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Sample records for facultad al hospital

  1. SWITCH: Al Wakra Hospital Journey to 90% Hand Hygiene Practice Compliance, 2011 – 2015

    PubMed Central

    Visan, Feah Altura -; Zakaria, Almunzer; Castro, Jenalyn; Alhasanat, Omar; Ismail, Khalil Al; Ansari, Naser Al; Hamed, Manal

    2017-01-01

    Hand Hygiene is the cheapest and simplest way to prevent the spread of infection, however international compliance is below than 40% (WHO, 2009). In the experience of Al Wakra Hospital, the improvement in hand hygiene compliance highlighted not just interventions towards training and education but also behavioral motivation and physical allocations of hand hygiene appliances and equipment. Through motivating the behavioral, emotional, physical and intellectual dimensions of the different healthcare worker professions, hand hygiene compliance has increased from 60.78% in 2011 to 94.14% by the end of December 2015. It took 25 months of continuous and collaborative work with different healthcare workers to reach the 90% hand hygiene target. “Together, we have reached our goals and together we fight against infections! Because we always strive for excellence in everything we do – that is our vision here in Al Wakra Hospital.” PMID:28469905

  2. Missan Surgical Hospital Under the Economic Support Fund Al Amarah, Iraq

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-16

    create septic conditions resulting in offensive odor and difficulty in treatment. Similar to the water supply system, the wastewater system design...associated with these aspects of the project, especially for water supply. According to GRS, the current plan is to place the river intake near the...intersection of the Tigris and Al Kahla Rivers and then run the water lines to the hospital site. However, this would require the contractor to

  3. PATTERN OF SURGICAL AND MEDICAL DISEASES AMONG PILGRIMS ATTENDING AL-NOOR HOSPITAL MAKKAH

    PubMed Central

    Al-Harbi, Mohammed A.

    2000-01-01

    Objective: Hajj usually presents a unique medical crisis especially for the Emergency Department. This study will identify the surgical and medical cases that presented at the Emergency Department during Hajj and percentage admitted. Design: A prospective study of the pattern of surgical and medical cases that presented at the Emergency Department of the largest tertiary care hospital in Makkah city and holy lands during Hajj. Methods: The study was conducted prospectively during the 1413 (1993) Hajj pilgrimage from 20.11.1413 to 20.12.1413. All Saudi and non-Saudi pilgrims presenting at the Emergency Department of Al-Noor Specialist Hospital were included. Results: From the 7,676 patients who came to the Emergency Department, 1426 were admitted. The commonest cause for surgical admission was trauma, while the commonest cause for medical admission was pneumonia. Conclusion: More than 50% of cases could have been dealt with in the Outpatient Department or Primary Health Care Centers. PMID:23008609

  4. [Al

    PubMed

    Purath; Köppe; Schnöckel

    1999-10-04

    A "naked" aluminum atom links two aluminum tetrahedra in the [Al(7){N(SiMe(3))(2)}(6)](-) ion (see picture), which results from the reaction of a metastable AlCl solution with LiN(SiMe(3))(2) and crystallizes with [Li(OEt(2))(3)](+) as cation. This unique structure among molecular metal atom clusters represents a small but characteristic section of cubic close-packed aluminum.

  5. Bacterial Contamination in Intensive Care Unit at Al-Imam Al-Hussein Hospital in Thi-qar Province in Iraq

    PubMed Central

    Nasser, Nazar Edward; Abbas, Ali Taher; Hamed, Saad L.

    2013-01-01

    Cross- infection from patient to patient or from hospital personnel to patients represents constant hazards. It is one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality especially in Intensive Care Unit all over the world. To identify the types and the source of bacterial contamination in ICU and to study the sensitivity of bacterial isolates to commonly used antibiotics in hospitals this study had been conducted in Al-Imam Al-Hussein hospital in Thi-qar province for the period from the 1st of September to the end of December 2011. A total of 320 swabs and samples were collected from 17 different sites of Intensive Care Unit environment and inoculated on a normal cultural media, then incubated at 37°C for 24 hour. The obtained growth revealed different bacterial colonies which had been tested for their morphological and biochemical characteristics. Sixty eight of pure isolates were obtained including 24 (35.29%) Gram positive bacterial isolates, and 44(64.71%) of Gram negative bacterial isolates, the highest rates (19.11%) of bacterial contamination had been found on the walls and the floor. Sensitivity tests for all isolates were done using 25 types of commonly used antibiotics in Iraq, among Gram negative bacteria and gram positive bacteria the genus Enterobacter spp and Staphylococcus spp respectively, showed the highest resistance to most of the tested antibiotics, MIC tests for 5 types of antibiotics being applied for the most resistant and the most sensitive isolates had identified that all isolates have a low rate of MIC against Ciprofloxacine. Bacillus spp and Enterobacter spp were the most prevalent bacterial contaminants of Intensive Care Unit environment. such contamination could be managed mostly by strict application of sterilization measures. PMID:23283046

  6. [Qualifications and morality requisite for the personnel to be employed in the Ottoman Hospitals (Dar-al-Shifas)].

    PubMed

    Sari, N

    1995-01-01

    Ottomans legislated various codes and founded several institutions to provide care and protection for the sick, disabled, orphans, widows, invalids and the aged. Sultans passed acts assigning a proportion of the tax income to the needs of the diseased and disabled people in hospitals (dar-al-shifas) and nursing; and created foundations of health with trusts of deeds (waqfiyyes). These deeds comprise interesting information on hospital management as well as the duties, responsibilities, qualities, and proficiency standards requisite for physicians and other employees of these institutions. This article deals with the trusts of deeds of the dar-al-shifas founded by the Sultans, Bayazid I. in 1400, Mehmed II. the Conqueror in 1470, Bayazid II. in 1488, Süleyman the Magnificent in 1556, Sultan Ahmet I in 1616; and the Sultans' wifes', Hafsa's in 1539, Haseki Sultan Hurrem's in 1550, and Nurbanu's in 1582, in view of the characteristics stated above. A Hospital which presumably had a capacity of 20 to 50 patients had a staff consisting of approximately 20 to 25 employees, covering primarily, physicians (tabib), ophtalmologists (kahhal), surgeons (djarrah) and assistant health personnel such as pharmacists (ashshab), cook-dieticians (tabbah), a drug-smasher (adviyekub), a cellar-keeper (kilardje), nurses (kayyum), an attendant of kitchen ware (qassa-kash), sweepers (farrash), a W.C. cleaner (ab-reze) and a doorkeeper (bevvab) etc. ...

  7. Evaluation of the Beckman Coulter AcT 5 diff AL hematology analyzer in a hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Bhuta, Ujvala M; Ulstein, Howard

    2003-01-01

    The Coulter AcT 5-part differential (5 diff) autoloader (AL) hematology analyzer from Beckman Coulter (Fullerton, CA, USA) was evaluated at the Florida Medical Center in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, an acute care hospital facility. The AcT 5 diff AL is a new, fully automated bench-top 5-part differential hematology analyzer with automatic loading and sampling. It is designed as a front-line instrument for small- to medium-sized laboratories or as a backup in larger laboratories. We evaluated the performance of the AcT 5 diff AL for complete blood counts (CBCs). The Coulter Onyx AL was used as the reference instrument and the 5-part differential against the reference 400-cell manual differential count (2 operators x 200 cells). A total of 140 patient samples were analyzed in the study, with most of the samples obtained from our own laboratory workload. We supplemented this dataset with pediatric and oncology samples from nearby practices. All samples were analyzed within 4 hours of collection, and the AcT 5 diff AL demonstrated excellent accuracy with correlation values (r) > 0.98 for all directly measured CBC parameters (white blood cell count, red blood cell count, hemoglobin, mean corpuscular volume, and platelets). Reproducibility studies on the AcT 5 diff AL also showed excellent results, with coefficients of variation much lower than the manufacturer's specifications. Initial differential comparisons showed good correlations for neutrophils, lymphocytes, and eosinophils (r = 0.84, 0.96, and 0.88, respectively) with a lower correlation for monocytes (r = 0.43). On subsequent review and data analysis we found differential discrepancies in 39 of the 140 samples, for which all showed multiple morphological flags, R diff flags, or poor scatterplot separations indicating that the AcT 5 diff AL differential was likely to be inaccurate and that a morphological assessment and differential was necessary. Given the acutecare setting that our laboratory serves and the

  8. Nasal carriage of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus among health care workers at Al Shifa hospital in Gaza Strip.

    PubMed

    El Aila, Nabil Abdullah; Al Laham, Nahed Ali; Ayesh, Basim Mohammad

    2017-01-05

    Nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus among hospital personnel is a common cause of hospital acquired infections. Emergence of drug resistant strains especially methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA) is a serious problem in hospital environment. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the nasal carriage rate of S. aureus and MRSA among Health Care Workers (HCWs) at Al Shifa Hospital, the major hospital in Gaza Strip. A cross sectional study was conducted on 200 HCWs. Nasal swabs were collected during February - April 2015, and cultured on blood and mannitol salt agar. The isolates were identified as S. aureus based on morphology, coagulase test, DNase test and mannitol salt agar fermentation. Disk diffusion antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed according to the guidelines of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. MRSA were confirmed by detection of the mecA gene by PCR. Out of the 200 healthcare workers, 62 (31%) carried S. aureus, of which 51 (82.3%) were MRSA. Therefore, 25.5% of all HCWs were identified as MRSA carriers. MRSA carriage rate was highest among nurses (30.4%) whereas the carriage rate among doctors was (16%). The majority of MRSA carriers were workers of internal medicine department and surgical wards (41.3 and 35% respectively). Out of the 51 MRSA isolates identified by oxacillin disc resistance, 40 were confirmed by PCR targeting the mecA gene. Penicillin showed the highest rate of resistance among MRSA and MSSA isolates (100%). The high rate of nasal MRSA carriage among healthcare workers found in this study is alarming and highlights the need for adjusted infection control measures to prevent MRSA transmission from HCWs to the vulnerable patient.

  9. [Epidemiological profile of maternal complications related to cesarean section at the Al Farabi Hospital in Oujda].

    PubMed

    Benkirane, Saad; Saadi, Hanane; Mimouni, Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    In Morocco cesarean section rate has increased from 2% in 1992 to 16% in 2011. This was associated with increased per- and postoperative mortality and morbidity, which was 19% in our case series. This study is the first of its kind to be conducted in the eastern region of Morocco and aims to analyze the comprehensive epidemiologic profile of maternal complications related to cesarean section on the basis of 2417 cases observed in the Maternity Department at the El Farabi Hospital, Oujda. We conducted an observational, descriptive, retrospective study of a series of 2416 patients undergoing cesarean section in the Maternity Department at the El Farabi Hospital, Oujda, over the period 1 January 2011-31 December 2013. Out of 24464 deliveries, 2416 were cesarean sections, reflecting a rate of 9.87%. The frequency of complications related to cesarean section was 19.45%. Postoperative complications accounted for 63.6% of the complications dominated by infection. Haemorrhagic complications accounted for 25.53% of all complications. 4 cases of maternal deaths were recorded. If the increased rate of cesarean sections has contributed to improve maternal-fetal prognosis, the surgical act itself is not complication-free, which leads us to review its indications for improved patient management.

  10. Discrepancies between dental and medical records of cardiac patients in AlHada Armed Forces Hospital, Taif, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al Hibshi, Sana M.; Al-Raddadi, Rajaa M.; Assery, Mansour K.

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: This study aims to estimate the prevalence of medical information discrepancies between dental and medical records of cardiac patients at AlHada Armed Forces Hospital in Taif and to identify the factors contributing to these information discrepancies. Materials and Methods: The study applied a descriptive retrospective medical and dental records review of a stratified proportional sample of 289 cardiac patients, which was extracted from 1154 cardiac patients who visited both the cardiology and dental clinics at the AlHada Armed Forces Hospital between 2007 and June 2012. Data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 19. Results: The main results of this study are the following: The mean and standard deviation of patient's age was 56 ± 16.9, female patients represented 47.8% of the study population. A total of 78.5% of dental records were documented by dental residents whereas 48.4% of the dentists had more than 6 years of experience. Two hundred and seventy-nine (96.5%) of the 289 dental records had medical information discrepancies compared to the corresponding medical records. One hundred percent of systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatic fever cases were not documented in the dental records followed by 93% of medications, 92% of stroke, and 88.5% of hyperlipidemia, whereas the least prevalent were cardiac disease (26%) and diabetes mellitus (22.2%). Conclusion: Approximately 75% of the patients who directly or indirectly accessed the dental services showed discrepancies. The researcher concludes that critical information gaps exist between dental and medical records that mostly attributed to system level problems. A well-established model for efficient communication among medical and dental care providers caring for cardiac patients does not appear to exist. The absence of such a model can threaten the overall health of patients. PMID:28032050

  11. Evaluation of medical consultation letters at King Fahd Hospital, Al Hufuf, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Wadaani, Hamed Abd Allah Al; Hassan Balaha, Magdy

    2012-01-01

    Background In surgical wards, it is of paramount importance to communicate with other health care providers, mostly physicians, referring patients to them for their consultation on any health conditions that affect pre-operative, operative and post-operative patient care. The purposes of this investigation were to assess the appropriateness of physician responses in medical consultation reports and compare physician responses when using these reports from different levels of health care providers. Methods This study was conducted in Al-Hufuf, Saudi Arabia. The researchers evaluated all the surgical consultation letters in the files during the period between March 2010 and March 2011. From the explored 234 files, only 200 consultation letters were chosen as there was a referral data plus consultation data in the same file. We evaluated the quality of consultation report included the ethical concerns towards colleagues and patient, consideration of patient safety in all opinions, comprehensive pertinent scientific information, addressing the patient's medical condition with putting possible differential diagnosis, conclusion and precise management plans suggested. Results The results showed that the specialists' consultation letters had the highest percentage of fulfillment of all the six items in the consultation report. There is no uniform existing consultation report form. Conclusion Specialist form showed the highest number of mentioning the diagnosis. Consultant form showed the highest number of mentioning the concise aim of referral. The highest percentage of all categories mentioned all items in consultation report with a good level were the specialists. PMID:22937194

  12. Study of intraventricular hemorrhage in VLBW neonates admitted in Al-Zahra Hospital, Tabriz, Iran.

    PubMed

    Jodeiry, B; Heidarzadeh, M; Sahmani-Asl, S; Hoseini, M; Javaherizadeh, H; Eliasi, S; Abedini, K

    2012-01-01

    Intra-ventricular hemorrhage (IVH) is an important predictor of adverse neurodevelopmental outcome. IVH risk factor identification may conduct improvement of quality of care in neonatal intensive care units. The aim of the current study was to determine possible risk factors associated with IVH in VLBW neonates admitted in our hospital. All neonates with birth weight below 1500 gr admitted to NICU. Cranial ultrasonography was done for premature neonates weighed <1000 g in 3 to 5 days and in 1 month again. In premature infants weighed >1000 g, sonography was done in 7 days and 30 days of life respectively. If there is any conditions such as apnea, seizure, significant decrease in level of hemoglobin, increased head circumference, increased oxygen consumption, and other significant changes another sonography was done again. Exclusion criteria were cerebral malformations, metabolic disturbances, chromosomal anomalies, central nervous system infection, and genetic syndromes. Data was analyzed by SPSS ver 16.0 (SPSS Inc, Chicago, IL, USA). In this study 64 cases with IVH and without IVH were included. Mean of gestational age was 28.78 +/- 12.08. From neonates, 54.6% were boys and 45.4% were girls. Vaginal delivery and cesarean section was done in 56 (32.2%) and 118 (67.8%) cases respectively. Mean +/- SD of pH in cases with IVH and without IVH was 7.19 +/- 0.22 and 7.30 +/- 0.12 respectively (p = 0.001). Mean ISD of pco2 in cases with IVH and without IVH was 65.15 +/- 29.89 and 49.88 +/- 40.89 respectively(p = 0.001). Mean of 5th min APGAR score in patients required CPR was 7.36 +/- 1.57 and in patients without CPR was 8.68 +/- 1.25 (P = 0.001). From cases with IVH, hydrocephaly was detected in 20 cases. From cases without IVH, hydrocephaly was detected in 6 cases. Result of chi-square show significant correlation between IVH and prematurity (chi2 = 21.94, df=1, P < 0.001). From cases with IVH, 18 cases (28.1%) expired. From cases without IVH, 11 cases (10%) expired

  13. Frequency of anti-Chlamydia trachomatis antibodies in infertile women referred to Tabriz Al-Zahra hospital

    PubMed Central

    Sattari, Mahtab; Ghiami Rad, Mehdi; Ghasemzadeh, Aaliye; Mohammadoghli Reihan, Zahra

    2017-01-01

    Background: Infertility is one of the major issues in society and its incidence is estimated to be almost 10-15%. Chlamydia trachomatis (C. trachomatis) is an important cause of sexually transmitted diseases leading to infertility. Objective: This study was designed to determine the frequency of anti-C. trachomatis antibodies in infertile women at Al-zahra hospital, Tabriz, Iran. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, the blood samples were collected randomly from 184 infertile women (case group) and 100 pregnant women (control group). The frequency of specific IgG and IgM anti-C. trachomatis antibodies were evaluated using ELISA method. Results: The frequency of IgG anti-C. trachomatis antibody in the control and case groups was 18% and 35.88%, respectively. IgM anti-C. trachomatis antibody was found in 2% of controls and 5.44% of infertile women. Our results showed the significant differences between the case and control groups in anti-C. trachomatis antibodies (IgG, p=0.035 and IgM, p=0.004). Also, no significant relation was seen between the frequency of anti-C. trachomatis antibodies and age, location, and tubal factor infertility in our two study groups. Conclusion: According to high frequency of antibody anti-C. trachomatis among infertile women in competition to the control group, evaluation and treatment of Chlamydia infections is necessary in these patients. PMID:28280796

  14. Antibiotic Prescribing Patterns in Outpatient Emergency Clinics at Queen Rania Al Abdullah II Children's Hospital, Jordan, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Al-Niemat, Sahar I.; Aljbouri, Tareq M.; Goussous, Lana S.; Efaishat, Rania A.; Salah, Rehab K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate antibiotics prescribing patterns in the outpatient pediatric emergency clinic at Queen Rania Al Abdullah II Children’s Hospital at Royal Medical Services in Amman, Jordan. Methods The data was collected from the emergency pharmacy over the period of a -five consecutive months. The methodology recommended by the World Health Organization for investigating drug use in a health facility was followed. The study measures the percentage of encounter with a prescribed antibiotic and the percentage share of each antibiotic category. The distribution of diagnostic categories that accounted for all antibiotics being prescribed and the distribution of each antibiotic being prescribed for upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) were also measured. Results Antibiotic prescribing was frequent during pediatric visits to the outpatient pediatric emergency clinic resulting in a high percentage of encounters (85%) when compared to appropriate. Emergency physicians continue to frequently prescribe broad spectrum antibiotics which accounted for approximately (60%) of the total prescribed antibiotics and (83%) of prescribed antibiotics for upper respiratory tract infections and macrolides (primarily azithromycin) were the leading class among them. Conclusion Our results showed high consumption of antibiotics by emergency department pediatricians which highlight the importance for interventions to promote rational and judicious prescribing. An insight into factors influencing antibiotics prescribing patterns by military prescribers is required. PMID:25170404

  15. Comparison of sexual dysfunction in women with infertility and without infertility referred to Al-Zahra Hospital in 2013-2014

    PubMed Central

    Mirblouk, Fariba; Asgharnia, Dr.Maryam; Solimani, Robabeh; Fakor, Fereshteh; Salamat, Fatemeh; Mansoori, Samaneh

    2016-01-01

    Background: One of the affected aspects in infertile women that have not been given sufficient attention is sexual function. Sexual function is a key factor in physical and marital health, and sexual dysfunction could significantly lower the quality of life. Aim of this study was to assess the comparison sexual dysfunction in women with infertility and without infertility, admitted to Al- Zahra Hospital. Objective: We decided to assess the prevalence of women sexual disorders in fertile and infertile subjects, admitted to Al-Zahra Hospital. Materials and Methods: 149 fertile and 147 infertile women who referred to infertility clinic of Al-Zahra Hospital during 2013-2014 were entered this cross-sectional study and Female Sexual Function Index questionnaire (FSFI) had been filled by all the cases. Most of women were married for 6-10 years (35.5%) and mean marriage time in participants was 9.55±6.07 years. Data were analyzed using SPSS software Ver. 18 and 2 test and logistic regression model has been used for analysis. Results: Results showed significant differences between desire (p=0.004), arousal (p=0.001), satisfaction (p=0.022) and total sexual dysfunction (p=0.011) in both groups but in lubrication (p=0.266), orgasm (p=0.61) and pain (p=0.793) difference were not significant. Conclusion: Some of sexual dysfunction indices are high in all infertile women. Our findings suggest that infertility impacts on women’s sexual function in desire, arousal, satisfaction and total sexual dysfunction. Health care professional should be sensitive to impact that diagnosis of infertility can have on women’s sexuality. PMID:27200426

  16. The comparison of printed resources bacterial contamination in libraries of Al-Zahra Hospital and Sciences Faculty of Isfahan University and the determination of their antibiotic sensitivity pattern

    PubMed Central

    Rafiei, Hosein; Chadeganipour, Mostafa; Ojaghi, Rezvan; Maracy, Mohammad Reza; Nouri, Rasool

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: During the library loan process, the printed resources can be a carrier of pathogenic bacteria. In this study, it was tried to compare the Bacterial Contamination Rates and their antibiotic sensitivity pattern in printed resources of a hospital and a non-hospital library. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study. Returning books from the Al-Zahra hospital library and library of Sciences faculty of Isfahan University provides the research community. The sample size, 96 cases, was calculated using quota sampling. For sampling sterile swab dipped in trypticase soy broth medium and transfer trypticase soy broth medium were used. To identify different type of isolated bacteria from Gram-staining test and biochemical tests such as; TSI, IMViC and etc., were used. Results: 76 (79.2%) and 20 (20.8%) of cultured samples were negative and positive, the respectively. Of 20 positive samples, 11 samples (55%) belong to the family Enterobacteriaceae that after detecting by Differential teste identified all 11 samples of Enterobacter that all of them were sensitive to Gentamicin and Ofloxacin. Also the most resistance to Nitrofurantoin and Amikacin was observed. 9 cases remained (45%) were coagulase-negative Staphylococcus that all of them were sensitive to the Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and Cephalexin antibiotics also the most resistance to Cefixime was observed. Conclusion: Considering that the Enterobacter sp and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus were separated from the books, the books as well as other hospital and medical equipment can transmit the infection to librarians, library users, patients and hospital staff, and also it can produce serious infections in patients with immune deficiency. PMID:28546984

  17. The comparison of printed resources bacterial contamination in libraries of Al-Zahra Hospital and Sciences Faculty of Isfahan University and the determination of their antibiotic sensitivity pattern.

    PubMed

    Rafiei, Hosein; Chadeganipour, Mostafa; Ojaghi, Rezvan; Maracy, Mohammad Reza; Nouri, Rasool

    2017-01-01

    During the library loan process, the printed resources can be a carrier of pathogenic bacteria. In this study, it was tried to compare the Bacterial Contamination Rates and their antibiotic sensitivity pattern in printed resources of a hospital and a non-hospital library. This is a cross-sectional study. Returning books from the Al-Zahra hospital library and library of Sciences faculty of Isfahan University provides the research community. The sample size, 96 cases, was calculated using quota sampling. For sampling sterile swab dipped in trypticase soy broth medium and transfer trypticase soy broth medium were used. To identify different type of isolated bacteria from Gram-staining test and biochemical tests such as; TSI, IMViC and etc., were used. 76 (79.2%) and 20 (20.8%) of cultured samples were negative and positive, the respectively. Of 20 positive samples, 11 samples (55%) belong to the family Enterobacteriaceae that after detecting by Differential teste identified all 11 samples of Enterobacter that all of them were sensitive to Gentamicin and Ofloxacin. Also the most resistance to Nitrofurantoin and Amikacin was observed. 9 cases remained (45%) were coagulase-negative Staphylococcus that all of them were sensitive to the Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and Cephalexin antibiotics also the most resistance to Cefixime was observed. Considering that the Enterobacter sp and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus were separated from the books, the books as well as other hospital and medical equipment can transmit the infection to librarians, library users, patients and hospital staff, and also it can produce serious infections in patients with immune deficiency.

  18. Conceptuaciones de los estudiantes de las facultades de educacion y ciencias naturales de la Universidad de Puerto Rico, recinto de Rio Piedras, acerca de la ciencia y la pseudociencia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes Medina, Hector A.

    Esta investigacion describe las conceptuaciones de los estudiantes de tercer ano o mas a nivel de bachillerato de los programas de Educacion en Ciencia y Ciencias Naturales de la Universidad de Puerto Rico, Recinto de Rio Piedras, acerca de lo establecido en la literatura para distinguir el conocimiento cientifico de las creencias pseudocientificas. Este estudio se guio por un diseno tipo encuesta transversal que permitio conocer de manera consistente las conceptuaciones de los estudiantes encuestados acerca de la Ciencia y la Pseudociencia. Ademas, permitio desarrollar inferencias estadisticas relacionadas a la poblacion de estudio, sus conceptuaciones y su inclinacion teorica en torno al Realismo y al Racionalismo cientifico moderados. El instrumento utilizado fue el Cuestionario acerca de las concepciones de la ciencia y la pseudocienca en estudiantes universitarios, Reyes (2015). Este cuestionario fue validado mediante la recopilacion de diversas fuentes de evidencias, entre estas se encuentran las evidencias basadas en el contenido, el proceso de respuesta, la estructura interna y de constructo. Tambien, se calculo el Alfa de Crombach para la escala total y para cada componente y se realizo un analisis de factores que demostro la presencia de seis componentes claramente definidos de acuerdo a lo esperado sobre las caracteristicas originales del instrumento. Las estadisticas utilizadas fueron descriptivas. Participaron 302 alumnos, de las facultades de educacion y ciencias naturales. Se encontro que las conceptuaciones de los estudiantes de ambas facultades se inclinan en un 66.2% a favor con lo establecido en el modelo teorico en torno al Realismo y al Racionalismo cientifico moderados. Sin embargo, aun hay un 33.8% de los estudiantes de ambas facultades que poseen conceptuaciones distintas al modelo teorico propuesto.

  19. Historical series of patients with visceral leishmaniasis treated with meglumine antimoniate in a hospital for tropical diseases, Maceió-AL, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Lindon Johoson Diniz; Rocha, Thiago José Matos; Ribeiro, Sandra Aparecida; Pedrosa, Célia Maria Silva

    2015-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis is an endemic protozoan found in Brazil. It is characterized by fever, pallor, hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, and progressive weakness in the patient. It may lead to death if untreated. The drug of choice for treatment is meglumine antimoniate (Glucantime). The aim of this study was to evaluate patients with visceral leishmaniasis according to criteria used for diagnosis, possible reactions to Glucantime and blood pressure measured before and after treatment. 89 patients admitted to the Teaching Hospital Dr. Hélvio Auto (HEHA) in Maceió-AL, in the period from May 2006 to December 2009 were evaluated. Data were collected on age, sex, origin, method of diagnosis, adverse effects of drugs, duration of hospitalization, duration of treatment and dosage up to the onset of adverse effects. There was a predominance of child male patients, aged between one and five years old, from the interior of the State of Alagoas. Parasitological diagnosis was made by bone marrow aspirate; three (3.37%) patients died, 12 (13.48%) had adverse reactions and treatment was changed to amphotericin B, and 74 (83.14%) were cured. Changes that led to replacing Glucantime were persistent fever, jaundice, rash, bleeding and cyanosis. During the study, 89 patients hospitalized for VL were analyzed: 74 were healed, 12 were replaced by amphotericin B treatment and three died. Most of them were under five years old, male and came from the interior. The dosage and duration of treatment with Glucantime were consistent with that advocated by the Ministry of Health. Persistence of fever, jaundice, rash, cyanosis and bleeding were the reactions that led the physician to modify treatment. No change was observed in blood pressure before and after treatment. This study demonstrated the work of a hospital, a reference in the treatment of leishmaniasis, which has many patients demanding its services in this area. It demonstrates that this disease is still important today, and

  20. Acute hepatic failure in pediatric H1N1 infection: a case report from Al-Adan Hospital, Kuwait

    PubMed Central

    Al-Refaee, Fawaz

    2012-01-01

    Liver involvement in pediatric influenza A (H1N1) infection is rare. Focused clinical evaluation and laboratory tests can rule out or identify hepatic complications early on. Here we report on a 9-year-old boy treated by the Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition Unit of Al-Adan Hospital’s Pediatric Department. The patient, who was infected with H1N1 during the 2010 pandemic, showed symptoms of associated acute hepatic failure, was managed conservatively, and recovered completely following treatment. The author would like to draw the attention of pediatricians to the hepatic aspect of human H1N1 infection in order for them to recognize it early and treat it in a timely manner. PMID:24367231

  1. Assessing the effectiveness of interpersonal communication skills training on job satisfaction among nurses in Al-Zahra Hospital of Isfahan, Iran.

    PubMed

    Dehaghani, Abdollah Rezaei; Akhormeh, Kobra Ahmadi; Mehrabi, Tayyebeh

    2012-05-01

    The worldwide nursing shortage is threatening the quality of healthcare. The two most common causes in maintaining nurses are job satisfaction, a positive working environment, and good relationships among staff. This study aimed to determine the effect of interpersonal communication skills training on job satisfaction among the nurses working in Al-Zahra Hospital affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran, in 2011. This study was a quasi-experimental research with two groups and two phases, and was carried out on 70 nurses from Al-Zahra University Hospital. Only nurses who had been employed for more than one year were accepted into the study. There were 35 nurses in the test group and 35 nurses in the control group. The study questionnaire included personal details and job satisfaction scale by Smith and Kendall. Sampling was done randomly and nurses were divided into test and control groups. In the test group, the communication skills training program was done in 6 sessions, twice a week and each session was held for 2 hours. The questionnaire was completed in two stages; before, and two months after the study. Data were analyzed by descriptive and inferential statistics through SPSS Software version 18. Findings showed that pre-intervention mean score of job satisfaction of nurses in both groups had no significant difference (p = 0.92). After the communication skills training program in the experimental group, mean score of job satisfaction increased and it was significant compared to the control group (p < 0.01). The data analysis showed that the interpersonal communication skills training program increased the mean score of job satisfaction in the test group. Therefore, it seems necessary that nursing managers design training programs for them.

  2. Causes of traumatic brain injury in patients admitted to Rafidia, Al-Ittihad and the specialized Arab hospitals, Palestine, 2006?2007.

    PubMed

    Younis, Rafif; Younis, Mustafa; Hamidi, Samer; Musmar, Mohamed; Mawson, Anthony R

    2011-01-01

    The eruption of Al-Aqsa Intifada created a war situation in Palestine, increasing the number of firearms injuries caused by occupying Israeli forces as well as disabling head injuries. No data were available to the Palestinian Ministry of Health and other health organizations on traumatic brain injury (TBI) in Palestine. This study, therefore, sought to determine the causes and outcomes of TBI in patients who were admitted to three hospitals in Nablus, Palestine. Retrospective review of medical records and contacts with patients and/or caregivers. The medical records of patients who were diagnosed with TBI (n=312) and admitted to any one of the three hospitals in 2006 and 2007 were reviewed. Data were also obtained from follow-up home visits and telephone calls with consenting patients and/or caregivers. The major causes of TBI were assault (33%), falls (32.1%), road traffic crashes (29.8%) and impacts from heavy objects (3.2%). Gunshot wounds are a major cause of head injury in Palestine. The study shows that assault with firearms is the most frequent cause of TBI in this population and that patients with head injuries due to assault have poorer outcomes at discharge than those injured in other ways.

  3. HISTORICAL SERIES OF PATIENTS WITH VISCERAL LEISHMANIASIS TREATED WITH MEGLUMINE ANTIMONIATE IN A HOSPITAL FOR TROPICAL DISEASES, MACEIÓ-AL, BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    Silveira, Lindon Johoson Diniz; Rocha, Thiago José Matos; Ribeiro, Sandra Aparecida; Pedrosa, Célia Maria Silva

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Visceral leishmaniasis is an endemic protozoan found in Brazil. It is characterized by fever, pallor, hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, and progressive weakness in the patient. It may lead to death if untreated. The drug of choice for treatment is meglumine antimoniate (Glucantime®). The aim of this study was to evaluate patients with visceral leishmaniasis according to criteria used for diagnosis, possible reactions to Glucantime® and blood pressure measured before and after treatment. Methods: 89 patients admitted to the Teaching Hospital Dr. Hélvio Auto (HEHA) in Maceió-AL, in the period from May 2006 to December 2009 were evaluated. Data were collected on age, sex, origin, method of diagnosis, adverse effects of drugs, duration of hospitalization, duration of treatment and dosage up to the onset of adverse effects. Results: There was a predominance of child male patients, aged between one and five years old, from the interior of the State of Alagoas. Parasitological diagnosis was made by bone marrow aspirate; three (3.37%) patients died, 12 (13.48%) had adverse reactions and treatment was changed to amphotericin B, and 74 (83.14%) were cured. Changes that led to replacing Glucantime® were persistent fever, jaundice, rash, bleeding and cyanosis. Conclusion: During the study, 89 patients hospitalized for VL were analyzed: 74 were healed, 12 were replaced by amphotericin B treatment and three died. Most of them were under five years old, male and came from the interior. The dosage and duration of treatment with Glucantime® were consistent with that advocated by the Ministry of Health. Persistence of fever, jaundice, rash, cyanosis and bleeding were the reactions that led the physician to modify treatment. No change was observed in blood pressure before and after treatment. This study demonstrated the work of a hospital, a reference in the treatment of leishmaniasis, which has many patients demanding its services in this area. It demonstrates

  4. Drug Dependence and Psychotic Symptoms: A Retrospective Study of Adolescents Who Abuse Drugs at Al-Amal Hospital in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Elawad, Nagi; Misau, Yusuf A.; Shaikh, Tarteel M.; Allam, Nedal

    2012-01-01

    Drug abuse is reported to be on the increase among young persons using illicit substances but little is known about the frequency with which they occur, the symptoms on presentation to health institutions, and the different substances abused. To establish this, we reviewed patient data collected at Al-Amal Hospital in Jeddah Kingdom of Saudi Arabia on young persons who are refered to the hospital for problems related to drug abuse. Data on 69 adolescent drug users were reviewed and analyzed using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview - Substance Abuse Model (CIDI-SAM) to assess dependence on substances including amphetamines, cannabis, cocaine, and opioids. Furthermore, we assessed the adolescents’ data on history of delusions and hallucinations in the context of use of, or withdrawal from, these specific substances. Our analysis shows that 10 to 79.6% of users of amphetamines, cannabis, cocaine, and opiates met DSM-III-R dependence criteria for each specific substance. The prevalence of psychotic symptoms associated with each specific substance ranged from users with no diagnosis to users with severe dependence as follows: amphetamines (3-100%), cannabis (7-60.0%), cocaine (5-70.7%), and opiates (4-88%). The risk of psychotic symptoms increased for respondents who abused (OR=7.2) or had mild (OR=8.1), moderate (OR=20.0), or severe dependence (OR=14.0) on cocaine when compared to those who were users with no diagnosis. A similar pattern was evident in cannabis, opiate, and amphetamine users. In conclusion, most adolescent drug users in Saudi Arabia who are dependent on illicit substances experience psychotic symptoms in the context of use of, or withdrawal from, these substances. Psychotic symptoms increased with the severity of the disorders associated with use of all four substances. These findings underscore the importance of developing services to target this population; a population at risk of developing psychotic symptoms. PMID:28299079

  5. Epidemiology of Suicide and its Associated Socio-demographic Factors in Patients Admitted to Emergency Department of Zahedan Khatam-Al-Anbia Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Behmanehsh Poor, Fatemeh; Tabatabaei, Seyed Mehdi; Bakhshani, Nour-Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Suicide is a growing public health problem all over the world. Understanding the prevalence of suicide and its correlates is of great importance in planning programs to reduce the risk in different societies. Objectives: The present study was conducted to assess the epidemiology of suicide and its associated risk factors in Sistan and Balouchestan Province, southeast of Iran. Patients and Methods: We investigated a total of 369 suicide cases admitted to the emergency department of Zahedan Khatam- Al- Anbia hospital between March 2010 and February 2012. Data was collected from the hospital information system (HIS) using a semi-structured questionnaire. Descriptive statistics and chi-square tests were used to identify the factors associated with suicidal behaviors. Results: A greater proportion of the study subjects (65%) were female. They were more likely to be young (43.5% in the age group of 16 to 25 years) and illiterate or have a primary school education (20.9% and 48.8%, respectively). Housewives and self-employed individuals and those with a low or medium income dominated the suicide cases. The most common method of suicide was burning (53.4%) followed by drug ingestion (23.8%). One third of the suicide cases occurred during spring. The case fatality rate was 49.6% and it was significantly associated with low income, summer time suicides, burning as a method of suicide. Conclusions: This study highlights the burden of suicide and itspotential socio-demographic risk factors in Sistan and Blouchestan Province. This information has an implication for planning the preventive measures, policy making and future research. PMID:25741486

  6. Incidence and associated risk factors of low birth weight babies born in Shaikh Khalifa Bin Zayad Al-Nayan Hospital Muzaffarabad, Azad Jammu and Kashmir.

    PubMed

    Iltaf, Gulnaz; Shahid, Beenish; Khan, Muhammad Ijaz

    2017-01-01

    Birth weight is the most important factor that affects infant and child mortality. The most common cause of low birth is malnutrition before and during the pregnancy period. The present study was conducted to explore the associated risk factors of low birth weight which will be helpful to undertake effective measures to reduce the incidence of the low birth weight babies. The study was conducted at Shaikh Khalifa Bin Zayad Al-Nayan Hospital Muzaffarabad. A sample size of 1603 live births over a period of five months were analyzed. The pregnant women were recruited in the last trimester of their pregnancy and followed up till their delivery. Information regarding maternal age, parity, income of family, gestational age, maternal occupation, degree of illiteracy, birth interval was collected. The birth weight was recorded within 24 hours of delivery. Data analysis was done using Graph Pad Prism version 6.0. Data of 1863 birth out of which 1603 were live births and among these live births, 1442 were normal birth weight babies and 161 number of low birth weight (LBW) were analyzed. The incidence of LBW in this study was (10.04%). LBW was more common in female (n=84) than in male (n=77) babies. However, this difference was statistically insignificant. Among different risk factors maternal age (p<0.05), parity (P = 0.0167), income of family (P = 0.0190), has a statically significant association with incidence of LBW. The gestational age of mother, maternal occupation, degree of illiteracy was found to affect the incidence of LBW babies, however the difference was found to be statistically insignificant for LBW. Birth interval less than three years and low hemoglobin level (P<0.0260) was found to have a significant association with LBW babies. LBW a common problem in Pakistan is an important factor for perinatal mortality and morbidity. Among different risk factors maternal age, parity, income of family, gestational age of mother, maternal occupation, degree of illiteracy

  7. Clinical evaluation of BIOXTRA in relieving signs and symptoms of dry mouth after head and neck radiotherapy of cancer patients at Seyed-al-Shohada Hospital, Isfahan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Gookizadeh, Abbas; Emami, Hamid; Najafizadeh, Nadia; Roayaei, Mahnaz

    2012-01-01

    Background: Radiotherapy of head and neck cancers causes acute and chronic xerostomia and acute mucositis. Xerostomia increases risk of radiation caries and affects on oral comfort, fit of prostheses, speech, swallowing, and the growth of caries-producing organisms. Salivary flow rate can be measured by asking patients some questions. There are different types of commercial synthetic saliva such as BIOXTRA, but until now, no one can effectively relieve xerostomia. We tried to design a clinical research on BIOXTRA efficacy for treating xerostomia. Materials and Methods: In this research, 58 patients with head and neck cancer (except salivary gland cancers) treated in Seyed-al-Shohada Hospital. The patients received at least 40-50 GY; and after 2 months of compilation treatment, they were evaluated by asking about having xerostomia. Before and after treatment with the BIOXTRA, the PH of the oral cavity, candida albicans, and lactobacillus counts measured and documented in laboratory. We used BIOXTRA for 2 weeks, 3 times daily, and then re-evaluated patients with some questions. Results: The counts of candida albicans and lactobacilli statistically significant decreased. Conclusion: Xerostomia for most patients improved clinically during the day and night while PH of the oral cavity increased. PMID:23326802

  8. The Relationship between Self-esteem and Quality of Life of Patients with Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura at Isfahan's Sayed Al-Shohada Hospital, Iran, in 2013.

    PubMed

    Hemati, Zeinab; Kiani, Davood

    2016-04-01

    Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is a chronic disease which is accompanied with hopelessness and loss of the sense of well-being due to its symptoms and treatment. It also affects patients' sense of social and spiritual well-being. This disorder decreases patients' self-esteem and their quality of life by changing their mental image and self-confidence. This study was performed to find the relationship between self-esteem and quality of life of patients with ITP. This was a descriptive-analytical study on 64 patients with ITP who referred to Isfahan's Sayed Al-Shohada Hospital, Iran. In this study, patients with ITP were selected randomly using a random number chart. The data collection tools consisted of the World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL)-BREF and Coopersmith Self-esteem Inventory (CSEI). Data were analyzed using SPSS and chi-square and Mann-Whitney tests and the Pearson and Spearman's rank correlation coefficients. In total, 64 patients completed the questionnaires. RESULTS showed that 32% of subjects were over 36 years of age and 59% were women. In addition, 29.7% of ITP patients had low self-esteem and quality of life. Chi-square test showed a significant relationship between self-esteem and quality of life of patients with ITP. The results of the present study showed that considerable attention must be paid to self-esteem, as one of the most important factors influencing the promotion of quality of life. Therefore, it is suggested that patient's self-esteem be improved by the implementation of educational and psychological programs in order to decrease the consequences of poor quality of life.

  9. The Relationship between Self-esteem and Quality of Life of Patients with Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura at Isfahan's Sayed Al-Shohada Hospital, Iran, in 2013

    PubMed Central

    Hemati, Zeinab; Kiani, Davood

    2016-01-01

    Background: Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is a chronic disease which is accompanied with hopelessness and loss of the sense of well-being due to its symptoms and treatment. It also affects patients' sense of social and spiritual well-being. This disorder decreases patients' self-esteem and their quality of life by changing their mental image and self-confidence. This study was performed to find the relationship between self-esteem and quality of life of patients with ITP. Subjects and Methods: This was a descriptive-analytical study on 64 patients with ITP who referred to Isfahan's Sayed Al-Shohada Hospital, Iran. In this study, patients with ITP were selected randomly using a random number chart. The data collection tools consisted of the World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL)-BREF and Coopersmith Self-esteem Inventory (CSEI). Data were analyzed using SPSS and chi-square and Mann-Whitney tests and the Pearson and Spearman’s rank correlation coefficients. Results: In total, 64 patients completed the questionnaires. Results showed that 32% of subjects were over 36 years of age and 59% were women. In addition, 29.7% of ITP patients had low self-esteem and quality of life. Chi-square test showed a significant relationship between self-esteem and quality of life of patients with ITP. Conclusions: The results of the present study showed that considerable attention must be paid to self-esteem, as one of the most important factors influencing the promotion of quality of life. Therefore, it is suggested that patient’s self-esteem be improved by the implementation of educational and psychological programs in order to decrease the consequences of poor quality of life. PMID:27252807

  10. Polyclonal Outbreak of KPC-3-Producing Enterobacter cloacae at a Single Hospital in Montréal, Québec, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Lévesque, Simon; Lefebvre, Brigitte; Blanchette, Ruth; Tomkinson, Melissa; Mataseje, Laura; Mulvey, Michael R.; Miller, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    From September 2010 to December 2011, 26 KPC-3-producing Enterobacter cloacae isolates were identified from 16 patients at a single hospital. Analyses revealed the blaKPC gene to be localized on multiple plasmids in a diverse nonclonal E. cloacae genetic background. These findings highlight the potential complexity of a KPC outbreak at a single hospital. PMID:23637289

  11. Report of the procedure of voluntary interruption of pregnancy at a university hospital in Uruguay.

    PubMed

    Bentancor, Ana; Hernández, Ana Laura; Godoy, Yamile; Dapueto, Juan J

    2016-07-04

    To describe the constitution and operation of a voluntary interruption of pregnancy team of a university hospital, from the outlook of the mental health team. In this case study, the following aspects were analyzed: 1) historical background; 2) implementation of Law 18,897 of October 22, 2012; and 3) functioning of the program at the Hospital de Clínicas of the Facultad de Medicina (Universidad de la República, Uruguay), taking into account three dimensions: structure, process, and results. Between December 2012 and November 2013, a total of 6,676 voluntary interruptions of pregnancy were reported in Uruguay; out of these, 80 were conducted at the Hospital de Clínicas. The patients' demographic data agreed with those reported at the national level: Of the total patients, 81.0% were aged over 19 years; 6.2% decided to continue with the pregnancy; and only 70.0% attended the subsequent control and received advice on contraception. In its implementation year in Uruguay, we can assess the experience as positive from the point of view of women's health. Our experience as a mental health team at the Hospital de Clínicas, inserted into the multidisciplinary voluntary interruption of pregnancy team, is in the process of assessment and reformulation of practices. Describir la conformación y funcionamiento de un equipo de interrupción voluntaria del embarazo de un hospital universitario, desde la mirada del equipo de salud mental. En este estudio de caso, se analizan los siguientes aspectos: 1) antecedentes históricos; 2) implementación de la Ley 18.897 de 22 de octubre de 2012; y 3) funcionamiento del programa en el Hospital de Clínicas de la Facultad de Medicina (Universidad de la República, Uruguay), teniendo en cuenta tres dimensiones (estructura, proceso y resultados). Entre diciembre de 2012 y noviembre de 2013, se reportaron en Uruguay un total de 6.676 interrupciones voluntarias del embarazo; de ellas, 80 se llevaron a cabo en el Hospital de Clínicas. Los

  12. Chest trauma experience over eleven-year period at al-mouassat university teaching hospital-Damascus: a retrospective review of 888 cases.

    PubMed

    Al-Koudmani, Ibrahim; Darwish, Bassam; Al-Kateb, Kamal; Taifour, Yahia

    2012-04-19

    Thoracic trauma is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in developing countries. In this study, we present our 11-year experience in the management and clinical outcome of 888 chest trauma cases as a result of blunt and penetrating injuries in our university hospital in Damascus, Syria. We reviewed files of 888 consequent cases of chest trauma between January 2000 and January 2011. The mean age of our patients was 31 ± 17 years mostly males with blunt injuries. Patients were evaluated and compared according to age, gender, etiology of trauma, thoracic and extra-thoracic injuries, complications, and mortality. The leading cause of the trauma was violence (41%) followed by traffic accidents (33%). Pneumothorax (51%), Hemothorax (38%), rib fractures (34%), and lung contusion (15%) were the most common types of injury. Associated injuries were documented in 36% of patients (extremities 19%, abdomen 13%, head 8%). A minority of the patients required thoracotomy (5.7%), and tube thoracostomy (56%) was sufficient to manage the majority of cases. Mean hospital LOS was 4.5 ± 4.6 days. The overall mortoality rate was 1.8%, and morbidity (n = 78, 8.7%). New traffic laws (including seat belt enforcement) reduced incidence and severity of chest trauma in Syria. Violence was the most common cause of chest trauma rather than road traffic accidents in this series, this necessitates epidemiologic or multi-institutional studies to know to which degree violence contributes to chest trauma in Syria. The number of fractured ribs can be used as simple indicator of the severity of trauma. And we believe that significant neurotrauma, traffic accidents, hemodynamic status and GCS upon arrival, ICU admission, ventilator use, and complication of therapy are predictors of dismal prognosis.

  13. Diagnosing ALS

    MedlinePlus

    ... that a person diagnosed with ALS seek a second opinion from an ALS "expert" - someone who diagnoses and treats many ALS patients and has training in this medical specialty. The ALS Association maintains a list of recognized experts in the field of ALS. See ALS Association Certified Centers of ...

  14. ALS Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... toward a world without ALS! Walk to Defeat ALS® Walk to Defeat ALS® draws people of all ... We need your help. I Will Advocate National ALS Registry The National ALS Registry is a congressionally ...

  15. Norovirus - hospital

    MedlinePlus

    Gastroenteritis - norovirus; Colitis - norovirus; Hospital acquired infection - norovirus ... fluids ( dehydration ). Anyone can become infected with norovirus. Hospital patients who are very old, very young, or ...

  16. ALS - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - ALS ... The following organizations are good resources for information on amyotrophic lateral sclerosis : Muscular Dystrophy Association -- www.mda.org/disease/amyotrophic-lateral-sclerosis National Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) ...

  17. Validating the use of Hospital Episode Statistics data and comparison of costing methodologies for economic evaluation: an end-of-life case study from the Cluster randomised triAl of PSA testing for Prostate cancer (CAP)

    PubMed Central

    Thorn, Joanna C; Turner, Emma L; Hounsome, Luke; Walsh, Eleanor; Down, Liz; Verne, Julia; Donovan, Jenny L; Neal, David E; Hamdy, Freddie C; Martin, Richard M; Noble, Sian M

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the accuracy of routine data for costing inpatient resource use in a large clinical trial and to investigate costing methodologies. Design Final-year inpatient cost profiles were derived using (1) data extracted from medical records mapped to the National Health Service (NHS) reference costs via service codes and (2) Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) data using NHS reference costs. Trust finance departments were consulted to obtain costs for comparison purposes. Setting 7 UK secondary care centres. Population A subsample of 292 men identified as having died at least a year after being diagnosed with prostate cancer in Cluster randomised triAl of PSA testing for Prostate cancer (CAP), a long-running trial to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing. Results Both inpatient cost profiles showed a rise in costs in the months leading up to death, and were broadly similar. The difference in mean inpatient costs was £899, with HES data yielding ∼8% lower costs than medical record data (differences compatible with chance, p=0.3). Events were missing from both data sets. 11 men (3.8%) had events identified in HES that were all missing from medical record review, while 7 men (2.4%) had events identified in medical record review that were all missing from HES. The response from finance departments to requests for cost data was poor: only 3 of 7 departments returned adequate data sets within 6 months. Conclusions Using HES routine data coupled with NHS reference costs resulted in mean annual inpatient costs that were very similar to those derived via medical record review; therefore, routinely available data can be used as the primary method of costing resource use in large clinical trials. Neither HES nor medical record review represent gold standards of data collection. Requesting cost data from finance departments is impractical for large clinical trials. Trial registration number ISRCTN92187251

  18. Understanding hospitality.

    PubMed

    Patten, C S

    1994-03-01

    Bridging patient/"customer" issues and business aspects can be aided through developing a specific nursing basis for hospitality. The ancient practice of hospitality has evolved into three distinct levels: public, personal and therapeutic. Understanding these levels is helpful in integrating various dimensions of guest relations programs in hospitals into a more comprehensive vision. Hospitality issues must become a greater part of today's nursing management.

  19. Validating the use of Hospital Episode Statistics data and comparison of costing methodologies for economic evaluation: an end-of-life case study from the Cluster randomised triAl of PSA testing for Prostate cancer (CAP).

    PubMed

    Thorn, Joanna C; Turner, Emma L; Hounsome, Luke; Walsh, Eleanor; Down, Liz; Verne, Julia; Donovan, Jenny L; Neal, David E; Hamdy, Freddie C; Martin, Richard M; Noble, Sian M

    2016-04-29

    To evaluate the accuracy of routine data for costing inpatient resource use in a large clinical trial and to investigate costing methodologies. Final-year inpatient cost profiles were derived using (1) data extracted from medical records mapped to the National Health Service (NHS) reference costs via service codes and (2) Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) data using NHS reference costs. Trust finance departments were consulted to obtain costs for comparison purposes. 7 UK secondary care centres. A subsample of 292 men identified as having died at least a year after being diagnosed with prostate cancer in Cluster randomised triAl of PSA testing for Prostate cancer (CAP), a long-running trial to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing. Both inpatient cost profiles showed a rise in costs in the months leading up to death, and were broadly similar. The difference in mean inpatient costs was £899, with HES data yielding ∼8% lower costs than medical record data (differences compatible with chance, p=0.3). Events were missing from both data sets. 11 men (3.8%) had events identified in HES that were all missing from medical record review, while 7 men (2.4%) had events identified in medical record review that were all missing from HES. The response from finance departments to requests for cost data was poor: only 3 of 7 departments returned adequate data sets within 6 months. Using HES routine data coupled with NHS reference costs resulted in mean annual inpatient costs that were very similar to those derived via medical record review; therefore, routinely available data can be used as the primary method of costing resource use in large clinical trials. Neither HES nor medical record review represent gold standards of data collection. Requesting cost data from finance departments is impractical for large clinical trials. ISRCTN92187251; Pre-results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use

  20. Hospital diversification.

    PubMed

    Eastaugh, Steven R

    2005-01-01

    Hospital diversification and its impact on the operating ratio are studied for 168 hospitals during the period from 1999 to 2004. Diversification and the operating ratio are modeled in a two-stage least squares (TSLS) framework as being jointly dependent. Institutional diversification is found to yield a better financial position, and the better operating ratio allows the institution the wherewithal to diversify. The impact of external government planning and hospital competition are also measured. An institution lifecycle hypothesis is advanced to explain hospital behavior: boom and bust, diversification and divestiture, occasionally leading to closure or merger. Management's attitude concerning risk and reward is considered.

  1. Hospital fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Althausen, Peter L; Hill, Austin D; Mead, Lisa

    2014-07-01

    Under the current system, orthopaedic trauma surgeons must work in some form of hospital setting as our primary service involves treatment of the trauma patient. We must not forget that just as a trauma center cannot exist without our services, we cannot function without their support. As a result, a clear understanding of the balance between physicians and hospitals is paramount. Historical perspective enables physicians and hospital personnel alike to understand the evolution of hospital-physician relationship. This process should be understood upon completion of this chapter. The relationship between physicians and hospitals is becoming increasingly complex and multiple forms of integration exist such as joint ventures, gain sharing, and co-management agreements. For the surgeon to negotiate well, an understanding of hospital governance and the role of the orthopaedic traumatologist is vital to success. An understanding of the value provided by the traumatologist includes all aspects of care including efficiency, availability, cost effectiveness, and research activities. To create effective and sustainable healthcare institutions, physicians and hospitals must be aligned over a sustained period of time. Unfortunately, external forces have eroded the historical basis for the working relationship between physicians and hospitals. Increased competition and reimbursement cuts, coupled with the increasing demands for quality, efficiency, and coordination and the payment changes outlined in healthcare reform, have left many organizations wondering how to best rebuild the relationship. The principal goal for the physician when partnering with a hospital or healthcare entity is to establish a sustainable model of service line management that protects or advances the physician's ability to make impactful improvements in quality of patient care, decreases in healthcare costs, and improvements in process efficiency through evidence-based practices and protocols.

  2. Hospital philanthropy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Dean G; Clement, Jan P

    2013-01-01

    It remains an open question whether hospital spending on fundraising efforts to garner philanthropy is a good use of funds. Research and industry reports provide conflicting results. We describe the accounting and data challenges in analysis of hospital philanthropy, which include measurement of donations, measurement of fundraising expenses, and finding the relationships among organizations where these cash flows occur. With these challenges, finding conflicting results is not a surprise.

  3. Hospital marketing.

    PubMed

    Carter, Tony

    2003-01-01

    This article looks at a prescribed academic framework for various criteria that serve as a checklist for marketing performance that can be applied to hospital marketing organizations. These guidelines are drawn from some of Dr. Noel Capon of Columbia University's book Marketing Management in the 21st Century and applied to actual practices of hospital marketing organizations. In many ways this checklist can act as a "marketing" balanced scorecard to verify performance effectiveness and develop opportunities for innovation.

  4. AL Amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Definition of the disease AL amyloidosis results from extra-cellular deposition of fibril-forming monoclonal immunoglobulin (Ig) light chains (LC) (most commonly of lambda isotype) usually secreted by a small plasma cell clone. Most patients have evidence of isolated monoclonal gammopathy or smoldering myeloma, and the occurrence of AL amyloidosis in patients with symptomatic multiple myeloma or other B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders is unusual. The key event in the development of AL amyloidosis is the change in the secondary or tertiary structure of an abnormal monoclonal LC, which results in instable conformation. This conformational change is responsible for abnormal folding of the LC, rich in β leaves, which assemble into monomers that stack together to form amyloid fibrils. Epidemiology AL amyloidosis is the most common type of systemic amyloidois in developed countries with an estimated incidence of 9 cases/million inhabitant/year. The average age of diagnosed patients is 65 years and less than 10% of patients are under 50. Clinical description The clinical presentation is protean, because of the wide number of tissues or organs that may be affected. The most common presenting symptoms are asthenia and dyspnoea, which are poorly specific and may account for delayed diagnosis. Renal manifestations are the most frequent, affecting two thirds of patients at presentation. They are characterized by heavy proteinuria, with nephrotic syndrome and impaired renal function in half of the patients. Heart involvement, which is present at diagnosis in more than 50% of patients, leading to restrictive cardiopathy, is the most serious complication and engages prognosis. Diagnostic methods The diagnosis relies on pathological examination of an involved site showing Congo red-positive amyloid deposits, with typical apple-green birefringence under polarized light, that stain positive with an anti-LC antibody by immunohistochemistry and/or immunofluorescence. Due to the

  5. Hospital finance.

    PubMed

    Herman, M J

    1998-01-01

    This article summarizes key areas of focus for the analysis of risk in the hospital segment of the health care industry. The article is written from a commercial bank lending perspective. Both for-profit (C-corporations) and 501 (c)(3) not-for-profit segments are addressed.

  6. Hospitality Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College of the Canyons, Valencia, CA.

    A project was conducted at College of the Canyons (Valencia, California) to initiate a new 2-year hospitality program with career options in hotel or restaurant management. A mail and telephone survey of area employers in the restaurant and hotel field demonstrated a need for, interest in, and willingness to provide internships for such a program.…

  7. Hospitality Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College of the Canyons, Valencia, CA.

    A project was conducted at College of the Canyons (Valencia, California) to initiate a new 2-year hospitality program with career options in hotel or restaurant management. A mail and telephone survey of area employers in the restaurant and hotel field demonstrated a need for, interest in, and willingness to provide internships for such a program.…

  8. Academic Hospitality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phipps, Alison; Barnett, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    Academic hospitality is a feature of academic life. It takes many forms. It takes material form in the hosting of academics giving papers. It takes epistemological form in the welcome of new ideas. It takes linguistic form in the translation of academic work into other languages, and it takes touristic form through the welcome and generosity with…

  9. Academic Hospitality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phipps, Alison; Barnett, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    Academic hospitality is a feature of academic life. It takes many forms. It takes material form in the hosting of academics giving papers. It takes epistemological form in the welcome of new ideas. It takes linguistic form in the translation of academic work into other languages, and it takes touristic form through the welcome and generosity with…

  10. Recentralization within decentralization: County hospital autonomy under devolution in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Manyara, Anthony M.; Molyneux, Sassy; Tsofa, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    Background In 2013, Kenya transitioned into a devolved system of government with a central government and 47 semi-autonomous county governments. In this paper, we report early experiences of devolution in the Kenyan health sector, with a focus on public county hospitals. Specifically, we examine changes in hospital autonomy as a result of devolution, and how these have affected hospital functioning. Methods We used a qualitative case study approach to examine the level of autonomy that hospitals had over key management functions and how this had affected hospital functioning in three county hospitals in coastal Kenya. We collected data by in-depth interviews of county health managers and hospital managers in the case study hospitals (n = 21). We adopted the framework proposed by Chawla et al (1995) to examine the autonomy that hospitals had over five management domains (strategic management, finance, procurement, human resource, and administration), and how these influenced hospital functioning. Findings Devolution had resulted in a substantial reduction in the autonomy of county hospitals over the five key functions examined. This resulted in weakened hospital management and leadership, reduced community participation in hospital affairs, compromised quality of services, reduced motivation among hospital staff, non-alignment of county and hospital priorities, staff insubordination, and compromised quality of care. Conclusion Increasing the autonomy of county hospitals in Kenya will improve their functioning. County governments should develop legislation that give hospitals greater control over resources and key management functions. PMID:28771558

  11. Hospital network performance: a survey of hospital stakeholders' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Bravi, F; Gibertoni, D; Marcon, A; Sicotte, C; Minvielle, E; Rucci, P; Angelastro, A; Carradori, T; Fantini, M P

    2013-02-01

    Hospital networks are an emerging organizational form designed to face the new challenges of public health systems. Although the benefits introduced by network models in terms of rationalization of resources are known, evidence about stakeholders' perspectives on hospital network performance from the literature is scanty. Using the Competing Values Framework of organizational effectiveness and its subsequent adaptation by Minvielle et al., we conducted in 2009 a survey in five hospitals of an Italian network for oncological care to examine and compare the views on hospital network performance of internal stakeholders (physicians, nurses and the administrative staff). 329 questionnaires exploring stakeholders' perspectives were completed, with a response rate of 65.8%. Using exploratory factor analysis of the 66 items of the questionnaire, we identified 4 factors, i.e. Centrality of relationships, Quality of care, Attractiveness/Reputation and Staff empowerment and Protection of workers' rights. 42 items were retained in the analysis. Factor scores proved to be high (mean score>8 on a 10-item scale), except for Attractiveness/Reputation (mean score 6.79), indicating that stakeholders attach a higher importance to relational and health care aspects. Comparison of factor scores among stakeholders did not reveal significant differences, suggesting a broadly shared view on hospital network performance. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Teaching of Astronomy at Teresa Martin College. (Breton Title: Ensino de Astronomia Nas Faculdades Teresa Martin.) Enseñanza de la Astronomia en la Facultad Teresa Martin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azevedo Sobreira, Paulo Henrique

    2005-12-01

    Courses with exclusive Astronomy contents did not exist at (FATEMA) Teresa Martin College's program until the end of 2002. In 2001, a series of educational experiments started in courses and classes of Astronomy at Mathematics and Geography departments. This actions culminated with the insertion of Teaching of Astronomy as a study theme in the course of Independent Studies for Mathematics professors in 2005. Até o final de 2002 inexistiam na grade curricular das Faculdades Integradas Teresa Martin (FATEMA) cadeiras com conteúdos exclusivos de Astronomia. A partir do ano de 2001 iniciou-se uma série de experiências educacionais através de modelos de cursos e de aulas de Astronomia nos Departamentos de Matemática e de Geografia, o que culminou com a inserção do Ensino de Astronomia como temática da disciplina de Estudos Independentes para o curso de Licenciatura em Matemática, em 2005. Hasta el final de 2002 no había en el currículo dela Facultad TeresaMartín (FATEMA) en San Pablo - SP, Brasil, disciplinas con contenidos exclusivos de Astronomía. A partir del año 2001 comenzó una secuencia de experimentos educacionales de carrera y de clases de Astronomía en los Departamentos de Matemática y Geografía, culminando en la implantación de clases de Enseñanza dela Astronomíaenla Licenciaturaen Matemática, en el año de 2003, y de la cátedra de extensión en Cosmografía parala Licenciaturaen Geografía.

  13. Can hospitals compete on quality? Hospital competition.

    PubMed

    Sadat, Somayeh; Abouee-Mehrizi, Hossein; Carter, Michael W

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we consider two hospitals with different perceived quality of care competing to capture a fraction of the total market demand. Patients select the hospital that provides the highest utility, which is a function of price and the patient's perceived quality of life during their life expectancy. We consider a market with a single class of patients and show that depending on the market demand and perceived quality of care of the hospitals, patients may enjoy a positive utility. Moreover, hospitals share the market demand based on their perceived quality of care and capacity. We also show that in a monopoly market (a market with a single hospital) the optimal demand captured by the hospital is independent of the perceived quality of care. We investigate the effects of different parameters including the market demand, hospitals' capacities, and perceived quality of care on the fraction of the demand that each hospital captures using some numerical examples.

  14. Changing hospital payments: implications for teaching hospitals.

    PubMed

    Bentley, J D

    1983-09-01

    Hospitals cannot continue to view themselves only as social institutions whose performance will be assessed on the good they do. Teaching hospitals, in particular, cannot view themselves simply as distinctive combinations of social and educational institutions. Under Medicare's prospective pricing system, the hospital's role as production system is enhanced, and all hospitals must learn to balance the new economic realities as they work with their medical staff to adapt to a changed future.

  15. Abu al-Layth al-Libi

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    jihadi doctrine, al-Libi enrolled himself in the recently erected and highly popular al-Faruq 2 “Al-Sahab Releases ‘Winds of Paradise , Part III...February 2008, http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/south_asia/7220823.stm. 3 “Al-Sahab Releases ‘Winds of Paradise , Part III,’” Global Terrorism Research Project...5 “Al-Sahab Releases ‘Winds of Paradise , Part III,’” Global Terrorism Research Project. 6 Ibid. The date provided in the video is 1410

  16. Multiple Hospital Systems and the Teaching Hospital.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levitan, Mark S.

    1979-01-01

    Although a substantial portion of hospital beds are in institutions that are in multiple hospital systems, the possible benefits to be gained through participation in such systems do not appear to be of sufficient magnitude to either core teaching hospitals or their parent universities to persuade them to join or form a multiple system.…

  17. Critical Access Hospitals (CAH)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Access Hospital from CMS and Critical Access Hospital Finance 101 Manual from TASC. Furthermore, the Joint Commission ... Hospital Mortgage Insurance Program – helps rural healthcare facilities finance new construction, refinance debt, or purchase new equipment ...

  18. Understanding your hospital bill

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000881.htm Understanding your hospital bill To use the sharing features on this ... help you save money. Charges Listed on Your Hospital Bill A hospital bill will list the major ...

  19. Going to the Hospital

    MedlinePlus

    ... Happens in the Operating Room? Going to the Hospital KidsHealth > For Kids > Going to the Hospital Print ... you flowers, balloons, or other treats! previous continue Hospital People You'll meet lots of people in ...

  20. What Is ALS?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Javits, actor David Niven, “Sesame Street” creator Jon Stone, boxing champion Ezzard Charles, NBA Hall of Fame ... Help for People with ALS and Caregivers Read stories from families living with ALS Forms of ALS ...

  1. Specialty hospitals: can general hospitals compete?

    PubMed

    Dummit, Laura A

    2005-07-13

    The rapid increase in specialty cardiac, surgical, and orthopedic hospitals has captured the attention of general hospitals and policymakers. Although the number of specialty hospitals remains small in absolute terms, their entry into certain health care markets has fueled arguments about the rules of "fair" competition among health care providers. To allow the smoke to clear, Congress effectively stalled the growth in new specialty hospitals by temporarily prohibiting physicians from referring Medicare or Medicaid patients to specialty hospitals in which they had an ownership interest. During this 18-month moratorium, which expired June 8, 2005, two mandated studies of specialty hospitals provided information to help assess their potential effect on health care delivery. This issue brief discusses the research on specialty hospitals, including their payments under Medicare's hospital inpatient payment system, the quality and cost of care they deliver, their effect on general hospitals and on overall health care delivery, and the regulatory and legal environment in which they have proliferated. It concludes with open issues concerning physician self-referral and the role of general hospitals in providing a range of health care services.

  2. Hospital marketing revisited.

    PubMed

    Costello, M M

    1987-05-01

    With more hospitals embracing the marketing function in their organizational management over the past decade, hospital marketing can no longer be considered a fad. However, a review of hospital marketing efforts as reported in the professional literature indicates that hospitals must pay greater attention to the marketing mix elements of service, price and distribution channels as their programs mature.

  3. Measuring Rural Hospital Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moscovice, Ira; Wholey, Douglas R.; Klingner, Jill; Knott, Astrid

    2004-01-01

    Increased interest in the measurement of hospital quality has been stimulated by accrediting bodies, purchaser coalitions, government agencies, and other entities. This paper examines quality measurement for hospitals in rural settings. We seek to identify rural hospital quality measures that reflect quality in all hospitals and that are sensitive…

  4. Measuring Rural Hospital Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moscovice, Ira; Wholey, Douglas R.; Klingner, Jill; Knott, Astrid

    2004-01-01

    Increased interest in the measurement of hospital quality has been stimulated by accrediting bodies, purchaser coalitions, government agencies, and other entities. This paper examines quality measurement for hospitals in rural settings. We seek to identify rural hospital quality measures that reflect quality in all hospitals and that are sensitive…

  5. Hospital libraries in perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Holst, R

    1991-01-01

    The proliferation of hospital libraries since World War II has created a generation of librarians who take for granted the existence of libraries in hospitals. A literature review for the first half of the twentieth century presents a picture of uncertainty and struggle for identity for the hospital library. Then as now, hospital libraries reflect the institutions within which they operate. A brief history of the development of the American hospital provides a context for describing the various roles that the hospital library has played within its parent institution during the twentieth century. Some personal reflections on working in a hospital library are also presented. PMID:1998812

  6. Competition among hospitals.

    PubMed

    Noether, M

    1988-09-01

    The traditional view of hospital competition has posited that hospitals compete primarily along 'quality' dimensions, in the form of fancy equipment to attract admitting physicians and pleasant surroundings to entice patients. Price competition among hospitals is thought to be non-existent. This paper estimates the effects of various hospital market characteristics on hospital prices and expenses in an attempt to determine the form of hospital competition. The results suggest that both price and quality competition are greater in markets that are less concentrated, although the net effect of the two on prices is insignificant. It appears, therefore, that, despite important distortions, hospital markets are not immune to standard competitive forces.

  7. Mathematical-statistical models of generated hazardous hospital solid waste.

    PubMed

    Awad, A R; Obeidat, M; Al-Shareef, M

    2004-01-01

    This research work was carried out under the assumption that wastes generated from hospitals in Irbid, Jordan were hazardous. The hazardous and non-hazardous wastes generated from the different divisions in the three hospitals under consideration were not separated during collection process. Three hospitals, Princess Basma hospital (public), Princess Bade'ah hospital (teaching), and Ibn Al-Nafis hospital (private) in Irbid were selected for this study. The research work took into account the amounts of solid waste accumulated from each division and also determined the total amount generated from each hospital. The generation rates were determined (kilogram per patient, per day; kilogram per bed, per day) for the three hospitals. These generation rates were compared with similar hospitals in Europe. The evaluation suggested that the current situation regarding the management of these wastes in the three studied hospitals needs revision as these hospitals do not follow methods of waste disposals that would reduce risk to human health and the environment practiced in developed countries. Statistical analysis was carried out to develop models for the prediction of the quantity of waste generated at each hospital (public, teaching, private). In these models number of patients, beds, and type of hospital were revealed to be significant factors on quantity of waste generated. Multiple regressions were also used to estimate the quantities of wastes generated from similar divisions in the three hospitals (surgery, internal diseases, and maternity).

  8. Report of the procedure of voluntary interruption of pregnancy at a university hospital in Uruguay

    PubMed Central

    Bentancor, Ana; Hernández, Ana Laura; Godoy, Yamile; Dapueto, Juan J

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To describe the constitution and operation of a voluntary interruption of pregnancy team of a university hospital, from the outlook of the mental health team. METHODS In this case study, the following aspects were analyzed: 1) historical background; 2) implementation of Law 18,897 of October 22, 2012; and 3) functioning of the program at the Hospital de Clínicas of the Facultad de Medicina (Universidad de la República, Uruguay), taking into account three dimensions: structure, process, and results. RESULTS Between December 2012 and November 2013, a total of 6,676 voluntary interruptions of pregnancy were reported in Uruguay; out of these, 80 were conducted at the Hospital de Clínicas. The patients’ demographic data agreed with those reported at the national level: Of the total patients, 81.0% were aged over 19 years; 6.2% decided to continue with the pregnancy; and only 70.0% attended the subsequent control and received advice on contraception. CONCLUSIONS In its implementation year in Uruguay, we can assess the experience as positive from the point of view of women’s health. Our experience as a mental health team at the Hospital de Clínicas, inserted into the multidisciplinary voluntary interruption of pregnancy team, is in the process of assessment and reformulation of practices. PMID:27384969

  9. Hospitable Classrooms: Biblical Hospitality and Inclusive Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, David W.

    2011-01-01

    This paper contributes to a Christian hermeneutic of special education by suggesting the biblical concept of hospitality as a necessary characteristic of classroom and school environments in which students with disabilities and other marginalized students can be effectively incorporated into the body of the classroom. Christian hospitality, seen…

  10. /Cu-Al System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kish, Orel; Froumin, Natalya; Aizenshtein, Michael; Frage, Nachum

    2014-05-01

    Wettability and interfacial interaction of the Ta2O5/Cu-Al system were studied. Pure Cu does not wet the Ta2O5 substrate, and improved spreading is achieved when relatively a high fraction of the active element (~40 at.% Al) was added. The Al2O3 and AlTaO4 phases were observed at the Ta2O5/Cu-Al interface. A thermodynamic evaluation allowed us to suggest that the lack of wetting bellow 40 at.% Al is due to the presence of a native oxide, which covers the drop. The conditions of the native oxide decomposition and the formation of the volatile Al2O suboxide strongly depend on the vacuum level during sessile drop experiments and the composition of the Cu-Al alloy. In our case, Al contents greater than 40% provides thermodynamic conditions for the formation of Al2O (as a result of Al reaction with Al2O3) and the drop spreading. It was suggested that the final contact angle in the Ta2O5/Cu-Al system (50°) is determined by Ta adsorption on the newly formed alumina interlayer.

  11. The application of hospitality elements in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ziqi; Robson, Stephani; Hollis, Brooke

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, many hospital designs have taken inspiration from hotels, spurred by factors such as increased patient and family expectations and regulatory or financial incentives. Increasingly, research evidence suggests the value of enhancing the physical environment to foster healing and drive consumer decisions and perceptions of service quality. Although interest is increasing in the broader applicability of numerous hospitality concepts to the healthcare field, the focus of this article is design innovations, and the services that such innovations support, from the hospitality industry. To identify physical hotel design elements and associated operational features that have been used in the healthcare arena, a series of interviews with hospital and hotel design experts were conducted. Current examples and suggestions for future hospitality elements were also sought from the experts, academic journals, and news articles. Hospitality elements applied in existing hospitals that are addressed in this article include hotel-like rooms and decor; actual hotels incorporated into medical centers; hotel-quality food, room service, and dining facilities for families; welcoming lobbies and common spaces; hospitality-oriented customer service training; enhanced service offerings, including concierges; spas or therapy centers; hotel-style signage and way-finding tools; and entertainment features. Selected elements that have potential for future incorporation include executive lounges and/or communal lobbies with complimentary wireless Internet and refreshments, centralized controls for patients, and flexible furniture. Although the findings from this study underscore the need for more hospitality-like environments in hospitals, the investment decisions made by healthcare executives must be balanced with cost-effectiveness and the assurance that clinical excellence remains the top priority.

  12. ALS (Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... risk factors for veterans include exposure to lead, pesticides, and other environmental toxins. ALS is recognized as ... from scientific studies suggests that both genetics and environment play a role in the development of ALS. ...

  13. Lou Gehrig's Disease (ALS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1930s. People in England and Australia call ALS motor neurone disease (MND). The French refer to it ... about ALS in 1869. Lou Gehrig's disease damages motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord. Motor ...

  14. Hospitals as health educators

    MedlinePlus

    ... than your local hospital. From health videos to yoga classes, many hospitals offer information families need to ... care and breastfeeding Parenting Baby sign language Baby yoga or massage Babysitting courses for teens Exercise classes ...

  15. Help prevent hospital errors

    MedlinePlus

    ... www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23330698 . The Joint Commission. Hospital: 2014 National Patient Safety Goals. www.jointcommission. ... October 24, 2014. Accessed October 27, 2016. The Joint Commission. Hospital: 2016 National Patient Safety Goals. Updated January ...

  16. Hospital Dermatology, Introduction.

    PubMed

    Fox, Lindy P

    2017-03-01

    Inpatient dermatology is emerging as a distinct dermatology subspecialty where dermatologists specialize in caring for patients hospitalized with skin disease. While the main focus of inpatient dermatology is the delivery of top-quality and timely dermatologic care to patients in the hospital setting, the practice of hospital-based dermatology has many additional components that are critical to its success.

  17. Positioning hospitals: a model for regional hospitals.

    PubMed

    Reddy, A C; Campbell, D P

    1993-01-01

    In an age of marketing warfare in the health care industry, hospitals need creative strategies to compete successfully. Lately, positioning concepts have been added to the health care marketer's arsenal of strategies. To blend theory with practice, the authors review basic positioning theory and present a framework for developing positioning strategies. They also evaluate the marketing strategies of a regional hospital to provide a case example.

  18. 2. View northwest of main hospital building complex, hospital building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. View northwest of main hospital building complex, hospital building (Building 90), administration and clinical hospital building (Building 88), and hospital building (Building 91) - National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers Western Branch, 4101 South Fourth Street, Leavenworth, Leavenworth County, KS

  19. Al Pie De La Letra

    PubMed Central

    Ovbiagele, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Ethnic minorities are at higher stroke risk than non-Hispanic whites yet are less likely to have optimal vascular risk factor control. There is a need to develop culturally sensitive strategies for enhancing vascular risk reduction in minority patients with stroke. This study aimed to develop a postdischarge report card to boost treatment adherence among elderly Spanish-speaking patients with stroke within an urban health system. Methods This study included a total of 13 Spanish-only speaking participants aged ≥60 years discharged from a local government hospital in Los Angeles within 18 months of an index ischemic stroke and 6 caregivers engaged in focus groups and interviews. Structured interviews were conducted with 11 care providers and 9 administrators at the hospital. Framework analysis examined the data and elicited themes to adapt a pre-existing patient report card tool. Results Spontaneously using the same phrase, “Al pie de la letra,” several participants expressed a need to follow medical instructions accurately to prevent recurrent stroke and identified barriers/facilitators for doing so. They made comments about the pre-existing report card, advising several changes, including the clarification of phrases, and written instructions to explain the need for the card and how to fill it out. The providers and administrators recommended avenues for successfully using the card at the hospital. A new report card was created that incorporated all major perspectives. Conclusions Crafting a culturally sensitive tool for promoting treatment adherence in elderly Spanish-only-speaking patients with stroke within an urban health system using a participatory methodology is feasible. The efficacy of this new report card should be tested in a randomized controlled trial. PMID:20167904

  20. Mold remediation in a hospital.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tang G

    2009-01-01

    As occupants in a hospital, patients are susceptible to air contaminants that can include biological agents dispersed throughout the premise. An exposed patient can become ill and require medical intervention. A consideration for patients is that they may have become environmentally sensitive and require placement in an environment that does not compromise their health. Unfortunately, the hospital environment often contains more biological substances than can be expected in an office or home environment. When a hospital also experiences water intrusion such as flooding or water leaks, resulting mold growth can seriously compromise the health of patients and others such as nursing staff and physicians (Burge, Indoor Air and Infectious Disease. Occupational Medicine: State of the Art Reviews, 1980; Lutz et al., Clinical Infectious Diseases 37: 786-793, 2003). Micro-organism growth can propagate if the water is not addressed quickly and effectively. Immunocompromised patients are particularly at risk when subjected to fungal infection such that the US Center for Disease Control issued guideline for building mold in health care facilities (Centers for Disease and Control [CDC], Centers for Disease and Control: Questions and Answers on Stachybotrys chartarum and Other Molds, 2000). This paper is based on mold remediation of one portion of a hospital unit due to water from construction activity and inadequate maintenance, resulting in mold growth. A large proportion of the hospital staff, primarily nurses in the dialysis unit, exhibited health symptoms consistent with mold exposure. Unfortunately, the hospital administrators did not consider the mold risk to be serious and refused an independent consultant retained by the nurse's union to examine the premise (Canadian Broadcasting Corporation [CBC], Nurses file complaints over mold at Foothills. Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, 2003). The nurse's union managed to have the premise examined by submitting a court order of

  1. Hospital diversification strategy.

    PubMed

    Eastaugh, Steven R

    2014-01-01

    To determine the impact of health system restructuring on the levels of hospital diversification and operating ratio this article analyzed 94 teaching hospitals and 94 community hospitals during the period 2008-2013. The 47 teaching hospitals are matched with 47 other teaching hospitals experiencing the same financial market position in 2008, but with different levels of preference for risk and diversification in their strategic plan. Covariates in the analysis included levels of hospital competition and the degree of local government planning (for example, highly regulated in New York, in contrast to Texas). Moreover, 47 nonteaching community hospitals are matched with 47 other community hospitals in 2008, having varying manager preferences for service-line diversification and risk. Diversification and operating ratio are modeled in a two-stage least squares (TSLS) framework as jointly dependent. Institutional diversification is found to yield better financial position, and the better operating profits provide the firm the wherewithal to diversify. Some services are in a growth phase, like bariatric weight-loss surgery and sleep disorder clinics. Hospital managers' preferences for risk/return potential were considered. An institution life cycle hypothesis is advanced to explain hospital behavior: boom and bust, diversification, and divestiture, occasionally leading to closure or merger.

  2. Desarrollo de una Interfaz de Control para un Observatorio Astronómico Robotizado con fines educativos en la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas; Físicas y Naturales de la UNSJ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogrebinsky, L.; Francile, C.

    We report the development and the construction of an Interface to Control a robotized Astronomical Observatory (ICOA), which allows to control the operation of an observatory based on a Meade LX200 telescope. The interface operates together with a computer to control and supervise all the local variables of the observatory, and can take the control of it in risky situations. It serves as a link among the control computer and all the necessary devices for the astronomical observation such as the telescope, the dome, the weather station, the CCD camera, the calibration devices and the security devices. The computer receives orders from an operator who can be or not at the site of observation. The goal of this robotized observatory is the operation in a secure, autonomous and unattended way, with the purpose of to be used remotely by the students of the "Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Físicas y Naturales" of the UNSJ. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  3. Genetic testing in ALS

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Russell L.; Heverin, Mark; Thorpe, Owen; Abrahams, Sharon; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Hardiman, Orla

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To determine the degree of consensus among clinicians on the clinical use of genetic testing in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and the factors that determine decision-making. Methods: ALS researchers worldwide were invited to participate in a detailed online survey to determine their attitudes and practices relating to genetic testing. Results: Responses from 167 clinicians from 21 different countries were analyzed. The majority of respondents (73.3%) do not consider that there is a consensus definition of familial ALS (FALS). Fifty-seven percent consider a family history of frontotemporal dementia and 48.5% the presence of a known ALS genetic mutation as sufficient for a diagnosis of FALS. Most respondents (90.2%) offer genetic testing to patients they define as having FALS and 49.4% to patients with sporadic ALS. Four main genes (SOD1, C9orf72, TARDBP, and FUS) are commonly tested. A total of 55.2% of respondents would seek genetic testing if they had personally received a diagnosis of ALS. Forty-two percent never offer presymptomatic testing to family members of patients with FALS. Responses varied between ALS specialists and nonspecialists and based on the number of new patients seen per year. Conclusions: There is a lack of consensus among clinicians as to the definition of FALS. Substantial variation exists in attitude and practices related to genetic testing of patients and presymptomatic testing of their relatives across geographic regions and between experienced specialists in ALS and nonspecialists. PMID:28159885

  4. Measuring hospital competition.

    PubMed

    White, S L; Chirikos, T N

    1988-03-01

    This paper appraises the use of the Herfindahl market share index as an exogenous competition variable in empirical studies of the hospital sector. An analysis of cross-sectional Florida data shows that this index itself is significantly influenced by the demand and supply factors commonly included in econometric models of hospital performance. The analysis then illustrates that biased inferences about the effects of market competition on the costs of hospital care may result unless the values of the Herfindahl Index are treated endogenously in hospital cost models.

  5. Central line infections - hospitals

    MedlinePlus

    ... infection; CVC - infection; Central venous device - infection; Infection control - central line infection; Nosocomial infection - central line infection; Hospital acquired infection - central line infection; Patient safety - central ...

  6. Ventilatory Control in ALS

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Nicole L.; Van Dyke, J.; Nashold, L.; Satriotomo, I.; Suzuki, M.; Mitchell, G.S.

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal, progressive neurodegenerative disease. ALS selectively causes degeneration in upper and lower (spinal) motor neurons, leading to muscle weakness, paralysis and death by ventilatory failure. Although ventilatory failure is generally the cause of death in ALS, little is known concerning the impact of this disorder on respiratory motor neurons, the consequences of respiratory motor neuron cell death, or the ability of the respiratory control system to “fight back” via mechanisms of compensatory respiratory plasticity. Here we review known effects of ALS on breathing, including possible effects on rhythm generation, respiratory motor neurons, and their target organs: the respiratory muscles. We consider evidence for spontaneous compensatory plasticity, preserving breathing well into disease progression despite dramatic loss of spinal respiratory motor neurons. Finally, we review current and potential therapeutic approaches directed toward preserving the capacity to breathe in ALS patients. PMID:23692930

  7. Virtual Pediatric Hospital

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thoracopaedia - An Imaging Encyclopedia of Pediatric Thoracic Disease Virtual Pediatric Hospital is the Apprentice's Assistant™ Last revised ... pediatric resources: GeneralPediatrics.com | PediatricEducation.org | SearchingPediatrics.com Virtual Pediatric Hospital is curated by Donna M. D' ...

  8. [Music in the hospital].

    PubMed

    Bouteloup, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Occasional events, regular workshops, concerts, shows, artists in residence, cultural outings...Hospital does not necessarily have to be a place of silence and sadness. But this situation has not always been so straightforward as on the face of it, nothing is more incompatible with a hospital environment than music, which, by definition, is festive and noisy.

  9. Handbook on Hospital Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prynne, T. A.

    Designed for both hospital personnel interested in television and audiovisual personnel entering the medical field, this handbook is a verbal and pictorial survey of what is being done with TV within the medical profession. After an introduction which answers technical questions about medical TV posed during the American Hospital Association's…

  10. Hospitality Occupations. Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Bureau of Homemaking Education.

    This curriculum guide on the hospitality occupations was developed to help secondary and postsecondary home economics teachers prepare individuals for entry-level jobs in the hospitality industry. The content is in seven sections. The first section presents organizational charts of a medium-size hotel, food and beverage division, housekeeping and…

  11. Hospitality, Tourism, and Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novachek, James

    The Northern Arizona Hospitality Education Program is an exemplary three-year project designed to help students, mainly Indian, obtain job skills and attitudes necessary for successful employment in the hospitality industry. Nine high schools from Apache, Coconino, and Navajo Counties participated in the project. Objectives included providing an…

  12. Hospitality Services. Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This guide, which was developed as part of Texas' home economics education program, is intended to assist teachers of a hospitality services course focusing on the food and lodging segments of the hospitality and tourism industry. The first 40% of the approximately 600-page guide consists of strategies for teaching each of 29 essential…

  13. Hospitality Services Reference Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This reference book provides information needed by employees in hospitality services occupations. It includes 29 chapters that cover the following topics: the hospitality services industry; professional ethics; organization and management structures; safety practices and emergency procedures; technology; property maintenance and repair; purchasing…

  14. Hospitality Services. Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This guide, which was developed as part of Texas' home economics education program, is intended to assist teachers of a hospitality services course focusing on the food and lodging segments of the hospitality and tourism industry. The first 40% of the approximately 600-page guide consists of strategies for teaching each of 29 essential…

  15. Hospitality Services Reference Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This reference book provides information needed by employees in hospitality services occupations. It includes 29 chapters that cover the following topics: the hospitality services industry; professional ethics; organization and management structures; safety practices and emergency procedures; technology; property maintenance and repair; purchasing…

  16. Hospitals are dangerous places.

    PubMed

    de Richemond, Albert L

    2010-01-01

    Hospital fire dangers are real, widespread, and ever present, the article demonstrates, spelling out the locations, conditions, and ignition potentials which exist in such a setting. Knowledge of codes and standards, good maintenance practices, and frequent drills in fire prevention and suppression are among the practices recommended for keeping a hospital fire from becoming a disaster, the author says.

  17. Handbook on Hospital Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prynne, T. A.

    Designed for both hospital personnel interested in television and audiovisual personnel entering the medical field, this handbook is a verbal and pictorial survey of what is being done with TV within the medical profession. After an introduction which answers technical questions about medical TV posed during the American Hospital Association's…

  18. Preventing falls in hospital.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lynne

    2017-01-04

    Falls are the most frequent adverse event reported in hospitals, usually affecting older patients. Every year, more than 240,000 falls are reported in acute hospitals and mental health trusts in England and Wales, equivalent to more than 600 per day, according to the Royal College of Physicians (RCP).

  19. Preventing falls in hospital.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lynne

    2017-01-31

    Essential facts Falls are the most frequently reported adverse events in hospitals, especially among older patients. According to the Royal College of Physicians (RCP) more than 240,000 falls are reported in acute hospitals and mental health trusts in England and Wale.

  20. Hospitality services generate revenue.

    PubMed

    Bizouati, S

    1993-01-01

    An increasing number of hospitals are undertaking external revenue-generating activities to supplement their shrinking budgets. Written at the request of Leadership, this article outlines an example of a successful catering service -- a money-generating business that more Canadian hospitals could profitably consider.

  1. Leading a hospital closure.

    PubMed

    Lucey, Paula A

    2002-01-01

    Hospital closures have become more common. The challenges facing a nursing leader in this situation are complex and difficult. This author suggests that looking for new beginnings rather than focusing on endings created an approach to closing a public hospital. The article includes approaches to employee morale, staffing, and patient care.

  2. Hospital benefit segmentation.

    PubMed

    Finn, D W; Lamb, C W

    1986-12-01

    Market segmentation is an important topic to both health care practitioners and researchers. The authors explore the relative importance that health care consumers attach to various benefits available in a major metropolitan area hospital. The purposes of the study are to test, and provide data to illustrate, the efficacy of one approach to hospital benefit segmentation analysis.

  3. ALS2 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Susanne A.; Carr, Lucinda; Deuschl, Guenther; Hopfner, Franziska; Stamelou, Maria; Wood, Nicholas W.; Bhatia, Kailash P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the genetic etiology in 2 consanguineous families who presented a novel phenotype of autosomal recessive juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis associated with generalized dystonia. Methods: A combination of homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing in the first family and Sanger sequencing of candidate genes in the second family were used. Results: Both families were found to have homozygous loss-of-function mutations in the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 2 (juvenile) (ALS2) gene. Conclusions: We report generalized dystonia and cerebellar signs in association with ALS2-related disease. We suggest that the ALS2 gene should be screened for mutations in patients who present with a similar phenotype. PMID:24562058

  4. Competition among hospitals.

    PubMed

    Gaynor, Martin; Vogt, William B

    2003-01-01

    We examine competition in the hospital industry, in particular the effect of ownership type (for-profit, not-for-profit, government). We estimate a structural model of demand and pricing in the hospital industry in California, then use the estimates to simulate the effect of a merger. California hospitals in 1995 face an average price elasticity of demand of -4.85. Not-for-profit hospitals face less elastic demand and act as if they have lower marginal costs. Their prices are lower than those of for-profits, but markups are higher. We simulate the effects of the 1997 merger of two hospital chains. In San Luis Obispo County, where the merger creates a near monopoly, prices rise by up to 53%, and the predicted price increase would not be substantially smaller were the chains not-for-profit.

  5. Medication safety in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Kirke, C

    2009-01-01

    Medication error and adverse drug reactions occur frequently, leading to a high burden of patient harm in the hospital setting. Many Irish hospitals have established medication safety initiatives, designed to encourage reporting and learning to improve medication use processes and therefore patient safety. Eight Irish hospitals or hospital networks provided data from voluntary medication safety incident and near miss reporting programmes for pooled analysis of events occurring between 1st January 2006 and 30th June 2007. 6179 reports were received in total (mean 772 per hospital; range 96-1855). 95% of reports did not involve patient harm. Forty seven percent of reports related to the prescribing stage of the medication use process, 40% to the administration stage and 9% to the pharmacy dispensing stage. This data is published to increase awareness of this key patient safety issue, to share learning from these incidents and near misses and to encourage a more open patient safety culture.

  6. Initial Symptoms of ALS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Combine your passion and commitment to finding a cure for ALS while achieving physical challenges through athletic events Register ... - 1275 K Street NW - Suite 250 - Washington, DC 20005 All content and works posted on this website are owned ...

  7. Genetic Testing for ALS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Some medical centers may require a neurological exam, psychological assessment and counseling before predictive testing. If a person in the family with ALS has a negative genetic test result (no identified genetic mutation), testing family members ...

  8. Lou Gehrig's Disease (ALS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... when it becomes necessary. For instance, a power wheelchair can enable a paralyzed person with ALS to ... done these things despite being confined to a wheelchair for many years, being able to move only ...

  9. Rub al Khali, Arabia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-08-08

    NASA Terra spacecraft shows the Rub al Khali, one of the largest sand deserts in the world, encompassing most of the southern third of the Arabian Peninsula; it includes parts of Oman, United Arab Emirates, and Yemen.

  10. Ag-Al-Ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carow-Watamura, U.; Louzguine, D. V.; Takeuchi, A.

    This document is part of Part 1 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/97.etType="URL"/> 'Systems from Ag-Al-Ca to Au-Pd-Si' of Subvolume B 'Physical Properties of Ternary Amorphous Alloys' of Volume 37 'Phase Diagrams and Physical Properties of Nonequilibrium Alloys' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains the Chapter 'Ag-Al-Ca' with the content:

  11. Guide to Choosing a Hospital

    MedlinePlus

    ... you visit Hospital Compare, finding information about the quality of hospitals is just a few steps away: • Click on “Find and Compare Hospitals,” and decide if you want to look for hospitals by the hospital name, or by ZIP Code, City, State or Territory, or County. • Select General Search, ...

  12. Hospitality as an Environmental Metaphor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horwood, Bert

    1991-01-01

    Compares stewardship and hospitality as they relate to the biosphere. Traces the origin of the word "hospitality," discusses cultural traditions of hospitality, and applies the concept of hospitality to the natural world. Considers forms of symbiosis in nature: commensals, mutualism, and parasitism. Hospitality promotes respect,…

  13. Philanthropy and hospital financing.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D G; Clement, J P; Wheeler, J R

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. This study explores the relationships among donations to not-for-profit hospitals, the returns provided by these hospitals, and fund-raising efforts. It tests a model of hospital behavior and addresses an earlier debate regarding the supply price of donations. DATA SOURCES. The main data source is the California Office of Statewide Health Planning data tapes of hospital financial disclosure reports for fiscal years 1980/1981 through 1986/1987. Complete data were available for 160 hospitals. STUDY DESIGN. Three structural equations (donations, returns, and fund-raising) are estimated as a system using a fixed-effects, pooled cross-section, time-series least squares regression. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. Estimation results reveal the expected positive relation between donations and returns. The reverse relation between returns and donations is insignificant. The estimated effect of fund-raising on donations is insignificantly different from zero, and the effect of donations on fund-raising is negative. Fund-raising and returns are negatively associated with one another. CONCLUSION. The empirical results presented here suggest a positive donations-returns relations and are consistent with a positive supply price for donations. Hospitals appear to view a trade-off between providing returns and soliciting donations, but donors do not respond equally to these two activities. Attempts to increase free cash flow through expansion of community returns or fund-raising activity, at least in the short run, are not likely to be highly successful financing strategies for many hospitals. PMID:8537223

  14. Hospitals' Internal Accountability

    PubMed Central

    Kraetschmer, Nancy; Jass, Janak; Woodman, Cheryl; Koo, Irene; Kromm, Seija K.; Deber, Raisa B.

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to enhance understanding of the dimensions of accountability captured and not captured in acute care hospitals in Ontario, Canada. Based on an Ontario-wide survey and follow-up interviews with three acute care hospitals in the Greater Toronto Area, we found that the two dominant dimensions of hospital accountability being reported are financial and quality performance. These two dimensions drove both internal and external reporting. Hospitals' internal reports typically included performance measures that were required or mandated in external reports. Although respondents saw reporting as a valuable mechanism for hospitals and the health system to monitor and track progress against desired outcomes, multiple challenges with current reporting requirements were communicated, including the following: 58% of survey respondents indicated that performance-reporting resources were insufficient; manual data capture and performance reporting were prevalent, with the majority of hospitals lacking sophisticated tools or technology to effectively capture, analyze and report performance data; hospitals tended to focus on those processes and outcomes with high measurability; and 53% of respondents indicated that valuable cross-system accountability, performance measures or both were not captured by current reporting requirements. PMID:25305387

  15. Hospitalizations for pediatric anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Calvani, M; Di Lallo, D; Polo, A; Spinelli, A; Zappalà, D; Zicari, A M

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study is to examine the epidemiology of anaphylaxis in hospitalized children in Lazio (Central Italy) and to evaluate the incidence and case fatality rate. We also verified the concordance of diagnosis between the Emergency Department and Ordinary hospitalizations. In order to obtain these results, we reviewed all ICD-9 codes indicative of anaphylaxis in all primary and secondary diagnoses from 2000 to 2003 in all Emergency Departments, Ordinary Hospitalizations and Day Hospitals in Lazio. We then identified 203 ICD-9 diagnoses of anaphylaxis in children aged between 0 and 17 years. Anaphylactic shock (995.0) accounted for 109 (53.7%) of cases. Food anaphylaxis (995.60 onwards) accounted for 87 (43.0%) of cases. Food anaphylaxis was more frequent in the first years of life. In fact, it decreased from 12.5/100,000 resident children/year in the first year of life to 6.1/100,000 resident children/year in the first two years of life, and less than 3/100,000 resident children/year after the seventh year (p <0.001). Only 12.5% of cases of anaphylaxis diagnosed in Ordinary Hospitalizations were subsequently diagnosed by the Emergency Department as anaphylaxis. Moreover, only 42.3% of the diagnoses of anaphylaxis made in the Emergency Department were later confirmed during ordinary hospitalization. In the four years of study, one child died from anaphylaxis. Thus, mortality was 0.038 cases/100,000 resident children/year. In conclusion, the incidence of hospitalization was highest in the first years of life, during which food anaphylaxis accounted for most hospitalizations. The inconsistency of diagnoses between Emergency Departments and Ordinary Hospitalizations suggests the need to increase awareness of anaphylaxis among health workers.

  16. Predicting hospital accounting costs

    PubMed Central

    Newhouse, Joseph P.; Cretin, Shan; Witsberger, Christina J.

    1989-01-01

    Two alternative methods to Medicare Cost Reports that provide information about hospital costs more promptly but less accurately are investigated. Both employ utilization data from current-year bills. The first attaches costs to utilization data using cost-charge ratios from the previous year's cost report; the second uses charges from current year's bills. The first method is the more accurate of the two, but even using it, only 40 percent of hospitals had predicted costs within plus or minus 5 percent of actual costs. The feasibility and cost of obtaining cost reports from a small, fast-track sample of hospitals should be investigated. PMID:10313352

  17. Hospital service recovery.

    PubMed

    Gutbezahl, Cary; Haan, Perry

    2006-01-01

    An organization's ability to correct service errors is an important factor in achieving success in today's service economy. This paper examines service recovery in hospitals in the U.S. First is a general review of service recovery theories. Next is a discussion of specific service issues related to the hospital environment. The literature on service recovery is used to make specific recommendations to hospitals for ways to improve their ability to remedy service errors when they occur. Suggestions for future research in the field of service recovery are also made.

  18. Hospital capital funding.

    PubMed

    Hebert, M

    1992-01-01

    It is critical that hospitals have a long-range plan in place to ensure that buildings and equipment are replaced when necessary. A study undertaken in British Columbia contrasted the Greater Vancouver Regional Hospital District's capital plan (past and future) to a proposed capital replacement model. The model, developed using accepted industry standards and criteria, provided an asset value that was used for comparison purposes. Building and equipment expenditures of the Surrey Memorial Hospital were also compared against the model. Findings from both studies are presented in this article.

  19. Frequently Asked Questions about ALS and the ALS Registry

    MedlinePlus

    ... long do people with familial ALS live? Do clusters of ALS possibly exist? (I have been told ... related?) What are the problems with studying possible clusters of ALS? What are motor neuron (nerve cell) ...

  20. Role of the Hospital Library Within the Hospital System *†

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzi, Nancy M.

    1969-01-01

    The results of a survey of hospital administrators, attending staff and house staff physicians, librarians, library committee chairmen, and nursing staff in five Northeastern Ohio hospitals concerning the status of the hospital library within the total hospital system are related. Results indicate that hospital libraries operate in the “fringe” area of the hospital system. A concentric-circle figure indicates the present position of the majority of hospital libraries surveyed. The future relationship of the library within the hospital system has also been represented by a concentric-circle figure. PMID:5778727

  1. Hospital free cash flow.

    PubMed

    Kauer, R T; Silvers, J B

    1991-01-01

    Hospital managers may find it difficult to admit their investments have been suboptimal, but such investments often lead to poor returns and less future cash. Inappropriate use of free cash flow produces large transaction costs of exit. The relative efficiency of investor-owned and tax-exempt hospitals in the product market for hospital services is examined as the free cash flow theory is used to explore capital-market conditions of hospitals. Hypotheses concerning the current competitive conditions in the industry are set forth, and the implications of free cash flow for risk, capital-market efficiency, and the cost of capital to tax-exempt institution is compared to capital-market norms.

  2. American Hospital Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Educational Trust HRET Main page HRET Hospital Improvement Innovation Network Equity of Care Huddle for Care The Symposium for Leaders in Healthcare Quality SLHQ Main page Research & Trends Research & Trends AHA Policy Research Reports Chartbook Financial ...

  3. General Practitioners in Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J. Weston; O'Donovan, J. B.

    1970-01-01

    An acute general hospital of 68 beds at Tamworth, a Midland town of 50,000 people, is staffed by general practitioners for both inpatient and casualty work. During the period 1967-8 there were 889 general practitioner admissions to the hospital for intermediate surgical and medical care, the average length of stay being 6·3 days and the average cost per case £44·3. Of these patients 96 were transferred to other hospitals. The patients, doctors, and standard of medical care have benefited from this kind of service. A “satellite” hospital of this type therefore has an important role in the community for carefully selected types of cases. PMID:5429111

  4. Home versus hospital confinement

    PubMed Central

    Barry, C. N.

    1980-01-01

    The case for hospital rather than home delivery has been powerfully argued, especially in and since the Report of the Peel Committee. Nevertheless, evidence of comparison with other countries, notably the Netherlands, suggests the choice is not necessarily simple. Some general practitioner units are now reporting perinatal mortality rates which are consistently lower than those of specialist units, and recent statistical analyses suggest that the presence of more high risk cases in consultant units does not explain this. The only big controlled home-versus-hospital trial did not lead to a significantly lower perinatal mortality rate in the hospital group. The onus of proof now seems to lie with those who advocate 100 per cent hospital confinement. PMID:7373581

  5. Objections to hospital philosophers.

    PubMed Central

    Ruddick, W; Finn, W

    1985-01-01

    Like morally sensitive hospital staff, philosophers resist routine simplification of morally complex cases. Like hospital clergy, they favour reflective and principled decision-making. Like hospital lawyers, they refine and extend the language we use to formulate and defend our complex decisions. But hospital philosophers are not redundant: they have a wider range of principles and categories and a sharper eye for self-serving presuppositions and implicit contradictions within our practices. As semi-outsiders, they are often best able to take an 'external point of view,' unburdened by routine, details, and departmental loyalties. Their clarifications can temporarily disrupt routine, but can eventually improve staff morale, hence team practice and patient welfare. PMID:3981573

  6. Hospital-acquired thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Christine M; Cuker, Adam

    2014-10-01

    The development of thrombocytopenia is common in hospitalized patients and is associated with increased mortality. Frequent and important causes of thrombocytopenia in hospitalized patients include etiologies related to the underlying illness for which the patient is admitted, such as infection and disseminated intravascular coagulation, and iatrogenic etiologies such as drug-induced immune thrombocytopenia, heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, posttransfusion purpura, hemodilution, major surgery, and extracorporeal circuitry. This review presents a brief discussion of the pathophysiology, distinguishing clinical features, and management of these etiologies, and provides a diagnostic approach to hospital-acquired thrombocytopenia that considers the timing and severity of the platelet count fall, the presence of hemorrhage or thrombosis, the clinical context, and the peripheral blood smear. This approach may offer guidance to clinicians in distinguishing among the various causes of hospital-acquired thrombocytopenia and providing management appropriate to the etiology.

  7. Practice Hospital Bed Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1, 1985 and January 1, 2013, FDA received reports of 901 incidents of patients caught, trapped, entangled, or strangled in ... Use Todd says there have been very few reports of safety incidents with hospital beds used in private residences. "This ...

  8. Epidemiology of ALS.

    PubMed

    Nelson, L M

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is an adult-onset neurodegenerative disorder of unknown etiology. ALS onset is rare before age 40 and increases with age thereafter. Men are at higher risk than women (ratio 1.3:1). Other than age and gender, the only indisputable risk factor for ALS is genetic susceptibility, with familial cases occurring in about 10% of most case series. Genetic linkage studies have provided evidence that a mutant form of the gene that codes for Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, an endogenous free radical scavenger, is important in 15-20% of familial cases. Epidemiologic studies have identified associations of sporadic ALS with work in occupations that involve toxicant exposure. Environmental toxicants may act against a background of increased genetic susceptibility; however, genetically acquired biochemical defects have not been identified in sporadic ALS patients. Other epidemiologic theories of disease etiology have emphasized the potential role of physical trauma, electrical shock, and vigorous physical exertion, but evidence regarding these factors is inconsistent.

  9. Fast tracking hospital construction.

    PubMed

    Quirk, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    Hospital leaders should consider four factors in determining whether to fast track a hospital construction project: Expectations of project length, quality, and cost. Whether decisions can be made quickly as issues arise. Their own time commitment to the project, as well as that of architects, engineers, construction managers, and others. The extent to which they are willing to share with the design and construction teams how and why decisions are being made.

  10. Managing diversity in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, R H; Sullivan, D B

    1993-01-01

    Hospital work force diversity, although potentially a source of creativity and improved problem solving, is often a source of political strife and the mistreatment of people based on their identification with one or another of the diverse groups that are employed in hospitals. Factors linked to these phenomena are discussed and are the basis for suggestions about how administrators can deal with the organizational pathologies that are often associated with unmanaged work force diversity.

  11. [Hospital organizational structure].

    PubMed

    Bittar, O J

    1994-01-01

    The basic point for an Institution to work is the existence of a definite organizational structure that puts together similar areas allowing decisions and the operationalization of different tasks. Knowledge and analysis of structures of private and public hospitals and a bibliography review about the issue is the purpose of this paper. Suggestions are given about the elaboration of small structures and the utilization of matrix management in order to accomplish the hospitals objectives.

  12. Salaries in psychiatric hospitals.

    PubMed

    Pope, D W

    1989-01-01

    The National Association of Private Psychiatric Hospitals has been surveying hospitals for the past several years. This paper focuses on the salary levels and average annual rates of increase for a few selected positions. Comparisons are made with data from surveys covering similar positions in other settings and with the Consumer Price Index. Annual rates of increase are reported for five- and ten-year periods.

  13. Preventing falls in hospital.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lynne

    2017-02-27

    Essential facts Falls are the most frequent adverse event reported in hospitals, usually affecting older patients. Every year, more than 240,000 falls are reported in acute hospitals and mental health trusts in England and Wales, equivalent to more than 600 a day, according to the Royal College of Physicians (RCP). But research shows that when nurses, doctors and therapists work together, falls can be reduced by 20-30%.

  14. Recurrent psychiatric hospitalization.

    PubMed Central

    Voineskos, G.; Denault, S.

    1978-01-01

    Undue emphasis has been placed on rising rates of readmission to psychiatric facilities. After a decade of preoccupation with discharge rates, readmission statistics have been singled out in the last 15 years as the key factor for assessing hospital effectiveness. A study of a group of patients at high risk for recurrent hospitalization revealed that these patients were characterized more by features relating to environmental supports than by diagnosis. The operational definition for recurrent hospitalization (five or more admissions during the 2-year period preceding the latest admission) was effective in identifying this group; this is the first reported instance in which the definition has specified a certain number of admissions within a time-limited period. The findings of this study, as well as of an analysis of case histories and consumer opinion, led to the design of a pilot program for persons undergoing recurrent hospitalization. Readmission statistics are useless or misleading as measures of hospital effectiveness and efficiency; what matters is the way the former patients function in the community after discharge. Rather than simply trying to reduce the readmission rate psychiatric facilities should be examining the types of persons who are hospitalized recurrently to develop programs aimed at improving the functioning of these people in the community. PMID:630483

  15. Statins: Do They Cause ALS?

    MedlinePlus

    Statins: Do they cause ALS? Do statins cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)? Answers from Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, M.D. ... D. References Sorensen HT, et al. Statins and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: The level of evidence for an association. Journal ...

  16. Photoelectron spectroscopy of the aluminum hydride anions: AlH2-, AlH3-, Al2H6-, Al3H9-, and Al4H12-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinxing; Wang, Haopeng; Collins, Evan; Lim, Alane; Ganteför, Gerd; Kiran, Boggavarapu; Schnöckel, Hansgeorg; Eichhorn, Bryan; Bowen, Kit

    2013-03-01

    We report measurements of the negative ion photoelectron spectra of the simple aluminum hydride anions: AlH2-, AlH3-, Al2H6-, Al3H9-, and Al4H12-. From these spectra, we measured the vertical detachment energies of the anions, and we estimated the electron affinities of their neutral counterparts. Our results for AlH2-, AlH3-, and Al2H6- were also compared with previous predictions by theory.

  17. Photoelectron spectroscopy of the aluminum hydride anions: AlH2(-), AlH3(-), Al2H6(-), Al3H9(-), and Al4H12(-).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinxing; Wang, Haopeng; Collins, Evan; Lim, Alane; Ganteför, Gerd; Kiran, Boggavarapu; Schnöckel, Hansgeorg; Eichhorn, Bryan; Bowen, Kit

    2013-03-28

    We report measurements of the negative ion photoelectron spectra of the simple aluminum hydride anions: AlH2(-), AlH3(-), Al2H6(-), Al3H9(-), and Al4H12(-). From these spectra, we measured the vertical detachment energies of the anions, and we estimated the electron affinities of their neutral counterparts. Our results for AlH2(-), AlH3(-), and Al2H6(-) were also compared with previous predictions by theory.

  18. Hospital Waste Management in Nonteaching Hospitals of Lucknow City, India

    PubMed Central

    Manar, Manish Kumar; Sahu, Krishna Kumar; Singh, Shivendra Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To assess hospital waste management in nonteaching hospitals of Lucknow city. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted on the staffs of nonteaching hospitals of Lucknow from September 2012 to March 2013. A total of eight hospitals were chosen as the study sample size. Simple random sampling technique was used for the selection of the nonteaching hospitals. A pre-structured and pre-tested interview questionnaire was used to collect necessary information regarding the hospitals and biomedical waste (BMW) management of the hospitals. The general information about the selected hospitals/employees of the hospitals was collected. Results: Mean hospital waste generated in the eight nonteaching hospitals of Lucknow was 0.56 kg/bed/day. About 50.5% of the hospitals did not have BMW department and colored dustbins. In 37.5% of the hospitals, there were no BMW records and segregation at source. Incinerator was used only by hospital A for treatment of BMW. Hospital G and hospital H had no facilities for BMW treatment. Conclusion: There is a need for appropriate training of staffs, strict implementation of rules, and continuous surveillance of the hospitals of Lucknow to improve the BMW management and handling practices. PMID:25657950

  19. ALS superbend magnet system

    SciTech Connect

    Zbasnik, J.; Wang, S.T.; Chen, J.Y.; DeVries, G.J.; DeMarco, R.; Fahmie, M.; Geyer, A.; Green, M.A.; Harkins, J.; Henderson, T.; Hinkson, J.; Hoyer, E.H.; Krupnick, J.; Marks, S.; Ottens, F.; Paterson, J.A.; Pipersky, P.; Portmann, G.; Robin, D.A.; Schlueter, R.D.; Steier, C.; Taylor, C.E.; Wahrer, R.

    2000-09-15

    The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is preparing to upgrade the Advanced Light Source (ALS) with three superconducting dipoles (Superbends). In this paper we present the final magnet system design which incorporates R&D test results and addresses the ALS operational concerns of alignment, availability, and economy. The design incorporates conduction-cooled Nb-Ti windings and HTS current leads, epoxy-glass suspension straps, and a Gifford-McMahon cryocooler to supply steady state refrigeration. We also present the current status of fabrication and testing.

  20. Effect of Hospital Ownership on Outcomes of Heart Failure Hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Akintoye, Emmanuel; Briasoulis, Alexandros; Egbe, Alexander; Orhurhu, Vwaire; Ibrahim, Walid; Kumar, Kartik; Alliu, Samson; Nas, Hala; Levine, Diane; Weinberger, Jarrett

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the impact of hospital ownership on heart failure (HF) hospitalization outcomes in the United States using data from the National Inpatient Sample of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Hospital ownership was classified into three, namely, nonfederal government, not-for-profit, and for-profit hospitals. Participants were adults hospitalized with a primary diagnosis of HF (2013 to 2014). End points included inpatient mortality, length-of-stay, cost and charge of hospitalization, and disposition at discharge. Of the estimated 1.9 million HF hospitalizations in the United States between 2013 and 2014, 73% were in not-for-profit hospitals, 15% were in for-profit hospitals, and 12% were in nonfederal government hospitals. Overall, mortality rate was 3%, mean length of stay was 5.3 days, median cost of hospitalization was USD 7,248, and median charge was USD 25,229, and among those who survived to hospital discharge, 51% had routine home discharge. There was no significant difference in inpatient mortality between hospital ownership among male patients, but there was a significant difference for female patients. Compared with government hospitals, mortality in female patients was lower in not-for-profit (odds ratio: 0.85 [95% confidence interval: 0.77 to 0.94]) and for-profit hospitals (odds ratio: 0.77 [0.68 to 0.87]). In addition, mean length of stay was highest in not-for-profit hospitals (5.4 days) and lowest in for-profit hospitals (5 days). Although cost of hospitalization was highest in not-for-profit hospitals (USD 7462) and lowest in for-profit hospitals (USD 6,290), total charge billed was highest in for-profit hospitals (USD 35,576) and lowest in government hospitals (USD 19,652). The average charge-to-cost ratio was 3:1 for government hospitals, 3.5:1 for not-for-profit hospitals, and 5.9:1 for for-profit hospitals. In conclusion, there exist significant disparities in HF hospitalization outcomes between hospital

  1. Market structure and hospital-insurer bargaining in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Halbersma, R S; Mikkers, M C; Motchenkova, E; Seinen, I

    2011-12-01

    In 2005, competition was introduced in part of the hospital market in the Netherlands. Using a unique dataset of transactions and list prices between hospitals and insurers in the years 2005 and 2006, we estimate the influence of buyer and seller concentration on the negotiated prices. First, we use a traditional structure-conduct-performance model (SCP-model) along the lines of Melnick et al. (J Health Econ 11(3): 217-233, 1992) to estimate the effects of buyer and seller concentration on price-cost margins. Second, we model the interaction between hospitals and insurers in the context of a generalized bargaining model similar to Brooks et al. (J Health Econ 16: 417-434, 1997). In the SCP-model, we find that the market shares of hospitals (insurers) have a significantly positive (negative) impact on the hospital price-cost margin. In the bargaining model, we find a significant negative effect of insurer concentration, but no significant effect of hospital concentration. In both models, we find a significant impact of idiosyncratic effects on the market outcomes. This is consistent with the fact that the Dutch hospital sector is not yet in a long-run equilibrium.

  2. 3. Hospital Point, general view toward Portsmouth Naval Hospital Building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Hospital Point, general view toward Portsmouth Naval Hospital Building showing cannon (at left) and Saunders Monument (at right in distance), view to southwest - Portsmouth Naval Hospital, Bounded by Elizabeth River, Crawford Street, Portsmouth General Hospital, Parkview Avenue, & Scotts Creek, Portsmouth, Portsmouth, VA

  3. Hospitals look to hospitality service firms to meet TQM goals.

    PubMed

    Hard, R

    1992-05-20

    Hospitals that hire contract service firms to manage one or all aspects of their hospitality service departments increasingly expect those firms to help meet total quality management goals as well as offer the more traditional cost reduction, quality improvement and specialized expertise, finds the 1992 Hospital Contract Services Survey conducted by Hospitals.

  4. The impact of hospital discharge on inappropriate hospital stay.

    PubMed

    Panis, Lambert J G G; Verheggen, Frank W S M; Pop, Peter; Prins, Martin H

    2004-01-01

    Appropriate hospital stay should be effective, efficient and tailored to patient needs. Previous studies have found that on average 20 per cent of hospital stay is inappropriate. Within obstetrics, inappropriate hospital stay consists mostly of delays in hospital discharge. The specific goals of this study were to reduce inappropriate hospital stay by fine-tuning patient logistics, increasing efficiency and providing more comfortable surroundings. New policies using strict discharge criteria were implemented. Total inappropriate hospital stay decreased from 13.3 to 7.2 per cent. The delay in discharge procedures halved. P-charts showed a decrease in inappropriate hospital stay, indicating the current process to be stable. Concludes that a significant reduction in inappropriate hospital stay was found following the implementation of innovative hospital discharge policies, indicating greater efficiency and accessibility of hospital services.

  5. Al Shanker Remembers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Educator, 2000

    2000-01-01

    In a 1996 interview shortly before his death, Al Shanker, longtime president of the American Federation of Teachers, discussed such topics as: his own educational experiences; how he learned about political fighting in the Boy Scouts; the appeal of socialism; multinational corporations and the nation state; teaching tough students; and John Dewey…

  6. Fosetyl-al

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) Chemical Assessment Summary U.S . Environmental Protection Agency National Center for Environmental Assessment This IRIS Summary has been removed from the IRIS database and is available for historical reference purposes . ( July 2016 ) Fosetyl - al ; CASRN

  7. Proton irradiation studies on Al and Al5083 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, P.; Gayathri, N.; Bhattacharya, M.; Gupta, A. Dutta; Sarkar, Apu; Dhar, S.; Mitra, M. K.; Mukherjee, P.

    2017-10-01

    The change in the microstructural parameters and microhardness values in 6.5 MeV proton irradiated pure Al and Al5083 alloy samples have been evaluated using different model based techniques of X-ray diffraction Line Profile Analysis (XRD) and microindendation techniques. The detailed line profile analysis of the XRD data showed that the domain size increases and saturates with irradiation dose both in the case of Al and Al5083 alloy. The corresponding microstrain values did not show any change with irradiation dose in the case of the pure Al but showed an increase at higher irradiation doses in the case of Al5083 alloy. The microindendation results showed that unirradiated Al5083 alloy has higher hardness value compared to that of unirradiated pure Al. The hardness increased marginally with irradiation dose in the case of Al5083, whereas for pure Al, there was no significant change with dose.

  8. Al Sumelat Water Network. Village of Al Sumelat, Iraq

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-15

    OFFICE OF THE SPECIAL INSPECTOR GENERAL FOR IRAQ RECONSTRUCTION AL SUMELAT WATER NETWORK VILLAGE OF AL SUMELAT, IRAQ...Sumelat Water Network Village of Al Sumelat, Iraq 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e...Al Sumelat Water Network Village of Al Sumelat, Iraq Synopsis Introduction. This report was previously provided on a limited distribution basis

  9. [Marianne in hospital].

    PubMed

    Weium, Frode

    2003-12-23

    In 1948 Norwegian architect and author Odd Brochmann (1909-92) published his popular children's book Marianne in hospital (Marianne på sykehus). Two years later the book was filmed on the initiative of the Ministry of Social Affairs. This article considers the question of what were the purposes of the film. Officially, it was presented as an attempt to teach children not to be afraid of hospitals. However, in internal notes and letters the health authorities stressed that the film should be an educational film about the social benefits and health services of the welfare state. Furthermore, I will argue that the film was the result of a wish to present the nation's modern hospital care and, by way of conclusion, discuss the characterisation of the film as educational.

  10. [Stress management in hospitals].

    PubMed

    Miki, Akiko

    2002-11-01

    Job stress in employees in hospitals has been recognized as a key issue in the workplace. In this paper, characteristics of job stress in the medical profession, especially in doctors and nurses, and the effectiveness of stress management are overviewed. The important points in stress management in hospitals are summarized as follows: 1) improvement of work environment, 2) assurance of participation and autonomy, 3) education or training to reduce job stress (ex. coping behavior, self-care, relaxation), 4) career development, 5) total support among medical professions. Some reports have demonstrated that the establishment of constant meetings is an effective method of reducing job stress and improving mental health in the medical profession, but few prospective intervention studies have been carried out. Further research is necessary to evaluate the effectiveness of stress reduction and to develop effective intervention programs for medical professions in hospitals.

  11. [Decrease in hospitalizations due to polyvalent medical day hospital].

    PubMed

    Escobar, M A; García-Egido, A A; Carmona, R; Lucas, A; Márquez, C; Gómez, F

    2012-02-01

    The day hospital is an alternative to hospitalization. This alternative improves accessibility and comfort of the patients, and avoids hospitalizations. Nevertheless, the efficacy of the polyvalent medical day hospital in avoiding hospitalizations has not been evaluated. To analyze hospital stays avoided by the polyvalent medical day hospital of a university hospital of the Andalusian Health Service. An observational prospective study of the patients studied and/or treated in the polyvalent medical day hospital of the Hospital Universitario Puerto Real over a one year period. A total of 9640 patients were attended to, with 1413 procedures and 4921 i.v. treatments. There were 3182 visits to the priority consultation of the polyvalent medical day hospital. The most frequent consultation complaints were constitutional symptoms (15.9%) and anemia (14.5%). After the first visit, 21.5% of the patients were discharged and fewer than 3% were hospitalized. Hospitalization was avoided in 16.8% of the patients, there being a 6.0% decrease in the need for hospital beds (5.0% reduction in the internal medicine unit). Inadequate hospitalizations and 30-day readmissions decreased 93.3% and 4.2%, respectively. The most frequent diagnosis was neoplasm (26.0%), and most of the beds freed up were generated by patients diagnosed of neoplasm (26.7%). With this type of polyvalent medical day hospital, we have observed improved efficiency of health care, freeing up hospital beds by reducing hospitalizations, inadequate hospitalizations and re-admissions in the medical units involved. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  12. The association between ambulance hospital turnaround times and patient acuity, destination hospital, and time of day.

    PubMed

    Vandeventer, Steve; Studnek, Jonathan R; Garrett, John S; Ward, Steven R; Staley, Kevin; Blackwell, Tom

    2011-01-01

    The availability of ambulances to respond to emergency calls is related to their ability to return to service from the hospital. Extended hospital turnaround times decrease the number of available unit hours ambulances are deployed, which in turn can increase coverage costs or sacrifice coverage. To determine whether ambulance turnaround times were associated with patient acuity, destination hospital, and time of day. This retrospective analysis of ambulance hospital turnaround times utilized 12 months of data from a single, countywide, metropolitan emergency medical services (EMS) service. Turnaround time was defined as the interval between the time of ambulance arrival at the hospital and the time the ambulance became available to respond to another call. Independent variables included patient acuity (low [BLS nonemergency transport], medium [ALS care and nonemergency transport], and high [ALS care and emergency transport]), destination hospital (seven regional hospitals), and time of day (one-hour intervals). Data analysis consisted of descriptive statistics, t-tests, and linear regression. Of the 61,094 patient transports, the mean turnaround time was 35.6 minutes (standard deviation [SD] = 16.5). Turnaround time was significantly associated with patient acuity (p < 0.001). High-acuity calls had a mean turnaround time of 52.5 minutes (SD = 21.5), whereas moderate-acuity and low-acuity calls had mean turnaround times of 42.0 minutes (SD = 16.4) and 32.5 minutes (SD = 14.4), respectively. A statistically significant relationship between destination hospital and turnaround time was found, with the differences in means ranging from 30 seconds to 8 minutes. Similarly, time of day was associated with turnaround time, with the longest turnaround times occurring between 0600 and 1500 hours. This study demonstrated that patient acuity, destination hospital, and time of day were associated with variation in ambulance turnaround times. Research describing other system

  13. [Standardization of hospital feeding].

    PubMed

    Caracuel García, Ángel Manuel

    2015-05-07

    Normalization can be understood as the establishing measures against repetitive situations through the development, dissemination, and application of technical design documents called standards. In Andalusia there are 45 public hospitals with 14,606 beds, and in which 11,700 full pensions / day are served. The Working Group on Hospital Food Standardization of the Andalusian Society for Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics, started in 2010, working on the certification of suppliers, product specifications, and meals technical card. - Develop a specific tool to help improving food safety through the certification of their suppliers. - Develop a standardized technical specifications of foodstuffs necessary for the development of menus established codes diets Andalusian hospitals document. - Develop a catalog of data sheets plates of hospital meals, to homogenize menus, respecting local and unifying criteria for qualitative and quantitative ingredients. - Providing documentation and studying of several public hospitals in Andalusia: • Product specifications and certification of suppliers. • International standards certification and distribution companies. • Legislation. • Data sheets for the menu items. • Specifications of different product procurement procedures. - Development of the draft standard HOSPIFOOD®, and approval of the version “0.0”. - Training course for auditors to this standard. - Development of a raw materials catalog as technical cards. - Meals Technical cards review and election of the ones which will be part of the document. After nearly three years of work, we have achieved the following products: - Standardized database of technical specifications for the production of food dietary codes for: fish, seafood, meat and meat products, meats and pates, ready meals, bread and pastries, preserves, milk and dairy products, oils, cereals, legumes , vegetables, fruits, fresh and frozen vegetables, condiments and spices. - Standardized database of

  14. Tiered hospital networks.

    PubMed

    Yegian, Jill M

    2003-01-01

    As a result of rising health care costs, health plans are experimenting with insurance products that shift greater financial responsibility for medical care to consumers and create incentives for consumers to consider cost differences when choosing among providers. Based on an October 2002 roundtable discussion, this paper discusses insurance product trends, particularly tiered hospital networks. Issues addressed include these product features' potential to reduce system costs, the effect on the hospital-health plan relationship, consumers' ability to consider cost and quality in decision making, and financial barriers to care for the chronically ill.

  15. Marketing the hospital library.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Jane

    2005-01-01

    Many librarians do not see themselves as marketers, but marketing is an essential role for hospital librarians. Library work involves education, and there are parallels between marketing and education as described in this article. It is incumbent upon hospital librarians actively to pursue ways of reminding their customers about library services. This article reinforces the idea that marketing is an element in many of the things that librarians already do, and includes a list of suggested marketing strategies intended to remind administrators, physicians, and other customers that they have libraries in their organizations.

  16. Telecommunications and the hospital.

    PubMed

    Tobias, T; Levine, J

    1986-04-01

    Telecommunications is a rapidly changing industry which currently offers the hospital administrator an opportunity to cut costs in the short run while providing for future needs. Like any important resource, this technology must be managed by skilled personnel who can recommend solutions consistent with the hospital's business philosophy and strategic plan. Three specific actions were recommended: first, consider modernizing your PBX; second, train an inhouse person or hire a telecommunications analyst to conduct the review of available systems and options and to supervise installation and operation; and third, when replacing computer systems and PBXs, develop a plan which will provide for current needs and future growth.

  17. Toward healthier hospitals.

    PubMed

    Mintzberg, H

    1997-01-01

    This article builds around a framework of cure, care, control, and community, with collaboration at the center, to consider 12 issues common to many hospitals. These include, among others, the fragmentation of efforts, confusion in mission (and in mission statements), the problems of bundling research with clinical work, selectivity in informing board members, the dangers of professional management, and the difficulties of combining external advocacy with internal reconciliation in the senior manager's job. The article concludes that hospitals could better learn how to solve systemic problems systemically, and that to do so will require not the wish lists of strategic planning and structural reorganizing, but tangible changes in their collective behavior.

  18. Seamless Care: Safe Patient Transitions From Hospital to Home

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    ON L3R 6G9, Canada. http://www.qsr.com.au/index.htm. (Accessed April 18, 2004). 38. Waite K, Oddone E, Weinberger M, et al. Lack of association...2877–85. 46. Weinberger M, Oddone EZ, Henderson WG. Does increased access to primary care reduce hospital readmissions? NEJM 1996;334(22):1441–7. 47

  19. ALS insertion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyer, E.; Chin, J.; Halbach, K.; Hassenzahl, W. V.; Humphries, D.; Kincaid, B.; Lancaster, H.; Plate, D.

    1991-08-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), the first US third generation synchrotron radiation source, is currently under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The low-emittance, 1.5 GeV electron storage ring and the insertion devices are specifically designed to produce high brightness beams in the UV to soft X-Ray range. The planned initial complement of insertion devices includes four 4.6 m long undulators, with period lengths of 3.9 cm, 5.0 cm (2) and 8.0 cm, and a 2.9 m long wiggler of 16 cm period length. Undulator design is well advanced and fabrication has begun on the 5.0 cm and 8.0 cm period length undulators. This paper discusses ALS insertion device requirements; general design philosophy; and design of the magnetic structure, support structure/drive systems, control system and vacuum system.

  20. Hospital Prices Increase in California, Especially Among Hospitals in the Largest Multi-hospital Systems.

    PubMed

    Melnick, Glenn A; Fonkych, Katya

    2016-01-01

    A surge in hospital consolidation is fueling formation of ever larger multi-hospital systems throughout the United States. This article examines hospital prices in California over time with a focus on hospitals in the largest multi-hospital systems. Our data show that hospital prices in California grew substantially (+76% per hospital admission) across all hospitals and all services between 2004 and 2013 and that prices at hospitals that are members of the largest, multi-hospital systems grew substantially more (113%) than prices paid to all other California hospitals (70%). Prices were similar in both groups at the start of the period (approximately $9200 per admission). By the end of the period, prices at hospitals in the largest systems exceeded prices at other California hospitals by almost $4000 per patient admission. Our study findings are potentially useful to policy makers across the country for several reasons. Our data measure actual prices for a large sample of hospitals over a long period of time in California. California experienced its wave of consolidation much earlier than the rest of the country and as such our findings may provide some insights into what may happen across the United States from hospital consolidation including growth of large, multi-hospital systems now forming in the rest of the rest of the country. © The Author(s) 2016.

  1. Cost characteristics of hospitals.

    PubMed

    Smet, Mike

    2002-09-01

    Modern hospitals are complex multi-product organisations. The analysis of a hospital's production and/or cost structure should therefore use the appropriate techniques. Flexible functional forms based on the neo-classical theory of the firm seem to be most suitable. Using neo-classical cost functions implicitly assumes minimisation of (variable) costs given that input prices and outputs are exogenous. Local and global properties of flexible functional forms and short-run versus long-run equilibrium are further issues that require thorough investigation. In order to put the results based on econometric estimations of cost functions in the right perspective, it is important to keep these considerations in mind when using flexible functional forms. The more recent studies seem to agree that hospitals generally do not operate in their long-run equilibrium (they tend to over-invest in capital (capacity and equipment)) and that it is therefore appropriate to estimate a short-run variable cost function. However, few studies explicitly take into account the implicit assumptions and restrictions embedded in the models they use. An alternative method to explain differences in costs uses management accounting techniques to identify the cost drivers of overhead costs. Related issues such as cost-shifting and cost-adjusting behaviour of hospitals and the influence of market structure on competition, prices and costs are also discussed shortly.

  2. Hospital restructuring and burnout.

    PubMed

    Greenglass, Esther R; Burke, Ronald J

    2002-01-01

    Increasingly, organizations are experiencing changes as a result of extensive downsizing, restructuring, and merging. In Canada, government-sponsored medicine has been affected as hospitals have merged or closed, reducing essential medical services and resulting in extensive job loss for hospital workers, particularly nurses. Hospital restructuring has also resulted in greater stress and job insecurity in nurses. The escalation of stressors has created burnout in nurses. This study examines predictors of burnout in nurses experiencing hospital restructuring using the MBI-General Survey which yields scores on three scales: Emotional exhaustion, Cynicism, and Professional efficacy. Multiple regressions were conducted where each burnout scale was the criterion and stressors (e.g., amount of work, use of generic workers to do nurses' work), restructuring effects, social support, and individual resources (e.g., control coping, self-efficacy, prior organizational commitment) were predictors. There were differences in the amount of variance accounted for in the burnout components by stressors and resources. Stressors contributed most to emotional exhaustion and least to professional efficacy. Individual resources were more likely to contribute to professional efficacy and least to emotional exhaustion. Stressors and resources accounted for approximately equal amounts of variance in cynicism. Three conclusions were drawn. First, present findings parallel others by showing that individual coping patterns contribute to professional efficacy. Second, emotional exhaustion was found to be the prototype of stress. Third, prior organizational commitment, self-efficacy, and control coping resulted in lower burnout.

  3. Innovations in Hospitality Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dzhandzhugazova, Elena A.; Blinova, Ekaterina A.; Orlova, Liubov N.; Romanova, Marianna M.

    2016-01-01

    The article focuses on the study of the role and importance of innovation, its classification, the problems of its application in the hotel industry with emphasis on the application of sensory marketing tools in the development of the innovative marketing mix within the hospitality industry. The article provides an analysis of the "seven…

  4. In-hospital resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Mason, Christine

    2016-09-21

    What was the nature of the CPD activity, practice-related feedback and/or event and/or experience in your practice? The CPD article outlined the response sequence required for cardiac arrest in an in-hospital environment and discussed effective cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and defibrillation.

  5. Hospital perceived value.

    PubMed

    Moliner, Miguel A

    2006-01-01

    The creation, distribution and communication of value have been considered to be the key element of marketing (American Marketing Association, 2004, www.marketingpower.com). The aim of this article is to identify the indicators of perceived value in a hospital context. The results show that perceived quality and emotions are key dimensions of perceived value.

  6. Responsible Hospitality. Prevention Updates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colthurst, Tom

    2004-01-01

    Responsible Hospitality (RH)--also called Responsible Beverage Service (RBS)--encompasses a variety of strategies for reducing risks associated with the sale and service of alcoholic beverages. RH programs have three goals: (1) to prevent illegal alcohol service to minors; (2) to reduce the likelihood of drinkers becoming intoxicated; and (3) to…

  7. Speech intelligibility in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Ryherd, Erica E; Moeller, Michael; Hsu, Timothy

    2013-07-01

    Effective communication between staff members is key to patient safety in hospitals. A variety of patient care activities including admittance, evaluation, and treatment rely on oral communication. Surprisingly, published information on speech intelligibility in hospitals is extremely limited. In this study, speech intelligibility measurements and occupant evaluations were conducted in 20 units of five different U.S. hospitals. A variety of unit types and locations were studied. Results show that overall, no unit had "good" intelligibility based on the speech intelligibility index (SII > 0.75) and several locations found to have "poor" intelligibility (SII < 0.45). Further, occupied spaces were found to have 10%-15% lower SII than unoccupied spaces on average. Additionally, staff perception of communication problems at nurse stations was significantly correlated with SII ratings. In a targeted second phase, a unit treated with sound absorption had higher SII ratings for a larger percentage of time as compared to an identical untreated unit. Taken as a whole, the study provides an extensive baseline evaluation of speech intelligibility across a variety of hospitals and unit types, offers some evidence of the positive impact of absorption on intelligibility, and identifies areas for future research.

  8. Toilet privacy in hospital.

    PubMed

    Logan, Karen

    Good practice in toilet management and continence promotion can help hospital patients to maintain their dignity. This article reports on an audit that highlighted the issues important to patients and nurses in terms of improving privacy and dignity for inpatients using the toilet.

  9. Drama Therapies in Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Judith; Prosperi, Mario

    1976-01-01

    Explores the use of drama as a therapeutic tool at various hospitals and records specific therapy groups dialogues. Available from: The Drama Review, 51 West 4th Street, Room 300, New York, N.Y. 10012. Subscription Rates: $12.50 per year. (MH)

  10. Dying in hospital.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lynne

    2016-06-22

    While surveys consistently show that about two thirds of people want to die at home, more than half of all deaths happen in hospitals. And in their last days, many people are cared for by generalist nursing staff who may be reticent, or even afraid, to talk about what is happening.

  11. Reengineering hospital materiel management.

    PubMed

    Giunipero, L C

    1995-08-01

    Reengineering involves significant change and dramatic rethinking of the business process. The expected result of these changed processes is dramatic improvement. Hospital cost pressures and technological change necessitate review or reengineering the process to enhance customer service at a lower cost. Three areas that yield significant results include reducing the cost of purchasing, implementing new technologies, and empowering teams to accomplish customer driven goals.

  12. Mechanical engineering in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Wallington, J W

    1980-10-01

    The design of a modern hospital owes more to engineering than the layman may realize. In this context, many engineers are in the position of laymen, being unfamiliar with the multitude of services that lies behind the impressive facade of a modern hospital. In recent years medicine and surgery themselves have taken on many of the characteristics of a technology. This has required a matching development of the services both mechanical and electrical that are required in modern health care buildings. In medical terms, if the architectural features provide the 'skin' of the hospital, the mechanical and electrical engineering services provide the nerves and sinews. If we take as an example the recently completed Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne, (Fig. 1), which cost 10 million pounds at current cost, the service network was responsible for about half the total cost. About 400 miles (643 km) of electrical wiring and more than 40 mile (64.5 km) of copper and steel piping were used to service 3000 separate rooms. This compares with percentages of between 18 and 25 per cent for other large buildings such as office blocks, hotels and sports complexes.

  13. Measuring hospital input price increases: The rebased hospital market basket

    PubMed Central

    Freeland, Mark S.; Chulis, George S.; Brown, Aaron P.; Skellan, David; Maple, Brenda T.; Singer, Naphtale; Lemieux, Jeffrey; Arnett, Ross H.

    1991-01-01

    The input prices indexes used in part to set payment rates for Medicare inpatient hospital services in both prospective payment system (PPS) and PPS-excluded hospitals were rebased from 1982 to 1987 beginning with payments for fiscal year 1991. In this article, the issues and evidence used to determine the composition of the revised hospital input price indexes are discussed. One issue is the need for a separate market basket for PPS-excluded hospitals. Also, the payment implications of using hospital-industry versus economywide measures of wage rates as price proxies for the growth in hospital wage rates are addressed. PMID:10113610

  14. [Leadership in the hospital].

    PubMed

    Schrappe, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    Current concepts in leadership and governance on the level of supervisory board, management and departments are often considered as insufficient to cope with the profound structural change which actually takes place in the German health care system. While vertical and horizontal disconnecting is typical of the professional bureaucracy of hospitals, transition from functional to divisional structure further increases this risk. Accordingly, medical experts are oriented towards their professional peers and patient care on the one side; on the other side the management gets isolated and looses operative and strategic control. Several studies provide evidence for the relevance of role models to serve as agents of change, which are now developed into the concept of "Clinical Governance": evidence-based medicine, guidelines, continuous quality improvement, safety culture, resource accountability and organisational learning. The present situation makes it necessary to extend this conception, which focuses on the departmental level in an organisation with divisional features, to one of "Clinical Corporate Governance". This term, which also includes supervisory structures and the management board and is relevant for the total hospital and company, respectively, is based on the corporate governance concept. Inside the hospital, the management and the heads of the departments have to agree that (1) experts really need to be integrated into the decision process, and that (2) the outcomes of the entire hospital have to be regarded as equal or superior to the aims of a single department. The public image of the hospital should be one of a strong and reliable partner in health care and health care business on a local, regional and national level. Members of the supervisory board should clearly put corporate aspects above political and other implications and pay attention to personal independence from the leaders of the medical departments.

  15. The frontline hospital.

    PubMed

    Mein, P

    1983-01-01

    This brief description of the planning process for a frontline hospital is intended as a guide only: there will be a variety of approaches depending on local conditions. However, certain of the principles raised have universal relevance for the construction of health facilities where resources are limited. In brief, these: - The changing role of the frontline hospital should not be allowed to obscure the fact that the small hospital still has a significant role to play and that future, as yet undefined, functional changes will take place necessitating generalized designs that can accommodate those changes. - The erection of new buildings is not always the appropriate solution to apparent problems with facilities. Often a more relevant course is to adapt existing buildings or to provide community-level primary health care services not based on facilities. - The development of standardized, though flexible, briefs for hospitals of different sizes is essential, since ther will, for some years to come, be a shortage of the professional manpower needed to enable completely individual designs to be produced for each facility. Standardized briefs are infinitely preferable to standard or type plans, which tend to be inflexible and lead to overbuilding. - Local involvement in the planning process is essential, not only because it provides useful knowledge but primarily because local commitment is the only way of avoiding the construction of inappropriate facilities. - Architectural expertise must be available within the health system, since very often outside consultants are unable or unwilling, because of the system of payment, to design suitable hospital buildings. - The type of construction used should be the simplest and most economical that will provide an effective environment for the health tasks to be carried out so that the limited resources available can be stretched to serve as many people as possible. - Local building materials should always be preferred- to

  16. Improving Hospital Discharge Time

    PubMed Central

    El-Eid, Ghada R.; Kaddoum, Roland; Tamim, Hani; Hitti, Eveline A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Delays in discharging patients can impact hospital and emergency department (ED) throughput. The discharge process is complex and involves setting specific challenges that limit generalizability of solutions. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of using Six Sigma methods to improve the patient discharge process. This is a quantitative pre and post-intervention study. Three hundred and eighty-six bed tertiary care hospital. A series of Six Sigma driven interventions over a 10-month period. The primary outcome was discharge time (time from discharge order to patient leaving the room). Secondary outcome measures included percent of patients whose discharge order was written before noon, percent of patients leaving the room by noon, hospital length of stay (LOS), and LOS of admitted ED patients. Discharge time decreased by 22.7% from 2.2 hours during the preintervention period to 1.7 hours post-intervention (P < 0.001). A greater proportion of patients left their room before noon in the postintervention period (P < 0.001), though there was no statistical difference in before noon discharge. Hospital LOS dropped from 3.4 to 3.1 days postintervention (P < 0.001). ED mean LOS of patients admitted to the hospital was significantly lower in the postintervention period (6.9 ± 7.8 vs 5.9 ± 7.7 hours; P < 0.001). Six Sigma methodology can be an effective change management tool to improve discharge time. The focus of institutions aspiring to tackle delays in the discharge process should be on adopting the core principles of Six Sigma rather than specific interventions that may be institution-specific. PMID:25816029

  17. [The founding of Zemun Hospital].

    PubMed

    Milanović, Jasmina; Milenković, Sanja; Pavlović, Momcilo; Stojanović, Dragos

    2014-01-01

    This year Zemun Hospital--Clinical Hospital Center Zemun celebrates 230th anniversary of continuous work, thus becoming the oldest medical facility in Serbia.The exact date of the hospital founding has been often questioned in history. Various dates appeared in the literature, but the most frequent one was 25th of February 1784. Until now, the document which confirms this has never been published. This article represents the first official publication of the document which confirms that Zemun Hospital was indeed founded on this date. The first hospitals started emerging in Zemun when the town became a part of the Habsburg Monarchy. The first sanitary facility ever formed was the"Kontumac"--a quarantine established in 1730. Soon after, two more confessional hospitals were opened.The Serbian (Orthodox) Hospital was founded before 1769, whereas the German (Catholic) Hospital started working in 1758. Both hospitals were financed, amongst others, by the Town Hall--the Magistrate. In order to improve efficiency of these hospitals, a decision was made to merge them into a single City Hospital. It was founded on 25th February 1784, when the General Command ordered the Magistrate of Zemun to merge the financess of all existing hospitals and initiate the construction of a new building. Although financially united, the hospitals continued working in separate buildings over a certain period of time.The final, physical merging of these hospitals was completed in 1795.

  18. Hospital malnutrition: a 33-hospital screening study.

    PubMed

    Kamath, S K; Lawler, M; Smith, A E; Kalat, T; Olson, R

    1986-02-01

    A collaborative study involving nutrition screening of 3,047 patients (excluding 125 pregnant women) at admission to 33 hospitals in and around the greater Chicago area was carried out to identify patients at nutritional risk. Information on sex, age, admitting diagnosis, serum albumin, hemoglobin, total lymphocyte count, and height and weight was collected from the medical chart within 48 hours of admission. Nutrition screening could not be completed for a larger number of patients (60%) because data at admission were not available. Of the remaining 40% of patients, more than 50% had below normal values for one or more of the variables studied: serum albumin, hemoglobin, and total lymphocyte count. A large number of the patients (40%) also were considered at nutritional risk as judged by the criteria of weight/height (measured only). Early nutrition intervention for high-risk patients cannot be implemented, nor can the efficacy of nutrition services be evaluated, unless nutrition screening is carried out on patients at admission.

  19. The politics of hospital payment.

    PubMed

    Feder, J; Spitz, B

    1979-01-01

    This paper analyzes the politics of hospital payment over the last decade. The authors explain how provider interests and judgments became a standard for appropriate hospital payment: the impact of that standard on hospital costs; and the political obstacles to imposing an alternative standard and controlling hospital costs. The authors draw lessons from this experience, here and in other countries, to propose an alternative approach to hospital payment that would allow policymakers, accountable to the public, to make explicit choices about the level and nature of hospital expenditures.

  20. How consumers view hospital advertising.

    PubMed

    Johns, H E; Moser, H R

    1988-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine: (a) consumers' attitudes toward advertising by hospitals; (b) which media consumers feel are appropriate for hospital advertising; and (c) whether consumers are seeing hospital advertisements, and if so, through which media. It was found that consumers indeed have a favorable attitude toward hospitals that advertise. It was also found that consumers feel that most media are appropriate for hospital advertising. Finally, it was found that most consumers have seen hospitals advertise their services, especially on television and radio and in the newspaper.

  1. [Hospital clinical ethics committees].

    PubMed

    Gómez Velásquez, Luis; Gómez Espinosa, Luis Néstor

    2007-01-01

    The scientific and technological advances have been surprising, more in the two last decades, but they don't go united with to the ethical values of the medical professional practice, it has been totally escaped, specially when the biological subsistence, the maintenance of the life through apparatuses and the mechanisms that prolong the existence are who undergoes an alteration that until recently time was mortal shortly lapse. It is common listening that exist a crisis in the medical profession, but what really is it of human values, which as soon and taken into nowadays, actually professional account, which gives rise to a dehumanization towards the life, the health, the disease, the suffering and the death. The ideal of the doctor to give to service to the man in its life and health, as well to be conscious that the last biological process that must fulfill is the death, and when it appears, does not have considered as a actually professional failure. It has protect to the patient as the extreme cruelty therapeutic, that it has right a worthy death. It's taking to the birth of the hospital ethics committees, they have like function to analyze, to advise and to think about the ethical dilemmas that appear actually clinical or in the biomedical investigation. In 1982 in the UEA only 1% of its hospitals had a ethics committees; by 1988, it was 67% and the 100% in 2000. In Mexico the process of the formation by these committees begins, only in the Military Central Hospital, to count the ethics committee on 1983, also the Hospital no. 14 of the IMSS in Guadalajara, it works with regularity from 1995, with internal teaching of bioethic. The Secretariat of Health has asked the formation of the bioethical committees in each hospital, and order the it was be coordinated by the National Committee of Bioética. The integration of these committees is indispensable that their members have the knowledge necessary of bioética. The Mexican Society of Ortopedia, conscious of

  2. Hospital Library Development. Hospital Library Handbooks No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Anne

    Addressed to the administrator of the hospital as well as the librarian, this handbook covers aspects of library service policy and long-range planning. While hospitals of all sizes are discussed, a special effort is made to cover problems of small hospitals (17 to 100 beds) in sparsely-settled regions. Contents: The library as a clinical service,…

  3. Hospital Preparedness and SARS

    PubMed Central

    Wallington, Tamara; Rutledge, Tim; Mederski, Barbara; Rose, Keith; Kwolek, Sue; McRitchie, Donna; Ali, Azra; Wolff, Bryan; White, Diane; Glassman, Edward; Ofner, Marianna; Low, Don E.; Berger, Lisa; McGeer, Allison; Wong, Tom; Baron, David; Berall, Glenn

    2004-01-01

    On May 23, 2003, Toronto experienced the second phase of a severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak. Ninety cases were confirmed, and >620 potential cases were managed. More than 9,000 persons had contact with confirmed or potential case-patients; many required quarantine. The main hospital involved during the second outbreak was North York General Hospital. We review this hospital’s response to, and management of, this outbreak, including such factors as building preparation and engineering, personnel, departmental workload, policies and documentation, infection control, personal protective equipment, training and education, public health, management and administration, follow-up of SARS patients, and psychological and psychosocial management and research. We also make recommendations for other institutions to prepare for future outbreaks, regardless of their origin. PMID:15200807

  4. Dementia for hospital physicians.

    PubMed

    Harwood, Rowan H

    2012-02-01

    Many people with dementia are admitted to general hospitals, yet doctors feel ill-prepared to manage them. Problems are often multiple and complex. In many cases, dementia is complicated by delirium. Medical assessment must be meticulous and requires collateral history taking, mental state examination and cognitive function testing. Hospital environments can be provocative, and the way staff interact with people with dementia can increase distress. Difficult behaviours usually represent unmet needs. The right approach by (all) staff can reduce this, including special efforts to establish reassuring, comforting relationships with patients. Try to see situations from the perspective of the person with dementia. Skilled communication is vital and family carers should be kept informed and involved. People with dementia are prone to side effects of prescribed drugs. Antipsychotic drugs are rarely the answer to difficult behaviours, but may be used in cases of psychosis or severe distress.

  5. Al Jazirah, Sudan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Al Jazirah (also Gezira) is one of the 26 states of Sudan. The state lies between the Blue Nile and the White Nile in the east-central region of the country. It is a well populated area suitable for agriculture. The area was at the southern end of Nubia and little is known about its ancient history and only limited archaeological work has been conducted in this area. The region has benefited from the Gezira Scheme, a program to foster cotton farming begun in 1925. At that time the Sennar Dam and numerous irrigation canals were built. Al Jazirah became the Sudan's major agricultural region with more than 2.5 million acres (10,000 km) under cultivation. The initial development project was semi-private, but the government nationalized it in 1950. Cotton production increased in the 1970s but by the 1990s increased wheat production has supplanted a third of the land formerly seeded with cotton.

    The image was acquired December 25, 2006, covers an area of 56 x 36.4 km, and is located near 14.5 degrees north latitude, 33.1 degrees east longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  6. Al Jazirah, Sudan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Al Jazirah (also Gezira) is one of the 26 states of Sudan. The state lies between the Blue Nile and the White Nile in the east-central region of the country. It is a well populated area suitable for agriculture. The area was at the southern end of Nubia and little is known about its ancient history and only limited archaeological work has been conducted in this area. The region has benefited from the Gezira Scheme, a program to foster cotton farming begun in 1925. At that time the Sennar Dam and numerous irrigation canals were built. Al Jazirah became the Sudan's major agricultural region with more than 2.5 million acres (10,000 km) under cultivation. The initial development project was semi-private, but the government nationalized it in 1950. Cotton production increased in the 1970s but by the 1990s increased wheat production has supplanted a third of the land formerly seeded with cotton.

    The image was acquired December 25, 2006, covers an area of 56 x 36.4 km, and is located near 14.5 degrees north latitude, 33.1 degrees east longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  7. [Homicide crimes in hospitals].

    PubMed

    Dürwald, W

    1993-02-01

    Report of some cases of willful homicide in hospitals of the former GDR. In no case the patient has wished his death. Besides compassion the cause of the homicide was a large carefully expense and in two cases the attempt to prove the incapability of the competent doctor. The patients were only means to an end. All the cases are discovered by the great number of obscure death.

  8. Children's Hospital visit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-02-04

    NASA senior staff members from John C. Stennis Space Center traveled to Children's Hospital in New Orleans on Feb. 4 for a morning of educational outreach, offering interactive demonstrations and activities for children. Staff members offered cryogenic demonstrations, informative and interactive exhibits and a chance for children to take photos 'wearing' a space suit. Children also had a chance to interact with Stennis' astronaut mascot.

  9. Hospital nurses' work motivation.

    PubMed

    Toode, Kristi; Routasalo, Pirkko; Helminen, Mika; Suominen, Tarja

    2015-06-01

    The knowledge surrounding nurses' work motivation is currently insufficient, and previous studies have rarely taken into account the role of many influential background factors. This study investigates the motivation of Estonian nurses in hospitals, and how individual and organisational background factors influence their motivation to work. The study is quantitative and cross-sectional. An electronically self-reported questionnaire was used for data collection. The sample comprised of 201 Registered Nurses working in various hospital settings in Estonia. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics, two-sample Wilcoxon rank-sum (Mann-Whitney) test, Kruskal-Wallis equality-of-populations rank test and Spearman's correlation. Both extrinsic and intrinsic motivations were noted among hospital nurses. Nurses were moderately externally motivated (M = 3.63, SD = 0.89) and intrinsically strongly motivated (M = 4.98, SD = 1.03). A nurses' age and the duration of service were positively correlated with one particular area of extrinsic work motivation, namely introjected regulation (p < 0.001). Nurses who had professional training over 7 days per year had both a higher extrinsic motivation (p = 0.016) and intrinsic work motivation (p = 0.004). The findings expand current knowledge of nurses' work motivation by describing the amount and orientation of work motivation among hospital nurses and highlighting background factors which should be taken into account in order to sustain and increase their intrinsic work motivation. The instrument used in the study can be an effective tool for nurse managers to determine a nurse's reasons to work and to choose a proper motivational strategy. Further research and testing of the instrument in different countries and in different contexts of nursing is however required. © 2014 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  10. Community Hospital Telehealth Consortium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    project involving the purchase of a neonatal retinal camera . This clinic transmits images from Lake Charles Memorial Hospital to a neonatal...ophthalmologist in New Orleans and assists in diagnosing Retinopathy of prematurity ( ROP ), a potentially blinding eye disorder that primarily affects...weeks). The smaller a baby is at birth, the more likely that baby is to develop ROP . This disorder—which usually develops in both eyes—is one of

  11. AL Amyloidosis and Agent Orange

    MedlinePlus

    ... for survivors' benefits . Research on AL amyloidosis and herbicides The Health and Medicine Division (formally known as ... to the compounds of interest found in the herbicide Agent Orange and AL amyloidosis." VA made a ...

  12. Hospital labs go under microscope.

    PubMed

    Aston, Geri

    2014-05-01

    Financial pressures are hitting hospital clinical labs on both the inpatient and outpatient sides. To control expenses, hospitals are teaming up to buy supplies, centralizing services and improving blood management.

  13. Hospitals report on cancer centers.

    PubMed

    Rees, T

    2001-01-01

    Woman's Hospital, Baton Rouge, La., is first-place winner among cancer centers. Holy Cross Hospital's Michael and Dianne Bienes Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., is named second; and, Cardinal Health System's Ball Cancer Center, Muncie, Ind., third.

  14. [Day Hospital: history and conceptualization].

    PubMed

    Stagnaro, Juan C

    2012-01-01

    The appearance of Day Hospitals operated as a model to inspire the different ways of partial time psychiatric care (night hospitals, weekend hospitals, long hour activities in hospitalization services or general hospitals, etc.) and came to complement or replace complete hospitalization in classic psychiatric hospitals. This article presents the history and origins of Day Hospitals and their initial propagation in different countries, and especially in Argentina. Social and political conditions that set their emergence as a therapeutic resource in psychiatry, their models of functioning and variants of application according to the diagnoses of patients admitted, age groups, etc., the theories put into play to report their effects, several studies and technical results, and ideological views related to mental disorders and their treatment in the society are also being studied.

  15. Current problems in national hospitals of Phnom Penh: finance and health care.

    PubMed

    Uy, Sophoat; Akashi, Hidechika; Taki, Kazumi; Ito, Katsuki

    2007-01-01

    The current problems in Cambodia's national hospitals subsist in a geographic imbalance in the location of staff and health facilities, and low staff motivation largely due to inadequate payment. This paper aims to investigate the associations among hospital performance, hospital finances, and other related issues in five national hospitals in Phnom Penh, using annual reports of the five hospitals and annual statistics of the Ministry of Health, from 2000 to 2004. The bed occupancy rates (BOR), average lengths of stay (ALS), hospital mortality rates (HMR), maternal and neonatal mortality rates, numbers of patients, main health problems of inpatients, numbers of health personnel, staff incentives, and annual hospital income were used in this study as indicators of five hospitals in Phnom Penh city. The ALS varied from 3.8 to 9 days. The numbers of health personnel (physician, medical assistant, secondary nurses, primary nurses, secondary midwives, and primary midwives) per 100 beds were from 114 to 282. Supplemental salary per staff also differed greatly among these hospitals; the salaries were the highest at Calmette hospital (US$ 212.8) and the lowest at Preah Kossamak (US$ 12.4). In the five hospitals, the average BOR was 58.8%, and the mean of total annual income was US$ 1,427,852 per year. Although not significant, there was a tendency for higher supplemental salaries to be associated with higher BOR (Spearman rank correlation coefficient 0.70, p = 0.188). This study showed the differences in the hospital indicators among five national hospitals in Phnom Penh city, and the tendency of higher BOR in the hospitals paying higher supplemental salaries to the staff. Higher supplemental salary to the staff seemed to contribute the better hospital performance.

  16. Al Qaeda as a System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-15

    either as welcome guests or parasites . As welcome guests, Al Qaeda members take sanctuary in sponsor states. Sponsor states provide Al Qaeda with...sponsorship, Al Qaeda takes sanctuary as parasites either overtly or covertly. They take overt sanctuary in countries that publicly claim a policy...39 Yehudit Barsky, “Al Qa’ida, Iran, and Hezbollah: A Continuing Symbiosis ,” The American Jewish Committee Series on Terrorism , February 2004, 2-3

  17. Hospital clowning: a paediatrician's view.

    PubMed

    van Venrooij, Lennard T; Barnhoorn, Pieter C

    2017-02-01

    This study investigates the current position of hospital clowns from the perspective of paediatricians and paediatric residents. A total of 14 attending paediatricians and paediatric residents participated in two focus group sessions. Data were analysed using Atlas.ti 5.0. In general, physicians reported positive experiences regarding the interaction between hospital clowns and paediatric patients on the ward. Physicians were more interested in research on children's perception of hospital clowns than in research on the clinical efficacy of hospital clowning. No direct collaboration between physicians and hospital clowns was reported. However, physicians proposed conditions which may streamline their encounters with hospital clowns such as clear communication prior to hospital clown visits, and the condition that visits do not impede medical interventions. Overall, paediatricians and paediatric residents view the positive impact on paediatric patients as the most important aspect of hospital clown visits, rather than the clinical efficacy of hospital clowning. In light of the growing number of hospital clowns worldwide, this article provides recommendations for arranging their encounters with paediatricians and paediatric residents to maintain optimal health care. What is known: • Previous studies show a clinically significant pain- and anxiety-reducing effect of hospital clowning in paediatric patients admitted to hospitals or undergoing (invasive) medical procedures. • In general, paediatricians have positive ideas about hospital clowns, aside from personal prejudices. What is new: • This novel study gives deeper insight into day-to-day interaction between paediatricians and hospital clowns on the ward. • This study provides recommendations for clinical practice to arrange encounters between physicians and hospital clowns during hospital clown visits.

  18. The practice of hospital epidemiology.

    PubMed Central

    Hierholzer, W. J.

    1982-01-01

    The practice and methodology of hospital epidemiology in infection control have begun to mature. At the same time, there is need for an institutionally based clinical epidemiologist to assist in several other mandatory patient care-related programs in the hospital. Hospital epidemiology programs should recognize this need, the parallels in other programs, and the unique opportunity to bring to hospital in-service, teaching, and research, epidemiologic methodology as a natural extension of its present role. PMID:7180022

  19. Al(+)-ligand binding energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sodupe, M.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Ab initio calculations are used to optimize the structure and determine the binding energies of Al(+) to a series of ligands. For Al(+)-CN, the bonding was found to have a large covalent component. For the remaining ligands, the bonding is shown to be electrostatic in origin. The results obtained for Al(+) are compared with those previously reported for Mg(+).

  20. Relationships between in-hospital and 30-day standardized hospital mortality: implications for profiling hospitals.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, G. E.; Baker, D. W.; Norris, D. G.; Way, L. E.; Harper, D. L.; Snow, R. J.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the relationship of in-hospital and 30-day mortality rates and the association between in-hospital mortality and hospital discharge practices. DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING: A secondary analysis of data for 13,834 patients with congestive heart failure who were admitted to 30 hospitals in northeast Ohio in 1992-1994. DESIGN: A retrospective cohort study was conducted. DATA COLLECTION: Demographic and clinical data were collected from patients' medical records and were used to develop multivariable models that estimated the risk of in-hospital and 30-day (post-admission) mortality. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) for in-hospital and 30-day mortality were determined by dividing observed death rates by predicted death rates. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In-hospital SMRs ranged from 0.54 to 1.42, and six hospitals were classified as statistical outliers (p <.05); 30-day SMRs ranged from 0.63 to 1.73, and seven hospitals were outliers. Although the correlation between in-hospital SMRs and 30-day SMRs was substantial (R = 0.78, p < .001), outlier status changed for seven of the 30 hospitals. Nonetheless, changes in outlier status reflected relatively small differences between in-hospital and 30-day SMRs. Rates of discharge to nursing homes or other inpatient facilities varied from 5.4 percent to 34.2 percent across hospitals. However, relationships between discharge rates to such facilities and in-hospital SMRs (R = 0.08; p = .65) and early post-discharge mortality rates (R = 0.23; p = .21) were not significant. CONCLUSIONS: SMRs based on in-hospital and 30-day mortality were relatively similar, although classification of hospitals as statistical outliers often differed. However, there was no evidence that in-hospital SMRs were biased by differences in post-discharge mortality or discharge practices. PMID:10737447

  1. Library Hospitality: Some Preliminary Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Eric D. M.; Kazmer, Michelle M.

    2011-01-01

    Library scholars and practitioners have frequently reflected on the various factors that in combination make up a hospitable library, but there has been little theoretical synthesis of the notion of the library as a place of hospitality. The hospitality industry provides a rich vein of theoretical material from which to draw definitions of…

  2. Childrens Hospital Inservice Education Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutz, Joan

    A description is provided of a 15-month, in-service nursing education program at Childrens Hospital (Los Angeles, California). The first sections of the paper describe Childrens Hospital and provide a rationale for the hospital-based program. A listing of program goals and objectives is also provided, indicating that the curriculum is designed to…

  3. Childrens Hospital Inservice Education Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutz, Joan

    A description is provided of a 15-month, in-service nursing education program at Childrens Hospital (Los Angeles, California). The first sections of the paper describe Childrens Hospital and provide a rationale for the hospital-based program. A listing of program goals and objectives is also provided, indicating that the curriculum is designed to…

  4. Hospitality Studies: Escaping the Tyranny?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lashley, Conrad

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore current strands in hospitality management education and research, and suggest that future programs should reflect a more social science informed content. Design/methodology/approach: The paper reviews current research in hospitality management education and in the study of hospitality and…

  5. Hospitality Services. Student Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This student activity book contains pencil-and-paper activities for use in a hospitality services course focusing on the food and lodging segments of the hospitality and tourism industry. The activities are organized into 29 chapters on the following topics: hospitality services industry; professional ethics; organization/management structures in…

  6. Library Hospitality: Some Preliminary Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Eric D. M.; Kazmer, Michelle M.

    2011-01-01

    Library scholars and practitioners have frequently reflected on the various factors that in combination make up a hospitable library, but there has been little theoretical synthesis of the notion of the library as a place of hospitality. The hospitality industry provides a rich vein of theoretical material from which to draw definitions of…

  7. Hospitality Services. Student Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This student activity book contains pencil-and-paper activities for use in a hospitality services course focusing on the food and lodging segments of the hospitality and tourism industry. The activities are organized into 29 chapters on the following topics: hospitality services industry; professional ethics; organization/management structures in…

  8. Hospitality in College Composition Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haswell, Janis; Haswell, Richard; Blalock, Glenn

    2009-01-01

    There has been little discussion of hospitality as a practice in college writing courses. Possible misuses of hospitality as an educational and ethical practice are explored, and three traditional and still tenable modes of hospitality are described and historicized: Homeric, Judeo-Christian, and nomadic. Application of these modes to…

  9. Hospitality Studies: Escaping the Tyranny?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lashley, Conrad

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore current strands in hospitality management education and research, and suggest that future programs should reflect a more social science informed content. Design/methodology/approach: The paper reviews current research in hospitality management education and in the study of hospitality and…

  10. Doppelthydrophile Blockcopolymere als Mineralisationstemplate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasparova, Pavla

    2002-07-01

    Die vorliegende Arbeit beschäftigt sich mit der Synthese und den Eigenschaften von doppelthydrophilen Blockcopolymeren und ihrer Anwendung in einem biomimetischen Mineralisationsprozeß von Calciumcarbonat und Bariumsulfat. Doppelthydrophile Blockcopolymere bestehen aus einem hydrophilen Block, der nicht mit Mineralien wechselwirkt und einem zweiten Polyelektrolyt-Block, der stark mit Mineraloberflächen wechselwirkt. Diese Blockcopolymere wurden durch ringöffnende Polymerisation von N-carboxyanhydriden (NCA's) und a-methoxy-ω-amino[poly(ethylene glycol)] PEG-NH2 als Initiator hergestellt. Die hergestellten Blockcopolymere wurden als effektive Wachstumsmodifikatoren für die Kristallisation von Calciumcarbonat und Bariumsulfat Mineralien eingesetzt. Die so erhaltenen Mineralpartikel (Kugeln, Hantel, eiförmige Partikel) wurden durch Lichtmikroskopie in Lösung, SEM und TEM charakterisiert. Röntgenweitwinkelstreuung (WAXS) wurde verwendet, um die Modifikation von Calciumcarbonat zu ermitteln und die Größe der Calciumcarbonat- und Bariumsulfat-Nanopartikel zu ermitteln. This work describes the synthesis and characterization of double hydrophilic block copolymers and their use in a biomimetic mineralization process of Calcium Carbonate and Barium Sulfate. Double hydrophilic block copolymers consist of a hydrophilic block that does not interact with minerals and another hydrophilic polyelectrolyte block that strongly interacts with mineral surfaces. These polymers were synthesised via ring opening polymerisation of N-carboxyanhydride (NCA), and the first hydrophilic block a-methoxy-ω-amino[poly(ethylene glycol)] PEG-NH2 was used as an initiator. The prepared block copolymers were used as effective crystal growth modifiers to control the crystallization of Calcium Carbonate and Barium Sulfate minerals. The resulting mineral particles (spheres, dumbbells, egg-like particles) were characterised by light microscopy in solution, by SEM, and by TEM. X-Ray scattering

  11. Submicron Nb-Al/Al oxide-Nb tunnel junctions sandwiched between Al films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, D.; Rothermel, H.; Gundlach, K. H.; Zimmermann, R.

    1996-02-01

    A process has been developed to embed Nb-Al/Al oxide-Nb junctions in planar structures of Al films. The submicron junctions are defined by photoresist lines. Motivation for this effort is a possible application of Nb junctions confined between normal conducting Al films as mixers above 700 GHz where Nb films loose their superconductive properties and tuning circuits made out of Nb therefore exhibit losses. First mixer results at 816 GHz are presented.

  12. Hospital mergers and market overlap.

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, G R; Jones, V G

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To address two questions: What are the characteristics of hospitals that affect the likelihood of their being involved in a merger? What characteristics of particular pairs of hospitals affect the likelihood of the pair engaging in a merger? DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING: Hospitals in the 12 county region surrounding the San Francisco Bay during the period 1983 to 1992 were the focus of the study. Data were drawn from secondary sources, including the Lexis/Nexis database, the American Hospital Association, and the Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development of the State of California. STUDY DESIGN: Seventeen hospital mergers during the study period were identified. A random sample of pairs of hospitals that did not merge was drawn to establish a statistically efficient control set. Models constructed from hypotheses regarding hospital and market characteristics believed to be related to merger likelihood were tested using logistic regression analysis. DATA COLLECTION: See Data Sources/Study Setting. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The analysis shows that the likelihood of a merger between a particular pair of hospitals is positively related to the degree of market overlap that exists between them. Furthermore, market overlap and performance difference interact in their effect on merger likelihood. In an analysis of individual hospitals, conditions of rivalry, hospital market share, and hospital size were not found to influence the likelihood that a hospital will engage in a merger. CONCLUSIONS: Mergers between hospitals are not driven directly by considerations of market power or efficiency as much as by the existence of specific merger opportunities in the hospitals' local markets. Market overlap is a condition that enables a merger to occur, but other factors, such as the relative performance levels of the hospitals in question and their ownership and teaching status, also play a role in influencing the likelihood that a merger will in fact take place. PMID

  13. Hospital mergers and market overlap.

    PubMed

    Brooks, G R; Jones, V G

    1997-02-01

    To address two questions: What are the characteristics of hospitals that affect the likelihood of their being involved in a merger? What characteristics of particular pairs of hospitals affect the likelihood of the pair engaging in a merger? Hospitals in the 12 county region surrounding the San Francisco Bay during the period 1983 to 1992 were the focus of the study. Data were drawn from secondary sources, including the Lexis/Nexis database, the American Hospital Association, and the Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development of the State of California. Seventeen hospital mergers during the study period were identified. A random sample of pairs of hospitals that did not merge was drawn to establish a statistically efficient control set. Models constructed from hypotheses regarding hospital and market characteristics believed to be related to merger likelihood were tested using logistic regression analysis. See Data Sources/Study Setting. The analysis shows that the likelihood of a merger between a particular pair of hospitals is positively related to the degree of market overlap that exists between them. Furthermore, market overlap and performance difference interact in their effect on merger likelihood. In an analysis of individual hospitals, conditions of rivalry, hospital market share, and hospital size were not found to influence the likelihood that a hospital will engage in a merger. Mergers between hospitals are not driven directly by considerations of market power or efficiency as much as by the existence of specific merger opportunities in the hospitals' local markets. Market overlap is a condition that enables a merger to occur, but other factors, such as the relative performance levels of the hospitals in question and their ownership and teaching status, also play a role in influencing the likelihood that a merger will in fact take place.

  14. Mother-baby friendly hospital.

    PubMed

    Aragon-choudhury, P

    1996-01-01

    In Manila, the Philippines, the Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital has been a maternity hospital for 75 years. It averages 90 deliveries a day. Its fees are P200-P500 for a normal delivery and P800-P2000 for a cesarean section. Patients pay what they can and pay the balance when they can. The hospital provides a safe motherhood package that encompasses teaching responsible parenthood, prenatal care, labor, delivery, postpartum care, breast feeding, family planning, and child survival. In 1986, the hospital introduced innovative policies and procedures that promote, protect, and support breast feeding. It has a rooming-in policy that has saved the hospital P6.5 million so far. In the prenatal stage, hospital staff inform pregnant women that colostrum protects the newborn against infections, that suckling stimulates milk production, and that there is no basis to the claim of having insufficient breast milk. Sales representatives of milk substitutes are banned from the hospital. Staff confiscate milk bottles or formula. A lactation management team demonstrates breast feeding procedures. Mothers also receive support on the correct way of breast feeding from hospital staff, volunteers from the Catholic Women's League, consumer groups, and women lawyers. The hospital's policy is no breast milk, no discharge. This encourages mothers to motivate each other to express milk immediately after birth. The hospital has received numerous awards for its breast feeding promotion efforts. UNICEF has designated Fabella Hospital as a model of the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative. The hospital serves as the National Lactation Management Education Training Center. People from other developing countries have received training in lactation management here. The First Lady of the Philippines, the First Lady of the US, and the Queen of Spain have all visited the hospital. The hospital has also integrated its existing services into a women's health care center.

  15. Growth and Optical Properties of Al rich AlN/AlGaN Quantum Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahtamouni, T. M. Al; Nepal, N.; Nakarmi, M. L.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.

    2006-03-01

    Al rich AlGaN alloys are promising materials for the applications in the optoelectronic devices such as deep ultraviolet (UV) emitters and detectors in the spectral range down to 200 nm. AlGaN based UV emitters (λ<340nm) has applications in bio-chemical agent detection and medical research/ health care. To realize deep UV emission (λ< 280 nm) Al rich AlGaN based quantum wells (QWs) are required. We report here the growth of AlN/AlxGa1-xNQWs (x>0.65) on AlN/sapphire templates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Deep UV photoluminescence (PL) was employed to study the optical properties of the QWs. Well width (Al composition) dependence was studied by varying the QW thickness (Al composition) with fixed x ˜ 0.65 (well width at 3 nm). Optical properties of these QWs such as the effects of alloy fluctuation, temperature, strain and piezoelectric field, carrier and exciton localizations on the quantum efficiency have been studied. Carrier and exciton dynamics were probed. Implications of our findings on the applications of Al rich AlN/AlGaN QWs for UV emitters and detectors will also be discussed.

  16. Studies of 27Al NMR in SrAl4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niki, Haruo; Higa, Nonoka; Kuroshima, Hiroko; Toji, Tatsuki; Morishima, Mach; Minei, Motofumi; Yogi, Mamoru; Nakamura, Ai; Hedo, Masato; Nakama, Takao; Ōnuki, Yoshichika; Harima, Hisatomo

    A charge density wave (CDW) transition at TCDW = 243 K and a structural phase (SP) transition at approximately 100 K occur in SrAl4 with the BaAl4-type body center tetragonal structure, which is the divalent and non-4f electron reference compound of EuAl4. To understand the behaviors of the CDW and SP transitions, the 27Al NMR measurements using a single crystal and a powder sample of SrAl4 have been carried out. The line width below TCDW is modulated by an electrical quadruple interaction between 27Al nucleus and CDW charge modulation. The incommensurate CDW state below TCDW changes into a different structure below TSP. The temperature dependences of Knight shifts of 27Al(I) and 27Al(II) show the different behaviors. The temperature variation of 27Al(I) Knight shift shows anomalies at the CDW and SP transition temperatures, revealing the shift to negative side below TCDW, which is attributable to the core polarization of the d-electrons. However, 27Al(II) Knight shift keeps almost constant except for the small shift due to the SP transition. The 1/T1T of 27Al(I) indicates the obvious changes due to the CDW and SP transitions, while that of 27Al(II) takes a constant value. The density of state at the Fermi level at Al(I) site below 60 K would be about 0.9 times less than that above TCDW.

  17. Hospital closure and economic efficiency.

    PubMed

    Capps, Cory; Dranove, David; Lindrooth, Richard C

    2010-01-01

    We present a new framework for assessing the effects of hospital closures on social welfare and the local economy. While patient welfare necessarily declines when patients lose access to a hospital, closures also tend to reduce costs. We study five hospital closures in two states and find that urban hospital bailouts reduce aggregate social welfare: on balance, the cost savings from closures more than offset the reduction in patient welfare. However, because some of the cost savings are shared nationally, total surplus in the local community may decline following a hospital closure.

  18. An ideal hospital.

    PubMed

    Chandrasiri, Singithi Sidney

    2017-07-03

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore a novel overarching strategy in tackling the key issues raised by the recent inquiry into bullying, harassment and discrimination in surgical practice and surgical training in Australian and New Zealand hospitals. Design/methodology/approach The approach taken is an analysis of the available evidence-based literature to inform the proposed viewpoint. The theoretical subject scope presented is a discussion of how and why the various strategies put forward in this paper should be integrated into and led from an overarching workforce engagement platform. Findings The key themes isolated from the Inquiry into Australian and New Zealand surgical practice ranged from abuse of power by those in leadership positions, gender inequity in the surgical workforce, opaque and corrupt complaints handling processes, excessive surgical trainee working hours to bystander silence secondary to a fear of reprisal. A workforce engagement perspective has elicited the potential to counter various impacts, that of clinical ineffectiveness, substandard quality and safety, inefficient medical workforce management outcomes, adverse economic implications and the operational profitability of a hospital. Generic strategies grounded in evidence-based literature were able to then be aligned with specific action areas to provide a new leadership framework for addressing these impacts. Originality/value To the author's knowledge, this is one of the first responses providing a framework on how medical managers and hospital executives can begin to lead a comprehensive and practical strategy for changing the existing culture of bullying, harassment and discrimination in surgical practice by using a staff engagement framework.

  19. Variations in hospital administrative costs.

    PubMed

    McKay, Niccie L; Lemak, Christy Harris; Lovett, Annesha

    2008-01-01

    Administrative costs in hospitals are substantial and can have a major effect on performance. Despite this fact, not much research has been done to better understand such costs. This study examined variations in hospital administrative costs using a data set of acute care hospitals in Florida over the period 2000 through 2004. Results indicated that inflation-adjusted total administrative costs increased from about $22 million to $28 million on average over this time period. However, the percentage of total operating costs devoted to administrative costs was quite stable over the period, averaging approximately 23 percent in each of the five years. Compared with those in rural areas, urban hospitals on average had higher administrative costs per adjusted admission but lower administrative costs as a percentage of total operating costs. Hospital administrative costs also differed by ownership: For-profit hospitals on average had higher administrative costs per adjusted admission than not-for-profit and government hospitals, but administrative costs as a percentage of total operating costs were highest for for-profit hospitals and lowest for not-for-profit hospitals, with government hospitals falling in the middle. For bed size, administrative costs as a percentage of total operating costs were highest for the smallest hospitals. Results of this study will be useful to healthcare managers searching for ways to reduce unnecessary administrative costs while continuing to maintain the level of administrative activities required for the provision of safe, effective, high-quality care.

  20. Hospital Acquisitions Before Healthcare Reform.

    PubMed

    McCue, Michael J; Thompson, Jon M; Kim, Tae Hyun

    2015-01-01

    The hospital industry has experienced increased consolidation in the past 20 years. Since 2010, in particular, there has been a large rise in the number of hospital acquisitions, and observers have suggested this is due in part to the expected impact of federal healthcare reform legislation. This article reports on a study undertaken to identify the market, management, and financial factors affecting acute care, community hospitals acquired between 2010 and 2012. We identified 77 such hospitals and compared them to other acute care facilities. To assess how different factors were associated with acquisitions, the study used multiple logistic regressions whereby market factors were included first, followed by management and financial factors. Study findings show that acquired hospitals were located in markets with lower rates of preferred provider organization (PPO) penetration compared with nonacquired hospitals. Occupancy rate was found to be inversely related to acquisition rate; however, case-mix index was significantly and positively related to a hospital's being acquired. Financial factors negatively associated with a hospital's being acquired included age of plant and cash flow margin. In contrast to the findings from earlier studies of hospital acquisitions, our results showed that acquired hospitals possessed newer assets. However, similar to the findings of other studies, the cash flow margin of acquired hospitals was lower than that of nonacquired facilities.

  1. [Success factors in hospital management].

    PubMed

    Heberer, M

    1998-12-01

    The hospital environment of most Western countries is currently undergoing dramatic changes. Competition among hospitals is increasing, and economic issues have become decisive factors for the allocation of medical care. Hospitals therefore require management tools to respond to these changes adequately. The balanced scorecard is a method of enabling development and implementation of a business strategy that equally respects the financial requirements, the needs of the customers, process development, and organizational learning. This method was used to derive generally valid success factors for hospital management based on an analysis of an academic hospital in Switzerland. Strategic management, the focus of medical services, customer orientation, and integration of professional groups across the hospital value chain were identified as success factors for hospital management.

  2. Quantifying the Relationship Among Hospital Design, Satisfaction, and Psychosocial Functioning in a Pediatric Hematology-Oncology Inpatient Unit

    PubMed Central

    Sherman-Bien, Sandra A.; Malcarne, Vanessa L.; Roesch, Scott; Varni, James W.; Katz, Ernest R.

    2013-01-01

    Increasingly, empirical support demonstrates that the built environment may affect the physical and psychosocial well-being of patients, their families, and hospital staff (Beauchemin & Hays, 1996; Rubin, Owens, & Golden, 1998; Sherman, Varni, Ulrich, & Malcarne, 2005; Ulrich, 1991; Varni et al., 2004; Whitehouse et al., 2001). Investigators posit two mechanisms through which the built environment can impact patients: indirectly, by enhancing the quality of care and helping a patient feel more relaxed; and/or directly, by altering the physiological recovery process (Malcolm, 1992). Several literature reviews have been published on the relationship between the hospital built environment and patient outcomes (Joseph, Keller, & Kronick, 2008; Rubin et al., 1998; Sherman, Shepley, & Varni, 2005; Ulrich, Quan, Zimring, Joseph, & Choudhary, 2004). In their 1998 review, Rubin et al. found studies linking environment with a number of health and satisfaction outcomes but little research that had been conducted in a scientifically valid manner. Ulrich et al.'s 2004 review of the role of the physical environment in hospital design identified a number of more rigorously conducted studies, focusing mainly on adult environments and on issues of medical safety and hospital-acquired infection rates. Their conclusions linked environmental features such as noise to an increase in perceived stress and physiological arousal; exposure to natural light to reductions in depression, length of hospital stay, and pain medications and to improved sleep; and hospital gardens to improved physical and psychosocial functioning (Ulrich et al., 2004). PMID:21960191

  3. The Effect of Changes in Hospital Reimbursement on Nurse Staffing Decisions at Safety Net and Nonsafety Net Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Lindrooth, Richard C; Bazzoli, Gloria J; Needleman, Jack; Hasnain-Wynia, Romana

    2006-01-01

    Research Objective The financial savings from the Balanced Budget Act (BBA) are attractive to policy makers, but such savings come at a cost. We measure changes in nurse staffing at hospitals related to potential declines in reimbursement through the BBA. Study Design Following Hadley, Zuckerman, and Feder (1989), we define a fiscal pressure index (FPI) to measure the differential effect of the BBA. We estimate the effect of the FPI on the number of full-time equivalent registered nurses (RN) and licensed practical nurses (LPN) per adjusted patient day using American Hospital Association (AHA) data of a panel of hospitals from 1996 to 2001. The AHA data are combined with the Area Resource Files and health maintenance organizations penetration data. We control for hospital heterogeneity using fixed effects. Population Studied All urban short-term general hospitals that responded to the staffing and uncompensated care questions in the AHA survey between 1996 and 2001. We define safety net hospitals as those with a high ratio of uncompensated costs to total hospital expenses (see, e.g., Zuckerman et al. 2001). Principal Findings We find that the nonsafety net hospitals that were most susceptible to the provisions of the BBA experienced a decline in RN staffing ratios about twice the rate of the nonsafety net hospitals that were least susceptible to the BBA. We are unable to detect an effect of the BBA on staffing at safety net hospitals. Conclusions RN and LPN staffing levels per adjusted patient day declined, on average, between 1996 and 2001. Within the context of the general decline, we find that RN staffing per adjusted patient day declined even more at nonsafety net hospitals that were most susceptible to lower reimbursement related to the BBA. Thus, there was a small but statistically significant incremental effect of potential BBA losses on RN staffing at hospitals that were expected to be affected most. This incremental decline represented about a 6 percent

  4. Morton et al. Reply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morton, Douglas C.; Nagol, Jyoteshwar; Carabajal, Claudia C.; Rosette, Jacqueline; Palace, Michael; Cook, Bruce D.; Vermote, Eric F.; Harding, David J.; North, Peter R. J.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple mechanisms could lead to up-regulation of dry-season photosynthesis in Amazon forests, including canopy phenology and illumination geometry. We specifically tested two mechanisms for phenology-driven changes in Amazon forests during dry-season months, and the combined evidence from passive optical and lidar satellite data was incompatible with large net changes in canopy leaf area or leaf reflectance suggested by previous studies. We therefore hypothesized that seasonal changes in the fraction of sunlit and shaded canopies, one aspect of bidirectional reflectance effects in Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data, could alter light availability for dry-season photosynthesis and the photosynthetic capacity of Amazon forests without large net changes in canopy composition. Subsequent work supports the hypothesis that seasonal changes in illumination geometry and diffuse light regulate light saturation in Amazon forests. These studies clarify the physical mechanisms that govern light availability in Amazon forests from seasonal variability in direct and diffuse illumination. Previously, in the debate over light limitation of Amazon forest productivity, seasonal changes in the distribution of light within complex Amazon forest canopies were confounded with dry-season increases in total incoming photosynthetically active radiation. In the accompanying Comment, Saleska et al. do not fully account for this confounding effect of forest structure on photosynthetic capacity.

  5. Morton et al. Reply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morton, Douglas C.; Nagol, Jyoteshwar; Carabajal, Claudia C.; Rosette, Jacqueline; Palace, Michael; Cook, Bruce D.; Vermote, Eric F.; Harding, David J.; North, Peter R. J.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple mechanisms could lead to up-regulation of dry-season photosynthesis in Amazon forests, including canopy phenology and illumination geometry. We specifically tested two mechanisms for phenology-driven changes in Amazon forests during dry-season months, and the combined evidence from passive optical and lidar satellite data was incompatible with large net changes in canopy leaf area or leaf reflectance suggested by previous studies. We therefore hypothesized that seasonal changes in the fraction of sunlit and shaded canopies, one aspect of bidirectional reflectance effects in Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data, could alter light availability for dry-season photosynthesis and the photosynthetic capacity of Amazon forests without large net changes in canopy composition. Subsequent work supports the hypothesis that seasonal changes in illumination geometry and diffuse light regulate light saturation in Amazon forests. These studies clarify the physical mechanisms that govern light availability in Amazon forests from seasonal variability in direct and diffuse illumination. Previously, in the debate over light limitation of Amazon forest productivity, seasonal changes in the distribution of light within complex Amazon forest canopies were confounded with dry-season increases in total incoming photosynthetically active radiation. In the accompanying Comment, Saleska et al. do not fully account for this confounding effect of forest structure on photosynthetic capacity.

  6. Rub' al Khali, Arabia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Rub' al Khali is one of the largest sand deserts in the world, encompassing most of the southern third of the Arabian Peninsula. It includes parts of Oman, United Arab Emirates, and Yemen. The desert covers 650,000 square kilometers, more than the area of France. Largely unexplored until recently, the desert is 1000 km long and 500 km wide. The first documented journeys made by Westerners were those of Bertram Thomas in 1931 and St. John Philby in 1932. With daytime temperatures reaching 55 degrees Celsius, and dunes taller than 330 meters, the desert may be one of the most forbidding places on Earth.

    The image was acquired December 2, 2005, covers an area of 54.8 x 61.9 km, and is located near 20.7 degrees north latitude, 53.6 degrees east longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  7. Hospitality and Collegial Community: An Essay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, John B.

    2000-01-01

    Explains a collegial ethic of hospitality as a cardinal academic virtue and suggests a way of building a "collegium," the covenantal community of academe. Discusses how academicians can develop hospitable teaching, hospitable scholarship, and hospitable service. (Author/SLD)

  8. [Satisfaction of hospitalized patients in a hospital in Apurimac, Peru].

    PubMed

    Sihuin-Tapia, Elsa Yudy; Gómez-Quispe, Oscar Elisban; Ibáñez-Quispe, Vladimiro

    2015-01-01

    In order to determine the satisfaction of hospitalized patients in the Sub-regional Hospital of Andahuaylas, 175 patients were surveyed using the Servqual multidimensional model. The estimate of variables associated with the satisfaction of the hospitalized patients was performed by using bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis. We found 25.0% satisfaction. Lower levels of satisfaction were associated with having a secondary level education (aOR: 0.05; 95% CI: 0.01 to 0.64) and with having been hospitalized in the surgery department (aOR 0.14, CI: 95%: 0.04 to 0.53). It was concluded that there was a low level of satisfaction with the quality of care received by hospitalized patients and this was associated with the level of education and type of hospital department.

  9. Electronic Cigarettes on Hospital Campuses

    PubMed Central

    Meernik, Clare; Baker, Hannah M.; Paci, Karina; Fischer-Brown, Isaiah; Dunlap, Daniel; Goldstein, Adam O.

    2015-01-01

    Smoke and tobacco-free policies on hospital campuses have become more prevalent across the U.S. and Europe, de-normalizing smoking and reducing secondhand smoke exposure on hospital grounds. Concerns about the increasing use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) and the impact of such use on smoke and tobacco-free policies have arisen, but to date, no systematic data describes e-cigarette policies on hospital campuses. The study surveyed all hospitals in North Carolina (n = 121) to assess what proportion of hospitals have developed e-cigarette policies, how policies have been implemented and communicated, and what motivators and barriers have influenced the development of e-cigarette regulations. Seventy-five hospitals (62%) completed the survey. Over 80% of hospitals reported the existence of a policy regulating the use of e-cigarettes on campus and roughly half of the hospitals without a current e-cigarette policy are likely to develop one within the next year. Most e-cigarette policies have been incorporated into existing tobacco-free policies with few reported barriers, though effective communication of e-cigarette policies is lacking. The majority of hospitals strongly agree that e-cigarette use on campus should be prohibited for staff, patients, and visitors. Widespread incorporation of e-cigarette policies into existing hospital smoke and tobacco-free campus policies is feasible but needs communication to staff, patients, and visitors. PMID:26729142

  10. Electronic Cigarettes on Hospital Campuses.

    PubMed

    Meernik, Clare; Baker, Hannah M; Paci, Karina; Fischer-Brown, Isaiah; Dunlap, Daniel; Goldstein, Adam O

    2015-12-29

    Smoke and tobacco-free policies on hospital campuses have become more prevalent across the U.S. and Europe, de-normalizing smoking and reducing secondhand smoke exposure on hospital grounds. Concerns about the increasing use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) and the impact of such use on smoke and tobacco-free policies have arisen, but to date, no systematic data describes e-cigarette policies on hospital campuses. The study surveyed all hospitals in North Carolina (n = 121) to assess what proportion of hospitals have developed e-cigarette policies, how policies have been implemented and communicated, and what motivators and barriers have influenced the development of e-cigarette regulations. Seventy-five hospitals (62%) completed the survey. Over 80% of hospitals reported the existence of a policy regulating the use of e-cigarettes on campus and roughly half of the hospitals without a current e-cigarette policy are likely to develop one within the next year. Most e-cigarette policies have been incorporated into existing tobacco-free policies with few reported barriers, though effective communication of e-cigarette policies is lacking. The majority of hospitals strongly agree that e-cigarette use on campus should be prohibited for staff, patients, and visitors. Widespread incorporation of e-cigarette policies into existing hospital smoke and tobacco-free campus policies is feasible but needs communication to staff, patients, and visitors.

  11. Contributions of Muhadhdhab Al-Deen Al-Baghdadi to the progress of medicine and urology. A study and translations from his book Al-Mukhtar.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Halim, Rabie E

    2006-11-01

    This study of the Arabic 4-volume book of Al-Mukhtar Fi Al-Tibb (Choice Book on Medicine) written by the Muslim physician Muhadhdhab Al-Deen Al-Baghdadi (515-610 H, 1117-1213 AD) aimed at evaluating his contributions to the progress of medicine and urology along with providing English translations of relevant excerpts. Al-Baghdadi laid emphasis on the morals of medical practice and the principles of medical education describing how to select medical students and how to evaluate graduates. He stressed on the need for a long training program directly supervised by skilled expert doctors both in hospitals (Al-Bimaristanat) and during home visits. A good part of volume 1 was allocated to preventive medicine and the whole of volume 2 was devoted to the pharmacy section, which he restricted to what was proven by the experience of his teacher and by his own experiments. Same as all his predecessors in the Islamic era, Al-Baghdadi stressed the importance of clinical medicine and gave more details related to history taking, physical examination, differential diagnosis and prognosis. Similar to them, he also, emphasized that a doctor should be quite knowledgeable in anatomy. Furthermore, the presence of anatomical drawings in Kitab Al-Mukhtar Fi Al-Tibb is a further step forward in illustrating medical text books; a trend that flourished in the Islamic era reflecting the role of direct observations and experience. The detailed description of the functional anatomy of the uretero-vesical junction and the antireflux and micturition mechanisms given by Al-Baghdadi is contrary to that of Galen (130-200 AD) but conforms well to our contemporary understanding. In the conservative management of urinary stones, he described 70 simple and 13 compound drugs while those described by Pulus of Aegina (625-690 AD) were only 20 simple and 3 compound drugs. Furthermore, Al-Baghdadi's description of the instruments and techniques of urethral catheterization, perineal cystolithotomy and

  12. Influence of Hospital and Nursing Home Quality on Hospital Readmissions

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Kali S.; Rahman, Momotazur; Mor, Vincent; Intrator, Orna

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether the quality of the hospital and of the nursing home (NH) to which a patient was discharged were related to the likelihood of rehospitalization. Study Design Retrospective cohort study of 1,382,477 individual hospitalizations discharged to 15,356 NHs from 3683 hospitals between 2006 and 2008. Methods Data come from Medicare claims and enrollment records, Minimum Data Set, Online Survey Certification and Reporting Dataset, Hospital Compare, and the American Hospital Association Database. Cross-classified random effects models were used to test the association of hospital and NH quality measures and the likelihood of 30-day rehospitalization. Results Patients discharged from higher-quality hospitals (as indicated by higher scores on their accountability process measures and high nurse staffing levels) and patients who received care in higher-quality NHs (as indicated by high nurse staffing levels and lower deficiency scores) were less likely to be rehospitalized within 30 days. Conclusions The passage of the Affordable Care Act changed the accountability of hospitals for patients’ outcomes after discharge. This study highlights the joint accountability of hospitals and NHs for rehospitalization of patients. PMID:25730351

  13. Hospital-Readmission Risk - Isolating Hospital Effects from Patient Effects.

    PubMed

    Krumholz, Harlan M; Wang, Kun; Lin, Zhenqiu; Dharmarajan, Kumar; Horwitz, Leora I; Ross, Joseph S; Drye, Elizabeth E; Bernheim, Susannah M; Normand, Sharon-Lise T

    2017-09-14

    To isolate hospital effects on risk-standardized hospital-readmission rates, we examined readmission outcomes among patients who had multiple admissions for a similar diagnosis at more than one hospital within a given year. We divided the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services hospital-wide readmission measure cohort from July 2014 through June 2015 into two random samples. All the patients in the cohort were Medicare recipients who were at least 65 years of age. We used the first sample to calculate the risk-standardized readmission rate within 30 days for each hospital, and we classified hospitals into performance quartiles, with a lower readmission rate indicating better performance (performance-classification sample). The study sample (identified from the second sample) included patients who had two admissions for similar diagnoses at different hospitals that occurred more than 1 month and less than 1 year apart, and we compared the observed readmission rates among patients who had been admitted to hospitals in different performance quartiles. In the performance-classification sample, the median risk-standardized readmission rate was 15.5% (interquartile range, 15.3 to 15.8). The study sample included 37,508 patients who had two admissions for similar diagnoses at a total of 4272 different hospitals. The observed readmission rate was consistently higher among patients admitted to hospitals in a worse-performing quartile than among those admitted to hospitals in a better-performing quartile, but the only significant difference was observed when the patients were admitted to hospitals in which one was in the best-performing quartile and the other was in the worst-performing quartile (absolute difference in readmission rate, 2.0 percentage points; 95% confidence interval, 0.4 to 3.5; P=0.001). When the same patients were admitted with similar diagnoses to hospitals in the best-performing quartile as compared with the worst-performing quartile of hospital

  14. The Evolution of Al Qaeda

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-15

    www.carleton.ca/cciss/res_docs/itac/gendron_e.pdf; Internet. 26Muhammad Abd al-salam Faraj, Al-Farīdah al-Ghā’ibah, trans. Johannes J.G. Jansen and... Theo Van Gogh.91 Hoffman also supports the idea proposed by other experts like Benjamin Orbach and Keith Blanchard of the Congressional Research...religious intolerance over cartoons in Danish newspapers, the assassination of Theo Van Goeh, and increasing discontent among disassociated Muslim

  15. Alexandria (Al Iskandariya), Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This image of Alexandria was taken by astronauts on board the International Space Station in December 2000 using an Electronic Still Camera. A wider-angle view (STS088-739-90) taken from the Space Shuttle in December 1998 is available for context. Alexandria (Al Iskandariya) occupies a T-shaped peninsula and strip of land separating the Mediterranean from Lake Mariout. Originally the town was built upon a mole (stone breakwater) called Heptastadium, which joined the island of Pharos (see referenced website, below) to the mainland. Since then sedimentary deposits have widened the mole. Since 1905, when the 370,000 Alexandrians lived in an area of about 4 sq km between the two harbors, the city (population 4 million; see referenced website, below) has grown beyond its medieval walls and now occupies an area of about 300 sq km. The Mahmudiya Canal, connecting Alexandria with the Nile, runs to the south of the city and, by a series of locks, enters the harbor of the principal port of Egypt (note ships). The reddish and ochre polygons west of Lake Mariout are salt-evaporation, chemical-storage, and water-treatment ponds within the coastal lagoon. Reference Youssef Halim and Fatma Abou Shouk, 2000, Human impacts on Alexandria's marine environment: UNESCO, Coastal Regions and Small Islands Unit (CSI), Coastal Management Sourcebooks 2 (accessed December 20, 2000) Additional photographs taken by astronauts can be viewed at NASA-JSC's Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth. Image ISS001-ESC-5025 provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory, Johnson Space Center.

  16. Is there a paraneoplastic ALS?

    PubMed

    Corcia, Philippe; Gordon, Paul H; Camdessanche, Jean-Philippe

    2015-06-01

    Our objective was to examine the strength of evidence in support of the paraneoplastic syndrome (PNS) as one cause of ALS and, if the association appears more likely than chance, determine which features of ALS imply concurrent malignancy. We reviewed the literature on concurrent ALS and neoplasia assessing the strength of evidence for the association. Most accounts of ALS and neoplasm are case reports or small uncontrolled series. In order of strength of evidence, three clinical situations that support a paraneoplastic aetiology for ALS are: 1) laboratory evidence of well-characterized onconeuronal antibodies, most often anti-Hu, anti-Yo or anti-Ri; 2) co-occurrence of ALS and a neoplasm known to cause PNS, usually lymphoma or cancer of the breast; and 3) combined ALS and a neoplasm not classically associated with PNS, without detectable onconeuronal antibodies. Clinical features that warrant evaluation of neoplasm include upper motor neuron disease in elderly females, rapid progression, non-motor signs, and young onset. In conclusion, most examples of ALS and neoplasm do not constitute a classically established PNS. Rare instances of elevated onconeuronal antibody titres or typical neoplasm, implies that, albeit rare, the PNS is one of a multitude of causes of ALS.

  17. Understanding ALS: new therapeutic approaches.

    PubMed

    Musarò, Antonio

    2013-09-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease associated with motor neuron degeneration, muscle atrophy and paralysis. Although numerous pathological mechanisms have been elucidated, ALS remains an invariably fatal disease in the absence of any effective therapy. The heterogeneity of the disease and the failure to develop satisfactory therapeutic protocols reinforce the view that ALS is a multi-factorial and multi-systemic disease. Thus, a better understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms and study of the potential pathological relationship between the various cellular processes is required to ensure efficacious therapy. The pathogenic mechanisms associated with ALS are reviewed, and the strengths and limitations of some new therapeutic approaches are discussed.

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of a blaOXA-58-Producing Acinetobacter baumannii Strain Isolated from a Mexican Hospital.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Oseguera, Ángeles; Castro-Jaimes, Semiramis; Salgado-Camargo, Abraham David; Silva-Sanchez, Jesus; Garza-González, Elvira; Castillo-Ramírez, Santiago; Cevallos, Miguel Ángel

    2017-09-07

    In this study, we present the complete genome sequence of a blaOXA-58-producing Acinetobacter baumannii strain, sampled from a Mexican hospital and not related to the international clones. Copyright © 2017 Pérez-Oseguera et al.

  19. Strategies and performance in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Madorrán García, Cristina; de Val Pardo, Isabel

    2004-01-01

    Today, more than ever in the past, the variables within the health care environment (demand, costs, system deregulation) are undergoing such rapid change that hospital administrators are finding it necessary to develop and implement competitive strategies in order to survive in the increasingly competitive hospital environment. The primary aim of this paper is to answer the following question: Is it possible to transfer strategic management research from other sectors into the hospital industry? The first objective was to identify strategies in hospital management. A questionnaire was designed and sent to hospital CEOs and the data extracted were used to construct the variables needed to identify strategies and perform the subsequent analyses. The second aim was to try to identify groups of organizations using similar strategies and, finally, analyse the impact of these on hospital performance.

  20. The economics of specialty hospitals.

    PubMed

    Schneider, John E; Miller, Thomas R; Ohsfeldt, Robert L; Morrisey, Michael A; Zelner, Bennet A; Pengxiang Li

    2008-10-01

    Specialty hospitals, particularly those specializing in surgery and owned by physicians, have generated a relatively high degree of policy attention over the past several years. The main focus of policy debates has been in two areas: the extent to which specialty hospitals might compete unfairly with incumbent general hospitals and the extent to which physician ownership might be associated with higher usage. Largely absent from the debates, however, has been a discussion of the basic economic model of specialty hospitals. This article reviews existing literature, reports, and findings from site visits to explore the economic rationale for specialty hospitals. The discussion focuses on six factors associated with specialization: consumer demand, procedural operating margins, clinical efficiencies, procedural economies of scale, economies (and diseconomies) of scope, and competencies and learning. A better understanding of the economics of specialization will help policy makers evaluate the full spectrum of advantages and disadvantages of specialty hospitals.

  1. Does outsourcing affect hospital profitability?

    PubMed

    Danvers, Kreag; Nikolov, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Organizations outsource non-core service functions to achieve cost reductions and strategic benefits, both of which can impact profitability performance. This article examines relations between managerial outsourcing decisions and profitability for a multi-state sample of non-profit hospitals, across 16 states and four regions of the United States. Overall regression results indicate that outsourcing does not necessarily improve hospital profitability. In addition, we identify no profitability impact from outsourcing for urban hospitals, but somewhat positive effects for teaching hospitals. Our regional analysis suggests that hospitals located in the Midwest maintain positive profitability effects with outsourcing, but those located in the South realize negative effects. These findings have implications for cost reduction efforts and the financial viability of non-profit hospitals.

  2. Union Density and Hospital Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Koys, Daniel J; Martin, Wm Marty; LaVan, Helen; Katz, Marsha

    2015-01-01

    The authors address the hospital outcomes of patient satisfaction, healthcare quality, and net income per bed. They define union density as the percentage of a hospital's employees who are in unions, healthcare quality as its 30-day acute myocardial infraction (AMI; heart attack) mortality rate, and patient satisfaction as its overall Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems score. Using a random sample of 84 union and 84 nonunion hospitals from across the United States, multiple regression analyses show that union density is negatively related to patient satisfaction. Union density is not related to healthcare quality as measured by the AMI mortality rate or to net income per bed. This implies that unions per se are not good or bad for hospitals. The authors suggest that it is better for hospital administrators to take a Balanced Scorecard approach and be concerned about employee satisfaction, patient satisfaction, healthcare quality, and net income.

  3. Controlling hospital library theft

    PubMed Central

    Cuddy, Theresa M.; Marchok, Catherine

    2003-01-01

    At Capital Health System/Fuld Campus (formerly Helene Fuld Medical Center), the Health Sciences Library lost many books and videocassettes. These materials were listed in the catalog but were missing when staff went to the shelves. The hospital had experienced a downsizing of staff, a reorganization, and a merger. When the library staff did an inventory, $10,000 worth of materials were found to be missing. We corrected the situation through a series of steps that we believe will help other libraries control their theft. Through regularly scheduling inventories, monitoring items, advertising, and using specific security measures, we have successfully controlled the library theft. The January 2002 inventory resulted in meeting our goal of zero missing books and videocassettes. We work to maintain that goal. PMID:12883573

  4. Breath of hospitality.

    PubMed

    Škof, Lenart

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we outline the possibilities of an ethic of care based on our self-affection and subjectivity in the ethical spaces between-two. In this we first refer to three Irigarayan concepts - breath, silence and listening from the third phase of her philosophy, and discuss them within the methodological framework of an ethics of intersubjectivity and interiority. Together with attentiveness, we analyse them as four categories of our ethical becoming. Furthermore, we argue that self-affection is based on our inchoate receptivity for the needs of the other(s) and is thus dialectical in its character. In this we critically confront some epistemological views of our ethical becoming. We wind up this paper with a proposal for an ethics towards two autonomous subjects, based on care and our shared ethical becoming - both as signs of our deepest hospitality towards the other.

  5. Controlling hospital library theft.

    PubMed

    Cuddy, Theresa M; Marchok, Catherine

    2003-04-01

    At Capital Health System/Fuld Campus (formerly Helene Fuld Medical Center), the Health Sciences Library lost many books and videocassettes. These materials were listed in the catalog but were missing when staff went to the shelves. The hospital had experienced a downsizing of staff, a reorganization, and a merger. When the library staff did an inventory, $10,000 worth of materials were found to be missing. We corrected the situation through a series of steps that we believe will help other libraries control their theft. Through regularly scheduling inventories, monitoring items, advertising, and using specific security measures, we have successfully controlled the library theft. The January 2002 inventory resulted in meeting our goal of zero missing books and videocassettes. We work to maintain that goal.

  6. Accidents on hospital wards.

    PubMed Central

    Levene, S; Bonfield, G

    1991-01-01

    Eight hospitals reported 781 non-iatrogenic accidents occurring to patients and visitors under 16 years of age during an 18 month period up to October 1989. Accidents more often involved boys and children aged 3 to 5 years old. Falls from a height, slips, and striking accidents were common by day and falls by night. A total of 41% of accidents to inpatients occurred when parents were present. Only three accidents were serious. Altogether 27% involved beds and cots, and only one consequent injury was more than minor. Data collected routinely in case of medicolegal action can be presented in a form that may facilitate preventative work. Potentially remediable causes for concern include falls from beds and cots and the use of makeshift equipment. PMID:1929510

  7. Hathaway v. Worcester City Hospital. 22 Mar 1973.

    PubMed

    1973-01-01

    The arguments and findings in the case of Robbie Mae Hathaway, Plaintiff, Appellant, versus Worcester City Hospital et al., (Worcester, Massachusetts), Defendants, Appellees, are presented. The case was heard January 3, 1973 by the United States Court of Appeals, First Circuit, and was decided March 22, 1973. Hathaway's action challenged the city hospital policy barring the use of facilities in connection with consensual sterilization. The appellant, Hathaway, had 12 pregnancies resulting in 8 live children and maintained that her life would be jeopardized by future pregnancies. She challenged as unconstitutional the policy of the Worcester City Hospital barring the use of its facilities in connection with any consensual sterilization. Appellee administrator specifically refused appellant's request that the hospital allow her physicians to perform a tubal ligation at the time of the delivery of her 8th child in April 1971. Despite further requests, the operation was not performed after the delivery. In the interim, the instant suit was filed in the district court seeking declaratory and injunctive relief and damages. Th district court twice dismissed the complaint. The Assistant solicitor's opinion, on which the hospital's policy is based, was that the legality of sterilization procedures was "highly doubtful" in view of the Massachusetts statutes concerning birth control assistance. The U.S. Court of Appeals, First Circuit, reverses and remands for entry of an order declaring the Worceste City Hospital's policy against the use of its facilities in conjunction with sterilization operations unconstitutional and enjoining the individual appellees from enforcing the policy in the future.

  8. Impurity Enhancement of Al_2O_3/Al Adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Gang; Smith, John R.; Zhang, Wenqing; Evans, Anthony

    2003-03-01

    Our first-principles computations indicate that the clean Al_2O_3/Al interface is relatively weak - weaker than bulk Al. Fracture experiments reveal that the interface is relatively strong with observed failure in bulk Al, however. This paradox is resolved via doping effects of the common impurity C. We have found that only 1/3 of a monolayer of carbon segregated to the interface can increase the work of separation by a factor of 3. The resulting strong interface is consistent with fracture experiments. It arises due to void formation in the interface, which provides low-strain sites for the carbon to segregate to. The degree of void formation is consistent with the relatively high heat of oxide formation of Al.

  9. [Quality and efficiency in hospitals].

    PubMed

    Paganini, J M

    1993-12-01

    The objective of this research was to study the relationship between structural characteristics of hospitals (number and types of personnel, size of hospital units, and specialization of services) and health care outcomes, as measured by in-hospital mortality and average weight gain (AWG) in children under 1 year diagnosed with acute diarrheal disease (ADD). The study was carried out at 14 nonprofit acute-care hospitals located in greater Buenos Aires. The units of analysis were 23 pediatric wards (1,718 beds). The study population included 3,434 ADD cases (15.6% of total ward discharges). Various generalized linear models were used in the analysis, and the findings were adjusted according to the patients' age, severity of illness, and nutritional status. The acuteness of the disease investigated was verified. Of the study patients, 80.4% were 6 months old or younger and 40.1% suffered from some nutritional deficiency. According to an analysis of 32% of the cases, age was inversely associated with severity of illness, grade I nutritional deficiency, and in-hospital mortality, and directly associated with AWG. The adjusted case-fatality rates for the wards studied were different. Analysis of the relationship between the structural variables and the outcomes revealed that the number of nurses was inversely related to in-hospital mortality, while ward specialization and professional experience were directly related to AWG. These associations were statistically significant. There was a direct, statistically significant relationship between number of hospital staff and in-hospital mortality. Structural variables measuring the physicians' commitment to the institution, ward size, and hospital size were not found to be related to the outcomes. These findings can provide useful support for decision-making about hospital resource allocation, as well as about hospital organization and management. There is a need for more in-depth study of the relationship between the

  10. RFID solution benefits Cambridge hospital.

    PubMed

    James, Andrew

    2013-10-01

    Keeping track of thousands of pieces of equipment in a busy hospital environment is a considerable challenge, but, according to RFID tagging and asset tracking specialist, Harland Simon, RFID technology can make the task considerably simpler. Here Andrew James, the company's RFID sales manager, describes the positive benefits the technology has brought the Medical Equipment Library (MEL) at Addenbrooke's Hospital, one of the world's most famous teaching hospitals.

  11. Determinants of Hospital Casemix Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Edmund R.; Steinwald, Bruce

    1981-01-01

    Using the Commission on Professional and Hospital Activities' Resource Need Index as a measure of casemix complexity, this paper examines the relative contributions of teaching commitment and other hospital characteristics, hospital service and insurer distributions, and area characteristics to variations in casemix complexity. The empirical estimates indicate that all three types of independent variables have a substantial influence. These results are discussed in light of recent casemix research as well as current policy implications. PMID:6799430

  12. Cross hospital bed management system.

    PubMed

    Abedian, S; Kazemi, H; Riazi, H; Bitaraf, E

    2014-01-01

    The lack of adequate numbers of hospital beds to accommodate the injured is a main problem in public hospitals. For control of occupancy of bed, we design a dynamic system that announces status of bed when it change with admission or discharge of a patient. This system provide a wide network in country for bed management, especially for ICU and CCU beds that help us to distribute injured patient in the hospitals.

  13. Interfacial characterization of Al-Al thermocompression bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Malik, N.; Carvalho, P. A.; Poppe, E.; Finstad, T. G.

    2016-05-28

    Interfaces formed by Al-Al thermocompression bonding were studied by the transmission electron microscopy. Si wafer pairs having patterned bonding frames were bonded using Al films deposited on Si or SiO{sub 2} as intermediate bonding media. A bond force of 36 or 60 kN at bonding temperatures ranging from 400–550 °C was applied for a duration of 60 min. Differences in the bonded interfaces of 200 μm wide sealing frames were investigated. It was observed that the interface had voids for bonding with 36 kN at 400 °C for Al deposited both on Si and on SiO{sub 2}. However, the dicing yield was 33% for Al on Si and 98% for Al on SiO{sub 2}, attesting for the higher quality of the latter bonds. Both a bond force of 60 kN applied at 400 °C and a bond force of 36 kN applied at 550 °C resulted in completely bonded frames with dicing yields of, respectively, 100% and 96%. A high density of long dislocations in the Al grains was observed for the 60 kN case, while the higher temperature resulted in grain boundary rotation away from the original Al-Al interface towards more stable configurations. Possible bonding mechanisms and reasons for the large difference in bonding quality of the Al films deposited on Si or SiO{sub 2} are discussed.

  14. [Rules for psychiatric emergency hospitalization].

    PubMed

    Pichené, Catherine

    2003-06-01

    The author describe how psychiatric emergencies are dealt with in France. Emergency rooms can admit these patients 24 hours a day particularly somato-psychiatric emergencies as well as situations of existential crisis. Many psychiatric hospitals have also designed a 24 hours a day response to emergencies but with a great diversity depending on local situations. Free-will hospitalization is the most common response but some situations can require commitment to a psychiatric hospital. The author describes in details the enforcement of the law in the case of hospitalization without patients's consent.

  15. Hospital Ethics Committees in Poland.

    PubMed

    Czarkowski, Marek; Kaczmarczyk, Katarzyna; Szymańska, Beata

    2015-12-01

    According to UNESCO guidelines, one of the four forms of bioethics committees in medicine are the Hospital Ethics Committees (HECs). The purpose of this study was to evaluate how the above guidelines are implemented in real practice. There were 111 hospitals selected out of 176 Polish clinical hospitals and hospitals accredited by Center of Monitoring Quality in Health System. The study was conducted by the survey method. There were 56 (50%) hospitals that responded to the survey. The number of HECs members fluctuated between 3 and 16 members, where usually 5 (22% of HECs) members were part of the board committee. The composition of the HECs for professions other than physicians was diverse and non-standardized (nurses-in 86% of HECs, clergy-42%, lawyers-38%, psychologists-28%, hospital management-23%, rehab staff-7 %, patient representatives-3%, ethicists-2%). Only 55% of HECs had a professional set of standards. 98% of HECs had specific tasks. 62% of HECs were asked for their expertise, and 55% prepared <6.88% of the opinions were related to interpersonal relations between hospital personnel, patients and their families with emphasis on the interactions between superiors and their inferiors or hospital staff and patients and their families. Only 12% of the opinions were reported by the respondents as related to ethical dilemmas. In conclusion, few Polish hospitals have HECs, and the structure, services and workload are not always adequate. To ensure a reliable operation of HECs requires the development of relevant legislation, standard operating procedures and well trained members.

  16. Wearing gloves in the hospital

    MedlinePlus

    Infection control - wearing gloves; Patient safety - wearing gloves; Personal protective equipment - wearing gloves; PPE - wearing gloves; Nosocomial infection - wearing gloves; Hospital acquired infection - wearing gloves

  17. [Hospitals and surgeons: Madrid 1940].

    PubMed

    de Quevedo, Francisco Vázquez

    2007-01-01

    The history of the hospitals and general surgeons that best represent the centres in Madrid are here in reviewed, comprising the period between 1940 and the closure of the Hospital Clinico (1957) as well as the Hospital General (General Hospital) (1967), both in Atocha. Other hospitals which are reviewed and highlighted are: the H. de la Princesa (the Princess Hospital), the H. del Nifio Jesus (Hospital of the Child Jesus), the H. Militar (Military Hospital) and the Cruz Roja (Red Cross). Data is provided on the permanent surgeons in the following centres: H. General: J. Goyanes, J. Die, J. de la Villa, T. Rodriguez, E. Diaz, G. Bueno e H. Huerta; H. Clinico: L. de la Peña, L. Cardenal, L. Olivares, R. Argüelles, J. Estella y M. F. Zumel; H. Militar: M. G. Ulla, M. Bastos, M. G. Durán, J. S. Galindo, y A. G. Durán; Hospital de la Cruz Roja: V. M. Noguera, L. Serrada, F. Luque y L. L. Durán; H. de la Princesa: P. Cifuentes, P. G. Duarte, L. Estella y R. Aiguabella; H. del Niño Jesús: J. Garrido Lestache; H. Clinico, last time, Atocha: F. M. Lagos, R. Vara y A. de la Fuente.

  18. Climate and Conflict: A Comment on Hsiang et al.s Reply to Buhaug et al

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    a wide range of climatic events, from heat waves via excess rainfall to global ENSO cycles; and a wide range of spatial scales, from municipalities...again analytical consistency; The Hsiang et al. (2011) study considers a global ENSO effect whereas the studies in the valid sample investigate a local...some of the studies described in Hsiang et al. (2013). Specifically, Buhaug et al. exclude the effects of ENSO and PDSI when estimating the aggregate

  19. Engaging Chicago hospitals in the baby-friendly hospital initiative.

    PubMed

    Schoenfelder, Samantha L; Wych, Sadie; Willows, Catherine A; Harrington, Joseph; Christoffel, Katherine Kaufer; Becker, Adam B

    2013-11-01

    Breastfeeding is now widely recognized as a vital obesity prevention strategy and hospitals play a primary role in promoting, supporting and helping mothers to initiate and maintain breastfeeding. The Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) provides an evidence-based model that hospitals can use to plan and implement breastfeeding quality improvement (QI) projects. Funding under Communities Putting Prevention to Work (CPPW), administered by the CDC, brought together key Chicago partners to provide individualized support and technical assistance with breastfeeding QI projects to the 19 maternity hospitals in Chicago. A community organizing approach was taken to mobilize hospital interest in breastfeeding QI projects, leading to successes, e.g. 12/19 (63 %) Chicago hospitals registered with Baby-Friendly USA, Inc. (BFUSA) to pursue official Baby-Friendly designation. Key factors that fostered this success included: involving all levels of hospital staff, financial incentives, and ongoing tailored technical assistance. To assist other communities in similar work, this article discusses the approach the project took to mobilize hospitals to improve breastfeeding support practices based on the BFHI, as well as successes and lessons learned.

  20. Closure of a home hospital program: impact on hospitalization rates.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Jeremy M; Cohen, Aaron; Rozengarten, Ora; Meiller, Ludmila; Azoulay, Daniel; Hammerman-Rozenberg, Robert; Stessman, Jochanan

    2007-01-01

    Home hospitalization (HH), as a substitute to in-patient care, is an area of growing interest, particularly amongst the elderly. Debate nonetheless exists concerning its economic justification. This study describes a natural experiment that arose following spending cuts and closure of the 400 patient Jerusalem HH program. It examines the hypothesis that HH closure would cause increasing geriatric and general medical hospital utilization amongst the 45,000 beneficiaries of the Jerusalem Clalit Health Fund (HMO) aged 65 years and over. Hospitalization rates were measured prior to and following HH closure, and analysis of variance confirmed the significance of the differences in both geriatric (p<0.0001) and general medical hospitalization rates (p=0.02) over the study period. Linear regression analyses of the hospitalization rates prior to HH closure were performed to determine the expected trajectory of hospitalization rates following HH closure. The observed hospital utilization in the year following HH closure cost 6.2 million US dollars in excess of predicted expenditure; closure of the HH resulted in the saving of 1.3 million USdollars. The ratio of direct increased costs to savings was 5:1 thus confirming the hypothesis that HH closure would result in increased hospital utilization rates among the local elderly population.

  1. Thermal Modeling of Al-Al and Al-Steel Friction Stir Spot Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedrasiak, P.; Shercliff, H. R.; Reilly, A.; McShane, G. J.; Chen, Y. C.; Wang, L.; Robson, J.; Prangnell, P.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a finite element thermal model for similar and dissimilar alloy friction stir spot welding (FSSW). The model is calibrated and validated using instrumented lap joints in Al-Al and Al-Fe automotive sheet alloys. The model successfully predicts the thermal histories for a range of process conditions. The resulting temperature histories are used to predict the growth of intermetallic phases at the interface in Al-Fe welds. Temperature predictions were used to study the evolution of hardness of a precipitation-hardened aluminum alloy during post-weld aging after FSSW.

  2. Explosive destruction of 26Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahl, D.; Yamaguchi, H.; Shimizu, H.; Abe, K.; Beliuskina, O.; Cha, S. M.; Chae, K. Y.; Ge, Z.; Hayakawa, S.; Kwag, M. S.; Kim, D. H.; Moon, J. Y.; Park, S. Y.; Yang, L.

    2017-09-01

    The γ -ray emission associated with the radioactive decay of 26Al is one of the key pieces of observational evidence indicating stellar nucleosynthesis is an ongoing process in our Galaxy, and it was the first such radioactivity to be detected. Despite numerous efforts in stellar modeling, observation, nuclear theory, and nuclear experiment over the past four decades, the precise sites and origin of Galactic ^{26} Al remain elusive. We explore the present experimental knowledge concerning the destruction of ^{26} Al in massive stars. The precise stellar rates of neutron-induced reactions on ^{26} Al, such as (n,p) and (n, α , have among the largest impacts on the total ^{26} Al yield. Meanwhile, reactions involving the short-lived isomeric state of ^{26} Al such as radiative proton capture are highly-uncertain at present. Although we presented on-going experimental work from n_TOF at CERN with an ^{26} Al target, the present proceeding focuses only on the ^{26} Al isomeric radioactive beam production aspect and the first experimental results at CRIB.

  3. Philosophieren als Unterrichtsprinzip im Mathematikunterricht

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meerwaldt, Diana

    Philosophieren und Mathematik scheinen zunächst gegensätzliche Bereiche zu sein, die sich kaum vereinbaren lassen. Dies trifft für eine Auffassung zu, die Philosophieren als "Gerede" disqualifiziert und Mathematik als eine reine "Formelwissenschaft" begreift. Beide Auffassungen werden den Gegenständen nicht gerecht.

  4. Prospective study of cost of care at multidisciplinary ALS centers adhering to American Academy of Neurology (AAN) ALS practice parameters.

    PubMed

    Boylan, Kevin; Levine, Todd; Lomen-Hoerth, Catherine; Lyon, Mary; Maginnis, Kimberly; Callas, Peter; Gaspari, Celeste; Tandan, Rup

    2015-01-01

    Multidisciplinary care in ALS is associated with longer survival, improved quality of life, and reduced hospital admissions, but there are no published data on institutional costs associated with multidisciplinary ALS care at U.S. centers. We prospectively examined institutional costs, adherence to AAN Practice Parameters and patient satisfaction in multidisciplinary ALS clinics at 18 U.S. ALS centers. Centers reported patient volumes; direct costs for staff salary/benefits, supplies and equipment; and institutional non-salary and overhead costs over a three-month period. In 1117 patients seen during this period, mean age was 61.5 years (range 25-91 years), 56% were male, and mean ALSFRS-R score was 29. Mean total salary/benefit cost per clinic day for all providers was $2964 (range $1692-$5236 across centers). Mean salary/benefit cost per patient per clinic was $507 (range $258-$806 across centers). Differences among centers in reporting non-salary costs prevented meaningful analysis. Practice parameter adherence and patient satisfaction were high. This prospective collaborative study demonstrates the direct financial burden of evidence-based multidisciplinary ALS care in the U.S.; more refined non-salary and overhead cost data are needed to evaluate the full cost impact of care. These data may be useful in supporting evidence-based models of patient centered care for ALS.

  5. Pre-hospital emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Mark H; Habig, Karel; Wright, Christopher; Hughes, Amy; Davies, Gareth; Imray, Chirstopher H E

    2015-12-19

    Pre-hospital care is emergency medical care given to patients before arrival in hospital after activation of emergency medical services. It traditionally incorporated a breadth of care from bystander resuscitation to statutory emergency medical services treatment and transfer. New concepts of care including community paramedicine, novel roles such as emergency care practitioners, and physician delivered pre-hospital emergency medicine are re-defining the scope of pre-hospital care. For severely ill or injured patients, acting quickly in the pre-hospital period is crucial with decisions and interventions greatly affecting outcomes. The transfer of skills and procedures from hospital care to pre-hospital medicine enables early advanced care across a range of disciplines. The variety of possible pathologies, challenges of environmental factors, and hazardous situations requires management that is tailored to the patient's clinical need and setting. Pre-hospital clinicians should be generalists with a broad understanding of medical, surgical, and trauma pathologies, who will often work from locally developed standard operating procedures, but who are able to revert to core principles. Pre-hospital emergency medicine consists of not only clinical care, but also logistics, rescue competencies, and scene management skills (especially in major incidents, which have their own set of management principles). Traditionally, research into the hyper-acute phase (the first hour) of disease has been difficult, largely because physicians are rarely present and issues of consent, transport expediency, and resourcing of research. However, the pre-hospital phase is acknowledged as a crucial period, when irreversible pathology and secondary injury to neuronal and cardiac tissue can be prevented. The development of pre-hospital emergency medicine into a sub-specialty in its own right should bring focus to this period of care.

  6. Steering Patients to Safer Hospitals? The Effect of a Tiered Hospital Network on Hospital Admissions

    PubMed Central

    Scanlon, Dennis P; Lindrooth, Richard C; Christianson, Jon B

    2008-01-01

    Objective To determine if a tiered hospital benefit and safety incentive shifted the distribution of admissions toward safer hospitals. Data Sources/Study Setting A large manufacturing company instituted the hospital safety incentive (HSI) for union employees. The HSI gave union patients a financial incentive to choose hospitals that met the Leapfrog Group's three patient safety “leaps.” The analysis merges data from four sources: claims and enrollment data from the company, the American Hospital Association, the AHRQ HCUP-SID, and a state Office of the Insurance Commissioner. Study Design Changes in hospital admissions’ patterns for union and nonunion employees using a difference-in-difference design. We estimate the probability of choosing a specific hospital from a set of available alternatives using conditional logistic regression. Principal Findings Patients affiliated with the engineers’ union and admitted for a medical diagnosis were 2.92 times more likely to select a hospital designated as safer in the postperiod than in the preperiod, while salaried nonunion (SNU) patients (not subject to the financial incentive) were 0.64 times as likely to choose a compliant hospital in the post- versus preperiod. The difference-in-difference estimate, which is based on the predictions of the conditional logit model, is 0.20. However, the machinists’ union was also exposed to the incentive and they were no more likely to choose a safer hospital than the SNU patients. The incentive did not have an effect on patients admitted for a surgical diagnosis, regardless of union status. All patients were averse to travel time, but those union patients selecting an incentive hospital were less averse to travel time. Conclusions Patient price incentives and quality/safety information may influence hospital selection decisions, particularly for medical admissions, though the optimal incentive level for financial return to the plan sponsor is not clear. PMID:18761676

  7. 42 CFR 419.20 - Hospitals subject to the hospital outpatient prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hospitals subject to the hospital outpatient... FOR HOSPITAL OUTPATIENT DEPARTMENT SERVICES Categories of Hospitals and Services Subject to and Excluded From the Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment System § 419.20 Hospitals subject to the hospital...

  8. 42 CFR 419.20 - Hospitals subject to the hospital outpatient prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hospitals subject to the hospital outpatient... FOR HOSPITAL OUTPATIENT DEPARTMENT SERVICES Categories of Hospitals and Services Subject to and Excluded From the Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment System § 419.20 Hospitals subject to the hospital...

  9. 42 CFR 419.20 - Hospitals subject to the hospital outpatient prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hospitals subject to the hospital outpatient... FOR HOSPITAL OUTPATIENT DEPARTMENT SERVICES Categories of Hospitals and Services Subject to and Excluded From the Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment System § 419.20 Hospitals subject to the hospital...

  10. Characteristics of CeCoIn5/Al/AlOx/Nb and CeCoIn5/Al/AlOx/Al Tunnel Junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, C.; Nevirkovets, I.P.; Chernyashevskyy, O.; Hu, R.; Ketterson, J.B.; Sarma, B.K.

    2009-03-03

    We report characteristics of CeCoIn{sub 5}/Al/AlO{sub x}/Nb and CeCoIn{sub 5}/Al/AlO{sub x}/Al tunnel junctions fabricated on the (0 0 1) surface of CeCoIn{sub 5} crystal platelets. The main result of this work is the observation of a low Josephson current (as compared with that expected from the Ambegaokar-Baratoff formula), which is consistent with idea that the order parameter in the heavy-fermion superconductor CeCoIn{sub 5} has unconventional pairing symmetry.

  11. [Mistreatment of students in hospitals].

    PubMed

    Auslender, Valérie; Fleury, Cynthia

    2017-09-01

    Health care students are abused and mistreated in hospital: humiliation, harassment and bullying of all sorts are daily occurrences, in a highly competitive universe and difficult working environment. It is time for the managerial policy of hospitals to consider the human factor and the well-being of employees and students. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparing Candidate Hospital Report Cards

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, T.L.; Rivenburgh, R.D.; Scovel, J.C.; White, J.M.

    1997-12-31

    We present graphical and analytical methods that focus on multivariate outlier detection applied to the hospital report cards data. No two methods agree which hospitals are unusually good or bad, so we also present ways to compare the agreement between two methods. We identify factors that have a significant impact on the scoring.

  13. Facts about Hospital Worker Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... road map” to implementing a safety and health management system, featuring “success stories” and best practices from a variety of hospitals. Good recordkeeping puts powerful data at your fingertips. The first step toward solving a problem is to understand it. Fortunately, every hospital should ...

  14. Do hospital mergers reduce costs?

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Matt

    2017-03-01

    Proponents of hospital consolidation claim that mergers lead to significant cost savings, but there is little systematic evidence backing these claims. For a large sample of hospital mergers between 2000 and 2010, I estimate difference-in-differences models that compare cost trends at acquired hospitals to cost trends at hospitals whose ownership did not change. I find evidence of economically and statistically significant cost reductions at acquired hospitals. On average, acquired hospitals realize cost savings between 4 and 7 percent in the years following the acquisition. These results are robust to a variety of different control strategies, and do not appear to be easily explained by post-merger changes in service and/or patient mix. I then explore several extensions of the results to examine (a) whether the acquiring hospital/system realizes cost savings post-merger and (b) if cost savings depend on the size of the acquirer and/or the geographic overlap of the merging hospitals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. [Obstetric analgesia in Norwegian hospitals].

    PubMed

    Dahl, V; Hagen, I E; Raeder, J C

    1998-04-30

    We report the results of a questionnaire sent to anaesthetists and midwives on the use of obstetric analgesia and anaesthesia in Norwegian hospitals in 1996. 95% of the 49 hospitals involved responded to the questionnaire, representing a total of 56,884 births. The use of epidural analgesia in labour varied from 0 to 25% in the different hospitals with a mean value of 15%. Epidural analgesia was much more widely used in university and regional hospitals than in local hospitals (p < 0.001). Five of the local hospitals did not offer epidural analgesia during labour at all. The combination of low-dose local anaesthetic and an opioid (either sufentanil or fentanyl) had not been introduced in nine of the hospitals (20%). The optimal use of epidural analgesia to relieve labour pain was judged to be more frequent by the anaesthetists than by the midwives (19% versus 11%, p < 0.01). In response to what factors limited the frequency of epidural analgesia, the anaesthetists specified factors related to the attitude of the midwife, and the midwives specified factors related to the anaesthetist. Only five of the hospitals provided written information on the various analgesic methods that could be employed during labour. The majority of midwives considered the analgesic methods employed on their maternity ward to be good or excellent. The frequency of Caesarean section was 12%; spinal anaesthesia was used in 55%, epidural anaesthesia in 17%, and general anaesthesia in 28% of the cases.

  16. Faculty Internships for Hospitality Instructors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynn, Christine; Hales, Jonathan A; Wiener, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Internships can help hospitality faculty build industry relationships while also ensuring the best and most current training for their students. Many hospitality organizations have structured faculty internships available or are willing to work with faculty to provide individualized internship opportunities. Career and technical educators in…

  17. Segmentation in local hospital markets.

    PubMed

    Dranove, D; White, W D; Wu, L

    1993-01-01

    This study examines evidence of market segmentation on the basis of patients' insurance status, demographic characteristics, and medical condition in selected local markets in California in the years 1983 and 1989. Substantial differences exist in the probability patients may be admitted to particular hospitals based on insurance coverage, particularly Medicaid, and race. Segmentation based on insurance and race is related to hospital characteristics, but not the characteristics of the hospital's community. Medicaid patients are more likely to go to hospitals with lower costs and fewer service offerings. Privately insured patients go to hospitals offering more services, although cost concerns are increasing. Hispanic patients also go to low-cost hospitals, ceteris paribus. Results indicate little evidence of segmentation based on medical condition in either 1983 or 1989, suggesting that "centers of excellence" have yet to play an important role in patient choice of hospital. The authors found that distance matters, and that patients prefer nearby hospitals, moreso for some medical conditions than others, in ways consistent with economic theories of consumer choice.

  18. Occupational hazards to hospital personnel

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, W.B.; Craven, D.E.; Schwartz, D.A.; Nardell, E.A.; Kasmer, J.; Noble, J.

    1985-05-01

    Hospital personnel are subject to various occupational hazards. Awareness of these risks, compliance with basic preventive measures, and adequate resources for interventions are essential components of an occupational health program. Physical, chemical, and radiation hazards; important infectious risks; and psychosocial problems prevalent in hospital workers are reviewed. A rational approach to managing and preventing these problems is offered. 370 references.

  19. Educational Costs to Hospitalized Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martz, E. Wayne; Ptakowski, Richard

    1978-01-01

    One of the less obvious costs of educational programs is the increased volume of work-ups and treatment for hospitalized patients that are ordered by residents. In a hospital with both private teaching and private nonteaching floors, a comparison shows that service charges on teaching floors are 60 percent higher than on nonteaching floors.…

  20. Management of the Hospital Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Alvis G.

    1976-01-01

    Hospital studies indicate the need for an environmental/sanitarian specialist for control of nosocomial infection and maintenance of a quality environment. The author recommends these requirements for certification as a hospital environmentalist: academic studies including toxicology, epidemiology, hygiene, management, and an internship in…

  1. Suicidal Behavior in Hospitalized Schizophrenics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasad, Ashoka Jahnavi; Kumar, Nirmal

    1988-01-01

    Compared 131 hospitalized schizophrenics who had attempted suicide within past year to 70 hospitalized schizophrenics who had not attempted suicide, using the Present State Examination depressive symptoms. Found that schizophrenics who had attempted suicide had significantly higher number of symptoms indicative of a depressive disorder. (Author/NB)

  2. Hospitality Management Education and Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brotherton, Bob, Ed.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Seven articles on hospitality management training discuss the following: computerized management games for restaurant manager training, work placement, real-life exercises, management information systems in hospitality degree programs, modular programming, service quality concepts in the curriculum, and General National Vocational Qualifications…

  3. Management of the Hospital Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Alvis G.

    1976-01-01

    Hospital studies indicate the need for an environmental/sanitarian specialist for control of nosocomial infection and maintenance of a quality environment. The author recommends these requirements for certification as a hospital environmentalist: academic studies including toxicology, epidemiology, hygiene, management, and an internship in…

  4. Hospital dispensing. On auto pilot.

    PubMed

    Farrar, Keith; Slee, Ann; Yeats, Michael

    2002-10-10

    An automated dispensing system installed in an acute hospital has halved dispensing errors and released more than 30 per cent of technicians' time for other duties. Reducing medication errors can have a considerable effect on reducing pressure on hospital beds. Automation has considerable advantages in light of the continuing shortage of pharmacists and pharmacy technicians.

  5. Hospital association libraries: an overview.

    PubMed

    Poole, C

    1982-04-01

    Results of a survey conducted by the Library of the American Hospital Association to gather data about library and information services provided by other hospital associations are reported. Topics covered include staffing, funding, collection size, users, and services. The interface of these libraries with other health sciences libraries and the national Biomedical Communications Network (BCN) is discussed.

  6. Hospitality Management Education and Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brotherton, Bob, Ed.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Seven articles on hospitality management training discuss the following: computerized management games for restaurant manager training, work placement, real-life exercises, management information systems in hospitality degree programs, modular programming, service quality concepts in the curriculum, and General National Vocational Qualifications…

  7. Faculty Internships for Hospitality Instructors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynn, Christine; Hales, Jonathan A; Wiener, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Internships can help hospitality faculty build industry relationships while also ensuring the best and most current training for their students. Many hospitality organizations have structured faculty internships available or are willing to work with faculty to provide individualized internship opportunities. Career and technical educators in…

  8. Practicing Hospitality in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burwell, Rebecca; Huyser, Mackenzi

    2013-01-01

    This article explores pedagogical approaches to teaching students how to practice hospitality toward the other. Using case examples from the college classroom, the authors discuss the roots of Christian hospitality and educational theory on transformative learning to explore how students experience engaging with others after they have…

  9. Practicing Hospitality in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burwell, Rebecca; Huyser, Mackenzi

    2013-01-01

    This article explores pedagogical approaches to teaching students how to practice hospitality toward the other. Using case examples from the college classroom, the authors discuss the roots of Christian hospitality and educational theory on transformative learning to explore how students experience engaging with others after they have…

  10. [Hospitals as vital links].

    PubMed

    Klink, A

    2013-01-01

    The reform of the system in 2006 aimed at reducing waiting lists in an efficient manner. Performance-linked funding and regulated competition did indeed lead to improved efficiency. The other side of the coin is overtreatment, and expensive and not infrequently damaging growth in volume. In order to control costs, three strategies have been determined: agreements with an annual cap on volume; (b) collaboration of regional health-care providers with the mission of improving results in health care (with profit-sharing if costs fall); and (c) fusions reducing the number of hospitals which reduces the burden of injuries (supply no longer creates its own demand). This article comments on these strategies. The author argues for a fourth approach: if the quality of health care improves, the number of complications will fall, overtreatment will decline and the outcome will be a decrease in burden of injuries. This requires the health care insurers to modify the way they manage their contracts and methods of payment, and stimulates competition based on quality.

  11. [Medication safety in hospitals].

    PubMed

    Sleinitz, Annett; Heyde, Christian; Kloft, Charlotte

    2012-04-01

    Drug therapy is one of the most common therapeutic interventions in the medical care of in-patients. It is a complex risk-associated procedure, which is why risk prevention is of top priority in medication safety. Medical care in hospitals is organised via various forms of distribution, e.g. the traditional distribution on the ward or as computerised unit dose drug dispensing system. In order to improve medication safety, the computerised unit dose drug dispensing system was introduced in the Ruppiner Kliniken in 2009. The implementation of the system to the clinic was scientifically evaluated within the scope of a diploma thesis which focused on the examination and analysis of medication safety and its evolvement. Amongst others, medication errors were detected and classified (via DokuPIK). The thesis showed that the implementation of the computerised unit dose system had a positive impact on the reduction of consequences of common and clinically relevant medication errors, thereby enhancing medication safety for the patient.

  12. Hospital transformation and organisational learning.

    PubMed

    Ho, W

    1999-12-01

    Kwong Wah Hospital was founded by the charity organisation Tung Wah Group of Hospitals some 88 years ago, with management transfer to the Hong Kong Hospital Authority in 1991. Capitalizing both from the traditional caring culture of its founder, as well as opportunities in the new management environment, the hospital has scored remarkable successes in service quality, community partnership, organisational effectiveness, and staff development. Underpinning these transformations were Structure, Process, People, and Culture strategies. The learning imperative is heavily mandated or the success of each of these strands of development. Indeed, the embodiment of a learning organisation culture provides the impetus in sustaining the change momentum, towards achieving the Vision of becoming a 'Most Preferred Hospital' in Hong Kong.

  13. Early discharge hospital at home.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves-Bradley, Daniela C; Iliffe, Steve; Doll, Helen A; Broad, Joanna; Gladman, John; Langhorne, Peter; Richards, Suzanne H; Shepperd, Sasha

    2017-06-26

    Early discharge hospital at home is a service that provides active treatment by healthcare professionals in the patient's home for a condition that otherwise would require acute hospital inpatient care. This is an update of a Cochrane review. To determine the effectiveness and cost of managing patients with early discharge hospital at home compared with inpatient hospital care. We searched the following databases to 9 January 2017: the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care Group (EPOC) register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, and EconLit. We searched clinical trials registries. Randomised trials comparing early discharge hospital at home with acute hospital inpatient care for adults. We excluded obstetric, paediatric and mental health hospital at home schemes.   DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: We followed the standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane and EPOC. We used the GRADE approach to assess the certainty of the body of evidence for the most important outcomes. We included 32 trials (N = 4746), six of them new for this update, mainly conducted in high-income countries. We judged most of the studies to have a low or unclear risk of bias. The intervention was delivered by hospital outreach services (17 trials), community-based services (11 trials), and was co-ordinated by a hospital-based stroke team or physician in conjunction with community-based services in four trials.Studies recruiting people recovering from strokeEarly discharge hospital at home probably makes little or no difference to mortality at three to six months (risk ratio (RR) 0.92, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.57 to 1.48, N = 1114, 11 trials, moderate-certainty evidence) and may make little or no difference to the risk of hospital readmission (RR 1.09, 95% CI 0.71 to 1.66, N = 345, 5 trials, low-certainty evidence). Hospital at home may lower the risk of living in institutional setting at six months (RR 0.63, 96% CI

  14. Establishing a Hospital Response Network Among Children's Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Bartenfeld, Michael T; Griese, Stephanie E; Krug, Steven E; Andreadis, Joanne; Peacock, Georgina

    A timely and effective response to public health threats requires a broad-reaching infrastructure. Children's hospitals are focused on evaluating and managing some of the most vulnerable patients and thus have unique preparedness and response planning needs. A virtual forum was established specifically for children's hospitals during the 2014-15 Ebola outbreak, and it demonstrated the importance and utility of connecting these specialty hospitals to discuss their shared concerns. Developing a successful children's hospital response network could build the national infrastructure for addressing children's needs in preparedness and response and for enhancing preparedness and response to high-consequence pathogens. Using the Laboratory Response Network and tiered-hospital network as models, a network of children's hospitals could work together, and with government and nongovernment partners, to establish and refine best practices for treating children with pathogens of public health concern. This network could more evenly distribute hospital readiness and tertiary pediatric patient care capabilities for highly infectious diseases across the country, thus reducing the need to transport pediatric patients across the country and increasing the national capacity to care for children infected with high-consequence pathogens.

  15. The single-hospital county: is its hospital at risk?

    PubMed Central

    Chang, C F; Tuckman, H P

    1991-01-01

    This article focuses on a hospital group that has not received adequate attention in the literature: the sole provider of short-term, acute hospital care located in a county. In Tennessee, SPHs (single provider hospitals) are fewer in number but are present in more counties than multiprovider hospitals (MPHs). They are smaller in size, less labor and capital intensive, more likely to be a government hospital, and more likely to be in a rural area with low income and limited health care resources. SPHs operate with lower costs, charge patients less, and have lower revenue write-offs than MPHs. As a result, their cash flow is sufficient to fund their depreciation and they consistently earn modest returns. Between 1982 and 1988, a total of 16 hospitals failed in Tennessee but only 3 were SPHs. While SPHs have not been profitable enough to make them ideal candidates for takeover by major hospital systems, they are not a population that is unduly at risk. PMID:1905685

  16. [Alcoholism in the general hospital: 4 years mortality and hospitalization].

    PubMed

    Monras, Miquel; Mondon, Silvia; Ortega, Lluisa; Gual, Antoni

    2005-10-08

    We aimed to analyze the mortality, and emergency room and hospital admissions in a sample of alcohol dependent patients during the four years following their identification in a general hospital. 198 inpatients from a general hospital who where identified as alcohol dependent and referred during 1998 to the liaison-psychiatry service. 30.8% had died, at a mean age of 57.5 (11.3). Deaths had a direct relationship to the illness responsible for the initial admission to hospital. 42.6% of patients had previous admissions, and 74% had been previously attended at emergency room departments. During the 4 years of follow up, there were new hospital admissions (54.6%), emergency room visits (72.7%) and repeated liaison-psychiatry consultations (20%). Previous admissions to hospital predicted future admissions. Acceptance of alcohol treatment did not reduce the mortality rates. Mortality correlated with age, it was increased in patients with cognitive deficits and was reduced in those with psychiatric co-morbidity. Late detection of alcohol dependence leads to pour outcomes both in the treatment of alcohol dependence and the concomitant somatic diseases. Early detection strategies of hazardous and harmful alcohol consumption should be implemented in hospital settings.

  17. The single-hospital county: is its hospital at risk?

    PubMed

    Chang, C F; Tuckman, H P

    1991-06-01

    This article focuses on a hospital group that has not received adequate attention in the literature: the sole provider of short-term, acute hospital care located in a county. In Tennessee, SPHs (single provider hospitals) are fewer in number but are present in more counties than multiprovider hospitals (MPHs). They are smaller in size, less labor and capital intensive, more likely to be a government hospital, and more likely to be in a rural area with low income and limited health care resources. SPHs operate with lower costs, charge patients less, and have lower revenue write-offs than MPHs. As a result, their cash flow is sufficient to fund their depreciation and they consistently earn modest returns. Between 1982 and 1988, a total of 16 hospitals failed in Tennessee but only 3 were SPHs. While SPHs have not been profitable enough to make them ideal candidates for takeover by major hospital systems, they are not a population that is unduly at risk.

  18. National survey of hospital patients.

    PubMed Central

    Bruster, S.; Jarman, B.; Bosanquet, N.; Weston, D.; Erens, R.; Delbanco, T. L.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To survey patients' opinions of their experiences in hospital in order to produce data that can help managers and doctors to identify and solve problems. DESIGN--Random sample of 36 NHS hospitals, stratified by size of hospital (number of beds), area (north, midlands, south east, south west), and type of hospital (teaching or non-teaching, trust or directly managed). From each hospital a random sample of, on average, 143 patients was interviewed at home or the place of discharge two to four weeks after discharge by means of a structured questionnaire about their treatment in hospital. SUBJECTS--5150 randomly chosen NHS patients recently discharged from acute hospitals in England. Subjects had been patients on medical and surgical wards apart from paediatric, maternity, psychiatric, and geriatric wards. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Patients' responses to direct questions about preadmission procedures, admission, communication with staff, physical care, tests and operations, help from staff, pain management, and discharge planning. Patients' responses to general questions about their degree of satisfaction in hospitals. RESULTS--Problems were reported by patients, particularly with regard to communication with staff (56% (2824/5020) had not been given written or printed information); pain management (33% (1042/3162) of those suffering pain were in pain all or most of the time); and discharge planning (70% (3599/5124) had not been told about warning signs and 62% (3177/5119) had not been told when to resume normal activities). Hospitals failed to reach the standards of the Patient's Charter--for example, in explaining the treatment proposed and giving patients the option of not taking part in student training. Answers to questions about patient satisfaction were, however, highly positive but of little use to managers. CONCLUSIONS--This survey has highlighted several problems with treatment in NHS hospitals. Asking patients direct questions about what happened

  19. Hospitals: Soft Target for Terrorism?

    PubMed

    De Cauwer, Harald; Somville, Francis; Sabbe, Marc; Mortelmans, Luc J

    2017-02-01

    In recent years, the world has been rocked repeatedly by terrorist attacks. Arguably, the most remarkable were: the series of four coordinated suicide plane attacks on September 11, 2001 on buildings in New York, Virginia, and Pennsylvania, USA; and the recent series of two coordinated attacks in Brussels (Belgium), on March 22, 2016, involving two bombings at the departure hall of Brussels International Airport and a bombing at Maalbeek Metro Station located near the European Commission headquarters in the center of Brussels. This statement paper deals with different aspects of hospital policy and disaster response planning that interface with terrorism. Research shows that the availability of necessary equipment and facilities (eg, personal protective clothing, decontamination rooms, antidotes, and anti-viral drugs) in hospitals clearly is insufficient. Emergency teams are insufficiently prepared: adequate and repetitive training remain necessary. Unfortunately, there are many examples of health care workers and physicians or hospitals being targeted in both political or religious conflicts and wars. Many health workers were kidnapped and/or killed by insurgents of various ideology. Attacks on hospitals also could cause long-term effects: hospital units could be unavailable for a long time and replacing staff could take several months, further compounding hospital operations. Both physical and psychological (eg, posttraumatic stress disorder [PTSD]) after-effects of a terrorist attack can be detrimental to health care services. On the other hand, physicians and other hospital employees have shown to be involved in terrorism. As data show that some offenders had a previous history with the location of the terror incident, the possibility of hospitals or other health care services being targeted by insiders is discussed. The purpose of this report was to consider how past terrorist incidents can inform current hospital preparedness and disaster response planning

  20. Hospital law: the changing scene.

    PubMed

    Hirsh, H L

    1978-01-01

    The liability of hospitals in tort law has been a fairly recent development. Formerly, hospitals were protected from liability under the doctrine of charitable immunity. Legal "immunity" avoids liability in tort essentially under all circumstances. It is conferred not because of the particular facts of the situation but because of the status or position of the favored defendant. It does not deny the tort, merely the resulting liability. Such immunity does not mean that conduct that would amount to a tort on the part of other defendants is not still equally tortious in character, but merely that for the protection of the particular defendant, or of the interests which he represents, he is given absolution from liability. Similarly, the "captain-of-the-ship" and the attendant "borrowed or lent servant" doctrine is being abandoned. As medical technology continues to advance, the modern hospital will undoubtedly assume a greater responsibility toward its patients--with amplified medical-legal implications. The hospital is no longer a hotel where patients stay, awaiting treatment by their private physicians. The theory that the hospital does not act through its employees--physicians, nurses, and others--no longer reflects the trend in judicial philosophy. The decisions cited reflect the current trend in judicial analysis and thinking. Medical science has provided numerous benefits to humankind, but along with those benefits, numerous risks have accrued. Whether hospitals should have to bear the responsibilities inherent in such risks is a much-argued matter. However, hospital liability, in fact, is the trend of our judicial determination. The ramifications of this trend have been many. Hospitals and physicians will closely scrutinize surgical operations and other hospitals procedures and practices. The fact remains clear that responsibility for every patient is now shared by both the physicians and the hospital--share and share alike. The present thinking is that the

  1. Medical application of 26Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhausen, C.; Gerisch, P.; Heisinger, B.; Hohl, Ch.; Kislinger, G.; Korschinek, G.; Niedermayer, M.; Nolte, E.; Dumitru, M.; Alvarez-Brückmann, M.; Schneider, M.; Ittel, T. H.

    1996-06-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) measurements with 26Al as tracer were performed in order to study the aluminium metabolism and anomalies in the human body and in rats. In particular, the differences between healthy volunteers and patients with renal failure were investigated. The obtained data points of 26Al in blood and urine were described by an open compartment model with three peripheral compartments. It was found that the minimum of peripheral compartments needed to describe 26Al concentrations in blood and urine over a time period of three years is at least three.

  2. 24 CFR 242.4 - Eligible hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Eligible hospitals. 242.4 Section... INSURANCE FOR HOSPITALS General Eligibility Requirements § 242.4 Eligible hospitals. (a) The hospital to be financed with a mortgage insured under this part shall involve the construction of a new hospital, the...

  3. 2 CFR 200.52 - Hospital.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Hospital. 200.52 Section 200.52 Grants and... AWARDS Acronyms and Definitions Acronyms § 200.52 Hospital. Hospital means a facility licensed as a hospital under the law of any state or a facility operated as a hospital by the United States, a state, or...

  4. 24 CFR 242.4 - Eligible hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Eligible hospitals. 242.4 Section... INSURANCE FOR HOSPITALS General Eligibility Requirements § 242.4 Eligible hospitals. (a) The hospital to be financed with a mortgage insured under this part shall involve the construction of a new hospital, the...

  5. Reply to Gopalswamy et al.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, H. V.; Richardson, I. G.

    2003-01-01

    The comment of Gopalswamy et al. (thereafter GMY) relates to a letter discussing coronal mass ejections (CMEs), interplanetary ejecta and geomagnetic storms. GMY contend that Cane et al. incorrectly identified ejecta (interplanetary CMEs) and hypothesize that this is because Cane et al. fail to understand how to separate ejecta from "shock sheaths" when interpreting solar wind and energetic particle data sets. They (GMY) are wrong be cause the relevant section of the paper was concerned with the propagation time to 1 AU of any potentially geoeffective structures caused by CMEs, i.e. upstream compression regions with or without shocks, or ejecta. In other words, the travel times used by Cane et al. were purposefully and deliberately distinct from ejecta travel times (except for those slow ejecta, approx. 30% of their events, which generated no upstream features), and no error in identification was involved. The confusion of GMY stems from the description did not characterize the observations sufficiently clearly.

  6. In memory of Al Cameron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, John; Truran, James W.

    Al Cameron, who died recently (October 3, 2005) at 80, was one of the giants in astrophysics. His insights were profound and his interests were wide-ranging. Originally trained as a nuclear physicist, he made major contributions in a number of fields, including nuclear reactions in stars, nucleosynthesis, the abundances of the elements in the Solar System, and the origin of the Solar System and the Moon. In 1957, Cameron and, independently, Burbidge, Burbidge, Fowler and Hoyle, wrote seminal papers on nuclear astrophysics. Most of our current ideas concerning ele- ment formation in stars have followed from those two pioneering and historical works. Al also made many contributions in the field of Solar System physics. Particularly noteworthy in this regard was Cameron's work on the formation of the Moon. Al was also a good friend and mentor of young people. Al Cameron will be missed by many in the community both for his scientific contributions and for his friendship.

  7. Do hospitals cross-subsidize?

    PubMed

    David, Guy; Lindrooth, Richard C; Helmchen, Lorens A; Burns, Lawton R

    2014-09-01

    Despite its salience as a regulatory tool to ensure the delivery of unprofitable medical services, cross-subsidization of services within hospital systems has been notoriously difficult to detect and quantify. We use repeated shocks to a profitable service in the market for hospital-based medical care to test for cross-subsidization of unprofitable services. Using patient-level data from general short-term hospitals in Arizona and Colorado before and after entry by cardiac specialty hospitals, we study how incumbent hospitals adjusted their provision of three uncontested services that are widely considered to be unprofitable. We estimate that the hospitals most exposed to entry reduced their provision of psychiatric, substance-abuse, and trauma care services at a rate of about one uncontested-service admission for every four cardiac admissions they stood to lose. Although entry by single-specialty hospitals may adversely affect the provision of unprofitable uncontested services, these findings warrant further evaluation of service-line cross-subsidization as a means to finance them. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Legitimacy of hospital reconfiguration: the controversial downsizing of Kidderminster hospital.

    PubMed

    Oborn, Eivor

    2008-04-01

    This paper examines the contested organizational legitimacy of hospital reconfiguration, which continues to be a central issue in health care management. A qualitative study which focuses on the controversial downsizing of Kidderminster Hospital, a highly publicized landmark case of district general hospital closure. Rhetorical strategies are analysed to examine how legitimacy was constructed by stakeholder groups and how these strategies were used to support or resist change. Stakeholders promoting change legitimized re-organization pragmatically and morally arguing the need for centralization as a rational necessity. Stakeholders resisting change argued for cognitive and moral legitimacy in current service arrangements, contrasting local versus regionalized aspects of safety and provision. Groups managed to talk past each other, failing to establish a dialogue, which led to significant conflict and political upheaval. Stakeholders value hospitals in different ways and argue for diverse accounts of legitimacy. Broader discourses of medical science and democratic participation were drawn into rhetorical texts concerning regionalization to render them more powerful.

  9. Al-Co-Fe (030)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carow-Watamura, U.; Louzguine, D. V.; Takeuchi, A.

    This document is part of Part 1 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/9getType="URL"/> 'Systems from Ag-Al-Ca to Au-Pd-Si' of Subvolume B 'Physical Properties of Ternary Amorphous Alloys' of Volume 37 'Phase Diagrams and Physical Properties of Nonequilibrium Alloys' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains the Chapter 'Al-Co-Fe (030)' with the content:

  10. Al-La-Nb (068)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carow-Watamura, U.; Louzguine, D. V.; Takeuchi, A.

    This document is part of Part 1 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/97.etType="URL"/> 'Systems from Ag-Al-Ca to Au-Pd-Si' of Subvolume B 'Physical Properties of Ternary Amorphous Alloys' of Volume 37 'Phase Diagrams and Physical Properties of Nonequilibrium Alloys' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains the Chapter 'Al-La-Nb (068)' with the content:

  11. Al-Cu-Zr (050)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carow-Watamura, U.; Louzguine, D. V.; Takeuchi, A.

    This document is part of Part 1 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/9getType="URL"/> 'Systems from Ag-Al-Ca to Au-Pd-Si' of Subvolume B 'Physical Properties of Ternary Amorphous Alloys' of Volume 37 'Phase Diagrams and Physical Properties of Nonequilibrium Alloys' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains the Chapter 'Al-Cu-Zr (050)' with the content:

  12. Al-La-Ni (069)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carow-Watamura, U.; Louzguine, D. V.; Takeuchi, A.

    This document is part of Part 1 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/9getType="URL"/> 'Systems from Ag-Al-Ca to Au-Pd-Si' of Subvolume B 'Physical Properties of Ternary Amorphous Alloys' of Volume 37 'Phase Diagrams and Physical Properties of Nonequilibrium Alloys' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains the Chapter 'Al-La-Ni (069)' with the content:

  13. Al-Au-La (010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carow-Watamura, U.; Louzguine, D. V.; Takeuchi, A.

    This document is part of Part 1 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/9getType="URL"/> 'Systems from Ag-Al-Ca to Au-Pd-Si' of Subvolume B 'Physical Properties of Ternary Amorphous Alloys' of Volume 37 'Phase Diagrams and Physical Properties of Nonequilibrium Alloys' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains the Chapter 'Al-Au-La (010)' with the content:

  14. Al-Ce-V (029)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carow-Watamura, U.; Louzguine, D. V.; Takeuchi, A.

    This document is part of Part 1 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/97.etType="URL"/> 'Systems from Ag-Al-Ca to Au-Pd-Si' of Subvolume B 'Physical Properties of Ternary Amorphous Alloys' of Volume 37 'Phase Diagrams and Physical Properties of Nonequilibrium Alloys' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains the Chapter 'Al-Ce-V (029)' with the content:

  15. ALS: focus on purinergic signalling.

    PubMed

    Volonté, Cinzia; Apolloni, Savina; Carrì, Maria Teresa; D'Ambrosi, Nadia

    2011-10-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is one of the most common neuromuscular diseases. It is devastating and fatal, causing progressive paralysis of all voluntary muscles and eventually death, while sparing cognitive functions. A pathological hallmark of ALS is neuroinflammation mediated by non-neuronal cells in the nervous system, such as microglia and astrocytes that accelerate the disease progression. Scientists have neither found a unique key mechanism, nor an effective treatment against ALS, supposedly because it is a multi-factorial and multi-systemic disease. Extracellular purines and pyrimidines are widespread and powerful physiopathological molecules, signalling to most cell types and directing cell-to-cell communication networks. They are instrumental for instance for neurotransmission, muscle contraction and immune surveillance. Recent work has reported the crucial involvement of purinergic pathways in many neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory diseases, comprising ALS. Especially P2 receptors for ATP, P1 receptors for adenosine, and nucleotide transporters were found to be modulated in ALS cells and tissues, playing a potential role in the disease. Given the composite cellular cross-talk occurring during ALS and the established action of extracellular purines/pyrimidines as neuron-to-glia alarm signal in the nervous system, a mutual query in these two fields should now be whether, how and when purinergic would meet ALS. In this review, we will highlight the early cellular and molecular purinergic cross-talk that participates to ALS etiopathology, with the conviction that better understanding of purinergic dynamics might provide original research perspectives, stimulate alternative disease modelling, and the design and testing of more powerful targeted therapeutics against this relentlessly progressive disorder. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Hospitals' evolution through the ages].

    PubMed

    de Micheli, Alfredo

    2005-01-01

    The predecessor institutions of modern hospitals--Byzantine nosocómeion, European hospitale and Islamic maristan--were dissimilar both in their patients and their aims. The first charitable organizations in West Europe (Rome) and in the East (Cesarea in Cappadocia) were rather hospices. After the collapse of the Western Roman Empire (476 A.D.), some monastic centers were prepared to provide medical assistance to religious and secular patients. Since the XI and XII Centuries in all of Christian Europe the charitable institutions, designated as hospitale, multiplied. Among the Italian ones, the Roman Santo Spirito (Holy Ghost) Hospital, built in the 1201-1204 period, reached a preeminet position. This one soon became the most important of the entire Christendom (archihospital), with a lot of affiliated hospitals in Europe and later in America. The first American hospital, Saint Nicholas Hospital, opened on December 29, 1503 in Santo Domingo, obtained in 1541 its affiliation to the Santo Spirito archihospital. Regarding continental America, the first health centers were established in Mexico: the Immaculate Conception Hospital and the Saint Lazarus Hospital, both established by Hernán Cortés. For its part, clinical teaching was systematized at the Saint Francis Hospital in Padua and by there moved to Leyden. In Mexico, the chair of medical clinics or practical medicine was established in 1806 at the Saint Andrew Hospital. During the XX century, Dr. Ignacio Chávez was the driving force behind the creation of the modern Mexican Health Institutes. These ones are dedicated to the treatment of poor patients, as well as to medical teaching and research.

  17. The status of hospital information systems in Iranian hospitals.

    PubMed

    Jahanbakhsh, Maryam; Sharifi, Mohammed; Ayat, Masar

    2014-08-01

    The area of e-Health is broad and has an excellent growth potential. An increasing number of experts believe that e-Health will fuel the next breakthroughs in health system improvements throughout the world, but there is frequent evidence of unsustainable use of e-Health systems in medical centres, particularly hospitals, for different reasons in different countries. Iran is also a developing country which is presently adopting this promising technology for its traditional healthcare delivery but there is not much information about the use of e-Health systems in its hospitals, and the weakness and opportunities of utilization of such Hospital Information Systems (HIS). For this research, a number of Hospitals from Isfahan, Iran, are selected using convenient sampling. E-health research professionals went there to observe their HIS and collect required data as a qualitative survey. The design of interview questions was based on the researchers' experiences and knowledge in this area along with elementary interviews with experts on HIS utilization in hospitals. Efficient administration of e-health implementation improves the quality of healthcare, reduces costs and medical errors, makes healthcare resources available to rural areas, etc. However, there are numerous issues affecting the successful utilization of e-health in Hospitals, such as a lack of a perfect HIS implementation plan and well-defined strategy, inadequate IT-security for the protection of e-health-related data, improper training and educational issues, legal challenges, privacy concerns, improper documentation of lessons learned, resistance to the application of new technologies, and finally a lack of recovery plan and disaster management. These results along with some informative stories are extracted from interview sessions to uncover associated challenges of HIS utilization in Iranian hospitals. The utilization of e-health in Iranian hospitals, particularly those in Isfahan, is subject to several

  18. The Status of Hospital Information Systems in Iranian Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Jahanbakhsh, Maryam; Sharifi, Mohammed; Ayat, Masar

    2014-01-01

    Background: The area of e-Health is broad and has an excellent growth potential. An increasing number of experts believe that e-Health will fuel the next breakthroughs in health system improvements throughout the world, but there is frequent evidence of unsustainable use of e-Health systems in medical centres, particularly hospitals, for different reasons in different countries. Iran is also a developing country which is presently adopting this promising technology for its traditional healthcare delivery but there is not much information about the use of e-Health systems in its hospitals, and the weakness and opportunities of utilization of such Hospital Information Systems (HIS). Methods: For this research, a number of Hospitals from Isfahan, Iran, are selected using convenient sampling. E-health research professionals went there to observe their HIS and collect required data as a qualitative survey. The design of interview questions was based on the researchers’ experiences and knowledge in this area along with elementary interviews with experts on HIS utilization in hospitals. Results: Efficient administration of e-health implementation improves the quality of healthcare, reduces costs and medical errors, makes healthcare resources available to rural areas, etc. However, there are numerous issues affecting the successful utilization of e-health in Hospitals, such as a lack of a perfect HIS implementation plan and well-defined strategy, inadequate IT-security for the protection of e-health-related data, improper training and educational issues, legal challenges, privacy concerns, improper documentation of lessons learned, resistance to the application of new technologies, and finally a lack of recovery plan and disaster management. These results along with some informative stories are extracted from interview sessions to uncover associated challenges of HIS utilization in Iranian hospitals. Conclusion: The utilization of e-health in Iranian hospitals

  19. Potential for Hospital Based Corneal Retreival in Hassan District Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Melsakkare, Suresh Ramappa; Manipur, Sahana R.; Acharya, Pavana; Ramamurthy, Lakshmi Bomalapura

    2015-01-01

    Context In developing countries, corneal diseases are the second leading cause of blindness. This corneal blindness can be treated through corneal transplantation. Though the present infrastructure is strong enough to increase keratoplasty numbers at a required rate, India has largest corneal blind population in the world. So a constant supply of high quality donor corneal tissue is the key factor for reduction of prevalence of corneal blindness. Considering the magnitude of corneal blindness and shortage of donor cornea, there is a huge gap in the demand and supply. Aim To study the potential for hospital based retrieval of donor corneal tissue in Hassan district hospital after analysing the indicated and contraindicated causes of deaths, so that hospital corneal retrieval program in Hassan district hospital can be planned. Materials and Methods The cross-sectional, retrospective and record-based study included all hospital deaths with age group more than two years occurred during one year period (January 2014 to December 2014). Data regarding demographic profile, cause of death, treatment given and presence of any systemic diseases were collected. The causes of deaths which are contraindicated for the retrieval of corneas were analysed and noted. The contraindications were based on the NPCB guidelines for standard of eye banking in India 2009. Results Out of 855 deaths, number of deaths in males (565) was greater than females (290). Numbers of deaths were highest between 41-60 years age group (343). Deaths due to HIV, septicaemia, meningitis, encephalitis, disseminated malignancies were contraindicated for corneal retrieval. Corneas could be retrieved from 736 deaths out of 855. Potential for corneal retrieval in a period of one year in Hassan District hospital was 86%. Conclusion Hospital corneal retrieval program has got a great potential to bridge the gap between the need for the cornea and actually collected corneas which will contribute enormously in

  20. Internet connectivity for hospitals and hospital libraries: strategies.

    PubMed

    Fuller, S S

    1995-01-01

    Access to Internet resources and communications has rapidly become a necessity in many hospitals nationally. The results of a Pacific Northwest pilot Intenet connections project provides important evidence of the value of librarians in establishing such connections in their institutions The pilot project has resulted in a wealth of information regarding approaches to promoting the utility of the Internet to health professionals in hospitals. Roles that librarians are playing in support of such connections include facilitator, negotiator, provider, publisher, integrator, and educator.

  1. Energy audits at 48 hospitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirst, E.

    1981-11-01

    Staff at the Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) conducted energy audits at 48 hospitals in four states (New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Tennessee) between 1978 and 1980. Staff at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and ORAU developed and organized a computerized data base containing information from these audits. This paper describes the ORAU audit process; summarizes the data collected from these audits on hospital characteristics annual energy use, and the audit recommendations; and analyzes the audit data in terms of cost effectiveness, type of recommendations, and the relationship between potential energy saving and characteristics of the individual hospital.

  2. Hospitals, providers collaborate on transitions.

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    Baystate Health, a three-hospital system with headquarters in Springfield, MA, is partnering with post-acute providers to improve transitions as patients move through the continuum of care. A multidisciplinary post-acute performance team partnered with post-acute providers to determine why patients are readmitted to the hospital and to work on ways to avoid readmissions. Facilities share information with the hospitals how they operate and what they need to ensure patients receive the care they need. The health system's director of post-acute services holds regular meetings with providers to brainstorm on improving patient care.

  3. A computerized hospital maintenance system.

    PubMed

    Kresch, E; Katz, P; Schwartz, H; Hamarman, H

    1985-01-01

    The Biomedical Instrumentation Department at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital maintains most of the clinical equipment owned by the hospital and provides support to six other hospitals, as well. In order to document these services, a computerized support system has been developed. This system maintains the inventory of equipment, documents the occurrence of repair and preventive maintenance procedures, generates lists of items due for maintenance and inspection, and prints reports and summaries of all activities performed by department staff. The system was designed for ease of use and requires a minimum of training for personnel who use it.

  4. The National Demonstration Hospitals Program.

    PubMed

    Alexander, A

    2000-01-01

    Fifty-five public hospitals in all Australian States and Territories participated in the first two phases of National Demonstration Hospitals Program (NDHP). The program was established in 1994 as part of a commitment by the then Department of Health and Family Services to reduce waiting times and improve health outcomes for patients. The program uses a collaborative approach to assist public hospitals to improve service delivery and patient care outcomes. Key results from Phases 1 and 2 of the NDHP have confirmed that identification of industry best practice, collaboration, knowledge sharing and innovation are key elements required to achieve positive health care reforms.

  5. [Adaptation of children to hospitalization].

    PubMed

    Kneist, W; Spangenberg, B

    1979-04-01

    Infants especially of about 1 to 4 years of age are opposed to an unknown environment and to unusual demands when they are admissed to hospital. Literature informes about some characteristic troubles during the first time of adaptation. In addition to those kinds of transitory adaptional difficulties, physical and mental retardation of development may appear when infants become long-time patients. The socalled psychic hospitalism has to be valued as a sign of underprotection and differs from adaptional troubles as a symptom of full strain. The survey shows adequate measures how physicians and nurses may deal with both of the problems in order to ease adaptation and to prevent psychic hospitalism.

  6. New developments in hospital management.

    PubMed

    Welch, J R; Kleiner, B H

    1995-01-01

    Changes in the health care environment over the past ten years have prompted changes in the way hospitals are being managed. The rising cost of health care has affected Medicare reimbursement, caused business to be a discerning selector of medical care, and given birth to alternative forms of health care delivery. All these conditions have resulted in decreased revenue and increased competition for hospitals. Focuses on what hospitals have done to adapt to these changing conditions: cost containment, marketing strategies, and human resource management, since these areas have undergone the most meaningful changes.

  7. A Decomposition of Hospital Profitability

    PubMed Central

    Broom, Kevin; Elliott, Michael; Lee, Jen-Fu

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This paper evaluates the drivers of profitability for a large sample of U.S. hospitals. Following a methodology frequently used by financial analysts, we use a DuPont analysis as a framework to evaluate the quality of earnings. By decomposing returns on equity (ROE) into profit margin, total asset turnover, and capital structure, the DuPont analysis reveals what drives overall profitability. Methods: Profit margin, the efficiency with which services are rendered (total asset turnover), and capital structure is calculated for 3,255 U.S. hospitals between 2007 and 2012 using data from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services’ Healthcare Cost Report Information System (CMS Form 2552). The sample is then stratified by ownership, size, system affiliation, teaching status, critical access designation, and urban or non-urban location. Those hospital characteristics and interaction terms are then regressed (OLS) against the ROE and the respective DuPont components. Sensitivity to regression methodology is also investigated using a seemingly unrelated regression. Results: When the sample is stratified by hospital characteristics, the results indicate investor-owned hospitals have higher profit margins, higher efficiency, and are substantially more leveraged. Hospitals in systems are found to have higher ROE, margins, and efficiency but are associated with less leverage. In addition, a number of important and significant interactions between teaching status, ownership, location, critical access designation, and inclusion in a system are documented. Many of the significant relationships, most notably not-for-profit ownership, lose significance or are predominately associated with one interaction effect when interaction terms are introduced as explanatory variables. Results are not sensitive to the alternative methodology. Conclusion: The results of the DuPont analysis suggest that although there appears to be convergence in the behavior of NFP and IO

  8. [Hospital governance and the structure of German hospital supervisory boards].

    PubMed

    Kuntz, L; Pulm, J; Wittland, M

    2014-06-01

    When thinking about corporate governance frequently the supervisory board comes to mind. The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between the participation of single professions in the supervisory board and hospital financial performance. Based on governance codes, relevant professions that should be part of the supervisory board are identified. With the help of a multiple regression, the relationship between the fractions of these professions in the supervisory board and the return on assets in the year 2009 is examined. The sample consists of 182 hospitals. The study shows that participation of physicians in the supervisory board is related to a higher return on assets. Furthermore, the association between the fractions of nurses and politicians and hospitals financial performance is ­negative. The composition of the supervisory board has a significant effect on hospital performance; it is an important issue for hospital owners. The present study identifies only one positive relationship between the involvement of physicians and financial performance. Other professions could be relevant in achieving other objectives. Further studies are necessary to analyse the effects on other dimensions of hospital performance, e. g., on quality. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Logistics in hospitals: a case study of some Singapore hospitals.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zhi Xiong; Pokharel, Shaligram

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate logistics activities in Singapore hospitals. It defines various types of activities handled by a logistics division. Inventory management policy and the use of information and communication technologies (ICT) for logistics purposes are also discussed. The study identifies the nature of strategic alliances in Singapore's health care industry. This study was conducted by utilizing a framework for data collection, pre-testing the questionnaire and conducting interviews. Various relevant literature was reviewed to design the questionnaire. This study finds that logistics division carry out many related activities and some of them also provide engineering services. The hospitals make use of ICT. The hospitals are clustered under various groups to minimize the cost of operation, including the logistics related costs. However, hospitals do not see alliances with suppliers as a strategic option; rather they focus on outsourcing of logistics services. The findings also show that Singapore hospitals have a good stocking policy for both medical and non-medical items so that changes in patient mix can be easily handled. Singapore is continuously improving its health care industry and therefore, the findings will help hospitals in other regions to adopt some of the practices, like concentrating on local vendors, outsourcing, clustering, and maximum use of information technology as competitive factors that can improve the service and reduce the cost of operation. The paper suggests motivators and barriers to the use of ICT in logistics in the health care industry.

  10. 78 FR 38679 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-27

    ...-AR53 Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Proposed Fiscal Year 2014 Rates; Quality Reporting Requirements for Specific Providers; Hospital Conditions of Participation; Corrections AGENCY...

  11. 75 FR 29479 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs: Proposed Changes Affecting Hospital and Critical Access Hospital...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-26

    ... Changes Affecting Hospital and Critical Access Hospital (CAH) Conditions of Participation (CoPs... conditions of participation (CoPs) for both hospitals and critical access hospitals (CAHs). These revisions...). [[Page 29480

  12. Comparing the Thermodynamic Behaviour of Al(1)+ZrO2(s) to Al(1)+Al2O3(s)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copland, Evan

    2004-01-01

    In an effort to better determine the thermodynamic properties of Al(g) and Al2O(g). the vapor in equilibrium with Al(l)+ZrO2(s) was compared to the vapor in equilibrium with Al(l)+Al2O3(s) over temperature range 1197-to-1509K. The comparison was made directly by Knudsen effusion-cell mass spectrometry with an instrument configured for a multiple effusion-cell vapor source (multi-cell KEMS). Second law enthalpies of vaporization of Al(g) and Al2O(g) together with activity measurements show that Al(l)+ZrO2(s) is thermodynamically equivalent to Al(l)+Al2O3(s), indicating Al(l) remained pure and Al2O3(s) was present in the ZrO2-cell. Subsequent observation of the Al(l)/ZrO2 and vapor/ZrO2 interfaces revealed a thin Al2O3-layer had formed, separating the ZrO2-cell from Al(l) and Al(g)+Al2O(g), effectively transforming it into an Al2O3 effusion-cell. This behavior agrees with recent observations made for Beta-NiAl(Pt) alloys measured in ZrO2 effusion-cell.

  13. CDC Vital Signs: Hospital Actions Affect Breastfeeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... Read the MMWR Science Clips Hospital Actions Affect Breastfeeding Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on ... in many US hospitals do not fully support breastfeeding. Some of the Ten Steps on which hospitals ...

  14. Hospital Room Floors May Harbor 'Superbugs'

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_163886.html Hospital Room Floors May Harbor 'Superbugs' But that area often overlooked when it comes ... Hospital room floors may be more of a "superbug" threat than many hospital staffers realize, new research ...

  15. State tort reforms and hospital malpractice costs.

    PubMed

    Ellington, Charles R; Dodoo, Martey; Phillips, Robert; Szabat, Ronald; Green, Larry; Bullock, Kim

    2010-01-01

    This study explored the relation between state medical liability reform measures, hospital malpractice costs, and hospital solvency. It suggests that state malpractice caps are desirable but not essential for improved hospital financial solvency or viability.

  16. Improve Hospital-to-Home Transitions

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the hospital. One study found that seniors hospitalized with heart failure often have multiple medical conditions, and they have the highest hospital readmission rate of all adult patient groups. This indicates a serious breakdown during the ...

  17. [Crisis unit at the general hospital: Determinants of further hospitalization].

    PubMed

    Norotte, C; Omnès, C; Crozier, C; Verlyck, C; Romanos, M

    2016-10-10

    The availability of short-stay beds for brief admission (less than 72hours) of crisis patients presenting to the emergency room is a model that has gained a growing interest because it allows time for developing alternatives to psychiatric hospitalization and favors a maintained functioning in the community. Still, the determinants influencing the disposition decision at discharge after crisis intervention remain largely unexplored. The primary objective of this study was to determine the factors predicting aftercare dispositions at crisis unit discharge: transfer for further hospitalization or return to the community. Secondary objectives included the description of clinical and socio-demographic characteristics of patients admitted to the crisis unit upon presentation to the emergency room. All patients (n=255) admitted to the short-stay unit of the emergency department of Rambouillet General Hospital during a one-year period were included in the study. Patient characteristics were collected in a retrospective manner from medical records: patterns of referral, acute stressors, presenting symptoms, initial patient demand, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, 5th edition (DSM-5) disorders, psychiatric history, and socio-demographic characteristics were inferred. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine the factors associated with hospitalization decision upon crisis intervention at discharge. Following crisis intervention at the short-stay unit, 100 patients (39.2%) required further hospitalization and were transferred. Statistically significant factors associated with a higher probability of hospitalization (P<0.05) included the patient's initial wish to be hospitalized (OR=4.28), the presence of a comorbid disorder (OR=3.43), a referral by family or friends (OR=2.89), a history of psychiatric hospitalization (OR=2.71) and suicidal ideation on arrival in the emergency room (OR=2.26). Conversely, significant factors associated with a lower probability of

  18. Diversification in the hospital industry.

    PubMed

    Eastaugh, Steven R

    2008-01-01

    An institution life cycle hypothesis is advanced to explain hospital behavior: boom and bust, diversification and divestiture, occasionally leading to closure or merger. Hospital diversification and its impact on the operating ratio are studied for 172 hospitals during the period 2002-2007. Diversification and operating ratio are modeled in a two-stage least squares (TSLS) framework as being jointly dependant. Institutional diversification is found to yield better financial position, and the better operating profits allow the institution the wherewithal to diversify. The impact of external government planning and hospital competition is also measured. Some services are in a growth phase, like bariatric weight loss surgery and sleep disorder clinics. Management's attitude concerning risk and reward is considered.

  19. Health Hazards of Hospital Personnel

    PubMed Central

    Clever, Linda Hawes

    1981-01-01

    Health care workers historically have faced serious health problems, such as exposure to patients with tuberculosis. For hospital personnel today, a number of hazards exist. These range from toxic substance exposure to safety hazards presented by patients themselves. PMID:7281652

  20. Play for Children in Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardgrove, Carol; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Contains six short articles on therapeutic play. Each article is an edited version of a paper delivered at the XIV World Congress of Pediatrics in Buenos Aires on the subject of children in the hospital. (JMB)

  1. Preventing Infections in the Hospital

    MedlinePlus

    ... and your doctor discuss the best way to control your blood sugar before, during, and after your hospital stay. High blood sugar increases the risk of infection noticeably. If you are overweight, losing weight will ...

  2. Aerospace technology and hospital systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The use of aerospace medical techniques to improve the quality of earth health care systems is discussed. Data are focused on physiological measurements and monitoring, medical information management, clean room technology, and reliability and quality assurance for hospital equipment.

  3. Public policy regarding specialty hospitals.

    PubMed

    Dowd, Bryan E

    2008-10-01

    Why do we need "public policy" regarding specialty hospitals? What is the rationale for government involvement in decisions by the private sector to invest in specialty hospitals? Two possibilities are reduced access to services primarily by the uninsured (a fairness concern) and changes in the types of patients receiving care resulting from poor consumer information (an efficiency concern). The fairness argument faces logical and empirical difficulties, and even if it proved to be true, it is not clear that limiting the growth of specialty hospitals would be an efficient way to address the problem. However, there is some empirical evidence to support the efficiency concern, and if specialty hospitals result in the treatment of patients with lower expected net benefits from treatment, then it is possible that physician-owned facilities could result in an increasingly inefficient allocation of health care resources, higher insurance premiums, and higher rates of uninsurance.

  4. Recommendations for managing hospital closure.

    PubMed

    van der Wal, R; Bouthillette, F; Havlovic, S J

    1998-01-01

    An acute care hospital was closed by the British Columbia Ministry of Health in 1993. A research study was conducted to investigate the ways closure of the hospital affected hospital employees and to identify ways to facilitate the closure/reorganization process. Unstructured interviews were conducted with 25 employees around the time of closure and six months after the closure. In the category Living with Closure, six themes arose from the qualitative analysis. They related to (1) provision of information; (2) effect of closure on the working environment and colleagues; (3) perceived stress; (4) recognition of one's worth; (5) provision of support services; and (6) the process of having a new job. The authors offer recommendations stemming from the analysis, which are intended to assist others planning for future hospital reorganizations or closures.

  5. Standards for hospital libraries 2002

    PubMed Central

    Gluck, Jeannine Cyr; Hassig, Robin Ackley; Balogh, Leeni; Bandy, Margaret; Doyle, Jacqueline Donaldson; Kronenfeld, Michael R.; Lindner, Katherine Lois; Murray, Kathleen; Petersen, JoAn; Rand, Debra C.

    2002-01-01

    The Medical Library Association's “Standards for Hospital Libraries 2002” have been developed as a guide for hospital administrators, librarians, and accrediting bodies to ensure that hospitals have the resources and services to effectively meet their needs for knowledge-based information. Specific requirements for knowledge-based information include that the library be a separate department with its own budget. Knowledge-based information in the library should be directed by a qualified librarian who functions as a department head and is a member of the Academy of Health Information Professionals. The standards define the role of the medical librarian and the links between knowledge-based information and other functions such as patient care, patient education, performance improvement, and education. In addition, the standards address the development and implementation of the knowledge-based information needs assessment and plans, the promotion and publicity of the knowledge-based information services, and the physical space and staffing requirements. The role, qualifications, and functions of a hospital library consultant are outlined. The health sciences library is positioned to play a key role in the hospital. The increasing use of the Internet and new information technologies by medical, nursing, and allied health staffs; patients; and the community require new strategies, strategic planning, allocation of adequate resources, and selection and evaluation of appropriate information resources and technologies. The Hospital Library Standards Committee has developed this document as a guideline to be used in facing these challenges. Editor's Note: The “Standards for Hospital Libraries 2002” were approved by the members of the Hospital Library Section during MLA '02 in Dallas, Texas. They were subsequently approved by Section Council and received final approval from the MLA Board of Directors in June 2002. They succeed the Standards for Hospital Libraries

  6. Hospital financial performance trends to watch.

    PubMed

    Schuhmann, Thomas M

    2008-07-01

    Hospitals may wish to compare their performance with that of their peers to identify areas for possible improvement. Comparing financial indicators over five years shows directional trends and the influence of environmental factors such as regulatory change. For-profit hospitals appear to outperform their not-for-profit counterparts. Rural hospitals generally exhibit better financial performance than urban hospitals. Nonteaching hospitals show more desirable operating margins than teaching hospitals.

  7. Facility management in German hospitals.

    PubMed

    Gudat, H

    2000-04-01

    Facility management and optimum building management offer for hospitals a chance to reduce costs and to increase quality, process sequences, employee motivation and customer satisfaction. Some years ago simple services such as cleaning, catering or laundry were outsourced. Now, German hospitals progress to more complex fields such as building and medical technology, clinical support processes such as pharmacy, central laboratory and sterilization, goods and logistics services.

  8. What's new in tent hospitals?

    PubMed

    Laufman, H

    1989-06-01

    There will always be a need for some kind of rapidly deployable, easy to assemble, temporary shelter for use in military conflicts, large-scale military disasters, industrial accidents, major construction projects in remote areas, refugee relocation centers, military hospitals, and any temporary outdoor event requiring cover. The history of tenting is essentially a history of man's ingenuity in creating portable, rapidly erected, temporary shelter. This article will be limited to the stages of development of the latest in military tent hospitals.

  9. Parenteral nutrition in hospital pharmacies.

    PubMed

    Katoue, Maram Gamal; Al-Taweel, Dalal; Matar, Kamal Mohamed; Kombian, Samuel B

    2016-07-11

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to explore parenteral nutrition (PN) practices in hospital pharmacies of Kuwait and identify potential avenues for quality improvement in this service. Design/methodology/approach - A descriptive, qualitative study about PN practices was conducted from June 2012 to February 2013 in Kuwait. Data were collected via in-depth semi-structured interviews with the head total parenteral nutrition (TPN) pharmacists at seven hospitals using a developed questionnaire. The questionnaire obtained information about the PN service at each hospital including the existence of nutritional support teams (NSTs), PN preparation practices, quality controls and guidelines/protocols. The interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analyzed for content. Findings - Seven hospitals in Kuwait provided PN preparation service through TPN units within hospital pharmacies. Functional NSTs did not exist in any of these hospitals. All TPN units used paper-based standard PN order forms for requesting PN. The content of PN order forms and PN formulas labeling information were inconsistent across hospitals. Most of the prepared PN formulas were tailor-made and packed in single compartment bags. Quality controls used included gravimetric analysis and visual inspection of PN formulations, and less consistently reported periodic evaluation of the aseptic techniques. Six TPN units independently developed PN guidelines/protocols. Originality/value - This study revealed variations in many aspects of PN practices among the hospitals in Kuwait and provided recommendations to improve this service. Standardization of PN practices would enhance the quality of care provided to patients receiving PN and facilitate national monitoring. This can be accomplished through the involvement of healthcare professionals with expertise in nutrition support working within proactive NSTs.

  10. Air handling units for hospitals.

    PubMed

    Amoroso, V; Gjestvang, R

    1989-10-01

    Air handling units should provide proper quality and conditioned air to various hospital areas. Unit capacity should be able to meet limited space functionality or load changes as well as any smoke control requirements. System components should be readily accessible and appropriate for spaces served. In summary, engineers should consider the following: Environmental design criteria for area being served Components desired Unit type required Economic issues affecting design. Using this approach, design engineers can design hospital air handling units methodically and logically.

  11. [Flexibility and safety in hospitals].

    PubMed

    Fara, G M; Barni, M

    2011-01-01

    The paper explains the reasons according to which the newly-planned hospitals must adopt the concept of advanced flexibility (structural, technological, organizational, diagnostic and therapeutic), in order to avoid the risk of being already obsolete at the moment of their opening, and this due to the fact that too much time elapses in this Country between the moment of planning a new hospital and the moment of the start of its activity. Flexibility is needed at different levels: at low or medium levels for what concerns administrative spaces and also patient rooms (except, in this latter case, when differential intensity of care is adopted); at advanced levelfor what concerns diagnostic and therapeutic areas, which must be rapidly adaptable to new solutions offered by advances in technology and organization. From a different standpoint, flexibility applies also to the fact that hospital must increasingly become a node of a large net including territorial health services: the latter devoted to take care of chronicity, while hospitals should concentrate on acute pathology. Of course the territory surrounding the hospital, through its outpatient service and consultories, is in charge also for first level diagnosy and therapy, leaving the hospital to more sophisticated activities.

  12. [Redesigning the hospital discharge process].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ramos, M; Flores-Pardo, E; Uris-Sellés, J

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this article is to show that the redesign and planning process of hospital discharge advances the departure time of the patient from a hospital environment. Quasi-experimental study conducted from January 2011 to April 2013, in a local hospital. The cases analysed were from medical and surgical nursing units. The process was redesigned to coordinate all the professionals involved in the process. The hospital discharge improvement process improvement was carried out by forming a working group, the analysis of retrospective data, identifying areas for improvement, and its redesign. The dependent variable was the time of patient administrative discharge. The sample was classified as pre-intervention, inter-intervention, and post-intervention, depending on the time point of the study. The final sample included 14,788 patients after applying the inclusion and exclusion criteria. The mean discharge release time decreased significantly by 50 min between pre-intervention and post-intervention periods. The release time in patients with planned discharge was one hour and 25 min less than in patients with unplanned discharge. Process redesign is a useful strategy to improve the process of hospital discharge. Besides planning the discharge, it is shown that the patient leaving the hospital before 12 midday is a key factor. Copyright © 2015 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Random output and hospital performance.

    PubMed

    Barros, Pedro Pita

    2003-11-01

    Many countries are under pressure to reform health care financing and delivery. Hospital care is one part of the health system that is under scrutiny. Private management initiatives are a possible way to increase efficiency in health care delivery. This motivates the interest in developing methodologies to assess hospital performance, recognizing hospitals as a different sort of firm. We present a simple way to describe hospital production: hospital output as a change in the distribution of survival probabilities. This output definition allows us to separate hospital production from patients' characteristics. The notion of "better performance" has a precise meaning: (first-order) stochastic dominance of a distribution of survival probabilities over another distribution. As an illustration, we compare, for an important DRG, private and public management and find that private management performs better, mainly in the range of high-survival probabilities. The measured performance difference cannot be attributed to input prices or to economies of scale and/or scope. It reflects pure technological and organisational differences.

  14. Foodborne listeriosis acquired in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Silk, Benjamin J; McCoy, Morgan H; Iwamoto, Martha; Griffin, Patricia M

    2014-08-15

    Listeriosis is characterized by bacteremia or meningitis. We searched for listeriosis case series and outbreak investigations published in English by 2013, and assessed the strength of evidence for foodborne acquisition among patients who ate hospital food. We identified 30 reports from 13 countries. Among the case series, the median proportion of cases considered to be hospital-acquired was 25% (range, 9%-67%). The median number of outbreak-related illnesses considered to be hospital-acquired was 4.0 (range, 2-16). All patients were immunosuppressed in 18 of 24 (75%) reports with available data. Eight outbreak reports with strong evidence for foodborne acquisition in a hospital implicated sandwiches (3 reports), butter, precut celery, Camembert cheese, sausage, and tuna salad (1 report each). Foodborne acquisition of listeriosis among hospitalized patients is well documented internationally. The number of listeriosis cases could be reduced substantially by establishing hospital policies for safe food preparation for immunocompromised patients and by not serving them higher-risk foods.

  15. Candiduria in hospitalized patients in teaching hospitals of Ahvaz.

    PubMed

    Zarei-Mahmoudabadi, A; Zarrin, M; Ghanatir, F; Vazirianzadeh, B

    2012-12-01

    Nosocomial infections are usually acquired during hospitalization. Fungal infection of the urinary tract is increasing due to predisposing factors such as; antibacterial agents, indwelling urinary catheters, diabetes mellitus, long hospitalization, immunosuppressive agents, use of IV catheters, radiation therapy, malignancy. The aim of our study was to determine the prevalence of candiduria and urinary tract infection in patients admitted in Golestan and Emam Khomeini hospitals of Ahvaz, Iran. During 14 months, a total of 744 urine samples were collected and transferred to medical mycology laboratory immediately. Ten µl of uncentrifuged sample was cultured on CHROM agar Candida plates and incubated at 37°C for 24-48h aerobically. Candida species were identified based on colony morphology on CHROM agar Candida, germ tube production and micro-morphology on corn meal agar including 1% Tween 80. In the present study, 744 hospitalized patients were sampled (49.5%, female; 50.5%, male). The prevalence of candiduria in subjects was 16.5% that included 65.1% female and 34.9% male. The most common isolates were C. albicans (53.3%), followed by C. glabrata (24.4%), C. tropicalis (3.7%), C. krusei (2.2%), and Geotrichum spp. (0.7%) Urine cultures yielded more than 10,000 yeast colonies in 34.1% of cases, and the major predisposing factor associated with candiduria was antibiotic therapy (69.1%). Candiduria is relatively common in hospitalized patients in educational hospitals of Ahvaz. In addition, there is a strong correlation between the incidence of candiduria in hospitalized patients and broad-spectrum antibiotics therapy.

  16. Ab initio modeling of zincblende AlN layer in Al-AlN-TiN multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, S. K. E-mail: yadav.satyesh@gmail.com Liu, X.-Y. E-mail: yadav.satyesh@gmail.com; Wang, J.

    2016-06-14

    An unusual growth mechanism of metastable zincblende AlN thin film by diffusion of nitrogen atoms into Al lattice is established. Using first-principles density functional theory, we studied the possibility of thermodynamic stability of AlN as a zincblende phase due to epitaxial strains and interface effect, which fails to explain the formation of zincblende AlN. We then compared the formation energetics of rocksalt and zincblende AlN in fcc Al through direct diffusion of nitrogen atoms to Al octahedral and tetrahedral interstitials. The formation of a zincblende AlN thin film is determined to be a kinetically driven process, not a thermodynamically driven process.

  17. Admission avoidance hospital at home.

    PubMed

    Shepperd, Sasha; Iliffe, Steve; Doll, Helen A; Clarke, Mike J; Kalra, Lalit; Wilson, Andrew D; Gonçalves-Bradley, Daniela C

    2016-09-01

    Admission avoidance hospital at home provides active treatment by healthcare professionals in the patient's home for a condition that otherwise would require acute hospital inpatient care, and always for a limited time period. This is the third update of the original review. To determine the effectiveness and cost of managing patients with admission avoidance hospital at home compared with inpatient hospital care. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, two other databases, and two trials registers on 2 March 2016. We checked the reference lists of eligible articles. We sought unpublished studies by contacting providers and researchers who were known to be involved in the field. Randomised controlled trials recruiting participants aged 18 years and over. Studies comparing admission avoidance hospital at home with acute hospital inpatient care. We followed the standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane and the Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) Group. We performed meta-analysis for trials that compared similar interventions and reported comparable outcomes with sufficient data, requested individual patient data from trialists, and relied on published data when this was not available. We used the GRADE approach to assess the certainty of the body of evidence for the most important outcomes. We included 16 randomised controlled trials with a total of 1814 participants; three trials recruited participants with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, two trials recruited participants recovering from a stroke, six trials recruited participants with an acute medical condition who were mainly elderly, and the remaining trials recruited participants with a mix of conditions. We assessed the majority of the included studies as at low risk of selection, detection, and attrition bias, and unclear for selective reporting and performance bias. Admission avoidance hospital at home probably makes little

  18. Navy nurse anesthetists at Fleet Hospital Five: the Desert Shield/Storm experience.

    PubMed

    Hrezo, Richard J

    2003-06-01

    In 1990, the United States Navy deployed its first operational fleet hospital: "Fleet Hospital Five" in support of Operation Desert Shield/Storm. Within 2 weeks of notification, the 900 medical providers assigned to this medical facility, which was capable of providing major trauma surgery and critical care, were on their way to Al Jabayl, Saudi Arabia. This article discusses the unique characteristics of this facility and introduces the crucial role that nurse anesthetists play. The article also introduces several innovative ideas that were developed and tested to expand the capabilities of the hospital.

  19. Benefits for Military Veterans with ALS

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Caregivers Newly Diagnosed Clinical Trials Familial ALS Military Veterans For Caregivers Resources Read stories from families living with ALS ALS Registry Augmentative Communication Site Map | Press Room | FAQ | Policies | RSS | Contact ...

  20. [Evaluation of satisfaction of patients hospitalized at the Kairouan Hospital].

    PubMed

    Mtiraoui, Ali; Alouini, Borhane

    2002-03-01

    The patients' satisfaction studies are more and more utilized to underline the health centers' deficiencies and consequently set improvement action plans. Our survey aims to measure inpatients' satisfaction in its different dimensions. A survey centered around a transversal inquiry has been conducted during a period going from February to April 2000 and reached a total number of 817 patients hospitalized in six service units at kairouan hospital. The data has been gathered by structured interviews led by a previously trained social worker. The investigation tool was a standardized questionnaire prepared by a group of experts from WHO in the Oriental Mediterranean region. The main results are as follow: High satisfaction level concerning the global evaluation of the hospital service units was recorded (score = 70%). The patient who are more satisfied are those who have the feeling that their health situation has considerably improved, and who will probably recommend this hospital to their surroundings. Big proportion of the patients (77%) was expecting better services. The main reason behind their unhappiness is the information emanated whether from the nurses or the doctors, the comfort and the cleanness of waiting room, linen, room comfort, food and the emergency. These results showed that the quality of care improvements priorities, according to patient expectations are especially in relation with the quality of information, the relational aspects and the hospital stay conditions.

  1. Technical Support Document: Development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Large Hospitals - 50% Energy Savings

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnema, E.; Leach, M.; Pless, S.

    2013-06-01

    This Technical Support Document describes the process and methodology for the development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Large Hospitals: Achieving 50% Energy Savings Toward a Net Zero Energy Building (AEDG-LH) ASHRAE et al. (2011b). The AEDG-LH is intended to provide recommendations for achieving 50% whole-building energy savings in large hospitals over levels achieved by following Standard 90.1-2004. The AEDG-LH was created for a 'standard' mid- to large-size hospital, typically at least 100,000 ft2, but the strategies apply to all sizes and classifications of new construction hospital buildings. Its primary focus is new construction, but recommendations may be applicable to facilities undergoing total renovation, and in part to many other hospital renovation, addition, remodeling, and modernization projects (including changes to one or more systems in existing buildings).

  2. Response to Zambon et al.

    PubMed

    Laplante, Caroline; Pollard, Thomas D

    2017-02-06

    Stimulated by our 2015 Current Biology paper [1], Zambon et al. reinvestigated how three myosin isoforms participate in the formation and constriction of the contractile ring in fission yeast. Our paper presented evidence that these myosin isoforms have distinct roles: "Conventional myosin-II Myo2 is crucial to ring assembly, unconventional myosin-II Myp2 is most important for ring constriction, and type V myosin Myo51 aids the other two myosins." Zambon et al. used different markers to reexamine the contributions of the three myosins to cytokinesis and concluded "that Myo2p is the major motor involved in ring contraction in S. pombe." Here, we show that most of the differences observed by Zambon et al. can be attributed to their use of the Rlc1p-3GFP marker, which genetically interacts with myo2-E1. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Co-circulation of Dengue and Chikungunya Viruses, Al Hudaydah, Yemen, 2012.

    PubMed

    Rezza, Giovanni; El-Sawaf, Gamal; Faggioni, Giovanni; Vescio, Fenicia; Al Ameri, Ranya; De Santis, Riccardo; Helaly, Ghada; Pomponi, Alice; Metwally, Dalia; Fantini, Massimo; Qadi, Hussein; Ciccozzi, Massimo; Lista, Florigio

    2014-08-01

    We investigated 400 cases of dengue-like illness in persons hospitalized during an outbreak in Al Hudaydah, Yemen, in 2012. Overall, 116 dengue and 49 chikungunya cases were diagnosed. Dengue virus type 2 was the predominant serotype. The co-circulation of these viruses indicates that mosquitoborne infections represent a public health threat in Yemen.

  4. Co-circulation of Dengue and Chikungunya Viruses, Al Hudaydah, Yemen, 2012

    PubMed Central

    El-Sawaf, Gamal; Faggioni, Giovanni; Vescio, Fenicia; Al Ameri, Ranya; De Santis, Riccardo; Helaly, Ghada; Pomponi, Alice; Metwally, Dalia; Fantini, Massimo; Qadi, Hussein; Ciccozzi, Massimo; Lista, Florigio

    2014-01-01

    We investigated 400 cases of dengue-like illness in persons hospitalized during an outbreak in Al Hudaydah, Yemen, in 2012. Overall, 116 dengue and 49 chikungunya cases were diagnosed. Dengue virus type 2 was the predominant serotype. The co-circulation of these viruses indicates that mosquitoborne infections represent a public health threat in Yemen. PMID:25061762

  5. FTD and ALS: genetic ties that bind.

    PubMed

    Orr, Harry T

    2011-10-20

    Curiously, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD), seemingly disparate neurodegenerative disorders, can be inherited together. Two groups (DeJesus-Hernandez et al. and Renton et al.) show that the long sought after ALS/FTD mutation on chromosomal region 9p is a hexanucleotide expansion in C90RF72. These studies, plus a study on X-linked ALS/FTD, provide molecular starting points for identifying pathways that link ALS and FTD pathogenesis.

  6. Superconductivity in Al/Al2O3 interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palnichenko, A. V.; Vyaselev, O. M.; Mazilkin, A. A.; Khasanov, S. S.

    2016-06-01

    Metastable superconductivity at Tc ≈ 65 K has been observed in Al foil subjected to special oxidation process, according to the ac magnetic susceptibility and electrical resistance measurements. Comparison of the ac susceptibility and the dc magnetization measurements infers that the superconductivity arises within the interfacial granular layer formed during the oxidation process between metallic aluminum and its oxide.

  7. Baumard et al.'s moral markets lack market dynamics.

    PubMed

    Fessler, Daniel M T; Holbrook, Colin

    2013-02-01

    Market models are indeed indispensable to understanding the evolution of cooperation and its emotional substrates. Unfortunately, Baumard et al. eschew market thinking in stressing the supposed invariance of moral/cooperative behavior across circumstances. To the contrary, humans display contingent morality/cooperation, and these shifts are best accounted for by market models of partner choice for mutually beneficial collaboration.

  8. Ocular trauma: A tertiary hospital experience from Oman.

    PubMed

    Al-Mahrouqi, Haitham H; Al-Harthi, Naila; Al-Wahaibi, Maryam; Hanumantharayappa, Kishore

    2017-01-01

    To describe the epidemiology of ocular trauma in a tertiary hospital setting in Muscat, Oman. Medical records of all cases of ocular trauma which presented to the Emergency Department at Al-Nahdha Hospital and were seen by the ophthalmology service from January 1, 2013 to June 30, 2013 (6 months) were reviewed to collect data on ocular trauma according to the World Eye Injury Registry initial reporting form which uses the Birmingham Eye Trauma Terminology System. There were 27,951 patients seen at the Emergency Department and 611 of which were ocular trauma cases (cumulative incidence 2.2% [confidence interval 2.0-2.4]). The mean age of the patients was 23 years and males comprised the majority of the cases (72%). Thirty-two patients had bilateral injury giving a total of 643 eyes injured. More than half of all injuries were caused by either blunt or large sharp objects. The cornea was the most frequently injured tissue (49%), but most injuries were minor in nature. More than three quarters (77%) of all eyes had a visual acuity of 0.3 (LogMAR) or better on presentation. There were 35 eyes (6%) with open globe injuries (OGI) and three-quarters of them occurring in the manual laborers. Ocular trauma is a common presentation at Al-Nahdha Hospital. Although the majority of trauma cases were minor without any visual disability sequelae, OGI could have been prevented with better ocular protection in the workplace.

  9. [Influence of prenatal hospitalization on parental stressful experience in the case of a premature birth].

    PubMed

    Morisod-Harari, M; Borghini, A; Hohlfeld, P; Forcada-Guex, M; Muller-Nix, C

    2013-02-01

    To investigate the influence of prenatal hospitalization before a premature birth, on the parental stressful experience, parental symptoms of post-traumatic stress and quality of parent-infant interaction during the hospitalization in neonatology. 51 preterm infants born and 25 full term infants control. Four groups: controls, premature without prenatal hospitalization, premature with a short (<8 days) prenatal hospitalization and premature with a long (≥ 8 days) prenatal hospitalization. the Parental Stressor Scale: Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (PSS: NICU, Miles et al., 1993 [14]) and the Perinatal PTSD Questionnaire (PPQ, Quinnell and Hynan, 1999 [16]). When prenatal hospitalization of the mother occurred, parents acknowledged increased stress induced by the environmental factors during the infant's hospitalization. Furthermore, mothers from the group with a short prenatal hospitalization presented significantly more symptoms of post-traumatic stress. Parents presenting more symptoms of post-traumatic stress describe a significantly more difficult interaction with their infant in neonatology. This study highlights the necessity to deliver special care to women hospitalized shortly (<8 days) prior to the delivery of their premature baby. This group is at high risk of presenting post-traumatic stress symptoms, which could have a negative impact on the quality of parent-infant interactions. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  10. ALS - A unique design approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlain, Roger A.

    1990-09-01

    An advanced launch system (ALS), which is intended to be flexible and to deliver a wide range of payloads at a reduced cost, is discussed. The ALS concept also features total quality management, modular subsystems, standardized interfaces, standardized missions, and off-line payload encapsulation. The technological improvements include manufacturing of dry structures, use of composite materials, adaptive guidance and control systems, and laser-initiated radar systems. The operational improvements range from paperless management, to rocket engine leak detection devices and automated ground operations.

  11. Wadi Al Dawasir, Saudi Arabia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-10-20

    In the middle of the Arabian desert the city Green Oasis Wadi Al Dawasir is being developed as a new urban center for the Wadi Al Dawasir region of Saudi Arabia, as shown in this image from NASA Terra spacecraft. Huge solar fields supply the entire city and the surrounding region with energy. Hundreds of circular agricultural fields are fed by center pivot irrigation apparatus, drawing water from subterranean aquifers. The image was acquired March 30, 2013, covers an area of 30 x 45 km, and is located at 20.2 degrees north, 44.8 degrees east. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20077

  12. Reporting hospital adverse events using the Alfred Hospital's morbidity data.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Rhonda; McLean, Jenny; Walsh, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Hospital morbidity data were analysed to determine their usefulness for reporting adverse events. The entire ICD-10-AM classification system was reviewed in conjunction with the Australian Coding Standards to identify external cause codes and code prefixes associated with adverse events. For the 50,712 separations registered at The Alfred from July 2000-June 2001, 4,740 external cause codes were associated with adverse events. Place of occurrence code CY92.22 was considered the best indicator of the number of separations associated with adverse events. Approximately 4% of all separations were associated with adverse events occurring during an episode of care. Results suggest that hospital morbidity data are useful for monitoring adverse events at hospital level. Reliable reporting across the health care industry requires consistent reporting requirements at state and national levels and the adoption of standard code prefixes nationally.

  13. Hospital readmission and parent perceptions of their child's hospital discharge.

    PubMed

    Berry, Jay G; Ziniel, Sonja I; Freeman, Linda; Kaplan, William; Antonelli, Richard; Gay, James; Coleman, Eric A; Porter, Stephanie; Goldmann, Don

    2013-10-01

    To describe parent perceptions of their child's hospital discharge and assess the relationship between these perceptions and hospital readmission. A prospective study of parents surveyed with questions adapted from the care transitions measure, an adult survey that assesses components of discharge care. Participant answers, scored on a 5-point Likert scale, were compared between children who did and did not experience a readmission using a Fisher's exact test and logistic regression that accounted for patient characteristics associated with increased readmission risk, including complex chronic condition and assistance with medical technology. A tertiary-care children's hospital. A total of 348 parents surveyed following their child's hospital discharge between March and October 2010. None. Unplanned readmission within 30 days of discharge. There were 28 children (8.1%) who experienced a readmission. Children had a lower readmission rate (4.4 vs. 11.3%, P = 0.004) and lower adjusted readmission likelihood [odds ratio 0.2 (95% confidence interval 0.1, 0.6)] when their parents strongly agreed (n = 206) with the statement, 'I felt that my child was healthy enough to leave the hospital' from the index admission. Parent perceptions relating to care management responsibilities, medications, written discharge plan, warning signs and symptoms to watch for and primary care follow-up were not associated with readmission risk in multivariate analysis. Parent perception of their child's health at discharge was associated with the risk of a subsequent, unplanned readmission. Addressing concerns with this perception prior to hospital discharge may help mitigate readmission risk in children.

  14. Hospital benchmarking: are U.S. eye hospitals ready?

    PubMed

    de Korne, Dirk F; van Wijngaarden, Jeroen D H; Sol, Kees J C A; Betz, Robert; Thomas, Richard C; Schein, Oliver D; Klazinga, Niek S

    2012-01-01

    Benchmarking is increasingly considered a useful management instrument to improve quality in health care, but little is known about its applicability in hospital settings. The aims of this study were to assess the applicability of a benchmarking project in U.S. eye hospitals and compare the results with an international initiative. We evaluated multiple cases by applying an evaluation frame abstracted from the literature to five U.S. eye hospitals that used a set of 10 indicators for efficiency benchmarking. Qualitative analysis entailed 46 semistructured face-to-face interviews with stakeholders, document analyses, and questionnaires. The case studies only partially met the conditions of the evaluation frame. Although learning and quality improvement were stated as overall purposes, the benchmarking initiative was at first focused on efficiency only. No ophthalmic outcomes were included, and clinicians were skeptical about their reporting relevance and disclosure. However, in contrast with earlier findings in international eye hospitals, all U.S. hospitals worked with internal indicators that were integrated in their performance management systems and supported benchmarking. Benchmarking can support performance management in individual hospitals. Having a certain number of comparable institutes provide similar services in a noncompetitive milieu seems to lay fertile ground for benchmarking. International benchmarking is useful only when these conditions are not met nationally. Although the literature focuses on static conditions for effective benchmarking, our case studies show that it is a highly iterative and learning process. The journey of benchmarking seems to be more important than the destination. Improving patient value (health outcomes per unit of cost) requires, however, an integrative perspective where clinicians and administrators closely cooperate on both quality and efficiency issues. If these worlds do not share such a relationship, the added

  15. Internet connectivity for hospitals and hospital libraries: strategies.

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, S S

    1995-01-01

    Access to Internet resources and communications has rapidly become a necessity in many hospitals nationally. The results of a Pacific Northwest pilot Intenet connections project provides important evidence of the value of librarians in establishing such connections in their institutions The pilot project has resulted in a wealth of information regarding approaches to promoting the utility of the Internet to health professionals in hospitals. Roles that librarians are playing in support of such connections include facilitator, negotiator, provider, publisher, integrator, and educator. PMID:7703936

  16. Regional Hospital Input Price Indexes

    PubMed Central

    Freeland, Mark S.; Schendler, Carol Ellen; Anderson, Gerard

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes the development of regional hospital input price indexes that is consistent with the general methodology used for the National Hospital Input Price Index. The feasibility of developing regional indexes was investigated because individuals inquired whether different regions experienced different rates of increase in hospital input prices. The regional indexes incorporate variations in cost-share weights (the amount an expense category contributes to total spending) associated with hospital type and location, and variations in the rate of input price increases for various regions. We found that between 1972 and 1979 none of the regional price indexes increased at average annual rates significantly different from the national rate. For the more recent period 1977 through 1979, the increase in one Census Region was significantly below the national rate. Further analyses indicated that variations in cost-share weights for various types of hospitals produced no substantial variations in the regional price indexes relative to the national index. We consider these findings preliminary because of limitations in the availability of current, relevant, and reliable data, especially for local area wage rate increases. PMID:10309557

  17. Estimating Influenza Hospitalizations among Children

    PubMed Central

    Grijalva, Carlos G.; Craig, Allen S.; Dupont, William D.; Bridges, Carolyn B.; Schrag, Stephanie J.; Iwane, Marika K.; Schaffner, William; Edwards, Kathryn M.

    2006-01-01

    Although influenza causes more hospitalizations and deaths among American children than any other vaccine-preventable disease, deriving accurate population-based estimates of disease impact is challenging. Using 2 independent surveillance systems, we performed a capture-recapture analysis to estimate influenza-associated hospitalizations in children in Davidson County, Tennessee, during the 2003–2004 influenza season. The New Vaccine Surveillance Network (NVSN) enrolled children hospitalized with respiratory symptoms or fever and tested them for influenza. The Tennessee Emerging Infections Program (EIP) identified inpatients with positive influenza diagnostic test results through review of laboratory and infection control logs. The hospitalization rate estimated from the capture-recapture analysis in children <5 years of age was 2.4 per 1,000 (95% confidence interval 1.8–3.8). When NVSN estimates were compared with capture-recapture estimates, NVSN found 84% of community-acquired cases, EIP found 64% of cases in which an influenza rapid test was performed, and the overall sensitivity of NVSN and EIP for influenza hospitalizations was 73% and 38%, respectively. PMID:16494725

  18. Measuring nutritional risk in hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Henrik H; Holst, Mette; Kondrup, Jens

    2010-01-01

    About 20%–50% of patients in hospitals are undernourished. The number varies depending on the screening tool amended and clinical setting. A large number of these patients are undernourished when admitted to the hospital, and in most of these patients, undernutrition develops further during hospital stay. The nutrition course of the patient starts by nutritional screening and is linked to the prescription of a nutrition plan and monitoring. The purpose of nutritional screening is to predict the probability of a better or worse outcome due to nutritional factors and whether nutritional treatment is likely to influence this. Most screening tools address four basic questions: recent weight loss, recent food intake, current body mass index, and disease severity. Some screening tools, moreover, include other measurements for predicting the risk of malnutrition. The usefulness of screening methods recommended is based on the aspects of predictive validity, content validity, reliability, and practicability. Various tools are recommended depending on the setting, ie, in the community, in the hospital, and among elderly in institutions. The Nutrition Risk Screening (NRS) 2002 seems to be the best validated screening tool, in terms of predictive validity ie, the clinical outcome improves when patients identified to be at risk are treated. For adult patients in hospital, thus, the NRS 2002 is recommended. PMID:21042553

  19. Al-Qaeda as Insurgency

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-18

    that directs military conduct; instead, in the words of Regis Debray “. . . the guerrilla force is the party in embryo.” Regis Debray , Revolution in...Jenkins. Deterrence and Influence in Counterterrorism: A Component in the War on al Qaeda . Santa Monica, CA: RAND, 2002. Debray , Regis . Revolution in

  20. Response to Moras et al.

    PubMed

    Rastinejad, Fraydoon; Ollendorff, Vincent; Polikarpov, Igor

    2015-06-01

    We recently reviewed full-length nuclear receptor (NR) structures in an Opinion article wherein we carefully evaluated a large body of literature. As heads of three separate laboratories working on NR architectures, we expressed our shared insights and critical comments. One group (Moras et al.) has declined to accept our strong concerns about several of their published reports. We comment on their letter.

  1. Dynamic Modeling of ALS Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of dynamic modeling and simulation of Advanced Life Support (ALS) systems is to help design them. Static steady state systems analysis provides basic information and is necessary to guide dynamic modeling, but static analysis is not sufficient to design and compare systems. ALS systems must respond to external input variations and internal off-nominal behavior. Buffer sizing, resupply scheduling, failure response, and control system design are aspects of dynamic system design. We develop two dynamic mass flow models and use them in simulations to evaluate systems issues, optimize designs, and make system design trades. One model is of nitrogen leakage in the space station, the other is of a waste processor failure in a regenerative life support system. Most systems analyses are concerned with optimizing the cost/benefit of a system at its nominal steady-state operating point. ALS analysis must go beyond the static steady state to include dynamic system design. All life support systems exhibit behavior that varies over time. ALS systems must respond to equipment operating cycles, repair schedules, and occasional off-nominal behavior or malfunctions. Biological components, such as bioreactors, composters, and food plant growth chambers, usually have operating cycles or other complex time behavior. Buffer sizes, material stocks, and resupply rates determine dynamic system behavior and directly affect system mass and cost. Dynamic simulation is needed to avoid the extremes of costly over-design of buffers and material reserves or system failure due to insufficient buffers and lack of stored material.

  2. Report: hospitals need more sophisticated planning efforts.

    PubMed

    Anderson, H J

    1990-09-20

    Sophisticated planning efforts are increasing among hospitals. However, hospital planners and marketers still have far to go before they can match their counterparts in industry. This is according to a report on hospital planning recently released by the Society for Healthcare Planning and Marketing of the American Hospital Association, Chicago.

  3. 46 CFR 108.209 - Hospital spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hospital spaces. 108.209 Section 108.209 Shipping COAST... Construction and Arrangement Accommodation Spaces § 108.209 Hospital spaces. (a) Each unit carrying twelve or more persons on a voyage of more than three days must have a hospital space. (b) Each hospital space...

  4. 46 CFR 108.209 - Hospital spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hospital spaces. 108.209 Section 108.209 Shipping COAST... Construction and Arrangement Accommodation Spaces § 108.209 Hospital spaces. (a) Each unit carrying twelve or more persons on a voyage of more than three days must have a hospital space. (b) Each hospital space...

  5. 46 CFR 108.209 - Hospital spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hospital spaces. 108.209 Section 108.209 Shipping COAST... Construction and Arrangement Accommodation Spaces § 108.209 Hospital spaces. (a) Each unit carrying twelve or more persons on a voyage of more than three days must have a hospital space. (b) Each hospital space...

  6. Hospital pricing policies: the simple economics.

    PubMed

    Robison, G A; Robison, H D

    1986-10-01

    Changes in hospital reimbursement structures and the shrinking inpatient service market are forcing hospitals to reexamine their pricing strategies. This article examines historical hospital pricing, the effect of pricing in a competitive market and considerations for hospitals moving toward competitive pricing for services.

  7. A conflict of interest policy for hospitals.

    PubMed

    McClure, A E

    1993-01-01

    As the environment in which community hospitals operate becomes ever more complex, the opportunity for conflict of interest between the hospital and members of its governing board increases. This article examines the duties and responsibilities of hospital trustees and the ways in which hospitals can identify and manage conflict of interest.

  8. 45 CFR 211.8 - Continuing hospitalization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Elizabeths Hospital in the District of Columbia, in an appropriate Public Health Service Hospital, or in such other suitable public or private hospital as the Administrator determines is in the best interests of... in need of continuing care and treatment in a hospital cannot be accomplished under § 211.7, or until...

  9. 45 CFR 211.8 - Continuing hospitalization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Elizabeths Hospital in the District of Columbia, in an appropriate Public Health Service Hospital, or in such other suitable public or private hospital as the Administrator determines is in the best interests of... in need of continuing care and treatment in a hospital cannot be accomplished under § 211.7, or until...

  10. 45 CFR 211.8 - Continuing hospitalization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Elizabeths Hospital in the District of Columbia, in an appropriate Public Health Service Hospital, or in such other suitable public or private hospital as the Administrator determines is in the best interests of... in need of continuing care and treatment in a hospital cannot be accomplished under § 211.7, or until...

  11. 45 CFR 211.8 - Continuing hospitalization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Elizabeths Hospital in the District of Columbia, in an appropriate Public Health Service Hospital, or in such other suitable public or private hospital as the Administrator determines is in the best interests of... in need of continuing care and treatment in a hospital cannot be accomplished under § 211.7, or until...

  12. Uninsured Hospitalizations: Rural and Urban Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Wanqing; Mueller, Keith J.; Chen, Li-Wu

    2008-01-01

    Context: Few studies have examined hospitalization patterns among the uninsured, especially from the perspective of rural and urban differences. Purpose: To examine whether the patterns of uninsured hospitalizations differ in rural and urban hospitals and to identify the most prevalent and costly diagnoses among uninsured hospitalizations.…

  13. 46 CFR 108.209 - Hospital spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hospital spaces. 108.209 Section 108.209 Shipping COAST... Construction and Arrangement Accommodation Spaces § 108.209 Hospital spaces. (a) Each unit carrying twelve or more persons on a voyage of more than three days must have a hospital space. (b) Each hospital...

  14. 46 CFR 108.209 - Hospital spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hospital spaces. 108.209 Section 108.209 Shipping COAST... Construction and Arrangement Accommodation Spaces § 108.209 Hospital spaces. (a) Each unit carrying twelve or more persons on a voyage of more than three days must have a hospital space. (b) Each hospital...

  15. AlGaN solar-blind avalanche photodiodes with AlInN/AlGaN distributed Bragg reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Chujun; Ye, Xuanchao; Sun, Rui; Yang, Guofeng; Wang, Jin; Lu, Yanan; Yan, Pengfei; Cao, Jintao

    2017-06-01

    AlGaN solar-blind avalanche photodiodes (APDs) with AlInN/AlGaN distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) operated at lower avalanche breakdown voltage are numerically demonstrated. The p-type AlGaN layer and the multiplicative layer with low Al composition are introduced to construct the polarization-induced electric field, which can significantly reduce the avalanche breakdown voltage of the APDs. Calculated results exhibit that the avalanche breakdown voltage of the designed APDs decrease by 13% compared with the conventional device structure. Simultaneously, an improved solar-blind spectral responsivity is achieved due to the inserted AlInN/AlGaN DBRs.

  16. [Gene therapy and hospital strategy].

    PubMed

    Leclercq, B

    1993-10-01

    Gene therapy raises strong interrogations among hospital managers. Actually, hospital environment is disturbed and moving as well in a legislative political and statutory level as in an economical (competition, consumerism, proximity of the establishments) and demographic one (ageing, new pathologies). The fast development of medical technologies amplifies this disturbance. In front of that environment, the hospital has to anticipate the arriving of gene therapy without underestimating the deontological, medical, economical and judicial risks. The decisions of implantation have to be taken in a collective way, and seriously planned and estimated on a medical and economical level. The way to train people and to forecast their careers don't have to be underestimated in consideration of the challenge which is represented by the gene therapy.

  17. Enterprise resource planning for hospitals.

    PubMed

    van Merode, Godefridus G; Groothuis, Siebren; Hasman, Arie

    2004-06-30

    Integrated hospitals need a central planning and control system to plan patients' processes and the required capacity. Given the changes in healthcare one can ask the question what type of information systems can best support these healthcare delivery organizations. We focus in this review on the potential of enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems for healthcare delivery organizations. First ERP systems are explained. An overview is then presented of the characteristics of the planning process in hospital environments. Problems with ERP that are due to the special characteristics of healthcare are presented. The situations in which ERP can or cannot be used are discussed. It is suggested to divide hospitals in a part that is concerned only with deterministic processes and a part that is concerned with non-deterministic processes. ERP can be very useful for planning and controlling the deterministic processes.

  18. Light Therapy in Mental Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Cormac, H. Dove

    1929-01-01

    The position of actinotherapy in Mental Hospitals in this country is reviewed. An investigation of the results of ultra-violet irradiation in mental disorders at Parkside Mental Hospital is described and it is shown that certain types of the psychoses appear to benefit. The physiological action of actinic rays in relation to mental disorders is discussed and their mode of action on the nervous system suggested. Reference is made to substances which sensitize the body tissues to sunlight and ultra-violet radiation. An allusion is made to glass, penetrable by a portion of the actinic rays, and its uses. The need for ultra-violet ray apparatus in every mental hospital is urged both for treatment of mental and physical conditions and for the study of its action. PMID:19986837

  19. SARS in Hospital Emergency Room

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yee-Chun; Huang, Li-Min; Chan, Chang-Chuan; Su, Chan-Ping; Chang, Ying-Ying; Chen, Mei-Ling; Hung, Chien-Ching; Chen, Wen-Jone; Lin, Fang-Yue; Lee, Yuan-Teh

    2004-01-01

    Thirty-one cases of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) occurred after exposure in the emergency room at the National Taiwan University Hospital. The index patient was linked to an outbreak at a nearby municipal hospital. Three clusters were identified over a 3-week period. The first cluster (5 patients) and the second cluster (14 patients) occurred among patients, family members, and nursing aids. The third cluster (12 patients) occurred exclusively among healthcare workers. Six healthcare workers had close contact with SARS patients. Six others, with different working patterns, indicated that they did not have contact with a SARS patient. Environmental surveys found 9 of 119 samples of inanimate objects to be positive for SARS coronavirus RNA. These observations indicate that although transmission by direct contact with known SARS patients was responsible for most cases, environmental contamination with the SARS coronavirus may have lead to infection among healthcare workers without documented contact with known hospitalized SARS patients. PMID:15200809

  20. Appropriate measures of hospital market areas.

    PubMed Central

    Garnick, D W; Luft, H S; Robinson, J C; Tetreault, J

    1987-01-01

    As public and private policymakers turn to market-oriented strategies to control hospital prices, it is necessary to understand the conceptual underpinnings of hospital market area measurement. This article provides a framework for evaluating which definitions of hospital market areas are suitable for various types of analyses. Hospital market areas can be defined from two perspectives: an individual hospital perspective and that of the overall market. From each perspective, empirical definitions can be based on geopolitical boundaries, distance between hospitals, and patient-origin data. In this article, market areas are compared based on various descriptions using data on California hospitals and patient discharge abstracts. PMID:3570813

  1. HMO penetration: has it hurt public hospitals?

    PubMed

    Clement, J P; Grazier, K L

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the extent to which health maintenance organization (HMO) penetration within the public hospitals' market area affects the financial performance and viability of these institutions, relative to private hospitals. Hospital- and market-specific measures are examined in a fully interacted model of over 2,300 hospitals in 321 metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) in 1995. Although hospitals located in markets with higher HMO penetration have lower financial performance as reflected in revenues, expenses and operating margin, public hospitals are not more disadvantaged than other hospitals by managed care.

  2. Large rectification magnetoresistance in nonmagnetic Al/Ge/Al heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kun; Li, Huan-Huan; Grünberg, Peter; Li, Qiang; Ye, Sheng-Tao; Tian, Yu-Feng; Yan, Shi-Shen; Lin, Zhao-Jun; Kang, Shi-Shou; Chen, Yan-Xue; Liu, Guo-Lei; Mei, Liang-Mo

    2015-09-01

    Magnetoresistance and rectification are two fundamental physical properties of heterojunctions and respectively have wide applications in spintronics devices. Being different from the well known various magnetoresistance effects, here we report a brand new large magnetoresistance that can be regarded as rectification magnetoresistance: the application of a pure small sinusoidal alternating-current to the nonmagnetic Al/Ge Schottky heterojunctions can generate a significant direct-current voltage, and this rectification voltage strongly varies with the external magnetic field. We find that the rectification magnetoresistance in Al/Ge Schottky heterojunctions is as large as 250% at room temperature, which is greatly enhanced as compared with the conventional magnetoresistance of 70%. The findings of rectification magnetoresistance open the way to the new nonmagnetic Ge-based spintronics devices of large rectification magnetoresistance at ambient temperature under the alternating-current due to the simultaneous implementation of the rectification and magnetoresistance in the same devices.

  3. Large rectification magnetoresistance in nonmagnetic Al/Ge/Al heterojunctions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kun; Li, Huan-huan; Grünberg, Peter; Li, Qiang; Ye, Sheng-tao; Tian, Yu-feng; Yan, Shi-shen; Lin, Zhao-jun; Kang, Shi-shou; Chen, Yan-xue; Liu, Guo-lei; Mei, Liang-mo

    2015-01-01

    Magnetoresistance and rectification are two fundamental physical properties of heterojunctions and respectively have wide applications in spintronics devices. Being different from the well known various magnetoresistance effects, here we report a brand new large magnetoresistance that can be regarded as rectification magnetoresistance: the application of a pure small sinusoidal alternating-current to the nonmagnetic Al/Ge Schottky heterojunctions can generate a significant direct-current voltage, and this rectification voltage strongly varies with the external magnetic field. We find that the rectification magnetoresistance in Al/Ge Schottky heterojunctions is as large as 250% at room temperature, which is greatly enhanced as compared with the conventional magnetoresistance of 70%. The findings of rectification magnetoresistance open the way to the new nonmagnetic Ge-based spintronics devices of large rectification magnetoresistance at ambient temperature under the alternating-current due to the simultaneous implementation of the rectification and magnetoresistance in the same devices. PMID:26387967

  4. Large rectification magnetoresistance in nonmagnetic Al/Ge/Al heterojunctions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kun; Li, Huan-Huan; Grünberg, Peter; Li, Qiang; Ye, Sheng-Tao; Tian, Yu-Feng; Yan, Shi-Shen; Lin, Zhao-Jun; Kang, Shi-Shou; Chen, Yan-Xue; Liu, Guo-Lei; Mei, Liang-Mo

    2015-09-21

    Magnetoresistance and rectification are two fundamental physical properties of heterojunctions and respectively have wide applications in spintronics devices. Being different from the well known various magnetoresistance effects, here we report a brand new large magnetoresistance that can be regarded as rectification magnetoresistance: the application of a pure small sinusoidal alternating-current to the nonmagnetic Al/Ge Schottky heterojunctions can generate a significant direct-current voltage, and this rectification voltage strongly varies with the external magnetic field. We find that the rectification magnetoresistance in Al/Ge Schottky heterojunctions is as large as 250% at room temperature, which is greatly enhanced as compared with the conventional magnetoresistance of 70%. The findings of rectification magnetoresistance open the way to the new nonmagnetic Ge-based spintronics devices of large rectification magnetoresistance at ambient temperature under the alternating-current due to the simultaneous implementation of the rectification and magnetoresistance in the same devices.

  5. [The future of hospitals and the hospitals in the future].

    PubMed

    Illés, S Tamás

    2016-07-01

    By the end of the 20th century the vertically organized hospitals formed into a closed hierarchical system, in which the healthcare supply significantly fragmented. The existing hospitals in the current organization are not prepared for the increase in longevity, nor for the high growth in the number of chronic and long-term illnesses and the multi-morbidity since they were not designed for extended carry treatments. The fast incorporation of high-tech and very expensive technologies into healthcare generates an economic crisis. Solving the supply and economic crisis at the same time cannot be achieved without changing the structure of hospitals. Future hospitals will be organized in a network, conducting special treatments according to disease profiles. According to present knowledge, this is the only structure that allows for economies in scale, the proper spending of the ever-shrinking resources, and to ensure the effective patient care required after the changing of disorder structures and patient corporate identities. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(28), 1099-1104.

  6. Hospital-integrated PACS at the University Hospital of Geneva

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratib, Osman M.; Ligier, Yves; Hochstrasser, Denis; Scherrer, Jean-Raoul

    1991-07-01

    The PACS under development at the University Hospital of Geneva is a hospital-wide image management system for radiological as well as non-radiological medical images which is part of one of the widest hospital information systems (HIS) in Switzerland (Diogene system). It is based on a multi-vendor open architecture and a set of widely available industry standards, namely: Unix as the operating system, TCP-IP as network protocol and an SQL-based distributed database (INGRES) that handles both the PACS and the HIS. The PACS is based on a distributed architecture of servers of two types: the archive servers connected to the sources of images and equipped with large optical disk libraries (jukeboxes) and display servers distributed over the hospital. A standard image storage format was developed based on the ACR-NEMA standard. This file format (the PAPYRUS format) allows storage of sets of images as a sequence of ACR-NEMA messages in an 'encapsulated' file structure. In order to provide a more uniform user interface on a variety of different workstations, a common platform for image display and manipulation called OSIRIS is developed based on X-11 windowing system and OSF/Motif extension. Such a platform is designed to be portable to any computer running Unix and equipped with a graphic display system running X-11. Because this software is written in the object-oriented language C++, it is easily expandable and easily adaptable to different needs and requirements.

  7. Pricing objectives in nonprofit hospitals.

    PubMed Central

    Bauerschmidt, A D; Jacobs, P

    1985-01-01

    This article reports on a survey of 60 financial managers of nonprofit hospitals in the eastern United States relating to the importance of a number of factors which influence their pricing decisions and the pricing objectives which they pursue. Among the results uncovered by the responses: that trustees are the single most important body in the price-setting process (doctors play a relatively unimportant role); that hospital pricing goals are more related to target net revenue than profit maximizing; and that regional factors seem to play an important role in management differences. PMID:4008272

  8. Pricing objectives in nonprofit hospitals.

    PubMed

    Bauerschmidt, A D; Jacobs, P

    1985-06-01

    This article reports on a survey of 60 financial managers of nonprofit hospitals in the eastern United States relating to the importance of a number of factors which influence their pricing decisions and the pricing objectives which they pursue. Among the results uncovered by the responses: that trustees are the single most important body in the price-setting process (doctors play a relatively unimportant role); that hospital pricing goals are more related to target net revenue than profit maximizing; and that regional factors seem to play an important role in management differences.

  9. Evaluation methods for hospital projects.

    PubMed

    Buelow, Janet R; Zuckweiler, Kathryn M; Rosacker, Kirsten M

    2010-01-01

    The authors report the findings of a survey of hospital managers on the utilization of various project selection and evaluation methodologies. The focus of the analysis was the empirical relationship between a portfolio of project evaluation(1) methods actually utilized for a given project and several measures of perceived project success. The analysis revealed that cost-benefit analysis and top management support were the two project evaluation methods used most often by the hospital managers. The authors' empirical assessment provides evidence that top management support is associated with overall project success.

  10. Command in a field hospital.

    PubMed

    Bricknell, M C M

    2003-03-01

    This paper examines the challenges involved in commanding a field hospital. There are frequent, dynamic tensions between the military culture that is based on a task-focussed, hierarchical structure and the clinical culture that is based on flat, process-focussed, multidisciplinary teams. The paper outlines the cultural environment of the field hospital and then examines the deployment sequence whereby a functioning clinical facility may be created from a group of disparate individuals. There are a number of tools that may assist with this including the personality of the Commanding Officer, individual skills, the creation of an organizational identity and the choice of command structure.

  11. Field guide to hospital cafeterias.

    PubMed

    Smith, R P

    1986-09-01

    We have all faced the problem of whether or not to venture into that gastronomic wasteland known as the hospital cafeteria. Hospital cafeterias have developed a reputation, deserved or otherwise, as less than ideal places to eat. Many people overlook the fact that this is a direct result of trying to provide patient meals that are salt-free, sugar-free, fiber-free, and taste-free. (Some faint traces of color may, occasionally, be found.) How then does one go about choosing whether to venture in, and how does one survive the encounter once there? The following guide has been assembled to help the reader through this difficult process.

  12. AlSb/InAs/AlSb quantum wells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroemer, Herbert

    1990-01-01

    Researchers studied the InAs/AlSb system recently, obtaining 12nm wide quantum wells with room temperature mobilities up to 28,000 cm(exp 2)/V center dot S and low-temperature mobilities up to 325,000 cm(exp 2)/V center dot S, both at high electron sheet concentrations in the 10(exp 12)/cm(exp 2) range (corresponding to volume concentrations in the 10(exp 18)/cm(exp 2) range). These wells were not intentionally doped; the combination of high carrier concentrations and high mobilities suggest that the electrons are due to not-intentional modulation doping by an unknown donor in the AlSb barriers, presumably a stoichiometric defect, like an antisite donor. Inasmuch as not intentionally doped bulk AlSb is semi-insulating, the donor must be a deep one, being ionized only by draining into the even deeper InAs quantum well. The excellent transport properties are confirmed by other observations, like excellent quantum Hall effect data, and the successful use of the quantum wells as superconductive weak links between Nb electrodes, with unprecendentedly high critical current densities. The system is promising for future field effect transistors (FETs), but many processing problems must first be solved. Although the researchers have achieved FETs, the results so far have not been competitive with GaAs FETs.

  13. Thermal conductance of a pressed Al-Al contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanner, M.

    1981-01-01

    Thermal conductance of a screw-fastened joint between two blocks of Al-alloys has been measured. An AlMg4.5Mn-block, the end of which is cooled by liquid helium, constitutes the upper part of the sample and the contact is formed at the face surface of a cylindrical extension of that block onto which a cylinder, made of AlMgSi1, is pressed by means of a copper-nickel screw. Pressing of the contact was carried out at room temperature by applying a defined torque, M, to the fastening screw. Three samples of the same shape but with differently treated surfaces of contact (machined flat, electro-chemically polished, with gold plated contacts) were studied. The results showed that the machined flat surfaces yield the best contact and that the contact conductance (measured in the range 4.2 K to 1.8 K) of all samples increased with increasing torque. In addition to thermal measurements, a study of the electrical conductance would be very interesting to determine the different contributions of phonon and electron heat conduction by means of the Wiedemann-Franz law. The work is useful for the GIRL (German Infra-Red Laboratory) space experiment.

  14. Demand Management: The Primary Care Role at Ireland Army Community Hospital (IACH)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-29

    internal medicine, and pediatrics (Kongstvedt, 2001). The principal role of primary care physicians is an inevitable evolution of managed care (Fox... Moron , Bacchetti, Baker & Bindman, 2001; Zhan, Miller, Wong, & Myer, 2004). A study examining the correlation of preventable hospitalizations and...effectiveness of primary care (Gill & Mainous, 1998; Backus, Moron , Bacchetti, Baker & Bindman, 2001; Bindman, et al., 1995; Zhan, Miller, Wong, & Myer, 2004

  15. Hospital readmission and parent perceptions of their child's hospital discharge

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Jay G.; Ziniel, Sonja I.; Freeman, Linda; Kaplan, William; Antonelli, Richard; Gay, James; Coleman, Eric A.; Porter, Stephanie; Goldmann, Don

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe parent perceptions of their child's hospital discharge and assess the relationship between these perceptions and hospital readmission. Design A prospective study of parents surveyed with questions adapted from the care transitions measure, an adult survey that assesses components of discharge care. Participant answers, scored on a 5-point Likert scale, were compared between children who did and did not experience a readmission using a Fisher's exact test and logistic regression that accounted for patient characteristics associated with increased readmission risk, including complex chronic condition and assistance with medical technology. Setting A tertiary-care children's hospital. Participants: A total of 348 parents surveyed following their child's hospital discharge between March and October 2010. Intervention None. Main Outcome Measure Unplanned readmission within 30 days of discharge. Results There were 28 children (8.1%) who experienced a readmission. Children had a lower readmission rate (4.4 vs. 11.3%, P = 0.004) and lower adjusted readmission likelihood [odds ratio 0.2 (95% confidence interval 0.1, 0.6)] when their parents strongly agreed (n = 206) with the statement, ‘I felt that my child was healthy enough to leave the hospital’ from the index admission. Parent perceptions relating to care management responsibilities, medications, written discharge plan, warning signs and symptoms to watch for and primary care follow-up were not associated with readmission risk in multivariate analysis. Conclusions Parent perception of their child's health at discharge was associated with the risk of a subsequent, unplanned readmission. Addressing concerns with this perception prior to hospital discharge may help mitigate readmission risk in children. PMID:23962990

  16. Effect of interface geometry on electron tunnelling in Al/Al2O3/Al junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koberidze, M.; Feshchenko, A. V.; Puska, M. J.; Nieminen, R. M.; Pekola, J. P.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate how different interface geometries of an Al/Al2O3 junction, a common component of modern tunnel devices, affect electron transport through the tunnel barrier. We study six distinct Al/Al2O3 interfaces which differ in stacking sequences of the metal and the oxide surface atoms and the oxide termination. To construct model potential barrier profiles for each examined geometry, we rely on first-principles density-functional theory (DFT) calculations for the barrier heights and the shapes of the interface regions as well as on experimental data for the barrier widths. We show that even tiny variations in the atomic arrangement at the interface cause significant changes in the tunnel barrier parameters and, consequently, in electron transport properties. Especially, we find that variations in the crucial barrier heights and widths can be as large as 2 eV and 5 Å, respectively. Finally, to gain information about the average properties of the measured junction, we fit the conductance calculated within the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation to the experimental data and interpret the fit parameters with the help of the DFT results.

  17. Hospitalization of hospice patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Cintron, Alexie; Hamel, Mary B; Davis, Roger B; Burns, Risa B; Phillips, Russell S; McCarthy, Ellen P

    2003-10-01

    To identify factors associated with hospitalization of elderly hospice patients with cancer and to describe their hospital experiences. Retrospective analysis of the last year of life. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database. Medicare beneficiaries dying of lung or colorectal cancer between 1988 and 1998 who enrolled in hospice. Hospitalization after hospice entry. For hospitalized patients, we describe admission diagnoses, aggressiveness of care, and in-hospital death. Of the 23608 patients, 1423 (6.0%) were hospitalized after hospice enrollment. Hospitalization declined over time by 7.0% per year of hospice enrollment. Factors associated with higher hospitalization rates were younger age, male gender, black race/ethnicity, local cancer stage at diagnosis, and hospice enrollment within 4 months of cancer diagnosis. The most common reasons for hospital admission were lung cancer, metastatic disease, bone fracture, pneumonia, and volume depletion. Of the 1423 patients hospitalized, 34.6% received aggressive care and 35.8% died in the hospital. The rates of hospitalization for elderly hospice patients with lung or colorectal cancer appear to be declining. However, patients who are hospitalized undergo aggressive care and often die in the hospital rather than at home. This aggressive care may be consistent with changes in patients' care preferences, but could also reflect the current culture of acute care hospitals, which focuses on curative treatment and is ill-equipped to provide palliative care.

  18. Developing IT Infrastructure for Rural Hospitals: A Case Study of Benefits and Challenges of Hospital-to-Hospital Partnerships

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Madhu C.; Purao, Sandeep; Kelly, Mary

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a study identifying benefits and challenges of a novel hospital-to-hospital information technology (IT) outsourcing partnership (HHP). The partnership is an innovative response to the problem that many smaller, rural hospitals face: to modernize their IT infrastructure in spite of a severe shortage of resources. The investigators studied three rural hospitals that outsourced their IT infrastructure, through an HHP, to a larger, more technologically advanced hospital in the region. The study design was based on purposive sampling and interviews of senior managers from the four hospitals. The results highlight the HHP's benefits and challenges from both the rural hospitals' and vendor hospital's perspectives. The HHP was considered a success: a key outcome was that it has improved the rural hospitals' IT infrastructure at an affordable cost. The investigators discuss key elements for creating a successful HHP and offer preliminary answers to the question of what it takes for an HHP to be successful. PMID:18436901

  19. Mode of delivery trends by hospital type: an 18-year comparison of a military hospital with university and community hospitals.

    PubMed

    Dahlke, Joshua D; Magann, Everett F; Bird, Tommy M; Rohloff, Jesse; Scardo, James A; Morrison, John C

    2014-02-01

    To determine the rate of mode of delivery over 18 years in a military teaching hospital as compared to university and community hospitals. From January 1992 to December 2009, we retrospectively calculated yearly rates for mode of delivery from a military hospital, two university hospitals, a community hospital in South Carolina and all community hospitals in Arkansas. Over the 18-year period, 803,249 deliveries occurred from all hospitals. Overall the cesarean delivery rates have significantly increased across all practice models (22.7% + 0.9 versus 33.0% + 0.9, p = <0.001). The rate of increase has been greatest in university hospitals (21.8-37%) followed by community hospitals (26.7-32.9%) and the military hospital (19.6-29.2%). The rate of forceps-assisted deliveries has decreased dramatically across all practice models (11.6% + 1.3 versus 1.1% + 0.1, p = <0.001). The decline in forceps use was 6.4 to 1.1% in community hospital, 12.6 to 1.4% in university hospitals, and 15.7 to 0.9% in military hospitals. The overall cesarean delivery rate has increased in all practice models but less so in the military. Forceps deliveries have dramatically decreased overall especially in the military hospital. Reprint & Copyright © 2014 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  20. 42 CFR 419.20 - Hospitals subject to the hospital outpatient prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hospitals subject to the hospital outpatient..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEM FOR HOSPITAL OUTPATIENT DEPARTMENT SERVICES Categories of Hospitals and Services Subject to and Excluded From the Hospital...

  1. 42 CFR 419.20 - Hospitals subject to the hospital outpatient prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hospitals subject to the hospital outpatient..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEM FOR HOSPITAL OUTPATIENT DEPARTMENT SERVICES Categories of Hospitals and Services Subject to and Excluded From the Hospital...

  2. 42 CFR 447.280 - Hospital providers of NF services (swing-bed hospitals).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hospital providers of NF services (swing-bed hospitals). 447.280 Section 447.280 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF... Inpatient Hospital and Long-Term Care Facility Services Swing-Bed Hospitals § 447.280 Hospital providers of...

  3. 42 CFR 447.280 - Hospital providers of NF services (swing-bed hospitals).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hospital providers of NF services (swing-bed hospitals). 447.280 Section 447.280 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF... Inpatient Hospital and Long-Term Care Facility Services Swing-Bed Hospitals § 447.280 Hospital providers of...

  4. 42 CFR 447.280 - Hospital providers of NF services (swing-bed hospitals).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hospital providers of NF services (swing-bed... Inpatient Hospital and Long-Term Care Facility Services Swing-Bed Hospitals § 447.280 Hospital providers of NF services (swing-bed hospitals). (a) General rule. If the State plan provides for NF...

  5. 42 CFR 447.280 - Hospital providers of NF services (swing-bed hospitals).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hospital providers of NF services (swing-bed... Inpatient Hospital and Long-Term Care Facility Services Swing-Bed Hospitals § 447.280 Hospital providers of NF services (swing-bed hospitals). (a) General rule. If the State plan provides for NF...

  6. Worst tornadoes in years: how hospitals fared; critical lessons learned.

    PubMed

    1998-06-01

    Tornado warnings have not been uncommon in many areas of the country this year and when twisters touch down, they can be extremely deadly. When tornadoes swept through Florida's Osceola County in late February, they caused 38 deaths and wide-spread damage. In April, tornadoes caused a number of deaths and considerable damage in Nashville, TN; Birmingham, AL; and Gainesville, GA. Hospitals in those areas that bore the brunt of treatment of victims activated disaster plans. This report relates their experiences and the lessons learned from them.

  7. Relativity and Al^+ Optical Clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Chin-Wen; Hume, David B.; Wineland, David J.; Rosenband, Till

    2010-03-01

    We have constructed an optical clock based on quantum logic spectroscopy of an Al+ ion that has a fractional frequency inaccuracy of 8.6x10-18. The frequency of the ^1S0<->^3P0 clock transition is compared to that of a previously constructed Al^+ optical clock with a statistical measurement uncertainty of 7.0x10-18. The two clocks exhibit a relative stability of 2.8x10-15&-1/2circ;, and a fractional frequency difference of -1.8x10-17, consistent with the accuracy limit of the older clock. By comparing the frequencies of the clocks, we have observed relativistic effects, such as time dilation due to velocities less than 10 m/s and the gravitational red shift from a 0.33 m height change of one of the clocks.

  8. Social Group Work in Hospitals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stambler, Moses

    This literature review focuses on social group work in the hospital setting. The first section addresses the need for a holistic approach within a typology of illness, and discusses the social work role and intervention tasks required at different stages of illness, i.e., diagnosis, adaptation to long-term illness, and the ending of the illness…

  9. Antidepressants in the general hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Gelenberg, A. J.

    1979-01-01

    An approach to the use of antidepressant medication in the general hospital is presented. The type of depression most likely to respond to chemotherapy is described, categories of available antidepressant agents are discussed, and relevant pharmacologic aspects are outlined. This paper suggests clinical guidelines for the use of these drugs, particularly in medical and surgical patients. PMID:455184

  10. Antidepressant adherence after psychiatric hospitalization

    PubMed Central

    Zivin, Kara; Ganoczy, Dara; Pfeiffer, Paul N.; Miller, Erin M.; Valenstein, Marcia

    2010-01-01

    Objective Depressed patients discharged from psychiatric hospitalizations face increased risks for adverse outcomes including suicide, yet antidepressant adherence rates during this high-risk period are unknown. Using Veterans Affairs (VA) data, we assessed antidepressant adherence and predictors of poor adherence among depressed veterans following psychiatric hospitalization. Method We identified VA patients nationwide with depressive disorders who had a psychiatric hospitalization between April 1, 1999 and September 30, 2003, received antidepressant medication, and had an outpatient appointment following discharge. We calculated medication possession ratios (MPRs), a measure of medication adherence, within three and six months following discharge. We assessed patient factors associated with having lower levels of adherence (MPRs <0.8) after discharge. Results 20,931 and 23,182 patients met criteria for three and six month MPRs. The mean three month MPR was 0.79 (s.d.=0.37). The mean six month MPR was 0.66 (s.d.=0.40). Patients with poorer adherence were male, younger, non-white, and had a substance abuse disorder, but were less likely to have PTSD or other anxiety disorders. Conclusion Poor antidepressant adherence is common among depressed patients after psychiatric hospitalization. Efforts to improve adherence at this time may be critical in improving the outcomes of these high-risk patients. PMID:19609666

  11. The PSRO hospital review system.

    PubMed

    Goran, M J; Roberts, J S; Kellogg, M A; Fielding, J; Jessee, W

    1975-04-01

    The 1972 Social Security amendments contained the landmark Professional Standards Review Organization (PSRO) provisions as well as several sections upgrading existing utilization review (UR) requirements under Medicare and Medicaid. With issuance of the PSRO Program Manual and the recent publication of the new UR regulations, HEW for the first time has brought Medicare and Medicaid hospital review requirements into conformity and made them compatible with and supportive of the PSRO program. This article defines the PSRO hospital review system, describes how the three major components-concurrent review, medical care evaluation studies, and profile analysis-interrelate and provides examples of each of these components. Under utilization review requirements or PSRO, hospitals will be required to implement an integrated system of review designed to assure appropriate utilization practices and improve the quality of care. These aims are to be accomplished through the application of concepts of peer review, the use of norms, criteria, and standards, the identification of deficiencies in the quality, administration, or appropriateness of health care services, and their correction through linkage with programs of continuing medical education. Although PSROs are initially responsible for review in hospitals, they will likely provide the locus for a community-wide system of peer review for all services provided under National Health Insurance.

  12. Social Group Work in Hospitals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stambler, Moses

    This literature review focuses on social group work in the hospital setting. The first section addresses the need for a holistic approach within a typology of illness, and discusses the social work role and intervention tasks required at different stages of illness, i.e., diagnosis, adaptation to long-term illness, and the ending of the illness…

  13. Scurvy in hospitalized elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Raynaud-Simon, A; Cohen-Bittan, J; Gouronnec, A; Pautas, E; Senet, P; Verny, M; Boddaert, J

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically screen hospitalized elderly patients for clinical symptoms of scurvy and to confirm the diagnosis with biological measures. Geriatric acute care ward. Scurvy symptoms (one or more among perifollicular hyperkeratosis, petechiae or bruises, haemorrhagic features caused by venous puncture, severe gingivitis). We compared associated diseases, nutritional status, need for assistance for feeding, serum albumin, transthyretin, B9 and B12 vitamins, iron status and Serum Ascorbic Acid Level (SAAL) and outcome (in-hospital mortality) between scurvy and scurvy free patients. 18 patients with clinical symptoms of scurvy (scurvy group) were identified out of 145 consecutive patients (12%). They were compared to 23 consecutive control patients with no clinical symptoms of scurvy (scurvy-free group). SAAL was significantly lower (1.09 +/- 1.06 vs 4.87 +/- 4.2 mg x L-1, p < .001) and vitamin C deficiency more frequent (94 vs 30 %, p < .001) in the scurvy group. Moreover, in scurvy group, coronary heart disease (39 vs 9 %, p=.028), need for assistance for feeding (56 vs 13 %, p=.006) and in-hospital deaths (44 vs 9 %, p=.012) were more frequent. Ninety-four percent of patients with clinical symptoms of scurvy had vitamin C deficiency. Our results suggest that in hospitalized elderly patients, clinical symptoms allow scurvy diagnosis. Scurvy could be a frequent disease in elderly patients admitted to acute geriatric ward.

  14. National Hospital Input Price Index

    PubMed Central

    Freeland, Mark S.; Anderson, Gerard; Schendler, Carol Ellen

    1979-01-01

    The national community hospital input price index presented here isolates the effects of prices of goods and services required to produce hospital care and measures the average percent change in prices for a fixed market basket of hospital inputs. Using the methodology described in this article, weights for various expenditure categories were estimated and proxy price variables associated with each were selected. The index is calculated for the historical period 1970 through 1978 and forecast for 1979 through 1981. During the historical period, the input price index increased an average of 8.0 percent a year, compared with an average rate of increase of 6.6 percent for overall consumer prices. For the period 1979 through 1981, the average annual increase is forecast at between 8.5 and 9.0 percent. Using the index to deflate growth in expenses, the level of real growth in expenditures per inpatient day (net service intensity growth) averaged 4.5 percent per year with considerable annual variation related to government and hospital industry policies. PMID:10309052

  15. National hospital input price index.

    PubMed

    Freeland, M S; Anderson, G; Schendler, C E

    1979-01-01

    The national community hospital input price index presented here isolates the effects of prices of goods and services required to produce hospital care and measures the average percent change in prices for a fixed market basket of hospital inputs. Using the methodology described in this article, weights for various expenditure categories were estimated and proxy price variables associated with each were selected. The index is calculated for the historical period 1970 through 1978 and forecast for 1979 through 1981. During the historical period, the input price index increased an average of 8.0 percent a year, compared with an average rate of increase of 6.6 percent for overall consumer prices. For the period 1979 through 1981, the average annual increase is forecast at between 8.5 and 9.0 per cent. Using the index to deflate growth in expenses, the level of real growth in expenditures per inpatient day (net service intensity growth) averaged 4.5 percent per year with considerable annual variation related to government and hospital industry policies.

  16. Bibliography for the Hospitality Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Elizabeth A.

    This annotated bibliography is a sample collection of reference materials in the hospitality industry suitable for a small academic library. It is assumed that the library has a general reference collection. Publication dates range from 1992-96, with two publication dates in the 1980s. No periodicals are included. The 41 reference materials are…

  17. Making hospitals safer at night.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Caroline

    2016-08-17

    In the middle of the night, when the rest of the country is asleep, ward nurses up and down the UK are calling the Hospital at Night service. They may be looking for a technician to take a blood sample, or calling for medical help as a patient suddenly deteriorates.

  18. The Johns Hopkins Hospital Network

    PubMed Central

    Tolchin, Stephen G.; Barta, Wendy; Harkness, Kenneth

    1985-01-01

    The Johns Hopkins Hospital has initiated an ambitious program to apply modern technologies to the development of a new, comprehensive clinical information system. One component of this system is a networking technology for supporting the integration of diverse and functionally distinct information systems. This paper discusses the selection of the networking technology implemented at JHH, issues and problems, networking concepts, protocols and reliability.

  19. Emergency contraception and Catholic hospitals.

    PubMed

    Bucar, L; Nolan, D

    1999-01-01

    The "Ethical and Religious Directives for Catholic Health Care," which outline policies for Catholic hospitals in the US, are ambiguous on the topic of emergency contraception. Recent evidence suggests that, in the absence of definitive guidelines, Catholic hospitals are erring on the side of not providing emergency contraception. A survey of 589 US Catholic hospitals conducted by Catholics for a Free Choice found that 82% refused to supply emergency contraception--even to rape victims. Directive 36, which governs cases of sexual assault, could be argued to sanction the provision of emergency contraception. It states, "A female who has been raped should be able to defend herself against a potential conception from the sexual assault. If, after appropriate testing, there is no evidence that conception has occurred already, she may be treated with medications that would prevent ovulation, sperm capacitation, or fertilization. It is not permissible, however, to initiate or to recommend treatments that have as their purpose or direct effect the removal, destruction, or interference with the implantation of a fertilized ovum." Because the process of conception takes approximately 2 days, it would be consistent with the Catholic Church's position to offer emergency contraception within 24 hours of a rape. Since no currently available test can confirm or deny conception as early as 72 hours after unprotected intercourse, the timetable for emergency contraception, Catholic hospitals should be able to provide this service to all women and still abide by the directives.

  20. [Obstetric analgesia in Norwegian hospitals].

    PubMed

    Barratt-Due, Andreas; Hagen, Inger; Dahl, Vegard

    2005-09-22

    Experience from our hospital has shown a significant increase in the use of epidural analgesia during labour. We wanted to see if this was a general trend in Norway, and wanted to find out for what kind of labour analgesia was offered in the different labour wards. A questionnaire concerning obstetric analgesia and anaesthetic methods for caesarean section was sent to chief anaesthetists and head midwives in Norwegian hospitals. The information was compared to an identical questionnaire from 1996. In addition, data concerning obstetric analgesia was collected from the Norwegian Medical Birth Register. 77% of the anaesthetic departments and 88% of the labour wards responded to the questionnaire. The use of epidural analgesia was on an average 20.6% (range 0-40.5%), which is twice as much as in 1996. 75% answered that the parturients' wish for epidural analgesia was reason enough to give an epidural. 84% of caesarean sections were performed in regional anaesthesia and 16% were done in general anaesthesia. This represents a significant reduction in the use of general anaesthesia. 85% of the labour wards offered acupuncture, which is a tremendous increase compared to 1996. Systemic opioids are still widely used, and pethidine is still the most frequently used opioid. Pethidine's negative side effect profile has been widely focused on during the past decade. The hospital's information on the various analgesic methods available for labour analgesi, is clearly improved since 1996. Obstetric analgesia in Norwegian hospitals has improved substantially since the last survey.

  1. Hospital mutual aid evacuation plan.

    PubMed

    Phillips, R

    1997-02-01

    Health care facilities need to be prepared for disasters such as floods, tornadoes and earthquakes. Rochester, NY, and its surrounding communities devised a hospital mutual aid evacuation plan in the event a disaster occurs and also to comply with the Joint Commission. This document discusses the plan's development process and also provides the end result.

  2. Hospital hygiene in Great Britain.

    PubMed

    Emmerson, A M

    1996-12-01

    ICT's in the UK are experienced, well trained and are enthusiastic. However, their efforts are frustrated through lack of resources. Infection Control is now a quality issue and defined separate budgets are being established and hospital contracts now contain elements of infection control as part of the service. Infection control is coming of age in the UK after 25 years of earnest effort.

  3. Third molar complications requiring hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Kunkel, Martin; Morbach, Thomas; Kleis, Wilfried; Wagner, Wilfried

    2006-09-01

    The aim of this study was to describe demographic and clinical patterns of subjects hospitalized with complications associated with third molars (M3). The investigation was designed as a prospective cohort study composed of subjects admitted to hospital for management of M3-associated complications. The predictor variable was "clinical status of the M3" defined as (A) prophylactic M3 removal, (B) nonelective M3 removal, or (C) M3 present at the time of admission. Outcome variables were infection parameters, treatment costs, length of hospital stay, and days of disability. Postoperative complications (A and B) were compared to complications based on pericoronitis (C). Complications due to prophylactic removal (A) were compared to those arising from pericoronitis or from the removal of symptomatic teeth (B and C). From January 2003 to December 2004, 45 deep space infections, 6 mandibular fractures, 2 lingual nerve injuries, 1 parapharyngeal tooth luxation, and 1 osteomyelitis were noticed. Fifteen complications resulted from prophylactic surgery (A), 25 from nonelective removal (B), and 15 from pericoronitis (C). Direct treatment costs were 147,000 euro (A: 42,000 euro; B: 74,000 euro; C: 31,000 euro). In 10 of the 15 patients of group C, deep space involvement resulted immediately from the first episode of pericoronitis. Neither clinical markers of infection nor economic parameters showed significant differences between the groups. Within the catchment area of our institution, the majority of third molar-related hospitalizations resulted from diseased third molars or their removal.

  4. What is your hospitality quotient?

    PubMed

    DeSilets, Lyn

    2015-03-01

    In addition to the behind-the-scenes work involved with planning and implementing continuing nursing education activities, there are additional ways we can enhance the learner's experience. This article presents ideas on how to improve your hospitality quotient. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. Hospital autopsy: Endangered or extinct?

    PubMed Central

    Turnbull, Angus; Osborn, Michael; Nicholas, Nick

    2015-01-01

    Aim To determine the hospital autopsy rate for the UK in 2013. Methods A study of data from a ‘Freedom of Information’ request to all (n=186) acute NHS Trusts within England (n=160), NHS Boards in Scotland (n=14) and Wales (n=7) and Social Care Trusts in Northern Ireland (n=5). Hospital autopsy rates were calculated from the number of hospital autopsies performed in 2013 as a percentage of total inpatient deaths in the Trust that year. Results The UK response rate was 99% (n=184), yielding a mean autopsy rate of 0.69%. The mean rates were 0.51% (England), 2.13% (Scotland), 0.65% (Wales) and 0.46% (Northern Ireland). 23% (n=38) of all included respondents had a rate of 0% and 86% (n=143) a rate less than 1%. Conclusions The decline in hospital autopsy has continued relentlessly and, for better or for worse, the practice is on the verge of extinction in the UK. The study highlights to health professionals and policy makers the magnitude of this decline. Further research should investigate the impact of this on patient safety, clinical audit, public health and medical education. PMID:26076965

  6. Hospital autopsy: Endangered or extinct?

    PubMed

    Turnbull, Angus; Osborn, Michael; Nicholas, Nick

    2015-08-01

    To determine the hospital autopsy rate for the UK in 2013. A study of data from a 'Freedom of Information' request to all (n=186) acute NHS Trusts within England (n=160), NHS Boards in Scotland (n=14) and Wales (n=7) and Social Care Trusts in Northern Ireland (n=5). Hospital autopsy rates were calculated from the number of hospital autopsies performed in 2013 as a percentage of total inpatient deaths in the Trust that year. The UK response rate was 99% (n=184), yielding a mean autopsy rate of 0.69%. The mean rates were 0.51% (England), 2.13% (Scotland), 0.65% (Wales) and 0.46% (Northern Ireland). 23% (n=38) of all included respondents had a rate of 0% and 86% (n=143) a rate less than 1%. The decline in hospital autopsy has continued relentlessly and, for better or for worse, the practice is on the verge of extinction in the UK. The study highlights to health professionals and policy makers the magnitude of this decline. Further research should investigate the impact of this on patient safety, clinical audit, public health and medical education. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  7. Hospital strategy and financial performance.

    PubMed

    Eastaugh, S R

    1992-01-01

    Five archetype strategies are studied involving productivity, diversification, or a hybrid approach. Manager opinions, staffing ratios, and profitability data bring the strategy effectiveness issue into perspective. Hospitals employing the productivity/defender strategy, specializing in fewer product lines, experienced less decline in profitability in recent years. Excess diversification appears to exhibit the most rapid declines in profitability.

  8. A profile of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests in Northern Emirates, United Arab Emirates

    PubMed Central

    Batt, Alan M.; Al-Hajeri, Ahmed S.; Cummins, Fergal H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To report the characteristics of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients and their outcomes in the emirates of Sharjah, Ras-al-Khaimah, Umm Al-Quwain, Fujairah, and Ajman in the United Arab Emirates (collectively known as the Northern Emirates). Methods: This is a prospective descriptive cohort study of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest incidents transported by the national ambulance crews between February 2014 and March 2015 in the Northern Emirates. Results: A total of 384 patients were enrolled in this study. Male victims of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest represented 76% of the participants. The mean age of the study population was 50.9 years. An over-all prehospital return of spontaneous circulation rate of 3.1% was documented, as well as a 30% rate of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation being performed. Public access defibrillators were applied in 0.5% of cases. Data is presented according to Utstein reporting criteria. Conclusion: Baseline data for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest was established for the first time in the Northern Emirates of the United Arab Emirates. A low survival rate for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, low rates of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and low public access defibrillator use were discovered. Although low by comparison to established western systems results are similar to other systems in the region. Determining the baseline data presented in this study is essential in recommending and implementing strategies to reduce mortality from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. PMID:27761558

  9. A profile of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests in Northern Emirates, United Arab Emirates.

    PubMed

    Batt, Alan M; Al-Hajeri, Ahmed S; Cummins, Fergal H

    2016-11-01

    To report the characteristics of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients and their outcomes in the emirates of Sharjah, Ras-al-Khaimah, Umm Al-Quwain, Fujairah, and Ajman in the United Arab Emirates (collectively known as the Northern Emirates). Methods: This is a prospective descriptive cohort study of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest incidents transported by the national ambulance crews between February 2014 and March 2015 in the Northern Emirates. Results: A total of 384 patients were enrolled in this study. Male victims of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest represented 76% of the participants. The mean age of the study population was 50.9 years. An over-all prehospital return of spontaneous circulation rate of 3.1% was documented, as well as a 30% rate of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation being performed. Public access defibrillators were applied in 0.5% of cases. Data is presented according to Utstein reporting criteria. Conclusion: Baseline data for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest was established for the first time in the Northern Emirates of the United Arab Emirates. A low survival rate for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, low rates of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and low public access defibrillator use were discovered. Although low by comparison to established western systems results are similar to other systems in the region. Determining the baseline data presented in this study is essential in recommending and implementing strategies to reduce mortality from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

  10. Patients' expectations of hospital chaplains.

    PubMed

    Piderman, Katherine M; Marek, Dean V; Jenkins, Sarah M; Johnson, Mary E; Buryska, James F; Mueller, Paul S

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate patients' expectations of hospital chaplains. From April 6, 2006, through April 25, 2006, we surveyed by mail 1500 consecutive medical and surgical patients within 3 weeks of their discharge from the hospital. The survey included questions related to demographics, duration and area of hospitalization, awareness of chaplain availability, expectations regarding chaplain visits, and reasons for wanting to see a chaplain. Measured characteristics were summarized by calculating means and SDs for continuous variables and proportions for categorical variables. Proportions were statistically compared via Fisher exact tests or Monte Carlo estimates. Surveys were returned by 535 of the 1500 patients to whom they were sent. Most of those who returned surveys had been hospitalized for less than 1 week (398/514 [77.4%]) and were male (265/510 [52.0%]), married (396/528 [75.0%]), 56 years or older (382/532 [71.8%]), or affiliated with either the Lutheran (177 [33.3%]) or Catholic (133 [25.0%]) churches. Most (78.9%) were aware of the availability of chaplains, and 62.3% would have appreciated chaplain visitation at least every few days. More than half (52.9%) reported that they were visited, and 86.4% reported that this visit was important to them. The primary reason selected for wanting to see a chaplain was "to be reminded of God's care and presence." Items related to ritual, prayer, and pastoral support were also highly endorsed. Some results were dependent on sex, age, religious affiliation, or duration of stay. Hospitalized patients value visitation by chaplains and appreciate both religious and supportive interventions. Opportunities for patient care, education, and research are apparent.

  11. Hospitalizations in elderly glioblastoma patients.

    PubMed

    Moroney, Claire; Perry, James R; Tsang, Derek S; Bilodeau, Denise; Mueller, Chris; Soliman, Hany; Myrehaug, Sten; Sahgal, Arjun; Tseng, Chia-Lin; Tsao, May N

    2017-08-11

    Elderly glioblastoma (GB) patients are at risk of hospitalizations due to the morbidity of the disease and possible treatment toxicity. In this observational cohort study, 255 newly diagnosed GB patients age 65 years and older were included. Survival, emergency room visits and admissions to an acute care hospital were determined. Mean and median total health care costs were calculated. Risk factors for Emergency room visits and acute care hospital admissions were determined. Median overall survival was 6 months. The majority of patients (68%) had at least one visit to the emergency department and 77% had at least one admission to acute care. The mean and median total costs (hospital, ambulatory, physician billing, other health care costs) per patient were $162,479.78 (CAN) and $125,511.00 (CAN), respectively. Treatment with radiation or treatment with radio-chemotherapy was associated with a relative risk (RR) of 2.31 (95% CI: 1.44-3.7; P=0.0005) and 2.19 (95% CI: 1.28-3.74; P=0.004), respectively for emergency department visits as compared to patients who were managed with comfort measures only. Patients with a baseline ECOG 0 had a RR of 1.71 (95% CI: 1.06-2.77; P=0.0289) and patients with baseline ECOG 1 had a RR of 1.49 (0.98-2.26; P=0.0623) for hospital admission as compared to patients with ECOG 4. A large proportion of elderly GB patients (particularly those with good baseline performance status who underwent active treatment) presented to the emergency department and had at least one admission to acute care.

  12. Peptic ulcers: mortality and hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Riley, R

    1991-01-01

    This study analyzes data on peptic ulcer disease based on deaths for 1951-1988 and hospital separations for 1969-1988. The source of the data are mortality and morbidity statistics provided to Statistics Canada by the provinces. The age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR) for peptic ulcer disease decreased from 1951 to 1988 by 69.4% for men (8.5 to 2.6 per 100,000 population), and 31.8% for women (2.2 to 1.5). Separation rates from hospitals during 1969-1988 for peptic ulcer disease also decreased by 59.8% for men (242.7 to 97.6 per 100,000 population) and 35.6% for women (103.2 to 66.5). Age-specific rates for both mortality and hospital separations increased with age. Epidemiological studies indicate that the incidence of peptic ulcer disease is declining in the general population. The downward trends in mortality and hospitalization rates for peptic ulcer disease reflect this change in incidence, but additional factors probably contribute as well to this decline. Male rates for both mortality and hospital separations were much higher than female rates at the beginning of the study period; but toward the end, the gap between the sexes narrowed considerably, mainly because the male rates declined substantially while the female rates decline moderately. The slower decline in the rates for women may be related to such factors as the increasing labour force participation among women and the slower decline in the population of female smokers.

  13. Nursing: the hospital's competitive edge.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, F A; Preziosi, P

    1988-09-01

    The health care marketplace is becoming increasingly competitive. The hospital has a built-in marketing force with the nursing department, because nurses are in constant, direct contact with the customer. Nursing must identify the case mix profile of the community and focus the hospital product lines to meet community needs. The nursing department should decentralize, change, measure, and innovate the staff mix needed to operationalize these product lines. The development of nursing practice standards for the case mix will help to identify the staff mix needed and create systems to efficiently manage the product lines. Nursing management must become aware of cross-subsidization and downward skill substitution of nursing personnel. Nursing information systems must generate quality reports that invoke cost consciousness on the part of nursing staff. Quality assurance programs must become unit based and complete with frequent audits to correlate length of stay with nursing quality. Correlations must be determined between nursing productivity and case mix to determine the hospital's niche in the marketplace. The transformation of health care into a competitive business industry has created many opportunities for nursing. The health care industry's incentives for efficiency along with the decreasing demand for inpatient hospital services will be the forces driving health care toward a competitive marketplace. The hospital's nursing department should be strategically positioned to become accountable for increasing market share and enhancing quality patient outcomes. The focus has shifted from the theoretical to the tactical, which is a step in the right direction, particularly for nursing. Nursing, if strategically positioned, will not only thrive but will also excel in this chaotic environment by capturing the opportunities and being innovative.

  14. Using Same-Hospital Readmission Rates to Estimate All-Hospital Readmission Rates

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Andrew A.; Shih, Terry; Dimick, Justin B.; Ghaferi, Amir A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Since October of 2012, Medicare’s Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program has fined 2,200 hospitals a total of $500 billion. While the program penalizes readmission to any hospital, many institutions can only track readmissions to their own hospitals. We sought to determine the extent to which same-hospital readmission rates may be used to estimate all-hospital readmission rates following major surgery. Study Design We evaluated 3,940 hospitals treating 741,656 Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting, hip fracture repair, or colectomy between 2006 and 2008. We used hierarchical logistic regression to calculate risk- and reliability-adjusted rates of 30-day readmission to the same hospital and to any hospital. We next evaluated the correlation between same-hospital and all-hospital rates. To analyze the impact on hospital profiling, we compared rankings based on same-hospital rates to those based on all-hospital rates. Results The mean risk- and reliability-adjusted all-hospital readmission rate was 13.2% (SD 1.5%) and mean same-hospital readmission rate was 8.4% (SD 1.1%). Depending upon operation, between 57% (colectomy) and 63% (coronary artery bypass grafting) of hospitals were reclassified when profiling was based on same-hospital readmission rates instead of on all-hospital readmission rates. This was particularly pronounced in the middle three quintiles where 66–73% of hospitals were reclassified. Conclusions In evaluating hospital profiling under Medicare’s Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program, same-hospital rates provide unstable estimates of all-hospital readmission rates. To better anticipate penalties, hospitals require novel approaches for accurately tracking the totality of their post-operative readmissions. PMID:25159017

  15. Markets for hospital services in Zambia.

    PubMed

    Nakamba, Pamela; Hanson, Kara; McPake, Barbara

    2002-01-01

    Hospital reforms involving the introduction of measures to increase competition in hospital markets are being implemented in a range of low and middle-income countries. However, little is understood about the operation of hospital markets outside the USA and the UK. This paper assesses the degree of competition for hospital services in two hospital markets in Zambia (Copperbelt and Midlands), and the implications for prices, quality and efficiency. We found substantial differences among different hospital types in prices, costs and quality, suggesting that the hospital service market is a segmented market. The two markets differ significantly in their degree of competition, with the high cost inpatient services market in Copperbelt relatively more competitive than that in the Midlands market. The implications of these differences are discussed in terms of the potential for competition to improve hospital performance, the impact of market structure on equity of access, and how the government should address the problem of the mine hospitals.

  16. Hospital Capital Investment During the Great Recession.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sung

    2017-01-01

    Hospital capital investment is important for acquiring and maintaining technology and equipment needed to provide health care. Reduction in capital investment by a hospital has negative implications for patient outcomes. Most hospitals rely on debt and internal cash flow to fund capital investment. The great recession may have made it difficult for hospitals to borrow, thus reducing their capital investment. I investigated the impact of the great recession on capital investment made by California hospitals. Modeling how hospital capital investment may have been liquidity constrained during the recession is a novel contribution to the literature. I estimated the model with California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development data and system generalized method of moments. Findings suggest that not-for-profit and public hospitals were liquidity constrained during the recession. Comparing the changes in hospital capital investment between 2006 and 2009 showed that hospitals used cash flow to increase capital investment by $2.45 million, other things equal.

  17. Measuring efficiency among US federal hospitals.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Jeffrey P; Meyer, Sean

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluates the efficiency of federal hospitals, specifically those hospitals administered by the US Department of Veterans Affairs and the US Department of Defense. Hospital executives, health care policymakers, taxpayers, and federal hospital beneficiaries benefit from studies that improve hospital efficiency. This study uses data envelopment analysis to evaluate a panel of 165 federal hospitals in 2007 and 157 of the same hospitals again in 2011. Results indicate that overall efficiency in federal hospitals improved from 81% in 2007 to 86% in 2011. The number of federal hospitals operating on the efficiency frontier decreased slightly from 25 in 2007 to 21 in 2011. The higher efficiency score clearly documents that federal hospitals are becoming more efficient in the management of resources. From a policy perspective, this study highlights the economic importance of encouraging increased efficiency throughout the health care industry. This research examines benchmarking strategies to improve the efficiency of hospital services to federal beneficiaries. Through the use of strategies such as integrated information systems, consolidation of services, transaction-cost economics, and focusing on preventative health care, these organizations have been able to provide quality service while maintaining fiscal responsibility. In addition, the research documented the characteristics of those federal hospitals that were found to be on the Efficiency Frontier. These hospitals serve as benchmarks for less efficient federal hospitals as they develop strategies for improvement.

  18. Variation in the rates of adverse events between hospitals and hospital departments.

    PubMed

    Zegers, Marieke; De Bruijne, Martine C; Spreeuwenberg, Peter; Wagner, Cordula; Van Der Wal, Gerrit; Groenewegen, Peter P

    2011-04-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the variation in the rates of adverse events (AEs), and preventable AEs, between hospitals and hospital departments in order to investigate the room for improvement in reducing AEs at both levels. In addition, we explored the extent to which patient, department and hospital characteristics explain differences in the rates of AEs. Structured retrospective patient record review of hospital admissions. Twenty-one Dutch hospitals. Population A representative random sample of 7113 hospital admissions in 2004. Variation in AEs, and preventable AEs, between hospitals and hospital departments and the explanatory factors of the variation. The rates of AEs varied between hospitals (P = 0.05) and hospital departments (P < 0.05). The rates of preventable AEs only varied significantly between hospital departments. The clustering of preventable AEs in hospital departments was more than twice that found in hospitals (ICC 9.5 versus 3.5%). The type of hospital explained 35% of the inter-hospital variance in AEs. Patient and department characteristics explained 23% of the inter-department variance in preventable AEs. In addition to interventions to improve the overall patient safety within a hospital, interventions tailored for specific departments are necessary to reduce their patient safety risks. Monitoring and comparing the performance of hospitals should not be limited to the hospital level, but should be extended to the individual department since there can be significant differences in the rates of preventable AEs between different departments within the same hospital.

  19. 42 CFR 412.22 - Excluded hospitals and hospital units: General rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES... Costs and Inpatient Capital-Related Costs § 412.22 Excluded hospitals and hospital units: General...

  20. 42 CFR 412.22 - Excluded hospitals and hospital units: General rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES... Costs and Inpatient Capital-Related Costs § 412.22 Excluded hospitals and hospital units: General...

  1. 42 CFR 412.22 - Excluded hospitals and hospital units: General rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES... Costs and Inpatient Capital-Related Costs § 412.22 Excluded hospitals and hospital units: General...

  2. 42 CFR 412.22 - Excluded hospitals and hospital units: General rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES... Costs and Inpatient Capital-Related Costs § 412.22 Excluded hospitals and hospital units: General...

  3. Malnutrition among hospitalized patients in King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh.

    PubMed

    Bani, I A; Al-Kanhal, M A

    1998-09-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the incidence of malnutrition among hospitalized patients. A cross-sectional study of patients were evaluated for findings suggestive of protein calorie malnutrition (PCM). Hundred and sixty patients admitted to the medical and surgical wards over a period of five months were studied. Anthropometrics and biochemical measurements were used. Nutrition status was calculated based on some nutrition parameters weight for height, midarm, circumference, serum albumin and total lymphocyte count. Anthropometric measurements, weight for height and midarm circumference reflected malnutrition (PCM) of 33.8% and 30% respectively. The overall prevalence of obesity was 21%. A higher proportion (23.9%) of medical cases were found to be obese compared to surgical cases (19.7%). If malnutrition can be documented on hospital admission, attempts can be made to reverse malnutrition in the high risk patients.

  4. Emerging mechanisms of molecular pathology in ALS

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Owen M.; Ghasemi, Mehdi; Brown, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating degenerative disease characterized by progressive loss of motor neurons in the motor cortex, brainstem, and spinal cord. Although defined as a motor disorder, ALS can arise concurrently with frontotemporal lobal dementia (FTLD). ALS begins focally but disseminates to cause paralysis and death. About 10% of ALS cases are caused by gene mutations, and more than 40 ALS-associated genes have been identified. While important questions about the biology of this disease remain unanswered, investigations of ALS genes have delineated pathogenic roles for (a) perturbations in protein stability and degradation, (b) altered homeostasis of critical RNA- and DNA-binding proteins, (c) impaired cytoskeleton function, and (d) non-neuronal cells as modifiers of the ALS phenotype. The rapidity of progress in ALS genetics and the subsequent acquisition of insights into the molecular biology of these genes provide grounds for optimism that meaningful therapies for ALS are attainable. PMID:25932674

  5. [Coagulation behavior of Al13 species].

    PubMed

    Hu, Cheng-zhi; Liu, Hui-juan; Qu, Jiu-hui

    2006-12-01

    Coagulation behavior of Al13 species was examined in synthetic water with high alkalinity and high humic acid concentration from viewpoint of the transformation of Al hydrolysis products during the coagulation process. The results indicated that coagulation efficiency of Al coagulants positively correlated with the content of Al13 in the coagulation process. Aluminum chloride (AlCl3) was more effective than polyaluminum chloride (PACI) in removing turbidity and dissolved organic matter in the synthetic water because AlCl3 could not only generate Al13 species but also function as pH control agent in the coagulation process. During coagulation process pH control can improve coagulation process through regulating Al speciation, and AlCl3 benefited most from pH control.

  6. Hospital advertising in California, 1991-1997.

    PubMed

    Town, Robert J; Currim, Imran

    2002-01-01

    This paper examines the advertising behavior of California hospitals from 1991 to 1997. Using highly detailed hospital-level information, we found that hospital advertising in California increased dramatically: annual spending on advertising grew (inflation adjusted) more than sixfold over the period. In addition, advertising expenditures varied significantly across hospitals. We found that hospital advertising increased with market concentration; with the number of nearby potential patients; with the percentage of nearby patients insured through Medicare, health maintenance organizations (HMOs), and indemnity insurance; and with chain affiliation. For-profit hospitals were not found to advertise more than their not-for-profit counterparts.

  7. Toward hospital library standards in Canada.

    PubMed Central

    Flower, M A

    1978-01-01

    A report is given on Canadian hospital library standards as recently developed and incorporated in a new Guide to Hospital Accreditation, 1977. The new Canadian standards are compared with MLA recommendations to the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Hospitals. Their development is sketched and the contribution from Quebec of a model of hospital classification is examined. This model provides differential minimal library standards based on the function of the hospital rather than on its size alone. Use of these minimal standards as a practical means of developing hospital libraries is discussed and their implications for accreditation visits are underlined. PMID:678698

  8. [Hospital admissions due to varicella in a tertiary hospital].

    PubMed

    Guzmán Laura, K P; Periañez Vasco, A; Falcón Neyra, M D; Croche Santander, B

    2014-06-01

    Varicella (chickenpox) can cause serious complications and admission to hospital. Several countries included the varicella vaccine in their immunization schedules. A descriptive and retrospective study of hospitalizations due to varicella and its complications was conducted in a referral center from 2005 to 2011. A total of 1192 children with varicella were seen in the emergency room, of which 99 (8.5%) required admission. The annual incidence of admissions due to varicella and varicella complications was, 19.4 and 15.3 cases per 100,000 children under 14 years, respectively. Complications were more common in children under 5 years (79.5%), and with no underlying disease (78.2%). Infection of skin and soft tissue was the most common complication (62%). The mean hospital stay was 4.5 days (SD 4). Varicella causes high morbidity, and is more frequent in absolute terms in healthy children under 5 years of age. Therefore, routine vaccination recommended by the Immunization Advisory Committee should be mandatory. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Synthesis of AlN/Al Polycrystals along with Al Nanoparticles Using Thermal Plasma Route

    SciTech Connect

    Kanhe, Nilesh S.; Nawale, A. B.; Kulkarni, N. V.; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Mathe, V. L.; Das, A. K.

    2011-07-15

    This paper for the first time reports the (200) oriented growth of hexagonal Aluminum nitride crystals during synthesis of aluminum nanoparticles in dc transferred arc thermal plasma reactor by gas phase condensation in nitrogen plasma. The structural and morphological study of as synthesized AlN crystal and aluminium nanoparticles was done by using the x-ray diffraction method, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy.

  10. Investigations of Al-Dalang and Al-Hawashat meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gismelseed, A. M.; Abdallah, S. B.; Al-Rawas, A. D.; Al-Mabsali, F. N.; Widatallah, H. M.; Elzain, M. E.; Yousif, A. A.; Ericsson, T.; Annersten, H.

    2016-12-01

    Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements, and electron microprobe analysis (EMPA) have been performed on two meteorites named Al-Dalang and Al-Hawashat after identifying their falling sites in the Western region of Sudan. These two meteorites are ordinary chondrites with similar mineralogy. XRD and EMPA show that the two specimens consist of primary olivine, ortho-pyroxene and later crystallising clino-pyroxene as reaction rims against plagioclase. Fe-metal phases are dominated by kamacite (≈6 wt.% Ni) and minor amounts of tetrataenite (≈52 wt.% Ni). Troilite (FeS) and alabandite (MnS) are optically observed as sulphide phases. The Mössbauer measurements at 295 and 78 K are in agreement with the above characterizations, showing at least two paramagnetic doublets which are assigned to olivine and pyroxene and magnetic sextets assigned to kamacite (hyperfine field ≈33.5 T) and troilite FeS (hyperfine field ≈31 T).

  11. Al-Al2O3-Pd junction hydrogen sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuyama, K.; Takinami, N.; Chiba, Y.; Ohshima, S.; Kambe, S.

    1994-07-01

    Al-Al2O3-Pd MIM (metal insulator metal) junctions fabricated on a glass substrate were tested as hydrogen sensors. The I-V (current versus voltage) characteristics of the junctions were measured at room temperature in a vacuum of 10-5 Torr and in H2 gas of 10-2-100 Torr. A significant increase in the current was observed upon introduction of H2 gas. This phenomenon is believed to occur due to the work function lowering of the hydrogen-absorbed Pd top electrode. The rise time was on the order of minutes, while the recovery time when hydrogen was purged was more than 20 h. However, when the junction was placed in an oxidizing ambient such as air, the recovery time was drastically reduced to the order of minutes, indicating that the device is operative as a hydrogen sensor in the atmospheric ambient. Hydrogen adsorption and desorption behavior of the Pd film was also investigated using a Pd coated quartz microbalance, and the results explained the current response of the Pd MIM junction to hydrogen in the presence of oxygen.

  12. Electronic spectroscopy of the Al +-Ar complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Jie; Dagdigian, Paul J.

    1999-05-01

    The laser fluorescence excitation spectrum of the Al +-Ar complex near the Al + ion 3s3p 1P ← 3s 2 1S resonance transition is reported. An excited-state ( v', 0) progression and the (0, 1) hot band were observed. Rotational analysis revealed that these bands involve an electronic transition from the Al +-Ar X 1Σ+ ground state to the 1Σ+ state correlating with the Al +( 1P)+Ar asymptote. Rotational constants and upper-state vibrational constants and the dissociation energy were determined. The spectroscopic constants of the two observed Al +-Ar electronic states are compared with those for neutral AlAr states.

  13. Ab initio modeling of zincblende AlN layer in Al-AlN-TiN multilayers

    DOE PAGES

    Yadav, S. K.; Wang, J.; Liu, X. -Y.

    2016-06-13

    An unusual growth mechanism of metastable zincblende AlN thin film by diffusion of nitrogen atoms into Al lattice is established. Using first-principles density functional theory, we studied the possibility of thermodynamic stability of AlN as a zincblende phase due to epitaxial strains and interface effect, which fails to explain the formation of zincblende AlN. We then compared the formation energetics of rocksalt and zincblende AlN in fcc Al through direct diffusion of nitrogen atoms to Al octahedral and tetrahedral interstitials. Furthermore, the formation of a zincblende AlN thin film is determined to be a kinetically driven process, not a thermodynamicallymore » driven process.« less

  14. [Historical exploration of Acapulco hospitals, Guerrero, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Fajardo-Ortiz, Guillermo; Salcedo-Alvarez, Rey Arturo

    2006-01-01

    This study attempts to recount the history of the main hospitals of the port of Acapulco from colonial times until the end of the 20th century. The Augustine friars began hospital care at the end of the first part of the 16th century. Later, Bernardino Alvarez (1514?-1584), with the support of the Spanish crown, founded the first formal hospital in Acapulco called Hospital de Nuestra Señora de la Consolación (Our Lady of Consolation Hospital). During the 16th and 17th centuries, the sick were attended by friars, and by the end of the 19th century there were physicians and surgeons. From the end of the Independence War until the end of the 19th century, the port did not have any true hospital. The first degreed physicians and surgeons arrived and resided in Acapulco in 1920. In 1938, the Hospital Civil Morelos (Morelos Civil Hospital) began providing services. It was replaced by the Hospital General de Acapulco (General Hospital of Acapulco). At the fourth decade of the past century the Cruz Roja (Red Cross) was created. In 1957 the hospital services of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS, Mexican Institute of Social Security), which was founded in 1963, was inaugurated with the Unidad Medico/Social (Medical and Social Unit) of the IMSS in Acapulco. This began the journey of modernity in Acapulco. In 1992, Hospital Regional Vicente Guerrero (Regional Hospital Vicente Guerrero) of the IMSS, initiated its services. In 1960, medical services for civil workers and their families were housed in the Hospital Civil Morelos (Morelos Civil Hospital). Shortly afterwards, the Instituto de Seguridad y Servicios Sociales para los Trabajadores del Estado (ISSSTE, Security and Social Services Institute for State Employees) had their own hospital. During the 20th century, Acapulco has added other hospital services to care for members of the navy and armed forces, as well as for those persons with financial resources for private care.

  15. The marketing of partial hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Millsap, P; Brown, E; Kiser, L; Pruitt, D

    1987-09-01

    Health-care professionals are currently operating in the context of a rapidly changing health-care delivery system, including the move away from inpatient services to outpatient services in order to control costs. Those who practice in partial-hospital settings are in a position to offer effective, cost-efficient services; however, there continue to be obstacles which hinder appropriate utilization of the modality. The development and use of a well-designed marketing plan is one strategy for removing these obstacles. This paper presents a brief overview of the marketing process, ideas for developing a marketing plan, and several examples of specific marketing strategies as well as ways to monitor their effectiveness. Partial-hospital providers must take an active role in answering the calls for alternative sources of psychiatric care. A comprehensive, education-oriented marketing approach will increase the public's awareness of such alternatives and enable programs to survive in a competitive environment.

  16. Ultrasonic cleaning in the hospital.

    PubMed

    Detwiler, M S

    1989-04-01

    Ultrasonic cleaning can prolong the life of expensive instruments. In the past, many fine instruments were discarded due to stiffening hinges and box locks, or sticking plungers. Hand scrubbing and spray washing could not thoroughly clean these areas. Ultrasonic cleaners effectively remove dried and baked blood, serums and medications from these instruments. Also, hinged instruments and syringes operate more smoothly during use in surgery when cleaned using ultrasonics. In addition, the use of ultrasonics alleviates the necessity for hand scrubbing of contaminated surgical instruments and laboratory apparatus, a procedure which could lead to injury or infection. The superb cleaning powers of ultrasonic cleaners, their speed and simplicity of operation, and their ability to remove blood, tissue, bacteria and microorganisms within minutes, makes them a valuable addition to any operating room suite, central service department, or emergency room. Their cost-effectiveness is considerable for the small hospital, and compelling for the large hospital.

  17. Nutritional Alert in hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Brieux, Humberto Fernán Mandirola; Kaminker, Diego; Campos, Fernando; Guillen, Sebastian; Alejandris, Javier; Luna, Daniel; Baum, Analia; de Quirós, Fernán Gonzalez Bernaldo

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the study is to assess a nutritional risk alert using an Informatics System in hospitalized patients versus the conventional methodology. We studied 400 medical patients at the Belgrano Hospital Critical Care Unit. We considered two groups of 200 patients. In the first the group (Control Group), nutritional risk was diagnosed in a traditional way. In the second group (Alarm Group), nutritional risk was diagnosed with an alert system. The alert was triggered when a patient showed low levels of, at least, two of the following variables: albumin, cholesterol, triglyceride, lymphocyte or low body mass index (BMI). Nutritional risk was detected in 20.3% of the Control Group patients while, in the Alert Group, nutritional risk was detected in 34.3% of the patients; the difference between the two groups was significant (p<0.001), with a sensitivity rate of 99% and a specificity rate of 98%. Malnutrition is more easily detected when using an alert system.

  18. [Pericarditis in a general hospital].

    PubMed

    Faintuch, J J; Friedmann, A A

    1996-01-01

    The authors studied 57 patients with pericarditis in the Ward of Internal Medicine of the University of São Paulo from January 1993 through May 1995. A comparison was made with the results of a similar study performed in the same hospital in 1989. Increasing frequency of pericarditis was verified. Tuberculosis, formerly the most frequent etiologic agent, decreased while neoplastic diseases became more common.

  19. Business Intelligence in Hospital Management.

    PubMed

    Escher, Achim; Hainc, Nicolin; Boll, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Business intelligence (BI) is a worthwhile investment, and will play a significant role in hospital management in the near future. Implementation of BI is challenging and requires resources, skills, and a strategy, but enables management to have easy access to relevant analysis of data and visualization of important key performance indicators (KPI). Modern BI applications will help to overcome shortages of common "hand-made" analysis, save time and money, and will enable even managers to do "self-service" analysis and reporting.

  20. Delirium in hospitalized older patients.

    PubMed

    Inouye, S K

    1998-11-01

    Delirium is a common, serious problem for hospitalized older patients. Recognition of delirium poses challenges requiring cognitive assessment and knowledge of the clinical course. Delirium often is of multiple causes and is associated with a poor long-term prognosis. Nonpharmacologic approaches for delirium management are recommended; pharmacologic management should be reserved for patients who pose a danger to themselves or others. Importantly, delirium and its complications may be preventable through a targeted risk factor approach.

  1. Observations on Hospitalized Dengue Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    DENGUE PATIENTS IN MANILA Carman. R. Min oto* be" S. Siqpo Ommon D. Leus** Curds G. Ibyes* INTRODUCION to the Hospital of Infant Jesus between October...31, 1983 and March 31, 1984: Criteria for the diagnosis of dengue Dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) has been recognized infection were based on the...titer of later sample < 1:640. DHF epidemic.4𔃿 Since that time, there have only been a few- was differentiated from dengue fever (DF), and DHF was

  2. Salmonella isolation from hospital areas.

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, R. W.; Price, T. H.; Joynson, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    Evidence of the presence of salmonellas in a paediatric ward, a special care baby unit, a maternity unit and a hospital kitchen was obtained by culture of sewer swabs, faeces and food samples. The survey was designed to cause as little administrative interference as possible. The technical aspects of the survey did not strain laboratory facilities. Minimal secondary spread of salmonella infection was experienced. PMID:390044

  3. NiAl-base composite containing high volume fraction of AlN for advanced engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hebsur, Mohan (Inventor); Whittenbeger, John D. (Inventor); Lowell, Carl F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A particulate reinforced NiAl-AlN composite alloy has a NiAl matrix and greater than about 13 volume percent fine particles of AlN within the matrix. The particles preferably have a diameter from about 15 nanometers to about 50 nanometers. The particulate reinforced NiAl-AlN composite alloy may be prepared by cryomilling prealloyed NiAl in liquid nitrogen using grinding media having a diameter of from about 2 to 6 mm at an impeller speed of from about 450 RPM to about 800 RPM. The cryomilling may be done for a duration of from about 4 hours to about 20 hours to obtain a cryomilled powder. The cryomilled powder may be consolidated to form the particulate reinforced NiAl-AlN composite alloy. The particulate reinforced alloy can further include a toughening alloy. The toughening alloy may include NiCrAlY, FeCrAlY, and FeAl.

  4. Microstructure and Oxidation Behavior of Al and Al/NiCrAlY Coatings on Pure Titanium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Xue; Zhang, Nannan; Zhang, Zhongli; Chen, Ruirun; Lin, Danyang

    2017-06-01

    To improve the oxidation resistance of Ti alloys, a NiCrAlY coating was deposited as diffusion barrier between aluminum overlay coating and pure Ti substrate by air plasma spraying method. The microstructure and oxidation behavior of Al coatings with and without NiCrAlY diffusion barrier were investigated in isothermal oxidation tests at 800 °C for 100 h. The results indicate that the weight gain of the Al/NiCrAlY coating was 4.16 × 10-5 mg2 cm-4 s-1, whereas that of the single Al coating was 9.52 × 10-5 mg2 cm-4 s-1 after 100 h oxidation. As compared with single Al coating, the Al/NiCrAlY coating revealed lower oxidation rate and excellent oxidation resistance by forming thin Al2O3 + NiO scales at overlaying coating/diffusion barrier and diffusion barrier/substrate interfaces. Meanwhile, the inward diffusion of Al and the outward diffusion of Ti were inhibited effectively by the NiCrAlY diffusion barrier.

  5. Welfare standards in hospital mergers.

    PubMed

    Katona, Katalin; Canoy, Marcel

    2013-08-01

    There is a broad literature on the consequences of applying different welfare standards in merger control. Total welfare is usually defined as the sum of consumer and provider surplus, i.e., potential external effects are not considered. The general result is then that consumer welfare is a more restrictive standard than total welfare, which is advantageous in certain situations. This relationship between the two standards is not necessarily true when the merger has significant external effects. We model mergers on hospital markets and allow for not-profit-maximizing behavior of providers and mandatory health insurance. Mandatory health insurance detaches the financial and consumption side of health care markets, and the concept consumer in merger control becomes non-evident. Patients not visiting the merging hospitals still are affected by price changes through their insurance premiums. External financial effects emerge on not directly affected consumers. We show that applying a restricted interpretation of consumer (neglecting externality) in health care merger control can reverse the relation between the two standards; consumer welfare standard can be weaker than total welfare. Consequently, applying the wrong standard can lead to both clearing socially undesirable and to blocking socially desirable mergers. The possible negative consequences of applying a simple consumer welfare standard in merger control can be even stronger when hospitals maximize quality and put less weight on financial considerations. We also investigate the implications of these results for the practice of merger control.

  6. Functional seismic evaluation of hospitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevara, L. T.

    2003-04-01

    Functional collapse of hospitals (FCH) occurs when a medical complex, or part of it, although with neither structural nor nonstructural damage, is unable to provide required services for immediate attention to earthquake victims and for the recovery of the affected community. As it is known, FCH during and after an earthquake, is produced, not only by the damage to nonstructural components, but by an inappropriate or deficient distribution of essential and supporting medical spaces. This paper presents some conclusions on the analysis of the traditional architectural schemes for the design and construction of hospitals in the 20th Century and some recommendations for the establishment of evaluation parameters for the remodeling and seismic upgrade of existing hospitals in seismic zones based on the new concepts of: a) the relative location of each essential service (ES) into the medical complex, b) the capacity of each of these spaces for housing temporary activities required for the attention of a massive emergency (ME); c) the relationship between ES and the supporting services (SS); d) the flexibility of transformation of nonessential services into complementary spaces for the attention of extraordinary number of victims; e) the dimensions and appropriateness of evacuation routes; and d) the appropriate supply and maintenance of water, electricity and vital gases emergency installations.

  7. Prognosis after Hospitalization for Erythroderma.

    PubMed

    Egeberg, Alexander; Thyssen, Jacob P; Gislason, Gunnar H; Skov, Lone

    2016-11-02

    Erythrodermic psoriasis (EP) and erythroderma exfoliativa (EE) are acute and potentially life-threatening inflammatory reactions. We estimated hazard ratios (HRs) of 3-year mortality following hospitalization for EP or EE compared with general population controls, patients hospitalized for psoriasis vulgaris, and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), respectively. We identified 26 and 48 patients with a first-time hospitalization (1997-2010) for EP and EE, respectively (10 matched population-controls for each patient), 1,998 patients with psoriasis vulgaris, and 60 patients with TEN. During follow-up, 8 (30.8%) patients with EP, 19 (39.6%) patients with EE, and 34 (56.7%) patients with TEN died. Compared with population-controls, adjusted HRs were 4.40 (95% CI 1.66-11.70) for EP and 2.16 (1.21-3.82) for EE. Compared with psoriasis vulgaris, adjusted HRs were 1.83 (0.90-3.73) for EP, and 1.28 (1.01-1.63) for EE. The risk was significantly lower in EP (0.38 (0.16-0.91)) and in EE (0.50 (0.36-0.71)), compared with TEN. Mortality in EP and EE is high, and close follow-up is advised.

  8. Hospital Sinks May Be Awash in 'Superbugs'

    MedlinePlus

    ... 163800.html Hospital Sinks May Be Awash in 'Superbugs' Study finds drug-resistant bacteria can colonize in ... News) -- New research suggests that the battle against "superbugs" -- multidrug-resistant bacteria -- should begin in hospital sinks. ...

  9. Depression Can Slow Hospital Patients' Recovery

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166427.html Depression Can Slow Hospital Patients' Recovery: Study Screening for ... 9, 2017 FRIDAY, June 9, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Depression affects about one-third of hospital patients and ...

  10. Hospital Protocol Helps Thwart Serious Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_165911.html Hospital Protocol Helps Thwart Serious Infection Study finds faster ... News) -- A new regulation requires New York state hospitals to follow a protocol to rapidly diagnosis and ...

  11. Leaving the hospital - your discharge plan

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000867.htm Leaving the hospital - your discharge plan To use the sharing features ... please enable JavaScript. After an illness, leaving the hospital is your next step toward recovery. Depending on ...

  12. Medication safety during your hospital stay

    MedlinePlus

    Five-rights - medication; Medication administration - hospital; Medical errors - medication; Patient safety - medication safety ... right dose, at the right times. During your hospital stay, your health care team needs to follow ...

  13. Learning to speak up about hospital failures.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Dawne

    2016-08-17

    The recent Public Accounts Committee (PAC) report on discharging older people from acute hospitals in England revealed that rising numbers of patients are remaining in hospital when they are clinically ready to go home.

  14. Metadata - National Hospital Discharge Survey (NHDS)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The National Hospital Discharge Survey (NHDS) is an annual probability survey that collects information on the characteristics of inpatients discharged from non-federal short-stay hospitals in the United States.

  15. Shingles Vaccine Cuts Chronic Pain, Hospitalizations

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164156.html Shingles Vaccine Cuts Chronic Pain, Hospitalizations Protection lasts years after ... age, researchers said. The new study showed the vaccine was 74 percent effective in preventing hospitalizations for ...

  16. At Major Teaching Hospitals, Lower Death Rates

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_165869.html At Major Teaching Hospitals, Lower Death Rates Researchers assess 30-day ... TUESDAY, May 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Major U.S. teaching hospitals are often considered more expensive than the ...

  17. Hospital demand for licensed practical nurses.

    PubMed

    Spetz, Joanne; Dyer, Wendy T; Chapman, Susan; Seago, Jean Ann

    2006-10-01

    Despite evidence that hospital use of licensed practical nurses (LPNs) declined in the 1990s, the current registered nurse (RN) shortage has prompted interest in LPNs as substitutes for RNs. Hospitals, being the dominant employer of RNs, have an economic incentive to use less expensive LPNs as substitutes. Beside wages, there are several forces underlying hospital demand for LPNs. In this article, the authors model and estimate hospital demand for LPNs as a function of nurse wages and hospital, market, and patient characteristics using a longitudinal data set of short-term general hospitals in the United States. The authors find evidence that higher RN wages increase hospital demand for LPNs, both in levels and relative to RNs, suggesting that hospitals at least partially substitute RNs with LPNs.

  18. Food production and service in UK hospitals.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mohamed; Jones, Eleri; Redmond, Elizabeth; Hewedi, Mahmoud; Wingert, Andreas; Gad El Rab, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to apply value stream mapping holistically to hospital food production/service systems focused on high-quality food. Multiple embedded case study of three (two private-sector and one public-sector) hospitals in the UK. The results indicated various issues affecting hospital food production including: the menu and nutritional considerations; food procurement; food production; foodservice; patient perceptions/expectations. Value stream mapping is a new approach for food production systems in UK hospitals whether private or public hospitals. The paper identifies opportunities for enhancing hospital food production systems. The paper provides a theoretical basis for process enhancement of hospital food production and the provision of high-quality hospital food.

  19. Getting your home ready - after the hospital

    MedlinePlus

    ... 000432.htm Getting your home ready - after the hospital To use the sharing features on this page, ... home ready after you have been in the hospital often requires much preparation. Set up your home ...

  20. The relationship of hospital ownership and service composition to hospital charges

    PubMed Central

    Eskoz, Robin; Peddecord, K. Michael

    1985-01-01

    The relationship of hospital ownership and service composition to hospital charges was examined for 456 general acute hospitals in California. Ancillary services had higher profit margins, both gross and net profits, than daily hospital services. Ancillary services accounted for 55.3 percent of total patient revenue. Charges per day were 23 percent higher for ancillary services than for daily hospital services. Net profits for daily and ancillary services were lowest at county hospitals. Proprietary hospitals had the highest net profits for total ancillary services and the highest mean charges. Not-for-profit hospitals had the highest profit margins for daily hospital services. Neither direct nor total costs for ancillary services were significantly different among ownership groups, although direct costs for daily hospital services were significantly higher at proprietary hospitals. PMID:10311161