host infection models have been increasingly used. Here, barcoded TF mutants were first screened in mice by pools of strains and fungal burdens (FBs) quantified in kidneys. Mutants of unannotated genes which generated a kidney FB significantly different from that of wild-type were selected and individually examined in Galleria mellonella. In addition, mutants that could not be detected in mice were also tested in G. mellonella. Only 25% of these mutants displayed matching phenotypes in both hosts, highlighting a significant discrepancy between the two models. To address the basis of this difference (pool or host effects), a set of 19 mutants tested in G. mellonella were also injected individually into mice. Matching FB phenotypes were observed in 50% of the cases, highlighting the bias due to host effects. In contrast, 33.4% concordance was observed between pool and single strain infections in mice, thereby highlighting the bias introduced by the “pool effect.” After filtering the results obtained from the two infection models, mutants for MBF1 and ZCF6 were selected. Independent marker-free mutants were subsequently tested in both hosts to validate previous results. The MBF1 mutant showed impaired infection in both models, while the ZCF6 mutant was only significant in mice infections. The two mutants showed no obvious in vitro phenotypes compared with the wild-type, indicating that these genes might be specifically involved in in vivo adapt PMID:25999923

  15. Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4α Controls Iron Metabolism and Regulates Transferrin Receptor 2 in Mouse Liver*

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Shunsuke; Ogawa, Masayuki; Muckenthaler, Martina U.; Mizui, Yumiko; Sasaki, Shota; Fujimura, Takafumi; Takizawa, Masayuki; Ariga, Nagayuki; Ozaki, Hiroaki; Sakaguchi, Masakiyo; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Inoue, Yusuke

    2015-01-01

    Iron is an essential element in biological systems, but excess iron promotes the formation of reactive oxygen species, resulting in cellular toxicity. Several iron-related genes are highly expressed in the liver, a tissue in which hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) plays a critical role in controlling gene expression. Therefore, the role of hepatic HNF4α in iron homeostasis was examined using liver-specific HNF4α-null mice (Hnf4aΔH mice). Hnf4aΔH mice exhibit hypoferremia and a significant change in hepatic gene expression. Notably, the expression of transferrin receptor 2 (Tfr2) mRNA was markedly decreased in Hnf4aΔH mice. Promoter analysis of the Tfr2 gene showed that the basal promoter was located at a GC-rich region upstream of the transcription start site, a region that can be transactivated in an HNF4α-independent manner. HNF4α-dependent expression of Tfr2 was mediated by a proximal promoter containing two HNF4α-binding sites located between the transcription start site and the translation start site. Both the GC-rich region of the basal promoter and the HNF4α-binding sites were required for maximal transactivation. Moreover, siRNA knockdown of HNF4α suppressed TFR2 expression in human HCC cells. These results suggest that Tfr2 is a novel target gene for HNF4α, and hepatic HNF4α plays a critical role in iron homeostasis. PMID:26527688

  16. Colon cancer metastasis in mouse liver is not affected by hypercoagulability due to Factor V Leiden mutation

    PubMed Central

    Klerk, CPW; Smorenburg, SM; Spek, CA; Van Noorden, CJF

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Clinical trials have shown life-prolonging effects of antithrombotics in cancer patients, but the molecular mechanisms remain unknown due to the multitude of their effects. We investigated in a mouse model whether one of the targets of antithrombotic therapy, fibrin deposition, stimulates tumour development. Fibrin may provide either protection of cancer cells in the circulation against mechanical stress and the immune system, or form a matrix for tumours and/or angiogenesis in tumours to develop. Mice homozygous for Factor V Leiden (FVL), a mutation in one of the coagulation factors that facilitates fibrin formation, were used to investigate whether hypercoagulability affects tumour development in an experimental metastasis model. Liver metastases of colon cancer were induced in mice with the FVL mutation and wild-type littermates. At day 21, number and size of tumours at the liver surface, fibrin/fibrinogen distribution, vessel density and the presence of newly formed vessels in tumours were analysed. Number and size of tumours did not differ between mice with and without the FVL mutation. Fibrin/fibrinogen was found in the cytoplasm of hepatocytes and cancer cells, in blood vessels in liver and tumour tissue and diffusely distributed outside vessels in tumours, indicating leaky vessels. Vessel density and angiogenesis varied widely between tumours, but a pre-dominance for vessel-rich or vessel-poor tumours or vessel formation could not be found in either genotype. In conclusion, the FVL mutation has no effect on the development of secondary tumours of colon cancer in livers of mice. Fibrin deposition and thus inhibition of fibrin formation by anticoagulants do not seem to affect tumour development in this model. PMID:17635646

  17. Purification of a mouse nuclear factor that binds to both the A and B cores of the polyomavirus enhancer.

    PubMed Central

    Kamachi, Y; Ogawa, E; Asano, M; Ishida, S; Murakami, Y; Satake, M; Ito, Y; Shigesada, K

    1990-01-01

    We have previously identified a protein factor, PEBP2 (polyomavirus enhancer-binding protein), in the nuclear extract from mouse NIH 3T3 cells which binds to the sequence motif, PEA2, located within the polyomavirus enhancer A element. Upon cellular transformation with activated oncogene c-Ha-ras, this factor frequently undergoes drastic molecular modifications into an altered form having a considerably reduced molecular size. In this study, the altered form, PEBP3, was purified to near homogeneity. The purified PEBP3 comprised two sets of families of polypeptides, alpha-1 to alpha-4 and beta-1 to beta-2, which were 30 to 35 kilodaltons and 20 to 25 kilodaltons in size, respectively. Both kinds of polypeptides possessed DNA-binding activities with exactly the same sequence specificity. Individual alpha or beta polypeptides complexed with DNA showed faster gel mobilities than did PEBP3. However, the original gel retardation pattern was restored when alpha and beta polypeptides were mixed together in any arbitrary pair. These observation along with the results of UV- and chemical-cross-linking studies led us to conclude that PEBP3 is a heterodimer of alpha and beta subunits, potentially having a divalent DNA-binding activity. Furthermore, PEBP3 was found to bind a second, hitherto-unnoticed site of the polyomavirus enhancer that is located within the B element and coincides with the sequence previously known as the simian virus 40 enhancer core homology. From comparison of this and the original binding sites, the consensus sequence for PEBP3 was defined to be PuACCPuCA. These findings provided new insights into the biological significance of PEBP3 and PEBP2. Images PMID:2168969

  18. Lens injury stimulates adult mouse retinal ganglion cell axon regeneration via both macrophage- and lens-derived factors.

    PubMed

    Lorber, Barbara; Berry, Martin; Logan, Ann

    2005-04-01

    In the present study the effects of lens injury on retinal ganglion cell axon/neurite re-growth were investigated in adult mice. In vivo, lens injury promoted successful regeneration of retinal ganglion cell axons past the optic nerve lesion site, concomitant with the invasion of macrophages into the eye and the presence of activated retinal astrocytes/Muller cells. In vitro, retinal ganglion cells from lens-lesioned mice grew significantly longer neurites than those from intact mice, which correlated with the presence of enhanced numbers of activated retinal astrocytes/Muller cells. Co-culture of retinal ganglion cells from intact mice with macrophage-rich lesioned lens/vitreous body led to increased neurite lengths compared with co-culture with macrophage-free intact lens/vitreous body, pointing to a neurotrophic effect of macrophages. Furthermore, retinal ganglion cells from mice that had no lens injury but had received intravitreal Zymosan injections to stimulate macrophage invasion into the eye grew significantly longer neurites compared with controls, as did retinal ganglion cells from intact mice co-cultured with macrophage-rich vitreous body from Zymosan-treated mice. The intact lens, but not the intact vitreous body, exerted a neurotrophic effect on retinal ganglion cell neurite outgrowth, suggesting that lens-derived neurotrophic factor(s) conspire with those derived from macrophages in lens injury-stimulated axon regeneration. Together, these results show that lens injury promotes retinal ganglion cell axon regeneration/neurite outgrowth in adult mice, an observation with important implications for axon regeneration studies in transgenic mouse models.

  19. Context-specific function of the LIM homeobox 1 transcription factor in head formation of the mouse embryo.

    PubMed

    Fossat, Nicolas; Ip, Chi Kin; Jones, Vanessa J; Studdert, Joshua B; Khoo, Poh-Lynn; Lewis, Samara L; Power, Melinda; Tourle, Karin; Loebel, David A F; Kwan, Kin Ming; Behringer, Richard R; Tam, Patrick P L

    2015-06-01

    Lhx1 encodes a LIM homeobox transcription factor that is expressed in the primitive streak, mesoderm and anterior mesendoderm of the mouse embryo. Using a conditional Lhx1 flox mutation and three different Cre deleters, we demonstrated that LHX1 is required in the anterior mesendoderm, but not in the mesoderm, for formation of the head. LHX1 enables the morphogenetic movement of cells that accompanies the formation of the anterior mesendoderm, in part through regulation of Pcdh7 expression. LHX1 also regulates, in the anterior mesendoderm, the transcription of genes encoding negative regulators of WNT signalling, such as Dkk1, Hesx1, Cer1 and Gsc. Embryos carrying mutations in Pcdh7, generated using CRISPR-Cas9 technology, and embryos without Lhx1 function specifically in the anterior mesendoderm displayed head defects that partially phenocopied the truncation defects of Lhx1-null mutants. Therefore, disruption of Lhx1-dependent movement of the anterior mesendoderm cells and failure to modulate WNT signalling both resulted in the truncation of head structures. Compound mutants of Lhx1, Dkk1 and Ctnnb1 show an enhanced head truncation phenotype, pointing to a functional link between LHX1 transcriptional activity and the regulation of WNT signalling. Collectively, these results provide comprehensive insight into the context-specific function of LHX1 in head formation: LHX1 enables the formation of the anterior mesendoderm that is instrumental for mediating the inductive interaction with the anterior neuroectoderm and LHX1 also regulates the expression of factors in the signalling cascade that modulate the level of WNT activity.

  20. Early alterations in extracellular matrix and transforming growth factor [beta] gene expression in mouse lung indicative of late radiation fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Finkelstein, J.N.; Johnston, C.J.; Baggs, R.; Rubin, P. )

    1994-02-01

    Fibrosis, characterized by the accumulation of collagen, is a late result of thoracic irradiation. The expression of late radiation injury can be found immediately after irradiation by measuring messenger RNA (mRNA) abundance. To determine if extracellular matrix mRNA and transforming growth factor beta abundance was affected acutely after irradiation, the authors measured mRNA levels of collagen I (CI), collagen III (CIII), collagen IV (CIV), fibronectin (FN), and transforming growth factor [beta] (TGF[beta][sub 1,2 3]) in mouse lungs on day 1 and day 14 after graded doses of radiation. C57BL/6 female mice were irradiated with a single dose to the thorax of 5 or 12.5 Gy. Total lung RNA was prepared and immobilized by Northern and slot blotting and hybridized with radiolabelled cDNA probes for CI, CIII, CIV, FN, TGF[beta][sub 1,2 3] and a control probe encoding for glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). Autoradiographic data were quantified by video densitometry and results normalized to GAPDH. Changes in the expression of CI, CIII, CIV, FN and TGF[beta][sub 1,2 3] were observed as early as 1 day after exposure. Through 14 days, changes in mRNA up to 5-fold were seen for any one dose. Dose related changes as high as 10-fold were also evident. The CI:CIII ratio increased gradually for the 5 Gy dose at 14 days postirradiation while the CI:CII ratio for the 12.5 Gy dose decreased by approximately 4-fold as compared to the control. These studies suggest that alterations in expression of extracellular matrix and TGF[beta] mRNA occur very early after radiation injury even at low doses and may play a role in the development of chronic fibrosis. 37 refs., 6 figs.

  1. Dextran-Conjugated Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor Antibody for In Vivo Melanoma Xenografted Mouse Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun-Mi; Jeong, Min-Hee; Lee, Chang-Moon; Cheong, Su-Jin; Kim, Dong Wook; Lim, Seok Tae; Sohn, Myung-Hee

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Intact immunoglobulin G antibody has a relatively large molecule size of approximately 150 kDa that remains in the bloodstream for many weeks, which is a considerable disadvantage when it is used to carry radioactive materials for imaging. To lower background activity and increase the contrast of images, we investigated antivascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor 2 antibody (DC101) conjugated dextran for VEGF receptor 2 imaging in tumor xenografted mice. DTPA-conjugated aminodextran was synthesized, reacted with sulfo-LC-SPDP, and then reacted with DC101. The binding affinity of DTPA-dextran-DC101 to Flk-1 was measured. The gamma imaging and biodistributions of 99mTc-DTPA-dextran-DC101, 99mTc-DTPA-DC101, and 125I-DC101 were studied in B16F10 melanoma xenografted mice. The dissociation values for DC101, DTPA-DC101, and DTPA-dextran-DC101 were 22.48, 3.05, and 14.74 pM, respectively. In gamma images, 99mTc-DTPA-dextran-DC101 showed weak liver uptake and rapid kidney elimination. In biodistribution results, the liver uptake of 99mTc-DTPA-dextran-DC101 was similar with that of 99mTc-DTPA-DC101 at each time point. However, the blood activity of 99mTc-DTPA-dextran-DC101 has shown significant differences, compared with 99mTc-DTPA-DC101 at all time points. The tumor accumulation of dextran-conjugated antibody was increased with time, whereas that of dextran nonconjugated antibody decreased. In particular, the pattern of tumor uptake of 99mTc-DTPA-dextran-DC101 was similar to that of 125I-DC101, so this was thought to reflect the kinetics of DC101, unlike the nonconjugated form. The results of this study suggested that introduction of dextran moiety to make 99mTc-radiolabeled DC101 imaging agent could provide better images with the impaired background and the steady increasing binding to the receptor. However, further studies are necessary to improve clinical pharmacokinetics, such as enhancement of tumor uptake and impaired renal uptake. PMID:22149589

  2. SOXC Transcription Factors Induce Cartilage Growth Plate Formation in Mouse Embryos by Promoting Noncanonical WNT Signaling.

    PubMed

    Kato, Kenji; Bhattaram, Pallavi; Penzo-Méndez, Alfredo; Gadi, Abhilash; Lefebvre, Véronique

    2015-09-01

    Growth plates are specialized cartilage structures that ensure the elongation of most skeletal primordia during vertebrate development. They are made by chondrocytes that proliferate in longitudinal columns and then progress in a staggered manner towards prehypertrophic, hypertrophic and terminal maturation. Complex molecular networks control the formation and activity of growth plates, but remain incompletely understood. We investigated here the importance of the SoxC genes, which encode the SOX4, SOX11 and SOX12 transcription factors, in growth plates. We show that the three genes are expressed robustly in perichondrocytes and weakly in growth plate chondrocytes. SoxC(Prx1Cre) mice, which deleted SoxC genes in limb bud skeletogenic mesenchyme, were born with tiny appendicular cartilage primordia because of failure to form growth plates. In contrast, SoxC(Col2Cre) and SoxC(ATC) mice, which deleted SoxC genes primarily in chondrocytes, were born with mild dwarfism and fair growth plates. Chondrocytes in the latter mutants matured normally, but formed irregular columns, proliferated slowly and died ectopically. Asymmetric distribution of VANGL2 was defective in both SoxC(Prx1Cre) and SoxC(ATC) chondrocytes, indicating impairment of planar cell polarity, a noncanonical WNT signaling pathway that controls growth plate chondrocyte alignment, proliferation and survival. Accordingly, SoxC genes were necessary in perichondrocytes for expression of Wnt5a, which encodes a noncanonical WNT ligand required for growth plate formation, and in chondrocytes and perichondrocytes for expression of Fzd3 and Csnk1e, which encode a WNT receptor and casein kinase-1 subunit mediating planar cell polarity, respectively. Reflecting the differential strengths of the SOXC protein transactivation domains, SOX11 was more powerful than SOX4, and SOX12 interfered with the activity of SOX4 and SOX11. Altogether, these findings provide novel insights into the molecular regulation of skeletal

  3. [Establishment of multiple myeloma mouse models expressing brain derived neurotrophic factor].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya-Dan; Hu, Yu; Zhang, Lu; Huang, Jing; Sun, Chun-Yan

    2007-10-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) on promoting proliferation of multiple myeloma (MM) cells and inducing angiogenesis in MM in vitro. This study was aimed to further explore whether BDNF/TrkB pathway is a potential therapeutic target in MM, and to elucidate the advantages and disadvantages of two ways developed for human myeloma xenograft in animal models. The models of xenograft tumors were established in the non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) mice by subcutaneous or intravenous injection of human myeloma cell line RPMI8226. Mice were monitored daily for life state, and the volume of subcutaneous tumors were measured after inoculation. 3 weeks after inoculation, red blood cell counts, BDNF level in plasma, human lambda light chain and calcium level in serum of NOD/SCID were detected every two weeks. The histological and cytological examinations were performed to observe pathological features of tumors. Using flow cytometry to observe the expression of human CD38+ cell in murine blood and bone marrow. The changes of bone density and skeletal lesions were detected by computer radiography. The results showed that the subcutaneously injected animal model showed a high growth efficiency of RPMI8226 subcutaneous tumors (5/5) and several pathological features of plasmacytomas. There were neither obvious increase in lambda light chain and calcium levels, nor spread of human MM cells to murine bone marrow and no radiological evidence of skeletal lesions. The intravenously injected animal model had relative low efficiency for growth of tumors (4/7) but MM cells could engraft and proliferate in murine bone marrow. The human lambda light chain could be detected in serum as early as 3 weeks after inoculation. Myeloma-bearing mice had high level of lambda light chain and high calcium in serum and resorption of the murine bone. Furthermore, the concentrations of BDNF were increased with the

  4. Casticin impairs cell migration and invasion of mouse melanoma B16F10 cells via PI3K/AKT and NF-κB signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Shih, Yung-Luen; Chou, Hsiao-Min; Chou, Hsiu-Chen; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Chu, Yung-Lin; Shang, Hung-Sheng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2017-09-01

    Casticin, a polymethoxyflavone, is one of the major active components obtained from Fructus viticis, which have been shown to have anticancer activities including induce cell apoptosis in human cancer cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanisms by which casticin inhibits cell migration and invasion of mouse melanoma B16F10 cells. Cell viability was examined by MTT assay and the results indicated that casticin decreased the total percentages of viable cells in dose-dependent manners. Casticin affected cell migration and invasion in B16F10 cells were examined by wound healing mobility assay and Boyden chamber migration and invasion assay and results indicated that casticin inhibited cell migration and invasion in dose-dependent manners. Western blotting was used to examine the protein expression of B16F10 cells after exposed to casticin and the results showed that casticin decreased the expressions of MMP-9, MMP-2, MMP-1, FAK, 14-3-3, GRB2, Akt, NF-κB p65, SOS-1, p-EGFR, p-JNK 1/2, uPA, and Rho A in B16F10 cells. Furthermore, cDNA microarray assay was used to show that casticin affected associated gene expression of cell migration and invasion and the results indicated that casticin affected some of the gene expression such as increased SCN1B (cell adhesion molecule 1) and TIMP2 (TIMP metallopeptidase inhibitor 2) and decreased NDUFS4 (NADH dehydrogenase (ubiquinone) Fe-S protein4), VEGFA (vascular endothelial growth factor A), and DDIT3 (DNA-damage-inducible transcript 3) which associated cell migration and invasion in B16F10 cells. Based on those observations, we suggest that casticin could be used as a novel anticancer metastasis of melanoma cancer in the future. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Hemizygous Tg.AC transgenic mouse as a potential alternative to the two-year mouse carcinogenicity bioassay: evaluation of husbandry and housing factors.

    PubMed

    Holden, H E; Stoll, R E; Spalding, J W; Tennant, R W

    1998-01-01

    The dermal Tg.AC transgenic mouse model has been proposed as a potential alternative to the conventional (e.g. oral, dermal, parenteral, inhalation, etc.) 2-year rodent bioassay for detecting chemical carcinogenicity. The present study was designed to address a number of technical aspects of this model as well as to augment the database being developed with the Tg.AC system at the NIEHS. Hemizygous Tg.AC mice were implanted s.c. with microchips for identification and housed individually in polycarbonate (i.e. 'plastic') or suspended stainless-steel wire-bottom (i.e. 'metal') cages. Treatment consisted of dermal application of the test or control material in treatment volumes of 200 microl of acetone. Groups of 10 males and 10 females were treated as follows: G1--shaved, no treatment; G2--acetone control seven times a week; G3--100 microl of benzene three times a week; G4--150 microl of benzene three times a week; G5--1.25 microg of phorbol ester (PMA) twice a week. The G1-G5 mice were housed in plastic caging with Alpha-dri bedding. Three additional groups were housed in stainless-steel wire-bottom caging: G6--shaved, no treatment; G7--acetone control seven times a week; G8--1.25 microg of PMA twice a week. The PMA-treated mice (G5 and G8) served as the positive controls. Mice were treated for 20 weeks followed by a 6-week recovery period prior to necropsy. The incidence of dermal papillomas in the shaved area was recorded weekly. There were no spontaneous papillomas in the target area of any of the untreated (G1) or vehicle control (G2) animals in the polycarbonate cages. One papilloma was observed in the untreated mice (G6) and one in the vehicle control group (G7) in the steel cages. This suggests that the type of caging, the shaving process, microchip implantation and daily acetone treatment for 20 weeks are all consistent with a very low background incidence of papillomas in this model. Papillomas were observed in the positive control groups as early as 4

  6. The pioneer factor OCT4 requires the chromatin remodeller BRG1 to support gene regulatory element function in mouse embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    King, Hamish W; Klose, Robert J

    2017-01-01

    Pioneer transcription factors recognise and bind their target sequences in inaccessible chromatin to establish new transcriptional networks throughout development and cellular reprogramming. During this process, pioneer factors establish an accessible chromatin state to facilitate additional transcription factor binding, yet it remains unclear how different pioneer factors achieve this. Here, we discover that the pluripotency-associated pioneer factor OCT4 binds chromatin to shape accessibility, transcription factor co-binding, and regulatory element function in mouse embryonic stem cells. Chromatin accessibility at OCT4-bound sites requires the chromatin remodeller BRG1, which is recruited to these sites by OCT4 to support additional transcription factor binding and expression of the pluripotency-associated transcriptome. Furthermore, the requirement for BRG1 in shaping OCT4 binding reflects how these target sites are used during cellular reprogramming and early mouse development. Together this reveals a distinct requirement for a chromatin remodeller in promoting the activity of the pioneer factor OCT4 and regulating the pluripotency network. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22631.001 PMID:28287392

  7. Membrane vesicles containing matrix metalloproteinase-9 and fibroblast growth factor-2 are released into the extracellular space from mouse mesoangioblast stem cells.

    PubMed

    Candela, Maria Elena; Geraci, Fabiana; Turturici, Giuseppina; Taverna, Simona; Albanese, Ida; Sconzo, Gabriella

    2010-07-01

    Certain proteins, including fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), have proved very effective in increasing the efficacy of mesoangioblast stem cell therapy in repairing damaged tissue. We provide the first evidence that mouse mesoangioblast stem cells release FGF-2 and MMP-9 in their active form through the production of membrane vesicles. These vesicles are produced and turned over continuously, but are stable for some time in the extracellular milieu. Mesoangioblasts shed membrane vesicles even under oxygen tensions that are lower than those typically used for cell culture and more like those of mouse tissues. These findings suggest that mesoangioblasts may themselves secrete paracrine signals and factors that make damaged tissues more amenable to cell therapy through the release of membrane vesicles. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. MITOCHONDRIAL DISEASES PART II: MOUSE MODELS OF OXPHOS DEFICIENCIES CAUSED BY DEFECTS IN REGULATORY FACTORS AND OTHER COMPONENTS REQUIRED FOR MITOCHONDRIAL FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Iommarini, Luisa; Peralta, Susana; Torraco, Alessandra; Diaz, Francisca

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are defined as defects that affect the oxidative phosphorylation system (OXPHOS). They are characterized by a heterogeneous array of clinical presentations due in part to a wide variety of factors required for proper function of the components of the OXPHOS system. There is no cure for these disorders owing our poor knowledge of the pathogenic mechanisms of disease. To understand the mechanisms of human disease numerous mouse models have been developed in recent years. Here we summarize the features of several mouse models of mitochondrial diseases directly related to those factors affecting mtDNA maintenance, replication, transcription, translation as well to other proteins that are involved in mitochondrial dynamics and quality control which affect mitochondrial OXPHOS function without been intrinsic components of the system. We discuss how these models have contributed to our understanding of mitochondrial diseases and their pathogenic mechanisms. PMID:25640959

  9. Crystal structure of the N-terminal SH3 domain of mouse {beta}PIX, p21-activated kinase-interacting exchange factor

    SciTech Connect

    Li Xiaofeng; Liu Xueqi; Sun Fei; Gao Jia; Zhou Hongwei; Gao, George F.; Bartlam, Mark; Rao Zihe . E-mail: raozh@xtal.tsinghua.edu.cn

    2006-01-06

    The mouse {beta}PIX-SH3 domain, residues 8-63 of P21-activated kinase interacting exchange factor, has been characterized by X-ray diffraction. Crystals belonging to space group P3{sub 2}21 diffracted to 2.0 A and the structure was phased by the single-wavelength anomalous diffraction method. The domain is a compact {beta}-barrel with an overall conformation similar to the general SH3 structure. The X-ray structure shows mouse {beta}PIX-SH3 domain binding the way in which the {beta}PIX characteristic amino acids do so for an unconventional ligand binding surface. This arrangement provides a rationale for the unusual ligand recognition motif exhibited by mouse {beta}PIX-SH3 domain. Comparison with another SH3/peptide complex shows that the recognition mode of the mouse {beta}PIX-SH3 domain should be very similar to the RXXK ligand binding mode. The unique large and planar hydrophobic pocket may contribute to the promiscuity of {beta}PIX-SH3 domain resulting in its multiple biological functions.

  10. Nerve growth factor and cytokines mediate lymphoid tissue-induced neurite outgrowth from mouse superior cervical ganglia in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Y; Bienenstock, J; Ohta, M; Stanisz, A M; Stead, R H

    1996-07-01

    Superior cervical ganglia (SCG) from neonatal mice were cultured with adult murine lymphoid tissue explants in Matrigel (Collaborative Biomedical, Bedford, MA). After 1 and 2 days in culture, many neurites grew toward thymus and spleen. Normal mesenteric lymph node (MLN) induced a smaller effect; however, activated MLN (isolated from mice 10 days after infection with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis; Nb-MLN-10d) caused significantly increased neurite outgrowth. To determine the roles of nerve growth factor (NGF) and cytokines in the promotion of neuritogenesis by lymphoid tissues, anti-NGF and various anti-cytokines were added to cocultures. Anti-NGF inhibited most of the neurite outgrowth toward thymus and spleen but only partially that toward Nb-MLN-10d. Anti-mouse IL-1 beta also significantly reduced the number of neurites growing toward thymus, spleen, and normal MLN. The number of neurites growing toward Nb-MLN-10d was significantly reduced by anti-IL-1 beta, anti-IL-3, anti-IL-6, or anti-GM-CSF. Exogenous IL-1 beta and IL-3 caused neurite outgrowth in single SCG cultures; and the IL-1 beta-, but not the IL-3-, mediated effect was completely blocked by anti-NGF. In one-day thymus/SCG cocultures, endogenous IL-1 was not detectable at concentrations sufficient to cause nerve growth; however, ample NGF was present in the thymic tissues and culture supernatants, but not in SCG. These data suggest that IL-1 mediates NGF production in lymphoid tissues, which in turn induces the growth of sympathetic nerves. Moreover, IL-3, IL-6, or GM-CSF produced during inflammation might also play important roles in the stimulation of nerve growth in vivo.

  11. Small molecular modulation of macrophage migration inhibitory factor in the hyperoxia-induced mouse model of bronchopulmonary dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The role and mechanism of action of MIF in bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) are not known. We hypothesized that increased MIF signaling would ameliorate the pulmonary phenotype of BPD in the mouse lung. Methods We studied newborn wild type (WT), MIF knockout (MIFKO), and lung MIF transgenic (MIFTG) mice in room air and a BPD model, and examined the effects of administering a small molecule MIF agonist and antagonist. Lung morphometry was performed and mRNA and protein expression of vascular mediators were analyzed. Results The pulmonary phenotype of MIFKO and MIFTG mice lungs in room air (RA) and BPD model were comparable to the WT-BPD mice at postnatal (PN) day 14. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A, -R1 and Angiopoietin (Ang)1 mRNA were decreased, and Ang2 increased in the WT-BPD, MIFKO-RA, MIFKO-BPD, MIFTG-RA and MIFTG-BPD mice lungs, compared to appropriate controls. The protein expression of Ang1 in the MIFKO-RA was similar to WT-RA, but decreased in MIFTG-RA, and decreased in all the BPD groups. Ang2 was increased in MIFKO-RA, MIFTG-RA and in all 3 BPD groups. Tie2 was increased in WT-BPD compared to WT-RA, but decreased in MIFKO- and MIFTG- RA and BPD groups. VEGFR1 was uniformly decreased in MIFKO-RA, MIFTG-RA and in all 3 BPD groups. VEGF-A had a similar expression across all RA and BPD groups. There was partial recovery of the pulmonary phenotype in the WT-BPD model treated with the MIF agonist, and in the MIFTG mice treated with the MIF antagonist. Conclusions These data point to the careful regulatory balance exerted by MIF in the developing lung and response to hyperoxia and support the potential therapeutic value of small molecule MIF modulation in BPD. PMID:23448134

  12. Aberrant epithelial morphology and persistent epidermal growth factor receptor signaling in a mouse model of renal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Zachary S.; McClatchey, Andrea I.

    2009-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has frequently been implicated in hyperproliferative diseases of renal tubule epithelia. We have shown that the NF2 tumor suppressor Merlin inhibits EGFR internalization and signaling in a cell contact–dependent manner. Interestingly, despite the paucity of recurring mutations in human renal cell carcinoma (RCC), homozygous mutation of the NF2 gene is found in ≈2% of RCC patient samples in the Sanger COSMIC database. To examine the roles of Merlin and EGFR in kidney tumorigenesis, we generated mice with a targeted deletion of Nf2 in the proximal convoluted epithelium using a Villin-Cre transgene. All of these mice developed intratubular neoplasia by 3 months, which progressed to invasive carcinoma by 6–10 months. Kidneys from these mice demonstrated marked hyperproliferation and a concomitant increase in label-retaining putative progenitor cells. Early lumen-filling lesions in this model exhibited hyperactivation of EGFR signaling, altered solubility of adherens junctions components, and loss of epithelial polarity. Renal cortical epithelial cells derived from either early or late lesions were dependent on EGF for in vitro proliferation and were arrested by pharmacologic inhibition of EGFR or re-expression of Nf2. These cells formed malignant tumors upon s.c. injection into immunocompromised mice before in vitro passage. Treatment of Vil-Cre;Nf2lox/lox mice with the EGFR inhibitor erlotinib halted the proliferation of tumor cells. These studies give added credence to the role of EGFR signaling and perhaps Nf2 deficiency in RCC and describe a rare and valuable mouse model for exploring the molecular basis of this disease. PMID:19487675

  13. Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Genetically Engineered to Overexpress Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor Improve Outcomes in Huntington's Disease Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, Kari; Dahlenburg, Heather; Nelson, Haley; Fink, Kyle D; Cary, Whitney; Hendrix, Kyle; Annett, Geralyn; Torrest, Audrey; Deng, Peter; Gutierrez, Joshua; Nacey, Catherine; Pepper, Karen; Kalomoiris, Stefanos; D Anderson, Johnathon; McGee, Jeannine; Gruenloh, William; Fury, Brian; Bauer, Gerhard; Duffy, Alexandria; Tempkin, Theresa; Wheelock, Vicki; Nolta, Jan A

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a fatal degenerative autosomal dominant neuropsychiatric disease that causes neuronal death and is characterized by progressive striatal and then widespread brain atrophy. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a lead candidate for the treatment of HD, as it has been shown to prevent cell death and to stimulate the growth and migration of new neurons in the brain in transgenic mouse models. BDNF levels are reduced in HD postmortem human brain. Previous studies have shown efficacy of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC)/BDNF using murine MSCs, and the present study used human MSCs to advance the therapeutic potential of the MSC/BDNF platform for clinical application. Double-blinded studies were performed to examine the effects of intrastriatally transplanted human MSC/BDNF on disease progression in two strains of immune-suppressed HD transgenic mice: YAC128 and R6/2. MSC/BDNF treatment decreased striatal atrophy in YAC128 mice. MSC/BDNF treatment also significantly reduced anxiety as measured in the open-field assay. Both MSC and MSC/BDNF treatments induced a significant increase in neurogenesis-like activity in R6/2 mice. MSC/BDNF treatment also increased the mean lifespan of the R6/2 mice. Our genetically modified MSC/BDNF cells set a precedent for stem cell-based neurotherapeutics and could potentially be modified for other neurodegenerative disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, and some forms of Parkinson's disease. These cells provide a platform delivery system for future studies involving corrective gene-editing strategies. PMID:26765769

  14. Mouse Genome-Wide Association Study of Preclinical Group II Pulmonary Hypertension Identifies Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Neil J; Radder, Josiah E; Baust, Jeffrey J; Burton, Christine L; Lai, Yen-Chun; Potoka, Karin C; Agostini, Brittani A; Wood, John P; Bachman, Timothy N; Vanderpool, Rebecca R; Dandachi, Nadine; Leme, Adriana S; Gregory, Alyssa D; Morris, Alison; Mora, Ana L; Gladwin, Mark T; Shapiro, Steven D

    2017-04-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is associated with features of obesity and metabolic syndrome that translate to the induction of PH by chronic high-fat diet (HFD) in some inbred mouse strains. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify candidate genes associated with susceptibility to HFD-induced PH. Mice from 36 inbred and wild-derived strains were fed with regular diet or HFD for 20 weeks beginning at 6-12 weeks of age, after which right ventricular (RV) and left ventricular (LV) end-systolic pressure (ESP) and maximum pressure (MaxP) were measured by cardiac catheterization. We tested for association of RV MaxP and RV ESP and identified genomic regions enriched with nominal associations to both of these phenotypes. We excluded genomic regions if they were also associated with LV MaxP, LV ESP, or body weight. Genes within significant regions were scored based on the shortest-path betweenness centrality, a measure of network connectivity, of their human orthologs in a gene interaction network of human PH-related genes. WSB/EiJ, NON/ShiLtJ, and AKR/J mice had the largest increases in RV MaxP after high-fat feeding. Network-based scoring of GWAS candidates identified epidermal growth factor receptor (Egfr) as having the highest shortest-path betweenness centrality of GWAS candidates. Expression studies of lung homogenate showed that EGFR expression is increased in the AKR/J strain, which developed a significant increase in RV MaxP after high-fat feeding as compared with C57BL/6J, which did not. Our combined GWAS and network-based approach adds evidence for a role for Egfr in murine PH.

  15. Substituting mouse transcription factor Pou4f2 with a sea urchin orthologue restores retinal ganglion cell development

    PubMed Central

    Mocko-Strand, Julie A.; Wang, Jing; Ullrich-Lüter, Esther; Pan, Ping; Wang, Steven W.; Arnone, Maria Ina; Frishman, Laura J.; Klein, William H.

    2016-01-01

    Pou domain transcription factor Pou4f2 is essential for the development of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in the vertebrate retina. A distant orthologue of Pou4f2 exists in the genome of the sea urchin (class Echinoidea) Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (SpPou4f1/2), yet the photosensory structure of sea urchins is strikingly different from that of the mammalian retina. Sea urchins have no obvious eyes, but have photoreceptors clustered around their tube feet disc. The mechanisms that are associated with the development and function of photoreception in sea urchins are largely unexplored. As an initial approach to better understand the sea urchin photosensory structure and relate it to the mammalian retina, we asked whether SpPou4f1/2 could support RGC development in the absence of Pou4f2. To answer this question, we replaced genomic Pou4f2 with an SpPou4f1/2 cDNA. In Pou4f2-null mice, retinas expressing SpPou4f1/2 were outwardly identical to those of wild-type mice. SpPou4f1/2 retinas exhibited dark-adapted electroretinogram scotopic threshold responses, indicating functionally active RGCs. During retinal development, SpPou4f1/2 activated RGC-specific genes and in S. purpuratus, SpPou4f2 was expressed in photoreceptor cells of tube feet in a pattern distinct from Opsin4 and Pax6. Our results suggest that SpPou4f1/2 and Pou4f2 share conserved components of a gene network for photosensory development and they maintain their conserved intrinsic functions despite vast morphological differences in mouse and sea urchin photosensory structures. PMID:26962139

  16. The glucocorticoid-glucocorticoid receptor signal transduction pathway, transforming growth factor-beta, and embryonic mouse lung development in vivo.

    PubMed

    Jaskoll, T; Choy, H A; Melnick, M

    1996-05-01

    Lung morphogenesis has been shown to be regulated by glucocorticoids (CORT). Because CORT has been primarily thought to affect fetal lung development, previous studies have focused on the role of CORT receptor (GR)-mediated regulation of fetal lung development. Although endogenous CORT increases during embryonic and fetal stages and exogenous CORT treatment in vivo and in vitro clearly accelerates embryonic lung development, little is known about the morphoregulatory role of the embryonic CORT-GR signal transduction pathway during lung development. In this study, we characterize the embryonic mouse CORT-GR pathway and demonstrate: stage-specific in situ patterns of GR immunolocalization; similarity in GR relative mobility with progressive (E13 --> E17) development; that embryonic GR can be activated to bind a GR response element (GRE); significantly increasing levels of functional GR with increasing lung maturation; and the presence of heat shock protein (hsp) 70 and hsp90 from early (E13) to late (E17) developmental stages. These results support the purported importance of the embryonic CORT-GR signal transduction pathway in progressive lung differentiation. To demonstrate that the embryonic CORT-GR directed pathway plays a role in lung development, early embryonic (E12) lungs were exposed to CORT in utero and surfactant-associated protein A (SP-A) expression was analyzed; CORT treatment up-regulates SP-A mRNA expression and spatiotemporal protein distribution. Finally, to determine whether CORT-GR-directed pulmonary morphogenesis in vivo involves the modulation of growth factors, we studied the effect of CORT on TGF-beta gene expression. Northern analysis of TGF-beta 1, TGF-beta 2, and TGF-beta 3 transcript levels in vivo indicates that CORT regulates the rate of lung morpho- and histodifferentiation by down-regulating TGF-beta 3 gene expression.

  17. The novel growth factor, progranulin, stimulates mouse cholangiocyte proliferation via sirtuin-1-mediated inactivation of FOXO1.

    PubMed

    Frampton, Gabriel; Ueno, Yoshiyuki; Quinn, Matthew; McMillin, Matthew; Pae, Hae Yong; Galindo, Cheryl; Leyva-Illades, Dinorah; DeMorrow, Sharon

    2012-12-01

    Progranulin (PGRN), a secreted growth factor, regulates the proliferation of various epithelial cells. Its mechanism of action is largely unknown. Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) is a protein deacetylase that is known to regulate the transcriptional activity of the forkhead receptor FOXO1, thereby modulating the balance between proapoptotic and cell cycle-arresting genes. We have shown that PGRN is overexpressed in cholangiocarcinoma and stimulates proliferation. However, its effects on hyperplastic cholangiocyte proliferation are unknown. In the present study, the expression of PGRN and its downstream targets was determined after bile duct ligation (BDL) in mice and in a mouse cholangiocyte cell line after stimulation with PGRN. The effects of PGRN on cholangiocyte proliferation were assessed in sham-operated (sham) and BDL mice treated with PGRN or by specifically knocking down endogenous PGRN expression using Vivo-Morpholinos or short hairpin RNA. PGRN expression and secretion were upregulated in proliferating cholangiocytes isolated after BDL. Treatment of mice with PGRN increased biliary mass and cholangiocyte proliferation in vivo and in vitro and enhanced cholangiocyte proliferation observed after BDL. PGRN treatment decreased Sirt1 expression and increased the acetylation of FOXO1, resulting in the cytoplasmic accumulation of FOXO1 in cholangiocytes. Overexpression of Sirt1 in vitro prevented the proliferative effects of PGRN. Conversely, knocking down PGRN expression in vitro or in vivo inhibited cholangiocyte proliferation. In conclusion, these data suggest that the upregulation of PGRN may be a key feature stimulating cholangiocyte proliferation. Modulating PGRN levels may be a viable technique for regulating the balance between ductal proliferation and ductopenia observed in a variety of cholangiopathies.

  18. Effects of epidermal growth factor receptor blockade on ependymoma stem cells in vitro and in orthotopic mouse models.

    PubMed

    Servidei, Tiziana; Meco, Daniela; Trivieri, Nadia; Patriarca, Valentina; Vellone, Valerio Gaetano; Zannoni, Gian Franco; Lamorte, Giuseppe; Pallini, Roberto; Riccardi, Riccardo

    2012-09-01

    Some lines of evidence suggest that tumors, including ependymoma, might arise from a subpopulation of cells, termed cancer stem cells (CSCs), with self-renewal and tumor-initiation properties. Given the strict dependence of CSCs on epidermal growth factor (EGF) through EGF receptor (EGFR), we investigated the effects of EGFR inhibitors in ependymoma-stem cells (SCs) in vitro and in orthotopic mouse models. We established two ependymoma-SC lines from two recurrent pediatric ependymoma. Both lines expressed markers of radial glia--the candidate SCs of ependymoma--and showed renewal ability, multipotency, and tumorigenicity after orthotopic implantation, despite markedly different expression of CD133 (94 vs. 6%). High phosphorylated-EGFR/EGFR ratio was detected, which decreased after differentiation. EGFR inhibitors (gefitinib and AEE788) reduced clonogenicity, proliferation and survival of ependymoma-SC lines dose-dependently, and blocked EGF-induced activation of EGFR, Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2. Overall, AEE788 was more effective than gefitinib. EGFR blockade as well as differentiation strongly reduced CD133 expression. However, ex vivo treatment with AEE788 did not impair orthotopic tumor engraftment, whereas ex vivo differentiation did, suggesting that CD133 does not absolutely segregate for tumorigenicity in ependymoma-SCs. Orally administered AEE788 prolonged survival of mice bearing ependymoma-SC-driven orthotopic xenografts from 56 to 63 days, close to statistical significance (log-rank p=0.06). Our study describes for the first time EGFR signaling in ependymoma-SCs and the effects of EGFR blockade in complementary in vitro and in vivo systems. The experimental models we developed can be used to further investigate the activity of EGFR inhibitors or other antineoplastic agents in this tumor.

  19. Substituting mouse transcription factor Pou4f2 with a sea urchin orthologue restores retinal ganglion cell development.

    PubMed

    Mao, Chai-An; Agca, Cavit; Mocko-Strand, Julie A; Wang, Jing; Ullrich-Lüter, Esther; Pan, Ping; Wang, Steven W; Arnone, Maria Ina; Frishman, Laura J; Klein, William H

    2016-03-16

    Pou domain transcription factor Pou4f2 is essential for the development of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in the vertebrate retina. A distant orthologue of Pou4f2 exists in the genome of the sea urchin (class Echinoidea) Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (SpPou4f1/2), yet the photosensory structure of sea urchins is strikingly different from that of the mammalian retina. Sea urchins have no obvious eyes, but have photoreceptors clustered around their tube feet disc. The mechanisms that are associated with the development and function of photoreception in sea urchins are largely unexplored. As an initial approach to better understand the sea urchin photosensory structure and relate it to the mammalian retina, we asked whether SpPou4f1/2 could support RGC development in the absence of Pou4f2. To answer this question, we replaced genomic Pou4f2 with an SpPou4f1/2 cDNA. In Pou4f2-null mice, retinas expressing SpPou4f1/2 were outwardly identical to those of wild-type mice. SpPou4f1/2 retinas exhibited dark-adapted electroretinogram scotopic threshold responses, indicating functionally active RGCs. During retinal development, SpPou4f1/2 activated RGC-specific genes and in S. purpuratus, SpPou4f2 was expressed in photoreceptor cells of tube feet in a pattern distinct from Opsin4 and Pax6. Our results suggest that SpPou4f1/2 and Pou4f2 share conserved components of a gene network for photosensory development and they maintain their conserved intrinsic functions despite vast morphological differences in mouse and sea urchin photosensory structures. © 2016 The Authors.

  20. Antitumor effect of nuclear factor-κB decoy transfer by mannose-modified bubble lipoplex into macrophages in mouse malignant ascites

    PubMed Central

    Kono, Yusuke; Kawakami, Shigeru; Higuchi, Yuriko; Maruyama, Kazuo; Yamashita, Fumiyoshi; Hashida, Mitsuru

    2014-01-01

    Patients with malignant ascites (MAs) display several symptoms, such as dyspnea, nausea, pain, and abdominal tenderness, resulting in a significant reduction in their quality of life. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) play a crucial role in MA progression. Because TAMs have a tumor-promoting M2 phenotype, conversion of the M2 phenotypic function of TAMs would be promising for MA treatment. Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) is a master regulator of macrophage polarization. Here, we developed targeted transfer of a NF-κB decoy into TAMs by ultrasound (US)-responsive, mannose-modified liposome/NF-κB decoy complexes (Man-PEG bubble lipoplexes) in a mouse peritoneal dissemination model of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma. In addition, we investigated the effects of NF-κB decoy transfection into TAMs on MA progression and mouse survival rates. Intraperitoneal injection of Man-PEG bubble lipoplexes and US exposure transferred the NF-κB decoy into TAMs effectively. When the NF-κB decoy was delivered into TAMs by this method in the mouse peritoneal dissemination model, mRNA expression of the Th2 cytokine interleukin (IL)-10 in TAMs was decreased significantly. In contrast, mRNA levels of Th1 cytokines (IL-12, tumor necrosis factor-α, and IL-6) were increased significantly. Moreover, the expression level of vascular endothelial growth factor in ascites was suppressed significantly, and peritoneal angiogenesis showed a reduction. Furthermore, NF-κB decoy transfer into TAMs significantly decreased the ascitic volume and number of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells in ascites, and prolonged mouse survival. In conclusion, we transferred a NF-κB decoy efficiently by Man-PEG bubble lipoplexes with US exposure into TAMs, which may be a novel approach for MA treatment. PMID:24850474

  1. A genome-wide survey on basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors in rat and mouse.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaodong; Zheng, X; Wang, Yong; Wang, Y; Yao, Qin; Yao, Q; Yang, Zhe; Yang, Z; Chen, Keping; Chen, K

    2009-04-01

    The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins play essential roles in a wide range of developmental processes in higher organisms. bHLH family members have been identified in over 20 organisms, including nematode, fruit fly, and human. Our study identified 114 rat and 14 additional mouse bHLH members in rat and mouse genomes, respectively. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that both rat and mouse had 49, 26, 15, 4, 12, and 4 bHLH members in groups A, B, C, D, E, and F, respectively. Only the rat Mxi1 gene has two copies in the genome. All other rat bHLH genes and all mouse bHLH genes are single-copy genes. The chromosomal distribution pattern of mouse, rat, and human bHLH genes suggests the emergence of some bHLH genes through gene duplication, which probably happened at least before the divergence of vertebrates from invertebrates. The present study provides useful information for future studies using rat as a model animal for mammalian development.

  2. Apparent loss and hypertrophy of interneurons in a mouse model of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis: evidence for partial response to insulin-like growth factor-1 treatment.

    PubMed

    Cooper, J D; Messer, A; Feng, A K; Chua-Couzens, J; Mobley, W C

    1999-04-01

    The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCL) are progressive neurodegenerative disorders with onset from infancy to adulthood that are manifested by blindness, seizures, and dementia. In NCL, lysosomes accumulate autofluorescent proteolipid in the brain and other tissues. The mnd/mnd mutant mouse was first characterized as exhibiting adult-onset upper and lower motor neuron degeneration, but closer examination revealed early, widespread pathology similar to that seen in NCL. We used the autofluorescent properties of accumulated storage material to map which CNS neuronal populations in the mnd/mnd mouse show NCL-like pathological changes. Pronounced, early accumulation of autofluorescent lipopigment was found in subpopulations of GABAergic neurons, including interneurons in the cortex and hippocampus. Staining for phenotypic markers normally present in these neurons revealed progressive loss of staining in the cortex and hippocampus of mnd/mnd mice, with pronounced hypertrophy of remaining detectable interneurons. In contrast, even in aged mutant mice, many hippocampal interneurons retained staining for glutamic acid decarboxylase. Treatment with insulin-like growth factor-1 partially restored interneuronal number and reduced hypertrophy in some subregions. These results provide the first evidence for the involvement of interneurons in a mouse model of NCL. Moreover, our findings suggest that at least some populations of these neurons persist in a growth factor-responsive state.

  3. IGF-1 deficiency causes atrophic changes associated with upregulation of VGluT1 and downregulation of MEF2 transcription factors in the mouse cochlear nuclei.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Santamaría, V; Alvarado, J C; Rodríguez-de la Rosa, L; Murillo-Cuesta, S; Contreras, J; Juiz, J M; Varela-Nieto, I

    2016-03-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) is a neurotrophic protein that plays a crucial role in modulating neuronal function and synaptic plasticity in the adult brain. Mice lacking the Igf1 gene exhibit profound deafness and multiple anomalies in the inner ear and spiral ganglion. An issue that remains unknown is whether, in addition to these peripheral abnormalities, IGF-1 deficiency also results in structural changes along the central auditory pathway that may contribute to an imbalance between excitation and inhibition, which might be reflected in abnormal auditory brainstem responses (ABR). To assess such a possibility, we evaluated the morphological and physiological alterations in the cochlear nucleus complex of the adult mouse. The expression and distribution of the vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (VGluT1) and the vesicular inhibitory transporter (VGAT), which were used as specific markers for labeling excitatory and inhibitory terminals, and the involvement of the activity-dependent myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) transcription factors in regulating excitatory synapses were assessed in a 4-month-old mouse model of IGF-1 deficiency and neurosensorial deafness (Igf1 (-/-) homozygous null mice). The results demonstrate decreases in the cochlear nucleus area and cell size along with cell loss in the cochlear nuclei of the deficient mouse. Additionally, our results demonstrate that there is upregulation of VGluT1, but not VGAT, immunostaining and downregulation of MEF2 transcription factors together with increased wave II amplitude in the ABR recording. Our observations provide evidence of an abnormal neuronal cytoarchitecture in the cochlear nuclei of Igf1 (-/-) null mice and suggest that the increased efficacy of glutamatergic synapses might be mediated by MEF2 transcription factors.

  4. Comprehensive Identification of Krüppel-Like Factor Family Members Contributing to the Self-Renewal of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells and Cellular Reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Hyojung; Waku, Tsuyoshi; Azami, Takuya; Khoa, Le Tran Phuc; Yanagisawa, Jun; Takahashi, Satoru; Ema, Masatsugu

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotency is maintained in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells and is induced from somatic cells by the activation of appropriate transcriptional regulatory networks. Krüppel-like factor gene family members, such as Klf2, Klf4 and Klf5, have important roles in maintaining the undifferentiated state of mouse ES cells as well as in cellular reprogramming, yet it is not known whether other Klf family members exert self-renewal and reprogramming functions when overexpressed. In this study, we examined whether overexpression of any representative Klf family member, such as Klf1-Klf10, would be sufficient for the self-renewal of mouse ES cells. We found that only Klf2, Klf4, and Klf5 produced leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF)-independent self-renewal, although most KLF proteins, if not all, have the ability to occupy the regulatory regions of Nanog, a critical Klf target gene. We also examined whether overexpression of any of Klf1-Klf10 would be sufficient to convert epiblast stem cells into a naïve pluripotent state and found that Klf5 had such reprogramming ability, in addition to Klf2 and Klf4. We also delineated the functional domains of the Klf2 protein for LIF-independent self-renewal and reprogramming. Interestingly, we found that both the N-terminal transcriptional activation and C-terminal zinc finger domains were indispensable for this activity. Taken together, our comprehensive analysis provides new insight into the contribution of Klf family members to mouse ES self-renewal and cellular reprogramming.

  5. Functional coupling of transcription factor HiNF-P and histone H4 gene expression during pre- and post-natal mouse development

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li-Jun; Xie, Ronglin; Hussain, Sadiq; Lian, Jane B.; Rivera-Perez, Jaime; Jones, Stephen N.; Stein, Janet L.; Stein, Gary S.; van Wijnen, Andre J.

    2011-01-01

    Transcription factor Histone Nuclear Factor P (HiNF-P; gene symbol Hinfp) mediates cell cycle control of histone H4 gene expression to support the packaging of newly replicated DNA as chromatin. The HiNF-P/p220NPAT complex controls multiple H4 genes in established human cell lines and is critical for cell proliferation. The mouse HinfpLacZ null allele causes early embryonic lethality due to a blastocyst defect. However, neither Hinfp function nor its temporal expression relative to histone H4 genes during fetal development has been explored. Here, we establish that expression of Hinfp is biologically coupled with expression of twelve functional mouse H4 genes during pre- and post-natal tissue-development. Both Hinfp and H4 genes are robustly expressed at multiple embryonic (E) days (from E5.5 to E15.5), coincident with ubiquitous LacZ staining driven by the Hinfp promoter. Five highly expressed mouse H4 genes (Hist1h4d, Histh4f, Hist1h4m and Hist2h4) account for >90% of total histone H4 mRNA throughout development. Post-natal expression of H4 genes in mice is most evident in lung, spleen, thymus and intestine, and with few exceptions (e.g., adult liver) correlates with Hinfp gene expression. Histone H4 gene expression decreases but Hinfp levels remain constitutive upon cell growth inhibition in culture. The in vivo co-expression of Hinfp and histone H4 genes is consistent with the biological function of Hinfp as a principal transcriptional regulator of histone H4 gene expression during mouse development. PMID:21605641

  6. Ethanol produces corticotropin-releasing factor receptor-dependent enhancement of spontaneous glutamatergic transmission in the mouse central amygdala.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Yuval; Fetterly, Tracy L; Awad, Elias K; Milano, Elana J; Usdin, Ted B; Winder, Danny G

    2015-11-01

    Ethanol (EtOH) modulation of central amygdala (CeA) neurocircuitry plays a key role in the development of alcoholism via activation of the corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptor (CRFR) system. Previous work has predominantly focused on EtOH × CRF interactions on the CeA GABA circuitry; however, our laboratory recently showed that CRF enhances CeA glutamatergic transmission. Therefore, this study sought to determine whether EtOH modulates CeA glutamate transmission via activation of CRF signaling. The effects of EtOH on spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) and basal resting membrane potentials were examined via standard electrophysiology methods in adult male C57BL/6J mice. Local ablation of CeA CRF neurons (CRF(CeAhDTR) ) was achieved by targeting the human diphtheria toxin receptor (hDTR) to CeA CRF neurons with an adeno-associated virus. Ablation was quantified post hoc with confocal microscopy. Genetic targeting of the diphtheria toxin active subunit to CRF neurons (CRF(DTA) mice) ablated CRF neurons throughout the central nervous system, as assessed by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction quantification of CRF mRNA. Acute bath application of EtOH significantly increased sEPSC frequency in a concentration-dependent manner in CeA neurons, and this effect was blocked by pretreatment of co-applied CRFR1 and CRFR2 antagonists. In experiments utilizing a CRF-tomato reporter mouse, EtOH did not significantly alter the basal membrane potential of CeA CRF neurons. The ability of EtOH to enhance CeA sEPSC frequency was not altered in CRF(CeAhDTR) mice despite a ~78% reduction in CeA CRF cell counts. The ability of EtOH to enhance CeA sEPSC frequency was also not altered in the CRF(DTA) mice despite a 3-fold reduction in CRF mRNA levels. These findings demonstrate that EtOH enhances spontaneous glutamatergic transmission in the CeA via a CRFR-dependent mechanism. Surprisingly, our data suggest that this action may not

  7. Ethanol produces corticotropin releasing factor receptor-dependent enhancement of spontaneous glutamatergic transmission in the mouse central amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Silberman, Yuval; Fetterly, Tracy L.; Awad, Elias K.; Milano, Elana J.; Usdin, Ted B.; Winder, Danny G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Ethanol modulation of Central Amygdala (CeA) neurocircuitry plays a key role in the development of alcoholism via activation of the corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) receptor system. Previous work has predominantly focused on ethanol/CRF interactions on the CeA GABA circuitry; however our lab recently showed that CRF enhances CeA glutamatergic transmission. Therefore, this study sought to determine if ethanol modulates CeA glutamate transmission via activation of CRF signaling. Methods The effects of ethanol on spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) and basal resting membrane potentials were examined via standard electrophysiology methods in adult male C57BL/6J mice. Local ablation of CeA CRF neurons (CRFCeAhDTR) was achieved by targeting the human diphtheria toxin receptor (hDTR) to CeA CRF neurons with an adeno-associated virus. Ablation was quantified post-hoc with confocal microscopy. Genetic targeting of the diphtheria toxin active subunit to CRF neurons (CRFDTA mice) ablated CRF neurons throughout the CNS, as assessed by qRT-PCR quantification of CRF mRNA. Results Acute bath application of ethanol significantly increased sEPSC frequency in a concentration dependent manner in CeA neurons, and this effect was blocked by pretreatment of co-applied CRF receptor 1 and CRF receptor 2 antagonists. In experiments utilizing a CRF-tomato reporter mouse, ethanol did not significantly alter the basal membrane potential of CeA CRF neurons. The ability of ethanol to enhance CeA sEPSC frequency was not altered in CRFCeAhDTR mice despite a ~78% reduction in CeA CRF cell counts. The ability of ethanol to enhance CeA sEPSC frequency was also not altered in the CRFDTA mice despite a three-fold reduction in CRF mRNA levels. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that ethanol enhances spontaneous glutamatergic transmission in the CeA via a CRF receptor dependent mechanism. Surprisingly, our data suggest that this action may not require endogenous CRF

  8. A gap-junction-mediated signal, rather than an external paracrine factor, predominates during meiotic induction in isolated mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Downs, S M

    2001-02-01

    This study was carried out to compare the possible role of a secreted paracrine factor versus that of a gap-junction-transmitted signal in mediating meiotic induction in isolated mouse oocytes from PMSG-primed, immature mice. In the first set of experiments, oocyte-cumulus cell complexes (OCC) were pretreated for 3 h with 2 mM dbcAMP or FSH, washed, and the oocytes then cultured for 17-18 h in 40 microl drops containing either 300 microM dbcAMP or 4 mM hypoxanthine (HX). Each set of pretreated oocytes was cultured under three different conditions: (1) intact cumulus-cell-enclosed oocytes (CEO); (2) denuded oocytes (DO), cultured alone after removal of cumulus cells; and (3) co-cultured cumulus cells and oocytes (CC/DO), where the cumulus cells were removed in the same drop with a mouth-operated pipette and cultured alongside the oocytes. When pretreated with high dbcAMP or FSH, maturation was stimulated in CEO when cultured in either inhibitor (by 41.4-53.7%). Pretreatment failed to affect the maturation rate in DO. DO maturation was not altered appreciably by co-cultured cumulus cells when arrest was maintained with dbcAMP. However, an increase in maturation of 21-23% was observed in CC/DO in the HX-containing cultures that was not dependent on prior treatment with a meiosis-inducing stimulus. When DO were co-cultured with intact, FSH-treated OCC, there was no evidence of a positive factor secreted by the stimulated complexes, despite the fact that oocytes within the OCC were induced to resume maturation. In a second series of experiments the gap junction inhibitor, 18alpha-glycyrrhetinic acid (GA), was utilised. An initial experiment determined that GA dose-dependently blocked OCC metabolic coupling (0.2% coupling at 10 microM compared with 13.6% in controls). When HX-arrested CEO and DO were cultured for 17-18 h in medium containing increasing concentrations of GA, meiotic maturation was induced in CEO but not DO, suggesting that the cumulus cells provided a

  9. Deletion of the mouse RegIIIβ (Reg2) gene disrupts ciliary neurotrophic factor signaling and delays myelination of mouse cranial motor neurons

    PubMed Central

    Tebar, L. A.; Géranton, S. M.; Parsons-Perez, C.; Fisher, A. S.; Bayne, R.; Smith, A. J. H.; Turmaine, M.; Perez-Luz, S.; Sheasby, A.; De Felipe, C.; Ruff, C.; Raivich, G.; Hunt, S. P.

    2008-01-01

    A large number of cytokines and growth factors support the development and subsequent maintenance of postnatal motor neurons. RegIIIβ, also known as Reg2 in rat and HIP/PAP1 in humans, is a member of a family of growth factors found in many areas of the body and previously shown to play an important role in both the development and regeneration of subsets of motor neurons. It has been suggested that RegIIIβ expressed by motor neurons is both an obligatory intermediate in the downstream signaling of the leukemia inhibitory factor/ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) family of cytokines, maintaining the integrity of motor neurons during development, as well as a powerful influence on Schwann cell growth during regeneration of the peripheral nerve. Here we report that in mice with a deletion of the RegIIIβ gene, motor neuron survival was unaffected up to 28 weeks after birth. However, there was no CNTF-mediated rescue of neonatal facial motor neurons after axotomy in KO animals when compared with wild-type. In mice, RegIIIβ positive motor neurons are concentrated in cranial motor nuclei that are involved in the patterning of swallowing and suckling. We found that suckling was impaired in RegIIIβ KO mice and correlated this with a significant delay in myelination of the hypoglossal nerve. In summary, we propose that RegIIIβ has an important role to play in the developmental fine-tuning of neonatal motor behaviors mediating the response to peripherally derived cytokines and growth factors and regulating the myelination of motor axons. PMID:18678917

  10. Myeloid zinc finger (MZF)-like, Kruppel-like and Ets families of transcription factors determine the cell-specific expression of mouse extracellular superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed Central

    Zelko, Igor N; Folz, Rodney J

    2003-01-01

    Extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD or SOD3) is an important protective enzyme against the toxicity of superoxide radicals that are produced under both physiological and pathophysiological conditions. We have isolated and characterized over 11 kb of the mouse EC-SOD gene and its 5'- and 3'-flanking regions. The gene consists of two exons, with the entire coding region located within exon 2. In order to study the mechanism of cell-specific gene regulation for mouse EC-SOD, we characterized 2500 bp of its 5'-flanking region using cultured cells derived from mouse lung fibroblasts (MLg), kidney medulla (mIMCD3) and hepatocytes (Hepa 1-6). Real-time PCR showed that basal expression of EC-SOD was considerably higher in MLg cells compared with the other cell types. Reporter-gene assays revealed that the proximal promoter region was sufficient to support this high expression in MLg cells. Although no obvious TATA box was identified, our results show that a highly purine-rich region from -208 to +104 contains active binding sites for both the Kruppel-like and Ets families of transcription factors. Using electrophoretic mobility shift, DNase footprinting and reporter gene assays, we identified myeloid zinc finger 1 and gut-enriched Kruppel-like-factor-like nuclear transcription factors as repressors of EC-SOD expression, whereas nuclear transcription factors from the Ets family, such as Elf-1 and GA-binding protein alpha and beta, were potent activators of EC-SOD transcription. We propose a model that highlights competition between Ets activators and Kruppel-like repressors within the proximal promoter region that determines the level of EC-SOD expression in a particular cell type. PMID:12374566

  11. A novel rabbit anti-hepatocyte growth factor monoclonal neutralizing antibody inhibits tumor growth in prostate cancer cells and mouse xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Yanlan; Chen, Yicheng; Ding, Guoqing; Wang, Mingchao; Wu, Haiyang; Xu, Liwei; Rui, Xuefang; Zhang, Zhigen

    2015-08-14

    The hepatocyte growth factor and its receptor c-Met are correlated with castration-resistance in prostate cancer. Although HGF has been considered as an attractive target for therapeutic antibodies, the lack of cross-reactivity of monoclonal antibodies with human/mouse HGFs is a major obstacle in preclinical developments. We generated a panel of anti-HGF RabMAbs either blocking HGF/c-Met interaction or inhibiting c-Met phosphorylation. We selected one RabMAb with mouse cross-reactivity and demonstrated that it blocked HGF-stimulated downstream activation in PC-3 and DU145 cells. Anti-HGF RabMAb inhibited not only the growth of PC-3 cells but also HGF-dependent proliferation in HUVECs. We further demonstrated the efficacy and potency of the anti-HGF RabMAb in tumor xenograft mice models. Through these in vitro and in vivo experiments, we explored a novel therapeutic antibody for advanced prostate cancer. - Highlights: • HGF is an attractive target for castration-refractory prostate cancer. • We generated and characterized a panel of anti-HGF rabbit monoclonal antibodies. • More than half of these anti-HGF RabMAbs was cross-reactive with mouse HGF. • Anti-HGF RabMAb blocks HGF-stimulated phosphorylation and cell growth in vitro. • Anti-HGF RabMAb inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis in xenograft mice.

  12. The chromosome localization and the HCF repeats of the human host cell factor gene (HCFC1) are conserved in the mouse homologue

    SciTech Connect

    Frattini, A.; Faranda, S.; Sacco, M.G.; Villa, A.; Vezzoni, P.

    1996-03-01

    The gene encoding the human host cell factor (HCFC1) has recently been cloned and mapped to Xq28. HCFC1 codes for a family of related polypeptides that apparently arise from posttranslational processing. Six extremely conserved 19-amino-acid (aa)-long motifs, unique to HCFC1 and located in the middle of the protein, could play a role in this processing or could be instrumental to the physiological role of the protein. Alternatively, these repeats could have arisen from recent duplications and may not have any specific function. To resolve this issue, we cloned the homologous region from the mouse Hcfc1 gene and demonstrated that the 19-aa motifs are extremely conserved in sequence, number, and genomic organization, while the {open_quotes}linker{close_quotes} region between the third and fourth repeat is not. This suggests an important function for these repeats. In addition, by RT-PCR analysis of human RNA and comparison to the human genomic sequence, an alternative transcript including a 44-aa in-frame insertion, driving from the 3{prime} nd of intron 18, was found. The significance of this alternative transcript is unknown, since it was not detectable in the mouse. The mouse Hcfc1 gene maps to a region syntenic to Xq28, and, as in human, is in close proximity to the Renin-binding protein gene, in a 100-kb region also including the L1cam and Vasopressin receptor type 2 genes. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Genomic organization, chromosomal mapping and promoter analysis of the mouse selenocysteine tRNA gene transcription-activating factor (mStaf) gene.

    PubMed

    Adachi, K; Katsuyama, M; Song, S; Oka, T

    2000-02-15

    mStaf is a zinc-finger protein that activates the transcription of the mouse selenocysteine tRNA gene. The mStaf gene is approx. 35 kb long and split into 16 exons. All exon-intron junction sequences conform to the GT/AG rule. The transcription start site is located 83 bp upstream of the initiation codon. Chromosomal mapping localized the gene to mouse chromosome 7, region E3-F1. Sequence analysis of the proximal promoter region revealed several potential regulatory elements; these include the recognition elements of Sp1, Nkx, CP2, E2A, SIF (SIS-inducible factor), TFII-I and cAMP-responsive element (CRE), but no TATA sequences. Transfection experiments demonstrated that the 5'-flanking region (-1894 to +37) of the mStaf gene drives transcription in mouse NMuMG cells and that a construct containing a fragment from -387 to +37 showed the highest transcriptional activity. Deletion and mutation experiments suggested that four Sp1 sites played an important role for the basal promoter activity. Furthermore, electrophoretic mobility-shift assays demonstrated that Sp3 but not other Sp (specificity protein) family members binds to three of the Sp1 sites. Our present study suggests that Sp3 is involved in the basal transcriptional activation of the mStaf gene.

  14. A missense mutation in the transcription factor ETV5 leads to sterility, increased embryonic and perinatal death, postnatal growth restriction, renal asymmetry and polydactyly in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Jamsai, Duangporn; Clark, Brett J; Smith, Stephanie J; Whittle, Belinda; Goodnow, Christopher C; Ormandy, Christopher J; O'Bryan, Moira K

    2013-01-01

    ETV5 (Ets variant gene 5) is a transcription factor that is required for fertility. In this study, we demonstrate that ETV5 plays additional roles in embryonic and postnatal developmental processes in the mouse. Through a genome-wide mouse mutagenesis approach, we generated a sterile mouse line that carried a nonsense mutation in exon 12 of the Etv5 gene. The mutation led to the conversion of lysine at position 412 into a premature termination codon (PTC) within the ETS DNA binding domain of the protein. We showed that the PTC-containing allele produced a highly unstable mRNA, which in turn resulted in an undetectable level of ETV5 protein. The Etv5 mutation resulted in male and female sterility as determined by breeding experiments. Mutant males were sterile due to a progressive loss of spermatogonia, which ultimately resulted in a Sertoli cell only phenotype by 8 week-of-age. Further, the ETV5 target genes Cxcr4 and Ccl9 were significantly down-regulated in mutant neonate testes. CXCR4 and CCL9 have been implicated in the maintenance and migration of spermatogonia, respectively. Moreover, the Etv5 mutation resulted in several developmental abnormalities including an increased incidence of embryonic and perinatal lethality, postnatal growth restriction, polydactyly and renal asymmetry. Thus, our data define a physiological role for ETV5 in many aspects of development including embryonic and perinatal survival, postnatal growth, limb patterning, kidney development and fertility.

  15. Ginsenoside Rg3 up-regulates the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in human dermal papilla cells and mouse hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dae Hyun; Cha, Youn Jeong; Yang, Kyeong Eun; Jang, Ik-Soon; Son, Chang-Gue; Kim, Bo Hyeon; Kim, Jung Min

    2014-07-01

    Crude Panax ginseng has been documented to possess hair growth activity and is widely used to treat alopecia, but the effects of ginsenoside Rg3 on hair growth have not to our knowledge been determined. The aim of the current study was to identify the molecules through which Rg3 stimulates hair growth. The thymidine incorporation for measuring cell proliferation was determined. We used DNA microarray analysis to measure gene expression levels in dermal papilla (DP) cells upon treatment with Rg3. The mRNA and protein expression levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in human DP cells were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry, respectively. We also used immunohistochemistry assays to detect in vivo changes in VEGF and 3-stemness marker expressions in mouse hair follicles. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction showed dose-dependent increases in VEGF mRNA levels on treatment with Rg3. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that expression of VEGF was significantly up-regulated by Rg3 in a dose-dependent manner in human DP cells and in mouse hair follicles. In addition, the CD8 and CD34 were also up-regulated by Rg3 in the mouse hair follicles. It may be concluded that Rg3 might increase hair growth through stimulation of hair follicle stem cells and it has the potential to be used in hair growth products.

  16. Effect of the Gc-derived macrophage-activating factor precursor (preGcMAF) on phagocytic activation of mouse peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Uto, Yoshihiro; Yamamoto, Syota; Takeuchi, Ryota; Nakagawa, Yoshinori; Hirota, Keiji; Terada, Hiroshi; Onizuka, Shinya; Nakata, Eiji; Hori, Hitoshi

    2011-07-01

    The 1f1f subtype of the Gc protein (Gc(1f1f) protein) was converted into Gc-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) by enzymatic processing in the presence of β-galactosidase of an activated B-cell and sialidase of a T-cell. We hypothesized that preGc(1f1f)MAF, the only Gc(1f1f) protein lacking galactose, can be converted to GcMAF in vivo because sialic acid is cleaved by residual sialidase. Hence, we investigated the effect of preGc(1f1f)MAF on the phagocytic activation of mouse peritoneal macrophages. We examined the sugar moiety of preGc(1f1f)MAF with a Western blot using peanut agglutinin (PNA) and Helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA) lectin. We also found that preGc(1f1f)MAF significantly enhanced phagocytic activity in mouse peritoneal macrophages but only in the presence of the mouse peritoneal fluid; the level of phagocytic activity was the same as that observed for GcMAF. PreGc(1f1f)MAF can be used as an effective macrophage activator in vivo.

  17. Chromosomal localization of mouse and human genes encoding the splicing factors ASF/SF2 (SFRS1) and SC-35 (SFRS2)

    SciTech Connect

    Bermingham, J.R. Jr.; Arden, K.C.; Viars, C.S.

    1995-09-01

    The mammalian SR-type splicing factors ASF/SF2 and SC-35 play crucial roles in pre-mRNA splicing and have been shown to shift splice site choice in vitro. We have mapped the ASF/SF2 gene in mice and humans and the SC-35 gene in mice. Somatic cell hybrid mapping of the human ASF/SF2 gene (SFRS1 locus) reveals that it resides on chromosome 17, and fluorescence in situ hybridization refines this localization to 17q21.3-q22. Recombinant inbred mapping of the mouse ASF/ SF2 gene (Sfrs1 locus) and the mouse SC-35 gene (Sfrs2 locus) demonstrates that both genes are located in a part of mouse chromosome 11 that is homologous to human chromosome 17. Mapping of Sfrs1 using F{sub 1} hybrid backcross mice between the strains C57BL/6 and DDK places Sfrs1 very near the marker D11Mit38 and indicates that the ASF/SF2 gene is closely linked to the Ovum mutant locus. 59 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Effect of brain-derived neurotrophic factor on behavior and key members of the brain serotonin system in genetically predisposed to behavioral disorders mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Naumenko, V S; Kondaurova, E M; Bazovkina, D V; Tsybko, A S; Tikhonova, M A; Kulikov, A V; Popova, N K

    2012-07-12

    The effect of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) on depressive-like behavior and serotonin (5-HT) system in the brain of antidepressant sensitive cataleptics (ASC)/Icg mouse strain, characterized by depressive-like behavior, in comparison with the parental nondepressive CBA/Lac mouse strain was examined. Significant decrease of catalepsy and tail suspension test (TST) immobility was shown 17days after acute central BDNF administration (300ng i.c.v.) in ASC mice. In CBA mouse strain, BDNF moderately decreased catalepsy without any effect on TST immobility time. Significant difference between ASC and CBA mice in the effect of BDNF on 5-HT system was revealed. It was shown that central administration of BDNF led to increase of 5-HT(1A) receptor gene expression but not 5-HT(1A) functional activity in ASC mice. Increased tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (Tph-2) and 5-HT(2A) receptor genes expression accompanied by 5-HT(2A) receptor sensitization was shown in BDNF-treated ASC but not in CBA mouse strain, suggesting BDNF-induced increase of the brain 5-HT system functional activity and activation of neurogenesis in "depressive" ASC mice. There were no changes found in the 5-HT transporter mRNA level in BDNF-treated ASC and CBA mice. In conclusion, central administration of BDNF produced prolonged ameliorative effect on depressive-like behavior accompanied by increase of the Tph-2, 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2A) genes expression and 5-HT(2A) receptor functional activity in animal model of hereditary behavior disorders. Copyright © 2012 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Regulation of p53, nuclear factor {kappa}B and cyclooxygenase-2 expression by bromelain through targeting mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in mouse skin

    SciTech Connect

    Kalra, Neetu; Bhui, Kulpreet; Roy, Preeti; Srivastava, Smita; George, Jasmine; Prasad, Sahdeo; Shukla, Yogeshwer

    2008-01-01

    Bromelain is a pharmacologically active compound, present in stems and immature fruits of pineapples (Ananas cosmosus), which has been shown to have anti-edematous, anti-inflammatory, anti-thrombotic and anti-metastatic properties. In the present study, antitumorigenic activity of bromelain was recorded in 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-initiated and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-promoted 2-stage mouse skin model. Results showed that bromelain application delayed the onset of tumorigenesis and reduced the cumulative number of tumors, tumor volume and the average number of tumors/mouse. To establish a cause and effect relationship, we targeted the proteins involved in the cell death pathway. Bromelain treatment resulted in upregulation of p53 and Bax and subsequent activation of caspase 3 and caspase 9 with concomitant decrease in antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 in mouse skin. Since persistent induction of cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) is frequently implicated in tumorigenesis and is regulated by nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B), we also investigated the effect of bromelain on Cox-2 and NF-{kappa}B expression. Results showed that bromelain application significantly inhibited Cox-2 and inactivated NF-{kappa}B by blocking phosphorylation and subsequent degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha}. In addition, bromelain treatment attenuated DMBA-TPA-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK1/2), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Akt. Taken together, we conclude that bromelain induces apoptosis-related proteins along with inhibition of NF-{kappa}B-driven Cox-2 expression by blocking the MAPK and Akt/protein kinase B signaling in DMBA-TPA-induced mouse skin tumors, which may account for its anti-tumorigenic effects.

  20. Regulation of p53, nuclear factor kappaB and cyclooxygenase-2 expression by bromelain through targeting mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Neetu; Bhui, Kulpreet; Roy, Preeti; Srivastava, Smita; George, Jasmine; Prasad, Sahdeo; Shukla, Yogeshwer

    2008-01-01

    Bromelain is a pharmacologically active compound, present in stems and immature fruits of pineapples (Ananas cosmosus), which has been shown to have anti-edematous, anti-inflammatory, anti-thrombotic and anti-metastatic properties. In the present study, antitumorigenic activity of bromelain was recorded in 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-initiated and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-promoted 2-stage mouse skin model. Results showed that bromelain application delayed the onset of tumorigenesis and reduced the cumulative number of tumors, tumor volume and the average number of tumors/mouse. To establish a cause and effect relationship, we targeted the proteins involved in the cell death pathway. Bromelain treatment resulted in upregulation of p53 and Bax and subsequent activation of caspase 3 and caspase 9 with concomitant decrease in antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 in mouse skin. Since persistent induction of cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) is frequently implicated in tumorigenesis and is regulated by nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB), we also investigated the effect of bromelain on Cox-2 and NF-kappaB expression. Results showed that bromelain application significantly inhibited Cox-2 and inactivated NF-kappaB by blocking phosphorylation and subsequent degradation of IkappaBalpha. In addition, bromelain treatment attenuated DMBA-TPA-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK1/2), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Akt. Taken together, we conclude that bromelain induces apoptosis-related proteins along with inhibition of NF-kappaB-driven Cox-2 expression by blocking the MAPK and Akt/protein kinase B signaling in DMBA-TPA-induced mouse skin tumors, which may account for its anti-tumorigenic effects.

  1. The Major Leukocyte Chemotactic and Activating Factors in the Mouse Gut Lumen are not N-formylpeptide Receptor 1 (Fpr1) Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Ojode, Teresa; Schneider, Erich H.; Tiffany, H. Lee; Yung, Sunny; Gao, Ji-Liang; Murphy, Philip M.

    2013-01-01

    Cultured bacteria release N-formylpeptides, which are potent chemoattractants for phagocytic leukocytes acting at G protein-coupled receptors FPR1 and FPR2. However, the distribution and immunologic activity of these molecules at mucosal surfaces, where large numbers of bacteria are separated from the immune system by epithelium, remain undefined. To investigate this for the gut, we tested leukocyte responses to cell-free gut luminal contents from C57Bl/6 mice fed a chow diet. Small and large intestine contents were able to compete with labeled N-formylpeptide for binding to FPR1, indicating the presence of FPR1 ligands in the gut lumen. Material from both small and large intestine induced robust calcium flux responses by primary FPR1+ leukocytes (mouse bone marrow cells and splenocytes, and human peripheral blood neutrophils and mononuclear cells), as well as chemotactic responses by both mouse bone marrow cells and human peripheral blood neutrophils. However, unlike defined N-formylpeptides, calcium flux responses induced by gut luminal contents were insensitive both to pertussis toxin treatment of leukocytes and to proteinase K digestion of the samples. Moreover, the gut samples were fully active on neutrophils from mice lacking Fpr1, and the kinetics of the calcium flux response differed markedly for neutrophils and PBMCs. The active factor(s) could be dialyzed using a 3.5 kD pore size membrane. Thus, mouse intestinal lumen contains small, potent and highly efficacious leukocyte chemotactic and activating factors that may be distinct for neutrophils and PBMCs and distinct from Fpr1 agonists. PMID:22722599

  2. Mouse Y-Encoded Transcription Factor Zfy2 Is Essential for Sperm Formation and Function in Assisted Fertilization

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Yasuhiro; Riel, Jonathan M.; Ruthig, Victor; Ward, Monika A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Spermatogenesis is a key developmental process allowing for a formation of a mature male gamete. During its final phase, spermiogenesis, haploid round spermatids undergo cellular differentiation into spermatozoa, which involves extensive restructuring of cell morphology, DNA, and epigenome. Using mouse models with abrogated Y chromosome gene complements and Y-derived transgene we identified Y chromosome encoded Zfy2 as the gene responsible for sperm formation and function. In the presence of a Zfy2 transgene, mice lacking the Y chromosome and transgenic for two other Y-derived genes, Sry driving sex determination and Eif2s3y initiating spermatogenesis, are capable of producing sperm which when injected into the oocytes yield live offspring. Therefore, only three Y chromosome genes, Sry, Eif2s3y and Zfy2, constitute the minimum Y chromosome complement compatible with successful intracytoplasmic sperm injection in the mouse. PMID:26719889

  3. Nuclear erythroid 2 p45-related factor-2 Nrf2 ameliorates cigarette smoking-induced mucus overproduction in airway epithelium and mouse lungs.

    PubMed

    Ying, Ying-Hua; Lin, Xiao-Ping; Zhou, Hong-bin; Wu, Yin-fang; Yan, Fu-gui; Hua, Wen; Xia, Li-Xia; Qiu, Zhang-wei; Chen, Zhi-Hua; Li, Wen; Shen, Hua-Hao

    2014-10-01

    Nuclear erythroid 2 p45-related factor-2 (Nrf2) is known to play important roles in airway disorders, whereas little has been investigated about its direct role in airway mucus hypersecretion. The aim of this study is to determine whether this factor could protect pulmonary epithelium and mouse airway from cigarette-induced mucus overproduction. Using genetic approaches, the role of Nrf2 on cigarette smoking extracts (CSE) induced MUC5AC expression was investigated in lung A549 cells. Nrf2 deficiency mice were smoked for various periods, and the airway inflammation and mucus production was characterized. Acute smoking exposure induced expression of MUC5AC and Nrf2 in both A549 cells and mouse lungs. Genetic ablation of Nrf2 augmented, whereas overexpression of this molecule ameliorated CSE-induced expression of MUC5AC. Nrf2 knockout mice, after exposure to cigarette smoking, displayed enhanced airway inflammation and mucus production. Nrf2 negatively regulated smoking-induced mucus production in vitro and in vivo, suggesting therapeutic potentials of this factor in airway diseases with hypersecreted mucus. Copyright © 2014 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. The effect of aloe vera on the expression of wound healing factors (TGFβ1 and bFGF) in mouse embryonic fibroblast cell: In vitro study.

    PubMed

    Hormozi, Maryam; Assaei, Raheleh; Boroujeni, Mandana Beigi

    2017-04-01

    Aloe vera (A.v) have been used traditionally for topical treatment of wounds and burns in different countries for centuries, but the mechanism of this effect is not well understood. Various growth factors are implicated in the process of wound healing. Among the different growth factors involved in the process, TGFβ1 and bFGF are the most importantly expressed in fibroblast cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of A.v on the expression of angiogenesis growth factors in mouse embryonic fibroblast cells. We exposed mouse embryonic fibroblast cells to different concentrations of A.v (50, 100 and 150μg/ml) at two different time of 12 and 24h. Fibroblast cell without A.v treatment serves as the control. The expression of TGFβ1and bFGF was measured by real time-polymerase chain reaction (real-time-PCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) at the level of gene and protein. We observed that A.v gel at first up-regulated the expression of TGFβ1 and bFGF, but, these genes were later repressed after a particular time. Our results demonstrated that A.v was dose-dependent and time-dependent on the expression of bFGF and TGFβ1 in fibroblast cell in vitro. This mechanism can be employed in the prospective treatment of physical lesion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of Recombinant Human Keratinocyte Growth Factor (rHuKGF, Palifermin) on Radiation-Induced Mouse Urinary Bladder Dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Jaal, Jana Doerr, Wolfgang

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of Palifermin (rHuKGF) on acute and late radiation effects in mouse urinary bladder. Methods and Materials: Graded radiation doses were applied on day 0. Single subcutaneous injections of Palifermin (15 mg/kg) were given on day -2 or day +2. Changes in bladder function (i.e., a reduction in bladder volume by {>=}50% of the individual preirradiation value) were assessed by cystometry. Results: Early changes in mouse bladder after irradiation occur in two phases. In the first early phase, a single injection of Palifermin on day -2 increased the ED{sub 50} (dose associated with a positive bladder response in 50% of the mice) from 20.0 {+-} 3.3 Gy to 27.1 {+-} 6.9 Gy (p < .0051). Palifermin given on day +2 was not beneficial. No significant effects of Palifermin were seen in the second early phase. However, Palifermin administration before, but not after, irradiation, also modified late radiation effects, with an ED{sub 50} of 22.2 {+-} 4.8 Gy compared with 16.2 {+-} 4.9 Gy in control animals (p < .0187). Conclusions: Initial early functional changes in the mouse urinary bladder after irradiation as well as late effects can be significantly reduced by a single administration of Palifermin before irradiation.

  6. Using brain slice cultures of mouse brain to assess the effect of growth factors on differentiation of bone marrow derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Bratincsák, András; Lonyai, Anna; Shahar, Tal; Hansen, Arne; Tóth, Zsuzsanna E; Mezey, Eva

    2007-03-30

    Bone marrow derived stem cells (BMDSCs) have been reported to form neurons and supportive cells in the brain. We describe a technique that combines the simplicity of in vitro studies with many of the advantages of in vivo experiments. We cultured mouse brain slices, deposited GFP-tagged BMDSCs evenly distributed on their surfaces, and then added test factors to the culture medium. Addition of both SDF-1 and EGF resulted in morphological changes of BMDSC and in the induction of islet-1, a marker of neuroepithelial progenitors. We conclude that organotypic tissue culture (OTC) may allow us to detect the effects of exogenous factors on the differentiation of BMDSCs (or any other type of stem cells) in an environment that may resemble the CNS after brain injury. Once such factors have been identified they could be evaluated for tissue regeneration in more complex, whole animal models.

  7. The isolation and characterization of growth regulatory factors produced by a herpes simplex virus Type 2 transformed mouse tumor cell line, H238

    SciTech Connect

    Stagg, R.B.

    1988-01-01

    This study was performed in an attempt to associate HSV-2-transformation with specific growth factors in order to develop a testable model for HSV-2-transformation. We report here the isolation and characterization of four growth regulatory factors produced by H238, an HSV-2-transformed mouse tumor cell line. These factors were separated from the H238-CM by heparin-sepharose affinity chromatography into three peaks of mitogenic activity and a fourth containing inhibitory activity for splenocytes. The three peaks of mitogenic activity have been identified based on physiochemical characteristics: the first supported the anchorage-independent growth of EGF treated NRK-c-49 cells and resembles transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF-{beta}); the second bound to lectin-coated sepharose beads and was sensitive to trypsin, neuroaminidase, and the reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT) and, resembled a platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-like factor; and the third displaced ({sup 125}I)-labeled basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) in a dose-dependent fashion when tested with a radioimmune assay. The fourth peak was inhibitory for a variety of splenocyte function assays. A model for the interaction of these factors in vivo is presented with an emphasis on testability.

  8. RNA Microarray Analysis in Prenatal Mouse Cochlea Reveals Novel IGF-I Target Genes: Implication of MEF2 and FOXM1 Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Calderon, Hortensia; Rodriguez-de la Rosa, Lourdes; Milo, Marta; Pichel, Jose G.; Holley, Matthew; Varela-Nieto, Isabel

    2010-01-01

    Background Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) provides pivotal cell survival and differentiation signals during inner ear development throughout evolution. Homozygous mutations of human IGF1 cause syndromic sensorineural deafness, decreased intrauterine and postnatal growth rates, and mental retardation. In the mouse, deficits in IGF-I result in profound hearing loss associated with reduced survival, differentiation and maturation of auditory neurons. Nevertheless, little is known about the molecular basis of IGF-I activity in hearing and deafness. Methodology/Principal Findings A combination of quantitative RT-PCR, subcellular fractionation and Western blotting, along with in situ hybridization studies show IGF-I and its high affinity receptor to be strongly expressed in the embryonic and postnatal mouse cochlea. The expression of both proteins decreases after birth and in the cochlea of E18.5 embryonic Igf1−/− null mice, the balance of the main IGF related signalling pathways is altered, with lower activation of Akt and ERK1/2 and stronger activation of p38 kinase. By comparing the Igf1−/− and Igf1+/+ transcriptomes in E18.5 mouse cochleae using RNA microchips and validating their results, we demonstrate the up-regulation of the FoxM1 transcription factor and the misexpression of the neural progenitor transcription factors Six6 and Mash1 associated with the loss of IGF-I. Parallel, in silico promoter analysis of the genes modulated in conjunction with the loss of IGF-I revealed the possible involvement of MEF2 in cochlear development. E18.5 Igf1+/+ mouse auditory ganglion neurons showed intense MEF2A and MEF2D nuclear staining and MEF2A was also evident in the organ of Corti. At P15, MEF2A and MEF2D expression were shown in neurons and sensory cells. In the absence of IGF-I, nuclear levels of MEF2 were diminished, indicating less transcriptional MEF2 activity. By contrast, there was an increase in the nuclear accumulation of FoxM1 and a corresponding

  9. Enhanced regenerative healing efficacy of a highly skin-permeable growth factor nanocomplex in a full-thickness excisional mouse wound model

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Il-Hong; Park, Jin Woo; Kim, Dae-Yong

    2014-01-01

    Exogenous administration of growth factors has potential benefits in wound healing; however, limited percutaneous absorption, inconsistent efficacy, and the need for high doses have hampered successful clinical use. To overcome these restrictions, we focused on the development of a topical formulation composed of highly skin-permeable multimeric nanocomplex of growth factors. In the present study, we fused low-molecular-weight protamine (LMWP) with epidermal growth factor (EGF), insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I), and platelet-derived growth factor A ligand (PDGF-A) (producing recombinant [r]LMWP-EGF, rLMWP-IGF-I, and rLMWP-PDGF-A, respectively) via genetic modification. Then, we used in vitro cell proliferation studies to assess the biological activity and the benefits of the combination. The LMWP-conjugated growth factors were complexed with low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) and formulated with Poloxamer 188 as a delivery vehicle. After confirming the enhanced skin permeability, in vivo studies were performed to assess whether the LMWP-conjugated growth factor nanocomplex formulations accelerated the healing of full-thickness wounds in mice. The LMWP-conjugated growth factors were biologically equivalent to their native forms, and their combination induced greater fibroblast proliferation. rLMWP-EGF showed significantly enhanced permeability and cumulative permeation, and the rates for rLMWP-IGF-I and rLMWP-PDGF-A, across excised mouse skin, were 124% and 164% higher, respectively, than for the native forms. The LMWP-fused growth factors resulted in formation of nanocomplexes (23.51±1.12 nm in diameter) in combination with LMWH. Topical delivery of growth factors fused with LMWP accelerated wound re-epithelialization significantly, accompanied by the formation of healthy granulation tissue within 9 days compared with a free–growth factor complex or vehicle. Thus, the LMWP-conjugated growth factor nanocomplex can induce rapid, comprehensive healing and may

  10. Effect of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor on behavior and key members of the brain serotonin system in mouse strains genetically predisposed to behavioral disorders.

    PubMed

    Naumenko, Vladimir S; Bazovkina, Daria V; Semenova, Alina A; Tsybko, Anton S; Il'chibaeva, Tatyana V; Kondaurova, Elena M; Popova, Nina K

    2013-12-01

    The effect of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) on behavior and on the serotonin (5-HT) system of a mouse strain predisposed to depressive-like behavior, ASC/Icg (Antidepressant Sensitive Cataleptics), in comparison with the parental "nondepressive" CBA/Lac mice was studied. Within 7 days after acute administration, GDNF (800 ng, i.c.v.) decreased cataleptic immobility but increased depressive-like behavioral traits in both investigated mouse strains and produced anxiolytic effects in ASC mice. The expression of the gene encoding the key enzyme for 5-HT biosynthesis in the brain, tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (Tph-2), and 5-HT1A receptor gene in the midbrain as well as 5-HT2A receptor gene in the frontal cortex were increased in GDNF-treated ASC mice. At the same time, GDNF decreased 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptor gene expression in the hippocampus of ASC mice. GDNF failed to change Tph2, 5-HT1A , or 5-HT2A receptor mRNA levels in CBA mice as well as 5-HT transporter gene expression and 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptor functional activity in both investigated mouse strains. The results show 1) a GDNF-induced increase in the expression of key genes of the brain 5-HT system, Tph2, 5-HT1A , and 5-HT2A receptors, and 2) significant genotype-dependent differences in the 5-HT system response to GDNF treatment. The data suggest that genetically defined cross-talk between neurotrophic factors and the brain 5-HT system underlies the variability in behavioral response to GDNF. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. 15-Deoxy-{delta}{sup 12,14}-Prostaglandin J{sub 2} regulates leukemia inhibitory factor signaling through JAK-STAT pathway in mouse embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rajasingh, Johnson; Bright, John J. . E-mail: jbright1@clarian.org

    2006-08-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are genetically normal, pluripotent cells, capable of self-renewal and differentiation into all cell lineages. While leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) maintains pluripotency in mouse ES cells, retinoic acid and other nuclear hormones induce neuro-glial differentiation in mouse and human ES cells in culture. Peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-dependent nuclear receptor transcription factors that regulate cell growth and differentiation in many cell types. However, the role of PPARs in the regulation of ES cell growth and differentiation is not known. In this study, we show that LIF induces proliferation and self-renewal of mouse D3-ES cells in culture. However, treatment with 15-Deoxy-{delta}{sup 12,14}-Prostaglandin J{sub 2} (15d-PGJ2), a natural ligand for PPAR{gamma}, or all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) results in a dose-dependent decrease in proliferation and self-renewal in D3-ES cells. Immunoprecipitation and Western blot analyses showed that LIF induces tyrosine phosphorylation of JAK1, TYK2 and STAT3 in 30 min and treatment with 15d-PGJ2 or ATRA results in a dose-dependent decrease in LIF-induced phosphorylation of JAK1 and STAT3 in D3-ES cells. However, treatment of D3-ES cells with Ciglitazone or 15d-PGJ2 for 48 h in culture resulted in a dose-dependent increase in PPAR{gamma} protein expression. These results suggest that PPAR{gamma} agonists regulate LIF signaling through JAK-STAT pathway leading to growth and self-renewal of ES cells.

  12. trans-Stilbene oxide induces expression of genes involved in metabolism and transport in mouse liver via CAR and Nrf2 transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Slitt, A L; Cherrington, N J; Dieter, M Z; Aleksunes, L M; Scheffer, G L; Huang, W; Moore, D D; Klaassen, C D

    2006-05-01

    trans-Stilbene oxide (TSO) induces drug metabolizing enzymes in rat and mouse liver. TSO is considered a phenobarbital-like compound because it induces Cyp2B mRNA expression in liver. Phenobarbital increases Cyp2B expression in liver via activation of the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR). The purpose of this study was to determine whether TSO induces gene expression in mouse liver via CAR activation. TSO increased CAR nuclear localization in mouse liver, activated the human Cyp2B6 promoter in liver in vivo, and activated a reporter plasmid that contains five nuclear receptor 1 (NR1) binding sites in HepG2 cells. TSO administration increased expression of Cyp2b10, NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (Nqo1), epoxide hydrolase, heme oxygenase-1, UDP-glucuronosyl-transferase (Ugt) 1a6 and 2b5, and multidrug resistance-associated proteins (Mrp) 2 and 3 mRNA in livers from male mice. Cyp2b10 and epoxide hydrolase induction by TSO was decreased in livers from CAR-null mice, compared with wild-type mice, suggesting CAR involvement. In contrast, TSO administration induced Nqo1 and Mrp3 mRNA expression equally in livers from wild-type and CAR-null mice, suggesting that TSO induces expression of some genes through a mechanism independent of CAR. TSO increased nuclear staining of the transcription factor Nrf2 in liver, and activated an antioxidant/electrophile response element luciferase reporter construct that was transfected into HepG2 cells. In summary, in mice, TSO increases Cyp2b10 and epoxide hydrolase expression in mice via CAR, and potentially induces Nqo1 and Mrp3 expression via Nrf2. Moreover, our data demonstrate that a single compound can activate both CAR and Nrf2 transcription factors in liver.

  13. The mouse insulin-like growth factor II/cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate (IGF-II/MPR) receptor gene: Molecular cloning and genomic organization

    SciTech Connect

    Szebenyi, G.; Rotwein, P. )

    1994-01-01

    The mammalian insulin-like growth factor III/cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor (IGF-II/MPR) is a multifunctional protein that binds both IGF-II and ligands containing a mannose 6-phosphate recognition marker through distinct high-affinity sites. This receptor plays an integral part in lysosomal enzyme transport, has a potential role in growth factor maturation and clearance, and may mediate IGF-II-activated signal transduction through a G-protein-coupled mechanism. Recent studies have shown that production of IGF-II/MPR mRNA and protein begins in the mouse embryo soon after fertilization and have demonstrated that the receptor gene is on mouse chromosome 17 and is maternally imprinted. In this paper, the authors report the cloning and characterization of the mouse IGF-II/MPR gene. The gene is 93 kb long, is composed of 48 exons, and codes for a predicted protein of 2482 amino acids. The extracellular part of the receptor is encoded by exons 1-46, with each of 15 related repeating motifs being determined by parts of 3-5 exons. A single fibronectin type II-like element is found in exon 39. The transmembrane portion of the receptor also is encoded by exon 46, and the cytoplasmic region by exons 46-48. The positions of exon-intron splice junctions are conserved between several of the repeats in the IGF-II/MPR and the homologous extracellular region of the gene for the other known lysosomal sorting receptor, the cation-dependent mannose 6-phosphate receptor. The gene duplications that gave rise to the modern IGF-II/MPR probably occurred before the divergence of mammals, since there is more extensive protein sequence conservation between receptors from different species than between any pair of repeating motifs within a single receptor. 55 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Compound mouse mutants of bZIP transcription factors Mafg and Mafk reveal a regulatory network of non-crystallin genes associated with cataract

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Smriti A.; Anand, Deepti; Siddam, Archana D.; Kakrana, Atul; Dash, Soma; Scheiblin, David A.; Dang, Christine A.; Terrell, Anne M.; Waters, Stephanie M.; Singh, Abhyudai; Motohashi, Hozumi; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Lachke, Salil A.

    2015-01-01

    Although majority of the genes linked to early-onset cataract exhibit lens fiber cell-enriched expression, our understanding of gene regulation in these cells is limited to function of just eight transcription factors and largely in the context of crystallins. We report on small Maf transcription factors Mafg and Mafk as regulators of several non-crystallin human cataract-associated genes in fiber cells and establish their significance to this disease. We applied a bioinformatics tool for cataract gene discovery iSyTE to identify Mafg and its co-regulators in the lens, and generated various null-allelic combinations of Mafg:Mafk mouse mutants for phenotypic and molecular analysis. By age 4-months, Mafg−/−:Mafk+/− mutants exhibit lens defects that progressively develop into cataract. High-resolution phenotypic characterization of Mafg−/−:Mafk+/− mouse lens reveals severely disorganized fiber cells, while microarrays-based expression profiling identifies 97 differentially regulated genes (DRGs). Integrative analysis of Mafg−/−:Mafk+/− lens-DRGs with 1) binding-motifs and genomic targets of small Mafs and their regulatory partners, 2) iSyTE lens-expression data, and 3) interactions between DRGs in the String database, unravels a detailed small Maf regulatory network in the lens, several nodes of which are linked to cataract. This approach identifies 36 high-priority candidates from the original 97 DRGs. Significantly, 8/36 (22%) DRGs are associated with cataracts in human (GSTO1, MGST1, SC4MOL, UCHL1) or mouse (Aldh3a1, Crygf, Hspb1, Pcbd1), suggesting a multifactorial etiology that includes oxidative stress and mis-regulation of sterol synthesis. These data identify Mafg and Mafk as new cataract-associated candidates and define their function in regulating largely non-crystallin genes linked to human cataract. PMID:25896808

  15. Interferon Regulatory Factor-5 Deficiency Ameliorates Disease Severity in the MRL/lpr Mouse Model of Lupus in the Absence of a Mutation in DOCK2

    PubMed Central

    Kochar, Guneet S.; Wilson, Gabriella E.; Laskow, Bari; Richez, Christophe; Bonegio, Ramon G.; Rifkin, Ian R.

    2014-01-01

    Interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) polymorphisms are strongly associated with an increased risk of developing the autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus. In mouse lupus models, IRF5-deficiency was shown to reduce disease severity consistent with an important role for IRF5 in disease pathogenesis. However these mouse studies were confounded by the recent demonstration that the IRF5 knockout mouse line contained a loss-of-function mutation in the dedicator of cytokinesis 2 (DOCK2) gene. As DOCK2 regulates lymphocyte trafficking and Toll-like receptor signaling, this raised the possibility that some of the protective effects attributed to IRF5 deficiency in the mouse lupus models may instead have been due to DOCK2 deficiency. We have therefore here evaluated the effect of IRF5-deficiency in the MRL/lpr mouse lupus model in the absence of the DOCK2 mutation. We find that IRF5-deficient (IRF5−/−) MRL/lpr mice develop much less severe disease than their IRF5-sufficient (IRF5+/+) littermates. Despite markedly lower serum levels of anti-nuclear autoantibodies and reduced total splenocyte and CD4+ T cell numbers, IRF5−/− MRL/lpr mice have similar numbers of all splenic B cell subsets compared to IRF5+/+ MRL/lpr mice, suggesting that IRF5 is not involved in B cell development up to the mature B cell stage. However, IRF5−/− MRL/lpr mice have greatly reduced numbers of spleen plasmablasts and bone marrow plasma cells. Serum levels of B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) were markedly elevated in the MRL/lpr mice but no effect of IRF5 on serum BLyS levels was seen. Overall our data demonstrate that IRF5 contributes to disease pathogenesis in the MRL/lpr lupus model and that this is due, at least in part, to the role of IRF5 in plasma cell formation. Our data also suggest that combined therapy targeting both IRF5 and BLyS might be a particularly effective therapeutic approach in lupus. PMID:25076492

  16. High-Throughput, Signature-Tagged Mutagenic Approach To Identify Novel Virulence Factors of Yersinia pestis CO92 in a Mouse Model of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ponnusamy, Duraisamy; Fitts, Eric C.; Erova, Tatiana E.; Kozlova, Elena V.; Kirtley, Michelle L.; Tiner, Bethany L.; Andersson, Jourdan A.

    2015-01-01

    The identification of new virulence factors in Yersinia pestis and understanding their molecular mechanisms during an infection process are necessary in designing a better vaccine or to formulate an appropriate therapeutic intervention. By using a high-throughput, signature-tagged mutagenic approach, we created 5,088 mutants of Y. pestis strain CO92 and screened them in a mouse model of pneumonic plague at a dose equivalent to 5 50% lethal doses (LD50) of wild-type (WT) CO92. From this screen, we obtained 118 clones showing impairment in disseminating to the spleen, based on hybridization of input versus output DNA from mutant pools with 53 unique signature tags. In the subsequent screen, 20/118 mutants exhibited attenuation at 8 LD50 when tested in a mouse model of bubonic plague, with infection by 10/20 of the aforementioned mutants resulting in 40% or higher survival rates at an infectious dose of 40 LD50. Upon sequencing, six of the attenuated mutants were found to carry interruptions in genes encoding hypothetical proteins or proteins with putative functions. Mutants with in-frame deletion mutations of two of the genes identified from the screen, namely, rbsA, which codes for a putative sugar transport system ATP-binding protein, and vasK, a component of the type VI secretion system, were also found to exhibit some attenuation at 11 or 12 LD50 in a mouse model of pneumonic plague. Likewise, among the remaining 18 signature-tagged mutants, 9 were also attenuated (40 to 100%) at 12 LD50 in a pneumonic plague mouse model. Previously, we found that deleting genes encoding Braun lipoprotein (Lpp) and acyltransferase (MsbB), the latter of which modifies lipopolysaccharide function, reduced the virulence of Y. pestis CO92 in mouse models of bubonic and pneumonic plague. Deletion of rbsA and vasK genes from either the Δlpp single or the Δlpp ΔmsbB double mutant augmented the attenuation to provide 90 to 100% survivability to mice in a pneumonic plague model at 20

  17. High-throughput, signature-tagged mutagenic approach to identify novel virulence factors of Yersinia pestis CO92 in a mouse model of infection.

    PubMed

    Ponnusamy, Duraisamy; Fitts, Eric C; Sha, Jian; Erova, Tatiana E; Kozlova, Elena V; Kirtley, Michelle L; Tiner, Bethany L; Andersson, Jourdan A; Chopra, Ashok K

    2015-05-01

    The identification of new virulence factors in Yersinia pestis and understanding their molecular mechanisms during an infection process are necessary in designing a better vaccine or to formulate an appropriate therapeutic intervention. By using a high-throughput, signature-tagged mutagenic approach, we created 5,088 mutants of Y. pestis strain CO92 and screened them in a mouse model of pneumonic plague at a dose equivalent to 5 50% lethal doses (LD50) of wild-type (WT) CO92. From this screen, we obtained 118 clones showing impairment in disseminating to the spleen, based on hybridization of input versus output DNA from mutant pools with 53 unique signature tags. In the subsequent screen, 20/118 mutants exhibited attenuation at 8 LD50 when tested in a mouse model of bubonic plague, with infection by 10/20 of the aforementioned mutants resulting in 40% or higher survival rates at an infectious dose of 40 LD50. Upon sequencing, six of the attenuated mutants were found to carry interruptions in genes encoding hypothetical proteins or proteins with putative functions. Mutants with in-frame deletion mutations of two of the genes identified from the screen, namely, rbsA, which codes for a putative sugar transport system ATP-binding protein, and vasK, a component of the type VI secretion system, were also found to exhibit some attenuation at 11 or 12 LD50 in a mouse model of pneumonic plague. Likewise, among the remaining 18 signature-tagged mutants, 9 were also attenuated (40 to 100%) at 12 LD50 in a pneumonic plague mouse model. Previously, we found that deleting genes encoding Braun lipoprotein (Lpp) and acyltransferase (MsbB), the latter of which modifies lipopolysaccharide function, reduced the virulence of Y. pestis CO92 in mouse models of bubonic and pneumonic plague. Deletion of rbsA and vasK genes from either the Δlpp single or the Δlpp ΔmsbB double mutant augmented the attenuation to provide 90 to 100% survivability to mice in a pneumonic plague model at 20

  18. Identification of a novel brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-inhibitory factor: regulation of BDNF by teneurin C-terminal associated peptide (TCAP)-1 in immortalized embryonic mouse hypothalamic cells.

    PubMed

    Ng, Tiffany; Chand, Dhan; Song, Lifang; Al Chawaf, Arij; Watson, John D; Boutros, Paul C; Belsham, Denise D; Lovejoy, David A

    2012-02-10

    The teneurins are a family of four large transmembrane proteins that are highly expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) where they have been implicated in development and CNS function. At the tip of the carboxyl terminus of each teneurin lies a 43-amino acid sequence, that when processed, could liberate an amidated 41-residue peptide. We have called this region the teneurin C-terminal associated peptide (TCAP). Picomolar concentrations of the synthetic version of TCAP-1 inhibit stress-induced cocaine reinstatement in rats. Because cocaine-seeking is associated with increased brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the brain, we examined whether synthetic mouse TCAP-1 has the potential to regulate BDNF expression in immortalized mouse neurons. Immortalized mouse neurons (N38; mHypoE38) show strong FITC-labeled [K(8)]-TCAP-1 uptake and BDNF labeling in the cytosol. Moreover, FITC-labeled [K(8)]-TCAP-1 bound competitively to membrane fractions. In culture, the labeled TCAP-1 peptide could be detected on cell membranes within 15 min and subsequently became internalized in the cytosol and trafficked toward the nucleus. Administration of 10(-8)M unlabeled TCAP-1 to cultures of the N38 cells resulted in a significant decrease of total cell BDNF immunoreactivity over 4h as determined by western blot and ELISA analyses. Real-time PCR, utilizing primers to the various BDNF transcripts showed a significant decline of promoter IIB- and VI-driven transcripts. Taken together, these studies indicated that in vitro, TCAP-1 induces a significant decline in BDNF transcription and protein labeling in embyronic mouse immortalized hypothalamic neurons. Thus, TCAP-1 may act as a novel BDNF inhibitory factor.

  19. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor alters the growth characteristics and genomic imprinting of mouse multipotent adult germline stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Yoon Hee

    2010-03-10

    This study evaluated the essentiality of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) for in vitro culture of established mouse multipotent adult germline stem (maGS) cell lines by culturing them in the presence of GDNF, leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) or both. We show that, in the absence of LIF, GDNF slows the proliferation of maGS cells and result in smaller sized colonies without any change in distribution of cells to different cell-cycle stages, expression of pluripotency genes and in vitro differentiation potential. Furthermore, in the absence of LIF, GDNF increased the expression of male germ-line genes and repopulated the empty seminiferous tubule of W/W{sup v} mutant mouse without the formation of teratoma. GDNF also altered the genomic imprinting of Igf2, Peg1, and H19 genes but had no effect on DNA methylation of Oct4, Nanog and Stra8 genes. However, these effects of GDNF were masked in the presence of LIF. GDNF also did not interfere with the multipotency of maGS cells if they are cultured in the presence of LIF. In conclusion, our results suggest that, in the absence of LIF, GDNF alters the growth characteristics of maGS cells and partially impart them some of the germline stem (GS) cell-like characteristics.

  20. Intranasal Delivery of Plasma and Platelet Growth Factors Using PRGF-Endoret System Enhances Neurogenesis in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Anitua, Eduardo; Pascual, Consuelo; Pérez-Gonzalez, Rocio; Antequera, Desiree; Padilla, Sabino; Orive, Gorka; Carro, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Neurodegeneration together with a reduction in neurogenesis are cardinal features of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) induced by a combination of toxic amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) and a loss of trophic factor support. Amelioration of these was assessed with diverse neurotrophins in experimental therapeutic approaches. The aim of this study was to investigate whether intranasal delivery of plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF-Endoret), an autologous pool of morphogens and proteins, could enhance hippocampal neurogenesis and reduce neurodegeneration in an amyloid precursor protein/presenilin-1 (APP/PS1) mouse model. Neurotrophic and neuroprotective actions were firstly evident in primary neuronal cultures, where cell proliferation and survival were augmented by Endoret treatment. Translation of these effects in vivo was assessed in wild type and APP/PS1 mice, where neurogenesis was evaluated using 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BdrU), doublecortin (DCX), and NeuN immunostaining 5 weeks after Endoret administration. The number of BrdU, DCX, and NeuN positive cell was increased after chronic treatment. The number of degenerating neurons, detected with fluoro Jade-B staining was reduced in Endoret-treated APP/PS1 mice at 5 week after intranasal administration. In conclusion, Endoret was able to activate neuronal progenitor cells, enhancing hippocampal neurogenesis, and to reduce Aβ-induced neurodegeneration in a mouse model of AD. PMID:24069173

  1. Application of recombinant human leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) produced in rice (Oryza sativa L.) for maintenance of mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Youngblood, Bradford A; Alfano, Randall; Pettit, Steve C; Zhang, Deshui; Dallmann, H Garry; Huang, Ning; Macdonald, Clinton C

    2014-02-20

    Embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells have the ability to differentiate into any somatic cell type, and thus have potential to treat a number of diseases that are currently incurable. Application of these cells for clinical or industrial uses would require an increase in production to yield adequate numbers of viable cells. However, the relatively high costs of cytokines and growth factors required for maintenance of stem cells in the undifferentiated state have the potential to limit translational research. Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), a member of the IL-6 cytokine family, is a key regulator in the maintenance of naïve states for both human and mouse stem cells. In this study, we describe a new recombinant human LIF (rhLIF) using a plant-based (rice) expression system. We found that rice-derived rhLIF possessed the same specific activity as commercial Escherichia coli-derived LIF and was capable of supporting mouse embryonic stem cell proliferation in the undifferentiated state as evidenced from pluripotency marker level analysis. Retention of the pluripotent state was found to be indistinguishable between rice-derived rhLIF and other recombinant LIF proteins currently on the market.

  2. Tissue-specific and ubiquitous factors binding next to the glucocorticoid receptor modulate transcription from the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Cavin, C; Buetti, E

    1995-01-01

    Steroid hormones complexed with their receptors play an essential role in the regulation of mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) transcription. However, the need for additional tissue-specific regulatory factors is suggested by the lack of virus expression in liver, in which glucocorticoid receptors are highly abundant, and by the tissue-specific transcription of reporter genes linked to an MMTV long terminal repeat in transgenic mice. In this study, we characterized two distal-region regulatory elements, DRa and DRc, which, together with the distal glucocorticoid receptor binding site (DRb), increased transcription from the MMTV promoter in permissive cells. This was demonstrated by transfection of these sequences (DRa, DRb, and DRc) in different combinations with the natural MMTV promoter in mouse fibroblasts and mammary epithelial cells, followed by quantitative S1 nuclease mapping of the transcripts. We further showed by DNase I footprinting, methylation interference, and gel retardation assays with various nuclear extracts from permissive or nonpermissive tissues and cell lines that the factors binding to the DRa site are distinct and tissue-specific whereas those binding to DRc are ubiquitous. PMID:7745724

  3. Intranasal delivery of plasma and platelet growth factors using PRGF-Endoret system enhances neurogenesis in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Anitua, Eduardo; Pascual, Consuelo; Pérez-Gonzalez, Rocio; Antequera, Desiree; Padilla, Sabino; Orive, Gorka; Carro, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Neurodegeneration together with a reduction in neurogenesis are cardinal features of Alzheimer's disease (AD) induced by a combination of toxic amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) and a loss of trophic factor support. Amelioration of these was assessed with diverse neurotrophins in experimental therapeutic approaches. The aim of this study was to investigate whether intranasal delivery of plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF-Endoret), an autologous pool of morphogens and proteins, could enhance hippocampal neurogenesis and reduce neurodegeneration in an amyloid precursor protein/presenilin-1 (APP/PS1) mouse model. Neurotrophic and neuroprotective actions were firstly evident in primary neuronal cultures, where cell proliferation and survival were augmented by Endoret treatment. Translation of these effects in vivo was assessed in wild type and APP/PS1 mice, where neurogenesis was evaluated using 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BdrU), doublecortin (DCX), and NeuN immunostaining 5 weeks after Endoret administration. The number of BrdU, DCX, and NeuN positive cell was increased after chronic treatment. The number of degenerating neurons, detected with fluoro Jade-B staining was reduced in Endoret-treated APP/PS1 mice at 5 week after intranasal administration. In conclusion, Endoret was able to activate neuronal progenitor cells, enhancing hippocampal neurogenesis, and to reduce Aβ-induced neurodegeneration in a mouse model of AD.

  4. The gene for murine megakaryocyte growth and development factor (thrombopoietin, Thpo) is located on mouse chromosome 16

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, M.S.; Hsu, R.Y.; McNinch, J.

    1995-04-10

    The canine MGDF genomic clone was isolated using a degenerative oligonucleotide probe based on the amino terminal sequences of the MGDF protein purified from aplastic canine serum. A mouse genomic library (1 x 10{sup 6} pfu) was then screened with a mixture of six canine MGDF oligomers. Phage DNA was isolated from the positive clone and sequenced. Comparison of the murine MGDF and the human MGDF gene showed that their genomic structures are similar in sizes of exons and introns. To determine chromosomal location of the murine MGDF gene (locus designation thrombopoietin, Thpo), interspecific backcross progeny were generated by mating (C57BL/6J X Mus spretus) F{sub 1} females and C57BL/6J males as described. This interspecific backcross mapping panel has been typed for over 1700 loci that are well distributed among all of the autosomes as well as the X chromosome. A total of 205 N{sub 2} mice were used to map the Thpo locus. The probe used in these studies was an {approximately}440-bp fragment of mouse genomic DNA consisting of exon 6, intron 6, and part of exon 7. C57BL/6J and M. spretus DNAs were digested with several enzymes and analyzed by Southern blot hybridization for informative restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) using a mouse genomic probe. A fragment of 6.5 kb was detected in EcoRI-digested C57BL/6J DNA, and a fragment of 4.6 kb was detected in EcoRI-digested M. spretus DNA. The 4.6-kb M. spretus-specific EcoRI fragment was used to follow the segregation of the Thpo locus in backcross mice. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  5. Developmental regulation of early mouse embryogenesis. A. Onset of insulin and related growth factor binding. B. Expression of selected proto-oncogenes

    SciTech Connect

    Mattson, B.A.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental and clinical evidence suggest a role for insulin and related growth factors in fetal growth. It was therefore of interest to determine the onset of insulin binding to cells of early embryos. These studies are the first to demonstrate stage-specific insulin binding during mouse preimplantation embryogenesis. Insulin binding was detected at the morula, blastocyst, and blastocyst outgrowth stages using indirect immunofluorescence and light microscopic autoradiographic techniques. No evidence of insulin binding was seen on unfertilized oocytes, two-, four-, or eight-cell embryos. Results of competitive inhibition studies using unlabeled insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) suggest binding of /sup 125/I-insulin to type I IGF receptors as well. Further studies are needed to confirm the presence of an IGF receptor in preimplantation embryos.

  6. Overexpression of the Rho-guanine nucleotide exchange factor ECT2 inhibits nuclear translocation of nuclear receptor CAR in the mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Hosseinpour, Fardin; Timsit, Yoav; Koike, Chika; Matsui, Kenji; Yamamoto, Yukio; Moore, Rick; Negishi, Masahiko

    2007-10-16

    Various drugs such as phenobarbital (PB) trigger translocation of constitutive active/adrostane receptor (CAR) from the cytoplasm into the nucleus of mouse liver cells without directly binding to the receptor. We have now characterized the guanine nucleotide exchange factor epithelial cell-transforming gene 2 (ECT2) as a PB-inducible factor as well as a cellular signal that represses PB-triggered nuclear translocation of CAR. When CFP-tagged ECT2 was co-expressed with YFP-tagged CAR in the liver of Car(-/-) mice, ECT2 repressed CAR nuclear translocation. Coexpression of various deletion mutants delineated this repressive activity to the tandem Dbl homology/pleckstrin homology domains of ECT2 and to their cytosolic expression. CAR directly bound to the PH domain. Thus, ECT2 may comprise a part of the PB response signal regulating the intracellular trafficking of CAR.

  7. Analysis of transcription factors key for mouse pancreatic development establishes NKX2-2 and MNX1 mutations as causes of neonatal diabetes in man.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Sarah E; De Franco, Elisa; Lango Allen, Hana; Zerah, Michele; Abdul-Rasoul, Majedah M; Edge, Julie A; Stewart, Helen; Alamiri, Elham; Hussain, Khalid; Wallis, Sam; de Vries, Liat; Rubio-Cabezas, Oscar; Houghton, Jayne A L; Edghill, Emma L; Patch, Ann-Marie; Ellard, Sian; Hattersley, Andrew T

    2014-01-07

    Understanding transcriptional regulation of pancreatic development is required to advance current efforts in developing beta cell replacement therapies for patients with diabetes. Current knowledge of key transcriptional regulators has predominantly come from mouse studies, with rare, naturally occurring mutations establishing their relevance in man. This study used a combination of homozygosity analysis and Sanger sequencing in 37 consanguineous patients with permanent neonatal diabetes to search for homozygous mutations in 29 transcription factor genes important for murine pancreatic development. We identified homozygous mutations in 7 different genes in 11 unrelated patients and show that NKX2-2 and MNX1 are etiological genes for neonatal diabetes, thus confirming their key role in development of the human pancreas. The similar phenotype of the patients with recessive mutations and mice with inactivation of a transcription factor gene support there being common steps critical for pancreatic development and validate the use of rodent models for beta cell development.

  8. A mammary cell-specific enhancer in mouse mammary tumor virus DNA is composed of multiple regulatory elements including binding sites for CTF/NFI and a novel transcription factor, mammary cell-activating factor.

    PubMed Central

    Mink, S; Härtig, E; Jennewein, P; Doppler, W; Cato, A C

    1992-01-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) is a milk-transmitted retrovirus involved in the neoplastic transformation of mouse mammary gland cells. The expression of this virus is regulated by mammary cell type-specific factors, steroid hormones, and polypeptide growth factors. Sequences for mammary cell-specific expression are located in an enhancer element in the extreme 5' end of the long terminal repeat region of this virus. This enhancer, when cloned in front of the herpes simplex thymidine kinase promoter, endows the promoter with mammary cell-specific response. Using functional and DNA-protein-binding studies with constructs mutated in the MMTV long terminal repeat enhancer, we have identified two main regulatory elements necessary for the mammary cell-specific response. These elements consist of binding sites for a transcription factor in the family of CTF/NFI proteins and the transcription factor mammary cell-activating factor (MAF) that recognizes the sequence G Pu Pu G C/G A A G G/T. Combinations of CTF/NFI- and MAF-binding sites or multiple copies of either one of these binding sites but not solitary binding sites mediate mammary cell-specific expression. The functional activities of these two regulatory elements are enhanced by another factor that binds to the core sequence ACAAAG. Interdigitated binding sites for CTF/NFI, MAF, and/or the ACAAAG factor are also found in the 5' upstream regions of genes encoding whey milk proteins from different species. These findings suggest that mammary cell-specific regulation is achieved by a concerted action of factors binding to multiple regulatory sites. Images PMID:1328867

  9. Metal allergens induce nitric oxide production by mouse dermal fibroblasts via the hypoxia-inducible factor-2α-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Kuroishi, Toshinobu; Bando, Kanan; Endo, Yasuo; Sugawara, Shunji

    2013-09-01

    Nickel (Ni) has been shown to be one of the most frequent metal allergens. We have already reported a murine metal allergy model with pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) as adjuvants. Interleukin (IL)-1β plays a critical role in our mouse model. Because nonimmune cells, including fibroblasts, play important roles in local allergic inflammation, we investigated whether Ni induces inflammatory responses in mouse dermal fibroblasts (MDF). We also analyzed the synergistic effects between Ni, PAMPs, and IL-1β. MDF stimulated with Ni produced a significantly higher amount of nitric oxide (NO) in a dose-dependent manner. NO production was augmented by costimulation with IL-1β but not with PAMPs. On the other hand, IL-1β or PAMPs induced a significantly higher amount of IL-6 production by MDF, but no augmentation was detected in the presence of Ni. A specific inhibitor for inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibited Ni-induced NO production. iNOS mRNA expression was significantly higher in MDF stimulated with Ni, IL-1β, or both. A specific inhibitor for hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-2α, but not HIF-1α, inhibited NO production. Another frequent metal allergen, cobalt, also induced iNOS expression and NO production by MDF via the HIF-2α-dependent pathway. The inhibitor for iNOS augmented ear swelling in Ni allergy mouse model. On the other hand, HIF-2α inhibitor attenuates allergic inflammation. These results indicate that metal allergens induce NO production in MDF via the HIF-2α-dependent pathway and IL-1β augments NO production, which suggests that the NO induced by metal allergens plays a pathological role in metal allergies.

  10. "The preadipocyte factor" DLK1 marks adult mouse adipose tissue residing vascular cells that lack in vitro adipogenic differentiation potential.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Ditte Caroline; Jensen, Line; Schrøder, Henrik Daa; Jensen, Charlotte Harken

    2009-09-03

    Delta-like 1 (Dlk1) is expressed in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and has frequently been referred to as "the" preadipocyte marker, yet the phenotype of DLK1(+) cells in adipose tissue remains undetermined. Herein, we demonstrate that DLK1(+) cells encompass around 1-2% of the adult mouse adipose stromal vascular fraction (SVF). Unexpectedly, the DLK1(+)SVF population was enriched for cells expressing genes generally ascribed to the vascular lineage and did not possess any adipogenic differentiation potential in vitro. Instead, DLK1(+) cells comprised an immediate ability for cobblestone formation, generation of tube-like structures on matrigel, and uptake of Acetylated Low Density-Lipoprotein, all characteristics of endothelial cells. We therefore suggest that DLK1(+)SVF cells are of a vascular origin and not them-selves committed preadipocytes as assumed hitherto.

  11. NF-kappaB inhibitor dehydroxymethylepoxyquinomicin suppresses osteoclastogenesis and expression of NFATc1 in mouse arthritis without affecting expression of RANKL, osteoprotegerin or macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Tetsuo; Hoshino, Machiko; Aoki, Kazuhiro; Ohya, Keiichi; Komano, Yukiko; Nanki, Toshihiro; Miyasaka, Nobuyuki; Umezawa, Kazuo

    2007-01-01

    Inhibition of NF-kappaB is known to be effective in reducing both inflammation and bone destruction in animal models of arthritis. Our previous study demonstrated that a small cell-permeable NF-kappaB inhibitor, dehydroxymethylepoxyquinomicin (DHMEQ), suppresses expression of proinflammatory cytokines and ameliorates mouse arthritis. It remained unclear, however, whether DHMEQ directly affects osteoclast precursor cells to suppress their differentiation to mature osteoclasts in vivo. The effect of DHMEQ on human osteoclastogenesis also remained elusive. In the present study, we therefore examined the effect of DHMEQ on osteoclastogenesis using a mouse collagen-induced arthritis model, and using culture systems of fibroblast-like synovial cells obtained from patients with rheumatoid arthritis, and of osteoclast precursor cells from peripheral blood of healthy volunteers. DHMEQ significantly suppressed formation of osteoclasts in arthritic joints, and also suppressed expression of NFATc1 along the inner surfaces of bone lacunae and the eroded bone surface, while serum levels of soluble receptor activator of NF-kappaB ligand (RANKL), osteoprotegerin and macrophage colony-stimulating factor were not affected by the treatment. DHMEQ also did not suppress spontaneous expression of RANKL nor of macrophage colony-stimulating factor in culture of fibroblast-like synovial cells obtained from patients with rheumatoid arthritis. These results suggest that DHMEQ suppresses osteoclastogenesis in vivo, through downregulation of NFATc1 expression, without significantly affecting expression of upstream molecules of the RANKL/receptor activator of NF-kappaB/osteoprotegerin cascade, at least in our experimental condition. Furthermore, in the presence of RANKL and macrophage colony-stimulating factor, differentiation and activation of human osteoclasts were also suppressed by DHMEQ, suggesting the possibility of future application of NF-kappaB inhibitors to rheumatoid arthritis

  12. RNA interference targeting hypoxia-inducible factor 1α via a novel multifunctional surfactant attenuates glioma growth in an intracranial mouse model.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, David L; Aguirre, Maria T; Ravichandran, Sandhya; Leishman, Lisa L; Berrondo, Claudia; Gamboa, Joseph T; Wang, Libo; King, Rose; Wang, Xuli; Tan, Mingqian; Malamas, Anthony; Lu, Zheng-Rong; Jensen, Randy L

    2015-02-01

    High-grade gliomas are the most common form of adult brain cancer, and patients have a dismal survival rate despite aggressive therapeutic measures. Intratumoral hypoxia is thought to be a main contributor to tumorigenesis and angiogenesis of these tumors. Because hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) is the major mediator of hypoxia-regulated cellular control, inhibition of this transcription factor may reduce glioblastoma growth. Using an orthotopic mouse model with U87-LucNeo cells, the authors used RNA interference to knock down HIF-1α in vivo. The small interfering RNA (siRNA) was packaged using a novel multifunctional surfactant, 1-(aminoethyl) iminobis[N-(oleicylcysteinylhistinyl-1-aminoethyl)propionamide] (EHCO), a nucleic acid carrier that facilitates cellular uptake and intracellular release of siRNA. Stereotactic injection was used to deliver siRNA locally through a guide-screw system, and delivery/uptake was verified by imaging of fluorescently labeled siRNA. Osmotic pumps were used for extended siRNA delivery to model a commonly used human intracranial drug-delivery technique, convection-enhanced delivery. Mice receiving daily siRNA injections targeting HIF-1α had a 79% lower tumor volume after 50 days of treatment than the controls. Levels of the HIF-1 transcriptional targets vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), glucose transporter 1 (GLUT-1), c-MET, and carbonic anhydrase-IX (CA-IX) and markers for cell growth (MIB-1 and microvascular density) were also significantly lower. Altering the carrier EHCO by adding polyethylene glycol significantly increased the efficacy of drug delivery and subsequent survival. Treating glioblastoma with siRNA targeting HIF-1α in vivo can significantly reduce tumor growth and increase survival in an intracranial mouse model, a finding that has direct clinical implications.

  13. Regulation of the nuclear export of the transcription factor NFATc1 by protein kinases after slow fibre type electrical stimulation of adult mouse skeletal muscle fibres.

    PubMed

    Shen, Tiansheng; Cseresnyés, Zoltán; Liu, Yewei; Randall, William R; Schneider, Martin F

    2007-03-01

    The transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT)c1 has been shown to be involved in turning on slow skeletal muscle fibre gene expression. Previous studies from our laboratory have characterized the stimulation pattern-dependent nuclear import and resting shuttling of NFATc1-green fluorescent protein (GFP) in flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) muscle fibres from adult mouse. In this study, we use viral expression of the transcription factor NFATc1-GFP fusion protein to investigate the mechanisms underlying the nuclear export of the NFATc1-GFP that accumulated in the nuclei of cultured dissociated adult mouse FDB muscle fibres during slow-twitch fibre type electrical stimulation. In these studies, we found that inhibition of either glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK3beta) or casein kinase 1 or 2 (CK1/2) markedly slowed the decay of nuclear NFATc1-GFP after cessation of muscle fibre electrical stimulation, whereas inhibition of casein kinase 1delta, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase and protein kinase A had little effect. Simultaneous inhibition of GSK3beta and CK1/2 completely blocked the nuclear export of NFATc1-GFP after muscle activity. We also developed a simplified model of NFATc1 phosphorylation/dephosphorylation and nuclear fluxes, and used this model to simulate the observed time courses of nuclear NFATc1-GFP with and without NFATc1 kinase inhibition. Our results suggest that GSK3beta and CK1/2 are the major protein kinases that contribute to the removal of NFATc1 that accumulates in muscle fibre nuclei during muscle activity, and that GSK3beta and CK1/2 are responsible for phosphorylating NFATc1 in muscle nuclei in a complementary or synergistic fashion.

  14. Downregulation of miR-219 enhances brain-derived neurotrophic factor production in mouse dorsal root ganglia to mediate morphine analgesic tolerance by upregulating CaMKIIγ

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xue-Ming; Cao, Shou-Bin; Zhang, Hai-Long; Lyu, Dong-Mei; Chen, Li-Ping; Xu, Heng; Pan, Zhi-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Background Increasing evidence suggests that microRNAs are functionally involved in the initiation and maintenance of pain hypersensitivity, including chronic morphine analgesic tolerance, through the posttranscriptional regulation of pain-related genes. We have previously demonstrated that miR-219 regulates inflammatory pain in the spinal cord by targeting calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II gamma (CaMKIIγ). However, whether miR-219 regulates CaMKIIγ expression in the dorsal root ganglia to mediate morphine tolerance remains unclear. Results MiR-219 expression was downregulated and CaMKIIγ expression was upregulated in mouse dorsal root ganglia following chronic morphine treatment. The changes in miR-219 and CaMKIIγ expression closely correlated with the development of morphine tolerance, which was measured using the reduction of percentage of maximum potential efficiency to thermal stimuli. Morphine tolerance was markedly delayed by upregulating miR-219 expression using miR-219 mimics or downregulating CaMKIIγ expression using CaMKIIγ small interfering RNA. The protein and mRNA expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor were also induced in dorsal root ganglia by prolonged morphine exposure in a time-dependent manner, which were transcriptionally regulated by miR-219 and CaMKIIγ. Scavenging brain-derived neurotrophic factor via tyrosine receptor kinase B-Fc partially attenuated morphine tolerance. Moreover, functional inhibition of miR-219 via miR-219-sponge in naive mice elicited thermal hyperalgesia and spinal neuronal sensitization, which were both suppressed by CaMKIIγ small interfering RNA or tyrosine receptor kinase B-Fc. Conclusions These results demonstrate that miR-219 contributes to the development of chronic tolerance to morphine analgesia in mouse dorsal root ganglia by targeting CaMKIIγ and enhancing CaMKIIγ-dependent brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression. PMID:27599867

  15. Decreased insulin-like growth factor-I and its receptor expression in the hippocampus and somatosensory cortex of the aged mouse.

    PubMed

    Lee, Choong Hyun; Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Park, Joon Ha; Yan, Bing Chun; Kim, In Hye; Lee, Dae Hwan; Cho, Jeong-Hwi; Chen, Bai Hui; Lee, Jae-Chul; Cho, Jun Hwi; Lee, Yun Lyul; Won, Moo-Ho; Kang, Il-Jun

    2014-04-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) is a multifunctional polypeptide and has diverse effects on brain functions. In the present study, we compared IGF-I and IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR) immunoreactivity and their protein levels between the adult (postnatal month 6) and aged (postnatal month 24) mouse hippocampus and somatosensory cortex. In the adult hippocampus, IGF-I immunoreactivity was easily observed in the pyramidal cells of the stratum pyramidale in the hippocampus proper and in the granule cells of the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus. In the adult somatosensory cortex, IGF-I immunoreactivity was easily found in the pyramidal cells of layer V. In the aged groups, IGF-I expression was dramatically decreased in the cells. Like the change of IGF-I immunoreactivity, IGF-IR immunoreactivity in the pyramidal and granule cells of the hippocampus and in the pyramidal cells of the somatosensory cortex was also markedly decreased in the aged group. In addition, both IGF-I and IGF-IR protein levels were significantly decreased in the aged hippocampus and somatosensory cortex. These results indicate that the apparent decrease of IGF-I and IGF-IR expression in the aged mouse hippocampus and somatosensory cortex may be related to age-related changes in the aged brain.

  16. Co-inhibition of colony stimulating factor-1 receptor and BRAF oncogene in mouse models of BRAF(V600E) melanoma.

    PubMed

    Ngiow, Shin Foong; Meeth, Katrina M; Stannard, Kimberley; Barkauskas, Deborah S; Bollag, Gideon; Bosenberg, Marcus; Smyth, Mark J

    2016-03-01

    The presence of colony stimulating factor-1 (CSF1)/CSF1 receptor (CSF1R)-driven tumor-infiltrating macrophages and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) is shown to promote targeted therapy resistance. In this study, we demonstrate the superior effect of a combination of CSF1R inhibitor, PLX3397 and BRAF inhibitor, PLX4720, in suppressing primary and metastatic mouse BRAF(V600E) melanoma. Using flow cytometry to assess SM1WT1 melanoma-infiltrating leukocytes immediately post therapy, we found that PLX3397 reduced the recruitment of CD11b(+) Gr1(lo) and CD11b(+) Gr1(int) M2-like macrophages, but this was accompanied by an accumulation of CD11b(+) Gr1(hi) cells. PDL1 expression on remaining myeloid cells potentially dampened the antitumor efficacy of PLX3397 and PLX4720 in combination, since PD1/PDL1 axis blockade improved outcome. We also reveal a role for PLX3397 in reducing tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, and interestingly, this feature was rescued by the co-administration of PLX4720. Our findings, from three different mouse models of BRAF-mutated melanoma, support clinical approaches that co-target BRAF oncogene and CSF1R.

  17. Modulator effects of interleukin-1beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha on AMPA-induced excitotoxicity in mouse organotypic hippocampal slice cultures.

    PubMed

    Bernardino, Liliana; Xapelli, Sara; Silva, Ana P; Jakobsen, Birthe; Poulsen, Frantz R; Oliveira, Catarina R; Vezzani, Annamaria; Malva, João O; Zimmer, Jens

    2005-07-20

    The inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) have been identified as mediators of several forms of neurodegeneration in the brain. However, they can produce either deleterious or beneficial effects on neuronal function. We investigated the effects of these cytokines on neuronal death caused by exposure of mouse organotypic hippocampal slice cultures to toxic concentrations of AMPA. Either potentiation of excitotoxicity or neuroprotection was observed, depending on the concentration of the cytokines and the timing of exposure. A relatively high concentration of mouse recombinant TNF-alpha (10 ng/ml) enhanced excitotoxicity when the cultures were simultaneously exposed to AMPA and to this cytokine. Decreasing the concentration of TNF-alpha to 1 ng/ml resulted in neuroprotection against AMPA-induced neuronal death independently on the application protocol. By using TNF-alpha receptor (TNFR) knock-out mice, we demonstrated that the potentiation of AMPA-induced toxicity by TNF-alpha involves TNF receptor-1, whereas the neuroprotective effect is mediated by TNF receptor-2. AMPA exposure was associated with activation and proliferation of microglia as assessed by macrophage antigen-1 and bromodeoxyuridine immunohistochemistry, suggesting a functional recruitment of cytokine-producing cells at sites of neurodegeneration. Together, these findings are relevant for understanding the role of proinflammatory cytokines and microglia activation in acute and chronic excitotoxic conditions.

  18. The mouse model is suitable for the study of viral factors governing transmission and pathogenesis of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Rigoni, Michela; Toffan, Anna; Viale, Elisabetta; Mancin, Marzia; Cilloni, Filippo; Bertoli, Elena; Salomoni, Angela; Marciano, Sabrina; Milani, Adelaide; Zecchin, Bianca; Capua, Ilaria; Cattoli, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses of the H5 and H7 subtype pose a major public health threat due to their capacity to cross the species barrier and infect mammals, for example dogs, cats and humans. In the present study we tested the capacity of selected H7 and H5 HPAI viruses to infect and to be transmitted from infected BALB/c mice to contact sentinels. Previous experiments have shown that viruses belonging to both H5 and H7 subtypes replicate in the respiratory tract and central nervous system of experimentally infected mice. In this study we show that selected H7N1 and H5N1 HPAI viruses can be transmitted from mouse-to-mouse by direct contact, and that in experimentally infected animals they exhibit a different pattern of replication and transmission. Our results can be considered as a starting point for transmission experiments involving other influenza A viruses with α 2-3 receptor affinity in order to better understand the viral factors influencing transmissibility of these viruses in selected mammalian species. PMID:20546698

  19. Optical coherence tomography-based contact indentation for diaphragm mechanics in a mouse model of transforming growth factor alpha induced lung disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kimberley C W; Astell, Chrissie J; Wijesinghe, Philip; Larcombe, Alexander N; Pinniger, Gavin J; Zosky, Graeme R; Kennedy, Brendan F; Berry, Luke J; Sampson, David D; James, Alan L; Le Cras, Timothy D; Noble, Peter B

    2017-05-04

    This study tested the utility of optical coherence tomography (OCT)-based indentation to assess mechanical properties of respiratory tissues in disease. Using OCT-based indentation, the elastic modulus of mouse diaphragm was measured from changes in diaphragm thickness in response to an applied force provided by an indenter. We used a transgenic mouse model of chronic lung disease induced by the overexpression of transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-α), established by the presence of pleural and peribronchial fibrosis and impaired lung mechanics determined by the forced oscillation technique and plethysmography. Diaphragm elastic modulus assessed by OCT-based indentation was reduced by TGF-α at both left and right lateral locations (p < 0.05). Diaphragm elastic modulus at left and right lateral locations were correlated within mice (r = 0.67, p < 0.01) suggesting that measurements were representative of tissue beyond the indenter field. Co-localised images of diaphragm after TGF-α overexpression revealed a layered fibrotic appearance. Maximum diaphragm force in conventional organ bath studies was also reduced by TGF-α overexpression (p < 0.01). Results show that OCT-based indentation provided clear delineation of diseased diaphragm, and together with organ bath assessment, provides new evidence suggesting that TGF-α overexpression produces impairment in diaphragm function and, therefore, an increase in the work of breathing in chronic lung disease.

  20. A disease-related rheumatoid factor autoantibody is not tolerized in a normal mouse: implications for the origins of autoantibodies in autoimmune disease

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    We have analyzed B cell tolerance in a rheumatoid factor (RF) transgenic mouse model. The model is based on AM14, a hybridoma, originally isolated from an autoimmune MRL/lpr mouse that has an affinity and specificity typical of disease-related RFs from this strain. AM14 binds to immunoglobulin (Ig)G2a of the "a" allotype (IgG2aa) and not to IgG2ab. Thus, by crossing the transgenes onto an IgHa (BALB/c) background or to a congenic IgHb (CB.17) background, we could study the RF-expressing B cells when they were self-specific (IgHa) or when they were not self-specific (IgHb). These features make the AM14 model unique in focusing on a true autoantibody specificity while at the same time allowing comparison of autoreactive and nonautoreactive transgenic B cells, as was possible in model autoantibody systems such as anti-hen egg lysozyme. Studies showed that AM14 RF B cells can make primary immune responses and do not downregulate sIgM, indicating that the presence of self-antigen does not induce anergy of these cells. In fact, IgHa AM14 transgenic mice have higher serum levels of transgene-encoded RF than their IgHb counterparts, suggesting that self-antigen-specific activation occurs even in the normal mouse background. Since AM14 B cells made primary responses, we had the opportunity to test for potential blocks to self- reactive cells entering the memory compartment. We did not find evidence of this, as AM14 B cells made secondary immune responses as well. These data demonstrate that a precursor of a disease-specific autoantibody can be present in the preimmune repertoire and functional even to the point of memory cell development of normal mice. Therefore, immunoregulatory mechanisms that normally prevent autoantibody production must exert their effects later in B cell development or through T cell tolerance. Conversely, the data suggest that it is not necessary to break central tolerance, even in an autoimmune mouse, to generate pathologic, disease