Science.gov

Sample records for facultative anaerobic bacteria

  1. Cultivation of anaerobic and facultatively anaerobic bacteria from spacecraft-associated clean rooms.

    PubMed

    Stieglmeier, Michaela; Wirth, Reinhard; Kminek, Gerhard; Moissl-Eichinger, Christine

    2009-06-01

    In the course of this biodiversity study, the cultivable microbial community of European spacecraft-associated clean rooms and the Herschel Space Observatory located therein were analyzed during routine assembly operations. Here, we focused on microorganisms capable of growing without oxygen. Anaerobes play a significant role in planetary protection considerations since extraterrestrial environments like Mars probably do not provide enough oxygen for fully aerobic microbial growth. A broad assortment of anaerobic media was used in our cultivation strategies, which focused on microorganisms with special metabolic skills. The majority of the isolated strains grew on anaerobic, complex, nutrient-rich media. Autotrophic microorganisms or microbes capable of fixing nitrogen were also cultivated. A broad range of facultatively anaerobic bacteria was detected during this study and also, for the first time, some strictly anaerobic bacteria (Clostridium and Propionibacterium) were isolated from spacecraft-associated clean rooms. The multiassay cultivation approach was the basis for the detection of several bacteria that had not been cultivated from these special environments before and also led to the discovery of two novel microbial species of Pseudomonas and Paenibacillus.

  2. Cultivation of Anaerobic and Facultatively Anaerobic Bacteria from Spacecraft-Associated Clean Rooms▿

    PubMed Central

    Stieglmeier, Michaela; Wirth, Reinhard; Kminek, Gerhard; Moissl-Eichinger, Christine

    2009-01-01

    In the course of this biodiversity study, the cultivable microbial community of European spacecraft-associated clean rooms and the Herschel Space Observatory located therein were analyzed during routine assembly operations. Here, we focused on microorganisms capable of growing without oxygen. Anaerobes play a significant role in planetary protection considerations since extraterrestrial environments like Mars probably do not provide enough oxygen for fully aerobic microbial growth. A broad assortment of anaerobic media was used in our cultivation strategies, which focused on microorganisms with special metabolic skills. The majority of the isolated strains grew on anaerobic, complex, nutrient-rich media. Autotrophic microorganisms or microbes capable of fixing nitrogen were also cultivated. A broad range of facultatively anaerobic bacteria was detected during this study and also, for the first time, some strictly anaerobic bacteria (Clostridium and Propionibacterium) were isolated from spacecraft-associated clean rooms. The multiassay cultivation approach was the basis for the detection of several bacteria that had not been cultivated from these special environments before and also led to the discovery of two novel microbial species of Pseudomonas and Paenibacillus. PMID:19363082

  3. Facultative or obligate anaerobic bacteria have the potential for multimodality therapy of solid tumours.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ming Q; Ellem, Kay A O; Dunn, Paul; West, Malcolm J; Bai, Chun Xue; Vogelstein, Bert

    2007-02-01

    Recent understanding of the unique pathology of solid tumours has shed light on the difficult and disappointing nature of their clinical treatment. All solid tumours undergo angiogenesis that results in biological changes and adaptive metabolisms, i.e. formation of defective vessels, appearance of hypoxic areas, and emergence of an heterogeneous tumour cell population. This micro-milieu provides a haven for anaerobic bacteria. The strictly anaerobic clostridia have several advantages over other facultative anaerobes such as salmonella or lactic acid-producing, Gram-positive, obligate, anaerobic bifidobacteria. Both pathogenic and non-pathogenic clostridia have been demonstrated to specifically colonise and destroy solid tumours. Early trials of non-pathogenic strains in humans had shown plausible safety. Genetic modifications and adaptation of pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains have further created improved features. However, these manipulations rarely generate strains that resulted in complete tumour control alone. Combined modalities of therapies with chemo and radiation therapies, on the other hand, often perform better, including 'cure' of solid tumours in a high percentage of animals. Considering that clostridia have unlimited capacities for genetic improvement, we predict that designer clostridia forecast a promising future for the development of potent strains for tumour destruction, incorporating mechanisms such as immunotherapy to overcome immune suppression and to elicit strong anti-tumour responses.

  4. Microbial oxidative stress response: Novel insights from environmental facultative anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fu, Huihui; Yuan, Jie; Gao, Haichun

    2015-10-15

    Facultative bacteria can grow under either oxic or anoxic conditions. While oxygen provides substantial advantages in energy yield by respiration, it can become life-threatening because of reactive oxygen species that derive from the molecule naturally. Thus, to survive and thrive in a given niche, these bacteria have to constantly regulate physiological processes to make maximum benefits from oxygen respiration while restraining oxidative stress. Molecular mechanisms and physiological consequences of oxidative stress have been under extensive investigation for decades, mostly on research model Escherichia coli, from which our understanding of bacterial oxidative stress response is largely derived. Nevertheless, given that bacteria live in enormously diverse environments, to cope with oxidative stress different strategies are conceivably developed.

  5. Comparative study of biological hydrogen production by pure strains and consortia of facultative and strict anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hiligsmann, Serge; Masset, Julien; Hamilton, Christopher; Beckers, Laurent; Thonart, Philippe

    2011-02-01

    In this paper, a simple and rapid method was developed in order to assess in comparative tests the production of binary biogas mixtures containing CO(2) and another gaseous compound such as hydrogen or methane. This method was validated and experimented for the characterisation of the biochemical hydrogen potential of different pure strains and mixed cultures of hydrogen-producing bacteria (HPB) growing on glucose. The experimental results compared the hydrogen production yield of 19 different pure strains and sludges: facultative and strict anaerobic HPB strains along with anaerobic digester sludges thermally pre-treated or not. Significant yields variations were recorded even between different strains of the same species by i.e. about 20% for three Clostridium butyricum strains. The pure Clostridium butyricum and pasteurianum strains achieved the highest yields i.e. up to 1.36 mol H(2)/mol glucose compared to the yields achieved by the sludges and the tested Escherichia and Citrobacter strains.

  6. The Paenibacillus polymyxa species is abundant among hydrogen-producing facultative anaerobic bacteria in Lake Averno sediment.

    PubMed

    Lal, Sadhana; Romano, Stefano; Chiarini, Luigi; Signorini, Antonella; Tabacchioni, Silvia

    2012-05-01

    Lake Averno sediment was used to isolate the facultative anaerobic bacteria having the potential for H(2) production. Twenty-five out of 35 isolates recovered from the sediment sample produced hydrogen under anaerobic conditions from glucose with yields ranging from 0.1 to 0.49 mol H(2)/mol glucose. Identification based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that most of them belong to the Firmicutes group, with a prevalence of the Paenibacillus polymyxa species. Seven distinct genomic fingerprints among the 11 P. polymyxa isolates were obtained using the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique. Glucose fermentation by P. polymyxa isolates was investigated. Glucose was totally consumed after 3 days of fermentation. The fermentation products were hydrogen (0.18-0.47 mol H(2)/mol glucose), ethanol (0.1-0.5 mol ethanol/mol glucose), and 2,3-butanediol (0.1 mol 2,3-butanediol/mol glucose). Lower amounts of acetic, butyric, formic, lactic, and propionic acids were detected. All metabolic data concerning P. polymyxa isolates were analyzed by cluster analysis to reveal similarities and/or differences with clustering based on RAPD profiles. Despite the high metabolic similarity among almost all P. paenibacillus isolates, results of cluster analyses of metabolic and genetic data do not match completely.

  7. Anaerobic bacteria

    MedlinePlus

    Anaerobic bacteria are bacteria that do not live or grow when oxygen is present. In humans, these ... Goldstein EJ. Diseases caused by non-spore forming anaerobic bacteria. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's ...

  8. The Pasteur effect in facultative anaerobic metazoa.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, H; Kamp, G

    1996-05-15

    The existence and the regulatory mechanisms of the Pasteur effect in facultative anaerobic metazoa are discussed. There are three reasons for the controversy surrounding this phenomenon. 1) The different definitions of the Pasteur effect, 2) the antagonistic effect of metabolic depression and its species specific response to hypoxia, as well as 3) the laboratory-specific differences in the experimental procedures for analyzing the Pasteur effect and its regulation. This review aims to clarify the confusion about the existence of the Pasteur effect in facultative anaerobic metazoa and to offer possible molecular mechanisms.

  9. Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Enteric Gram Negative Facultative Anaerobe Bacilli in Aerobic versus Anaerobic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Amachawadi, Raghavendra G.; Renter, David G.; Volkova, Victoriya V.

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial treatments result in the host’s enteric bacteria being exposed to the antimicrobials. Pharmacodynamic models can describe how this exposure affects the enteric bacteria and their antimicrobial resistance. The models utilize measurements of bacterial antimicrobial susceptibility traditionally obtained in vitro in aerobic conditions. However, in vivo enteric bacteria are exposed to antimicrobials in anaerobic conditions of the lower intestine. Some of enteric bacteria of food animals are potential foodborne pathogens, e.g., Gram-negative bacilli Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica. These are facultative anaerobes; their physiology and growth rates change in anaerobic conditions. We hypothesized that their antimicrobial susceptibility also changes, and evaluated differences in the susceptibility in aerobic vs. anaerobic conditions of generic E. coli and Salmonella enterica of diverse serovars isolated from cattle feces. Susceptibility of an isolate was evaluated as its minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) measured by E-Test® following 24 hours of adaptation to the conditions on Mueller-Hinton agar, and on a more complex tryptic soy agar with 5% sheep blood (BAP) media. We considered all major antimicrobial drug classes used in the U.S. to treat cattle: β-lactams (specifically, ampicillin and ceftriaxone E-Test®), aminoglycosides (gentamicin and kanamycin), fluoroquinolones (enrofloxacin), classical macrolides (erythromycin), azalides (azithromycin), sulfanomides (sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim), and tetracyclines (tetracycline). Statistical analyses were conducted for the isolates (n≥30) interpreted as susceptible to the antimicrobials based on the clinical breakpoint interpretation for human infection. Bacterial susceptibility to every antimicrobial tested was statistically significantly different in anaerobic vs. aerobic conditions on both media, except for no difference in susceptibility to ceftriaxone on BAP agar. A satellite experiment

  10. Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Enteric Gram Negative Facultative Anaerobe Bacilli in Aerobic versus Anaerobic Conditions.

    PubMed

    DeMars, Zachary; Biswas, Silpak; Amachawadi, Raghavendra G; Renter, David G; Volkova, Victoriya V

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial treatments result in the host's enteric bacteria being exposed to the antimicrobials. Pharmacodynamic models can describe how this exposure affects the enteric bacteria and their antimicrobial resistance. The models utilize measurements of bacterial antimicrobial susceptibility traditionally obtained in vitro in aerobic conditions. However, in vivo enteric bacteria are exposed to antimicrobials in anaerobic conditions of the lower intestine. Some of enteric bacteria of food animals are potential foodborne pathogens, e.g., Gram-negative bacilli Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica. These are facultative anaerobes; their physiology and growth rates change in anaerobic conditions. We hypothesized that their antimicrobial susceptibility also changes, and evaluated differences in the susceptibility in aerobic vs. anaerobic conditions of generic E. coli and Salmonella enterica of diverse serovars isolated from cattle feces. Susceptibility of an isolate was evaluated as its minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) measured by E-Test® following 24 hours of adaptation to the conditions on Mueller-Hinton agar, and on a more complex tryptic soy agar with 5% sheep blood (BAP) media. We considered all major antimicrobial drug classes used in the U.S. to treat cattle: β-lactams (specifically, ampicillin and ceftriaxone E-Test®), aminoglycosides (gentamicin and kanamycin), fluoroquinolones (enrofloxacin), classical macrolides (erythromycin), azalides (azithromycin), sulfanomides (sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim), and tetracyclines (tetracycline). Statistical analyses were conducted for the isolates (n≥30) interpreted as susceptible to the antimicrobials based on the clinical breakpoint interpretation for human infection. Bacterial susceptibility to every antimicrobial tested was statistically significantly different in anaerobic vs. aerobic conditions on both media, except for no difference in susceptibility to ceftriaxone on BAP agar. A satellite experiment

  11. Detection of Sulphate-Reducing Bacteria and Others Cultivable Facultative Bacteria in Dental Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Lúcio de Souza; Dias, Eliane Pedra; Heggendorn, Christiane; Lutterbach, Márcia T. S.

    2014-01-01

    Aim To detect for the presence of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and evaluate the possible association between SRB and cultivable facultative bacterial of oral sites with different periodontal conditions. Methods The study was carried out on 9 samples from different oral sites in 8 patients (two samples were collected from the same patient). Material was collected using modified Postgate E culture medium, indicated for the growth and isolation of SRB. In addition, a reducing solution for anaerobic bacteria was used as a transport solution for facultative bacteria and identified by polymerase chain reaction amplification (PCR) and sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Results SRB was found in 3 patient samples: the first in a root fragment, the second in a root fragment and a healthy tooth with vertical bone loss and a mobility degree of 3; and the third in a healthy tooth extracted for orthodontic treatment. In the final patient, the cultivable facultative species Lactobacillus casei was identified. Other facultative bacterial species were identified in patient 5 (Kurthia Gibsonii) and patient 7 (Pseudomonas aeruginosa). Conclusions The detection of SRB in different dental tissues with distinct periodontal features demonstrated that new studies need to be developed in order to determine the true role of SRB in the oral microbiota. In addition, it was possible to verify the presence of Lactobacillus casei together with SRB in one sample.

  12. Simple and Versatile Turbidimetric Monitoring of Bacterial Growth in Liquid Cultures Using a Customized 3D Printed Culture Tube Holder and a Miniaturized Spectrophotometer: Application to Facultative and Strictly Anaerobic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Maia, Margarida R. G.; Marques, Sara; Cabrita, Ana R. J.; Wallace, R. John; Thompson, Gertrude; Fonseca, António J. M.; Oliveira, Hugo M.

    2016-01-01

    Here we introduce a novel strategy for turbidimetric monitoring of bacterial growth in liquid culture. The instrumentation comprises a light source, a customized 3D printed culture tube holder and a miniaturized spectrophotometer, connected through optical cables. Due to its small footprint and the possibility to operate with external light, bacterial growth was directly monitored from culture tubes in a simple and versatile fashion. This new portable measurement technique was used to monitor the growth of facultative (Escherichia coli ATCC/25922, and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC/29213) and strictly (Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens JW11, Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus P18, and Propionibacterium acnes DSMZ 1897) anaerobic bacteria. For E. coli and S. aureus, the growth rates calculated from normalized optical density values were compared with those ones obtained using a benchtop spectrophotometer without significant differences (P = 0.256). For the strictly anaerobic species, a high precision (relative standard deviation < 3.5%) was observed between replicates up to 48 h. Regarding its potential for customization, this manifold could accommodate further developments for customized turbidimetric monitoring, such as the use of light-emitting diodes as a light source or flow cells.

  13. Simple and Versatile Turbidimetric Monitoring of Bacterial Growth in Liquid Cultures Using a Customized 3D Printed Culture Tube Holder and a Miniaturized Spectrophotometer: Application to Facultative and Strictly Anaerobic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Maia, Margarida R G; Marques, Sara; Cabrita, Ana R J; Wallace, R John; Thompson, Gertrude; Fonseca, António J M; Oliveira, Hugo M

    2016-01-01

    Here we introduce a novel strategy for turbidimetric monitoring of bacterial growth in liquid culture. The instrumentation comprises a light source, a customized 3D printed culture tube holder and a miniaturized spectrophotometer, connected through optical cables. Due to its small footprint and the possibility to operate with external light, bacterial growth was directly monitored from culture tubes in a simple and versatile fashion. This new portable measurement technique was used to monitor the growth of facultative (Escherichia coli ATCC/25922, and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC/29213) and strictly (Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens JW11, Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus P18, and Propionibacterium acnes DSMZ 1897) anaerobic bacteria. For E. coli and S. aureus, the growth rates calculated from normalized optical density values were compared with those ones obtained using a benchtop spectrophotometer without significant differences (P = 0.256). For the strictly anaerobic species, a high precision (relative standard deviation < 3.5%) was observed between replicates up to 48 h. Regarding its potential for customization, this manifold could accommodate further developments for customized turbidimetric monitoring, such as the use of light-emitting diodes as a light source or flow cells.

  14. Simple and Versatile Turbidimetric Monitoring of Bacterial Growth in Liquid Cultures Using a Customized 3D Printed Culture Tube Holder and a Miniaturized Spectrophotometer: Application to Facultative and Strictly Anaerobic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Maia, Margarida R G; Marques, Sara; Cabrita, Ana R J; Wallace, R John; Thompson, Gertrude; Fonseca, António J M; Oliveira, Hugo M

    2016-01-01

    Here we introduce a novel strategy for turbidimetric monitoring of bacterial growth in liquid culture. The instrumentation comprises a light source, a customized 3D printed culture tube holder and a miniaturized spectrophotometer, connected through optical cables. Due to its small footprint and the possibility to operate with external light, bacterial growth was directly monitored from culture tubes in a simple and versatile fashion. This new portable measurement technique was used to monitor the growth of facultative (Escherichia coli ATCC/25922, and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC/29213) and strictly (Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens JW11, Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus P18, and Propionibacterium acnes DSMZ 1897) anaerobic bacteria. For E. coli and S. aureus, the growth rates calculated from normalized optical density values were compared with those ones obtained using a benchtop spectrophotometer without significant differences (P = 0.256). For the strictly anaerobic species, a high precision (relative standard deviation < 3.5%) was observed between replicates up to 48 h. Regarding its potential for customization, this manifold could accommodate further developments for customized turbidimetric monitoring, such as the use of light-emitting diodes as a light source or flow cells. PMID:27630632

  15. Simple and Versatile Turbidimetric Monitoring of Bacterial Growth in Liquid Cultures Using a Customized 3D Printed Culture Tube Holder and a Miniaturized Spectrophotometer: Application to Facultative and Strictly Anaerobic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Maia, Margarida R. G.; Marques, Sara; Cabrita, Ana R. J.; Wallace, R. John; Thompson, Gertrude; Fonseca, António J. M.; Oliveira, Hugo M.

    2016-01-01

    Here we introduce a novel strategy for turbidimetric monitoring of bacterial growth in liquid culture. The instrumentation comprises a light source, a customized 3D printed culture tube holder and a miniaturized spectrophotometer, connected through optical cables. Due to its small footprint and the possibility to operate with external light, bacterial growth was directly monitored from culture tubes in a simple and versatile fashion. This new portable measurement technique was used to monitor the growth of facultative (Escherichia coli ATCC/25922, and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC/29213) and strictly (Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens JW11, Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus P18, and Propionibacterium acnes DSMZ 1897) anaerobic bacteria. For E. coli and S. aureus, the growth rates calculated from normalized optical density values were compared with those ones obtained using a benchtop spectrophotometer without significant differences (P = 0.256). For the strictly anaerobic species, a high precision (relative standard deviation < 3.5%) was observed between replicates up to 48 h. Regarding its potential for customization, this manifold could accommodate further developments for customized turbidimetric monitoring, such as the use of light-emitting diodes as a light source or flow cells. PMID:27630632

  16. Facultative to strict anaerobes ratio in the preterm infant microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Arboleya, Silvia; Solís, Gonzalo; Fernández, Nuria; de los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara G.; Gueimonde, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    During recent years there has been an increasing interest on the development of strategies for modulating the process of microbiota establishment in preterm infants. For successfully developing of such strategies, a detailed knowledge of the microbiota establishment process in these infants is needed. In a previous study we evidenced clear alterations in the process of microbiota establishment in preterm newborns when compared with a control group of full-term breast-fed infants. Here we have analyzed these data more in depth, corroborating a reduced proportion of strict anaerobes with respect to facultatives in the fecal microbiota of preterm infants. The potential benefits, as well as the side effects, of strategies aimed at counterbalancing this alteration in the facultative to strict anaerobes ratio are discussed in this addendum. PMID:22922559

  17. Anaerobic bacteria in otitis media.

    PubMed

    Fulghum, R S; Daniel, H J; Yarborough, J G

    1977-01-01

    Anaerobic bacteria, Peptostrepotococcus intermedius and Propionibacterium acnes, were found in mixed culture specimens from four to ten tested cases of chronic secretory otitis media. These anaerobic bacteria were in a mixed infection flora with aerobic bacteria most often Staphylococcus epidermidis and Cornybacterium sp. which do not fit any established species. The findings of anaerobic bacteria in otitis media is consistent with the sporadic report of the involvement of anaerobic bacteria in otitis media in the literature since 1898.

  18. Reduction of Uranium(VI) to Uranium (IV) by Three Facultative Anaerobes at High Concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabalala, Simphiwe; Chirwa, Evans M. N.

    2010-01-01

    Six bacteria species were isolated from a uranium mine in Limpopo, South Africa, and three facultative anaerobes reduced U(VI) to U(IV) and aided the removal of U(VI) from solution. The pure cultures showed a high reduction rate at pH 5 to 6 for concentrations 100-800 mg/L during the first 4 to 6 hours of incubation. A biological remediation process for removing U(VI) is desirable in the nuclear industry where more expensive environmentally non-friendly physical chemical processes have been used conventionally for decades.

  19. [Recovery of facultatives and anaerobes from frozen specimens with a polymicrobial nature].

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Chizuko; Nakamura, Toshihiko; Kaimori, Mitsuomi; Watanabe, Kunitomo

    2003-01-01

    Microbiological examination of frozen specimens is sometimes carried out in clinical microbiology and the result is used as an aid of diagnosis and/or treatment of polymicrobial infections. The study was carried out to reevaluate the merit of freezing specimens in clinical microbiology. A total of 10 specimens with a polymicrobial nature were included in this study. Before and after freezing specimens, we isolated facultative and anaerobic bacteria using a set of primary isolation media, consisting of three aerobic agar plates (MacConkey agar, blood agar and chocolate agar) and four pre-reduced anaerobic agar plates (HK Blood agar, HK blood agar with paromomycin (PM) and vancomycin (VM), phenyl ethyl-alcohol (PEA) agar and Bacteroides bile esculin (BBE) agar). All the procedures were done in a properly controlled anaerobic chamber. The number of isolates before and after freezing was 79 and 70, respectively. Among the strains isolated before freezing, 33 strains were recovered on the same kin of media artery freezing, without a remarkable decrease in the quantity. But 26 strains were not recovered and 2 strains were recovered with a remarkable decrease. Among 26 strains, 15 strains could be successfully backed up on the different kind of media. In conclusion, an anaerobic technique with an anaerobic chamber and a set of isolatin plates including blood agar, chocolate agar, HK blood agar, PEA blood agar, HK blood agar with PM and VM enable us to estimate the bacteriology before freezing from frozen specimens.

  20. Enhanced start-up of anaerobic facultatively autotrophic biocathodes in bioelectrochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Zaybak, Zehra; Pisciotta, John M; Tokash, Justin C; Logan, Bruce E

    2013-12-01

    Biocathodes in bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) can be used to convert CO2 into diverse organic compounds through a process called microbial electrosynthesis. Unfortunately, start-up of anaerobic biocathodes in BESs is a difficult and time consuming process. Here, a pre-enrichment method was developed to improve start-up of anaerobic facultatively autotrophic biocathodes capable of using cathodes as the electron donor (electrotrophs) and CO2 as the electron acceptor. Anaerobic enrichment of bacteria from freshwater bog sediment samples was first performed in batch cultures fed with glucose and then used to inoculate BES cathode chambers set at -0.4V (versus a standard hydrogen electrode; SHE). After two weeks of heterotrophic operation of BESs, CO2 was provided as the sole electron acceptor and carbon source. Consumption of electrons from cathodes increased gradually and was sustained for about two months in concert with a significant decrease in cathode chamber headspace CO2. The maximum current density consumed was -34 ± 4 mA/m(2). Biosynthesis resulted in organic compounds that included butanol, ethanol, acetate, propionate, butyrate, and hydrogen gas. Bacterial community analyses based on 16S rRNA gene clone libraries revealed Trichococcus palustris DSM 9172 (99% sequence identity) as the prevailing species in biocathode communities, followed by Oscillibacter sp. and Clostridium sp. Isolates from autotrophic cultivation were most closely related to Clostridium propionicum (99% sequence identity; ZZ16), Clostridium celerecrescens (98-99%; ZZ22, ZZ23), Desulfotomaculum sp. (97%; ZZ21), and Tissierella sp. (98%; ZZ25). This pre-enrichment procedure enables simplified start-up of anaerobic biocathodes for applications such as electrofuel production by facultatively autotrophic electrotrophs.

  1. Enhanced start-up of anaerobic facultatively autotrophic biocathodes in bioelectrochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Zaybak, Zehra; Pisciotta, John M; Tokash, Justin C; Logan, Bruce E

    2013-12-01

    Biocathodes in bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) can be used to convert CO2 into diverse organic compounds through a process called microbial electrosynthesis. Unfortunately, start-up of anaerobic biocathodes in BESs is a difficult and time consuming process. Here, a pre-enrichment method was developed to improve start-up of anaerobic facultatively autotrophic biocathodes capable of using cathodes as the electron donor (electrotrophs) and CO2 as the electron acceptor. Anaerobic enrichment of bacteria from freshwater bog sediment samples was first performed in batch cultures fed with glucose and then used to inoculate BES cathode chambers set at -0.4V (versus a standard hydrogen electrode; SHE). After two weeks of heterotrophic operation of BESs, CO2 was provided as the sole electron acceptor and carbon source. Consumption of electrons from cathodes increased gradually and was sustained for about two months in concert with a significant decrease in cathode chamber headspace CO2. The maximum current density consumed was -34 ± 4 mA/m(2). Biosynthesis resulted in organic compounds that included butanol, ethanol, acetate, propionate, butyrate, and hydrogen gas. Bacterial community analyses based on 16S rRNA gene clone libraries revealed Trichococcus palustris DSM 9172 (99% sequence identity) as the prevailing species in biocathode communities, followed by Oscillibacter sp. and Clostridium sp. Isolates from autotrophic cultivation were most closely related to Clostridium propionicum (99% sequence identity; ZZ16), Clostridium celerecrescens (98-99%; ZZ22, ZZ23), Desulfotomaculum sp. (97%; ZZ21), and Tissierella sp. (98%; ZZ25). This pre-enrichment procedure enables simplified start-up of anaerobic biocathodes for applications such as electrofuel production by facultatively autotrophic electrotrophs. PMID:24126154

  2. D/H fractionation in lipids of facultative and obligate denitrifying and sulfate reducing bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osburn, M. R.; Sessions, A. L.

    2012-12-01

    The hydrogen isotopic composition of lipids has been shown to vary broadly in both cultured bacteria and in environmental samples. Culturing studies have indicated that this variability may primarily reflect metabolism; however, the limited number of organisms studied thus far prevents application of these trends to interpretation of environmental samples. Here we report D/H fractionations in anaerobic bacteria, including both facultative and obligate anaerobic organisms with a range of electron donors, acceptors, and metabolic pathways. Experiments using the metabolically flexible alphaproteobacterium Paracoccus denitrificans probe particular central metabolic pathways using a range of terminal electron acceptors. While a large range of δD values has been observed during aerobic metabolism, denitrifying cultures produce a more limited range in δD values that are more similar to each other than the corresponding aerobic culture. Data from the sulfate reducing bacteria Desulfobacterium autotrophicum and Desulfobacter hydrogenophilus indicate that chemolithoautotrophy and anaerobic heterotrophy can produce similar δD values, and are similar between bacteria despite differing metabolic pathways. These results suggest that the fractionation of D/H depends both on the specific metabolic pathway and the electron acceptor. While this is not inconsistent with previous studies, it suggests the simple correspondence between δD and metabolism previously understood from aerobic bacteria is not universally applicable.

  3. Rapid isolation of a facultative anaerobic electrochemically active bacterium capable of oxidizing acetate for electrogenesis and azo dyes reduction.

    PubMed

    Shen, Nan; Yuan, Shi-Jie; Wu, Chao; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Song, Xiang-Ning; Li, Wen-Wei; Tong, Zhong-Hua; Yu, Han-Qing

    2014-05-01

    In this study, 27 strains of electrochemically active bacteria (EAB) were rapidly isolated and their capabilities of extracellular electron transfer were identified using a photometric method based on WO3 nanoclusters. These strains caused color change of WO3 from white to blue in a 24-well agar plate within 40 h. Most of the isolated EAB strains belonged to the genera of Aeromonas and Shewanella. One isolate, Pantoea agglomerans S5-44, was identified as an EAB that can utilize acetate as the carbon source to produce electricity and reduce azo dyes under anaerobic conditions. The results confirmed the capability of P. agglomerans S5-44 for extracellular electron transfer. The isolation of this acetate-utilizing, facultative EBA reveals the metabolic diversity of environmental bacteria. Such strains have great potential for environmental applications, especially at interfaces of aerobic and anaerobic environments, where acetate is the main available carbon source.

  4. Culturable Aerobic and Facultative Anaerobic Intestinal Bacterial Flora of Black Cobra (Naja naja karachiensis) in Southern Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Junaid; Sagheer, Mehwish; Tabassum, Nazneen; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Using morphological analysis and biochemical testing, here for the first time, we determined the culturable gut bacterial flora (aerobes and facultative anaerobes) in the venomous Black Cobra (Naja naja karachiensis) from South Asia. The findings revealed that these snakes inhabit potentially pathogenic bacteria including Serratia marcescens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Shewanella putrefaciens, Aeromonas hydrophila, Salmonella sp., Moraxella sp., Bacillus sp., Ochrobactrum anthropi, and Providencia rettgeri. These findings are of concern, as injury from snake bite can result in wound infections and tissue necrosis leading to sepsis/necrotizing fasciitis and/or expose consumers of snake meat/medicine in the community to infections. PMID:25002979

  5. Culturable Aerobic and Facultative Anaerobic Intestinal Bacterial Flora of Black Cobra (Naja naja karachiensis) in Southern Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Junaid; Sagheer, Mehwish; Tabassum, Nazneen; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Using morphological analysis and biochemical testing, here for the first time, we determined the culturable gut bacterial flora (aerobes and facultative anaerobes) in the venomous Black Cobra (Naja naja karachiensis) from South Asia. The findings revealed that these snakes inhabit potentially pathogenic bacteria including Serratia marcescens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Shewanella putrefaciens, Aeromonas hydrophila, Salmonella sp., Moraxella sp., Bacillus sp., Ochrobactrum anthropi, and Providencia rettgeri. These findings are of concern, as injury from snake bite can result in wound infections and tissue necrosis leading to sepsis/necrotizing fasciitis and/or expose consumers of snake meat/medicine in the community to infections. PMID:25002979

  6. Genome Sequence of the Facultative Anaerobe Oerskovia enterophila DFA-19 (DSM 43852T)

    PubMed Central

    Jag, Vanessa; Bengelsdorf, Frank R.; Daniel, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Oerskovia enterophila DFA-19 (DSM 43852T), a facultative anaerobe soil bacterium, which was originally isolated from millipede feces and first described as Promicromonospora enterophila. The genome consists of a circular chromosome comprising approximately 4.65 Mb and 4,044 predicted protein-encoding genes. PMID:27634998

  7. Genome Sequence of the Facultative Anaerobe Oerskovia enterophila DFA-19 (DSM 43852T).

    PubMed

    Jag, Vanessa; Poehlein, Anja; Bengelsdorf, Frank R; Daniel, Rolf; Dürre, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Oerskovia enterophila DFA-19 (DSM 43852(T)), a facultative anaerobe soil bacterium, which was originally isolated from millipede feces and first described as Promicromonospora enterophila The genome consists of a circular chromosome comprising approximately 4.65 Mb and 4,044 predicted protein-encoding genes. PMID:27634998

  8. Growth of the facultative anaerobe Shewanella putrefaciens by elemental sulfur reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moser, D. P.; Nealson, K. H.

    1996-01-01

    The growth of bacteria by dissimilatory elemental sulfur reduction is generally associated with obligate anaerobes and thermophiles in particular. Here we describe the sulfur-dependent growth of the facultatively anaerobic mesophile Shewanella putrefaciens. Six of nine representative S. putrefaciens isolates from a variety of environments proved able to grow by sulfur reduction, and strain MR-1 was chosen for further study. Growth was monitored in a minimal medium (usually with 0.05% Casamino Acids added as a growth stimulant) containing 30 mM lactate and limiting concentrations of elemental sulfur. When mechanisms were provided for the removal of the metabolic end product, H2S, measurable growth was obtained at sulfur concentrations of from 2 to 30 mM. Initial doubling times were ca. 1.5 h and substrate independent over the range of sulfur concentrations tested. In the cultures with the highest sulfur concentrations, cell numbers increased by greater than 400-fold after 48 h, reaching a maximum density of 6.8 x 10(8) cells ml-1. Yields were determined as total cell carbon and ranged from 1.7 to 5.9 g of C mol of S(0) consumed-1 in the presence of the amino acid supplement and from 0.9 to 3.4 g of C mol of S(0-1) in its absence. Several lines of evidence indicate that cell-to-sulfur contact is not required for growth. Approaches for the culture of sulfur-metabolizing bacteria and potential ecological implications of sulfur reduction in Shewanella-like heterotrophs are discussed.

  9. Enhanced biohydrogen production from beverage industrial wastewater using external nitrogen sources and bioaugmentation with facultative anaerobic strains.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Gopalakrishnan; Bakonyi, Péter; Sivagurunathan, Periyasamy; Kim, Sang-Hyoun; Nemestóthy, Nándor; Bélafi-Bakó, Katalin; Lin, Chiu-Yue

    2015-08-01

    In this work biohydrogen generation and its improvement possibilities from beverage industrial wastewater were sought. Firstly, mesophilic hydrogen fermentations were conducted in batch vials by applying heat-treated (80°C, 30 min) sludge and liquid (LB-grown) cultures of Escherichia coli XL1-Blue/Enterobacter cloacae DSM 16657 strains for bioaugmentation purposes. The results showed that there was a remarkable increase in hydrogen production capacities when facultative anaerobes were added in the form of inoculum. Furthermore, experiments were carried out in order to reveal whether the increment occurred either due to the efficient contribution of the facultative anaerobic microorganisms or the culture ingredients (in particular yeast extract and tryptone) supplied when the bacterial suspensions (LB media-based inocula) were mixed with the sludge. The outcome of these tests was that both the applied nitrogen sources and the bacteria (E. coli) could individually enhance hydrogen formation. Nevertheless, the highest increase took place when they were used together. Finally, the optimal initial wastewater concentration was determined as 5 g/L. PMID:25661265

  10. Enhanced biohydrogen production from beverage industrial wastewater using external nitrogen sources and bioaugmentation with facultative anaerobic strains.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Gopalakrishnan; Bakonyi, Péter; Sivagurunathan, Periyasamy; Kim, Sang-Hyoun; Nemestóthy, Nándor; Bélafi-Bakó, Katalin; Lin, Chiu-Yue

    2015-08-01

    In this work biohydrogen generation and its improvement possibilities from beverage industrial wastewater were sought. Firstly, mesophilic hydrogen fermentations were conducted in batch vials by applying heat-treated (80°C, 30 min) sludge and liquid (LB-grown) cultures of Escherichia coli XL1-Blue/Enterobacter cloacae DSM 16657 strains for bioaugmentation purposes. The results showed that there was a remarkable increase in hydrogen production capacities when facultative anaerobes were added in the form of inoculum. Furthermore, experiments were carried out in order to reveal whether the increment occurred either due to the efficient contribution of the facultative anaerobic microorganisms or the culture ingredients (in particular yeast extract and tryptone) supplied when the bacterial suspensions (LB media-based inocula) were mixed with the sludge. The outcome of these tests was that both the applied nitrogen sources and the bacteria (E. coli) could individually enhance hydrogen formation. Nevertheless, the highest increase took place when they were used together. Finally, the optimal initial wastewater concentration was determined as 5 g/L.

  11. Oxygen Effect on the Low Temperature Tolerance of Facultative Anaerobes from Antarctica, Alaska, and Patagonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2004-01-01

    Psychrotolerance as an adaptation to survival in extreme environments is widespread among many of the mesophilic microorganisms. Red-ox potential, pH and salinity could significantly alter the features of ecosystems by providing liquid water at subzero temperatures. Furthermore, organisms can respond to temperature changes by several known mechanisms, including changing the conformation capacities of constitutional proteins or by the synthesis of mucopolysaccharides around the cell wall and membrane. Such protective mechanisms make it possible for cells to not only passively survive low-temperature in a state of anabiosis, but also to be capable of actively metabolizing substrates and reproducing normally. The physiological and biochemical characteristics of species as well as genetics could be remarkably changed due to -on and surviving m extreme environments. The cold shock genes for some of the studied strains of psychrotolerant facultative anaerobes already were published In this paper we present experimental data for psychrotolerant facultative anaerobes isolated from geographically different cold regions of our planet. We show the growth response on the changing of anaerobic conditions to aerobic with cultivation at subzero temperatures.

  12. Growth of the Facultative Anaerobes from Antarctica, Alaska, and Patagonia at Low Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2004-01-01

    Psychotolerance, as an adaptation for surviving in extreme environments, is widespread among mesophilic microorganisms. Physico-chemical factors such as pressure, red-ox potential, pH and salinity could significantly alter the features of ecosystems by providing liquid water at subzero temperatures. Furthermore, organisms can respond to temperature changes by several known mechanisms, including changing the conformation capacities of constitutional proteins or by the synthesis of mucopolysaccharides around the cell wall and membrane. Such protective mechanisms make it possible for cells to not only passively survive low temperatures in a state of anabiosis, but also to be capable of actively metabolizing substrates and reproducing normally. The physiological and biochemical characteristics of the species, as well as genetics, could be remarkably changed due to adaptation and surviving in extreme environments. The cold shock genes of some of the studied strains of psychotolerant facultative anaerobes were reported previously. In this paper we present experimental data for psychotolerant, non spore-forming, facultative anaerobes isolated from geographically different cold regions of our planet. We show the growth response on changing from anaerobic conditions to aerobic with cultivation at low temperatures.

  13. Genomic Analysis of Melioribacter roseus, Facultatively Anaerobic Organotrophic Bacterium Representing a Novel Deep Lineage within Bacteriodetes/Chlorobi Group

    PubMed Central

    Kadnikov, Vitaly V.; Mardanov, Andrey V.; Podosokorskaya, Olga A.; Gavrilov, Sergey N.; Kublanov, Ilya V.; Beletsky, Alexey V.; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A.; Ravin, Nikolai V.

    2013-01-01

    Melioribacter roseus is a moderately thermophilic facultatively anaerobic organotrophic bacterium representing a novel deep branch within Bacteriodetes/Chlorobi group. To better understand the metabolic capabilities and possible ecological functions of M. roseus and get insights into the evolutionary history of this bacterial lineage, we sequenced the genome of the type strain P3M-2T. A total of 2838 open reading frames was predicted from its 3.30 Mb genome. The whole proteome analysis supported phylum-level classification of M. roseus since most of the predicted proteins had closest matches in Bacteriodetes, Proteobacteria, Chlorobi, Firmicutes and deeply-branching bacterium Caldithrix abyssi, rather than in one particular phylum. Consistent with the ability of the bacterium to grow on complex carbohydrates, the genome analysis revealed more than one hundred glycoside hydrolases, glycoside transferases, polysaccharide lyases and carbohydrate esterases. The reconstructed central metabolism revealed pathways enabling the fermentation of complex organic substrates, as well as their complete oxidation through aerobic and anaerobic respiration. Genes encoding the photosynthetic and nitrogen-fixation machinery of green sulfur bacteria, as well as key enzymes of autotrophic carbon fixation pathways, were not identified. The M. roseus genome supports its affiliation to a novel phylum Ignavibateriae, representing the first step on the evolutionary pathway from heterotrophic ancestors of Bacteriodetes/Chlorobi group towards anaerobic photoautotrophic Chlorobi. PMID:23301019

  14. Basic Laboratory Culture Methods for Anaerobic Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strobel, Herbert J.

    Oxygen is either limiting or absent in many ecosystems. Anaerobic bacteria are often key players in such environments and these organisms have important roles in geo-elemental cycling, agriculture, and medicine. The metabolic versatility of anaerobes is exploited in a variety of industrial processes including fermented food production, biochemical synthesis, and bioremediation. There has been recent considerable interest in developing and enhancing technologies that employ anaerobes as biocatalysts. The study of anaerobic bacteria requires specialized techniques, and specific methods are described for the culture and manipulation of these microbes.

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas putida JLR11, a Facultative Anaerobic 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene Biotransforming Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Javier; Udaondo, Zulema; Molina, Lazaro; Segura, Ana; Esteve-Núñez, Abraham; Caballero, Antonio; Duque, Estrella; Ramos, Juan Luis; van Dillewijn, Pieter

    2015-09-03

    We report the draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas putida JLR11, a facultative anaerobic bacterium that has been studied in detail for its capacity to use the explosive 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) as a nitrogen source. The sequence confirms the mechanisms used by this versatile strain to reduce and assimilate nitrogen from TNT.

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas putida JLR11, a Facultative Anaerobic 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene Biotransforming Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Pascual, Javier; Udaondo, Zulema; Molina, Lazaro; Segura, Ana; Esteve-Núñez, Abraham; Caballero, Antonio; Duque, Estrella; Ramos, Juan Luis

    2015-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas putida JLR11, a facultative anaerobic bacterium that has been studied in detail for its capacity to use the explosive 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) as a nitrogen source. The sequence confirms the mechanisms used by this versatile strain to reduce and assimilate nitrogen from TNT. PMID:26337875

  17. Identification of a conserved protein involved in anaerobic unsaturated fatty acid synthesis in Neiserria gonorrhoeae: implications for facultative and obligate anaerobes that lack FabA.

    PubMed

    Isabella, Vincent M; Clark, Virginia L

    2011-10-01

    Transcriptome analysis of the facultative anaerobe, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, revealed that many genes of unknown function were induced under anaerobic conditions. Mutation of one such gene, NGO1024, encoding a protein belonging to the 2-nitropropane dioxygenase-like superfamily of proteins, was found to result in an inability of gonococci to grow anaerobically. Anaerobic growth of an NG1024 mutant was restored upon supplementation with unsaturated fatty acids (UFA), but not with the saturated fatty acid palmitate. Gonococcal fatty acid profiles confirmed that NGO1024 was involved in UFA synthesis anaerobically, but not aerobically, demonstrating that gonococci contain two distinct pathways for the production of UFAs, with a yet unidentified aerobic mechanism, and an anaerobic mechanism involving NGO1024. Expression of genes involved in classical anaerobic UFA synthesis, fabA, fabM and fabB, was toxic in gonococci and unable to complement a NGO1024 mutation, suggesting that the chemistry involved in gonococcal anaerobic UFA synthesis is distinct from that of the classical pathway. NGO1024 homologues, which we suggest naming UfaA, form a distinct lineage within the 2-nitropropane dioxygenase-like superfamily, and are found in many facultative and obligate anaerobes that produce UFAs but lack fabA, suggesting that UfaA is part of a widespread pathway involved in UFA synthesis. PMID:21895795

  18. Presence and antimicrobial profile of gram-negative facultative anaerobe rods in patients with chronic periodontitis and gingivitis.

    PubMed

    Gamboa, Fredy; García, Dabeiba-Adriana; Acosta, Adriana; Mizrahi, Deborah; Paz, Andreína; Martínez, Diana; Arévalo, Azucena; Aristizabal, Fabio; Abba, Martín

    2013-01-01

    Chronic periodontitis is a multifactorial infectious disease associated with Gram-negative anaerobes which are part of the subgingival microflora. In recent years, studies have been conducted to assess the presence of Gram-negative facultative anaerobes (Enterobacteriaceae) and their participation in the development and progression of chronic periodontitis. The aim of this study was to determine the presence of Enterobacteriaceae in patients with chronic periodontitis and gingivitis and to assess antimicrobial susceptibility of clinical isolates. A descriptive, observational study was performed including 64 patients with chronic periodontitis and 22 patients with gingivitis. Microbiological samples were taken from the gingival sulcus using paper points, which then were placed in thioglycollate broth. Samples were incubated for 4 hours at 37 degrees C and finally replated on MacConkey agar Bacteria were identified using the API-20E system (Biomerieux, France) and antimicrobial susceptibility was determined using the disk diffusion method. The evaluation of samples showed presence of 29 enterobacterial species distributed as follows: 7 in the group with gingivitis and 22 in the group with chronic periodontitis. In the chronic periodontitis group the most common species were: K. oxytoca n = 5, S. liquefaciens n = 4 and K. pneumoniae and E. coli with n = 3. The gingivitis group had the highest frequency of Erwinia sp. (n = 2). Clinical isolates showed very low sensitivity levels to beta-lactam ampicillin and amoxicillin/ clavulanic acid, 17.2% and 27.6% respectively, and higher sensitivity levels to ciprofloxacin (96.6%), amikacin (79.3%), gentamicin (68.9%) and ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, kanamycin and trimethoprimsulfa (65.5%). In conclusion, the existence of a high frequency of enterobacteria in patients with chronic periodontitis and gingivitis shows that periodontologists should pay greater attention to prevention protocols, and develop mechanical and antimicrobial

  19. In vitro sensitivity of oral, gram-negative, facultative bacteria to the bactericidal activity of human neutrophil defensins.

    PubMed Central

    Miyasaki, K T; Bodeau, A L; Ganz, T; Selsted, M E; Lehrer, R I

    1990-01-01

    Neutrophils play a major role in defending the periodontium against infection by oral, gram-negative, facultative bacteria, such as Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Eikenella corrodens, and Capnocytophaga spp. We examined the sensitivity of these bacteria to a mixture of low-molecular-weight peptides and highly purified individual defensin peptides (HNP-1, HNP-2, and HNP-3) isolated from human neutrophils. Whereas the Capnocytophaga spp. strains were killed significantly by the mixed human neutrophil peptides, the A. actinomycetemcomitans and E. corrodens strains were resistant. Killing was attributable to the defensins. The bactericidal activities of purified defensins HNP-1 and HNP-2 were equal, and both of these activities were greater than HNP-3 activity against strains of Capnocytophaga sputigena and Capnocytophaga gingivalis. The strain of Capnocytophaga ochracea was more sensitive to defensin-mediated bactericidal activity than either C. sputigena or C. gingivalis was. The three human defensins were equipotent in killing C. ochracea. C. ochracea was killed under aerobic and anaerobic conditions and over a broad pH range. Killing was most effective under hypotonic conditions but also occurred at physiologic salt concentrations. We concluded that Capnocytophaga spp. are sensitive to oxygen-independent killing by human defensins. Additional studies will be required to identify other components that may equip human neutrophils to kill A. actinomycetemcomitans, E. corrodens, and other oral gram-negative bacteria. Images PMID:2254020

  20. Shewanella amazonensis sp. nov., a novel metal-reducing facultative anaerobe from Amazonian shelf muds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkateswaran, K.; Dollhopf, M. E.; Aller, R.; Stackebrandt, E.; Nealson, K. H.

    1998-01-01

    A new bacterial species belonging to the genus Shewanella is described on the basis of phenotypic characterization and sequence analysis of its 16S rRNA-encoding and gyrase B (gyrB) genes. This organism, isolated from shallow-water marine sediments derived from the Amazon River delta, is a Gram-negative, motile, polarly flagellated, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped eubacterium and has a G&C content of 51.7 mol%. Strain SB2BT is exceptionally active in the anaerobic reduction of iron, manganese and sulfur compounds. SB2BT grows optimally at 35 degrees C, with 1-3% NaCl and over a pH range of 7-8. Analysis of the 16S rDNA sequence revealed a clear affiliation between strain SB2BT and members of the gamma subclass of the class Proteobacteria. High similarity values were found with certain members of the genus Shewanella, especially with Shewanella putrefaciens, and this was supported by cellular fatty acid profiles and phenotypic characterization. DNA-DNA hybridization between strain SB2BT and its phylogenetically closest relatives revealed low similarity values (24.6-42.7%) which indicated species status for strain SB2BT. That SB2BT represents a distinct bacterial species within the genus Shewanella is also supported by gyrB sequence analysis. Considering the source of the isolate, the name Shewanella amazonensis sp. nov. is proposed and strain SB2BT (= ATCC 700329T) is designated as the type strain.

  1. Biosynthesis of polyhydroxyalkanaotes by a novel facultatively anaerobic Vibrio sp. under marine conditions.

    PubMed

    Numata, Keiji; Doi, Yoshiharu

    2012-06-01

    Marine bacteria have recently attracted attention as potentially useful candidates for the production of practical materials from marine ecosystems, including the oceanic carbon dioxide cycle. The advantages of using marine bacteria for the biosynthesis of poly(hydroxyalkanoate) (PHA), one of the eco-friendly bioplastics, include avoiding contamination with bacteria that lack salt-water resistance, ability to use filtered seawater as a culture medium, and the potential for extracellular production of PHA, all of which would contribute to large-scale industrial production of PHA. A novel marine bacterium, Vibrio sp. strain KN01, was isolated and characterized in PHA productivity using various carbon sources under aerobic and aerobic-anaerobic marine conditions. The PHA contents of all the samples under the aerobic-anaerobic condition, especially when using soybean oil as the sole carbon source, were enhanced by limiting the amount of dissolved oxygen. The PHA accumulated using soybean oil as a sole carbon source under the aerobic-anaerobic condition contained 14% 3-hydroxypropionate (3HP) and 3% 5-hydroxyvalerate (5HV) units in addition to (R)-3-hydroxybutyrate (3HB) units and had a molecular weight of 42 × 10³ g/mol. The present result indicates that the activity of the beta-oxidation pathway under the aerobic-anaerobic condition is reduced due to a reduction in the amount of dissolved oxygen. These findings have potential for use in controlling the biosynthesis of long main-chain PHA by regulating the activity of the beta-oxidation pathway, which also could be regulated by varying the dissolved oxygen concentration. PMID:22068389

  2. Ferrovibrio denitrificans gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel neutrophilic facultative anaerobic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacterium.

    PubMed

    Sorokina, Anna Y; Chernousova, Elena Y; Dubinina, Galina A

    2012-10-01

    A neutrophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacterium was isolated from the redox zone of a low-salinity spring in Krasnodar krai (Russia), at the FeS-Fe(OH)(3) interface deposited at the sediment surface. The cells of strain Sp-1 were short, thin motile vibrioids with one polar flagellum dividing by binary fission. The optimal values and ranges for pH and temperature were pH 6.2 (5.5-8) and 35 °C (5-45 °C), respectively. The organism was a facultative anaerobe. Strain Sp-1 was capable of organotrophic, lithoheterotrophic and mixotrophic growth with Fe(II) as an electron donor. The denitrification chain was 'disrupted'. Oxidation of Fe(II) was coupled to reduction of NO3 - to NO2 - or of N(2) O to N(2) , as well as under microaerobic conditions, with O(2) as an electron acceptor. The DNA G+C content was 64.2 mol%. According to the results of phylogenetic analysis, the strain was 10.6-12% remote from the closest relatives, members of the genera Sneathiella, Inquilinus, Oceanibaculum and Phaeospirillum within the Alphaproteobacteria. Based on its morphological, physiological and taxonomic characteristics, together with the results of phylogenetic analysis, strain Sp-1 is described as a member of a new genus Ferrovibrio gen. nov., with the type species Ferrovibrio denitrificans sp. nov. and the type strain Sp-1(T) (= LMG 25817(T)  = VKM B-2673(T) ). PMID:22765162

  3. Pigmentiphaga litoralis sp. nov., a facultatively anaerobic bacterium isolated from a tidal flat sediment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Guang; Zhang, Yu-Qin; Huang, Ke; Tang, Shu-Kun; Cao, Yao; Shi, Jin-Xiao; Xiao, Huai-Dong; Cui, Xiao-Long; Li, Wen-Jun

    2009-03-01

    A novel Gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, non-sporulating, non-motile, catalase- and oxidase-positive, rod-shaped bacterium (strain JSM 061001(T)) was isolated from a tidal flat in the South China Sea, China. Growth occurred with 0-5 % (w/v) NaCl [optimum, 0.5-1 % (w/v) NaCl], at pH 5.0-10.0 (optimum, pH 7.0) and at 4-35 degrees C (optimum, 25-30 degrees C). The major cellular fatty acids were C(16 : 0), cyclo C(17 : 0), C(18 : 1)omega7c and C(16 : 1). Strain JSM 061001(T) contained ubiquinone Q-8 as the predominant respiratory quinone, and phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and an unidentified phospholipid as the polar lipids. The genomic DNA G+C content was 65.5 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain JSM 061001(T) belongs to the family Alcaligenaceae and was related most closely to the type strains of the two recognized species of the genus Pigmentiphaga. The three strains formed a robust cluster in the neighbour-joining, maximum-parsimony and maximum-likelihood phylogenetic trees. Levels of DNA-DNA relatedness between strain JSM 061001(T) and the type strains of Pigmentiphaga daeguensis and Pigmentiphaga kullae were 15.8 and 10.5 %, respectively. The combination of phylogenetic analysis, DNA-DNA hybridization data, phenotypic characteristics and chemotaxonomic differences supported the view that strain JSM 061001(T) represents a novel species of the genus Pigmentiphaga, for which the name Pigmentiphaga litoralis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is JSM 061001(T) (=CCTCC AA207034(T)=KCTC 22165(T)).

  4. Isolation of Halotolerant, Thermotolerant, Facultative Polymer-Producing Bacteria and Characterization of the Exopolymer

    PubMed Central

    Pfiffner, S. M.; McInerney, Michael J.; Jenneman, Gary E.; Knapp, Roy M.

    1986-01-01

    Over 200 bacterial strains were selected for anaerobic growth at 50°C and extracellular polysaccharide production in a sucrose-mineral salts medium with NaNO3 and up to 10% NaCl. The predominant cell type was an encapsulated gram-positive, motile, facultative sporeforming rod similar to Bacillus species. Strain SP018 grew and produced the polysaccharide on a variety of substrates at salinities up to 12% NaCl. Good polymer production only occurred anaerobically and was optimal between 4 and 10% NaCl. The ethanol-precipitated SP018 polymer was a charged heteropolysaccharide that contained glucose, mannose, arabinose, ribose, and low levels of allose and glucosamine. The SP018 polymer showed pseudoplastic behavior, was resistant to shearing, and had a higher viscosity at dilute concentrations and at elevated temperatures than xanthan gum. High-ionic-strength solutions reversibly decreased the viscosity of SP018 polymer solutions. The bacterium and the associated polymer have many properties that make them potentially useful for in situ microbially enhanced oil recovery processes. PMID:16347080

  5. Isolation of halotolerant, thermotolerant, facultative polymer-producing bacteria and characterization of the exopolymer

    SciTech Connect

    Pfiffner, S.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Jenneman, G.E.; Knapp, R.M.

    1986-06-01

    Over 200 bacterial strains were selected for anaerobic growth at 50/sup 0/C and extracellular polysaccharide production in a sucrose-mineral salts medium with NaNO/sub 3/ and up to 10% NaCl. The predominant cell type was an encapsulated gram-positive, motile, facultative spore-forming rod similar to Bacillus species. Strain SP018 grew and produced the polysaccharide on a variety of substrates at salinities up to 12% NaCl. Good polymer production only occurred anaerobically and was optimal between 4 and 10% NaCl. The ethanol-precipitated SP018 polymer was a charged heteropolysaccharide that contained glucose, mannose, arabinose, ribose, and low levels of allose and glucosamine. The SP018 polymer showed pseudoplastic behavior, was resistant to shearing, and had a higher viscosity at dilute concentrations and at elevated temperatures than xanthan gum. High-ionic-strength solutions reversibly decreased the viscosity of SP018 polymer solutions. The bacterium and the associated polymer have many properties that make them potentially useful for in situ microbially enhanced oil recovery processes.

  6. Isolation of halotolerant, thermotolerant, facultative polymer-producing bacteria and characterization of the exopolymer.

    PubMed

    Pfiffner, S M; McInerney, M J; Jenneman, G E; Knapp, R M

    1986-06-01

    Over 200 bacterial strains were selected for anaerobic growth at 50 degrees C and extracellular polysaccharide production in a sucrose-mineral salts medium with NaNO(3) and up to 10% NaCl. The predominant cell type was an encapsulated gram-positive, motile, facultative sporeforming rod similar to Bacillus species. Strain SP018 grew and produced the polysaccharide on a variety of substrates at salinities up to 12% NaCl. Good polymer production only occurred anaerobically and was optimal between 4 and 10% NaCl. The ethanol-precipitated SP018 polymer was a charged heteropolysaccharide that contained glucose, mannose, arabinose, ribose, and low levels of allose and glucosamine. The SP018 polymer showed pseudoplastic behavior, was resistant to shearing, and had a higher viscosity at dilute concentrations and at elevated temperatures than xanthan gum. High-ionic-strength solutions reversibly decreased the viscosity of SP018 polymer solutions. The bacterium and the associated polymer have many properties that make them potentially useful for in situ microbially enhanced oil recovery processes.

  7. Fuel from Bacteria: Bioconversion of Carbon Dioxide to Biofuels by Facultatively Autotrophic Hydrogen Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    2010-07-01

    Electrofuels Project: Ohio State is genetically modifying bacteria to efficiently convert carbon dioxide directly into butanol, an alcohol that can be used directly as a fuel blend or converted to a hydrocarbon, which closely resembles a gasoline. Bacteria are typically capable of producing a certain amount of butanol before it becomes too toxic for the bacteria to survive. Ohio State is engineering a new strain of the bacteria that could produce up to 50% more butanol before it becomes too toxic for the bacteria to survive. Finding a way to produce more butanol more efficiently would significantly cut down on biofuel production costs and help make butanol cost competitive with gasoline. Ohio State is also engineering large tanks, or bioreactors, to grow the biofuel-producing bacteria in, and they are developing ways to efficiently recover biofuel from the tanks.

  8. Antimicrobial resistance and susceptibility testing of anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Schuetz, Audrey N

    2014-09-01

    Infections due to anaerobic bacteria can be severe and life-threatening. Susceptibility testing of anaerobes is not frequently performed in laboratories, but such testing is important to direct appropriate therapy. Anaerobic resistance is increasing globally, and resistance trends vary by geographic region. An overview of a variety of susceptibility testing methods for anaerobes is provided, and the advantages and disadvantages of each method are reviewed. Specific clinical situations warranting anaerobic susceptibility testing are discussed.

  9. ANAEROBIC RESISTANCE TO HIGH LEVELS OF CADMIUM AND OTHER TOXIC METALS IN A FACULTATIVE ANAEROBE ISOLATED FROM PRISTINE SALT MARSH SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    SHARMA,P.K.; VAIRAVAMURTHY,A.; KIELECZAWA,J.

    1999-06-20

    The authors have isolated many Cd (II) resistant bacterial strains from relatively pristine sediments collected from salt marshes in Shelter Island, New York. Detailed studies are being performed on one isolate, strain Cd-1. Strain Cd-1 is metabolically diverse, halotolerant, Gram-negative, facultative anaerobe. It can resist high amounts of Cd (II), Cr (VI), As (V), Se (IV), Co (II), Pb (II), or Zn (II) under defined anaerobic conditions. With pyruvate as the energy source, Cd-1 can grow well at examined Cd (II) concentrations ranging up to 15 mM. It can resist Cd (II) with or without marine level NaCl concentration, under acidic or neutral conditions. It can resist Cd (II) under aerobic conditions as well. These features are novel for a heavy metal resistant bacterium.

  10. Toxicity of organic extraction reagents to anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Playne, M J; Smith, B R

    1983-05-01

    Various forms of liquid-liquid extraction systems are being developed to separate products, such as ethanol and volatile fatty acids (VFA), from fermentation liquids, since distillation is energetically expensive. Continuous extraction is advantageous, as product inhibition of the fermentation is minimized. However, some extraction solvents may be toxic or inhibitory to microorganisms.Thirty organic chemicals were examined by means of a small scale (60 mL) batch fermentation bioassay procedure for their toxicity to a commercial inoculum (Methanobac, W.B.E. Ltd.), which was a mixed culture of facultatively anaerobic, acid-producing bacteria. Gas production, pH change of medium, and the concentrations of ethanol, VFA, and lactic acid were measured after 75 h growth. The optimum experimental conditions for toxicity testing were alfalfa as substrate (2 g), a buffered nutrient medium (pH 6.8), "Methanobac" inoculum (10 mL), and test chemicals at levels between 10 and 100 microL/mL.Thirteen chemicals were nontoxic, and included the paraffins (C(6)-C(12)), phthalates, organophosphorus compounds, Freon 113 (1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoro ethane), Aliquat 336 (tricaprylylmethyl ammonium chloride), di-isoamyl ether, and trioctylamine. Other amine extractants were partially toxic. Alcohols (C(5)-C(12)), ketones (C(5)-C(8)), benzene derivatives, isoamyl acetate, and di-isopropyl ether were toxic. Generally, the chemicals were not toxic unless present at levels in excess of that expected to be required to saturate the aqueous phase.Total gas production was a good indicator of toxicity even within 24 h, but the presence of homofermentative (nongas producing) lactic acid bacteria complicated interpretation."Methanobac" inoculum was compared with an inoculum derived from a rumen culture for four test chemicals. The results were essentially the same. However, the toxicity of a chemical to bacteria is likely to vary considerably between bacterial species.

  11. Toxicity of organic extraction reagents to anaerobic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Playne, M.J.; Smith, B.R.

    1983-05-01

    Thirty organic chemicals were examined by means of a small scale (60 mL) batch fermentation bioassay procedure for their toxicity to a commercial inoculum (Methanobac, W.B.E. Ltd.), which was a mixed culture of facultatively anaerobic, acid-producing bacteria. Gas production, pH change of medium, and the concentrations of ethanol, VFA, and lactic acid were measured after 75 h growth. The optimum experimental conditions for toxicity testing were alfalfa as substrate (2 g), a buffered nutrient medium (pH 6.8), ''Methanobac'' inoculum (10 mL), and test chemicals at levels between 10 and 100 ..mu..L/mL. Thirteen chemicals were nontoxic, and included the paraffins (C/sub 6/-C/sub 12/), phthalates, organophosphorus compounds, Freon 113 (1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoro ethane), Aliquat 336 (tricaprylylmethyl ammonium chloride), di-isoamyl ether, and trioctylamine. Other amine extractants were partially toxic. Alcohols (C/sub 5/-C/sub 12/), ketones (C/sub 5/-C/sub 8/), benzene derivatives, isoamyl acetate, and di-isopropyl ether were toxic. Generally, the chemicals were not toxic unless present at levels in excess of that expected to be required to saturate the aqueous phase. Total gas production was a good indicator of toxicity even within 24 h, but the presence of homofermentative (nongas producing) lactic acid bacteria complicated interpretation. ''Methanobac'' inoculum was compared with an inoculum derived from a rumen culture for four test chemicals. The results were essentially the same. However, the toxicity of a chemical to bacteria is likely to vary considerably between bacterial species.

  12. Isolation, culture characteristics, and identification of anaerobic bacteria from the chicken cecum.

    PubMed

    Salanitro, J P; Fairchilds, I G; Zgornicki, Y D

    1974-04-01

    Studies on the anaerobic cecal microflora of the 5-week-old chicken were made to determine a suitable roll-tube medium for enumeration and isolation of the bacterial population, to determine effects of medium components on recovery of total anaerobes, and to identify the predominant bacterial groups. The total number of microorganisms in cecal contents determined by direct microscope cell counts varied (among six samples) from 3.83 x 10(10) to 7.64 x 10(10) per g. Comparison of different nonselective media indicated that 60% of the direct microscope count could be recovered with a rumen fluid medium (M98-5) and 45% with medium 10. Deletion of rumen fluid from M98-5 reduced the total anaerobic count by half. Colony counts were lower if chicken cecal extract was substituted for rumen fluid in M98-5. Supplementing medium 10 with liver, chicken fecal, or cecal extracts improved recovery of anaerobes slightly. Prereduced blood agar media were inferior to M98-5. At least 11 groups of bacteria were isolated from high dilutions (10(-9)) of cecal material. Data on morphology and physiological and fermentation characteristics of 90% of the 298 isolated strains indicated that these bacteria represented species of anaerobic gram-negative cocci, facultatively anaerobic cocci and streptococci, Peptostreptococcus, Propionibacterium, Eubacterium, Bacteroides, and Clostridium. The growth of many of these strains was enhanced by rumen fluid, yeast extract, and cecal extract additions to basal media. These studies indicate that some of the more numerous anaerobic bacteria present in chicken cecal digesta can be isolated and cultured when media and methods that have been developed for ruminal bacteria are employed.

  13. Draft Genome of Thermanaerothrix daxensis GNS-1, a Thermophilic Facultative Anaerobe from the Chloroflexi Class Anaerolineae.

    PubMed

    Pace, Laura A; Hemp, James; Ward, Lewis M; Fischer, Woodward W

    2015-01-01

    We present the draft genome of Thermanaerothrix daxensis GNS-1, a thermophilic member of the Chloroflexi phylum. This organism was initially characterized as a nonmotile, strictly anaerobic fermenter; however, genome analysis demonstrates that it encodes genes for a flagellum and multiple pathways for aerobic and anaerobic respiration. PMID:26586891

  14. [Diversity of Cuproproteins and Copper Homeostasis Systems in Melioribacter roseus, a Facultatively Anaerobic Thermophilic Member of a New Phylum Ignavibacteriae].

    PubMed

    Karnachuk, O V; Gavrilov, S N; Avakyan, M R; Podosokorskaya, O A; Frank, Yu A; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, E A; Kublanov, I B

    2015-01-01

    The genome of Melioribacter roseus, one of two members of the recently described phylum Ignavibacteriae, was searched for the genes encoding proteins associated with copper transport or containing copper as cofactors, and the effect of Cu2+ concentration in the medium on M. roseus growth was investigated. Genomic analysis revealed a variety of copper-containing oxidoreductases in this facultative anaerobe. Three ATPases responsible for copper transport were identified. One of them (MROS_1511) was.probably involved in assembly of the copper-containing cytochrome c oxidase, while two others (MROS_0327 and MROS_0791) probably carried out a detoxification function. The presence of several copper-containing oxidoreductases and copper homeostasis systems in M. roseus is in agreement with the previously hypothesized origin of the phylum Ignavibacteriae from an aerobic ancestor common with those of Bacteroidetes and Chlorobi.

  15. [Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of anaerobic bacteria].

    PubMed

    García-Sánchez, José E; García-Sánchez, Enrique; García-García, María Inmaculada

    2014-02-01

    The anaerobic bacteria resistance to antibiotics is increasing, and even has appeared against the most active of those, like metronidazol and carbapenems. This fact forces to make and periodical sensibility tests -at least in the most aggressive and virulent species, in cases that they are isolated from life locations and in the absence of therapeutic response- to check the local sensibility and to establish suitable empiric therapies, all based on multicentric studies carried out in order to this or well to check the activity of new antibiotics. For the laboratory routine, the easiest sensibility method is the E-test/MIC evaluator. Another alternative is microdilution, that's only normalized for Bacteroides. There are preliminary facts that allow the use of disc diffusion method in some species of Bacteroides and Clostridium. For the temporal and multicentric studies, the procedure is dilution in agar plate, the reference method.

  16. Intermediary Metabolism in Protists: a Sequence-based View of Facultative Anaerobic Metabolism in Evolutionarily Diverse Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Ginger, Michael L.; Fritz-Laylin, Lillian K.; Fulton, Chandler; Cande, W. Zacheus; Dawson, Scott C.

    2011-01-01

    Protists account for the bulk of eukaryotic diversity. Through studies of gene and especially genome sequences the molecular basis for this diversity can be determined. Evident from genome sequencing are examples of versatile metabolism that go far beyond the canonical pathways described for eukaryotes in textbooks. In the last 2–3 years, genome sequencing and transcript profiling has unveiled several examples of heterotrophic and phototrophic protists that are unexpectedly well-equipped for ATP production using a facultative anaerobic metabolism, including some protists that can (Chlamydomonas reinhardtii) or are predicted (Naegleria gruberi, Acanthamoeba castellanii, Amoebidium parasiticum) to produce H2 in their metabolism. It is possible that some enzymes of anaerobic metabolism were acquired and distributed among eukaryotes by lateral transfer, but it is also likely that the common ancestor of eukaryotes already had far more metabolic versatility than was widely thought a few years ago. The discussion of core energy metabolism in unicellular eukaryotes is the subject of this review. Since genomic sequencing has so far only touched the surface of protist diversity, it is anticipated that sequences of additional protists may reveal an even wider range of metabolic capabilities, while simultaneously enriching our understanding of the early evolution of eukaryotes. PMID:21036663

  17. Intermediary metabolism in protists: a sequence-based view of facultative anaerobic metabolism in evolutionarily diverse eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Ginger, Michael L; Fritz-Laylin, Lillian K; Fulton, Chandler; Cande, W Zacheus; Dawson, Scott C

    2010-12-01

    Protists account for the bulk of eukaryotic diversity. Through studies of gene and especially genome sequences the molecular basis for this diversity can be determined. Evident from genome sequencing are examples of versatile metabolism that go far beyond the canonical pathways described for eukaryotes in textbooks. In the last 2-3 years, genome sequencing and transcript profiling has unveiled several examples of heterotrophic and phototrophic protists that are unexpectedly well-equipped for ATP production using a facultative anaerobic metabolism, including some protists that can (Chlamydomonas reinhardtii) or are predicted (Naegleria gruberi, Acanthamoeba castellanii, Amoebidium parasiticum) to produce H(2) in their metabolism. It is possible that some enzymes of anaerobic metabolism were acquired and distributed among eukaryotes by lateral transfer, but it is also likely that the common ancestor of eukaryotes already had far more metabolic versatility than was widely thought a few years ago. The discussion of core energy metabolism in unicellular eukaryotes is the subject of this review. Since genomic sequencing has so far only touched the surface of protist diversity, it is anticipated that sequences of additional protists may reveal an even wider range of metabolic capabilities, while simultaneously enriching our understanding of the early evolution of eukaryotes.

  18. [Isolation and characterization of a facultative anaerobic aniline-degrading bacterium].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Guo-Qu; Ren, Sui-Zhou; Cao, Wei; Hu, Jin-Cai; Lin, Lu-Jing; Sun, Guo-Ping

    2006-08-01

    An aniline-degrading bacterium (designated strain AN29) was isolated from dyeing wastewater process (anaerobic baffled reactor, ABR) with the capability of utilizing aniline as sole carbon source and nitrogen source. It was identified as Pseudomonas sp. based upon the phenotypic properties and a partial analysis of the 16S rDNA. The strain could degrade aniline under the aerobic and anaerobic conditions, the optimal initial pH 6.5 - 8.0, a temperature of 37 degrees C, and initial aniline concentrations of 500 - 2 000 mg/L with maximum concentration of 4 000 mg/L respectively.

  19. Bacterial cellulose synthesis mechanism of facultative anaerobe Enterobacter sp. FY-07.

    PubMed

    Ji, Kaihua; Wang, Wei; Zeng, Bing; Chen, Sibin; Zhao, Qianqian; Chen, Yueqing; Li, Guoqiang; Ma, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Enterobacter sp. FY-07 can produce bacterial cellulose (BC) under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Three potential BC synthesis gene clusters (bcsI, bcsII and bcsIII) of Enterobacter sp. FY-07 have been predicted using genome sequencing and comparative genome analysis, in which bcsIII was confirmed as the main contributor to BC synthesis by gene knockout and functional reconstitution methods. Protein homology, gene arrangement and gene constitution analysis indicated that bcsIII had high identity to the bcsI operon of Enterobacter sp. 638; however, its arrangement and composition were same as those of BC synthesizing operon of G. xylinum ATCC53582 except for the flanking sequences. According to the BC biosynthesizing process, oxygen is not directly involved in the reactions of BC synthesis, however, energy is required to activate intermediate metabolites and synthesize the activator, c-di-GMP. Comparative transcriptome and metabolite quantitative analysis demonstrated that under anaerobic conditions genes involved in the TCA cycle were downregulated, however, genes in the nitrate reduction and gluconeogenesis pathways were upregulated, especially, genes in three pyruvate metabolism pathways. These results suggested that Enterobacter sp. FY-07 could produce energy efficiently under anaerobic conditions to meet the requirement of BC biosynthesis. PMID:26911736

  20. Bacterial cellulose synthesis mechanism of facultative anaerobe Enterobacter sp. FY-07

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Kaihua; Wang, Wei; Zeng, Bing; Chen, Sibin; Zhao, Qianqian; Chen, Yueqing; Li, Guoqiang; Ma, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Enterobacter sp. FY-07 can produce bacterial cellulose (BC) under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Three potential BC synthesis gene clusters (bcsI, bcsII and bcsIII) of Enterobacter sp. FY-07 have been predicted using genome sequencing and comparative genome analysis, in which bcsIII was confirmed as the main contributor to BC synthesis by gene knockout and functional reconstitution methods. Protein homology, gene arrangement and gene constitution analysis indicated that bcsIII had high identity to the bcsI operon of Enterobacter sp. 638; however, its arrangement and composition were same as those of BC synthesizing operon of G. xylinum ATCC53582 except for the flanking sequences. According to the BC biosynthesizing process, oxygen is not directly involved in the reactions of BC synthesis, however, energy is required to activate intermediate metabolites and synthesize the activator, c-di-GMP. Comparative transcriptome and metabolite quantitative analysis demonstrated that under anaerobic conditions genes involved in the TCA cycle were downregulated, however, genes in the nitrate reduction and gluconeogenesis pathways were upregulated, especially, genes in three pyruvate metabolism pathways. These results suggested that Enterobacter sp. FY-07 could produce energy efficiently under anaerobic conditions to meet the requirement of BC biosynthesis. PMID:26911736

  1. The genome sequence of the obligately chemolithoautotrophic, facultatively anaerobic bacterium Thiobacillus denitfificans.

    SciTech Connect

    Beller, H R; Larimer, Frank W

    2006-02-01

    The complete genome sequence of Thiobacillus denitrificans ATCC 25259 is the first to become available for an obligately chemolithoautotrophic, sulfur-compound-oxidizing, {beta}-proteobacterium. Analysis of the 2,909,809-bp genome will facilitate our molecular and biochemical understanding of the unusual metabolic repertoire of this bacterium, including its ability to couple denitrification to sulfur-compound oxidation, to catalyze anaerobic, nitrate-dependent oxidation of Fe(II) and U(IV), and to oxidize mineral electron donors. Notable genomic features include (i) genes encoding c-type cytochromes totaling 1 to 2 percent of the genome, which is a proportion greater than for almost all bacterial and archaeal species sequenced to date, (ii) genes encoding two [NiFe]hydrogenases, which is particularly significant because no information on hydrogenases has previously been reported for T. denitrificans and hydrogen oxidation appears to be critical for anaerobic U(IV) oxidation by this species, (iii) a diverse complement of more than 50 genes associated with sulfur-compound oxidation (including sox genes, dsr genes, and genes associated with the AMP-dependent oxidation of sulfite to sulfate), some of which occur in multiple (up to eight) copies, (iv) a relatively large number of genes associated with inorganic ion transport and heavy metal resistance, and (v) a paucity of genes encoding organic-compound transporters, commensurate with obligate chemolithoautotrophy. Ultimately, the genome sequence of T. denitrificans will enable elucidation of the mechanisms of aerobic and anaerobic sulfur-compound oxidation by {beta}-proteobacteria and will help reveal the molecular basis of this organism's role in major biogeochemical cycles (i.e., those involving sulfur, nitrogen, and carbon) and groundwater restoration.

  2. The genome sequence of the obligately chemolithoautotrophic, facultatively anaerobic bacterium Thiobacillus denitrificans.

    PubMed

    Beller, Harry R; Chain, Patrick S G; Letain, Tracy E; Chakicherla, Anu; Larimer, Frank W; Richardson, Paul M; Coleman, Matthew A; Wood, Ann P; Kelly, Donovan P

    2006-02-01

    The complete genome sequence of Thiobacillus denitrificans ATCC 25259 is the first to become available for an obligately chemolithoautotrophic, sulfur-compound-oxidizing, beta-proteobacterium. Analysis of the 2,909,809-bp genome will facilitate our molecular and biochemical understanding of the unusual metabolic repertoire of this bacterium, including its ability to couple denitrification to sulfur-compound oxidation, to catalyze anaerobic, nitrate-dependent oxidation of Fe(II) and U(IV), and to oxidize mineral electron donors. Notable genomic features include (i) genes encoding c-type cytochromes totaling 1 to 2 percent of the genome, which is a proportion greater than for almost all bacterial and archaeal species sequenced to date, (ii) genes encoding two [NiFe]hydrogenases, which is particularly significant because no information on hydrogenases has previously been reported for T. denitrificans and hydrogen oxidation appears to be critical for anaerobic U(IV) oxidation by this species, (iii) a diverse complement of more than 50 genes associated with sulfur-compound oxidation (including sox genes, dsr genes, and genes associated with the AMP-dependent oxidation of sulfite to sulfate), some of which occur in multiple (up to eight) copies, (iv) a relatively large number of genes associated with inorganic ion transport and heavy metal resistance, and (v) a paucity of genes encoding organic-compound transporters, commensurate with obligate chemolithoautotrophy. Ultimately, the genome sequence of T. denitrificans will enable elucidation of the mechanisms of aerobic and anaerobic sulfur-compound oxidation by beta-proteobacteria and will help reveal the molecular basis of this organism's role in major biogeochemical cycles (i.e., those involving sulfur, nitrogen, and carbon) and groundwater restoration.

  3. Carnobacterium Pleistocaenium sp. nov.: A Novel Psychrotolerant, Facultative Anaerobe Isolated from Permafrost of the Fox Tunnel in Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Marsic, Damien; Bej, Asim; Tang, Jane; Krader, Paul; Hoover, Richard B.

    2004-01-01

    A novel, psychrotolerant, facultative anaerobe, strain FTRIT1(sup T), was isolated from Pleistocene ice from the permafrost tunnel in Fox, Alaska. Gram-positive, motile, rod-shaped cells with sizes 0.6-0.7 x 0.9-1.5 micrometers were observed. Growth occurred within the pH range 6.5-9.5 and optimum at pH 7.3-7.5. The temperature range of the new isolate was 0-28 C and optimum growth occurred at 24 C. The novel isolate requires NaCl (growth absent at 0 %) and growth was observed between 0 and 5% NaCl with optimum at 0.5% (w/v). The new isolate was a catalase-negative chemoorganoheterotroph that used as substrates sugars and some products of proteolysis. The metabolic end products were: acetate, ethanol and CO2. Strain FTRl was sensitive to ampicillin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, rifampin, kanamycin, and gentamycin. The 16S rDNA sequence analysis showed 99.8% similarity of strain FTR1 with Carnobacterium alterfunditum, but the DNA-DNA hybridization between them demonstrated 39 plus or minus 5% homology. On the basis of genotypic and phenotypic characteristics, it is proposed that the strain FTR1(sup T) (= ATCC BAA-754(sup T) = JSM 12174(sup T) is assigned to the new species of the genus Carnobacterium with proposed name Carnobacterium pleistocaenium sp. nov.

  4. Carnobacterium pleistocenium sp. nov., a novel psychrotolerant, facultative anaerobe isolated from permafrost of the Fox Tunnel in Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Marsic, Damien; Bej, Asim; Tang, Jane; Krader, Paul; Hoover, Richard B.

    2005-01-01

    A novel, psychrotolerant, facultative anaerobe, strain FTR1T, was isolated from Pleistocene ice from the permafrost tunnel in Fox, Alaska. Gram-positive, motile, rod-shaped cells were observed with sizes 0.6-0.7 x 0.9-1.5 microm. Growth occurred within the pH range 6.5-9.5 with optimum growth at pH 7.3-7.5. The temperature range for growth of the novel isolate was 0-28 degrees C and optimum growth occurred at 24 degrees C. The novel isolate does not require NaCl; growth was observed between 0 and 5 % NaCl with optimum growth at 0.5 % (w/v). The novel isolate was a catalase-negative chemoorganoheterotroph that used as substrates sugars and some products of proteolysis. The metabolic end products were acetate, ethanol and CO2. Strain FTR1T was sensitive to ampicillin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, rifampicin, kanamycin and gentamicin. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed 99.8 % similarity between strain FTR1T and Carnobacterium alterfunditum, but DNA-DNA hybridization between them demonstrated 39+/-1.5 % relatedness. On the basis of genotypic and phenotypic characteristics, it is proposed that strain FTR1T (=ATCC BAA-754T=JCM 12174T=CIP 108033T) be assigned to the novel species Carnobacterium pleistocenium sp. nov.

  5. Carnobacterium pleistocenium sp. nov., a novel psychrotolerant, facultative anaerobe isolated from permafrost of the Fox Tunnel in Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilkuta, Elena V.; Marsic, Damien; Bej, Asim; Tang, Jane; Krader, Paul; Hoover, Richard B.

    2005-01-01

    A novel, psychrotolerant, facultative anaerobe, strain FTRl, was isolated from Pleistocene ice from the permafrost tunnel in Fox, Alaska. Gram-positive, motile, rod-shaped cells were observed with sizes 0(raised dot)6-0(raised dot)7 x 0(raised dot)9-1(raised dot)5 microns. Growth occurred within the pH range 6(raised dot)5-9(raised dot)5 with optimum growth at pH 7(raised dot)3-7(raised dot)5. The temperature range for growth of the novel isolate was 0-28 C and optimum growth occurred at 24 C. The novel isolate does not require NaCl; growth was observed between 0 and 5% NaCl with optimum growth at 0(raised dot)5% (w/v). The novel isolate was a catalase-negative chemoorganoheterotroph that used as substrates sugars and some products of proteolysis. The metabolic end products were acetate, ethanol and CO2. Strain FTRl was sensitive to ampicillin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, rifampicin, kanamycin and gentamicin. 16s rRNA gene sequence analysis showed 99(raised dot)8% similarity between strain FTR1 and Carnobacterium alterfunditum, but DNA-DNA hybridization between them demonstrated 39 plus or minus 1(raised dot)5% relatedness. On the basis of genotypic and phenotypic characteristics, it is proposed that strain FTRl (= ATCC BAA-754T= JCM 12174T=CIP 108033) be assigned to the novel species Carnobacterium pleistocenium sp. nov.

  6. Streptohalobacillus salinus gen. nov., sp. nov., a moderately halophilic, Gram-positive, facultative anaerobe isolated from subsurface saline soil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaowei; Xue, Yanfen; Ma, Yanhe

    2011-05-01

    A Gram-stain-positive, rod-shaped, non-sporulating, motile and moderately halophilic bacterium, designated strain H96B60(T), was isolated from a saline soil sample of the Qaidam basin, China. The strain was facultatively anaerobic. Major end products formed from glucose fermentation were acetate, ethanol and lactic acid. The cell-wall peptidoglycan contained meso-diaminopimelic acid as the diagnostic diamino acid. The isoprenoid quinone component was menaquinone-6 (MK-6). The predominant cellular fatty acids were C(16: 0), anteiso-C(13 : 0) and anteiso-C(15 : 0). The genomic DNA G+C content of strain H96B60(T) was 36.2 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on comparative 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain H96B60(T) represented a novel phyletic lineage within the family Bacillaceae and was related most closely to Halolactibacillus species (96.1-96.4 % similarity). Based on the phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic data presented, strain H96B60(T) is considered to represent a novel species of a new genus, for which the name Streptohalobacillus salinus gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Streptohalobacillus salinus is H96B60(T) ( = DSM 22440(T)  = CGMCC 1.7733(T)).

  7. Use of Enzyme Tests in Characterization and Identification of Aerobic and Facultatively Anaerobic Gram-Positive Cocci

    PubMed Central

    Bascomb, Shoshana; Manafi, Mammad

    1998-01-01

    The contribution of enzyme tests to the accurate and rapid routine identification of gram-positive cocci is introduced. The current taxonomy of the genera of aerobic and facultatively anaerobic cocci based on genotypic and phenotypic characterization is reviewed. The clinical and economic importance of members of these taxa is briefly summarized. Tables summarizing test schemes and kits available for the identification of staphylococci, enterococci, and streptococci on the basis of general requirements, number of tests, number of taxa, test classes, and completion times are discussed. Enzyme tests included in each scheme are compared on the basis of their synthetic moiety. The current understanding of the activity of enzymes important for classification and identification of the major groups, methods of testing, and relevance to the ease and speed of identification are reviewed. Publications describing the use of different identification kits are listed, and overall identification successes and problems are discussed. The relationships between the results of conventional biochemical and rapid enzyme tests are described and considered. The use of synthetic substrates for the detection of glycosidases and peptidases is reviewed, and the advantages of fluorogenic synthetic moieties are discussed. The relevance of enzyme tests to accurate and meaningful rapid routine identification is discussed. PMID:9564566

  8. Anaerobic oxidation of arsenite in Mono Lake water and by a facultative, arsenite-oxidizing chemoautotroph, strain MLHE-1

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, R.S.; Hoeft, S.E.; Santini, J.M.; Bano, N.; Hollibaugh, R.A.; Hollibaugh, J.T.

    2002-01-01

    Arsenite [As(III)]-enriched anoxic bottom water from Mono Lake, California, produced arsenate [As(V)] during incubation with either nitrate or nitrite. No such oxidation occurred in killed controls or in live samples incubated without added nitrate or nitrite. A small amount of biological As(III) oxidation was observed in samples amended with Fe(III) chelated with nitrolotriacetic acid, although some chemical oxidation was also evident in killed controls. A pure culture, strain MLHE-1, that was capable of growth with As(III) as its electron donor and nitrate as its electron acceptor was isolated in a defined mineral salts medium. Cells were also able to grow in nitrate-mineral salts medium by using H2 or sulfide as their electron donor in lieu of As(III). Arsenite-grown cells demonstrated dark 14CO2 fixation, and PCR was used to indicate the presence of a gene encoding ribulose-1,5-biphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase. Strain MLHE-1 is a facultative chemoautotroph, able to grow with these inorganic electron donors and nitrate as its electron acceptor, but heterotrophic growth on acetate was also observed under both aerobic and anaerobic (nitrate) conditions. Phylogenetic analysis of its 16S ribosomal DNA sequence placed strain MLHE-1 within the haloalkaliphilic Ectothiorhodospira of the ??-Proteobacteria. Arsenite oxidation has never been reported for any members of this subgroup of the Proteobacteria.

  9. Suigetsumonas clinomigrationis gen. et sp. nov., a Novel Facultative Anaerobic Nanoflagellate Isolated from the Meromictic Lake Suigetsu, Japan.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Takahiko; Kondo, Ryuji

    2015-09-01

    A novel facultative anaerobic bacterivorous nanoflagellate was isolated from the water just below the permanent oxic-anoxic interface of the meromictic Lake Suigetsu, Japan. We characterized the isolate using light and transmission electron microscopy and molecular phylogenetic analyses inferred from 18S rDNA sequences. The phylogenetic analyses showed that the isolate belonged to class Placididea (stramenopiles). The isolate showed key ultrastructural features of the Placididea, such as flagellar hairs with two unequal terminal filaments, microtubular root 2 changing in shape from an arced to an acute-angled shape, and a lack of an x-fiber in root 2. However, the isolate had a single helix in the flagellar transition region, which is a double helix in the two known placidid nanoflagellates Placidia cafeteriopsis and Wobblia lunata. Moreover, the isolate had different intracellular features compared with these two genera, such as the arrangement of basal bodies, the components of the flagellar apparatus, the number of mitochondria, and the absence (or presence) of paranuclear bodies. The 18S rDNA sequence was also phylogenetically distant from the clades of the known Placididae W. lunata and P. cafeteriopsis. Consequently, the newly isolated nanoflagellate was described as Suigetsumonas clinomigrationis gen. et sp. nov. PMID:26202992

  10. The Genome Sequences of Cellulomonas fimi and “Cellvibrio gilvus” Reveal the Cellulolytic Strategies of Two Facultative Anaerobes, Transfer of “Cellvibrio gilvus” to the Genus Cellulomonas, and Proposal of Cellulomonas gilvus sp. nov

    PubMed Central

    Bramhacharya, Shanti; Jewell, Kelsea A.; Aylward, Frank O.; Mead, David; Brumm, Phillip J.

    2013-01-01

    Actinobacteria in the genus Cellulomonas are the only known and reported cellulolytic facultative anaerobes. To better understand the cellulolytic strategy employed by these bacteria, we sequenced the genome of the Cellulomonas fimi ATCC 484T. For comparative purposes, we also sequenced the genome of the aerobic cellulolytic “Cellvibrio gilvus” ATCC 13127T. An initial analysis of these genomes using phylogenetic and whole-genome comparison revealed that “Cellvibrio gilvus” belongs to the genus Cellulomonas. We thus propose to assign “Cellvibrio gilvus” to the genus Cellulomonas. A comparative genomics analysis between these two Cellulomonas genome sequences and the recently completed genome for Cellulomonas flavigena ATCC 482T showed that these cellulomonads do not encode cellulosomes but appear to degrade cellulose by secreting multi-domain glycoside hydrolases. Despite the minimal number of carbohydrate-active enzymes encoded by these genomes, as compared to other known cellulolytic organisms, these bacteria were found to be proficient at degrading and utilizing a diverse set of carbohydrates, including crystalline cellulose. Moreover, they also encode for proteins required for the fermentation of hexose and xylose sugars into products such as ethanol. Finally, we found relatively few significant differences between the predicted carbohydrate-active enzymes encoded by these Cellulomonas genomes, in contrast to previous studies reporting differences in physiological approaches for carbohydrate degradation. Our sequencing and analysis of these genomes sheds light onto the mechanism through which these facultative anaerobes degrade cellulose, suggesting that the sequenced cellulomonads use secreted, multidomain enzymes to degrade cellulose in a way that is distinct from known anaerobic cellulolytic strategies. PMID:23342046

  11. The genome sequences of Cellulomonas fimi and "Cellvibrio gilvus" reveal the cellulolytic strategies of two facultative anaerobes, transfer of "Cellvibrio gilvus" to the genus Cellulomonas, and proposal of Cellulomonas gilvus sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Christopherson, Melissa R; Suen, Garret; Bramhacharya, Shanti; Jewell, Kelsea A; Aylward, Frank O; Mead, David; Brumm, Phillip J

    2013-01-01

    Actinobacteria in the genus Cellulomonas are the only known and reported cellulolytic facultative anaerobes. To better understand the cellulolytic strategy employed by these bacteria, we sequenced the genome of the Cellulomonas fimi ATCC 484(T). For comparative purposes, we also sequenced the genome of the aerobic cellulolytic "Cellvibrio gilvus" ATCC 13127(T). An initial analysis of these genomes using phylogenetic and whole-genome comparison revealed that "Cellvibrio gilvus" belongs to the genus Cellulomonas. We thus propose to assign "Cellvibrio gilvus" to the genus Cellulomonas. A comparative genomics analysis between these two Cellulomonas genome sequences and the recently completed genome for Cellulomonas flavigena ATCC 482(T) showed that these cellulomonads do not encode cellulosomes but appear to degrade cellulose by secreting multi-domain glycoside hydrolases. Despite the minimal number of carbohydrate-active enzymes encoded by these genomes, as compared to other known cellulolytic organisms, these bacteria were found to be proficient at degrading and utilizing a diverse set of carbohydrates, including crystalline cellulose. Moreover, they also encode for proteins required for the fermentation of hexose and xylose sugars into products such as ethanol. Finally, we found relatively few significant differences between the predicted carbohydrate-active enzymes encoded by these Cellulomonas genomes, in contrast to previous studies reporting differences in physiological approaches for carbohydrate degradation. Our sequencing and analysis of these genomes sheds light onto the mechanism through which these facultative anaerobes degrade cellulose, suggesting that the sequenced cellulomonads use secreted, multidomain enzymes to degrade cellulose in a way that is distinct from known anaerobic cellulolytic strategies.

  12. Methane and hydrogen production by human intestinal anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    McKay, L F; Holbrook, W P; Eastwood, M A

    1982-06-01

    The gas above liquid cultures of a variety of human intestinal anaerobic bacteria was sampled and analysed by headspace gas chromatography. Hydrogen production was greatest with strains of the genus Clostridium, intermediate with anaerobic cocci and least with Bacteroides sp. Very few strains produced methane although small amounts were detected with one strain of B. thetaiotaomicron, C. perfringens and C. histolyticum. There may be a relationship between these anaerobic bacteria and several gastrointestinal disorders in which there is a build up of hydrogen or methane in the intestines.

  13. Plutonium Oxidation State Distribution under Aerobic and Anaerobic Subsurface Conditions for Metal-Reducing Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, D. T.; Swanson, J.; Khaing, H.; Deo, R.; Rittmann, B.

    2009-12-01

    The fate and potential mobility of plutonium in the subsurface is receiving increased attention as the DOE looks to cleanup the many legacy nuclear waste sites and associated subsurface contamination. Plutonium is the near-surface contaminant of concern at several DOE sites and continues to be the contaminant of concern for the permanent disposal of nuclear waste. The mobility of plutonium is highly dependent on its redox distribution at its contamination source and along its potential migration pathways. This redox distribution is often controlled, especially in the near-surface where organic/inorganic contaminants often coexist, by the direct and indirect effects of microbial activity. The redox distribution of plutonium in the presence of facultative metal reducing bacteria (specifically Shewanella and Geobacter species) was established in a concurrent experimental and modeling study under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Pu(VI), although relatively soluble under oxidizing conditions at near-neutral pH, does not persist under a wide range of the oxic and anoxic conditions investigated in microbiologically active systems. Pu(V) complexes, which exhibit high chemical toxicity towards microorganisms, are relatively stable under oxic conditions but are reduced by metal reducing bacteria under anaerobic conditions. These facultative metal-reducing bacteria led to the rapid reduction of higher valent plutonium to form Pu(III/IV) species depending on nature of the starting plutonium species and chelating agents present in solution. Redox cycling of these lower oxidation states is likely a critical step in the formation of pseudo colloids that may lead to long-range subsurface transport. The CCBATCH biogeochemical model is used to explain the redox mechanisms and final speciation of the plutonium oxidation state distributions observed. These results for microbiologically active systems are interpreted in the context of their importance in defining the overall migration

  14. Acidithiobacillus ferriphilus sp. nov., a facultatively anaerobic iron- and sulfur-metabolizing extreme acidophile.

    PubMed

    Falagán, Carmen; Johnson, D Barrie

    2016-01-01

    The genus Acidithiobacillus includes three species that conserve energy from the oxidation of ferrous iron, as well as reduced sulfur, to support their growth. Previous work, based on multi-locus sequence analysis, identified a fourth group of iron- and sulfur-oxidizing acidithiobacilli as a potential distinct species. Eleven strains of 'Group IV' acidithiobacilli, isolated from different global locations, have been studied. These were all shown to be obligate chemolithotrophs, growing aerobically by coupling the oxidation of ferrous iron or reduced sulfur (but not hydrogen) to molecular oxygen, or anaerobically by the oxidation of reduced sulfur coupled to ferric iron reduction. All strains were mesophilic, although some were also psychrotolerant. Strain variation was also noted in terms of tolerance to extremely low pH and to elevated concentrations of transition metals. One strain was noted to display far greater tolerance to chloride than reported for other iron-oxidizing acidithiobacilli. All of the strains were able to catalyse the oxidative dissolution of pyrite and, on the basis of some of the combined traits of some of the strains examined, it is proposed that these may have niche roles in commercial mineral bioprocessing operations, such as for low temperature bioleaching of polysulfide ores in brackish waters. The name Acidithiobacillus ferriphilus sp. nov. is proposed to accommodate the strains described, with the type strain being M20T ( = DSM 100412T = JCM 30830T).

  15. Acidithiobacillus ferriphilus sp. nov., a facultatively anaerobic iron- and sulfur-metabolizing extreme acidophile.

    PubMed

    Falagán, Carmen; Johnson, D Barrie

    2016-01-01

    The genus Acidithiobacillus includes three species that conserve energy from the oxidation of ferrous iron, as well as reduced sulfur, to support their growth. Previous work, based on multi-locus sequence analysis, identified a fourth group of iron- and sulfur-oxidizing acidithiobacilli as a potential distinct species. Eleven strains of 'Group IV' acidithiobacilli, isolated from different global locations, have been studied. These were all shown to be obligate chemolithotrophs, growing aerobically by coupling the oxidation of ferrous iron or reduced sulfur (but not hydrogen) to molecular oxygen, or anaerobically by the oxidation of reduced sulfur coupled to ferric iron reduction. All strains were mesophilic, although some were also psychrotolerant. Strain variation was also noted in terms of tolerance to extremely low pH and to elevated concentrations of transition metals. One strain was noted to display far greater tolerance to chloride than reported for other iron-oxidizing acidithiobacilli. All of the strains were able to catalyse the oxidative dissolution of pyrite and, on the basis of some of the combined traits of some of the strains examined, it is proposed that these may have niche roles in commercial mineral bioprocessing operations, such as for low temperature bioleaching of polysulfide ores in brackish waters. The name Acidithiobacillus ferriphilus sp. nov. is proposed to accommodate the strains described, with the type strain being M20T ( = DSM 100412T = JCM 30830T). PMID:26498321

  16. Complete genome sequence of the facultatively anaerobic, appendaged bacterium Muricauda ruestringensis type strain (B1T)

    PubMed Central

    Huntemann, Marcel; Teshima, Hazuki; Lapidus, Alla; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Pan, Chongle; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Spring, Stefan; Göker, Markus; Detter, John C.; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja

    2012-01-01

    Muricauda ruestringensis Bruns et al. 2001 is the type species of the genus Muricauda, which belongs to the family Flavobacteriaceae in the phylum Bacteroidetes. The species is of interest because of its isolated position in the genomically unexplored genus Muricauda, which is located in a part of the tree of life containing not many organisms with sequenced genomes. The genome, which consists of a circular chromosome of 3,842,422 bp length with a total of 3,478 protein-coding and 47 RNA genes, is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:22768362

  17. Complete genome sequence of the facultatively anaerobic, appendaged bacterium Muricauda ruestringensis type strain (B1T)

    SciTech Connect

    Huntemann, Marcel; Teshima, Hazuki; Lapidus, Alla L.; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Pan, Chongle; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Spring, Stefan; Goker, Markus; Detter, J. Chris; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja

    2012-01-01

    Muricauda ruestringensis Bruns et al. 2001 is the type species of the genus Muricauda, which belongs to the family Flavobacteriaceae in the phylum Bacteroidetes. The species is of interest because of its isolated position in the genomically unexplored genus Muricauda, which is located in a part of the tree of life containing not many organisms with sequenced genomes. The genome, which consists of a circular chromosome of 3,842,422 bp length with a total of 3,478 protein-coding and 47 RNA genes, is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  18. Trichococcus Patagoniensis sp. nov., a Facultative Anaerobe that grows at -5 C, Isolated from Penguin Guano in Chilean Patagonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.; Bej, Asim K.; Marsic, Damien; Whitman, William B.; Krader, Paul E.; Tang, Jane

    2006-01-01

    A novel, extremely psychrotolerant, facultative anaerobe, strain PmagGl(sup T), was isolated from guano of Magellanic penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus) collected in Chilean Patagonia. Gram-variable, motile cocci with a diameter of 1.3-2.0 micrometers were observed singularly or in pairs, short chains and irregular conglomerates. Growth occurred within the pH range 6.0-10.0, with optimum growth at pH 8.5. The temperature range for growth of the novel isolate was from -5 to 35 C, with optimum growth at 28-30 C. Strain PmagG1(sup T) did not require NaCl, as growth was observed in the presence of 0-6.5% NaCl with optimum growth at 0.5% (w/v). Strain PmagGl(sup T) was a catalase-negative chemo-organoheterotroph that used sugars and some organic acids as substrates. The metabolic end products were lactate, formate, acetate, ethanol and Con. Strain PmagG1(sup T) was sensitive to ampicillin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, rifampicin, kanamycin and gentamicin. The G+C content of its genomic DNA was 45.8 mol%. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed 100 % similarity of strain PmagG1(sup T) with Trichococcus collinsii ATCC BAA-296(sup T), but DNA-DNA hybridization between them demonstrated relatedness values of less than 45 plus or minus 1%. Another phylogenetically closely related species, Trichococcus pasteurii, showed 99.85 % similarity by 16s rRNA sequencing and DNA-DNA hybridization showed relatedness values of 47 plus or minus 1.5%. Based on genotypic and phenotypic characteristics, the novel species Trichococcus patagoniensis sp. nov. is proposed, with strain PmagG1(sup T) (=ATCC BAA-756(sup T)=JCM 12176(sup T)=CIP 108035(sup T)) as the type strain.

  19. Pontibacillus litoralis sp. nov., a facultatively anaerobic bacterium isolated from a sea anemone, and emended description of the genus Pontibacillus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Guang; Zhang, Yu-Qin; Yi, Lang-Bo; Li, Zhao-Yang; Wang, Yong-Xiao; Xiao, Huai-Dong; Chen, Qi-Hui; Cui, Xiao-Long; Li, Wen-Jun

    2010-03-01

    A facultatively anaerobic, moderately halophilic, Gram-positive, endospore-forming, motile, catalase- and oxidase-positive, rod-shaped bacterium, strain JSM 072002(T), was isolated from a sea anemone (Anthopleura xanthogrammica) collected from the South China Sea. Strain JSM 072002(T) was able to grow with 0.5-15 % (w/v) NaCl and at pH 6.0-10.0 and 15-50 degrees C; optimum growth was observed with 2-5 % (w/v) NaCl and at pH 7.5 and 35 degrees C. meso-Diaminopimelic acid was present in the cell-wall peptidoglycan. The major cellular fatty acids were iso-C(15 : 0) and anteiso-C(15 : 0). The predominant respiratory quinone was menaquinone 7 and the genomic DNA G+C content was 41.3 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain JSM 072002(T) should be assigned to the genus Pontibacillus and revealed relatively low 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities (<97 %) with the type strains of the three recognized Pontibacillus species (Pontibacillus chungwhensis BH030062(T), 96.8 %; Pontibacillus marinus KCTC 3917(T), 96.7 %; Pontibacillus halophilus JSM 076056(T), 96.0 %). The combination of phylogenetic analysis, DNA-DNA relatedness values, phenotypic characteristics and chemotaxonomic data supports the view that strain JSM 072002(T) represents a novel species of the genus Pontibacillus, for which the name Pontibacillus litoralis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is JSM 072002(T) (=DSM 21186(T)=KCTC 13237(T)). An emended description of the genus Pontibacillus is also presented.

  20. Phospholipid biosynthesis in some anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Silber, P; Borie, R P; Mikowski, E J; Goldfine, H

    1981-01-01

    We have identified and characterized enzymes of phospholipid synthesis in two plasmalogen-rich anaerobes. Megasphaera elsdenii and Veillonella parvula, and one anaerobe lacking plasmalogens. Desulfovibrio vulgaris. All three species contained phosphatidate cytidylyltransferase and phosphatidylserine synthase. Phosphatidylglycerophosphate synthesis was detected only D. vulgaris extracts. Phosphatidylserine (diacyl form) was the major product of the phosphatidylserine synthase assay with particles from M. elsdenii or V. parvula. The amounts of phosphatidylethanolamine formed were very low. Only D. vulgaris particles had an active phosphatidylserine decarboxylase. PMID:6263870

  1. Bacillus stamsii sp. nov., a facultatively anaerobic sugar degrader that is numerically dominant in freshwater lake sediment.

    PubMed

    Müller, Nicolai; Scherag, Frank D; Pester, Michael; Schink, Bernhard

    2015-09-01

    A novel type of anaerobic bacteria was previously isolated from profundal lake sediment by direct dilution of the sediment in mineral agar medium containing glucose and a background lawn of Methanospirillum hungatei as a syntrophic partner. The isolated bacteria grouped with aerobic Bacillus spp. according to their 16S rRNA gene sequence, and the most closely related species is Bacillus thioparans. Fermentative growth of the novel strain with glucose was possible only in the presence of syntrophic partners, and cocultures produced acetate and methane, in some cases also lactate and traces of succinate as fermentation products. In contrast, the closely related strains Bacillus jeotgali and Bacillus sp. strain PeC11 are able to grow with glucose axenically by mixed acid fermentation yielding lactate, acetate, formate, succinate, and ethanol as fermentation products. Alternatively, the isolated strain grew anaerobically in pure culture if pyruvate was added to glucose-containing media, and lactate, acetate and formate were the major fermentation products, but the strain never produced ethanol. Aerobic growth was found with a variety of organic substrates in the presence of partly reduced sulfur compounds. In the absence of sulfide and oxygen, nitrate served as an electron acceptor. Strain BoGlc83 was characterized as the type strain of a new species for which the name Bacillus stamsii sp. nov. (DSM 19598=JCM 30025) is proposed.

  2. The aerobic activity of metronidazole against anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Dione, Niokhor; Khelaifia, Saber; Lagier, Jean-Christophe; Raoult, Didier

    2015-05-01

    Recently, the aerobic growth of strictly anaerobic bacteria was demonstrated using antioxidants. Metronidazole is frequently used to treat infections caused by anaerobic bacteria; however, to date its antibacterial activity was only tested in anaerobic conditions. Here we aerobically tested using antioxidants the in vitro activities of metronidazole, gentamicin, doxycycline and imipenem against 10 common anaerobic and aerobic bacteria. In vitro susceptibility testing was performed by the disk diffusion method, and minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined by Etest. Aerobic culture of the bacteria was performed at 37°C using Schaedler agar medium supplemented with 1mg/mL ascorbic acid and 0.1mg/mL glutathione; the pH was adjusted to 7.2 by 10M KOH. Growth of anaerobic bacteria cultured aerobically using antioxidants was inhibited by metronidazole after 72h of incubation at 37°C, with a mean inhibition diameter of 37.76mm and an MIC of 1μg/mL; however, strains remained non-sensitive to gentamicin. No growth inhibition of aerobic bacteria was observed after 24h of incubation at 37°C with metronidazole; however, inhibition was observed with doxycycline and imipenem used as controls. These results indicate that bacterial sensitivity to metronidazole is not related to the oxygen tension but is a result of the sensitivity of the micro-organism. In future, both culture and antibiotic susceptibility testing of strictly anaerobic bacteria will be performed in an aerobic atmosphere using antioxidants in clinical microbiology laboratories.

  3. Anaerobic Growth of Purple Nonsulfur Bacteria Under Dark Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Uffen, Robert L.; Wolfe, R. S.

    1970-01-01

    Purple nonsulfur photosynthetic bacteria were cultured anaerobically in the absence of light by a modification of the Hungate technique. Growth was slow and resembled that of fastidious anaerobes; on yeast extract-peptone-agar medium, each cell produced about 16 descendants in 15 to 20 days. Growth was stimulated by addition of ethyl alcohol, acetate and H2, or pyruvate and H2. Cells grown in the presence of pyruvate and H2 produced acetate and CO2; each cell produced approximately 10 descendants in 24 hr under anaerobic, dark conditions. Spectrophotometric evidence obtained from cells which were the product of five generations suggests no difference between the bacteriochlorophyll and carotenoids synthesized by cells grown anaerobically under dark or light conditions. Likewise, the ultrastructure of the photosynthetic apparatus in cells grown anaerobically in the dark and in the light appears similar. Images PMID:5473903

  4. Biochemistry and physiology of anaerobic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    2000-05-18

    We welcome you to The Power of Anaerobes. This conference serves two purposes. One is to celebrate the life of Harry D. Peck, Jr.,who was born May 18, 1927 and would have celebrated his 73rd birthday at this conference. He died November 20, 1998. The second is to gather investigators to exchange views within the realm of anaerobic microbiology, an area in which tremendous progress has been seen during recent years. It is sufficient to mention discoveries of a new form of life (the archaea), hyper or extreme thermophiles, thermophilic alkaliphiles and anaerobic fungi. With these discoveries has come a new realization about physiological and metabolic properties of microorganisms, and this in turn has demonstrated their importance for the development, maintenance and sustenance of life on Earth.

  5. Anoxybacillusgeothermalis sp. nov., a facultatively anaerobic, endospore-forming bacterium isolated from mineral deposits in a geothermal station.

    PubMed

    Filippidou, Sevasti; Jaussi, Marion; Junier, Thomas; Wunderlin, Tina; Jeanneret, Nicole; Palmieri, Fabio; Palmieri, Ilona; Roussel-Delif, Ludovic; Vieth-Hillebrand, Andrea; Vetter, Alexandra; Chain, Patrick S; Regenspurg, Simona; Junier, Pilar

    2016-08-01

    A novel endospore-forming bacterium designated strain GSsed3T was isolated from deposits clogging aboveground filters from the geothermal power platform of Groß Schönebeck in northern Germany. The novel isolate was Gram-staining-positive, facultatively anaerobic, catalase-positive and oxidase-positive. Optimum growth occurred at 60 °C, 0.5 % (w/v) NaCl and pH 7-8. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity indicated that strain GSsed3T belonged to the genus Anoxybacillus, and showed 99.8 % sequence similarity to Anoxybacillus rupiensis R270T, 98.2 % similarity to Anoxybacillus tepidamans GS5-97T, 97.9 % similarity to Anoxybacillus voinovskiensis TH13T, 97.7 % similarity to Anoxybacillus caldiproteolyticus DSM 15730T and 97.6 % similarity to Anoxybacillus amylolyticus MR3CT. DNA-DNA hybridization (DDH) indicated only 16 % relatedness to Anoxybacillus rupiensis DSM 17127T. Furthermore, DDH estimation based on genomes analysis indicated only 19.9 % overall nucleotide similarity to Anoxybacillus amylolyticus DSM 15939T. The major respiratory menaquinone was MK-8. The polar lipid profile consisted of phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, one unknown phosphoglycolipid and one unknown phospholipid. The predominant cellular fatty acids were iso-C15 : 0, iso-C17 : 0, C16 : 0, iso-C16 : 0 and anteiso-C17 : 0. The peptidoglycan type was A1γ meso-Dpm-direct. The genomic DNA G+C content of the strain was 46.9 mol%. The phenotypic, genotypic and chemotaxonomic characterization indicated that strain GSsed3T differs from related species of the genus. Therefore, strain GSsed3T is considered to be a representative of a novel species of the genus Anoxybacillus, for which the name Anoxybacillus geothermalis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Anoxybacillus geothermalis is GSsed3T (=CCOS808T =ATCC BAA2555T). PMID:27126386

  6. Anoxybacillusgeothermalis sp. nov., a facultatively anaerobic, endospore-forming bacterium isolated from mineral deposits in a geothermal station.

    PubMed

    Filippidou, Sevasti; Jaussi, Marion; Junier, Thomas; Wunderlin, Tina; Jeanneret, Nicole; Palmieri, Fabio; Palmieri, Ilona; Roussel-Delif, Ludovic; Vieth-Hillebrand, Andrea; Vetter, Alexandra; Chain, Patrick S; Regenspurg, Simona; Junier, Pilar

    2016-08-01

    A novel endospore-forming bacterium designated strain GSsed3T was isolated from deposits clogging aboveground filters from the geothermal power platform of Groß Schönebeck in northern Germany. The novel isolate was Gram-staining-positive, facultatively anaerobic, catalase-positive and oxidase-positive. Optimum growth occurred at 60 °C, 0.5 % (w/v) NaCl and pH 7-8. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity indicated that strain GSsed3T belonged to the genus Anoxybacillus, and showed 99.8 % sequence similarity to Anoxybacillus rupiensis R270T, 98.2 % similarity to Anoxybacillus tepidamans GS5-97T, 97.9 % similarity to Anoxybacillus voinovskiensis TH13T, 97.7 % similarity to Anoxybacillus caldiproteolyticus DSM 15730T and 97.6 % similarity to Anoxybacillus amylolyticus MR3CT. DNA-DNA hybridization (DDH) indicated only 16 % relatedness to Anoxybacillus rupiensis DSM 17127T. Furthermore, DDH estimation based on genomes analysis indicated only 19.9 % overall nucleotide similarity to Anoxybacillus amylolyticus DSM 15939T. The major respiratory menaquinone was MK-8. The polar lipid profile consisted of phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, one unknown phosphoglycolipid and one unknown phospholipid. The predominant cellular fatty acids were iso-C15 : 0, iso-C17 : 0, C16 : 0, iso-C16 : 0 and anteiso-C17 : 0. The peptidoglycan type was A1γ meso-Dpm-direct. The genomic DNA G+C content of the strain was 46.9 mol%. The phenotypic, genotypic and chemotaxonomic characterization indicated that strain GSsed3T differs from related species of the genus. Therefore, strain GSsed3T is considered to be a representative of a novel species of the genus Anoxybacillus, for which the name Anoxybacillus geothermalis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Anoxybacillus geothermalis is GSsed3T (=CCOS808T =ATCC BAA2555T).

  7. Material and method for promoting the growth of anaerobic bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Adler, H.I.

    1984-10-09

    A material and method is disclosed for promoting the growth of anaerobic bacteria which includes a nutrient media containing a hydrogen donor and sterile membrane fragments of bacteria having an electron transfer system which reduces oxygen to water. Dissolved oxygen in the medium is removed by adding the sterile membrane fragments to the nutrient medium and holding the medium at a temperature of about 10 to about 60 C until the dissolved oxygen is removed. No Drawings

  8. Material and method for promoting the growth of anaerobic bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Adler, Howard I.

    1984-01-01

    A material and method for promoting the growth of anaerobic bacteria which includes a nutrient media containing a hydrogen donor and sterile membrane fragments of bacteria having an electron transfer system which reduces oxygen to water. Dissolved oxygen in the medium is removed by adding the sterile membrane fragments to the nutrient medium and holding the medium at a temperature of about 10.degree. to about 60.degree. C. until the dissolved oxygen is removed.

  9. Comparative Susceptibility of Anaerobic Bacteria to Minocycline, Doxycycline, and Tetracycline

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Anthony W.; Patten, Valerie; Guze, Lucien B.

    1975-01-01

    The comparative susceptibility of 622 recent clinical isolates of anaerobic bacteria to minocycline, doxycycline, and tetracycline was determined by an agar-dilution technique. In addition to Bacteroides fragilis, a variety of other anaerobic bacteria was resistant to achievable blood concentrations of tetracycline (55% inhibited by 6.25 μg/ml) and doxycycline (58% inhibited by 2.5 μg/ml). In contrast, minocycline was significantly more active (P < 0.05) than both doxycycline and tetracycline, and 70% of strains were inhibited by achievable blood concentrations of this antibiotic (2.5 μg/ml). The enhanced activity of minocycline was particularly striking for Peptococcus asaccharolyticus, P. magnus, P. prevotii, Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, and Bacteroides melaninogenicus. Further evaluation of the clinical efficacy of minocycline against anaerobic infections is indicated. PMID:1137358

  10. Susceptibility testing of anaerobic bacteria: myth, magic, or method?

    PubMed Central

    Wexler, H M

    1991-01-01

    The demand for susceptibility testing of anaerobes has increased, yet consensus as to procedure and interpretation in this area has not been achieved. While routine testing of anaerobic isolates is not needed, certain isolates in specific clinical settings should be tested. Also, laboratories may monitor their local antibiograms by doing periodic surveillance batch testing. The National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards has published a protocol of methods approved for susceptibility testing of anaerobic bacteria. Both agar and broth microdilution are included; however, the broth disk elution method is no longer approved by the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards because of method-related interpretive errors. A number of newer methods are undergoing evaluation and seem promising. Clinicians and microbiologists reviewing susceptibility reports should be aware of sources of variability in the test results. Variables in susceptibility testing of anaerobes include the media and methods used, organisms chosen for testing, breakpoints chosen for interpretation, antibiotic, and determination of endpoint. Clustering of MICs around the breakpoint may lead to significant variability in test results. Adherence of testing laboratories to approved methods and careful descriptions of the method and the breakpoints used for interpretation would facilitate interlaboratory comparisons and allow problems of emerging resistance to be noted. A variety of resistance mechanisms occurs in anaerobic bacteria, including the production of beta-lactamase and other drug-inactivating enzymes, alteration of target proteins, and inability of the drug to penetrate the bacterial wall. Antimicrobial resistance patterns in the United States and abroad are described. PMID:1747863

  11. Massilia eurypsychrophila sp. nov. a facultatively psychrophilic bacteria isolated from ice core.

    PubMed

    Shen, Liang; Liu, Yongqin; Gu, Zhengquan; Xu, Baiqing; Wang, Ninglian; Jiao, Nianzhi; Liu, Hongcan; Zhou, Yuguang

    2015-07-01

    Strain B528-3(T), a Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped, aerobic, facultatively psychrophilic bacterium with polar flagella, was isolated from an ice core drilled from Muztagh Glacier, Xinjiang, China. The novel isolate was classified into the genus Massilia. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of the novel isolate shares a pairwise similarity of less than 97% with those of all the type strains of the genus Massilia. The major fatty acids of strain B528-3(T) were summed feature 3 (C16:1ω7c and/or iso-C15:0 2-OH) (57.31%), C16:0 (11.46%) and C18:1ω7c (14.72%). The predominant isoprenoid quinone was Q-8. The DNA G + C content was 62.2 mol% (Tm). The major polar lipids of this bacterium were phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol and diphosphatidylglycerol. From the genotypic and phenotypic data, it is evident that strain B528-3(T) represents a novel species of the genus Massilia, for which the name Massilia eurypsychrophila sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is B528-3(T) ( = JCM 30074(T) = CGMCC 1.12828(T)).

  12. Decrease of U(VI) Immobilization Capability of the Facultative Anaerobic Strain Paenibacillus sp. JG-TB8 under Anoxic Conditions Due to Strongly Reduced Phosphatase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Reitz, Thomas; Rossberg, Andre; Barkleit, Astrid; Selenska-Pobell, Sonja; Merroun, Mohamed L.

    2014-01-01

    Interactions of a facultative anaerobic bacterial isolate named Paenibacillus sp. JG-TB8 with U(VI) were studied under oxic and anoxic conditions in order to assess the influence of the oxygen-dependent cell metabolism on microbial uranium mobilization and immobilization. We demonstrated that aerobically and anaerobically grown cells of Paenibacillus sp. JG-TB8 accumulate uranium from aqueous solutions under acidic conditions (pH 2 to 6), under oxic and anoxic conditions. A combination of spectroscopic and microscopic methods revealed that the speciation of U(VI) associated with the cells of the strain depend on the pH as well as on the aeration conditions. At pH 2 and pH 3, uranium was exclusively bound by organic phosphate groups provided by cellular components, independently on the aeration conditions. At higher pH values, a part (pH 4.5) or the total amount (pH 6) of the dissolved uranium was precipitated under oxic conditions in a meta-autunite-like uranyl phosphate mineral phase without supplying an additional organic phosphate substrate. In contrast to that, under anoxic conditions no mineral formation was observed at pH 4.5 and pH 6, which was clearly assigned to decreased orthophosphate release by the cells. This in turn was caused by a suppression of the indigenous phosphatase activity of the strain. The results demonstrate that changes in the metabolism of facultative anaerobic microorganisms caused by the presence or absence of oxygen can decisively influence U(VI) biomineralization. PMID:25157416

  13. Cellulose fermentation by nitrogen-fixing anaerobic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Canale-Parola, E.

    1992-12-13

    In anaerobic natural environments cellulose is degraded to methane, carbon dioxide and other products by the combined activities of many diverse microorganisms. We are simulating processes occurring in natural environments by constructing biologically-defined, stable, heterogeneous bacterial communities (consortia) that we use as in vitro systems for quantitative studies of cellulose degradation under conditions of combined nitrogen deprivation. These studies include the investigation of (i) metabolic interactions among members of cellulose-degrading microbial populations, and (ii) processes that regulate the activity or biosynthesis of cellulolytic enzymes. In addition, we are studying the sensory mechanisms that, in natural environments, may enable motile cellulolytic bacteria to migrate toward cellulose. This part of our work includes biochemical characterization of the cellobiose chemoreceptor of cellulolytic bacteria. Finally, an important aspect of our research is the investigation of the mechanisms by which multienzyme complexes of anaerobic bacteria catalyze the depolymerization of crystalline cellulose and of other plant cell wall polysacchaddes. The research will provide fundamental information on the physiology and ecology of cellulose-fermenting, N{sub 2}-fixing bacteria, and on the intricate processes involved in C and N cycling in anaerobic environments. Furthermore, the information will be valuable for the development of practical applications, such as the conversion of plant biomass (e.g., agricultural, forestry and municipal wastes) to automotive fuels such as ethanol.

  14. Anaerobic bacteria and herpes simplex virus in genital ulceration.

    PubMed Central

    Masfari, A N; Kinghorn, G R; Hafiz, S; Barton, I G; Duerden, B I

    1985-01-01

    Of 91 patients with genital ulceration, herpes simplex virus was isolated from 52 (57%) and Haemophilus ducreyi from 12 (13%); none had syphilis. The difference in incidence of other aerobes in patients and controls was not significant. Anaerobes, predominantly Bacteroides spp, were isolated from a large proportion (77%) of men and women patients with ulcers but from few control men. The most common anaerobic species were B asaccharolyticus and B ureolyticus, with fewer isolates of the melaninogenicus/oralis group. The bacterial flora of herpetic and non-herpetic ulcers were similar, but Candida albicans was isolated significantly more often from non-herpetic ulcers. Anaerobic bacteria may contribute to the pathogenesis of genital ulcers. PMID:2984108

  15. [Anaerobic bacteria 150 years after their discovery by Pasteur].

    PubMed

    García-Sánchez, José Elías; García-Sánchez, Enrique; Martín-Del-Rey, Ángel; García-Merino, Enrique

    2015-02-01

    In 2011 we celebrated the 150th anniversary of the discovery of anaerobic bacteria by Louis Pasteur. The interest of the biomedical community on such bacteria is still maintained, and is particularly focused on Clostridium difficile. In the past few years important advances in taxonomy have been made due to the genetic, technological and computing developments. Thus, a significant number of new species related to human infections have been characterised, and some already known have been reclassified. At pathogenic level some specimens of anaerobic microflora, that had not been isolated from human infections, have been now isolated in some clinical conditions. There was emergence (or re-emergence) of some species and clinical conditions. Certain anaerobic bacteria have been associated with established infectious syndromes. The virulence of certain strains has increased, and some hypotheses on their participation in certain diseases have been given. In terms of diagnosis, the routine use of MALDI-TOF has led to a shortening of time and a cost reduction in the identification, with an improvement directly related to the improvement of data bases. The application of real-time PCR has been another major progress, and the sequencing of 16srRNA gene and others is currently a reality for several laboratories. Anaerobes have increased their resistance to antimicrobial agents, and the emergence of resistance to carbapenems and metronidazole, and multi-resistance is a current reality. In this situation, linezolid could be an effective alternative for Bacteroides. Fidaxomicin is the only anti-anaerobic agent introduced in the recent years, specifically for the diarrhoea caused by C.difficile. Moreover, some mathematical models have also been proposed in relation with this species.

  16. Degradation potential and growth of anaerobic bacteria in produced water.

    PubMed

    Vieira, D S; Sérvulo, E F C; Cammarota, M C

    2005-08-01

    The efficiency of an anaerobic biological treatment for the reduction of essential contaminants of produced water from an offshore oilfield was investigated using a microbial consortium enriched with sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Experiments were conducted in a bench bioreactor at 35 degrees C, 250 rpm, with intermittent purges of N2 gas in order to establish anaerobic conditions and to remove the H2S generated. The results showed that pH control effectively influenced the activity of the anaerobic bacteria leading to COD removal of 57%. Meanwhile, pH control was found to have no influence on the removal efficiencies of oil and grease and total phenols. In all experiments, removals of oil and grease and total phenols of 60% and 58-67%, respectively, were obtained after a 15-day process. In studies carried out with biomass reuse the reductions obtained were 61% for oil and grease and 78% for total phenols over the same period. Such results point to the technical feasibility of anaerobic biodegradation for oilfield wastewater treatment. PMID:16128390

  17. In vitro evaluation of faropenem activity against anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Behra-Miellet, J; Dubreuil, L; Bryskier, A

    2005-02-01

    Faropenem, a new oral penem with broad spectrum activity, could be used as empirical treatment in infections due to unidentified anaerobes, but only a few investigations have been carried out on these bacteria. The aim of this study was to compare faropenem in vitro activity with that of positive antimicrobial controls (metronidazole, imipenem, meropenem, amoxicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, ticarcillin-clavulanic acid, cefotetan, cefoxitin and clindamycin) against 462 anaerobic bacterial strains. The reference agar dilution method was used according to the NCCLS standard. Faropenem demonstrated high antimicrobial activity, similar to that of both imipenem and meropenem (faropenem Minimal Inhibitory Concentrations 50% and 90% were 0.12 and 1 mg/L for all Gram-negative anaerobes, 0.25 and 1 mg/L for all Gram-positive anaerobes). Only 5 strains of the Bacteroides fragilis group (1.1% of all anaerobes) were resistant to faropenem, which compared favorably with that of other reference antianaerobic drugs. The results obtained confirm those previously reported. PMID:15828442

  18. Use of Presumpto Plates to identify anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Whaley, D N; Wiggs, L S; Miller, P H; Srivastava, P U; Miller, J M

    1995-01-01

    Identification of anaerobic bacteria requires special media and growth conditions that contribute to a higher cost per identification than that for aerobic isolates. Newer rapid methods streamline the identification process, but confirmation to the species level is often difficult. The Presumpto Plate method for the identification of commonly encountered anaerobes consists of three quadrant plates, each containing four conventional media, that result in the generation of 21 test parameters: growth on Lombard-Dowell medium; production of indole, indole derivative, catalase, lecithinase, and lipase; proteolysis of milk, H2S, and esculin; growth on 20% bile; precipitate on bile; DNase, glucose, casein, starch, and gelatin hydrolysis; and fermentation of lactose, mannitol, and rhamnose. Identification charts were developed by using the results from 2,300 anaerobic isolates. Because conventional media were used, there was a high degree of agreement between the Presumpto Plate method and the reference method when testing commonly encountered anaerobes. The Presumpto Plate method is as accurate as commercially available enzyme systems for the identification of many anaerobic species but is less expensive to perform. PMID:7615728

  19. Use of Presumpto Plates to identify anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Whaley, D N; Wiggs, L S; Miller, P H; Srivastava, P U; Miller, J M

    1995-05-01

    Identification of anaerobic bacteria requires special media and growth conditions that contribute to a higher cost per identification than that for aerobic isolates. Newer rapid methods streamline the identification process, but confirmation to the species level is often difficult. The Presumpto Plate method for the identification of commonly encountered anaerobes consists of three quadrant plates, each containing four conventional media, that result in the generation of 21 test parameters: growth on Lombard-Dowell medium; production of indole, indole derivative, catalase, lecithinase, and lipase; proteolysis of milk, H2S, and esculin; growth on 20% bile; precipitate on bile; DNase, glucose, casein, starch, and gelatin hydrolysis; and fermentation of lactose, mannitol, and rhamnose. Identification charts were developed by using the results from 2,300 anaerobic isolates. Because conventional media were used, there was a high degree of agreement between the Presumpto Plate method and the reference method when testing commonly encountered anaerobes. The Presumpto Plate method is as accurate as commercially available enzyme systems for the identification of many anaerobic species but is less expensive to perform.

  20. Susceptibility of anaerobic bacteria to BAY v 3522.

    PubMed Central

    Nord, C E; Rylander, M; Norrby, S R

    1991-01-01

    The activity of BAY v 3522 against 340 strains of anaerobic bacteria was determined by an agar dilution method. Its activity was compared with those of amoxicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, cefaclor, cefadroxil, cefoxitin, cefuroxime, cephalexin, clindamycin, doxycycline, and metronidazole. BAY v 3522, amoxicillin-clavulanate, cefoxitin, clindamycin, and metronidazole were the most active agents tested. On the basis of these results, BAY v 3522 appears to have an antibacterial activity that warrants further investigation in clinical trials. PMID:2039213

  1. Oxidation and methylation of dissolved elemental mercury by anaerobic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Haiyan; Lin, Hui; Zheng, Wang; Tomanicek, Stephen J; Johs, Alexander; Feng, Xinbin; Elias, Dwayne A; Liang, Liyuan; Gu, Baohua

    2013-08-04

    Methylmercury is a neurotoxin that poses significant health risks to humans. Some anaerobic sulphate- and iron-reducing bacteria can methylate oxidized forms of mercury, generating methylmercury1-4. One strain of sulphate-reducing bacteria (Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132) can also methylate elemental mercury5. The prevalence of this trait among different bacterial strains and species remains unclear, however. Here, we compare the ability of two strains of the sulphate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio and one strain of the iron-reducing bacterium Geobacter to oxidise and methylate elemental mercury in a series of laboratory incubations. Experiments were carried out under dark, anaerobic conditions, in the presence of environmentally-relevant concentrations of elemental mercury. We report differences in the ability of these organisms to oxidise and methylate elemental mercury. In line with recent findings5, we show that Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 can both oxidise and methylate elemental mercury. However, the rate of methylation of elemental mercury is only about one third the rate of methylation of oxidized mercury. We also show that Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 can oxidise, but not methylate, elemental mercury. Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA is able to oxidise and methylate elemental mercury in the presence of cysteine. We suggest that the activity of methylating and non-methylating bacteria may together enhance the formation of methylmercury in anaerobic environments.

  2. Oxidation and methylation of dissolved elemental mercury by anaerobic bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Haiyan; Lin, Hui; Zheng, Wang; Tomanicek, Stephen J.; Johs, Alexander; Feng, Xinbin; Elias, Dwayne A.; Liang, Liyuan; Gu, Baohua

    2013-09-01

    Methylmercury is a neurotoxin that poses significant health risks to humans. Some anaerobic sulphate- and iron-reducing bacteria can methylate oxidized forms of mercury, generating methylmercury. One strain of sulphate-reducing bacteria (Desulfovibrio desulphuricans ND132) can also methylate elemental mercury. The prevalence of this trait among different bacterial strains and species remains unclear, however. Here, we compare the ability of two strains of the sulphate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio and one strain of the iron-reducing bacterium Geobacter to oxidize and methylate elemental mercury in a series of laboratory incubations. Experiments were carried out under dark, anaerobic conditions, in the presence of environmentally relevant concentrations of elemental mercury. We report differences in the ability of these organisms to oxidize and methylate elemental mercury. In line with recent findings, we show that D.desulphuricans ND132 can both oxidize and methylate elemental mercury. We find that the rate of methylation of elemental mercury is about one-third the rate of methylation of oxidized mercury. We also show that Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 can oxidize, but not methylate, elemental mercury. Geobacter sulphurreducens PCA is able to oxidize and methylate elemental mercury in the presence of cysteine. We suggest that the activity of methylating and non-methylating bacteria may together enhance the formation of methylmercury in anaerobic environments.

  3. The potential of anaerobic bacteria to degrade chlorinated compounds.

    PubMed

    van Eekert, M H; Schraa, G

    2001-01-01

    Chlorinated ethenes and chlorinated aromatics are often found as pollutants in sediments, groundwater, and wastewater. These compounds were long considered to be recalcitrant under anaerobic conditions. In the past years however, dechlorination of these compounds has been found to occur under anaerobic conditions at contaminated sites and in wastewater treatment systems. This dechlorination is mainly attributed to halo-respiring bacteria, which are able to couple this dechlorination to energy conservation via electron transport coupled phosphorylation. The dechlorinating activities of the halo-respiring bacteria seem to be confined to the dechlorination of chloroethenes and chlorinated aromatic compounds. In addition, methanogenic and acetogenic bacteria are also able to reduce the chlorinated ethenes via a-specific cometabolic pathways. Although these latter reactions may not be important in the remediation of contaminated sites, they may be of substantial influence in the start-up of remediation processes and in the application of granular sludge from UASB reactors. Specific halo-respiring bacteria may be used to increase the dechlorination activities via bioaugmentation in the case that the appropriate microorganisms are not present at the contaminated site or in the sludge.

  4. GC/IR computer-aided identification of anaerobic bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Hunian; Zhang, Feng S.; Yang, Hua; Li, Zhu; Ye, Song

    1993-09-01

    A new method was developed to identify anaerobic bacteria by using pattern recognition. The method is depended on GC / JR data. The system is intended for use as a precise rapid and reproduceable aid in the identification of unknown isolates. Key Words: Anaerobic bacteria Pattern recognition Computeraided identification GC / JR 1 . TNTRODUCTTON A major problem in the field of anaerobic bacteriology is the difficulty in accurately precisely and rapidly identifying unknown isolates. Tn the proceedings of the Third International Symposium on Rapid Methods and Automation in Microbiology C. M. Moss said: " Chromatographic analysis is a new future for clinical microbiology" . 12 years past and so far it seems that this is an idea whose time has not get come but it close. Now two major advances that have brought the technology forword in terms ofmaking it appropriate for use in the clinical laboratory can aldo be cited. One is the development and implementation of fused silica capillary columns. In contrast to packed columns and those of'' greater width these columns allow reproducible recovery of hydroxey fatty acids with the same carbon chain length. The second advance is the efficient data processing afforded by modern microcomputer systems. On the other hand the practical steps for sample preparation also are an advance in the clinical laboratory. Chromatographic Analysis means mainly of analysis of fatty acids. The most common

  5. Detection of periodontopathogenic bacteria in pregnant women by traditional anaerobic culture method and by a commercial molecular genetic method.

    PubMed

    Urbán, Edit; Terhes, Gabriella; Radnai, Márta; Gorzó, István; Nagy, Elisabeth

    2010-06-01

    To culture facultative and strict anaerobic bacteria is a well-established method for analyzing subgingival plaque samples. Micro-IDent and micro-IDent Plus (HAIN Lifescience GmbH, Nehren, Germany) tests are two commercially available rapid PCR-based methods for the identification and quantification of putative periodontopathogen bacteria. In this study, we compared these commercial PCR-based hybridization methods with conventional anaerobic culture technique. A total of 36 subgingival plaque samples were collected from periodontal pockets of pregnant women with chronic localized periodontitis. Aliquots of these samples were evaluated with species-specific probes provided by micro-IDent and micro-IDent Plus tests simultaneously, and from the same samples anaerobic and capnophylic bacteria were cultured on selective media. The overall agreement between both methods was excellent for Eubacterium nodatum, Tannerella forsythia and Porphyromonas gingivalis (97-92%), fair for Capnocytophaga sp, Eikenella corrodens, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, and Prevotella intermedia (91-89%) and poor for Fusobacterium nucleatum, Parvimonas micra (Micromonas micros), and Campylobacter rectus (86-78%). Discrepancies in the results may be explained by inability of culture method to distinguish between closely related taxa (e.i P. intermedia/Prevotella. nigrescens), and problems of keeping periodontopathogen bacteria viable, which is required for successful detection by standard culture method. Nucleic acid-based methods may replace cultivation method as frequently used methods in microbiological diagnosis of progressive periodontitis, thus micro-IDent and micro-IDent Plus tests can be recommended where culture of periodontopathogenic bacteria is not performed in routine microbiology laboratories to analyze subgingival plaque samples.

  6. Antimicrobial susceptibility of clinically isolated anaerobic bacteria in a University Hospital Centre Split, Croatia in 2013.

    PubMed

    Novak, Anita; Rubic, Zana; Dogas, Varja; Goic-Barisic, Ivana; Radic, Marina; Tonkic, Marija

    2015-02-01

    .7%) received empiric antimicrobial therapy. One hundred and one patients (82.8%) had polymicrobial aerobic/anaerobic isolates cultivated from the same specimens. Almost all aerobic bacteria were of endogenous origin and showed fully susceptible antimicrobial profile; only 8.7% (9/104) were multiresistant and considered as hospital acquired. Based on our findings, β-lactam/β-lactamase inhibitor combinations and metronidazole remain useful antimicrobials for empiric treatment of anaerobic infections, while carbapenems should be reserved for situations were multidrug resistant, aerobic or facultative Gram-negative bacteria are expected. However, a certain percentage of resistant isolates were observed for each of these agents. Therefore, periodic resistance surveillance in anaerobes is highly recommended in order to guide empirical therapy. PMID:25479237

  7. Antimicrobial susceptibility of clinically isolated anaerobic bacteria in a University Hospital Centre Split, Croatia in 2013.

    PubMed

    Novak, Anita; Rubic, Zana; Dogas, Varja; Goic-Barisic, Ivana; Radic, Marina; Tonkic, Marija

    2015-02-01

    .7%) received empiric antimicrobial therapy. One hundred and one patients (82.8%) had polymicrobial aerobic/anaerobic isolates cultivated from the same specimens. Almost all aerobic bacteria were of endogenous origin and showed fully susceptible antimicrobial profile; only 8.7% (9/104) were multiresistant and considered as hospital acquired. Based on our findings, β-lactam/β-lactamase inhibitor combinations and metronidazole remain useful antimicrobials for empiric treatment of anaerobic infections, while carbapenems should be reserved for situations were multidrug resistant, aerobic or facultative Gram-negative bacteria are expected. However, a certain percentage of resistant isolates were observed for each of these agents. Therefore, periodic resistance surveillance in anaerobes is highly recommended in order to guide empirical therapy.

  8. Genome sequence of Phaeobacter daeponensis type strain (DSM 23529T), a facultatively anaerobic bacterium isolated from marine sediment, and emendation of Phaeobacter daeponensis

    PubMed Central

    Dogs, Marco; Teshima, Hazuki; Petersen, Jörn; Fiebig, Anne; Chertkov, Olga; Dalingault, Hajnalka; Chen, Amy; Pati, Amrita; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Chain, Patrick; Detter, John C.; Ivanova, Natalia; Lapidus, Alla; Rohde, Manfred; Gronow, Sabine; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Woyke, Tanja; Simon, Meinhard; Göker, Markus; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Brinkhoff, Thorsten

    2013-01-01

    TF-218T is the type strain of the species Phaeobacter daeponensis Yoon et al. 2007, a facultatively anaerobic Phaeobacter species isolated from tidal flats. Here we describe the draft genome sequence and annotation of this bacterium together with previously unreported aspects of its phenotype. We analyzed the genome for genes involved in secondary metabolite production and its anaerobic lifestyle, which have also been described for its closest relative Phaeobacter caeruleus. The 4,642,596 bp long genome of strain TF-218T contains 4,310 protein-coding genes and 78 RNA genes including four rRNA operons and consists of five replicons: one chromosome and four extrachromosomal elements with sizes of 276 kb, 174 kb, 117 kb and 90 kb. Genome analysis showed that TF-218T possesses all of the genes for indigoidine biosynthesis, and on specific media the strain showed a blue pigmentation. We also found genes for dissimilatory nitrate reduction, gene-transfer agents, NRPS/ PKS genes and signaling systems homologous to the LuxR/I system. PMID:24501652

  9. Prevalence of anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria in contaminated groundwater.

    PubMed

    Moore, Tara A; Xing, Yangping; Lazenby, Brent; Lynch, Michael D J; Schiff, Sherry; Robertson, William D; Timlin, Robert; Lanza, Sadia; Ryan, M Cathryn; Aravena, Ramon; Fortin, Danielle; Clark, Ian D; Neufeld, Josh D

    2011-09-01

    Anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria perform an important step in the global nitrogen cycle: anaerobic oxidation of ammonium and reduction of nitrite to form dinitrogen gas (N(2)). Anammox organisms appear to be widely distributed in natural and artificial environments. However, their roles in groundwater ammonium attenuation remain unclear and only limited biomarker-based data confirmed their presence prior to this study. We used complementary molecular and isotope-based methods to assess anammox diversity and activity occurring at three ammonium-contaminated groundwater sites: quantitative PCR, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, sequencing of 16S rRNA genes, and (15)N-tracer incubations. Here we show that anammox performing organisms were abundant bacterial community members. Although all sites were dominated by Candidatus Brocadia-like sequences, the community at one site was particularly diverse, possessing four of five known genera of anammox bacteria. Isotope data showed that anammox produced up to 18 and 36% of N(2) at these sites. By combining molecular and isotopic results we have demonstrated the diversity, abundance, and activity of these autotrophic bacteria. Our results provide strong evidence for their important biogeochemical role in attenuating groundwater ammonium contamination.

  10. Characterization of anaerobic heterotrophic bacteria isolated from freshwater lake sediments.

    PubMed

    Molongoski, J J; Klug, M J

    1976-01-01

    Strict anaerobic culture techniques were used to quantitatively and qualitatively evaluate the anaerobic heterotrophic bacteria present at the sediment-water interface of hyperutrophic Wintergreen Lake (Augusta, Mich.). Anaerobic plate counts remained constant from March through December, 1973, ranging from 2.4 X 10(6) to 5.7 X 10(6) organisms/g (dry weight) of sediment. The isolatable bacteria represented a small percentage of the total microbial community, which was shown by direct microscopic counts to be 2.0 X 10'' organisms/g (dry weight) of sediment during June and July. Bacteria of the genus Clostridium dominated the isolates obtained, accounting for 71.8% of the 960 isolates examined. A single species, Clostridium bifermentens, comprised 47.7% of the total. Additional bacterial groups and the percentage in which they were isolated included: Streptococcus sp. (10.8%), unidentified curved rods (9.5%y, gram-positive nonsporing rods (5.6%), and motile gram-negative rods (1.9%). Temperature growth studies demonstrated the ability of all the isolates to grow at in situ sediment temperatures. Gas-liqid radiochromatography was used to determine the soluble metabolic end products from [U-14C]glucose and a U-14C-labeled amino acid mixture by representative sedimentary clostridial isolates and by natural sediment microbial communities. At in situ temperatures the natural sediment microflora produced soluble fermentative end products characteristic of those elaborated by the clostridial isolates tested. These results are considered strong presumptive evidence that clostridia are actively metabolizing in the sediments of Wintergreen Lake.

  11. Multidrug Efflux Systems in Microaerobic and Anaerobic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zeling; Yan, Aixin

    2015-01-01

    Active drug efflux constitutes an important mechanism of antibiotic and multidrug resistance in bacteria. Understanding the distribution, expression, and physiological functions of multidrug efflux pumps, especially under physiologically and clinically relevant conditions of the pathogens, is the key to combat drug resistance. In animal hosts, most wounded, infected and inflamed tissues display low oxygen tensions. In this article, we summarize research development on multidrug efflux pumps in the medicinally relevant microaerobic and anaerobic pathogens and their implications in the effort to combat drug-resistant infections. PMID:27025630

  12. Biogeography of anaerobic ammonia-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Sonthiphand, Puntipar; Hall, Michael W.; Neufeld, Josh D.

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonia-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria are able to oxidize ammonia and reduce nitrite to produce N2 gas. After being discovered in a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP), anammox bacteria were subsequently characterized in natural environments, including marine, estuary, freshwater, and terrestrial habitats. Although anammox bacteria play an important role in removing fixed N from both engineered and natural ecosystems, broad scale anammox bacterial distributions have not yet been summarized. The objectives of this study were to explore global distributions and diversity of anammox bacteria and to identify factors that influence their biogeography. Over 6000 anammox 16S rRNA gene sequences from the public database were analyzed in this current study. Data ordinations indicated that salinity was an important factor governing anammox bacterial distributions, with distinct populations inhabiting natural and engineered ecosystems. Gene phylogenies and rarefaction analysis demonstrated that freshwater environments and the marine water column harbored the highest and the lowest diversity of anammox bacteria, respectively. Co-occurrence network analysis indicated that Ca. Scalindua strongly connected with other Ca. Scalindua taxa, whereas Ca. Brocadia co-occurred with taxa from both known and unknown anammox genera. Our survey provides a better understanding of ecological factors affecting anammox bacterial distributions and provides a comprehensive baseline for understanding the relationships among anammox communities in global environments. PMID:25147546

  13. Anaerobic Ammonium-Oxidizing Bacteria: Unique Microorganisms with Exceptional Properties

    PubMed Central

    Jetten, Mike S. M.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria defy many microbiological concepts and share numerous properties with both eukaryotes and archaea. Among their most intriguing characteristics are their compartmentalized cell plan and archaeon-like cell wall. Here we review our current knowledge about anammox cell biology. The anammox cell is divided into three separate compartments by bilayer membranes. The anammox cell consists of (from outside to inside) the cell wall, paryphoplasm, riboplasm, and anammoxosome. Not much is known about the composition or function of both the anammox cell wall and the paryphoplasm compartment. The cell wall is proposed to be proteinaceous and to lack both peptidoglycan and an outer membrane typical of Gram-negative bacteria. The function of the paryphoplasm is unknown, but it contains the cell division ring. The riboplasm resembles the standard cytoplasmic compartment of other bacteria; it contains ribosomes and the nucleoid. The anammoxosome occupies most of the cell volume and is a so-called “prokaryotic organelle” analogous to the eukaryotic mitochondrion. This is the site where the anammox reaction takes place, coupled over the curved anammoxosome membrane, possibly giving rise to a proton motive force and subsequent ATP synthesis. With these unique properties, anammox bacteria are food for thought concerning the early evolution of the domains Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukarya. PMID:22933561

  14. Anaerobic metabolism of aromatic compounds by phototrophic bacteria: Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Harwood, C.S.; Gibson, J.

    1986-12-19

    Vast quantities of aromatic compounds in the form of lignin, lignin derivatives, and aromatic pollutants are continually being introduced into the biosphere and much of this material accumulates in anaerobic environments. This project seeks to elucidate anaerobic routes of benzoate and 4-hydroxybenzoate metabolism by the photorophic bacterium, Rhodopseudomonas palustris. Recent evidence suggests that diverse aromatics must first be metabolized to form one or the other of these compounds prior to cleavage of the aromatic ring and so these pathways probably play general role as major degradative routes. R. palustris is particularly well suited for these studies because its ability to separate carbon metabolism from energy generating mechanisms frees it from the thermodynamic constraints that restrict the anaerobic metabolism of aromatics by pure cultures of fermentative bacteria. Studies include identification of the number and specificity of enzymes involved in benzoate and 4-hydroxybenzoate metabolism, identification of cofactors and electron carriers involved in each pathway, and a determination of the precise nature of the products formed. Mutants that are blocked in aromatic metabolism have been isolated. These mutants will be used, together with physiological approaches, to identify compounds (inducers and repressors) that regulate the expression of genes for aromatic degradation. 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  15. A novel mode of lactate metabolism in strictly anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Weghoff, Marie Charlotte; Bertsch, Johannes; Müller, Volker

    2015-03-01

    Lactate is a common substrate for major groups of strictly anaerobic bacteria, but the biochemistry and bioenergetics of lactate oxidation is obscure. The high redox potential of the pyruvate/lactate pair of E0 ' = -190 mV excludes direct NAD(+) reduction (E0 ' = -320 mV). To identify the hitherto unknown electron acceptor, we have purified the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) from the strictly anaerobic, acetogenic bacterium Acetobacterium woodii. The LDH forms a stable complex with an electron-transferring flavoprotein (Etf) that exhibited NAD(+) reduction only when reduced ferredoxin (Fd(2-) ) was present. Biochemical analyses revealed that the LDH/Etf complex of A. woodii uses flavin-based electron confurcation to drive endergonic lactate oxidation with NAD(+) as oxidant at the expense of simultaneous exergonic electron flow from reduced ferredoxin (E0 ' ≈ -500 mV) to NAD(+) according to: lactate + Fd(2-)  + 2 NAD(+)  → pyruvate + Fd + 2 NADH. The reduced Fd(2-) is regenerated from NADH by a sequence of events that involves conversion of chemical (ATP) to electrochemical ( Δ μ ˜ Na + ) and finally redox energy (Fd(2-) from NADH) via reversed electron transport catalysed by the Rnf complex. Inspection of genomes revealed that this metabolic scenario for lactate oxidation may also apply to many other anaerobes.

  16. Iron biomineralization by anaerobic neutrophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miot, Jennyfer; Benzerara, Karim; Morin, Guillaume; Kappler, Andreas; Bernard, Sylvain; Obst, Martin; Férard, Céline; Skouri-Panet, Fériel; Guigner, Jean-Michel; Posth, Nicole; Galvez, Matthieu; Brown, Gordon E., Jr.; Guyot, François

    2009-02-01

    Minerals formed by bio-oxidation of ferrous iron (Fe(II)) at neutral pH, their association with bacterial ultrastructures as well as their impact on the metabolism of iron-oxidizing bacteria remain poorly understood. Here, we investigated iron biomineralization by the anaerobic nitrate-dependent iron-oxidizing bacterium Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1 in the presence of dissolved Fe(II) using electron microscopy and Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM). All detected minerals consisted mainly of amorphous iron phosphates, but based on their morphology and localization, three types of precipitates could be discriminated: (1) mineralized filaments at distance from the cells, (2) globules of 100 ± 25 nm in diameter, at the cell surface and (3) a 40-nm thick mineralized layer within the periplasm. All of those phases were shown to be intimately associated with organic molecules. Periplasmic encrustation was accompanied by an accumulation of protein moieties. In the same way, exopolysaccharides were associated with the extracellular mineralized filaments. The evolution of cell encrustation was followed by TEM over the time course of a culture: cell encrustation proceeded progressively, with rapid precipitation in the periplasm (in a few tens of minutes), followed by the formation of surface-bound globules. Moreover, we frequently observed an asymmetric mineral thickening at the cell poles. In parallel, the evolution of iron oxidation was quantified by STXM: iron both contained in the bacteria and in the extracellular precipitates reached complete oxidation within 6 days. While a progressive oxidation of Fe in the bacteria and in the medium could be observed, spatial redox (oxido-reduction state) heterogeneities were detected at the cell poles and in the extracellular precipitates after 1 day. All these findings provide new information to further the understanding of molecular processes involved in iron biomineralization by anaerobic iron-oxidizing bacteria and

  17. Azoreductase activity of anaerobic bacteria isolated from human intestinal microflora.

    PubMed Central

    Rafii, F; Franklin, W; Cerniglia, C E

    1990-01-01

    A plate assay was developed for the detection of anaerobic bacteria that produce azoreductases. With this plate assay, 10 strains of anaerobic bacteria capable of reducing azo dyes were isolated from human feces and identified as Eubacterium hadrum (2 strains), Eubacterium spp. (2 species), Clostridium clostridiiforme, a Butyrivibrio sp., a Bacteroides sp., Clostridium paraputrificum, Clostridium nexile, and a Clostridium sp. The average rate of reduction of Direct Blue 15 dye (a dimethoxybenzidine-based dye) in these strains ranged from 16 to 135 nmol of dye per min per mg of protein. The enzymes were inactivated by oxygen. In seven isolates, a flavin compound (riboflavin, flavin adenine dinucleotide, or flavin mononucleotide) was required for azoreductase activity. In the other three isolates and in Clostridium perfringens, no added flavin was required for activity. Nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that each bacterium expressed only one azoreductase isozyme. At least three types of azoreductase enzyme were produced by the different isolates. All of the azoreductases were produced constitutively and released extracellularly. Images PMID:2202258

  18. Production of Value-added Products by Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are a group of facultative anaerobic, catalase negative, nonmotile and nonsporeforming–Gram positive bacteria. Most LAB utilize high energy C sources including monomer sugars to produce energy to maintain cellular structure and function. This anaerobic fermentation proce...

  19. Targeting solid tumors with non-pathogenic obligate anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Shun'ichiro; Fujimori, Minoru; Sasaki, Takayuki; Tsutsui, Hiroko; Shimatani, Yuko; Seki, Keiichi; Amano, Jun

    2010-09-01

    Molecular-targeting drugs with fewer severe adverse effects are attracting great attention as the next wave of cancer treatment. There exist, however, populations of cancer cells resistant to these drugs that stem from the instability of tumor cells and/or the existence of cancer stem cells, and thus specific toxicity is required to destroy them. If such selectivity is not available, these targets may be sought out not by the cancer cell types themselves, but rather in their adjacent cancer microenvironments by means of hypoxia, low pH, and so on. The anaerobic conditions present in malignant tumor tissues have previously been regarded as a source of resistance in cancer cells against conventional therapy. However, there now appears to be a way to make use of these limiting factors as a selective target. In this review, we will refer to several trials, including our own, to direct attention to the utilizable anaerobic conditions present in malignant tumor tissues and the use of bacteria as carriers to target them. Specifically, we have been developing a method to attack solid cancers using the non-pathogenic obligate anaerobic bacterium Bifidobacterium longum as a vehicle to selectively recognize and target the anaerobic conditions in solid cancer tissues. We will also discuss the existence of low oxygen pressure in tumor masses in spite of generally enhanced angiogenesis, overview current cancer therapies, especially the history and present situation of bacterial utility to treat solid tumors, and discuss the rationality and future possibilities of this novel mode of cancer treatment.

  20. Interactions between amino-acid-degrading bacteria and methanogenic bacteria in anaerobic digestion

    SciTech Connect

    Nagase, M.; Matsuo, T.

    1982-10-01

    The degradation of amino acids in anaerobic digestion was examined in terms of the interactions between amino-acid-degrading bacteria and methanogenic bacteria. Certain amino acids were degraded oxidatively by dehydrogenation, with methanogenic bacteria acting as H/sub 2/ acceptors. The inhibition of methanogenesis by chloroform also inhibited the degradation of these amino acids and/or caused variations in the composition of volatile acids produced from them. The presence of glycine reduced the inhibitory effect caused by chloroform, probably because glycine acted as an H/sub 2/ acceptor in place of methanogenic bacteria. This fact suggested that the coupled oxidation-reduction reactions between two amino acids - one acting as the H/sub 2/ donor and the other acting as the H/sub 2/ acceptor - may occur in the anaerobic digestion of proteins or amino-acid mixtures. The conversion of some proteins to volatile acids was not affected when methanogensis was inhibited by chloroform. This suggested that the component amino acids of proteins may be degraded by the coupled oxidation-reduction reactions and that the degradation of proteins may not be dependent on the activity of methanogenic bacteria as H/sub 2/ acceptors.

  1. Paper Chromatography as an Adjunct in the Identification of Anaerobic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Slifkin, M.; Hercher, H. J.

    1974-01-01

    Modified paper chromatography procedures for the analysis of fatty acids produced by anaerobic bacteria are described. Both ethylamine and hydroxylamine derivatives of fatty acids were prepared from inoculated anaerobic culture broth. The derivatives were spotted on chromatography paper and developed with appropriate solvents. Paper chromatography is a valuable alternative to gas liquid chromatography as an ancillary procedure in the identification of anaerobic bacteria in the clinical bacteriology laboratory. PMID:4596386

  2. Aerobic and anaerobic oxidation of hydrogen by acidophilic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hedrich, Sabrina; Johnson, D Barrie

    2013-12-01

    While many prokaryotic species are known to use hydrogen as an electron donor to support their growth, this trait has only previously been reported for two acidophilic bacteria, Hydrogenobaculum acidophilum (in the presence of reduced sulfur) and Acidithiobacillus (At.) ferrooxidans. To test the hypothesis that hydrogen may be utilized more widely by acidophilic bacteria, 38 strains of acidophilic bacteria, including representatives of 20 designated and four proposed species, were screened for their abilities to grow via the dissimilatory oxidation of hydrogen. Growth was demonstrated in several species of acidophiles that also use other inorganic electron donors (ferrous iron and sulfur) but in none of the obligately heterotrophic species tested. Strains of At. ferrooxidans, At. ferridurans and At. caldus, grew chemolithotrophically on hydrogen, though those of At. thiooxidans and At. ferrivorans did not. Growth was also observed with Sulfobacillus acidophilus, Sb. benefaciens and Sb. thermosulfidooxidans, though not with other iron-oxidizing Firmicutes. Similarly, Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans grew on hydrogen, closely related acidophilic actinobacteria did not. Growth yields of At. ferrooxidans and At. ferridurans grown aerobically on hydrogen (c. 10(10)  cells mL(-1) ) were far greater than typically obtained using other electron donors. Several species also grew anaerobically by coupling hydrogen oxidation to the reduction of ferric iron.

  3. Thermostilla marina gen. nov., sp. nov., a thermophilic, facultatively anaerobic planctomycete isolated from a shallow submarine hydrothermal vent.

    PubMed

    Slobodkina, Galina B; Panteleeva, Angela N; Beskorovaynaya, Darya A; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A; Slobodkin, Alexander I

    2016-02-01

    A novel thermophilic planctomycete (strain SVX8T) was isolated from a shallow submarine hydrothermal vent, Vulcano Island, Italy. The temperature range for growth was 30-68 °C, with an optimum at 55 °C. The pH range for growth was 5.0-9.0, with an optimum at pH 7.0-8.0. Growth was observed at NaCl concentrations ranging from 0.8 to 4.5 % (w/v) with an optimum at 2.5-3.5 % (w/v). The isolate grew anaerobically using a number of mono-, di- and polysaccharides as electron donors and nitrate or elemental sulfur as electron acceptors or by fermentation. Nitrate was reduced to nitrite; sulfur was reduced to sulfide. Strain SVX8T did not grow at atmospheric concentration of oxygen but grew microaerobically (up to 2 % oxygen in the gas phase). The G+C content of the DNA of strain SVX8T was 58.5 mol%. Based on phylogenetic position and phenotypic features, the new isolate is considered to represent a novel species belonging to a new genus in the order Planctomycetales, for which the name Thermostilla marina gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Thermostilla marina is SVX8T ( = JCM 19992T = VKM B-2881T). Strain SVX8T is the first thermophilic planctomycete isolated from a marine environment. PMID:26559645

  4. Palaeococcus helgesonii sp. nov., a facultatively anaerobic, hyperthermophilic archaeon from a geothermal well on Vulcano Island, Italy.

    PubMed

    Amend, Jan P; Meyer-Dombard, D'Arcy R; Sheth, Seema N; Zolotova, Natalya; Amend, Andrea C

    2003-06-01

    A novel, hyperthermophilic archaeon was isolated from a shallow geothermal well that taps marine waters on the Island of Vulcano in the southern Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy. The cells were irregular cocci, 0.6-1.5 microm in diameter, with multiple polar flagella. Growth was observed at temperatures from 45 to 85 degrees C (optimum at approximately 80 degrees C), pH 5-8 (optimum at 6.5), and 0.5-6.0% NaCl (optimum at approximately 2.8%). The minimum doubling time was 50 min. The isolate was obligately chemoheterotrophic, utilizing complex organic compounds including yeast or beef extract, peptone, tryptone, or casein for best growth. The presence of elemental sulfur enhanced growth. The isolate grew anaerobically as well as microaerobically. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 42.5 mol%. The 16S rRNA sequence indicated that the new isolate was a member of the Thermococcales within the euryarchaeota, representing the second species in the genus Palaeococcus. Its physiology and phylogeny differed in several key characteristics from those of Palaeococcus ferrophilus, justifying the establishment of a new species; the name Palaeococcus helgesonii sp. nov. is proposed, type strain PI1 (DSM 15127).

  5. Bacteria associated with deep, alkaline, anaerobic groundwaters in Southeast Washington.

    PubMed

    Stevens, T O; McKinley, J P; Fredrickson, J K

    1993-01-01

    The microbial diversity in two deep, confined aquifers, the Grande Ronde (1270 m) and the Priest Rapids (316 m), Hanford Reservation, Washington, USA, was investigated by sampling from artesian wells. These basaltic aquifers were alkaline (pH 8.5 to 10.5) and anaerobic (Eh -200 to -450 mV). The wells were allowed to free-flow until pH and Eh stabilized, then the microflora was sampled with water filtration and flow-through sandtrap methods. Direct microscopic counts showed 7.6 × 10(5) and 3.6 × 10(3) bacteria ml(-1) in water from the Grande Ronde and Priest Rapids aquifers, respectively. The sand filter method yielded 5.7 × 10(8) and 1.1 × 10(5) cells g(-1) wet weight of sand. The numbers of bacteria did not decrease as increasing volumes of water were flushed out. The heterotrophic diversity of these bacterial populations was assessed using enrichments for 20 functional groups. These groups were defined by their ability to grow in a matrix of five different electron acceptors (O2, Fe(III), NO3 (-), SO4 (2-), HCO3 (-)) and four groups of electron donors (fermentation products, monomers, polymers, aromatics) in a mineral salts medium at pH 9.5. Growth was assessed by protein production. Culture media were subsequently analyzed to determine substrate utilization patterns. Substrate utilization patterns proved to be more reliable indicators of the presence of a particular physiological group than was protein production. The sand-trap method obtained a greater diversity of bacteria than did water filtration, presumably by enriching the proportion of normally sessile bacteria relative to planktonic bacteria. Substrate utilization patterns were different for microflora from the two aquifers and corresponded to their different geochemistries. Activities in the filtered water enrichments more closely matched those predicted by aquifer geochemistry than did the sand-trap enrichments. The greatest activities were found in Fe(III)-reducing enrichments from both wells, SO4

  6. Porphyromonas gingivalis as a Model Organism for Assessing Interaction of Anaerobic Bacteria with Host Cells.

    PubMed

    Wunsch, Christopher M; Lewis, Janina P

    2015-12-17

    Anaerobic bacteria far outnumber aerobes in many human niches such as the gut, mouth, and vagina. Furthermore, anaerobic infections are common and frequently of indigenous origin. The ability of some anaerobic pathogens to invade human cells gives them adaptive measures to escape innate immunity as well as to modulate host cell behavior. However, ensuring that the anaerobic bacteria are live during experimental investigation of the events may pose challenges. Porphyromonas gingivalis, a Gram-negative anaerobe, is capable of invading a variety of eukaryotic non-phagocytic cells. This article outlines how to successfully culture and assess the ability of P. gingivalis to invade human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Two protocols were developed: one to measure bacteria that can successfully invade and survive within the host, and the other to visualize bacteria interacting with host cells. These techniques necessitate the use of an anaerobic chamber to supply P. gingivalis with an anaerobic environment for optimal growth. The first protocol is based on the antibiotic protection assay, which is largely used to study the invasion of host cells by bacteria. However, the antibiotic protection assay is limited; only intracellular bacteria that are culturable following antibiotic treatment and host cell lysis are measured. To assess all bacteria interacting with host cells, both live and dead, we developed a protocol that uses fluorescent microscopy to examine host-pathogen interaction. Bacteria are fluorescently labeled with 2',7'-Bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein acetoxymethyl ester (BCECF-AM) and used to infect eukaryotic cells under anaerobic conditions. Following fixing with paraformaldehyde and permeabilization with 0.2% Triton X-100, host cells are labeled with TRITC phalloidin and DAPI to label the cell cytoskeleton and nucleus, respectively. Multiple images taken at different focal points (Z-stack) are obtained for temporal

  7. Anaerobic degradation of benzene by marine sulfate-reducing bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musat, Florin; Wilkes, Heinz; Musat, Niculina; Kuypers, Marcel; Widdel, Friedrich

    2010-05-01

    Benzene, the archetypal aromatic hydrocarbon is a common constituent of crude oil and oil-refined products. As such, it can enter the biosphere through natural oil seeps or as a consequence of exploitation of fossil fuel reservoirs. Benzene is chemically very stable, due to the stabilizing aromatic electron system and to the lack of functional groups. Although the anaerobic degradation of benzene has been reported under denitrifying, sulfate-reducing and methanogenic conditions, the microorganisms involved and the initial biochemical steps of degradation remain insufficiently understood. Using marine sediment from a Mediterranean lagoon a sulfate-reducing enrichment culture with benzene as the sole organic substrate was obtained. Application of 16S rRNA gene-based methods showed that the enrichment was dominated (more than 85% of total cells) by a distinct phylotype affiliated with a clade of Deltaproteobacteria that include degraders of other aromatic hydrocarbons, such as naphthalene, ethylbenzene and m-xylene. Using benzoate as a soluble substrate in agar dilution series, several pure cultures closely related to Desulfotignum spp. and Desulfosarcina spp. were isolated. None of these strains was able to utilize benzene as a substrate and hybridizations with specific oligonucleotide probes showed that they accounted for as much as 6% of the total cells. Incubations with 13C-labeled benzene followed by Halogen in situ Hybridization - Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (HISH-SIMS) analysis showed that cells of the dominant phylotype were highly enriched in 13C, while the accompanying bacteria had little or no 13C incorporation. These results demonstrate that the dominant phylotype was indeed the apparent benzene degrader. Dense-cell suspensions of the enrichment culture did not show metabolic activity toward added phenol or toluene, suggesting that benzene degradation did not proceed through anaerobic hydroxylation or methylation. Instead, benzoate was identified in

  8. Novel [NiFe]- and [FeFe]-hydrogenase gene transcripts indicative of active facultative aerobes and obligate anaerobes in earthworm gut contents.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Oliver; Wüst, Pia K; Hellmuth, Susanne; Borst, Katharina; Horn, Marcus A; Drake, Harold L

    2011-09-01

    The concomitant occurrence of molecular hydrogen (H(2)) and organic acids along the alimentary canal of the earthworm is indicative of ongoing fermentation during gut passage. Fermentative H(2) production is catalyzed by [FeFe]-hydrogenases and group 4 [NiFe]-hydrogenases in obligate anaerobes (e.g., Clostridiales) and facultative aerobes (e.g., Enterobacteriaceae), respectively, functional groups that might respond differently to contrasting redox conditions. Thus, the objectives of this study were to assess the redox potentials of the alimentary canal of Lumbricus terrestris and analyze the hydrogenase transcript diversities of H(2) producers in glucose-supplemented gut content microcosms. Although redox potentials in the core of the alimentary canal were variable on an individual worm basis, average redox potentials were similar. The lowest redox potentials occurred in the foregut and midgut regions, averaging 40 and 110 mV, respectively. Correlation plots between hydrogenase amino acid sequences and 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that closely related hydrogenases belonged to closely related taxa, whereas distantly related hydrogenases did not necessarily belong to distantly related taxa. Of 178 [FeFe]-hydrogenase gene transcripts, 177 clustered in 12 Clostridiales-affiliated operational taxonomic units, the majority of which were indicative of heretofore unknown hydrogenases. Of 86 group 4 [NiFe]-hydrogenase gene transcripts, 79% and 21% were affiliated with organisms in the Enterobacteriaceae and Aeromonadaceae, respectively. The collective results (i) suggest that fermenters must cope with variable and moderately oxidative redox conditions along the alimentary canal, (ii) demonstrate that heretofore undetected hydrogenases are present in the earthworm gut, and (iii) corroborate previous findings implicating Clostridiaceae and Enterobacteriaceae as active fermentative taxa in earthworm gut content. PMID:21784904

  9. Novel [NiFe]- and [FeFe]-Hydrogenase Gene Transcripts Indicative of Active Facultative Aerobes and Obligate Anaerobes in Earthworm Gut Contents▿†

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Oliver; Wüst, Pia K.; Hellmuth, Susanne; Borst, Katharina; Horn, Marcus A.; Drake, Harold L.

    2011-01-01

    The concomitant occurrence of molecular hydrogen (H2) and organic acids along the alimentary canal of the earthworm is indicative of ongoing fermentation during gut passage. Fermentative H2 production is catalyzed by [FeFe]-hydrogenases and group 4 [NiFe]-hydrogenases in obligate anaerobes (e.g., Clostridiales) and facultative aerobes (e.g., Enterobacteriaceae), respectively, functional groups that might respond differently to contrasting redox conditions. Thus, the objectives of this study were to assess the redox potentials of the alimentary canal of Lumbricus terrestris and analyze the hydrogenase transcript diversities of H2 producers in glucose-supplemented gut content microcosms. Although redox potentials in the core of the alimentary canal were variable on an individual worm basis, average redox potentials were similar. The lowest redox potentials occurred in the foregut and midgut regions, averaging 40 and 110 mV, respectively. Correlation plots between hydrogenase amino acid sequences and 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that closely related hydrogenases belonged to closely related taxa, whereas distantly related hydrogenases did not necessarily belong to distantly related taxa. Of 178 [FeFe]-hydrogenase gene transcripts, 177 clustered in 12 Clostridiales-affiliated operational taxonomic units, the majority of which were indicative of heretofore unknown hydrogenases. Of 86 group 4 [NiFe]-hydrogenase gene transcripts, 79% and 21% were affiliated with organisms in the Enterobacteriaceae and Aeromonadaceae, respectively. The collective results (i) suggest that fermenters must cope with variable and moderately oxidative redox conditions along the alimentary canal, (ii) demonstrate that heretofore undetected hydrogenases are present in the earthworm gut, and (iii) corroborate previous findings implicating Clostridiaceae and Enterobacteriaceae as active fermentative taxa in earthworm gut content. PMID:21784904

  10. Anaerobic bacteria in the gut of terrestrial isopod Crustacean Porcellio scaber.

    PubMed

    Kostanjsek, R; Lapanje, A; Rupnik, M; Strus, J; Drobne, D; Avgustin, G

    2004-01-01

    Anaerobic bacteria from Porcellio scaber hindgut were identified and, subsequently, isolated using molecular approach. Phylogenetic affiliation of bacteria associated with the hindgut wall was determined by analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences which were retrieved directly from washed hindguts of P. scaber. Sequences from bacteria related to obligate anaerobic bacteria from genera Bacteroides and Enterococcus were retrieved, as well as sequences from 'A1 subcluster' of the wall-less mollicutes. Bacteria from the genus Desulfotomaculum were isolated from gut wall and cultivated under anaerobic conditions. In contrast to previous reports which suggested the absence of anaerobic bacteria in the isopod digestive system due to short retention time of the food in the tube-like hindgut, frequent renewal of the gut cuticle during the moulting process, and unsuccessful attempts to isolate anaerobic bacteria from this environment our results indicate the presence of resident anaerobic bacteria in the gut of P. scaber, in spite of apparently unsuitable, i.e. predominantly oxic, conditions.

  11. Facilitated cell export and desorption of methylmercury by anaerobic bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, B.; Lu, X.; Liu, Y.; Lin, H.

    2015-12-01

    Neurotoxic methylmercury (MeHg), formed by certain anaerobic bacteria, is shown to be rapidly excreted from the cell, but the mechanism of this process is unclear. Using both G. sulfurreducens PCA and D. desulfuricans ND132 strains, we investigated the factors affecting export and distribution of MeHg in mercury [Hg(II)] methylation as well as MeHg sorption and desorption assays. Thiols, such as cysteine, were found to greatly facilitate desorption and export of MeHg, particularly by G. sulfurreducens PCA cells. In short-term cysteine-free assays, we found that >90% of the synthesized MeHg was associated with PCA, among which ~73% was sorbed on the cell surface and 19% remained inside the cells, leaving only a small fraction in the phosphate buffered solution. However, MeHg export by PCA increased with increasing cysteine concentrations (0.05-50 mM), and nearly 100% of the MeHg was in solution in the presence of 50 mM cysteine. In comparison, ND132 cells were much more efficient than PCA in producing and exporting MeHg. In the absence of cysteine, a majority of the MeHg (~70%) was exported in 4 h, leaving about 20% of the MeHg sorbed on the surface and 10% inside the cells. When MeHg was directly added to the cell suspensions, ND132 adsorbed much lower MeHg than PCA cells; however, ND132 cells took up more MeHg (20%) inside cells than PCA did (8%). Taken together, our results demonstrate that MeHg export efficiency is bacteria strain-specific and is influenced by the ligand concentration and complexation, which could be important in facilitating MeHg synthesis and bioavailability in anoxic water and sediments.

  12. Early pathogenesis of infection in the liver with the facultative intracellular bacteria Listeria monocytogenes, Francisella tularensis, and Salmonella typhimurium involves lysis of infected hepatocytes by leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Conlan, J W; North, R J

    1992-12-01

    The results show that Listeria monocytogenes, Francisella tularensis, and Salmonella typhimurium are facultative intracellular bacteria with a capacity to invade and grow in nonphagocytic cells in vivo. In the liver, all of these pathogens were seen to invade and to multiply extensively in hepatocytes. In all three cases, inflammatory phagocytes were rapidly marshalled to foci of infection where they appeared to cause the destruction of infected hepatocytes, thereby releasing bacteria into the extracellular space, in which presumably they could be ingested and destroyed by the phagocytes. If phagocytic cells were prevented from accumulating at foci of liver infection by treatment of the mice with a monoclonal antibody (NIMP-R10) directed against the type 3 complement receptor of myelomonocytic cells, then lysis of hepatocytes failed to occur and bacteria proliferated unrestrictedly within them. Under these circumstances, otherwise sublethal infections became rapidly lethal. These findings strongly suggest that lysis of infected hepatocytes by phagocytic cells is an important general early-defense strategy against liver infection with at least three different intracellular bacteria.

  13. Plant pathogenic anaerobic bacteria use aromatic polyketides to access aerobic territory.

    PubMed

    Shabuer, Gulimila; Ishida, Keishi; Pidot, Sacha J; Roth, Martin; Dahse, Hans-Martin; Hertweck, Christian

    2015-11-01

    Around 25% of vegetable food is lost worldwide because of infectious plant diseases, including microbe-induced decay of harvested crops. In wet seasons and under humid storage conditions, potato tubers are readily infected and decomposed by anaerobic bacteria (Clostridium puniceum). We found that these anaerobic plant pathogens harbor a gene locus (type II polyketide synthase) to produce unusual polyketide metabolites (clostrubins) with dual functions. The clostrubins, which act as antibiotics against other microbial plant pathogens, enable the anaerobic bacteria to survive an oxygen-rich plant environment. PMID:26542569

  14. Anaerobic biodegradation of explosives and related compounds by sulfate-reducing and methanogenic bacteria : a review.

    SciTech Connect

    Boopathy, R.; Kulpa, C. F.; Manning, J.; Environmental Research; Univ. of Notre Dame

    1998-01-01

    In recent years, research on microbial degradation of explosives and nitroaromatic compounds has increased. Most studies of the microbial metabolism of nitroaromatic compounds have used aerobic microorganisms. Ecological observations suggest that sulfate-reducing and methanogenic bacteria might metabolize nitroaromatic compounds under anaerobic conditions if appropriate electron donors and electron acceptors are present in the environment, but this ability had not been demonstrated until recently. Few review papers exist, and those deal mainly with aerobic bacterial degradation of explosives; none deals with anaerobic bacteria. In this paper, we review the anaerobic metabolic processes in the degradation of explosives and nitroaromatic compounds under sulfate-reducing and methanogenic conditions.

  15. Metabolism of Hydrocarbons in n-Alkane-Utilizing Anaerobic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wilkes, Heinz; Buckel, Wolfgang; Golding, Bernard T; Rabus, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    The glycyl radical enzyme-catalyzed addition of n-alkanes to fumarate creates a C-C-bond between two concomitantly formed stereogenic carbon centers. The configurations of the two diastereoisomers of the product resulting from n-hexane activation by the n-alkane-utilizing denitrifying bacterium strain HxN1, i.e. (1-methylpentyl)succinate, were assigned as (2S,1'R) and (2R,1'R). Experiments with stereospecifically deuterated n-(2,5-2H2)hexanes revealed that exclusively the pro-S hydrogen atom is abstracted from C2 of the n-alkane by the enzyme and later transferred back to C3 of the alkylsuccinate formed. These results indicate that the alkylsuccinate-forming reaction proceeds with an inversion of configuration at the carbon atom (C2) of the n-alkane forming the new C-C-bond, and thus stereochemically resembles a SN2-type reaction. Therefore, the reaction may occur in a concerted manner, which may avoid the highly energetic hex-2-yl radical as an intermediate. The reaction is associated with a significant primary kinetic isotope effect (kH/kD ≥3) for hydrogen, indicating that the homolytic C-H-bond cleavage is involved in the first irreversible step of the reaction mechanism. The (1-methylalkyl)succinate synthases of n-alkane-utilizing anaerobic bacteria apparently have very broad substrate ranges enabling them to activate not only aliphatic but also alkyl-aromatic hydrocarbons. Thus, two denitrifiers and one sulfate reducer were shown to convert the nongrowth substrate toluene to benzylsuccinate and further to the dead-end product benzoyl-CoA. For this purpose, however, the modified β-oxidation pathway known from alkylbenzene-utilizing bacteria was not employed, but rather the pathway used for n-alkane degradation involving CoA ligation, carbon skeleton rearrangement and decarboxylation. Furthermore, various n-alkane- and alkylbenzene-utilizing denitrifiers and sulfate reducers were found to be capable of forming benzyl alcohols from diverse alkylbenzenes

  16. Antibacterial susceptibility of plaque bacteria.

    PubMed

    Newman, M G; Hulem, C; Colgate, J; Anselmo, C

    1979-07-01

    Selected anaerobic, capnophilic and facultative bacteria isolated from patients with various forms of periodontal health and disease were tested for their susceptibility to antibiotics and antimicrobial agents. Specific bactericidal and minimum inhibitory concentrations were compared to disc zone diameters, thereby generating new standards for the potential selection of antimicrobial agents. PMID:286720

  17. Antibacterial susceptibility of plaque bacteria.

    PubMed

    Newman, M G; Hulem, C; Colgate, J; Anselmo, C

    1979-07-01

    Selected anaerobic, capnophilic and facultative bacteria isolated from patients with various forms of periodontal health and disease were tested for their susceptibility to antibiotics and antimicrobial agents. Specific bactericidal and minimum inhibitory concentrations were compared to disc zone diameters, thereby generating new standards for the potential selection of antimicrobial agents.

  18. Effect of different nitroheterocyclic compounds on aerobic, microaerophilic, and anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Hof, H; Ströder, J; Buisson, J P; Royer, R

    1986-01-01

    The antibacterial activities of different nitroheterocyclic compounds were assessed by an agar dilution method against aerobic, microaerophilic, and anaerobic bacteria. Nitronaphthofurans inhibited the multiplication of aerobic bacteria at low concentrations (MIC for 50% of strains tested [MIC50], 1 mg/liter). Under anaerobic growth conditions the MICs were found to be even lower. The rough, DNA repair-deficient mutants of Salmonella typhimurium were more susceptible, whereas nitroreductase-deficient strains were resistant. Microaerophilic campylobacter isolates could be divided into two groups, one of which was as susceptible as aerobic bacteria (MIC50, 1 mg/liter) and the other of which was more highly susceptible (MIC50, 0.015 mg/liter). All anaerobic bacteria tested were susceptible to nitronaphthofurans (MIC50, 0.125 mg/liter). Nitrothiazole exerted antibacterial activities similar to those of the nitronaphthofurans. Metronidazole, a nitroimidazole derivative, and nitrofurans were definitely less active. Nitrobenzofurans showed relatively high MICs. PMID:3800344

  19. EVALUATION OF THE TEA TREE OIL ACTIVITY TO ANAEROBIC BACTERIA--IN VITRO STUDY.

    PubMed

    Ziółkowska-Klinkosz, Marta; Kedzia, Anna; Meissner, Hhenry O; Kedzia, Andrzej W

    2016-01-01

    The study of the sensitivity to tea tree oil (Australian Company TTD International Pty. Ltd. Sydney) was carried out on 193 strains of anaerobic bacteria isolated from patients with various infections within the oral cavity and respiratory tracts. The susceptibility (MIC) of anaerobes was determined by means of plate dilution technique in Brucella agar supplemented with 5% defibrinated sheep blood, menadione and hemin. Inoculum contained 10(5) CFU per spot was cultured with Steers replicator upon the surface of agar with various tea tree oil concentrations or without oil (anaerobes growth control). Incubation the plates was performed in anaerobic jars under anaerobic conditions at 37 degrees C for 48 h. MIC was defined as the lowest concentrations of the essential oil completely inhibiting growth of anaerobic bacteria. Test results indicate, that among Gram-negative bacteria the most sensitive to essential oil were strains of Veillonella and Porphyromonas species. Essential oil in low concentrations (MIC in the range of = 0.12 - 0.5 mg/mL) inhibited growth of accordingly 80% and 68% strains. The least sensitive were strains of the genus Tannerella, Parabacteroides and Dialister (MIC 1.0 - 2.0 mg/mL). In the case of Gram-positive anaerobic bacteria the tea tree oil was the most active to strains of cocci of the genus Anaerococcus and Ruminococcus (MIC in range = 0.12 - 0.5 mg/mL) or strains of rods of the genus Eubacterium and Eggerthella (MIC = 0.25 mg/mL). Among Gram-positive rods the least sensitive were the strains of the genus Bifidobacterium ( MIC = 2.0 mg/mL). The tea tree oil was more active to Gram-positive than to Gram-negative anaerobic bacteria.

  20. EVALUATION OF THE TEA TREE OIL ACTIVITY TO ANAEROBIC BACTERIA--IN VITRO STUDY.

    PubMed

    Ziółkowska-Klinkosz, Marta; Kedzia, Anna; Meissner, Hhenry O; Kedzia, Andrzej W

    2016-01-01

    The study of the sensitivity to tea tree oil (Australian Company TTD International Pty. Ltd. Sydney) was carried out on 193 strains of anaerobic bacteria isolated from patients with various infections within the oral cavity and respiratory tracts. The susceptibility (MIC) of anaerobes was determined by means of plate dilution technique in Brucella agar supplemented with 5% defibrinated sheep blood, menadione and hemin. Inoculum contained 10(5) CFU per spot was cultured with Steers replicator upon the surface of agar with various tea tree oil concentrations or without oil (anaerobes growth control). Incubation the plates was performed in anaerobic jars under anaerobic conditions at 37 degrees C for 48 h. MIC was defined as the lowest concentrations of the essential oil completely inhibiting growth of anaerobic bacteria. Test results indicate, that among Gram-negative bacteria the most sensitive to essential oil were strains of Veillonella and Porphyromonas species. Essential oil in low concentrations (MIC in the range of = 0.12 - 0.5 mg/mL) inhibited growth of accordingly 80% and 68% strains. The least sensitive were strains of the genus Tannerella, Parabacteroides and Dialister (MIC 1.0 - 2.0 mg/mL). In the case of Gram-positive anaerobic bacteria the tea tree oil was the most active to strains of cocci of the genus Anaerococcus and Ruminococcus (MIC in range = 0.12 - 0.5 mg/mL) or strains of rods of the genus Eubacterium and Eggerthella (MIC = 0.25 mg/mL). Among Gram-positive rods the least sensitive were the strains of the genus Bifidobacterium ( MIC = 2.0 mg/mL). The tea tree oil was more active to Gram-positive than to Gram-negative anaerobic bacteria. PMID:27180431

  1. Removal of micropollutants, facultative pathogenic and antibiotic resistant bacteria in a full-scale retention soil filter receiving combined sewer overflow.

    PubMed

    Scheurer, Marco; Heß, Stefanie; Lüddeke, Frauke; Sacher, Frank; Güde, Hans; Löffler, Herbert; Gallert, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Combined sewer systems collect surface runoff as well as wastewater of industrial and domestic origin. During periods of heavy rainfall the capacity of the sewer system is exceeded and the overflow is discharged into receiving waters without any treatment. Consequently, combined sewer overflow (CSO) is considered as a major source of water pollution. This study investigates the effectiveness of a retention soil filter (RSF) for the removal of micropollutants as well as facultative pathogenic and antibiotic resistant bacteria from CSO. The removal of organic group parameters like total organic carbon was excellent and the removal efficiency for micropollutants of the RSF and the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP), which treats wastewater of the same origin during dry and normal weather conditions, was comparable. Compounds of high environmental concern like estrogens or certain pharmaceuticals, e.g. diclofenac, were completely eliminated or removed to a high degree during RSF passage. RSF treatment also reduced the number of E. coli, enterococci and staphylococci by 2.7, 2.2 and 2.4 log-units (median values), respectively. Obviously, some Staphylococcus species can better adapt to the conditions of the RSF than others as a shift of the abundance of the different species was observed when comparing the diversity of staphylococci obtained from the RSF influent and effluent. RSF treatment also decreased the absolute number of antibiotic resistant bacteria. The percentage of antibiotic resistant E. coli and staphylococci isolates also decreased during passage of the RSF, whereas the percentage of resistant enterococci did not change. For E. coli ampicillin and for enterococci and staphylococci erythromycin determined the antibiotic resistance level. The results demonstrate that RSFs can be considered as an adequate treatment option for CSO. The performance for the removal of micropollutants is comparable with a medium sized WWTP with conventional activated sludge

  2. Removal of micropollutants, facultative pathogenic and antibiotic resistant bacteria in a full-scale retention soil filter receiving combined sewer overflow.

    PubMed

    Scheurer, Marco; Heß, Stefanie; Lüddeke, Frauke; Sacher, Frank; Güde, Hans; Löffler, Herbert; Gallert, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Combined sewer systems collect surface runoff as well as wastewater of industrial and domestic origin. During periods of heavy rainfall the capacity of the sewer system is exceeded and the overflow is discharged into receiving waters without any treatment. Consequently, combined sewer overflow (CSO) is considered as a major source of water pollution. This study investigates the effectiveness of a retention soil filter (RSF) for the removal of micropollutants as well as facultative pathogenic and antibiotic resistant bacteria from CSO. The removal of organic group parameters like total organic carbon was excellent and the removal efficiency for micropollutants of the RSF and the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP), which treats wastewater of the same origin during dry and normal weather conditions, was comparable. Compounds of high environmental concern like estrogens or certain pharmaceuticals, e.g. diclofenac, were completely eliminated or removed to a high degree during RSF passage. RSF treatment also reduced the number of E. coli, enterococci and staphylococci by 2.7, 2.2 and 2.4 log-units (median values), respectively. Obviously, some Staphylococcus species can better adapt to the conditions of the RSF than others as a shift of the abundance of the different species was observed when comparing the diversity of staphylococci obtained from the RSF influent and effluent. RSF treatment also decreased the absolute number of antibiotic resistant bacteria. The percentage of antibiotic resistant E. coli and staphylococci isolates also decreased during passage of the RSF, whereas the percentage of resistant enterococci did not change. For E. coli ampicillin and for enterococci and staphylococci erythromycin determined the antibiotic resistance level. The results demonstrate that RSFs can be considered as an adequate treatment option for CSO. The performance for the removal of micropollutants is comparable with a medium sized WWTP with conventional activated sludge

  3. Present-day biogeochemical activities of anaerobic bacteria and their relevance to future exobiological investigations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, R.S.

    1989-01-01

    If the primordial atmosphere was reducing, then the first microbial ecosystem was probably composed of anaerobic bacteria. However, despite the presence of an oxygen-rich atmosphere, anaerobic habitats are important, commonplace components of the Earth's present biosphere. The geochemical activities displayed by these anaerobes impact the global cycling of certain elements (e.g., C, N, S, Fe, Mn, etc.). Methane provides an obvious example of how human-enhanced activities on a global scale can influence the content of a "radiative" (i.e., infrared absorbing) trace gas in the atmosphere. Methane can be oxidized by anaerobic bacteria, but this does not appear to support their growth. Acetylene, however, does support such growth. This may form the basis for future exobiological investigations of the atmospheres of anoxic, hydrocarbon-rich planets like Jupiter and Saturn, as well as the latter's satellite Titan. ?? 1989.

  4. [Cerebellar abscess due to infection with the anaerobic bacteria fusobacterium nucleatum: a case report].

    PubMed

    Shimogawa, Takafumi; Sayama, Tetsuro; Haga, Sei; Akiyama, Tomoaki; Morioka, Takato

    2015-02-01

    We report a rare case of cerebellar abscess produced by anaerobic bacteria. A 76-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with a history of fever, vomiting, and dizziness lasting 14 days. Computed tomography(CT)scan and magnetic resonance images showed the presence of a multiloculated cerebellar abscess with a right subdural abscess. The patient underwent aspiration of the abscess through a suboccipital craniotomy. Fusobacterium nucleatum, which is an anaerobic bacteria naturally present in the human oral cavity, was detected in cultures of the aspirated abscess. The patient was administered antibiotic treatment combined with hyperbaric oxygen therapy(HBO). The symptoms were briefly relieved but the cerebellar abscess recurred, which required a second aspiration. The combined treatment with antibiotics and HBO was maintained after the second operation. After 6 weeks of treatment, the cerebellar abscess was completely controlled. We conclude that antibiotic treatment combined with HBO is useful for treatment of cerebellar abscesses caused by infection with anaerobic bacteria.

  5. Physiologically anaerobic microorganisms of the deep subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, S.E. Jr.; Chung, K.T.

    1992-06-01

    A variety of different media were used to isolate facultatively (FAB) and obligately anaerobic bacteria (OAB). These bacteria were isolated from core subsamples obtained from boreholes at the Idaho National Engineering Lab. (INEL) or at the Hanford Lab. (Yakima). Core material was sampled at various depths to 600 feet below the surface. All core samples with culturable bacteria contained at least FAB making thisthe most common physiological type of anaerobic bacteria present in the deep subsurface at these two sites. INEL core samples are characterized by isolates of both FAB and OAB. No isolates of acetogenic, methanogenic, or sulfate reducing bacteria were obtained. Yakima core samples are characterized by a marked predominance of FAB in comparison to OAB. In addition, isolates of acetogenic, methanogenic, and sulfate reducing bacteria were obtained. The Yakima site has the potential for complete anaerobic mineralization of organic compounds whereas this potential appears to be lacking at INEL.

  6. Differential recognition of obligate anaerobic bacteria by human mannose-binding lectin

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, R; Read, R C; Turner, M W; Klein, N J; Jack, D L

    2001-01-01

    Deficiency of the innate, humoral immune component mannose-binding lectin (MBL) predisposes individuals to a variety of infections, but the importance of MBL in infection by anaerobes has not been addressed. The attachment of MBL to a wide range of anaerobic bacteria associated with human disease and colonization was surveyed. The results suggest that for the species we examined, resistance to MBL binding may be associated with organisms that are more commonly pathogenic and that MBL binding to some bacteria may be phase variable. PMID:11422198

  7. Clinical evaluation of the RapID-ANA II panel for identification of anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Celig, D M; Schreckenberger, P C

    1991-03-01

    The accuracy of the RapID-ANA II system (Innovative Diagnostic Systems, Inc., Atlanta, Ga.) was evaluated by comparing the results obtained with that system with results obtained by the methods described by the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. Three hundred anaerobic bacteria were tested, including 259 clinical isolates and 41 stock strains of anaerobic microorganisms representing 16 genera and 48 species. When identifications to the genus level only were included, 96% of the anaerobic gram-negative bacilli, 94% of the Clostridium species, 83% of the anaerobic, nonsporeforming, gram-positive bacilli, and 97% of the anaerobic cocci were correctly identified. When correct identifications to the genus and species levels were compared, 86% of 152 anaerobic gram-negative bacilli, 76% of 34 Clostridium species, 81% of 41 anaerobic, nonsporeforming, gram-positive bacilli, and 97% of 73 anaerobic cocci were correctly identified. Eight isolates (3%) produced inadequate identification in which the correct identification was listed with one or two other possible choices and extra tests were required for separation. A total of 9 isolates (3%) were misidentified by the RapID-ANA II panel. Overall, the system was able to correctly identify 94% of all the isolates to the genus level and 87% of the isolates to the species level in 4 h by using aerobic incubation.

  8. Identification and antimicrobial susceptibility of obligate anaerobic bacteria from clinical samples of animal origin.

    PubMed

    Mayorga, Melissa; Rodríguez-Cavallini, Evelyn; López-Ureña, Diana; Barquero-Calvo, Elías; Quesada-Gómez, Carlos

    2015-12-01

    The etiology of veterinary infectious diseases has been the focus of considerable research, yet relatively little is known about the causative agents of anaerobic infections. Susceptibility studies have documented the emergence of antimicrobial resistance and indicate distinct differences in resistance patterns related to veterinary hospitals, geographic regions, and antibiotic-prescribing regimens. The aim of the present study was to identify the obligate anaerobic bacteria from veterinary clinical samples and to determinate the in vitro susceptibility to eight antimicrobials and their resistance-associated genes. 81 clinical specimens obtained from food-producing animals, pets and wild animals were examined to determine the relative prevalence of obligate anaerobic bacteria, and the species represented. Bacteroides spp, Prevotella spp and Clostridium spp represented approximately 80% of all anaerobic isolates. Resistance to metronidazole, clindamycin, tetracycline and fluoroquinolones was found in strains isolated from food-producing animals. Ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin and cephalotin showed the highest resistance in all isolates. In 17%, 4% and 14% of tetracycline-resistant isolates, the resistance genes tetL, tetM and tetW were respectively amplified by PCR whereas in 4% of clindamycin-resistant strains the ermG gene was detected. 26% of the isolates were positive for cepA, while only 6% harbored the cfxA (resistance-conferring genes to beta-lactams). In this study, the obligate anaerobic bacteria from Costa Rica showed a high degree of resistance to most antimicrobials tested. Nevertheless, in the majority of cases this resistance was not related to the resistance acquired genes usually described in anaerobes. It is important to address and regulate the use of antimicrobials in the agricultural industry and the empirical therapy in anaerobic bacterial infections in veterinary medicine, especially since antibiotics and resistant bacteria can persist in the

  9. Modification of the Minitek Miniaturized Differentiation System for characterization of anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Stargel, D; Thompson, F S; Phillips, S E; Lombard, G L; Dowell, V R

    1976-03-01

    The Minitek Miniaturized System (BBL) was modified for characterization of anaerobic bacteria. The modified system and the conventional Center for Disease Control method were used to test a variety of anaerobic bacteria, and results were compared. Tests performed by both techniques were indole and H2S production, esculin hydrolysis, nitrate reduction, and fermentation of glucose, mannitol, lactose, sucrose, maltose, salicin, glycerol, xylose, arabinose, mannose, rhamnose, and trehalose. The manufacturer's recommended procedure for the Minitek system was modified by using a new suspension medium (Lombard-Dowell broth) and an inoculum equivalent to the density of a McFarland no. 5 nephelometer standard. The Minitek results, recorded after 48 h, agreed satisfactorily with the conventional test results, usually recorded after 5 to 7 days of incubation. In the examination of 80 strains representing 22 different species or subspecies of anaerobic bacteria, with 16 biochemical tests performed in triplicate, 93.8% of the Minitek test results agreed with those of the corresponding conventional tests. Only tests for indole, H2S, and nitrate reduction gave less than 90% agreement. It was concluded that the modified Minitek system is a suitable substitute for the more expensive and time-consuming conventional procedure for determining carbohydrate fermentation and esculin hydrolysis by anaerobes. This system, when used in conjunction with other tests, can effectively aid in the definitive identification of commonly isolated anaerobes.

  10. Anaerobic carboxydotrophic bacteria in geothermal springs identified using stable isotope probing.

    PubMed

    Brady, Allyson L; Sharp, Christine E; Grasby, Stephen E; Dunfield, Peter F

    2015-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is a potential energy and carbon source for thermophilic bacteria in geothermal environments. Geothermal sites ranging in temperature from 45 to 65°C were investigated for the presence and activity of anaerobic CO-oxidizing bacteria. Anaerobic CO oxidation potentials were measured at up to 48.9 μmoles CO g(-1) (wet weight) day(-1) within five selected sites. Active anaerobic carboxydotrophic bacteria were identified using (13)CO DNA stable isotope probing (SIP) combined with pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes amplified from labeled DNA. Bacterial communities identified in heavy DNA fractions were predominated by Firmicutes, which comprised up to 95% of all sequences in (13)CO incubations. The predominant bacteria that assimilated (13)C derived from CO were closely related (>98% 16S rRNA gene sequence identity) to genera of known carboxydotrophs including Thermincola, Desulfotomaculum, Thermolithobacter, and Carboxydocella, although a few species with lower similarity to known bacteria were also found that may represent previously unconfirmed CO-oxidizers. While the distribution was variable, many of the same OTUs were identified across sample sites from different temperature regimes. These results show that bacteria capable of using CO as a carbon source are common in geothermal springs, and that thermophilic carboxydotrophs are probably already quite well known from cultivation studies.

  11. Anaerobic carboxydotrophic bacteria in geothermal springs identified using stable isotope probing

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Allyson L.; Sharp, Christine E.; Grasby, Stephen E.; Dunfield, Peter F.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is a potential energy and carbon source for thermophilic bacteria in geothermal environments. Geothermal sites ranging in temperature from 45 to 65°C were investigated for the presence and activity of anaerobic CO-oxidizing bacteria. Anaerobic CO oxidation potentials were measured at up to 48.9 μmoles CO g−1 (wet weight) day−1 within five selected sites. Active anaerobic carboxydotrophic bacteria were identified using 13CO DNA stable isotope probing (SIP) combined with pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes amplified from labeled DNA. Bacterial communities identified in heavy DNA fractions were predominated by Firmicutes, which comprised up to 95% of all sequences in 13CO incubations. The predominant bacteria that assimilated 13C derived from CO were closely related (>98% 16S rRNA gene sequence identity) to genera of known carboxydotrophs including Thermincola, Desulfotomaculum, Thermolithobacter, and Carboxydocella, although a few species with lower similarity to known bacteria were also found that may represent previously unconfirmed CO-oxidizers. While the distribution was variable, many of the same OTUs were identified across sample sites from different temperature regimes. These results show that bacteria capable of using CO as a carbon source are common in geothermal springs, and that thermophilic carboxydotrophs are probably already quite well known from cultivation studies. PMID:26388850

  12. Anaerobic carboxydotrophic bacteria in geothermal springs identified using stable isotope probing.

    PubMed

    Brady, Allyson L; Sharp, Christine E; Grasby, Stephen E; Dunfield, Peter F

    2015-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is a potential energy and carbon source for thermophilic bacteria in geothermal environments. Geothermal sites ranging in temperature from 45 to 65°C were investigated for the presence and activity of anaerobic CO-oxidizing bacteria. Anaerobic CO oxidation potentials were measured at up to 48.9 μmoles CO g(-1) (wet weight) day(-1) within five selected sites. Active anaerobic carboxydotrophic bacteria were identified using (13)CO DNA stable isotope probing (SIP) combined with pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes amplified from labeled DNA. Bacterial communities identified in heavy DNA fractions were predominated by Firmicutes, which comprised up to 95% of all sequences in (13)CO incubations. The predominant bacteria that assimilated (13)C derived from CO were closely related (>98% 16S rRNA gene sequence identity) to genera of known carboxydotrophs including Thermincola, Desulfotomaculum, Thermolithobacter, and Carboxydocella, although a few species with lower similarity to known bacteria were also found that may represent previously unconfirmed CO-oxidizers. While the distribution was variable, many of the same OTUs were identified across sample sites from different temperature regimes. These results show that bacteria capable of using CO as a carbon source are common in geothermal springs, and that thermophilic carboxydotrophs are probably already quite well known from cultivation studies. PMID:26388850

  13. (Anaerobic metabolism of aromatic compounds by phototrophic bacteria: Biochemical aspects)

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, J.

    1989-01-01

    Two aspects of the work proposed have received major emphasis during the period since the grant was activated: isolation and characterization of transposon insertion mutants of Rhodopseudomonas palusrtis defective in phototrophic growth on aromatic compounds, and attempts to purify and characterize the Coenzyme A ligase enzyme involved in activating 4-hydroxybenzoate. The HPLC apparatus was installed in August, and calibration of columns both for metabolite and for protein separations has been initiated. A start has also been made on synthesis of Coenzyme A thioesters of compounds that are potential intermediates in the anaerobic degradation pathways. 1 tab.

  14. Enrichment and characterization of anaerobic TNT-degrading bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, D.J.; Pendharkar, S.

    1995-12-31

    Three media constitutions were used to enrich for mixed cultures capable of degrading 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) under strictly anaerobic conditions. The media were derived from a mineral salts solution buffered to pH 7 with CO{sub 2}/bicarbonate and all contained TNT. The cultures were enriched in the TNT mineral salts medium or the TNT mineral salts medium supplemented with glucose, yeast extract, or ammonia in various combinations. Inocula were obtained from a treated soil, previously contaminated with dinoseb and then treated using anaerobic procedures, or from a bench-top aqueous culture, maintained with an extract from a munitions-contaminated soil for more than 4 years. Several cultures reduced TNT, producing 4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene and 2,4-diamino-6-nitrotoluene as the major products. The cultures were unable to effectively remove TNT when cross-transferred to the media they were not enriched on, suggesting that different media had enriched different subcultures form the original inoculum. The treated soil provided the most successful inoculum. Two media were chosen for further studies. Medium 1 contained TNT and glucose and produced a culture that might have used TNT as a nitrogen source. Medium 2, containing TNT and yeast extract, enriched cultures that degraded TNT, accumulating small amounts of p-cresol during the degradation.

  15. Binary Interactions of Antagonistic Bacteria with Candida albicans Under Aerobic and Anaerobic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Benadé, Eliska; Stone, Wendy; Mouton, Marnel; Postma, Ferdinand; Wilsenach, Jac; Botha, Alfred

    2016-04-01

    We used both aerobic and anaerobic liquid co-cultures, prepared with Luria Bertani broth, to study the effect of bacteria on the survival of Candida albicans in the external environment, away from an animal host. The bacteria were represented by Aeromonas hydrophila, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis, Clostridium, Enterobacter, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Kluyvera ascorbata and Serratia marcescens. Under aerobic conditions, the yeast's growth was inhibited in the presence of bacterial growth; however, under anaerobic conditions, yeast and bacterial growth in co-cultures was similar to that observed for pure cultures. Subsequent assays revealed that the majority of bacterial strains aerobically produced extracellular hydrolytic enzymes capable of yeast cell wall hydrolysis, including chitinases and mannan-degrading enzymes. In contrast, except for the A. hydrophila strain, these enzymes were not detected in anaerobic bacterial cultures, nor was the antimicrobial compound prodigiosin found in anaerobic cultures of S. marcescens. When we suspended C. albicans cells in crude extracellular enzyme preparations from K. pneumoniae and S. marcescens, we detected no negative effect on yeast viability. However, we found that these preparations enhance the toxicity of prodigiosin towards the yeast, especially in combination with mannan-degrading enzymes. Analyses of the chitin and mannan content of yeast cell walls revealed that less chitin was produced under anaerobic than aerobic conditions; however, the levels of mannan, known for its low permeability, remained the same. The latter phenomenon, as well as reduced production of the bacterial enzymes and prodigiosin, may contribute to anaerobic growth and survival of C. albicans in the presence of bacteria.

  16. Binary Interactions of Antagonistic Bacteria with Candida albicans Under Aerobic and Anaerobic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Benadé, Eliska; Stone, Wendy; Mouton, Marnel; Postma, Ferdinand; Wilsenach, Jac; Botha, Alfred

    2016-04-01

    We used both aerobic and anaerobic liquid co-cultures, prepared with Luria Bertani broth, to study the effect of bacteria on the survival of Candida albicans in the external environment, away from an animal host. The bacteria were represented by Aeromonas hydrophila, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis, Clostridium, Enterobacter, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Kluyvera ascorbata and Serratia marcescens. Under aerobic conditions, the yeast's growth was inhibited in the presence of bacterial growth; however, under anaerobic conditions, yeast and bacterial growth in co-cultures was similar to that observed for pure cultures. Subsequent assays revealed that the majority of bacterial strains aerobically produced extracellular hydrolytic enzymes capable of yeast cell wall hydrolysis, including chitinases and mannan-degrading enzymes. In contrast, except for the A. hydrophila strain, these enzymes were not detected in anaerobic bacterial cultures, nor was the antimicrobial compound prodigiosin found in anaerobic cultures of S. marcescens. When we suspended C. albicans cells in crude extracellular enzyme preparations from K. pneumoniae and S. marcescens, we detected no negative effect on yeast viability. However, we found that these preparations enhance the toxicity of prodigiosin towards the yeast, especially in combination with mannan-degrading enzymes. Analyses of the chitin and mannan content of yeast cell walls revealed that less chitin was produced under anaerobic than aerobic conditions; however, the levels of mannan, known for its low permeability, remained the same. The latter phenomenon, as well as reduced production of the bacterial enzymes and prodigiosin, may contribute to anaerobic growth and survival of C. albicans in the presence of bacteria. PMID:26566932

  17. Multi-centre evaluation of mass spectrometric identification of anaerobic bacteria using the VITEK® MS system.

    PubMed

    Garner, O; Mochon, A; Branda, J; Burnham, C-A; Bythrow, M; Ferraro, M; Ginocchio, C; Jennemann, R; Manji, R; Procop, G W; Richter, S; Rychert, J; Sercia, L; Westblade, L; Lewinski, M

    2014-04-01

    Accurate and timely identification of anaerobic bacteria is critical to successful treatment. Classic phenotypic methods for identification require long turnaround times and can exhibit poor species level identification. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is an identification method that can provide rapid identification of anaerobes. We present a multi-centre study assessing the clinical performance of the VITEK(®) MS in the identification of anaerobic bacteria. Five different test sites analysed a collection of 651 unique anaerobic isolates comprising 11 different genera. Multiple species were included for several of the genera. Briefly, anaerobic isolates were applied directly to a well of a target plate. Matrix solution (α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid) was added and allowed to dry. Mass spectra results were generated with the VITEK(®) MS, and the comparative spectral analysis and organism identification were determined using the VITEK(®) MS database 2.0. Results were confirmed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Of the 651 isolates analysed, 91.2% (594/651) exhibited the correct species identification. An additional eight isolates were correctly identified to genus level, raising the rate of identification to 92.5%. Genus-level identification consisted of Actinomyces, Bacteroides and Prevotella species. Fusobacterium nucleatum, Actinomyces neuii and Bacteroides uniformis were notable for an increased percentage of no-identification results compared with the other anaerobes tested. VITEK(®) MS identification of clinically relevant anaerobes is highly accurate and represents a dramatic improvement over other phenotypic methods in accuracy and turnaround time.

  18. Glycosaminoglycan-depolymerizing enzymes produced by anaerobic bacteria isolated from the human mouth.

    PubMed

    Tipler, L S; Embery, G

    1985-01-01

    A number of obligately anaerobic bacteria, some implicated in periodontal disease, were screened for their ability to produce enzymes capable of degrading hyaluronic acid and chondroitin-4-sulphate. Two screening methods were used following anaerobic incubation at 37 degrees C for 7 days. One involved incorporating the respective substrates and bovine-serum albumin into agar plates and, after incubation, flooding the plates with 2 M acetic acid. Clear zones were produced around colonies which produced enzymes capable of depolymerizing the substrates. The second was a sensitive spectrophotometric procedure based on the ability of certain bacteria to produce eliminase enzymes, which degrade the substrates to unsaturated products having a characteristic u.v. absorption at 232 nm. Strains of Bacteroides gingivalis and Bacteroides melaninogenicus degraded both substrates whereas Bacteroides asaccharolyticus degraded neither substrate by either method. Some bacteria gave negative results with the plate method whereas the more sensitive spectrophotometric assay proved positive. The number of anaerobic bacteria capable of degrading hyaluronic acid and chondroitin-4-sulphate in vitro may therefore have been underestimated in previous studies.

  19. [Quantitative use of fluorescence in situ hybridization to detect syntrophic acetogenic bacteria in anaerobic environmental samples].

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Na; Xu, Ke-Wei; Du, Guo-Cheng; Chen, Jian; Liu, He

    2007-12-01

    Syntrophic acetogenic bacteria, an important functional one in anaerobic habitats, were detected and counted by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technology by using 16S rRNA-based oligonucleotide probes. For enumeration and quantification of the targeted bacteria, an attempt was made to optimize the hybridization conditions. The optimum conditions are as follows: a fixation time of 19h, a dehydrated time of 5 min, and a formamide concentration of 55% in hybridized solution. The abundance of syntrophic acetogenic bacteria of different environmental samples were quantified by FISH and the results showed that Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Reactor (UASB) treating STHZ high-concentration organic wastewater and the digestive tract of some animals were the main habitats of syntrophic acetogenic bacteria. The numbers of syntrophic acetogenic bacteria in UASB and cattle manure were 1.70 x 10(9) cells/mL sample and 6.50 x 10(8) cells/mL sample, respectively. Meanwhile, the sediments of rivers and lakes existed less of the bacteria and the contents of them were just about 1.20 x 10(8) cells/mL sample in Taihu lake.

  20. Biogas production from brewery spent grain enhanced by bioaugmentation with hydrolytic anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Čater, Maša; Fanedl, Lijana; Malovrh, Špela; Logar, Romana Marinšek

    2015-06-01

    Lignocellulosic substrates are widely available but not easily applied in biogas production due to their poor anaerobic degradation. The effect of bioaugmentation by anaerobic hydrolytic bacteria on biogas production was determined by the biochemical methane potential assay. Microbial biomass from full scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor treating brewery wastewater was a source of active microorganisms and brewery spent grain a model lignocellulosic substrate. Ruminococcus flavefaciens 007C, Pseudobutyrivibrio xylanivorans Mz5(T), Fibrobacter succinogenes S85 and Clostridium cellulovorans as pure and mixed cultures were used to enhance the lignocellulose degradation and elevate the biogas production. P. xylanivorans Mz5(T) was the most successful in elevating methane production (+17.8%), followed by the coculture of P. xylanivorans Mz5(T) and F. succinogenes S85 (+6.9%) and the coculture of C. cellulovorans and F. succinogenes S85 (+4.9%). Changes in microbial community structure were detected by fingerprinting techniques.

  1. Biogas production from brewery spent grain enhanced by bioaugmentation with hydrolytic anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Čater, Maša; Fanedl, Lijana; Malovrh, Špela; Logar, Romana Marinšek

    2015-06-01

    Lignocellulosic substrates are widely available but not easily applied in biogas production due to their poor anaerobic degradation. The effect of bioaugmentation by anaerobic hydrolytic bacteria on biogas production was determined by the biochemical methane potential assay. Microbial biomass from full scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor treating brewery wastewater was a source of active microorganisms and brewery spent grain a model lignocellulosic substrate. Ruminococcus flavefaciens 007C, Pseudobutyrivibrio xylanivorans Mz5(T), Fibrobacter succinogenes S85 and Clostridium cellulovorans as pure and mixed cultures were used to enhance the lignocellulose degradation and elevate the biogas production. P. xylanivorans Mz5(T) was the most successful in elevating methane production (+17.8%), followed by the coculture of P. xylanivorans Mz5(T) and F. succinogenes S85 (+6.9%) and the coculture of C. cellulovorans and F. succinogenes S85 (+4.9%). Changes in microbial community structure were detected by fingerprinting techniques. PMID:25836034

  2. Isolation and partial characterization of bacteria in an anaerobic consortium that mineralizes 3-chlorobenzoic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Shelton, D.R.; Tiedje, J.M.

    1984-10-01

    A methanogenic consortium able to use 3-chlorobenzoic acid as its sole energy and carbon source was enriched from anaerobic sewage sludge. Seven bacteria were isolated from the consortium in mono- or coculture. They included: one dechlorinating bacterium, one benzoate-oxidizing bacterium, two butyrate-oxidizing bacteria, two H/sub 2/-consuming methanogens (methanospirillum hungatei PM-1 and Methanobacterium sp. strain PM-2), and a sulfate-reducing bacterium (Desulfovibrio sp.). The dechlorinating bacterium was a gram-negative, obligate anaerobe with a unique collar surrounding the cell. A medium containing rumen fluid supported minimal growth; pyruvate was the only substrate found to increase growth. The bacterium had a generation time of 4 to 5 days. 3-Chlorobenzoate was dechlorinated stoichiometrically to benzoate, which accumulated in the medium; the rate of dechlorination was ca. 0.1 pmol bacterium/sup -1/ day/sup -1/. The benzoate-oxidizing bacterium was a gram-negative, obligate anaerobe and could only be grown as a syntroph. Benzoate was the only substrate observed to support growth, and, when grown in coculture with M. hungatei, it was fermented to acetate and CH/sub 4/. One butyrate-oxidizing bacterium was a gram-negative, non-sporeforming, obligate anaerobe; the other was a gram-positive, sporeforming, obligate anaerobe. Both could only be grown as syntrophs. The substrates observed to support growth of both bacteria were butyrate, 2-DL-methylbutyrate, valerate, and caproate; isobutyrate supported growth of only the sporeforming bacterium. Fermentation products were acetate and CH/sub 4/ or acetate, propionate, and CH/sub 4/ when grown in coculture with M. hungatei. A mutualism among at least the dechlorinating, benzoate-oxidizing, and methane-forming members was apparently required for utilization of the 3-chlorobenzoate substrate. 21 references, 8 figures, 2 tables.

  3. Identification of Anaerobic Aniline-Degrading Bacteria at a Contaminated Industrial Site.

    PubMed

    Sun, Weimin; Li, Yun; McGuinness, Lora R; Luo, Shuai; Huang, Weilin; Kerkhof, Lee J; Mack, E Erin; Häggblom, Max M; Fennell, Donna E

    2015-09-15

    Anaerobic aniline biodegradation was investigated under different electron-accepting conditions using contaminated canal and groundwater aquifer sediments from an industrial site. Aniline loss was observed in nitrate- and sulfate-amended microcosms and in microcosms established to promote methanogenic conditions. Lag times of 37 days (sulfate amended) to more than 100 days (methanogenic) were observed prior to activity. Time-series DNA-stable isotope probing (SIP) was used to identify bacteria that incorporated (13)C-labeled aniline in the microcosms established to promote methanogenic conditions. In microcosms from heavily contaminated aquifer sediments, a phylotype with 92.7% sequence similarity to Ignavibacterium album was identified as a dominant aniline degrader as indicated by incorporation of (13)C-aniline into its DNA. In microcosms from contaminated canal sediments, a bacterial phylotype within the family Anaerolineaceae, but without a match to any known genus, demonstrated the assimilation of (13)C-aniline. Acidovorax spp. were also identified as putative aniline degraders in both of these two treatments, indicating that these species were present and active in both the canal and aquifer sediments. There were multiple bacterial phylotypes associated with anaerobic degradation of aniline at this complex industrial site, which suggests that anaerobic transformation of aniline is an important process at the site. Furthermore, the aniline degrading phylotypes identified in the current study are not related to any known aniline-degrading bacteria. The identification of novel putative aniline degraders expands current knowledge regarding the potential fate of aniline under anaerobic conditions.

  4. 34S/32S fractionation in sulfur cycles catalyzed by anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Fry, B; Gest, H; Hayes, J M

    1988-01-01

    Stable isotopic distributions in the sulfur cycle were studied with pure and mixed cultures of the anaerobic bacteria, Chlorobium vibrioforme and Desulfovibrio vulgaris. D. vulgaris and C. vibrioforme can catalyze three reactions constituting a complete anaerobic sulfur cycle: reduction of sulfate to sulfide (D. vulgaris), oxidation of sulfide to elemental sulfur (C. vibrioforme), and oxidation of sulfur to sulfate (C. vibrioforme). In all experiments, the first and last reactions favored concentration of the light 32S isotope in products (isotopic fractionation factor epsilon = -7.2 and -1.7%, respectively), whereas oxidation of sulfide favored concentration of the heavy 34S isotope in products (epsilon = +1.7%). Experimental results and model calculations suggest that elemental sulfur enriched in 34S versus sulfide may be a biogeochemical marker for the presence of sulfide-oxidizing bacteria in modern and ancient environments. PMID:11536596

  5. 34S/32S fractionation in sulfur cycles catalyzed by anaerobic bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fry, B.; Gest, H.; Hayes, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    Stable isotopic distributions in the sulfur cycle were studied with pure and mixed cultures of the anaerobic bacteria, Chlorobium vibrioforme and Desulfovibrio vulgaris. D. vulgaris and C. vibrioforme can catalyze three reactions constituting a complete anaerobic sulfur cycle: reduction of sulfate to sulfide (D. vulgaris), oxidation of sulfide to elemental sulfur (C. vibrioforme), and oxidation of sulfur to sulfate (C. vibrioforme). In all experiments, the first and last reactions favored concentration of the light 32S isotope in products (isotopic fractionation factor epsilon = -7.2 and -1.7%, respectively), whereas oxidation of sulfide favored concentration of the heavy 34S isotope in products (epsilon = +1.7%). Experimental results and model calculations suggest that elemental sulfur enriched in 34S versus sulfide may be a biogeochemical marker for the presence of sulfide-oxidizing bacteria in modern and ancient environments.

  6. Clinically significant anaerobic bacteria isolated from patients in a South African academic hospital: antimicrobial susceptibility testing.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, S; Perovic, O; Richards, G A; Duse, A G

    2011-09-27

    BACKGROUND. Increasing resistance to some antimicrobial agents among anaerobic bacteria has made susceptibility patterns less predictable. METHOD. This was a prospective study of the susceptibility data of anaerobic organisms isolated from clinical specimens from patients with suspected anaerobic infections from June 2005 until February 2007. Specimens were submitted to the microbiology laboratory at Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital, where microscopy, culture and susceptibility testing were performed the using E test® strip minimum inhibitory concentration method. Results were interpreted with reference to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines for amoxicillin-clavulanate, clindamycin, metronidazole, penicillin, ertapenem, cefoxitin, ceftriaxone, chloramphenicol and piperacillin-tazobactam. RESULTS. One hundred and eighty anaerobic isolates were submitted from 165 patients. The most active antimicrobial agents were chloramphenicol (100% susceptible), ertapenem (97.2%), piperacillin-tazobactam (99.4%) and amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (96.7%). Less active were metronidazole (89.4%), cefoxitin (85%), clindamycin (81.7%), ceftriaxone (68.3%) and penicillin (33.3%). CONCLUSION. Susceptibility testing should be performed periodically to identify emerging trends in resistance and to modify empirical treatment of anaerobic infections.

  7. Arsenite Oxidation by Anaerobic Bacteria in Mono Lake, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeft, S. E.; Oremland, R. S.

    2001-12-01

    Mono Lake, California is a meromictic soda lake (pH = 9.8; salinity = 70-90 g/L) with exceptionally high arsenic content (200 μ M) derived from hydrothermal sources. Previous work has shown that arsenic speciation changes from arsenate [As(V)] to the more reduced arsenite [As(III)] with vertical transition from the lake's surface oxic waters to its unmixed, anoxic bottom waters and that dissimilatory reduction is responsible for the observed change in arsenic speciation (Oremland et al., 2000). Depth profiles of arsenic speciation indicate that a small amount of As(V) exists in the anoxic bottom waters, suggesting a constant re-supply by microbial oxidation of As(III). Anaerobic microbial oxidation of As(III) to As(V) was first noted in arsenate-enriched anoxic bottom water amended with nitrate, where nitrate addition caused a rapid microbial re-oxidation of arsenite to arsenate (Hoeft et al. 2001). In following, we conducted time course experiments with As(III)-amended bottom waters supplemented with either 5 mM nitrate, Fe(III)-NTA or nitrite. Nitrate-amended waters formed As(V), while killed controls did not form significant amounts and 5 mM nitrate was completely reduced to 5 mM nitrite by the end of the incubation. Live samples amended with 5mM Fe(III)-NTA produced As(V) that exceeded production of As(V) in killed controls, while nitrite-amended waters formed As(V) in excess of killed controls after an initial lag. We isolated a pure culture, strain MLHE-1, that grows in minimal salts media by oxidation of As(III) to As(V) with the reduction of equivalent quantities of nitrate to nitrite. Strain MLHE-1 appears to be a chemoautotroph. These results demonstrate that the cycling of As(V) and As(III) can be sustained in the absence of oxygen. This has implications not only for the recycling of As(V) in Mono Lake's bottom waters, but also for the mobility of arsenic in aquifers as well. Oremland, R.S. et al. 2000. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 64: 3073-3084. Hoeft, S

  8. Thermophilic, anaerobic bacteria isolated from a deep borehole in granite in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Szewzyk, U; Szewzyk, R; Stenström, T A

    1994-03-01

    A borehole drilled to a total depth of 6779 m in granitic rock in Gravberg, Sweden, was sampled and examined for the presence of anaerobic, thermophilic, fermenting bacteria and sulfate-reducing bacteria. Growth in enrichment cultures was obtained only from water samples collected from a specific sampling depth in the borehole (3500 m). The hole was cased down to a depth of 5278 m and open to the formation below that level. All the water below 2000 m in depth standing in the borehole at the time of sampling must have entered at the 5278-m level or below, during a prior pumping operation. A strong salinity stratification certifies that no major amount of vertical mixing had taken place. The depth from which bacteria could be enriched was that of a pronounced local minimum of salinity. Pure cultures of thermophilic, anaerobic, fermenting bacteria were obtained with the following substrates: glucose, starch, xylan, ethanol, and lactate. The morphology and physiology of the glucose- and starch-degrading strains indicate a relationship to Thermoanaerobacter and Thermoanaerobium species. All but one of the newly isolated strains differ however from those by lacking acetate as a fermentation product. The glucose-degrading strain Gluc1 is phylogenetically related to Clostridium thermohydrosulfuricum, with an evolutionary distance based upon rRNA sequence comparisons of 3%. No sulfate-reducing or methanogenic bacteria were found.

  9. A modified bioautographic method for antibacterial component screening against anaerobic and microaerophilic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Judit K; Horváth, Györgyi; Kerényi, Monika; Kocsis, Béla; Emődy, Levente; Schneider, György

    2016-04-01

    Direct bioautography is a useful method to identify antimicrobial compounds with potential therapeutic importance. Because of technical limitations till now, it has been applied only for aerobic bacteria. In this work we present the modification of the original method by which antimicrobial screening of bacteria requiring modified atmosphere became feasible by direct bioautography. Here we demonstrate its applicability by testing three anaerobic Clostridium perfringens and three microaerophilic Campylobacter jejuni strains against two essential oils, clove and thyme. Antimicrobial component profiles of clove and thyme essential oils against these two medically important pathogenic bacteria were compared and significant differences were revealed in their inhibition capacities. Linalool, a component of thyme essential oil exerted a more expressed antibacterial activity against C. perfringens than against C. jejuni. Our results demonstrate that direct bioautography is not only suitable for testing aerobic bacteria, but by applying the presently described modified version it can also contribute to the quest to find novel antimicrobial agents against multidrug resistant anaerobic and microaerophilic bacteria. PMID:26853123

  10. [Utility of MALDI-TOF MS for the identification of anaerobic bacteria].

    PubMed

    Zárate, Mariela S; Romano, Vanesa; Nievas, Jimena; Smayevsky, Jorgelina

    2014-01-01

    The analysis by MALDI-TOF MS (Matrix-assited laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry) has become a reference method for the identification of microorganisms in Clinical Microbiology. However, data on some groups of microorganisms are still controversial. The aim of this study is to determine the utility of MALDI-TOF MS for the identification of clinical isolates of anaerobic bacteria. One-hundred and six anaerobic bacteria isolates were analyzed by MALDI-TOF MS and by conventional biochemical tests. In those cases where identification by conventional methodology was not applicable or in the face of discordance between sequencing methodologies, 16 S rRNA gene sequence analysis was performed. The conventional method and MALDI-TOF MS agreed at genus and species level by 95.3 %. Concordance in gram-negative bacilli was 91.4% and 100% among gram-positive bacilli; there was also concordance both in the 8 isolates studied in gram-positive cocci and in the single gram-negative cocci included. The data obtained in this study demonstrate that MALDI-TOF MS offers the possibility of adequate identification of anaerobic bacteria.

  11. Immobilization of anaerobic bacteria on rubberized-coir for psychrophilic digestion of night soil.

    PubMed

    Dhaked, Ram Kumar; Ramana, Karna Venkat; Tomar, Arvind; Waghmare, Chandrakant; Kamboj, Dev Vrat; Singh, Lokendra

    2005-08-01

    Low-ambient temperatures, <30 degrees C, are known to cause drastic reduction in the efficiency of anaerobic biodigesters due to low-growth rate of the constituent bacterial consortium. Immobilization of anaerobic bacteria has been attempted in the biodigester operating at 10 degrees C. Various matrices were screened and evaluated for the immobilization of bacteria in digesters. Anaerobic digestion of night soil was carried out with hydraulic retention time in the range of 9-18 days. Among the tested matrices, rubberized-coir was found to be the most useful at 10 degrees C with optimum hydraulic retention time of 15 days. Optimum amount of coir was found as 25 g/L of the working volume of biodigesters. Immobilization of bacteria on the coir was observed by scanning electron microscopy and fluorescent microscopy. The study indicates that rubberized-coir can be utilized to increase biodegradation of night soil at higher organic loading. Another advantage of using this matrix is that it is renewable and easily available in comparison to other synthetic polymeric matrices.

  12. A redox switch shapes the Lon protease exit pore to facultatively regulate proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Nishii, Wataru; Kukimoto-Niino, Mutsuko; Terada, Takaho; Shirouzu, Mikako; Muramatsu, Tomonari; Kojima, Masaki; Kihara, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2015-01-01

    The Lon AAA+ protease degrades damaged or misfolded proteins in its intramolecular chamber. Its activity must be precisely controlled, but the mechanism by which Lon is regulated in response to different environments is not known. Facultative anaerobes in the Enterobacteriaceae family, mostly symbionts and pathogens, encounter both anaerobic and aerobic environments inside and outside the host's body, respectively. The bacteria characteristically have two cysteine residues on the Lon protease (P) domain surface that unusually form a disulfide bond. Here we show that the cysteine residues act as a redox switch of Lon. Upon disulfide bond reduction, the exit pore of the P-domain ring narrows by ∼30%, thus interrupting product passage and decreasing activity by 80%; disulfide bonding by oxidation restores the pore size and activity. The redox switch (E°' = -227 mV) is appropriately tuned to respond to variation between anaerobic and aerobic conditions, thus optimizing the cellular proteolysis level for each environment.

  13. Isolation of Anaerobic Bacteria from Human Gingiva and Mouse Cecum by Means of a Simplified Glove Box Procedure1

    PubMed Central

    Aranki, Alexander; Syed, Salam A.; Kenney, Ernest B.; Freter, Rolf

    1969-01-01

    An anaerobic glove box constructed of clear flexible vinyl plastic is described. It is sufficiently inexpensive and simple in operation to be used not only in research but also in a clinical laboratory by technicians without special training. Conventional bacteriological techniques may be used inside the glove box for culturing and transferring anaerobic bacteria. The box may be heated to 37 C and thus serve as an anaerobic incubator as well, permitting inspection of cultures at any time. Media may be prepared and agar plates may be poured on the laboratory bench in the conventional manner. An overlay of trace amounts of palladium black catalyst over plated agar media reduces the medium to an oxidation-reduction (O-R) potential of - 300 mv within 2 days after introduction into the glove box. In spite of its greater simplicity, the system matched or excelled the roll tube method with respect to all parameters tested, including O-R potential obtainable in the media, O2 concentration in the gas phase, and efficiency in isolating anaerobic bacteria from the mouse cecum. Comparative studies indicate that the conventional anaerobic jar method was inadequate for the isolation of strict anaerobes from human gingival specimens and from the mouse cecum. This was due to the exposure of specimens and media to air during plating on the open laboratory bench. Anaerobic jars were adequate for maintaining the proper conditions for growth of anaerobic bacteria once these had been established in the glove box. Images PMID:4890748

  14. Antibacterial activity of Pinus elliottii against anaerobic bacteria present in primary endodontic infections.

    PubMed

    Caetano da Silva, Sandro Donizete; Mendes de Souza, Maria Gorete; Oliveira Cardoso, Miguel Jorge; da Silva Moraes, Thais; Ambrósio, Sérgio Ricardo; Sola Veneziani, Rodrigo Cássio; Martins, Carlos Henrique G

    2014-12-01

    Endodontic infections have a polymicrobial nature, but anaerobic bacteria prevail among the infectious microbes. Considering that it is easy to eliminate planktonic bacteria, biofilm-forming bacteria still challenge clinicians during the fight against endodontic diseases. The chemical constituents of the oleoresin of Pinus elliottii, a plant belonging to the family Pinaceae, stand out in the search for biologically active compounds based on natural products with potential application in the treatment of endodontic infections. Indeed, plant oleoresins are an abundant natural source of diterpenes that display significant and well-defined biological activities as well as potential antimicrobial action. In this context, this study aimed to (1) evaluate the in vitro antibacterial activity of the oleoresin, fractions, and subfractions of P. elliottii as well as the action of dehydroabietic acid against 11 anaerobic bacteria that cause endodontic infection in both their planktonic and biofilm forms and (2) assess the in vitro antibiofilm activity of dehydroabietic acid against the same group of bacteria. The broth microdilution technique helped to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the oleoresin and fractions. This same technique aided determination of the MIC values of nine subfractions of Fraction 1, the most active fraction. The MIC, minimum bactericidal concentration, and antibiofilm activity of dehydroabietic acid against the tested anaerobic bacteria were also examined. The oleoresin and fractions, especially fraction PE1, afforded promising MIC values, which ranged from 0.4 to 50 μg/mL. Concerning the nine evaluated subfractions, PE1.3 and PE1.4 furnished the most noteworthy MIC values, between 6.2 and 100 μg/mL. Dehydroabietic acid displayed antibacterial activity, with MIC values lying from 6.2 to 50 μg/mL, as well as bactericidal effect for all the investigated bacteria, except for Prevotella nigrescens. Assessment of the antibiofilm

  15. Antibacterial activity of Pinus elliottii against anaerobic bacteria present in primary endodontic infections.

    PubMed

    Caetano da Silva, Sandro Donizete; Mendes de Souza, Maria Gorete; Oliveira Cardoso, Miguel Jorge; da Silva Moraes, Thais; Ambrósio, Sérgio Ricardo; Sola Veneziani, Rodrigo Cássio; Martins, Carlos Henrique G

    2014-12-01

    Endodontic infections have a polymicrobial nature, but anaerobic bacteria prevail among the infectious microbes. Considering that it is easy to eliminate planktonic bacteria, biofilm-forming bacteria still challenge clinicians during the fight against endodontic diseases. The chemical constituents of the oleoresin of Pinus elliottii, a plant belonging to the family Pinaceae, stand out in the search for biologically active compounds based on natural products with potential application in the treatment of endodontic infections. Indeed, plant oleoresins are an abundant natural source of diterpenes that display significant and well-defined biological activities as well as potential antimicrobial action. In this context, this study aimed to (1) evaluate the in vitro antibacterial activity of the oleoresin, fractions, and subfractions of P. elliottii as well as the action of dehydroabietic acid against 11 anaerobic bacteria that cause endodontic infection in both their planktonic and biofilm forms and (2) assess the in vitro antibiofilm activity of dehydroabietic acid against the same group of bacteria. The broth microdilution technique helped to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the oleoresin and fractions. This same technique aided determination of the MIC values of nine subfractions of Fraction 1, the most active fraction. The MIC, minimum bactericidal concentration, and antibiofilm activity of dehydroabietic acid against the tested anaerobic bacteria were also examined. The oleoresin and fractions, especially fraction PE1, afforded promising MIC values, which ranged from 0.4 to 50 μg/mL. Concerning the nine evaluated subfractions, PE1.3 and PE1.4 furnished the most noteworthy MIC values, between 6.2 and 100 μg/mL. Dehydroabietic acid displayed antibacterial activity, with MIC values lying from 6.2 to 50 μg/mL, as well as bactericidal effect for all the investigated bacteria, except for Prevotella nigrescens. Assessment of the antibiofilm

  16. Ecophysiological adaptations of anaerobic bacteria to low pH. [Sarcina ventriculi; Lactobacillus helveticus

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, S.D.

    1986-01-01

    The ecological and physiological adaptations of anaerobic bacteria to low pH were investigated in field and laboratory studies. Determinations of hydrogen kinetic parameters demonstrated that overall hydrogen metabolism was inhibited in acid ecosystems. In particular, hydrogen metabolism became progressively uncoupled at low pH. This uncoupling resulted in a slowing of carbon flow during anaerobic digestion and the accumulation of intermediary metabolites. The addition of carbon electron donors to acid bog sediments resulted in the accumulation of hydrogen and a slowing of the overall rates of anaerobic digestion. As an adaptation to low pH, anaerobic bacterial populations shifted from production of acid intermediary metabolites (e.g. acetate and lactate) to the production of neutral intermediary metabolites (e.g. ethanol). This shift was observed both in situ and in pure cultures of hydrolytic strains isolated from bog sediments. Detailed physiological studies of Sarcina ventriculi showed an adaptation to growth at low pH by mechanisms which allowed the continued production of ethanol from glucose and the maintenance of a proton motive force at low cytoplasmic pH values. Further physiological studies Lactobacillus helveticus showed that the accumulation of acidic end-product (lactic acid) strongly influenced cellular electrochemical parameters. Based on the results of computer simulations and laboratory studies of the physiology of the organism in the presence of organic acids, a new model for the passive coupling of energy conservation to the efflux of lactic acid in an electroneutral process is proposed.

  17. Sulfate-reducing bacteria mediate thionation of diphenylarsinic acid under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Guan, Ling; Shiiya, Ayaka; Hisatomi, Shihoko; Fujii, Kunihiko; Nonaka, Masanori; Harada, Naoki

    2015-02-01

    Diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA) is often found as a toxic intermediate metabolite of diphenylchloroarsine or diphenylcyanoarsine that were produced as chemical warfare agents and were buried in soil after the World Wars. In our previous study Guan et al. (J Hazard Mater 241-242:355-362, 2012), after application of sulfate and carbon sources, anaerobic transformation of DPAA in soil was enhanced with the production of diphenylthioarsinic acid (DPTAA) as a main metabolite. This study aimed to isolate and characterize anaerobic soil microorganisms responsible for the metabolism of DPAA. First, we obtained four microbial consortia capable of transforming DPAA to DPTAA at a high transformation rate of more than 80% after 4 weeks of incubation. Sequencing for the bacterial 16S rRNA gene clone libraries constructed from the consortia revealed that all the positive consortia contained Desulfotomaculum acetoxidans species. In contrast, the absence of dissimilatory sulfite reductase gene (dsrAB) which is unique to sulfate-reducing bacteria was confirmed in the negative consortia showing no DPAA reduction. Finally, strain DEA14 showing transformation of DPAA to DPTAA was isolated from one of the positive consortia. The isolate was assigned to D. acetoxidans based on the partial 16S rDNA sequence analysis. Thionation of DPAA was also carried out in a pure culture of a known sulfate-reducing bacterial strain, Desulfovibrio aerotolerans JCM 12613(T). These facts indicate that sulfate-reducing bacteria are microorganisms responsible for the transformation of DPAA to DPTAA under anaerobic conditions. PMID:25228086

  18. Sulfate-reducing bacteria mediate thionation of diphenylarsinic acid under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Guan, Ling; Shiiya, Ayaka; Hisatomi, Shihoko; Fujii, Kunihiko; Nonaka, Masanori; Harada, Naoki

    2015-02-01

    Diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA) is often found as a toxic intermediate metabolite of diphenylchloroarsine or diphenylcyanoarsine that were produced as chemical warfare agents and were buried in soil after the World Wars. In our previous study Guan et al. (J Hazard Mater 241-242:355-362, 2012), after application of sulfate and carbon sources, anaerobic transformation of DPAA in soil was enhanced with the production of diphenylthioarsinic acid (DPTAA) as a main metabolite. This study aimed to isolate and characterize anaerobic soil microorganisms responsible for the metabolism of DPAA. First, we obtained four microbial consortia capable of transforming DPAA to DPTAA at a high transformation rate of more than 80% after 4 weeks of incubation. Sequencing for the bacterial 16S rRNA gene clone libraries constructed from the consortia revealed that all the positive consortia contained Desulfotomaculum acetoxidans species. In contrast, the absence of dissimilatory sulfite reductase gene (dsrAB) which is unique to sulfate-reducing bacteria was confirmed in the negative consortia showing no DPAA reduction. Finally, strain DEA14 showing transformation of DPAA to DPTAA was isolated from one of the positive consortia. The isolate was assigned to D. acetoxidans based on the partial 16S rDNA sequence analysis. Thionation of DPAA was also carried out in a pure culture of a known sulfate-reducing bacterial strain, Desulfovibrio aerotolerans JCM 12613(T). These facts indicate that sulfate-reducing bacteria are microorganisms responsible for the transformation of DPAA to DPTAA under anaerobic conditions.

  19. Anaerobic metabolism of nitroaromatic compounds by sulfate-reducing and methanogenic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Boopathy, R.; Kulpa, C.F.

    1994-06-01

    Ecological observations suggest that sulfate-reducing and methanogenic bacteria might metabolize nitroaromatic compounds under anaerobic conditions if appropriate electron donors and electron acceptors are present in the environment, but this ability had not been demonstrated until recently. Most studies on the microbial metabolism of nitroaromatic compounds used aerobic microorganisms. In most cases no mineralization of nitroaromatics occurs, and only superficial modifications of the structures are reported. However, under anaerobic sulfate-reducing conditions, the nitroaromatic compounds reportedly undergo a series of reductions with the formation of amino compounds. For example, trinitrotoluene under sulfate-reducing conditions is reduced to triaminotoluene by the enzyme nitrite reductase, which is commonly found in many Desulfovibrio spp. The removal of ammonia from triaminotoluene is achieved by reductive deamination catalyzed by the enzyme reductive deaminase, with the production of ammonia and toluene. Some sulfate reducers can metabolize toluene to CO{sub 2}. Similar metabolic processes could be applied to other nitroaromatic compounds like nitrobenzene, nitrobenzoic acids, nitrophenols, and aniline. Many methanogenic bacteria can reduce nitroaromatic compounds to amino compounds. In this paper we review the anaerobic metabolic processes of nitroaromatic compounds under sulfate-reducing And methanogenic conditions.

  20. Limnochorda pilosa gen. nov., sp. nov., a moderately thermophilic, facultatively anaerobic, pleomorphic bacterium and proposal of Limnochordaceae fam. nov., Limnochordales ord. nov. and Limnochordia classis nov. in the phylum Firmicutes.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Miho; Kojima, Hisaya; Fukui, Manabu

    2015-08-01

    A novel facultatively anaerobic bacterium, strain HC45T, was isolated from sediment of a brackish meromictic lake in Japan, Lake Harutori. Cells were pleomorphic, and filamentous bodies were 5-100 μm in length. For growth, the optimum pH was 7.0 and the optimum temperature was 45-50 °C. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 71 mol%. iso-C15 : 0 and anteiso-C15 : 0 were the major components in the cellular fatty acid profile. The predominant respiratory quinone was MK-7. Strain HC45T shared very low 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with cultivated strains ( ≤ 85%). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the isolate was distantly related to members of the family Symbiobacteriaceae and family XVII Incertae Sedis in the class Clostridia, and they formed a cluster separate from canonical species of the phylum Firmicutes. These results indicated that strain HC45T should not be placed in any existing class of the phylum Firmicutes. On the basis of phylogenetic and phenotypic characterization, Limnochorda pilosa gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed with HC45T ( = NBRC 110152T = DSM 28787T) as the type strain, as the first representative of novel taxa, Limnochordales ord. nov., Limnochordaceae fam. nov. in Limnochordia classis. nov.

  1. A rapid method for the detection of tryptophanase in anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Karim, M R; Qadri, S M; Flournoy, D J

    1981-01-01

    A total of 633 anaerobic bacteria were examined for tryptophanase production using a rapid method which distinguishes within 5 to 180 minutes between anaerobes that contain tryptophanase and those that do not. Of the 196 tryptophanase-positive isolates tested, 99% showed tryptophanase activity within 2 hours as compared with 94.4% in 24 hours by a conventional method. A total of 299 tryptophanase-negative organisms were tested. Ninety three percent of these remained negative after 24 hours as compared with 95.3% when tested within a 24-h conventional method. Additional information was obtained on the sensitivity of this test and the time-dependent production of indole by tryptophanase.

  2. Anaerobic degradation of veratrylglycerol-beta-guaiacyl ether and guaiacoxyacetic acid by mixed rumen bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, W; Supanwong, K; Ohmiya, K; Shimizu, S; Kawakami, H

    1985-01-01

    Veratrylglycerol-beta-guaiacyl ether (0.2 g/liter), a lignin model compound, was found to be degraded by mixed rumen bacteria in a yeast extract medium under strictly anaerobic conditions to the extent of 19% within 24 h. Guaiacoxyacetic acid, 2-(o-methoxyphenoxy)ethanol, vanillic acid, and vanillin were detected as degradation products of veratrylglycerol-beta-guaiacyl ether by thin-layer chromatography, gas chromatography, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Guaiacoxyacetic acid (0.25 g/liter), when added into the medium as a substrate, was entirely degraded within 36 h, resulting in the formation of phenoxyacetic acid, guaiacol, and phenol. These results suggest that the beta-arylether bond, an important intermonomer linkage in lignin, can be cleaved completely by these rumen anaerobes. PMID:3841472

  3. Diversity and distribution of planktonic anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria in the Dongjiang River, China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Xia, Chunyu; Xu, Meiying; Guo, Jun; Wang, Aijie; Sun, Guoping

    2014-12-01

    Anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) process has recently been recognized as an important pathway for removing fixed nitrogen (N) from aquatic ecosystems. Anammox organisms are widely distributed in freshwater environments. However, little is known about their presence in the water column of riverine ecosystems. Here, the existence of a diverse anammox community was revealed in the water column of the Dongjiang River by analyzing 16S rRNA and hydrazine oxidation (hzo) genes of anammox bacteria. Phylogenetic analyses of hzo genes showed that Candidatus Jettenia related clades of anammox bacteria were dominant in the river, suggesting the ecological microniche distinction from freshwater/estuary and marine anammox bacteria with Ca. Brocadia and Kuenenia genera mainly detected in freshwater/estuary ecosystems, and Ca. Scalindua genus mainly detected in marine ecosystems. The abundance and diversity of anammox bacteria along the river were both significantly correlated with concentrations of NH4(+)-N based on Pearson and partial correlation analyses. Redundancy analyses showed the contents of NH4(+)-N, NO3(-)-N and the ratio of NH4(+)-N to NO2(-)-N significantly influenced the spatial distributions of anammox bacteria in the water column of the Dongjiang River. These results expanded our understanding of the distribution and potential roles of anammox bacteria in the water column of the river ecosystem.

  4. Anaerobic activities of bacteria and fungi in moderately acidic conifer and deciduous leaf litter.

    PubMed

    Reith, Frank; Drake, Harold L; Küsel, Kirsten

    2002-07-01

    Abstract The litter layer of forest soils harbors high amounts of labile organic matter, and anaerobic decomposition processes can be initiated when oxygen is consumed more rapidly than it is supplied by diffusion. In this study, two adjacent moderately acidic forest sites, a spruce and a beech-oak forest, were selected to compare the anaerobic bacterial and fungal activities and populations of conifer and deciduous leaf litter. Most probable number (MPN) estimates of general heterotrophic aerobes and anaerobes from conifer litter equaled those from deciduous leaf litter. H(2), ethanol, formate, and lactate were initially produced with similar rates in both anoxic conifer and deciduous leaf litter microcosms. These products were rapidly consumed in deciduous leaf but not in conifer litter microcosms. Supplemental ethanol and H(2) were consumed only by deciduous leaf litter and yielded additional amounts of acetate in stoichiometries indicative of ethanol- or H(2)-dependent acetogenesis. The negligible turnover of primary fermentation products in conifer litter might be due to the low numbers of acetogens and secondary fermenters present in conifer litter compared to deciduous leaf litter. Fungi capable of anaerobic growth made up only 0.01-0.1% of the total anaerobic microorganisms cultured from conifer and deciduous leaf litter, respectively. Metabolic product profiles obtained from the highest anoxic, growth-positive MPN dilutions supplemented with antibacterial agents indicated that the dominant population of fungi, apparently mainly yeast-like cells, produced H(2), ethanol, acetate, and lactate both in conifer and deciduous leaf litter. Thus, despite acidic conditions, bacteria appear to dominate in the decomposition of carbon in anoxic microsites of both conifer and deciduous leaf litter.

  5. MALDI-TOF MS versus VITEK 2 ANC card for identification of anaerobic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Gu, Bing; Xia, Wenying; Fan, Kun; Mei, Yaning; Huang, Peijun; Pan, Shiyang

    2014-01-01

    Background Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is an accurate, rapid and inexpensive technique that has initiated a revolution in the clinical microbiology laboratory for identification of pathogens. The Vitek 2 anaerobe and Corynebacterium (ANC) identification card is a newly developed method for identification of corynebacteria and anaerobic species. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the ANC card and MALDI-TOF MS techniques for identification of clinical anaerobic isolates. Methods Five reference strains and a total of 50 anaerobic bacteria clinical isolates comprising ten different genera and 14 species were identified and analyzed by the ANC card together with Vitek 2 identification system and Vitek MS together with version 2.0 database respectively. 16S rRNA gene sequencing was used as reference method for accuracy in the identification. Results Vitek 2 ANC card and Vitek MS provided comparable results at species level for the five reference strains. Of 50 clinical strains, the Vitek MS provided identification for 46 strains (92%) to the species level, 47 (94%) to genus level, one (2%) low discrimination, two (4%) no identification and one (2%) misidentification. The Vitek 2 ANC card provided identification for 43 strains (86%) correct to the species level, 47 (94%) correct to the genus level, three (6%) low discrimination, three (6%) no identification and one (2%) misidentification. Conclusions Both Vitek MS and Vitek 2 ANC card can be used for accurate routine clinical anaerobe identification. Comparing to the Vitek 2 ANC card, Vitek MS is easier, faster and more economic for each test. The databases currently available for both systems should be updated and further developed to enhance performance. PMID:24822113

  6. Intestinal microflora in rats: isolation and characterization of strictly anaerobic bacteria requiring long-chain fatty acids.

    PubMed Central

    Morotomi, M; Kawai, Y; Mutai, M

    1976-01-01

    Three strains of strictly anaerobic bacteria, isolated from the cecal contents of rats, have strict requirements for long-chain fatty acids. The effect of exogenous fatty acids on the growth and fatty acid composition of the bacteria was examined. Biohydrogenation of linoleic acid into octadecenoic acid was observed. These observations suggest that long-chain fatty acids in the intestine are factors in controlling the localization and the population levels of indigenous bacteria in vivo in rats. PMID:1267446

  7. Colonizing the embryonic zebrafish gut with anaerobic bacteria derived from the human gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Toh, Michael C; Goodyear, Mara; Daigneault, Michelle; Allen-Vercoe, Emma; Van Raay, Terence J

    2013-06-01

    The zebrafish has become increasingly popular for microbiological research. It has been used as an infection model for a variety of pathogens, and is also emerging as a tool for studying interactions between a host and its resident microbial communities. The mouse microbiota has been transplanted into the zebrafish gut, but to our knowledge, there has been no attempt to introduce a bacterial community derived from the human gut. We explored two methods for colonizing the developing gut of 5-day-old germ-free zebrafish larvae with a defined anaerobic microbial community derived from a single human fecal sample. Both environmental exposure (static immersion) and direct microinjection into the gut resulted in the establishment of two species-Lactobacillus paracasei and Eubacterium limosum-from a community of 30 strains consisting of 22 anaerobic species. Of particular interest is E. limosum, which, as a strict anaerobe, represents a group of bacteria which until now have not been shown to colonize the developing zebrafish gut. Our success here indicates that further investigation of zebrafish as a tool for studying human gut microbial communities is warranted.

  8. Enrichment of anaerobic syngas-converting bacteria from thermophilic bioreactor sludge.

    PubMed

    Alves, Joana I; Stams, Alfons J M; Plugge, Caroline M; Alves, M Madalena; Sousa, Diana Z

    2013-12-01

    Thermophilic (55 °C) anaerobic microbial communities were enriched with a synthetic syngas mixture (composed of CO, H2 , and CO2 ) or with CO alone. Cultures T-Syn and T-CO were incubated and successively transferred with syngas (16 transfers) or CO (9 transfers), respectively, with increasing CO partial pressures from 0.09 to 0.88 bar. Culture T-Syn, after 4 successive transfers with syngas, was also incubated with CO and subsequently transferred (9 transfers) with solely this substrate - cultures T-Syn-CO. Incubation with syngas and CO caused a rapid decrease in the microbial diversity of the anaerobic consortium. T-Syn and T-Syn-CO showed identical microbial composition and were dominated by Desulfotomaculum and Caloribacterium species. Incubation initiated with CO resulted in the enrichment of bacteria from the genera Thermincola and Thermoanaerobacter. Methane was detected in the first two to three transfers of T-Syn, but production ceased afterward. Acetate was the main product formed by T-Syn and T-Syn-CO. Enriched T-CO cultures showed a two-phase conversion, in which H2 was formed first and then converted to acetate. This research provides insight into how thermophilic anaerobic communities develop using syngas/CO as sole energy and carbon source can be steered for specific end products and subsequent microbial synthesis of chemicals.

  9. Compartmental model for organic matter digestion in facultative ponds.

    PubMed

    Giraldo, E; Garzón, A

    2002-01-01

    A model has been developed for the digestion of organic matter in facultative ponds in tropical regions. Complete mixing has been assumed for the aerobic and anaerobic compartments. Settling, aerobic layer oxidation, and anaerobic layer methanogenesis are the main processes for organic matter removal in the water column. Exchange processes between layers are dispersive or soluble exchange, solubilization and transport of organic matter from sediments to water column are also taken into account. Degradation of organic matter in the sediments produces gaseous emissions to the water column. The exchange between bubbles ascending and the water column was measured. The model was calibrated with data obtained from a pilot facultative pond built in Muña Reservoir in Bogotá. The pond was sampled during 4 months to compare data between its water hyacinth covered section and uncovered section. The results clearly show the relative importance of different BOD removal processes in facultative ponds and suggest modifications to further improve performance. The results from the model suggest that internal loadings to facultative ponds due to solubilization and return of organic matter from the sediments to the aerobic layer greatly influence the soluble BOD effluent concentration. Aerobic degradation activity in the facultative pond does not affect significantly the effluent concentration. Anaerobic degradation activity in the facultative pond can more easily achieve increases in the removal efficiencies of BOD.

  10. Compartmental model for organic matter digestion in facultative ponds.

    PubMed

    Giraldo, E; Garzón, A

    2002-01-01

    A model has been developed for the digestion of organic matter in facultative ponds in tropical regions. Complete mixing has been assumed for the aerobic and anaerobic compartments. Settling, aerobic layer oxidation, and anaerobic layer methanogenesis are the main processes for organic matter removal in the water column. Exchange processes between layers are dispersive or soluble exchange, solubilization and transport of organic matter from sediments to water column are also taken into account. Degradation of organic matter in the sediments produces gaseous emissions to the water column. The exchange between bubbles ascending and the water column was measured. The model was calibrated with data obtained from a pilot facultative pond built in Muña Reservoir in Bogotá. The pond was sampled during 4 months to compare data between its water hyacinth covered section and uncovered section. The results clearly show the relative importance of different BOD removal processes in facultative ponds and suggest modifications to further improve performance. The results from the model suggest that internal loadings to facultative ponds due to solubilization and return of organic matter from the sediments to the aerobic layer greatly influence the soluble BOD effluent concentration. Aerobic degradation activity in the facultative pond does not affect significantly the effluent concentration. Anaerobic degradation activity in the facultative pond can more easily achieve increases in the removal efficiencies of BOD. PMID:11833730

  11. Degradation of phenolic contaminants in ground water by anaerobic bacteria: St. Louis Park, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ehrlich, G.G.; Goerlitz, D.F.; Godsy, E.M.; Hult, M.F.

    1982-01-01

    Coal-tar derivatives from a coal-tar distillation and wood-treating plant that operated from 1918 to 1972 at St. Louis Park, Minnesota contaminated the near-surface ground water. Solutions of phenolic compounds and a water-immiscible mixture of polynuclear aromatic compounds accumulated in wetlands near the plant site and entered the aquifer. The concentration of phenolic compounds in the aqueous phase under the wetlands is about 30 mg/1 but decreases to less than 0.2 mg/1 at a distance of 430 m immediately downgradient from the source. Concentrations of naphthalene (the predominant polynuclear compound in the ground water) and sodium (selected as a conservative tracer) range from about 20 mg/1 and 430 mg/1 in the aqueous phase at the source to about 2 mg/1 and 120 mg/1 at 430 m downgradient, respectively. Phenolic compounds and naphthalene are disappearing faster than expected if only dilution were occurring. Sorption of phenolic compounds on aquifer sediments is negligible but naphthalene is slightly sorbed. Anaerobic biodegradation of phenolic compounds is primarily responsible for the observed attenuation. Methane was found only in water samples from the contaminated zone (2-20 mg/1). Methane-producing bacteria were found only in water from the contaminated zone. Methane was produced in laboratory cultures of contaminated water inoculated with bacteria from the contaminated zone. Evidence for anaerobic biodegradation of naphthalene under either field or laboratory conditions was not obtained.

  12. Anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria gain antibiotic resistance during long-term acclimatization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zheng-Zhe; Zhang, Qian-Qian; Guo, Qiong; Chen, Qian-Qian; Jiang, Xiao-Yan; Jin, Ren-Cun

    2015-09-01

    Three broad-spectrum antibiotics, amoxicillin (AMX), florfenicol (FF) and sulfamethazine (SMZ), that inhibit bacteria via different target sites, were selected to evaluate the acute toxicity and long-term effects on anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) granules. The specific anammox activity (SAA) levels reduced by approximately half within the first 3 days in the presence of antibiotics but no nitrite accumulation was observed in continuous-flow experiments. However, the SAA levels and heme c content gradually recovered as the antibiotic concentrations increased. Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) analysis suggested that anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria gradually developed a better survival strategy during long-term acclimatization, which reduced the antibiotic stress via increased EPS secretion that provided a protective 'cocoon.' In terms of nitrogen removal efficiency, anammox granules could resist 60 mg-AMX L(-1), 10 mg-FF L(-1) and 100 mg-SMZ L(-1). This study supported the feasibility of using anammox granules to treat antibiotic-containing wastewater.

  13. Cultivation of nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria: impact of reactor configuration.

    PubMed

    Hu, Baolan; He, Zhanfei; Geng, Sha; Cai, Chen; Lou, Liping; Zheng, Ping; Xu, Xinhua

    2014-09-01

    Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (n-damo) is mediated by bacteria that anaerobically oxidize methane coupled with nitrite reduction and is a potential bioprocess for wastewater treatment. In this work, the effect of reactor configuration on n-damo bacterial cultivation was investigated. A magnetically stirred gas lift reactor (MSGLR), a sequencing batch reactor (SBR), and a continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) were selected to cultivate the bacteria. Microbial community was monitored by using quantitative PCR, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, pmoA gene sequencing, and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The effects of substrate inhibition, methane mass transfer, and biomass washout in the three reactors were focused on. The results indicated that the MSGLR had the best performance among the three reactor systems, with the highest total and specific n-damo activities. Its maximum volumetric nitrogen removal rate was up to 76.9 mg N L(-1) day(-1), which was higher than previously reported values (5.1-37.8 mg N L(-1) d(-1)).

  14. Comparison of three reagents for detecting indole production by anaerobic bacteria in microtest systems.

    PubMed Central

    Lombard, G L; Dowell, V R

    1983-01-01

    Three reagents for detecting indole, Kovac, Ehrlich, and p-dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde (DMCA), were evaluated with commercial microtest systems for characterizing and identifying anaerobic bacteria. The DMCA reagent, the most sensitive of the three reagents, gave a positive reaction with 445 of 449 strains of various indole-producing anaerobic bacteria. There was 99.6% agreement between the results obtained with the DMCA in the microtest systems and results using the conventional tube test to detect indole by using xylene extraction and Ehrlich reagent. Ehrlich reagent detected indole in 163 of 176 (92.6%) indole-positive strains when the inoculum was overlaid with mineral oil before incubation. Kovac reagent was the least sensitive of the reagents tested. When the inoculum was overlaid with mineral oil, Kovac reagent detected only 80 of 108 (74.0%) of indole-positive strains. In addition to being the most sensitive reagent for detection indole, DMCA also allowed detection of indole derivatives (skatole, 3-indolepropionic acid, and 3-indolebutyric acid) produced by some clostridia. PMID:6630445

  15. Phenols in anaerobic digestion processes and inhibition of ammonia oxidising bacteria (AOB) in soil.

    PubMed

    Levén, Lotta; Nyberg, Karin; Korkea-Aho, Lena; Schnürer, Anna

    2006-07-01

    This study focuses on the presence of phenols in digestate from seven Swedish large-scale anaerobic digestion processes and their impact on the activity of ammonia oxidising bacteria (AOB) in soil. In addition, the importance of feedstock composition and phenol degradation capacity for the occurrence of phenols in the digestate was investigated in the same processes. The results revealed that the content of phenols in the digestate was related to the inhibition of the activity of AOB in soil (EC(50)=26 microg phenols g(-1) d.w. soil). In addition, five pure phenols (phenol, o-, p-, m-cresol and 4-ethylphenol) inhibited the AOB to a similar extent (EC(50)=43-110 microg g(-1) d.w. soil). The phenol content in the digestate was mainly dependent on the composition of the feedstock, but also to some extent by the degradation capacity in the anaerobic digestion process. Swine manure in the feedstock resulted in digestate containing higher amounts of phenols than digestate from reactors with less or no swine manure in the feedstock. The degradation capacity of phenol and p-cresol was studied in diluted small-scale batch cultures and revealed that anaerobic digestion at mesophilic temperatures generally exhibited a higher degradation capacity compared to digestion at thermophilic temperature. Although phenol, p-cresol and 4-ethylphenol were quickly degraded in soil, the phenols added with the digestate constitute an environmental risk according to the guideline values for contaminated soils set by the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency. In conclusion, the management of anaerobic digestion processes is of decisive importance for the production of digestate with low amounts of phenols, and thereby little risks for negative effects of the phenols on the soil ecosystem.

  16. One carbon metabolism in anaerobic bacteria: Regulation of carbon and electron flow during organic acid production

    SciTech Connect

    Zeikus, J.G.; Jain, M.

    1993-12-31

    The project deals with understanding the fundamental biochemical mechanisms that physiologically control and regulate carbon and electron flow in anaerobic chemosynthetic bacteria that couple metabolism of single carbon compounds and hydrogen to the production of organic acids (formic, acetic, butyric, and succinic) or methane. The authors compare the regulation of carbon dioxide and hydrogen metabolism by fermentation, enzyme, and electron carrier analysis using Butyribacterium methylotrophicum, Anaeroblospirillum succiniciproducens, Methanosarcina barkeri, and a newly isolated tri-culture composed of a syntrophic butyrate degrader strain IB, Methanosarcina mazei and Methanobacterium formicicum as model systems. To understand the regulation of hydrogen metabolism during butyrate production or acetate degradation, hydrogenase activity in B. methylotrophicum or M. barkeri is measured in relation to growth substrate and pH; hydrogenase is purified and characterized to investigate number of hydrogenases; their localization and functions; and, their sequences are determined. To understand the mechanism for catabolic CO{sub 2} fixation to succinate the PEP carboxykinase enzyme and gene of A. succiniciproducens are purified and characterized. Genetically engineered strains of Escherichia coli containing the phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxykinase gene are examined for their ability to produce succinate in high yield. To understand the mechanism of fatty acid degradation by syntrophic acetogens during mixed culture methanogenesis formate and hydrogen production are characterized by radio tracer studies. It is intended that these studies provide strategies to improve anaerobic fermentations used for the production of organic acids or methane and, new basic understanding on catabolic CO{sub 2} fixation mechanisms and on the function of hydrogenase in anaerobic bacteria.

  17. Isolation, Characterization, and U(VI)-Reducing Potential of a Facultatively Anaerobic, Acid-Resistant Bacterium from Low-pH, Nitrate- and U(VI)-Contaminated Subsurface Sediment and Description of Salmonella subterranea sp. nov.

    PubMed Central

    Shelobolina, Evgenya S.; Sullivan, Sara A.; O'Neill, Kathleen R.; Nevin, Kelly P.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2004-01-01

    A facultatively anaerobic, acid-resistant bacterium, designated strain FRCl, was isolated from a low-pH, nitrate- and U(VI)-contaminated subsurface sediment at site FW-024 at the Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research Field Research Center in Oak Ridge, Tenn. Strain FRCl was enriched at pH 4.5 in minimal medium with nitrate as the electron acceptor, hydrogen as the electron donor, and acetate as the carbon source. Clones with 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences identical to the sequence of strain FRCl were also detected in a U(VI)-reducing enrichment culture derived from the same sediment. Cells of strain FRCl were gram-negative motile regular rods 2.0 to 3.4 μm long and 0.7 to 0.9 μm in diameter. Strain FRCl was positive for indole production, by the methyl red test, and for ornithine decarboxylase; it was negative by the Voges-Proskauer test (for acetylmethylcarbinol production), for urea hydrolysis, for arginine dihydrolase, for lysine decarboxylase, for phenylalanine deaminase, for H2S production, and for gelatin hydrolysis. Strain FRCl was capable of using O2, NO3−, S2O32−, fumarate, and malate as terminal electron acceptors and of reducing U(VI) in the cell suspension. Analysis of the 16S rDNA sequence of the isolate indicated that this strain was 96.4% similar to Salmonella bongori and 96.3% similar to Enterobacter cloacae. Physiological and phylogenetic analyses suggested that strain FRCl belongs to the genus Salmonella and represents a new species, Salmonella subterranea sp. nov. PMID:15128557

  18. Anaerobic Oxidation of Methane Coupled to Nitrite Reduction by Halophilic Marine NC10 Bacteria.

    PubMed

    He, Zhanfei; Geng, Sha; Cai, Chaoyang; Liu, Shuai; Liu, Yan; Pan, Yawei; Lou, Liping; Zheng, Ping; Xu, Xinhua; Hu, Baolan

    2015-08-15

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to nitrite reduction is a novel AOM process that is mediated by denitrifying methanotrophs. To date, enrichments of these denitrifying methanotrophs have been confined to freshwater systems; however, the recent findings of 16S rRNA and pmoA gene sequences in marine sediments suggest a possible occurrence of AOM coupled to nitrite reduction in marine systems. In this research, a marine denitrifying methanotrophic culture was obtained after 20 months of enrichment. Activity testing and quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis were then conducted and showed that the methane oxidation activity and the number of NC10 bacteria increased correlatively during the enrichment period. 16S rRNA gene sequencing indicated that only bacteria in group A of the NC10 phylum were enriched and responsible for the resulting methane oxidation activity, although a diverse community of NC10 bacteria was harbored in the inoculum. Fluorescence in situ hybridization showed that NC10 bacteria were dominant in the enrichment culture after 20 months. The effect of salinity on the marine denitrifying methanotrophic culture was investigated, and the apparent optimal salinity was 20.5‰, which suggested that halophilic bacterial AOM coupled to nitrite reduction was obtained. Moreover, the apparent substrate affinity coefficients of the halophilic denitrifying methanotrophs were determined to be 9.8 ± 2.2 μM for methane and 8.7 ± 1.5 μM for nitrite.

  19. Anaerobic bacteria grow within Candida albicans biofilms and induce biofilm formation in suspension cultures.

    PubMed

    Fox, Emily P; Cowley, Elise S; Nobile, Clarissa J; Hartooni, Nairi; Newman, Dianne K; Johnson, Alexander D

    2014-10-20

    The human microbiome contains diverse microorganisms, which share and compete for the same environmental niches. A major microbial growth form in the human body is the biofilm state, where tightly packed bacterial, archaeal, and fungal cells must cooperate and/or compete for resources in order to survive. We examined mixed biofilms composed of the major fungal species of the gut microbiome, Candida albicans, and each of five prevalent bacterial gastrointestinal inhabitants: Bacteroides fragilis, Clostridium perfringens, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Enterococcus faecalis. We observed that biofilms formed by C. albicans provide a hypoxic microenvironment that supports the growth of two anaerobic bacteria, even when cultured in ambient oxic conditions that are normally toxic to the bacteria. We also found that coculture with bacteria in biofilms induces massive gene expression changes in C. albicans, including upregulation of WOR1, which encodes a transcription regulator that controls a phenotypic switch in C. albicans, from the "white" cell type to the "opaque" cell type. Finally, we observed that in suspension cultures, C. perfringens induces aggregation of C. albicans into "mini-biofilms," which allow C. perfringens cells to survive in a normally toxic environment. This work indicates that bacteria and C. albicans interactions modulate the local chemistry of their environment in multiple ways to create niches favorable to their growth and survival.

  20. Reduction of nitroaromatic compounds by anaerobic bacteria isolated from the human gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed Central

    Rafil, F; Franklin, W; Heflich, R H; Cerniglia, C E

    1991-01-01

    Human intestinal microbial flora were screened for their abilities to reduce nitroaromatic compounds by growing them on brain heart infusion agar plates containing 1-nitropyrene. Bacteria metabolizing 1-nitropyrene, detected by the appearance of clear zones around the colonies, were identified as Clostridium leptum, Clostridium paraputrificum, Clostridium clostridiiforme, another Clostridium sp., and a Eubacterium sp. These bacteria produced aromatic amines from nitroaromatic compounds, as shown by thin-layer chromatography, high-pressure liquid chromatography, and biochemical tests. Incubation of three of these bacteria with 1-nitropyrene, 1,3-dinitropyrene, and 1,6-dinitropyrene inactivated the direct-acting mutagenicity associated with these compounds. Menadione and o-iodosobenzoic acid inhibited nitroreductase activity in all of the isolates, indicating the involvement of sulfhydryl groups in the active site of the enzyme. The optimum pH for nitroreductase activity was 8.0. Only the Clostridium sp. required added flavin adenine dinucleotide for nitroreductase activity. The nitroreductases were constitutive and extracellular. An activity stain for the detection of nitroreductase on anaerobic native polyacrylamide gels was developed. This activity stain revealed only one isozyme in each bacterium but showed that the nitroreductases from different bacteria had distinct electrophoretic mobilities. Images PMID:2059053

  1. Investigation of the relation between anaerobic bacteria genus clostridium and late-onset autism etiology in children.

    PubMed

    Keşli, Recep; Gökçen, Cem; Buluğ, Ufuk; Terzi, Yüksel

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between the etiology of late-onset childhood autism and anaerobic bacteria. Thirty children diagnosed with autistic disorder and control group have been included in the study. 3-(3-hydroxy phenyl)-3-hydroxypropionic acid (HPHPA) excretion rates which is a metabolic product of the genus Clostridium, were measured via mass spectrometry-gas chromatography (MS-GC) method from urine samples. When the assayed average HPHPA values compared with each group, a statistically significant difference was found (p < 0.05). Data obtained from this study support the existence of a significant correlation between autism etiology and anaerobic bacteria.

  2. Nitrate removal by organotrophic anaerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria with C2/C3 fatty acid in upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactors.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yuhai; Li, Dong; Zhang, Xiaojing; Zeng, Huiping; Yang, Yin; Zhang, Jie

    2015-10-01

    In anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox) process, a harsh ratio of nitrite to ammonia in influent was demanded, and the max nitrogen removal efficiency could only achieve to 89%, both of which limited the development of Anammox. The aim of this work was to study the nitrate removal by organotrophic anaerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria (AAOB) with C2/C3 fatty acid in upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors. In this study, organotrophic AAOB was successfully enriched by adding acetate and propionate with the total organic carbon to nitrogen (TOC/N) ratio of 0.1. In the condition of low substrate, the TN removal efficiency reached 90%, with the effluent TN of around 11.8 mg L(-1). After the addition of acetate and propionate, the predominant species in Anammox granular sludge transformed to Candidatus Jettenia that belonging to organotrophic AAOB from the Candidatus Kuenenia relating to general AAOB. PMID:26151852

  3. Physiologically anaerobic microorganisms of the deep subsurface. Progress report, June 1, 1991--May 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, S.E. Jr.; Chung, K.T.

    1992-06-01

    A variety of different media were used to isolate facultatively (FAB) and obligately anaerobic bacteria (OAB). These bacteria were isolated from core subsamples obtained from boreholes at the Idaho National Engineering Lab. (INEL) or at the Hanford Lab. (Yakima). Core material was sampled at various depths to 600 feet below the surface. All core samples with culturable bacteria contained at least FAB making thisthe most common physiological type of anaerobic bacteria present in the deep subsurface at these two sites. INEL core samples are characterized by isolates of both FAB and OAB. No isolates of acetogenic, methanogenic, or sulfate reducing bacteria were obtained. Yakima core samples are characterized by a marked predominance of FAB in comparison to OAB. In addition, isolates of acetogenic, methanogenic, and sulfate reducing bacteria were obtained. The Yakima site has the potential for complete anaerobic mineralization of organic compounds whereas this potential appears to be lacking at INEL.

  4. Reduced bacterial colony count of anaerobic bacteria is associated with a worsening in lung clearance index and inflammation in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Katherine; Bradley, Judy M; Johnston, Elinor; McGrath, Stephanie; McIlreavey, Leanne; Rowan, Stephen; Reid, Alastair; Bradbury, Ian; Einarsson, Gisli; Elborn, J Stuart; Tunney, Michael M

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic bacteria have been identified in abundance in the airways of cystic fibrosis (CF) subjects. The impact their presence and abundance has on lung function and inflammation is unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the colony count of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, lung clearance index (LCI), spirometry and C-Reactive Protein (CRP) in patients with CF. Sputum and blood were collected from CF patients at a single cross-sectional visit when clinically stable. Community composition and bacterial colony counts were analysed using extended aerobic and anaerobic culture. Patients completed spirometry and a multiple breath washout (MBW) test to obtain LCI. An inverse correlation between colony count of aerobic bacteria (n = 41, r = -0.35; p = 0.02), anaerobic bacteria (n = 41, r = -0.44, p = 0.004) and LCI was observed. There was an inverse correlation between colony count of anaerobic bacteria and CRP (n = 25, r = -0.44, p = 0.03) only. The results of this study demonstrate that a lower colony count of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria correlated with a worse LCI. A lower colony count of anaerobic bacteria also correlated with higher CRP levels. These results indicate that lower abundance of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria may reflect microbiota disruption and disease progression in the CF lung.

  5. Molecular Detection of Anaerobic Ammonium-Oxidizing (Anammox) Bacteria in High-Temperature Petroleum Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Chen, Shuo; Mu, Bo-Zhong

    2010-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) process plays an important role in the nitrogen cycle of the worldwide anoxic and mesophilic habitats. Recently, the existence and activity of anammox bacteria have been detected in some thermophilic environments, but their existence in the geothermal subterranean oil reservoirs is still not reported. This study investigated the abundance, distribution and functional diversity of anammox bacteria in nine out of 17 high-temperature oil reservoirs by molecular ecology analysis. High concentration (5.31–39.2 mg l−1) of ammonium was detected in the production water from these oilfields with temperatures between 55°C and 75°C. Both 16S rRNA and hzo molecular biomarkers indicated the occurrence of anammox bacteria in nine out of 17 samples. Most of 16S rRNA gene phylotypes are closely related to the known anammox bacterial genera Candidatus Brocadia, Candidatus Kuenenia, Candidatus Scalindua, and Candidatus Jettenia, while hzo gene phylotypes are closely related to the genera Candidatus Anammoxoglobus, Candidatus Kuenenia, Candidatus Scalindua, and Candidatus Jettenia. The total bacterial and anammox bacterial densities were 6.4 ± 0.5 × 103 to 2.0 ± 0.18 × 106 cells ml−1 and 6.6 ± 0.51 × 102 to 4.9 ± 0.36 × 104 cell ml−1, respectively. The cluster I of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed distant identity (<92%) to the known Candidatus Scalindua species, inferring this cluster of anammox bacteria to be a new species, and a tentative name Candidatus “Scalindua sinooilfield” was proposed. The results extended the existence of anammox bacteria to the high-temperature oil reservoirs. PMID:20740282

  6. Advances in methods for detection of anaerobic ammonium oxidizing (anammox) bacteria.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2011-05-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox), the biochemical process oxidizing ammonium into dinitrogen gas using nitrite as an electron acceptor, has only been recognized for its significant role in the global nitrogen cycle not long ago, and its ubiquitous distribution in a wide range of environments has changed our knowledge about the contributors to the global nitrogen cycle. Currently, several groups of methods are used in detection of anammox bacteria based on their physiological and biochemical characteristics, cellular chemical composition, and both 16S rRNA gene and selective functional genes as biomarkers, including hydrazine oxidoreductase and nitrite reductase encoding genes hzo and nirS, respectively. Results from these methods coupling with advances in quantitative PCR, reverse transcription of mRNA genes and stable isotope labeling have improved our understanding on the distribution, diversity, and activity of anammox bacteria in different environments both natural and engineered ones. In this review, we summarize these methods used in detection of anammox bacteria from various environments, highlight the strengths and weakness of these methods, and also discuss the new development potentials on the existing and new techniques in the future.

  7. Anaerobic respiration on tellurate and other metalloids in bacteria from hydrothermal vent fields in the eastern Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Csotonyi, Julius T; Stackebrandt, Erko; Yurkov, Vladimir

    2006-07-01

    This paper reports the discovery of anaerobic respiration on tellurate by bacteria isolated from deep ocean (1,543 to 1,791 m) hydrothermal vent worms. The first evidence for selenite- and vanadate-respiring bacteria from deep ocean hydrothermal vents is also presented. Enumeration of the anaerobic metal(loid)-resistant microbial community associated with hydrothermal vent animals indicates that a greater proportion of the bacterial community associated with certain vent fauna resists and reduces metal(loid)s anaerobically than aerobically, suggesting that anaerobic metal(loid) respiration might be an important process in bacteria that are symbiotic with vent fauna. Isolates from Axial Volcano and Explorer Ridge were tested for their ability to reduce tellurate, selenite, metavanadate, or orthovanadate in the absence of alternate electron acceptors. In the presence of metal(loid)s, strains showed an ability to grow and produce ATP, whereas in the absence of metal(loid)s, no growth or ATP production was observed. The protonophore carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone depressed metal(loid) reduction. Anaerobic tellurate respiration will be a significant component in describing biogeochemical cycling of Te at hydrothermal vents.

  8. In vitro activities of faropenem against 579 strains of anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wexler, Hannah M; Molitoris, Denise; St John, Shahera; Vu, Ann; Read, Erik K; Finegold, Sydney M

    2002-11-01

    The activity of faropenem, a new oral penem, was tested against 579 strains of anaerobic bacteria by using the NCCLS-approved reference method. Drugs tested included amoxicillin-clavulanate, cefoxitin, clindamycin, faropenem, imipenem, and metronidazole. Of the 176 strains of Bacteroides fragilis group isolates tested, two isolates had faropenem MICs of 64 micro g/ml and imipenem MICs of >32 micro g/ml. Faropenem had an MIC of 16 micro g/ml for an additional isolate of B. fragilis; this strain was sensitive to imipenem (MIC of 1 micro g/ml). Both faropenem and imipenem had MICs of < or=4 micro g/ml for all isolates of Bacteroides capillosus (10 isolates), Bacteroides splanchnicus (13 isolates), Bacteroides ureolyticus (11 isolates), Bilophila wadsworthia (11 isolates), Porphyromonas species (42 isolates), Prevotella species (78 isolates), Campylobacter species (25 isolates), Sutterella wadsworthensis (11 isolates), Fusobacterium nucleatum (19 isolates), Fusobacterium mortiferum/varium (20 isolates), and other Fusobacterium species (9 isolates). Faropenem and imipenem had MICs of 16 to 32 micro g/ml for two strains of Clostridium difficile; the MICs for all other strains of Clostridium tested (69 isolates) were < or =4 micro g/ml. Faropenem had MICs of 8 and 16 micro g/ml, respectively, for two strains of Peptostreptococcus anaerobius (MICs of imipenem were 2 micro g/ml). MICs were < or =4 micro g/ml for all other strains of gram-positive anaerobic cocci (53 isolates) and non-spore-forming gram-positive rods (28 isolates). Other results were as expected and reported in previous studies. No metronidazole resistance was seen in gram-negative anaerobes other than S. wadsworthensis (18% resistant); 63% of gram-positive non-spore-forming rods were resistant. Some degree of clindamycin resistance was seen in most of the groups tested. PMID:12384389

  9. In Vitro Activities of Faropenem against 579 Strains of Anaerobic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Wexler, Hannah M.; Molitoris, Denise; St. John, Shahera; Vu, Ann; Read, Erik K.; Finegold, Sydney M.

    2002-01-01

    The activity of faropenem, a new oral penem, was tested against 579 strains of anaerobic bacteria by using the NCCLS-approved reference method. Drugs tested included amoxicillin-clavulanate, cefoxitin, clindamycin, faropenem, imipenem, and metronidazole. Of the 176 strains of Bacteroides fragilis group isolates tested, two isolates had faropenem MICs of 64 μg/ml and imipenem MICs of >32 μg/ml. Faropenem had an MIC of 16 μg/ml for an additional isolate of B. fragilis; this strain was sensitive to imipenem (MIC of 1 μg/ml). Both faropenem and imipenem had MICs of ≤4 μg/ml for all isolates of Bacteroides capillosus (10 isolates), Bacteroides splanchnicus (13 isolates), Bacteroides ureolyticus (11 isolates), Bilophila wadsworthia (11 isolates), Porphyromonas species (42 isolates), Prevotella species (78 isolates), Campylobacter species (25 isolates), Sutterella wadsworthensis (11 isolates), Fusobacterium nucleatum (19 isolates), Fusobacterium mortiferum/varium (20 isolates), and other Fusobacterium species (9 isolates). Faropenem and imipenem had MICs of 16 to 32 μg/ml for two strains of Clostridium difficile; the MICs for all other strains of Clostridium tested (69 isolates) were ≤4 μg/ml. Faropenem had MICs of 8 and 16 μg/ml, respectively, for two strains of Peptostreptococcus anaerobius (MICs of imipenem were 2 μg/ml). MICs were ≤4 μg/ml for all other strains of gram-positive anaerobic cocci (53 isolates) and non-spore-forming gram-positive rods (28 isolates). Other results were as expected and reported in previous studies. No metronidazole resistance was seen in gram-negative anaerobes other than S. wadsworthensis (18% resistant); 63% of gram-positive non-spore-forming rods were resistant. Some degree of clindamycin resistance was seen in most of the groups tested. PMID:12384389

  10. The role of anaerobic bacteria in the neutralization of acid mine drainage. [Desulfovibrio

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, P.E.

    1988-01-01

    In contrast to the acidic water column, the sediments underlying Lake Anna, which receives acid mine drainage, are circumneutral and contain 1-4 meq alkalinity/L. Indirect fluorescent antibody counts of a methanogen (strain CA) and a sulfate reducer (Desulfovibrio strain SM) demonstrated that these organisms were present in the sediments at numbers of approximately 10{sup 6} bacteria/mL sediment. Anaerobic heterotrophs in the sediments underlying the acidified arm of the lake outnumbered anaerobic heterotrophs in a non-acidified arm of the lake. A major storm event resulted in the deposition of 11 cm of oxidized, acidic new sediment material over the older circumneutral sediments. The Eh in the new sediments decreased by 200 mV within one week after the storm event. The pH and alkalinity increased even in the 1-cm layer by two weeks after the storm and products of sulfate reduction (acid volatile sulfide) increased at three weeks after the storm. This suggests that biological processes other than sulfate reduction were responsible for the initial buffering of these sediments. Laboratory experiments using the sulfate reducer and two anaerobes (also isolated from the sediments) suggested that alkalinity production during sulfate reduction decreases with decreasing carbon concentration. Generation of alkalinity was found not to be a simple function of sulfate reduction or of iron reduction. The generation of alkalinity was found to be a function of the carbon source, and concentration, organisms present, and mineral phase formed. Iron reduction rates in the sediments of Contrary Creek ranged from 4.9-27.8 mM/m{sup 2}-sediment-day. Alkalinity was produced in the floc layer in the absence of sulfate reduction. Iron reduction could be responsible for the mineralization of 15-90% of the carbon input to this system.

  11. Complete Reductive Dechlorination of 1,2-Dichloropropane by Anaerobic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Loffler, F. E.; Champine, J. E.; Ritalahti, K. M.; Sprague, S. J.; Tiedje, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    The transformation of 1,2-dichloropropane (1,2-D) was observed in anaerobic microcosms and enrichment cultures derived from Red Cedar Creek sediment. 1-Chloropropane (1-CP) and 2-CP were detected after an incubation period of 4 weeks. After 4 months the initial amount of 1,2-D was stoichiometrically converted to propene, which was not further transformed. Dechlorination of 1,2-D was not inhibited by 2-bromoethanesulfonate. Sequential 5% (vol/vol) transfers from active microcosms yielded a sediment-free, nonmethanogenic culture, which completely dechlorinated 1,2-D to propene at a rate of 5 nmol min(sup-1) mg of protein(sup-1). No intermediate formation of 1-CP or 2-CP was detected in the sediment-free enrichment culture. A variety of electron donors, including hydrogen, supported reductive dechlorination of 1,2-D. The highest dechlorination rates were observed between 20(deg) and 25(deg)C. In the presence of 1,2-D, the hydrogen threshold concentration was below 1 ppm by volume (ppmv). In addition to 1,2-D, the enrichment culture transformed 1,1-D, 2-bromo-1-CP, tetrachloroethene, 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane, and 1,2-dichloroethane to less halogenated compounds. These findings extend our knowledge of the reductive dechlorination process and show that halogenated propanes can be completely dechlorinated by anaerobic bacteria. PMID:16535654

  12. Active transport, substrate specificity, and methylation of Hg(II) in anaerobic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Schasfer, Jeffra; Rocks, Sara; Zheng, Wang; Liang, Liyuan; Gu, Baohua; Morel, Francois M

    2011-01-01

    The formation of methylmercury (MeHg), which is biomagnified in aquatic food chains and poses a risk to human health, is effected by some iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria (FeRB and SRB) in anaerobic environments. However, very little is known regarding the mechanism of uptake of inorganic Hg by these organisms, in part because of the inherent difficulty in measuring the intracellular Hg concentration. By using the FeRB Geobacter sulfurreducens and the SRB Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 as model organisms, we demonstrate that Hg(II) uptake occurs by active transport. We also establish that Hg(II) uptake by G. sulfurreducens is highly dependent on the characteristics of the thiols that bind Hg(II) in the external medium, with some thiols promoting uptake and methylation and others inhibiting both. The Hg(II) uptake system of D. desulfuricans has a higher affinity than that of G. sulfurreducens and promotes Hg methylation in the presence of stronger complexing thiols. We observed a tight coupling between Hg methylation and MeHg export from the cell, suggesting that these two processes may serve to avoid the build up and toxicity of cellular Hg. Our results bring up the question of whether cellular Hg uptake is specific for Hg(II) or accidental, occurring via some essential metal importer. Our data also point at Hg(II) complexation by thiols as an important factor controlling Hg methylation in anaerobic environments.

  13. Evaluating Primers for Profiling Anaerobic Ammonia Oxidizing Bacteria within Freshwater Environments

    PubMed Central

    Sonthiphand, Puntipar; Neufeld, Josh D.

    2013-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonia oxidizing (anammox) bacteria play an important role in transforming ammonium to nitrogen gas and contribute to fixed nitrogen losses in freshwater environments. Understanding the diversity and abundance of anammox bacteria requires reliable molecular tools, and these are not yet well established for these important Planctomycetes. To help validate PCR primers for the detection of anammox bacteria within freshwater ecosystems, we analyzed representative positive controls and selected samples from Grand River and groundwater sites, both from Ontario, Canada. The objectives of this study were to identify a suitable anammox denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprint method by using GC-clamp modifications to existing primers, and to verify the specificity of anammox-specific primers used for DGGE, cloning and qPCR methods. Six primer combinations were tested from four published primer sets (i.e. A438f/A684r, Amx368f/Amx820r, An7f/An1388r, and Pla46/1392r) for both direct and nested PCR amplifications. All PCR products were run subsequently on DGGE gels to compare the resulting patterns. Two anammox-specific primer combinations were also used to generate clone libraries and quantify anammox bacterial 16S rRNA genes with qPCR. The primer set A438f/A684r was highly specific to anammox bacteria, provided reliable DGGE fingerprints and generated a high proportion of anammox-related clones. A second primer set (Amx368f/Amx820r) was anammox specific, based on clone library analysis, but PCR products from different candidate species of anammox bacteria resolved poorly using DGGE analysis. Both DGGE and cloning results revealed that Ca. Brocadia and an uncharacterized anammox bacterial cluster represented the majority of anammox bacteria found in Grand River sediment and groundwater samples, respectively. Together, our results demonstrate that although Amx368f/Amx820r was useful for anammox-specific qPCR and clone library analysis, A438f/A684r

  14. Evaluating primers for profiling anaerobic ammonia oxidizing bacteria within freshwater environments.

    PubMed

    Sonthiphand, Puntipar; Neufeld, Josh D

    2013-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonia oxidizing (anammox) bacteria play an important role in transforming ammonium to nitrogen gas and contribute to fixed nitrogen losses in freshwater environments. Understanding the diversity and abundance of anammox bacteria requires reliable molecular tools, and these are not yet well established for these important Planctomycetes. To help validate PCR primers for the detection of anammox bacteria within freshwater ecosystems, we analyzed representative positive controls and selected samples from Grand River and groundwater sites, both from Ontario, Canada. The objectives of this study were to identify a suitable anammox denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprint method by using GC-clamp modifications to existing primers, and to verify the specificity of anammox-specific primers used for DGGE, cloning and qPCR methods. Six primer combinations were tested from four published primer sets (i.e. A438f/A684r, Amx368f/Amx820r, An7f/An1388r, and Pla46/1392r) for both direct and nested PCR amplifications. All PCR products were run subsequently on DGGE gels to compare the resulting patterns. Two anammox-specific primer combinations were also used to generate clone libraries and quantify anammox bacterial 16S rRNA genes with qPCR. The primer set A438f/A684r was highly specific to anammox bacteria, provided reliable DGGE fingerprints and generated a high proportion of anammox-related clones. A second primer set (Amx368f/Amx820r) was anammox specific, based on clone library analysis, but PCR products from different candidate species of anammox bacteria resolved poorly using DGGE analysis. Both DGGE and cloning results revealed that Ca. Brocadia and an uncharacterized anammox bacterial cluster represented the majority of anammox bacteria found in Grand River sediment and groundwater samples, respectively. Together, our results demonstrate that although Amx368f/Amx820r was useful for anammox-specific qPCR and clone library analysis, A438f/A684r

  15. Distribution and activity of anaerobic ammonium-oxidising bacteria in natural freshwater wetland soils.

    PubMed

    Shen, Li-dong; Wu, Hong-sheng; Gao, Zhi-qiu; Cheng, Hai-xiang; Li, Ji; Liu, Xu; Ren, Qian-qi

    2016-04-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) process plays a significant role in the marine nitrogen cycle. However, the quantitative importance of this process in nitrogen removal in wetland systems, particularly in natural freshwater wetlands, is still not determined. In the present study, we provided the evidence of the distribution and activity of anammox bacteria in a natural freshwater wetland, located in southeastern China, by using (15)N stable isotope measurements, quantitative PCR assays and 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis. The potential anammox rates measured in this wetland system ranged between 2.5 and 25.5 nmol N2 g(-1) soil day(-1), and up to 20% soil dinitrogen gas production could be attributed to the anammox process. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA genes showed that anammox bacteria related to Candidatus Brocadia, Candidatus Kuenenia, Candidatus Anammoxoglobus and two novel anammox clusters coexisted in the collected soil cores, with Candidatus Brocadia and Candidatus Kuenenia being the dominant anammox genera. Quantitative PCR of hydrazine synthase genes showed that the abundance of anammox bacteria varied from 2.3 × 10(5) to 2.2 × 10(6) copies g(-1) soil in the examined soil cores. Correlation analyses suggested that the soil ammonium concentration had significant influence on the activity of anammox bacteria. On the basis of (15)N tracing technology, it is estimated that a total loss of 31.1 g N m(-2) per year could be linked the anammox process in the examined wetland. PMID:26621804

  16. Anaerobic infections in the head and neck region.

    PubMed

    Tabaqchali, S

    1988-01-01

    Anaerobic bacteria form the predominant flora of the oral cavity, outnumbering facultative organisms by 10-1,000: 1. The type of anaerobic bacteria and their concentration depend on the anatomical site and the degree of anaerobiosis in the different sites in the mouth. Three groups of anaerobic bacteria inhabit the oral cavity; the strict anaerobes, the moderate anaerobes, and the microaerophilic group of organisms. The majority of anaerobic bacterial infections occurring in the region of the mouth, head and neck are caused by the commensal flora. These infections include dental and periodontal disease where the predominant organisms are Bacteroides species, Veillonella, Bifidobacteria, Peptococcus, Peptostreptococcus and Propionibacterium species. More recently, Bacteroides endontalis has been isolated from a periapical abscess of endodontal origin and B. gingivalis, B. intermedius, Haemophilus actinomycetemcomitans and Wollinella species in chronic periodontal disease. Treponema species and other strict anaerobes are seen in smears of severe periodontal disease and acute necrotising gingivitis, but have not yet been isolated in pure culture. Until such time, their role in disease remains uncertain. Fusobacterium nucleatum is specially associated with severe orofacial infections which may extend into the mediastinum. Other anaerobic infections include chronic otitis media, chronic sinusitis and mastoiditis, and brain abscess. Treatment of these conditions should include the use of beta-lactamase resistant antimicrobials, such as clindamycin or one of the nitroimidazoles with penicillin.

  17. Distribution and environmental significance of nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane-oxidising bacteria in natural ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Shen, Li-dong; Wu, Hong-sheng; Gao, Zhi-qiu

    2015-01-01

    Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (N-DAMO) is a recently discovered process that is performed by "Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera" (M. oxyfera). This process constitutes a unique association between the two major global elements essential to life, carbon and nitrogen, and may act as an important and overlooked sink of the greenhouse gas methane. In recent years, more and more studies have reported the distribution of M. oxyfera-like bacteria and the occurrence of N-DAMO process in different natural ecosystems, including freshwater lakes, rivers, wetlands and marine ecosystems. Previous studies have estimated that a total of 2%-6% of current worldwide methane flux in wetlands could be consumed via the N-DAMO process. These findings indicate that N-DAMO is indeed a previously overlooked methane sink in natural ecosystems. Given the worldwide increase in anthropogenic nitrogen pollution, the N-DAMO process as a methane sink in reducing global warming could become more important in the future. The present mini-review summarises the current knowledge of the ecological distribution of M. oxyfera-like bacteria and the potential importance of the N-DAMO process in reducing methane emissions in various natural ecosystems. The potential influence of environmental factors on the N-DAMO process is also discussed. PMID:25398284

  18. Anaerobic ammonium-oxidising bacteria: A biological source of the bacteriohopanetetrol stereoisomer in marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rush, Darci; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Poulton, Simon W.; Thamdrup, Bo; Garside, A. Leigh; Acuña González, Jenaro; Schouten, Stefan; Jetten, Mike S. M.; Talbot, Helen M.

    2014-09-01

    Bacterially-derived bacteriohopanepolyols (BHPs) are abundant, well preserved lipids in modern and paleo-environments. Bacteriohopanetetrol (BHT) is a ubiquitously produced BHP while its less common stereoisomer (BHT isomer) has previously been associated with anoxic environments; however, its biological source remained unknown. We investigated the occurrence of BHPs in Golfo Dulce, an anoxic marine fjord-like enclosure located in Costa Rica. The distribution of BHT isomer in four sediment cores and a surface sediment transect closely followed the distribution of ladderane fatty acids, unique biomarkers for bacteria performing anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox). This suggests that BHT isomer and ladderane lipids likely shared the same biological source in Golfo Dulce. This was supported by examining the BHP lipid compositions of two enrichment cultures of a marine anammox species (‘Candidatus Scalindua profunda’), which were found to contain both BHT and BHT isomer. Remarkably, the BHT isomer was present in higher relative abundance than BHT. However, a non-marine anammox enrichment contained only BHT, which explains the infrequence of BHT isomer observations in terrestrial settings, and indicates that marine anammox bacteria are likely responsible for at least part of the environmentally-observed marine BHT isomer occurrences. Given the substantially greater residence time of BHPs in sediments, compared to ladderanes, BHT isomer is a potential biomarker for past anammox activity.

  19. Detection of bacteria from a cecal anaerobic competitive exclusion culture with an immunoassay electrochemiluminescence sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beier, Ross C.; Young, Colin R.; Stanker, Larry H.

    1999-01-01

    A competitive exclusion (CE) culture of chicken cecal anaerobes has been developed and used in this laboratory for control of Salmonella typhimurium in chickens. The CE culture consists of 29 different species of micro-organisms, and is known as CF3. Detection of one of the CF3 bacteria, Eubacteria, and S. typhimurium were demonstrated using a commercial immunomagnetic (IM) electrochemiluminescence (ECL) sensor, the ORIGENR Analyzer. Analysis was achieved using a sandwich immunoassay. Bacteria were captured on antibody- conjugated 280 micron sized magnetic beads followed by binding of reporter antibodies labelled with ruthenium (II) tris(dipyridyl) chelate [Ru(bpy)32+]. The magnetic beads were then trapped on an electrode in the reaction cell of the ORIGENR Analyzer by a magnet, and the ECL was evoked from Ru(bpy)32+ on the tagged reporter antibodies by an electrical potential at the electrode. Preliminary IM-ECL assays with Eubacteria yielded a detection limit of 105 cfu/mL. Preliminary IM-ECL assays with S. typhimurium yielded a similar detection limit of 105 cfu/mL.

  20. Electricity generation by anaerobic bacteria and anoxic sediments from hypersaline soda lakes.

    PubMed

    Miller, Laurence G; Oremland, Ronald S

    2008-11-01

    Anaerobic bacteria and anoxic sediments from soda lakes produced electricity in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). No electricity was generated in the absence of bacterial metabolism. Arsenate respiring bacteria isolated from moderately hypersaline Mono Lake (Bacillus selenitireducens), and salt-saturated Searles Lake, CA (strain SLAS-1) oxidized lactate using arsenate as the electron acceptor. However, these cultures grew equally well without added arsenate using the MFC anode as their electron acceptor, and in the process oxidized lactate more efficiently. The decrease in electricity generation by consumption of added alternative electron acceptors (i.e. arsenate) which competed with the anode for available electrons proved to be a useful indicator of microbial activity and hence life in the fuel cells. Shaken sediment slurries from these two lakes also generated electricity, with or without added lactate. Hydrogen added to sediment slurries was consumed but did not stimulate electricity production. Finally, electricity was generated in statically incubated "intact" sediment cores from these lakes. More power was produced in sediment from Mono Lake than from Searles Lake, however microbial fuel cells could detect low levels of metabolism operating under moderate and extreme conditions of salt stress.

  1. Electricity generation by anaerobic bacteria and anoxic sediments from hypersaline soda lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, L.G.; Oremland, R.S.

    2008-01-01

    Anaerobic bacteria and anoxic sediments from soda lakes produced electricity in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). No electricity was generated in the absence of bacterial metabolism. Arsenate respiring bacteria isolated from moderately hypersaline Mono Lake (Bacillus selenitireducens), and salt-saturated Searles Lake, CA (strain SLAS-1) oxidized lactate using arsenate as the electron acceptor. However, these cultures grew equally well without added arsenate using the MFC anode as their electron acceptor, and in the process oxidized lactate more efficiently. The decrease in electricity generation by consumption of added alternative electron acceptors (i.e. arsenate) which competed with the anode for available electrons proved to be a useful indicator of microbial activity and hence life in the fuel cells. Shaken sediment slurries from these two lakes also generated electricity, with or without added lactate. Hydrogen added to sediment slurries was consumed but did not stimulate electricity production. Finally, electricity was generated in statically incubated "intact" sediment cores from these lakes. More power was produced in sediment from Mono Lake than from Searles Lake, however microbial fuel cells could detect low levels of metabolism operating under moderate and extreme conditions of salt stress. ?? 2008 US Government.

  2. Cultivation of Planktonic Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation (Anammox) Bacteria Using Membrane Bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Oshiki, Mamoru; Awata, Takanori; Kindaichi, Tomonori; Satoh, Hisashi; Okabe, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    Enrichment cultures of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) bacteria as planktonic cell suspensions are essential for studying their ecophysiology and biochemistry, while their cultivation is still laborious. The present study aimed to cultivate two phylogenetically distinct anammox bacteria, “Candidatus Brocadia sinica” and “Ca. Scalindua sp.” in the form of planktonic cells using membrane bioreactors (MBRs). The MBRs were continuously operated for more than 250 d with nitrogen loading rates of 0.48–1.02 and 0.004–0.09 kgN m−3 d−1 for “Ca. Brocadia sinica” and “Ca. Scalindua sp.”, respectively. Planktonic anammox bacterial cells were successfully enriched (>90%) in the MBRs, which was confirmed by fluorescence in-situ hybridization and 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis. The decay rate and half-saturation constant for NO2− of “Ca. Brocadia sinica” were determined to be 0.0029–0.0081 d−1 and 0.47 mgN L−1, respectively, using enriched planktonic cells. The present study demonstrated that MBR enables the culture of planktonic anammox bacterial cells, which are suitable for studying their ecophysiology and biochemistry. PMID:24200833

  3. Phylogeny of numerically abundant culturable anaerobic bacteria associated with degradation of rice plant residue in Japanese paddy field soil.

    PubMed

    Akasaka, Hiroshi; Izawa, Tomoe; Ueki, Katsuji; Ueki, Atsuko

    2003-03-01

    Culturable anaerobic bacterial populations on rice plant residue (straw and stubble with roots) in paddy field soil were found on the order of 10(9) CFU (colony-forming units) (g dry weight of plant residue)(-1), and the percentages of spores were usually less than 1% of the total anaerobes. Anaerobic bacteria were isolated from each sample by picking up colonies on the roll tube agar used for the enumeration. The phylogenetic analysis of 47 isolates based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the composition of dominant culturable anaerobic bacteria on rice plant residue was rather simple. The most dominant group was closely related to the Cellulomonas species in the Actinobacteria phylum and accounted for more than 60% of the isolates for most of the samples. The second major group was also affiliated with the Actinobacteria phylum and tentatively named the 'propionate-producing Actinobacteria group' because the strains in the group commonly produced propionate. Strains in the third group, the 'Prevotella-like group', were Gram-negative, strictly anaerobic rods and placed in the Bacteroides phylum with 16S rRNA gene similarities of 86-92% to the closest relatives. Some other strains belonging to Betaproteobacteria and the clostridial group were also isolated. Most of the strains affiliated to the clostridial group were isolated from the heat-treated samples. Some phenotypic characteristics of representative strains of each group are also described.

  4. Environmental evaluation of coexistence of denitrifying anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea and bacteria in a paddy field.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jing; Fu, Liang; Ding, Zhao-Wei; Lu, Yong-Ze; Cheng, Shuk H; Zeng, Raymond J

    2016-01-01

    The nitrate-dependent denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation (DAMO) process, which is metabolized together by anaerobic methanotrophic archaea and NC10 phylum bacteria, is expected to be important for the global carbon and nitrogen cycles. However, there are little studies about the existence of this process and the functional microbes in environments. Therefore, the coexistence of DAMO archaea and bacteria in a paddy field was evaluated in this study. Next-generation sequencing showed that the two orders, Methanosarcinales and Nitrospirales, to which DAMO archaea and DAMO bacteria belong, were detected in the four soil samples. Then the in vitro experiments demonstrated both of nitrite- and nitrate-dependent DAMO activities, which confirmed the coexistence of DAMO archaea and DAMO bacteria. It was the first report about the coexistence of DAMO archaea and bacteria in a paddy field. Furthermore, anammox bacteria were detected in two of the four samples. The in vitro experiments did not show anammox activity in the initial period but showed low anammox activity after 20 days' enrichment. These results implicated that anammox bacteria may coexist with DAMO microorganisms in this field, but at a very low percentage.

  5. Biology, ecology, and biotechnological applications of anaerobic bacteria adapted to environmental stresses in temperature, pH, salinity, or substrates.

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, S E; Jain, M K; Zeikus, J G

    1993-01-01

    Anaerobic bacteria include diverse species that can grow at environmental extremes of temperature, pH, salinity, substrate toxicity, or available free energy. The first evolved archaebacterial and eubacterial species appear to have been anaerobes adapted to high temperatures. Thermoanaerobes and their stable enzymes have served as model systems for basic and applied studies of microbial cellulose and starch degradation, methanogenesis, ethanologenesis, acetogenesis, autotrophic CO2 fixation, saccharidases, hydrogenases, and alcohol dehydrogenases. Anaerobes, unlike aerobes, appear to have evolved more energy-conserving mechanisms for physiological adaptation to environmental stresses such as novel enzyme activities and stabilities and novel membrane lipid compositions and functions. Anaerobic syntrophs do not have similar aerobic bacterial counterparts. The metabolic end products of syntrophs are potent thermodynamic inhibitors of energy conservation mechanisms, and they require coordinated consumption by a second partner organism for species growth. Anaerobes adapted to environmental stresses and their enzymes have biotechnological applications in organic waste treatment systems and chemical and fuel production systems based on biomass-derived substrates or syngas. These kinds of anaerobes have only recently been examined by biologists, and considerably more study is required before they are fully appreciated by science and technology. Images PMID:8336675

  6. Enrichment of acetogenic bacteria in high rate anaerobic reactors under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions.

    PubMed

    Ryan, P; Forbes, C; McHugh, S; O'Reilly, C; Fleming, G T A; Colleran, E

    2010-07-01

    The objective of the current study was to expand the knowledge of the role of acetogenic Bacteria in high rate anaerobic digesters. To this end, acetogens were enriched by supplying a variety of acetogenic growth supportive substrates to two laboratory scale high rate upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactors operated at 37 degrees C (R1) and 55 degrees C (R2). The reactors were initially fed a glucose/acetate influent. Having achieved high operational performance and granular sludge development and activity, both reactors were changed to homoacetogenic bacterial substrates on day 373 of the trial. The reactors were initially fed with sodium vanillate as a sole substrate. Although % COD removal indicated that the 55 degrees C reactor out performed the 37 degrees C reactor, effluent acetate levels from R2 were generally higher than from R1, reaching values as high as 5023 mg l(-1). Homoacetogenic activity in both reactors was confirmed on day 419 by specific acetogenic activity (SAA) measurement, with higher values obtained for R2 than R1. Sodium formate was introduced as sole substrate to both reactors on day 464. It was found that formate supported acetogenic activity at both temperatures. By the end of the trial, no specific methanogenic activity (SMA) was observed against acetate and propionate indicating that the methane produced was solely by hydrogenotrophic Archaea. Higher SMA and SAA values against H(2)/CO(2) suggested development of a formate utilising acetogenic population growing in syntrophy with hydrogenotrophic methanogens. Throughout the formate trial, the mesophilic reactor performed better overall than the thermophilic reactor.

  7. Screening of thermophilic anaerobic bacteria for solid substrate cultivation on lignocellulosic substrates.

    PubMed

    Chinn, Mari S; Nokes, Sue E; Strobel, Herbert J

    2006-01-01

    Interest in solid substrate cultivation (SSC) techniques is gaining for biochemical production from renewable resources; however, heat and mass transfer problems may limit application of this technique. The use of anaerobic thermophiles in SSC offers a unique solution to overcoming these challenges. The production potential of nine thermophilic anaerobic bacteria was examined on corn stover, sugar cane bagasse, paper pulp sludge, and wheat bran in submerged liquid cultivation (SmC) and SSC. Production of acetate, ethanol, and lactate was measured over a 10 day period, and total product concentrations were used to compare the performance of different organism-substrate combinations using the two cultivation methods. Overall microbial activity in SmC and SSC was dependent on the organism and growth substrate. Clostridium thermocellum strains JW20, LQRI, and 27405 performed significantly better in SSC when grown on sugar cane bagasse and paper pulp sludge, producing at least 70 and 170 mM of total products, respectively. Growth of C. thermocellum strains in SSC on paper pulp sludge proved to be most favorable, generating at least twice the concentration of total products produced in SmC (p-value < 0.05). Clostridium thermolacticum TC21 demonstrated growth on all substrates producing 30-80 and 60-116 mM of total product in SmC and SSC, respectively. Bacterial species with optimal growth temperatures of 70 degrees C grew best on wheat bran in SmC, producing total product concentrations of 45-75 mM. For some of the organism-substrate combinations total end product concentrations in SSC exceeded those in SmC, indicating that SSC may be a promising alternative for microbial activity and value-added biochemical production.

  8. Experimental modelling of Calcium carbonate precipitation in the presence of phototrophic anaerobic bacteria Rhodovulum sp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bundeleva, Irina; Shirokova, Liudmila; Benezeth, Pascale; Pokrovsky, Oleg; Kompantseva, Elena

    2010-05-01

    -potential of the cells. To characterise the link between the rate of bacterial growth (biomass production) and the rate of CaCO3 precipitation, batch kinetic experiments were performed. These experiments were carried out in closed (anaerobic) bottles with initial concentration of calcium from 1 to 20 mM and from 5 to 20 mM bicarbonate. The biomass of cells, pH, [Ca2+] and [Alk] were measured as a function of time. Blank experiments (without cell or autoclaved cells) were always carried out. We found that the optimal conditions for both CaCO3 precipitation and biomass increase for the culture Rhodovulum sp. A-20s, is calcium concentration of 3 mM, whatever the concentration of bicarbonate (5, 10, 15 mM). Note also that for calcium concentration higher than 3 mM, the biomass production decreases. In the case of strictly anaerobic Rhodovulum sp. S-1765 bacteria, the optimal conditions for calcium carbonate precipitation is observed for the bicarbonate concentration of 10 mM, whatever the calcium concentration (3, 5, 10 mM). Overall, the present study allows quantitative modeling of bacterially-induced CaCO3 precipitation. It helps to distinguish between the effect of cell surface functional groups, surface electrical charge, soluble organic matter and metabolic change of solution pH on the rate and nature of precipitating calcium carbonate solid phase.

  9. Genes for Uranium Bioremediation in the Anaerobic Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria: Desulfovibrio mutants with altered sensitivity to oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Rayford B.; Ringbauer, Joseph A., Jr.; Wall, Judy D.

    2006-04-05

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria of the genus Desulfovibrio are ubiquitous in anaerobic environments such as groundwater, sediments, and the gastrointestinal tract of animals. Because of the ability of Desulfovibrio to reduce radionuclides and metals through both enzymatic and chemical means, they have been proposed as a means to bioremediate heavy metal contaminated sites. Although classically thought of as strict anaerobes, Desulfovibrio species are surprisingly aerotolerant. Our objective is to understand the response of Desulfovibrio to oxidative stress so that we may more effectively utilize them in bioremediation of heavy metals in mixed aerobic-anaerobic environments. The enzymes superoxide dismutase, superoxide reductase, catalase, and rubrerythrin have been shown by others to be involved in the detoxification of reactive oxygen species in Desulfovibrio. Some members of the genus Desulfovibrio can even reduce molecular oxygen to water via a membrane bound electron transport chain with the concomitant production of ATP, although their ability to grow with oxygen as the sole electron acceptor is still questioned.

  10. The Performance of the Four Anaerobic Blood Culture Bottles BacT/ALERT-FN, -FN Plus, BACTEC-Plus and -Lytic in Detection of Anaerobic Bacteria and Identification by Direct MALDI-TOF MS.

    PubMed

    Almuhayawi, Mohammed; Altun, Osman; Abdulmajeed, Adam Dilshad; Ullberg, Måns; Özenci, Volkan

    2015-01-01

    Detection and identification of anaerobic bacteria in blood cultures (BC) is a well-recognized challenge in clinical microbiology. We studied 100 clinical anaerobic BC isolates to evaluate the performance of BacT/ALERT-FN, -FN Plus (BioMérieux), BACTEC-Plus and -Lytic (Becton Dickinson BioSciences) BC bottles in detection and time to detection (TTD) of anaerobic bacteria. BACTEC Lytic had higher detection rate (94/100, 94%) than BacT/ALERT FN Plus (80/100, 80%) (p<0.01) in the studied material. There was no significant difference in detection of anaerobic bacteria among the remaining bottle types. The 67 anaerobic bacteria that signalled positive in all four bottle types were analyzed to compare the time to detection (TTD) and isolates were directly identified by MALDI-TOF MS. There was a significant difference in TTD among the four bottle types (p<0.0001). The shortest median TTD was 18 h in BACTEC Lytic followed by BacT/ALERT FN (23.5 h), BACTEC Plus (27 h) and finally BacT/ALERT FN Plus (38 h) bottles. In contrast, MALDI-TOF MS performed similarly in all bottle types with accurate identification in 51/67 (76%) BacT/ALERT FN, 51/67 (76%) BacT/ALERT FN Plus, 53/67 (79%) BACTEC Plus and 50/67 (75%) BACTEC Lytic bottles. In conclusion, BACTEC Lytic bottles have significantly better detection rates and shorter TTD compared to the three other bottle types. The anaerobic BC bottles are equally suitable for direct MALDI-TOF MS for rapid and reliable identification of common anaerobic bacteria. Further clinical studies are warranted to investigate the performance of anaerobic BC bottles in detection of anaerobic bacteria and identification by direct MALDI-TOF MS.

  11. Mutagenicity of anaerobic fenitrothion metabolites after aerobic biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Taku; Matsui, Yoshihiko; Saeki, Ryo; Inoue, Takanobu

    2005-12-01

    Previous studies have revealed that the mutagenicity of fenitrothion increases during anaerobic biodegradation, suggesting that this insecticide's mutagenicity could effectively increase after it pollutes anaerobic environments such as lake sediments. To investigate possible changes to the mutagenicity of fenitrothion under aerobic conditions after it had already been increased by anaerobic biodegradation, batch incubation cultures were maintained under aerobic conditions. The mutagenicity, which had increased during anaerobic biodegradation, decreased under aerobic conditions with aerobic or facultative bacteria, but did not disappear completely in 22 days. In contrast, it did not change under aerobic conditions without bacteria or under continued anaerobic conditions. These observations suggest that the mutagenicity of anaerobically metabolized fenitrothion would not necessarily decrease after it arrives in an aerobic environment: this would depend on the presence of suitable bacteria. Therefore, fenitrothion-derived mutagenic compounds may pollute the water environment, including our drinking water sources, after accidental pollution of aerobic waters. Although amino-fenitrothion generated during anaerobic biodegradation of fenitrothion was the principal mutagen, non-trivial contributions of other, unidentified metabolites to the mutagenicity were also observed. PMID:16263383

  12. Anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria and associated activity in fixed-film biofilters of a marine recirculating aquaculture system.

    PubMed

    Tal, Yossi; Watts, Joy E M; Schreier, Harold J

    2006-04-01

    Microbial communities in the biological filter and waste sludge compartments of a marine recirculating aquaculture system were examined to determine the presence and activity of anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria. Community DNA was extracted from aerobic and anaerobic fixed-film biofilters and the anaerobic sludge waste collection tank and was analyzed by amplifying 16S rRNA genes by PCR using anammox-selective and universal GC-clamped primers. Separation of amplified PCR products by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and sequencing of the different phylotypes revealed a diverse biofilter microbial community. While Planctomycetales were found in all three communities, the anaerobic denitrifying biofilters contained one clone that exhibited high levels of sequence similarity to known anammox bacteria. Fluorescence in situ hybridization studies using an anammox-specific probe confirmed the presence of anammox Planctomycetales in the microbial biofilm from the denitrifying biofilters, and anammox activity was observed in these biofilters, as detected by the ability to simultaneously consume ammonia and nitrite. To our knowledge, this is the first identification of anammox-related sequences in a marine recirculating aquaculture filtration system, and our findings provide a foundation for incorporating this important pathway for complete nitrogen removal in such systems.

  13. Introduction of anaerobic dechlorinating bacteria into soil slurry microcosms and nested-PCR monitoring.

    PubMed Central

    el Fantroussi, S; Mahillon, J; Naveau, H; Agathos, S N

    1997-01-01

    Desulfomonile tiedjei and Desulfitobacterium dehalogenans were chosen as model bacteria to demonstrate the introduction of an anaerobic microbia reductive dechlorination activity into nonsterile soil slurry microcosms by inoculation. De novo 3-chlorobenzoate dechlorination activity was established with the bacterium D. tiedjei in microcosms normally devoid of this dechlorination capacity. The addition of D. tiedjei to microcosms supplemented with 20 mM pyruvate as the cosubstrate resulted in total biotransformation of 1.5 mM 3-chlorobenzoate within 7 days. The introduction of the bacterium Desulfitobacterium dehalogenans into nonsterile microcosms resulted in a shortening of the period required for dechlorination activity to be established. In microcosms inoculated with Desulfitobacterium dehalogenans, total degradation of 6 mM 3-chloro-4-hydroxy phenoxyacetic acid (3-Cl-4-OHPA) was observed after 4 days in contrast to the result in noninoculated microcosms, where the total degradation of 3-Cl-4-OHPA by indigenous microorganisms was observed after 11 days. Both externally introduced bacterial strains were detected in soil slurry microcosms by a nested-PCR methodology. PMID:9023963

  14. Sodium ion pumps and hydrogen production in glutamate fermenting anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Boiangiu, Clara D; Jayamani, Elamparithi; Brügel, Daniela; Herrmann, Gloria; Kim, Jihoe; Forzi, Lucia; Hedderich, Reiner; Vgenopoulou, Irini; Pierik, Antonio J; Steuber, Julia; Buckel, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    Anaerobic bacteria ferment glutamate via two different pathways to ammonia, carbon dioxide, acetate, butyrate and molecular hydrogen. The coenzyme B12-dependent pathway in Clostridium tetanomorphum via 3-methylaspartate involves pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase and a novel enzyme, a membrane-bound NADH:ferredoxin oxidoreductase. The flavin- and iron-sulfur-containing enzyme probably uses the energy difference between reduced ferredoxin and NADH to generate an electrochemical Na+ gradient, which drives transport processes. The other pathway via 2-hydroxyglutarate in Acidaminococcus fermentans and Fusobacterium nucleatum involves glutaconyl-CoA decarboxylase, which uses the free energy of decarboxylation to generate also an electrochemical Na+ gradient. In the latter two organisms, similar membrane-bound NADH:ferredoxin oxidoreductases have been characterized. We propose that in the hydroxyglutarate pathway these oxidoreductases work in the reverse direction, whereby the reduction of ferredoxin by NADH is driven by the Na+ gradient. The reduced ferredoxin is required for hydrogen production and the activation of radical enzymes. Further examples show that reduced ferredoxin is an agent, whose reducing energy is about 1 ATP 'richer' than that of NADH.

  15. Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane-oxidising bacteria: unique microorganisms with special properties.

    PubMed

    Shen, Li-Dong; He, Zhan-Fei; Wu, Hong-Sheng; Gao, Zhi-Qiu

    2015-04-01

    Microbial mediated nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (N-DAMO), which couples the oxidation of methane to nitrite reduction, is a recently discovered process. The discovery of N-DAMO process makes great contributions to complete the biogeochemical cycles of carbon and nitrogen, and to develop novel economic biotechnology for simultaneous carbon and nitrogen removal. This process is catalysed by the unique bacterium "Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera" (M. oxyfera), which belongs to the candidate phylum NC10, a phylum having no members in pure culture. In recent years, some microbiological properties of M. oxyfera have been unravelled. The most prominent examples are the discoveries of the special ultrastructure (star-like) of the cell shape and the unique chemical composition (10MeC16:1Δ7) of M. oxyfera that have not been found in other bacteria yet. More importantly, a new intra-aerobic pathway was discovered in M. oxyfera. It seems that M. oxyfera produces oxygen intracellularly by the conversion of two nitric oxide molecules to dinitrogen gas and oxygen, and the produced oxygen is then used for methane oxidation and normal respiration. The current paper is a systematic review in the microbiological properties of M. oxyfera, especially for its special properties. PMID:25519694

  16. Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane-oxidising bacteria: unique microorganisms with special properties.

    PubMed

    Shen, Li-Dong; He, Zhan-Fei; Wu, Hong-Sheng; Gao, Zhi-Qiu

    2015-04-01

    Microbial mediated nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (N-DAMO), which couples the oxidation of methane to nitrite reduction, is a recently discovered process. The discovery of N-DAMO process makes great contributions to complete the biogeochemical cycles of carbon and nitrogen, and to develop novel economic biotechnology for simultaneous carbon and nitrogen removal. This process is catalysed by the unique bacterium "Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera" (M. oxyfera), which belongs to the candidate phylum NC10, a phylum having no members in pure culture. In recent years, some microbiological properties of M. oxyfera have been unravelled. The most prominent examples are the discoveries of the special ultrastructure (star-like) of the cell shape and the unique chemical composition (10MeC16:1Δ7) of M. oxyfera that have not been found in other bacteria yet. More importantly, a new intra-aerobic pathway was discovered in M. oxyfera. It seems that M. oxyfera produces oxygen intracellularly by the conversion of two nitric oxide molecules to dinitrogen gas and oxygen, and the produced oxygen is then used for methane oxidation and normal respiration. The current paper is a systematic review in the microbiological properties of M. oxyfera, especially for its special properties.

  17. Antimicrobial activity of some Pacific Northwest woods against anaerobic bacteria and yeast.

    PubMed

    Johnston, W H; Karchesy, J J; Constantine, G H; Craig, A M

    2001-11-01

    Extracts of woods commonly used for animal bedding were tested for antimicrobial activity. Essential oils from Alaska cedar (Chamaecyparis nootkatensis), western juniper (Juniperus occidentalis) and old growth Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) as well as methanol extracts of wood from these trees plus western red cedar (Thuja plicata) and ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) were tested for antimicrobial activity against anaerobic bacteria and yeast. The test microbes included Fusobacterium necrophorum, Clostridium perfringens, Actinomyces bovis and Candida albicans which are common to foot diseases and other infections in animals. The essential oils and methanol extracts were tested using a standardized broth assay. Only extracts of Alaska cedar and western juniper showed significant antimicrobial activity against each of the microbes tested. The essential oil of Douglas fir did show antimicrobial activity against A. bovis at the concentrations tested. The methanol extracts of the heartwood of Douglas fir and the sapwood of ponderosa pine showed no antimicrobial activity. The major chemical components of western juniper (cedrol and alpha- and beta-cedrene) and Alaska cedar (nootkatin) were also tested. In western juniper, alpha- and beta-cedrene were found to be active components. Nootkatin showed activity only against C. albicans. The inhibitory activity in Alaska cedar oil was high enough to justify further efforts to define the other chemical components responsible for the antimicrobial activity. PMID:11746838

  18. In vivo imaging and tracking of host-microbiota interactions via metabolic labeling of gut anaerobic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Geva-Zatorsky, Naama; Alvarez, David; Hudak, Jason E.; Reading, Nicola C.; Erturk-Hasdemir, Deniz; Dasgupta, Suryasarathi; von Andrian, Ulrich H.; Kasper, Dennis L.

    2015-01-01

    The intestine is densely populated by anaerobic commensal bacteria. These microorganisms shape immune system development, but our understanding of host–commensal interactions is hampered by a lack of tools for studying the anaerobic intestinal environment. We applied metabolic oligosaccharide engineering and bioorthogonal click-chemistry to label various commensal anaerobes, including Bacteroides fragilis, a common and immunologically important commensal. We studied the dissemination of B. fragilis following acute peritonitis, and characterized the interactions of the intact microbe and its polysaccharide components in myeloid and B cell lineages. The distribution and colonization of labeled B. fragilis along the intestine can be assessed, as well as niche competition following coadministration of multiple species of the microbiota. Nine additional anaerobic commensals (both gram-negative and gram-positive) from three phyla common in the gut—Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria—and five families and one aerobic pathogen (Staphylococcus aureus) were also fluorescently labeled. This strategy permits visualization of the anaerobic microbial niche by various methods, including intravital two-photon microscopy and non-invasive whole-body imaging, and an approach to study microbial colonization and host–microbe interactions in real-time. PMID:26280120

  19. Stoke's and anti-Stoke's characteristics of anaerobic and aerobic bacterias at excitation of fluorescence by low-intensity red light: I. Research of anaerobic bacterias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masychev, Victor I.; Alexandrov, Michail T.

    2000-04-01

    Biopsy or photo dynamic therapy of tumors are usually investigated by fluorescent diagnostics methods. Information on modified method of fluorescence diagnostics of inflammatory diseases is represented in this research. Anaerobic micro organisms are often the cause of these pathological processes. These micro organisms also accompany disbiotic processes in intestines.

  20. Environmental detection of octahaem cytochrome c hydroxylamine/hydrazine oxidoreductase genes of aerobic and anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Markus C; Hooper, Alan B; Klotz, Martin G; Woebken, Dagmar; Lam, Phyllis; Kuypers, Marcel M M; Pommerening-Roeser, Andreas; Op den Camp, Huub J M; Jetten, Mike S M

    2008-11-01

    Bacterial aerobic ammonium oxidation and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) are important processes in the global nitrogen cycle. Key enzymes in both processes are the octahaem cytochrome c (OCC) proteins, hydroxylamine oxidoreductase (HAO) of aerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), which catalyses the oxidation of hydroxylamine to nitrite, and hydrazine oxidoreductase (HZO) of anammox bacteria, which converts hydrazine to N(2). While the genomes of AOB encode up to three nearly identical copies of hao operons, genome analysis of Candidatus'Kuenenia stuttgartiensis' showed eight highly divergent octahaem protein coding regions as possible candidates for the HZO. Based on their phylogenetic relationship and biochemical characteristics, the sequences of these eight gene products grouped in three clusters. Degenerate primers were designed on the basis of available gene sequences with the aim to detect hao and hzo genes in various ecosystems. The hao primer pairs amplified gene fragments from 738 to 1172 bp and the hzo primer pairs amplified gene fragments from 289 to 876 bp in length, when tested on genomic DNA isolated from a variety of AOB and anammox bacteria. A selection of these primer pairs was also used successfully to amplify and analyse the hao and hzo genes in community DNA isolated from different ecosystems harbouring both AOB and anammox bacteria. We propose that OCC protein-encoding genes are suitable targets for molecular ecological studies on both aerobic and anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria.

  1. Azoarcus sp. CIB, an Anaerobic Biodegrader of Aromatic Compounds Shows an Endophytic Lifestyle

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Helga; Prandoni, Nicolás; Fernández-Pascual, Mercedes; Fajardo, Susana; Morcillo, César; Díaz, Eduardo; Carmona, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Background Endophytic bacteria that have plant growth promoting traits are of great interest in green biotechnology. The previous thought that the Azoarcus genus comprises bacteria that fit into one of two major eco-physiological groups, either free-living anaerobic biodegraders of aromatic compounds or obligate endophytes unable to degrade aromatics under anaerobic conditions, is revisited here. Methodology/Principal Findings Light, confocal and electron microscopy reveal that Azoarcus sp. CIB, a facultative anaerobe β-proteobacterium able to degrade aromatic hydrocarbons under anoxic conditions, is also able to colonize the intercellular spaces of the rice roots. In addition, the strain CIB displays plant growth promoting traits such nitrogen fixation, uptake of insoluble phosphorus and production of indoleacetic acid. Therefore, this work demonstrates by the first time that a free-living bacterium able to degrade aromatic compounds under aerobic and anoxic conditions can share also an endophytic lifestyle. The phylogenetic analyses based on the 16S rDNA and nifH genes confirmed that obligate endophytes of the Azoarcus genus and facultative endophytes, such as Azoarcus sp. CIB, locate into different evolutionary branches. Conclusions/Significance This is the first report of a bacterium, Azoarcus sp. CIB, able to degrade anaerobically a significant number of aromatic compounds, some of them of great environmental concern, and to colonize the rice as a facultative endophyte. Thus, Azoarcus sp. CIB becomes a suitable candidate for a more sustainable agricultural practice and phytoremediation technology. PMID:25340341

  2. Nitrate-Dependent Ferrous Iron Oxidation by Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation (Anammox) Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Oshiki, M.; Ishii, S.; Yoshida, K.; Fujii, N.; Ishiguro, M.; Satoh, H.

    2013-01-01

    We examined nitrate-dependent Fe2+ oxidation mediated by anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) bacteria. Enrichment cultures of “Candidatus Brocadia sinica” anaerobically oxidized Fe2+ and reduced NO3− to nitrogen gas at rates of 3.7 ± 0.2 and 1.3 ± 0.1 (mean ± standard deviation [SD]) nmol mg protein−1 min−1, respectively (37°C and pH 7.3). This nitrate reduction rate is an order of magnitude lower than the anammox activity of “Ca. Brocadia sinica” (10 to 75 nmol NH4+ mg protein−1 min−1). A 15N tracer experiment demonstrated that coupling of nitrate-dependent Fe2+ oxidation and the anammox reaction was responsible for producing nitrogen gas from NO3− by “Ca. Brocadia sinica.” The activities of nitrate-dependent Fe2+ oxidation were dependent on temperature and pH, and the highest activities were seen at temperatures of 30 to 45°C and pHs ranging from 5.9 to 9.8. The mean half-saturation constant for NO3− ± SD of “Ca. Brocadia sinica” was determined to be 51 ± 21 μM. Nitrate-dependent Fe2+ oxidation was further demonstrated by another anammox bacterium, “Candidatus Scalindua sp.,” whose rates of Fe2+ oxidation and NO3− reduction were 4.7 ± 0.59 and 1.45 ± 0.05 nmol mg protein−1 min−1, respectively (20°C and pH 7.3). Co-occurrence of nitrate-dependent Fe2+ oxidation and the anammox reaction decreased the molar ratios of consumed NO2− to consumed NH4+ (ΔNO2−/ΔNH4+) and produced NO3− to consumed NH4+ (ΔNO3−/ΔNH4+). These reactions are preferable to the application of anammox processes for wastewater treatment. PMID:23624480

  3. Diversity and ubiquity of bacteria capable of utilizing humic substances as electron donors for anaerobic respiration.

    PubMed

    Coates, John D; Cole, Kimberly A; Chakraborty, Romy; O'Connor, Susan M; Achenbach, Laurie A

    2002-05-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that reduced humic substances (HS) can be reoxidized by anaerobic bacteria such as Geobacter, Geothrix, and Wolinella species with a suitable electron acceptor; however, little is known of the importance of this metabolism in the environment. Recently we investigated this metabolism in a diversity of environments including marine and aquatic sediments, forest soils, and drainage ditch soils. Most-probable-number enumeration studies were performed using 2,6-anthrahydroquinone disulfonate (AHDS), an analog for reduced HS, as the electron donor with nitrate as the electron acceptor. Anaerobic organisms capable of utilizing reduced HS as an electron donor were found in all environments tested and ranged from a low of 2.31 x 10(1) in aquifer sediments to a high of 9.33 x 10(6) in lake sediments. As part of this study we isolated six novel organisms capable of anaerobic AHDS oxidation. All of the isolates coupled the oxidation of AHDS to the reduction of nitrate with acetate (0.1 mM) as the carbon source. In the absence of cells, no AHDS oxidation was apparent, and in the absence of AHDS, no cell density increase was observed. Generally, nitrate was reduced to N(2). Analysis of the AHDS and its oxidized form, 2,6-anthraquinone disulfonate (AQDS), in the medium during growth revealed that the anthraquinone was not being biodegraded as a carbon source and was simply being oxidized as an energy source. Determination of the AHDS oxidized and nitrate reduced accounted for 109% of the theoretical electron transfer. In addition to AHDS, all of these isolates could also couple the oxidation of reduced humic substances to the reduction of nitrate. No HS oxidation occurred in the absence of cells and in the absence of a suitable electron acceptor, demonstrating that these organisms were capable of utilizing natural HS as an energy source and that AHDS serves as a suitable analog for studying this metabolism. Alternative electron donors included

  4. O-demethylation, dehydroxylation, ring-reduction and cleavage of aromatic substrates by Enterobacteriaceae under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Grbić-Galić, D

    1986-12-01

    Four fermentative facultative anaerobes, members of the genera Enterobacter and Escherichia, were tested for their ability to transform an aromatic lignin derivative, 3-methoxy-4-hydroxy-cinnamic acid (ferulic acid), under anaerobic (fermentative) conditions. The pure cultures studied were shown to O-demethylate, dehydroxylate, reduce the double bond in the side-chain, decarboxylate the aromatic ring to the stage of benzoate and to reduce the ring to an alicyclic acid. Aromatic hydrocarbons (toluene, ethylbenzene and propylbenzene), as well as phenols (phenol, o-cresol, p-cresol, 2-ethylphenol and 3-hydroxy-4-ethylphenol) were also produced. In addition, during 3 months incubation, the cleavage of the aromatic ring occurred, whereby a small fraction of the substrate was converted to straight-chain and branched (methylated, ethylated) five- to eight-carbon aliphatic acids. The results indicate that pure cultures of fermentative facultative anaerobes might be capable of degrading substituted aromatic acids to aliphatic products under strictly anaerobic (fermentative) conditions. These abilities, which have so far been found only in denitrifying pseudomonads among facultative anaerobes, might be common in Enterobacteriaceae. It is conceivable that these bacteria are important as degraders of aromatic compounds in anaerobic ecosystems.

  5. Domestic wastewater treatment with purple phototrophic bacteria using a novel continuous photo anaerobic membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Hülsen, Tim; Barry, Edward M; Lu, Yang; Puyol, Daniel; Keller, Jürg; Batstone, Damien J

    2016-09-01

    A key future challenge of domestic wastewater treatment is nutrient recovery while still achieving acceptable discharge limits. Nutrient partitioning using purple phototrophic bacteria (PPB) has the potential to biologically concentrate nutrients through growth. This study evaluates the use of PPB in a continuous photo-anaerobic membrane bioreactor (PAnMBR) for simultaneous organics and nutrient removal from domestic wastewater. This process could continuously treat domestic wastewater to discharge limits (<50 mgCOD L(-1), 5 mgN L(-1), 1.0 mgP L(-1)). Approximately 6.4 ± 1.3 gNH4-N and 1.1 ± 0.2 gPO4-P for every 100 gSCOD were removed at a hydraulic retention time of 8-24 h and volumetric loading rates of 0.8-2.5 COD kg m(3) d(-1). Thus, a minimum of 200 mg L(-1) of ethanol (to provide soluble COD) was required to achieve these discharge limits. Microbial community through sequencing indicated dominance of >60% of PPB, though the PPB community was highly variable. The outcomes from the current work demonstrate the potential of PPB for continuous domestic (and possibly industrial) wastewater treatment and nutrient recovery. Technical challenges include the in situ COD supply in a continuous reactor system, as well as efficient light delivery. Addition of external (agricultural or fossil) derived organics is not financially nor environmentally justified, and carbon needs to be sourced internally from the biomass itself to enable this technology. Reduced energy consumption for lighting is technically feasible, and needs to be addressed as a key objective in scaleup. PMID:27232993

  6. A single-cell view on the ecophysiology of anaerobic phototrophic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Musat, Niculina; Halm, Hannah; Winterholler, Bärbel; Hoppe, Peter; Peduzzi, Sandro; Hillion, Francois; Horreard, Francois; Amann, Rudolf; Jørgensen, Bo B; Kuypers, Marcel M M

    2008-11-18

    Quantitative information on the ecophysiology of individual microorganisms is generally limited because it is difficult to assign specific metabolic activities to identified single cells. Here, we develop and apply a method, Halogen In Situ Hybridization-Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (HISH-SIMS), and show that it allows simultaneous phylogenetic identification and quantitation of metabolic activities of single microbial cells in the environment. Using HISH-SIMS, individual cells of the anaerobic, phototropic bacteria Chromatium okenii, Lamprocystis purpurea, and Chlorobium clathratiforme inhabiting the oligotrophic, meromictic Lake Cadagno were analyzed with respect to H(13)CO(3)(-) and (15)NH(4)(+) assimilation. Metabolic rates were found to vary greatly between individual cells of the same species, showing that microbial populations in the environment are heterogeneous, being comprised of physiologically distinct individuals. Furthermore, C. okenii, the least abundant species representing approximately 0.3% of the total cell number, contributed more than 40% of the total uptake of ammonium and 70% of the total uptake of carbon in the system, thereby emphasizing that numerically inconspicuous microbes can play a significant role in the nitrogen and carbon cycles in the environment. By introducing this quantification method for the ecophysiological roles of individual cells, our study opens a variety of possibilities of research in environmental microbiology, especially by increasing the ability to examine the ecophysiological roles of individual cells, including those of less abundant and less active microbes, and by the capacity to track not only nitrogen and carbon but also phosphorus, sulfur, and other biological element flows within microbial communities. PMID:19004766

  7. Inter-phylum HGT has shaped the metabolism of many mesophilic and anaerobic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Caro-Quintero, Alejandro; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T

    2015-01-01

    Genome sequencing has revealed that horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is a major evolutionary process in bacteria. Although it is generally assumed that closely related organisms engage in genetic exchange more frequently than distantly related ones, the frequency of HGT among distantly related organisms and the effect of ecological relatedness on the frequency has not been rigorously assessed. Here, we devised a novel bioinformatic pipeline, which minimized the effect of over-representation of specific taxa in the available databases and other limitations of homology-based approaches by analyzing genomes in standardized triplets, to quantify gene exchange between bacterial genomes representing different phyla. Our analysis revealed the existence of networks of genetic exchange between organisms with overlapping ecological niches, with mesophilic anaerobic organisms showing the highest frequency of exchange and engaging in HGT twice as frequently as their aerobic counterparts. Examination of individual cases suggested that inter-phylum HGT is more pronounced than previously thought, affecting up to ∼16% of the total genes and ∼35% of the metabolic genes in some genomes (conservative estimation). In contrast, ribosomal and other universal protein-coding genes were subjected to HGT at least 150 times less frequently than genes encoding the most promiscuous metabolic functions (for example, various dehydrogenases and ABC transport systems), suggesting that the species tree based on the former genes may be reliable. These results indicated that the metabolic diversity of microbial communities within most habitats has been largely assembled from preexisting genetic diversity through HGT and that HGT accounts for the functional redundancy among phyla. PMID:25314320

  8. Concerning the role of cell lysis-cryptic growth in anaerobic side-stream reactors: the single-cell analysis of viable, dead and lysed bacteria.

    PubMed

    Foladori, P; Velho, V F; Costa, R H R; Bruni, L; Quaranta, A; Andreottola, G

    2015-05-01

    In the Anaerobic Side-Stream Reactor (ASSR), part of the return sludge undergoes alternating aerobic and anaerobic conditions with the aim of reducing sludge production. In this paper, viability, enzymatic activity, death and lysis of bacterial cells exposed to aerobic and anaerobic conditions for 16 d were investigated at single-cell level by flow cytometry, with the objective of contributing to the understanding of the mechanisms of sludge reduction in the ASSR systems. Results indicated that total and viable bacteria did not decrease during the anaerobic phase, indicating that anaerobiosis at ambient temperature does not produce a significant cell lysis. Bacteria decay and lysis occurred principally under aerobic conditions. The aerobic decay rate of total bacteria (bTB) was considered as the rate of generation of lysed bacteria. Values of bTB of 0.07-0.11 d(-1) were measured in anaerobic + aerobic sequence. The enzymatic activity was not particularly affected by the transition from anaerobiosis to aerobiosis. Large solubilisation of COD and NH4(+) was observed only under anaerobic conditions, as a consequence of hydrolysis of organic matter, but not due to cell lysis. The observations supported the proposal of two independent mechanisms contributing equally to sludge reduction: (1) under anaerobic conditions: sludge hydrolysis of non-bacterial material, (2) under aerobic conditions: bacterial cell lysis and oxidation of released biodegradable compounds.

  9. [First Argentine consensus guidelines for in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility testing of clinically relevant anaerobic bacteria in humans/ Anaerobic Subcommittee of the Asociación Argentina de Microbiología].

    PubMed

    Legaria, María C; Bianchini, Hebe M; Castello, Liliana; Carloni, Graciela; Di Martino, Ana; Fernández Canigia, Liliana; Litterio, Mirta; Rollet, Raquel; Rossetti, Adelaida; Predari, Silvia C

    2011-01-01

    Through time, anaerobic bacteria have shown good susceptibility to clinically useful antianaerobic agents. Nevertheless, the antimicrobial resistance profile of most of the anaerobic species related to severe infections in humans has been modified in the last years and different kinds of resistance to the most active agents have emerged, making their effectiveness less predictable. With the aim of finding an answer and for the purpose of facilitating the detection of anaerobic antimicrobial resistance, the Anaerobic Subcommittee of the Asociación Argentina de Microbiología developed the First Argentine consensus guidelines for in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility testing of clinically relevant anaerobic bacteria in humans. This document resulted from the compatibilization of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute recommendations, the international literature and the work and experience of the Subcommittee. The Consensus document provides a brief taxonomy review, and exposes why and when anaerobic antimicrobial susceptibility tests should be conducted, and which antimicrobial agents can be used according to the species involved. The recommendations on how to perform, read and interpret in vitro anaerobic antimicrobial susceptibility tests with each method are exposed. Finally, the antibiotic susceptibility profile, the classification of antibiotics according to their in vitro activities, the natural and acquired mechanisms of resistance, the emerging resistance and the regional antibiotic resistance profile of clinically relevant anaerobic species are shown.

  10. Exogenous nitrate attenuates nitrite toxicity to anaerobic ammonium oxidizing (anammox) bacteria.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangbin; Vilcherrez, David; Carvajal-Arroyo, Jose Maria; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A

    2016-02-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria (anammox) can be severely inhibited by one of its main substrates, nitrite (NO2(-)). At present, there is limited information on the processes by which anammox bacteria are able to tolerate toxic NO2(-). Intracellular consumption or electrochemically driven (transmembrane proton motive force) NO2(-) export are considered the main mechanisms of NO2(-) detoxification. In this work, we evaluated the potential of exogenous nitrate (NO3(-)) on relieving NO2(-) toxicity, putatively facilitated by NarK, a NO3(-)/NO2(-) transporter encoded in the anammox genome. The relative contribution of NO3(-) to NO2(-) detoxification was found to be pH dependent. Exposure of anammox cells to NO2(-) in absence of their electron donating substrate, ammonium (NH4(+)), causes NO2(-) stress. At pH 6.7 and 7.0, the activity of NO2(-) stressed cells was respectively 0 and 27% of the non-stressed control activity (NO2(-) and NH4(+) fed simultaneously). Exogenous NO3(-) addition caused the recovery to 42% and 80% of the control activity at pH 6.7 and 7.0, respectively. The recovery of the activity of NO2(-) stressed cells improved with increasing NO3(-) concentration, the maximum recovery being achieved at 0.85 mM. The NO3(-) pre-incubation time is less significant at pH 7.0 than at pH 6.7 due to a more severe NO2(-) toxicity at lower pH. Additionally, NO3(-) caused almost complete attenuation of NO2(-) toxicity in cells exposed to the proton gradient disruptor carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone at pH 7.5, providing evidence that the NO3(-) attenuation is independent of the proton motive force. The absence of a measurable NO3(-) consumption (or NO3(-) dependent N2 production) during the batch tests leaves NO3(-) dependent active transport of NO2(-) as the only plausible explanation for the relief of NO2(-) inhibition. We suggest that anammox cells can use a secondary transport system facilitated by exogenous NO3(-) to alleviate NO2(-) toxicity. PMID

  11. Effect of soil salinity and nutrient levels on the community structure of the root-associated bacteria of the facultative halophyte, Tamarix ramosissima, in southwestern United States.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Takeshi; Imada, Shogo; Acharya, Kumud; Iwanaga, Fumiko; Yamanaka, Norikazu

    2015-01-01

    Tamarix ramosissima is a tree species that is highly resistant to salt and drought. The Tamarix species survives in a broad range of environmental salt levels, and invades major river systems in southwestern United States. It may affect root-associated bacteria (RB) by increasing soil salts and nutrients. The effects of RB on host plants may vary even under saline conditions, and the relationship may be important for T. ramosissima. However, to the best of our knowledge, there have been no reports relating to T. ramosissima RB and its association with salinity and nutrient levels. In this study, we have examined this association and the effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization of T. ramosissima on RB because a previous study has reported that colonization of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi affected the rhizobacterial community (Marschner et al., 2001). T. ramosissima roots were collected from five locations with varying soil salinity and nutrient levels. RB community structures were examined by terminal restriction fragment (T-RF) length polymorphism, cloning, and sequencing analyses. The results suggest that RB richness, or the diversity of T. ramosissima, have significant negative relationships with electrical conductivity (EC), sodium concentration (Na), and the colonization of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, but have a significant positive relationship with phosphorus in the soil. However, at each T-RF level, positive correlations between the emergence of some T-RFs and EC or Na were observed. These results indicate that high salinity decreased the total number of RB species, but some saline-tolerant RB species multiplied with increasing salinity levels. The ordination scores of nonmetric multidimensional scale analysis of RB community composition show significant relationships with water content, calcium concentration, available phosphorus, and total nitrogen. These results indicate that the RB diversity and community composition of T. ramosissima are affected

  12. Versatile transformations of hydrocarbons in anaerobic bacteria: substrate ranges and regio- and stereo-chemistry of activation reactions†

    PubMed Central

    Jarling, René; Kühner, Simon; Basílio Janke, Eline; Gruner, Andrea; Drozdowska, Marta; Golding, Bernard T.; Rabus, Ralf; Wilkes, Heinz

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic metabolism of hydrocarbons proceeds either via addition to fumarate or by hydroxylation in various microorganisms, e.g., sulfate-reducing or denitrifying bacteria, which are specialized in utilizing n-alkanes or alkylbenzenes as growth substrates. General pathways for carbon assimilation and energy gain have been elucidated for a limited number of possible substrates. In this work the metabolic activity of 11 bacterial strains during anaerobic growth with crude oil was investigated and compared with the metabolite patterns appearing during anaerobic growth with more than 40 different hydrocarbons supplied as binary mixtures. We show that the range of co-metabolically formed alkyl- and arylalkyl-succinates is much broader in n-alkane than in alkylbenzene utilizers. The structures and stereochemistry of these products are resolved. Furthermore, we demonstrate that anaerobic hydroxylation of alkylbenzenes does not only occur in denitrifiers but also in sulfate reducers. We propose that these processes play a role in detoxification under conditions of solvent stress. The thermophilic sulfate-reducing strain TD3 is shown to produce n-alkylsuccinates, which are suggested not to derive from terminal activation of n-alkanes, but rather to represent intermediates of a metabolic pathway short-cutting fumarate regeneration by reverse action of succinate synthase. The outcomes of this study provide a basis for geochemically tracing such processes in natural habitats and contribute to an improved understanding of microbial activity in hydrocarbon-rich anoxic environments. PMID:26441848

  13. The performance of an anaerobic sequencing batch biofilm reactor treating domestic sewage colonized by anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sarti, A; Pozzi, E; Chinalia, F A; Zaiat, M; Foresti, E

    2006-03-01

    There are few reports on morphological characterization of microbial population colonizing anaerobic bioreactors and the aim of this work was to access such variable in an anaerobic sequencing batch biofilm reactor treating the University of Sao Paulo (Sao Carlos city, Brazil) domestic sewage. This pilot-scale reactor (1.2m3) has been treating 0.65 m3 of liquid waste under cycles of 8h. The ASBBR has the distinct characteristics of being filled with support material for biomass attachment with the aim of skipping the sedimentation phase during the operational cycles, as it is commonly observed in anaerobic sequencing batch reactors (ASBR). Physical, chemical and physico-chemical variables were accessed in the influent and in the effluent for performance evaluation. Microbial characterization was made by means of direct microscopy and samples were taken over 150 d with a 25 d period interval. The ASBBR attained approximately 60% of COD removal efficiency. Microscopic analysis of biomass showed the presence of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria probably influencing the ASBBR performance in the domestic sewage treatment. It is very likely that the exclusion of phototrophic sulfur bacteria by efficiently restraining the light would enhance the bioreactor efficiency.

  14. Anaerobic Oxidization of Methane in a Minerotrophic Peatland: Enrichment of Nitrite-Dependent Methane-Oxidizing Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Baoli; van Dijk, Gijs; Fritz, Christian; Smolders, Alfons J. P.; Pol, Arjan; Jetten, Mike S. M.

    2012-01-01

    The importance of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) as a methane sink in freshwater systems is largely unexplored, particularly in peat ecosystems. Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (n-damo) was recently discovered and reported to be catalyzed by the bacterium “Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera,” which is affiliated with the NC10 phylum. So far, several “Ca. Methylomirabilis oxyfera” enrichment cultures have been obtained using a limited number of freshwater sediments or wastewater treatment sludge as the inoculum. In this study, using stable isotope measurements and porewater profiles, we investigated the potential of n-damo in a minerotrophic peatland in the south of the Netherlands that is infiltrated by nitrate-rich ground water. Methane and nitrate profiles suggested that all methane produced was oxidized before reaching the oxic layer, and NC10 bacteria could be active in the transition zone where countergradients of methane and nitrate occur. Quantitative PCR showed high NC10 bacterial cell numbers at this methane-nitrate transition zone. This soil section was used to enrich the prevalent NC10 bacteria in a continuous culture supplied with methane and nitrite at an in situ pH of 6.2. An enrichment of nitrite-reducing methanotrophic NC10 bacteria was successfully obtained. Phylogenetic analysis of retrieved 16S rRNA and pmoA genes showed that the enriched bacteria were very similar to the ones found in situ and constituted a new branch of NC10 bacteria with an identity of less than 96 and 90% to the 16S rRNA and pmoA genes of “Ca. Methylomirabilis oxyfera,” respectively. The results of this study expand our knowledge of the diversity and distribution of NC10 bacteria in the environment and highlight their potential contribution to nitrogen and methane cycles. PMID:23042166

  15. Studies on Hydrogen Production by Photosynthetic Bacteria after Anaerobic Fermentation of Starch by a Hyperthermophile, Pyrococcus furiosus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugitate, Toshihiro; Fukatsu, Makoto; Ishimi, Katsuhiro; Kohno, Hideki; Wakayama, Tatsuki; Nakamura, Yoshihiro; Miyake, Jun; Asada, Yasuo

    In order to establish the sequential hydrogen production from waste starch using a hyperthermophile, Pyrococcus furiosus, and a photosynthetic bacterium, basic studies were done. P. furiosus produced hydrogen and acetate by anaerobic fermentation at 90°C. A photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides RV, was able to produce hydrogen from acetate under anaerobic and light conditions at 30°C. However, Rb. sphaeroides RV was not able to produce hydrogen from acetate in the presence of sodium chloride that was essential for the growth and hydrogen production of P. furiosus although it produced hydrogen from lactate at a reduced rate with 1% sodium chloride. A newly isolated strain, CST-8, from natural environment was, however, able to produce hydrogen from acetate, especially with 3 mM L-alanine and in the presence of 1% sodium chloride. The sequential hydrogen production with P. furiosus and salt-tolerant photosynthetic bacteria could be probable at least in the laboratory experiment scale.

  16. Anaerobic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria show as resistance and immobilize as during Fe(III) mineral precipitation.

    PubMed

    Hohmann, Claudia; Winkler, Eva; Morin, Guillaume; Kappler, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    More than 100 million individuals worldwide are exposed to arsenic-contaminated water, making the investigation of arsenic mobility in aquatic systems of utmost importance. Iron (hydr)oxides play a key role in preventing arsenic release in aquifers and soils due to their strong arsenic sorption and are even used to remove arsenic in water treatment. Neutrophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria produce Fe(III) minerals and therefore have the potential to affect arsenic mobility. In the present study, we demonstrate that the metabolism of anaerobic nitrate-reducing and phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria is not significantly affected by arsenate concentrations of up to 500 muM (37.5 mg/L). Even in the presence of the more toxic arsenic species, arsenite, cell metabolism was significantly impaired only at the highest arsenite concentration (500 muM) for one of the Fe(II)-oxidizers. All Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria tested effectively immobilized arsenic during Fe(II) oxidation (>96%), lowering the remaining dissolved arsenic concentrations to values close to or even lower than the current drinking water limit of 10 microg/L. Since the minerals formed by these bacteria included highly crystalline Fe(III) minerals that are hardly reducible by Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, stimulation of arsenic immobilization by Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria can potentially support water treatment systems or even be applied as an effective remediation strategy. PMID:20039738

  17. Isolation and characterization of anaerobic bacteria for symbiotic recycling of uric acid nitrogen in the gut of various termites.

    PubMed

    Thong-On, Arunee; Suzuki, Katsuyuki; Noda, Satoko; Inoue, Jun-ichi; Kajiwara, Susumu; Ohkuma, Moriya

    2012-01-01

    Recycling of the nitrogenous waste uric acid (UA) of wood-feeding termites by their gut bacteria is one of the significant aspects of symbiosis for the conservation of nitrogen sources. Diverse anaerobic UA-degrading bacteria comprising 16 species were isolated from the gut of eight termite species, and were assigned to Clostridia, Enterobacteriaceae, and low G+C Gram-positive cocci. UA-degrading Clostridia had never been isolated from termite guts. UA-degrading ability was sporadically distributed among phylogenetically various culturable anaerobic bacteria from termite guts. A strain of Clostridium sp., which was commonly isolated from three termite species and represented a probable new species in cluster XIVa of clostridia, utilized UA as a nitrogen source but not as a sole carbon and energy source. This feature is in clear contrast to that of well-studied purinolytic clostridia or previously isolated UA degraders from termite guts, which also utilize UA as a sole carbon and energy source. Ammonia is the major nitrogenous product of UA degradation. Various purines stimulated the growth of this strain when added to an otherwise growth-limiting, nitrogen poor medium. The bacterial species involved the recycling of UA nitrogen in the gut microbial community of termites are more diverse in terms of both taxonomy and nutritional physiology than previously recognized. PMID:22791052

  18. Isolation and characterization of anaerobic bacteria for symbiotic recycling of uric acid nitrogen in the gut of various termites.

    PubMed

    Thong-On, Arunee; Suzuki, Katsuyuki; Noda, Satoko; Inoue, Jun-ichi; Kajiwara, Susumu; Ohkuma, Moriya

    2012-01-01

    Recycling of the nitrogenous waste uric acid (UA) of wood-feeding termites by their gut bacteria is one of the significant aspects of symbiosis for the conservation of nitrogen sources. Diverse anaerobic UA-degrading bacteria comprising 16 species were isolated from the gut of eight termite species, and were assigned to Clostridia, Enterobacteriaceae, and low G+C Gram-positive cocci. UA-degrading Clostridia had never been isolated from termite guts. UA-degrading ability was sporadically distributed among phylogenetically various culturable anaerobic bacteria from termite guts. A strain of Clostridium sp., which was commonly isolated from three termite species and represented a probable new species in cluster XIVa of clostridia, utilized UA as a nitrogen source but not as a sole carbon and energy source. This feature is in clear contrast to that of well-studied purinolytic clostridia or previously isolated UA degraders from termite guts, which also utilize UA as a sole carbon and energy source. Ammonia is the major nitrogenous product of UA degradation. Various purines stimulated the growth of this strain when added to an otherwise growth-limiting, nitrogen poor medium. The bacterial species involved the recycling of UA nitrogen in the gut microbial community of termites are more diverse in terms of both taxonomy and nutritional physiology than previously recognized.

  19. Biomarker evidence for widespread anaerobic methane oxidation in Mediterranean sediments by a consortium of methanogenic archaea and bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Pancost, R.D.; Damste, J.S.S.; Lint, S. De; Maarel, M.J.E.C. van der; Gottschal, J.C.

    2000-03-01

    Although abundant geochemical data indicate that anaerobic methane oxidation occurs in marine sediments, the linkage to specific microorganisms remains unclear. In order to examine processes of methane consumption and oxidation, sediment samples from mud volcanoes at two distinct sites on the Mediterranean consumption and oxidation, sediment samples from mud volcanoes at two distinct sites on the Mediterranean Ridge were collected via the submersible Nautile. Geochemical data strongly indicate that methane is oxidized under aerobic conditions, and compound-specific carbon isotope analyses indicate that methane is oxidized under anaerobic conditions, and compound-specific carbon isotope analyses indicate that this reaction is facilitated by a consortium of archaea and bacteria. Specifically, these methane-rich sediments contain high abundances of methanogen-specific biomarkers that are significantly depleted in {sup 13}C ({delta}{sup 13}C values are as low as {minus}95%). Biomarkers inferred to derive from sulfate-reducing bacteria and other heterotrophic bacteria are similarly depleted. Consistent with previous work, such depletion can be explained by consumption of {sup 13}C-depleted methane by methanogens operating in reverse and as part a consortium of organisms in which sulfate serves as the terminal electron acceptor. Moreover, their results indicate that this process is widespread in Mediterranean mud volcanoes and in some localized settings in the predominant microbiological process.

  20. Anaerobic Catabolism of Aromatic Compounds: a Genetic and Genomic View

    PubMed Central

    Carmona, Manuel; Zamarro, María Teresa; Blázquez, Blas; Durante-Rodríguez, Gonzalo; Juárez, Javier F.; Valderrama, J. Andrés; Barragán, María J. L.; García, José Luis; Díaz, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Aromatic compounds belong to one of the most widely distributed classes of organic compounds in nature, and a significant number of xenobiotics belong to this family of compounds. Since many habitats containing large amounts of aromatic compounds are often anoxic, the anaerobic catabolism of aromatic compounds by microorganisms becomes crucial in biogeochemical cycles and in the sustainable development of the biosphere. The mineralization of aromatic compounds by facultative or obligate anaerobic bacteria can be coupled to anaerobic respiration with a variety of electron acceptors as well as to fermentation and anoxygenic photosynthesis. Since the redox potential of the electron-accepting system dictates the degradative strategy, there is wide biochemical diversity among anaerobic aromatic degraders. However, the genetic determinants of all these processes and the mechanisms involved in their regulation are much less studied. This review focuses on the recent findings that standard molecular biology approaches together with new high-throughput technologies (e.g., genome sequencing, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metagenomics) have provided regarding the genetics, regulation, ecophysiology, and evolution of anaerobic aromatic degradation pathways. These studies revealed that the anaerobic catabolism of aromatic compounds is more diverse and widespread than previously thought, and the complex metabolic and stress programs associated with the use of aromatic compounds under anaerobic conditions are starting to be unraveled. Anaerobic biotransformation processes based on unprecedented enzymes and pathways with novel metabolic capabilities, as well as the design of novel regulatory circuits and catabolic networks of great biotechnological potential in synthetic biology, are now feasible to approach. PMID:19258534

  1. Anaerobic catabolism of aromatic compounds: a genetic and genomic view.

    PubMed

    Carmona, Manuel; Zamarro, María Teresa; Blázquez, Blas; Durante-Rodríguez, Gonzalo; Juárez, Javier F; Valderrama, J Andrés; Barragán, María J L; García, José Luis; Díaz, Eduardo

    2009-03-01

    Aromatic compounds belong to one of the most widely distributed classes of organic compounds in nature, and a significant number of xenobiotics belong to this family of compounds. Since many habitats containing large amounts of aromatic compounds are often anoxic, the anaerobic catabolism of aromatic compounds by microorganisms becomes crucial in biogeochemical cycles and in the sustainable development of the biosphere. The mineralization of aromatic compounds by facultative or obligate anaerobic bacteria can be coupled to anaerobic respiration with a variety of electron acceptors as well as to fermentation and anoxygenic photosynthesis. Since the redox potential of the electron-accepting system dictates the degradative strategy, there is wide biochemical diversity among anaerobic aromatic degraders. However, the genetic determinants of all these processes and the mechanisms involved in their regulation are much less studied. This review focuses on the recent findings that standard molecular biology approaches together with new high-throughput technologies (e.g., genome sequencing, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metagenomics) have provided regarding the genetics, regulation, ecophysiology, and evolution of anaerobic aromatic degradation pathways. These studies revealed that the anaerobic catabolism of aromatic compounds is more diverse and widespread than previously thought, and the complex metabolic and stress programs associated with the use of aromatic compounds under anaerobic conditions are starting to be unraveled. Anaerobic biotransformation processes based on unprecedented enzymes and pathways with novel metabolic capabilities, as well as the design of novel regulatory circuits and catabolic networks of great biotechnological potential in synthetic biology, are now feasible to approach.

  2. EFFECT OF HEMIN AND OXYGEN TENSION ON GROWTH AND NITRATE REDUCTION BY BACTERIA.

    PubMed

    JACOBS, N J; HEADY, R E; JACOBS, J M; CHAN, K; DEIBEL, R H

    1964-06-01

    Jacobs, N. J. (American Meat Institute Foundation, Chicago, Ill.), R. E. Heady, J. M. Jacobs, K. Chan, and R. H. Deibel. Effect of hemin and oxygen tension on growth and nitrate reduction by bacteria. J. Bacteriol. 87:1406-1411. 1964.-The effect of hemin supplementation of growth media on the ability of several bacteria to reduce nitrate was studied. Added hemin had no detectable effect on the ability of these organisms to reduce nitrate when grown in stationary cultures exposed to air. However, under anaerobic conditions, six strains of facultatively anaerobic staphylococci required hemin for nitrate reduction and growth stimulation in complex, nitrate-containing media. In a nutritionally defined medium, one strain of Staphylococcus required both hemin and nitrate for anaerobic growth. Anaerobic growth and nitrite production of the aerobe Bacillus subtilis was stimulated by addition of hemin. However, the anaerobic growth response was markedly de-decreased as compared with that obtained under static atmospheric conditions. Hemin had no detectable effect on anaerobic nitrate reduction or growth of the obligate aerobe Pseudomonas denitrificans, or of the facultative anaerobes Escherichia coli, B. polymyxa, and Corynebacterium diphtheriae.

  3. Bioelectrochemical regulation accelerates facultatively syntrophic proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Daisuke; Sasaki, Kengo; Morita, Masahiko; Hirano, Shin-ichi; Matsumoto, Norio; Ohmura, Naoya

    2012-07-01

    Bioelectrochemical systems can affect microbial metabolism by controlling the redox potential. We constructed bioelectrochemical cultures of the proteolytic bacterium, Coprothermobacter proteolyticus strain CT-1, both as a single-culture and as a co-culture with the hydrogenotrophic methanogen, Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus strain ∆H, to investigate the influences of bioelectrochemical regulation on facultatively syntrophic proteolysis. The co-culture and single-culture were cultivated at 55°C with an anaerobic medium containing casein as the carbon source. The working electrode potential of the bioelectrochemical system was controlled at -0.8V (vs. Ag/AgCl) for bioelectrochemical cultures and was not controlled for non-bioelectrochemical cultures. The cell densities of hydrogenotrophic methanogen and methane production in the bioelectrochemical co-culture were 3.6 and 1.5 times higher than those in the non-bioelectrochemical co-culture after 7 days of cultivation, respectively. Contrastingly, the cell density of Coprothermobacter sp. in the bioelectrochemical co-culture was only 1.3 times higher than that in the non-bioelectrochemical co-culture. The protein decomposition rates were nearly proportional to the cell density of Coprothermobacter sp. in the all types of cultures. These results indicate that bioelectrochemical regulation, particularly, affected the carbon fixation of the hydrogenotrophic methanogen and that facultatively syntrophic proteolysis was accelerated as a result of hydrogen consumption by the methanogens growing well in bioelectrochemical co-cultures. PMID:22421636

  4. Reduction and Immobilization of Radionuclides and Toxic Metal Ions Using Combined Zero Valent Iron and Anaerobic Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Lenly J. Weathers; Lynn E. Katz

    2002-05-29

    The use of zero valent iron, permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) for groundwater remediation continues to increase. AN exciting variation of this technology involves introducing anaerobic bacteria into these barriers so that both biological and abiotic pollutant removal processes are functional. This work evaluated the hypothesis that a system combining a mixed culture of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) with zero valent iron would have a greater cr(VI) removal efficiency and a greater total Cr(VI) removal capacity than a zero valent iron system without the microorganisms. Hence, the overall goal of this research was to compare the performance of these types of systems with regard to their Cr(VI) removal efficiency and total Cr(VI) removal capacity. Both batch and continuous flow reactor systems were evaluated.

  5. Disulfide bond-dependent mechanism of protection against oxidative stress in pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase of anaerobic Desulfovibrio bacteria.

    PubMed

    Vita, Nicolas; Hatchikian, E Claude; Nouailler, Matthieu; Dolla, Alain; Pieulle, Laetitia

    2008-01-22

    Oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate forming acetyl-coenzyme A is a crucial step in many metabolic pathways. In most anaerobes, this reaction is carried out by pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR), an enzyme normally oxygen sensitive except in Desulfovibrio africanus (Da), where it shows an abnormally high oxygen stability. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we have specified a disulfide bond-dependent protective mechanism against oxidative conditions in Da PFOR. Our data demonstrated that the two cysteine residues forming the only disulfide bond in the as-isolated PFOR are crucial for the stability of the enzyme in oxidative conditions. A methionine residue located in the environment of the proximal [4Fe-4S] cluster was also found to be essential for this protective mechanism. In vivo analysis demonstrated unambiguously that PFOR in Da cells as well as two other Desulfovibrio species was efficiently protected against oxidative stress. Importantly, a less active but stable Da PFOR in oxidized cells rapidly reactivated when returned to anaerobic medium. Our work demonstrates the existence of an elegant disulfide bond-dependent reversible mechanism, found in the Desulfovibrio species to protect one of the key enzymes implicated in the central metabolism of these strict anaerobes. This new mechanism could be considered as an adaptation strategy used by sulfate-reducing bacteria to cope with temporary oxidative conditions and to maintain an active dormancy. PMID:18161989

  6. Induction of anaerobic, photoautotrophic growth in the cyanobacterium Oscillatoria limnetica.

    PubMed Central

    Oren, A; Padan, E

    1978-01-01

    Anaerobic photoautotrophic growth of the cyanobacterium Oscillatoria limnetica was demonstrated under nitrogen in the presence of 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (5micron), a constant concentration of Na2S (2.5 mM), and constant pH (7.3). The photoanaerobic growth rate (2 days doubling time) was similar to that obtained under oxygenic photoautotrophic growth conditions. The potential of oxygenic photosynthesis is constitutive in the cells; that of anoxygenic photosynthesis is rapidly (2 h) induced in the presence of Na2S in the light in a process requiring protein synthesis. The facultative anaerobic phototrophic growth physiology exhibited by O. limnetica would seem to represent an intermediate physiological pattern between the obligate anaerobic one of photosynthetic bacteria and the oxygenic one of eucaryotic algae. PMID:415043

  7. Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidizing bacteria along the water level fluctuation zone of the Three Gorges Reservoir.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Huang, Pei; Ye, Fei; Jiang, Yi; Song, Liyan; Op den Camp, Huub J M; Zhu, Guibing; Wu, Shengjun

    2016-02-01

    The nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (n-damo) mediated by "Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera" connects the biogeochemical carbon and nitrogen cycles in a novel way. Many environments have been reported to harbor such organism being slow-growing and oxygen-sensitive anaerobes. Here, we focused on the population of n-damo bacteria in a fluctuating habitat being the wetland in the water level fluctuation zone (WLFZ) of the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR) in China. A molecular approach demonstrated positive amplifications when targeting the functional pmoA gene only in the lower sites which endured longer flooding time in an elevation gradient. Only 1 operational taxonomic unit (OTU) in the lower elevation zone targeting the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene was clustering into the NC-10 group a, which is presumed to be the true n-damo group. Moreover, a relatively low level of diversity was observed in this study. The abundances were as low as 4.7 × 10(2) to 1.5 × 10(3) copies g(-1) dry soil (ds) in the initial stage, which were almost the lowest reported. However, an increase was observed (3.2 × 10(3) to 5.3 × 10(4) copies g(-1) ds) after nearly 6 months of flooding. Intriguingly, the abundance of n-damo bacteria correlated positively with the accumulated flooding time (AFT). The current study revealed that n-damo bacteria can be detected in a fluctuating environment and the sites with longer flooding time seem to be preferred habitats. The water flooding may be the principal factor in this ecosystem by creating anoxic condition. The wide range of such habitats suggests a high potential of n-damo bacteria to play a key role in natural CH4 consumption. PMID:26515563

  8. Enumeration and Detection of Anaerobic Ferrous Iron-Oxidizing, Nitrate-Reducing Bacteria from Diverse European Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Straub, Kristina L.; Buchholz-Cleven, Berit E. E.

    1998-01-01

    Anaerobic, nitrate-dependent microbial oxidation of ferrous iron was recently recognized as a new type of metabolism. In order to study the occurrence of three novel groups of ferrous iron-oxidizing, nitrate-reducing bacteria (represented by strains BrG1, BrG2, and BrG3), 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes were developed. In pure-culture experiments, these probes were shown to be suitable for fluorescent in situ hybridization, as well as for hybridization analysis of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) patterns. However, neither enumeration by in situ hybridization nor detection by the DGGE-hybridization approach was feasible with sediment samples. Therefore, the DGGE-hybridization approach was combined with microbiological methods. Freshwater sediment samples from different European locations were used for enrichment cultures and most-probable-number (MPN) determinations. Bacteria with the ability to oxidize ferrous iron under nitrate-reducing conditions were detected in all of the sediment samples investigated. At least one of the previously described types of bacteria was detected in each enrichment culture. MPN studies showed that sediments contained from 1 × 105 to 5 × 108 ferrous iron-oxidizing, nitrate-reducing bacteria per g (dry weight) of sediment, which accounted for at most 0.8% of the nitrate-reducing bacteria growing with acetate. Type BrG1, BrG2, and BrG3 bacteria accounted for an even smaller fraction (0.2% or less) of the ferrous iron-oxidizing, nitrate-reducing community. The DGGE patterns of MPN cultures suggested that more organisms than those isolated thus far are able to oxidize ferrous iron with nitrate. A comparison showed that among the anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria, organisms that have the ability to oxidize ferrous iron also account for only a minor fraction of the population. PMID:9835573

  9. Decoloration of textile wastewater by means of a fluidized-bed loop reactor and immobilized anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, D; Aivasidis, A

    2006-07-31

    Textile wastewater was treated by means of a fluidized-bed loop reactor and immobilized anaerobic bacteria. The main target of this treatment was decoloration of the wastewater and transformation of the non-biodegradable azo-reactive dyes to the degradable, under aerobic biological conditions, aromatic amines. Special porous beads (Siran) were utilized as the microbial carriers. Acetic acid solution, enriched with nutrients and trace elements, served both as a pH-regulator and as an external substrate for the growth of methanogenic bacteria. The above technique was firstly applied on synthetic wastewater (an aqueous solution of a mixture of different azo-reactive dyes). Hydraulic residence time was gradually decreased from 24 to 6 h over a period of 3 months. Full decoloration of the wastewater could be achieved even at such a low hydraulic residence time (6 h), while methane-rich biogas was also produced. The same technique was then applied on real textile wastewater with excellent results (full decoloration at a hydraulic residence time of 6 h). Furthermore, the effluent proved to be highly biodegradable by aerobic microbes (activated-sludge). Thus, the above-described anaerobic/aerobic biological technique seems to be a very attractive method for treating textile wastewater since it is cost-effective and environment-friendly.

  10. Role of Anaerobic Ciliates in Planktonic Food Webs: Abundance, Feeding, and Impact on Bacteria in the Field

    PubMed Central

    Massana, Ramon; Pedrós-Alió, Carlos

    1994-01-01

    We studied the dynamics of two populations of anaerobic ciliates, Plagiopyla sp. and Metopus sp., and of their potential prey, heterotrophic and phototrophic purple bacteria, in Lake Cisó throughout a 1-year cycle. The abundance of both ciliates was very low (less than 2 individuals per ml). During mixing, Plagiopyla ciliates exhibited high clearance rates (about 100 nl ciliate-1 h-1), its integrated abundance increased with a net doubling time of 47 days, and its potential doubling times, as calculated from the number of bacteria consumed, ranged between 5 and 8 days. During stratification, the activity of Plagiopyla ciliates was reduced and the population decreased; this was related to the higher amounts of sulfide present. The impact of predation by the Plagiopyla population on bacterioplankton was found to be insignificant, less than 0.1% of bacterial biomass consumed per day. Thus, anaerobic ciliates cannot control the bacterioplankton in Lake Cisó because of both the low abundance over the period studied and the low feeding rates during certain periods. A review of available field studies suggests that this conclusion can be extrapolated to most other anoxic systems. PMID:16349239

  11. Anaerobic bacteria in upper respiratory tract and head and neck infections: microbiology and treatment.

    PubMed

    Brook, Itzhak

    2012-04-01

    Anaerobes are the predominant components of oropharyngeal mucous membranes bacterial flora, and are therefore a common cause of bacterial infections of endogenous origin of upper respiratory tract and head and neck. This review summarizes the aerobic and anaerobic microbiology and antimicrobials therapy of these infections. These include acute and chronic otitis media, mastoiditis and sinusitis, pharyngo-tonsillitis, peritonsillar, retropharyngeal and parapharyngeal abscesses, suppurative thyroiditis, cervical lymphadenitis, parotitis, siliadenitis, and deep neck infections including Lemierre Syndrome. The recovery from these infections depends on prompt and proper medical and when indicated also surgical management.

  12. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of competitive exclusion bacteria applied to newly hatched chickens.

    PubMed

    Wagner, R Doug; Cerniglia, Carl E

    2005-07-25

    Competitive exclusion (CE) products are mixtures of obligate and facultative anaerobic bacteria applied to poultry hatchlings for prevention of Salmonella colonization. These mixtures have the potential to introduce bacteria with undesirable antimicrobial drug resistance traits into the human food supply. Antimicrobial drug susceptibilities of 27 obligate and facultative anaerobes isolated from a commercial CE product were evaluated with a microdilution minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) assay. Bacteroides distasonis and Bacteroides fragilis isolates were resistant to tetracycline and other antimicrobial drugs. An Escherichia coli isolate was resistant to four antimicrobial drugs: erythromycin, penicillin, vancomycin, and tylosin. Erythromycin-resistant enterococci and vancomycin-resistant Lactococcus lactis isolates in the CE product were detected. These findings suggest that more work needs to be done to assess the potential effects of CE product use in poultry on the food supply. PMID:16014302

  13. Anaerobic nitrite-dependent methane-oxidizing bacteria - novel participants in methane cycling of drained peatlands ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravchenko, Irina; Sukhacheva, Marina; Menko, Ekaterina; Sirin, Andrey

    2014-05-01

    Northern peatlands are one of the key sources of atmospheric methane. Process-based studies of methane dynamic are based on the hypothesis of the balance between microbial methane production and oxidation, but this doesn't explain all variations in and constraints on peatland CH4 emissions. One of the reasons for this discrepancy could be anaerobic methane oxidation (AOM) - the process which is still poorly studied and remained controversial. Very little is known about AOM in peatlands, where it could work as an important 'internal' sink for CH4. This lack of knowledge primarily originated from researchers who generally consider AOM quantitatively insignificant or even non-existent in northern peatland ecosystems. But not far ago, Smemo and Yavitt (2007) presented evidence for AOM in freshwater peatlands used indirect techniques including isotope dilution assays and selective methanogenic inhibitors. Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation NC10 group bacteria (n-damo) were detected in a minerotrophic peatland in the Netherlands that is infiltrated by nitrate-rich ground water (Zhu et al., 2012). Present study represents the first, to our knowledge, characterization of AOM in human disturbed peatlands, including hydrological elements of artificial drainage network. The experiments were conducted with samples of peat from drained peatlands, as well as of water and bottom sediments of ditches from drained Dubnensky mire massif, Moscow region (Chistotin et al., 2006; Sirin et al., 2012). This is the key testing area of our research group in European part of Russia for the long-term greenhouse gases fluxes measurements supported by testing physicochemical parameters, intensity and genomic diversity of CH4-cycling microbial communities. Only in sediments of drainage ditches the transition anaerobic zone was found, where methane and nitrate occurred, suggested the possible ecological niche for n-damo bacteria. The NC10 group methanotrophs were analyzed by PCR

  14. A genomic view of methane oxidation by aerobic bacteria and anaerobic archaea

    PubMed Central

    Chistoserdova, Ludmila; Vorholt, Julia A; Lidstrom, Mary E

    2005-01-01

    Recent sequencing of the genome and proteomic analysis of a model aerobic methanotrophic bacterium, Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) has revealed a highly versatile metabolic potential. In parallel, environmental genomics has provided glimpses into anaerobic methane oxidation by certain archaea, further supporting the hypothesis of reverse methanogenesis. PMID:15693955

  15. One carbon metabolism in anaerobic bacteria: Regulation of carbon and electron flow during organic acid production

    SciTech Connect

    Zeikus, J.G.; Jain, M.K.

    1992-01-01

    This reporting period, progress is reported on the following: metabolic pathway of solvent production in B. methylotrophicum; the biochemical mechanism for metabolic regulation of the succinate fermentation; models to understand the physiobiochemical function of formate metabolism in anaerobes and; models for understanding the influence of low pH on one carbon metabolism. (CBS)

  16. Characterization of Two New Facultative Methanotrophs

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Martha J.; Wopat, Ann E.; O'Connor, Mary L.

    1980-01-01

    Two new facultative methane-oxidizing bacteria have been isolated from lake water enrichments. The organisms have been characterized in terms of colony types, growth characteristics, the guanine plus cytosine content of their deoxyribonucleic acid, thin sections, oxidation rates, and carbon assimilation pathways. Methane-grown cells of both organisms contained intracytoplasmic membranes similar to those described as type II in other methanotrophic bacteria. Neither organism had such membranes when grown heterotrophically. Both organisms assimilated methane by way of the isocitrate lyase-negative serine pathway for formaldehyde incorporation. The enzymes of this pathway were high in specific activity in cells grown on methane and were at low levels in cells grown either on heterotrophic substrates or on heterotrophic substrates plus methane. It is proposed that both organisms be classified in the genus Methylobacterium as two new species, Methylobacterium ethanolicum and Methylobacterium hypolimneticum. Images PMID:16345617

  17. Remediation of polychlorinated biphenyl impacted sediment by concurrent bioaugmentation with anaerobic halorespiring and aerobic degrading bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Rayford B.; Fagervold, Sonja K.; May, Harold D.; Sowers, Kevin R.

    2013-01-01

    Bioremediation of sediments contaminated with commercial PCBs is potentially achievable by the sequential activity of anaerobic halorespiration to convert higher chlorinated congeners to less chlorinated congeners that are susceptible to aerobic respiratory degradation. The efficacy of bioaugmentation with anaerobic halorespiring “Dehalobium chlorocoercia” DF1 and aerobic Burkholderia xenovorans LB400 added concurrently with GAC as a delivery system was determined in 2-liter laboratory mesocosms containing weathered Aroclor-contaminated sediment from Baltimore Harbor, MD. The greatest effect was seen in the mesocosm bioaugmented with both DF1 and LB400 together, which resulted in an 80% decrease by mass of PCBs, from 8 mg/kg to less than 2 mg/kg after 120 days. There was no significant increase in lesser-chlorinated congeners, indicating that both anaerobic dechlorination by DF1 and aerobic degradation by LB400 occurred. In contrast, non-bioaugmented controls containing filtered culture supernatant showed only 25% decrease in total levels of PCBs after 365 days, which was likely due to biostimulation of the indigenous population by the medium. Direct colony counts and molecular analysis targeting a putative reductive dehalogenase gene of D. chlorocoercia, or the bphA gene of LB400 showed the presence of viable DF1 and LB400 in bioaugmented mesocosms after 365 days, indicating that both non-indigenous strains were sustainable within the indigenous microbial community. These results suggest that an in situ treatment employing the simultaneous application of anaerobic and aerobic microorganisms could be an effective, environmentally sustainable strategy to reduce PCBs levels in contaminated sediment. PMID:23463900

  18. Monitoring the dynamics of syntrophic β-oxidizing bacteria during anaerobic degradation of oleic acid by quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Ziels, Ryan M; Beck, David A C; Martí, Magalí; Gough, Heidi L; Stensel, H David; Svensson, Bo H

    2015-04-01

    The ecophysiology of long-chain fatty acid-degrading syntrophic β-oxidizing bacteria has been poorly understood due to a lack of quantitative abundance data. Here, TaqMan quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays targeting the 16S rRNA gene of the known mesophilic syntrophic β-oxidizing bacterial genera Syntrophomonas and Syntrophus were developed and validated. Microbial community dynamics were followed using qPCR and Illumina-based high-throughput amplicon sequencing in triplicate methanogenic bioreactors subjected to five consecutive batch feedings of oleic acid. With repeated oleic acid feeding, the initial specific methane production rate significantly increased along with the relative abundances of Syntrophomonas and methanogenic archaea in the bioreactor communities. The novel qPCR assays showed that Syntrophomonas increased from 7 to 31% of the bacterial community 16S rRNA gene concentration, whereas that of Syntrophus decreased from 0.02 to less than 0.005%. High-throughput amplicon sequencing also revealed that Syntrophomonas became the dominant genus within the bioreactor microbiomes. These results suggest that increased specific mineralization rates of oleic acid were attributed to quantitative shifts within the microbial communities toward higher abundances of syntrophic β-oxidizing bacteria and methanogenic archaea. The novel qPCR assays targeting syntrophic β-oxidizing bacteria may thus serve as monitoring tools to indicate the fatty acid β-oxidization potential of anaerobic digester communities.

  19. Characterization and Detection of a Widely Distributed Gene Cluster That Predicts Anaerobic Choline Utilization by Human Gut Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-del Campo, Ana; Bodea, Smaranda; Hamer, Hilary A.; Marks, Jonathan A.; Haiser, Henry J.; Turnbaugh, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying the human gut microbiota’s effects on health and disease has been complicated by difficulties in linking metabolic functions associated with the gut community as a whole to individual microorganisms and activities. Anaerobic microbial choline metabolism, a disease-associated metabolic pathway, exemplifies this challenge, as the specific human gut microorganisms responsible for this transformation have not yet been clearly identified. In this study, we established the link between a bacterial gene cluster, the choline utilization (cut) cluster, and anaerobic choline metabolism in human gut isolates by combining transcriptional, biochemical, bioinformatic, and cultivation-based approaches. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR analysis and in vitro biochemical characterization of two cut gene products linked the entire cluster to growth on choline and supported a model for this pathway. Analyses of sequenced bacterial genomes revealed that the cut cluster is present in many human gut bacteria, is predictive of choline utilization in sequenced isolates, and is widely but discontinuously distributed across multiple bacterial phyla. Given that bacterial phylogeny is a poor marker for choline utilization, we were prompted to develop a degenerate PCR-based method for detecting the key functional gene choline TMA-lyase (cutC) in genomic and metagenomic DNA. Using this tool, we found that new choline-metabolizing gut isolates universally possessed cutC. We also demonstrated that this gene is widespread in stool metagenomic data sets. Overall, this work represents a crucial step toward understanding anaerobic choline metabolism in the human gut microbiota and underscores the importance of examining this microbial community from a function-oriented perspective. PMID:25873372

  20. Bioaugmentation of anaerobic sludge digestion with iron-reducing bacteria: process and microbial responses to variations in hydraulic retention time.

    PubMed

    Baek, Gahyun; Kim, Jaai; Shin, Seung Gu; Lee, Changsoo

    2016-01-01

    Although anaerobic digestion (AD) is a widely used option to manage waste activated sludge (WAS), there are some drawbacks related to its slow reaction rate and low energy productivity. This study examined an anaerobic WAS digester, augmented with an iron-reducing microbial consortium, relative to changes in microbial community structure and process performance at decreasing hydraulic retention times (HRTs) of 20 to 10 days. The enhanced methanation performance (approximately 40 % increase in methane yield) by the bioaugmentation was sustained until the HRT was decreased to 12.5 days, under Fe(3+)-rich conditions (ferric oxyhydroxide, 20 mM Fe). Enhanced iron-reducing activity was evidenced by the increased Fe(2+) to total Fe ratio maintained above 50 % during the stable operational phases. A further decrease in HRT to 10 days resulted in a significant performance deterioration, along with a drop in the Fe(2+) to total Fe ratio to <35 %, after four turnovers of operation. Prevailing existence of putative iron-reducing bacteria (IRBs) was identified by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), with Spirochaetaceae- and Thauera-related organisms being dominant members, and clear dominance shifts among them with respect to decrease in HRT were observed. Lowering HRT led to evident shifts in bacterial community structure likely associated with washout of IRBs, leading to decreases in iron respiration activity and AD performance at a lower HRT. The bacterial community structure shifted dynamically over phases, and the community transitions correlated well with the changes in process performance. Overall, the combined biostimulation and bioaugmentation investigated in this study proved effective for enhanced methane recovery from anaerobic WAS digestion, which suggests an interesting potential for high-rate AD.

  1. The determination of the real nano-scale sizes of bacteria in chernozem during microbial succession by means of hatching of a soil in aerobic and anaerobic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbacheva, M.

    2012-04-01

    M.A. Gorbacheva,L.M. Polyanskaya The Faculty of Soil Science, Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, GSP-1, Moscow,119991,Russia In recent years there's been particular attention paid to the smallest life's forms- bacteria which size can be measured in nanometer. These are the forms of bacteria with diameter of 5-200 nm. Theoretical calculations based on the content of the minimum number of DNA, enzyme, lipids in and ribosome in cells indicates impossibility of existence of a living cells within diameter less than 300 nm. It is theoretically possible for a living cell to exist within possible diameter of approximately 140 nm. Using a fluorescence microscope there's been indicated in a number of samples from lakes, rivers, soil, snow and rain water that 200 nm is the smallest diameter of a living cell. Supposingly, such a small size of bacteria in soil is determined by natural conditions which limit their development by nutritious substances and stress-factors. Rejuvenescence of nanobacteria under unfavourable natural conditions and stress-factors is studied in laboratory environment. The object of the current study has become the samples of typical arable chernozem of the Central Chernozem State Biosphere Reserve in Kursk. The detailed morphological description of the soil profile and its basic analytical characteristics are widely represented in scientific publications. The soil is characterized by a high carbon content which makes up 3,96% ,3,8% , and 2,9% for the upper layers of the A horizon, and 0,79% for the layer of the B horizon. A microbial succession was studied under aerobic and anaerobic conditions by means of experiments with microcosms in upper A horizons and B horizon of a chernozem. The final aim is to identify the cells size of bacteria in aerobic and anaerobic soil conditions in chernozem during the microbial succession, by dampening and application of chitin by means of «cascade filtration» method. The study of the microcosms is important for

  2. A lipid chemotactic factor from anaerobic coryneform bacteria including Corynebacterium parvum with activity for macrophages and monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Russell, R J; McInroy, R J; Wilkinson, P C; White, R G

    1976-01-01

    A lipid with chemoattractant (chemotactic) activity for mouse and guinea-pig macrophages and for human blood monocytes is released by anaerobic coryneform bacteria (including Corynebacterium parvum). The active lipid is associated with fibrillar structures which lie on the outside of the bacterial cell and are released spontaneously during growth. The lipid can also be extracted easily by a number of methods. The fibrils are loosely associated with a capsule-like structure composed largely of polysaccharide. Purification of the active lipid was achieved by chloroform-methanol extraction of the whole organisms yielding a chloroform-soluble fraction attracting mononuclear phagocytes at concentrations around 10 microgram/ml. The infra-red spectrum of this material showed lipid but no peptide or sugar. Thin-layer chromatography yielded twelve spots of which three had chemoattractant properties. The most active of these gave staining reactions consistent with the presence of phospholipid, the other two probably contained free fatty acids and triglycerides. Thin-layer electrophoresis also yielded an active phosphorus-containing spot. Saturated fatty acids of chain lengths found in the anaerobic coryne forms had weak monocyte-attractant activity. As the active material was progressively purified, its activity as a monocyte attractant weakened. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:1027716

  3. Synthesis and Antimicrobial Evaluation of Amixicile-Based Inhibitors of the Pyruvate-Ferredoxin Oxidoreductases of Anaerobic Bacteria and Epsilonproteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Andrew J; Bruce, Alexandra M; Gineste, Catherine; Ballard, T Eric; Olekhnovich, Igor N; Macdonald, Timothy L; Hoffman, Paul S

    2016-07-01

    Amixicile is a promising derivative of nitazoxanide (an antiparasitic therapeutic) developed to treat systemic infections caused by anaerobic bacteria, anaerobic parasites, and members of the Epsilonproteobacteria (Campylobacter and Helicobacter). Amixicile selectively inhibits pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) and related enzymes by inhibiting the function of the vitamin B1 cofactor (thiamine pyrophosphate) by a novel mechanism. Here, we interrogate the amixicile scaffold, guided by docking simulations, direct PFOR inhibition assays, and MIC tests against Clostridium difficile, Campylobacter jejuni, and Helicobacter pylori Docking simulations revealed that the nitro group present in nitazoxanide interacts with the protonated N4'-aminopyrimidine of thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP). The ortho-propylamine on the benzene ring formed an electrostatic interaction with an aspartic acid moiety (B456) of PFOR that correlated with improved PFOR-inhibitory activity and potency by MIC tests. Aryl substitution with electron-withdrawing groups and substitutions of the propylamine with other alkyl amines or nitrogen-containing heterocycles both improved PFOR inhibition and, in many cases, biological activity against C. difficile Docking simulation results correlate well with mechanistic enzymology and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies that show members of this class of antimicrobials to be specific inhibitors of vitamin B1 function by proton abstraction, which is both novel and likely to limit mutation-based drug resistance. PMID:27090174

  4. Organic carbon recovery and photosynthetic bacteria population in an anaerobic membrane photo-bioreactor treating food processing wastewater.

    PubMed

    Chitapornpan, S; Chiemchaisri, C; Chiemchaisri, W; Honda, R; Yamamoto, K

    2013-08-01

    Purple non-sulfur bacteria (PNSB) were cultivated by food industry wastewater in the anaerobic membrane photo-bioreactor. Organic removal and biomass production and characteristics were accomplished via an explicit examination of the long term performance of the photo-bioreactor fed with real wastewater. With the support of infra-red light transmitting filter, PNSB could survive and maintain in the system even under the continual fluctuations of influent wastewater characteristics. The average BOD and COD removal efficiencies were found at the moderate range of 51% and 58%, respectively. Observed photosynthetic biomass yield was 0.6g dried solid/g BOD with crude protein content of 0.41 g/g dried solid. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoretic analysis (DGGE) and 16S rDNA sequencing revealed the presence of Rhodopseudomonas palustris and significant changes in the photosynthetic bacterial community within the system. PMID:23489563

  5. Fate of antibiotic resistance bacteria and genes during enhanced anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge by microwave pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Tong, Juan; Liu, Jibao; Zheng, Xiang; Zhang, Junya; Ni, Xiaotang; Chen, Meixue; Wei, Yuansong

    2016-10-01

    The fate of antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) were investigated during the sludge anaerobic digestion (AD) with microwave-acid (MW-H), microwave (MW) and microwave-H2O2-alkaline (MW-H2O2) pretreatments. Results showed that combined MW pretreatment especially for the MW-H pretreatment could efficiently reduce the ARB concentration, and most ARG concentrations tended to attenuate during the pretreatment. The subsequent AD showed evident removal of the ARB, but most ARGs were enriched after AD. Only the concentration of tetX kept continuous declination during the whole sludge treatment. The total ARGs concentration showed significant correlation with 16S rRNA during the pretreatment and AD. Compared with unpretreated sludge, the AD of MW and MW-H2O2 pretreated sludge presented slightly better ARB and ARGs reduction efficiency.

  6. Organic carbon recovery and photosynthetic bacteria population in an anaerobic membrane photo-bioreactor treating food processing wastewater.

    PubMed

    Chitapornpan, S; Chiemchaisri, C; Chiemchaisri, W; Honda, R; Yamamoto, K

    2013-08-01

    Purple non-sulfur bacteria (PNSB) were cultivated by food industry wastewater in the anaerobic membrane photo-bioreactor. Organic removal and biomass production and characteristics were accomplished via an explicit examination of the long term performance of the photo-bioreactor fed with real wastewater. With the support of infra-red light transmitting filter, PNSB could survive and maintain in the system even under the continual fluctuations of influent wastewater characteristics. The average BOD and COD removal efficiencies were found at the moderate range of 51% and 58%, respectively. Observed photosynthetic biomass yield was 0.6g dried solid/g BOD with crude protein content of 0.41 g/g dried solid. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoretic analysis (DGGE) and 16S rDNA sequencing revealed the presence of Rhodopseudomonas palustris and significant changes in the photosynthetic bacterial community within the system.

  7. Anaerobic and aerobic bacteriology of the saliva and gingiva from 16 captive Komodo dragons (Varanus komodoensis): new implications for the "bacteria as venom" model.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Ellie J C; Tyrrell, Kerin L; Citron, Diane M; Cox, Cathleen R; Recchio, Ian M; Okimoto, Ben; Bryja, Judith; Fry, Bryan G

    2013-06-01

    It has been speculated that the oral flora of the Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis) exerts a lethal effect on its prey; yet, scant information about their specific oral flora bacteriology, especially anaerobes, exists. Consequently, the aerobic and anaerobic oral bacteriology of 16 captive Komodo dragons (10 adults and six neonates), aged 2-17 yr for adults and 7-10 days for neonates, from three U.S. zoos were studied. Saliva and gingival samples were collected by zoo personnel, inoculated into anaerobic transport media, and delivered by courier to a reference laboratory. Samples were cultured for aerobes and anaerobes. Strains were identified by standard methods and 16S rRNA gene sequencing when required. The oral flora consisted of 39 aerobic and 21 anaerobic species, with some variation by zoo. Adult dragons grew 128 isolates, including 37 aerobic gram-negative rods (one to eight per specimen), especially Enterobacteriaceae; 50 aerobic gram-positive bacteria (two to nine per specimen), especially Staphylococcus sciuri and Enterococcusfaecalis, present in eight of 10 and nine of 10 dragons, respectively; and 41 anaerobes (one to six per specimen), especially clostridia. All hatchlings grew aerobes but none grew anaerobes. No virulent species were isolated. As with other carnivores, captive Komodo oral flora is simply reflective of the gut and skin flora of their recent meals and environment and is unlikely to cause rapid fatal infection.

  8. Anaerobic and aerobic bacteriology of the saliva and gingiva from 16 captive Komodo dragons (Varanus komodoensis): new implications for the "bacteria as venom" model.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Ellie J C; Tyrrell, Kerin L; Citron, Diane M; Cox, Cathleen R; Recchio, Ian M; Okimoto, Ben; Bryja, Judith; Fry, Bryan G

    2013-06-01

    It has been speculated that the oral flora of the Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis) exerts a lethal effect on its prey; yet, scant information about their specific oral flora bacteriology, especially anaerobes, exists. Consequently, the aerobic and anaerobic oral bacteriology of 16 captive Komodo dragons (10 adults and six neonates), aged 2-17 yr for adults and 7-10 days for neonates, from three U.S. zoos were studied. Saliva and gingival samples were collected by zoo personnel, inoculated into anaerobic transport media, and delivered by courier to a reference laboratory. Samples were cultured for aerobes and anaerobes. Strains were identified by standard methods and 16S rRNA gene sequencing when required. The oral flora consisted of 39 aerobic and 21 anaerobic species, with some variation by zoo. Adult dragons grew 128 isolates, including 37 aerobic gram-negative rods (one to eight per specimen), especially Enterobacteriaceae; 50 aerobic gram-positive bacteria (two to nine per specimen), especially Staphylococcus sciuri and Enterococcusfaecalis, present in eight of 10 and nine of 10 dragons, respectively; and 41 anaerobes (one to six per specimen), especially clostridia. All hatchlings grew aerobes but none grew anaerobes. No virulent species were isolated. As with other carnivores, captive Komodo oral flora is simply reflective of the gut and skin flora of their recent meals and environment and is unlikely to cause rapid fatal infection. PMID:23805543

  9. Iron and Copper Act Synergistically To Delay Anaerobic Growth of Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Lina J.; Coleman, Maureen L.

    2013-01-01

    Transition metals are known to cause toxic effects through their interaction with oxygen, but toxicity under anoxic conditions is poorly understood. Here we investigated the effects of iron (Fe) and copper (Cu) on the anaerobic growth and gene expression of the purple phototrophic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris TIE-1. We found that Fe(II) and Cu(II) act synergistically to delay anaerobic growth at environmentally relevant metal concentrations. Cu(I) and Cu(II) had similar effects both alone and in the presence of ascorbate, a Cu(II) reductant, indicating that reduction of Cu(II) to Cu(I) by Fe(II) is not sufficient to explain the growth inhibition. Addition of Cu(II) increased the toxicity of Co(II) and Ni(II); in contrast, Ni(II) toxicity was diminished in the presence of Fe(II). The synergistic anaerobic toxicity of Fe(II) and Cu(II) was also observed for Escherichia coli MG1655, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, and Rhodobacter capsulatus SB1003. Gene expression analyses for R. palustris identified three regulatory genes that respond to Cu(II) and not to Fe(II): homologs of cueR and cusR, two known proteobacterial copper homeostasis regulators, and csoR, a copper regulator recently identified in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Two P-type ATPase efflux pumps, along with an FoF1 ATP synthase, were also upregulated by Cu(II) but not by Fe(II). An Escherichia coli mutant deficient in copA, cus, and cueO showed a smaller synergistic effect, indicating that iron might interfere with one or more of the copper homeostasis systems. Our results suggest that interactive effects of transition metals on microbial physiology may be widespread under anoxic conditions, although the molecular mechanisms remain to be more fully elucidated. PMID:23563938

  10. Distribution and diversity of nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane-oxidising bacteria in the sediments of the Qiantang River.

    PubMed

    Shen, Li-dong; Liu, Shuai; Zhu, Qun; Li, Xiao-yu; Cai, Chen; Cheng, Dong-qing; Lou, Li-ping; Xu, Xiang-yang; Zheng, Ping; Hu, Bao-lan

    2014-02-01

    Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (n-damo) process was reported to be mediated by "Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera", which belongs to the candidate phylum NC10. M. oxyfera-like bacteria have been detected in lake ecosystems, while their distribution, diversity and abundance in river ecosystems have not been well studied. In this study, both the 16S rRNA and the pmoA molecular biomarkers confirmed the presence of diverse NC10 phylum bacteria related to M. oxyfera in a river ecosystem-the Qiantang River, Zhejiang Province (China). Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA genes demonstrated that the recovered M. oxyfera-like sequences could be grouped into several distinct clusters that exhibited 89.8% to 98.9% identity to the M. oxyfera 16S rRNA gene. Similarly, several different clusters of pmoA gene sequences were observed, and these clusters displayed 85.1-95.4% sequence identity to the pmoA gene of M. oxyfera. Quantitative PCR showed that the abundance of M. oxyfera-like bacteria varied from 1.32 ± 0.16 × 10(6) to 1.03 ± 0.12 × 10(7) copies g (dry weight)(-1). Correlation analysis demonstrated that the total inorganic nitrogen content, the ammonium content and the organic content of the sediment were important factors affecting the distribution of M. oxyfera-like bacterial groups in the examined sediments. This study demonstrated the distribution of diverse M. oxyfera-like bacteria and their correlation with environmental factors in Qiantang River sediments.

  11. The influence of incubation time, sample preparation and exposure to oxygen on the quality of the MALDI-TOF MS spectrum of anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Veloo, A C M; Elgersma, P E; Friedrich, A W; Nagy, E; van Winkelhoff, A J

    2014-12-01

    With matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), bacteria can be identified quickly and reliably. This accounts especially for anaerobic bacteria. Because growth rate and oxygen sensitivity differ among anaerobic bacteria, we aimed to study the influence of incubation time, exposure to oxygen and sample preparation on the quality of the spectrum using the Bruker system. Also, reproducibility and inter-examiner variability were determined. Twenty-six anaerobic species, representing 17 genera, were selected based on gram-stain characteristics, growth rate and colony morphology. Inter-examiner variation showed that experience in the preparation of the targets can be a significant variable. The influence of incubation time was determined between 24 and 96 h of incubation. Reliable species identification was obtained after 48 h of incubation for gram-negative anaerobes and after 72 h for gram-positive anaerobes. Exposure of the cultures to oxygen did not influence the results of the MALDI-TOF MS identifications of all tested gram-positive species. Fusobacterium necrophorum and Prevotella intermedia could not be identified after >24 h and 48 h of exposure to oxygen, respectively. Other tested gram-negative bacteria could be identified after 48 h of exposure to oxygen. Most of the tested species could be identified using the direct spotting method. Bifidobacterium longum and Finegoldia magna needed on-target extraction with 70% formic acid in order to obtain reliable species identification and Peptoniphilus ivorii a full extraction. Spectrum quality was influenced by the amount of bacteria spotted on the target, the homogeneity of the smear and the experience of the examiner.

  12. Effect of pH and temperature on the sorption of Np and Pa to mixed anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, T; Kauri, T; Kudo, A

    2001-10-01

    While considering the geological disposal of radioactive wastes, the behaviour of the radionuclide Np and its daughter element Pa was investigated in the presence of a mixture of anaerobic bacteria (MAB). Originally, MAB were used for the treatment of pulp and paper wastewater. The interaction between radionuclides and bacteria was evaluated by determining distribution coefficients (Kd) over 10 days and at 5 degrees C and 35 degrees C. Kd for Np at 35 degrees C after 5 days had a low value around 10(-2) After 10 days, however, Kd was > 100-fold higher. On the other hand, Kd at 5 degrees C was low (10(-2)) throughout, without any significant increase over time. The interaction between Pa and MAB was found to be stronger than that for Np, with Kd for Pa about 100 times higher. The Kd was controlled by some basic factors, the activity of MAB, the complexing capacity of MAB, and the chemical conditions in the solution such as pH and Eh.

  13. Effect of pH and temperature on the sorption of Np and Pa to mixed anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, T; Kauri, T; Kudo, A

    2001-10-01

    While considering the geological disposal of radioactive wastes, the behaviour of the radionuclide Np and its daughter element Pa was investigated in the presence of a mixture of anaerobic bacteria (MAB). Originally, MAB were used for the treatment of pulp and paper wastewater. The interaction between radionuclides and bacteria was evaluated by determining distribution coefficients (Kd) over 10 days and at 5 degrees C and 35 degrees C. Kd for Np at 35 degrees C after 5 days had a low value around 10(-2) After 10 days, however, Kd was > 100-fold higher. On the other hand, Kd at 5 degrees C was low (10(-2)) throughout, without any significant increase over time. The interaction between Pa and MAB was found to be stronger than that for Np, with Kd for Pa about 100 times higher. The Kd was controlled by some basic factors, the activity of MAB, the complexing capacity of MAB, and the chemical conditions in the solution such as pH and Eh. PMID:11545492

  14. Nitrate-dependent anaerobic ferrous oxidation (NAFO) by denitrifying bacteria: a perspective autotrophic nitrogen pollution control technology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meng; Zheng, Ping; Wang, Ru; Li, Wei; Lu, Huifeng; Zhang, Jiqiang

    2014-12-01

    The nitrate-dependent anaerobic ferrous oxidation (NAFO) is an important discovery in the fields of microbiology and geology, which is a valuable biological reaction since it can convert nitrate into nitrogen gas, removing nitrogen from wastewater. The research on NAFO can promote the development of novel autotrophic biotechnologies for nitrogen pollution control and get a deep insight into the biogeochemical cycles. In this work, batch experiments were conducted with denitrifying bacteria as biocatalyst to investigate the performance of nitrogen removal by NAFO. The results showed that the denitrifying bacteria were capable of chemolithotrophic denitrification with ferrous salt as electron donor, namely NAFO. And the maximum nitrate conversion rates (qmax) reached 57.89 mg (g VSS d)−1, which was the rate-limiting step in NAFO. Fe/N ratio, temperature and initial pH had significant influences on nitrogen removal by NAFO process, and their optimal values were 2.0 °C, 30.15 °C and 8.0 °C, respectively.

  15. Survival of Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria and Horizontal Gene Transfer Control Antibiotic Resistance Gene Content in Anaerobic Digesters

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jennifer H.; Novak, John T.; Knocke, William R.; Pruden, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Understanding fate of antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) vs. their antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) during wastewater sludge treatment is critical in order to reduce the spread of antibiotic resistance through process optimization. Here, we spiked high concentrations of tetracycline-resistant bacteria, isolated from mesophilic (Iso M1-1—a Pseudomonas sp.) and thermophilic (Iso T10—a Bacillus sp.) anaerobic digested sludge, into batch digesters and monitored their fate by plate counts and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) of their corresponding tetracycline ARGs. In batch studies, spiked ARB plate counts returned to baseline (thermophilic) or 1-log above baseline (mesophilic) while levels of the ARG present in the spiked isolate [tet(G)] remained high in mesophilic batch reactors. To compare results under semi-continuous flow conditions with natural influent variation, tet(O), tet(W), and sul1 ARGs, along with the intI1 integrase gene, were monitored over a 9-month period in the raw feed sludge and effluent sludge of lab-scale thermophilic and mesophilic anaerobic digesters. sul1 and intI1 in mesophilic and thermophilic digesters correlated positively (Spearman rho = 0.457–0.829, P < 0.05) with the raw feed sludge. There was no correlation in tet(O) or tet(W) ratios in raw sludge and mesophilic digested sludge or thermophilic digested sludge (Spearman rho = 0.130–0.486, P = 0.075–0.612). However, in the thermophilic digester, the tet(O) and tet(W) ratios remained consistently low over the entire monitoring period. We conclude that the influent sludge microbial composition can influence the ARG content of a digester, apparently as a result of differential survival or death of ARBs or horizontal gene transfer of genes between raw sludge ARBs and the digester microbial community. Notably, mesophilic digestion was more susceptible to ARG intrusion than thermophilic digestion, which may be attributed to a higher rate of ARB survival and

  16. Survival of Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria and Horizontal Gene Transfer Control Antibiotic Resistance Gene Content in Anaerobic Digesters.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jennifer H; Novak, John T; Knocke, William R; Pruden, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Understanding fate of antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) vs. their antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) during wastewater sludge treatment is critical in order to reduce the spread of antibiotic resistance through process optimization. Here, we spiked high concentrations of tetracycline-resistant bacteria, isolated from mesophilic (Iso M1-1-a Pseudomonas sp.) and thermophilic (Iso T10-a Bacillus sp.) anaerobic digested sludge, into batch digesters and monitored their fate by plate counts and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) of their corresponding tetracycline ARGs. In batch studies, spiked ARB plate counts returned to baseline (thermophilic) or 1-log above baseline (mesophilic) while levels of the ARG present in the spiked isolate [tet(G)] remained high in mesophilic batch reactors. To compare results under semi-continuous flow conditions with natural influent variation, tet(O), tet(W), and sul1 ARGs, along with the intI1 integrase gene, were monitored over a 9-month period in the raw feed sludge and effluent sludge of lab-scale thermophilic and mesophilic anaerobic digesters. sul1 and intI1 in mesophilic and thermophilic digesters correlated positively (Spearman rho = 0.457-0.829, P < 0.05) with the raw feed sludge. There was no correlation in tet(O) or tet(W) ratios in raw sludge and mesophilic digested sludge or thermophilic digested sludge (Spearman rho = 0.130-0.486, P = 0.075-0.612). However, in the thermophilic digester, the tet(O) and tet(W) ratios remained consistently low over the entire monitoring period. We conclude that the influent sludge microbial composition can influence the ARG content of a digester, apparently as a result of differential survival or death of ARBs or horizontal gene transfer of genes between raw sludge ARBs and the digester microbial community. Notably, mesophilic digestion was more susceptible to ARG intrusion than thermophilic digestion, which may be attributed to a higher rate of ARB survival and/or horizontal gene

  17. The intracellular proton gradient enables anaerobic ammonia oxidizing (anammox) bacteria to tolerate NO2 - inhibition.

    PubMed

    Carvajal-Arroyo, José M; Puyol, Daniel; Li, Guangbin; Sierra-Álvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A

    2014-12-20

    Anammox bacteria are inhibited by nitrite, which is one of their substrates. By utilizing 2,4 dinitrophenol and carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone, two uncouplers of respiration, we demonstrate that nitrite tolerance of anammox cells is strongly dependent on their ability to maintain a proton gradient, which may be the driving force for active nitrite transport system.

  18. Survival of bacteria in carcasses.

    PubMed

    Gill, C O; Penney, N

    1979-04-01

    Bacteria injected into the bloodstream of guinea pigs shortly before death decreased in number in carcass tissues for about 1 h after death. If initial bacterial numbers were sufficiently low, all bacteria were eliminated, and carcass tissues were sterile 24 h after death. Carcass tissue sterility was maintained with an initial density of Clostridium perfringens or Salmonella typhimurium of 20 cells per g or with an initial density of the other species examined of several hundred cells per gram. With larger numbers of strict and facultative anaerobes, growth commenced after 3 h in carcasses incubated at 30 degrees C. Spores of C. perfringens were killed over the same period as vegetative cells, but growth did not commence until 8 h after death. Bactericidal activity in carcass tissues must therefore be taken into account in evaluating the significance of reports of deep-tissue contamination of carcasses from meat animals.

  19. Community composition and activity of anaerobic ammonium oxidation bacteria in the rhizosphere of salt-marsh grass Spartina alterniflora.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yanling; Hou, Lijun; Liu, Min; Yin, Guoyu; Gao, Juan; Jiang, Xiaofen; Lin, Xianbiao; Li, Xiaofei; Yu, Chendi; Wang, Rong

    2016-09-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) as an important nitrogen removal pathway has been investigated in intertidal marshes. However, the rhizosphere-driven anammox process in these ecosystems is largely overlooked so far. In this study, the community dynamics and activities of anammox bacteria in the rhizosphere and non-rhizosphere sediments of salt-marsh grass Spartina alterniflora (a widely distributed plant in estuaries and intertidal ecosystems) were investigated using clone library analysis, quantitative PCR assay, and isotope-tracing technique. Phylogenetic analysis showed that anammox bacterial diversity was higher in the non-rhizosphere sediments (Scalindua and Kuenenia) compared with the rhizosphere zone (only Scalindua genus). Higher abundance of anammox bacteria was detected in the rhizosphere (6.46 × 10(6)-1.56 × 10(7) copies g(-1)), which was about 1.5-fold higher in comparison with that in the non-rhizosphere zone (4.22 × 10(6)-1.12 × 10(7) copies g(-1)). Nitrogen isotope-tracing experiments indicated that the anammox process in the rhizosphere contributed to 12-14 % N2 generation with rates of 0.43-1.58 nmol N g(-1) h(-1), while anammox activity in the non-rhizosphere zone contributed to only 4-7 % N2 production with significantly lower activities (0.28-0.83 nmol N g(-1) h(-1)). Overall, we propose that the rhizosphere microenvironment in intertidal marshes might provide a favorable niche for anammox bacteria and thus plays an important role in nitrogen cycling. PMID:27225476

  20. Antibacterial activity of Brazilian propolis and fractions against oral anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Santos, F A; Bastos, E M A; Uzeda, M; Carvalho, M A R; Farias, L M; Moreira, E S A; Braga, F C

    2002-04-01

    Propolis collected from a cerrado area in Minas Gerais State, Brazil, was subjected to chromatography on silica gel column and to partition between immiscible solvents. Propolis aqueous-ethanolic extract and fractions obtained were tested for inhibitory activity against periodontitis-causing bacteria. All of the assayed bacterium species were susceptible to propolis extract. The two fractionation methodologies yielded fractions which were active against bacteria, with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) ranging from 64 to 1024 microg/ml. TLC and HPLC analyses of the extract and of active fractions showed the presence of phenolic compounds of varied polarity. None of the assayed fractions was more active than the extract, suggesting that the antibacterial activity is probably due to the synergistic effect of several compounds.

  1. Utilization of alkylbenzenes during anaerobic growth of pure cultures of denitrifying bacteria on crude oil

    SciTech Connect

    Rabus, R.; Widdel, F.

    1996-04-01

    Leakage from oil pipelines and underground fuel tanks may result in contamination of soils and deeper horizons. Even though the equilibrium partitioning of BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes) between oil and water is largely on the side of the hydrophobic phase, BTEX exhibit a certain water solubility higher than other oil hydrocarbons. This study evaluates the growth of four strains of denitrifying bacteria on crude oil and the resulting, strain-specific depletion of alkylbenzenes.

  2. Growth of Anaerobic Methane-Oxidizing Archaea and Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria in a High-Pressure Membrane Capsule Bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Gieteling, Jarno; Widjaja-Greefkes, H. C. Aura; Plugge, Caroline M.; Stams, Alfons J. M.; Lens, Piet N. L.; Meulepas, Roel J. W.

    2014-01-01

    Communities of anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea (ANME) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) grow slowly, which limits the ability to perform physiological studies. High methane partial pressure was previously successfully applied to stimulate growth, but it is not clear how different ANME subtypes and associated SRB are affected by it. Here, we report on the growth of ANME-SRB in a membrane capsule bioreactor inoculated with Eckernförde Bay sediment that combines high-pressure incubation (10.1 MPa methane) and thorough mixing (100 rpm) with complete cell retention by a 0.2-μm-pore-size membrane. The results were compared to previously obtained data from an ambient-pressure (0.101 MPa methane) bioreactor inoculated with the same sediment. The rates of oxidation of labeled methane were not higher at 10.1 MPa, likely because measurements were done at ambient pressure. The subtype ANME-2a/b was abundant in both reactors, but subtype ANME-2c was enriched only at 10.1 MPa. SRB at 10.1 MPa mainly belonged to the SEEP-SRB2 and Eel-1 groups and the Desulfuromonadales and not to the typically found SEEP-SRB1 group. The increase of ANME-2a/b occurred in parallel with the increase of SEEP-SRB2, which was previously found to be associated only with ANME-2c. Our results imply that the syntrophic association is flexible and that methane pressure and sulfide concentration influence the growth of different ANME-SRB consortia. We also studied the effect of elevated methane pressure on methane production and oxidation by a mixture of methanogenic and sulfate-reducing sludge. Here, methane oxidation rates decreased and were not coupled to sulfide production, indicating trace methane oxidation during net methanogenesis and not anaerobic methane oxidation, even at a high methane partial pressure. PMID:25501484

  3. Growth of anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea and sulfate-reducing bacteria in a high-pressure membrane capsule bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Timmers, Peer H A; Gieteling, Jarno; Widjaja-Greefkes, H C Aura; Plugge, Caroline M; Stams, Alfons J M; Lens, Piet N L; Meulepas, Roel J W

    2015-02-01

    Communities of anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea (ANME) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) grow slowly, which limits the ability to perform physiological studies. High methane partial pressure was previously successfully applied to stimulate growth, but it is not clear how different ANME subtypes and associated SRB are affected by it. Here, we report on the growth of ANME-SRB in a membrane capsule bioreactor inoculated with Eckernförde Bay sediment that combines high-pressure incubation (10.1 MPa methane) and thorough mixing (100 rpm) with complete cell retention by a 0.2-m-pore-size membrane. The results were compared to previously obtained data from an ambient-pressure (0.101 MPa methane) bioreactor inoculated with the same sediment. The rates of oxidation of labeled methane were not higher at 10.1 MPa, likely because measurements were done at ambient pressure. The subtype ANME-2a/b was abundant in both reactors, but subtype ANME-2c was enriched only at 10.1 MPa. SRB at 10.1 MPa mainly belonged to the SEEP-SRB2 and Eel-1 groups and the Desulfuromonadales and not to the typically found SEEP-SRB1 group. The increase of ANME-2a/b occurred in parallel with the increase of SEEP-SRB2, which was previously found to be associated only with ANME-2c. Our results imply that the syntrophic association is flexible and that methane pressure and sulfide concentration influence the growth of different ANME-SRB consortia. We also studied the effect of elevated methane pressure on methane production and oxidation by a mixture of methanogenic and sulfate-reducing sludge. Here, methane oxidation rates decreased and were not coupled to sulfide production, indicating trace methane oxidation during net methanogenesis and not anaerobic methane oxidation, even at a high methane partial pressure.

  4. In vitro activities of cefminox against anaerobic bacteria compared with those of nine other compounds.

    PubMed

    Hoellman, D B; Spangler, S K; Jacobs, M R; Appelbaum, P C

    1998-03-01

    The agar dilution MIC method was used to test the activity of cefminox, a beta-lactamase-stable cephamycin, compared with those of cefoxitin, cefotetan, moxalactam, ceftizoxime, cefotiam, cefamandole, cefoperazone, clindamycin, and metronidazole against 357 anaerobes. Overall, cefminox was the most active beta-lactam, with an MIC at which 50% of isolates are inhibited (MIC50) of 1.0 microg/ml and an MIC90 of 16.0 microg/ml. Other beta-lactams were less active, with respective MIC50s and MIC90s of 2.0 and 64.0 microg/ml for cefoxitin, 2.0 and 128.0 microg/ml for cefotetan, 2.0 and 64.0 microg/ml for moxalactam, 4.0 and > 128.0 microg/ml for ceftizoxime, 16.0 and > 128.0 microg/ml for cefotiam, 8.0 and >128.0 microg/ml for cefamandole, and 4.0 and 128.0 microg/ml for cefoperazone. The clindamycin MIC50 and MIC90 were 0.5 and 8.0 microg/ml, respectively, and the metronidazole MIC50 and MIC90 were 1.0 and 4.0 microg/ml, respectively. Cefminox was especially active against Bacteroides fragilis (MIC90, 2.0 microg/ml), Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (MIC90, 4.0 microg/ml), fusobacteria (MIC90, 1.0 microg/ml), peptostreptococci (MIC90, 2.0 microg/ml), and clostridia, including Clostridium difficile (MIC90, 2.0 microg/ml). Time-kill studies performed with six representative anaerobic species revealed that at the MIC all compounds except ceftizoxime were bactericidal (99.9% killing) against all strains after 48 h. At 24 h, only cefminox and cefoxitin at 4x the MIC and cefoperazone at 8x the MIC were bactericidal against all strains. After 12 h, at the MIC all compounds except moxalactam, ceftizoxime, cefotiam, cefamandole, clindamycin, and metronidazole gave 90% killing of all strains. After 3 h, cefminox at 2 x the MIC produced the most rapid effect, with 90% killing of all strains. PMID:9517922

  5. In Vitro Activities of Cefminox against Anaerobic Bacteria Compared with Those of Nine Other Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Hoellman, Dianne B.; Spangler, Sheila K.; Jacobs, Michael R.; Appelbaum, Peter C.

    1998-01-01

    The agar dilution MIC method was used to test the activity of cefminox, a β-lactamase-stable cephamycin, compared with those of cefoxitin, cefotetan, moxalactam, ceftizoxime, cefotiam, cefamandole, cefoperazone, clindamycin, and metronidazole against 357 anaerobes. Overall, cefminox was the most active β-lactam, with an MIC at which 50% of isolates are inhibited (MIC50) of 1.0 μg/ml and an MIC90 of 16.0 μg/ml. Other β-lactams were less active, with respective MIC50s and MIC90s of 2.0 and 64.0 μg/ml for cefoxitin, 2.0 and 128.0 μg/ml for cefotetan, 2.0 and 64.0 μg/ml for moxalactam, 4.0 and >128.0 μg/ml for ceftizoxime, 16.0 and >128.0 μg/ml for cefotiam, 8.0 and >128.0 μg/ml for cefamandole, and 4.0 and 128.0 μg/ml for cefoperazone. The clindamycin MIC50 and MIC90 were 0.5 and 8.0 μg/ml, respectively, and the metronidazole MIC50 and MIC90 were 1.0 and 4.0 μg/ml, respectively. Cefminox was especially active against Bacteroides fragilis (MIC90, 2.0 μg/ml), Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (MIC90, 4.0 μg/ml), fusobacteria (MIC90, 1.0 μg/ml), peptostreptococci (MIC90, 2.0 μg/ml), and clostridia, including Clostridium difficile (MIC90, 2.0 μg/ml). Time-kill studies performed with six representative anaerobic species revealed that at the MIC all compounds except ceftizoxime were bactericidal (99.9% killing) against all strains after 48 h. At 24 h, only cefminox and cefoxitin at 4× the MIC and cefoperazone at 8× the MIC were bactericidal against all strains. After 12 h, at the MIC all compounds except moxalactam, ceftizoxime, cefotiam, cefamandole, clindamycin, and metronidazole gave 90% killing of all strains. After 3 h, cefminox at 2× the MIC produced the most rapid effect, with 90% killing of all strains. PMID:9517922

  6. Studies on some characteristics of hydrogen production by cell-free extracts of rumen anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Joyner, A E; Winter, W T; Godbout, D M

    1977-03-01

    Hydrogen production was studied in the following rumen anaerobes: Bacteroides clostridiiformis, Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens, Enbacterium limosum, Fusobacterium necrophorum, Megasphaera elsdenii, Ruminococcus albus, and Ruminococcus flavefaciens. Clostridium pasteurianum and Escherichia coli were included for comparative purposes. Hydrogen production from dithionite, dithionite-reduced methyl viologen, pyruvate, and formate was determined. All species tested produced hydrogen from dithionite-reduce methyl viologen, but only C. pasteurianum, B. clostridiiformis, E. limosum, and M. elsdenii produced hydrogen from dithionite. All species except E. coli produced hydrogen from pyruvate, but activity was low or absent in extracts of E. limosum, F. necrophorum, R. albus, and R. flavefaciens unless methyl viologen was added. Hydrogen was produced from formate only by E. coli, B. clostridiiformis, E. limosum, F. necrophorum, and R. flavefaciens. Extracts were subjected to ultracentrifugation in an effort to determine the solubility of hydrogenase. The hydrogenase of all species except E. coli appeared to be soluble, although variable amounts of hydrogenase activity were detected in the pellet. Treatment of extracts of the rumen microbial species with DEAE-cellulose resulted in loss ofhydrogen production from pyruvate. Activity was restored by the addition of methyl viologen. It is concluded that hydrogen production in these rumen microorganisms is similar to that in the saccharolytic clostridia.

  7. Direct observation and quantification of extracellular long-range electron flow in anaerobic bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malvankar, Nikhil; Yalcin, Sibel; Vargas, Madeline; Tuominen, Mark; Lovley, Derek

    2013-03-01

    Some anaerobic microorganisms are capable of transporting electrons outside their cell to distant electron acceptors such as metals, minerals or partner species. Previous studies have focused primarily on transport over short distances (< 1 μm) via diffusion of molecular intermediates, or alternatively via tunneling or thermally-activated hopping across biomolecules. However, we have found that Geobacter sulfurreducens can transport electrons over long distances (> 10 μm) using pili filaments that show organic metal-like conductivity. Pili also enable direct exchange of electrons among syntrophic Geobacter co-cultures. In order to establish the physical principles underlying this remarkable electron transport, we have employed a novel scanning probe microscopy-based method to perform quantitative measurements of electron flow at a single cell level under physiological conditions. Using this nanoscopic approach, we have directly observed the propagation and distribution of injected electrons in individual native bacterial extracellular proteins. Our direct measurements demonstrate unambiguously for the first time that the pili of G. sulfurreducens are a novel class of electronically functional proteins that can sustain electron flow in a surprising manner that has not been observed previously in any other natural protein. Funded by Office of Naval Research, DOE Genomic Sciences and NSF-NSEC Center for Hierarchical Manufacturing grant no. CMMI-1025020.

  8. Diversity of culturable psychrophilic and psychrotrophic anaerobic bacteria isolated from beef abattoirs and their environments.

    PubMed

    Moschonas, G; Bolton, D J; McDowell, D A; Sheridan, J J

    2011-07-01

    This study identified 431 psychrophilic or psychrotrophic isolates from commercial Irish beef abattoir environments and "blown packs" of vacuum-packed beef, using PCR and 16S rRNA sequencing, and estimated their intraspecies genetic diversity using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis and spacer region PCR (SR-PCR). Twenty-five species were identified in the 431 isolates, with the most frequently recovered species being Clostridium gasigenes (n=315), Clostridium estertheticum (n=17), and a potentially novel species designated strain TC1 (n=52). These species were previously found to be associated with a particular type of spoilage known as blown-pack spoilage (BPS), which occurs in chilled-stored (i.e., -1.5°C to 4°C) vacuum-packaged meat within 2 to 4 weeks and involves the production of large volumes of gas. Overall, the study demonstrates the considerable and not previously reported diversity of the anaerobic microflora in abattoirs and the presence of a wide range of organisms capable of causing BPS at chilled temperatures. PMID:21498765

  9. Low Trimethoprim Susceptibility of Anaerobic Bacteria Due to Insensitive Dihydrofolate Reductases

    PubMed Central

    Then, Rudolf L.; Angehrn, Peter

    1979-01-01

    All the 28 Bacteroides fragilis strains investigated were susceptible to sulfamethoxazole (minimal inhibitory concentration < 16 μg/ml) and resistant to trimethoprim (TMP; minimal inhibitory concentration > 4 μg/ml). Synergism between sulfamethoxazole and TMP was present in all strains at a ratio of 1:1. The few clostridia investigated proved more resistant to both compounds. Dihydrofolate reductases from B. fragilis, C. perfringens, and some other anaerobic species were isolated. Inhibition profiles with six structurally different inhibitors revealed major differences in all enzymes. For 50% inhibition, the enzyme from B. fragilis and all clostridia required concentrations of TMP which were between several hundredfold and 1,000-fold higher than those required for the enzyme of Escherichia coli, whereas the enzyme from Propionibacterium acnes only needed a threefold higher concentration. In vitro activities of TMP were seen to correspond to the activity at the enzymatic level in B. fragilis and P. acnes, but correspond to a much lesser extent to the activity at the enzymatic level in clostridia, where a poor penetration is assumed to be involved. Dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors other than TMP were found to be as active as TMP both at the enzyme and in vitro. In B. fragilis, higher concentrations of exogenous thymidine were required for increasing the minimal inhibitory concentration of TMP than in E. coli and probably also in C. perfringens. PMID:218496

  10. Comprehensive analysis of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria found on dental bib clips.

    PubMed

    Alt-Holland, Addy; Murphy, Christina M; Powers, Anne; Kublin, Claire L; Jeong, Youjin Natalie; DiMattia, Michelle; Pham, Linh; Park, Angel; Finkelman, Matthew; Lombard, Maureen; Hanley, James B; Paster, Bruce J; Kugel, Gerard

    2013-04-01

    Multiple-use dental bib clips are considered to present relatively low risks for transmitting infections and, thus, are thought to only require disinfection between patient visits. This study was designed to: 1) determine the presence and composition of bacterial contaminants on reusable rubber-faced metal bib clips after dental treatment at the hygiene clinic at Tufts University School of Dental Medicine and 2) evaluate the effectiveness of the disinfection for this clip type. Aerobic and anaerobic bacterial contaminant loads on the surfaces of the clips were investigated immediately after hygiene treatments were rendered and again after clips were disinfected. The species and strains of bacterial isolates were identified using 16S rDNA sequencing and Human Oral Microbe Identification Microarray analyses. The results demonstrated that although the use of disinfection proved to be significantly effective, some clips retained at least one bacterium on their surfaces after disinfection. Although the bacterial species present on disinfected clips were typical skin or environmental isolates, some were oral in origin. In the study's settings, bacterial presence on the clips did not indicate an infectious disease problem. The different bacterial loads on clips suggest that cross-contamination risks may not be the same for all clinics, and that this difference may be related to the type of treatments and services performed.

  11. Genes for Uranium Bioremediation in the Anaerobic Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, Judy D.

    2001-06-01

    The objectives of the previous grant period were designed to explore the electron transport pathway employed by the sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) for the reduction of U(VI) to U(IV). More specifically experiments were designed to determine whether U(VI) reduction by members of the genus Desulfovibrio was mediated by a unique, dedicated reductase or occurred as a fortuitous reaction with a reductase naturally involved in alternative reduction processes. In addition, the regulation of the hierarchical expression of terminal electron acceptors (reductases) in the SRB was to be examined.

  12. Genes for Uranium Bioremediation in the Anaerobic Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, Judy D.

    1999-06-01

    Objective A: Electron transfer components necessary for uranium reduction. Objective B: Possible FNR-analog in the sulfate-reducing bacteria. Attempts to isolate FNR or FIKJ analogs from Desuflovibrio through the design of degenerate primers for amplification of portions of the genes has not been successful. In contrast, several amplicons have been generated for the genes encoding the regulators of two-component signal sequences. Since several global regulators fall into this class, we are attempting to obtain sufficient sequence information to indicate what metabolic pathways are affected by the regulators. Cloning and sequencing of two such amplicons has revealed that bona fide two-component regulators are present in Desulfovibrio.

  13. Arsenic biotransformation and release by bacteria indigenous to arsenic contaminated groundwater.

    PubMed

    Paul, Dhiraj; Kazy, Sufia K; Banerjee, Tirtha Das; Gupta, Ashok K; Pal, Taraknath; Sar, Pinaki

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic (As) biotransformation and release by indigenous bacteria from As rich groundwater was investigated. Metabolic landscape of 173 bacterial isolates indicated broad catabolic repertoire including abundance of As(5+) reductase activity and abilities in utilizing wide ranges of organic and inorganic respiratory substrates. Abundance of As homeostasis genes and utilization of hydrocarbon as carbon/electron donor and As(5+) as electron acceptor were noted within the isolates. Sediment microcosm study (for 300 days) showed a pivotal role of metal reducing facultative anaerobic bacteria in toxic As(3+) release in aqueous phase. Inhabitant bacteria catalyze As transformation and facilitate its release through a cascade of reactions including mineral bioweathering and As(5+) and/or Fe(3+) reduction activities. Compared to anaerobic incubation with As(5+) reducing strains, oxic state and/or incubation with As(3+) oxidizing bacteria resulted in reduced As release, thus indicating a strong role of such condition or biocatalytic mechanism in controlling in situ As contamination.

  14. Arsenic biotransformation and release by bacteria indigenous to arsenic contaminated groundwater.

    PubMed

    Paul, Dhiraj; Kazy, Sufia K; Banerjee, Tirtha Das; Gupta, Ashok K; Pal, Taraknath; Sar, Pinaki

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic (As) biotransformation and release by indigenous bacteria from As rich groundwater was investigated. Metabolic landscape of 173 bacterial isolates indicated broad catabolic repertoire including abundance of As(5+) reductase activity and abilities in utilizing wide ranges of organic and inorganic respiratory substrates. Abundance of As homeostasis genes and utilization of hydrocarbon as carbon/electron donor and As(5+) as electron acceptor were noted within the isolates. Sediment microcosm study (for 300 days) showed a pivotal role of metal reducing facultative anaerobic bacteria in toxic As(3+) release in aqueous phase. Inhabitant bacteria catalyze As transformation and facilitate its release through a cascade of reactions including mineral bioweathering and As(5+) and/or Fe(3+) reduction activities. Compared to anaerobic incubation with As(5+) reducing strains, oxic state and/or incubation with As(3+) oxidizing bacteria resulted in reduced As release, thus indicating a strong role of such condition or biocatalytic mechanism in controlling in situ As contamination. PMID:25782634

  15. Taxonomic composition and physiological and biochemical properties of bacteria in the digestive tracts of earthworms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byzov, B. A.; Tikhonov, V. V.; Nechitailo, T. Yu.; Demin, V. V.; Zvyagintsev, D. G.

    2015-03-01

    Several hundred bacterial strains belonging to different taxa were isolated and identified from the digestive tracts of soil and compost earthworms. Some physiological and biochemical properties of the bacteria were characterized. The majority of intestinal bacteria in the earthworms were found to be facultative anaerobes. The intestinal isolates as compared to the soil ones had elevated activity of proteases and dehydrogenases. In addition, bacteria associated with earthworms' intestines are capable of growth on humic acids as a sole carbon source. Humic acid stimulated the growth of the intestinal bacteria to a greater extent than those of the soil ones. In the digestive tracts, polyphenol oxidase activity was found. Along with the data on the taxonomic separation of the intestinal bacteria, the features described testified to the presence of a group of bacteria in the earthworms intestines that is functionally characteristic and is different from the soil bacteria.

  16. Anaerobic hydrocarbon and fatty acid metabolism by syntrophic bacteria and their impact on carbon steel corrosion.

    PubMed

    Lyles, Christopher N; Le, Huynh M; Beasley, William Howard; McInerney, Michael J; Suflita, Joseph M

    2014-01-01

    The microbial metabolism of hydrocarbons is increasingly associated with the corrosion of carbon steel in sulfate-rich marine waters. However, how such transformations influence metal biocorrosion in the absence of an electron acceptor is not fully recognized. We grew a marine alkane-utilizing, sulfate-reducing bacterium, Desulfoglaeba alkanexedens, with either sulfate or Methanospirillum hungatei as electron acceptors, and tested the ability of the cultures to catalyze metal corrosion. Axenically, D. alkanexedens had a higher instantaneous corrosion rate and produced more pits in carbon steel coupons than when the same organism was grown in syntrophic co-culture with the methanogen. Since anaerobic hydrocarbon biodegradation pathways converge on fatty acid intermediates, the corrosive ability of a known fatty acid-oxidizing syntrophic bacterium, Syntrophus aciditrophicus was compared when grown in pure culture or in co-culture with a H2-utilizing sulfate-reducing bacterium (Desulfovibrio sp., strain G11) or a methanogen (M. hungatei). The instantaneous corrosion rates in the cultures were not substantially different, but the syntrophic, sulfate-reducing co-culture produced more pits in coupons than other combinations of microorganisms. Lactate-grown cultures of strain G11 had higher instantaneous corrosion rates and coupon pitting compared to the same organism cultured with hydrogen as an electron donor. Thus, if sulfate is available as an electron acceptor, the same microbial assemblages produce sulfide and low molecular weight organic acids that exacerbated biocorrosion. Despite these trends, a surprisingly high degree of variation was encountered with the corrosion assessments. Differences in biomass, initial substrate concentration, rates of microbial activity or the degree of end product formation did not account for the variations. We are forced to ascribe such differences to the metallurgical properties of the coupons.

  17. Anaerobic hydrocarbon and fatty acid metabolism by syntrophic bacteria and their impact on carbon steel corrosion

    PubMed Central

    Lyles, Christopher N.; Le, Huynh M.; Beasley, William Howard; McInerney, Michael J.; Suflita, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    The microbial metabolism of hydrocarbons is increasingly associated with the corrosion of carbon steel in sulfate-rich marine waters. However, how such transformations influence metal biocorrosion in the absence of an electron acceptor is not fully recognized. We grew a marine alkane-utilizing, sulfate-reducing bacterium, Desulfoglaeba alkanexedens, with either sulfate or Methanospirillum hungatei as electron acceptors, and tested the ability of the cultures to catalyze metal corrosion. Axenically, D. alkanexedens had a higher instantaneous corrosion rate and produced more pits in carbon steel coupons than when the same organism was grown in syntrophic co-culture with the methanogen. Since anaerobic hydrocarbon biodegradation pathways converge on fatty acid intermediates, the corrosive ability of a known fatty acid-oxidizing syntrophic bacterium, Syntrophus aciditrophicus was compared when grown in pure culture or in co-culture with a H2-utilizing sulfate-reducing bacterium (Desulfovibrio sp., strain G11) or a methanogen (M. hungatei). The instantaneous corrosion rates in the cultures were not substantially different, but the syntrophic, sulfate-reducing co-culture produced more pits in coupons than other combinations of microorganisms. Lactate-grown cultures of strain G11 had higher instantaneous corrosion rates and coupon pitting compared to the same organism cultured with hydrogen as an electron donor. Thus, if sulfate is available as an electron acceptor, the same microbial assemblages produce sulfide and low molecular weight organic acids that exacerbated biocorrosion. Despite these trends, a surprisingly high degree of variation was encountered with the corrosion assessments. Differences in biomass, initial substrate concentration, rates of microbial activity or the degree of end product formation did not account for the variations. We are forced to ascribe such differences to the metallurgical properties of the coupons. PMID:24744752

  18. Effect of pH on anaerobic mild steel corrosion by methanogenic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Boopathy, R.; Daniels, L. )

    1991-07-01

    Methanogens can use H{sub 2} produced by cathodic depolarization-mediated oxidation of elemental iron to produce methane. Thermodynamic consideration of the cathodic depolarization mechanism predicts more oxidation of Fe{sup 0} at lower pH. Methanogenic responses to pH by Methanococcus deltae, Methanococcus thermolithotrophicus, and Methanosarcina barkeri were examined. When grown on H{sub 2}-CO{sub 2}, these bacteria had pH optima from 6.2 to 7.0, but when all H{sub 2} was supplied from Fe{sup 0}, methanogenic pH optima were lower, 5.4 to 6.5. Corrosion was monitored with and without cultures and at various pHs; more corrosion occurred when cultures were present, biologically induced corrosion was greatest at the pH optima for methanogenesis from Fe{sup 0}, and corrosion without cultures increased with a drop in pH.

  19. Laboratory identification of anaerobic bacteria isolated on Clostridium difficile selective medium.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Cristina; Warszawski, Nathalie; Korsak, Nicolas; Taminiau, Bernard; Van Broeck, Johan; Delmée, Michel; Daube, Georges

    2016-06-01

    Despite increasing interest in the bacterium, the methodology for Clostridium difficile recovery has not yet been standardized. Cycloserine-cefoxitin fructose taurocholate (CCFT) has historically been the most used medium for C. difficile isolation from human, animal, environmental, and food samples, and presumptive identification is usually based on colony morphologies. However, CCFT is not totally selective. This study describes the recovery of 24 bacteria species belonging to 10 different genera other than C. difficile, present in the environment and foods of a retirement establishment that were not inhibited in the C. difficile selective medium. These findings provide insight for further environmental and food studies as well as for the isolation of C. difficile on supplemented CCFT.

  20. Influence of four antimicrobials on methane-producing archaea and sulfate-reducing bacteria in anaerobic granular sludge.

    PubMed

    Du, Jingru; Hu, Yong; Qi, Weikang; Zhang, Yanlong; Jing, Zhaoqian; Norton, Michael; Li, Yu-You

    2015-12-01

    The influence of Cephalexin (CLX), Tetracycline (TC), Erythromycin (ERY) and Sulfathiazole (ST) on methane-producing archaea (MPA) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in anaerobic sludge was investigated using acetate or ethanol as substrate. With antimicrobial concentrations below 400mgL(-1), the relative specific methanogenic activity (SMA) was above 50%, so that the antimicrobials exerted slight effects on archaea. However ERY and ST at 400mgL(-1) caused a 74.5% and 57.6% inhibition to specific sulfidogenic activity (SSA) when the sludge granules were disrupted and ethanol used as substrate. After disruption, microbial tolerance to antimicrobials decreased, but the rate at which MPA utilized acetate and ethanol increased from 0.95gCOD·(gVSS⋅d)(-1) to 1.45gCOD·(gVSS⋅d)(-1) and 0.90gCOD·(gVSS⋅d)(-1) to 1.15gCOD·(gVSS⋅d)(-1) respectively. The ethanol utilization rate for SRB also increased after disruption from 0.35gCOD·(gVSS⋅d)(-1) to 0.46gCOD·(gVSS⋅d)(-1). Removal rates for CLX approaching 20.0% and 25.0% were obtained used acetate and ethanol respectively. The disintegration of granules improved the CLX removal rate to 65% and 78%, but ST was not removed during this process.

  1. Distribution of sulfate-reducing and methanogenic bacteria in anaerobic aggregates determined by microsensor and molecular analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Santegoeds, C.M.; Damgaard, L.R.; Hesselink, G.; Zopfi, J.; Lens, P.; Muyzer, G.; Beer, D. de

    1999-10-01

    Using molecular techniques and microsensors for H{sub 2}S and CH{sub 4}, the authors studied the population structure of and the activity distribution in anaerobic aggregates. The aggregates originated from three different types of reactors: a methanogenic reactor, a methanogenic-sulfidogenic reactor, and a sulfidogenic reactor. Microsensor measurements in methanogenic-sulfidogenic aggregates revealed that the activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria was located in a surface layer of 50 to 100 {micro}m thick. The sulfidogenic aggregates contained a wider sulfate-reducing zone (the first 200 to 300 {micro}m from the aggregate surface) with a higher activity. The methanogenic aggregates did not show significant sulfate-reducing activity. Methanogenic activity in the methanogenic-sulfidogenic aggregates and the methanogenic aggregates was located more inward, starting at ca. 100 {micro}m from the aggregate surface. The methanogenic activity was not affected by 10 mM sulfate during a 1-day incubation. The sulfidogenic and methanogenic activities were independent of the type of electron donor, but the substrates were metabolized in different zones. The localization of the populations corresponded to the microsensor data.

  2. Treatment of agro-industrial wastewater using microalgae-bacteria consortium combined with anaerobic digestion of the produced biomass.

    PubMed

    Hernández, D; Riaño, B; Coca, M; García-González, M C

    2013-05-01

    Two combined processes were studied in order to produce second generation biofuels: microalgae biomass production and its further use to produce biogas. Two 5 L photobioreactors for treating wastewater from a potato processing industry (from now on RPP) and from a treated liquid fraction of pig manure (from now on RTE) were inoculated with Chlorella sorokiniana and aerobic bacteria at 24±2.7 °C and 6000 lux for 12 h per day of light supply. The maximum biomass growth was obtained for RTE wastewater, with 26.30 mg dry weight L(-1) d(-1). Regarding macromolecular composition of collected biomass, lipid concentration reached 30.20% in RPP and 4.30% in RTE. Anaerobic digestion results showed that methane yield was highly influenced by substrate/inoculum ratio and by lipids concentration of the biomass, with a maximum methane yield of 518 mL CH4 g COD(-1)added using biomass with a lipid content of 30% and a substrate/inoculum ratio of 0.5. PMID:23069610

  3. Anaerobic thermophilic bacteria isolated from a Venezuelan oil field and its potential use in microbial improved oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Trebbau, G.; Fernandez, B.; Marin, A.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this work is to determine the ability of indigenous bacteria from a Venezuelan oil field to grow under reservoir conditions inside a porous media, and to produce metabolites capable of recovering residual crude oil. For this purpose, samples of formation waters from a central-eastern Venezuelan oil reservoir were enriched with different carbon sources and a mineral basal media. Formation water was used as a source of trace metals. The enrichments obtained were incubated at reservoir temperature (71{degrees}C), reservoir pressure (1,200 psi), and under anaerobic conditions for both outside and inside porous media (Berea core). Growth and metabolic activity was followed outside porous media by measuring absorbance at 660 nm, increases in pressure, and decreases in pH. Inside porous media bacterial activity was determined by visual examination of the produced waters (gas bubbles and bacterial cells). All the carbohydrates tested outside porous media showed good growth at reservoir conditions. The pH was lowered, gases such as CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} were identified by GC. Surface tension was lowered in some enrichments by 30% when compared to controls. Growth was decreased inside porous media, but gases were produced and helped displace oil. In addition, 10% residual oil was recovered from the Berea core. Mathematical modeling was applied to the laboratory coreflood experiment to evaluate the reproducibility of the results obtained.

  4. Vertical profiles of community abundance and diversity of anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) and bacteria in a simple waste landfill in north China.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jun; Ding, Linjie; Wang, Xu; Chi, Zifang; Lei, Jiansen

    2015-03-01

    Anaerobic methane oxidation (AMO) is considered to be an important sink of CH4 in habitats as marine sediments. But, few studies focused on AMO in landfills which may be an important sink of CH4 derived from waste fermentation. To show evidence of AMO and to uncover function anaerobic methanotroph (ANME) community in landfill, different age waste samples were collected in Jinqianpu landfill located in north China. Through high-throughput sequencing, Methanomicrobiales and Methanosarcinales archaea associated with ANME and reverse methanogenic archaea of Methanosarcina and Methanobacterium were detected. Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) (Desulfobulbus and Desulfococcus) which could couple with ANME-conducting AMO were also found. But, the community structure of ANME had no significant difference with depths. From the results of investigation, we can come to a conclusion that sulfate-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (SR-DAMO) would be the dominant AMO process in the landfill, while iron-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (M/IR-DAMO) process was weak though concentration of ferric iron was large in the landfill. Denitrification-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (NR-DAMO) was negative because of lack of nitrate and relevant function microorganisms in the landfill. Results also indicate that CH4 mitigation would have higher potential by increasing electron acceptor contents and promoting the growth of relevant function microorganisms.

  5. Potential Application of Anaerobic Extremophiles for Hydrogen Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2004-01-01

    During substrate fermentation many anaerobes produce the hydrogen as a waste product, which often regulates the growth of the cultures as an inhibitor. In nature the hydrogen is usually removed from the ecosystem due to its physical properties or by consumption of hydrogen by secondary anaerobes, which sometimes behave as competitors for electron donors as is seen in the classical example in anaerobic microbial communities via the interaction between methanogens and sulfate- or sulfur- reducers. It was demonstrated previously on mixed cultures of anaerobes at neutral pH that bacterial hydrogen production could provide an alternative energy source. But at neutral pH the original cultures can easily be contaminated by methanogens, a most unpleasant side effect of these conditions is the development of pathogenic bacteria. In both cases the rate of hydrogen production was dramatically decreased since some part of the hydrogen was transformed to methane, and the cultivation of human pathogens on a global scale is very dangerous. In our laboratory, experiments with obligately alkaliphilic bacteria that excrete hydrogen as the end metabolic product were performed at different temperature regimes. Mesophilic and moderately thermophilic bacterial cultures have been studied and compared for the most effective hydrogen production. For high-mineralized media with pH 9.5-10.0 not many methanogens are known to exist. Furthermore, the development of pathogenic contaminant microorganisms is virtually impossible: carbonate-saturated solutions are used as antiseptics in medicine. Therefore the cultivation of alkaliphilic hydrogen producing bacteria could be considered as most safe process for global Scale industry in future. Here we present experimental data on the rates of hydrogen productivity for mesophilic, alkaliphilic, obligately anaerobic bacterium Spirocheta americana ASpG1 and moderately thermophilic, alkaliphilic, facultative anaerobe Anoxybacillus pushchinoensis K1 and

  6. Dissimilatory Reduction of Elemental Selenium to Selenide in Sediments and Anaerobic Cultures of Selenium Respiring Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbel, M. J.; Switzer-Blum, J.; Oremland, R. S.

    2001-12-01

    Selenium contaminated environments often contain elemental Se (Se0) in their sediments that originates from dissimilatory reduction of Se oxyanions. The forms of Se in sedimentary rocks similarly contain high proportions of Se0, but much of the Se is also in the form of metal selenides, Se-2. It is not clear if the occurrence of these selenides is due to microbial reduction of Se0, or some other biological or chemical process. In this investigation we examined the possibility that bacterial respiratory reduction of Se0 to Se-2 could explain the presence of the latter species in sedimentary rocks. We conducted incubations of anoxic sediment slurries amended with different forms of Se0. High levels of Se0 (mM) were added to San Francisco Bay sediments in order to enhance the detection of soluble HSe-, which was precipitated with Cu2+ then redissolved and quantified by ICP-MS. Concentrations of HSe- were highest in live samples amended with red amorphous Se0 formed by either microbial reduction of Se+4 ("biogenic Se0") or by chemical oxidation of H2Se(g) ("chem. Se0"); very little HSe- was formed in those amended with black crystalline Se0, indicating the general lack of reactivity of this allotrope. Controls poisoned with 10% formalin did not produce HSe- from additions of chem. Se0. Reduction of both forms of red amorphous Se0 to HSe- occurred vigorously in growing cultures of Bacillus selenitireducens, an anaerobic halophile previously isolated from sediments of Mono Lake, CA. Up to 73% and 68% of red amorphous, biogenic Se0 or chem. Se0, respectively, was reduced to HSe- during growth of B. selenitireducens, (incubation time ~ 200 hrs): oxidation of lactate to acetate as well as cell density increases indicated that a dissimilatory reduction pathway was likely. Reduction was most enhanced when cells were previously grown on elemental sulfur or Se+4. In contrast to the growth experiments, washed cell suspensions of B. selenitireducens exhibited no HSe- production

  7. In situ capping for size control of monochalcogenides (ZnS, CdS, and SnS) nanocrystals produced by anaerobic metal-reducing bacteria

    DOE PAGES

    Jang, Gyoung Gug; Jacobs, Christopher B.; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Joshi, Pooran C.; Meyer, III, Harry M.; Kidder, Michelle; Armstrong, Beth L.; Datskos, Panos G.; Graham, David E.; Moon, Ji -Won

    2015-07-24

    Metal monochalcogenide quantum dot nanocrystals of ZnS, CdS and SnS were prepared by anaerobic, metal-reducing bacteria using in situ capping by oleic acid or oleylamine. Furthermore, the capping agent preferentially adsorbs on the surface of the nanocrystal, suppressing the growth process in the early stages, thus leading to production of nanocrystals with a diameter of less than 5 nm.

  8. In Vitro Activity of TD-1792, a Multivalent Glycopeptide-Cephalosporin Antibiotic, against 377 Strains of Anaerobic Bacteria and 34 Strains of Corynebacterium Species

    PubMed Central

    Citron, Diane M.; Warren, Yumi A.; Goldstein, Ellie J. C.

    2012-01-01

    TD-1792 is a multivalent glycopeptide-cephalosporin heterodimer antibiotic with potent activity against Gram-positive bacteria. We tested TD-1792 against 377 anaerobes and 34 strains of Corynebacterium species. Against nearly all Gram-positive strains, TD-1792 had an MIC90 of 0.25 μg/ml and was typically 3 to 7 dilutions more active than vancomycin and daptomycin. PMID:22290981

  9. Anaerobic oxidation of ferrous iron by purple bacteria, a new type of phototrophic metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Ehrenreich, A; Widdel, F

    1994-01-01

    Anoxic iron-rich sediment samples that had been stored in the light showed development of brown, rusty patches. Subcultures in defined mineral media with ferrous iron (10 mmol/liter, mostly precipitated as FeCO3) yielded enrichments of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria which used ferrous iron as the sole electron donor for photosynthesis. Two different types of purple bacteria, represented by strains L7 and SW2, were isolated which oxidized colorless ferrous iron under anoxic conditions in the light to brown ferric iron. Strain L7 had rod-shaped, nonmotile cells (1.3 by 2 to 3 microns) which frequently formed gas vesicles. In addition to ferrous iron, strain L7 used H2 + CO2, acetate, pyruvate, and glucose as substrate for phototrophic growth. Strain SW2 had small rod-shaped, nonmotile cells (0.5 by 1 to 1.5 microns). Besides ferrous iron, strain SW2 utilized H2 + CO2, monocarboxylic acids, glucose, and fructose. Neither strain utilized free sulfide; however, both strains grew on black ferrous sulfide (FeS) which was converted to ferric iron and sulfate. Strains L7 and SW2 grown photoheterotrophically without ferrous iron were purple to brownish red and yellowish brown, respectively; absorption spectra revealed peaks characteristic of bacteriochlorophyll a. The closest phototrophic relatives of strains L7 and SW2 so far examined on the basis of 16S rRNA sequences were species of the genera Chromatium (gamma subclass of proteobacteria) and Rhodobacter (alpha subclass), respectively. In mineral medium, the new isolates formed 7.6 g of cell dry mass per mol of Fe(II) oxidized, which is in good agreement with a photoautotrophic utilization of ferrous iron as electron donor for CO2 fixation. Dependence of ferrous iron oxidation on light and CO2 was also demonstrated in dense cell suspensions. In media containing both ferrous iron and an organic substrate (e.g., acetate, glucose), strain L7 utilized ferrous iron and the organic compound simultaneously; in contrast, strain

  10. Anaerobic degradation of cyclohexane by sulfate-reducing bacteria from hydrocarbon-contaminated marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Jaekel, Ulrike; Zedelius, Johannes; Wilkes, Heinz; Musat, Florin

    2015-01-01

    The fate of cyclohexane, often used as a model compound for the biodegradation of cyclic alkanes due to its abundance in crude oils, in anoxic marine sediments has been poorly investigated. In the present study, we obtained an enrichment culture of cyclohexane-degrading sulfate-reducing bacteria from hydrocarbon-contaminated intertidal marine sediments. Microscopic analyses showed an apparent dominance by oval cells of 1.5 × 0.8 μm. Analysis of a 16S rRNA gene library, followed by whole-cell hybridization with group- and sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes showed that these cells belonged to a single phylotype, and were accounting for more than 80% of the total cell number. The dominant phylotype, affiliated with the Desulfosarcina-Desulfococcus cluster of the Deltaproteobacteria, is proposed to be responsible for the degradation of cyclohexane. Quantitative growth experiments showed that cyclohexane degradation was coupled with the stoichiometric reduction of sulfate to sulfide. Substrate response tests corroborated with hybridization with a sequence-specific oligonucleotide probe suggested that the dominant phylotype apparently was able to degrade other cyclic and n-alkanes, including the gaseous alkane n-butane. Based on GC-MS analyses of culture extracts cyclohexylsuccinate was identified as a metabolite, indicating an activation of cyclohexane by addition to fumarate. Other metabolites detected were 3-cyclohexylpropionate and cyclohexanecarboxylate providing evidence that the overall degradation pathway of cyclohexane under anoxic conditions is analogous to that of n-alkanes.

  11. Anaerobic degradation of cyclohexane by sulfate-reducing bacteria from hydrocarbon-contaminated marine sediments

    PubMed Central

    Jaekel, Ulrike; Zedelius, Johannes; Wilkes, Heinz; Musat, Florin

    2015-01-01

    The fate of cyclohexane, often used as a model compound for the biodegradation of cyclic alkanes due to its abundance in crude oils, in anoxic marine sediments has been poorly investigated. In the present study, we obtained an enrichment culture of cyclohexane-degrading sulfate-reducing bacteria from hydrocarbon-contaminated intertidal marine sediments. Microscopic analyses showed an apparent dominance by oval cells of 1.5 × 0.8 μm. Analysis of a 16S rRNA gene library, followed by whole-cell hybridization with group- and sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes showed that these cells belonged to a single phylotype, and were accounting for more than 80% of the total cell number. The dominant phylotype, affiliated with the Desulfosarcina-Desulfococcus cluster of the Deltaproteobacteria, is proposed to be responsible for the degradation of cyclohexane. Quantitative growth experiments showed that cyclohexane degradation was coupled with the stoichiometric reduction of sulfate to sulfide. Substrate response tests corroborated with hybridization with a sequence-specific oligonucleotide probe suggested that the dominant phylotype apparently was able to degrade other cyclic and n-alkanes, including the gaseous alkane n-butane. Based on GC-MS analyses of culture extracts cyclohexylsuccinate was identified as a metabolite, indicating an activation of cyclohexane by addition to fumarate. Other metabolites detected were 3-cyclohexylpropionate and cyclohexanecarboxylate providing evidence that the overall degradation pathway of cyclohexane under anoxic conditions is analogous to that of n-alkanes. PMID:25806023

  12. Use of bacteria in anti-cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Rachel M; Green, Jeffrey; Lewis, Claire E

    2006-01-01

    While a number of valid molecular targets have been discovered for tumours over the past decade, finding an effective way of delivering therapeutic genes specifically to tumours has proved more problematic. A variety of viral and non-viral delivery vehicles have been developed and applied in anti-cancer gene therapies. However, these suffer from either inefficient and/or short-lived gene transfer to target cells, instability in the bloodstream and inadequate tumour targeting. Recently, various types of non-pathogenic obligate anaerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria have been shown to infiltrate and selectively replicate within solid tumours when delivered systemically. This has prompted the development of cancer gene therapy protocols that use such bacteria as gene delivery vehicles. Here, we review the evidence for the success of these in pre-clinical models and clinical trials, as single modality treatments and in combination with conventional cancer therapies.

  13. Winding paths to simplicity: genome evolution in facultative insect symbionts

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Wen-Sui; Huang, Ya-Yi; Kuo, Chih-Horng

    2016-01-01

    Symbiosis between organisms is an important driving force in evolution. Among the diverse relationships described, extensive progress has been made in insect–bacteria symbiosis, which improved our understanding of the genome evolution in host-associated bacteria. Particularly, investigations on several obligate mutualists have pushed the limits of what we know about the minimal genomes for sustaining cellular life. To bridge the gap between those obligate symbionts with extremely reduced genomes and their non-host-restricted ancestors, this review focuses on the recent progress in genome characterization of facultative insect symbionts. Notable cases representing various types and stages of host associations, including those from multiple genera in the family Enterobacteriaceae (class Gammaproteobacteria), Wolbachia (Alphaproteobacteria) and Spiroplasma (Mollicutes), are discussed. Although several general patterns of genome reduction associated with the adoption of symbiotic relationships could be identified, extensive variation was found among these facultative symbionts. These findings are incorporated into the established conceptual frameworks to develop a more detailed evolutionary model for the discussion of possible trajectories. In summary, transitions from facultative to obligate symbiosis do not appear to be a universal one-way street; switches between hosts and lifestyles (e.g. commensalism, parasitism or mutualism) occur frequently and could be facilitated by horizontal gene transfer. PMID:27519426

  14. Use of anaerobic green fluorescent protein versus green fluorescent protein as reporter in lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Landete, José M; Langa, Susana; Revilla, Concepción; Margolles, Abelardo; Medina, Margarita; Arqués, Juan L

    2015-08-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are commonly used in the production of fermented and probiotic foods. Development of molecular tools to discriminate the strains of interest from the endogenous microbiota in complex environments like food or gut is of high interest. Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-like chromophores strictly requires molecular oxygen for maturation of fluorescence, which restrict the study of microorganisms in low-oxygen environments. In this work, we have developed a noninvasive cyan-green fluorescent based reporter system for real-time tracking of LAB that is functional under anoxic conditions. The evoglow-Pp1 was cloned downstream from the promoters D-alanyl-D-alanine carboxypeptidase and elongation factor Tu of Lactobacillus reuteri CECT925 using pNZ8048 and downstream of the lactococcal P1 promoter using pT1NX. The classical gfp was also cloned in pT1NX. These recombinant expression vectors were electroporated into Lactococccus, Lactobacillus, and Enterococcus strains with biotechnological and/or probiotic interests to assess and compare their functionality under different conditions of oxygen and pH. The expression was analyzed by imaging and fluorometric methods as well as by flow cytometry. We demonstrate that reporter systems pNZ:TuR-aFP and pT1-aFP are two versatile molecular markers for monitoring LAB in food and fecal environments without the potential problems caused by oxygen and pH limitations, which could be exploited for in vivo studies. Production of the fluorescent protein did not disturb any important physiological properties of the parental strains, such as growth rate, reuterin, or bacteriocin production.

  15. Ethanol and hydrogen production by two thermophilic, anaerobic bacteria isolated from Icelandic geothermal areas.

    PubMed

    Koskinen, Perttu E P; Beck, Steinar R; Orlygsson, Jóhann; Puhakka, Jaakko A

    2008-11-01

    Microbial fermentations are potential producers of sustainable energy carriers. In this study, ethanol and hydrogen production was studied by two thermophilic bacteria (strain AK15 and AK17) isolated from geothermal springs in Iceland. Strain AK15 was affiliated with Clostridium uzonii (98.8%), while AK17 was affiliated with Thermoanaerobacterium aciditolerans (99.2%) based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Both strains fermented a wide variety of sugar residues typically found in lignocellulosic materials, and some polysaccharides. In the batch cultivations, strain AK17 produced ethanol from glucose and xylose fermentations of up to 1.6 mol-EtOH/mol-glucose (80% of the theoretical maximum) and 1.1 mol-EtOH/mol-xylose (66%), respectively. The hydrogen yields by AK17 were up to 1.2 mol-H2/ mol-glucose (30% of the theoretical maximum) and 1.0 mol-H2/mol-xylose (30%). The strain AK15 produced hydrogen as the main fermentation product from glucose (up to 1.9 mol-H2/mol-glucose [48%]) and xylose (1.1 mol-H2/mol-xylose [33%]). The strain AK17 tolerated exogenously added ethanol up to 4% (v/v). The ethanol and hydrogen production performance from glucose by a co-culture of the strains AK15 and AK17 was studied in a continuous-flow bioreactor at 60 degrees C. Stable and continuous ethanol and hydrogen co-production was achieved with ethanol yield of 1.35 mol-EtOH/mol-glucose, and with the hydrogen production rate of 6.1 mmol/h/L (H2 yield of 0.80 mol-H2/mol-glucose). PCR-DGGE analysis revealed that the AK17 became the dominant bacterium in the bioreactor. In conclusion, strain AK17 is a promising strain for the co-production of ethanol and hydrogen with a wide substrate utilization spectrum, relatively high ethanol tolerance, and ethanol yields among the highest reported for thermoanaerobes.

  16. Competition and coexistence of sulfate-reducing bacteria, acetogens and methanogens in a lab-scale anaerobic bioreactor as affected by changing substrate to sulfate ratio.

    PubMed

    Dar, Shabir A; Kleerebezem, Robbert; Stams, Alfons J M; Kuenen, J Gijs; Muyzer, Gerard

    2008-04-01

    The microbial population structure and function of natural anaerobic communities maintained in lab-scale continuously stirred tank reactors at different lactate to sulfate ratios and in the absence of sulfate were analyzed using an integrated approach of molecular techniques and chemical analysis. The population structure, determined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and by the use of oligonucleotide probes, was linked to the functional changes in the reactors. At the influent lactate to sulfate molar ratio of 0.35 mol mol(-1), i.e., electron donor limitation, lactate oxidation was mainly carried out by incompletely oxidizing sulfate-reducing bacteria, which formed 80-85% of the total bacterial population. Desulfomicrobium- and Desulfovibrio-like species were the most abundant sulfate-reducing bacteria. Acetogens and methanogenic Archaea were mostly outcompeted, although less than 2% of an acetogenic population could still be observed at this limiting concentration of lactate. In the near absence of sulfate (i.e., at very high lactate/sulfate ratio), acetogens and methanogenic Archaea were the dominant microbial communities. Acetogenic bacteria represented by Dendrosporobacter quercicolus-like species formed more than 70% of the population, while methanogenic bacteria related to uncultured Archaea comprising about 10-15% of the microbial community. At an influent lactate to sulfate molar ratio of 2 mol mol(-1), i.e., under sulfate-limiting conditions, a different metabolic route was followed by the mixed anaerobic community. Apparently, lactate was fermented to acetate and propionate, while the majority of sulfidogenesis and methanogenesis were dependent on these fermentation products. This was consistent with the presence of significant levels (40-45% of total bacteria) of D. quercicolus-like heteroacetogens and a corresponding increase of propionate-oxidizing Desulfobulbus-like sulfate-reducing bacteria (20% of the total bacteria). Methanogenic Archaea

  17. Aerobic and anaerobic cellulase production by Cellulomonas uda.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Henrik Vestergaard; Willink, Fillip Wolfgang; Ingvorsen, Kjeld

    2016-10-01

    Cellulomonas uda (DSM 20108/ATCC 21399) is one of the few described cellulolytic facultative anaerobes. Based on these characteristics, we initiated a physiological study of C. uda with the aim to exploit it for cellulase production in simple bioreactors with no or sporadic aeration. Growth, cellulase activity and fermentation product formation were evaluated in different media under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions and in experiments where C. uda was exposed to alternating aerobic/anaerobic growth conditions. Here we show that C. uda behaves as a true facultative anaerobe when cultivated on soluble substrates such as glucose and cellobiose, but for reasons unknown cellulase activity is only induced under aerobic conditions on insoluble cellulosic substrates and not under anaerobic conditions. These findings enhance knowledge on the limited number of described facultative cellulolytic anaerobes, and in addition it greatly limits the utility of C. uda as an 'easy to handle' cellulase producer with low aeration demands.

  18. Aerobic and anaerobic cellulase production by Cellulomonas uda.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Henrik Vestergaard; Willink, Fillip Wolfgang; Ingvorsen, Kjeld

    2016-10-01

    Cellulomonas uda (DSM 20108/ATCC 21399) is one of the few described cellulolytic facultative anaerobes. Based on these characteristics, we initiated a physiological study of C. uda with the aim to exploit it for cellulase production in simple bioreactors with no or sporadic aeration. Growth, cellulase activity and fermentation product formation were evaluated in different media under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions and in experiments where C. uda was exposed to alternating aerobic/anaerobic growth conditions. Here we show that C. uda behaves as a true facultative anaerobe when cultivated on soluble substrates such as glucose and cellobiose, but for reasons unknown cellulase activity is only induced under aerobic conditions on insoluble cellulosic substrates and not under anaerobic conditions. These findings enhance knowledge on the limited number of described facultative cellulolytic anaerobes, and in addition it greatly limits the utility of C. uda as an 'easy to handle' cellulase producer with low aeration demands. PMID:27154570

  19. Anaerobic BTEX degradation in oil sands tailings ponds: Impact of labile organic carbon and sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Stasik, Sebastian; Wick, Lukas Y; Wendt-Potthoff, Katrin

    2015-11-01

    The extraction of bitumen from oil sands in Alberta (Canada) produces volumes of tailings that are pumped into large anaerobic settling-basins. Beside bitumen, tailings comprise fractions of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX) that derive from the application of industrial solvents. Due to their toxicity and volatility, BTEX pose a strong concern for gas- and water-phase environments in the vicinity of the ponds. The examination of two pond profiles showed that concentrations of indigenous BTEX decreased with depth, pointing at BTEX transformation in situ. With depth, the relative contribution of ethylbenzene and xylenes to total BTEX significantly decreased, while benzene increased relatively from 44% to 69%, indicating preferential hydrocarbon degradation. To predict BTEX turnover and residence time, we determined BTEX degradation rates in tailings of different depths in a 180-days microcosm study. In addition, we evaluated the impact of labile organic substrates (e.g. acetate) generally considered to stimulate hydrocarbon degradation and the contribution of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) to BTEX turnover. In all depths, BTEX concentrations significantly decreased due to microbial activity, with degradation rates ranging between 4 and 9 μg kg(-1) d(-1). BTEX biodegradation decreased linearly in correlation with initial concentrations, suggesting a concentration-dependent BTEX transformation. SRB were not significantly involved in BTEX consumption, indicating the importance of methanogenic degradation. BTEX removal decreased to 70-90% in presence of organic substrates presumptively due to an accumulation of acetate that lowered BTEX turnover due to product inhibition. In those assays SRB slightly stimulated BTEX transformation by reducing inhibitory acetate levels.

  20. Shifts in the community structure and activity of anaerobic ammonium oxidation bacteria along an estuarine salinity gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yanling; Jiang, Xiaofen; Hou, Lijun; Liu, Min; Lin, Xianbiao; Gao, Juan; Li, Xiaofei; Yin, Guoyu; Yu, Chendi; Wang, Rong

    2016-06-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) is a major microbial pathway for nitrogen (N) removal in estuarine and coastal environments. However, understanding of anammox bacterial dynamics and associations with anammox activity remains scarce along estuarine salinity gradient. In this study, the diversity, abundance, and activity of anammox bacteria, and their potential contributions to total N2 production in the sediments along the salinity gradient (0.1-33.8) of the Yangtze estuarine and coastal zone, were studied using 16S rRNA gene clone library, quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay, and isotope-tracing technique. Phylogenetic analysis showed a significant change in anammox bacterial community structure along the salinity gradient (P < 0.01), with the dominant genus shifting from Brocadia in the freshwater region to Scalindua in the open ocean. Anammox bacterial abundance ranged from 3.67 × 105 to 8.22 × 107 copies 16S rRNA gene g-1 and related significantly with salinity (P < 0.05). The anammox activity varied between 0.08 and 6.46 nmol N g-1 h-1 and related closely with anammox bacterial abundance (P < 0.01). Contributions of anammox activity to total N loss were highly variable along the salinity gradient, ranging from 5 to 77% and were significantly negatively correlated with salinity (P < 0.01). Sediment organic matter was also recognized as an important factor in controlling the relative role of anammox to total N2 production in the Yangtze estuarine and coastal zone. Overall, our data demonstrated a biogeographical distribution of anammox bacterial diversity, abundance, and activity along the estuarine salinity gradient and suggested that salinity is a major environmental control on anammox process in the estuarine and coastal ecosystems.

  1. Antiparasitic drug nitazoxanide inhibits the pyruvate oxidoreductases of Helicobacter pylori, selected anaerobic bacteria and parasites, and Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Paul S; Sisson, Gary; Croxen, Matthew A; Welch, Kevin; Harman, W Dean; Cremades, Nunilo; Morash, Michael G

    2007-03-01

    Nitazoxanide (NTZ) exhibits broad-spectrum activity against anaerobic bacteria and parasites and the ulcer-causing pathogen Helicobacter pylori. Here we show that NTZ is a noncompetitive inhibitor (K(i), 2 to 10 microM) of the pyruvate:ferredoxin/flavodoxin oxidoreductases (PFORs) of Trichomonas vaginalis, Entamoeba histolytica, Giardia intestinalis, Clostridium difficile, Clostridium perfringens, H. pylori, and Campylobacter jejuni and is weakly active against the pyruvate dehydrogenase of Escherichia coli. To further mechanistic studies, the PFOR operon of H. pylori was cloned and overexpressed in E. coli, and the multisubunit complex was purified by ion-exchange chromatography. Pyruvate-dependent PFOR activity with NTZ, as measured by a decrease in absorbance at 418 nm (spectral shift from 418 to 351 nm), unlike the reduction of viologen dyes, did not result in the accumulation of products (acetyl coenzyme A and CO(2)) and pyruvate was not consumed in the reaction. NTZ did not displace the thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) cofactor of PFOR, and the 351-nm absorbing form of NTZ was inactive. Optical scans and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance analyses determined that the spectral shift (A(418) to A(351)) of NTZ was due to protonation of the anion (NTZ(-)) of the 2-amino group of the thiazole ring which could be generated with the pure compound under acidic solutions (pK(a) = 6.18). We propose that NTZ(-) intercepts PFOR at an early step in the formation of the lactyl-TPP transition intermediate, resulting in the reversal of pyruvate binding prior to decarboxylation and in coordination with proton transfer to NTZ. Thus, NTZ might be the first example of an antimicrobial that targets the "activated cofactor" of an enzymatic reaction rather than its substrate or catalytic sites, a novel mechanism that may escape mutation-based drug resistance. PMID:17158936

  2. Thermotoga profunda sp. nov. and Thermotoga caldifontis sp. nov., anaerobic thermophilic bacteria isolated from terrestrial hot springs.

    PubMed

    Mori, Koji; Yamazoe, Atsushi; Hosoyama, Akira; Ohji, Shoko; Fujita, Nobuyuki; Ishibashi, Jun-ichiro; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Ken-ichiro

    2014-06-01

    Two thermophilic, strictly anaerobic, Gram-negative bacteria, designated strains AZM34c06(T) and AZM44c09(T), were isolated from terrestrial hot springs in Japan. The optimum growth conditions for strain AZM34c06(T) were 60 °C, pH 7.4 and 0% additional NaCl, and those for strain AZM44c09(T) were 70 °C, pH 7.4 and 0% additional NaCl. Complete genome sequencing was performed for both strains, revealing genome sizes of 2.19 Mbp (AZM34c06(T)) and 2.01 Mbp (AZM44c09(T)). Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and the concatenated predicted amino acid sequences of 33 ribosomal proteins showed that both strains belonged to the genus Thermotoga. The closest relatives of strains AZM34c06(T) and AZM44c09(T) were the type strains of Thermotoga lettingae (96.0% similarity based on the 16S rRNA gene and 84.1% similarity based on ribosomal proteins) and Thermotoga hypogea (98.6 and 92.7% similarity), respectively. Using blast, the average nucleotide identity was 70.4-70.5% when comparing strain AZM34c06(T) and T. lettingae TMO(T) and 76.6% when comparing strain AZM44c09(T) and T. hypogea NBRC 106472(T). Both values are far below the 95% threshold value for species delineation. In view of these data, we propose the inclusion of the two isolates in the genus Thermotoga within two novel species, Thermotoga profunda sp. nov. (type strain AZM34c06(T) = NBRC 106115(T) = DSM 23275(T)) and Thermotoga caldifontis sp. nov. (type strain AZM44c09(T) = NBRC 106116(T) = DSM 23272(T)).

  3. Application of real-time PCR to determination of combined effect of antibiotics on Bacteria, Methanogenic Archaea, Archaea in anaerobic sequencing batch reactors.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Sevcan; Ince, Bahar; Ince, Orhan

    2015-06-01

    This study evaluated the long-term effects of erythromycin-tetracycline-sulfamethoxazole (ETS) and sulfamethoxazole-tetracycline (ST) antibiotic combinations on the microbial community and examined the ways in which these antimicrobials impact the performance of anaerobic reactors. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to determine the effect that different antibiotic combinations had on the total and active Bacteria, Archae and Methanogenic Archae. Three primer sets that targeted metabolic genes encoding formylterahydrofolate synthetase, methyl-coenzyme M reductase and acetyl-coA synthetase were also used to determine the inhibition level on the mRNA expression of the homoacetogens, methanogens and specifically acetoclastic methanogens, respectively. These microorganisms play a vital role in the anaerobic degradation of organic waste and targeting these gene expressions offers operators or someone at a treatment plant the potential to control and the improve the anaerobic system. The results of the investigation revealed that acetogens have a competitive advantage over Archaea in the presence of ETS and ST combinations. Although the efficiency with which methane production takes place and the quantification of microbial populations in both the ETS and ST reactors decreased as antibiotic concentrations increased, the ETS batch reactor performed better than the ST batch reactor. According to the expression of genes results, the syntrophic interaction of acetogens and methanogens is critical to the performance of the ETS and ST reactors. Failure to maintain the stability of these microorganisms resulted in a decrease in the performance and stability of the anaerobic reactors.

  4. Bioelectricity generation in microbial fuel cell using natural microflora and isolated pure culture bacteria from anaerobic palm oil mill effluent sludge.

    PubMed

    Nor, Muhamad Hanif Md; Mubarak, Mohd Fahmi Muhammad; Elmi, Hassan Sh Abdirahman; Ibrahim, Norahim; Wahab, Mohd Firdaus Abdul; Ibrahim, Zaharah

    2015-08-01

    A double-chambered membrane microbial fuel cell (MFC) was constructed to investigate the potential use of natural microflora anaerobic palm oil mill effluent (POME) sludge and pure culture bacteria isolated from anaerobic POME sludge as inoculum for electricity generation. Sterilized final discharge POME was used as the substrate with no addition of nutrients. MFC operation using natural microflora anaerobic POME sludge showed a maximum power density and current density of 85.11mW/m(2) and 91.12mA/m(2) respectively. Bacterial identification using 16S rRNA analysis of the pure culture isolated from the biofilm on the anode MFC was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain ZH1. The electricity generated in MFC using P. aeruginosa strain ZH1 showed maximum power density and current density of 451.26mW/m(2) and 654.90mA/m(2) respectively which were five times higher in power density and seven times higher in current density compared to that of MFC using anaerobic POME sludge.

  5. Bioelectricity generation in microbial fuel cell using natural microflora and isolated pure culture bacteria from anaerobic palm oil mill effluent sludge.

    PubMed

    Nor, Muhamad Hanif Md; Mubarak, Mohd Fahmi Muhammad; Elmi, Hassan Sh Abdirahman; Ibrahim, Norahim; Wahab, Mohd Firdaus Abdul; Ibrahim, Zaharah

    2015-08-01

    A double-chambered membrane microbial fuel cell (MFC) was constructed to investigate the potential use of natural microflora anaerobic palm oil mill effluent (POME) sludge and pure culture bacteria isolated from anaerobic POME sludge as inoculum for electricity generation. Sterilized final discharge POME was used as the substrate with no addition of nutrients. MFC operation using natural microflora anaerobic POME sludge showed a maximum power density and current density of 85.11mW/m(2) and 91.12mA/m(2) respectively. Bacterial identification using 16S rRNA analysis of the pure culture isolated from the biofilm on the anode MFC was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain ZH1. The electricity generated in MFC using P. aeruginosa strain ZH1 showed maximum power density and current density of 451.26mW/m(2) and 654.90mA/m(2) respectively which were five times higher in power density and seven times higher in current density compared to that of MFC using anaerobic POME sludge. PMID:25799955

  6. Arsenic, Anaerobes, and Autotrophy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oremland, R. S.

    2008-12-01

    That microbes have resistance to the toxic arsenic oxyanions arsenite [As(III)] and arsenate [As(V)] has been recognized for some time. More recently it was shown that certain prokaryotes can demonstrate As- dependent growth by conserving the energy gained from the aerobic oxidation of As(III) to As(V), or from the reduction of As(V) to As(III) under anaerobic conditions. During the course of our field studies of two alkaline, hypersaline soda lakes (Mono Lake and Searles Lake, CA) we have discovered several new anaerobic chemo- and photo-autotrophic bacteria that can center their energy gain around the redox reactions between As(III) and As(V). Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii, isolated from the water column of Mono Lake is a nitrate-respiring, As(III)-oxidizing chemoautotroph of the gamma-proteobacteria that has a highly flexible metabolism. It can function either as a facultative anaerobe or as a chemo-autotroph, or as a heterotroph (Hoeft et al., 2007). In contrast, strain MLMS-1 of the delta-proteobacteria was also isolated from Mono Lake, but to date is the first example of an obligate As(V)-respirer that is also an obligate chemo-autotroph, gaining its energy via the oxidation of sulfide to sulfate (Hoeft et al., 2004). Strain SLAS-1, isolated from salt-saturated Searles Lake is a member of the Halananerobiales, and can either grow as a heterotroph (lactate e-donor) or chemo- autotroph (sulfide e-donor) while respiring As(V). The fact that it can achieve this feat at salt-saturation (~ 340 g/L) makes it a true extremophile (Oremland et. al., 2005). Finally, strain PHS-1 isolated from a hot spring on Paoha island in Mono Lake is the first example of a photosynthetic bacterium of the gamma- proteobacteria able to link its growth to As(III)-dependent anoxygenic photosynthesis (Kulp et al., 2008). These novel microbes give us new insights into the evolution of arsenic-based metabolism and their role in the biogeochemical cycling of this toxic element. Hoeft, S.E., et

  7. Community structures and distribution of anaerobic ammonium oxidizing and nirS-encoding nitrite-reducing bacteria in surface sediments of the South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng; Hong, Yiguo; Cao, Huiluo; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2013-08-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) and denitrification are two important processes responsible for nitrogen loss; monitoring of microbial communities carrying out these two processes offers a unique opportunity to understand the microbial nitrogen cycle. The aim of the current study was to characterize community structures and distribution of anammox and nirS-encoding nitrite-reducing bacteria in surface sediments of the northern South China Sea (SCS). The consistent phylogenetic results of three biomarkers of anammox bacteria, including 16S rRNA, hzo, and Scalindua-nirS genes, showed that Scalindua-like bacteria were the only anammox group presenting in surface sediments of the SCS. However, a relatively high micro-diversity was found within this group, including several SCS habitat-specific phylotypes, Candidatus "Scalindua zhenghei". Comparing to 16S rRNA gene, hzo and Scalindua-nirS genes provided a relatively higher resolution to elucidate anammox bacteria. For the nirS-encoding nitrite-reducing bacteria, the detected nirS gene sequences were closely related to various marine nirS denitrifiers, especially those which originated from coastal and estuarine sediments with a much higher diversity than anammox bacteria. Anammox bacterial communities shifted along with the seawater depth, while nirS-encoding nitrite-reducing bacteria did not. Although nirS-encoding nitrite-reducing bacteria have a much higher abundance and diversity than anammox bacteria, they showed similar abundance variation patterns in research sites, suggesting the two microbial groups might be affected by the similar environmental factors. The significant correlations among the abundance of the two microbial groups with the molar ratio of NH4 (+) to (NO2 (-) + NO3 (-)), pH, and organic matters of sediments strongly supported this hypothesis. PMID:23354291

  8. Community structures and distribution of anaerobic ammonium oxidizing and nirS-encoding nitrite-reducing bacteria in surface sediments of the South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng; Hong, Yiguo; Cao, Huiluo; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2013-08-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) and denitrification are two important processes responsible for nitrogen loss; monitoring of microbial communities carrying out these two processes offers a unique opportunity to understand the microbial nitrogen cycle. The aim of the current study was to characterize community structures and distribution of anammox and nirS-encoding nitrite-reducing bacteria in surface sediments of the northern South China Sea (SCS). The consistent phylogenetic results of three biomarkers of anammox bacteria, including 16S rRNA, hzo, and Scalindua-nirS genes, showed that Scalindua-like bacteria were the only anammox group presenting in surface sediments of the SCS. However, a relatively high micro-diversity was found within this group, including several SCS habitat-specific phylotypes, Candidatus "Scalindua zhenghei". Comparing to 16S rRNA gene, hzo and Scalindua-nirS genes provided a relatively higher resolution to elucidate anammox bacteria. For the nirS-encoding nitrite-reducing bacteria, the detected nirS gene sequences were closely related to various marine nirS denitrifiers, especially those which originated from coastal and estuarine sediments with a much higher diversity than anammox bacteria. Anammox bacterial communities shifted along with the seawater depth, while nirS-encoding nitrite-reducing bacteria did not. Although nirS-encoding nitrite-reducing bacteria have a much higher abundance and diversity than anammox bacteria, they showed similar abundance variation patterns in research sites, suggesting the two microbial groups might be affected by the similar environmental factors. The significant correlations among the abundance of the two microbial groups with the molar ratio of NH4 (+) to (NO2 (-) + NO3 (-)), pH, and organic matters of sediments strongly supported this hypothesis.

  9. Microbial populations of an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor treating wastewater from a gelatin industry.

    PubMed

    Vieira, A M; Bergamasco, R; Gimenes, M L; Nakamura, C V; Dias Filho, B P

    2001-12-01

    The microbial populations of an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor, used for treating wastewater from the gelatin industry, were studied by microbiological methods and phase-contrast and electron microscopy. Microscopy examination of the sludge showed a complex mixture of various rod-shaped and coccoid bacterial pluslong filaments and verymobile curved rods. In addition free-living anaerobic ciliates and flagellates were also observed. The trophic group population observed in decreasing order of dominance were hydrolytic and acetogenic at 10(6) and sulfate reducing and methanogenic at 10(5). The rate of methane production in anaerobic granular sludge cultivated in growth medium supplement with formate pressurized with H2:CO2 showed a significant increase in methane yield compared with theseed culture containingthe same substrate and atmosphere of N2:CO2. Similar rates of methane production were observed when the growth medium was supplemented with acetate pressurized either with H2:CO2 or N2:CO2. The number of total anaerobic bacteria at 10(7), fecal coliforms and total coliforms at 10(6), and fecal streptococci at 10(3) is based on colony counts on solid media. The four prevalent species of facultative anaerobic gram-negative bacteria that belong to the family of Enterobacteriaceae were identified as Escherichia coli, Esherichia fergusonii, Klebsiella oxytoca, and Citrobacter freundii. The species Aeromonas hydrophila, Aeromonas veronii, Acinetobacter iwoffi and Stenotrophomonas maltophila were the most frequently isolated glucose fermenting and nonfermenting gram-negative bacilli.

  10. Ecophysiological adaptations of anaerobic bacteria to low pH: analysis of anaerobic digestion in acidic bog sediments. [Lactobacillus; Clostridium; Sarcina ventriculi

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, S.; Zeikus, G.J.

    1987-01-01

    The dynamics of anaerobic digestion were examined in the low-pH sediments of Crystal Bog in Wisconsin. The sediments (pH 4.9) contained 71% organic matter and the following concentrations of dissolved gases (micromoles per liter):CO/sub 2/, 1140; CH/sub 4/, 490; and H/sub 2/, 0.01. The rate of methane production was 6.2 ..mu..mol/liter of sediment per h, which is slower than eutrophic, neutral sediments. Microbial metabolic processes displayed the following pH optima: hydrolysis reactions, between 4.2 and 5.6; aceticlastic methanogenesis, 5.2; and hydrogen-consuming reactions, 5.6. The turnover rate constants for key intermediary metabolites were (h/sup -1/): glucose, 1.10; lactate, 0.277; acetate, 0.118; and ethanol, 0.089. The populations of anaerobes were low, with hydrolytic groups (10/sup 6//ml) several orders of magnitude higher than methanogens (10/sup 2//ml). The addition of carbon electron donors to the sediment resulted in the accumulation of hydrogen, whereas the addition of hydrogen resulted in the accumulation of fatty acids and the inhibition of hydrogen-producing acetogenic reactions. Strains of Lactobacillus, Clostridium, and Sarcina ventriculi were isolated from the bog, and their physiological attributes were characterized in relation to hydrolytic process functions in the sediments. The present studies provide evidence that the pH present in the bog sediments alter anaerobic digestion processes s, that total biocatalytic activity is lower bu the general carbon and electron flow pathways are similar to those of neutral anoxic sediments.

  11. Anaerobic treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Witt, E.R.; Humphrey, W.J.; Cave, J.P.

    1982-12-28

    This invention provides for the anaerobic treatment of acidic petrochemical wastes in an anaerobic filter at high loadings and high recycle rates. The effluent from the top of the filter passes into a gas-disengaging/solids-settling zone containing a quiescent body of the effluent liquid. The settled solids are withdrawn and recycled to the base of the filter together with fresh acidic waste and an inorganic alkaline material (preferably magnesium oxide or carbonate) to maintain a neutral pH. The liquid portion of the effluent is sent to an aerobic digester to remove the rest of the organic material, which is used to support the growth of bacteria and fed back to the anaerobic system.

  12. Occurrence of facultative anoxygenic photosynthesis among filamentous and unicellular cyanobacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Garlick, S; Oren, A; Padan, E

    1977-01-01

    Eleven of 21 cyanobacteria strains examined are capable of facultative anoxygenic photosynthesis, as shown by their ability to photoassimilate CO2 in the presence of Na2S, 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea and 703-nm light. These include different cyanobacterial types (filamentous and unicellular) of different growth histories (aerobic, anaerobic, and marine and freshwater). Oscillatoria limnetica, Aphanothece halophytica (7418), and Lyngbya (7104) have different optimal concentrations of Na2S permitting CO2 photoassimilation, above which the rate decreases: 3.5, 0.7, and 0.1 mM, respectively. In A. halophytica, for each CO2 molecule photoassimilated two sulfide molecules are oxidized to elemental sulfur, which is excreted from the cells.The ecological and evolutionary significance of anoxygenic photosynthesis in the cyanobacteria is discussed. PMID:402355

  13. Occurrence of facultative anoxygenic photosynthesis among filamentous and unicellular cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Garlick, S; Oren, A; Padan, E

    1977-02-01

    Eleven of 21 cyanobacteria strains examined are capable of facultative anoxygenic photosynthesis, as shown by their ability to photoassimilate CO2 in the presence of Na2S, 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea and 703-nm light. These include different cyanobacterial types (filamentous and unicellular) of different growth histories (aerobic, anaerobic, and marine and freshwater). Oscillatoria limnetica, Aphanothece halophytica (7418), and Lyngbya (7104) have different optimal concentrations of Na2S permitting CO2 photoassimilation, above which the rate decreases: 3.5, 0.7, and 0.1 mM, respectively. In A. halophytica, for each CO2 molecule photoassimilated two sulfide molecules are oxidized to elemental sulfur, which is excreted from the cells. The ecological and evolutionary significance of anoxygenic photosynthesis in the cyanobacteria is discussed. PMID:402355

  14. In vitro efficacy of cefovecin against anaerobic bacteria isolated from subgingival plaque of dogs and cats with periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Khazandi, Manouchehr; Bird, Philip S; Owens, Jane; Wilson, Gary; Meyer, James N; Trott, Darren J

    2014-08-01

    Periodontal disease is a common disease of dogs and cats often requiring antimicrobial treatment as an adjunct to mechanical debridement. However, correct compliance with oral antimicrobial therapy in companion animals is often difficult. Cefovecin is a recently introduced veterinary cephalosporin that has demonstrated prolonged concentrations in extracellular fluid, allowing for dosing intervals of up to 14 days. Subgingival samples were collected from the oral cavity of 29 dogs and eight cats exhibiting grade 2 or grade 3 periodontal disease. Samples were cultivated on Wilkin Chalgrens agar and incubated in an anaerobic chamber for seven days. Selected anaerobic bacteria were isolated and identified to species level using 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined for cefovecin and six additional antimicrobials using the agar dilution methodology recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. The 65 clinical isolates were identified as Porphyromonas gulae (n = 45), Porphyromonas crevioricanis (n = 12), Porphyromonas macacae (n = 1), Porphyromonas cangingivalis (n = 1) Fusobacterium nucleatum (n = 2), Fusobacterium russii (n = 1) and Solobacterium moorei (n = 3). This is the first report of S. moorei being isolated from companion animals with periodontal disease. All isolates were highly susceptible to cefovecin, with a MIC90 of ≤0.125 μg/ml. Conversely, different resistance rates to ampicillin, amoxicillin and erythromycin between isolates were detected. Cefovecin is thus shown to be effective in vitro against anaerobic bacteria isolated from dogs and cats with periodontal disease. PMID:24930431

  15. Facultative cheating supports the coexistence of diverse quorum-sensing alleles

    PubMed Central

    Pollak, Shaul; Omer-Bendori, Shira; Even-Tov, Eran; Lipsman, Valeria; Bareia, Tasneem; Ben-Zion, Ishay; Eldar, Avigdor

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial quorum sensing enables bacteria to cooperate in a density-dependent manner via the group-wide secretion and detection of specific autoinducer molecules. Many bacterial species show high intraspecific diversity of autoinducer–receptor alleles, called pherotypes. The autoinducer produced by one pherotype activates its coencoded receptor, but not the receptor of another pherotype. It is unclear what selection forces drive the maintenance of pherotype diversity. Here, we use the ComQXPA system of Bacillus subtilis as a model system, to show that pherotype diversity can be maintained by facultative cheating—a minority pherotype exploits the majority, but resumes cooperation when its frequency increases. We find that the maintenance of multiple pherotypes by facultative cheating can persist under kin-selection conditions that select against “obligate cheaters” quorum-sensing response null mutants. Our results therefore support a role for facultative cheating and kin selection in the evolution of quorum-sensing diversity. PMID:26787913

  16. Facultative cheating supports the coexistence of diverse quorum-sensing alleles.

    PubMed

    Pollak, Shaul; Omer-Bendori, Shira; Even-Tov, Eran; Lipsman, Valeria; Bareia, Tasneem; Ben-Zion, Ishay; Eldar, Avigdor

    2016-02-23

    Bacterial quorum sensing enables bacteria to cooperate in a density-dependent manner via the group-wide secretion and detection of specific autoinducer molecules. Many bacterial species show high intraspecific diversity of autoinducer-receptor alleles, called pherotypes. The autoinducer produced by one pherotype activates its coencoded receptor, but not the receptor of another pherotype. It is unclear what selection forces drive the maintenance of pherotype diversity. Here, we use the ComQXPA system of Bacillus subtilis as a model system, to show that pherotype diversity can be maintained by facultative cheating--a minority pherotype exploits the majority, but resumes cooperation when its frequency increases. We find that the maintenance of multiple pherotypes by facultative cheating can persist under kin-selection conditions that select against "obligate cheaters" quorum-sensing response null mutants. Our results therefore support a role for facultative cheating and kin selection in the evolution of quorum-sensing diversity.

  17. Facultative cheating supports the coexistence of diverse quorum-sensing alleles.

    PubMed

    Pollak, Shaul; Omer-Bendori, Shira; Even-Tov, Eran; Lipsman, Valeria; Bareia, Tasneem; Ben-Zion, Ishay; Eldar, Avigdor

    2016-02-23

    Bacterial quorum sensing enables bacteria to cooperate in a density-dependent manner via the group-wide secretion and detection of specific autoinducer molecules. Many bacterial species show high intraspecific diversity of autoinducer-receptor alleles, called pherotypes. The autoinducer produced by one pherotype activates its coencoded receptor, but not the receptor of another pherotype. It is unclear what selection forces drive the maintenance of pherotype diversity. Here, we use the ComQXPA system of Bacillus subtilis as a model system, to show that pherotype diversity can be maintained by facultative cheating--a minority pherotype exploits the majority, but resumes cooperation when its frequency increases. We find that the maintenance of multiple pherotypes by facultative cheating can persist under kin-selection conditions that select against "obligate cheaters" quorum-sensing response null mutants. Our results therefore support a role for facultative cheating and kin selection in the evolution of quorum-sensing diversity. PMID:26787913

  18. A newly designed degenerate PCR primer based on pmoA gene for detection of nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria from different ecological niches.

    PubMed

    Han, Ping; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2013-12-01

    A new pmoA gene-based PCR primer set was designed for detection of nitrite-dependent anaerobic oxidation of methane (n-damo) bacteria from four different ecosystems, namely rice paddy soil, freshwater reservoir, reed bed, and sludge from wastewater treatment plant. This primer set showed high specificity and efficiency in recovering n-damo bacteria from these diverse samples. The obtained sequences showed 88-94 and 90-96% similarity to nucleotide and amino acid sequences, respectively, with the known NC10 phylum bacterium. According to the UniFrac principal coordinates analysis (PCoA), DNA sequences retrieved by the new PCR primer set in this study formed a separate group from the reported sequences, indicating higher diversity of n-damo in the environment. This newly designed PCR primer is capable of amplifying not only the currently known n-damo bacteria but also those that have not been reported, providing new information on the ecological diversity and distribution of this group of microorganisms in the ecosystem.

  19. Efficiency of autothermal thermophilic aerobic digestion and thermophilic anaerobic digestion of municipal wastewater sludge in removing Salmonella spp. and indicator bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zábranská, J; Dohányos, M; Jenícek, P; Růziciková, H; Vránová, A

    2003-01-01

    The study is focused on the comparison of autothermal thermophilic aerobic digestion, thermophilic and mesophilic anaerobic digestion, based on long-term monitoring of all processes in full-scale wastewater treatment plants, with an emphasis on the efficiency in destroying pathogens. The hygienisation effect was evaluated as a removal of counts of indicator bacteria, thermotolerant coliforms and enterococci as CFU/g total sludge solids and a frequency of a positive Salmonella spp. detection. Both thermophilic technologies of municipal wastewater sludge stabilisation had the capability of producing sludge A biosolids suitable for agricultural land application when all operational parameters (mainly temperature, mixing and retention time) were stable and maintained at an appropriate level.

  20. Indigenous cellulolytic and hemicellulolytic bacteria enhanced rapid co-composting of lignocellulose oil palm empty fruit bunch with palm oil mill effluent anaerobic sludge.

    PubMed

    Zainudin, Mohd Huzairi Mohd; Hassan, Mohd Ali; Tokura, Mitsunori; Shirai, Yoshihito

    2013-11-01

    The composting of lignocellulosic oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB) with continuous addition of palm oil mill (POME) anaerobic sludge which contained nutrients and indigenous microbes was studied. In comparison to the conventional OPEFB composting which took 60-90 days, the rapid composting in this study can be completed in 40 days with final C/N ratio of 12.4 and nitrogen (2.5%), phosphorus (1.4%), and potassium (2.8%), respectively. Twenty-seven cellulolytic bacterial strains of which 23 strains were closely related to Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus firmus, Thermobifida fusca, Thermomonospora spp., Cellulomonas sp., Ureibacillus thermosphaericus, Paenibacillus barengoltzii, Paenibacillus campinasensis, Geobacillus thermodenitrificans, Pseudoxanthomonas byssovorax which were known as lignocellulose degrading bacteria and commonly involved in lignocellulose degradation. Four isolated strains related to Exiguobacterium acetylicum and Rhizobium sp., with cellulolytic and hemicellulolytic activities. The rapid composting period achieved in this study can thus be attributed to the naturally occurring cellulolytic and hemicellulolytic strains identified. PMID:24012093

  1. Anaerobic Co-Culture of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Anaerobic Pathogens - A New In Vitro Model System

    PubMed Central

    Kriebel, Katja; Biedermann, Anne; Kreikemeyer, Bernd; Lang, Hermann

    2013-01-01

    Background Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are multipotent by nature and are originally isolated from bone marrow. In light of a future application of hMSCs in the oral cavity, a body compartment with varying oxygen partial pressures and an omnipresence of different bacterial species i.e. periodontitis pathogens, we performed this study to gain information about the behavior of hMSC in an anaerobic system and the response in interaction with oral bacterial pathogens. Methodology/Principal Findings We established a model system with oral pathogenic bacterial species and eukaryotic cells cultured in anaerobic conditions. The facultative anaerobe bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans were studied. Their effects on hMSCs and primary as well as permanent gingival epithelial cells (Ca9-22, HGPEC) were comparatively analyzed. We show that hMSCs cope with anoxic conditions, since 40% vital cells remain after 72 h of anaerobic culture. The Ca9-22 and HGPEC cells are significantly more sensitive to lack of oxygen. All bacterial species reveal a comparatively low adherence to and internalization into hMSCs (0.2% and 0.01% of the initial inoculum, respectively). In comparison, the Ca9-22 and HGPEC cells present better targets for bacterial adherence and internalization. The production of the pro-inflammatory chemokine IL-8 is higher in both gingival epithelial cell lines compared to hMSCs and Fusobacterium nucleatum induce a time-dependent cytokine secretion in both cell lines. Porphyromonas gingivalis is less effective in stimulating secretion of IL-8 in the co-cultivation experiments. Conclusions/significance HMSCs are suitable for use in anoxic regions of the oral cavity. The interaction with local pathogenic bacteria does not result in massive pro-inflammatory cytokine responses. The test system established in this study allowed further investigation of parameters prior to set up of oral hMSC in vivo

  2. The Effect of Bamboo Leaf Extract Solution and Sodium Copper Chlorophyllin Solution on Growth and Volatile Sulfur Compounds Production of Oral Malodor Associated Some Anaerobic Periodontal Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Majbauddin, Abir; Kodani, Isamu; Ryoke, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Background Bamboo leaf extract solution (BLES) and sodium copper chlorophyllin solution (SCCS) are known for their anti-oxidant activities. Oral malodor is often related with periodontal pathogens. The present study was undertaken to investigate the anti-bacterial effect of both BLES and SCCS on anaerobic periodontal bacteria producing oral malodorous volatile sulfur compounds (VSC). Methods Porphyromonas gingivalis W83 (PG), Prevotella intermidai TDC19B (PI), Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC25586 (FN) and Prevotella nigrescence ATCC33563 (PN) were investigated as oral isolated bacteria. VSC production ability of the oral strains was investigated by gas chromatography. With serial dilution of BLES or SCCS, the strains PG, PI, FN or PN were cultured anaerobically with AnaeroPack at 37 ℃ for 3 days. For the determination of anti-bacterial action of BLES or SCCS, the inoculum was cultured with original concentrations of BLES 0.16% (w/v) or SCCS 0.25% (w/v). Results Gas chromatography exhibited that all strains, PG, PI, FN and PN were responsible for producing a high range of H2S and a moderate range of CH3SH. Anti-bacterial effect of BLES or SCCS on the strains was observed. Inhibition of BLES or SCCS on the strains was revealed as concentration dependent. BLES or SCCS inhibited bacterial proliferation at higher concentrations (PG; 0.04% BLES or 0.03% SCCS, PI; 0.002% BLES or 0.03% SCCS, FN; 0.005% BLES or 0.01% SCCS, PN; 0.01% BLES or 0.015% SCCS). No viable bacterial colony observed at original concentration of BLES 0.16% or SCCS 0.25%. Strain growth was eliminated from inhibition at lower concentrations (PG; 0.02% BLES or 0.015% SCCS, PI; 0.001% BLES or 0.015% SCCS, FN; 0.002% BLES or 0.007% SCCS, PN; 0.005% BLES or 0.007% SCCS). Conclusion High concentrations of both BLES (0.16%) and SCCS (0.25%) show superior inhibiting capability on all four oral malodor associated periodontal anaerobes during testing, suggesting that these compounds might have a beneficial effect

  3. Isolation and characterization of a Klebsiella oxytoca strain for simultaneous azo-dye anaerobic reduction and bio-hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lei; Li, Wen-Wei; Lam, Michael Hon-Wah; Yu, Han-Qing; Wu, Chao

    2012-07-01

    A facultative anaerobic bacteria strain GS-4-08, isolated from an anaerobic sequence batch reactor for synthetic dye wastewater treatment, was investigated for azo-dye decolorization. This bacterium was identified as a member of Klebsiella oxytoca based on Gram staining, morphology characterization and 16S rRNA gene analysis. It exhibited a good capacity of simultaneous decolorization and hydrogen production in the presence of electron donor. The hydrogen production was less affected even at a high Methyl Orange (MO) concentration of 0.5 mM, indicating a superior tolerability of this strain to MO. This efficient bio-hydrogen production from electron donor can not only avoid bacterial inhibition due to accumulation of volatile fatty acids during MO decolorization, but also can recover considerable energy from dye wastewater.

  4. Viable Bacteria Associated with Red Blood Cells and Plasma in Freshly Drawn Blood Donations

    PubMed Central

    Damgaard, Christian; Magnussen, Karin; Enevold, Christian; Nilsson, Martin; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Holmstrup, Palle; Nielsen, Claus Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Infection remains a leading cause of post-transfusion mortality and morbidity. Bacterial contamination is, however, detected in less than 0.1% of blood units tested. The aim of the study was to identify viable bacteria in standard blood-pack units, with particular focus on bacteria from the oral cavity, and to determine the distribution of bacteria revealed in plasma and in the red blood cell (RBC)-fraction. Design Cross-sectional study. Blood were separated into plasma and RBC-suspensions, which were incubated anaerobically or aerobically for 7 days on trypticase soy blood agar (TSA) or blue lactose plates. For identification colony PCR was performed using primers targeting 16S rDNA. Setting Blood donors attending Capital Region Blood Bank, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Hvidovre, Denmark, October 29th to December 10th 2013. Participants 60 donors (≥50 years old), self-reported medically healthy. Results Bacterial growth was observed on plates inoculated with plasma or RBCs from 62% of the blood donations. Growth was evident in 21 (35%) of 60 RBC-fractions and in 32 (53%) of 60 plasma-fractions versus 8 of 60 negative controls (p = 0.005 and p = 2.6x10-6, respectively). Propionibacterium acnes was found in 23% of the donations, and Staphylococcus epidermidis in 38%. The majority of bacteria identified in the present study were either facultative anaerobic (59.5%) or anaerobic (27.8%) species, which are not likely to be detected during current routine screening. Conclusions Viable bacteria are present in blood from donors self-reported as medically healthy, indicating that conventional test systems employed by blood banks insufficiently detect bacteria in plasma. Further investigation is needed to determine whether routine testing for anaerobic bacteria and testing of RBC-fractions for adherent bacteria should be recommended. PMID:25751254

  5. Iron, Sulfur, Arsenic and Water: Geochemical Implications of Facultative Anoxygenic Photosynthesis in Cyanobacteria and the Slow Rise of Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe-Simon, F.; Johnston, D. T.; Girguis, P. R.; Pearson, A.; Knoll, A. H.

    2008-12-01

    Over geologic time, the global rise in atmospheric oxygen (O2) is attributed to the evolution and wide spread proliferation of oxygenic photosynthesis in cyanobacteria. However, cyanobacteria maintain a metabolic flexibility that may not always result in O2 release. Specifically, cyanobacteria can use a variety of alternative electron donors, rather than water, that are also readily oxidized. These may include sulfur, iron, and arsenic. Cyanobacteria are thus not uniquely constrained towards O2 production. Changes in the bioavailability of these key elements may have had dramatic consequences for and resulted in the slow accumulation of O2 in the atmosphere. In particular, by using facultative anoxygenic photosynthesis the cells maintain advantageous anaerobic conditions for N2-fixation. Although other types of bacteria are capable of N2-fixation, cyanobacteria singularly possess the dynamic capability of generating and surviving O2. These two processes "pull" the cells in opposite directions, metabolically speaking, around an aerobic-anaerobic continuum. Such a strategy also confers a distinct competitive advantage for cyanobacteria over photosynthetic eukaryotes, as they can endure widespread euxinia and maintain their cellular N quota. In an anoxic and/or sulfidic ocean, cyanobacteria would be expected to dominate over eukaryotic algae. Here we present Bayesian constructed phylogenetic distribution of specific genes and the metabolic role of key enzymes that form the basis of this hypothesis. We further suggest that the consequences of this proposed ecosystem structure altered the redox balance of the fluid Earth (atmosphere and oceans) and can help explain the observed long-term geochemical stasis and slow rates of eukaryotic diversification. We suggest that the underlying control for global oxygenation was a synergistic interplay between the evolution and elastic physiology of cyanobacteria as they impacted the redox state of early Earth.

  6. Quantitative detection of previously characterized syntrophic bacteria in anaerobic wastewater treatment systems by sequence-specific rRNA cleavage method.

    PubMed

    Narihiro, Takashi; Terada, Takeshi; Ohashi, Akiko; Kamagata, Yoichi; Nakamura, Kazunori; Sekiguchi, Yuji

    2012-05-01

    Quantitative monitoring method of two important trophic groups of bacteria in methanogenic communities was established and applied to six different anaerobic processes. The method we employed was based upon our previous sequence-specific rRNA cleavage method that allows quantification of rRNA of target groups so that the populations reflecting in situ activity could be determined. We constructed a set of scissor probes targeting the Chloroflexi group known as 'semi-syntrophic' heterotrophic bacteria and fatty acid-oxidizing syntrophs to determine their relative abundance in the processes. By using the method, we found that several reactors harbored a large amount of organisms belonging to the phylum Chloroflexi accounting for up to 20% of the total prokaryotic populations. Propionate-oxidizing syntrophs, Syntrophobacter, Smithella and Pelotomaculum were also found to be significant comprising up to 3.9% of the total populations, but their distribution is highly dependent on the process examined. This is the first clear, non-PCR based quantitative evidence that those organisms play active roles under in situ methanogenic conditions.

  7. Diverse anaerobic Cr(VI) tolerant bacteria from Cr(VI)-contaminated 100H site at Hanford

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, R.; Phan, R.; Lam, S.; Leung, C.; Brodie, E. L.; Hazen, T. C.

    2007-12-01

    Hexavalent Chromium [Cr(VI)] is a widespread contaminant found in soil, sediment, and ground water. Cr(VI) is more soluble, toxic, carcinogenic, and mutagenic compared to its reduced form Cr(III). In order to stimulate microbially mediated reduction of Cr(VI), a poly-lactate compound HRC was injected into the chromium contaminated aquifers at site 100H at Hanford. Based on the results of the bacterial community composition using high-density DNA microarray analysis of 16S rRNA gene products, we recently investigated the diversity of the dominant anaerobic culturable microbial population present at this site and their role in Cr(VI) reduction. Positive enrichments set up at 30°C using specific defined anaerobic media resulted in the isolation of an iron reducing isolate strain HAF, a sulfate reducing isolate strain HBLS and a nitrate reducing isolate, strain HLN among several others. Preliminary 16S rDNA sequence analysis identifies strain HAF as Geobacter metallireducens, strain HLN as Pseudomonas stutzeri and strain HBLS as a member of Desulfovibrio species. Strain HAF isolated with acetate as the electron donor utilized propionate, glycerol and pyruvate as alternative carbon sources, and reduced metals like Mn(IV) and Cr(VI). Growth was optimal at 37°C, pH of 6.5 and 0% salinity. Strain HLN isolated with lactate as electron donor utilized acetate, glycerol and pyruvate as alternative carbon sources, and reduced metals like Mn(IV) and Cr(VI). Optimal growth was observed at 37°C, at a pH of 7.5 and 0.3% salinity. Anaerobic active washed cell suspension of strain HLN reduced almost 95 micromolar Cr(VI) within 4 hours relative to controls. Further, with 100 micromolar Cr(VI) as the sole electron acceptor, cells of strain HLN grew to cell numbers of 4.05X 107/ml over a period of 24hrs after an initial lag, demonstrating direct enzymatic Cr(VI) reduction by this species. 10mM lactate served as the sole electron donor. These results demonstrate that Cr

  8. 46 CFR 308.544 - Facultative binder, Form MA-315.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Facultative binder, Form MA-315. 308.544 Section 308.544 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Cargo Insurance Iii-Facultative War Risk Cargo Insurance § 308.544 Facultative binder, Form...

  9. 46 CFR 308.544 - Facultative binder, Form MA-315.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Facultative binder, Form MA-315. 308.544 Section 308.544 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Cargo Insurance Iii-Facultative War Risk Cargo Insurance § 308.544 Facultative binder, Form...

  10. (Anaerobic metabolism of aromatic compounds by phototrophic bacteria: biochemical aspects): Annual progress report, April 1988--March 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Harwood, C.S.; Gibson, J.

    1989-01-01

    Intensive efforts to define a protocol for generating transposon mutations in R. palustris have continued. An indirect approach, in which a transposon is introduced into a pLAFR1 cosmid containing an approximately 20 kb fragment of R. palustris DNA from a lambda derivative containing Tn5, appears promising. Both plasmids can be introduced into E. coli, and the antibiotic resistances coded for by each subsequently mated into wild-type R. palustris. A mutant isolated following chemical mutagenesis which is unable to grow aerobically on 4-OH benzoate (CGA033) has been complemented biochemically by the same clone which functions in the absence of the transposon; in addition, and more importantly, this indirect tranposon mutagenesis appears to yield mutants with novel phenotypes affecting the anaerobic pathway for 4-OH benzoate utilization. 2 refs.

  11. The predominant bacteria isolated from radicular cysts

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To detect predominant bacteria associated with radicular cysts and discuss in light of the literature. Material and methods Clinical materials were obtained from 35 radicular cysts by aspiration. Cultures were made from clinical materials by modern laboratory techniques, they underwent microbiologic analysis. Results The following are microorganisms isolated from cultures: Streptococcus milleri Group (SMG) (23.8%) [Streptococcus constellatus (19.1%) and Streptococcus anginosus (4.7%)], Streptococcus sanguis (14.3%), Streptococcus mitis (4.7%), Streptococcus cremoris (4.7%), Peptostreptococcus pevotii (4.7%), Prevotella buccae (4.7%), Prevotella intermedia (4.7%), Actinomyces meyeri (4.7%), Actinomyces viscosus (4.7%), Propionibacterium propionicum (4.7%), Bacteroides capillosus (4.7%), Staphylococcus hominis (4.7%), Rothia denticariosa (4.7%), Gemella haemolysans (4.7%), and Fusobacterium nucleatum (4.7%). Conclusions Results of this study demonstrated that radicular cysts show a great variety of anaerobic and facultative anaerobic bacterial flora. It was observed that all isolated microorganisms were the types commonly found in oral flora. Although no specific microorganism was found, Streptococcus spp. bacteria (47.5%) – especially SMG (23.8%) – were predominantly found in the microorganisms isolated. Furthermore, radicular cysts might be polymicrobial originated. Although radicular cyst is an inflammatory cyst, some radicular cyst fluids might be sterile. PMID:24011184

  12. A quasi-universal medium to break the aerobic/anaerobic bacterial culture dichotomy in clinical microbiology.

    PubMed

    Dione, N; Khelaifia, S; La Scola, B; Lagier, J C; Raoult, D

    2016-01-01

    In the mid-19th century, the dichotomy between aerobic and anaerobic bacteria was introduced. Nevertheless, the aerobic growth of strictly anaerobic bacterial species such as Ruminococcus gnavus and Fusobacterium necrophorum, in a culture medium containing antioxidants, was recently demonstrated. We tested aerobically the culture of 623 bacterial strains from 276 bacterial species including 82 strictly anaerobic, 154 facultative anaerobic, 31 aerobic and nine microaerophilic bacterial species as well as ten fungi. The basic culture medium was based on Schaedler agar supplemented with 1 g/L ascorbic acid and 0.1 g/L glutathione (R-medium). We successively optimized this media, adding 0.4 g/L uric acid, using separate autoclaving of the component, or adding haemin 0.1 g/L or α-ketoglutarate 2 g/L. In the basic medium, 237 bacterial species and ten fungal species grew but with no growth of 36 bacterial species, including 22 strict anaerobes. Adding uric acid allowed the growth of 14 further species including eight strict anaerobes, while separate autoclaving allowed the growth of all tested bacterial strains. To extend its potential use for fastidious bacteria, we added haemin for Haemophilus influenzae, Haemophilus parainfluenzae and Eikenella corrodens and α-ketoglutarate for Legionella pneumophila. This medium allowed the growth of all tested strains with the exception of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis. Testing primoculture and more fastidious species will constitute the main work to be done, but R-medium coupled with a rapid identification method (matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry) will facilitate the anaerobic culture in clinical microbiology laboratories.

  13. Acid pre-treatment of sewage anaerobic sludge to increase hydrogen producing bacteria HPB: effectiveness and reproducibility.

    PubMed

    Tommasi, T; Sassi, G; Ruggeri, B

    2008-01-01

    The present study is aimed to test the effectiveness and the reproducibility of the acid pre-treatment of sewage sludge to suppress the methanogenic bacteria activity, in order to increase the hydrogen forming bacteria activity, mainly Clostridium species. The treated sludge has been tested on glucose reach medium under mesophilic conditions (35 degrees C), in batch mode to quantify the biological fermentative hydrogen production. In the whole series of experiments, the main components of biogas are hydrogen (52-60%) and carbon dioxide (40-48%); no methane and hydrogen sulphide were present in it. The rate of biogas production reached a maximum of 75 ml/lh. An overall mean hydrogen conversion efficiency was 11.20% on the assumption of maximum of 3 mol H2/mol glucose. Clostridium spp. multiplied ten times after 10 h of fermentation and over that thousand times at the end of fermentation.

  14. Structure and function of assemblages of Bacteria and Archaea in model anaerobic aquifer columns: can functional instability be practically beneficial?

    PubMed

    Nelson, Denice K; Lapara, Timothy M; Novak, Paige J

    2012-09-18

    Biodegradable organic carbon is often added to aquifers to stimulate microbial reduction of oxidized contaminants. This carbon also stimulates fermenters, which generate important metabolites that can fuel contaminant reduction and may enhance dissolution of hydrophobic compounds. Therefore, understanding how different methods of carbon addition affect the fermentative community will enable design of more effective remediation strategies. Our research objective was to evaluate the microbial communities that developed in model aquifer columns in response to pulsed or continuous molasses input. Results indicated that the continuously fed column produced relatively low concentrations of metabolic intermediates and had a greater proportion of Bacteria and methanogens, as measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, near the column inlet. In contrast, the pulsed-fed column generated periodic high concentrations of metabolic intermediates, with Bacteria and methanogens distributed throughout the length of the column. The community structures of Bacteria and Archaea, measured via automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis, in the pulsed-fed column were significantly different from those in the control column (not fed). The microbial community composition of the continuously fed column, however, became increasingly similar to the control column along the column length. These results demonstrate that a strategy of pulsed carbon addition leads to activity that is associated with functional instability, in terms of the production of periodic pulses of fermentation products and changing carbon concentration, and may be advantageous for remediation by producing large quantities of beneficial intermediates and resulting in more homogenously distributed biomass.

  15. Reduction and immobilization of radionuclides and toxic metal ions using combined zero valent iron and anaerobic bacteria. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Weathers, L.

    1998-06-01

    'Previous research findings indicate that both zero valent iron and sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) can yield significant decreases in Cr(VI) or U(VI) concentrations due to abiotic and microbial reduction, respectively. The major hypothesis associated with this research project is that a combined abiotic-biological system can synergistically combine both processes to maximize metal ion reduction in an engineered permeable reactive barrier. The overall goal of this project is to design a combined abiotic/microbial, reactive, permeable, in-situ barrier with sufficient reductive potential to prevent downgradient migration of toxic metal ions. The field-scale application of this technology would utilize anaerobic digester sludge, Fe(O) particles for supporting anaerobic biofilms, and suitable aquifer material for construction of the barrier. Successful completion of this goal requires testing of the two hypotheses listed above by evaluating: (1) the rates of abiotic metal ion reduction, and (2) the rates of microbial metal ion reduction in microbial and combined abiotic/microbial reduction systems under a range of environmental conditions. This report summarizes work after one and one-half years of a three year project. Abiotic studies: The thrust of the abiotic research conducted to date has been to determine the rates of Cr(VI) reduction in batch reactors and to evaluate the role of aquifer materials on those rates. Experiments have been conducted to determine the rates of reduction by Fe(II) and Fe(O). The parameters that have been evaluated are the effect of pH and the presence of sulfide and aquifer material.'

  16. Next-generation RNA-based fluorescent biosensors enable anaerobic detection of cyclic di-GMP

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin C.; Wilson, Stephen C.; Hammond, Ming C.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria occupy a diverse set of environmental niches with differing oxygen availability. Anaerobic environments such as mammalian digestive tracts and industrial reactors harbor an abundance of both obligate and facultative anaerobes, many of which play significant roles in human health and biomanufacturing. Studying bacterial function under partial or fully anaerobic conditions, however, is challenging given the paucity of suitable live-cell imaging tools. Here, we introduce a series of RNA-based fluorescent biosensors that respond selectively to cyclic di-GMP, an intracellular bacterial second messenger that controls cellular motility and biofilm formation. We demonstrate the utility of these biosensors in vivo under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and we show that biosensor expression does not interfere with the native motility phenotype. Together, our results attest to the effectiveness and versatility of RNA-based fluorescent biosensors, priming further development and application of these and other analogous sensors to study host–microbial and microbial–microbial interactions through small molecule signals. PMID:27382070

  17. Next-generation RNA-based fluorescent biosensors enable anaerobic detection of cyclic di-GMP.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin C; Wilson, Stephen C; Hammond, Ming C

    2016-09-30

    Bacteria occupy a diverse set of environmental niches with differing oxygen availability. Anaerobic environments such as mammalian digestive tracts and industrial reactors harbor an abundance of both obligate and facultative anaerobes, many of which play significant roles in human health and biomanufacturing. Studying bacterial function under partial or fully anaerobic conditions, however, is challenging given the paucity of suitable live-cell imaging tools. Here, we introduce a series of RNA-based fluorescent biosensors that respond selectively to cyclic di-GMP, an intracellular bacterial second messenger that controls cellular motility and biofilm formation. We demonstrate the utility of these biosensors in vivo under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and we show that biosensor expression does not interfere with the native motility phenotype. Together, our results attest to the effectiveness and versatility of RNA-based fluorescent biosensors, priming further development and application of these and other analogous sensors to study host-microbial and microbial-microbial interactions through small molecule signals.

  18. Next-generation RNA-based fluorescent biosensors enable anaerobic detection of cyclic di-GMP.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin C; Wilson, Stephen C; Hammond, Ming C

    2016-09-30

    Bacteria occupy a diverse set of environmental niches with differing oxygen availability. Anaerobic environments such as mammalian digestive tracts and industrial reactors harbor an abundance of both obligate and facultative anaerobes, many of which play significant roles in human health and biomanufacturing. Studying bacterial function under partial or fully anaerobic conditions, however, is challenging given the paucity of suitable live-cell imaging tools. Here, we introduce a series of RNA-based fluorescent biosensors that respond selectively to cyclic di-GMP, an intracellular bacterial second messenger that controls cellular motility and biofilm formation. We demonstrate the utility of these biosensors in vivo under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and we show that biosensor expression does not interfere with the native motility phenotype. Together, our results attest to the effectiveness and versatility of RNA-based fluorescent biosensors, priming further development and application of these and other analogous sensors to study host-microbial and microbial-microbial interactions through small molecule signals. PMID:27382070

  19. Experimental otitis media in gerbils and chinchillas with Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and other aerobic and anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fulghum, R S; Brinn, J E; Smith, A M; Daniel, H J; Loesche, P J

    1982-05-01

    To ascertain the usefulness of Mongolian gerbils as an inbred model for otitis media, 52 Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus, strain MONT/Tum) were compared with 26 chinchillas (Chinchilla laniger) for susceptibility to Streptococcus pneumoniae type 3. Haemophilus influenzae type b, and a polymicrobic culture including anaerobes (Streptococcus intermedius, Propionibacterium acnes, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Corynebacterium sp.). Organisms were inoculated percutaneously into the superior chamber of the middle ear bulla. The gerbils and chinchillas shared similar susceptibilities and responses to the inoculated organisms as determined by X-ray, otoscopic, histopathological, and microbiological determinations at 5 to 7 days. Koch's postulate studies proved the role of S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae in the pathology found in both animal models. The animals were also susceptible to the polymicrobic culture, although the relative virulence of the individual members of this mixture was low, suggesting that these species potentiated as a polymicrobic mixture. The Corynebacterium sp. appeared to elicit the greatest histopathological response in chronic (8-week) studies in gerbils. The gerbils were found to be useful as an alternative animal model for the study of otitis media of bacterial etiology.

  20. Oral Gram-negative anaerobic bacilli as a reservoir of β-lactam resistance genes facilitating infections with multiresistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Dupin, Clarisse; Tamanai-Shacoori, Zohreh; Ehrmann, Elodie; Dupont, Anais; Barloy-Hubler, Frédérique; Bousarghin, Latifa; Bonnaure-Mallet, Martine; Jolivet-Gougeon, Anne

    2015-02-01

    Many β-lactamases have been described in various Gram-negative bacilli (Capnocytophaga, Prevotella, Fusobacterium, etc.) of the oral cavity, belonging to class A of the Ambler classification (CepA, CblA, CfxA, CSP-1 and TEM), class B (CfiA) or class D in Fusobacterium nucleatum (FUS-1). The minimum inhibitory concentrations of β-lactams are variable and this variation is often related to the presence of plasmids or other mobile genetic elements (MGEs) that modulate the expression of resistance genes. DNA persistence and bacterial promiscuity in oral biofilms also contribute to genetic transformation and conjugation in this particular microcosm. Overexpression of efflux pumps is facilitated because the encoding genes are located on MGEs, in some multidrug-resistant clinical isolates, similar to conjugative transposons harbouring genes encoding β-lactamases. All these facts lead us to consider the oral cavity as an important reservoir of β-lactam resistance genes and a privileged place for genetic exchange, especially in commensal strictly anaerobic Gram-negative bacilli.

  1. Evaluation of substrates for radiometric detection of bacteria in blood cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Bopp, H.; Ellner, P.D.

    1988-05-01

    Various /sup 14/C-labeled substrates were evaluated for their potential use in blood culture media. These uniformly labeled compounds were added to hypertonic and anaerobic formulations of modified Columbia broth and compared with analogous BACTEC media with the BACTEC 460. Different bacterial species gave significant growth indices when 2.0 microCi of labeled glucose, glutamic acid, aspartic acid, arginine, or formate was used alone or in combinations in the experimental media. The combination of glucose, glutamic acid, and sodium formate was selected, and simulated blood cultures with representative aerobic, facultative, and anaerobic bacteria and a yeast were compared with BACTEC vials. Under these conditions, the experimental media often became positive several hours earlier than the BACTEC vials and usually produced higher growth indices.

  2. Horizontal gene transfer from Bacteria to rumen Ciliates indicates adaptation to their anaerobic, carbohydrates-rich environment

    PubMed Central

    Ricard, Guénola; McEwan, Neil R; Dutilh, Bas E; Jouany, Jean-Pierre; Macheboeuf, Didier; Mitsumori, Makoto; McIntosh, Freda M; Michalowski, Tadeusz; Nagamine, Takafumi; Nelson, Nancy; Newbold, Charles J; Nsabimana, Eli; Takenaka, Akio; Thomas, Nadine A; Ushida, Kazunari; Hackstein, Johannes HP; Huynen, Martijn A

    2006-01-01

    Background The horizontal transfer of expressed genes from Bacteria into Ciliates which live in close contact with each other in the rumen (the foregut of ruminants) was studied using ciliate Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs). More than 4000 ESTs were sequenced from representatives of the two major groups of rumen Cilates: the order Entodiniomorphida (Entodinium simplex, Entodinium caudatum, Eudiplodinium maggii, Metadinium medium, Diploplastron affine, Polyplastron multivesiculatum and Epidinium ecaudatum) and the order Vestibuliferida, previously called Holotricha (Isotricha prostoma, Isotricha intestinalis and Dasytricha ruminantium). Results A comparison of the sequences with the completely sequenced genomes of Eukaryotes and Prokaryotes, followed by large-scale construction and analysis of phylogenies, identified 148 ciliate genes that specifically cluster with genes from the Bacteria and Archaea. The phylogenetic clustering with bacterial genes, coupled with the absence of close relatives of these genes in the Ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila, indicates that they have been acquired via Horizontal Gene Transfer (HGT) after the colonization of the gut by the rumen Ciliates. Conclusion Among the HGT candidates, we found an over-representation (>75%) of genes involved in metabolism, specifically in the catabolism of complex carbohydrates, a rich food source in the rumen. We propose that the acquisition of these genes has greatly facilitated the Ciliates' colonization of the rumen providing evidence for the role of HGT in the adaptation to new niches. PMID:16472398

  3. Formation of tellurium nanocrystals during anaerobic growth of bacteria that use Te oxyanions as respiratory electron acceptors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baesman, S.M.; Bullen, T.D.; Dewald, J.; Zhang, Dongxiao; Curran, S.; Islam, F.S.; Beveridge, T.J.; Oremland, R.S.

    2007-01-01

    Certain toxic elements support the metabolism of diverse prokaryotes by serving as respiratory electron acceptors for growth. Here, we demonstrate that two anaerobes previously shown to be capable of respiring oxyanions of selenium also achieve growth by reduction of either tellurate [Te(VI)] or tellurite [Te(IV)] to elemental tellurium [Te(0)]. This reduction achieves a sizeable stable-Te-isotopic fractionation (isotopic enrichment factor [??] = -0.4 to -1.0 per ml per atomic mass unit) and results in the formation of unique crystalline Te(0) nanoarchitectures as end products. The Te(0) crystals occur internally within but mainly externally from the cells, and each microorganism forms a distinctly different structure. Those formed by Bacillus selenitireducens initially are nanorods (???10-nm diameter by 200-nm length), which cluster together, forming larger (???1,000-nm) rosettes composed of numerous individual shards (???100-nm width by 1,000-nm length). In contrast, Sulfurospirillium barnesii forms extremely small, irregularly shaped nanospheres (diameter < 50 nm) that coalesce into larger composite aggregates. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and selected area electron diffraction indicate that both biominerals are composed entirely of Te and are crystalline, while Raman spectroscopy confirms that they are in the elemental state. These Te biominerals have specific spectral signatures (UV-visible light, Raman) that also provide clues to their internal structures. The use of microorganisms to generate Te nanomaterials may be an alternative for bench-scale syntheses. Additionally, they may also generate products with unique properties unattainable by conventional physical/chemical methods. Copyright ?? 2007, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Formation of Tellurium Nanocrystals during Anaerobic Growth of Bacteria That Use Te Oxyanions as Respiratory Electron Acceptors▿

    PubMed Central

    Baesman, Shaun M.; Bullen, Thomas D.; Dewald, James; Zhang, Donghui; Curran, Seamus; Islam, Farhana S.; Beveridge, Terry J.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    2007-01-01

    Certain toxic elements support the metabolism of diverse prokaryotes by serving as respiratory electron acceptors for growth. Here, we demonstrate that two anaerobes previously shown to be capable of respiring oxyanions of selenium also achieve growth by reduction of either tellurate [Te(VI)] or tellurite [Te(IV)] to elemental tellurium [Te(0)]. This reduction achieves a sizeable stable-Te-isotopic fractionation (isotopic enrichment factor [ɛ] = −0.4 to −1.0 per ml per atomic mass unit) and results in the formation of unique crystalline Te(0) nanoarchitectures as end products. The Te(0) crystals occur internally within but mainly externally from the cells, and each microorganism forms a distinctly different structure. Those formed by Bacillus selenitireducens initially are nanorods (∼10-nm diameter by 200-nm length), which cluster together, forming larger (∼1,000-nm) rosettes composed of numerous individual shards (∼100-nm width by 1,000-nm length). In contrast, Sulfurospirillum barnesii forms extremely small, irregularly shaped nanospheres (diameter < 50 nm) that coalesce into larger composite aggregates. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and selected area electron diffraction indicate that both biominerals are composed entirely of Te and are crystalline, while Raman spectroscopy confirms that they are in the elemental state. These Te biominerals have specific spectral signatures (UV-visible light, Raman) that also provide clues to their internal structures. The use of microorganisms to generate Te nanomaterials may be an alternative for bench-scale syntheses. Additionally, they may also generate products with unique properties unattainable by conventional physical/chemical methods. PMID:17277198

  5. Fate of parasites and pathogenic bacteria in an anaerobic hybrid reactor followed by downflow hanging sponge system treating domestic wastewater.

    PubMed

    Tawfik, A; El-Zamel, T; Herrawy, A; El-Taweel, G

    2015-08-01

    Treatment of domestic wastewater in a pilot-scale upflow anaerobic hybrid (AH) reactor (0.9 m(3)) in combination with downflow hanging sponge (DHS) system (1.3 m(3)) was investigated. The combined system was operated at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 6.0 h for AH and 3.2 h for DHS system. The total process achieved a substantial reduction of COD(total) resulting in an average effluent concentration of only 39 ± 12 mg/l. Moreover, 90 ± 7% of ammonia was eliminated in the DHS system. Nitrate and nitrite data revealed that 49 ± 3.2% of the ammonia removal occurred through nitrification process. The removal efficiency of total coliform (TC), fecal coliform (FC), and fecal streptococci (FS) was relatively low in the AH reactor. The major portion of TC, FC, and FS was removed in the DHS system resulting to an average count of 1.7 × 10(5) ± 1.1 × 10(2)/100 ml for TC, 7.1 × 10(4) ± 1.2 × 10(2)/100 ml for FC, and 7.5 × 10(4) ± 1.3 × 10(2)/100 ml for FS in the final effluent. Likely, the combined system was very efficient for the removal of protozoological species such as sarcodins (Entamoeba cysts), flagellates (Giardia cysts), and ciliates (Balantidium cysts). This was not the case for coccidia (Cryptosporidium oocysts), where 36.4 and 27.3% were detected in the effluent of AH and DHS system, respectively. Only 10% of intestinal nematode and cestode ova were recorded in the effluent of AH reactor and were completely removed in the DHS system.

  6. Evaluation of the use of PCR and reverse transcriptase PCR for detection of pathogenic bacteria in biosolids from anaerobic digestors and aerobic composters.

    PubMed

    Burtscher, Carola; Wuertz, Stefan

    2003-08-01

    A PCR-based method and a reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR)-based method were developed for the detection of pathogenic bacteria in organic waste, using Salmonella spp., Listeria monocytogenes, Yersinia enterocolitica, and Staphylococcus aureus as model organisms. In seeded organic waste samples, detection limits of less than 10 cells per g of organic waste were achieved after one-step enrichment of bacteria, isolation, and purification of DNA or RNA before PCR or RT-PCR amplification. To test the reproducibility and reliability of the newly developed methods, 46 unseeded samples were collected from diverse aerobic (composting) facilities and anaerobic digestors and analyzed by both culture-based classical and newly developed PCR-based procedures. No false-positive but some false-negative results were generated by the PCR- or RT-PCR-based methods after one-step enrichment when compared to the classical detection methods. The results indicated that the level of activity of the tested bacteria in unseeded samples was very low compared to that of freshly inoculated cells, preventing samples from reaching the cell density required for PCR-based detection after one-step enrichment. However, for Salmonella spp., a distinct PCR product could be obtained for all 22 nonamended samples that tested positive for Salmonella spp. by the classical detection procedure when a selective two-step enrichment (20 h in peptone water at 37 degrees C and 24 h in Rappaport Vassiliadis medium at 43 degrees C) was performed prior to nucleic acid extraction and PCR. Hence, the classical procedure was shortened, since cell plating and further differentiation of isolated colonies can be omitted, substituted for by highly sensitive and reliable detection based on nucleic acid extraction and PCR. Similarly, 2 of the 22 samples in which Salmonella spp. were detected also tested positive for Listeria monocytogenes according to a two-step enrichment procedure followed by PCR, compared to 3 samples

  7. Mono- and Dialkyl Glycerol Ether Lipids in Anaerobic Bacteria: Biosynthetic Insights from the Mesophilic Sulfate Reducer Desulfatibacillum alkenivorans PF2803T

    PubMed Central

    Mollex, Damien; Vinçon-Laugier, Arnauld; Hakil, Florence; Pacton, Muriel; Cravo-Laureau, Cristiana

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial glycerol ether lipids (alkylglycerols) have received increasing attention during the last decades, notably due to their potential role in cell resistance or adaptation to adverse environmental conditions. Major uncertainties remain, however, regarding the origin, biosynthesis, and modes of formation of these uncommon bacterial lipids. We report here the preponderance of monoalkyl- and dialkylglycerols (1-O-alkyl-, 2-O-alkyl-, and 1,2-O-dialkylglycerols) among the hydrolyzed lipids of the marine mesophilic sulfate-reducing proteobacterium Desulfatibacillum alkenivorans PF2803T grown on n-alkenes (pentadec-1-ene or hexadec-1-ene) as the sole carbon and energy source. Alkylglycerols account for one-third to two-thirds of the total cellular lipids (alkylglycerols plus acylglycerols), depending on the growth substrate, with dialkylglycerols contributing to one-fifth to two-fifths of the total ether lipids. The carbon chain distribution of the lipids of D. alkenivorans also depends on that of the substrate, but the chain length and methyl-branching patterns of fatty acids and monoalkyl- and dialkylglycerols are systematically congruent, supporting the idea of a biosynthetic link between the three classes of compounds. Vinyl ethers (1-alken-1′-yl-glycerols, known as plasmalogens) are not detected among the lipids of strain PF2803T. Cultures grown on different (per)deuterated n-alkene, n-alkanol, and n-fatty acid substrates further demonstrate that saturated alkylglycerols are not formed via the reduction of hypothetic alken-1′-yl intermediates. Our results support an unprecedented biosynthetic pathway to monoalkyl/monoacyl- and dialkylglycerols in anaerobic bacteria and suggest that n-alkyl compounds present in the environment can serve as the substrates for supplying the building blocks of ether phospholipids of heterotrophic bacteria. PMID:25724965

  8. Carbon conversion efficiency and population dynamics of a marine algae-bacteria consortium growing on simplified synthetic digestate: first step in a bioprocess coupling algal production and anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Vasseur, Christophe; Bougaran, Gaël; Garnier, Matthieu; Hamelin, Jérôme; Leboulanger, Christophe; Le Chevanton, Myriam; Mostajir, Behzad; Sialve, Bruno; Steyer, Jean-Philippe; Fouilland, Eric

    2012-09-01

    Association of microalgae culture and anaerobic digestion seems a promising technology for sustainable algal biomass and biogas production. The use of digestates for sustaining the growth of microalgae reduces the costs and the environmental impacts associated with the substantial algal nutrient requirements. A natural marine algae-bacteria consortium was selected by growing on a medium containing macro nutrients (ammonia, phosphate and acetate) specific of a digestate, and was submitted to a factorial experimental design with different levels of temperature, light and pH. The microalgal consortium reached a maximum C conversion efficiency (i.e. ratio between carbon content produced and carbon supplied through light photosynthetic C conversion and acetate) of 3.6%. The presence of bacteria increased this maximum C conversion efficiency up to 6.3%. The associated bacterial community was considered beneficial to the total biomass production by recycling the carbon lost during photosynthesis and assimilating organic by-products from anaerobic digestion. PMID:22728186

  9. Distribution of tetracycline resistance genes in anaerobic treatment of waste sludge: The role of pH in regulating tetracycline resistant bacteria and horizontal gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haining; Chen, Yinguang; Zheng, Xiong; Su, Yinglong; Wan, Rui; Yang, Shouye

    2016-10-01

    Although pH value has been widely regarded as an important factor that affects resource recovery of waste sludge, the potential influence of diverse pHs on the distribution of tetracycline resistance genes (TRGs) during sludge anaerobic treatment is largely unknown. Here we reported that in the range of pH 4-10, 0.58-1.18 log unit increase of target TRGs was observed at pH 4, compared with that at pH 7, while 0.70-1.31 log unit further removal were obtained at pH 10. Mechanism study revealed that varied pHs not only altered the community structures of tetracycline resistant bacteria (TRB), but also changed their relative abundances, benefitting the propagation (acidic pHs) or attenuation (alkaline pHs) of TRB. Further investigation indicated that the amount and gene-possessing abilities of key genetic vectors for horizontal TRGs transfer were greatly promoted at acidic pHs but restricted under alkaline conditions. PMID:27485281

  10. Influence of an aerobic fungus grown on solid culture on ruminal degradability and on a mixture culture of anaerobic cellulolytic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Díaz, R; Pimentel-González, D J; Figueira, A C; Viniegra-González, G; Campos-Montiel, R G

    2010-06-01

    In this work, the effect of a solid fungal culture of Aspergillus niger (An) grown on coffee pulp on the in situ ruminal degradability (RD) of corn stover was evaluated. In addition, the effect of its extracts on the in vitro dry matter disappearance (IVDMD) and on a mixed culture of anaerobic cellulolytic bacteria (MCACB) was also investigated. The solid ferment was a crude culture of An, grown on coffee pulp. Regarding in situ RD, a significant difference (p < 0.05) was found between treatment with 200 g/day of the solid culture and control (no solid culture added) on dry matter, crude protein and neutral detergent fibre on RD. All the water extracts (pH 4, 7 and 10) enhanced IVDMD and stimulated the cellulolytic activity on a MCACB. Ultrafiltration results showed that active compounds with a molecular weight lower than 30 kDa were responsible for the effect on MCACB. Such results suggest that the effects of the solid An culture in RD are related to the presence of water soluble compounds having a molecular weight lower than 30 kDa.

  11. Removal of sulfate and heavy metals by sulfate reducing bacteria in short-term bench scale upflow anaerobic packed bed reactor runs.

    PubMed

    Jong, Tony; Parry, David L

    2003-08-01

    Mildly acidic metal (Cu, Zn, Ni, Fe, Al and Mg), arsenic and sulfate contaminated waters were treated, over a 14 day period at 25 degrees C, in a bench-scale upflow anaerobic packed bed reactor filled with silica sand and employing a mixed population of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). The activity of SRB increased the water pH from approximately 4.5 to 7.0, and enhanced the removal of sulfate and metals in comparison to controls not inoculated with SRB. Addition of organic substrate and sulfate at loading rates of 7.43 and 3.71 kg d(-1) m(-3), respectively, resulted in >82% reduction in sulfate concentration. The reactor removed more than 97.5% of the initial concentrations of Cu, Zn and Ni, while only >77.5% and >82% of As and Fe were removed, respectively. In contrast, Mg and Al levels remained unchanged during the whole treatment process. The removal patterns for Cu, Zn, Ni and Fe reflected the trend in their solubility for their respective metal sulfides, while As removal appeared to coincide with decreasing Cu, Zn, Ni and Fe concentrations, which suggests adsorption or concomitant precipitation with the other metal sulfides. PMID:12834731

  12. Predatory prokaryotes: predation and primary consumption evolved in bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guerrero, R.; Pedros-Alio, C.; Esteve, I.; Mas, J.; Chase, D.; Margulis, L.

    1986-01-01

    Two kinds of predatory bacteria have been observed and characterized by light and electron microscopy in samples from freshwater sulfurous lakes in northeastern Spain. The first bacterium, named Vampirococcus, is Gram-negative and ovoidal (0.6 micrometer wide). An anaerobic epibiont, it adheres to the surface of phototrophic bacteria (Chromatium spp.) by specific attachment structures and, as it grows and divides by fission, destroys its prey. An important in situ predatory role can be inferred for Vampirococcus from direct counts in natural samples. The second bacterium, named Daptobacter, is a Gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic straight rod (0.5 x 1.5 micrometers) with a single polar flagellum, which collides, penetrates, and grows inside the cytoplasm of its prey (several genera of Chromatiaceae). Considering also the well-known case of Bdellovibrio, a Gram-negative, aerobic curved rod that penetrates and divides in the periplasmic space of many chemotrophic Gram-negative bacteria, there are three types of predatory prokaryotes presently known (epibiotic, cytoplasmic, and periplasmic). Thus, we conclude that antagonistic relationships such as primary consumption, predation, and scavenging had already evolved in microbial ecosystems prior to the appearance of eukaryotes. Furthermore, because they represent methods by which prokaryotes can penetrate other prokaryotes in the absence of phagocytosis, these associations can be considered preadaptation for the origin of intracellular organelles.

  13. Predatory prokaryotes: Predation and primary consumption evolved in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Ricardo; Pedrós-Alió, Carlos; Esteve, Isabel; Mas, Jordi; Chase, David; Margulis, Lynn

    1986-01-01

    Two kinds of predatory bacteria have been observed and characterized by light and electron microscopy in samples from freshwater sulfurous lakes in northeastern Spain. The first bacterium, named Vampirococcus, is Gram-negative and ovoidal (0.6 μm wide). An anaerobic epibiont, it adheres to the surface of phototrophic bacteria (Chromatium spp.) by specific attachment structures and, as it grows and divides by fission, destroys its prey. An important in situ predatory role can be inferred for Vampirococcus from direct counts in natural samples. The second bacterium, named Daptobacter, is a Gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic straight rod (0.5 × 1.5 μm) with a single polar flagellum, which collides, penetrates, and grows inside the cytoplasm of its prey (several genera of Chromatiaceae). Considering also the well-known case of Bdellovibrio, a Gram-negative, aerobic curved rod that penetrates and divides in the periplasmic space of many chemotrophic Gram-negative bacteria, there are three types of predatory prokaryotes presently known (epibiotic, cytoplasmic, and periplasmic). Thus, we conclude that antagonistic relationships such as primary consumption, predation, and scavenging had already evolved in microbial ecosystems prior to the appearance of eukaryotes. Furthermore, because they represent methods by which prokaryotes can penetrate other prokaryotes in the absence of phagocytosis, these associations can be considered preadaptations for the origin of intracellular organelles. Images PMID:11542073

  14. Genome-scale analysis of anaerobic benzoate and phenol metabolism in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Ferroglobus placidus

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Dawn E; Risso, Carla; Smith, Jessica A; Lovley, Derek R

    2012-01-01

    Insight into the mechanisms for the anaerobic metabolism of aromatic compounds by the hyperthermophilic archaeon Ferroglobus placidus is expected to improve understanding of the degradation of aromatics in hot (>80° C) environments and to identify enzymes that might have biotechnological applications. Analysis of the F. placidus genome revealed genes predicted to encode enzymes homologous to those previously identified as having a role in benzoate and phenol metabolism in mesophilic bacteria. Surprisingly, F. placidus lacks genes for an ATP-independent class II benzoyl-CoA (coenzyme A) reductase (BCR) found in all strictly anaerobic bacteria, but has instead genes coding for a bzd-type ATP-consuming class I BCR, similar to those found in facultative bacteria. The lower portion of the benzoate degradation pathway appears to be more similar to that found in the phototroph Rhodopseudomonas palustris, than the pathway reported for all heterotrophic anaerobic benzoate degraders. Many of the genes predicted to be involved in benzoate metabolism were found in one of two gene clusters. Genes for phenol carboxylation proceeding through a phenylphosphate intermediate were identified in a single gene cluster. Analysis of transcript abundance with a whole-genome microarray and quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction demonstrated that most of the genes predicted to be involved in benzoate or phenol metabolism had higher transcript abundance during growth on those substrates vs growth on acetate. These results suggest that the general strategies for benzoate and phenol metabolism are highly conserved between microorganisms living in moderate and hot environments, and that anaerobic metabolism of aromatic compounds might be analyzed in a wide range of environments with similar molecular targets. PMID:21776029

  15. Facultative anoxygenic photosynthesis in cyanobacteria driven by arsenite and sulfide with evidence for the support of nitrogen fixation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe-Simon, F.; Hoeft, S. E.; Baesman, S. M.; Oremland, R. S.

    2010-12-01

    The rise in atmospheric oxygen (O2) over geologic time is attributed to the evolution and widespread proliferation of oxygenic photosynthesis in cyanobacteria. However, cyanobacteria maintain a metabolic flexibility that may not always result in O2 release. In the environment, cyanobacteria may use a variety of alternative electron donors rather than water that are known to be used by other anoxygenic phototrophs (eg. purple sulfur bacteria) including reduced forms of sulfur, iron, nitrogen, and arsenic. Recent evidence suggests cyanobacteria actively take advantage of at least a few of these alternatives. We used a classical Winogradsky approach to enrich for cyanobacteria from the high salinity, elevated pH and arsenic-enriched waters of Mono Lake (CA). Experiments, optimized for cyanobacteria, revealed light-dependent, anaerobic arsenite-oxidation in sub-cultured sediment-free enrichments dominated by a filamentous cyanobacteria. We isolated and identified the dominant member of this enrichment to be a member of the Oscillatoriales by 16S rDNA. Addition of 1 mM arsenite induced facultative anoxygenic photosynthesis under continuous and circadian light. This isolate also oxidized sulfide under the same light-based conditions. Aerobic conditions elicited no arsenite oxidation in the light or dark and the isolate grew as a typical cyanobacterium using oxygenic photosynthesis. Under near-infrared light (700 nm) there was a direct correlation of enhanced growth with an increase in the rate arsenite or sulfide oxidation suggesting the use of photosystem I. Additionally, to test the wide-spread nature of this metabolism in the Oscillatoriales, we followed similar arsenite- and sulfide-driven facultative anoxygenic photosynthesis as well as nitrogen fixation (C2H2 reduction) in the axenic isolate Oscillatoria sp. CCMP 1731. Future characterization includes axenic isolation of the Mono Lake Oscillatoria sp. as well as the arsenite oxidase responsible for electron

  16. Back to the Future: Are Tumor-Targeting Bacteria the Next-Generation Cancer Therapy?

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    Cancer patients infected with various bacteria were reported, for at least two centuries, to have spontaneous remission. W.B. Coley, of what is now the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, pioneered bacterial therapy of cancer in the clinic with considerable success beginning in the late nineteenth century. After Coley died in 1936, bacterial therapy of cancer essentially ended. Currently there is much excitement in developing bacterial therapy for treating cancer using either obligate or facultative anaerobic bacteria. This chapter will demonstrate the potential and strategy of Salmonella typhimurium A1-R, an engineered tumor-targeting variant for the systemic treatment of metastatic cancer. A new concept using Salmonella typhimurium A1-R for cell cycle "decoy" chemotherapy of metastatic cancer is also described.

  17. Denitrification by extremely halophilic bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, L. I.; Tomlinson, G. A.

    1985-01-01

    Extremely halophilic bacteria were isolated from widely separated sites by anaerobic enrichment in the presence of nitrate. The anaerobic growth of several of these isolates was accompanied by the production of nitrite, nitrous oxide, and dinitrogen. These results are a direct confirmation of the existence of extremely halophilic denitrifying bacteria, and suggest that such bacteria may be common inhabitants of hypersaline environments.

  18. Worldwide populations of APHIS CRACCIVORA have diverse facultative bacterial symbionts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Facultative bacterial endosymbionts can play an important role in the evolutionary trajectory of their hosts. Aphids are infected with a wide variety of facultative endosymbionts that can confer ecologically relevant traits, which in turn may drive microevolution in a dynamic selective environment....

  19. Obligate anaerobes in clinical veterinary practice.

    PubMed Central

    Hirsh, D C; Biberstein, E L; Jang, S S

    1979-01-01

    Clinical specimens obtained from domestic animals were examined to determine the relative prevalence of obligate anaerobic bacteria and the species represented. Of 3,167 samples cultured anaerobically as well as aerobically, 2,234 were bacteriologically positive. Of these positive samples, 583 (26%) contained species of obligate anaerobic bacteria in a total of 641 isolates. Most positive samples contained anaerobes admixed with aerobic species, although 6% of such samples yielded pure cultures of obligate anaerobes. The most common sites from which anaerobes were isolated were abscesses (32% of abscesses cultured contained species of obligate anaerobes), peritoneal exudates (24%), and pleural effusions (20%). Bacteroides melaninogenicus, Bacteroides spp., Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, and Bacteroides ruminicola accounted in the aggregate for approximately 50% of all anaerobic isolates. Bacteroides fragilis accounted for 1% of all the isolates, and members of the genus Clostridium accounted for 8%. PMID:511987

  20. Phenotypic study of bacteria associated with the caribbean sclerosponge, Ceratoporella nicholsoni.

    PubMed Central

    Santavy, D L; Willenz, P; Colwell, R R

    1990-01-01

    Heterotrophic bacteria associated with the Caribbean sclerosponge, Ceratoporella nicholsoni (Hickson), were found to occur extracellularly and were confined to the mesohyl regions of the sponge tissue. Physiological, metabolic, and morphological attributes of the culturable bacteria associated with the sponge were recorded by using numerical taxonomy methods for the analysis of 158 phenotypic attributes. Morphometric methods were used to determine the proportion of the total sponge-associated bacteria that were culturable by the methods employed, with the results ranging from 3 to 11% of the total bacteria inhabiting the sponge. Approximately 78% of the culturable bacteria clustered into four groups or phena, representing two previously undescribed Vibrio spp., an Aeromonas sp., and a coryneform- or actinomycete-like sp. Most of the bacteria were facultative anaerobes, fermenting sucrose and fucose but unusual in an inability to ferment glucose. This study was the first comprehensive study of heterotrophic bacteria associated with a sponge from the Caribbean basin, a region reputed to contain the most prolific sponge populations, with respect to biomass and diversity. The possible significance of these associations is discussed. Images PMID:2383012

  1. Could petroleum biodegradation be a joint achievement of aerobic and anaerobic microrganisms in deep sea reservoirs?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Several studies suggest that petroleum biodegradation can be achieved by either aerobic or anaerobic microorganisms, depending on oxygen input or other electron acceptors and appropriate nutrients. Evidence from in vitro experiments with samples of petroleum formation water and oils from Pampo Field indicate that petroleum biodegradation is more likely to be a joint achievement of both aerobic and anaerobic bacterial consortium, refining our previous observations of aerobic degradation. The aerobic consortium depleted, in decreasing order, hydrocarbons > hopanes > steranes > tricyclic terpanes while the anaerobic consortium depleted hydrocarbons > steranes > hopanes > tricyclic terpanes. The oxygen content of the mixed consortia was measured from time to time revealing alternating periods of microaerobicity (O2 ~0.8 mg.L-1) and of aerobicity (O2~6.0 mg.L-1). In this experiment, the petroleum biodegradation changed from time to time, alternating periods of biodegradation similar to the aerobic process and periods of biodegradation similar to the anaerobic process. The consortia showed preferences for metabolizing hydrocarbons > hopanes > steranes > tricyclic terpanes during a 90-day period, after which this trend changed and steranes were more biodegraded than hopanes. The analysis of aerobic oil degrading microbiota by the 16S rRNA gene clone library detected the presence of Bacillus, Brevibacterium, Mesorhizobium and Achromobacter, and the analysis of the anaerobic oil degrading microbiota using the same technique detected the presence of Bacillus and Acinetobacter (facultative strains). In the mixed consortia Stenotrophomonas, Brevibacterium, Bacillus, Rhizobium, Achromobacter and 5% uncultured bacteria were detected. This is certainly a new contribution to the study of reservoir biodegradation processes, combining two of the more important accepted hypotheses. PMID:22196374

  2. Could petroleum biodegradation be a joint achievement of aerobic and anaerobic microrganisms in deep sea reservoirs?

    PubMed

    da Cruz, Georgiana F; de Vasconcellos, Suzan P; Angolini, Célio Ff; Dellagnezze, Bruna M; Garcia, Isabel Ns; de Oliveira, Valéria M; Dos Santos Neto, Eugenio V; Marsaioli, Anita J

    2011-12-23

    Several studies suggest that petroleum biodegradation can be achieved by either aerobic or anaerobic microorganisms, depending on oxygen input or other electron acceptors and appropriate nutrients. Evidence from in vitro experiments with samples of petroleum formation water and oils from Pampo Field indicate that petroleum biodegradation is more likely to be a joint achievement of both aerobic and anaerobic bacterial consortium, refining our previous observations of aerobic degradation. The aerobic consortium depleted, in decreasing order, hydrocarbons > hopanes > steranes > tricyclic terpanes while the anaerobic consortium depleted hydrocarbons > steranes > hopanes > tricyclic terpanes. The oxygen content of the mixed consortia was measured from time to time revealing alternating periods of microaerobicity (O2 ~0.8 mg.L-1) and of aerobicity (O2~6.0 mg.L-1). In this experiment, the petroleum biodegradation changed from time to time, alternating periods of biodegradation similar to the aerobic process and periods of biodegradation similar to the anaerobic process. The consortia showed preferences for metabolizing hydrocarbons > hopanes > steranes > tricyclic terpanes during a 90-day period, after which this trend changed and steranes were more biodegraded than hopanes. The analysis of aerobic oil degrading microbiota by the 16S rRNA gene clone library detected the presence of Bacillus, Brevibacterium, Mesorhizobium and Achromobacter, and the analysis of the anaerobic oil degrading microbiota using the same technique detected the presence of Bacillus and Acinetobacter (facultative strains). In the mixed consortia Stenotrophomonas, Brevibacterium, Bacillus, Rhizobium, Achromobacter and 5% uncultured bacteria were detected. This is certainly a new contribution to the study of reservoir biodegradation processes, combining two of the more important accepted hypotheses.

  3. Endozoicomonas Are Specific, Facultative Symbionts of Sea Squirts.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Lars; Kjeldsen, Kasper U; Funch, Peter; Jensen, Jeppe; Obst, Matthias; López-Legentil, Susanna; Schramm, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Ascidians are marine filter feeders and harbor diverse microbiota that can exhibit a high degree of host-specificity. Pharyngeal samples of Scandinavian and Mediterranean ascidians were screened for consistently associated bacteria by culture-dependent and -independent approaches. Representatives of the Endozoicomonas (Gammaproteobacteria, Hahellaceae) clade were detected in the ascidian species Ascidiella aspersa, Ascidiella scabra, Botryllus schlosseri, Ciona intestinalis, Styela clava, and multiple Ascidia/Ascidiella spp. In total, Endozoicomonas was detected in more than half of all specimens screened, and in 25-100% of the specimens for each species. The retrieved Endozoicomonas 16S rRNA gene sequences formed an ascidian-specific subclade, whose members were detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) as extracellular microcolonies in the pharynx. Two strains of the ascidian-specific Endozoicomonas subclade were isolated in pure culture and characterized. Both strains are chemoorganoheterotrophs and grow on mucin (a mucus glycoprotein). The strains tested negative for cytotoxic or antibacterial activity. Based on these observations, we propose ascidian-associated Endozoicomonas to be commensals, living off the mucus continuously secreted into the pharynx. Members of the ascidian-specific Endozoicomonas subclade were also detected in seawater from the Scandinavian sampling site, which suggests acquisition of the symbionts by horizontal transmission. The combined results indicate a host-specific, yet facultative symbiosis between ascidians and Endozoicomonas. PMID:27462299

  4. Endozoicomonas Are Specific, Facultative Symbionts of Sea Squirts

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Lars; Kjeldsen, Kasper U.; Funch, Peter; Jensen, Jeppe; Obst, Matthias; López-Legentil, Susanna; Schramm, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Ascidians are marine filter feeders and harbor diverse microbiota that can exhibit a high degree of host-specificity. Pharyngeal samples of Scandinavian and Mediterranean ascidians were screened for consistently associated bacteria by culture-dependent and -independent approaches. Representatives of the Endozoicomonas (Gammaproteobacteria, Hahellaceae) clade were detected in the ascidian species Ascidiella aspersa, Ascidiella scabra, Botryllus schlosseri, Ciona intestinalis, Styela clava, and multiple Ascidia/Ascidiella spp. In total, Endozoicomonas was detected in more than half of all specimens screened, and in 25–100% of the specimens for each species. The retrieved Endozoicomonas 16S rRNA gene sequences formed an ascidian-specific subclade, whose members were detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) as extracellular microcolonies in the pharynx. Two strains of the ascidian-specific Endozoicomonas subclade were isolated in pure culture and characterized. Both strains are chemoorganoheterotrophs and grow on mucin (a mucus glycoprotein). The strains tested negative for cytotoxic or antibacterial activity. Based on these observations, we propose ascidian-associated Endozoicomonas to be commensals, living off the mucus continuously secreted into the pharynx. Members of the ascidian-specific Endozoicomonas subclade were also detected in seawater from the Scandinavian sampling site, which suggests acquisition of the symbionts by horizontal transmission. The combined results indicate a host-specific, yet facultative symbiosis between ascidians and Endozoicomonas. PMID:27462299

  5. Engineering an anaerobic metabolic regime in Pseudomonas putida KT2440 for the anoxic biodegradation of 1,3-dichloroprop-1-ene.

    PubMed

    Nikel, Pablo I; de Lorenzo, Víctor

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida KT2440, a microbial cell factory of reference for industrial whole-cell biocatalysis, is unable to support biochemical reactions that occur under anoxic conditions, limiting its utility for a large number of relevant biotransformations. Unlike (facultative) anaerobes, P. putida resorts to NADH oxidation via an oxic respiratory chain and completely lacks a true fermentation metabolism. Therefore, it cannot achieve the correct balances of energy and redox couples (i.e., ATP/ADP and NADH/NAD(+)) that are required to sustain an O(2)-free lifestyle. To overcome this state of affairs, the acetate kinase (ackA) gene of the facultative anaerobe Escherichia coli and the pyruvate decarboxylase (pdc) and alcohol dehydrogenase II (adhB) genes of the aerotolerant Zymomonas mobilis were knocked-in to a wild-type P. putida strain. Biochemical and genetic assays showed that conditional expression of the entire enzyme set allowed the engineered bacteria to adopt an anoxic regime that maintained considerable metabolic activity. The resulting strain was exploited as a host for the heterologous expression of a 1,3-dichloroprop-1-ene degradation pathway recruited from Pseudomonas pavonaceae 170, enabling the recombinants to degrade this recalcitrant chlorinated compound anoxically. These results underscore the value of P. putida as a versatile agent for biotransformations able to function at progressively lower redox statuses.

  6. Anaerobic Thermophiles

    PubMed Central

    Canganella, Francesco; Wiegel, Juergen

    2014-01-01

    The term “extremophile” was introduced to describe any organism capable of living and growing under extreme conditions. With the further development of studies on microbial ecology and taxonomy, a variety of “extreme” environments have been found and an increasing number of extremophiles are being described. Extremophiles have also been investigated as far as regarding the search for life on other planets and even evaluating the hypothesis that life on Earth originally came from space. The first extreme environments to be largely investigated were those characterized by elevated temperatures. The naturally “hot environments” on Earth range from solar heated surface soils and water with temperatures up to 65 °C, subterranean sites such as oil reserves and terrestrial geothermal with temperatures ranging from slightly above ambient to above 100 °C, to submarine hydrothermal systems with temperatures exceeding 300 °C. There are also human-made environments with elevated temperatures such as compost piles, slag heaps, industrial processes and water heaters. Thermophilic anaerobic microorganisms have been known for a long time, but scientists have often resisted the belief that some organisms do not only survive at high temperatures, but actually thrive under those hot conditions. They are perhaps one of the most interesting varieties of extremophilic organisms. These microorganisms can thrive at temperatures over 50 °C and, based on their optimal temperature, anaerobic thermophiles can be subdivided into three main groups: thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 50 °C and 64 °C and a maximum at 70 °C, extreme thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 65 °C and 80 °C, and finally hyperthermophiles with an optimal temperature above 80 °C and a maximum above 90 °C. The finding of novel extremely thermophilic and hyperthermophilic anaerobic bacteria in recent years, and the fact that a large fraction of them belong to the Archaea has

  7. Evolution of N-converting bacteria during the start-up of anaerobic digestion coupled biological nitrogen removal pilot-scale bioreactors treating high-strength animal waste slurry.

    PubMed

    Anceno, Alfredo J; Rouseau, Pierre; Béline, Fabrice; Shipin, Oleg V; Dabert, Patrick

    2009-07-01

    Animal wastes have been successfully employed in anaerobic biogas production, viewed as a pragmatic approach to rationalize energy costs in animal farms. Effluents resulting from that process however are still high in nitrogen such that attempts were made to couple biological nitrogen removal (BNR) with anaerobic digestion (AD). The demand for organic substrate in such system is partitioned between the anaerobic metabolism in AD and the heterotrophic denitrification cascade following the autotrophic nitrification in BNR. Investigation of underlying N-converting taxa with respect to process conditions is therefore critical in optimizing N-removal in such treatment system. In this study, a pilot-scale intermittently aerated BNR bioreactor was started up either independently or in series with the AD bioreactor to treat high-strength swine waste slurry. The compositions of NH(3)-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), NO(2)(-)-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) and denitrifiers (nosZ gene) were profiled by polymerase chain reaction-capillary electrophoresis/single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-CE/SSCP) technique and clone library analysis. Performance data suggested that these two process configurations significantly differ in the modes of biological N-removal. PCR-CE/SSCP based profiling of the underlying nitrifying bacteria also revealed the selection of distinct taxa between process configurations. Under the investigated process conditions, correlation of performance data and composition of underlying nitrifiers suggest that the stand-alone BNR bioreactor tended to favor N-removal via NO(3)(-) whereas the coupled bioreactors could be optimized to achieve the same via a NO(2)(-) shortcut.

  8. Oribacterium parvum sp. nov. and Oribacterium asaccharolyticum sp. nov., obligately anaerobic bacteria from the human oral cavity, and emended description of the genus Oribacterium.

    PubMed

    Sizova, Maria V; Muller, Paul A; Stancyk, David; Panikov, Nicolai S; Mandalakis, Manolis; Hazen, Amanda; Hohmann, Tine; Doerfert, Sebastian N; Fowle, William; Earl, Ashlee M; Nelson, Karen E; Epstein, Slava S

    2014-08-01

    Three strictly anaerobic, Gram-positive, non-spore-forming, rod-shaped, motile bacteria, designated strains ACB1(T), ACB7(T) and ACB8, were isolated from human subgingival dental plaque. All strains required yeast extract for growth. Strains ACB1(T) and ACB8 were able to grow on glucose, lactose, maltose, maltodextrin and raffinose; strain ACB7(T) grew weakly on sucrose only. The growth temperature range was 30-42 °C with optimum growth at 37 °C. Major metabolic fermentation end products of strain ACB1(T) were acetate and lactate; the only product of strains ACB7(T) and ACB8 was acetate. Major fatty acids of strain ACB1(T) were C(14 : 0), C(16 : 0), C(16 : 1)ω7c dimethyl aldehyde (DMA) and C(18 : 1)ω7c DMA. Major fatty acids of strain ACB7(T) were C(12 : 0), C(14 : 0), C(16 : 0), C(16 : 1)ω7c and C(16 : 1)ω7c DMA. The hydrolysate of the peptidoglycan contained meso-diaminopimelic acid, indicating peptidoglycan type A1γ. Genomic DNA G+C content varied from 42 to 43.3% between strains. According to 16S rRNA gene sequence phylogeny, strains ACB1(T), ACB8 and ACB7(T) formed two separate branches within the genus Oribacterium, with 98.1-98.6% sequence similarity to the type strain of the type species, Oribacterium sinus. Predicted DNA-DNA hybridization values between strains ACB1(T), ACB8, ACB7(T) and O. sinus F0268 were <70%. Based on distinct genotypic and phenotypic characteristics, strains ACB1(T) and ACB8, and strain ACB7(T) are considered to represent two distinct species of the genus Oribacterium, for which the names Oribacterium parvum sp. nov. and Oribacterium asaccharolyticum sp. nov. are proposed. The type strains are ACB1(T) ( = DSM 24637(T) = HM-481(T) = ATCC BAA-2638(T)) and ACB7(T) ( = DSM 24638(T) = HM-482(T) = ATCC BAA-2639(T)), respectively.

  9. The effects of stress hormones on growth of selected periodontitis related bacteria.

    PubMed

    Jentsch, H F R; März, Diana; Krüger, Monika

    2013-12-01

    The focus of this study was to examine in vitro the effects of stress hormones (catecholamines: epinephrine, norepinephrine, dopamine and hydrocortisone: cortisol) on the growth of four anaerobic species of periodontitis-related bacteria (Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia and Tannerella forsythia) and one facultative anaerobic species (Eikenella corrodens). Bacterial growth was determined by two different methods: fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and the viable count by culture method. To simulate stress, each single strain was grown in a special growth medium with three different concentrations of each hormone, using an anaerobic chamber at 37 °C. Growth of F. nucleatum increased in the presence of all stress hormones. Growth of P. gingivalis was not significantly influenced by any hormone. Growth of P. intermedia and E. corrodens was inhibited by almost all stress hormones tested. Both methods of analysis revealed that the highest concentrations of norepinephrine and cortisol increased the growth of T. forsythia. Different hormones have a different effect on the growth of periodontitis-related bacteria in vitro. It appears that bacterial viability is more strongly influenced than is bacterial metabolic activity. The growth of F. nucleatum particularly and partially of T. forsythia is increased by several stress hormones and may have an additional negative impact on periodontal disease.

  10. Anaerobic prosthetic joint infection.

    PubMed

    Shah, Neel B; Tande, Aaron J; Patel, Robin; Berbari, Elie F

    2015-12-01

    In an effort to improve mobility and alleviate pain from degenerative and connective tissue joint disease, an increasing number of individuals are undergoing prosthetic joint replacement in the United States. Joint replacement is a highly effective intervention, resulting in improved quality of life and increased independence [1]. By 2030, it is predicted that approximately 4 million total hip and knee arthroplasties will be performed yearly in the United States [2]. One of the major complications associated with this procedure is prosthetic joint infection (PJI), occurring at a rate of 1-2% [3-7]. In 2011, the Musculoskeletal Infectious Society created a unifying definition for prosthetic joint infection [8]. The following year, the Infectious Disease Society of America published practice guidelines that focused on the diagnosis and management of PJI. These guidelines focused on the management of commonly encountered organisms associated with PJI, including staphylococci, streptococci and select aerobic Gram-negative bacteria. However, with the exception of Propionibacterium acnes, management of other anaerobic organisms was not addressed in these guidelines [1]. Although making up approximately 3-6% of PJI [9,10], anaerobic microorganisms cause devastating complications, and similar to the more common organisms associated with PJI, these bacteria also result in significant morbidity, poor outcomes and increased health-care costs. Data on diagnosis and management of anaerobic PJI is mostly derived from case reports, along with a few cohort studies [3]. There is a paucity of published data outlining factors associated with risks, diagnosis and management of anaerobic PJI. We therefore reviewed available literature on anaerobic PJI by systematically searching the PubMed database, and collected data from secondary searches to determine information on pathogenesis, demographic data, clinical features, diagnosis and management. We focused our search on five commonly

  11. Genome characteristics of facultatively symbiotic Frankia sp. strains reflect host range and host plant biogeography.

    PubMed

    Normand, Philippe; Lapierre, Pascal; Tisa, Louis S; Gogarten, Johann Peter; Alloisio, Nicole; Bagnarol, Emilie; Bassi, Carla A; Berry, Alison M; Bickhart, Derek M; Choisne, Nathalie; Couloux, Arnaud; Cournoyer, Benoit; Cruveiller, Stephane; Daubin, Vincent; Demange, Nadia; Francino, Maria Pilar; Goltsman, Eugene; Huang, Ying; Kopp, Olga R; Labarre, Laurent; Lapidus, Alla; Lavire, Celine; Marechal, Joelle; Martinez, Michele; Mastronunzio, Juliana E; Mullin, Beth C; Niemann, James; Pujic, Pierre; Rawnsley, Tania; Rouy, Zoe; Schenowitz, Chantal; Sellstedt, Anita; Tavares, Fernando; Tomkins, Jeffrey P; Vallenet, David; Valverde, Claudio; Wall, Luis G; Wang, Ying; Medigue, Claudine; Benson, David R

    2007-01-01

    Soil bacteria that also form mutualistic symbioses in plants encounter two major levels of selection. One occurs during adaptation to and survival in soil, and the other occurs in concert with host plant speciation and adaptation. Actinobacteria from the genus Frankia are facultative symbionts that form N(2)-fixing root nodules on diverse and globally distributed angiosperms in the "actinorhizal" symbioses. Three closely related clades of Frankia sp. strains are recognized; members of each clade infect a subset of plants from among eight angiosperm families. We sequenced the genomes from three strains; their sizes varied from 5.43 Mbp for a narrow host range strain (Frankia sp. strain HFPCcI3) to 7.50 Mbp for a medium host range strain (Frankia alni strain ACN14a) to 9.04 Mbp for a broad host range strain (Frankia sp. strain EAN1pec.) This size divergence is the largest yet reported for such closely related soil bacteria (97.8%-98.9% identity of 16S rRNA genes). The extent of gene deletion, duplication, and acquisition is in concert with the biogeographic history of the symbioses and host plant speciation. Host plant isolation favored genome contraction, whereas host plant diversification favored genome expansion. The results support the idea that major genome expansions as well as reductions can occur in facultative symbiotic soil bacteria as they respond to new environments in the context of their symbioses. PMID:17151343

  12. Occurrence and diversity of nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation bacteria in the sediments of the South China Sea revealed by amplification of both 16S rRNA and pmoA genes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Zhou, Zhi-Chao; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2014-06-01

    Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (n-damo) process is unique in linking the microbial carbon and nitrogen cycles, but the presence of n-damo bacteria in marine ecosystem and the associated environmental factors are still poorly understood. In the present study, detection of n-damo bacteria using 16S rRNA and pmoA gene-based PCR primers was successfully employed to reveal their diversity and distribution in the surface and subsurface sediments of the South China Sea (SCS). The widespread occurrence of n-damo bacteria in both the surface and subsurface sediments with high diversity has been confirmed in this study. The pmoA gene-amplified sequences clustered within three newly erected subclusters, namely SCS-1, SCS-2, and SCS-3, suggesting the unique niche specificity of n-damo bacteria in the marine ecosystem. Results indicated the presence of n-damo bacteria in the west Pacific Ocean with a wide distribution from the continental shelf (E201S) to the deep abyss (E407S and E407B). Community structures of n-damo bacteria in SCS are clearly different from those of nonmarine ones known. It is also found that NO x (-) and NH4 (+) affected the community structures and distribution of n-damo bacteria in the SCS sediments differently. Salinity is another important factor identified, shaping the n-damo communities in marine environments. The community based on pmoA gene-amplified sequences, and community richness and diversity based on 16S rRNA gene-amplified sequences correlated with temperature. PMID:24769903

  13. Occurrence and diversity of nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation bacteria in the sediments of the South China Sea revealed by amplification of both 16S rRNA and pmoA genes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Zhou, Zhi-Chao; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2014-06-01

    Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (n-damo) process is unique in linking the microbial carbon and nitrogen cycles, but the presence of n-damo bacteria in marine ecosystem and the associated environmental factors are still poorly understood. In the present study, detection of n-damo bacteria using 16S rRNA and pmoA gene-based PCR primers was successfully employed to reveal their diversity and distribution in the surface and subsurface sediments of the South China Sea (SCS). The widespread occurrence of n-damo bacteria in both the surface and subsurface sediments with high diversity has been confirmed in this study. The pmoA gene-amplified sequences clustered within three newly erected subclusters, namely SCS-1, SCS-2, and SCS-3, suggesting the unique niche specificity of n-damo bacteria in the marine ecosystem. Results indicated the presence of n-damo bacteria in the west Pacific Ocean with a wide distribution from the continental shelf (E201S) to the deep abyss (E407S and E407B). Community structures of n-damo bacteria in SCS are clearly different from those of nonmarine ones known. It is also found that NO x (-) and NH4 (+) affected the community structures and distribution of n-damo bacteria in the SCS sediments differently. Salinity is another important factor identified, shaping the n-damo communities in marine environments. The community based on pmoA gene-amplified sequences, and community richness and diversity based on 16S rRNA gene-amplified sequences correlated with temperature.

  14. Facultative parthenogenesis discovered in wild vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Warren; Smith, Charles F.; Eskridge, Pamela H.; Hoss, Shannon K.; Mendelson, Joseph R.; Schuett, Gordon W.

    2012-01-01

    Facultative parthenogenesis (FP)—asexual reproduction by bisexual species—has been documented in a variety of multi-cellular organisms but only recently in snakes, varanid lizards, birds and sharks. Unlike the approximately 80 taxa of unisexual reptiles, amphibians and fishes that exist in nature, FP has yet to be documented in the wild. Based on captive documentation, it appears that FP is widespread in squamate reptiles (snakes, lizards and amphisbaenians), and its occurrence in nature seems inevitable, yet the task of detecting FP in wild individuals has been deemed formidable. Here we show, using microsatellite DNA genotyping and litter characteristics, the first cases of FP in wild-collected pregnant females and their offspring of two closely related species of North American pitviper snakes—the copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix) and cottonmouth (Agkistrodon piscivorus). Our findings support the view that non-hybrid origins of parthenogenesis, such as FP, are more common in squamates than previously thought. With this confirmation, FP can no longer be viewed as a rare curiosity outside the mainstream of vertebrate evolution. Future research on FP in squamate reptiles related to proximate control of induction, reproductive competence of parthenogens and population genetics modelling is warranted. PMID:22977071

  15. Facultative parthenogenesis discovered in wild vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Booth, Warren; Smith, Charles F; Eskridge, Pamela H; Hoss, Shannon K; Mendelson, Joseph R; Schuett, Gordon W

    2012-12-23

    Facultative parthenogenesis (FP)-asexual reproduction by bisexual species-has been documented in a variety of multi-cellular organisms but only recently in snakes, varanid lizards, birds and sharks. Unlike the approximately 80 taxa of unisexual reptiles, amphibians and fishes that exist in nature, FP has yet to be documented in the wild. Based on captive documentation, it appears that FP is widespread in squamate reptiles (snakes, lizards and amphisbaenians), and its occurrence in nature seems inevitable, yet the task of detecting FP in wild individuals has been deemed formidable. Here we show, using microsatellite DNA genotyping and litter characteristics, the first cases of FP in wild-collected pregnant females and their offspring of two closely related species of North American pitviper snakes-the copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix) and cottonmouth (Agkistrodon piscivorus). Our findings support the view that non-hybrid origins of parthenogenesis, such as FP, are more common in squamates than previously thought. With this confirmation, FP can no longer be viewed as a rare curiosity outside the mainstream of vertebrate evolution. Future research on FP in squamate reptiles related to proximate control of induction, reproductive competence of parthenogens and population genetics modelling is warranted. PMID:22977071

  16. Reduction and immobilization of radionuclides and toxic metal ions using combined zero valent iron and anaerobic bacteria. Year one technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Weathers, L.J.; Katz, L.E.

    1997-10-01

    'The objective of this project is to design a combined abiotic/microbial, reactive, permeable, in-situ barrier with sufficient reductive potential to prevent downgradient migration of toxic metal ions. The field-scale application of this technology would utilize anaerobic digester sludge, Fe(O) particles for supporting anaerobic biofilms, and suitable aquifer material for construction of the barrier. The major goals for Year 1 were to establish the sulfate reducing mixed culture, to obtain sources of iron metal, and to conduct background experiments which will establish baseline rates for abiotic chromium reduction rates. Research completed to date is described.'

  17. Bovine intestinal bacteria inactivate and degrade ceftiofur and ceftriaxone with multiple beta-lactamases.

    PubMed

    Wagner, R Doug; Johnson, Shemedia J; Cerniglia, Carl E; Erickson, Bruce D

    2011-11-01

    The veterinary cephalosporin drug ceftiofur is rapidly degraded in the bovine intestinal tract. A cylinder-plate assay was used to detect microbiologically active ceftiofur, and high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis was used to quantify the amount of ceftiofur remaining after incubation with bovine intestinal anaerobic bacteria, which were isolated from colon contents or feces from 8 cattle. Ninety-six percent of the isolates were able to inactivate ceftiofur to some degree, and 54% actually degraded the drug. None of 9 fungal isolates inactivated or degraded ceftiofur. Facultative and obligate anaerobic bacterial species that inactivated or degraded ceftiofur were identified with Vitek and Biolog systems, respectively. A subset of ceftiofur degraders also degraded the chemically similar drug ceftriaxone. Most of the species of bacteria that degraded ceftiofur belonged to the genera Bacillus and Bacteroides. PCR analysis of bacterial DNA detected specific β-lactamase genes. Bacillus cereus and B. mycoides isolates produced extended-spectrum β-lactamases and metallo-β-lactamases. Seven isolates of Bacteroides spp. produced multiple β-lactamases, including possibly CepA, and metallo-β-lactamases. Isolates of Eubacterium biforme, Bifidobacterium breve, and several Clostridium spp. also produced ceftiofur-degrading β-lactamases. An agar gel overlay technique on isoelectric focusing separations of bacterial lysates showed that β-lactamase enzymes were sufficient to degrade ceftiofur. These results suggest that ceftiofur is inactivated nonenzymatically and degraded enzymatically by multiple β-lactamases from bacteria in the large intestines of cattle.

  18. Facultative parthenogenesis in vertebrates: reproductive error or chance?

    PubMed

    Lampert, K P

    2008-01-01

    Parthenogenesis, the development of an embryo from a female gamete without any contribution of a male gamete, is very rare in vertebrates. Parthenogenetically reproducing species have, so far, only been found in the Squamate reptiles (lizards and snakes). Facultative parthenogenesis, switching between sexual and clonal reproduction, although quite common in invertebrates, e.g. Daphnia and aphids, seems to be even rarer in vertebrates. However, isolated cases of parthenogenetic development have been reported in all vertebrate groups. Facultative parthenogenesis in vertebrates has only been found in captive animals but might simply have been overlooked in natural populations. Even though its evolutionary impact is hard to determine and very likely varies depending on the ploidy restoration mechanisms and sex-determining mechanisms involved, facultative parthenogenesis is already discussed in conservation biology and medical research. To raise interest for facultative parthenogenesis especially in evolutionary biology, I summarize the current knowledge about facultative parthenogenesis in the different vertebrate groups, introduce mechanisms of diploid oocyte formation and discuss the genetic consequences and potential evolutionary impact of facultative parthenogenesis in vertebrates.

  19. One carbon metabolism in anaerobic bacteria: Regulation of carbon and electron flow during organic acid production. Progress report, June 1990--May 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Zeikus, J.G.; Jain, M.K.

    1992-04-01

    This reporting period, progress is reported on the following: metabolic pathway of solvent production in B. methylotrophicum; the biochemical mechanism for metabolic regulation of the succinate fermentation; models to understand the physiobiochemical function of formate metabolism in anaerobes and; models for understanding the influence of low pH on one carbon metabolism. (CBS)

  20. (Per)Chlorate-Reducing Bacteria Can Utilize Aerobic and Anaerobic Pathways of Aromatic Degradation with (Per)Chlorate as an Electron Acceptor

    PubMed Central

    Carlström, Charlotte I.; Loutey, Dana; Bauer, Stefan; Clark, Iain C.; Rohde, Robert A.; Iavarone, Anthony T.; Lucas, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The pathways involved in aromatic compound oxidation under perchlorate and chlorate [collectively known as (per)chlorate]-reducing conditions are poorly understood. Previous studies suggest that these are oxygenase-dependent pathways involving O2 biogenically produced during (per)chlorate respiration. Recently, we described Sedimenticola selenatireducens CUZ and Dechloromarinus chlorophilus NSS, which oxidized phenylacetate and benzoate, two key intermediates in aromatic compound catabolism, coupled to the reduction of perchlorate or chlorate, respectively, and nitrate. While strain CUZ also oxidized benzoate and phenylacetate with oxygen as an electron acceptor, strain NSS oxidized only the latter, even at a very low oxygen concentration (1%, vol/vol). Strains CUZ and NSS contain similar genes for both the anaerobic and aerobic-hybrid pathways of benzoate and phenylacetate degradation; however, the key genes (paaABCD) encoding the epoxidase of the aerobic-hybrid phenylacetate pathway were not found in either genome. By using transcriptomics and proteomics, as well as by monitoring metabolic intermediates, we investigated the utilization of the anaerobic and aerobic-hybrid pathways on different electron acceptors. For strain CUZ, the results indicated utilization of the anaerobic pathways with perchlorate and nitrate as electron acceptors and of the aerobic-hybrid pathways in the presence of oxygen. In contrast, proteomic results suggest that strain NSS may use a combination of the anaerobic and aerobic-hybrid pathways when growing on phenylacetate with chlorate. Though microbial (per)chlorate reduction produces molecular oxygen through the dismutation of chlorite (ClO2−), this study demonstrates that anaerobic pathways for the degradation of aromatics can still be utilized by these novel organisms. PMID:25805732

  1. The anaerobic digestion process

    SciTech Connect

    Rivard, C.J.; Boone, D.R.

    1996-01-01

    The microbial process of converting organic matter into methane and carbon dioxide is so complex that anaerobic digesters have long been treated as {open_quotes}black boxes.{close_quotes} Research into this process during the past few decades has gradually unraveled this complexity, but many questions remain. The major biochemical reactions for forming methane by methanogens are largely understood, and evolutionary studies indicate that these microbes are as different from bacteria as they are from plants and animals. In anaerobic digesters, methanogens are at the terminus of a metabolic web, in which the reactions of myriads of other microbes produce a very limited range of compounds - mainly acetate, hydrogen, and formate - on which the methanogens grow and from which they form methane. {open_quotes}Interspecies hydrogen-transfer{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}interspecies formate-transfer{close_quotes} are major mechanisms by which methanogens obtain their substrates and by which volatile fatty acids are degraded. Present understanding of these reactions and other complex interactions among the bacteria involved in anaerobic digestion is only now to the point where anaerobic digesters need no longer be treated as black boxes.

  2. Conditional Reduction of Predation Risk Associated with a Facultative Symbiont in an Insect

    PubMed Central

    Polin, Sarah; Le Gallic, Jean-François; Simon, Jean-Christophe; Tsuchida, Tsutomu; Outreman, Yannick

    2015-01-01

    Symbionts are widespread among eukaryotes and their impacts on the ecology and evolution of their hosts are meaningful. Most insects harbour obligate and facultative symbiotic bacteria that can influence their phenotype. In the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum, an astounding symbiotic-mediated phenotype has been recently observed: when infected with the symbiotic bacteria Rickettsiella viridis, young red aphid larvae become greener at adulthood and even darker green when co-infected with Rickettsiella viridis and Hamiltonella defensa. As body colour affects the susceptibility towards natural enemies in aphids, the influence of the colour change due to these facultative symbionts on the host survival in presence of predators was tested. Our results suggested that the Rickettsiella viridis infection may impact positively host survival by reducing predation risk. Due to results from uninfected aphids (i.e., more green ones attacked), the main assumption is that this symbiotic infection would deter the predatory ladybird feeding by reducing the profitability of their hosts rather than decreasing host detection through body colour change. Aphids co-infected with Rickettsiella viridis and Hamiltonella defensa were, however, more exposed to predation suggesting an ecological cost associated with multiple infections. The underlying mechanisms and ecological consequences of these symbiotic effects are discussed. PMID:26618776

  3. Conditional Reduction of Predation Risk Associated with a Facultative Symbiont in an Insect.

    PubMed

    Polin, Sarah; Le Gallic, Jean-François; Simon, Jean-Christophe; Tsuchida, Tsutomu; Outreman, Yannick

    2015-01-01

    Symbionts are widespread among eukaryotes and their impacts on the ecology and evolution of their hosts are meaningful. Most insects harbour obligate and facultative symbiotic bacteria that can influence their phenotype. In the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum, an astounding symbiotic-mediated phenotype has been recently observed: when infected with the symbiotic bacteria Rickettsiella viridis, young red aphid larvae become greener at adulthood and even darker green when co-infected with Rickettsiella viridis and Hamiltonella defensa. As body colour affects the susceptibility towards natural enemies in aphids, the influence of the colour change due to these facultative symbionts on the host survival in presence of predators was tested. Our results suggested that the Rickettsiella viridis infection may impact positively host survival by reducing predation risk. Due to results from uninfected aphids (i.e., more green ones attacked), the main assumption is that this symbiotic infection would deter the predatory ladybird feeding by reducing the profitability of their hosts rather than decreasing host detection through body colour change. Aphids co-infected with Rickettsiella viridis and Hamiltonella defensa were, however, more exposed to predation suggesting an ecological cost associated with multiple infections. The underlying mechanisms and ecological consequences of these symbiotic effects are discussed. PMID:26618776

  4. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a facultative pathogen of red palm weevil, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, A; Dangar, T K

    1995-11-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa was identified as a facultative pathogen of red palm weevil. Intra-haemocoelic injection of the pathogen within larvae and pre-pupae was more effective at killing the insects [with a median lethal dose (LD50) of 9×10(2) to 2×10(3) bacteria/insect] than inoculation by force feeding (LD50 of 10(5) to 4×10(5) bacteria/insect) or by wading the insects in a suspension of the pathogen (LD50 of 10(5) to 2×10(5) bacteria/insect). Injection of 3×10(3) bacteria/insect killed 69% of larvae; small larvae were more susceptible (LD50 of 9×10(5) bacteria/larva) than either larger larvae (LD50 of 10(3) bacteria/larva) or pre-pupa. The median time to death of the small larvae following injection of P. aeruginosa was about 6 days but that following force feeding or wading was about 8 days. A secondary invader, Serratia marcescens, had no effect on the pathogenicity of P. aeruginosa but hastened death of larvae by about 3 days.

  5. Diapause and maintenance of facultative sexual reproductive strategies.

    PubMed

    Stelzer, Claus-Peter; Lehtonen, Jussi

    2016-10-19

    Facultative sex combines sexual and asexual reproduction in the same individual (or clone) and allows for a large diversity of life-history patterns regarding the timing, frequency and intensity of sexual episodes. In addition, other life-history traits such as a diapause stage may become linked to sex. Here, we develop a matrix modelling framework for addressing the cost of sex in facultative sexuals, in constant, periodic and stochastically fluctuating environments. The model is parametrized using life-history data from Brachionus calyciflorus, a facultative sexual rotifer in which sex and diapause are linked. Sexual propensity was an important driver of costs in constant environments, in which high costs (always > onefold, and sometimes > twofold) indicated that asexuals should outcompete facultative sexuals. By contrast, stochastic environments with high temporal autocorrelation favoured facultative sex over obligate asex, in particular, if the penalty to fecundity in 'bad' environments was large. In such environments, obligate asexuals were constrained by their life cycle length (i.e. time from birth to last reproductive adult age class), which determined an upper limit to the number of consecutive bad periods they could tolerate. Nevertheless, when facultative asexuals with different sexual propensities competed simultaneously against each other and asex, the lowest sex propensity was the most successful in stochastic environments with positive autocorrelation. Our results suggest that a highly specific mechanism (i.e. diapause linked to sex) can alone stabilize facultative sex in these animals, and protect it from invasion of both asexual and pure sexual strategies.This article is part of the themed issue 'Weird sex: the underappreciated diversity of sexual reproduction'. PMID:27619700

  6. Diapause and maintenance of facultative sexual reproductive strategies.

    PubMed

    Stelzer, Claus-Peter; Lehtonen, Jussi

    2016-10-19

    Facultative sex combines sexual and asexual reproduction in the same individual (or clone) and allows for a large diversity of life-history patterns regarding the timing, frequency and intensity of sexual episodes. In addition, other life-history traits such as a diapause stage may become linked to sex. Here, we develop a matrix modelling framework for addressing the cost of sex in facultative sexuals, in constant, periodic and stochastically fluctuating environments. The model is parametrized using life-history data from Brachionus calyciflorus, a facultative sexual rotifer in which sex and diapause are linked. Sexual propensity was an important driver of costs in constant environments, in which high costs (always > onefold, and sometimes > twofold) indicated that asexuals should outcompete facultative sexuals. By contrast, stochastic environments with high temporal autocorrelation favoured facultative sex over obligate asex, in particular, if the penalty to fecundity in 'bad' environments was large. In such environments, obligate asexuals were constrained by their life cycle length (i.e. time from birth to last reproductive adult age class), which determined an upper limit to the number of consecutive bad periods they could tolerate. Nevertheless, when facultative asexuals with different sexual propensities competed simultaneously against each other and asex, the lowest sex propensity was the most successful in stochastic environments with positive autocorrelation. Our results suggest that a highly specific mechanism (i.e. diapause linked to sex) can alone stabilize facultative sex in these animals, and protect it from invasion of both asexual and pure sexual strategies.This article is part of the themed issue 'Weird sex: the underappreciated diversity of sexual reproduction'.

  7. Reduction of Ferric Iron in Anaerobic, Marine Sediment and Interaction with Reduction of Nitrate and Sulfate

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Jan

    1982-01-01

    Studies were carried out to elucidate the nature and importance of Fe3+ reduction in anaerobic slurries of marine surface sediment. A constant accumulation of Fe2+ took place immediately after the endogenous NO3− was depleted. Pasteurized controls showed no activity of Fe3+ reduction. Additions of 0.2 mM NO3− and NO2− to the active slurries arrested the Fe3+ reduction, and the process was resumed only after a depletion of the added compounds. Extended, initial aeration of the sediment did not affect the capacity for reduction of NO3− and Fe3+, but the treatments with NO3− increased the capacity for Fe3+ reduction. Addition of 20 mM MoO42− completely inhibited the SO42− reduction, but did not affect the reduction of Fe3+. The process of Fe3+ reduction was most likely associated with the activity of facultative anaerobic, NO3−-reducing bacteria. In surface sediment, the bulk of the Fe3+ reduction may be microbial, and the process may be important for mineralization in situ if the availability of NO3− is low. PMID:16345937

  8. Iron and manganese in anaerobic respiration: environmental significance, physiology, and regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nealson, K. H.; Saffarini, D.

    1994-01-01

    Dissimilatory iron and/or manganese reduction is known to occur in several organisms, including anaerobic sulfur-reducing organisms such as Geobacter metallireducens or Desulfuromonas acetoxidans, and facultative aerobes such as Shewanella putrefaciens. These bacteria couple both carbon oxidation and growth to the reduction of these metals, and inhibitor and competition experiments suggest that Mn(IV) and Fe(III) are efficient electron acceptors similar to nitrate in redox abilities and capable of out-competing electron acceptors of lower potential, such as sulfate (sulfate reduction) or CO2 (methanogenesis). Field studies of iron and/or manganese reduction suggest that organisms with such metabolic abilities play important roles in coupling the oxidation of organic carbon to metal reduction under anaerobic conditions. Because both iron and manganese oxides are solids or colloids, they tend to settle downward in aquatic environments, providing a physical mechanism for the movement of oxidizing potential into anoxic zones. The resulting biogeochemical metal cycles have a strong impact on many other elements including carbon, sulfur, phosphorous, and trace metals.

  9. Comparison of nitroethane, 2-nitro-1-propanol, lauric acid, Lauricidin and the Hawaiian marine algae, Chaetoceros, for potential broad-spectrum control of anaerobically grown lactic acid bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gastrointestinal tract of bovines often contains bacteria that contribute to disorders of the rumen and may also contain foodborne or opportunistic human pathogens as well as bacteria capable of causing mastitis in cows. Thus, there is a need to develop broad-spectrum therapies that are effecti...

  10. Antimicrobial resistance characteristics and fitness of Gram-negative fecal bacteria from volunteers treated with minocycline or amoxicillin

    PubMed Central

    Kirchner, Miranda; Mafura, Muriel; Hunt, Theresa; Abu-Oun, Manal; Nunez-Garcia, Javier; Hu, Yanmin; Weile, Jan; Coates, Anthony; Card, Roderick; Anjum, Muna F.

    2014-01-01

    A yearlong study was performed to examine the effect of antibiotic administration on the bacterial gut flora. Gram-negative facultative anaerobic bacteria were recovered from the feces of healthy adult volunteers administered amoxicillin, minocycline or placebo, and changes determined in antimicrobial resistance (AMR) gene carriage. Seventy percent of the 1039 facultative anaerobic isolates recovered were identified by MALDI-TOF as Escherichia coli. A microarray used to determine virulence and resistance gene carriage demonstrated that AMR genes were widespread in all administration groups, with the most common resistance genes being blaTEM, dfr, strB, tet(A), and tet(B). Following amoxicillin administration, an increase in the proportion of amoxicillin resistant E. coli and a three-fold increase in the levels of blaTEM gene carriage was observed, an effect not observed in the other two treatment groups. Detection of virulence genes, including stx1A, indicated not all E. coli were innocuous commensals. Approximately 150 E. coli collected from 6 participants were selected for pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and a subset used for characterisation of plasmids and Phenotypic Microarrays (PM). PFGE indicated some E. coli clones had persisted in volunteers for up to 1 year, while others were transient. Although there were no unique characteristics associated with plasmids from persistent or transient isolates, PM assays showed transient isolates had greater adaptability to a range of antiseptic biocides and tetracycline; characteristics which were lost in some, but not all persistent isolates. This study indicates healthy individuals carry bacteria harboring resistance to a variety of antibiotics and biocides in their intestinal tract. Antibiotic administration can have a temporary effect of selecting bacteria, showing co-resistance to multiple antibiotics, some of which can persist within the gut for up to 1 year. PMID:25566232

  11. Antimicrobial resistance characteristics and fitness of Gram-negative fecal bacteria from volunteers treated with minocycline or amoxicillin.

    PubMed

    Kirchner, Miranda; Mafura, Muriel; Hunt, Theresa; Abu-Oun, Manal; Nunez-Garcia, Javier; Hu, Yanmin; Weile, Jan; Coates, Anthony; Card, Roderick; Anjum, Muna F

    2014-01-01

    A yearlong study was performed to examine the effect of antibiotic administration on the bacterial gut flora. Gram-negative facultative anaerobic bacteria were recovered from the feces of healthy adult volunteers administered amoxicillin, minocycline or placebo, and changes determined in antimicrobial resistance (AMR) gene carriage. Seventy percent of the 1039 facultative anaerobic isolates recovered were identified by MALDI-TOF as Escherichia coli. A microarray used to determine virulence and resistance gene carriage demonstrated that AMR genes were widespread in all administration groups, with the most common resistance genes being bla TEM, dfr, strB, tet(A), and tet(B). Following amoxicillin administration, an increase in the proportion of amoxicillin resistant E. coli and a three-fold increase in the levels of bla TEM gene carriage was observed, an effect not observed in the other two treatment groups. Detection of virulence genes, including stx1A, indicated not all E. coli were innocuous commensals. Approximately 150 E. coli collected from 6 participants were selected for pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and a subset used for characterisation of plasmids and Phenotypic Microarrays (PM). PFGE indicated some E. coli clones had persisted in volunteers for up to 1 year, while others were transient. Although there were no unique characteristics associated with plasmids from persistent or transient isolates, PM assays showed transient isolates had greater adaptability to a range of antiseptic biocides and tetracycline; characteristics which were lost in some, but not all persistent isolates. This study indicates healthy individuals carry bacteria harboring resistance to a variety of antibiotics and biocides in their intestinal tract. Antibiotic administration can have a temporary effect of selecting bacteria, showing co-resistance to multiple antibiotics, some of which can persist within the gut for up to 1 year. PMID:25566232

  12. Enhanced hydrolysis and methane yield by applying microaeration pretreatment to the anaerobic co-digestion of brown water and food waste

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Jun Wei; Wang, Jing-Yuan

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► Microaeration pretreatment was effective for brown water and food waste mixture. ► The added oxygen was consumed fully by facultative microorganisms. ► Enhanced solubilization, acidification and breakdown of SCFAs to acetate. ► Microaeration pretreatment improved methane yield by 10–21%. ► Nature of inoculum influenced the effects of microaeration. - Abstract: Microaeration has been used conventionally for the desulphurization of biogas, and recently it was shown to be an alternative pretreatment to enhance hydrolysis of the anaerobic digestion (AD) process. Previous studies on microaeration pretreatment were limited to the study of substrates with complex organic matter, while little has been reported on its effect on substrates with higher biodegradability such as brown water and food waste. Due to the lack of consistent microaeration intensities, previous studies were not comparable and thus inconclusive in proving the effectiveness of microaeration to the overall AD process. In this study, the role of microaeration pretreatment in the anaerobic co-digestion of brown water and food waste was evaluated in batch-tests. After a 4-day pretreatment with 37.5 mL-O{sub 2}/L{sub R}-d added to the liquid phase of the reactor, the methane production of substrates were monitored in anaerobic conditions over the next 40 days. The added oxygen was consumed fully by facultative microorganisms and a reducing environment for organic matter degradation was maintained. Other than higher COD solubilization, microaeration pretreatment led to greater VFA accumulation and the conversion of other short chain fatty acids to acetate. This could be due to enhanced activities of hydrolytic and acidogenic bacteria and the degradation of slowly biodegradable compounds under microaerobic conditions. This study also found that the nature of inoculum influenced the effects of microaeration as a 21% and 10% increase in methane yield was observed when pretreatment was

  13. Facultative thermogenesis during brooding is not the norm among pythons.

    PubMed

    Brashears, Jake; DeNardo, Dale F

    2015-08-01

    Facultative thermogenesis is often attributed to pythons in general despite limited comparative data available for the family. While all species within Pythonidae brood their eggs, only two species are known to produce heat to enhance embryonic thermal regulation. By contrast, a few python species have been reported to have insignificant thermogenic capabilities. To provide insight into potential phylogenetic, morphological, and ecological factors influencing thermogenic capability among pythons, we measured metabolic rates and clutch-environment temperature differentials at two environmental temperatures-python preferred brooding temperature (31.5 °C) and a sub-optimal temperature (25.5 °C)-in six species of pythons, including members of two major phylogenetic branches currently devoid of data on the subject. We found no evidence of facultative thermogenesis in five species: Aspidites melanocephalus, A. ramsayi, Morelia viridis, M. spilota cheynei, and Python regius. However, we found that Bothrochilus boa had a thermal metabolic sensitivity indicative of facultative thermogenesis (i.e., a higher metabolic rate at the lower temperature). However, its metabolic rate was quite low and technical challenges prevented us from measuring temperature differential to make conclusions about facultative endothermy in this species. Regardless, our data combined with existing literature demonstrate that facultative thermogenesis is not as widespread among pythons as previously thought.

  14. Bacteria Associated with the Gut Tract of Larval Stages of the Aquatic Cranefly Tipula abdominalis (Diptera; Tipulidae) †

    PubMed Central

    Klug, M. J.; Kotarski, S.

    1980-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy, light microscopy, and direct isolations were used to examine the distribution and diversity of bacteria in the gut tracts of larval stages of Tipula abdominalis. The animal had an enlarged hindgut which housed a diverse bacterial community in the lumen and directly attached to the gut wall. Distinct localization was noted, with the most dense and most diverse community anterior to the rectum. A distinct architecture of bacteria occurred in this region, characterized by a layering or a “weblike” array of filamentous bacteria overlying mats of bacteria closely associated with the gut wall. Although morphological diversity was high in the hindgut, filamentous bacteria were the dominant morphology observed. The attached microbiota, sloughed during ecdysis, recolonized to the same density and diversity observed before the molt. The majority of the isolatable bacterial types were facultatively anaerobic. The distinct localization and attached nature of the hindgut bacteria and the recolonization after each molt suggest they are indigenous to this region of the gut tract. Images PMID:16345618

  15. Metabolism of octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine by Clostridium bifermentans strain HAW-1 and several other H2-producing fermentative anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian-Shen; Paquet, Louise; Halasz, Annamaria; Manno, Dominic; Hawari, Jalal

    2004-08-01

    Several H2-producing fermentative anaerobic bacteria including Clostridium, Klebsiella and Fusobacteria degraded octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) (36 microM) to formaldehyde (HCHO) and nitrous oxide (N2O) with rates ranging from 5 to 190 nmol h(-1)g [dry weight] of cells(-1). Among these strains, C. bifermentans strain HAW-1 grew and transformed HMX rapidly with the detection of the two key intermediates the mononitroso product and methylenedinitramine. Its cellular extract alone did not seem to degrade HMX appreciably, but degraded much faster in the presence of H2, NADH or NADPH. The disappearance of HMX was concurrent with the release of nitrite without the formation of the nitroso derivative(s). Results suggest that two types of enzymes were involved in HMX metabolism: one for denitration and the second for reduction to the nitroso derivative(s).

  16. Unrelated facultative endosymbionts protect aphids against a fungal pathogen.

    PubMed

    Łukasik, Piotr; van Asch, Margriet; Guo, Huifang; Ferrari, Julia; Godfray, H Charles J

    2013-02-01

    The importance of microbial facultative endosymbionts to insects is increasingly being recognized, but our understanding of how the fitness effects of infection are distributed across symbiont taxa is limited. In the pea aphid, some of the seven known species of facultative symbionts influence their host's resistance to natural enemies, including parasitoid wasps and a pathogenic fungus. Here we show that protection against this entomopathogen, Pandora neoaphidis, can be conferred by strains of four distantly related symbionts (in the genera Regiella, Rickettsia, Rickettsiella and Spiroplasma). They reduce mortality and also decrease fungal sporulation on dead aphids which may help protect nearby genetically identical insects. Pea aphids thus obtain protection from natural enemies through association with a wider range of microbial associates than has previously been thought. Providing resistance against natural enemies appears to be a particularly common way for facultative endosymbionts to increase in frequency within host populations.

  17. Anaerobic Infections in Children with Neurological Impairments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brook, Itzhak

    1995-01-01

    Children with neurological impairments are prone to develop serious infection with anaerobic bacteria. The most common anaerobic infections are decubitus ulcers; gastrostomy site wound infections; pulmonary infections (aspiration pneumonia, lung abscesses, and tracheitis); and chronic suppurative otitis media. The unique microbiology of each of…

  18. Enumeration, isolation, and characterization of n(2)-fixing bacteria from seawater.

    PubMed

    Guerinot, M L; Colwell, R R

    1985-08-01

    Marine pelagic N(2)-fixing bacteria have not, in general, been identified or quantified, since low or negligible rates of N(2) fixation have been recorded for seawater when blue-green algae (cyanobacteria) are absent. In the study reported here, marine N(2)-fixing bacteria were found in all samples of seawater collected and were analyzed by using a most-probable-number (MPN) method. Two different media were used which allowed growth of microaerophiles, as well as that of aerobes and facultative anaerobes. MPN values obtained for N(2)-fixing bacteria ranged from 0.4 to 1 x 10 per liter for water collected off the coast of Puerto Rico and from 2 to 5.5 x 10 per liter for Chesapeake Bay water. Over 100 strains of N(2)-fixing bacteria were isolated from the MPN tubes and classified, yielding four major groups of NaCl-requiring bacteria based on biochemical characteristics. Results of differential filtration studies indicate that N(2)-fixing bacteria may be associated with phytoplankton. In addition, when N(2)-fixing bacteria were inoculated into unfiltered seawater and incubated in situ, nitrogenase activity could be detected within 1 h. However, no nitrogenase activity was detected in uninoculated seawater or when bacteria were incubated in 0.2-mum-filtered (phytoplankton-free) seawater. The ability of these isolates to fix N(2) at ambient conditions in seawater and the large variety of N(2)-fixing bacteria isolated and identified lead to the conclusion that N(2) fixation in the ocean may occur to a greater degree than previously believed. PMID:16346855

  19. Contamination pathways of spore-forming bacteria in a vegetable cannery.

    PubMed

    Durand, Loïc; Planchon, Stella; Guinebretiere, Marie-Hélène; André, Stéphane; Carlin, Frédéric; Remize, Fabienne

    2015-06-01

    Spoilage of low-acid canned food during prolonged storage at high temperatures is caused by heat resistant thermophilic spores of strict or facultative bacteria. Here, we performed a bacterial survey over two consecutive years on the processing line of a French company manufacturing canned mixed green peas and carrots. In total, 341 samples were collected, including raw vegetables, green peas and carrots at different steps of processing, cover brine, and process environment samples. Thermophilic and highly-heat-resistant thermophilic spores growing anaerobically were counted. During vegetable preparation, anaerobic spore counts were significantly decreased, and tended to remain unchanged further downstream in the process. Large variation of spore levels in products immediately before the sterilization process could be explained by occasionally high spore levels on surfaces and in debris of vegetable combined with long residence times in conditions suitable for growth and sporulation. Vegetable processing was also associated with an increase in the prevalence of highly-heat-resistant species, probably due to cross-contamination of peas via blanching water. Geobacillus stearothermophilus M13-PCR genotypic profiling on 112 isolates determined 23 profile-types and confirmed process-driven cross-contamination. Taken together, these findings clarify the scheme of contamination pathway by thermophilic spore-forming bacteria in a vegetable cannery.

  20. Contamination pathways of spore-forming bacteria in a vegetable cannery.

    PubMed

    Durand, Loïc; Planchon, Stella; Guinebretiere, Marie-Hélène; André, Stéphane; Carlin, Frédéric; Remize, Fabienne

    2015-06-01

    Spoilage of low-acid canned food during prolonged storage at high temperatures is caused by heat resistant thermophilic spores of strict or facultative bacteria. Here, we performed a bacterial survey over two consecutive years on the processing line of a French company manufacturing canned mixed green peas and carrots. In total, 341 samples were collected, including raw vegetables, green peas and carrots at different steps of processing, cover brine, and process environment samples. Thermophilic and highly-heat-resistant thermophilic spores growing anaerobically were counted. During vegetable preparation, anaerobic spore counts were significantly decreased, and tended to remain unchanged further downstream in the process. Large variation of spore levels in products immediately before the sterilization process could be explained by occasionally high spore levels on surfaces and in debris of vegetable combined with long residence times in conditions suitable for growth and sporulation. Vegetable processing was also associated with an increase in the prevalence of highly-heat-resistant species, probably due to cross-contamination of peas via blanching water. Geobacillus stearothermophilus M13-PCR genotypic profiling on 112 isolates determined 23 profile-types and confirmed process-driven cross-contamination. Taken together, these findings clarify the scheme of contamination pathway by thermophilic spore-forming bacteria in a vegetable cannery. PMID:25755080

  1. Distribution and activity of bacteria in deep granitic groundwaters of southeastern sweden.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, K; Ekendahl, S

    1990-12-01

    This study investigated the distribution of bacteria in groundwater from 16 different levels in five boreholes in granite bedrock down to a maximum of 860 m. Enrichment cultures were used to assay the groups of bacteria present. Autoradiographic studies with(14)C- or(3)H-labeled formate, methanol, acetate, lactate, glucose, sodium bicarbonate, leucine, glutamine, thymidine, orN-acetyl-glucosamine were used to obtain information about bacteria active in substrate uptake. The biofilm formation potential was studied in one borehole. The chemical environment in the groundwater was anaerobic with an Eh between -112 and -383 mV, a pH usually around 8, and a temperature range of 10.2 to 20.5°C, depending on the depth. The organic content ranged between <0.5 and 9.5 mg total organic carbon liter(-1). Carbon dioxide, hydrogen, hydrogen sulfide, and methane were present in the water. The nitrate, nitrite, and phosphate concentrations were close to, or below, the detection limits, while there were detectable amounts of NH4 (+) in the range of 4 to 330 μg liter(-1). The average total number of bacteria was 2.6×10(5) bacteria ml(-1), as determined with an acridine organge direct-count (AODC) technique. The average number of bacteria that grew on a medium with 1.5 g liter(-1) of organic substrate was 7.7×10(3) colony-forming units (CFU) ml(-1). The majority of these were facultatively anaerobic, gram-negative, nonfermenting heterotrophs. Enrichment cultures indicated the presence of anaerobic bacteria capable of growth on C-1 compounds and hydrogen, presumably methanogenic bacteria. Most probable number assays with sulfate and lactate revealed up to 5.6×10(4) viable sulfate-reducing bacteria per ml. A biofilm development experiment indicated an active attached microbial population. Active substrate uptake could not be registered with the bulk water populations, except for an uptake of leucine not associated with growth. The bulk water microbial cells in deep groundwater may

  2. N2 fixation in marine heterotrophic bacteria: dynamics of environmental and molecular regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Coyer, J A; Cabello-Pasini, A; Swift, H; Alberte, R S

    1996-01-01

    Molecular and immunological techniques were used to examine N2 fixation in a ubiquitous heterotrophic marine bacterium, the facultative anaerobic Vibrio natriegens. When batch cultures were shifted from aerobic N-replete to anaerobic N-deplete conditions, transcriptional and post-translational regulation of N2 fixation was observed. Levels of nifHDK mRNA encoding the nitrogenase enzyme were highest at 140 min postshift and undetectable between 6 and 9 h later. Immunologically determined levels of nitrogenase enzyme (Fe protein) were highest between 6 and 15 h postshift, and nitrogenase activity peaked between 6 and 9 h postshift, declining by a factor of 2 after 12-15 h. Unlike their regulation in cyanobacteria, Fe protein and nitrogenase activity were present when nifHDK mRNA was absent in V. natriegens, indicating that nitrogenase is stored and stable under anaerobic conditions. Both nifHDK mRNA and Fe protein disappeared within 40 min after cultures were shifted from N2-fixing conditions (anaerobic, N-deplete) to non- N2-fixing conditions (aerobic, N-enriched) but reappeared when shifted to conditions favoring N2 fixation. Thus, unlike other N2-fixing heterotrophic bacteria, nitrogenase must be resynthesized after aerobic exposure in V. natriegens. Immunological detection based on immunoblot (Western) analysis and immunogold labeling correlated positively with nitrogenase activity; no localization of nitrogenase was observed. Because V. natriegens continues to fix N2 for many hours after anaerobic induction, this species may play an important role in providing "new" nitrogen in marine ecosystems. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:11607653

  3. A comparison of primer sets for detecting 16S rRNA and hydrazine oxidoreductase genes of anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria in marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng; Hong, Yiguo; Klotz, Martin Gunter; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2010-03-01

    Published polymerase chain reaction primer sets for detecting the genes encoding 16S rRNA gene and hydrazine oxidoreductase (hzo) in anammox bacteria were compared by using the same coastal marine sediment samples. While four previously reported primer sets developed to detect the 16S rRNA gene showed varying specificities between 12% and 77%, an optimized primer combination resulted in up to 98% specificity, and the recovered anammox 16S rRNA gene sequences were >95% sequence identical to published sequences from anammox bacteria in the Candidatus "Scalindua" group. Furthermore, four primer sets used in detecting the hzo gene of anammox bacteria were highly specific (up to 92%) and efficient, and the newly designed primer set in this study amplified longer hzo gene segments suitable for phylogenetic analysis. The optimized primer set for the 16S rRNA gene and the newly designed primer set for the hzo gene were successfully applied to identify anammox bacteria from marine sediments of aquaculture zone, coastal wetland, and deep ocean where the three ecosystems form a gradient of anthropogenic impact. Results indicated a broad distribution of anammox bacteria with high niche-specific community structure within each marine ecosystem. PMID:20107988

  4. Anaerobic Process.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qian; Ju, Mei-Ting; Li, Wei-Zun; Liu, Le; Wang, Yan-Nan; Chang, Chein-Chi

    2016-10-01

    A review of the literature published in 2015 on the focus of Anaerobic Process. It is divided into the following sections. Pretreatment Organic waste Multiple-stage co-digestion Process Methodology and Technology. PMID:27620085

  5. Practical removal of radioactivity from soil in Fukushima using immobilized photosynthetic bacteria combined with anaerobic digestion and lactic acid fermentation as pre-treatment.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Ken; Morikawa, Hiroyo; Kishibe, Takashi; Takeno, Kenji; Mikami, Ayaka; Harada, Toshihiko; Ohta, Masahiro

    2012-01-01

    Practical removal of radioactivity from polluted soil in Fukushima, Japan was done using a photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides SSI, immobilized in alginate beads. The beads were put in a mesh bag and soaked in which soil was suspended (5 kg of soil/10 L of tap water). The radioactivity of the broth decreased by 31% after 15 d of aerobic treatment. When lactic acid bacterial culture broth was added to the suspend broth, about 50% of the radioactivity was transferred to a suspend broth fraction consisting of small particles from the soil after 3 d of fermentation and 20 s of sedimentation. The results suggest that organic matter in the soil was decomposed by anaerobic digestion and lactic acid fermentation simultaneously, and was then transferred into the liquid as small particles. With combined treatment by anaerobic digestion and lactic acid fermentation for 5 d and immobilized bead aerobic treatment for an additional 19 d, the radioactivity of suspend broth decreased by 66%. The radioactivity of the original soil (10.56 µSv/h) ultimately decreased by 67% (3.52 µSv/h) after the combined treatment.

  6. Application of molecular techniques to evaluate the methanogenic archaea and anaerobic bacteria in the presence of oxygen with different COD:sulfate ratios in a UASB reactor.

    PubMed

    Hirasawa, Julia Sumiko; Sarti, Arnaldo; Del Aguila, Nora Katia Saavedra; Varesche, Maria Bernadete A

    2008-10-01

    In this paper, the microbial characteristics of the granular sludge in the presence of oxygen (3.0+/-0.7 mg O2 l(-1)) were analyzed using molecular biology techniques. The granules were provided by an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) operated over 469 days and fed with synthetic substrate. Ethanol and sulfate were added to obtain different COD/SO4(2-) ratios (3.0, 2.0, and 1.6). The results of fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses showed that archaeal cells, detected by the ARC915 probe, accounted for 77%, 84%, and 75% in the COD/SO(4)(2-) ratios (3.0, 2.0, and 1.6, respectively). Methanosaeta sp. was the predominant acetoclastic archaea observed by optical microscopy and FISH analyses, and confirmed by sequencing of the excised bands of the DGGE gel with a similarity of 96%. The sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. vulgaris (similarity of 99%) was verified by sequencing of the DGGE band. Others identified microorganism were similar to Shewanella sp. and Desulfitobacterium hafniense, with similarities of 95% and 99%, respectively. These results confirmed that the presence of oxygen did not severely affect the metabolism of microorganisms that are commonly considered strictly anaerobic. We obtained mean efficiencies of organic matter conversion and sulfate reducing higher than 74%. PMID:18634895

  7. Diversity of anaerobic halophilic microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oren, Aharon; Oremland, Roland S.

    2000-12-01

    Life in the presence of high salt concentrations is compatible with life in the absence of oxygen. Halophilic and halotolerant anaerobic prokaryotes are found both in the archaeal and in the bacterial domain, and they display a great metabolic diversity. Many of the representatives of the Halobacteriales (Archaea), which are generally considered aerobes, have the potential of anaerobic growth. Some can use alternative electron acceptors such as nitrate, fumarate, dimethylsulfoxide or trimethylamine-N-oxide Halobacterium salinarum can also grow fermentatively on L-arginine, and bacteriorhodopsin-containing cells may even grow anaerobically, energized by light. Obligatory anaerobic halophilic methanogenic Archaea also exist. The bacterial domain contains many anaerobic halophiles, including sulfate reducers. There is also a group of specialized obligatory anaerobic Bacteria, phylogenetically clustering in the low G + C branch of the Firmicutes. Most representatives of this group (order Haloanaerobiales, families Haloanaerobiaceae and Halobacteroidaceae) are fermentative, using a variety of carbohydrates and amino acids. One species combines the potential for anaerobic growth at high salt concentrations with a preference for high temperatures. Others are homoacetogens; Acetohalobium arabaticum can grow anaerobically as a chemolithotroph, producing acetate from hydrogen and CO2. The Haloanaerobiales accumulate high concentrations of K+ and Cl- in their cytoplasm, thereby showing a strategy of salt adaptation similar to that used by the Halobacteriales. Recently a new representative of the Haloanaerobiales was isolated from bottom sediments of the Dead Sea (strain DSSe1), which grows anaerobically by oxidation of glycerol to acetate and CO2 while reducing selenate to selenite and elementary selenium. Other electron acceptors supporting anaerobic growth of this strain are nitrate and trimethylamine-N-oxide. The versatility of life at high salt concentrations with respect

  8. The Facultative Symbiont Rickettsia Protects an Invasive Whitefly against Entomopathogenic Pseudomonas syringae Strains

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Martha S.; Baltrus, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Facultative endosymbionts can benefit insect hosts in a variety of ways, including context-dependent roles, such as providing defense against pathogens. The role of some symbionts in defense may be overlooked, however, when pathogen infection is transient, sporadic, or asymptomatic. The facultative endosymbiont Rickettsia increases the fitness of the sweet potato whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) in some populations through mechanisms that are not yet understood. In this study, we investigated the role of Rickettsia in mediating the interaction between the sweet potato whitefly and Pseudomonas syringae, a common environmental bacterium, some strains of which are pathogenic to aphids. Our results show that P. syringae multiplies within whiteflies, leading to host death, and that whiteflies infected with Rickettsia show a decreased rate of death due to P. syringae. Experiments using plants coated with P. syringae confirmed that whiteflies can acquire the bacteria at a low rate while feeding, leading to increased mortality, particularly when the whiteflies are not infected with Rickettsia. These results suggest that P. syringae may affect whitefly populations in nature and that Rickettsia can ameliorate this effect. This study highlights the possible importance of interactions among opportunistic environmental pathogens and endosymbionts of insects. PMID:25217020

  9. The Facultative Symbiont Rickettsia Protects an Invasive Whitefly against Entomopathogenic Pseudomonas syringae Strains.

    PubMed

    Hendry, Tory A; Hunter, Martha S; Baltrus, David A

    2014-12-01

    Facultative endosymbionts can benefit insect hosts in a variety of ways, including context-dependent roles, such as providing defense against pathogens. The role of some symbionts in defense may be overlooked, however, when pathogen infection is transient, sporadic, or asymptomatic. The facultative endosymbiont Rickettsia increases the fitness of the sweet potato whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) in some populations through mechanisms that are not yet understood. In this study, we investigated the role of Rickettsia in mediating the interaction between the sweet potato whitefly and Pseudomonas syringae, a common environmental bacterium, some strains of which are pathogenic to aphids. Our results show that P. syringae multiplies within whiteflies, leading to host death, and that whiteflies infected with Rickettsia show a decreased rate of death due to P. syringae. Experiments using plants coated with P. syringae confirmed that whiteflies can acquire the bacteria at a low rate while feeding, leading to increased mortality, particularly when the whiteflies are not infected with Rickettsia. These results suggest that P. syringae may affect whitefly populations in nature and that Rickettsia can ameliorate this effect. This study highlights the possible importance of interactions among opportunistic environmental pathogens and endosymbionts of insects.

  10. Abundance and diversity of octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX)-metabolizing bacteria in UXO-contaminated marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian-Shen; Manno, Dominic; Hawari, Jalal

    2007-03-01

    Octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) is a toxic explosive known to be resistant to biodegradation. In this study, we found that sediment collected from two unexploded ordnance (UXO) disposal sites (UXO-3, UXO-5) and one nearby reference site (midref) in Hawaii contained anaerobic bacteria capable of removing HMX. Two groups of HMX-removing bacteria were found in UXO-5: group I contained aerotolerant anaerobes and microaerophiles, and group II contained facultative anaerobes. In UXO-3 and midref sediments, HMX-metabolizing bacteria were strictly anaerobic (group III and group IV). Using 16S rRNA sequencing, group I was assigned to a novel phylogenetic cluster of Clostridiales, and groups II and III were related to Paenibacillus and Tepidibacter of Firmicutes, respectively. Group IV bacteria were identified as Desulfovibrio of Deltaproteobacteria. Using [UL-(14)C]-HMX, group IV isolates were found to mineralize HMX (26.8% in 308 d) as determined by liberated (14)CO(2), but negligible mineralization was observed in groups I-III. Resting cells of isolates metabolized HMX to N(2)O and HCHO via the intermediary formation of 1-nitroso-octahydro-3,5,7-trinitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine together with methylenedinitramine. These experimental findings suggest that HMX biotransformation occurred either via initial denitration followed by ring cleavage or via reduction of one or more of the N-NO(2) group(s) to the corresponding N-NO bond(s) prior to ring cleavage.

  11. A novel application of an anaerobic membrane process in wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    You, H S; Tseng, C C; Peng, M J; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Peng, S H

    2005-01-01

    The applications of membrane processes in anaerobic biological wastewater treatment still have some limitations due to severe membrane scaling and fouling, although they have been proven to achieve superior COD removal and biomass retention. An innovative anaerobic membrane process for wastewater treatment was conducted to control the membrane scaling problems. The process comprises an anaerobic reactor, an aerobic reactor, and a membrane separation tank. Anaerobic sludge from a full-scale UASB reactor treating food wastewater was inoculated to anaerobic and aerobic reactor to purify synthetic wastewater consisting of glucose and sodium acetate. The anaerobic reactor was operated in a sludge bed type without three-phase separator. The aerobic reactor can eliminate residual organics from the anaerobic reactor effluent using facultative microorganisms. To provide solid-liquid separation, hollow fiber ultrafiltration module was submerged in the separation tank. The results clearly show that the anaerobic membrane process combined methanogenic and aerobic COD reduction is a stable system. No fatal scaling was found after two months of operation even without chemical cleaning for the membrane. It was also found that inorganic precipitates formed in the aerobic reactor were reduced due to CO2 stripping in aerobic reactor. Another important finding was that the inorganic precipitates were entrapped into facultative aerobes floc. The ash/SS ratio of aerobes floc increased from 0.17 to 0.55 after 50 days of operation, which confirms this phenomenon. Based on our investigation, the new process can control scaling effectively to extend the membrane application in anaerobic treatment.

  12. Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria and Their Activities in Cyanobacterial Mats of Solar Lake (Sinai, Egypt)

    PubMed Central

    Teske, Andreas; Ramsing, Niels B.; Habicht, Kirsten; Fukui, Manabu; Küver, Jan; Jørgensen, Bo Barker; Cohen, Yehuda

    1998-01-01

    The sulfate-reducing bacteria within the surface layer of the hypersaline cyanobacterial mat of Solar Lake (Sinai, Egypt) were investigated with combined microbiological, molecular, and biogeochemical approaches. The diurnally oxic surface layer contained between 106 and 107 cultivable sulfate-reducing bacteria ml−1 and showed sulfate reduction rates between 1,000 and 2,200 nmol ml−1 day−1, both in the same range as and sometimes higher than those in anaerobic deeper mat layers. In the oxic surface layer and in the mat layers below, filamentous sulfate-reducing Desulfonema bacteria were found in variable densities of 104 to 106 cells ml−1. A Desulfonema-related, diurnally migrating bacterium was detected with PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis within and below the oxic surface layer. Facultative aerobic respiration, filamentous morphology, motility, diurnal migration, and aggregate formation were the most conspicuous adaptations of Solar Lake sulfate-reducing bacteria to the mat matrix and to diurnal oxygen stress. A comparison of sulfate reduction rates within the mat and previously published photosynthesis rates showed that CO2 from sulfate reduction in the upper 5 mm accounted for 7 to 8% of the total photosynthetic CO2 demand of the mat. PMID:9687455

  13. Sulfate-reducing bacteria and their activities in cyanobacterial mats of Solar Lake (Sinai, Egypt)

    SciTech Connect

    Teske, A.; Ramsing, N.B.; Habicht, K.; Kuever, J.; Joergensen, B.B.; Fukui, Manabu; Cohen, Y.

    1998-08-01

    The sulfate-reducing bacteria within the surface layer of the hypersaline cyanobacterial mat of Solar Lake (Sinai, Egypt) were investigated with combined microbiological, molecular, and biogeochemical approaches. The diurnally oxic surface layer contained between 10{sup 6} and 10{sup 7} cultivable sulfate-reducing bacteria ml{sup {minus}1} day{sup {minus}1}, both in the same range as and sometimes higher than those in anaerobic deeper mat layers. In the oxic surface layer and in the mat layers below, filamentous sulfate-reducing Desulfonema bacteria were found in variable densities of 10{sup 4} and 10{sup 6} cells ml{sup {minus}1}. A Desulfonema-related, diurnally migrating bacterium was detected with PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis within and below the oxic surface layer. Facultative aerobic respiration, filamentous morphology, motility, diurnal migration, and aggregate formation were the most conspicuous adaptations of Solar Lake sulfate-reducing bacteria to the mat matrix and to diurnal oxygen stress. A comparison of sulfate reduction rates within the mat and previously published photosynthesis rates showed that CO{sub 2} from sulfate reduction in the upper 5 mm accounted for 7 to 8% of the total photosynthetic CO{sub 2} demand of the mat.

  14. A comparative cytotoxicity study of isomeric alkylphthalates to metabolically variant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sandy, Edward H; Yao, Jun; Zheng, Shixue; Gogra, Alhaji B; Chen, Huilun; Zheng, Hui; Yormah, Thomas B R; Zhang, Xin; Zaray, Gyula; Ceccanti, Brunello; Choi, Martin M F

    2010-10-15

    This work investigated the toxicity of two isomeric alkylphthalates, i.e., di-n-octyl phthalate (DOP) and di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) to two model bacteria, Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis), which have been previously used to study the toxicity of environmental pollutants. Microcalorimetry was used as the key analytical tool alongside scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and traditional microbiology techniques. The thermokinetic parameters from microcalorimetry showed that the phthalates had a biphasic effect on the metabolic activities of the bacteria; serving as energy sources for the bacteria thereby stimulating their growth at low dosages (< or = 150 microg/mL), but displaying inhibitory effects at higher dosages (> or = 300 microg/mL), indicated by a sharp decrease in growth rate constants at 450 microg/mL. The SEM revealed that the bacterial cells were morphological deformed, with shrunk cells and elongated strands at 600 microg/mL of both phthalates. The elongated strands inferred that the phthalates inhibited the reproductive processes of the bacteria by possibly impeding some stages of cell division. The half inhibitory concentrations of the phthalates showed that DEHP was more toxic than DOP. Additionally, E. coli, a facultative anaerobe, was more susceptible to the toxic effects of phthalates than B. subtilis, an obligate aerobe capable of forming endospores crucial for tolerating extreme environmental conditions.

  15. Sulfate-reducing bacteria and their activities in cyanobacterial mats of solar lake (Sinai, Egypt).

    PubMed

    Teske, A; Ramsing, N B; Habicht, K; Fukui, M; Küver, J; Jørgensen, B B; Cohen, Y

    1998-08-01

    The sulfate-reducing bacteria within the surface layer of the hypersaline cyanobacterial mat of Solar Lake (Sinai, Egypt) were investigated with combined microbiological, molecular, and biogeochemical approaches. The diurnally oxic surface layer contained between 10(6) and 10(7) cultivable sulfate-reducing bacteria ml-1 and showed sulfate reduction rates between 1,000 and 2, 200 nmol ml-1 day-1, both in the same range as and sometimes higher than those in anaerobic deeper mat layers. In the oxic surface layer and in the mat layers below, filamentous sulfate-reducing Desulfonema bacteria were found in variable densities of 10(4) to 10(6) cells ml-1. A Desulfonema-related, diurnally migrating bacterium was detected with PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis within and below the oxic surface layer. Facultative aerobic respiration, filamentous morphology, motility, diurnal migration, and aggregate formation were the most conspicuous adaptations of Solar Lake sulfate-reducing bacteria to the mat matrix and to diurnal oxygen stress. A comparison of sulfate reduction rates within the mat and previously published photosynthesis rates showed that CO2 from sulfate reduction in the upper 5 mm accounted for 7 to 8% of the total photosynthetic CO2 demand of the mat. PMID:9687455

  16. Phylogenetic and metabolic diversity of bacteria associated with cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Guss, Adam M; Roeselers, Guus; Newton, Irene L G; Young, C Robert; Klepac-Ceraj, Vanja; Lory, Stephen; Cavanaugh, Colleen M

    2011-01-01

    In patients afflicted with cystic fibrosis (CF), morbidity and mortality are primarily associated with the adverse consequences of chronic microbial bronchial infections, which are thought to be caused by a few opportunistic pathogens. However, recent evidence suggests the presence of other microorganisms, which may significantly affect the course and outcome of the infection. Using a combination of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries, bacterial culturing and pyrosequencing of barcoded 16S rRNA amplicons, the microbial communities present in CF patient sputum samples were examined. In addition to previously recognized CF pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, >60 phylogenetically diverse bacterial genera that are not typically associated with CF pathogenesis were also detected. A surprisingly large number of fermenting facultative and obligate anaerobes from multiple bacterial phyla was present in each sample. Many of the bacteria and sequences found were normal residents of the oropharyngeal microflora and with many containing opportunistic pathogens. Our data suggest that these undersampled organisms within the CF lung are part of a much more complex microbial ecosystem than is normally presumed. Characterization of these communities is the first step in elucidating potential roles of diverse bacteria in disease progression and to ultimately facilitate advances in CF therapy. PMID:20631810

  17. Evolution of Molybdenum Nitrogenase during the Transition from Anaerobic to Aerobic Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Eric S.; Costas, Amaya M. Garcia; Hamilton, Trinity L.; Mus, Florence

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Molybdenum nitrogenase (Nif), which catalyzes the reduction of dinitrogen to ammonium, has modulated the availability of fixed nitrogen in the biosphere since early in Earth's history. Phylogenetic evidence indicates that oxygen (O2)-sensitive Nif emerged in an anaerobic archaeon and later diversified into an aerobic bacterium. Aerobic bacteria that fix N2 have adapted a number of strategies to protect Nif from inactivation by O2, including spatial and temporal segregation of Nif from O2 and respiratory consumption of O2. Here we report the complement of Nif-encoding genes in 189 diazotrophic genomes. We show that the evolution of Nif during the transition from anaerobic to aerobic metabolism was accompanied by both gene recruitment and loss, resulting in a substantial increase in the number of nif genes. While the observed increase in the number of nif genes and their phylogenetic distribution are strongly correlated with adaptation to utilize O2 in metabolism, the increase is not correlated with any of the known O2 protection mechanisms. Rather, gene recruitment appears to have been in response to selective pressure to optimize Nif synthesis to meet fixed N demands associated with aerobic productivity and to more efficiently regulate Nif under oxic conditions that favor protein turnover. Consistent with this hypothesis, the transition of Nif from anoxic to oxic environments is associated with a shift from posttranslational regulation in anaerobes to transcriptional regulation in obligate aerobes and facultative anaerobes. Given that fixed nitrogen typically limits ecosystem productivity, our observations further underscore the dynamic interplay between the evolution of Earth's oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon biogeochemical cycles. IMPORTANCE Molybdenum nitrogenase (Nif), which catalyzes the reduction of dinitrogen to ammonium, has modulated the availability of fixed nitrogen in the biosphere since early in Earth's history. Nif emerged in an anaerobe and

  18. Evolutionary ecology of facultative paedomorphosis in newts and salamanders.

    PubMed

    Denoël, Mathieu; Joly, Pierre; Whiteman, Howard H

    2005-11-01

    Facultative paedomorphosis is an environmentally induced polymorphism that results in the coexistence of mature, gilled, and fully aquatic paedomorphic adults and transformed, terrestrial, metamorphic adults in the same population. This polymorphism has been of interest to scientists for decades because it occurs in a large number of caudate amphibian taxa as well as in a large diversity of habitats. Numerous experimental and observational studies have been conducted to explain the proximate and ultimate factors affecting these heterochronic variants in natural populations. The production of each alternative phenotype is based on a genotypexenvironment interaction and research suggests that differences in the environment can produce paedomorphs through several ontogenetic pathways. No single advantage accounts for the maintenance of this polymorphism. Rather, the interplay of different costs and benefits explains the success of the polyphenism across variable environments. Facultative paedomorphosis allows individuals to cope with habitat variation, to take advantage of environmental heterogeneity in the presence of open niches, and to increase their fitness. This process is expected to constitute a first step towards speciation events, and is also an example of biodiversity at the intraspecific level. The facultative paedomorphosis system is thus ripe for future studies encompassing ecology, evolution, behaviour, endocrinology, physiology, and conservation biology. Few other systems have been broad enough to provide varied research opportunities on topics as diverse as phenotypic plasticity, speciation, mating behaviour, and hormonal regulation of morphology. Further research on facultative paedomorphosis will provide needed insight into these and other important questions facing biologists.

  19. Facultative Lagoons. Student Manual. Biological Treatment Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersen, Lorri

    The textual material for a unit on facultative lagoons is presented in this student manual. Topic areas discussed include: (1) loading; (2) microbial theory; (3) structure and design; (4) process control; (5) lagoon start-up; (6) data handling and analysis; (7) lagoon maintenance (considering visual observations, pond structure, safety, odor,…

  20. Facultative Lagoons. Instructor's Guide. Biological Treatment Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersen, Lorri

    This instructor's guide contains materials needed to teach a two-lesson unit on the structure and components of facultative lagoons, the biological theory of their operation, and factors affecting their operation. Control testing recommendations, maintenance guidelines, and troubleshooting hints are also provided. These materials include: (1) an…

  1. Cytochrome cd1-containing nitrite reductase encoding gene nirS as a new functional biomarker for detection of anaerobic ammonium oxidizing (Anammox) bacteria.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng; Ford, Tim; Li, Xiaoyan; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2011-04-15

    A newly designed primer set (AnnirS), together with a previously published primer set (ScnirS), was used to detect anammox bacterial nirS genes from sediments collected from three marine environments. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that all retrieved sequences were clearly different from typical denitrifiers' nirS, but do group together with the known anammox bacterial nirS. Sequences targeted by ScnirS are closely related to Scalindua nirS genes recovered from the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone (OMZ), whereas sequences targeted by AnnirS are more closely affiliated with the nirS of Candidatus 'Kuenenia stuttgartiensis' and even form a new phylogenetic nirS clade, which might be related to other genera of the anammox bacteria. Analysis demonstrated that retrieved sequences had higher sequence identities (>60%) with known anammox bacterial nirS genes than with denitrifiers' nirS, on both nucleotide and amino acid levels. Compared to the 16S rRNA and hydrazine oxidoreductase (hzo) genes, the anammox bacterial nirS not only showed consistent phylogenetic relationships but also demonstrated more reliable quantification of anammox bacteria because of the single copy of the nirS gene in the anammox bacterial genome and the specificity of PCR primers for different genera of anammox bacteria, thus providing a suitable functional biomarker for investigation of anammox bacteria. PMID:21417444

  2. Enhancement of anaerobic acidogenesis by integrating an electrochemical system into an acidogenic reactor: effect of hydraulic retention times (HRT) and role of bacteria and acidophilic methanogenic Archaea.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingxin; Zhang, Yaobin; Quan, Xie; Chen, Shuo

    2015-03-01

    In this study, an acidogenic reactor packed with a pair of Fe-carbon electrodes (R1) was developed to enhance anaerobic acidogenesis of organic wastewater at short hydraulic retention times. The results indicated that the acidogenic efficiency was improved by settling a bio-electrochemical system. When hydraulic retention times decreased from 12 to 3h, R1 showed 18.9% more chemical oxygen demand removal and 13.8% more acidification efficiency. After cutting off the voltage of R1, the COD removal decreased by about 5%. Coupling of Fe(2+) leaching and electric field accelerated the hydrolysis of polysaccharide, relieving its accumulation in the sludge phase. Several acidophilic methanogenic Archaea such as Methanosarcina sp. were enriched in R1, which was favorable for consuming organic acids and preventing excessive pH decline. Thus, the developed acidogenic reactor with Fe-carbon electrodes is expected to be potentially effective and useful for wastewater treatment.

  3. Quantitative fluorescent in-situ hybridization: a hypothesized competition mode between two dominant bacteria groups in hydrogen-producing anaerobic sludge processes.

    PubMed

    Huang, C-L; Chen, C-C; Lin, C-Y; Liu, W-T

    2009-01-01

    Two hydrogen-producing continuous flow stirred tank reactors (CSTRs) fed respectively with glucose and sucrose were investigated by polymerase chain reaction-denatured gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) and fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH). The substrate was fed in a continuous mode decreased from hydraulic retention time (HRT) 10 hours to 6, 5, 4, 3, and 2 hours. Quantitative fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH) observations further demonstrated that two morphotypes of bacteria dominated both microbial communities. One was long rod bacteria which can be targeted either by Chis150 probe designed to hybridize the gram positive low G + C bacteria or the specific oligonucleotide probe Lg10-6. The probe Lg10-6, affiliated with Clostridium pasteurianum, was designed and then checked with other reference organisms. The other type, unknown group, which cannot be detected by Chis150 was curved rod bacteria. Notably, the population ratios of the two predominant groups reflected the different operational performance of the two reactors, such as hydrogen producing rates, substrate turnover rates and metabolites compositions. Therefore, a competition mode of the two dominant bacteria groups was hypothesized. In the study, 16S rRNA-based gene library of hydrogen-producing microbial communities was established. The efficiency of hydrogen yields was correlated with substrates (glucose or sucrose), HRT, metabolites compositions (acetate, propionate, butyrate and ethanol), thermal pre-treatment (seed biomass was heated at 100 degrees C for 45 minutes), and microbial communities in the bioreactor, not sludge sources (municipal sewage sludge, alcohol-processing sludge, or bean-processing sludge). The designed specific oligonucleotide probe Lg10-6 also provides us a useful and fast molecular tool to screen hydrogen-producing microbial communities in the future research.

  4. Hydrogenosomes: convergent adaptations of mitochondria to anaerobic environments.

    PubMed

    Hackstein, J H; Akhmanova, A; Voncken, F; van Hoek, A; van Alen, T; Boxma, B; Moon-van der Staay, S Y; van der Staay, G; Leunissen, J; Huynen, M; Rosenberg, J; Veenhuis, M

    2001-01-01

    Hydrogenosomes are membrane-bound organelles that compartmentalise the final steps of energy metabolism in a number of anaerobic eukaryotes. They produce hydrogen and ATP. Here we will review the data, which are relevant for the questions: how did the hydrogenosomes originate, and what was their ancestor? Notably, there is strong evidence that hydrogenosomes evolved several times as adaptations to anaerobic environments. Most likely, hydrogenosomes and mitochondria share a common ancestor, but an unequivocal proof for this hypothesis is difficult because hydrogenosomes lack an organelle genome - with one remarkable exception (Nyctotherus ovalis). In particular, the diversity of extant hydrogenosomes hampers a straightforward analysis of their origins. Nevertheless, it is conceivable to postulate that the common ancestor of mitochondria and hydrogenosomes was a facultative anaerobic organelle that participated in the early radiation of unicellular eukaryotes. Consequently, it is reasonable to assume that both, hydrogenosomes and mitochondria are evolutionary adaptations to anaerobic or aerobic environments, respectively.

  5. Increased d-lactic Acid intestinal bacteria in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sheedy, John R; Wettenhall, Richard E H; Scanlon, Denis; Gooley, Paul R; Lewis, Donald P; McGregor, Neil; Stapleton, David I; Butt, Henry L; DE Meirleir, Kenny L

    2009-01-01

    Patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) are affected by symptoms of cognitive dysfunction and neurological impairment, the cause of which has yet to be elucidated. However, these symptoms are strikingly similar to those of patients presented with D-lactic acidosis. A significant increase of Gram positive facultative anaerobic faecal microorganisms in 108 CFS patients as compared to 177 control subjects (p<0.01) is presented in this report. The viable count of D-lactic acid producing Enterococcus and Streptococcus spp. in the faecal samples from the CFS group (3.5 x 10(7) cfu/L and 9.8 x 10(7) cfu/L respectively) were significantly higher than those for the control group (5.0 x 10(6) cfu/L and 8.9 x 10(4) cfu/L respectively). Analysis of exometabolic profiles of Enterococcus faecalis and Streptococcus sanguinis, representatives of Enterococcus and Streptococcus spp. respectively, by NMR and HPLC showed that these organisms produced significantly more lactic acid (p<0.01) from (13)C-labeled glucose, than the Gram negative Escherichia coli. Further, both E. faecalis and S. sanguinis secrete more D-lactic acid than E. coli. This study suggests a probable link between intestinal colonization of Gram positive facultative anaerobic D-lactic acid bacteria and symptom expressions in a subgroup of patients with CFS. Given the fact that this might explain not only neurocognitive dysfunction in CFS patients but also mitochondrial dysfunction, these findings may have important clinical implications.

  6. Conversion of Cn-Unsaturated into Cn-2-Saturated LCFA Can Occur Uncoupled from Methanogenesis in Anaerobic Bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Cavaleiro, Ana J; Pereira, Maria Alcina; Guedes, Ana P; Stams, Alfons J M; Alves, M Madalena; Sousa, Diana Z

    2016-03-15

    Fat, oils, and grease present in complex wastewater can be readily converted to methane, but the energy potential of these compounds is not always recyclable, due to incomplete degradation of long chain fatty acids (LCFA) released during lipids hydrolysis. Oleate (C18:1) is generally the dominant LCFA in lipid-containing wastewater, and its conversion in anaerobic bioreactors results in palmitate (C16:0) accumulation. The reason why oleate is continuously converted to palmitate without further degradation via β-oxidation is still unknown. In this work, the influence of methanogenic activity in the initial conversion steps of unsaturated LCFA was studied in 10 bioreactors continuously operated with saturated or unsaturated C16- and C18-LCFA, in the presence or absence of the methanogenic inhibitor bromoethanesulfonate (BrES). Saturated Cn-2-LCFA accumulated both in the presence and absence of BrES during the degradation of unsaturated Cn-LCFA, and represented more than 50% of total LCFA. In the presence of BrES further conversion of saturated intermediates did not proceed, not even when prolonged batch incubation was applied. As the initial steps of unsaturated LCFA degradation proceed uncoupled from methanogenesis, accumulation of saturated LCFA can be expected. Analysis of the active microbial communities suggests a role for facultative anaerobic bacteria in the initial steps of unsaturated LCFA biodegradation. Understanding this role is now imperative to optimize methane production from LCFA. PMID:26810160

  7. Selenate reduction to elemental selenium by anaerobic bacteria in sediments and culture: biogeochemical significance of a novel, sulfate-independent respiration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, Ronald S.; Hollibaugh, James T.; Maest, Ann S.; Presser, Theresa S.; Miller, Laurence G.; Culbertson, Charles W.

    1989-01-01

    Interstitial water profiles of SeO42−, SeO32−, SO42−, and Cl− in anoxic sediments indicated removal of the seleno-oxyanions by a near-surface process unrelated to sulfate reduction. In sediment slurry experiments, a complete reductive removal of SeO42− occurred under anaerobic conditions, was more rapid with H2 or acetate, and was inhibited by O2, NO3−, MnO2, or autoclaving but not by SO42− or FeOOH. Oxidation of acetate in sediments could be coupled to selenate but not to molybdate. Reduction of selenate to elemental selenium was determined to be the mechanism for loss from solution. Selenate reduction was inhibited by tungstate and chromate but not by molybdate. A small quantity of the elemental selenium precipitated into sediments from solution could be resolublized by oxidation with either nitrate or FeOOH, but not with MnO2. A bacterium isolated from estuarine sediments demonstrated selenate-dependent growth on acetate, forming elemental selenium and carbon dioxide as respiratory end products. These results indicate that dissimilatory selenate reduction to elemental selenium is the major sink for selenium oxyanions in anoxic sediments. In addition, they suggest application as a treatment process for removing selenium oxyanions from wastewaters and also offer an explanation for the presence of selenite in oxic waters.

  8. The potential of bacteria isolated from ruminal contents of seaweed-eating North Ronaldsay sheep to hydrolyse seaweed components and produce methane by anaerobic digestion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Williams, Allan G; Withers, Susan; Sutherland, Alastair D

    2013-01-01

    The production of methane biofuel from seaweeds is limited by the hydrolysis of polysaccharides. The rumen microbiota of seaweed-eating North Ronaldsay sheep was studied for polysaccharidic bacterial isolates degrading brown-seaweed polysaccharides. Only nine isolates out of 65 utilized >90% of the polysaccharide they were isolated on. The nine isolates (eight Prevotella spp. and one Clostridium butyricum) utilized whole Laminaria hyperborea extract and a range of seaweed polysaccharides, including alginate (seven out of nine isolates), laminarin and carboxymethylcellulose (eight out of nine isolates); while two out of nine isolates additionally hydrolysed fucoidan to some extent. Crude enzyme extracts from three of the isolates studied further had diverse glycosidases and polysaccharidase activities; particularly against laminarin and alginate (two isolates were shown to have alginate lyase activity) and notably fucoidan and carageenan (one isolate). In serial culture rumen microbiota hydrolysed a range of seaweed polysaccharides (fucoidan to a notably lesser degree) and homogenates of L. hyperborea, mixed Fucus spp. and Ascophyllum nodosum to produce methane and acetate. The rumen microbiota and isolates represent potential adjunct organisms or enzymes which may improve hydrolysis of seaweed components and thus improve the efficiency of seaweed anaerobic digestion for methane biofuel production. PMID:23170956

  9. Carbon and hydrogen stable isotope fractionation associated with the anaerobic degradation of propane and butane by marine sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Jaekel, Ulrike; Vogt, Carsten; Fischer, Anko; Richnow, Hans-Hermann; Musat, Florin

    2014-01-01

    The anaerobic degradation of propane and butane is typically initiated by activation via addition to fumarate. Here we investigated the mechanism of activation under sulfate-reducing conditions by one pure culture (strain BuS5) and three enrichment cultures employing stable isotope analysis. Stable isotope fractionation was compared for cultures incubated with or without substrate diffusion limitation. Bulk enrichment factors were significantly higher in mixed vs. static incubations. Two dimensional factors, given by the correlation of stable isotope fractionation of both carbon and hydrogen at their reactive positions (Lambda reactive position, Λrp), were compared to analyse the activation mechanisms. A characteristic reactive position isotope fractionation pattern was observed, distinct from aerobic degradation. Λrp values ranged from 10.5 to 11.8 for propane and from 7.8 to 9.4 for butane. Incubations of strain BuS5 with deuterium-labelled n-alkanes indicated that butane was activated solely at the subterminal C atom. In contrast, propane was activated mainly at the subterminal C atom but also significantly at the terminal C atoms. A conservative estimate suggests that about 70% of the propane activation events occurred at the subterminal C atom and about 30% at the terminal C atoms.

  10. Potential competitive exclusion bacteria from poultry inhibitory to Campylobacter jejuni and Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guodong; Ma, Li; Doyle, Michael P

    2007-04-01

    The objective of this study was to isolate from chickens potential competitive exclusion bacteria (CE) that are inhibitory to Campylobacter jejuni or Salmonella, or to both, for subsequent development of a defined CE product for use in poultry. Adult chickens from family farms, commercial farms, and broiler chicken research centers were sampled to identify and select C. jejuni-free donor chickens. A challenge treatment, which included administering perorally 106 CFU C. jejuni per chicken and determining undetectable cecal shedding of campylobacters at 4 weeks, was important for identifying the best CE donor chickens. Screening of bacterial colonies obtained from nine donor chickens by using selective and nonselective media yielded 636 isolates inhibitory to six C. jejuni strains in vitro, with 194 isolates being strongly inhibitory. Of the 194 isolates, 145 were from ceca, and 117 were facultative anaerobic bacteria. One hundred forty-three isolates were inhibitory to six strains of Salmonella (including five different serotypes) in vitro. Of these, 41 were strongly inhibitory to all C. jejuni and Salmonella strains evaluated, and most were Lactobacillus salivarius. A direct overlay method, which involved directly applying soft agar on plates with discrete colonies from mucus scrapings of gastrointestinal tracts, was more effective in isolating CE than was the frequently practiced isolation method of picking and transferring discrete colonies and then overlaying them with soft agar. The best approach for obtaining bacteria highly inhibitory to Salmonella and C. jejuni from chickens was to isolate bacteria from ceca under anaerobic conditions. Free-range chickens from family farms were better donors of potential CE strongly inhibitory to both Salmonella and Campylobacter than were chickens from commercial farms and broiler chicken research centers.

  11. Complete genome sequences for the anaerobic, extremely thermophilic plant biomass-degrading bacteria Caldicellulosiruptor hydrothermalis, Caldicellulosiruptor kristjanssonii, Caldicellulosiruptor kronotskyensis, Caldicellulosiruptor owensenis, and Caldicellulosiruptor lactoaceticus

    SciTech Connect

    Blumer-Schuette, Sara E.; Ozdemir, Inci; Mistry, Dhaval; Lucas, Susan; Lapidus, Alla L.; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Woyke, Tanja; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Ivanova, N; Detter, J. Chris; Walston Davenport, Karen; Han, Cliff; Adams, Michael W. W.; Kelly, Robert M

    2011-01-01

    The genus Caldicellulosiruptor contains the most thermophilic, plant biomass-degrading bacteria isolated to date. Previously, genome sequences from three cellulolytic members of this genus were reported (C. saccharolyticus, C. bescii, and C. obsidiansis). To further explore the physiological and biochemical basis for polysaccharide degradation within this genus, five additional genomes were sequenced: C. hydrothermalis, C. kristjanssonii, C. kronotskyensis, C. lactoaceticus, and C. owensensis. Taken together, the seven completed and one draft-phase Caldicellulosiruptor genomes suggest that, while central metabolism is highly conserved, significant differences in glycoside hydrolase inventories and numbers of carbohydrate transporters exist, a finding which likely relates to variability observed in plant biomass degradation capacity.

  12. A novel multienzyme complex from a newly isolated facultative anaerobic bacterium, Paenibacillus sp. TW1.

    PubMed

    Tachaapaikoon, C; Kyu, K L; Pason, P; Ratanakhanockchai, K

    2012-06-01

    A multienzyme complex from newly isolated Paenibacillus sp. TW1 was purified from pellet-bound enzyme preparations by elution with 0.25% sucrose and 1.0% triethylamine (TEA), ultrafiltration and Sephacryl S-400 gel filtration chromatography. The purified multienzyme complex showed a single protein band on non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (native-PAGE). The high molecular mass of the purified multienzyme complex was approximately 1,950 kDa. The complex consisted of xylanase and cellulase activities as the major and minor enzyme subunits, respectively. The complex appeared as at least 18 protein bands on sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and as 15 xylanases and 6 cellulases on zymograms. The purified multienzyme complex contained xylanase, α-L-arabinofuranosidase, carboxymethyl cellulase (CMCase), avicelase and cellobiohydrolase. The complex could effectively hydrolyze corn hulls, corncobs and sugarcane bagasse. These results indicate that the multienzyme complex that is produced by this bacterium is a large, novel xylanolytic-cellulolytic enzyme complex.

  13. Comparison of nitrogen removal rates and nitrous oxide production from enriched anaerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria