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Sample records for facultatively heterotrophic cyanobacterium

  1. Antagonistic interactions between filamentous heterotrophs and the cyanobacterium Nostoc muscorum.

    PubMed

    Svercel, Miroslav; Saladin, Bianca; van Moorsel, Sofia J; Wolf, Sarah; Bagheri, Homayoun C

    2011-09-13

    Little is known about interactions between filamentous heterotrophs and filamentous cyanobacteria. Here, interactions between the filamentous heterotrophic bacteria Fibrella aestuarina (strain BUZ 2) and Fibrisoma limi (BUZ 3) with an axenic strain of the autotrophic filamentous cyanobacterium Nostoc muscorum (SAG 25.82) were studied in mixed cultures under nutrient rich (carbon source present in medium) and poor (carbon source absent in medium) conditions. F. aestuarina BUZ 2 significantly reduced the cyanobacterial population whereas F. limi BUZ 3 did not. Physical contact between heterotrophs and autotroph was observed and the cyanobacterial cells showed some level of damage and lysis. Therefore, either contact lysis or entrapment with production of extracellular compounds in close vicinity of host cells could be considered as potential modes of action.The supernatants from pure heterotrophic cultures did not have an effect on Nostoc cultures. However, supernatant from mixed cultures of BUZ 2 and Nostoc had a negative effect on cyanobacterial growth, indicating that the lytic compounds were only produced in the presence of Nostoc.The growth and survival of tested heterotrophs was enhanced by the presence of Nostoc or its metabolites, suggesting that the heterotrophs could utilize the autotrophs and its products as a nutrient source. However, the autotroph could withstand and out-compete the heterotrophs under nutrient poor conditions. Our results suggest that the nutrients in cultivation media, which boost or reduce the number of heterotrophs, were the important factor influencing the outcome of the interplay between filamentous heterotrophs and autotrophs. For better understanding of these interactions, additional research is needed. In particular, it is necessary to elucidate the mode of action for lysis by heterotrophs, and the possible defense mechanisms of the autotrophs.

  2. New Facultative Thiobacillus and a Reevaluation of the Heterotrophic Potential of Thiobacillus novellus

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Barrie F.; Hoare, Derek S.

    1969-01-01

    A new facultatively autotrophic Thiobacillus has been isolated in pure culture. The general physiological characteristics of the organism are described together with a redescription of Thiobacillus novellus. The new isolate differs from T. novellus in its ability to grow heterotrophically at faster rates and on a greater range of organic compounds. It can be transferred readily between autotrophic and heterotrophic conditions. It can grow anaerobically by nitrate respiration on a number of organic compounds, but not on thiosulfate. Some problems in the nomenclature and taxonomy of the thiobacilli are discussed with reference to the new isolate. Images PMID:5344108

  3. Indirect Interspecies Regulation: Transcriptional and Physiological Responses of a Cyanobacterium to Heterotrophic Partnership

    PubMed Central

    McClure, Ryan S.; Thiel, Vera; Sadler, Natalie C.; Kim, Young-Mo; Chrisler, William B.; Hill, Eric A.; Romine, Margaret F.; Jansson, Janet K.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alexander S.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The mechanisms by which microbes interact in communities remain poorly understood. Here, we interrogated specific interactions between photoautotrophic and heterotrophic members of a model consortium to infer mechanisms that mediate metabolic coupling and acclimation to partnership. This binary consortium was composed of a cyanobacterium, Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1, which supported growth of an obligate aerobic heterotroph, Meiothermus ruber strain A, by providing organic carbon, O2, and reduced nitrogen. Species-resolved transcriptomic analyses were used in combination with growth and photosynthesis kinetics to infer interactions and the environmental context under which they occur. We found that the efficiency of biomass production and resistance to stress induced by high levels of dissolved O2 increased, beyond axenic performance, as a result of heterotrophic partnership. Coordinated transcriptional responses transcending both species were observed and used to infer specific interactions resulting from the synthesis and exchange of resources. The cyanobacterium responded to heterotrophic partnership by altering expression of core genes involved with photosynthesis, carbon uptake/fixation, vitamin synthesis, and scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS). IMPORTANCE This study elucidates how a cyanobacterial primary producer acclimates to heterotrophic partnership by modulating the expression levels of key metabolic genes. Heterotrophic bacteria can indirectly regulate the physiology of the photoautotrophic primary producers, resulting in physiological changes identified here, such as increased intracellular ROS. Some of the interactions inferred from this model system represent putative principles of metabolic coupling in phototrophic-heterotrophic partnerships. PMID:28289730

  4. Effects of substrate concentrations on the growth of heterotrophic bacteria and algae in secondary facultative ponds.

    PubMed

    Kayombo, S; Mbwette, T S A; Katima, J H Y; Jorgensen, S E

    2003-07-01

    This paper presents the effect of substrate concentration on the growth of a mixed culture of algae and heterotrophic bacteria in secondary facultative ponds (SFPs) utilizing settled domestic sewage as a sole source of organic carbon. The growth of the mixed culture was studied at the concentrations ranging between 200 and 800 mg COD/l in a series of batch chemostat reactors. From the laboratory data, the specific growth rate (micro) was determined using the modified Gompertz model. The maximum specific growth rate ( micro(max)) and half saturation coefficients (K(s)) were calculated using the Monod kinetic equation. The maximum observed growth rate ( micro(max)) for heterotrophic bacteria was 3.8 day(-1) with K(s) of 200 mg COD/l. The micro(max) for algal biomass based on suspended volatile solids was 2.7 day(-1) with K(s) of 110 mg COD/l. The micro(max) of algae based on the chlorophyll-a was 3.5 day(-1) at K(s) of 50mg COD/l. The observed specific substrate removal by heterotrophic bacteria varied between the concentrations of substrate used and the average value was 0.82 (mg COD/mg biomass). The specific substrate utilization rate in the bioreactors was direct proportional to the specific growth rate. Hence, the determined Monod kinetic parameters are useful for the definition of the operation of SFPs.

  5. Electron Transport Controls Glutamine Synthetase Activity in the Facultative Heterotrophic Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, J. C.; Crespo, J. L.; Garcia-Dominguez, M.; Florencio, F. J.

    1995-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 was inactivated in vivo by transferring cells from light to darkness or by incubation with the photosynthetic inhibitor 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea but not with 2,5-dibromo-3-methyl-6-isopropyl-p-benzoquinone. Addition of glucose prevented both dark and 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea GS inactivation. In a Synechocystis psbE-psbF mutant (T1297) lacking photosystem II, glucose was required to maintain active GS, even in the light. However, in nitrogen-starved T1297 cells the removal of glucose did not affect GS activity. The fact that dark-inactivated GS was reactivated in vitro by the same treatments that reactivate the ammonium-inactivated GS points out that both nitrogen metabolism and redox state of the cells lead to the same molecular regulatory mechanism in the control of GS activity. Using GS antibodies we detected that dark-inactivated GS displayed a different electrophoretic migration with respect to the active form in nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis but not in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The possible pathway to modulate GS activity by the electron transport flow in Synechocystis cells is discussed. PMID:12228640

  6. Electron Transport Controls Glutamine Synthetase Activity in the Facultative Heterotrophic Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Reyes, J. C.; Crespo, J. L.; Garcia-Dominguez, M.; Florencio, F. J.

    1995-11-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 was inactivated in vivo by transferring cells from light to darkness or by incubation with the photosynthetic inhibitor 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea but not with 2,5-dibromo-3-methyl-6-isopropyl-p-benzoquinone. Addition of glucose prevented both dark and 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea GS inactivation. In a Synechocystis psbE-psbF mutant (T1297) lacking photosystem II, glucose was required to maintain active GS, even in the light. However, in nitrogen-starved T1297 cells the removal of glucose did not affect GS activity. The fact that dark-inactivated GS was reactivated in vitro by the same treatments that reactivate the ammonium-inactivated GS points out that both nitrogen metabolism and redox state of the cells lead to the same molecular regulatory mechanism in the control of GS activity. Using GS antibodies we detected that dark-inactivated GS displayed a different electrophoretic migration with respect to the active form in nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis but not in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The possible pathway to modulate GS activity by the electron transport flow in Synechocystis cells is discussed.

  7. Growth of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus leopoliensis CCAP1405/1 on agar media in the presence of heterotrophic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Shohei; Itoh, Kazuhito; Suyama, Kousuke

    2011-01-01

    The cyanobacterium Synechococcus leopoliensis CCAP1405/1 does not grow on common solid media made of agar, agarose HT, noble agar, gelrite and gelatin, although it grows in liquid media with the same components. The inoculation of S. leopoliensis CCAP1405/1 at a high initial cell density allowed it to grow on the agar media, and co-inoculation with one of the heterotrophic bacterial strains belonging to a wide range of phylogeny, showed the same effects even at a low initial cell density of S. leopoliensis CCAP1405/1. The addition of thiosulfate and high concentrations of vitamin B(12), biotin and thiamine also supported growth on solid media, but catalase had no effect. On inorganic solid media, the autotrophic cyanobacterial strain supported the growth of heterotrophic bacteria, suggesting mutual interaction.

  8. [The sll0886 gene, controlling light-activated heterotrophic growth, is involved in regulating phototaxis in cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6893].

    PubMed

    Kirik, I A; Babykin, M M

    2008-05-01

    The sll0886 gene, controlling light-activated heterotrophic growth (LAHG), was tested for the role in regulating phototaxis in cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Insertional inactivation of the gene in the genome of a wildtype strain did not affect positive (toward light) or negative (away from high light) phototaxis. However, cells lost motility when sll0886 inactivation was combined with the prqRL17Q mutation, which determined negative phototaxis at low light. Immotile cells with the prqRL17Q mutation and the inactivated sll0886 gene did not display any defect in the formation of type IV pili, essential for phototaxis. Hence, the function, rather than biogenesis, of pili was affected. It was concluded that the sll0886 gene, coding for a TPR family protein, is involved in controlling negative phototaxis of cyanobacteria at the level of photoreception and signal transduction and that its role is mediated by the unidentified redundant gene whose function is suppressed by the prqRL17Q mutation.

  9. The cyanobacterial thioredoxin gene is required for both photoautotrophic and heterotrophic growth.

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, F; Florencio, F J

    1996-01-01

    The gene encoding thioredoxin in the facultative heterotrophic cyanobacterium Synechocytis sp. PCC 6803 (trxA) has been cloned by heterologous hybridization using the corresponding gene trxM from the cyanobacterium Anacystis nidulans as a probe. The deduced amino acid sequence of trxA predicts a protein of relative molecular weight of 11,750 and has strong identity with its cyanobacterial counterparts and other m-type thioredoxins of photo-synthetic eukaryotes. The trxA gene has been expressed Escherichia coli as a functional protein of 12 kD and has been shown by western blot analysis to be the same size as in Synechocystis. The trxA gene is transcribed in Synechocystis as a single transcript of 450 nucleotides and accumulates to the same level under photosynthetic and heterotrophic growth conditions. The trxA gene was inactivated with a kanamycin-resistant cassette, and total segregation of the disrupted trxA gene was obtained only when the trxM gene from A. nidulans (E.D.G. Muller, B.B. Buchanan [1989] J Biol Chem 264: 4008-4014) was simultaneously expressed in Synechocytis. Our results suggest an essential role of thioredoxin not only when cells grow photosynthetically but also under heterotrophic conditions. PMID:8756494

  10. Inference of Interactions in Cyanobacterial-Heterotrophic Co-Cultures via Transcriptome Sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Beliaev, Alex S.; Romine, Margaret F.; Serres, Margaret; Bernstein, Hans C.; Linggi, Bryan E.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Isern, Nancy G.; Chrisler, William B.; Kucek, Leo A.; Hill, Eric A.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy; Bryant, Donald A.; Wiley, H. S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Konopka, Allan

    2014-04-29

    We employed deep sequencing technology to identify transcriptional adaptation of the euryhaline unicellular cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 and the marine facultative aerobe Shewanella putrefaciens W3-18-1 to growth in a co-culture and infer the effect of carbon flux distributions on photoautotroph-heterotroph interactions. The overall transcriptome response of both organisms to co-cultivation was shaped by their respective physiologies and growth constraints. Carbon limitation resulted in the expansion of metabolic capacities which was manifested through the transcriptional upregulation of transport and catabolic pathways. While growth coupling occurred via lactate oxidation or secretion of photosynthetically fixed carbon, there was evidence of specific metabolic interactions between the two organisms. On one hand, the production and excretion of specific amino acids (methionine and alanine) by the cyanobacterium correlated with the putative downregulation of the corresponding biosynthetic machinery of Shewanella W3-18-1. On the other hand, the broad and consistent decrease of mRNA levels for many Fe-regulated Synechococcus 7002 genes during co-cultivation suggested increased Fe availability as well as more facile and energy-efficient mechanisms for Fe acquisition by the cyanobacterium. Furthermore, evidence pointed at potentially novel interactions between oxygenic photoautotrophs and heterotrophs related to the oxidative stress response as transcriptional patterns suggested that Synechococcus 7002 rather than Shewanella W3-18-1 provided scavenging functions for reactive oxygen species under co-culture conditions. This study provides an initial insight into the complexity of photoautotrophic-heterotrophic interactions and brings new perspectives of their role in the robustness and stability of the association.

  11. A Nostoc punctiforme sugar transporter necessary to establish a Cyanobacterium-plant symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Ekman, Martin; Picossi, Silvia; Campbell, Elsie L; Meeks, John C; Flores, Enrique

    2013-04-01

    In cyanobacteria-plant symbioses, the symbiotic nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium has low photosynthetic activity and is supplemented by sugars provided by the plant partner. Which sugars and cyanobacterial sugar uptake mechanism(s) are involved in the symbiosis, however, is unknown. Mutants of the symbiotically competent, facultatively heterotrophic cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme were constructed bearing a neomycin resistance gene cassette replacing genes in a putative sugar transport gene cluster. Results of transport activity assays using (14)C-labeled fructose and glucose and tests of heterotrophic growth with these sugars enabled the identification of an ATP-binding cassette-type transporter for fructose (Frt), a major facilitator permease for glucose (GlcP), and a porin needed for the optimal uptake of both fructose and glucose. Analysis of green fluorescent protein fluorescence in strains of N. punctiforme bearing frt::gfp fusions showed high expression in vegetative cells and akinetes, variable expression in hormogonia, and no expression in heterocysts. The symbiotic efficiency of N. punctiforme sugar transport mutants was investigated by testing their ability to infect a nonvascular plant partner, the hornwort Anthoceros punctatus. Strains that were specifically unable to transport glucose did not infect the plant. These results imply a role for GlcP in establishing symbiosis under the conditions used in this work.

  12. A Nostoc punctiforme Sugar Transporter Necessary to Establish a Cyanobacterium-Plant Symbiosis1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Ekman, Martin; Picossi, Silvia; Campbell, Elsie L.; Meeks, John C.; Flores, Enrique

    2013-01-01

    In cyanobacteria-plant symbioses, the symbiotic nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium has low photosynthetic activity and is supplemented by sugars provided by the plant partner. Which sugars and cyanobacterial sugar uptake mechanism(s) are involved in the symbiosis, however, is unknown. Mutants of the symbiotically competent, facultatively heterotrophic cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme were constructed bearing a neomycin resistance gene cassette replacing genes in a putative sugar transport gene cluster. Results of transport activity assays using 14C-labeled fructose and glucose and tests of heterotrophic growth with these sugars enabled the identification of an ATP-binding cassette-type transporter for fructose (Frt), a major facilitator permease for glucose (GlcP), and a porin needed for the optimal uptake of both fructose and glucose. Analysis of green fluorescent protein fluorescence in strains of N. punctiforme bearing frt::gfp fusions showed high expression in vegetative cells and akinetes, variable expression in hormogonia, and no expression in heterocysts. The symbiotic efficiency of N. punctiforme sugar transport mutants was investigated by testing their ability to infect a nonvascular plant partner, the hornwort Anthoceros punctatus. Strains that were specifically unable to transport glucose did not infect the plant. These results imply a role for GlcP in establishing symbiosis under the conditions used in this work. PMID:23463784

  13. Characterization of Two New Facultative Methanotrophs

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Martha J.; Wopat, Ann E.; O'Connor, Mary L.

    1980-01-01

    Two new facultative methane-oxidizing bacteria have been isolated from lake water enrichments. The organisms have been characterized in terms of colony types, growth characteristics, the guanine plus cytosine content of their deoxyribonucleic acid, thin sections, oxidation rates, and carbon assimilation pathways. Methane-grown cells of both organisms contained intracytoplasmic membranes similar to those described as type II in other methanotrophic bacteria. Neither organism had such membranes when grown heterotrophically. Both organisms assimilated methane by way of the isocitrate lyase-negative serine pathway for formaldehyde incorporation. The enzymes of this pathway were high in specific activity in cells grown on methane and were at low levels in cells grown either on heterotrophic substrates or on heterotrophic substrates plus methane. It is proposed that both organisms be classified in the genus Methylobacterium as two new species, Methylobacterium ethanolicum and Methylobacterium hypolimneticum. Images PMID:16345617

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Limnobacter sp. Strain CACIAM 66H1, a Heterotrophic Bacterium Associated with Cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Fábio Daniel Florêncio; Lima, Alex Ranieri Jerônimo; Moraes, Pablo Henrique Gonçalves; Siqueira, Andrei Santos; Dall'Agnol, Leonardo Teixeira; Baraúna, Anna Rafaella Ferreira; Martins, Luisa Carício; Oliveira, Karol Guimarães; de Lima, Clayton Pereira Silva; Nunes, Márcio Roberto Teixeira; Vianez-Júnior, João Lídio Silva Gonçalves; Gonçalves, Evonnildo Costa

    2016-05-19

    Ecological interactions between cyanobacteria and heterotrophic prokaryotes are poorly known. To improve the genomic studies of heterotrophic bacterium-cyanobacterium associations, the draft genome sequence (3.2 Mbp) of Limnobacter sp. strain CACIAM 66H1, found in a nonaxenic culture of Synechococcus sp. (cyanobacteria), is presented here.

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Paenibacillus Strain P1XP2, a Polysaccharide-Degrading, Thermophilic, Facultative Anaerobic Bacterium Isolated from a Commercial Bioreactor Degrading Food Waste

    PubMed Central

    Adelskov, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of the ~5.8-Mb draft genome sequence of a moderately thermophilic, heterotrophic, facultative anaerobic bacterium, Paenibacillus strain P1XP2, identified genes for enzymes with the potential for degrading complex food wastes, a property consistent with the ecological habitat of the isolate. PMID:25635015

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Paenibacillus Strain P1XP2, a Polysaccharide-Degrading, Thermophilic, Facultative Anaerobic Bacterium Isolated from a Commercial Bioreactor Degrading Food Waste.

    PubMed

    Adelskov, Joseph; Patel, Bharat K C

    2015-01-29

    The analysis of the ~5.8-Mb draft genome sequence of a moderately thermophilic, heterotrophic, facultative anaerobic bacterium, Paenibacillus strain P1XP2, identified genes for enzymes with the potential for degrading complex food wastes, a property consistent with the ecological habitat of the isolate.

  17. The oligotrophic ocean is heterotrophic.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Carlos M; Regaudie-de-Gioux, Aurore; Arrieta, Jesús M; Delgado-Huertas, Antonio; Agustí, Susana

    2013-01-01

    Incubation (in vitro) and incubation-free (in situ) methods, each with their own advantages and limitations, have been used to derive estimates of net community metabolism in the oligotrophic subtropical gyres of the open ocean. The hypothesis that heterotrophic communities are prevalent in most oligotrophic regions is consistent with the available evidence and supported by scaling relationships showing that heterotrophic communities prevail in areas of low gross primary production, low chlorophyll a, and warm water, conditions found in the oligotrophic ocean. Heterotrophic metabolism can prevail where heterotrophic activity is subsidized by organic carbon inputs from the continental shelf or the atmosphere and from nonphotosynthetic autotrophic and mixotrophic metabolic pathways. The growth of the oligotrophic regions is likely to be tilting the metabolic balance of the ocean toward a greater prevalence of heterotrophic communities.

  18. Loss of cytochrome cM stimulates cyanobacterial heterotrophic growth in the dark.

    PubMed

    Hiraide, Yuto; Oshima, Kenshiro; Fujisawa, Takatomo; Uesaka, Kazuma; Hirose, Yuu; Tsujimoto, Ryoma; Yamamoto, Haruki; Okamoto, Shinobu; Nakamura, Yasukazu; Terauchi, Kazuki; Omata, Tatsuo; Ihara, Kunio; Hattori, Masahira; Fujita, Yuichi

    2015-02-01

    Although cyanobacteria are photoautotrophs, they have the capability for heterotrophic metabolism that enables them to survive in their natural habitat. However, cyanobacterial species that grow heterotrophically in the dark are rare. It remains largely unknown how cyanobacteria regulate heterotrophic activity. The cyanobacterium Leptolyngbya boryana grows heterotrophically with glucose in the dark. A dark-adapted variant dg5 isolated from the wild type (WT) exhibits enhanced heterotrophic growth in the dark. We sequenced the genomes of dg5 and the WT to identify the mutation(s) of dg5. The WT genome consists of a circular chromosome (6,176,364 bp), a circular plasmid pLBA (77,793 bp) and two linear plasmids pLBX (504,942 bp) and pLBY (44,369 bp). Genome comparison revealed three mutation sites. Phenotype analysis of mutants isolated from the WT by introducing these mutations individually revealed that the relevant mutation is a single adenine insertion causing a frameshift of cytM encoding Cyt c(M). The respiratory oxygen consumption of the cytM-lacking mutant grown in the dark was significantly higher than that of the WT. We isolated a cytM-lacking mutant, ΔcytM, from another cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, and ΔcytM grew in the dark with a doubling time of 33 h in contrast to no growth of the WT. The respiratory oxygen consumption of ΔcytM grown in the dark was about 2-fold higher than that of the WT. These results suggest a suppressive role(s) for Cyt cM in regulation of heterotrophic activity.

  19. Growth and Grazing Kinetics of the Facultative Anaerobic Nanoflagellate, Suigetsumonas clinomigrationis

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Ryuji; Okamura, Takahiko

    2017-01-01

    The functional and numerical responses of the facultative anaerobic heterotrophic nanoflagellate, Suigetsumonas clinomigrationis NIES-3647 to prey density were examined under oxic and anoxic conditions. S. clinomigrationis grew at temperatures between 10 and 30°C and in the salinity range of 3.9–36.9 psu. The maximum specific growth and ingestion rates of S. clinomigrationis were lower under anoxic conditions than under oxic conditions. Half-saturation constants for the growth of S. clinomigrationis were within or greater than the range of bacterial densities in the water column of Lake Suigetsu, suggesting that its growth rate is limited by bacterial prey densities in natural environments. PMID:28190796

  20. Growth and Grazing Kinetics of the Facultative Anaerobic Nanoflagellate, Suigetsumonas clinomigrationis.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Ryuji; Okamura, Takahiko

    2017-03-31

    The functional and numerical responses of the facultative anaerobic heterotrophic nanoflagellate, Suigetsumonas clinomigrationis NIES-3647 to prey density were examined under oxic and anoxic conditions. S. clinomigrationis grew at temperatures between 10 and 30°C and in the salinity range of 3.9-36.9 psu. The maximum specific growth and ingestion rates of S. clinomigrationis were lower under anoxic conditions than under oxic conditions. Half-saturation constants for the growth of S. clinomigrationis were within or greater than the range of bacterial densities in the water column of Lake Suigetsu, suggesting that its growth rate is limited by bacterial prey densities in natural environments.

  1. Heterotrophic nitrification among denitrifiers.

    PubMed Central

    Castignetti, D; Hollocher, T C

    1984-01-01

    Twelve denitrifying bacteria representing six genera were tested for an ability to nitrify pyruvic oxime heterotrophically. Six of these bacteria exhibited appreciable nitrification activity, yielding as much as 5.8 mM nitrite and little or no nitrate when grown in a mineral salts medium containing 7 mM pyruvic oxime and 0.05% yeast extract. Of the six active bacteria, four (Pseudomonas denitrificans, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and two strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens) could grow on yeast extract but not pyruvic oxime, one (Pseudomonas aureofaciens) could grow slowly on pyruvic oxime, and one (Alcaligenes faecalis) could apparently grow on pyruvic oxime in the presence of yeast extract but not in its absence. Eight of the twelve bacteria in the resting state could oxidize hydroxylamine to nitrite, and P. aureofaciens was remarkably active in this regard. In general, those denitrifiers active in the nitrification of pyruvic oxime or hydroxylamine or both are abundant in soils. A possible advantage of having nitrification and denitrification capabilities in the same organism is discussed. PMID:6721486

  2. Culture and manipulation of insect facultative symbionts.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Mauricio H; Dale, Colin

    2006-09-01

    Insects from many different taxonomic groups harbor maternally transmitted bacterial symbionts. Some of these associations are ancient in origin and obligate in nature whereas others originated more recently and are facultative. Previous research focused on the biology of ancient obligate symbionts with essential nutritional roles in their insect hosts. However, recent important advances in understanding the biology of facultative associations have been driven by the development of techniques for the culture, genetic modification and manipulation of facultative symbionts. In this review, we examine these available experimental techniques and illustrate how they have provided fascinating new insight into the nature of associations involving facultative symbionts. We also propose a rationale for future research based on the integration of genomics and experimentation.

  3. 46 CFR 308.544 - Facultative binder, Form MA-315.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Facultative binder, Form MA-315. 308.544 Section 308.544... Risk Cargo Insurance Iii-Facultative War Risk Cargo Insurance § 308.544 Facultative binder, Form MA-315. The standard form of War Risk Facultative Cargo Binder, which may be obtained from the American...

  4. Ecological genomics of the newly discovered diazotrophic filamentous cyanobacterium ESFC-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everroad, C.; Bebout, B.; Bebout, L. E.; Detweiler, A. M.; Lee, J.; Mayali, X.; Singer, S. W.; Stuart, R.; Weber, P. K.; Woebken, D.; Pett-Ridge, J.

    2014-12-01

    Cyanobacteria-dominated microbial mats played a key role in the evolution of the early Earth and provide a model for exploring the relationships between ecology, evolution and biogeochemistry. A recently described nonheterocystous filamentous cyanobacterium, strain ESFC-1, has been shown to be a major diazotroph year round in the intertidal microbial mat system at Elkhorn Slough, CA, USA. Based on phylogenetic analyses of the 16s RNA gene, ESFC-1 appears to belong to a unique, genus-level divergence within the cyanobacteria. Consequently, the draft genome sequence of this strain has been determined. Here we report features of this genome, particularly as they relate to the ecological functions and capabilities of strain ESFC-1. One striking feature of this cyanobacterium is the apparent lack of a functional bi-directional hydrogenase typically expected to be found within a diazotroph; consortia- and culture-based experiments exploring the metabolic processes of ESFC-1 also indicate that this hydrogenase is absent. Co-culture studies with ESFC-1 and some of the dominant heterotrophic members within the microbial mat system, including the ubiquitous Flavobacterium Muricauda sp., which often is found associated with cyanobacteria in nature and in culture collections worldwide, have also been performed. We report on these species-species interactions, including materials exchange between the cyanobacterium and heterotrophic bacterium. The combination of genomics with culture- and consortia-based experimental research is a powerful tool for understanding microbial processes and interactions in complex ecosystems.

  5. Comparative lipid composition of heterotrophically and autotrophically grown Sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    PubMed

    Langworthy, T A

    1977-06-01

    Complex lipids from the thermoacidophilic facultative autotroph Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, as well as a strictly autotrophic isolate, were compared between cells grown on yeast extract and elemental sulfur. Lipids from both organisms grown autotrophically were nearly identical. Each contained about 15% neutral lipids, 35% glycolipids, and 50% acidic lipids. Glycolipids and acidic lipids contained C40H82-76-derived glycerol ether residues. Major glycolipids included the glycerol ether analogues of glucosyl galactosyl diglyceride (5%) and glucosyl polyol diglyceride (75%). Acidic lipids were comprised mainly of the glycerol ether analogues of phosphatidyl inositol (7%), inositolphosphoryl glucosyl polyol diglyceride (72%), and a partially characterized sulfate- and phosphate-containing derivative of glucosyl polyol diglyceride (13%). The lipids from cells grown heterotrophically were similar to those from autotrophically grown cells, except that the partially characterized acidic lipid was absent. In addition, the two glycolipids as well as the respective inositolphosphoryl derivatives were each present in nearly equal proportions.

  6. Comparative lipid composition of heterotrophically and autotrophically grown Sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    PubMed Central

    Langworthy, T A

    1977-01-01

    Complex lipids from the thermoacidophilic facultative autotroph Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, as well as a strictly autotrophic isolate, were compared between cells grown on yeast extract and elemental sulfur. Lipids from both organisms grown autotrophically were nearly identical. Each contained about 15% neutral lipids, 35% glycolipids, and 50% acidic lipids. Glycolipids and acidic lipids contained C40H82-76-derived glycerol ether residues. Major glycolipids included the glycerol ether analogues of glucosyl galactosyl diglyceride (5%) and glucosyl polyol diglyceride (75%). Acidic lipids were comprised mainly of the glycerol ether analogues of phosphatidyl inositol (7%), inositolphosphoryl glucosyl polyol diglyceride (72%), and a partially characterized sulfate- and phosphate-containing derivative of glucosyl polyol diglyceride (13%). The lipids from cells grown heterotrophically were similar to those from autotrophically grown cells, except that the partially characterized acidic lipid was absent. In addition, the two glycolipids as well as the respective inositolphosphoryl derivatives were each present in nearly equal proportions. Images PMID:863856

  7. Facultative symbiont infections affect aphid reproduction.

    PubMed

    Simon, Jean-Christophe; Boutin, Sébastien; Tsuchida, Tsutomu; Koga, Ryuichi; Le Gallic, Jean-François; Frantz, Adrien; Outreman, Yannick; Fukatsu, Takema

    2011-01-01

    Some bacterial symbionts alter their hosts reproduction through various mechanisms that enhance their transmission in the host population. In addition to its obligatory symbiont Buchnera aphidicola, the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum harbors several facultative symbionts influencing several aspects of host ecology. Aphids reproduce by cyclical parthenogenesis whereby clonal and sexual reproduction alternate within the annual life cycle. Many species, including the pea aphid, also show variation in their reproductive mode at the population level, with some lineages reproducing by cyclical parthenogenesis and others by permanent parthenogenesis. While the role of facultative symbionts has been well studied during the parthenogenetic phase of their aphid hosts, very little is known on their possible influence during the sexual phase. Here we investigated whether facultative symbionts modulate the capacity to produce sexual forms in various genetic backgrounds of the pea aphid with controlled symbiont composition and also in different aphid genotypes from natural populations with previously characterized infection status and reproductive mode. We found that most facultative symbionts exhibited detrimental effects on their hosts fitness under sex-inducing conditions in comparison with the reference lines. We also showed that the loss of sexual phase in permanently parthenogenetic lineages of A. pisum was not explained by facultative symbionts. Finally, we demonstrated that Spiroplasma infection annihilated the production of males in the host progeny by inducing a male-killing phenotype, an unexpected result for organisms such as aphids that reproduce primarily through clonal reproduction.

  8. Genomic and proteomic characterization of two novel siphovirus infecting the sedentary facultative epibiont cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yi-Wah; Millard, Andrew D; Wheatley, Peter J; Holmes, Antony B; Mohr, Remus; Whitworth, Anna L; Mann, Nicholas H; Larkum, Anthony W D; Hess, Wolfgang R; Scanlan, David J; Clokie, Martha R J

    2015-11-01

    Acaryochloris marina is a symbiotic species of cyanobacteria that is capable of utilizing far-red light. We report the characterization of the phages A-HIS1 and A-HIS2, capable of infecting Acaryochloris. Morphological characterization of these phages places them in the family Siphoviridae. However, molecular characterization reveals that they do not show genetic similarity with any known siphoviruses. While the phages do show synteny between each other, the nucleotide identity between the phages is low at 45-67%, suggesting they diverged from each other some time ago. The greatest number of genes shared with another phage (a myovirus infecting marine Synechococcus) was four. Unlike most other cyanophages and in common with the Siphoviridae infecting Synechococcus, no photosynthesis-related genes were found in the genome. CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) spacers from the host Acaryochloris had partial matches to sequences found within the phages, which is the first time CRISPRs have been reported in a cyanobacterial/cyanophage system. The phages also encode a homologue of the proteobacterial RNase T. The potential function of RNase T in the mark-up or digestion of crRNA hints at a novel mechanism for evading the host CRISPR system. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Contributions of Respiratory and Photosynthetic Pathways during Growth of a Facultative Photoautotrophic Cyanobacterium, Aphanocapsa 6714 1

    PubMed Central

    Der-Vartanian, Maurice; Joset-Espardellier, Francoise; Astier, Chantal

    1981-01-01

    Comparison of the growth parameters and photosynthetic capacities of cells of Aphanocapsa 6714 under various growth conditions led to the following conclusions: (a), no enzymic regulation of CO2/glucose assimilation takes place in this strain; (b), functioning of photodependent phosphorylating pathways turns off oxidative ATP synthesis; (c), no efficient regulation of pigment synthesis exists in these cells; (d), most modulations of photosynthetic activities probably occur through structural modifications of the photosynthetic membranes (a small proportion of the pigments might appear as a nonintegrated pool in the cell and be sensitive to synthesis regulation); and (e), photosystem II activity would be dependent on light intensity in a discontinuous way, the consequence of this property being the appearance of two successive exponential phases during phototrophic growth in adequate light conditions. PMID:16662036

  10. Facultative hyperaccumulation of heavy metals and metalloids.

    PubMed

    Pollard, A Joseph; Reeves, Roger D; Baker, Alan J M

    2014-03-01

    Approximately 500 species of plants are known to hyperaccumulate heavy metals and metalloids. The majority are obligate metallophytes, species that are restricted to metalliferous soils. However, a smaller but increasing list of plants are "facultative hyperaccumulators" that hyperaccumulate heavy metals when occurring on metalliferous soils, yet also occur commonly on normal, non-metalliferous soils. This paper reviews the biology of facultative hyperaccumulators and the opportunities they provide for ecological and evolutionary research. The existence of facultative hyperaccumulator populations across a wide edaphic range allows intraspecific comparisons of tolerance and uptake physiology. This approach has been used to study zinc and cadmium hyperaccumulation by Noccaea (Thlaspi) caerulescens and Arabidopsis halleri, and it will be instructive to make similar comparisons on species that are distributed even more abundantly on normal soil. Over 90% of known hyperaccumulators occur on serpentine (ultramafic) soil and accumulate nickel, yet there have paradoxically been few experimental studies of facultative nickel hyperaccumulation. Several hypotheses suggested to explain the evolution of hyperaccumulation seem unlikely when most populations of a species occur on normal soil, where plants cannot hyperaccumulate due to low metal availability. In such species, it may be that hyperaccumulation is an ancestral phylogenetic trait or an anomalous manifestation of physiological mechanisms evolved on normal soils, and may or may not have direct adaptive benefits. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Three stage cultivation process of facultative strain of Chlorella sorokiniana for treating dairy farm effluent and lipid enhancement.

    PubMed

    Hena, S; Fatihah, N; Tabassum, S; Ismail, N

    2015-09-01

    Reserve lipids of microalgae are promising for biodiesel production. However, economically feasible and sustainable energy production from microalgae requires optimization of cultivation conditions for both biomass yield and lipid production of microalgae. Biomass yield and lipid production in microalgae are a contradictory problem because required conditions for both targets are different. Simultaneously, the mass cultivation of microalgae for biofuel production also depends extremely on the performance of the microalgae strains used. In this study a green unicellular microalgae Chlorella sorokiniana (DS6) isolated from the holding tanks of farm wastewater treatment plant using multi-step screening and acclimation procedures was found high-lipid producing facultative heterotrophic microalgae strain capable of growing on dairy farm effluent (DFE) for biodiesel feedstock and wastewater treatment. Morphological features and the phylogenetic analysis for the 18S rRNA identified the isolated strains. A novel three stage cultivation process of facultative strain of C. sorokiniana was examined for lipid production.

  12. Symbiosis regulation in a facultatively symbiotic temperate coral: zooxanthellae division and expulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimond, J.; Carrington, E.

    2008-09-01

    Zooxanthellae mitotic index (MI) and expulsion rates were measured in the facultatively symbiotic scleractinian Astrangia poculata during winter and summer off the southern New England coast, USA. While MI was significantly higher in summer than in winter, mean expulsion rates were comparable between seasons. Corals therefore appear to allow increases in symbiont density when symbiosis is advantageous during the warm season, followed by a net reduction during the cold season when zooxanthellae may draw resources from the coral. Given previous reports that photosynthesis in A. poculata symbionts does not occur below approximately 6°C, considerable zooxanthellae division at 3°C and in darkness suggests that zooxanthellae are heterotrophic at low seasonal temperatures. Finally, examination of expulsion as a function of zooxanthellae density revealed that corals with very low zooxanthellae densities export a significantly greater proportion of their symbionts, apparently allowing them to persist in a stable azooxanthellate state.

  13. Significant N2 fixation by heterotrophs, photoheterotrophs and heterocystous cyanobacteria in two temperate estuaries

    PubMed Central

    Bentzon-Tilia, Mikkel; Traving, Sachia J; Mantikci, Mustafa; Knudsen-Leerbeck, Helle; Hansen, Jørgen LS; Markager, Stiig; Riemann, Lasse

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) fixation is fueling planktonic production in a multitude of aquatic environments. In meso- and poly-haline estuaries, however, the contribution of N by pelagic N2 fixation is believed to be insignificant due to the high input of N from land and the presumed absence of active N2-fixing organisms. Here we report N2 fixation rates, nifH gene composition and nifH gene transcript abundance for key diazotrophic groups over 1 year in two contrasting, temperate, estuarine systems: Roskilde Fjord (RF) and the Great Belt (GB) strait. Annual pelagic N2 fixation rates averaged 17 and 61 mmol N m−2 per year at the two sites, respectively. In RF, N2 fixation was mainly accompanied by transcripts related to heterotrophic (for example, Pseudomonas sp.) and photoheterotrophic bacteria (for example, unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacteria group A). In the GB, the first of two N2 fixation peaks coincided with a similar nifH-expressing community as in RF, whereas the second peak was synchronous with increased nifH expression by an array of diazotrophs, including heterotrophic organisms as well as the heterocystous cyanobacterium Anabaena. Thus, we show for the first time that significant planktonic N2 fixation takes place in mesohaline, temperate estuaries and that the importance of heterotrophic, photoheterotrophic and photosynthetic diazotrophs is clearly variable in space and time. PMID:25026373

  14. Significant N₂ fixation by heterotrophs, photoheterotrophs and heterocystous cyanobacteria in two temperate estuaries.

    PubMed

    Bentzon-Tilia, Mikkel; Traving, Sachia J; Mantikci, Mustafa; Knudsen-Leerbeck, Helle; Hansen, Jørgen L S; Markager, Stiig; Riemann, Lasse

    2015-02-01

    Nitrogen (N) fixation is fueling planktonic production in a multitude of aquatic environments. In meso- and poly-haline estuaries, however, the contribution of N by pelagic N₂ fixation is believed to be insignificant due to the high input of N from land and the presumed absence of active N₂-fixing organisms. Here we report N₂ fixation rates, nifH gene composition and nifH gene transcript abundance for key diazotrophic groups over 1 year in two contrasting, temperate, estuarine systems: Roskilde Fjord (RF) and the Great Belt (GB) strait. Annual pelagic N₂ fixation rates averaged 17 and 61 mmol N m(-2) per year at the two sites, respectively. In RF, N₂ fixation was mainly accompanied by transcripts related to heterotrophic (for example, Pseudomonas sp.) and photoheterotrophic bacteria (for example, unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacteria group A). In the GB, the first of two N₂ fixation peaks coincided with a similar nifH-expressing community as in RF, whereas the second peak was synchronous with increased nifH expression by an array of diazotrophs, including heterotrophic organisms as well as the heterocystous cyanobacterium Anabaena. Thus, we show for the first time that significant planktonic N₂ fixation takes place in mesohaline, temperate estuaries and that the importance of heterotrophic, photoheterotrophic and photosynthetic diazotrophs is clearly variable in space and time.

  15. Heterotrophic and autotrophic microbial populations in cold perennial springs of the high arctic.

    PubMed

    Perreault, Nancy N; Greer, Charles W; Andersen, Dale T; Tille, Stefanie; Lacrampe-Couloume, Georges; Lollar, Barbara Sherwood; Whyte, Lyle G

    2008-11-01

    The saline springs of Gypsum Hill in the Canadian high Arctic are a rare example of cold springs originating from deep groundwater and rising to the surface through thick permafrost. The heterotrophic bacteria and autotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (up to 40% of the total microbial community) isolated from the spring waters and sediments were classified into four phyla (Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria) based on 16S rRNA gene analysis; heterotrophic isolates were primarily psychrotolerant, salt-tolerant, facultative anaerobes. Some of the isolates contained genes for thiosulfate oxidation (soxB) and anoxygenic photosynthesis (pufM), possibly enabling the strains to better compete in these sulfur-rich environments subject to long periods of illumination in the Arctic summer. Although leucine uptake by the spring water microbial community was low, CO(2) uptake was relatively high under dark incubation, reinforcing the idea that primary production by chemoautotrophs is an important process in the springs. The small amounts of hydrocarbons in gases exsolving from the springs (0.38 to 0.51% CH(4)) were compositionally and isotopically consistent with microbial methanogenesis and possible methanotrophy. Anaerobic heterotrophic sulfur oxidation and aerobic autotrophic sulfur oxidation activities were demonstrated in sediment slurries. Overall, our results describe an active microbial community capable of sustainability in an extreme environment that experiences prolonged periods of continuous light or darkness, low temperatures, and moderate salinity, where life seems to rely on chemolithoautotrophy.

  16. Rare occurrence of heterotrophic bacteria with pathogenic potential in potable water.

    PubMed

    Stelma, Gerard N; Lye, Dennis J; Smith, Bennett G; Messer, James W; Payment, Pierre

    2004-05-01

    Since the discovery of Legionella pneumophila, an opportunistic pathogen that is indigenous to water, microbiologists have speculated that there may be other opportunistic pathogens among the numerous heterotrophic bacteria found in potable water. The US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) developed a series of rapid in vitro assays to assess the virulence potential of large numbers of bacteria from potable water to possibly identify currently unknown pathogens. Results of surveys of potable water from several distribution systems using these tests showed that only 50 of the approximately 10,000 bacterial colonies expressed one or more virulence characteristics. In another study, 45 potable water isolates that expressed multiple virulence factors were tested for pathogenicity in immunocompromised mice. None of the isolates infected mice that were compromised either by treatment with carrageenan (CG), to induce susceptibility to facultative intracellular pathogens, or by cyclophosphamide (CY), to induce susceptibility to extracellular pathogens. These results indicate that there are very few potential pathogens in potable water and that the currently developed in vitro virulence screening tests give an overestimation of the numbers of heterotrophic bacteria that may be pathogens. Current efforts are focused on using the animal models to screen concentrated samples of waters known to contain large numbers of heterotrophic bacteria and newly discovered Legionella-like organisms that parasitize amoebae.

  17. Heterotrophic and Autotrophic Microbial Populations in Cold Perennial Springs of the High Arctic ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Perreault, Nancy N.; Greer, Charles W.; Andersen, Dale T.; Tille, Stefanie; Lacrampe-Couloume, Georges; Lollar, Barbara Sherwood; Whyte, Lyle G.

    2008-01-01

    The saline springs of Gypsum Hill in the Canadian high Arctic are a rare example of cold springs originating from deep groundwater and rising to the surface through thick permafrost. The heterotrophic bacteria and autotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (up to 40% of the total microbial community) isolated from the spring waters and sediments were classified into four phyla (Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria) based on 16S rRNA gene analysis; heterotrophic isolates were primarily psychrotolerant, salt-tolerant, facultative anaerobes. Some of the isolates contained genes for thiosulfate oxidation (soxB) and anoxygenic photosynthesis (pufM), possibly enabling the strains to better compete in these sulfur-rich environments subject to long periods of illumination in the Arctic summer. Although leucine uptake by the spring water microbial community was low, CO2 uptake was relatively high under dark incubation, reinforcing the idea that primary production by chemoautotrophs is an important process in the springs. The small amounts of hydrocarbons in gases exsolving from the springs (0.38 to 0.51% CH4) were compositionally and isotopically consistent with microbial methanogenesis and possible methanotrophy. Anaerobic heterotrophic sulfur oxidation and aerobic autotrophic sulfur oxidation activities were demonstrated in sediment slurries. Overall, our results describe an active microbial community capable of sustainability in an extreme environment that experiences prolonged periods of continuous light or darkness, low temperatures, and moderate salinity, where life seems to rely on chemolithoautotrophy. PMID:18805995

  18. Facultative parthenogenesis discovered in wild vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Warren; Smith, Charles F.; Eskridge, Pamela H.; Hoss, Shannon K.; Mendelson, Joseph R.; Schuett, Gordon W.

    2012-01-01

    Facultative parthenogenesis (FP)—asexual reproduction by bisexual species—has been documented in a variety of multi-cellular organisms but only recently in snakes, varanid lizards, birds and sharks. Unlike the approximately 80 taxa of unisexual reptiles, amphibians and fishes that exist in nature, FP has yet to be documented in the wild. Based on captive documentation, it appears that FP is widespread in squamate reptiles (snakes, lizards and amphisbaenians), and its occurrence in nature seems inevitable, yet the task of detecting FP in wild individuals has been deemed formidable. Here we show, using microsatellite DNA genotyping and litter characteristics, the first cases of FP in wild-collected pregnant females and their offspring of two closely related species of North American pitviper snakes—the copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix) and cottonmouth (Agkistrodon piscivorus). Our findings support the view that non-hybrid origins of parthenogenesis, such as FP, are more common in squamates than previously thought. With this confirmation, FP can no longer be viewed as a rare curiosity outside the mainstream of vertebrate evolution. Future research on FP in squamate reptiles related to proximate control of induction, reproductive competence of parthenogens and population genetics modelling is warranted. PMID:22977071

  19. Facultative parthenogenesis discovered in wild vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Booth, Warren; Smith, Charles F; Eskridge, Pamela H; Hoss, Shannon K; Mendelson, Joseph R; Schuett, Gordon W

    2012-12-23

    Facultative parthenogenesis (FP)-asexual reproduction by bisexual species-has been documented in a variety of multi-cellular organisms but only recently in snakes, varanid lizards, birds and sharks. Unlike the approximately 80 taxa of unisexual reptiles, amphibians and fishes that exist in nature, FP has yet to be documented in the wild. Based on captive documentation, it appears that FP is widespread in squamate reptiles (snakes, lizards and amphisbaenians), and its occurrence in nature seems inevitable, yet the task of detecting FP in wild individuals has been deemed formidable. Here we show, using microsatellite DNA genotyping and litter characteristics, the first cases of FP in wild-collected pregnant females and their offspring of two closely related species of North American pitviper snakes-the copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix) and cottonmouth (Agkistrodon piscivorus). Our findings support the view that non-hybrid origins of parthenogenesis, such as FP, are more common in squamates than previously thought. With this confirmation, FP can no longer be viewed as a rare curiosity outside the mainstream of vertebrate evolution. Future research on FP in squamate reptiles related to proximate control of induction, reproductive competence of parthenogens and population genetics modelling is warranted.

  20. Facultative parthenogenesis in vertebrates: reproductive error or chance?

    PubMed

    Lampert, K P

    2008-01-01

    Parthenogenesis, the development of an embryo from a female gamete without any contribution of a male gamete, is very rare in vertebrates. Parthenogenetically reproducing species have, so far, only been found in the Squamate reptiles (lizards and snakes). Facultative parthenogenesis, switching between sexual and clonal reproduction, although quite common in invertebrates, e.g. Daphnia and aphids, seems to be even rarer in vertebrates. However, isolated cases of parthenogenetic development have been reported in all vertebrate groups. Facultative parthenogenesis in vertebrates has only been found in captive animals but might simply have been overlooked in natural populations. Even though its evolutionary impact is hard to determine and very likely varies depending on the ploidy restoration mechanisms and sex-determining mechanisms involved, facultative parthenogenesis is already discussed in conservation biology and medical research. To raise interest for facultative parthenogenesis especially in evolutionary biology, I summarize the current knowledge about facultative parthenogenesis in the different vertebrate groups, introduce mechanisms of diploid oocyte formation and discuss the genetic consequences and potential evolutionary impact of facultative parthenogenesis in vertebrates.

  1. Biodiesel production from heterotrophic microalgal oil.

    PubMed

    Miao, Xiaoling; Wu, Qingyu

    2006-04-01

    The present study introduced an integrated method for the production of biodiesel from microalgal oil. Heterotrophic growth of Chlorella protothecoides resulted in the accumulation of high lipid content (55%) in cells. Large amount of microalgal oil was efficiently extracted from these heterotrophic cells by using n-hexane. Biodiesel comparable to conventional diesel was obtained from heterotrophic microalgal oil by acidic transesterification. The best process combination was 100% catalyst quantity (based on oil weight) with 56:1 molar ratio of methanol to oil at temperature of 30 degrees C, which reduced product specific gravity from an initial value of 0.912 to a final value of 0.8637 in about 4h of reaction time. The results suggested that the new process, which combined bioengineering and transesterification, was a feasible and effective method for the production of high quality biodiesel from microalgal oil.

  2. Unicellular cyanobacteria Synechocystis accommodate heterotrophic bacteria with varied enzymatic and metal resistance properties.

    PubMed

    Abdulaziz, Anas; Sageer, Saliha; Chekidhenkuzhiyil, Jasmin; Vijayan, Vijitha; Pavanan, Pratheesh; Athiyanathil, Sujith; Nair, Shanta

    2016-08-01

    The interactions between heterotrophic bacteria and primary producers have a profound impact on the functioning of marine ecosystem. We characterized the enzymatic and metal resistance properties of fourteen heterotrophic bacteria isolated from a unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. that came from a heavy metal contaminated region of Cochin estuary, southwest coast of India. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities, the heterotrophic bacteria were grouped into three phyla: namely Actinobacteria, Firmicute, and Proteobacteria. Overall Proteobacteria showed a higher level of enzyme expression while Actinobacteria and Firmicutes showed higher tolerance to heavy metals. Among Proteobacteria, an isolate of Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus (MMRF-584) showed highest activities of β-glucosidase (1.58 ± 0.2 μMml(-1)  min(-1) ) and laminarinase (1170.17 ± 95.4 μgml(-1)  min(-1) ), while other two isolates of M. hydrocarbonoclasticus, MMRF-578 and 581, showed highest phosphatase (44.71 ± 0.2 μMml(-1)  min(-1) ) and aminopeptidase (33.22 ± 0 μMml(-1)  min(-1) ) activities respectively. Among Firmicutes, the Virgibacillus sp. MMRF-571 showed exceptional resistance against the toxic heavy metals Cd (180 mM), Pb (150 mM), and Hg (0.5 mM). Bacillus cereus, MMRF-575, showed resistance to the highest concentrations of Co (250 mM), Cd (150 mM), Pb (180 mM), Hg (0.5 mM), Ni (280 mM), and Zn (250 mM) tested. Our results show that heterotrophic bacteria with varied enzymatic and metal resistance properties are associated with Synechocystis sp. Further studies to delineate the role of these heterotrophic bacteria in protecting primary producers from toxic effects of heavy metals and their potential application in bioremediation will be appreciated.

  3. Diapause and maintenance of facultative sexual reproductive strategies.

    PubMed

    Stelzer, Claus-Peter; Lehtonen, Jussi

    2016-10-19

    Facultative sex combines sexual and asexual reproduction in the same individual (or clone) and allows for a large diversity of life-history patterns regarding the timing, frequency and intensity of sexual episodes. In addition, other life-history traits such as a diapause stage may become linked to sex. Here, we develop a matrix modelling framework for addressing the cost of sex in facultative sexuals, in constant, periodic and stochastically fluctuating environments. The model is parametrized using life-history data from Brachionus calyciflorus, a facultative sexual rotifer in which sex and diapause are linked. Sexual propensity was an important driver of costs in constant environments, in which high costs (always > onefold, and sometimes > twofold) indicated that asexuals should outcompete facultative sexuals. By contrast, stochastic environments with high temporal autocorrelation favoured facultative sex over obligate asex, in particular, if the penalty to fecundity in 'bad' environments was large. In such environments, obligate asexuals were constrained by their life cycle length (i.e. time from birth to last reproductive adult age class), which determined an upper limit to the number of consecutive bad periods they could tolerate. Nevertheless, when facultative asexuals with different sexual propensities competed simultaneously against each other and asex, the lowest sex propensity was the most successful in stochastic environments with positive autocorrelation. Our results suggest that a highly specific mechanism (i.e. diapause linked to sex) can alone stabilize facultative sex in these animals, and protect it from invasion of both asexual and pure sexual strategies.This article is part of the themed issue 'Weird sex: the underappreciated diversity of sexual reproduction'.

  4. Sexual Conflict, Facultative Asexuality, and the True Paradox of Sex.

    PubMed

    Burke, Nathan W; Bonduriansky, Russell

    2017-09-01

    Theory suggests that occasional or conditional sex involving facultative switching between sexual and asexual reproduction is the optimal reproductive strategy. Therefore, the true 'paradox of sex' is the prevalence of obligate sex. This points to the existence of powerful, general impediments to the invasion of obligately sexual populations by facultative mutants, and recent studies raise the intriguing possibility that a key impediment could be sexual conflict. Using Bateman gradients we show that facultative asexuality can amplify sexual conflict over mating, generating strong selection for both female resistance and male coercion. We hypothesize that invasions are most likely to succeed when mutants have negative Bateman gradients, can avoid mating, and achieve high fecundity through asexual reproduction - a combination unlikely to occur in natural populations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Heterotrophic activities of bacterioplankton and bacteriobenthos.

    PubMed

    Chocair, J A; Albright, L J

    1981-03-01

    Several marine waters and surface sediments of coastal British Columbia were analyzed and compared for bacterial colony forming units (CFU) and numbers of active bacteria (NAB) as indicated by microautoradiography, glucose and alanine heterotrophic activities, and dissolved (DOC) and particulate organic carbon (POC). Bacteria numbers (CFU, NAB) were usually much greater (by several orders of magnitude) in surface sediments than in overlying waters. DOC and POC were also generally greater in surface sediments than in overlying waters, often by as much as one order of magnitude. Both glucose and alanine heterotrophic potentials were greater in surface sediments; however, on a per active cell (NAB) basis, no significant differences were noted between the glucose-specific activities of the bacteria of the surface sediments and overlying waters. The data suggest that these surface sediments carry greater standing crops of bacteria than overlying waters without significant decreases in glucose-specific activities.

  6. Shrubs stimulate heterotrophic respiration in arctic soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, C. A.; Wurzburger, N.

    2016-12-01

    The response of arctic ecosystems to global change will have critical effects on future climate. Climate warming has already triggered the expansion of shrubs across tundra, raising questions about how shrubs will affect ecosystem carbon balance. Shrub litter quality and mycorrhizal symbionts may accelerate the activity of soil microorganisms that facilitate the release of large stores of soil carbon. We investigated how shrubs affect the activity of soil microorganisms by creating soil mesocosms from areas with and without shrub species as dominants of the plant community in arctic Alaska. We hypothesized that relative to their non-shrub counterparts, heterotrophic respiration of shrub soils would: (1) be greater, (2) demonstrate greater response to additions of shrub litter, and (3) be less nutrient limited. We created mesocosms with root-free soils at constant moisture and temperature, and quantified basal heterotrophic soil respiration rates, and the response of respiration to litter and nutrient inputs in a series of laboratory experiments inputs. (1) We found that the presence of shrubs generally produced higher rates of basal soil respiration in both horizons, suggesting that shrubs stimulate microbial activity. (2) Litter addition increased respiration across both horizons with no differences in response between shrub and non-shrub soils. (3) N additions did not increase heterotrophic respiration, but P and N+P additions induced a short respiratory pulse in all soils, suggesting mild P limitation. Collectively, these findings provide evidence that shrubs stimulate heterotrophic microbial activity to enhance carbon loss, but generate new questions about the mechanisms driving these patterns.

  7. Facultative Lagoons. Instructor's Guide. Biological Treatment Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersen, Lorri

    This instructor's guide contains materials needed to teach a two-lesson unit on the structure and components of facultative lagoons, the biological theory of their operation, and factors affecting their operation. Control testing recommendations, maintenance guidelines, and troubleshooting hints are also provided. These materials include: (1) an…

  8. Performance of a baffled facultative pond treating piggery wastes.

    PubMed

    Zanotelli, C T; Medri, W; Belli, Filho P; Perdomo, C C; Mulinari, M R; Costa, R H R

    2002-01-01

    This paper shows the performance of a baffled facultative pond for the treatment of piggery wastes. The full-scale system is composed of an equalizer, one decanter (DP), two anaerobic ponds (LA1 and LA2), one facultative pond (LF), with five baffles, and one maturation pond with water hyacinths (LAG). The studies were conducted over a 12 month period in the west region of Santa Catarina, Brazil. The system was supplied daily with a volume of 3 m3/day of farm wastes. A good performance of the treatment system was obtained with average removal efficiencies of 98% for chemical oxygen demand, 93% for total solids, 98% for total phosphorus, 92% for total nitrogen, 7 log units of faecal coliforms and 5 log units of total coliforms. The facultative pond performed well, removing 43% of the chemical oxygen demand, 47% of total nitrogen and 54% of total phosphorus. It was found that the first baffle in the facultative pond was mainly responsible for the efficiency of this pond, and compared with another study the introduction of the baffles improved the removal efficiency by 20% for total phosphorus.

  9. Facultative Lagoons. Student Manual. Biological Treatment Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersen, Lorri

    The textual material for a unit on facultative lagoons is presented in this student manual. Topic areas discussed include: (1) loading; (2) microbial theory; (3) structure and design; (4) process control; (5) lagoon start-up; (6) data handling and analysis; (7) lagoon maintenance (considering visual observations, pond structure, safety, odor,…

  10. Evolutionary ecology of facultative paedomorphosis in newts and salamanders.

    PubMed

    Denoël, Mathieu; Joly, Pierre; Whiteman, Howard H

    2005-11-01

    Facultative paedomorphosis is an environmentally induced polymorphism that results in the coexistence of mature, gilled, and fully aquatic paedomorphic adults and transformed, terrestrial, metamorphic adults in the same population. This polymorphism has been of interest to scientists for decades because it occurs in a large number of caudate amphibian taxa as well as in a large diversity of habitats. Numerous experimental and observational studies have been conducted to explain the proximate and ultimate factors affecting these heterochronic variants in natural populations. The production of each alternative phenotype is based on a genotypexenvironment interaction and research suggests that differences in the environment can produce paedomorphs through several ontogenetic pathways. No single advantage accounts for the maintenance of this polymorphism. Rather, the interplay of different costs and benefits explains the success of the polyphenism across variable environments. Facultative paedomorphosis allows individuals to cope with habitat variation, to take advantage of environmental heterogeneity in the presence of open niches, and to increase their fitness. This process is expected to constitute a first step towards speciation events, and is also an example of biodiversity at the intraspecific level. The facultative paedomorphosis system is thus ripe for future studies encompassing ecology, evolution, behaviour, endocrinology, physiology, and conservation biology. Few other systems have been broad enough to provide varied research opportunities on topics as diverse as phenotypic plasticity, speciation, mating behaviour, and hormonal regulation of morphology. Further research on facultative paedomorphosis will provide needed insight into these and other important questions facing biologists.

  11. Diel vertical migration of phytoplankton and heterotrophic flagellates in the Gulf of Riga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olli, Kalle

    1999-12-01

    Vertical distribution of a phototrophic ciliate ( Mesodinium rubrum), autotrophic dinoflagellates ( Peridiniella catenata, Heterocapsa rotundata, Dinophysis acuminata), a cryptomonad ( Teleaulax sp.), a filamentous cyanobacterium ( Aphanizomenon flos-aquae), a non-motile chlorophyte ( Monoraphidium sp.) and two heterotrophic dinoflagellates were studied during two diel periods in spring (May 1-2 and 27-28, 1995) and summer (June 26-27 and July 6-7, 1994) in the southern part of the Gulf of Riga, the Baltic Sea. The two seasons, corresponding to the vernal bloom and summer stage, differed considerably with respect to phytoplankton community, hydrography and vertical distribution of the species. In spring the cells stayed in the upper mixed layer above a strong thermocline at 12-15 m depth, and changes in the vertical distribution were related to surface avoidance in the middle of the day. By using correspondence analysis, the vertical distribution of all the motile species were shown to differ significantly from the non-motile Monoraphidium, but not from each other. The vertical migration was reflected in a higher variability in the depth distribution patterns of the motile species, compared to Monoraphidium. In summer 1994, Aphanizomenon, Dinophysis and Teleaulax showed similar depth distribution patterns during the first period, but different from Mesodinium and the heterotrophic dinoflagellates, while during the second period all the autotrophic species had a species specific depth distribution pattern. Me. rubrum revealed a considerably different depth distribution between the two seasons, characterised by surface accumulation in spring and relatively uniform depth distribution over the whole sampling range (0-30 m) in summer. The results demonstrate different vertical niche separation strategies between species.

  12. Light scattering by marine heterotrophic bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulloa, Osvaldo; Sathyendranath, Shubha; Platt, Trevor; Quinones, Renato A.

    1992-01-01

    Mie theory is applied to estimate scattering by polydispersions of marine heterotrophic bacteria, and a simple expression is derived for the bacterial scattering coefficient. The error incurred in deriving bacterial optical properties by use of the van de Hulst approximations is computed. The scattering properties of natural bacterial assemblages in three marine environments, Georges Bank, Northeast Channel, and Sargasso Sea, are assessed by applying Mie theory to field data on bacterial size and abundance. Results are used to examine the potential contribution of bacteria to the scattering properties of seawater. The utility of using pigment data to predict the magnitude of scattering by bacteria is discussed.

  13. Light scattering by marine heterotrophic bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulloa, Osvaldo; Sathyendranath, Shubha; Platt, Trevor; Quinones, Renato A.

    1992-01-01

    Mie theory is applied to estimate scattering by polydispersions of marine heterotrophic bacteria, and a simple expression is derived for the bacterial scattering coefficient. The error incurred in deriving bacterial optical properties by use of the van de Hulst approximations is computed. The scattering properties of natural bacterial assemblages in three marine environments, Georges Bank, Northeast Channel, and Sargasso Sea, are assessed by applying Mie theory to field data on bacterial size and abundance. Results are used to examine the potential contribution of bacteria to the scattering properties of seawater. The utility of using pigment data to predict the magnitude of scattering by bacteria is discussed.

  14. Multihost saprobes are facultative pathogens of bullfrog Lithobates catesbeianus eggs.

    PubMed

    Ruthig, Gregory R; Provost-Javier, Katie N

    2012-10-10

    Pathogens that infect more than one host species create complex linkages in ecological communities. We tested whether saprobes that grow on multiple host species in aquatic systems can be facultative pathogens of amphibian eggs. We isolated oomycetes from dead arthropods, vertebrates, plant leaves, and frog eggs that coexisted in a small pond. Analysis of internal transcribed spacer regions of rDNA (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2) indicated that several of the strains colonized more than one substrate, including bullfrog Lithobates catesbeianus eggs. In a controlled experiment, isolates from 7 different host species were pathogenic to L. catesbeianus eggs. These results demonstrate that dead organisms can serve as reservoirs for facultative pathogens.

  15. Growth of the facultative anaerobe Shewanella putrefaciens by elemental sulfur reduction.

    PubMed

    Moser, D P; Nealson, K H

    1996-06-01

    The growth of bacteria by dissimilatory elemental sulfur reduction is generally associated with obligate anaerobes and thermophiles in particular. Here we describe the sulfur-dependent growth of the facultatively anaerobic mesophile Shewanella putrefaciens. Six of nine representative S. putrefaciens isolates from a variety of environments proved able to grow by sulfur reduction, and strain MR-1 was chosen for further study. Growth was monitored in a minimal medium (usually with 0.05% Casamino Acids added as a growth stimulant) containing 30 mM lactate and limiting concentrations of elemental sulfur. When mechanisms were provided for the removal of the metabolic end product, H2S, measurable growth was obtained at sulfur concentrations of from 2 to 30 mM. Initial doubling times were ca. 1.5 h and substrate independent over the range of sulfur concentrations tested. In the cultures with the highest sulfur concentrations, cell numbers increased by greater than 400-fold after 48 h, reaching a maximum density of 6.8 x 10(8) cells ml-1. Yields were determined as total cell carbon and ranged from 1.7 to 5.9 g of C mol of S(0) consumed-1 in the presence of the amino acid supplement and from 0.9 to 3.4 g of C mol of S(0-1) in its absence. Several lines of evidence indicate that cell-to-sulfur contact is not required for growth. Approaches for the culture of sulfur-metabolizing bacteria and potential ecological implications of sulfur reduction in Shewanella-like heterotrophs are discussed.

  16. Application of the two coupled models for water quality management: facultative pond cum constructed wetland models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashauri, D. A.; Kayombo, S.

    Recent work has emphasized the potential importance of the constructed wetland systems for purification of effluents from secondary biological treatment plants for prevention of pollution to the receiving water bodies. A model for transformation of organic carbon in facultative pond (FP) was formulated and was coupled with a model of organic carbon transformation in the constructed wetland (CW) for downstream water resources management. The main essence of coupling the model was to have simultaneous simulation of PFP and CW processes. Simultaneous run of the two models imply that the disturbance on parameters in PFP will have a direct effect on CW processes. The model was formulated on the basis fundamental principle that the growth of active biomass in the system defines the transformation of organic carbon. The growth rate of microorganisms was model based on the Monod kinetic equation. The forcing functions to the model were formulated based on multiplicative function. The removal of organic carbon in the FP based on the unfiltered sample was 66% with an average concentration of 206 mg COD/l in the effluent. The removal of organic carbon in the CW was 87.5% with an average concentration of 40 mg COD/l in the effluent. The overall performance of the coupled model was 93%. The main processes of organic carbon removal in the FP and CW were due to uptake by heterotrophic bacteria followed by oxidation. It was found that 80% of the total organic carbon in the CW was due to the biological growth. Oxidation of organic carbon in the PFP was a source of high growth of algae. The constants and coefficients obtained after validation of the model reflect the simultaneous performance of the coupled model of PFP and CW.

  17. Growth of the facultative anaerobe Shewanella putrefaciens by elemental sulfur reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moser, D. P.; Nealson, K. H.

    1996-01-01

    The growth of bacteria by dissimilatory elemental sulfur reduction is generally associated with obligate anaerobes and thermophiles in particular. Here we describe the sulfur-dependent growth of the facultatively anaerobic mesophile Shewanella putrefaciens. Six of nine representative S. putrefaciens isolates from a variety of environments proved able to grow by sulfur reduction, and strain MR-1 was chosen for further study. Growth was monitored in a minimal medium (usually with 0.05% Casamino Acids added as a growth stimulant) containing 30 mM lactate and limiting concentrations of elemental sulfur. When mechanisms were provided for the removal of the metabolic end product, H2S, measurable growth was obtained at sulfur concentrations of from 2 to 30 mM. Initial doubling times were ca. 1.5 h and substrate independent over the range of sulfur concentrations tested. In the cultures with the highest sulfur concentrations, cell numbers increased by greater than 400-fold after 48 h, reaching a maximum density of 6.8 x 10(8) cells ml-1. Yields were determined as total cell carbon and ranged from 1.7 to 5.9 g of C mol of S(0) consumed-1 in the presence of the amino acid supplement and from 0.9 to 3.4 g of C mol of S(0-1) in its absence. Several lines of evidence indicate that cell-to-sulfur contact is not required for growth. Approaches for the culture of sulfur-metabolizing bacteria and potential ecological implications of sulfur reduction in Shewanella-like heterotrophs are discussed.

  18. Growth of the facultative anaerobe Shewanella putrefaciens by elemental sulfur reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moser, D. P.; Nealson, K. H.

    1996-01-01

    The growth of bacteria by dissimilatory elemental sulfur reduction is generally associated with obligate anaerobes and thermophiles in particular. Here we describe the sulfur-dependent growth of the facultatively anaerobic mesophile Shewanella putrefaciens. Six of nine representative S. putrefaciens isolates from a variety of environments proved able to grow by sulfur reduction, and strain MR-1 was chosen for further study. Growth was monitored in a minimal medium (usually with 0.05% Casamino Acids added as a growth stimulant) containing 30 mM lactate and limiting concentrations of elemental sulfur. When mechanisms were provided for the removal of the metabolic end product, H2S, measurable growth was obtained at sulfur concentrations of from 2 to 30 mM. Initial doubling times were ca. 1.5 h and substrate independent over the range of sulfur concentrations tested. In the cultures with the highest sulfur concentrations, cell numbers increased by greater than 400-fold after 48 h, reaching a maximum density of 6.8 x 10(8) cells ml-1. Yields were determined as total cell carbon and ranged from 1.7 to 5.9 g of C mol of S(0) consumed-1 in the presence of the amino acid supplement and from 0.9 to 3.4 g of C mol of S(0-1) in its absence. Several lines of evidence indicate that cell-to-sulfur contact is not required for growth. Approaches for the culture of sulfur-metabolizing bacteria and potential ecological implications of sulfur reduction in Shewanella-like heterotrophs are discussed.

  19. Anaerobic biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acids in the cyanobacterium, Oscillatoria limnetica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, L. L.; Lee, B.; Sweeney, M. J.; Klein, H. P.

    1989-01-01

    The mechanism for synthesis of monounsaturated fatty acids under aerobic and anaerobic conditions was studied in the facultative anaerobic cyanobacterium, Oscillatoria limnetica. The hexadecenoic acid (C16:1) of aerobically grown O. limnetica was shown to contain both the delta 7 (79%) and delta 9 (21%) isomers, while the octadecenoic (C18:1) acid was entirely the delta 9 acid. Incorporation of [2-14C] acetate into the fatty acids under aerobic conditions resulted in synthesis of the delta 7 and delta 9 C16:1 and the delta 9 C18:1. Synthesis of unsaturated fatty acids in the presence of DCMU required sulfide. Anaerobic incubations in the presence of DCMU and sulfide (less than 0.003% atmospheric oxygen) resulted in a two-fold increase in monounsaturated fatty acids of both delta 7 and delta 9 C16:1 and delta 9 and delta 11 C18:1. The synthesis of these is characteristic of a bacterial-type, anaerobic pathway.

  20. Anaerobic biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acids in the cyanobacterium, Oscillatoria limnetica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, L. L.; Lee, B.; Sweeney, M. J.; Klein, H. P.

    1989-01-01

    The mechanism for synthesis of monounsaturated fatty acids under aerobic and anaerobic conditions was studied in the facultative anaerobic cyanobacterium, Oscillatoria limnetica. The hexadecenoic acid (C16:1) of aerobically grown O. limnetica was shown to contain both the delta 7 (79%) and delta 9 (21%) isomers, while the octadecenoic (C18:1) acid was entirely the delta 9 acid. Incorporation of [2-14C] acetate into the fatty acids under aerobic conditions resulted in synthesis of the delta 7 and delta 9 C16:1 and the delta 9 C18:1. Synthesis of unsaturated fatty acids in the presence of DCMU required sulfide. Anaerobic incubations in the presence of DCMU and sulfide (less than 0.003% atmospheric oxygen) resulted in a two-fold increase in monounsaturated fatty acids of both delta 7 and delta 9 C16:1 and delta 9 and delta 11 C18:1. The synthesis of these is characteristic of a bacterial-type, anaerobic pathway.

  1. Winding paths to simplicity: genome evolution in facultative insect symbionts.

    PubMed

    Lo, Wen-Sui; Huang, Ya-Yi; Kuo, Chih-Horng

    2016-11-01

    Symbiosis between organisms is an important driving force in evolution. Among the diverse relationships described, extensive progress has been made in insect–bacteria symbiosis, which improved our understanding of the genome evolution in host-associated bacteria. Particularly, investigations on several obligate mutualists have pushed the limits of what we know about the minimal genomes for sustaining cellular life. To bridge the gap between those obligate symbionts with extremely reduced genomes and their non-host-restricted ancestors, this review focuses on the recent progress in genome characterization of facultative insect symbionts. Notable cases representing various types and stages of host associations, including those from multiple genera in the family Enterobacteriaceae (class Gammaproteobacteria), Wolbachia (Alphaproteobacteria) and Spiroplasma (Mollicutes), are discussed. Although several general patterns of genome reduction associated with the adoption of symbiotic relationships could be identified, extensive variation was found among these facultative symbionts. These findings are incorporated into the established conceptual frameworks to develop a more detailed evolutionary model for the discussion of possible trajectories. In summary, transitions from facultative to obligate symbiosis do not appear to be a universal one-way street; switches between hosts and lifestyles (e.g. commensalism, parasitism or mutualism) occur frequently and could be facilitated by horizontal gene transfer.

  2. Winding paths to simplicity: genome evolution in facultative insect symbionts

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Wen-Sui; Huang, Ya-Yi; Kuo, Chih-Horng

    2016-01-01

    Symbiosis between organisms is an important driving force in evolution. Among the diverse relationships described, extensive progress has been made in insect–bacteria symbiosis, which improved our understanding of the genome evolution in host-associated bacteria. Particularly, investigations on several obligate mutualists have pushed the limits of what we know about the minimal genomes for sustaining cellular life. To bridge the gap between those obligate symbionts with extremely reduced genomes and their non-host-restricted ancestors, this review focuses on the recent progress in genome characterization of facultative insect symbionts. Notable cases representing various types and stages of host associations, including those from multiple genera in the family Enterobacteriaceae (class Gammaproteobacteria), Wolbachia (Alphaproteobacteria) and Spiroplasma (Mollicutes), are discussed. Although several general patterns of genome reduction associated with the adoption of symbiotic relationships could be identified, extensive variation was found among these facultative symbionts. These findings are incorporated into the established conceptual frameworks to develop a more detailed evolutionary model for the discussion of possible trajectories. In summary, transitions from facultative to obligate symbiosis do not appear to be a universal one-way street; switches between hosts and lifestyles (e.g. commensalism, parasitism or mutualism) occur frequently and could be facilitated by horizontal gene transfer. PMID:28204477

  3. A facultative endosymbiont in aphids can provide diverse ecological benefits.

    PubMed

    Heyworth, E R; Ferrari, J

    2015-10-01

    Ecologically important traits of insects are often affected by facultative bacterial endosymbionts. This is best studied in the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum, which is frequently infected by one or more of eight facultative symbiont species. Many of these symbiont species have been shown to provide one ecological benefit, but we have little understanding of the range of effects that a single strain can have. Here, we describe the phenotypes conferred by three strains of the recently discovered bacterium known as X-type (Enterobacteriaceae), each in their original aphid genotype which also carries a Spiroplasma symbiont. All comparisons are made between aphids that are coinfected with Spiroplasma and X-type and aphids of the same genotype that harbour only Spiroplasma. We show that in all cases, infection with X-type protects aphids from the lethal fungal pathogen Pandora neoaphidis, and in two cases, resistance to the parasitoid Aphidius ervi also increases. X-type can additionally affect aphid stress responses--the presence of X-type increased reproduction after the aphids were heat-stressed. Two of the three strains of X-type are able to provide all of these benefits. Under benign conditions, the aphids tended to suffer from reduced fecundity when harbouring X-type, a mechanism that might maintain intermediate frequencies in field populations. These findings highlight that a single strain of a facultative endosymbiont has the potential to provide diverse benefits to its aphid host.

  4. Synergistic allelochemicals from a freshwater cyanobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Leão, Pedro N.; Pereira, Alban R.; Liu, Wei-Ting; Ng, Julio; Pevzner, Pavel A.; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; König, Gabriele M.; Vasconcelos, Vitor M.; Gerwick, William H.

    2010-01-01

    The ability of cyanobacteria to produce complex secondary metabolites with potent biological activities has gathered considerable attention due to their potential therapeutic and agrochemical applications. However, the precise physiological or ecological roles played by a majority of these metabolites have remained elusive. Several studies have shown that cyanobacteria are able to interfere with other organisms in their communities through the release of compounds into the surrounding medium, a phenomenon usually referred to as allelopathy. Exudates from the freshwater cyanobacterium Oscillatoria sp. had previously been shown to inhibit the green microalga Chlorella vulgaris. In this study, we observed that maximal allelopathic activity is highest in early growth stages of the cyanobacterium, and this provided sufficient material for isolation and chemical characterization of active compounds that inhibited the growth of C. vulgaris. Using a bioassay-guided approach, we isolated and structurally characterized these metabolites as cyclic peptides containing several unusually modified amino acids that are found both in the cells and in the spent media of Oscillatoria sp. cultures. Strikingly, only the mixture of the two most abundant metabolites in the cells was active toward C. vulgaris. Synergism was also observed in a lung cancer cell cytotoxicity assay. The binary mixture inhibited other phytoplanktonic organisms, supporting a natural function of this synergistic mixture of metabolites as allelochemicals. PMID:20534563

  5. N2 fixation in marine heterotrophic bacteria: dynamics of environmental and molecular regulation.

    PubMed

    Coyer, J A; Cabello-Pasini, A; Swift, H; Alberte, R S

    1996-04-16

    Molecular and immunological techniques were used to examine N2 fixation in a ubiquitous heterotrophic marine bacterium, the facultative anaerobic Vibrio natriegens. When batch cultures were shifted from aerobic N-replete to anaerobic N-deplete conditions, transcriptional and post-translational regulation of N2 fixation was observed. Levels of nifHDK mRNA encoding the nitrogenase enzyme were highest at 140 min postshift and undetectable between 6 and 9 h later. Immunologically determined levels of nitrogenase enzyme (Fe protein) were highest between 6 and 15 h postshift, and nitrogenase activity peaked between 6 and 9 h postshift, declining by a factor of 2 after 12-15 h. Unlike their regulation in cyanobacteria, Fe protein and nitrogenase activity were present when nifHDK mRNA was absent in V. natriegens, indicating that nitrogenase is stored and stable under anaerobic conditions. Both nifHDK mRNA and Fe protein disappeared within 40 min after cultures were shifted from N2-fixing conditions (anaerobic, N-deplete) to non- N2-fixing conditions (aerobic, N-enriched) but reappeared when shifted to conditions favoring N2 fixation. Thus, unlike other N2-fixing heterotrophic bacteria, nitrogenase must be resynthesized after aerobic exposure in V. natriegens. Immunological detection based on immunoblot (Western) analysis and immunogold labeling correlated positively with nitrogenase activity; no localization of nitrogenase was observed. Because V. natriegens continues to fix N2 for many hours after anaerobic induction, this species may play an important role in providing "new" nitrogen in marine ecosystems.

  6. N2 fixation in marine heterotrophic bacteria: dynamics of environmental and molecular regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Coyer, J A; Cabello-Pasini, A; Swift, H; Alberte, R S

    1996-01-01

    Molecular and immunological techniques were used to examine N2 fixation in a ubiquitous heterotrophic marine bacterium, the facultative anaerobic Vibrio natriegens. When batch cultures were shifted from aerobic N-replete to anaerobic N-deplete conditions, transcriptional and post-translational regulation of N2 fixation was observed. Levels of nifHDK mRNA encoding the nitrogenase enzyme were highest at 140 min postshift and undetectable between 6 and 9 h later. Immunologically determined levels of nitrogenase enzyme (Fe protein) were highest between 6 and 15 h postshift, and nitrogenase activity peaked between 6 and 9 h postshift, declining by a factor of 2 after 12-15 h. Unlike their regulation in cyanobacteria, Fe protein and nitrogenase activity were present when nifHDK mRNA was absent in V. natriegens, indicating that nitrogenase is stored and stable under anaerobic conditions. Both nifHDK mRNA and Fe protein disappeared within 40 min after cultures were shifted from N2-fixing conditions (anaerobic, N-deplete) to non- N2-fixing conditions (aerobic, N-enriched) but reappeared when shifted to conditions favoring N2 fixation. Thus, unlike other N2-fixing heterotrophic bacteria, nitrogenase must be resynthesized after aerobic exposure in V. natriegens. Immunological detection based on immunoblot (Western) analysis and immunogold labeling correlated positively with nitrogenase activity; no localization of nitrogenase was observed. Because V. natriegens continues to fix N2 for many hours after anaerobic induction, this species may play an important role in providing "new" nitrogen in marine ecosystems. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:11607653

  7. Photo- and heterotrophic nitrogenase activity by the cyano-bacterium Nostoc in symbiosis with the bryophyte Anthoceros

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, N.A.; Meeks, J.C.

    1987-04-01

    In symbiosis with Anthoceros, Nostoc is thought to do little or no photosynthesis. However, light-dependent /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ fixation by symbiotic Nostoc, freshly isolated from pure cultures of the reconstituted Anthoceros-Nostoc association, was 16% of that by free-living Nostoc. A DCMU-resistant mutant of Nostoc was isolated that fixed CO/sub 2/ at rates comparable to wild-type in both symbiotic and free-living growth states. To determine if symbiotic Nostoc can use its photosynthate directly to fix nitrogen, acetylene reduction by Anthoceros associations reconstituted with wild-type Nostoc was compared to associations with the DCMU-resistant mutant. In wild-type Anthoceros-Nostoc acetylene reduction was inhibited 97% by 5 ..mu..M DCMU, while inhibition of the DCMU-resistant Nostoc association was only 63%. Additions of glucose, fructose, maltose or sucrose to wild-type associations completely restored DCMU-inhibited acetylene reduction in the light. Acetylene reduction in the dark was stimulated by glucose, attaining 84% of the uninhibited light-dependent value. The authors conclude that symbiotic Nostoc maintains a pool of photosynthate which supports nitrogenase activity. The pool can also be supplemented from plant sources.

  8. Thermal adaptation of heterotrophic soil respiration in laboratory microcosms.

    Treesearch

    Mark A. Bradford; Brian W. Watts; Christian A. Davies

    2010-01-01

    Respiration of heterotrophic microorganisms decomposing soil organic carbon releases carbon dioxide from soils to the atmosphere. In the short term, soil microbial respiration is strongly dependent on temperature. In the long term, the response of heterotrophic soil respiration to temperature is uncertain. However, following established evolutionary tradeoffs, mass-...

  9. Two-stage (photoautotrophy and heterotrophy) cultivation enables efficient production of bioplastic poly-3-hydroxybutyrate in auto-sedimenting cyanobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Monshupanee, Tanakarn; Nimdach, Palida; Incharoensakdi, Aran

    2016-01-01

    Sustainable production of bioplastics by heterotrophic microbes has been restricted by the limited resources of organic substrates and the energy required for biomass harvest. Here, the easy-to-harvest cyanobacterium (Chlorogloea fritschii TISTR 8527), from which the biomass instantaneously settled to the bottom of liquid culture, was utilized to produce poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) using a two-stage cultivation strategy. The cells were first pre-grown under normal photoautotrophy to increase their biomass and then recultivated under a heterotrophic condition with a single organic substrate to produce the product. Through optimization of this two-stage cultivation, the mass conversion efficiency of acetate substrate to PHB was obtained at 51 ± 7% (w/w), the comparable level to the theoretical biochemical conversion efficiency of acetate to PHB. This two-stage cultivation that efficiently converted the substrate to the product, concurrent with a reduced culture biomass, may be applicable for the production of other biopolymers by cyanobacteria. PMID:27845413

  10. Two-stage (photoautotrophy and heterotrophy) cultivation enables efficient production of bioplastic poly-3-hydroxybutyrate in auto-sedimenting cyanobacterium.

    PubMed

    Monshupanee, Tanakarn; Nimdach, Palida; Incharoensakdi, Aran

    2016-11-15

    Sustainable production of bioplastics by heterotrophic microbes has been restricted by the limited resources of organic substrates and the energy required for biomass harvest. Here, the easy-to-harvest cyanobacterium (Chlorogloea fritschii TISTR 8527), from which the biomass instantaneously settled to the bottom of liquid culture, was utilized to produce poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) using a two-stage cultivation strategy. The cells were first pre-grown under normal photoautotrophy to increase their biomass and then recultivated under a heterotrophic condition with a single organic substrate to produce the product. Through optimization of this two-stage cultivation, the mass conversion efficiency of acetate substrate to PHB was obtained at 51 ± 7% (w/w), the comparable level to the theoretical biochemical conversion efficiency of acetate to PHB. This two-stage cultivation that efficiently converted the substrate to the product, concurrent with a reduced culture biomass, may be applicable for the production of other biopolymers by cyanobacteria.

  11. Engineering of Ralstonia eutropha H16 for Autotrophic and Heterotrophic Production of Methyl Ketones

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Jana; MacEachran, Daniel; Burd, Helcio; Sathitsuksanoh, Noppadon; Bi, Changhao; Yeh, Yi-Chun; Lee, Taek Soon; Hillson, Nathan J.; Chhabra, Swapnil R.; Singer, Steven W.

    2013-01-01

    Ralstonia eutropha is a facultatively chemolithoautotrophic bacterium able to grow with organic substrates or H2 and CO2 under aerobic conditions. Under conditions of nutrient imbalance, R. eutropha produces copious amounts of poly[(R)-3-hydroxybutyrate] (PHB). Its ability to utilize CO2 as a sole carbon source renders it an interesting new candidate host for the production of renewable liquid transportation fuels. We engineered R. eutropha for the production of fatty acid-derived, diesel-range methyl ketones. Modifications engineered in R. eutropha included overexpression of a cytoplasmic version of the TesA thioesterase, which led to a substantial (>150-fold) increase in fatty acid titer under certain conditions. In addition, deletion of two putative β-oxidation operons and heterologous expression of three genes (the acyl coenzyme A oxidase gene from Micrococcus luteus and fadB and fadM from Escherichia coli) led to the production of 50 to 65 mg/liter of diesel-range methyl ketones under heterotrophic growth conditions and 50 to 180 mg/liter under chemolithoautotrophic growth conditions (with CO2 and H2 as the sole carbon source and electron donor, respectively). Induction of the methyl ketone pathway diverted substantial carbon flux away from PHB biosynthesis and appeared to enhance carbon flux through the pathway for biosynthesis of fatty acids, which are the precursors of methyl ketones. PMID:23686271

  12. Link between facultative melanin and tobacco use among African Americans.

    PubMed

    King, Gary; Yerger, Valerie B; Whembolua, Guy-Lucien; Bendel, Robert B; Kittles, Rick; Moolchan, Eric T

    2009-06-01

    Nicotine's affinity for melanin-containing tissues may result from its precursor function in melanin synthesis or the irreversible binding of melanin and nicotine. The objective of this study was to investigate a hypothesized association of tobacco use, dependence, and nicotine exposure with melanin pigmentation among African American smokers. A criterion-based sample was employed to collect data from a study of 147 adult African American current smokers. Carbon monoxide, saliva cotinine samples, and skin reflectance measures were obtained from each participant. Questionnaire data on demographic, sociological and behavioral questions related to smoking and skin color were gathered. The three dependent measures were the average number of cigarettes per day (CPD), Fagerström Test of Nicotine Dependence (FTND) score, and cotinine concentration. Analysis of variance, Pearson Correlations, and Multiple Linear Regression were conducted to analyze findings. The mean constitutive melanin reading was 56.3 and 66.5 for facultative melanin. Respondents on average smoked 19 CPD, had a mean FTND of 5.6, and a cotinine concentration of 435 ng/ml. Facultative melanin level was correlated with CPD and cotinine concentration in the bivariate analysis. The multiple linear regression results revealed that facultative melanin was significantly and positively related to CPD, the FTND, and cotinine. The results of this analysis support the hypothesis of a positive association between melanin levels and tobacco use, dependence, and exposure among African American smokers. This analysis may have important implications for research and interventions on tobacco dependence and disease outcomes. Further research on melanin and nicotine among African Americans as well as other population groups is warranted.

  13. Comparative studies on two ferredoxins from the cyanobacterium Nostoc strain MAC.

    PubMed

    Hutson, K G; Rogers, L J; Haslett, B G; Boulter, D; Cammack, R

    1978-06-15

    Two ferredoxins were isolated from the cyanobacterium Nostoc strain MAC grown autotrophically in the light or heterotrophically in the dark. In either case approximately three times as much ferredoxin I as ferredoxin II was obtained. Both ferredoxins had absorption maxima at 276, 282 (shoulder), 330, 423 and 465 nm in the oxidized state, and each possessed a single 2 Fe-2S active centre. Their isoelectric points were approx. 3.2. The midpoint redox potentials of the ferredoxins differed markedly; that of ferredoxin I was --350mV and that of ferredoxin II was --445mV, at pH 8.0. The midpoint potential of ferredoxin II was unusual in being pH dependent. Ferredoxin I was most active in supporting NADP+ photoreduction by chloroplasts, whereas ferredoxin II was somewhat more active in pyruvate decarboxylation by the phosphoroclastic system of Clostridum pasteurianum. Though the molecular weights of the ferredoxins determined by ultracentrifugation were the same within experimetnal error, the amino acid compositions showed marked differences. The N-terminal amino acid sequences of ferredoxins I and II were determined by means of an automatic sequencer. There are 11--12 differences between the sequences of the first 32 residues. It appears that the two ferredoxins have evolved separately to fulfil different roles in the organism.

  14. The stringent response regulates adaptation to darkness in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus

    PubMed Central

    Hood, Rachel D.; Higgins, Sean A.; Flamholz, Avi; Nichols, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    The cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus relies upon photosynthesis to drive metabolism and growth. During darkness, Synechococcus stops growing, derives energy from its glycogen stores, and greatly decreases rates of macromolecular synthesis via unknown mechanisms. Here, we show that the stringent response, a stress response pathway whose genes are conserved across bacteria and plant plastids, contributes to this dark adaptation. Levels of the stringent response alarmone guanosine 3′-diphosphate 5′-diphosphate (ppGpp) rise after a shift from light to dark, indicating that darkness triggers the same response in cyanobacteria as starvation in heterotrophic bacteria. High levels of ppGpp are sufficient to stop growth and dramatically alter many aspects of cellular physiology, including levels of photosynthetic pigments and polyphosphate, DNA content, and the rate of translation. Cells unable to synthesize ppGpp display pronounced growth defects after exposure to darkness. The stringent response regulates expression of a number of genes in Synechococcus, including ribosomal hibernation promoting factor (hpf), which causes ribosomes to dimerize in the dark and may contribute to decreased translation. Although the metabolism of Synechococcus differentiates it from other model bacterial systems, the logic of the stringent response remains remarkably conserved, while at the same time having adapted to the unique stresses of the photosynthetic lifestyle. PMID:27486247

  15. Dioxomorpholines and Derivatives from a Marine-Facultative Aspergillus Species.

    PubMed

    Aparicio-Cuevas, Manuel A; Rivero-Cruz, Isabel; Sánchez-Castellanos, Mariano; Menéndez, Daniel; Raja, Huzefa A; Joseph-Nathan, Pedro; González, María Del Carmen; Figueroa, Mario

    2017-08-25

    Two new dioxomorpholines, 1 and 2, three new derivatives, 3-5, and the known compound PF1233 B (6) were isolated from a marine-facultative Aspergillus sp. MEXU 27854. Their structures were established by 1D and 2D NMR and HRESIMS data analysis. The absolute configuration of 1 and 2 was elucidated by comparison of experimental and DFT-calculated vibrational circular dichroism spectra. Compounds 3, 5, and 6 were noncytotoxic to a panel of human cancer cell lines with different functional status for the tumor-suppressor protein p53, but were inhibitors of P-glycoprotein-reversing multidrug resistance in a doxorubicin-resistant cell line.

  16. Intermediary Metabolism in Protists: a Sequence-based View of Facultative Anaerobic Metabolism in Evolutionarily Diverse Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Ginger, Michael L.; Fritz-Laylin, Lillian K.; Fulton, Chandler; Cande, W. Zacheus; Dawson, Scott C.

    2011-01-01

    Protists account for the bulk of eukaryotic diversity. Through studies of gene and especially genome sequences the molecular basis for this diversity can be determined. Evident from genome sequencing are examples of versatile metabolism that go far beyond the canonical pathways described for eukaryotes in textbooks. In the last 2–3 years, genome sequencing and transcript profiling has unveiled several examples of heterotrophic and phototrophic protists that are unexpectedly well-equipped for ATP production using a facultative anaerobic metabolism, including some protists that can (Chlamydomonas reinhardtii) or are predicted (Naegleria gruberi, Acanthamoeba castellanii, Amoebidium parasiticum) to produce H2 in their metabolism. It is possible that some enzymes of anaerobic metabolism were acquired and distributed among eukaryotes by lateral transfer, but it is also likely that the common ancestor of eukaryotes already had far more metabolic versatility than was widely thought a few years ago. The discussion of core energy metabolism in unicellular eukaryotes is the subject of this review. Since genomic sequencing has so far only touched the surface of protist diversity, it is anticipated that sequences of additional protists may reveal an even wider range of metabolic capabilities, while simultaneously enriching our understanding of the early evolution of eukaryotes. PMID:21036663

  17. Anaerobic oxidation of arsenite in Mono Lake water and by a facultative, arsenite-oxidizing chemoautotroph, strain MLHE-1.

    PubMed

    Oremland, Ronald S; Hoeft, Shelley E; Santini, Joanne M; Bano, Nasreen; Hollibaugh, Ryan A; Hollibaugh, James T

    2002-10-01

    Arsenite [As(III)]-enriched anoxic bottom water from Mono Lake, California, produced arsenate [As(V)] during incubation with either nitrate or nitrite. No such oxidation occurred in killed controls or in live samples incubated without added nitrate or nitrite. A small amount of biological As(III) oxidation was observed in samples amended with Fe(III) chelated with nitrolotriacetic acid, although some chemical oxidation was also evident in killed controls. A pure culture, strain MLHE-1, that was capable of growth with As(III) as its electron donor and nitrate as its electron acceptor was isolated in a defined mineral salts medium. Cells were also able to grow in nitrate-mineral salts medium by using H(2) or sulfide as their electron donor in lieu of As(III). Arsenite-grown cells demonstrated dark (14)CO(2) fixation, and PCR was used to indicate the presence of a gene encoding ribulose-1,5-biphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase. Strain MLHE-1 is a facultative chemoautotroph, able to grow with these inorganic electron donors and nitrate as its electron acceptor, but heterotrophic growth on acetate was also observed under both aerobic and anaerobic (nitrate) conditions. Phylogenetic analysis of its 16S ribosomal DNA sequence placed strain MLHE-1 within the haloalkaliphilic Ectothiorhodospira of the gamma-PROTEOBACTERIA: Arsenite oxidation has never been reported for any members of this subgroup of the PROTEOBACTERIA:

  18. Anaerobic oxidation of arsenite in Mono Lake water and by a facultative, arsenite-oxidizing chemoautotroph, strain MLHE-1

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, R.S.; Hoeft, S.E.; Santini, J.M.; Bano, N.; Hollibaugh, R.A.; Hollibaugh, J.T.

    2002-01-01

    Arsenite [As(III)]-enriched anoxic bottom water from Mono Lake, California, produced arsenate [As(V)] during incubation with either nitrate or nitrite. No such oxidation occurred in killed controls or in live samples incubated without added nitrate or nitrite. A small amount of biological As(III) oxidation was observed in samples amended with Fe(III) chelated with nitrolotriacetic acid, although some chemical oxidation was also evident in killed controls. A pure culture, strain MLHE-1, that was capable of growth with As(III) as its electron donor and nitrate as its electron acceptor was isolated in a defined mineral salts medium. Cells were also able to grow in nitrate-mineral salts medium by using H2 or sulfide as their electron donor in lieu of As(III). Arsenite-grown cells demonstrated dark 14CO2 fixation, and PCR was used to indicate the presence of a gene encoding ribulose-1,5-biphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase. Strain MLHE-1 is a facultative chemoautotroph, able to grow with these inorganic electron donors and nitrate as its electron acceptor, but heterotrophic growth on acetate was also observed under both aerobic and anaerobic (nitrate) conditions. Phylogenetic analysis of its 16S ribosomal DNA sequence placed strain MLHE-1 within the haloalkaliphilic Ectothiorhodospira of the ??-Proteobacteria. Arsenite oxidation has never been reported for any members of this subgroup of the Proteobacteria.

  19. Intermediary metabolism in protists: a sequence-based view of facultative anaerobic metabolism in evolutionarily diverse eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Ginger, Michael L; Fritz-Laylin, Lillian K; Fulton, Chandler; Cande, W Zacheus; Dawson, Scott C

    2010-12-01

    Protists account for the bulk of eukaryotic diversity. Through studies of gene and especially genome sequences the molecular basis for this diversity can be determined. Evident from genome sequencing are examples of versatile metabolism that go far beyond the canonical pathways described for eukaryotes in textbooks. In the last 2-3 years, genome sequencing and transcript profiling has unveiled several examples of heterotrophic and phototrophic protists that are unexpectedly well-equipped for ATP production using a facultative anaerobic metabolism, including some protists that can (Chlamydomonas reinhardtii) or are predicted (Naegleria gruberi, Acanthamoeba castellanii, Amoebidium parasiticum) to produce H(2) in their metabolism. It is possible that some enzymes of anaerobic metabolism were acquired and distributed among eukaryotes by lateral transfer, but it is also likely that the common ancestor of eukaryotes already had far more metabolic versatility than was widely thought a few years ago. The discussion of core energy metabolism in unicellular eukaryotes is the subject of this review. Since genomic sequencing has so far only touched the surface of protist diversity, it is anticipated that sequences of additional protists may reveal an even wider range of metabolic capabilities, while simultaneously enriching our understanding of the early evolution of eukaryotes.

  20. Genomic analysis of Melioribacter roseus, facultatively anaerobic organotrophic bacterium representing a novel deep lineage within Bacteriodetes/Chlorobi group.

    PubMed

    Kadnikov, Vitaly V; Mardanov, Andrey V; Podosokorskaya, Olga A; Gavrilov, Sergey N; Kublanov, Ilya V; Beletsky, Alexey V; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A; Ravin, Nikolai V

    2013-01-01

    Melioribacter roseus is a moderately thermophilic facultatively anaerobic organotrophic bacterium representing a novel deep branch within Bacteriodetes/Chlorobi group. To better understand the metabolic capabilities and possible ecological functions of M. roseus and get insights into the evolutionary history of this bacterial lineage, we sequenced the genome of the type strain P3M-2(T). A total of 2838 open reading frames was predicted from its 3.30 Mb genome. The whole proteome analysis supported phylum-level classification of M. roseus since most of the predicted proteins had closest matches in Bacteriodetes, Proteobacteria, Chlorobi, Firmicutes and deeply-branching bacterium Caldithrix abyssi, rather than in one particular phylum. Consistent with the ability of the bacterium to grow on complex carbohydrates, the genome analysis revealed more than one hundred glycoside hydrolases, glycoside transferases, polysaccharide lyases and carbohydrate esterases. The reconstructed central metabolism revealed pathways enabling the fermentation of complex organic substrates, as well as their complete oxidation through aerobic and anaerobic respiration. Genes encoding the photosynthetic and nitrogen-fixation machinery of green sulfur bacteria, as well as key enzymes of autotrophic carbon fixation pathways, were not identified. The M. roseus genome supports its affiliation to a novel phylum Ignavibateriae, representing the first step on the evolutionary pathway from heterotrophic ancestors of Bacteriodetes/Chlorobi group towards anaerobic photoautotrophic Chlorobi.

  1. Facultative anoxygenic photosynthesis in cyanobacteria driven by arsenite and sulfide with evidence for the support of nitrogen fixation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe-Simon, F.; Hoeft, S. E.; Baesman, S. M.; Oremland, R. S.

    2010-12-01

    The rise in atmospheric oxygen (O2) over geologic time is attributed to the evolution and widespread proliferation of oxygenic photosynthesis in cyanobacteria. However, cyanobacteria maintain a metabolic flexibility that may not always result in O2 release. In the environment, cyanobacteria may use a variety of alternative electron donors rather than water that are known to be used by other anoxygenic phototrophs (eg. purple sulfur bacteria) including reduced forms of sulfur, iron, nitrogen, and arsenic. Recent evidence suggests cyanobacteria actively take advantage of at least a few of these alternatives. We used a classical Winogradsky approach to enrich for cyanobacteria from the high salinity, elevated pH and arsenic-enriched waters of Mono Lake (CA). Experiments, optimized for cyanobacteria, revealed light-dependent, anaerobic arsenite-oxidation in sub-cultured sediment-free enrichments dominated by a filamentous cyanobacteria. We isolated and identified the dominant member of this enrichment to be a member of the Oscillatoriales by 16S rDNA. Addition of 1 mM arsenite induced facultative anoxygenic photosynthesis under continuous and circadian light. This isolate also oxidized sulfide under the same light-based conditions. Aerobic conditions elicited no arsenite oxidation in the light or dark and the isolate grew as a typical cyanobacterium using oxygenic photosynthesis. Under near-infrared light (700 nm) there was a direct correlation of enhanced growth with an increase in the rate arsenite or sulfide oxidation suggesting the use of photosystem I. Additionally, to test the wide-spread nature of this metabolism in the Oscillatoriales, we followed similar arsenite- and sulfide-driven facultative anoxygenic photosynthesis as well as nitrogen fixation (C2H2 reduction) in the axenic isolate Oscillatoria sp. CCMP 1731. Future characterization includes axenic isolation of the Mono Lake Oscillatoria sp. as well as the arsenite oxidase responsible for electron

  2. Nutrient feedbacks to soil heterotrophic nitrogen fixation in forests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perakis, Steven; Pett-Ridge, Julie C.; Catricala, Christina E.

    2017-01-01

    Multiple nutrient cycles regulate biological nitrogen (N) fixation in forests, yet long-term feedbacks between N-fixation and coupled element cycles remain largely unexplored. We examined soil nutrients and heterotrophic N-fixation across a gradient of 24 temperate conifer forests shaped by legacies of symbiotic N-fixing trees. We observed positive relationships among mineral soil pools of N, carbon (C), organic molybdenum (Mo), and organic phosphorus (P) across sites, evidence that legacies of symbiotic N-fixing trees can increase the abundance of multiple elements important to heterotrophic N-fixation. Soil N accumulation lowered rates of heterotrophic N-fixation in organic horizons due to both N inhibition of nitrogenase enzymes and declines in soil organic matter quality. Experimental fertilization of organic horizon soil revealed widespread Mo limitation of heterotrophic N-fixation, especially at sites where soil Mo was scarce relative to C. Fertilization also revealed widespread absence of P limitation, consistent with high soil P:Mo ratios. Responses of heterotrophic N-fixation to added Mo (positive) and N (negative) were correlated across sites, evidence that multiple nutrient controls of heterotrophic N-fixation were more common than single-nutrient effects. We propose a conceptual model where symbiotic N-fixation promotes coupled N, C, P, and Mo accumulation in soil, leading to positive feedback that relaxes nutrient limitation of overall N-fixation, though heterotrophic N-fixation is primarily suppressed by strong negative feedback from long-term soil N accumulation.

  3. Absence of genome reduction in diverse, facultative endohyphal bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, Kevin; Arendt, Kayla R.; Huntemann, Marcel; Clum, Alicia; Pillay, Manoj; Palaniappan, Krishnaveni; Varghese, Neha; Mikhailova, Natalia; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, T. B. K.; Ngan, Chew Yee; Daum, Chris; Shapiro, Nicole; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Woyke, Tanja; Arnold, A. Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Fungi interact closely with bacteria, both on the surfaces of the hyphae and within their living tissues (i.e. endohyphal bacteria, EHB). These EHB can be obligate or facultative symbionts and can mediate diverse phenotypic traits in their hosts. Although EHB have been observed in many lineages of fungi, it remains unclear how widespread and general these associations are, and whether there are unifying ecological and genomic features can be found across EHB strains as a whole. We cultured 11 bacterial strains after they emerged from the hyphae of diverse Ascomycota that were isolated as foliar endophytes of cupressaceous trees, and generated nearly complete genome sequences for all. Unlike the genomes of largely obligate EHB, the genomes of these facultative EHB resembled those of closely related strains isolated from environmental sources. Although all analysed genomes encoded structures that could be used to interact with eukaryotic hosts, pathways previously implicated in maintenance and establishment of EHB symbiosis were not universally present across all strains. Independent isolation of two nearly identical pairs of strains from different classes of fungi, coupled with recent experimental evidence, suggests horizontal transfer of EHB across endophytic hosts. Given the potential for EHB to influence fungal phenotypes, these genomes could shed light on the mechanisms of plant growth promotion or stress mitigation by fungal endophytes during the symbiotic phase, as well as degradation of plant material during the saprotrophic phase. As such, these findings contribute to the illumination of a new dimension of functional biodiversity in fungi. PMID:28348879

  4. Floral scents repel facultative flower visitors, but attract obligate ones

    PubMed Central

    Junker, Robert R.; Blüthgen, Nico

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims Biological mutualisms rely on communication between partners, but also require protective measures against exploitation. Animal-pollinated flowers need to attract pollinators but also to avoid conflicts with antagonistic consumers. The view of flower visitors as mutualistic and antagonistic agents considers primarily the plants' interest. A classification emphasizing the consumer's point of view, however, may be more useful when considering animal's adaptations to flower visits which may include a tolerance against defensive floral scent compounds. Methods In a meta-analysis covering 18 studies on the responses of animals to floral scents, the animals were assigned to the categories of obligate and facultative flower visitors which considers their dependency on floral resources. Their responses on floral scents were compared. Key Results On average, obligate flower visitors, often corresponding to pollinators, were attracted to floral scent compounds. In contrast, facultative and mainly antagonistic visitors were strongly repelled by floral scents. The findings confirm that floral scents have a dual function both as attractive and defensive cues. Conclusions Whether an animal depends on floral resources determines its response to these signals, suggesting that obligate flower visitors evolved a tolerance against primarily defensive compounds. Therefore, floral scent bouquets in conjunction with nutritious rewards may solve the conflicting tasks of attracting mutualists while repelling antagonists. PMID:20228087

  5. Mafia behaviour and the evolution of facultative virulence.

    PubMed

    Soler, J J; Møller, A P; Soler, M

    1998-04-07

    Some organisms enforce "maladaptive" behaviours on others of the same or different species by imposing costs in the absence of compliance. Such enforcement is used by the enforcer to obtain benefits in the possession of the enforced individual. This mechanism is known as mafia behaviour in humans, but may be widespread in parasite-host relationships in nature, from the cellular level to societies. In this paper we describe the evolution of such mafia mechanisms, and we propose a fuzzy logic model where the mafia mechanism is based on enforcement of hosts by exponentially increasing the cost of resistance to the parasite. The benefits of host resistance can be counteracted by parasite virulence, or even a decrease in response to an increment in its resistance. This parasite response to the host defence increment can be used for the parasite to teach the host that it is better to pay part of its benefits than increase its extremely costly defence. This model differs from others because it takes into account the evolution of host defence related to the evolution of parasite virulence (host-parasite coevolution) and points out an optimum in host defence related to the facultative virulence of the parasite. We provide several potential examples of facultative virulence depending on the antiparasite responses of hosts, and we suggest that this kind of mafia behaviour may be a widespread mechanism in biological processes at a number of different levels.

  6. Facultative and obligate slave making in Formica ants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savolainen, R.; Deslippe, R. J.

    2001-08-01

    Here we show for the first time that the presumed facultative slave-making ant Formica subintegra does not activate outside its nest until July and August, when it raids slaves. A comparative behavioral study of seasonal and daily activities, retrieval of prey, and nest maintenance of F. subintegra, the obligate slavemaker Polyergus breviceps, and the facultative Formica subnuda, shows that the behavioral repertory of F. subintegra closely resembles that of P. breviceps and clearly differs from the repertory of F. subnuda. Unlike P. breviceps, F. subintegra has retained some nest-building activity which, owing to lack of competence, does not contribute to nest maintenance. We suggested earlier that F. subintegra is probably an obligate slavemaker, because it always has in its colonies a large proportion of slaves of the total workforce, whereas F. subnuda fares well even without slaves. This, coupled with no foraging in early summer and a raiding period later on, strongly suggests that F. subintegra is an obligate slave-making ant.

  7. Saline landfill leachate disposal in facultative lagoons for wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Orta de Velasquez, M T; Monje-Ramirez, I; Yañez Noguez, I

    2012-01-01

    This study was carried out to determine the effect of disposing of saline landfill leachates in a Facultative Lagoon Wastewater Treatment Plant (FLWTP). The FLWTP is near a landfill and presents two characteristics: a wastewater influent with low organic matter, and high lagoon salinity due to the soil characteristics. These characteristics made the FLWTP a viable candidate to evaluate the feasibility of adding landfill leachates to the wastewater influent. Different mixtures of leachate with raw wastewater using volumetric ratios of 4%, 6%, and 10% (v/v) were evaluated in facultative lagoon reactors (FLRs). A 10% concentration of leachates in raw wastewater increased BOD5 and COD in the influent from 45 to 110 mg L(-1) and from 219 to 711 mg L(-1), respectively. It was found that the increase in salinity given by the raw wastewater and leachate mixture did not inhibit algae diversity. The types of algae present were Microcystis sp., Merismopedia sp., Euglena sp., Scenedesmus sp., Chlorella, Diatomea and Anacystis sp. However, decreased algae densities were observed, as measured by the decrease in chlorophyll concentration. The results showed that a 100% leachate concentration combined with wastewater did not upset biological treatment in the FLRs. Mean removal efficiencies for BOD5 and COD were 75% and 35%, respectively, giving a final BOD5 lower than 25 mg L(-1). There was also a significant decrease in the leachate heavy metal content when diluted with raw wastewater as result of natural precipitation.

  8. Facultative parthenogenesis in a critically endangered wild vertebrate.

    PubMed

    Fields, Andrew T; Feldheim, Kevin A; Poulakis, Gregg R; Chapman, Demian D

    2015-06-01

    Facultative parthenogenesis - the ability of sexually reproducing species to sometimes produce offspring asexually - is known from a wide range of ordinarily sexually reproducing vertebrates in captivity, including some birds, reptiles and sharks [1-3]. Despite this, free-living parthenogens have never been observed in any of these taxa in the wild, although two free-living snakes were recently discovered each gestating a single parthenogen - one copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix) and one cottonmouth (Agkistrodon piscivorus) [1]. Vertebrate parthenogens are characterized as being of the homogametic sex (e.g., females in sharks, males in birds) and by having elevated homozygosity compared to their mother [1-3], which may reduce their viability [4]. Although it is unknown if either of the parthenogenetic snakes would have been carried to term or survived in the wild, facultative parthenogenesis might have adaptive significance [1]. If this is true, it is reasonable to hypothesize that parthenogenesis would be found most often at low population density, when females risk reproductive failure because finding mates is difficult [5]. Here, we document the first examples of viable parthenogens living in a normally sexually reproducing wild vertebrate, the smalltooth sawfish (Pristis pectinata). We also provide a simple approach to screen any microsatellite DNA database for parthenogens, which will enable hypothesis-driven research on the significance of vertebrate parthenogenesis in the wild.

  9. Heterotrophic protists in the Central Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherr, Evelyn B.; Sherr, Barry F.; Fessenden, Lynne

    Distribution, general composition and activity of heterotrophic protists, as well as the distribution of bacteria, were assessed in the upper water column of the central Arctic Ocean during the Arctic Ocean Section, July-September 1994. Bacterial biomass varied from 5 to > 25 mg C 1 -1, with the highest values occurring in the Chukchi Sea. Protist biomass was highest (5-107 mg Cl -1) in the upper 50 m of the water column. Higher integrated (0-50 m) protist biomass values (average 910±250 mg C m -2, range 580-1370 mg C m -2) were found in the Chukchi Sea, compared to the central Arctic Ocean (average 480±320 mg C m -2, range 120-1120 mg C m -2). Heterotrophic dinoflagellates were more abundant than ciliates in the >20 μm size class at all stations. In the central Arctic Ocean, the <20 μm size class was numerically composed of dinoflagellates (16%), choanoflagellates (4%) and other flagellates (80%). Choanoflagellates were slightly more abundant in the Chukchi Sea (9% of cell numbers), but were a large component of the flagellate assemblage (55% of cell numbers) at only one station, in the Nansen Basin. Bacterivory estimated via uptake of added fluorescently labeled bacteria ranged from 1·2 × 10 3 to 46 × 10 3 bacteria ml -1 day -1; the highest rate was found at the station with a high choanoflagellate abundance. Observation of food vacuole contents showed that all size classes and taxonomic types of protists ingested phytoplankton. Choanoflagellates, and monads as small as 1·5 μm in size, ingested picoplanktonic eukaryotic phytoplankton, which were abundant (10 3-10 4 cells ml -1) in the upper 50 m. Larger protists ingested cryptomonads and diatoms, as well as pico-autotrophs. Clearance rates of 10-100 μm sized ciliates and dinoflagellates, based on the uptake of 1-5 μm fluorescent microspheres, were similar to rates reported for herbivorous protists in temperate waters. In terms of ecosystem carbon flow, we infer that phagotrophic protists in the Arctic

  10. Fixation, Counting, and Manipulation of Heterotrophic Nanoflagellates

    PubMed Central

    Bloem, Jaap; Bär-Gilissen, Marie-José B.; Cappenberg, Thomas E.

    1986-01-01

    Quantitative effects of several fixatives on heterotrophic nanoflagellates (HNAN) and phototrophic nanoflagellates (PNAN) were investigated by hemacytometer and epifluorescence counting techniques. Counts of Monas sp. cultures before and after fixation with unbuffered 0.3% glutaraldehyde and 5% formaldehyde showed no loss of cells during fixation, and cell concentrations remained constant for several weeks after fixation. Buffering of fixatives with borax caused severe losses, up to 100% within 2 h. Field samples from Lake Vechten showed no decline of HNAN and total nanoflagellate concentrations for at least 1 week after fixation with 5% formaldehyde and with 1% glutaraldehyde. With 1% glutaraldehyde, the chlorophyll autofluorescence of PNAN was much brighter than with 5% formaldehyde, although it was lost after a few days and thus limited the storage time of samples. However, when primulin-stained slides were prepared soon after fixation and stored at −30°C, the loss of autofluorescence was prevented and PNAN and HNAN concentrations were stable for at least 16 weeks. Effects of filtration and centrifugation on HNAN were also studied. Filtration vacuum could not exceed 3 kPa since 10 kPa already caused losses of 15 to 20%. Similar losses were caused by centrifugation, even at low speed (500 × g). PMID:16347232

  11. Heterotrophic plasticity and resilience in bleached corals.

    PubMed

    Grottoli, Andréa G; Rodrigues, Lisa J; Palardy, James E

    2006-04-27

    Mass coral bleaching events caused by elevated seawater temperatures have resulted in extensive coral mortality throughout the tropics over the past few decades. With continued global warming, bleaching events are predicted to increase in frequency and severity, causing up to 60% coral mortality globally within the next few decades. Although some corals are able to recover and to survive bleaching, the mechanisms underlying such resilience are poorly understood. Here we show that the coral host has a significant role in recovery and resilience. Bleached and recovering Montipora capitata (branching) corals met more than 100% of their daily metabolic energy requirements by markedly increasing their feeding rates and CHAR (per cent contribution of heterotrophically acquired carbon to daily animal respiration), whereas Porites compressa (branching) and Porites lobata (mounding) corals did not. These findings suggest that coral species with high-CHAR capability during bleaching and recovery, irrespective of morphology, will be more resilient to bleaching events over the long term, could become the dominant coral species on reefs, and may help to safeguard affected reefs from potential local and global extinction.

  12. Magnetic properties of heterotrophic bacteria (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkhovceva, Nadezda V.; Glebova, Irina N.; Romanuk, Anatoly V.

    1994-05-01

    The magnetic properties (magnetic susceptibility and saturation magnetization) of six species of heterotrophic bacteria were studied: alcaligenes faecalis 81, arthrobacter globiformis BKM 685, bacillus cereus 8, leptothrix pseudo-ochracea D-405, proteus vulgaris 14, and seliberia stellata. It has been shown that the magnetic properties of bacteria depend on (1) the peculiarity of the micro-organism (species-specific and connected with cultivation conditions); (2) the source of the iron in the media. Most of the bacteria are diamagnetic in media with a minimum of iron (χ∞=-7.2-0.3×10-6 sm3/g). The spore forming species (bacillus cereus) has increased diamagnetism. Usually the bacteria are paramagnetic in iron-containing media because they concentrate into Fe compounds. The paramagnetism of the iron-concentrating species (anthrobacter globiformis -χpar=2.4×10-6, leptothrix pseudo-ochtracea χpar=11.0×10-6 and seliberia stellata χpar=3.2×10-6 sm3/g) depends, in general, on magnetically ordered compounds. Iron compounds not accumulated by proteus vulgaris and these species are always diamagnetic .

  13. Heterotrophic denitrification of aquaculture effluent using fluidized sand biofilters

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The ability to consistently and cost-effectively reduce nitrate-nitrogen loads in effluent from recirculating aquaculture systems would enhance the industry's environmental stewardship and allow improved facility proximity to large markets in sensitive watersheds. Heterotrophic denitrification techn...

  14. Heterotrophic cultivation of microalgae for pigment production: A review.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jianjun; Nagarajan, Dillirani; Zhang, Quanguo; Chang, Jo-Shu; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2017-09-22

    Pigments (mainly carotenoids) are important nutraceuticals known for their potent anti-oxidant activities and have been used extensively as high end health supplements. Microalgae are the most promising sources of natural carotenoids and are devoid of the toxic effects associated with synthetic derivatives. Compared to photoautotrophic cultivation, heterotrophic cultivation of microalgae in well-controlled bioreactors for pigments production has attracted much attention for commercial applications due to overcoming the difficulties associated with the supply of CO2 and light, as well as avoiding the contamination problems and land requirements in open autotrophic culture systems. In this review, the heterotrophic metabolic potential of microalgae and their uses in pigment production are comprehensively described. Strategies to enhance pigment production under heterotrophic conditions are critically discussed and the challenges faced in heterotrophic pigment production with possible alternative solutions are presented. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. OCCURRENCE OF HETEROTROPHIC BACTERIA WITH VIRULENCE CHARACTERISTICS IN POTABLE WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Treated potable water contains a variety of heterotrophic bacteria that survive current treatment processes. There is evidence that these bacteria are not hazardous to the healthy population, however, the possibility exists that some of them may be opportunistic pathogens capabl...

  16. VIRULENCE CHARACTERISTICS OF HETEROTROPHIC BACTERIA COMMONLY ISOLATED FROM POTABLE WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Heterotrophic bacteria isolated from drinking water distribution systems were examined to determine if they possessed putative virulence factors such as hemolysins, proteases, or cytotoxins. Representative samples of colonies from several different distribution systems indicated ...

  17. Biotransformation of pharmaceuticals under nitrification, nitratation and heterotrophic conditions.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Fontaina, E; Gomes, I B; Aga, D S; Omil, F; Lema, J M; Carballa, M

    2016-01-15

    The effect of nitrification, nitratation and heterotrophic conditions on the biotransformation of several pharmaceuticals in a highly enriched nitrifying activated sludge was evaluated in this study by selective activation of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB), nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) and heterotrophic bacteria. Nitrifiers displayed a noticeable capacity to process ibuprofen due to hydroxylation by ammonia monooxygenase (AMO) to produce 2-hydroxy-ibuprofen. Naproxen was also biotransformed under nitrifying conditions. On the other hand, heterotrophic bacteria present in the nitrifying activated sludge (NAS) biotransformed sulfamethoxazole. In contrast, both nitrifying and heterotrophic activities were ineffective against diclofenac, diazepam, carbamazepine and trimethoprim. Similar biotransformation rates of erythromycin, roxithromycin and fluoxetine were observed under all conditions tested. Overall, results from this study give more evidence on the role of the different microbial communities present in activated sludge reactors on the biological removal of pharmaceuticals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. OCCURRENCE OF HETEROTROPHIC BACTERIA WITH VIRULENCE CHARACTERISTICS IN POTABLE WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Treated potable water contains a variety of heterotrophic bacteria that survive current treatment processes. There is evidence that these bacteria are not hazardous to the healthy population, however, the possibility exists that some of them may be opportunistic pathogens capabl...

  19. Heterotrophic euglenids from marine sediments of cape tribulation, tropical australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Je Lee, Won

    2006-06-01

    This paper presents new data on free-living heterotrophic euglenids (Euglenozoa, Protista) that occurred in the marine sediments at Cape Tribulation, Queensland, Australia. Twenty-nine species from 9 genera are described with uninterpreted records based on light microscopy, including one new taxon: Notosolenus capetribulationi n. sp. There was little evidence for endemism because the majority of heterotrophic euglenid species encountered here have been reported or were found from other habitats.

  20. Contrasting life strategies of viruses that infect photo- and heterotrophic bacteria, as revealed by viral tagging.

    PubMed

    Deng, Li; Gregory, Ann; Yilmaz, Suzan; Poulos, Bonnie T; Hugenholtz, Philip; Sullivan, Matthew B

    2012-10-30

    Ocean viruses are ubiquitous and abundant and play important roles in global biogeochemical cycles by means of their mortality, horizontal gene transfer, and manipulation of host metabolism. However, the obstacles involved in linking viruses to their hosts in a high-throughput manner bottlenecks our ability to understand virus-host interactions in complex communities. We have developed a method called viral tagging (VT), which combines mixtures of host cells and fluorescent viruses with flow cytometry. We investigated multiple viruses which infect each of two model marine bacteria that represent the slow-growing, photoautotrophic genus Synechococcus (Cyanobacteria) and the fast-growing, heterotrophic genus Pseudoalteromonas (Gammaproteobacteria). Overall, viral tagging results for viral infection were consistent with plaque and liquid infection assays for cyanobacterial myo-, podo- and siphoviruses and some (myo- and podoviruses) but not all (four siphoviruses) heterotrophic bacterial viruses. Virus-tagged Pseudoalteromonas organisms were proportional to the added viruses under varied infection conditions (virus-bacterium ratios), while no more than 50% of the Synechococcus organisms were virus tagged even at viral abundances that exceeded (5 to 10×) that of their hosts. Further, we found that host growth phase minimally impacts the fraction of virus-tagged Synechococcus organisms while greatly affecting phage adsorption to Pseudoalteromonas. Together these findings suggest that at least two contrasting viral life strategies exist in the oceans and that they likely reflect adaptation to their host microbes. Looking forward to the point at which the virus-tagging signature is well understood (e.g., for Synechococcus), application to natural communities should begin to provide population genomic data at the proper scale for predictively modeling two of the most abundant biological entities on Earth. Viral study suffers from an inability to link viruses to hosts en

  1. Oceanic heterotrophic dinoflagellates: distribution, abundance, and role as microzooplankton

    SciTech Connect

    Lessard, E.J.

    1984-01-01

    The primary objectives of this thesis were to determine the distribution and abundance of heterotrophic dinoflagellates across the Gulf Stream system off Cape Hatteras and to assess the potential grazing impact of these microheterotrophs in plankton communities. A list of species encountered in this study and their trophic status based on epifluorescence is presented, as well as observations on the presence of external or internal symbionts. The abundance of heterotrophic dinoflagellates across the Gulf Stream region off Cape Hatteras was determined from bimonthly net tow samples over a year and from whole water samples in March. Their average abundance was twice that of net ciliates in the net plankton and ten times that of ciliates in the nanoplankton. An isotope technique was developed to measure grazing rates of individual dinoflaggellates and other microzooplankton which cannot be separated in natural populations on the basis of size. /sup 3/H-thymidine and /sup 14/C-bicarbonate were used to label natural heterotrophic (bacteria and bacterivores) and autotrophic (phytoplankton and herbivores) food, respectively. Estimates of the grazing impact of heterotrophic kinoflagellates relative to other groups of heterotrophs on phytoplankton and bacteria were made by combining abundance data and clearance rates. Such calculations suggested that heterotrophic dinoflagellates may be an important group of grazers in oceanic waters.

  2. Fermentation of polysaccharides by Klebsiella and other facultative bacilli

    SciTech Connect

    Ochuba, G.U.; Von Riesen, V.L.

    1980-05-01

    Fermentations of 10 polysaccharides by species of the family Enterobacteriaceae were examined. Algin, guar, karaya, xanthan, and xylan were not fermented by any of the strains tested. Most of the activity was found in the tribe Klebsielleae. Klebseilla oxytoca fermented amylopectin (97% of the strains studied), carrageenan (100%), inulin (68%), polypectate (100%), and tragacanth (100%). Klebsiella pneumoniae fermented amylopectin (91%), carrageenan (100%), and tragacanth (86%). Carraggeenan was also fermented by Enterobacter aerogenes (100%), Enterobacter agglomerans (63%), Enterobacter cloacae (95%), and pectobacterium (38%). pectobacterium shared polypectate fermentation (100%) with K. oxytoca. With one exception, Serratia strains were negative on all polysaccharides. These results, along with other evidence, indicate that (i) the genus Klebsiella is biochemically the most versatile genus of the tribe, (ii) because of its distinct characteristics, K. oxytoca warrants species designation separate from K. pneumoniae, and (iii) some food additives generally considered indigestible can be metabolized by a few species of facultative bacilli, whereas others appear to be resistant.

  3. Fermentation of polysaccharides by Klebsielleae and other facultative bacilli.

    PubMed

    Ochuba, G U; von Riesen, V L

    1980-05-01

    Fermentations of 10 polysaccharides by species of the family Enterobacteriaceae were examined. Algin, guar, karaya, xanthan, and xylan were not fermented by any of the strains tested. Most of the activity was found in the tribe Klebsielleae. Klebsiella oxytoca fermented amylopectin (97% of the strains studied), carrageenan (100%), inulin (68%), polypectate (100%), and tragacanth (100%). Klebsiella pneumoniae fermented amylopectin (91%), carrageenan (100%), and tragacanth (86%). Carrageenan was also fermented by Enterobacter aerogenes (100%), Enterobacter agglomerans (63%), Enterobacter cloacae (95%), and Pectobacterium (38%). Pectobacterium shared polypectate fermentation (100%) with K. oxytoca. With one exception, Serratia strains were negative on all polysaccharides. These results, along with other evidence, indicate that (i) the genus Klebsiella is biochemically the most versatile genus of the tribe, (ii) because of its distinct characteristics, K. oxytoca warrants species designation separate from K. pneumoniae, and (iii) some food additives generally considered indigestible can be metabolized by a few species of facultative bacilli, whereas others appear to be resistant.

  4. Absence of genome reduction in diverse, facultative endohyphal bacteria

    DOE PAGES

    Baltrus, David A.; Dougherty, Kevin; Arendt, Kayla R.; ...

    2017-02-28

    Fungi interact closely with bacteria, both on the surfaces of the hyphae and within their living tissues (i.e. endohyphal bacteria, EHB). These EHB can be obligate or facultative symbionts and can mediate diverse phenotypic traits in their hosts. Although EHB have been observed in many lineages of fungi, it remains unclear how widespread and general these associations are, and whether there are unifying ecological and genomic features can be found across EHB strains as a whole. We cultured 11 bacterial strains after they emerged from the hyphae of diverse Ascomycota that were isolated as foliar endophytes of cupressaceous trees, andmore » generated nearly complete genome sequences for all. Unlike the genomes of largely obligate EHB, the genomes of these facultative EHB resembled those of closely related strains isolated from environmental sources. Although all analysed genomes encoded structures that could be used to interact with eukaryotic hosts, pathways previously implicated in maintenance and establishment of EHB symbiosis were not universally present across all strains. Independent isolation of two nearly identical pairs of strains from different classes of fungi, coupled with recent experimental evidence, suggests horizontal transfer of EHB across endophytic hosts. Given the potential for EHB to influence fungal phenotypes, these genomes could shed light on the mechanisms of plant growth promotion or stress mitigation by fungal endophytes during the symbiotic phase, as well as degradation of plant material during the saprotrophic phase. As such, these findings contribute to the illumination of a new dimension of functional biodiversity in fungi.« less

  5. Aphid facultative symbionts reduce survival of the predatory lady beetle Hippodamia convergens

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-essential facultative endosymbionts can provide their hosts with protection from parasites, pathogens, and predators. For example, two facultative bacterial symbionts of the pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum), Serratia symbiotica and Hamiltonella defensa, protect their hosts from parasitism by two species of parasitoid wasp. Previous studies have not explored whether facultative symbionts also play a defensive role against predation in this system. We tested whether feeding on aphids harboring different facultative symbionts affected the fitness of an aphid predator, the lady beetle Hippodamia convergens. Results While these aphid faculative symbionts did not deter lady beetle feeding, they did decrease survival of lady beetle larvae. Lady beetle larvae fed a diet of aphids with facultative symbionts had significantly reduced survival from egg hatching to pupation and therefore had reduced survival to adult emergence. Additionally, lady beetle adults fed aphids with facultative symbionts were significantly heavier than those fed facultative symbiont-free aphids, though development time was not significantly different. Conclusions Aphids reproduce clonally and are often found in large groups. Thus, aphid symbionts, by reducing the fitness of the aphid predator H. convergens, may indirectly defend their hosts’ clonal descendants against predation. These findings highlight the often far-reaching effects that symbionts can have in ecological systems. PMID:24555501

  6. LOW PATHOGENIC POTENTIAL IN HETEROTROPHIC BACTERIA FROM POTABLE WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Forty-five isolates of HPC bacteria, most of which express virulence-related characteristics are being tested for pathogenicity in immunocompromised mice. All forty-five were negative for facultative intracellular pathogenicity. All twenty-three isolates tested thus far were a...

  7. Nitrification in histosols: a potential role for the heterotrophic nitrifier.

    PubMed Central

    Tate, R L

    1977-01-01

    Insufficient populations of Nitrosomonas and Nitrobacter were found in a Pahokee muck soil (Lithic medidaprit) to account for the nitrate concentration observed. To determine if heterotrophic nitrifiers could account for some of this discrepancy, a method was developed to measure the levels of heterotrophic nitrifiers in soil. A population of 4.1 X 10(5) Arthrobacter per g of dry fallow soil, capable of producing nitrite and/or nitrate from reduced nitrogenous compounds, was observed. Amendment of the much with 0.5% (wt/wt) sodium acetate and 0.1% (wt/wt) ammonium-nitrogen as ammonium sulfate (final concentrations) not only resulted in the usual increase in autotrophic nitrifiers, but also in a fourfold increase in the heterotrophic nitrifying Arrthrobacter. Amendment of like samples with N-Serve [2-chloro-6(trichloromethyl) pyridinel] prevented the increase in Nitrosomonas, but not that in the heterotrophic nitrifiers. Nitrate production in the presence of the inhibitor was diminished but not prevented. An Arthrobacter sp., isolated from the muck, produced nitrite when inoculated at high densities into sterile soil, unamended or amended with sodium acetate and/or ammomium sulfate. These data suggest that the heterotrophic population may be responsible for some of the nitrate produced in these Histosols. PMID:869537

  8. The Evolution of Facultative Conformity Based on Similarity

    PubMed Central

    Efferson, Charles; Lalive, Rafael; Cacault, Maria Paula; Kistler, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Conformist social learning can have a pronounced impact on the cultural evolution of human societies, and it can shape both the genetic and cultural evolution of human social behavior more broadly. Conformist social learning is beneficial when the social learner and the demonstrators from whom she learns are similar in the sense that the same behavior is optimal for both. Otherwise, the social learner’s optimum is likely to be rare among demonstrators, and conformity is costly. The trade-off between these two situations has figured prominently in the longstanding debate about the evolution of conformity, but the importance of the trade-off can depend critically on the flexibility of one’s social learning strategy. We developed a gene-culture coevolutionary model that allows cognition to encode and process information about the similarity between naive learners and experienced demonstrators. Facultative social learning strategies that condition on perceived similarity evolve under certain circumstances. When this happens, facultative adjustments are often asymmetric. Asymmetric adjustments mean that the tendency to follow the majority when learners perceive demonstrators as similar is stronger than the tendency to follow the minority when learners perceive demonstrators as different. In an associated incentivized experiment, we found that social learners adjusted how they used social information based on perceived similarity, but adjustments were symmetric. The symmetry of adjustments completely eliminated the commonly assumed trade-off between cases in which learners and demonstrators share an optimum versus cases in which they do not. In a second experiment that maximized the potential for social learners to follow their preferred strategies, a few social learners exhibited an inclination to follow the majority. Most, however, did not respond systematically to social information. Additionally, in the complete absence of information about their similarity to

  9. The Evolution of Facultative Conformity Based on Similarity.

    PubMed

    Efferson, Charles; Lalive, Rafael; Cacault, Maria Paula; Kistler, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Conformist social learning can have a pronounced impact on the cultural evolution of human societies, and it can shape both the genetic and cultural evolution of human social behavior more broadly. Conformist social learning is beneficial when the social learner and the demonstrators from whom she learns are similar in the sense that the same behavior is optimal for both. Otherwise, the social learner's optimum is likely to be rare among demonstrators, and conformity is costly. The trade-off between these two situations has figured prominently in the longstanding debate about the evolution of conformity, but the importance of the trade-off can depend critically on the flexibility of one's social learning strategy. We developed a gene-culture coevolutionary model that allows cognition to encode and process information about the similarity between naive learners and experienced demonstrators. Facultative social learning strategies that condition on perceived similarity evolve under certain circumstances. When this happens, facultative adjustments are often asymmetric. Asymmetric adjustments mean that the tendency to follow the majority when learners perceive demonstrators as similar is stronger than the tendency to follow the minority when learners perceive demonstrators as different. In an associated incentivized experiment, we found that social learners adjusted how they used social information based on perceived similarity, but adjustments were symmetric. The symmetry of adjustments completely eliminated the commonly assumed trade-off between cases in which learners and demonstrators share an optimum versus cases in which they do not. In a second experiment that maximized the potential for social learners to follow their preferred strategies, a few social learners exhibited an inclination to follow the majority. Most, however, did not respond systematically to social information. Additionally, in the complete absence of information about their similarity to

  10. Application of molecular techniques on heterotrophic hydrogen production research.

    PubMed

    Li, R Y; Zhang, T; Fang, H H P

    2011-09-01

    This paper reviews the application of molecular techniques in heterotrophic hydrogen production studies. Commonly used molecular techniques are introduced briefly first, including cloning-sequencing after polymerase chain reaction (PCR), denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and quantitative real-time PCR. Application of the molecular techniques in heterotrophic hydrogen production studies are discussed in details, focusing on identification of new isolates for hydrogen production, characterization of microbial compositions in bioreactors, monitoring microbial diversity variation, visualization of microbial distribution in hydrogen-producing granular sludge, and quantification of various microbial populations. Some significant findings in recent hydrogen production studies with the application of molecular techniques are discussed, followed by a research outlook of the heterotrophic biohydrogen field.

  11. Dependence of the Cyanobacterium Prochlorococcus on Hydrogen Peroxide Scavenging Microbes for Growth at the Ocean's Surface

    PubMed Central

    Morris, J. Jeffrey; Johnson, Zackary I.; Szul, Martin J.; Keller, Martin; Zinser, Erik R.

    2011-01-01

    The phytoplankton community in the oligotrophic open ocean is numerically dominated by the cyanobacterium Prochlorococcus, accounting for approximately half of all photosynthesis. In the illuminated euphotic zone where Prochlorococcus grows, reactive oxygen species are continuously generated via photochemical reactions with dissolved organic matter. However, Prochlorococcus genomes lack catalase and additional protective mechanisms common in other aerobes, and this genus is highly susceptible to oxidative damage from hydrogen peroxide (HOOH). In this study we showed that the extant microbial community plays a vital, previously unrecognized role in cross-protecting Prochlorococcus from oxidative damage in the surface mixed layer of the oligotrophic ocean. Microbes are the primary HOOH sink in marine systems, and in the absence of the microbial community, surface waters in the Atlantic and Pacific Ocean accumulated HOOH to concentrations that were lethal for Prochlorococcus cultures. In laboratory experiments with the marine heterotroph Alteromonas sp., serving as a proxy for the natural community of HOOH-degrading microbes, bacterial depletion of HOOH from the extracellular milieu prevented oxidative damage to the cell envelope and photosystems of co-cultured Prochlorococcus, and facilitated the growth of Prochlorococcus at ecologically-relevant cell concentrations. Curiously, the more recently evolved lineages of Prochlorococcus that exploit the surface mixed layer niche were also the most sensitive to HOOH. The genomic streamlining of these evolved lineages during adaptation to the high-light exposed upper euphotic zone thus appears to be coincident with an acquired dependency on the extant HOOH-consuming community. These results underscore the importance of (indirect) biotic interactions in establishing niche boundaries, and highlight the impacts that community-level responses to stress may have in the ecological and evolutionary outcomes for co-existing species

  12. An Early-Branching Freshwater Cyanobacterium at the Origin of Plastids.

    PubMed

    Ponce-Toledo, Rafael I; Deschamps, Philippe; López-García, Purificación; Zivanovic, Yvan; Benzerara, Karim; Moreira, David

    2017-02-06

    Photosynthesis evolved in eukaryotes by the endosymbiosis of a cyanobacterium, the future plastid, within a heterotrophic host. This primary endosymbiosis occurred in the ancestor of Archaeplastida, a eukaryotic supergroup that includes glaucophytes, red algae, green algae, and land plants [1-4]. However, although the endosymbiotic origin of plastids from a single cyanobacterial ancestor is firmly established, the nature of that ancestor remains controversial: plastids have been proposed to derive from either early- or late-branching cyanobacterial lineages [5-11]. To solve this issue, we carried out phylogenomic and supernetwork analyses of the most comprehensive dataset analyzed so far including plastid-encoded proteins and nucleus-encoded proteins of plastid origin resulting from endosymbiotic gene transfer (EGT) of primary photosynthetic eukaryotes, as well as wide-ranging genome data from cyanobacteria, including novel lineages. Our analyses strongly support that plastids evolved from deep-branching cyanobacteria and that the present-day closest cultured relative of primary plastids is Gloeomargarita lithophora. This species belongs to a recently discovered cyanobacterial lineage widespread in freshwater microbialites and microbial mats [12, 13]. The ecological distribution of this lineage sheds new light on the environmental conditions where the emergence of photosynthetic eukaryotes occurred, most likely in a terrestrial-freshwater setting. The fact that glaucophytes, the first archaeplastid lineage to diverge, are exclusively found in freshwater ecosystems reinforces this hypothesis. Therefore, not only did plastids emerge early within cyanobacteria, but the first photosynthetic eukaryotes most likely evolved in terrestrial-freshwater settings, not in oceans as commonly thought.

  13. The LexA transcription factor regulates fatty acid biosynthetic genes in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Kizawa, Ayumi; Kawahara, Akihito; Takashima, Kosuke; Takimura, Yasushi; Nishiyama, Yoshitaka; Hihara, Yukako

    2017-07-26

    Specific transcription factors have been identified in various heterotrophic bacterial species that regulate the sets of genes required for fatty acid metabolism. Here, we report that expression of the fab genes, encoding fatty acid biosynthetic enzymes, is regulated by the global regulator LexA in the photoautotrophic cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Sll1626, an ortholog of the well-known LexA repressor involved in the SOS response in heterotrophic bacteria, was isolated from crude extracts of Synechocystis by DNA affinity chromatography, reflecting its binding to the upstream region of the acpP-fabF and fabI genes. An electrophoresis mobility shift assay revealed that the recombinant LexA protein can bind to the upstream region of each fab gene tested (fabD, fabH, fabF, fabG, fabZ and fabI). Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of the wild type and a lexA-disrupted mutant strain suggested that LexA acts as a repressor of the fab genes involved in initiation of fatty acid biosynthesis (fabD, fabH and fabF) and the first reductive step in the subsequent elongation cycle (fabG) under normal growth conditions. Under nitrogen-depleted conditions, downregulation of fab gene expression is partly achieved through an increase in LexA-repressing activity. In contrast, under phosphate-depleted conditions, fab gene expression is upregulated, probably due to the loss of repression by LexA. We further demonstrate that elimination of LexA largely increases the production of fatty acids in strains modified to secrete free fatty acids. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. The genome sequence of the facultative intracellular pathogen Brucella melitensis

    PubMed Central

    DelVecchio, Vito G.; Kapatral, Vinayak; Redkar, Rajendra J.; Patra, Guy; Mujer, Cesar; Los, Tamara; Ivanova, Natalia; Anderson, Iain; Bhattacharyya, Anamitra; Lykidis, Athanasios; Reznik, Gary; Jablonski, Lynn; Larsen, Niels; D'Souza, Mark; Bernal, Axel; Mazur, Mikhail; Goltsman, Eugene; Selkov, Eugene; Elzer, Philip H.; Hagius, Sue; O'Callaghan, David; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Haselkorn, Robert; Kyrpides, Nikos; Overbeek, Ross

    2002-01-01

    Brucella melitensis is a facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes abortion in goats and sheep and Malta fever in humans. The genome of B. melitensis strain 16M was sequenced and found to contain 3,294,935 bp distributed over two circular chromosomes of 2,117,144 bp and 1,177,787 bp encoding 3,197 ORFs. By using the bioinformatics suite ERGO, 2,487 (78%) ORFs were assigned functions. The origins of replication of the two chromosomes are similar to those of other α-proteobacteria. Housekeeping genes, including those involved in DNA replication, transcription, translation, core metabolism, and cell wall biosynthesis, are distributed on both chromosomes. Type I, II, and III secretion systems are absent, but genes encoding sec-dependent, sec-independent, and flagella-specific type III, type IV, and type V secretion systems as well as adhesins, invasins, and hemolysins were identified. Several features of the B. melitensis genome are similar to those of the symbiotic Sinorhizobium meliloti. PMID:11756688

  15. The genome sequence of the facultative intracellular pathogen Brucella melitensis.

    PubMed

    DelVecchio, Vito G; Kapatral, Vinayak; Redkar, Rajendra J; Patra, Guy; Mujer, Cesar; Los, Tamara; Ivanova, Natalia; Anderson, Iain; Bhattacharyya, Anamitra; Lykidis, Athanasios; Reznik, Gary; Jablonski, Lynn; Larsen, Niels; D'Souza, Mark; Bernal, Axel; Mazur, Mikhail; Goltsman, Eugene; Selkov, Eugene; Elzer, Philip H; Hagius, Sue; O'Callaghan, David; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Haselkorn, Robert; Kyrpides, Nikos; Overbeek, Ross

    2002-01-08

    Brucella melitensis is a facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes abortion in goats and sheep and Malta fever in humans. The genome of B. melitensis strain 16M was sequenced and found to contain 3,294,935 bp distributed over two circular chromosomes of 2,117,144 bp and 1,177,787 bp encoding 3,197 ORFs. By using the bioinformatics suite ERGO, 2,487 (78%) ORFs were assigned functions. The origins of replication of the two chromosomes are similar to those of other alpha-proteobacteria. Housekeeping genes, including those involved in DNA replication, transcription, translation, core metabolism, and cell wall biosynthesis, are distributed on both chromosomes. Type I, II, and III secretion systems are absent, but genes encoding sec-dependent, sec-independent, and flagella-specific type III, type IV, and type V secretion systems as well as adhesins, invasins, and hemolysins were identified. Several features of the B. melitensis genome are similar to those of the symbiotic Sinorhizobium meliloti.

  16. [Obligatory and facultative symptoms of the Alice in wonderland syndrome].

    PubMed

    Podoll, K; Ebel, H; Robinson, D; Nicola, U

    2002-08-01

    The Alice in Wonderland syndrome (AIWS), as described by Todd in 1955, denotes a variety of self-experienced paroxysmal body schema disturbances (obligatory core symptoms of the AIWS) which may co-occur with depersonalization, derealization, visual illusions and disorders of the time perception (facultative symptoms of the AIWS). The name comes, of course, from Lewis Carroll's 1865 novel "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland", which is believed to have been inspired by Carroll's own migraine experiences documented as early as 1856. Recent studies of the AIWS occurring as somesthetic migraine aura indicated that the body schema disturbance of macrosomatognosia most frequently affects the head and upper extremities, paralleling the extension of their representation in the human brain. As a misapprehension commonly encountered in the medical literature, it has been suggested to define the AIWS by the presence of visual rather than somesthetic perceptual disturbances, e.g. metamorphopsia and/or visual hallucinations, but this change and broadening of Todd's definition of the AIWS turns it to a both scientifically and clinically useless concept.

  17. Developmental Transcriptome for a Facultatively Eusocial Bee, Megalopta genalis

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Beryl M.; Wcislo, William T.; Robinson, Gene E.

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptomes provide excellent foundational resources for mechanistic and evolutionary analyses of complex traits. We present a developmental transcriptome for the facultatively eusocial bee Megalopta genalis, which represents a potential transition point in the evolution of eusociality. A de novo transcriptome assembly of Megalopta genalis was generated using paired-end Illumina sequencing and the Trinity assembler. Males and females of all life stages were aligned to this transcriptome for analysis of gene expression profiles throughout development. Gene Ontology analysis indicates that stage-specific genes are involved in ion transport, cell–cell signaling, and metabolism. A number of distinct biological processes are upregulated in each life stage, and transitions between life stages involve shifts in dominant functional processes, including shifts from transcriptional regulation in embryos to metabolism in larvae, and increased lipid metabolism in adults. We expect that this transcriptome will provide a useful resource for future analyses to better understand the molecular basis of the evolution of eusociality and, more generally, phenotypic plasticity. PMID:26276382

  18. Facultative bacterial symbionts in aphids confer resistance to parasitic wasps

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Kerry M.; Russell, Jacob A.; Moran, Nancy A.; Hunter, Martha S.

    2003-01-01

    Symbiotic relationships between animals and microorganisms are common in nature, yet the factors controlling the abundance and distributions of symbionts are mostly unknown. Aphids have an obligate association with the bacterium Buchnera aphidicola (the primary symbiont) that has been shown to contribute directly to aphid fitness. In addition, aphids sometimes harbor other vertically transmitted bacteria (secondary symbionts), for which few benefits of infection have been previously documented. We carried out experiments to determine the consequences of these facultative symbioses in Acyrthosiphon pisum (the pea aphid) for vulnerability of the aphid host to a hymenopteran parasitoid, Aphidius ervi, a major natural enemy in field populations. Our results show that, in a controlled genetic background, infection confers resistance to parasitoid attack by causing high mortality of developing parasitoid larvae. Compared with uninfected controls, experimentally infected aphids were as likely to be attacked by ovipositing parasitoids but less likely to support parasitoid development. This strong interaction between a symbiotic bacterium and a host natural enemy provides a mechanism for the persistence and spread of symbiotic bacteria. PMID:12563031

  19. Endozoicomonas Are Specific, Facultative Symbionts of Sea Squirts

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Lars; Kjeldsen, Kasper U.; Funch, Peter; Jensen, Jeppe; Obst, Matthias; López-Legentil, Susanna; Schramm, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Ascidians are marine filter feeders and harbor diverse microbiota that can exhibit a high degree of host-specificity. Pharyngeal samples of Scandinavian and Mediterranean ascidians were screened for consistently associated bacteria by culture-dependent and -independent approaches. Representatives of the Endozoicomonas (Gammaproteobacteria, Hahellaceae) clade were detected in the ascidian species Ascidiella aspersa, Ascidiella scabra, Botryllus schlosseri, Ciona intestinalis, Styela clava, and multiple Ascidia/Ascidiella spp. In total, Endozoicomonas was detected in more than half of all specimens screened, and in 25–100% of the specimens for each species. The retrieved Endozoicomonas 16S rRNA gene sequences formed an ascidian-specific subclade, whose members were detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) as extracellular microcolonies in the pharynx. Two strains of the ascidian-specific Endozoicomonas subclade were isolated in pure culture and characterized. Both strains are chemoorganoheterotrophs and grow on mucin (a mucus glycoprotein). The strains tested negative for cytotoxic or antibacterial activity. Based on these observations, we propose ascidian-associated Endozoicomonas to be commensals, living off the mucus continuously secreted into the pharynx. Members of the ascidian-specific Endozoicomonas subclade were also detected in seawater from the Scandinavian sampling site, which suggests acquisition of the symbionts by horizontal transmission. The combined results indicate a host-specific, yet facultative symbiosis between ascidians and Endozoicomonas. PMID:27462299

  20. Endozoicomonas Are Specific, Facultative Symbionts of Sea Squirts.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Lars; Kjeldsen, Kasper U; Funch, Peter; Jensen, Jeppe; Obst, Matthias; López-Legentil, Susanna; Schramm, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Ascidians are marine filter feeders and harbor diverse microbiota that can exhibit a high degree of host-specificity. Pharyngeal samples of Scandinavian and Mediterranean ascidians were screened for consistently associated bacteria by culture-dependent and -independent approaches. Representatives of the Endozoicomonas (Gammaproteobacteria, Hahellaceae) clade were detected in the ascidian species Ascidiella aspersa, Ascidiella scabra, Botryllus schlosseri, Ciona intestinalis, Styela clava, and multiple Ascidia/Ascidiella spp. In total, Endozoicomonas was detected in more than half of all specimens screened, and in 25-100% of the specimens for each species. The retrieved Endozoicomonas 16S rRNA gene sequences formed an ascidian-specific subclade, whose members were detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) as extracellular microcolonies in the pharynx. Two strains of the ascidian-specific Endozoicomonas subclade were isolated in pure culture and characterized. Both strains are chemoorganoheterotrophs and grow on mucin (a mucus glycoprotein). The strains tested negative for cytotoxic or antibacterial activity. Based on these observations, we propose ascidian-associated Endozoicomonas to be commensals, living off the mucus continuously secreted into the pharynx. Members of the ascidian-specific Endozoicomonas subclade were also detected in seawater from the Scandinavian sampling site, which suggests acquisition of the symbionts by horizontal transmission. The combined results indicate a host-specific, yet facultative symbiosis between ascidians and Endozoicomonas.

  1. Facultative diazotrophy increases Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii competitiveness under fluctuating nitrogen availability.

    PubMed

    Moisander, Pia H; Cheshire, Lou Anne; Braddy, Jeremy; Calandrino, Elizabeth S; Hoffman, Melissa; Piehler, Michael F; Paerl, Hans W

    2012-03-01

    Relative fitness of three bloom-forming and potentially toxic cyanobacteria from the subtropical St. John's River, Florida was investigated under a range of nutrient conditions, during a bloom dominated by Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii. Nitrogen (N) was the primary nutrient limiting phytoplankton primary productivity and biomass. Phytoplankton biomass was also enhanced by phosphorus (P) added either alone or jointly with N, suggesting different components of the phytoplankton experienced distinct nutrient limitations. Based on quantitative PCR, the diazotrophic cyanobacteria Anabaena sp. and C. raciborskii were responsible for the primary production response to P additions, while the nondiazotrophic Microcystis aeruginosa appeared to benefit from N released from the diazotrophs. Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii maintained high net growth rates under diazotrophic and nondiazotrophic conditions, while Anabaena sp. growth was significantly reduced under DIN enrichment. C. raciborskii appears to be a generalist with regard to N source, a lifestyle traditionally not considered a viable ecological strategy among diazotrophs. Using facultative diazotrophy, C. raciborskii gains a growth advantage under fluctuating DIN conditions, such as systems that are under the influence of anthropogenic N loading events. The described niche differentiation may be a key factor explaining the recent global expansion of C. raciborskii. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The persistence of facultative parthenogenesis in Drosophila albomicans.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-chen; Ting, Chau-Ti; Chang, Ching-Ho; Fang, Shu; Chang, Hwei-yu

    2014-01-01

    Parthenogenesis has evolved independently in more than 10 Drosophila species. Most cases are tychoparthenogenesis, which is occasional or accidental parthenogenesis in normally bisexual species with a low hatching rate of eggs produced by virgin females; this form is presumed to be an early stage of parthenogenesis. To address how parthenogenesis and sexual reproduction coexist in Drosophila populations, we investigated several reproductive traits, including the fertility, parthenogenetic capability, diploidization mechanisms, and mating propensity of parthenogenetic D. albomicans. The fertility of mated parthenogenetic females was significantly higher than that of virgin females. The mated females could still produce parthenogenetic offspring but predominantly produced offspring by sexual reproduction. Both mated parthenogenetic females and their parthenogenetic-sexual descendants were capable of parthenogenesis. The alleles responsible for parthenogenesis can be propagated through both parthenogenesis and sexual reproduction. As diploidy is restored predominantly by gamete duplication, heterozygosity would be very low in parthenogenetic individuals. Hence, genetic variation in parthenogenetic genomes would result from sexual reproduction. The mating propensity of females after more than 20 years of isolation from males was decreased. If mutations reducing mating propensities could occur under male-limited conditions in natural populations, decreased mating propensity might accelerate tychoparthenogenesis through a positive feedback mechanism. This process provides an opportunity for the evolution of obligate parthenogenesis. Therefore, the persistence of facultative parthenogenesis may be an adaptive reproductive strategy in Drosophila when a few founders colonize a new niche or when small populations are distributed at the edge of a species' range, consistent with models of geographical parthenogenesis.

  3. Heterotrophic cultivation of microalgae for production of biodiesel.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Mohd Shamzi; Wei, Lai Zee; Ariff, Arbakariya B

    2011-08-01

    High cell density cultivation of microalgae via heterotrophic growth mechanism could effectively address the issues of low productivity and operational constraints presently affecting the solar driven biodiesel production. This paper reviews the progress made so far in the development of commercial-scale heterotrophic microalgae cultivation processes. The review also discusses on patentable concepts and innovations disclosed in the past four years with regards to new approaches to microalgal cultivation technique, improvisation on the process flow designs to economically produced biodiesel and genetic manipulation to confer desirable traits leading to much valued high lipid-bearing microalgae strains.

  4. Facultative crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants: powerful tools for unravelling the functional elements of CAM photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Winter, Klaus; Holtum, Joseph A M

    2014-07-01

    Facultative crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) describes the optional use of CAM photosynthesis, typically under conditions of drought stress, in plants that otherwise employ C3 or C4 photosynthesis. In its cleanest form, the upregulation of CAM is fully reversible upon removal of stress. Reversibility distinguishes facultative CAM from ontogenetically programmed unidirectional C3-to-CAM shifts inherent in constitutive CAM plants. Using mainly measurements of 24h CO2 exchange, defining features of facultative CAM are highlighted in five terrestrial species, Clusia pratensis, Calandrinia polyandra, Mesembryanthemum crystallinum, Portulaca oleracea and Talinum triangulare. For these, we provide detailed chronologies of the shifts between photosynthetic modes and comment on their usefulness as experimental systems. Photosynthetic flexibility is also reviewed in an aquatic CAM plant, Isoetes howellii. Through comparisons of C3 and CAM states in facultative CAM species, many fundamental biochemical principles of the CAM pathway have been uncovered. Facultative CAM species will be of even greater relevance now that new sequencing technologies facilitate the mapping of genomes and tracking of the expression patterns of multiple genes. These technologies and facultative CAM systems, when joined, are expected to contribute in a major way towards our goal of understanding the essence of CAM. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. A MEMBRANE FILTER PROCEDURE FOR ASSAYING CYTOTOXIC ACTIVITY IN HETEROTROPHIC BACTERIA ISOLATED FROM DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cytotoxic activity assays of Gram-negative, heterotrophic bacteria are often laborious and time consuming. The objective of this study was to develop in situ procedures for testing potential cytotoxic activities of heterotrophic bacteria isolated from drinking water systems. Wate...

  6. A MEMBRANE FILTER PROCEDURE FOR ASSAYING CYTOTOXIC ACTIVITY IN HETEROTROPHIC BACTERIA ISOLATED FROM DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cytotoxic activity assays of Gram-negative, heterotrophic bacteria are often laborious and time consuming. The objective of this study was to develop in situ procedures for testing potential cytotoxic activities of heterotrophic bacteria isolated from drinking water systems. Wate...

  7. Diversification of myco-heterotrophic angiosperms: Evidence from Burmanniaceae

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Myco-heterotrophy evolved independently several times during angiosperm evolution. Although many species of myco-heterotrophic plants are highly endemic and long-distance dispersal seems unlikely, some genera are widely dispersed and have pantropical distributions, often with large disjunctions. Traditionally this has been interpreted as evidence for an old age of these taxa. However, due to their scarcity and highly reduced plastid genomes our understanding about the evolutionary histories of the angiosperm myco-heterotrophic groups is poor. Results We provide a hypothesis for the diversification of the myco-heterotrophic family Burmanniaceae. Phylogenetic inference, combined with biogeographical analyses, molecular divergence time estimates, and diversification analyses suggest that Burmanniaceae originated in West Gondwana and started to diversify during the Late Cretaceous. Diversification and migration of the species-rich pantropical genera Burmannia and Gymnosiphon display congruent patterns. Diversification began during the Eocene, when global temperatures peaked and tropical forests occurred at low latitudes. Simultaneous migration from the New to the Old World in Burmannia and Gymnosiphon occurred via boreotropical migration routes. Subsequent Oligocene cooling and breakup of boreotropical flora ended New-Old World migration and caused a gradual decrease in diversification rate in Burmanniaceae. Conclusion Our results indicate that extant diversity and pantropical distribution of myco-heterotrophic Burmanniaceae is the result of diversification and boreotropical migration during the Eocene when tropical rain forest expanded dramatically. PMID:18573195

  8. Viruses, bacteria, and heterotrophic nanoflagellates in Laptev Sea plankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopylov, A. I.; Sazhin, A. F.; Zabotkina, E. A.; Romanenko, A. V.; Romanova, N. D.; Makarevich, P. R.; Wenger, M. P.

    2016-11-01

    The paper considers the concentrations and functional characteristics of viruses, bacteria, and heterotrophic nanoflagellates determined for the first time in the Laptev Sea in August-September, 2014. The abundance of bacteria, viruses, and heterotrophic nanoflagellates varied from 110.1 × 103 to 828.4 × 103 cells/mL, from 384.2 × 103 to 2932.8 × 103 particles/mL, and from 108 to 651 cells/mL, respectively. The daily bacterioplankton production varied from 4.2 × 103 to 381.7 × 103 cells/mL, with an average of 117.6 × 103 cells/mL. Electron transmission microscopy has for the first time shown that the frequency of visibly infected bacterial cells varied from 0.2 to 2.0% (0.8% on average) of NB. The average virus-induced mortality of bacteria was 6.3% of bacterioplankton production, with variations ranging from 1.4 to 16.9%. Grazing on bacteria by heterotrophic nanoflagellates contributed more to bacteria mortality than virus-induced bacterial lysis. By grazing on bacteria, heterotrophic nanoflagellates consumed large quantities of viruses located on the surface and inside bacterial cells.

  9. Lipid Accumulation Mechanisms in Auto- and Heterotrophic Microalgae.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao-Hong; Jiang, Jian-Guo

    2017-09-20

    Microalgae lipids have attracted great attention in the world as a result of their potential use for biodiesel productions. Microalgae are cultivated in photoautotrophic conditions in most cases, but several species are able to grow under heterotrophic conditions, in which microalgae are cultivated in the dark where the cell growth and reproduction are supported by organic carbons. This perspective is covering the related studies concerning the difference between hetero- and autotrophic cultivation of microalgae. The auto- and heterotrophic central carbon metabolic pathways in microalgae are described, and the catalyzing reactions of several key metabolic enzymes and their corresponding changes in the protein level are summarized. Under adverse environmental conditions, such as nutrient deprivation, microalgae have the ability to highly store energy by forming triacylglycerol (TAG), the reason for which is analyzed. In addition, the biosynthesis of fatty acids and TAGs and their difference between auto- and heterotrophic conditions are compared at the molecular level. The positive regulatory enzymes, such as glucose transporter protein, fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase, and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and the negative regulation enzymes, such as triose phosphate isomerase, played a crucial role in the lipid accumulation auto- and heterotrophic conditions.

  10. Alcohol dehydrogenase AdhA plays a role in ethanol tolerance in model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Rebeca

    2017-02-03

    The protein AdhA from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (hereafter Synechocystis) has been previously reported to show alcohol dehydrogenase activity towards ethanol and both NAD and NADP. This protein is currently being used in genetically modified strains of Synechocystis capable of synthesizing ethanol showing the highest ethanol productivities. In the present work, mutant strains of Synechocystis lacking AdhA have been constructed and tested for tolerance to ethanol. The lack of AdhA in the wild-type strain reduces survival to externally added ethanol at lethal concentration of 4% (v/v). On the other hand, the lack of AdhA in an ethanologenic strain diminishes tolerance of cells to internally produced ethanol. It is also shown that light-activated heterotrophic growth (LAHG) of the wild-type strain is impaired in the mutant strain lacking AdhA (∆adhA strain). Photoautotrophic, mixotrophic, and photoheterotrophic growth are not affected in the mutant strain. Based on phenotypic characterization of ∆adhA mutants, the possible physiological function of AdhA in Synechocystis is discussed.

  11. Constant phycobilisome size in chromatically adapted cells of the cyanobacterium Tolypothrix tenuis, and variation in Nostoc sp

    SciTech Connect

    Ohki, K.; Gantt, E.; Lipschultz, C.A.; Ernst, M.C.

    1985-12-01

    Phycobilisomes of Tolypothrix tenuis, a cyanobacterium capable of complete chromatic adaptation, were studied from cells grown in red and green light, and in darkness. The phycobilisome size remained constant irrespective of the light quality. The hemidiscoidal phycobilisomes had an average diameter of about 52 nanometers and height of about 33 nanometers, by negative staining. The thickness was equivalent to a physocyanin molecule (about 10 nanometers). The molar ratio of allophycocyanin, relative to other phycobiliproteins always remained at about 1:3. Phycobilisomes from red light grown cells and cells grown heterotrophically in darkness were indistinguishable in their pigment composition, polypeptide pattern, and size. Eight polypeptides were resolved in the phycobilin region (17.5 to 23.5 kilodaltons) by isoelectric focusing followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Half of these were invariable, while others were variable in green and red light. It is inferred that phycoerythrin synthesis in green light resulted in a one for one substitution of phycocyanin, thus retaining a constant phycobilisome size. Tolypothrix appears to be one of the best examples of phycobiliprotein regulation with wavelength. By contrast, in Nostoc sp., the decrease in phycoerythrin in red light cells was accompanied by a decrease in phycobilisome size but not a regulated substitution.

  12. Consortium of the 'bichlorophyllous' cyanobacterium Prochlorothrix hollandica and chemoheterotrophic partner bacteria: culture and metagenome-based description.

    PubMed

    Velichko, Natalia; Chernyaeva, Ekaterina; Averina, Svetlana; Gavrilova, Olga; Lapidus, Alla; Pinevich, Alexander

    2015-08-01

    'Bacterial consortium' sensu lato applies to mutualism or syntrophy-based systems consisting of unrelated bacteria. Consortia of cyanobacteria have been preferentially studied on Anabaena epibioses; non-photosynthetic satellites of other filamentous or unicellular cyanobacteria were also considered although structure-functional data are few. At the same time, information about consortia of cyanobacteria which have light-harvesting antennae distinct from standard phycobilisome was missing. In this study, we characterized first, via a polyphasic approach, the cultivable consortium of Prochlorothrix hollandica CCAP 1490/1 (filamentous cyanobacterium which contains chlorophylls a, b/carotenoid/protein complex in the absence of phycobilisome) and non-photosynthetic heterotrophic bacteria. The strains of most abundant satellites were isolated and identified. Consortium metagenome reconstructed via 454-pyro and Illumina sequencing was shown to include, except for P. hollandica, several phylotypes of Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. The ratio of consortium members was essentially stable irrespective of culture age, and restored after artificially imposed imbalance. The consortium had a complex spatial arrangement as demonstrated by FISH and SEM images of the association, epibiosis, and biofilm type. Preliminary data of metagenome annotation agreed with the hypothesis that satellite bacteria contribute to P. hollandica protection from reactive oxygen species (ROS).

  13. Constant Phycobilisome Size in Chromatically Adapted Cells of the Cyanobacterium Tolypothrix tenuis, and Variation in Nostoc sp. 1

    PubMed Central

    Ohki, Kaori; Gantt, Elisabeth; Lipschultz, Claudia A.; Ernst, Marjorie C.

    1985-01-01

    Phycobilisomes of Tolypothrix tenuis, a cyanobacterium capable of complete chromatic adaptation, were studied from cells grown in red and green light, and in darkness. The phycobilisome size remained constant irrespective of the light quality. The hemidiscoidal phycobilisomes had an average diameter of about 52 nanometers and height of about 33 nanometers, by negative staining. The thickness was equivalent to a phycocyanin molecule (about 10 nanometers). The molar ratio of allophycocyanin, relative to other phycobiliproteins always remained at about 1:3. Phycobilisomes from red light grown cells and cells grown heterotrophically in darkness were indistinguishable in their pigment composition, polypeptide pattern, and size. Eight polypeptides were resolved in the phycobilin region (17.5 to 23.5 kilodaltons) by isoelectric focusing followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Half of these were invariable, while others were variable in green and red light. It is inferred that phycoerythrin synthesis in green light resulted in a one for one substitution of phycocyanin, thus retaining a constant phycobilisome size. Tolypothrix appears to be one of the best examples of phycobiliprotein regulation with wavelength. By contrast, in Nostoc sp., the decrease in phycoerythrin in red light cells was accompanied by a decrease in phycobilisome size but not a regulated substitution. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:16664550

  14. An Early-Branching Microbialite Cyanobacterium Forms Intracellular Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couradeau, Estelle; Benzerara, Karim; Gérard, Emmanuelle; Moreira, David; Bernard, Sylvain; Brown, Gordon E.; López-García, Purificación

    2012-04-01

    Cyanobacteria have affected major geochemical cycles (carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen) on Earth for billions of years. In particular, they have played a major role in the formation of calcium carbonates (i.e., calcification), which has been considered to be an extracellular process. We identified a cyanobacterium in modern microbialites in Lake Alchichica (Mexico) that forms intracellular amorphous calcium-magnesium-strontium-barium carbonate inclusions about 270 nanometers in average diameter, revealing an unexplored pathway for calcification. Phylogenetic analyses place this cyanobacterium within the deeply divergent order Gloeobacterales. The chemical composition and structure of the intracellular precipitates suggest some level of cellular control on the biomineralization process. This discovery expands the diversity of organisms capable of forming amorphous calcium carbonates.

  15. Unicellular cyanobacterium symbiotic with a single-celled eukaryotic alga.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Anne W; Foster, Rachel A; Krupke, Andreas; Carter, Brandon J; Musat, Niculina; Vaulot, Daniel; Kuypers, Marcel M M; Zehr, Jonathan P

    2012-09-21

    Symbioses between nitrogen (N)(2)-fixing prokaryotes and photosynthetic eukaryotes are important for nitrogen acquisition in N-limited environments. Recently, a widely distributed planktonic uncultured nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium (UCYN-A) was found to have unprecedented genome reduction, including the lack of oxygen-evolving photosystem II and the tricarboxylic acid cycle, which suggested partnership in a symbiosis. We showed that UCYN-A has a symbiotic association with a unicellular prymnesiophyte, closely related to calcifying taxa present in the fossil record. The partnership is mutualistic, because the prymnesiophyte receives fixed N in exchange for transferring fixed carbon to UCYN-A. This unusual partnership between a cyanobacterium and a unicellular alga is a model for symbiosis and is analogous to plastid and organismal evolution, and if calcifying, may have important implications for past and present oceanic N(2) fixation.

  16. A primitive cyanobacterium as pioneer microorganism for terraforming Mars.

    PubMed

    Friedmann, E I; Ocampo-Friedmann, R

    1995-03-01

    The primitive characteristics of the cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis suggest that it represents a very ancient type of the group. Its morphology is simple but shows a wide range of variability, and it resembles certain Proterozoic microfossils. Chroococcidiopsis is probably the most desiccation-resistant cyanobacterium, the sole photosynthetic organism in extreme arid habitats. It is also present in a wide range of other extreme environments, from Antarctic rocks to thermal springs and hypersaline habitats, but it is unable to compete with more specialized organisms. Genetic evidence suggests that all forms belong to a single species. Its remarkable tolerance of environmental extremes makes Chroococcidiopsis a prime candidate for use as a pioneer photosynthetic microorganism for terraforming of Mars. The hypolithic microbial growth form (which lives under stones of a desert pavement) could be used as a model for development of technologies for large-scale Martian farming.

  17. An early-branching microbialite cyanobacterium forms intracellular carbonates.

    PubMed

    Couradeau, Estelle; Benzerara, Karim; Gérard, Emmanuelle; Moreira, David; Bernard, Sylvain; Brown, Gordon E; López-García, Purificación

    2012-04-27

    Cyanobacteria have affected major geochemical cycles (carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen) on Earth for billions of years. In particular, they have played a major role in the formation of calcium carbonates (i.e., calcification), which has been considered to be an extracellular process. We identified a cyanobacterium in modern microbialites in Lake Alchichica (Mexico) that forms intracellular amorphous calcium-magnesium-strontium-barium carbonate inclusions about 270 nanometers in average diameter, revealing an unexplored pathway for calcification. Phylogenetic analyses place this cyanobacterium within the deeply divergent order Gloeobacterales. The chemical composition and structure of the intracellular precipitates suggest some level of cellular control on the biomineralization process. This discovery expands the diversity of organisms capable of forming amorphous calcium carbonates.

  18. The consequences of facultative sex in a prey adapting to predation.

    PubMed

    Koch, H; Becks, L

    2017-01-01

    A species reproductive mode, along with its associated costs and benefits, can play a significant role in its evolution and survival. Facultative sexuality, being able to reproduce both sexually and asexually, has been deemed evolutionary favourable as the benefits of either mode may be fully realized. In fact, many studies have focused on identifying the benefits of sex and/or the forces selecting for increased rates of sex using facultative sexual species. The costs of either mode, however, can also have a profound impact on a population's evolutionary trajectory. Here, we used experimental evolution and fitness assays to investigate the consequences of facultative sexuality in prey adapting to predation. Specifically, we compared the adaptive response of algal prey populations exposed to constant rotifer predation and which had alternating cycles of asexual and sexual reproduction where sexual episodes were either facultative (sexual and asexual progeny simultaneously propagated) or obligate (only sexual progeny propagated). We found that prey populations with facultative sexual episodes reached a lower final relative fitness and suffered a greater trade-off in traits under selection, that is defence and competitive ability, as compared to prey populations with obligate sexual episodes. Our results suggest that costs associated with sexual reproduction (germination time) and asexual reproduction (selection interference) were amplified in the facultative sexual prey populations, leading to a reduction in the net advantage of sexuality. Additionally, we found evidence that the cost of sex was reduced in the obligate sexual prey populations because increased selection for sex was observed via the spontaneous production of sexual cells. These results show that certain costs associated with facultative sexuality can affect an organism's evolutionary trajectory.

  19. Oxygen regulated gene expression in facultatively anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Unden, G; Becker, S; Bongaerts, J; Schirawski, J; Six, S

    1994-01-01

    In facultatively anaerobic bacteria such as Escherichia coli, oxygen and other electron acceptors fundamentally influence catabolic and anabolic pathways. E. coli is able to grow aerobically by respiration and in the absence of O2 by anaerobic respiration with nitrate, nitrite, fumarate, dimethylsulfoxide and trimethylamine N-oxide as acceptors or by fermentation. The expression of the various catabolic pathways occurs according to a hierarchy with 3 or 4 levels. Aerobic respiration at the highest level is followed by nitrate respiration (level 2), anaerobic respiration with the other acceptors (level 3) and fermentation. In other bacteria, different regulatory cascades with other underlying principles can be observed. Regulation of anabolism in response to O2 availability is important, too. It is caused by different requirements of cofactors or coenzymes in aerobic and anaerobic metabolism and by the requirement for different O2-independent biosynthetic routes under anoxia. The regulation mainly occurs at the transcriptional level. In E. coli, 4 global regulatory systems are known to be essential for the aerobic/anaerobic switch and the described hierarchy. A two-component sensor/regulator system comprising ArcB (sensor) and ArcA (transcriptional regulator) is responsible for regulation of aerobic metabolism. The FNR protein is a transcriptional sensor-regulator protein which regulates anaerobic respiratory genes in response to O2 availability. The gene activator FhlA regulates fermentative formate and hydrogen metabolism with formate as the inductor. ArcA/B and FNR directly respond to O2, FhlA indirectly by decreased levels of formate in the presence of O2. Regulation of nitrate/nitrite catabolism is effected by two 2-component sensor/regulator systems NarX(Q)/NarL(P) in response to nitrate/nitrite. Co-operation of the different regulatory systems at the target promoters which are in part under dual (or manifold) transcriptional control causes the expression

  20. Ecology and Physiology of the Pathogenic Cyanobacterium Roseofilum reptotaenium

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Laurie L.; Stanić, Dina; May, Amanda; Brownell, Abigael; Gantar, Miroslav; Campagna, Shawn R.

    2014-01-01

    Roseofilum reptotaenium is a gliding, filamentous, phycoerythrin-rich cyanobacterium that has been found only in the horizontally migrating, pathogenic microbial mat, black band disease (BBD) on Caribbean corals. R. reptotaenium dominates the BBD mat in terms of biomass and motility, and the filaments form the mat fabric. This cyanobacterium produces the cyanotoxin microcystin, predominately MC-LR, and can tolerate high levels of sulfide produced by sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) that are also associated with BBD. Laboratory cultures of R. reptotaenium infect coral fragments, suggesting that the cyanobacterium is the primary pathogen of BBD, but since this species cannot grow axenically and Koch’s Postulates cannot be fulfilled, it cannot be proposed as a primary pathogen. However, R. reptotaenium does play several major pathogenic roles in this polymicrobial disease. Here, we provide an overview of the ecology of this coral pathogen and present new information on R. reptotaenium ecophysiology, including roles in the infection process, chemotactic and other motility responses, and the effect of pH on growth and motility. Additionally, we show, using metabolomics, that exposure of the BBD microbial community to the cyanotoxin MC-LR affects community metabolite profiles, in particular those associated with nucleic acid biosynthesis. PMID:25517133

  1. Bartolosides E-K from a Marine Coccoid Cyanobacterium.

    PubMed

    Afonso, Tiago B; Costa, M Sofia; Rezende de Castro, Roberta; Freitas, Sara; Silva, Artur; Schneider, Maria Paula Cruz; Martins, Rosário; Leão, Pedro N

    2016-10-28

    The glycosylated and halogenated dialkylresorcinol (DAR) compounds bartolosides A-D (1-4) were recently discovered from marine cyanobacteria and represent a novel family of glycolipids, encoded by the brt biosynthetic gene cluster. Here, we report the isolation and NMR- and MS-based structure elucidation of monoglycosylated bartolosides E-K (5-11), obtained from Synechocystis salina LEGE 06099, a strain closely related to the cyanobacterium that produces the diglycosylated 2-4. In addition, a genome region containing orthologues of brt genes was identified in this cyanobacterium. Interestingly, the major bartoloside in S. salina LEGE 06099 was 1 (above 0.5% dry wt), originally isolated from the phylogenetically distant filamentous cyanobacterium Nodosilinea sp. LEGE 06102. Compounds 5-11 are analogues of 1, with different alkyl chain lengths or halogenation patterns. Their structures and the organization of the brt genes suggest that the DAR-forming ketosynthase BrtD can generate structural diversity by accepting fatty acyl-derived substrates of varying length. Compound 9 features a rare midchain gem-dichloro moiety, indicating that the putative halogenase BrtJ is able to act twice on the same midchain carbon.

  2. Heterotrophic bacterial flora in aquaculture area around Xuejiadao

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zongjun, Du; Yun, Li; Dehua, Yu; Xianghong, Wang; Jixiang, Chen; Robertson, P. A. W.; Austin, B.; Huaishu, Xu

    2002-10-01

    From Oct., 1999 to Oct., 2000, the heterotrophic bacterial flora in the aquaculture area around Xuejiadao was investigated. The result shows that the populations of the heterotrophic bacteria are heavier in summer and autumn than those in winter and spring. The average populations in seawater, sediment, the surface of seaweed and the surface of fish are 1.4×104cfu mL-1, 5.4×106cfu g-1, 1.5×106cfu g-1 and 1.8×103cfu cm-2, respectively. A total of 301 strains were isolated, among them 259 were Gram-negative. All the Gram-negative bacteria belong to 13 genera and some genera of Enterobacteriaceae. The communities of bacteria are slightly different among the samples. In the body surface of fish, Genus vibrio is dominant. In the remaining samples, dominant genus is Aeromonas.

  3. Systems biology for understanding and engineering of heterotrophic oleaginous microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Park, Beom Gi; Kim, Minsuk; Kim, Joonwon; Yoo, Heewang; Kim, Byung-Gee

    2017-01-01

    Heterotrophic oleaginous microorganisms continue to draw interest as they can accumulate a large amount of lipids which is a promising feedstock for the production of biofuels and oleochemicals. Nutrient limitation, especially nitrogen limitation, is known to effectively trigger the lipid production in these microorganisms. For the aim of developing improved strains, the mechanisms behind the lipid production have been studied for a long time. Nowadays, system-level understanding of their metabolism and associated metabolic switches is attainable with modern systems biology tools. This work reviews the systems biology studies, based on (i) top-down, large-scale 'omics' tools, and (ii) bottom-up, mathematical modeling methods, on the heterotrophic oleaginous microorganisms with an emphasis on further application to metabolic engineering.

  4. Carbon dynamics in highly heterotrophic subarctic thaw ponds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roiha, T.; Laurion, I.; Rautio, M.

    2015-07-01

    Global warming has accelerated the formation of permafrost thaw ponds in several subarctic and arctic regions. These ponds are net heterotrophic as evidenced by their greenhouse gas (GHG) supersaturation levels (CO2 and CH4), and generally receive large terrestrial carbon inputs from the thawing and eroding permafrost. We measured seasonal and vertical variations in the concentration and type of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in five subarctic thaw (thermokarst) ponds in northern Quebec, and explored how environmental gradients influenced heterotrophic and phototrophic biomass and productivity. Late winter DOM had low aromaticity indicating reduced inputs of terrestrial carbon, while the high concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) suggests that some production of non-chromophoric dissolved compounds by the microbial food web took place under the ice cover. Summer DOM had a strong terrestrial signature, but was also characterized with significant inputs of algal-derived carbon, especially at the pond surface. During late winter, bacterial production was low (maximum of 0.8 mg C m-3 d-1) and was largely based on free-living bacterioplankton (58 %). Bacterial production in summer was high (up to 58 mg C m-3 d-1), dominated by particle-attached bacteria (67 %), and strongly correlated to the amount of terrestrial carbon. Primary production was restricted to summer surface waters due to strong light limitation deeper in the water column or in winter. The phototrophic biomass was equal to the heterotrophic biomass, but as the algae were mostly composed of mixotrophic species, most probably they used bacteria rather than solar energy in such shaded ponds. According to the δ13C analyses, non-algal carbon supported 51 % of winter and 37 % of summer biomass of the phantom midge larvae, Chaoborus sp., that are at the top of the trophic chain. Our results point to a strong heterotrophic energy pathway in these thaw pond ecosystems, where bacterioplankton dominates

  5. Carbon dynamics in highly heterotrophic subarctic thaw ponds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roiha, T.; Laurion, I.; Rautio, M.

    2015-12-01

    Global warming has accelerated the formation of permafrost thaw ponds in several subarctic and arctic regions. These ponds are net heterotrophic as evidenced by their greenhouse gas (GHG) supersaturation levels (CO2 and CH4), and generally receive large terrestrial carbon inputs from the thawing and eroding permafrost. We measured seasonal and vertical variations in the concentration and type of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in five subarctic thaw (thermokarst) ponds in northern Quebec, and explored how environmental gradients influenced heterotrophic and phototrophic biomass and productivity. Late winter DOM had low aromaticity indicating reduced inputs of terrestrial carbon, while the high concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) suggests that some production of non-chromophoric dissolved compounds by the microbial food web took place under the ice cover. Summer DOM had a strong terrestrial signature, but was also characterized with significant inputs of algal-derived carbon, especially at the pond surface. During late winter, bacterial production was low (maximum of 0.8 mg C m-3 d-1) and was largely based on free-living bacterioplankton (58 %). Bacterial production in summer was high (up to 58 mg C m-3 d-1), dominated by particle-attached bacteria (67 %), and strongly correlated with the amount of terrestrial carbon. Primary production was restricted to summer surface waters due to strong light limitation deeper in the water column or in winter. The phototrophic biomass was equal to the heterotrophic biomass, but as the algae were mostly composed of mixotrophic species, most probably they used bacteria rather than solar energy in such shaded ponds. Our results point to a strong heterotrophic energy pathway in these thaw pond ecosystems, where bacterioplankton dominates the production of new carbon biomass in both summer and winter.

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of Exopolysaccharide-Producing Cyanobacterium Aphanocapsa montana BDHKU 210001

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Sourav; Chandrababunaidu, Mathu Malar; Sen, Deeya; Panda, Arijit; Ghorai, Arpita; Bhan, Sushma; Sanghi, Neha

    2015-01-01

    We report for the first time the draft genome sequence of Aphanocapsa montana BDHKU 210001, a halotolerant cyanobacterium isolated from India. This is a marine exopolysaccharide (EPS)-producing cyanobacterium. The genome of this species is assembled into 11.50 million bases, with 296 scaffolds carrying approximately 7,296 protein-coding genes. PMID:25744997

  7. Nutrient and media recycling in heterotrophic microalgae cultures.

    PubMed

    Lowrey, Joshua; Armenta, Roberto E; Brooks, Marianne S

    2016-02-01

    In order for microalgae-based processes to reach commercial production for biofuels and high-value products such as omega-3 fatty acids, it is necessary that economic feasibility be demonstrated at the industrial scale. Therefore, process optimization is critical to ensure that the maximum yield can be achieved from the most efficient use of resources. This is particularly true for processes involving heterotrophic microalgae, which have not been studied as extensively as phototrophic microalgae. An area that has received significant conceptual praise, but little experimental validation, is that of nutrient recycling, where the waste materials from prior cultures and post-lipid extraction are reused for secondary fermentations. While the concept is very simple and could result in significant economic and environmental benefits, there are some underlying challenges that must be overcome before adoption of nutrient recycling is viable at commercial scale. Even more, adapting nutrient recycling for optimized heterotrophic cultures presents some added challenges that must be identified and addressed that have been largely unexplored to date. These challenges center on carbon and nitrogen recycling and the implications of using waste materials in conjunction with virgin nutrients for secondary cultures. The aim of this review is to provide a foundation for further understanding of nutrient recycling for microalgae cultivation. As such, we outline the current state of technology and practical challenges associated with nutrient recycling for heterotrophic microalgae on an industrial scale and give recommendations for future work.

  8. Responses of Diverse Marine Heterotrophic Bacteria to Changing Copper Availability.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posacka, A. M.; Maldonado, M. T.

    2016-02-01

    Copper (Cu) is essential to a variety of metabolic pathways in marine prokaryotes, including cellular respiration and degradation of complex organic substrates. Yet, its nutritional role in marine heterotrophic bacteria remains poorly understood. Our goal was to investigate the effects of Cu availability on growth and metabolism of diverse classes of marine heterotrophic bacteria (α -, Ɣ- proteobacteria and Flavobacteriia), including a number of strains isolated from the Northeast Pacific Ocean (Pseudoalteromonas sp., Alteromondales; and Dokdonia sp., Flavobacteriales) and a model bacterium from the Roseobacter clade Ruegeria pomeroyi (ATCC 700808). Our preliminary results indicate that Pseudoalteromonas sp may have a low metabolic requirement for Cu as their growth rates were only slightly reduced under Cu deficiency (10-25% µmax). In contrast, the growth of the flavobacterium Dokdonia sp is severely limited by low Cu levels (up to 90% µmax) and follows a Monod-type kinetics from 0 - 50nM Cu in EDTA-buffered media. Metabolic responses to changing Cu availability include an increase in intracellular sulfur content with decreasing Cu concentrations, while maintaining constant C:N stoichiometry. Bacterial growth efficiency (BGE, %) was directly correlated with Cu suggesting that carbon utilization in this organism is regulated by Cu availability. Our results indicate that Cu affects growth and metabolism of marine heterotrophic bacteria, and highlight the physiological differences in copper requirements among different bacterial groups.

  9. Heterotrophic Proteobacteria in the vicinity of diffuse hydrothermal venting.

    PubMed

    Meier, Dimitri V; Bach, Wolfgang; Girguis, Peter R; Gruber-Vodicka, Harald R; Reeves, Eoghan P; Richter, Michael; Vidoudez, Charles; Amann, Rudolf; Meyerdierks, Anke

    2016-12-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vents are highly dynamic habitats characterized by steep temperature and chemical gradients. The oxidation of reduced compounds dissolved in the venting fluids fuels primary production providing the basis for extensive life. Until recently studies of microbial vent communities have focused primarily on chemolithoautotrophic organisms. In our study, we targeted the change of microbial community compositions along mixing gradients, focusing on distribution and capabilities of heterotrophic microorganisms. Samples were retrieved from different venting areas within the Menez Gwen hydrothermal field, taken along mixing gradients, including diffuse fluid discharge points, their immediate surroundings and the buoyant parts of hydrothermal plumes. High throughput 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing, fluorescence in situ hybridization, and targeted metagenome analysis were combined with geochemical analyses. Close to diffuse venting orifices dominated by chemolithoautotrophic Epsilonproteobacteria, in areas where environmental conditions still supported chemolithoautotrophic processes, we detected microbial communities enriched for versatile heterotrophic Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria. The potential for alkane degradation could be shown for several genera and yet uncultured clades. We propose that hotspots of chemolithoautotrophic life support a 'belt' of heterotrophic bacteria significantly different from the dominating oligotrophic microbiota of the deep sea. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Facultative cheating supports the coexistence of diverse quorum-sensing alleles.

    PubMed

    Pollak, Shaul; Omer-Bendori, Shira; Even-Tov, Eran; Lipsman, Valeria; Bareia, Tasneem; Ben-Zion, Ishay; Eldar, Avigdor

    2016-02-23

    Bacterial quorum sensing enables bacteria to cooperate in a density-dependent manner via the group-wide secretion and detection of specific autoinducer molecules. Many bacterial species show high intraspecific diversity of autoinducer-receptor alleles, called pherotypes. The autoinducer produced by one pherotype activates its coencoded receptor, but not the receptor of another pherotype. It is unclear what selection forces drive the maintenance of pherotype diversity. Here, we use the ComQXPA system of Bacillus subtilis as a model system, to show that pherotype diversity can be maintained by facultative cheating--a minority pherotype exploits the majority, but resumes cooperation when its frequency increases. We find that the maintenance of multiple pherotypes by facultative cheating can persist under kin-selection conditions that select against "obligate cheaters" quorum-sensing response null mutants. Our results therefore support a role for facultative cheating and kin selection in the evolution of quorum-sensing diversity.

  11. Facultative cheating supports the coexistence of diverse quorum-sensing alleles

    PubMed Central

    Pollak, Shaul; Omer-Bendori, Shira; Even-Tov, Eran; Lipsman, Valeria; Bareia, Tasneem; Ben-Zion, Ishay; Eldar, Avigdor

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial quorum sensing enables bacteria to cooperate in a density-dependent manner via the group-wide secretion and detection of specific autoinducer molecules. Many bacterial species show high intraspecific diversity of autoinducer–receptor alleles, called pherotypes. The autoinducer produced by one pherotype activates its coencoded receptor, but not the receptor of another pherotype. It is unclear what selection forces drive the maintenance of pherotype diversity. Here, we use the ComQXPA system of Bacillus subtilis as a model system, to show that pherotype diversity can be maintained by facultative cheating—a minority pherotype exploits the majority, but resumes cooperation when its frequency increases. We find that the maintenance of multiple pherotypes by facultative cheating can persist under kin-selection conditions that select against “obligate cheaters” quorum-sensing response null mutants. Our results therefore support a role for facultative cheating and kin selection in the evolution of quorum-sensing diversity. PMID:26787913

  12. Two thresholds, three male forms result in facultative male trimorphism in beetles.

    PubMed

    Rowland, J Mark; Emlen, Douglas J

    2009-02-06

    Male animals of many species deploy conditional reproductive strategies that contain distinct alternative phenotypes. Such facultatively expressed male tactics are assumed to be due to a single developmental threshold mechanism switching between the expression of two alternative phenotypes. However, we discovered a clade of dung beetles that commonly expresses two threshold mechanisms, resulting in three alternative phenotypes (male trimorphism). Once recognized, we found trimorphism in other beetle families that involves different types of male weapons. Evidence that insects assumed to be dimorphic can express three facultative male forms suggests that we need to adjust how we think about animal mating systems and the evolution of conditional strategies.

  13. Biological and chemical factors driving the temporal distribution of cyanobacteria and heterotrophic bacteria in a eutrophic lake (West Lake, China).

    PubMed

    Song, Hao; Xu, Jiahui; Lavoie, Michel; Fan, Xiaoji; Liu, Guangfu; Sun, Liwei; Fu, Zhengwei; Qian, Haifeng

    2017-02-01

    Physico-chemical parameters, hydrological conditions, and microbial interactions can affect the growth and persistence of cyanobacteria, but the interacting effects among these bloom-forming factors are still poorly known. This hampers our capacity to predict the occurrence of cyanobacterial bloom accurately. Here, we studied the relationship between temperature, N and P cycles, and the microbial community abundance and diversity at 0.5 m under the surface of West Lake (China) from January 21 to November 20, 2015, in order to better understand the key factors regulating temporal changes in the cyanobacterial community. Using high throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene V3-V4 region, we studied the diversity and abundance of bacteria. In parallel, we measured physico-chemical parameters and followed the abundance of key genes involved in N fixation, denitrification, and nutrient uptake. Multivariate analyses suggest that P concentration and water temperature are the key factors controlling the outbreak of summer cyanobacterial bloom. RT-qPCR analyses of the bacterial community and measurements of the copy number of denitrification-related gene (nirK, nosZ, nirS) show that denitrification potential and denitrifying bacteria relative abundance (Pseudomonas and Bacillus) increased in concert with diazotrophic cyanobacterial genera (Anabaena, Nostoc, Aphanizomenon flos-aquae) and the common bloom-forming non-diazotrophic cyanobacterium genus Microcystis. The present study brings new insights on the complex interplay between physico-chemical parameters, heterotrophic bacterial community composition, nitrogen cycle, and cyanobacteria dominance in a eutrophic lake.

  14. Characterization of nifB, nifS, and nifU genes in the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis: NifB is required for the vanadium-dependent nitrogenase.

    PubMed

    Lyons, E M; Thiel, T

    1995-03-01

    Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413 is a heterotrophic, nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium containing both a Mo-dependent nitrogenase encoded by the nif genes and V-dependent nitrogenase encoded by the vnf genes. The nifB, nifS, and nifU genes of A. variabilis were cloned, mapped, and partially sequenced. The fdxN gene was between nifB and nifS. Growth and acetylene reduction assays using wild-type and mutant strains indicated that the nifB product (NifB) was required for nitrogen fixation not only by the enzyme encoded by the nif genes but also by the enzyme encoded by the vnf genes. Neither NifS nor NifU was essential for nitrogen fixation in A. variabilis.

  15. Characterization of nifB, nifS, and nifU genes in the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis: NifB is required for the vanadium-dependent nitrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, E M; Thiel, T

    1995-01-01

    Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413 is a heterotrophic, nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium containing both a Mo-dependent nitrogenase encoded by the nif genes and V-dependent nitrogenase encoded by the vnf genes. The nifB, nifS, and nifU genes of A. variabilis were cloned, mapped, and partially sequenced. The fdxN gene was between nifB and nifS. Growth and acetylene reduction assays using wild-type and mutant strains indicated that the nifB product (NifB) was required for nitrogen fixation not only by the enzyme encoded by the nif genes but also by the enzyme encoded by the vnf genes. Neither NifS nor NifU was essential for nitrogen fixation in A. variabilis. PMID:7883714

  16. Chemokinetic motility responses of the cyanobacterium oscillatoria terebriformis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Laurie L.; Castenholz, Richard W.

    1989-01-01

    Oscillatoria terebriformis, a gliding, filamentous, thermophilic cyanobacterium, exhibited an inhibition of gliding motility upon exposure to fructose. The observed response was transient, and the duration of nonmotility was directly proportional to the concentration of fructose. Upon resumption of motility, the rate of motility was also inversely proportional to the concentration of fructose. Sulfide caused a similar response. The effect of sulfide was specific and not due to either anoxia or negative redox potential. Exposure to glucose, acetate, lactate, or mat interstitial water did not elicit any motility response.

  17. Hapalindole-related Alkaloids from the Cultured Cyanobacterium Fischerella ambigua

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Shunyan; Krunic, Aleksej; Santarsiero, Bernard D.; Franzblau, Scott G.; Orjala, Jimmy

    2010-01-01

    Four new hapalindole-related alkaloids, namely fischambiguines A and B, ambiguine P, ambiguine Q nitrile as well as ambiguine G nitrile were identified from the cultured cyanobacterium Fischerella ambigua (UTEX 1903). The structures were determined by spectroscopic analysis including MS, 1D and 2D NMR and X-ray crystallography. The alkaloids possessed fused penta- and hexacyclic carbon skeletons. Fischambiguine B displayed a strong inhibitory activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis with an MIC value of 2 μM, with no detectable cytotoxicity in a Vero cell line. PMID:20965528

  18. Chemokinetic motility responses of the cyanobacterium oscillatoria terebriformis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Laurie L.; Castenholz, Richard W.

    1989-01-01

    Oscillatoria terebriformis, a gliding, filamentous, thermophilic cyanobacterium, exhibited an inhibition of gliding motility upon exposure to fructose. The observed response was transient, and the duration of nonmotility was directly proportional to the concentration of fructose. Upon resumption of motility, the rate of motility was also inversely proportional to the concentration of fructose. Sulfide caused a similar response. The effect of sulfide was specific and not due to either anoxia or negative redox potential. Exposure to glucose, acetate, lactate, or mat interstitial water did not elicit any motility response.

  19. Photosynthetic production of glycerol by a recombinant cyanobacterium.

    PubMed

    Savakis, Philipp; Tan, Xiaoming; Du, Wei; Branco dos Santos, Filipe; Lu, Xuefeng; Hellingwerf, Klaas J

    2015-02-10

    Cyanobacteria are prokaryotic organisms capable of oxygenic photosynthesis. Glycerol is an important commodity chemical. Introduction of phosphoglycerol phosphatase 2 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae into the model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 resulted in a mutant strain that produced a considerable amount of glycerol from light, water and COPhotosynthetic production . Mild salt stress (200 mM NaCl) on the cells led to an increase of the extracellular glycerol concentration of more than 20%. Under these conditions the mutant accumulated glycerol to an extracellular concentration of 14.3 mM after 17 days of culturing.

  20. Detection of Sulphate-Reducing Bacteria and Others Cultivable Facultative Bacteria in Dental Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Lúcio de Souza; Dias, Eliane Pedra; Heggendorn, Christiane; Lutterbach, Márcia T. S.

    2014-01-01

    Aim To detect for the presence of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and evaluate the possible association between SRB and cultivable facultative bacterial of oral sites with different periodontal conditions. Methods The study was carried out on 9 samples from different oral sites in 8 patients (two samples were collected from the same patient). Material was collected using modified Postgate E culture medium, indicated for the growth and isolation of SRB. In addition, a reducing solution for anaerobic bacteria was used as a transport solution for facultative bacteria and identified by polymerase chain reaction amplification (PCR) and sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Results SRB was found in 3 patient samples: the first in a root fragment, the second in a root fragment and a healthy tooth with vertical bone loss and a mobility degree of 3; and the third in a healthy tooth extracted for orthodontic treatment. In the final patient, the cultivable facultative species Lactobacillus casei was identified. Other facultative bacterial species were identified in patient 5 (Kurthia Gibsonii) and patient 7 (Pseudomonas aeruginosa). Conclusions The detection of SRB in different dental tissues with distinct periodontal features demonstrated that new studies need to be developed in order to determine the true role of SRB in the oral microbiota. In addition, it was possible to verify the presence of Lactobacillus casei together with SRB in one sample. PMID:27688355

  1. Thermal adaptation in yeast: obligate psychrophiles are obligate aerobes, and obligate thermophiles are facultative anaerobes.

    PubMed Central

    Watson, K; Arthur, H; Morton, H

    1978-01-01

    The obligate psychrophilic yeasts Torulopsis psychrophila, T. austromarina, Leucosporidium frigidum, L. gelidum, and L. nivalis were obligate aerobes and were unable to grow anaerobically. In contrast, the obligate thermophilic yeasts T. bovina, T. pintolopesii, Candida slooffii, and Saccharomyces telluris were facultative anaerobes. PMID:568620

  2. Genome Sequence of the Facultative Anaerobe Oerskovia enterophila DFA-19 (DSM 43852T)

    PubMed Central

    Jag, Vanessa; Bengelsdorf, Frank R.; Daniel, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Oerskovia enterophila DFA-19 (DSM 43852T), a facultative anaerobe soil bacterium, which was originally isolated from millipede feces and first described as Promicromonospora enterophila. The genome consists of a circular chromosome comprising approximately 4.65 Mb and 4,044 predicted protein-encoding genes. PMID:27634998

  3. Methylation site within a facultatively persistent sequence in the macronucleus of Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed Central

    White, T C; McLaren, N C; Allen, S L

    1986-01-01

    DNA methylation occurs at the adenines in the somatic macronucleus of Tetrahymena thermophila. We report on a methylation site within a DNA segment showing facultative persistence in the macronucleus. When the site is present, methylation occurs on both strands, although only 50% of the DNA molecules are methylated. Images PMID:3796615

  4. Facultative anadromy in salmonids: linking habitat, individual life history decisions, and population-level consequences

    Treesearch

    Steven F. Railsback; Bret C. Harvey; Jason L. White

    2014-01-01

    Modeling and management of facultative anadromous salmonids is complicated by their ability to select anadromous or resident life histories. Conventional theory for this behavior assumes individuals select the strategy offering highest expected reproductive success but does not predict how population-level consequences such as a stream’s smolt production emerge from...

  5. Moisture Limitations Dominate the Seasonality of Heterotrophic Respiration in the Southern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konings, A. G.; Bloom, A. A.; Liu, J.; Parazoo, N.; Schimel, D.; Bowman, K. W.

    2016-12-01

    Heterotrophic respiration is the dominant process causing the loss of soil organic carbon, the largest stock of carbon on earth. Temperature, soil moisture, substrate availability, and soil microbial composition can all affect the rate of heterotrophic respiration. Without isotopic or root-specific measurements, it can be difficult to separate the total soil respiration into autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration. As a result, the large-scale variability and seasonality of heterotrophic respiration remains unknown, especially outside the mid-latitudes. In this study, we use remote-sensing based observational constraints to estimate heterotrophic respiration at large scales. We combine net ecosystem exchange estimates from atmospheric inversions of the Carbon Monitoring System-Flux project (CMS-Flux) with a recently derived optimally-scaled GPP dataset based on satellite-observed solar-induced fluorescence variations to estimate total ecosystem respiration. The ecosystem respiration is then separated into autotrophic and heterotrophic components based on a spatially-varying carbon use efficiency retrieved in a model-data fusion framework (CARDAMOM). The three datasets are combined into a Bayesian framework to derive the uncertainty distribution of global heterotrophic respiration allowing only physically realistic solutions (appropriate signs for all fluxes), In most Southern Hemisphere regions where precipitation and temperature are anti-correlated (e.g. dry African woodlands, Sahel, Southern India, etc..), the seasonality of heterotrophic respiration follows precipitation, not temperature. This results in an apparent anti-correlation between heterotrophic respiration and temperature. By comparison, a data-constrained terrestrial ecosystem model that does not simulate an effect of soil moisture on heterotrophic respiration did not show this anti-correlation. Data-driven heterotrophic respiration estimates such as those presented here may be used to benchmark

  6. [Activity and growth efficiency of heterotrophic bacteria in Rybinsk Reservoir].

    PubMed

    Kosolapov, D B; Kosolapova, N G; Rumiantseva, E V

    2014-01-01

    The active fraction, production, and respiration of heterotrophic bacteria are determined to assess their growth efficiency and their role in the carbon cycle in the pelagic zone of Rybinsk Reservoir in summer. The greater part of organic substances assimilated by bacteria is mineralized to CO2. It has been established that the essential part of the constructive and energy metabolism of bacteria is supported by the input of allochthonous substances. Bacterioplankton, producing the biomass at their expense, performs functions similar to the functions of phytoplankton, and substantially supports the structural and functional organization of the planktonic food web in the reservoir.

  7. Expression of a highly active catalase VktA in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 alleviates the photoinhibition of photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Jimbo, Haruhiko; Noda, Akiko; Hayashi, Hidenori; Nagano, Takanori; Yumoto, Isao; Orikasa, Yoshitake; Okuyama, Hidetoshi; Nishiyama, Yoshitaka

    2013-11-01

    The repair of photosystem II (PSII) after photodamage is particularly sensitive to reactive oxygen species-such as H2O2, which is abundantly produced during the photoinhibition of PSII. In the present study, we generated a transformant of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 that expressed a highly active catalase, VktA, which is derived from a facultatively psychrophilic bacterium Vibrio rumoiensis, and examined the effect of expression of VktA on the photoinhibition of PSII. The activity of PSII in transformed cells declined much more slowly than in wild-type cells when cells were exposed to strong light in the presence of H2O2. However, the rate of photodamage to PSII, as monitored in the presence of chloramphenicol, was the same in the two lines of cells, suggesting that the repair of PSII was protected by the expression of VktA. The de novo synthesis of the D1 protein, which is required for the repair of PSII, was activated in transformed cells under the same stress conditions. Similar protection of the repair of PSII in transformed cells was also observed under strong light at a relatively low temperature. Thus, the expression of the highly active catalase mitigates photoinhibition of PSII by protecting protein synthesis against damage by H2O2 with subsequent enhancement of the repair of PSII.

  8. Chlorophyll f-driven photosynthesis in a cavernous cyanobacterium.

    PubMed

    Behrendt, Lars; Brejnrod, Asker; Schliep, Martin; Sørensen, Søren J; Larkum, Anthony W D; Kühl, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Chlorophyll (Chl) f is the most recently discovered chlorophyll and has only been found in cyanobacteria from wet environments. Although its structure and biophysical properties are resolved, the importance of Chl f as an accessory pigment in photosynthesis remains unresolved. We found Chl f in a cyanobacterium enriched from a cavernous environment and report the first example of Chl f-supported oxygenic photosynthesis in cyanobacteria from such habitats. Pigment extraction, hyperspectral microscopy and transmission electron microscopy demonstrated the presence of Chl a and f in unicellular cyanobacteria found in enrichment cultures. Amplicon sequencing indicated that all oxygenic phototrophs were related to KC1, a Chl f-containing cyanobacterium previously isolated from an aquatic environment. Microsensor measurements on aggregates demonstrated oxygenic photosynthesis at 742 nm and less efficient photosynthesis under 768- and 777-nm light probably because of diminished overlap with the absorption spectrum of Chl f and other far-red absorbing pigments. Our findings suggest the importance of Chl f-containing cyanobacteria in terrestrial habitats.

  9. Hydrogen production by the unicellular, diazotrophic cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. strain ATCC 51142 under conditions of continuous light.

    PubMed

    Min, Hongtao; Sherman, Louis A

    2010-07-01

    We report on the hydrogen production properties of the unicellular, diazotrophic cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. strain ATCC 51142. This organism has a versatile metabolism and can grow in the presence or absence of combined nitrogen and can grow photosynthetically or mixotrophically and heterotrophically in the presence of glycerol. The strain produces a bidirectional hydrogenase (encoded by the hox genes), an uptake hydrogenase (hupLS), and nitrogenase (nifHDK). We demonstrated hydrogen production by both the hydrogenase and the nitrogenase under appropriate metabolic conditions. The highest rates of hydrogen production were produced under nitrogen-fixing conditions when cells were grown and incubated under continuous light conditions, in either the presence or absence of glycerol. Under such nitrogen-fixing conditions, we have achieved rates of 300 micromol H(2)/mg chloramphenicol (Chl)/hr during the first 24 h of incubation. The levels of H(2) measured were dependent upon the incubation conditions, such as sparging with argon, which generated anaerobic conditions. We demonstrated that the same conditions led to high levels of H(2) production and N(2) fixation, indicating that low-oxygen conditions favor nitrogenase activity for both processes. The levels of hydrogen produced by the hydrogenase are much lower, typically 5 to 10 micromol H(2)/mg Chl/hr. Hydrogenase activity was dependent upon electron transport through photosystem II (PS II), whereas nitrogenase activity was more dependent on PS I, as well as on respiration. Although cells do not double under the incubation conditions when sparged with argon to provide a low-oxygen environment, the cells are metabolically active, and hydrogen production can be inhibited by the addition of chloramphenicol to inhibit protein synthesis.

  10. Hydrogen Production by the Unicellular, Diazotrophic Cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. Strain ATCC 51142 under Conditions of Continuous Light▿

    PubMed Central

    Min, Hongtao; Sherman, Louis A.

    2010-01-01

    We report on the hydrogen production properties of the unicellular, diazotrophic cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. strain ATCC 51142. This organism has a versatile metabolism and can grow in the presence or absence of combined nitrogen and can grow photosynthetically or mixotrophically and heterotrophically in the presence of glycerol. The strain produces a bidirectional hydrogenase (encoded by the hox genes), an uptake hydrogenase (hupLS), and nitrogenase (nifHDK). We demonstrated hydrogen production by both the hydrogenase and the nitrogenase under appropriate metabolic conditions. The highest rates of hydrogen production were produced under nitrogen-fixing conditions when cells were grown and incubated under continuous light conditions, in either the presence or absence of glycerol. Under such nitrogen-fixing conditions, we have achieved rates of 300 μmol H2/mg chloramphenicol (Chl)/hr during the first 24 h of incubation. The levels of H2 measured were dependent upon the incubation conditions, such as sparging with argon, which generated anaerobic conditions. We demonstrated that the same conditions led to high levels of H2 production and N2 fixation, indicating that low-oxygen conditions favor nitrogenase activity for both processes. The levels of hydrogen produced by the hydrogenase are much lower, typically 5 to 10 μmol H2/mg Chl/hr. Hydrogenase activity was dependent upon electron transport through photosystem II (PS II), whereas nitrogenase activity was more dependent on PS I, as well as on respiration. Although cells do not double under the incubation conditions when sparged with argon to provide a low-oxygen environment, the cells are metabolically active, and hydrogen production can be inhibited by the addition of chloramphenicol to inhibit protein synthesis. PMID:20453150

  11. Photoresponse in the heterotrophic marine dinoflagellate Oxyrrhis marina.

    PubMed

    Hartz, Aaron J; Sherr, Barry F; Sherr, Evelyn B

    2011-01-01

    Expressed rhodopsins were detected by proteomic analysis in an investigation of potential signal receptors in the cell membrane of the marine heterotrophic dinoflagellate Oxyrrhis marina (CCMP604). We inferred these to be sensory rhodopsins, a type of G-protein-coupled receptor trans-membrane signaling molecule. Because phototactic behavior based on sensory rhodopsins has been reported in other protists, we investigated the photosensory response of O. marina. This dinoflagellate exhibited strongest positive phototaxis at low levels (2-3 μE/m(2)/s) of white light when the cells were previously light adapted and well fed. Positive phototaxis was also found for blue (450 nm), green (525 nm), and red (680 nm) wavelengths. In a further test, O. marina showed significantly greater phototaxis toward concentrated algal food illuminated by blue light to stimulate red chlorophyll-a autofluorescence in the prey, compared with using bleached algae as prey. Concentration of a cytoplasmic downstream messenger molecule, cyclic adenosine monophosphate, a component of the signaling pathway of G-protein-coupled receptor molecules, rapidly increased in O. marina cells after exposure to white light. In addition, treatment with hydroxylamine, a rhodopsin signaling inhibitor, significantly decreased their phototactic response. Our results demonstrate that a heterotrophic marine dinoflagellate can orient to light based on rhodopsins present in the outer cell membrane and may be able to use photosensory response to detect algal prey based on chlorophyll autofluorescence. © 2011 The Author(s). Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology© 2011 International Society of Protistologists.

  12. Heterotrophic bacteria in an air-handling system.

    PubMed Central

    Hugenholtz, P; Fuerst, J A

    1992-01-01

    Heterotrophic bacteria from structural surfaces, drain pan water, and the airstream of a well-maintained air-handling system with no reported building-related illness were enumerated. Visually the system appeared clean, but large populations of bacteria were found on the fin surface of the supply-side cooling coils (10(5) to 10(6) CFU cm-2), in drain pan water (10(5) to 10(7) CFU ml-1), and in the sump water of the evaporative condenser (10(5) CFU ml-1). Representative bacterial colony types recovered from heterotrophic plate count cultures on R2A medium were identified to the genus level. Budding bacteria belonging to the genus Blastobacter dominated the supply surface of the coil fins, the drain pan water, and the postcoil air. These data and independent scanning electron microscopy indicated that a resident population of predominantly Blastobacter bacteria was present as a biofilm on the supply-side cooling coil fins. Images PMID:1476435

  13. Diversity of retrievable heterotrophic bacteria in Kongsfjorden, an Arctic fjord.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Rupesh Kumar; Krishnan, Kottekkatu Padinchati; Hatha, Ammanamveetil Abdulla Mohamed; Rahiman, Mujeeb; Thresyamma, Divya David; Kerkar, Savita

    The diversity and abundance of retrievable pelagic heterotrophic bacteria in Kongsfjorden, an Arctic fjord, was studied during the summer of 2011 (June, August, and September). Retrievable bacterial load ranged from 10(3) to 10(7)CFUL(-1) in June, while it was 10(4)-10(6)CFUL(-1) in August and September. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities, a higher number of phylotypes was observed during August (22 phylotypes) compared to that during June (6 phylotypes) and September (12 phylotypes). The groups were classified into four phyla: Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes. Bacteroidetes was represented only by a single member Leewenhoekiella aequorea during the three months and was dominant (40%) in June. However, this dominance changed in August to a well-known phytopathogenic species Rhodococcus fascians (32%), which could be a result of decrease in the phytoplankton biomass following the secondary bloom. It is the first report of Halomonas titanicae isolation from the Arctic waters. It showed an increase in its abundance with the intrusion of Atlantic water into Kongsfjorden. Increased abundance of Psychrobacter species in the late summer months coincided with the presence of cooler waters. Thus, the composition and function of heterotrophic bacterial community was fundamentally different in different months. This could be linked to the changes in the water masses and/or phytoplankton bloom dynamics occurring in Arctic summer. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  14. Growth, Grazing, and Starvation Survival in Three Heterotrophic Dinoflagellate Species.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Sean R; Menden-Deuer, Susanne

    2017-03-01

    To assess the effects of fluctuating prey availability on predator population dynamics and grazing impact on phytoplankton, we measured growth and grazing rates of three heterotrophic dinoflagellate species-Oxyrrhis marina, Gyrodinium dominans and Gyrodinium spirale-before and after depriving them of phytoplankton prey. All three dinoflagellate species survived long periods (> 10 d) without algal prey, coincident with decreases in predator abundance and cell size. After 1-3 wks, starvation led to a 17-57% decrease in predator cell volume and some cells became deformed and transparent. When re-exposed to phytoplankton prey, heterotrophs ingested prey within minutes and increased cell volumes by 4-17%. At an equivalent prey concentration, continuously fed predators had ~2-fold higher specific growth rates (0.18 to 0.55 d(-1) ) than after starvation (-0.16 to 0.25 d(-1) ). Maximum specific predator growth rates would be achievable only after a time lag of at least 3 d. A delay in predator growth poststarvation delays predator-induced phytoplankton mortality when prey re-emerges at the onset of a bloom event or in patchy prey distributions. These altered predator-prey population dynamics have implications for the formation of phytoplankton blooms, trophic transfer rates, and potential export of carbon. © 2016 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2016 International Society of Protistologists.

  15. Fate of Heterotrophic Microbes in Pelagic Habitats: Focus on Populations

    PubMed Central

    Pernthaler, Jakob; Amann, Rudolf

    2005-01-01

    Major biogeochemical processes in the water columns of lakes and oceans are related to the activities of heterotrophic microbes, e.g., the mineralization of organic carbon from photosynthesis and allochthonous influx or its transport to the higher trophic levels. During the last 15 years, cultivation-independent molecular techniques have substantially contributed to our understanding of the diversity of the microbial communities in different aquatic systems. In parallel, the complexity of aquatic habitats at a microscale has inspired research on the ecophysiological properties of uncultured microorganisms that thrive in a continuum of dissolved to particulate organic matter. One possibility to link these two aspects is to adopt a “Gleasonian” perspective, i.e., to study aquatic microbial assemblages in situ at the population level rather than looking at microbial community structure, diversity, or function as a whole. This review compiles current knowledge about the role and fate of different populations of heterotrophic picoplankton in marine and inland waters. Specifically, we focus on a growing suite of techniques that link the analysis of bacterial identity with growth, morphology, and various physiological activities at the level of single cells. An overview is given of the potential and limitations of methodological approaches, and factors that might control the population sizes of different microbes in pelagic habitats are discussed. PMID:16148306

  16. Recovery and diversity of heterotrophic bacteria from chlorinated drinking waters.

    PubMed Central

    Maki, J S; LaCroix, S J; Hopkins, B S; Staley, J T

    1986-01-01

    Heterotrophic bacteria were enumerated from the Seattle drinking water catchment basins and distribution system. The highest bacterial recoveries were obtained by using a very dilute medium containing 0.01% peptone as the primary carbon source. Other factors favoring high recovery were the use of incubation temperatures close to that of the habitat and an extended incubation (28 days or longer provided the highest counts). Total bacterial counts were determined by using acridine orange staining. With one exception, all acridine orange counts in chlorinated samples were lower than those in prechlorinated reservoir water, indicating that chlorination often reduces the number of acridine orange-detectable bacteria. Source waters had higher diversity index values than did samples examined following chlorination and storage in reservoirs. Shannon index values based upon colony morphology were in excess of 4.0 for prechlorinated source waters, whereas the values for final chlorinated tap waters were lower than 2.9. It is not known whether the reduction in diversity was due solely to chlorination or in part to other factors in the water treatment and distribution system. Based upon the results of this investigation, we provide a list of recommendations for changes in the procedures used for the enumeration of heterotrophic bacteria from drinking waters. Images PMID:3524453

  17. Modeling heterotrophic bacteria in plumbing system of drinking water.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Shakhawat; Al-Zahrani, Muhammad

    2014-06-01

    This study investigated occurrences of heterotrophic (HPC) bacteria and developed predictive models for HPC bacteria in plumbing pipes (PP) and hot water tanks (HWT) of two houses in Dhahran (Saudi Arabia). Heterotrophic bacteria in PP and HWT were observed to be 2.4 to 5.3 and 0.4 to 5.9 times the HPC bacteria in water distribution system (WDS), respectively. Three linear, one nonlinear, and one neural network models were investigated to predict HPC bacteria in PP and HWT. Significant factors for bacteria regrowth in PP and HWT were identified through numerical and graphical techniques. The R2 values of the models varied between 0.57 and 0.96, indicating moderate to excellent predictive ability for HPC bacteria in PP and HWT. The models were found to be statistically significant, which were also validated using additional data. These models can be used to predict HPC bacteria regrowth from WDS to PP and HWT, and could help to predict exposure and risks.

  18. Interactions of Methylotrophs with Plants and Other Heterotrophic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Iguchi, Hiroyuki; Yurimoto, Hiroya; Sakai, Yasuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Methylotrophs, which can utilize methane and/or methanol as sole carbon and energy sources, are key players in the carbon cycle between methane and CO2, the two most important greenhouse gases. This review describes the relationships between methylotrophs and plants, and between methanotrophs (methane-utilizers, a subset of methylotrophs) and heterotrophic bacteria. Some plants emit methane and methanol from their leaves, and provide methylotrophs with habitats. Methanol-utilizing methylotrophs in the genus Methylobacterium are abundant in the phyllosphere and have the ability to promote the growth of some plants. Methanotrophs also inhabit the phyllosphere, and methanotrophs with high methane oxidation activities have been found on aquatic plants. Both plant and environmental factors are involved in shaping the methylotroph community on plants. Methanotrophic activity can be enhanced by heterotrophic bacteria that provide growth factors (e.g., cobalamin). Information regarding the biological interaction of methylotrophs with other organisms will facilitate a better understanding of the carbon cycle that is driven by methylotrophs. PMID:27682083

  19. Distribution, Diversity, and Activities of Sulfur Dioxygenases in Heterotrophic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Honglei; Xin, Yufeng

    2014-01-01

    Sulfur oxidation by chemolithotrophic bacteria is well known; however, sulfur oxidation by heterotrophic bacteria is often ignored. Sulfur dioxygenases (SDOs) (EC 1.13.11.18) were originally found in the cell extracts of some chemolithotrophic bacteria as glutathione (GSH)-dependent sulfur dioxygenases. GSH spontaneously reacts with elemental sulfur to generate glutathione persulfide (GSSH), and SDOs oxidize GSSH to sulfite and GSH. However, SDOs have not been characterized for bacteria, including chemolithotrophs. The gene coding for human SDO (human ETHE1 [hETHE1]) in mitochondria was discovered because its mutations lead to a hereditary human disease, ethylmalonic encephalopathy. Using sequence analysis and activity assays, we discovered three subgroups of bacterial SDOs in the proteobacteria and cyanobacteria. Ten selected SDO genes were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant proteins were purified. The SDOs used Fe2+ for catalysis and displayed considerable variations in specific activities. The wide distribution of SDO genes reveals the likely source of the hETHE1 gene and highlights the potential of sulfur oxidation by heterotrophic bacteria. PMID:24389926

  20. Modeling of heterotrophic bacteria counts in a water distribution system.

    PubMed

    Francisque, Alex; Rodriguez, Manuel J; Miranda-Moreno, Luis F; Sadiq, Rehan; Proulx, François

    2009-03-01

    Heterotrophic plate count (HPC) constitutes a common indicator for monitoring of microbiological water quality in distribution systems (DS). This paper aims to identify factors explaining the spatiotemporal distribution of heterotrophic bacteria and model their occurrence in the distribution system. The case under study is the DS of Quebec City, Canada. The study is based on a robust database resulting from a sampling campaign carried out in about 50 DS locations, monitored bi-weekly over a three-year period. Models for explaining and predicting HPC levels were based on both one-level and multi-level Poisson regression techniques. The latter take into account the nested structure of data, the possible spatiotemporal correlation among HPC observations and the fact that sampling points, months and/or distribution sub-systems may represent clusters. Models show that the best predictors for spatiotemporal occurrence of HPC in the DS are: free residual chlorine that has an inverse relation with the HPC levels, water temperature and water ultraviolet absorbance, both having a positive impact on HPC levels. A sensitivity analysis based on the best performing model (two-level model) allowed for the identification of seasonal-based strategies to reduce HPC levels.

  1. Unraveling the Physiological Roles of the Cyanobacterium Geitlerinema sp. BBD and Other Black Band Disease Community Members through Genomic Analysis of a Mixed Culture

    PubMed Central

    Den Uyl, Paul A.; Richardson, Laurie L.; Jain, Sunit

    2016-01-01

    Black band disease (BBD) is a cyanobacterial-dominated polymicrobial mat that propagates on and migrates across coral surfaces, necrotizing coral tissue. Culture-based laboratory studies have investigated cyanobacteria and heterotrophic bacteria isolated from BBD, but the metabolic potential of various BBD microbial community members and interactions between them remain poorly understood. Here we report genomic insights into the physiological and metabolic potential of the BBD-associated cyanobacterium Geitlerinema sp. BBD 1991 and six associated bacteria that were also present in the non-axenic culture. The essentially complete genome of Geitlerinema sp. BBD 1991 contains a sulfide quinone oxidoreductase gene for oxidation of sulfide, suggesting a mechanism for tolerating the sulfidic conditions of BBD mats. Although the operon for biosynthesis of the cyanotoxin microcystin was surprisingly absent, potential relics were identified. Genomic evidence for mixed-acid fermentation indicates a strategy for energy metabolism under the anaerobic conditions present in BBD during darkness. Fermentation products may supply carbon to BBD heterotrophic bacteria. Among the six associated bacteria in the culture, two are closely related to organisms found in culture-independent studies of diseased corals. Their metabolic pathways for carbon and sulfur cycling, energy metabolism, and mechanisms for resisting coral defenses suggest adaptations to the coral surface environment and biogeochemical roles within the BBD mat. Polysulfide reductases were identified in a Flammeovirgaceae genome (Bacteroidetes) and the sox pathway for sulfur oxidation was found in the genome of a Rhodospirillales bacterium (Alphaproteobacteria), revealing mechanisms for sulfur cycling, which influences virulence of BBD. Each genomic bin possessed a pathway for conserving energy from glycerol degradation, reflecting adaptations to the glycerol-rich coral environment. The presence of genes for detoxification

  2. [Biodiversity and enzymes of culturable facultative-alkaliphilic actinobacteria in saline-alkaline soil in Fukang, Xinjiang].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongguang; Liu, Qing; Wang, Hongfei; Zhang, Daofeng; Chen, Jiyue; Zhang, Yuanming; Li, Wenjun

    2014-02-04

    In order to analyze the biodiversity of cultivable facultative-alkaliphilic actinobacteria and the enzymes they produced. Total 10 soil samples were collected from saline-alkaline environments of Fukang, Xinjiang province. Facultative-alkaliphilic actinobacteria strains were isolated and identified by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Enzymes including amylase, proteinase, xylanase, and cellulase were detected. Total 116 facultative-alkaliphilic actinobacterial strains and 4 alkali-tolerant actinobacterial strains were isolated from the samples, and those strains were distributed within 22 genera in 13 families and 8 orders of actinobacteria based on their 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The ratio of non-predominant Streptomyces and Nocardiopsis strains were 53.3%. The positive rates of amylase, proteinase, xylanase and cellulase were 35.8, 37.6, 28.3 and 17.5%, respectively. Diverse facultative-alkaliphilic actinobacteria were discovered from saline-alkaline environments of Fukang. Facultative-alkaliphilic actinobacteria are a potential source for enzymes. The study would facilitate the knowledge of the diversity of facultative-alkaliphilic actinobacteria, and provide the technical basis for exploration of facultative-alkaliphilic actinobacteria resources.

  3. Cyanobacterium sp. host cell and vector for production of chemical compounds in Cyanobacterial cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Piven, Irina; Friedrich, Alexandra; Duhring, Ulf; Uliczka, Frank; Baier, Kerstin; Inaba, Masami; Shi, Tuo; Wang, Kui; Enke, Heike; Kramer, Dan

    2016-04-19

    A cyanobacterial host cell, Cyanobacterium sp., that harbors at least one recombinant gene for the production of a chemical compounds is provided, as well as vectors derived from an endogenous plasmid isolated from the cell.

  4. Mössbauer study of cobalt and iron in the cyanobacterium (blue green alga)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambe, Shizuko

    1990-07-01

    Mössbauer emission and absorption studies have been performed on cobalt and iron in the cyanobacterium (blue-green alga). The Mössbauer spectrum of the cyanobacterium cultivated with57Co is decomposed into two doublets. The parameters of the major doublet are in good agreement with those of cyanocobalamin (vitamin B12) labeled with57Co. The other minor doublet has parameters close to those of Fe(II) coordinated with six nitrogen atoms. These suggest that cobalt is used for the biosynthesis of vitamin B12 or its analogs in the cyanobacterium. The spectra of the cyanobacterium grown with57Fe show that iron is in the high-spin trivalent state and possibly in the form of ferritin, iron storage protein.

  5. Cyanobacterium sp. host cell and vector for production of chemical compounds in cyanobacterial cultures

    DOEpatents

    Piven, Irina; Friedrich, Alexandra; Duhring, Ulf; Uliczka, Frank; Baier, Kerstin; Inaba, Masami; Shi, Tuo; Wang, Kui; Enke, Heike; Kramer, Dan

    2014-09-30

    A cyanobacterial host cell, Cyanobacterium sp., that harbors at least one recombinant gene for the production of a chemical compounds is provided, as well as vectors derived from an endogenous plasmid isolated from the cell.

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of Microcystis aeruginosa CACIAM 03, a Cyanobacterium Isolated from an Amazonian Freshwater Environment

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Wendel Oliveira; Lima, Alex Ranieri Jerônimo; Moraes, Pablo Henrique Gonçalves; Siqueira, Andrei Santos; Aguiar, Délia Cristina Figueira; Baraúna, Anna Rafaella Ferreira; Martins, Luisa Carício; Fuzii, Hellen Thais; de Lima, Clayton Pereira Silva; Vianez-Júnior, João Lídio Silva Gonçalves; Nunes, Márcio Roberto Teixeira; Dall'Agnol, Leonardo Teixeira

    2016-01-01

    Given its toxigenic potential, Microcystis aeruginosa is an important bloom-forming cyanobacterium. Here, we present a draft genome and annotation of the strain CACIAM 03, which was isolated from an Amazonian freshwater environment. PMID:27856592

  7. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN LEVELS OF HETEROTROPHIC BACTERIA AND WATER QUALITY PARAMETERS IN A DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conventional plating methods were used to quantify heterotrophic bacteria from a drinking water distribution system. Three media, plate count agar (PCA), R2A agar and sheep blood agar (TSA-SB) were used to determine heterotrophic plate count (HPC) levels. Grab samples were collec...

  8. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN LEVELS OF HETEROTROPHIC BACTERIA AND WATER QUALITY PARAMETERS IN A DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conventional plating methods were used to quantify heterotrophic bacteria from a drinking water distribution system. Three media, plate count agar (PCA), R2A agar and sheep blood agar (TSA-SB) were used to determine heterotrophic plate count (HPC) levels. Grab samples were collec...

  9. The origins of extraversion: joint effects of facultative calibration and genetic polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Lukaszewski, Aaron W; Roney, James R

    2011-03-01

    The origins of variation in extraversion are largely mysterious. Recent theories and some findings suggest that personality variation can be orchestrated by specific genetic polymorphisms. Few studies, however, have examined an alternative hypothesis that personality traits are facultatively calibrated to variations in other phenotypic features, and none have considered how these distinct processes may interact in personality determination. Since physical strength and physical attractiveness likely predicted the reproductive payoffs of extraverted behavioral strategies over most of human history, it was theorized that extraversion is calibrated to variation in these characteristics. Confirming these predicted patterns, strength and attractiveness together explained a surprisingly large fraction of variance in extraversion across two studies--effects that were independent of variance explained by an androgen receptor gene polymorphism. These novel findings initially support an integrative model wherein facultative calibration and specific genetic polymorphisms operate in concert to determine personality variation.

  10. Facultative cheater mutants reveal the genetic complexity of cooperation in social amoebae.

    PubMed

    Santorelli, Lorenzo A; Thompson, Christopher R L; Villegas, Elizabeth; Svetz, Jessica; Dinh, Christopher; Parikh, Anup; Sucgang, Richard; Kuspa, Adam; Strassmann, Joan E; Queller, David C; Shaulsky, Gad

    2008-02-28

    Cooperation is central to many major transitions in evolution, including the emergence of eukaryotic cells, multicellularity and eusociality. Cooperation can be destroyed by the spread of cheater mutants that do not cooperate but gain the benefits of cooperation from others. However, cooperation can be preserved if cheaters are facultative, cheating others but cooperating among themselves. Several cheater mutants have been studied before, but no study has attempted a genome-scale investigation of the genetic opportunities for cheating. Here we describe such a screen in a social amoeba and show that cheating is multifaceted by revealing cheater mutations in well over 100 genes of diverse types. Many of these mutants cheat facultatively, producing more than their fair share of spores in chimaeras, but cooperating normally when clonal. These findings indicate that phenotypically stable cooperative systems may nevertheless harbour genetic conflicts. The opportunities for evolutionary moves and countermoves in such conflicts may select for the involvement of multiple pathways and numerous genes.

  11. Evidence of a myco-heterotroph in the plant family Ericaceae that lacks mycorrhizal specificity

    PubMed Central

    Hynson, Nicole A.; Bruns, Thomas D.

    2009-01-01

    Myco-heterotrophy is one of the longest-studied aspects of the mycorrhizal symbiosis, but there remain many critical, unanswered questions regarding the ecology and physiology of myco-heterotrophic plants and their associated fungi. The vast majority of all myco-heterotrophs studied to date have exhibited specificity towards narrow lineages of fungi, but it is unclear whether the loss of photosynthesis in these plants is contingent upon fungal specialization. Here, we examine the fungal associates of the myco-heterotroph Pyrola aphylla (Ericaceae) and its closest green relative Pyrola picta to determine the pattern of mycorrhizal specialization. Our findings show that both plant species associate with a range of root-inhabiting fungi, the majority of which are ectomycorrhizal taxa. This study provides the first example of a eudicotyledonous myco-heterotroph that is a mycorrhizal generalist, indicating that the loss of photosynthesis in myco-heterotrophs is not contingent upon fungal specialization. PMID:19740879

  12. Modeling pure culture heterotrophic production of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB).

    PubMed

    Mozumder, Md Salatul Islam; Goormachtigh, Laurens; Garcia-Gonzalez, Linsey; De Wever, Heleen; Volcke, Eveline I P

    2014-03-01

    In this contribution a mechanistic model describing the production of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) through pure-culture fermentation was developed, calibrated and validated for two different substrates, namely glucose and waste glycerol. In both cases, non-growth-associated PHB production was triggered by applying nitrogen limitation. The occurrence of some growth-associated PHB production besides non-growth-associated PHB production was demonstrated, although it is inhibited in the presence of nitrogen. Other phenomena observed experimentally and described by the model included biomass growth on PHB and non-linear product inhibition of PHB production. The accumulated impurities from the waste substrate negatively affected the obtained maximum PHB content. Overall, the developed mathematical model provided an accurate prediction of the dynamic behavior of heterotrophic biomass growth and PHB production in a two-phase pure culture system.

  13. Effect of temperature on mineralization by heterotrophic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Tison, D.L.; Pope, D.H.

    1980-03-01

    When pure cultures of the bacteria Pseudomonas fluorescens (a psychrotroph), Escherichia coli (a mesophile), and SRL 261 (a thermophile) were shifted away from temperatures to which they were adapted, the percentage of substrate mineralized increased (percent mineralized = (substrate respired to CO/sub 2/)/(substrate respired to CO/sub 2/ + substrate incorporated into biomass) x 100). The increase in the percent mineralized was larger for larger temperature shifts. Similar responses were observed when natural heterotrophic bacterial populations from sediments of Lake George, N.Y., and a thermophilic algal-bacterial mat community at the Savannah River Plant, Aiken, S.C., were subjected to temperature shifts. These results suggest that an increase in the percent mineralized may be an indication of thermal stress in bacterial populations.

  14. Lipids from heterotrophic microbes: advances in metabolism research.

    PubMed

    Kosa, Matyas; Ragauskas, Arthur J

    2011-02-01

    Heterotrophic oleaginous microorganisms are capable of producing over 20% of their weight in single cell oils (SCOs) composed of triacylglycerols (TAGs). These TAGs contain fatty acids, such as palmitic, stearic and oleic acids, that are well-suited for biodiesel applications. Although some of these microbes are able to accumulate SCOs while growing on inexpensive agro-industrial biomass, the competition with plant oil resources means that a significant increase in productivity is desired. The present review aims to summarize recent details in lipid metabolism research and engineering (e.g. direct fatty acid ethyl ester production), as well as culture condition optimization and innovations, such as solid-state or semi-solid-state fermentation, that can all contribute to higher productivity and further advancement of the field.

  15. Food waste as nutrient source in heterotrophic microalgae cultivation.

    PubMed

    Pleissner, Daniel; Lam, Wan Chi; Sun, Zheng; Lin, Carol Sze Ki

    2013-06-01

    Glucose, free amino nitrogen (FAN), and phosphate were recovered from food waste by fungal hydrolysis using Aspergillus awamori and Aspergillus oryzae. Using 100g food waste (dry weight), 31.9 g glucose, 0.28 g FAN, and 0.38 g phosphate were recovered after 24h of hydrolysis. The pure hydrolysate has then been used as culture medium and nutrient source for the two heterotrophic microalgae Schizochytrium mangrovei and Chlorella pyrenoidosa, S. mangrovei and C. pyrenoidosa grew well on the complex food waste hydrolysate by utilizing the nutrients recovered. At the end of fermentation 10-20 g biomass were produced rich in carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and saturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Results of this study revealed the potential of food waste hydrolysate as culture medium and nutrient source in microalgae cultivation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Diffuse urban pollution increases metal tolerance of natural heterotrophic biofilms.

    PubMed

    Fechner, Lise C; Gourlay-Francé, Catherine; Bourgeault, Adeline; Tusseau-Vuillemin, Marie-Hélène

    2012-03-01

    This study is a first attempt to investigate the impact of urban contamination on metal tolerance of heterotrophic river biofilms using a short-term test based on β-glucosidase activity. Tolerance levels to Cu, Cd, Zn, Ni and Pb were evaluated for biofilms collected at three sites along an urban gradient in the Seine river (France). Metallic pollution increased along the river, but concentrations remained low compared to environmental quality standards. Biofilm metal tolerance increased downstream from the urban area. Multivariate analysis confirmed the correlation between tolerance and contamination and between multi-metallic and physico-chemical gradients. Therefore, tolerance levels have to be interpreted in relation to the whole chemical and physical characteristics and not solely metal exposure. We conclude that community tolerance is a sensitive biological response to urban pressure and that mixtures of contaminants at levels lower than quality standards might have a significant impact on periphytic communities.

  17. Revised evidence for facultative sex ratio adjustment in birds: a correction

    PubMed Central

    Cassey, Phillip; Ewen, John G; Møller, Anders P

    2006-01-01

    We provide a revision to the calculation of effect sizes and heterogeneity statistics in our original article, ‘Facultative primary sex ratio variation: a lack of evidence in birds’ (Ewen et al. 2004). Our revision shows that significant heterogeneity in sex ratio study effect sizes does indeed exist and that for a series of key traits the average effect sizes (while still weak) are in fact significantly different from zero. PMID:17015370

  18. Characterization of corrinoid compounds from edible cyanobacterium Nostochopsis sp.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Eri; Yabuta, Yukinori; Takenaka, Shigeo; Yamaguchi, Yuji; Takenaka, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Fumio

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin B₁₂ content of an edible cyanobacterium, Nostochopsis sp. was determined to be 140.6±16.2 μg/100 g dry weight by a microbiological method. To evaluate whether the Nostochopsis cells contain vitamin B₁₂ or inactive corrinoid compounds, corrinoid compounds were purified from the cells and then identified as pseudovitamin B₁₂ (97.4±11.8 μg/100 g dry weight) and vitamin B₁₂ (43.2±6.0 μg/100 g dry weight) on the basis of silica gel 60 TLC bioautograms and LC/ESI-MS/MS chromatograms. Vitamin B₁₂ content was significantly increased in the Nostochopsis cells (254.8±17.6 μg/100 g dry weight) grown in the vitamin B₁₂-supplemented medium.

  19. Genomes of diverse isolates of the marine cyanobacterium Prochlorococcus

    PubMed Central

    Biller, Steven J.; Berube, Paul M.; Berta-Thompson, Jessie W.; Kelly, Libusha; Roggensack, Sara E.; Awad, Lana; Roache-Johnson, Kathryn H.; Ding, Huiming; Giovannoni, Stephen J.; Rocap, Gabrielle; Moore, Lisa R.; Chisholm, Sallie W.

    2014-01-01

    The marine cyanobacterium Prochlorococcus is the numerically dominant photosynthetic organism in the oligotrophic oceans, and a model system in marine microbial ecology. Here we report 27 new whole genome sequences (2 complete and closed; 25 of draft quality) of cultured isolates, representing five major phylogenetic clades of Prochlorococcus. The sequenced strains were isolated from diverse regions of the oceans, facilitating studies of the drivers of microbial diversity—both in the lab and in the field. To improve the utility of these genomes for comparative genomics, we also define pre-computed clusters of orthologous groups of proteins (COGs), indicating how genes are distributed among these and other publicly available Prochlorococcus genomes. These data represent a significant expansion of Prochlorococcus reference genomes that are useful for numerous applications in microbial ecology, evolution and oceanography. PMID:25977791

  20. A New Lyngbyatoxin from the Hawaiian Cyanobacterium Moorea producens

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Weina; Zhou, Wei; Uchida, Hajime; Kikumori, Masayuki; Irie, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Ryuichi; Suzuki, Toshiyuki; Sakamoto, Bryan; Kamio, Michiya; Nagai, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Lyngbyatoxin A from the marine cyanobacterium Moorea producens (formerly Lyngbya majuscula) is known as the causative agent of “swimmer’s itch” with its highly inflammatory effect. A new toxic compound was isolated along with lyngbyatoxin A from an ethyl acetate extract of M. producens collected from Hawaii. Analyses of HR-ESI-MS and NMR spectroscopies revealed the isolated compound had the same planar structure with that of lyngbyatoxin A. The results of optical rotation and CD spectra indicated that the compound was a new lyngbyatoxin A derivative, 12-epi-lyngbyatoxin A (1). While 12-epi-lyngbyatoxin A showed comparable toxicities with lyngbyatoxin A in cytotoxicity and crustacean lethality tests, it showed more than 100 times lower affinity for protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ) using the PKCδ-C1B peptide when compared to lyngbyatoxin A. PMID:24824022

  1. Interaction effects of mercury-pesticide combinations towards a cyanobacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, G.W.

    1985-05-01

    The present study supplies interaction data for combinations of mercuric ion (supplied as mercuric chloride), atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-1,3,5-triazine), and permethrin (3-phenoxybenzyl-(1RS)-cis,trans-3-(2,2-dichloro-vinyl)-2,2-dimethyl cyclopropanecarboxylate) when tested towards growth of the cyanobacterium (blue-green alga) Anabaena inaequalis. Mercury is one of the most important heavy metal pollutants and has been widely used in toxicology research. Atrazine is the most heavily used pesticide in the United States and its residues are widely distributed in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Permethrin is an important insecticide with expanding markets and is presently being evaluated for its environmental impact. A. inaequalis has been used extensively in this laboratory in previous interaction studies.

  2. Photoinhibition and reactivation of photosynthesis in the cyanobacterium Anacystis nidulans

    SciTech Connect

    Samuelsson, G.; Loenneborg, A.; Rosenqvist, E.; Gustafsson, P.; Oequist, G.

    1985-12-01

    The susceptibility of photosynthesis to photoinhibition and its recovery were studied on cultures of the cyanobacterium Anacystis nidulans. Oxygen evolution and low temperature fluorescence kinetics were measured. Upon exposure to high light A. nidulans showed a rapid decrease in oxygen evolution followed by a quasi steady state rate of photosynthesis. This quasi steady state rate decreased with increasing photon flux density of the photoinhibitory light. Reactivation of photosynthesis in dim light after the photoinhibitory treatment was rapid: 85 to 95% recovery occurred within 2 hours. In the presence of the translation inhibitor, streptomycin (250 micrograms per milliliter), no reactivation occurred. We also found that the damage increased dramatically if the high light treatment was done with streptomycin added. A transcription inhibitor, rifampicin, did not inhibit the reactivation process. Based on these data we conclude that the photoinhibitory damage observed is the net result of a balance between the photoinhibitory process and the operation of the repairing mechanism(s).

  3. Genetic manipulation of a cyanobacterium for heavy metal detoxivication

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, P.; Cannon, G.; Heinhorst, S.

    1995-12-31

    Increasing heavy metal contamination of soil and water has produced a need for economical and effective methods to reduce toxic buildup of these materials. Biological systems use metallothionein proteins to sequester such metals as Cu, Cd, and Zn. Studies are underway to genetically engineer a cyanobacteria strain with increased ability for metallothionein production and increased sequestration capacity. Cyanobacteria require only sunlight and CO{sub 2}. Vector constructs are being developed in a naturally competent, unicellular cyanobacterium Anacystis nidulans R2. Closed copies of a yeast copper metallothionein gene have been inserted into a cyanobacterial shuttle vector as well as a vector designed for genomic integration. Transformation studies have produced recombinant cyanobacteria from both of these systems, and work is currently underway to assess the organism`s ability to withstand increasing Cu, Cd, and Zn concentrations.

  4. Fine-Tuning of Photoautotrophic Protein Production by Combining Promoters and Neutral Sites in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803

    PubMed Central

    Berla, Bertram M.

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic cell factories that use solar energy to convert CO2 into useful products. Despite this attractive feature, the development of tools for engineering cyanobacterial chassis has lagged behind that for heterotrophs such as Escherichia coli or Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Heterologous genes in cyanobacteria are often integrated at presumptively “neutral” chromosomal sites, with unknown effects. We used transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) data for the model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 to identify neutral sites from which no transcripts are expressed. We characterized the two largest such sites on the chromosome, a site on an endogenous plasmid, and a shuttle vector by integrating an enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) expression cassette expressed from either the Pcpc560 or the Ptrc1O promoter into each locus. Expression from the endogenous plasmid was as much as 14-fold higher than that from the chromosome, with intermediate expression from the shuttle vector. The expression characteristics of each locus correlated predictably with the promoters used. These findings provide novel, characterized tools for synthetic biology and metabolic engineering in cyanobacteria. PMID:26209663

  5. Diversity and distribution of pigmented heterotrophic bacteria in marine environments.

    PubMed

    Du, Hailian; Jiao, Nianzhi; Hu, Yaohua; Zeng, Yonghui

    2006-07-01

    A systematic investigation of marine pigmented heterotrophic bacteria (PHB) based on the cultivation method and sequencing analysis of 16S rRNA genes was conducted in Chinese coastal and shelf waters and the Pacific Ocean. Both the abundance of PHB and the ratio of PHB to CFU decreased along trophic gradients from coastal to oceanic waters, with the highest values of 9.9 x 10(3) cell mL(-1) and 39.6%, respectively, in the Yangtze River Estuary. In contrast to the total heterotrophic bacteria (TB) and CFU, which were present in the whole water column, PHB were primarily confined to the euphotic zone, with the highest abundance of PHB and ratio of PHB to CFU occurring in surface water. In total, 247 pigmented isolates were obtained during this study, and the phylogenetic analysis showed a wide genetic diversity covering 25 genera of six phylogenetic classes: Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacilli, Flavobacteria and Sphingobacteria. PHB belonging to Alphaproteobacteria, Flavobacteria and Sphingobacteria were obtained mainly from the South China Sea and East China Sea; PHB from the Pacific Ocean water were predominantly affiliated with Gammaproteobacteria, and most isolates from the Yangtze River Estuary fell into the classes Actinobacteria and Bacilli. The isolates exhibited various colours (e.g. golden, yellow, red, pink and orange), with genus or species specificity. Furthermore, the pigment of PHB cells absorbed light mainly in the wavelength range between 450 and 550 nm. In conclusion, our work has revealed that PHB with broad genetic diversity are widely distributed in the marine environment, and may account for up to 39.6% of culturable bacteria, equivalent to 1.4% of the total microbial community. This value might even be underestimated because it is probable that not all pigmented bacteria were isolated. Their abundance and genetic distribution are heavily influenced by environmental properties, such as light and nutrition

  6. Heterotrophic organisms dominate nitrogen fixation in the South Pacific Gyre.

    PubMed

    Halm, Hannah; Lam, Phyllis; Ferdelman, Timothy G; Lavik, Gaute; Dittmar, Thorsten; LaRoche, Julie; D'Hondt, Steven; Kuypers, Marcel M M

    2012-06-01

    Oceanic subtropical gyres are considered biological deserts because of the extremely low availability of nutrients and thus minimum productivities. The major source of nutrient nitrogen in these ecosystems is N(2)-fixation. The South Pacific Gyre (SPG) is the largest ocean gyre in the world, but measurements of N(2)-fixation therein, or identification of microorganisms involved, are scarce. In the 2006/2007 austral summer, we investigated nitrogen and carbon assimilation at 11 stations throughout the SPG. In the ultra-oligotrophic waters of the SPG, the chlorophyll maxima reached as deep as 200 m. Surface primary production seemed limited by nitrogen, as dissolved inorganic carbon uptake was stimulated upon additions of (15)N-labeled ammonium and leucine in our incubation experiments. N(2)-fixation was detectable throughout the upper 200 m at most stations, with rates ranging from 0.001 to 0.19 nM N h(-1). N(2)-fixation in the SPG may account for the production of 8-20% of global oceanic new nitrogen. Interestingly, comparable (15)N(2)-fixation rates were measured under light and dark conditions. Meanwhile, phylogenetic analyses for the functional gene biomarker nifH and its transcripts could not detect any common photoautotrophic diazotrophs, such as, Trichodesmium, but a prevalence of γ-proteobacteria and the unicellular photoheterotrophic Group A cyanobacteria. The dominance of these likely heterotrophic diazotrophs was further verified by quantitative PCR. Hence, our combined results show that the ultra-oligotrophic SPG harbors a hitherto unknown heterotrophic diazotrophic community, clearly distinct from other oceanic gyres previously visited.

  7. Measuring and Modeling Soil Heterotrophic Respiration in Southern Pine Plantations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markewitz, D.; Brown, R.

    2016-12-01

    Soil respiration (Rs) returns carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere and is a substantial component of the forest C cycle. Whether Rs is derived from root autotrophic respiration (Ra) or microbial heterotrophic respiration (Rh) has an important influence on estimates of net ecosystem productivity (NEP), a reflection of stand level C sequestration, which is determined by subtracting Rh from net primary productivity (NPP). Modeling the heterotrophic proportion of Rs (Rh/Rs) is thus necessary for quantifying NEP across landscapes. Here we present statistical (regression) and process (DAYCENT) based models used to estimate the Rh proportion as measured in six loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) plantations located in the Piedmont and Coastal Plain of Georgia and Alabama. Soil and forest floor samples were collected at each site to parameterize the DAYCENT model, and Rs and Rh were measured in the field over one year for model validation. Differences in Rs and Rh were compared between silvicultural treatments of control, fertilizer, and herbicide, as well as seasonally. Model predictions of Rs, Rh, and Rh proportion were compared to observed values, which for Rh ranged from 60 to 80% across all sites and seasons. Statistical models accounted for 40-70% of the observed variance. For the process model the fits (r2) ranged from 0.1 to 0.4 across the various sites and the range of predicted Rh proportions (60 to 94%) extended beyond the range of those measured. Results from these six southern pine plantations suggest a need to continue to develop models to estimate the Rh proportion of soil respiration.

  8. Seasonal variation of morph ratio in facultatively paedomorphic populations of the palmate newt Triturus helveticus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denoël, Mathieu

    2006-03-01

    Facultative paedomorphosis is a polyphenism in which individuals may express one of two alternative ontogenetic pathways (metamorphosis vs. paedomorphosis) depending on environmental cues. Previous laboratory experiments showed that drying can cause morph ratio change, suggesting that the maintenance of facultative paedomorphosis is highly dependent on environmental determinants. The aim of this study was to examine seasonal variation in morph ratios in eight ponds from Larzac (southern France) naturally inhabited by palmate newts and to relate it to pond drying. In some ponds, the relative proportion of paedomorphs (i.e. individuals retaining gills at the adult stage) increased after the breeding period, but it remained stable or decreased in other ponds. This seasonal variation in the abundance of the two morphs most probably reflects (1) the emigration of metamorphs leaving the pond to occupy terrestrial habitats and (2) metamorphosis of paedomorphic adults in response to drying of the ponds. This study shows that facultative paedomorphosis in palmate newts is a dynamic process that allows rapid change (i.e. within a single year) in morph ratio to fit environmental variation (i.e. risk of drying) within the aquatic habitats. Long-term studies are needed to model the evolution of the dimorphism according to environmental change.

  9. Quantification of social behavior in D. discoideum reveals complex fixed and facultative strategies.

    PubMed

    Buttery, Neil J; Rozen, Daniel E; Wolf, Jason B; Thompson, Christopher R L

    2009-08-25

    Understanding the maintenance of cooperation requires an understanding of the nature of cheaters and the strategies used to mitigate their effects. However, it is often difficult to determine how cheating or differential social success has arisen. For example, cheaters may employ different strategies (e.g., fixed and facultative), whereas other causes of unequal fitness in social situations can result in winners and losers without cheating. To address these problems, we quantified the social success of naturally occurring genotypes of Dictyostelium discoideum during the formation of chimeric fruiting bodies, consisting of dead stalk cells and viable spores. We demonstrate that an apparent competitive dominance hierarchy of spore formation in chimera is partly due to a fixed strategy where genotypes exhibit dramatically different spore allocations. However, we also find complex, variable facultative strategies, where genotypes change their allocation in chimera. By determining the magnitude and direction of these changes, we partition facultative cheating into two forms: (1) promotion of individual fitness through selfish behaviour ("self-promotion") and (2) coercion of other genotypes to act cooperatively. Our results demonstrate and define social interactions between D. discoideum isolates, thus providing a conceptual framework for the study of the genetic mechanisms that underpin social evolution.

  10. Recovery of anaerobic, facultative, and aerobic bacteria from clinical specimens in three anaerobic transport systems.

    PubMed

    Helstad, A G; Kimball, J L; Maki, D G

    1977-06-01

    With aspirated specimens from clinical infections, we evaluated the recovery of anaerobic, aerobic, and facultative bacteria in three widely used transport systems: (i) aspirated fluid in a gassed-out tube (FGT), (ii) swab in modified Cary and Blair transport medium (SCB), and (iii) swab in a gassed-out tube (SGT). Transport tubes were held at 25 degrees C and semiquantitatively sampled at 0, 2, 24, and 48 h. Twenty-five clinical specimens yielded 75 anaerobic strains and 43 isolates of facultative and 3 of aerobic bacteria. Only one anaerobic isolate was not recovered in the first 24 h, and then, only in the SGT. At 48 h, 73 anaerobic strains (97%) were recovered in the FGT, 69 (92%) in the SCB, and 64 (85%) in the SGT. Two problems hindered the recovery of anaerobes in the SCB and SGT systems: first die-off of organisms, as evidenced by a decrease in colony-forming units of 20 strains (27%) in the SCB and 25 strains (33%) in the SGT, as compared with 7 strains (9%) in the FGT, over 48 h; and second, overgrowth of facultative bacteria, more frequent with SCB and SGT. The FGT method was clearly superior at 48 h to the SCB and SGT systems in this study and is recommended as the preferred method for transporting specimens for anaerobic culture.

  11. [Advances in degradation of chlorinated hydrocarbons by obligate and facultative methanotrophs].

    PubMed

    Xing, Zhilin; Zhang, Lijie; Zhao, Tiantao

    2014-04-01

    Bioremediation is one of the most effective ways to treat and dispose of chlorinated hydrocarbons, and methanotrophs are potentially useful to do so. Recent studies found that facultative methanotrophs can use compounds containing C-C bond as sources of carbon and energy, thus overcoming the limitation that obligate methanotrophsone uses only C1 compounds for this process. This is a unique metabolic approach that is becoming increasingly attractive in the field of contaminant biodegradation. Here, we summarized the bioremediation of chlorinated hydrocarbons by obligate and facultative methanotrophs. This process involves the degradation of various chlorinated hydrocarbons by diverse strains, including pure cultures and mixed cultures. We also compare the activity expression and catalytic properties of different types of methane monooxygenases in various substrates. We furthermore summarize the kinetic characteristics of the degradation of chlorinated hydrocarbons using the model strain Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b, and outline the degradation and potential of chlorinated hydrocarbons by facultative methanotrophs. Lastly, we discuss current problems and future research directions for degradation of chlorinated hydrocarbons by methanotrophs.

  12. Sex choice in plants: facultative adjustment of the sex ratio in the perennial herb Begonia gracilis.

    PubMed

    López, S; Domínguez, C A

    2003-11-01

    Sex allocation theory predicts that reproducing individuals will increase their fitness by facultatively adjusting their relative investment towards the rarer sex in response to population shifts in operational sex ratio (OSR). The evolution of facultative manipulation of sex ratio depends on the ability of the parents to track the conditions favouring skewed sex allocation and on the mechanism controlling sex allocation. In animals, which have well-developed sensorial mechanisms, facultative adjustment of sex ratios has been demonstrated on many occasions. In this paper, we show that plants have mechanisms that allow them to evaluate the population OSR. We simulated three different conditions of population OSR by manipulating the amount of pollen received by the female flowers of a monoecious herb, and examined the effect of this treatment on the allocation to male vs. female flowers. A shortage of pollen on the stigmas resulted in a more male-skewed sex allocation, whereas plants that experienced a relatively pollen rich environment tended to produce a more female-skewed sex allocation pattern. Our results for Begonia gracilis demonstrate that the individuals of this species are able to respond to the levels of pollination intensity experienced by their female flowers and adjust their patterns of sex allocation in accordance to the expectations of sex allocation theory.

  13. Substrate preference, uptake kinetics and bioenergetics in a facultatively autotrophic, thermoacidophilic crenarchaeote.

    PubMed

    Urschel, Matthew R; Hamilton, Trinity L; Roden, Eric E; Boyd, Eric S

    2016-05-01

    Facultative autotrophs are abundant components of communities inhabiting geothermal springs. However, the influence of uptake kinetics and energetics on preference for substrates is not well understood in this group of organisms. Here, we report the isolation of a facultatively autotrophic crenarchaeote, strain CP80, from Cinder Pool (CP, 88.7°C, pH 4.0), Yellowstone National Park. The 16S rRNA gene sequence from CP80 is 98.8% identical to that from Thermoproteus uzonensis and is identical to the most abundant sequence identified in CP sediments. Strain CP80 reduces elemental sulfur (S8°) and demonstrates hydrogen (H2)-dependent autotrophic growth. H2-dependent autotrophic activity is suppressed by amendment with formate at a concentration in the range of 20-40 μM, similar to the affinity constant determined for formate utilization. Synthesis of a cell during growth with low concentrations of formate required 0.5 μJ compared to 2.5 μJ during autotrophic growth with H2 These results, coupled to data indicating greater C assimilation efficiency when grown with formate as compared to carbon dioxide, are consistent with preferential use of formate for energetic reasons. Collectively, these results provide new insights into the kinetic and energetic factors that influence the physiology and ecology of facultative autotrophs in high-temperature acidic environments.

  14. Formaldehyde as a carbon and electron shuttle between autotroph and heterotroph populations in acidic hydrothermal vents of Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park.

    PubMed

    Moran, James J; Whitmore, Laura M; Isern, Nancy G; Romine, Margaret F; Riha, Krystin M; Inskeep, William P; Kreuzer, Helen W

    2016-05-01

    The Norris Geyser Basin in Yellowstone National Park contains a large number of hydrothermal systems, which host microbial populations supported by primary productivity associated with a suite of chemolithotrophic metabolisms. We demonstrate that Metallosphaera yellowstonensis MK1, a facultative autotrophic archaeon isolated from a hyperthermal acidic hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) spring in Norris Geyser Basin, excretes formaldehyde during autotrophic growth. To determine the fate of formaldehyde in this low organic carbon environment, we incubated native microbial mat (containing M. yellowstonensis) from a HFO spring with (13)C-formaldehyde. Isotopic analysis of incubation-derived CO2 and biomass showed that formaldehyde was both oxidized and assimilated by members of the community. Autotrophy, formaldehyde oxidation, and formaldehyde assimilation displayed different sensitivities to chemical inhibitors, suggesting that distinct sub-populations in the mat selectively perform these functions. Our results demonstrate that electrons originally resulting from iron oxidation can energetically fuel autotrophic carbon fixation and associated formaldehyde excretion, and that formaldehyde is both oxidized and assimilated by different organisms within the native microbial community. Thus, formaldehyde can effectively act as a carbon and electron shuttle connecting the autotrophic, iron oxidizing members with associated heterotrophic members in the HFO community.

  15. Formaldehyde as a carbon and electron shuttle between autotroph and heterotroph populations in acidic hydrothermal vents of Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, James J.; Whitmore, Laura M.; Isern, Nancy G.; Romine, Margaret F.; Riha, Krystin M.; Inskeep, William P.; Kreuzer, Helen W.

    2016-03-19

    The Norris Geyser Basin in Yellowstone National Park contains a large number of hydrothermal systems, which host microbial populations supported by primary productivity associated with a suite of chemolithotrophic metabolisms. We demonstrate that Metallosphaera yellowstonesis MK1, a facultative autotrophic archaeon isolated from a hyperthermal acidic hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) spring in Norris Geyser Basin, excretes formaldehyde during autotrophic growth. To determine the fate of formaldehyde in this low organic carbon environment, we incubated native microbial mat (containing M. yellowstonensis) from a HFO spring with 13C-formaldehyde. Isotopic analysis of incubation-derived CO2 and biomass showed that formaldehyde was both oxidized and assimilated by members of the community. Autotrophy, formaldehyde oxidation, and formaldehyde assimilation displayed different sensitivities to chemical inhibitors, suggesting that distinct sub-populations in the mat selectively perform these functions. Our results demonstrate that electrons originally resulting from iron oxidation can energetically fuel autotrophic carbon fixation and associated formaldehyde excretion, and that formaldehyde is both oxidized and assimilated by different organisms within the native microbial community. Thus, formaldehyde can effectively act as a carbon and electron shuttle connecting the autotrophic, iron oxidizing members with associated heterotrophic members in the HFO community.

  16. Microbial plankton abundance and heterotrophic activity across the Central Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez-Domínguez, Evaristo; Duarte, Carlos M.; Agustí, Susana; Jürgens, Klaus; Vaqué, Dolors; Gasol, Josep M.

    2008-10-01

    The role of microorganisms in the transfer of carbon of marine systems is very important in open oligotrophic oceans. Here, we analyze the picoplankton structure, the heterotrophic bacterioplankton activity, and the predator-prey relationships between heterotrophic bacteria and nanoflagellates during two large scale cruises in the Central Atlantic Ocean (∼29°N to ∼40°S). Latitud cruises were performed in 1995 between March-April and October-November. During both cruises we crossed the regions of different trophic statuses; where we measured different biological variables both at the surface and at the deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM). The concentration of chlorophyll a varied between 0.1 and 0.8 mg m -3, the abundance of heterotrophic bacteria varied between <1.0 × 10 5 and >1.0 × 10 6 cells ml -1, and that of heterotrophic nanoflagellates between <100 and >1.0 × 10 4 cells ml -1. The production of heterotrophic bacteria varied more than three orders of magnitude between <0.01 and 24 μgC L -1 d -1; and the growth rates were in the range <0.01-2.1 d -1. In the Latitud-II cruise, Prochlorococcus ranged between <10 3 and >3 × 10 5 cells ml -1, Synechococcus between <100 and >1.0 × 10 4 cells ml -1, and picoeukaryotes between <100 and >10 4 cells ml -1. Two empirical models were used to learn more about the relationship between heterotrophic bacteria and nanoflagellates. Most bacterial production was ingested when this production was low, the heterotrophic nanoflagellates could be controlled by preys during Latitud-I cruise at the DCM, and by predators in the surface and in the Latitud-II cruise. Our results were placed in context with others about the structure and function of auto- and heterotrophic picoplankton and heterotrophic nanoplankton in the Central Atlantic Ocean.

  17. Comparative Amperometric Study of Uptake Hydrogenase and Hydrogen Photoproduction Activities between Heterocystous Cyanobacterium Anabaena cylindrica B629 and Nonheterocystous Cyanobacterium Oscillatoria sp. Strain Miami BG7

    PubMed Central

    Kumazawa, S.; Mitsui, A.

    1985-01-01

    Heterocystous filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena cylindrica B629 and nonheterocystous filamentous cyanobacterium Oscillatoria sp. strain Miami BG7 were cultured in media with N2 as the sole nitrogen source; and activities of oxygen-dependent hydrogen uptake, photohydrogen production, photooxygen evolution, and respiration were compared amperometrically under the same or similar experimental conditions for both strains. Distinct differences in these activities were observed in both strains. The rates of hydrogen photoproduction and hydrogen accumulation were significantly higher in Oscillatoria sp. strain BG7 than in A. cylindrica B629 at every light intensity tested. The major reason for the difference was attributable to the fact that the heterocystous cyanobacterium had a high rate of oxygen-dependent hydrogen consumption activity and the nonheterocystous cyanobacterium did not. The activity of oxygen photoevolution and respiration also contributed to the difference. Oscillatoria sp. strain BG7 had lower O2 evolution and higher respiration than did A. cylindrica B629. Thus, the effect of O2 on hydrogen photoproduction was minimized in Oscillatoria sp. strain BG7. PMID:16346850

  18. C isotope fractionation during heterotrophic activity driven carbonate precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balci, Nurgul; Demirel, Cansu

    2016-04-01

    Stable carbon isotopic fractionation during carbonate precipitation induced by environmentally enriched heterotrophic halophilic microorganims was experimentally investigated under various salinity (% 4.5, %8, %15) conditions at 30 °C. Halophilic heterotrophic microorganims were enriched from a hypersaline Lake Acigöl located in SW Turkey (Balci et al.,2015) and later used for the precipitation experiments (solid and liquid medium). The carbonate precipitates had relatively high δ13C values (-4.3 to -16.9 ‰) compared to the δ13C values of the organic compounds that ranged from -27.5 to -25.4 ‰. At salinity of 4.5 % δ13C values of carbonate ranged from -4.9 ‰ to -10.9 ‰ with a 13C-enrichment factor of +20 to +16 ‰ higher than the δ13C values of the associated DOC (-27.5) . At salinity 8 % δ13C values of carbonate ranged from -16.3 ‰ to -11.7 ‰ with a 13C-enrichment factor of+11.3 to+15.9 ‰ higher than the δ13C values of the associated DOC. The respected values for 15 % salinity ranged from -12.3 ‰ to -9.7 ‰ with a 13C-enrichment factor of +15.2 to+16.8 ‰ higher than the δ13C values of the associated DOC. The carbonate precipitates produced in the solid medium are more enriched in 13C relative to liquid culture experiments. These results suggest that the carbon in the solid was derived from both the bacterial oxidation of organic compounds in the medium and from the atmospheric CO2. A solid medium used in the experiments may have suppressed convective and advective mass transport favouring diffusion-controlled system. This determination suggests that the rate and equilibration of CO2 exchange with the atmosphere is the major control on C isotope composition of carbonate minerals precipitated in the experiments. Key words: Lake Acıgöl, halophilic bacteria, carbonate biomineralization, C isotopes References Nurgul Balci, Meryem Menekşe, Nevin Gül Karagüler, M. Şeref Sönmez,Patrick Meister 2015.Reproducing authigenic carbonate

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of the Axenic Strain Phormidesmispriestleyi ULC007, a Cyanobacterium Isolated from Lake Bruehwiler (Larsemann Hills, Antarctica).

    PubMed

    Lara, Yannick; Durieu, Benoit; Cornet, Luc; Verlaine, Olivier; Rippka, Rosmarie; Pessi, Igor S; Misztak, Agnieszka; Joris, Bernard; Javaux, Emmanuelle J; Baurain, Denis; Wilmotte, Annick

    2017-02-16

    Phormidesmis priestleyi ULC007 is an Antarctic freshwater cyanobacterium. Its draft genome is 5,684,389 bp long. It contains a total of 5,604 protein-encoding genes, of which 22.2% have no clear homologues in known genomes. To date, this draft genome is the first one ever determined for an axenic cyanobacterium from Antarctica.

  20. A New Heterotrophic Cryptomonad: Hemiarma marina n. g., n. sp.

    PubMed

    Shiratori, Takashi; Ishida, Ken-Ichiro

    2016-11-01

    We report a new heterotrophic cryptomonad Hemiarma marina n. g., n. sp. that was collected from a seaweed sample from the Republic of Palau. In our molecular phylogenetic analyses using the small subunit ribosomal RNA gene, H. marina formed a clade with two marine environmental sequences, and the clade was placed as a sister lineage of the freshwater cryptomonad environmental clade CRY1. Alternatively, in the concatenated large and small subunit ribosomal RNA gene phylogeny, H. marina was placed as a sister lineage of Goniomonas. Light and electron microscopic observations showed that H. marina shares several ultrastructural features with cryptomonads, such as flattened mitochondrial cristae, a periplast cell covering, and ejectisomes that consist of two coiled ribbon structures. On the other hand, H. marina exhibited unique behaviors, such as attaching to substrates with its posterior flagellum and displaying a jumping motion. H. marina also had unique periplast arrangement and flagellar transitional region. On the basis of both molecular and morphological information, we concluded that H. marina should be treated as new genus and species of cryptomonads. © 2016 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2016 International Society of Protistologists.

  1. Heterotrophic potential of Atribacteria from deep marine Antarctic sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, S. A.; Orcutt, B.; Mandernack, K. W.; Spear, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Bacteria belonging to the newly classified candidate phylum "Atribacteria" (formerly referred to as "OP9" and "JS1") are common in anoxic methane-rich sediments. However, the metabolic functions and biogeochemical role of these microorganisms in the subsurface remains unrealized due to the lack of pure culture representatives. This study observed a steady increase of Atribacteria-related sequences with increasing sediment depth throughout the methane-rich zone of the Adélie Basin, Antarctica (according to a 16S rRNA gene survey). To explore the functional potential of Atribacteria in this basin, samples from various depths (14, 25 and 97 meters below seafloor), were subjected to metagenomic sequencing. Additionally, individual cells were separated from frozen, unpreserved sediment for whole genome amplification. The successful isolation and sequencing of a single-amplified Atribacteria genome from these unpreserved sediments demonstrates a future use of single cell techniques with previously collected and frozen sediments. Our resulting single-cell amplified genome, combined with metagenomic interpretations, provides our first insights to the functional potential of Atribacteria in deep subsurface settings. As observed for non-marine Atribacteria, genomic analyses suggest a heterotrophic metabolism, with Atribacteria potentially producing fermentation products such as acetate, ethanol and CO2. These products may in turn support methanogens within the sediment microbial community and explain the frequent occurrence of Atribacteria in anoxic methane-rich sediments.

  2. Diversity of chemotactic heterotrophic bacteria associated with arctic cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Sathish; Pratibha, Mambatta Shankaranarayanan; Manasa, Poorna; Buddhi, Sailaja; Begum, Zareena; Shivaji, Sisinthy

    2013-01-01

    The abundance and diversity of chemotactic heterotrophic bacteria associated with Arctic cyanobacteria was determined. The viable numbers ranged between 10(4) and 10(6) cell g(-1) cyanobacterial biomass. A total of 112 morphotypes, representing 22 phylotypes based on their 16S rRNA sequence similarity were isolated from the samples. All the phylotypes were Gram-negative with affiliation to the proteobacterial and bacteroidetes divisions. Among the 22 phylotypes, 14 were chemotactic to glucose. Majority of the phylotypes were psychrotolerant showing growth up to 30 °C. Representatives of Alphaproteobacteria, the genus Flavobacterium and the gammaproteobacterial Alcanivorax sp, were psychrophilic with growth at or below 18 °C. A significant percentage of phylotypes were pigmented (~68 %), rich in unsaturated membrane fatty acids and tolerated pH values and NaCl concentrations between 5.0-8.0 and 0.15-1.0 M, respectively. The percentages of phylotypes producing extracellular cold-active enzymes at 4 °C were amylase (18.18 %), lipase and urease (45.45 %), caseinase (59.09 %) and gelatinase (31.8 %).

  3. Heterotrophic bacteria in drinking water distribution system: a review.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Shakhawat

    2012-10-01

    The microbiological quality of drinking water in municipal water distribution systems (WDS) depends on several factors. Free residual chlorine and/or chloramines are typically used to minimize bacterial recontamination and/or regrowth in WDS. Despite such preventive measures, regrowth of heterotrophic (HPC) and opportunistic bacteria in bulk water and biofilms has yet to be controlled completely. No approach has shown complete success in eliminating biofilms or HPC bacteria from bulk water and pipe surfaces. Biofilms can provide shelter for pathogenic bacteria and protect these bacteria from disinfectants. Some HPC bacteria may be associated with aesthetic and non-life threatening diseases. Research to date has achieved important success in understanding occurrence and regrowth of bacteria in bulk water and biofilms in WDS. To achieve comprehensive understanding and to provide efficient control against bacteria regrowth, future research on bacteria regrowth dynamics and their implications is warranted. In this study, a review was performed on the literature published in this area. The findings and limitations of these papers are summarized. Occurrences of bacteria in WDS, factors affecting bacteria regrowth in bulk water and biofilms, bacteria control strategies, sources of nutrients, human health risks from bacterial exposure, modelling of bacteria regrowth and methods of bacteria sampling and detection and quantification are investigated. Advances to date are noted, and future research needs are identified. Finally, research directions are proposed to effectively control HPC and opportunistic bacteria in bulk water and biofilms in WDS.

  4. Global abundance of planktonic heterotrophic protists in the deep ocean

    PubMed Central

    Pernice, Massimo C; Forn, Irene; Gomes, Ana; Lara, Elena; Alonso-Sáez, Laura; Arrieta, Jesus M; del Carmen Garcia, Francisca; Hernando-Morales, Victor; MacKenzie, Roy; Mestre, Mireia; Sintes, Eva; Teira, Eva; Valencia, Joaquin; Varela, Marta M; Vaqué, Dolors; Duarte, Carlos M; Gasol, Josep M; Massana, Ramon

    2015-01-01

    The dark ocean is one of the largest biomes on Earth, with critical roles in organic matter remineralization and global carbon sequestration. Despite its recognized importance, little is known about some key microbial players, such as the community of heterotrophic protists (HP), which are likely the main consumers of prokaryotic biomass. To investigate this microbial component at a global scale, we determined their abundance and biomass in deepwater column samples from the Malaspina 2010 circumnavigation using a combination of epifluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. HP were ubiquitously found at all depths investigated down to 4000 m. HP abundances decreased with depth, from an average of 72±19 cells ml−1 in mesopelagic waters down to 11±1 cells ml−1 in bathypelagic waters, whereas their total biomass decreased from 280±46 to 50±14 pg C ml−1. The parameters that better explained the variance of HP abundance were depth and prokaryote abundance, and to lesser extent oxygen concentration. The generally good correlation with prokaryotic abundance suggested active grazing of HP on prokaryotes. On a finer scale, the prokaryote:HP abundance ratio varied at a regional scale, and sites with the highest ratios exhibited a larger contribution of fungi molecular signal. Our study is a step forward towards determining the relationship between HP and their environment, unveiling their importance as players in the dark ocean's microbial food web. PMID:25290506

  5. Metabolic flux analysis of heterotrophic growth in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Nanette R.; Sengupta, Neelanjan; Morgan, John A.

    2017-01-01

    Despite the wealth of knowledge available for C. reinhardtii, the central metabolic fluxes of growth on acetate have not yet been determined. In this study, 13C-metabolic flux analysis (13C-MFA) was used to determine and quantify the metabolic pathways of primary metabolism in C. reinhardtii cells grown under heterotrophic conditions with acetate as the sole carbon source. Isotopic labeling patterns of compartment specific biomass derived metabolites were used to calculate the fluxes. It was found that acetate is ligated with coenzyme A in the three subcellular compartments (cytosol, mitochondria and plastid) included in the model. Two citrate synthases were found to potentially be involved in acetyl-coA metabolism; one localized in the mitochondria and the other acting outside the mitochondria. Labeling patterns demonstrate that Acetyl-coA synthesized in the plastid is directly incorporated in synthesis of fatty acids. Despite having a complete TCA cycle in the mitochondria, it was also found that a majority of the malate flux is shuttled to the cytosol and plastid where it is converted to oxaloacetate providing reducing equivalents to these compartments. When compared to predictions by flux balance analysis, fluxes measured with 13C-MFA were found to be suboptimal with respect to biomass yield; C. reinhardtii sacrifices biomass yield to produce ATP and reducing equivalents. PMID:28542252

  6. The potential of producing heterotrophic bacteria biomass on aquaculture waste.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Oliver; Sereti, Vasiliki; Machiels, Marcel A M; Eding, Ep H; Verreth, Johan A J

    2006-08-01

    The effluent from the drumfilter of a recirculation aquaculture system was used as substrate to produce heterotrophic bacteria in suspended growth reactors. The effects of organic carbon supplementation (0, 3, 6, 8 g/l sodium acetate) and of hydraulic retention times (11-1h) on bacteria biomass production and nutrient conversion were investigated. Bacteria production, expressed as volatile suspended solids (VSS), was enhanced by organic carbon supplementation, resulting in a production of 55-125 g VSS/kg fish feed (0.2-0.5 g VSS/g carbon). Maximum observed crude protein production was approximately 100 g protein/kg fish feed. The metabolic maintenance costs were 0.08 Cmol/Cmol h, and the maximum growth rate was 0.25-0.5 h(-1). Ninety percent of the inorganic nitrogenous and 80% of ortho-phosphate were converted. Producing bacteria on the drumfilter effluent results in additional protein retention and lowers overall nutrient discharge from recirculation aquaculture systems.

  7. Global abundance of planktonic heterotrophic protists in the deep ocean.

    PubMed

    Pernice, Massimo C; Forn, Irene; Gomes, Ana; Lara, Elena; Alonso-Sáez, Laura; Arrieta, Jesus M; del Carmen Garcia, Francisca; Hernando-Morales, Victor; MacKenzie, Roy; Mestre, Mireia; Sintes, Eva; Teira, Eva; Valencia, Joaquin; Varela, Marta M; Vaqué, Dolors; Duarte, Carlos M; Gasol, Josep M; Massana, Ramon

    2015-03-01

    The dark ocean is one of the largest biomes on Earth, with critical roles in organic matter remineralization and global carbon sequestration. Despite its recognized importance, little is known about some key microbial players, such as the community of heterotrophic protists (HP), which are likely the main consumers of prokaryotic biomass. To investigate this microbial component at a global scale, we determined their abundance and biomass in deepwater column samples from the Malaspina 2010 circumnavigation using a combination of epifluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. HP were ubiquitously found at all depths investigated down to 4000 m. HP abundances decreased with depth, from an average of 72±19 cells ml(-1) in mesopelagic waters down to 11±1 cells ml(-1) in bathypelagic waters, whereas their total biomass decreased from 280±46 to 50±14 pg C ml(-1). The parameters that better explained the variance of HP abundance were depth and prokaryote abundance, and to lesser extent oxygen concentration. The generally good correlation with prokaryotic abundance suggested active grazing of HP on prokaryotes. On a finer scale, the prokaryote:HP abundance ratio varied at a regional scale, and sites with the highest ratios exhibited a larger contribution of fungi molecular signal. Our study is a step forward towards determining the relationship between HP and their environment, unveiling their importance as players in the dark ocean's microbial food web.

  8. Polyhydroxyalkanoate production potential of heterotrophic bacteria in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Daisuke; Suzuki, Yuta; Uchida, Takahiro; Morohoshi, Jota; Sei, Kazunari

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) production potential of cultivable heterotrophic bacteria in activated sludge by genotypic and phenotypic characterizations. A total of 114 bacterial strains were isolated from four activated sludge samples taken from a lab-scale sequencing batch reactor and three wastewater treatment processes of two municipal wastewater treatment plants. PCR detection of the phaC genes encoding class I and II PHA synthase revealed that 15% of the total isolates possessed phaC genes, all of which had the closest similarities to known phaC genes of α- and β-Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria. PHA production experiments under aerobic and nitrogen-limited conditions showed that 68% of the total isolates were capable of producing PHA from at least one of the six substrates used (acetate, propionate, lactate, butyrate, glucose and glycerol). Genotypic and phenotypic characterizations revealed that 75% of the activated sludge bacteria had PHA production potential. Our results also indicated that short-chain fatty acids would be the preferable substrates for PHA production by activated sludge bacteria, and that there might be a variety of unidentified phaC genes in activated sludge.

  9. Hydrogen transfer between methanogens and fermentative heterotrophs in hyperthermophilic cocultures

    SciTech Connect

    Muralidharan, V.; Hirsh, I.S.; Bouwer, E.J.; Rinker, K.D.; Kelly, R.M.

    1997-11-05

    Interactions involving hydrogen transfer were studied in a coculture of two hyperthermophilic microorganisms: Thermotoga maritima, an anaerobic heterotroph, and Methanococcus jannaschii, a hydrogenotrophic methanogen. Cell densities of T. maritima increased 10-fold when cocultured with M. jannaschii at 85 C, and the methanogen was able to grow in the absence of externally supplied H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}. The coculture could not be established if the two organisms were physically separated by a dialysis membrane, suggesting the importance of spatial proximity. The significance of spatial proximity was also supported by cell cytometry, where the methanogen was only found in cell sorts at or above 4.5 {micro}m in samples of the coculture in exponential phase. An unstructured mathematical model was used to compare the influence of hydrogen transport and metabolic properties on mesophilic and hyperthermophilic cocultures. Calculations suggest the increases in methanogenesis rates with temperature result from greater interactions between the methanogenic and fermentative organisms, as evidenced by the sharp decline in H{sub 2} concentration in the proximity of a hyperthermophilic methanogen. The experimental and modeling results presented here illustrate the need to consider the interactions within hyperthermophilic consortia when choosing isolation strategies and evaluating biotransformations at elevated temperatures.

  10. Diversity of Heterotrophic Protists from Extremely Hypersaline Habitats.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong Soo; Simpson, Alastair G B

    2015-09-01

    Heterotrophic protists (protozoa) are a diverse but understudied component of the biota of extremely hypersaline environments, with few data on molecular diversity within halophile 'species', and almost nothing known of their biogeographic distribution. We have garnered SSU rRNA gene sequences for several clades of halophilic protozoa from enrichments from waters of >12.5% salinity from Australia, North America, and Europe (6 geographic sites, 25 distinct samples). The small stramenopile Halocafeteria was found at all sites, but phylogenies did not show clear geographic clustering. The ciliate Trimyema was recorded from 6 non-European samples. Phylogenies confirmed a monophyletic halophilic Trimyema group that included possible south-eastern Australian, Western Australian and North American clusters. Several halophilic Heterolobosea were detected, demonstrating that Pleurostomum contains at least three relatively distinct clades, and increasing known continental ranges for Tulamoeba peronaphora and Euplaesiobystra hypersalinica. The unclassified flagellate Palustrimonas, found in one Australian sample, proves to be a novel deep-branching alveolate. These results are consistent with a global distribution of halophilic protozoa groups (∼ morphospecies), but the Trimyema case suggests that is worth testing whether larger forms exhibit biogeographic phylogenetic substructure. The molecular detection/characterization of halophilic protozoa is still far from complete at the clade level, let alone the 'species level'. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Phenotypic plasticity in heterotrophic marine microbial communities in continuous cultures

    PubMed Central

    Beier, Sara; Rivers, Adam R; Moran, Mary Ann; Obernosterer, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity (PP) is the development of alternate phenotypes of a given taxon as an adaptation to environmental conditions. Methodological limitations have restricted the quantification of PP to the measurement of a few traits in single organisms. We used metatranscriptomic libraries to overcome these challenges and estimate PP using the expressed genes of multiple heterotrophic organisms as a proxy for traits in a microbial community. The metatranscriptomes captured the expression response of natural marine bacterial communities grown on differing carbon resource regimes in continuous cultures. We found that taxa with different magnitudes of PP coexisted in the same cultures, and that members of the order Rhodobacterales had the highest levels of PP. In agreement with previous studies, our results suggest that continuous culturing may have specifically selected for taxa featuring a rather high range of PP. On average, PP and abundance changes within a taxon contributed equally to the organism's change in functional gene abundance, implying that both PP and abundance mediated observed differences in community function. However, not all functional changes due to PP were directly reflected in the bulk community functional response: gene expression changes in individual taxa due to PP were partly masked by counterbalanced expression of the same gene in other taxa. This observation demonstrates that PP had a stabilizing effect on a community's functional response to environmental change. PMID:25397947

  12. Colony stage and not facultative policing explains pattern of worker reproduction in the Saxon wasp.

    PubMed

    Bonckaert, W; van Zweden, J S; d'Ettorre, P; Billen, J; Wenseleers, T

    2011-08-01

    Inclusive fitness theory predicts that in colonies of social Hymenoptera headed by a multiple-mated queen, workers should benefit from policing eggs laid by other workers. Foster & Ratnieks provided evidence that in the vespine wasp Dolichovespula saxonica, workers police other workers' eggs only in colonies headed by a multiple-mated queen, but not in those headed by a single-mated one. This conclusion, however, was based on a relatively small sample size, and the original study did not control for possible confounding variables such as the seasonal colony progression of the nests. Our aim, therefore, was to reinvestigate whether or not facultative worker policing occurs in D. saxonica. Remarkably, our data show that in the studied Danish population, there was no correlation between worker-worker relatedness and the percentage of worker-derived males. In addition, we show that variability in cuticular hydrocarbon profiles among the workers did not significantly correlate with relatedness and that workers therefore probably did not have sufficient information on queen mating frequency from the workers' cuticular hydrocarbon profiles. Hence, there was no evidence that workers facultatively policed other workers' eggs in response to queen mating frequency. Nevertheless, our data do show that the seasonal progression of the nest and the location in which the males were reared both explain the patterns of worker reproduction found. Overall, our results suggest that the earlier evidence for facultative worker policing in D. saxonica may have been caused by accidental correlations with certain confounding variables, or, alternatively, that there are large interpopulation differences in the expression of worker policing. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Two Host Clades, Two Bacterial Arsenals: Evolution through Gene Losses in Facultative Endosymbionts

    PubMed Central

    Rollat-Farnier, Pierre-Antoine; Santos-Garcia, Diego; Rao, Qiong; Sagot, Marie-France; Silva, Francisco J.; Henri, Hélène; Zchori-Fein, Einat; Latorre, Amparo; Moya, Andrés; Barbe, Valérie; Liu, Shu-Sheng; Wang, Xiao-Wei; Vavre, Fabrice; Mouton, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial endosymbiosis is an important evolutionary process in insects, which can harbor both obligate and facultative symbionts. The evolution of these symbionts is driven by evolutionary convergence, and they exhibit among the tiniest genomes in prokaryotes. The large host spectrum of facultative symbionts and the high diversity of strategies they use to infect new hosts probably impact the evolution of their genome and explain why they undergo less severe genomic erosion than obligate symbionts. Candidatus Hamiltonella defensa is suitable for the investigation of the genomic evolution of facultative symbionts because the bacteria are engaged in specific relationships in two clades of insects. In aphids, H. defensa is found in several species with an intermediate prevalence and confers protection against parasitoids. In whiteflies, H. defensa is almost fixed in some species of Bemisia tabaci, which suggests an important role of and a transition toward obligate symbiosis. In this study, comparisons of the genome of H. defensa present in two B. tabaci species (Middle East Asia Minor 1 and Mediterranean) and in the aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum revealed that they belong to two distinct clades and underwent specific gene losses. In aphids, it contains highly virulent factors that could allow protection and horizontal transfers. In whiteflies, the genome lost these factors and seems to have a limited ability to acquire genes. However it contains genes that could be involved in the production of essential nutrients, which is consistent with a primordial role for this symbiont. In conclusion, although both lineages of H. defensa have mutualistic interactions with their hosts, their genomes follow distinct evolutionary trajectories that reflect their phenotype and could have important consequences on their evolvability. PMID:25714744

  14. Nutrients stimulate leaf breakdown rates and detritivore biomass: bottom-up effects via heterotrophic pathways.

    Treesearch

    Jennifer L. Greenwood; Amy D. Rosemond; J. Bruce Wallace; Wyatt F. Cross; Holly S. Weyers

    2009-01-01

    Most nutrient enrichment studies in aquatic systems have focused on autotrophic food webs in systems where primary producers dominate the resource base. We tested the heterotrophic response to long-...

  15. Screening, growth medium optimisation and heterotrophic cultivation of microalgae for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zongchao; Liu, Ying; Daroch, Maurycy; Geng, Shu; Cheng, Jay J

    2014-08-01

    This article presents a study on screening of microalgal strains from the Peking University Algae Collection and heterotrophic cultivation for biodiesel production of a selected microalgal strain. Among 89 strains, only five were capable of growing under heterotrophic conditions in liquid cultures and Chlorella sp. PKUAC 102 was found the best for the production of heterotrophic algal biodiesel. Composition of the growth medium was optimised using response surface methodology and optimised growth conditions were successfully used for cultivation of the strain in a fermentor. Conversion of algal lipids to fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) showed that the lipid profile of the heterotrophically cultivated Chlorella sp. PKUAC 102 contains fatty acids suitable for biodiesel production.

  16. RARE OCCURRENCE OF HETEROTROPHIC BACTERIA WITH PATHOGENIC POTENTIAL IN POTABLE WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since the discovery of Legionella pneumophila, an opportunistic pathogen that is indigenous to water, microbiologists have speculated that there may be other opportunistic pathogens among the numerous heterotrophic bacteria found in potable water. The USEPA developed a series of...

  17. RARE OCCURRENCE OF HETEROTROPHIC BACTERIA WITH PATHOGENIC POTENTIAL IN POTABLE WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since the discovery of Legionella pneumophila, an opportunistic pathogen that is indigenous to water, microbiologists have speculated that there may be other opportunistic pathogens among the numerous heterotrophic bacteria found in potable water. The USEPA developed a series of...

  18. Heterotrophic bacterial activities and treatment performance of surface flow constructed wetlands receiving woodwaste leachate.

    PubMed

    Tao, Wendong; Hall, Ken J; Duff, Sheldon J B

    2006-07-01

    Heterotrophic activities were investigated by measuring 3H-leucine incorporation to bacterial protein and 14C-glucose turnover in surface flow constructed wetlands receiving woodwaste leachate. No significant longitudinal variation was found in heterotrophic activities of bacterioplankton. An open wetland, a vegetated wetland, and a fertilized vegetated wetland were used to examine the effects of vegetation and ammonium nitrate amendment. There was not a significant difference in treatment performance among the three wetlands, except for a significant pH increase and more efficient volatile fatty acids removal in the fertilized wetland. The fertilized wetland had the highest leucine incorporation rate and shortest glucose turnover time accompanied by the lowest glucose mineralization percentage, followed by the open wetland, then the vegetated wetland. Planktonic and sedimentary bacteria contributed to the majority of the total heterotrophic activities; epiphytic bacteria played a minor role. Heterotrophic activities were influenced by the availability of nutrient, electron acceptor, and organic substrate.

  19. Anaerobic facultative bacteria isolated from the gut of rabbits fed different diets.

    PubMed

    Canganella, F; Zirletta, G; Gualterio, L; Massa, S; Trovatelli, L D

    1992-11-01

    Anaerobic facultative bacteria colonizing the intestinal tract of conventional rabbits fed three different diets (standard pellet, hay and pellet/hay mixture) were enumerated in brain heart infusion agar. Colony counts recovered from homogenized samples of small intestine, caecum and rectum differed with reference to the diet given. Among anaerobic groups, identified from rabbit fed pellet/hay mixture, Enterococci (E. faecalis, E. avium, E. faecium and E. durans) represented the predominant flora. Enterobacters (E. cloacae and E. aerogenes) accounted for about 10 to 25% of the bacteria in the rectum and colon respectively, whereas Staphylococci (S. intermedius, S. epidermidis and S. lentus) represented 11% of the bacteria isolated from colon.

  20. Mal de Meleda: recessive transgressive palmoplantar keratoderma with three unusual facultative features.

    PubMed

    Lestringant, G G; Hadi, S M; Qayed, K I; Blayney, B J

    1992-01-01

    Mal de Meleda (keratoderma palmoplantaris transgrediens) is a rare autosomal recessive form of palmoplantar keratoderma characterized by hyperkeratosis of the palms and soles which appears soon after birth and progressively (progrediens) involves other areas (transgrediens) of the body skin. We report the case of a patient with mal de Meleda with three unusual facultative features, i.e. prominent knuckle pads, peculiar finger-nail anomalies and pseudo-ainhum on both fifth fingers. Four other members of the family are also affected by mal de Meleda.

  1. Production of the neurotoxin BMAA by a marine cyanobacterium.

    PubMed

    Banack, Sandra Anne; Johnson, Holly E; Cheng, Ran; Cox, Paul Alan

    2007-12-06

    Diverse species of cyanobacteria have recently been discovered to produce the neurotoxic non-protein amino acid beta-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA). In Guam, BMAA has been studied as a possible environmental toxin in the diets of indigenous Chamorro people known to have high levels of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/ Parkinsonism Dementia Complex (ALS/PDC). BMAA has been found to accumulate in brain tissues of patients with progressive neurodegenerative illness in North America. In Guam, BMAA was found to be produced by endosymbiotic cyanobacteria of the genus Nostoc which live in specialized cycad roots. We here report detection of BMAA in laboratory cultures of a free-living marine species of Nostoc. We successfully detected BMAA in this marine species of Nostoc with five different methods: HPLC-FD, UPLC-UV, Amino Acid Analyzer, LC/MS, and Triple Quadrupole LC/MS/MS. This consensus of five different analytical methods unequivocally demonstrates the presence of BMAA in this marine cyanobacterium. Since protein-associated BMAA can accumulate in increasing levels within food chains, it is possible that biomagnification of BMAA could occur in marine ecosystems similar to the biomagnification of BMAA in terrestrial ecosystems. Production of BMAA by marine cyanobacteria may represent another route of human exposure to BMAA. Since BMAA at low concentrations causes the death of motor neurons, low levels of BMAA exposure may trigger motor neuron disease in genetically vulnerable individuals.

  2. Export of Extracellular Polysaccharides Modulates Adherence of the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, ML; Allen, R; Luo, YQ; Curtiss, R

    2013-09-10

    The field of cyanobacterial biofuel production is advancing rapidly, yet we know little of the basic biology of these organisms outside of their photosynthetic pathways. We aimed to gain a greater understanding of how the cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803 (Synechocystis, hereafter) modulates its cell surface. Such understanding will allow for the creation of mutants that autoflocculate in a regulated way, thus avoiding energy intensive centrifugation in the creation of biofuels. We constructed mutant strains lacking genes predicted to function in carbohydrate transport or synthesis. Strains with gene deletions of slr0977 (predicted to encode a permease component of an ABC transporter), slr0982 (predicted to encode an ATP binding component of an ABC transporter) and slr1610 (predicted to encode a methyltransferase) demonstrated flocculent phenotypes and increased adherence to glass. Upon bioinformatic inspection, the gene products of slr0977, slr0982, and slr1610 appear to function in O-antigen (OAg) transport and synthesis. However, the analysis provided here demonstrated no differences between OAg purified from wild-type and mutants. However, exopolysaccharides (EPS) purified from mutants were altered in composition when compared to wild-type. Our data suggest that there are multiple means to modulate the cell surface of Synechocystis by disrupting different combinations of ABC transporters and/or glycosyl transferases. Further understanding of these mechanisms may allow for the development of industrially and ecologically useful strains of cyanobacteria. Additionally, these data imply that many cyanobacterial gene products may possess as-yet undiscovered functions, and are meritorious of further study.

  3. Ribulose diphosphate carboxylase of the cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis

    SciTech Connect

    Terekhova, I.V.; Chernyad'ev, I.I.; Doman, N.G.

    1986-11-20

    The ribulose diphosphate (RDP) carboxylase activity of the cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis is represented by two peaks when a cell homogenate is centrifuged in a sucrose density gradient. In the case of differential centrifugation (40,000 g, 1 h), the activity of the enzyme was distributed between the supernatant liquid (soluble form) and the precipitate (carboxysomal form). From the soluble fraction, in which 80-95% of the total activity of the enzyme is concentrated, electrophoretically homogeneous RDP carboxylase was isolated by precipitation with ammonium sulfate and centrifugation in a sucrose density gradient. The purified enzyme possessed greater electrophoretic mobility in comparison with the RDP carboxylase of beans Vicia faba. The molecular weight of the enzyme, determined by gel filtration, was 450,000. The enzyme consists of monotypic subunits with a molecular weight of 53,000. The small subunits were not detected in electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gel in the presence of SDS after fixation and staining of the gels by various methods.

  4. Sucrose secreted by the engineered cyanobacterium and its fermentability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Yangkai; Luo, Quan; Liang, Feiyan; Lu, Xuefeng

    2016-10-01

    The unicellular cyanobacterium, Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 (Syn7942), synthesizes sucrose as the only compatible solute under salt stress. A series of engineered Syn7942 strains for sucrose production were constructed. The overexpression of the native sps (encoding a natively fused protein of sucrose phosphate synthase SPS and sucrose phosphate phosphatase SPP) in Syn7942 wild type caused a 93% improvement of sucrose productivity. The strain FL130 co-overexpressing sps and cscB (encoding a sucrose transporter) exhibited a 74% higher extracellular sucrose production than that overexpressing cscB only. Both results showed the significant improvement of sucrose productivity by the double functional protein SPS-SPP. Afterwards, FL130 was cultivated under a modified condition, and the cell-free culture medium containing 1.5 g L-1 sucrose was pre-treated with an acid hydrolysis technique. Cultivated with the neutralized hydrolysates as the starting media, two widely used microorganisms, Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, showed a comparable growth with that in the control media supplemented with glucose. These results clearly demonstrated that the cell-free culture of sucrose-secreting cyanobacteria can be applied as starting media in microbial cultivation.

  5. Construction of a cyanobacterium synthesizing cyclopropane fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Machida, Shuntaro; Shiraiwa, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Iwane

    2016-09-01

    Microalgae have received much attention as a next-generation source of biomass energy. However, most of the fatty acids (FAs) from microalgae are multiply unsaturated; thus, the biofuels derived from them are fluid, but vulnerable to oxidation. In this study, we attempted to synthesize cyclopropane FAs in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 by expressing the cfa gene for cyclopropane FA synthase from Escherichia coli with the aim of producing FAs that are fluid and stable in response to oxidization. We successfully synthesized cyclopropane FAs in Synechocystis with a yield of ~30% of total FAs. Growth of the transformants was altered, particularly at low temperatures, but photosynthesis and respiration were not significantly affected. C16:1(∆9) synthesis in the desA(-)/desD(-) strain by expression of the desC2 gene for sn-2 specific ∆9 desaturase positively affected growth at low temperatures via promotion of various cellular processes, with the exceptions of photosynthesis and respiration. Estimation of the apparent activities of desaturases suggested that some acyl-lipid desaturases might recognize the lipid side chain.

  6. Crassulacean acid metabolism and fitness under water deficit stress: if not for carbon gain, what is facultative CAM good for?

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Ana

    2009-01-01

    Background In obligate Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM), up to 99 % of CO2 assimilation occurs during the night, therefore supporting the hypothesis that CAM is adaptive because it allows CO2 fixation during the part of the day with lower evaporative demand, making life in water-limited environments possible. By comparison, in facultative CAM (inducible CAM, C3-CAM) and CAM-cycling plants drought-induced dark CO2 fixation may only be, with few exceptions, a small proportion of C3 CO2 assimilation in watered plants and occur during a few days. From the viewpoint of survival the adaptive advantages, i.e. increased fitness, of facultative CAM and CAM-cycling are not obvious. Therefore, it is hypothesized that, if it is to increase fitness, CAM must aid in reproduction. Scope An examination of published reports of 23 facultative CAM and CAM-cycling species finds that, in 19 species, drought-induced dark CO2 fixation represents on average 11 % of C3 CO2 assimilation of watered plants. Evidence is discussed on the impact of the operation of CAM in facultative and CAM-cycling plants on their survival – carbon balance, water conservation, water absorption, photo-protection of the photosynthetic apparatus – and reproductive effort. It is concluded that in some species, but not all, facultative and cycling CAM contribute, rather than to increase carbon balance, to increase water-use efficiency, water absorption, prevention of photoinhibition and reproductive output. PMID:18708641

  7. Heterotrophic-autotrophic sequential system for reductive nitrate and perchlorate removal.

    PubMed

    Ucar, Deniz; Cokgor, Emine Ubay; Sahinkaya, Erkan

    2016-01-01

    Nitrate and perchlorate were identified as significant water contaminants all over the world. This study aims at evaluating the performances of the heterotrophic-autotrophic sequential denitrification process for reductive nitrate and perchlorate removal from drinking water. The reduced nitrate concentration in the heterotrophic reactor increased with increasing methanol concentrations and the remaining nitrate/nitrite was further removed in the following autotrophic denitrifying process. The performances of the sequential process were studied under varying nitrate loads of [Formula: see text] at a fixed hydraulic retention time of 2 h. The C/N ratio in the heterotrophic reactor varied between 1.24 and 2.77 throughout the study. Nitrate and perchlorate reduced completely with maximum initial concentrations of [Formula: see text] and 1000 µg/L, respectively. The maximum denitrification rate for the heterotrophic reactor was [Formula: see text] when the bioreactor was fed with [Formula: see text] and 277 mg/L methanol. For the autotrophic reactor, the highest denitrification rate was [Formula: see text] in the first period when the heterotrophic reactor performance was low. Perchlorate reduction was initiated in the heterotrophic reactor, but completed in the following autotrophic process. Effluent sulphate concentration was below the drinking water standard level of 250 mg/L and pH was in the neutral level.

  8. Growth, feeding and ecological roles of the mixotrophic and heterotrophic dinoflagellates in marine planktonic food webs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hae Jin; Yoo, Yeong Du; Kim, Jae Seong; Seong, Kyeong Ah; Kang, Nam Seon; Kim, Tae Hoon

    2010-06-01

    Planktonic mixotrophic and heterotrophic dinoflagellates are ubiquitous protists and often abundant in marine environments. Recently many phototrophic dinoflagellate species have been revealed to be mixotrophic organisms and also it is suggested that most dinoflagellates may be mixotrophic or heterotrophic protists. The mixotrophic and heterotrophic dinoflagellates are able to feed on diverse prey items including bacteria, picoeukaryotes, nanoflagellates, diatoms, other dinoflagellates, heterotrophic protists, and metazoans due to their diverse feeding mechanisms. In turn they are ingested by many kinds of predators. Thus, the roles of the dinoflagellates in marine planktonic food webs are very diverse. The present paper reviewed the kind of prey which mixotrophic and heterotrophic dinoflagellates are able to feed on, feeding mechanisms, growth and ingestion rates of dinoflagellates, grazing impact by dinoflagellate predators on natural prey populations, predators on dinoflagellates, and red tides dominated by dinoflagellates. Based on this information, we suggested a new marine planktonic food web focusing on mixotrophic and heterotrophic dinoflagellates and provided an insight on the roles of dinoflagellates in the food web.

  9. Bacterial Diversity in a Nonsaline Alkaline Environment: Heterotrophic Aerobic Populations

    PubMed Central

    Tiago, Igor; Chung, Ana Paula; Veríssimo, António

    2004-01-01

    Heterotrophic populations were isolated and characterized from an alkaline groundwater environment generated by active serpentinization, which results in a Ca(OH)2-enriched, extremely diluted groundwater with pH 11.4. One hundred eighty-five strains were isolated in different media at different pH values during two sampling periods. To assess the degree of diversity present in the environment and to select representative strains for further characterization of the populations, we screened the isolates by using random amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR profiles and grouped them based on similarities determined by fatty acid methyl ester analysis. Phenotypic characterization, determinations of G+C content, phylogenetic analyses by direct sequencing of 16S rRNA genes, and determinations of pH tolerance were performed with the selected isolates. Although 38 different populations were identified and characterized, the vast majority of the isolates were gram positive with high G+C contents and were affiliated with three distinct groups, namely, strains closely related to the species Dietzia natrolimnae (32% of the isolates), to Frigoribacterium/Clavibacter lineages (29% of the isolates), and to the type strain of Microbacterium kitamiense (20% of the isolates). Other isolates were phylogenetically related to strains of the genera Agrococcus, Leifsonia, Kytococcus, Janibacter, Kocuria, Rothia, Nesterenkonia, Citrococcus, Micrococcus, Actinomyces, Rhodococcus, Bacillus, and Staphylococcus. Only five isolates were gram negative: one was related to the Sphingobacteria lineage and the other four were related to the α-Proteobacteria lineage. Despite the pH of the environment, the vast majority of the populations were alkali tolerant, and only two strains were able to grow at pH 11. PMID:15574939

  10. Surface production fuels deep heterotrophic respiration in northern peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elizabeth Corbett, J.; Burdige, David J.; Tfaily, Malak M.; Dial, Angela R.; Cooper, William T.; Glaser, Paul H.; Chanton, Jeffrey P.

    2013-12-01

    Multiple analyses of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from pore waters were conducted to define the processes that govern carbon balance in peatlands: (1) source, reactivity, and transport of DOC with respect to vegetation, peat, and age of carbon substrate, (2) reactivity of DOC with respect to molecular size, and (3) lability to photoxidation of surficial DOC. We found that surface organic production fuels heterotrophic respiration at depth in advection-dominated peatlands, especially in fens. Fen DOC was Δ14C enriched relative to the surrounding fen peat, and fen respiration products were similar to this enriched DOC indicating that DOC was the main microbial substrate. Bog DOC was more variable showing either enrichment in ∆14C at depth or ∆14C values that follow peat values. This variability in bogs is probably controlled by the relative importance of vertical transport of labile carbon substrates within the peat profile versus DOC production from bog peat. These results extended our set of observations to 10 years at one bog-fen pair and add two additional bog-fen pairs to our series of observations. Anaerobic incubations of peat, rinsed free of residual DOC, produced DOC and respiration products that were strikingly similar to the peat values in a bog and two fens. This result demonstrated conclusively that downward advection is the process responsible for the presence of modern DOC found at depth in the peat column. Fen DOC has lower C/N values and up to twice as much LMW (<1 kDa) DOC as bogs due to differences in organic inputs and greater microbial processing. Fluorescence irradiation experiments showed that fen DOC is more photolabile than bog DOC.

  11. Pathogenic Leptospira interrogans Exoproteins Are Primarily Involved in Heterotrophic Processes

    PubMed Central

    Eshghi, Azad; Pappalardo, Elisa; Hester, Svenja; Thomas, Benjamin; Pretre, Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a life-threatening and emerging zoonotic disease with a worldwide annual occurrence of more than 1 million cases. Leptospirosis is caused by spirochetes belonging to the genus Leptospira. The mechanisms of disease manifestation in the host remain elusive, and the roles of leptospiral exoproteins in these processes have yet to be determined. Our aim in this study was to assess the composition and quantity of exoproteins of pathogenic Leptospira interrogans and to construe how these proteins contribute to disease pathogenesis. Label-free quantitative mass spectrometry of proteins obtained from Leptospira spirochetes cultured in vitro under conditions mimicking infection identified 325 exoproteins. The majority of these proteins are conserved in the nonpathogenic species Leptospira biflexa, and proteins involved in metabolism and energy-generating functions were overrepresented and displayed the highest relative abundance in culture supernatants. Conversely, proteins of unknown function, which represent the majority of pathogen-specific proteins (presumably involved in virulence mechanisms), were underrepresented. Characterization of various L. interrogans exoprotein mutants in the animal infection model revealed host mortality rates similar to those of hosts infected with wild-type L. interrogans. Collectively, these results indicate that pathogenic Leptospira exoproteins primarily function in heterotrophic processes (the processes by which organisms utilize organic substances as nutrient sources) to maintain the saprophytic lifestyle rather than the virulence of the bacteria. The underrepresentation of proteins homologous to known virulence factors, such as toxins and effectors in the exoproteome, also suggests that disease manifesting from Leptospira infection is likely caused by a combination of the primary and potentially moonlight functioning of exoproteins. PMID:25987703

  12. Facultative Vivipary is a Life-History Trait in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianjun; Caswell-Chen, Edward P.

    2004-01-01

    Organisms partition their resources among growth, maintenance, and reproduction and, when resources become limiting, the allocation to one process necessitates reduced allocation to others. When starved, Caenorhabditis elegans adults retain progeny internally which then consume the parent body contents, and some of those larvae use the resources to reach the resistant, long-lived dauer stage. If starved under similarly extreme conditions, larvae from eggs laid outside of the body are unable to develop into dauers. We interpret this switch from ovipary, or laying eggs, to bearing live young as facultative vivipary. This switch is induced by starvation of late fourth-stage larvae, young adults, or gravid adults. In C. elegans, vivipary is the altruistic allocation of all available parental energy and nutrients to progeny, with the associated costs to adult hermaphrodites of truncated life span and fecundity. As a life-history trait, facultative vivipary is a survival-enhancing response to stress that may provide insights into the evolution of reproduction and longevity. PMID:19262794

  13. Culturable aerobic and facultative bacteria from the gut of the polyphagic dung beetle Thorectes lusitanicus.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Noemi; Escudero, José A; San Millán, Álvaro; González-Zorn, Bruno; Lobo, Jorge M; Verdú, José R; Suárez, Mónica

    2015-04-01

    Unlike other dung beetles, the Iberian geotrupid, Thorectes lusitanicus, exhibits polyphagous behavior; for example, it is able to eat acorns, fungi, fruits, and carrion in addition to the dung of different mammals. This adaptation to digest a wider diet has physiological and developmental advantages and requires key changes in the composition and diversity of the beetle's gut microbiota. In this study, we isolated aerobic, facultative anaerobic, and aerotolerant microbiota amenable to grow in culture from the gut contents of T. lusitanicus and resolved isolate identity to the species level by sequencing 16S rRNA gene fragments. Using BLAST similarity searches and maximum likelihood phylogenetic analyses, we were able to reveal that the analyzed fraction (culturable, aerobic, facultative anaerobic, and aerotolerant) of beetle gut microbiota is dominated by the phyla Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Actinobacteria. Among Proteobacteria, members of the order Enterobacteriales (Gammaproteobacteria) were the most abundant. The main functions associated with the bacteria found in the gut of T. lusitanicus would likely include nitrogen fixation, denitrification, detoxification, and diverse defensive roles against pathogens.

  14. The Facultative Symbiont Rickettsia Protects an Invasive Whitefly against Entomopathogenic Pseudomonas syringae Strains

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Martha S.; Baltrus, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Facultative endosymbionts can benefit insect hosts in a variety of ways, including context-dependent roles, such as providing defense against pathogens. The role of some symbionts in defense may be overlooked, however, when pathogen infection is transient, sporadic, or asymptomatic. The facultative endosymbiont Rickettsia increases the fitness of the sweet potato whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) in some populations through mechanisms that are not yet understood. In this study, we investigated the role of Rickettsia in mediating the interaction between the sweet potato whitefly and Pseudomonas syringae, a common environmental bacterium, some strains of which are pathogenic to aphids. Our results show that P. syringae multiplies within whiteflies, leading to host death, and that whiteflies infected with Rickettsia show a decreased rate of death due to P. syringae. Experiments using plants coated with P. syringae confirmed that whiteflies can acquire the bacteria at a low rate while feeding, leading to increased mortality, particularly when the whiteflies are not infected with Rickettsia. These results suggest that P. syringae may affect whitefly populations in nature and that Rickettsia can ameliorate this effect. This study highlights the possible importance of interactions among opportunistic environmental pathogens and endosymbionts of insects. PMID:25217020

  15. Growth of the facultative anaerobes from Antarctica, Alaska, and Patagonia at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2004-11-01

    Psychrotolerance, as an adaptation for surviving in extreme environments, is widespread among mesophilic microorganisms. Physico-chemical factors such as pressure, red-ox potential, pH and salinity could significantly alter the features of ecosystems by providing liquid water at subzero temperatures. Furthermore, organisms can respond to temperature changes by several known mechanisms, including changing the conformation capacities of constitutional proteins or by the synthesis of mucopolysaccharides around the cell wall and membrane. Such protective mechanisms make it possible for cells to not only passively survive low temperatures in a state of anabiosis, but also to be capable of actively metabolizing substrates and reproducing normally. The physiological and biochemical characteristics of the species, as well as genetics, could be remarkably changed due to adaptation and surviving in extreme environments. The cold shock genes of some of the studied strains of psychrotolerant facultative anaerobes were reported previously. In this paper we present experimental data for psychrotolerant, non spore-forming, facultative anaerobes isolated from geographically different cold regions of our planet. We show the growth response on changing from anaerobic conditions to aerobic with cultivation at low temperatures.

  16. The vocal repertoire in a solitary foraging carnivore, Cynictis penicillata, may reflect facultative sociality.

    PubMed

    Le Roux, Aliza; Cherry, Michael I; Manser, Marta B

    2009-05-01

    We describe the vocal repertoire of a facultatively social carnivore, the yellow mongoose, Cynictis penicillata. Using a combination of close-range observations, recordings and experiments with simulated predators, we were able to obtain clear descriptions of call structure and function for a wide range of calls used by this herpestid. The vocal repertoire of the yellow mongooses comprised ten call types, half of which were used in appeasing or fearful contexts and half in aggressive interactions. Data from this study suggest that the yellow mongoose uses an urgency-based alarm calling system, indicating high and low urgency through two distinct call types. Compared to solitary mongooses, the yellow mongoose has a large proportion of 'friendly' vocalisations that enhance group cohesion, but its vocal repertoire is smaller and less context-specific than those of obligate social species. This study of the vocal repertoire of the yellow mongoose is, to our knowledge, the most complete to have been conducted on a facultatively social species in its natural habitat.

  17. The vocal repertoire in a solitary foraging carnivore, Cynictis penicillata, may reflect facultative sociality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Roux, Aliza; Cherry, Michael I.; Manser, Marta B.

    2009-05-01

    We describe the vocal repertoire of a facultatively social carnivore, the yellow mongoose, Cynictis penicillata. Using a combination of close-range observations, recordings and experiments with simulated predators, we were able to obtain clear descriptions of call structure and function for a wide range of calls used by this herpestid. The vocal repertoire of the yellow mongooses comprised ten call types, half of which were used in appeasing or fearful contexts and half in aggressive interactions. Data from this study suggest that the yellow mongoose uses an urgency-based alarm calling system, indicating high and low urgency through two distinct call types. Compared to solitary mongooses, the yellow mongoose has a large proportion of ‘friendly’ vocalisations that enhance group cohesion, but its vocal repertoire is smaller and less context-specific than those of obligate social species. This study of the vocal repertoire of the yellow mongoose is, to our knowledge, the most complete to have been conducted on a facultatively social species in its natural habitat.

  18. Glucose transporter 1-positive endothelial cells in infantile hemangioma exhibit features of facultative stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lan; Nakayama, Hironao; Klagsbrun, Michael; Mulliken, John B.; Bischoff, Joyce

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) is a definitive and diagnostic marker for infantile hemangioma (IH), a vascular tumor of infancy. To date, GLUT1-positive endothelial cells in IH have not been quantified nor directly isolated and studied. We isolated GLUT1-positive and GLUT1-negative endothelial cells from IH specimens and characterized their proliferation, differentiation and response to propranolol, a first-line therapy for IH, and to rapamycin, an mTOR pathway inhibitor used to treat an increasingly wide array of proliferative disorders. Although freshly isolated GLUT1-positive cells, selected using anti-GLUT1 magnetic beads, expressed endothelial markers CD31, VE-Cadherin and VEGFR2, they converted to a mesenchymal phenotype after three weeks in culture. In contrast, GLUT1-negative endothelial cells exhibited a stable endothelial phenotype in vitro. GLUT1-selected cells were clonogenic when plated as single cells and could be induced to re-differentiate into endothelial cells, or into pericyte/smooth muscle cells or into adipocytes, indicating a stem cell-like phenotype. These data demonstrate that, although they appear and function in the tumor as bona fide endothelial cells, the GLUT1-positive endothelial cells display properties of facultative stem cells. Pretreatment with rapamycin for 4 days significantly slowed proliferation of GLUT1-selected cells, whereas propranolol pretreatment had no effect. These results reveal for the first time the facultative nature of GLUT1-positive endothelial cells in infantile hemangioma. PMID:25187207

  19. No facultative worker policing in the honey bee (Apis mellifera L.).

    PubMed

    Loope, Kevin J; Seeley, Thomas D; Mattila, Heather R

    2013-05-01

    Kin selection theory predicts that in colonies of social Hymenoptera with multiply mated queens, workers should mutually inhibit ("police") worker reproduction, but that in colonies with singly mated queens, workers should favor rearing workers' sons instead of queens' sons. In line with these predictions, Mattila et al. (Curr Biol 22:2027-2031, 2012) documented increased ovary development among workers in colonies of honey bees with singly mated queens, suggesting that workers can detect and respond adaptively to queen mating frequency and raising the possibility that they facultative police. In a follow-up experiment, we test and reject the hypothesis that workers in single-patriline colonies prefer worker-derived males and are able to reproduce directly; we show that their eggs are policed as strongly as those of workers in colonies with multiply mated queens. Evidently, workers do not respond facultatively to a kin structure that favors relaxed policing and increased direct reproduction. These workers may instead be responding to a poor queen or preparing for possible queen loss.

  20. Genome characteristics of facultatively symbiotic Frankia sp. strains reflect host range and host plant biogeography

    PubMed Central

    Normand, Philippe; Lapierre, Pascal; Tisa, Louis S.; Gogarten, Johann Peter; Alloisio, Nicole; Bagnarol, Emilie; Bassi, Carla A.; Berry, Alison M.; Bickhart, Derek M.; Choisne, Nathalie; Couloux, Arnaud; Cournoyer, Benoit; Cruveiller, Stephane; Daubin, Vincent; Demange, Nadia; Francino, Maria Pilar; Goltsman, Eugene; Huang, Ying; Kopp, Olga R.; Labarre, Laurent; Lapidus, Alla; Lavire, Celine; Marechal, Joelle; Martinez, Michele; Mastronunzio, Juliana E.; Mullin, Beth C.; Niemann, James; Pujic, Pierre; Rawnsley, Tania; Rouy, Zoe; Schenowitz, Chantal; Sellstedt, Anita; Tavares, Fernando; Tomkins, Jeffrey P.; Vallenet, David; Valverde, Claudio; Wall, Luis G.; Wang, Ying; Medigue, Claudine; Benson, David R.

    2007-01-01

    Soil bacteria that also form mutualistic symbioses in plants encounter two major levels of selection. One occurs during adaptation to and survival in soil, and the other occurs in concert with host plant speciation and adaptation. Actinobacteria from the genus Frankia are facultative symbionts that form N2-fixing root nodules on diverse and globally distributed angiosperms in the “actinorhizal” symbioses. Three closely related clades of Frankia sp. strains are recognized; members of each clade infect a subset of plants from among eight angiosperm families. We sequenced the genomes from three strains; their sizes varied from 5.43 Mbp for a narrow host range strain (Frankia sp. strain HFPCcI3) to 7.50 Mbp for a medium host range strain (Frankia alni strain ACN14a) to 9.04 Mbp for a broad host range strain (Frankia sp. strain EAN1pec.) This size divergence is the largest yet reported for such closely related soil bacteria (97.8%–98.9% identity of 16S rRNA genes). The extent of gene deletion, duplication, and acquisition is in concert with the biogeographic history of the symbioses and host plant speciation. Host plant isolation favored genome contraction, whereas host plant diversification favored genome expansion. The results support the idea that major genome expansions as well as reductions can occur in facultative symbiotic soil bacteria as they respond to new environments in the context of their symbioses. PMID:17151343

  1. Facultative mimicry: cues for colour change and colour accuracy in a coral reef fish

    PubMed Central

    Cheney, Karen L; Grutter, Alexandra S; Marshall, N. Justin

    2007-01-01

    Mimetic species evolve colours and body patterns to closely resemble poisonous species and thus avoid predation (Batesian mimicry), or resemble beneficial or harmless species in order to approach and attack prey (aggressive mimicry). Facultative mimicry, the ability to switch between mimic and non-mimic colours at will, is uncommon in the animal kingdom, but has been shown in a cephalopod, and recently in a marine fish, the bluestriped fangblenny Plagiotremus rhinorhynchos, an aggressive mimic of the juvenile cleaner fish Labroides dimidiatus. Here we demonstrate for the first time that fangblennies adopted mimic colours in the presence of juvenile cleaner fish; however, this only occurred in smaller individuals. Field data indicated that when juvenile cleaner fish were abundant, the proportion of mimic to non-mimic fangblennies was greater, suggesting that fangblennies adopt their mimic disguise depending on the availability of cleaner fish. Finally, measurements of spectral reflectance suggest that not only do mimic fangblennies accurately resemble the colour of their cleaner fish models but also mimic other species of fish that they associate with. This study provides insights into the cues that control this remarkable facultative mimicry system and qualitatively measures its accuracy. PMID:17986437

  2. Egg energetics, fertilization kinetics, and population structure in echinoids with facultatively feeding larvae.

    PubMed

    Zigler, Kirk S; Lessios, H A; Raff, Rudolf A

    2008-10-01

    Larvae of marine invertebrates either arise from small eggs and feed during their development or arise from large eggs that proceed to metamorphosis sustained only from maternal provisioning. Only a few species are known to possess facultatively feeding larvae. Of about 250 echinoid species with known mode of development, only two, Brisaster latifrons and Clypeaster rosaceus, are known to develop through facultatively planktotrophic larvae. To obtain more information on this form of development and its consequences, we determined egg size and egg energetic and protein content of these two species. We found that eggs of B. latifrons resemble those of species with nonfeeding larvae in these characteristics more than those of C. rosaceus. We also compared DNA sequences of the cytochrome oxidase (COI) gene from the Caribbean C. rosaceus to those of the sympatric planktotrophic developer C. subdepressus and also to those of the eastern Pacific species C. europacificus to estimate the degree of divergence between species with different developmental modes. Comparison of COI sequences of C. rosaceus from Panama and Florida revealed that there is no geographic differentiation in this species. Cross-fertilization experiments between C. rosaceus and C. subdepressus indicated that bidirectional gametic incompatibility has evolved between the two species.

  3. No facultative worker policing in the honey bee ( Apis mellifera L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loope, Kevin J.; Seeley, Thomas D.; Mattila, Heather R.

    2013-05-01

    Kin selection theory predicts that in colonies of social Hymenoptera with multiply mated queens, workers should mutually inhibit ("police") worker reproduction, but that in colonies with singly mated queens, workers should favor rearing workers' sons instead of queens' sons. In line with these predictions, Mattila et al. (Curr Biol 22:2027-2031, 2012) documented increased ovary development among workers in colonies of honey bees with singly mated queens, suggesting that workers can detect and respond adaptively to queen mating frequency and raising the possibility that they facultative police. In a follow-up experiment, we test and reject the hypothesis that workers in single-patriline colonies prefer worker-derived males and are able to reproduce directly; we show that their eggs are policed as strongly as those of workers in colonies with multiply mated queens. Evidently, workers do not respond facultatively to a kin structure that favors relaxed policing and increased direct reproduction. These workers may instead be responding to a poor queen or preparing for possible queen loss.

  4. The Facultative Symbiont Rickettsia Protects an Invasive Whitefly against Entomopathogenic Pseudomonas syringae Strains.

    PubMed

    Hendry, Tory A; Hunter, Martha S; Baltrus, David A

    2014-12-01

    Facultative endosymbionts can benefit insect hosts in a variety of ways, including context-dependent roles, such as providing defense against pathogens. The role of some symbionts in defense may be overlooked, however, when pathogen infection is transient, sporadic, or asymptomatic. The facultative endosymbiont Rickettsia increases the fitness of the sweet potato whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) in some populations through mechanisms that are not yet understood. In this study, we investigated the role of Rickettsia in mediating the interaction between the sweet potato whitefly and Pseudomonas syringae, a common environmental bacterium, some strains of which are pathogenic to aphids. Our results show that P. syringae multiplies within whiteflies, leading to host death, and that whiteflies infected with Rickettsia show a decreased rate of death due to P. syringae. Experiments using plants coated with P. syringae confirmed that whiteflies can acquire the bacteria at a low rate while feeding, leading to increased mortality, particularly when the whiteflies are not infected with Rickettsia. These results suggest that P. syringae may affect whitefly populations in nature and that Rickettsia can ameliorate this effect. This study highlights the possible importance of interactions among opportunistic environmental pathogens and endosymbionts of insects. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Physiological variation as a mechanism for developmental caste-biasing in a facultatively eusocial sweat bee

    PubMed Central

    Kapheim, Karen M.; Smith, Adam R.; Ihle, Kate E.; Amdam, Gro V.; Nonacs, Peter; Wcislo, William T.

    2012-01-01

    Social castes of eusocial insects may have arisen through an evolutionary modification of an ancestral reproductive ground plan, such that some adults emerge from development physiologically primed to specialize on reproduction (queens) and others on maternal care expressed as allo-maternal behaviour (workers). This hypothesis predicts that variation in reproductive physiology should emerge from ontogeny and underlie division of labour. To test these predictions, we identified physiological links to division of labour in a facultatively eusocial sweat bee, Megalopta genalis. Queens are larger, have larger ovaries and have higher vitellogenin titres than workers. We then compared queens and workers with their solitary counterparts—solitary reproductive females and dispersing nest foundresses—to investigate physiological variation as a factor in caste evolution. Within dyads, body size and ovary development were the best predictors of behavioural class. Queens and dispersers are larger, with larger ovaries than their solitary counterparts. Finally, we raised bees in social isolation to investigate the influence of ontogeny on physiological variation. Body size and ovary development among isolated females were highly variable, and linked to differences in vitellogenin titres. As these are key physiological predictors of social caste, our results provide evidence for developmental caste-biasing in a facultatively eusocial bee. PMID:22048951

  6. Growth of the Facultative Anaerobes from Antarctica, Alaska, and Patagonia at Low Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2004-01-01

    Psychotolerance, as an adaptation for surviving in extreme environments, is widespread among mesophilic microorganisms. Physico-chemical factors such as pressure, red-ox potential, pH and salinity could significantly alter the features of ecosystems by providing liquid water at subzero temperatures. Furthermore, organisms can respond to temperature changes by several known mechanisms, including changing the conformation capacities of constitutional proteins or by the synthesis of mucopolysaccharides around the cell wall and membrane. Such protective mechanisms make it possible for cells to not only passively survive low temperatures in a state of anabiosis, but also to be capable of actively metabolizing substrates and reproducing normally. The physiological and biochemical characteristics of the species, as well as genetics, could be remarkably changed due to adaptation and surviving in extreme environments. The cold shock genes of some of the studied strains of psychotolerant facultative anaerobes were reported previously. In this paper we present experimental data for psychotolerant, non spore-forming, facultative anaerobes isolated from geographically different cold regions of our planet. We show the growth response on changing from anaerobic conditions to aerobic with cultivation at low temperatures.

  7. Conditional Reduction of Predation Risk Associated with a Facultative Symbiont in an Insect

    PubMed Central

    Polin, Sarah; Le Gallic, Jean-François; Simon, Jean-Christophe; Tsuchida, Tsutomu; Outreman, Yannick

    2015-01-01

    Symbionts are widespread among eukaryotes and their impacts on the ecology and evolution of their hosts are meaningful. Most insects harbour obligate and facultative symbiotic bacteria that can influence their phenotype. In the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum, an astounding symbiotic-mediated phenotype has been recently observed: when infected with the symbiotic bacteria Rickettsiella viridis, young red aphid larvae become greener at adulthood and even darker green when co-infected with Rickettsiella viridis and Hamiltonella defensa. As body colour affects the susceptibility towards natural enemies in aphids, the influence of the colour change due to these facultative symbionts on the host survival in presence of predators was tested. Our results suggested that the Rickettsiella viridis infection may impact positively host survival by reducing predation risk. Due to results from uninfected aphids (i.e., more green ones attacked), the main assumption is that this symbiotic infection would deter the predatory ladybird feeding by reducing the profitability of their hosts rather than decreasing host detection through body colour change. Aphids co-infected with Rickettsiella viridis and Hamiltonella defensa were, however, more exposed to predation suggesting an ecological cost associated with multiple infections. The underlying mechanisms and ecological consequences of these symbiotic effects are discussed. PMID:26618776

  8. Oxygen Effect on the Low Temperature Tolerance of Facultative Anaerobes from Antarctica, Alaska, and Patagonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2004-01-01

    Psychrotolerance as an adaptation to survival in extreme environments is widespread among many of the mesophilic microorganisms. Red-ox potential, pH and salinity could significantly alter the features of ecosystems by providing liquid water at subzero temperatures. Furthermore, organisms can respond to temperature changes by several known mechanisms, including changing the conformation capacities of constitutional proteins or by the synthesis of mucopolysaccharides around the cell wall and membrane. Such protective mechanisms make it possible for cells to not only passively survive low-temperature in a state of anabiosis, but also to be capable of actively metabolizing substrates and reproducing normally. The physiological and biochemical characteristics of species as well as genetics could be remarkably changed due to -on and surviving m extreme environments. The cold shock genes for some of the studied strains of psychrotolerant facultative anaerobes already were published In this paper we present experimental data for psychrotolerant facultative anaerobes isolated from geographically different cold regions of our planet. We show the growth response on the changing of anaerobic conditions to aerobic with cultivation at subzero temperatures.

  9. Growth of the Facultative Anaerobes from Antarctica, Alaska, and Patagonia at Low Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2004-01-01

    Psychotolerance, as an adaptation for surviving in extreme environments, is widespread among mesophilic microorganisms. Physico-chemical factors such as pressure, red-ox potential, pH and salinity could significantly alter the features of ecosystems by providing liquid water at subzero temperatures. Furthermore, organisms can respond to temperature changes by several known mechanisms, including changing the conformation capacities of constitutional proteins or by the synthesis of mucopolysaccharides around the cell wall and membrane. Such protective mechanisms make it possible for cells to not only passively survive low temperatures in a state of anabiosis, but also to be capable of actively metabolizing substrates and reproducing normally. The physiological and biochemical characteristics of the species, as well as genetics, could be remarkably changed due to adaptation and surviving in extreme environments. The cold shock genes of some of the studied strains of psychotolerant facultative anaerobes were reported previously. In this paper we present experimental data for psychotolerant, non spore-forming, facultative anaerobes isolated from geographically different cold regions of our planet. We show the growth response on changing from anaerobic conditions to aerobic with cultivation at low temperatures.

  10. Sex versus parthenogenesis; immune function in a facultatively parthenogenetic phasmatid (Extatosoma tiaratum).

    PubMed

    Alavi, Yasaman; Elgar, Mark Adrian; Jones, Therésa Melanie

    2017-07-01

    Facultative parthenogenetic species, in which females can alternate between sex and parthenogenesis, are useful models to investigate the costs and benefits of sex and parthenogenesis, an ongoing issue in biology. The necessary empirical studies comparing the outcomes of alternative reproductive modes on life history traits are rare and focus mainly on traits directly associated with reproductive fitness. Immune function determines the ability of individuals to defend themselves against injury and disease and is therefore likely to have a significant impact on fitness. Here, we used the facultatively parthenogenetic Australian phasmatid, Extatosoma tiaratum, to investigate the effect of both maternal and offspring mode of conception (sexual or parthenogenetic) on offspring immune function (haemocyte concentration, lytic activity and phenoloxidase activity). We show that when parthenogenesis persists beyond one generation, it has negative effects on immune response in terms of haemocyte concentration and lytic activity. Phenoloxidase activity positively correlates with the level of microsatellite heterozygosity. Moreover, immune response decreases across consecutive sampling weeks, suggesting there are physiological constraints with respect to mounting immune responses in close time intervals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Temperature dependent virulence of obligate and facultative fungal pathogens of honeybee brood.

    PubMed

    Vojvodic, S; Jensen, A B; James, R R; Boomsma, J J; Eilenberg, J

    2011-04-21

    Chalkbrood (Ascosphaera apis) and stonebrood (Aspergillus flavus) are well known fungal brood diseases of honeybees (Apis mellifera), but they have hardly been systematically studied because the difficulty of rearing larvae in vitro has precluded controlled experimentation. Chalkbrood is a chronic honeybee-specific disease that can persist in colonies for years, reducing both brood and honey production, whereas stonebrood is a rare facultative pathogen that also affects hosts other than honeybees and can likely survive outside insect hosts. Hive infection trials have indicated that accidental drops in comb temperature increase the prevalence of chalkbrood, but it has remained unclear whether virulence is directly temperature-dependent. We used a newly established in vitro rearing technique for honeybee larvae to test whether there are systematic temperature effects on mortality induced by controlled infections, and whether such effects differed between the two fungal pathogens. We found that increasing spore dosage at infection had a more dramatic effect on mortality from stonebrood compared to chalkbrood. In addition, a 24h cooling period after inoculation increased larval mortality from chalkbrood infection, whereas such a cooling period decreased mortality after stonebrood infection. These results raise interesting questions about honeybee defenses against obligate and facultative pathogens and about the extent to which stress factors in the host (dis)favor pathogens with lesser degrees of specialization. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Facultative mimicry: cues for colour change and colour accuracy in a coral reef fish.

    PubMed

    Cheney, Karen L; Grutter, Alexandra S; Marshall, N Justin

    2008-01-22

    Mimetic species evolve colours and body patterns to closely resemble poisonous species and thus avoid predation (Batesian mimicry), or resemble beneficial or harmless species in order to approach and attack prey (aggressive mimicry). Facultative mimicry, the ability to switch between mimic and non-mimic colours at will, is uncommon in the animal kingdom, but has been shown in a cephalopod, and recently in a marine fish, the bluestriped fangblenny Plagiotremus rhinorhynchos, an aggressive mimic of the juvenile cleaner fish Labroides dimidiatus. Here we demonstrate for the first time that fangblennies adopted mimic colours in the presence of juvenile cleaner fish; however, this only occurred in smaller individuals. Field data indicated that when juvenile cleaner fish were abundant, the proportion of mimic to non-mimic fangblennies was greater, suggesting that fangblennies adopt their mimic disguise depending on the availability of cleaner fish. Finally, measurements of spectral reflectance suggest that not only do mimic fangblennies accurately resemble the colour of their cleaner fish models but also mimic other species of fish that they associate with. This study provides insights into the cues that control this remarkable facultative mimicry system and qualitatively measures its accuracy.

  13. Sex at the margins: parthenogenesis vs. facultative and obligate sex in a Neotropical ant.

    PubMed

    Kellner, K; Seal, J N; Heinze, J

    2013-01-01

    Geographic parthenogenesis is a distribution pattern, in which parthenogenetic populations tend to live in marginal habitats, at higher latitudes and altitudes and island-like habitats compared with the sexual forms. The facultatively parthenogenetic ant Platythyrea punctata is thought to exhibit this general pattern throughout its wide range in Central America and the Caribbean Islands. Workers of P. punctata from the Caribbean produce diploid female offspring from unfertilized eggs by thelytokous parthenogenesis, and mated females and males are rare. In contrast, workers in one colony from Costa Rica were incapable of thelytoky; instead mated workers produced all female offspring. Because sample sizes were very low in former studies, we here use microsatellite markers and explicit tests of thelytoky to examine the population genetic structure of ancestral and derived populations of P. punctata throughout the Caribbean and Central America. Populations from the Caribbean islands were fully capable of parthenogenesis, and population genetic signatures indicate that this is the predominant mode of reproduction, although males are occasionally produced. In contrast, the northernmost population on the mainland (Texas) showed signatures of sexual reproduction, and individuals were incapable of reproduction by thelytoky. Contrary to expectations from a geographic parthenogenesis distribution pattern, most parts of the mainland populations were found to be facultatively thelytokous, with population genetic signatures of both sexual and parthenogenetic reproduction.

  14. Glucose transporter 1-positive endothelial cells in infantile hemangioma exhibit features of facultative stem cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lan; Nakayama, Hironao; Klagsbrun, Michael; Mulliken, John B; Bischoff, Joyce

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) is a definitive and diagnostic marker for infantile hemangioma (IH), a vascular tumor of infancy. To date, GLUT1-positive endothelial cells in IH have not been quantified nor directly isolated and studied. We isolated GLUT1-positive and GLUT1-negative endothelial cells from IH specimens and characterized their proliferation, differentiation, and response to propranolol, a first-line therapy for IH, and to rapamycin, an mTOR pathway inhibitor used to treat an increasingly wide array of proliferative disorders. Although freshly isolated GLUT1-positive cells, selected using anti-GLUT1 magnetic beads, expressed endothelial markers CD31, VE-Cadherin, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, they converted to a mesenchymal phenotype after 3 weeks in culture. In contrast, GLUT1-negative endothelial cells exhibited a stable endothelial phenotype in vitro. GLUT1-selected cells were clonogenic when plated as single cells and could be induced to redifferentiate into endothelial cells, or into pericytes/smooth muscle cells or into adipocytes, indicating a stem cell-like phenotype. These data demonstrate that, although they appear and function in the tumor as bona fide endothelial cells, the GLUT1-positive endothelial cells display properties of facultative stem cells. Pretreatment with rapamycin for 4 days significantly slowed proliferation of GLUT1-selected cells, whereas propranolol pretreatment had no effect. These results reveal for the first time the facultative nature of GLUT1-positive endothelial cells in IH. © 2014 AlphaMed Press.

  15. Growth rates and production of heterotrophic bacteria and phytoplankton in the North Pacific subtropical gyre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, David R.; Karl, David M.; Laws, Edward A.

    1996-10-01

    In field work conducted at 26°N, 155°W, in the North Pacific subtropical gyre, phytoplankton growth rates μp estimated from 14C labeling of chlorophyll a (chl a) averaged approximately one doubling per day in the euphotic zone (0-150 m). Microbial (microalgal plus heterotrophic bacterial) growth rates μm calculated from the incorporation of 3H-adenine into DNA were comparable to or exceeded phytoplankton growth rates at most depths in the euphotic zone. Photosynthetic rates averaged 727 mg C m -2 day -1 Phytoplankton carbon biomass, calculated from 14C labeling of chl a, averaged 7.2 mg m -3 in the euphotic zone. Vertical profiles of particulate DNA and ATP suggested that no more than 15% of particulate DNA was associated with actively growing cells. Heterotrophic bacterial carbon biomass was estimated from a two-year average at station ALOHA (22°45'N, 158°W) of flow cytometric counts of unpigmented, bacteria-size particles which bound DAPI on the assumption that 15% of the particles were actively growing cells and that heterotrophic bacterial cells contained 20 fg C cell -1 The heterotrophic bacterial carbon so calculated averaged 1.1 mg m -3 in the euphotic zone. Heterotrophic bacterial production was estimated to be 164 mg C m -2 day -1 or 23% of the calculated photosynthetic rate. Estimated heterotrophic bacterial growth rates averaged 0.97 day -1 in the euphotic zone and reached 4.7 day - at a depth of 20 m. Most heterotrophic bacterial production occurred in the upper 40 m of the euphotic zone, suggesting that direct excretion by phytoplankton, perhaps due to photorespiration or ultraviolet light effects, was a significant source of dissolved organic carbon for the bacteria.

  16. Enhanced lipid accumulation of photoautotrophic microalgae by high-dose CO2 mimics a heterotrophic characterization.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhilan; Dou, Xiao; Wu, Jun; He, Bing; Wang, Yuancong; Chen, Yi-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Microalgae possess higher photosynthetic efficiency and accumulate more neutral lipids when supplied with high-dose CO2. However, the nature of lipid accumulation under conditions of elevated CO2 has not been fully elucidated so far. We now revealed that the enhanced lipid accumulation of Chlorella in high-dose CO2 was as efficient as under heterotrophic conditions and this may be attributed to the driving of enlarged carbon source. Both photoautotrophic and heterotrophic cultures were established by using Chlorella sorokiniana CS-1. A series of changes in the carbon fixation, lipid accumulation, energy conversion, and carbon-lipid conversion under high-dose CO2 (1-10%) treatment were characterized subsequently. The daily carbon fixation rate of C. sorokiniana LS-2 in 10% CO2 aeration was significantly increased compared with air CO2. Correspondingly, double oil content (28%) was observed in 10% CO2 aeration, close to 32.3% produced under heterotrophic conditions. In addition, with 10% CO2 aeration, the overall energy yield (Ψ) in Chlorella reached 12.4 from 7.3% (with air aeration) because of the enhanced daily carbon fixation rates. This treatment also improved the energetic lipid yield (Ylipid/Es) with 4.7-fold, tending to the heterotrophic parameters. More significantly, 2.2 times of carbon-lipid conversion efficiency (ηClipid/Ctotal, 42.4%) was observed in 10% CO2 aeration, towards to 53.7% in heterotrophic cultures, suggesting that more fixed carbon might flow into lipid synthesis under both 10% CO2 aeration and heterotrophic conditions. Taken together, all our evidence showed that 10% CO2 may push photoautotrophic Chlorella to display heterotrophic-like efficiency at least in lipid production. It might bring us an efficient model of lipid production based on microalgal cells with high-dose CO2, which is essential to sustain biodiesel production at large scales.

  17. Gene transfer to the desiccation-tolerant cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis.

    PubMed

    Billi, D; Friedmann, E I; Helm, R F; Potts, M

    2001-04-01

    The coccoid cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis dominates microbial communities in the most extreme arid hot and cold deserts. These communities withstand constraints that result from multiple cycles of drying and wetting and/or prolonged desiccation, through mechanisms which remain poorly understood. Here we describe the first system for genetic manipulation of Chroococcidiopsis. Plasmids pDUCA7 and pRL489, based on the pDU1 replicon of Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7524, were transferred to different isolates of Chroococcidiopsis via conjugation and electroporation. This report provides the first evidence that pDU1 replicons can be maintained in cyanobacteria other than Nostoc and Anabaena. Following conjugation, both plasmids replicated in Chroococcidiopsis sp. strains 029, 057, and 123 but not in strains 171 and 584. Both plasmids were electroporated into strains 029 and 123 but not into strains 057, 171, and 584. Expression of P(psbA)-luxAB on pRL489 was visualized through in vivo luminescence. Efficiencies of conjugative transfer for pDUCA7 and pRL489 into Chroococcidiopsis sp. strain 029 were approximately 10(-2) and 10(-4) transconjugants per recipient cell, respectively. Conjugative transfer occurred with a lower efficiency into strains 057 and 123. Electrotransformation efficiencies of about 10(-4) electrotransformants per recipient cell were achieved with strains 029 and 123, using either pDUCA7 or pRL489. Extracellular deoxyribonucleases were associated with each of the five strains. Phylogenetic analysis, based upon the V6 to V8 variable regions of 16S rRNA, suggests that desert strains 057, 123, 171, and 029 are distinct from the type species strain Chroococcidiopsis thermalis PCC 7203. The high efficiency of conjugative transfer of Chroococcidiopsis sp. strain 029, from the Negev Desert, Israel, makes this a suitable experimental strain for genetic studies on desiccation tolerance.

  18. Export of Extracellular Polysaccharides Modulates Adherence of the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Michael L.; Allen, Rebecca; Luo, Yingqin; Curtiss, Roy

    2013-01-01

    The field of cyanobacterial biofuel production is advancing rapidly, yet we know little of the basic biology of these organisms outside of their photosynthetic pathways. We aimed to gain a greater understanding of how the cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803 (Synechocystis, hereafter) modulates its cell surface. Such understanding will allow for the creation of mutants that autoflocculate in a regulated way, thus avoiding energy intensive centrifugation in the creation of biofuels. We constructed mutant strains lacking genes predicted to function in carbohydrate transport or synthesis. Strains with gene deletions of slr0977 (predicted to encode a permease component of an ABC transporter), slr0982 (predicted to encode an ATP binding component of an ABC transporter) and slr1610 (predicted to encode a methyltransferase) demonstrated flocculent phenotypes and increased adherence to glass. Upon bioinformatic inspection, the gene products of slr0977, slr0982, and slr1610 appear to function in O-antigen (OAg) transport and synthesis. However, the analysis provided here demonstrated no differences between OAg purified from wild-type and mutants. However, exopolysaccharides (EPS) purified from mutants were altered in composition when compared to wild-type. Our data suggest that there are multiple means to modulate the cell surface of Synechocystis by disrupting different combinations of ABC transporters and/or glycosyl transferases. Further understanding of these mechanisms may allow for the development of industrially and ecologically useful strains of cyanobacteria. Additionally, these data imply that many cyanobacterial gene products may possess as-yet undiscovered functions, and are meritorious of further study. PMID:24040267

  19. Arsenic biotransformation by a cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Xue, Xi-Mei; Yan, Yu; Xiong, Chan; Raber, Georg; Francesconi, Kevin; Pan, Ting; Ye, Jun; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2017-09-01

    Nostoc sp. PCC 7120 (Nostoc), a typical filamentous cyanobacterium ubiquitous in aquatic system, is recognized as a model organism to study prokaryotic cell differentiation and nitrogen fixation. In this study, Nostoc cells incubated with arsenite (As(III)) for two weeks were extracted with dichloromethane/methanol (DCM/MeOH) and the extract was partitioned between water and DCM. Arsenic species in aqueous and DCM layers were determined using high performance liquid chromatography - inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICPMS/ESIMSMS). In addition to inorganic arsenic (iAs), the aqueous layer also contained monomethylarsonate (MAs(V)), dimethylarsinate (DMAs(V)), and the two arsenosugars, namely a glycerol arsenosugar (Oxo-Gly) and a phosphate arsenosugar (Oxo-PO4). Two major arsenosugar phospholipids (AsSugPL982 and AsSugPL984) were detected in DCM fraction. Arsenic in the growth medium was also investigated by HPLC/ICPMS and shown to be present mainly as the inorganic forms As(III) and As(V) accounting for 29%-38% and 29%-57% of the total arsenic respectively. The total arsenic of methylated arsenic, arsenosugars, and arsenosugar phospholipids in Nostoc cells with increasing As(III) exposure were not markedly different, indicating that the transformation to organoarsenic in Nostoc was not dependent on As(III) concentration in the medium. Our results provide new insights into the role of cyanobacteria in the biogeochemical cycling of arsenic. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Ferredoxin and flavodoxin from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Bottin, H; Lagoutte, B

    1992-07-06

    The unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp PCC 6803 is capable of synthesizing two different Photosystem-I electron acceptors, ferredoxin and flavodoxin. Under normal growth conditions a [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin was recovered and purified to homogeneity. The complete amino-acid sequence of this protein was established. The isoelectric point (pI = 3.48), midpoint redox potential (Em = -0.412 V) and stability under denaturing conditions were also determined. This ferredoxin exhibits an unusual electrophoretic behavior, resulting in a very low apparent molecular mass between 2 and 3.5 kDa, even in the presence of high concentrations of urea. However, a molecular mass of 10,232 Da (apo-ferredoxin) is calculated from the sequence. Free thiol assays indicate the presence of a disulfide bridge in this protein. A small amount of ferredoxin was also found in another fraction during the purification procedure. The amino-acid sequence and properties of this minor ferredoxin were similar to those of the major ferredoxin. However, its solubility in ammonium sulfate and its reactivity with antibodies directed against spinach ferredoxin were different. Traces of flavodoxin were also recovered from the same fraction. The amount of flavodoxin was dramatically increased under iron-deficient growth conditions. An acidic isoelectric point was measured (pI = 3.76), close to that of ferredoxin. The midpoint redox potentials of flavodoxin are Em1 = -0.433 V and Em2 = -0.238 V at pH 7.8. Sequence comparison based on the 42 N-terminal amino acids indicates that Synechocystis 6803 flavodoxin most likely belongs to the long-chain class, despite an apparent molecular mass of 15 kDa determined by SDS-PAGE.

  1. Feeding by the Pfiesteria-like heterotrophic dinoflagellate Luciella masanensis.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hae Jin; Ha, Jeong Hyun; Yoo, Yeong Du; Park, Jae Yeon; Kim, Jong Hyeok; Kang, Nam Seon; Kim, Tae Hoon; Kim, Hyung Seop; Yih, Won Ho

    2007-01-01

    To explore the feeding ecology of the Pfiesteria-like dinoflagellate (PLD) Luciella masanensis (GenBank Accession no. AM050344, previously Lucy), we investigated the feeding behavior and the kinds of prey species that L. masanensis fed on and determined its growth and ingestion rates of L. masanensis when it fed on the dinoflagellate Amphidinium carterae and an unidentified cryptophyte species (equivalent spherical diam., ESD=5.6 microm), which were the dominant phototrophic species when L. masanensis and similar small heterotrophic dinoflagellates were abundant in Masan Bay, Korea in 2005. Additionally, these parameters were also measured for L. masanensis fed on blood cells of the perch Lateolabrax japonicus and the raphidophyte Heterosigma akashiwo in the laboratory. Luciella masanensis fed on prey cells by using a peduncle after anchoring the prey with tow filament, and was able to feed on diverse prey such as cryptophytes, raphidophytes, diatoms, mixotrophic dinoflagellates, and the blood cells of fish and humans. Among the prey species tested in the present study, perch blood cells were observed to be the optimal prey for L. masanensis. Specific growth rates of L. masanensis feeding on perch blood cells, A. carterae, H. akashiwo, and the cryptophyte, either increased continuously or became saturated with increasing the mean prey concentration. The maximum specific growth rate of L. masanensis feeding on perch blood cells (1.46/day) was much greater than that of A. carterae (0.59/day), the cryptophyte (0.24/day), or H. akashiwo (0.20/day). The maximum ingestion rate of L. masanensis on perch blood cells (2.6 ng C/grazer/day) was also much higher than that of A. carterae (0.32 ng C/grazer/day), the cryptophyte (0.44 ng C/grazer/day), or H. akashiwo (0.16 ng C/grazer/day). The kinds of prey species which L. masanensis is able to feed on were the same as those of Pfiesteria piscicida, but very different from those of another PLD Stoeckeria algicida. However, the

  2. Heterotrophic plate count methodology in the United States.

    PubMed

    Reasoner, Donald J

    2004-05-01

    In the United States (US), the history of bacterial plate counting (BPC) methods used for water can be traced largely through Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater (Standard Methods). The bacterial count method has evolved from the original Standard Methods (1st edition, 1905) plate count which used nutrient gelatin and incubation at 20 degrees C for 48 h, to the HPC method options in the latest edition of Standard Methods that provide greater flexibility of application, depending on the data needs of the water analyst. The use of agar-agar as a gelling agent, replacing gelatin, allowed the use of higher incubation temperatures and resulted in the "body temperature count" (37 degrees C) found in the 3rd through the 8th edition of Standard Methods. The change from 37 degrees C incubation to 35+/-0.5 degrees C accommodated laboratories that did both milk and water analyses. By using a single temperature, fewer incubators were needed. The term "standard plate count" (SPC) first appeared in 1960 (11th edition) along with plate count agar. Incubation at 20 degrees C for the plate count was dropped from the 13th to 15th editions and few changes were made in the SPC method from the 11th edition through the 13th editions. Plate count analysis of bottled waters was included in the 14th edition (1975), calling for incubation at 35+/-0.5 degrees C for 72+/-4 h. Perhaps the most significant changes in plate count methods occurred with the 16th edition (1985). The term heterotrophic plate count replaced the standard plate count, and the spread plate (SP) and membrane filter (MF) methods were added along with new media for pour and spread plates (R2A agar and NWRI agar, both low nutrient) and for the membrane filter method (mHPC medium). The use of low nutrient media, lower incubation temperature, and longer incubation times, results in higher plate count results for most water samples. The options currently available, including low and high nutrient media

  3. Heterotrophic Growth and Production of Xanthophylls by Chlorella pyrenoidosa

    PubMed Central

    Theriault, Robert J.

    1965-01-01

    The growth and level of xanthophylls of several representative species of green algae were investigated as a possible source of pigmentation for the egg yolk and broiler markets. Chlorella pyrenoidosa 7-11-05 was selected for fermentation studies because of its high level of xanthophylls and wide temperature range for growth. The heterotrophic metabolism was preferred because of the ease of adaptability to present fermentation equipment. When used as the sole carbon source, glucose was the only sugar, among many tested, that gave appreciable growth in illuminated shaken flasks. A dry cell weight of 90 g per liter and total xanthophylls of 450 mg per liter were obtained from 190 g per liter of glucose monohydrate in 168-hr illuminated shaken flasks. Higher levels of glucose decreased yields. In combination with glucose, monosaccharides, such as fructose and galactose, were readily assimilated. The 7-11-05 strain was adapted to galactose as the sole carbon source after six vegetative passages. Light of the proper intensity and duration stimulated total xanthophylls approximately 35%. The effect on dry cell weight and total xanthophylls of seven antibiotics added at various levels in shaken flasks was studied. Erythromycin was essentially stable throughout the fermentation and nontoxic up to 25 μg/ml, with only slight toxicity at higher levels. Both erythromycin and ristocetin were effective in controlling a high incidence of bacterial contamination in 30-liter fermentors. With the higher agitation and aeration rates possible in 30-liter fermentors, dry cell weights in excess of 100 g per liter and total xanthophylls of 467 to 512 mg per liter were readily obtained from 230 to 260 g per liter of glucose in 162-hr illuminated batch-type fermentations. Continuous-feed runs yielded a dry cell weight of 302 g per liter and total xanthophylls of 650 mg per liter from 520 g per liter of glucose. The type of Chlorella cell produced was an important consideration with

  4. Outer Membrane Permeability of Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803: Studies of Passive Diffusion of Small Organic Nutrients Reveal the Absence of Classical Porins and Intrinsically Low Permeability.

    PubMed

    Kowata, Hikaru; Tochigi, Saeko; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Kojima, Seiji

    2017-10-01

    The outer membrane of heterotrophic Gram-negative bacteria plays the role of a selective permeability barrier that prevents the influx of toxic compounds while allowing the nonspecific passage of small hydrophilic nutrients through porin channels. Compared with heterotrophic Gram-negative bacteria, the outer membrane properties of cyanobacteria, which are Gram-negative photoautotrophs, are not clearly understood. In this study, using small carbohydrates, amino acids, and inorganic ions as permeation probes, we determined the outer membrane permeability of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 in intact cells and in proteoliposomes reconstituted with outer membrane proteins. The permeability of this cyanobacterium was >20-fold lower than that of Escherichia coli The predominant outer membrane proteins Slr1841, Slr1908, and Slr0042 were not permeable to organic nutrients and allowed only the passage of inorganic ions. Only the less abundant outer membrane protein Slr1270, a homolog of the E. coli export channel TolC, was permeable to organic solutes. The activity of Slr1270 as a channel was verified in a recombinant Slr1270-producing E. coli outer membrane. The lack of putative porins and the low outer membrane permeability appear to suit the cyanobacterial autotrophic lifestyle; the highly impermeable outer membrane would be advantageous to cellular survival by protecting the cell from toxic compounds, especially when the cellular physiology is not dependent on the uptake of organic nutrients.IMPORTANCE Because the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria affects the flux rates for various substances into and out of the cell, its permeability is closely associated with cellular physiology. The outer membrane properties of cyanobacteria, which are photoautotrophic Gram-negative bacteria, are not clearly understood. Here, we examined the outer membrane of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803. We revealed that it is relatively permeable to inorganic ions but is markedly less

  5. Finished Genome Sequence of the Unicellular Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6714.

    PubMed

    Kopf, Matthias; Klähn, Stephan; Voss, Björn; Stüber, Kurt; Huettel, Bruno; Reinhardt, Richard; Hess, Wolfgang R

    2014-07-31

    Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6714 is a unicellular cyanobacterium closely related to the popular model organism Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803. A combination of PacBio SMRT and Illumina GAIIx data results in a highly accurate finished genome sequence that provides a reliable resource for further comparative analyses.

  6. Genome Sequence of the Thermophilic Cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus sp. Strain NK55a.

    SciTech Connect

    Stolyar, Sergey; Liu, Zhenfeng; Thiel, Vera; Tomsho, Lynn P.; Pinel, Nicolas; Nelson, William C.; Lindemann, Stephen R.; Romine, Margaret F.; Haruta, Shin; Schuster, Stephan C.; Bryant, Donald A.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2014-01-02

    The genome of the unicellular cyanobacterium, Thermosynechococcus sp. strain NK55a, isolated from Nakabusa hot spring, comprises a single, circular, 2.5-Mb chromosome. The genome is predicted to encode 2358 protein coding genes, including genes for all typical cyanobacterial photosynthetic and metabolic functions. No genes encoding hydrogenases or nitrogenase were identified.

  7. Lyngbyabellin B, a toxic and antifungal secondary metabolite from the marine cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula.

    PubMed

    Milligan, K E; Marquez, B L; Williamson, R T; Gerwick, W H

    2000-10-01

    Lyngbyabellin B (1) was isolated from a marine cyanobacterium, Lyngbya majuscula, collected near the Dry Tortugas National Park, Florida. This new cyclic depsipeptide displayed potent toxicity toward brine shrimp and the fungus Candida albicans. The planar structure was deduced using 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic methods, and the stereochemistry is proposed through a combination of NMR and chiral GC/MS analysis.

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Cyanobacterium sp. Strain IPPAS B-1200 with a Unique Fatty Acid Composition

    PubMed Central

    Starikov, Alexander Y.; Usserbaeva, Aizhan A.; Sinetova, Maria A.; Sarsekeyeva, Fariza K.; Zayadan, Bolatkhan K.; Ustinova, Vera V.; Kupriyanova, Elena V.; Los, Dmitry A.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome of Cyanobacterium sp. IPPAS strain B-1200, isolated from Lake Balkhash, Kazakhstan, and characterized by the unique fatty acid composition of its membrane lipids, which are enriched with myristic and myristoleic acids. The approximate genome size is 3.4 Mb, and the predicted number of coding sequences is 3,119. PMID:27856596

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of the Thermotolerant Cyanobacterium Desertifilum sp. IPPAS B-1220

    PubMed Central

    Sinetova, Maria A.; Bolatkhan, Kenzhegul; Zayadan, Bolatkhan K.; Ustinova, Vera V.; Kupriyanova, Elena V.; Skrypnik, Alexandra N.; Gogoleva, Natalya E.; Gogolev, Yuriy V.; Los, Dmitry A.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome of the filamentous cyanobacterium Desertifilum sp. strain IPPAS B-1220, isolated from Lake Shar-Nuur, Mongolia. The genome of 6.1 Mb codes for 5,113 genes. Genome mining revealed 10 clusters for the synthesis of bioactive compounds (nonribosomal peptides, polyketides, bacteriocins, and lantipeptides) with potential biotechnological or medical importance. PMID:27856594

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of a Coastal Cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp. Strain NIES-970

    PubMed Central

    Hirose, Yuu; Misawa, Naomi; Wakazuki, Sachiko; Fujisawa, Takatomo; Nakamura, Yasukazu; Kanesaki, Yu; Yamaguchi, Haruyo; Kawachi, Masanobu

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Members of the cyanobacterial genus Synechococcus are abundant in marine environments. To better understand the genomic diversity of marine Synechococcus spp., we determined the complete genome sequence of a coastal cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp. NIES-970. The genome had a size of 3.1 Mb, consisting of one chromosome and four plasmids. PMID:28385852

  11. Draft Genome Assembly of a Filamentous Euendolithic (True Boring) Cyanobacterium, Mastigocoleus testarum Strain BC008.

    PubMed

    Guida, Brandon S; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran

    2016-01-28

    Mastigocoleus testarum strain BC008 is a model organism used to study marine photoautotrophic carbonate dissolution. It is a multicellular, filamentous, diazotrophic, euendolithic cyanobacterium ubiquitously found in marine benthic environments. We present an accurate draft genome assembly of 172 contigs spanning 12,700,239 bp with 9,131 annotated genes with an average G+C% of 37.3.

  12. Temporal Variability in Nitrogenase Gene Expression in Natural Populations of the Marine Cyanobacterium Trichodesmium thiebautii

    PubMed Central

    Wyman, M.; Zehr, J. P.; Capone, D. G.

    1996-01-01

    We report a distinct diel periodicity in the abundance of nifH (dinitrogenase reductase) mRNA in natural populations of the nonheterocystous marine cyanobacterium Trichodesmium thiebautii. Our observations show that in addition to translational and posttranslational controls, Trichodesmium nitrogenase expression is also regulated at the transcriptional and/or posttranscriptional level. PMID:16535258

  13. Variation in Heterotrophic and Autotrophic Nitrifier Populations in Relation to Nitrification in Organic Soils †

    PubMed Central

    Tate, Robert L.

    1980-01-01

    The occurrence of heterotrophic and autotrophic nitrifiers in Pahokee muck and the role of these organisms in the ecosystem were assessed by surveying their population densities under different field conditions and by observing the relationship of these populations with aerobic bacteria and soil moisture. Heterotrophic nitrifier populations varied from 2.0 × 105 to 3.8 × 106 bacteria per cm3 of muck in surface fallow (bare) Pahokee muck during the annual cycle. This population decreased 40-fold between the surface and the 60- to 70-cm depths of soil. Similar variations were noted with autotrophic nitrifier populations. Significant correlations were found between heterotrophic nitrifiers and both soil moisture and aerobic bacteria. These relationships did not exist for the autotrophic nitrifiers. In soil that had been heated to kill the autotrophic nitrifiers, while preserving a population of the heterotrophs, and then amended with sodium acetate or ammonium sulfate or both, no nitrate or nitrite accumulated, although significant increases in heterotrophic nitrifiers were detected. In unheated control soil, nitrate plus nitrite-N increased from 14.3 to 181 μg/g of wet soil, and 48 μg of nitrite-N per g was produced. These data suggest that the autotrophic nitrifiers were the sole population responsible for nitrification in Pahokee muck. PMID:16345599

  14. Influence of tetracycline on tetracycline-resistant heterotrophs and tet genes in activated sludge process.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jie; Liu, Dongfang; Li, Kexun

    2015-03-01

    The concentrations of tetracycline-intermediate resistant, tetracycline-resistant heterotrophic bacteria, and total heterotrophic bacteria were examined to assess the influence of tetracycline on tetracycline-resistant heterotrophs by the R2A agar cultivation method in the tetracycline fortified activated sludge process and in the natural background. Results showed that the percentages of both tetracycline-intermediate resistant and tetracycline-resistant heterotrophic bacteria in total heterotrophic bacteria were significantly increased, after tetracycline was fed to activated sludge for a 3 months period under four different operating conditions, as compared with the background. In order to investigate the mechanism of activated sludge resistance to tetracycline, polymerase chain reaction experiments were carried out to analyze the existence and evolution of tet genes in the presence of tetracycline. Results revealed that only tet A and tet B genes out of the 11 target tet genes were observed in tetracycline treated activated sludge while no tet gene was detected in background. This indicated that tet A gene could accumulate in activated sludge with slower and continuous influent, while the accumulation of tet B gene could be attributed to shorter hydraulic retention time. Therefore, it was proposed in this study that tetracycline-resistant genes created by efflux pumps spread earlier and quicker to encode resistance to tetracycline, which facilitated the increase in tetracycline-resistance.

  15. Culturing bias in marine heterotrophic flagellates analyzed through seawater enrichment incubations.

    PubMed

    del Campo, Javier; Balagué, Vanessa; Forn, Irene; Lekunberri, Itziar; Massana, Ramon

    2013-10-01

    The diversity of heterotrophic flagellates is generally based on cultivated strains, on which ultrastructural, physiological, and molecular studies have been performed. However, the relevance of these cultured strains as models of the dominant heterotrophic flagellates in the marine planktonic environment is unclear. In fact, molecular surveys typically recover novel eukaryotic lineages that have refused cultivation so far. This study was designed to directly address the culturing bias in planktonic marine heterotrophic flagellates. Several microcosms were established adding increasing amounts and sources of organic matter to a confined natural microbial community pre-filtered by 3 μm. Growth dynamics were followed by epifluorescence microscopy and showed the expected higher yield of bacteria and heterotrophic flagellates at increased organic matter additions. Moreover, protist diversity analyzed by molecular tools showed a clear substitution in the community, which differed more and more from the initial sample as the organic matter increased. Within this gradient, there was also an increase of sequences related to cultured organisms as well as a decrease in diversity. Culturing bias is partly explained by the use of organic matter in the isolation process, which drives a shift in the community to conditions closer to laboratory cultures. An intensive culturing effort using alternative isolation methods is necessary to allow the access to the missing heterotrophic flagellates that constitute the abundant and active taxa in marine systems.

  16. High quality biodiesel production from a microalga Chlorella protothecoides by heterotrophic growth in fermenters.

    PubMed

    Xu, Han; Miao, Xiaoling; Wu, Qingyu

    2006-12-01

    The aim of the study was to obtain high quality biodiesel production from a microalga Chlorella protothecoids through the technology of transesterification. The technique of metabolic controlling through heterotrophic growth of C. protothecoides was applied, and the heterotrophic C. protothecoides contained the crude lipid content of 55.2%. To increase the biomass and reduce the cost of alga, corn powder hydrolysate instead of glucose was used as organic carbon source in heterotrophic culture medium in fermenters. The result showed that cell density significantly increased under the heterotrophic condition, and the highest cell concentration reached 15.5 g L(-1). Large amount of microalgal oil was efficiently extracted from the heterotrophic cells by using n-hexane, and then transmuted into biodiesel by acidic transesterification. The biodiesel was characterized by a high heating value of 41 MJ kg(-1), a density of 0.864 kg L(-1), and a viscosity of 5.2 x 10(-4) Pa s (at 40 degrees C). The method has great potential in the industrial production of liquid fuel from microalga.

  17. Assessment of Heterotrophic Growth Supported by Soluble Microbial Products in Anammox Biofilm using Multidimensional Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yiwen; Sun, Jing; Peng, Lai; Wang, Dongbo; Dai, Xiaohu; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) is known to autotrophically convert ammonium to dinitrogen gas with nitrite as the electron acceptor, but little is known about their released microbial products and how these are relative to heterotrophic growth in anammox system. In this work, we applied a mathematical model to assess the heterotrophic growth supported by three key microbial products produced by bacteria in anammox biofilm (utilization associated products (UAP), biomass associated products (BAP), and decay released substrate). Both One-dimensional and two-dimensional numerical biofilm models were developed to describe the development of anammox biofilm as a function of the multiple bacteria–substrate interactions. Model simulations show that UAP of anammox is the main organic carbon source for heterotrophs. Heterotrophs are mainly dominant at the surface of the anammox biofilm with small fraction inside the biofilm. 1-D model is sufficient to describe the main substrate concentrations/fluxes within the anammox biofilm, while the 2-D model can give a more detailed biomass distribution. The heterotrophic growth on UAP is mainly present at the outside of anammox biofilm, their growth on BAP (HetB) are present throughout the biofilm, while the growth on decay released substrate (HetD) is mainly located in the inner layers of the biofilm. PMID:27273460

  18. Resource Islands Predict the Distribution of Heterotrophic Bacteria in Chihuahuan Desert Soils

    PubMed Central

    Herman, R. P.; Provencio, K. R.; Herrera-Matos, J.; Torrez, R. J.

    1995-01-01

    The resource island hypothesis predicts that soil resources such as nitrogen, phosphorus, and water will be distributed evenly in grasslands but have a patchy distribution focused around plants in shrublands. This hypothesis predicts that microorganism numbers will follow resources and be (i) evenly distributed in grasslands, (ii) concentrated around individual plants in shrublands, and (iii) higher where resources are higher when comparing the same vegetation type. This study enumerated total heterotrophic bacteria and a subset of these, the nitrogen-efficient guild (NEG), in three shrublands (playa fringe mesquite, tar bush, and creosote) and two grasslands (playa and bajada). Both heterotrophs and NEG members followed the distribution pattern predicted by the resource island hypothesis. There were no significant differences in heterotroph or NEG numbers comparing at-plant and interplant samples for both the playa and bajada grasslands. Furthermore, populations were generally higher in nutrient-rich playa grasslands than nutrient-poor bajada grasslands. In contrast, both heterotroph and NEG numbers were higher at shrubs than between shrubs in all three shrub sites. These results suggest that resource abundance in resource islands predicts the distribution of heterotrophic bacterial numbers in desert soils. PMID:16535022

  19. Competition for Ammonium between Nitrifying and Heterotrophic Bacteria in Dual Energy-Limited Chemostats

    PubMed Central

    Verhagen, Frank J. M.; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J.

    1991-01-01

    The absence of nitrification in soils rich in organic matter has often been reported. Therefore, competition for limiting amounts of ammonium between the chemolithotrophic ammonium-oxidizing species Nitrosomonas europaea and the heterotrophic species Arthrobacter globiformis was studied in the presence of Nitrobacter winogradskyi in continuous cultures at dilution rates of 0.004 and 0.01 h−1. Ammonium limitation of A. globiformis was achieved by increasing the glucose concentration in the reservoir stepwise from 0 to 5 mM while maintaining the ammonium concentration at 2 mM. The numbers of N. europaea and N. winogradskyi cells decreased as the numbers of heterotrophic bacteria rose with increasing glucose concentrations for both dilution rates. Critical carbon-to-nitrogen ratios of 11.6 and 9.6 were determined for the dilution rates of 0.004 and 0.01 h−1, respectively. Below these critical values, coexistence of the competing species was found in steady-state situations. Although the numbers were strongly reduced, the nitrifying bacteria were not fully outcompeted by the heterotrophic bacteria above the critical carbon-to-nitrogen ratios. Nitrifying bacteria could probably maintain themselves in the system above the critical carbon-to-nitrogen ratios because they are attached to the glass wall of the culture vessels. The numbers of N. europaea decreased more than did those of N. winogradskyi. This was assumed to be due to heterotrophic growth of the latter species on organic substrates excreted by the heterotrophic bacteria. PMID:16348588

  20. Investigation of mixotrophic, heterotrophic, and autotrophic growth of Chlorella vulgaris under agricultural waste medium.

    PubMed

    Mohammad Mirzaie, M A; Kalbasi, M; Mousavi, S M; Ghobadian, B

    2016-01-01

    Growth of Chlorella vulgaris and its lipid production were investigated under autotrophic, heterotrophic, and mixotrophic conditions. Cheap agricultural waste molasses and corn steep liquor from industries were used as carbon and nitrogen sources, respectively. Chlorella vulgaris grew remarkably under this agricultural waste medium, which resulted in a reduction in the final cost of the biodiesel production. Maximum dry weight of 2.62 g L(-1) was obtained in mixotrophic growth with the highest lipid concentration of 0.86 g L(-1). These biomass and lipid concentrations were, respectively, 140% and 170% higher than autotrophic growth and 300% and 1200% higher than heterotrophic growth. In mixotrophic growth, independent or simultaneous occurrence of autotrophic and heterotrophic metabolisms was investigated. The growth of the microalgae was observed to take place first heterotrophically to a minimum substrate concentration with a little fraction in growth under autotrophic metabolism, and then the cells grew more autotrophically. It was found that mixotrophic growth was not a simple combination of heterotrophic and autotrophic growth.

  1. Incidence of Legionella and heterotrophic bacteria in household rainwater tanks in Azumino, Nagano prefecture, Japan.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Michiko; Oana, Kozue; Kawakami, Yoshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    Many administrative agencies in Japan are encouraging installation of household rainwater-storage tanks for more effective use of natural rainwater. Water samples were collected periodically from 43 rainwater tanks from 40 households and tested for the presence of Legionella species and the extent of heterotrophic bacteria in Azumino city, Nagano prefecture, Japan. PCR assays indicated the presence of Legionella spp. in 12 (30%) of the 43 tank water samples. Attempts were made to identify correlations between PCR positive samples, topography, pH, chemical oxygen demand (COD), atmospheric temperature and the numbers of heterotrophic bacteria. Between June and October, 2012, the numbers of heterotrophic bacteria in rainwater tanks and the values of COD positively correlated with the presence of Legionella species. In most of the Legionella-positive cases, heterotrophic bacterial cell counts were >10(4) CFU/mL. Moreover, Legionella species were less frequently detected when the COD value was >5 mg KMnO(4)/L. Therefore, at least in Azumino, Japan between June and October 2012, both heterotrophic bacterial counts and COD values may be considered index parameters for the presence of Legionella cells in rainwater tanks. Much more accumulation of such data is needed to verify the accuracy of these findings.

  2. Tank bromeliads as natural microcosms: a facultative association with ants influences the aquatic invertebrate community structure.

    PubMed

    Talaga, Stanislas; Dézerald, Olivier; Carteron, Alexis; Petitclerc, Frédéric; Leroy, Céline; Céréghino, Régis; Dejean, Alain

    2015-10-01

    Many tank bromeliads have facultative relationships with ants as is the case in French Guiana between Aechmea aquilega (Salib.) Griseb. and the trap-jaw ant, Odontomachus haematodus Linnaeus. Using a redundancy analysis, we determined that the presence of O. haematodus colonies is accompanied by a greater quantity of fine particulate organic matter in the water likely due to their wastes. This increase in nutrient availability is significantly correlated with an increase in the abundance of some detritivorous taxa, suggesting a positive bottom-up influence on the aquatic macroinvertebrate communities living in the A. aquilega wells. On the other hand, the abundance of top predators is negatively affected by a lower number of available wells due to ant constructions for nesting, releasing a top-down pressure that could also favor lower trophic levels. Copyright © 2015 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Bifurcation and global periodic solutions in a delayed facultative mutualism system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xiang-Ping; Li, Wan-Tong

    2007-03-01

    A facultative mutualism system with a discrete delay is considered. By analyzing the associated characteristic equation, its linear stability is investigated and Hopf bifurcations are demonstrated. Some explicit formulae are obtained by applying the normal form theory and center manifold reduction. Such formulae enable us to determine the stability and the direction of the bifurcating periodic solutions bifurcating from Hopf bifurcations. Furthermore, a global Hopf bifurcation result due to Wu [J. Wu, Symmetric functional differential equations and neural networks with memory, Trans. Amer. Math. Soc. 350 (1998) 4799-4838] is employed to study the global existence of periodic solutions. It is shown that the local Hopf bifurcation implies the global Hopf bifurcation after the third critical value τ1(1) of delay. Finally, numerical simulations supporting the theoretical analysis are given.

  4. Facultative nitrogen fixation by canopy legumes in a lowland tropical forest.

    PubMed

    Barron, Alexander R; Purves, Drew W; Hedin, Lars O

    2011-02-01

    Symbiotic dinitrogen (N(2)) fixation is often invoked to explain the N richness of tropical forests as ostensibly N(2)-fixing trees can be a major component of the community. Such arguments assume N(2) fixers are fixing N when present. However, in laboratory experiments, legumes consistently reduce N(2) fixation in response to increased soil N availability. These contrasting views of N(2) fixation as either obligate or facultative have drastically different implications for the N cycle of tropical forests. We tested these models by directly measuring N(2)-fixing root nodules and nitrogenase activity of individual canopy-dominant legume trees (Inga sp.) across several lowland forest types. Fixation was substantial in disturbed forests and some gaps but near zero in the high N soils of mature forest. Our findings suggest that canopy legumes closely regulate N(2) fixation, leading to large variations in N inputs across the landscape, and low symbiotic fixation in mature forests despite abundant legumes.

  5. Anaerobic Degradation of Cyanuric Acid, Cysteine, and Atrazine by a Facultative Anaerobic Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Jessee, J. A.; Benoit, R. E.; Hendricks, A. C.; Allen, G. C.; Neal, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    A facultative anaerobic bacterium that rapidly degrades cyanuric acid (CA) was isolated from the sediment of a stream that received industrial wastewater effluent. CA decomposition was measured throughout the growth cycle by using a high-performance liquid chromatography assay, and the concomitant production of ammonia was also measured. The bacterium used CA or cysteine as a major, if not the sole, carbon and energy source under anaerobic, but not aerobic, conditions in a defined medium. The cell yield was greatly enhanced by the simultaneous presence of cysteine and CA in the medium. Cysteine was preferentially used rather than CA early in the growth cycle, but all of the CA was used without an apparent lag after the cysteine was metabolized. Atrazine was also degraded by this bacterium under anaerobic conditions in a defined medium. PMID:16346187

  6. Distribution of the mevalonate and glyceraldehyde phosphate/pyruvate pathways for isoprenoid biosynthesis in unicellular algae and the cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6714.

    PubMed Central

    Disch, A; Schwender, J; Müller, C; Lichtenthaler, H K; Rohmer, M

    1998-01-01

    Isopentenyl diphosphate, the universal isoprenoid precursor, can be produced by two different biosynthetic routes: either via the acetate/mevalonate (MVA) pathway, or via the more recently identified MVA-independent glyceraldehyde phosphate/pyruvate pathway. These two pathways are easily differentiated by incorporation of [1-13C]glucose and analysis of the resulting labelling patterns found in the isoprenoids. This method was successfully applied to several unicellular algae raised under heterotrophic growth conditions and allowed for the identification of the pathways that were utilized for isoprenoid biosynthesis. All isoprenoids examined (sterols, phytol, carotenoids) of the green algae Chlorella fusca and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii were synthesized via the GAP/pyruvate pathway, as in another previously investigated green alga, Scenedesmus obliquus, which was also shown in this study to synthesize ubiquinone by the same MVA-independent route. In the red alga Cyanidium caldarium and in the Chrysophyte Ochromonas danica a clear dichotomy was observed: as in higher plants, sterols were formed via the MVA route, whereas chloroplast isoprenoids (phytol in Cy. caldarium and O. danica and beta-carotene in O. danica) were synthesized via the GAP/pyruvate route. In contrast, the Euglenophyte Euglena gracilis synthesized ergosterol, as well as phytol, via the acetate/MVA route. Similar feeding experiments were performed with the cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6714 using [1-13C]- and [6-13C]-glucose. The two isoprenoids examined, phytol and beta-carotene, were shown to have the typical labelling pattern derived from the GAP/pyruvate route. PMID:9657979

  7. Photoperiod Extension Enhances Sexual Megaspore Formation and Triggers Metabolic Reprogramming in Facultative Apomictic Ranunculus auricomus.

    PubMed

    Klatt, Simone; Hadacek, Franz; Hodač, Ladislav; Brinkmann, Gina; Eilerts, Marius; Hojsgaard, Diego; Hörandl, Elvira

    2016-01-01

    Meiosis, the key step of sexual reproduction, persists in facultative apomictic plants functional to some extent. However, it still remains unclear how and why proportions of reproductive pathways vary under different environmental stress conditions. We hypothesized that oxidative stress mediates alterations of developmental pathways. In apomictic plants we expected that megasporogenesis, the stage directly after meiosis, would be more affected than later stages of seed development. To simulate moderate stress conditions we subjected clone-mates of facultative apomictic Ranunculus auricomus to 10 h photoperiods, reflecting natural conditions, and extended ones (16.5 h). Reproduction mode was screened directly after megasporogenesis (microscope) and at seed stage (flow cytometric seed screening). Targeted metabolite profiles were performed with HPLC-DAD to explore if and which metabolic reprogramming was caused by the extended photoperiod. Prolonged photoperiods resulted in increased frequencies of sexual vs. aposporous initials directly after meiosis, but did not affect frequencies of sexual vs. asexual seed formation. Changes in secondary metabolite profiles under extended photoperiods affected all classes of compounds, and c. 20% of these changes separated the two treatments. Unexpectedly, the renowned antioxidant phenylpropanoids and flavonoids added more to clone-mate variation than to treatment differentiation. Among others, chlorophyll degradation products, non-assigned phenolic compounds and more lipophilic metabolites also contributed to the dissimilarity of the metabolic profiles of plants that had been exposed to the two different photoperiods. The hypothesis of moderate light stress effects was supported by increased proportions of sexual megaspore development at the expense of aposporous initial formation. The lack of effects at the seed stage confirms the basic assumption that only meiosis and sporogenesis would be sensitive to light stress. The

  8. O2-sensing and O2-dependent gene regulation in facultatively anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Unden, G; Becker, S; Bongaerts, J; Holighaus, G; Schirawski, J; Six, S

    1995-08-01

    Availability of O2 is one of the most important regulatory signals in facultatively anaerobic bacteria. Various two- or one-component sensor/regulator systems control the expression of aerobic and anaerobic metabolism in response to O2. Most of the sensor proteins contain heme or Fe as cofactors that interact with O2 either by binding or by a redox reaction. The ArcA/ArcB regulator of aerobic metabolism in Escherichia coli may use a different sensory mechanism. In two-component regulators, the sensor is located in the cytoplasmic membrane, whereas one-component regulators are located in the cytoplasm. Under most conditions, O2 can readily reach the cytoplasm and could provide the signal in the cytoplasm. The transcriptional regulator FNR of E. Coli controls the expression of many genes required for anaerobic metabolism in response to O2. Functional homologs of FNR are present in facultatively anaerobic Proteobacteria and presumably also in gram-positive bacteria. The target genes of FNR are mostly under multiple regulation by FNR and other regulators that respond to O2, nitrate, or glucose. FNR represents a 'one-component' sensor/regulator and contains Fe for signal perception. In response to O2 availability, FNR is converted reversibly from the aerobic (inactive) state to the anaerobic (active) state. Experiments suggest that the Fe cofactor is bound by four essential cysteine residues. The O2-triggered transformation between active and inactive FNR presumably is due to a redox reaction at the Fe cofactor, but other modes of interaction cannot be excluded. O2 seems to affect the site-specific DNA binding of FNR at target genes or the formation of an active transcriptional complex with RNA polymerase.

  9. Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Enteric Gram Negative Facultative Anaerobe Bacilli in Aerobic versus Anaerobic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Amachawadi, Raghavendra G.; Renter, David G.; Volkova, Victoriya V.

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial treatments result in the host’s enteric bacteria being exposed to the antimicrobials. Pharmacodynamic models can describe how this exposure affects the enteric bacteria and their antimicrobial resistance. The models utilize measurements of bacterial antimicrobial susceptibility traditionally obtained in vitro in aerobic conditions. However, in vivo enteric bacteria are exposed to antimicrobials in anaerobic conditions of the lower intestine. Some of enteric bacteria of food animals are potential foodborne pathogens, e.g., Gram-negative bacilli Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica. These are facultative anaerobes; their physiology and growth rates change in anaerobic conditions. We hypothesized that their antimicrobial susceptibility also changes, and evaluated differences in the susceptibility in aerobic vs. anaerobic conditions of generic E. coli and Salmonella enterica of diverse serovars isolated from cattle feces. Susceptibility of an isolate was evaluated as its minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) measured by E-Test® following 24 hours of adaptation to the conditions on Mueller-Hinton agar, and on a more complex tryptic soy agar with 5% sheep blood (BAP) media. We considered all major antimicrobial drug classes used in the U.S. to treat cattle: β-lactams (specifically, ampicillin and ceftriaxone E-Test®), aminoglycosides (gentamicin and kanamycin), fluoroquinolones (enrofloxacin), classical macrolides (erythromycin), azalides (azithromycin), sulfanomides (sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim), and tetracyclines (tetracycline). Statistical analyses were conducted for the isolates (n≥30) interpreted as susceptible to the antimicrobials based on the clinical breakpoint interpretation for human infection. Bacterial susceptibility to every antimicrobial tested was statistically significantly different in anaerobic vs. aerobic conditions on both media, except for no difference in susceptibility to ceftriaxone on BAP agar. A satellite experiment

  10. Photoperiod Extension Enhances Sexual Megaspore Formation and Triggers Metabolic Reprogramming in Facultative Apomictic Ranunculus auricomus

    PubMed Central

    Klatt, Simone; Hadacek, Franz; Hodač, Ladislav; Brinkmann, Gina; Eilerts, Marius; Hojsgaard, Diego; Hörandl, Elvira

    2016-01-01

    Meiosis, the key step of sexual reproduction, persists in facultative apomictic plants functional to some extent. However, it still remains unclear how and why proportions of reproductive pathways vary under different environmental stress conditions. We hypothesized that oxidative stress mediates alterations of developmental pathways. In apomictic plants we expected that megasporogenesis, the stage directly after meiosis, would be more affected than later stages of seed development. To simulate moderate stress conditions we subjected clone-mates of facultative apomictic Ranunculus auricomus to 10 h photoperiods, reflecting natural conditions, and extended ones (16.5 h). Reproduction mode was screened directly after megasporogenesis (microscope) and at seed stage (flow cytometric seed screening). Targeted metabolite profiles were performed with HPLC–DAD to explore if and which metabolic reprogramming was caused by the extended photoperiod. Prolonged photoperiods resulted in increased frequencies of sexual vs. aposporous initials directly after meiosis, but did not affect frequencies of sexual vs. asexual seed formation. Changes in secondary metabolite profiles under extended photoperiods affected all classes of compounds, and c. 20% of these changes separated the two treatments. Unexpectedly, the renowned antioxidant phenylpropanoids and flavonoids added more to clone-mate variation than to treatment differentiation. Among others, chlorophyll degradation products, non-assigned phenolic compounds and more lipophilic metabolites also contributed to the dissimilarity of the metabolic profiles of plants that had been exposed to the two different photoperiods. The hypothesis of moderate light stress effects was supported by increased proportions of sexual megaspore development at the expense of aposporous initial formation. The lack of effects at the seed stage confirms the basic assumption that only meiosis and sporogenesis would be sensitive to light stress. The

  11. Geographic variation in a facultative mutualism: consequences for local arthropod composition and diversity.

    PubMed

    Rudgers, Jennifer A; Savage, Amy M; Rúa, Megan A

    2010-08-01

    Geographic variation in the outcome of interspecific interactions may influence not only the evolutionary trajectories of species but also the structure of local communities. We investigated this community consequence of geographic variation for a facultative mutualism between ants and wild cotton (Gossypium thurberi). Ants consume wild cotton extrafloral nectar and can protect plants from herbivores. We chose three sites that differed in interaction outcome, including a mutualism (ants provided the greatest benefits to plant fitness and responded to manipulations of extrafloral nectar), a potential commensalism (ants increased plant fitness but were unresponsive to extrafloral nectar), and a neutral interaction (ants neither affected plant fitness nor responded to extrafloral nectar). At all sites, we manipulated ants and extrafloral nectar in a factorial design and monitored the abundance, diversity, and composition of other arthropods occurring on wild cotton plants. We predicted that the effects of ants and extrafloral nectar on arthropods would be largest in the location with the mutualism and weakest where the interaction was neutral. A non-metric multidimensional scaling analysis revealed that the presence of ants altered arthropod composition, but only at the two sites in which ants increased plant fitness. At the site with the mutualism, ants also suppressed detritivore/scavenger abundance and increased aphids. The presence of extrafloral nectar increased arthropod abundance where mutual benefits were the strongest, whereas both arthropod abundance and morphospecies richness declined with extrafloral nectar availability at the site with the weakest ant-plant interaction. Some responses were geographically invariable: total arthropod richness and evenness declined by approximately 20% on plants with ants, and extrafloral nectar reduced carnivore abundance when ants were excluded from plants. These results demonstrate that a facultative ant-plant mutualism

  12. Genome Sequence of the Facultative Anaerobic Arsenite-Oxidizing and Nitrate-Reducing Bacterium Acidovorax sp. Strain NO1

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yinyan; Li, Hang; Rensing, Christopher; Zhao, Kai; Johnstone, Laurel

    2012-01-01

    Acidovorax sp. strain NO1, isolated from gold mine soil, was shown to be a facultative anaerobic arsenite-oxidizing and nitrate-reducing bacterium. The reported draft genome predicts the presence of genes involved in arsenic metabolism, nitrate reduction, phosphate transport, and multiple metal resistances and indicates putative horizontal gene transfer events. PMID:22374962

  13. Coalescent Times and Patterns of Genetic Diversity in Species with Facultative Sex: Effects of Gene Conversion, Population Structure, and Heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Hartfield, Matthew; Wright, Stephen I; Agrawal, Aneil F

    2016-01-01

    Many diploid organisms undergo facultative sexual reproduction. However, little is currently known concerning the distribution of neutral genetic variation among facultative sexual organisms except in very simple cases. Understanding this distribution is important when making inferences about rates of sexual reproduction, effective population size, and demographic history. Here we extend coalescent theory in diploids with facultative sex to consider gene conversion, selfing, population subdivision, and temporal and spatial heterogeneity in rates of sex. In addition to analytical results for two-sample coalescent times, we outline a coalescent algorithm that accommodates the complexities arising from partial sex; this algorithm can be used to generate multisample coalescent distributions. A key result is that when sex is rare, gene conversion becomes a significant force in reducing diversity within individuals. This can reduce genomic signatures of infrequent sex (i.e., elevated within-individual allelic sequence divergence) or entirely reverse the predicted patterns. These models offer improved methods for assessing null patterns of molecular variation in facultative sexual organisms.

  14. Performance evaluation and spatial sludge distribution at facultative and maturation ponds treating wastewater from an international airport.

    PubMed

    Passos, Ricardo Gomes; von Sperling, Marcos; Ribeiro, Thiago Bressani

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a performance evaluation of facultative and maturation ponds in series treating wastewater from a large and intensively used international airport in Brazil, based on 16 years of regular monitoring. The wastewater from the airport showed similar or slightly lower concentrations compared to typical domestic sewage for most of the quality parameters. The contribution of effluents with possible industrial features (aircraft toilets and hangar effluent) did not seem to have adversely affected the characteristics of the influent in terms of aptitude to biological treatment. Overall, the ponds operated under very underloaded conditions (mean loading rate of 44 kg biochemical oxygen demand/ha.d in the facultative pond) and presented a satisfactory quality in terms of effluent concentrations for most parameters. A bathymetric survey of the ponds was done manually by a low-cost measurer constructed specifically for this purpose. After 27 years of operation, only 25% and 18% of the volumes of the facultative and maturation ponds were occupied by sludge. Specific sludge accumulation rates were 0.0071 m³/passenger.year for the facultative pond and 0.00017 m³/passenger.year for the maturation pond.

  15. Coalescent Times and Patterns of Genetic Diversity in Species with Facultative Sex: Effects of Gene Conversion, Population Structure, and Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Hartfield, Matthew; Wright, Stephen I.; Agrawal, Aneil F.

    2016-01-01

    Many diploid organisms undergo facultative sexual reproduction. However, little is currently known concerning the distribution of neutral genetic variation among facultative sexual organisms except in very simple cases. Understanding this distribution is important when making inferences about rates of sexual reproduction, effective population size, and demographic history. Here we extend coalescent theory in diploids with facultative sex to consider gene conversion, selfing, population subdivision, and temporal and spatial heterogeneity in rates of sex. In addition to analytical results for two-sample coalescent times, we outline a coalescent algorithm that accommodates the complexities arising from partial sex; this algorithm can be used to generate multisample coalescent distributions. A key result is that when sex is rare, gene conversion becomes a significant force in reducing diversity within individuals. This can reduce genomic signatures of infrequent sex (i.e., elevated within-individual allelic sequence divergence) or entirely reverse the predicted patterns. These models offer improved methods for assessing null patterns of molecular variation in facultative sexual organisms. PMID:26584902

  16. Research on waste stabilisation ponds in the United Kingdom--initial results from pilot-scale facultative ponds.

    PubMed

    Abis, K L; Mara, D D

    2003-01-01

    Three pilot-scale facultative ponds were constructed at Esholt wastewater treatment works in Bradford, West Yorkshire, UK. The ponds were operated in parallel to test the effect of surface BOD loading on performance and the maintenance of facultative conditions. The performance criteria adopted were BOD, SS and ammonia removal. The criterion for facultative conditions was the presence of an algal population maintaining aerobic conditions at the pond surface. Filtered BOD removal was found to be more than 90%, non-seasonal, and related to areal BOD loading. SS removal was also found to be non-seasonal, at around 95% but not related to areal BOD load. Ammonia removal was seasonal (32-48% October to March; 60-81% March to July) and related to areal BOD load. At the test loadings (60, 110 and 169 kg/ha.d) an algal population was not maintained in winter. The initial results indicate that a much lower loading is required to maintain facultative conditions than to optimise BOD and SS removal.

  17. Engineering analysis of the high-density heterotrophic cultivation of mung bean sprouts.

    PubMed

    Tamate, Haruka; Nakai, Ran; Nakamori, Yasuyuki; Esashi, Masahiro; Iwamoto, Yasushi; Tsukada, Yoshihiro; Saito, Mika; Ishikawa, Daitaro; Fujii, Tomoyuki

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated the heterotrophic growth behavior of mung beans cultivated in an individual bed under water supply. The fresh weight of mung beans in the bed was estimated, and changes in temperature, and oxygen and carbon dioxide concentrations were recorded during the cultivation period. The specific growth rate, oxygen uptake rate, and carbon dioxide evolution rate, based on the fresh weight in the bed, were calculated. Growth under heterotrophic cultivation can be classified into the following three stages. Reductions in specific oxygen uptake rate, specific carbon dioxide evolution rate, and specific energy production rate corresponded to that of specific growth rate. Indicators of biological activity related to oxygen and carbon dioxide were evaluated quantitatively for beds under high-density heterotrophic cultivation. Moreover, the results obtained from this study successfully demonstrate that there is a relationship between the growth of mung beans and indicators of biological activity.

  18. Autotrophic and heterotrophic microalgae and cyanobacteria cultivation for food and feed: life cycle assessment.

    PubMed

    Smetana, Sergiy; Sandmann, Michael; Rohn, Sascha; Pleissner, Daniel; Heinz, Volker

    2017-08-20

    The lack of protein sources in Europe could be reduced with onsite production of microalgae with autotrophic and heterotrophic systems, owing the confirmation of economic and environmental benefits. This study aimed at the life cycle assessment (LCA) of microalgae and cyanobacteria cultivation (Chlorella vulgaris and Arthrospira platensis) in autotrophic and heterotrophic conditions on a pilot industrial scale (in model conditions of Berlin, Germany) with further biomass processing for food and feed products. The comparison of analysis results with traditional benchmarks (protein concentrates) indicated higher environmental impact of microalgae protein powders. However high-moisture extrusion of heterotrophic cultivated C. vulgaris resulted in more environmentally sustainable product than pork and beef. Further optimization of production with Chlorella pyrenoidosa on hydrolyzed food waste could reduce environmental impact in 4.5 times and create one of the most sustainable sources of proteins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Ocean microbes. Multispecies diel transcriptional oscillations in open ocean heterotrophic bacterial assemblages.

    PubMed

    Ottesen, Elizabeth A; Young, Curtis R; Gifford, Scott M; Eppley, John M; Marin, Roman; Schuster, Stephan C; Scholin, Christopher A; DeLong, Edward F

    2014-07-11

    Oscillating diurnal rhythms of gene transcription, metabolic activity, and behavior are found in all three domains of life. However, diel cycles in naturally occurring heterotrophic bacteria and archaea have rarely been observed. Here, we report time-resolved whole-genome transcriptome profiles of multiple, naturally occurring oceanic bacterial populations sampled in situ over 3 days. As anticipated, the cyanobacterial transcriptome exhibited pronounced diel periodicity. Unexpectedly, several different heterotrophic bacterioplankton groups also displayed diel cycling in many of their gene transcripts. Furthermore, diel oscillations in different heterotrophic bacterial groups suggested population-specific timing of peak transcript expression in a variety of metabolic gene suites. These staggered multispecies waves of diel gene transcription may influence both the tempo and the mode of matter and energy transformation in the sea.

  20. Negative consequences of glacial turbidity for the survival of freshwater planktonic heterotrophic flagellates.

    PubMed

    Sommaruga, Ruben; Kandolf, Georg

    2014-02-17

    Heterotrophic (phagotrophic) flagellates are key components of planktonic food webs in freshwater and marine ecosystems because they are the main consumers of bacteria. Although they are ubiquitous in aquatic ecosystems, they were numerically undetectable in turbid glacier-fed lakes. Here we show that glacial particles had negative effects on the survival and growth of heterotrophic flagellates. The effect of glacial particles was concentration-dependent and was caused by their interference with bacterial uptake rather than by physical damage. These results are the first to reveal why establishment of heterotrophic flagellates populations is hindered in very turbid glacial lakes. Because glaciers are vanishing around the world, recently formed turbid meltwater lakes represent an excellent opportunity to understand the environmental conditions that probably shaped the establishment of lake communities at the end of the last glaciation.

  1. N2O and N2 production during heterotrophic nitrification by Alcaligenes faecalis strain NR.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bin; An, Qiang; He, Yi Liang; Guo, Jin Song

    2012-07-01

    A heterotrophic nitrifier, strain NR, was isolated from a membrane bioreactor. Strain NR was identified as Alcaligenes faecalis by Auto-Microbic system and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. A. faecalis strain NR shows a capability of heterotrophic nitrification and N(2)O and N(2) production as well under the aerobic condition. Further tests demonstrated that neither nitrite nor nitrate could be denitrified aerobically by strain NR. However, when hydroxylamine was used as the sole nitrogen source, nitrogenous gases were detected. With an enzyme assay, a 0.063 U activity of hydroxylamine oxidase was observed, while nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase were undetectable. Thus, nitrogenous gas was speculated to be produced via hydroxylamine. Therefore, two different metabolic pathways might exist in A. faecalis NR. One is heterotrophic nitrification by oxidizing ammonium to nitrite and nitrate. The other is oxidizing ammonium to nitrogenous gas directly via hydroxylamine.

  2. Nitrate and bromate removal by autotrophic and heterotrophic denitrification processes: batch experiments

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The effects of various parameters on bromate reduction were tested using lab-scale batch reactors with sulfur based autotrophic and methanol based heterotrophic denitrification processes. The initial bromate (BrO3–) concentration of 100 and 500 μg/L was completely reduced and bromide (Br-) was produced stoichiometrically from bromate in all batch reactors. In all experiments, nitrate was completely reduced to below detection limit. Kinetic studies showed that the sulfur-based autotrophic nitrate reduction rate increased with increasing initial nitrate concentration. At stoichiometrically sufficient methanol concentration as an external carbon source, nitrate and bromate were reduced to below US EPA drinking water limits in heterotrophic denitrification conditions. The methanol was completely depleted at the end of the heterotrophic operation conditions. PMID:24354945

  3. Removal of cyanobacteria, cyanotoxins, heterotrophic bacteria and endotoxins at an operating surface water treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Rapala, J; Niemelä, M; Berg, K A; Lepistö, L; Lahti, K

    2006-01-01

    The removal of cyanobacteria, hepatotoxins produced by them (microcystins), phytoplankton, heterotrophic bacteria and endotoxins were monitored at a surface water treatment plant with coagulation, clarification, sand filtration, ozonation, slow sand filtration and chlorination as the treatment process. Coagulation-sand filtration reduced microcystins by 1.2-2.4, and endotoxins by 0.72-2.01 log10 units. Ozonation effectively removed the residual microcystins. The treatment process reduced phytoplankton biomass by 2.2-4.6 and heterotrophic bacteria by 2.0-5.0 log10 units. In treated water, the concentration of microcystins never exceeded the WHO guide value (1 microg/L), but picoplankton and monad cells were often detected in high numbers. The heterotrophic bacterial isolates from the treated waters belonged to genera Sphingomonas, Pseudomonas, Bacillus, Herbaspirillum and Bosea.

  4. Evolution of Anabaenopeptin Peptide Structural Variability in the Cyanobacterium Planktothrix

    PubMed Central

    Entfellner, Elisabeth; Frei, Mark; Christiansen, Guntram; Deng, Li; Blom, Jochen; Kurmayer, Rainer

    2017-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are frequently involved in the formation of harmful algal blooms wherein, apart from the toxic microcystins, other groups of bioactive peptides are abundant as well, such as anabaenopeptins (APs). The APs are synthesized nonribosomally as cyclic hexapeptides with various amino acids at the exocyclic position. We investigated the presence and recombination of the AP synthesis gene cluster (apnA-E) through comparing 125 strains of the bloom-forming cyanobacterium Planktothrix spp., which were isolated from numerous shallow and deep water habitats in the temperate and tropical climatic zone. Ten ecologically divergent strains were purified and genome sequenced to compare their entire apnA-E gene cluster. In order to quantify apn gene distribution patterns, all the strains were investigated by PCR amplification of 2 kbp portions of the entire apn gene cluster without interruption. Within the 11 strains assigned to P. pseudagardhii, P. mougeotii, or P. tepida (Lineage 3), neither apnA-E genes nor remnants were observed. Within the P. agardhii/P. rubescens strains from shallow waters (Lineage 1, 52 strains), strains both carrying and lacking apn genes occurred, while among the strains lacking the apnA-E genes, the presence of the 5′end flanking region indicated a gene cluster deletion. Among the strains of the more derived deep water ecotype (Lineage 2, 62 strains), apnA-E genes were always present. A high similarity of apn genes of the genus Planktothrix when compared with strains of the genus Microcystis suggested its horizontal gene transfer during the speciation of P. agardhii/P. rubescens. Genetic analysis of the first (A1-) domain of the apnA gene, encoding synthesis of the exocyclic position of the AP molecule, revealed four genotype groups that corresponded with substrate activation. Groups of genotypes were either related to Arginine only, the coproduction of Arginine and Tyrosine or Arginine and Lysine, or even the coproduction of Arginine

  5. Heterotrophic bacteria in soils of Larsemann Oasis of East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churilin, Nikita; Soina, Vera

    2015-04-01

    The study of diversity and functional state of microorganisms in subsurface rocks layers, their participation in the biochemical weathering and formation of organic horizons of soils is important for understanding ecology and microorganisms in Antarctic soils. The study of cultured forms of microorganisms and their potential viability is still relevant to characterize the physiological state, biological activity and resilience of microorganisms involved in the initial soil formation. Improvement of isolation techniques of viable bacteria from the extreme habitats has a particular importance for rising the efficiency of environmental monitoring. The aim of the study was to investigate the viable heterotrophic bacteria involved in the formation of soils from wet valleys Larsemann Oasis, which is one of the warmest ice-free space of East Antarctica. Soil samples were taken from the intermountain humid valleys, where silt-gravelly substrates formed moss, algae, lichen cover. We used nutrient solutions (trypticase soy, R2A and glucose-peptone) to isolate cultured bacteria and study their morphological types in the light microscope. The total number of microorganisms was determined by fluorescent microscopy with acridine orange. SEM was used for morphological studies of bacterial communities in situ. To activate the growth processes we added into nutrient solutions various regulatory metabolites that have dose-dependence and operate at the community level. Physiological and functional conditions were determined by the duration of the lag phase and specific growth rate of bacterial communities in nutrient solutions containing various organic substrates. Soils form under protection of «stone pavement» and organisms leave the surface, so the forming organo-mineral horizon occurs inside of rock, thus the microprofile can form on both sides of the organic horizons. UV radiation, lack of moisture and strong wind are main limiting factors for microorganisms' growth in

  6. Sunlight modulates the relative importance of heterotrophic bacteria and picophytoplankton in DMSP-sulphur uptake

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-González, Clara; Simó, Rafel; Vila-Costa, Maria; Sommaruga, Ruben; Gasol, Josep M

    2012-01-01

    There is a large body of evidence supporting a major role of heterotrophic bacteria in dimethylsulphoniopropionate (DMSP) utilisation as a source of reduced sulphur. However, a role for phototrophic microorganisms has been only recently described and little is known about their contribution to DMSP consumption and the potential modulating effects of sunlight. In an attempt to ascertain the relative quantitative roles of heterotrophic bacteria and picophytoplankton in the osmoheterotrophic uptake of DMSP-sulphur upon exposure to natural sunlight conditions, we incubated northwestern Mediterranean waters under various optical filters and used an array of bulk and single-cell activity methods to trace the fate of added 35S-DMSP. Flow cytometry cell sorting confirmed dark 35S uptake by Prochlorococcus, Synechococcus and heterotrophic bacteria, the latter being the most efficient in terms of uptake on a cell volume basis. Under exposure to full sunlight, however, the relative contribution of Synechococcus was significantly enhanced, mainly because of the inhibition of heterotrophic bacteria. Microautoradiography showed a strong increase in the proportion of Synechococcus cells actively taking up 35S-DMSP, which, after full sunlight exposure, made up to 15% of total active Bacteria. Parallel incubations with 3H-leucine generally showed no clear responses to light. Finally, size-fractionated assimilation experiments showed greater relative cyanobacterial assimilation during the day than at night compared with that of heterotrophic bacteria. Our results show for the first time a major influence of sunlight in regulating the competition among autotrophic and heterotrophic picoplankton for DMSP uptake at both the daily and seasonal time scales. PMID:21955992

  7. Dried Colony in Cyanobacterium, Nostoc sp. HK-01 — Several high Space Environment Tolerances for ``Tanpopo'' Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita-Yokotani, K.; Kimura, S.; Kimura, Y.; Igarashi, Y.; Ajioka, R.; Sato, S.; Katoh, H.; Baba, K.

    2013-11-01

    A cyanobacterium, Nostoc sp. HK-01, has high several space environmental tolerance. Nostoc sp HK-01 would have high contribution for the “Tanpopo” mission in Japan Experimental Module of the International Space Station.

  8. Alternative model and approach for determining microbial heterotrophic activities in aquatic systems.

    PubMed Central

    Dietz, A S; Albright, L J; Tuominen, T

    1977-01-01

    Increasing amounts of high-specific-activity tritiated organic compounds were added to samples of several natural waters such that in situ substrate concentrations might be approximated. The uptake responses by the native heterotrophic microflora suggested that (i) heterotrophic populations metabolize the added nutrients, but (ii) these responses are not necessarily a reflection of Michaelis-Menten enzyme kinetics. The uptake kinetics appeared to be due to dilution of the naturally occurring metabolite by added radioactive substrate and physiological responses of the microflora to organic enrichment. PMID:326186

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of the Axenic Strain Phormidesmis priestleyi ULC007, a Cyanobacterium Isolated from Lake Bruehwiler (Larsemann Hills, Antarctica)

    PubMed Central

    Durieu, Benoit; Cornet, Luc; Verlaine, Olivier; Rippka, Rosmarie; Pessi, Igor S.; Misztak, Agnieszka; Joris, Bernard; Javaux, Emmanuelle J.; Baurain, Denis

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Phormidesmis priestleyi ULC007 is an Antarctic freshwater cyanobacterium. Its draft genome is 5,684,389 bp long. It contains a total of 5,604 protein-encoding genes, of which 22.2% have no clear homologues in known genomes. To date, this draft genome is the first one ever determined for an axenic cyanobacterium from Antarctica. PMID:28209814

  10. Differential lipid and fatty acid profiles of photoautotrophic and heterotrophic Chlorella zofingiensis: assessment of algal oils for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin; Huang, Junchao; Sun, Zheng; Zhong, Yujuan; Jiang, Yue; Chen, Feng

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to document and compare the lipid class and fatty acid composition of the green microalga Chlorella zofingiensis cultivated under photoautotrophic and heterotrophic conditions. Compared with photoautotrophic cells, a 900% increase in lipid yield was achieved in heterotrophic cells fed with 30 g L(-1) of glucose. Furthermore heterotrophic cells accumulated predominantly neutral lipids (NL) that accounted for 79.5% of total lipids with 88.7% being triacylglycerol (TAG); whereas photoautotrophic cells contained mainly the membrane lipids glycolipids (GL) and phospholipids (PL). Together with the much higher content of oleic acid (C18:1) (35.2% of total fatty acids), oils from heterotrophic C. zofingiensis appear to be more feasible for biodiesel production. Our study highlights the possibility of using heterotrophic algae for producing high quality biodiesel.

  11. TEM Study of Manganese Biosorption by Cyanobacterium Synechocystis 6803

    SciTech Connect

    Dohnalkova, Alice; Bilskis, Christina L.; Kennedy, David W.

    2006-09-01

    The capture of solar energy and its conversion into chemical energy in photosynthetic organisms involves a series of charge reactions across photosynthetic membranes. Oxygen is generated by a proton-electron coupling in photosystem II (PSII) during a water oxidation process where hydrogen is extracted from water terminally bound to a Mn4Ca1Clx inorganic cluster [1]. Manganese is, therefore, an essential catalytic element for photosynthetic growth in cyanobacteria and plants. Since bioavailability of this micronutrient largely depends on the Mn concentration in natural environments, cells have to manage its uptake in order to endure Mn fluctuations. Previous studies have shown that metal biosorption in cyanobacteria can occur by passive adsorption to their outer membrane (pool A), and by metabolically mediated internal uptake [2]. The fresh water cyanobacterium Synechocystis 6803 has been widely used as a model organism for studying photosynthetic processes. This Gram-negative organism has an intricate architecture of internal thylakoid membranes where photosynthetic electron transfer takes place. Here we report on the spatial distribution of Mn biosorbed by cells in both external pool A and intracellular pool B, as observed and analyzed by methods of TEM. The Synechocystis 6803 cells were cultured in BG11 medium at 30 C with continuous irradiance and constant air bubbling. To determine the influence of solid or liquid Mn substrate and its oxidation state on the cell biosorption ability, cells were exposed to two Mn substrates: 1mM solution of MnCl2, and 0.5mM suspension of nanocrystalline MnO2. Cells were incubated with the respective Mn solutions for 48 hours, harvested, and processed using a modified protocol for plastic embedding of bacterial samples containing minerals that was developed in our laboratory [3]. In order to preserve the fragile redox conditions within the cells, all the common heavy metal-based fixatives and stains were omitted, resulting in

  12. Woodchip-sulfur based heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrification (WSHAD) process for nitrate contaminated water remediation.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Feng, Chuanping; Hu, Weiwu; Xi, Beidou; Chen, Nan; Zhao, Baowei; Liu, Ying; Hao, Chunbo; Pu, Jiaoyang

    2016-02-01

    Nitrate contaminated water can be effectively treated by simultaneous heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrification (HAD). In the present study, woodchips and elemental sulfur were used as co-electron donors for HAD. It was found that ammonium salts could enhance the denitrifying activity of the Thiobacillus bacteria, which utilize the ammonium that is produced by the dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) in the woodchip-sulfur based heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrification (WSHAD) process. The denitrification performance of the WSHAD process (reaction constants range from 0.05485 h(-1) to 0.06637 h(-1)) is better than that of sulfur-based autotrophic denitrification (reaction constants range from 0.01029 h(-1) to 0.01379 h(-1)), and the optimized ratio of woodchips to sulfur is 1:1 (w/w). No sulfate accumulation is observed in the WSHAD process and the alkalinity generated in the heterotrophic denitrification can compensate for alkalinity consumption by the sulfur-based autotrophic denitrification. The symbiotic relationship between the autotrophic and the heterotrophic denitrification processes play a vital role in the mixotrophic environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Endogenous respiration process analysis of heterotrophic biomass and autotrophic biomass based on respiration map ].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-hua; Bai, Xu-li; Zhang, Qin; Liu, Yi; He, Chun-bo

    2014-09-01

    The endogenous process is an important metabolic part of the activated sludge, and the understanding of this process is still unclear. Characteristics of endogenous respiration for heterotrophic bacteria and autotrophic nitrifiers were analyzed using respirogram. Results showed that both heterotrophic and autotrophic bacteria entered the stage of endogenous respiration at almost the same time, but heterotrophic bacteria first entered the stage of dormancy i. e. , they were easier to recover a higher proportion of biomass during the dormancy stage, indicating that heterotrophic bacteria exhibited strong environmental adaptability. Autotrophic bacteria were, however, quite different. This finding confirmed that autotrophic bacteria were more vulnerable from the viewpoint of endogenous respiration. In addition, the study also found that the increase of endogenous respiration rate ratio reflected the decreased sludge activity. And the proportion of endogenous respiration was an important parameter to characterize the activity of activated sludge, which can be used as a quantitative index for the health status of activated sludge. The findings further deepened the understanding of endogenous respiration process and provided a theoretical basis for the operation and management of wastewater treatment plants.

  14. Uptake, Accumulation and Toxicity of Silver Nanoparticle in Autotrophic Plants, and Heterotrophic Microbes: A Concentric Review

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Durgesh K.; Tripathi, Ashutosh; Shweta; Singh, Swati; Singh, Yashwant; Vishwakarma, Kanchan; Yadav, Gaurav; Sharma, Shivesh; Singh, Vivek K.; Mishra, Rohit K.; Upadhyay, R. G.; Dubey, Nawal K.; Lee, Yonghoon; Chauhan, Devendra K.

    2017-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a cutting-edge field of science with the potential to revolutionize today’s technological advances including industrial applications. It is being utilized for the welfare of mankind; but at the same time, the unprecedented use and uncontrolled release of nanomaterials into the environment poses enormous threat to living organisms. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are used in several industries and its continuous release may hamper many physiological and biochemical processes in the living organisms including autotrophs and heterotrophs. The present review gives a concentric know-how of the effects of AgNPs on the lower and higher autotrophic plants as well as on heterotrophic microbes so as to have better understanding of the differences in effects among these two groups. It also focuses on the mechanism of uptake, translocation, accumulation in the plants and microbes, and resulting toxicity as well as tolerance mechanisms by which these microorganisms are able to survive and reduce the effects of AgNPs. This review differentiates the impact of silver nanoparticles at various levels between autotrophs and heterotrophs and signifies the prevailing tolerance mechanisms. With this background, a comprehensive idea can be made with respect to the influence of AgNPs on lower and higher autotrophic plants together with heterotrophic microbes and new insights can be generated for the researchers to understand the toxicity and tolerance mechanisms of AgNPs in plants and microbes. PMID:28184215

  15. Impact of Sulfur Starvation in Autotrophic and Heterotrophic Cultures of the Extremophilic Microalga Galdieria phlegrea (Cyanidiophyceae).

    PubMed

    Carfagna, Simona; Bottone, Claudia; Cataletto, Pia Rosa; Petriccione, Milena; Pinto, Gabriele; Salbitani, Giovanna; Vona, Vincenza; Pollio, Antonino; Ciniglia, Claudia

    2016-09-01

    In plants and algae, sulfate assimilation and cysteine synthesis are regulated by sulfur (S) accessibility from the environment. This study reports the effects of S deprivation in autotrophic and heterotrophic cultures of Galdieria phlegrea (Cyanidiophyceae), a unicellular red alga isolated in the Solfatara crater located in Campi Flegrei (Naples, Italy), where H2S is the prevalent form of gaseous S in the fumarolic fluids and S is widespread in the soils near the fumaroles. This is the first report on the effects of S deprivation on a sulfurous microalga that is also able to grow heterotrophically in the dark. The removal of S from the culture medium of illuminated cells caused a decrease in the soluble protein content and a significant decrease in the intracellular levels of glutathione. Cells from heterotrophic cultures of G. phlegrea exhibited high levels of internal proteins and high glutathione content, which did not diminish during S starvation, but rather glutathione significantly increased. The activity of O-acetylserine(thiol)lyase (OASTL), the enzyme synthesizing cysteine, was enhanced under S deprivation in a time-dependent manner in autotrophic but not in heterotrophic cells. Analysis of the transcript abundance of the OASTL gene supports the OASTL activity increase in autotrophic cultures under S deprivation.

  16. Heterotrophic Bacteria Show Weak Competition for Nitrogen in Mediterranean Coastal Waters (Thau Lagoon) in Autumn.

    PubMed

    Trottet, Aurore; Leboulanger, Christophe; Vidussi, Francesca; Pete, Romain; Bouvy, Marc; Fouilland, Eric

    2016-02-01

    The importance of heterotrophic bacteria relative to phytoplankton in the uptake of ammonium and nitrate was studied in Mediterranean coastal waters (Thau Lagoon) during autumn, when the Mediterranean Sea received the greatest allochthonous nutrient loads. Specific inhibitors and size-fractionation methods were used in combination with isotopic (15)N tracers. NO3 (-) and NH4 (+) uptake was dominated by phytoplankton (60 % on average) during the study period, which included a flood event. Despite lower biomass specific NH4 (+) and NO3 uptake rates, free-living heterotrophic bacteria contributed significantly (>30 %) to total microbial NH4 (+) and NO3 (-) uptake rates in low chlorophyll waters. Under these conditions, heterotrophic bacteria may be responsible for more than 50 % of primary production, using very little freshly produced phytoplankton exudates. In low chlorophyll coastal waters as reported during the present 3-month study, the heterotrophic bacteria seemed to depend to a greater extent on allochthonous N and C substrates than on autochthonous substrates derived from phytoplankton.

  17. Elevated temperature increases carbon and nitrogen fluxes between phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacteria through physical attachment.

    PubMed

    Arandia-Gorostidi, Nestor; Weber, Peter K; Alonso-Sáez, Laura; Morán, Xosé Anxelu G; Mayali, Xavier

    2017-03-01

    Quantifying the contribution of marine microorganisms to carbon and nitrogen cycles and their response to predicted ocean warming is one of the main challenges of microbial oceanography. Here we present a single-cell NanoSIMS isotope analysis to quantify C and N uptake by free-living and attached phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacteria, and their response to short-term experimental warming of 4 °C. Elevated temperature increased total C fixation by over 50%, a small but significant fraction of which was transferred to heterotrophs within 12 h. Cell-to-cell attachment doubled the secondary C uptake by heterotrophic bacteria and increased secondary N incorporation by autotrophs by 68%. Warming also increased the abundance of phytoplankton with attached heterotrophs by 80%, and promoted C transfer from phytoplankton to bacteria by 17% and N transfer from bacteria to phytoplankton by 50%. Our results indicate that phytoplankton-bacteria attachment provides an ecological advantage for nutrient incorporation, suggesting a mutualistic relationship that appears to be enhanced by temperature increases.

  18. Dynamic metabolic modeling of heterotrophic and mixotrophic microalgal growth on fermentative wastes

    PubMed Central

    Baroukh, Caroline; Turon, Violette; Bernard, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    Microalgae are promising microorganisms for the production of numerous molecules of interest, such as pigments, proteins or triglycerides that can be turned into biofuels. Heterotrophic or mixotrophic growth on fermentative wastes represents an interesting approach to achieving higher biomass concentrations, while reducing cost and improving the environmental footprint. Fermentative wastes generally consist of a blend of diverse molecules and it is thus crucial to understand microalgal metabolism in such conditions, where switching between substrates might occur. Metabolic modeling has proven to be an efficient tool for understanding metabolism and guiding the optimization of biomass or target molecule production. Here, we focused on the metabolism of Chlorella sorokiniana growing heterotrophically and mixotrophically on acetate and butyrate. The metabolism was represented by 172 metabolic reactions. The DRUM modeling framework with a mildly relaxed quasi-steady-state assumption was used to account for the switching between substrates and the presence of light. Nine experiments were used to calibrate the model and nine experiments for the validation. The model efficiently predicted the experimental data, including the transient behavior during heterotrophic, autotrophic, mixotrophic and diauxic growth. It shows that an accurate model of metabolism can now be constructed, even in dynamic conditions, with the presence of several carbon substrates. It also opens new perspectives for the heterotrophic and mixotrophic use of microalgae, especially for biofuel production from wastes. PMID:28582469

  19. Warming and Acidification Effects on Planktonic Heterotrophic Pico- and Nanoflagellates in a Mesocosm Experiment.

    PubMed

    Moustaka-Gouni, Maria; Kormas, Konstantinos A; Scotti, Marco; Vardaka, Elisabeth; Sommer, Ulrich

    2016-08-01

    We studied the response of the heterotrophic flagellate (HF) community to the combined impact of warming and ocean acidification in a mesocosm experiment with a plankton community from the western Baltic Sea. We performed a quantitative analysis of the response at the level of total biomass and size classes and a semi-quantitative one at the level of individual taxa. Total biomass of HF was significantly lower under higher temperatures while there was no significant effect of CO2. The mean biomass of the picoflagellates did not respond to temperature while the three nanoflagellate size classes (class limits 3, 5, 8, 15μm) responded negatively to warming while not responding to CO2. The taxon-level results indicate that heterotrophic flagellates do not form a homogenous trophic guild, as often assumed in pelagic food web studies. Instead, the heterotrophic flagellates formed a "food web within the food web". There was a pronounced succession of flagellates leading from a dominance of bacterivores and colloidal matter feeders before the phytoplankton bloom to omnivorous feeders preying upon phytoplankton and heterotrophic flagellates during and after the bloom. This complex intraguild predation patterns probably dampened the response to experimental treatments.

  20. Heterotrophic prokaryotic production in ultraoligotrophic alpine karst aquifers and ecological implications.

    PubMed

    Wilhartitz, Inés C; Kirschner, Alexander K T; Stadler, Hermann; Herndl, Gerhard J; Dietzel, Martin; Latal, Christine; Mach, Robert L; Farnleitner, Andreas H

    2009-06-01

    Spring waters from alpine karst aquifers are important drinking water resources. To investigate in situ heterotrophic prokaryotic production and its controlling factors, two different alpine karst springs were studied over two annual cycles. Heterotrophic production in spring water, as determined by [(3)H]leucine incorporation, was extremely low ranging from 0.06 to 6.83 pmol C L(-1) h(-1) (DKAS1, dolomitic-karst-spring) and from 0.50 to 75.6 pmol C L(-1) h(-1) (LKAS2, limestone-karst-spring). Microautoradiography combined with catalyzed reporter deposition-FISH showed that only about 7% of the picoplankton community took up [(3)H]leucine, resulting in generation times of 3-684 days. Principal component analysis, applying hydrological, chemical and biological parameters demonstrated that planktonic heterotrophic production in LKAS2 was governed by the respective hydrological conditions, whereas variations in DKAS1 changed seemingly independent from discharge. Measurements in sediments recovered from LKAS2, DKAS1 and similar alpine karst aquifers (n=12) revealed a 10(6)-fold higher heterotrophic production (average 19 micromol C dm(-3) h(-1)) with significantly lower generation times as compared with the planktonic fraction, highlighting the potential of surface-associated communities to add to self-purification processes. Estimates of the microbially mediated CO(2) in this compartment indicated a possible contribution to karstification.

  1. Uptake, Accumulation and Toxicity of Silver Nanoparticle in Autotrophic Plants, and Heterotrophic Microbes: A Concentric Review.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Durgesh K; Tripathi, Ashutosh; Shweta; Singh, Swati; Singh, Yashwant; Vishwakarma, Kanchan; Yadav, Gaurav; Sharma, Shivesh; Singh, Vivek K; Mishra, Rohit K; Upadhyay, R G; Dubey, Nawal K; Lee, Yonghoon; Chauhan, Devendra K

    2017-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a cutting-edge field of science with the potential to revolutionize today's technological advances including industrial applications. It is being utilized for the welfare of mankind; but at the same time, the unprecedented use and uncontrolled release of nanomaterials into the environment poses enormous threat to living organisms. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are used in several industries and its continuous release may hamper many physiological and biochemical processes in the living organisms including autotrophs and heterotrophs. The present review gives a concentric know-how of the effects of AgNPs on the lower and higher autotrophic plants as well as on heterotrophic microbes so as to have better understanding of the differences in effects among these two groups. It also focuses on the mechanism of uptake, translocation, accumulation in the plants and microbes, and resulting toxicity as well as tolerance mechanisms by which these microorganisms are able to survive and reduce the effects of AgNPs. This review differentiates the impact of silver nanoparticles at various levels between autotrophs and heterotrophs and signifies the prevailing tolerance mechanisms. With this background, a comprehensive idea can be made with respect to the influence of AgNPs on lower and higher autotrophic plants together with heterotrophic microbes and new insights can be generated for the researchers to understand the toxicity and tolerance mechanisms of AgNPs in plants and microbes.

  2. Heavy metal bioleaching and sludge stabilization in a single-stage reactor using indigenous acidophilic heterotrophs.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, Akanksha; Sreekrishnan, T R

    2017-01-10

    Simultaneous sludge digestion and metal leaching (SSDML) have been reported at mesophilic temperature. It is generally perceived that while sludge stabilization is effected by heterotrophs at neutral pH, metal bioleaching is done by acidophilic autotrophs. However, little information is available on the microbial communities involved in the process. This study carried out SSDML in a single-stage reactor using sludge indigenous microorganisms and looked at the bacterial communities responsible for the process. Volatile suspended solids were reduced by more than 40%. The concentration of zinc, copper, chromium, cadmium and nickel decreased by more than 45% in the dry sludge. Acidophilic species of Alicyclobacillus genus were the dominant heterotrophs. A few heterotrophic bacteria were detected which can oxidize iron (Alicyclobacillus ferrooxydans, Alicyclobacillus ferripilum and Ferrimicrobium acidiphilum). Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans (autotroph) was responsible for the oxidation of both iron and sulfur which lead to a change in the pH from neutral to acidic. The presence of acidophilic heterotrophs, which can oxidize either iron or sulfur, enhanced the efficiency of SSDML process with respect to sludge stabilization and metal leaching. This study shows that it is possible to carry out the SSDML in a single-stage reactor with indigenous microorganisms.

  3. HETEROTROPHIC PLATE COUNT BACTERIA - WHAT IS THEIR SIGNIFICANCE IN DRINKING WATER?

    EPA Science Inventory

    The possible health significance of heterotrophic plate count (HPC) bacteria, also know in earlier terminology as standard plate count (SPC) bacteria, in drinking water has been debated for decades. While the literature documents the universal occurrence of HPC bacteria in soil, ...

  4. A new process for enriching nitrifiers in activated sludge through separate heterotrophic wasting from biofilm carriers.

    PubMed

    Parker, Denny S; Rusten, Bjørn; Wien, Asgeir; Siljudalen, Jon G

    2002-01-01

    A new process, the biofilm-activated sludge innovative nitrification (BASIN) process, consisting of a moving-bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) with separate heterotrophic wasting, followed by an activated-sludge process, has been proposed to reduce the volumetric requirements of the activated-sludge process for nitrification. The basic principle is to remove chemical oxygen demand on the biofilm carriers by heterotrophic organisms and then to waste a portion of the heterotrophic biomass before it can be released into the activated-sludge reactor. By this means, the amount of heterotrophic organisms grown in the activated-sludge reactor is reduced, thereby reducing the volume of that tank needed for nitrification. For nitrification applications, the simplest method for stripping biomass was to use an in-tank technique using high shearing rates with aeration. Bench-scale testing showed sludge yields in the BASIN process were one-half of that in a control activated-sludge process and twice that of a process line with intermediate settling between the MBBR and activated-sludge stage. Critical washout solids retention times for nitrifiers were the same for all three lines, so activated-sludge volumes for the BASIN process could be reduced by 50% compared with the control. Originally conceived process concepts for the BASIN process were confirmed by the experimental work.

  5. HETEROTROPHIC PLATE COUNT BACTERIA - WHAT IS THEIR SIGNIFICANCE IN DRINKING WATER?

    EPA Science Inventory

    The possible health significance of heterotrophic plate count (HPC) bacteria, also know in earlier terminology as standard plate count (SPC) bacteria, in drinking water has been debated for decades. While the literature documents the universal occurrence of HPC bacteria in soil, ...

  6. Elevated temperature increases carbon and nitrogen fluxes between phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacteria through physical attachment

    SciTech Connect

    Arandia-Gorostidi, Nestor; Alonso-Sáez, Laura; Morán, Xosé Anxelu G.; Mayali, Xavier

    2016-12-06

    Quantifying the contribution of marine microorganisms to carbon and nitrogen cycles and their response to predicted ocean warming is one of the main challenges of microbial oceanography. Here we present a single-cell NanoSIMS isotope analysis to quantify C and N uptake by free-living and attached phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacteria, and their response to short-term experimental warming of 4 °C. Elevated temperature increased total C fixation by over 50%, a small but significant fraction of which was transferred to heterotrophs within 12 h. Cell-to-cell attachment doubled the secondary C uptake by heterotrophic bacteria and increased secondary N incorporation by autotrophs by 68%. Warming also increased the abundance of phytoplankton with attached heterotrophs by 80%, and promoted C transfer from phytoplankton to bacteria by 17% and N transfer from bacteria to phytoplankton by 50%. Lastly, our results indicate that phytoplankton-bacteria attachment provides an ecological advantage for nutrient incorporation, suggesting a mutualistic relationship that appears to be enhanced by temperature increases.

  7. Elevated temperature increases carbon and nitrogen fluxes between phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacteria through physical attachment

    DOE PAGES

    Arandia-Gorostidi, Nestor; Weber, Peter K.; Alonso-Sáez, Laura; ...

    2016-12-06

    Quantifying the contribution of marine microorganisms to carbon and nitrogen cycles and their response to predicted ocean warming is one of the main challenges of microbial oceanography. Here we present a single-cell NanoSIMS isotope analysis to quantify C and N uptake by free-living and attached phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacteria, and their response to short-term experimental warming of 4 °C. Elevated temperature increased total C fixation by over 50%, a small but significant fraction of which was transferred to heterotrophs within 12 h. Cell-to-cell attachment doubled the secondary C uptake by heterotrophic bacteria and increased secondary N incorporation by autotrophs bymore » 68%. Warming also increased the abundance of phytoplankton with attached heterotrophs by 80%, and promoted C transfer from phytoplankton to bacteria by 17% and N transfer from bacteria to phytoplankton by 50%. Lastly, our results indicate that phytoplankton-bacteria attachment provides an ecological advantage for nutrient incorporation, suggesting a mutualistic relationship that appears to be enhanced by temperature increases.« less

  8. Lysogeny and lytic viral production during a bloom of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus spp.

    PubMed

    Ortmann, A C; Lawrence, J E; Suttle, C A

    2002-03-01

    Lytic viral production and lysogeny were investigated in cyanobacteria and heterotrophic bacteria during a bloom of Synechococcus spp. in a pristine fjord in British Columbia, Canada. Triplicate seawater samples were incubated with and without mitomycin C and the abundances of heterotrophic bacteria, cyanobacteria, total viruses and infectious cyanophage were followed over 24 h. Addition of mitomycin C led to increases in total viral abundance as well as the abundance of cyanophages infecting Synechococcus strain DC2. Given typical estimates of burst size, these increases were consistent with 80% of the heterotrophic bacteria and 0.6% of Synechococcus cells being inducible by the addition of mitomycin C. This is the highest percentage of lysogens reported for a natural microbial community and demonstrates induction in a marine Synechococcus population. It is likely that the cyanophage production following the addition of mitomycin C was much higher than that titered against a single strain of Synechococcus; hence this estimate is a minimum. In untreated seawater samples, lytic viral production was estimated to remove ca. 27% of the gross heterotrophic bacterial production, and a minimum of 1.0% of the gross cyanobacterial production. Our results demonstrate very high levels of lysogeny in the heterotrophic bacterial community, outside of an oligotrophic environment, and the presence of inducible lysogens in Synechococcus spp. during a naturally occurring bloom. These data emphasize the need for further examination of the factors influencing lytic and lysogenic viral infection in natural microbial communities.

  9. Partitioning Soil Respiration Between Autotrophic and Heterotrophic Components in a Mature Boreal Black Spruce Stand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaumont-Guay, D.; Black, T. A.; Barr, A. G.; Jassal, R. S.; Morgenstern, K.; Nesic, Z.

    2005-12-01

    A root-exclusion experiment conducted in mature boreal black spruce stand (125 year-old) in Saskatchewan, Canada, from September 2003 to December 2004 allowed the partitioning of soil respiration between autotrophic (roots, mycorrhizae and decomposers associated with the rhizosphere) and heterotrophic (free-living organisms) components using continuous automated chamber measurements of soil CO2 efflux. The exclusion of live roots caused a 25% reduction in soil respiration three weeks after the application of the treatment in September 2003, which suggested a strong link between tree photosynthesis and belowground respiration processes. Annual estimates of autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration were 324 and 230 g C m-2 y-1 in 2004, accounting for 53 and 38% of soil respiration, respectively, after correcting for the decomposition of roots killed by trenching (78 g C m-2 y-1). The remainder (57 g C m-2 y-1) originated from live-moss respiration. Over the course of the year, there was a gradual transition from heterotrophic to autotrophic-dominated respiration with three distinctive phases: (1) autotrophic respiration was negligible during winter when the trees were dormant; (2) heterotrophic respiration dominated soil respiration during the shoulder periods of April-May and October-November when soil temperature was low; (3) autotrophic respiration exceeded heterotrophic respiration from mid-July to mid-September when soil temperature was high and trees were active. Both components of respiration increased exponentially with soil temperature during the growing season but autotrophic respiration showed greater temperature sensitivity than heterotrophic respiration. The replenishment of soil water following spring snowmelt induced a sustained increase in heterotrophic respiration. Pulses in autotrophic respiration were observed during summer following large rainfalls that were attributed to rhizosphere priming effects. After normalizing autotrophic respiration for

  10. Heterotrophic plate counts of surface water samples by using impedance methods.

    PubMed Central

    Noble, P A; Ashton, E; Davidson, C A; Albritton, W L

    1991-01-01

    Membrane filtration, spread plating, and pour plating are conventional methods used to determine the heterotrophic plate counts of water samples. Impedance methods were investigated as an alternative to conventional methods, since sample dilution is not required and the bacterial count can be estimated within 24 h. Comparisons of impedance signals obtained with different water samples revealed that capacitance produced faster detection times than conductance. Moreover, the correlation between heterotrophic plate count and detection time was highest (r = 0.966) when capacitance was used. Linear and quadratic regressions of heterotrophic plate count and impedance detection time were affected by incubation temperatures. Regressions between heterotrophic plate counts based on conventional methods and detection times of water samples incubated at less than or equal to 25 degrees C had R2 values of 0.878 to 0.933. However, regressions using detection times of water samples incubated at greater than or equal to 30 degrees C had lower R2 values, even though water samples produced faster detection times. Comparisons between broth-based versions of R2A medium and plate count agar revealed that the latter correlated highly with heterotrophic plate count, provided that water samples were incubated at 25 degrees C and impedance measurements were conducted with the capacitance signal (r = 0.966). When the linear regression of this relationship was tested with 100 water samples, the correlation between predicted and actual log10 CFU milliliter-1 was 0.869. These results indicate that impedance methods provide a suitable alternative to conventional methods. PMID:1781686

  11. Bloom of the cyanobacterium Moorea bouillonii on the gorgonian coral Annella reticulata in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Yamashiro, Hideyuki; Isomura, Naoko; Sakai, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Coral populations are in decline due to environmental changes and biological attacks by predators and infectious diseases. Here, we report a localized bloom of the benthic filamentous cyanobacterium Moorea bouillonii (formerly Lyngbya bouillonii) observed exclusively on the gorgonian (sea fan) coral Annella reticulata at around 20 m depth in Japan. The degree of infection has reached 26% among different sizes of Annella colonies. Thick and continuous growth of Moorea may be sustained partly by symbiotic alpheid shrimp, which affix Moorea filaments to gorgonian corals for use as food and shelter. Most filaments get entangled on the coral colony, some penetrate into the stem of the coral with a swollen end like a root hair, which appears to function as an anchor in Annella. In addition to the cyanobacterium–shrimp interaction, the new trait of anchoring by the cyanobacterium into gorgonian coral may contribute to persistence of this bloom. PMID:25112498

  12. Genetic manipulation of a metabolic enzyme and a transcriptional regulator increasing succinate excretion from unicellular cyanobacterium.

    PubMed

    Osanai, Takashi; Shirai, Tomokazu; Iijima, Hiroko; Nakaya, Yuka; Okamoto, Mami; Kondo, Akihiko; Hirai, Masami Y

    2015-01-01

    Succinate is a building block compound that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has declared as important in biorefineries, and it is widely used as a commodity chemical. Here, we identified the two genes increasing succinate production of the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Succinate was excreted under dark, anaerobic conditions, and its production level increased by knocking out ackA, which encodes an acetate kinase, and by overexpressing sigE, which encodes an RNA polymerase sigma factor. Glycogen catabolism and organic acid biosynthesis were enhanced in the mutant lacking ackA and overexpressing sigE, leading to an increase in succinate production reaching five times of the wild-type levels. Our genetic and metabolomic analyses thus demonstrated the effect of genetic manipulation of a metabolic enzyme and a transcriptional regulator on succinate excretion from this cyanobacterium with the data based on metabolomic technique.

  13. Identification of a new-to-science cyanobacterium, Toxifilum mysidocida gen. nov. & sp. nov. (Cyanobacteria, Cyanophyceae).

    PubMed

    Zimba, Paul V; Huang, I-Shuo; Foley, Jennifer E; Linton, Eric W

    2017-02-01

    Cyanobacteria occupy many niches within terrestrial, planktonic, and benthic habitats. The diversity of habitats colonized, similarity of morphology, and phenotypic plasticity all contribute to the difficulty of cyanobacterial identification. An unknown marine filamentous cyanobacterium was isolated from an aquatic animal rearing facility having mysid mortality events. The cyanobacterium originated from Corpus Christi Bay, TX. Filaments are rarely solitary, benthic mat forming, unbranched, and narrowing at the ends. Cells are 2.1 × 3.1 μm (width × length). Thylakoids are peripherally arranged on the outer third of the cell; cyanophycin granules and polyphosphate bodies are present. Molecular phylogenetic analysis in addition to morphology (transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy) and chemical composition all confirm it as a new genus and species we name Toxifilum mysidocida. At least one identified Leptolyngbya appears (based on genetic evidence and TEM) to belong to this new genus.

  14. Genetic manipulation of a metabolic enzyme and a transcriptional regulator increasing succinate excretion from unicellular cyanobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Osanai, Takashi; Shirai, Tomokazu; Iijima, Hiroko; Nakaya, Yuka; Okamoto, Mami; Kondo, Akihiko; Hirai, Masami Y.

    2015-01-01

    Succinate is a building block compound that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has declared as important in biorefineries, and it is widely used as a commodity chemical. Here, we identified the two genes increasing succinate production of the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Succinate was excreted under dark, anaerobic conditions, and its production level increased by knocking out ackA, which encodes an acetate kinase, and by overexpressing sigE, which encodes an RNA polymerase sigma factor. Glycogen catabolism and organic acid biosynthesis were enhanced in the mutant lacking ackA and overexpressing sigE, leading to an increase in succinate production reaching five times of the wild-type levels. Our genetic and metabolomic analyses thus demonstrated the effect of genetic manipulation of a metabolic enzyme and a transcriptional regulator on succinate excretion from this cyanobacterium with the data based on metabolomic technique. PMID:26500619

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of the Thermophilic and Facultatively Chemolithoautotrophic Sulfate Reducer Archaeoglobus sulfaticallidus Strain PM70-1T

    PubMed Central

    Stokke, Runar; Hocking, William Peter; Steinsbu, Bjørn Olav

    2013-01-01

    Dissimilatory sulfate-reducing archaea of the genus Archaeoglobus display divergent preferences in the use of energy sources and electron acceptors. Here we present the complete genome sequence of the thermophilic Archaeoglobus sulfaticallidus strain PM70-1T, which distinctly couples chemolithoautotrophic growth on H2/CO2 to sulfate reduction in addition to heterotrophic growth. PMID:23833130

  16. High gene flow between alternative morphs and the evolutionary persistence of facultative paedomorphosis

    PubMed Central

    Oromi, Neus; Michaux, Johan; Denoël, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Paedomorphosis and metamorphosis are two major developmental processes that characterize the evolution of complex life cycles in many lineages. Whereas these processes were fixed in some taxa, they remained facultative in others, with alternative phenotypes expressed in the same populations. From a genetic perspective, it is still unknown whether such phenotypes form a single population or whether they show some patterns of isolation in syntopy. This has deep implications for understanding the evolution of the phenotypes, i.e. towards their persistence or their fixation and speciation. Newts and salamanders are excellent models to test this hypothesis because they exhibit both developmental processes in their populations: the aquatic paedomorphs retain gills, whereas the metamorphs are able to colonize land. Using microsatellite data of coexisting paedomorphic and metamorphic palmate newts (Lissotriton helveticus), we found that they formed a panmictic population, which evidences sexual compatibility between the two phenotypes. The high gene flow could be understood as an adaptation to unstable habitats in which phenotypic plasticity is favored over the fixation of developmental alternatives. This makes then possible the persistence of a polyphenism: only metamorphosis could be maintained in case of occasional drying whereas paedomorphosis could offer specific advantages in organisms remaining in water. PMID:27534370

  17. Distribution of pink-pigmented facultative methylotrophs on leaves of vegetables.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Masayuki; Yurimoto, Hiroya; Yoshida, Naoko; Iguchi, Hiroyuki; Sakai, Yasuyoshi

    2012-01-01

    The distribution of pink-pigmented facultative methylotrophs (PPFMs) on the leaves of various vegetables was studied. All kinds of vegetable leaves tested gave pink-pigmented colonies on agar plates containing methanol as sole carbon source. The numbers of PPFMs on the leaves, colony-forming units (CFU)/g of fresh leaves, differed among the plants, although they were planted and grown at the same farm. Commercial green perilla, Perilla frutescens viridis (Makino) Makino, gave the highest counts of PPFMs (2.0-4.1×10(7) CFU/g) of all the commercial vegetable leaves tested, amounting to 15% of total microbes on the leaves. The PPFMs isolated from seeds of two varieties of perilla, the red and green varieties, exhibited high sequence similarity as to the 16S rRNA gene to two different Methylobacterium species, M. fujisawaense DSM5686(T) and M. radiotolerans JCM2831(T) respectively, suggesting that there is specific interaction between perilla and the PPFMs.

  18. Direct Fitness Correlates and Thermal Consequences of Facultative Aggregation in a Desert Lizard

    PubMed Central

    Rabosky, Alison R. Davis; Corl, Ammon; Liwanag, Heather E. M.; Surget-Groba, Yann; Sinervo, Barry

    2012-01-01

    Social aggregation is a common behavioral phenomenon thought to evolve through adaptive benefits to group living. Comparing fitness differences between aggregated and solitary individuals in nature – necessary to infer an evolutionary benefit to living in groups – has proven difficult because communally-living species tend to be obligately social and behaviorally complex. However, these differences and the mechanisms driving them are critical to understanding how solitary individuals transition to group living, as well as how and why nascent social systems change over time. Here we demonstrate that facultative aggregation in a reptile (the Desert Night Lizard, Xantusia vigilis) confers direct reproductive success and survival advantages and that thermal benefits of winter huddling disproportionately benefit small juveniles, which can favor delayed dispersal of offspring and the formation of kin groups. Using climate projection models, however, we estimate that future aggregation in night lizards could decline more than 50% due to warmer temperatures. Our results support the theory that transitions to group living arise from direct benefits to social individuals and offer a clear mechanism for the origin of kin groups through juvenile philopatry. The temperature dependence of aggregation in this and other taxa suggests that environmental variation may be a powerful but underappreciated force in the rapid transition between social and solitary behavior. PMID:22844413

  19. A Successful Crayfish Invader Is Capable of Facultative Parthenogenesis: A Novel Reproductive Mode in Decapod Crustaceans

    PubMed Central

    Buřič, Miloš; Hulák, Martin; Kouba, Antonín

    2011-01-01

    Biological invasions are impacting biota worldwide, and explaining why some taxa tend to become invasive is of major scientific interest. North American crayfish species, particularly of the family Cambaridae, are prominent invaders in freshwaters, defying the “tens rule” which states that only a minority of species introduced to new regions become established, and only a minority of those become invasive and pests. So far, success of cambarid invaders has largely been attributed to rapid maturation, high reproductive output, aggressiveness, and tolerance to pollution. We provide experimental evidence that females of one cambarid species particularly widespread in Europe, the spiny-cheek crayfish Orconectes limosus, are capable of facultative parthenogenesis. Such reproductive mode has never before been recognized in decapods, the most diverse crustacean order. As shown by analysis of seven microsatellite loci, crayfish females kept physically separated from males produced genetically homogeneous offspring identical with maternal individuals; this suggests they reproduced by apomixis, unlike those females which mated with males and had a diverse offspring. Further research is needed to clarify what environmental conditions are necessary for a switch to parthenogenesis in O. limosus, and what role it plays in natural crayfish populations. However, if such reproductive plasticity is present in other cambarid crayfish species, it may contribute to the overwhelming invasive success of this group. PMID:21655282

  20. A selection mosaic in the facultative mutualism between ants and wild cotton.

    PubMed

    Rudgers, Jennifer A; Strauss, Sharon Y

    2004-12-07

    In protection mutualisms, one mutualist defends its partner against a natural enemy in exchange for a reward, usually food or shelter. For both partners, the costs and benefits of these interactions often vary considerably in space because the outcome (positive, negative or neutral) depends on the local abundance of at least three species: the protector, the beneficiary of protection and the beneficiary's natural enemy. In Gossypium thurberi (wild cotton), ants benefit nutritionally from the plant's extrafloral nectaries and guard plants from herbivores. Experimentally altering the availability of both ants and extrafloral nectar in three populations demonstrated that the mutualism is facultative, depending, in part, on the abundance of ants and the level of herbivore damage. The species composition of ants and a parasitic alga that clogs extrafloral nectaries were also implicated in altering the outcome of plant-ant interactions. Furthermore, experimental treatments that excluded ants (the putative selective agents) in combination with phenotypic selection analyses revealed that selection on extrafloral nectary traits was mediated by ants and, importantly, varied across populations. This work is some of the first to manipulate interactions experimentally across multiple sites and thereby document that geographically variable selection, mediated by a mutualist, can shape the evolution of plant traits.

  1. A selection mosaic in the facultative mutualism between ants and wild cotton.

    PubMed Central

    Rudgers, Jennifer A.; Strauss, Sharon Y.

    2004-01-01

    In protection mutualisms, one mutualist defends its partner against a natural enemy in exchange for a reward, usually food or shelter. For both partners, the costs and benefits of these interactions often vary considerably in space because the outcome (positive, negative or neutral) depends on the local abundance of at least three species: the protector, the beneficiary of protection and the beneficiary's natural enemy. In Gossypium thurberi (wild cotton), ants benefit nutritionally from the plant's extrafloral nectaries and guard plants from herbivores. Experimentally altering the availability of both ants and extrafloral nectar in three populations demonstrated that the mutualism is facultative, depending, in part, on the abundance of ants and the level of herbivore damage. The species composition of ants and a parasitic alga that clogs extrafloral nectaries were also implicated in altering the outcome of plant-ant interactions. Furthermore, experimental treatments that excluded ants (the putative selective agents) in combination with phenotypic selection analyses revealed that selection on extrafloral nectary traits was mediated by ants and, importantly, varied across populations. This work is some of the first to manipulate interactions experimentally across multiple sites and thereby document that geographically variable selection, mediated by a mutualist, can shape the evolution of plant traits. PMID:15590599

  2. Requirement of carbon dioxide for initial growth of facultative methylotroph, Acidomonas methanolica MB58.

    PubMed

    Mitsui, Ryoji; Katayama, Hiroko; Tanaka, Mitsuo

    2015-07-01

    The facultative methylotrophic bacterium Acidomonas methanolica MB58 can utilize C1 compounds via the ribulose monophosphate pathway. A large gene cluster comprising three components related to C1 metabolism was found in the genome. From upstream, the first was an mxa cluster encoding proteins for oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde; the second was the rmp cluster encoding enzymes for formaldehyde fixation; and the third was the cbb gene cluster encoding proteins for carbon dioxide (CO2) fixation. Examination of CO2 requirements for growth of A. methanolica MB58 cells demonstrated that it did not grow on any carbon source under CO2-free conditions. Measurement of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase activity and RT-PCR analysis demonstrated enzymatic activity was detected in A. methanolica MB58 at growth phase, regardless of carbon sources. However, methanol dehydrogenase and 3-hexlose-6-phosphate synthase expression was regulated by methanol or formaldehyde; it were detected during growth and apparently differed from ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase expression. These results suggested that A. methanolica MB58 may be initially dependent on autotrophic growth and that carbon assimilation was subsequently coupled with the ribulose monophosphate pathway at early- to mid-log phases during methylotrophic growth. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Oceanobacillus chironomi sp. nov., a halotolerant and facultatively alkaliphilic species isolated from a chironomid egg mass.

    PubMed

    Raats, Dina; Halpern, Malka

    2007-02-01

    Chironomids (Diptera; Chironomidae) are the most abundant insects in freshwater aquatic habitats. Females of the genus Chironomus lay egg masses containing hundreds of eggs embedded in a gelatinous matrix. A bacterial strain, designated T3944D(T), was isolated from a chironomid egg mass sampled from a waste-stabilization pond in northern Israel and was found to be Gram-positive, motile by peritrichous flagella, endospore-forming, halotolerant and facultatively alkaliphilic. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that strain T3944D(T) belonged to the genus Oceanobacillus, exhibiting the highest levels of similarity with the sequences of Oceanobacillus oncorhynchi subsp. incaldanensis DSM 16557(T) (94.9 %), Oceanobacillus oncorhynchi subsp. oncorhynchi JCM 12661(T) (94.8 %), Oceanobacillus iheyensis JCM 11309(T) (94.7 %) and Oceanobacillus picturae LMG 19416 (94.5 %). Strain T3944D(T) grew optimally at 1-3 % NaCl, pH 8.5 and 37 degrees C. The major cellular fatty acids were anteiso-C(15 : 0) (60.0 %) and anteiso-C(17 : 0) (12.9 %) and the DNA G+C content was 38.1 mol%. On the basis of its phenotypic properties and phylogenetic distinctiveness, strain T3944D(T) represents a novel species in the genus Oceanobacillus, for which the name Oceanobacillus chironomi sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is T3944D(T) (=LMG 23627(T)=DSM 18262(T)).

  4. Facultative parasitism by the bivalve Kurtiella pedroana in the sand crab Emerita analoga

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bhaduri, Ritin; Valentich-Scott, Paul; Hilgers, Mark; Singh, Rajvir; Hickman, Mikaila; Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2017-01-01

    It is rare that an organism capable of independent or commensalistic existence can also become endoparasitic on a host. In this study, we documented a potential step toward parasitism in the commensal clam Kurtiella pedroana (Bivalvia: Galeommatoidea). Galeommatoideans are known commensals of various invertebrates, including crustaceans. Emerita analoga (Decapoda: Hippidae) is an abundant intertidal decapod inhabiting sandy beaches of the Pacific coast of North and South America. Crabs collected from Monterey Bay, California, were measured and examined externally and internally for associated molluscs. Out of the 520 crabs, 37 large female individuals harbored 49 bivalves (prevalence of 7.11% and mean intensity of 1.3). Forty-one ectocommensal clams were either inside the crab's branchial chambers or on their lateroventral surfaces, and were attached by byssal threads. Our key finding was eight clams that lacked byssal threads and were living in the hemocoel. These internal clams were significantly smaller than the ectocommensals. Because these internal clams lacked access to their normal food, we hypothesize they might have fed on their host's hemolymph as would a parasite. This clam species likely can't reproduce inside its host, implying that endoparasitism is a dead-end state for K. pedroana. Facultative parasitism in a free-living or an ectocommensal is uncommon and suggests a pathway to parasitism.

  5. Massilia eurypsychrophila sp. nov. a facultatively psychrophilic bacteria isolated from ice core.

    PubMed

    Shen, Liang; Liu, Yongqin; Gu, Zhengquan; Xu, Baiqing; Wang, Ninglian; Jiao, Nianzhi; Liu, Hongcan; Zhou, Yuguang

    2015-07-01

    Strain B528-3(T), a Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped, aerobic, facultatively psychrophilic bacterium with polar flagella, was isolated from an ice core drilled from Muztagh Glacier, Xinjiang, China. The novel isolate was classified into the genus Massilia. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of the novel isolate shares a pairwise similarity of less than 97% with those of all the type strains of the genus Massilia. The major fatty acids of strain B528-3(T) were summed feature 3 (C16:1ω7c and/or iso-C15:0 2-OH) (57.31%), C16:0 (11.46%) and C18:1ω7c (14.72%). The predominant isoprenoid quinone was Q-8. The DNA G + C content was 62.2 mol% (Tm). The major polar lipids of this bacterium were phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol and diphosphatidylglycerol. From the genotypic and phenotypic data, it is evident that strain B528-3(T) represents a novel species of the genus Massilia, for which the name Massilia eurypsychrophila sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is B528-3(T) ( = JCM 30074(T) = CGMCC 1.12828(T)).

  6. Abnormal methylation pattern in constitutive and facultative heterochromatin of ICF patients

    SciTech Connect

    Miniou, P.; Blanquet, V.; Viegas-Pequignot, E.

    1994-09-01

    ICF syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disease, characterized by variable immunodeficiency, centromeric instability and facial abnormalities. Stretchings and frequent associations of centromeric or juxtacentromeric heterochromatin of chromosome 1 and 16 principally, and to a lesser degree, chromosome 9 mimic chromosome features of normal PHA-stimulated lymphocytes treated with 5-azacytidine, an inducer of demethylation. In fact, in these patients we have detected by DNA digestion with methyl-sensitive enzymes a hypomethylation of classical satellites 2 and 3, located in heterochromatin. To assess the role of other satellite DNA in the heterochromatin modifications and chromosome rearrangements, in situ fluorescent method using 5-methylcytosine (5-MeC) monoclonal antibody on chromosomes and nuclei were performed in parallel with Southern blot analysis of other satellite sequences located in heterochromatin. 5-MeC reveals that constitutive and facultative heterochromatin (X inactive chromosome) are hypomethylated. Alpha satellite sequences corresponding to centromeric heterochromatin of chromosomes 1, 3, 6, 9, 16, 18 and X are mostly methylated in patients G and R, and are undermethylated in patient S. Both molecular and cytogenetic analysis are in agreement. By in situ hybridization, breakpoints of rearranged chromosomes were located in stretched and hypomethylated classical satellites. In euchromatin, 5-MeC antibodies reveal an R-like banding pattern indicating an unequal distribution of DNA methylation, disclosing another aspect of chromosome organization. The underlying hypomethylation, associated with an abnormal chromatin structure, may predispose to chromosome instability.

  7. A test of the facultative calibration/reactive heritability model of extraversion

    PubMed Central

    Haysom, Hannah J.; Mitchem, Dorian G.; Lee, Anthony J.; Wright, Margaret J.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Keller, Matthew C.; Zietsch, Brendan P.

    2015-01-01

    A model proposed by Lukaszewski and Roney (2011) suggests that each individual’s level of extraversion is calibrated to other traits that predict the success of an extraverted behavioural strategy. Under ‘facultative calibration’, extraversion is not directly heritable, but rather exhibits heritability through its calibration to directly heritable traits (“reactive heritability”). The current study uses biometrical modelling of 1659 identical and non-identical twins and their siblings to assess whether the genetic variation in extraversion is calibrated to variation in facial attractiveness, intelligence, height in men and body mass index (BMI) in women. Extraversion was significantly positively correlated with facial attractiveness in both males (r=.11) and females (r=.18), but correlations between extraversion and the other variables were not consistent with predictions. Further, twin modelling revealed that the genetic variation in facial attractiveness did not account for a substantial proportion of the variation in extraversion in either males (2.4%) or females (0.5%). PMID:26880866

  8. Thiobacillus cuprinus sp. nov. , a novel facultatively organotrophic metal-mobilizing bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, H.; Stetter, K.O. )

    1990-02-01

    Five strains of mesophilic, facultatively organotrophic, ore-leaching eubacteria were isolated from solfatara fields in Iceland and a uranium mine in the Federal Republic of Germany. The new organisms are aerobic gram-negative rods. They can use sulfidic ores or elemental sulfur as sole energy source, indicating that they belong to the genus Thiobacillus. Alternatively, they grow on organic substrates such as yeast extract, peptone, and pyruvate. In contrast to the other leaching bacteria known so far, the new isolates are unable to oxidize ferrous iron. They consist of extreme and moderate acidophiles growing optimally at pH 3 and 4, respectively. The extreme acidophiles showed leaching characteristics similar to those shown by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, while the moderate acidophiles exhibited a pronounced preference for copper leaching on some chalcopyrite ores. The G+C content of the DNA is between 66 and 69 mol%, depending on the isolate. In DNA-DNA hybridization experiments, the new strains showed homologies among each other of >70%, indicating that they belong to the same species. No significant DNA homology to Thiobacillus reference strains was detectable. Therefore, the new isolates represent a new species of Thiobacillus, which the authors named Thiobacillus cuprinus. Isolate Hoe5 is designated as the type strain (DSM 5495).

  9. Discriminatory abilities of facultative slave-making ants and their slaves.

    PubMed

    Włodarczyk, T

    2016-01-01

    Intra-colony odor variability can disturb ants' ability to discriminate against intruders. The evolutionary relevance of this phenomenon can be revealed by studies on colonies of slave-making ants in which the parasite, and not the host, is subject to selection pressures associated with living in a mixed colony. We examined how the European facultative slave-making species Formica sanguinea and its F. fusca slaves perform in discriminating ants from alien colonies. Results of behavioral assays showed that slave-maker ants respond with hostility to conspecific individuals from alien colonies but are relatively tolerant to alien slaves. Furthermore, the behavior of slaves indicated a limited ability to discriminate ants from alien parasitic colonies. The subdivision of colony fragments into mixed and species-separated groups demonstrated that contact with the parasite is necessary for F. fusca slaves to be re-accepted by former nestmates after a period of separation from the stock colony. The results presented in this paper are consistent with the following hypotheses: (1) F. sanguinea ants, as opposed to their slaves, are adapted to discriminate alien individuals in the conditions of odor variability found in a mixed-species colony, (2) the recognition of slaves by F. sanguinea ants involves a dedicated adaptive mechanism that prevents aggression toward them, (3) the odor of slaves is strongly influenced by the parasite with beneficial effect on the colony integrity.

  10. Notes on facultative predation in Prosimulium larvae (Diptera: Simuliidae) in alpine and subalpine streams in Colorado.

    PubMed

    Al-Shaer, Layla; Pierce, Allison K; Larson, David; Hancock, Robert

    2015-03-01

    Although it is widely accepted that black fly larvae employ filter feeding as their primary mode of nutrient intake, other forms of food acquisition, such as predation, may be more prevalent than previously realized. It has been suggested that environments where particulate matter is low, such as high-elevation seasonal streams, may drive predatory behavior in black fly larvae. Relatively little is known about the frequency at which larvae prey on other organisms or if predation may be obligate in some species. In order to supplement the idea that larval black fly predation may be a common method of feeding under certain conditions, a preliminary survey of predation by Prosimulium larvae was conducted in order to assess predation frequency at high-elevation sites (> 3,200 m) in the Colorado Rocky Mountains. Larvae were sampled from alpine and subalpine locations, and their gut content analysis revealed evidence of facultative predation and possible cannibalism. Evidence of predation was observed in all but 1 Prosimulium species collected. Predation frequency was highest in the North Fork Snake River headwater location, a small tributary stream of the Snake River in central Colorado. This survey suggests that further inquiry into predatory behavior of black fly larvae should be conducted to determine the mechanisms, behavior, and ecological impact of this understudied feeding strategy.

  11. Genomes of three facultatively symbiotic Frankia sp. strainsreflect host plant biogeography

    SciTech Connect

    Normand, Philippe; Lapierre, Pascal; Tisa, Louis S.; Gogarten, J.Peter; Alloisio, Nicole; Bagnarol, Emilie; Bassi, Carla A.; Berry,Alison; Bickhart, Derek M.; Choisne, Nathalie; Couloux, Arnaud; Cournoyer, Benoit; Cruveiller, Stephane; Daubin, Vincent; Demange, Nadia; Francino, M. Pilar; Ggoltsman, Eugene; Huang, Ying; Kopp, Olga; Labarre,Laurent; Lapidus, Alla; Lavire, Celine; Marechal, Joelle; Martinez,Michele; Mastronunzio, Juliana E.; Mullin, Beth; Niemann, James; Pujic,Pierre; Rawnsley, Tania; Rouy, Zoe; Schenowitz, Chantal; Sellstedt,Anita; Tavares, Fernando; Tomkins, Jeffrey P.; Vallenet, David; Valverde,Claudio; Wall, Luis; Wang, Ying; Medigue, Claudine; Benson, David R.

    2006-02-01

    Filamentous actinobacteria from the genus Frankia anddiverse woody trees and shrubs together form N2-fixing actinorhizal rootnodule symbioses that are a major source of new soil nitrogen in widelydiverse biomes 1. Three major clades of Frankia sp. strains are defined;each clade is associated with a defined subset of plants from among theeight actinorhizal plant families 2,3. The evolution arytrajectoriesfollowed by the ancestors of both symbionts leading to current patternsof symbiont compatibility are unknown. Here we show that the competingprocesses of genome expansion and contraction have operated in differentgroups of Frankia strains in a manner that can be related to thespeciation of the plant hosts and their geographic distribution. Wesequenced and compared the genomes from three Frankia sp. strains havingdifferent host plant specificities. The sizes of their genomes variedfrom 5.38 Mbp for a narrow host range strain (HFPCcI3) to 7.50Mbp for amedium host range strain (ACN14a) to 9.08 Mbp for a broad host rangestrain (EAN1pec.) This size divergence is the largest yet reported forsuch closely related bacteria. Since the order of divergence of thestrains is known, the extent of gene deletion, duplication andacquisition could be estimated and was found to be inconcert with thebiogeographic history of the symbioses. Host plant isolation favoredgenome contraction, whereas host plant diversification favored genomeexpansion. The results support the idea that major genome reductions aswell as expansions can occur in facultatively symbiotic soil bacteria asthey respond to new environments in the context of theirsymbioses.

  12. Characterization and degradation process of sludge profiles inside a facultative pond (Patagonia, Argentina).

    PubMed

    Faleschini, M; Esteves, J L

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the characteristics and degradation process in sludge profile, three sampling sessions were made in three different places inside the primary facultative pond of Puerto Madryn city, which was located in a region with a temperate climate in coastal Patagonia (Argentina). The sludge showed an extremely negative redox potential (between -441 and -282 mV) and elevated water content and organic matter concentration, ranging from 83.3 to 97.1% for porosity and from 22.5 to 64.4% for organic matter. The surface layer at the Outlet station during the summer showed the greatest concentration of pigments, reaching a maximum value of 10.6 mg/g for chlorophyll-a and 40.9 mg/g for phaeophytin, and a fast diminution with sediment depth. The important concentration of pigment in the surface layer, coincident with phytoplankton bloom in the water column, could support the importance of nitrogen removal via uptake and organic sedimentation in the water column. In warm months the degradation rate was clear, as reflected in a decrease in sediment layer, and even part of the clay bottom was captured inside an 8 cm core sample, registering extremely low concentrations of pigments, carbohydrates, proteins and lipids. The season and the degree of treatment have an influence on sludge characteristics and the organic matter degradation process.

  13. Sexual imprinting misguides species recognition in a facultative interspecific brood parasite

    PubMed Central

    Sorenson, Michael D.; Hauber, Mark E.; Derrickson, Scott R.

    2010-01-01

    Sexual reproduction relies on the recognition of conspecifics for breeding. Most experiments in birds have implicated a critical role for early social learning in directing subsequent courtship behaviours and mating decisions. This classical view of avian sexual imprinting is challenged, however, by studies of megapodes and obligate brood parasites, species in which reliable recognition is achieved despite the lack of early experience with conspecifics. By rearing males with either conspecific or heterospecific brood mates, we experimentally tested the effect of early social experience on the association preferences and courtship behaviours of two sympatrically breeding ducks. We predicted that redheads (Aythya americana), which are facultative interspecific brood parasites, would show a diminished effect of early social environment on subsequent courtship preferences when compared with their host and congener, the canvasback (Aythya valisineria). Contrary to expectations, cross-fostered males of both species courted heterospecific females and preferred them in spatial association tests, whereas control males courted and associated with conspecific females. These results imply that ontogenetic constraints on species recognition may be a general impediment to the initial evolution of interspecific brood parasitism in birds. Under more natural conditions, a variety of mechanisms may mitigate or counteract the effects of early imprinting for redheads reared in canvasback broods. PMID:20484239

  14. Facultative apomixis and development of fruit in a deciduous shrub with medicinal and nutritional uses

    PubMed Central

    Mangla, Yash; Chaudhary, Manju; Gupta, Himshikha; Thakur, Rakesh; Goel, Shailendra; Raina, S. N.; Tandon, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of reproductive biology of plants is crucial to understand their natural mode of propagation, which may aid in conservation and crop improvement. The reproductive details are also crucial for beginning the cultivation of a potential crop on a commercial scale. Fruits of sea buckthorn, Hippophae rhamnoides, are used in a variety of medicinal and nutritional products. So far, fruits are collected from the female plants in the wild. It is known that the species fruits profusely and also propagates by forming root suckers, but the details of sexual reproduction are not available. We investigated the mode of reproduction and development of fruits from natural populations of sea buckthorn. Megasporogenesis and megagametogenesis were studied through resin-embedded sectioning and ovule-clearing methods, and fruit development through histochemistry. The study of mitosis and male meiosis showed that the plants at the site were diploid (2n = 2x = 24). The embryo sac may develop either through the monosporic pathway and differentiates into ‘Polygonum type’ or aposporously into ‘Panicum type’. The embryo may develop by sexual and adventitious pathways. Thus, sea buckthorn is a facultative apomict. The occurrence of diverse reproductive pathways assures the possibility of generation of novel genotypes through sexuality, while apomictic reproduction maintains adaptive genotypes and ensures reproduction in the absence of pollination. Anatomical details suggest that the fruit of sea buckthorn may be appropriately described as a pseudo-drupe. PMID:26286224

  15. Seroepidemiologic Survey of Potential Pathogens in Obligate and Facultative Scavenging Avian Species in California.

    PubMed

    Straub, Mary H; Kelly, Terra R; Rideout, Bruce A; Eng, Curtis; Wynne, Janna; Braun, Josephine; Johnson, Christine K

    2015-01-01

    Throughout the world, populations of scavenger birds are declining rapidly with some populations already on the brink of extinction. Much of the current research into the factors contributing to these declines has focused on exposure to drug residues, lead, and other toxins. Despite increased monitoring of these declining populations, little is known about infectious diseases affecting scavenger bird species. To assess potential infectious disease risks to both obligate and facultative scavenger bird species, we performed a serosurvey for eleven potential pathogens in three species of scavenging birds in California: the California condor (Gymnogyps californianus), turkey vulture (Cathartes aura) and golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos). California condors were seropositive for avian adenovirus, infectious bronchitis virus, Mycoplasma gallisepticum, avian paramyxovirus-2, West Nile virus (WNV) and Toxoplasma gondii. Golden eagles were seropositive for avian adenovirus, Chlamydophila psittaci and Toxoplasma gondii, and turkey vultures were seropositive for avian adenovirus, Chlamydophila psittaci, avian paramyxovirus-1, Toxoplasma gondii and WNV. Risk factor analyses indicated that rearing site and original release location were significantly associated with a positive serologic titer to WNV among free-flying condors. This study provides preliminary baseline data on infectious disease exposure in these populations for aiding in early disease detection and provides potentially critical information for conservation of the endangered California condor as it continues to expand its range and encounter new infectious disease threats.

  16. Social structure and facultative mating systems of hoary marmots (Marmota caligata).

    PubMed

    Kyle, C J; Karels, T J; Davis, C S; Mebs, S; Clark, B; Strobeck, C; Hik, D S

    2007-03-01

    Mate-choice theory predicts different optimal mating systems depending on resource availability and habitat stability. Regions with limited resources are thought to promote monogamy. We tested predictions of monogamy in a social rodent, the hoary marmot (Marmota caligata), at the northern climatic extreme of its distribution. Mating systems, social structure and genetic relationships were investigated within and among neighbouring colonies of marmots within a 4 km(2) valley near Kluane National Park, Yukon, Canada, using 21 microsatellite loci. While both monogamous and polygynous populations of hoary marmots have been observed in the southern reaches of this species' range; northern populations of this species are thought to be predominantly monogamous. Contrary to previous studies, we did not find northern hoary marmot social groups to be predominantly monogamous; rather, the mating system seemed to be facultative, varying between monogamy and polygyny within, as well as among, social groups. These findings reveal that the mating systems within colonies of this species are more flexible than previously thought, potentially reflecting local variation in resource availability.

  17. Seroepidemiologic Survey of Potential Pathogens in Obligate and Facultative Scavenging Avian Species in California

    PubMed Central

    Straub, Mary H.; Kelly, Terra R.; Rideout, Bruce A.; Eng, Curtis; Wynne, Janna; Braun, Josephine; Johnson, Christine K.

    2015-01-01

    Throughout the world, populations of scavenger birds are declining rapidly with some populations already on the brink of extinction. Much of the current research into the factors contributing to these declines has focused on exposure to drug residues, lead, and other toxins. Despite increased monitoring of these declining populations, little is known about infectious diseases affecting scavenger bird species. To assess potential infectious disease risks to both obligate and facultative scavenger bird species, we performed a serosurvey for eleven potential pathogens in three species of scavenging birds in California: the California condor (Gymnogyps californianus), turkey vulture (Cathartes aura) and golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos). California condors were seropositive for avian adenovirus, infectious bronchitis virus, Mycoplasma gallisepticum, avian paramyxovirus-2, West Nile virus (WNV) and Toxoplasma gondii. Golden eagles were seropositive for avian adenovirus, Chlamydophila psittaci and Toxoplasma gondii, and turkey vultures were seropositive for avian adenovirus, Chlamydophila psittaci, avian paramyxovirus-1, Toxoplasma gondii and WNV. Risk factor analyses indicated that rearing site and original release location were significantly associated with a positive serologic titer to WNV among free-flying condors. This study provides preliminary baseline data on infectious disease exposure in these populations for aiding in early disease detection and provides potentially critical information for conservation of the endangered California condor as it continues to expand its range and encounter new infectious disease threats. PMID:26606755

  18. FACULTATIVE PARASITISM BY THE BIVALVE KURTIELLA PEDROANA IN THE SAND CRAB EMERITA ANALOGA.

    PubMed

    Bhaduri, Ritin; Valentich-Scott, Paul; Hilgers, Mark; Singh, Rajvir; Hickman, Mikaila; Lafferty, Kevin

    2017-08-31

    It is rare that an organism capable of independent or commensalistic existence can also become endoparasitic on a host. In this study, we documented a potential step toward parasitism in the commensal clam Kurtiella pedroana (Bivalvia: Galeommatoidea). Galeommatoideans are known commensals of various invertebrates, including crustaceans. Emerita analoga (Decapoda: Hippidae) is an abundant intertidal decapod inhabiting sandy beaches of the Pacific coast of North and South America. Crabs collected from Monterey Bay, California, were measured and examined externally and internally for associated molluscs. Out of the 520 crabs, 37 large female individuals harbored 49 bivalves (prevalence of 7.11% and mean intensity of 1.3). Forty-one ectocommensal clams were either inside the crab's branchial chambers or on their lateroventral surfaces, and were attached by byssal threads. Our key finding was eight clams that lacked byssal threads and were living in the hemocoel. These internal clams were significantly smaller than the ectocommensals. Because these internal clams lacked access to their normal food, we hypothesize they might have fed on their host's hemolymph as would a parasite. This clam species likely can't reproduce inside its host, implying that endoparasitism is a dead-end state for K. pedroana. Facultative parasitism in a free-living or an ectocommensal is uncommon and suggests a pathway to parasitism.

  19. Effects of competition on induction of crassulacean acid metabolism in a facultative CAM plant.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kailiang; D'Odorico, Paolo; Li, Wei; He, Yongli

    2017-04-11

    Abiotic drivers of environmental stress have been found to induce CAM expression (nocturnal carboxylation) in facultative CAM species such as Mesembryanthemum crystallinum. The role played by biotic factors such as competition with non-CAM species in affecting CAM expression, however, remains largely understudied. This research investigated the effects of salt and water conditions on the competition between M. crystallinum and the C3 grass Bromus mollis with which it is found to coexist in California's coastal grasslands. We also investigated the extent to which CAM expression in M. crystallinum was affected by the intensity of the competition with B. mollis. We found that M. crystallinum had a competitive advantage over B. mollis in drought and saline conditions, while B. mollis exerted strong competitive effects on M. crystallinum in access to light and soil nutrients in high water conditions. This strong competitive effect even outweighed the favorable effects of salt or water additions in increasing the biomass and productivity of M. crystallinum in mixture. Regardless of salt conditions, M. crystallinum did not switch to CAM photosynthesis in response to this strong competitive effect from B. mollis. Disturbance (i.e., grass cutting) reduced the competitive pressure by B. mollis and allowed for CAM expression in M. crystallinum when it was grown mixed with B. mollis. We suggest that moderate competition with other functional groups can enhance CAM expression in M. crystallinum, thereby affecting its plasticity and ability to cope with biological stress.

  20. Facultative control of matrix production optimizes competitive fitness in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 biofilm models.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Jonas S; Lin, Yu-Cheng; Squyres, Georgia R; Price-Whelan, Alexa; de Santiago Torio, Ana; Song, Angela; Cornell, William C; Sørensen, Søren J; Xavier, Joao B; Dietrich, Lars E P

    2015-12-01

    As biofilms grow, resident cells inevitably face the challenge of resource limitation. In the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14, electron acceptor availability affects matrix production and, as a result, biofilm morphogenesis. The secreted matrix polysaccharide Pel is required for pellicle formation and for colony wrinkling, two activities that promote access to O2. We examined the exploitability and evolvability of Pel production at the air-liquid interface (during pellicle formation) and on solid surfaces (during colony formation). Although Pel contributes to the developmental response to electron acceptor limitation in both biofilm formation regimes, we found variation in the exploitability of its production and necessity for competitive fitness between the two systems. The wild type showed a competitive advantage against a non-Pel-producing mutant in pellicles but no advantage in colonies. Adaptation to the pellicle environment selected for mutants with a competitive advantage against the wild type in pellicles but also caused a severe disadvantage in colonies, even in wrinkled colony centers. Evolution in the colony center produced divergent phenotypes, while adaptation to the colony edge produced mutants with clear competitive advantages against the wild type in this O2-replete niche. In general, the structurally heterogeneous colony environment promoted more diversification than the more homogeneous pellicle. These results suggest that the role of Pel in community structure formation in response to electron acceptor limitation is unique to specific biofilm models and that the facultative control of Pel production is required for PA14 to maintain optimum benefit in different types of communities.

  1. Fungi Treated with Small Chemicals Exhibit Increased Antimicrobial Activity against Facultative Bacterial and Yeast Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Zutz, Christoph; Bandian, Dragana; Neumayer, Bernhard; Speringer, Franz; Wagner, Martin; Strauss, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    For decades, fungi have been the main source for the discovery of novel antimicrobial drugs. Recent sequencing efforts revealed a still high number of so far unknown “cryptic” secondary metabolites. The production of these metabolites is presumably epigenetically silenced under standard laboratory conditions. In this study, we investigated the effect of six small mass chemicals, of which some are known to act as epigenetic modulators, on the production of antimicrobial compounds in 54 spore forming fungi. The antimicrobial effect of fungal samples was tested against clinically facultative pathogens and multiresistant clinical isolates. In total, 30 samples of treated fungi belonging to six different genera reduced significantly growth of different test organisms compared to the untreated fungal sample (growth log reduction 0.3–4.3). For instance, the pellet of Penicillium restrictum grown in the presence of butyrate revealed significant higher antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus (S.) aureus and multiresistant S. aureus strains and displayed no cytotoxicity against human cells, thus making it an ideal candidate for antimicrobial compound discovery. Our study shows that every presumable fungus, even well described fungi, has the potential to produce novel antimicrobial compounds and that our approach is capable of rapidly filling the pipeline for yet undiscovered antimicrobial substances. PMID:25121102

  2. Heat Stress Affects Facultative Symbiont-Mediated Protection from a Parasitoid Wasp

    PubMed Central

    Heyworth, Eleanor R.

    2016-01-01

    Many insects carry facultative bacterial symbionts, which provide benefits including resistance to natural enemies and abiotic stresses. Little is known about how these beneficial phenotypes are affected when biotic or abiotic threats occur simultaneously. The pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum) can host several well-characterized symbiont species. The symbiont known as X-type can protect against both parasitoid wasps and heat stress. Here, we used three pea aphid genotypes that were naturally infected with X-type and the symbiont Spiroplasma sp. We compared aphids coinfected with these two symbionts with those cured from X-type and infected with only Spiroplasma to investigate the ability of X-type to confer benefits to the host when two threats are experienced simultaneously. Our aim is to explore how robust symbiont protection may be outside a benign laboratory environment. Aphids were subjected to heat shock either before or after attack by parasitoid wasps. Under a benign temperature regime, the aphids carrying X-type tended to be better protected from the parasitoid than those cured. When the aphids experienced a heat shock before being parasitized aphids carrying X-type were more susceptible than those cured. Regardless of infection with the symbiont, the aphids benefitted from being heat shocked after parasitization. The results demonstrate how resistance to parasitoid wasps can be strongly environment-dependent and that a beneficial phenotype conferred by a symbiont under controlled conditions in the laboratory does not necessarily equate to a consistently useful effect in natural populations. PMID:27875577

  3. Characteristics of the draft genome of "Candidatus Arsenophonus nilaparvatae", a facultative endosymbiont of Nilaparvata lugens.

    PubMed

    Fan, Hai-Wei; Lu, Jia-Bao; Ye, Yu-Xuan; Yu, Xiao-Ping; Zhang, Chuan-Xi

    2016-06-01

    There exists a kind of symbiotic bacterium named "Candidatus Arsenophonus nilaparvatae" in the brown planthopper (BPH), Nilaparvata lugens. After being filtered and assembled from the BPH genome sequencing project, the genome sequence of this bacterial symbiont was obtained. After initial analysis based on the genome, we have found its potential role to synthesize B vitamins for the host. In order to better understand the lifestyle and the genomic changes of this symbiotic bacterium after the symbiotic relationship was established, we further report the characteristics of this draft genome. Compared with several other related bacteria, "Candidatus Arsenophonus nilaparvatae" has proven to be a facultative endosymbiont at the genomic level. Concurrently, the presence of fimbriae and flagella formation related genes indicates this maternally transmitted endosymbiont is most likely to retain the capacity to invade new hosts. Through further analysis of annotated gene sets, we also find evidence of genome reduction in its secretion system and metabolic pathways. These findings reflect its evolutionary trend to be an obligate one and enable a deeper study of microbe-insect interactions.

  4. Cultivation of Anaerobic and Facultatively Anaerobic Bacteria from Spacecraft-Associated Clean Rooms▿

    PubMed Central

    Stieglmeier, Michaela; Wirth, Reinhard; Kminek, Gerhard; Moissl-Eichinger, Christine

    2009-01-01

    In the course of this biodiversity study, the cultivable microbial community of European spacecraft-associated clean rooms and the Herschel Space Observatory located therein were analyzed during routine assembly operations. Here, we focused on microorganisms capable of growing without oxygen. Anaerobes play a significant role in planetary protection considerations since extraterrestrial environments like Mars probably do not provide enough oxygen for fully aerobic microbial growth. A broad assortment of anaerobic media was used in our cultivation strategies, which focused on microorganisms with special metabolic skills. The majority of the isolated strains grew on anaerobic, complex, nutrient-rich media. Autotrophic microorganisms or microbes capable of fixing nitrogen were also cultivated. A broad range of facultatively anaerobic bacteria was detected during this study and also, for the first time, some strictly anaerobic bacteria (Clostridium and Propionibacterium) were isolated from spacecraft-associated clean rooms. The multiassay cultivation approach was the basis for the detection of several bacteria that had not been cultivated from these special environments before and also led to the discovery of two novel microbial species of Pseudomonas and Paenibacillus. PMID:19363082

  5. Self-powered wastewater treatment for the enhanced operation of a facultative lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewing, Timothy; Babauta, Jerome T.; Atci, Erhan; Tang, Nghia; Orellana, Josue; Heo, Deukhyoun; Beyenal, Haluk

    2014-12-01

    The goal of this study was to harness the redox gradients in facultative lagoons using a lagoon microbial fuel cell (LMFC) to enhance autonomously the delivery of oxygen to the lagoon through aeration and mixing by operating an air pump. To enhance the usability of the low power generated by the LMFC, a power management system (PMS) was used to harvest power continually while only operating the air pump intermittently. Here we demonstrate the LMFC as an alternative energy source for self-powered wastewater treatment systems by treating both artificial wastewater and dairy wastewater in large laboratory-scale simulated lagoons. For comparison, we also used a lagoon treatment system without self-aeration. We show that the integrated LMFC and PMS system was able to improve chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal time by 21% for artificial wastewater and by 54% for dairy wastewater. The LMFC-PMS wastewater treatment system operated for over a year and proved to be robust and provide a measure of sustainability. The LMFC-PMS combination offers an innovative and low-tech approach to increasing the capacity of lagoons for rural communities. We believe that the technology developed in this research is the first step towards providing sustainable self-powered wastewater treatment systems.

  6. Effects of vulture declines on facultative scavengers and potential implications for mammalian disease transmission.

    PubMed

    Ogada, D L; Torchin, M E; Kinnaird, M F; Ezenwa, V O

    2012-06-01

    Vultures (Accipitridae and Cathartidae) are the only known obligate scavengers. They feed on rotting carcasses and are the most threatened avian functional group in the world. Possible effects of vulture declines include longer persistence of carcasses and increasing abundance of and contact between facultative scavengers at these carcasses. These changes could increase rates of transmission of infectious diseases, with carcasses serving as hubs of infection. To evaluate these possibilities, we conducted a series of observations and experimental tests of the effects of vulture extirpation on decomposition rates of livestock carcasses and mammalian scavengers in Kenya. We examined whether the absence of vultures changed carcass decomposition time, number of mammalian scavengers visiting carcasses, time spent by mammals at carcasses, and potential for disease transmission at carcasses (measured by changes in intraspecific contact rates). In the absence of vultures, mean carcass decomposition rates nearly tripled. Furthermore, the mean number of mammals at carcasses increased 3-fold (from 1.5 to 4.4 individuals/carcass), and the average time spent by mammals at carcasses increased almost 3-fold (from 55 min to 143 min). There was a nearly 3-fold increase in the mean number of contacts between mammalian scavengers at carcasses without vultures. These results highlight the role of vultures in carcass decomposition and level of contact among mammalian scavengers. In combination, our findings lead us to hypothesize that changes in vulture abundance may affect patterns of disease transmission among mammalian carnivores. ©2012 Society for Conservation Biology.

  7. Sexual imprinting misguides species recognition in a facultative interspecific brood parasite.

    PubMed

    Sorenson, Michael D; Hauber, Mark E; Derrickson, Scott R

    2010-10-22

    Sexual reproduction relies on the recognition of conspecifics for breeding. Most experiments in birds have implicated a critical role for early social learning in directing subsequent courtship behaviours and mating decisions. This classical view of avian sexual imprinting is challenged, however, by studies of megapodes and obligate brood parasites, species in which reliable recognition is achieved despite the lack of early experience with conspecifics. By rearing males with either conspecific or heterospecific brood mates, we experimentally tested the effect of early social experience on the association preferences and courtship behaviours of two sympatrically breeding ducks. We predicted that redheads (Aythya americana), which are facultative interspecific brood parasites, would show a diminished effect of early social environment on subsequent courtship preferences when compared with their host and congener, the canvasback (Aythya valisineria). Contrary to expectations, cross-fostered males of both species courted heterospecific females and preferred them in spatial association tests, whereas control males courted and associated with conspecific females. These results imply that ontogenetic constraints on species recognition may be a general impediment to the initial evolution of interspecific brood parasitism in birds. Under more natural conditions, a variety of mechanisms may mitigate or counteract the effects of early imprinting for redheads reared in canvasback broods.

  8. Direct fitness correlates and thermal consequences of facultative aggregation in a desert lizard.

    PubMed

    Rabosky, Alison R Davis; Corl, Ammon; Liwanag, Heather E M; Surget-Groba, Yann; Sinervo, Barry

    2012-01-01

    Social aggregation is a common behavioral phenomenon thought to evolve through adaptive benefits to group living. Comparing fitness differences between aggregated and solitary individuals in nature--necessary to infer an evolutionary benefit to living in groups--has proven difficult because communally-living species tend to be obligately social and behaviorally complex. However, these differences and the mechanisms driving them are critical to understanding how solitary individuals transition to group living, as well as how and why nascent social systems change over time. Here we demonstrate that facultative aggregation in a reptile (the Desert Night Lizard, Xantusia vigilis) confers direct reproductive success and survival advantages and that thermal benefits of winter huddling disproportionately benefit small juveniles, which can favor delayed dispersal of offspring and the formation of kin groups. Using climate projection models, however, we estimate that future aggregation in night lizards could decline more than 50% due to warmer temperatures. Our results support the theory that transitions to group living arise from direct benefits to social individuals and offer a clear mechanism for the origin of kin groups through juvenile philopatry. The temperature dependence of aggregation in this and other taxa suggests that environmental variation may be a powerful but underappreciated force in the rapid transition between social and solitary behavior.

  9. Stable isotopes reveal habitat-related diet shifts in facultative deposit-feeders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Francesca; Baeta, Alexandra; Marques, João C.

    2015-01-01

    Seagrass patches interspersed in a sediment matrix may vary environmental conditions and affect feeding habits of consumers and food-web structure. This paper investigates diet shifts between bare sediments and a Zostera noltei (Hornemann, 1832) meadow for three facultative deposit-feeding macrofaunal consumers, notably the bivalve Scrobicularia plana (da Costa, 1778), the polychaete Hediste diversicolor (O.T. Müller, 1776), and the gastropod Hydrobia ulvae (Pennant, 1778). In July 2008, one eelgrass meadow and two bare sediment locations were chosen in the Mondego estuary (40° 08″ N, 8° 50‧ W, Portugal) and sampled for stable isotope signatures (δ13C and δ15N) of macrofauna consumers and some of their potential basal food sources, such as sedimentary organic matter (SOM), microphytobenthos (MPB), seagrass shoots, leaves and seaweeds laying on the surface sediment. The δ15N of H. diversicolor was 3‰ higher in the eelgrass meadow than in bare sediment, indicating a change of trophic position, whereas the Bayesian stable-isotope mixing model showed that S. plana assimilated more macroalgal detritus than microphytobenthos in the eelgrass bed. Such habitat-related diet shifts have the potential to change structure and spatial dynamics of benthic food webs.

  10. Antimicrobial resistance of aerobes and facultative anaerobes isolated from the oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    GAETTI-JARDIM, Ellen Cristina; MARQUETI, Antônio Carlos; FAVERANI, Leonardo Perez; GAETTI-JARDIM JÚNIOR, Elerson

    2010-01-01

    Objectives This study evaluated the resistance to antimicrobials of aerobes and facultative anaerobes isolated from patients wearing complete dentures, patients with gingivitis and periodontitis, and periodontally health subjects. Material and methods Three hundred and four isolates were tested. The minimal inhibitory concentrations of the drugs were evaluated through the agar dilution method using Mueller-Hinton agar. Results The most active antimicrobial drugs were the carbapenems (meropenem and imipenem), and resistance to these drugs was restrict to 1.6-2.3% of the isolates, as well as ciprofloxacin and rifampin. Microbial resistance to ampicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, cefoxitin, cephalothin, amikacin, chloramphenicol and nalidixic acid was particularly high. In most cases, the resistance to β-lactams was mediated by the production of hydrolytic enzymes, especially in gram-negative enteric rods, while enterococci did not evidence production of these enzymes. The association amoxicillin/clavulanic acid was not effective in 28.3% of the tested isolates. Conclusions The results of this investigation confirmed that the oral cavity of patients with periodontitis and gingivitis, and particularly edentulous patients wearing complete dentures, could harbor microorganisms with several antimicrobial resistance markers, and these microorganisms are frequently implicated in multiresistant, systemic, oral or nosocomial infections. PMID:21308284

  11. Genetic Draft and Quasi-Neutrality in Large Facultatively Sexual Populations

    PubMed Central

    Neher, R. A.; Shraiman, B. I.

    2011-01-01

    Large populations may contain numerous simultaneously segregating polymorphisms subject to natural selection. Since selection acts on individuals whose fitness depends on many loci, different loci affect each other’s dynamics. This leads to stochastic fluctuations of allele frequencies above and beyond genetic drift—an effect known as genetic draft. Since recombination disrupts associations between alleles, draft is strong when recombination is rare. Here, we study a facultatively outcrossing population in a regime where the frequency of outcrossing and recombination, r, is small compared to the characteristic scale of fitness differences σ. In this regime, fit genotypes expand clonally, leading to large fluctuations in the number of recombinant offspring genotypes. The power law tail in the distribution of the latter makes it impossible to capture the dynamics of draft by an effective neutral model. Instead, we find that the fixation time of a neutral allele increases only slowly with the population size but depends sensitively on the ratio r/σ. The efficacy of selection is reduced dramatically and alleles behave “quasi-neutrally” even for Ns≫1, provided that |s| < sc, where sc depends strongly on r/σ, but only weakly on population size N. In addition, the anomalous fluctuations due to draft change the spectrum of (quasi)-neutral alleles from f(ν) ∼ ν−1, corresponding to drift, to ∼ ν−2. Finally, draft accelerates the rate of two-step adaptations through deleterious intermediates. PMID:21625002

  12. Thiobacillus cuprinus sp. nov., a Novel Facultatively Organotrophic Metal-Mobilizing Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Harald; Stetter, Karl O.

    1990-01-01

    Five strains of mesophilic, facultatively organotrophic, ore-leaching eubacteria were isolated from solfatara fields in Iceland and a uranium mine in the Federal Republic of Germany. The new organisms are aerobic gram-negative rods. They can use sulfidic ores or elemental sulfur as sole energy source, indicating that they belong to the genus Thiobacillus. Alternatively, they grow on organic substrates such as yeast extract, peptone, and pyruvate. In contrast to the other leaching bacteria known so far, the new isolates are unable to oxidize ferrous iron. They consist of extreme and moderate acidophiles growing optimally at pH 3 and 4, respectively. The extreme acidophiles showed leaching characteristics similar to those shown by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, while the moderate acidophiles exhibited a pronounced preference for copper leaching on some chalcopyrite ores. The G+C content of the DNA is between 66 and 69 mol%, depending on the isolate. In DNA-DNA hybridization experiments, the new strains showed homologies among each other of >70%, indicating that they belong to the same species. No significant DNA homology to Thiobacillus reference strains was detectable. Therefore, the new isolates represent a new species of Thiobacillus, which we name Thiobacillus cuprinus. Isolate Hö5 is designated as the type strain (DSM 5495). Images PMID:16348110

  13. Facultative use of thelytokous parthenogenesis for queen production in the polyandrous ant Cataglyphis cursor.

    PubMed

    Doums, C; Cronin, A L; Ruel, C; Fédérici, P; Haussy, C; Tirard, C; Monnin, T

    2013-07-01

    The evolutionary paradox of sex remains one of the major debates in evolutionary biology. The study of species capable of both sexual and asexual reproduction can elucidate factors important in the evolution of sex. One such species is the ant Cataglyphis cursor, where the queen maximizes the transmission of her genes by producing new queens (gynes) asexually while simultaneously maintaining a genetically diverse workforce via the sexual production of workers. We show that the queen can also produce gynes sexually and may do so to offset the costs of asexual reproduction. We genotyped 235 gynes from 18 colonies and found that half were sexually produced. A few colonies contained both sexually and asexually produced gynes. Although workers in this species can also use thelytoky, we found no evidence of worker production of gynes based on genotypes of 471 workers from the six colonies producing sexual gynes. Gynes are thus mainly, and potentially exclusively, produced by the queen. Simulations of gynes inbreeding level following one to ten generations of automictic thelytoky suggest that the queen switches between or combines thelytoky and sex, which may reduce the costs of inbreeding. This is supported by the relatively small size of inbred gynes in one colony, although we found no relationship between the level of inbreeding and immune parameters. Such facultative use of sex and thelytoky by individual queens contrasts with other known forms of parthenogenesis in ants, which are typically characterized by distinct lineages specializing in one strategy or the other.

  14. A successful crayfish invader is capable of facultative parthenogenesis: a novel reproductive mode in decapod crustaceans.

    PubMed

    Buřič, Miloš; Hulák, Martin; Kouba, Antonín; Petrusek, Adam; Kozák, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Biological invasions are impacting biota worldwide, and explaining why some taxa tend to become invasive is of major scientific interest. North American crayfish species, particularly of the family Cambaridae, are prominent invaders in freshwaters, defying the "tens rule" which states that only a minority of species introduced to new regions become established, and only a minority of those become invasive and pests. So far, success of cambarid invaders has largely been attributed to rapid maturation, high reproductive output, aggressiveness, and tolerance to pollution. We provide experimental evidence that females of one cambarid species particularly widespread in Europe, the spiny-cheek crayfish Orconectes limosus, are capable of facultative parthenogenesis. Such reproductive mode has never before been recognized in decapods, the most diverse crustacean order. As shown by analysis of seven microsatellite loci, crayfish females kept physically separated from males produced genetically homogeneous offspring identical with maternal individuals; this suggests they reproduced by apomixis, unlike those females which mated with males and had a diverse offspring. Further research is needed to clarify what environmental conditions are necessary for a switch to parthenogenesis in O. limosus, and what role it plays in natural crayfish populations. However, if such reproductive plasticity is present in other cambarid crayfish species, it may contribute to the overwhelming invasive success of this group.

  15. Facultative apomixis and development of fruit in a deciduous shrub with medicinal and nutritional uses.

    PubMed

    Mangla, Yash; Chaudhary, Manju; Gupta, Himshikha; Thakur, Rakesh; Goel, Shailendra; Raina, S N; Tandon, Rajesh

    2015-08-17

    Knowledge of reproductive biology of plants is crucial to understand their natural mode of propagation, which may aid in conservation and crop improvement. The reproductive details are also crucial for beginning the cultivation of a potential crop on a commercial scale. Fruits of sea buckthorn, Hippophae rhamnoides, are used in a variety of medicinal and nutritional products. So far, fruits are collected from the female plants in the wild. It is known that the species fruits profusely and also propagates by forming root suckers, but the details of sexual reproduction are not available. We investigated the mode of reproduction and development of fruits from natural populations of sea buckthorn. Megasporogenesis and megagametogenesis were studied through resin-embedded sectioning and ovule-clearing methods, and fruit development through histochemistry. The study of mitosis and male meiosis showed that the plants at the site were diploid (2n = 2x = 24). The embryo sac may develop either through the monosporic pathway and differentiates into 'Polygonum type' or aposporously into 'Panicum type'. The embryo may develop by sexual and adventitious pathways. Thus, sea buckthorn is a facultative apomict. The occurrence of diverse reproductive pathways assures the possibility of generation of novel genotypes through sexuality, while apomictic reproduction maintains adaptive genotypes and ensures reproduction in the absence of pollination. Anatomical details suggest that the fruit of sea buckthorn may be appropriately described as a pseudo-drupe.

  16. Involvement of facultative apomixis in inheritance of EPSPS gene amplification in glyphosate-resistant Amaranthus palmeri.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Daniela N; Pan, Zhiqiang; Duke, Stephen O; Nandula, Vijay K; Baldwin, Brian S; Shaw, David R; Dayan, Franck E

    2014-01-01

    The inheritance of glyphosate resistance in two Amaranthus palmeri populations (R1 and R2) was examined in reciprocal crosses (RC) and second reciprocal crosses (2RC) between glyphosate-resistant (R) and -susceptible (S) parents of this dioecious species. R populations and Female-R × Male-S crosses contain higher 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) gene copy numbers than the S population. EPSPS expression, EPSPS enzyme activity, EPSPS protein quantity, and level of resistance to glyphosate correlated positively with genomic EPSPS relative copy number. Transfer of resistance was more influenced by the female than the male parent in spite of the fact that the multiple copies of EPSPS are amplified in the nuclear genome. This led us to hypothesize that this perplexing pattern of inheritance may result from apomictic seed production in A. palmeri. We confirmed that reproductively isolated R and S female plants produced seeds, indicating that A. palmeri can produce seeds both sexually and apomictically (facultative apomixis). This apomictic trait accounts for the low copy number inheritance in the Female-S × Male-R offsprings. Apomixis may also enhance the stability of the glyphosate resistance trait in the R populations in the absence of reproductive partners.

  17. Mutualism exploitation: predatory drosophilid larvae sugar-trap ants and jeopardize facultative ant-plant mutualism.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Mayra C; Sendoya, Sebastian F; Oliveira, Paulo S

    2016-07-01

    An open question in the evolutionary ecology of ant-plant facultative mutualism is how other members of the associated community can affect the interaction to a point where reciprocal benefits are disrupted. While visiting Qualea grandiflora shrubs to collect sugary rewards at extrafloral nectaries, tropical savanna ants deter herbivores and reduce leaf damage. Here we show that larvae of the fly Rhinoleucophenga myrmecophaga, which develop on extrafloral nectaries, lure potentially mutualistic, nectar-feeding ants and prey on them. Foraging ants spend less time on fly-infested foliage. Field experiments showed that predation (or the threat of predation) on ants by fly larvae produces cascading effects through three trophic levels, resulting in fewer protective ants on leaves, increased numbers of chewing herbivores, and greater leaf damage. These results reveal an undocumented mode of mutualism exploitation by an opportunistic predator at a plant-provided food source, jeopardizing ant-derived protection services to the plant. Our study documents a rather unusual case of predation of adult ants by a dipteran species and demonstrates a top-down trophic cascade within a generalized ant-plant mutualism. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  18. A case of a facultative life-cycle diversification in the fluke Pleurogenoides sp. (Lecithodendriidae, Plagiorchiida).

    PubMed

    Hassl, Andreas R

    2010-10-01

    Numerous specimens of the native, intestinal digenean fluke Pleurogenoides sp. (Lecithodendriidae, Plagiorchiida), a genus known for the simultaneous co-existence of genuine adults and progenetic, adult-like metacercaria, were found by chance parasitizing in the oesophagus of a recently imported, tropical Bristly Bush Viper (Atheris hispida). The snake had before been force-fed with native water frogs, the assumed definitive host of these flukes. Hence water frogs act as the second intermediate host or as a paratenic host for Pleurogenoides flukes, as they must house progenetic fluke larvae, which develop to genuine adults when transmitted to an appropriate consecutive host, the ancestral definitive host, a reptile. The European Pleurogenoides fluke species seem to display a facultative life-cycle diversification, they can adjust their life-history strategy according to their immediate transmission opportunities. This phenotypic plasticity allows the parasite to respond quickly to any changes in the abundance of a host; usually this biological oddity results in a life-cycle truncation by the elimination of the definitive host.

  19. Induction of Crassulacean Acid Metabolism in the Facultative Halophyte Mesembryanthemum crystallinum by Abscisic Acid 1

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Chun; Dai, Ziyu; Ku, Maurice S. B.; Edwards, Gerald E.

    1990-01-01

    The facultative halophyte, Mesembryanthemum crystallinum, shifts its mode of carbon assimilation from the C3 pathway to Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) in response to water stress. In this study, exogenously applied abscisic acid (ABA), at micromolar concentrations, could partially substitute for water stress in induction of CAM in this species. ABA at concentrations of 5 to 10 micromolar, when applied to leaves or to the roots in hydroponic culture or in soil, induced the expression of CAM within days (as indicated by the nocturnal accumulation of total titratable acidity and malate). After applying ABA there was also an increase in phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and NADP-malic enzyme activities. The degree and time course of induction by ABA were comparable to those induced by salt and water stress. Electrophoretic analyses of leaf soluble protein indicate that the increases in phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity during the induction by ABA, salt, and water stress are due to an increase in the quantity of the enzyme protein. ABA may be a factor in the stress-induced expression of CAM in M. crystallinum, serving as a functional link between stress and biochemical adaptation. Images Figure 9 PMID:16667587

  20. Roseimarinus sediminis gen. nov., sp. nov., a facultatively anaerobic bacterium isolated from coastal sediment.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wen-Jie; Liu, Qian-Qian; Chen, Guan-Jun; Du, Zong-Jun

    2015-07-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, facultatively anaerobic, non-motile and pink-pigmented bacterium, designated strain HF08(T), was isolated from marine sediment of the coast of Weihai, China. Cells were rod-shaped, and oxidase- and catalase-positive. The isolate grew optimally at 33 °C, at pH 7.5-8.0 and with 2-3% (w/v) NaCl. The dominant cellular fatty acids were iso-C15 : 0, anteiso-C15 : 0 and iso-C14 : 0. Menaquinone 7 (MK-7) was the major respiratory quinone and the DNA G+C content was 44.8 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the isolate was a member of the class Bacteroidia, and shared 88-90% sequence similarity with the closest genera Sunxiuqinia, Prolixibacter, Draconibacterium, Mariniphaga and Meniscus. Based on the phylogenetic and phenotypic evidence presented, a novel species in a new genus of the family Prolixibacteraceae is proposed, with the name Roseimarinus sediminis gen. nov., sp. nov. The type strain of Roseimarinus sediminis is HF08(T) ( = KCTC 42261(T) = CICC 10901(T)).

  1. Tracing impacts of partner abundance in facultative pollination mutualisms: from individuals to populations.

    PubMed

    Geib, Jennifer C; Galen, Candace

    2012-07-01

    Partner abundance affects costs and benefits in obligate mutualisms, but its role in facultative partnerships is less clear. We address this gap in a pollination web consisting of two clovers (Trifolium) that differ in specialization on a bumble bee pollinator Bombus balteatus. We examine how pollination niche breadth affects plant responses to pollinator abundance, comparing early-flowering (specialized) and late-flowering (generalized) cohorts of T. parryi and early T. parryi to T. dasyphyllum, a pollination generalist. Co-pollinators disrupt the link between B. halteatus visitation and pollination rate for both clovers. Only for early-flowering T. parryi do visitation, pollination, and seed set increase with density of B. balteatus. Bumble bee density also alters timing of seed germination in T. parryi, with seeds from plants receiving augmented B. balteatus germinating sooner than seeds of open-pollinated counterparts. Benefits saturate at intermediate bumble bee densities. Despite strong effects of B. balteatus density on individual plant fitness components, population models suggest little impact of B. balteatus density on lamda in T. parryi or T. dasyphyllum. Findings show that functional redundancy in a pollinator guild mediates host-plant responses to partner density. Unexpected effects of pollinator density on life history schedule have implications for recruitment under pollinator decline.

  2. Cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa response to pentachlorophenol and comparison with that of the microalga Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    de Morais, Paulo; Stoichev, Teodor; Basto, M Clara P; Ramos, V; Vasconcelos, V M; Vasconcelos, M Teresa S D

    2014-04-01

    Pentachlorophenol (PCP) effects on a strain of the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa were investigated at laboratory scale. This is the first systematic ecotoxicity study of the effects of PCP on an aquatic cyanobacterium. The microalga Chlorella vulgaris was studied in the same conditions as the cyanobacterium, in order to compare the PCP toxicity and its removal by the species. The cells were exposed to environmental levels of PCP during 10 days, in Fraquil culture medium, at nominal concentrations from 0.01 to 1000 μg L(-1), to the cyanobacterium, and 0.01 to 5000 μg L(-1), to the microalga. Growth was assessed by area under growth curve (AUC, optical density vs time) and chlorophyll a content (chla). The toxicity profiles of the two species were very different. The calculated effective concentrations EC20 and EC50 were much lower to M. aeruginosa, and its growth inhibition expressed by chla was concentration-dependent while by AUC was not concentration-dependent. The cells might continue to divide even with lower levels of chla. The number of C. vulgaris cells decreased with the PCP concentration without major impact on the chla. The effect of PCP on M. aeruginosa is hormetic: every concentration studied was toxic except 1 μg L(-1), which promoted its growth. The legal limit of PCP set by the European Union for surface waters (1 μg L(-1)) should be reconsidered since a toxic cyanobacteria bloom might occur. The study of the removal of PCP from the culture medium by the two species is an additional novelty of this work. M. aeruginosa could remove part of the PCP from the medium, at concentrations where toxic effects were observed, while C. vulgaris stabilized it. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Aeruginazole A, a novel thiazole-containing cyclopeptide from the cyanobacterium Microcystis sp.

    PubMed

    Raveh, Avi; Carmeli, Shmuel

    2010-08-06

    A novel thiazole-containing cyclic peptide, aeruginazole A (1), was isolated from the cyanobacterium Microcystis sp. strain (IL-323), which was collected from a water reservoir near Kfar-Yehoshua, Valley of Armageddon, Israel. The planar structure of aeruginazole A was established using homonuclear and inverse-heteronuclear 2D NMR techniques, as well as high-resolution mass spectrometry. The absolute configuration of the asymmetric centers was determined using Marfey's method. Aeruginazole A potently inhibited Bacillus subtilis.

  4. Alotamide A, a Novel Neuropharmacological Agent From the Marine Cyanobacterium Lyngbya bouillonii

    PubMed Central

    Soria-Mercado, Irma E.; Pereira, Alban; Cao, Zhengyu; Murray, Thomas F.; Gerwick, William H.

    2009-01-01

    Alotamide A (1), a structurally intriguing cyclic depsipeptide, was isolated from the marine mat-forming cyanobacterium Lyngbya bouillonii collected in Papua New Guinea. It features three contiguous peptidic residues and an unsaturated heptaketide with oxidations and methylations unlike those found in any other marine cyanobacterial metabolite. Pure alotamide A (1) displays an unusual calcium influx activation profile in murine cerebrocortical neurons with an EC50 of 4.18 μM. PMID:19754100

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of the Toxic Bloom-Forming Cyanobacterium Aphanizomenon flos-aquae NIES-81.

    PubMed

    Cao, Huansheng; Shimura, Yohei; Masanobu, Kawachi; Yin, Yanbin

    2014-02-13

    Aphanizomenon flos-aquae is a toxic filamentous cyanobacterium that causes water blooms in freshwaters across the globe. We present the draft genome sequence of the A. flos-aquae strain NIES-81, which was determined by 454 pyrosequencing technology. The draft genome is ~5.7 Mb, containing 5,802 predicted protein-coding genes and 58 RNA genes, with a G+C content of 38.5%.

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of the Toxic Bloom-Forming Cyanobacterium Aphanizomenon flos-aquae NIES-81

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Huansheng; Shimura, Yohei; Masanobu, Kawachi

    2014-01-01

    Aphanizomenon flos-aquae is a toxic filamentous cyanobacterium that causes water blooms in freshwaters across the globe. We present the draft genome sequence of the A. flos-aquae strain NIES-81, which was determined by 454 pyrosequencing technology. The draft genome is ~5.7 Mb, containing 5,802 predicted protein-coding genes and 58 RNA genes, with a G+C content of 38.5%. PMID:24526634

  7. Draft Genome Assembly of a Filamentous Euendolithic (True Boring) Cyanobacterium, Mastigocoleus testarum Strain BC008

    PubMed Central

    Guida, Brandon S.

    2016-01-01

    Mastigocoleus testarum strain BC008 is a model organism used to study marine photoautotrophic carbonate dissolution. It is a multicellular, filamentous, diazotrophic, euendolithic cyanobacterium ubiquitously found in marine benthic environments. We present an accurate draft genome assembly of 172 contigs spanning 12,700,239 bp with 9,131 annotated genes with an average G+C% of 37.3. PMID:26823575

  8. Higher clonal integration in the facultative epiphytic fern Selliguea griffithiana growing in the forest canopy compared with the forest understorey

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hua-Zheng; Liu, Wen-Yao; Yu, Fei-Hai; Song, Liang; Xu, Xing-Liang; Wu, Chuan-Sheng; Zheng, Yu-Long; Li, Yang-Ping; Gong, He-De; Chen, Ke; Li, Su; Chen, Xi; Qi, Jin-Hua; Lu, Shu-Gang

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims The advantage of clonal integration (resource sharing between connected ramets of clonal plants) varies and a higher degree of integration is expected in more stressful and/or more heterogeneous habitats. Clonal facultative epiphytes occur in both forest canopies (epiphytic habitats) and forest understories (terrestrial habitats). Because environmental conditions, especially water and nutrients, are more stressful and heterogeneous in the canopy than in the understorey, this study hypothesizes that clonal integration is more important for facultative epiphytes in epiphytic habitats than in terrestrial habitats. Methods In a field experiment, an examination was made of the effects of rhizome connection (connected vs. disconnected, i.e. with vs. without clonal integration) on survival and growth of single ramets, both young and old, of the facultative epiphytic rhizomatous fern Selliguea griffithiana (Polypodiaceae) in both epiphytic and terrestrial habitats. In another field experiment, the effects of rhizome connection on performance of ramets were tested in small (10 × 10 cm2) and large (20 × 20 cm2) plots in both epiphytic and terrestrial habitats. Key Results Rhizome disconnection significantly decreased survival and growth of S. griffithiana in both experiments. The effects of rhizome disconnection on survival of single ramets and on ramet number and growth in plots were greater in epiphytic habitats than in terrestrial habitats. Conclusions Clonal integration contributes greatly to performance of facultative epiphytic ferns, and the effects were more important in forest canopies than in forest understories. The results therefore support the hypothesis that natural selection favours genotypes with a higher degree of integration in more stressful and heterogeneous environments. PMID:26050068

  9. Higher clonal integration in the facultative epiphytic fern Selliguea griffithiana growing in the forest canopy compared with the forest understorey.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hua-Zheng; Liu, Wen-Yao; Yu, Fei-Hai; Song, Liang; Xu, Xing-Liang; Wu, Chuan-Sheng; Zheng, Yu-Long; Li, Yang-Ping; Gong, He-De; Chen, Ke; Li, Su; Chen, Xi; Qi, Jin-Hua; Lu, Shu-Gang

    2015-07-01

    The advantage of clonal integration (resource sharing between connected ramets of clonal plants) varies and a higher degree of integration is expected in more stressful and/or more heterogeneous habitats. Clonal facultative epiphytes occur in both forest canopies (epiphytic habitats) and forest understories (terrestrial habitats). Because environmental conditions, especially water and nutrients, are more stressful and heterogeneous in the canopy than in the understorey, this study hypothesizes that clonal integration is more important for facultative epiphytes in epiphytic habitats than in terrestrial habitats. In a field experiment, an examination was made of the effects of rhizome connection (connected vs. disconnected, i.e. with vs. without clonal integration) on survival and growth of single ramets, both young and old, of the facultative epiphytic rhizomatous fern Selliguea griffithiana (Polypodiaceae) in both epiphytic and terrestrial habitats. In another field experiment, the effects of rhizome connection on performance of ramets were tested in small (10 × 10 cm(2)) and large (20 × 20 cm(2)) plots in both epiphytic and terrestrial habitats. Rhizome disconnection significantly decreased survival and growth of S. griffithiana in both experiments. The effects of rhizome disconnection on survival of single ramets and on ramet number and growth in plots were greater in epiphytic habitats than in terrestrial habitats. Clonal integration contributes greatly to performance of facultative epiphytic ferns, and the effects were more important in forest canopies than in forest understories. The results therefore support the hypothesis that natural selection favours genotypes with a higher degree of integration in more stressful and heterogeneous environments. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Influence of Leaching Parameters on the Biological Removal of Uranium from Coal by a Filamentous Cyanobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Michael G.; Krumbein, Wolfgang E.

    1985-01-01

    Axenic cultures of the filamentous cyanobacterium LPP OL3 were incubated with samples of uraniumbearing coal from a German mining area. The influence of leaching parameters such as coal concentration (pulp density), initial biomass, particle size, temperature, and composition of the growth medium on the leaching of uranium from the ore by the cyanobacterial strain was studied. When low pulp densities were applied, the yield of biologically extracted uranium was optimal (reaching 96% at 1% [wt/vol] coal) and all released uranium was found in the culture liquid. Above 10% (wt/vol) coal in the medium, the amount of cell-bound uranium increased. Initial biomass concentration (protein content of the cultures) and particle size were not critical parameters of leaching by LPP OL3. However, temperature and composition of the growth medium profoundly influenced the leaching of uranium and growth of the cyanobacterium. The yield of leached uranium (at 10% [wt/vol] coal) could not be raised with a tank leaching apparatus. Also, coal ashes were not suitable substrates for the leaching of uranium by LPP OL3. In conclusion, the reactions of the cyanobacterium to variations in leaching parameters were different from reactions of acidic leaching organisms. Images PMID:16346934

  11. Role of manganese in protection against oxidative stress under iron starvation in cyanobacterium Anabaena 7120.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Manish Singh; Srivastava, Meenakshi; Verma, Ekta; Mishra, Arun Kumar

    2015-06-01

    The cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 was grown in presence and absence of iron to decipher the role of manganese in protection against the oxidative stress under iron starvation and growth, manganese uptake kinetics, antioxidative enzymes, lipid peroxidation, electrolyte leakage, thiol content, total peroxide, proline and NADH content was investigated. Manganese supported the growth of cyanobacterium Anabaena 7120 under iron deprived conditions where maximum uptake rate of manganese was observed with lower K(m) and higher V(max) values. Antioxidative enzymes were also found to be elevated in iron-starved conditions. Estimation of lipid peroxidation and electrolyte leakage depicted the role of manganese in stabilizing the integrity of the membrane which was considered as the prime target of oxygen free radicals in oxidative stress. The levels of total peroxide, thiol, proline and NADH content, which are the representative of oxidative stress response in Anabaena 7120, were also showed increasing trends in iron starvation. Hence, the results discerned, clearly suggested the role of manganese in protection against the oxidative stress in cyanobacterium Anabaena 7120 under iron starvation either due to its antioxidative properties or involvement as cofactor in a number of antioxidative enzymes.

  12. Gene flow between sexual and facultatively asexual lineages of an aphid species and the maintenance of reproductive mode variation.

    PubMed

    Halkett, F; Plantegenest, M; Bonhomme, J; Simon, J-C

    2008-06-01

    Many organisms considered as strictly clonal may in fact experience some rare events of sexual reproduction with their sexual relatives. However, the rate of sexual-asexual gene flow has rarely been assessed mainly because its evaluation is difficult to achieve in the field. In the cyclically parthenogenetic aphid Rhopalosiphum padi, two main sets of lineages, differing in their investment in sexual reproduction and in their genetic attributes, co-exist even at a very fine scale: the 'sexual' lineages which have a full commitment to the sexual reproduction, and the 'facultatively asexual' lineages, which allocate investment in the sexual and parthenogenetic reproduction. This system offers a unique opportunity to tackle the genetic interactions between two contrasting reproductive modes. Here, we provide evidence that gene flow occurred between sexual and facultatively asexual lineages of R. padi. We carefully examined the shuffling in phenotypic and genotypic variation following a sexual reproduction event that took place in the field. Combining genotypic data and phenotypic measurements showed that this gene mixing led to the production of a wide array of reproductive modes, including strictly asexual lineages. Finally, we discuss the central role played by facultatively asexual lineages on the maintenance of reproductive mode variation.

  13. Investigating the path of plastid genome degradation in an early-transitional clade of heterotrophic orchids, and implications for heterotrophic angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Craig F; Freudenstein, John V; Li, Jeff; Mayfield-Jones, Dustin R; Perez, Leticia; Pires, J Chris; Santos, Cristian

    2014-12-01

    Parasitic organisms exemplify morphological and genomic reduction. Some heterotrophic, parasitic plants harbor drastically reduced and degraded plastid genomes resulting from relaxed selective pressure on photosynthetic function. However, few studies have addressed the initial stages of plastome degradation in groups containing both photosynthetic and nonphotosynthetic species. Corallorhiza is a genus of leafless, heterotrophic orchids that contains both green, photosynthetic species and nongreen, putatively nonphotosynthetic species, and represents an ideal system in which to assess the beginning of the transition to a "minimal plastome." Complete plastomes were generated for nine taxa of Corallorhiza using Illumina paired-end sequencing of genomic DNA to assess the degree of degradation among taxa, and for comparison with a general model of degradation among angiosperms. Quantification of total chlorophyll suggests that nongreen Corallorhiza still produce chlorophyll, but at 10-fold lower concentrations than green congeners. Complete plastomes and partial nuclear rDNA cistrons yielded a fully resolved tree for Corallorhiza, with at least two independent losses of photosynthesis, evidenced by gene deletions and pseudogenes in Co. striata and nongreen Co. maculata. All Corallorhiza show some evidence of degradation in genes of the NAD(P)H dehydrogenase complex. Among genes with open reading frames, photosynthesis-related genes displayed evidence of neutral evolution in nongreen Corallorhiza, whereas genes of the ATP synthase complex displayed some evidence of positive selection in these same groups, though for reasons unknown. Corallorhiza spans the early stages of a general model of plastome degradation and has added critical insight for understanding the process of plastome evolution in heterotrophic angiosperms. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For

  14. Simultaneous removal of organic carbon and nitrogen pollutants in the Yangtze estuarine sediment: The role of heterotrophic nitrifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Qiang; Lu, Jian; Wu, Jun; Luo, Yongming

    2017-05-01

    The Yangtze Estuary is one of the most eutrophic coastal areas in the world. The engagement of heterotrophic nitrification bacteria in the simultaneous removal of organic carbon and ammonium in the Yangtze estuarine sediment was investigated. The specific nitrification rate in the selective autotrophic nitrification inhibition treatment was about 25% of that in the control without autotrophic nitrification inhibition, suggesting that heterotrophic nitrification, in addition to autotrophic nitrification, was an important nitrification process in the sediment. The increase of heterotrophic nitrification can offset the decrease in autotrophic nitrification, which subsequently leads to the high tolerance of nitrification to the organic carbon. The number of heterotrophic nitrification bacteria was 7.1 × 107 MPN g-1 in sediment collected from Site 1 while that of autotrophic nitrification bacteria was 4.2 × 108 MPN g-1. The isolation of heterotrophic nitrification bacteria provides direct evidence of the engagement of heterotrophs in the nitrification of the Yangtze estuarine sediment. The results show that nitrification is catalyzed by both the autotrophs and the heterotrophs, indicating functional redundancy of nitrification in sediment. Since organic carbon usually coexists with ammonium, these findings indicate an alternative bioprocess for the simultaneous removal of organic carbon and ammonium in Yangtze estuarine sediment.

  15. The Interaction between Heterotrophic Bacteria and Coliform, Fecal Coliform, Fecal Streptococci Bacteria in the Water Supply Networks

    PubMed Central

    AMANIDAZ, Nazak; ZAFARZADEH, Ali; MAHVI, Amir Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study investigated the interaction between heterotrophic bacteria and coliform, fecal coliforms, fecal streptococci bacteria in water supply networks. Methods: This study was conducted during 2013 on water supply distribution network in Aq Qala City, Golestan Province, Northern Iran and standard methods were applied for microbiological analysis. The surface method was applied to test the heterotrophic bacteria and MPN method was used for coliform, fecal coliform and fecal streptococci bacteria measurements. Results: In 114 samples, heterotrophic bacteria count were over 500 CFU/ml, which the amount of fecal coliform, coliform, and fecal streptococci were 8, 32, and 20 CFU/100 ml, respectively. However, in the other 242 samples, with heterotrophic bacteria count being less than 500 CFU/ml, the amount of fecal coliform, coliform, and fecal streptococci was 7, 23, and 11 CFU/100ml, respectively. The relationship between heterotrophic bacteria, coliforms and fecal streptococci was highly significant (P<0.05). We observed the concentration of coliforms, fecal streptococci bacteria being high, whenever the concentration of heterotrophic bacteria in the water network systems was high. Conclusion: Interaction between heterotrophic bacteria and coliform, fecal coliforms, fecal streptococci bacteria in the Aq Qala City water supply networks was not notable. It can be due to high concentrations of organic carbon, bio-films and nutrients, which are necessary for growth, and survival of all microorganisms. PMID:26811820

  16. The Interaction between Heterotrophic Bacteria and Coliform, Fecal Coliform, Fecal Streptococci Bacteria in the Water Supply Networks.

    PubMed

    Amanidaz, Nazak; Zafarzadeh, Ali; Mahvi, Amir Hossein

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the interaction between heterotrophic bacteria and coliform, fecal coliforms, fecal streptococci bacteria in water supply networks. This study was conducted during 2013 on water supply distribution network in Aq Qala City, Golestan Province, Northern Iran and standard methods were applied for microbiological analysis. The surface method was applied to test the heterotrophic bacteria and MPN method was used for coliform, fecal coliform and fecal streptococci bacteria measurements. In 114 samples, heterotrophic bacteria count were over 500 CFU/ml, which the amount of fecal coliform, coliform, and fecal streptococci were 8, 32, and 20 CFU/100 ml, respectively. However, in the other 242 samples, with heterotrophic bacteria count being less than 500 CFU/ml, the amount of fecal coliform, coliform, and fecal streptococci was 7, 23, and 11 CFU/100ml, respectively. The relationship between heterotrophic bacteria, coliforms and fecal streptococci was highly significant (P<0.05). We observed the concentration of coliforms, fecal streptococci bacteria being high, whenever the concentration of heterotrophic bacteria in the water network systems was high. Interaction between heterotrophic bacteria and coliform, fecal coliforms, fecal streptococci bacteria in the Aq Qala City water supply networks was not notable. It can be due to high concentrations of organic carbon, bio-films and nutrients, which are necessary for growth, and survival of all microorganisms.

  17. Heterotrophic bacterial production and metabolic balance during the VAHINE mesocosm experiment in the New Caledonia lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Wambeke, France; Pfreundt, Ulrike; Barani, Aude; Berthelot, Hugo; Moutin, Thierry; Rodier, Martine; Hess, Wolfgang R.; Bonnet, Sophie

    2016-06-01

    Studies investigating the fate of diazotrophs through the microbial food web are lacking, although N2 fixation can fuel up to 50 % of new production in some oligotrophic oceans. In particular, the role played by heterotrophic prokaryotes in this transfer is largely unknown. In the frame of the VAHINE (VAriability of vertical and tropHIc transfer of diazotroph derived N in the south wEst Pacific) experiment, three replicate large-volume (˜ 50 m3) mesocosms were deployed for 23 days in the new Caledonia lagoon and were intentionally fertilized on day 4 with dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) to stimulate N2 fixation. We specifically examined relationships between heterotrophic bacterial production (BP) and N2 fixation or primary production, determined bacterial growth efficiency and established carbon budgets. BP was statistically higher during the second phase of the experiment (P2: days 15-23), when chlorophyll biomass started to increase compared to the first phase (P1: days 5-14). Phosphatase alkaline activity increased drastically during the second phase of the experiment, showing adaptations of microbial populations after utilization of the added DIP. Notably, among autotrophs, Synechococcus abundances increased during P2, possibly related to its capacity to assimilate leucine and to produce alkaline phosphatase. Bacterial growth efficiency based on the carbon budget (27-43 %), was notably higher than generally cited for oligotrophic environments and discussed in links with the presence of abundant species of bacteria expressing proteorhodopsin. The main fates of gross primary production (particulate + dissolved) were respiration (67 %) and export through sedimentation (17 %). BP was highly correlated with particulate primary production and chlorophyll biomass during both phases of the experiment but was slightly correlated, and only during P2 phase, with N2 fixation rates. Heterotrophic bacterial production was strongly stimulated after mineral N enrichment

  18. Genomics and Ecophysiology of Heterotrophic Nitrogen-Fixing Bacteria Isolated from Estuarine Surface Water.

    PubMed

    Bentzon-Tilia, Mikkel; Severin, Ina; Hansen, Lars H; Riemann, Lasse

    2015-07-07

    The ability to reduce atmospheric nitrogen (N2) to ammonia, known as N2 fixation, is a widely distributed trait among prokaryotes that accounts for an essential input of new N to a multitude of environments. Nitrogenase reductase gene (nifH) composition suggests that putative N2-fixing heterotrophic organisms are widespread in marine bacterioplankton, but their autecology and ecological significance are unknown. Here, we report genomic and ecophysiology data in relation to N2 fixation by three environmentally relevant heterotrophic bacteria isolated from Baltic Sea surface water: Pseudomonas stutzeri strain BAL361 and Raoultella ornithinolytica strain BAL286, which are gammaproteobacteria, and Rhodopseudomonas palustris strain BAL398, an alphaproteobacterium. Genome sequencing revealed that all were metabolically versatile and that the gene clusters encoding the N2 fixation complex varied in length and complexity between isolates. All three isolates could sustain growth by N2 fixation in the absence of reactive N, and this fixation was stimulated by low concentrations of oxygen in all three organisms (≈ 4 to 40 µmol O2 liter(-1)). P. stutzeri BAL361 did, however, fix N at up to 165 µmol O2 liter(-1), presumably accommodated through aggregate formation. Glucose stimulated N2 fixation in general, and reactive N repressed N2 fixation, except that ammonium (NH4 (+)) stimulated N2 fixation in R. palustris BAL398, indicating the use of nitrogenase as an electron sink. The lack of correlations between nitrogenase reductase gene expression and ethylene (C2H4) production indicated tight posttranscriptional-level control. The N2 fixation rates obtained suggested that, given the right conditions, these heterotrophic diazotrophs could contribute significantly to in situ rates. The biological process of importing atmospheric N2 is of paramount importance in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. In the oceans, a diverse array of prokaryotes seemingly carry the genetic capacity

  19. Constitutive and relative facultative skin pigmentation among Victorian children including comparison of two visual skin charts for determining constitutive melanin density.

    PubMed

    Pezic, Angela; Ponsonby, Anne-Louise; Cameron, Fergus J; Rodda, Christine; Ellis, Justine A; Halliday, Jane; Siero, William; Lucas, Robyn M; Dwyer, Terence

    2013-01-01

    Our aim was to examine the association between ethnicity, phenotype, sun behavior and other characteristics, and constitutive and relative facultative skin pigmentation. A total of 191 participants were recruited, with a mean age of 7.6 years (SD 3.4), during 2009-2011 from Maternal and Child Health Centres (MCHC) and schools in Melbourne, Australia. Parental questionnaire data were obtained on sun behavior and examination consisted of noting the child's natural skin, hair and eye color, ethnicity, nevi count and spectrophotometric melanin density (MD). Constitutive skin pigmentation was estimated from buttock MD. Relative facultative skin pigmentation was estimated by hand compared with buttock absorption. Ethnicity, hair color and skin color were associated with constitutive and facultative skin pigmentation on univariate analysis. Higher ambient ultraviolet radiation (UVR) in the past month, greater freckling, greater nevi and increased sun exposure over the past year were related to darker facultative skin pigmentation. Sun exposure over the life course was not. The two skin charts accounted for 39.7% and 21.4% of buttock MD, respectively. Relative facultative skin pigmentation is associated with recent UVR levels, not life-course sun exposure. Relative facultative skin pigmentation may not be a useful measure of sun exposure over the early life course. Skin color charts can be used to assess constitutive skin pigmentation if spectrophotometry is not available. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Photochemistry and Photobiology © 2013 The American Society of Photobiology.

  20. Shewanella amazonensis sp. nov., a novel metal-reducing facultative anaerobe from Amazonian shelf muds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkateswaran, K.; Dollhopf, M. E.; Aller, R.; Stackebrandt, E.; Nealson, K. H.

    1998-01-01

    A new bacterial species belonging to the genus Shewanella is described on the basis of phenotypic characterization and sequence analysis of its 16S rRNA-encoding and gyrase B (gyrB) genes. This organism, isolated from shallow-water marine sediments derived from the Amazon River delta, is a Gram-negative, motile, polarly flagellated, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped eubacterium and has a G&C content of 51.7 mol%. Strain SB2BT is exceptionally active in the anaerobic reduction of iron, manganese and sulfur compounds. SB2BT grows optimally at 35 degrees C, with 1-3% NaCl and over a pH range of 7-8. Analysis of the 16S rDNA sequence revealed a clear affiliation between strain SB2BT and members of the gamma subclass of the class Proteobacteria. High similarity values were found with certain members of the genus Shewanella, especially with Shewanella putrefaciens, and this was supported by cellular fatty acid profiles and phenotypic characterization. DNA-DNA hybridization between strain SB2BT and its phylogenetically closest relatives revealed low similarity values (24.6-42.7%) which indicated species status for strain SB2BT. That SB2BT represents a distinct bacterial species within the genus Shewanella is also supported by gyrB sequence analysis. Considering the source of the isolate, the name Shewanella amazonensis sp. nov. is proposed and strain SB2BT (= ATCC 700329T) is designated as the type strain.

  1. Cloning and phylogenetic analysis of the chitinase gene from the facultative pathogen Paecilomyces lilacinus.

    PubMed

    Dong, L Q; Yang, J K; Zhang, K Q

    2007-12-01

    To PCR-amplify the full-length genomic-encoding sequence for one chitinase from the facultative fungal pathogen Paecilomyces lilacinus, analyse the DNA and deduced amino acid sequences and compare the amino acid sequence with chitinases reported from mycopathogens, entomopathogens and nematopathogens. The encoding gene (designated as PLC) was isolated using the degenerate PCR primers and the DNA-Walking method. The gene is 1458 bp in length and contains three putative introns. A number of sequence motifs that might play a role in its regulation and function had also been found. Alignment of the translation product (designated as Plc, molecular mass of 45.783 kDa and pI of 5.65) with homologous sequences from other species showed that Plc belongs to Class V chitinase within the glycosyl hydrolase family 18. The phylogenetic and molecular evolutionary analysis using mega (Molecular Evolutionary Genetics Analysis) indicated that these chitinases from mycopathogens, entomopathogens and nematopathogens, the majority of which belong to glycosyl hydrolase family 18, were clustered into two well-supported subgroups corresponding to ascomycetes fungal and nonfungal chitinases (bacteria, baculoviruses). Our study showed that chitinases from mycoparasitic, entomopathogenic and nematophagous fungi are closely related to each other and reaffirmed the hypothesis that baculovirus chitinase is most likely to be of a bacterial origin - acquired by gene transfer. Bacterial and baculoviral chitinases in our study are potential pathogenicity factors; however, we still cannot ascribe any specific function to those chitinases from the fungi. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing the chitinase gene and its translation product from Paecilomyces lilacinus, which constitutes the largest number of formulated biological nematicides reported so far, this is also the first study to analyse and resolve the phylogenetic and molecular evolutionary relationships among the chitinases

  2. Population Genomics of the Facultatively Mutualistic Bacteria Sinorhizobium meliloti and S. medicae

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Brendan; Branca, Antoine; Mudge, Joann; Bharti, Arvind K.; Briskine, Roman; Farmer, Andrew D.; Sugawara, Masayuki; Young, Nevin D.; Sadowsky, Michael J.; Tiffin, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The symbiosis between rhizobial bacteria and legume plants has served as a model for investigating the genetics of nitrogen fixation and the evolution of facultative mutualism. We used deep sequence coverage (>100×) to characterize genomic diversity at the nucleotide level among 12 Sinorhizobium medicae and 32 S. meliloti strains. Although these species are closely related and share host plants, based on the ratio of shared polymorphisms to fixed differences we found that horizontal gene transfer (HGT) between these species was confined almost exclusively to plasmid genes. Three multi-genic regions that show the strongest evidence of HGT harbor genes directly involved in establishing or maintaining the mutualism with host plants. In both species, nucleotide diversity is 1.5–2.5 times greater on the plasmids than chromosomes. Interestingly, nucleotide diversity in S. meliloti but not S. medicae is highly structured along the chromosome – with mean diversity (θπ) on one half of the chromosome five times greater than mean diversity on the other half. Based on the ratio of plasmid to chromosome diversity, this appears to be due to severely reduced diversity on the chromosome half with less diversity, which is consistent with extensive hitchhiking along with a selective sweep. Frequency-spectrum based tests identified 82 genes with a signature of adaptive evolution in one species or another but none of the genes were identified in both species. Based upon available functional information, several genes identified as targets of selection are likely to alter the symbiosis with the host plant, making them attractive targets for further functional characterization. PMID:22876202

  3. Population genomics of the facultatively mutualistic bacteria Sinorhizobium meliloti and S. medicae.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Brendan; Branca, Antoine; Mudge, Joann; Bharti, Arvind K; Briskine, Roman; Farmer, Andrew D; Sugawara, Masayuki; Young, Nevin D; Sadowsky, Michael J; Tiffin, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The symbiosis between rhizobial bacteria and legume plants has served as a model for investigating the genetics of nitrogen fixation and the evolution of facultative mutualism. We used deep sequence coverage (>100×) to characterize genomic diversity at the nucleotide level among 12 Sinorhizobium medicae and 32 S. meliloti strains. Although these species are closely related and share host plants, based on the ratio of shared polymorphisms to fixed differences we found that horizontal gene transfer (HGT) between these species was confined almost exclusively to plasmid genes. Three multi-genic regions that show the strongest evidence of HGT harbor genes directly involved in establishing or maintaining the mutualism with host plants. In both species, nucleotide diversity is 1.5-2.5 times greater on the plasmids than chromosomes. Interestingly, nucleotide diversity in S. meliloti but not S. medicae is highly structured along the chromosome - with mean diversity (θ(π)) on one half of the chromosome five times greater than mean diversity on the other half. Based on the ratio of plasmid to chromosome diversity, this appears to be due to severely reduced diversity on the chromosome half with less diversity, which is consistent with extensive hitchhiking along with a selective sweep. Frequency-spectrum based tests identified 82 genes with a signature of adaptive evolution in one species or another but none of the genes were identified in both species. Based upon available functional information, several genes identified as targets of selection are likely to alter the symbiosis with the host plant, making them attractive targets for further functional characterization.

  4. Facultative Control of Matrix Production Optimizes Competitive Fitness in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 Biofilm Models

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Jonas S.; Lin, Yu-Cheng; Squyres, Georgia R.; Price-Whelan, Alexa; de Santiago Torio, Ana; Song, Angela; Cornell, William C.; Sørensen, Søren J.

    2015-01-01

    As biofilms grow, resident cells inevitably face the challenge of resource limitation. In the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14, electron acceptor availability affects matrix production and, as a result, biofilm morphogenesis. The secreted matrix polysaccharide Pel is required for pellicle formation and for colony wrinkling, two activities that promote access to O2. We examined the exploitability and evolvability of Pel production at the air-liquid interface (during pellicle formation) and on solid surfaces (during colony formation). Although Pel contributes to the developmental response to electron acceptor limitation in both biofilm formation regimes, we found variation in the exploitability of its production and necessity for competitive fitness between the two systems. The wild type showed a competitive advantage against a non-Pel-producing mutant in pellicles but no advantage in colonies. Adaptation to the pellicle environment selected for mutants with a competitive advantage against the wild type in pellicles but also caused a severe disadvantage in colonies, even in wrinkled colony centers. Evolution in the colony center produced divergent phenotypes, while adaptation to the colony edge produced mutants with clear competitive advantages against the wild type in this O2-replete niche. In general, the structurally heterogeneous colony environment promoted more diversification than the more homogeneous pellicle. These results suggest that the role of Pel in community structure formation in response to electron acceptor limitation is unique to specific biofilm models and that the facultative control of Pel production is required for PA14 to maintain optimum benefit in different types of communities. PMID:26431965

  5. Stress-induced changes in abundance differ among obligate and facultative endosymbionts of the soybean aphid.

    PubMed

    Enders, Laramy S; Miller, Nicholas J

    2016-02-01

    Bacterial endosymbionts can drive evolutionary novelty by conferring adaptive benefits under adverse environmental conditions. Among aphid species there is growing evidence that symbionts influence tolerance to various forms of stress. However, the extent to which stress inflicted on the aphid host has cascading effects on symbiont community dynamics remains poorly understood. Here we simultaneously quantified the effect of host-plant induced and xenobiotic stress on soybean aphid (Aphis glycines) fitness and relative abundance of its three bacterial symbionts. Exposure to soybean defensive stress (Rag1 gene) and a neurotoxic insecticide (thiamethoxam) substantially reduced aphid composite fitness (survival × reproduction) by 74 ± 10% and 92 ± 2%, respectively, which in turn induced distinctive changes in the endosymbiont microbiota. When challenged by host-plant defenses a 1.4-fold reduction in abundance of the obligate symbiont Buchnera was observed across four aphid clonal lines. Among facultative symbionts of Rag1-stressed aphids, Wolbachia abundance increased twofold and Arsenophonus decreased 1.5-fold. A similar pattern was observed under xenobiotic stress, with Buchnera and Arsenophonus titers decreasing (1.3-fold) and Wolbachia increasing (1.5-fold). Furthermore, variation in aphid virulence to Rag1 was positively correlated with changes in Arsenophonus titers, but not Wolbachia or Buchnera. A single Arsenophonus multi-locus genotype was found among aphid clonal lines, indicating strain diversity is not primarily responsible for correlated host-symbiont stress levels. Overall, our results demonstrate the nature of aphid symbioses can significantly affect the outcome of interactions under stress and suggests general changes in the microbiome can occur across multiple stress types.

  6. Dual lattice model of the evolution of facultative symbiosis with continuous Prisoner's Dilemma game.

    PubMed

    Ezoe, Hideo

    2009-08-21

    Mutualism is ubiquitous in nature and is thought to have played a key role in the history of life. However, how mutualism could evolve despite being prone to unilateral exploitation is a puzzling question in evolutionary ecology. Some theoretical studies have shown that spatial structure of habitat can facilitate the emergence and maintenance of mutualism. However, they are based on the simple assumption that the trait in question is discrete: each individual is either a mutualist or a non-mutualist. In this article I develop a simple simulation model of coevolution of facultative symbiosis using a one-shot continuous Prisoner's Dilemma game to investigate the evolutionary dynamics of mutualism between two species. In this model I assume continuous traits for both species from -1 (fully deceptive) to 1 (fully cooperative). The habitat has a dual-lattice structure, each layer is inhabited by one species. Interspecific interaction is restricted between two corresponding sites of the two layers. Without limitation on the magnitude of a single mutation, I find that mutualism can arise and persist when the intrinsic reproduction rate is low (but is above a threshold) and the benefit/cost ratio of the cooperative strategy is large, which is consistent with Yamamura et al. [2004. Evolution of mutualism through spatial effects. J. Theor. Biol. 226, 421-428]. In these cases, extreme antagonism often evolves starting from a neutral population that seems nearly stable, but once mutualism arises, the cooperative individuals quickly increase and both the populations eventually become mutualistic on average, although they are polymorphic. However, when the effect of a single mutation was limited to be small, extreme antagonism is much likely to dominate unless the intrinsic reproduction rate is low. When only one species is allowed to evolve, mutualism arises when the initial strategy of the other species is cooperative. Otherwise, excessive deception evolves in the former, and

  7. Socially induced brain development in a facultatively eusocial sweat bee Megalopta genalis (Halictidae)

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Adam R.; Seid, Marc A.; Jiménez, Lissette C.; Wcislo, William T.

    2010-01-01

    Changes in the relative size of brain regions are often dependent on experience and environmental stimulation, which includes an animal's social environment. Some studies suggest that social interactions are cognitively demanding, and have examined predictions that the evolution of sociality led to the evolution of larger brains. Previous studies have compared species with different social organizations or different groups within obligately social species. Here, we report the first intraspecific study to examine how social experience shapes brain volume using a species with facultatively eusocial or solitary behaviour, the sweat bee Megalopta genalis. Serial histological sections were used to reconstruct and measure the volume of brain areas of bees behaving as social reproductives, social workers, solitary reproductives or 1-day-old bees that are undifferentiated with respect to the social phenotype. Social reproductives showed increased development of the mushroom body (an area of the insect brain associated with sensory integration and learning) relative to social workers and solitary reproductives. The gross neuroanatomy of young bees is developmentally similar to the advanced eusocial species previously studied, despite vast differences in colony size and social organization. Our results suggest that the transition from solitary to social behaviour is associated with modified brain development, and that maintaining dominance, rather than sociality per se, leads to increased mushroom body development, even in the smallest social groups possible (i.e. groups with two bees). Such results suggest that capabilities to navigate the complexities of social life may be a factor shaping brain evolution in some social insects, as for some vertebrates. PMID:20335213

  8. Pseudomonas toyotomiensis sp. nov., a psychrotolerant facultative alkaliphile that utilizes hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Kikue; Yamahira, Keiko; Nakajima, Kenji; Nodasaka, Yoshinobu; Okuyama, Hidetoshi; Yumoto, Isao

    2011-08-01

    A psychrotolerant, facultatively alkaliphilic strain, HT-3(T), was isolated from a sample of soil immersed in hot-spring water containing hydrocarbons in Toyotomi, Hokkaido, Japan. 16S rRNA gene sequence-based phylogeny suggested that strain HT-3(T) is a member of the genus Pseudomonas and belongs to the Pseudomonas oleovorans group. Cells of the isolate were Gram-negative, aerobic, straight rods, motile by a single polar flagellum. The strain grew at 4-42 °C, with optimum growth at 35 °C at pH 7, and at pH 6-10. It hydrolysed Tweens 20, 40, 60 and 80, but not casein, gelatin, starch or DNA. Its major isoprenoid quinone was ubiquinone-9 (Q-9) and the DNA G+C content was 65.1 mol%. The whole-cell fatty acid profile consisted mainly of C(16 : 0), C(16 : 1)ω9c and C(18 : 1)ω9c. Phylogenetic analyses based on gyrB, rpoB and rpoD sequences revealed that the isolate could be discriminated from Pseudomonas species that exhibited more than 97 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity and phylogenetic neighbours belonging to the P. oleovorans group including the closest relative of the isolate, Pseudomonas alcaliphila. DNA-DNA hybridization with P. alcaliphila AL15-21(T) revealed 51 ± 5 % relatedness. Owing to differences in phenotypic properties and phylogenetic analyses based on multilocus gene sequence analysis and DNA-DNA relatedness data, the isolate merits classification in a novel species, for which the name Pseudomonas toyotomiensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is HT-3(T) ( = JCM 15604(T)  = NCIMB 14511(T)).

  9. Are hummingbirds facultatively ammonotelic? Nitrogen excretion and requirements as a function of body size.

    PubMed

    McWhorter, Todd J; Powers, Donald R; Martínez Del Rio, Carlos

    2003-01-01

    Most birds are uricotelic. An exception to this rule may be nectar-feeding birds, which excrete significant amounts of ammonia under certain conditions. Although ammonia is toxic, because it is highly water soluble its excretion may be facilitated in animals that ingest and excrete large amounts of water. Bird-pollinated plants secrete carbohydrate- and water-rich floral nectars that contain exceedingly little protein. Thus, nectar-feeding birds are faced with the dual challenge of meeting nitrogen requirements while disposing of large amounts of water. The peculiar diet of nectar-feeding birds suggests two hypotheses: (1) these birds must have low protein requirements, and (2) when they ingest large quantities of water their primary nitrogen excretion product may be ammonia. To test these hypotheses, we measured maintenance nitrogen requirements (MNR) and total endogenous nitrogen losses (TENL) in three hummingbird species (Archilochus alexandri, Eugenes fulgens, and Lampornis clemenciae) fed on diets with varying sugar, protein, and water content. We also quantified the form in which the by-products of nitrogen metabolism were excreted. The MNR and TENL of the hummingbirds examined were exceptionally low. However, no birds excreted more than 50% of nitrogen as ammonia or more nitrogen as ammonia than urates. Furthermore, ammonia excretion was not influenced by either water or protein intake. The smallest species (A. alexandri) excreted a significantly greater proportion (>25%) of their nitrogenous wastes as ammonia than the larger hummingbirds ( approximately 4%). Our results support the hypothesis that nectar-feeding birds have low protein requirements but cast doubt on the notion that they are facultatively ammonotelic. Our data also hint at a possible size-dependent dichotomy in hummingbirds, with higher ammonia excretion in smaller species. Differences in proportionate water loads and/or postrenal modification of urine may explain this dichotomy.

  10. Facultative Apomixis in Garcinia atroviridis (Clusiaceae) and Effects of Different Pollination Regimes on Reproductive Success

    PubMed Central

    Pangsuban, Sasithorn; Bamroongrugsa, Noparat; Kanchanapoom, Kamnoon; Nualsri, Charassri

    2009-01-01

    Various aspects of the reproductive success of Garcinia atroviridis Griff. were studied. Controlled pollination experiments were carried out in an orchard located in Songkhla province, southern Thailand, from February to July 2003. Floral longevity, stigma receptivity, and pollen viability were examined before carrying out the experiments. Three pollination treatments were compared: open pollination, manual pollination with bags, and bags without pollination (apogamy). Although there was no significant difference in the initial fruit set, bagged and manual pollination produced a significantly greater fruit drop rate than apogamy or natural pollination at one week after the flowers had been pollinated. On the other hand, the apogamy treatment had a greater fruit drop rate than natural and manual pollination treatments before fruit maturation. In addition, unpollinated bagged flowers bore fewer and smaller fruit than naturally and manually cross-pollinated flowers. Although the fruits from unpollinated flowers were capable of asexual seed formation, they produced fewer seeds and had poorer seed quality (defined as average fresh weight and germination rate) than those from the other treatments. The occurrence of asexual and sexual reproduction was also studied using Random Amplification of Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis and by comparing the patterns of bands produced from DNA extracted from the offspring of the naturally cross-pollinated fruits. On average, 58% of the offspring had a genetic constitution identical to that of the maternal parent (ranging from 36% to 87%), indicating that some offspring were produced without prior fertilisation. However, the remainder showed polymorphism, demonstrating the occurrence of sexual reproduction. These findings indicate that facultative apomixis occurred in the study population. However, a residual sexuality was important for fruit production, fruit size, normal seed set and seed quality. PMID:24575182

  11. Amphibacillus jilinensis sp. nov., a facultatively anaerobic, alkaliphilic bacillus from a soda lake.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao-Yue; Zheng, Gang; Zhang, Wen-Wu; Xu, Xue-Wei; Wu, Min; Zhu, Xu-Fen

    2010-11-01

    A facultatively anaerobic, alkaliphilic, spore-forming, Gram-positive-staining rod, designated Y1(T), was isolated under strictly anaerobic conditions from sediment of a soda lake in Jilin province, China. The strain was not dependent on Na(+) but was highly halotolerant and grew optimally in medium JY with 0.5 M Na(+) (0.06 M NaHCO(3) and 0.44 M NaCl). The optimum pH for growth was 9.0, with a range of pH 7.5-10.5. No growth occurred at pH 7.0 or 11.0. The strain was mesophilic, with a temperature range of 15-45 °C and optimum growth at 32 °C. Strain Y1(T) was able to use certain mono- and oligosaccharides. Soluble starch and casein were hydrolysed. The methyl red test, Voges-Proskauer test and tests for catalase and oxidase activities were negative. The predominant fatty acids were anteiso-C(15 : 0) and iso-C(15 : 0). Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed 93.4-96.8 % sequence similarity to members of the genus Amphibacillus. The DNA G+C content was 37.7 mol% (T(m) method). The DNA-DNA relatedness of strain Y1(T) with respect to Amphibacillus tropicus DSM 13870(T) and Amphibacillus sediminis DSM 21624(T) was 48 and 37 %, respectively. On the basis of its phylogenetic position and the DNA-DNA relatedness data as well as its physiological and biochemical properties, strain Y1(T) represents a novel species of the genus Amphibacillus, for which the name Amphibacillus jilinensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is Y1(T) (=CGMCC 1.5123(T) =JCM 16149(T)).

  12. Characterization and Genome Analysis of the First Facultatively Alkaliphilic Thermodesulfovibrio Isolated from the Deep Terrestrial Subsurface

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Yulia A.; Kadnikov, Vitaly V.; Lukina, Anastasia P.; Banks, David; Beletsky, Alexey V.; Mardanov, Andrey V.; Sen’kina, Elena I.; Avakyan, Marat R.; Karnachuk, Olga V.; Ravin, Nikolai V.

    2016-01-01

    Members of the genus Thermodesulfovibrio belong to the Nitrospirae phylum and all isolates characterized to date are neutrophiles. They have been isolated from terrestrial hot springs and thermophilic methanogenic anaerobic sludges. Their molecular signatures have, however, also been detected in deep subsurface. The purpose of this study was to characterize and analyze the genome of a newly isolated, facultatively alkaliphilic Thermodesulfovibrio from a 2 km deep aquifer system in Western Siberia, Russia. The new isolate, designated N1, grows optimally at pH 8.5 and at 65°C. It is able to reduce sulfate, thiosulfate or sulfite with a limited range of electron donors, such as formate, pyruvate, and lactate. Analysis of the 1.93 Mb draft genome of strain N1 revealed that it contains a set of genes for dissimilatory sulfate reduction, including sulfate adenyltransferase, adenosine-5′-phosphosulfate reductase AprAB, membrane-bound electron transfer complex QmoABC, dissimilatory sulfite reductase DsrABC, and sulfite reductase-associated electron transfer complex DsrMKJOP. Hydrogen turnover is enabled by soluble cytoplasmic, membrane-linked, and soluble periplasmic hydrogenases. The use of thiosulfate as an electron acceptor is enabled by a membrane-linked molybdopterin oxidoreductase. The N1 requirement for organic carbon sources corresponds to the lack of the autotrophic C1-fixation pathways. Comparative analysis of the genomes of Thermodesulfovibrio (T. yellowstonii, T. islandicus, T. àggregans, T. thiophilus, and strain N1) revealed a low overall genetic diversity and several adaptive traits. Consistent with an alkaliphilic lifestyle, a multisubunit Na+/H+ antiporter of the Mnh family is encoded in the Thermodesulfovibrio strain N1 genome. Nitrogenase genes were found in T. yellowstonii, T. aggregans, and T. islandicus, nitrate reductase in T. islandicus, and cellulose synthetase in T. aggregans and strain N1. Overall, our results provide genomic insights into

  13. Fixed and Flexible: Coexistence of Obligate and Facultative Migratory Strategies in a Freshwater Fish

    PubMed Central

    Brodersen, Jakob; Chapman, Ben B.; Nilsson, P. Anders; Skov, Christian; Hansson, Lars-Anders; Brönmark, Christer

    2014-01-01

    Migration is an important event in many animal life histories, but the degree to which individual animals participate in seasonal migrations often varies within populations. The powerful ecological and evolutionary consequences of such partial migration are now well documented, but the underlying mechanisms are still heavily debated. One potential mechanism of partial migration is between-individual variation in body condition, where animals in poor condition cannot pay the costs of migration and hence adopt a resident strategy. However, underlying intrinsic traits may overrule such environmental influence, dictating individual consistency in migratory patterns. Unfortunately, field tests of individual consistency compared to the importance of individual condition on migratory propensity are rare. Here we analyse 6 years of field data on roach migration, gathered by tagging almost 3000 individual fish and monitoring their seasonal migrations over extended periods of time. Our aims were to provide a field test of the role of condition in wild fish for migratory decisions, and also to assess individual consistency in migratory tendency. Our analyses reveal that (1) migratory strategy, in terms of migration/residency, is highly consistent within individuals over time and (2) there is a positive relationship between condition and the probability of migration, but only in individuals that adopt a migratory strategy at some point during their lives. However, life-long residents do not differ in condition to migrants, hence body condition is only a good predictor of migratory tendency in fish with migratory phenotypes and not a more general determinant of migratory tendency for the population. As resident individuals can achieve very high body condition and still remain resident, we suggest that our data provides some of the first field evidence to show that both facultative and obligate strategies can co-exist within populations of migratory animals. PMID:24594698

  14. Degradation of 1,2-dichloroethane by Ancylobacter aquaticus and other facultative methylotrophs

    SciTech Connect

    Van Den Wijngaard, A.J.; Van Der Kamp, K.W.H.J.; Van Der Ploeg, J.; Pries, F.; Kazemier, B.; Janssen, D.B. )

    1992-03-01

    Cultures of the newly isolated bacterial strains AD20, AD25, and AD27, identified as strains of Ancylobacter aquaticus, were capable of growth on 1,2-dichloroethane (DCE) as the sole carbon and energy source. These strains, as well as two other new DCE utilizers, were facultative methylotrophs and were also able to row on 2-chloroethanol, chloroacetate, and 2-chloropropionate. In all strains tested, DCE was degraded by initial hydrolytic dehalogenation to 2-chloroethanol, followed by oxidation by a phenazine methosulfate-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase and an NAD-dependent aldehyde dehydrogenase. The resulting chloroacetic acid was converted to glycolate by chloroacetate dehalogenase. The alcohol dehydrogenase was induced during growth on methanol or DCE in strain AD20, but no activity was found during growth on glucose. However, in strain AD25 the enzyme was synthesized to a higher level during growth on glucose than on methanol, and it reached levels of around 2 U/mg of protein in late-exponential-phase cultures growing on glucose. The haloalkane dehalogenase was constitutively produced in all strains tested, but strain AD25 synthesized the enzyme at a level of 30 to 40% of the total cellular protein, which is much higher than that found in other DCE degraders. The nucleotide sequences of the haloalkane dehalogenase (dhlA) genes of strains AD20 and AD25 were the same as the sequence of dhlA from Xanthobacter autotrophicus GJ10 and GJ11. Hybridization experiments showed that the dhlA genes of six different DCE utilizers were all locate on an 8.3-kb EcoRI restriction fragment, indicating that the organisms may have obtained the dhlA gene by horizontal gene transmission.

  15. Direct and indirect roles for β-catenin in facultative basal progenitor cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Mary Kathryn; Koch, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    The conducting airway epithelium is maintained and repaired by endogenous progenitor cells. Dysregulated progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation is thought to contribute to epithelial dysplasia in chronic lung disease. Thus modification of progenitor cell function is an attractive therapeutic goal and one that would be facilitated by knowledge of the molecular pathways that regulate their behavior. We modeled the human tracheobronchial epithelium using primary mouse tracheal epithelial cell cultures that were differentiated by exposure to the air-liquid-interface (ALI). A basal cell subset, termed facultative basal cell progenitors (FBP), initiate these cultures and are the progenitor for tracheal-specific secretory cells, the Clara-like cell, and ciliated cells. To test the hypothesis that β-catenin is necessary for FBP function, ALI cultures were generated from mice homozygous for the Ctnbflox(E2–6) allele. In this model, exons 2–6 of the β-catenin gene are flanked by LoxP sites, allowing conditional knockout of β-catenin. The β-catenin locus was modified through transduction with Adenovirus-5-encoding Cre recombinase. This approach generated a mosaic epithelium, comprised of β-catenin wild-type and β-catenin knockout cells. Dual immunostaining and quantitative histomorphometric analyses demonstrated that β-catenin played a direct role in FBP-to-ciliated cell differentiation and that it regulated cell-cell interactions that were necessary for FBP-to-Clara-like cell differentiation. β-catenin was also necessary for FBP proliferation and long-term FBP viability. We conclude that β-catenin is a critical determinant of FBP function and suggest that dysregulation of the β-catenin signaling pathway may contribute to disease pathology. PMID:22227204

  16. Shewanella amazonensis sp. nov., a novel metal-reducing facultative anaerobe from Amazonian shelf muds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkateswaran, K.; Dollhopf, M. E.; Aller, R.; Stackebrandt, E.; Nealson, K. H.

    1998-01-01

    A new bacterial species belonging to the genus Shewanella is described on the basis of phenotypic characterization and sequence analysis of its 16S rRNA-encoding and gyrase B (gyrB) genes. This organism, isolated from shallow-water marine sediments derived from the Amazon River delta, is a Gram-negative, motile, polarly flagellated, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped eubacterium and has a G&C content of 51.7 mol%. Strain SB2BT is exceptionally active in the anaerobic reduction of iron, manganese and sulfur compounds. SB2BT grows optimally at 35 degrees C, with 1-3% NaCl and over a pH range of 7-8. Analysis of the 16S rDNA sequence revealed a clear affiliation between strain SB2BT and members of the gamma subclass of the class Proteobacteria. High similarity values were found with certain members of the genus Shewanella, especially with Shewanella putrefaciens, and this was supported by cellular fatty acid profiles and phenotypic characterization. DNA-DNA hybridization between strain SB2BT and its phylogenetically closest relatives revealed low similarity values (24.6-42.7%) which indicated species status for strain SB2BT. That SB2BT represents a distinct bacterial species within the genus Shewanella is also supported by gyrB sequence analysis. Considering the source of the isolate, the name Shewanella amazonensis sp. nov. is proposed and strain SB2BT (= ATCC 700329T) is designated as the type strain.

  17. Facultative Apomixis in Garcinia atroviridis (Clusiaceae) and Effects of Different Pollination Regimes on Reproductive Success.

    PubMed

    Pangsuban, Sasithorn; Bamroongrugsa, Noparat; Kanchanapoom, Kamnoon; Nualsri, Charassri

    2009-12-01

    Various aspects of the reproductive success of Garcinia atroviridis Griff. were studied. Controlled pollination experiments were carried out in an orchard located in Songkhla province, southern Thailand, from February to July 2003. Floral longevity, stigma receptivity, and pollen viability were examined before carrying out the experiments. Three pollination treatments were compared: open pollination, manual pollination with bags, and bags without pollination (apogamy). Although there was no significant difference in the initial fruit set, bagged and manual pollination produced a significantly greater fruit drop rate than apogamy or natural pollination at one week after the flowers had been pollinated. On the other hand, the apogamy treatment had a greater fruit drop rate than natural and manual pollination treatments before fruit maturation. In addition, unpollinated bagged flowers bore fewer and smaller fruit than naturally and manually cross-pollinated flowers. Although the fruits from unpollinated flowers were capable of asexual seed formation, they produced fewer seeds and had poorer seed quality (defined as average fresh weight and germination rate) than those from the other treatments. The occurrence of asexual and sexual reproduction was also studied using Random Amplification of Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis and by comparing the patterns of bands produced from DNA extracted from the offspring of the naturally cross-pollinated fruits. On average, 58% of the offspring had a genetic constitution identical to that of the maternal parent (ranging from 36% to 87%), indicating that some offspring were produced without prior fertilisation. However, the remainder showed polymorphism, demonstrating the occurrence of sexual reproduction. These findings indicate that facultative apomixis occurred in the study population. However, a residual sexuality was important for fruit production, fruit size, normal seed set and seed quality.

  18. Oxidation of methyl halides by the facultative methylotroph strain IMB-1

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaefer, J.K.; Oremland, R.S.

    1999-01-01

    Washed cell suspensions of the facultative methylotroph strain IMB-1 grown on methyl bromide (MeBr) were able to consume methyl chloride (MeCl) and methyl iodide (MeI) as well as MeBr. Consumption of >100 ??M MeBr by cells grown on glucose, acetate, or monomethylamine required induction. Induction was inhibited by chloramphenicol. However, cells had a constitutive ability to consume low concentrations (<20 nM) of MeBr. Glucose-grown cells were able to readily oxidize [14C]formaldehyde to 14CO2 but had only a small capacity for oxidation of [14C]methanol. Preincubation of cells with MeBr did not affect either activity, but MeBr-induced cells had a greater capacity for [14C]MeBr oxidation than did cells without preincubation. Consumption of MeBr was inhibited by MeI, and MeCl consumption was inhibited by MeBr. No inhibition of MeBr consumption occurred with methyl fluoride, propyl iodide, dibromomethane, dichloromethane, or difluoromethane, and in addition cells did not oxidize any of these compounds. Cells displayed Michaelis-Menten kinetics for the various methyl halides, with apparent K(s) values of 190, 280, and 6,100 nM for MeBr, MeI, and MeCl, respectively. These results suggest the presence of a single oxidation enzyme system specific for methyl halides (other than methyl fluoride) which runs through formaldehyde to CO2. The ease of induction of methyl halide oxidation in strain IMB-1 should facilitate its mass culture for the purpose of reducing MeBr emissions to the atmosphere from fumigated soils.

  19. Biological removal of nitrate by an oil reservoir culture capable of autotrophic and heterotrophic activities: kinetic evaluation and modeling of heterotrophic process.

    PubMed

    An, Shijie; Stone, Heather; Nemati, Mehdi

    2011-06-15

    Kinetics of heterotrophic denitrification was investigated using an oil reservoir culture with the ability to function under both autotrophic and heterotrophic conditions. In the batch system nitrate at concentrations up to 30 mM did not influence the kinetics but with 50mM slower growth and removal rates were observed. A kinetic model, representing the denitrification as reduction of nitrate to nitrite, and subsequent reduction of nitrite to nitrous oxides and nitrogen gas was developed. The value of various kinetic coefficients, including maximum specific growth rate, saturation constant, yield and activation energy for nitrate and nitrite reductions were determined by fitting the experimental data into the developed model. In continuous bioreactors operated with 10 or 30 mM nitrate, complete removal of nitrate (no residual nitrite) and linear dependency between nitrate loading and removal rates were observed for loading rates up to 0.21 and 0.58 mM h(-1), respectively. The highest removal rates of 0.31 and 0.94 mM h(-1) observed at loading rates of 0.42 mM h(-1) and 1.26 mM h(-1), with corresponding removal percentages of nitrate and total nitrogen being 75.4, 54.4%, and 74.4 and 17.9%, respectively. Developed kinetic model predicted the performance of the continuous bioreactors with accuracy.

  20. Heterotrophic microalgae cultivation to synergize biodiesel production with waste remediation: progress and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Venkata Mohan, S; Rohit, M V; Chiranjeevi, P; Chandra, Rashmi; Navaneeth, B

    2015-05-01

    Microalgae are inexhaustible feedstock for synthesis of biodiesel rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and valuable bioactive compounds. Their cultivation is critical in sustaining the global economy in terms of human consumption of food and fuel. When compared to autotrophic cultivation, heterotrophic systems are more suitable for producing high cell densities of microalgae for accumulation of large quantities of lipids (triacylglycerols) which can be converted into biodiesel. Consorted efforts are made in this communication to converge recent literature on heterotrophic cultivation systems with simultaneous wastewater treatment and algal oil production. Challenges faced during large scale production and limiting factors which hinder the microalgae growth are enumerated. A strategic deployment of integrated closed loop biorefinery concept with multi-product recovery is proposed to exploit the full potential of algal systems. Sustainable algae cultivation is essential to produce biofuels leading to green future. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Piggery wastewater treatment using Alcaligenes faecalis strain No. 4 with heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification.

    PubMed

    Joo, Hung-Soo; Hirai, Mitsuyo; Shoda, Makoto

    2006-09-01

    Alcaligenes faecalis strain No. 4, which has heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification abilities, was used to treat actual piggery wastewater containing high-strength ammonium under aerobic conditions. In a continuous experiment using a solids-free wastewater (SFW) mixed with feces, almost all of the 2000 NH4+ -N mg/L and 12,000 COD mg/L in the wastewater was removed and the ammonium removal rate was approximately 30 mg-N/L/h, which was 5-10 times higher than the rates achieved by other bacteria with the same abilities. The denitrification ratio was more than 65% of removed NH4+ -N, indicating that strain No. 4 exhibited its heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification abilities in the piggery wastewater.

  2. Formalising a mechanistic linkage between heterotrophic feeding and thermal bleaching resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooldridge, Scott A.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, I utilise the CO2 (sink) limitation model of coral bleaching to propose a new biochemical framework that explains how certain (well-adapted) coral species can utilise heterotrophic carbon acquisition to combat the damaging algal photoinhibition response sequence that underpins thermal bleaching, thereby increasing thermal bleaching resistance. This mechanistic linkage helps to clarify a number of previously challenging experimental responses arising from feeding (versus starved) temperature stress experiments, and isotope labelling (tracer) experiments with heterotrophic carbon sources (e.g., zooplankton). In an era of rapidly warming surface ocean temperatures, the conferred fitness benefits arising from such a mechanistic linkage are considerable. Yet, various ecological constraints are outlined which caution against the ultimate benefit of the mechanism for raising bleaching thresholds at the coral community (reef) scale. Future experiments are suggested that can strengthen these proposed arguments.

  3. Gases generated from simulated thermal degradation of autotrophic and heterotrophic chlorella

    SciTech Connect

    Qingyu Wu )

    1992-01-01

    The content of crude lipid in the cells of heterotrophic Chlorella protothecoides is 4.4 times as high as in the autotrophic algal cells. The gases thermally degraded from autotrophic cells at 200-300[degrees]C contain mainly CO[sub 2], while the heterotrophic algal cells produce hydrocarbon gas at a much higher rate than autotraophic algal cells. With the rise in temperature, both kinds of cells display a rapid drop in the acid/alkane ratio of the gas components and the ratio of ethane to ethylene increases regularly. Their ratio of normal and isomeric alkanes are all above 1. The study reveals that the actual potential of microplanktonic algae in producing oil and natural gas should be much greater than what people have recognized before.

  4. Heterotrophic prokaryotic production in ultra-oligotrophic alpine karst aquifers and ecological implications

    PubMed Central

    Wilhartitz, Inés C.; Kirschner, Alexander K.T.; Stadler, Hermann; Herndl, Gerhard J.; Dietzel, Martin; Latal, Christine; Mach, Robert L.; Farnleitner, Andreas H.

    2011-01-01

    Spring waters from alpine karst aquifers are important drinking water resources. To investigate in situ prokaryotic heterotrophic production (HP) and its controlling factors, two alpine karst springs of contrasting hydrogeology but of nearby catchments were studied over two annual cycles. Heterotrophic production in spring water, as determined by [3H]leucine incorporation, was low but revealed strong seasonal variations ranging from 0.06 to 6.83 pmol C l−1 h−1 (DKAS1, dolomitic karst-spring) and from 0.50 to 75.6 pmol C l−1 h−1 (LKAS2, limestone karst-spring). Microautoradiography combined with catalyzed reporter deposition - fluorescence in situ hybridization (MAR-CARD-FISH) showed that only about 7 % of the picoplankton community took up [3H]leucine resulting in generation times of 3 to 684 days. Principal component analysis, applying hydrological, chemical and biological parameters demonstrated that planktonic heterotrophic production in LKAS2 was strongly governed by hydrogeographical components (e.g. discharge), whereas variations in DKAS1 are also strongly influenced by changes within the aquifer itself. Measurements in sediments recovered from LKAS2, DKAS1 and similar alpine karst aquifers (n=12) revealed an 106-fold higher heterotrophic production (average 19 μmol C dm−3 h−1) with significantly lower generation times as compared to the planktonic fraction, highlighting the metabolic potential of surface associated endokarst communities to add to self-purification processes. Estimates of microbially mediated CO2 in this compartment indicated a possible contribution to karstification. PMID:19490127

  5. Transcriptional Changes Underlying Elemental Stoichiometry Shifts in a Marine Heterotrophic Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Leong-Keat; Newton, Ryan J.; Sharma, Shalabh; Smith, Christa B.; Rayapati, Pratibha; Limardo, Alexander J.; Meile, Christof; Moran, Mary Ann

    2012-01-01

    Marine bacteria drive the biogeochemical processing of oceanic dissolved organic carbon (DOC), a 750-Tg C reservoir that is a critical component of the global C cycle. Catabolism of DOC is thought to be regulated by the biomass composition of heterotrophic bacteria, as cells maintain a C:N:P ratio of ∼50:10:1 during DOC processing. Yet a complicating factor in stoichiometry-based analyses is that bacteria can change the C:N:P ratio of their biomass in response to resource composition. We investigated the physiological mechanisms of resource-driven shifts in biomass stoichiometry in continuous cultures of the marine heterotrophic bacterium Ruegeria pomeroyi (a member of the Roseobacter clade) under four element limitation regimes (C, N, P, and S). Microarray analysis indicated that the bacterium scavenged for alternate sources of the scarce element when cells were C-, N-, or P-limited; reworked the ratios of biomolecules when C- and P- limited; and exerted tighter control over import/export and cytoplasmic pools when N-limited. Under S limitation, a scenario not existing naturally for surface ocean microbes, stress responses dominated transcriptional changes. Resource-driven changes in C:N ratios of up to 2.5-fold and in C:P ratios of up to sixfold were measured in R. pomeroyi biomass. These changes were best explained if the C and P content of the cells was flexible in the face of shifting resources but N content was not, achieved through the net balance of different transcriptional strategies. The cellular-level metabolic trade-offs that govern biomass stoichiometry in R. pomeroyi may have implications for global carbon cycling if extendable to other heterotrophic bacteria. Strong homeostatic responses to N limitation by marine bacteria would intensify competition with autotrophs. Modification of cellular inventories in C- and P-limited heterotrophs would vary the elemental ratio of particulate organic matter sequestered in the deep ocean. PMID:22783226

  6. Citric acid cycle in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrobaculum islandicum grown autotrophically, heterotrophically, and mixotrophically with acetate.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yajing; Holden, James F

    2006-06-01

    The hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrobaculum islandicum uses the citric acid cycle in the oxidative and reductive directions for heterotrophic and autotrophic growth, respectively, but the control of carbon flow is poorly understood. P. islandicum was grown at 95 degrees C autotrophically, heterotrophically, and mixotrophically with acetate, H2, and small amounts of yeast extract and with thiosulfate as the terminal electron acceptor. The autotrophic growth rates and maximum concentrations of cells were significantly lower than those in other media. The growth rates on H2 and 0.001% yeast extract with and without 0.05% acetate were the same, but the maximum concentration of cells was fourfold higher with acetate. There was no growth with acetate if 0.001% yeast extract was not present, and addition of H2 to acetate-containing medium greatly increased the growth rates and maximum concentrations of cells. P. islandicum cultures assimilated 14C-labeled acetate in the presence of H2 and yeast extract with an efficiency of 55%. The activities of 11 of 19 enzymes involved in the central metabolism of P. islandicum were regulated under the three different growth conditions. Pyruvate synthase and acetate:coenzyme A (CoA) ligase (ADP-forming) activities were detected only in heterotrophically grown cultures. Citrate synthase activity decreased in autotrophic and acetate-containing cultures compared to the activity in heterotrophic cultures. Acetylated citrate lyase, acetate:CoA ligase (AMP forming), and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activities increased in autotrophic and acetate-containing cultures. Citrate lyase activity was higher than ATP citrate synthase activity in autotrophic cultures. These data suggest that citrate lyase and AMP-forming acetate:CoA ligase, but not ATP citrate synthase, work opposite citrate synthase to control the direction of carbon flow in the citric acid cycle.

  7. Autotrophic and heterotrophic denitrification for simultaneous removal of nitrogen, sulfur and organic matter.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Lorna; Aguirre, Juan P; Muñoz, Maria A; Barahona, Andrea; Huiliñir, Cesar; Montalvo, Silvio; Borja, Rafael

    2016-07-02

    The aim of this investigation was to assess the startup and operation of a laboratory-scale hybrid UASB-Anaerobic Filter Reactor (UASFB) of 1 L volume, kept at 30°C, in order to carry out a simultaneous autotrophic and heterotrophic denitrification process. First, the heterotrophic and autotrophic populations were separately enriched, with specific cultures and subsequently the UASFB was inoculated with 2 g L(-1) of volatile suspended solids (VSS), with a ratio of 1.5:1 (autotrophs: heterotrophs). The influent or synthetic wastewater used was composed of: Na2S2O3·5H2O, CH3COOK, NaNO3, NaHCO3, K2HPO4, NH4Cl and saline solution. The concentrations varied depending on the organic loading rate (OLR), nitrogen loading rate (NLR) and sulfur loading rate (SLR) applied. In the UASFB reactor, two experimental conditions were tested and assessed: (i) COD/N ratio of 3.6 and SLR of 0.75 kg S m(-3) d(-1); and (ii) COD/N ratio of 5.8 and SLR of 0.25 kg S m(-3) d(-1). The results obtained demonstrated that an inoculum coming from an anaerobic reactor was able to carry out the process, obtaining a maximum nitrate removal of 85.3% in the first stage of operation and 99.5% in the second stage. The recovery of sulfur in form of sulfate in the effluent did not present a tendency to stabilize during the measured time, with a maximum thiosulfate removal of 32.5%, when the SLR was lowered to 0.25 kg S m(-3) d(-1). The maximum organic matter elimination, measured as COD, was 75.8%, which indicates the relatively good performance and behavior of the heterotrophic microorganisms.

  8. Acclimation to NaCl and light stress of heterotrophic Chlamydomonas reinhardtii for lipid accumulation.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jianhua; Zheng, Lvhong

    2017-09-01

    Salt stress has been proven very effective in enhancing the lipid content among many photoautotrophically grown microalgae species including marine and freshwater algae. Nevertheless, its effect on heterotrophic grown cells and lipid accumulation is scarcely known. This study sought to demonstrate a new train of thought for cost-effective biofuels production by heterotrophic culture of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii coupling with subsequent salt and light stress. NaCl treatments (25-200 mM) gradually suppressed the cell growth. After one day's acclimation, the cells restored slow growth with light supplement (200 μmol/m2/s) in low salt concentration (0-50 mM). However, high concentration of NaCl (200 mM) dose caused permanent damage, with over 47% cells death after 3 days treatment. The highest lipid content of 35.8% and lipid productivity of 28.6 mg/L/d were achieved by 50 mM NaCl stress and light treatment upon heterotrophic grown cells. Cells lost their green pigmentation and became yellowish under 100-200 mM NaCl conditions, whereas cells grown in 0-50 mM NaCl retained their dark-green pigmentation. Variable-to-maximum fluorescence ratio (Fv/Fm) and non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) value were markedly influenced under salt and light stress, indicating that severe inhibition of photosynthetic ability was occurred. Moreover, we further demonstrated the dynamic changes of cell growth and lipid accumulation would potentially be caused by the increase of intracellular redox state. To our knowledge, this study is the first instance in which C. reinhardtii was applied to oil accumulation by using combination of heterotrophic culture and multiple stress, and opened up a new territory for the further development of microalgae-based biofuels production. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Competition for Ammonium between Nitrifying and Heterotrophic Bacteria in Continuously Percolated Soil Columns

    PubMed Central

    Verhagen, Frank J. M.; Duyts, Hendrik; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J.

    1992-01-01

    Although the absence of nitrate formation in grassland soils rich in organic matter has often been reported, low numbers of nitrifying bacteria are still found in these soils. To obtain more insight into these observations, we studied the competition for limiting amounts of ammonium between the chemolithotrophic ammonium-oxidizing species Nitrosomonas europaea and the heterotrophic species Arthrobacter globiformis in the presence of Nitrobacter winogradskyi with soil columns containing calcareous sandy soil. The soil columns were percolated continuously at a dilution rate of 0.007 h-1, based on liquid volumes, with medium containing 5 mM ammonium and different amounts of glucose ranging from 0 to 12 mM.A. globiformis was the most competitive organism for limiting amounts of ammonium. The numbers of N. europaea and N. winogradskyi cells were lower at higher glucose concentrations, and the potential ammonium-oxidizing activities in the uppermost 3 cm of the soil columns were nonexistent when at least 10 mM glucose was present in the reservoir, although 107 nitrifying cells per g of dry soil were still present. This result demonstrated that there was no correlation between the numbers of nitrifying bacteria and their activities. The numbers and activities of N. winogradskyi cells decreased less than those of N. europaea cells in all layers of the soil columns, probably because of heterotrophic growth of the nitrite-oxidizing bacteria on organic substrates excreted by the heterotrophic bacteria or because of nitrate reduction at reduced oxygen concentrations by the nitrite-oxidizing bacteria. Our conclusion was that the nitrifying bacteria were less competitive than the heterotrophic bacteria for ammonium in soil columns but that they survived as viable inactive cells. Inactive nitrifying bacteria may also be found in the rhizosphere of grassland plants, which is rich in organic carbon. They are possibly reactivated during periods of net mineralization. PMID:16348787

  10. Membrane biofouling in a wastewater nitrification reactor: Microbial succession from autotrophic colonization to heterotrophic domination.

    PubMed

    Lu, Huijie; Xue, Zheng; Saikaly, Pascal; Nunes, Suzana P; Bluver, Ted R; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2016-01-01

    Membrane biofouling is a complex process that involves bacterial adhesion, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) excretion and utilization, and species interactions. To obtain a better understanding of the microbial ecology of biofouling process, this study conducted rigorous, time-course analyses on the structure, EPS and microbial composition of the fouling layer developed on ultrafiltration membranes in a nitrification bioreactor. During a 14-day fouling event, three phases were determined according to the flux decline and microbial succession patterns. In Phase I (0-2 days), small sludge flocs in the bulk liquid were selectively attached on membrane surfaces, leading to the formation of similar EPS and microbial community composition as the early biofilms. Dominant populations in small flocs, e.g., Nitrosomonas, Nitrobacter, and Acinetobacter spp., were also the major initial colonizers on membranes. In Phase II (2-4 d), fouling layer structure, EPS composition, and bacterial community went through significant changes. Initial colonizers were replaced by fast-growing and metabolically versatile heterotrophs (e.g., unclassified Sphingobacteria). The declining EPS polysaccharide to protein (PS:PN) ratios could be correlated well with the increase in microbial community diversity. In Phase III (5-14 d), heterotrophs comprised over 90% of the community, whereas biofilm structure and EPS composition remained relatively stable. In all phases, AOB and NOB were constantly found within the top 40% of the fouling layer, with the maximum concentrations around 15% from the top. The overall microbial succession pattern from autotrophic colonization to heterotrophic domination implied that MBR biofouling could be alleviated by forming larger bacterial flocs in bioreactor suspension (reducing autotrophic colonization), and by designing more specific cleaning procedures targeting dominant heterotrophs during typical filtration cycles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All

  11. Dynamics of natural prokaryotes, viruses, and heterotrophic nanoflagellates in alpine karstic groundwater

    PubMed Central

    Wilhartitz, Inés C; Kirschner, Alexander K T; Brussaard, Corina P D; Fischer, Ulrike R; Wieltschnig, Claudia; Stadler, Hermann; Farnleitner, Andreas H

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Seasonal dynamics of naturally occurring prokaryotes, viruses, and heterotrophic nanoflagellates in two hydro-geologically contrasting alpine karst springs were monitored over three annual cycles. To our knowledge, this study is the first to shed light on the occurrence and possible interrelationships between these three groups in karstic groundwater. Hydrological and microbiological standard indicators were recovered simultaneously in order to estimate surface influence, especially during rainfall events. Data revealed a strong dependence of the microbial communities on the prevailing hydrological situation. Prokaryotic numbers averaged 5.1 × 107 and 1.3 × 107 cells L−1, and heterotrophic nanoflagellate abundance averaged 1.1 × 104 and 3 × 103 cells L−1 in the limestone spring type (LKAS2) and the dolomitic spring type (DKAS1), respectively. Viral abundance in LKAS2 and DKAS1 averaged 9.4 × 108 and 1.1 × 108 viruses L−1. Unlike in DKAS1, the dynamic spring type LKAS2 revealed a clear difference between base flow and high discharge conditions. The virus-to-prokaryotes ratio was generally lower by a factor of 2–3, at higher average water residence times. Furthermore, the high prokaryotes-to-heterotrophic nanoflagellate ratios, namely about 4700 and 5400 for LKAS2 and DKAS1, respectively, pointed toward an uncoupling of these two groups in the planktonic fraction of alpine karstic aquifers. Seasonal dynamics of naturally occurring prokaryotes, viruses and heterotrophic nanoflagellates in two hydro-geologically contrasting alpine karst springs were monitored over three annual cycles. Data revealed a strong dependence of the microbial communities on the prevailing hydrological situation. PMID:23828838

  12. Chromium induced stress conditions in heterotrophic and auxotrophic strains of Euglena gracilis.

    PubMed

    Rocchetta, Iara; Mazzuca, Marcia; Conforti, Visitación; Balzaretti, Vilma; del Carmen Ríos de Molina, María

    2012-10-01

    Oxidative stress parameter and antioxidant defense compound as well as enzyme activity were studied in relation to different Cr(VI) concentrations (0, 10, 20, 40 μM) in two strains of Euglena gracilis, one isolated from a polluted river (MAT) and the other acquired from a culture collection (UTEX). Chromium toxicity was measured in the auxotrophic and obligated heterotrophic variants of the two strains. Chromium uptake was higher in auxotrophic cultures, reflected by their higher cell proliferation inhibition and lower IC50 levels compared to heterotrophic ones. In the Cr(VI) treatments a reduction of chlorophyll a and b ratio (Chl a/Chl b) was observed, the ratio of protein to paramylon content was augmented, and total lipid content increased, having the auxotrophic strains the highest values. TBARS content increased significantly only at 40 μM Cr(VI) treatment. Unsaturated fatty acids also increased in the Cr(VI) treatments, with the higher storage lipid (saturated acids) content in the heterotrophic cells. The antioxidant response, such as SOD activity and GSH content, increased with chromium concentration, showing the highest GSH values in the heterotrophic cultures and the SOD enzyme participation in chromium toxicity. The MAT strain had higher IC50 values, higher carbohydrate and saturated acid content, and better response of the antioxidant system than the UTEX one. This strain isolated from the polluted place also showed higher GSH content and SOD activity in control cells and in almost all treated cultures. SOD activity reached a 9-fold increase in both MAT strains. These results suggest that tolerance of MAT strain against Cr(VI) stress is not only related to GSH level and/or biosynthesis capacity but is also related to the participation of the SOD antioxidant enzyme. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Technique for Enumeration of Heterotrophic and Phototrophic Nanoplankton, Using Epifluorescence Microscopy, and Comparison with Other Procedures †

    PubMed Central

    Caron, David A.

    1983-01-01

    A new method is described that uses the fluorochrome primulin and epifluorescence microscopy for the enumeration of heterotrophic and phototrophic nanoplankton (2 to 20 μm). Phototrophic microorganisms are distinguished from heterotrophs by the red autofluorescence of chlorophyll a. Separate filter sets are used which allow visualization of the primulin-stained nanoplankton without masking chlorophyll a fluorescence, thus allowing easy recognition of phototrophic cells. Comparison with existing epifluorescence techniques for counting heterotrophic and phototrophic nanoplankton shows that primulin provides more accurate counts of these populations than the fluorescein isothiocyanate or proflavine techniques. Accuracy is comparable to that with the acridine orange technique, but this method requires only one filter preparation for the enumeration of both phototrophic and heterotrophic populations. Images PMID:16346372

  14. Characteristics of a novel thermophilic heterotrophic bacterium, Anoxybacillus contaminans HA, for nitrification-aerobic denitrification.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Zheng, Ji; Li, Yan; Hao, Hong-Hong; Chen, Jian-Meng

    2015-12-01

    A strain bacterium that is thermophilic, heterotrophic nitrifying, and aerobic denitrifying was isolated and identified as Anoxybacillus contaminans HA for the first time. The identification was based on morphological and physiological characterizations, together with phylogenetic analysis of 16S rDNA sequence. The strain possessed excellent tolerance to high temperatures, with 55 °C as its optimum and 60 °C as viable. Moreover, NH4 (+)-N and NO3 (-)-N could be efficiently removed under thermophilic and solely aerobic conditions, with little intermediate accumulation. Average removal efficiencies of NH4 (+)-N and NO3 (-)-N at 55 °C reached 71.0 and 74.7 %, respectively, with removal rates of 5.83 and 32.08 mg l(-1) h(-1), respectively. Single-factor experiments suggested that the optimal conditions for both heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification were glucose as carbon source, NH4 (+)-N range of 50-200 mg l(-1), and wide NO3 (-)-N range of 200-1000 mg l(-1). These results indicated that strain HA had heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification abilities, as well as the notable ability to remove ammonium under thermophilic condition. Thus, this strain has potential application in waste-gas treatment.

  15. Nitrogen, carbon, and sulfur isotopic change during heterotrophic (Pseudomonas aureofaciens) and autotrophic (Thiobacillus denitrificans) denitrification reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosono, Takahiro; Alvarez, Kelly; Lin, In-Tian; Shimada, Jun

    2015-12-01

    In batch culture experiments, we examined the isotopic change of nitrogen in nitrate (δ15NNO3), carbon in dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13CDIC), and sulfur in sulfate (δ34SSO4) during heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrification of two bacterial strains (Pseudomonas aureofaciens and Thiobacillus denitrificans). Heterotrophic denitrification (HD) experiments were conducted with trisodium citrate as electron donor, and autotrophic denitrification (AD) experiments were carried out with iron disulfide (FeS2) as electron donor. For heterotrophic denitrification experiments, a complete nitrate reduction was accomplished, however bacterial denitrification with T. denitrificans is a slow process in which, after seventy days nitrate was reduced to 40% of the initial concentration by denitrification. In the HD experiment, systematic change of δ13CDIC (from - 7.7‰ to - 12.2‰) with increase of DIC was observed during denitrification (enrichment factor εN was - 4.7‰), suggesting the contribution of C of trisodium citrate (δ13C = - 12.4‰). No SO42 - and δ34SSO4 changes were observed. In the AD experiment, clear fractionation of δ13CDIC during DIC consumption (εC = - 7.8‰) and δ34SSO4 during sulfur use of FeS2-S (around 2‰), were confirmed through denitrification (εN = - 12.5‰). Different pattern in isotopic change between HD and AD obtained on laboratory-scale are useful to recognize the type of denitrification occurring in the field.

  16. Nitrogen, carbon, and sulfur isotopic change during heterotrophic (Pseudomonas aureofaciens) and autotrophic (Thiobacillus denitrificans) denitrification reactions.

    PubMed

    Hosono, Takahiro; Alvarez, Kelly; Lin, In-Tian; Shimada, Jun

    2015-12-01

    In batch culture experiments, we examined the isotopic change of nitrogen in nitrate (δ(15)NNO3), carbon in dissolved inorganic carbon (δ(13)CDIC), and sulfur in sulfate (δ(34)SSO4) during heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrification of two bacterial strains (Pseudomonas aureofaciens and Thiobacillus denitrificans). Heterotrophic denitrification (HD) experiments were conducted with trisodium citrate as electron donor, and autotrophic denitrification (AD) experiments were carried out with iron disulfide (FeS2) as electron donor. For heterotrophic denitrification experiments, a complete nitrate reduction was accomplished, however bacterial denitrification with T. denitrificans is a slow process in which, after seventy days nitrate was reduced to 40% of the initial concentration by denitrification. In the HD experiment, systematic change of δ(13)CDIC (from -7.7‰ to -12.2‰) with increase of DIC was observed during denitrification (enrichment factor εN was -4.7‰), suggesting the contribution of C of trisodium citrate (δ(13)C=-12.4‰). No SO4(2-) and δ(34)SSO4 changes were observed. In the AD experiment, clear fractionation of δ(13)CDIC during DIC consumption (εC=-7.8‰) and δ(34)SSO4 during sulfur use of FeS2-S (around 2‰), were confirmed through denitrification (εN=-12.5‰). Different pattern in isotopic change between HD and AD obtained on laboratory-scale are useful to recognize the type of denitrification occurring in the field.

  17. Weak Coupling between Heterotrophic Nanoflagellates and Bacteria in a Eutrophic Freshwater Environment.

    PubMed

    Wieltschnig, C.; Kirschner, A.K.T.; Steitz, A.; Velimirov, B.

    2001-08-01

    In a study on the dynamics and trophic role of the heterotrophic nanoflagellate (HNAN) assemblage in the microbial food web of a eutrophic oxbow lake abundances, biomass, and production rates of HNAN and their potential prey organisms, namely heterotrophic bacteria and autotrophic picoplankton, were monitored for a period of 2 years. No coupling between HNAN abundance and biomass and the abundance and biomass of their picoplanktonic prey was observed for the investigation period. The ratio of heterotrophic bacterial to HNAN abundance ranged from 2.2 x 103 to 8.6 x 103 (mean: 4.2 x 103 +/- 1.8 x 103). HNAN carbon consumption could account for only 10% to 40% of bacterial secondary production. The lack of coupling between HNAN and their potential prey and the low HNAN abundance relative to bacterial abundance suggested (a) that HNAN grazing was an insignificant factor in the regulation of bacterial abundance and (b) that HNAN abundance was regulated by predation rather than by prey abundance. This hypothesis was supported by the fact that HNAN growth rates were high (in the range of 0.45 d-1 to 1.00 d-1 during spring and summer, yearly mean: 0.52 d-1), and only weakly correlated with prey abundance and biomass. The results indicated strong top-down control of HNAN and consequently a weak coupling of HNAN and picoplankton in the investigated eutrophic freshwater environment.

  18. Alexandr I. Oparin and the Origin of Life: A Historical Reassessment of the Heterotrophic Theory.

    PubMed

    Lazcano, Antonio

    2016-12-01

    The heterotrophic origin of life proposed by A. I. Oparin in the 1920s was part of a Darwinian framework that assumed that living organisms were the historical outcome of a gradual transformation of lifeless matter. Eighty years ago, he presented a much more detailed scheme of the processes that may have led to life. As argued here, the development of the heterotrophic theory has been shaped by an entangled scenario in which a number of technical and scientific developments concur, as well as non-scientific issues including the Stalinist period and the tensions of the Cold War atmosphere. What has been largely ignored until now is the key role played by Haeckel's ideas in shaping Oparin's theory. The heterotrophic theory has been erroneously described as a metabolism-first hypothesis in which genetic material was not included due to ideological pressures of the Soviet government. As shown here, both characterizations are mistaken. The development of Oparin's views and the ensuing debates cannot be understood without considering the confrontation between Mendelism and Darwinism during the first three decades of the past century, combined with the doubts surrounding the existence of genes.

  19. Characteristics of heterotrophic/biofilm-electrode autotrophic denitrification for nitrate removal from groundwater.

    PubMed

    Tong, Shuang; Zhang, Baogang; Feng, Chuanping; Zhao, Yingxin; Chen, Nan; Hao, Chunbo; Pu, Jiaoyang; Zhao, Liwei

    2013-11-01

    A heterotrophic/biofilm-electrode autotrophic denitrification reactor (HAD-BER) was developed to improve denitrification efficiency and reduce the consumption of organic carbon source. Maximum nitrate removal efficiency of 99.9% was gained under the optimum current density of 200 mA/m(2). The number of heterotrophic denitrification bacteria (HDB) 2.0 × 10(5) and hydrogen autotrophic denitrification bacteria (ADB) 2.0 × 10(3) in per milliliter biofilm solution were observed by the most probable number (MPN) culture, demonstrating that HDB and ADB coexist in the HAD-BER. The inorganic carbon source for autotrophic denitrification was supplied by the dissolved carbon dioxide (CO2) evolved from the heterotrophic denitrification process, indicating that there was synergistic interaction between the HDB and ADB, i.e., the organic carbon source used for denitrification could be decreased in the HAD-BER. Therefore, the developed HAD-BER would be a promising approach for nitrate removal from groundwater. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Soil respiration under climate warming: differential response of heterotrophic and autotrophic respiration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Liu, Lingli; Piao, Shilong; Janssens, Ivan A; Tang, Jianwu; Liu, Weixing; Chi, Yonggang; Wang, Jing; Xu, Shan

    2014-10-01

    Despite decades of research, how climate warming alters the global flux of soil respiration is still poorly characterized. Here, we use meta-analysis to synthesize 202 soil respiration datasets from 50 ecosystem warming experiments across multiple terrestrial ecosystems. We found that, on average, warming by 2 °C increased soil respiration by 12% during the early warming years, but warming-induced drought partially offset this effect. More significantly, the two components of soil respiration, heterotrophic respiration and autotrophic respiration showed distinct responses. The warming effect on autotrophic respiration was not statistically detectable during the early warming years, but nonetheless decreased with treatment duration. In contrast, warming by 2 °C increased heterotrophic respiration by an average of 21%, and this stimulation remained stable over the warming duration. This result challenged the assumption that microbial activity would acclimate to the rising temperature. Together, our findings demonstrate that distinguishing heterotrophic respiration and autotrophic respiration would allow us better understand and predict the long-term response of soil respiration to warming. The dependence of soil respiration on soil moisture condition also underscores the importance of incorporating warming-induced soil hydrological changes when modeling soil respiration under climate change. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. A "footprint" of plant carbon fixation cycle functions during the development of a heterotrophic fungus.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Xueliang; Shen, Cuicui; Xie, Jiatao; Fu, Yanping; Jiang, Daohong; Hu, Zijin; Tang, Lihua; Tang, Liguang; Ding, Feng; Li, Kunfei; Wu, Song; Hu, Yanping; Luo, Lilian; Li, Yuanhao; Wang, Qihua; Li, Guoqing; Cheng, Jiasen

    2015-08-11

    Carbon fixation pathway of plants (CFPP) in photosynthesis converts solar energy to biomass, bio-products and biofuel. Intriguingly, a large number of heterotrophic fungi also possess enzymes functionally associated with CFPP, raising the questions about their roles in fungal development and in evolution. Here, we report on the presence of 17 CFPP associated enzymes (ten in Calvin-Benson-Basham reductive pentose phosphate pathway and seven in C4-dicarboxylic acid cycle) in the genome of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, a heterotrophic phytopathogenic fungus, and only two unique enzymes: ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase (Rubisco) and phosphoribulokinase (PRK) were absent. This data suggested an incomplete CFPP-like pathway (CLP) in fungi. Functional profile analysis demonstrated that the activity of the incomplete CLP was dramatically regulated during different developmental stages of S. sclerotiorum. Subsequent experiments confirmed that many of them were essential to the virulence and/or sclerotial formation. Most of the CLP associated genes are conserved in fungi. Phylogenetic analysis showed that many of them have undergone gene duplication, gene acquisition or loss and functional diversification in evolutionary history. These findings showed an evolutionary links in the carbon fixation processes of autotrophs and heterotrophs and implicated the functions of related genes were in course of continuous change in different organisms in evolution.

  2. A modeling study of benthic detritus flux's impacts on heterotrophic processes in Lake Michigan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Changsheng; Wang, Lixia; Qi, Jianhua; Liu, Hedong; Budd, Judith Wells; Schwab, David J.; Beletsky, Dmitry; Vanderploeg, Henry; Eadie, Brian; Johengen, Thomas; Cotner, James; Lavrentyev, Peter J.

    2004-10-01

    Effects of sediment resuspension-induced benthic detrital flux on the heterotrophic part of the microbial food web in Lake Michigan were examined using a three-dimensional (3-D) coupled biological and physical model. The model was driven by the realistic meteorological forcing observed in March 1999. Wind-induced surface wave dynamics were incorporated into the physical model to generate the bottom flux. The model-generated benthic detrital flux was assumed to be proportional to the difference between model-calculated and critical stresses at the bottom. The model results indicate that detrital flux at the bottom was a key factor causing a significant increase of phosphorus and detritus concentrations in the nearshore region of the springtime plume. Inside the plume the sediment-resuspended bottom detritus flux could directly enhance heterotrophic production, while outside the plume, detrital flux from river discharge might have a direct contribution to the high abundance of bacteria and microzooplankton in the nearshore region. Model-data comparison on cross-shore transects near Chicago, Gary, St. Joseph, and Racine suggests that other physical and biological processes may play a comparative role as the bottom detritus flux in terms of the spatial distribution of bacteria and microzoplankton. A more complete microbial food web model needs to be developed to simulate the heterotrophic process in southern Lake Michigan.

  3. Acidophilic algae isolated from mine-impacted environments and their roles in sustaining heterotrophic acidophiles.

    PubMed

    Nancucheo, Ivan; Barrie Johnson, D

    2012-01-01

    Two acidophilic algae, identified as strains of Chlorella protothecoides var. acidicola and Euglena mutabilis, were isolated in pure culture from abandoned copper mines in Spain and Wales and grown in pH- and temperature-controlled bioreactors. The Chlorella isolate grew optimally at pH 2.5 and 30°C, with a corresponding culture doubling time of 9 h. The isolates displayed similar tolerance (10-50 mM) to four transition metals tested. Growth of the algae in liquid media was paralleled with increasing concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Glycolic acid was identified as a significant component (12-14%) of total DOC. Protracted incubation resulted in concentrations of glycolic acid declining in both cases, and glycolic acid added to a culture of Chlorella incubated in the dark was taken up by the alga (~100% within 3 days). Two monosaccharides were identified in cell-free liquors of each algal isolate: fructose and glucose (Chlorella), and mannitol and glucose (Euglena). These were rapidly metabolized by acidophilic heterotrophic bacteria (Acidiphilium and Acidobacterium spp.) though only fructose was utilized by the more fastidious heterotroph "Acidocella aromatica." The significance of algae in promoting the growth of iron- (and sulfate-) reducing heterotrophic acidophiles that are important in remediating mine-impacted waters (MIWs) is discussed.

  4. Large-scale biodiesel production from microalga Chlorella protothecoides through heterotrophic cultivation in bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiufeng; Xu, Han; Wu, Qingyu

    2007-11-01

    An integrated approach of biodiesel production from heterotrophic Chlorella protothecoides focused on scaling up fermentation in bioreactors was reported in this study. Through substrate feeding and fermentation process controls, the cell density of C. protothecoides achieved 15.5 g L(-1) in 5 L, 12.8 g L(-1) in 750 L, and 14.2 g L(-1) in 11,000 L bioreactors, respectively. Resulted from heterotrophic metabolism, the lipid content reached 46.1%, 48.7%, and 44.3% of cell dry weight in samples from 5 L, 750 L, and 11,000 L bioreactors, respectively. Transesterification of the microalgal oil was catalyzed by immobilized lipase from Candidia sp. 99-125. With 75% lipase (12,000 U g(-1), based on lipid quantity) and 3:1 molar ratio of methanol to oil batch-fed at three times, 98.15% of the oil was converted to monoalkyl esters of fatty acids in 12 h. The expanded biodiesel production rates were 7.02 g L(-1), 6.12 g L(-1), and 6.24 g L(-1) in 5 L, 750 L, and 11,000 L bioreactors, respectively. The properties of biodiesel from Chlorella were comparable to conventional diesel fuel and comply with the US Standard for Biodiesel (ASTM 6751). These results suggest that it is feasible to expand heterotrophic Chlorella fermentation for biodiesel production at the industry level.

  5. Risk assessment of heterotrophic bacteria from bottled drinking water sold in Indian markets.

    PubMed

    Jeena, M I; Deepa, P; Mujeeb Rahiman, K M; Shanthi, R T; Hatha, A A M

    2006-03-01

    One hundred and five samples of bottled drinking water belonging to 30 different brands, collected from six different states of India have been analysed for total heterotrophic bacterial (THB) load and coliforms. Almost all bottlers used multiple treatment procedures such as microfiltration, reverse osmosis and ozonization to treat the water. Around 40% of the samples exceeded the limit of 100 cfu/ml set by the department of health as well as Bureau of Indian Standards (BIS), Government of India. Fourteen percent and 44% of the samples with THB loads between 100 and 1000 cfu/ml or 1000 cfu/ml tested positive for coliforms indicating a linear relationship between THB and coliform bacteria. Gram-positive genera such as Kurthia and Corynebacterium were found to be dominant genera, while members of the family enterobacteriaceae contributed to 7%. Risk assessment of the heterotrophic bacteria revealed that the majority of the strains acquired resistance against ampicillin, nalidixic acid, novobiocin and oxytetracycline. As bottled drinking water is a ready to drink commodity, the high load of heterotrophic bacteria with multiple drug resistance poses significant health hazards to the consumers, especially to immunocompromised individuals.

  6. Roots affect the response of heterotrophic soil respiration to temperature in tussock grass microcosms.

    PubMed

    Graham, Scott L; Millard, Peter; Hunt, John E; Rogers, Graeme N D; Whitehead, David

    2012-07-01

    While the temperature response of soil respiration (R(S)) has been well studied, the partitioning of heterotrophic respiration (R(H)) by soil microbes from autotrophic respiration (R(A)) by roots, known to have distinct temperature sensitivities, has been problematic. Further complexity stems from the presence of roots affecting R(H), the rhizosphere priming effect. In this study the short-term temperature responses of R(A) and R(H) in relation to rhizosphere priming are investigated. Temperature responses of R(A), R(H) and rhizosphere priming were assessed in microcosms of Poa cita using a natural abundance δ(13)C discrimination approach. The temperature response of R(S) was found to be regulated primarily by R(A), which accounted for 70 % of total soil respiration. Heterotrophic respiration was less sensitive to temperature in the presence of plant roots, resulting in negative priming effects with increasing temperature. The results emphasize the importance of roots in regulating the temperature response of R(S), and a framework is presented for further investigation into temperature effects on heterotrophic respiration and rhizosphere priming, which could be applied to other soil and vegetation types to improve models of soil carbon turnover.

  7. Lipid remodelling is a widespread strategy in marine heterotrophic bacteria upon phosphorus deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Sebastián, Marta; Smith, Alastair F; González, José M; Fredricks, Helen F; Van Mooy, Benjamin; Koblížek, Michal; Brandsma, Joost; Koster, Grielof; Mestre, Mireia; Mostajir, Behzad; Pitta, Paraskevi; Postle, Anthony D; Sánchez, Pablo; Gasol, Josep M; Scanlan, David J; Chen, Yin

    2016-01-01

    Upon phosphorus (P) deficiency, marine phytoplankton reduce their requirements for P by replacing membrane phospholipids with alternative non-phosphorus lipids. It was very recently demonstrated that a SAR11 isolate also shares this capability when phosphate starved in culture. Yet, the extent to which this process occurs in other marine heterotrophic bacteria and in the natural environment is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the substitution of membrane phospholipids for a variety of non-phosphorus lipids is a conserved response to P deficiency among phylogenetically diverse marine heterotrophic bacteria, including members of the Alphaproteobacteria and Flavobacteria. By deletion mutagenesis and complementation in the model marine bacterium Phaeobacter sp. MED193 and heterologous expression in recombinant Escherichia coli, we confirm the roles of a phospholipase C (PlcP) and a glycosyltransferase in lipid remodelling. Analyses of the Global Ocean Sampling and Tara Oceans metagenome data sets demonstrate that PlcP is particularly abundant in areas characterized by low phosphate concentrations. Furthermore, we show that lipid remodelling occurs seasonally and responds to changing nutrient conditions in natural microbial communities from the Mediterranean Sea. Together, our results point to the key role of lipid substitution as an adaptive strategy enabling heterotrophic bacteria to thrive in the vast P-depleted areas of the ocean. PMID:26565724

  8. Distribution and abundance of uncultured heterotrophic flagellates in the world oceans.

    PubMed

    Massana, Ramon; Terrado, Ramon; Forn, Irene; Lovejoy, Connie; Pedrós-Alió, Carlos

    2006-09-01

    Heterotrophic flagellates play fundamental roles in marine ecosystems as picoplankton grazers. This recognized importance contrasts with our ignorance of the taxonomic composition of this functional group, which remains mostly unidentified by microscopical and culturing approaches. Recent molecular marine surveys based on 18S rDNA genes have retrieved many sequences unrelated to cultured organisms and marine stramenopiles were among the first reported uncultured eukaryotes. However, little is known about the organisms corresponding to these sequences. Here we determine the abundance of several marine stramenopile lineages in surface marine waters using molecular probes and fluorescent in situ hybridization. We show that these protists are free-living bacterivorous heterotrophic flagellates. They were widely distributed, occurring in the five world oceans, and accounted for a significant fraction (up to 35%) of heterotrophic flagellates in diverse geographic regions. A single group, MAST-4, represented 9% of cells within this functional assemblage, with the intriguing exception of polar waters where it was absent. MAST-4 cells likely contribute substantially to picoplankton grazing and nutrient re-mineralization in vast areas of the oceans and represent a key eukaryotic group in marine food webs.

  9. Easy visualization of the protist Oxyrrhis marina grazing on a live fluorescently labelled heterotrophic nanoflagellate.

    PubMed

    Martín-Cereceda, Mercedes; Williams, Richard A J; Novarino, Gianfranco

    2008-07-01

    Planktonic heterotrophic flagellates are ubiquitous eukaryotic microorganisms that play a crucial role in carbon and nutrient fluxes through pelagic food webs. Here we illustrate for the first time a grazing model of planktonic dinoflagellate, Oxyrrhis marina, on the heterotrophic nanoflagellate Goniomonas amphinema, using the DNA-binding fluorescent dye Hoechst 33342. A solution of 1 microg/mL of the fluorochrome allowed viability of the prey for at least 48 hours, provided low fluorescence quenching, and labelled the flagellate without masking the cytoplasm. After 2 hours of contact between the fluorescent prey and the predator, O. marina population had preyed on live G. amphinema at an ingestion rate of 2.2 prey Oxyrrhis (-1) h(-1). Results show that this model is a time-effective and inexpensive approach for the direct observation of heterotrophic flagellate grazing. The fact that prey remain alive while predation occurs, as well as the low rate of quenching, could be of help in studying the fate of real-time trophic interactions between protists in microbial webs.

  10. Contribution of mono and polysaccharides to heterotrophic N2 fixation at the eastern Mediterranean coastline.

    PubMed

    Rahav, E; Giannetto, M J; Bar-Zeev, E

    2016-06-16

    N2 fixation should be a critical process in the nitrogen-poor surface water of the eastern Mediterranean Sea. Despite favorable conditions, diazotroph abundance and N2 fixation rates remains low for reasons yet explained. The main goal of this study was to investigate the limiting nutrients for diazotrophy in this oligotrophic environment. Hence, we conducted dedicated bottle-microcosms with eastern Mediterranean Sea water that were supplemented with mono and polysaccharides as well as inorganic nitrogen and phosphorous. Our results indicate that the diazotrophic community expressing nifH was primarily represented by heterotrophic Proteobacteria. N2 fixation and heterotrophic bacterial activity increased up-to tenfold following two days of dark incubations, once seawater was supplemented with organic carbon substrate in the form of glucose (monosaccharides) or gum-xanthan (polysaccharide surrogate). Furthermore, our results point that carbon-rich polysaccharides, such as transparent exopolymer particles, enhance heterotrophic N2 fixation, by forming microenvironments of intense metabolic activity, high carbon: nitrogen ratio, and possibly low O2 levels. The conclusions of this study indicate that diazotrophs in the eastern Mediterranean coast are primarily limited by organic carbon substrates, as possibly in many other marine regions.

  11. Characterization of autotrophic and heterotrophic soluble microbial product (SMP) fractions from activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wen-Ming; Ni, Bing-Jie; Seviour, Thomas; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Yu, Han-Qing

    2012-12-01

    Soluble microbial products (SMP) generated by microbial populations can adversely affect the efficiency of biological wastewater treatment systems and secondary effluent quality. In this work, both experimental and modeling approaches were used to investigate the formation of SMP by both heterotrophic and autotrophic bacteria. Strategies to control and reduce SMP in activated sludge systems were thus evaluated. SMP produced by heterotrophs were found to account for more than 92% of total SMP. The SMP produced by autotrophs contributed to less than 8% of the total SMP, with 5% attributable to the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and 3% to the nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB). When external organic substrate was present, the utilization-associated products (UAP) were the main component of SMP. When external organic substrate was completely consumed, biomass-associated products (BAP) from the hydrolysis of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) dominated the SMP. The model developed in this study described the fractions and dynamics of UAP and BAP produced by heterotrophs, AOB and NOB. Solids retention time of the reactor had a significant effect on SMP production, while the effect of the hydraulic retention time was only minor. Decreasing the solids retention time from 15 to 0.5 d reduced SMP production in the reactor by 62%.

  12. Simultaneous heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification by the marine origin bacterium Pseudomonas sp. ADN-42.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ruofei; Liu, Tianqi; Liu, Guangfei; Zhou, Jiti; Huang, Jianyu; Wang, Aijie

    2015-02-01

    Recent research has highlighted the existence of some bacteria that are capable of performing heterotrophic nitrification and have a phenomenal ability to denitrify their nitrification products under aerobic conditions. A high-salinity-tolerant strain ADN-42 was isolated from Hymeniacidon perleve and found to display high heterotrophic ammonium removal capability. This strain was identified as Pseudomonas sp. via 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Gene cloning and sequencing analysis indicated that the bacterial genome contains N2O reductase function (nosZ) gene. NH3-N removal rate of ADN-42 was very high. And the highest removal rate was 6.52 mg/L · h in the presence of 40 g/L NaCl. Under the condition of pure oxygen (DO >8 mg/L), NH3-N removal efficiency was 56.9 %. Moreover, 38.4 % of oxygen remained in the upper gas space during 72 h without greenhouse gas N2O production. Keeping continuous and low level of dissolved oxygen (DO <3 mg/L) was helpful for better denitrification performance. All these results indicated that the strain has heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification abilities, which guarantee future application in wastewater treatment.

  13. Heterotrophic Potential for Amino Acid Uptake in a Naturally Eutrophic Lake1

    PubMed Central

    Burnison, B. Kent; Morita, Richard Y.

    1974-01-01

    The uptake of sixteen 14C-labeled amino acids by the indigenous heterotrophic microflora of Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon, was measured using the kinetic approach. The year-long study showed a seasonal variation in the maximum uptake velocity, Vmax, of all the amino acids which was proportional to temperature. The maximum total flux of amino acids by the heterotrophic microflora ranged from 1.2 to 11.9 μmol of C per liter per day (spring to summer). Glutamate, asparagine, aspartate, and serine had the highest Vmax values and were respired to the greatest extent. The percentages of the gross (net + respired) uptake of the amino acids which were respired to CO2 ranged from 2% for leucine to 63% for glutamate. Serine, lysine, and glycine were the most abundant amino acids found in Upper Klamath Lake surface water; at intermediate concentrations were alanine, aspartate, and threonine; and the remaining amino acids were always below 7.5 × 10-8 M (10 μg/liter). The amino acid concentrations determined chemically appear to be the sum of free and adsorbed amino acids, since the values obtained were usually greater than the (Kt + Sn) values obtained by the heterotrophic uptake experiments. PMID:4207581

  14. Contribution of mono and polysaccharides to heterotrophic N2 fixation at the eastern Mediterranean coastline

    PubMed Central

    Rahav, E.; Giannetto, M. J.; Bar-Zeev, E.

    2016-01-01

    N2 fixation should be a critical process in the nitrogen-poor surface water of the eastern Mediterranean Sea. Despite favorable conditions, diazotroph abundance and N2 fixation rates remains low for reasons yet explained. The main goal of this study was to investigate the limiting nutrients for diazotrophy in this oligotrophic environment. Hence, we conducted dedicated bottle-microcosms with eastern Mediterranean Sea water that were supplemented with mono and polysaccharides as well as inorganic nitrogen and phosphorous. Our results indicate that the diazotrophic community expressing nifH was primarily represented by heterotrophic Proteobacteria. N2 fixation and heterotrophic bacterial activity increased up-to tenfold following two days of dark incubations, once seawater was supplemented with organic carbon substrate in the form of glucose (monosaccharides) or gum-xanthan (polysaccharide surrogate). Furthermore, our results point that carbon-rich polysaccharides, such as transparent exopolymer particles, enhance heterotrophic N2 fixation, by forming microenvironments of intense metabolic activity, high carbon: nitrogen ratio, and possibly low O2 levels. The conclusions of this study indicate that diazotrophs in the eastern Mediterranean coast are primarily limited by organic carbon substrates, as possibly in many other marine regions. PMID:27306501

  15. Use of heterotrophic CO2 assimilation as a measure of metabolic activity in planktonic and sessile bacteria.

    PubMed

    Roslev, Peter; Larsen, Mariann Brøndum; Jørgensen, Dennis; Hesselsoe, Martin

    2004-12-01

    We have examined whether assimilation of CO2 can be used as a measure of metabolic activity in planktonic and sessile heterotrophic bacteria. CO2 assimilation by environmental samples and pure cultures of heterotrophic bacteria was studied using 14CO2 and 13CO2 as tracers. Heterotrophic growth on complex organic substrates resulted in assimilation of CO2 into cell biomass by activated sludge, drinking water biofilm, and pure cultures of Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Es. coli ATCC 13706, Rhodococcus ruber, Burkholderia sp., Bacillus circulans, Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas stutzeri, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Analysis of 13C-labelled phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) confirmed that heterotrophic bacteria may assimilate 13CO2 into cell macromolecules such as membrane lipids. All major PLFAs extracted from activated sludge and drinking water biofilm samples were enriched in 13C after incubation with CO2. Between 1.4% and 6.5% of the biomass produced by cultures of P. putida and a drinking water biofilm during growth in complex media was apparently derived from assimilation of CO2. Resting cells assimilated less CO2 compared to actively growing cells, and CO2 assimilation activity correlated with the amount of biomass produced during heterotrophic growth. The 14CO2 assimilation assay was evaluated as a tool to examine inhibitory effects of biocides on planktonic and sessile heterotrophs (biofilms). On the basis of 14CO2 assimilation activity, the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of benzalkonium chloride was estimated to 21.1 and 127.2 mg l(-1) for planktonic and biofilm samples, respectively. The results indicate that assimilation of isotopically labelled CO2 can be used as a relatively simple measure of metabolic activity in heterotrophic bacteria. CO2 assimilation assays may be used to study the effects of antimicrobial agents on growth and survival of planktonic and sessile heterotrophic organisms.

  16. Occurrence of heterotrophic and coliform bacteria in liquid hand soaps from bulk refillable dispensers in public facilities.

    PubMed

    Chattman, Marisa; Gerba, Sheri L; Maxwell, Charles P

    2011-03-01

    The goal of the study discussed in this article was to determine the occurrence of heterotrophic and coliform bacteria in liquid soap from bulk refillable dispensers, obtained from restrooms in a variety of public facilities. A total of 541 samples was collected from five U.S. cities. Liquid soap from dispensers in public areas was found to contain heterotrophic and coliform bacterial numbers averaging more than 106 CFU/mL in 24.8% of the dispensers.

  17. Phototrophic Biofilm Assembly in Microbial-Mat-Derived Unicyanobacterial Consortia: Model Systems for the Study of Autotroph-Heterotroph Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, Jessica K.; Hutchison, Janine R.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Kim, Young-Mo; Chrisler, William B.; Engelmann, Heather E.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Hu, Dehong; Metz, Thomas O.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Lindemann, Stephen R.

    2014-04-07

    Though microbial autotroph-heterotroph interactions influence biogeochemical cycles on a global scale, the diversity and complexity of natural systems and their intractability to in situ environmental manipulation makes elucidation of the principles governing these interactions challenging. Examination of primary succession during phototrophic biofilm assembly provides a robust means by which to elucidate the dynamics of such interactions and determine their influence upon recruitment and maintenance of phylogenetic and functional diversity in microbial communities. We isolated and characterized two unicyanobacterial consortia from the Hot Lake phototrophic mat, quantifying the structural and community composition of their assembling biofilms. The same heterotrophs were retained in both consortia and included members of Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes, taxa frequently reported as consorts of microbial photoautotrophs. Cyanobacteria led biofilm assembly, eventually giving way to a late heterotrophic bloom. The consortial biofilms exhibited similar patterns of assembly, with the relative abundances of members of Bacteroidetes and Alphaproteobacteria increasing and members of Gammaproteobacteria decreasing as colonization progressed. Despite similar trends in assembly at higher taxa, the consortia exhibited substantial differences in community structure at the species level. These similar patterns of assembly with divergent community structures suggest that, while similar niches are created by the metabolism of the cyanobacteria, the resultant webs of autotroph-heterotroph and heterotroph-heterotroph interactions driving metabolic exchange are specific to each primary producer. Altogether, our data support these Hot Lake unicyanobacterial consortia as generalizable model systems whose simplicity and tractability permit the deciphering of community assembly principles relevant to natural microbial communities.

  18. Heterotrophic growth of Neochloris oleoabundans using glucose as a carbon source

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In comparison with phototrophic growth, heterotrophic conditions can significantly increase growth rates, final cell number and cell mass in microalgae cultures. Neochloris oleoabundans is a microalga of biotechnological interest that accumulates lipids under phototrophic and nitrogen-limited conditions. Heterotrophic flask culture experiments were conducted to identify carbon sources that can be metabolized by N. oleoabundans, and bioreactor batch and fed-batch (nitrate pulse additions) cultures supplemented with glucose were performed to study the cellular composition of the microalgae under balanced and high C/N ratios (glucose/nitrate). Results N. oleoabundans was able to grow using glucose and cellobiose as sole carbon sources under strict heterotrophic conditions. Under a balanced C/N ratio of 17 and using bioreactor batch cultures containing 3 g/L glucose, a maximal cell mass of 1.72 g/L was found, with protein being the major cell component (44% w/w). A maximal cell mass of 9.2 g/L was obtained using batch cultures at a C/N ratio of 278. Under these conditions, lipid accumulation was promoted (up to 52% w/w) through N-limitation, resulting in high lipid productivity (528.5 mg/L/day). Fed-batch cultures were performed at a C/N ratio of 278 and with nitrate pulse additions. This condition allowed a maximal cell mass of 14.2 g/L to be achieved and switched the metabolism to carbohydrate synthesis (up to 54% of dry weight), mainly in the form of starch. It was found that transmembrane transport under these conditions was dependent on a proton-motive force, indicating that glucose is transported by a symporter. Conclusions N. oleoabundans was able to grow under strict heterotrophic culture conditions with glucose or cellobiose as the only carbon source. The glucose used is transported by a symporter system. Batch cultures with a balanced C/N ratio accumulate proteins as the major cellular component; a high C/N ratio significantly increased the

  19. The Heterotrophic Bacterial Response During the Meso-scale Southern Ocean Iron Experiment (SOFeX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, J. L.; Barber, R. T.; Ducklow, H. W.

    2002-12-01

    Previous meso-scale iron enrichments have demonstrated the stimulatory effect of iron on primary productivity and the accelerated flow of carbon into the surface ocean foodweb. In stratified waters, heterotrophic activity can work against carbon export by remineralizing POC and/or DOC back to CO2, effectively slowing the biological pump. To assess the response of heterotrophic activity to iron enrichment, we measured heterotrophic bacterial production and abundance during the Southern Ocean Iron Experiment (SOFeX). Heterotrophic bacterial processes primarily affect the latter of the two carbon export mechanisms, removal of DOC to the deep ocean. Heterotrophic bacterial production (BP), measured via tritiated thymidine (3H-TdR) and leucine (3H-Leu) incorporation, increased ~40% over the 18-d observation period in iron fertilized waters south of the Polar Front (South Patch). Also, South Patch BP was 61% higher than in the surrounding unfertilized waters. Abundance, measured by flow cytometry (FCM) and acridine orange direct counts (AODC), also increased in the South Patch from 3 to 5 x 108 cells liter-1, a 70% increase. Bacterial biomass increased from ~3.6 to 6.3 μg C liter-1, a clear indication that production rates exceeded removal rates (bactivory, viral lysis) over the course of 18 days. Biomass within the fertilized patch was 11% higher than in surrounding unfertilized waters reflecting a similar trend. This pattern is in contrast to SOIREE where no accumulation of biomass was observed. High DNA-containing (HDNA) cells detected by FCM also increased over time in iron fertilized waters from 20% to 46% relative to the total population suggesting an active subpopulation of cells that were growing faster than the removal rates. In iron fertilized waters north of the Polar Front (North Patch), BP and abundance were ~90% and 80% higher, respectively, than in unfertilized waters. Our results suggest an active bacterial population that responded to iron fertilization

  20. Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii sp. nov., a novel, arsenite-oxidizing haloalkaliphilic gammaproteobacterium capable of chemoautotrophic or heterotrophic growth with nitrate or oxygen as the electron acceptor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoeft, S.E.; Blum, J.S.; Stolz, J.F.; Tabita, F.R.; Witte, B.; King, G.M.; Santini, J.M.; Oremland, R.S.

    2007-01-01

    A facultative chemoautotrophic bacterium, strain MLHE-1T, was isolated from Mono Lake, an alkaline hypersaline soda lake in California, USA. Cells of strain MLHE-1T were Gram-negative, short motile rods that grew with inorganic electron donors (arsenite, hydrogen, sulfide or thiosulfate) coupled with the reduction of nitrate to nitrite. No aerobic growth was attained with arsenite or sulfide, but hydrogen sustained both aerobic and anaerobic growth. No growth occurred when nitrite or nitrous oxide was substituted for nitrate. Heterotrophic growth was observed under aerobic and anaerobic (nitrate) conditions. Cells of strain MLHE-1T could oxidize but not grow on CO, while CH4 neither supported growth nor was it oxidized. When grown chemoautotrophically, strain MLHE-1T assimilated inorganic carbon via the Calvin-Benson-Bassham reductive pentose phosphate pathway, with the activity of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RuBisCO) functioning optimally at 0.1 M NaCl and at pH 7.3. Strain MLHE-1T grew over broad ranges of pH (7.3-10.0; optimum, 9.3), salinity (115-190 g l-1; optimum 30 g l-1) and temperature (113-40 ??C; optimum, 30 ??C). Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences placed strain MLHE-1T in the class Gammaproteobacteria (family Ectothiorhodospiraceae) and most closely related to Alkalispirillum mobile (98.5%) and Alkalilimnicola halodurans (98.6%), although none of these three haloalkaliphilic micro-organisms were capable of photoautotrophic growth and only strain MLHE-1T was able to oxidize As(III). On the basis of physiological characteristics and DNA-DNA hybridization data, it is suggested that strain MLHE-1T represents a novel species within the genus Alkalilimnicola for which the name Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii is proposed. The type strain is MLHE-1T (=DSM 17681T =ATCC BAA-1101T). Aspects of the annotated full genome of Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii are discussed in the light of its physiology. ?? 2007 IUMS.

  1. Diet shift of a facultative scavenger, the wolverine, following recolonization of wolves.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Jiska; Gustavsen, Line; Mysterud, Atle; May, Roel; Flagstad, Øystein; Brøseth, Henrik; Andersen, Roy; Andersen, Reidar; Steen, Harald; Landa, Arild

    2008-11-01

    1. Wolves Canis lupus L. recolonized the boreal forests in the southern part of the Scandinavian peninsula during the late 1990s, but so far there has been little attention to its effect on ecosystem functioning. Wolf predation increases the availability of carcasses of large prey, especially moose Alces alces L., which may lead in turn to a diet switch in facultative scavengers such as the wolverine Gulo gulo L. 2. Using 459 wolverine scats collected during winter-spring 2001-04 for DNA identity and dietary contents, we compared diet inside and outside wolf territories while controlling for potential confounding factors, such as prey density. We tested the hypothesis that wolverine diet shifted towards moose in the presence of wolves, while taking into account possible sexual segregation between the sexes. Occurrence of reindeer, moose and small prey was modelled against explanatory covariates using logistic mixed-effects models. Furthermore, we compared diet composition and breadth among habitats and sexes. 3. Occurrence of reindeer, moose and small prey in the diet varied with prey availability and habitat. As expected, diet contained more moose and less reindeer and small prey in the presence of wolves. Their diet in tundra consisted of 40% reindeer Rangifer tarandus L., 39% moose and 9% rodents. In forest with wolf, their diet shifted to 76% moose, 18% reindeer and 5% rodents; compared to 42% moose, 32% reindeer and 15% rodents in forest without wolf. This diet switch could not be explained by higher moose density in wolf territories. Female diet consisted of more small prey than for males, but there was a tendency for females to use the highly available moose carrion opportunistically and to hunt less on small prey within wolf territories. 4. Our study highlights how wolves increase scavenging opportunities for wolverines, and how sexual differences in diet may also apply to large scavengers. Due to their more restricted home range, female wolverines are

  2. Control of Wilt and Rot Pathogens of Tomato by Antagonistic Pink Pigmented Facultative Methylotrophic Delftia lacustris and Bacillus spp.

    PubMed Central

    Janahiraman, Veeranan; Anandham, Rangasamy; Kwon, Soon W.; Sundaram, Subbiah; Karthik Pandi, Veeranan; Krishnamoorthy, Ramasamy; Kim, Kiyoon; Samaddar, Sandipan; Sa, Tongmin

    2016-01-01

    The studies on the biocontrol potential of pink pigmented facultative methylotrophic (PPFM) bacteria other than the genus Methylobacterium are scarce. In the present study, we report three facultative methylotrophic isolates; PPO-1, PPT-1, and PPB-1, respectively, identified as Delftia lacustris, Bacillus subtilis, and Bacillus cereus by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Hemolytic activity was tested to investigate the potential pathogenicity of isolates to plants and humans, the results indicates that the isolates PPO-1, PPT-1, and PPB-1 are not pathogenic strains. Under in vitro conditions, D. lacustris PPO-1, B. subtilis PPT-1, and B. cereus PPB-1 showed direct antagonistic effect by inhibiting the mycelial growth of fungal pathogens; Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (2.15, 2.05, and 1.95 cm), Sclerotium rolfsii (2.14, 2.04, and 1.94 cm), Pythium ultimum (2.12, 2.02, and 1.92 cm), and Rhizoctonia solani (2.18, 2.08, and 1.98 cm) and also produced volatile inhibitory compounds. Under plant growth chamber condition methylotrophic bacterial isolates; D. lacustris PPO-1, B. subtilis PPT-1, and B. cereus PPB-1 significantly reduced the disease incidence of tomato. Under greenhouse condition, D. lacustris PPO-1, B. subtilis PPT-1, and B. cereus PPB-1 inoculated tomato plants, when challenged with F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici, S. rolfsii, P. ultimum, and R. solani, increased the pathogenesis related proteins (β-1,3-glucanase and chitinase) and defense enzymes (phenylalanine ammonia lyase, peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase, and catalase) on day 5 after inoculation. In the current study, we first report the facultative methylotrophy in pink pigmented D. lacustris, B. subtilis, and B. cereus and their antagonistic potential against fungal pathogens. Direct antagonistic and ISR effects of these isolates against fungal pathogens of tomato evidenced their possible use as a biocontrol agent. PMID:27872630

  3. Control of Wilt and Rot Pathogens of Tomato by Antagonistic Pi